WorldWideScience

Sample records for ribosomal frameshifting directed

  1. A stochastic model of translation with -1 programmed ribosomal frameshifting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Brenae L.; Visscher, Koen; Watkins, Joseph

    2014-02-01

    Many viruses produce multiple proteins from a single mRNA sequence by encoding overlapping genes. One mechanism to decode both genes, which reside in alternate reading frames, is -1 programmed ribosomal frameshifting. Although recognized for over 25 years, the molecular and physical mechanism of -1 frameshifting remains poorly understood. We have developed a mathematical model that treats mRNA translation and associated -1 frameshifting as a stochastic process in which the transition probabilities are based on the energetics of local molecular interactions. The model predicts both the location and efficiency of -1 frameshift events in HIV-1. Moreover, we compute -1 frameshift efficiencies upon mutations in the viral mRNA sequence and variations in relative tRNA abundances, predictions that are directly testable in experiment.

  2. Stimulation of ribosomal frameshifting by antisense LNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Chien-Hung; Noteborn, Mathieu H. M.; Olsthoorn, René C. L.

    2010-01-01

    Programmed ribosomal frameshifting is a translational recoding mechanism commonly used by RNA viruses to express two or more proteins from a single mRNA at a fixed ratio. An essential element in this process is the presence of an RNA secondary structure, such as a pseudoknot or a hairpin, located downstream of the slippery sequence. Here, we have tested the efficiency of RNA oligonucleotides annealing downstream of the slippery sequence to induce frameshifting in vitro. Maximal frameshifting was observed with oligonucleotides of 12–18 nt. Antisense oligonucleotides bearing locked nucleid acid (LNA) modifications also proved to be efficient frameshift-stimulators in contrast to DNA oligonucleotides. The number, sequence and location of LNA bases in an otherwise DNA oligonucleotide have to be carefully manipulated to obtain optimal levels of frameshifting. Our data favor a model in which RNA stability at the entrance of the ribosomal tunnel is the major determinant of stimulating slippage rather than a specific three-dimensional structure of the stimulating RNA element. PMID:20693527

  3. Translation with frameshifting of ribosome along mRNA transcript

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Jingwei

    2015-01-01

    Translation is an important process for prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells to produce necessary proteins for cell growth. Numerious experiments have been performed to explore the translational properties. Diverse models have also been developed to determine the biochemical mechanism of translation. However, to simplify the majority of the existing models, the frameshifting of ribosome along the mRNA transcript is neglected, which actually occurs in real cells and has been extensively experimentally studied. The frameshifting of ribosome evidently influences the efficiency and speed of translation, considering that the peptide chains synthesized by shifted ribosomes will not fold into functional proteins and will degrade rapidly. In this study, a theoretical model is presented to describe the translational process based on the model for totally asymmetric simple exclusion process. In this model, the frameshifting of the ribosome along the mRNA transcript and the attachment/detachment of the ribosome to/from the ...

  4. A gripping tale of ribosomal frameshifting: extragenic suppressors of frameshift mutations spotlight P-site realignment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkins, John F; Björk, Glenn R

    2009-03-01

    Mutants of translation components which compensate for both -1 and +1 frameshift mutations showed the first evidence for framing malleability. Those compensatory mutants isolated in bacteria and yeast with altered tRNA or protein factors are reviewed here and are considered to primarily cause altered P-site realignment and not altered translocation. Though the first sequenced tRNA mutant which suppressed a +1 frameshift mutation had an extra base in its anticodon loop and led to a textbook "yardstick" model in which the number of anticodon bases determines codon size, this model has long been discounted, although not by all. Accordingly, the reviewed data suggest that reading frame maintenance and translocation are two distinct features of the ribosome. None of the -1 tRNA suppressors have anticodon loops with fewer than the standard seven nucleotides. Many of the tRNA mutants potentially affect tRNA bending and/or stability and can be used for functional assays, and one has the conserved C74 of the 3' CCA substituted. The effect of tRNA modification deficiencies on framing has been particularly informative. The properties of some mutants suggest the use of alternative tRNA anticodon loop stack conformations by individual tRNAs in one translation cycle. The mutant proteins range from defective release factors with delayed decoding of A-site stop codons facilitating P-site frameshifting to altered EF-Tu/EF1alpha to mutant ribosomal large- and small-subunit proteins L9 and S9. Their study is revealing how mRNA slippage is restrained except where it is programmed to occur and be utilized.

  5. Identification of functional, endogenous programmed −1 ribosomal frameshift signals in the genome of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    In viruses, programmed −1 ribosomal frameshifting (−1 PRF) signals direct the translation of alternative proteins from a single mRNA. Given that many basic regulatory mechanisms were first discovered in viral systems, the current study endeavored to: (i) identify −1 PRF signals in genomic databases, (ii) apply the protocol to the yeast genome and (iii) test selected candidates at the bench. Computational analyses revealed the presence of 10 340 consensus −1 PRF signals in the yeast genome. Of...

  6. Translational Maintenance of Frame: Mutants of Saccharomyces Cerevisiae with Altered -1 Ribosomal Frameshifting Efficiences

    OpenAIRE

    Dinman, J D; Wickner, R B

    1994-01-01

    A special site on the (+) strand of the L-A dsRNA virus induces about 2% of ribosomes translating the gag open reading frame to execute a -1 frameshift and thus produce the viral gag-pol fusion protein. Using constructs in which a -1 ribosomal frameshift at this site was necessary for expression of lacZ we isolated chromosomal mutants in which the efficiency of frameshifting was increased. These mutants comprise eight genes, named mof (maintenance of frame). The mof1-1, mof2-1, mof4-1, mof5-1...

  7. Translational Maintenance of Frame: Mutants of Saccharomyces Cerevisiae with Altered -1 Ribosomal Frameshifting Efficiences

    OpenAIRE

    Dinman, J D; Wickner, R B

    1994-01-01

    A special site on the (+) strand of the L-A dsRNA virus induces about 2% of ribosomes translating the gag open reading frame to execute a -1 frameshift and thus produce the viral gag-pol fusion protein. Using constructs in which a -1 ribosomal frameshift at this site was necessary for expression of lacZ we isolated chromosomal mutants in which the efficiency of frameshifting was increased. These mutants comprise eight genes, named mof (maintenance of frame). The mof1-1, mof2-1, mof4-1, mof5-1...

  8. Ribosomal frameshifting and transcriptional slippage: From genetic steganography and cryptography to adventitious use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkins, John F; Loughran, Gary; Bhatt, Pramod R; Firth, Andrew E; Baranov, Pavel V

    2016-09-06

    Genetic decoding is not 'frozen' as was earlier thought, but dynamic. One facet of this is frameshifting that often results in synthesis of a C-terminal region encoded by a new frame. Ribosomal frameshifting is utilized for the synthesis of additional products, for regulatory purposes and for translational 'correction' of problem or 'savior' indels. Utilization for synthesis of additional products occurs prominently in the decoding of mobile chromosomal element and viral genomes. One class of regulatory frameshifting of stable chromosomal genes governs cellular polyamine levels from yeasts to humans. In many cases of productively utilized frameshifting, the proportion of ribosomes that frameshift at a shift-prone site is enhanced by specific nascent peptide or mRNA context features. Such mRNA signals, which can be 5' or 3' of the shift site or both, can act by pairing with ribosomal RNA or as stem loops or pseudoknots even with one component being 4 kb 3' from the shift site. Transcriptional realignment at slippage-prone sequences also generates productively utilized products encoded trans-frame with respect to the genomic sequence. This too can be enhanced by nucleic acid structure. Together with dynamic codon redefinition, frameshifting is one of the forms of recoding that enriches gene expression. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  9. Structure and Function of the Ribosomal Frameshifting Pseudoknot RNA from Beet Western Yellow Virus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Egli, M.; Sarkhel, S.; Minasov, G.; Rich, A.

    2010-03-05

    Many viruses reprogram ribosomes to produce two different proteins from two different reading frames. So-called -1 frameshifting often involves pairwise alignment of two adjacent tRNAs at a 'slippery' sequence in the ribosomal A and P sites such that an overlapping codon is shifted upstream by one base relative to the zero frame. In the majority of cases, an RNA pseudoknot located downstream stimulates this type of frameshift. Crystal structures of the frameshifting RNA pseudoknot from Beet Western Yellow Virus (BWYV) have provided a detailed picture of the tertiary interactions stabilizing this folding motif, including a minor-groove triplex and quadruple-base interactions. The structure determined at atomic resolution revealed the locations of several magnesium ions and provided insights into the role of structured water stabilizing the RNA. Systematic in vitro and in vivo mutational analyses based on the structural results revealed specific tertiary interactions and regions in the pseudoknot that drastically change frameshifting efficiency. Here, we summarize recent advances in our understanding of pseudoknot-mediated ribosomal frameshifting on the basis of the insights gained from structural and functional studies of the RNA pseudoknot from BWYV.

  10. Revealing −1 Programmed Ribosomal Frameshifting Mechanisms by Single-Molecule Techniques and Computational Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai-Chun Chang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Programmed ribosomal frameshifting (PRF serves as an intrinsic translational regulation mechanism employed by some viruses to control the ratio between structural and enzymatic proteins. Most viral mRNAs which use PRF adapt an H-type pseudoknot to stimulate −1 PRF. The relationship between the thermodynamic stability and the frameshifting efficiency of pseudoknots has not been fully understood. Recently, single-molecule force spectroscopy has revealed that the frequency of −1 PRF correlates with the unwinding forces required for disrupting pseudoknots, and that some of the unwinding work dissipates irreversibly due to the torsional restraint of pseudoknots. Complementary to single-molecule techniques, computational modeling provides insights into global motions of the ribosome, whose structural transitions during frameshifting have not yet been elucidated in atomic detail. Taken together, recent advances in biophysical tools may help to develop antiviral therapies that target the ubiquitous −1 PRF mechanism among viruses.

  11. A mutant RNA pseudoknot that promotes ribosomal frameshifting in mouse mammary tumor virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, H; Tinoco, I

    1997-05-15

    A single A-->G mutation that changes a potential A.U base pair to a G.U pair at the junction of the stems and loops of a non-frameshifting pseudoknot dramatically increases its frameshifting efficiency in mouse mammary tumor virus. The structure of the non-frameshifting pseudoknot APK has been found to be very different from that of pseudoknots that cause efficient frameshifting [Kang,H., Hines,J.V. and Tinoco,I. (1995) J. Mol. Biol. , 259, 135-147]. The 3-dimensional structure of the mutant pseudoknot was determined by restrained molecular dynamics based on NMR-derived interproton distance and torsion angle constraints. One striking feature of the mutant pseudoknot compared with the parent pseudoknot is that a G.U base pair forms at the top of stem 2, thus leaving only 1 nt at the junction of the two stems. The conformation is very different from that of the previously determined non-frameshifting parent pseudoknot, which lacks the A.U base pair at the top of the stem and has 2 nt between the stems. However, the conformation is quite similar to that of efficient frameshifting pseudoknots whose structures were previously determined by NMR. A single adenylate residue intervenes between the two stems and interrupts their coaxial stacking. This unpaired nucleotide produces a bent structure. The structural similarity among the efficient frameshifting pseudoknots indicates that a specific conformation is required for ribosomal frameshifting, further implying a specific interaction of the pseudoknot with the ribosome.

  12. Mechanical unfolding kinetics of the SRV-1 gag-pro mRNA pseudoknot: possible implications for ‑1 ribosomal frameshifting stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Zhensheng; Yang, Lixia; Zhang, Haiping; Shi, Jiahao; Vandana, J. Jeya; Lam, Do Thuy Uyen Ha; Olsthoorn, René C. L.; Lu, Lanyuan; Chen, Gang

    2016-12-01

    Minus-one ribosomal frameshifting is a translational recoding mechanism widely utilized by many RNA viruses to generate accurate ratios of structural and catalytic proteins. An RNA pseudoknot structure located in the overlapping region of the gag and pro genes of Simian Retrovirus type 1 (SRV-1) stimulates frameshifting. However, the experimental characterization of SRV-1 pseudoknot (un)folding dynamics and the effect of the base triple formation is lacking. Here, we report the results of our single-molecule nanomanipulation using optical tweezers and theoretical simulation by steered molecular dynamics. Our results directly reveal that the energetic coupling between loop 2 and stem 1 via minor-groove base triple formation enhances the mechanical stability. The terminal base pair in stem 1 (directly in contact with a translating ribosome at the slippery site) also affects the mechanical stability of the pseudoknot. The ‑1 frameshifting efficiency is positively correlated with the cooperative one-step unfolding force and inversely correlated with the one-step mechanical unfolding rate at zero force. A significantly improved correlation was observed between ‑1 frameshifting efficiency and unfolding rate at forces of 15–35 pN, consistent with the fact that the ribosome is a force-generating molecular motor with helicase activity. No correlation was observed between thermal stability and ‑1 frameshifting efficiency.

  13. Minor groove RNA triplex in the crystal structure of a ribosomal frameshifting viral pseudoknot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, L.; Chen, L.; Egli, M.; Berger, J. M.; Rich, A.

    1999-01-01

    Many viruses regulate translation of polycistronic mRNA using a -1 ribosomal frameshift induced by an RNA pseudoknot. A pseudoknot has two stems that form a quasi-continuous helix and two connecting loops. A 1.6 A crystal structure of the beet western yellow virus (BWYV) pseudoknot reveals rotation and a bend at the junction of the two stems. A loop base is inserted in the major groove of one stem with quadruple-base interactions. The second loop forms a new minor-groove triplex motif with the other stem, involving 2'-OH and triple-base interactions, as well as sodium ion coordination. Overall, the number of hydrogen bonds stabilizing the tertiary interactions exceeds the number involved in Watson-Crick base pairs. This structure will aid mechanistic analyses of ribosomal frameshifting.

  14. Orsay virus utilizes ribosomal frameshifting to express a novel protein that is incorporated into virions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Hongbing; Franz, Carl J.; Wu, Guang; Renshaw, Hilary; Zhao, Guoyan [Departments of Molecular Microbiology and Pathology and Immunology, Washington University in St. Louis School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63110 (United States); Firth, Andrew E. [Department of Pathology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 1QP (United Kingdom); Wang, David, E-mail: davewang@borcim.wustl.edu [Departments of Molecular Microbiology and Pathology and Immunology, Washington University in St. Louis School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63110 (United States)

    2014-02-15

    Orsay virus is the first identified virus that is capable of naturally infecting Caenorhabditis elegans. Although it is most closely related to nodaviruses, Orsay virus differs from nodaviruses in its genome organization. In particular, the Orsay virus RNA2 segment encodes a putative novel protein of unknown function, termed delta, which is absent from all known nodaviruses. Here we present evidence that Orsay virus utilizes a ribosomal frameshifting strategy to express a novel fusion protein from the viral capsid (alpha) and delta ORFs. Moreover, the fusion protein was detected in purified virus fractions, demonstrating that it is most likely incorporated into Orsay virions. Furthermore, N-terminal sequencing of both the fusion protein and the capsid protein demonstrated that these proteins must be translated from a non-canonical initiation site. While the function of the alpha–delta fusion remains cryptic, these studies provide novel insights into the fundamental properties of this new clade of viruses. - Highlights: • Orsay virus encodes a novel fusion protein by a ribosomal frameshifting mechanism. • Orsay capsid and fusion protein is translated from a non-canonical initiation site. • The fusion protein is likely incorporated into Orsay virions.

  15. Monitoring ribosomal frameshifting as a platform to screen anti-riboswitch drug candidates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Chien-Hung; Olsthoorn, René C L

    2015-01-01

    Riboswitches are regions within mRNAs that can regulate downstream expression of genes through metabolite-induced alteration of their secondary structures. Due to the significant association of bacterial essential or virulence genes, bacterial riboswitches have become promising targets for development of putative antibacterial drugs. However, most of the screening systems to date are based on in vitro or bacterial systems, lacking the possibility to preobserve the adverse effects to the host's translation machinery. This chapter describes a novel screening method based on monitoring the riboswitch-induced -1 ribosomal frameshifting (-1 FS) efficiency in a mammalian cell-free lysate system using preQ1 class-I (preQ1-I) riboswitches as model target.

  16. A [Cu]rious Ribosomal Profiling Pattern Leads to the Discovery of Ribosomal Frameshifting in the Synthesis of a Copper Chaperone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkins, John F; Loughran, Gary; Baranov, Pavel V

    2017-01-19

    In many bacteria, separate genes encode a copper binding chaperone and a copper efflux pump, but in some the chaperone encoding gene has been elusive. In this issue of Molecular Cell, Meydan et al. (2017) report that ribosomes translating the ORF that encodes the copper pump frequently frameshift and terminate to produce the copper chaperone.

  17. Large-scale mass spectrometry-based analysis of Euplotes octocarinatus supports the high frequency of +1 programmed ribosomal frameshift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ruanlin; Zhang, Zhiyun; Du, Jun; Fu, Yuejun; Liang, Aihua

    2016-01-01

    Programmed ribosomal frameshifting (PRF) is commonly used to express many viral and some cellular genes. We conducted a genome-wide investigation of +1 PRF in ciliate Euplotes octocarinatus through genome and transcriptome sequencing and our results demonstrated that approximately 11.4% of genes require +1 PRF to produce complete gene products. While nucleic acid-based evidence for candidate genes with +1 PRF is strong, only very limited information is available at protein levels to date. In this study, E. octocarinatus was subjected to large-scale mass spectrometry-based analysis to verify the high frequency of +1 PRF and 226 +1 PRF gene products were identified. Based on the amino acid sequences of the peptides spanning the frameshift sites, typical frameshift motif AAA-UAR for +1 PRF in Euplotes was identified. Our data in this study provide very useful insight into the understanding of the molecular mechanism of +1 PRF. PMID:27597422

  18. A Genome-Wide Analysis of RNA Pseudoknots That Stimulate Efficient −1 Ribosomal Frameshifting or Readthrough in Animal Viruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaolan Huang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Programmed −1 ribosomal frameshifting (PRF and stop codon readthrough are two translational recoding mechanisms utilized by some RNA viruses to express their structural and enzymatic proteins at a defined ratio. Efficient recoding usually requires an RNA pseudoknot located several nucleotides downstream from the recoding site. To assess the strategic importance of the recoding pseudoknots, we have carried out a large scale genome-wide analysis in which we used an in-house developed program to detect all possible H-type pseudoknots within the genomic mRNAs of 81 animal viruses. Pseudoknots are detected downstream from ~85% of the recoding sites, including many previously unknown pseudoknots. ~78% of the recoding pseudoknots are the most stable pseudoknot within the viral genomes. However, they are not as strong as some designed pseudoknots that exhibit roadblocking effect on the translating ribosome. Strong roadblocking pseudoknots are not detected within the viral genomes. These results indicate that the decoding pseudoknots have evolved to possess optimal stability for efficient recoding. We also found that the sequence at the gag-pol frameshift junction of HIV1 harbors potential elaborated pseudoknots encompassing the frameshift site. A novel mechanism is proposed for possible involvement of the elaborated pseudoknots in the HIV1 PRF event.

  19. HIV-1 frameshift efficiency is primarily determined by the stability of base pairs positioned at the mRNA entrance channel of the ribosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouzakis, Kathryn D; Lang, Andrew L; Vander Meulen, Kirk A; Easterday, Preston D; Butcher, Samuel E

    2013-02-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) requires a programmed -1 ribosomal frameshift for Pol gene expression. The HIV frameshift site consists of a heptanucleotide slippery sequence (UUUUUUA) followed by a spacer region and a downstream RNA stem-loop structure. Here we investigate the role of the RNA structure in promoting the -1 frameshift. The stem-loop was systematically altered to decouple the contributions of local and overall thermodynamic stability towards frameshift efficiency. No correlation between overall stability and frameshift efficiency is observed. In contrast, there is a strong correlation between frameshift efficiency and the local thermodynamic stability of the first 3-4 bp in the stem-loop, which are predicted to reside at the opening of the mRNA entrance channel when the ribosome is paused at the slippery site. Insertion or deletions in the spacer region appear to correspondingly change the identity of the base pairs encountered 8 nt downstream of the slippery site. Finally, the role of the surrounding genomic secondary structure was investigated and found to have a modest impact on frameshift efficiency, consistent with the hypothesis that the genomic secondary structure attenuates frameshifting by affecting the overall rate of translation.

  20. Correlation between mechanical strength of messenger RNA pseudoknots and ribosomal frameshifting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Thomas Møller; Reihani, S Nader S; Oddershede, Lene B

    2007-01-01

    the Infectious Bronchitis Virus were used, differing by one base pair in the first stem. In Escherichia coli, these two pseudoknots caused frameshifting frequencies that differed by a factor of two. We used optical tweezers to unfold the pseudoknots. The pseudoknot giving rise to the highest degree...

  1. Rational design of a synthetic mammalian riboswitch as a ligand-responsive -1 ribosomal frame-shifting stimulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ya-Hui; Chang, Kung-Yao

    2016-01-01

    Metabolite-responsive RNA pseudoknots derived from prokaryotic riboswitches have been shown to stimulate −1 programmed ribosomal frameshifting (PRF), suggesting −1 PRF as a promising gene expression platform to extend riboswitch applications in higher eukaryotes. However, its general application has been hampered by difficulty in identifying a specific ligand-responsive pseudoknot that also functions as a ligand-dependent -1 PRF stimulator. We addressed this problem by using the −1 PRF stimulation pseudoknot of SARS-CoV (SARS-PK) to build a ligand-dependent −1 PRF stimulator. In particular, the extra stem of SARS-PK was replaced by an RNA aptamer of theophylline and designed to couple theophylline binding with the stimulation of −1 PRF. Conformational and functional analyses indicate that the engineered theophylline-responsive RNA functions as a mammalian riboswitch with robust theophylline-dependent −1 PRF stimulation activity in a stable human 293T cell-line. Thus, RNA–ligand interaction repertoire provided by in vitro selection becomes accessible to ligand-specific −1 PRF stimulator engineering using SARS-PK as the scaffold for synthetic biology application. PMID:27521370

  2. Nucleotide sequence of Zygosaccharomyces bailii virus Z: Evidence for +1 programmed ribosomal frameshifting and for assignment to family Amalgaviridae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depierreux, Delphine; Vong, Minh; Nibert, Max L

    2016-06-02

    Zygosaccharomyces bailii virus Z (ZbV-Z) is a monosegmented dsRNA virus that infects the yeast Zygosaccharomyces bailii and remains unclassified to date despite its discovery >20years ago. The previously reported nucleotide sequence of ZbV-Z (GenBank AF224490) encompasses two nonoverlapping long ORFs: upstream ORF1 encoding the putative coat protein and downstream ORF2 encoding the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp). The lack of overlap between these ORFs raises the question of how the downstream ORF is translated. After examining the previous sequence of ZbV-Z, we predicted that it contains at least one sequencing error to explain the nonoverlapping ORFs, and hence we redetermined the nucleotide sequence of ZbV-Z, derived from the same isolate of Z. bailii as previously studied, to address this prediction. The key finding from our new sequence, which includes several insertions, deletions, and substitutions relative to the previous one, is that ORF2 in fact overlaps ORF1 in the +1 frame. Moreover, a proposed sequence motif for +1 programmed ribosomal frameshifting, previously noted in influenza A viruses, plant amalgaviruses, and others, is also present in the newly identified ORF1-ORF2 overlap region of ZbV-Z. Phylogenetic analyses provided evidence that ZbV-Z represents a distinct taxon most closely related to plant amalgaviruses (genus Amalgavirus, family Amalgaviridae). We conclude that ZbV-Z is the prototype of a new species, which we propose to assign as type species of a new genus of monosegmented dsRNA mycoviruses in family Amalgaviridae. Comparisons involving other unclassified mycoviruses with RdRps apparently related to those of plant amalgaviruses, and having either mono- or bisegmented dsRNA genomes, are also discussed.

  3. Adjustable under-expression of yeast mating pathway proteins in Saccharomyces cerevisiae using a programmed ribosomal frameshift.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Min-Yeon; Park, Sang-Hyun

    2016-06-01

    Experimental research in molecular biology frequently relies on the promotion or suppression of gene expression, an important tool in the study of its functions. Although yeast is among the most studied model systems with the ease of maintenance and manipulation, current experimental methods are mostly limited to gene deletion, suppression or overexpression of genes. Therefore, the ability to reduce protein expressions and then observing the effects would promote a better understanding of the exact functions and their interactions. Reducing protein expression is mainly limited by the difficulties associated with controlling the reduction level, and in some cases, the initial endogenous abundance is too low. For the under-expression to be useful as an experimental tool, repeatability and stability of reduced expression is important. We found that cis-elements in programmed -1 ribosomal frameshifting (-1RFS) of beet western yellow virus (BWYV) could be utilized to reduced protein expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The two main advantages of using -1RFS are adjustable reduction rates and ease of use. To demonstrate the utility of this under-expression system, examples of reduced protein abundance were shown using yeast mating pathway components. The abundance of MAP kinase Fus3 was reduced to approximately 28-75 % of the wild-type value. Other MAP kinase mating pathway components, including Ste5, Ste11, and Ste7, were also under-expressed to verify that the -1RFS system works with different proteins. Furthermore, reduced Fus3 abundance altered the overall signal transduction outcome of the mating pathway, demonstrating the potential for further studies of signal transduction adjustment via under-expression.

  4. Solenopsis invicta virus 3: mapping of structural proteins, ribosomal frameshifting, and similarities to Acyrthosiphon pisum virus and kelp fly virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solenopsis invicta virus 3 (SINV-3) is a positive-sense single-stranded RNA virus that infects the red imported fire ant, Solenopsis invicta. We show that the second open reading frame (ORF) of the dicistronic genome is expressed via a frameshifting mechanism and that the sequences encoding the stru...

  5. A conserved predicted pseudoknot in the NS2A-encoding sequence of West Nile and Japanese encephalitis flaviviruses suggests NS1' may derive from ribosomal frameshifting

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    Atkins John F

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Japanese encephalitis, West Nile, Usutu and Murray Valley encephalitis viruses form a tight subgroup within the larger Flavivirus genus. These viruses utilize a single-polyprotein expression strategy, resulting in ~10 mature proteins. Plotting the conservation at synonymous sites along the polyprotein coding sequence reveals strong conservation peaks at the very 5' end of the coding sequence, and also at the 5' end of the sequence encoding the NS2A protein. Such peaks are generally indicative of functionally important non-coding sequence elements. The second peak corresponds to a predicted stable pseudoknot structure whose biological importance is supported by compensatory mutations that preserve the structure. The pseudoknot is preceded by a conserved slippery heptanucleotide (Y CCU UUU, thus forming a classical stimulatory motif for -1 ribosomal frameshifting. We hypothesize, therefore, that the functional importance of the pseudoknot is to stimulate a portion of ribosomes to shift -1 nt into a short (45 codon, conserved, overlapping open reading frame, termed foo. Since cleavage at the NS1-NS2A boundary is known to require synthesis of NS2A in cis, the resulting transframe fusion protein is predicted to be NS1-NS2AN-term-FOO. We hypothesize that this may explain the origin of the previously identified NS1 'extension' protein in JEV-group flaviviruses, known as NS1'.

  6. Structure and dynamics of the HIV-1 frameshift element RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, Justin T; Garcia-Miranda, Pablo; Mouzakis, Kathryn D; Gorelick, Robert J; Butcher, Samuel E; Weeks, Kevin M

    2014-07-08

    The HIV-1 ribosomal frameshift element is highly structured, regulates translation of all virally encoded enzymes, and is a promising therapeutic target. The prior model for this motif contains two helices separated by a three-nucleotide bulge. Modifications to this model were suggested by SHAPE chemical probing of an entire HIV-1 RNA genome. Novel features of the SHAPE-directed model include alternate helical conformations and a larger, more complex structure. These structural elements also support the presence of a secondary frameshift site within the frameshift domain. Here, we use oligonucleotide-directed structure perturbation, probing in the presence of formamide, and in-virion experiments to examine these models. Our data support a model in which the frameshift domain is anchored by a stable helix outside the conventional domain. Less stable helices within the domain can switch from the SHAPE-predicted to the two-helix conformation. Translational frameshifting assays with frameshift domain mutants support a functional role for the interactions predicted by and specific to the SHAPE-directed model. These results reveal that the HIV-1 frameshift domain is a complex, dynamic structure and underscore the importance of analyzing folding in the context of full-length RNAs.

  7. The ribosomal protein Rpl22 controls ribosome composition by directly repressing expression of its own paralog, Rpl22l1.

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    Monique N O'Leary

    Full Text Available Most yeast ribosomal protein genes are duplicated and their characterization has led to hypotheses regarding the existence of specialized ribosomes with different subunit composition or specifically-tailored functions. In yeast, ribosomal protein genes are generally duplicated and evidence has emerged that paralogs might have specific roles. Unlike yeast, most mammalian ribosomal proteins are thought to be encoded by a single gene copy, raising the possibility that heterogenous populations of ribosomes are unique to yeast. Here, we examine the roles of the mammalian Rpl22, finding that Rpl22(-/- mice have only subtle phenotypes with no significant translation defects. We find that in the Rpl22(-/- mouse there is a compensatory increase in Rpl22-like1 (Rpl22l1 expression and incorporation into ribosomes. Consistent with the hypothesis that either ribosomal protein can support translation, knockdown of Rpl22l1 impairs growth of cells lacking Rpl22. Mechanistically, Rpl22 regulates Rpl22l1 directly by binding to an internal hairpin structure and repressing its expression. We propose that ribosome specificity may exist in mammals, providing evidence that one ribosomal protein can influence composition of the ribosome by regulating its own paralog.

  8. A Stochastic Model of RNA Translation with Frameshifting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Brenae

    2011-10-01

    Many viruses can produce different proteins from the same RNA sequence by encoding them in overlapping genes. One mechanism that causes the ribosomes of infected cells to decode both genes is called programmed ribosomal frameshifting (PRF). Although PRF has been recognized for 25 years, the mechanism is not well understood. We have developed a model that treats RNA translation as a stochastic process in which the transition probabilities are based on the free energies of local molecular interactions. The model reproduces observed translation rates and frameshift efficiencies, and can be used to predict the effects of mutations in the viral RNA sequence on both the mean translation rate and the frameshift efficiency.

  9. Structural basis for precursor protein-directed ribosomal peptide macrocyclization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Kunhua; Condurso, Heather L.; Li, Gengnan; Ding, Yousong; Bruner, Steven D. (Florida)

    2016-11-11

    Macrocyclization is a common feature of natural product biosynthetic pathways including the diverse family of ribosomal peptides. Microviridins are architecturally complex cyanobacterial ribosomal peptides that target proteases with potent reversible inhibition. The product structure is constructed via three macrocyclizations catalyzed sequentially by two members of the ATP-grasp family, a unique strategy for ribosomal peptide macrocyclization. Here we describe in detail the structural basis for the enzyme-catalyzed macrocyclizations in the microviridin J pathway of Microcystis aeruginosa. The macrocyclases MdnC and MdnB interact with a conserved α-helix of the precursor peptide using a novel precursor-peptide recognition mechanism. The results provide insight into the unique protein–protein interactions that are key to the chemistry, suggest an origin for the natural combinatorial synthesis of microviridin peptides, and provide a framework for future engineering efforts to generate designed compounds.

  10. IDENTIFICATION OF THE REGION OF NS1′ PROTEIN RESULTED FROM RIBOSOMAL FRAMESHIFT IN JAPANESE ENCEPHALITIS VIRUS%乙型脑炎病毒NS1′蛋白移码序列的鉴定

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑浩; 童光志

    2012-01-01

    The sequence resulted from -1 ribosomal frameshifl in the NS1 coding region was amplified using three primers and cloned in triplex into a prokaryotic expression vector pET-28a. The recombinant plasmid pET3NS was transformed into E.coli BL-21 competent cells. The target proteins was expressed with IPTG induction and purified with His-Bind Purification Kit. Mice were immunized with the purified proteins and polyclonal antibodies were prepared. The polyclonal antibodies were reacted in IFA with Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) proteins in Vero cells infected with JEV. Total proteins of Vero ceils infected with JEV were prepared. Western blot results showed that the monoclonal antibodies against NS 1 of JEV reacted with both NS 1 and NS 1′, while the polyclonal antibodies reacted only with NS 1′. These results indicated that the sequence of the expressed protein was partially identical to that of NSI' and NS 1′ was the product resulted from -1 ribosomal frameshift in the NS1 coding region.%本文通过对猪乙型脑炎病毒(Japanese encephalitis virus,JEV)基因组中移码序列分析,设计合成三条引物,通过PCR扩增出假定的NS1′移码片段,并将移码片段三倍重复克隆入pET-28a表达载体中。重组质粒转化E.coliBL-21后,经IPTG诱导在37℃下实现目的片段的可溶性表达。纯化表达产物,并免疫小鼠制备了多抗血清,以多抗血清为一抗,对JEv感染的Vero细胞进行免疫荧光分析,结果发现抗移码片段表达蛋白的血清可识别JEV蛋白。以JEV感染Vero细胞,提取感染细胞总蛋白,分别以NSl单抗和VAI-制备的多抗血清为一抗,进行Westernblot分析。结果显示,NS1单抗为一抗,可染出48kDa的NS1条带和56kDa的NS1′条带:而以多抗血清为一抗,仅染出56kDa的条带。上述结果显示,多抗血清识别的NS1′蛋白为NS1′移码后片段表达的蛋白。

  11. Position-dependent termination and widespread obligatory frameshifting in Euplotes translation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lobanov, Alexei V.; Heaphy, Stephen M.; Turanov, Anton A.; Gerashchenko, Maxim V.; Pucciarelli, Sandra; Devaraj, Raghul R.; Xie, Fang; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Smith, Richard D.; Klobutcher, Lawrence A.; Atkins, John F.; Miceli, Cristina; Hatfield, Dolph L.; Baranov, Pavel V.; Gladyshev, Vadim N.

    2016-11-21

    The ribosome can change its reading frame during translation in a process known as programmed ribosomal frameshifting. These rare events are supported by complex mRNA signals. However, we found that the ciliates Euplotes crassus and Euplotes focardii exhibit widespread frameshifting at stop codons. 47 different codons preceding stop signals resulted in either +1 or +2 frameshifts, and +1 frameshifting at AAA was the most frequent. The frameshifts showed unusual plasticity and rapid evolution, and had little influence on translation rates. The proximity of a stop codon to the 3' mRNA end, rather than its occurrence or sequence context, appeared to designate termination. Thus, a ‘stop codon’ is not a sufficient signal for translation termination, and the default function of stop codons in Euplotes is frameshifting, whereas termination is specific to certain mRNA positions and probably requires additional factors.

  12. Model of the pathway of −1 frameshifting: Long pausing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Xie

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available It has been characterized that the programmed ribosomal −1 frameshifting often occurs at the slippery sequence on the presence of a downstream mRNA pseudoknot. In some prokaryotic cases such as the dnaX gene of Escherichia coli, an additional stimulatory signal—an upstream, internal Shine–Dalgarno (SD sequence—is also necessary to stimulate the efficient −1 frameshifting. However, the molecular and physical mechanism of the −1 frameshifting is poorly understood. Here, we propose a model of the pathway of the −1 translational frameshifting during ribosome translation of the dnaX −1 frameshift mRNA. With the model, the single-molecule fluorescence data (Chen et al. (2014 [29] on the dynamics of the shunt either to long pausing or to normal translation, the tRNA transit and sampling dynamics in the long-paused rotated state, the EF-G sampling dynamics, the mean rotated-state lifetimes, etc., are explained quantitatively. Moreover, the model is also consistent with the experimental data (Yan et al. (2015 [30] on translocation excursions and broad branching of frameshifting pathways. In addition, we present some predicted results, which can be easily tested by future optical trapping experiments.

  13. Structural diversity of frameshifting signals : reprogramming the programmed

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yu, Chien-Hung

    2011-01-01

    Programmed ribosomal frameshifting (PRF) is one kind of recoding events that is mostly utilized by RNA viruses to synthesize more proteins with defined ratio from their compact genome and it is known that the stoichiometric is critical to virus infection and propagation. Two cis-acting RNA elements

  14. A functional interaction between ribosomal proteins S7 and S11 within the bacterial ribosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert, Francis; Brakier-Gingras, Léa

    2003-11-01

    In this study, we used site-directed mutagenesis to disrupt an interaction that had been detected between ribosomal proteins S7 and S11 in the crystal structure of the bacterial 30 S subunit. This interaction, which is located in the E site, connects the head of the 30 S subunit to the platform and is involved in the formation of the exit channel through which passes the 30 S-bound messenger RNA. Neither mutations in S7 nor mutations in S11 prevented the incorporation of the proteins into the 30 S subunits but they perturbed the function of the ribosome. In vivo assays showed that ribosomes with either mutated S7 or S11 were altered in the control of translational fidelity, having an increased capacity for frameshifting, readthrough of a nonsense codon and codon misreading. Toeprinting and filter-binding assays showed that 30 S subunits with either mutated S7 or S11 have an enhanced capacity to bind mRNA. The effects of the S7 and S11 mutations can be related to an increased flexibility of the head of the 30 S, to an opening of the mRNA exit channel and to a perturbation of the proposed allosteric coupling between the A and E sites. Altogether, our results demonstrate that S7 and S11 interact in a functional manner and support the notion that protein-protein interactions contribute to the dynamics of the ribosome.

  15. In vitro synthesis of ribosomal proteins directed by Escherichia coli DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaltschmidt, E; Kahan, L; Nomura, M

    1974-02-01

    In vitro synthesis of a number of E. coli 30S ribosomal proteins has been demonstrated in a cell-free system consisting of ribosomes, initiation factors, RNA polymerase, a fraction containing soluble enzymes and factors, and E. coli DNA. DNA-dependent synthesis of the following 30S proteins has been demonstrated: S4, S5, S7, S8, S9, S10, S13, S14, S16, S19, and S20.

  16. 日本脑炎病毒NS1’蛋白移码片段的原核表达及免疫反应性分析%Prokaryotic expression of NS1' protein resulted from ribosomal frameshifting in Japanese encephalitis virus and its immunoreactivity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孟刚; 王经满; 曹瑞兵; 陈溥言

    2013-01-01

    The NS1' gene fragment resulted from ribosomal frameshifting in Japanese encephalitis virus(JEV)was amplified by RT-PCR and inserted into a prokaryotic expression vector pET-32a.The recombinant plasmid pET-32a-NS1 ' was transformed into Escherichia coli BL21 and induced to express by IPTG.The fusion protein with a molecular weight of 25ku was visible on the SDS-PAGE gel and purified with His-Bind Purification Kit.The Western blotting analysis showed that the NS1 ' protein could react with the polyclonal antibody from the mice immunized with wild strain of JEV,while the NS1 ' protein did not react with that from mice immunized with JEV vaccine.These results indicated that the NS1 ' protein had the potential to distinguish between wild strain infection and vaccine immunization in clinical practice.%通过对日本脑炎病毒(Japanese encephalitis virus,JEV)基因组中移码序列分析,设计合成1对引物,利用PCR扩增出NS1’移码片段,并将移码片段克隆入pET-32a表达载体中.重组质粒转化大肠杆菌BL21后,经IPTG于20℃过夜诱导,实现了目的片段的可溶性表达.对表达产物进行SDS-PAGE鉴定,可检测到分子质量约为25 ku的融合蛋白.以日本脑炎病毒野毒株和弱毒株感染小鼠血清为一抗,进行Western blot分析,原核表达蛋白仅与野毒感染小鼠血清发生特异性反应,说明该蛋白具有区分临床野毒感染和疫苗免疫的潜力.

  17. GeneTack database: genes with frameshifts in prokaryotic genomes and eukaryotic mRNA sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonov, Ivan; Baranov, Pavel; Borodovsky, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Database annotations of prokaryotic genomes and eukaryotic mRNA sequences pay relatively low attention to frame transitions that disrupt protein-coding genes. Frame transitions (frameshifts) could be caused by sequencing errors or indel mutations inside protein-coding regions. Other observed frameshifts are related to recoding events (that evolved to control expression of some genes). Earlier, we have developed an algorithm and software program GeneTack for ab initio frameshift finding in intronless genes. Here, we describe a database (freely available at http://topaz.gatech.edu/GeneTack/db.html) containing genes with frameshifts (fs-genes) predicted by GeneTack. The database includes 206 991 fs-genes from 1106 complete prokaryotic genomes and 45 295 frameshifts predicted in mRNA sequences from 100 eukaryotic genomes. The whole set of fs-genes was grouped into clusters based on sequence similarity between fs-proteins (conceptually translated fs-genes), conservation of the frameshift position and frameshift direction (-1, +1). The fs-genes can be retrieved by similarity search to a given query sequence via a web interface, by fs-gene cluster browsing, etc. Clusters of fs-genes are characterized with respect to their likely origin, such as pseudogenization, phase variation, etc. The largest clusters contain fs-genes with programed frameshifts (related to recoding events).

  18. The phenotype of many independently isolated +1 frameshift suppressor mutants supports a pivotal role of the P-site in reading frame maintenance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jäger, Gunilla; Nilsson, Kristina; Björk, Glenn R

    2013-01-01

    The main features of translation are similar in all organisms on this planet and one important feature of it is the way the ribosome maintain the reading frame. We have earlier characterized several bacterial mutants defective in tRNA maturation and found that some of them correct a +1 frameshift mutation; i.e. such mutants possess an error in reading frame maintenance. Based on the analysis of the frameshifting phenotype of such mutants we proposed a pivotal role of the ribosomal grip of the peptidyl-tRNA to maintain the correct reading frame. To test the model in an unbiased way we first isolated many (467) independent mutants able to correct a +1 frameshift mutation and thereafter tested whether or not their frameshifting phenotypes were consistent with the model. These 467+1 frameshift suppressor mutants had alterations in 16 different loci of which 15 induced a defective tRNA by hypo- or hypermodifications or altering its primary sequence. All these alterations of tRNAs induce a frameshift error in the P-site to correct a +1 frameshift mutation consistent with the proposed model. Modifications next to and 3' of the anticodon (position 37), like 1-methylguanosine, are important for proper reading frame maintenance due to their interactions with components of the ribosomal P-site. Interestingly, two mutants had a defect in a locus (rpsI), which encodes ribosomal protein S9. The C-terminal of this protein contacts position 32-34 of the peptidyl-tRNA and is thus part of the P-site environment. The two rpsI mutants had a C-terminal truncated ribosomal protein S9 that destroys its interaction with the peptidyl-tRNA resulting in +1 shift in the reading frame. The isolation and characterization of the S9 mutants gave strong support of our model that the ribosomal grip of the peptidyl-tRNA is pivotal for the reading frame maintenance.

  19. A Nascent Peptide Signal Responsive to Endogenous Levels of Polyamines Acts to Stimulate Regulatory Frameshifting on Antizyme mRNA*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yordanova, Martina M.; Wu, Cheng; Andreev, Dmitry E.; Sachs, Matthew S.; Atkins, John F.

    2015-01-01

    The protein antizyme is a negative regulator of cellular polyamine concentrations from yeast to mammals. Synthesis of functional antizyme requires programmed +1 ribosomal frameshifting at the 3′ end of the first of two partially overlapping ORFs. The frameshift is the sensor and effector in an autoregulatory circuit. Except for Saccharomyces cerevisiae antizyme mRNA, the frameshift site alone only supports low levels of frameshifting. The high levels usually observed depend on the presence of cis-acting stimulatory elements located 5′ and 3′ of the frameshift site. Antizyme genes from different evolutionary branches have evolved different stimulatory elements. Prior and new multiple alignments of fungal antizyme mRNA sequences from the Agaricomycetes class of Basidiomycota show a distinct pattern of conservation 5′ of the frameshift site consistent with a function at the amino acid level. As shown here when tested in Schizosaccharomyces pombe and mammalian HEK293T cells, the 5′ part of this conserved sequence acts at the nascent peptide level to stimulate the frameshifting, without involving stalling detectable by toe-printing. However, the peptide is only part of the signal. The 3′ part of the stimulator functions largely independently and acts at least mostly at the nucleotide level. When polyamine levels were varied, the stimulatory effect was seen to be especially responsive in the endogenous polyamine concentration range, and this effect may be more general. A conserved RNA secondary structure 3′ of the frameshift site has weaker stimulatory and polyamine sensitizing effects on frameshifting. PMID:25998126

  20. A Nascent Peptide Signal Responsive to Endogenous Levels of Polyamines Acts to Stimulate Regulatory Frameshifting on Antizyme mRNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yordanova, Martina M; Wu, Cheng; Andreev, Dmitry E; Sachs, Matthew S; Atkins, John F

    2015-07-17

    The protein antizyme is a negative regulator of cellular polyamine concentrations from yeast to mammals. Synthesis of functional antizyme requires programmed +1 ribosomal frameshifting at the 3' end of the first of two partially overlapping ORFs. The frameshift is the sensor and effector in an autoregulatory circuit. Except for Saccharomyces cerevisiae antizyme mRNA, the frameshift site alone only supports low levels of frameshifting. The high levels usually observed depend on the presence of cis-acting stimulatory elements located 5' and 3' of the frameshift site. Antizyme genes from different evolutionary branches have evolved different stimulatory elements. Prior and new multiple alignments of fungal antizyme mRNA sequences from the Agaricomycetes class of Basidiomycota show a distinct pattern of conservation 5' of the frameshift site consistent with a function at the amino acid level. As shown here when tested in Schizosaccharomyces pombe and mammalian HEK293T cells, the 5' part of this conserved sequence acts at the nascent peptide level to stimulate the frameshifting, without involving stalling detectable by toe-printing. However, the peptide is only part of the signal. The 3' part of the stimulator functions largely independently and acts at least mostly at the nucleotide level. When polyamine levels were varied, the stimulatory effect was seen to be especially responsive in the endogenous polyamine concentration range, and this effect may be more general. A conserved RNA secondary structure 3' of the frameshift site has weaker stimulatory and polyamine sensitizing effects on frameshifting. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  1. Ribosomal protein methyltransferases in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae: Roles in ribosome biogenesis and translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hadid, Qais; White, Jonelle; Clarke, Steven

    2016-02-12

    A significant percentage of the methyltransferasome in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and higher eukaryotes is devoted to methylation of the translational machinery. Methylation of the RNA components of the translational machinery has been studied extensively and is important for structure stability, ribosome biogenesis, and translational fidelity. However, the functional effects of ribosomal protein methylation by their cognate methyltransferases are still largely unknown. Previous work has shown that the ribosomal protein Rpl3 methyltransferase, histidine protein methyltransferase 1 (Hpm1), is important for ribosome biogenesis and translation elongation fidelity. In this study, yeast strains deficient in each of the ten ribosomal protein methyltransferases in S. cerevisiae were examined for potential defects in ribosome biogenesis and translation. Like Hpm1-deficient cells, loss of four of the nine other ribosomal protein methyltransferases resulted in defects in ribosomal subunit synthesis. All of the mutant strains exhibited resistance to the ribosome inhibitors anisomycin and/or cycloheximide in plate assays, but not in liquid culture. Translational fidelity assays measuring stop codon readthrough, amino acid misincorporation, and programmed -1 ribosomal frameshifting, revealed that eight of the ten enzymes are important for translation elongation fidelity and the remaining two are necessary for translation termination efficiency. Altogether, these results demonstrate that ribosomal protein methyltransferases in S. cerevisiae play important roles in ribosome biogenesis and translation.

  2. Dystrophin in frameshift deletion patients with Becker Muscular Dystrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gangopadhyay, S.B.; Ray, P.N.; Worton, R.G.; Sherratt, T.G.; Heckmatt, J.Z.; Dubowitz, V.; Strong, P.N.; Miller, G. (Penn State College of Medicine, Hershey, PA (United States)); Shokeir, M. (Univ. Hospital, Saskatchewan (Canada))

    1992-09-01

    In a previous study the authors identified 14 cases with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) or its milder variant, Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD), with a deletion of exons 3-7, a deletion that would be expected to shift the translational reading frame of the mRNA and give a severe phenotype. They have examined dystrophin and its mRNA from muscle biopsies of seven cases with either mild or intermediate phenotypes. In all cases they detected slightly lower-molecular-weight dystrophin in 12%-15% abundance relative to the normal. By sequencing amplified mRNA they have found that exon 2 is spliced to exon 8, a splice that produces a frameshifted mRNA, and have found no evidence for alternate splicing that might be involved in restoration of dystrophin mRNA reading frame in the patients with a mild phenotype. Other transcriptional and posttranscriptional mechanisms such as cryptic promoter, ribosomal frameshifting, and reinitiation are suggested that might play some role in restoring the reading frame. 34 refs., 5 figs. 1 tab.

  3. An Expanded CAG Repeat in Huntingtin Causes +1 Frameshifting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saffert, Paul; Adamla, Frauke; Schieweck, Rico; Atkins, John F; Ignatova, Zoya

    2016-08-26

    Maintenance of triplet decoding is crucial for the expression of functional protein because deviations either into the -1 or +1 reading frames are often non-functional. We report here that expression of huntingtin (Htt) exon 1 with expanded CAG repeats, implicated in Huntington pathology, undergoes a sporadic +1 frameshift to generate from the CAG repeat a trans-frame AGC repeat-encoded product. This +1 recoding is exclusively detected in pathological Htt variants, i.e. those with expanded repeats with more than 35 consecutive CAG codons. An atypical +1 shift site, UUC C at the 5' end of CAG repeats, which has some resemblance to the influenza A virus shift site, triggers the +1 frameshifting and is enhanced by the increased propensity of the expanded CAG repeats to form a stem-loop structure. The +1 trans-frame-encoded product can directly influence the aggregation of the parental Htt exon 1.

  4. Ribosome Assembly as Antimicrobial Target

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rainer Nikolay

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Many antibiotics target the ribosome and interfere with its translation cycle. Since translation is the source of all cellular proteins including ribosomal proteins, protein synthesis and ribosome assembly are interdependent. As a consequence, the activity of translation inhibitors might indirectly cause defective ribosome assembly. Due to the difficulty in distinguishing between direct and indirect effects, and because assembly is probably a target in its own right, concepts are needed to identify small molecules that directly inhibit ribosome assembly. Here, we summarize the basic facts of ribosome targeting antibiotics. Furthermore, we present an in vivo screening strategy that focuses on ribosome assembly by a direct fluorescence based read-out that aims to identify and characterize small molecules acting as primary assembly inhibitors.

  5. Direct interaction of the N-terminal domain of ribosomal protein S1 with protein S2 in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrgazov, Konstantin; Manoharadas, Salim; Kaberdina, Anna C; Vesper, Oliver; Moll, Isabella

    2012-01-01

    Despite of the high resolution structure available for the E. coli ribosome, hitherto the structure and localization of the essential ribosomal protein S1 on the 30 S subunit still remains to be elucidated. It was previously reported that protein S1 binds to the ribosome via protein-protein interaction at the two N-terminal domains. Moreover, protein S2 was shown to be required for binding of protein S1 to the ribosome. Here, we present evidence that the N-terminal domain of S1 (amino acids 1-106; S1(106)) is necessary and sufficient for the interaction with protein S2 as well as for ribosome binding. We show that over production of protein S1(106) affects E. coli growth by displacing native protein S1 from its binding pocket on the ribosome. In addition, our data reveal that the coiled-coil domain of protein S2 (S2α(2)) is sufficient to allow protein S1 to bind to the ribosome. Taken together, these data uncover the crucial elements required for the S1/S2 interaction, which is pivotal for translation initiation on canonical mRNAs in gram-negative bacteria. The results are discussed in terms of a model wherein the S1/S2 interaction surface could represent a possible target to modulate the selectivity of the translational machinery and thereby alter the translational program under distinct conditions.

  6. mRNA pseudoknot structures can act as ribosomal roadblocks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jesper Tholstrup; Oddershede, Lene Broeng; Sørensen, Michael Askvad

    2012-01-01

    Several viruses utilize programmed ribosomal frameshifting mediated by mRNA pseudoknots in combination with a slippery sequence to produce a well defined stochiometric ratio of the upstream encoded to the downstream-encoded protein. A correlation between the mechanical strength of mRNA pseudoknot...

  7. The phenotype of many independently isolated +1 frameshift suppressor mutants supports a pivotal role of the P-site in reading frame maintenance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunilla Jäger

    Full Text Available The main features of translation are similar in all organisms on this planet and one important feature of it is the way the ribosome maintain the reading frame. We have earlier characterized several bacterial mutants defective in tRNA maturation and found that some of them correct a +1 frameshift mutation; i.e. such mutants possess an error in reading frame maintenance. Based on the analysis of the frameshifting phenotype of such mutants we proposed a pivotal role of the ribosomal grip of the peptidyl-tRNA to maintain the correct reading frame. To test the model in an unbiased way we first isolated many (467 independent mutants able to correct a +1 frameshift mutation and thereafter tested whether or not their frameshifting phenotypes were consistent with the model. These 467+1 frameshift suppressor mutants had alterations in 16 different loci of which 15 induced a defective tRNA by hypo- or hypermodifications or altering its primary sequence. All these alterations of tRNAs induce a frameshift error in the P-site to correct a +1 frameshift mutation consistent with the proposed model. Modifications next to and 3' of the anticodon (position 37, like 1-methylguanosine, are important for proper reading frame maintenance due to their interactions with components of the ribosomal P-site. Interestingly, two mutants had a defect in a locus (rpsI, which encodes ribosomal protein S9. The C-terminal of this protein contacts position 32-34 of the peptidyl-tRNA and is thus part of the P-site environment. The two rpsI mutants had a C-terminal truncated ribosomal protein S9 that destroys its interaction with the peptidyl-tRNA resulting in +1 shift in the reading frame. The isolation and characterization of the S9 mutants gave strong support of our model that the ribosomal grip of the peptidyl-tRNA is pivotal for the reading frame maintenance.

  8. Reconstitution of functional eukaryotic ribosomes from Dictyostelium discoideum ribosomal proteins and RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangiarotti, G; Chiaberge, S

    1997-08-08

    40 and 60 S ribosomal subunits have been reconstituted in vitro from purified ribosomal RNA and ribosomal proteins of Dictyostelium discoideum. The functionality of the reconstituted ribosomes was demonstrated in in vitro mRNA-directed protein synthesis. The reassembly proceeded well with immature precursors of ribosomal RNA but poorly if at all with mature cytoplasmic RNA species. Reassembly also required a preparation of small nuclear RNA(s), acting as morphopoietic factor(s).

  9. Capreomycin susceptibility is increased by TlyA-directed 2'-O-methylation on both ribosomal subunits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Monshupanee, Tanakarn; Johansen, Shanna K; Dahlberg, Albert E;

    2012-01-01

    of recombinant TlyA(II) Escherichia coli strains in competition shows that even subtle changes in the level of rRNA methylation lead to significant differences in susceptibility to sub-inhibitory concentrations of capreomycin. The findings reveal that 2'-O-methyls at both C1409 and C1920 play a role...... in facilitating the inhibitory effects of capreomycin and viomycin on the bacterial ribosome....

  10. Ribosome can resume the translation in both +1 or -1 frames after encountering an AGA cluster in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lainé, Sébastien; Thouard, Anne; Komar, Anton A; Rossignol, Jean-Michel

    2008-04-15

    In Escherichia coli the rare codons AGG, AGA and CGA are reported to have a detrimental effect on protein synthesis, especially during the expression of heterologous proteins. In the present work, we have studied the impact of successive clusters of these rare codons on the accuracy of mRNA translation in E. coli. For this purpose, we have analyzed the expression of an mRNA which contains in its 3' region a triplet and a tandem of AGA codons. This mRNA is derived from the human hepatitis B virus (HBV) preC gene. Both in eukaryotic cells and in eukaryotic cell-free translation system, this mRNA, directs the synthesis of a single 25 kDa protein. However, in a conventional E. coli strain BL 21 (DE3), transformed with a plasmid expressing this protein the synthesis of four polypeptides ranging from 30 to 21.5 kDa can be observed. Using different approaches, notably expression of i) precore mutated proteins or ii) chimeric proteins containing HA- and Myc-tags downstream of the AGA clusters (respectively in the -1 or +1 frame), we have found that when the ribosome encounters the AGA clusters, it can then resume the translation in both +1 and -1 frames. This result is in agreement with the model proposed recently by Baranov et al. (Baranov, P.V., Gesteland, R.F., Atkins, J.F., 2004. P-site tRNA is a crucial initiator of ribosomal frameshifting. RNA 10, 221-230), thus confirming that AGA/AGG codons can serve as sites for -1 frameshifting events. Only +1 frameshifting was suggested previously to occur at the AGA/AGG clusters.

  11. The location of protein S8 and surrounding elements of 16S rRNA in the 70S ribosome from combined use of directed hydroxyl radical probing and X-ray crystallography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancaster, L; Culver, G M; Yusupova, G Z; Cate, J H; Yusupov, M M; Noller, H F

    2000-05-01

    Ribosomal protein S8, which is essential for the assembly of the central domain of 16S rRNA, is one of the most thoroughly studied RNA-binding proteins. To map its surrounding RNA in the ribosome, we carried out directed hydroxyl radical probing of 16S rRNA using Fe(II) tethered to nine different positions on the surface of protein S8 in 70S ribosomes. Hydroxyl radical-induced cleavage was observed near the classical S8-binding site in the 620 stem, and flanking the other S8-footprinted regions of the central domain at the three-helix junction near position 650 and the 825 and 860 stems. In addition, cleavage near the 5' terminus of 16S rRNA, in the 300 region of its 5' domain, and in the 1070 region of its 3'-major domain provide information about the proximity to S8 of RNA elements not directly involved in its binding. These data, along with previous footprinting and crosslinking results, allowed positioning of protein S8 and its surrounding RNA elements in a 7.8-A map of the Thermus thermophilus 70S ribosome. The resulting model is in close agreement with the extensive body of data from previous studies using protein-protein and protein-RNA crosslinking, chemical and enzymatic footprinting, and genetics.

  12. Inhibition of internal ribosomal entry site-directed translation of HCV by recombinant IFN-alpha correlates with a reduced La protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimazaki, Takeo; Honda, Masao; Kaneko, Shuichi; Kobayashi, Kenichi

    2002-01-01

    Translation of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) polyprotein is mediated by an internal ribosome entry site (IRES) that is located within the 5'-nontranslated region (5'NTR). We investigated the effect of interferon alfa (IFN-alpha) on the IRES-directed translation of HCV, using two stably transformed cell lines, RCF-1 and RCF-26, of Huh7 cells derived from human hepatocellular carcinoma that express dicistronic reporter proteins, Renilla luciferase (RL) and firefly luciferase (FL), separated by HCV-IRES. After the administration of IFN-alpha or poly(I)-poly(C), HCV-IRES-directed translation was inhibited in a dose-dependent manner. The relative HCV-IRES activity (F/L) decreased to 60% at 5,000 IU/mL of IFN-alpha and 45% at 40 microg/mL of poly(I)-poly(C). Thus, IFN-alpha or poly(I)-poly(C) inhibited HCV-IRES-directed translation more efficiently than a cellular cap-dependent translation. 2',5'-oligoadenylate synthetase (2',5'AS) protein level in cells analyzed significantly increased after the administration of IFN-alpha, but not upon poly(I)-poly(C). Overexpression of double-stranded RNA-activated protein kinase (PKR) gene did not mimic the selective inhibition of HCV-IRES-directed translation in the transformant cells, suggesting that neither the 2',5'AS nor the PKR system are involved in this selective inhibition. Interestingly, the expression of the autoantigen, La, which has been reported to enhance HCV-IRES-directed translation, was significantly reduced after the administration of IFN-alpha and poly(I)-poly(C) in a dose-dependent manner. Transient expression of La protein completely restored the selective inhibition of HCV-IRES-directed translation by IFN-alpha and poly(I)-poly(C). These findings suggested a new antiviral mechanism induced by IFN-alpha in that IFN-alpha or poly(I)-poly(C) selectively inhibited HCV-IRES-directed translation compared with the eukaryotic cap-dependent translation through the reduction of La protein.

  13. A +RNA virus diptych : Chikungunya virus-host interactions and arteriviral programmed ribosomal frameshifting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Treffers, Emma Elisabeth (Emmely)

    2015-01-01

    In part 1 of the thesis quantitative proteomics was used to determine changes in abundance and phosphorylation status of host proteins during infection with the human pathogen chikungunya virus (CHIKV). Several proteins were identified that may be specifically downregulated during CHIKV infection to

  14. A +RNA virus diptych : Chikungunya virus-host interactions and arteriviral programmed ribosomal frameshifting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Treffers, Emma Elisabeth (Emmely)

    2015-01-01

    In part 1 of the thesis quantitative proteomics was used to determine changes in abundance and phosphorylation status of host proteins during infection with the human pathogen chikungunya virus (CHIKV). Several proteins were identified that may be specifically downregulated during CHIKV infection to

  15. Slip of grip of a molecular motor on a crowded track: Modeling shift of reading frame of ribosome on RNA template

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Bhavya; Schütz, Gunter M.; Chowdhury, Debashish

    2016-06-01

    We develop a stochastic model for the programmed frameshift of ribosomes synthesizing a protein while moving along a mRNA template. Normally the reading frame of a ribosome decodes successive triplets of nucleotides on the mRNA in a step-by-step manner. We focus on the programmed shift of the ribosomal reading frame, forward or backward, by only one nucleotide which results in a fusion protein; it occurs when a ribosome temporarily loses its grip to its mRNA track. Special “slippery” sequences of nucleotides and also downstream secondary structures of the mRNA strand are believed to play key roles in programmed frameshift. Here we explore the role of an hitherto neglected parameter in regulating -1 programmed frameshift. Specifically, we demonstrate that the frameshift frequency can be strongly regulated also by the density of the ribosomes, all of which are engaged in simultaneous translation of the same mRNA, at and around the slippery sequence. Monte Carlo simulations support the analytical predictions obtained from a mean-field analysis of the stochastic dynamics.

  16. Slip of grip of a molecular motor on a crowded track: Modeling shift of reading frame of ribosome on RNA template

    CERN Document Server

    Mishra, Bhavya; Chowdhury, Debashish

    2016-01-01

    We develop a stochastic model for the programmed frameshift of ribosomes synthesizing a protein while moving along a mRNA template. Normally the reading frame of a ribosome decodes successive triplets of nucleotides on the mRNA in a step-by-step manner. We focus on the programmed shift of the ribosomal reading frame, forward or backward, by only one nucleotide which results in a fusion protein; it occurs when a ribosome temporarily loses its grip to its mRNA track. Special "slippery" sequences of nucleotides and also downstream secondary structures of the mRNA strand are believed to play key roles in programmed frameshift. Here we explore the role of an hitherto neglected parameter in regulating -1 programmed frameshift. Specifically, we demonstrate that the frameshift frequency can be strongly regulated also by the density of the ribosomes, all of which are engaged in simultaneous translation of the same mRNA, at and around the slippery sequence. Monte Carlo simulations support the analytical predictions obt...

  17. Differential Stoichiometry among Core Ribosomal Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slavov, Nikolai; Semrau, Stefan; Airoldi, Edoardo; Budnik, Bogdan; van Oudenaarden, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Summary Understanding the regulation and structure of ribosomes is essential to understanding protein synthesis and its dysregulation in disease. While ribosomes are believed to have a fixed stoichiometry among their core ribosomal proteins (RPs), some experiments suggest a more variable composition. Testing such variability requires direct and precise quantification of RPs. We used mass spectrometry to directly quantify RPs across monosomes and polysomes of mouse embryonic stem cells (ESC) and budding yeast. Our data show that the stoichiometry among core RPs in wild-type yeast cells and ESC depends both on the growth conditions and on the number of ribosomes bound per mRNA. Furthermore, we find that the fitness of cells with a deleted RP-gene is inversely proportional to the enrichment of the corresponding RP in polysomes. Together, our findings support the existence of ribosomes with distinct protein composition and physiological function. PMID:26565899

  18. The mitochondrial genome of the hexactinellid sponge Aphrocallistes vastus: Evidence for programmed translational frameshifting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leys Sally P

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mitochondrial genomes (mtDNA of numerous sponges have been sequenced as part of an ongoing effort to resolve the class-level phylogeny of the Porifera, as well as to place the various lower metazoan groups on the animal-kingdom tree. Most recently, the partial mtDNA of two glass sponges, class Hexactinellida, were reported. While previous phylogenetic estimations based on these data remain uncertain due to insufficient taxon sampling and accelerated rates of evolution, the mtDNA molecules themselves reveal interesting traits that may be unique to hexactinellids. Here we determined the first complete mitochondrial genome of a hexactinellid sponge, Aphrocallistes vastus, and compared it to published poriferan mtDNAs to further describe characteristics specific to hexactinellid and other sponge mitochondrial genomes. Results The A. vastus mtDNA consisted of a 17,427 base pair circular molecule containing thirteen protein-coding genes, divergent large and small subunit ribosomal RNAs, and a reduced set of 18 tRNAs. The A. vastus mtDNA showed a typical hexactinellid nucleotide composition and shared a large synteny with the other sequenced glass sponge mtDNAs. It also contained an unidentified open reading frame and large intergenic space region. Two frameshifts, in the cox3 and nad6 genes, were not corrected by RNA editing, but rather possessed identical shift sites marked by the extremely rare tryptophan codon (UGG followed by the common glycine codon (GGA in the +1 frame. Conclusion Hexactinellid mtDNAs have shown similar trends in gene content, nucleotide composition, and codon usage, and have retained a large gene syntenty. Analysis of the mtDNA of A. vastus has provided evidence diagnostic for +1 programmed translational frameshifting, a phenomenon disparately reported throughout the animal kingdom, but present in the hexactinellid mtDNAs that have been sequenced to date.

  19. Reverse Translocation of tRNA in the Ribosome

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    A widely held view is that directional movement of tRNA in the ribosome is determined by an intrinsic mechanism and driven thermodynamically by transpeptidation. Here, we show that, in certain ribosomal complexes, the pretranslocation (PRE) state is thermodynamically favored over the posttranslocation (POST) state. Spontaneous and efficient conversion from the POST to PRE state is observed when EF-G is depleted from ribosomes in the POST state or when tRNA is added to the E site of ribosomes ...

  20. DVL3 Alleles Resulting in a −1 Frameshift of the Last Exon Mediate Autosomal-Dominant Robinow Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Janson J.; Mazzeu, Juliana F.; Hoischen, Alexander; Bayram, Yavuz; Withers, Marjorie; Gezdirici, Alper; Kimonis, Virginia; Steehouwer, Marloes; Jhangiani, Shalini N.; Muzny, Donna M.; Gibbs, Richard A.; van Bon, Bregje W.M.; Sutton, V. Reid; Lupski, James R.; Brunner, Han G.; Carvalho, Claudia M.B.

    2016-01-01

    Robinow syndrome is a rare congenital disorder characterized by mesomelic limb shortening, genital hypoplasia, and distinctive facial features. Recent reports have identified, in individuals with dominant Robinow syndrome, a specific type of variant characterized by being uniformly located in the penultimate exon of DVL1 and resulting in a −1 frameshift allele with a premature termination codon that escapes nonsense-mediated decay. Here, we studied a cohort of individuals who had been clinically diagnosed with Robinow syndrome but who had not received a molecular diagnosis from variant studies of DVL1, WNT5A, and ROR2. Because of the uniform location of frameshift variants in DVL1-mediated Robinow syndrome and the functional redundancy of DVL1, DVL2, and DVL3, we elected to pursue direct Sanger sequencing of the penultimate exon of DVL1 and its paralogs DVL2 and DVL3 to search for potential disease-associated variants. Remarkably, targeted sequencing identified five unrelated individuals harboring heterozygous, de novo frameshift variants in DVL3, including two splice acceptor mutations and three 1 bp deletions. Similar to the variants observed in DVL1-mediated Robinow syndrome, all variants in DVL3 result in a −1 frameshift, indicating that these highly specific alterations might be a common cause of dominant Robinow syndrome. Here, we review the current knowledge of these peculiar variant alleles in DVL1- and DVL3-mediated Robinow syndrome and further elucidate the phenotypic features present in subjects with DVL1 and DVL3 frameshift mutations. PMID:26924530

  1. Direct Activation of Ribosome-Associated Double-Stranded RNA-Dependent Protein Kinase (PKR by Deoxynivalenol, Anisomycin and Ricin: A New Model for Ribotoxic Stress Response Induction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui-Ren Zhou

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Double-stranded RNA (dsRNA-activated protein kinase (PKR is a critical upstream mediator of the ribotoxic stress response (RSR to the trichothecene deoxynivalenol (DON and other translational inhibitors. Here, we employed HeLa cell lysates to: (1 characterize PKR’s interactions with the ribosome and ribosomal RNA (rRNA; (2 demonstrate cell-free activation of ribosomal-associated PKR and (3 integrate these findings in a unified model for RSR. Robust PKR-dependent RSR was initially confirmed in intact cells. PKR basally associated with 40S, 60S, 80S and polysome fractions at molar ratios of 7, 2, 23 and 3, respectively. Treatment of ATP-containing HeLa lysates with DON or the ribotoxins anisomycin and ricin concentration-dependently elicited phosphorylation of PKR and its substrate eIF2α. These phosphorylations could be blocked by PKR inhibitors. rRNA immunoprecipitation (RNA-IP of HeLa lysates with PKR-specific antibody and sequencing revealed that in the presence of DON or not, the kinase associated with numerous discrete sites on both the 18S and 28S rRNA molecules, a number of which contained double-stranded hairpins. These findings are consistent with a sentinel model whereby multiple PKR molecules basally associate with the ribosome positioning them to respond to ribotoxin-induced alterations in rRNA structure by dimerizing, autoactivating and, ultimately, evoking RSR.

  2. Direct activation of ribosome-associated double-stranded RNA-dependent protein kinase (PKR) by deoxynivalenol, anisomycin and ricin: a new model for ribotoxic stress response induction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Hui-Ren; He, Kaiyu; Landgraf, Jeff; Pan, Xiao; Pestka, James J

    2014-12-16

    Double-stranded RNA (dsRNA)-activated protein kinase (PKR) is a critical upstream mediator of the ribotoxic stress response (RSR) to the trichothecene deoxynivalenol (DON) and other translational inhibitors. Here, we employed HeLa cell lysates to: (1) characterize PKR's interactions with the ribosome and ribosomal RNA (rRNA); (2) demonstrate cell-free activation of ribosomal-associated PKR and (3) integrate these findings in a unified model for RSR. Robust PKR-dependent RSR was initially confirmed in intact cells. PKR basally associated with 40S, 60S, 80S and polysome fractions at molar ratios of 7, 2, 23 and 3, respectively. Treatment of ATP-containing HeLa lysates with DON or the ribotoxins anisomycin and ricin concentration-dependently elicited phosphorylation of PKR and its substrate eIF2α. These phosphorylations could be blocked by PKR inhibitors. rRNA immunoprecipitation (RNA-IP) of HeLa lysates with PKR-specific antibody and sequencing revealed that in the presence of DON or not, the kinase associated with numerous discrete sites on both the 18S and 28S rRNA molecules, a number of which contained double-stranded hairpins. These findings are consistent with a sentinel model whereby multiple PKR molecules basally associate with the ribosome positioning them to respond to ribotoxin-induced alterations in rRNA structure by dimerizing, autoactivating and, ultimately, evoking RSR.

  3. Neomycin is more efficient than streptomycin in suppressing frameshift mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phoenix, P; Gravel, M; Herrington, M B; Brakier-Gingras, L

    1985-12-01

    The effects of streptomycin and neomycin on the phenotypic suppression of frameshift mutations in the lacZ gene of Escherichia coli and on the efficiency of suppression of amber mutations in T4 phage by the informational supE tRNA nonsense suppressor were compared. Neomycin stimulated much more efficiently than streptomycin the phenotypic suppression of frameshift mutations. Because neomycin favors mismatches of the central codon base whereas streptomycin favors mismatches of the first codon base, this result suggests that mismatching of the central codon base pair and shifting of the reading frame are two correlated phenomena. In contrast, both streptomycin and neomycin stimulated about equally the efficiency of the tRNA nonsense suppressor, an effect probably related to their interference with the proofreading control in tRNA selection.

  4. Salt Effects on the Thermodynamics of a Frameshifting RNA Pseudoknot under Tension

    CERN Document Server

    Hori, Naoto; Thirumalai, D

    2016-01-01

    One of the key factors in -1 programmed ribosomal frameshifting (PRF) is a pseudoknot (PK) RNA. A number of single molecule experiments have been performed on PKs to decipher the mechanism of PRF. Motivated by the experiments, we performed simulations to describe the response of a PK over a range of mechanical forces ($f$s) and monovalent salt concentrations ($C$s). The coarse-grained simulations quantitatively reproduces the multistep thermal melting. The free energy changes obtained in simulations are in excellent agreement with experiments, thus validating our model. The predicted phase diagram shows that a sequence of structural transitions, populating distinct intermediates, occur as $f$ and $C$ are changed. The stem-loop tertiary interactions rupture first followed by unfolding of the $3^{\\prime}$-end hairpin ($\\textrm{U-I}$). Finally, the $5^{\\prime}$-end hairpin unravels producing a stretched state ($\\textrm{I-F}$). A theoretical analysis of the phase boundaries shows that the critical force for ruptu...

  5. The Ribosomal Database Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, G. J.; Overbeek, R.; Larsen, N.; Marsh, T. L.; McCaughey, M. J.; Maciukenas, M. A.; Kuan, W. M.; Macke, T. J.; Xing, Y.; Woese, C. R.

    1992-01-01

    The Ribosomal Database Project (RDP) complies ribosomal sequences and related data, and redistributes them in aligned and phylogenetically ordered form to its user community. It also offers various software packages for handling, analyzing and displaying sequences. In addition, the RDP offers (or will offer) certain analytic services. At present the project is in an intermediate stage of development.

  6. The structure of ribosome-lankacidin complex reveals ribosomal sites for synergistic antibiotics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Auerbach, Tamar; Mermershtain, Inbal; Davidovich, Chen; Bashan, Anat; Belousoff, Matthew; Wekselman, Itai; Zimmerman, Ella; Xiong, Liqun; Klepacki, Dorota; Arakawa, Kenji; Kinashi, Haruyasu; Mankin, Alexander S.; Yonath, Ada (Hiroshima); (WIS-I); (UIC)

    2010-04-26

    Crystallographic analysis revealed that the 17-member polyketide antibiotic lankacidin produced by Streptomyces rochei binds at the peptidyl transferase center of the eubacterial large ribosomal subunit. Biochemical and functional studies verified this finding and showed interference with peptide bond formation. Chemical probing indicated that the macrolide lankamycin, a second antibiotic produced by the same species, binds at a neighboring site, at the ribosome exit tunnel. These two antibiotics can bind to the ribosome simultaneously and display synergy in inhibiting bacterial growth. The binding site of lankacidin and lankamycin partially overlap with the binding site of another pair of synergistic antibiotics, the streptogramins. Thus, at least two pairs of structurally dissimilar compounds have been selected in the course of evolution to act synergistically by targeting neighboring sites in the ribosome. These results underscore the importance of the corresponding ribosomal sites for development of clinically relevant synergistic antibiotics and demonstrate the utility of structural analysis for providing new directions for drug discovery.

  7. The circadian clock coordinates ribosome biogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Céline Jouffe

    Full Text Available Biological rhythms play a fundamental role in the physiology and behavior of most living organisms. Rhythmic circadian expression of clock-controlled genes is orchestrated by a molecular clock that relies on interconnected negative feedback loops of transcription regulators. Here we show that the circadian clock exerts its function also through the regulation of mRNA translation. Namely, the circadian clock influences the temporal translation of a subset of mRNAs involved in ribosome biogenesis by controlling the transcription of translation initiation factors as well as the clock-dependent rhythmic activation of signaling pathways involved in their regulation. Moreover, the circadian oscillator directly regulates the transcription of ribosomal protein mRNAs and ribosomal RNAs. Thus the circadian clock exerts a major role in coordinating transcription and translation steps underlying ribosome biogenesis.

  8. The vhs1 mutant form of herpes simplex virus virion host shutoff protein retains significant internal ribosome entry site-directed RNA cleavage activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, P; Saffran, H A; Smiley, J R

    2001-01-01

    The virion host shutoff (vhs) protein of herpes simplex virus (HSV) triggers global shutoff of host protein synthesis and accelerated turnover of host and viral mRNAs during HSV infection. As well, it induces endoribonucleolytic cleavage of RNA substrates when produced in a rabbit reticulocyte lysate (RRL) in vitro translation system. The vhs1 point mutation (Thr 214-->Ile) eliminates vhs function during virus infection and in transiently transfected mammalian cells and was therefore previously considered to abolish vhs activity. Here we demonstrate that the vhs1 mutant protein induces readily detectable endoribonuclease activity on RNA substrates bearing the internal ribosome entry site of encephalomyocarditis virus in the RRL assay system. These data document that the vhs1 mutation does not eliminate catalytic activity and raise the possibility that the vhs-dependent endoribonuclease employs more than one mode of substrate recognition.

  9. Ribosomal history reveals origins of modern protein synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harish, Ajith; Caetano-Anollés, Gustavo

    2012-01-01

    The origin and evolution of the ribosome is central to our understanding of the cellular world. Most hypotheses posit that the ribosome originated in the peptidyl transferase center of the large ribosomal subunit. However, these proposals do not link protein synthesis to RNA recognition and do not use a phylogenetic comparative framework to study ribosomal evolution. Here we infer evolution of the structural components of the ribosome. Phylogenetic methods widely used in morphometrics are applied directly to RNA structures of thousands of molecules and to a census of protein structures in hundreds of genomes. We find that components of the small subunit involved in ribosomal processivity evolved earlier than the catalytic peptidyl transferase center responsible for protein synthesis. Remarkably, subunit RNA and proteins coevolved, starting with interactions between the oldest proteins (S12 and S17) and the oldest substructure (the ribosomal ratchet) in the small subunit and ending with the rise of a modern multi-subunit ribosome. Ancestral ribonucleoprotein components show similarities to in vitro evolved RNA replicase ribozymes and protein structures in extant replication machinery. Our study therefore provides important clues about the chicken-or-egg dilemma associated with the central dogma of molecular biology by showing that ribosomal history is driven by the gradual structural accretion of protein and RNA structures. Most importantly, results suggest that functionally important and conserved regions of the ribosome were recruited and could be relics of an ancient ribonucleoprotein world.

  10. Paternal Somatic Mosaicism of a Novel Frameshift Mutation in ELANE Causing Severe Congenital Neutropenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hee-Jung; Song, Min-Jung; Lee, Ki-O; Kim, Sun-Hee; Kim, Hee-Jin

    2015-12-01

    Severe congenital neutropenia (SCN) is a bone marrow failure disease with an autosomal dominant inheritance from mutations in ELANE. Here, we report a 7-week-old Korean male with SCN. His elder sister died from pneumonia at 2 years. Direct sequencing of ELANE in the proband identified a heterozygous novel frameshift mutation: c.658delC (p.Arg220Glyfs20*). Family study involving his asymptomatic parents with normal cell counts revealed that his father had the same mutation, but at a lower burden than expected in a typical heterozygous state. Further molecular investigation demonstrated somatic mosaicism with ~18% mutant alleles. We concluded the proband inherited the mutation from his somatic mosaic father.

  11. Two new Rett syndrome families and review of the literature: expanding the knowledge of MECP2 frameshift mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eiklid Kristin L

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rett syndrome (RTT is an X-linked dominant neurodevelopmental disorder, which is usually caused by de novo mutations in the MECP2 gene. More than 70% of the disease causing MECP2 mutations are eight recurrent C to T transitions, which almost exclusively arise on the paternally derived X chromosome. About 10% of the RTT cases have a C-terminal frameshift deletion in MECP2. Only few RTT families with a segregating MECP2 mutation, which affects female carriers with a phenotype of mental retardation or RTT, have been reported in the literature. In this study we describe two new RTT families with three and four individuals, respectively, and review the literature comparing the type of mutations and phenotypes observed in RTT families with those observed in sporadic cases. Based on these observations we also investigated origin of mutation segregation to further improve genetic counselling. Methods MECP2 mutations were identified by direct sequencing. XCI studies were performed using the X-linked androgen receptor (AR locus. The parental origin of de novo MECP2 frameshift mutations was investigated using intronic SNPs. Results In both families a C-terminal frameshift mutation segregates. Clinical features of the mutation carriers vary from classical RTT to mild mental retardation. XCI profiles of the female carriers correlate to their respective geno-/phenotypes. The majority of the de novo frameshift mutations occur on the paternally derived X chromosome (7/9 cases, without a paternal age effect. Conclusions The present study suggests a correlation between the intrafamilial phenotypic differences observed in RTT families and their respective XCI pattern in blood, in contrast to sporadic RTT cases where a similar correlation has not been demonstrated. Furthermore, we found de novo MECP2 frameshift mutations frequently to be of paternal origin, although not with the same high paternal occurrence as in sporadic cases with C to T

  12. Structural and functional topography of the human ribosome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dmitri Graifer; Galina Karpova

    2012-01-01

    This review covers data on the structural organization of functional sites in the human ribosome,namely,the messenger RNA binding center,the binding site of the hepatitis C virus RNA internal ribosome entry site,and the peptidyl transferase center.The data summarized here have been obtained primarily by means of a site-directed crosslinking approach with application of the analogs of the respective ribosomal ligands bearing cross-linkers at the designed positions.These data are discussed taking into consideration available structural data on ribosomes from various kingdoms obtained with the use of cryo-electron microscopy,X-ray crystallography,and other approaches.

  13. Whole-exome sequencing reveals a novel frameshift mutation in the FAM161A gene causing autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa in the Indian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yu; Saikia, Bibhuti B; Jiang, Zhilin; Zhu, Xiong; Liu, Yuqing; Huang, Lulin; Kim, Ramasamy; Yang, Yin; Qu, Chao; Hao, Fang; Gong, Bo; Tai, Zhengfu; Niu, Lihong; Yang, Zhenglin; Sundaresan, Periasamy; Zhu, Xianjun

    2015-10-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a heterogenous group of inherited retinal degenerations caused by mutations in at least 50 genes. To identify genetic mutations underlying autosomal recessive RP (arRP), we performed whole-exome sequencing study on two consanguineous marriage Indian families (RP-252 and RP-182) and 100 sporadic RP patients. Here we reported novel mutation in FAM161A in RP-252 and RP-182 with two patients affected with RP in each family. The FAM161A gene was identified as the causative gene for RP28, an autosomal recessive form of RP. By whole-exome sequencing we identified several homozygous genomic regions, one of which included the recently identified FAM161A gene mutated in RP28-linked arRP. Sequencing analysis revealed the presence of a novel homozygous frameshift mutation p.R592FsX2 in both patients of family RP-252 and family RP-182. In 100 sporadic Indian RP patients, this novel homozygous frameshift mutation p.R592FsX2 was identified in one sporadic patient ARRP-S-I-46 by whole-exome sequencing and validated by Sanger sequencing. Meanwhile, this homozygous frameshift mutation was absent in 1000 ethnicity-matched control samples screened by direct Sanger sequencing. In conclusion, we identified a novel homozygous frameshift mutations of RP28-linked RP gene FAM161A in Indian population.

  14. A new β⁰-thalassemia frameshift mutation [β 48 (-T)] in a Uruguayan family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da Luz, J; López, P; Kimura, E M; Albuquerque, D M; Costa, F F; Sans, M; Sonati, M F

    2013-02-01

    We describe here a new frameshift mutation of β-thalassemia in a Uruguayan family with Italian ancestry [β48 (-T); HBB:c.146delT]. This frameshift results in formation of premature stop codon (TGA) 40 bp downstream and in a short unstable product that is degraded in the cell.

  15. Selection and characterization of small molecules that bind the HIV-1 frameshift site RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcheschi, Ryan J; Mouzakis, Kathryn D; Butcher, Samuel E

    2009-10-16

    HIV-1 requires a -1 translational frameshift to properly synthesize the viral enzymes required for replication. The frameshift mechanism is dependent upon two RNA elements, a seven-nucleotide slippery sequence (UUUUUUA) and a downstream RNA structure. Frameshifting occurs with a frequency of approximately 5%, and increasing or decreasing this frequency may result in a decrease in viral replication. Here, we report the results of a high-throughput screen designed to find small molecules that bind to the HIV-1 frameshift site RNA. Out of 34,500 compounds screened, 202 were identified as positive hits. We show that one of these compounds, doxorubicin, binds the HIV-1 RNA with low micromolar affinity (K(d) = 2.8 microM). This binding was confirmed and localized to the RNA using NMR. Further analysis revealed that this compound increased the RNA stability by approximately 5 degrees C and decreased translational frameshifting by 28% (+/-14%), as measured in vitro.

  16. Ribosome maturation in E. coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silengo, L; Altruda, F; Dotto, G P; Lacquaniti, F; Perlo, C; Turco, E; Mangiarotti, G

    1977-01-01

    In vivo and in vitro experiments have shown that processing of ribosomal RNA is a late event in ribosome biogenesis. The precursor form of RNA is probably necessary to speed up the assembly of ribomal proteins. Newly formed ribosomal particles which have already entered polyribosomes differ from mature ribosomes not only in their RNA content but also in their susceptibility to unfolding in low Mg concentration and to RNase attack. Final maturation of new ribosomes is probably dependent on their functioning in protein synthesis. Thus only those ribosomes which have proven to be functional may be converted into stable cellular structures.

  17. Efficient Translation Initiation Directed by the 900-Nucleotide-Long and GC-Rich 5′ Untranslated Region of the Human Retrotransposon LINE-1 mRNA Is Strictly Cap Dependent Rather than Internal Ribosome Entry Site Mediated▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dmitriev, Sergey E.; Andreev, Dmitri E.; Terenin, Ilya M.; Olovnikov, Ivan A.; Prassolov, Vladimir S.; Merrick, William C.; Shatsky, Ivan N.

    2007-01-01

    Retrotransposon L1 is a mobile genetic element of the LINE family that is extremely widespread in the mammalian genome. It encodes a dicistronic mRNA, which is exceptionally rare among eukaryotic cellular mRNAs. The extremely long and GC-rich L1 5′ untranslated region (5′UTR) directs synthesis of numerous copies of RNA-binding protein ORF1p per mRNA. One could suggest that the 5′UTR of L1 mRNA contained a powerful internal ribosome entry site (IRES) element. Using transfection of cultured cells with the polyadenylated monocistronic (L1 5′UTR-Fluc) or bicistronic (Rluc-L1 5′UTR-Fluc) RNA constructs, capped or uncapped, it has been firmly established that the 5′UTR of L1 does not contain an IRES. Uncapping reduces the initiation activity of the L1 5′UTR to that of background. Moreover, the translation is inhibited by upstream AUG codons in the 5′UTR. Nevertheless, this cap-dependent initiation activity of the L1 5′UTR was unexpectedly high and resembles that of the beta-actin 5′UTR (84 nucleotides long). Strikingly, the deletion of up to 80% of the nucleotide sequence of the L1 5′UTR, with most of its stem loops, does not significantly change its translation initiation efficiency. These data can modify current ideas on mechanisms used by 40S ribosomal subunits to cope with complex 5′UTRs and call into question the conception that every long GC-rich 5′UTR working with a high efficiency has to contain an IRES. Our data also demonstrate that the ORF2 translation initiation is not directed by internal initiation, either. It is very inefficient and presumably based on a reinitiation event. PMID:17470553

  18. Efficient translation initiation directed by the 900-nucleotide-long and GC-rich 5' untranslated region of the human retrotransposon LINE-1 mRNA is strictly cap dependent rather than internal ribosome entry site mediated.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dmitriev, Sergey E; Andreev, Dmitri E; Terenin, Ilya M; Olovnikov, Ivan A; Prassolov, Vladimir S; Merrick, William C; Shatsky, Ivan N

    2007-07-01

    Retrotransposon L1 is a mobile genetic element of the LINE family that is extremely widespread in the mammalian genome. It encodes a dicistronic mRNA, which is exceptionally rare among eukaryotic cellular mRNAs. The extremely long and GC-rich L1 5' untranslated region (5'UTR) directs synthesis of numerous copies of RNA-binding protein ORF1p per mRNA. One could suggest that the 5'UTR of L1 mRNA contained a powerful internal ribosome entry site (IRES) element. Using transfection of cultured cells with the polyadenylated monocistronic (L1 5'UTR-Fluc) or bicistronic (Rluc-L1 5'UTR-Fluc) RNA constructs, capped or uncapped, it has been firmly established that the 5'UTR of L1 does not contain an IRES. Uncapping reduces the initiation activity of the L1 5'UTR to that of background. Moreover, the translation is inhibited by upstream AUG codons in the 5'UTR. Nevertheless, this cap-dependent initiation activity of the L1 5'UTR was unexpectedly high and resembles that of the beta-actin 5'UTR (84 nucleotides long). Strikingly, the deletion of up to 80% of the nucleotide sequence of the L1 5'UTR, with most of its stem loops, does not significantly change its translation initiation efficiency. These data can modify current ideas on mechanisms used by 40S ribosomal subunits to cope with complex 5'UTRs and call into question the conception that every long GC-rich 5'UTR working with a high efficiency has to contain an IRES. Our data also demonstrate that the ORF2 translation initiation is not directed by internal initiation, either. It is very inefficient and presumably based on a reinitiation event.

  19. An internal ribosome entry site directs translation of the 3'-gene from Pelargonium flower break virus genomic RNA: implications for infectivity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Fernández-Miragall

    Full Text Available Pelargonium flower break virus (PFBV, genus Carmovirus has a single-stranded positive-sense genomic RNA (gRNA which contains five ORFs. The two 5'-proximal ORFs encode the replicases, two internal ORFs encode movement proteins, and the 3'-proximal ORF encodes a polypeptide (p37 which plays a dual role as capsid protein and as suppressor of RNA silencing. Like other members of family Tombusviridae, carmoviruses express ORFs that are not 5'-proximal from subgenomic RNAs. However, in one case, corresponding to Hisbiscus chlorotic ringspot virus, it has been reported that the 3'-proximal gene can be translated from the gRNA through an internal ribosome entry site (IRES. Here we show that PFBV also holds an IRES that mediates production of p37 from the gRNA, raising the question of whether this translation strategy may be conserved in the genus. The PFBV IRES was functional both in vitro and in vivo and either in the viral context or when inserted into synthetic bicistronic constructs. Through deletion and mutagenesis studies we have found that the IRES is contained within a 80 nt segment and have identified some structural traits that influence IRES function. Interestingly, mutations that diminish IRES activity strongly reduced the infectivity of the virus while the progress of the infection was favoured by mutations potentiating such activity. These results support the biological significance of the IRES-driven p37 translation and suggest that production of the silencing suppressor from the gRNA might allow the virus to early counteract the defence response of the host, thus facilitating pathogen multiplication and spread.

  20. An internal ribosome entry site directs translation of the 3'-gene from Pelargonium flower break virus genomic RNA: implications for infectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Miragall, Olga; Hernández, Carmen

    2011-01-01

    Pelargonium flower break virus (PFBV, genus Carmovirus) has a single-stranded positive-sense genomic RNA (gRNA) which contains five ORFs. The two 5'-proximal ORFs encode the replicases, two internal ORFs encode movement proteins, and the 3'-proximal ORF encodes a polypeptide (p37) which plays a dual role as capsid protein and as suppressor of RNA silencing. Like other members of family Tombusviridae, carmoviruses express ORFs that are not 5'-proximal from subgenomic RNAs. However, in one case, corresponding to Hisbiscus chlorotic ringspot virus, it has been reported that the 3'-proximal gene can be translated from the gRNA through an internal ribosome entry site (IRES). Here we show that PFBV also holds an IRES that mediates production of p37 from the gRNA, raising the question of whether this translation strategy may be conserved in the genus. The PFBV IRES was functional both in vitro and in vivo and either in the viral context or when inserted into synthetic bicistronic constructs. Through deletion and mutagenesis studies we have found that the IRES is contained within a 80 nt segment and have identified some structural traits that influence IRES function. Interestingly, mutations that diminish IRES activity strongly reduced the infectivity of the virus while the progress of the infection was favoured by mutations potentiating such activity. These results support the biological significance of the IRES-driven p37 translation and suggest that production of the silencing suppressor from the gRNA might allow the virus to early counteract the defence response of the host, thus facilitating pathogen multiplication and spread.

  1. [Ribosomal RNA Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    It is generally believed that an RNA World existed at an early stage in the history of life. During this early period, RNA molecules are seen to be potentially involved in both catalysis and the storage of genetic information. Translation presents several interrelated themes of inquiry for exobiology. First, it is essential, for understanding the very origin of life, how peptides and eventually proteins might have come to be made on the early Earth in a template directed manner. Second, it is necessary to understand how a machinery of similar complexity to that found in the ribosomes of modern organisms came to exist by the time of the last common ancestor (as detected by 16S rRNA sequence studies). Third, the ribosomal RNAs themselves likely had a very early origin and studies of their history may be very informative about the nature of the RNA World. Moreover, studies of these RNAs will contribute to a better understanding of the potential roles of RNA in early evolution.During the past year we have ave conducted a comparative study of four completely sequenced bacterial genoames. We have focused initially on conservation of gene order. The second component of the project continues to build on the model system for studying the validity of variant 5S rRNA sequences in the vicinity of the modern Vibrio proteolyticus 5S rRNA that we established earlier. This system has made it possible to conduct a detailed and extensive analysis of a local portion of the sequence space. These core methods have been used to construct numerous mutants during the last several years. Although it has been a secondary focus, this work has continued over the last year such that we now have in excess of 125 V. proteolyticus derived constructs which have been made and characterized. We have also continued high resolution NMR work on RNA oligomers originally initiated by G. Kenneth Smith who was funded by a NASA Graduate Student Researcher's Fellowship Award until May of 1996. Mr. Smith

  2. Alterations in the ribosomal machinery in cancer and hematologic disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shenoy Niraj

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Ribosomes are essential components of the protein translation machinery and are composed of more than 80 unique large and small ribosomal proteins. Recent studies show that in addition to their roles in protein translation, ribosomal proteins are also involved in extra-ribosomal functions of DNA repair, apoptosis and cellular homeostasis. Consequently, alterations in the synthesis or functioning of ribosomal proteins can lead to various hematologic disorders. These include congenital anemias such as Diamond Blackfan anemia and Shwachman Diamond syndrome; both of which are associated with mutations in various ribosomal genes. Acquired uniallelic deletion of RPS14 gene has also been shown to lead to the 5q syndrome, a distinct subset of MDS associated with macrocytic anemia. Recent evidence shows that specific ribosomal proteins are overexpressed in liver, colon, prostate and other tumors. Ribosomal protein overexpression can promote tumorigenesis by interactions with the p53 tumor suppressor pathway and also by direct effects on various oncogenes. These data point to a broad role of ribosome protein alterations in hematologic and oncologic diseases.

  3. Placeholder factors in ribosome biogenesis: please, pave my way

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco J. Espinar-Marchena

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The synthesis of cytoplasmic eukaryotic ribosomes is an extraordinarily energy-demanding cellular activity that occurs progressively from the nucleolus to the cytoplasm. In the nucleolus, precursor rRNAs associate with a myriad of trans-acting factors and some ribosomal proteins to form pre-ribosomal particles. These factors include snoRNPs, nucleases, ATPases, GTPases, RNA helicases, and a vast list of proteins with no predicted enzymatic activity. Their coordinate activity orchestrates in a spatiotemporal manner the modification and processing of precursor rRNAs, the rearrangement reactions required for the formation of productive RNA folding intermediates, the ordered assembly of the ribosomal proteins, and the export of pre-ribosomal particles to the cytoplasm; thus, providing speed, directionality and accuracy to the overall process of formation of translation-competent ribosomes. Here, we review a particular class of trans-acting factors known as “placeholders”. Placeholder factors temporarily bind selected ribosomal sites until these have achieved a structural context that is appropriate for exchanging the placeholder with another site-specific binding factor. By this strategy, placeholders sterically prevent premature recruitment of subsequently binding factors, premature formation of structures, avoid possible folding traps, and act as molecular clocks that supervise the correct progression of pre-ribosomal particles into functional ribosomal subunits. We summarize the current understanding of those factors that delay the assembly of distinct ribosomal proteins or subsequently bind key sites in pre-ribosomal particles. We also discuss recurrent examples of RNA-protein and protein-protein mimicry between rRNAs and/or factors, which have clear functional implications for the ribosome biogenesis pathway.

  4. Ornithine decarboxylase antizyme finder (OAF: Fast and reliable detection of antizymes with frameshifts in mRNAs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atkins John F

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ornithine decarboxylase antizymes are proteins which negatively regulate cellular polyamine levels via their affects on polyamine synthesis and cellular uptake. In virtually all organisms from yeast to mammals, antizymes are encoded by two partially overlapping open reading frames (ORFs. A +1 frameshift between frames is required for the synthesis of antizyme. Ribosomes change translation phase at the end of the first ORF in response to stimulatory signals embedded in mRNA. Since standard sequence analysis pipelines are currently unable to recognise sites of programmed ribosomal frameshifting, proper detection of full length antizyme coding sequences (CDS requires conscientious manual evaluation by a human expert. The rapid growth of sequence information demands less laborious and more cost efficient solutions for this problem. This manuscript describes a rapid and accurate computer tool for antizyme CDS detection that requires minimal human involvement. Results We have developed a computer tool, OAF (ODC antizyme finder for identifying antizyme encoding sequences in spliced or intronless nucleic acid sequenes. OAF utilizes a combination of profile hidden Markov models (HMM built separately for the products of each open reading frame constituting the entire antizyme coding sequence. Profile HMMs are based on a set of 218 manually assembled antizyme sequences. To distinguish between antizyme paralogs and orthologs from major phyla, antizyme sequences were clustered into twelve groups and specific combinations of profile HMMs were designed for each group. OAF has been tested on the current version of dbEST, where it identified over six thousand Expressed Sequence Tags (EST sequences encoding antizyme proteins (over two thousand antizyme CDS in these ESTs are non redundant. Conclusion OAF performs well on raw EST sequences and mRNA sequences derived from genomic annotations. OAF will be used for the future updates of the RECODE

  5. Ribosomal Antibiotics: Contemporary Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamar Auerbach-Nevo

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Most ribosomal antibiotics obstruct distinct ribosomal functions. In selected cases, in addition to paralyzing vital ribosomal tasks, some ribosomal antibiotics are involved in cellular regulation. Owing to the global rapid increase in the appearance of multi-drug resistance in pathogenic bacterial strains, and to the extremely slow progress in developing new antibiotics worldwide, it seems that, in addition to the traditional attempts at improving current antibiotics and the intensive screening for additional natural compounds, this field should undergo substantial conceptual revision. Here, we highlight several contemporary issues, including challenging the common preference of broad-range antibiotics; the marginal attention to alterations in the microbiome population resulting from antibiotics usage, and the insufficient awareness of ecological and environmental aspects of antibiotics usage. We also highlight recent advances in the identification of species-specific structural motifs that may be exploited for the design and the creation of novel, environmental friendly, degradable, antibiotic types, with a better distinction between pathogens and useful bacterial species in the microbiome. Thus, these studies are leading towards the design of “pathogen-specific antibiotics,” in contrast to the current preference of broad range antibiotics, partially because it requires significant efforts in speeding up the discovery of the unique species motifs as well as the clinical pathogen identification.

  6. A secreted WNT-ligand-binding domain of FZD5 generated by a frameshift mutation causes autosomal dominant coloboma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chunqiao; Widen, Sonya A; Williamson, Kathleen A; Ratnapriya, Rinki; Gerth-Kahlert, Christina; Rainger, Joe; Alur, Ramakrishna P; Strachan, Erin; Manjunath, Souparnika H; Balakrishnan, Archana; Floyd, James A; Li, Tiansen; Waskiewicz, Andrew; Brooks, Brian P; Lehmann, Ordan J; FitzPatrick, David R; Swaroop, Anand

    2016-04-01

    Ocular coloboma is a common eye malformation resulting from incomplete fusion of the optic fissure during development. Coloboma is often associated with microphthalmia and/or contralateral anophthalmia. Coloboma shows extensive locus heterogeneity associated with causative mutations identified in genes encoding developmental transcription factors or components of signaling pathways. We report an ultra-rare, heterozygous frameshift mutation in FZD5 (p.Ala219Glufs*49) that was identified independently in two branches of a large family with autosomal dominant non-syndromic coloboma. FZD5 has a single-coding exon and consequently a transcript with this frameshift variant is not a canonical substrate for nonsense-mediated decay. FZD5 encodes a transmembrane receptor with a conserved extracellular cysteine rich domain for ligand binding. The frameshift mutation results in the production of a truncated protein, which retains the Wingless-type MMTV integration site family member-ligand-binding domain, but lacks the transmembrane domain. The truncated protein was secreted from cells, and behaved as a dominant-negative FZD5 receptor, antagonizing both canonical and non-canonical WNT signaling. Expression of the resultant mutant protein caused coloboma and microphthalmia in zebrafish, and disruption of the apical junction of the retinal neural epithelium in mouse, mimicking the phenotype of Fz5/Fz8 compound conditional knockout mutants. Our studies have revealed a conserved role of Wnt-Frizzled (FZD) signaling in ocular development and directly implicate WNT-FZD signaling both in normal closure of the human optic fissure and pathogenesis of coloboma.

  7. HIV-1 and Human PEG10 Frameshift Elements Are Functionally Distinct and Distinguished by Novel Small Molecule Modulators.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tony S Cardno

    Full Text Available Frameshifting during translation of viral or in rare cases cellular mRNA results in the synthesis of proteins from two overlapping reading frames within the same mRNA. In HIV-1 the protease, reverse transcriptase, and integrase enzymes are in a second reading frame relative to the structural group-specific antigen (gag, and their synthesis is dependent upon frameshifting. This ensures that a strictly regulated ratio of structural proteins and enzymes, which is critical for HIV-1 replication and viral infectivity, is maintained during protein synthesis. The frameshift element in HIV-1 RNA is an attractive target for the development of a new class of anti HIV-1 drugs. However, a number of examples are now emerging of human genes using -1 frameshifting, such as PEG10 and CCR5. In this study we have compared the HIV-1 and PEG10 frameshift elements and shown they have distinct functional characteristics. Frameshifting occurs at several points within each element. Moreover, frameshift modulators that were isolated by high-throughput screening of a library of 114,000 lead-like compounds behaved differently with the PEG10 frameshift element. The most effective compounds affecting the HIV-1 element enhanced frameshifting by 2.5-fold at 10 μM in two different frameshift reporter assay systems. HIV-1 protease:gag protein ratio was affected by a similar amount in a specific assay of virally-infected cultured cell, but the modulation of frameshifting of the first-iteration compounds was not sufficient to show significant effects on viral infectivity. Importantly, two compounds did not affect frameshifting with the human PEG10 element, while one modestly inhibited rather than enhanced frameshifting at the human element. These studies indicate that frameshift elements have unique characteristics that may allow targeting of HIV-1 and of other viruses specifically for development of antiviral therapeutic molecules without effect on human genes like PEG10 that

  8. Dissecting non-canonical interactions in frameshift-stimulating mRNA pseudoknots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cornish, Peter V. [University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Department of Physics (United States); Giedroc, David P. [2128 TAMU, Texas A and M University, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics (United States); Hennig, Mirko [Scripps Research Institute, MB33, Department of Molecular Biology (United States)], E-mail: hennig@musc.edu

    2006-07-15

    A variety of powerful NMR experiments have been introduced over the last few years that allow for the direct identification of different combinations of donor and acceptor atoms involved in hydrogen bonds in biomolecules. This ability to directly observe tertiary structural hydrogen bonds in solution tremendously facilitates structural studies of nucleic acids. We show here that an adiabatic HNN-COSY pulse scheme permits observation and measurement of J(N,N) couplings for nitrogen sites that are separated by up to 140 ppm in a single experiment at a proton resonance frequency of 500 MHz. Crucial hydrogen bond acceptor sites in nucleic acids, such as cytidine N3 nitrogens, can be unambiguously identified even in the absence of detectable H41 and H42 amino protons using a novel triple-resonance two-dimensional experiment, denoted H5(C5C4)N3. The unambiguous identification of amino nitrogen donor and aromatic nitrogen acceptor sites associated with both major groove as well as minor groove triple base pairs reveal the details of hydrogen bonding networks that stabilize the complex architecture of frameshift-stimulating mRNA pseudoknots. Another key tertiary interaction involving a 2'-OH hydroxyl proton that donates a hydrogen bond to an aromatic nitrogen acceptor in a cis Watson-Crick/sugar edge interaction can also be directly detected using a quantitative J(H,N) {sup 1}H,{sup 15}N-HSQC experiment.

  9. Regulation of ribosomal DNA amplification by the TOR pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jack, Carmen V; Cruz, Cristina; Hull, Ryan M; Keller, Markus A; Ralser, Markus; Houseley, Jonathan

    2015-08-01

    Repeated regions are widespread in eukaryotic genomes, and key functional elements such as the ribosomal DNA tend to be formed of high copy repeated sequences organized in tandem arrays. In general, high copy repeats are remarkably stable, but a number of organisms display rapid ribosomal DNA amplification at specific times or under specific conditions. Here we demonstrate that target of rapamycin (TOR) signaling stimulates ribosomal DNA amplification in budding yeast, linking external nutrient availability to ribosomal DNA copy number. We show that ribosomal DNA amplification is regulated by three histone deacetylases: Sir2, Hst3, and Hst4. These enzymes control homologous recombination-dependent and nonhomologous recombination-dependent amplification pathways that act in concert to mediate rapid, directional ribosomal DNA copy number change. Amplification is completely repressed by rapamycin, an inhibitor of the nutrient-responsive TOR pathway; this effect is separable from growth rate and is mediated directly through Sir2, Hst3, and Hst4. Caloric restriction is known to up-regulate expression of nicotinamidase Pnc1, an enzyme that enhances Sir2, Hst3, and Hst4 activity. In contrast, normal glucose concentrations stretch the ribosome synthesis capacity of cells with low ribosomal DNA copy number, and we find that these cells show a previously unrecognized transcriptional response to caloric excess by reducing PNC1 expression. PNC1 down-regulation forms a key element in the control of ribosomal DNA amplification as overexpression of PNC1 substantially reduces ribosomal DNA amplification rate. Our results reveal how a signaling pathway can orchestrate specific genome changes and demonstrate that the copy number of repetitive DNA can be altered to suit environmental conditions.

  10. Ribosomal Genes in Focus: New Transcripts Label the Dense Fibrillar Components and Form Clusters Indicative of "Christmas Trees" in situ

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Karel Koberna; Jan Malínský; Artem Pliss; Martin Mas̆ata; Jaromíra Vec̆er̆ová; Markéta Fialová; Jan Bednár; Ivan Ras̆ka

    2002-01-01

    ... localization of these genes. Detailed analyses of HeLa cell nucleoli include direct localization of ribosomal genes by in situ hybridization and their indirect localization via nascent ribosomal transcript mappings...

  11. Detection of frameshift mutations of RIZin gastric cancers with microsatellite instability

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kai-Feng Pan; You-Yong Lu; Wan-Guo Liu; Lian Zhang; Wei-Cheng You

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To study the frameshift mutations of the retinoblastomaprotein-interacting zinc finger gene RIZ in gastric cancer with microsatellite instability, and to identify two coding polyadenosine tracts of RIZ.METHODS: Frameshift mutations at (A)8 and (A)9 tracts of RIZwere detected in 70 human gastric cancer (HGC) specimens by DHPLC and DNA sequencing. Microsatelliteinstability (MSI) status was assessed by two mononucleotide markers, BAT26 and BAT25, by means of denaturing highperformance liquid chromatography (DHPLC).RESULTS: In 70 HGC samples, 8 (11.4%) were found positivefor instabilities at BAT26 and BAT25. In 7 of the 8 cases with instabilities at both BAT26 and BAT25 (MSI-H), 1 was unstable at BAT26 but stable at BAT25. Frameshift mutations were identified in 4 (57.1%) of the 7 samples with MSI-Hin the (A)9 tract of RIZ without mutations in the (A)8 tract.In contrast, frameshift mutations were found in neither of the polyadenosine tracts in 63 samples of MSI-L or MSI stable tumors. Pro704 LOH detection in 4 cases with frameshift mutations did not find LOH in these cases.CONCLUSION: Frameshift mutations of RIZ may play an important role in gastric cancers with MSI.

  12. Molecular inventory control in ribosome biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, J R; Johnson, S P

    1986-11-01

    The eukaryotic cell coordinates the accumulation of each ribosomal protein with every other ribosomal protein, with ribosomal RNA and with the needs of the cell. To do so it regulates the transcription, processing, translation and lifetime of the mRNA for ribosomal proteins. When all else fails, it rapidly degrades any excess ribosomal protein which is synthesized.

  13. Dynamic motions of the HIV-1 frameshift site RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouzakis, Kathryn D; Dethoff, Elizabeth A; Tonelli, Marco; Al-Hashimi, Hashim; Butcher, Samuel E

    2015-02-03

    The HIV-1 frameshift site (FS) plays a critical role in viral replication. During translation, the HIV-1 FS transitions from a 3-helix to a 2-helix junction RNA secondary structure. The 2-helix junction structure contains a GGA bulge, and purine-rich bulges are common motifs in RNA secondary structure. Here, we investigate the dynamics of the HIV-1 FS 2-helix junction RNA. Interhelical motions were studied under different ionic conditions using NMR order tensor analysis of residual dipolar couplings. In 150 mM potassium, the RNA adopts a 43°(±4°) interhelical bend angle (β) and displays large amplitude, anisotropic interhelical motions characterized by a 0.52(±0.04) internal generalized degree of order (GDOint) and distinct order tensor asymmetries for its two helices (η = 0.26(±0.04) and 0.5(±0.1)). These motions are effectively quenched by addition of 2 mM magnesium (GDOint = 0.87(±0.06)), which promotes a near-coaxial conformation (β = 15°(±6°)) of the two helices. Base stacking in the bulge was investigated using the fluorescent purine analog 2-aminopurine. These results indicate that magnesium stabilizes extrahelical conformations of the bulge nucleotides, thereby promoting coaxial stacking of helices. These results are highly similar to previous studies of the HIV transactivation response RNA, despite a complete lack of sequence similarity between the two RNAs. Thus, the conformational space of these RNAs is largely determined by the topology of their interhelical junctions.

  14. Molecular signatures of ribosomal evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Elijah; Sethi, Anurag; Montoya, Jonathan; Woese, Carl R; Luthey-Schulten, Zaida

    2008-09-16

    Ribosomal signatures, idiosyncrasies in the ribosomal RNA (rRNA) and/or proteins, are characteristic of the individual domains of life. As such, insight into the early evolution of the domains can be gained from a comparative analysis of their respective signatures in the translational apparatus. In this work, we identify signatures in both the sequence and structure of the rRNA and analyze their contributions to the universal phylogenetic tree using both sequence- and structure-based methods. Domain-specific ribosomal proteins can be considered signatures in their own right. Although it is commonly assumed that they developed after the universal ribosomal proteins, we present evidence that at least one may have been present before the divergence of the organismal lineages. We find correlations between the rRNA signatures and signatures in the ribosomal proteins showing that the rRNA signatures coevolved with both domain-specific and universal ribosomal proteins. Finally, we show that the genomic organization of the universal ribosomal components contains these signatures as well. From these studies, we propose the ribosomal signatures are remnants of an evolutionary-phase transition that occurred as the cell lineages began to coalesce and so should be reflected in corresponding signatures throughout the fabric of the cell and its genome.

  15. Four-base codons ACCA, ACCU and ACCC are recognized by frameshift suppressor sufJ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bossi, L; Roth, J R

    1981-08-01

    The frameshift suppressor sufJ acts to correct a set of +1 frameshift mutations having very different sequences at their mutant sites. This suppressor acts by reading a 4 base codon located near, but not at, the site of each suppressible mutation. Suppression thus necessitates out-of-phase translation of the short stretch of mRNA between the site of action of the suppressor tRNA and the site of the frameshift mutation. We have identified the site read by sufJ by mutationally creating a series of such sites in the neighborhood of a previously nonsuppressible frameshift mutation. Each of the newly generated sites was formed by base substitution. Four independently generated sites were analyzed by DNA sequencing. At each site the quadruplet codon ACCX was generated (where X is A, U or C). Thus sufJ is able to read a 4 base codon in which any of three bases is acceptable in the fourth position. This is the first frameshift suppressor that does not read a run of three repeated bases in the first three positions of its codon.

  16. Structural features of the tmRNA-ribosome interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugaeva, Elizaveta Y; Surkov, Serhiy; Golovin, Andrey V; Ofverstedt, Lars-Göran; Skoglund, Ulf; Isaksson, Leif A; Bogdanov, Alexey A; Shpanchenko, Olga V; Dontsova, Olga A

    2009-12-01

    Trans-translation is a process which switches the synthesis of a polypeptide chain encoded by a nonstop messenger RNA to the mRNA-like domain of a transfer-messenger RNA (tmRNA). It is used in bacterial cells for rescuing the ribosomes arrested during translation of damaged mRNA and directing this mRNA and the product polypeptide for degradation. The molecular basis of this process is not well understood. Earlier, we developed an approach that allowed isolation of tmRNA-ribosomal complexes arrested at a desired step of tmRNA passage through the ribosome. We have here exploited it to examine the tmRNA structure using chemical probing and cryo-electron microscopy tomography. Computer modeling has been used to develop a model for spatial organization of the tmRNA inside the ribosome at different stages of trans-translation.

  17. Structural features of the tmRNA–ribosome interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugaeva, Elizaveta Y.; Surkov, Serhiy; Golovin, Andrey V.; Öfverstedt, Lars-Göran; Skoglund, Ulf; Isaksson, Leif A.; Bogdanov, Alexey A.; Shpanchenko, Olga V.; Dontsova, Olga A.

    2009-01-01

    Trans-translation is a process which switches the synthesis of a polypeptide chain encoded by a nonstop messenger RNA to the mRNA-like domain of a transfer-messenger RNA (tmRNA). It is used in bacterial cells for rescuing the ribosomes arrested during translation of damaged mRNA and directing this mRNA and the product polypeptide for degradation. The molecular basis of this process is not well understood. Earlier, we developed an approach that allowed isolation of tmRNA–ribosomal complexes arrested at a desired step of tmRNA passage through the ribosome. We have here exploited it to examine the tmRNA structure using chemical probing and cryo-electron microscopy tomography. Computer modeling has been used to develop a model for spatial organization of the tmRNA inside the ribosome at different stages of trans-translation. PMID:19861420

  18. Both microsatellite length and sequence context determine frameshift mutation rates in defective DNA mismatch repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Heekyung; Lopez, Claudia G; Holmstrom, Joy; Young, Dennis J; Lai, Jenny F; Ream-Robinson, Deena; Carethers, John M

    2010-07-01

    It is generally accepted that longer microsatellites mutate more frequently in defective DNA mismatch repair (MMR) than shorter microsatellites. Indeed, we have previously observed that the A10 microsatellite of transforming growth factor beta type II receptor (TGFBR2) frameshifts -1 bp at a faster rate than the A8 microsatellite of activin type II receptor (ACVR2), although both genes become frameshift-mutated in >80% of MMR-defective colorectal cancers. To experimentally determine the effect of microsatellite length upon frameshift mutation in gene-specific sequence contexts, we altered the microsatellite length within TGFBR2 exon 3 and ACVR2 exon 10, generating A7, A10 and A13 constructs. These constructs were cloned 1 bp out of frame of EGFP, allowing a -1 bp frameshift to drive EGFP expression, and stably transfected into MMR-deficient cells. Subsequent non-fluorescent cells were sorted, cultured for 7-35 days and harvested for EGFP analysis and DNA sequencing. Longer microsatellites within TGFBR2 and ACVR2 showed significantly higher mutation rates than shorter ones, with TGFBR2 A13, A10 and A7 frameshifts measured at 22.38x10(-4), 2.17x10(-4) and 0.13x10(-4), respectively. Surprisingly, shorter ACVR2 constructs showed three times higher mutation rates at A7 and A10 lengths than identical length TGFBR2 constructs but comparably lower at the A13 length, suggesting influences from both microsatellite length as well as the sequence context. Furthermore, the TGFBR2 A13 construct mutated into 33% A11 sequences (-2 bp) in addition to expected A12 (-1 bp), indicating that this construct undergoes continual subsequent frameshift mutation. These data demonstrate experimentally that both the length of a mononucleotide microsatellite and its sequence context influence mutation rate in defective DNA MMR.

  19. Structural Dynamics of the Ribosome

    OpenAIRE

    Korostelev, Andrei; Ermolenko, Dmitri N.; Noller, Harry F.

    2008-01-01

    Protein synthesis is inherently a dynamic process, requiring both small- and large-scale movements of tRNA and mRNA. It has long been suspected that these movements might be coupled to conformational changes in the ribosome, and in its RNA moieties in particular. Recently, the nature of ribosome structural dynamics has begun to emerge from a combination of approaches, most notably cryo-EM, X-ray crystallography and FRET. Ribosome movement occurs both on a grand scale, as in the intersubunit r...

  20. Functional analysis of a frame-shift mutant of the dihydropyridine receptor pore subunit (α1S expressing two complementary protein fragments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mortenson Lindsay

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The L-type Ca2+ channel formed by the dihydropyridine receptor (DHPR of skeletal muscle senses the membrane voltage and opens the ryanodine receptor (RyR1. This channel-to-channel coupling is essential for Ca2+ signaling but poorly understood. We characterized a single-base frame-shift mutant of α1S, the pore subunit of the DHPR, that has the unusual ability to function voltage sensor for excitation-contraction (EC coupling by virtue of expressing two complementary hemi-Ca2+ channel fragments. Results Functional analysis of cDNA transfected dysgenic myotubes lacking α1S were carried out using voltage-clamp, confocal Ca2+ indicator fluoresence, epitope immunofluorescence and immunoblots of expressed proteins. The frame-shift mutant (fs-α1S expressed the N-terminal half of α1S (M1 to L670 and the C-terminal half starting at M701 separately. The C-terminal fragment was generated by an unexpected restart of translation of the fs-α1S message at M701 and was eliminated by a M701I mutation. Protein-protein complementation between the two fragments produced recovery of skeletal-type EC coupling but not L-type Ca2+ current. Discussion A premature stop codon in the II-III loop may not necessarily cause a loss of DHPR function due to a restart of translation within the II-III loop, presumably by a mechanism involving leaky ribosomal scanning. In these cases, function is recovered by expression of complementary protein fragments from the same cDNA. DHPR-RyR1 interactions can be achieved via protein-protein complementation between hemi-Ca2+ channel proteins, hence an intact II-III loop is not essential for coupling the DHPR voltage sensor to the opening of RyR1 channel.

  1. The RDP (Ribosomal Database Project).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maidak, B L; Olsen, G J; Larsen, N; Overbeek, R; McCaughey, M J; Woese, C R

    1997-01-01

    The Ribosomal Database Project (RDP) is a curated database that offers ribosome-related data, analysis services and associated computer programs. The offerings include phylogenetically ordered alignments of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) sequences, derived phylogenetic trees, rRNA secondary structure diagrams, and various software for handling, analyzing and displaying alignments and trees. The data are available via anonymous FTP (rdp.life.uiuc.edu), electronic mail (server@rdp.life.uiuc.edu), gopher (rdpgopher.life.uiuc.edu) and WWW (http://rdpwww.life.uiuc.edu/ ). The electronic mail and WWW servers provide ribosomal probe checking, approximate phylogenetic placement of user-submitted sequences, screening for possible chimeric rRNA sequences, automated alignment, and a suggested placement of an unknown sequence on an existing phylogenetic tree.

  2. The Ribosomal Database Project (RDP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maidak, B L; Olsen, G J; Larsen, N; Overbeek, R; McCaughey, M J; Woese, C R

    1996-01-01

    The Ribosomal Database Project (RDP) is a curated database that offers ribosome-related data, analysis services and associated computer programs. The offerings include phylogenetically ordered alignments of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) sequences, derived phylogenetic trees, rRNA secondary structure diagrams and various software for handling, analyzing and displaying alignments and trees. The data are available via anonymous ftp (rdp.life.uiuc.edu), electronic mail (server@rdp.life.uiuc.edu), gopher (rdpgopher.life.uiuc.edu) and World Wide Web (WWW)(http://rdpwww.life.uiuc.edu/). The electronic mail and WWW servers provide ribosomal probe checking, screening for possible chimeric rRNA sequences, automated alignment and approximate phylogenetic placement of user-submitted sequences on an existing phylogenetic tree.

  3. Serum antibodies against frameshift peptides in microsatellite unstable colorectal cancer patients with Lynch syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuschenbach, Miriam; Kloor, Matthias; Morak, Monika; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Germann, Anja; Garbe, Yvette; Tariverdian, Mirjam; Findeisen, Peter; Neumaier, Michael; Holinski-Feder, Elke; von Knebel Doeberitz, Magnus

    2010-06-01

    High level microsatellite instability (MSI-H) occurs in about 15% of colorectal cancer (CRCs), either as sporadic cancers or in the context of hereditary non-polyposis cancer or Lynch syndrome. In MSI-H CRC, mismatch repair deficiency leads to insertion/deletion mutations at coding microsatellites and thus to the translation of frameshift peptides (FSPs). FSPs are potent inductors of T cell responses in vitro and in vivo. The present study aims at the identification of FSP-specific humoral immune responses in MSI-H CRC and Lynch syndrome. Sera from patients with history of MSI-H CRC (n = 69), healthy Lynch syndrome mutation carriers (n = 31) and healthy controls (n = 52) were analyzed for antibodies against FSPs using peptide ELISA. Reactivities were measured against FSPs derived from genes frequently mutated in MSI-H CRCs, AIM2, TGFBR2, CASP5, TAF1B, ZNF294, and MARCKS. Antibody reactivity against FSPs was significantly higher in MSI-H CRC patients than in healthy controls (P = 0.036, Mann-Whitney) and highest in patients with shortest interval between tumor resection and serum sampling. Humoral immune responses in patients were most frequently directed against FSPs derived from mutated TAF1B (11.6%, 8/69) and TGFBR2 (10.1%, 7/69). Low level FSP-specific antibodies were also detected in healthy mutation carriers. Our results show that antibody responses against FSPs are detectable in MSI-H CRC patients and healthy Lynch syndrome mutation carriers. Based on the high number of defined FSP antigens, measuring FSP-specific humoral immune responses is a highly promising tool for future diagnostic application in MSI-H cancer patients.

  4. Novel MLH1 frameshift mutation in an extended hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer family

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tanya Kirilova Kadiyska; Nadja Bogdanova; Ivo Marinov Kremensky; Radka Petrova Kaneva; Dimitar Georgiev Nedin; Alexandrina Borisova Alexandrova; Antonina Todorova Gegova; Stoyan Ganchev Lalchev; Tatyana Christova; Vanio Ivanov Mitev; Juergen Horst

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To present novel frameshift mutation c.31delC [p.L11X] in the MLH1 gene identified in an extended Bulgarian hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) family and to analyze the molecular and clinical findings within the pedigree concerning the proposal of adequate individual prophylactic strategy for all mutation carriers.METHODS: The pedigree of the family consists of 42 members in four generations. Search for mutations in the MLH1 and hMSH2 genes was performed in the proband. After PCR amplification of all exons including flanking intronic regions, amplicons were directly sequenced.RESULTS: The mutation was found in nine from the thirteen pedigree members who signed informed consent to participate in the study. In three adenocarcinomas,microsatellite instability and lack of the MLH1 protein expression were detected. The only one tubulovillous adenoma analyzed was microsatellite stable and the MLH1 protein showed an intact staining.CONCLUSION: The newly described mutation c.31delC is HNPCC causative. Besides the typical clinical features of the syndrome, we found a specific pathologic manifestation such as moderate to high differentiated adenocarcinomas of the colon. One of the mutation carriers developed a benign giant cell soft tissue tumor. The primary tumor localizations were frequently extracolonic and detailed yearly gastrointestinal and gynecological examinations have been proposed to the mutation carriers.We emphasize the importance of including the HNPCC genetic counseling and testing as well in the following surveillance of all patients at risk in the services covered by the health insurance in Bulgaria.

  5. Ribosome dynamics and the evolutionary history of ribosomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, George E.; Paci, Maxim; Tran, Quyen; Petrov, Anton S.; Williams, Loren D.

    2015-09-01

    The ribosome is a dynamic nanomachine responsible for coded protein synthesis. Its major subsystems were essentially in place at the time of the last universal common ancestor (LUCA). Ribosome evolutionary history thus potentially provides a window into the pre- LUCA world. This history begins with the origins of the peptidyl transferase center where the actual peptide is synthesized and then continues over an extended timeframe as additional functional centers including the GTPase center are added. The large ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs) have grown over time by an accretion process and a model exists that proposes a relative age of each accreted element. We have compared atomic resolution ribosome structures before and after EF-G bound GTP hydrolysis and thereby identified the location of 23 pivot points in the large rRNAs that facilitate ribosome dynamics. Pivots in small subunit helices h28 and h44 appear to be especially central to the process and according to the accretion model significantly older than the other helices containing pivots. Overall, the results suggest that ribosomal dynamics occurred in two phases. In the first phase, an inherently mobile h28/h44 combination provided the flexibility needed to create a dynamic ribosome that was essentially a Brownian machine. This addition likely made coded peptide synthesis possible by facilitating movement of a primitive mRNA. During the second phase, addition of pivoting elements and the creation of a factor binding site allowed the regulation of the inherent motion created by h28/h44. All of these events likely occurred before LUCA.

  6. Annexin A2 binds RNA and reduces the frameshifting efficiency of infectious bronchitis virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoyun Kwak

    Full Text Available Annexin A2 (ANXA2 is a protein implicated in diverse cellular functions, including exocytosis, DNA synthesis and cell proliferation. It was recently proposed to be involved in RNA metabolism because it was shown to associate with some cellular mRNA. Here, we identified ANXA2 as a RNA binding protein (RBP that binds IBV (Infectious Bronchitis Virus pseudoknot RNA. We first confirmed the binding of ANXA2 to IBV pseudoknot RNA by ultraviolet crosslinking and showed its binding to RNA pseudoknot with ANXA2 protein in vitro and in the cells. Since the RNA pseudoknot located in the frameshifting region of IBV was used as bait for cellular RBPs, we tested whether ANXA2 could regulate the frameshfting of IBV pseudoknot RNA by dual luciferase assay. Overexpression of ANXA2 significantly reduced the frameshifting efficiency from IBV pseudoknot RNA and knockdown of the protein strikingly increased the frameshifting efficiency. The results suggest that ANXA2 is a cellular RBP that can modulate the frameshifting efficiency of viral RNA, enabling it to act as an anti-viral cellular protein, and hinting at roles in RNA metabolism for other cellular mRNAs.

  7. A frame-shift mutation of PMS2 is a widespread cause of Lynch syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clendenning, Mark; Senter, Leigha; Hampel, Heather;

    2008-01-01

    on immunohistochemical analysis. RESULTS: We have identified a frequently occurring frame-shift mutation (c.736_741del6ins11) in 12 ostensibly unrelated Lynch syndrome patients (20% of patients we have identified with a deleterious mutation in PMS2, n=61). These individuals all display the rare allele (population...

  8. Sensorineural hearing impairment in patients with Pmp22 duplication, deletion, and frameshift mutations.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhagen, W.I.M.; Huygen, P.L.M.; Gabreëls-Festen, A.A.W.M.; Engelhart, M.J.; Mierlo, P.J. van; Engelen, B.G.M. van

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To characterize and distinguish the types of sensorineural hearing impairment (SNHI) that occur in hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy Type 1a (HMSN-1a) and hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP), which are caused by deletion or frameshift mutation. STUDY DESI

  9. Neuron-Like Networks Between Ribosomal Proteins Within the Ribosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poirot, Olivier; Timsit, Youri

    2016-05-26

    From brain to the World Wide Web, information-processing networks share common scale invariant properties. Here, we reveal the existence of neural-like networks at a molecular scale within the ribosome. We show that with their extensions, ribosomal proteins form complex assortative interaction networks through which they communicate through tiny interfaces. The analysis of the crystal structures of 50S eubacterial particles reveals that most of these interfaces involve key phylogenetically conserved residues. The systematic observation of interactions between basic and aromatic amino acids at the interfaces and along the extension provides new structural insights that may contribute to decipher the molecular mechanisms of signal transmission within or between the ribosomal proteins. Similar to neurons interacting through "molecular synapses", ribosomal proteins form a network that suggest an analogy with a simple molecular brain in which the "sensory-proteins" innervate the functional ribosomal sites, while the "inter-proteins" interconnect them into circuits suitable to process the information flow that circulates during protein synthesis. It is likely that these circuits have evolved to coordinate both the complex macromolecular motions and the binding of the multiple factors during translation. This opens new perspectives on nanoscale information transfer and processing.

  10. Neuron-Like Networks Between Ribosomal Proteins Within the Ribosome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poirot, Olivier; Timsit, Youri

    2016-05-01

    From brain to the World Wide Web, information-processing networks share common scale invariant properties. Here, we reveal the existence of neural-like networks at a molecular scale within the ribosome. We show that with their extensions, ribosomal proteins form complex assortative interaction networks through which they communicate through tiny interfaces. The analysis of the crystal structures of 50S eubacterial particles reveals that most of these interfaces involve key phylogenetically conserved residues. The systematic observation of interactions between basic and aromatic amino acids at the interfaces and along the extension provides new structural insights that may contribute to decipher the molecular mechanisms of signal transmission within or between the ribosomal proteins. Similar to neurons interacting through “molecular synapses”, ribosomal proteins form a network that suggest an analogy with a simple molecular brain in which the “sensory-proteins” innervate the functional ribosomal sites, while the “inter-proteins” interconnect them into circuits suitable to process the information flow that circulates during protein synthesis. It is likely that these circuits have evolved to coordinate both the complex macromolecular motions and the binding of the multiple factors during translation. This opens new perspectives on nanoscale information transfer and processing.

  11. High-Resolution Analysis of Coronavirus Gene Expression by RNA Sequencing and Ribosome Profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irigoyen, Nerea; Firth, Andrew E; Jones, Joshua D; Chung, Betty Y-W; Siddell, Stuart G; Brierley, Ian

    2016-02-01

    frameshift site. To our knowledge this is the first application of ribosome profiling to an RNA virus.

  12. High-Resolution Analysis of Coronavirus Gene Expression by RNA Sequencing and Ribosome Profiling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nerea Irigoyen

    2016-02-01

    ribosomal frameshift site. To our knowledge this is the first application of ribosome profiling to an RNA virus.

  13. Fluorescent T7 display phages obtained by translational frameshift

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slootweg, E.J.; Keller, H.J.H.G.; Hink, M.A.; Borst, J.W.; Bakker, J.; Schots, A.

    2006-01-01

    Lytic phages form a powerful platform for the display of large cDNA libraries and offer the possibility to screen for interactions with almost any substrate. To visualize these interactions directly by fluorescence microscopy, we constructed fluorescent T7 phages by exploiting the flexibility of pha

  14. RNA polymerase and the ribosome: the close relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGary, Katelyn; Nudler, Evgeny

    2013-04-01

    In bacteria transcription and translation are linked in time and space. When coupled to RNA polymerase (RNAP), the translating ribosome ensures transcriptional processivity by preventing RNAP backtracking. Recent advances in the field have characterized important linker proteins that bridge the gap between transcription and translation: In particular, the NusE(S10):NusG complex and the NusG homolog, RfaH. The direct link between the moving ribosome and RNAP provides a basis for maintaining genomic integrity while enabling efficient transcription and timely translation of various genes within the bacterial cell. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Direct crosslinking of the antitumor antibiotic sparsomycin, and its derivatives, to A2602 in the peptidyl transferase center of 23S-like rRNA within ribosome-tRNA complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Porse, B T; Kirillov, S V; Awayez, M J

    1999-01-01

    of action was investigated by inducing a crosslink between sparsomycin and bacterial, archaeal, and eukaryotic ribosomes complexed with P-site-bound tRNA, on irradiating with low energy ultraviolet light (at 365 nm). The crosslink was localized exclusively to the universally conserved nucleotide A2602...... within the peptidyl transferase loop region of 23S-like rRNA by using a combination of a primer extension approach, RNase H fragment analysis, and crosslinking with radioactive [(125)I]phenol-alanine-sparsomycin. Crosslinking of several sparsomycin derivatives, modified near the sulfoxy group, implicated...

  16. Rab-GDI complex dissociation factor expressed through translational frameshifting in filamentous ascomycetes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabienne Malagnac

    Full Text Available In the model fungus Podospora anserina, the PaYIP3 gene encoding the orthologue of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae YIP3 Rab-GDI complex dissociation factor expresses two polypeptides, one of which, the long form, is produced through a programmed translation frameshift. Inactivation of PaYIP3 results in slightly delayed growth associated with modification in repartition of fruiting body on the thallus, along with reduced ascospore production on wood. Long and short forms of PaYIP3 are expressed in the mycelium, while only the short form appears expressed in the maturing fruiting body (perithecium. The frameshift has been conserved over the evolution of the Pezizomycotina, lasting for over 400 million years, suggesting that it has an important role in the wild.

  17. Rab-GDI complex dissociation factor expressed through translational frameshifting in filamentous ascomycetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malagnac, Fabienne; Fabret, Céline; Prigent, Magali; Rousset, Jean-Pierre; Namy, Olivier; Silar, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    In the model fungus Podospora anserina, the PaYIP3 gene encoding the orthologue of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae YIP3 Rab-GDI complex dissociation factor expresses two polypeptides, one of which, the long form, is produced through a programmed translation frameshift. Inactivation of PaYIP3 results in slightly delayed growth associated with modification in repartition of fruiting body on the thallus, along with reduced ascospore production on wood. Long and short forms of PaYIP3 are expressed in the mycelium, while only the short form appears expressed in the maturing fruiting body (perithecium). The frameshift has been conserved over the evolution of the Pezizomycotina, lasting for over 400 million years, suggesting that it has an important role in the wild.

  18. A novel frameshift mutation of CHD7 in a Japanese patient with CHARGE syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohmoto, Tomohiro; Shono, Miki; Naruto, Takuya; Watanabe, Miki; Suga, Ken-Ichi; Nakagawa, Ryuji; Kagami, Shoji; Masuda, Kiyoshi; Imoto, Issei

    2016-01-01

    CHARGE syndrome is a rare autosomal dominant developmental disorder involving multiple organs. CHD7 is a major causative gene of CHARGE syndrome. We performed targeted-exome sequencing using a next-generation sequencer for molecular diagnosis of a 4-month-old male patient who was clinically suspected to have CHARGE syndrome, and report a novel monoallelic mutation in CHD7, NM_017780.3(CHD7_v001):c.2966del causing a reading frameshift [p.(Cys989Serfs*3)].

  19. Interaction of tRNA with Eukaryotic Ribosome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitri Graifer

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper is a review of currently available data concerning interactions of tRNAs with the eukaryotic ribosome at various stages of translation. These data include the results obtained by means of cryo-electron microscopy and X-ray crystallography applied to various model ribosomal complexes, site-directed cross-linking with the use of tRNA derivatives bearing chemically or photochemically reactive groups in the CCA-terminal fragment and chemical probing of 28S rRNA in the region of the peptidyl transferase center. Similarities and differences in the interactions of tRNAs with prokaryotic and eukaryotic ribosomes are discussed with concomitant consideration of the extent of resemblance between molecular mechanisms of translation in eukaryotes and bacteria.

  20. Thermodynamic stability and statistical significance of potential stem-loop structures situated at the frameshift sites of retroviruses.

    OpenAIRE

    Le, S.Y.; Chen, J H; Maizel, J. V.

    1989-01-01

    RNA stem-loop structures situated just 3' to the frameshift sites of the retroviral gag-pol or gag-pro and pro-pol regions may make important contributions to frame-shifting in retroviruses. In this study, the thermodynamic stability and statistical significance of such secondary structural features relative to others in the sequence have been assessed using a newly developed method that combines calculations of the lowest free energy of formation of RNA secondary structures and the Monte Car...

  1. Depletion of Cognate Charged Transfer RNA Causes Translational Frameshifting within the Expanded CAG Stretch in Huntingtin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannah Girstmair

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Huntington disease (HD, a dominantly inherited neurodegenerative disorder caused by the expansion of a CAG-encoded polyglutamine (polyQ repeat in huntingtin (Htt, displays a highly heterogeneous etiopathology and disease onset. Here, we show that the translation of expanded CAG repeats in mutant Htt exon 1 leads to a depletion of charged glutaminyl-transfer RNA (tRNAGln-CUG that pairs exclusively to the CAG codon. This results in translational frameshifting and the generation of various transframe-encoded species that differently modulate the conformational switch to nucleate fibrillization of the parental polyQ protein. Intriguingly, the frameshifting frequency varies strongly among different cell lines and is higher in cells with intrinsically lower concentrations of tRNAGln-CUG. The concentration of tRNAGln-CUG also differs among different brain areas in the mouse. We propose that translational frameshifting may act as a significant disease modifier that contributes to the cell-selective neurotoxicity and disease course heterogeneity of HD on both cellular and individual levels.

  2. Depletion of cognate charged transfer RNA causes translational frameshifting within the expanded CAG stretch in huntingtin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girstmair, Hannah; Saffert, Paul; Rode, Sascha; Czech, Andreas; Holland, Gudrun; Bannert, Norbert; Ignatova, Zoya

    2013-01-31

    Huntington disease (HD), a dominantly inherited neurodegenerative disorder caused by the expansion of a CAG-encoded polyglutamine (polyQ) repeat in huntingtin (Htt), displays a highly heterogeneous etiopathology and disease onset. Here, we show that the translation of expanded CAG repeats in mutant Htt exon 1 leads to a depletion of charged glutaminyl-transfer RNA (tRNA)(Gln-CUG) that pairs exclusively to the CAG codon. This results in translational frameshifting and the generation of various transframe-encoded species that differently modulate the conformational switch to nucleate fibrillization of the parental polyQ protein. Intriguingly, the frameshifting frequency varies strongly among different cell lines and is higher in cells with intrinsically lower concentrations of tRNA(Gln-CUG). The concentration of tRNA(Gln-CUG) also differs among different brain areas in the mouse. We propose that translational frameshifting may act as a significant disease modifier that contributes to the cell-selective neurotoxicity and disease course heterogeneity of HD on both cellular and individual levels.

  3. HMM-FRAME: accurate protein domain classification for metagenomic sequences containing frameshift errors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun Yanni

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein domain classification is an important step in metagenomic annotation. The state-of-the-art method for protein domain classification is profile HMM-based alignment. However, the relatively high rates of insertions and deletions in homopolymer regions of pyrosequencing reads create frameshifts, causing conventional profile HMM alignment tools to generate alignments with marginal scores. This makes error-containing gene fragments unclassifiable with conventional tools. Thus, there is a need for an accurate domain classification tool that can detect and correct sequencing errors. Results We introduce HMM-FRAME, a protein domain classification tool based on an augmented Viterbi algorithm that can incorporate error models from different sequencing platforms. HMM-FRAME corrects sequencing errors and classifies putative gene fragments into domain families. It achieved high error detection sensitivity and specificity in a data set with annotated errors. We applied HMM-FRAME in Targeted Metagenomics and a published metagenomic data set. The results showed that our tool can correct frameshifts in error-containing sequences, generate much longer alignments with significantly smaller E-values, and classify more sequences into their native families. Conclusions HMM-FRAME provides a complementary protein domain classification tool to conventional profile HMM-based methods for data sets containing frameshifts. Its current implementation is best used for small-scale metagenomic data sets. The source code of HMM-FRAME can be downloaded at http://www.cse.msu.edu/~zhangy72/hmmframe/ and at https://sourceforge.net/projects/hmm-frame/.

  4. Eight new mtDNA sequences of glass sponges reveal an extensive usage of +1 frameshifting in mitochondrial translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haen, Karri M; Pett, Walker; Lavrov, Dennis V

    2014-02-10

    Three previously studied mitochondrial genomes of glass sponges (phylum Porifera, class Hexactinellida) contained single nucleotide insertions in protein coding genes inferred as sites of +1 translational frameshifting. To investigate the distribution and evolution of these sites and to help elucidate the mechanism of frameshifting, we determined eight new complete or nearly complete mtDNA sequences from glass sponges and examined individual mitochondrial genes from three others. We found nine new instances of single nucleotide insertions in these sequences and analyzed them both comparatively and phylogenetically. The base insertions appear to have been gained and lost repeatedly in hexactinellid mt protein genes, suggesting no functional significance for the frameshifting sites. A high degree of sequence conservation, the presence of unusual tRNAs, and a distinct pattern of codon usage suggest the "out-of-frame pairing" model of translational frameshifting. Additionally, we provide evidence that relaxed selection pressure on glass sponge mtDNA - possibly a result of their low growth rates and deep-water lifestyle - has allowed frameshift insertions to be tolerated for hundreds of millions of years. Our study provides the first example of a phylogenetically diverse and extensive usage of translational frameshifting in animal mitochondrial coding sequences.

  5. Frameshift mutations in the insulin gene leading to prolonged molecule of insulin in two families with Maturity-Onset Diabetes of the Young.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dusatkova, Lenka; Dusatkova, Petra; Vosahlo, Jan; Vesela, Klara; Cinek, Ondrej; Lebl, Jan; Pruhova, Stepanka

    2015-04-01

    Mutations in the insulin (INS) gene rarely occur in patients with Maturity-Onset Diabetes of the Young (MODY). We aimed to describe in detail two MODY families with INS mutations. The INS gene was screened by direct sequencing. The probands and their affected relatives underwent a mixed-meal test. Mutation predictions were modeled using I-TASSER and were visualized by Swiss-PdbViewer. A novel heterozygous frameshift mutation p.Gln78fs in the INS gene was found in three generations of patients with clinically distinct diabetes. The single nucleotide deletion (c.233delA) is predicted to change and prolong amino acid sequence, resulting in aberrant proinsulin without native structures of C-peptide and A-chain. In the second family, the heterozygous mutation c.188-31G>A within the terminal intron was detected. The mother and her daughter were misdiagnosed as having type 1 diabetes since the ages of 6 and 2 years, respectively. This result is in contrast to the previously described carrier of the same mutation who was diagnosed with permanent neonatal diabetes. We identified a novel coding frameshift mutation and an intronic mutation in the INS gene leading to childhood-onset diabetes. INS mutations may result in various phenotypes, suggesting that additional mechanisms may be involved in the pathogenesis and clinical manifestation of diabetes.

  6. GTPases involved in bacterial ribosome maturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Simon; Muto, Akira; Himeno, Hyouta

    2013-05-01

    The ribosome is an RNA- and protein-based macromolecule having multiple functional domains to facilitate protein synthesis, and it is synthesized through multiple steps including transcription, stepwise cleavages of the primary transcript, modifications of ribosomal proteins and RNAs and assemblies of ribosomal proteins with rRNAs. This process requires dozens of trans-acting factors including GTP- and ATP-binding proteins to overcome several energy-consuming steps. Despite accumulation of genetic, biochemical and structural data, the entire process of bacterial ribosome synthesis remains elusive. Here, we review GTPases involved in bacterial ribosome maturation.

  7. 5S rRNA and ribosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gongadze, G M

    2011-12-01

    5S rRNA is an integral component of the ribosome of all living organisms. It is known that the ribosome without 5S rRNA is functionally inactive. However, the question about the specific role of this RNA in functioning of the translation apparatus is still open. This review presents a brief history of the discovery of 5S rRNA and studies of its origin and localization in the ribosome. The previously expressed hypotheses about the role of this RNA in the functioning of the ribosome are discussed considering the unique location of 5S rRNA in the ribosome and its intermolecular contacts. Based on analysis of the current data on ribosome structure and its functional complexes, the role of 5S rRNA as an intermediary between ribosome functional domains is discussed.

  8. Crystal structure of the eukaryotic ribosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Shem, Adam; Jenner, Lasse; Yusupova, Gulnara; Yusupov, Marat

    2010-11-26

    Crystal structures of prokaryotic ribosomes have described in detail the universally conserved core of the translation mechanism. However, many facets of the translation process in eukaryotes are not shared with prokaryotes. The crystal structure of the yeast 80S ribosome determined at 4.15 angstrom resolution reveals the higher complexity of eukaryotic ribosomes, which are 40% larger than their bacterial counterparts. Our model shows how eukaryote-specific elements considerably expand the network of interactions within the ribosome and provides insights into eukaryote-specific features of protein synthesis. Our crystals capture the ribosome in the ratcheted state, which is essential for translocation of mRNA and transfer RNA (tRNA), and in which the small ribosomal subunit has rotated with respect to the large subunit. We describe the conformational changes in both ribosomal subunits that are involved in ratcheting and their implications in coordination between the two associated subunits and in mRNA and tRNA translocation.

  9. Ribosomal targets for antibiotic drug discovery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanchard, Scott C.; Feldman, Michael Brian; Wang, Leyi; Doudna Cate, James H.; Pulk, Arto; Altman, Roger B.; Wasserman, Michael R

    2016-09-13

    The present invention relates to methods to identify molecules that binds in the neomycin binding pocket of a bacterial ribosome using structures of an intact bacterial ribosome that reveal how the ribosome binds tRNA in two functionally distinct states, determined by x-ray crystallography. One state positions tRNA in the peptidyl-tRNA binding site. The second, a fully rotated state, is stabilized by ribosome recycling factor (RRF) and binds tRNA in a highly bent conformation in a hybrid peptidyl/exit (P/E) site. Additionally, the invention relates to various assays, including single-molecule assay for ribosome recycling, and methods to identify compounds that interfere with ribosomal function by detecting newly identified intermediate FRET states using known and novel FRET pairs on the ribosome. The invention also provides vectors and compositions with an N-terminally tagged S13 protein.

  10. Novel dentin phosphoprotein frameshift mutations in dentinogenesis imperfecta type II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, K-E; Kang, H-Y; Lee, S-K; Yoo, S-H; Lee, J-C; Hwang, Y-H; Nam, K H; Kim, J-S; Park, J-C; Kim, J-W

    2011-04-01

    The dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP) gene encodes the most abundant non-collagenous protein in tooth dentin and DSPP protein is cleaved into several segments including the highly phosphorylated dentin phosphoprotein (DPP). Mutations in the DSPP gene have been solely related to non-syndromic form of hereditary dentin defects. We recruited three Korean families with dentinogenesis imperfecta (DGI) type II and sequenced the exons and exon-intron boundaries of the DSPP gene based on the candidate gene approach. Direct sequencing of PCR products and allele-specific cloning of the highly repetitive exon 5 revealed novel single base pair (bp) deletional mutations (c.2688delT and c.3560delG) introducing hydrophobic amino acids in the hydrophilic repeat domain of the DPP coding region. All affected members of the three families showed exceptionally rapid pulp chambers obliteration, even before tooth eruption. Individuals with the c.3560delG mutation showed only mild, yellowish tooth discoloration, in contrast to the affected individuals from two families with c.2688delT mutation. We believe that these results will help us to understand the molecular pathogenesis of DGI type II as well as the normal process of dentin biomineralization.

  11. Protein-protein interactions within late pre-40S ribosomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melody G Campbell

    Full Text Available Ribosome assembly in eukaryotic organisms requires more than 200 assembly factors to facilitate and coordinate rRNA transcription, processing, and folding with the binding of the ribosomal proteins. Many of these assembly factors bind and dissociate at defined times giving rise to discrete assembly intermediates, some of which have been partially characterized with regards to their protein and RNA composition. Here, we have analyzed the protein-protein interactions between the seven assembly factors bound to late cytoplasmic pre-40S ribosomes using recombinant proteins in binding assays. Our data show that these factors form two modules: one comprising Enp1 and the export adaptor Ltv1 near the beak structure, and the second comprising the kinase Rio2, the nuclease Nob1, and a regulatory RNA binding protein Dim2/Pno1 on the front of the head. The GTPase-like Tsr1 and the universally conserved methylase Dim1 are also peripherally connected to this second module. Additionally, in an effort to further define the locations for these essential proteins, we have analyzed the interactions between these assembly factors and six ribosomal proteins: Rps0, Rps3, Rps5, Rps14, Rps15 and Rps29. Together, these results and previous RNA-protein crosslinking data allow us to propose a model for the binding sites of these seven assembly factors. Furthermore, our data show that the essential kinase Rio2 is located at the center of the pre-ribosomal particle and interacts, directly or indirectly, with every other assembly factor, as well as three ribosomal proteins required for cytoplasmic 40S maturation. These data suggest that Rio2 could play a central role in regulating cytoplasmic maturation steps.

  12. Interrelationships between yeast ribosomal protein assembly events and transient ribosome biogenesis factors interactions in early pre-ribosomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steffen Jakob

    Full Text Available Early steps of eukaryotic ribosome biogenesis require a large set of ribosome biogenesis factors which transiently interact with nascent rRNA precursors (pre-rRNA. Most likely, concomitant with that initial contacts between ribosomal proteins (r-proteins and ribosome precursors (pre-ribosomes are established which are converted into robust interactions between pre-rRNA and r-proteins during the course of ribosome maturation. Here we analysed the interrelationship between r-protein assembly events and the transient interactions of ribosome biogenesis factors with early pre-ribosomal intermediates termed 90S pre-ribosomes or small ribosomal subunit (SSU processome in yeast cells. We observed that components of the SSU processome UTP-A and UTP-B sub-modules were recruited to early pre-ribosomes independently of all tested r-proteins. On the other hand, groups of SSU processome components were identified whose association with early pre-ribosomes was affected by specific r-protein assembly events in the head-platform interface of the SSU. One of these components, Noc4p, appeared to be itself required for robust incorporation of r-proteins into the SSU head domain. Altogether, the data reveal an emerging network of specific interrelationships between local r-protein assembly events and the functional interactions of SSU processome components with early pre-ribosomes. They point towards some of these components being transient primary pre-rRNA in vivo binders and towards a role for others in coordinating the assembly of major SSU domains.

  13. Reverse translocation of tRNA in the ribosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoji, Shinichiro; Walker, Sarah E; Fredrick, Kurt

    2006-12-28

    A widely held view is that directional movement of tRNA in the ribosome is determined by an intrinsic mechanism and driven thermodynamically by transpeptidation. Here, we show that, in certain ribosomal complexes, the pretranslocation (PRE) state is thermodynamically favored over the posttranslocation (POST) state. Spontaneous and efficient conversion from the POST to PRE state is observed when EF-G is depleted from ribosomes in the POST state or when tRNA is added to the E site of ribosomes containing P-site tRNA. In the latter assay, the rate of tRNA movement is increased by streptomycin and neomycin, decreased by tetracycline, and not affected by the acylation state of the tRNA. In one case, we provide evidence that complex conversion occurs by reverse translocation (i.e., direct movement of the tRNAs from the E and P sites to the P and A sites, respectively). These findings have important implications for the energetics of translocation.

  14. A novel frameshift mutation in the cylindromatosis (CYLD) gene in a Chinese family with multiple familial trichoepithelioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, J W; Xiao, S X; Huo, J; An, J G; Ren, J W

    2014-11-01

    Multiple familial trichoepithelioma (MFT) (OMIM: 601606) is an autosomal dominantly inherited disorder characterized by numerous, skin-colored papules and nodules with pilar differentiation. Recently, several mutations in the cylindromatosis (CYLD) gene have been reported in MFT. In this study, a mutation analysis of the CYLD was conducted in a Chinese pedigree of typical MFT. Affected individuals were identified through probands from Shanxi Province, China. Lesional skin biopsy of the proband revealed the typical histopathological characteristics of trichoepithelioma. Individuals belonging to five consecutive generations were similarly affected, which indicated an autosomal dominant inheritance pattern. Genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral blood lymphocytes using standard phenol/chloroform extraction method. All the coding exons (4-20) and exon-intron boundaries of the CYLD gene were amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Direct sequencing of all PCR products amplified from the complete coding regions of the CYLD gene was performed to identify mutations. Sequencing of the CYLD gene was performed in a further 100 unrelated, unaffected control individuals to exclude the possibility of polymorphism. A novel heterozygous frameshift mutation c.1169_1170delCA (p.Thr390Argfs) was identified in exon 10 of the CYLD gene in the affected family members. This mutation was also detected in unaffected family members, but not in the unrelated, healthy individuals who were also analyzed. Our study expands the database on the CYLD gene mutations in MFT and should be useful in providing genetic counseling and prenatal diagnosis for families affected by MFT.

  15. Frameshift mutation hotspot identified in Smith-Magenis syndrome: case report and review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truong, Hoa T; Dudding, Tracy; Blanchard, Christopher L; Elsea, Sarah H

    2010-10-08

    Smith-Magenis syndrome (SMS) is a complex syndrome involving intellectual disabilities, sleep disturbance, behavioural problems, and a variety of craniofacial, skeletal, and visceral anomalies. While the majority of SMS cases harbor an ~3.5 Mb common deletion on 17p11.2 that encompasses the retinoic acid induced-1 (RAI1) gene, some patients carry small intragenic deletions or point mutations in RAI1. We present data on two cases of Smith-Magenis syndrome with mutation of RAI1. Both cases are phenotypically consistent with SMS and RAI1 mutation but also have other anomalies not previously reported in SMS, including spontaneous pneumothoraces. These cases also illustrate variability in the SMS phenotype not previously shown for RAI1 mutation cases, including hearing loss, absence of self-abusive behaviours, and mild global delays. Sequencing of RAI1 revealed mutation of the same heptameric C-tract (CCCCCCC) in exon 3 in both cases (c.3103delC one case and and c.3103insC in the other), resulting in frameshift mutations. Of the seven reported frameshift mutations occurring in poly C-tracts in RAI1, four cases (~57%) occur at this heptameric C-tract. Collectively, these results indicate that this heptameric C-tract is a preferential hotspot for single nucleotide insertion/deletions (SNindels) and therefore, should be considered a primary target for analysis in patients suspected for mutations in RAI1. We expect that as more patients are sequenced for mutations in RAI1, the incidence of frameshift mutations in this hotspot will become more evident.

  16. Frameshift mutation hotspot identified in Smith-Magenis syndrome: case report and review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dudding Tracy

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Smith-Magenis syndrome (SMS is a complex syndrome involving intellectual disabilities, sleep disturbance, behavioural problems, and a variety of craniofacial, skeletal, and visceral anomalies. While the majority of SMS cases harbor an ~3.5 Mb common deletion on 17p11.2 that encompasses the retinoic acid induced-1 (RAI1 gene, some patients carry small intragenic deletions or point mutations in RAI1. We present data on two cases of Smith-Magenis syndrome with mutation of RAI1. Both cases are phenotypically consistent with SMS and RAI1 mutation but also have other anomalies not previously reported in SMS, including spontaneous pneumothoraces. These cases also illustrate variability in the SMS phenotype not previously shown for RAI1 mutation cases, including hearing loss, absence of self-abusive behaviours, and mild global delays. Sequencing of RAI1 revealed mutation of the same heptameric C-tract (CCCCCCC in exon 3 in both cases (c.3103delC one case and and c.3103insC in the other, resulting in frameshift mutations. Of the seven reported frameshift mutations occurring in poly C-tracts in RAI1, four cases (~57% occur at this heptameric C-tract. Collectively, these results indicate that this heptameric C-tract is a preferential hotspot for single nucleotide insertion/deletions (SNindels and therefore, should be considered a primary target for analysis in patients suspected for mutations in RAI1. We expect that as more patients are sequenced for mutations in RAI1, the incidence of frameshift mutations in this hotspot will become more evident.

  17. Frameshift mutation of WISP3 gene and its regional heterogeneity in gastric and colorectal cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ju Hwa; Choi, Youn Jin; Je, Eun Mi; Kim, Ho Shik; Yoo, Nam Jin; Lee, Sug Hyung

    2016-04-01

    WISP3 is involved in many cancer-related processes including epithelial-mesenchymal transition, cell death, invasion, and metastasis and is considered a tumor suppressor. The aim of our study was to find whether WISP3 gene was mutated and expressionally altered in gastric (GC) and colorectal cancers (CRCs). WISP3 gene possesses a mononucleotide repeat in the coding sequence that could be mutated in cancers with high microsatellite instability (MSI-H). We analyzed 79 GCs and 156 CRCs, and found that GCs (8.8%) and CRCs (10.5%) with MSI-H, but not those with microsatellite stable/low MSI, harbored a frameshift mutation. We also analyzed intratumoral heterogeneity (ITH) of the frameshift mutation in 16 CRCs and found that the WISP3 mutation exhibited regional ITH in 25% of the CRCs. In immunohistochemistry, loss of WISP3 expression was identified in 24% of GCs and 21% of CRCs. The loss of expression was more common in those with WISP3 mutation than with wild-type WISP3 and those with MSI-H than with microsatellite stable/low MSI. Our data indicate that WISP3 harbored not only frameshift mutation but also mutational ITH and loss of expression, which together might play a role in tumorigenesis of GC and CRC with MSI-H by inhibiting tumor suppressor functions of WISP3. Our data also suggest that mutation analysis in multiregions is needed for a proper evaluation of mutation status in GC and CRC with MSI-H.

  18. Frequent alteration of MLL3 frameshift mutations in microsatellite deficient colorectal cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshiyuki Watanabe

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: MLL3 is a histone 3-lysine 4 methyltransferase with tumor-suppressor properties that belongs to a family of chromatin regulator genes potentially altered in neoplasia. Mutations in MLL3 were found in a whole genome analysis of colorectal cancer but have not been confirmed by a separate study. METHODS AND RESULTS: We analyzed mutations of coding region and promoter methylation in MLL3 using 126 cases of colorectal cancer. We found two isoforms of MLL3 and DNA sequencing revealed frameshift and other mutations affecting both isoforms of MLL3 in colorectal cancer cells and 19 of 134 (14% primary colorectal samples analyzed. Moreover, frameshift mutations were more common in cases with microsatellite instability (31% both in CRC cell lines and primary tumors. The largest isoform of MLL3 is transcribed from a CpG island-associated promoter that has highly homology with a pseudo-gene on chromosome 22 (psiTPTE22. Using an assay which measured both loci simultaneously we found prominent age related methylation in normal colon (from 21% in individuals less than 25 years old to 56% in individuals older than 70, R = 0.88, p<0.001 and frequent hypermethylation (83% in both CRC cell lines and primary tumors. We next studied the two loci separately and found that age and cancer related methylation was solely a property of the pseudogene CpG island and that the MLL3 loci was unmethylated. CONCLUSIONS: We found that frameshift mutations of MLL3 in both CRC cells and primary tumor that were more common in cases with microsatellite instability. Moreover, we have shown CpG island-associated promoter of MLL3 gene has no DNA methylation in CRC cells but also primary tumor and normal colon, and this region has a highly homologous of pseudo gene (psiTPTE22 that was age relate DNA methylation.

  19. ABC-F Proteins Mediate Antibiotic Resistance through Ribosomal Protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharkey, Liam K R; Edwards, Thomas A; O'Neill, Alex J

    2016-03-22

    Members of the ABC-F subfamily of ATP-binding cassette proteins mediate resistance to a broad array of clinically important antibiotic classes that target the ribosome of Gram-positive pathogens. The mechanism by which these proteins act has been a subject of long-standing controversy, with two competing hypotheses each having gained considerable support: antibiotic efflux versus ribosomal protection. Here, we report on studies employing a combination of bacteriological and biochemical techniques to unravel the mechanism of resistance of these proteins, and provide several lines of evidence that together offer clear support to the ribosomal protection hypothesis. Of particular note, we show that addition of purified ABC-F proteins to anin vitrotranslation assay prompts dose-dependent rescue of translation, and demonstrate that such proteins are capable of displacing antibiotic from the ribosomein vitro To our knowledge, these experiments constitute the first direct evidence that ABC-F proteins mediate antibiotic resistance through ribosomal protection.IMPORTANCEAntimicrobial resistance ranks among the greatest threats currently facing human health. Elucidation of the mechanisms by which microorganisms resist the effect of antibiotics is central to understanding the biology of this phenomenon and has the potential to inform the development of new drugs capable of blocking or circumventing resistance. Members of the ABC-F family, which includelsa(A),msr(A),optr(A), andvga(A), collectively yield resistance to a broader range of clinically significant antibiotic classes than any other family of resistance determinants, although their mechanism of action has been controversial since their discovery 25 years ago. Here we present the first direct evidence that proteins of the ABC-F family act to protect the bacterial ribosome from antibiotic-mediated inhibition. Copyright © 2016 Sharkey et al.

  20. Etudes structurales du ribosome de Staphylococcus aureus

    OpenAIRE

    Khusainov, Iskander

    2015-01-01

    The ribosome is a large cellular machinery that performs the protein synthesis in every living cell. Therefore, the ribosome is one of the major targets of naturally produced antibiotics, which can kill bacterial cells by blocking protein synthesis. However, some bacteria are resistant to these antibiotics due to small modifications of their ribosomes. Among them, Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) is a severe pathogen that causes numerous infections in humans. The crystal structures of comple...

  1. The nucleolus and transcription of ribosomal genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raska, Ivan; Koberna, Karel; Malínský, Jan; Fidlerová, Helena; Masata, Martin

    2004-10-01

    Ribosome biogenesis is a highly dynamic, steady-state nucleolar process that involves synthesis and maturation of rRNA, its transient interactions with non-ribosomal proteins and RNPs and assembly with ribosomal proteins. In the few years of the 21st century, an exciting progress in the molecular understanding of rRNA and ribosome biogenesis has taken place. In this review, we discuss the recent results on the regulation of rRNA synthesis in relation to the functional organization of the nucleolus, and put an emphasis on the situation encountered in mammalian somatic cells.

  2. A novel frameshift mutation in exon 4 causing a deficiency of high-molecular-weight kininogen in a patient with splenic infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukushima, Noriyasu; Itamura, Hidekazu; Wada, Hideo; Ikejiri, Makoto; Igarashi, Yuko; Masaki, Hiroya; Sano, Masayuki; Komiyama, Yutaka; Ichinohe, Tatsuo; Kimura, Shinya

    2014-01-01

    High-molecular-weight kininogen (HMWK) deficiency is a very rare hereditary disorder. We herein report a case of HMWK deficiency with splenic infarction. The HMWK activity of the proband was markedly decreased (0.9%). Direct sequencing of his HMWK gene showed a homozygous "TC" insertion at c523-524 in exon 4. This insertion led to an amino acid substitution, Ser175Ser, resulting in a frameshift mutation and a premature stop codon in amino acid 183. Furthermore, the HMWK activity was also reduced in the patient's three children, who exhibited the heterozygous "TC" insertion at c523-524 in exon 4. This is the first report of this gene alteration in a patient with HMWK deficiency.

  3. Analysis Of Solute Concentration And Concentration Derivative Distribution By Means Of Frameshift Fourier And Other Algorithms Applied To Rayleigh Interferometric And Fresnel Fringe Patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, Arthur J.; Jones, S. W.; Thomas, D.; Harding, Stephen E.

    1989-11-01

    The equilibrium distribution of particles dispersed in an aqueous solute situated in a centrifugal accelerative field is routinely studied by means of an optical trace recorded photographically. Rayleigh interferometric fringe patterns have been widely used to give this trace, in which the displacement of the parallel fringes is directly related to particle concentration differences. We have developed a simple but highly efficient frameshift algorithm for automatic interpretation of these patternsl . Results obtained from extensive use and further definition of this algorithm confirm its validity and utility. We have also studied algorithms for the interpretation of Fresnel fringe patterns yielded by an alternative optical system. These more complex patterns involving non parallel fringes can be analysed successfully, subject to certain conditions, with a precision similar to that obtained using Rayleigh interference optics.

  4. A novel mitochondrial ATP6 frameshift mutation causing isolated complex V deficiency, ataxia and encephalomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Christopher B; Hahn, Dagmar; Schröter, Barbara; Richter, Uwe; Battersby, Brendan J; Schmitt-Mechelke, Thomas; Marttinen, Paula; Nuoffer, Jean-Marc; Schaller, André

    2017-06-01

    We describe a novel frameshift mutation in the mitochondrial ATP6 gene in a 4-year-old girl associated with ataxia, microcephaly, developmental delay and intellectual disability. A heteroplasmic frameshift mutation in the MT-ATP6 gene was confirmed in the patient's skeletal muscle and blood. The mutation was not detectable in the mother's DNA extracted from blood or buccal cells. Enzymatic and oxymetric analysis of the mitochondrial respiratory system in the patients' skeletal muscle and skin fibroblasts demonstrated an isolated complex V deficiency. Native PAGE with subsequent immunoblotting for complex V revealed impaired complex V assembly and accumulation of ATPase subcomplexes. Whilst northern blotting confirmed equal presence of ATP8/6 mRNA, metabolic (35)S-labelling of mitochondrial translation products showed a severe depletion of the ATP6 protein together with aberrant translation product accumulation. In conclusion, this novel isolated complex V defect expands the clinical and genetic spectrum of mitochondrial defects of complex V deficiency. Furthermore, this work confirms the benefit of native PAGE as an additional diagnostic method for the identification of OXPHOS defects, as the presence of complex V subcomplexes is associated with pathogenic mutations of mtDNA. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Frameshift mutation in the PTCH2 gene can cause nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Katsunori; Ohashi, Hirofumi; Suzuki, Maiko; Hatsuse, Hiromi; Shiohama, Tadashi; Uchikawa, Hideki; Miyashita, Toshiyuki

    2013-12-01

    Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by developmental defects and tumorigenesis. The gene responsible for NBCCS is PTCH1, encoding a receptor for the secreted protein, sonic hedgehog. Recently, a Chinese family with NBCCS carrying a missense mutation in PTCH2, a close homolog of PTCH1, was reported. However, the pathological significance of missense mutations should be discussed cautiously. Here, we report a 13-year-old girl diagnosed with NBCCS based on multiple keratocystic odontogenic tumors and rib anomalies carrying a frameshift mutation in the PTCH2 gene (c.1172_1173delCT). Considering the deleterious nature of the frameshift mutation, our study further confirmed a causative role for the PTCH2 mutation in NBCCS. The absence of typical phenotypes in this case such as palmar/plantar pits, macrocephaly, falx calcification, hypertelorism and coarse face, together with previously reported cases, suggested that individuals with NBCCS carrying a PTCH2 mutation may have a milder phenotype than those with a PTCH1 mutation.

  6. Early frameshift mutation in PIGA identified in a large XLID family without neonatal lethality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belet, Stefanie; Fieremans, Nathalie; Yuan, Xuan; Van Esch, Hilde; Verbeeck, Jelle; Ye, Zhaohui; Cheng, Linzhao; Brodsky, Brett R; Hu, Hao; Kalscheuer, Vera M; Brodsky, Robert A; Froyen, Guy

    2014-03-01

    The phosphatidylinositol glycan class A (PIGA) protein is a member of the glycosylphosphatidylinositol anchor pathway. Germline mutations in PIGA located at Xp22.2 are thought to be lethal in males. However, a nonsense mutation in the last coding exon was recently described in two brothers with multiple congenital anomalies-hypotonia-seizures syndrome 2 (MCAHS2) who survived through birth likely because of the hypomorphic nature of the truncated protein, but died in their first weeks of life. Here, we report on a frameshift mutation early in the PIGA cDNA (c.76dupT; p.Y26Lfs*3) that cosegregates with the disease in a large family diagnosed with a severe syndromic form of X-linked intellectual disability. Unexpectedly, CD59 surface expression suggested the production of a shorter PIGA protein with residual functionality. We provide evidence that the second methionine at position 37 may be used for the translation of a 36 amino acids shorter PIGA. Complementation assays confirmed that this shorter PIGA cDNA was able to partially rescue the surface expression of CD59 in a PIGA-null cell line. Taken together, our data strongly suggest that the early frameshift mutation in PIGA produces a truncated hypomorph, which is sufficient to rescue the lethality in males but not the MCAHS2-like phenotype.

  7. Frameshift mutations in dentin phosphoprotein and dependence of dentin disease phenotype on mutation location.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieminen, Pekka; Papagiannoulis-Lascarides, Lisa; Waltimo-Siren, Janna; Ollila, Päivi; Karjalainen, Sara; Arte, Sirpa; Veerkamp, Jaap; Tallon Walton, Victoria; Chimenos Küstner, Eduard; Siltanen, Tarja; Holappa, Heidi; Lukinmaa, Pirjo-Liisa; Alaluusua, Satu

    2011-04-01

    We describe results from a mutational analysis of the region of the dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP) gene encoding dentin phosphoprotein (DPP) in 12 families with dominantly inherited dentin diseases. In eight families (five mutations in the N-terminal third of DPP), the clinical and radiologic features were uniform and compatible with dentin dysplasia type II (DD-II) with major clinical signs in the deciduous dentition. In the other families (four mutations in the more C-terminal part), the permanent teeth also were affected, and the diseases could be classified as variants of dentinogenesis imperfecta. Attrition was not prominent, but periapical infections were common. Discoloring with varying intensity was evident, and pulps and root canals were obliterated in the permanent dentition. All mutations caused a frameshift that replaced the Ser-Ser-Asx repeat by a code for a hydrophobic downstream sequence of approximately original length. We conclude that frameshift mutations in DSPP explain a significant part of dentin diseases. Furthermore, we propose that the location of the mutation is reflected in the phenotypic features as a gradient from DD-II to more severe disease that does not conform to the classic definitions of DI-II. Copyright © 2011 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research.

  8. Back-translation for discovering distant protein homologies in the presence of frameshift mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noé Laurent

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Frameshift mutations in protein-coding DNA sequences produce a drastic change in the resulting protein sequence, which prevents classic protein alignment methods from revealing the proteins' common origin. Moreover, when a large number of substitutions are additionally involved in the divergence, the homology detection becomes difficult even at the DNA level. Results We developed a novel method to infer distant homology relations of two proteins, that accounts for frameshift and point mutations that may have affected the coding sequences. We design a dynamic programming alignment algorithm over memory-efficient graph representations of the complete set of putative DNA sequences of each protein, with the goal of determining the two putative DNA sequences which have the best scoring alignment under a powerful scoring system designed to reflect the most probable evolutionary process. Our implementation is freely available at http://bioinfo.lifl.fr/path/. Conclusions Our approach allows to uncover evolutionary information that is not captured by traditional alignment methods, which is confirmed by biologically significant examples.

  9. Ribosomal trafficking is reduced in Schwann cells following induction of myelination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James M. Love

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Local synthesis of proteins within the Schwann cell periphery is extremely important for efficient process extension and myelination, when cells undergo dramatic changes in polarity and geometry. Still, it is unclear how ribosomal distributions are developed and maintained within Schwann cell projections to sustain local translation. In this multi-disciplinary study, we expressed a plasmid encoding a fluorescently labeled ribosomal subunit (L4-GFP in cultured primary rat Schwann cells. This enabled the generation of high-resolution, quantitative data on ribosomal distributions and trafficking dynamics within Schwann cells during early stages of myelination, induced by ascorbic acid treatment. Ribosomes were distributed throughout Schwann cell projections, with ~2-3 bright clusters along each projection. Clusters emerged within 1 day of culture and were maintained throughout early stages of myelination. Three days after induction of myelination, net ribosomal movement remained anterograde (directed away from the Schwann cell body, but ribosomal velocity decreased to about half the levels of the untreated group. Statistical and modeling analysis provided additional insight into key factors underlying ribosomal trafficking. Multiple regression analysis indicated that net transport at early time points was dependent on anterograde velocity, but shifted to dependence on anterograde duration at later time points. A simple, data-driven rate kinetics model suggested that the observed decrease in net ribosomal movement was primarily dictated by an increased conversion of anterograde particles to stationary particles, rather than changes in other directional parameters. These results reveal the strength of a combined experimental and theoretical approach in examining protein localization and transport, and provide evidence of an early establishment of ribosomal populations within Schwann cell projections with a reduction in trafficking following

  10. The other lives of ribosomal proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhavsar Rital B

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Despite the fact that ribosomal proteins are the constituents of an organelle that is present in every cell, they show a surprising level of regulation, and several of them have also been shown to have other extra-ribosomal functions, such in replication, transcription, splicing or even ageing. This review provides a comprehensive summary of these important aspects.

  11. Complementary roles of initiation factor 1 and ribosome recycling factor in 70S ribosome splitting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlov, Michael Y; Antoun, Ayman; Lovmar, Martin; Ehrenberg, Måns

    2008-01-01

    We demonstrate that ribosomes containing a messenger RNA (mRNA) with a strong Shine–Dalgarno sequence are rapidly split into subunits by initiation factors 1 (IF1) and 3 (IF3), but slowly split by ribosome recycling factor (RRF) and elongation factor G (EF-G). Post-termination-like (PTL) ribosomes containing mRNA and a P-site-bound deacylated transfer RNA (tRNA) are split very rapidly by RRF and EF-G, but extremely slowly by IF1 and IF3. Vacant ribosomes are split by RRF/EF-G much more slowly than PTL ribosomes and by IF1/IF3 much more slowly than mRNA-containing ribosomes. These observations reveal complementary splitting of different ribosomal complexes by IF1/IF3 and RRF/EF-G, and suggest the existence of two major pathways for ribosome splitting into subunits in the living cell. We show that the identity of the deacylated tRNA in the PTL ribosome strongly affects the rate by which it is split by RRF/EF-G and that IF3 is involved in the mechanism of ribosome splitting by IF1/IF3 but not by RRF/EF-G. With support from our experimental data, we discuss the principally different mechanisms of ribosome splitting by IF1/IF3 and by RRF/EF-G. PMID:18497739

  12. Chaperone binding at the ribosomal exit tunnel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Ole; Gajhede, Michael

    2003-01-01

    The exit tunnel region of the ribosome is well established as a focal point for interaction between the components that guide the fate of nascent polypeptides. One of these, the chaperone trigger factor (TF), associates with the 50S ribosomal subunit through its N-terminal domain. Targeting of TF...... to ribosomes is crucial to achieve its remarkable efficiency in protein folding. A similar tight coupling to translation is found in signal recognition particle (SRP)-dependent protein translocation. Here, we report crystal structures of the E. coli TF ribosome binding domain. TF is structurally related...... to the Hsp33 chaperone but has a prominent ribosome anchor located as a tip of the molecule. This tip includes the previously established unique TF signature motif. Comparison reveals that this feature is not found in SRP structures. We identify a conserved helical kink as a hallmark of the TF structure...

  13. Import of ribosomal proteins into yeast mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woellhaf, Michael W; Hansen, Katja G; Garth, Christoph; Herrmann, Johannes M

    2014-12-01

    Mitochondrial ribosomes of baker's yeast contain at least 78 protein subunits. All but one of these proteins are nuclear-encoded, synthesized on cytosolic ribosomes, and imported into the matrix for biogenesis. The import of matrix proteins typically relies on N-terminal mitochondrial targeting sequences that form positively charged amphipathic helices. Interestingly, the N-terminal regions of many ribosomal proteins do not closely match the characteristics of matrix targeting sequences, suggesting that the import processes of these proteins might deviate to some extent from the general import route. So far, the biogenesis of only two ribosomal proteins, Mrpl32 and Mrp10, was studied experimentally and indeed showed surprising differences to the import of other preproteins. In this review article we summarize the current knowledge on the transport of proteins into the mitochondrial matrix, and thereby specifically focus on proteins of the mitochondrial ribosome.

  14. Immunological evidence for structural homology between Drosophila melanogaster (S14), rabbit liver (S12), Saccharomyces cerevisiae (S25), Bacillus subtilis (S6), and Escherichia coli (S6) ribosomal proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chooi, W Y; Otaka, E

    1984-11-01

    Specific antibodies directed against Drosophila melanogaster acidic ribosomal protein S14 were used in a comparative study of eucaryotic and procaryotic ribosomes by immunoblotting and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Common antigenic determinants and, thus, structural homology were found between D. melanogaster, Saccharomyces cerevisiae (S25), rabbit liver (S12), Bacillus subtilis (S6), and Escherichia coli (S6) ribosomes.

  15. T cell responses against microsatellite instability-induced frameshift peptides and influence of regulatory T cells in colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Kathrin; Nelius, Nina; Reuschenbach, Miriam; Koch, Moritz; Weitz, Jürgen; Steinert, Gunnar; Kopitz, Jürgen; Beckhove, Philipp; Tariverdian, Mirjam; von Knebel Doeberitz, Magnus; Kloor, Matthias

    2013-01-01

    High-level microsatellite-unstable (MSI-H) colorectal carcinomas (CRC) represent a distinct subtype of tumors commonly characterized by dense infiltration with cytotoxic T cells, most likely due to expression of MSI-H-related frameshift peptides (FSP). The contribution of FSP and classical antigens like MUC1 and CEA to the cellular immune response against MSI-H CRC had not been analyzed so far. We analyzed tumor-infiltrating and peripheral T cells from MSI-H (n = 4 and n = 14, respectively) and microsatellite-stable (MSS) tumor patients (n = 26 and n = 17) using interferon gamma ELISpot assays. Responses against 4 FSP antigens and peptides derived from MUC1 to CEA were compared with and without depletion of regulatory T cells, and the results were related to the presence of the respective antigens in tumor tissue. Preexisting FSP-specific T cell responses were detected in all (4 out of 4) tumor-infiltrating and in the majority (10 out of 14) of peripheral T cell samples from MSI-H CRC patients, but rarely observed in MSS CRC patients. Preexisting T cell responses in MSI-H CRC patients were significantly more frequently directed against FSP tested in the present study than against peptides derived from classical antigens MUC1 or CEA (p = 0.049). Depletion of regulatory T cells increased the frequency of effector T cell responses specific for MUC1/CEA-derived peptides and, to a lesser extent, T cell responses specific for FSP. Our data suggest that the analyzed FSP may represent an immunologically relevant pool of antigens capable of eliciting antitumoral effector T cell responses.

  16. A novel frameshift mutation in BLM gene associated with high sister chromatid exchanges (SCE) in heterozygous family members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Salah, Ghada; Hadj Salem, Ikhlas; Masmoudi, Abderrahmen; Kallabi, Fakhri; Turki, Hamida; Fakhfakh, Faiza; Ayadi, Hamadi; Kamoun, Hassen

    2014-11-01

    The Bloom syndrome (BS) is an autosomic recessive disorder comprising a wide range of abnormalities, including stunted growth, immunodeficiency, sun sensitivity and increased frequency of various types of cancer. Bloom syndrome cells display a high level of genetic instability, including a 10-fold increase in the sister chromatid exchanges (SCE) level. Bloom syndrome arises through mutations in both alleles of the BLM gene, which was identified as a member of the RecQ helicase family. In this study, we screened a Tunisian family with three BS patients. Cytogenetic analysis showed several chromosomal aberrations, and an approximately 14-fold elevated SCE frequency in BS cells. A significant increase in SCE frequency was observed in some family members but not reaching the BS patients values, leading to suggest that this could be due to the heterozygous profile. Microsatellite genotyping using four fluorescent dye-labeled microsatellite markers revealed evidence of linkage to BLM locus and the healthy members, sharing higher SCE frequency, showed heterozygous haplotypes as expected. Additionally, the direct BLM gene sequencing identified a novel homozygous frameshift mutation c.3617-3619delAA (p.K1207fsX9) in BS patients and a heterozygous BLM mutation in the family members with higher SCE frequency. Our findings suggest that this latter mutation likely leads to a reduced BLM activity explaining the homologous recombination repair defect and, therefore, the increase in SCE. Based on the present data, the screening of this mutation could contribute to the rapid diagnosis of BS. The genetic confirmation of the mutation in BLM gene provides crucial information for genetic counseling and prenatal diagnosis.

  17. Efficient reconstitution of functional Escherichia coli 30S ribosomal subunits from a complete set of recombinant small subunit ribosomal proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culver, G M; Noller, H F

    1999-06-01

    from ribosomes. Particles reconstituted from the recombinant proteins sediment at 30S in sucrose gradients, bind tRNA in a template-dependent manner, and associate with 50S subunits to form 70S ribosomes that are active in poly(U)-directed polyphenylalanine synthesis. Both the protein composition and the dimethyl sulfate modification pattern of 16S ribosomal RNA are similar for 30S subunits reconstituted with either recombinant proteins or proteins isolated as a mixture from ribosomal subunits as well as for natural 30S subunits.

  18. Microsatellite instability derived JAK1 frameshift mutations are associated with tumor immune evasion in endometrioid endometrial cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stelloo, Ellen; Versluis, Marco A; Nijman, Hans W; de Bruyn, Marco; Plat, Annechien; Osse, Elisabeth M; van Dijk, Reinhardt H; Nout, Remi A; Creutzberg, Carien L; de Bock, Geertruida H; Smit, Vincent T; Bosse, Tjalling; Hollema, Harry

    2016-01-01

    JAK1 frameshift mutations may promote cancer cell immune evasion by impeding upregulation of the antigen presentation pathway in microsatellite unstable endometrial cancers (ECs). This study investigated the JAK1 mutation frequency, its functional implication in immune evasion and its prognostic sig

  19. Escherichia coli frameshift mutation rate depends on the chromosomal context but not on the GATC content near the mutation site.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana A Martina

    Full Text Available Different studies have suggested that mutation rate varies at different positions in the genome. In this work we analyzed if the chromosomal context and/or the presence of GATC sites can affect the frameshift mutation rate in the Escherichia coli genome. We show that in a mismatch repair deficient background, a condition where the mutation rate reflects the fidelity of the DNA polymerization process, the frameshift mutation rate could vary up to four times among different chromosomal contexts. Furthermore, the mismatch repair efficiency could vary up to eight times when compared at different chromosomal locations, indicating that detection and/or repair of frameshift events also depends on the chromosomal context. Also, GATC sequences have been proved to be essential for the correct functioning of the E. coli mismatch repair system. Using bacteriophage heteroduplexes molecules it has been shown that GATC influence the mismatch repair efficiency in a distance- and number-dependent manner, being almost nonfunctional when GATC sequences are located at 1 kb or more from the mutation site. Interestingly, we found that in E. coli genomic DNA the mismatch repair system can efficiently function even if the nearest GATC sequence is located more than 2 kb away from the mutation site. The results presented in this work show that even though frameshift mutations can be efficiently generated and/or repaired anywhere in the genome, these processes can be modulated by the chromosomal context that surrounds the mutation site.

  20. A Novel WRN Frameshift Mutation Identified by Multiplex Genetic Testing in a Family with Multiple Cases of Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Liu; Wang, Guosheng; Zhao, Xinyi; Ye, Song; Shen, Peng; Wang, Weilin; Zheng, Shusen

    2015-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing technology allows simultaneous analysis of multiple susceptibility genes for clinical cancer genetics. In this study, multiplex genetic testing was conducted in a Chinese family with multiple cases of cancer to determine the variations in cancer predisposition genes. The family comprises a mother and her five daughters, of whom the mother and the eldest daughter have cancer and the secondary daughter died of cancer. We conducted multiplex genetic testing of 90 cancer susceptibility genes using the peripheral blood DNA of the mother and all five daughters. WRN frameshift mutation is considered a potential pathogenic variation according to the guidelines of the American College of Medical Genetics. A novel WRN frameshift mutation (p.N1370Tfs*23) was identified in the three cancer patients and in the youngest unaffected daughter. Other rare non-synonymous germline mutations were also detected in DICER and ELAC2. Functional mutations in WRN cause Werner syndrome, a human autosomal recessive disease characterized by premature aging and associated with genetic instability and increased cancer risk. Our results suggest that the WRN frameshift mutation is important in the surveillance of other members of this family, especially the youngest daughter, but the pathogenicity of the novel WRN frameshift mutation needs to be investigated further. Given its extensive use in clinical genetic screening, multiplex genetic testing is a promising tool in clinical cancer surveillance.

  1. On the codon assignment of chain termination signals and the minimization of the effects of frameshift mutations

    CERN Document Server

    Jestin, J L

    1997-01-01

    It has been suggested that the minimization of the probability for lethal mutations is a major constraint shaping the genetic code, with the finding that the genetic code is highly protective against transition mutations. Here, we show that recent data on polymerase-induced frameshifts provide a rationale for the codon assignment of chain termination signals (CTS).

  2. Escherichia coli frameshift mutation rate depends on the chromosomal context but not on the GATC content near the mutation site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martina, Mariana A; Correa, Elisa M E; Argaraña, Carlos E; Barra, José L

    2012-01-01

    Different studies have suggested that mutation rate varies at different positions in the genome. In this work we analyzed if the chromosomal context and/or the presence of GATC sites can affect the frameshift mutation rate in the Escherichia coli genome. We show that in a mismatch repair deficient background, a condition where the mutation rate reflects the fidelity of the DNA polymerization process, the frameshift mutation rate could vary up to four times among different chromosomal contexts. Furthermore, the mismatch repair efficiency could vary up to eight times when compared at different chromosomal locations, indicating that detection and/or repair of frameshift events also depends on the chromosomal context. Also, GATC sequences have been proved to be essential for the correct functioning of the E. coli mismatch repair system. Using bacteriophage heteroduplexes molecules it has been shown that GATC influence the mismatch repair efficiency in a distance- and number-dependent manner, being almost nonfunctional when GATC sequences are located at 1 kb or more from the mutation site. Interestingly, we found that in E. coli genomic DNA the mismatch repair system can efficiently function even if the nearest GATC sequence is located more than 2 kb away from the mutation site. The results presented in this work show that even though frameshift mutations can be efficiently generated and/or repaired anywhere in the genome, these processes can be modulated by the chromosomal context that surrounds the mutation site.

  3. The sequence spectrum of frameshift reversions obtained with a novel adaptive mutation assay in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erich Heidenreich

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Research on the mechanisms of adaptive mutagenesis in resting, i.e. non-replicating cells relies on appropriate mutation assays. Here we provide a novel procedure for the detection of frameshift-reverting mutations in yeast. Proliferation of non-reverted cells in this assay is suppressed by the lack of a fermentable carbon source. The test allele was constructed in a way that the reversions mimic microsatellite instability, a condition often found in cancer cells. We show the cell numbers during these starvation conditions and provide a DNA sequence spectrum of a representative set of revertants. The data in this article support the publication "Glucose starvation as a selective tool for the study of adaptive mutations in Saccharomyces cerevisiae" (Heidenreich and Steinboeck, 2016 [1].

  4. A novel frameshift mutation in PMP22 accounts for hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, P; Wiebusch, H; Stögbauer, F; Ringelstein, B; Assmann, G; Funke, H

    1997-02-01

    Peripheral myelin protein PMP22 deficiency is associated with hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP). Most HNPP cases are caused by a 1.5-megabase deletion in chromosome 17p11.2-12, a region that contains the PMP22 gene, whereas point mutations leading to HNPP are extremely rare. We have identified a family with clinical and electrophysiologic features of HNPP,in which all affected members are heterozygous carriers of a single base insertion in codon 94. This mutation is predicted to alter the reading frame and to result in a delayed termination signal. We conclude that the functional consequences of the frameshift are equivalent to those of the PMP22 deletion allele.

  5. A novel mitochondrial MTND5 frameshift mutation causing isolated complex I deficiency, renal failure and myopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alston, Charlotte L; Morak, Monika; Reid, Christopher; Hargreaves, Iain P; Pope, Simon A S; Land, John M; Heales, Simon J; Horvath, Rita; Mundy, Helen; Taylor, Robert W

    2010-02-01

    Isolated complex I deficiency is the most commonly reported enzyme defect in paediatric mitochondrial disorders, and may arise due to mutations in nuclear-encoded structural or assembly genes, or the mitochondrial genome. We present the clinical, biochemical and molecular genetic data in a young girl whose clinical picture is dominated by chronic renal failure, myopathy and persistent lactic acidosis. An isolated complex I deficiency in muscle was identified due to a novel mutation (m.12425delA) in the MTND5 gene. This single nucleotide deletion is heteroplasmic and detectable in several tissues from the proband but not her mother, suggesting a de novo mutation event. The description of the first frameshift mutation in a mitochondrial complex I gene affirms mitochondrial DNA mutations as an important cause of isolated complex I deficiency in children and the importance of whole mitochondrial genome sequencing in the diagnostic work-up to elucidate the underlying molecular genetic abnormality and provide important genetic advice.

  6. Frameshift mutation of UVRAG: Switching a tumor suppressor to an oncogene in colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Shanshan; Liang, Chengyu

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) ranks as the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the Western world. It has a nearly 50% metastasis rate and only a subset of patients respond to current treatment strategy. UVRAG, a key autophagy effector and a guardian of chromosomal stability, is truncated by a frameshift (FS) mutation in CRC with microsatellite instability (MSI). However, the pathological and clinical significance of this UVRAG truncation remains less understood. Our recent study discovered that this FS mutation yields a much shortened form of the UVRAG protein, which counteracts most of the tumor-suppressor functions of wild-type (WT) UVRAG in autophagy, centrosome stability, and DNA repair in a dominant-negative fashion. Whereas this truncated mutation of UVRAG promotes tumorigenesis, epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, and metastasis, it appears to sensitize CRC tumors to adjuvant chemotherapy, making it a potential molecular marker to individualize therapeutic approach in CRC.

  7. A novel fibrinogen B beta chain frameshift mutation causes congenital afibrinogenaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jian; Zhao, Xiaojuan; Wang, Zhaoyue; Yu, Ziqiang; Cao, Lijuan; Zhang, Wei; Bai, Xia; Ruan, Changgeng

    2013-07-01

    Congenital afibrinogenaemia is a rare autosomal recessive disorder caused by various mutations within the fibrinogen genes FGA, FGB and FGG. Ins/del mutations in FGB are extremely rare. We report a patient with afibrinogenaemia who suffered from umbilical cord bleeding and repeated bleeding episodes. His plasma fibrinogen levels could not be detected using the Clauss method and immunological methods. Molecular analyses revealed homozygosity in a novel four bases insertion in codon 40 of FGB exon 2 (g. 2833_2834 ins GTTT), which resulted in a truncated 50-residue polypeptide that contained 11 exceptional abnormal residues. In the transient expression experiments, mutant fibrinogen could be detected at higher level than wild-type fibrinogen in COS-7 cell lysates but not in culture media. These results suggest that the homozygous mutation in FGB could be responsible for congenital afibrinogenaemia in this patient. This frameshift mutation could impair fibrinogen assembly and secretion without influencing the protein synthesis.

  8. Choreography of molecular movements during ribosome progression along mRNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belardinelli, Riccardo; Sharma, Heena; Caliskan, Neva; Cunha, Carlos E; Peske, Frank; Wintermeyer, Wolfgang; Rodnina, Marina V

    2016-04-01

    During translation elongation, ribosome translocation along an mRNA entails rotations of the ribosomal subunits, swiveling motions of the small subunit (SSU) head and stepwise movements of the tRNAs together with the mRNA. Here, we reconstructed the choreography of the collective motions of the Escherichia coli ribosome during translocation promoted by elongation factor EF-G, by recording the fluorescence signatures of nine different reporters placed on both ribosomal subunits, tRNA and mRNA. We captured an early forward swiveling of the SSU head taking place while the SSU body rotates in the opposite, clockwise direction. Backward swiveling of the SSU head starts upon tRNA translocation and continues until the post-translocation state is reached. This work places structures of translocation intermediates along a time axis and unravels principles of the motions of macromolecular machines.

  9. Detection of coding microsatellite frameshift mutations in DNA mismatch repair-deficient mouse intestinal tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woerner, Stefan M; Tosti, Elena; Yuan, Yan P; Kloor, Matthias; Bork, Peer; Edelmann, Winfried; Gebert, Johannes

    2015-11-01

    Different DNA mismatch repair (MMR)-deficient mouse strains have been developed as models for the inherited cancer predisposing Lynch syndrome. It is completely unresolved, whether coding mononucleotide repeat (cMNR) gene mutations in these mice can contribute to intestinal tumorigenesis and whether MMR-deficient mice are a suitable molecular model of human microsatellite instability (MSI)-associated intestinal tumorigenesis. A proof-of-principle study was performed to identify mouse cMNR-harboring genes affected by insertion/deletion mutations in MSI murine intestinal tumors. Bioinformatic algorithms were developed to establish a database of mouse cMNR-harboring genes. A panel of five mouse noncoding mononucleotide markers was used for MSI classification of intestinal matched normal/tumor tissues from MMR-deficient (Mlh1(-/-) , Msh2(-/-) , Msh2(LoxP/LoxP) ) mice. cMNR frameshift mutations of candidate genes were determined by DNA fragment analysis. Murine MSI intestinal tumors but not normal tissues from MMR-deficient mice showed cMNR frameshift mutations in six candidate genes (Elavl3, Tmem107, Glis2, Sdccag1, Senp6, Rfc3). cMNRs of mouse Rfc3 and Elavl3 are conserved in type and length in their human orthologs that are known to be mutated in human MSI colorectal, endometrial and gastric cancer. We provide evidence for the utility of a mononucleotide marker panel for detection of MSI in murine tumors, the existence of cMNR instability in MSI murine tumors, the utility of mouse subspecies DNA for identification of polymorphic repeats, and repeat conservation among some orthologous human/mouse genes, two of them showing instability in human and mouse MSI intestinal tumors. MMR-deficient mice hence are a useful molecular model system for analyzing MSI intestinal carcinogenesis.

  10. A CNGB1 frameshift mutation in Papillon and Phalene dogs with progressive retinal atrophy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saija J Ahonen

    Full Text Available Progressive retinal degenerations are the most common causes of complete blindness both in human and in dogs. Canine progressive retinal atrophy (PRA or degeneration resembles human retinitis pigmentosa (RP and is characterized by a progressive loss of rod photoreceptor cells followed by a loss of cone function. The primary clinical signs are detected as vision impairment in a dim light. Although several genes have been associated with PRAs, there are still PRAs of unknown genetic cause in many breeds, including Papillons and Phalènes. We have performed a genome wide association and linkage studies in cohort of 6 affected Papillons and Phalènes and 14 healthy control dogs to map a novel PRA locus on canine chromosome 2, with a 1.9 Mb shared homozygous region in the affected dogs. Parallel exome sequencing of a trio identified an indel mutation, including a 1-bp deletion, followed by a 6-bp insertion in the CNGB1 gene. This mutation causes a frameshift and premature stop codon leading to probable nonsense mediated decay (NMD of the CNGB1 mRNA. The mutation segregated with the disease and was confirmed in a larger cohort of 145 Papillons and Phalènes (PFisher = 1.4×10(-8 with a carrier frequency of 17.2 %. This breed specific mutation was not present in 334 healthy dogs from 10 other breeds or 121 PRA affected dogs from 44 other breeds. CNGB1 is important for the photoreceptor cell function its defects have been previously associated with retinal degeneration in both human and mouse. Our study indicates that a frameshift mutation in CNGB1 is a cause of PRA in Papillons and Phalènes and establishes the breed as a large functional animal model for further characterization of retinal CNGB1 biology and possible retinal gene therapy trials. This study enables also the development of a genetic test for breeding purposes.

  11. Genetic mosaicism of a frameshift mutation in the RET gene in a family with Hirschsprung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Charlotte M; Haase, Michael G; Kemnitz, Ivonne; Fitze, Guido

    2014-05-10

    Mutations and polymorphisms in the RET gene are a major cause of Hirschsprung disease (HSCR). Theoretically, all true heterozygous patients with a new manifestation of a genetically determined disease must have parents with a genetic mosaicism of some extent. However, no genetic mosaicism has been described for the RET gene in HSCR yet. Therefore, we analyzed families with mutations in the RET gene for genetic mosaicism in the parents of the patients. Blood samples were taken from patients with HSCR and their families/parents to sequence the RET coding region. Among 125 families with HSCR, 33 families with RET mutations were analyzed. In one family, we detected a frameshift mutation due to a loss of one in a row of four cytosines in codon 117/118 of the RET gene (c.352delC) leading to a frameshift mutation in the protein (p.Leu118Cysfs*105) that affected two siblings. In the blood sample of the asymptomatic father we found a genetic mosaicism of this mutation which was confirmed in two independent samples of saliva and hair roots. Quantification of peak-heights and comparison with different mixtures of normal and mutated plasmid DNA suggested that the mutation occurred in the early morula stadium of the founder, between the 4- and 8-cell stages. We conclude that the presence of a RET mutation leading to loss of one functional allele in 20 to 25% of the cells is not sufficient to cause HSCR. The possibility of a mosaicism has to be kept in mind during genetic counseling for inherited diseases.

  12. A Frameshift Mutation in KIT is Associated with White Spotting in the Arabian Camel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holl, Heather; Isaza, Ramiro; Mohamoud, Yasmin; Ahmed, Ayeda; Almathen, Faisal; Youcef, Cherifi; Gaouar, Semir; Antczak, Douglas F.; Brooks, Samantha

    2017-01-01

    While the typical Arabian camel is characterized by a single colored coat, there are rare populations with white spotting patterns. White spotting coat patterns are found in virtually all domesticated species, but are rare in wild species. Theories suggest that white spotting is linked to the domestication process, and is occasionally associated with health disorders. Though mutations have been found in a diverse array of species, fewer than 30 genes have been associated with spotting patterns, thus providing a key set of candidate genes for the Arabian camel. We obtained 26 spotted camels and 24 solid controls for candidate gene analysis. One spotted and eight solid camels were whole genome sequenced as part of a separate project. The spotted camel was heterozygous for a frameshift deletion in KIT (c.1842delG, named KITW1 for White spotting 1), whereas all other camels were wild-type (KIT+/KIT+). No additional mutations unique to the spotted camel were detected in the EDNRB, EDN3, SOX10, KITLG, PDGFRA, MITF, and PAX3 candidate white spotting genes. Sanger sequencing of the study population identified an additional five KITW1/KIT+ spotted camels. The frameshift results in a premature stop codon five amino acids downstream, thus terminating KIT at the tyrosine kinase domain. An additional 13 spotted camels tested KIT+/KIT+, but due to phenotypic differences when compared to the KITW1/KIT+ camels, they likely represent an independent mutation. Our study suggests that there are at least two causes of white spotting in the Arabian camel, the newly described KITW1 allele and an uncharacterized mutation. PMID:28282952

  13. The CFTR frameshift mutation 3905insT and its effect at transcript and protein level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanz, Javier; von Känel, Thomas; Schneider, Mircea; Steiner, Bernhard; Schaller, André; Gallati, Sabina

    2010-02-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is one of the most common genetic diseases in the Caucasian population and is characterized by chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, exocrine pancreatic insufficiency, and elevation of sodium and chloride concentrations in the sweat and infertility in men. The disease is caused by mutations in the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene, which encodes a protein that functions as chloride channel at the apical membrane of different epithelia. Owing to the high genotypic and phenotypic disease heterogeneity, effects and consequences of the majority of the CFTR mutations have not yet been studied. Recently, the frameshift mutation 3905insT was identified as the second most frequent mutation in the Swiss population and found to be associated with a severe phenotype. The frameshift mutation produces a premature termination codon (PTC) in exon 20, and transcripts bearing this PTC are potential targets for degradation through nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) and/or for exon skipping through nonsense-associated alternative splicing (NAS). Using RT-PCR analysis in lymphocytes and different tissue types from patients carrying the mutation, we showed that the PTC introduced by the mutation does neither elicit a degradation of the mRNA through NMD nor an alternative splicing through NAS. Moreover, immunocytochemical analysis in nasal epithelial cells revealed a significantly reduced amount of CFTR at the apical membrane providing a possible molecular explanation for the more severe phenotype observed in F508del/3905insT compound heterozygotes compared with F508del homozygotes. However, further experiments are needed to elucidate the fate of the 3905insT CFTR in the cell after its biosynthesis.

  14. Improve homology search sensitivity of PacBio data by correcting frameshifts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Nan; Sun, Yanni

    2016-09-01

    Single-molecule, real-time sequencing (SMRT) developed by Pacific BioSciences produces longer reads than secondary generation sequencing technologies such as Illumina. The long read length enables PacBio sequencing to close gaps in genome assembly, reveal structural variations, and identify gene isoforms with higher accuracy in transcriptomic sequencing. However, PacBio data has high sequencing error rate and most of the errors are insertion or deletion errors. During alignment-based homology search, insertion or deletion errors in genes will cause frameshifts and may only lead to marginal alignment scores and short alignments. As a result, it is hard to distinguish true alignments from random alignments and the ambiguity will incur errors in structural and functional annotation. Existing frameshift correction tools are designed for data with much lower error rate and are not optimized for PacBio data. As an increasing number of groups are using SMRT, there is an urgent need for dedicated homology search tools for PacBio data. In this work, we introduce Frame-Pro, a profile homology search tool for PacBio reads. Our tool corrects sequencing errors and also outputs the profile alignments of the corrected sequences against characterized protein families. We applied our tool to both simulated and real PacBio data. The results showed that our method enables more sensitive homology search, especially for PacBio data sets of low sequencing coverage. In addition, we can correct more errors when comparing with a popular error correction tool that does not rely on hybrid sequencing. The source code is freely available at https://sourceforge.net/projects/frame-pro/ yannisun@msu.edu. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Hold on to your friends: Dedicated chaperones of ribosomal proteins: Dedicated chaperones mediate the safe transfer of ribosomal proteins to their site of pre-ribosome incorporation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillet, Benjamin; Mitterer, Valentin; Kressler, Dieter; Pertschy, Brigitte

    2017-01-01

    Eukaryotic ribosomes are assembled from their components, the ribosomal RNAs and ribosomal proteins, in a tremendously complex, multi-step process, which primarily takes place in the nuclear compartment. Therefore, most ribosomal proteins have to travel from the cytoplasm to their incorporation site on pre-ribosomes within the nucleus. However, due to their particular characteristics, such as a highly basic amino acid composition and the presence of unstructured extensions, ribosomal proteins are especially prone to aggregation and degradation in their unassembled state, hence specific mechanisms must operate to ensure their safe delivery. Recent studies have uncovered a group of proteins, termed dedicated chaperones, specialized in accompanying and guarding individual ribosomal proteins. In this essay, we review how these dedicated chaperones utilize different folds to interact with their ribosomal protein clients and how they ensure their soluble expression and interconnect their intracellular transport with their efficient assembly into pre-ribosomes.

  16. Is The Ribosome Targeted By Adaptive Mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jimenez Fernandez, Alicia; Molin, Søren; Johansen, Helle Krogh

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: RNA polymerase and ribosomes, composing the macromolecular synthesis machinery (MMSM), carry out the central processes of transcription and translation, but are usually seen as mechanical elements with no regulatory function. Extensive investigations of gene regulation and the high...

  17. Potential extra-ribosomal functions of ribosomal proteins in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Hui; Zhu, Yi-Fei; Xiong, Juan; Wang, Rong; Jia, Zhengping

    2015-08-01

    Ribosomal proteins (RPs), are essential components of the ribosomes, the molecular machines that turn mRNA blueprints into proteins, as they serve to stabilize the structure of the rRNA, thus improving protein biosynthesis. In addition, growing evidence suggests that RPs can function in other cellular roles. In the present review, we summarize several potential extra-ribosomal functions of RPs in ribosomal biogenesis, transcription activity, translation process, DNA repair, replicative life span, adhesive growth, and morphological transformation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. However, the future in-depth studies are needed to identify these novel secondary functions of RPs in S. cerevisiae.

  18. An RNA Element That Facilitates Programmed Ribosomal Readthrough in Turnip Crinkle Virus Adopts Multiple Conformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhlmann, Micki M; Chattopadhyay, Maitreyi; Stupina, Vera A; Gao, Feng; Simon, Anne E

    2016-10-01

    Ribosome recoding is used by RNA viruses for translational readthrough or frameshifting past termination codons for the synthesis of extension products. Recoding sites, along with downstream recoding stimulatory elements (RSEs), have long been studied in reporter constructs, because these fragments alone mediate customary levels of recoding and are thus assumed to contain complete instructions for establishment of the proper ratio of termination to recoding. RSEs from the Tombusviridae and Luteoviridae are thought to be exceptions, since they contain a long-distance RNA-RNA connection with the 3' end. This interaction has been suggested to substitute for pseudoknots, thought to be missing in tombusvirid RSEs. We provide evidence that the phylogenetically conserved RSE of the carmovirus Turnip crinkle virus (TCV) adopts an alternative, smaller structure that extends an upstream conserved hairpin and that this alternative structure is the predominant form of the RSE within nascent viral RNA in plant cells and when RNA is synthesized in vitro The TCV RSE also contains an internal pseudoknot along with the long-distance interaction, and the pseudoknot is not compatible with the phylogenetically conserved structure. Conserved residues just past the recoding site are important for recoding, and these residues are also conserved in the RSEs of gammaretroviruses. Our data demonstrate the dynamic nature of the TCV RSE and suggest that studies using reporter constructs may not be effectively recapitulating RSE-mediated recoding within viral genomes. Ribosome recoding is used by RNA viruses to enable ribosomes to extend translation past termination codons for the synthesis of longer products. Recoding sites and a downstream recoding stimulatory element (RSE) mediate expected levels of recoding when excised and placed in reporter constructs and thus are assumed to contain complete instructions for the establishment of the proper ratio of termination to recoding. We provide

  19. Ribosome Inactivating Proteins from Rosaceae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Chenjing; Rougé, Pierre; Van Damme, Els J M

    2016-08-22

    Ribosome-inactivating proteins (RIPs) are widespread among higher plants of different taxonomic orders. In this study, we report on the RIP sequences found in the genome/transcriptome of several important Rosaceae species, including many economically important edible fruits such as apple, pear, peach, apricot, and strawberry. All RIP domains from Rosaceae share high sequence similarity with conserved residues in the catalytic site and the carbohydrate binding sites. The genomes of Malus domestica and Pyrus communis contain both type 1 and type 2 RIP sequences, whereas for Prunus mume, Prunus persica, Pyrus bretschneideri, and Pyrus communis a complex set of type 1 RIP sequences was retrieved. Heterologous expression and purification of the type 1 as well as the type 2 RIP from apple allowed to characterize the biological activity of the proteins. Both RIPs from Malus domestica can inhibit protein synthesis. Furthermore, molecular modelling suggests that RIPs from Rosaceae possess three-dimensional structures that are highly similar to the model proteins and can bind to RIP substrates. Screening of the recombinant type 2 RIP from apple on a glycan array revealed that this type 2 RIP interacts with terminal sialic acid residues. Our data suggest that the RIPs from Rosaceae are biologically active proteins.

  20. RPG: the Ribosomal Protein Gene database

    OpenAIRE

    Nakao, Akihiro; Yoshihama, Maki; Kenmochi, Naoya

    2004-01-01

    RPG (http://ribosome.miyazaki-med.ac.jp/) is a new database that provides detailed information about ribosomal protein (RP) genes. It contains data from humans and other organisms, including Drosophila melanogaster, Caenorhabditis elegans, Saccharo myces cerevisiae, Methanococcus jannaschii and Escherichia coli. Users can search the database by gene name and organism. Each record includes sequences (genomic, cDNA and amino acid sequences), intron/exon structures, genomic locations and informa...

  1. A recent intermezzo at the Ribosome Club.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlov, Michael Y; Liljas, Anders; Ehrenberg, Måns

    2017-03-19

    Two sets of ribosome structures have recently led to two different interpretations of what limits the accuracy of codon translation by transfer RNAs. In this review, inspired by this intermezzo at the Ribosome Club, we briefly discuss accuracy amplification by energy driven proofreading and its implementation in genetic code translation. We further discuss general ways by which the monitoring bases of 16S rRNA may enhance the ultimate accuracy (d-values) and how the codon translation accuracy is reduced by the actions of Mg(2+) ions and the presence of error inducing aminoglycoside antibiotics. We demonstrate that complete freezing-in of cognate-like tautomeric states of ribosome-bound nucleotide bases in transfer RNA or messenger RNA is not compatible with recent experiments on initial codon selection by transfer RNA in ternary complex with elongation factor Tu and GTP. From these considerations, we suggest that the sets of 30S subunit structures from the Ramakrishnan group and 70S structures from the Yusupov/Yusupova group may, after all, reflect two sides of the same coin and how the structurally based intermezzo at the Ribosome Club may be resolved simply by taking the dynamic aspects of ribosome function into account.This article is part of the themed issue 'Perspectives on the ribosome'.

  2. Structure of the hypusinylated eukaryotic translation factor eIF-5A bound to the ribosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Christian; Becker, Thomas; Heuer, André; Braunger, Katharina; Shanmuganathan, Vivekanandan; Pech, Markus; Berninghausen, Otto; Wilson, Daniel N; Beckmann, Roland

    2016-02-29

    During protein synthesis, ribosomes become stalled on polyproline-containing sequences, unless they are rescued in archaea and eukaryotes by the initiation factor 5A (a/eIF-5A) and in bacteria by the homologous protein EF-P. While a structure of EF-P bound to the 70S ribosome exists, structural insight into eIF-5A on the 80S ribosome has been lacking. Here we present a cryo-electron microscopy reconstruction of eIF-5A bound to the yeast 80S ribosome at 3.9 Å resolution. The structure reveals that the unique and functionally essential post-translational hypusine modification reaches toward the peptidyltransferase center of the ribosome, where the hypusine moiety contacts A76 of the CCA-end of the P-site tRNA. These findings would support a model whereby eIF-5A stimulates peptide bond formation on polyproline-stalled ribosomes by stabilizing and orienting the CCA-end of the P-tRNA, rather than by directly contributing to the catalysis.

  3. Structural and functional analysis of the Rpf2-Rrs1 complex in ribosome biogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asano, Nozomi; Kato, Koji; Nakamura, Akiyoshi; Komoda, Keisuke; Tanaka, Isao; Yao, Min

    2015-01-01

    Proteins Rpf2 and Rrs1 are required for 60S ribosomal subunit maturation. These proteins are necessary for the recruitment of three ribosomal components (5S ribosomal RNA [rRNA], RpL5 and RpL11) to the 90S ribosome precursor and subsequent 27SB pre-rRNA processing. Here we present the crystal structure of the Aspergillus nidulans (An) Rpf2-Rrs1 core complex. The core complex contains the tightly interlocked N-terminal domains of Rpf2 and Rrs1. The Rpf2 N-terminal domain includes a Brix domain characterized by similar N- and C-terminal architecture. The long α-helix of Rrs1 joins the C-terminal half of the Brix domain as if it were part of a single molecule. The conserved proline-rich linker connecting the N- and C-terminal domains of Rrs1 wrap around the side of Rpf2 and anchor the C-terminal domain of Rrs1 to a specific site on Rpf2. In addition, gel shift analysis revealed that the Rpf2-Rrs1 complex binds directly to 5S rRNA. Further analysis of Rpf2-Rrs1 mutants demonstrated that Saccharomyces cerevisiae Rpf2 R236 (corresponds to R238 of AnRpf2) plays a significant role in this binding. Based on these studies and previous reports, we have proposed a model for ribosomal component recruitment to the 90S ribosome precursor. PMID:25855814

  4. Mapping the interaction of SmpB with ribosomes by footprinting of ribosomal RNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanova, Natalia; Pavlov, Michael Y.; Bouakaz, Elli; Ehrenberg, Måns; Schiavone, Lovisa Holmberg

    2005-01-01

    In trans-translation transfer messenger RNA (tmRNA) and small protein B (SmpB) rescue ribosomes stalled on truncated or in other ways problematic mRNAs. SmpB promotes the binding of tmRNA to the ribosome but there is uncertainty about the number of participating SmpB molecules as well as their ribosomal location. Here, the interaction of SmpB with ribosomal subunits and ribosomes was studied by isolation of SmpB containing complexes followed by chemical modification of ribosomal RNA with dimethyl sulfate, kethoxal and hydroxyl radicals. The results show that SmpB binds 30S and 50S subunits with 1:1 molar ratios and the 70S ribosome with 2:1 molar ratio. SmpB-footprints are similar on subunits and the ribosome. In the 30S subunit, SmpB footprints nucleotides that are in the vicinity of the P-site facing the E-site, and in the 50S subunit SmpB footprints nucleotides that are located below the L7/L12 stalk in the 3D structure of the ribosome. Based on these results, we suggest a mechanism where two molecules of SmpB interact with tmRNA and the ribosome during trans-translation. The first SmpB molecule binds near the factor-binding site on the 50S subunit helping tmRNA accommodation on the ribosome, whereas the second SmpB molecule may functionally substitute for a missing anticodon stem–loop in tmRNA during later steps of trans-translation. PMID:15972795

  5. Natural selection retains overrepresented out-of-frame stop codons against frameshift peptides in prokaryotes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tse Herman

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Out-of-frame stop codons (OSCs occur naturally in coding sequences of all organisms, providing a mechanism of early termination of translation in incorrect reading frame so that the metabolic cost associated with frameshift events can be reduced. Given such a functional significance, we expect statistically overrepresented OSCs in coding sequences as a result of a widespread selection. Accordingly, we examined available prokaryotic genomes to look for evidence of this selection. Results The complete genome sequences of 990 prokaryotes were obtained from NCBI GenBank. We found that low G+C content coding sequences contain significantly more OSCs and G+C content at specific codon positions were the principal determinants of OSC usage bias in the different reading frames. To investigate if there is overrepresentation of OSCs, we modeled the trinucleotide and hexanucleotide biases of the coding sequences using Markov models, and calculated the expected OSC frequencies for each organism using a Monte Carlo approach. More than 93% of 342 phylogenetically representative prokaryotic genomes contain excess OSCs. Interestingly the degree of OSC overrepresentation correlates positively with G+C content, which may represent a compensatory mechanism for the negative correlation of OSC frequency with G+C content. We extended the analysis using additional compositional bias models and showed that lower-order bias like codon usage and dipeptide bias could not explain the OSC overrepresentation. The degree of OSC overrepresentation was found to correlate negatively with the optimal growth temperature of the organism after correcting for the G+C% and AT skew of the coding sequence. Conclusions The present study uses approaches with statistical rigor to show that OSC overrepresentation is a widespread phenomenon among prokaryotes. Our results support the hypothesis that OSCs carry functional significance and have been selected in the course of

  6. Evidence for direct regulation of myocardial Na+/H+ exchanger isoform 1 phosphorylation and activity by 90-kDa ribosomal S6 kinase (RSK): effects of the novel and specific RSK inhibitor fmk on responses to alpha1-adrenergic stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuello, Friederike; Snabaitis, Andrew K; Cohen, Michael S; Taunton, Jack; Avkiran, Metin

    2007-03-01

    Multiple stimuli of physiological and pathophysiological significance, including alpha1-adrenoceptor agonists, stimulate the cardiac sarcolemmal Na+/H+ exchanger isoform 1 (NHE1) through activation of the mitogen-activated or extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) kinase (MEK) ERK-90-kDa ribosomal S6 kinase (RSK) signaling cascade. However, the individual contributions of ERK and RSK, which can each phosphorylate the NHE1 regulatory domain, to such stimulation are unknown. In the present study, we have used the novel RSK inhibitor fmk to determine the role of RSK as a direct regulator of NHE1 phosphorylation and activity in response to alpha1-adrenergic stimulation, in ventricular myocytes isolated from the adult rat heart. Initial experiments confirmed that pretreatment of myocytes with fmk before exposure to the alpha1-adrenoceptor agonist phenylephrine inhibited RSK C-terminal kinase activity and thereby RSK N-terminal kinase activation, without affecting MEK or ERK activation. Pretreatment of myocytes with fmk also inhibited phenylephrine-induced increases in NHE1 phosphorylation and the rate of NHE1-mediated H+ efflux under conditions of intracellular acidosis. These findings reveal, for the first time to our knowledge, that RSK is the principal regulator of NHE1 phosphorylation and activity after alpha1-adrenergic stimulation in adult myocardium.

  7. Structural and Functional Studies of Ribosome-inactivating Proteins and Ribosomal RNA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Wangyi; ZHANG Jinsong; LIU Renshui; HE Wenjun; LING Jun

    2007-01-01

    @@ A plant's ribosome-inactivating proteins (RIPs) are a group of toxic proteins. Theoretically, they can be employed as a tool enzyme in the exploration of the structure and function of the ribosomal RNA; in practical application, they can be used as an insecticide in agriculture, for preparation of immuno-toxic protein to kill cancer cells or against viral infection in medicine.

  8. Structural diversity in bacterial ribosomes: mycobacterial 70S ribosome structure reveals novel features.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manidip Shasmal

    Full Text Available Here we present analysis of a 3D cryo-EM map of the 70S ribosome from Mycobacterium smegmatis, a saprophytic cousin of the etiological agent of tuberculosis in humans, Mycobacterium tuberculosis. In comparison with the 3D structures of other prokaryotic ribosomes, the density map of the M. smegmatis 70S ribosome reveals unique structural features and their relative orientations in the ribosome. Dramatic changes in the periphery due to additional rRNA segments and extra domains of some of the peripheral ribosomal proteins like S3, S5, S16, L17, L25, are evident. One of the most notable features appears in the large subunit near L1 stalk as a long helical structure next to helix 54 of the 23S rRNA. The sharp upper end of this structure is located in the vicinity of the mRNA exit channel. Although the M. smegmatis 70S ribosome possesses conserved core structure of bacterial ribosome, the new structural features, unveiled in this study, demonstrates diversity in the 3D architecture of bacterial ribosomes. We postulate that the prominent helical structure related to the 23S rRNA actively participates in the mechanisms of translation in mycobacteria.

  9. Distribution of dwell times of a ribosome: effects of infidelity, kinetic proofreading and ribosome crowding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Ajeet K; Chowdhury, Debashish

    2011-04-01

    Ribosome is a molecular machine that polymerizes a protein where the sequence of the amino acid residues, the monomers of the protein, is dictated by the sequence of codons (triplets of nucleotides) on a messenger RNA (mRNA) that serves as the template. The ribosome is a molecular motor that utilizes the template mRNA strand also as the track. Thus, in each step the ribosome moves forward by one codon and, simultaneously, elongates the protein by one amino acid. We present a theoretical model that captures most of the main steps in the mechanochemical cycle of a ribosome. The stochastic movement of the ribosome consists of an alternating sequence of pause and translocation; the sum of the durations of a pause and the following translocation is the time of dwell of the ribosome at the corresponding codon. We derive the analytical expression for the distribution of the dwell times of a ribosome in our model. Wherever experimental data are available, our theoretical predictions are consistent with those results. We suggest appropriate experiments to test the new predictions of our model, particularly the effects of the quality control mechanism of the ribosome and that of their crowding on the mRNA track.

  10. Precursors of ribosomal RNA in yeast nucleus : Biosynthesis and relation to cytoplasmic ribosomal RNA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sillevis Smitt, W.W.; Vlak, J.M.; Schiphof, R.; Rozijn, Th.H.

    In vivo methylated precursors of ribosomal RNA in yeast have been characterized on acrylamide gels. The initial ribosomal precursor in the yeast nucleus is a 37S RNA component, which is processed to a nuclear 28S RNA. Both the 37S and the 28S RNA components are important constituents of the yeast

  11. Synthetic peptides and ribosomal proteins as substrate for 60S ribosomal protein kinase from yeast cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grankowski, N; Gasior, E; Issinger, O G

    1993-01-01

    Kinetic studies on the 60S protein kinase were conducted with synthetic peptides and ribosomal proteins as substrate. Peptide RRREEESDDD proved to be the best synthetic substrate for this enzyme. The peptide has a sequence of amino acids which most closely resembles the structure of potential...... phosphorylation sites in natural substrates, i.e., acidic ribosomal proteins. The superiority of certain kinetic parameters for 60S kinase obtained with the native whole 80S ribosomes over those of the isolated fraction of acidic ribosomal proteins indicates that the affinity of 60S kinase to the specific protein...... substrate not only depends on the structure of the polypeptide chain around the target amino acid but also on its native structure within the 80S ribosome....

  12. De novo nonsense and frameshift variants of TCF20 in individuals with intellectual disability and postnatal overgrowth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schäfgen, Johanna; Cremer, Kirsten; Becker, Jessica; Wieland, Thomas; Zink, Alexander M; Kim, Sarah; Windheuser, Isabelle C; Kreiß, Martina; Aretz, Stefan; Strom, Tim M; Wieczorek, Dagmar; Engels, Hartmut

    2016-12-01

    Recently, germline variants of the transcriptional co-regulator gene TCF20 have been implicated in the aetiology of autism spectrum disorders (ASD). However, the knowledge about the associated clinical picture remains fragmentary. In this study, two individuals with de novo TCF20 sequence variants were identified in a cohort of 313 individuals with intellectual disability of unknown aetiology, which was analysed by whole exome sequencing using a child-parent trio design. Both detected variants - one nonsense and one frameshift variant - were truncating. A comprehensive clinical characterisation of the patients yielded mild intellectual disability, postnatal tall stature and macrocephaly, obesity and muscular hypotonia as common clinical signs while ASD was only present in one proband. The present report begins to establish the clinical picture of individuals with de novo nonsense and frameshift variants of TCF20 which includes features such as proportionate overgrowth and muscular hypotonia. Furthermore, intellectual disability/developmental delay seems to be fully penetrant amongst known individuals with de novo nonsense and frameshift variants of TCF20, whereas ASD is shown to be incompletely penetrant. The transcriptional co-regulator gene TCF20 is hereby added to the growing number of genes implicated in the aetiology of both ASD and intellectual disability. Furthermore, such de novo variants of TCF20 may represent a novel differential diagnosis in the overgrowth syndrome spectrum.

  13. Familial Dilated Cardiomyopathy Caused by a Novel Frameshift in the BAG3 Gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toro, Rocio; Pérez-Serra, Alexandra; Campuzano, Oscar; Moncayo-Arlandi, Javier; Allegue, Catarina; Iglesias, Anna; Mangas, Alipio; Brugada, Ramon

    2016-01-01

    Dilated cardiomyopathy, a major cause of chronic heart failure and cardiac transplantation, is characterized by left ventricular or biventricular heart dilatation. In nearly 50% of cases the pathology is inherited, and more than 60 genes have been reported as disease-causing. However, in 30% of familial cases the mutation remains unidentified even after comprehensive genetic analysis. This study clinically and genetically assessed a large Spanish family affected by dilated cardiomyopathy to search for novel variations. Our study included a total of 100 family members. Clinical assessment was performed in alive, and genetic analysis was also performed in alive and 1 deceased relative. Genetic screening included resequencing of 55 genes associated with sudden cardiac death, and Sanger sequencing of main disease-associated genes. Genetic analysis identified a frame-shift variation in BAG3 (p.H243Tfr*64) in 32 patients. Genotype-phenotype correlation identified substantial heterogeneity in disease expression. Of 32 genetic carriers (one deceased), 21 relatives were clinically affected, and 10 were asymptomatic. Seventeen of the symptomatic genetic carriers exhibited proto-diastolic septal knock by echocardiographic assessment. We report p.H243Tfr*64_BAG3 as a novel pathogenic variation responsible for familial dilated cardiomyopathy. This variation correlates with a more severe phenotype of the disease, mainly in younger individuals. Genetic analysis in families, even asymptomatic individuals, enables early identification of individuals at risk and allows implementation of preventive measures.

  14. Familial Dilated Cardiomyopathy Caused by a Novel Frameshift in the BAG3 Gene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rocio Toro

    Full Text Available Dilated cardiomyopathy, a major cause of chronic heart failure and cardiac transplantation, is characterized by left ventricular or biventricular heart dilatation. In nearly 50% of cases the pathology is inherited, and more than 60 genes have been reported as disease-causing. However, in 30% of familial cases the mutation remains unidentified even after comprehensive genetic analysis. This study clinically and genetically assessed a large Spanish family affected by dilated cardiomyopathy to search for novel variations.Our study included a total of 100 family members. Clinical assessment was performed in alive, and genetic analysis was also performed in alive and 1 deceased relative. Genetic screening included resequencing of 55 genes associated with sudden cardiac death, and Sanger sequencing of main disease-associated genes. Genetic analysis identified a frame-shift variation in BAG3 (p.H243Tfr*64 in 32 patients. Genotype-phenotype correlation identified substantial heterogeneity in disease expression. Of 32 genetic carriers (one deceased, 21 relatives were clinically affected, and 10 were asymptomatic. Seventeen of the symptomatic genetic carriers exhibited proto-diastolic septal knock by echocardiographic assessment.We report p.H243Tfr*64_BAG3 as a novel pathogenic variation responsible for familial dilated cardiomyopathy. This variation correlates with a more severe phenotype of the disease, mainly in younger individuals. Genetic analysis in families, even asymptomatic individuals, enables early identification of individuals at risk and allows implementation of preventive measures.

  15. A negative feedback modulator of antigen processing evolved from a frameshift in the cowpox virus genome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiacheng Lin

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Coevolution of viruses and their hosts represents a dynamic molecular battle between the immune system and viral factors that mediate immune evasion. After the abandonment of smallpox vaccination, cowpox virus infections are an emerging zoonotic health threat, especially for immunocompromised patients. Here we delineate the mechanistic basis of how cowpox viral CPXV012 interferes with MHC class I antigen processing. This type II membrane protein inhibits the coreTAP complex at the step after peptide binding and peptide-induced conformational change, in blocking ATP binding and hydrolysis. Distinct from other immune evasion mechanisms, TAP inhibition is mediated by a short ER-lumenal fragment of CPXV012, which results from a frameshift in the cowpox virus genome. Tethered to the ER membrane, this fragment mimics a high ER-lumenal peptide concentration, thus provoking a trans-inhibition of antigen translocation as supply for MHC I loading. These findings illuminate the evolution of viral immune modulators and the basis of a fine-balanced regulation of antigen processing.

  16. A CHRNE frameshift mutation causes congenital myasthenic syndrome in young Jack Russell Terriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinz, Caitlin J; Lennon, Vanda A; James, Fiona; Thoreson, James B; Tsai, Kate L; Starr-Moss, Alison N; Humphries, H Dale; Guo, Ling T; Palmer, Anthony C; Clark, Leigh Anne; Shelton, G Diane

    2015-12-01

    Congenital myasthenic syndromes (CMSs) are a group of rare genetic disorders of the neuromuscular junction resulting in structural or functional causes of fatigable weakness that usually begins early in life. Mutations in pre-synaptic, synaptic and post-synaptic proteins have been demonstrated in human cases, with more than half involving aberrations in nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (AChR) subunits. CMS was first recognized in dogs in 1974 as an autosomal recessive trait in Jack Russell Terriers (JRTs). A deficiency of junctional AChRs was demonstrated. Here we characterize a CMS in 2 contemporary cases of JRT littermates with classic clinical and electromyographic findings, and immunochemical confirmation of an approximately 90% reduction in AChR protein content. Loci encoding the 5 AChR subunits were evaluated using microsatellite markers, and CHRNB1 and CHRNE were identified as candidate genes. Sequences of the splice sites and exons of both genes revealed a single base insertion in exon 7 of CHRNE that predicts a frameshift mutation and a premature stop codon. We further demonstrated this pathogenic mutation in CHRNE in archival tissues from unrelated JRTs studied 34 years ago.

  17. A frameshift mutation in GRXCR2 causes recessively inherited hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imtiaz, Ayesha; Kohrman, David C; Naz, Sadaf

    2014-05-01

    More than 360 million humans are affected with some degree of hearing loss, either early or later in life. A genetic cause for the disorder is present in a majority of the cases. We mapped a locus (DFNB101) for hearing loss in humans to chromosome 5q in a consanguineous Pakistani family. Exome sequencing revealed an insertion mutation in GRXCR2 as the cause of moderate-to-severe and likely progressive hearing loss in the affected individuals of the family. The frameshift mutation is predicted to affect a conserved, cysteine-rich region of GRXCR2, and to result in an abnormal extension of the C-terminus. Functional studies by cell transfections demonstrated that the mutant protein is unstable and mislocalized relative to wild-type GRXCR2, consistent with a loss-of-function mutation. Targeted disruption of Grxcr2 is concurrently reported to cause hearing loss in mice. The structural abnormalities in this animal model suggest a role for GRXCR2 in the development of stereocilia bundles, specialized structures on the apical surface of sensory cells in the cochlea that are critical for sound detection. Our results indicate that GRXCR2 should be considered in differential genetic diagnosis for individuals with early onset, moderate-to-severe and progressive hearing loss.

  18. Selective translational repression of truncated proteins from frameshift mutation-derived mRNAs in tumors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwon Tae You

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Frameshift and nonsense mutations are common in tumors with microsatellite instability, and mRNAs from these mutated genes have premature termination codons (PTCs. Abnormal mRNAs containing PTCs are normally degraded by the nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD system. However, PTCs located within 50-55 nucleotides of the last exon-exon junction are not recognized by NMD (NMD-irrelevant, and some PTC-containing mRNAs can escape from the NMD system (NMD-escape. We investigated protein expression from NMD-irrelevant and NMD-escape PTC-containing mRNAs by Western blotting and transfection assays. We demonstrated that transfection of NMD-irrelevant PTC-containing genomic DNA of MARCKS generates truncated protein. In contrast, NMD-escape PTC-containing versions of hMSH3 and TGFBR2 generate normal levels of mRNA, but do not generate detectable levels of protein. Transfection of NMD-escape mutant TGFBR2 genomic DNA failed to generate expression of truncated proteins, whereas transfection of wild-type TGFBR2 genomic DNA or mutant PTC-containing TGFBR2 cDNA generated expression of wild-type protein and truncated protein, respectively. Our findings suggest a novel mechanism of gene expression regulation for PTC-containing mRNAs in which the deleterious transcripts are regulated either by NMD or translational repression.

  19. CAG tract of MJD-1 may be prone to frameshifts causing polyalanine accumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaspar, C; Jannatipour, M; Dion, P; Laganière, J; Sequeiros, J; Brais, B; Rouleau, G A

    2000-08-12

    Machado-Joseph disease (MJD) is one of several disorders caused by the expansion of a coding CAG repeat (exp-CAG). The presence of intranuclear inclusions (INIs) in patients and cellular models of exp-CAG-associated diseases has lead to a nuclear toxicity model. Similar INIs are found in oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy, which is caused by a short expansion of an alanine-encoding GCG repeat. Here we propose that transcriptional or translational frameshifts occurring within expanded CAG tracts result in the production and accumulation of polyalanine-containing mutant proteins. We hypothesize that these alanine polymers deposit in cells forming INIs and may contribute to nuclear toxicity. We show evidence that supports our hypothesis in lymphoblast cells from MJD patients, as well as in pontine neurons of MJD brain and in in vitro cell culture models of the disease. We also provide evidence that alanine polymers alone are harmful to cells and predict that a similar pathogenic mechanism may occur in the other CAG repeat disorders.

  20. The ribosome can prevent aggregation of partially folded protein intermediates: studies using the Escherichia coli ribosome.

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    Bani Kumar Pathak

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Molecular chaperones that support de novo folding of proteins under non stress condition are classified as chaperone 'foldases' that are distinct from chaperone' holdases' that provide high affinity binding platform for unfolded proteins and prevent their aggregation specifically under stress conditions. Ribosome, the cellular protein synthesis machine can act as a foldase chaperone that can bind unfolded proteins and release them in folding competent state. The peptidyl transferase center (PTC located in the domain V of the 23S rRNA of Escherichia coli ribosome (bDV RNA is the chaperoning center of the ribosome. It has been proposed that via specific interactions between the RNA and refolding proteins, the chaperone provides information for the correct folding of unfolded polypeptide chains. RESULTS: We demonstrate using Escherichia coli ribosome and variants of its domain V RNA that the ribosome can bind to partially folded intermediates of bovine carbonic anhydrase II (BCAII and lysozyme and suppress aggregation during their refolding. Using mutants of domain V RNA we demonstrate that the time for which the chaperone retains the bound protein is an important factor in determining its ability to suppress aggregation and/or support reactivation of protein. CONCLUSION: The ribosome can behave like a 'holdase' chaperone and has the ability to bind and hold back partially folded intermediate states of proteins from participating in the aggregation process. Since the ribosome is an essential organelle that is present in large numbers in all living cells, this ability of the ribosome provides an energetically inexpensive way to suppress cellular aggregation. Further, this ability of the ribosome might also be crucial in the context that the ribosome is one of the first chaperones to be encountered by a large nascent polypeptide chains that have a tendency to form partially folded intermediates immediately following their synthesis.

  1. Pseudouridines and pseudouridine synthases of the ribosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ofengand, J; Malhotra, A; Remme, J; Gutgsell, N S; Del Campo, M; Jean-Charles, S; Peil, L; Kaya, Y

    2001-01-01

    psi are ubiquitous in ribosomal RNA. Eubacteria, Archaea, and eukaryotes all contain psi, although their number varies widely, with eukaryotes having the most. The small ribosomal subunit can apparently do without psi in some organisms, even though others have as many as 40 or more. Large subunits appear to need at least one psi but can have up to 50-60. psi is made by a set of site-specific enzymes in eubacteria, and in eukaryotes by a single enzyme complexed with auxiliary proteins and specificity-conferring guide RNAs. The mechanism is not known in Archaea, but based on an analysis of the kinds of psi synthases found in sequenced archaeal genomes, it is likely to involve use of guide RNAs. All psi synthases can be classified into one of four related groups, virtually all of which have a conserved aspartate residue in a conserved sequence motif. The aspartate is essential for psi formation in all twelve synthases examined so far. When the need for psi in E. coli was examined, the only synthase whose absence caused a major decrease in growth rate under normal conditions was RluD, the synthase that makes psi 1911, psi 1915, and psi 1917 in the helix 69 end-loop. This growth defect was the result of a major failure in assembly of the large ribosomal subunit. The defect could be prevented by supplying the rluD structural gene in trans, and also by providing a point mutant gene that made a synthase unable to make psi. Therefore, the RluD synthase protein appears to be directly involved in 50S subunit assembly, possibly as an RNA chaperone, and this activity is independent of its ability to form psi. This result is not without precedent. Depletion of PET56, a 2'-O-methyltransferase specific for G2251 (E. coli numbering) in yeast mitochondria virtually blocks 50S subunit assembly and mitochondrial function (Sirum-Connolly et al. 1995), but the methylation activity of the enzyme is not required (T. Mason, pers. comm.). The absence of FtsJ, a heat shock protein that makes

  2. Functional Importance of Mobile Ribosomal Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Kai-Chun; Wen, Jin-Der; Yang, Lee-Wei

    2015-01-01

    Although the dynamic motions and peptidyl transferase activity seem to be embedded in the rRNAs, the ribosome contains more than 50 ribosomal proteins (r-proteins), whose functions remain largely elusive. Also, the precise forms of some of these r-proteins, as being part of the ribosome, are not structurally solved due to their high flexibility, which hinders the efforts in their functional elucidation. Owing to recent advances in cryo-electron microscopy, single-molecule techniques, and theoretical modeling, much has been learned about the dynamics of these r-proteins. Surprisingly, allosteric regulations have been found in between spatially separated components as distant as those in the opposite sides of the ribosome. Here, we focus on the functional roles and intricate regulations of the mobile L1 and L12 stalks and L9 and S1 proteins. Conformational flexibility also enables versatile functions for r-proteins beyond translation. The arrangement of r-proteins may be under evolutionary pressure that fine-tunes mass distributions for optimal structural dynamics and catalytic activity of the ribosome.

  3. Ribosomal analysis of rapid rates of protein synthesis in the Antarctic sea urchin Sterechinus neumayeri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pace, Douglas A; Maxson, Robert; Manahan, Donal T

    2010-02-01

    Previous research has shown that developing stages of the Antarctic sea urchin Sterechinus neumayeri have high rates of protein synthesis that are comparable to those of similar species living in much warmer waters. Direct measurements of the biosynthetic capacities of isolated ribosomes have not been reported for marine organisms living in the extreme-cold environment of Antarctica. Such measurements are required for a mechanistic understanding of how the critical and highly complex processes involved in protein synthesis are regulated in animals living in the coldest marine environment on Earth (< -1 degrees C). We tested the hypothesis that high rates of protein synthesis in the cold are a direct result of high biosynthetic capacities of ribosomes engaged in protein synthesis. Our results show that the rate at which ribosomes manufacture proteins (i.e., the peptide elongation rate) at -1 degrees C is surprisingly similar to rates measured in other sea urchin species at temperatures that are over 15 degrees C warmer. Average peptide elongation rates for a range of developmental stages of the Antarctic sea urchin were 0.36 codons s(-1) (+/- 0.05, SE). On the basis of subcellular rate determinations of ribosomal activity, we calculated stage-specific rates of protein synthesis for blastulae and gastrulae to be 3.7 and 6.5 ng protein h(-1), respectively. These findings support the conclusion that the high rates of biosynthesis previously reported for the Antarctic sea urchin are an outcome of high ribosomal activities.

  4. Ribosomal studies on the 70S ribosome of E.coli by means of neutron scattering; Strukturuntersuchungen am 70S-Ribosom von E.coli unter Anwendung von Neutronenstreuung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burkhardt, N. [GKSS-Forschungszentrum Geesthacht GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Werkstofforschung

    1997-12-31

    Ribosomes are ribonucleo-protein complexes, which catalyse proteinbiosynthesis in all living organisms. Currently, most of the structural models of the prokaryotic 70S ribosome rely on electron microscopy and describe mainly the outer shape of the particle. Neutron scattering can provide information on the internal structure of the ribosome. Parts of the structure can be contrasted for neutrons by means of an isotopic exchange of the naturally occurring hydrogen ({sup 1}H) for deuterium ({sup 2}H), allowing direct measurements in situ. Specifically deuterium-labeled ribosomes (E. coli) were prepared and analysed with neutron scattering. The biochemical methods were established and combined to a generally applicable preparation system. This allows labeling of all ribosomal components in any combination. A systematic analysis of the protein and RNA phases resulted in the development of a new model for the 70S ribosome. This model describes not only the outer shape of the particle, but displays also an experimentally determined internal protein-RNA distribution and the border of subunits for the first time (four-phase model; resolution: 50A). Models of the 70S ribosome from other studies were evaluated and ranked according to consistency with the measured scattering data. Applying a new neutron scattering technique of particular sensitivity, the proton-spin contrast-variation, single proteins could be measured and localized. The positions of the proteins S6 and S10 were determined, providing the first coordinates of protein mass centers within the 70S ribosome. (orig.) [Deutsch] Ribosomen sind Ribonukleinsaeure-Protein Komplexe, die in allen lebenden Organismen die Proteinbiosynthese katalysieren. Strukturmodelle fuer das prokaryontische 70S-Ribosom beruhen derzeit vorwiegend auf elektronenmikroskopischen Untersuchungen und beschreiben im wesentlichen die aeussere Oberflaeche des Partikels. Informationen ueber die innere Struktur des Ribosoms koennen Messungen mit

  5. The ribosomal genes of Mycoplasma capricolum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muto, A; Hori, H; Sawada, M; Kawauchi, Y; Iwami, M; Yamao, F; Osawa, S

    1983-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of 5S rRNA from Mycoplasma capricolum is more similar to that of the gram-positive bacteria than that of the gram-negative bacteria. The presence of two copies of rRNA genes in M. capricolum genome has been demonstrated. The two different rRNA gene clusters have been cloned in E. coli plasmid vectors and analyzed for the rRNA gene organizations, demonstrating that the gene arrangement is in the order of 16S, 23S, and 5S rDNA. The ribosomes of M. capricolum contain about 30 species of proteins in 50S and 20 in 30S subunits. The number and size of the ribosomal proteins are not significantly different from those of other eubacterial ribosomes.

  6. Methylation of ribosomal protein S10 by protein-arginine methyltransferase 5 regulates ribosome biogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Jinqi; Wang, Yaqing; Liang, Yuheng; Zhang, Yongqing; Bao, Shilai; Xu, Zhiheng

    2010-04-23

    Modulation of ribosomal assembly is a fine tuning mechanism for cell number and organ size control. Many ribosomal proteins undergo post-translational modification, but their exact roles remain elusive. Here, we report that ribosomal protein s10 (RPS10) is a novel substrate of an oncoprotein, protein-arginine methyltransferase 5 (PRMT5). We show that PRMT5 interacts with RPS10 and catalyzes its methylation at the Arg(158) and Arg(160) residues. The methylation of RPS10 at Arg(158) and Arg(160) plays a role in the proper assembly of ribosomes, protein synthesis, and optimal cell proliferation. The RPS10-R158K/R160K mutant is not efficiently assembled into ribosomes and is unstable and prone to degradation by the proteasomal pathway. In nucleoli, RPS10 interacts with nucleophosmin/B23 and is predominantly concentrated in the granular component region, which is required for ribosome assembly. The RPS10 methylation mutant interacts weakly with nucleophosmin/B23 and fails to concentrate in the granular component region. Our results suggest that PRMT5 is likely to regulate cell proliferation through the methylation of ribosome proteins, and thus reveal a novel mechanism for PRMT5 in tumorigenesis.

  7. Distribution of dwell times of a ribosome: effects of infidelity, kinetic proofreading and ribosome crowding

    CERN Document Server

    Sharma, Ajeet K

    2010-01-01

    Ribosome is a molecular machine that polymerizes a protein where the sequence of the amino acid subunits of the protein is dictated by the sequence of codons (triplets of nucleotide subunits) on a messenger RNA (mRNA) that serves as the template. The ribosome is a molecular motor that utilizes the template mRNA strand also as the track. Thus, in each step the ribosome moves forward by one codon and, simultaneously, elongates the protein by one amino acid. We present a theoretical model that captures most of the main steps in the mechano-chemical cycle of a ribosome. The stochastic movement of the ribosome consists of an alternating sequence of pause and translocation; the sum of the durations of a pause and the following translocation is defined as the time of dwell of the ribosome at the corresponding codon. We present an analytical calculation of the distribution of the dwell times of a ribosome in our model. Our theoretical prediction is consistent with the experimental results reported in the literature.

  8. Mutations of ribosomal protein S5 suppress a defect in late-30S ribosomal subunit biogenesis caused by lack of the RbfA biogenesis factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nord, Stefan; Bhatt, Monika J; Tükenmez, Hasan; Farabaugh, Philip J; Wikström, P Mikael

    2015-08-01

    The in vivo assembly of ribosomal subunits requires assistance by maturation proteins that are not part of mature ribosomes. One such protein, RbfA, associates with the 30S ribosomal subunits. Loss of RbfA causes cold sensitivity and defects of the 30S subunit biogenesis and its overexpression partially suppresses the dominant cold sensitivity caused by a C23U mutation in the central pseudoknot of 16S rRNA, a structure essential for ribosome function. We have isolated suppressor mutations that restore partially the growth of an RbfA-lacking strain. Most of the strongest suppressor mutations alter one out of three distinct positions in the carboxy-terminal domain of ribosomal protein S5 (S5) in direct contact with helix 1 and helix 2 of the central pseudoknot. Their effect is to increase the translational capacity of the RbfA-lacking strain as evidenced by an increase in polysomes in the suppressed strains. Overexpression of RimP, a protein factor that along with RbfA regulates formation of the ribosome's central pseudoknot, was lethal to the RbfA-lacking strain but not to a wild-type strain and this lethality was suppressed by the alterations in S5. The S5 mutants alter translational fidelity but these changes do not explain consistently their effect on the RbfA-lacking strain. Our genetic results support a role for the region of S5 modified in the suppressors in the formation of the central pseudoknot in 16S rRNA.

  9. Studies on structural stability of thermophilic Sulfolobus acidocaldarius ribosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yangala, Kalavathi; Suryanarayana, Tangirala

    2007-02-01

    Structural stability of thermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus acidocaldarius ribosomes, with respect their susceptibility to pancreatic RNase A and stability to temperature (deltaTm), on treatment with various stabilizing (polyamines) and destabilizing (sulfhydryl and intercalating) agents were studied and compared with mesophilic E. coli ribosomes, to understand the structural differences between thermophilic and mesophilic ribosomes. Thermophilic archaeal ribosomes and their subunits were 10-times less susceptible to pancreatic RNase A, compared to mesophilic ribosomes, showing the presence of strong and compact structural organization in them. Thermophilic ribosomes treated with destabilizing agents, such as sulfhydryl reagents [5,5'-Dithio-bis-(2-nitrobenzoic acid), N-ethylmaleimide and p-hydroxymercurybenzoate) and intercalating agents (ethidium bromide, EtBr) showed higher stability to RNase A, compared to similarly treated mesophilic ribosomes, indicating the unavailability of thiol-reactive groups and the presence of strong solvent inaccessible inner core. Higher stability of thermophilic ribosomes compared to mesophilic ribosomes to unfolding agents like urea further supported the presence of strong inner core particle. Thermophilic ribosomes treated with intercalating agents, such as EtBr were less susceptible to RNase A, though they bound to more reagent, showing the rigidity or resilience of their macromolecular structure to alterations caused by destabilizing agents. Overall, these results indicated that factors such as presence of strong solvent inaccessible inner core and rigidity of ribosome macromolecular structure contributed stability of thermophilic ribosomes to RNase A and other destabilizing agents, when compared to mesophilic ribosomes.

  10. Ribosomal RNA pseudouridines and pseudouridine synthases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ofengand, James

    2002-03-01

    Pseudouridines are found in virtually all ribosomal RNAs but their function is unknown. There are four to eight times more pseudouridines in eukaryotes than in eubacteria. Mapping 19 Haloarcula marismortui pseudouridines on the three-dimensional 50S subunit does not show clustering. In bacteria, specific enzymes choose the site of pseudouridine formation. In eukaryotes, and probably also in archaea, selection and modification is done by a guide RNA-protein complex. No unique specific role for ribosomal pseudouridines has been identified. We propose that pseudouridine's function is as a molecular glue to stabilize required RNA conformations that would otherwise be too flexible.

  11. Global shape mimicry of tRNA within a viral internal ribosome entry site mediates translational reading frame selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Au, Hilda H; Cornilescu, Gabriel; Mouzakis, Kathryn D; Ren, Qian; Burke, Jordan E; Lee, Seonghoon; Butcher, Samuel E; Jan, Eric

    2015-11-24

    The dicistrovirus intergenic region internal ribosome entry site (IRES) adopts a triple-pseudoknotted RNA structure and occupies the core ribosomal E, P, and A sites to directly recruit the ribosome and initiate translation at a non-AUG codon. A subset of dicistrovirus IRESs directs translation in the 0 and +1 frames to produce the viral structural proteins and a +1 overlapping open reading frame called ORFx, respectively. Here we show that specific mutations of two unpaired adenosines located at the core of the three-helical junction of the honey bee dicistrovirus Israeli acute paralysis virus (IAPV) IRES PKI domain can uncouple 0 and +1 frame translation, suggesting that the structure adopts distinct conformations that contribute to 0 or +1 frame translation. Using a reconstituted translation system, we show that ribosomes assembled on mutant IRESs that direct exclusive 0 or +1 frame translation lack reading frame fidelity. Finally, a nuclear magnetic resonance/small-angle X-ray scattering hybrid approach reveals that the PKI domain of the IAPV IRES adopts an RNA structure that resembles a complete tRNA. The tRNA shape-mimicry enables the viral IRES to gain access to the ribosome tRNA-binding sites and form intermolecular contacts with the ribosome that are necessary for initiating IRES translation in a specific reading frame.

  12. Clinical and neurocognitive characterization of a family with a novel MED12 gene frameshift mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesca, Gaetan; Moizard, Marie-Pierre; Bussy, Gerald; Boggio, Dominique; Hu, Hao; Haas, Stefan A; Ropers, Hans-Hilger; Kalscheuer, Vera M; Des Portes, Vincent; Labalme, Audrey; Sanlaville, Damien; Edery, Patrick; Raynaud, Martine; Lespinasse, James

    2013-12-01

    FG syndrome, Lujan syndrome, and Ohdo syndrome, the Maat-Kievit-Brunner type, have been described as distinct syndromes with overlapping non-specific features and different missense mutations of the MED12 gene have been reported in all of them. We report a family including 10 males and 1 female affected with profound non-specific intellectual disability (ID) which was linked to a 30-cM region extending from Xp11.21 (ALAS2) to Xq22.3 (COL4A5). Parallel sequencing of all X-chromosome exons identified a frameshift mutation (c.5898dupC) of MED12. Mutated mRNA was not affected by non-sense mediated RNA decay and induced an additional abnormal isoform due to activation of cryptic splice-sites in exon 41. Dysmorphic features common to most affected males were long narrow face, high forehead, flat malar area, high nasal bridge, and short philtrum. Language was absent or very limited. Most patients had a friendly personality. Cognitive impairment, varying from borderline to profound ID was similarly observed in seven heterozygous females. There was no correlation between cognitive function and X-chromosome inactivation profiles in blood cells. The severe degree of ID in male patients, as well as variable cognitive impairment in heterozygous females suggests that the duplication observed in the present family may have a more severe effect on MED12 function than missense mutations. In a cognitively impaired male from this family, who also presented with tall stature and dysmorphism and did not have the MED12 mutation, a 600-kb duplication at 17p13.3 including the YWHAE gene, was found in a mosaic state.

  13. A frameshift mutation in GON4L is associated with proportionate dwarfism in Fleckvieh cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarzenbacher, Hermann; Wurmser, Christine; Flisikowski, Krzysztof; Misurova, Lubica; Jung, Simone; Langenmayer, Martin C; Schnieke, Angelika; Knubben-Schweizer, Gabriela; Fries, Ruedi; Pausch, Hubert

    2016-03-31

    Low birth weight and postnatal growth restriction are the most evident symptoms of dwarfism. Accompanying skeletal aberrations may compromise the general condition and locomotion of affected individuals. Several paternal half-sibs with a low birth weight and a small size were born in 2013 in the Fleckvieh cattle population. Affected calves were strikingly underweight at birth in spite of a normal gestation length and had craniofacial abnormalities such as elongated narrow heads and brachygnathia inferior. In spite of a normal general condition, their growth remained restricted during rearing. We genotyped 27 affected and 10,454 unaffected animals at 44,672 single nucleotide polymorphisms and performed association tests followed by homozygosity mapping, which allowed us to map the locus responsible for growth failure to a 1.85-Mb segment on bovine chromosome 3. Analysis of whole-genome re-sequencing data from one affected and 289 unaffected animals revealed a 1-bp deletion (g.15079217delC, rs723240647) in the coding region of the GON4L gene that segregated with the dwarfism-associated haplotype. We showed that the deletion induces intron retention and premature termination of translation, which can lead to a severely truncated protein that lacks domains that are likely essential to normal protein function. The widespread use of an undetected carrier bull for artificial insemination has resulted in a tenfold increase in the frequency of the deleterious allele in the female population. A frameshift mutation in GON4L is associated with autosomal recessive proportionate dwarfism in Fleckvieh cattle. The mutation has segregated in the population for more than 50 years without being recognized as a genetic disorder. However, the widespread use of an undetected carrier bull for artificial insemination caused a sudden accumulation of homozygous calves with dwarfism. Our findings provide the basis for genome-based mating strategies to avoid the inadvertent mating of carrier

  14. Specific structural probing of plasmid-coded ribosomal RNAs from Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aagaard, C; Rosendahl, G; Dam, M

    1991-01-01

    ribosome population, which consequently hinders direct probing of mutant rRNAs. Here, we describe how nonconserved helical regions of plasmid-coded rRNA have been altered in a manner that preserves their secondary structures while creating new sites for primer extension of mutant rRNAs. This facilitates...

  15. Molecular interactions of ribosomal components. IV: Cooperative interactions during assembly in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, M; Kurland, C G

    1973-08-01

    Cooperative interactions between different 30S ribosomal proteins during assembly in vitro are described. The site specific binding of S7 to 16S RNA is enhanced by S20; that of S16 requires S4 and S20; and S7 is required for the maximum binding of S9, S13 and S19. Some of these interactions are reflected in the protein neighborhoods of the functional ribosome, but this may not be a general rule. Finally, we suggest that the assembly cooperativety observed may not be a consequence of direct-protein interactions.

  16. Ribosomal protein L16 binds to the 3'-end of transfer RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maimets, T; Remme, J; Villems, R

    1984-01-23

    Escherichia coli 50 S ribosomal subunits were reconstituted with and without protein L16 present. The latter particles, although active in puromycin reaction, were unable to use CACCA-Phe as an acceptor substrate. We also found that L16 interacts directly with this oligonucleotide and, in the complex with tRNA, protects its 3'-end from pancreatic ribonuclease digestion. We suggest that the role of L16 is in the fixation of the aminoacyl stem of tRNA to the ribosome at its A-site.

  17. Specific structural probing of plasmid-coded ribosomal RNAs from Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aagaard, C; Rosendahl, G; Dam, M

    1991-01-01

    The preferred method for construction and in vivo expression of mutagenised Escherichia coli ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs) is via high copy number plasmids. Transcription of wild-type rRNA from the seven chromosomal rrn operons in strains harbouring plasmid-coded mutant rRNAs leads to a heterogeneous...... ribosome population, which consequently hinders direct probing of mutant rRNAs. Here, we describe how nonconserved helical regions of plasmid-coded rRNA have been altered in a manner that preserves their secondary structures while creating new sites for primer extension of mutant rRNAs. This facilitates...

  18. Chromosomal instability associated with a novel BLM frameshift mutation (c.1980-1982delAA) in two unrelated Tunisian families with Bloom syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Salah, G; Salem, I Hadj; Masmoudi, A; Ben Rhouma, B; Turki, H; Fakhfakh, F; Ayadi, H; Kamoun, H

    2014-10-01

    The Bloom syndrome (BS) is an autosomal recessive disorder associated with dwarfism, immunodeficiency, reduced fertility and cancer risk. BS cells show genomic instability, particularly an hyper exchange between the sister chromatids due to a defective processing of the DNA replication intermediates. It is caused by mutations in the BLM gene which encodes a member of the RecQ family of DExH box DNA helicases. In this study, we reported cytogenetic, BLM linkage and mutational analyses for two affected Tunisian families. The Cytogenetic parameters were performed by chromosomal aberration (CA) and sister chromatid exchange (SCE) assays and results showed a significant increase in mean frequency of CA and SCE in BS cells. BLM linkage performed by microsatellite genotyping revealed homozygous haplotypes for the BS patients, evidence of linkage to BLM gene. Mutational analysis by direct DNA sequencing revealed a novel frameshift mutation (c.1980-1982delAA) in exon 8 of BLM gene, resulting in a truncated protein (p.Lys662fsX5). The truncated protein could explain genomic instability and its related symptoms in the BS patients. The screening of this mutation is useful for BS diagnosis confirmation in Tunisian families.

  19. Ribosomal ribonucleic acid maturation during bacterial spore germination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleyman, M; Woese, C

    1969-01-01

    All the ribosomal ribonucleic acid made during the early stages of germination of spores of Bacillus subtilis is of the "precursor" type, i.e., that type appearing in the incomplete forms of the ribosome. Shortly before the onset of deoxyribonucleic acid synthesis in germination, this precursor ribonucleic acid changed to the mature ribosomal ribonucleic acid characteristic of the 30S and 50S ribosomal subunits.

  20. The DEAD-box helicase DDX3 supports the assembly of functional 80S ribosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geissler, Rene; Golbik, Ralph P; Behrens, Sven-Erik

    2012-06-01

    The DEAD-box helicase DDX3 has suggested functions in innate immunity, mRNA translocation and translation, and it participates in the propagation of assorted viruses. Exploring initially the role of DDX3 in the life cycle of hepatitis C virus, we observed the protein to be involved in translation directed by different viral internal ribosomal entry sites. Extension of these studies revealed a general supportive role of DDX3 in translation initiation. DDX3 was found to interact in an RNA-independent manner with defined components of the translational pre-initiation complex and to specifically associate with newly assembling 80S ribosomes. DDX3 knock down and in vitro reconstitution experiments revealed a significant function of the protein in the formation of 80S translation initiation complexes. Our study implies that DDX3 assists the 60S subunit joining process to assemble functional 80S ribosomes.

  1. Ribosome evolution: Emergence of peptide synthesis machinery

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Koji Tamura

    2011-12-01

    Proteins, the main players in current biological systems, are produced on ribosomes by sequential amide bond (peptide bond) formations between amino-acid-bearing tRNAs. The ribosome is an exquisite super-complex of RNA-proteins, containing more than 50 proteins and at least 3 kinds of RNAs. The combination of a variety of side chains of amino acids (typically 20 kinds with some exceptions) confers proteins with extraordinary structure and functions. The origin of peptide bond formation and the ribosome is crucial to the understanding of life itself. In this article, a possible evolutionary pathway to peptide bond formation machinery (proto-ribosome) will be discussed, with a special focus on the RNA minihelix (primordial form of modern tRNA) as a starting molecule. Combining the present data with recent experimental data, we can infer that the peptidyl transferase center (PTC) evolved from a primitive system in the RNA world comprising tRNA-like molecules formed by duplication of minihelix-like small RNA.

  2. Control of Ribosome Synthesis in Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Molin, Søren; Meyenburg, K. von; Måløe, O.

    1977-01-01

    The rate of ribosome synthesis and accumulation in Escherichia coli during the transition after an energy source shift-down was analyzed. The shift was imposed on cultures of stringent and relaxed strains growing in glucose minimal medium by the addition of the glucose analogue {alpha}-methylgluc...

  3. Crystal structure of eukaryotic ribosome and its complexes with inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusupova, Gulnara; Yusupov, Marat

    2017-03-19

    A high-resolution structure of the eukaryotic ribosome has been determined and has led to increased interest in studying protein biosynthesis and regulation of biosynthesis in cells. The functional complexes of the ribosome crystals obtained from bacteria and yeast have permitted researchers to identify the precise residue positions in different states of ribosome function. This knowledge, together with electron microscopy studies, enhances our understanding of how basic ribosome processes, including mRNA decoding, peptide bond formation, mRNA, and tRNA translocation and cotranslational transport of the nascent peptide, are regulated. In this review, we discuss the crystal structure of the entire 80S ribosome from yeast, which reveals its eukaryotic-specific features, and application of X-ray crystallography of the 80S ribosome for investigation of the binding mode for distinct compounds known to inhibit or modulate the protein-translation function of the ribosome. We also refer to a challenging aspect of the structural study of ribosomes, from higher eukaryotes, where the structures of major distinctive features of higher eukaryote ribosome-the high-eukaryote-specific long ribosomal RNA segments (about 1MDa)-remain unresolved. Presently, the structures of the major part of these high-eukaryotic expansion ribosomal RNA segments still remain unresolved.This article is part of the themed issue 'Perspectives on the ribosome'.

  4. Mescaline-induced changes of brain-cortex ribosomes. Effect of mescaline on the stability of brain-cortex ribosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, R K; Ghosh, J J

    1970-05-01

    1. During the action of mescaline sulphate on goat brain-cortex slices the ribosomal particles become susceptible to breakdown, releasing protein, RNA, acidsoluble nucleotides and ninhydrin-positive materials, resulting in loss of ribosomal enzyme activities. 2. Ribosomes of the mescaline-treated cortex slices undergo rapid degradation in the presence of trypsin and ribonuclease. 3. Mescaline does not alter the chemical and nucleotide compositions or the u.v.-absorption characteristics of ribosomal particles, however.

  5. Somatic frameshift mutations in the Bloom syndrome BLM gene are frequent in sporadic gastric carcinomas with microsatellite mutator phenotype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matei Irina

    2001-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genomic instability has been reported at microsatellite tracts in few coding sequences. We have shown that the Bloom syndrome BLM gene may be a target of microsatelliteinstability (MSI in a short poly-adenine repeat located in its coding region. To further characterize the involvement of BLM in tumorigenesis, we have investigated mutations in nine genes containing coding microsatellites in microsatellite mutator phenotype (MMP positive and negative gastric carcinomas (GCs. Methods We analyzed 50 gastric carcinomas (GCs for mutations in the BLM poly(A tract aswell as in the coding microsatellites of the TGFβ1-RII, IGFIIR, hMSH3, hMSH6, BAX, WRN, RECQL and CBL genes. Results BLM mutations were found in 27% of MMP+ GCs (4/15 cases but not in any of the MMP negative GCs (0/35 cases. The frequency of mutations in the other eight coding regions microsatellite was the following: TGFβ1-RII (60 %, BAX (27%, hMSH6 (20%,hMSH3 (13%, CBL (13%, IGFIIR (7%, RECQL (0% and WRN (0%. Mutations in BLM appear to be more frequently associated with frameshifts in BAX and in hMSH6and/or hMSH3. Tumors with BLM alterations present a higher frequency of unstable mono- and trinucleotide repeats located in coding regions as compared with mutator phenotype tumors without BLM frameshifts. Conclusions BLM frameshifts are frequent alterations in GCs specifically associated with MMP+tumors. We suggest that BLM loss of function by MSI may increase the genetic instability of a pre-existent unstable genotype in gastric tumors.

  6. A frameshift mutation in the cubilin gene (CUBN in Border Collies with Imerslund-Grasbeck syndrome (selective cobalamin malabsorption.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Owczarek-Lipska

    Full Text Available Imerslund-Gräsbeck syndrome (IGS or selective cobalamin malabsorption has been described in humans and dogs. IGS occurs in Border Collies and is inherited as a monogenic autosomal recessive trait in this breed. Using 7 IGS cases and 7 non-affected controls we mapped the causative mutation by genome-wide association and homozygosity mapping to a 3.53 Mb interval on chromosome 2. We re-sequenced the genome of one affected dog at ∼10× coverage and detected 17 non-synonymous variants in the critical interval. Two of these non-synonymous variants were in the cubilin gene (CUBN, which is known to play an essential role in cobalamin uptake from the ileum. We tested these two CUBN variants for association with IGS in larger cohorts of dogs and found that only one of them was perfectly associated with the phenotype. This variant, a single base pair deletion (c.8392delC, is predicted to cause a frameshift and premature stop codon in the CUBN gene. The resulting mutant open reading frame is 821 codons shorter than the wildtype open reading frame (p.Q2798Rfs*3. Interestingly, we observed an additional nonsense mutation in the MRC1 gene encoding the mannose receptor, C type 1, which was in perfect linkage disequilibrium with the CUBN frameshift mutation. Based on our genetic data and the known role of CUBN for cobalamin uptake we conclude that the identified CUBN frameshift mutation is most likely causative for IGS in Border Collies.

  7. Alterations at the peptidyl transferase centre of the ribosome induced by the synergistic action of the streptogramins dalfopristin and quinupristin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fucini Paola

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The bacterial ribosome is a primary target of several classes of antibiotics. Investigation of the structure of the ribosomal subunits in complex with different antibiotics can reveal the mode of inhibition of ribosomal protein synthesis. Analysis of the interactions between antibiotics and the ribosome permits investigation of the specific effect of modifications leading to antimicrobial resistances. Streptogramins are unique among the ribosome-targeting antibiotics because they consist of two components, streptogramins A and B, which act synergistically. Each compound alone exhibits a weak bacteriostatic activity, whereas the combination can act bactericidal. The streptogramins A display a prolonged activity that even persists after removal of the drug. However, the mode of activity of the streptogramins has not yet been fully elucidated, despite a plethora of biochemical and structural data. Results The investigation of the crystal structure of the 50S ribosomal subunit from Deinococcus radiodurans in complex with the clinically relevant streptogramins quinupristin and dalfopristin reveals their unique inhibitory mechanism. Quinupristin, a streptogramin B compound, binds in the ribosomal exit tunnel in a similar manner and position as the macrolides, suggesting a similar inhibitory mechanism, namely blockage of the ribosomal tunnel. Dalfopristin, the corresponding streptogramin A compound, binds close to quinupristin directly within the peptidyl transferase centre affecting both A- and P-site occupation by tRNA molecules. Conclusions The crystal structure indicates that the synergistic effect derives from direct interaction between both compounds and shared contacts with a single nucleotide, A2062. Upon binding of the streptogramins, the peptidyl transferase centre undergoes a significant conformational transition, which leads to a stable, non-productive orientation of the universally conserved U2585. Mutations of this r

  8. Translation regulation via nascent polypeptide-mediated ribosome stalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Daniel N; Arenz, Stefan; Beckmann, Roland

    2016-04-01

    As the nascent polypeptide chain is being synthesized, it passes through a tunnel within the large ribosomal subunit. Interaction between the nascent polypeptide chain and the ribosomal tunnel can modulate the translation rate and induce translational stalling to regulate gene expression. In this article, we highlight recent structural insights into how the nascent polypeptide chain, either alone or in cooperation with co-factors, can interact with components of the ribosomal tunnel to regulate translation via inactivating the peptidyltransferase center of the ribosome and inducing ribosome stalling.

  9. Effect of frameshift mutagen acriflavine on control of resistance genes in Acinetobacter baumannii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, B S; Hamouda, A; Findlay, J; Amyes, S G B

    2011-02-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is a Gram-negative pathogenic bacterium that often exhibits a multidrug-resistant phenotype causing infections at various sites of the body and increasingly leading to septicaemic shock. This study evaluated the role of acriflavine, a frameshift mutagen, on the movement of insertion sequence ISAba1 in clinical isolates of A. baumannii, with the focus on changes in expression levels of the bla(ADC) and bla(OXA-51-like) genes. Resistance profiles were assessed with consideration of ISAba1 acting as a promoter upstream of the bla(ADC) or bla(OXA-51-like) gene. ISAba1 movement was observed in the acriflavine mutants Ab153M and Ab1225M. Ab153M exhibited an increase in the MIC values of carbapenems and ceftazidime, with ISAba1 gained upstream of the bla(ADC) and bla(OXA-51-like) genes, correlating with an increase in gene expression. Reduced expression of the 17, 23 and 25 kDa outer-membrane proteins (OMPs) was also observed in Ab153M. There was a significant decrease in MIC values of carbapenems with the loss of ISAba1 upstream of the bla(ADC) and bla(OXA-51-like) genes in strain Ab1225M, and a significant decrease in bla(OXA-51-like) gene expression and, to a lesser extent, in bla(ADC) expression. Ab1225M and a serially subcultured Ab1225 strain (Ab1225s) exhibited overexpression of the 17, 23, 25 and 27 kDa OMPs. There was a decrease in MIC values of the carbapenems and piperacillin/tazobactam but not of ceftazidime in Ab1225s, which had ISAba1 upstream of the bla(ADC) and bla(OXA-51-like) genes. A significant decrease in bla(OXA-51-like) expression was observed in Ab1225s, whereas the expression of bla(ADC) was similar to that in the Ab1225 parental strain. The attenuation in this strain may be due to overexpression of OMPs and it is clear that, even if ISAba1 is present upstream of an antibiotic resistance gene, it may not necessarily contribute towards the overexpression of antibiotic resistance genes (bla(OXA-51-like) in Ab

  10. SERPINB11 frameshift variant associated with novel hoof specific phenotype in Connemara ponies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carrie J Finno

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Horses belong to the order Perissodactyla and bear the majority of their weight on their third toe; therefore, tremendous force is applied to each hoof. An inherited disease characterized by a phenotype restricted to the dorsal hoof wall was identified in the Connemara pony. Hoof wall separation disease (HWSD manifests clinically as separation of the dorsal hoof wall along the weight-bearing surface of the hoof during the first year of life. Parents of affected ponies appeared clinically normal, suggesting an autosomal recessive mode of inheritance. A case-control allelic genome wide association analysis was performed (ncases = 15, ncontrols = 24. Population stratification (λ = 1.48 was successfully improved by removing outliers (ncontrols = 7 identified on a multidimensional scaling plot. A genome-wide significant association was detected on chromosome 8 (praw = 1.37x10-10, pgenome = 1.92x10-5. A homozygous region identified in affected ponies spanned from 79,936,024-81,676,900 bp and contained a family of 13 annotated SERPINB genes. Whole genome next-generation sequencing at 6x coverage of two cases and two controls revealed 9,758 SNVs and 1,230 indels within the ~1.7-Mb haplotype, of which 17 and 5, respectively, segregated with the disease and were located within or adjacent to genes. Additional genotyping of these 22 putative functional variants in 369 Connemara ponies (ncases = 23, ncontrols = 346 and 169 horses of other breeds revealed segregation of three putative variants adjacent or within four SERPIN genes. Two of the variants were non-coding and one was an insertion within SERPINB11 that introduced a frameshift resulting in a premature stop codon. Evaluation of mRNA levels at the proximal hoof capsule (ncases = 4, ncontrols = 4 revealed that SERPINB11 expression was significantly reduced in affected ponies (p<0.001. Carrier frequency was estimated at 14.8%. This study describes the first genetic variant associated with a hoof wall

  11. A novel frameshift mutation in CX46 associated with hereditary dominant cataracts in a Chinese family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiu-Kun Cui

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To investigate the genetic mutations that are associated the hereditary autosomal dominant cataract in a Chinese family. METHODS: A Chinese family consisting of 20 cataract patients (including 9 male and 11 female and 2 unaffected individuals from 5 generations were diagnosed to be a typical autosomal dominant cataract pedigree. Genomic DNA samples were extracted from the peripheral blood cells of the participants in this pedigree. Exon sequence was used for genetic mutation screening. In silico analysis was used to study the structure characteristics of connexin 46 (CX46 mutant. Immunoblotting was conduceted for testing the expression of CX46. RESULTS: To determine the involved genetic mutations, 11 well-known cataract-associated genes (cryaa, cryab, crybb1, crybb2, crygc, crygd, Gja3, Gja8, Hsf4, Mip and Pitx3 were chosen for genetic mutation test by using exon sequencing. A novel cytosine insertion at position 1195 of CX46 cDNA (c.1194_1195ins C was found in the samples of 5 tested cataract patients but not in the unaffected 2 individuals nor in normal controls, which resulted in 30 amino acids more extension in CX46C-terminus (cx46fs400 compared with the wild-type CX46. In silico protein structure analysis indicated that the mutant showed distinctive hydrophobicity and protein secondary structure compared with the wild-type CX46. The immunoblot results revealed that CX46 protein, which expressed in the aging cataract lens tissues, was absence in the proband lens. In contrast, CX50, alpha A-crystallin and alphaB-crystallin expressed equally in both proband and aging cataract tissues. Those results revealed that the cx46fs400 mutation could impair CX46 protein expression. CONCLUSION: The insertion of cytosine at position 1195 of CX46 cDNA is a novel mutation site that is associated with the autosomal dominant cataracts in this Chinese family. The C-terminal frameshift mutation is involved in regulating CX46 protein expression.

  12. Ribosomal Protein S14 Negatively Regulates c-Myc Activity*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiang; Hao, Qian; Liao, Jun-ming; Liao, Peng; Lu, Hua

    2013-01-01

    The ribosomal gene RPS14 is associated with the cancer-prone 5q-syndrome, which is caused by an interstitial deletion of the long arm of human chromosome 5. Previously, we found that ribosomal protein S14 (RPS14) binds to and inactivates MDM2, consequently leading to p53-dependent cell-cycle arrest and growth inhibition. However, it remains elusive whether RPS14 regulates cell proliferation in a p53-independent manner. Here, we show that RPS14 interacts with the Myc homology box II (MBII) and the C-terminal basic helix-loop-helix leucine zipper (bHLH-LZ) domains of the oncoprotein c-Myc. Further, RPS14 inhibited c-Myc transcriptional activity by preventing the recruitment of c-Myc and its cofactor, TRRAP, to the target gene promoters, as thus suppressing c-Myc-induced cell proliferation. Also, siRNA-mediated RPS14 depletion elevated c-Myc transcriptional activity determined by its target gene, Nucleolin, expression. Interestingly, RPS14 depletion also resulted in the induction of c-Myc mRNA and subsequent protein levels. Consistent with this, RPS14 promoted c-Myc mRNA turnover through an Argonaute 2 (Ago2)- and microRNA-mediated pathway. Taken together, our study demonstrates that RPS14 negates c-Myc functions by directly inhibiting its transcriptional activity and mediating its mRNA degradation via miRNA. PMID:23775087

  13. History of the ribosome and the origin of translation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrov, Anton S.; Gulen, Burak; Norris, Ashlyn M.; Kovacs, Nicholas A.; Lanier, Kathryn A.; Fox, George E.; Harvey, Stephen C.; Wartell, Roger M.; Hud, Nicholas V.; Williams, Loren Dean

    2015-01-01

    We present a molecular-level model for the origin and evolution of the translation system, using a 3D comparative method. In this model, the ribosome evolved by accretion, recursively adding expansion segments, iteratively growing, subsuming, and freezing the rRNA. Functions of expansion segments in the ancestral ribosome are assigned by correspondence with their functions in the extant ribosome. The model explains the evolution of the large ribosomal subunit, the small ribosomal subunit, tRNA, and mRNA. Prokaryotic ribosomes evolved in six phases, sequentially acquiring capabilities for RNA folding, catalysis, subunit association, correlated evolution, decoding, energy-driven translocation, and surface proteinization. Two additional phases exclusive to eukaryotes led to tentacle-like rRNA expansions. In this model, ribosomal proteinization was a driving force for the broad adoption of proteins in other biological processes. The exit tunnel was clearly a central theme of all phases of ribosomal evolution and was continuously extended and rigidified. In the primitive noncoding ribosome, proto-mRNA and the small ribosomal subunit acted as cofactors, positioning the activated ends of tRNAs within the peptidyl transferase center. This association linked the evolution of the large and small ribosomal subunits, proto-mRNA, and tRNA. PMID:26621738

  14. GTPases and the origin of the ribosome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smith Temple F

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This paper is an attempt to trace the evolution of the ribosome through the evolution of the universal P-loop GTPases that are involved with the ribosome in translation and with the attachment of the ribosome to the membrane. The GTPases involved in translation in Bacteria/Archaea are the elongation factors EFTu/EF1, the initiation factors IF2/aeIF5b + aeIF2, and the elongation factors EFG/EF2. All of these GTPases also contain the OB fold also found in the non GTPase IF1 involved in initiation. The GTPase involved in the signal recognition particle in most Bacteria and Archaea is SRP54. Results 1 The Elongation Factors of the Archaea based on structural considerations of the domains have the following evolutionary path: EF1→ aeIF2 → EF2. The evolution of the aeIF5b was a later event; 2 the Elongation Factors of the Bacteria based on the topological considerations of the GTPase domain have a similar evolutionary path: EFTu→ IF→2→EFG. These evolutionary sequences reflect the evolution of the LSU followed by the SSU to form the ribosome; 3 the OB-fold IF1 is a mimic of an ancient tRNA minihelix. Conclusion The evolution of translational GTPases of both the Archaea and Bacteria point to the evolution of the ribosome. The elongation factors, EFTu/EF1, began as a Ras-like GTPase bringing the activated minihelix tRNA to the Large Subunit Unit. The initiation factors and elongation factor would then have evolved from the EFTu/EF1 as the small subunit was added to the evolving ribosome. The SRP has an SRP54 GTPase and a specific RNA fold in its RNA component similar to the PTC. We consider the SRP to be a remnant of an ancient form of an LSU bound to a membrane. Reviewers This article was reviewed by George Fox, Leonid Mirny and Chris Sander.

  15. RPG: the Ribosomal Protein Gene database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakao, Akihiro; Yoshihama, Maki; Kenmochi, Naoya

    2004-01-01

    RPG (http://ribosome.miyazaki-med.ac.jp/) is a new database that provides detailed information about ribosomal protein (RP) genes. It contains data from humans and other organisms, including Drosophila melanogaster, Caenorhabditis elegans, Saccharo myces cerevisiae, Methanococcus jannaschii and Escherichia coli. Users can search the database by gene name and organism. Each record includes sequences (genomic, cDNA and amino acid sequences), intron/exon structures, genomic locations and information about orthologs. In addition, users can view and compare the gene structures of the above organisms and make multiple amino acid sequence alignments. RPG also provides information on small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNAs) that are encoded in the introns of RP genes.

  16. Tertiary interactions within the ribosomal exit tunnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosolapov, Andrey; Deutsch, Carol

    2009-04-01

    Although tertiary folding of whole protein domains is prohibited by the cramped dimensions of the ribosomal tunnel, dynamic tertiary interactions may permit folding of small elementary units within the tunnel. To probe this possibility, we used a beta-hairpin and an alpha-helical hairpin from the cytosolic N terminus of a voltage-gated potassium channel and determined a probability of folding for each at defined locations inside and outside the tunnel. Minimalist tertiary structures can form near the exit port of the tunnel, a region that provides an entropic window for initial exploration of local peptide conformations. Tertiary subdomains of the nascent peptide fold sequentially, but not independently, during translation. These studies offer an approach for diagnosing the molecular basis for folding defects that lead to protein malfunction and provide insight into the role of the ribosome during early potassium channel biogenesis.

  17. Novel Mutation of Cleidocranial Dysplasia-related Frameshift Runt-related Transcription Factor 2 in a Sporadic Chinese Case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Xue-Yan; Jia, Pei-Zeng; Zhao, Hua-Xiang; Li, Wei-Ran; Chen, Feng; Lin, Jiu-Xiang

    2017-01-01

    Background: Cleidocranial dysplasia (CCD) is an autosomal dominant disease that affects the skeletal system. Common symptoms of CCD include hypoplasia or aplasia of the clavicles, delayed or even absent closure of the fontanels, midface hypoplasia, short stature, and delayed eruption of permanent and supernumerary teeth. Previous studies reported a connection between CCD and the haploinsufficiency of runt-related transcription factor 2 (RUNX2). Here, we report a sporadic Chinese case presenting typical symptoms of CCD. Methods: We made genetic testing on this sporadic Chinese case and identified a novel RUNX2 frameshift mutation: c.1111dupT. In situ immunofluorescence microscopy and osteocalcin promoter luciferase assay were performed to compare the functions of the RUNX2 mutation with those of wild-type RUNX2. Results: RUNX2 mutation was observed in the perinuclear region, cytoplasm, and nuclei. In contrast, wild-type RUNX2 was confined in the nuclei, which indicated that the subcellular compartmentalization of RUNX2 mutation was partially perturbed. The transactivation function on osteocalcin promoter of the RUNX2 mutation was obviously abrogated. Conclusions: We identified a sporadic CCD patient carrying a novel insertion/frameshift mutation of RUNX2. This finding expanded our understanding of CCD-related phenotypes. PMID:28091408

  18. Clinical and molecular characterization of a novel PLIN1 frameshift mutation identified in patients with familial partial lipodystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozusko, Kristina; Tsang, Venessa H M; Bottomley, William; Cho, Yoon-Hi; Gandotra, Sheetal; Mimmack, Michael; Lim, Koini; Isaac, Iona; Patel, Satish; Saudek, Vladimir; O'Rahilly, Stephen; Srinivasan, Shubha; Greenfield, Jerry R; Barroso, Ines; Campbell, Lesley V; Savage, David B

    2015-01-01

    Perilipin 1 is a lipid droplet coat protein predominantly expressed in adipocytes, where it inhibits basal and facilitates stimulated lipolysis. Loss-of-function mutations in the PLIN1 gene were recently reported in patients with a novel subtype of familial partial lipodystrophy, designated as FPLD4. We now report the identification and characterization of a novel heterozygous frameshift mutation affecting the carboxy-terminus (439fs) of perilipin 1 in two unrelated families. The mutation cosegregated with a similar phenotype including partial lipodystrophy, severe insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes, extreme hypertriglyceridemia, and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in both families. Poor metabolic control despite maximal medical therapy prompted two patients to undergo bariatric surgery, with remarkably beneficial consequences. Functional studies indicated that expression levels of the mutant protein were lower than wild-type protein, and in stably transfected preadipocytes the mutant protein was associated with smaller lipid droplets. Interestingly, unlike the previously reported 398 and 404 frameshift mutants, this variant binds and stabilizes ABHD5 expression but still fails to inhibit basal lipolysis as effectively as wild-type perilipin 1. Collectively, these findings highlight the physiological need for exquisite regulation of neutral lipid storage within adipocyte lipid droplets, as well as the possible metabolic benefits of bariatric surgery in this serious disease.

  19. A novel frameshift mutation in FGA (c.1846 del A) leading to congenital afibrinogenemia in a consanguineous Syrian family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levrat, Emmanuel; Aboukhamis, Imad; de Moerloose, Philippe; Farho, Jaafar; Chamaa, Sahar; Reber, Guido; Fort, Alexandre; Neerman-Arbez, Marguerite

    2011-03-01

    Congenital afibrinogenemia is a rare autosomal recessive coagulation disorder characterized essentially by bleeding symptoms, but miscarriages and, paradoxically, thromboembolic events can also occur. Most reported mutations leading to congenital afibrinogenemia are located in FGA encoding the fibrinogen A α-chain. In this study, we analysed 12 individuals from a consanguineous Syrian family with reduced or absent fibrinogen levels: those with fibrinogen levels around 1 g/l (n = 7) were found to be heterozygous for a novel frameshift mutation in FGA exon 5 (c.1846 del A) and those with undetectable fibrinogen levels (n = 5) were homozygous for the same mutation. This novel frameshift mutation is the most C-terminal causative FGA mutation identified to date in afibrinogenemic patients. The resulting aberrant Aα-chain (p.Thr616HisfsX32) is most likely synthesized, but is less efficiently assembled and/or secreted into the circulation given the phenotype of asymptomatic hypofibrinogenemia in heterozygous individuals and bleeding diathesis in homozygous individuals.

  20. A frameshift mutation in HTRA1 expands CARASIL syndrome and peripheral small arterial disease to the Chinese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Bin; Zeng, Jiabin; Lin, Yi; Lin, Yu; Lin, WenPing; Lin, Wei; Li, Zhiwen; Wang, Ning

    2015-08-01

    Cerebral autosomal recessive arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CARASIL) is a rare hereditary cerebral artery disease. The HtrA serine protease 1 (HTRA1) gene has been identified as the causative gene of CARASIL. Here, we report a novel mutation in the HTRA1 gene in a CARASIL pedigree and explore its pathogenesis at the protein level. Subcutaneous tissue biopsy and HTRA1 gene analysis were performed in a CARASIL patient, and HTRA1 and TGF-β1 protein expression in subcutaneous tissue and cultured fibroblasts from the proband were detected by immunohistochemistry and western blotting. A 28-year-old male proband and his brother experienced recurrent stroke, hair loss and low back pain. Abnormalities in the proband were found in the elastic plate of subcutaneous small arteries, and a novel homozygous frameshift mutation (c.161_162insAG), leading to the formation of a stop codon 159 amino acids downstream of the insertion (p.Gly56Alafs*160) was detected. Reduced HTRA1 protein and increased TGF-β1 expression were detected in subcutaneous tissue and in cultured fibroblasts. A frameshift mutation in the HTRA1 gene detected in a CARASIL pedigree resulted in reduced HTRA1 protein and increased TGF-β1 expression, which may cause severe CARASIL and peripheral small arterial disease.

  1. Mitochondrial ribosome assembly in health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Silva, Dasmanthie; Tu, Ya-Ting; Amunts, Alexey; Fontanesi, Flavia; Barrientos, Antoni

    2015-01-01

    The ribosome is a structurally and functionally conserved macromolecular machine universally responsible for catalyzing protein synthesis. Within eukaryotic cells, mitochondria contain their own ribosomes (mitoribosomes), which synthesize a handful of proteins, all essential for the biogenesis of the oxidative phosphorylation system. High-resolution cryo-EM structures of the yeast, porcine and human mitoribosomal subunits and of the entire human mitoribosome have uncovered a wealth of new information to illustrate their evolutionary divergence from their bacterial ancestors and their adaptation to synthesis of highly hydrophobic membrane proteins. With such structural data becoming available, one of the most important remaining questions is that of the mitoribosome assembly pathway and factors involved. The regulation of mitoribosome biogenesis is paramount to mitochondrial respiration, and thus to cell viability, growth and differentiation. Moreover, mutations affecting the rRNA and protein components produce severe human mitochondrial disorders. Despite its biological and biomedical significance, knowledge on mitoribosome biogenesis and its deviations from the much-studied bacterial ribosome assembly processes is scarce, especially the order of rRNA processing and assembly events and the regulatory factors required to achieve fully functional particles. This article focuses on summarizing the current available information on mitoribosome assembly pathway, factors that form the mitoribosome assembly machinery, and the effect of defective mitoribosome assembly on human health.

  2. Ribosome Inactivating Proteins from Plants Inhibiting Viruses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Inderdeep Kaur; R C Gupta; Munish Puri

    2011-01-01

    Many plants contain ribosome inactivating proteins (RIPs) with N-glycosidase activity,which depurinate large ribosomal RNA and arrest protein synthesis.RIPs so far tested inhibit replication of mRNA as well as DNA viruses and these proteins,isolated from plants,are found to be effective against a broad range of viruses such as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV),hepatitis B virus (HBV) and herpes simplex virus (HSV).Most of the research work related to RIPs has been focused on antiviral activity against HIV; however,the exact mechanism of antiviral activity is still not clear.The mechanism of antiviral activity was thought to follow inactivation of the host cell ribosome,leading to inhibition of viral protein translation and host cell death.Enzymatic activity of RIPs is not hmited to depurination of the large rRNA,in addition they can depurinate viral DNA as well as RNA.Recently,Phase Ⅰ/Ⅱ clinical trials have demonstrated the potential use of RIPs for treating patients with HIV disease.The aim of this review is to focus on various RIPs from plants associated with anti-HIV activity.

  3. Hb Filottrano [codon 120 (-A)]: a novel frameshift mutation in exon 3 of the β-globin gene causing dominantly inherited β-thalassemia intermedia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amato, Antonio; Cappabianca, Maria Pia; Perri, Maria; Zaghis, Ivo; Mastropietro, Fabrizio; Ponzini, Donatella; Di Biagio, Paola; Piscitelli, Roberta

    2012-01-01

    We report a novel frameshift mutation in exon 3 of the β-globin gene, that, in the heterozygous state, leads to a β-thalassemia intermedia (β-TI) phenotype (marked anemia, splenomegaly, hyperbilirubinemia, jaundice, unbalanced synthesis of α/non-α chains in a 34-year-old Italian woman. This frameshift mutation, due to the deletion of the first nucleotide (-A) at codon 120, results in a β-globin chain that is elongated to 156 amino acid residues. These highly unstable abnormal chains precipitate in the erythroblasts as inclusion bodies, thus causing inefficient erythropoiesis and ultimately resulting in the observed dominant clinical phenotype.

  4. Zfrp8/PDCD2 Interacts with RpS2 Connecting Ribosome Maturation and Gene-Specific Translation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetlana Minakhina

    Full Text Available Zfrp8/PDCD2 is a highly conserved protein essential for stem cell maintenance in both flies and mammals. It is also required in fast proliferating cells such as cancer cells. Our previous studies suggested that Zfrp8 functions in the formation of mRNP (mRNA ribonucleoprotein complexes and also controls RNA of select Transposable Elements (TEs. Here we show that in Zfrp8/PDCD2 knock down (KD ovaries, specific mRNAs and TE transcripts show increased nuclear accumulation. We also show that Zfrp8/PDCD2 interacts with the (40S small ribosomal subunit through direct interaction with RpS2 (uS5. By studying the distribution of endogenous and transgenic fluorescently tagged ribosomal proteins we demonstrate that Zfrp8/PDCD2 regulates the cytoplasmic levels of components of the small (40S ribosomal subunit, but does not control nuclear/nucleolar localization of ribosomal proteins. Our results suggest that Zfrp8/PDCD2 functions at late stages of ribosome assembly and may regulate the binding of specific mRNA-RNPs to the small ribosomal subunit ultimately controlling their cytoplasmic localization and translation.

  5. Macrolide-peptide conjugates as probes of the path of travel of the nascent peptides through the ribosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washington, Arren Z; Benicewicz, Derek B; Canzoneri, Joshua C; Fagan, Crystal E; Mwakwari, Sandra C; Maehigashi, Tatsuya; Dunham, Christine M; Oyelere, Adegboyega K

    2014-11-21

    Despite decades of research on the bacterial ribosome, the ribosomal exit tunnel is still poorly understood. Although it has been suggested that the exit tunnel is simply a convenient route of egress for the nascent chain, specific protein sequences serve to slow the rate of translation, suggesting some degree of interaction between the nascent peptide chain and the exit tunnel. To understand how the ribosome interacts with nascent peptide sequences, we synthesized and characterized a novel class of probe molecules. These peptide-macrolide (or "peptolide") conjugates were designed to present unique peptide sequences to the exit tunnel. Biochemical and X-ray structural analyses of the interactions between these probes and the ribosome reveal interesting insights about the exit tunnel. Using translation inhibition and RNA structure probing assays, we find the exit tunnel has a relaxed preference for the directionality (N → C or C → N orientation) of the nascent peptides. Moreover, the X-ray crystal structure of one peptolide derived from a positively charged, reverse Nuclear Localization Sequence peptide, bound to the 70S bacterial ribosome, reveals that the macrolide ring of the peptolide binds in the same position as other macrolides. However, the peptide tail folds over the macrolide ring, oriented toward the peptidyl transferase center and interacting in a novel manner with 23S rRNA residue C2442 and His69 of ribosomal protein L4. These data suggest that these peptolides are viable probes for interrogating nascent peptide-exit tunnel interaction.

  6. Perinatal exogenous nitric oxide in fawn-hooded hypertensive rats reduces renal ribosomal biogenesis in early life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastiaan eWesseling

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide (NO is known to depress ribosome biogenesis in vitro. In this study we analyzed the influence of exogenous NO on ribosome biogenesis in vivo using a proven antihypertensive model of perinatal NO administration in genetically hypertensive rats. Fawn-hooded hypertensive rat (FHH dams were supplied with the NO donor molsidomine in drinking water from two weeks before to four weeks after birth, and the kidneys were subsequently collected from 2 day, 2 week and 9-10 month old adult offspring. Although the NO donor increased maternal NO metabolite excretion, the NO status of juvenile renal (and liver tissue was unchanged as assayed by EPR spectroscopy of NO trapped with iron-dithiocarbamate complexes. Nevertheless, microarray analysis revealed marked differential up-regulation of renal ribosomal protein genes at 2 days and down-regulation at 2 weeks and in adult males. Such differential regulation of renal ribosomal protein genes was not observed in females. These changes were confirmed in males at 2 weeks by expression analysis of renal ribosomal protein L36a and by polysome profiling, which also revealed a down-regulation of ribosomes in females at that age. However, renal polysome profiles returned to normal in adults after early exposure to molsidomine. No direct effects of molsidomine were observed on cellular proliferation in kidneys at any age, and the changes induced by molsidomine in renal polysome profiles at 2 weeks were absent in the livers of the same rats.Our results suggest that the previously found prolonged antihypertensive effects of perinatal NO administration may be due to epigenetically programmed alterations in renal ribosome biogenesis during a critical fetal period of renal development, and provide a salient example of a drug-induced reduction of ribosome biogenesis that is accompanied by a beneficial long-term health effect in both males and females.

  7. Origin of the nucleus and Ran-dependent transport to safeguard ribosome biogenesis in a chimeric cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jékely, Gáspár

    2008-07-24

    The origin of the nucleus is a central problem about the origin of eukaryotes. The common ancestry of nuclear pore complexes (NPC) and vesicle coating complexes indicates that the nucleus evolved via the modification of a pre-existing endomembrane system. Such an autogenous scenario is cell biologically feasible, but it is not clear what were the selective or neutral mechanisms that had led to the origin of the nuclear compartment. A key selective force during the autogenous origin of the nucleus could have been the need to segregate ribosome factories from the cytoplasm where ribosomal proteins (RPs) of the protomitochondrium were synthesized. After its uptake by an anuclear cell the protomitochondrium transferred several of its RP genes to the host genome. Alphaproteobacterial RPs and archaebacterial-type host ribosomes were consequently synthesized in the same cytoplasm. This could have led to the formation of chimeric ribosomes. I propose that the nucleus evolved when the host cell compartmentalised its ribosome factories and the tightly linked genome to reduce ribosome chimerism. This was achieved in successive stages by first evolving karyopherin and RanGTP dependent chaperoning of RPs, followed by the evolution of a membrane network to serve as a diffusion barrier, and finally a hydrogel sieve to ensure selective permeability at nuclear pores. Computer simulations show that a gradual segregation of cytoplasm and nucleoplasm via these steps can progressively reduce ribosome chimerism. Ribosome chimerism can provide a direct link between the selective forces for and the mechanisms of evolving nuclear transport and compartmentalisation. The detailed molecular scenario presented here provides a solution to the gradual evolution of nuclear compartmentalization from an anuclear stage. This article was reviewed by Eugene V Koonin, Martijn Huynen, Anthony M. Poole and Patrick Forterre.

  8. Origin of the nucleus and Ran-dependent transport to safeguard ribosome biogenesis in a chimeric cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jékely Gáspár

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The origin of the nucleus is a central problem about the origin of eukaryotes. The common ancestry of nuclear pore complexes (NPC and vesicle coating complexes indicates that the nucleus evolved via the modification of a pre-existing endomembrane system. Such an autogenous scenario is cell biologically feasible, but it is not clear what were the selective or neutral mechanisms that had led to the origin of the nuclear compartment. Results A key selective force during the autogenous origin of the nucleus could have been the need to segregate ribosome factories from the cytoplasm where ribosomal proteins (RPs of the protomitochondrium were synthesized. After its uptake by an anuclear cell the protomitochondrium transferred several of its RP genes to the host genome. Alphaproteobacterial RPs and archaebacterial-type host ribosomes were consequently synthesized in the same cytoplasm. This could have led to the formation of chimeric ribosomes. I propose that the nucleus evolved when the host cell compartmentalised its ribosome factories and the tightly linked genome to reduce ribosome chimerism. This was achieved in successive stages by first evolving karyopherin and RanGTP dependent chaperoning of RPs, followed by the evolution of a membrane network to serve as a diffusion barrier, and finally a hydrogel sieve to ensure selective permeability at nuclear pores. Computer simulations show that a gradual segregation of cytoplasm and nucleoplasm via these steps can progressively reduce ribosome chimerism. Conclusion Ribosome chimerism can provide a direct link between the selective forces for and the mechanisms of evolving nuclear transport and compartmentalisation. The detailed molecular scenario presented here provides a solution to the gradual evolution of nuclear compartmentalization from an anuclear stage. Reviewers This article was reviewed by Eugene V Koonin, Martijn Huynen, Anthony M. Poole and Patrick Forterre.

  9. A mutation in the 530 loop of Escherichia coli 16S ribosomal RNA causes resistance to streptomycin.

    OpenAIRE

    1988-01-01

    Oligonucleotide-directed mutagenesis was used to introduce an A to C transversion at position 523 in the 16S ribosomal RNA gene of Escherichia coli rrnB operon cloned in plasmid pKK3535. E. coli cells transformed with the mutated plasmid were resistant to streptomycin. The mutated ribosomes isolated from these cells were not stimulated by streptomycin to misread the message in a poly(U)-directed assay. They were also restrictive to the stimulation of misreading by other error-promoting relate...

  10. Phosphorylation of acidic ribosomal proteins from rabbit reticulocytes by a ribosome-associated casein kinase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Issinger, O G

    1977-01-01

    Two acidic proteins from 80-S ribosomes were isolated and purified to homogeneity. The purified acidic proteins could be phosphorylated by casein kinase using [gamma-32P]ATP and [gamma-32P]GTP as a phosphoryl donor. The proteins became phosphorylated in situ, too. Sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacryl......Two acidic proteins from 80-S ribosomes were isolated and purified to homogeneity. The purified acidic proteins could be phosphorylated by casein kinase using [gamma-32P]ATP and [gamma-32P]GTP as a phosphoryl donor. The proteins became phosphorylated in situ, too. Sodium dodecyl sulfate...

  11. The structure and function of the eukaryotic ribosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Daniel N; Doudna Cate, Jamie H

    2012-05-01

    Structures of the bacterial ribosome have provided a framework for understanding universal mechanisms of protein synthesis. However, the eukaryotic ribosome is much larger than it is in bacteria, and its activity is fundamentally different in many key ways. Recent cryo-electron microscopy reconstructions and X-ray crystal structures of eukaryotic ribosomes and ribosomal subunits now provide an unprecedented opportunity to explore mechanisms of eukaryotic translation and its regulation in atomic detail. This review describes the X-ray crystal structures of the Tetrahymena thermophila 40S and 60S subunits and the Saccharomyces cerevisiae 80S ribosome, as well as cryo-electron microscopy reconstructions of translating yeast and plant 80S ribosomes. Mechanistic questions about translation in eukaryotes that will require additional structural insights to be resolved are also presented.

  12. A comparison of the unfolding and dissociation of the large ribosome subunits from Rhodopseudomonas spheroides N.C.I.B. 8253 and Escherichia coli M.R.E. 600.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, A; Sykes, J

    1973-08-01

    1. The behaviour of the large ribosomal subunit from Rhodopseudomonas spheroides (45S) has been compared with the 50S ribosome from Escherichia coli M.R.E. 600 (and E. coli M.R.E. 162) during unfolding by removal of Mg(2+) and detachment of ribosomal proteins by high univalent cation concentrations. The extent to which these processes are reversible with these ribosomes has also been examined. 2. The R. spheroides 45S ribosome unfolds relatively slowly but then gives rise directly to two ribonucleoprotein particles (16.6S and 13.7S); the former contains the intact primary structure of the 16.25S rRNA species and the latter the 15.00S rRNA species of the original ribosome. No detectable protein loss occurs during unfolding. The E. coli ribosome unfolds via a series of discrete intermediates to a single, unfolded ribonucleoprotein unit (19.1S) containing the 23S rRNA and all the protein of the original ribosome. 3. The two unfolded R. spheroides ribonucleoproteins did not recombine when the original conditions were restored but each simply assumed a more compact configuration. Similar treatments reversed the unfolding of the E. coli 50S ribosomes; replacement of Mg(2+) caused the refolding of the initial products of unfolding and in the presence of Ni(2+) the completely unfolded species (19.1S) again sedimented at the same rate as the original ribosomes (44S). 4. Ribosomal proteins (25%) were dissociated from R. spheroides 45S ribosomes by dialysis against a solution with a Na(+)/Mg(2+) ratio of 250:1. During this process two core particles were formed (21.2S and 14.2S) and the primary structures of the two original rRNA species were conserved. This dissociation was not reversed. With E. coli 50S approximately 15% of the original ribosomal protein was dissociated, a single 37.6S core particle was formed, the 23S rRNA remained intact and the ribosomal proteins would reassociate with the core particle to give a 50S ribosome. 5. The ribonuclease activities in R

  13. Chaos and Hyperchaos in a Model of Ribosome Autocatalytic Synthesis

    OpenAIRE

    Likhoshvai, Vitaly A.; Vladislav V. Kogai; Fadeev, Stanislav I.; Khlebodarova, Tamara M.

    2016-01-01

    Any vital activities of the cell are based on the ribosomes, which not only provide the basic machinery for the synthesis of all proteins necessary for cell functioning during growth and division, but for biogenesis itself. From this point of view, ribosomes are self-replicating and autocatalytic structures. In current work we present an elementary model in which the autocatalytic synthesis of ribosomal RNA and proteins, as well as enzymes ensuring their degradation are described with two mon...

  14. An intron in a ribosomal protein gene from Tetrahymena

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Henrik; Andreasen, Per Hove; Dreisig, Hanne

    1986-01-01

    We have cloned and sequenced a single copy gene encoding a ribosomal protein from the ciliate Tetrahymena thermophila. The gene product was identified as ribosomal protein S25 by comparison of the migration in two-dimensional polyacrylamide gels of the protein synthesized by translation in vitro...... of hybrid-selected mRNA and authentic ribosomal proteins. The proteins show strong homology to ribosomal protein S12 from Escherichia coli. The coding region of the gene is interrupted by a 979-bp intron 68 bp downstream of the translation start. This is the first intron in a protein encoding gene...

  15. Ribosome recycling: An essential process of protein synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiel, Michael C; Kaji, Hideko; Kaji, Akira

    2007-01-01

    A preponderance of textbooks outlines cellular protein synthesis (translation) in three basic steps: initiation, elongation, and termination. However, researchers in the field of translation accept that a vital fourth step exists; this fourth step is called ribosome recycling. Ribosome recycling occurs after the nascent polypeptide has been released during the termination step. Despite the release of the polypeptide, ribosomes remain bound to the mRNA and tRNA. It is only during the fourth step of translation that ribosomes are ultimately released from the mRNA, split into subunits, and are free to bind new mRNA, thus the term "ribosome recycling." This step is essential to the viability of cells. In bacteria, it is catalyzed by two proteins, elongation factor G and ribosome recycling factor, a near perfect structural mimic of tRNA. Eukaryotic organelles such as mitochondria and chloroplasts possess ribosome recycling factor and elongation factor G homologues, but the nature of ribosome recycling in eukaryotic cytoplasm is still under investigation. In this review, the discovery of ribosome recycling and the basic mechanisms involved are discussed so that textbook writers and teachers can include this vital step, which is just as important as the three conventional steps, in sections dealing with protein synthesis.

  16. Complete kinetic mechanism for recycling of the bacterial ribosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borg, Anneli; Pavlov, Michael; Ehrenberg, Måns

    2016-01-01

    How EF-G and RRF act together to split a post-termination ribosomal complex into its subunits has remained obscure. Here, using stopped-flow experiments with Rayleigh light scattering detection and quench-flow experiments with radio-detection of GTP hydrolysis, we have clarified the kinetic mechanism of ribosome recycling and obtained precise estimates of its kinetic parameters. Ribosome splitting requires that EF-G binds to an already RRF-containing ribosome. EF-G binding to RRF-free ribosomes induces futile rounds of GTP hydrolysis and inhibits ribosome splitting, implying that while RRF is purely an activator of recycling, EF-G acts as both activator and competitive inhibitor of RRF in recycling of the post-termination ribosome. The ribosome splitting rate and the number of GTPs consumed per splitting event depend strongly on the free concentrations of EF-G and RRF. The maximal recycling rate, here estimated as 25 sec(-1), is approached at very high concentrations of EF-G and RRF with RRF in high excess over EF-G. The present in vitro results, suggesting an in vivo ribosome recycling rate of ∼5 sec(-1), are discussed in the perspective of rapidly growing bacterial cells.

  17. A new Frameshift mutation on the α2-globin gene causing α⁺-thalassemia: codon 43 (TTC>-TC or TTC>T-C).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joly, Philippe; Lacan, Philippe; Garcia, Caroline; Barro, Claire; Francina, Alain

    2012-01-01

    We report a new mutation on the α2-globin gene causing α(+)-thalassemia (α(+)-thal) with a deletion of a single nucleotide (T) at amino acid residue 43 [HBA2:c.130delT or HBA2:c.131delT]. This frameshift deletion gives rise to a premature termination codon at codon 47.

  18. Selection on length mutations after frameshift can explain the origin and retention of the AP3/DEF-like paralogues in Impatiens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssens, S.; Viaene, T.; Huysmans, S.; Huysmans, S.; Smets, E.F.; Geuten, K.

    2008-01-01

    Evolution of class B genes through gene duplication has been proposed as an evolutionary mechanism that contributed to the enormous floral diversity. Frameshift mutations are a likely mechanism to explain the divergent C-terminal sequences of MIKC gene subfamilies. So far, the inferences for framesh

  19. In Profile: Models of Ribosome Biogenesis Defects and Regulation of Protein Synthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Essers, P.B.M.

    2013-01-01

    Ribosomes are the mediators of protein synthesis in the cell and therefore crucial to proper cell function. In addition, ribosomes are highly abundant, with ribosomal RNA making up 80% of the RNA in the cell. A large amount of resources go into maintaining this pool of ribosomes, so ribosome biogene

  20. The architecture of mammalian ribosomal protein promoters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perry Robert P

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mammalian ribosomes contain 79 different proteins encoded by widely scattered single copy genes. Coordinate expression of these genes at transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels is required to ensure a roughly equimolar accumulation of ribosomal proteins. To date, detailed studies of only a very few ribosomal protein (rp promoters have been made. To elucidate the general features of rp promoter architecture, I made a detailed sequence comparison of the promoter regions of the entire set of orthologous human and mouse rp genes. Results A striking evolutionarily conserved feature of most rp genes is the separation by an intron of the sequences involved in transcriptional and translational regulation from the sequences with protein encoding function. Another conserved feature is the polypyrimidine initiator, which conforms to the consensus (Y2C+1TY(T2(Y3. At least 60 % of the rp promoters contain a largely conserved TATA box or A/T-rich motif, which should theoretically have TBP-binding capability. A remarkably high proportion of the promoters contain conserved binding sites for transcription factors that were previously implicated in rp gene expression, namely upstream GABP and Sp1 sites and downstream YY1 sites. Over 80 % of human and mouse rp genes contain a transposable element residue within 900 bp of 5' flanking sequence; very little sequence identity between human and mouse orthologues was evident more than 200 bp upstream of the transcriptional start point. Conclusions This analysis has provided some valuable insights into the general architecture of mammalian rp promoters and has identified parameters that might coordinately regulate the transcriptional activity of certain subsets of rp genes.

  1. [Fragment reaction catalyzed by E. coli ribosomes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotusov, V V; Kukhanova, M K; Sal'nikova, N E; Nikolaeva, L V; Kraevskiĭ, A A

    1977-01-01

    It has been shown that 50S subunits of E. coli MRE-600 ribosomes catalyze the reaction of N-(formyl)-methionyl ester of adenosine 5'-phosphate acting as peptide donor, with Phe-tRNA or CACCA-Phe serving as a peptide acceptor. The reaction is stimulated by cytidine 5'phosphate and inhibited by lincomycin, puromycin and chloramphenicol. The obtained results show that the structure of the donor site of peptidyltransferase is completely assembled on the 50S subunit and 30S subunit is not required for its formation.

  2. Ribosomal RNA: a key to phylogeny

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, G. J.; Woese, C. R.

    1993-01-01

    As molecular phylogeny increasingly shapes our understanding of organismal relationships, no molecule has been applied to more questions than have ribosomal RNAs. We review this role of the rRNAs and some of the insights that have been gained from them. We also offer some of the practical considerations in extracting the phylogenetic information from the sequences. Finally, we stress the importance of comparing results from multiple molecules, both as a method for testing the overall reliability of the organismal phylogeny and as a method for more broadly exploring the history of the genome.

  3. Molecular dynamics simulation of ribosome jam

    KAUST Repository

    Matsumoto, Shigenori

    2011-09-01

    We propose a coarse-grained molecular dynamics model of ribosome molecules to study the dependence of translation process on environmental parameters. We found the model exhibits traffic jam property, which is consistent with an ASEP model. We estimated the influence of the temperature and concentration of molecules on the hopping probability used in the ASEP model. Our model can also treat environmental effects on the translation process that cannot be explained by such cellular automaton models. © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Ribosomal RNA: a key to phylogeny

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, G. J.; Woese, C. R.

    1993-01-01

    As molecular phylogeny increasingly shapes our understanding of organismal relationships, no molecule has been applied to more questions than have ribosomal RNAs. We review this role of the rRNAs and some of the insights that have been gained from them. We also offer some of the practical considerations in extracting the phylogenetic information from the sequences. Finally, we stress the importance of comparing results from multiple molecules, both as a method for testing the overall reliability of the organismal phylogeny and as a method for more broadly exploring the history of the genome.

  5. Molecular morphology of ribosomes. Iodination of Escherichia coli ribosomal proteins with solid-state lactoperoxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalski, C J; Sells, B H

    1975-03-17

    Using either soluble or solid-state lactoperoxidase, a comparison was made between the enzymic iodination of ribosomal proteins iodinated as 30-S and 50-S subunits or as 70-S monosomes. Proteins S7, S11 and S12 of the 30-S subunit and proteins L2, L11, L26 and L28 of the 50-S subunit were labelled to a greater extent in isolated particles than in the 70-S ribosome. In contrast, proteins S4, S19 and S20 were labelled to a lesser extent in the isolated subunit. No significant differences were observed in the iodination patterns of ribosomes iodinated in the presence of soluble lactoperoxidase and those iodinated in the presence of lactoperoxidase bound to Sepharose 4B. It is suggested that the 30-S subunit undergoes a conformational change during its association with the 50-S subunit to form a 70-S monosome. Implications from results obtained with solid-state lactoperoxidase-catalyzed iodination of ribosomal proteins are also discussed.

  6. A Molecular Titration System Coordinates Ribosomal Protein Gene Transcription with Ribosomal RNA Synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, Benjamin; Knight, Britta; Merwin, Jason; Martin, Victoria; Ottoz, Diana; Gloor, Yvonne; Bruzzone, Maria Jessica; Rudner, Adam; Shore, David

    2016-11-17

    Cell growth potential is determined by the rate of ribosome biogenesis, a complex process that requires massive and coordinated transcriptional output. In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, ribosome biogenesis is highly regulated at the transcriptional level. Although evidence for a system that coordinates ribosomal RNA (rRNA) and ribosomal protein gene (RPG) transcription has been described, the molecular mechanisms remain poorly understood. Here we show that an interaction between the RPG transcriptional activator Ifh1 and the rRNA processing factor Utp22 serves to coordinate RPG transcription with that of rRNA. We demonstrate that Ifh1 is rapidly released from RPG promoters by a Utp22-independent mechanism following growth inhibition, but that its long-term dissociation requires Utp22. We present evidence that RNA polymerase I activity inhibits the ability of Utp22 to titrate Ifh1 from RPG promoters and propose that a dynamic Ifh1-Utp22 interaction fine-tunes RPG expression to coordinate RPG and rRNA transcription. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Dravet syndrome with favourable cognitive and behavioral development due to a novel SCN1A frameshift mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Peifang; Shen, Jue; Yu, Yonglin; Jiang, Lihua; Xu, Jialu; Xu, Lu; Yu, Huimin; Gao, Feng

    2016-07-01

    Children with Dravet syndrome (DS) often have severe cognitive, behaviour and motor impairments. Patients with truncating mutations would logically have the more severe phenotype. Here we present a case of DS with an unusually favourable cognitive and behavioral development with a novel SCN1A frameshift mutation (c.4233-4234insAT). Under regular following up for ten years, the patient had normal expressive language and mild motor clumsiness. It is suggested that besides the type of SCN1A mutation, other mechanisms may be existed to influence the SCN1A phenotype, such as modifier genes, developmental variability, accumulation of somatic mutation in lifetime and environmental insults can all contribute to the cognitive and behavioral outcome.

  8. A CNGB1 frameshift mutation in Papillon and Phalène dogs with progressive retinal atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahonen, Saija J; Arumilli, Meharji; Lohi, Hannes

    2013-01-01

    Progressive retinal degenerations are the most common causes of complete blindness both in human and in dogs. Canine progressive retinal atrophy (PRA) or degeneration resembles human retinitis pigmentosa (RP) and is characterized by a progressive loss of rod photoreceptor cells followed by a loss of cone function. The primary clinical signs are detected as vision impairment in a dim light. Although several genes have been associated with PRAs, there are still PRAs of unknown genetic cause in many breeds, including Papillons and Phalènes. We have performed a genome wide association and linkage studies in cohort of 6 affected Papillons and Phalènes and 14 healthy control dogs to map a novel PRA locus on canine chromosome 2, with a 1.9 Mb shared homozygous region in the affected dogs. Parallel exome sequencing of a trio identified an indel mutation, including a 1-bp deletion, followed by a 6-bp insertion in the CNGB1 gene. This mutation causes a frameshift and premature stop codon leading to probable nonsense mediated decay (NMD) of the CNGB1 mRNA. The mutation segregated with the disease and was confirmed in a larger cohort of 145 Papillons and Phalènes (PFisher = 1.4×10(-8)) with a carrier frequency of 17.2 %. This breed specific mutation was not present in 334 healthy dogs from 10 other breeds or 121 PRA affected dogs from 44 other breeds. CNGB1 is important for the photoreceptor cell function its defects have been previously associated with retinal degeneration in both human and mouse. Our study indicates that a frameshift mutation in CNGB1 is a cause of PRA in Papillons and Phalènes and establishes the breed as a large functional animal model for further characterization of retinal CNGB1 biology and possible retinal gene therapy trials. This study enables also the development of a genetic test for breeding purposes.

  9. A computational investigation on the connection between dynamics properties of ribosomal proteins and ribosome assembly.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brittany Burton

    Full Text Available Assembly of the ribosome from its protein and RNA constituents has been studied extensively over the past 50 years, and experimental evidence suggests that prokaryotic ribosomal proteins undergo conformational changes during assembly. However, to date, no studies have attempted to elucidate these conformational changes. The present work utilizes computational methods to analyze protein dynamics and to investigate the linkage between dynamics and binding of these proteins during the assembly of the ribosome. Ribosomal proteins are known to be positively charged and we find the percentage of positive residues in r-proteins to be about twice that of the average protein: Lys+Arg is 18.7% for E. coli and 21.2% for T. thermophilus. Also, positive residues constitute a large proportion of RNA contacting residues: 39% for E. coli and 46% for T. thermophilus. This affirms the known importance of charge-charge interactions in the assembly of the ribosome. We studied the dynamics of three primary proteins from E. coli and T. thermophilus 30S subunits that bind early in the assembly (S15, S17, and S20 with atomic molecular dynamic simulations, followed by a study of all r-proteins using elastic network models. Molecular dynamics simulations show that solvent-exposed proteins (S15 and S17 tend to adopt more stable solution conformations than an RNA-embedded protein (S20. We also find protein residues that contact the 16S rRNA are generally more mobile in comparison with the other residues. This is because there is a larger proportion of contacting residues located in flexible loop regions. By the use of elastic network models, which are computationally more efficient, we show that this trend holds for most of the 30S r-proteins.

  10. Ribosomal protein gene knockdown causes developmental defects in zebrafish.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamayo Uechi

    Full Text Available The ribosomal proteins (RPs form the majority of cellular proteins and are mandatory for cellular growth. RP genes have been linked, either directly or indirectly, to various diseases in humans. Mutations in RP genes are also associated with tissue-specific phenotypes, suggesting a possible role in organ development during early embryogenesis. However, it is not yet known how mutations in a particular RP gene result in specific cellular changes, or how RP genes might contribute to human diseases. The development of animal models with defects in RP genes will be essential for studying these questions. In this study, we knocked down 21 RP genes in zebrafish by using morpholino antisense oligos to inhibit their translation. Of these 21, knockdown of 19 RPs resulted in the development of morphants with obvious deformities. Although mutations in RP genes, like other housekeeping genes, would be expected to result in nonspecific developmental defects with widespread phenotypes, we found that knockdown of some RP genes resulted in phenotypes specific to each gene, with varying degrees of abnormality in the brain, body trunk, eyes, and ears at about 25 hours post fertilization. We focused further on the organogenesis of the brain. Each knocked-down gene that affected the morphogenesis of the brain produced a different pattern of abnormality. Among the 7 RP genes whose knockdown produced severe brain phenotypes, 3 human orthologs are located within chromosomal regions that have been linked to brain-associated diseases, suggesting a possible involvement of RP genes in brain or neurological diseases. The RP gene knockdown system developed in this study could be a powerful tool for studying the roles of ribosomes in human diseases.

  11. Kinetic analysis reveals the ordered coupling of translation termination and ribosome recycling in yeast

    OpenAIRE

    Shoemaker, Christopher J.; Green, Rachel

    2011-01-01

    Although well defined in bacterial systems, the molecular mechanisms underlying ribosome recycling in eukaryotic cells have only begun to be explored. Recent studies have proposed a direct role for eukaryotic termination factors eRF1 and eRF3 (and the related factors Dom34 and Hbs1) in downstream recycling processes; however, our understanding of the connection between termination and recycling in eukaryotes is limited. Here, using an in vitro reconstituted yeast translation system, we identi...

  12. Defining the bacteroides ribosomal binding site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegmann, Udo; Horn, Nikki; Carding, Simon R

    2013-03-01

    The human gastrointestinal tract, in particular the colon, hosts a vast number of commensal microorganisms. Representatives of the genus Bacteroides are among the most abundant bacterial species in the human colon. Bacteroidetes diverged from the common line of eubacterial descent before other eubacterial groups. As a result, they employ unique transcription initiation signals and, because of this uniqueness, they require specific genetic tools. Although some tools exist, they are not optimal for studying the roles and functions of these bacteria in the human gastrointestinal tract. Focusing on translation initiation signals in Bacteroides, we created a series of expression vectors allowing for different levels of protein expression in this genus, and we describe the use of pepI from Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. lactis as a novel reporter gene for Bacteroides. Furthermore, we report the identification of the 3' end of the 16S rRNA of Bacteroides ovatus and analyze in detail its ribosomal binding site, thus defining a core region necessary for efficient translation, which we have incorporated into the design of our expression vectors. Based on the sequence logo information from the 5' untranslated region of other Bacteroidales ribosomal protein genes, we conclude that our findings are relevant to all members of this order.

  13. Ribosomal protein S6 associates with alphavirus nonstructural protein 2 and mediates expression from alphavirus messages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, Stephanie A; Berglund, Peter; Beard, Clayton W; Johnston, Robert E

    2006-08-01

    Although alphaviruses dramatically alter cellular function within hours of infection, interactions between alphaviruses and specific host cellular proteins are poorly understood. Although the alphavirus nonstructural protein 2 (nsP2) is an essential component of the viral replication complex, it also has critical auxiliary functions that determine the outcome of infection in the host. To gain a better understanding of nsP2 function, we sought to identify cellular proteins with which Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus nsP2 interacted. We demonstrate here that nsP2 associates with ribosomal protein S6 (RpS6) and that nsP2 is present in the ribosome-containing fractions of a polysome gradient, suggesting that nsP2 associates with RpS6 in the context of the whole ribosome. This result was noteworthy, since viral replicase proteins have seldom been described in direct association with components of the ribosome. The association of RpS6 with nsP2 was detected throughout the course of infection, and neither the synthesis of the viral structural proteins nor the presence of the other nonstructural proteins was required for RpS6 interaction with nsP2. nsP1 also was associated with RpS6, but other nonstructural proteins were not. RpS6 phosphorylation was dramatically diminished within hours after infection with alphaviruses. Furthermore, a reduction in the level of RpS6 protein expression led to diminished expression from alphavirus subgenomic messages, whereas no dramatic diminution in cellular translation was observed. Taken together, these data suggest that alphaviruses alter the ribosome during infection and that this alteration may contribute to differential translation of host and viral messages.

  14. Interaction of pleuromutilin derivatives with the ribosomal peptidyl transferase center

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Long, K. S.; Hansen, L. K.; Jakobsen, L.;

    2006-01-01

    Tiamulin is a pleuromutilin antibiotic that is used in veterinary medicine. The recently published crystal structure of a tiamulin-50S ribosomal subunit complex provides detailed information about how this drug targets the peptidyl transferase center of the ribosome. To promote rational design...

  15. 5S Ribosomal RNA Is an Essential Component of a Nascent Ribosomal Precursor Complex that Regulates the Hdm2-p53 Checkpoint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulio Donati

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Recently, we demonstrated that RPL5 and RPL11 act in a mutually dependent manner to inhibit Hdm2 and stabilize p53 following impaired ribosome biogenesis. Given that RPL5 and RPL11 form a preribosomal complex with noncoding 5S ribosomal RNA (rRNA and the three have been implicated in the p53 response, we reasoned they may be part of an Hdm2-inhibitory complex. Here, we show that small interfering RNAs directed against 5S rRNA have no effect on total or nascent levels of the noncoding rRNA, though they prevent the reported Hdm4 inhibition of p53. To achieve efficient inhibition of 5S rRNA synthesis, we targeted TFIIIA, a specific RNA polymerase III cofactor, which, like depletion of either RPL5 or RPL11, did not induce p53. Instead, 5S rRNA acts in a dependent manner with RPL5 and RPL11 to inhibit Hdm2 and stabilize p53. Moreover, depletion of any one of the three components abolished the binding of the other two to Hdm2, explaining their common dependence. Finally, we demonstrate that the RPL5/RPL11/5S rRNA preribosomal complex is redirected from assembly into nascent 60S ribosomes to Hdm2 inhibition as a consequence of impaired ribosome biogenesis. Thus, the activation of the Hdm2-inhibitory complex is not a passive but a regulated event, whose potential role in tumor suppression has been recently noted.

  16. 5S ribosomal RNA is an essential component of a nascent ribosomal precursor complex that regulates the Hdm2-p53 checkpoint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donati, Giulio; Peddigari, Suresh; Mercer, Carol A; Thomas, George

    2013-07-11

    Recently, we demonstrated that RPL5 and RPL11 act in a mutually dependent manner to inhibit Hdm2 and stabilize p53 following impaired ribosome biogenesis. Given that RPL5 and RPL11 form a preribosomal complex with noncoding 5S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) and the three have been implicated in the p53 response, we reasoned they may be part of an Hdm2-inhibitory complex. Here, we show that small interfering RNAs directed against 5S rRNA have no effect on total or nascent levels of the noncoding rRNA, though they prevent the reported Hdm4 inhibition of p53. To achieve efficient inhibition of 5S rRNA synthesis, we targeted TFIIIA, a specific RNA polymerase III cofactor, which, like depletion of either RPL5 or RPL11, did not induce p53. Instead, 5S rRNA acts in a dependent manner with RPL5 and RPL11 to inhibit Hdm2 and stabilize p53. Moreover, depletion of any one of the three components abolished the binding of the other two to Hdm2, explaining their common dependence. Finally, we demonstrate that the RPL5/RPL11/5S rRNA preribosomal complex is redirected from assembly into nascent 60S ribosomes to Hdm2 inhibition as a consequence of impaired ribosome biogenesis. Thus, the activation of the Hdm2-inhibitory complex is not a passive but a regulated event, whose potential role in tumor suppression has been recently noted. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Crosslinking of eukaryotic initiation factor eIF3 to the 40S ribosomal subunit from rabbit reticulocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolan, D R; Hershey, J W; Traut, R T

    1983-07-01

    Complexes of purified 40S ribosomal subunits and initiation factor 3 from rabbit reticulocytes were crosslinked using the reversible protein crosslinking reagent, 2-iminothiolane, under conditions shown previously to lead to the formation of dimers between 40S proteins but not higher multimers. The activity of both the 40S subunits and initiation factor 3 was maintained. Protein crosslinked to the factor was purified by sucrose density gradient centrifugation following nuclease digestion of the ribosomal subunit: alternatively, the total protein was extracted from 40S: factor complexes. The protein obtained by either method was analyzed by two-dimensional diagonal polyacrylamide/sodium dodecyl sulfate gel electrophoresis. Ribosomal proteins were found in multimeric complexes of high molecular weight due to their crosslinking to components of eIF3. Identification of the ribosomal proteins appearing below the diagonal was accomplished by elution, radioiodination, two-dimensional polyacrylamide/urea gel electrophoresis, and radioautography. Proteins S2, S3, S3a, S4, S5, S6, S8, S9, S11, S12, S14, S15, S16, S19, S24, S25, and S26 were identified. Because many of the proteins in this group form crosslinked dimers with each other, it was impossible to distinguish proteins directly crosslinked to eIF3 from those crosslinked indirectly through one bridging protein. The results nonetheless imply that the 40S ribosomal proteins identified are at or near the binding site for initiation factor 3.

  18. Crystal Structures of the uL3 Mutant Ribosome: Illustration of the Importance of Ribosomal Proteins for Translation Efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mailliot, Justine; Garreau de Loubresse, Nicolas; Yusupova, Gulnara; Meskauskas, Arturas; Dinman, Jonathan D; Yusupov, Marat

    2016-05-22

    The ribosome has been described as a ribozyme in which ribosomal RNA is responsible for peptidyl-transferase reaction catalysis. The W255C mutation of the universally conserved ribosomal protein uL3 has diverse effects on ribosome function (e.g., increased affinities for transfer RNAs, decreased rates of peptidyl-transfer), and cells harboring this mutation are resistant to peptidyl-transferase inhibitors (e.g., anisomycin). These observations beg the question of how a single amino acid mutation may have such wide ranging consequences. Here, we report the structure of the vacant yeast uL3 W255C mutant ribosome by X-ray crystallography, showing a disruption of the A-site side of the peptidyl-transferase center (PTC). An additional X-ray crystallographic structure of the anisomycin-containing mutant ribosome shows that high concentrations of this inhibitor restore a "WT-like" configuration to this region of the PTC, providing insight into the resistance mechanism of the mutant. Globally, our data demonstrate that ribosomal protein uL3 is structurally essential to ensure an optimal and catalytically efficient organization of the PTC, highlighting the importance of proteins in the RNA-centered ribosome.

  19. [Topography of ribosomal proteins: reconsideration of of protein map of small ribosomal subunit].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spirin, A S; Agafonov, D E; Kolb, V A; Kommer, A

    1996-11-01

    Exposure of proteins on the surface of the small (30S) ribosomal subunit of Escherichia coli was studied by the hot tritium bombardment technique. Eight of 21 proteins of the 30 S subunit (S3, S8, S10, S12, S15, S16, S17, and S19) had virtually no groups exposed on the surface of the particle, i.e., they were mainly hidden inside. Seven proteins (S1, S4, S5, S7, S18, S20, and S21) were all well exposed on the surface of the particle, thus being outside proteins. The remaining proteins (S2, S6, S9 and/or S11, S13, and S14) were partially exposed. On the basis of these results a reconcilement of the three-dimensional protein map of the small ribosomal subunit has been done and corrected model is proposed.

  20. Actinomadura Species: Laboratory Maintenance and Ribosome Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhakal, Dipesh; Chung, Nguyen Thanh; Rayamajhi, Vijay; Sohng, Jae Kyung

    2017-02-06

    Actinomadura spp. are aerobic, Gram-positive, catalase-positive, non-acid fast, non-motile actinomycetes. Some species of Actinomadura are associated with opportunistic infections in humans. However, many bioactive compounds with pharmaceutical applications can be isolated from various Actinomadura spp. This unit includes general protocols for the laboratory maintenance of Actinomadura spp., including growth in liquid medium, growth on solid agar, long-term storage, and generation of a higher producing strain by ribosome engineering. Actinomadura hibisca P157-2 is used as a prototype for explaining the considerations for efficient laboratory maintenance of Actinomadura spp. © 2017 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  1. Higher order structure in ribosomal RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutell, R R; Noller, H F; Woese, C R

    1986-05-01

    The only reliable general method currently available for determining precise higher order structure in the large ribosomal RNAs is comparative sequence analysis. The method is here applied to reveal 'tertiary' structure in the 16S-like rRNAs, i.e. structure more complex than simple double-helical, secondary structure. From a list of computer-generated potential higher order interactions within 16S rRNA one such interaction considered likely was selected for experimental test. The putative interaction involves a Watson-Crick one to one correspondence between positions 570 and 866 in the molecule (E. coli numbering). Using existing oligonucleotide catalog information several organisms were selected whose 16S rRNA sequences might test the proposed co-variation. In all of the (phylogenetically independent) cases selected, full sequence evidence confirms the predicted one to one (Watson-Crick) correspondence. An interaction between positions 570 and 866 is, therefore, considered proven phylogenetically.

  2. Traffic of interacting ribosomes on mRNA during protein synthesis: effects of chemo-mechanics of individual ribosomes

    CERN Document Server

    Basu, A; Basu, Aakash; Chowdhury, Debashish

    2006-01-01

    Many {\\it ribosomes} simultaneously move on the same messenger RNA (mRNA), each synthesizing a protein. In contrast to the earlier models, here {\\it we develope a ``unified'' theoretical model} that not only incorporates the {\\it mutual exclusions} of the interacting ribosomes, but also describes explicitly the mechano-chemistry of each of these individual cyclic machines during protein synthesis. Using a combination of analytical and numerical techniques of non-equilibrium statistical mechanics, we analyze the rates of protein synthesis and the spatio-temporal oraganization of the ribosomes in this model. We also predict how these properties would change with the changes in the rates of the various chemo-mechanical processes in each ribosome. Finally, we illustrate the power of this model by making experimentally testable predictions on the rates of protein synthesis and the density profiles of the ribosomes on some mRNAs in {\\it E-coli}.

  3. Evolution of the holozoan ribosome biogenesis regulon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Seth J; Cole, Michael D; Erives, Albert J

    2008-01-01

    Background The ribosome biogenesis (RiBi) genes encode a highly-conserved eukaryotic set of nucleolar proteins involved in rRNA transcription, assembly, processing, and export from the nucleus. While the mode of regulation of this suite of genes has been studied in the yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, how this gene set is coordinately regulated in the larger and more complex metazoan genomes is not understood. Results Here we present genome-wide analyses indicating that a distinct mode of RiBi regulation co-evolved with the E(CG)-binding, Myc:Max bHLH heterodimer complex in a stem-holozoan, the ancestor of both Metazoa and Choanoflagellata, the protozoan group most closely related to animals. These results show that this mode of regulation, characterized by an E(CG)-bearing core-promoter, is specific to almost all of the known genes involved in ribosome biogenesis in these genomes. Interestingly, this holozoan RiBi promoter signature is absent in nematode genomes, which have not only secondarily lost Myc but are marked by invariant cell lineages typically producing small body plans of 1000 somatic cells. Furthermore, a detailed analysis of 10 fungal genomes shows that this holozoan signature in RiBi genes is not found in hemiascomycete fungi, which evolved their own unique regulatory signature for the RiBi regulon. Conclusion These results indicate that a Myc regulon, which is activated in proliferating cells during normal development as well as during tumor progression, has primordial roots in the evolution of an inducible growth regime in a protozoan ancestor of animals. Furthermore, by comparing divergent bHLH repertoires, we conclude that regulation by Myc but not by other bHLH genes is responsible for the evolutionary maintenance of E(CG) sites across the RiBi suite of genes. PMID:18816399

  4. Evolution of the holozoan ribosome biogenesis regulon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cole Michael D

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ribosome biogenesis (RiBi genes encode a highly-conserved eukaryotic set of nucleolar proteins involved in rRNA transcription, assembly, processing, and export from the nucleus. While the mode of regulation of this suite of genes has been studied in the yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, how this gene set is coordinately regulated in the larger and more complex metazoan genomes is not understood. Results Here we present genome-wide analyses indicating that a distinct mode of RiBi regulation co-evolved with the E(CG-binding, Myc:Max bHLH heterodimer complex in a stem-holozoan, the ancestor of both Metazoa and Choanoflagellata, the protozoan group most closely related to animals. These results show that this mode of regulation, characterized by an E(CG-bearing core-promoter, is specific to almost all of the known genes involved in ribosome biogenesis in these genomes. Interestingly, this holozoan RiBi promoter signature is absent in nematode genomes, which have not only secondarily lost Myc but are marked by invariant cell lineages typically producing small body plans of 1000 somatic cells. Furthermore, a detailed analysis of 10 fungal genomes shows that this holozoan signature in RiBi genes is not found in hemiascomycete fungi, which evolved their own unique regulatory signature for the RiBi regulon. Conclusion These results indicate that a Myc regulon, which is activated in proliferating cells during normal development as well as during tumor progression, has primordial roots in the evolution of an inducible growth regime in a protozoan ancestor of animals. Furthermore, by comparing divergent bHLH repertoires, we conclude that regulation by Myc but not by other bHLH genes is responsible for the evolutionary maintenance of E(CG sites across the RiBi suite of genes.

  5. An extra-ribosomal function of ribosomal protein L13a in macrophage resolves inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poddar, Darshana; Basu, Abhijit; Baldwin, William; Kondratov, Roman V; Barik, Sailen; Mazumder, Barsanjit

    2013-01-01

    Inflammation is an obligatory attempt of the immune system to protect the host from infections. However, unregulated synthesis of pro-inflammatory products can have detrimental effects. Although mechanisms that lead to inflammation are well appreciated, those that restrain it are not adequately understood. Creating macrophage-specific L13a-knockout (KO) mice here we report that depletion of ribosomal protein L13a abrogates the endogenous translation control of several chemokines in macrophages. Upon LPS-induced endotoxemia these animals displayed symptoms of severe inflammation caused by widespread infiltration of macrophages in major organs causing tissue injury and reduced survival rates. Macrophages from these KO animals show unregulated expression of several chemokines e.g. CXCL13, CCL22, CCL8 and CCR3. These macrophages failed to show L13a-dependent RNA binding complex formation on target mRNAs. In addition, increased polyribosomal abundance of these mRNAs shows a defect in translation control in the macrophages. Thus, our studies provide the first evidence of an essential extra-ribosomal function of ribosomal protein L13a in resolving physiological inflammation in a mammalian host. PMID:23460747

  6. The small subunit of the mammalian mitochondrial ribosome. Identification of the full complement of ribosomal proteins present.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavdar Koc, E; Burkhart, W; Blackburn, K; Moseley, A; Spremulli, L L

    2001-06-01

    Identification of all the protein components of the small subunit (28 S) of the mammalian mitochondrial ribosome has been achieved by carrying out proteolytic digestions of whole 28 S subunits followed by analysis of the resultant peptides by liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS). Peptide sequence information was used to search the human EST data bases and complete coding sequences of the proteins were assembled. The human mitochondrial ribosome has 29 distinct proteins in the small subunit. Fourteen of this group of proteins are homologs of the Escherichia coli 30 S ribosomal proteins S2, S5, S6, S7, S9, S10, S11, S12, S14, S15, S16, S17, S18, and S21. All of these proteins have homologs in Drosophila melanogaster, Caenorhabditis elegans, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae mitochondrial ribosomes. Surprisingly, three variants of ribosomal protein S18 are found in the mammalian and D. melanogaster mitochondrial ribosomes while C. elegans has two S18 homologs. The S18 homologs tend to be more closely related to chloroplast S18s than to prokaryotic S18s. No mitochondrial homologs to prokaryotic ribosomal proteins S1, S3, S4, S8, S13, S19, and S20 could be found in the peptides obtained from the whole 28 S subunit digests or by analysis of the available data bases. The remaining 15 proteins present in mammalian mitochondrial 28 S subunits (MRP-S22 through MRP-S36) are specific to mitochondrial ribosomes. Proteins in this group have no apparent homologs in bacterial, chloroplast, archaebacterial, or cytosolic ribosomes. All but two of these proteins have a clear homolog in D. melanogaster while all but three can be found in the genome of C. elegans. Five of the mitochondrial specific ribosomal proteins have homologs in S. cerevisiae.

  7. Protein Folding Activity of the Ribosome is involved in Yeast Prion Propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blondel, Marc; Soubigou, Flavie; Evrard, Justine; Nguyen, Phu hai; Hasin, Naushaba; Chédin, Stéphane; Gillet, Reynald; Contesse, Marie-Astrid; Friocourt, Gaëlle; Stahl, Guillaume; Jones, Gary W.; Voisset, Cécile

    2016-01-01

    6AP and GA are potent inhibitors of yeast and mammalian prions and also specific inhibitors of PFAR, the protein-folding activity borne by domain V of the large rRNA of the large subunit of the ribosome. We therefore explored the link between PFAR and yeast prion [PSI+] using both PFAR-enriched mutants and site-directed methylation. We demonstrate that PFAR is involved in propagation and de novo formation of [PSI+]. PFAR and the yeast heat-shock protein Hsp104 partially compensate each other for [PSI+] propagation. Our data also provide insight into new functions for the ribosome in basal thermotolerance and heat-shocked protein refolding. PFAR is thus an evolutionarily conserved cell component implicated in the prion life cycle, and we propose that it could be a potential therapeutic target for human protein misfolding diseases. PMID:27633137

  8. Protein Folding Activity of the Ribosome is involved in Yeast Prion Propagation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blondel, Marc; Soubigou, Flavie; Evrard, Justine; Nguyen, Phu Hai; Hasin, Naushaba; Chédin, Stéphane; Gillet, Reynald; Contesse, Marie-Astrid; Friocourt, Gaëlle; Stahl, Guillaume; Jones, Gary W; Voisset, Cécile

    2016-09-16

    6AP and GA are potent inhibitors of yeast and mammalian prions and also specific inhibitors of PFAR, the protein-folding activity borne by domain V of the large rRNA of the large subunit of the ribosome. We therefore explored the link between PFAR and yeast prion [PSI(+)] using both PFAR-enriched mutants and site-directed methylation. We demonstrate that PFAR is involved in propagation and de novo formation of [PSI(+)]. PFAR and the yeast heat-shock protein Hsp104 partially compensate each other for [PSI(+)] propagation. Our data also provide insight into new functions for the ribosome in basal thermotolerance and heat-shocked protein refolding. PFAR is thus an evolutionarily conserved cell component implicated in the prion life cycle, and we propose that it could be a potential therapeutic target for human protein misfolding diseases.

  9. Association of a multi-synthetase complex with translating ribosomes in the archaeon Thermococcus kodakarensis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raina, Medha; Elgamal, Sara; Santangelo, Thomas J;

    2012-01-01

    that components of the archaeal protein synthesis machinery associate into macromolecular assemblies in vivo and provide the potential to increase translation efficiency by limiting substrate diffusion away from the ribosome, thus facilitating rapid recycling of tRNAs. STRUCTURED SUMMARY OF PROTEIN INTERACTIONS...... with several other factors involved in protein synthesis, suggesting that MSCs may interact directly with translating ribosomes. In support of this hypothesis, the aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase (aaRS) activities of the MSC were enriched in isolated T. kodakarensis polysome fractions. These data indicate......)-triphosphatase 205, thiamine monophosphate kinase 179, pyruvate formate lyase family activating protein 298, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (mevanolate), N(2), N(2)-dimethylguanosine tRNA methyltransferase 145, N2, N2-dimethylguanosine tRNA methyltransferase 170, putative 5-methylcytosine restriction...

  10. Nascent peptide side chains induce rearrangements in distinct locations of the ribosomal tunnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jianli; Hua, Zhengmao; Kobertz, William R; Deutsch, Carol

    2011-08-12

    Although we have numerous structures of ribosomes, none disclose side-chain rearrangements of the nascent peptide during chain elongation. This study reports for the first time that rearrangement of the peptide and/or tunnel occurs in distinct regions of the tunnel and is directed by the unique primary sequence of each nascent peptide. In the tunnel mid-region, the accessibility of an introduced cysteine to a series of novel hydrophilic maleimide reagents increases with increasing volume of the adjacent chain residue, a sensitivity not manifest at the constriction and exit port. This surprising result reveals molecular movements not yet resolvable from structural studies. These findings map solvent-accessible volumes along the tunnel and provide novel insights critical to our understanding of allosteric communication within the ribosomal tunnel, translational arrest, chaperone interaction, folding, and rates of elongation.

  11. Crystal structure of the 80S yeast ribosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenner, Lasse; Melnikov, Sergey; Garreau de Loubresse, Nicolas; Ben-Shem, Adam; Iskakova, Madina; Urzhumtsev, Alexandre; Meskauskas, Arturas; Dinman, Jonathan; Yusupova, Gulnara; Yusupov, Marat

    2012-12-01

    The first X-ray structure of the eukaryotic ribosome at 3.0Å resolution was determined using ribosomes isolated and crystallized from the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Ben-Shem A, Garreau de Loubresse N, Melnikov S, Jenner L, Yusupova G, Yusupov M: The structure of the eukaryotic ribosome at 3.0 A resolution. Science 2011, 334:1524-1529). This accomplishment was possible due to progress in yeast ribosome biochemistry as well as recent advances in crystallographic methods developed for structure determination of prokaryotic ribosomes isolated from Thermus thermophilus and Escherichia coli. In this review we will focus on the development of isolation procedures that allowed structure determination (both cryo-EM and X-ray crystallography) to be successful for the yeast S. cerevisiae. Additionally we will introduce a new nomenclature that facilitates comparison of ribosomes from different species and kingdoms of life. Finally we will discuss the impact of the yeast 80S ribosome crystal structure on perspectives for future investigations.

  12. Conservation of ribosomal protein gene ordering in 16 complete genomes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王宁; 陈润生; 王永雄

    2000-01-01

    The organization of ribosomal proteins in 16 prokaryotic genomes was studied as an example of comparative genome analyses of gene systems. Hypothetical ribosomal protein-containing operons were constructed. These operons also contained putative genes and other non-ribosomal genes. The correspondences among these genes across different organisms were clarified by sequence homology computations. In this way a cross tabulation of 70 ribosomal proteins genes was constructed. On average, these were organized into 9-14 operons in each genome. There were also 25 non-ribosomal or putative genes in these mainly ribosomal protein operons. Hence the table contains 95 genes in total. It was found that: (i) the conservation of the block of about 20 r-proteins in the L3 and L4 operons across almost the entire eubacteria and ar-chaebacteria is remarkable; (ii) some operons only belong to eubacteria or archaebacte-ria; (iii) although the ribosomal protein operons are highly conserved within domain, there are fine variat

  13. Conservation of ribosomal protein gene ordering in 16 complete genomes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The organization of ribosomal proteins in 16 prokaryotic genomes was studied as an example of comparative genome analyses of gene systems. Hypothetical ribosomal protein-containing operons were constructed. These operons also contained putative genes and other non-ribosomal genes. The correspondences among these genes across different organisms were clarified by sequence homology computations. In this way a cross tabulation of 70 ribosomal proteins genes was constructed. On average, these were organized into 9-14 operons in each genome. There were also 25 non-ribosomal or putative genes in these mainly ribosomal protein operons. Hence the table contains 95 genes in total. It was found that: (i) the conservation of the block of about 20 r-proteins in the L3 and L4 operons across almost the entire eubacteria and archaebacteria is remarkable; (ii) some operons only belong to eubacteria or archaebacteria; (iii) although the ribosomal protein operons are highly conserved within domain, there are fine variations in some operons across different organisms within each domain, and these variations are informative on the evolutionary relations among the organisms. This method provides a new potential for studying the origin and evolution of old species.

  14. Ribosome-targeting antibiotics and mechanisms of bacterial resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Daniel N

    2014-01-01

    The ribosome is one of the main antibiotic targets in the bacterial cell. Crystal structures of naturally produced antibiotics and their semi-synthetic derivatives bound to ribosomal particles have provided unparalleled insight into their mechanisms of action, and they are also facilitating the design of more effective antibiotics for targeting multidrug-resistant bacteria. In this Review, I discuss the recent structural insights into the mechanism of action of ribosome-targeting antibiotics and the molecular mechanisms of bacterial resistance, in addition to the approaches that are being pursued for the production of improved drugs that inhibit bacterial protein synthesis.

  15. Complete androgen insensitivity syndrome due to a new frameshift deletion in exon 4 of the androgen receptor gene: Functional analysis of the mutant receptor

    OpenAIRE

    Lobaccaro, J.M.; Lumbroso, S.; Poujol, Nicolas; Georget, V.; Brinkmann, Albert; Malpuech, Georges; Sultan, C.

    1995-01-01

    textabstractWe studied the androgen receptor gene in a large kindred with complete androgen insensitivity syndrome and negative receptor-binding activity, single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis and sequencing identified a 13 base pair deletion within exon 4. This was responsible for a predictive frameshift in the open reading frame and introduction of a premature stop codon at position 783 instead of 919. The deletion was reproduced in androgen receptor wildtype cDNA and tran...

  16. α(+)-Thalassemia Due to a Frameshift Mutation of the α2-Globin Gene [codons 55/56 (+T) or HBA2: c.168dup].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waye, John S; Eng, Barry; Hanna, Meredith; Hohenadel, Betty-Ann; Nakamura, Lisa M; Walker, Lynda

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of α(+)-thalassemia (α(+)-thal) trait in a Chinese-Canadian family caused by a novel frameshift mutation of the α2-globin gene, specifically the duplication of a single nucleotide at amino acid codon 56 [HBA2: c.168dup]. The mutation results in substitution of a termination codon (TAA) for lysine (AAG) at amino acid position 56.

  17. The sequential addition of ribosomal proteins during the formation of the small ribosomal subunit in Friend erythroleukemia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todorov, I T; Noll, F; Hadjiolov, A A

    1983-03-15

    Nucleolar '80-S' and '40-S' preribosomes (containing 45-S and 21-S pre-rRNA, respectively), as well as cytoplasmic ribosomes, were isolated from Friend erythroleukemia cells. The presence of structural ribosomal proteins in the isolated particles was studied by using antisera against individual rat liver small ribosomal subunit proteins. The analysis is based on the established crossreactivity between rat and mouse ribosomes [F. Noll and H. Bielka (1970) Mol. Gen. Genet. 106, 106-113]. The identification of the proteins was achieved by two independent immunological techniques: the passive haemagglutination test and the enzyme immunoassay of electrophoretically fractionated proteins, blotted on nitrocellulose. All 17 proteins tested are present in cytoplasmic ribosomes. A large number of proteins (S3a, S6, S7, S8, S11, S14, S18, S20, S23/24 and S25) are present in the '80-S' preribosome. Only two proteins (S3 and S21) are added during the formation of the '40-S' preribosome in the nucleolus. Four proteins (S2, S19, S26 and S29) are added at later, possibly extranucleolar, stages of ribosome formation. The results obtained provide evidence for the sequential addition of proteins during the formation of the small ribosomal subunit in Friend erythroleukemia cells.

  18. A cis-eQTL of HLA-DRB1 and a frameshift mutation of MICA contribute to the pattern of association of HLA alleles with cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dan; Gyllensten, Ulf

    2014-04-01

    The association of classic human leukocyte antigen (HLA) alleles with risk of cervical cancer has been extensively studied, and a protective effect has consistently been found for DRB1*1301, DQA1*0103, and/or DQB1*0603 (these three alleles are in perfect linkage disequilibrium [LD] and often occur on the same haplotype in Europeans), while reports have differed widely with respect to the effect of HLA-B*07, DRB1*1501, and/or DQB1*0602 (the last two alleles are also in perfect LD in Europeans). It is not clear whether the reported HLA alleles are responsible for the differences in cervical cancer susceptibility, or if functional variants at other locations within the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) region may explain the effect. In order to assess the relative contribution of both classic HLA alleles and single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within the MHC region to cervical cancer susceptibility, we have imputed classic HLA alleles in 1034 cervical cancer patients and 3948 controls in a Swedish population for an integrated analysis. We found that the protective haplotype DRB1*1301-DQA1*0103-DQB1*0603 has a direct effect on cervical cancer and always occurs together with the C allele of a HLA-DRB1 cis-eQTL (rs9272143), which increases the expression of HLA-DRB1. The haplotype rs9272143C-DRB1*1301-DQA1*0103-DQB1*0603 conferred the strongest protection against cervical cancer (odds ratio [OR] = 0.41, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.32-0.52, P = 6.2 × 10(-13)). On the other hand, the associations with HLA-B*0702 and DRB1*1501-DQB1*0602 are attributable to the joint effects of both the HLA-DRB1 cis-eQTL (rs9272143) and a frameshift mutation (G inserion of rs67841474, also known as A5.1) of the MHC class I polypeptide-related sequence A gene (MICA). Variation in LD between the classic HLA loci, rs9272143 and rs67841474 between populations may explain the different associations of HLA-B*07 and DRB1*1501-DQB1*0602 with cervical cancer between studies. The

  19. NOD2 3020insC frameshift mutation is not associated with inflammatory bowel disease in Chinese patients of Han nationality

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qiu-Sha Guo; Bing Xia; Yi Jiang; Yan Qü; Jing Li

    2004-01-01

    AIM: An insertion mutation at nucleotide 3020 (3020insC) in the Caspase recruitment domain gene (CARD15),originally reported as NOD2, is strongly associated with Crohn's disease. The C-insertion mutation at nucleotide 3020 (3020inC) in the leucine-rich repeat (LRR) region results in a frameshift in the 10th LRR followed by a premature stop codon. This truncation mutation is responsible for the inability to activate nuclear factor (NF)-κB in response to bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS). The present study aimed to genotype NOD2/CARD15 gene 3020insC frameshift mutation in Chinese patients with inflammatory bowel disease.METHODS: We genotyped an insertion polymorphism affecting the leucine-rich region of the protein product by the allele specific PCR in 74 unrelated patients with ulcerative colitis of Han nationality in Hubei Province of China, 15 patients with Crohn's disease and 172 healthy individuals.RESULTS: No significant differences were found in the genotype and allele frequencies of the C-insertion mutation of NOD2 gene among patients with Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis and healthy controls.CONCLUSION: NOD2 gene 3020insC frameshift mutation is not a major contributor to the susceptibility to both Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis in Chinese Han patients.

  20. A Tumor-Specific Neo-Antigen Caused by a Frameshift Mutation in BAP1 Is a Potential Personalized Biomarker in Malignant Peritoneal Mesothelioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Jun; Zhou, Zhan; Tang, Xiao-Jing; Gao, Zhi-Bin; Zhou, Jie; Chen, Shu-Qing

    2016-05-14

    Malignant peritoneal mesothelioma (MPM) is an aggressive rare malignancy associated with asbestos exposure. A better understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of MPM will help develop a targeted therapy strategy. Oncogene targeted depth sequencing was performed on a tumor sample and paired peripheral blood DNA from a patient with malignant mesothelioma of the peritoneum. Four somatic base-substitutions in NOTCH2, NSD1, PDE4DIP, and ATP10B and 1 insert frameshift mutation in BAP1 were validated by the Sanger method at the transcriptional level. A 13-amino acids neo-peptide of the truncated Bap1 protein, which was produced as a result of this novel frameshift mutation, was predicted to be presented by this patient's HLA-B protein. The polyclonal antibody of the synthesized 13-mer neo-peptide was produced in rabbits. Western blotting results showed a good antibody-neoantigen specificity, and Immunohistochemistry (IHC) staining with the antibody of the neo-peptide clearly differentiated neoplastic cells from normal cells. A search of the Catalogue of Somatic Mutations in Cancer (COSMIC) database also revealed that 53.2% of mutations in BAP1 were frameshift indels with neo-peptide formation. An identified tumor-specific neo-antigen could be the potential molecular biomarker for personalized diagnosis to precisely subtype rare malignancies such as MPM.

  1. Non-homologous end joining dependency of {gamma}-irradiation-induced adaptive frameshift mutation formation in cell cycle-arrested yeast cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heidenreich, Erich [Institute of Cancer Research, Division of Molecular Genetics, Medical University of Vienna, Borschkegasse 8a, A-1090 Vienna (Austria)]. E-mail: erich.heidenreich@meduniwien.ac.at; Eisler, Herfried [Institute of Cancer Research, Division of Molecular Genetics, Medical University of Vienna, Borschkegasse 8a, A-1090 Vienna (Austria)

    2004-11-22

    There is a strong selective pressure favoring adaptive mutations which relieve proliferation-limiting adverse living conditions. Due to their importance for evolution and pathogenesis, we are interested in the mechanisms responsible for the formation of such adaptive, gain-of-fitness mutations in stationary-phase cells. During previous studies on the occurrence of spontaneous reversions of an auxotrophy-causing frameshift allele in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we noticed that about 50% of the adaptive reversions depended on a functional non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) pathway of DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair. Here, we show that the occasional NHEJ component Pol4, which is the yeast ortholog of mammalian DNA polymerase lambda, is not required for adaptive mutagenesis. An artificially imposed excess of DSBs by {gamma}-irradiation resulted in a dramatic increase in the incidence of adaptive, cell cycle arrest-releasing frameshift reversions. By the use of DNA ligase IV-deficient strains we detected that the majority of the {gamma}-induced adaptive mutations were also dependent on a functional NHEJ pathway. This suggests that the same mutagenic NHEJ mechanism acts on spontaneously arising as well as on ionizing radiation-induced DSBs. Inaccuracy of the NHEJ repair pathway may extensively contribute to the incidence of frameshift mutations in resting (non-dividing) eukaryotic cells, and thus act as a driving force in tumor development.

  2. Phenotype diversity in familial cylindromatosis: a frameshift mutation in the tumor suppressor gene CYLD underlies different tumors of skin appendages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poblete Gutiérrez, Pamela; Eggermann, Thomas; Höller, Daniela; Jugert, Frank K; Beermann, Torsten; Grussendorf-Conen, Elke-Ingrid; Zerres, Klaus; Merk, Hans F; Frank, Jorge

    2002-08-01

    Familial cylindromatosis (turban tumor syndrome; Brooke-Spiegler syndrome) (OMIM numbers 123850, 132700, 313100, and 605041) is a rare autosomal dominantly inherited tumor syndrome. The disorder can present with cutaneous adnexal tumors such as cylindromas, trichoepitheliomas, and spiradenomas, and tumors preferably develop in hairy areas of the body such as head and neck. In affected families, mutations have been demonstrated in the CYLD gene located on chromosome 16q12-13 and reveal the characteristic attributes of a tumor suppressor. Here, we studied familial cylindromatosis in a multigeneration family of German origin. Clinically, some individuals only revealed discrete small skin-colored tumors localized in the nasolabial region whereas one family member showed expansion of multiple big tumors on the trunk and in a turban-like fashion on the scalp. Histologically, cylindromas as well as epithelioma adenoides cysticum were found. We detected a frameshift mutation in the CYLD gene, designated 2253delG, underlying the disorder and were able to show that a single mutation can result in distinct clinical and histologic expression in familial cylindromatosis. The reasons for different expression patterns of the same genetic defect in this disease remain elusive, however. Identification of mutations in the CYLD gene enable us to rapidly confirm putative diagnoses on the genetic level and to provide affected families with genetic counseling.

  3. Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome: novel FLCN frameshift deletion in daughter and father with renal cell carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Näf, Ernst; Laubscher, Dominik; Hopfer, Helmut; Streit, Markus; Matyas, Gabor

    2016-01-01

    Germline mutation of the FLCN gene causes Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome (BHD), a rare autosomal dominant condition characterized by skin fibrofolliculomas, lung cysts, spontaneous pneumothorax and renal tumours. We identified a hitherto unreported pathogenic FLCN frameshift deletion c.563delT (p.Phe188Serfs*35) in a family of a 46-year-old woman presented with macrohematuria due to bilateral chromophobe renal carcinomas. A heritable renal cancer was suspected due to the bilaterality of the tumour and as the father of this woman had suffered from renal cancer. Initially, however, BHD was overlooked by the medical team despite the highly suggestive clinical presentation. We assume that BHD is underdiagnosed, at least partially, due to low awareness of this variable condition and to insufficient use of appropriate genetic testing. Our study indicates that BHD and FLCN testing should be routinely considered in patients with positive family or personal history of renal tumours. In addition, we demonstrate how patients and their families can play a driving role in initiating genetic diagnosis, presymptomatic testing of at-risk relatives, targeted disease management, and genetic counselling of rare diseases such as BHD.

  4. TRPC1 transcript variants, inefficient nonsense-mediated decay and low up-frameshift-1 in vascular smooth muscle cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar Bhaskar

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transient Receptor Potential Canonical 1 (TRPC1 is a widely-expressed mammalian cationic channel with functional effects that include stimulation of cardiovascular remodelling. The initial aim of this study was to investigate variation in TRPC1-encoding gene transcripts. Results Extensive TRPC1 transcript alternative splicing was observed, with exons 2, 3 and 5-9 frequently omitted, leading to variants containing premature termination codons. Consistent with the predicted sensitivity of such variants to nonsense-mediated decay (NMD the variants were increased by cycloheximide. However it was notable that control of the variants by NMD was prominent in human embryonic kidney 293 cells but not human vascular smooth muscle cells. The cellular difference was attributed in part to a critical protein in NMD, up-frameshift-1 (UPF1, which was found to have low abundance in the vascular cells. Rescue of UPF1 by expression of exogenous UPF1 was found to suppress vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation. Conclusions The data suggest: (i extensive NMD-sensitive transcripts of TRPC1; (ii inefficient clearance of aberrant transcripts and enhanced proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells in part because of low UPF1 expression.

  5. A frameshift mutation in the canine HEXB gene in toy poodles with GM2 gangliosidosis variant 0 (Sandhoff disease).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Mohammad M; Chang, Hye-Sook; Mizukami, Keijiro; Hossain, Mohammad A; Yabuki, Akira; Tamura, Shinji; Kitagawa, Masato; Mitani, Sawane; Higo, Takashi; Uddin, Mohammad M; Uchida, Kazuyuki; Yamato, Osamu

    2012-12-01

    GM2 gangliosidosis variant 0 (Sandhoff disease, SD) is a fatal, progressive neurodegenerative lysosomal storage disease caused by mutations in the HEXB gene. Toy poodles recently were reported as the second breed of dog with SD. The present paper describes the molecular defect of this canine SD as the first identification of a pathogenic mutation in the canine HEXB gene. Genomic and complementary DNA sequences covering exonic regions of the canine HEXB gene, except exon 1, were analysed using DNA and RNA in an affected dog. A homozygous single base pair deletion of guanine in exon 3 was identified at nucleotide position 283 of the putative open reading frame (c.283delG). This mutation has the potential to cause a frameshift resulting in the alteration of valine at amino acid position 59 to a stop codon (p.V59fsX). Genotyping using the mutagenically separated PCR method demonstrated a correlation between phenotype and genotype in dogs with a pedigree related to the disease and that the mutation was rare in a randomly-selected population of toy poodles. These results strongly suggest that the deletion is pathogenic.

  6. A novel frameshift mutation and infrequent clinical findings in two cases with Dyggve-Melchior-Clausen syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seven, Mehmet; Koparir, Erkan; Gezdirici, Alper; Aydin, Hatip; Skladny, Heyko; Fenercioğlu, Elif; Güven, Gülgün; Karataş, Ömer Faruk; Koparir, Asuman; Özen, Mustafa; Ulucan, Hakan

    2014-01-01

    Dyggve-Melchior-Clausen syndrome (DMC) (MIM #223800) is a rare autosomal-recessive type of skeletal dysplasia accompanied by variable degrees of intellectual disability (ID). It is characterized by progressive spondyloepimetaphyseal dysplasia leading to disproportionate short stature, microcephaly, and coarse facies. The radiographic appearance of generalized platyspondyly with double-humped end plates and the lace-like appearance of iliac crests are pathognomonic in this syndrome. The disorder results from mutations in the dymeclin (DYM) mapped to the 18q12-12.1 chromosomal region. Here, we report two cases with DMC: one with disproportionate short stature, developmental delay, and severe ID with a novel frameshift mutation (c.1028_1056del29) leading to a premature stop codon, and the second patient with classical clinical and radiological features of DMC with mild ID and rectal prolapse, which is very rare. The clinical diagnosis was confirmed with molecular analysis of DYM with a known mutation at c.580C>T (p.R194X). The parents and sibling of the second patient were heterozygous carriers with mild skeletal changes and short stature.

  7. CCR4 frameshift mutation identifies a distinct group of adult T cell leukaemia/lymphoma with poor prognosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Noriaki; Miyoshi, Hiroaki; Kato, Takeharu; Sakata-Yanagimoto, Mamiko; Niino, Daisuke; Taniguchi, Hiroaki; Moriuchi, Yukiyoshi; Miyahara, Masaharu; Kurita, Daisuke; Sasaki, Yuya; Shimono, Joji; Kawamoto, Keisuke; Utsunomiya, Atae; Imaizumi, Yoshitaka; Seto, Masao; Ohshima, Koichi

    2016-04-01

    Adult T cell leukaemia/lymphoma (ATLL) is an intractable T cell neoplasm caused by human T cell leukaemia virus type 1. Next-generation sequencing-based comprehensive mutation studies have revealed recurrent somatic CCR4 mutations in ATLL, although clinicopathological findings associated with CCR4 mutations remain to be delineated. In the current study, 184 cases of peripheral T cell lymphoma, including 113 cases of ATLL, were subjected to CCR4 mutation analysis. This sequence analysis identified mutations in 27% (30/113) of cases of ATLL and 9% (4/44) of cases of peripheral T cell lymphoma not otherwise specified. Identified mutations included nonsense (NS) and frameshift (FS) mutations. No significant differences in clinicopathological findings were observed between ATLL cases stratified by presence of CCR4 mutation. All ATLL cases with CCR4 mutations exhibited cell-surface CCR4 positivity. Semi-quantitative CCR4 protein analysis of immunohistochemical sections revealed higher CCR4 expression in cases with NS mutations of CCR4 than in cases with wild-type (WT) CCR4. Furthermore, among ATLL cases, FS mutation was significantly associated with a poor prognosis, compared with NS mutation and WT CCR4. These results suggest that CCR4 mutation is an important determinant of the clinical course in ATLL cases, and that NS and FS mutations of CCR4 behave differently with respect to ATLL pathophysiology.

  8. A homozygous frameshift mutation in the HOXC13 gene underlies pure hair and nail ectodermal dysplasia in a Syrian family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farooq, Muhammad; Kurban, Mazen; Fujimoto, Atsushi; Fujikawa, Hiroki; Abbas, Ossama; Nemer, Georges; Saliba, Jessica; Sleiman, Rima; Tofaili, Mona; Kibbi, Abdul-Ghani; Ito, Masaaki; Shimomura, Yutaka

    2013-04-01

    Pure hair and nail ectodermal dysplasia (PHNED) is a rare genetic disorder characterized by hypotrichosis or complete alopecia, as well as nail dystrophy. Mutations in the type II hair keratin gene KRT85 and the HOXC13 gene on chromosome 12q have recently been identified in families with autosomal-recessive PHNED. In the present study, we have analyzed a consanguineous Syrian family with an affected girl having complete alopecia and nail dystrophy since birth. The family clearly showed linkage to chromosome 12q13.13-12q14.3, which excluded the KRT85 gene. Sequencing of another candidate gene HOXC13 within the linkage interval identified a homozygous frameshift mutation (c.355delC; p.Leu119Trpfs*20). Expression studies in cultured cells revealed that the mutant HOXC13 protein mislocalized within the cytoplasm, and failed to upregulate the promoter activities of its target genes. Our results strongly suggest crucial roles of the HOXC13 gene in the development of hair and nails in humans.

  9. Multiple nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome associated with congenital orbital teratoma, caused by a PTCH1 frameshift mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, A L; Carvalho, A; Cabral, R; Carneiro, V; Gilardi, P; Duarte, C P; Puente-Prieto, J; Santos, P; Mota-Vieira, L

    2014-07-25

    Gorlin-Goltz syndrome, or nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS), is a rare autosomal dominant disorder caused by mutations in the PTCH1 gene and shows a high level of penetrance and variable expressivity. The syndrome is characterized by developmental abnormalities or neoplasms and is diagnosed with 2 major criteria, or with 1 major and 2 minor criteria. Here, we report a new clinical manifestation associated with this syndrome in a boy affected by NBCCS who had congenital orbital teratoma at birth. Later, at the age of 15 years, he presented with 4 major and 4 minor criteria of NBCCS, including multiple basal cell carcinoma and 2 odontogenic keratocysts of the jaw, both confirmed by histology, more than 5 palmar pits, calcification of the cerebral falx, extensive meningeal calcifications, macrocephaly, hypertelorism, frontal bosses, and kyphoscoliosis. PTCH1 mutation analysis revealed the heterozygous germline mutation c.290dupA. This mutation generated a frameshift within exon 2 and an early premature stop codon (p.Asn97LysfsX43), predicting a truncated protein with complete loss of function. Identification of this mutation is useful for genetic counseling. Although the clinical symptoms are well-known, our case contributes to the understanding of phenotypic variability in NBCCS, highlighting that PTCH1 mutations cannot be used for predicting disease burden and reinforces the need of a multidisciplinary team in the diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up of NBCCS patients.

  10. Whole exome sequencing identifies a novel frameshift mutation in GPC3 gene in a patient with overgrowth syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das Bhowmik, Aneek; Dalal, Ashwin

    2015-11-10

    Overgrowth syndromes are a heterogeneous group of diseases characterized by focal or generalized overgrowth. Many of the syndromes have overlapping clinical features and it is difficult to diagnose the condition based on clinical features alone. In the present study we report on a patient with overgrowth syndrome where extensive investigation did not reveal the cause of disease. Finally exome sequencing revealed a novel hemizygous single base pair deletion in exon 8 of GPC3 gene (chrX:132670203delA) resulting in a frameshift and creating a new stop codon at 62 amino acids downstream to codon 564 (c.1692delT; p.Leu565SerfsTer63) of the protein. The mutation was confirmed by Sanger sequencing. The mother was found to be heterozygous for the mutation. This variation is not reported in the 1000 Genomes, Exome Variant Server (EVS), Exome Aggregation Consortium (ExAC) and dbSNP databases and the region is conserved across primates. Exome sequencing was helpful in establishing diagnosis of Simpson-Golabi-Behmel syndrome type 1 (SGBS1) in a patient with unknown overgrowth syndrome.

  11. Functional analysis of a promoter variant identified in the CFTR gene in cis of a frameshift mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viart, Victoria; Des Georges, Marie; Claustres, Mireille; Taulan, Magali

    2012-02-01

    In monogenic diseases, the presence of several sequence variations in the same allele may complicate our understanding of genotype-phenotype relationships. We described new alterations identified in a cystic fibrosis (CF) patient harboring a 48C>G promoter sequence variation associated in cis of a 3532AC>GTA mutation and in trans with the F508del mutation. Functional analyses including in vitro experiments confirmed the deleterious effect of the 3532GTA frameshift mutation through the creation of a premature termination codon. The analyses also revealed that the 48G promoter variant has a negative effect on both transcription and mRNA level, thus demonstrating the importance of analyzing all mutations or sequence variations with potential impact on CF transmembrane conductance regulator processing, even when the two known disease-causing mutations have already been detected. Our results emphasize the need to perform, wherever possible, functional studies that may greatly assist the interpretation of the disease-causing potential of rare mutation-associated sequence variations.

  12. A frameshift mutation in the cubilin gene (CUBN) in Beagles with Imerslund-Gräsbeck syndrome (selective cobalamin malabsorption).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drögemüller, Michaela; Jagannathan, Vidhya; Howard, Judith; Bruggmann, Rémy; Drögemüller, Cord; Ruetten, Maja; Leeb, Tosso; Kook, Peter H

    2014-02-01

    Mammals are unable to synthesize cobalamin or vitamin B12 and rely on the uptake of dietary cobalamin. The cubam receptor expressed on the intestinal endothelium is required for the uptake of cobalamin from the gut. Cubam is composed of two protein subunits, amnionless and cubilin, which are encoded by the AMN and CUBN genes respectively. Loss-of-function mutations in either the AMN or the CUBN gene lead to hereditary selective cobalamin malabsorption or Imerslund-Gräsbeck syndrome (IGS). We investigated Beagles with IGS and resequenced the whole genome of one affected Beagle at 15× coverage. The analysis of the AMN and CUBN candidate genes revealed a homozygous deletion of a single cytosine in exon 8 of the CUBN gene (c.786delC). This deletion leads to a frameshift and early premature stop codon (p.Asp262Glufs*47) and is, thus, predicted to represent a complete loss-of-function allele. We tested three IGS-affected and 89 control Beagles and found perfect association between the IGS phenotype and the CUBN:c.786delC variant. Given the known role of cubilin in cobalamin transport, which has been firmly established in humans and dogs, our data strongly suggest that the CUBN:c.786delC variant is causing IGS in the investigated Beagles.

  13. An exon 53 frameshift mutation in CUBN abrogates cubam function and causes Imerslund-Gräsbeck syndrome in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fyfe, John C; Hemker, Shelby L; Venta, Patrick J; Fitzgerald, Caitlin A; Outerbridge, Catherine A; Myers, Sherry L; Giger, Urs

    2013-08-01

    Cobalamin malabsorption accompanied by selective proteinuria is an autosomal recessive disorder known as Imerslund-Gräsbeck syndrome in humans and was previously described in dogs due to amnionless (AMN) mutations. The resultant vitamin B12 deficiency causes dyshematopoiesis, lethargy, failure to thrive, and life-threatening metabolic disruption in the juvenile period. We studied 3 kindreds of border collies with cobalamin malabsorption and mapped the disease locus in affected dogs to a 2.9Mb region of homozygosity on canine chromosome 2. The region included CUBN, the locus encoding cubilin, a peripheral membrane protein that in concert with AMN forms the functional intrinsic factor-cobalamin receptor expressed in ileum and a multi-ligand receptor in renal proximal tubules. Cobalamin malabsorption and proteinuria comprising CUBN ligands were demonstrated by radiolabeled cobalamin uptake studies and SDS-PAGE, respectively. CUBN mRNA and protein expression were reduced ~10 fold and ~20 fold, respectively, in both ileum and kidney of affected dogs. DNA sequencing demonstrated a single base deletion in exon 53 predicting a translational frameshift and early termination codon likely triggering nonsense mediated mRNA decay. The mutant allele segregated with the disease in the border collie kindred. The border collie disorder indicates that a CUBN mutation far C-terminal from the intrinsic factor-cobalamin binding site can abrogate receptor expression and cause Imerslund-Gräsbeck syndrome.

  14. Mechanisms for ribotoxin-induced ribosomal RNA cleavage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Kaiyu [Department of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics (United States); Center for Integrative Toxicology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Zhou, Hui-Ren [Food Science and Human Nutrition (United States); Pestka, James J., E-mail: pestka@msu.edu [Department of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics (United States); Food Science and Human Nutrition (United States); Center for Integrative Toxicology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States)

    2012-11-15

    The Type B trichothecene deoxynivalenol (DON), a ribotoxic mycotoxin known to contaminate cereal-based foods, induces ribosomal RNA (rRNA) cleavage in the macrophage via p38-directed activation of caspases. Here we employed the RAW 264.7 murine macrophage model to test the hypothesis that this rRNA cleavage pathway is similarly induced by other ribotoxins. Capillary electrophoresis confirmed that the antibiotic anisomycin (≥ 25 ng/ml), the macrocylic trichothecene satratoxin G (SG) (≥ 10 ng/ml) and ribosome-inactivating protein ricin (≥ 300 ng/ml) induced 18s and 28s rRNA fragmentation patterns identical to that observed for DON. Also, as found for DON, inhibition of p38, double-stranded RNA-activated kinase (PKR) and hematopoietic cell kinase (Hck) suppressed MAPK anisomycin-induced rRNA cleavage, while, in contrast, their inhibition did not affect SG- and ricin-induced rRNA fragmentation. The p53 inhibitor pifithrin-μ and pan caspase inhibitor Z-VAD-FMK suppressed rRNA cleavage induced by anisomycin, SG and ricin, indicating that these ribotoxins shared with DON a conserved downstream pathway. Activation of caspases 8, 9 and 3 concurrently with apoptosis further suggested that rRNA cleavage occurred in parallel with both extrinsic and intrinsic pathways of programmed cell death. When specific inhibitors of cathepsins L and B (lysosomal cysteine cathepsins active at cytosolic neutral pH) were tested, only the former impaired anisomycin-, SG-, ricin- and DON-induced rRNA cleavage. Taken together, the data suggest that (1) all four ribotoxins induced p53-dependent rRNA cleavage via activation of cathepsin L and caspase 3, and (2) activation of p53 by DON and anisomycin involved p38 whereas SG and ricin activated p53 by an alternative mechanism. Highlights: ► Deoxynivalenol (DON) anisomycin, satratoxin G (SG) and ricin are ribotoxins. ► Ribotoxins induce 18s and 28s rRNA cleavage in the RAW 264.7 macrophage model. ► Ribotoxins induce rRNA cleavage via

  15. Organization of Replication of Ribosomal DNA in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Linskens, Maarten H.K.; Huberman, Joel A.

    1988-01-01

    Using recently developed replicon mapping techniques, we have analyzed the replication of the ribosomal DNA in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The results show that (i) the functional origin of replication colocalizes with an autonomously replicating sequence element previously mapped to the

  16. The characterization of cytoplasmic ribosomal protein genes in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2012-04-17

    Apr 17, 2012 ... 2Experimental Teaching Center, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400016, ... ribosomal protein genes of N. bombycis were located in syntenic blocks, .... genome distribution of all RPGs have been displayed and.

  17. Antibiotic resistance evolved via inactivation of a ribosomal RNA methylating enzyme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stojković, Vanja; Noda-Garcia, Lianet; Tawfik, Dan S.; Fujimori, Danica Galonić

    2016-01-01

    Modifications of the bacterial ribosome regulate the function of the ribosome and modulate its susceptibility to antibiotics. By modifying a highly conserved adenosine A2503 in 23S rRNA, methylating enzyme Cfr confers resistance to a range of ribosome-targeting antibiotics. The same adenosine is also methylated by RlmN, an enzyme widely distributed among bacteria. While RlmN modifies C2, Cfr modifies the C8 position of A2503. Shared nucleotide substrate and phylogenetic relationship between RlmN and Cfr prompted us to investigate evolutionary origin of antibiotic resistance in this enzyme family. Using directed evolution of RlmN under antibiotic selection, we obtained RlmN variants that mediate low-level resistance. Surprisingly, these variants confer resistance not through the Cfr-like C8 methylation, but via inhibition of the endogenous RlmN C2 methylation of A2503. Detection of RlmN inactivating mutations in clinical resistance isolates suggests that the mechanism used by the in vitro evolved variants is also relevant in a clinical setting. Additionally, as indicated by a phylogenetic analysis, it appears that Cfr did not diverge from the RlmN family but from another distinct family of predicted radical SAM methylating enzymes whose function remains unknown. PMID:27496281

  18. Genome shuffling and ribosome engineering of Streptomyces actuosus for high-yield nosiheptide production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qingling; Zhang, Dong; Li, Yudong; Zhang, Fuming; Wang, Cao; Liang, Xinle

    2014-07-01

    Nosiheptide is one of the EU-approved sulfur-containing peptides in feed industry to inhibit the growth of the majority of Gram-positive bacteria. The main purpose of this study is directed to breed the high nosiheptide-producers by genome shuffling and ribosome engineering in Streptomyces actuosus AW7. The starting population for shuffling was generated by combining (60)Coγ-irradiation with LiCl mutagenesis treatments on the spores. After four rounds of protoplast fusion exposed to streptomycin as adaptive pressure, a high-yield recombinant strain D92 was obtained. In a 10-L fermenter, nosiheptide production reached 1.54 g/L which was 9.20-fold compared to that of the parental strain. Hyphae development, metabolic process, and ribosomal protein S12 sequence were investigated to characterize the differentiation among the recombinants. Several mutations in S12 were believed to be responsible to streptomycin resistance in the tested strain. The results demonstrated that the combination of genome shuffling and ribosome engineering is an efficient approach to breed high-yield industrial strains.

  19. Ribosome binding induces repositioning of the signal recognition particle receptor on the translocon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhn, Patrick; Draycheva, Albena; Vogt, Andreas; Petriman, Narcis-Adrian; Sturm, Lukas; Drepper, Friedel; Warscheid, Bettina; Wintermeyer, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    Cotranslational protein targeting delivers proteins to the bacterial cytoplasmic membrane or to the eukaryotic endoplasmic reticulum membrane. The signal recognition particle (SRP) binds to signal sequences emerging from the ribosomal tunnel and targets the ribosome-nascent-chain complex (RNC) to the SRP receptor, termed FtsY in bacteria. FtsY interacts with the fifth cytosolic loop of SecY in the SecYEG translocon, but the functional role of the interaction is unclear. By using photo-cross-linking and fluorescence resonance energy transfer measurements, we show that FtsY–SecY complex formation is guanosine triphosphate independent but requires a phospholipid environment. Binding of an SRP–RNC complex exposing a hydrophobic transmembrane segment induces a rearrangement of the SecY–FtsY complex, which allows the subsequent contact between SecY and ribosomal protein uL23. These results suggest that direct RNC transfer to the translocon is guided by the interaction between SRP and translocon-bound FtsY in a quaternary targeting complex. PMID:26459600

  20. The ribosomal gene spacer region in archaebacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achenbach-Richter, L.; Woese, C. R.

    1988-01-01

    Sequences for the spacer regions that separate the 16S and 23S ribosomal RNA genes have been determined for four more (strategically placed) archaebacteria. These confirm the general rule that methanogens and extreme halophiles have spacers that contain a single tRNAala gene, while tRNA genes are not found in the spacer region of the true extreme thermophiles. The present study also shows that the spacer regions from the sulfate reducing Archaeglobus and the extreme thermophile Thermococcus (both of which cluster phylogenetically with the methanogens and extreme halophiles) contain each a tRNAala gene. Thus, not only all methanogens and extreme halophiles show this characteristic, but all organisms on the "methanogen branch" of the archaebacterial tree appear to do so. The finding of a tRNA gene in the spacer region of the extreme thermophile Thermococcus celer is the first known phenotypic property that links this organism with its phylogenetic counterparts, the methanogens, rather than with its phenotypic counterparts, the sulfur-dependent extreme thermophiles.

  1. Cisplatin Targeting of Bacterial Ribosomal RNA Hairpins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gayani N. P. Dedduwa-Mudalige

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Cisplatin is a clinically important chemotherapeutic agent known to target purine bases in nucleic acids. In addition to major deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA intrastrand cross-links, cisplatin also forms stable adducts with many types of ribonucleic acid (RNA including siRNA, spliceosomal RNAs, tRNA, and rRNA. All of these RNAs play vital roles in the cell, such as catalysis of protein synthesis by rRNA, and therefore serve as potential drug targets. This work focused on platination of two highly conserved RNA hairpins from E. coli ribosomes, namely pseudouridine-modified helix 69 from 23S rRNA and the 790 loop of helix 24 from 16S rRNA. RNase T1 probing, MALDI mass spectrometry, and dimethyl sulfate mapping revealed platination at GpG sites. Chemical probing results also showed platination-induced RNA structural changes. These findings reveal solvent and structural accessibility of sites within bacterial RNA secondary structures that are functionally significant and therefore viable targets for cisplatin as well as other classes of small molecules. Identifying target preferences at the nucleotide level, as well as determining cisplatin-induced RNA conformational changes, is important for the design of more potent drug molecules. Furthermore, the knowledge gained through studies of RNA-targeting by cisplatin is applicable to a broad range of organisms from bacteria to human.

  2. An Allosteric Pathway Revealed in the Ribosome Binding Stress Factor BipA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makanji, H.; deLivron, M; Robinson, V

    2009-01-01

    BipA is a highly conserved prokaryotic GTPase that functions as a master regulator of stress and virulence processes in bacteria. It is a member of the translational factor family of GTPases along with EF-G, IF-2 and LepA. Structural and biochemical data suggest that ribosome binding specificity for each member of this family lies in an effector domain. As with other bacterial GTPases, the ribosome binding and GTPase activities of this protein are tightly coupled. However, the mechanism by which this occurs is still unknown. A series of experiments have been designed to probe structural features of the protein to see if we can pinpoint specific areas of BipA, perhaps even individual residues, which are important to its association with the ribosome. Included in the list are the C-terminal effector domain of the protein, which is distinct to the BipA family of proteins, and amino acid residues in the switch I and II regions of the G domain. Using sucrose density gradients, we have shown that the C-terminal domain is required in order for BipA to bind to the ribosome. Moreover, deletion of this domain increases the GTP hydrolysis rates of the protein, likely through relief of inhibitory contacts. Additional evidence has revealed an allosteric connection between the conformationally flexible switch II region and the C-terminal domain of BipA. Site directed mutagenesis, sucrose gradients and malachite green assays are being used to elucidate the details of this coupling.

  3. Fluorescently labeled ribosomes as a tool for analyzing antibiotic binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llano-Sotelo, Beatriz; Hickerson, Robyn P; Lancaster, Laura; Noller, Harry F; Mankin, Alexander S

    2009-08-01

    Measuring the binding of antibiotics and other small-molecular-weight ligands to the 2.5 MDa ribosome often presents formidable challenges. Here, we describe a general method for studying binding of ligands to ribosomes that carry a site-specific fluorescent label covalently attached to one of the ribosomal proteins. As a proof of principle, an environment-sensitive fluorescent group was placed at several specific sites within the ribosomal protein S12. Small ribosomal subunits were reconstituted from native 16S rRNA, individually purified small subunit proteins, and fluorescently labeled S12. The fluorescence characteristics of the reconstituted subunits were affected by several antibiotics, including streptomycin and neomycin, which bind in the vicinity of protein S12. The equilibrium dissociation constants of the drugs obtained using a conventional fluorometer were in good agreement with those observed using previously published methods and with measurements based on the use of radiolabeled streptomycin. The newly developed method is rapid and sensitive, and can be used for determining thermodynamic and kinetic binding characteristics of antibiotics and other small ribosomal ligands. The method can readily be adapted for use in high-throughput screening assays.

  4. Modulation of Decoding Fidelity by Ribosomal Proteins S4 and S5

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Ribosomal proteins S4 and S5 participate in the decoding and assembly processes on the ribosome and the interaction with specific antibiotic inhibitors of translation. Many of the characterized mutations affecting these proteins decrease the accuracy of translation, leading to a ribosomal-ambiguity phenotype. Structural analyses of ribosomal complexes indicate that the tRNA selection pathway involves a transition between the closed and open conformations of the 30S ribosomal subunit and requi...

  5. Structural and functional analysis of Escherichia coli ribosomes containing small deletions around position 1760 in the 23S ribosomal RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zweib, C; Dahlberg, A E

    1984-09-25

    Three different small deletions were produced at a single Pvu 2 restriction site in E. coli 23S rDNA of plasmid pKK 3535 using exonuclease Bal 31. The deletions were located around position 1760 in 23S rRNA and were characterized by DNA sequencing as well as by direct fingerprinting and S1-mapping of the rRNA. Two of the mutant plasmids, Pvu 2-32 and Pvu 2-33, greatly reduced the growth rate of transformed cells while the third mutant, Pvu 2-14 grew as fast as cells containing the wild-type plasmid pKK 3535. All three mutant 23S rRNAs were incorporated into 50S-like particles and were even found in 70S ribosomes and polysomes in vivo. The conformation of mutant 23S rRNA in 50S subunits was probed with a double-strand specific RNase from cobra venom. These analyses revealed changes in the accessibility of cleavage sites near the deletions around position 1760 and in the area around position 800 in all three mutant rRNAs. We suggest, that an altered conformation of the rRNAs at the site of the deletion is responsible for the slow growth of cells containing mutant plasmids Pvu 2-32 and Pvu 2-33.

  6. Molecular phenotype and bleeding risks of an inherited platelet disorder in a family with a RUNX1 frameshift mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badin, M S; Iyer, J K; Chong, M; Graf, L; Rivard, G E; Waye, J S; Paterson, A D; Pare, G; Hayward, C P M

    2017-05-01

    Inherited defects in RUNX1 are important causes of platelet function disorders. Our goals were to evaluate RUNX1-related platelet disorders among individuals evaluated for uncharacterized, inherited platelet function disorders and test a proof of concept that bleeding risks could be quantitatively estimated for typical families with an inherited platelet function disorder. Index cases with an uncharacterized inherited platelet function disorder were subjected to exome sequencing with confirmation of RUNX1 mutations by Sanger sequencing. Laboratory findings were obtained from medical records and persistence of platelet non-muscle myosin heavy chain IIB (MYH10), a biomarker of RUNX1 defects, was assessed by Western blotting. Bleeding histories were assessed using standardized assessment tools. Bleeding risks were estimated as odds ratios (OR) using questionnaire data for affected individuals compared to controls. Among 12 index cases who had their exomes sequenced, one individual from a family with eight study participants had a c.583dup in RUNX1 that segregated with the disease and was predicted to cause a frameshift and RUNX1 haploinsufficiency. Unlike unaffected family members (n = 2), affected family members (n = 6) had increased bleeding scores and abnormal platelet aggregation and dense granule release responses to agonists but only some had thrombocytopenia and/or dense granule deficiency. This family's mutation was associated with persistence of MYH10 in platelets and increased risks (OR 11-440) for wound healing problems and mild bleeding symptoms, including bleeding interfering with lifestyle in women. Inherited platelet dysfunction due to a RUNX1 haploinsufficiency mutation significantly increases bleeding risks. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Coding Microsatellite Frameshift Mutations Accumulate in Atherosclerotic Carotid Artery Lesions: Evaluation of 26 Cases and Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurz, Carolin; Hakimi, Maani; Kloor, Matthias; Grond-Ginsbach, Caspar; Gross-Weissmann, Marie-Luise; Böckler, Dittmar; von Knebel Doeberitz, Magnus; Dihlmann, Susanne

    2015-06-09

    Somatic DNA alterations are known to occur in atherosclerotic carotid artery lesions; however, their significance is unknown. The accumulation of microsatellite mutations in coding DNA regions may reflect a deficiency of the DNA mismatch repair (MMR) system. Alternatively, accumulation of these coding microsatellite mutations may indicate that they contribute to the pathology. To discriminate between these two possibilities, we compared the mutation frequencies in coding microsatellites (likely functionally relevant) with those in noncoding microsatellites (likely neutral). Genomic DNA was isolated from carotid endarterectomy (CEA) specimens of 26 patients undergoing carotid surgery and from 15 nonatherosclerotic control arteries. Samples were analyzed by DNA fragment analysis for instability at three noncoding (BAT25, BAT26, CAT25) and five coding (AIM2, ACVR2, BAX, CASP5, TGFBR2) microsatellite loci, with proven validity for detection of microsatellite instability in neoplasms. We found an increased frequency of coding microsatellite mutations in CEA specimens compared with control specimens (34.6 versus 0%; p = 0.0013). Five CEA specimens exhibited more than one frameshift mutation, and ACVR2 and CASP5 were affected most frequently (5/26 and 6/26). Moreover, the rate of coding microsatellite alterations (15/130) differed significantly from that of noncoding alterations (0/78) in CEA specimens (p = 0.0013). In control arteries, no microsatellite alterations were observed, neither in coding nor in noncoding microsatellite loci. In conclusion, the specific accumulation of coding mutations suggests that these mutations play a role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerotic carotid lesions, since the absence of mutations in noncoding microsatellites argues against general microsatellite instability, reflecting MMR deficiency.

  8. A frameshift mutation in the melanophilin gene causes the dilute coat colour in rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus) breeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontanesi, L; Scotti, E; Allain, D; Dall'olio, S

    2014-04-01

    In rabbit, the dilute locus is determined by a recessive mutated allele (d) that causes the dilution of both eumelanic and pheomelanic pigmentations. In mice, similar phenotypes are determined by mutations in the myosin VA, Rab27a and melanophilin (MLPH) genes. In this study, we investigated the rabbit MLPH gene and showed that a mutation in this gene appears responsible for the dilute coat colour in this species. Checkered Giant F1 families segregating for black and grey (diluted or blue) coat colour were first genotyped for a complex indel in intron 1 of the MLPH gene that was completely associated with the coat colour phenotype (θ = 0.00; LOD = 4.82). Then, we sequenced 6357 bp of the MLPH gene in 18 rabbits of different coat colours, including blue animals. A total of 165 polymorphisms were identified: 137 were in non-coding regions and 28 were in coding exons. One of them was a frameshift deletion in exon 5. Genotyping the half-sib families confirmed the complete cosegregation of this mutation with the blue coat colour. The mutation was analysed in 198 rabbits of 23 breeds. All Blue Vienna and all other blue/grey/ash rabbits in other breeds (Californian, Castor Rex, Checkered Giant, English Spot, Fairy Marburg and Fairy Pearly) were homozygous for this deletion. The identification of MLPH as the responsible gene for the dilute locus in rabbit provides a natural animal model for human Griscelli syndrome type 3 and a new mutant to study the role of this gene on pigmentation. © 2013 Stichting International Foundation for Animal Genetics.

  9. Detection of Frameshift Mutations of the Transforming Growth Factor Receptor Ⅱ in Gastric Cancers with Microsatellite Instability

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dong Wang; Xin Geng; Yanyun Li; Yuchuan Wang; Yanni Li; Linsheng Zhao; Weiming Zhang

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To study the relationship among microsatellite instability (MSI), frameshift mutations (FM) of the transforming growth factor β receptor Ⅱ (TGFβR Ⅱ), methylation state of the hMLH1 promoter and hMLH1 protein expression level in gastric cancers, and to explore their relationship to gastric carcinogenesis.METHODS DNA was isolated from 101 gastric specimens and 5 microsatellite loci were detected. PCR, electrophoresis on denatured polyacrylamide gels and silver staining were performed to detect the MSI. The FMs of TGFβR Ⅱ were also screened with the same method. HMLH1 methylation was analyzed by methylation specific PCR (MSP) and sequencing. HMLH1 protein expression was detected using immunohistochemistry.RESULTS The incidence of MSIs was 53.7% and 0% in the cancers and normal tissues, respectively, with the frequency of MSIs being significantly higher in the gastric cancers compared to the normal gastric tissues (P<0.05). The frequency of hMLH1 methylation was 41.5%(17/41) in the gastric cancers and 0%(0/60) in the normal group. Decreased hMLH1 expression was observed in 94.1%(16/17) of cases exhibiting methylation. FMs of TGFβR Ⅱ were identified in 5 (62.5%) of the 8 samples with MSIH. In contrast, FMs were not found in MSI-L or microsatellite stable (MSS) cases.CONCLUSION MSIs and FMs of TGFβR Ⅱ may play an important role in gastric carcinogenesis. HMLH1 methylation is an important modification of the DNA which results in inactivation of hMLH1 and mismatch repair defects which lead to MSIs and FMs of TGFβR Ⅱ.

  10. A novel frameshift mutation in the AFG3L2 gene in a patient with spinocerebellar ataxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musova, Zuzana; Kaiserova, Michaela; Kriegova, Eva; Fillerova, Regina; Vasovcak, Peter; Santava, Alena; Mensikova, Katerina; Zumrova, Alena; Krepelova, Anna; Sedlacek, Zdenek; Kanovsky, Petr

    2014-06-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 28 (SCA28) is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder caused by missense AFG3L2 mutations. To examine the occurrence of SCA28 in the Czech Republic, we screened 288 unrelated ataxic patients with hereditary (N = 49) and sporadic or unknown (N = 239) form of ataxia for mutations in exons 15 and 16, the AFG3L2 mutation hotspots. A single significant variant, frameshift mutation c.1958dupT leading to a premature termination codon, was identified in a patient with slowly progressive speech and gait problems starting at the age of 68 years. Neurological examination showed cerebellar ataxia, mild Parkinsonian features with predominant bradykinesia, polyneuropathy of the lower limbs, and cognitive decline. However, other common SCA28 features like pyramidal tract signs (lower limb hyperreflexia, positive Babinski sign), ophthalmoparesis or ptosis were absent. The mutation was also found in a patient's unaffected daughter in whom a targeted examination at 53 years of age revealed mild imbalance signs. RNA analysis showed a decreased ratio of the transcript from the mutated AFG3L2 allele relative to the normal transcript in the peripheral lymphocytes of both patients. The ratio was increased by puromycin treatment, indicating that the mutated transcript can be degraded via nonsense-mediated RNA decay. The causal link between the mutation and the phenotype of the patient is currently unclear but a pathogenic mechanism based on AFG3L2 haploinsufficiency rather than the usual dominant-negative effect of missense AFG3L2 mutations reported in SCA28, cannot be excluded.

  11. A novel frameshift mutation in KCNQ4 in a family with autosomal recessive non-syndromic hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasano, Koichiro; Mutai, Hideki; Obuchi, Chie; Masuda, Sawako; Matsunaga, Tatsuo

    2015-08-01

    Mutation of KCNQ4 has been reported to cause autosomal dominant non-syndromic hearing loss (DFNA2A) that usually presents as progressive hearing loss starting from mild to moderate hearing loss during childhood. Here, we identified a novel KCNQ4 mutation, c.1044_1051del8, in a family with autosomal recessive non-syndromic hearing loss. The proband was homozygous for the mutation and was born to consanguineous parents; she showed severe hearing loss that was either congenital or of early childhood onset. The proband had a sister who was heterozygous for the mutation but showed normal hearing. The mutation caused a frameshift that eliminated most of the cytoplasmic C-terminus, including the A-domain, which has an important role for protein tetramerization, and the B-segment, which is a binding site for calmodulin (CaM) that regulates channel function via Ca ions. The fact that the heterozygote had normal hearing indicates that sufficient tetramerization and CaM binding sites were present to preserve a normal phenotype even when only half the proteins contained an A-domain and B-segment. On the other hand, the severe hearing loss in the homozygote suggests that complete loss of the A-domain and B-segment in the protein caused loss of function due to the failure of tetramer formation and CaM binding. This family suggests that some KCNQ4 mutations can cause autosomal recessive hearing loss with more severe phenotype in addition to autosomal dominant hearing loss with milder phenotype. This genotype-phenotype correlation is analogous to that in KCNQ1 which causes autosomal dominant hereditary long QT syndrome 1 with milder phenotype and the autosomal recessive Jervell and Lange-Nielsen syndrome 1 with more severe phenotype due to deletion of the cytoplasmic C-terminus of the potassium channel.

  12. A newly described bovine type 2 scurs syndrome segregates with a frame-shift mutation in TWIST1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurélien Capitan

    Full Text Available The developmental pathways involved in horn development are complex and still poorly understood. Here we report the description of a new dominant inherited syndrome in the bovine Charolais breed that we have named type 2 scurs. Clinical examination revealed that, despite a strong phenotypic variability, all affected individuals show both horn abnormalities similar to classical scurs phenotype and skull interfrontal suture synostosis. Based on a genome-wide linkage analysis using Illumina BovineSNP50 BeadChip genotyping data from 57 half-sib and full-sib progeny, this locus was mapped to a 1.7 Mb interval on bovine chromosome 4. Within this region, the TWIST1 gene encoding a transcription factor was considered as a strong candidate gene since its haploinsufficiency is responsible for the human Saethre-Chotzen syndrome, characterized by skull coronal suture synostosis. Sequencing of the TWIST1 gene identified a c.148_157dup (p.A56RfsX87 frame-shift mutation predicted to completely inactivate this gene. Genotyping 17 scurred and 20 horned founders of our pedigree as well as 48 unrelated horned controls revealed a perfect association between this mutation and the type 2 scurs phenotype. Subsequent genotyping of 32 individuals born from heterozygous parents showed that homozygous mutated progeny are completely absent, which is consistent with the embryonic lethality reported in Drosophila and mouse suffering from TWIST1 complete insufficiency. Finally, data from previous studies on model species and a fine description of type 2 scurs symptoms allowed us to propose different mechanisms to explain the features of this syndrome. In conclusion, this first report on the identification of a potential causal mutation affecting horn development in cattle offers a unique opportunity to better understand horn ontogenesis.

  13. A Frame-Shift Mutation in CAV1 Is Associated with a Severe Neonatal Progeroid and Lipodystrophy Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrauwen, Isabelle; Szelinger, Szabolcs; Siniard, Ashley L; Kurdoglu, Ahmet; Corneveaux, Jason J; Malenica, Ivana; Richholt, Ryan; Van Camp, Guy; De Both, Matt; Swaminathan, Shanker; Turk, Mari; Ramsey, Keri; Craig, David W; Narayanan, Vinodh; Huentelman, Matthew J

    2015-01-01

    A 3-year-old female patient presenting with an unknown syndrome of a neonatal progeroid appearance, lipodystrophy, pulmonary hypertension, cutis marmorata, feeding disorder and failure to thrive was investigated by whole-genome sequencing. This revealed a de novo, heterozygous, frame-shift mutation in the Caveolin1 gene (CAV1) (p.Phe160X). Mutations in CAV1, encoding the main component of the caveolae in plasma membranes, cause Berardinelli-Seip congenital lipodystrophy type 3 (BSCL). Although BSCL is recessive, heterozygous carriers either show a reduced phenotype of partial lipodystrophy, pulmonary hypertension, or no phenotype. To investigate the pathogenic mechanisms underlying this syndrome in more depth, we performed next generation RNA sequencing of peripheral blood, which showed several dysregulated pathways in the patient that might be related to the phenotypic progeroid features (apoptosis, DNA repair/replication, mitochondrial). Secondly, we found a significant down-regulation of known Cav1 interaction partners, verifying the dysfunction of CAV1. Other known progeroid genes and lipodystrophy genes were also dysregulated. Next, western blotting of lysates of cultured fibroblasts showed that the patient shows a significantly decreased expression of wild-type CAV1 protein, demonstrating a loss-of-function mutation, though her phenotype is more severe that other heterozygotes with similar mutations. This phenotypic variety could be explained by differences in genetic background. Indications for this are supported by additional rare variants we found in AGPAT2 and LPIN1 lipodystrophy genes. CAV1, AGPAT2 and LPIN1 all play an important role in triacylglycerol (TAG) biosynthesis in adipose tissue, and the defective function in different parts of this pathway, though not all to the same extend, could contribute to a more severe lipoatrophic phenotype in this patient. In conclusion, we report, for the first time, an association of CAV1 dysfunction with a syndrome

  14. Golden Retriever dogs with neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis have a two-base-pair deletion and frameshift in CLN5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilliam, D; Kolicheski, A; Johnson, G S; Mhlanga-Mutangadura, T; Taylor, J F; Schnabel, R D; Katz, M L

    2015-01-01

    We studied a recessive, progressive neurodegenerative disease occurring in Golden Retriever siblings with an onset of signs at 15 months of age. As the disease progressed these signs included ataxia, anxiety, pacing and circling, tremors, aggression, visual impairment and localized and generalized seizures. A whole genome sequence, generated with DNA from one affected dog, contained a plausibly causal homozygous mutation: CLN5:c.934_935delAG. This mutation was predicted to produce a frameshift and premature termination codon and encode a protein variant, CLN5:p.E312Vfs*6, which would lack 39 C-terminal amino acids. Eighteen DNA samples from the Golden Retriever family members were genotyped at CLN5:c.934_935delAG. Three clinically affected dogs were homozygous for the deletion allele; whereas, the clinically normal family members were either heterozygotes (n = 11) or homozygous for the reference allele (n = 4). Among archived Golden Retrievers DNA samples with incomplete clinical records that were also genotyped at the CLN5:c.934_935delAG variant, 1053 of 1062 were homozygous for the reference allele, 8 were heterozygotes and one was a deletion-allele homozygote. When contacted, the owner of this homozygote indicated that their dog had been euthanized because of a neurologic disease that progressed similarly to that of the affected Golden Retriever siblings. We have collected and stored semen from a heterozygous Golden Retriever, thereby preserving an opportunity for us or others to establish a colony of CLN5-deficient dogs.

  15. Assembly of the central domain of the 30S ribosomal subunit: roles for the primary binding ribosomal proteins S15 and S8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagannathan, Indu; Culver, Gloria M

    2003-07-01

    Assembly of the 30S ribosomal subunit occurs in a highly ordered and sequential manner. The ordered addition of ribosomal proteins to the growing ribonucleoprotein particle is initiated by the association of primary binding proteins. These proteins bind specifically and independently to 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA). Two primary binding proteins, S8 and S15, interact exclusively with the central domain of 16S rRNA. Binding of S15 to the central domain results in a conformational change in the RNA and is followed by the ordered assembly of the S6/S18 dimer, S11 and finally S21 to form the platform of the 30S subunit. In contrast, S8 is not part of this major platform assembly branch. Of the remaining central domain binding proteins, only S21 association is slightly dependent on S8. Thus, although S8 is a primary binding protein that extensively contacts the central domain, its role in assembly of this domain remains unclear. Here, we used directed hydroxyl radical probing from four unique positions on S15 to assess organization of the central domain of 16S rRNA as a consequence of S8 association. Hydroxyl radical probing of Fe(II)-S15/16S rRNA and Fe(II)-S15/S8/16S rRNA ribonucleoprotein particles reveal changes in the 16S rRNA environment of S15 upon addition of S8. These changes occur predominantly in helices 24 and 26 near previously identified S8 binding sites. These S8-dependent conformational changes are consistent with 16S rRNA folding in complete 30S subunits. Thus, while S8 binding is not absolutely required for assembly of the platform, it appears to affect significantly the 16S rRNA environment of S15 by influencing central domain organization.

  16. Selection of scFvs specific for the HepG2 cell line using ribosome display

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Lei Zhou; Wei-Ping Mao; Juan Fen; Hong-Yun Liu; Chuan-Jing Wei; Wen-Xiu Li; Feng-Yun Zhou

    2009-06-01

    The aim of this study was to construct a ribosome display library of single chain variable fragments (scFvs) associated with hepatocarcinoma and screen such a library for hepatocarcinoma-binding scFvs. mRNA was isolated from the spleens of mice immunized with hepatocellular carcinoma cell line HepG2. Heavy and k chain genes (VH and k) were amplified separately by RT-PCR, and an anti-HepG2 VH/k chain ribosome display library was constructed by assembling VH and k into the VH/k chain with a specially constructed linker by SOE-PCR. The VH/k chain library was transcribed and translated in vitro using a rabbit reticulocyte lysate system. In order to isolate specific scFvs, recognizing HepG2 negative selection on a normal hepatocyte line WRL-68 was carried out before three rounds of positive selection on HepG2. After three rounds of panning, cell enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) showed that one of the scFvs had high affinity for the HepG2 cell and lower affinity for the WRL-68 cell. In this study, we successfully constructed a native ribosome display library. Such a library would prove useful for direct intact cell panning using ribosome display technology. The selected scFv had a potential value for hepatocarcinoma treatment.

  17. Phosphorylation of ribosomal proteins influences subunit association and translation of poly (U) in Streptomyces coelicolor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikulík, Karel; Bobek, Jan; Ziková, Alice; Smětáková, Magdalena; Bezoušková, Silvie

    2011-03-01

    The occurrence of phosphorylated proteins in ribosomes of Streptomyces coelicolor was investigated. Little is known about which biological functions these posttranslational modifications might fulfil. A protein kinase associated with ribosomes phosphorylated six ribosomal proteins of the small subunit (S3, S4, S12, S13, S14 and S18) and seven ribosomal proteins of the large subunit (L2, L3, L7/L12, L16, L17, L23 and L27). The ribosomal proteins were phosphorylated mainly on the Ser/Thr residues. Phosphorylation of the ribosomal proteins influences ribosomal subunits association. Ribosomes with phosphorylated proteins were used to examine poly (U) translation activity. Phosphorylation induced about 50% decrease in polyphenylalanine synthesis. After preincubation of ribosomes with alkaline phosphatase the activity of ribosomes was greatly restored. Small differences were observed between phosphorylated and unphosphorylated ribosomes in the kinetic parameters of the binding of Phe-tRNA to the A-site of poly (U) programmed ribosomes, suggesting that the initial binding of Phe-tRNA is not significantly affected by phosphorylation. On contrary, the rate of peptidyl transferase was about two-fold lower than that in unphosphorylated ribosomes. The data presented demonstrate that phosphorylation of ribosomal proteins affects critical steps of protein synthesis.

  18. Transcriptome Profiling Identifies Ribosome Biogenesis as a Target of Alcohol Teratogenicity and Vulnerability during Early Embryogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berres, Mark E.; Garic, Ana; Flentke, George R.; Smith, Susan M.

    2017-01-01

    Fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) is a leading cause of neurodevelopmental disability. Individuals with FASD may exhibit a characteristic facial appearance that has diagnostic utility. The mechanism by which alcohol disrupts craniofacial development is incompletely understood, as are the genetic factors that can modify individual alcohol vulnerability. Using an established avian model, we characterized the cranial transcriptome in response to alcohol to inform the mechanism underlying these cells’ vulnerability. Gallus gallus embryos having 3–6 somites were exposed to 52 mM alcohol and the cranial transcriptomes were sequenced thereafter. A total of 3422 genes had significantly differential expression. The KEGG pathways with the greatest enrichment of differentially expressed gene clusters were Ribosome (P = 1.2 x 10−17, 67 genes), Oxidative Phosphorylation (P = 4.8 x 10−12, 60 genes), RNA Polymerase (P = 2.2 x 10−3, 15 genes) and Spliceosome (P = 2.6 x 10−2, 39 genes). The preponderance of transcripts in these pathways were repressed in response to alcohol. These same gene clusters also had the greatest altered representation in our previous comparison of neural crest populations having differential vulnerability to alcohol-induced apoptosis. Comparison of differentially expressed genes in alcohol-exposed (3422) and untreated, alcohol-vulnerable (1201) transcriptomes identified 525 overlapping genes of which 257 have the same direction of transcriptional change. These included 36 ribosomal, 25 oxidative phosphorylation and 7 spliceosome genes. Using a functional approach in zebrafish, partial knockdown of ribosomal proteins zrpl11, zrpl5a, and zrps3a individually heightened vulnerability to alcohol-induced craniofacial deficits and increased apoptosis. In humans, haploinsufficiency of several of the identified ribosomal proteins are causative in craniofacial dysmorphologies such as Treacher Collins Syndrome and Diamond-Blackfan Anemia. This work

  19. Development of translating ribosome affinity purification for zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tryon, Robert C; Pisat, Nilambari; Johnson, Stephen L; Dougherty, Joseph D

    2013-03-01

    The regulation of transcription and translation by specific cell types is essential to generate the cellular diversity that typifies complex multicellular organisms. Tagging and purification of ribosomal proteins has been shown to be an innovative and effective means of characterizing the ribosome bound transcriptome of highly specific cell populations in vivo. To test the feasibility of using translating ribosome affinity purification (TRAP) in zebrafish, we have generated both a ubiquitous TRAP line and a melanocyte-specific TRAP line using the native zebrafish rpl10a ribosomal protein. We have demonstrated the capacity to capture mRNA transcripts bound to ribosomes, and confirmed the expected enrichment of melanocyte specific genes and depletion of non-melanocyte genes when expressing the TRAP construct with a cell specific promoter. We have also generated a generic EGFP-rpl10a Tol2 plasmid construct (Tol2-zTRAP) that can be readily modified to target any additional cell populations with characterized promoters in zebrafish. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Chemotherapeutic drugs inhibit ribosome biogenesis at various levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burger, Kaspar; Mühl, Bastian; Harasim, Thomas; Rohrmoser, Michaela; Malamoussi, Anastassia; Orban, Mathias; Kellner, Markus; Gruber-Eber, Anita; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Hölzel, Michael; Eick, Dirk

    2010-04-16

    Drugs for cancer therapy belong to different categories of chemical substances. The cellular targets for the therapeutic efficacy are often not unambiguously identified. Here, we describe the process of ribosome biogenesis as a target of a large variety of chemotherapeutic drugs. We determined the inhibitory concentration of 36 chemotherapeutic drugs for transcription and processing of ribosomal RNA by in vivo labeling experiments. Inhibitory drug concentrations were correlated to the loss of nucleolar integrity. The synergism of drugs inhibiting ribosomal RNA synthesis at different levels was studied. Drugs inhibited ribosomal RNA synthesis either at the level of (i) rRNA transcription (e.g. oxaliplatin, doxorubicin, mitoxantrone, methotrexate), (ii) early rRNA processing (e.g. camptothecin, flavopiridol, roscovitine), or (iii) late rRNA processing (e.g. 5-fluorouracil, MG-132, homoharringtonine). Blockage of rRNA transcription or early rRNA processing steps caused nucleolar disintegration, whereas blockage of late rRNA processing steps left the nucleolus intact. Flavopiridol and 5-fluorouracil showed a strong synergism for inhibition of rRNA processing. We conclude that inhibition of ribosome biogenesis by chemotherapeutic drugs potentially may contribute to the efficacy of therapeutic regimens.

  1. Stochastic kinetics of ribosomes: single motor properties and collective behavior

    CERN Document Server

    Garai, Ashok; Chowdhury, Debashish; Ramakrishnan, T V

    2009-01-01

    Synthesis of protein molecules in a cell are carried out by ribosomes. A ribosome can be regarded as a molecular motor which utilizes the input chemical energy to move on a messenger RNA (mRNA) track that also serves as a template for the polymerization of the corresponding protein. The forward movement, however, is characterized by an alternating sequence of translocation and pause. Using a quantitative model, which captures the mechanochemical cycle of an individual ribosome, we derive an {\\it exact} analytical expression for the distribution of its dwell times at the successive positions on the mRNA track. Inverse of the average dwell time satisfies a ``Michaelis-Menten-like'' equation and is consistent with the general formula for the average velocity of a molecular motor with an unbranched mechano-chemical cycle. Extending this formula appropriately, we also derive the exact force-velocity relation for a ribosome. Often many ribosomes simultaneously move on the same mRNA track, while each synthesizes a c...

  2. Transformation of MCF-10A cells by random mutagenesis with frameshift mutagen ICR191: A model for identifying candidate breast-tumor suppressors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matsui Sei-Ichi

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Widely accepted somatic mutation theory of carcinogenesis states that mutations in oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes in genomes of somatic cells is the cause of neoplastic transformation. Identifying frequent mutations in cancer cells suggests the involvement of mutant genes in carcinogenesis. Results To develop an in vitro model for the analysis of genetic alterations associated with breast carcinogenesis, we used random mutagenesis and selection of human non-tumorigenic immortalized breast epithelial cells MCF-10A in tissue-culture conditions that mimic tumor environment. Random mutations were generated in MCF-10A cells by cultivating them in a tissue-culture medium containing the frameshift-inducing agent ICR191. The first selective condition we used to transform MCF1-10A cells was cultivation in a medium containing mutagen at a concentration that allowed cell replication despite p53 protein accumulation induced by mutagen treatment. The second step of selection was either cell cultivation in a medium with reduced growth-factor supply or in a medium that mimics a hypoxia condition or growing in soft agar. Using mutagenesis and selection, we have generated several independently derived cultures with various degrees of transformation. Gene Identification by Nonsense-mediated mRNA decay Inhibition (GINI analysis has identified the ICR191-induced frameshift mutations in the TP53, smoothelin, Ras association (RalGDS/AF-6 domain family 6 (RASSF6 and other genes in the transformed MCF-10A cells. The TP53 gene mutations resulting in the loss of protein expression had been found in all independently transformed MCF-10A cultures, which form large progressively growing tumors with sustained angiogenesis in nude mice. Conclusion Identifying genes containing bi-allelic ICR191-induced frameshift mutations in the transformed MCF-10A cells generated by random mutagenesis and selection indicates putative breast-tumor suppressors. This

  3. A frameshift mutation in the cubilin gene (CUBN) in Border Collies with Imerslund-Gräsbeck syndrome (selective cobalamin malabsorption).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owczarek-Lipska, Marta; Jagannathan, Vidhya; Drögemüller, Cord; Lutz, Sabina; Glanemann, Barbara; Leeb, Tosso; Kook, Peter H

    2013-01-01

    Imerslund-Gräsbeck syndrome (IGS) or selective cobalamin malabsorption has been described in humans and dogs. IGS occurs in Border Collies and is inherited as a monogenic autosomal recessive trait in this breed. Using 7 IGS cases and 7 non-affected controls we mapped the causative mutation by genome-wide association and homozygosity mapping to a 3.53 Mb interval on chromosome 2. We re-sequenced the genome of one affected dog at ∼10× coverage and detected 17 non-synonymous variants in the critical interval. Two of these non-synonymous variants were in the cubilin gene (CUBN), which is known to play an essential role in cobalamin uptake from the ileum. We tested these two CUBN variants for association with IGS in larger cohorts of dogs and found that only one of them was perfectly associated with the phenotype. This variant, a single base pair deletion (c.8392delC), is predicted to cause a frameshift and premature stop codon in the CUBN gene. The resulting mutant open reading frame is 821 codons shorter than the wildtype open reading frame (p.Q2798Rfs*3). Interestingly, we observed an additional nonsense mutation in the MRC1 gene encoding the mannose receptor, C type 1, which was in perfect linkage disequilibrium with the CUBN frameshift mutation. Based on our genetic data and the known role of CUBN for cobalamin uptake we conclude that the identified CUBN frameshift mutation is most likely causative for IGS in Border Collies.

  4. Visualization of cytosolic ribosomes on the surface of mitochondria by electron cryo-tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, Vicki Am; Chroscicki, Piotr; Bragoszewski, Piotr; Chacinska, Agnieszka

    2017-10-01

    We employed electron cryo-tomography to visualize cytosolic ribosomes on the surface of mitochondria. Translation-arrested ribosomes reveal the clustered organization of the TOM complex, corroborating earlier reports of localized translation. Ribosomes are shown to interact specifically with the TOM complex, and nascent chain binding is crucial for ribosome recruitment and stabilization. Ribosomes are bound to the membrane in discrete clusters, often in the vicinity of the crista junctions. This interaction highlights how protein synthesis may be coupled with transport. Our work provides unique insights into the spatial organization of cytosolic ribosomes on mitochondria. © 2017 The Authors. Published under the terms of the CC BY 4.0 license.

  5. Composition and structure of the 80S ribosome from the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii: 80S ribosomes are conserved in plants and animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manuell, Andrea L; Yamaguchi, Kenichi; Haynes, Paul A; Milligan, Ronald A; Mayfield, Stephen P

    2005-08-12

    We have conducted a proteomic analysis of the 80S cytosolic ribosome from the eukaryotic green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, and accompany this with a cryo-electron microscopy structure of the ribosome. Proteins homologous to all but one rat 40S subunit protein, including a homolog of RACK1, and all but three rat 60S subunit proteins were identified as components of the C. reinhardtii ribosome. Expressed Sequence Tag (EST) evidence and annotation of the completed C. reinhardtii genome identified genes for each of the four proteins not identified by proteomic analysis, showing that algae potentially have a complete set of orthologs to mammalian 80S ribosomal proteins. Presented at 25A, the algal 80S ribosome is very similar in structure to the yeast 80S ribosome, with only minor distinguishable differences. These data show that, although separated by billions of years of evolution, cytosolic ribosomes from photosynthetic organisms are highly conserved with their yeast and animal counterparts.

  6. T-cell factor-4 frameshift mutations occur frequently in human microsatellite instability-high colorectal carcinomas but do not contribute to carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruckert, Stefan; Hiendlmeyer, Elke; Brueckl, Wolfgang M; Oswald, Ursula; Beyser, Kurt; Dietmaier, Wolfgang; Haynl, Angela; Koch, Claudia; Rüschoff, Josef; Brabletz, Thomas; Kirchner, Thomas; Jung, Andreas

    2002-06-01

    Colorectal carcinomas with microsatellite instability accumulate errors in short repetitive DNA repeats, especially mono and dinucleotide repeats. One such error-prone A(9) monorepeat is found in exon 17 of the TCF-4 gene. TCF-4 and beta-catenin form a transcription complex, which is important for both maintenance of normal epithelium and development of colorectal tumors. To elucidate the relevance of frameshift mutations in the TCF-4 in colorectal carcinogenesis, a variety of investigations in human tumors and cell lines was performed. It was found that mutations in the TCF-4 A(9) repeat do not contribute to tumorigenesis and seem to be passenger mutations.

  7. Global shape mimicry of tRNA within a viral internal ribosome entry site mediates translational reading frame selection

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Viruses use alternate mechanisms to increase the coding capacity of their viral genomes. The dicistrovirus intergenic region internal ribosome entry site (IRES) adopts an RNA structure that can direct translation in 0 and +1 reading frames to produce the viral structural proteins and an overlapping ORFx product. Here we provide structural and biochemical evidence that the PKI domain of the IRES mimics a complete tRNA-like structure to facilitate reading frame selection and allows the viral IR...

  8. Antibody VH and VL recombination using phage and ribosome display technologies reveals distinct structural routes to affinity improvements with VH-VL interface residues providing important structural diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groves, Maria A T; Amanuel, Lily; Campbell, Jamie I; Rees, D Gareth; Sridharan, Sudharsan; Finch, Donna K; Lowe, David C; Vaughan, Tristan J

    2014-01-01

    In vitro selection technologies are an important means of affinity maturing antibodies to generate the optimal therapeutic profile for a particular disease target. Here, we describe the isolation of a parent antibody, KENB061 using phage display and solution phase selections with soluble biotinylated human IL-1R1. KENB061 was affinity matured using phage display and targeted mutagenesis of VH and VL CDR3 using NNS randomization. Affinity matured VHCDR3 and VLCDR3 library blocks were recombined and selected using phage and ribosome display protocol. A direct comparison of the phage and ribosome display antibodies generated was made to determine their functional characteristics.In our analyses, we observed distinct differences in the pattern of beneficial mutations in antibodies derived from phage and ribosome display selections, and discovered the lead antibody Jedi067 had a ~3700-fold improvement in KD over the parent KENB061. We constructed a homology model of the Fv region of Jedi067 to map the specific positions where mutations occurred in the CDR3 loops. For VL CDR3, positions 94 to 97 carry greater diversity in the ribosome display variants compared with the phage display. The positions 95a, 95b and 96 of VLCDR3 form part of the interface with VH in this model. The model shows that positions 96, 98, 100e, 100f, 100 g, 100h, 100i and 101 of the VHCDR3 include residues at the VH and VL interface. Importantly, Leu96 and Tyr98 are conserved at the interface positions in both phage and ribosome display indicating their importance in maintaining the VH-VL interface. For antibodies derived from ribosome display, there is significant diversity at residues 100a to 100f of the VH CDR3 compared with phage display. A unique deletion of isoleucine at position 102 of the lead candidate, Jedi067, also occurs in the VHCDR3.As anticipated, recombining the mutations via ribosome display led to a greater structural diversity, particularly in the heavy chain CDR3, which in turn

  9. RNA structures regulating ribosomal protein biosynthesis in bacilli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deiorio-Haggar, Kaila; Anthony, Jon; Meyer, Michelle M

    2013-07-01

    In Bacilli, there are three experimentally validated ribosomal-protein autogenous regulatory RNAs that are not shared with E. coli. Each of these RNAs forms a unique secondary structure that interacts with a ribosomal protein encoded by a downstream gene, namely S4, S15, and L20. Only one of these RNAs that interacts with L20 is currently found in the RNA Families Database. We created, or modified, existing structural alignments for these three RNAs and used them to perform homology searches. We have determined that each structure exhibits a narrow phylogenetic distribution, mostly relegated to the Firmicute class Bacilli. This work, in conjunction with other similar work, demonstrates that there are most likely many non-homologous RNA regulatory elements regulating ribosomal protein biosynthesis that still await discovery and characterization in other bacterial species.

  10. Cinnamomin-A Versatile Type Ⅱ Ribosome-inactivating Protein

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong XU; Wang-Yi LIU

    2004-01-01

    Ribosome-inactivating proteins(RIPs)are a group of toxic proteins that can specifically act on the universally conserved sarcin/ricin domain(S/R domain)of the largest RNA in ribosome and thus irreversibly inactivate ribosome for protein synthesis.Cinnamomin is a multifunctional type Ⅱ RIP isolated in our laboratory from the mature seeds of the camphor tree.This protein has been extensively studied with regard to its purification,characteristics,structure and function,genetic expression,enzymatic mechanism,physiological role in seed cell and toxicity to cancer cells and insect larvae.The research results of cinnamomin obtained in our laboratory are summarized in this review.Understanding of cinnamomin and the relative new proteins will help expand our knowledge of RIPs and may accelerate theoretical study and the development of their potential applications.

  11. Posttranslational Modifications of Ribosomal Proteins in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesterchuk, M V; Sergiev, P V; Dontsova, O A

    2011-04-01

    А number of ribosomal proteins inEscherichia coliundergo posttranslational modifications. Six ribosomal proteins are methylated (S11, L3, L11, L7/L12, L16, and L33), three proteins are acetylated (S5, S18, and L7), and protein S12 is methylthiolated. Extra amino acid residues are added to protein S6. С-terminal amino acid residues are partially removed from protein L31. The functional significance of these modifications has remained unclear. These modifications are not vital to the cells, and it is likely that they have regulatory functions. This paper reviews all the known posttranslational modifications of ribosomal proteins inEscherichia coli. Certain enzymes responsible for the modifications and mechanisms of enzymatic reactions are also discussed.

  12. 5SRNAdb: an information resource for 5S ribosomal RNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szymanski, Maciej; Zielezinski, Andrzej; Barciszewski, Jan; Erdmann, Volker A; Karlowski, Wojciech M

    2016-01-04

    Ribosomal 5S RNA (5S rRNA) is the ubiquitous RNA component found in the large subunit of ribosomes in all known organisms. Due to its small size, abundance and evolutionary conservation 5S rRNA for many years now is used as a model molecule in studies on RNA structure, RNA-protein interactions and molecular phylogeny. 5SRNAdb (http://combio.pl/5srnadb/) is the first database that provides a high quality reference set of ribosomal 5S RNAs (5S rRNA) across three domains of life. Here, we give an overview of new developments in the database and associated web tools since 2002, including updates to database content, curation processes and user web interfaces. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  13. Metagenome mining reveals polytheonamides as posttranslationally modified ribosomal peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Michael F; Gurgui, Cristian; Helf, Maximilian J; Morinaka, Brandon I; Uria, Agustinus R; Oldham, Neil J; Sahl, Hans-Georg; Matsunaga, Shigeki; Piel, Jörn

    2012-10-19

    It is held as a paradigm that ribosomally synthesized peptides and proteins contain only l-amino acids. We demonstrate a ribosomal origin of the marine sponge-derived polytheonamides, exceptionally potent, giant natural-product toxins. Isolation of the biosynthetic genes from the sponge metagenome revealed a bacterial gene architecture. Only six candidate enzymes were identified for 48 posttranslational modifications, including 18 epimerizations and 17 methylations of nonactivated carbon centers. Three enzymes were functionally validated, which showed that a radical S-adenosylmethionine enzyme is responsible for the unidirectional epimerization of multiple and different amino acids. Collectively, these complex alterations create toxins that function as unimolecular minimalistic ion channels with near-femtomolar activity. This study broadens the biosynthetic scope of ribosomal systems and creates new opportunities for peptide and protein bioengineering.

  14. Ribosomal Chamber Music: Toward an Understanding of IRES Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Hiroshi; Unbehaun, Anett; Spahn, Christian M T

    2017-08-01

    Internal initiation is a 5'-end-independent mode of translation initiation engaged by many virus- and putatively some cell-encoded templates. Internal initiation is facilitated by specific RNA tertiary folds, called internal ribosomal entry sites (IRESs), in the 5' untranslated region (UTR) of the respective transcripts. In this review we discuss recent structural insight into how established IRESs first capture and then manipulate the eukaryotic translation machinery through non-canonical interactions and by guiding the intrinsic conformational flexibility of the eukaryotic ribosome. Because IRESs operate with reduced complexity and constitute minimal systems of initiation, comparison with canonical initiation may allow common mechanistic principles of the ribosome to be delineated. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. A Frame-Shift Mutation in CAV1 Is Associated with a Severe Neonatal Progeroid and Lipodystrophy Syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabelle Schrauwen

    Full Text Available A 3-year-old female patient presenting with an unknown syndrome of a neonatal progeroid appearance, lipodystrophy, pulmonary hypertension, cutis marmorata, feeding disorder and failure to thrive was investigated by whole-genome sequencing. This revealed a de novo, heterozygous, frame-shift mutation in the Caveolin1 gene (CAV1 (p.Phe160X. Mutations in CAV1, encoding the main component of the caveolae in plasma membranes, cause Berardinelli-Seip congenital lipodystrophy type 3 (BSCL. Although BSCL is recessive, heterozygous carriers either show a reduced phenotype of partial lipodystrophy, pulmonary hypertension, or no phenotype. To investigate the pathogenic mechanisms underlying this syndrome in more depth, we performed next generation RNA sequencing of peripheral blood, which showed several dysregulated pathways in the patient that might be related to the phenotypic progeroid features (apoptosis, DNA repair/replication, mitochondrial. Secondly, we found a significant down-regulation of known Cav1 interaction partners, verifying the dysfunction of CAV1. Other known progeroid genes and lipodystrophy genes were also dysregulated. Next, western blotting of lysates of cultured fibroblasts showed that the patient shows a significantly decreased expression of wild-type CAV1 protein, demonstrating a loss-of-function mutation, though her phenotype is more severe that other heterozygotes with similar mutations. This phenotypic variety could be explained by differences in genetic background. Indications for this are supported by additional rare variants we found in AGPAT2 and LPIN1 lipodystrophy genes. CAV1, AGPAT2 and LPIN1 all play an important role in triacylglycerol (TAG biosynthesis in adipose tissue, and the defective function in different parts of this pathway, though not all to the same extend, could contribute to a more severe lipoatrophic phenotype in this patient. In conclusion, we report, for the first time, an association of CAV1 dysfunction

  16. Effects of magnesium ions on ribosomes: a fluorescence study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonincontro, A; Briganti, G; Giansanti, A; Pedone, F; Risuleo, G

    1993-07-18

    Fluorescence intensity measurements of ethidium bromide (EB) bound to ribosomal RNA (rRNA) in suspensions of 30S and 50S subunits, of 70S ribosomal particles and of protein-free extracted rRNA are presented. Changes in the intercalation of EB reflect changes in conformation and degree of exposure of rRNA. The effect of removal of magnesium ions on the binding of EB is compared in protein-free rRNA and in ribosomal particles by a Scatchard plot analysis. In free ribosomal RNA the number of bound EBs do not depend on magnesium content, only the association constant is affected. In intact 70S particles and both in the separated 50S and 30S subunits the presence of magnesium greatly reduces binding of EB and no saturation of the fluorescence intensity with rRNA concentration is observed, preventing a Scatchard plot analysis. Removal of magnesium restores a strong EB intercalation. Then magnesium ions induce a conformational change in the 70S particles as well as in the separated subunits. The different behavior of the free-rRNA and of the ribosomal particles indicates that ribosomal proteins are relevant to the structural changes induced by magnesium ions. The comparison of the number of excluded sites and of the association constant in the 30S, 50S subunits and in the 70S particles indicates that even without Mg2+ ions the two subunits still interact, at variance with the commonly shared opinion that subunits dissociation takes place at low magnesium concentration.

  17. Loss of ribosomal protein L11 affects zebrafish embryonic development through a p53-dependent apoptotic response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anirban Chakraborty

    Full Text Available Ribosome is responsible for protein synthesis in all organisms and ribosomal proteins (RPs play important roles in the formation of a functional ribosome. L11 was recently shown to regulate p53 activity through a direct binding with MDM2 and abrogating the MDM2-induced p53 degradation in response to ribosomal stress. However, the studies were performed in cell lines and the significance of this tumor suppressor function of L11 has yet to be explored in animal models. To investigate the effects of the deletion of L11 and its physiological relevance to p53 activity, we knocked down the rpl11 gene in zebrafish and analyzed the p53 response. Contrary to the cell line-based results, our data indicate that an L11 deficiency in a model organism activates the p53 pathway. The L11-deficient embryos (morphants displayed developmental abnormalities primarily in the brain, leading to embryonic lethality within 6-7 days post fertilization. Extensive apoptosis was observed in the head region of the morphants, thus correlating the morphological defects with apparent cell death. A decrease in total abundance of genes involved in neural patterning of the brain was observed in the morphants, suggesting a reduction in neural progenitor cells. Upregulation of the genes involved in the p53 pathway were observed in the morphants. Simultaneous knockdown of the p53 gene rescued the developmental defects and apoptosis in the morphants. These results suggest that ribosomal dysfunction due to the loss of L11 activates a p53-dependent checkpoint response to prevent improper embryonic development.

  18. Oxygenase-catalyzed ribosome hydroxylation occurs in prokaryotes and humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Wei; Wolf, Alexander; Feng, Tianshu; Ho, Chia-Hua; Sekirnik, Rok; Zayer, Adam; Granatino, Nicolas; Cockman, Matthew E; Loenarz, Christoph; Loik, Nikita D; Hardy, Adam P; Claridge, Timothy D W; Hamed, Refaat B; Chowdhury, Rasheduzzaman; Gong, Lingzhi; Robinson, Carol V; Trudgian, David C; Jiang, Miao; Mackeen, Mukram M; Mccullagh, James S; Gordiyenko, Yuliya; Thalhammer, Armin; Yamamoto, Atsushi; Yang, Ming; Liu-Yi, Phebee; Zhang, Zhihong; Schmidt-Zachmann, Marion; Kessler, Benedikt M; Ratcliffe, Peter J; Preston, Gail M; Coleman, Mathew L; Schofield, Christopher J

    2012-12-01

    The finding that oxygenase-catalyzed protein hydroxylation regulates animal transcription raises questions as to whether the translation machinery and prokaryotic proteins are analogously modified. Escherichia coli ycfD is a growth-regulating 2-oxoglutarate oxygenase catalyzing arginyl hydroxylation of the ribosomal protein Rpl16. Human ycfD homologs, Myc-induced nuclear antigen (MINA53) and NO66, are also linked to growth and catalyze histidyl hydroxylation of Rpl27a and Rpl8, respectively. This work reveals new therapeutic possibilities via oxygenase inhibition and by targeting modified over unmodified ribosomes.

  19. Mapping the non-standardized biases of ribosome profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartholomäus, Alexander; Del Campo, Cristian; Ignatova, Zoya

    2016-01-01

    Ribosome profiling is a new emerging technology that uses massively parallel amplification of ribosome-protected fragments and next-generation sequencing to monitor translation in vivo with codon resolution. Studies using this approach provide insightful views on the regulation of translation on a global cell-wide level. In this review, we compare different experimental set-ups and current protocols for sequencing data analysis. Specifically, we review the pitfalls at some experimental steps and highlight the importance of standardized protocol for sample preparation and data processing pipeline, at least for mapping and normalization.

  20. An intron in a ribosomal protein gene from Tetrahymena

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Henrik; Andreasen, Per Hove; Dreisig, Hanne

    1986-01-01

    of hybrid-selected mRNA and authentic ribosomal proteins. The proteins show strong homology to ribosomal protein S12 from Escherichia coli. The coding region of the gene is interrupted by a 979-bp intron 68 bp downstream of the translation start. This is the first intron in a protein encoding gene...... of a ciliate to be described at the nucleotide sequence level. The intron obeys the GT/AG rule for splice junctions of nuclear mRNA introns from higher eukaryotes but lacks the pyrimidine stretch usually found in the immediate vicinity of the 3' splice junction. The structure of the intron and the fact...

  1. A streamlined ribosome profiling protocol for the characterization of microorganisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Latif, Haythem; Szubin, Richard; Tan, Justin

    2015-01-01

    in the microbial research community. Here we present a streamlined ribosome profiling protocol with reduced barriers to entry for microbial characterization studies. Our approach provides simplified alternatives during harvest, lysis, and recovery of monosomes and also eliminates several time-consuming steps......Ribosome profiling is a powerful tool for characterizing in vivo protein translation at the genome scale, with multiple applications ranging from detailed molecular mechanisms to systems-level predictive modeling. Though highly effective, this intricate technique has yet to become widely used...

  2. Phosphorylation of acidic ribosomal proteins by ribosome-associated protein kinases of ``Saccharomyces cerevisiae`` and ``Schizosaccharomyces pombe``

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jakubowicz, T.; Cytrynska, M.; Kowalczyk, W.; Gasior, E. [Uniwersytet Marii Curie-Sklodowskiej, Lublin (Poland)

    1993-12-31

    Two proteins of 13 kDa and 38 kDa, the components of 60S ribosomal subunits, were identified as phosphorylation substrates for protein tightly associated with ``S. cerevisiae`` and ``Schizosaccharomyces pombe`` ribosomes. An enzyme with properties of multifunctional casein kinase II was detected in ribosome preparations from both yeast species. In S. cerevisiae another protein kinase with high substrate specificity toward those proteins was also identified. By using isoelectric focusing, the protein band of 13 kDa from ``S. cerevisiae`` and ``S. pombe`` was resolved respectively into three and four major forms of different charge. The same protein forms were phosphorylated in the in vivo {sup 32}P-labelling experiments. (author). 33 refs, 6 figs.

  3. 颅锁骨发育不良的三个RUNX2基因新突变%Identification of three novel frameshift mutations in the RUNX2 gene in three sporadic Chinese cases with cleidocranial dysplasia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    齐展; 杨威; 孟岩; 刘雅萍

    2014-01-01

    目的 通过对3例散发的颅锁骨发育不良患者进行RUNX2基因编码区的扩增及测序,寻找RUNX2基因突变,为家系进行遗传咨询和产前诊断提供依据.方法 抽取患者及其父母外周血,提取基因组DNA,PCR扩增RUNX2基因的7个编码外显子并测序;并对患者突变所在外显子的PCR产物经T-A克隆后再次测序.结果 例1的RUNX2第1外显子发生了1个80bp的c.227_306del杂合性缺失突变,引起读码框移位并提前出现终止密码(p.Ala76GlyfsX58);例2的RUNX2第2外显子发生了1个c.471_472dupGG杂合重复突变,亦导致读码框改变及提前出现终止密码(p.Ala158GlyfsX19);例3的R UNX2第17显子发生了1个c.1321dupT杂合重复突变,同样导致读码框改变和提前出现终止密码(p.Ser370PhefsX13).这三个移码突变经查询HGMD突变数据库及国内外文献均未见报道.结论 发现了3种新的导致颅锁骨发育不良的RUNX2基因突变,新的突变扩展了RUNX2基因的突变谱,可为这些家系提供准确可靠的遗传咨询和产前诊断.%Objective To investigate the molecular etiology of three patients with sporadic cleidocranial dysplasia (CCD) and to provide genetic counseling and prenatal diagnosis for the family members based on the identified mutations.Methods Genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral blood samples using a standard method.All 7 coding exons of the RUNX2 gene and their flanking intronic sequences were amplified by PCR and sequenced directly.The PCR products of the exons with mutations from the three patients were cloned into a T-vector.Positive clones were sequenced.Results The three patients who have the typical CCD phenotypes involving clavicles,calvarium,stature,and teeth have carried various frameshift mutations in the RUNX2 gene.Patient 1 has a gross deletion of 80 nucleotides in exon 1 (c.227_306del),which caused a frameshift beginning at the Q/A repeat of the polypeptide and a premature termination (p.Ala76GlyfsX58).Patient

  4. A ribosomal RNA gene intergenic spacer based PCR and DGGE fingerprinting method for the analysis of specific rhizobial communities in soil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Oliveira, VM; Manfio, GP; Coutinho, HLD; Keijzer-Wolters, AC; van Elsas, JD

    2006-01-01

    A direct molecular method for assessing the diversity of specific populations of rhizobia in soil, based on nested PCR amplification of 16S-23S ribosomal RNA gene (rDNA) intergenic spacer (IGS) sequences, was developed. Initial generic amplification of bacterial rDNA IGS sequences from soil DNA was

  5. NF1 frameshift mutation (c.6520_6523delGAGA) association with nervous system tumors and bone abnormalities in a Chinese patient with neurofibromatosis type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, S Y; Zhou, X; Pang, X M; Chen, C Y; Li, S H; Liu, J L

    2016-04-07

    Neurofibromatosis type 1, also known as NF1 or von Recklinghausen's disease, is a common neurocutaneous syndrome that presents with multiple café-au-lait patches, skinfold freckling, dermatofibromas, neurofibromas, and Lisch nodules. The mutations of the gene NF1, encoding the protein neurofibromin, have been identified as the cause of this disease. Here, we report a clinical and molecular study of a Chinese patient with multiple café-au-lait skin freckles, dermatofibroma, central and peripheral nervous system tumors, and bone abnormalities attributed to NF1. The patient showed >6 café-au-lait spots on the body and multiple dermatofibromas. A brain glioma and multiple nerve sheath tumors inside and outside the vertebral canal were identified by magnetic resonance imaging, which also showed multiple intercostal nerve schwannomas and hydrocephalies above the cerebellar tentorium. Talipes equinus was also apparent. A mutation analysis of the NF1 gene revealed a novel frameshift mutation in exon 43, consisting of a heterozygous deletion of four nucleotides (GAGA) between positions 6520 and 6523. No NF1 mutations were detected in the patient's parents or younger brother. These results extend the list of known mutations in this gene. The absence of the NF1 mutation in the healthy family members suggests that it is responsible for the NF1 phenotype. To our knowledge, this frameshift mutation represents a novel NF1 case, and may be associated with nervous system tumors and bone abnormalities.

  6. Postmortem diagnosis of Marfan syndrome in a case of sudden death due to aortic rupture: Detection of a novel FBN1 frameshift mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yunyun; Chen, Shu; Wang, Rongshuai; Huang, Sizhe; Yang, Mingzhen; Liu, Liang; Liu, Qian

    2016-04-01

    To investigate the sudden death of a 36-year-old Chinese man, a medicolegal autopsy was performed, combining forensic pathological examinations and genetic sequencing analysis to diagnose the cause of death. Genomic DNA samples were extracted from blood and subjected to high-throughput sequencing. Major findings included a dilated aortic root with a ruptured and dissected aorta and consequent tamponade of the pericardial sac. Moreover, arachnodactyly and other skeletal deformities were noted. By sequencing the fibrillin-1 gene (FBN1), five genetic variations were found, including four previously known single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and a novel frameshift mutation, leading to the diagnosis of Marfan syndrome. The frameshift mutation (c.4921delG, p.glu1641llysFsX9) detected in exon 40 led to a stop codon after the next 8 amino acids. The four SNPs included a splice site mutation (c.3464-5 G>A, rs11853943), a synonymous mutation (p.Asn625Asn, rs25458), and two missense mutations (p.Pro1148Ala, rs140598; p.Cys472Tyr, rs4775765). Genetic screening was recommended for the relatives as it was reported that the father and brother of the deceased had died at the ages of 40 and 25, respectively, from sudden cardiac failure. The son of the deceased lacked the relevant mutations. This report emphasizes the important contribution of medicolegal postmortem analysis on the molecular pathogenesis study of Marfan syndrome and early diagnosis of at-risk relatives.

  7. Exome sequencing identifies a novel frameshift mutation of MYO6 as the cause of autosomal dominant nonsyndromic hearing loss in a Chinese family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Jing; Zhou, Xueya; Lu, Yu; Chen, Jing; Han, Bing; Zhu, Yuhua; Liu, Liyang; Choy, Kwong-Wai; Han, Dongyi; Sham, Pak C; Zhang, Michael Q; Zhang, Xuegong; Yuan, Huijun

    2014-11-01

    Autosomal dominant types of nonsyndromic hearing loss (ADNSHL) are typically postlingual in onset and progressive. High genetic heterogeneity, late onset age, and possible confounding due to nongenetic factors hinder the timely molecular diagnoses for most patients. In this study, exome sequencing was applied to investigate a large Chinese family segregating ADNSHL in which we initially failed to find strong evidence of linkage to any locus by whole-genome linkage analysis. Two affected family members were selected for sequencing. We identified two novel mutations disrupting known ADNSHL genes and shared by the sequenced samples: c.328C>A in COCH (DFNA9) resulting in a p.Q110K substitution and a deletion c. 2814_2815delAA in MYO6 (DFNA22) causing a frameshift alteration p.R939Tfs*2. The pathogenicity of novel coding variants in ADNSHL genes was carefully evaluated by analysis of co-segregation with phenotype in the pedigree and in light of established genotype-phenotype correlations. The frameshift deletion in MYO6 was confirmed as the causative variant for this pedigree, whereas the missense mutation in COCH had no clinical significance. The results allowed us to retrospectively identify the phenocopy in one patient that contributed to the negative finding in the linkage scan. Our clinical data also supported the emerging genotype-phenotype correlation for DFNA22.

  8. Identification of a novel COL1A1 frameshift mutation, c.700delG, in a Chinese osteogenesis imperfecta family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiran; Pei, Yu; Dou, Jingtao; Lu, Juming; Li, Jian; Lv, Zhaohui

    2015-03-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a family of genetic disorders associated with bone loss and fragility. Mutations associated with OI have been found in genes encoding the type I collagen chains. People with OI type I often produce insufficient α1-chain type I collagen because of frameshift, nonsense, or splice site mutations in COL1A1 or COL1A2. This report is of a Chinese daughter and mother who had both experienced two bone fractures. Because skeletal fragility is predominantly inherited, we focused on identifying mutations in COL1A1 and COL1A2 genes. A novel mutation in COL1A1, c.700delG, was detected by genomic DNA sequencing in the mother and daughter, but not in their relatives. The identification of this mutation led to the conclusion that they were affected by mild OI type I. Open reading frame analysis indicated that this frameshift mutation would truncate α1-chain type I collagen at residue p263 (p.E234KfsX264), while the wild-type protein would contain 1,464 residues. The clinical data were consistent with the patients' diagnosis of mild OI type I caused by haploinsufficiency of α1-chain type I collagen. Combined with previous reports, identification of the novel mutation COL1A1-c.700delG in these patients suggests that additional genetic and environmental factors may influence the severity of OI.

  9. Transcriptional frameshifting rescues Citrobacter rodentium type VI secretion by the production of two length variants from the prematurely interrupted tssM gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gueguen, Erwan; Wills, Norma M; Atkins, John F; Cascales, Eric

    2014-12-01

    The Type VI secretion system (T6SS) mediates toxin delivery into both eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells. It is composed of a cytoplasmic structure resembling the tail of contractile bacteriophages anchored to the cell envelope through a membrane complex composed of the TssL and TssM inner membrane proteins and of the TssJ outer membrane lipoprotein. The C-terminal domain of TssM is required for its interaction with TssJ, and for the function of the T6SS. In Citrobacter rodentium, the tssM1 gene does not encode the C-terminal domain. However, the stop codon is preceded by a run of 11 consecutive adenosines. In this study, we demonstrate that this poly-A tract is a transcriptional slippery site that induces the incorporation of additional adenosines, leading to frameshifting, and hence the production of two TssM1 variants, including a full-length canonical protein. We show that both forms of TssM1, and the ratio between these two forms, are required for the function of the T6SS in C. rodentium. Finally, we demonstrate that the tssM gene associated with the Yersinia pseudotuberculosis T6SS-3 gene cluster is also subjected to transcriptional frameshifting.

  10. Identification of a novel COL1A1 frameshift mutation, c.700delG, in a Chinese osteogenesis imperfecta family

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiran; Pei, Yu; Dou, Jingtao; Lu, Juming; Li, Jian; Lv, Zhaohui

    2015-01-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a family of genetic disorders associated with bone loss and fragility. Mutations associated with OI have been found in genes encoding the type I collagen chains. People with OI type I often produce insufficient α1-chain type I collagen because of frameshift, nonsense, or splice site mutations in COL1A1 or COL1A2. This report is of a Chinese daughter and mother who had both experienced two bone fractures. Because skeletal fragility is predominantly inherited, we focused on identifying mutations in COL1A1 and COL1A2 genes. A novel mutation in COL1A1, c.700delG, was detected by genomic DNA sequencing in the mother and daughter, but not in their relatives. The identification of this mutation led to the conclusion that they were affected by mild OI type I. Open reading frame analysis indicated that this frameshift mutation would truncate α1-chain type I collagen at residue p263 (p.E234KfsX264), while the wild-type protein would contain 1,464 residues. The clinical data were consistent with the patients’ diagnosis of mild OI type I caused by haploinsufficiency of α1-chain type I collagen. Combined with previous reports, identification of the novel mutation COL1A1-c.700delG in these patients suggests that additional genetic and environmental factors may influence the severity of OI. PMID:25983617

  11. VHL Frameshift Mutation as Target of Nonsense-Mediated mRNA Decay in Drosophila melanogaster and Human HEK293 Cell Line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucia Micale

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available There are many well-studied examples of human phenotypes resulting from nonsense or frameshift mutations that are modulated by Nonsense-Mediated mRNA Decay (NMD, a process that typically degrades transcripts containing premature termination codons (PTCs in order to prevent translation of unnecessary or aberrant transcripts. Different types of germline mutations in the VHL gene cause the von Hippel-Lindau disease, a dominantly inherited familial cancer syndrome with a marked phenotypic variability and age-dependent penetrance. By generating the Drosophila UAS:Upf1D45B line we showed the possible involvement of NMD mechanism in the modulation of the c.172delG frameshift mutation located in the exon 1 of Vhl gene. Further, by Quantitative Real-time PCR (QPCR we demonstrated that the corresponding c.163delG human mutation is targeted by NMD in human HEK 293 cells. The UAS:Upf1D45B line represents a useful system to identify novel substrates of NMD pathway in Drosophila melanogaster. Finally, we suggest the possible role of NMD on the regulation of VHL mutations.

  12. Functional universality and evolutionary diversity: insights from the structure of the ribosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yonath, A; Franceschi, F

    1998-06-15

    The structure of the mammalian ribosome, reconstructed at 25 A resolution, has added a new dimension to our current knowledge, as it manifests the conservation and universality of the ribosome in respect to its primary tasks in protein biosynthesis. A combined approach to study of the ribosome, using X-ray crystallography and electron microscopy, may further improve our understanding of ribosome function in the future.

  13. Establishing Rps6 hemizygous mice as a model for studying how ribosomal protein haploinsufficiency impairs erythropoiesis

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Diamond-Blackfan Anemia(DBA) is a congenital hypoproliferative macrocytic anemia; 5q-syndrome myelodysplastic syndrome(MDS) is an acquired hypoproliferative macrocytic anemia. Their common erythroid phenotype reflects a shared pathophysiology -- haploinsufficiency of one of many ribosomal proteins and somatic deletion of one allele of the ribosomal protein S14 gene, respectively. Although these abnormalities lead to defective ribosome biogenesis, why ribosomal protein hemizygosity results in ...

  14. Construction of an in vivo nonsense readthrough assay system and functional analysis of ribosomal proteins S12, S4, and S5 in Bacillus subtilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inaoka, T; Kasai, K; Ochi, K

    2001-09-01

    To investigate the function of ribosomal proteins and translational factors in Bacillus subtilis, we developed an in vivo assay system to measure the level of nonsense readthrough by utilizing the LacZ-LacI system. Using the in vivo nonsense readthrough assay system which we developed, together with an in vitro poly(U)-directed cell-free translation assay system, we compared the processibility and translational accuracy of mutant ribosomes with those of the wild-type ribosome. Like Escherichia coli mutants, most S12 mutants exhibited lower frequencies of both UGA readthrough and missense error; the only exception was a mutant (in which Lys-56 was changed to Arg) which exhibited a threefold-higher frequency of readthrough than the wild-type strain. We also isolated several ribosomal ambiguity (ram) mutants from an S12 mutant. These ram mutants and the S12 mutant mentioned above (in which Lys-56 was changed to Arg) exhibited higher UGA readthrough levels. Thus, the mutation which altered Lys-56 to Arg resulted in a ram phenotype in B. subtilis. The efficacy of our in vivo nonsense readthrough assay system was demonstrated in our investigation of the function of ribosomal proteins and translational factors.

  15. Differential expression of ribosomal proteins in myelodysplastic syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinker, Elizabeth B; Dueber, Julie C; Qualtieri, Julianne; Tedesco, Jason; Erdogan, Begum; Bosompem, Amma; Kim, Annette S

    2016-02-01

    Aberrations of ribosomal biogenesis have been implicated in several congenital bone marrow failure syndromes, such as Diamond-Blackfan anaemia, Shwachman-Diamond syndrome and Dyskeratosis Congenita. Recent studies have identified haploinsufficiency of RPS14 in the acquired bone marrow disease isolated 5q minus syndrome, a subtype of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). However, the expression of various proteins comprising the ribosomal subunits and other proteins enzymatically involved in the synthesis of the ribosome has not been explored in non-5q minus MDS. Furthermore, differences in the effects of these expression alterations among myeloid, erythroid and megakaryocyte lineages have not been well elucidated. We examined the expression of several proteins related to ribosomal biogenesis in bone marrow biopsy specimens from patients with MDS (5q minus patients excluded) and controls with no known myeloid disease. Specifically, we found that there is overexpression of RPS24, DKC1 and SBDS in MDS. This overexpression is in contrast to the haploinsufficiency identified in the congenital bone marrow failure syndromes and in acquired 5q minus MDS. Potential mechanisms for these differences and aetiology for these findings in MDS are discussed.

  16. The Database of Ribosomal Cross-links: an update.

    OpenAIRE

    Baranov, P V; Kubarenko, A V; Gurvich, O L; Shamolina, T A; Brimacombe, R

    1999-01-01

    The Database of Ribosomal Cross-links (DRC) was created in 1997. Here we describe new data incorporated into this database and several new features of the DRC. The DRC is freely available via World Wide Web at http://visitweb.com/database/ or http://www. mpimg-berlin-dahlem.mpg.de/ approximately ag_ribo/ag_brimacombe/drc/

  17. The ribosome-associated complex antagonizes prion formation in yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amor, Alvaro J; Castanzo, Dominic T; Delany, Sean P; Selechnik, Daniel M; van Ooy, Alex; Cameron, Dale M

    2015-01-01

    The number of known fungal proteins capable of switching between alternative stable conformations is steadily increasing, suggesting that a prion-like mechanism may be broadly utilized as a means to propagate altered cellular states. To gain insight into the mechanisms by which cells regulate prion formation and toxicity we examined the role of the yeast ribosome-associated complex (RAC) in modulating both the formation of the [PSI(+)] prion - an alternative conformer of Sup35 protein - and the toxicity of aggregation-prone polypeptides. The Hsp40 RAC chaperone Zuo1 anchors the RAC to ribosomes and stimulates the ATPase activity of the Hsp70 chaperone Ssb. We found that cells lacking Zuo1 are sensitive to over-expression of some aggregation-prone proteins, including the Sup35 prion domain, suggesting that co-translational protein misfolding increases in Δzuo1 strains. Consistent with this finding, Δzuo1 cells exhibit higher frequencies of spontaneous and induced prion formation. Cells expressing mutant forms of Zuo1 lacking either a C-terminal charged region required for ribosome association, or the J-domain responsible for Ssb ATPase stimulation, exhibit similarly high frequencies of prion formation. Our findings are consistent with a role for the RAC in chaperoning nascent Sup35 to regulate folding of the N-terminal prion domain as it emerges from the ribosome.

  18. Classification of methanogenic bacteria by 16S ribosomal RNA characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, G.E.; Magrum, L.J.; Balch, W.E.; Wolfe, R.S.; Woese, C.R.

    1977-10-01

    The 16S ribosomal RNAs from 10 species of methanogenic bacteria have been characterized in terms of the oligonucleotides produced by T/sub 1/ RNase digestion. Comparative analysis of these data reveals the methanogens to constitute a distinct phylogenetic group containing two major divisions. These organisms appear to be only distantly related to typical bacteria.

  19. PCR primers for metazoan mitochondrial 12S ribosomal DNA sequences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryuji J Machida

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Assessment of the biodiversity of communities of small organisms is most readily done using PCR-based analysis of environmental samples consisting of mixtures of individuals. Known as metagenetics, this approach has transformed understanding of microbial communities and is beginning to be applied to metazoans as well. Unlike microbial studies, where analysis of the 16S ribosomal DNA sequence is standard, the best gene for metazoan metagenetics is less clear. In this study we designed a set of PCR primers for the mitochondrial 12S ribosomal DNA sequence based on 64 complete mitochondrial genomes and then tested their efficacy. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A total of the 64 complete mitochondrial genome sequences representing all metazoan classes available in GenBank were downloaded using the NCBI Taxonomy Browser. Alignment of sequences was performed for the excised mitochondrial 12S ribosomal DNA sequences, and conserved regions were identified for all 64 mitochondrial genomes. These regions were used to design a primer pair that flanks a more variable region in the gene. Then all of the complete metazoan mitochondrial genomes available in NCBI's Organelle Genome Resources database were used to determine the percentage of taxa that would likely be amplified using these primers. Results suggest that these primers will amplify target sequences for many metazoans. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Newly designed 12S ribosomal DNA primers have considerable potential for metazoan metagenetic analysis because of their ability to amplify sequences from many metazoans.

  20. Architecture of the E.coli 70S ribosome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burkhardt, N.; Diedrich, G.; Nierhaus, K.H.

    1997-01-01

    The 70S ribosome from E.coli was analysed by neutron scattering focusing on the shape and the internal protein-RNA-distribution of the complex. Measurements on selectively deuterated 70S particles and free 30S and 50S subunits applying conventional contrast variation and proton-spin contrast...

  1. Protein folding on the ribosome studied using NMR spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waudby, Christopher A.; Launay, Hélène; Cabrita, Lisa D.; Christodoulou, John

    2013-01-01

    NMR spectroscopy is a powerful tool for the investigation of protein folding and misfolding, providing a characterization of molecular structure, dynamics and exchange processes, across a very wide range of timescales and with near atomic resolution. In recent years NMR methods have also been developed to study protein folding as it might occur within the cell, in a de novo manner, by observing the folding of nascent polypeptides in the process of emerging from the ribosome during synthesis. Despite the 2.3 MDa molecular weight of the bacterial 70S ribosome, many nascent polypeptides, and some ribosomal proteins, have sufficient local flexibility that sharp resonances may be observed in solution-state NMR spectra. In providing information on dynamic regions of the structure, NMR spectroscopy is therefore highly complementary to alternative methods such as X-ray crystallography and cryo-electron microscopy, which have successfully characterized the rigid core of the ribosome particle. However, the low working concentrations and limited sample stability associated with ribosome–nascent chain complexes means that such studies still present significant technical challenges to the NMR spectroscopist. This review will discuss the progress that has been made in this area, surveying all NMR studies that have been published to date, and with a particular focus on strategies for improving experimental sensitivity. PMID:24083462

  2. Kinetoplastid Specific RNA-Protein Interactions in Trypanosoma cruzi Ribosome Biogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khan Umaer

    Full Text Available RNA binding proteins (RBP play essential roles in the highly conserved and coordinated process of ribosome biogenesis. Our laboratory has previously characterized two essential and abundant RBPs, P34 and P37, in Trypanosoma brucei which are required for several critical steps in ribosome biogenesis. The genes for these proteins have only been identified in kinetoplastid organisms but not in the host genome. We have identified a homolog of the TbP34 and TbP37 in a T. cruzi strain (termed TcP37/NRBD. Although the N-terminal APK-rich domain and RNA recognition motifs are conserved, the C-terminal region which contains putative nuclear and nucleolar localization signals in TbP34 and TbP37 is almost entirely missing from TcP37/NRBD. We have shown that TcP37/NRBD is expressed in T. cruzi epimastigotes at the level of mature mRNA and protein. Despite the loss of the C-terminal domain, TcP37/NRBD is present in the nucleus, including the nucleolus, and the cytoplasm. TcP37/NRBD interacts directly with Tc 5S rRNA, but does not associate with polyadenylated RNA. TcP37/NRBD also associates in vivo and in vitro with large ribosomal protein TcL5 and, unlike the case of T. brucei, this association is strongly enhanced by the presence of 5S rRNA, suggesting that the loss of the C-terminal domain of TcP37/NRBD may alter the interactions within the complex. These results indicate that the unique preribosomal complex comprised of L5, 5S rRNA, and the trypanosome-specific TcP37/NRBD or TbP34 and TbP37 is functionally conserved in trypanosomes despite the differences in the C-termini of the trypanosome-specific protein components.

  3. Kinetoplastid Specific RNA-Protein Interactions in Trypanosoma cruzi Ribosome Biogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umaer, Khan; Williams, Noreen

    2015-01-01

    RNA binding proteins (RBP) play essential roles in the highly conserved and coordinated process of ribosome biogenesis. Our laboratory has previously characterized two essential and abundant RBPs, P34 and P37, in Trypanosoma brucei which are required for several critical steps in ribosome biogenesis. The genes for these proteins have only been identified in kinetoplastid organisms but not in the host genome. We have identified a homolog of the TbP34 and TbP37 in a T. cruzi strain (termed TcP37/NRBD). Although the N-terminal APK-rich domain and RNA recognition motifs are conserved, the C-terminal region which contains putative nuclear and nucleolar localization signals in TbP34 and TbP37 is almost entirely missing from TcP37/NRBD. We have shown that TcP37/NRBD is expressed in T. cruzi epimastigotes at the level of mature mRNA and protein. Despite the loss of the C-terminal domain, TcP37/NRBD is present in the nucleus, including the nucleolus, and the cytoplasm. TcP37/NRBD interacts directly with Tc 5S rRNA, but does not associate with polyadenylated RNA. TcP37/NRBD also associates in vivo and in vitro with large ribosomal protein TcL5 and, unlike the case of T. brucei, this association is strongly enhanced by the presence of 5S rRNA, suggesting that the loss of the C-terminal domain of TcP37/NRBD may alter the interactions within the complex. These results indicate that the unique preribosomal complex comprised of L5, 5S rRNA, and the trypanosome-specific TcP37/NRBD or TbP34 and TbP37 is functionally conserved in trypanosomes despite the differences in the C-termini of the trypanosome-specific protein components.

  4. Kinetoplastid Specific RNA-Protein Interactions in Trypanosoma cruzi Ribosome Biogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umaer, Khan; Williams, Noreen

    2015-01-01

    RNA binding proteins (RBP) play essential roles in the highly conserved and coordinated process of ribosome biogenesis. Our laboratory has previously characterized two essential and abundant RBPs, P34 and P37, in Trypanosoma brucei which are required for several critical steps in ribosome biogenesis. The genes for these proteins have only been identified in kinetoplastid organisms but not in the host genome. We have identified a homolog of the TbP34 and TbP37 in a T. cruzi strain (termed TcP37/NRBD). Although the N-terminal APK-rich domain and RNA recognition motifs are conserved, the C-terminal region which contains putative nuclear and nucleolar localization signals in TbP34 and TbP37 is almost entirely missing from TcP37/NRBD. We have shown that TcP37/NRBD is expressed in T. cruzi epimastigotes at the level of mature mRNA and protein. Despite the loss of the C-terminal domain, TcP37/NRBD is present in the nucleus, including the nucleolus, and the cytoplasm. TcP37/NRBD interacts directly with Tc 5S rRNA, but does not associate with polyadenylated RNA. TcP37/NRBD also associates in vivo and in vitro with large ribosomal protein TcL5 and, unlike the case of T. brucei, this association is strongly enhanced by the presence of 5S rRNA, suggesting that the loss of the C-terminal domain of TcP37/NRBD may alter the interactions within the complex. These results indicate that the unique preribosomal complex comprised of L5, 5S rRNA, and the trypanosome-specific TcP37/NRBD or TbP34 and TbP37 is functionally conserved in trypanosomes despite the differences in the C-termini of the trypanosome-specific protein components. PMID:26121669

  5. Structure of the ribosomal interacting GTPase YjeQ from the enterobacterial species Salmonella typhimurium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nichols, C. E. [Division of Structural Biology, The Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, University of Oxford, Roosevelt Drive, Oxford OX3 7BN (United Kingdom); Johnson, C.; Lamb, H. K. [Institute of Cell and Molecular Biosciences, Catherine Cookson Building, Medical School, Framlington Place, Newcastle University, Newcastle-upon-Tyne NE2 4HH (United Kingdom); Lockyer, M. [Arrow Therapeutics Ltd, Britannia House, Trinity Street, Borough, London SE1 1DA (United Kingdom); Charles, I. G. [The Wolfson Institute for Biomedical Research, The Cruciform Building, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Hawkins, A. R. [Institute of Cell and Molecular Biosciences, Catherine Cookson Building, Medical School, Framlington Place, Newcastle University, Newcastle-upon-Tyne NE2 4HH (United Kingdom); Stammers, D. K., E-mail: daves@strubi.ox.ac.uk [Division of Structural Biology, The Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, University of Oxford, Roosevelt Drive, Oxford OX3 7BN (United Kingdom)

    2007-11-01

    The X-ray crystal structure of the GTPase YjeQ from S. typhimurium is presented and compared with those of orthologues from T. maritima and B. subtilis. The YjeQ class of P-loop GTPases assist in ribosome biogenesis and also bind to the 30S subunit of mature ribosomes. YjeQ ribosomal binding is GTP-dependent and thought to specifically direct protein synthesis, although the nature of the upstream signal causing this event in vivo is as yet unknown. The attenuating effect of YjeQ mutants on bacterial growth in Escherichia coli makes it a potential target for novel antimicrobial agents. In order to further explore the structure and function of YjeQ, the isolation, crystallization and structure determination of YjeQ from the enterobacterial species Salmonella typhimurium (StYjeQ) is reported. Whilst the overall StYjeQ fold is similar to those of the previously reported Thematoga maritima and Bacillus subtilis orthologues, particularly the GTPase domain, there are larger differences in the three OB folds. Although the zinc-finger secondary structure is conserved, significant sequence differences alter the nature of the external surface in each case and may reflect varying signalling pathways. Therefore, it may be easier to develop YjeQ-specific inhibitors that target the N- and C-terminal regions, disrupting the metabolic connectivity rather than the GTPase activity. The availability of coordinates for StYjeQ will provide a significantly improved basis for threading Gram-negative orthologue sequences and in silico compound-screening studies, with the potential for the development of species-selective drugs.

  6. Mechanism of initiation site selection promoted by the human rhinovirus 2 internal ribosome entry site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaminski, Ann; Pöyry, Tuija A A; Skene, Peter J; Jackson, Richard J

    2010-07-01

    Translation initiation site usage on the human rhinovirus 2 internal ribosome entry site (IRES) has been examined in a mixed reticulocyte lysate/HeLa cell extract system. There are two relevant AUG triplets, both in a base-paired hairpin structure (domain VI), with one on the 5' side at nucleotide (nt) 576, base paired with the other at nt 611, which is the initiation site for polyprotein synthesis. A single residue was inserted in the apical loop to put AUG-576 in frame with AUG-611, and in addition another in-frame AUG was introduced at nt 593. When most of the IRES was deleted to generate a monocistronic mRNA, the use of these AUGs conformed to the scanning ribosome model: improving the AUG-576 context increased initiation at this site and decreased initiation at downstream sites, whereas the converse was seen when AUG-576 was mutated to GUA; and AUG-593, when present, took complete precedence over AUG-611. Under IRES-dependent conditions, by contrast, much less initiation occurred at AUG-576 than in a monocistronic mRNA with the same AUG-576 context, mutation of AUG-576 decreased initiation at downstream sites by approximately 70%, and introduction of AUG-593 did not completely abrogate initiation at AUG-611, unless the apical base pairing in domain VI was destroyed by point mutations. These results indicate that ribosomes first bind at the AUG-576 site, but instead of initiating there, most of them are transferred to AUG-611, the majority by strictly linear scanning and a substantial minority by direct transfer, which is possibly facilitated by the occasional persistence of base pairing in the apical part of the domain VI stem.

  7. Ribosome profiling: a Hi-Def monitor for protein synthesis at the genome-wide scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, Audrey M; Baranov, Pavel V

    2013-01-01

    Ribosome profiling or ribo-seq is a new technique that provides genome-wide information on protein synthesis (GWIPS) in vivo. It is based on the deep sequencing of ribosome protected mRNA fragments allowing the measurement of ribosome density along all RNA molecules present in the cell. At the same time, the high resolution of this technique allows detailed analysis of ribosome density on individual RNAs. Since its invention, the ribosome profiling technique has been utilized in a range of studies in both prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms. Several studies have adapted and refined the original ribosome profiling protocol for studying specific aspects of translation. Ribosome profiling of initiating ribosomes has been used to map sites of translation initiation. These studies revealed the surprisingly complex organization of translation initiation sites in eukaryotes. Multiple initiation sites are responsible for the generation of N-terminally extended and truncated isoforms of known proteins as well as for the translation of numerous open reading frames (ORFs), upstream of protein coding ORFs. Ribosome profiling of elongating ribosomes has been used for measuring differential gene expression at the level of translation, the identification of novel protein coding genes and ribosome pausing. It has also provided data for developing quantitative models of translation. Although only a dozen or so ribosome profiling datasets have been published so far, they have already dramatically changed our understanding of translational control and have led to new hypotheses regarding the origin of protein coding genes. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Lactococcus lactis YfiA is necessary and sufficient for ribosome dimerization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Puri, Pranav; Eckhardt, Thomas H; Franken, Linda E; Fusetti, Fabrizia; Stuart, Marc C A; Boekema, Egbert J; Kuipers, Oscar P; Kok, Jan; Poolman, Berend

    2014-01-01

    Dimerization and inactivation of ribosomes in Escherichia coli is a two-step process that involves the binding of ribosome modulation factor (RMF) and hibernation promotion factor (HPF). Lactococcus lactisMG1363 expresses a protein, YfiA(Ll), which associates with ribosomes in the stationary phase o

  9. Structure based hypothesis of a mitochondrial ribosome rescue mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huynen Martijn A

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background mtRF1 is a vertebrate mitochondrial protein with an unknown function that arose from a duplication of the mitochondrial release factor mtRF1a. To elucidate the function of mtRF1, we determined the positions that are conserved among mtRF1 sequences but that are different in their mtRF1a paralogs. We subsequently modeled the 3D structure of mtRF1a and mtRF1 bound to the ribosome, highlighting the structural implications of these differences to derive a hypothesis for the function of mtRF1. Results Our model predicts, in agreement with the experimental data, that the 3D structure of mtRF1a allows it to recognize the stop codons UAA and UAG in the A-site of the ribosome. In contrast, we show that mtRF1 likely can only bind the ribosome when the A-site is devoid of mRNA. Furthermore, while mtRF1a will adopt its catalytic conformation, in which it functions as a peptidyl-tRNA hydrolase in the ribosome, only upon binding of a stop codon in the A-site, mtRF1 appears specifically adapted to assume this extended, peptidyl-tRNA hydrolyzing conformation in the absence of mRNA in the A-site. Conclusions We predict that mtRF1 specifically recognizes ribosomes with an empty A-site and is able to function as a peptidyl-tRNA hydrolase in those situations. Stalled ribosomes with empty A-sites that still contain a tRNA bound to a peptide chain can result from the translation of truncated, stop-codon less mRNAs. We hypothesize that mtRF1 recycles such stalled ribosomes, performing a function that is analogous to that of tmRNA in bacteria. Reviewers This article was reviewed by Dr. Eugene Koonin, Prof. Knud H. Nierhaus (nominated by Dr. Sarah Teichmann and Dr. Shamil Sunyaev.

  10. DNA replication stress restricts ribosomal DNA copy number.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salim, Devika; Bradford, William D; Freeland, Amy; Cady, Gillian; Wang, Jianmin; Pruitt, Steven C; Gerton, Jennifer L

    2017-09-15

    Ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs) in budding yeast are encoded by ~100-200 repeats of a 9.1kb sequence arranged in tandem on chromosome XII, the ribosomal DNA (rDNA) locus. Copy number of rDNA repeat units in eukaryotic cells is maintained far in excess of the requirement for ribosome biogenesis. Despite the importance of the repeats for both ribosomal and non-ribosomal functions, it is currently not known how "normal" copy number is determined or maintained. To identify essential genes involved in the maintenance of rDNA copy number, we developed a droplet digital PCR based assay to measure rDNA copy number in yeast and used it to screen the yeast conditional temperature-sensitive mutant collection of essential genes. Our screen revealed that low rDNA copy number is associated with compromised DNA replication. Further, subculturing yeast under two separate conditions of DNA replication stress selected for a contraction of the rDNA array independent of the replication fork blocking protein, Fob1. Interestingly, cells with a contracted array grew better than their counterparts with normal copy number under conditions of DNA replication stress. Our data indicate that DNA replication stresses select for a smaller rDNA array. We speculate that this liberates scarce replication factors for use by the rest of the genome, which in turn helps cells complete DNA replication and continue to propagate. Interestingly, tumors from mini chromosome maintenance 2 (MCM2)-deficient mice also show a loss of rDNA repeats. Our data suggest that a reduction in rDNA copy number may indicate a history of DNA replication stress, and that rDNA array size could serve as a diagnostic marker for replication stress. Taken together, these data begin to suggest the selective pressures that combine to yield a "normal" rDNA copy number.

  11. Ribosomal Synthesis of Peptides with Multiple β-Amino Acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujino, Tomoshige; Goto, Yuki; Suga, Hiroaki; Murakami, Hiroshi

    2016-02-17

    The compatibility of β-amino acids with ribosomal translation was studied for decades, but it has been still unclear whether the ribosome can accept various β-amino acids, and whether the ribosome can introduce multiple β-amino acids in a peptide. In the present study, by using the Escherichia coli reconstituted cell-free translation system with a reprogramed genetic code, we screened β-amino acids that give high single incorporation efficiency and used them to synthesize peptides containing multiple β-amino acids. The experiments of single β-amino acid incorporation into a peptide revealed that 13 β-amino acids are compatible with ribosomal translation. Six of the tested β-amino acids (βhGly, l-βhAla, l-βhGln, l-βhPhg, l-βhMet, and d-βhPhg) showed high incorporation efficiencies, and seven (l-βhLeu, l-βhIle, l-βhAsn, l-βhPhe, l-βhLys, d-βhAla, and d-βhLeu) showed moderate incorporation efficiencies; whereas no full-length peptide was produced using other β-amino acids (l-βhPro, l-βhTrp, and l-βhGlu). Subsequent double-incorporation experiments using β-amino acids with high single incorporation efficiency revealed that elongation of peptides with successive β-amino acids is prohibited. Efficiency of the double-incorporation of the β-amino acids was restored by the insertion of Tyr or Ile between the two β-amino acids. On the basis of these experiments, we also designed mRNA sequences of peptides, and demonstrated the ribosomal synthesis of peptides containing different types of β-amino acids at multiple positions.

  12. Evidence for a Negative Cooperativity between eIF5A and eEF2 on Binding to the Ribosome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danuza Rossi

    Full Text Available eIF5A is the only protein known to contain the essential and unique amino acid residue hypusine. eIF5A functions in both translation initiation due to its stimulation of methionyl-puromycin synthesis and translation elongation, being highly required for peptide-bound formation of specific ribosome stalling sequences such as poly-proline. The functional interaction between eIF5A, tRNA, and eEF2 on the surface of the ribosome is further clarified herein. Fluorescence anisotropy assays were performed to determine the affinity of eIF5A to different ribosomal complexes and reveal its interaction exclusively and directly with the 60S ribosomal subunit in a hypusine-dependent manner (Ki60S-eIF5A-Hyp = 16 nM, Ki60S-eIF5A-Lys = 385 nM. A 3-fold increase in eIF5A affinity to the 80S is observed upon charged-tRNAiMet binding, indicating positive cooperativity between P-site tRNA binding and eIF5A binding to the ribosome. Previously identified conditional mutants of yeast eIF5A, eIF5AQ22H/L93F and eIF5AK56A, display a significant decrease in ribosome binding affinity. Binding affinity between ribosome and eIF5A-wild type or mutants eIF5AK56A, but not eIF5AQ22H/L93F, is impaired in the presence of eEF2 by 4-fold, consistent with negative cooperativity between eEF2 and eIF5A binding to the ribosome. Interestingly, high-copy eEF2 is toxic only to eIF5AQ22H/L93F and causes translation elongation defects in this mutant. These results suggest that binding of eEF2 to the ribosome alters its conformation, resulting in a weakened affinity of eIF5A and impairment of this interplay compromises cell growth due to translation elongation defects.

  13. Evidence for a Negative Cooperativity between eIF5A and eEF2 on Binding to the Ribosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Danuza; Barbosa, Natalia M; Galvão, Fabio C; Boldrin, Paulo E G; Hershey, John W B; Zanelli, Cleslei F; Fraser, Christopher S; Valentini, Sandro R

    2016-01-01

    eIF5A is the only protein known to contain the essential and unique amino acid residue hypusine. eIF5A functions in both translation initiation due to its stimulation of methionyl-puromycin synthesis and translation elongation, being highly required for peptide-bound formation of specific ribosome stalling sequences such as poly-proline. The functional interaction between eIF5A, tRNA, and eEF2 on the surface of the ribosome is further clarified herein. Fluorescence anisotropy assays were performed to determine the affinity of eIF5A to different ribosomal complexes and reveal its interaction exclusively and directly with the 60S ribosomal subunit in a hypusine-dependent manner (Ki60S-eIF5A-Hyp = 16 nM, Ki60S-eIF5A-Lys = 385 nM). A 3-fold increase in eIF5A affinity to the 80S is observed upon charged-tRNAiMet binding, indicating positive cooperativity between P-site tRNA binding and eIF5A binding to the ribosome. Previously identified conditional mutants of yeast eIF5A, eIF5AQ22H/L93F and eIF5AK56A, display a significant decrease in ribosome binding affinity. Binding affinity between ribosome and eIF5A-wild type or mutants eIF5AK56A, but not eIF5AQ22H/L93F, is impaired in the presence of eEF2 by 4-fold, consistent with negative cooperativity between eEF2 and eIF5A binding to the ribosome. Interestingly, high-copy eEF2 is toxic only to eIF5AQ22H/L93F and causes translation elongation defects in this mutant. These results suggest that binding of eEF2 to the ribosome alters its conformation, resulting in a weakened affinity of eIF5A and impairment of this interplay compromises cell growth due to translation elongation defects.

  14. Assembly of the 30S ribosomal subunit: positioning ribosomal protein S13 in the S7 assembly branch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grondek, Joel F; Culver, Gloria M

    2004-12-01

    Studies of Escherichia coli 30S ribosomal subunit assembly have revealed a hierarchical and cooperative association of ribosomal proteins with 16S ribosomal RNA; these results have been used to compile an in vitro 30S subunit assembly map. In single protein addition and omission studies, ribosomal protein S13 was shown to be dependent on the prior association of ribosomal protein S20 for binding to the ribonucleoprotein particle. While the overwhelming majority of interactions revealed in the assembly map are consistent with additional data, the dependency of S13 on S20 is not. Structural studies position S13 in the head of the 30S subunit > 100 A away from S20, which resides near the bottom of the body of the 30S subunit. All of the proteins that reside in the head of the 30S subunit, except S13, have been shown to be part of the S7 assembly branch, that is, they all depend on S7 for association with the assembling 30S subunit. Given these observations, the assembly requirements for S13 were investigated using base-specific chemical footprinting and primer extension analysis. These studies reveal that S13 can bind to 16S rRNA in the presence of S7, but not S20. Additionally, interaction between S13 and other members of the S7 assembly branch have been observed. These results link S13 to the 3' major domain family of proteins, and the S7 assembly branch, placing S13 in a new location in the 30S subunit assembly map where its position is in accordance with much biochemical and structural data.

  15. The Role of Disordered Ribosomal Protein Extensions in the Early Steps of Eubacterial 50 S Ribosomal Subunit Assembly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youri Timsit

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Although during the past decade research has shown the functional importance of disorder in proteins, many of the structural and dynamics properties of intrinsically unstructured proteins (IUPs remain to be elucidated. This review is focused on the role of the extensions of the ribosomal proteins in the early steps of the assembly of the eubacterial 50 S subunit. The recent crystallographic structures of the ribosomal particles have revealed the picture of a complex assembly pathway that condenses the rRNA and the ribosomal proteins into active ribosomes. However, little is know about the molecular mechanisms of this process. It is thought that the long basic r-protein extensions that penetrate deeply into the subunit cores play a key role through disorder-order transitions and/or co-folding mechanisms. A current view is that such structural transitions may facilitate the proper rRNA folding. In this paper, the structures of the proteins L3, L4, L13, L20, L22 and L24 that have been experimentally found to be essential for the first steps of ribosome assembly have been compared. On the basis of their structural and dynamics properties, three categories of extensions have been identified. Each of them seems to play a distinct function. Among them, only the coil-helix transition that occurs in a phylogenetically conserved cluster of basic residues of the L20 extension appears to be strictly required for the large subunit assembly in eubacteria. The role of a helix-coil transitions in 23 S RNA folding is discussed in the light of the calcium binding protein calmodulin that shares many structural and dynamics properties with L20.

  16. Mescaline-induced changes of brain-cortex ribosomes. Effect of mescaline on the hydrogen-bonded structure of ribonucleic acid of brain-cortex ribosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, R K; Ghosh, J J

    1970-05-01

    1. The action of mescaline sulphate on the hydrogen-bonded structure of the RNA constituent of ribosomes of goat brain-cortex slices was studied by using the hyperchromic effect of heating and formaldehyde reaction. 2. The ribosomal total RNA species of the mescaline-treated brain-cortex slices have a smaller proportion of hydrogen-bonded structure than the ribosomal RNA species of the untreated brain-cortex slices. 3. Mescaline also appears to have affected this lowering of hydrogen-bonded structure of the ribosomal 28S RNA of brain-cortex tissue.

  17. CTCF regulates the local epigenetic state of ribosomal DNA repeats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van de Nobelen Suzanne

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background CCCTC binding factor (CTCF is a highly conserved zinc finger protein, which is involved in chromatin organization, local histone modifications, and RNA polymerase II-mediated gene transcription. CTCF may act by binding tightly to DNA and recruiting other proteins to mediate its various functions in the nucleus. To further explore the role of this essential factor, we used a mass spectrometry-based approach to screen for novel CTCF-interacting partners. Results Using biotinylated CTCF as bait, we identified upstream binding factor (UBF and multiple other components of the RNA polymerase I complex as potential CTCF-interacting partners. Interestingly, CTCFL, the testis-specific paralog of CTCF, also binds UBF. The interaction between CTCF(L and UBF is direct, and requires the zinc finger domain of CTCF(L and the high mobility group (HMG-box 1 and dimerization domain of UBF. Because UBF is involved in RNA polymerase I-mediated ribosomal (rRNA transcription, we analyzed CTCF binding to the rDNA repeat. We found that CTCF bound to a site upstream of the rDNA spacer promoter and preferred non-methylated over methylated rDNA. DNA binding by CTCF in turn stimulated binding of UBF. Absence of CTCF in cultured cells resulted in decreased association of UBF with rDNA and in nucleolar fusion. Furthermore, lack of CTCF led to reduced binding of RNA polymerase I and variant histone H2A.Z near the rDNA spacer promoter, a loss of specific histone modifications, and diminished transcription of non-coding RNA from the spacer promoter. Conclusions UBF is the first common interaction partner of CTCF and CTCFL, suggesting a role for these proteins in chromatin organization of the rDNA repeats. We propose that CTCF affects RNA polymerase I-mediated events globally by controlling nucleolar number, and locally by regulating chromatin at the rDNA spacer promoter, similar to RNA polymerase II promoters. CTCF may load UBF onto rDNA, thereby forming

  18. Structural variation of the ribosomal gene cluster within the class Insecta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mukha, D.V.; Sidorenko, A.P.; Lazebnaya, I.V. [Vavilov Institute of General Genetics, Moscow (Russian Federation)] [and others

    1995-09-01

    General estimation of ribosomal DNA variation within the class Insecta is presented. It is shown that, using blot-hybridization, one can detect differences in the structure of the ribosomal gene cluster not only between genera within an order, but also between species within a genera, including sibling species. Structure of the ribosomal gene cluster of the Coccinellidae family (ladybirds) is analyzed. It is shown that cloned highly conservative regions of ribosomal DNA of Tetrahymena pyriformis can be used as probes for analyzing ribosomal genes in insects. 24 refs., 4 figs.

  19. S18 family of mitochondrial ribosomal proteins: evolutionary history and Gly132 polymorphism in colon carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mushtaq, Muhammad; Ali, Raja Hashim; Kashuba, Vladimir; Klein, George; Kashuba, Elena

    2016-08-23

    S18 family of mitochondrial ribosomal proteins (MRPS18, S18) consists of three members, S18-1 to -3. Earlier, we found that overexpression of S18-2 protein resulted in immortalization and eventual transformation of primary rat fibroblasts. The S18-1 and -3 have not exhibited such abilities. To understand the differences in protein properties, the evolutionary history of S18 family was analyzed. The S18-3, followed by S18-1 and S18-2 emerged as a result of ancient gene duplication in the root of eukaryotic species tree, followed by two metazoan-specific gene duplications. However, the most conserved metazoan S18 homolog is the S18-1; it shares the most sequence similarity with S18 proteins of bacteria and of other eukaryotic clades. Evolutionarily conserved residues of S18 proteins were analyzed in various cancers. S18-2 is mutated at a higher rate, compared with S18-1 and -3 proteins. Moreover, the evolutionarily conserved residue, Gly132 of S18-2, shows genetic polymorphism in colon adenocarcinomas that was confirmed by direct DNA sequencing.Concluding, S18 family represents the yet unexplored important mitochondrial ribosomal proteins.

  20. Ribosomal oxygenases are structurally conserved from prokaryotes to humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Rasheduzzaman; Sekirnik, Rok; Brissett, Nigel C; Krojer, Tobias; Ho, Chia-Hua; Ng, Stanley S; Clifton, Ian J; Ge, Wei; Kershaw, Nadia J; Fox, Gavin C; Muniz, Joao R C; Vollmar, Melanie; Phillips, Claire; Pilka, Ewa S; Kavanagh, Kathryn L; von Delft, Frank; Oppermann, Udo; McDonough, Michael A; Doherty, Aiden J; Schofield, Christopher J

    2014-06-19

    2-Oxoglutarate (2OG)-dependent oxygenases have important roles in the regulation of gene expression via demethylation of N-methylated chromatin components and in the hydroxylation of transcription factors and splicing factor proteins. Recently, 2OG-dependent oxygenases that catalyse hydroxylation of transfer RNA and ribosomal proteins have been shown to be important in translation relating to cellular growth, TH17-cell differentiation and translational accuracy. The finding that ribosomal oxygenases (ROXs) occur in organisms ranging from prokaryotes to humans raises questions as to their structural and evolutionary relationships. In Escherichia coli, YcfD catalyses arginine hydroxylation in the ribosomal protein L16; in humans, MYC-induced nuclear antigen (MINA53; also known as MINA) and nucleolar protein 66 (NO66) catalyse histidine hydroxylation in the ribosomal proteins RPL27A and RPL8, respectively. The functional assignments of ROXs open therapeutic possibilities via either ROX inhibition or targeting of differentially modified ribosomes. Despite differences in the residue and protein selectivities of prokaryotic and eukaryotic ROXs, comparison of the crystal structures of E. coli YcfD and Rhodothermus marinus YcfD with those of human MINA53 and NO66 reveals highly conserved folds and novel dimerization modes defining a new structural subfamily of 2OG-dependent oxygenases. ROX structures with and without their substrates support their functional assignments as hydroxylases but not demethylases, and reveal how the subfamily has evolved to catalyse the hydroxylation of different residue side chains of ribosomal proteins. Comparison of ROX crystal structures with those of other JmjC-domain-containing hydroxylases, including the hypoxia-inducible factor asparaginyl hydroxylase FIH and histone N(ε)-methyl lysine demethylases, identifies branch points in 2OG-dependent oxygenase evolution and distinguishes between JmjC-containing hydroxylases and demethylases

  1. In vivo labelling of functional ribosomes reveals spatial regulation during starvation in Podospora anserina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silar Philippe

    2000-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To date, in eukaryotes, ribosomal protein expression is known to be regulated at the transcriptional and/or translational levels. But other forms of regulation may be possible. Results Here, we report the successful tagging of functional ribosomal particles with a S7-GFP chimaeric protein, making it possible to observe in vivo ribosome dynamics in the filamentous fungus Podospora anserina. Microscopic observations revealed a novel kind of ribosomal protein regulation during the passage between cell growth and stationary phases, with a transient accumulation of ribosomal proteins and/or ribosome subunits in the nucleus, possibly the nucleolus, being observed at the beginning of stationary phase. Conclusion Nuclear sequestration can be another level of ribosomal protein regulation in eukaryotic cells.This may contribute to the regulation of cell growth and division.

  2. Dynamic protein composition of Arabidopsis thaliana cytosolic ribosomes in response to sucrose feeding as revealed by label free MSE proteomics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hummel, M.; Cordewener, J.H.G.C.; Groot, de J.C.M.; Smeekens, S.; America, A.H.P.; Hanson, J.

    2012-01-01

    Cytosolic ribosomes are among the largest multisubunit cellular complexes. Arabidopsis thaliana ribosomes consist of 79 different ribosomal proteins (r-proteins) that each are encoded by two to six (paralogous) genes. It is unknown whether the paralogs are incorporated into the ribosome and whether

  3. A Novel Frameshift Mutation of the ALDOB Gene in a Korean Girl Presenting with Recurrent Hepatitis Diagnosed as Hereditary Fructose Intolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hae-Won; Lee, Yeoun Joo; Oh, Seak Hee; Kim, Kyung Mo; Ryu, Jeong-Min; Lee, Beom Hee; Kim, Gu-Hwan; Yoo, Han-Wook

    2012-01-01

    Hereditary fructose intolerance is an autosomal recessive disorder that is caused by a deficiency in fructose-1-phosphate aldolase (Aldolase B). Children can present with hypoglycemia, jaundice, elevated liver enzymes and hepatomegaly after intake of dietary fructose. Long-term intake of fructose in undiagnosed patients can result in hepatic failure or renal failure. We experienced a case of hereditary fructose intolerance presenting as recurrent hepatitis-like episodes. Detailed evaluation of her dietary habits revealed her avoidance of sweetened foods and fruits. Genetic analysis of ALDOB revealed that she is a homozygote for a novel frameshifting mutation c[758_759insT]+[758_759insT] (p.[val25 3fsX24]+[val253fsX24]). This report is the first of a Korean patient diagnosed with hereditary fructose intolerance using only molecular testing without undergoing intravenous fructose tolerance test or enzyme assay.

  4. A large deletion/insertion-induced frameshift mutation of the androgen receptor gene in a family with a familial complete androgen insensitivity syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cong, Peikuan; Ye, Yinghui; Wang, Yue; Lu, Lingping; Yong, Jing; Yu, Ping; Joseph, Kimani Kagunda; Jin, Fan; Qi, Ming

    2012-06-01

    Androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS) is an X-linked recessive genetic disorder with a normal 46, XY karyotype caused by abnormality of the androgen receptor (AR) gene. One Chinese family consisting of the proband and 5 other members with complete androgen insensitivity syndrome (CAIS) was investigated. Mutation analysis by DNA sequencing on all 8 exons and flanking intron regions of the AR gene revealed a unique large deletion/insertion mutation in the family. A 287 bp deletion and 77 bp insertion (c.933_1219delins77) mutation at codon 312 resulted in a frameshift which caused a premature stop (p.Phe312Aspfs*7) of polypeptide formation. The proband's mother and grandmother were heterozygous for the mutant allele. The proband's father, uncle and grandfather have the normal allele. From the pedigree constructed from mutational analysis of the family, it is revealed that the probably pathogenic mutation comes from the maternal side.

  5. Hierarchical RNA Processing Is Required for Mitochondrial Ribosome Assembly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver Rackham

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The regulation of mitochondrial RNA processing and its importance for ribosome biogenesis and energy metabolism are not clear. We generated conditional knockout mice of the endoribonuclease component of the RNase P complex, MRPP3, and report that it is essential for life and that heart and skeletal-muscle-specific knockout leads to severe cardiomyopathy, indicating that its activity is non-redundant. Transcriptome-wide parallel analyses of RNA ends (PARE and RNA-seq enabled us to identify that in vivo 5′ tRNA cleavage precedes 3′ tRNA processing, and this is required for the correct biogenesis of the mitochondrial ribosomal subunits. We identify that mitoribosomal biogenesis proceeds co-transcriptionally because large mitoribosomal proteins can form a subcomplex on an unprocessed RNA containing the 16S rRNA. Taken together, our data show that RNA processing links transcription to translation via assembly of the mitoribosome.

  6. Expression of protein-coding genes embedded in ribosomal DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Steinar D; Haugen, Peik; Nielsen, Henrik

    2007-01-01

    Ribosomal DNA (rDNA) is a specialised chromosomal location that is dedicated to high-level transcription of ribosomal RNA genes. Interestingly, rDNAs are frequently interrupted by parasitic elements, some of which carry protein genes. These are non-LTR retrotransposons and group II introns...... that encode reverse transcriptase-like genes, and group I introns and archaeal introns that encode homing endonuclease genes (HEGs). Although rDNA-embedded protein genes are widespread in nuclei, organelles and bacteria, there is surprisingly little information available on how these genes are expressed....... Exceptions include a handful of HEGs from group I introns. Recent studies have revealed unusual and essential roles of group I and group I-like ribozymes in the endogenous expression of HEGs. Here we discuss general aspects of rDNA-embedded protein genes and focus on HEG expression from group I introns...

  7. Pactamycin binding site on archaebacterial and eukaryotic ribosomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tejedor, F.; Amils, R.; Ballesta, J.P.G.

    1987-01-27

    The presence of a photoreactive acetophenone group in the protein synthesis inhibitor pactamycin and the possibility of obtaining active iodinated derivatives that retain full biological activity allow the antibiotic binding site on Saccharomyces cerevisiae and archaebacterium Sulfolobus solfataricus ribosomes to be photoaffinity labeled. Four major labeled proteins have been identified in the yeast ribosomes, i.e., YS10, YS18, YS21/24, and YS30, while proteins AL1a, AS10/L8, AS18/20, and AS21/22 appeared as radioactive spots in S. solfataricus. There seems to be a correlation between some of the proteins labeled in yeast and those previously reported in Escherichia coli indicating that the pactamycin binding sites of both species, which are in the small subunit close to the initiation factors and mRNA binding sites, must have similar characteristics.

  8. Evolution of Drosophila ribosomal protein gene core promoters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xiaotu; Zhang, Kangyu; Li, Xiaoman

    2009-03-01

    The coordinated expression of ribosomal protein genes (RPGs) has been well documented in many species. Previous analyses of RPG promoters focus only on Fungi and mammals. Recognizing this gap and using a comparative genomics approach, we utilize a motif-finding algorithm that incorporates cross-species conservation to identify several significant motifs in Drosophila RPG promoters. As a result, significant differences of the enriched motifs in RPG promoter are found among Drosophila, Fungi, and mammals, demonstrating the evolutionary dynamics of the ribosomal gene regulatory network. We also report a motif present in similar numbers of RPGs among Drosophila species which does not appear to be conserved at the individual RPG gene level. A module-wise stabilizing selection theory is proposed to explain this observation. Overall, our results provide significant insight into the fast-evolving nature of transcriptional regulation in the RPG module.

  9. Electrostatics in the ribosomal tunnel modulate chain elongation rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jianli; Deutsch, Carol

    2008-12-05

    Electrostatic potentials along the ribosomal exit tunnel are nonuniform and negative. The significance of electrostatics in the tunnel remains relatively uninvestigated, yet they are likely to play a role in translation and secondary folding of nascent peptides. To probe the role of nascent peptide charges in ribosome function, we used a molecular tape measure that was engineered to contain different numbers of charged amino acids localized to known regions of the tunnel and measured chain elongation rates. Positively charged arginine or lysine sequences produce transient arrest (pausing) before the nascent peptide is fully elongated. The rate of conversion from transiently arrested to full-length nascent peptide is faster for peptides containing neutral or negatively charged residues than for those containing positively charged residues. We provide experimental evidence that extraribosomal mechanisms do not account for this charge-specific pausing. We conclude that pausing is due to charge-specific interactions between the tunnel and the nascent peptide.

  10. Frameshift Mutation in KIT is Associated with  White Spotting in the Arabian Camel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather Holl

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available While the typical Arabian camel is characterized by a single colored coat, there are rare populations with white spotting patterns. White spotting coat patterns are found in virtually all domesticated species, but are rare in wild species. Theories suggest that white spotting is linked to the domestication process, and is occasionally associated with health disorders. Though mutations have been found in a diverse array of species, fewer than 30 genes have been associated with spotting patterns, thus providing a key set of candidate genes for the Arabian camel. We obtained 26 spotted camels and 24 solid controls for candidate gene analysis. One spotted and eight solid camels were whole genome sequenced as part of a separate project. The spotted camel was heterozygous for a frameshift deletion in KIT (c.1842delG, named KITW1 for White spotting 1, whereas all other camels were wild‐type (KIT+/KIT+. No additional mutations unique to the spotted camel were detected in the EDNRB, EDN3, SOX10, KITLG, PDGFRA, MITF, and PAX3 candidate white spotting genes. Sanger sequencing of the study population identified an additional five kITW1/KIT+ spotted camels. The frameshift results in a premature stop codon five amino acids downstream, thus terminating KIT at the tyrosine kinase domain. An additional 13 spotted camels tested KIT+/KIT+, but due to phenotypic differences when compared to the KITW1/KIT+ camels, they likely represent an independent mutation. Our study suggests that there are at least two causes of white spotting in the Arabian camel, the newly described KITW1 allele and an uncharacterized mutation.

  11. A novel frameshift mutation of the mtDNA COIII gene leads to impaired assembly of cytochrome c oxidase in a patient affected by Leigh-like syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiranti, V; Corona, P; Greco, M; Taanman, J W; Carrara, F; Lamantea, E; Nijtmans, L; Uziel, G; Zeviani, M

    2000-11-01

    We report on a novel frameshift mutation in the mtDNA gene encoding cytochrome c oxidase (COX) subunit III. The proband is an 11-year-old girl with a negative family history and an apparently healthy younger brother. Since 4 years of age, she has developed a progressive spastic paraparesis associated with ophthalmoparesis and moderate mental retardation. The presence of severe lactic acidosis and Leigh-like lesions of putamina prompted us to perform muscle and skin biopsies. In both, a profound, isolated defect of COX was found by histochemical and biochemical assays. Sequence analysis of muscle mtDNA resulted in the identification of a virtually homoplasmic frameshift mutation in the COIII gene, due to the insertion of an extra C at nucleotide position 9537 of mtDNA. Although the 9537C(ins) does not impair transcription of COIII, no full-length COX III protein was detected in mtDNA translation assays in vivo. Western blot analysis of two-dimensional blue-native electrophoresis showed a reduction of specific crossreacting material and the accumulation of early-assembly intermediates of COX, whereas the fully assembled complex was absent. One of these intermediates had an electrophoretic mobility different from those seen in controls, suggesting the presence of a qualitative abnormality of COX assembly. Immunostaining with specific antibodies failed to detect the presence of several smaller subunits in the complex lacking COX III, in spite of the demonstration that these subunits were present in the crude mitochondrial fraction of patient's cultured fibroblasts. Taken together, the data indicate a role for COX III in the incorporation and maintenance of smaller COX subunits within the complex.

  12. A novel NF1 frame-shift mutation (c.702_703delGT) in a Chinese family with neurofibromatosis type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, S P; Fan, N; Chen, J; Xia, Z L; Wang, Y; Zhou, X M; Yin, Y; Wen, T L; Xia, Q J; Liu, X Y; Wang, H Y

    2014-07-24

    This study aimed to characterize the clinical features of a Chinese pedigree with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) and to identify mutations in the NF1 gene. In this three-generation family containing 8 members, 5 had been diagnosed with NF1 and the others were asymptomatic. All members of the family underwent complete medical examinations. Molecular genetic analyses were performed on all subjects included in the study. All exons of NF1 were amplified by polymerase chain reaction, sequenced, and compared with a reference database. Possible changes in function of the protein induced by amino acid variants were predicted by bioinformatic analysis. In this family, the 5 patients presented different clinical phenotypes, but all manifested typical café-au-lait macules. One novel frame-shift mutation, c.702_703delGT, in exon 7 of NF1 was identified in all affected family members, but not in the unaffected family members or in 102 normal controls. This mutation generates a premature stop codon at amino acid position 720. Additionally, a synonymous mutation c.702 G>A was found in 3 family members, including 2 affected and 1 normal individuals. In conclusion, our study suggests that a novel c.702_703delGT frame-shift mutation in NF1 is likely to be responsible for the pathogenesis of NF1 in this family. To the best of our knowledge, it is the first time that a c.702_703delGT mutation has been identified in a family with neurofibromatosis type 1.

  13. Frameshift mutation of a histone methylation-related gene SETD1B and its regional heterogeneity in gastric and colorectal cancers with high microsatellite instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Youn Jin; Oh, Hye Rim; Choi, Mi Ryoung; Gwak, Min; An, Chang Hyeok; Chung, Yeun Jun; Yoo, Nam Jin; Lee, Sug Hyung

    2014-08-01

    Histone methyltransferase (HMT), which catalyzes a histone methylation, is frequently altered in cancers at mutation and expression levels. The aims of this study were to explore whether SETD1B, SETDB2, and SETD2, SET domain-containing HMT genes, are mutated and expressionally altered in gastric (GC) and colorectal cancers (CRC). In a public database, we found that SETD1B, SETDB2, and SETD2 had mononucleotide repeats in coding sequences that might be mutation targets in cancers with microsatellite instability (MSI). We analyzed the mutations in 76 GCs and 93 CRCs and found SETD1B (38.7% of GC and 35.6% of CRC with high MSI [MSI-H]), SETDB2 (11.1% of CRC with MSI-H), and SETD2 frameshift mutations (6.7% of CRC with MSI-H). These mutations were not found in stable MSI/low MSI. In addition, we analyzed intratumoral heterogeneity (ITH) of SETD1B mutation in 6 CRCs and found that 2 CRCs harbored regional ITH of SETD1B. We also analyzed SETD1B expression in GC and CRC by immunohistochemistry. Loss of SETD1B expression was identified in 15% to 55% of the GC and CRC with respect to the MSI status. Of note, the loss of expression was more common in those with SETD1B mutations than those with wild-type SETD1B. We identified alterations of SET domain-containing HMT at various levels (frameshift mutations, genetic ITH, and expression loss), which together might play a role in tumorigenesis of GC and CRC with MSI-H. Our data suggest that mutation analysis in multiple regions is needed for a better evaluation of mutation status in CRC with MSI-H.

  14. Contribution of the intercalated adenosine at the helical junction to the stability of the gag-pro frameshifting pseudoknot from mouse mammary tumor virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theimer, C A; Giedroc, D P

    2000-03-01

    The mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) gag-pro frameshifting pseudoknot is an H-type RNA pseudoknot that contains an unpaired adenosine (A14) at the junction of the two helical stems required for efficient frameshifting activity. The thermodynamics of folding of the MMTV vpk pseudoknot have been compared with a structurally homologous mutant RNA containing a G x U to G-C substitution at the helical junction (U13C RNA), and an A14 deletion mutation in that context (U13CdeltaA14 RNA). Dual wavelength optical melting and differential scanning calorimetry reveal that the unpaired adenosine contributes 0.7 (+/-0.2) kcal mol(-1) at low salt and 1.4 (+/-0.2) kcal mol(-1) to the stability (deltaG(0)37) at 1 M NaCl. This stability increment derives from a favorable enthalpy contribution to the stability deltadeltaH = 6.6 (+/-2.1) kcal mol(-1) with deltadeltaG(0)37 comparable to that predicted for the stacking of a dangling 3' unpaired adenosine on a G-C or G x U base pair. Group 1A monovalent ions, NH4+, Mg2+, and Co(NH3)6(3+) ions stabilize the A14 and deltaA14 pseudoknots to largely identical extents, revealing that the observed differences in stability in these molecules do not derive from a differential or specific accumulation of ions in the A14 versus deltaA14 pseudoknots. Knowledge of this free energy contribution may facilitate the prediction of RNA pseudoknot formation from primary nucleotide sequence (Gultyaev et al., 1999, RNA 5:609-617).

  15. An indigenous posttranscriptional modification in the ribosomal peptidyl transferase center confers resistance to an array of protein synthesis inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toh, Seok-Ming; Mankin, Alexander S.

    2017-01-01

    A number of nucleotide residues in ribosomal RNA undergo specific posttranscriptional modification. The roles of most modifications are unclear, but their clustering in the functionally-important regions of rRNA suggest that they might either directly affect the activity or assembly of the ribosome or modulate its interactions with ligands. Of the 25 modified nucleotides in E. coli 23S rRNA, 14 are located in the peptidyl transferase center, the main antibiotic target in the large ribosomal subunit. Since nucleotide modifications have been closely associated with both antibiotic sensitivity and antibiotic resistance, the loss of some of these posttranscriptional modifications may affect the susceptibility of bacteria to antibiotics. We investigated the antibiotic sensitivity of E. coli cells in which the genes of eight rRNA modifying enzymes targeting the PTC were individually inactivated. The lack of pseudouridine at position 2504 of 23S rRNA was found to significantly increase the susceptibility of bacteria to peptidyl transferase inhibitors. Therefore, this indigenous posttranscriptional modification may have evolved as an intrinsic resistance mechanism protecting bacteria against natural antibiotics. PMID:18554609

  16. Ribosome biogenesis in replicating cells: Integration of experiment and theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Earnest, Tyler M; Cole, John A; Peterson, Joseph R; Hallock, Michael J; Kuhlman, Thomas E; Luthey-Schulten, Zaida

    2016-10-01

    Ribosomes-the primary macromolecular machines responsible for translating the genetic code into proteins-are complexes of precisely folded RNA and proteins. The ways in which their production and assembly are managed by the living cell is of deep biological importance. Here we extend a recent spatially resolved whole-cell model of ribosome biogenesis in a fixed volume [Earnest et al., Biophys J 2015, 109, 1117-1135] to include the effects of growth, DNA replication, and cell division. All biological processes are described in terms of reaction-diffusion master equations and solved stochastically using the Lattice Microbes simulation software. In order to determine the replication parameters, we construct and analyze a series of Escherichia coli strains with fluorescently labeled genes distributed evenly throughout their chromosomes. By measuring these cells' lengths and number of gene copies at the single-cell level, we could fit a statistical model of the initiation and duration of chromosome replication. We found that for our slow-growing (120 min doubling time) E. coli cells, replication was initiated 42 min into the cell cycle and completed after an additional 42 min. While simulations of the biogenesis model produce the correct ribosome and mRNA counts over the cell cycle, the kinetic parameters for transcription and degradation are lower than anticipated from a recent analytical time dependent model of in vivo mRNA production. Describing expression in terms of a simple chemical master equation, we show that the discrepancies are due to the lack of nonribosomal genes in the extended biogenesis model which effects the competition of mRNA for ribosome binding, and suggest corrections to parameters to be used in the whole-cell model when modeling expression of the entire transcriptome. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers 105: 735-751, 2016.

  17. Transcription Factor Substitution during the Evolution of Fungal Ribosome Regulation

    OpenAIRE

    Hogues, Hervé; Lavoie, Hugo; Sellam, Adnane; Mangos, Maria; Roemer, Terry; Purisima, Enrico; Nantel, André; Whiteway, Malcolm

    2008-01-01

    Coordinated ribosomal protein (RP) gene expression is crucial for cellular viability, but the transcriptional network controlling this regulon has only been well characterized in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We have used whole-genome transcriptional and location profiling to establish that, in Candida albicans, the RP regulon is controlled by the Myb domain protein Tbf1 working in conjunction with Cbf1. These two factors bind both the promoters of RP genes and the rDNA locus; Tbf1 acti...

  18. The European database on small subunit ribosomal RNA

    OpenAIRE

    Wuyts, Jan; Van de Peer, Yves; Winkelmans, Tina; De Wachter, Rupert

    2002-01-01

    The European database on SSU rRNA can be consulted via the World WideWeb at http://rrna.uia.ac.be/ssu/ and compiles all complete or nearly complete small subunit ribosomal RNA sequences. Sequences are provided in aligned format. The alignment takes into account the secondary structure information derived by comparative sequence analysis of thousands of sequences. Additional information such as literature references, taxonomy, secondary structure models and nucleotide variability maps, is also...

  19. A relaxed mutant with an altered ribosomal protein L11.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, J; Watson, R J; Friesen, J D

    1976-02-27

    Relaxed mutants of Escherichia coli have been isolated which have an altered electrophoretic mobility of ribosomal protein L11. It can be shown that reversion to stringency in one of these mutants occurs simultaneously with a reversion of L11 protein to tis normal mobility. The L11 structural gene, rplK, maping near rif, is carried by the bacteriophage lambdacI857S7drifd18, and is most likely identical with relC.

  20. The localization of ribosomal DNA in Sciaridae (Diptera: Nematocera) reassessed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madalena, Christiane Rodriguez Gutierrez; Amabis, José Mariano; Stocker, Ann Jacob; Gorab, Eduardo

    2007-01-01

    The chromosomal localization of ribosomal DNA (rDNA) was studied in polytene and diploid tissues of four sciarid species, Trichosia pubescens, Rhynchosciara americana, R. milleri and Schwenkfeldina sp. While hybridization to mitotic chromosomes showed the existence of a single rDNA locus, ribosomal probes hybridized to more than one polytene chromosome region in all the species analyzed as a result of micronucleolar attachment to specific chromosome sites. Micronucleoli are small, round bodies containing transcriptionally active, probably extrachromosomal rDNA. In T. pubescens the rDNA is predominantly localized in chromosome sections X-10 and X-8. In R. americana the rDNA is frequently found associated with centromeric heterochromatin of the chromosomes X, C, B and A, and also with sections X-1 and B-13. Ribosomal probes in R. milleri hybridized with high frequency to pericentric and telomeric regions of its polytene complement. Schwfenkfeldina sp. displays a remarkably unusual distribution of rDNA in polytene nuclei, characterized by the attachment of micronucleoli to many chromosome regions. The results showed that micronucleoli preferentially associate with intercalary or terminal heterochromatin of all sciarid flies analyzed and, depending on the species, are attached to a few (Trichosia), moderate (Rhynchosciara) or a large (Schwenkfeldina sp.) number of polytene chromosome sites.

  1. On ribosome load, codon bias and protein abundance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Klumpp

    Full Text Available Different codons encoding the same amino acid are not used equally in protein-coding sequences. In bacteria, there is a bias towards codons with high translation rates. This bias is most pronounced in highly expressed proteins, but a recent study of synthetic GFP-coding sequences did not find a correlation between codon usage and GFP expression, suggesting that such correlation in natural sequences is not a simple property of translational mechanisms. Here, we investigate the effect of evolutionary forces on codon usage. The relation between codon bias and protein abundance is quantitatively analyzed based on the hypothesis that codon bias evolved to ensure the efficient usage of ribosomes, a precious commodity for fast growing cells. An explicit fitness landscape is formulated based on bacterial growth laws to relate protein abundance and ribosomal load. The model leads to a quantitative relation between codon bias and protein abundance, which accounts for a substantial part of the observed bias for E. coli. Moreover, by providing an evolutionary link, the ribosome load model resolves the apparent conflict between the observed relation of protein abundance and codon bias in natural sequences and the lack of such dependence in a synthetic gfp library. Finally, we show that the relation between codon usage and protein abundance can be used to predict protein abundance from genomic sequence data alone without adjustable parameters.

  2. Photoaffinity labeling of the pactamycin binding site on eubacterial ribosomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tejedor, F.; Amils, R.; Ballesta, J.P.

    1985-07-02

    Pactamycin, an inhibitor of the initial steps of protein synthesis, has an acetophenone group in its chemical structure that makes the drug a potentially photoreactive molecule. In addition, the presence of a phenolic residue makes it easily susceptible to radioactive labeling. Through iodination, one radioactive derivative of pactamycin has been obtained with biological activities similar to the unmodified drug when tested on in vivo and cell-free systems. With the use of (/sup 125/I)iodopactamycin, ribosomes of Escherichia coli have been photolabeled under conditions that preserve the activity of the particles and guarantee the specificity of the binding sites. Under these conditions, RNA is preferentially labeled when free, small ribosomal subunits are photolabeled, but proteins are the main target in the whole ribosome. This indicates that an important conformational change takes place in the binding site on association of the two subunits. The major labeled proteins are S2, S4, S18, S21, and L13. These proteins in the pactamycin binding site are probably related to the initiation step of protein synthesis.

  3. JHDM1B expression regulates ribosome biogenesis and cancer cell growth in a p53 dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penzo, Marianna; Casoli, Lucia; Pollutri, Daniela; Sicuro, Laura; Ceccarelli, Claudio; Santini, Donatella; Taffurelli, Mario; Govoni, Marzia; Brina, Daniela; Trerè, Davide; Montanaro, Lorenzo

    2015-03-01

    Tumors characterized by an intense ribosome biogenesis often display a more aggressive behavior. Ribosomal RNA (rRNA) synthesis is controlled at several levels, including the epigenetic regulation of the condensation of chromatin portions containing rRNA genes. JHDM1B (Jumonji C histone demethylase 1B) is a histone demethylase able to regulate the accessibility of rRNA genes. In this study, we aimed to define the contribution of JHDM1B expression to the features of breast cancer, a tumor type whose behavior is related to the rate of ribosome biogenesis. We show that, in breast cancer-derived cell lines, the increase in rRNA transcription that follows JHDM1B knock-down is mirrored by an augmented cell proliferation only in p53 compromised cells, while p53 competent cells undergo cellular senescence and death. The latter effect appears to be mediated by a p38-dependent phosphorylation of p53, inducing the expression of p15(Ink4b) and p21(Waf1). In breast cancers, lower JHDM1B expression correlates with an increased size of specifically stained nucleolar organized regions, a morphological parameter directly related to the rate of ribosome biogenesis and with a poorer prognosis. In addition, in tumors lacking the controller function of p53, a lower expression of JHDM1B is associated with an increased tumor size at diagnosis. Altogether, our data indicate that epigenetic activation of rDNA genes induced by JHDM1B depletion is associated with a p53-dependent growth arrest, but may promote cancer cell growth when p53 is lacking.

  4. Phosphorylation in vivo of non-ribosomal proteins from native 40 S ribosomal particles of Krebs II mouse ascites-tumour cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schuck, J; Reichert, G; Issinger, O G

    1981-01-01

    Four non-ribosomal proteins from native 40 S ribosomal subunits with mol.wts. of 110 000, 84 000, 68 000 and 26 000 were phosphorylated in vivo when ascites cells were incubated in the presence of [32P]Pi. The 110 000-, 84 000- and 26 000-dalton proteins are identical with phosphorylated products...

  5. Mescaline-induced changes of brain-cortex ribosomes. Role of sperimidine in counteracting the destabilizing effect of mescaline of brain-cortex ribosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, R K; Antopol, W; Ghosh, J J

    1971-11-01

    1. The effect of spermidine on the mescaline-induced changes of brain-cortex ribosomes was studied by adding spermidine during the treatment of goat brain-cortex slices with mescaline. 2. Mescaline treatment of brain-cortex slices removed a portion of the endogenous spermidine from ribosomes and this removal was significantly prevented when spermidine was present during mescaline treatment. 3. Spermidine present during mescaline treatment of brain-cortex slices counteracted, to some extent, the destabilizing effect of mescaline on ribosomes with respect to heat denaturation. 4. Mescaline treatment of brain-cortex slices made ribosomes more susceptible to breakdown, releasing protein and RNA, and resulting in loss of ribosomal enzymic activities. However, spermidine present during mescaline treatment counteracted moderately the mescaline-induced ribosomal susceptibility to breakdown and ribosomal loss of enzymic activities. 5. Ribosomes of mescaline-treated cortex slices were rapidly degraded by ribonuclease and trypsin. However, if spermidine was present during mescaline treatment of brain-cortex slices the rates of degradation diminished.

  6. Heterogeneous Ribosomes Preferentially Translate Distinct Subpools of mRNAs Genome-wide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Zhen; Fujii, Kotaro; Kovary, Kyle M; Genuth, Naomi R; Röst, Hannes L; Teruel, Mary N; Barna, Maria

    2017-07-06

    Emerging studies have linked the ribosome to more selective control of gene regulation. However, an outstanding question is whether ribosome heterogeneity at the level of core ribosomal proteins (RPs) exists and enables ribosomes to preferentially translate specific mRNAs genome-wide. Here, we measured the absolute abundance of RPs in translating ribosomes and profiled transcripts that are enriched or depleted from select subsets of ribosomes within embryonic stem cells. We find that heterogeneity in RP composition endows ribosomes with differential selectivity for translating subpools of transcripts, including those controlling metabolism, cell cycle, and development. As an example, mRNAs enriched in binding to RPL10A/uL1-containing ribosomes are shown to require RPL10A/uL1 for their efficient translation. Within several of these transcripts, this level of regulation is mediated, at least in part, by internal ribosome entry sites. Together, these results reveal a critical functional link between ribosome heterogeneity and the post-transcriptional circuitry of gene expression. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Disassembly of the Staphylococcus aureus hibernating 100S ribosome by an evolutionarily conserved GTPase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Arnab; Yap, Mee-Ngan F

    2017-09-11

    The bacterial hibernating 100S ribosome is a poorly understood form of the dimeric 70S particle that has been linked to pathogenesis, translational repression, starvation responses, and ribosome turnover. In the opportunistic pathogen Staphylococcus aureus and most other bacteria, hibernation-promoting factor (HPF) homodimerizes the 70S ribosomes to form a translationally silent 100S complex. Conversely, the 100S ribosomes dissociate into subunits and are presumably recycled for new rounds of translation. The regulation and disassembly of the 100S ribosome are largely unknown because the temporal abundance of the 100S ribosome varies considerably among different bacterial phyla. Here, we identify a universally conserved GTPase (HflX) as a bona fide dissociation factor of the S. aureus 100S ribosome. The expression levels hpf and hflX are coregulated by general stress and stringent responses in a temperature-dependent manner. While all tested guanosine analogs stimulate the splitting activity of HflX on the 70S ribosome, only GTP can completely dissociate the 100S ribosome. Our results reveal the antagonistic relationship of HPF and HflX and uncover the key regulators of 70S and 100S ribosome homeostasis that are intimately associated with bacterial survival.

  8. Cryo-EM structure of the archaeal 50S ribosomal subunit in complex with initiation factor 6 and implications for ribosome evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greber, Basil J; Boehringer, Daniel; Godinic-Mikulcic, Vlatka

    2012-01-01

    Translation of mRNA into proteins by the ribosome is universally conserved in all cellular life. The composition and complexity of the translation machinery differ markedly between the three domains of life. Organisms from the domain Archaea show an intermediate level of complexity, sharing several...... additional components of the translation machinery with eukaryotes that are absent in bacteria. One of these translation factors is initiation factor 6 (IF6), which associates with the large ribosomal subunit. We have reconstructed the 50S ribosomal subunit from the archaeon Methanothermobacter...... thermautotrophicus in complex with archaeal IF6 at 6.6 Å resolution using cryo-electron microscopy (EM). The structure provides detailed architectural insights into the 50S ribosomal subunit from a methanogenic archaeon through identification of the rRNA expansion segments and ribosomal proteins that are shared...

  9. A ribosomal protein L23-nucleophosmin circuit coordinates Miz1 function with cell growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wanzel, Michael; Russ, Annika C; Kleine-Kohlbrecher, Daniela

    2008-01-01

    The Myc-associated zinc-finger protein, Miz1, is a negative regulator of cell proliferation and induces expression of the cell-cycle inhibitors p15(Ink4b) and p21(Cip1). Here we identify the ribosomal protein L23 as a negative regulator of Miz1-dependent transactivation. L23 exerts this function...... by retaining nucleophosmin, an essential co-activator of Miz1 required for Miz1-induced cell-cycle arrest, in the nucleolus. Mutant forms of nucleophosmin found in acute myeloid leukaemia fail to co-activate Miz1 and re-localize it to the cytosol. As L23 is encoded by a direct target gene of Myc......, this regulatory circuit may provide a feedback mechanism that links translation of Myc target genes and cell growth to Miz1-dependent cell-cycle arrest....

  10. Internal ribosome entry site mediates protein synthesis in yeast Pichia pastoris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Shuli; Lin, Ying; Li, Cheng; Ye, Yanrui

    2012-05-01

    The imitation of translation, as mediated by internal ribosome entry sites, has not yet been reported in Pichia pastoris. An IRES element from Saccharomyces cerevisiae was demonstrated to direct the translation of a dicistronic mRNA in P. pastoris. The 5′-untranslated region of GPR1 mRNA, termed GPR, was cloned into a dual reporter construct containing an upstream Rhizomucor miehei lipase (RML) and a downstream β-galactosidase gene (lacZ) from Escherichia coli BL21. After being transformed into P. pastoris, the RML gene and lacZ were simultaneously expressed. The possibility of DNA rearrangement, spurious splicing, or cryptic promoter in the GPR sequence were eliminated, indicating that expression of a second ORF was IRES-dependent. These findings strongly suggested that the IRES-dependent translation initiation mechanism is conserved in P. pastoris and provides a useful means to express multiple genes simultaneously.

  11. Probing the structure of 16 S ribosomal RNA from Bacillus brevis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kop, J; Kopylov, A M; Magrum, L; Siegel, R; Gupta, R; Woese, C R; Noller, H F

    1984-12-25

    A majority (approximately 89%) of the nucleotide sequence of Bacillus brevis 16 S rRNA has been determined by a combination of RNA sequencing methods. Several experimental approaches have been used to probe its structure, including (a) partial RNase digestion of 30 S ribosomal subunits, followed by two-dimensional native/denatured gel electrophoresis, in which base-paired fragments were directly identified; (b) identification of positions susceptible to cleavage by RNase A and RNase T1 in 30 S subunits; (c) sites of attack by cobra venom RNase on naked 16 S rRNA; and (d) nucleotides susceptible to attack by bisulfite in 16 S rRNA. These data are discussed with respect to a secondary structure model for B. brevis 16 S rRNA derived by comparative sequence analysis.

  12. Purification and Characterization of a New Ribosome Inactivating Protein from Cinchonaglycoside C-treated Tobacco Leaves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yanmei Li; Yantao Jia; Zhongkai Zhang; Xiaoying Chen; Hongping He; Rongxiang Fang; Xiaojiang Hao

    2007-01-01

    A new ribosome-inactivating protein (RIP) with a molecular weight of 31 kDa induced by Cinchonaglycoside C (1) designated CIP31, was isolated from tobacco leaves. Analysis of this protein sequence indicated that it belongs to the RIP family and it was distinct from the other plant RIPs reported previously at its N-terminal amino acid sequence. CIP31 can directly impair synthesis of coat protein (CP) of tobacco mosaic virus (TMV), which resulted in inhibition of TMV long distance movement and multiplication in tobacco plants at concentrations of ng/mL. Furthermore, no toxicity was shown to the growth and fertility of the plants. CIP31 was synthesized only in the presence of Cinchonaglycoside C (1) and was independent of the salicylic acid (SA) signal pathway. We provided evidence for the SA-independent biological induction of resistance.

  13. Senescent changes in the ribosomes of animal cells in vivo and in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miquel, J.; Johnson, J. E., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    The paper examines RNA-ribosomal changes observed in protozoa and fixed postmitotic cells, as well as the characteristics of intermitotic cells. Attention is given to a discussion of the implications of the reported ribosomal changes as to the senescent deterioration of protein synthesis and physiological functions. A survey of the literature suggests that, while the data on ribosomal change in dividing cells both in vivo and in vitro are inconclusive, there is strong histological and biochemical evidence in favor of some degree of quantitative ribosomal loss in fixed postmitotic cells. Since these decreases in ribosomes are demonstrated in differential cells from nematodes, insects and mammals, they may represent a universal manifestation of cytoplasmic senescence in certain types of fixed postmitotic animal cells. The observed variability in ribosomal loss for cells belonging to the same type suggests that this involution phenomenon is rather related to the wear and tear suffered by a particular cell.

  14. Control of ribosome traffic by position-dependent choice of synonymous codons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mitarai, Namiko; Pedersen, Steen

    2013-01-01

    Messenger RNA (mRNA) encodes a sequence of amino acids by using codons. For most amino acids, there are multiple synonymous codons that can encode the amino acid. The translation speed can vary from one codon to another, thus there is room for changing the ribosome speed while keeping the amino...... acid sequence and hence the resulting protein. Recently, it has been noticed that the choice of the synonymous codon, via the resulting distribution of slow- and fast-translated codons, affects not only on the average speed of one ribosome translating the mRNA but also might have an effect on nearby...... ribosomes by affecting the appearance of 'traffic jams' where multiple ribosomes collide and form queues. To test this 'context effect' further, we here investigate the effect of the sequence of synonymous codons on the ribosome traffic by using a ribosome traffic model with codon-dependent rates, estimated...

  15. The fail-safe system to rescue the stalled ribosomes in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abo, Tatsuhiko; Chadani, Yuhei

    2014-01-01

    Translation terminates at stop codon. Without stop codon, ribosome cannot terminate translation properly and reaches and stalls at the 3'-end of the mRNA lacking stop codon. Bacterial tmRNA-mediated trans-translation releases such stalled ribosome and targets the protein product to degradation by adding specific "degradation tag." Recently two alternative ribosome rescue factors, ArfA (YhdL) and ArfB (YaeJ), have been found in Escherichia coli. These three ribosome rescue systems are different each other in terms of molecular mechanism of ribosome rescue and their activity, but they are mutually related and co-operate to maintain the translation system in shape. This suggests the biological significance of ribosome rescue.

  16. Senescent changes in the ribosomes of animal cells in vivo and in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miquel, J.; Johnson, J. E., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    The paper examines RNA-ribosomal changes observed in protozoa and fixed postmitotic cells, as well as the characteristics of intermitotic cells. Attention is given to a discussion of the implications of the reported ribosomal changes as to the senescent deterioration of protein synthesis and physiological functions. A survey of the literature suggests that, while the data on ribosomal change in dividing cells both in vivo and in vitro are inconclusive, there is strong histological and biochemical evidence in favor of some degree of quantitative ribosomal loss in fixed postmitotic cells. Since these decreases in ribosomes are demonstrated in differential cells from nematodes, insects and mammals, they may represent a universal manifestation of cytoplasmic senescence in certain types of fixed postmitotic animal cells. The observed variability in ribosomal loss for cells belonging to the same type suggests that this involution phenomenon is rather related to the wear and tear suffered by a particular cell.

  17. Structures of the Bacterial Ribosome in Classical and Hybrid States of tRNA Binding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunkle, Jack A.; Wang, Leyi; Feldman, Michael B.; Pulk, Arto; Chen, Vincent B.; Kapral, Gary J.; Noeske, Jonas; Richardson, Jane S.; Blanchard, Scott C.; Cate, Jamie H. Doudna (Cornell); (UCB); (Duke)

    2011-09-06

    During protein synthesis, the ribosome controls the movement of tRNA and mRNA by means of large-scale structural rearrangements. We describe structures of the intact bacterial ribosome from Escherichia coli that reveal how the ribosome binds tRNA in two functionally distinct states, determined to a resolution of {approx}3.2 angstroms by means of x-ray crystallography. One state positions tRNA in the peptidyl-tRNA binding site. The second, a fully rotated state, is stabilized by ribosome recycling factor and binds tRNA in a highly bent conformation in a hybrid peptidyl/exit site. The structures help to explain how the ratchet-like motion of the two ribosomal subunits contributes to the mechanisms of translocation, termination, and ribosome recycling.

  18. Kinase-Mediated Regulation of 40S Ribosome Assembly in Human Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-16-1-0008 TITLE: Kinase-Mediated Regulation of 40S Ribosome Assembly in Human Breast Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR...Jan 2017 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Kinase-Mediated Regulation of 40S Ribosome Assembly in Human Breast Cancer 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH...Investigator [PI], Scripps) and John Cleveland (Collaborating/Partnering PI, Moffitt Cancer Center) seek to validate 40S ribosome assembly as a therapeutic

  19. Genome-wide polysomal analysis of a yeast strain with mutated ribosomal protein S9

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arava Yoav

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The yeast ribosomal protein S9 (S9 is located at the entrance tunnel of the mRNA into the ribosome. It is known to play a role in accurate decoding and its bacterial homolog (S4 has recently been shown to be involved in opening RNA duplexes. Here we examined the effects of changing the C terminus of S9, which is rich in acidic amino acids and extends out of the ribosome surface. Results We performed a genome-wide analysis to reveal effects at the transcription and translation levels of all yeast genes. While negligible relative changes were observed in steady-state mRNA levels, a significant number of mRNAs appeared to have altered ribosomal density. Notably, 40% of the genes having reliable signals changed their ribosomal association by more than one ribosome. Yet, no general correlations with physical or functional features of the mRNA were observed. Ribosome Density Mapping (RDM along four of the mRNAs with increased association revealed an increase in ribosomal density towards the end of the coding region for at least two of them. Read-through analysis did not reveal any increase in read-through of a premature stop codon by the mutant strain. Conclusion The ribosomal protein rpS9 appears to be involved in the translation of many mRNAs, since altering its C terminus led to a significant change in ribosomal association of many mRNAs. We did not find strong correlations between these changes and several physical features of the mRNA, yet future studies with advanced tools may allow such correlations to be determined. Importantly, our results indicate an accumulation of ribosomes towards the end of the coding regions of some mRNAs. This suggests an involvement of S9 in ribosomal dissociation during translation termination.

  20. tmRNA-SmpB: a journey to the centre of the bacterial ribosome.

    OpenAIRE

    Weis, Félix; Bron, Patrick; Giudice, Emmanuel; Rolland, Jean-Paul; Thomas, Daniel; Felden, Brice; Gillet, Reynald

    2010-01-01

    International audience; Ribosomes mediate protein synthesis by decoding the information carried by messenger RNAs (mRNAs) and catalysing peptide bond formation between amino acids. When bacterial ribosomes stall on incomplete messages, the trans-translation quality control mechanism is activated by the transfer-messenger RNA bound to small protein B (tmRNA-SmpB ribonucleoprotein complex). Trans-translation liberates the stalled ribosomes and triggers degradation of the incomplete proteins. He...

  1. Study of several factors in RNA-protein cross-link formation induced by ionizing radiations within 70S ribosomes of E. coli MRE 600.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekert, B; Giocanti, N; Sabattier, R

    1986-09-01

    The induction of RNA-protein crosslinks in E. coli 70S ribosomes by gamma-irradiation was studied by measuring the dependence of cross-link formation on ribosome concentration. The inverse dependence of cross-link percentage upon concentration up to at least 20 A260 nm units ml-1 indicate that indirect effects seem to play a more major part than direct effects for these ribosome concentrations. The effect of various gases and free radical scavengers was used to determine the roles of the radicals H., CO2-., OH. and e-aq and to estimate their relative efficiencies for cross-links. They were found to be: 7.2(H.), 6(CO2-.), 2(OH.) and 1(e-aq). The extent of RNA-protein cross-link production in 70S ribosomes induced by gamma-rays and neutrons in the presence and absence of oxygen was also investigated. Cross-link formation was estimated by separation of linked and unlinked material on nitrocellulose filters or after separation by SDS-sucrose gradient centrifugation under dissociating conditions. Oxygen inhibited cross-link formation by both neutrons and gamma-rays. However, very few cross-links were formed in de-aerated solutions by exposure to neutrons, compared to those produced by gamma-rays under the same conditions. This suggests that molecular oxygen generated along the secondary particle track can reduce the formation of RNA-protein cross-links.

  2. The tumor suppressor p53 connects ribosome biogenesis to cell cycle control: a double-edged sword.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hölzel, Michael; Burger, Kaspar; Mühl, Bastian; Orban, Mathias; Kellner, Markus; Eick, Dirk

    2010-05-01

    Since its first description more than 30 years ago p53 has become a paradigm for a protein with versatile functions. P53 sensitizes a large variety of genetic alterations and has been entitled the guardian of the genome. Stabilization of p53 upon DNA damage is accompanied by a complex pattern of modifications, which ascertain the cellular response either in the direction of a reversible or irreversible cell cycle arrest or programmed cell death. More recently it became evident that p53 also responds to non-genotoxic cell stress, in particular if ribosome biogenesis is affected.

  3. Genetic differentiation of strongyloides stercoralis from two different climate zones revealed by 18S ribosomal DNA sequence comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakdee, Wallop; Thaenkham, Urusa; Dekumyoy, Paron; Sa-Nguankiat, Surapol; Maipanich, Wanna; Pubampen, Somchit

    2012-11-01

    Over 70 countries in tropical and subtropical zones are endemic areas for Strongyloides stercoralis, with a higher prevalence of the parasite often occurring in tropical regions compared to subtropical ones. In order to explore genetic variations of S. stercoralis form different climate zones, 18S ribosomal DNA of parasite specimens obtained from Thailand were sequenced and compared with those from Japan. The maximum likelihood indicates that S. stercoralis populations from these two different climate zones have genetically diverged. The genetic relationship between S. stercoralis populations is not related to the host species, but rather to moisture and temperature. These factors may directly drive genetic differentiation among isolated populations of S. stercoralis.

  4. [RIBOSOMAL DNA INTERNAL TRANSCRIBED SPACER 2 SEQUENCE AS A PHYLOGENETIC MARKER FOR THE IDENTIFICATION OF TRICHINELLA NEMATODES].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odoyevskaya, I M; Spiridonov, S E

    2015-01-01

    The results of testing several primer combinations were used to choose an optimal pair for the amplification of the internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2) region of ribosomal DNA (direct: Tri58s F 5 CGG TGG ATC RCT TGG CTC GTA CG and reverse: AB28 Rr (CGA CCG CTT ATT GAT ATG C). This pair of primers yields a 900 bp PCR product. Comparative analysis of obtained ITS2 sequences, for 8 Trichinella isolates from different regions of the Russian Federation permits different species and individual genotypes of these parasitic nematodes to be validly distinguished.

  5. Specialized yeast ribosomes: a customized tool for selective mRNA translation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johann W Bauer

    Full Text Available Evidence is now accumulating that sub-populations of ribosomes - so-called specialized ribosomes - can favour the translation of subsets of mRNAs. Here we use a large collection of diploid yeast strains, each deficient in one or other copy of the set of ribosomal protein (RP genes, to generate eukaryotic cells carrying distinct populations of altered 'specialized' ribosomes. We show by comparative protein synthesis assays that different heterologous mRNA reporters based on luciferase are preferentially translated by distinct populations of specialized ribosomes. These mRNAs include reporters carrying premature termination codons (PTC thus allowing us to identify specialized ribosomes that alter the efficiency of translation termination leading to enhanced synthesis of the wild-type protein. This finding suggests that these strains can be used to identify novel therapeutic targets in the ribosome. To explore this further we examined the translation of the mRNA encoding the extracellular matrix protein laminin β3 (LAMB3 since a LAMB3-PTC mutant is implicated in the blistering skin disease Epidermolysis bullosa (EB. This screen identified specialized ribosomes with reduced levels of RP L35B as showing enhanced synthesis of full-length LAMB3 in cells expressing the LAMB3-PTC mutant. Importantly, the RP L35B sub-population of specialized ribosomes leave both translation of a reporter luciferase carrying a different PTC and bulk mRNA translation largely unaltered.

  6. Methylation of yeast ribosomal protein S2 is elevated during stationary phase growth conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladror, Daniel T; Frey, Brian L; Scalf, Mark; Levenstein, Mark E; Artymiuk, Jacklyn M; Smith, Lloyd M

    2014-03-14

    Ribosomes, as the center of protein translation in the cell, require careful regulation via multiple pathways. While regulation of ribosomal synthesis and function has been widely studied on the transcriptional and translational "levels," the biological roles of ribosomal post-translational modifications (PTMs) are largely not understood. Here, we explore this matter by using quantitative mass spectrometry to compare the prevalence of ribosomal methylation and acetylation for yeast in the log phase and the stationary phase of growth. We find that of the 27 modified peptides identified, two peptides experience statistically significant changes in abundance: a 1.9-fold decrease in methylation for k(Me)VSGFKDEVLETV of ribosomal protein S1B (RPS1B), and a 10-fold increase in dimethylation for r(DiMe)GGFGGR of ribosomal protein S2 (RPS2). While the biological role of RPS1B methylation has largely been unexplored, RPS2 methylation is a modification known to have a role in processing and export of ribosomal RNA. This suggests that yeast in the stationary phase increase methylation of RPS2 in order to regulate ribosomal synthesis. These results demonstrate the utility of mass spectrometry for quantifying dynamic changes in ribosomal PTMs.

  7. Modeling of ribosome dynamics on a ds-mRNA under an external load

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakiba, Bahareh; Dayeri, Maryam; Mohammad-Rafiee, Farshid

    2016-07-01

    Protein molecules in cells are synthesized by macromolecular machines called ribosomes. According to the recent experimental data, we reduce the complexity of the ribosome and propose a model to express its activity in six main states. Using our model, we study the translation rate in different biological relevant situations in the presence of external force and the translation through the RNA double stranded region in the absence or presence of the external force. In the present study, we give a quantitative theory for translation rate and show that the ribosome behaves more like a Brownian Ratchet motor. Our findings could shed some light on understanding behaviors of the ribosome in biological conditions.

  8. Modeling of Ribosome Dynamics on a ds-mRNA under an External Load

    CERN Document Server

    Shakiba, Bahareh; Mohammad-Rafiee, Farshid

    2016-01-01

    Protein molecules in cells are synthesized by macromolecular machines called ribosomes. According to recent experimental data, we reduce the complexity of the ribosome and propose a model to express its activity in six main states. Using our model, we study the translation rate in different biological relevant situations in the presence of external force, and translation through the RNA double stranded region in the absence or presence of the external force. In the present study, we give a quantitative theory for translation rate and show that the ribosome behaves more like a Brownian Ratchet motor. Our findings could shed some light on understanding behaviors of the ribosome in biological conditions.

  9. Ligation-free ribosome profiling of cell type-specific translation in the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornstein, Nicholas; Torres, Daniela; Das Sharma, Sohani; Tang, Guomei; Canoll, Peter; Sims, Peter A

    2016-01-01

    Ribosome profiling has emerged as a powerful tool for genome-wide measurements of translation, but library construction requires multiple ligation steps and remains cumbersome relative to more conventional deep-sequencing experiments. We report a new, ligation-free approach to ribosome profiling that does not require ligation. Library construction for ligation-free ribosome profiling can be completed in one day with as little as 1 ng of purified RNA footprints. We apply ligation-free ribosome profiling to mouse brain tissue to identify new patterns of cell type-specific translation and test its ability to identify translational targets of mTOR signaling in the brain.

  10. Generation of monoclonal antibodies for the assessment of protein purification by recombinant ribosomal coupling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Janni; Sperling-Petersen, Hans Uffe; Mortensen, Kim Kusk;

    2005-01-01

    We recently described a conceptually novel method for the purification of recombinant proteins with a propensity to form inclusion bodies in the cytoplasm of Escherichia coli. Recombinant proteins were covalently coupled to the E. coli ribosome by fusing them to ribosomal protein 23 (rpL23...... Sepharose affinity chromatography. The purified antibodies were used to evaluate the separation of ribosomes from GFP, streptavidin, murine interleukin-6, a phagedisplay antibody and yeast elongation factor 1A by centrifugation, when ribosomes with covalently coupled target protein were cleaved at specific...

  11. Effect of neomycin and protein S1 on the binding of streptomycin to the ribosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grisé-Miron, L; Brakier-Gingras, L

    1982-04-01

    The binding of [3H]dihydrostreptomycin to the 70-S ribosome or to the 30-S subunit has been investigated in the presence of neomycin by the Millipore filtration or the equilibrium dialysis procedure. It was observed that dihydrostreptomycin binds equally well to the 30-S subunit and the 70-S ribosome, and that neomycin stimulates the binding of dihydrostreptomycin to the ribosome by increasing the association constant and not by creating new binding sites. Specific removal of protein S1 from the 30-S subunit neither affected the binding of dihydrostreptomycin to the ribosome nor the stimulation of dihydrostreptomycin binding by neomycin.

  12. Are there proteins between the ribosomal subunits? Hot tritium bombardment experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusupov, M M; Spirin, A S

    1986-03-03

    The hot tritium bombardment technique [(1976) Dokl. Akad. Nauk SSSR 228, 1237-1238] was used for studying the surface localization of ribosomal proteins on Escherichia coli ribosomes. The degree of tritium labeling of proteins was considered as a measure of their exposure (surface localization). Proteins S1, S4, S7, S9 and/or S11, S12 and/or L20, S13, S18, S20, S21, L5, L6, L7/L12, L10, L11, L16, L17, L24, L26 and L27 were shown to be the most exposed on the ribosome surface. The sets of exposed ribosomal proteins on the surface of 70 S ribosomes, on the one hand, and the surfaces of 50 S and 30 S ribosomal subunits in the dissociated state, on the other, were compared. It was found that the dissociation of ribosomes into subunits did not result in exposure of additional ribosomal proteins. The conclusion was drawn that proteins are absent from the contacting surfaces of the ribosomal subunits.

  13. Immunohistochemical evidence for an association of ribosomes with microfilaments in 3T3 fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesketh, J E; Horne, Z; Campbell, G P

    1991-02-01

    Ribosome distribution in cultured fibroblasts was investigated immunohistochemically using antibodies which recognize the 60S ribosomal subunit. After treatment of cells with buffer containing 25mM KCl and 0.05% Nonidet-P40 immunostained material was present in punctate patterns and linear arrays consistent with some ribosomes being associated with the cytoskeleton. Treatment of the cells with 130mM KCl caused loss of both the beaded lines of immunostaining and micro-filaments. Double immunostaining showed ribosomes to be closely associated with microfilaments.

  14. Rates of synthesis and degradation of ribosomal ribonucleic acid during differentiation of Dictyostelium discoideum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangiarotti, G; Altruda, F; Lodish, H F

    1981-01-01

    Synthesis of ribosomes and ribosomal ribonucleic acid (RNA) continued during differentiation of Dictyostelium discoideum concurrently with extensive turnover of ribosomes synthesized during both growth and developmental stages. We show here that the rate of synthesis of 26S and 17S ribosomal RNA during differentiation was less than 15% of that in growing cells, and by the time of sorocarp formation only about 25% of the cellular ribosomes had been synthesized during differentiation. Ribosomes synthesized during growth and differentiation were utilized in messenger RNA translation to the same extent; about 50% of each class were on polyribosomes. Ribosome degradation is apparently an all-or-nothing process, since virtually all 80S monosomes present in developing cells could be incorporated into polysomes when growth conditions were restored. By several criteria, ribosomes synthesized during growth and differentiation were functionally indistinguishable. Our data, together with previously published information on changes in the messenger RNA population during differentiation, indicate that synthesis of new ribosomes is not necessary for translation of developmentally regulated messenger RNA. We also establish that the overall rate of messenger RNA synthesis during differentiation is less than 15% of that in growing cells.

  15. Two Dictyostelium ribosomal proteins act as RNases for specific classes of mRNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangiarotti, Giorgio

    2003-03-01

    Phosphorylation of ribosomal protein S6 leads to the stabilization of pre-spore specific mRNAs during development of Dictyostelium discoideum. The purification of S6 kinase has allowed the identification of protein S11 as the mRNase specific for pre-spore mRNAs. Methylation of ribosomal protein S31 leads to the destabilization of ribosomal protein mRNAs. The purification of S31 methyltransferase has allowed the identification of protein S29 as the mRNAse specific for ribosomal protein mRNAs.

  16. Ribosome-inactivating lectins with polynucleotide:adenosine glycosidase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battelli, M G; Barbieri, L; Bolognesi, A; Buonamici, L; Valbonesi, P; Polito, L; Van Damme, E J; Peumans, W J; Stirpe, F

    1997-05-26

    Lectins from Aegopodium podagraria (APA), Bryonia dioica (BDA), Galanthus nivalis (GNA), Iris hybrid (IRA) and Sambucus nigra (SNAI), and a new lectin-related protein from Sambucus nigra (SNLRP) were studied to ascertain whether they had the properties of ribosome-inactivating proteins (RIP). IRA and SNLRP inhibited protein synthesis by a cell-free system and, at much higher concentrations, by cells and had polynucleotide:adenosine glycosidase activity, thus behaving like non-toxic type 2 (two chain) RIP. APA and SNAI had much less activity, and BDA and GNA did not inhibit protein synthesis.

  17. Mosaic tetracycline resistance genes encoding ribosomal protection proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warburton, Philip J; Amodeo, Nina; Roberts, Adam P

    2016-12-01

    First reported in 2003, mosaic tetracycline resistance genes are a subgroup of the genes encoding ribosomal protection proteins (RPPs). They are formed when two or more RPP-encoding genes recombine resulting in a functional chimera. To date, the majority of mosaic genes are derived from sections of three RPP genes, tet(O), tet(W) and tet(32), with others comprising tet(M) and tet(S). In this first review of mosaic genes, we report on their structure, diversity and prevalence, and suggest that these genes may be responsible for an under-reported contribution to tetracycline resistance in bacteria.

  18. Expanding the Entamoeba Universe: New Hosts Yield Novel Ribosomal Lineages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Alison S; Busby, Eloise J; Levy, Abigail D; Komm, Natasha; Clark, C Graham

    2016-01-01

    Removing the requirement for cell culture has led to a substantial increase in the number of lineages of Entamoeba recognized as distinct. Surveying the range of potential host species for this parasite genus has barely been started and it is clear that additional sampling of the same host in different locations often identifies additional diversity. In this study, using small subunit ribosomal RNA gene sequencing, we identify four new lineages of Entamoeba, including the first report of Entamoeba from an elephant, and extend the host range of some previously described lineages. In addition, examination of microbiome data from a number of host animals suggests that substantial Entamoeba diversity remains to be uncovered.

  19. Detection and identification of the Candida species by 25S ribosomal DNA analysis in the urine of candidal cystitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kano, Rui; Hattori, Yousuke; Okuzumi, Katsuko; Miyazaki, Yoshio; Yamauchi, Rie; Koie, Hiroshi; Watari, Toshihiro; Hasegawa, Atsuhiko

    2002-02-01

    Candida species in clinical urine samples were identified directly by the newly developed method of PCR analysis on 25S ribosomal DNA (rDNA). Two dogs were referred to the Animal Medical Center, Nihon University School of Veterinary Medicine, Fujisawa, Kanagawa, Japan for the examination of chronic cystitis. Microscopic examination of urine samples from these dogs revealed yeast cells. Urine culture on Sabouraud's dextrose agar at 27 degrees C for 5 days produced white to cream colored colonies. The isolates were identifical to Candida albicans and C. parapsilosis by mycological examination, respectively. The nucleotide sequences of 25S ribosomal DNA from these urine isolates showed 99% similarity to those of a reference strain of Candida albicans or C. parapsilosis. The nucleotide sequences of 25S rDNA obtained directly from urine samples were also identical to C. albicans and C. parapsilosis, respectively. Confirming the results on the isolates cultured from the same urine samples. This PCR analysis method could be available for the direct identification of Candida species in urine samples within 2 days.

  20. Epistatic participation of REV1 and REV3 in the formation of UV-induced frameshift mutations in cell cycle-arrested yeast cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heidenreich, Erich [Institute of Cancer Research, Department of Medicine I, Medical University of Vienna, Borschkegasse 8a, A-1090 Vienna (Austria)]. E-mail: erich.heidenreich@meduniwien.ac.at; Eisler, Herfried [Institute of Cancer Research, Department of Medicine I, Medical University of Vienna, Borschkegasse 8a, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Steinboeck, Ferdinand [Institute of Cancer Research, Department of Medicine I, Medical University of Vienna, Borschkegasse 8a, A-1090 Vienna (Austria)

    2006-01-29

    Mutations arising in times of cell cycle arrest may provide a selective advantage for unicellular organisms adapting to environmental changes. For multicellular organisms, however, they may pose a serious threat, in that such mutations in somatic cells contribute to carcinogenesis and ageing. The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae presents a convenient model system for studying the incidence and the mechanisms of stationary-phase mutation in a eukaryotic organism. Having studied the emergence of frameshift mutants after several days of starvation-induced cell cycle arrest, we previously reported that all (potentially error-prone) translesion synthesis (TLS) enzymes identified in S. cerevisiae did not contribute to the basal level of spontaneous stationary-phase mutations. However, we observed that an increased frequency of stationary-phase frameshift mutations, brought about by a defective nucleotide excision repair (NER) pathway or by UV irradiation, was dependent on Rev3p, the catalytic subunit of the TLS polymerase zeta (Pol {zeta}). Employing the same two conditions, we now examined the effect of deletions of the genes coding for polymerase eta (Pol {eta}) (RAD30) and Rev1p (REV1). In a NER-deficient strain background, the increased incidence of stationary-phase mutations was only moderately influenced by a lack of Pol {eta} but completely reduced to wild type level by a knockout of the REV1 gene. UV-induced stationary-phase mutations were abundant in wild type and rad30{delta} strains, but substantially reduced in a rev1{delta} as well as a rev3{delta} strain. The similarity of the rev1{delta} and the rev3{delta} phenotype and an epistatic relationship evident from experiments with a double-deficient strain suggests a participation of Rev1p and Rev3p in the same mutagenic pathway. Based on these results, we propose that the response of cell cycle-arrested cells to an excess of exo- or endogenously induced DNA damage includes a novel replication

  1. The subcellular distribution of the human ribosomal "stalk" components: P1, P2 and P0 proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tchórzewski, Marek; Krokowski, Dawid; Rzeski, Wojciech;

    2003-01-01

    The ribosomal "stalk" structure is a distinct lateral protuberance located on the large ribosomal subunit in prokaryotic, as well as in eukaryotic cells. In eukaryotes, this ribosomal structure is composed of the acidic ribosomal P proteins, forming two hetero-dimers (P1/P2) attached......-proteins that are not actively transported into the nucleus; moreover, this might imply that the "stalk" constituents are assembled onto the ribosomal particle at the very last step of ribosomal maturation, which takes part in the cell cytoplasm....

  2. A La autoantigen homologue is required for the internal ribosome entry site mediated translation of giardiavirus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srinivas Garlapati

    Full Text Available Translation of Giardiavirus (GLV mRNA is initiated at an internal ribosome entry site (IRES in the viral transcript. The IRES localizes to a downstream portion of 5' untranslated region (UTR and a part of the early downstream coding region of the transcript. Recent studies indicated that the IRES does not require a pre-initiation complex to initiate translation but may directly recruit the small ribosome subunit with the help of a number of trans-activating protein factors. A La autoantigen homologue in the viral host Giardia lamblia, GlLa, was proposed as one of the potential trans-activating factors based on its specific binding to GLV-IRES in vitro. In this study, we further elucidated the functional role of GlLa in GLV-IRES mediated translation in Giardia by knocking down GlLa with antisense morpholino oligo, which resulted in a reduction of GLV-IRES activity by 40%. An over-expression of GlLa in Giardia moderately stimulated GLV-IRES activity by 20%. A yeast inhibitory RNA (IRNA, known to bind mammalian and yeast La autoantigen and inhibit Poliovirus and Hepatitis C virus IRES activities in vitro and in vivo, was also found to bind to GlLa protein in vitro and inhibited GLV-IRES function in vivo. The C-terminal domain of La autoantigen interferes with the dimerization of La and inhibits its function. An over-expression of the C-terminal domain (200-348aa of GlLa in Giardia showed a dominant-negative effect on GLV-IRES activity, suggesting a potential inhibition of GlLa dimerization. HA tagged GlLa protein was detected mainly in the cytoplasm of Giardia, thus supporting a primary role of GlLa in translation initiation in Giardiavirus.

  3. The p90 ribosomal S6 kinase (RSK is a mediator of smooth muscle contractility.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mykhaylo Artamonov

    Full Text Available In the canonical model of smooth muscle (SM contraction, the contractile force is generated by phosphorylation of the myosin regulatory light chain (RLC20 by the myosin light chain kinase (MLCK. Moreover, phosphorylation of the myosin targeting subunit (MYPT1 of the RLC20 phosphatase (MLCP by the RhoA-dependent ROCK kinase, inhibits the phosphatase activity and consequently inhibits dephosphorylation of RLC20 with concomitant increase in contractile force, at constant intracellular [Ca(2+]. This pathway is referred to as Ca(2+-sensitization. There is, however, emerging evidence suggesting that additional Ser/Thr kinases may contribute to the regulatory pathways in SM. Here, we report data implicating the p90 ribosomal S6 kinase (RSK in SM contractility. During both Ca(2+- and agonist (U46619 induced SM contraction, RSK inhibition by the highly selective compound BI-D1870 (which has no effect on MLCK or ROCK resulted in significant suppression of contractile force. Furthermore, phosphorylation levels of RLC20 and MYPT1 were both significantly decreased. Experiments involving the irreversible MLCP inhibitor microcystin-LR, in the absence of Ca(2+, revealed that the decrease in phosphorylation levels of RLC20 upon RSK inhibition are not due solely to the increase in the phosphatase activity, but reflect direct or indirect phosphorylation of RLC20 by RSK. Finally, we show that agonist (U46619 stimulation of SM leads to activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases ERK1/2 and PDK1, consistent with a canonical activation cascade for RSK. Thus, we demonstrate a novel and important physiological function of the p90 ribosomal S6 kinase, which to date has been typically associated with the regulation of gene expression.

  4. Ataluren stimulates ribosomal selection of near-cognate tRNAs to promote nonsense suppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Bijoyita; Friesen, Westley J; Tomizawa, Yuki; Leszyk, John D; Zhuo, Jin; Johnson, Briana; Dakka, Jumana; Trotta, Christopher R; Xue, Xiaojiao; Mutyam, Venkateshwar; Keeling, Kim M; Mobley, James A; Rowe, Steven M; Bedwell, David M; Welch, Ellen M; Jacobson, Allan

    2016-11-01

    A premature termination codon (PTC) in the ORF of an mRNA generally leads to production of a truncated polypeptide, accelerated degradation of the mRNA, and depression of overall mRNA expression. Accordingly, nonsense mutations cause some of the most severe forms of inherited disorders. The small-molecule drug ataluren promotes therapeutic nonsense suppression and has been thought to mediate the insertion of near-cognate tRNAs at PTCs. However, direct evidence for this activity has been lacking. Here, we expressed multiple nonsense mutation reporters in human cells and yeast and identified the amino acids inserted when a PTC occupies the ribosomal A site in control, ataluren-treated, and aminoglycoside-treated cells. We find that ataluren's likely target is the ribosome and that it produces full-length protein by promoting insertion of near-cognate tRNAs at the site of the nonsense codon without apparent effects on transcription, mRNA processing, mRNA stability, or protein stability. The resulting readthrough proteins retain function and contain amino acid replacements similar to those derived from endogenous readthrough, namely Gln, Lys, or Tyr at UAA or UAG PTCs and Trp, Arg, or Cys at UGA PTCs. These insertion biases arise primarily from mRNA:tRNA mispairing at codon positions 1 and 3 and reflect, in part, the preferred use of certain nonstandard base pairs, e.g., U-G. Ataluren's retention of similar specificity of near-cognate tRNA insertion as occurs endogenously has important implications for its general use in therapeutic nonsense suppression.

  5. Disruption of the ribosomal P complex leads to stress-induced autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artero-Castro, Ana; Perez-Alea, Mileidys; Feliciano, Andrea; Leal, Jose A; Genestar, Mónica; Castellvi, Josep; Peg, Vicente; Ramón Y Cajal, Santiago; Lleonart, Matilde E L

    2015-01-01

    The human ribosomal P complex, which consists of the acidic ribosomal P proteins RPLP0, RPLP1, and RPLP2 (RPLP proteins), recruits translational factors, facilitating protein synthesis. Recently, we showed that overexpression of RPLP1 immortalizes primary cells and contributes to transformation. Moreover, RPLP proteins are overexpressed in human cancer, with the highest incidence in breast carcinomas. It is thought that disruption of the P complex would directly affect protein synthesis, causing cell growth arrest and eventually apoptosis. Here, we report a distinct mechanism by which cancer cells undergo cell cycle arrest and induced autophagy when RPLP proteins are downregulated. We found that absence of RPLP0, RPLP1, or RPLP2 resulted in reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation and MAPK1/ERK2 signaling pathway activation. Moreover, ROS generation led to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress that involved the EIF2AK3/PERK-EIF2S1/eIF2α-EIF2S2-EIF2S3-ATF4/ATF-4- and ATF6/ATF-6-dependent arms of the unfolded protein response (UPR). RPLP protein-deficient cells treated with autophagy inhibitors experienced apoptotic cell death as an alternative to autophagy. Strikingly, antioxidant treatment prevented UPR activation and autophagy while restoring the proliferative capacity of these cells. Our results indicate that ROS are a critical signal generated by disruption of the P complex that causes a cellular response that follows a sequential order: first ROS, then ER stress/UPR activation, and finally autophagy. Importantly, inhibition of the first step alone is able to restore the proliferative capacity of the cells, preventing UPR activation and autophagy. Overall, our results support a role for autophagy as a survival mechanism in response to stress due to RPLP protein deficiency.

  6. Nucleotide sequence of a crustacean 18S ribosomal RNA gene and secondary structure of eukaryotic small subunit ribosomal RNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelles, L; Fang, B L; Volckaert, G; Vandenberghe, A; De Wachter, R

    1984-12-11

    The primary structure of the gene for 18 S rRNA of the crustacean Artemia salina was determined. The sequence has been aligned with 13 other small ribosomal subunit RNA sequences of eukaryotic, archaebacterial, eubacterial, chloroplastic and plant mitochondrial origin. Secondary structure models for these RNAs were derived on the basis of previously proposed models and additional comparative evidence found in the alignment. Although there is a general similarity in the secondary structure models for eukaryotes and prokaryotes, the evidence seems to indicate a different topology in a central area of the structures.

  7. Ribosomal DNA copy number loss and sequence variation in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Baoshan; Li, Hua; Perry, John M; Singh, Vijay Pratap; Unruh, Jay; Yu, Zulin; Zakari, Musinu; McDowell, William; Li, Linheng; Gerton, Jennifer L

    2017-06-01

    Ribosomal DNA is one of the most variable regions in the human genome with respect to copy number. Despite the importance of rDNA for cellular function, we know virtually nothing about what governs its copy number, stability, and sequence in the mammalian genome due to challenges associated with mapping and analysis. We applied computational and droplet digital PCR approaches to measure rDNA copy number in normal and cancer states in human and mouse genomes. We find that copy number and sequence can change in cancer genomes. Counterintuitively, human cancer genomes show a loss of copies, accompanied by global copy number co-variation. The sequence can also be more variable in the cancer genome. Cancer genomes with lower copies have mutational evidence of mTOR hyperactivity. The PTEN phosphatase is a tumor suppressor that is critical for genome stability and a negative regulator of the mTOR kinase pathway. Surprisingly, but consistent with the human cancer genomes, hematopoietic cancer stem cells from a Pten-/- mouse model for leukemia have lower rDNA copy number than normal tissue, despite increased proliferation, rRNA production, and protein synthesis. Loss of copies occurs early and is associated with hypersensitivity to DNA damage. Therefore, copy loss is a recurrent feature in cancers associated with mTOR activation. Ribosomal DNA copy number may be a simple and useful indicator of whether a cancer will be sensitive to DNA damaging treatments.

  8. Ribosomal small subunit domains radiate from a central core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulen, Burak; Petrov, Anton S.; Okafor, C. Denise; Vander Wood, Drew; O’Neill, Eric B.; Hud, Nicholas V.; Williams, Loren Dean

    2016-01-01

    The domain architecture of a large RNA can help explain and/or predict folding, function, biogenesis and evolution. We offer a formal and general definition of an RNA domain and use that definition to experimentally characterize the rRNA of the ribosomal small subunit. Here the rRNA comprising a domain is compact, with a self-contained system of molecular interactions. A given rRNA helix or stem-loop must be allocated uniquely to a single domain. Local changes such as mutations can give domain-wide effects. Helices within a domain have interdependent orientations, stabilities and interactions. With these criteria we identify a core domain (domain A) of small subunit rRNA. Domain A acts as a hub, linking the four peripheral domains and imposing orientational and positional restraints on the other domains. Experimental characterization of isolated domain A, and mutations and truncations of it, by methods including selective 2′OH acylation analyzed by primer extension and circular dichroism spectroscopy are consistent with our architectural model. The results support the utility of the concept of an RNA domain. Domain A, which exhibits structural similarity to tRNA, appears to be an essential core of the small ribosomal subunit. PMID:26876483

  9. Riboproteomics of the hepatitis C virus internal ribosomal entry site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Henry; Li, Weiqun; Noble, William Stafford; Payan, Donald; Anderson, D C

    2004-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) protein translation is mediated by a cis-acting RNA, an internal ribosomal entry site (IRES), located in the 5' nontranslated region of the viral RNA. To examine proteins bound to the IRES, which could include proteins important for its function as well as potential drug targets, we used shotgun peptide sequencing to identify proteins in quadruplicate protein affinity extracts of lysed Huh7 cells, obtained using a biotinylated IRES. Twenty-six proteins bound the HCV IRES but not a reversed complementary sequence RNA or vector RNA controls. These included five ribosomal subunits, nine eukaryotic initiation factor 3 subunits, and novel interacting proteins such as the cytoskeletal-related proteins actin, FHOS (formin homologue overexpressed in spleen) and MIP-T3 (microtubule interacting protein that associates with TRAF3). Other novel HCV IRES-binding proteins included UNR (upstream of N-ras), UNR-interacting protein, and the RNA-binding proteins PAI-1 (plasminogen activator inhibitor-1) mRNA binding protein and Ewing sarcoma breakpoint 1 region protein EWS. A large set of additional proteins bound both the HCV IRES and a reversed complementary IRES sequence control, including the known HCV interactors PTB (polypyrimidine tract binding protein), the La autoantigen, and nucleolin. The discovery of these novel HCV IRES-binding proteins suggests links between IRES biology and the cytoskeleton, signal transduction, and other cellular functions.

  10. Analysis of ribosomal protein gene structures: implications for intron evolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Many spliceosomal introns exist in the eukaryotic nuclear genome. Despite much research, the evolution of spliceosomal introns remains poorly understood. In this paper, we tried to gain insights into intron evolution from a novel perspective by comparing the gene structures of cytoplasmic ribosomal proteins (CRPs and mitochondrial ribosomal proteins (MRPs, which are held to be of archaeal and bacterial origin, respectively. We analyzed 25 homologous pairs of CRP and MRP genes that together had a total of 527 intron positions. We found that all 12 of the intron positions shared by CRP and MRP genes resulted from parallel intron gains and none could be considered to be "conserved," i.e., descendants of the same ancestor. This was supported further by the high frequency of proto-splice sites at these shared positions; proto-splice sites are proposed to be sites for intron insertion. Although we could not definitively disprove that spliceosomal introns were already present in the last universal common ancestor, our results lend more support to the idea that introns were gained late. At least, our results show that MRP genes were intronless at the time of endosymbiosis. The parallel intron gains between CRP and MRP genes accounted for 2.3% of total intron positions, which should provide a reliable estimate for future inferences of intron evolution.

  11. Ribosomal small subunit domains radiate from a central core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulen, Burak; Petrov, Anton S.; Okafor, C. Denise; Vander Wood, Drew; O'Neill, Eric B.; Hud, Nicholas V.; Williams, Loren Dean

    2016-02-01

    The domain architecture of a large RNA can help explain and/or predict folding, function, biogenesis and evolution. We offer a formal and general definition of an RNA domain and use that definition to experimentally characterize the rRNA of the ribosomal small subunit. Here the rRNA comprising a domain is compact, with a self-contained system of molecular interactions. A given rRNA helix or stem-loop must be allocated uniquely to a single domain. Local changes such as mutations can give domain-wide effects. Helices within a domain have interdependent orientations, stabilities and interactions. With these criteria we identify a core domain (domain A) of small subunit rRNA. Domain A acts as a hub, linking the four peripheral domains and imposing orientational and positional restraints on the other domains. Experimental characterization of isolated domain A, and mutations and truncations of it, by methods including selective 2‧OH acylation analyzed by primer extension and circular dichroism spectroscopy are consistent with our architectural model. The results support the utility of the concept of an RNA domain. Domain A, which exhibits structural similarity to tRNA, appears to be an essential core of the small ribosomal subunit.

  12. Hepatitis-C-virus-like internal ribosome entry sites displace eIF3 to gain access to the 40S subunit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashem, Yaser; Des Georges, Amedee; Dhote, Vidya; Langlois, Robert; Liao, Hstau Y.; Grassucci, Robert A.; Pestova, Tatyana V.; Hellen, Christopher U. T.; Frank, Joachim

    2013-11-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) and classical swine fever virus (CSFV) messenger RNAs contain related (HCV-like) internal ribosome entry sites (IRESs) that promote 5'-end independent initiation of translation, requiring only a subset of the eukaryotic initiation factors (eIFs) needed for canonical initiation on cellular mRNAs. Initiation on HCV-like IRESs relies on their specific interaction with the 40S subunit, which places the initiation codon into the P site, where it directly base-pairs with eIF2-bound initiator methionyl transfer RNA to form a 48S initiation complex. However, all HCV-like IRESs also specifically interact with eIF3 (refs 2, 5, 6, 7, 9, 10, 11, 12), but the role of this interaction in IRES-mediated initiation has remained unknown. During canonical initiation, eIF3 binds to the 40S subunit as a component of the 43S pre-initiation complex, and comparison of the ribosomal positions of eIF3 and the HCV IRES revealed that they overlap, so that their rearrangement would be required for formation of ribosomal complexes containing both components. Here we present a cryo-electron microscopy reconstruction of a 40S ribosomal complex containing eIF3 and the CSFV IRES. Remarkably, although the position and interactions of the CSFV IRES with the 40S subunit in this complex are similar to those of the HCV IRES in the 40S-IRES binary complex, eIF3 is completely displaced from its ribosomal position in the 43S complex, and instead interacts through its ribosome-binding surface exclusively with the apical region of domain III of the IRES. Our results suggest a role for the specific interaction of HCV-like IRESs with eIF3 in preventing ribosomal association of eIF3, which could serve two purposes: relieving the competition between the IRES and eIF3 for a common binding site on the 40S subunit, and reducing formation of 43S complexes, thereby favouring translation of viral mRNAs.

  13. Effects of electroacupuncture on the expression of p70 ribosomal protein S6 kinase and ribosomal protein S6 in the hippocampus of rats with vascular dementia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yanzhen Zhu; Xuan Wang; Xiaobao Ye; Changhua Gao; Wei Wang

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the mechanism underlying electroacupuncture therapy for vascular dementia through electroacupuncture at the acupoints of Baihui (DU20), Dazhui (DU14), and bilateral Shenshu (BL23) in a rat model of vascular dementia produced by bilateral middle cerebral artery occlusion. Morris water maze test showed that electroacupuncture improved the learning ability of vascular dementia rats. Western blot assay revealed that the expression of p70 ribosomal protein S6 kinase and ribosomal protein S6 in vascular dementia rats was significantly increased after electroacupuncture, compared with the model group that was not treated with acupuncture. The average escape latency was also shortened after electroacupuncture, and escape strategies in the spatial probe test improved from edge and random searches, to linear and trending swim pathways. The experimental findings indicate that electroacupuncture improves learning and memory ability by up-regulating expression of p70 ribosomal protein S6 kinase and ribosomal protein S6 in the hippocampus of vascular dementia rats.

  14. Identification of A Novel SBF2 Frameshift Mutation in Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease Type 4B2 Using Whole-exome Sequencing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Meiyan Chen; Xin Yi; Ming Qi; Jing Wu; Ning Liang; Lihui Tang; Yanhua Chen; Huishuang Chen; Wei Wei; Tianying Wei; Hui Huang

    2014-01-01

    Charcot–Marie–Tooth disease type 4B2 with early-onset glaucoma (CMT4B2, OMIM 604563) is a genetically-heterogeneous childhood-onset neuromuscular disorder. Here, we report the case of a 15-year-old male adolescent with lower extremity weakness, gait abnormalities, foot deformities and early-onset glaucoma. Since clinical diagnosis alone was insufficient for providing pathogenetic evidence to indicate that the condition belonged to a consanguineous family, we applied whole-exome sequencing to samples from the patient, his parents and his younger brother, assuming that the patient’s condition is transmitted in an autosomal recessive pattern. A frame-shift mutation, c.4571delG (P.Gly1524Glufs*42), was revealed in the CMT4B2-related gene SBF2 (also known as MTMR13, MIM 607697), and this mutation was found to be homozygous in the proband and heterozygous in his parents and younger brother. Together with the results of clinical diagnosis, this case was diagnosed as CMT4B2. Our finding further demonstrates the use of whole-exome sequencing in the diagnosis and treatment of rare diseases.

  15. The Immature Fiber Mutant Phenotype of Cotton (Gossypium hirsutum Is Linked to a 22-bp Frame-Shift Deletion in a Mitochondria Targeted Pentatricopeptide Repeat Gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory N. Thyssen

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Cotton seed trichomes are the most important source of natural fibers globally. The major fiber thickness properties influence the price of the raw material, and the quality of the finished product. The recessive immature fiber (im gene reduces the degree of fiber cell wall thickening by a process that was previously shown to involve mitochondrial function in allotetraploid Gossypium hirsutum. Here, we present the fine genetic mapping of the im locus, gene expression analysis of annotated proteins near the locus, and association analysis of the linked markers. Mapping-by-sequencing identified a 22-bp deletion in a pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR gene that is completely linked to the immature fiber phenotype in 2837 F2 plants, and is absent from all 163 cultivated varieties tested, although other closely linked marker polymorphisms are prevalent in the diversity panel. This frame-shift mutation results in a transcript with two long open reading frames: one containing the N-terminal transit peptide that targets mitochondria, the other containing only the RNA-binding PPR domains, suggesting that a functional PPR protein cannot be targeted to mitochondria in the im mutant. Taken together, these results suggest that PPR gene Gh_A03G0489 is involved in the cotton fiber wall thickening process, and is a promising candidate gene at the im locus. Our findings expand our understanding of the molecular mechanisms that modulate cotton fiber fineness and maturity, and may facilitate the development of cotton varieties with superior fiber attributes.

  16. A novel insertion-induced frameshift mutation of the SLC26A4 gene in a Korean family with Pendred syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagong, Borum; Seok, Jun Ho; Kwon, Tae-Jun; Kim, Un-Kyung; Lee, Sang-Heun; Lee, Kyu-Yup

    2012-10-15

    Pendred syndrome (PS) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by congenital bilateral sensorineural hearing loss, goiter, and incomplete iodide organification. Patients with PS also have structural anomalies of the inner ear such as enlarged vestibular aqueducts (EVA) and Mondini's malformation. The goiter, which is a major clinical manifestation of PS, usually develops around adolescence. PS is caused by biallelic mutations of the SLC26A4 gene, while nonsyndromic bilateral EVA is associated with zero or one SLC26A4 mutant allele. We report here a Korean family including a young female with PS who had goiter and progressive, fluctuating sensorineural hearing loss that could be partially recovered by oral steroid treatment. Genetic investigation revealed compound heterozygous mutations for p.R677AfsX11, a novel frameshift mutation, and p.H723R in the SLC26A4 gene. Our findings provide detailed information regarding the distribution of mutant alleles for PS and may serve as a foundation for studies to comprehend the genetic portion of syndromic hearing loss.

  17. Molecular characterization of WFS1 in an Iranian family with Wolfram syndrome reveals a novel frameshift mutation associated with early symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobhani, Maryam; Tabatabaiefar, Mohammad Amin; Rajab, Asadollah; Kajbafzadeh, Abdol-Mohammad; Noori-Daloii, Mohammad Reza

    2013-10-10

    Wolfram syndrome (WS) is a rare autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder that represents a likely source of childhood diabetes especially among countries in the consanguinity belt. The main responsible gene is WFS1 for which over one hundred mutations have been reported from different ethnic groups. The aim of this study was to identify the molecular etiology of WS and to perform a possible genotype-phenotype correlation in Iranian kindred. An Iranian family with two patients was clinically studied and WS was suspected. Genetic linkage analysis via 5 STR markers was carried out. For identification of mutations, DNA sequencing of WFS1 including all the exons, exon-intron boundaries and the promoter was performed. Linkage analysis indicated linkage to the WFS1 region. After DNA sequencing of WFS1, one novel pathogenic mutation, which causes frameshift alteration c.2177_2178insTCTTC (or c.2173_2177dupTCTTC) in exon eight, was found. The genotype-phenotype correlation analysis suggests that the presence of the homozygous mutation may be associated with early onset of disease symptoms. This study stresses the necessity of considering the molecular analysis of WFS1 in childhood diabetes with some symptoms of WS.

  18. Phenotypic variability in a seven-generation Swedish family segregating autosomal dominant hearing impairment due to a novel EYA4 frameshift mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frykholm, Carina; Klar, Joakim; Arnesson, Hanna; Rehnman, Anna-Carin; Lodahl, Marianne; Wedén, Ulla; Dahl, Niklas; Tranebjærg, Lisbeth; Rendtorff, Nanna D

    2015-05-25

    Linkage to an interval overlapping the DFNA10 locus on chromosome 6q22-23 was found through genome wide linkage analysis in a seven-generation Swedish family segregating postlingual, autosomal dominant nonsyndromic sensorineural hearing impairment. A novel heterozygous frame-shift mutation (c.579_580insTACC, p.(Asp194Tyrfs*52)) in EYA4 was identified that truncates the so-called variable region of the protein. The mutation is predicted to result in haploinsufficiency of the EYA4 product. No evidence for dilated cardiomyopathy was found in the family, contrasting to a previous family with a deletion resulting in a similar truncation in the variable region. A highly variable age of onset was seen in the mutation carriers. For assessment of the aetiology of this variability, clinical and audiometric data analyses were performed. The affected family members all had similar cross-sectional and longitudinal deterioration of pure tone average (PTA) once the process of hearing deterioration had started, and no gender, parent-of-origin or family branch differences on PTA could be found. Age at onset varied between the family branches. In summary, this is the ninth published genetically verified DFNA10 family. The results imply that unidentified factors, genetic or environmental, other than the EYA4 mutation, are of importance for the age at onset of DFNA10, and that mutation early in the variable region of the EYA4 protein can occur in the absence of dilated cardiomyopathy.

  19. A patient with a unique frameshift mutation in GPC3, causing Simpson-Golabi-Behmel syndrome, presenting with craniosynostosis, penoscrotal hypospadias, and a large prostatic utricle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villarreal, Diana D; Villarreal, Humberto; Paez, Ana Maria; Peppas, Dennis; Lynch, Jane; Roeder, Elizabeth; Powers, George C

    2013-12-01

    We present a Hispanic male with the clinical and molecular diagnosis of Simpson-Golabi-Behmel syndrome (SGBS). The patient was born with multiple anomalies not entirely typical of SGBS patients, including penoscrotal hypospadias, a large prostatic utricle, and left coronal craniosynostosis. In addition, he demonstrated endocrine anomalies including a low random cortisol level suspicious for adrenal insufficiency and low testosterone level. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a prostatic utricle in SGBS and the second report of craniosynostosis. The unique disease-causing mutation likely arose de novo in the mother. It is a deletion-insertion that leads to a frameshift at the p.p. S359 [corrected] residue of GPC3 and a premature stop codon after five more amino acids. p. S359 [corrected] is the same residue that is normally cleaved by the Furin convertase, although the significance of this novel mutation with respect to the patient's multiple anomalies is unknown. We present this case as the perinatal course of a patient with unique features of SGBS and a confirmed molecular diagnosis.

  20. Tigecycline resistance in Acinetobacter baumannii mediated by frameshift mutation in plsC, encoding 1-acyl-sn-glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, X; Liu, L; Ji, J; Chen, Q; Hua, X; Jiang, Y; Feng, Y; Yu, Y

    2015-03-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is an important pathogen of healthcare-associated infections and shows multidrug resistance. With the increasing application of tigecycline, isolates resistant to this antibiotic are of growing concern clinically. However, the definitive mechanism of tigecycline resistance remains unclear. To explore the mechanism of tigecycline resistance in A. baumannii, a tigecycline-resistant strain was obtained by increasing the concentration of the antimicrobial in liquid culture. Three mutations were identified by the whole genome comparison, including one synonymous substitution in a hypothetical protein and a frameshift mutation in plsC and omp38. The plsC gene was confirmed to cause decreased susceptibility to tigecycline by a complementation experiment and cellular membrane change was detected by flow cytometry. By measuring the relative growth rate, the fitness cost of plsC was estimated to be approximately 8 %. In conclusion, plsC was found to play an important role in tigecycline resistance in A. baumannii. The minor fitness cost of plsC indicates a high risk of the emergence and development of tigecycline resistance in A. baumannii.

  1. Early-progressive dilated cardiomyopathy in a family with Becker muscular dystrophy related to a novel frameshift mutation in the dystrophin gene exon 27.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuda, Takeshi; Fitzgerald, Kristi; Scavena, Mena; Gidding, Samuel; Cox, Mary O; Marks, Harold; Flanigan, Kevin M; Moore, Steven A

    2015-03-01

    We report a family in which two male siblings with Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD) developed severe dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) and progressive heart failure (HF) at age 11 years; one died at age 14 years while awaiting heart transplant and the other underwent left ventricular assist device implantation at the same age. Genetic analysis of one sibling showed a novel frameshift mutation in exon 27 of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) gene (c.3779_3785delCTTTGGAinsGG), in which seven base pairs are deleted and two are inserted. Although this predicts an amino-acid substitution and premature termination (p.Thr1260Argfs*8), muscle biopsy dystrophin immunostaining instead indicates that the mutation is more likely to alter splicing. Despite relatively preserved skeletal muscular performance, both the siblings developed progressive HF secondary to early-onset DCM. In addition, their 7-year-old nephew with delayed gross motor development, mild proximal muscle weakness and markedly elevated serum creatine kinase level (>13 000 IU l(-1)) at 16 months was recently demonstrated to have the familial DMD mutation. Here, we report a novel genotype of BMD with early-onset DCM and progressive lethal HF during early adolescence.

  2. Identification of a novel SBF2 frameshift mutation in charcot-marie-tooth disease type 4B2 using whole-exome sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Meiyan; Wu, Jing; Liang, Ning; Tang, Lihui; Chen, Yanhua; Chen, Huishuang; Wei, Wei; Wei, Tianying; Huang, Hui; Yi, Xin; Qi, Ming

    2014-10-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 4B2 with early-onset glaucoma (CMT4B2, OMIM 604563) is a genetically-heterogeneous childhood-onset neuromuscular disorder. Here, we report the case of a 15-year-old male adolescent with lower extremity weakness, gait abnormalities, foot deformities and early-onset glaucoma. Since clinical diagnosis alone was insufficient for providing pathogenetic evidence to indicate that the condition belonged to a consanguineous family, we applied whole-exome sequencing to samples from the patient, his parents and his younger brother, assuming that the patient's condition is transmitted in an autosomal recessive pattern. A frame-shift mutation, c.4571delG (P.Gly1524Glufs∗42), was revealed in the CMT4B2-related gene SBF2 (also known as MTMR13, MIM 607697), and this mutation was found to be homozygous in the proband and heterozygous in his parents and younger brother. Together with the results of clinical diagnosis, this case was diagnosed as CMT4B2. Our finding further demonstrates the use of whole-exome sequencing in the diagnosis and treatment of rare diseases.

  3. Identification of A Novel SBF2 Frameshift Mutation in Charcot–Marie–Tooth Disease Type 4B2 Using Whole-exome Sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meiyan Chen

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Charcot–Marie–Tooth disease type 4B2 with early-onset glaucoma (CMT4B2, OMIM 604563 is a genetically-heterogeneous childhood-onset neuromuscular disorder. Here, we report the case of a 15-year-old male adolescent with lower extremity weakness, gait abnormalities, foot deformities and early-onset glaucoma. Since clinical diagnosis alone was insufficient for providing pathogenetic evidence to indicate that the condition belonged to a consanguineous family, we applied whole-exome sequencing to samples from the patient, his parents and his younger brother, assuming that the patient’s condition is transmitted in an autosomal recessive pattern. A frame-shift mutation, c.4571delG (P.Gly1524Glufs∗42, was revealed in the CMT4B2-related gene SBF2 (also known as MTMR13, MIM 607697, and this mutation was found to be homozygous in the proband and heterozygous in his parents and younger brother. Together with the results of clinical diagnosis, this case was diagnosed as CMT4B2. Our finding further demonstrates the use of whole-exome sequencing in the diagnosis and treatment of rare diseases.

  4. Maize reas1 Mutant Stimulates Ribosome Use Efficiency and Triggers Distinct Transcriptional and Translational Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Weiwei; Zhu, Jie; Wu, Qiao; Wang, Qun; Li, Xia; Yao, Dongsheng; Jin, Ying; Wang, Gang; Wang, Guifeng; Song, Rentao

    2016-02-01

    Ribosome biogenesis is a fundamental cellular process in all cells. Impaired ribosome biogenesis causes developmental defects; however, its molecular and cellular bases are not fully understood. We cloned a gene responsible for a maize (Zea mays) small seed mutant, dek* (for defective kernel), and found that it encodes Ribosome export associated1 (ZmReas1). Reas1 is an AAA-ATPase that controls 60S ribosome export from the nucleus to the cytoplasm after ribosome maturation. dek* is a weak mutant allele with decreased Reas1 function. In dek* cells, mature 60S ribosome subunits are reduced in the nucleus and cytoplasm, but the proportion of actively translating polyribosomes in cytosol is significantly increased. Reduced phosphorylation of eukaryotic initiation factor 2α and the increased elongation factor 1α level indicate an enhancement of general translational efficiency in dek* cells. The mutation also triggers dramatic changes in differentially transcribed genes and differentially translated RNAs. Discrepancy was observed between differentially transcribed genes and differentially translated RNAs, indicating distinct cellular responses at transcription and translation levels to the stress of defective ribosome processing. DNA replication and nucleosome assembly-related gene expression are selectively suppressed at the translational level, resulting in inhibited cell growth and proliferation in dek* cells. This study provides insight into cellular responses due to impaired ribosome biogenesis. © 2016 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  5. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae protein Stm1p facilitates ribosome preservation during quiescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Dyke, Natalya; Chanchorn, Ekkawit [Department of Chemistry and Physics, Western Carolina University, 111 Memorial Drive, Cullowhee, NC 28723 (United States); Van Dyke, Michael W., E-mail: mvandyke@email.wcu.edu [Department of Chemistry and Physics, Western Carolina University, 111 Memorial Drive, Cullowhee, NC 28723 (United States)

    2013-01-11

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Stm1p confers increased resistance to the macrolide starvation-mimic rapamycin. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Stm1p maintains 80S ribosome integrity during stationary phase-induced quiescence. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Stm1p facilitates polysome formation following quiescence exit. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Stm1p facilitates protein synthesis following quiescence exit. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Stm1p is a ribosome preservation factor under conditions of nutrient deprivation. -- Abstract: Once cells exhaust nutrients from their environment, they enter an alternative resting state known as quiescence, whereby proliferation ceases and essential nutrients are obtained through internal stores and through the catabolism of existing macromolecules and organelles. One example of this is ribophagy, the degradation of ribosomes through the process of autophagy. However, some ribosomes need to be preserved for an anticipated recovery from nutrient deprivation. We found that the ribosome-associated protein Stm1p greatly increases the quantity of 80S ribosomes present in quiescent yeast cells and that these ribosomes facilitate increased protein synthesis rates once nutrients are restored. These findings suggest that Stm1p can act as a ribosome preservation factor under conditions of nutrient deprivation and restoration.

  6. A Conserved Proline Switch on the Ribosome Facilitates the Recruitment and Binding of trGTPases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    The process of protein synthesis in vivo is a highly complex and orderly system, which is dependent on the ribosome as factory, mRNA as a template, the amino acid as raw materials, the GTP for energy. Ri- bosomal protein synthesis is a continuous dynamics process, which involves not only the ribosome itself, but also involves the synergy of translation factors.

  7. The Ribosomal Protein uL22 Modulates the Shape of the Protein Exit Tunnel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wekselman, Itai; Zimmerman, Ella; Davidovich, Chen

    2017-01-01

    Erythromycin is a clinically useful antibiotic that binds to an rRNA pocket in the ribosomal exit tunnel. Commonly, resistance to erythromycin is acquired by alterations of rRNA nucleotides that interact with the drug. Mutations in the β hairpin of ribosomal protein uL22, which is rather distal t...

  8. A Long Noncoding RNA on the Ribosome Is Required for Lifespan Extension

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Essers, Paul B.; Nonnekens, Julie; Goos, Yvonne J.; Betist, Marco C.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304073202; Viester, Marjon D.; Mossink, Britt; Lansu, Nico; Korswagen, Hendrik C.; Jelier, Rob; Brenkman, Arjan B.; MacInnes, Alyson W.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/338681388

    2015-01-01

    The biogenesis of ribosomes and their coordination of protein translation consume an enormous amount of cellular energy. As such, it has been established that the inhibition of either process can extend eukaryotic lifespan. Here, we used next-generation sequencing to compare ribosome-associated RNAs

  9. Isolation of Moraxella bovis ribosomes and their subsequent use in a vaccine against infectious bovine keratoconjunctivitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugh, G W; Phillips, M; McDonald, T J; Kopecky, K E

    1981-03-01

    A study was conducted to determine whether a Moraxella bovis ribosomal vaccine would protect calves from infectious bovine keratoconjunctivitis (IBK). Each of 16 calves were given 2 inoculations 21 days apart. Twenty-one days after the 2nd inoculation, 8 of the calves were challenge exposed with a homologous strain culture and 8 calves were challenge exposed to a heterologous strain culture of M bovis. Sedimentation velocity analysis of the ribosomes used in this study indicated that they were mostly 30S and 50S subunits. Chemical assays indicated that the ribosomes were composed of 64% to 65% RNA and 35% to 36% protein. The cesium chloride buoyant density of the ribosomes was 1.62 g/ml. Ribosomes used as antigen gave 1 line of precipitation in a gel-diffusion precipitin test with hyperimmune serum against the whole-cell antigen of the homologous strain of M bovis. The eyes of all the experimentally exposed calves became infected and all calves developed clinical signs of either unilateral or bilateral IBK. None of the sera of the vaccinated calves had detectable precipitins against the ribosomal antigen at the time they were challenge exposed, but most of the sera had precipitins against whole-cell and pilus antigens. The results indicate that M bovis ribosomes, although similar to other bacterial ribosomes, did not protect cattle against IBK.

  10. The Ribosomal RNA is a Useful Marker to Visualize Rhizobia Interacting with Legume Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinaudi, Luciana; Isola, Maria C.; Giordano, Walter

    2004-01-01

    Symbiosis between rhizobia and leguminous plants leads to the formation of nitrogen-fixing root nodules. In the present article, we recommend the use of the ribosomal RNA (rRNA) isolated from legume nodules in an experimental class with the purpose of introducing students to the structure of eukaryotic and prokaryotic ribosomes and of…

  11. N(α)-Acetylation of yeast ribosomal proteins and its effect on protein synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamita, Masahiro; Kimura, Yayoi; Ino, Yoko; Kamp, Roza M; Polevoda, Bogdan; Sherman, Fred; Hirano, Hisashi

    2011-04-01

    N(α)-Acetyltransferases (NATs) cause the N(α)-acetylation of the majority of eukaryotic proteins during their translation, although the functions of this modification have been largely unexplored. In yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae), four NATs have been identified: NatA, NatB, NatC, and NatD. In this study, the N(α)-acetylation status of ribosomal protein was analyzed using NAT mutants combined with two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) and mass spectrometry (MS). A total of 60 ribosomal proteins were identified, of which 17 were N(α)-acetylated by NatA, and two by NatB. The N(α)-acetylation of two of these, S17 and L23, by NatA was not previously observed. Furthermore, we tested the effect of ribosomal protein N(α)-acetylation on protein synthesis using the purified ribosomes from each NAT mutant. It was found that the protein synthesis activities of ribosomes from NatA and NatB mutants were decreased by 27% and 23%, respectively, as compared to that of the normal strain. Furthermore, we have shown that ribosomal protein N(α)-acetylation by NatA influences translational fidelity in the presence of paromomycin. These results suggest that ribosomal protein N(α)-acetylation is necessary to maintain the ribosome's protein synthesis function.

  12. Assembling the archaeal ribosome: roles for translation-factor-related GTPases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blombach, F.; Brouns, S.J.J.; Oost, van der J.

    2011-01-01

    The assembly of ribosomal subunits from their individual components (rRNA and ribosomal proteins) requires the assistance of a multitude of factors in order to control and increase the efficiency of the assembly process. GTPases of the TRAFAC (translation-factor-related) class constitute a major typ

  13. Implementation of communication-mediating domains for non-ribosomal peptide production in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siewers, Verena; San-Bento, Rita; Nielsen, Jens

    2010-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae has in several cases been proven to be a suitable host for the production of natural products and was recently exploited for the production of non-ribosomal peptides. Synthesis of non-ribosomal peptides (NRPs) is mediated by NRP synthetases (NRPSs), modular enzymes, which...

  14. Autogenous Regulation of Splicing of the Transcript of a Yeast Ribosomal Protein Gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabeva, Mariana D.; Post-Beittenmiller, Martha A.; Warner, Jonathan R.

    1986-08-01

    The gene for a yeast ribosomal protein, RPL32, contains a single intron. The product of this gene appears to participate in feedback control of the splicing of the intron from the transcript. This autogenous regulation of splicing provides a striking analogy to the autogenous regulation of translation of ribosomal proteins in Escherichia coli.

  15. Ribosomal protein mutations induce autophagy through S6 kinase inhibition of the insulin pathway

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijnen, Harry F; van Wijk, Richard; Pereboom, Tamara C; Goos, Yvonne J; Seinen, Cor W; van Oirschot, Brigitte A; van Dooren, Rowie; Gastou, Marc; Giles, Rachel H; van Solinge, Wouter; Kuijpers, Taco W; Gazda, Hanna T; Bierings, Marc B; Da Costa, Lydie; MacInnes, Alyson W

    2014-01-01

    Mutations affecting the ribosome lead to several diseases known as ribosomopathies, with phenotypes that include growth defects, cytopenia, and bone marrow failure. Diamond-Blackfan anemia (DBA), for example, is a pure red cell aplasia linked to the mutation of ribosomal protein (RP) genes. Here we

  16. Ribosome-induced changes in elongation factor Tu conformation control GTP hydrolysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villa, Elizabeth; Sengupta, Jayati; Trabuco, Leonard G.

    2009-01-01

    In translation, elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu) molecules deliver aminoacyl-tRNAs to the mRNA-programmed ribosome. The GTPase activity of EF-Tu is triggered by ribosome-induced conformational changes of the factor that play a pivotal role in the selection of the cognate aminoacyl-tRNAs. We present a...

  17. Ribosomal protein mutations induce autophagy through S6 kinase inhibition of the insulin pathway

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijnen, Harry F; van Wijk, Richard; Pereboom, Tamara C; Goos, Yvonne J; Seinen, Cor W; van Oirschot, Brigitte A; van Dooren, Rowie; Gastou, Marc; Giles, Rachel H; van Solinge, Wouter; Kuijpers, Taco W; Gazda, Hanna T; Bierings, Marc B; Da Costa, Lydie; MacInnes, Alyson W

    2014-01-01

    Mutations affecting the ribosome lead to several diseases known as ribosomopathies, with phenotypes that include growth defects, cytopenia, and bone marrow failure. Diamond-Blackfan anemia (DBA), for example, is a pure red cell aplasia linked to the mutation of ribosomal protein (RP) genes. Here we

  18. Inhibition of protein synthesis on the ribosome by tildipirosin compared with other veterinary macrolides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Niels Møller; Poehlsgaard, Jacob; Warrass, Ralf

    2012-01-01

    on the ribosome (50% inhibitory concentration [IC(50)], 0.23 ± 0.01 μM) and compared it with the established veterinary macrolides tylosin, tilmicosin, and tulathromycin. Mutation and methylation at key rRNA nucleotides revealed differences in the interactions of these macrolides within their common ribosomal...

  19. Assembly factors Rpf2 and Rrs1 recruit 5S rRNA and ribosomal proteins rpL5 and rpL11 into nascent ribosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jingyu; Harnpicharnchai, Piyanun; Jakovljevic, Jelena; Tang, Lan; Guo, Yurong; Oeffinger, Marlene; Rout, Michael P; Hiley, Shawna L; Hughes, Timothy; Woolford, John L

    2007-10-15

    More than 170 proteins are necessary for assembly of ribosomes in eukaryotes. However, cofactors that function with each of these proteins, substrates on which they act, and the precise functions of assembly factors--e.g., recruiting other molecules into preribosomes or triggering structural rearrangements of pre-rRNPs--remain mostly unknown. Here we investigated the recruitment of two ribosomal proteins and 5S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) into nascent ribosomes. We identified a ribonucleoprotein neighborhood in preribosomes that contains two yeast ribosome assembly factors, Rpf2 and Rrs1, two ribosomal proteins, rpL5 and rpL11, and 5S rRNA. Interactions between each of these four proteins have been confirmed by binding assays in vitro. These molecules assemble into 90S preribosomal particles containing 35S rRNA precursor (pre-rRNA). Rpf2 and Rrs1 are required for recruiting rpL5, rpL11, and 5S rRNA into preribosomes. In the absence of association of these molecules with pre-rRNPs, processing of 27SB pre-rRNA is blocked. Consequently, the abortive 66S pre-rRNPs are prematurely released from the nucleolus to the nucleoplasm, and cannot be exported to the cytoplasm.

  20. UtpA and UtpB chaperone nascent pre-ribosomal RNA and U3 snoRNA to initiate eukaryotic ribosome assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunziker, Mirjam; Barandun, Jonas; Petfalski, Elisabeth; Tan, Dongyan; Delan-Forino, Clémentine; Molloy, Kelly R.; Kim, Kelly H.; Dunn-Davies, Hywel; Shi, Yi; Chaker-Margot, Malik; Chait, Brian T.; Walz, Thomas; Tollervey, David; Klinge, Sebastian

    2016-06-01

    Early eukaryotic ribosome biogenesis involves large multi-protein complexes, which co-transcriptionally associate with pre-ribosomal RNA to form the small subunit processome. The precise mechanisms by which two of the largest multi-protein complexes--UtpA and UtpB--interact with nascent pre-ribosomal RNA are poorly understood. Here, we combined biochemical and structural biology approaches with ensembles of RNA-protein cross-linking data to elucidate the essential functions of both complexes. We show that UtpA contains a large composite RNA-binding site and captures the 5' end of pre-ribosomal RNA. UtpB forms an extended structure that binds early pre-ribosomal intermediates in close proximity to architectural sites such as an RNA duplex formed by the 5' ETS and U3 snoRNA as well as the 3' boundary of the 18S rRNA. Both complexes therefore act as vital RNA chaperones to initiate eukaryotic ribosome assembly.