WorldWideScience

Sample records for rib fracture diagnosis

  1. Rib Fracture Diagnosis in the Panscan Era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Charles E; Raja, Ali S; Baumann, Brigitte M; Medak, Anthony J; Langdorf, Mark I; Nishijima, Daniel K; Hendey, Gregory W; Mower, William R; Rodriguez, Robert M

    2017-12-01

    With increased use of chest computed tomography (CT) in trauma evaluation, traditional teachings in regard to rib fracture morbidity and mortality may no longer be accurate. We seek to determine rates of rib fracture observed on chest CT only; admission and mortality of patients with isolated rib fractures, rib fractures observed on CT only, and first or second rib fractures; and first or second rib fracture-associated great vessel injury. We conducted a planned secondary analysis of 2 prospectively enrolled cohorts of the National Emergency X-Radiography Utilization Study chest studies, which evaluated patients with blunt trauma who were older than 14 years and received chest imaging in the emergency department. We defined rib fractures and other thoracic injuries according to CT reports and followed patients through their hospital course to determine outcomes. Of 8,661 patients who had both chest radiograph and chest CT, 2,071 (23.9%) had rib fractures, and rib fractures were observed on chest CT only in 1,368 cases (66.1%). Rib fracture patients had higher admission rates (88.7% versus 45.8%; mean difference 42.9%; 95% confidence interval [CI] 41.4% to 44.4%) and mortality (5.6% versus 2.7%; mean difference 2.9%; 95% CI 1.8% to 4.0%) than patients without rib fracture. The mortality of patients with rib fracture observed on chest CT only was not statistically significantly different from that of patients with fractures also observed on chest radiograph (4.8% versus 5.7%; mean difference -0.9%; 95% CI -3.1% to 1.1%). Patients with first or second rib fractures had significantly higher mortality (7.4% versus 4.1%; mean difference 3.3%; 95% CI 0.2% to 7.1%) and prevalence of concomitant great vessel injury (2.8% versus 0.6%; mean difference 2.2%; 95% CI 0.6% to 4.9%) than patients with fractures of ribs 3 to 12, and the odds ratio of great vessel injury with first or second rib fracture was 4.4 (95% CI 1.8 to 10.4). Under trauma imaging protocols that commonly

  2. Rib Radiography versus Chest Computed Tomography in the Diagnosis of Rib Fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sano, Atsushi

    2018-05-01

     The accurate diagnosis of rib fractures is important in chest trauma. Diagnostic images following chest trauma are usually obtained via chest X-ray, chest computed tomography, or rib radiography. This study evaluated the diagnostic characteristics of rib radiography and chest computed tomography.  Seventy-five rib fracture patients who underwent both chest computed tomography and rib radiography between April 2008 and December 2013 were included. Rib radiographs, centered on the site of pain, were taken from two directions. Chest computed tomography was performed using a 16-row multidetector scanner with 5-mm slice-pitch without overlap, and axial images were visualized in a bone window.  In total, 217 rib fractures were diagnosed in 75 patients. Rib radiography missed 43 rib fractures in 24 patients. The causes were overlap with organs in 15 cases, trivial fractures in 21 cases, and injury outside the imaging range in 7 cases. Left lower rib fractures were often missed due to overlap with the heart, while middle and lower rib fractures were frequently not diagnosed due to overlap with abdominal organs. Computed tomography missed 21 rib fractures in 17 patients. The causes were horizontal fractures in 10 cases, trivial fractures in 9 cases, and insufficient breath holding in 1 case.  In rib radiography, overlap with organs and fractures outside the imaging range were characteristic reasons for missed diagnoses. In chest computed tomography, horizontal rib fractures and insufficient breath holding were often responsible. We should take these challenges into account when diagnosing rib fractures. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  3. Rib Fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Video) Achilles Tendon Tear Additional Content Medical News Rib Fractures By Thomas G. Weiser, MD, MPH, Associate Professor, ... Tamponade Hemothorax Injury to the Aorta Pulmonary Contusion Rib Fractures Tension Pneumothorax Traumatic Pneumothorax (See also Introduction to ...

  4. Comparison of ultrasonography and radiography in diagnosis of rib fractures

    OpenAIRE

    Pishbin, Elham; Ahmadi, Koorosh; Foogardi, Molood; Salehi, Maryam; Seilanian Toosi, Farrokh; Rahimi-Movaghar, Vafa

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Rib fractures are the most common skeletal thoracic injuries resulting from blunt chest trauma. Half of the rib fractures are not detected upon a precise physical evaluation and radiographs. Recently ultrasonography (USG) has been investigated to detect rib fractures. But based on literature the usefulness of USG varies widely. This study was conducted to investigate the role of USG in the detection of possible rib fractures in comparison with radiography. Methods: In this cross-s...

  5. Acute rib fracture diagnosis in an infant by US: a matter of child protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelloff, Jennifer; Spivey, Maria; Hulett, Rebecca

    2009-01-01

    Rib fractures in infants and children are highly specific for inflicted injury in the absence of a major accidental injury or underlying bone disorder. We present a 9-week-old infant diagnosed with an acute rib fracture by US at the site where physicians palpated chest wall crepitus when no rib fractures had been visualized on the skeletal survey, including oblique views of the ribs. Based on the US diagnosis of the acute rib fracture the infant was taken into protective custody. Follow-up skeletal survey 2 weeks later revealed healing fractures of the left 6th and 7th posterolateral ribs and right 7th, 8th and 9th anterolateral ribs. We were unable to locate previous reports describing the diagnosis of rib fractures in infants by US. (orig.)

  6. Acute rib fracture diagnosis in an infant by US: a matter of child protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelloff, Jennifer; Spivey, Maria [Washington University School of Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Section on Child Abuse and Neglect, St. Louis Children' s Hospital, One Children' s Place, Box 8116, St. Louis, MO (United States); Hulett, Rebecca [Washington University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, St. Louis Children' s Hospital, St. Louis, MO (United States)

    2009-01-15

    Rib fractures in infants and children are highly specific for inflicted injury in the absence of a major accidental injury or underlying bone disorder. We present a 9-week-old infant diagnosed with an acute rib fracture by US at the site where physicians palpated chest wall crepitus when no rib fractures had been visualized on the skeletal survey, including oblique views of the ribs. Based on the US diagnosis of the acute rib fracture the infant was taken into protective custody. Follow-up skeletal survey 2 weeks later revealed healing fractures of the left 6th and 7th posterolateral ribs and right 7th, 8th and 9th anterolateral ribs. We were unable to locate previous reports describing the diagnosis of rib fractures in infants by US. (orig.)

  7. Comparison of ultrasonography and radiography in diagnosis of rib fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pishbin, Elham; Ahmadi, Koorosh; Foogardi, Molood; Salehi, Maryam; Seilanian Toosi, Farrokh; Rahimi-Movaghar, Vafa

    2017-08-01

    Rib fractures are the most common skeletal thoracic injuries resulting from blunt chest trauma. Half of the rib fractures are not detected upon a precise physical evaluation and radiographs. Recently ultrasonography (USG) has been investigated to detect rib fractures. But based on literature the usefulness of USG varies widely. This study was conducted to investigate the role of USG in the detection of possible rib fractures in comparison with radiography. In this cross-sectional study, consecutive patients with minor blunt chest trauma and suspected rib fractures presenting in Imam Reza Hospital located in Mashhad-Iran, between April 2013 and October 2013 were assessed by USG and radiography. The radiography was performed in a posteroanterior (PA) chest projection and oblique rib view centered over the area of trauma. The time duration spent in taking USG and radiography were recorded. The prevalence and location of fractures revealed by USG and radiography were compared. Sixty-one suspected patients were assessed. The male to female ratio was 2.4:1 (43 men and 18 women) with a mean ± SD age of (44.3 ± 19.7) years. There were totally 59 rib fractures in 38 (62.3%) patients based on radiography and USG, while 23 (37.7%) patients had no diagnostic evidence of rib lesions. USG revealed 58 rib fractures in 33 (54.1%) of 61 suspected patients and radiographs revealed 32 rib fractures in 20 (32.8%) of 61 patients. A total of 58 (98.3%) rib fractures were detected by USG, whereas oblique rib view and PA chest radiography showed 27 (45.8%) and 24 (40.7%) rib fractures, respectively. The average duration of USG was (12 ± 3) min (range 7-17 min), whereas the duration of radiography was (27 ± 6) min (range 15-37 min). The kappa coefficient showed a low level of agreement between both USG and PA chest radiography (kappa coefficient = 0.28), and between USG and oblique rib view (kappa coefficient = 0.32). USG discloses more fractures than radiography in

  8. The value of multislice helical CT in the diagnosis of the rib micro-fracture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Shuli; Wang Linsen; Sun Dingyuan; Deng Xin; Geng Xin; Li Jian; Liu Zhigang; Guo Lin; Jia Zhihong

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the clinical value of MSCT with thin-section reconstruction and curved multiplanar reformation of rib micro-fracture. Methods: Thirty-eight patients suspected ribs fracture by clinical examination, which had negative appearance in X-ray film, were performed with MSCT scan with thin-section reconstructed and curved multiplanar reformation. The imaging of 5 mm, 1 mm thickness and curved reformatted imags were analysed by three groups of radiologists respectively. Results: Of the 38 patients, 26 patients were demonstrated ribs fracture with 1 mm thin-section reconstructed and curved multiplanar reformatted CT imaging, which were classified as complete fracture in 18 ribs and incomplete fracture in 41 ribs. The ends of the fractures displacement located within a distance of double-thickness of the cortex of the complete ribs fracture. With 5 mm thickness imaging, the accuracy of the diagnosis was 86.4%, 89.8% and 94.9% by three groups radiologists, respectively. Conclusion: The rib fracture is very common in clinic, the incomplete and non evident displacement complete ribs fracture are difficult to be diagnosed by plain radiography. The MSCT can produce a large range volume information scan. Thin-section reconstructed and curved multiplanar reformatted imaging should be the effective method in diagnosis of ribs fracture. The total rib pattern and location, extend of all the ribs fracture in this cases can be displayed in one scan by the curved multiplanar reformatted imaging. (authors)

  9. [Diagnosis and treatment of rib fracture during spontaneous vaginal delivery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jovanović, Nebojša; Ristovska, Nataša; Bogdanović, Zorica; Petronijević, Miloš; Opalić, Jasna; Plećaš, Darko

    2013-01-01

    Progress of labor in multiparous women usually is not accompanied with risk of any kind of birth trauma. We report a very rare case of rib fracture in a neonate during vaginal delivery in the 39/40 week of gestation. The expulsion started spontaneously without any manipulation from the obstetrician. Live male newborn was delivered 4650 g. in weight, 55 cm long, with head circumference of 39 cm, Apgar score 9. The child was immediately examined by the neonatologist. Crepitations were palpable over the left hemithorax, and auscultatory on the left side inspiratory cracks. Finding was suspicious for rib fracture on the left side posteriorly and brachial plexus palsy, while other findings were normal. X-ray finding was inconclusive, but suspicious for fracture of the 4th, 5th, and 6th left rib posteriorly, without dislocation of bone fragments. There were no signs of pneumothorax. Dorsal position of the newborn was considered sufficient, accompanied with analgetics. X-ray was scheduled in a week because formation of the calus would be the only objective sign of previous rib fracture. On the control X-ray fracture lines were clearly visible on the 3rd, 4th, 5th 6th and 7th rib posteriorly, without dislocation of bone fragments with initial calus formation. The child was discharged from hospital in good condition after two weeks, for further outpatient care. With timely diagnostics of this very rare intrapartal fracture, adequate treatment, dorsal position and close control of clinical condition of the newborn, serious and potentially life threatening complications can be avoided.

  10. Diagnosis and treatment of rib fracture during spontaneous vaginal delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovanović Nebojša

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Progress of labor in multiparous women usually is not accompanied with risk of any kind of birth trauma. Case Outline. We report a very rare case of rib fracture in a neonate during vaginal delivery in the 39/40 week of gestation. The expulsion started spontaneously without any manipulation from the obstetrician. Live male newborn was delivered 4650 g. in weight, 55 cm long, with head circumference of 39 cm, Apgar score 9. The child was immediately examined by the neonatologist. Crepitations were palpable over the left hemithorax, and auscultatory on the left side inspiratory cracks. Finding was suspicious for rib fracture on the left side posteriorly and brachial plexus palsy, while other findings were normal. X­ray finding was inconclusive, but suspicious for fracture of the 4th, 5th, and 6th left rib posteriorly, without dislocation of bone fragments. There were no signs of pneumothorax. Dorsal position of the newborn was considered sufficient, accompanied with analgetics. X­ray was scheduled in a week because formation of the calus would be the only objective sign of previous rib fracture. On the control X­ray fracture lines were clearly visible on the 3rd, 4th, 5th, 6th and 7th rib posteriorly, without dislocation of bone fragments with initial calus formation. The child was discharged from hospital in good condition after two weeks, for further outpatient care. Conclusion. With timely diagnostics of this very rare intrapartal fracture, adequate treatment, dorsal position and close control of clinical condition of the newborn, serious and potentially life threatening complications can be avoided.

  11. Cough-induced rib fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sano, Atsushi; Tashiro, Ken; Fukuda, Tsutomu

    2015-10-01

    Occasionally, patients who complain of chest pain after the onset of coughing are diagnosed with rib fractures. We investigated the characteristics of cough-induced rib fractures. Between April 2008 and December 2013, 17 patients were referred to our hospital with chest pain after the onset of coughing. Rib radiography was performed, focusing on the location of the chest pain. When the patient had other signs and symptoms such as fever or persistent cough, computed tomography of the chest was carried out. We analyzed the data retrospectively. Rib fractures were found in 14 of the 17 patients. The age of the patients ranged from 14 to 86 years (median 39.5 years). Ten patients were female and 4 were male. Three patients had chronic lung disease. There was a single rib fracture in 9 patients, and 5 had two or more fractures. The middle and lower ribs were the most commonly involved; the 10th rib was fractured most frequently. Cough-induced rib fractures occur in every age group regardless of the presence or absence of underlying disease. Since rib fractures often occur in the lower and middle ribs, rib radiography is useful for diagnosis. © The Author(s) 2015.

  12. Conventional radiography or ultra sound for rib fracture diagnosis: a literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elham Pishbin

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Blunt chest trauma accounts for the majority of mortalities and morbidities in traumatized patients. Rib fractures are one of the most common chest wall injuries due to blunt chest trauma, which is estimated to occur in 10% of all traumatic injuries. Conventional radiography and ultra-sonography are two commonly methods used for rib fracture diagnosis with different accuracy. In this study, we described different methods used in diagnosis of injuries related to blunt chest trauma and we aimed to review several studies compared the diagnostic value of these methods.

  13. Rib fracture - aftercare

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000539.htm Rib fracture - aftercare To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. A rib fracture is a crack or break in one or ...

  14. Atraumatic First Rib Fracture

    OpenAIRE

    Koray Aydogdu

    2014-01-01

    Rib fractures are usually seen after a trauma, while atraumatic spontaneous rib fractures are quite rare. A first rib fracture identified in our 17 years old female patient who had not a history of trauma except lifting a heavy weight was examined in details in terms of the potential complications and followed-up for a long time. We presented our experience on this case with atraumatic first rib fracture that has different views for the etiology in light of the literature.

  15. Atraumatic First Rib Fracture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koray Aydogdu

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Rib fractures are usually seen after a trauma, while atraumatic spontaneous rib fractures are quite rare. A first rib fracture identified in our 17 years old female patient who had not a history of trauma except lifting a heavy weight was examined in details in terms of the potential complications and followed-up for a long time. We presented our experience on this case with atraumatic first rib fracture that has different views for the etiology in light of the literature.

  16. Spontaneous rib fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katrancioglu, Ozgur; Akkas, Yucel; Arslan, Sulhattin; Sahin, Ekber

    2015-07-01

    Other than trauma, rib fracture can occur spontaneously due to a severe cough or sneeze. In this study, patients with spontaneous rib fractures were analyzed according to age, sex, underlying pathology, treatment, and complications. Twelve patients who presented between February 2009 and February 2011 with spontaneous rib fracture were reviewed retrospectively. The patients' data were evaluated according to anamnesis, physical examination, and chest radiographs. The ages of the patients ranged from 34 to 77 years (mean 55.91 ± 12.20 years), and 7 (58.4%) were male. All patients had severe cough and chest pain. The fractures were most frequently between 4th and 9th ribs; multiple rib fractures were detected in 5 (41.7%) patients. Eight (66.7%) patients had chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, 2 (16.7%) had bronchial asthma, and 2 (16.7%) had osteoporosis. Bone densitometry revealed a high risk of bone fracture in all patients. Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease or bronchial asthma had been treated with high-dose steroids for over a year. Spontaneous rib fracture due to severe cough may occur in patients with osteoporosis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, or bronchial asthma, receiving long-term steroid therapy. If these patients have severe chest pain, chest radiography should be performed to check for bone lesions. © The Author(s) 2015.

  17. Feasibility of emergency department point-of-care ultrasound for rib fracture diagnosis in minor thoracic injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalande, Élizabeth; Guimont, Chantal; Émond, Marcel; Parent, Marc Charles; Topping, Claude; Kuimi, Brice Lionel Batomen; Boucher, Valérie; Le Sage, Natalie

    2017-05-01

    The main objective of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of emergency department (ED) point-of-care ultrasound (PoCUS) for rib fracture diagnosis in patients with minor thoracic injury (mTI). Secondary objectives were to 1) evaluate patients' pain during the PoCUS procedure, 2) identify the limitations of the use of PoCUS technique, and 3) compare the diagnosis obtained with PoCUS to radiography results. Adult patients who presented with clinical suspicion of rib fractures after mTI were included. All patients underwent PoCUS performed by emergency physicians (EPs) prior to a rib view X-ray. A visual analogue scale (VAS) ranging from 0 to 100 was used to ascertain feasibility, patients' pain and clinicians' degree of certitude. Feasibility was defined as a score of more than 50 on the VAS. We documented the radiologists' interpretation of rib view X-ray. Radiologists were blinded to the PoCUS results. Ninety-six patients were included. A majority (65%) of EPs concluded that the PoCUS technique to diagnose rib fracture was feasible (VAS score > 50). Median score for feasibility was 63. Median score was 31 (Interquartile range [IQR] 5-57) for patients' pain related to the PoCUS. The main limiting factor of the PoCUS technique was pain during patient examination (15%). PoCUS examination appears to be a feasible technique for a rib fracture diagnosis in the ED.

  18. Cough-induced rib fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanak, Viktor; Hartman, Thomas E; Ryu, Jay H

    2005-07-01

    To define the demographic, clinical, and radiological features of patients with cough-induced rib fractures and to assess potential risk factors. For this retrospective, single-center study, we identified all cases of cough-induced rib fractures diagnosed at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn, over a 9-year period between January 1, 1996, and January 31, 2005. Bone densitometry data from patients' medical records were analyzed, and T scores were used to classify patients into bone density categories. The mean +/- SD age of the 54 study patients at presentation was 55+/-17 years, and 42 patients (78%) were female. Patients presented with chest wall pain after onset of cough. Rib fracture was associated with chronic cough (> or =3 weeks' duration) in 85% of patients. Rib fractures were documented by chest radiography, rib radiography, computed tomography, or bone scan. Chest radiography had been performed in 52 patients and revealed rib fracture in 30 (58%). There were 112 fractured ribs in 54 patients. One half of patients had more than one fractured rib. Right-sided rib fractures alone were present in 17 patients (26 fractured ribs), left-sided in 23 patients (35 fractured ribs), and bilateral in 14 patients (51 fractured ribs). The most commonly fractured rib on both sides was rib 6. The fractures were most common at the lateral aspect of the rib cage. Bone densitometry was done in 26 patients and revealed osteopenia or osteoporosis in 17 (65%). Cough-induced rib fractures occur primarily in women with chronic cough. Middle ribs along the lateral aspect of the rib cage are affected most commonly. Although reduced bone density is likely a risk factor, cough-induced rib fractures can occur in the presence of normal bone density.

  19. Scintigraphic diagnosis of sport injuries: Multiple fractures of ribs by golf-players

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pohle, W.; Schuemichen, C.; Hoffmann, G.; Keul, J.; Kluemper, A.

    1981-01-01

    Three untrained golf-players suffered from pain in the dorsal region of the left thorax after some training hours. Three to four weeks after the pains had begun serial fractures of ribs were diagnosed by sup(99m)Tc-MDP bonescan-examinations. All fractures were localized near the costal angulus (paravertebral) of these ribs. The fractures are caused by manual tensions. The difficulties in timing the bone-scan and in identifying the morphologic substrate are demonstrated. It is recommended, that golf-players suffering from thoracic pain ought to be examined by bone scan. (orig.) [de

  20. Scintigraphic diagnosis of sport injuries: Multiple fractures of ribs by golf-players

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pohle, W; Schuemichen, C; Hoffmann, G; Keul, J; Kluemper, A

    1981-02-01

    Three untrained golf-players suffered from pain in the dorsal region of the left thorax after some training hours. Three to four weeks after the pains had begun serial fractures of ribs were diagnosed by sup(99m)Tc-MDP bonescan-examinations. All fractures were localized near the costal angulus (paravertebral) of these ribs. The fractures are caused by manual tensions. The difficulties in timing the bone-scan and in identifying the morphologic substrate are demonstrated. It is recommended, that golf-players suffering from thoracic pain ought to be examined by bone scan.

  1. Simple X-ray versus ultrasonography examination in blunt chest trauma: effective tools of accurate diagnosis and considerations for rib fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Eun Gu; Lee, Yunjung

    2016-12-01

    Simple radiography is the best diagnostic tool for rib fractures caused by chest trauma, but it has some limitations. Thus, other tools are also being used. The aims of this study were to investigate the effectiveness of ultrasonography (US) for identifying rib fractures and to identify influencing factors of its effectiveness. Between October 2003 and August 2007, 201 patients with blunt chest trauma were available to undergo chest radiographic and US examinations for diagnosis of rib fractures. The two modalities were compared in terms of effectiveness based on simple radiographic readings and US examination results. We also investigated the factors that influenced the effectiveness of US examination. Rib fractures were detected on radiography in 69 patients (34.3%) but not in 132 patients. Rib fractures were diagnosed by using US examination in 160 patients (84.6%). Of the 132 patients who showed no rib fractures on radiography, 92 showed rib fractures on US. Among the 69 patients of rib fracture detected on radiography, 33 had additional rib fractures detected on US. Of the patients, 76 (37.8%) had identical radiographic and US results, and 125 (62.2%) had fractures detected on US that were previously undetected on radiography or additional fractures detected on US. Age, duration until US examination, and fracture location were not significant influencing factors. However, in the group without detected fractures on radiography, US showed a more significant effectiveness than in the group with detected fractures on radiography ( P =0.003). US examination could detect unnoticed rib fractures on simple radiography. US examination is especially more effective in the group without detected fractures on radiography. More attention should be paid to patients with chest trauma who have no detected fractures on radiography.

  2. Simple X-ray versus ultrasonography examination in blunt chest trauma: effective tools of accurate diagnosis and considerations for rib fractures

    OpenAIRE

    Hwang, Eun Gu; Lee, Yunjung

    2016-01-01

    Simple radiography is the best diagnostic tool for rib fractures caused by chest trauma, but it has some limitations. Thus, other tools are also being used. The aims of this study were to investigate the effectiveness of ultrasonography (US) for identifying rib fractures and to identify influencing factors of its effectiveness. Between October 2003 and August 2007, 201 patients with blunt chest trauma were available to undergo chest radiographic and US examinations for diagnosis of rib fractu...

  3. Rib Fracture Fixation: Indications and Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senekjian, Lara; Nirula, Raminder

    2017-01-01

    Rib fractures are a frequently identified injury in the trauma population. Not only are multiple rib fractures painful, but they are associated with an increased risk of adverse outcomes. Pneumonia in particular can be devastating, especially to an elderly patient, but other complications such as prolonged ventilation and increased intensive care and hospital durations of stay have a negative impact on the patient. Computed tomography scan is the best modality to diagnosis rib fractures but the treatment of fractures is still evolving. Currently patient care involves a multidisciplinary approach that includes pain control, aggressive pulmonary therapy, and possibly surgical fixation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Pulmonary embolism developing after rib fracture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manabu Nemoto

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In this letter, we wanted to show that acute pulmonary embolism may be observed as a complication in patients with traumatic rib fracture and to emphasize on the importance the early diagnosis examinations in suspicious cases.

  5. ACR Appropriateness Criteria® rib fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Travis S; Kirsch, Jacobo; Kanne, Jeffrey P; Chung, Jonathan H; Donnelly, Edwin F; Ginsburg, Mark E; Heitkamp, Darel E; Kazerooni, Ella A; Ketai, Loren H; McComb, Barbara L; Parker, J Anthony; Ravenel, James G; Restrepo, Carlos Santiago; Saleh, Anthony G; Shah, Rakesh D; Steiner, Robert M; Suh, Robert D; Mohammed, Tan-Lucien H

    2014-11-01

    Rib fracture is the most common thoracic injury, present in 10% of all traumatic injuries and almost 40% of patients who sustain severe nonpenetrating trauma. Although rib fractures can produce significant morbidity, the diagnosis of associated complications (such as pneumothorax, hemothorax, pulmonary contusion, atelectasis, flail chest, cardiovascular injury, and injuries to solid and hollow abdominal organs) may have a more significant clinical impact. When isolated, rib fractures have a relatively low morbidity and mortality, and failure to detect isolated rib fractures does not necessarily alter patient management or outcome in uncomplicated cases. A standard posteroanterior chest radiograph should be the initial, and often the only, imaging test required in patients with suspected rib fracture after minor trauma. Detailed radiographs of the ribs rarely add additional information that would change treatment, and, although other imaging tests (eg, computed tomography, bone scan) have increased sensitivity for detection of rib fractures, there are little data to support their use. The American College of Radiology Appropriateness Criteria are evidence-based guidelines for specific clinical conditions that are reviewed every 3 years by a multidisciplinary expert panel. The guideline development and review process include an extensive analysis of current medical literature from peer-reviewed journals and the application of a well-established consensus methodology (modified Delphi) to rate the appropriateness of imaging and treatment procedures by the panel. In those instances in which evidence is lacking or not definitive, expert opinion may be used to recommend imaging or treatment.

  6. A Rare Entity: Bilateral First Rib Fractures Accompanying Bilateral Scapular Fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gultekin Gulbahar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available First rib fractures are scarce due to their well-protected anatomic locations. Bilateral first rib fractures accompanying bilateral scapular fractures are very rare, although they may be together with scapular and clavicular fractures. According to our knowledge, no case of bilateral first rib fractures accompanying bilateral scapular fractures has been reported, so we herein discussed the diagnosis, treatment, and complications of bone fractures due to thoracic trauma in bias of this rare entity.

  7. A Rare Entity: Bilateral First Rib Fractures Accompanying Bilateral Scapular Fractures

    OpenAIRE

    Gulbahar, Gultekin; Kaplan, Tevfik; Turker, Hasan Bozkurt; Gundogdu, Ahmet Gokhan; Han, Serdar

    2015-01-01

    First rib fractures are scarce due to their well-protected anatomic locations. Bilateral first rib fractures accompanying bilateral scapular fractures are very rare, although they may be together with scapular and clavicular fractures. According to our knowledge, no case of bilateral first rib fractures accompanying bilateral scapular fractures has been reported, so we herein discussed the diagnosis, treatment, and complications of bone fractures due to thoracic trauma in bias of this rare en...

  8. A Rare Entity: Bilateral First Rib Fractures Accompanying Bilateral Scapular Fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulbahar, Gultekin; Kaplan, Tevfik; Turker, Hasan Bozkurt; Gundogdu, Ahmet Gokhan; Han, Serdar

    2015-01-01

    First rib fractures are scarce due to their well-protected anatomic locations. Bilateral first rib fractures accompanying bilateral scapular fractures are very rare, although they may be together with scapular and clavicular fractures. According to our knowledge, no case of bilateral first rib fractures accompanying bilateral scapular fractures has been reported, so we herein discussed the diagnosis, treatment, and complications of bone fractures due to thoracic trauma in bias of this rare entity.

  9. Rib fracture following stereotactic body radiotherapy: a potential pitfall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanic, Sinisa; Boike, Thomas P; Rule, William G; Timmerman, Robert D

    2011-11-01

    Although the incidence of rib fractures after conventional radiotherapy is generally low (rib fractures are a relatively common complication of stereotactic body radiotherapy. For malignancy adjacent to the chest wall, the incidence of rib fractures after stereotactic body radiotherapy is as high as 10%. Unrecognized bone fractures can mimic bone metastases on bone scintigraphy, can lead to extensive workup, and can even lead to consideration of unnecessary systemic chemotherapy, as treatment decisions can be based on imaging findings alone. Nuclear medicine physicians and diagnostic radiologists should always consider rib fracture in the differential diagnosis.

  10. First Rib Fracture Resulting in Horner's Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, You-Cheng; Chuang, Ming-Tsung; Hsu, Chin-Hao; Tailor, Al-Rahim Abbasali; Lee, Jung-Shun

    2015-12-01

    First rib fractures and traumatic Horner's syndrome are both quite rare, which can make it difficult to properly diagnose the combination of these 2 conditions in the emergency department. These conditions may be associated with severe medical emergencies, such as ongoing carotid dissection. We present the case of a 33-year-old man who sustained fractures to his right second, third, and fourth ribs and a delay in the diagnosis of left Horner's syndrome after he was involved in a traffic accident. Left Horner's syndrome was caused by a left transverse fracture of the first rib. This fracture was not detected on chest radiographs and required a 3-dimensional reconstructed neck computed tomography scan for detection. WHY SHOULD AN EMERGENCY PHYSICIAN BE AWARE OF THIS?: In the diagnosis of carotid artery dissection, conventional angiography is the criterion standard but is considered invasive. CTA is less invasive, time-saving, and can show more anatomic structures in the neck in addition to the carotid arteries. It is a good screening diagnostic modality in the traumatology department. Although the treatments for Horner's syndrome and first rib fracture are conservative, the early diagnosis of both conditions can resolve the anxiety and uncertainty experienced by both doctors and patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Golfer's fracture of the ribs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, J. H.

    1980-01-01

    Golfer's fracture is stress fracture of the posterior portion of left 3, 4, 5, 6 or 7th ribs of golfer's, usually beginners,and it is considered due to exposure to unaccustomed severe exercise of this fascinating sport. Healing is usually uneventful, but possible complication may occur, because symptom is mild and golfers continue the exercise with physical therapy such as massage. Author report 4 cases of golfer's fracture, including 1 case complicated by platelike at electasis of lung.

  12. Golfer's fracture of the ribs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, J H [Seoul District Armed Forces General Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1980-06-15

    Golfer's fracture is stress fracture of the posterior portion of left 3, 4, 5, 6 or 7th ribs of golfer's, usually beginners,and it is considered due to exposure to unaccustomed severe exercise of this fascinating sport. Healing is usually uneventful, but possible complication may occur, because symptom is mild and golfers continue the exercise with physical therapy such as massage. Author report 4 cases of golfer's fracture, including 1 case complicated by platelike at electasis of lung.

  13. Epidural Analgesia after Rib Fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaw, Andrea A; Murry, Jason; Hoang, David; Chen, Kevin; Louy, Charles; Bloom, Matthew B; Melo, Nicolas; Alban, Rodrigo F; Margulies, Daniel R; Ley, Eric J

    2015-10-01

    Pain associated with rib fractures impairs respiratory function and increases pulmonary morbidity. The purpose of this study was to determine how epidural catheters alter mortality and complications in trauma patients. We performed a retrospective study involving adult blunt trauma patients with moderate-to-severe injuries from January 1, 2004 to December 31, 2013. During the 10-year period, 526 patients met the inclusion criteria; 43/526 (8%) patients had a catheter placed. Mean age of patients with epidural catheter (CATH) was higher compared with patients without epidural catheter (NOCATH) (54 vs 48 years, P = 0.021), Injury Severity Score was similar (26 CATH vs 27 NOCATH, P = 0.84), and CATH had higher mean rib fractures (7.4 vs 4.1, P ribs fractured. The epidural cohort had longer hospital LOS and decreased mortality. In contrast to other studies, DVT rates were increased in patients who received epidural catheters.

  14. Isolated rib fractures in geriatric patients

    OpenAIRE

    Elmistekawy, Elsayed M.; Hammad, Abd Almohsen M.

    2007-01-01

    Introduction: The goal of this study was to investigate the short-term outcomes in patients older than 60 years with isolated rib fractures and admitted to emergency hospital. Materials and Methods: This study included patients who were 60 years old or more and sustained blunt chest injury and had isolated rib fractures. The following data were obtained from the medical records: age, gender, number of fracture ribs, side of fracture ribs, mechanism and nature of injury, preexisting medical...

  15. Radiation Induced Rib Fractures on Bone Scan after Breast Cancer Surgery and Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hae Won; Won, Kyoung Sook; Zeon, Seok Kil; Kim, Jin Hee

    2009-01-01

    This study is to evaluate rib fractures on bone scan in breast cancer patients treated with breast cancer surgery and radiation therapy and to evaluate its relation with radiation therapy and operation modality. Two hundred seventy cases that underwent serial bone scan after breast cancer surgery and radiation therapy were enrolled. Bone scan and chest CT findings of rib fracture were analyzed. The rib uptake was seen in 74 of 270 cases (27.4%) on bone scan and 50 cases (18.5%) were confirmed to have rib fracture by chest CT. The rate of modified radical mastectomy in patients with rib fracture was significantly higher than that in patients without rib fracture (66.0% vs. 27.0%, p=0.000). The rate of additional radiation therapy to axillar or supraclavicular regions in patients with rib fracture was significantly higher than that in patients without rib fracture (62.0% vs. 28.6%, p=0.000). Rib fracture was seen most frequently at 1-2 years after radiation therapy (51.9%) and single rib fracture was seen most frequently (55.2%). Of total 106 rib fractures, focal rib uptake was seen in 94 ribs (88.7%) and diffuse rib uptake was seen in 12 ribs (11.3%). On one year follow-up bone scan, complete resolution of rib uptake was seen in 15 ribs (14.2%). On chest CT, the rate of fracture line in ribs with intense uptake was significantly higher than that in ribs with mild or moderate uptake (p=0.000). The rate of presence of fracture line in ribs with focal uptake was significantly higher than that in ribs with diffuse uptake (p=0.001). Rib fracture in breast cancer patients after radiation therapy was related to radiation portal and operation modality. It should be interpreted carefully as a differential diagnosis of bone metastasis

  16. Radiation Induced Rib Fractures on Bone Scan after Breast Cancer Surgery and Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hae Won; Won, Kyoung Sook; Zeon, Seok Kil; Kim, Jin Hee [Keimyung University, School of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-08-15

    This study is to evaluate rib fractures on bone scan in breast cancer patients treated with breast cancer surgery and radiation therapy and to evaluate its relation with radiation therapy and operation modality. Two hundred seventy cases that underwent serial bone scan after breast cancer surgery and radiation therapy were enrolled. Bone scan and chest CT findings of rib fracture were analyzed. The rib uptake was seen in 74 of 270 cases (27.4%) on bone scan and 50 cases (18.5%) were confirmed to have rib fracture by chest CT. The rate of modified radical mastectomy in patients with rib fracture was significantly higher than that in patients without rib fracture (66.0% vs. 27.0%, p=0.000). The rate of additional radiation therapy to axillar or supraclavicular regions in patients with rib fracture was significantly higher than that in patients without rib fracture (62.0% vs. 28.6%, p=0.000). Rib fracture was seen most frequently at 1-2 years after radiation therapy (51.9%) and single rib fracture was seen most frequently (55.2%). Of total 106 rib fractures, focal rib uptake was seen in 94 ribs (88.7%) and diffuse rib uptake was seen in 12 ribs (11.3%). On one year follow-up bone scan, complete resolution of rib uptake was seen in 15 ribs (14.2%). On chest CT, the rate of fracture line in ribs with intense uptake was significantly higher than that in ribs with mild or moderate uptake (p=0.000). The rate of presence of fracture line in ribs with focal uptake was significantly higher than that in ribs with diffuse uptake (p=0.001). Rib fracture in breast cancer patients after radiation therapy was related to radiation portal and operation modality. It should be interpreted carefully as a differential diagnosis of bone metastasis.

  17. Bilateral first rib fractures: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dilip Amonkar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available From the time first rib fractures were first described in 1869, they have been a source of anxiety to attendant trauma surgeons working in the accident and emergency department of major hospitals. First rib fractures are associated with major thoracic trauma and may involve injury to subclavian vessels, brachial plexus, and mediastinal structures. But these complications are more often seen following unilateral first rib fractures. In contrast, bilateral first rib fractures may follow insignificant trauma, suggesting a different mechanism involved. Serious vascular injuries and brachial plexus injuries are rare and angiograms for evaluation of these patients aren′t routinely warranted. The case that we report illustrates this very point.

  18. Lower thoracic rib stress fractures in baseball pitchers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerrie, Brayden J; Harris, Joshua D; Lintner, David M; McCulloch, Patrick C

    2016-01-01

    Stress fractures of the first rib on the dominant throwing side are well-described in baseball pitchers; however, lower thoracic rib fractures are not commonly recognized. While common in other sports such as rowing, there is scant literature on these injuries in baseball. Intercostal muscle strains are commonly diagnosed in baseball pitchers and have a nearly identical presentation but also a highly variable healing time. The diagnosis of a rib stress fracture can predict a more protracted recovery. This case series presents two collegiate baseball pitchers on one team during the same season who were originally diagnosed with intercostal muscle strains, which following magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were found to have actually sustained lower thoracic rib stress fractures. The first sustained a stress fracture of the posterior aspect of the right 8th rib on the dominant arm side, while the second presented with a left-sided 10th rib stress fracture on the nondominant arm side. In both cases, MRI was used to visualize the fractures as plain radiographs are insensitive and commonly negative early in patient presentation. Patients were treated with activity modification, and symptomatic management for 4-6 weeks with a graduated return to throwing and competition by 8-10 weeks. The repetitive high stresses incurred by pitching may cause either dominant or nondominant rib stress fractures and this should be included in the differential diagnosis of thoracic injuries in throwers. It is especially important that athletic trainers and team physicians consider this diagnosis, as rib fractures may have a protracted course and delayed return to play. Additionally, using the appropriate imaging techniques to establish an accurate diagnosis can help inform return-to-play decisions, which have important practical applications in baseball, such as roster management and eligibility.

  19. [Analysis of 163 rib fractures by imaging examination].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Tian-fu; Wang, Chao-chao

    2014-12-01

    To explore the applications of imaging examination on rib fracture sites in forensic identification. Features including the sites, numbers of the processed imaging examination and the first radiological technology at diagnosis in 56 cases of rib fractures from 163 injuries were retrospectively analyzed. The detection rate of the rib fractures within 14 days was 65.6%. The initial detection rate of anterior rib fracture proceeded by X-ray was 76.2%, then 90.5% detected at a second time X-ray, while the detection rate of CT was 66.7% and 80.0%, respectively. The initial detec- tion rate of rib fracture in axillary section proceeded by X-ray was 27.6%, then 58.6% detected at a second time X-ray, while the detection rate of CT was 54.3% and 80.4%, respectively. The initial detection rate of posterior rib fracture proceeded by X-ray was 63.6%, then 81.8% detected at a second time X-ray, while the detection rate of CT was 50.0% and 70.0%, respectively. It is important to pay attention to the use of combined imaging examinations and the follow-up results. In the cases of suspicious for rib fracture in axillary section, CT examination is suggested in such false X-ray negative cases.

  20. Novel classification system of rib fractures observed in infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, Jennifer C; Derrick, Sharon M; Wiersema, Jason M; Pinto, Deborrah C; Greeley, Christopher; Donaruma-Kwoh, Marcella; Bista, Bibek

    2013-03-01

    Rib fractures are considered highly suspicious for nonaccidental injury in the pediatric clinical literature; however, a rib fracture classification system has not been developed. As an aid and impetus for rib fracture research, we developed a concise schema for classifying rib fracture types and fracture location that is applicable to infants. The system defined four fracture types (sternal end, buckle, transverse, and oblique) and four regions of the rib (posterior, posterolateral, anterolateral, and anterior). It was applied to all rib fractures observed during 85 consecutive infant autopsies. Rib fractures were found in 24 (28%) of the cases. A total of 158 rib fractures were identified. The proposed schema was adequate to classify 153 (97%) of the observed fractures. The results indicate that the classification system is sufficiently robust to classify rib fractures typically observed in infants and should be used by researchers investigating infant rib fractures. © 2013 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  1. Clinical Utility of Chest Computed Tomography in Patients with Rib Fractures CT Chest and Rib Fractures

    OpenAIRE

    Chapman, Brandon C.; Overbey, Douglas M.; Tesfalidet, Feven; Schramm, Kristofer; Stovall, Robert T.; French, Andrew; Johnson, Jeffrey L.; Burlew, Clay C.; Barnett, Carlton; Moore, Ernest E.; Pieracci, Fredric M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Chest CT is more sensitive than a chest X-ray (CXR) in diagnosing rib fractures; however, the clinical significance of these fractures remains unclear. Objectives The purpose of this study was to determine the added diagnostic use of chest CT performed after CXR in patients with either known or suspected rib fractures secondary to blunt trauma. Methods Retrospective coho...

  2. A case of pathological rib fractures: focal osteolysis or osteoporosis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrbanić, T S L; Novak, S; Sestan, B; Tudor, A; Gulan, G

    2008-03-01

    This paper reports on a unique, previously unreported, successful outcome in the case of a patient with focal osteolytic lesions of the ribs as a first sign of osteoporosis. The lesions were detected by chance after acute cough-induced rib fractures were seen on plain chest radiographs. The diagnosis had to be approached as a diagnosis of exclusion since known causes of the osteolytic process had to be eliminated. The authors describe multiple focal osteolytic lesions with rib fractures appearing in a pattern that could be confused with metastases. Laboratory results were normal. Final diagnosis was based on plain radiography, bone scan and bone densitometry. Pharmacomedical treatments for osteoporosis were applied. The patient was observed between the year 2000 and 2005. Five years later radiological and bone scintigraphy revealed resolution of the lesion. We conclude that osteoporosis should be included in the differential diagnosis of asymptomatic focal osteolysis of the ribs with rib fractures as a complication of acute cough. The case suggests that focal osteolytic lesions of the ribs may regress over time and become scintigraphically inactive.

  3. Delayed pneumothorax complicating minor rib fracture after chest trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Ming-Shian; Huang, Yao-Kuang; Liu, Yun-Hen; Liu, Hui-Ping; Kao, Chiung-Lun

    2008-06-01

    Pneumothorax (PTX) after trauma is a preventable cause of death. Drainage procedures such as chest tube insertion have been traditionally advocated to prevent fatal tension PTX. We evaluated the safety of close observation in patients with delayed PTX complicating rib fracture after minor chest trauma. Adult patients (>18 years) with a diagnosis of chest trauma and 3 or fewer fractured ribs were reviewed. Case patients were divided according to age, location and number of fractured ribs, mechanism of trauma, and initial pulmonary complication after thoracic trauma for comparative analysis. There were 207 male (70.2%) and 88 female (29.8%) patients whose ages ranged from 18 to 93 years (median, 55 years). The mechanisms of trauma were a motor vehicle accident in 207 patients, falls in 66, pedestrian injury in 10, and assaults in 14. Ninety-five patients sustained 1 rib fracture, 95 had 2 rib fractures, and 105 suffered 3 rib fractures. Right-sided injury occurred in 164 cases, left-sided injury did in 127, and bilateral injury did in 4. The most frequent location of rib fractures was from the fourth rib to the ninth rib. The initial pulmonary complications after trauma were PTX in 16 patients, hemothorax in 43, pneumohemothorax in 14, lung contusion in 75, and isolated subcutaneous emphysema (SubcEmph) in 33. Thirty percent of the patients (n = 5/16) who presented with traumatic PTX were observed safely without drainage. Delayed PTX was recorded in 16 patients, occurring mostly during the first 2 days of their admission. Associated extrathoracic injury was recorded in 189 patients. The mean hospital stay of the patients was 7.66 days. Longer hospital stay was related to increasing number of fractured ribs, need for thoracic drainage, and the presence of associated extrathoracic injury. The mortality rate for the entire group was 2%. The presence of SubcEmph was the only risk factor associated with the development of delayed PTX. Patients sustaining blunt chest

  4. Isolated rib fractures in geriatric patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elmistekawy Elsayed

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The goal of this study was to investigate the short-term outcomes in patients older than 60 years with isolated rib fractures and admitted to emergency hospital. Materials and Methods: This study included patients who were 60 years old or more and sustained blunt chest injury and had isolated rib fractures. The following data were obtained from the medical records: age, gender, number of fracture ribs, side of fracture ribs, mechanism and nature of injury, preexisting medical conditions, complications, admission to intensive care unit (ICU, need for mechanical ventilation, length of ICU and hospital stay and mortality. Results: For the study, 39 patients who were 60 years old or more and admitted to the hospital because of isolated rib fractures were enrolled. There were 28 males (71.7% and 11 females (28.3% with mean age of (66.84 ± 4.7 years. No correlation was found between comorbidities and hospital outcomes except in those who were diabetic (P-value = 0.005 and those with chronic lung disease (P-value = 0.006. Pulmonary complications were the most frequent complications encountered in those patients. Pulmonary complications were: lung contusion in 8 patients (20.5% and pulmonary infection in 6 patients (15.8%. Conclusion: Elderly patients sustaining blunt chest trauma had significant morbidity and potential for mortality.

  5. Rib fracture in a horse during an endurance race

    OpenAIRE

    Trigo, Pablo; Muñoz, Ana; Castejón, Francisco; Riber, Cristina; Hassel, Diana M.

    2011-01-01

    We describe a fatal case, in which a horse suffered a fall and as a consequence, rib fractures. Diagnosis was made postmortem and the horse died without showing clear signs of respiratory dysfunction. The retrospective reports of injuries can be important to reduce these traumatic events and to avoid fatalities.

  6. Rib fracture in a horse during an endurance race.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trigo, Pablo; Muñoz, Ana; Castejón, Francisco; Riber, Cristina; Hassel, Diana M

    2011-11-01

    We describe a fatal case, in which a horse suffered a fall and as a consequence, rib fractures. Diagnosis was made postmortem and the horse died without showing clear signs of respiratory dysfunction. The retrospective reports of injuries can be important to reduce these traumatic events and to avoid fatalities.

  7. Clinical Utility of Chest Computed Tomography in Patients with Rib Fractures CT Chest and Rib Fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Brandon C; Overbey, Douglas M; Tesfalidet, Feven; Schramm, Kristofer; Stovall, Robert T; French, Andrew; Johnson, Jeffrey L; Burlew, Clay C; Barnett, Carlton; Moore, Ernest E; Pieracci, Fredric M

    2016-12-01

    Chest CT is more sensitive than a chest X-ray (CXR) in diagnosing rib fractures; however, the clinical significance of these fractures remains unclear. The purpose of this study was to determine the added diagnostic use of chest CT performed after CXR in patients with either known or suspected rib fractures secondary to blunt trauma. Retrospective cohort study of blunt trauma patients with rib fractures at a level I trauma center that had both a CXR and a CT chest. The CT finding of ≥ 3 additional fractures in patients with ≤ 3 rib fractures on CXR was considered clinically meaningful. Student's t-test and chi-square analysis were used for comparison. We identified 499 patients with rib fractures: 93 (18.6%) had CXR only, 7 (1.4%) had chest CT only, and 399 (79.9%) had both CXR and chest CT. Among these 399 patients, a total of 1,969 rib fractures were identified: 1,467 (74.5%) were missed by CXR. The median number of additional fractures identified by CT was 3 (range, 4 - 15). Of 212 (53.1%) patients with a clinically meaningful increase in the number of fractures, 68 patients underwent one or more clinical interventions: 36 SICU admissions, 20 pain catheter placements, 23 epidural placements, and 3 SSRF. Additionally, 70 patients had a chest tube placed for retained hemothorax or occult pneumothorax. Overall, 138 patients (34.5%) had a change in clinical management based upon CT chest. The chest X-ray missed ~75% of rib fractures seen on chest CT. Although patients with a clinical meaningful increase in the number of rib fractures were more likely to be admitted to the intensive care unit, there was no associated improvement in pulmonary outcomes.

  8. [Internal fixation treatment of multiple rib fractures with absorbable rib-connecting-pins under epidural anesthesia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jinliang; Li, Keyao; Ju, Zhenlong; Bai, Yan

    2011-03-01

    To study the indications, methods and experience of absorbable rib-connecting-pins fixation in the treatment of multiple rib fractures. 52 cases with multiple rib fractures were performed internal fixation with absorbable rib-connecting-pins under epidural anesthesia. All cases were followed up for 1 to 12 months, with an average of 5 months. All fractures were achieved healing in 3 to 6 months after the operation and were not found chest wall deformity. Absorbable rib-connecting-pins fixation is a simple and effective method and worthies recommending to perform operation for the appropriate cases with multiple rib fractures.

  9. Case report: clinical and postmortem findings in four cows with rib fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Ueli; Warislohner, Sonja; Hetzel, Udo; Nuss, Karl

    2017-02-06

    Published reports of rib fractures in adult cattle are limited to the occurrence of chronic rib swellings caused by calluses, which are unremarkable from a clinical standpoint, whereas studies identifying clinical signs of rib fractures were not found in a literature search. This report describes the clinical and postmortem findings in four cows with rib fractures. The 13th rib was fractured in three cows and the 11th rib in the remaining cow; three fractures were on the right and one on the left side. Clinical and postmortem findings varied considerably, and percussion of the rib cage elicited a pain response in only one cow. One cow had generalised peritonitis because of perforation of the rumen by the fractured rib. One cow was recumbent because of pain and became a downer cow, and two other cows had bronchopneumonia, which was a sequel to osteomyelitis of the fracture site in one. In the absence of a history of trauma, the diagnosis of rib fracture based on clinical signs alone is difficult. Although rib fractures undoubtedly are very painful, the four cases described in this report suggest that they are difficult to diagnose in cattle because associated clinical signs are nonspecific.

  10. Morbidity, mortality, associated injuries, and management of traumatic rib fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Cheau-Feng Lin

    2016-06-01

    Conclusion: The severity of traumatic rib fractures was identified in this study. Therefore, a trauma team needs better preparation to provide effective treatment strategies when encountering thoracic trauma patients, especially patients who are older and have rib fractures.

  11. Bilateral First Rib Stress Fractures in a Basketball Player

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abidin (Radyoloji Kilincer

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available I read the article published by Aydogdu et al with a great interest. I congratulate them for this successfully written case report. Additionally, I want to focus an important point about the case they presented is that the diagnosis in that case is likely stress fracture. It is understood from the text and title that they avoided to make a diagnosis of stress fracture in the case, despite of history of lifting heavy weights for three days. And also I decided to mention through this article to an example of our case with bilateral first rib old fractures.

  12. Rib fractures induced by coughing: an unusual cause of acute chest pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Maeseneer, M; De Mey, J; Debaere, C; Meysman, M; Osteaux, M

    2000-03-01

    We report three patients with stress fractures of the ribs induced by coughing. Standard radiographs of the chest and ribs did not reveal evidence of rib fractures in any of the patients. Bone scintigraphy, performed 1 to 2 weeks after initial onset of symptoms, showed a focal area of increased uptake along the chest wall in all cases. Thin section angulated helical CT directly visualized the subtle rib fractures. Initial diagnosis of a cough-induced fracture of the rib may be difficult because of the associated underlying disorder, and unnecessary examinations are commonly performed. Identification of a cough-induced fracture of the rib using helical CT may be clinically important to avoid unnecessary concern and additional examinations.

  13. Rib fractures and their association With solid organ injury: higher rib fractures have greater significance for solid organ injury screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostas, Jack W; Lively, Timothy B; Brevard, Sidney B; Simmons, Jon D; Frotan, Mohammad A; Gonzalez, Richard P

    2017-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify patients with rib injuries who were at risk for solid organ injury. A retrospective chart review was performed of all blunt trauma patients with rib fractures during the period from July 2007 to July 2012. Data were analyzed for association of rib fractures and solid organ injury. In all, 1,103 rib fracture patients were identified; 142 patients had liver injuries with 109 (77%) associated right rib fractures. Right-sided rib fractures with highest sensitivity for liver injury were middle rib segment (5 to 8) and lower segment (9 to 12) with liver injury sensitivities of 68% and 43%, respectively (P rib fractures. Left middle segment rib fractures and lower segment rib fractures had sensitivities of 80% and 63% for splenic injury, respectively (P Rib fractures higher in the thoracic cage have significant association with solid organ injury. Using rib fractures from middle plus lower segments as indication for abdominal screening will significantly improve rib fracture sensitivity for identification of solid organ injury. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Factors affecting visualization of posterior rib fractures in abused infants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kleinman, P.K.; Adams, V.I.; Blackbourne, B.D.; Marks, S.C.

    1987-01-01

    Rib fractures in abused infants commonly occur in the posterior rib arcs. Fractures occurring near the costovertebral articulations are usually identified radiographically only once callus has formed. To assess the factors influencing the visibility of fractures near the costovertical articulations, the authors studied 103 posterior rib fractures occurring in 16 abused infants. Radiologic findings were correlated with CT findings and pathologic material from nine ribs in four patients. The limited visibility of fractures relates to (1) the frequent superimposition of the transverse process over the rib fracture site, (2) a fracture line that crosses at an obliquity to the x-ray beam, and (3) nondisplacement of rib fragments due to preservation of the posterior periosteum. Fresh rib fractures invisible on a frontal projection may be clearly defined on axial CT scans, or on postmortem radiographs. A knowledge of the factors influencing the visibility of these important injuries is useful in planning an appropriate diagnostic evaluation of suspected infant abuse

  15. The contribution of rib fractures to chronic pain and disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordy, Stephanie; Fabricant, Loic; Ham, Bruce; Mullins, Richard; Mayberry, John

    2014-05-01

    The contribution of rib fractures to chronic pain and disability is not well described. Two hundred three patients with rib fractures were followed for 6 months. Chronic pain was assessed using the McGill Pain Questionnaire Pain Rating Index and Present Pain Intensity (PPI) scales. Disability was defined as a decrease in work or functional status. The prevalence of chronic pain was 22% and disability was 53%. Acute PPI predicted chronic pain. Associated injuries, bilateral rib fractures, injury severity score, and number of rib fractures were not predictive of chronic pain. No acute injury characteristics were predictive of disability. Among 89 patients with isolated rib fractures, the prevalence of chronic pain was 28% and of disability was 40%. No injury characteristics predicted chronic pain. Bilateral rib fractures and acute PPI predicted disability. The contribution of rib fractures to chronic pain and disability is significant but unpredictable with conventional injury descriptors. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. An analysis of 214 cases of rib fractures

    OpenAIRE

    Karadayi, Sule; Nadir, Aydin; Sahin, Ekber; Celik, Burcin; Arslan, Sulhattin; Kaptanoglu, Melih

    2011-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Rib fractures are the most common type of injury associated with trauma to the thorax. In this study, we investigated whether morbidity and mortality rates increased in correlation with the number of fractured ribs. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Data from 214 patients with rib fractures who applied or were referred to our clinic between January 2007 and December 2008 were retrospectively evaluated. The patients were allocated into three groups according to the number of fractures: 1) p...

  17. The Place of Ultrasonography in the Evaluation of Rib Fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fulya Bakılan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate whether ultrasonography is superior to chest x-ray in detecting rib fractures in patients with minor blunt chest trauma and chest pain. Materials and Methods: Ultrasonography findings of 32 patients with minor blunt chest trauma showing no evidence of a rib fracture on anteroposterior chest x-rays, were documented. Presence of cortical discontinuities, acoustic shadows, reverberation artifacts, and hematoma by ultrasonography was proposed as the diagnostic criteria for detecting the rib fracture. Results: Rib fracture was detected in 20 patients (62.5% according to ultrasonography results. A mildly displaced fracture was detected in 7 patients (35%, hematoma was detected in 3 patients (15% and multiple fractures (in 5th, 6th, 7th, and 8th ribs were detected in 1 patient (5%. Conclusion: The results of our study showed that ultrasonography is superior to chest x-ray, in detecting rib fractures.

  18. Rib fracture repair: indications, technical issues, and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nirula, Raminder; Diaz, Jose J; Trunkey, Donald D; Mayberry, John C

    2009-01-01

    Rib fracture repair has been performed at selected centers around the world for more than 50 years; however, the operative indications have not been established and are considered controversial. The outcome of a strictly nonoperative approach may not be optimal. Potential indications for rib fracture repair include flail chest, painful, movable rib fractures refractory to conventional pain management, chest wall deformity/defect, rib fracture nonunion, and during thoracotomy for other traumatic indication. Rib fracture repair is technically challenging secondary to the human rib's relatively thin cortex and its tendency to fracture obliquely. Nonetheless, several effective repair systems have been developed. Future directions for progress on this important surgical problem include the development of minimally invasive techniques and the conduct of multicenter, randomized trials.

  19. Trial of Injected Liposomal Bupivacaine vs Bupivacaine Infusion After Surgical Stabilization of Rib Fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-06

    Drug Effect; Rib Fractures; Rib Trauma; Surgical Procedure, Unspecified; Pain; Catheter (Other); Nerve Pain; Local Infiltration; Anesthesia, Local; Intercostal Rib; Opioid Dependence; Chest Injury Trauma; Pneumonia

  20. Rib fractures in blunt chest trauma - associated thoracic injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iv. Dimitrov

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE. The aim of our retrospective study was to analyze the patterns of associated thoracic injuries in patients underwent blunt chest trauma and rib fractures. METHODS. The study included 212 patients with rib fractures due to blunt thoracic trauma. The mechanism of trauma, the type of rib fracture and the type of associated injuries were analyzed. RESULTS. The patients were divided in two groups according to the number of fractured ribs-group I included the patients with up to two fractured ribs (72 patients-33,9%, and group II – with ≥3 fractured ribs (140 patients-66,1%. Associated chest injuries were present in 36 of the patients from group I (50%, and in 133 patients from group II (95%. Pulmonary contusion was the most common intrathoracicinjurie-65,6% of the cases. The mean hospital stay was 8, 7 days. The lethality rate was 16,9% -all of them due to the associated chest injuries. CONCLUSIONS. The mortality related to rib fractures is affected by the associated thoracic injuries, the advanced age, and the number of fractured ribs.

  1. Surgical Management of Rib Fractures: Strategies and Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jong, M B; Kokke, M C; Hietbrink, F; Leenen, L P H

    2014-06-01

    Rib fractures can cause significant problems in trauma patients, often resulting in pain and difficulty with respiration. To prevent pulmonary complications and decrease the morbidity and mortality rates of patients with rib fractures, currently there is a trend to provide surgical management of patients with flail chest. However, the indications for rib fracture fixation require further specification. Past and current strategies are described according to a review of the medical literature. A systematic review was performed including current indications for rib fracture fixation. MEDLINE (2000-2013) was searched, as well as Embase (2000-2013) and Cochrane Databases, using the keywords rib, fracture, fixation, plate, repair, and surgery. Three retrospective studies were found that described different techniques for rib fracture fixation. The results demonstrated a reduced number of ventilation days, decreased long-term morbidity and pain, and satisfactory rehabilitation after surgical treatment. In addition to flail chest, age, Injury Severity Score, and the number of rib fractures were important predictive factors for morbidity and mortality. Surgical rib fracture fixation might be indicated in a broader range of cases than is currently performed. Prospective randomized trials are needed for further confirmation. © The Finnish Surgical Society 2014.

  2. Upper extremity and rib stress fractures in a child

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moon, B.S.; Price, C.T.; Campbell, J.B.

    1998-01-01

    Stress fractures in children are rare compared with the incidence in [ults. This report describes an 11-year-old girl with stress fractures of the acromion, clavicle, and first rib on the left and contralateral fractures of the first and second ribs. It was eventually discovered that these fractures were caused by a nervous tic consisting of repetitive, vigorous shrugging and translation of the shoulders. (orig.)

  3. Rib fixation for severe chest deformity due to multiple rib fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igai, Hitoshi; Kamiyoshihara, Mitsuhiro; Nagashima, Toshiteru; Ohtaki, Yoichi

    2012-01-01

    The operative indications for rib fracture repair have been a matter of debate. However, several reports have suggested that flail chest, pain on respiration, and chest deformity/defect are potential conditions for rib fracture repair. We describe our experience of rib fixation in a patient with severe chest deformity due to multiple rib fractures. A 70-year-old woman was admitted with right-sided multiple rib fractures (2nd to 7th) and marked chest wall deformity without flailing caused by an automobile accident. Collapse of the chest wall was observed along the middle anterior axillary line. At 11 days after the injury, surgery was performed to repair the chest deformity, as it was considered to pose a risk of restrictive impairment of pulmonary function or chronic intercostal pain in the future. Operative findings revealed marked displacement of the superior 4 ribs, from the 2nd to the 5th, and collapse of the osseous chest wall towards the thoracic cavity. After exposure of the fracture regions, ribs fixations were performed using rib staplers. The total operation time was 90 minutes, and the collapsed portion of the chest wall along the middle anterior axillary line was reconstructed successfully.

  4. Quality of life after major trauma with multiple rib fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marasco, Silvana; Lee, Geraldine; Summerhayes, Robyn; Fitzgerald, Mark; Bailey, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Rib fractures are a common injury presenting to major trauma centres and community hospitals. Aside from the acute impact of rib fracture injury, longer-term morbidity of pain, disability and deformity have been described. Despite this, the mainstay of management for the vast majority of rib fracture injuries remains supportive only with analgesia and where required respiratory support. This study aimed to document the long-term quality of life in a cohort of major trauma patients with rib fracture injury over 24 months. Retrospective review (July 2006-July 2011) of 397 major trauma patients admitted to The Alfred Hospital with rib fractures and not treated with operative rib fixation. The main outcome measures were quality of life over 24 months post injury assessed using the Glasgow Outcome Scale Extended and SF12 health assessment forms and a pain questionnaire. Assessment over 24 months of major trauma patients with multiple rib fractures demonstrated significantly lower quality of life compared with published Australian norms at all time points measured. Return to work rates were poor with only 71% of those who were working prior to their accident, returning to any work. This study demonstrates a significant reduction in quality of life for rib fracture patients requiring admission to hospital, which does not return to the level of Australian norms for at least two years. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. What Accounts for Rib Fractures in Older Adults?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa-Ann Wuermser

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available To address the epidemiology of rib fractures, an age- and sex-stratified random sample of 699 Rochester, Minnesota, adults age 21–93 years was followed in a long-term prospective study. Bone mineral density (BMD was assessed at baseline, and fractures were ascertained by periodic interview and medical record review. During 8560 person-years of followup (median, 13.9 years, 56 subjects experienced 67 rib fracture episodes. Risk factors for falling predicted rib fractures as well as BMD, but both were strongly age-related. After age-adjustment, BMD was associated with rib fractures in women but not men. Importantly, rib fractures attributed to severe trauma were associated with BMD in older individuals of both sexes. Self-reported heavy alcohol use doubled fracture risk but did not achieve significance due to limited statistical power. Bone density, along with heavy alcohol use and other risk factors for falling, contributes to the risk of rib fractures, but no one factor predominates. Older women with rib fractures, regardless of cause, should be considered for an osteoporosis evaluation, and strategies to prevent falling should be considered in both sexes.

  6. What Accounts for Rib Fractures in Older Adults?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuermser, Lisa-Ann; Achenbach, Sara J.; Amin, Shreyasee; Khosla, Sundeep; Melton, L. Joseph

    2011-01-01

    To address the epidemiology of rib fractures, an age- and sex-stratified random sample of 699 Rochester, Minnesota, adults age 21–93 years was followed in a long-term prospective study. Bone mineral density (BMD) was assessed at baseline, and fractures were ascertained by periodic interview and medical record review. During 8560 person-years of followup (median, 13.9 years), 56 subjects experienced 67 rib fracture episodes. Risk factors for falling predicted rib fractures as well as BMD, but both were strongly age-related. After age-adjustment, BMD was associated with rib fractures in women but not men. Importantly, rib fractures attributed to severe trauma were associated with BMD in older individuals of both sexes. Self-reported heavy alcohol use doubled fracture risk but did not achieve significance due to limited statistical power. Bone density, along with heavy alcohol use and other risk factors for falling, contributes to the risk of rib fractures, but no one factor predominates. Older women with rib fractures, regardless of cause, should be considered for an osteoporosis evaluation, and strategies to prevent falling should be considered in both sexes. PMID:22028986

  7. What accounts for rib fractures in older adults?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuermser, Lisa-Ann; Achenbach, Sara J; Amin, Shreyasee; Khosla, Sundeep; Melton, L Joseph

    2011-01-01

    To address the epidemiology of rib fractures, an age- and sex-stratified random sample of 699 Rochester, Minnesota, adults age 21-93 years was followed in a long-term prospective study. Bone mineral density (BMD) was assessed at baseline, and fractures were ascertained by periodic interview and medical record review. During 8560 person-years of followup (median, 13.9 years), 56 subjects experienced 67 rib fracture episodes. Risk factors for falling predicted rib fractures as well as BMD, but both were strongly age-related. After age-adjustment, BMD was associated with rib fractures in women but not men. Importantly, rib fractures attributed to severe trauma were associated with BMD in older individuals of both sexes. Self-reported heavy alcohol use doubled fracture risk but did not achieve significance due to limited statistical power. Bone density, along with heavy alcohol use and other risk factors for falling, contributes to the risk of rib fractures, but no one factor predominates. Older women with rib fractures, regardless of cause, should be considered for an osteoporosis evaluation, and strategies to prevent falling should be considered in both sexes.

  8. Sonography of occult rib and costal cartilage fractures: a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattox, Ross; Reckelhoff, Kenneth E; Welk, Aaron B; Kettner, Norman W

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of this case series is to describe the use of diagnostic ultrasound (US) in the detection of occult rib and costal cartilage fractures presenting as chest wall pain to a chiropractic clinic. Three patients presented with chest wall pain and tenderness. Two of the patients presented with acute chest wall injury and 1 carried a previous diagnosis of rib fracture after trivial trauma 2 months earlier. Diagnostic US was selected as a non-ionizing imaging tool for these patients after negative digital radiography studies. All fractures were considered isolated as there was no associated injury, such as pneumothorax. Both of the acute cases were followed up to complete healing (evidence of osseous union) using US. All patients eventually achieved pain-free status. In these cases, US was more sensitive than radiography for diagnosing these cases of acute rib and costal cartilage fractures. Early recognition of rib injury could avoid potential complications from local manipulative therapy.

  9. Case report: clinical and postmortem findings in four cows with rib fracture

    OpenAIRE

    Braun, Ueli; Warislohner, Sonja; Hetzel, Udo; Nuss, Karl

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Published reports of rib fractures in adult cattle are limited to the occurrence of chronic rib swellings caused by calluses, which are unremarkable from a clinical standpoint, whereas studies identifying clinical signs of rib fractures were not found in a literature search. This report describes the clinical and postmortem findings in four cows with rib fractures. CASE PRESENTATION: The 13th rib was fractured in three cows and the 11th rib in the remaining cow; three fractures...

  10. Association of Ipsilateral Rib Fractures With Displacement of Midshaft Clavicle Fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahl, Daniel; Ellington, Matthew; Brennan, Kindyle; Brennan, Michael

    2017-04-01

    To determine whether the presence of ipsilateral rib fractures affects the rate of a clavicle fracture being unstable (>100% displacement). A retrospective review from 2002-2013 performed at a single level 1 trauma center evaluated 243 midshaft clavicle fractures. Single Level 1 trauma center. These fractures were subdivided into those with ipsilateral rib fractures (CIR; n = 149) and those without ipsilateral rib fractures (CnIR; n = 94). The amount of displacement was measured on the initial injury radiograph and subsequent follow-up radiographs. Fractures were classified into either 100% displacement, based on anteroposterior radiographs. Ipsilateral rib fractures were recorded based on which number rib was fractured and the total number of fractured ribs. One hundred sixteen (78%) of the CIR group and 51 (54%) of the CnIR group were found to have >100% displacement at follow-up (P = 0.0047). Seventy-two percent of the CIR group demonstrated progression from 100% displacement of the fracture compared with only 54% of the CnIR group (P fracture to >100% was 4.08 (P = 0.000194) when ribs 1-4 were fractured and not significant for rib fractures 5-8 or 9-12. The presence of concomitant ipsilateral rib fractures significantly increases the rate of midshaft clavicle fractures being >100% displaced. In addition, a fracture involving the upper one-third of the ribs significantly increases the rate of the clavicle fracture being >100% displaced on early follow-up. Clavicle fractures with associated ipsilateral rib fractures tend to demonstrate an increased amount of displacement on follow-up radiographs compared with those without ipsilateral rib fractures. Prognostic Level II. See Instructions for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

  11. Stress fractures of the rib arising from the manufactory assembly line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arima, Toru; Iwasaki, Masayuki

    2007-01-01

    We investigated stress injuries of the rib arising from the assembly line. The patients, all males, were 20 in number and divided into two groups; those with stress fracture (n=13) and those with ''pre-fracture'' (n=7). The former group with the average age of 37 years was involved by a single fracture in 10 patients and multiple fractures in 3, ranging from 5th to 8th ribs, with the affected side on the right in 9 and the left in 4. All 13 fractures occurred in the posterior half of the rib, in which 5 were located in its lateral portion, 5 in the middle, and 3 in the posterior. The latter group with the average age of 32 years were involved on the right side in 4 and the left in 3. The working pattern causing rib injuries was either repeated raising of the upper extremity or forward pushing of the shoulder girdle. The symptom was back pain, and aggravated especially in elevation of the arm, deep breathing and sneezing. Local tenderness over the fracture site was noted in all cases. X-ray findings at initial examination revealed fractures in most cases and 3D-CT was employed in 9 questionable cases to assess fracture conditions. In the ''pre-fracture'' group, although the fracture was not recognized on X-ray, the diagnosis was made as an impending fracture based on the localized tenderness on the rib. As to treatment, bust band fixation and work load reduction were performed. Stress fractures of the rib have been occasionally reported in sports medicine, but not so much in industrial medicine. This specific injury has been treated in literature as muscle strain because of the absence of apparent trauma. It is important to recognize the underlying pathology to make the correct diagnosis. In the early stage of rib fractures, 3D-CT was more useful than X-ray in making diagnosis and assessing the bony union. As to the pathomechanism of this condition, it was postulated that repeated raising or forward pushing of the arm applying excessive traction to the origin of the

  12. Operative Fixation of Rib Fractures Indications, Techniques, and Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galos, David; Taylor, Benjamin; McLaurin, Toni

    2017-01-01

    Rib fractures are extremely common injuries and vary in there severity from single nondisplaced fractures to multiple segmental fractures resulting in flail chest and respiratory compromise. Historically, rib fractures have been treated conservatively with pain control and respiratory therapy. However this method may not be the best treatment modality in all situations. Operative fixation of select rib fractures has been increasing in popularity especially in patients with flail chest and respiratory compromise. Newer techniques use muscle sparing approaches and precontoured locking plate technology to obtain stable fixation and allow improved respiration. Current reports shows that rib fracture fixation offers the benefits of improved respiratory mechanics and improved pain control in the severe chest wall injury with resultant improvement in patient outcomes by decreasing time on the ventilator, time in the intensive care unit, and overall hospital length of stay.

  13. New technique for fixing rib fracture with bioabsorbable plate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyamatsu, Hironori; Ohata, Norihisa; Narita, Kunio

    2016-09-01

    Fixation of a bone fracture with a bioabsorbable plate made of poly-L-lactide and hydroxyapatite has received attention. We adopted this technique for a rib fracture by bending the plate into a U-shape and fixing it with suture through the holes in the mesh of the plate and holes that are drilled in the edge of the fractured rib. The suture is also wound around the plate. © The Author(s) 2016.

  14. An analysis of 214 cases of rib fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sule Karadayi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Rib fractures are the most common type of injury associated with trauma to the thorax. In this study, we investigated whether morbidity and mortality rates increased in correlation with the number of fractured ribs. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Data from 214 patients with rib fractures who applied or were referred to our clinic between January 2007 and December 2008 were retrospectively evaluated. The patients were allocated into three groups according to the number of fractures: 1 patients with an isolated rib fracture (RF1 (n = 50, 23.4%, 2 patients with two rib fractures (RF2 (n = 53, 24.8%, and 3 patients with more than two rib fractures (RF3 (n = 111, 51.9%. The patients were evaluated and compared according to the number of rib fractures, mean age, associated chest injuries (hemothorax, pneumothorax, and/or pulmonary contusion, and co-existing injuries to other systems. FINDINGS: The mean age of the patients was 51.5 years. The distribution of associated chest injuries was 30% in group RF1, 24.6% in group RF2, and 75.6% in group RF3 (p<0.05. Co-existing injuries to other systems were 24% in group RF1, 23.2% in group RF2, and 52.6% in group RF3 (p<0.05. Two patients (4% in group RF1, 2 patients (3.8% in group RF2, and 5 patients (4.5% in group RF3 (total n = 9; 4.2% died. CONCLUSION: Patients with any number of rib fractures should be carefully screened for co-existing injuries in other body systems and hospitalized to receive proper treatment.

  15. Potential Benefits of Rib Fracture Fixation in Patients with Flail Chest and Multiple Non-flail Rib Fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Meiguang; Shi, Zhanjun; Xiao, Jun; Zhang, Xuming; Ling, Shishui; Ling, Hao

    2016-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the potential benefits of rib fracture fixation in patients with flail chest and multiple non-flail rib fractures versus conventional treatment modalities. A retrospective reviewed study compared 86 cases which received surgical treatment between June 2009 and May 2013 to 76 cases which received conservative treatment between January 2006 and May 2009. The patients were divided into the flail chest ( n  = 38) and multiple non-flail rib fracture groups ( n  = 124). In the flail chest group, the mechanical ventilation time, ICU monitoring time, tracheostomies, thoracic deformity, and impaired pulmonary function and return to full-time employment were compared. In the multiple non-flail rib fracture group, fracture healing, visual analog scale (VAS) pain score, inpatient length of stay, atelectatic, pulmonary complications, and normal activity-returning time were compared. Patients in the flail chest operative fixation group had significantly shorter ICU stay, decreased ventilator requirements, fewer tracheostomies, less thoracic deformity and impaired pulmonary function, and more returned to full-time employment. Patients in the multiple non-flail rib fracture operative fixation had shorter hospital stay, less pain, earlier return to normal activity, more fracture healing, less atelectasis, and fewer pulmonary infections. This study demonstrates the potential benefits of surgical stabilization of flail chest and multiple non-flail rib fractures with plate fixation. When compared with conventional conservative management, operatively managed patients demonstrated improved clinical outcomes.

  16. Rib fracture in Prognathodon saturator (Mosasauridae, Late Cretaceous)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schulp, Anne S.; Walenkamp, G. H I M; Hofman, P.A.M.; Rothschild, B. M.; Jagt, J. W M

    2004-01-01

    Two unusual bumps occur on the internal surface of a rib of the marine reptile Prognathodon saturator from the Upper Cretaceous (Maastrichtian) of Maastricht, The Netherlands. These bumps are interpreted as stress fractures, possibly related to agonistic behaviour.

  17. Rib fractures in coronary bypass patients: radionuclide detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenwald, L.V.; Baisden, C.E.; Symbas, P.N.

    1983-01-01

    Sternal retraction can cause the first rib to be fractured posteriorly, injuring the brachial plexus. The authors conducted bone scans of 24 consecutive open-heart surgery patients and found an unexpectedly high number of rib fractures which in all but one case had not been seen on the chest radiograph. Bone scans are recommended whenever there is unexplained non-incisional pain in a patient who has undergone sternal retraction

  18. The Place of Ultrasonography in the Evaluation of Rib Fractures

    OpenAIRE

    Fulya Bakılan; Gökhan Yüce; Ahmet Çağdaş Biçen; Tanju Keten

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate whether ultrasonography is superior to chest x-ray in detecting rib fractures in patients with minor blunt chest trauma and chest pain. Materials and Methods: Ultrasonography findings of 32 patients with minor blunt chest trauma showing no evidence of a rib fracture on anteroposterior chest x-rays, were documented. Presence of cortical discontinuities, acoustic shadows, reverberation artifacts, and hematoma by ultrasonography was...

  19. [Internal fixation treatment of multiple rib fractures with absorbable rib-connecting-pins].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jinliang; Li, Keyao; He, Jianning

    2011-01-01

    To study the indications, methods, and therapeutic effect of absorbable rib-connecting-pins fixation in the treatment of multiple rib fractures. Between March 2007 and September 2009, 40 patients with multiple rib fractures received internal fixation with absorbable rib-connecting-pins, including 8 one-side flail chest and 1 two-side flail chest. There were 32 males and 8 females with an average age of 39.8 years (range, 25-72 years). The injury was caused by traffic accident in 32 cases, falling from height in 6 cases, and blunt hitting in 2 cases. Preoperatively, imaging data of the chest X-ray or spiral CT three-dimensional (3D) examination showed that all patients had multiple ribs fractures and displacement. The number of fractured ribs was 4-10 (median, 6), and the fracture location ranged from the 2nd to the 10th ribs. Of them, 28 cases were accompanied by hemathorax, pneumothorax or hemopneumothorax; 5 cases by thoracic organ injury; and 10 cases by other part trauma. The time from injury to hospitalization was less than 1 day in 26 cases, 1-3 days in 12 cases, and 3-6 days in 2 cases, and the time from hospitalization to operation was 3 hours to 3 days (mean, 1.2 days). The median fixation rib number was 5 (range, 3-8). The mean operative time, the time in bed, and hospitalization days were 32 minutes (range, 15-50 minutes), 4.5 days (range, 2-7 days), and 11.2 days (range, 5-18 days), respectively. All incisions healed by first intention. No pulmonary infection, pulmonary atelectasis, intrathoracic infection or other complications occurred. All cases were followed up 6-12 months (mean, 8 months). PaO2 [(86.6 +/- 2.2) mmHg (1 mm Hg = 0.133 kPa)] and SpO2 (97.2% +/- 0.6%) at 2 hours after operation were obviously improved when compared with preoperative ones (PaO2 (53.6 + 4.7) mm Hg and SpO2 (86.2% + 1.8%)], showing significant differences (t = 2.971, P = 0.005; t = 2.426, P = 0.020). The chest X-ray films or spiral CT 3D indicated that fracture of rib

  20. Rib fractures in trauma patients: does operative fixation improve outcome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majak, Peter; Næss, Pål A

    2016-12-01

    Renewed interest in surgical fixation of rib fractures has emerged. However, conservative treatment is still preferred at most surgical departments. We wanted to evaluate whether operative treatment of rib fractures may benefit severely injured patients. Several studies report a reduction in mechanical ventilation time, ICU length of stay (LOS), hospital LOS, pneumonia, need for tracheostomy, pain and costs in operatively treated patients with multiple rib fractures compared with patients treated nonoperatively. Although patient selection and timing of the operation seem crucial for successful outcome, no consensus exists. Mortality reduction has only been shown in a few studies. Most studies are retrospective cohort and case-control studies. Only four randomized control trials exist. Conservative treatment, consisting of respiratory assistance and pain control, is still the treatment of choice in the vast majority of patients with multiple rib fractures. In selected patients, operative fixation of fractured ribs within 72 h postinjury may lead to better outcome. More randomized control trials are needed to further determine who benefits from surgical fixation of rib fractures.

  1. Cronkhite-Canada syndrome associated with rib fractures: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Bosi; Jin, Xinxin; Zhu, Renmin; Zhang, Xiaohua; Liu, Jiong; Wan, Haijun; Lu, Heng; Shen, Yunzhu; Wang, Fangyu

    2010-10-18

    Cronkhite-Canada syndrome (CCS) is a rare multiple gastrointestinal polyposis. Up till now, many complications of CCS have been reported in the literature, but rib fracture is not included. We report a case of a 58-year-old man who was admitted to our hospital with a 6-month history of frequent diarrhea, intermittent hematochezia and a weight loss of 13 kg. On admission, physical examination revealed alopecia of the scalp, hyperpigmentation of the hands and soles, and dystrophy of the fingernails. Laboratory data revealed hypocalcaemia and hypoproteinemia. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy, video capsule endoscopy and colonoscopy revealed various sizes of generalized gastrointestinal polyps. Histological examination of the biopsy specimens obtained from the stomach and the colon showed adenomatous polyp and inflammatory polyp respectively. Thus, a diagnosis of CCS was made. After treatment with corticosteroids for 24 days and nutritional support for two months, his clinical condition improved. Two months later, he was admitted to our hospital for the second time with frequent diarrhea and weight loss. The chest radiography revealed fractures of the left sixth and seventh ribs. Examinations, including emission computed tomography, bone densitometry test, and other serum parameters, were performed, but could not identify the definite etiology of the rib fractures. One month later, the patient suffered from aggravating multiple rib fractures due to the ineffective treatment, persistent hypocalcaemia and malnutrition. This is the first case of a CCS patient with multiple rib fractures. Although the association between CCS and multiple rib fractures in this case remains uncertain, we presume that persistent hypocalcaemia and malnutrition contribute to this situation, or at least aggravate this rare complication. Besides, since prolonged corticosteroid therapy will result in an increased risk of osteoporotic fracture, CCS patients who accept corticosteroid therapy could be

  2. Cronkhite-Canada syndrome associated with rib fractures: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wan Haijun

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cronkhite-Canada syndrome (CCS is a rare multiple gastrointestinal polyposis. Up till now, many complications of CCS have been reported in the literature, but rib fracture is not included. Case Presentation We report a case of a 58-year-old man who was admitted to our hospital with a 6-month history of frequent diarrhea, intermittent hematochezia and a weight loss of 13 kg. On admission, physical examination revealed alopecia of the scalp, hyperpigmentation of the hands and soles, and dystrophy of the fingernails. Laboratory data revealed hypocalcaemia and hypoproteinemia. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy, video capsule endoscopy and colonoscopy revealed various sizes of generalized gastrointestinal polyps. Histological examination of the biopsy specimens obtained from the stomach and the colon showed adenomatous polyp and inflammatory polyp respectively. Thus, a diagnosis of CCS was made. After treatment with corticosteroids for 24 days and nutritional support for two months, his clinical condition improved. Two months later, he was admitted to our hospital for the second time with frequent diarrhea and weight loss. The chest radiography revealed fractures of the left sixth and seventh ribs. Examinations, including emission computed tomography, bone densitometry test, and other serum parameters, were performed, but could not identify the definite etiology of the rib fractures. One month later, the patient suffered from aggravating multiple rib fractures due to the ineffective treatment, persistent hypocalcaemia and malnutrition. Conclusions This is the first case of a CCS patient with multiple rib fractures. Although the association between CCS and multiple rib fractures in this case remains uncertain, we presume that persistent hypocalcaemia and malnutrition contribute to this situation, or at least aggravate this rare complication. Besides, since prolonged corticosteroid therapy will result in an increased risk of osteoporotic

  3. Missed rib fractures on evaluation of initial chest CT for trauma patients: pattern analysis and diagnostic value of coronal multiplanar reconstruction images with multidetector row CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, S H; Sung, Y M; Kim, M S

    2012-10-01

    The objective of this study was to review the prevalence and radiological features of rib fractures missed on initial chest CT evaluation, and to examine the diagnostic value of additional coronal images in a large series of trauma patients. 130 patients who presented to an emergency room for blunt chest trauma underwent multidetector row CT of the thorax within the first hour during their stay, and had follow-up CT or bone scans as diagnostic gold standards. Images were evaluated on two separate occasions: once with axial images and once with both axial and coronal images. The detection rates of missed rib fractures were compared between readings using a non-parametric method of clustered data. In the cases of missed rib fractures, the shapes, locations and associated fractures were evaluated. 58 rib fractures were missed with axial images only and 52 were missed with both axial and coronal images (p=0.088). The most common shape of missed rib fractures was buckled (56.9%), and the anterior arc (55.2%) was most commonly involved. 21 (36.2%) missed rib fractures had combined fractures on the same ribs, and 38 (65.5%) were accompanied by fracture on neighbouring ribs. Missed rib fractures are not uncommon, and radiologists should be familiar with buckle fractures, which are frequently missed. Additional coronal imagescan be helpful in the diagnosis of rib fractures that are not seen on axial images.

  4. Prolonged pain and disability are common after rib fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabricant, Loic; Ham, Bruce; Mullins, Richard; Mayberry, John

    2013-05-01

    The contribution of rib fractures to prolonged pain and disability may be underappreciated and undertreated. Clinicians are traditionally taught that the pain and disability of rib fractures resolves in 6 to 8 weeks. This study was a prospective observation of 203 patients with rib fractures at a level 1 trauma center. Chest wall pain was evaluated by the McGill Pain Questionnaire (MPQ) pain rating index (PRI) and present pain intensity (PPI). Prolonged pain was defined as a PRI of 8 or more at 2 months after injury. Prolonged disability was defined as a decrease in 1 or more levels of work or functional status at 2 months after injury. Predictors of prolonged pain and disability were determined by multivariate analysis. One hundred forty-five male patients and 58 female patients with a mean injury severity score (ISS) of 20 (range, 1 to 59) had a mean of 5.4 rib fractures (range, 1 to 29). Forty-four (22%) patients had bilateral fractures, 15 (7%) had flail chest, and 92 (45%) had associated injury. One hundred eighty-seven patients were followed 2 months or more. One hundred ten (59%) patients had prolonged chest wall pain and 142 (76%) had prolonged disability. Among 111 patients with isolated rib fractures, 67 (64%) had prolonged chest wall pain and 69 (66%) had prolonged disability. MPQ PPI was predictive of prolonged pain (odds ratio [OR], 1.8; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.4 to 2.5), and prolonged disability (OR, 2.2; 95% CI, 1.5 to 3.4). The presence of significant associated injuries was predictive of prolonged disability (OR, 5.9; 95% CI, 1.4 to 29). Prolonged chest wall pain is common, and the contribution of rib fractures to disability is greater than traditionally expected. Further investigation into more effective therapies that prevent prolonged pain and disability after rib fractures is needed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Stress fractures of the ribs in elite competitive rowers: a report of nine cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dragoni, S. [Institute of Sport Medicine and Science of the Italian Olympic Committee, Department of Radiology, Rome (Italy); Giombini, A.; Ripani, M. [University of Motor Sciences, Department of Health, Rome (Italy); Di Cesare, A. [University of Rome ' ' La Sapienza' ' , Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Rome (Italy); Magliani, G. [Medical Department of the Italian State Police, Rome (Italy)

    2007-10-15

    The objective was to report the clinical and imaging patterns of nine cases of stress fractures of the rib diagnosed in Italian Olympic rowers. Nine patients with stress fractures of the rib detected from 103 (8.7%) Italian team rowers competing between May 2000 and May 2006 were identified based on the database of a sports medicine institute. All athletes were male. They were aged between 17 and 31 years (mean: 24.4). Patient weight, fracture location, rowing side and imaging methods employed were noted. The diagnosis was made based on history, clinical examination and Tc-99m MDP bone scintigraphy. Eight of the 9 fractures were located anterolaterally between the fourth and ninth rib. In 1 of the 5 athletes with standard radiographs, a fracture line was visible and in 4 there was callus formation. In 2 athletes sonography was performed, which detected discontinuity of the rib surface and callus formation (1 case each). Stress fractures of the ribs are relatively common in competitive rowers. They are characterized by increasing lateral chest pain and typical scintigraphic, radiographic and sonographic findings. (orig.)

  6. Stress fractures of the ribs in elite competitive rowers: a report of nine cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dragoni, S.; Giombini, A.; Ripani, M.; Di Cesare, A.; Magliani, G.

    2007-01-01

    The objective was to report the clinical and imaging patterns of nine cases of stress fractures of the rib diagnosed in Italian Olympic rowers. Nine patients with stress fractures of the rib detected from 103 (8.7%) Italian team rowers competing between May 2000 and May 2006 were identified based on the database of a sports medicine institute. All athletes were male. They were aged between 17 and 31 years (mean: 24.4). Patient weight, fracture location, rowing side and imaging methods employed were noted. The diagnosis was made based on history, clinical examination and Tc-99m MDP bone scintigraphy. Eight of the 9 fractures were located anterolaterally between the fourth and ninth rib. In 1 of the 5 athletes with standard radiographs, a fracture line was visible and in 4 there was callus formation. In 2 athletes sonography was performed, which detected discontinuity of the rib surface and callus formation (1 case each). Stress fractures of the ribs are relatively common in competitive rowers. They are characterized by increasing lateral chest pain and typical scintigraphic, radiographic and sonographic findings. (orig.)

  7. First-rib stress fracture in two adolescent swimmers: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, Sara; Kern, Michael; Atanda, Alfred

    2016-01-01

    First-rib stress fractures have been described in adolescent athletes in various sports, with only one prior case report of first-rib stress fractures in an adolescent female swimmer. There is a need for research on the cause, management, and prevention of these injuries as they lead to significant morbidity and critical time away from sport for these aspiring athletes. We aimed to describe first-rib stress fractures as a potential cause for non-specific atraumatic chronic shoulder pain in adolescent swimmers and to discuss the different presentations, unique risk factors, treatment, and potential injury prevention strategies of such fractures. We discussed two such cases which were successfully treated with activity modification with restriction of all overhead activity, gradually progressive physical therapy and a return to swimming protocol. First-rib stress fractures can vary in presentation and should be in the differential diagnosis in adolescent swimmers with chronic shoulder pain. These injuries can be successfully managed with rest from overhead activities and physical therapy. Gradual return to competitive swimming can be achieved even with non-union of a first-rib stress fracture. Emphasis on balanced strength training in different muscle groups and proper swimming technique is essential to prevent these injuries.

  8. Vital capacity helps predict pulmonary complications after rib fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carver, Thomas W; Milia, David J; Somberg, Chloe; Brasel, Karen; Paul, Jasmeet

    2015-09-01

    Traumatic rib fractures are associated with significant morbidity. Vital capacity (VC) assesses pulmonary function; however, limited data link VC to patient outcomes. Our objective was to determine if VC predicted complications and disposition in patients with rib fractures. This is a retrospective chart review of all patients with fractured ribs admitted to a Level 1 trauma center during a 4-year period. Patients were excluded if no VC was performed within 48 hours of admission. Data collected included demographics, hospital/intensive care unit length of stay, epidural, discharge to home versus extended care facility, mortality, chest Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS) score, Injury Severity Score (ISS), number of rib fractures, hemothorax/pneumothorax, presence of pulmonary contusion, presence of chest tube, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and average daily VC (percentage of predicted). Pulmonary complication was defined as pneumonia, need for intubation, new home O2 requirement, readmission for pulmonary issue, or intensive care unit transfer. Statistical analysis was performed using χ and multivariate logistic regression. Of 801 patients with rib fractures, 683 had VC performed within 48 hours. Average age was 53 years, median ISS was 13 (interquartile range, 9-18), and median length of stay was 5 days. Most (72%) were discharged home, and 26% went to extended care facility. Ten percent developed a pulmonary complication, and there were nine deaths. Every 10% increase in VC was associated with 36% decrease in likelihood of pulmonary complication. Patients with a VC greater than 50% had a significantly lower association of pulmonary complication (p = 0.017), and a VC of less than 30% was independently associated with pulmonary complication (odds ratio, 2.36). Patients with fractured ribs and VC of less than 30% have significant association for pulmonary complication. Higher VC is associated with lower likelihood of pulmonary complication. VC may help

  9. Differentiating the Causes of Spontaneous Rib Fracture After Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Susan R

    2016-12-01

    Spontaneous rib fracture after treatment for primary breast cancer is not uncommon. Although metastatic disease accounts for about 30% of spontaneous rib fractures and should constitute the first line of diagnostic investigation, other possible contributors include primary osteoporosis or secondary osteoporosis resulting from cancer treatments. Chemotherapy-induced menopause, aromatase inhibitors, radiation therapy, and long-term bisphosphonate use can all contribute to bone fragility, including spontaneous rib fractures in the latter 3. Drawing on recent breast cancer practice guidelines as well as population-based studies of fracture risk for women with a history of breast cancer and systematic reviews, this Perspective will provide an update on recent developments in understanding how to differentiate the possible reasons for non-traumatic rib fracture in women treated for breast cancer. In addition to describing the various possible causes of spontaneous rib fracture, the recommended medical and imaging procedures for differentiating among the potential causes will be presented. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Ketamine as an Analgesic Adjuvant in Adult Trauma Intensive Care Unit Patients With Rib Fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walters, Mary K; Farhat, Joseph; Bischoff, James; Foss, Mary; Evans, Cory

    2018-03-01

    Rib fracture associated pain is difficult to control. There are no published studies that use ketamine as a therapeutic modality to reduce the amount of opioid to control rib fracture pain. To examine the analgesic effects of adjuvant ketamine on pain scale scores in trauma intensive care unit (ICU) rib fracture. This retrospective, case-control cohort chart review evaluated ICU adult patients with a diagnosis of ≥1 rib fracture and an Injury Severity Score >15 during 2016. Patients received standard-of-care pain management with the physician's choice analgesics with or without ketamine as a continuous, fixed, intravenous infusion at 0.1 mg/kg/h. A total of 15 ketamine treatment patients were matched with 15 control standard-of-care patients. Efficacy was measured via Numeric Pain Scale (NPS)/Behavioral Pain Scale (BPS) scores, opioid use, and ICU and hospital length of stay. Safety of ketamine was measured by changes in vital signs, adverse effects, and mortality. Average NPS/BPS, severest NPS/BPS, and opioid use were lower in the ketamine group than in controls (NPS: 4.1 vs 5.8, P rib fracture.

  11. Stress fractures of the ribs and upper extremities: causation, evaluation, and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Timothy L; Harris, Joshua D; Kaeding, Christopher C

    2013-08-01

    Stress fractures are common troublesome injuries in athletes and non-athletes. Historically, stress fractures have been thought to predominate in the lower extremities secondary to the repetitive stresses of impact loading. Stress injuries of the ribs and upper extremities are much less common and often unrecognized. Consequently, these injuries are often omitted from the differential diagnosis of rib or upper extremity pain. Given the infrequency of this diagnosis, few case reports or case series have reported on their precipitating activities and common locations. Appropriate evaluation for these injuries requires a thorough history and physical examination. Radiographs may be negative early, requiring bone scintigraphy or MRI to confirm the diagnosis. Nonoperative and operative treatment recommendations are made based on location, injury classification, and causative activity. An understanding of the most common locations of upper extremity stress fractures and their associated causative activities is essential for prompt diagnosis and optimal treatment.

  12. Thoracic epidural steroid injection for rib fracture pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauchwerger, Jacob J; Candido, Kenneth D; Deer, Timothy R; Frogel, Jonathan K; Iadevaio, Robert; Kirschen, Neil B

    2013-06-01

    Treatment for rib fracture pain can be broadly divided into pharmacologic approaches with oral and/or parenteral medication and interventional approaches utilizing neuraxial analgesia or peripheral nerve blocks to provide pain relief. Both approaches attempt to control nociceptive and neuropathic pain secondary to osseous injury and nerve insult, respectively. Success of treatment is ultimately measured by the ability of the selected modality to decrease pain, chest splinting, and to prevent sequelae of injury, such as pneumonia. Typically, opioids and NSAIDs are the drugs of first choice for acute pain because of ease of administration, immediate onset of action, and rapid titration to effect. In contrast, neuropathic pain medications have a slower onset of action and are more difficult to titrate to therapeutic effect. Interventional approaches include interpleural catheters, intercostal nerve blocks, paravertebral nerve blocks, and thoracic and lumbar epidural catheters. Each intervention has its own inherent advantages, disadvantages, and success rates. Rib fracture pain management practice is founded on the thoracic surgical and anesthesiology literature. Articles addressing rib fracture pain are relatively scarce in the pain medicine literature. As life expectancy increases, and as healthcare system modifications are implemented, pain medicine physicians may be consulted to treat increasing number of patients suffering rib fracture pain and may need to resort to novel therapeutic measures because of financial constraints imposed by those changes. Here we present the first published case series of thoracic epidural steroid injections used for management of rib fracture pain. © 2012 The Authors Pain Practice © 2012 World Institute of Pain.

  13. Fractured Ribs and the CT Funky Fat Sign of Diaphragmatic Rupture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iclal Ocak

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic diaphragmatic rupture remains a diagnostic challenge for both radiologists and surgeons. In recent years, multidetector CT has markedly improved the diagnosis of diaphragmatic injury in polytrauma patients. Herein, we describe two cases of subacute presentation of traumatic diaphragmatic rupture from a penetrating rib fracture and subsequent intrathoracic herniation of omental fat, representing the CT “funky fat” sign.

  14. Ultrasonography as a better diagnostic efficiency in rib fracture

    OpenAIRE

    UZUN, Metin; BEKSAÇ, Burak; KARATAŞ, Adnan; KÜÇÜKDURMAZ, Fatih; KIRCALI, Bahar ANAYURDU; TETİK, Cihangir

    2013-01-01

    In this study, our aim was to demonstrate the need of use of ultrasonography in rib fractures in order not to face medicolegal problems. One hundred patients admitted to our emergency service with mild to moderate blunt thorax trauma were included in our study prospectively. The inclusion criteria were pain upon palpation of ribs, deep inspiration, coughing but no any other pathologies like a pneumothorax, hemothorax. All patients are evaluated with ultrasonography (USG) and direct X-rays. X-...

  15. X-ray diagnosis of rib chondrosarcoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smakova, M.S.

    1982-01-01

    A study was made on X-ray images of 24 patients, suffering from rib chondrosarcoma with relapses. X-ray symptoms of rib chondrosarcoma, depending on process localization were improved. Chondrosarcoma of rib cartilage is characterized by soft-tissue component with calcareous inclusions or without them. Chondrosarcoma of rib bone is characterized by destruction and soft-tissue component. Chondrosarcoma relapses were localized in soft tissues

  16. Traumatic Vertebral Fractures and Concomitant Fractures of the Rib in Southwest China, 2001 to 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongwei; Zhou, Yue; Ou, Lan; Li, Changqing; Liu, Jun; Xiang, Liangbi

    2015-01-01

    Abstract To our knowledge, the clinical characteristics of traumatic vertebral fractures and concomitant fractures of the rib (TVF-RF) have not been described in previous studies. To investigate the clinical characteristics of patients managed for TVF-RF. A retrospective study of 3142 patients who presented with traumatic vertebral fractures was performed. Two hundred twenty-six patients (7.2%) suffered from TVF-RF. Incidence rate ratios were then calculated with respect to the level of injury to the spine, the ASIA classification of neurological deficits and age. There were 171 male (75.7%) and 55 female (24.3%) patients with a mean age of 43.8 years. The most common mechanisms were falls from high heights in 81 cases and road traffic crashes in 67 cases. Right-sided rib injury occurred in 106 cases, left-sided injury occurred in 76 cases, and bilateral injury occurred in 44 cases. The most frequent location of the rib fractures was from the fourth rib to the ninth rib (70.3%, 510/725). Initial pulmonary complications (IPC) after trauma occurred in 116 cases (51.3%). The mortality rate for the entire group was 1.3% (3/226). The patients with thoracic vertebral fractures and neurological deficits had a higher frequency of multiple rib fractures and IPC than the other patients (P rib fractures, the frequency of IPC and mean intensive care unit (ICU) length of stay also increased. The rates of complications for patients with rib fractures were significantly different from those without rib fractures. We should pay much attention to the patients who presented with thoracic vertebral fractures and neurological deficits for minimizing further complications and mortality in such patients who had a higher frequency of multiple rib fractures and IPC than the other patients. PMID:26554809

  17. Epidural analgesia in patients with traumatic rib fractures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duch, P; Møller, M H

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Traumatic rib fractures are a common condition associated with considerable morbidity and mortality. Observational studies have suggested improved outcome in patients receiving continuous epidural analgesia (CEA). The aim of the present systematic review of randomised controlled trials...... (RCTs) was to assess the benefit and harm of CEA compared with other analgesic interventions in patients with traumatic rib fractures. METHODS: We performed a systematic review with meta-analysis and trial sequential analysis (TSA). Eligible trials were RCTs comparing CEA with other analgesic...... interventions in patients with traumatic rib fractures. Cumulative relative risks (RRs) and mean differences (MDs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated, and risk of systematic and random errors was assessed. The predefined primary outcome measures were mortality, pneumonia and duration...

  18. Flank pseudohernia following posterior rib fracture: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butensky, Adam M; Gruss, Leah P; Gleit, Zachary L

    2016-10-01

    A pseudohernia is an abdominal wall bulge that may be mistaken for a hernia but that lacks the disruption of the abdominal wall that characterizes a hernia. Thus, the natural history and treatment of this condition differ from those of a hernia. This is the first report of a pseudohernia due to cough-associated rib fracture. A case of pseudohernia due to fractures of the 10 th and 11 th ribs in a 68-year-old white woman is presented. The patient suffered from a major coughing episode 1 year prior to her presentation, after which she noted a progressively enlarging bulge in her left flank. Computed tomography demonstrated a bulge in the abdominal wall containing bowel and spleen but with all muscle and fascial layers intact; in addition, lateral 10 th rib and posterior 11 th rib fractures were noted. As there was no defect in muscle or fascia, we diagnosed a pseudohernia, likely due to a denervation injury from the fractured ribs. Symptomatic treatment was recommended, including wearing a corset and referral to a pain management clinic. Symptomatic treatment is thought to be the mainstay of therapy for pseudohernias, as surgical intervention is unlikely to be of benefit.

  19. Rib fractures predict incident limb fractures: results from the European prospective osteoporosis study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, A A; Silman, A J; Reeve, J; Kaptoge, S; O'Neill, T W

    2006-01-01

    Population studies suggest that rib fractures are associated with a reduction in bone mass. While much is known about the predictive risk of hip, spine and distal forearm fracture on the risk of future fracture, little is known about the impact of rib fracture. The aim of this study was to determine whether a recalled history of rib fracture was associated with an increased risk of future limb fracture. Men and women aged 50 years and over were recruited from population registers in 31 European centres for participation in a screening survey of osteoporosis (European Prospective Osteoporosis Study). Subjects were invited to complete an interviewer-administered questionnaire that included questions about previous fractures including rib fracture, the age of their first fracture and also the level of trauma. Lateral spine radiographs were performed and the presence of vertebral deformity was determined morphometrically. Following the baseline survey, subjects were followed prospectively by annual postal questionnaire to determine the occurrence of clinical fractures. The subjects included 6,344 men, with a mean age of 64.2 years, and 6,788 women, with a mean age of 63.6 years, who were followed for a median of 3 years (range 0.4-5.9 years), of whom 135 men (2.3%) and 101 women (1.6%) reported a previous low trauma rib fracture. In total, 138 men and 391 women sustained a limb fracture during follow-up. In women, after age adjustment, those with a recalled history of low trauma rib fracture had an increased risk of sustaining 'any' limb fracture [relative hazard (RH)=2.3; 95% CI 1.3, 4.0]. When stratified by fracture type the predictive risk was more marked for hip (RH=7.7; 95% CI 2.3, 25.9) and humerus fracture (RH=4.5; 95% CI 1.4, 14.6) than other sites (RH=1.6; 95% CI 0.6, 4.3). Additional adjustment for prevalent vertebral deformity and previous (non-rib) low trauma fractures at other sites slightly reduced the strength of the association between rib fracture and

  20. Surgical treatment of rib fracture nonunion: A single center experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jong, M B; Houwert, R M; van Heerde, S; de Steenwinkel, M; Hietbrink, F; Leenen, L P H

    2018-03-01

    In contrast to the emerging evidence on the operative treatment of flail chest, there is a paucity of literature on the surgical treatment of rib fracture nonunion. The purpose of this study was to describe our standardized approach and report the outcome (e.g. patient satisfaction, pain and complications) after surgical treatment of a rib fracture nonunion. A single centre retrospective cohort study was performed at a level 1 trauma centre. Symptomatic rib nonunion was defined as a severe persistent localized pain associated with the nonunion of one or more rib fractures on a chest CT scan at least 3 months after the initial trauma. Patients after initial operative treatment of rib fractures were excluded. Nineteen patients (11 men, 8 women), with symptomatic nonunions were included. Fourteen patients were referred from other hospitals and 8 patients received treatment from a pain medicine specialist. The mean follow-up was 36 months. No in-hospital complications were observed. In 2 patients, new fractures adjacent to the implant, without new trauma were observed. Furthermore 3 patients requested implant removal with a persistent nonunion in one patient. There was a mean follow-up of 36 months, the majority of patients (n = 13) were satisfied with the results of their surgical treatment and all patients experienced a reduction in the number of complaints. Persisting pain was a common complaint. Three patients reporting severe pain used opioid analgesics on a daily or weekly basis. Only 1 patient needed ongoing treatment by a pain medicine specialist. Surgical fixation of symptomatic rib nonunion is a safe and feasible procedure, with a low perioperative complication rate, and might be beneficial in selected symptomatic patients in the future. In our study, although the majority of patients were satisfied and the pain level subjectively decreases, complaints of persistent pain were common. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. First rib fractures as an indicator of injury severity in major trauma

    OpenAIRE

    Sammy, I.A.; Chatha, H.; Lecky, F.; Bouamra, O.; Fragoso Iniguez, M.; Sattout, A.; Hickey, M.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction First rib fractures are traditionally considered indicators of increased morbidity and mortality in major trauma. However, this relationship has not been definitively proven. With an increase in computed tomography in major trauma, and the likely increase in detection of first rib fractures, this study re-evaluates whether first rib fractures are an indicator of injury severity. Discussion This study suggests that major trauma patients with first rib fractures have increased ISS ...

  2. Rib Fracture Patterns and Radiologic Detection – A Restraint-Based Comparison

    OpenAIRE

    Crandall, Jeff; Kent, Richard; Patrie, James; Fertile, Jay; Martin, Peter

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents a study of the rib fracture patterns generated in simulated frontal collisions and the visibility of the rib fractures on plain film radiographs. Using 29 cadaver subjects, rib fractures were identified on oblique, lateral, and anteroposterior chest films by five radiologists independently and were compared with fractures found during a detailed necropsy. Physical, geometric, and experimental factors demonstrated an influence on the ability of a radiologist to identify rib...

  3. Comparison of Computed Tomography and Chest Radiography in the Detection of Rib Fractures in Abused Infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wootton-Gorges, Sandra L.; Stein-Wexler, Rebecca; Walton, John W.; Rosas, Angela J.; Coulter, Kevin P.; Rogers, Kristen K.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Chest radiographs (CXR) are the standard method for evaluating rib fractures in abused infants. Computed tomography (CT) is a sensitive method to detect rib fractures. The purpose of this study was to compare CT and CXR in the evaluation of rib fractures in abused infants. Methods: This retrospective study included all 12 abused infants…

  4. Continuous intercostal nerve blockade for rib fractures: ready for primetime?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truitt, Michael S; Murry, Jason; Amos, Joseph; Lorenzo, Manuel; Mangram, Alicia; Dunn, Ernest; Moore, Ernest E

    2011-12-01

    Providing analgesia for patients with rib fractures continues to be a management challenge. The objective of this study was to examine our experience with the use of a continuous intercostal nerve block (CINB). Although this technique is being used, little data have been published documenting its use and efficacy. We hypothesized that a CINB would provide excellent analgesia, improve pulmonary function, and decrease length of stay (LOS). Consecutive adult blunt trauma patients with three or more unilateral rib fractures were prospectively studied over 24 months. The catheters were placed at the bedside in the extrathoracic, paravertebral location, and 0.2% ropivacaine was infused. Respiratory rate, preplacement (PRE) numeric pain scale (NPS) scores, and sustained maximal inspiration (SMI) lung volumes were determined at rest and after coughing. Parameters were repeated 60 minutes after catheter placement (POST). Hospital LOS comparison was made with historical controls using epidural analgesia. Over the study period, 102 patients met inclusion criteria. Mean age was 69 (21-96) years, mean injury severity score was 14 (9-16), and the mean number of rib fractures was 5.8 (3-10). Mean NPS improved significantly (PRE NPS at rest = 7.5 vs. POST NPS at rest = 2.6, p pain control, and shortens LOS in patients with rib fractures.

  5. Lidocaine patches reduce pain in trauma patients with rib fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zink, Karen A; Mayberry, John C; Peck, Ellen G; Schreiber, Martin A

    2011-04-01

    Rib fracture pain is notoriously difficult to manage. The lidocaine patch is effective in other pain scenarios with an excellent safety profile. This study assesses the efficacy of lidocaine patches for treating rib fracture pain. A prospectively gathered cohort of patients with rib fracture was retrospectively analyzed for use of lidocaine patches. Patients treated with lidocaine patches were matched to control subjects treated without patches. Subjective pain reports and narcotic use before and after patch placement, or equivalent time points for control subjects, were gathered from the chart. All patients underwent long-term follow-up, including a McGill Pain Questionnaire (MPQ). Twenty-nine patients with lidocaine patches (LP) and 29 matched control subjects (C) were analyzed. During the 24 hours before patch placement, pain scores and narcotic use were similar (LP 5.3, C 4.6, P = 0.19 and LP 51, C 32 mg morphine, P = 0.17). In the 24 hours after patch placement, LP patients had a greater decrease in pain scores (LP 1.2, C 0.0, P = 0.01) with no change in narcotic use (LP -8.4, C 0.5-mg change in morphine, P = 0.25). At 60 days, LP patients had a lower MPQ pain score (LP 7.7, C 12.2, P rib fracture pain. Lidocaine patches resulted in a sustained reduction in pain, outlasting the duration of therapy.

  6. Rib Fractures: To Fix or Not to Fix? An Evidence-Based Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Bemelman

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Rib fractures are a common injury resulting from blunt chest trauma. The most important complications associated with rib fractures include death, pneumonia, and the need for mechanical ventilation. The development of new osteosynthesis materials has stimulated increased interest in the surgical treatment of rib fractures. Surgical stabilisation, however, is not needed for every patient with rib fractures or for every patient with flail chest. This paper presents an easy-to-use evidence-based algorithm, developed by the authors, for the treatment of patients with flail chest and isolated rib fractures.

  7. Biomechanical rationale and evaluation of an implant system for rib fracture fixation

    OpenAIRE

    Bottlang, M.; Walleser, S.; Noll, M.; Honold, S.; Madey, S. M.; Fitzpatrick, D.; Long, W. B.

    2010-01-01

    Background Biomechanical research directed at developing customized implant solutions for rib fracture fixation is essential to reduce the complexity and to increase the reliability of rib osteosynthesis. Without a simple and reliable implant solution, surgical stabilization of rib fractures will remain underutilized despite proven benefits for select indications. This article summarizes the research, development, and testing of a specialized and comprehensive implant solution for rib fractur...

  8. Surgical Stabilization of Rib Fractures in a 6-Year-Old Child After Blunt Trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelsattar, Zaid M; Ishitani, Michael B; Kim, Brian D

    2017-12-01

    When identified, rib fractures in children are associated with high-energy trauma, nonaccidental trauma, or both. Traditionally, the optimal management of rib fractures in children is supportive care. In this case report, we present a 6-year-old boy who underwent surgical rib fixation for multiple displaced and comminuted rib fractures after being stepped on by a horse. Copyright © 2017 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Stabilization of multiple rib fractures in a canine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ke-Nan; Xu, Zhi-Fei; Sun, Ju-Xian; Ding, Xin-Yu; Wu, Bin; Li, Wei; Qin, Xiong; Tang, Hua

    2014-12-01

    Operative stabilization is frequently used in the clinical treatment of multiple rib fractures (MRF); however, no ideal material exists for use in this fixation. This study investigates a newly developed biodegradable plate system for the stabilization of MRF. Silk fiber-reinforced polycaprolactone (SF/PCL) plates were developed for rib fracture stabilization and studied using a canine flail chest model. Adult mongrel dogs were divided into three groups: one group received the SF/PCL plates, one group received standard clinical steel plates, and the final group did not undergo operative fracture stabilization (n = 6 for each group). Radiographic, mechanical, and histologic examination was performed to evaluate the effectiveness of the biodegradable material for the stabilization of the rib fractures. No nonunion and no infections were found when using SF-PCL plates. The fracture sites collapsed in the untreated control group, leading to obvious chest wall deformity not encountered in the two groups that underwent operative stabilization. Our experimental study shows that the SF/PCL plate has the biocompatibility and mechanical strength suitable for fixation of MRF and is potentially ideal for the treatment of these injuries. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. The Effectiveness of Transdermal Opioid in the Management Multiple Rib Fractures: Randomized Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okan Solak

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: The most commonly observed pathology in chest traumas is rib fracture, and the most important clinical symptom is severe pain. Aims: To investigate the effectiveness of intramuscular opioid (IMO, intravenous patient-controlled analgesia (IVPCA and the Fentanyl transdermal therapeutic system (TTS in the management of rib fracture pain. Study Design: Prospective randomized clinical trial. Methods: In our prospective and randomised study, we included 45 patients with a diagnosis of multiple rib fractures. There were three groups and intercostal nerve blockage (ICB in the first day and oral paracetamol for five days was administered to each group as standard. In Group IMO (n=15, 4x40 mg pethidine HCl was administered to the patients, while in Group IVPCA (n=15 this was 5 µg/mL continuous intravenous fentanyl and was 50 µg fentanyl TTS in Group TTS (n=15. The demographics, injury data and vital signs of the patients were recorded. Pain was scored using Visual Analogue Scale (VAS. The pain during lying down (VASl and mobilisation (VASm was detected. Results: There were no differences between the three groups regarding age, sex, the trauma pattern, the number and distribution of costal fracture localisations, the presence of additional pathology, complications, thoracal catheter and the duration of thoracal catheter. No significant difference between the groups regarding systolic and diastolic arterial tension, number of breaths and beats in a minute was observed (p>0.05. We observed an improvement in the mean VAS score after treatment in all three groups. The mean VASl score significantly decreased after treatment in each group (p0.05. Conclusion: In the analgesia of patients with multiple rib fractures, TTS administration with ICB showed similar effectiveness with IVPCA administration with ICB. In the management of pain due to multiple rib fractures, TTS administration is a safe, non-invasive and effective procedure.

  11. The effectiveness of transdermal opioid in the management multiple rib fractures: randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solak, Okan; Oz, Gürhan; Kokulu, Serdar; Solak, Ozlem; Doğan, Gökçen; Esme, Hıdır; Ocalan, Kubilay; Baki, Elif Doğan

    2013-09-01

    The most commonly observed pathology in chest traumas is rib fracture, and the most important clinical symptom is severe pain. To investigate the effectiveness of intramuscular opioid (IMO), intravenous patient-controlled analgesia (IVPCA) and the Fentanyl transdermal therapeutic system (TTS) in the management of rib fracture pain. Prospective randomized clinical trial. In our prospective and randomised study, we included 45 patients with a diagnosis of multiple rib fractures. There were three groups and intercostal nerve blockage (ICB) in the first day and oral paracetamol for five days was administered to each group as standard. In Group IMO (n=15), 4×40 mg pethidine HCl was administered to the patients, while in Group IVPCA (n=15) this was 5 μg/mL continuous intravenous fentanyl and was 50 μg fentanyl TTS in Group TTS (n=15). The demographics, injury data and vital signs of the patients were recorded. Pain was scored using Visual Analogue Scale (VAS). The pain during lying down (VASl) and mobilisation (VASm) was detected. There were no differences between the three groups regarding age, sex, the trauma pattern, the number and distribution of costal fracture localisations, the presence of additional pathology, complications, thoracal catheter and the duration of thoracal catheter. No significant difference between the groups regarding systolic and diastolic arterial tension, number of breaths and beats in a minute was observed (p>0.05). We observed an improvement in the mean VAS score after treatment in all three groups. The mean VASl score significantly decreased after treatment in each group (p0.05). In the analgesia of patients with multiple rib fractures, TTS administration with ICB showed similar effectiveness with IVPCA administration with ICB. In the management of pain due to multiple rib fractures, TTS administration is a safe, non-invasive and effective procedure.

  12. Skull and Posterior Rib Fractures with Respiratory Failure caused by Child Abuse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dzulfikar Djalil Lukmanul Hakim

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Presence of multiple fractures suggests child abuse. Skull fractures rarely occurred but posterior rib fractures are commonly found and have high specificity as a radiological finding in child abuse. A respiratory failure can occur as a result of the damage to the osseous structure of the thorax that destabilizes the rib cage and impairs spontaneous breathing mechanism. Methods: A case report of a 6-month-old boy who presented with respiratory failure, multiple bilateral parietal and occipital bone fractures, and also fractures of right rib 5–8. The patient required ventilatory support for 9 days in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit, Dr.HasanSadikin General Hospital. Results: The patient was on ventilatory support for 9 days, and was given antibiotics for 2 weeks. Next, the patient was referred to the High Care Unit (HCU after the condition was stabilized, and then referred to the ward, for treatment by the Social Pediatric Division. The patient was still having issues about his foster care. Conclusions: Recognition of presence of fractures is important in early diagnosis and treatment of child abuse.

  13. Rib fracture as a predictor of future fractures in young and older postmenopausal women: National Osteoporosis Risk Assessment (NORA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajjan, S. G.; Barrett-Connor, E.; McHorney, C. A.; Miller, P. D.; Sen, S. S.; Siris, E.

    2013-01-01

    Summary A rib fracture history after age 45 was associated with a 5.4-fold increase in new rib fracture risk and a 2.4-fold increase in risk of any new clinical fracture in 155,031 postmenopausal women. A rib fracture history suggests osteoporosis and should be considered when evaluating patients for interventions to prevent fractures. Introduction Until recently, little attention was paid to rib fracture as an osteoporosis marker. Emerging evidence suggests rib fracture may be an osteoporotic fracture in men and women. We report the 5-year independent association between baseline rib fracture histories and self-reported future fractures by age (decade) in the NORA cohort (155,031 postmenopausal women, 50–99 years). Methods Participants reported fracture history and responded to follow-up surveys at years 1, 3, or 6. Women with a baseline rib fracture history without other fractures were compared with women with no fracture. Results At baseline, 4,758 (3.07%) women reported a rib fracture history without other fractures; 6,300 women reported 6,830 new clinical fractures, including wrist (2,271), rib (1,891), spine (1,136), hip (941), and forearm (591). Adjusted relative risk (ARR) values (95% confidence interval [CI]) for future fractures in women with rib fracture history versus women with no fracture history were 5.4 (4.8–6.1) at the rib, 2.1 (1.7–2.6) at the spine, and 1.4 (1.1–1.7) at the wrist, and not significant for forearm or hip fractures. Future fracture risk was at least doubled in women with a rib fracture history in all ages: ARR (95% CI) 3.4 (2.8–4.0) for ages 50–59, 2.5 (2.1–3.0) for ages 60–69, 2.0 (1.7–2.3) for ages 70–79, and 2.0 (1.6–2.6) for ages >80. Conclusions Rib fracture, the second most common clinical fracture in women (after wrist fracture), predicted future fractures of the rib, wrist, and spine at all ages. Women presenting with rib fractures should be evaluated for appropriate management to prevent future

  14. Numerical investigations of rib fracture failure models in different dynamic loading conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fang; Yang, Jikuang; Miller, Karol; Li, Guibing; Joldes, Grand R; Doyle, Barry; Wittek, Adam

    2016-01-01

    Rib fracture is one of the most common thoracic injuries in vehicle traffic accidents that can result in fatalities associated with seriously injured internal organs. A failure model is critical when modelling rib fracture to predict such injuries. Different rib failure models have been proposed in prediction of thorax injuries. However, the biofidelity of the fracture failure models when varying the loading conditions and the effects of a rib fracture failure model on prediction of thoracic injuries have been studied only to a limited extent. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the effects of three rib failure models on prediction of thoracic injuries using a previously validated finite element model of the human thorax. The performance and biofidelity of each rib failure model were first evaluated by modelling rib responses to different loading conditions in two experimental configurations: (1) the three-point bending on the specimen taken from rib and (2) the anterior-posterior dynamic loading to an entire bony part of the rib. Furthermore, the simulation of the rib failure behaviour in the frontal impact to an entire thorax was conducted at varying velocities and the effects of the failure models were analysed with respect to the severity of rib cage damages. Simulation results demonstrated that the responses of the thorax model are similar to the general trends of the rib fracture responses reported in the experimental literature. However, they also indicated that the accuracy of the rib fracture prediction using a given failure model varies for different loading conditions.

  15. Retrospective Analysis of 513 Cases Diagnosed with Rib Fracture Secondary to Blunt Thorax Trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serdar Ozkan

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Aim: This study aimed to analyze blunt chest trauma cases who were diagnosed with rib fracture and to examine the regional differences likely to appear in trauma cases and treatment approaches. Material and Method: 513 cases who applied to the Emergency Service and Department of Thoracic Surgery between October 2013 and December 2014 due to blunt trauma and were diagnosed with rib fracture were retrospectively examined. The cases were evaluated in terms of etiological factors, thoracic, and other system injuries accompanying the rib fracture, prognosis, and the treatments applied. Results: Isolated rib fracture was present in 266 of the cases. Thoracic organ injuries such as pneumothorax, hemothorax, hemopneumothorax, lung contusion, or laceration and sternal fracture accompanying the rib fracture were present in 247 of the cases. While one or two rib fractures were detected in 298 cases, six or more rib fractures were present in 28 cases. 78.2% of hemothorax cases, 85.3% of pneumothorax cases, 95.4% of hemopneumothorax cases, 81.8% of bilateral pneumothorax cases, 26% of bilateral hemothorax cases, and 71.4% of bilateral hemopneumothorax cases were treated by applying tube thoracostomy. 129 cases diagnosed with thoracic organ injury in addition to rib fracture but not subjected to surgical intervention, and 266 cases diagnosed with isolated rib fracture were discharged with full recovery after appropriate medical treatment. Discussion: Most of the rib fractures occurring due to blunt trauma are treated successfully with medical treatments and conservative approaches and do not need advanced surgical treatments.

  16. Small female rib cage fracture in frontal sled tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Greg; Lessley, David; Ash, Joseph; Poplin, Jerry; McMurry, Tim; Sochor, Mark; Crandall, Jeff

    2017-01-02

    The 2 objectives of this study are to (1) examine the rib and sternal fractures sustained by small stature elderly females in simulated frontal crashes and (2) determine how the findings are characterized by prior knowledge and field data. A test series was conducted to evaluate the response of 5 elderly (average age 76 years) female postmortem human subjects (PMHS), similar in mass and size to a 5th percentile female, in 30 km/h frontal sled tests. The subjects were restrained on a rigid planar seat by bilateral rigid knee bolsters, pelvic blocks, and a custom force-limited 3-point shoulder and lap belt. Posttest subject injury assessment included identifying rib cage fractures by means of a radiologist read of a posttest computed tomography (CT) and an autopsy. The data from a motion capture camera system were processed to provide chest deflection, defined as the movement of the sternum relative to the spine at the level of T8.  A complementary field data investigation involved querying the NASS-CDS database over the years 1997-2012. The targeted cases involved belted front seat small female passenger vehicle occupants over 40 years old who were injured in 25 to 35 km/h delta-V frontal crashes (11 to 1 o'clock). Peak upper shoulder belt tension averaged 1,970 N (SD = 140 N) in the sled tests. For all subjects, the peak x-axis deflection was recorded at the sternum with an average of -44.5 mm or 25% of chest depth. The thoracic injury severity based on the number and distribution of rib fractures yielded 4 subjects coded as Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS) 3 (serious) and one as AIS 5 (critical). The NASS-CDS field data investigation of small females identified 205 occupants who met the search criteria. Rib fractures were reported for 2.7% of the female occupants. The small elderly test subjects sustained a higher number of rib cage fractures than expected in what was intended to be a minimally injurious frontal crash test condition. Neither field studies nor

  17. Epidemiology of rib fractures in older men: Osteoporotic Fractures in Men (MrOS) prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett-Connor, Elizabeth; Nielson, Carrie M; Orwoll, Eric; Bauer, Douglas C; Cauley, Jane A

    2010-03-15

    To study the causes and consequences of radiologically confirmed rib fractures (seldom considered in the context of osteoporosis) in community dwelling older men. Prospective cohort study (Osteoporotic Fractures in Men (MrOS) Study). 5995 men aged 65 or over recruited in 2000-2 from six US sites; 99% answered mailed questionnaires about falls and fractures every four months for a mean 6.2 (SD 1.3) year follow-up. New fractures validated by radiology reports; multivariate Cox proportional hazard ratios were used to evaluate factors independently associated with time to incident rib fracture; associations between baseline rib fracture and incident hip and wrist fracture were also evaluated. The incidence of rib fracture was 3.5/1000 person years, and 24% (126/522) of all incident non-spine fractures were rib fractures. Nearly half of new rib fractures (48%; n=61) followed falling from standing height or lower. Independent risk factors for an incident rib fracture were age 80 or above, low bone density, difficulty with instrumental activities of daily living, and a baseline history of rib/chest fracture. Men with a history of rib/chest fracture had at least a twofold increased risk of an incident rib fracture (adjusted hazard ratio 2.71, 95% confidence interval 1.86 to 3.95), hip fracture (2.05, 1.33 to 3.15), and wrist fracture (2.06, 1.14 to 3.70). Only 14/82 of men reported being treated with bone specific drugs after their incident rib fracture. Rib fracture, the most common incident clinical fracture in men, was associated with classic risk markers for osteoporosis, including old age, low hip bone mineral density, and history of fracture. A history of rib fracture predicted a more than twofold increased risk of future fracture of the rib, hip, or wrist, independent of bone density and other covariates. Rib fractures should be considered to be osteoporotic fractures in the evaluation of older men for treatment to prevent future fracture.

  18. Morbidity, mortality, associated injuries, and management of traumatic rib fractures

    OpenAIRE

    Frank Cheau-Feng Lin; Ruei-Yun Li; Yung-Wei Tung; Kee-Ching Jeng; Stella Chin-Shaw Tsai

    2016-01-01

    Background: Thoracic trauma is responsible for approximately 25% of trauma deaths, and rib fractures are present in as many as 40–80% of patients, and intensive care and/or ventilator support are frequently required for these patients. To identify their risk factors would improve treatment strategies for these patients. Methods: Between March 2005 and December 2013, consecutive patients with blunt thoracic trauma, who were admitted to the Department of Thoracic Surgery at Tungs' Taichung M...

  19. High prevalence of simultaneous rib and vertebral fractures in patients with hip fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Bong-Gun; Sung, Yoon-Kyoung; Kim, Dam; Choi, Yun Young; Kim, Hunchul; Kim, Yeesuk

    2017-02-01

    The purpose was to evaluate the prevalence and location of simultaneous fracture using bone scans in patients with hip fracture and to determine the risk factors associated with simultaneous fracture. One hundred eighty two patients with hip fracture were reviewed for this study. Clinical parameters and bone mineral density (BMD) of the lumbar vertebra and femoral neck were investigated. To identify acute simultaneous fracture, a bone scan was performed at 15.4±4.1days after hip fracture. The prevalence and location of simultaneous fracture were evaluated, and multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to determine the risk factors. Simultaneous fracture was observed in 102 of 182 patients, a prevalence of 56.0%. Rib fracture was the most common type of simultaneous fracture followed by rib with vertebral fracture. The BMD of the lumbar vertebra was significantly lower in patients with simultaneous fracture (p=0.044) and was identified as an independent risk factor (odds ratio: OR 0.05, 95% confidence interval: CI 0.01-0.57). The prevalence of simultaneous fracture was relatively high among patients with hip fracture, and BMD was significantly lower in patients with simultaneous fracture than in patients without it. Surgeons should be aware of the possibility of simultaneous fracture in patients with hip fracture. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Clinical and Radiologic Predictive Factors of Rib Fractures in Outpatients With Chest Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Liang; McMahon, Colm J; Shah, Samir; Wu, Jim S; Eisenberg, Ronald L; Kung, Justin W

    To identify the clinical and radiologic predictive factors of rib fractures in stable adult outpatients presenting with chest pain and to determine the utility of dedicated rib radiographs in this population of patients. Following Institutional Review Board approval, we performed a retrospective review of 339 consecutive cases in which a frontal chest radiograph and dedicated rib series had been obtained for chest pain in the outpatient setting. The frontal chest radiograph and dedicated rib series were sequentially reviewed in consensus by two fellowship-trained musculoskeletal radiologists blinded to the initial report. The consensus interpretation of the dedicated rib series was used as the gold standard. Multiple variable logistic regression analysis assessed clinical and radiological factors associated with rib fractures. Fisher exact test was used to assess differences in medical treatment between the 2 groups. Of the 339 patients, 53 (15.6%) had at least 1 rib fracture. Only 20 of the 53 (37.7%) patients' fractures could be identified on the frontal chest radiograph. The frontal chest radiograph had a sensitivity of 38% and specificity of 100% when using the rib series as the reference standard. No pneumothorax, new mediastinal widening or pulmonary contusion was identified. Multiple variable logistic regression analysis of clinical factors associated with the presence of rib fractures revealed a significant association of trauma history (odds ratio 5.7 [p rib fractures in this population demonstrated a significant association of pleural effusion with rib fractures (odds ratio 18.9 [p rib fractures received narcotic analgesia in 47.2% of the cases, significantly more than those without rib fractures (21.3%, p rib fractures have a higher association with a history of minor trauma and age ≥40 in the adult population. Radiographic findings associated with rib fractures include pleural effusion. The frontal chest radiograph alone has low sensitivity in

  1. Concurrent rib and pelvic fractures as an indicator of solid abdominal organ injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hassani, Ammar; Afifi, Ibrahim; Abdelrahman, Husham; El-Menyar, Ayman; Almadani, Ammar; Recicar, Jan; Al-Thani, Hassan; Maull, Kimball; Latifi, Rifat

    2013-01-01

    To study the association of solid organ injuries (SOIs) in patients with concurrent rib and pelvic fractures. Retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data from November 2007 to May 2010. Patients' demographics, mechanism of injury, Injury severity scoring, pelvic fracture, and SOIs were analyzed. Patients with SOIs were compared in rib fractures with and without pelvic fracture. The study included 829 patients (460 with rib fractures ± pelvic fracture and 369 with pelvic fracture alone) with mean age of 35 ± 12.7 years. Motor vehicle crashes (45%) and falls from height (30%) were the most common mechanism of injury. The overall incidence of SOIs in this study was 22% (185/829). Further, 15% of patient with rib fractures had associated pelvic fracture. SOI was predominant in patients with concurrent rib fracture and pelvic fracture compared to ribs or pelvic fractures alone (42% vs. 26% vs. 15%, respectively, p = 0.02). Concurrent multiple rib fractures and pelvic fracture increases the risk of SOI compared to either group alone. Lower RFs and pelvic fracture had higher association for SOI and could be used as an early indicator of the presence of SOIs. Copyright © 2013 Surgical Associates Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Surgical plate fixation of multiple rib fractures: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitev, Konstantin; Neziri, Dashurie; Stoicovski, Emil; Mitrev, Zan

    2018-05-29

    The healthcare system in developing countries is limited; particularly, medical specialties such as emergency and trauma medicine are underdeveloped. Consequently, trauma injuries sustained in traffic accidents result in chronic morbidity more often than similar cases in developed countries. Multiple rib fractures induce significant patient morbidity. Current international guidelines recommend a multidisciplinary, surgery-based treatment approach to achieve optimal clinical benefit. We admitted a 41-year-old Albanian man to our emergency department following a pedestrian-vehicle accident 5 days earlier. He presented with severe upper thoracic pain, chest deformity, dyspnea, tachycardia, subcutaneous emphysema, and hematoma. Chest radiography pointed to hypoventilated lung fields and a minor pleural effusion. Computed tomographic scans indicated displaced fractures of right lateral ribs 5 -11, hyperdensity regions from bone fragments, and pulmonary contusion. The treatment consisted of surgical fixation of ribs 7-10 using titanium reconstruction plates and cortical locking screws. The patient's clinical condition rapidly improved postoperatively. Follow-up at 6 weeks confirmed a full return to preoperative daily activities and a high quality of life. In this case report, we present a novel and promising development in the field of trauma medicine in the Republic of Macedonia. Trauma injuries can be treated via advanced multidisciplinary medical care according to international standards, allowing optimal health recovery.

  3. Rib fractures after chest physiotherapy for bronchiolitis or pneumonia in infants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chalumeau, Martin [Service de Pneumologie et d' Allergologie Pediatriques, Hopital Necker-Enfants Malades, Paris (France); Service de Pediatrie, Hopital Saint-Vincent-de-Paul, Paris (France); Foix-l' Helias, Laurence; Scheinmann, Pierre; Zuani, Pierre [Service de Pneumologie et d' Allergologie Pediatriques, Hopital Necker-Enfants Malades, Paris (France); Gendrel, Dominique [Service de Pediatrie, Hopital Saint-Vincent-de-Paul, Paris (France); Ducou-le-Pointe, Hubert [Service de Radiologie, Hopital d' Enfants Armand-Trousseau, Avenue du Docteur Arnold Netter, 75571 Paris Cedex 12 (France)

    2002-09-01

    Heading AbstractBackground. The reported causes of rib fractures in infants are: child abuse, accidental injury, cardiopulmonary resuscitation, bone fragility, birth trauma and severe cough.Objective. To report chest physiotherapy (CPT) as a new cause of rib fractures in five infants.Materials and methods. We retrospectively identified all infants with rib fractures after CPT for bronchiolitis or pneumonia over a 4-year period in two paediatric and one paediatric radiology units in three university hospitals in Paris.Results. Five boys were identified. Their median age was 3 months. None had any other potential cause of rib fractures. The indication for CPT was bronchiolitis in four cases and pneumonia in one. The median number of rib fractures was four (range 1-5). Fractures were located between the 3rd and 8th ribs; they were lateral in four patients and posterior in one; they were unilateral in four patients and bilateral in one. Evolution was favourable in all cases. The prevalence of rib fractures after CPT during the study period was estimated at 1 in 1,000 infants hospitalised for bronchiolitis or pneumonia.Conclusions. CPT should be considered a potential, but very rare cause of rib fractures in infants. It can be of clinical relevance when rib fractures are the only feature suggestive of child abuse. (orig.)

  4. Rib fractures after chest physiotherapy for bronchiolitis or pneumonia in infants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chalumeau, Martin; Foix-l'Helias, Laurence; Scheinmann, Pierre; Zuani, Pierre; Gendrel, Dominique; Ducou-le-Pointe, Hubert

    2002-01-01

    Heading AbstractBackground. The reported causes of rib fractures in infants are: child abuse, accidental injury, cardiopulmonary resuscitation, bone fragility, birth trauma and severe cough.Objective. To report chest physiotherapy (CPT) as a new cause of rib fractures in five infants.Materials and methods. We retrospectively identified all infants with rib fractures after CPT for bronchiolitis or pneumonia over a 4-year period in two paediatric and one paediatric radiology units in three university hospitals in Paris.Results. Five boys were identified. Their median age was 3 months. None had any other potential cause of rib fractures. The indication for CPT was bronchiolitis in four cases and pneumonia in one. The median number of rib fractures was four (range 1-5). Fractures were located between the 3rd and 8th ribs; they were lateral in four patients and posterior in one; they were unilateral in four patients and bilateral in one. Evolution was favourable in all cases. The prevalence of rib fractures after CPT during the study period was estimated at 1 in 1,000 infants hospitalised for bronchiolitis or pneumonia.Conclusions. CPT should be considered a potential, but very rare cause of rib fractures in infants. It can be of clinical relevance when rib fractures are the only feature suggestive of child abuse. (orig.)

  5. Rib fractures: comparison of associated injuries between pediatric and adult population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessel, Boris; Dagan, Jasmin; Swaid, Forat; Ashkenazi, Itamar; Olsha, Oded; Peleg, Kobi; Givon, Adi; Alfici, Ricardo

    2014-11-01

    Rib fractures are considered a marker of exposure to significant traumatic energy. In children, because of high elasticity of the chest wall, higher energy levels are necessary for ribs to fracture. The purpose of this study was to analyze patterns of associated injuries in children as compared with adults, all of whom presented with rib fractures. A retrospective cohort study involving blunt trauma patients with rib fractures registered in the National Trauma Registry was conducted. Of 6,995 trauma victims who were found to suffer from rib fractures, 328 were children and 6,627 were adults. Isolated rib fractures without associated injuries occurred in 19 children (5.8%) and 731 adults (11%). More adults had 4 or more fractured ribs compared with children (P pneumothorax (P = .006), spleen, and liver injury (P < .001). Mortality rate was 5% in both groups. The incidence of associated head, thoracic, and abdominal solid organ injuries in children was significantly higher than in adults suffering from rib fractures. In spite of a higher Injury Severity Score and incidence of associated injuries, mortality rate was similar. Mortality of rib fracture patients was mostly affected by the presence of extrathoracic injuries. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Rib fractures after percutaneous radiofrequency and microwave ablation of lung tumors: incidence and relevance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Erica S; Hankins, Carol A; Machan, Jason T; Healey, Terrance T; Dupuy, Damian E

    2013-03-01

    To retrospectively identify the incidence and probable risk factors for rib fractures after percutaneous radiofrequency ablation (RFA) and microwave ablation (MWA) of neoplasms in the lung and to identify complications related to these fractures. Institutional review board approval was obtained for this HIPAA-compliant retrospective study. Study population was 163 patients treated with MWA and/or RFA for 195 lung neoplasms between February 2004 and April 2010. Follow-up computed tomographic images of at least 3 months were retrospectively reviewed by board-certified radiologists to determine the presence of rib fractures. Generalized estimating equations were performed to assess the effect that patient demographics, tumor characteristics, treatment parameters, and ablation zone characteristics had on development of rib fractures. Kaplan-Meier curve was used to estimate patients' probability of rib fracture after ablation as a function of time. Clinical parameters (ie, pain in ribs or chest, organ damage caused by fractured rib) were evaluated for patients with confirmed fracture. Rib fractures in proximity to the ablation zone were found in 13.5% (22 of 163) of patients. Estimated probability of fracture was 9% at 1 year and 22% at 3 years. Women were more likely than were men to develop fracture after ablation (P = .041). Patients with tumors closer to the chest wall were more likely to develop fracture (P = .0009), as were patients with ablation zones that involved visceral pleura (P = .039). No patients with rib fractures that were apparently induced by RFA and MWA had organ injury or damage related to fracture, and 9.1% (2 of 22) of patients reported mild pain. Rib fractures were present in 13.5% of patients after percutaneous RFA and MWA of lung neoplasms. Patients who had ablations performed close to the chest wall should be monitored for rib fractures.

  7. The number of displaced rib fractures is more predictive for complications in chest trauma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, Chih-Ying; Chen, Yu-Hsien; Han, Shih-Tsung; Blaney, Gerald N; Huang, Ting-Shuo; Chen, Kuan-Fu

    2017-02-28

    Traumatic rib fractures can cause chest complications that need further treatment and hospitalization. We hypothesized that an increase in the number of displaced rib fractures will be accompanied by an increase in chest complications. We retrospectively reviewed the trauma registry between January 2013 and May 2015 in a teaching hospital in northeastern Taiwan. Patients admitted with chest trauma and rib fractures without concomitant severe brain, splenic, pelvic or liver injuries were included. The demographic data, such as gender, age, the index of coexistence disease, alcohol consumption, trauma mechanisms were analyzed as potential predictors of pulmonary complications. Pulmonary complications were defined as pneumothorax, hemothorax, flail chest, pulmonary contusion, and pneumonia. In the 29 months of the study period, a total of 3151 trauma patients were admitted to our hospital. Among them, 174 patients were enrolled for final analysis. The most common trauma mechanism was road traffic accidents (58.6%), mainly motorbike accidents (n = 70, 40.2%). Three or more displaced rib fractures had higher specificity for predicting complications, compared to three or more total rib fractures (95.5% vs 59.1%). Adjusting the severity of chest trauma using TTSS and Ribscore by multivariable logistic regression analysis, we found that three or more rib fractures or any displaced rib fracture was the most significant predictor for developing pulmonary complication (aOR: 5.49 95% CI: 1.82-16.55). Furthermore, there were 18/57 (31.6%) patients with fewer than three ribs fractures developed pulmonary complications. In these 18 patients, only five patients had delayed onset complications and four of them had at least one displaced rib fracture. In this retrospective cohort study, we found that the number of displaced or total rib fractures, bilateral rib fractures, and rib fractures in more than two areas were associated with the more chest complications. Furthermore

  8. Rib stress fractures in pregnancy: a case report and review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pouwels, S; Dabekausen, Y A

    2017-01-01

    Thoracic pain in pregnancy has a broad differential diagnosis. The authors report a young pregnant woman with acute pain in the thoracic region due to a rib fracture after a coughing flare. Physicians must be aware of the broad differential diagnosis (and its clinical consequences) of thoracic pain in pregnancy. Radiographic imaging is not necessary if the clinical signs are obvious. If there is no suspicion for underlying pathology other (expensive) diagnostic tests lose their value. Treatment consists of adequate analgesia and no firther measures need to be taken.

  9. Frequency of intrathoracic injuries in children younger than 3 years with rib fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darling, Stephen E; Done, Stephen L; Friedman, Seth D; Feldman, Kenneth W

    2014-10-01

    Research documents that among children admitted to trauma intensive care units the number of rib fractures sustained indicates the child's likelihood of having and severity of intrathoracic injury. This has been misused in court to argue that children with multiple rib fractures who lack intrathoracic injury have abnormal bone fragility rather than inflicted injury. To determine frequency of intrathoracic injuries in children younger than 3 years with rib fractures in cases of child abuse and accidental trauma. We conducted a retrospective review of rib fractures caused by documented abuse or accidents from 2003 to 2010 in children treated at Seattle Children's Hospital and Harborview Medical Center. A senior pediatric radiologist and radiology fellow independently reviewed the imaging. Children with bone demineralization were excluded. Descriptive and simple comparative statistics were used. Seventy-two percent (47/65) of infants and toddlers with rib fractures were abused. Abused children had more rib fractures than accidentally injured children (5.55 vs. 3.11, P = 0.012). However intrathoracic injuries as a whole (55.6% vs. 12.8%, P fractures were equally frequent, but other extrathoracic fractures were more common with abuse (70.2% vs. 16.7%, P rib fractures than accidentally injured peers. This likely reflects different injury mechanics. Lack of intrathoracic injuries in abused children with rib fractures does not imply bone fragility.

  10. Low evaluation rate for osteoporosis among patients presenting with a rib fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Whang; Gong, Hyun Sik; Lee, Seung Hoo; Park, Jin Woo; Kim, Kahyun; Baek, Goo Hyun

    2017-12-01

    This study in a regional hospital setting found a low evaluation rate for osteoporosis among patients presenting with a rib fracture. Increased emphasis or education for osteoporosis evaluation may be necessary in case of rib fractures. Rib fractures from a low-energy trauma are common in the elderly, and a history of rib fracture has been reported to increase the risk for a subsequent osteoporotic fracture. The purpose of this study was to evaluate how many of the patients presenting with an isolated rib fracture were being evaluated for osteoporosis and the risk for a subsequent fracture. We retrospectively reviewed all patients aged 50 years or older who were diagnosed with a rib fracture between January 2011 and April 2016 at a regional tertiary care university hospital near Seoul, South Korea. We excluded those who had been treated for osteoporosis or those with other concomitant fractures or fractures from a motor vehicle accident or cancer. We evaluated the frequency of dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) scan examinations in these patients. There were 231 patients with isolated rib fractures (132 men and 99 women). The mean age was 65 years. Rib fractures were most commonly diagnosed at the emergency department and most of the patients were referred to the department of thoracic surgery for follow-up evaluations. Of these 231 patients, 29 (12%) had DXA examinations after the injury, and only 9 (4%) of them did so within 6 months. Physicians specializing in orthopedic surgery, family medicine, internal medicine, rehabilitation medicine, and emergency medicine were ordering the examination. This study in a regional hospital setting found a low evaluation rate for osteoporosis among patients presenting with a rib fracture. This study suggests that increased emphasis or education for osteoporosis evaluation may be necessary for physicians who are often referred to for care of rib fractures.

  11. RIB FRACTURE AFTER BREAST RECONSTRUCTION WITH TISSUE EXPANDER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uroš Ahčan

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Breast reconstruction with tissue expansion and later exchange with prosthesis is one of the most common methods for breast reconstruction. Women that are not appropriate for reconstruction with autologous tissue, women that have small breast or have a positive family history for breast cancer are most suitable for this type of reconstruction. Surgical technique of tissue expansion is relatively easy. Complications are rarely seen. With this case report we want to show the common, although occult existence of skeletal deformities in thorax after breast tissue expansion that may lead to rib fractures.

  12. The clinical implications of severe low rib fracture in the management of diaphragm injury: A Case Control Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seongyup; Choi, Woo Jin; Lee, Kawng Ho; Byun, Chun Sung; Bae, Keum Seok; Park, Il Hwan

    2017-06-01

    The objective of this study was to analyze the differences in clinical presentation and characteristics with regard to diaphragmatic injury between blunt trauma patients with severe low rib fractures and those without severe low rib fractures. The medical records of all patients with diaphragmatic injuries who were surgically treated at this level I trauma center, between January 2004 and December 2016 were reviewed. Patient notes, radiologic findings, and operative reports were evaluated. All of the diaphragmatic injuries were confirmed based on the operative findings. Rib fracture with displacement between the ends of the fracture of more than half the width of the fractured rib on computed tomography was classified as 'severe rib fracture'. Patients were categorized into 2 groups and analyzed: those who had more than one severe rib fracture in low ribs on the ipsilateral side of the diaphragm injury (Severe group), and those with no severe rib fracture (Non-severe group). Delayed diagnosis of diaphragmatic injury was more frequent in the Severe group than in the Non-severe group (81.8% vs 36.8%, p-value = 0.026). With regard to initial indications for operation, intrathoracic visceral herniation was more frequent in the Non-severe group (78.9% vs 18.2%, p-value = 0.002), while hemothorax was more frequent in the Severe group (63.6% vs 5.3%, p-value = 0.001). Central type diaphragmatic laceration was more frequent in the Non-severe group than in the Severe group (78.9% vs 18.2%, p-value = 0.002). The diameter of diaphragmatic injury was larger in the Non-severe group than in the Severe group (9.70 ± 4.10 cm vs 4.80 ± 3.60 cm, p-value = 0.004). The results of this study imply that a low threshold for thoracotomy or laparotomy should be considered in blunt trauma patients with severe low rib fractures for the purpose of hidden diaphragmatic injury detection and management. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  13. Radiation-induced skin ulcer and rib fractures following percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI): A case of right back skin ulcer and adjacent rib fractures after single PCI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasukochi, Yumi; Nakahara, Takeshi; Koike, Akihiro; Ichikawa, Ryutaro; Koga, Tetsuya; Furue, Masutaka

    2015-05-01

    We experienced a 75-year-old male patient with a refractory and severely painful skin ulcer on the right back. He had suffered from ischemic heart disease and undergone percutaneous coronary intervention 5 months prior to the consultation with us. The characteristic clinical appearance, location of the lesion and his past medical history led us to the diagnosis of radiation-induced skin ulcer. Magnetic resonance imaging, computed tomography as well as bone scintigraphy showed fractures of the right back rib adjacent to the ulcer, which was thought to be attributable to bone damage due to X-ray radiation and/or persistent secondary inflammation of the chronic ulcer. In the published work, there are no other reports of bone fractures associated with radiation dermatitis after coronary interventional radiology. © 2015 Japanese Dermatological Association.

  14. Radiological diagnosis of fractures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finlay, D.B.L.; Allen, M.J.

    1984-01-01

    This book is about radiology of fractures. While it contains sections of clinical features it is not intended that readers should rely entirely upon these for the diagnosis and management of the injured patient. As in the diagnosis and treatment of all medical problems, fracture management must be carried out in a logical step-by-step fashion - namely, history, examination, investigation, differential diagnosis, diagnosis and then treatment. Each section deals with a specific anatomical area and begins with line drawings of the normal radiographs demonstrating the anatomy. Accessory views that may be requested, and the indications for these, are included. Any radiological pitfalls for the area in general are then described. The fractures in adults are then examined in turn, their radiological features described, and any pitfalls in their diagnosis discussed. A brief note of important clinical findings is included. A brief mention is made of pediatric fractures which are of significance and their differences to the adult pattern indicated. Although fractures can be classified into types with different characteristics, in life every fracture is individual. Fractures by and large follow common patterns, but many have variations

  15. Less-invasive stabilization of rib fractures by intramedullary fixation: a biomechanical evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottlang, Michael; Helzel, Inga; Long, William; Fitzpatrick, Daniel; Madey, Steven

    2010-05-01

    This study evaluated intramedullary fixation of rib fractures with Kirschner wires and novel ribs splints. We hypothesized that rib splints can provide equivalent fixation strength while avoiding complications associated with Kirschner wires, namely wire migration and cutout. The durability, strength, and failure modes of rib fracture fixation with Kirschner wires and rib splints were evaluated in 22 paired human ribs. First, intact ribs were loaded to failure to determine their strength. After fracture fixation with Kirschner wires and rib splints, fixation constructs were dynamically loaded to 360,000 cycles at five times the respiratory load to determine their durability. Finally, constructs were loaded to failure to determine residual strength and failure modes. All constructs sustained dynamic loading without failure. Dynamic loading caused three times more subsidence in Kirschner wire constructs (1.2 mm +/- 1.4 mm) than in rib splint constructs (0.4 mm +/- 0.2 mm, p = 0.09). After dynamic loading, rib splint constructs remained 48% stronger than Kirschner wire constructs (p = 0.001). Five of 11 Kirschner wire constructs failed catastrophically by cutting through the medial cortex, leading to complete loss of stability and wire migration through the lateral cortex. The remaining six constructs failed by wire bending. Rib splint constructs failed by development of fracture lines along the superior and interior cortices. No splint construct failed catastrophically, and all splint constructs retained functional reduction and fixation. Because of their superior strength and absence of catastrophic failure mode, rib splints can serve as an attractive alternative to Kirschner wires for intramedullary stabilization of rib fractures, especially in the case of posterior rib fractures where access for plating is limited.

  16. Reduction of rib fractures with a bioresorbable plating system: preliminary observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vu, Kim-Chi; Skourtis, Mia E; Gong, Xi; Zhou, Minhao; Ozaki, Wayne; Winn, Shelley R

    2008-05-01

    Operative fixation of rib fractures can reduce morbidity and mortality. Currently, resorbable fixation devices are used in a variety of surgical procedures. A standard osteotomy was prepared in 30 New Zealand white rabbits at the 12th rib. Eighteen had surgical repair with bioresorbable plates and 12 underwent nonoperative management. Half the animals in each group were killed at 3-week postfracture and the remaining animals were killed at 6-week postfracture. Ribs were radiographed and processed histologically to assess fracture healing. Rib reduction was defined as the alignment of the rib ends in a structural condition similar to the prefractured state and quantitative radiomorphometry measured the radiopaque callus surrounding the rib injury sites. Statistical analysis was performed using Fisher's exact test and an unpaired Student's t test and significance was established at p rib fractures remained reduced in the operative group, whereas zero of six and three of six of the rib fractures remained reduced, respectively, in the nonoperative group. A statistically significant increase in radiopaque callus surrounding the rib injury sites was observed at 3 and 6 weeks in the fixed groups. Fixation of rib fractures with a bioresorbable miniplate system was superior to nonoperative treatment at the 3-week interval, with a statistically significant increase in radiopaque callus formation at both 3 and 6 weeks. Additional studies will evaluate the biomechanical outcomes and degradation tissue response after extended in vivo intervals.

  17. Does Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Cause Rib Fractures in Children? A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maguire, Sabine; Mann, Mala; John, Nia; Ellaway, Bev; Sibert, Jo R.; Kemp, Alison M.

    2006-01-01

    Background: There is a diagnostic dilemma when a child presents with rib fractures after cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) where child abuse is suspected as the cause of collapse. We have performed a systematic review to establish the evidence base for the following questions: (i) Does cardiopulmonary resuscitation cause rib fractures in…

  18. Rib Fractures : To Fix or Not to Fix? An Evidence-Based Algorithm

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bemelman, Michael; de Kruijf, M W; van Baal, Mark; Leenen, Luke

    Rib fractures are a common injury resulting from blunt chest trauma. The most important complications associated with rib fractures include death, pneumonia, and the need for mechanical ventilation. The development of new osteosynthesis materials has stimulated increased interest in the surgical

  19. The use of nylon cable ties to repair rib fractures in neonatal foals

    OpenAIRE

    Downs, Chris; Rodgerson, Dwayne

    2011-01-01

    Commercially available nylon cable ties were used as a method of internal fixation for displaced rib fractures in 8 equine neonates. The procedure was effective, well-tolerated, rapid, and inexpensive. The use of nylon cable ties as internal fixation for displaced rib fractures in foals is an effective surgical procedure.

  20. Prevalence of Abuse Among Young Children with Rib Fractures: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paine, Christine Weirich; Fakeye, Oludolapo; Christian, Cindy W.; Wood, Joanne N.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives We aimed to estimate the prevalence of abuse in young children presenting with rib fractures and to identify demographic, injury, and presentation-related characteristics that affect the probability that rib fractures are secondary to abuse. Methods We searched PubMed/MEDLINE and CINAHL databases for articles published in English between January 1, 1990 and June 30, 2014 on rib fracture etiology in children ≤ 5 years old. Two reviewers independently extracted predefined data elements and assigned quality ratings to included studies. Study-specific abuse prevalences and the sensitivities, specificities, and positive and negative likelihood ratios of patients’ demographic and clinical characteristics for abuse were calculated with 95% confidence intervals. Results Data for 1,396 children ≤ 48 months old with rib fractures were abstracted from 10 articles. Among infants Rib fracture location was not associated with likelihood of abuse. The retrospective design of the included studies and variations in ascertainment of cases, inclusion/exclusion criteria, and child abuse assessments prevented further meta-analysis. Conclusions Abuse is the most common cause of rib fractures in infants rib fractures and characteristics associated with abusive rib fractures. PMID:27749806

  1. STRESS FRACTURE OF THE FIRST RIB IN A HIGH SCHOOL WEIGHT LIFTER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroyuki Fujioka

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available A 17-year-old boy, who played a weight lifting in high school, sustained stress fracture of the first rib without any causes. We successfully treated first rib stress fracture with limitation of using the upper extremity and with using low-intensity pulsed ultrasound

  2. Evaluation of Rib Fractures on a Single-in-plane Image Reformation of the Rib Cage in CT Examinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dankerl, Peter; Seuss, Hannes; Ellmann, Stephan; Cavallaro, Alexander; Uder, Michael; Hammon, Matthias

    2017-02-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the diagnostic performance of using a reformatted single-in-plane image reformation of the rib cage for the detection of rib fractures in computed tomography (CT) examinations, employing different levels of radiological experience. We retrospectively evaluated 10 consecutive patients with and 10 patients without rib fractures, whose CT scans were reformatted to a single-in-plane image reformation of the rib cage. Eight readers (two radiologists, two residents in radiology, and four interns) independently evaluated the images for the presence of rib fractures using a reformatted single-in-plane image and a multi-planar image reformation. The time limit was 30 seconds for each read. A consensus of two radiologist readings was considered as the reference standard. Diagnostic performance (sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value [PPV], and negative predictive value [NPV]) was assessed and evaluated per rib and per location (anterior, lateral, posterior). To determine the time limit, we prospectively analyzed the average time it took radiologists to assess the rib cage, in a bone window setting, in 50 routine CT examinations. McNemar test was used to compare the diagnostic performances. Single image reformation was successful in all 20 patients. The sensitivity, specificity, PPV, and NPV for the detection of rib fractures using the conventional multi-planar read were 77.5%, 99.2%, 89.9%, and 98.0% for radiologists; 46.3%, 99.7%, 92.5%, and 95.3% for residents; and 29.4%, 99.4%, 82.5%, and 93.9% for interns, respectively. Sensitivity, PPV, and NPV increased across all three groups of experience, using the reformatted single-in-plane image of the rib cage (radiologists: 85.0%, 98.6%, and 98.7%; residents: 80.0%, 92.8%, and 98.2%; interns: 66.9%, 89.9%, and 97.1%), whereas specificity did not change significantly (99.9%, 99.4%, and 99.3%). The diagnostic performance of the interns and residents was significantly better when

  3. Traumatic Vertebral Fractures and Concomitant Fractures of the Rib in Southwest China, 2001 to 2010: An Observational Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongwei; Zhou, Yue; Ou, Lan; Li, Changqing; Liu, Jun; Xiang, Liangbi

    2015-11-01

    To our knowledge, the clinical characteristics of traumatic vertebral fractures and concomitant fractures of the rib (TVF-RF) have not been described in previous studies.To investigate the clinical characteristics of patients managed for TVF-RF. A retrospective study of 3142 patients who presented with traumatic vertebral fractures was performed. Two hundred twenty-six patients (7.2%) suffered from TVF-RF.Incidence rate ratios were then calculated with respect to the level of injury to the spine, the ASIA classification of neurological deficits and age.There were 171 male (75.7%) and 55 female (24.3%) patients with a mean age of 43.8 years. The most common mechanisms were falls from high heights in 81 cases and road traffic crashes in 67 cases. Right-sided rib injury occurred in 106 cases, left-sided injury occurred in 76 cases, and bilateral injury occurred in 44 cases. The most frequent location of the rib fractures was from the fourth rib to the ninth rib (70.3%, 510/725). Initial pulmonary complications (IPC) after trauma occurred in 116 cases (51.3%). The mortality rate for the entire group was 1.3% (3/226). The patients with thoracic vertebral fractures and neurological deficits had a higher frequency of multiple rib fractures and IPC than the other patients (P the increased number of rib fractures, the frequency of IPC and mean intensive care unit (ICU) length of stay also increased.The rates of complications for patients with rib fractures were significantly different from those without rib fractures. We should pay much attention to the patients who presented with thoracic vertebral fractures and neurological deficits for minimizing further complications and mortality in such patients who had a higher frequency of multiple rib fractures and IPC than the other patients.

  4. Delayed chest wall hematoma caused by progressive displacement of rib fractures after blunt trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nobuhiro Sato

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Rib fracture is a common injury resulting from blunt thoracic trauma. Although hemothorax and pneumothorax are known delayed complications of rib fracture, delayed chest wall hematoma has rarely been reported. We discuss the case of an 81-year-old woman who was not undergoing antiplatelet or anticoagulant therapy who presented to our emergency department after a traffic injury. This patient had a nondisplaced rib fracture that went undetected on the initial computed tomography scan; the development of progressive displacement led to hemorrhagic shock due to delayed chest wall hematoma. The chest wall hematoma was effectively diagnosed and treated via contrast-enhanced computed tomography and angiographic embolization. This case highlights the possibility of this potential delayed complication from a common injury such as a rib fracture. Keywords: Angiography, Chest wall, Delayed complication, Rib fracture, Thoracic injury

  5. Early intravenous ibuprofen decreases narcotic requirement and length of stay after traumatic rib fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayouth, Lilly; Safcsak, Karen; Cheatham, Michael L; Smith, Chadwick P; Birrer, Kara L; Promes, John T

    2013-11-01

    Pain control after traumatic rib fracture is essential to avoid respiratory complications and prolonged hospitalization. Narcotics are commonly used, but adjunctive medications such as nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs may be beneficial. Twenty-one patients with traumatic rib fractures treated with both narcotics and intravenous ibuprofen (IVIb) (Treatment) were retrospectively compared with 21 age- and rib fracture-matched patients who received narcotics alone (Control). Pain medication requirements over the first 7 hospital days were evaluated. Mean daily IVIb dose was 2070 ± 880 mg. Daily intravenous morphine-equivalent requirement was 19 ± 16 vs 32 ± 24 mg (P pain scores were lower in the Treatment group (P rib fractures significantly decreases narcotic requirement and results in clinically significant decreases in hospital length of stay. IVIb therapy should be initiated in patients with traumatic rib fractures to improve patient comfort and reduce narcotic requirement.

  6. Birth-related mid-posterior rib fractures in neonates: a report of three cases (and a possible fourth case) and a review of the literature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rijn, Rick R. van [Academic Medical Centre Amsterdam, Department of Radiology, Amsterdam Zuid-Oost (Netherlands); Bilo, Rob A.C. [Netherlands Forensic Institute, Department of Forensic Pathology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Robben, Simon G.F. [Maastricht University Medical Centre, Department of Radiology, Maastricht (Netherlands)

    2009-01-15

    Posterior rib fractures in young children have a high positive predictive value for non-accidental injury (NAI). Combined data of five studies on birth trauma (115,756 live births) showed no cases of rib fractures resulting from birth trauma. There have, however, been sporadic cases reported in the literature. We present three neonates with both posterior rib fractures and ipsilateral clavicular fractures resulting from birth trauma. A review of the literature is also presented. The common denominator and a possible mechanical aetiology are discussed. In total, 13 cases of definitive birth-related posterior rib fractures were identified. Nearly all (9/10) posterior rib fractures were (as far as reported in the original publications) in the midline. In 12 of the 13 children, birth weight was high and in 7 children birth was complicated by shoulder dystocia. An interesting finding was that in cases where a clavicular fracture was present, this was on the ipsilateral side. Radiologists, when presented with a neonate with posterior rib fractures, should be aware of this rare differential diagnosis. (orig.)

  7. Birth-related mid-posterior rib fractures in neonates: a report of three cases (and a possible fourth case) and a review of the literature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rijn, Rick R. van; Bilo, Rob A.C.; Robben, Simon G.F.

    2009-01-01

    Posterior rib fractures in young children have a high positive predictive value for non-accidental injury (NAI). Combined data of five studies on birth trauma (115,756 live births) showed no cases of rib fractures resulting from birth trauma. There have, however, been sporadic cases reported in the literature. We present three neonates with both posterior rib fractures and ipsilateral clavicular fractures resulting from birth trauma. A review of the literature is also presented. The common denominator and a possible mechanical aetiology are discussed. In total, 13 cases of definitive birth-related posterior rib fractures were identified. Nearly all (9/10) posterior rib fractures were (as far as reported in the original publications) in the midline. In 12 of the 13 children, birth weight was high and in 7 children birth was complicated by shoulder dystocia. An interesting finding was that in cases where a clavicular fracture was present, this was on the ipsilateral side. Radiologists, when presented with a neonate with posterior rib fractures, should be aware of this rare differential diagnosis. (orig.)

  8. Successful management of threatened aortic rupture late after rib fracture caused by blunt chest trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morimoto, Yoshihisa; Sugimoto, Takaki; Sakahira, Hideki; Matsuoka, Hidehito; Yoshioka, Yuki; Arase, Hiroki

    2014-05-01

    A 62-year-old man was crushed in a car accident and diagnosed with a fractured left ninth rib, pulmonary and heart contusion, hemopneumothorax, and descending aortic injury based on a computed tomography scan. He underwent chest tube drainage and was intubated for mechanical ventilation because a bone fragment of the ninth rib threatened to penetrate the descending aorta. On the second posttrauma day, computed tomography showed the bone fragment of the ninth rib approaching the descending aorta. He underwent graft replacement of the injured portion of the descending thoracic aorta, and we removed the fractured left ninth rib. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Mutiple Spontaneous Rib Fractures in Patient with Cushing's Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyun Jung; Je, Ji Hye; Seo, Ji Hye; Na, Young Ju; Yoo, Hye Jin

    2014-11-01

    Glucocorticoid (GC) excess, including Cushing's syndrome, is a common cause of secondary osteoporosis. Thirty to fifty percent of Cushing's syndrome patients experience non-traumatic fractures, which is often the presenting manifestation of Cushing's syndrome. However, there have been rare cases of Cushing's syndrome diagnosed only based upon bone manifestations. We describe a case of Cushing's syndrome that was diagnosed in a 44-year-old woman who initially visited our hospital due to multiple non-traumatic rib fractures. She did not exhibit any other manifestations of Cushing's syndrome such as moon face, buffalo hump or abdominal striae. Initially, we evaluated her for bone metastases from a cancer of unknown origin, but there was no evidence of metastatic cancer. Instead, we found a left adrenal incidentaloma. As a result of the hormone study, she was diagnosed as having Cushing's syndrome. Interestingly, her bony manifestation of Cushing's syndrome, which was evident in the bone scan and bone mineral densitometry, completely recovered after a left adrenalectomy. Therefore, the possibility of Cushing's syndrome as a cause of secondary osteoporosis should be considered in young patients with non-traumatic multiple fractures, with or without any other typical features of Cushing's syndrome.

  10. Posterior rib fractures in a young infant who received chiropractic care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Paria Majd; Greiner, Mary V; Duma, Elena M

    2012-11-01

    We report on a 21-day-old infant with healing posterior rib fractures that were noted after a chiropractic visit for colic. Chiropractors are the third largest group of health care professionals in the United States, and colic is the leading complaint for pediatric chiropractic care. Rib fractures, specifically when posterior, are traditionally considered to be secondary to nonaccidental trauma. Thorough investigation is necessary to rule out bone fragility and genetic disorders, but patient history is key when evaluating unexplained fractures.

  11. Number of rib fractures thresholds independently predict worse outcomes in older patients with blunt trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shulzhenko, Nikita O; Zens, Tiffany J; Beems, Megan V; Jung, Hee Soo; O'Rourke, Ann P; Liepert, Amy E; Scarborough, John E; Agarwal, Suresh K

    2017-04-01

    There have been conflicting reports regarding whether the number of rib fractures sustained in blunt trauma is associated independently with worse patient outcomes. We sought to investigate this risk-adjusted relationship among the lesser-studied population of older adults. A retrospective review of the National Trauma Data Bank was performed for patients with blunt trauma who were ≥65 years old and had rib fractures between 2009 and 2012 (N = 67,695). Control data were collected for age, sex, injury severity score, injury mechanism, 24 comorbidities, and number of rib fractures. Outcome data included hospital mortality, hospital and intensive care unit durations of stay, duration of mechanical ventilation, and the occurrence of pneumonia. Multiple logistic and linear regression analyses were performed. Sustaining ≥5 rib fractures was associated with increased intensive care unit admission (odds ratio: 1.14, P rib fractures was associated with an increased incidence of pneumonia (odds ratio: 1.32, P rib fractures was associated with increased mortality (odds ratio: 1.51, P rib fractures is a significant predictor of worse outcomes independent of patient characteristics, comorbidities, and trauma burden. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Retrospective evaluation and dating of non-accidental rib fractures in infants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez, T.R.; Nguyen, H.; Palacios, W.; Doherty, M.; Coulter, K.

    2013-01-01

    Aim: To describe the sequential appearance of healing rib fractures on initial and follow-up radiographs using published guidelines in approximating the age of rib fractures in infants with the aim of establishing a more objective method of dating rib fractures by measuring the thickness of the callous formation. Materials and methods: This was a retrospective analysis of initial and follow-up digital skeletal surveys of infants less than 12 months of age performed between January 2008 and January 2012 at the University of California Davis Children's Hospital. Six radiological features of rib fractures evaluating the appearance of the callous formation (C stage) and fracture line (F stage) were assessed. Patients with osteogenesis imperfecta, known vitamin D deficiency, and skeletal or metabolic dysplasia were not included in the study. Thereafter, callous thickness was measured and recorded for each stage. Results: Sixteen infants (age range 1–11 months, seven males and nine females) with 23 rib fractures were analysed. The thickness of the callous formation follows a predictable pattern advancing one stage after a 2-week follow-up with progressive callous thickening starting from stage 2, peaks at around stage 4, and then tapers and remodels until it almost disappears when the fracture is healed at stage 6. Conclusion: It appears that rib fractures in infants follow a predictable pattern of healing. Measuring the thickness of the callous formation is a more objective way of guiding the radiologist in estimating the age of the fracture

  13. Use of a 90° drill and screwdriver for rib fracture stabilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickerson, Terry P; Kim, Brian D; Zielinski, Martin D; Jenkins, Donald; Schiller, Henry J

    2015-03-01

    Rib fracture stabilization has become a more accepted practice although stabilization of the most cephalad ribs presents a unique challenge. We present our experience with use of a 90° drill and screwdriver to bridge these difficult rib fractures. This retrospective review included patients who underwent rib fracture stabilization from August 1, 2009, through September 30, 2012. Patients were divided into two groups: those whose procedure used the 90° device and those that did not. Data were compared using standard statistical analysis and reported as percentages and medians [interquartile ranges]. P values rib stabilized was different between the 2 groups (3 [2-5] vs. 5 [2-9]; P = 0.001), with more third rib stabilizations in the 90° group (38 vs. 20%; P = 0.04) as well as more total number of ribs fixed (5 vs. 4; P = 0.001). There was no difference in operative time between the 2 groups. The surgical reach for rib fracture stabilization has been extended with use of a 90° drill and screwdriver. High fractures under the scapula where access is technically challenging can be stabilized without prolonging operative times.

  14. Exercise-induced rib stress fractures: influence of reduced bone mineral density

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinther, Anders; Kanstrup, Inge-Lis; Christiansen, Erik

    2005-01-01

    study investigated BMD in seven Danish national team rowers with previous rib stress fracture (RSF) and 7 controls (C) matched for gender, age, height, weight and training experience. Total body scan and specific scans of the lumbar spine (L2-L4), femoral neck and distal radius were performed using......Exercise-induced rib stress fractures have been reported frequently in elite rowers during the past decade. The etiology of rib stress fractures is unclear, but low bone mineral density (BMD) has been suggested to be a potential risk factor for stress fractures in weight-bearing bones. The present...... density may be a potential risk factor for the development of exercise-induced rib stress fractures in elite rowers....

  15. Isolated Cervical Rib Fracture: A Rare Etiology of Thoracic Outlet Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rayees Ahmad Dar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Isolated fracture of a cervical rib is a very rare entity and usually presents as a painless swelling or as thoracic outlet syndrome. We describe a case of a 45-year-old woman with history of fall two months back. She presented with symptoms of neurogenic thoracic outlet syndrome for one month. Isolated left cervical rib fracture was documented on X-ray cervical spine. Her fractured cervical rib was resected through a supraclavicular approach, and symptoms resolved completely in the postoperative period.

  16. Preoperative three-dimensional printing for surgical stabilization of rib fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Chun Lin

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary trauma is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with major trauma. Chest wall contusion with rib fracture is very common. Surgical stabilization of rib fracture (SSRF has traditionally required an exploratory thoracotomy for adequate exposure. Minimally invasive approaches for SSRF are now being developed. However, preoperative localization of rib fractures and intraoperative designing of titanium plates require additional time. We present a novel technique involving three-dimensional printing for promoting SSRF with a minimally invasive approach that is efficient and provides good patient outcomes.

  17. Thoracic Outlet Syndrome in a Volleyball Player Due to Nonunion of the First Rib Fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puttmann, Kathleen T; Satiani, Bhagwan; Vaccaro, Patrick

    2016-11-01

    Fracture of the first rib with ensuing callus formation is a rare cause of thoracic outlet syndrome. We report a case of a 17-year-old female volleyball player who presented with months of chronic arm pain. Radiographic imaging demonstrated nonunion fracture of the first rib. Physical therapy had been unsuccessful in relieving the pain, and surgical management was performed with resection of the first rib through a transaxillary approach with complete resolution of symptoms. Inflammation surrounding such fractures may destroy tissue planes, making dissection more technically difficult.

  18. Compressive rib fracture: peri-mortem and post-mortem trauma patterns in a pig model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kieser, Jules A; Weller, Sarah; Swain, Michael V; Neil Waddell, J; Das, Raj

    2013-07-01

    Despite numerous studies on high impact fractures of ribs, little is known about compressive rib injuries. We studied rib fractures from a biomechanical and morphological perspective using 15, 5th ribs of domestic pigs Sus scrofa, divided into two groups, desiccated (representing post-mortem trauma) and fresh ribs with intact periosteum (representing peri-mortem trauma). Ribs were axially compressed and subjected to four-point bending in an Instron 3339 fitted with custom jigs. Morphoscopic analysis of resultant fractures consisted of standard optical methods, micro-CT (μCT) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). During axial compression, fresh ribs had slightly higher strength because of energy absorption capabilities of their soft and fluidic components. In flexure tests, dry ribs showed typical elastic-brittle behaviour with long linear load-extension curves, followed by relatively short non-linear elastic (hyperelastic) behaviour and brittle fracture. Fresh ribs showed initial linear-elastic behaviour, followed by strain softening, visco-plastic responses. During the course of loading, dry bone showed minimal observable damage prior to the onset of unstable fracture. In contrast, fresh bone showed buckling-like damage features on the compressive surface and cracking parallel to the axis of the bone. Morphologically, all dry ribs fractured precipitously, whereas all but one of the fresh ribs showed incomplete fracture. The mode of fracture, however, was remarkably similar for both groups, with butterfly fractures predominating (7/15, 46.6% dry and wet). Our study highlights the fact that under controlled loading, despite seemingly similar butterfly fracture morphology, fresh ribs (representing perimortem trauma) show a non-catastrophic response. While extensive strain softening observed for the fresh bone does show some additional micro-cracking damage, it appears that the periosteum may play a key role in imparting the observed pseudo-ductility to the ribs

  19. Anatomically contoured plates for fixation of rib fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottlang, Michael; Helzel, Inga; Long, William B; Madey, Steven

    2010-03-01

    : Intraoperative contouring of long bridging plates for stabilization of flail chest injuries is difficult and time consuming. This study implemented for the first time biometric parameters to derive anatomically contoured rib plates. These plates were tested on a range of cadaveric ribs to quantify plate fit and to extract a best-fit plating configuration. : Three left and three right rib plates were designed, which accounted for anatomic parameters required when conforming a plate to the rib surface. The length lP over which each plate could trace the rib surface was evaluated on 109 cadaveric ribs. For each rib level 3-9, the plate design with the highest lP value was extracted to determine a best-fit plating configuration. Furthermore, the characteristic twist of rib surfaces was measured on 49 ribs to determine the surface congruency of anatomic plates with a constant twist. : The tracing length lP of the best-fit plating configuration ranged from 12.5 cm to 14.7 cm for ribs 3-9. The corresponding range for standard plates was 7.1-13.7 cm. The average twist of ribs over 8-cm, 12-cm, and 16-cm segments was 8.3 degrees, 20.6 degrees, and 32.7 degrees, respectively. The constant twist of anatomic rib plates was not significantly different from the average rib twist. : A small set of anatomic rib plates can minimize the need for intraoperative plate contouring for fixation of ribs 3-9. Anatomic rib plates can therefore reduce the time and complexity of flail chest stabilization and facilitate spanning of flail segments with long plates.

  20. Absence of uptake of the rib cage; diagnosis of a Poland's syndrome with the bone SPECT-CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Granier, P.; Mourad, M.

    2008-01-01

    We report the case of a 37-year-old man, investigated for pains of the right upper limb impairing the hand, the wrist and the shoulder after a surgery for fracture of the radius and the scaphoid. The 99m Tc-H.D.P. three-phase bone scintigraphy confirmed the diagnosis of acute phase of a reflex sympathetic dystrophy. The delayed images highlighted a focal absence of tracer uptake of the left anterior rib cage. The single photon emission computerized tomography guided by computerized tomography showed that it was related to the absence of the anterior part of the third and the fourth left ribs highlighting an aplasia of the left pectoralis major muscle. These anomalies led to the diagnosis of congenital malformation in connection with a Poland's syndrome. The differential diagnosis of this syndrome resulted in discussing the multiple etiologies of the photopenic lesions of the rib cage. (authors)

  1. Prevalence and characteristics of rib fractures in ex-preterm infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas-Herald, Angela; Butler, Sandra; Mactier, Helen; McDevitt, Helen; Young, David; Ahmed, Syed Faisal

    2012-12-01

    This study aimed to identify the prevalence and characteristics of rib fractures in ex-preterm infants. Infants born at rib fractures, and the case notes of all affected individuals were scrutinized. Of the 3318 eligible preterm infants, 1446 had a total of 9386 chest radiographs. Of these infants, 26 (1.8%) were identified as having a total of 62 rib fractures. Their median (range) gestation at birth was 26 weeks (23-34). The median chronological age of these infants at the time of the radiograph was 14 weeks (5 weeks to 8 months). The median corrected gestational age at the time of the radiograph was 39 weeks (34 weeks to 4 months). Of the 62 fractures, 27 (36%) were sited posteriorly, and 15 (53%) of the infants with posterior rib fractures were diagnosed with osteopathy of prematurity. Classic risk including conjugated hyperbilirubinemia and diuretics, were present in 23 of 26 (88%) infants. A full skeletal survey was performed in 8 of 26 (31%). Investigations for nonaccidental injury occurred in 4 of 26 (15%) cases. Evidence of rib fractures is present in ~2% of ex-preterm infants. The evaluation of these fractures in infancy requires a detailed neonatal history irrespective of the site of rib fracture.

  2. When Should Abdominal Computed Tomography Be Considered in Patients with Lower Rib Fractures?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeroukhimov, Igor; Hershkovitz, Yehuda; Wiser, Itay; Kessel, Boris; Ayyad, Mohammed; Gatot, Inbar; Shapira, Zahar; Jeoravlev, Svetlana; Halevy, Ariel; Lavy, Ron

    2017-05-01

    Lower rib fractures are considered as a marker of intra-abdominal organ injury. Abdominal computed tomography (CT) is the "gold standard" examination for patients with lower rib fractures. However, the reported incidence of concomitant intra-abdominal injuries (IAI) is 20%-40%. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the incidence of intra-abdominal organ injuries in blunt trauma patients with lower rib fractures. Medical charts and radiology reports of patients with lower rib (from the 8th to 12th rib) fractures admitted to our center during a 6-year period were retrospectively reviewed. Patients were divided into two groups. Group I included patients with intra-abdominal injury (IAI) diagnosed either by CT or on urgent laparotomy, and Group II included those with normal abdominal CT scans. Data included demographics, mechanism of injury, laboratory tests, radiology results including number and location of fractured ribs, and incidence of IAI. Overall 318 patients were included in the study. Fifty-seven patients (17.9%) had 71 IAIs compared with 265 (82.1%) patients with no IAI. Logistic regression identified age younger than 55 years (relative risk [RR] = 7.2; 95% confidence interval [CI] 3.1-16.8; p = 0.001), bilateral rib fractures (RR = 3.9; 95% CI 1.1-13.5; p = 0.03) and decreased levels of hematocrit (RR = 2.4; 95% CI 1.2-4.8; p = 0.016) as independent risk factors for the presence of IAI. Abdominal CT should be considered in blunt trauma patients with lower rib fractures who are younger than 55 years of age and have bilateral rib fractures and decreased levels of hematocrit on admission. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Frequency of intrathoracic injuries in children younger than 3 years with rib fractures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darling, Stephen E.; Done, Stephen L.; Friedman, Seth D.; Feldman, Kenneth W.

    2014-01-01

    Research documents that among children admitted to trauma intensive care units the number of rib fractures sustained indicates the child's likelihood of having and severity of intrathoracic injury. This has been misused in court to argue that children with multiple rib fractures who lack intrathoracic injury have abnormal bone fragility rather than inflicted injury. To determine frequency of intrathoracic injuries in children younger than 3 years with rib fractures in cases of child abuse and accidental trauma. We conducted a retrospective review of rib fractures caused by documented abuse or accidents from 2003 to 2010 in children treated at Seattle Children's Hospital and Harborview Medical Center. A senior pediatric radiologist and radiology fellow independently reviewed the imaging. Children with bone demineralization were excluded. Descriptive and simple comparative statistics were used. Seventy-two percent (47/65) of infants and toddlers with rib fractures were abused. Abused children had more rib fractures than accidentally injured children (5.55 vs. 3.11, P = 0.012). However intrathoracic injuries as a whole (55.6% vs. 12.8%, P < 0.001) and individual types of intrathoracic injuries were more common with accidents. Rates of other thoracic cage injuries did not differ substantially (27.8% accidents vs. 12.8% abuse, P = 0.064). Intracranial and intra-abdominal injuries and skull fractures were equally frequent, but other extrathoracic fractures were more common with abuse (70.2% vs. 16.7%, P < 0.001). Abused infants and toddlers have fewer intrathoracic injuries but more rib fractures than accidentally injured peers. This likely reflects different injury mechanics. Lack of intrathoracic injuries in abused children with rib fractures does not imply bone fragility. (orig.)

  4. Frequency of intrathoracic injuries in children younger than 3 years with rib fractures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darling, Stephen E. [Kapiolani Children' s Hospital, The Department of Radiology, Honolulu, HI (United States); Done, Stephen L.; Friedman, Seth D. [Seattle Children' s Hospital, The Department' s of Radiology, Seattle, WA (United States); University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, WA (United States); Feldman, Kenneth W. [Seattle Children' s Hospital, Pediatrics, General Pediatrics Division, Seattle, WA (United States); Seattle Children' s Protection Program, Children' s Protection Program, M/S M2-10, Seattle, WA (United States); University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2014-10-15

    Research documents that among children admitted to trauma intensive care units the number of rib fractures sustained indicates the child's likelihood of having and severity of intrathoracic injury. This has been misused in court to argue that children with multiple rib fractures who lack intrathoracic injury have abnormal bone fragility rather than inflicted injury. To determine frequency of intrathoracic injuries in children younger than 3 years with rib fractures in cases of child abuse and accidental trauma. We conducted a retrospective review of rib fractures caused by documented abuse or accidents from 2003 to 2010 in children treated at Seattle Children's Hospital and Harborview Medical Center. A senior pediatric radiologist and radiology fellow independently reviewed the imaging. Children with bone demineralization were excluded. Descriptive and simple comparative statistics were used. Seventy-two percent (47/65) of infants and toddlers with rib fractures were abused. Abused children had more rib fractures than accidentally injured children (5.55 vs. 3.11, P = 0.012). However intrathoracic injuries as a whole (55.6% vs. 12.8%, P < 0.001) and individual types of intrathoracic injuries were more common with accidents. Rates of other thoracic cage injuries did not differ substantially (27.8% accidents vs. 12.8% abuse, P = 0.064). Intracranial and intra-abdominal injuries and skull fractures were equally frequent, but other extrathoracic fractures were more common with abuse (70.2% vs. 16.7%, P < 0.001). Abused infants and toddlers have fewer intrathoracic injuries but more rib fractures than accidentally injured peers. This likely reflects different injury mechanics. Lack of intrathoracic injuries in abused children with rib fractures does not imply bone fragility. (orig.)

  5. Bilateral first rib anomalous articulations with pseudarthroses mimicking healing fractures in an infant with abusive head injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasquale-Styles, Melissa A; Crowder, Christian M; Fridie, Jeannette; Milla, Sarah S

    2014-11-01

    Bilateral symmetric bone nodules were observed in the anterolateral first ribs of an infant with shaking injuries at autopsy. The location prompted diagnostic considerations of healing fractures versus anomalous articulations with pseudarthroses. The forensic pathologist worked with forensic anthropologists and pediatric radiologists to evaluate autopsy findings and compare premortem and postmortem X-rays. Gross examination of the bones by the pathologist and anthropologists confirmed bilateral, callus-like bone nodules in first-rib locations associated with pseudarthroses. Histologic examination of one of the bones further showed features most consistent with pseudarthrosis, not a healing fracture. Radiologists then compared multiple premortem and postmortem radiographs that showed no remodeling of the bone over a 2-week interval between the time of injury and death, which would be unexpected for a healing fracture in an infant. This multidisciplinary approach resulted in the appropriate diagnosis of pseudarthroses due to anomalous articulations, an uncommon finding in forensic pathology. © 2014 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  6. Surgical Treatment of Snapping Scapula Syndrome Due to Malunion of Rib Fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ten Duis, Kaj; IJpma, Frank F A

    2017-02-01

    This report describes a case of snapping scapula syndrome (SSS) caused by malunited rib fractures. Abrasion of the deformed ribs was performed with good results. SSS as a cause of shoulder pain after thoracic trauma has to be considered and can be treated by a surgical abrasion technique. Copyright © 2017 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Rib fractures after reirradiation plus hyperthermia for recurrent breast cancer. Predictive factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oldenborg, Sabine; Valk, Christel; Os, Rob van; Voerde Sive Voerding, Paul zum; Crezee, Hans; Tienhoven, Geertjan van; Rasch, Coen; Oei, Bing; Venselaar, Jack; Randen, Adrienne van

    2016-01-01

    Combining reirradiation (reRT) and hyperthermia (HT) has shown high therapeutic value for patients with locoregional recurrent breast cancer (LR). However, additional toxicity of reirradiation (e.g., rib fractures) may occur. The aim of this study is to determine the impact of potential risk factors on the occurrence of rib fractures. From 1982-2005, 234 patients were treated with adjuvant reRT + HT after surgery for LR. ReRT consisted typically of 8 fractions of 4 Gy twice a week, or 12 fractions of 3 Gy four times a week. A total of 118 patients were irradiated with abutted photon and electron fields. In all, 60 patients were irradiated using either one or alternating combinations of abutted AP electron fields. Hyperthermia was given once or twice a week. The 5-year infield local control (LC) rate was 70 %. Rib fractures were detected in 16 of 234 patients (actuarial risk: 7 % at 5 years). All rib fractures occurred in patients treated with a combination of photon and abutted electron fields (p = 0.000); in 15 of 16 patients fractures were located in the abutment regions. The other significant predictive factors for rib fractures were a higher fraction dose (p = 0.040), large RT fields, and treatment before the year 2000. ReRT + HT results in long-term LC. The majority of rib fractures were located in the photon/electron abutment area, emphasizing the disadvantage of field overlap. Large abutted photon/electron fields combined with 4 Gy fractions increase the number of rib fractures in this study group. However, as these factors were highly correlated no relative importance of the individual factors could be estimated. Increasing the number of HT sessions a week does not increase the risk of rib fractures. (orig.) [de

  8. Trauma patient adverse outcomes are independently associated with rib cage fracture burden and severity of lung, head, and abdominal injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunham, C Michael; Hileman, Barbara M; Ransom, Kenneth J; Malik, Rema J

    2015-01-01

    We hypothesized that lung injury and rib cage fracture quantification would be associated with adverse outcomes. Consecutive admissions to a trauma center with Injury Severity Score ≥ 9, age 18-75, and blunt trauma. CT scans were reviewed to score rib and sternal fractures and lung infiltrates. Sternum and each anterior, lateral, and posterior rib fracture was scored 1 = non-displaced and 2 = displaced. Rib cage fracture score (RCFS) = total rib fracture score + sternal fracture score + thoracic spine Abbreviated Injury Score (AIS). Four lung regions (right upper/middle, right lower, left upper, and left lower lobes) were each scored for % of infiltrate: 0% = 0; ≤ 20% = 1, ≤ 50% = 2, > 50% = 3; total of 4 scores = lung infiltrate score (LIS). Of 599 patients, 193 (32%) had 854 rib fractures. Rib fracture patients had more abdominal injuries (p fractures (p = 0.0028) and death or need for mechanical ventilation ≥ 3 days (Death/Vdays ≥ 3) (p rib fracture patients, Glasgow Coma Score 3-12 or head AIS ≥ 2 occurred in 43%. A lung infiltrate or hemo/pneumothorax occurred in 55%. Thoracic spine injury occurred in 23%. RCFS was 6.3 ± 4.4 and Death/Vdays ≥ 3 occurred in 31%. Death/Vdays ≥ 3 rates correlated with RCFS values: 19% for 1-3; 24% for 4-6; 42% for 7-12 and 65% for ≥ 13 (p rib fracture score (p = 0.08) or number of fractured ribs (p = 0.80). Rib fracture patients have increased risk for truncal injuries and adverse outcomes. Adverse outcomes are independently associated with rib cage fracture burden. Severity of head, abdominal, and lung injuries also influence rib fracture outcomes.

  9. First rib fractures: not always a hallmark of severe trauma-a report of three cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaiswal Atin

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available 【Abstract】According to medical literature, fracture of the first rib is quite rare and the bilateral condition is especially rare. This type of fracture is usually associated with severe intrathoracic trauma and other bony or neurovascular injuries, thus can be considered as a harbinger of major trauma. However here we present three cases of low velocity first rib fractures without any major trauma or multisystem injuries. All the three patients were treated conservatively and did well on simple analgesics and rest and had no early or late complications. It can be seen that not all the first rib fractures are associated with major trauma or multisystem injuries. There is a variant of first rib fracture with low velocity injuries which is not associated with any major complications in contrast to majority of first rib fractures associated with high velocity injuries. Causative factor of such injuries may be violent muscular contraction of scalenus anterior or serratus anterior, but not direct trauma. Key words: Rib fractures; Wounds and injuries; Multiple trauma

  10. The Efficacy of Platelet-Rich Plasma in the Treatment of Rib Fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunay, Samil; Candan, Huseyin; Yılmaz, Rahsan; Eser, Irfan; Aydoğmus, Umit

    2017-10-01

    Background  Rib fracture is the most common result of thoracic traumas. Intrapulmonary shunt, alveolar capillary membrane damage, intra-alveolar hemorrhage, and hypoxia may develop following rib fractures. Therefore, prompt treatment is important. The aim of this experimental study was to analyze the effects of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) on rib fractures to secure a speedier and more efficient treatment method. Materials and Methods  The study involved 18 New Zealand white rabbits, randomly divided into three groups as Group 1, the sham group with no surgical intervention; Group 2, the control group in which simple rib fractures were applied and no treatment; and Group 3, in which rib fractures were applied and then PRP treatment was administered. Results  The mean recovery plate thickness measurements were found to be statistically significantly higher in the PRP group compared with the other groups ( p  rib fractures and used easily in pseudoarthrosis, surgical fracture, or flail chest. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  11. Comprehensive approach to the management of the patient with multiple rib fractures: a review and introduction of a bundled rib fracture management protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witt, Cordelie E; Bulger, Eileen M

    2017-01-01

    Rib fractures are common among patients sustaining blunt trauma, and are markers of severe bodily and solid organ injury. They are associated with high morbidity and mortality, including multiple pulmonary complications, and can lead to chronic pain and disability. Clinical and radiographic scoring systems have been developed at several institutions to predict risk of complications. Clinical strategies to reduce morbidity have been studied, including multimodal pain management, catheter-based analgesia, pulmonary hygiene, and operative stabilization. In this article, we review risk factors for morbidity and complications, intervention strategies, and discuss experience with bundled clinical pathways for rib fractures. In addition, we introduce the multidisciplinary rib fracture management protocol used at our level I trauma center.

  12. [Surgical fixation of rib fractures with clips and titanium bars (STRATOS System). Preliminary experience].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno De La Santa Barajas, Pablo; Polo Otero, María Dolores; Delgado Sánchez-Gracián, Carlos; Lozano Gómez, Manuel; Toscano Novella, Alberto; Calatayud Moscoso Del Prado, Julia; Leal Ruiloba, Sonsoles; Choren Durán, Maria L

    2010-09-01

    Rib fractures are very common in closed chest injuries. The majority of these patients suffer significant pain with movement and cough. The purpose of this study is to assess the usefulness of titanium rib bars and clips in stabilising rib fractures. Twenty-two patients with rib fractures were treated with open reduction and internal fixation between 2008 and 2009. Indications for treatment were defined as; 1) Patients with unstable chest (13 patients), 2) Patients with pain or instability due to rib fractures (6 patients), and 3) Significant traumatic deformities of the chest wall (3 patients). Age, traumatic mechanism, chest and associated injuries, surgical data, complications and follow-up were prospectively analysed. The surgical technique is described. The majority of patients were extubated immediately after surgery. All patients with pain or instability showed a subjective improvement or disappearance of pain after the surgery. Four patients had a wound infection which had to be drained. After 3 months, 55% of the patients had returned to work or normal life. The results in each group are described. Open reduction with internal fixation of rib fractures is a good alternative. The use of titanium rib bars and clips give good clinical results, are easy to apply and have few complications. Copyright © 2010 AEC. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  13. Phrenic Arterial Injury Presenting as Delayed Hemothorax Complicating Simple Rib Fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Hong Joon; Lee, Jun Wan; Kim, Kun Dong; You, In Sool

    2016-04-01

    Delayed hemothorax after blunt torso injury is rare, but might be associated with significant morbidity and mortality. We present a case of delayed hemothorax bleeding from phrenic artery injury in a 24-year-old woman. The patient suffered from multiple rib fractures on the right side, a right hemopneumothorax, thoracic vertebral injury and a pelvic bone fracture after a fall from a fourth floor window. Delayed hemothorax associated with phrenic artery bleeding, caused by a stab injury from a fractured rib segment, was treated successfully by a minimally invasive thoracoscopic surgery. Here, we have shown that fracture of a lower rib or ribs might be accompanied by delayed massive hemothorax that can be rapidly identified and promptly managed by thoracoscopic means.

  14. Plating versus wiring for fixation of traumatic rib and sternal fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mostafa Kamel Abd-Elnaim

    2017-12-01

    Conclusions: Plating of rib and sternal fractures had better outcome than wiring, regarding better chest wall stability and restoration of chest contour; also it had shorter intensive care unit, hospital and ventilator days.

  15. Successful emergency pain control for posterior rib fractures with ultrasound-guided erector spinae plane block.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luftig, Josh; Mantuani, Daniel; Herring, Andrew A; Dixon, Brittany; Clattenburg, Eben; Nagdev, Arun

    2017-12-28

    The Eastern Association for the Surgery of Trauma and Trauma Anesthesiology Society Guidelines recommend prompt and effective multimodal analgesia for rib fractures that combines regional anesthesia (RA) techniques with pharmacotherapy to treat pain, optimize pulmonary function, and reduce opioid related complications. However, RA techniques such as epidurals and paravertebral blocks, are generally underutilized or unavailable for emergency department (ED) patients. The recently described serratus anterior plane block (SAPB) is a promising technique, but failures with posterior rib fractures have been observed. The erector spinae plane block (ESPB) is conceptually similar to the SAPB, but targets the posterior thorax making it likely more effective for ED patients with posterior rib fractures. Our initial experience demonstrates consistent success with the ESPB for traumatic posterior rib fracture analgesia. Herein, we present the first description of the ESPB utilized in the ED. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Assessment and management of rib fracture pain in geriatric population: an ode to old age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wardhan, Richa

    2013-10-01

    Pain management for traumatic rib fractures has been described in literature, but there is paucity of data when it comes to acute pain management in the elderly, let alone pain resulting from traumatic rib fractures. This article focuses on challenges of assessment of pain in elderly patients and the various options available for pain management including utilization of nerve blocks. Nerve blocks are instrumental in treating rib fracture pain along with utilization of opioids and nonopioids thus formulating a multimodal approach to pain management. The goal is to devise a proper pain management regimen for geriatric patients with rib fractures to decrease the morbidity and mortality associated with it. Developing institutional protocols is one step forward towards quality care for such patients.

  17. Risk Factors for Pneumonia in Ventilated Trauma Patients with Multiple Rib Fractures

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Hyun Oh; Kang, Dong Hoon; Moon, Seong Ho; Yang, Jun Ho; Kim, Sung Hwan; Byun, Joung Hun

    2017-01-01

    Background: Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) is a common disease that may contribute to morbidity and mortality among trauma patients in the intensive care unit (ICU). This study evaluated the associations between trauma factors and the development of VAP in ventilated patients with multiple rib fractures. Methods: We retrospectively and consecutively evaluated 101 patients with multiple rib fractures who were ventilated and managed at our hospital between January 2010 and De...

  18. Clinical Analysis for the Correlation of Intra-abdominal Organ Injury in the Patients with Rib Fracture

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Seongsik

    2012-01-01

    Background Although it is rare for the fracture itself to become a life threatening injury in patients suffering from rib fracture, the lives of these patients are occasionally threatened by other associated injuries. Especially, early discovery of patients with rib fracture and intra-abdominal organ injury is extremely important to the prognosis. This study analyzed the link between rib fracture and intra-abdominal injury to achieve improved treatment. Materials and Methods Among trauma pati...

  19. A prospective, controlled clinical evaluation of surgical stabilization of severe rib fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pieracci, Fredric M; Lin, Yihan; Rodil, Maria; Synder, Madelyne; Herbert, Benoit; Tran, Dong Kha; Stoval, Robert T; Johnson, Jeffrey L; Biffl, Walter L; Barnett, Carlton C; Cothren-Burlew, Clay; Fox, Charles; Jurkovich, Gregory J; Moore, Ernest E

    2016-02-01

    Previous studies of surgical stabilization of rib fractures (SSRF) have been limited by small sample sizes, retrospective methodology, and inclusion of only patients with flail chest. We performed a prospective, controlled evaluation of SSRF as compared with optimal medical management for severe rib fracture patterns among critically ill trauma patients. We hypothesized that SSRF improves acute outcomes. We conducted a 2-year clinical evaluation of patients with any of the following rib fracture patterns: flail chest, three or more fractures with bicortical displacement, 30% or greater hemithorax volume loss, and either severe pain or respiratory failure despite optimal medical management. In the year 2013, all patients were managed nonoperatively. In the year 2014, all patients were managed operatively. Outcomes included respiratory failure, tracheostomy, pneumonia, ventilator days, tracheostomy, length of stay, daily maximum incentive spirometer volume, narcotic requirements, and mortality. Univariate and multivariable analyses were performed. Seventy patients were included, 35 in each group. For the operative group, time from injury to surgery was 2.4 day, operative time was 1.5 hours, and the ratio of ribs fixed to ribs fractured was 0.6. The operative group had a significantly higher RibScore (4 vs. 3, respectively, p fracture patterns. Therapeutic study, level II.

  20. Biomechanical investigation of impact induced rib fractures of a porcine infant surrogate model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackburne, William B; Waddell, J Neil; Swain, Michael V; Alves de Sousa, Ricardo J; Kieser, Jules A

    2016-09-01

    This study investigated the structural, biomechanical and fractographic features of rib fractures in a piglet model, to test the hypothesis that fist impact, apart from thoracic squeezing, may result in lateral costal fractures as observed in abused infants. A mechanical fist with an accelerometer was constructed and fixed to a custom jig. Twenty stillborn piglets in the supine position were impacted on the thoracic cage. The resultant force versus time curves from the accelerometer data showed a number of steps indicative of rib fracture. The correlation between impact force and number of fractures was statistically significant (Pearson׳s r=0.528). Of the fractures visualized, 15 completely pierced the parietal pleura of the thoracic wall, and 5 had butterfly fracture patterning. Scanning electron microscopy showed complete bone fractures, at the zone of impact, were normal to the axis of the ribs. Incomplete vertical fractures, with bifurcation, occurred on the periphery of the contact zone. This work suggests the mechanism of rib failure during a fist impact is typical of the transverse fracture pattern in the anterolateral region associated with cases of non-accidental rib injury. The impact events investigated have a velocity of ~2-3m/s, approximately 2×10(4) times faster than previous quasi-static axial and bending tests. While squeezing the infantile may induce buckle fractures in the anterior as well as posterior region of the highly flexible bones, a fist punch impact event may result in anterolateral transverse fractures. Hence, these findings suggest that the presence of anterolateral rib fractures may result from impact rather than manual compression. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Reoperative surgical stabilization of a painful nonunited rib fracture using bone grafting and a metal plate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Yang Hyun; Kim, Hyun Koo; Kang, Du-Young; Choi, Young Ho

    2009-09-01

    We report a case of a nonunited sixth rib in a patient with multiple rib fractures who underwent internal fixation using a wire and Judet strut 3 times. During the following 3 years, the patient continued to complain of pain and instability. At surgery, a pseudarthrosis between the ends of the sixth rib was excised. A longitudinal gutter crossing the fracture site was fashioned and splinted with an inlay block of cancellous bone grafted from the iliac crest; stabilization was accomplished with a reconstruction plate and screws. The following 2 years of follow-up demonstrated no instability or pain.

  2. Value of postmortem thoracic CT over radiography in imaging of pediatric rib fractures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Terence S.; Babyn, Paul S. [The Hospital for Sick Children, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Toronto (Canada); Reyes, Jeanette A.; Chiasson, David A. [The Hospital for Sick Children, Department of Paediatric Laboratory Medicine, Toronto (Canada); Moineddin, Rahim [University of Toronto, Department of Family and Community Medicine, Toronto (Canada); Berdon, Walter E. [Columbia Presbyterian Medical Center, Babies Hospital, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States)

    2011-06-15

    Studies have reported that thoracic CT may provide greater sensitivity compared with radiography in detection of pediatric rib fractures and fracture healing. The additional sensitivity afforded by thoracic CT may have medicolegal implications where abuse is suspected. To determine the additional value of postmortem thoracic CT compared with radiography in detecting pediatric rib fractures, and fracture healing, using autopsy findings as a gold standard. We retrospectively reviewed 56 coroner's cases with postmortem radiography and CT thoracic survey. All studies underwent primary interpretation by one or two radiologists. The study radiologist independently reviewed all images from 13 patients with positive findings on radiography, CT or autopsy. Sensitivity and specificity between observers and imaging modalities were compared. Primary interpretation: Fractures were recognized on radiography in 5/12 patients who had fractures found at autopsy, and on CT in 8/12 patients. In total, 29% (24/83) of fractures were reported on radiography, and 51% (52/101) of fractures were reported on CT. Study radiologist: Fractures were recognized on radiography in 7/12 patients who had fractures found at autopsy, and on CT in 11/12 patients. In total, 46% (38/83) of fractures were reported on radiography, and 85% (86/101) of fractures were reported on CT. Postmortem thoracic CT provides greater sensitivity than radiography in detecting pediatric rib fractures, most notably in anterior and posterior fractures. However, the degree of improvement in sensitivity provided by CT might depend on observer experience. (orig.)

  3. [Comparison of clinical effectiveness of thoracic epidural and intravenous patient-controlled analgesia for the treatment of rib fractures pain in intensive care unit].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topçu, Ismet; Ekici, Zeynep; Sakarya, Melek

    2007-07-01

    The results of thoracic epidural and systemic patient controlled analgesia practice were evaluated retrospectively in patients with thoracic trauma. Patients who were admitted to the intensive care unit between 1997 and 2003, with a diagnosis of multiple rib fractures related to thoracic trauma were evaluated retrospectively. Data were recorded from 49 patients who met the following criteria; three or more rib fractures, initiation of PCA with I.V. phentanyl or thoracic epidural analgesia with phentanyl and bupivacaine. There were no significant differences between the groups concerning injury severity score. APACHE II score (8.1+/-1.6 and 9.2+/-1.7) and the number of rib fractures (4+/-1.1 and 6.8+/-2.7) were higher in thoracic epidural analgesia group (pPain scores of patients who received thoracic epidural analgesia were significantly lower as from 6th hour during whole therapy (prib fractures who require intensive care.

  4. Rib and sternum fractures in the elderly and extreme elderly following motor vehicle crashes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Vishal; Conroy, Carol; Chang, David; Tominaga, Gail T; Coimbra, Raul

    2011-05-01

    As the population ages, the need to protect the elderly during motor vehicle crashes becomes increasingly critical. This study focuses on causation of elderly rib and sternum fractures in seriously injured elderly occupants involved in motor vehicle crashes. We used data from the Crash Injury Research and Engineering Network (CIREN) database (1997-2009). Study case criteria included occupant (≥ 65 years old) drivers (sitting in the left outboard position of the first row) or passengers (sitting in the first row right outboard position) who were in frontal or side impacts. To avoid selection bias, only occupants with a Maximum Abbreviated Injury Scale (MAIS) 3 (serious) or greater severity injury were included in this study. Odds ratios were used as a descriptive measure of the strength of association between variables and Chi square tests were used to determine if there was a statistically significant relationship between categorical variables. Of the 211 elderly (65-79 years old) occupants with thoracic injury, 92.0% had rib fractures and 19.6% had sternum fractures. For the 76 extreme elderly (80 years or older) with thoracic injury, 90.4% had rib fractures and 27.7% had sternum fractures. Except for greater mortality and more rib fractures caused by safety belts, there were no differences between the extreme elderly and the elderly occupants. Current safety systems may need to be redesigned to prevent rib and sternum fractures in occupants 80 years and older. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Surveyed opinion of American trauma, orthopedic, and thoracic surgeons on rib and sternal fracture repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayberry, John C; Ham, L Bruce; Schipper, Paul H; Ellis, Thomas J; Mullins, Richard J

    2009-03-01

    Rib and sternal fracture repair are controversial. The opinion of surgeons regarding those patients who would benefit from repair is unknown. Members of the Eastern Association for the Surgery of Trauma, the Orthopedic Trauma Association, and thoracic surgeons (THS) affiliated with teaching hospitals in the United States were recruited to complete an electronic survey regarding rib and sternal fracture repair. Two hundred thirty-eight trauma surgeons (TRS), 97 orthopedic trauma surgeons (OTS), and 70 THS completed the survey. Eighty-two percent of TRS, 66% of OTS, and 71% of THS thought that rib fracture repair was indicated in selected patients. A greater proportion of surgeons thought that sternal fracture repair was indicated in selected patients (89% of TRS, 85% of OTS, and 95% of THS). Chest wall defect/pulmonary hernia (58%) and sternal fracture nonunion (>6 weeks) (68%) were the only two indications accepted by a majority of respondents. Twenty-six percent of surgeons reported that they had performed or assisted on a chest wall fracture repair, whereas 22% of surgeons were familiar with published randomized trials of the surgical repair of flail chest. Of surgeons who thought rib fracture or sternal fracture repair was rarely, if ever, indicated, 91% and 95%, respectively, specified that a randomized trial confirming efficacy would be necessary to change their negative opinion. A majority of surveyed surgeons reported that rib and sternal fracture repair is indicated in selected patients; however, a much smaller proportion indicated that they had performed the procedures. The published literature on surgical repair is sparse and unfamiliar to most surgeons. Barriers to surgical repair of rib and sternal fracture include a lack of expertise among TRS, lack of research of optimal techniques, and a dearth of randomized trials.

  6. Rib fractures under anterior-posterior dynamic loads: experimental and finite-element study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zuoping; Kindig, Matthew W; Kerrigan, Jason R; Untaroiu, Costin D; Subit, Damien; Crandall, Jeff R; Kent, Richard W

    2010-01-19

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether using a finite-element (FE) mesh composed entirely of hexahedral elements to model cortical and trabecular bone (all-hex model) would provide more accurate simulations than those with variable thickness shell elements for cortical bone and hexahedral elements for trabecular bone (hex-shell model) in the modeling human ribs. First, quasi-static non-injurious and dynamic injurious experiments were performed using the second, fourth, and tenth human thoracic ribs to record the structural behavior and fracture tolerance of individual ribs under anterior-posterior bending loads. Then, all-hex and hex-shell FE models for the three ribs were developed using an octree-based and multi-block hex meshing approach, respectively. Material properties of cortical bone were optimized using dynamic experimental data and the hex-shell model of the fourth rib and trabecular bone properties were taken from the literature. Overall, the reaction force-displacement relationship predicted by both all-hex and hex-shell models with nodes in the offset middle-cortical surfaces compared well with those measured experimentally for all the three ribs. With the exception of fracture locations, the predictions from all-hex and offset hex-shell models of the second and fourth ribs agreed better with experimental data than those from the tenth rib models in terms of reaction force at fracture (difference rib responses and bone fractures for the loading conditions considered, but coarse hex-shell models with constant or variable shell thickness were more computationally efficient and therefore preferred. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Evaluating the Relationship between Rib Fractures and the Probability of Abdominal Trauma; a Brief Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vahid Monsef Kasmaei

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Trauma is one of the most important causes of death in patients under 40 years of age and the third common cause of death regardless of age. Rib cage damages are one of the major reasons for death in the early minutes post-trauma. Therefore, the present study aimed to evaluate the frequency of intra-abdominal injury in the patients with rib fracture who were referred to emergency department. Methods: This cross-sectional study included 60 patients with rib fractures who were admitted to the emergency department of Poorsina Hospital, Rasht, Iran, from March 2011 to March2012. A checklist was filled out for all the patients including age, sex, trauma mechanism, side and site of fracture, the number of broken ribs, the results of abdominal ultrasonography, the need for laparotomy and mortality. The collected data were classified based on descriptive statistics and analyzed using SPSS 16. Results: 60 patients with the mean age of 47.26±13.71 years were admitted to the emergency department during this time (81.7% male. The most common mechanism of trauma was car accident [22(36.7%]. Among these 60 patients, 71 rib fractures in 3 levels of chest (upper, middle, lower were detected and 50 (83.3% in the same area. Mean number of fractured ribs was 2.85±2.2 (minimum: 1, maximum 10. In 3 (5% patients, fracture was on both sides. The results of abdominal ultrasonography in 7 (11.7% patients were positive. The number of fractured ribs (p=0.017 and the area of the fracture (p=0.048 showed a significant correlation with the presence of intra-abdominal free fluid. The fracture of more than 2 ribs directly correlated with the possibility of intra-abdominal hemorrhage (p<0.0001. Conclusion: Based on the results of this study, it seems that the number and area of the fractured ribs directly and significantly correlate with the probability of abdominal trauma based on the results of abdominal ultrasonography.

  8. Analysis of bone healing in flail chest injury: do we need to fix both fractures per rib?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marasco, Silvana; Liew, Susan; Edwards, Elton; Varma, Dinesh; Summerhayes, Robyn

    2014-09-01

    Surgical rib fixation (SRF) for severe rib fracture injuries is generating increasing interest in the medical literature. It is well documented that poorly healed fractured ribs can lead to chronic pain, disability, and deformity. An unanswered question in SRF for flail chest injury is whether it is sufficient to fix one fracture per rib, on successive ribs, thus converting a flail chest injury into simple fractured ribs, or whether both ends of the floating segment of the chest wall should be fixed. This study aimed to analyze SRF in flail chest injury, assessing 3-month outcomes for nonfixed fractured rib ends in the flail segment. This is a retrospective review (2005-2013) of 60 consecutive patients who underwent SRF for flail chest injury admitted to the Alfred Hospital, Melbourne, Australia. Imaging by three-dimensional computed tomography (3D CT) of the chest at admission was compared with follow-up 3D CT at 3 months after injury. The 3-month CT scans were assessed for degree of healing and presence of residual deformity at the fracture fixation site. Follow-up CT was performed in 52 of the 60 patients. At 3 months after surgery, 86.5% of the patients had at least partial healing with good alignment and adequate fracture stabilization. Hardware failure was noted in five patients (9.6%) and occurred with the absorbable prostheses only. Six patients who had preoperative overlapping or displacement showed no improvement in deformity despite fixing the lateral fractures. Callus formation and bony bridging between adjacent ribs was often noted in the rib fractures not fixed (28 of 52 patients, 54%) This retrospective review of 3D CT chest at 3 months after rib fixation indicates that a philosophy of fixing only one fracture per rib in a flail segment does not avoid deformity and displacement, particularly in posterior rib fractures. Therapeutic study, level V; epidemiologic study, level V.

  9. Systemic administration of mesenchymal stem cells combined with parathyroid hormone therapy synergistically regenerates multiple rib fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohn Yakubovich, Doron; Sheyn, Dmitriy; Bez, Maxim; Schary, Yeshai; Yalon, Eran; Sirhan, Afeef; Amira, May; Yaya, Alin; De Mel, Sandra; Da, Xiaoyu; Ben-David, Shiran; Tawackoli, Wafa; Ley, Eric J; Gazit, Dan; Gazit, Zulma; Pelled, Gadi

    2017-03-09

    A devastating condition that leads to trauma-related morbidity, multiple rib fractures, remain a serious unmet clinical need. Systemic administration of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) has been shown to regenerate various tissues. We hypothesized that parathyroid hormone (PTH) therapy would enhance MSC homing and differentiation, ultimately leading to bone formation that would bridge rib fractures. The combination of human MSCs (hMSCs) and a clinically relevant PTH dose was studied using immunosuppressed rats. Segmental defects were created in animals' fifth and sixth ribs. The rats were divided into four groups: a negative control group, in which animals received vehicle alone; the PTH-only group, in which animals received daily subcutaneous injections of 4 μg/kg teriparatide, a pharmaceutical derivative of PTH; the hMSC-only group, in which each animal received five injections of 2 × 10 6 hMSCs; and the hMSC + PTH group, in which animals received both treatments. Longitudinal in vivo monitoring of bone formation was performed biweekly using micro-computed tomography (μCT), followed by histological analysis. Fluorescently-dyed hMSCs were counted using confocal microscopy imaging of histological samples harvested 8 weeks after surgery. PTH significantly augmented the number of hMSCs that homed to the fracture site. Immunofluorescence of osteogenic markers, osteocalcin and bone sialoprotein, showed that PTH induced cell differentiation in both exogenously administered cells and resident cells. μCT scans revealed a significant increase in bone volume only in the hMSC + PTH group, beginning by the 4 th week after surgery. Eight weeks after surgery, 35% of ribs in the hMSC + PTH group had complete bone bridging, whereas there was complete bridging in only 6.25% of ribs (one rib) in the PTH-only group and in none of the ribs in the other groups. Based on the μCT scans, biomechanical analysis using the micro-finite element method demonstrated that

  10. Rib plating of acute and sub-acute non-union rib fractures in an adult with cystic fibrosis: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, Nathan C; Van Boerum, Don H; Liou, Theodore G

    2014-10-01

    Rib fractures associated with osteoporosis have been reported to occur ten times more frequently in adults with cystic fibrosis. Fractures cause chest pain, and interfere with cough and sputum clearance leading to worsened lung function and acute exacerbations which are the two main contributors to early mortality in cystic fibrosis. Usual treatment involves analgesics and time for healing; however considerable pain and disability result due to constant re-injury from chronic repetitive cough. Recently, surgical plating of rib fractures has become commonplace in treating acute, traumatic chest injuries. We describe here successful surgical plating in a White cystic fibrosis patient with multiple, non-traumatic rib fractures. A-37-year old White male with cystic fibrosis was readmitted to Intermountain Medical Center for a pulmonary exacerbation. He had developed localized rib pain while coughing 2 months earlier, with worsening just prior to hospital admission in conjunction with a "pop" in the same location while bending over. A chest computerized tomography scan at admission demonstrated an acute 5th rib fracture and chronic non-united 6th and 7th right rib fractures. An epidural catheter was placed both for analgesia and to make secretion clearance possible in preparation for the surgery performed 2 days later. Under general anesthesia, he had open reduction and internal fixation of the right 5th, 6th and 7th rib fractures with a Synthes Matrix rib set. After several days of increased oxygen requirements, fever, fluid retention, and borderline vital signs, he stabilized. Numerical pain rating scores from his ribs were lower post-operatively and he was able to tolerate chest physical therapy and vigorous coughing. In our case report, rib plating with bone grafting improved rib pain and allowed healing of the fractures and recovery, although the immediate post-op period required close attention and care. We believe repair may be of benefit in selected cystic

  11. A comparison between rib fracture patterns in peri- and post-mortem compressive injury in a piglet model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Amanda L; Swain, Michael V; Neil Waddell, J; Das, Raj; Athens, Josie; Kieser, Jules A

    2014-05-01

    Forensic biomechanics is increasingly being used to explain how observed injuries occur. We studied infant rib fractures from a biomechanical and morphological perspective using a porcine model. We used 24, 6th ribs of one day old domestic pigs Sus scrofa, divided into three groups, desiccated (representing post-mortem trauma), fresh ribs with intact periosteum (representing peri-mortem trauma) and those stored at -20°C. Two experiments were designed to study their biomechanical behaviour fracture morphology: ribs were axially compressed and subjected to four-point bending in an Instron 3339 fitted with custom jigs. Morphoscopic analysis of resultant fractures consisted of standard optical methods, micro-CT (μCT) and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). During axial compression fresh ribs did not fracture because of energy absorption capabilities of their soft and fluidic components. In flexure tests, dry ribs showed typical elastic-brittle behaviour with long linear load-extension curves, followed by short non-linear elastic (hyperelastic) behaviour and brittle fracture. Fresh ribs showed initial linear-elastic behaviour, followed by strain softening and visco-plastic responses. During the course of loading, dry bone showed minimal observable damage prior to the onset of unstable fracture. Frozen then thawed bone showed similar patterns to fresh bone. Morphologically, fresh ribs showed extensive periosteal damage to the tensile surface with areas of collagen fibre pull-out along the tensile surface. While all dry ribs fractured precipitously, with associated fibre pull-out, the latter feature was absent in thawed ribs. Our study highlights the fact that under controlled loading, fresh piglet ribs (representing perimortem trauma) did not fracture through bone, but was associated with periosteal tearing. These results suggest firstly, that complete lateral rib fracture in infants may in fact not result from pure compression as has been previously assumed; and

  12. Rib fracture after stereotactic radiotherapy for primary lung cancer: prevalence, degree of clinical symptoms, and risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nambu, Atsushi; Onishi, Hiroshi; Aoki, Shinichi; Tominaga, Licht; Kuriyama, Kengo; Araya, Masayuki; Saito, Ryoh; Maehata, Yoshiyasu; Komiyama, Takafumi; Marino, Kan; Koshiishi, Tsuyota; Sawada, Eiichi; Araki, Tsutomu

    2013-02-07

    As stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) is a highly dose-dense radiotherapy, adverse events of neighboring normal tissues are a major concern. This study thus aimed to clarify the frequency and degree of clinical symptoms in patients with rib fractures after SBRT for primary lung cancer and to reveal risk factors for rib fracture. Appropriate α/β ratios for discriminating between fracture and non-fracture groups were also investigated. Between November 2001 and April 2009, 177 patients who had undergone SBRT were evaluated for clinical symptoms and underwent follow-up thin-section computed tomography (CT). The time of rib fracture appearance was also assessed. Cox proportional hazard modeling was performed to identify risk factors for rib fracture, using independent variables of age, sex, maximum tumor diameter, radiotherapeutic method and tumor-chest wall distance. Dosimetric details were analyzed for 26 patients with and 22 randomly-sampled patients without rib fracture. Biologically effective dose (BED) was calculated with a range of α/β ratios (1-10 Gy). Receiver operating characteristics analysis was used to define the most appropriate α/β ratio. Rib fracture was found on follow-up thin-section CT in 41 patients. The frequency of chest wall pain in patients with rib fracture was 34.1% (14/41), and was classified as Grade 1 or 2. Significant risk factors for rib fracture were smaller tumor-chest wall distance and female sex. Area under the curve was maximal for BED at an α/β ratio of 8 Gy. Rib fracture is frequently seen on CT after SBRT for lung cancer. Small tumor-chest wall distance and female sex are risk factors for rib fracture. However, clinical symptoms are infrequent and generally mild. When using BED analysis, an α/β ratio of 8 Gy appears most effective for discriminating between fracture and non-fracture patients.

  13. Rib fracture after stereotactic radiotherapy for primary lung cancer: prevalence, degree of clinical symptoms, and risk factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nambu, Atsushi; Marino, Kan; Koshiishi, Tsuyota; Sawada, Eiichi; Araki, Tsutomu; Onishi, Hiroshi; Aoki, Shinichi; Tominaga, Licht; Kuriyama, Kengo; Araya, Masayuki; Saito, Ryoh; Maehata, Yoshiyasu; Komiyama, Takafumi

    2013-01-01

    As stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) is a highly dose-dense radiotherapy, adverse events of neighboring normal tissues are a major concern. This study thus aimed to clarify the frequency and degree of clinical symptoms in patients with rib fractures after SBRT for primary lung cancer and to reveal risk factors for rib fracture. Appropriate α/β ratios for discriminating between fracture and non-fracture groups were also investigated. Between November 2001 and April 2009, 177 patients who had undergone SBRT were evaluated for clinical symptoms and underwent follow-up thin-section computed tomography (CT). The time of rib fracture appearance was also assessed. Cox proportional hazard modeling was performed to identify risk factors for rib fracture, using independent variables of age, sex, maximum tumor diameter, radiotherapeutic method and tumor-chest wall distance. Dosimetric details were analyzed for 26 patients with and 22 randomly-sampled patients without rib fracture. Biologically effective dose (BED) was calculated with a range of α/β ratios (1–10 Gy). Receiver operating characteristics analysis was used to define the most appropriate α/β ratio. Rib fracture was found on follow-up thin-section CT in 41 patients. The frequency of chest wall pain in patients with rib fracture was 34.1% (14/41), and was classified as Grade 1 or 2. Significant risk factors for rib fracture were smaller tumor-chest wall distance and female sex. Area under the curve was maximal for BED at an α/β ratio of 8 Gy. Rib fracture is frequently seen on CT after SBRT for lung cancer. Small tumor-chest wall distance and female sex are risk factors for rib fracture. However, clinical symptoms are infrequent and generally mild. When using BED analysis, an α/β ratio of 8 Gy appears most effective for discriminating between fracture and non-fracture patients

  14. Rib fracture after stereotactic radiotherapy for primary lung cancer: prevalence, degree of clinical symptoms, and risk factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nambu Atsushi

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT is a highly dose-dense radiotherapy, adverse events of neighboring normal tissues are a major concern. This study thus aimed to clarify the frequency and degree of clinical symptoms in patients with rib fractures after SBRT for primary lung cancer and to reveal risk factors for rib fracture. Appropriate α/β ratios for discriminating between fracture and non-fracture groups were also investigated. Methods Between November 2001 and April 2009, 177 patients who had undergone SBRT were evaluated for clinical symptoms and underwent follow-up thin-section computed tomography (CT. The time of rib fracture appearance was also assessed. Cox proportional hazard modeling was performed to identify risk factors for rib fracture, using independent variables of age, sex, maximum tumor diameter, radiotherapeutic method and tumor-chest wall distance. Dosimetric details were analyzed for 26 patients with and 22 randomly-sampled patients without rib fracture. Biologically effective dose (BED was calculated with a range of α/β ratios (1–10 Gy. Receiver operating characteristics analysis was used to define the most appropriate α/β ratio. Results Rib fracture was found on follow-up thin-section CT in 41 patients. The frequency of chest wall pain in patients with rib fracture was 34.1% (14/41, and was classified as Grade 1 or 2. Significant risk factors for rib fracture were smaller tumor-chest wall distance and female sex. Area under the curve was maximal for BED at an α/β ratio of 8 Gy. Conclusions Rib fracture is frequently seen on CT after SBRT for lung cancer. Small tumor-chest wall distance and female sex are risk factors for rib fracture. However, clinical symptoms are infrequent and generally mild. When using BED analysis, an α/β ratio of 8 Gy appears most effective for discriminating between fracture and non-fracture patients.

  15. Rib fracture after stereotactic radiotherapy for primary lung cancer: prevalence, degree of clinical symptoms, and risk factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background As stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) is a highly dose-dense radiotherapy, adverse events of neighboring normal tissues are a major concern. This study thus aimed to clarify the frequency and degree of clinical symptoms in patients with rib fractures after SBRT for primary lung cancer and to reveal risk factors for rib fracture. Appropriate α/β ratios for discriminating between fracture and non-fracture groups were also investigated. Methods Between November 2001 and April 2009, 177 patients who had undergone SBRT were evaluated for clinical symptoms and underwent follow-up thin-section computed tomography (CT). The time of rib fracture appearance was also assessed. Cox proportional hazard modeling was performed to identify risk factors for rib fracture, using independent variables of age, sex, maximum tumor diameter, radiotherapeutic method and tumor-chest wall distance. Dosimetric details were analyzed for 26 patients with and 22 randomly-sampled patients without rib fracture. Biologically effective dose (BED) was calculated with a range of α/β ratios (1–10 Gy). Receiver operating characteristics analysis was used to define the most appropriate α/β ratio. Results Rib fracture was found on follow-up thin-section CT in 41 patients. The frequency of chest wall pain in patients with rib fracture was 34.1% (14/41), and was classified as Grade 1 or 2. Significant risk factors for rib fracture were smaller tumor-chest wall distance and female sex. Area under the curve was maximal for BED at an α/β ratio of 8 Gy. Conclusions Rib fracture is frequently seen on CT after SBRT for lung cancer. Small tumor-chest wall distance and female sex are risk factors for rib fracture. However, clinical symptoms are infrequent and generally mild. When using BED analysis, an α/β ratio of 8 Gy appears most effective for discriminating between fracture and non-fracture patients. PMID:23391264

  16. Rib fractures and death from deletion of osteoblast βcatenin in adult mice is rescued by corticosteroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, JinZhu; Lee, Yueh; Jania, Corey; Gong, Jucheng; Rojas, Mauricio; Burk, Laurel; Willis, Monte; Homeister, Jonathon; Tilley, Stephen; Rubin, Janet; Deb, Arjun

    2013-01-01

    Ribs are primarily made of cortical bone and are necessary for chest expansion and ventilation. Rib fractures represent the most common type of non-traumatic fractures in the elderly yet few studies have focused on the biology of rib fragility. Here, we show that deletion of βcatenin in Col1a2 expressing osteoblasts of adult mice leads to aggressive osteoclastogenesis with increased serum levels of the osteoclastogenic cytokine RANKL, extensive rib resorption, multiple spontaneous rib fractures and chest wall deformities. Within days of osteoblast specific βcatenin deletion, animals die from respiratory failure with a vanishing rib cage that is unable to sustain ventilation. Increased bone resorption is also observed in the vertebrae and femur. Treatment with the bisphosphonate pamidronate delayed but did not prevent death or associated rib fractures. In contrast, administration of the glucocorticoid dexamethasone decreased serum RANKL and slowed osteoclastogenesis. Dexamethasone preserved rib structure, prevented respiratory compromise and strikingly increased survival. Our findings provide a novel model of accelerated osteoclastogenesis, where deletion of osteoblast βcatenin in adults leads to rapid development of destructive rib fractures. We demonstrate the role of βcatenin dependent mechanisms in rib fractures and suggest that glucocorticoids, by suppressing RANKL, may have a role in treating bone loss due to aggressive osteoclastogenesis.

  17. Real-World Rib Fracture Patterns in Frontal Crashes in Different Restraint Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ellen L; Craig, Matthew; Scarboro, Mark

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to use the detailed medical injury information in the Crash Injury Research and Engineering Network (CIREN) to evaluate patterns of rib fractures in real-world crash occupants in both belted and unbelted restraint conditions. Fracture patterns binned into rib regional levels were examined to determine normative trends associated with belt use and other possible contributing factors. Front row adult occupants with Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS) 3+ rib fractures, in frontal crashes with a deployed frontal airbag, were selected from the CIREN database. The circumferential location of each rib fracture (with respect to the sternum) was documented using a previously published method (Ritchie et al. 2006) and digital computed tomography scans. Fracture patterns for different crash and occupant parameters (restraint use, involved physical component, occupant kinematics, crash principal direction of force, and occupant age) were compared qualitatively and quantitatively. There were 158 belted and 44 unbelted occupants included in this study. For belted occupants, fractures were mainly located near the path of the shoulder belt, with the majority of fractures occurring on the inboard (with respect to the vehicle) side of the thorax. For unbelted occupants, fractures were approximately symmetric and distributed across both sides of the thorax. There were negligible differences in fracture patterns between occupants with frontal (0°) and near side (330° to 350° for drivers; 10° to 30° for passengers) crash principal directions of force but substantial differences between groups when occupant kinematics (and contacts within the vehicle) were considered. Age also affected fracture pattern, with fractures tending to occur more anteriorly in older occupants and more laterally in younger occupants (both belted and unbelted). Results of this study confirmed with real-world data that rib fracture patterns in unbelted occupants were more distributed

  18. Influence of mesh density, cortical thickness and material properties on human rib fracture prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zuoping; Kindig, Matthew W; Subit, Damien; Kent, Richard W

    2010-11-01

    The purpose of this paper was to investigate the sensitivity of the structural responses and bone fractures of the ribs to mesh density, cortical thickness, and material properties so as to provide guidelines for the development of finite element (FE) thorax models used in impact biomechanics. Subject-specific FE models of the second, fourth, sixth and tenth ribs were developed to reproduce dynamic failure experiments. Sensitivity studies were then conducted to quantify the effects of variations in mesh density, cortical thickness, and material parameters on the model-predicted reaction force-displacement relationship, cortical strains, and bone fracture locations for all four ribs. Overall, it was demonstrated that rib FE models consisting of 2000-3000 trabecular hexahedral elements (weighted element length 2-3mm) and associated quadrilateral cortical shell elements with variable thickness more closely predicted the rib structural responses and bone fracture force-failure displacement relationships observed in the experiments (except the fracture locations), compared to models with constant cortical thickness. Further increases in mesh density increased computational cost but did not markedly improve model predictions. A ±30% change in the major material parameters of cortical bone lead to a -16.7 to 33.3% change in fracture displacement and -22.5 to +19.1% change in the fracture force. The results in this study suggest that human rib structural responses can be modeled in an accurate and computationally efficient way using (a) a coarse mesh of 2000-3000 solid elements, (b) cortical shells elements with variable thickness distribution and (c) a rate-dependent elastic-plastic material model. Copyright © 2010 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Biomechanical investigation of different surgical strategies for the treatment of rib fractures using a three-dimensional human respiratory model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Kao-Shang; Truong, Thanh An; Hsu, Ching-Chi; Hou, Sheng-Mou

    2017-11-02

    Rib fracture is a common injury and can result in pain during respiration. Conservative treatment of rib fracture is applied via mechanical ventilation. However, ventilator-associated complications frequently occur. Surgical fixation is another approach to treat rib fractures. Unfortunately, this surgical treatment is still not completely defined. Past studies have evaluated the biomechanics of the rib cage during respiration using a finite element method, but only intact conditions were modelled. Thus, the purpose of this study was to develop a realistic numerical model of the human rib cage and to analyse the biomechanical performance of intact, injured and treated rib cages. Three-dimensional finite element models of the human rib cage were developed. Respiratory movement of the human rib cage was simulated to evaluate the strengths and limitations of different scenarios. The results show that a realistic human respiratory movement can be simulated and the predicted results were closely related to previous study (correlation coefficient>0.92). Fixation of two fractured ribs significantly decreased the fixation index (191%) compared to the injured model. This fixation may provide adequate fixation stability as well as reveal lower bone stress and implant stress compared with the fixation of three or more fractured ribs.

  20. Significance of Rib Fractures Potentially Caused by Blunt Impact Non Lethal Weapons

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-01

    J. Mullins, Tuesday E. Pearson, and John C. Mayberry. 2003. “Rib Fracture Pain and Disability: Can We Do Better?” The Journal of Truama–Injury...J. Mullins, Tuesday E. Pearson, and John C. Mayberry. 2003. “Rib Fracture Pain and Disability: Can We Do Better?” The Journal of Truama–Injury...2016. http://www.physio-pedia.com/Thoracic_Examination. Lee, Robert B., Sue M. Bass, John A. Morris , and Ellen J. Mackenzie. 1990. “Three or More

  1. Cough induced rib fracture, rupture of the diaphragm and abdominal herniation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wurl Peter

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cough can be associated with many complications. In this article, we present a 59 year old male patient with a very rare combination of a cough related stress fracture of the ninth rib, a traumatic rupture of the diaphragm, and an abdominal wall herniation. The hernia was repaired through surgical treatment without bowel resection, the diaphragm and the internal and oblique abdominal muscle were adapted, and the abdomen was reinforced with a prolene net. Although each individual injury is well documented in the literature, the combination of rib fracture, abdominal herniation and diaphragm rupture has not been reported.

  2. Increasing number of fractured ribs is not predictive of the severity of splenic injury following blunt trauma: an analysis of a National Trauma Registry database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boris, Kessel; Forat, Swaid; Itamar, Ashkenazi; Oded, Olsha; Kobi, Peleg; Adi, Givon; Igor, Jeroukhimov; Ricardo, Alfici

    2014-05-01

    Association between rib fractures and incidence of abdominal solid organs injury is well described. However, the correlation between the number of fractured ribs and severity of splenic injury is not clear. The purpose of this study was to assess whether an increasing number of rib fractures predicts the severity of splenic injury in blunt trauma patients. A retrospective cohort study involving blunt trauma patients with concomitant splenic injuries and rib fractures, between the years 1998 and 2012, registered in the Israeli National Trauma Registry. Of 321,618 patients with blunt mechanism of trauma, 57,130 had torso injuries, and of these 14,651 patients sustained rib fractures, and 3691 patients suffered from splenic injury. Concomitant splenic injury occurred in 1326 of the patients with rib fractures (9.1%), as compared to 2365 patients sustaining splenic injury without rib fractures (5.6%). The incidence of splenic injury among patients sustaining 5 or more rib fractures was significantly higher compared to patients suffering from 1 to 4 rib fractures. Among patients with splenic injury, the tendency to sustain associated rib fractures increased steadily with age. Patients with concomitant rib fractures had higher Injury Severity Score (ISS), but similar mortality rates, compared to patients with splenic injury without rib fractures. Among patients with concomitant rib fractures and splenic injury, there was no relation between the number of fractured ribs and the severity of splenic injury, neither as a whole group, nor after stratification according to the mechanism of injury. Although the presence of rib fractures increases the probability of splenic injury in blunt torso trauma, there is no relation between the number of fractured ribs and splenic injury severity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Radiation-Induced Rib Fractures After Hypofractionated Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy: Risk Factors and Dose-Volume Relationship

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asai, Kaori [Department of Clinical Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Shioyama, Yoshiyuki, E-mail: shioyama@radiol.med.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Department of Heavy Particle Therapy and Radiation Oncology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Nakamura, Katsumasa; Sasaki, Tomonari; Ohga, Saiji; Nonoshita, Takeshi [Department of Clinical Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Yoshitake, Tadamasa [Department of Heavy Particle Therapy and Radiation Oncology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Ohnishi, Kayoko [Department of Radiology, National Center for Global Health and Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Terashima, Kotaro; Matsumoto, Keiji [Department of Clinical Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Hirata, Hideki [Department of Health Sciences, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Honda, Hiroshi [Department of Clinical Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan)

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to clarify the incidence, the clinical risk factors, and the dose-volume relationship of radiation-induced rib fracture (RIRF) after hypofractionated stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Methods and Materials: One hundred sixteen patients treated with SBRT for primary or metastatic lung cancer at our institution, with at least 6 months of follow-up and no previous overlapping radiation exposure, were included in this study. To determine the clinical risk factors associated with RIRF, correlations between the incidence of RIRF and the variables, including age, sex, diagnosis, gross tumor volume diameter, rib-tumor distance, and use of steroid administration, were analyzed. Dose-volume histogram analysis was also conducted. Regarding the maximum dose, V10, V20, V30, and V40 of the rib, and the incidences of RIRF were compared between the two groups divided by the cutoff value determined by the receiver operating characteristic curves. Results: One hundred sixteen patients and 374 ribs met the inclusion criteria. Among the 116 patients, 28 patients (46 ribs) experienced RIRF. The estimated incidence of rib fracture was 37.7% at 3 years. Limited distance from the rib to the tumor (<2.0 cm) was the only significant risk factor for RIRF (p = 0.0001). Among the dosimetric parameters used for receiver operating characteristic analysis, the maximum dose showed the highest area under the curve. The 3-year estimated risk of RIRF and the determined cutoff value were 45.8% vs. 1.4% (maximum dose, {>=}42.4 Gy or less), 51.6% vs. 2.0% (V40, {>=}0.29 cm{sup 3} or less), 45.8% vs. 2.2% (V30, {>=}1.35 cm{sup 3} or less), 42.0% vs. 8.5% (V20, {>=}3.62 cm{sup 3} or less), or 25.9% vs. 10.5% (V10, {>=}5.03 cm{sup 3} or less). Conclusions: The incidence of RIRF after hypofractionated SBRT is relatively high. The maximum dose and high-dose volume are strongly correlated with RIRF.

  4. Bone images from dual-energy subtraction chest radiography in the detection of rib fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szucs-Farkas, Zsolt; Lautenschlager, Katrin; Flach, Patricia M; Ott, Daniel; Strautz, Tamara; Vock, Peter; Ruder, Thomas D

    2011-08-01

    To assess the sensitivity and image quality of chest radiography (CXR) with or without dual-energy subtracted (ES) bone images in the detection of rib fractures. In this retrospective study, 39 patients with 204 rib fractures and 24 subjects with no fractures were examined with a single exposure dual-energy subtraction digital radiography system. Three blinded readers first evaluated the non-subtracted posteroanterior and lateral chest radiographs alone, and 3 months later they evaluated the non-subtracted images together with the subtracted posteroanterior bone images. The locations of rib fractures were registered with confidence levels on a 3-grade scale. Image quality was rated on a 5-point scale. Marks by readers were compared with fracture localizations in CT as a standard of reference. The sensivity for fracture detection using both methods was very similar (34.3% with standard CXR and 33.5% with ES-CXR, p=0.92). At the patient level, both sensitivity (71.8%) and specificity (92.9%) with or without ES were identical. Diagnostic confidence was not significantly different (2.61 with CXR and 2.75 with ES-CXR, p=0.063). Image quality with ES was rated higher than that on standard CXR (4.08 vs. 3.74, prib fractures. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Keeping an Open Mind: Cognitive Bias in the Evaluation of an Infant with Posterior-Lateral Rib Fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katie Johnson

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A four-month-old former premature male is incidentally found to have posterior-lateral rib fractures during evaluation of a febrile illness. This finding led to the initiation of a workup for nonaccidental trauma. A thorough history and physical exam ultimately led to the diagnosis, which was not related to abuse. This case highlights a rare sequela of patent ductus arteriosus repair, cautions medical teams to remain aware of how cognitive bias can affect diagnostic decision-making, and emphasizes the importance of a thorough history, physical exam, and medical record review in cases of suspected nonaccidental trauma.

  6. Guideline-Driven Care Improves Outcomes in Patients with Traumatic Rib Fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flarity, Kathleen; Rhodes, Whitney C; Berson, Andrew J; Leininger, Brian E; Reckard, Paul E; Riley, Keyan D; Shahan, Charles P; Schroeppel, Thomas J

    2017-09-01

    There is no established national standard for rib fracture management. A clinical practice guideline (CPG) for rib fractures, including monitoring of pulmonary function, early initiation of aggressive loco-regional analgesia, and early identification of deteriorating respiratory function, was implemented in 2013. The objective of the study was to evaluate the effect of the CPG on hospital length of stay. Hospital length of stay (LOS) was compared for adult patients admitted to the hospital with rib fracture(s) two years before and two years after CPG implementation. A separate analysis was done for the patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU). Over the 48-month study period, 571 patients met inclusion criteria for the study. Pre-CPG and CPG study groups were well matched with few differences. Multivariable regression did not demonstrate a difference in LOS (B = -0.838; P = 0.095) in the total study cohort. In the ICU cohort (n = 274), patients in the CPG group were older (57 vs 52 years; P = 0.023) and had more rib fractures (4 vs 3; P = 0.003). Multivariable regression identified a significant decrease in LOS for those patients admitted in the CPG period (B = -2.29; P = 0.019). Despite being significantly older with more rib fractures in the ICU cohort, patients admitted after implementation of the CPG had a significantly reduced LOS on multivariable analysis, reducing LOS by over two days. This structured intervention can limit narcotic usage, improve pulmonary function, and decrease LOS in the most injured patients with chest trauma.

  7. Challenges experienced during rehabilitation after traumatic multiple rib fractures: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claydon, Jacqueline; Maniatopoulos, Gregory; Robinson, Lisa; Fearon, Paul

    2017-08-02

    People with multiple rib fractures rarely receive rehabilitation aimed specifically at their chest wall injuries. This research explores patient perceptions of rehabilitation and recovery. A qualitative study exploring how a purposive sample of 15 people with traumatic multiple rib fractures at a Major Trauma Centre in the United Kingdom make sense of their recovery. Data collected during one-to-one interviews 4 to 9 months after injury. Transcripts analysed using Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis. Struggling with breathing and pain: Difficulties with breathing and pain were initially so severe ?it takes your breath away? and people felt scared they may not survive. These symptoms gradually improved but feeling "out of puff" often persisted. Life on hold: Healing was considered a natural process which people couldn't influence, creating frustration whilst waiting for injuries to heal. Many believed they would never fully recover and accepted limitations. Lucky to be alive: All participants expressed a sense of feeling lucky to be alive. The seriousness of injury prompted a change in attitude to make the most of life. Rib fractures can be painful, but also frightening. A rehabilitation intervention promoting pain management, normalises trauma and restores physical activity may improve recovery. Implications for Rehabilitation Patients identified challenges with rehabilitation throughout the entire recovery journey, and their rehabilitation needs evolved with time. People find it difficult to regain pre-injury fitness even after their fractures heal and pain subsides. A belief there is nothing that can be done to help rib fractures contributed to people lowering their expectations of achieving a full recovery and developing a sense of "making do". Rehabilitation and patient education after traumatic multiple rib fractures should focus on improving pain management, respiratory fitness and emotional well-being.

  8. FRACTURES OF THE RIBS AND THE DIAPHRAGMATIC RUPTURE WITH A FORMATION OF THE TRANSDIAPHRAGMATIC INTERCOSTAL HERNIA AS A RESULT OF SEVERE COUGHING (CLINICAL OBSERVATION WITH A REVIEW OF THE LITERATURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. N. Danielyan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT. Severe coughing might lead to development of a number of complications, including the diaphragmatic rupture and the ribs fractures. The report contains two similar rare clinical cases: male patients aged 48 and 74 years with transdiaphragmatic intercostal thoracic wall hernia after the rupture of the left half of the diaphragm and ribs fractures as a result of violent coughing. Both patients had a late diagnosis of injuries. Surgical therapy was performed via thoracotomy access using a mesh implant. histological study of the rib in the damaged area in one case detected fibrous osteodysplasia. The review of literature on this rare type of injury was analyzed. 

  9. Surgical stabilization of severe rib fractures decreases incidence of retained hemothorax and empyema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majercik, Sarah; Vijayakumar, Sathya; Olsen, Griffin; Wilson, Emily; Gardner, Scott; Granger, Steven R; Van Boerum, Don H; White, Thomas W

    2015-12-01

    Retained hemothorax (RH) is relatively common after chest trauma and can lead to empyema. We hypothesized that patients who have surgical fixation of rib fractures (SSRF) have less RH and empyema than those who have medical management of rib fractures (MMRF). Admitted rib fracture patients from January 2009 to June 2013 were identified. A 2:1 propensity score model identified MMRF patients who were similar to SSRF. RH, and empyema and readmissions, were recorded. Variables were compared using Fisher exact test and Wilcoxon rank-sum tests. One hundred thirty-seven SSRF and 274 MMRF were analyzed; 31 (7.5%) had RH requiring 35 interventions; 3 (2.2%) SSRF patients had RH compared with 28 (10.2%) MMRF (P = .003). Four (14.3%) MMRF subjects with RH developed empyema versus zero in the SSRF group (P = .008); 6 (19.3%) RH patients required readmission versus 14 (3.7%) in the non-RH group (P = .002). Patients with rib fractures who have SSRF have less RH compared with similar MMRF patients. Although not a singular reason to perform SSRF, this clinical benefit should not be overlooked. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Rib fractures after reirradiation plus hyperthermia for recurrent breast cancer: Predictive factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oldenborg, Sabine; Valk, Christel; van Os, Rob; Oei, Bing; Venselaar, Jack; Vörding, Paul Zum Vörde Sive; van Randen, Adriënne; Crezee, Hans; van Tienhoven, Geertjan; Rasch, Coen

    2016-01-01

    Combining reirradiation (reRT) and hyperthermia (HT) has shown high therapeutic value for patients with locoregional recurrent breast cancer (LR). However, additional toxicity of reirradiation (e.g., rib fractures) may occur. The aim of this study is to determine the impact of potential risk factors

  11. Rib stress fractures among rowers: a systematic review on return to sports, risk factors and prevention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D'Ailly, Philip N.; Sluiter, Judith K.; Kuijer, Paul P.

    2016-01-01

    Rib stress fractures (RSFs) are injuries frequently sustained by elite rowers with an injury rate of 8-16% over the course of a rowing career, resulting in negative effects on training and performance. For clinical management, the aim of this review was to describe time to return to sports,

  12. Phrenic Arterial Injury Presenting as Delayed Hemothorax Complicating Simple Rib Fracture

    OpenAIRE

    Ahn, Hong Joon; Lee, Jun Wan; Kim, Kun Dong; You, In Sool

    2016-01-01

    Delayed hemothorax after blunt torso injury is rare, but might be associated with significant morbidity and mortality. We present a case of delayed hemothorax bleeding from phrenic artery injury in a 24-year-old woman. The patient suffered from multiple rib fractures on the right side, a right hemopneumothorax, thoracic vertebral injury and a pelvic bone fracture after a fall from a fourth floor window. Delayed hemothorax associated with phrenic artery bleeding, caused by a stab injury from a...

  13. A Novel Biodegradable Polycaprolactone Fixator for Osteosynthesis Surgery of Rib Fracture: In Vitro and in Vivo Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Hsun Yu

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Osteosynthesis surgery for rib fractures is controversial and challenging. This study developed a noval poly(ε-caprolactone (PCL-based biodegradable “cable-tie” fixator for osteosynthesis surgery for rib fractures. A biodegradable fixator specifically for fractured ribs was designed and fabricated by a micro-injection molding machine in our laboratory. The fixator has three belts that could be passed through matching holes individually. The locking mechanism allows the belt movement to move in only one direction. To examine the in vitro biomechanical performance, ribs 3–7 from four fresh New Zealand rabbits were employed. The load to failure and stress-strain curve was compared in the three-point bending test among native ribs, titanium plate-fixed ribs, and PCL fixator-fixed ribs. In the in vivo animal study, the sixth ribs of New Zealand rabbits were osteotomized and osteosynthesis surgery was performed using the PCL fixator. Outcomes were assessed by monthly X-ray examinations, a final micro-computed tomography (CT scan, and histological analysis. The experimental results suggested that the ribs fixed with the PCL fixator were significantly less stiff than those fixed with titanium plates (p < 0.05. All ribs fixed with the PCL fixators exhibited union. The bridging callus was confirmed by gross, radiographic micro-three-dimensional (3D CT, and histological examinations. In addition, there was no significant inflammatory response of the osteotomized ribs or the PCL-rib interface during application. The novel PCL fixator developed in this work achieves satisfactory results in osteosynthesis surgery for rib fractures, and may provide potential applications in other orthopedic surgeries.

  14. Pitfalls associated with open reduction and internal fixation of fractured ribs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarani, Babak; Schulte, Leah; Diaz, Jose J

    2015-12-01

    Rib fracture is exceedingly common and remains a leading cause of death in patients with chest injury. Probability of death increases by 19% with each broken rib, and the probability of death increases further with age. Treatment is centered on pain control and early mobilization to provide adequate pulmonary hygiene. Multimodality interventions, such as incentive spirometry, postural changes, and coughing, are pivotal in minimizing the risk of pneumonia and death. Recently, many studies have found mortality benefit to operation fixation (ORIF) of ribs in select patients. However, this procedure remains underutilized partly due to lack of familiarity with its technique and pitfalls by trauma surgeons, in particular. Whereas there are publications on operative technique, there are no studies describing pitfalls associated with this procedure. The purpose of this paper is to describe pitfalls on the technical aspects of ORIF of the ribs based on the medical literature where possible and based on our experience in instances where peer reviewed evidence is lacking. The paper is not meant to serve as a protocol for managing rib fractures. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Bone images from dual-energy subtraction chest radiography in the detection of rib fractures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szucs-Farkas, Zsolt, E-mail: zsolt.szuecs@insel.ch [Department of Diagnostic, Interventional and Pediatric Radiology, University Hospital Bern, Freiburgstrasse 4, Bern CH-3010 (Switzerland); Lautenschlager, Katrin, E-mail: katrin@students.unibe.ch [Department of Diagnostic, Interventional and Pediatric Radiology, University Hospital Bern, Freiburgstrasse 4, Bern CH-3010 (Switzerland); Flach, Patricia M., E-mail: patricia.flach@irm.unibe.ch [Institute of Forensic Medicine, University of Bern, Freiburgstrasse 4, Bern CH-3010 (Switzerland); Ott, Daniel, E-mail: daniel.ott@insel.ch [Department of Diagnostic, Interventional and Pediatric Radiology, University Hospital Bern, Freiburgstrasse 4, Bern CH-3010 (Switzerland); Strautz, Tamara, E-mail: tamara.strautz@insel.ch [Department of Diagnostic, Interventional and Pediatric Radiology, University Hospital Bern, Freiburgstrasse 4, Bern CH-3010 (Switzerland); Vock, Peter, E-mail: peter.vock@insel.ch [Department of Diagnostic, Interventional and Pediatric Radiology, University Hospital Bern, Freiburgstrasse 4, Bern CH-3010 (Switzerland); Ruder, Thomas D., E-mail: thomas.ruder@irm.unibe.ch [Institute of Forensic Medicine, University of Bern, Freiburgstrasse 4, Bern CH-3010 (Switzerland)

    2011-08-15

    Objective: To assess the sensitivity and image quality of chest radiography (CXR) with or without dual-energy subtracted (ES) bone images in the detection of rib fractures. Materials and methods: In this retrospective study, 39 patients with 204 rib fractures and 24 subjects with no fractures were examined with a single exposure dual-energy subtraction digital radiography system. Three blinded readers first evaluated the non-subtracted posteroanterior and lateral chest radiographs alone, and 3 months later they evaluated the non-subtracted images together with the subtracted posteroanterior bone images. The locations of rib fractures were registered with confidence levels on a 3-grade scale. Image quality was rated on a 5-point scale. Marks by readers were compared with fracture localizations in CT as a standard of reference. Results: The sensivity for fracture detection using both methods was very similar (34.3% with standard CXR and 33.5% with ES-CXR, p = 0.92). At the patient level, both sensitivity (71.8%) and specificity (92.9%) with or without ES were identical. Diagnostic confidence was not significantly different (2.61 with CXR and 2.75 with ES-CXR, p = 0.063). Image quality with ES was rated higher than that on standard CXR (4.08 vs. 3.74, p < 0.001). Conclusions: Despite a better image quality, adding ES bone images to standard radiographs of the chest does not provide better sensitivity or improved diagnostic confidence in the detection of rib fractures.

  16. Chondral Rib Fractures in Professional American Football: Two Cases and Current Practice Patterns Among NFL Team Physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAdams, Timothy R; Deimel, Jay F; Ferguson, Jeff; Beamer, Brandon S; Beaulieu, Christopher F

    2016-02-01

    Although a recognized and discussed injury, chondral rib fractures in professional American football have not been previously reported in the literature. There currently exists no consensus on how to identify and treat these injuries or the expected return to play for the athlete. To present 2 cases of chondral rib injuries in the National Football League (NFL) and discuss the current practice patterns for management of these injuries among the NFL team physicians. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Two cases of NFL players with chondral rib injuries are presented. A survey regarding work-up and treatment of these injuries was completed by team physicians at the 2014 NFL Combine. Our experience in identifying and treating these injuries is presented in conjunction with a survey of NFL team physicians' experiences. Two cases of rib chondral injuries were diagnosed by computed tomography (CT) and treated with rest and protective splinting. Return to play was 2 to 4 weeks. NFL Combine survey results show that NFL team physicians see a mean of 4 costal cartilage injuries per 5-year period, or approximately 1 case per year per team. Seventy percent of team physicians use CT scanning and 43% use magnetic resonance imaging for diagnosis of these injuries. An anesthetic block is used acutely in 57% and only electively in subsequent games by 39%. A high index of suspicion is necessary to diagnose chondral rib injuries in American football. CT scan is most commonly used to confirm diagnosis. Return to play can take up to 2 to 4 weeks with a protective device, although anesthetic blocks can be used to potentially expedite return. Chondral rib injuries are common among NFL football players, while there is no literature to support proper diagnosis and treatment of these injuries or expected duration of recovery. These injuries are likely common in other contact sports and levels of competition as well. Our series combined with NFL team physician survey results can aid team

  17. Detection of rib fractures in minor chest injuries: a comparison between ultrasonography and radiography performed on the same day

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Yong Soo; Back, Chang Hee; Lee, Kyung Rae; Shin, Yun Hack; Whang, Yeong Seop; Jeong, Ku Young [Yeosu Baek Hospital, Yeosu (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Soo Hyun [NamWon Medical Center, NamWon (Korea, Republic of); Whang, Cheol Mog [Konyang University Hospital, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-04-15

    We wished to compare the ability of ultrasonography and radiography performed on the same day to detect rib fractures in minor chest injuries. Two hundred and fifteen patients with minor chest injuries were selected. Radiography and ultrasonography were performed on the same day with these patients. Chest wall pain was the only presenting symptom. Two radiologists performed ultrasonography. Fractures were identified by a disruption of the anterior margin of the rib and costal cartilage. The incidence and location of fractures and complications revealed by radiography and ultrasonography were compared. Radiographs revealed the presence of 70 rib fractures in 50 (23%) of 215 patients and ultrasonography revealed the presence of 203 rib fractures in 133 (62%) of 215 patients. Ultrasonography uniquely identified 133 rib fractures in 83 patients. Ultrasonography identified a 2.9 fold increase in the number of fractures in a 2.6 fold number of subjects as compared to radiography. Of the 203 sonographically detected fractures, 201 were located in the rib, one was located at the costochondral junction, and one in the costal cartilage. There were no complications seen by either radiography or ultrasonography. Ultrasonography reveals more fractures than those that may be overlooked on radiography for minor chest injuries.

  18. Detection of rib fractures in minor chest injuries: a comparison between ultrasonography and radiography performed on the same day

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Yong Soo; Back, Chang Hee; Lee, Kyung Rae; Shin, Yun Hack; Whang, Yeong Seop; Jeong, Ku Young; Chung, Soo Hyun; Whang, Cheol Mog

    2007-01-01

    We wished to compare the ability of ultrasonography and radiography performed on the same day to detect rib fractures in minor chest injuries. Two hundred and fifteen patients with minor chest injuries were selected. Radiography and ultrasonography were performed on the same day with these patients. Chest wall pain was the only presenting symptom. Two radiologists performed ultrasonography. Fractures were identified by a disruption of the anterior margin of the rib and costal cartilage. The incidence and location of fractures and complications revealed by radiography and ultrasonography were compared. Radiographs revealed the presence of 70 rib fractures in 50 (23%) of 215 patients and ultrasonography revealed the presence of 203 rib fractures in 133 (62%) of 215 patients. Ultrasonography uniquely identified 133 rib fractures in 83 patients. Ultrasonography identified a 2.9 fold increase in the number of fractures in a 2.6 fold number of subjects as compared to radiography. Of the 203 sonographically detected fractures, 201 were located in the rib, one was located at the costochondral junction, and one in the costal cartilage. There were no complications seen by either radiography or ultrasonography. Ultrasonography reveals more fractures than those that may be overlooked on radiography for minor chest injuries

  19. Detection of rib fractures in an abused infant using digital radiography: a laboratory study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kleinman, Paul K.; O'Connor, Brian; Nimkin, Katherine; Rayder, Shawn M.; Spevak, Melissa R.; Belanger, Patricia L.; Getty, David J.; Karellas, Andrew

    2002-01-01

    To assess the diagnostic performance of digital radiography using charge-coupled device (CCD) technology in the detection of rib fracture in infant abuse.Materials and methods. Four fractured posterior rib arcs and eight normal ribs removed at autopsy from a 10-month-old abused infant were radiographed using a CCD prototype, four clinical film-screen systems, and direct-exposure film. Each rib was viewed with these six systems in nine different projections. The resultant 648 images were assessed for probability of fracture (0-100%) by four pediatric radiologists. The calculated area under the resultant ROC curves (A z ) for the CCD was compared with those obtained with direct-exposure, high-detail, medium and fast film-screen radiographic systems. The mean A z for the CCD (0.937) fell within the range of the high-detail systems (0.934-0.940) and was significantly higher (p 20 line pairs per millimeter) the CCD performance was comparable (A z =0.944 vs. 0.937). The similar performance can be explained by the higher contrast resolution of the digital technology. This study indicates that in the ex vivo setting, digital radiology can perform comparably to high-detail film-screen imaging. The findings suggest that digital radiography has the potential to replace film-screen imaging in the evaluation of inflicted skeletal injury in infants. (orig.)

  20. The ribs unfolded - a CT visualization algorithm for fast detection of rib fractures: effect on sensitivity and specificity in trauma patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ringl, Helmut; Lazar, Mathias; Toepker, Michael; Woitek, Ramona; Prosch, Helmut; Asenbaum, Ulrika; Balassy, Csilla; Toth, Daniel; Weber, Michael; Mang, Thomas; Hajdu, Stefan; Soza, Grzegorz; Wimmer, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    To assess a radiologist's detection rate of rib fractures in trauma CT when reading curved planar reformats (CPRs) of the ribs compared to reading standard MPRs. Two hundred and twenty trauma CTs (146 males, 74 females) were retrospectively subjected to a software algorithm to generate CPRs of the ribs. Patients were split into two equal groups. Sixteen patients were excluded due to insufficient segmentation, leaving 107 patients in group A and 97 patients in group B. Two radiologists independently evaluated group A using CPRs and group B using standard MPRs. Two different radiologists reviewed both groups with the inverse methods setting. Results were compared to a standard of reference created by two senior radiologists. The reference standard identified 361 rib fractures in 61 patients. Reading CPRs showed a significantly higher overall sensitivity (P < 0.001) for fracture detection than reading standard MPRs, with 80.9 % (584/722) and 71.5 % (516/722), respectively. Mean reading time was significantly shorter for CPRs (31.3 s) compared to standard MPRs (60.7 s; P < 0.001). Using CPRs for the detection of rib fractures accelerates the reading of trauma patient chest CTs, while offering an increased overall sensitivity compared to conventional standard MPRs. (orig.)

  1. The ribs unfolded - a CT visualization algorithm for fast detection of rib fractures: effect on sensitivity and specificity in trauma patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ringl, Helmut; Lazar, Mathias; Toepker, Michael; Woitek, Ramona; Prosch, Helmut; Asenbaum, Ulrika; Balassy, Csilla; Toth, Daniel; Weber, Michael; Mang, Thomas [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Vienna (Austria); Hajdu, Stefan [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Trauma Surgery, Vienna (Austria); Soza, Grzegorz; Wimmer, Andreas [Siemens AG, Healthcare Sector, Computed Tomography, Forchheim (Germany)

    2015-07-15

    To assess a radiologist's detection rate of rib fractures in trauma CT when reading curved planar reformats (CPRs) of the ribs compared to reading standard MPRs. Two hundred and twenty trauma CTs (146 males, 74 females) were retrospectively subjected to a software algorithm to generate CPRs of the ribs. Patients were split into two equal groups. Sixteen patients were excluded due to insufficient segmentation, leaving 107 patients in group A and 97 patients in group B. Two radiologists independently evaluated group A using CPRs and group B using standard MPRs. Two different radiologists reviewed both groups with the inverse methods setting. Results were compared to a standard of reference created by two senior radiologists. The reference standard identified 361 rib fractures in 61 patients. Reading CPRs showed a significantly higher overall sensitivity (P < 0.001) for fracture detection than reading standard MPRs, with 80.9 % (584/722) and 71.5 % (516/722), respectively. Mean reading time was significantly shorter for CPRs (31.3 s) compared to standard MPRs (60.7 s; P < 0.001). Using CPRs for the detection of rib fractures accelerates the reading of trauma patient chest CTs, while offering an increased overall sensitivity compared to conventional standard MPRs. (orig.)

  2. Fracture of the clavicle and second rib: an indirect injury from tricep dips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malavolta, Eduardo A; Assunção, Jorge H; Gracitelli, Mauro E; Lobo, Frederico L; Ferreira Neto, Arnaldo A

    2016-01-01

    Due to the recent rise in the interest in strength training, an increment in the number of lesions is expected, whether of the tendons, muscles, or bones. We describe a case of fracture involving the middle third of the clavicle and the second rib in a low-demand weightlifter. The fractures occurred suddenly while performing a triceps dips exercise, and the patient had no previous symptoms. He was treated conservatively and was able to return to sports six months later. To our knowledge, this is the first study describing the association of these fractures triggered by a single event of muscle contraction.

  3. [Chronic chest pain after rib fracture: It can cause a disability?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabiou, S; Ouadnouni, Y; Lakranbi, M; Traibi, A; Antoini, F; Smahi, M

    2018-04-01

    The rib fractures and instability of the chest wall are the main lesions of closed chest trauma. These lesions can be a source of chronic, often disabling with daily discomfort resulting limitation of some activities. The objective of this study was to assess the prevalence of this phenomenon in order to improve the quality of early care. Through an observational retrospective cohort study on a number of 41 patients supported and monitored for traumatic rib fractures at the Military Hospital of Meknes during the period from October 2010 to March 2016. The circumstances of the accident were dominated by accidents of public roads (86%) and concerned the young adult male. Radiographs have enumerated 165 fracture lines with an average of 4 rib fractures per patient. These were unilateral fractures in 88% of cases, and concerned the means arc in 46% of cases. The rib fracture was undisplaced fracture in 39% of patients, whereas in 2 patients, a flail chest was present. Post-traumatic hemothorax (63% of cases) were the thoracic lesions most commonly associated with rib fractures. The initial management consisted in the use of analgesics systemically in all patients. The retrospective evaluation of pain by the verbal scale was possible in 30 patients. The persistent pain was noted in 60% of cases. This pain was triggered by a simple effort to moderate in 55% of cases, and hard effort in 28% of cases. In 17% of patients, even at rest, the pain occurred intermittently. The impact in terms of disability was mild to moderate in 28% of cases and important in 17%. The neuropathic pain was found in 3 patients. Therapeutically, the first and second levels of analgesics were sufficient to relieve pain. The neuroleptics were required for 2 patients. Our study confirms the persistence of chronic painful, sometimes lasting several years after the initial chest trauma. This pain is responsible of disability triggered most often after exercise. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson

  4. The clinical application of absorbable intramedullary nail and claw plate on treating multiple rib fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, X; Lin, Q; Ruan, Z; Zheng, J; Zhou, J; Zhang, J

    2013-08-01

    The absorption intramedullary nail and claw plate indications and efficacy were investigated in the treatment of a life-threatening multiple rib fractures. A retrospective analysis of 248 surgically treated rib fracture patients was performed who admitted to our hospital from March 2007 to December 2012. Intramedullary nailing was performed in 28 cases, a claw-type bone plate was fixed in 141 cases, and a combination of both was fixed in 79 cases. All internal fixation patients were clinically cured except 1 patient died 14 days after a massive pulmonary embolism. The patients with flail chest and floating chest wall causing respiratory and circulatory disorders were promptly corrected. Routine follow-up was from 1 to 2 years, displaced fractures were in 2 cases, and there were 11 cases of internal fixation and extraction. Internal fixation is a simple and reliable method for the treatment of multiple rib fractures. Both internal fixation materials have their pros and cons but the claw bone plate is more robust. The actual selection of appropriate treatment options helps to improve the treatment efficacy.

  5. Risk Factors for Pneumonia in Ventilated Trauma Patients with Multiple Rib Fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun Oh Park

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP is a common disease that may contribute to morbidity and mortality among trauma patients in the intensive care unit (ICU. This study evaluated the associations between trauma factors and the development of VAP in ventilated patients with multiple rib fractures. Methods: We retrospectively and consecutively evaluated 101 patients with multiple rib fractures who were ventilated and managed at our hospital between January 2010 and December 2015, analyzing the associations between VAP and trauma factors in these patients. Trauma factors included sternal fracture, flail chest, diaphragm injury, traumatic aortic dissection, combined cardiac injury, pulmonary contusion, pneumothorax, hemothorax, hemopneumothorax, abbreviated injury scale score, thoracic trauma severity score, and injury severity score. Results: Forty-six patients (45.5% had at least 1 episode of VAP, 10 (21.7% of whom died in the ICU. Of the 55 (54.5% patients who did not have pneumonia, 9 (16.4% died in the ICU. Using logistic regression analysis, we found that VAP was associated with severe lung contusion (odds ratio, 3.07; 95% confidence interval, 1.12 to 8.39; p=0.029. Conclusion: Severe pulmonary contusion (pulmonary lung contusion score 6–12 is an independent risk factor for VAP in ventilated trauma patients with multiple rib fractures.

  6. Rib Geometry Explains Variation in Dynamic Structural Response: Potential Implications for Frontal Impact Fracture Risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murach, Michelle M; Kang, Yun-Seok; Goldman, Samuel D; Schafman, Michelle A; Schlecht, Stephen H; Moorhouse, Kevin; Bolte, John H; Agnew, Amanda M

    2017-09-01

    The human thorax is commonly injured in motor vehicle crashes, and despite advancements in occupant safety rib fractures are highly prevalent. The objective of this study was to quantify the ability of gross and cross-sectional geometry, separately and in combination, to explain variation of human rib structural properties. One hundred and twenty-two whole mid-level ribs from 76 fresh post-mortem human subjects were tested in a dynamic frontal impact scenario. Structural properties (peak force and stiffness) were successfully predicted (p rib cross-sectional geometry obtained via direct histological imaging (total area, cortical area, and section modulus) and were improved further when utilizing a combination of cross-sectional and gross geometry (robusticity, whole bone strength index). Additionally, preliminary application of a novel, adaptive thresholding technique, allowed for total area and robusticity to be measured on a subsample of standard clinical CT scans with varied success. These results can be used to understand variation in individual rib response to frontal loading as well as identify important geometric parameters, which could ultimately improve injury criteria as well as the biofidelity of anthropomorphic test devices (ATDs) and finite element (FE) models of the human thorax.

  7. Improved Outcomes Associated with the Liberal Use of Thoracic Epidural Analgesia in Patients with Rib Fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Courtney D; Stark, Jamie T; Jacobson, Lewis L; Powers, Jan M; Joseph, Michael F; Kinsella-Shaw, Jeffrey M; Denegar, Craig R

    2017-09-01

    Each year, more than 150,000 patients with rib fractures are admitted to US trauma centers; as many as 10% die. Effective pain control is critical to survival. One way to manage pain is thoracic epidural analgesia. If this treatment reduces mortality, more frequent use may be indicated. We analyzed the patient registry of a level II trauma center. All patients admitted with one or more rib fractures (N = 1,347) were considered. Patients who were not candidates for epidural analgesia (N = 382) were eliminated. Mortality was assessed with binary logistic regressions. Across the total population, mortality was 6.7%; incidence of pneumonia was 11.1%; mechanical ventilation was required in 23.8% of patients, for an average duration of 10.0 days; average stay in the hospital was 7.7 nights; and 49.7% of patients were admitted to the ICU for an average of 7.2 nights. Epidural analgesia was administered to 18.4% of patients. After matching samples for candidacy, patients who received epidurals were 3.7 years older, fractured 2.6 more ribs, had higher injury severity scores, and were more likely to present with bilateral fractures, flail segments, pulmonary contusions, hemothoraces, and pneumothoraces. Despite greater injury severity, mortality among these patients was lower (0.5%) than those who received alternative care (1.9%). Controlling for age, injury severity, and use of mechanical ventilation, epidural analgesia predicted a 97% reduction in mortality. Thoracic epidural analgesia associates with reduced mortality in rib fracture patients. Better care of this population is likely to be facilitated by more frequent reliance on this treatment. © 2016 American Academy of Pain Medicine. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  8. Rib fractures after reirradiation plus hyperthermia for recurrent breast cancer. Predictive factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oldenborg, Sabine; Valk, Christel; Os, Rob van; Voerde Sive Voerding, Paul zum; Crezee, Hans; Tienhoven, Geertjan van; Rasch, Coen [University of Amsterdam, Department of Radiation Oncology, Z1-215, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Oei, Bing; Venselaar, Jack [Institute Verbeeten (BVI), Tilburg (Netherlands); Randen, Adrienne van [University of Amsterdam (AMC), Department of Radiology Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2016-04-15

    Combining reirradiation (reRT) and hyperthermia (HT) has shown high therapeutic value for patients with locoregional recurrent breast cancer (LR). However, additional toxicity of reirradiation (e.g., rib fractures) may occur. The aim of this study is to determine the impact of potential risk factors on the occurrence of rib fractures. From 1982-2005, 234 patients were treated with adjuvant reRT + HT after surgery for LR. ReRT consisted typically of 8 fractions of 4 Gy twice a week, or 12 fractions of 3 Gy four times a week. A total of 118 patients were irradiated with abutted photon and electron fields. In all, 60 patients were irradiated using either one or alternating combinations of abutted AP electron fields. Hyperthermia was given once or twice a week. The 5-year infield local control (LC) rate was 70 %. Rib fractures were detected in 16 of 234 patients (actuarial risk: 7 % at 5 years). All rib fractures occurred in patients treated with a combination of photon and abutted electron fields (p = 0.000); in 15 of 16 patients fractures were located in the abutment regions. The other significant predictive factors for rib fractures were a higher fraction dose (p = 0.040), large RT fields, and treatment before the year 2000. ReRT + HT results in long-term LC. The majority of rib fractures were located in the photon/electron abutment area, emphasizing the disadvantage of field overlap. Large abutted photon/electron fields combined with 4 Gy fractions increase the number of rib fractures in this study group. However, as these factors were highly correlated no relative importance of the individual factors could be estimated. Increasing the number of HT sessions a week does not increase the risk of rib fractures. (orig.) [German] Der kombinierte Einsatz von Rebestrahlung (reRT) und Hyperthermie (HT) zeigt eine hohe Wirksamkeit bei Patienten mit lokoregional rezidiviertem Brustkrebs (LR). Jedoch koennen zusaetzliche toxische Effekte von reRT (z. B. Rippenfrakturen

  9. α(1) adrenergic receptor agonist, phenylephrine, actively contracts early rat rib fracture callus ex vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Stuart J; Dooley, Philip C; McDonald, Aaron C; Djouma, Elvan; Schuijers, Johannes A; Ward, Alex R; Grills, Brian L

    2011-05-01

    Early, soft fracture callus that links fracture ends together is smooth muscle-like in nature. We aimed to determine if early fracture callus could be induced to contract and relax ex vivo by similar pathways to smooth muscle, that is, contraction via α(1) adrenergic receptor (α(1) AR) activation with phenylephrine (PE) and relaxation via β(2) adrenergic receptor (β(2) AR) stimulation with terbutaline. A sensitive force transducer quantified 7 day rat rib fracture callus responses in modified Krebs-Henseliet (KH) solutions. Unfractured ribs along with 7, 14, and 21 day fracture calluses were analyzed for both α(1) AR and β(2) AR gene expression using qPCR, whilst 7 day fracture callus was examined via immunohistochemistry for both α(1) AR and β(2) AR- immunoreactivity. In 7 day callus, PE (10(-6)  M) significantly induced an increase in force that was greater than passive force generated in calcium-free KH (n = 8, mean 51% increase, 95% CI: 26-76%). PE-induced contractions in calluses were attenuated by the α(1) AR antagonist, prazosin (10(-6)  M; n = 7, mean 5% increase, 95% CI: 2-11%). Terbutaline did not relax callus. Gene expression of α(1) ARs was constant throughout fracture healing; however, β(2) AR expression was down-regulated at 7 days compared to unfractured rib (p contract. We propose that increased concentrations of α(1) AR agonists such as noradrenaline may tonically contract callus in vivo to promote osteogenesis. Copyright © 2010 Orthopaedic Research Society.

  10. A novel and effective acupuncture modality as a complementary therapy to acute pain relief in inpatients with rib fractures

    OpenAIRE

    Hsin-Yi Ho; Chao-Wei Chen; Ming-Chieh Li; Yu-Pao Hsu; Shih-Ching Kang; Erh-Hao Liu; Ko-Hung Lee

    2014-01-01

    Background: Pain control has been emphasized as a priority for both practitioners and inpatients with rib fractures, since analgesia could only offer limited relief from severe pain. A prospective and randomized controlled trial was conducted to analyze the efficacy and efficiency of acupuncture in acute pain relief for inpatients with rib fractures. Methods: A total of 58 inpatients were recruited and allocated to two groups, receiving identical doses of conventional oral analgesics as we...

  11. Case report: ultrasound-guided continuous thoracic paravertebral block for outpatient acute pain management of multilevel unilateral rib fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murata, Hiroaki; Salviz, Emine Aysu; Chen, Stephanie; Vandepitte, Catherine; Hadzic, Admir

    2013-01-01

    A 61-year-old man with multiple unilateral rib fractures (T3-T8) gained the ability to breathe deeply and to ambulate after ultrasound-guided continuous thoracic paravertebral block and was discharged home after being observed for 15 hours after the block. The ultrasound guidance was helpful in determining the site of rib fractures and the optimal level for catheter placement. This report also discusses the management of analgesia using continuous paravertebral block in an outpatient with trauma.

  12. Comparison Thoracic Epidural and Intercostal Block to Improve Ventilation Parameters and Reduce Pain in Patients with Multiple Rib Fractures

    OpenAIRE

    Raheleh Aligholipour Maleki; Hamzeh Hosseinzadeh; Shahryar Hashemzadeh; Khosrov Hashemzadeh

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Chest wall blunt trauma causes multiple rib fractures and will often be associated with significant pain and may compromise ventilator mechanics. Analgesia has great roll in rib fracture therapies, opioid are useful, but when used as sole agent may re-quire such high dose that they produce respiratory depression, especially in el-derly .the best analgesia for a severe chest wall injury is a continuous epidural infusion of local anesthetic. This provides complete analgesia allowi...

  13. A Multidisciplinary Clinical Pathway Decreases Rib Fracture-Associated Infectious Morbidity and Mortality in High-Risk Trauma Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    RT respiratory therapy ; PT physical therapy ; OT occupational therapy ; GCS Glasgow Coma Scale. 808 S.R. Todd et al. / The American Journal of...Morbidity form rib fractures increases after age 45. J Am Coll Surg 2003;196:549–55. [14] Pierson DJ, Kacmarek R. Foundations of Respiratory Care. New...Papers presented A multidisciplinary clinical pathway decreases rib fracture –associated infectious morbidity and mortality in high-risk trauma

  14. Analgesic Choice in Management of Rib Fractures: Paravertebral Block or Epidural Analgesia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malekpour, Mahdi; Hashmi, Ammar; Dove, James; Torres, Denise; Wild, Jeffrey

    2017-06-01

    Rib fractures are commonly encountered in the setting of trauma. The aim of this study was to assess the association between the clinical outcome of rib fracture and epidural analgesia (EA) versus paravertebral block (PVB) using the National Trauma Data Bank (NTDB). Using the 2011 and 2012 versions of the NTDB, we retrieved completed records for all patients above 18 years of age who were admitted with rib fractures. Primary outcome was in-hospital mortality. Secondary outcomes were length of stay (LOS), intensive care unit (ICU) admission, ICU LOS, mechanical ventilation, duration of mechanical ventilation, development of pneumonia, and development of any other complication. Clinical outcomes were first compared between propensity score-matched EA and PVB patients. Then, EA and PVB patients were combined into the procedure group and the outcomes were compared with propensity score-matched patients that received neither intervention (no-procedure group). A total of 194,766 patients were included in the study with 1073 patients having EA, 1110 patients having PVB, and 192,583 patients having neither procedure. After propensity score matching, comparison of primary and secondary outcomes between EA and PVB patients showed no difference. Comparison of propensity score-matched procedure and no-procedure patients showed prolonged LOS and more frequent ICU admissions in patients receiving a procedure (both P rib fractures. There was an association between use of a block and improved outcome, but this could be explained by selection of healthier patients to receive a block. Prospective study of this association is recommended.

  15. Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial using lidocaine patch 5% in traumatic rib fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingalls, Nichole K; Horton, Zachary A; Bettendorf, Matthew; Frye, Ira; Rodriguez, Carlos

    2010-02-01

    The lidocaine patch 5% was developed to treat postherpetic neuralgia. Anecdotal experience at our institution suggests the lidocaine patch 5% decreases narcotic usage in patients with traumatic rib fractures. This trial was developed to define the patch's efficacy. Patients with rib fractures admitted to the trauma service at our Level I trauma center were enrolled and randomized in a 1 to 1 double-blind manner to receive a lidocaine patch 5% or placebo patch. Fifty-eight patients who met the inclusion criteria were enrolled from January 2007 to August 2008. Demographic and clinical information were recorded. The primary outcomes variable was total narcotic use, analyzed using the 1-tailed Mann-Whitney test. The secondary outcomes variables included non-narcotic pain medication, average pain score, pulmonary complications, and length of stay. Significance was defined based on a 1-sided test for the primary outcome and 2-sided tests for other comparisons, at p rib fractures, gender, trauma mechanism, preinjury lung disease, smoking history, percent of current smokers, and need for placement of chest tube between the lidocaine patch 5% and placebo groups. There was no difference between the lidocaine patch 5% and placebo groups, respectively, with regard to total IV narcotic usage: median, 0.23 units versus 0.26 units; total oral narcotics: median, 4 units versus 7 units; pain score: 5.6 +/- 0.4 versus 6.0 +/- 0.3 (mean +/- SEM); length of stay: 7.8 +/- 1.1 versus 6.2 +/- 0.7; or percentage of patients with pulmonary complications: 72.7% versus 72.0%. The lidocaine patch 5% does not significantly improve pain control in polytrauma patients with traumatic rib fractures.

  16. Rib plating of acute and sub-acute non-union rib fractures in an adult with cystic fibrosis: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Dean, Nathan C; Van Boerum, Don H; Liou, Theodore G

    2014-01-01

    Background Rib fractures associated with osteoporosis have been reported to occur ten times more frequently in adults with cystic fibrosis. Fractures cause chest pain, and interfere with cough and sputum clearance leading to worsened lung function and acute exacerbations which are the two main contributors to early mortality in cystic fibrosis. Usual treatment involves analgesics and time for healing; however considerable pain and disability result due to constant re-injury from chronic repet...

  17. Rib fracture after stereotactic radiotherapy on follow-up thin-section computed tomography in 177 primary lung cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saito Ryo

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chest wall injury after stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT for primary lung cancer has recently been reported. However, its detailed imaging findings are not clarified. So this study aimed to fully characterize the findings on computed tomography (CT, appearance time and frequency of chest wall injury after stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT for primary lung cancer Materials and methods A total of 177 patients who had undergone SRT were prospectively evaluated for periodical follow-up thin-section CT with special attention to chest wall injury. The time at which CT findings of chest wall injury appeared was assessed. Related clinical symptoms were also evaluated. Results Rib fracture was identified on follow-up CT in 41 patients (23.2%. Rib fractures appeared at a mean of 21.2 months after the completion of SRT (range, 4 -58 months. Chest wall edema, thinning of the cortex and osteosclerosis were findings frequently associated with, and tending to precede rib fractures. No patients with rib fracture showed tumors > 16 mm from the adjacent chest wall. Chest wall pain was seen in 18 of 177 patients (10.2%, of whom 14 patients developed rib fracture. No patients complained of Grade 3 or more symptoms. Conclusion Rib fracture is frequently seen after SRT for lung cancer on CT, and is often associated with chest wall edema, thinning of the cortex and osteosclerosis. However, related chest wall pain is less frequent and is generally mild if present.

  18. Rib fracture after stereotactic radiotherapy on follow-up thin-section computed tomography in 177 primary lung cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nambu, Atsushi; Tominaga, Lichto; Maehata, Yoshiyasu; Sawada, Eiichi; Araki, Tsutomu; Onishi, Hiroshi; Aoki, Shinichi; Koshiishi, Tsuyota; Kuriyama, Kengo; Komiyama, Takafumi; Marino, Kan; Araya, Masayuki; Saito, Ryo

    2011-01-01

    Chest wall injury after stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) for primary lung cancer has recently been reported. However, its detailed imaging findings are not clarified. So this study aimed to fully characterize the findings on computed tomography (CT), appearance time and frequency of chest wall injury after stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) for primary lung cancer A total of 177 patients who had undergone SRT were prospectively evaluated for periodical follow-up thin-section CT with special attention to chest wall injury. The time at which CT findings of chest wall injury appeared was assessed. Related clinical symptoms were also evaluated. Rib fracture was identified on follow-up CT in 41 patients (23.2%). Rib fractures appeared at a mean of 21.2 months after the completion of SRT (range, 4 -58 months). Chest wall edema, thinning of the cortex and osteosclerosis were findings frequently associated with, and tending to precede rib fractures. No patients with rib fracture showed tumors > 16 mm from the adjacent chest wall. Chest wall pain was seen in 18 of 177 patients (10.2%), of whom 14 patients developed rib fracture. No patients complained of Grade 3 or more symptoms. Rib fracture is frequently seen after SRT for lung cancer on CT, and is often associated with chest wall edema, thinning of the cortex and osteosclerosis. However, related chest wall pain is less frequent and is generally mild if present

  19. Rib fracture after stereotactic radiotherapy on follow-up thin-section computed tomography in 177 primary lung cancer patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Chest wall injury after stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) for primary lung cancer has recently been reported. However, its detailed imaging findings are not clarified. So this study aimed to fully characterize the findings on computed tomography (CT), appearance time and frequency of chest wall injury after stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) for primary lung cancer Materials and methods A total of 177 patients who had undergone SRT were prospectively evaluated for periodical follow-up thin-section CT with special attention to chest wall injury. The time at which CT findings of chest wall injury appeared was assessed. Related clinical symptoms were also evaluated. Results Rib fracture was identified on follow-up CT in 41 patients (23.2%). Rib fractures appeared at a mean of 21.2 months after the completion of SRT (range, 4 -58 months). Chest wall edema, thinning of the cortex and osteosclerosis were findings frequently associated with, and tending to precede rib fractures. No patients with rib fracture showed tumors > 16 mm from the adjacent chest wall. Chest wall pain was seen in 18 of 177 patients (10.2%), of whom 14 patients developed rib fracture. No patients complained of Grade 3 or more symptoms. Conclusion Rib fracture is frequently seen after SRT for lung cancer on CT, and is often associated with chest wall edema, thinning of the cortex and osteosclerosis. However, related chest wall pain is less frequent and is generally mild if present. PMID:21995807

  20. Long-term patient outcomes after surgical stabilization of rib fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majercik, Sarah; Cannon, Quinn; Granger, Steven R; VanBoerum, Don H; White, Thomas W

    2014-07-01

    Rib fractures are common, and can be disabling. Recently, there has been increased interest in surgical stabilization of rib fractures (SSRF). It is difficult to define long-term benefits of the procedure. This is a descriptive study of patient outcomes after SSRF. SSRF patients between April 2010 and August 2012 at a Level I trauma center were identified. Data were collected from the medical records. A telephone survey asking about pain, satisfaction, and employment was administered to patients after hospital discharge. One hundred-one patients met inclusion criteria. Fifty (50%) patients completed the survey. Indications for SSRF included flail chest, displaced fractures, pain, and inability to wean from mechanical ventilation. Pain was gone at 5.4 ± 1.1 weeks post discharge. Satisfaction with SSRF on a scale of 1 to 10 was 9.2 ± .2. Ninety percent of employed patients returned to the same work at 8.5 ± 1.2 weeks. SSRF patients are satisfied and are able to return to normal activity with few limitations. A prospective study using modern rib fixation technology is needed to further define benefits. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Prospective clinical trial of surgical intervention for painful rib fracture nonunion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabricant, Loic; Ham, Bruce; Mullins, Richard; Mayberry, John

    2014-06-01

    We performed a prospective clinical trial of resection with or without plate fixation for symptomatic rib fracture nonunion three or more months postinjury with 6-month postoperative followup. The McGill Pain Questionnaire (MPQ) and RAND 36 Health Survey were administered and activity level (sedentary, ambulatory, moderately active, vigorous), functional status (disabled, nonphysical labor, physical labor), and work status (employed, unemployed, retired, student) were queried pre- and postoperatively. Twenty-four patients 4 to 197 months (median, 16 months) postinjury underwent surgical intervention for one to four rib fracture nonunions (median, two nonunions). Evidence of intercostal nerve entrapment was present in nine patients (38%). MPQ Present Pain Intensity and Pain Rating Index and RAND 36 Physical Functioning, Role Physical, Social Functioning, Role Social, Bodily Pain, Vitality, Mental Health, and General Health were significantly improved at six months compared with study entry (P rib fracture nonunion may improve chronic pain and disability but without change in functional or work status. Resection of adjacent nonunions with significant gaps may lead to chest wall hernia.

  2. Comparison of analgesic interventions for traumatic rib fractures: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peek, Jesse; Smeeing, Diederik P J; Hietbrink, Falco; Houwert, Roderick M; Marsman, Marije; de Jong, Mirjam B

    2018-02-06

    Many studies report on outcomes of analgesic therapy for (suspected) traumatic rib fractures. However, the literature is inconclusive and diverse regarding the management of pain and its effect on pain relief and associated complications. This systematic review and meta-analysis summarizes and compares reduction of pain for the different treatment modalities and as secondary outcome mortality during hospitalization, length of mechanical ventilation, length of hospital stay, length of intensive care unit stay (ICU) and complications such as respiratory, cardiovascular, and/or analgesia-related complications, for four different types of analgesic therapy: epidural analgesia, intravenous analgesia, paravertebral blocks and intercostal blocks. PubMed, EMBASE and CENTRAL databases were searched to identify comparative studies investigating epidural, intravenous, paravertebral and intercostal interventions for traumatic rib fractures, without restriction for study type. The search strategy included keywords and MeSH or Emtree terms relating blunt chest trauma (including rib fractures), analgesic interventions, pain management and complications. A total of 19 papers met our inclusion criteria and were finally included in this systematic review. Significant differences were found in favor of epidural analgesia for the reduction of pain. No significant differences were observed between epidural analgesia, intravenous analgesia, paravertebral blocks and intercostal blocks, for the secondary outcomes. Results of this study show that epidural analgesia provides better pain relief than the other modalities. No differences were observed for secondary endpoints like length of ICU stay, length of mechanical ventilation or pulmonary complications. However, the quality of the available evidence is low, and therefore, preclude strong recommendations.

  3. Non-censored rib fracture data during frontal PMHS sled tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemper, Andrew R; Beeman, Stephanie M; Porta, David J; Duma, Stefan M

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to obtain non-censored rib fracture data due to three-point belt loading during dynamic frontal post-mortem human surrogate (PMHS) sled tests. The PMHS responses were then compared to matched tests performed using the Hybrid-III 50(th) percentile male ATD. Matched dynamic frontal sled tests were performed on two male PMHSs, which were approximately 50(th) percentile height and weight, and the Hybrid-III 50(th) percentile male ATD. The sled pulse was designed to match the vehicle acceleration of a standard sedan during a FMVSS-208 40 kph test. Each subject was restrained with a 4 kN load limiting, driver-side, three-point seatbelt. A 59-channel chestband, aligned at the nipple line, was used to quantify the chest contour, anterior-posterior sternum deflection, and maximum anterior-posterior chest deflection for all test subjects. The internal sternum deflection of the ATD was quantified with the sternum potentiometer. For the PMHS tests, a total of 23 single-axis strain gages were attached to the bony structures of the thorax, including the ribs, sternum, and clavicle. In order to create a non-censored data set, the time history of each strain gage was analyzed to determine the timing of each rib fracture and corresponding timing of each AIS level (AIS = 1, 2, 3, etc.) with respect to chest deflection. Peak sternum deflection for PMHS 1 and PMHS 2 were 48.7 mm (19.0%) and 36.7 mm (12.2%), respectively. The peak sternum deflection for the ATD was 20.8 mm when measured by the chest potentiometer and 34.4 mm (12.0%) when measured by the chestband. Although the measured ATD sternum deflections were found to be well below the current thoracic injury criterion (63 mm) specified for the ATD in FMVSS-208, both PMHSs sustained AIS 3+ thoracic injuries. For all subjects, the maximum chest deflection measured by the chestband occurred to the right of the sternum and was found to be 83.0 mm (36.0%) for PMHS 1, 60.6 mm (23.9%) for PMHS 2

  4. Epidural analgesia for traumatic rib fractures is associated with worse outcomes: a matched analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKendy, Katherine M; Lee, Lawrence F; Boulva, Kerianne; Deckelbaum, Dan L; Mulder, David S; Razek, Tarek S; Grushka, Jeremy R

    2017-06-15

    The optimal method of pain control for patients with traumatic rib fractures is unknown. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of epidural analgesia on respiratory complications and in-hospital mortality in patients with rib fractures. Adult patients at a level I trauma center with ≥1 rib fracture from blunt trauma were included (2004-2013). Those with a blunt-penetrating mechanism, traumatic brain injury, or underwent a laparotomy or thoracotomy were excluded. Patients who were treated with epidural analgesia (EPI) were compared with those were not treated with epidural analgesia (NEPI) using coarsened exact matching. Primary outcomes were respiratory complications (pneumonia, deep vein thrombosis/pulmonary embolus, and respiratory failure) and 30-d in-hospital mortality. Secondary outcomes were total hospital and intensive care unit length of stay, and duration of ventilator support. About 1360 patients (EPI: 329 and NEPI: 1031) met inclusion criteria (mean age: 54.2 y; standard deviation [SD]: 19.7; 68% male). The mean number of rib fractures was 4.8 (SD: 3.3; 21% bilateral) with a high total burden of injury (mean Injury Severity Score: 19.9 [SD: 8.9]). The overall incidence of respiratory complications was 13% and mortality was 4%. After matching, 204 EPI patients were compared with 204 NEPI patients, with no differences in baseline characteristics. EPI patients experienced more respiratory complications (19% versus 10%, P = 0.009), but no differences in 30-d mortality (5% versus 2%, P = 0.159), duration of mechanical ventilation (EPI: 148 h [SD: 167] versus NEPI: 117 h [SD: 187], P = 0.434), or duration of intensive care unit length of stay (6.5 d [SD: 7.6] versus 5.8 d [SD: 9.1], P = 0.626). Hospital stay was higher in the EPI group (16.6 d [SD: 19.6] vs 12.7 d [SD: 15.2], P = 0.026). Epidural analgesia is associated with increased respiratory complications without providing mortality benefit after traumatic rib fractures

  5. Clinical application of low-dose CT in patients with rib fractures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ge Xiaojun; Wu Hao; Hua Yanqing; Wang Mingpeng; Mao Dingbiao; Tang Ping; Hu Fei; Zhang Guozhen

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate images quality and diagnostic feasibility of low-dose CT in patients with traumatic rib fractures. Methods: Twenty-five patients presented with thoracic injury were underwent 64-slice spiral CT scanning in inspiration breath-hold technique. Two scan protocols were performed. In one scan protocol noise index (NI) is 11, and in another NI is 21, but the other scan parameters were no difference. The mean value of tube current, the volume CT dose index (CTDI vol ), and effective dose (ED) were recorded. Image quality was scored by 2 experienced radiologists using the 5-points scale. The numbers and degrees of rib fractures were recorded. The data were tested by using the Wilcoxon signed rank sum test. The differences of the inter-observer were determined by Kappa statistics. Results: The mean CTDIvol and ED in scan protocol with NI of 11 were (13.88±5.17) mGy and (8.14± 3.21) mSv, and that with NI of 21 were (3.91±1.57) mGy and (2.31±0.97) mSv. Compared the scan with NI of 11, there was 72% intrinsic dose reduction in the scan with NI of 21. The mean value of tube current in scan with NI of 11 and 21 were (195.88±69.33) mAs and (54.56±21.54) mAs. All patients with Ⅱ and Ⅲ degree and most patients with Ⅰ degree rib fractures that identified by the scan with NI of 11 were detected by the scan with NI of 21. There were no statistical difference between two scans with the Wilcoxon, signed rank sum test. The diagnostic acceptability and image noise score in the scan with NI of 11 were 4.9±0.2 and 4.6±0.5, and that with NI = 21 were 3.5±0.5 and 3.3±0.5. There was prefect concordance in the inter-observers in diagnostic, acceptability on finding of rib fractures, diagnostic acceptability and image noise (Kappa =0.876, 0.820, 0.792, P<0.01) between two scan protocols. Conclusion: Rib fractures can be diagnosed by the low-dose CT using the scan protocol with NI of 21. (authors)

  6. Detection of rib fractures in an abused infant using digital radiography: a laboratory study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kleinman, Paul K. [Department of Radiology, UMASS Memorial Health Care, 55 Lake Avenue North, Worcester, MA 01655 (United States); O' Connor, Brian; Nimkin, Katherine [Department of Pediatric Radiology, New England Medical Center, 750 Washington Street, Boston, MA 02111 (United States); Rayder, Shawn M. [Department of Radiology, Cape Cod Hospital, 12 Park Street, Hyannis, MA 02601-5203 (United States); Spevak, Melissa R. [Department of Radiology, Johns Hopkins Hospital, 600 N. Wolfe Street, Baltimore, MD 21287 (United States); Belanger, Patricia L. [University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States); Getty, David J. [BBNT Solutions LLC, 10 Moulton Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Karellas, Andrew [Department of Radiology, University of Mass. Medical School, Lake Avenue North, Worcester, MA 01655 (United States)

    2002-12-01

    To assess the diagnostic performance of digital radiography using charge-coupled device (CCD) technology in the detection of rib fracture in infant abuse.Materials and methods. Four fractured posterior rib arcs and eight normal ribs removed at autopsy from a 10-month-old abused infant were radiographed using a CCD prototype, four clinical film-screen systems, and direct-exposure film. Each rib was viewed with these six systems in nine different projections. The resultant 648 images were assessed for probability of fracture (0-100%) by four pediatric radiologists. The calculated area under the resultant ROC curves (A{sub z}) for the CCD was compared with those obtained with direct-exposure, high-detail, medium and fast film-screen radiographic systems. The mean A{sub z} for the CCD (0.937) fell within the range of the high-detail systems (0.934-0.940) and was significantly higher (p<0.05) than the medium and fast system (0.861 and 0.858, respectively). Despite a lower spatial resolution than direct-exposure film (7 line pairs per millimeter vs. >20 line pairs per millimeter) the CCD performance was comparable (A{sub z}=0.944 vs. 0.937). The similar performance can be explained by the higher contrast resolution of the digital technology. This study indicates that in the ex vivo setting, digital radiology can perform comparably to high-detail film-screen imaging. The findings suggest that digital radiography has the potential to replace film-screen imaging in the evaluation of inflicted skeletal injury in infants. (orig.)

  7. Rib fractures in chronic alcoholic men: Relationship with feeding habits, social problems, malnutrition, bone alterations, and liver dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Reimers, Emilio; García-Valdecasas-Campelo, Elena; Santolaria-Fernández, Francisco; Milena-Abril, Antonio; Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Eva; Martínez-Riera, Antonio; Pérez-Ramírez, Alina; Alemán-Valls, María Remedios

    2005-10-01

    Rib fractures are common in alcoholics. This high prevalence might be due to ethanol-associated malnutrition, bone disease, liver dysfunction, or the peculiar lifestyle of the alcoholic with frequent trauma and altercations. In this study we try to discern the role of these factors on rib fracture (assessed on a plain thoracic X-ray film) in 81 consecutive alcoholic patients, 25 of them cirrhotics. Serum albumin, prothrombin aspartate aminotransferase (ASAT), alanine aminotransferase (ALAT), gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase, C-terminal cross-linking telopeptide of type 1 collagen, osteocalcin, insulin growth factor 1, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D, parathyroid hormone, estradiol, free testosterone, and corticosterone were measured, and the patients also underwent assessment of bone mineral density by a HOLOGIC QDR-2000 bone densitometer (Waltham, MA, USA). Body mass index, triceps skinfold, and brachial perimeter were also determined, and the patients and their families were asked about tobacco consumption, social and familial links, consumption of ethanol by other members of the family, kind of job, and feeding habits. Forty-two male nondrinker sanitary workers of similar age served as controls. Forty of the 81 patients showed rib fractures. There was a statistically significant association between rib fractures and disruption of social and familial links, irregular feeding habits (in bars or pubs, not at home), ethanol consumption by close relatives, and intensity of tobacco consumption, but not between rib fractures and liver function tests, nutritional parameters, or bone mineral density, besides a nearly significant trend (p = .053) with the presence of osteopenia at the femoral neck. Patients with major withdrawal symptoms at admission also presented more frequent rib fractures. We conclude that rib fractures in alcoholics are related to the peculiar lifestyle of these patients rather than to bone alterations, liver dysfunction, or nutritional status.

  8. Rib Tuberculosis Treatment By Steel Greft which has Fractured after a Thoracic Trauma: 10-year Follow up Case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murat Oncel

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Rib tuberculosis is an uncommon form of osteoarticular tuberculosis. The physical and radiological examination can often mimic other conditions ,including primary and metastatic chest wall tumors . A 60 year-old male patient had a mass in the chest wall. Surgery aiming diagnosis and treatment based on physical and radiological findings were performed. Histopathological examination of the mass specimen revealed tuberculosis. The chest wall defect was supported with a stell greft after the six month . The patient had fallen from stairs and hit his chest six year after . The case had a significant fracture in the steel graft . This is unusual manifestation of chest wall grefts . This, chest wall, showing a softer steel materials should be used in grafts that would break a long-term follow-up is presented [Cukurova Med J 2013; 38(2.000: 295-298

  9. Surgical rib fixation

    OpenAIRE

    Marasco, Silvana

    2017-01-01

    Traumatic rib fracture injuries are being seen with increasing frequency in the hospital setting. They are often associated with other severe injuries and frequently require admission. The most severe form of rib fracture injury, flail chest, has a mortality of up to 33%. Rib fracture injuries have also been associated with chronic pain, malunion, deformity, disability and poor quality of life. Despite this, the standard of management for rib fracture injuries was, and in most ...

  10. Ribbing disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukkada, Philson J; Franklin, Teenu; Rajeswaran, Rangasami; Joseph, Santhosh

    2010-01-01

    Ribbing disease is a rare sclerosing dysplasia that involves long tubular bones, especially the tibia and femur. It occurs after puberty and is reported to be more common in women. In this article we describe how Ribbing disease can be differentiated from diseases like Engelmann-Camurati disease, van Buchem disease, Erdheim-Chester disease, osteoid osteoma, chronic osteomyelitis, stress fracture, etc

  11. Characteristics of Rib Fractures in Child Abuse-The Role of Low-Dose Chest Computed Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Thomas R; Grasparil, Angelo D; Chaudhari, Ruchir; Coulter, Kevin P; Wootton-Gorges, Sandra L

    2018-02-01

    Our aim is to describe the radiologic characteristics of rib fractures in clinically diagnosed cases of child abuse and suggest a complementary imaging for radiographically occult injuries in highly suspicious cases of child abuse. Retrospective analysis of initial and follow-up skeletal surveys and computed tomography (CT) scans of 16 patients younger than 12 months were reviewed after obtaining approval from our institutional review board. The number, location, displacement, and age of the rib fractures were recorded. Out of a total 105 rib fractures, 84% (87/105) were detected on the initial skeletal survey. Seventeen percent (18/105) were seen only after follow-up imaging, more than half of which (11/18) were detected on a subsequent CT. Majority of the fractures were posterior (43%) and anterior (30%) in location. An overwhelming majority (96%) of the fractures are nondisplaced. Seventeen percent of rib fractures analyzed in the study were not documented on the initial skeletal survey. Majority of fractures are nondisplaced and located posteriorly or anteriorly, areas that are often difficult to assess especially in the acute stage. The CT scan is more sensitive in evaluating these types of fractures. Low-dose chest CT can be an important imaging modality for suspicious cases of child abuse when initial radiographic findings are inconclusive.

  12. The clinical significance of adjacent rib involvement on MRI in patients with acute osteoporotic compression fractures of the thoracic spine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hyun Joo; Kim, Jae Hyun; Kwon, Kui Hyang; Choi, Deuk Lin; Goo, Dong Erk; Suh, You Sung; Bae, Won Kyung

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the significance of the presence of adjacent rib involvement in osteoporotic compression fractures. All the patients with acute osteoporotic compression fractures of the thoracic spine on thoracic spine MRI that presented to our clinic between September 2003 and January 2010 were retrospectively reviewed. All the vertebrae were divided into two groups: those that showed signal intensity change in the rib adjacent to the compression fracture and those that did not. We compared the results between the two groups to determine if there were differences in the degree of osteoporosis, the compression fracture level and the age of patients between the two groups. We calculated the degree of correlation between the MRI and the bone scan images of these patients. We also reviewed whether percutaneous vertebroplasty relieved symptoms or not. Signal intensity changes were found in the adjacent rib(s) in 12 of the 60 patients and in 14 of the 94 levels (the total number of levels). The MRI and bone scan showed significant correlation (p < 0.001). There was a statistically significant difference in the incidence of pain at the one month outpatient follow up between the two groups (p = 0.0215). The radiologist should comment on the presence or absence of adjacent rib involvement when reporting on the thoracic spine MRI of patients suffering from osteoporotic compression fractures in order to more accurately determine prognosis

  13. The clinical significance of adjacent rib involvement on MRI in patients with acute osteoporotic compression fractures of the thoracic spine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyun Joo; Kim, Jae Hyun; Kwon, Kui Hyang; Choi, Deuk Lin; Goo, Dong Erk; Suh, You Sung [Soonchunhyang Univ. Seoul Hospital/Soonchunhyang Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Bae, Won Kyung [Soonchunhyang Univ. Cheonan Hospital/Soonchunhyang Univ. College of Medicine, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-05-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the significance of the presence of adjacent rib involvement in osteoporotic compression fractures. All the patients with acute osteoporotic compression fractures of the thoracic spine on thoracic spine MRI that presented to our clinic between September 2003 and January 2010 were retrospectively reviewed. All the vertebrae were divided into two groups: those that showed signal intensity change in the rib adjacent to the compression fracture and those that did not. We compared the results between the two groups to determine if there were differences in the degree of osteoporosis, the compression fracture level and the age of patients between the two groups. We calculated the degree of correlation between the MRI and the bone scan images of these patients. We also reviewed whether percutaneous vertebroplasty relieved symptoms or not. Signal intensity changes were found in the adjacent rib(s) in 12 of the 60 patients and in 14 of the 94 levels (the total number of levels). The MRI and bone scan showed significant correlation (p < 0.001). There was a statistically significant difference in the incidence of pain at the one month outpatient follow up between the two groups (p = 0.0215). The radiologist should comment on the presence or absence of adjacent rib involvement when reporting on the thoracic spine MRI of patients suffering from osteoporotic compression fractures in order to more accurately determine prognosis.

  14. Risk of pneumonia in patients with isolated minor rib fractures: a nationwide cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Sai-Wai; Teng, Ying-Hock; Yang, Shun-Fa; Yeh, Han-Wei; Wang, Yu-Hsun; Chou, Ming-Chih; Yeh, Chao-Bin

    2017-01-13

    Isolated minor rib fractures (IMRFs) after blunt chest traumas are commonly observed in emergency departments. However, the relationship between IMRFs and subsequent pneumonia remains controversial. This nationwide cohort study investigated the association between IMRFs and the risk of pneumonia in patients with blunt chest traumas. Nationwide population-based cohort study. Patients with IMRFs were identified between 2010 and 2011 from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. Non-traumatic patients were matched through 1:8 propensity-score matching according to age, sex, and comorbidities (namely diabetes, hypertension, cardiovascular disease, asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)) with the comparison cohort. We estimated the adjusted HRs (aHRs) by using the Cox proportional hazard model. A total of 709 patients with IMRFs and 5672 non-traumatic patients were included. The primary end point was the occurrence of pneumonia within 30 days. The incidence of pneumonia following IMRFs was 1.6% (11/709). The aHR for the risk of pneumonia after IMRFs was 8.94 (95% CI=3.79 to 21.09, ppneumonia following IMRFs. In the IMRF group, presence of single or two isolated rib fractures was associated with an increased risk of pneumonia with aHRs of 3.97 (95% CI 1.09 to 14.44, ppneumonia following IMRFs is low, patients with two isolated rib fractures were particularly susceptible to pneumonia. Physicians should focus on this complication, particularly in elderly patients and those with COPD. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  15. Secondary left ventricular injury with haemopericardium caused by a rib fracture after blunt chest trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somsekhar Ganti

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Trauma is the third most common cause of death in the West. In the US, approximately 90,000 deaths annually are traumatic in nature and over 75% of casualties from blunt trauma are due to chest injuries. Cardiac injuries from rib fractures following blunt trauma are extremely rare. We report the unusual case of a patient who fell from a height and presented with haemopericardium and haemothorax as a result of left ventricular and lingular lacerations and was sucessfully operated upon.

  16. Infected hardware after surgical stabilization of rib fractures: Outcomes and management experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiels, Cornelius A; Aho, Johnathon M; Naik, Nimesh D; Zielinski, Martin D; Schiller, Henry J; Morris, David S; Kim, Brian D

    2016-05-01

    Surgical stabilization of rib fracture (SSRF) is increasingly used for treatment of rib fractures. There are few data on the incidence, risk factors, outcomes, and optimal management strategy for hardware infection in these patients. We aimed to develop and propose a management algorithm to help others treat this potentially morbid complication. We retrospectively searched a prospectively collected rib fracture database for the records of all patients who underwent SSRF from August 2009 through March 2014 at our institution. We then analyzed for the subsequent development of hardware infection among these patients. Standard descriptive analyses were performed. Among 122 patients who underwent SSRF, most (73%) were men; the mean (SD) age was 59.5 (16.4) years, and median (interquartile range [IQR]) Injury Severity Score was 17 (13-22). The median number of rib fractures was 7 (5-9) and 48% of the patients had flail chest. Mortality at 30 days was 0.8%. Five patients (4.1%) had a hardware infection on mean (SD) postoperative day 12.0 (6.6). Median Injury Severity Score (17 [range, 13-42]) and hospital length of stay (9 days [6-37 days]) in these patients were similar to the values for those without infection (17 days [range, 13-22 days] and 9 days [6-12 days], respectively). Patients with infection underwent a median (IQR) of 2 (range, 2-3) additional operations, which included wound debridement (n = 5), negative-pressure wound therapy (n = 3), and antibiotic beads (n = 4). Hardware was removed in 3 patients at 140, 190, and 192 days after index operation. Cultures grew only gram-positive organisms. No patients required reintervention after hardware removal, and all achieved bony union and were taking no narcotics or antibiotics at the latest follow-up. Although uncommon, hardware infection after SSRF carries considerable morbidity. With the use of an aggressive multimodal management strategy, however, bony union and favorable long-term outcomes can be achieved

  17. A rare case of an intercostal lung herniation with fractures of the fifth and sixth ribs after thoracic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haro, Akira; Komiya, Kazune; Taguchi, Yoshihiro; Nishikawa, Haruka; Kouda, Takuyuki; Fujishita, Takatoshi; Yokoyama, Hideki

    2017-01-01

    Lung herniation is a rare condition defined as a protrusion of the pleural-covered lung parenchyma through an abnormal defect or weakness in the thoracic wall. Postoperative lung herniation is reported to result from a preceding operation with inadequate closure of the chest wall. A 77-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital for treatment of hemoptysis and nausea. One year previously, she had undergone wedge resection of the right lower lobe (S6) for treatment of primary lung adenocarcinoma. Upon admission, chest radiograph and chest computed tomography showed a right lung herniation through the fifth enlarged intercostal space with right fifth and sixth rib fractures. She underwent surgical closure of the intercostal hernia using synthetic materials with fixation of the fifth and sixth ribs. The patient had developed no recurrence 9 months after surgical repair. In the present case, adequate closure of the right pleural cavity was ensured by fixation of both fifth and sixth ribs during the preceding video-assisted thoracic surgery for the primary lung carcinoma. Our patient may have had some exacerbation factors for lung herniation, increased intrathoracic pressure, attenuation of chest wall by prolonged coughing and rib fracture, and high abdominal pressure due to her hunched-over posture. It is important to know some exacerbation factors for postoperative intercostal lung herniation. Addition of monofirament-suture fixation of the ribs to patch repair is very effective for lung herniation repair in patients with concurrent lung herniation and rib fractures.

  18. Pulsed ultrasounds accelerate healing of rib fractures in an experimental animal model: an effective new thoracic therapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santana-Rodríguez, Norberto; Clavo, Bernardino; Fernández-Pérez, Leandro; Rivero, José C; Travieso, María M; Fiuza, María D; Villar, Jesús; García-Castellano, José M; Hernández-Pérez, Octavio; Déniz, Antonio

    2011-05-01

    Rib fractures are a frequent traumatic injury associated with a relatively high morbidity. Currently, the treatment of rib fractures is symptomatic. Since it has been reported that pulsed ultrasounds accelerates repair of limb fractures, we hypothesized that the application of pulsed ultrasounds will modify the course of healing in an animal model of rib fracture. We studied 136 male Sprague-Dawley rats. Animals were randomly assigned to different groups of doses (none, 50, 100, and 250 mW/cm(2) of intensity for 3 minutes per day) and durations (2, 10, 20, and 28 days) of treatment with pulsed ultrasounds. In every subgroup, we analyzed radiologic and histologic changes in the bone callus. In addition, we examined changes in gene expression of relevant genes involved in wound repair in both control and treated animals. Histologic and radiologic consolidation was significantly increased by pulsed ultrasound treatment when applied for more than 10 days. The application of 50 mW/cm(2) was the most effective dose. Only the 100 and 250 mW/cm(2) doses were able to significantly increase messenger RNA expression of insulin-like growth factor 1, suppressor of cytokine signaling-2 and -3, and vascular endothelial growth factor and decrease monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 and collagen type II-alpha 1. Our findings indicate that pulsed ultrasound accelerates the consolidation of rib fractures. This study is the first to show that pulsed ultrasound promotes the healing of rib fractures. From a translational point of view, this easy, cheap technique could serve as an effective new therapeutic modality in patients with rib fractures. Copyright © 2011 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Birth-related mid-posterior rib fractures in neonates: a report of three cases (and a possible fourth case) and a review of the literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rijn, Rick R.; Bilo, Rob A. C.; Robben, Simon G. F.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Posterior rib fractures in young children have a high positive predictive value for non-accidental injury (NAI). Combined data of five studies on birth trauma (115,756 live births) showed no cases of rib fractures resulting from birth trauma. There have, however, been sporadic cases

  20. Frequency of rib and sternum fractures associated with out-of-hospital cardiopulmonary resuscitation is underestimated by conventional chest X-ray.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lederer, Wolfgang; Mair, Dieter; Rabl, Walter; Baubin, Michael

    2004-02-01

    Fractured ribs and sternum are frequent complications of thoracic compression during CPR in adults. This study was conducted to determine whether findings of plain chest radiography (CXR) correlate with post-mortem findings in patients who underwent cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. CXR findings and autopsy results of CPR-related chest injuries comprising rib and sternum fractures were compared prospectively in 19 patients. Fractures were diagnosed in nine of 19 patients by means of radiology and in 18 of 19 patients by autopsy (rib fractures in 6/19 versus 17/19, P=0.002; sternum fractures in 5/19 versus in 9/19, P=0.227. The total number of isolated bone fractures detected by CXR was 18 (12 rib and six sternum fractures) and by autopsy 92 (83 rib and nine sternum fractures). The majority of rib fractures was located in the anterior part of the thoracic cage. Sternum fractures predominantly occurred in the lower third. Eight of 19 patients received either thrombolytic or antithrombotic treatment during CPR but no major bleeding complication associated with CPR was detected by autopsy. The findings of this study indicate that fractures associated with CPR are underreported in conventional radiographic investigations. No major bleeding complications related to CPR-associated fractures was detected.

  1. The radiological diagnosis of stress fracture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Yonggang; Wang Renfa; Zhang Jingfeng; Wang Min

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To study the radiological features and biomechanics of stress fracture. Methods: The X-ray, CT, MRI, and ECT signs in 20 cases of stress fracture and its correlation to biomechanics were analyzed. Results: Of the 20 cases, 14 cases occurred in the tibia, 2 cases in the metatarsal bone, 1 case in the rib, 1 case in the neck of femur and ribs, 1 case in the middle-inferior part of the femur, and 1 case in the fibula. Tow early cases of stress fracture demonstrated a characteristic sign of 'gray cortex'. The spherical or abnormal generation of bony callus and periosteum proliferation that demonstrated 'double cortex' sign in 2 cases were the sign of bone remodeling and the 'button sign' was the sign of bone healing. CT scan could clearly show the pathologic changes of bone and the soft tissue edema. Bone callus showed low signal on T 1 WI and slight high signal on T 2 WI. The area of bone edema on MRI that demonstrated low signal on T 1 WI and high signal on T 2 WI was larger than that on CT. MRI showed a linear band of low signal on both T 1 WI and T 2 WI in the area of bone fracture. ECT showed a focal area of increased uptake in the abnormal areas. The areas of bone stress fracture were characteristic and accorded with the biomechanical weak area in the bone. Conclusion: Stress fracture occurs in the special parts of the bone and has characteristic imaging features. X-ray should still be used to find the fracture of bones in the first inspection. CT and MRI are very helpful in the differentiation. Although sensitive, bone scan has lower specificity than either CT or MRI. (authors)

  2. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR)-related posterior rib fractures in neonates and infants following recommended changes in CPR techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franke, I; Pingen, A; Schiffmann, H; Vogel, M; Vlajnic, D; Ganschow, R; Born, M

    2014-07-01

    Posterior rib fractures are highly indicative of non-accidental trauma (NAT) in infants. Since 2000, the "two-thumbs" technique for cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) of newborns and infants has been recommended by the American Heart Association (AHA). This technique is similar to the grip on an infant's thorax while shaking. Is it possible that posterior rib fractures in newborns and infants could be caused by the "two-thumbs" technique? Using computerized databases from three German children's hospitals, we identified all infants less than 12 months old who underwent professional CPR within a 10-year period. We included all infants with anterior-posterior chest radiographs taken after CPR. Exclusion criteria were sternotomy, osteopenia, various other bone diseases and NAT. The radiographs were independently reviewed by the Chief of Pediatric Radiology (MB) and a Senior Pediatrician, Head of the local Child Protection Team (IF). Eighty infants with 546 chest radiographs were identified, and 50 of those infants underwent CPR immediately after birth. Data concerning the length of CPR was available for 41 infants. The mean length of CPR was 11min (range: 1-180min, median: 3min). On average, there were seven radiographs per infant. A total of 39 infants had a follow-up radiograph after at least 10 days. No rib fracture was visible on any chest X-ray. The results of this study suggest rib fracture after the use of the "two-thumbs" CPR technique is uncommon. Thus, there should be careful consideration of abuse when these fractures are identified, regardless of whether CPR was performed and what technique used. The discovery of rib fractures in an infant who has undergone CPR without underlying bone disease or major trauma warrants a full child protection investigation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Rib stress fractures among rowers: definition, epidemiology, mechanisms, risk factors and effectiveness of injury prevention strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonnell, Lisa K; Hume, Patria A; Nolte, Volker

    2011-11-01

    Rib stress fractures (RSFs) can have serious effects on rowing training and performance and accordingly represent an important topic for sports medicine practitioners. Therefore, the aim of this review is to outline the definition, epidemiology, mechanisms, intrinsic and extrinsic risk factors, injury management and injury prevention strategies for RSF in rowers. To this end, nine relevant books, 140 journal articles, the proceedings of five conferences and two unpublished presentations were reviewed after searches of electronic databases using the keywords 'rowing', 'rib', 'stress fracture', 'injury', 'mechanics' and 'kinetics'. The review showed that RSF is an incomplete fracture occurring from an imbalance between the rate of bone resorption and the rate of bone formation. RSF occurs in 8.1-16.4% of elite rowers, 2% of university rowers and 1% of junior elite rowers. Approximately 86% of rowing RSF cases with known locations occur in ribs four to eight, mostly along the anterolateral/lateral rib cage. Elite rowers are more likely to experience RSF than nonelite rowers. Injury occurrence is equal among sweep rowers and scullers, but the regional location of the injury differs. The mechanism of injury is multifactorial with numerous intrinsic and extrinsic risk factors contributing. Posterior-directed resultant forces arising from the forward directed force vector through the arms to the oar handle in combination with the force vector induced by the scapula retractors during mid-drive, or repetitive stress from the external obliques and rectus abdominis in the 'finish' position, may be responsible for RSF. Joint hypomobility, vertebral malalignment or low bone mineral density may be associated with RSF. Case studies have shown increased risk associated with amenorrhoea, low bone density or poor technique, in combination with increases in training volume. Training volume alone may have less effect on injury than other factors. Large differences in seat and handle

  4. Exercise-induced rib stress fractures: potential risk factors related to thoracic muscle co-contraction and movement pattern

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinther-Knudsen, Archibald; Kanstrup, I-L; Christiansen, E

    2006-01-01

    The etiology of exercise-induced rib stress fractures (RSFs) in elite rowers is unclear. The purpose of the study was to investigate thoracic muscle activity, movement patterns and muscle strength in elite rowers. Electromyographic (EMG) and 2-D video analysis were performed during ergometer rowing...

  5. A novel and effective acupuncture modality as a complementary therapy to acute pain relief in inpatients with rib fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Hsin-Yi; Chen, Chao-Wei; Li, Ming-Chieh; Hsu, Yu-Pao; Kang, Shih-Ching; Liu, Erh-Hao; Lee, Ko-Hung

    2014-01-01

    Pain control has been emphasized as a priority for both practitioners and inpatients with rib fractures, since analgesia could only offer limited relief from severe pain. A prospective and randomized controlled trial was conducted to analyze the efficacy and efficiency of acupuncture in acute pain relief for inpatients with rib fractures. A total of 58 inpatients were recruited and allocated to two groups, receiving identical doses of conventional oral analgesics as well as filiform needles as treatment and thumbtack intradermal (TI) needles placed upon the skin surface as a control, respectively, via novel acupuncture modality once daily for three consecutive days. The effect of pain relief was evaluated during activities that induce pain, and sustained maximal inspiration (SMI) lung volumes and sleep quality were assessed. The patients treated with filiform needles had more effective pain relief than those in the TI needle group during deep breathing, coughing, and turning over the body (p pain relief via acupuncture. The active evaluation could provide a more adaptive model for assessing pain intensity due to rib fractures. This novel acupuncture modality in which the needle insertion sites are corresponding to the pain spots can be a safe and viable therapy for relieving pain in inpatients with rib fractures.

  6. Out with the old, in with the new: a novel approach to treating pain associated with rib fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truitt, Michael S; Mooty, R Clark; Amos, Joseph; Lorenzo, Manuel; Mangram, Alicia; Dunn, Ernest

    2010-10-01

    Rib fractures continue to be a challenging problem from both a pulmonary and analgesia standpoint. As a result, numerous modalities have been used to treat this condition, but none has proven universally available and efficacious. The objective of this pilot study was to assess the efficacy of a novel technique for placing an elastomeric infusion pump (EIP) catheter (On-Q; Lake Forest, CA, USA) in the extrathoracic paraspinous space to create a continuous intercostal nerve block. This was a prospective, nonrandomized study conducted in the surgical intensive care unit (SICU) of an urban level II trauma center. We developed a novel technique for placing EIP catheters in the extrathoracic paraspinous space to provide continuous intercostal nerve blockade. We subsequently evaluated 30 consecutive blunt trauma patients with three or more unilateral rib fractures. The catheters were infused with local anesthetic, and the dose was titrated to achieve adequate analgesia. For each patient, preplacement numeric pain scale scores (NPSs) and sustained maximum inspiration (SMI) lung volumes were determined. Sixty minutes following placement of the catheters, the NPS and SMI were repeated. The patients were monitored for any procedural or drug-related complications. The mean age of the patients was 65 years (22-92 years); the mean ISS was 14 (9-16); and the mean number of rib fractures was 4.4 (3-8). Overall, the mean NPS significantly improved (preplacement NPS 9.03, postplacement NPS 3.06; p pain secondary to rib fractures.

  7. A novel and effective acupuncture modality as a complementary therapy to acute pain relief in inpatients with rib fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsin-Yi Ho

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pain control has been emphasized as a priority for both practitioners and inpatients with rib fractures, since analgesia could only offer limited relief from severe pain. A prospective and randomized controlled trial was conducted to analyze the efficacy and efficiency of acupuncture in acute pain relief for inpatients with rib fractures. Methods: A total of 58 inpatients were recruited and allocated to two groups, receiving identical doses of conventional oral analgesics as well as filiform needles as treatment and thumbtack intradermal (TI needles placed upon the skin surface as a control, respectively, via novel acupuncture modality once daily for three consecutive days. The effect of pain relief was evaluated during activities that induce pain, and sustained maximal inspiration (SMI lung volumes and sleep quality were assessed. Results: The patients treated with filiform needles had more effective pain relief than those in the TI needle group during deep breathing, coughing, and turning over the body (p < 0.05, and the effect persisted for at least 6 h in most patients. Sustained maximal inspiration lung volumes and sleep quality did not show improvement through every acupuncture intervention, and they could not respond accurately to pain relief via acupuncture. Conclusion: The active evaluation could provide a more adaptive model for assessing pain intensity due to rib fractures. This novel acupuncture modality in which the needle insertion sites are corresponding to the pain spots can be a safe and viable therapy for relieving pain in inpatients with rib fractures.

  8. [Stress fractures of the ribs with acute thoracic pain in a young woman, diagnosed by the bone scan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgitzikis, Athanasios; Siopi, Dimitra; Doumas, Argyrios; Mitka, Ekaterini; Antoniadis, Antonios

    2010-01-01

    We report the unusual case of a 29 -year old woman with emotional instability who presented with acute onset chest pain after severe chronic cough. The chest X-ray and the serological tests were normal but the CT scanning, and the bone scanning revealed multiple bilateral rib stress fractures, caused by severe coughing and physical activity and worsened by the patient's emotional instability.

  9. Comparison thoracic epidural and intercostal block to improve ventilation parameters and reduce pain in patients with multiple rib fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashemzadeh, Shahryar; Hashemzadeh, Khosrov; Hosseinzadeh, Hamzeh; Aligholipour Maleki, Raheleh; Golzari, Samad E J; Golzari, Samad

    2011-01-01

    Chest wall blunt trauma causes multiple rib fractures and will often be associated with significant pain and may compromise ventilator mechanics. Analgesia has great roll in rib fracture therapies, opioid are useful, but when used as sole agent may require such high dose that they produce respiratory depression, especially in elderly .the best analgesia for a severe chest wall injury is a continuous epidural infusion of local anesthetic. This provides complete analgesia allowing inspiration and coughing without of the risk of respiratory depression. sixty adult patients who with multiple rib fractures were enrolled in this study. They were divided into Group A or thoracic epidural with bupivacaine 0.125 % +1mg/5ml morphine and group B or intercostal block with 0.25% bupivacaine. The patients were assessed through ICU and hospital stay length, ventilation function tests. Pain score among the patients was measured with verbal rating scale, before and after administration of the analgesia. We found a significant improvement in ventilatory function tests during the 1st, 2nd, and 3rd days after epidural analgesia compared with the intercostal block (P pain at rest and pain caused by coughing and deep breathing in group A compared group B... ICU and hospital stay markedly reduced in Group A. thoracic epidural analgesia is superior to intercostals block regarding pain relief of rib fractures. Patients who received epidural analgesia had significantly lower pain scores at all studied times.

  10. Posterior paramedian subrhomboidal analgesia versus thoracic epidural analgesia for pain control in patients with multiple rib fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelley, Casey L; Berry, Stepheny; Howard, James; De Ruyter, Martin; Thepthepha, Melissa; Nazir, Niaman; McDonald, Tracy; Dalton, Annemarie; Moncure, Michael

    2016-09-01

    Rib fractures are common in trauma admissions and are associated with an increased risk of pulmonary complications, intensive care unit admissions, and mortality. Providing adequate pain control in patients with multiple rib fractures decreases the risk of adverse events. Thoracic epidural analgesia is currently the preferred method for pain control. This study compared outcomes in patients with multiple acute rib fractures treated with posterior paramedian subrhomboidal (PoPS) analgesia versus thoracic epidural analgesia (TEA). This prospective study included 30 patients with three or more acute rib fractures admitted to a Level I trauma center. Thoracic epidural analgesia or PoPS catheters were placed, and local anesthesia was infused. Data were collected including patients' pain level, adjunct morphine equivalent use, adverse events, length of stay, lung volumes, and discharge disposition. Nonparametric tests were used and two-sided p Pain rating was lower in the PoPS group (2.5 vs. 5; p = 0.03) after initial placement. Overall, there was no other statistically significant difference in pain control or use of oral morphine adjuncts between the groups. Hypotension occurred in eight patients, 75% with TEA and only 25% with PoPS. No difference was found in adverse events, length of stay, lung volumes, or discharge disposition. In patients with rib fractures, PoPS analgesia may provide pain control equivalent to TEA while being less invasive and more readily placed by a variety of hospital staff. This pilot study is limited by its small sample size, and therefore additional studies are needed to prove equivalence of PoPS compared to TEA. Therapeutic study, level IV.

  11. Role of computed tomography in the diagnosis of rib and lung involvement in tuberculous retromammary abscesses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Supe, A.N.; Prabhu, R.Y.; Priya, Hira

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To assess the role of computed tomography (CT) in the diagnosis of rib and lung involvement in tuberculous abscess in the retromammary region. Design and patients: Eight patients with tuberculous retromammary abscess were examined by CT and the findings were evaluated. A cold abscess (purulent collection with absence of acute inflammation) was aspirated in all cases. Diagnosis was confirmed by acid-fast bacillus culture, or histologic examination. Results: CT showed a relatively well marginated, inhomogeneous, hypodense lesions in all eight cases. Following administration of intravenous contrast medium, these lesions showed enhancing walls, suggestive of an infective collection. Lung involvement was seen in one patient. A direct communication from the retromammary lesion through the thoracic wall into the pleura was seen in five cases. In four cases destroyed rib fragments within the abscess were noted. Conclusion: A tuberculous abscess in the retromammary region is usually shown on CT as a focal, well-marginated, inhomogeneous, hypodense lesion with a surrounding enhancing rim. A direct communication with the pleura, a destroyed rib fragment in the abscess, and associated lung involvement may be revealed by CT. (orig.)

  12. Role of computed tomography in the diagnosis of rib and lung involvement in tuberculous retromammary abscesses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Supe, A.N.; Prabhu, R.Y. [Department of Surgery, Seth G.S. Medical College and K.E.M. Hospital, Parel, Mumbai (India); Priya, Hira [Department of Radiology, Seth G.S. Medical College and K.E.M. Hospital, Parel, Mumbai (India)

    2002-02-01

    Objective: To assess the role of computed tomography (CT) in the diagnosis of rib and lung involvement in tuberculous abscess in the retromammary region. Design and patients: Eight patients with tuberculous retromammary abscess were examined by CT and the findings were evaluated. A cold abscess (purulent collection with absence of acute inflammation) was aspirated in all cases. Diagnosis was confirmed by acid-fast bacillus culture, or histologic examination. Results: CT showed a relatively well marginated, inhomogeneous, hypodense lesions in all eight cases. Following administration of intravenous contrast medium, these lesions showed enhancing walls, suggestive of an infective collection. Lung involvement was seen in one patient. A direct communication from the retromammary lesion through the thoracic wall into the pleura was seen in five cases. In four cases destroyed rib fragments within the abscess were noted. Conclusion: A tuberculous abscess in the retromammary region is usually shown on CT as a focal, well-marginated, inhomogeneous, hypodense lesion with a surrounding enhancing rim. A direct communication with the pleura, a destroyed rib fragment in the abscess, and associated lung involvement may be revealed by CT. (orig.)

  13. Evaluation of efficacy and indications of surgical fixation for multiple rib fractures: a propensity-score matched analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, K; Nishimura, T; Takesada, H; Morioka, T; Hagawa, N; Yamamoto, T; Kaga, S; Terada, T; Shinyama, N; Yamamoto, H; Mizobata, Y

    2017-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of recent surgical rib fixation and establish its indications not only for flail chest but also for multiple rib fractures. Between 2007 and 2015, 187 patients were diagnosed as having multiple rib fractures in our institution. After the propensity score matching was performed, ten patients who had performed surgical rib fixation and ten patients who had treated with non-operative management were included. Categorical variables were analyzed with Fischer's exact test and non-parametric numerical data were compared using the Mann-Whitney U test. Wilcoxon signed-rank test was performed for comparison of pre- and postoperative variables. All statistical data are presented as median (25-75 % interquartile range [IQR]) or number. The surgically treated patients extubated significantly earlier than non-operative management patients (5.5 [1-8] vs 9 [7-12] days: p = 0.019). The duration of continuous intravenous narcotic agents infusion days (4.5 [3-6] vs 12 [9-14] days: p = 0.002) and the duration of intensive care unit stay (6.5 [3-9] vs 12 [8-14] days: p = 0.008) were also significantly shorter in surgically treated patients. Under the same ventilating conditions, the postoperative values of tidal volume and respiratory rate improved significantly compared to those values measured just before the surgery. The incidence of pneumonia as a complication was significantly higher in non-operative management group (p = 0.05). From the viewpoints of early respiratory stabilization and intensive care unit disposition without any complications, surgical rib fixation is a sufficiently acceptable procedure not only for flail chest but also for repair of severe multiple rib fractures.

  14. New bone post-processing tools in forensic imaging: a multi-reader feasibility study to evaluate detection time and diagnostic accuracy in rib fracture assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glemser, Philip A; Pfleiderer, Michael; Heger, Anna; Tremper, Jan; Krauskopf, Astrid; Schlemmer, Heinz-Peter; Yen, Kathrin; Simons, David

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this multi-reader feasibility study was to evaluate new post-processing CT imaging tools in rib fracture assessment of forensic cases by analyzing detection time and diagnostic accuracy. Thirty autopsy cases (20 with and 10 without rib fractures in autopsy) were randomly selected and included in this study. All cases received a native whole body CT scan prior to the autopsy procedure, which included dissection and careful evaluation of each rib. In addition to standard transverse sections (modality A), CT images were subjected to a reconstruction algorithm to compute axial labelling of the ribs (modality B) as well as "unfolding" visualizations of the rib cage (modality C, "eagle tool"). Three radiologists with different clinical and forensic experience who were blinded to autopsy results evaluated all cases in a random manner of modality and case. Rib fracture assessment of each reader was evaluated compared to autopsy and a CT consensus read as radiologic reference. A detailed evaluation of relevant test parameters revealed a better accordance to the CT consensus read as to the autopsy. Modality C was the significantly quickest rib fracture detection modality despite slightly reduced statistic test parameters compared to modalities A and B. Modern CT post-processing software is able to shorten reading time and to increase sensitivity and specificity compared to standard autopsy alone. The eagle tool as an easy to use tool is suited for an initial rib fracture screening prior to autopsy and can therefore be beneficial for forensic pathologists.

  15. Are first rib fractures a marker for other life-threatening injuries in patients with major trauma? A cohort study of patients on the UK Trauma Audit and Research Network database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sammy, Ian Ayenga; Chatha, Hridesh; Lecky, Fiona; Bouamra, Omar; Fragoso-Iñiguez, Marisol; Sattout, Abdo; Hickey, Michael; Edwards, John E

    2017-04-01

    First rib fractures are considered indicators of increased morbidity and mortality in major trauma. However, this has not been definitively proven. With an increased use of CT and the potential increase in detection of first rib fractures, re-evaluation of these injuries as a marker for life-threatening injuries is warranted. Patients sustaining rib fractures between January 2012 and December 2013 were investigated using data from the UK Trauma Audit and Research Network. The prevalence of life-threatening injuries was compared in patients with first rib fractures and those with other rib fractures. Multivariate logistic regression was performed to determine the association between first rib fractures, injury severity, polytrauma and mortality. There were 1683 patients with first rib fractures and 8369 with fractures of other ribs. Life-threatening intrathoracic and extrathoracic injuries were more likely in patients with first rib fractures. The presence of first rib fractures was a significant predictor of injury severity (Injury Severity Score >15) and polytrauma, independent of mechanism of injury, age and gender with an adjusted OR of 2.64 (95% CI 2.33 to 3.00) and 2.01 (95% CI 1.80 to 2.25), respectively. Risk-adjusted mortality was the same in patients with first rib fractures and those with other rib fractures (adjusted OR 0.97, 95% CI 0.79 to 1.19). First rib fractures are a marker of life-threatening injuries in major trauma, though they do not independently increase mortality. Management of patients with first rib fractures should focus on identification and treatment of associated life-threatening injuries. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) [year]. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  16. Clavicular fractures: Classification, diagnosis, therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schunk, K.; Strunk, H.; Schild, H.; Lohr, S.

    1988-01-01

    Clavicular fracture is one of the most frequent skeletal lesions. In most cases the median third of the clavicula is affected (this is due to the peculiar biomechanical structure). Accompanying lesions and complications of clavicular fractures are rare. A total of 13 X-ray diagnostic techniques are described of clavicular fractures. X-ray film should, as a matter of principle, always be taken in two planes. Definitely the major part of clavicular fractures are treated conservatively (rucsac dressing), whereas surgery is reserved for few and strictly defined indications. (orig.) [de

  17. Clavicular fractures: Classification, diagnosis, therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schunk, K.; Strunk, H.; Schild, H.; Lohr, S.

    1988-09-01

    Clavicular fracture is one of the most frequent skeletal lesions. In most cases the median third of the clavicula is affected (this is due to the peculiar biomechanical structure). Accompanying lesions and complications of clavicular fractures are rare. A total of 13 X-ray diagnostic techniques are described of clavicular fractures. X-ray film should, as a matter of principle, always be taken in two planes. Definitely the major part of clavicular fractures are treated conservatively (rucsac dressing), whereas surgery is reserved for few and strictly defined indications.

  18. Surgical stabilization of rib fractures using Inion OTPS wraps--techniques and quality of life follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Nicole; Conaglen, Paul; Martin, Katherine; Antippa, Phillip

    2009-09-01

    A variety of operative techniques have been described in the past for the surgical stabilization of fractured ribs. From February 2004 to November 2008, consecutive patients who underwent open reduction and internal fixation of traumatic fractured ribs during their index admission using the Inion orthopedic trauma plating system (OTPS) at a Level I trauma center were retrospectively analyzed. Demographics, Injury Severity Scores, number and site of rib fractures, operative details, and complications were recorded. All patients were followed-up with a questionnaire assessing chest symptoms, disability, and quality of life. Thirty-two patients underwent surgical stabilization with Inion OTPS. Road crashes were the commonest mechanism of injury (81%), followed by falls. Seventy-two percent of patients were male, with a median age at operation of 53 years (interquartile range [IQR], 40-64 years). Median number of ribs fixed was 3 (IQR, 2-4), while median number of fractures was 9 (IQR, 6-13). Median time to fixation was 5 days (IQR, 3-7 days), intensive care unit stay 3 days (IQR, 0.8-6.3 days), and total hospital stay 13.5 days (IQR, 8.8-22 days). Wound infection occurred in 19%, with nonunion of a fixed fracture in one patient. Sixty-three percent of patients completed the survey with a mean time between open reduction and internal fixation and questionnaire of 1,039 days (+/-480 days). Patients reported low levels of pain at rest and with coughing (median at rest 1.0/10 [IQR, 0-2.3/10]; with coughing 1.3/10 [IQR, 0-3.75/10]). Chest wall stiffness was experienced by 60% of patients, while dyspnoea at rest was reported by 20% of patients. Mean return to work (for 55%) was 3.9 months (+/-3.3 months). All patients were satisfied with the results of their operation. Patients demonstrated low levels of pain and satisfactory rehabilitation. The Inion OTPS system has several advantages including gradual transference of stress loads to bone, micromotion across the fracture

  19. Predicting Rib Fracture Risk With Whole-Body Finite Element Models: Development and Preliminary Evaluation of a Probabilistic Analytical Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forman, Jason L.; Kent, Richard W.; Mroz, Krystoffer; Pipkorn, Bengt; Bostrom, Ola; Segui-Gomez, Maria

    2012-01-01

    This study sought to develop a strain-based probabilistic method to predict rib fracture risk with whole-body finite element (FE) models, and to describe a method to combine the results with collision exposure information to predict injury risk and potential intervention effectiveness in the field. An age-adjusted ultimate strain distribution was used to estimate local rib fracture probabilities within an FE model. These local probabilities were combined to predict injury risk and severity within the whole ribcage. The ultimate strain distribution was developed from a literature dataset of 133 tests. Frontal collision simulations were performed with the THUMS (Total HUman Model for Safety) model with four levels of delta-V and two restraints: a standard 3-point belt and a progressive 3.5–7 kN force-limited, pretensioned (FL+PT) belt. The results of three simulations (29 km/h standard, 48 km/h standard, and 48 km/h FL+PT) were compared to matched cadaver sled tests. The numbers of fractures predicted for the comparison cases were consistent with those observed experimentally. Combining these results with field exposure informantion (ΔV, NASS-CDS 1992–2002) suggests a 8.9% probability of incurring AIS3+ rib fractures for a 60 year-old restrained by a standard belt in a tow-away frontal collision with this restraint, vehicle, and occupant configuration, compared to 4.6% for the FL+PT belt. This is the first study to describe a probabilistic framework to predict rib fracture risk based on strains observed in human-body FE models. Using this analytical framework, future efforts may incorporate additional subject or collision factors for multi-variable probabilistic injury prediction. PMID:23169122

  20. Comparative Analysis of the Paravertebral Analgesic Pump Catheter with the Epidural Catheter in Elderly Trauma Patients with Multiple Rib Fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, Brian S; Wasfie, Tarik; Chadwick, Mathew; Barber, Kimberly R; Yapchai, Raquel

    2017-04-01

    Presently, trauma guidelines recommend epidural analgesia as the optimal modality of pain relief from rib fractures. They are not ideally suited for elderly trauma patients and have disadvantages including bleeding risk. The paravertebral analgesic pump (PVP) eliminates such disadvantages and includes ease of placement in the trauma setting. This study compares pain control in patients treated by EPI versus PVP. This is a retrospective, historical cohort study comparing two methods of pain management in the trauma setting. Before 2010, patients who had epidural catheters (EPI) placed for pain control were compared with patients after 2010 in which the PVP was used. All patients had multiple rib fractures as diagnosed by CT scan. Analysis was adjusted for age, number of fractures, and comorbid conditions. Multiple linear regression analysis was conducted to compare average reported pain. A total of 110 patients, 31 PVP and 79 epidural catheters, were included in the study. Overall mean age was 65 years. The mean Injury Severity Score was 12.0 (EPI) and 11.1 (PVP). Mean number rib fractures was 4.29 (EPI) and 4.71 (PVP). PVP was associated with a 30 per cent greater decrease in pain than that seen with EPI (6.0-1.9 vs 6.4-3.4). After controlling for age, Injury Severity Score, and number of rib fractures, there were no differences in intensive care unit or total length of stay (P = 0.35) or in pain score (3.76 vs 3.56, P = 0.64). In conclusion, the PVP compares well with epidural analgesia in older trauma patients yet is safe, well tolerated, and easily inserted.

  1. The application of digital tomosynthesis in diagnosis of occult bone fracture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian Jun; Gong Wuxian; Zhang Dianxing; Tian Ye; Huang Shiting

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the digital tomosynthesis in the diagnosis of occult bone fracture. Methods: Both DR and DTS were performed in 135 cases with traumatic-induced pain. All the cases were suspected of bone fractures but with no abnormal findings in DR images. Two radiologists reviewed all the images and diagnosed in consensus. All cases were followed up and the imaging diagnoses were reviewed. Results: Bone fractures or joint dislocations of 61 cases were shown in DTS images but not in DR images, including atlanto-axial fracture and subluxation in 7 cases, articular fracture of limbs in 20 cases, bone fractures of wrist, hand and foot in 11 cases, fractures of cervical, thoracic and lumbar vertebra in 7 cases, fracture of sacrococcyx in 8 cases, fracture of nasal bone in 4 cases, fractures of' Sternum, rib, orbit and mandible in 1 case. Thirty-four cases with bone fractures were determined by using DTS in suspected cases and 17 cases were denied. Both DR and DTS images showed normal findings in 23 cases. Imaging diagnoses of all cases were consistent with the results of follow up. Conclusion: DTS can depict bone fractures especially in the deep and complex bony structures, which may improve the diagnostic accuracy of bone fracture. (authors)

  2. Comparison Thoracic Epidural and Intercostal Block to Improve Ventilation Parameters and Reduce Pain in Patients with Multiple Rib Fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raheleh Aligholipour Maleki

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Chest wall blunt trauma causes multiple rib fractures and will often be associated with significant pain and may compromise ventilator mechanics. Analgesia has great roll in rib fracture therapies, opioid are useful, but when used as sole agent may re-quire such high dose that they produce respiratory depression, especially in el-derly .the best analgesia for a severe chest wall injury is a continuous epidural infusion of local anesthetic. This provides complete analgesia allowing inspiration and coughing without of the risk of respiratory depression. Methods: sixty adult patients who with multiple rib fractures were enrolled in this study. They were divided into Group A or thoracic epidural with bupivacaine 0.125 % +1mg/5ml morphine and group B or inter-costal block with %0.25 bupivacaine. The patients were assessed through ICU and hos-pital stay length, ventilation function tests. Pain score among the patients was meas-ured with verbal rating scale, before and after administration of the analgesia. Results: We found a significant improvement in ventilatory function tests during the 1st, 2nd, and 3rd days after epidural analgesia compared with the intercostal block (P < 0.004. Changes in the visual Analogue Scale were associated with marked improvement re-garding pain at rest and pain caused by coughing and deep breathing in group A com-pared group B... ICU and hospital stay markedly reduced in Group A. Conclusion: tho-racic epidural analgesia is superior to intercostals block regarding pain relief of rib frac-tures. Patients who received epidural analgesia had significantly lower pain scores at all studied times.

  3. Surgical treatment of multiple rib fractures and flail chest in trauma: a one-year follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caragounis, Eva-Corina; Fagevik Olsén, Monika; Pazooki, David; Granhed, Hans

    2016-01-01

    Multiple rib fractures and unstable thoracic cage injuries are common in blunt trauma. Surgical management of rib fractures has received increasing attention in recent years and the aim of this 1-year, prospective study was to assess the long-term effects of surgery. Fifty-four trauma patients with median Injury Severity Score 20 (9-66) and median New Injury Severity Score 34 (16-66) who presented with multiple rib fractures and flail chest, and underwent surgical stabilization with plate fixation were recruited. Patients responded to a standardized questionnaire concerning pain, local discomfort, breathlessness and use of analgesics and health-related quality of life (EQ-5D-3 L) questionnaire at 6 weeks, 3 months, 6 months and 1 year. Lung function, breathing movements, range of motion and physical function were measured at 3 months, 6 months and 1 year. Symptoms associated with pain, breathlessness and use of analgesics significantly decreased from 6 weeks to 1 year following surgery. After 1 year, 13 % of patients complained of pain at rest, 47 % had local discomfort and 9 % used analgesics. The EQ-5D-3 L index increased from 0.78 to 0.93 and perceived overall health state increased from 60 to 90 % (p rib fractures and flail chest show a gradual improvement in symptoms associated with pain, quality of life, mobility, disability and lung function over 1 year post surgery. Therefore, the final outcome of surgery cannot be assessed before 1 year post-operatively.

  4. A prospective single center study to assess the impact of surgical stabilization in patients with rib fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khandelwal, Gaurav; Mathur, R K; Shukla, Sumit; Maheshwari, Ankur

    2011-01-01

    To compare the intensity of pain and duration of return to normal activity in patients with rib fractures treated with surgical stabilization with plating versus conventional treatment modalities. This study was conducted over a 12 month period. Patients with rib fractures were assessed by numerical pain scale. Patients having pain scale less than 5 were excluded from study. Patients having pain scale of 5 or more than 5 were treated with conventional treatment for next 10 days. On 11th day patients were again assessed by numerical pain scale and patients having score less than 5 were excluded from study. Patients having pain scale of 5, 6, and 7 were treated with conventional treatment and patients having pain scale of 8, 9, and 10 were selected for operative management. Operative and control group were compared on basis of intensity of pain and duration of return to normal activity. Follow up was done on 5, 15, and 30 post operative day. There was less pain in operative group as compared to control group. Mean rib fracture pain in operative group was 9.15, 2.31, 1.12 as compared to 6.25, 5.96, 4.50 in control group on 5, 15 and 30 post operative days. Also there was early return to normal activity in operative group. Surgical stabilization of rib fracture, an underutilized intervention is better than conventional conservative management in terms of both, decrease in intensity of pain and early return to normal activity. Copyright © 2011 Surgical Associates Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Fratura bilateral de primeira costela em mergulho com colete salva-vidas Bilateral first rib fracture in a dive with life vest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pietro de Almeida Sandri

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available As fraturas de primeira costela são incomuns e geralmente associadas a grandes traumas torácicos a ponto de servirem como associação com a gravidade do trauma. As fraturas isoladas bilaterais de primeira costela sem grandes traumas torácicos são raramente descritas na literatura. Os sintomas podem passar despercebidos e serem minimizados dificultando o diagnóstico desta condição. O presente relato mostra um trauma direto sobre a região supraclavicular com sintomas de contusão do plexo braquial numa queda de jet ski com uso de salva-vidas. É feita uma revisão da literatura mostrando as diversas faces do problema discutindo-se o tratamento desta condição.First rib fractures are uncommon and are generally related to major thoracic traumas, so much so that they indicate the severity of the trauma. Isolated bilateral first rib fractures without major thoracic trauma are rarely described in the literature. Symptoms may go unnoticed and could be minimal, making diagnosis of this condition difficult. The present report presents a direct trauma of the supraclavicular region with symptoms of contusion of the brachial plexus, caused by a fall from a jet ski using a life vest. A review was done of literature indicating the various facets of the problem and discussing treatment of this condition.

  6. Clinical prognostic factors and grading system for rib fracture following stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) in patients with peripheral lung tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Su Ssan; Song, Si Yeol; Kwak, Jungwon; Ahn, Seung Do; Kim, Jong Hoon; Lee, Jung Shin; Kim, Woo Sung; Kim, Sang-We; Choi, Eun Kyung

    2013-02-01

    Several studies reported rib fractures following stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for peripheral lung tumors. We tried to investigate risk factors and grading system for rib fractures after SBRT. Of 375 primary or metastatic lung tumors (296 patients) which were treated with SBRT at the Asan Medical Center (2006-2009), 126 lesions (118 patients) were adjacent to the chest-wall (6 months; these were investigated in the present retrospective study. Three to four fractional doses of 10-20 Gy were delivered to 85-90% iso-dose volume of the isocenter dose. Rib fracture grade was defined from follow-up CT scans as the appearance of a fracture line (Gr1), dislocation of the fractured rib by more than half the rib diameter (Gr2), or the appearance of adjacent soft tissue edema (Gr3). Chest wall pain was assessed according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE) v3.0. Correlations between dose-volume data and the development of rib fracture were then analyzed. The Kaplan-Meier method, log-rank tests, and chi-square tests were used for statistical analysis. The median age of the patients was 69 years (range: 19-90). Over a median follow-up period of 22 months (range: 7-62), 48 cases of rib fracture were confirmed. Median time to rib fracture was 17 months (range: 4-52). The 2-year actuarial risk of rib fracture was 42.4%. Maximal grade was Gr1 (n=28), Gr2 (n=8), or Gr3 (n=15). The incidence of moderate to severe chest wall pain (CTCAE Gr ≥ 2) increased with maximal fracture grade (17.5% for Gr0-1 and 60.9% for Gr2-3; prib fracture in the present study. Efforts to decrease chest wall dose should be made to reduce the risk of the rib fracture, particularly in high-risk patients. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Physical function and pain after surgical or conservative management of multiple rib fractures - a follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagevik Olsén, Monika; Slobo, Margareta; Klarin, Lena; Caragounis, Eva-Corina; Pazooki, David; Granhed, Hans

    2016-10-28

    There is scarce knowledge of physical function and pain due to multiple rib fractures following trauma. The purpose of this follow-up was to assess respiratory and physical function, pain, range of movement and kinesiophobia in patients with multiple rib fractures who had undergone stabilizing surgery and compare with conservatively managed patients. A consecutive series of 31 patients with multiple rib fractures who had undergone stabilizing surgery were assessed >1 year after the trauma concerning respiratory and physical function, pain, range of movement in the shoulders and thorax, shoulder function and kinesiophobia. For comparison, 30 patients who were treated conservatively were evaluated with the same outcome measures. The results concerning pain, lung function, shoulder function and level of physical activity were similar in the two groups. The patients who had undergone surgery had a significantly larger range of motion in the thorax (p pain, better thoracic range of motion and physical function which would indicate that surgery is preferable. If operation technique could improve in the future with a less invasive approach, it would presumably decrease post-operative pain and the benefit of surgery would be greater than the morbidity of surgery. Patients undergoing surgery have a similar long-term recovery to those who are treated conservatively except for a better range of motion in the thorax and fewer limitations in physical function. Surgery seems to be beneficial for some patients, the question remains which patients. FoU i Sverige (R&D in Sweden), No 106121.

  8. Thoracic epidural analgesia in a child with multiple traumatic rib fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keech, Brian M

    2015-12-01

    The morbidity and mortality associated with blunt thoracic trauma are significant and can be multisystem in nature. Of these, pulmonary complications, including ventilatory impairment secondary to pain, have been recognized to be the most consequential. Although several analgesic strategies have emerged, thoracic epidural analgesia (TEA) has arguably demonstrated superior efficacy and is used frequently in adults. Unfortunately, TEA is rarely used in children after blunt thoracic trauma, but may be of considerable benefit. This low rate of use likely reflects one or more of several factors potentially encountered when considering the use of TEA in pediatric chest wall trauma. Among them are (1) uncertainty regarding safety and efficacy; (2) the technical challenges of pediatric thoracic epidural placement, including technique and equipment concerns; and (3) drug selection, dosing, and toxicity. The following case review describes the successful application of TEA in a 4-year-old boy after multiple traumatic rib fractures and associated pneumothorax and pulmonary contusion. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Ultrasonographic diagnosis of pancreatic fracture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woo, Seong Ku; Lim, Jae Hoon; Ko, Young Tae; Choi, Yong Dae; Yoon, Yup; Kim, Soo yong

    1983-01-01

    The pancreatic fracture, known also as complete transection of the pancreas, is severe injury of the pancreas characterized by complete vertical transection of its body overlying the body of the vertebra. The authors diagnosed three cases of traumatic fracture of the pancreas by ultrasonography and these were confirmed surgically. Ultrasonography disclosed an anechoic fluid collection between the separated parenchyma of the body of the pancreas anterior to the superior mesenteric artery. The remaining pancreas enlarged diffusely and decreased in echogenecity. Associated feature was accumulation of fluid in the lesser sac and the peritoneal cavity

  10. Effect of analgesia on the changes in respiratory parameters in blunt chest injury with multiple rib fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekpe, Eyo Effiong; Eyo, Catherine

    2017-01-01

    Blunt chest injury with multiple rib fractures can result in such complications as pneumonia, atelectasis, bronchiectasis, empyema thoracis, acute respiratory distress syndrome, and prolonged Intensive Care Unit and hospital stay, with its concomitant mortality. These may be prevented or reduced by good analgesic therapy which is the subject of this study. This was a prospective study of effects of analgesia on changes in pulmonary functions of patients with traumatic multiple rib fractures resulting from blunt chest injury. There were 64 adult patients who were studied with multiple rib fractures caused by blunt chest trauma. Of these patients, 54 (84.4%) were male and 10 (15.6%) were female. Motorcycle (popularly known as "okada") and tricycle (popularly known as keke napep) accidents significantly accounted for the majority of the multiple rib fractures, that is, in 50 (78.1%) of the patients. Before analgesic administration, no patient had a normal respiratory rate, but at 1 h following the administration of analgesic, 21 (32.8%) of patients recorded normal respiratory rates and there was a significant reduction in the number (10.9% vs. 39.1%) of patients with respiratory rates> 30 breaths/min. Before commencement of analgesic, no patient recorded up to 99% of oxygen saturation (SpO2) as measured by pulse oximeter, while 43.8% recorded SpO2of 96%. This improved after 1 h of administration of analgesics to SpO2of 100% in 18.8% of patients and 99% in 31.3% of patients and none recording SpO2of 100% of predicted while only 9 (14.1%) patients were able to achieve a PEFR value in the range of 91%-100% of predicted value. One hour after analgesia, a total of 6 (9.4%) patients were able to achieve PEFR values> 100% predicted, while 35 (54.7%) patients achieved PEFR values in the range of 91%-100% predicted. Adequate analgesia is capable of reversing the negative effects of chest pain of traumatic multiple rib fractures on pulmonary function parameters through

  11. Sustained relief of pain from osteosynthesis surgery of rib fracture by using biodegradable lidocaine-eluting nanofibrous membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yi-Hsun; Hsu, Yung-Heng; Chou, Ying-Chao; Fan, Chin-Lung; Ueng, Steve W N; Kau, Yi-Chuan; Liu, Shih-Jung

    2016-10-01

    Various effective methods are available for perioperative pain control in osteosynthesis surgery, but they are seldom applied intraoperatively. The aim of this study was to evaluate a biodegradable poly([d,l]-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA)/lidocaine nanofibrous membrane for perioperative pain control in rib fracture surgery. Scanning electron microscopy showed high porosity of the membrane, and an ex vivo high-performance liquid chromatography study revealed an excellent release profile for both burst and controlled release of lidocaine within 30days. Additionally, the PLGA/lidocaine nanofibrous membrane was applied in an experimental rabbit rib osteotomy model. Implantation of the membrane around the osteotomized rib during osteosynthesis surgery resulted in a significant increase in weight gain, food and water consumption, and daily activity compared to the study group without the membrane. In addition, all osteotomized ribs were united. Thus, application of the PLGA/lidocaine nanofibrous membrane may be effective for sustained relief of pain in oeteosynthesis surgery. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Diagnosis and Management of Common Foot Fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bica, David; Sprouse, Ryan A; Armen, Joseph

    2016-02-01

    Foot fractures are among the most common foot injuries evaluated by primary care physicians. They most often involve the metatarsals and toes. Patients typically present with varying signs and symptoms, the most common being pain and trouble with ambulation. Diagnosis requires radiographic evaluation, although emerging evidence demonstrates that ultrasonography may be just as accurate. Management is determined by the location of the fracture and its effect on balance and weight bearing. Metatarsal shaft fractures are initially treated with a posterior splint and avoidance of weight-bearing activities; subsequent treatment consists of a short leg walking cast or boot for four to six weeks. Proximal fifth metatarsal fractures have different treatments depending on the location of the fracture. A fifth metatarsal tuberosity avulsion fracture can be treated acutely with a compressive dressing, then the patient can be transitioned to a short leg walking boot for two weeks, with progressive mobility as tolerated after initial immobilization. A Jones fracture has a higher risk of nonunion and requires at least six to eight weeks in a short leg non-weight-bearing cast; healing time can be as long as 10 to 12 weeks. Great toe fractures are treated with a short leg walking boot or cast with toe plate for two to three weeks, then a rigid-sole shoe for an additional three to four weeks. Lesser toe fractures can be treated with buddy taping and a rigid-sole shoe for four to six weeks.

  13. Rib cage pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... any of the following: Bruised, cracked, or fractured rib Inflammation of cartilage near the ... the best cures for a ribcage fracture . Follow your health care provider's instructions for treating ...

  14. Computerized tomographic diagnosis of basal skull fracture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Tokutaro; Shimoyama, Ichiro; Endoh, Mitsutoshi; Ninchoji, Toshiaki; Uemura, Kenichi.

    1984-01-01

    The diagnosis of basal skull fractures used to be difficult, particularly on the basis of routine skull roentgenography alone. We have now examined the diagnostic value of conventional computerized tomography in basal skull fractures. We studied 82 cases clinically diagnosed as basal skull fractures. We examined them based on at least one of the following computerized tomographic criteria for basal skull fractures: 1) fracture line(s), 2) intracranial air, 3) fluid in the paranasal sinuses, and 4) fluid in the middle ear, including the mastoid air cells. The signs of the fracture line and of the intracranial air are definite indications of basal skull fracture, but the signs of fluid in the paranasal sinuses and/or in the middle ear are not definite. When combined, however, with such other clinical signs as black eye, Battle's sign, CSF leakage, CSF findings, and profuse nasal or ear bleeding, the diagnosis is more reliable. Seventy cases (85.4%) in this series had basal skull fractures according to our computerized tomographic criteria. Among them , 26 cases (31.7%) were diagnosed with fracture lines, 17 cases (20.7%) with intracranial air, 16 cases (19.5%) with fluid in the paranasal sinuses, 10 cases (12.2%) with fluid in the middle ear, and one case (1.2%) with fluid in both. Twelve cases (14.6%) of the 82 cases clinically diagnosed as basal skull fractures could not have been diagnosed on our computerized tomographic criteria alone. We diagnosed them because of CSF leakage, CSF findings, surgical findings, etc. (author)

  15. Rib stress fracture in a male adaptive rower from the arms and shoulders sport class: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smoljanovic, Tomislav; Bojanic, Ivan; Pollock, Courtney L; Radonic, Radovan

    2011-10-15

    Adaptive rowing is rowing or sculling for rowers with a physical disability. It debuted at the Paralympic Games in 2008. In order to ensure an equitable playing field, rowers with similar levels of physical function and disability are classified into different sport classes for competition. Rowers with an inability to use a sliding seat and impaired trunk function resulting in an inability to perform trunk forward and backward lean via hip flexion/extension are assigned to the Arms and Shoulders (AS) class. AS rowers have to use a chest strap set immediately below the chest in order to localize any trunk movement in AS class. Conditions created by adaptations of rowing equipment and technique within the AS class create unique stresses on the upper thoracic region. The following case report demonstrates how etiology and management of a rib stress fracture in an AS rower differs in comparison to able-body rowers. Of significant importance were the limitations imposed on the rower's ability to maintain rowing-specific fitness, due to the nature of the rib stress fracture and requirement to decrease force transmission through the ribs for several weeks. The rower's gradual return to full training was further impacted by obligatory use of the chest strap, which directly applied pressure over the injured area. Protective orthosis for the chest was designed and applied in order to dissipate pressure of the chest strap over the thorax during rowing (most importantly at the catch position) both on the ergometer and in the boat.

  16. Internal rib structure can be predicted using mathematical models: An anatomic study comparing the chest to a shell dome with application to understanding fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casha, Aaron R; Camilleri, Liberato; Manché, Alexander; Gatt, Ruben; Attard, Daphne; Gauci, Marilyn; Camilleri-Podesta, Marie-Therese; Mcdonald, Stuart; Grima, Joseph N

    2015-11-01

    The human rib cage resembles a masonry dome in shape. Masonry domes have a particular construction that mimics stress distribution. Rib cortical thickness and bone density were analyzed to determine whether the morphology of the rib cage is sufficiently similar to a shell dome for internal rib structure to be predicted mathematically. A finite element analysis (FEA) simulation was used to measure stresses on the internal and external surfaces of a chest-shaped dome. Inner and outer rib cortical thickness and bone density were measured in the mid-axillary lines of seven cadaveric rib cages using computerized tomography scanning. Paired t tests and Pearson correlation were used to relate cortical thickness and bone density to stress. FEA modeling showed that the stress was 82% higher on the internal than the external surface, with a gradual decrease in internal and external wall stresses from the base to the apex. The inner cortex was more radio-dense, P rib level. The internal anatomical features of ribs, including the inner and outer cortical thicknesses and bone densities, are similar to the stress distribution in dome-shaped structures modeled using FEA computer simulations of a thick-walled dome pressure vessel. Fixation of rib fractures should include the stronger internal cortex. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Dose-volume histogram analysis for risk factors of radiation-induced rib fracture after hypofractionated proton beam therapy for hepatocellular carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanemoto, Ayae

    2013-01-01

    Background: Radiation-induced rib fracture has been reported as a late complication after external radiotherapy to the chest. The purpose of this study was to clarify the characteristics and risk factors of rib fracture after hypofractionated proton beam therapy (PBT). Material and methods: The retrospective study comprised 67 patients with hepatocellular carcinoma who were treated using PBT of 66 Cobalt-Gray-equivalents [Gy (RBE)] in 10 fractions. We analyzed the patients' characteristics and determined dose-volume histograms (DVHs) for the irradiated ribs, and then estimated relationships between risk of fracture and several dose-volume parameters. An irradiated rib was defined to be any rib included in the area irradiated by PBT as determined by treatment-planning computed tomography. Results. Among the 67 patients, a total of 310 ribs were identified as irradiated ribs. Twenty-seven (8.7%) of the irradiated ribs developed fractures in 11 patients (16.4%). No significant relationships were seen between incidence of fracture and characteristics of patients, including sex, age, tumor size, tumor site, and follow-up period (p ≥ 0.05). The results of receiver operating characteristic curve analysis using DVH parameters demonstrated that the largest area under the curve (AUC) was observed for the volume of rib receiving a biologically effective dose of more than 60 Gy 3 (RBE) (V60) [The equivalent dose in 2 Gy fractions (EQD2); 36 Gy 3 ] and the AUCs of V30 to V120 (EQD2; 18-72 Gy 3 ) and D max to D 1 0 cm 3 were similar to that of V60. No significant relationships were seen for DVH parameters and intervals from PBT to incidence of fracture. Conclusion. DVH parameters are useful in predicting late adverse events of rib irradiation. This study identified that V60 was a most statistically significant parameter, and V30 to V120 and D max to D 1 0 cm 3 were also significant and clinically useful for estimating the risk of rib fracture after hypofractionated PBT

  18. Dose-volume histogram analysis for risk factors of radiation-induced rib fracture after hypofractionated proton beam therapy for hepatocellular carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanemoto, Ayae [Proton Medical Research Center and Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Univ. of Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)], e-mail: ayaek@pmrc.tsukuba.ac.jp [and others

    2013-04-15

    Background: Radiation-induced rib fracture has been reported as a late complication after external radiotherapy to the chest. The purpose of this study was to clarify the characteristics and risk factors of rib fracture after hypofractionated proton beam therapy (PBT). Material and methods: The retrospective study comprised 67 patients with hepatocellular carcinoma who were treated using PBT of 66 Cobalt-Gray-equivalents [Gy (RBE)] in 10 fractions. We analyzed the patients' characteristics and determined dose-volume histograms (DVHs) for the irradiated ribs, and then estimated relationships between risk of fracture and several dose-volume parameters. An irradiated rib was defined to be any rib included in the area irradiated by PBT as determined by treatment-planning computed tomography. Results. Among the 67 patients, a total of 310 ribs were identified as irradiated ribs. Twenty-seven (8.7%) of the irradiated ribs developed fractures in 11 patients (16.4%). No significant relationships were seen between incidence of fracture and characteristics of patients, including sex, age, tumor size, tumor site, and follow-up period (p {>=} 0.05). The results of receiver operating characteristic curve analysis using DVH parameters demonstrated that the largest area under the curve (AUC) was observed for the volume of rib receiving a biologically effective dose of more than 60 Gy{sub 3} (RBE) (V60) [The equivalent dose in 2 Gy fractions (EQD2); 36 Gy{sub 3}] and the AUCs of V30 to V120 (EQD2; 18-72 Gy{sub 3}) and D{sub max} to D{sub 1}0{sub cm}{sup 3} were similar to that of V60. No significant relationships were seen for DVH parameters and intervals from PBT to incidence of fracture. Conclusion. DVH parameters are useful in predicting late adverse events of rib irradiation. This study identified that V60 was a most statistically significant parameter, and V30 to V120 and D{sub max} to D{sub 1}0{sub cm}{sup 3} were also significant and clinically useful for estimating

  19. Are first rib fractures a marker for other life-threatening injuries in patients with major trauma? A cohort study of patients on the UK Trauma Audit and Research Network database

    OpenAIRE

    Sammy, Ian Ayenga; Chatha, Hridesh; Lecky, Fiona; Bouamra, Omar; Fragoso-I?iguez, Marisol; Sattout, Abdo; Hickey, Michael; Edwards, John E

    2017-01-01

    Background: First rib fractures are considered indicators of increased morbidity and mortality in major trauma. However, this has not been definitively proven. With an increased use of CT and the potential increase in detection of first rib fractures, re-evaluation of these injuries as a marker for life-threatening injuries is warranted.\\ud \\ud Methods: Patients sustaining rib fractures between January 2012 and December 2013 were investigated using data from the UK Trauma Audit and Research N...

  20. Rib stress fractures among rowers: a systematic review on return to sports, risk factors and prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Ailly, Philip N; Sluiter, Judith K; Kuijer, Paul P

    2016-06-01

    Rib stress fractures (RSFs) are injuries frequently sustained by elite rowers with an injury rate of 8-16% over the course of a rowing career, resulting in negative effects on training and performance. For clinical management, the aim of this review was to describe time to return to sports, summarize potentially preventive measures and appraise the evidence on risk factors. A search strategy was performed in PubMed, SportDiscus, Web of Science and Embase till June 1st 2015. All studies were graded on their quality. The search resulted in 124 studies, of which 17 were included: Ten reported on return to sports, 17 reported on risk factors and nine on preventive measures. For return to sports, nine studies mentioned a loss of training of 4-6 weeks. The shortest period was one week and the longest 16 weeks. For risk factors, insufficient or conflicting evidence was found for changes in the training program, incorrect rowing technique, female gender, low bone mineral density, inadequate equipment, and training type. For prevention, gradual changes in the training program, alertness on the part of coaches and clinicians, and supplementation of diet and hormones are suggested as effective measures. However, no effect studies have been found. The main outcome of this review on RSFs is that little evidence is available on return to sports, risk factors and preventive measures. Coaches and clinicians should carefully guide and assist rowers suffering from RSFs in off training and in the subsequent training period to regain their pre-injury level.

  1. Radiation-induced rib fracture after stereotactic body radiotherapy with a total dose of 54-56 Gy given in 9-7 fractions for patients with peripheral lung tumor: impact of maximum dose and fraction size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, Masahiko; Sato, Mariko; Hirose, Katsumi; Akimoto, Hiroyoshi; Kawaguchi, Hideo; Hatayama, Yoshiomi; Ono, Shuichi; Takai, Yoshihiro

    2015-04-22

    Radiation-induced rib fracture after stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for lung cancer has been recently reported. However, incidence of radiation-induced rib fracture after SBRT using moderate fraction sizes with a long-term follow-up time are not clarified. We examined incidence and risk factors of radiation-induced rib fracture after SBRT using moderate fraction sizes for the patients with peripherally located lung tumor. During 2003-2008, 41 patients with 42 lung tumors were treated with SBRT to 54-56 Gy in 9-7 fractions. The endpoint in the study was radiation-induced rib fracture detected by CT scan after the treatment. All ribs where the irradiated doses were more than 80% of prescribed dose were selected and contoured to build the dose-volume histograms (DVHs). Comparisons of the several factors obtained from the DVHs and the probabilities of rib fracture calculated by Kaplan-Meier method were performed in the study. Median follow-up time was 68 months. Among 75 contoured ribs, 23 rib fractures were observed in 34% of the patients during 16-48 months after SBRT, however, no patients complained of chest wall pain. The 4-year probabilities of rib fracture for maximum dose of ribs (Dmax) more than and less than 54 Gy were 47.7% and 12.9% (p = 0.0184), and for fraction size of 6, 7 and 8 Gy were 19.5%, 31.2% and 55.7% (p = 0.0458), respectively. Other factors, such as D2cc, mean dose of ribs, V10-55, age, sex, and planning target volume were not significantly different. The doses and fractionations used in this study resulted in no clinically significant rib fractures for this population, but that higher Dmax and dose per fraction treatments resulted in an increase in asymptomatic grade 1 rib fractures.

  2. Radiation-induced rib fracture after stereotactic body radiotherapy with a total dose of 54–56 Gy given in 9–7 fractions for patients with peripheral lung tumor: impact of maximum dose and fraction size

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoki, Masahiko; Sato, Mariko; Hirose, Katsumi; Akimoto, Hiroyoshi; Kawaguchi, Hideo; Hatayama, Yoshiomi; Ono, Shuichi; Takai, Yoshihiro

    2015-01-01

    Radiation-induced rib fracture after stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for lung cancer has been recently reported. However, incidence of radiation-induced rib fracture after SBRT using moderate fraction sizes with a long-term follow-up time are not clarified. We examined incidence and risk factors of radiation-induced rib fracture after SBRT using moderate fraction sizes for the patients with peripherally located lung tumor. During 2003–2008, 41 patients with 42 lung tumors were treated with SBRT to 54–56 Gy in 9–7 fractions. The endpoint in the study was radiation-induced rib fracture detected by CT scan after the treatment. All ribs where the irradiated doses were more than 80% of prescribed dose were selected and contoured to build the dose-volume histograms (DVHs). Comparisons of the several factors obtained from the DVHs and the probabilities of rib fracture calculated by Kaplan-Meier method were performed in the study. Median follow-up time was 68 months. Among 75 contoured ribs, 23 rib fractures were observed in 34% of the patients during 16–48 months after SBRT, however, no patients complained of chest wall pain. The 4-year probabilities of rib fracture for maximum dose of ribs (Dmax) more than and less than 54 Gy were 47.7% and 12.9% (p = 0.0184), and for fraction size of 6, 7 and 8 Gy were 19.5%, 31.2% and 55.7% (p = 0.0458), respectively. Other factors, such as D2cc, mean dose of ribs, V10–55, age, sex, and planning target volume were not significantly different. The doses and fractionations used in this study resulted in no clinically significant rib fractures for this population, but that higher Dmax and dose per fraction treatments resulted in an increase in asymptomatic grade 1 rib fractures

  3. [Comparison of screw' inserting angle through the 11th and 12th rib anterior approaches for L1 burst fracture].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Li-Tai; Liu, Hao; Li, Tao; Song, Yue-Ming; Pei, Fu-Xing; Liu, Li-Min; Gong, Quan; Zeng, Jian-Cheng; Feng, Gan-Jun; Zhou, Zhong-Jie

    2012-12-01

    To compare screw's inserting angle through the 11th and 12th rib in treating L1 burst fracture, explore effects on inserting screw and postoperative angle. From October 2007 to October 2010, 108 patients with L1 brust fracture treated through anterior approach were analyzed,including 68 males and 40 females, aged from 21 to 64 years (mean 38.22 years). All patients were divided into the 11th (A, 51 cases) and 12th (B, 57 cases) approach. The data of operation time,blood loss, duration of incision pain, JOA score, Oswestry score, VAS score, quality of life (SF-36), recovery of nervous function, coronal Cobb angle, included angle between screw and plate were observed. All patients were followed up for 9 to 37 months, mean 23 months. The operation time, blood loss, duration of incision pain, in group A were lower than group B (P0.05). There were no differences in Cobb angle before operation, but had significance after operation (P=0.000). There were statistically significance between two group in angle between screw and plate (P=0.000, P=0.003). The 11th rib approach for the treatment of L1 burst fracture has less effects on screw, less trauma and less angle between screw and plate.

  4. Does surgical stabilization improve outcomes in patients with isolated multiple distracted and painful non-flail rib fractures?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girsowicz, Elie; Falcoz, Pierre-Emmanuel; Santelmo, Nicola; Massard, Gilbert

    2012-03-01

    A best evidence topic was constructed according to a structured protocol. The question addressed was whether surgical stabilization is effective in improving the outcomes of patients with isolated multiple distracted and painful non-flail rib fractures. Of the 356 papers found using a report search, nine presented the best evidence to answer the clinical question. The authors, journal, date and country of publication, study type, group studied, relevant outcomes and results of these papers are given. We conclude that, on the whole, the nine retrieved studies clearly support the use of surgical stabilization in the management of isolated multiple non-flail and painful rib fractures for improving patient outcomes. The interest and benefit was shown not only in terms of pain (McGill pain questionnaire) and respiratory function (forced vital capacity, forced expiratory volume in 1 s and carbon monoxide diffusing capacity), but also in improved quality of life (RAND 36-Item Health Survey) and reduced socio-professional disability. Indeed, most of the authors justified surgical management based on the fact that the results of surgical stabilization showed improvement in short- and long-term patient outcomes, with fast reduction in pain and disability, as well as lower average wait before recommencing normal activities. Hence, the current evidence shows surgical stabilization to be safe and effective in alleviating post-operative pain and in improving patient recovery, thus enhancing the outcome after isolated multiple rib fractures. However, given the little published evidence, prospective trials are necessary to confirm these encouraging results.

  5. Comparison of the Analgesic Effect of Intravenous Acetaminophen and Morphine Sulfate in Rib Fracture; a Randomized Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehrdad Esmailian

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Rib fracture is one of the common causes of trauma disabilities in many events and the outcome of these patients are very extensive from temporary pain management to long-term significant disability. Control and management of the pain in such patients is one of the most important challenges in emergency departments. Thus, the aim of the present study was assessing the efficacy of IV acetaminophen in pain control of patients with rib fracture. Methods: In this double-blind study, 54 patients over 18 years of age, referred to two educational hospitals with rib fracture, were entered. Patients were randomly categorized in two groups of morphine sulfate (0.1 milligram per kilogram of body weight and IV acetaminophen (1gram, as single-dose infused in 100 cc normal saline. The pain severity was measured by Numeric Rating Scale on arrival and 30 minutes after drug administration. At least three scores reduction was reported as therapeutic success. Results: The mean and standard deviation of patients’ age was 41.2 ± 14.1 years. There is no difference in gender (p=0.24 and age frequency (p=0.77 between groups. 30 minutes after drug administration the mean of pain severity were 5.5 ± 2.3 and 4.9 ± 1.7 in morphine and acetaminophen groups, respectively (p=0.23. Success rate in morphine and acetaminophen groups were 58.6% (95% Cl: 39.6-77.7 and 80% (95% Cl: 63.2-96.7, respectively, (p=0.09. Only 3 (5.6% patients had dizziness (p=0.44 and other effects were not seen in any of patients. Conclusion: The findings of the present study shows that intravenous acetaminophen and morphine have the same therapeutic value in relieving the pain of rib fracture. The success rate after 30 minutes drug administration were 80% and 58.6% in acetaminophen and morphine groups, respectively. Presentation of side effects was similar in both groups.

  6. Differences in rates of radiation-induced true and false rib fractures after stereotactic body radiation therapy for Stage I primary lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miura, Hideharu; Inoue, Toshihiko; Shiomi, Hiroya; Oh, Ryoong-Jin

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the dosimetry and investigate the clinical outcomes of radiation-induced rib fractures (RIRFs) after stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). A total of 126 patients with Stage I primary lung cancer treated with SBRT, who had undergone follow-up computed tomography (CT) at least 12 months after SBRT and who had no previous overlapping radiation exposure were included in the study. We used the Mantel-Haenszel method and multiple logistic regression analysis to compare risk factors. We analyzed D(0.5 cm 3 ) (minimum absolute dose received by a 0.5-cm 3 volume) and identified each rib that received a biologically effective dose (BED) (BED3, using the linear-quadratic (LQ) formulation assuming an α/β = 3) of at least 50 Gy. Of the 126 patients, 46 (37%) suffered a total of 77 RIRFs. The median interval from SBRT to RIRF detection was 15 months (range, 3-56 months). The 3-year cumulative probabilities were 45% (95% CI, 34-56%) and 3% (95% CI, 0-6%), for Grades 1 and 2 RIRFs, respectively. Multivariate analysis showed that tumor location was a statistically significant risk factor for the development of Grade 1 RIRFs. Of the 77 RIRFs, 71 (92%) developed in the true ribs (ribs 1-7), and the remaining six developed in the false ribs (ribs 8-12). The BED3 associated with 10% and 50% probabilities of RIRF were 55 and 210 Gy to the true ribs and 240 and 260 Gy to the false ribs. We conclude that RIRFs develop more frequently in true ribs than in false ribs. (author)

  7. Overexpression of BMP3 in the developing skeleton alters endochondral bone formation resulting in spontaneous rib fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamer, Laura W; Cox, Karen; Carlo, Joelle M; Rosen, Vicki

    2009-09-01

    Bone morphogenetic protein-3 (BMP) has been identified as a negative regulator in the skeleton as mice lacking BMP3 have increased bone mass. To further understand how BMP3 mediates bone formation, we created transgenic mice overexpressing BMP3 using the type I collagen promoter. BMP3 transgenic mice displayed spontaneous rib fractures that were first detected at E17.0. The fractures were due to defects in differentiation of the periosteum and late hypertrophic chondrocytes resulting in thinner cortical bone with decreased mineralization. As BMP3 modulates BMP and activin signaling through ActRIIB, we examined the ribs of ActRIIB receptor knockout mice and found they had defects in late chondrogenesis and mineralization similar to BMP3 transgenic mice. These data suggest that BMP3 exerts its effects in the skeleton by altering signaling through ActRIIB in chondrocytes and the periosteum, and this results in defects in bone collar formation and late hypertrophic chondrocyte maturation leading to decreased mineralization and less bone. 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  8. Acupuncture for central pain affecting the ribcage following traumatic brain injury and rib fractures--a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnellan, Clare P

    2006-09-01

    This case report describes the use of acupuncture in the management of chronic central pain in a 51 year old man following severe traumatic brain injury and multiple injuries including rib fractures. The patient reported rapid and significant improvements in pain and mood during a course of acupuncture treatment. Chronic pain following traumatic brain injury is a significant problem. Chronic pain after rib fractures is also commonly reported. Acupuncture is widely used in the management of pain but its use has been reported rarely in the traumatic brain injury literature. This case report suggests that acupuncture may be a useful option to consider in these patients. Outcome was assessed formally using a 0-10 verbal numerical rating scale for pain, and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) for psychological status before and after the course of treatment. These scales are widely used in clinical practice as well as in research involving patients with traumatic brain injury, although they have not been validated in this population. The changes in this patient's outcome scores were not consistent with the benefits he reported. Treatment of this patient highlighted the difficulties of using standardised self rating scales for patients with cognitive impairment. The report also discusses the effects of acupuncture on this patient's mood.

  9. Erector spinae plane block may aid weaning from mechanical ventilation in patients with multiple rib fractures: Case report of two cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amar Nandhakumar

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Uncontrolled pain in patients with rib fracture leads to atelectasis and impaired cough which can progress to pneumonia and respiratory failure necessitating mechanical ventilation. Of the various pain modalities, regional anaesthesia (epidural and paravertebral is better than systemic and oral analgesics. The erector spinae plane block (ESPB is a new modality in the armamentarium for the management of pain in multiple rib fractures, which is simple to perform and without major complications. We report a case series where ESPB helped in weaning the patients from mechanical ventilation. Further randomised controlled studies are warranted in comparing their efficacy in relation to other regional anaesthetic techniques.

  10. Case Report of Serratus Plane Catheter for Pain Management in a Patient With Multiple Rib Fractures and an Inferior Scapular Fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Peter; Weyker, Paul D; Webb, Christopher A J

    2017-03-15

    We placed a superficial serratus anterior plane catheter in an elderly woman with dementia and elevated clotting times who presented with multiple rib fractures after a mechanical fall. She was not a surgical candidate, and treatment consisted of conservative management with physical therapy and pain control. She was not a candidate for a patient-controlled analgesia regimen because of her dementia. Given her elevated international normalized ratio, thoracic epidural and paravertebral analgesia was also contraindicated. We placed an ultrasound-guided serratus anterior plane catheter, allowing titratable continuous infusion in a trauma patient, resulting in excellent analgesia without adverse effects.

  11. Thoracic paravertebral block versus intravenous patient-controlled analgesia for pain treatment in patients with multiple rib fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeying, Ge; Liyong, Yuan; Yuebo, Chen; Yu, Zhang; Guangao, Ye; Weihu, Ma; Liujun, Zhao

    2017-12-01

    Objectives To assess the effect of thoracic paravertebral block (PVB) on pain management and preservation of pulmonary function compared with intravenous, patient-controlled analgesia (IVPCA) in patients with multiple rib fractures (MRFs). Methods Ninety patients with unilateral MRFs were included in this prospective study and randomly assigned to the TPVB or IVPCA group. The visual analogue scale (VAS) pain score, blood gas analysis, and bedside spirometry were measured and recorded at different time points after analgesia. Results TPVB and IVPCA provided good pain relief. VAS scores were significantly lower in the TPVB group than in the IVPCA group at rest and during coughing ( P pain relief and preservation of pulmonary function in patients with MRFs.

  12. Absence of uptake of the rib cage; diagnosis of a Poland's syndrome with the bone SPECT-CT; Absence de fixation du gril costal: diagnostic d'un syndrome de Poland par la TEMP-TDM osseuse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Granier, P.; Mourad, M. [Centre Hospitalier Antoine-Gayraud, Service de Medecine Nucleaire, 11 - Carcassonne (France)

    2008-09-15

    We report the case of a 37-year-old man, investigated for pains of the right upper limb impairing the hand, the wrist and the shoulder after a surgery for fracture of the radius and the scaphoid. The {sup 99m}Tc-H.D.P. three-phase bone scintigraphy confirmed the diagnosis of acute phase of a reflex sympathetic dystrophy. The delayed images highlighted a focal absence of tracer uptake of the left anterior rib cage. The single photon emission computerized tomography guided by computerized tomography showed that it was related to the absence of the anterior part of the third and the fourth left ribs highlighting an aplasia of the left pectoralis major muscle. These anomalies led to the diagnosis of congenital malformation in connection with a Poland's syndrome. The differential diagnosis of this syndrome resulted in discussing the multiple etiologies of the photopenic lesions of the rib cage. (authors)

  13. Accessory caudal axial and pelvic ribs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bohutova, J.; Kolar, J.; Vitovec, J.; Vyhnanek, L.

    1980-01-01

    Accessory caudal ribs are reported as an extremely curious anomaly in five patients. Once the fracture of this rib was a source of pains after injury. The different shapes of the ribs are documented in this clinical survey which is the most extensive in the present literature. Anomalous ribs arise due to inappropriate segmentation during the embryonal development of the axial skeleton. (orig.) [de

  14. Image diagnosis of nasal bone fracture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirota, Yoshiharu; Shimizu, Yayoi; Iinuma, Toshitaka.

    1988-01-01

    Twenty cases of nasal bone fractures were evaluated as to the types of fractures based upon HRCT findings. Conventional X-Ray films for nasal bones were analyzed and compared with HRCT findings. Nasal bone fractures were classified into lateral and frontal fractures. HRCT images were evaluated in three planes including upper, middle and lower portions of the nasal bone. Fractures favored males of teens. Lateral fracture gave rise to the fractures of the nasal bone opposite to the external force, loosening of the ipsilateral nasomaxillary sutures and fractures of the frontal process of the maxilla. Conventional X-Ray films were reevaluated after HRCT evaluation and indications of nasal bone fractures were determined. In addition to the discontinuity of the nasal dorsum, fracture lines parallel to and beneath the nasal dorsum and indistinct fracture lines along the nasomaxillary sutures are the indication of nasal bone fractures by conventional X-Ray films. (author)

  15. Operative fixation of rib fractures after blunt trauma: A practice management guideline from the Eastern Association for the Surgery of Trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasotakis, George; Hasenboehler, Erik A; Streib, Erik W; Patel, Nimitt; Patel, Mayur B; Alarcon, Louis; Bosarge, Patrick L; Love, Joseph; Haut, Elliott R; Como, John J

    2017-03-01

    Rib fractures are identified in 10% of all injury victims and are associated with significant morbidity (33%) and mortality (12%). Significant progress has been made in the management of rib fractures over the past few decades, including operative reduction and internal fixation (rib ORIF); however, the subset of patients that would benefit most from this procedure remains ill-defined. The aim of this project was to develop evidence-based recommendations. Population, intervention, comparison, and outcome (PICO) questions were formulated for patients with and without flail chest. Outcomes of interest included mortality, duration of mechanical ventilation (DMV), hospital and intensive care unit (ICU) length of stay (LOS), incidence of pneumonia, need for tracheostomy, and pain control. A systematic review and meta-analysis of currently available evidence was performed per the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation methodology. Twenty-two studies were identified and analyzed. These included 986 patients with flail chest, of whom 334 underwent rib ORIF. Rib ORIF afforded lower mortality; shorter DMV, hospital LOS, and ICU LOS; and lower incidence of pneumonia and need for tracheostomy. The data quality was deemed very low, with only three prospective randomized trials available. Analyses for pain in patients with flail chest and all outcomes in patients with nonflail chest were not feasible due to inadequate data. In adult patients with flail chest, we conditionally recommend rib ORIF to decrease mortality; shorten DMV, hospital LOS, and ICU LOS; and decrease incidence of pneumonia and need for tracheostomy. We cannot offer a recommendation for pain control, or any of the outcomes in patients with nonflail chest with currently available data. Systematic review/meta-analysis, level III.

  16. Chest Wall Volume Receiving >30 Gy Predicts Risk of Severe Pain and/or Rib Fracture After Lung Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunlap, Neal E.; Cai, Jing; Biedermann, Gregory B.; Yang, Wensha; Benedict, Stanley H.; Sheng Ke; Schefter, Tracey E.; Kavanagh, Brian D.; Larner, James M.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To identify the dose-volume parameters that predict the risk of chest wall (CW) pain and/or rib fracture after lung stereotactic body radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: From a combined, larger multi-institution experience, 60 consecutive patients treated with three to five fractions of stereotactic body radiotherapy for primary or metastatic peripheral lung lesions were reviewed. CW pain was assessed using the Common Toxicity Criteria for pain. Peripheral lung lesions were defined as those located within 2.5 cm of the CW. A minimal point dose of 20 Gy to the CW was required. The CW volume receiving ≥20, ≥30, ≥40, ≥50, and ≥60 Gy was determined and related to the risk of CW toxicity. Results: Of the 60 patients, 17 experienced Grade 3 CW pain and five rib fractures. The median interval to the onset of severe pain and/or fracture was 7.1 months. The risk of CW toxicity was fitted to the median effective concentration dose-response model. The CW volume receiving 30 Gy best predicted the risk of severe CW pain and/or rib fracture (R 2 = 0.9552). A volume threshold of 30 cm 3 was observed before severe pain and/or rib fracture was reported. A 30% risk of developing severe CW toxicity correlated with a CW volume of 35 cm 3 receiving 30 Gy. Conclusion: The development of CW toxicity is clinically relevant, and the CW should be considered an organ at risk in treatment planning. The CW volume receiving 30 Gy in three to five fractions should be limited to 3 , if possible, to reduce the risk of toxicity without compromising tumor coverage.

  17. Lidocaine Skin Patch (Lidopat® 5%) Is Effective in the Treatment of Traumatic Rib Fractures: A Prospective Double-Blinded and Vehicle-Controlled Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yu-Jen

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the efficacy of the Lidopat(®) 5% skin patch in relieving rib fracture pain. From June 2009 to May 2011, 44 trauma patients with isolated rib fractures were enrolled in this study and randomized in a double-blind method into 2 groups. The experimental group (group E: 27 patients) used a Lidopat(®) 5% skin patch at the trauma site and took an oral analgesic drug for pain relief. The placebo group (group P: 17 patients) used a placebo vehicle patch and an oral analgesic drug. The mean age, weight and hospital stay of patients were 56.8 ± 13.8 years, 67.4 ± 12.6 kg and 6.34 ± 1.3 days, respectively. In the first 4 days, there were no significant differences in pain scores between the groups (p > 0.05). After the 5th day, the average pain score was significantly less in group E (mean 1.5) than in group P (mean 3.10; p fractured ribs between groups (p = 0.904). The use of meperidine and the length of hospital stay (6.0 vs. 6.9 days) were both significantly less in group E (p = 0.043 and 0.009, respectively). In this study, the use of the Lidopat(®) 5% skin patch in patients with isolated rib fractures alleviated pain and shortened the hospital stay, and a lower dose of pain-relieving medication was used. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  18. Comparison of the Effects on Rib Fracture between the Traditional Japanese Medicine Jidabokuippo and Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hajime Nakae

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Jidabokuippo is a traditional Japanese medicine used for contusion-induced swelling and pain. This open multicenter randomized study was designed to compare the efficacies of jidabokuippo and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs in patients with rib fracture by analyzing the treatment duration. Our study involved 170 rib fracture patients capable of oral ingestion divided randomly into 2 groups: the jidabokuippo and NSAID groups. We compared the duration of treatment and healthcare expenditure between these 2 groups. Medication was continued in both groups until the visual analogue scale score decreased to less than 50% of the pretreatment score. We excluded the patients in whom medication was prematurely discontinued. We analyzed 81 patients belonging to the jidabokuippo and NSAIDs groups. No significant intergroup differences were observed in age, gender, severity (injury severity score, and presence/absence of underlying disease. The treatment duration was significantly shorter in the jidabokuippo group than in the NSAIDs group (P=0.0003. Healthcare expenditure was significantly lower in the jidabokuippo group than in the NSAIDs group (P<0.0001. Our results suggest that compared to NSAIDs, jidabokuippo can shorten the duration of treatment in patients with rib fracture and is a promising analgesic agent based on the medical economic viewpoint.

  19. Costal cartilage fractures and disruptions in a rugby football player.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Victor; Ma, Richard; Li, Xinning; Steele, John; Allen, Answorth A

    2013-05-01

    Costal cartilage fracture of the rib cage, or costochondral, is a rare sporting injury. For contact athletes, the instability of the rib cage may lead to potential serious complications, similar to rib fractures or thorax disruption. Most authors recommend initial conservative treatment with surgery reserved for only recalcitrant cases. We report a case of an amateur American male rugby football player who sustained a costal cartilage fracture and disruption involving the anterior left fifth and sixth rib costal cartilages. The case highlights the difficulty in establishing the diagnosis based on clinical examination and standard radiographs alone. Computed tomography was used to assist in diagnosing this destabilizing injury to the rib cage. Costal cartilage fractures and disruptions in athletes are rarely reported in the literature and can have serious implications for the athlete's ability to return to play if the rib cage is destabilized.

  20. Rib fracture fixation in the 65 years and older population: A paradigm shift in management strategy at a Level I trauma center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, Michael T; Ashley, Dennis W; Abukhdeir, Hesham; Christie, D Benjamin

    2017-03-01

    Rib fractures after chest wall trauma are a common injury; however, they carry a significant morbidity and mortality risk. The impact of rib fractures in the 65-year and older patient population has been well documented as have the mortality and pneumonia rates. We hypothesize that patients 65 years and older receiving rib plating (RP) have decreased mortality, complication rates, and an accelerated return to normal functional states when compared with controls. With institutional review board approval, a retrospective review analyzed patients 65 years and older with rib fractures admitted from 2009 to 2015 receiving RP (RP group) (n = 23) compared to nonoperative, injury-matched controls admitted from 2003 to 2008 (NO group) (n = 50). Patients were followed prospectively with regard to lifestyle and functional satisfaction. Independent variables analyzed included Injury Severity Score (ISS), number of rib fractures, mortalities, hospital days, intensive care unit days, pneumonia development, respiratory complications, readmission rates, need for and length of rehabilitation stay time. Comparisons were by χ tests/Fisher's exact tests, Student's t tests and Wilcoxon rank sum tests. From 2003 to 2008, 50 NO patients were admitted with ages ranging 65 to 97 years, average ISS of 18.47 (14.28-22.66) versus ages ranging from 63 to 89 years, average ISS of 20.71 (15.7-25.73) for the RP group (n = 23). Average hospital days were 16.76 (10.35-23.18) and 18.36 (13.61-23.11) in the NO and RP groups, respectively. Average intensive care unit days were 11.65 (6.45-16.85) and 8.29 (5.31-11.26) days in the NO and RP groups, respectively. Four respiratory readmissions, two deaths, seven pneumonias, seven pleural-effusions, and 19 recurrent pneumothoraces were encountered in the NO group versus 0 in the RP group (p < 0.001). An equal percentage of patients in both groups entered rehabilitation facilities with average stay time of 18.5 and 28.53 days for the RP and NO groups

  1. Radiation induced fractures of sacrum: CT diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rafii, M.; Firooznia, H.; Golimbu, C.; Horner, N.

    1988-01-01

    Sacral insufficiency fracture due to bone atrophy may develop as a complication of irradiation of pelvic malignancies. Pain is the presenting symptom and the clinical diagnoses most often considered are recurrence of the original malignancy and metastatic disease. Computed tomography provides the most specific information helpful for the detection of these fractures and for exclusion of recurrent malignancy

  2. Continuous paravertebral infusion of ropivacaine with or without fentanyl for pain relief in unilateral multiple fractured ribs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Medha Mohta

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Continuous thoracic paravertebral block (TPVB provides effective analgesia for unilateral multiple fractured ribs (MFR. However, prolonged infusion of local anaesthetic (LA in high doses can predispose to risk of LA toxicity, which may be reduced by using safer drugs or drug combinations. This study was conducted to assess efficacy and safety of paravertebral infusion of ropivacaine and adrenaline with or without fentanyl to provide analgesia to patients with unilateral MFR. Methods: Thirty adults, having ≥3 unilateral MFR, with no significant trauma outside chest wall, were studied. All received bolus of 0.5% ropivacaine 0.3 ml/kg through paravertebral catheter, followed by either 0.1-0.2 ml/kg/hr infusion of ropivacaine 0.375% with adrenaline 5 μg/ml in group RA or ropivacaine 0.2% with adrenaline 5 μg/ml and fentanyl 2 μg/ml in group RAF. Rescue analgesia was provided by IV morphine. Results: Statistical analysis was performed using unpaired Student t-test, Chi-square test and repeated measures ANOVA. After TPVB, VAS scores, respiratory rate and PEFR improved in both groups with no significant inter-group differences. Duration of ropivacaine infusion, morphine requirements, length of ICU and hospital stay, incidence of pulmonary complications and opioid-related side-effects were similar in both groups. Ropivacaine requirement was higher in group RA than group RAF. No patient showed signs of LA toxicity. Conclusion: Continuous paravertebral infusion of ropivacaine 0.375% with adrenaline 5 μg/ml at 0.1-0.2 ml/kg/hr provided effective and safe analgesia to patients with unilateral MFR. Addition of fentanyl 2 μg/ml allowed reduction of ropivacaine concentration to 0.2% without decreasing efficacy or increasing opioid-related side-effects.

  3. Diagnosis of scaphoid fracture: optimal imaging techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geijer M

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Mats Geijer Center for Medical Imaging and Physiology, Skåne University Hospital and Lund University, Lund, Sweden Abstract: This review aims to provide an overview of modern imaging techniques for evaluation of scaphoid fracture, with emphasis on occult fractures and an outlook on the possible evolution of imaging; it also gives an overview of the pathologic and anatomic basis for selection of techniques. Displaced scaphoid fractures detected by wrist radiography, with or without special scaphoid views, pose no diagnostic problems. After wrist trauma with clinically suspected scaphoid fracture and normal scaphoid radiography, most patients will have no clinically important fracture. Between 5% and 19% of patients (on average 16% in meta-analyses will, however, have an occult scaphoid fracture which, untreated, may lead to later, potentially devastating, complications. Follow-up imaging may be done with repeat radiography, tomosynthesis, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, or bone scintigraphy. However, no method is perfect, and choice of imaging may be based on availability, cost, perceived accuracy, or personal preference. Generally, MRI and bone scintigraphy are regarded as the most sensitive modalities, but both are flawed by false positive results at various rates. Keywords: occult fracture, wrist, radiography, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, radionuclide imaging

  4. High-Risk Stress Fractures: Diagnosis and Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McInnis, Kelly C; Ramey, Lindsay N

    2016-03-01

    Stress fractures are common overuse injuries in athletes. They occur during periods of increased training without adequate rest, disrupting normal bone reparative mechanisms. There are a host of intrinsic and extrinsic factors, including biochemical and biomechanical, that put athletes at risk. In most stress fractures, the diagnosis is primarily clinical, with imaging indicated at times, and management focused on symptom-free relative rest with advancement of activity as tolerated. Overall, stress fractures in athletes have an excellent prognosis for return to sport, with little risk of complication. There is a subset of injuries that have a greater risk of fracture progression, delayed healing, and nonunion and are generally more challenging to treat with nonoperative care. Specific locations of high-risk stress fracture include the femoral neck (tension side), patella, anterior tibia, medial malleolus, talus, tarsal navicular, proximal fifth metatarsal, and great toe sesamoids. These sites share a characteristic region of high tensile load and low blood flow. High-risk stress fractures require a more aggressive approach to evaluation, with imaging often necessary, to confirm early and accurate diagnosis and initiate immediate treatment. Treatment consists of nonweight-bearing immobilization, often with a prolonged period away from sport, and a more methodic and careful reintroduction to athletic activity. These stress fractures may require surgical intervention. A high index of suspicion is essential to avoid delayed diagnosis and optimize outcomes in this subset of stress fractures. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. [Diagnosis and management of zygomaticomaxillary complex fractures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Bing; Zheng, Jia-wei; Shi, Jun

    2006-12-01

    The zygornaticomaxillarx complex (ZMC) plays an important role in maintaining the structure and function of the face. The prominent convex shape of the ZMC makes it particularly vulnerable to trauma, resulting in a tetrapod fracture involving all four buttresses. ZMC fracture usually leads to local depressed deformities, even dysfunction such as limited mouth opening and diplopia. This article lescribes the etiology, clinical features, surgical approaches and postoperative complications of ZMC fractures based on our own clinical experiences and literature review. It is believed that lateral brow incision combined with intraoral incision can provide better access to ZMC fractures and avoid the disadvantages caused by coronal incision. This surgical approach leaves minimal scar and injury to the facial nerve, with better esthetic and functional outcomes. Supported by Shanghai Leading Academic Discipline Project (Grant No. Y0203).

  6. Stress fractures: definition, diagnosis and treatment ?

    OpenAIRE

    Astur, Diego Costa; Zanatta, Fernando; Arliani, Gustavo Gon?alves; Moraes, Eduardo Ramalho; Pochini, Alberto de Castro; Ejnisman, Benno

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Stress fractures were first described in Prussian soldiers by Breithaupt in 1855. They occur as the result of repeatedly making the same movement in a specific region, which can lead to fatigue and imbalance between osteoblast and osteoclast activity, thus favoring bone breakage. In addition, when a particular region of the body is used in the wrong way, a stress fracture can occur even without the occurrence of an excessive number of functional cycles. The objective of this study wa...

  7. Indications for surgical stabilization of rib fractures in patients without flail chest: surveyed opinions of members of the Chest Wall Injury Society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pieracci, Fredric M; Agarwal, Suresh; Doben, Andrew; Shiroff, Adam; Lottenberg, Larwence; Whitbeck, Sarah Ann; White, Thomas W

    2018-02-01

    There are currently no evidence-based indications for surgical stabilization of rib fractures (SSRF) in patients without flail chest. The purpose of this survey was to identify patients for whom there is relative equipoise (operative vs. non-operative) in order to assist in designing a randomized clinical trial. Members of the Chest Wall Injury Society were sent an online survey, in which 18 patient scenarios were presented. The baseline patient had ≥ three displaced, contiguous fractures and had no other contraindications for surgery. This default scenario was then varied based upon patient age, degree of traumatic brain injury (TBI), fracture series location, and number of abnormal pulmonary physiologic variables (oxygen requirement, respiratory rate, incentive spirometry ability, cough, and numeric pain score). Thirty respondents provided a total of 540 answers. Overall, the majority of responses were in favor of SSRF (n = 413, 84.1%). Furthermore, the vast majority of responses indicated that some degree of pulmonary compromise was necessary to recommend SSRF (n = 44, 90.4%), with ≥ two abnormal parameters being the most common threshold (n = 156, 31.8%). Decision to recommend SSRF varied significantly by number of abnormal clinical variables, age, and degree of TBI, but not by fracture series location. Patients aged 85 years old and those with moderate TBI were the least likely to be recommended for SSRF, regardless of abnormal pulmonary physiologic variables. The most appropriate cutoff for equipoise appeared to be a patient aged 21-79 years old, with no or mild TBI, ≥ two abnormal pulmonary parameters, and regardless of fracture location (44.8% consensus for SSRF). SSRF was recommended for most patients with non-flail, displaced rib fractures. However, this recommendation was contingent upon patient age, degree of TBI, and pulmonary clinical status. Results of this survey may be used to inform inclusion criteria for a future randomized

  8. The Role of Minimally Invasive Plate Osteosynthesis in Rib Fixation: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bemelman, Michael; van Baal, Mark; Yuan, Jian Zhang; Leenen, Luke

    2016-01-01

    More than a century ago, the first scientific report was published about fracture fixation with plates. During the 1950’s, open reduction and plate fixation for fractures were standardized by the founders of Arbeitsgemeinschaft für osteosynthesefragen/Association for the Study of Internal Fixation. Since the introduction of plate fixation for fractures, several plates and screws have been developed, all with their own characteristics. To accomplice more fracture stability, it was thought the bigger the plate, the better. The counter side was a compromised blood supply of the bone, often resulting in bone necrosis and ultimately delayed or non-union. With the search and development of new materials and techniques for fracture fixation, less invasive procedures have become increasingly popular. This resulted in the minimally invasive plate osteosynthesis (MIPO) technique for fracture fixation. With the MIPO technique, procedures could be performed with smaller incisions and thus with less soft tissue damage and a better preserved blood supply. The last 5 years rib fixation has become increasingly popular, rising evidence has become available suggesting that surgical rib fixation improves outcome of patients with a flail chest or isolated rib fractures. Many surgical approaches for rib fixation have been described in the old literature, however, most of these techniques are obscure nowadays. Currently mostly large incisions with considerable surgical insult are used to stabilize rib fractures. We think that MIPO deserves a place in the surgical treatment of rib fractures. We present the aspects of diagnosis, preoperative planning and operative techniques in regard to MIPO rib fixation. PMID:26889439

  9. The Role of Minimally Invasive Plate Osteosynthesis in Rib Fixation: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Bemelman

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available More than a century ago, the first scientific report was published about fracture fixation with plates. During the 1950’s, open reduction and plate fixation for fractures were standardized by the founders of Arbeitsgemeinschaft für osteosynthesefragen/Association for the Study of Internal Fixation. Since the introduction of plate fixation for fractures, several plates and screws have been developed, all with their own characteristics. To accomplice more fracture stability, it was thought the bigger the plate, the better. The counter side was a compromised blood supply of the bone, often resulting in bone necrosis and ultimately delayed or non-union. With the search and development of new materials and techniques for fracture fixation, less invasive procedures have become increasingly popular. This resulted in the minimally invasive plate osteosynthesis (MIPO technique for fracture fixation. With the MIPO technique, procedures could be performed with smaller incisions and thus with less soft tissue damage and a better preserved blood supply. The last 5 years rib fixation has become increasingly popular, rising evidence has becomeavailable suggesting that surgical rib fixation improves outcome of patients with a flail chest or isolated rib fractures. Many surgical approaches for rib fixation have been described in the old literature, however, most of these techniques are obscure nowadays. Currently mostly large incisions with considerable surgical insult are used to stabilize rib fractures. We think that MIPO deserves a place in the surgical treatment of rib fractures. We present the aspects of diagnosis, preoperative planning and operative techniques in regard to MIPO rib fixation.

  10. Stress fractures: definition, diagnosis and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astur, Diego Costa; Zanatta, Fernando; Arliani, Gustavo Gonçalves; Moraes, Eduardo Ramalho; Pochini, Alberto de Castro; Ejnisman, Benno

    2016-01-01

    Stress fractures were first described in Prussian soldiers by Breithaupt in 1855. They occur as the result of repeatedly making the same movement in a specific region, which can lead to fatigue and imbalance between osteoblast and osteoclast activity, thus favoring bone breakage. In addition, when a particular region of the body is used in the wrong way, a stress fracture can occur even without the occurrence of an excessive number of functional cycles. The objective of this study was to review the most relevant literature of recent years in order to add key information regarding this pathological condition, as an updating article on this topic.

  11. Nineth Rib Syndrome after 10(th) Rib Resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hyun Jeong; Jeong, Yu Sub; Lee, Dong Hoon; Yim, Kyoung Hoon

    2016-07-01

    The 12(th) rib syndrome is a disease that causes pain between the upper abdomen and the lower chest. It is assumed that the impinging on the nerves between the ribs causes pain in the lower chest, upper abdomen, and flank. A 74-year-old female patient visited a pain clinic complaining of pain in her back, and left chest wall at a 7 on the 0-10 Numeric Rating scale (NRS). She had a lateral fixation at T12-L2, 6 years earlier. After the operation, she had multiple osteoporotic compression fractures. When the spine was bent, the patient complained about a sharp pain in the left mid-axillary line and radiating pain toward the abdomen. On physical examination, the 10(th) rib was not felt, and an image of the rib-cage confirmed that the left 10(th) rib was severed. When applying pressure from the legs to the 9(th) rib of the patient, pain was reproduced. Therefore, the patient was diagnosed with 9(th) rib syndrome, and ultrasound-guided 9(th) and 10(th) intercostal nerve blocks were performed around the tips of the severed 10(th) rib. In addition, local anesthetics with triamcinolone were administered into the muscles beneath the 9(th) rib at the point of the greatest tenderness. The patient's pain was reduced to NRS 2 point. In this case, it is suspected that the patient had a partial resection of the left 10(th) rib in the past, and subsequent compression fractures at T8 and T9 led to the deformation of the rib cage, causing the tip of the remaining 10(th) rib to impinge on the 9(th) intercostal nerves, causing pain.

  12. Anatomical variation of human thoracic rib in dry bone.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Nalini Konkani

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The Ribs are essential structure of osseous thorax and provide information that aids in the interpretation of radiologic images. The purpose of this study to investigate variations in thoracic rib and its morphological & clinical importance. So, In present study attempted to find out additional intercostal spaces due to bifurcation of ribs, less intercostal space due to fusion of ribs, variation of the normal ribs like, gap in the rib, fusion of one rib to another at a shaft of rib. Congenital abnormalities of the ribs are usually asymptomatic, often discovered incidentally on chest X-ray. Effects of this neuroskeletal anomaly can include respiratory difficulties and neurological limitations.Material & Method: The study was carried out in Bone Store of Department of Anatomy, B. J. Medical College, Ahmedabad, Gujarat. Study was carried out on 500 human dried ribs. And the variations in the ribs are studied. We got variation in the human ribs and studied. Result : Variations were seen like out of 500 ribs, Bifid rib having two ends 9(1.8%, rib having bifid space 2(0.4%, fusion rib at the level of shaft 1(0.2%, fusion of first rib and second rib 1(0.2%,first rib having two ends 1(0.2%. Conclusion: Bifid rib is an anatomical variant where the sternal end of the rib is cleaved into two. So we can rule out mesodermal abnormalities, parenchymal lung disease, chest wall tumor or costal fracture.

  13. Problems in the diagnosis of metaphyseal fractures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kleinman, Paul K.

    The radiographic projection influences the appearance of the metaphyseal fragment. If the long axis of the metaphysis and the radiographic projection are at right angles, the thicker peripheral margin of the metaphyseal fragment will be viewed end-on as a relatively discrete triangular bony fragment. A caudally or cranially angulated radiographic projection results in a curvilinear bony density that represents the dense peripheral margin of the fracture fragment that has been separated from the metaphysis. Thus, in one projection a fragment may appear as a corner fracture, and in another view, as a bucket-handle lesion. From autopsy and clinical studies it is evident that bruising overlying CMLs is often absent. (orig.)

  14. Type 4 capitellum fractures: Diagnosis and treatment strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suresh S

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Fractures of the capitellum are rare injuries of the elbow usually seen in the adolescents. This fracture is often missed in the emergency room if a proper radiograph is not available. Recent reports have described many modalities of treatment favoring headless screw for fixation. The facility for headless screw fixation, however, is not available in most centers. This paper presents the diagnosis and management of type 4 capituller fractures (Mckee with gadgets available in a district hospital. Materials and Methods: Between 2004 and 2007 three patients with right sided type IV capetullar fracture were treated in a district hospital. There were two boys aged 15 and 17 and one 33 years old lady. In one case, the fracture was missed in the emergency room. A double arc sign in the lateral views of the X-rays of the elbow was seen in all the cases. In each case a preoperative CT scan was done and a diagnosis of Mckee type IV fracture of the capitellum was made. Under tourniquet, using extended lateral approach, open reduction and internal fixation was done using 4mm partially threaded AO cancellous screws (n=2 and 2.7 mm AO screws (n=1, under vision from posterior to anterior direction from the posterior aspect of lateral condyle of humerus avoiding articular penetration. Results: All the fractures united uneventfully. At the end of one year follow-up, two cases had excellent elbow function; implants were removed and there were no signs of AVN or arthritis. The third case had good elbow ROM at 11 months without AVN. Conclusion: Double arc sign on lateral X-rays of the elbow along with pre-operative CT scan evaluation is important to avoid a missed diagnosis and analysis of type IV capitellur fracture. Fixation with non-cannulated ordinary AO screws using extended Kocher′s lateral approach has given good results.

  15. The usefulness of sagittal reformation for diagnosis of sternal fracture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Im, Dong Jin; Hahn, Seok; Kim, Young Ju [Dept. of Radiology, Wonju Severance Christian Hospital, Yonsei University Wonju College of Medicine, Wonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-01-15

    The purpose of our study was to evaluate the usefulness of sagittal reformation of chest computed tomography for the diagnosis of sternal fracture after trauma. We retrospectively reviewed medical records and chest computer tomography (CT) of 716 patients in the emergency department after trauma between January and December 2010. Two radiologists investigated chest CT images. We investigated numbers and locations of sternal fractures on axial images only and on both axial and sagittal images for each radiologist. First, radiologist found sternal fractures in 58 patients (70.7%) on only axial images, and 80 (97.5%) on both axial and sagittal images. Second, radiologist found fractures in 67 patients (81.7%) on axial image only and 81 (98.7%) on both axial and sagittal images. The sensitivity increased after adding sagittal reformation images for each radiologist (p < 0.05, respectively). On the axial images, the interobserver agreement was low (k 0.596) between the two radiologists. However, on both axial and sagittal images, the interobserver agreement increased (k = 0.872). Sagittal reformation of chest CT increases the chance of diagnosis for sternal fracture and leads to early diagnosis resulting in appropriate treatment.

  16. The usefulness of sagittal reformation for diagnosis of sternal fracture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Im, Dong Jin; Hahn, Seok; Kim, Young Ju

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of our study was to evaluate the usefulness of sagittal reformation of chest computed tomography for the diagnosis of sternal fracture after trauma. We retrospectively reviewed medical records and chest computer tomography (CT) of 716 patients in the emergency department after trauma between January and December 2010. Two radiologists investigated chest CT images. We investigated numbers and locations of sternal fractures on axial images only and on both axial and sagittal images for each radiologist. First, radiologist found sternal fractures in 58 patients (70.7%) on only axial images, and 80 (97.5%) on both axial and sagittal images. Second, radiologist found fractures in 67 patients (81.7%) on axial image only and 81 (98.7%) on both axial and sagittal images. The sensitivity increased after adding sagittal reformation images for each radiologist (p < 0.05, respectively). On the axial images, the interobserver agreement was low (k 0.596) between the two radiologists. However, on both axial and sagittal images, the interobserver agreement increased (k = 0.872). Sagittal reformation of chest CT increases the chance of diagnosis for sternal fracture and leads to early diagnosis resulting in appropriate treatment.

  17. Diagnosis and management of hook of hamate fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadar, Assaf; Bishop, Allen T; Suchyta, Marissa A; Moran, Steven L

    2018-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the time to diagnosis and management of hook of hamate fractures in an era of advanced imaging. We performed a retrospective study of 51 patients treated for hook of hamate fractures. Patients were sent a quickDASH questionnaire regarding the outcomes of their treatment. Hook of hamate fractures were diagnosed with advanced imaging at a median of 27 days. Clinical findings of hook of hamate tenderness had better sensitivity than carpal tunnel-view radiographs. Nonunion occurred in 24% of patients with non-operative treatment and did not occur in the operative group. Both treatment groups achieved good clinical results, with a grip strength of 80% compared with the non-injured hand and a median quickDASH score of 2. Advanced imaging improved the time to diagnosis and treatment compared to historical case series. Nonunion is common in patients treated non-operatively. IV.

  18. A new method of CT scanning for the diagnosis of mandibular fractures; A preliminary report: diagnosis of condyle fractures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsukagoshi, Taku; Satoh, Kaneshige; Onizuka, Takuya (Showa Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1990-08-01

    The condylar neck of the mandible is one of the most common fracture sites in the facial skeleton. Such a fracture is routinely diagnosed by A-P, lateral oblique, and Towne projection roentgenography or orthopantomography. Despite the combination of these films, fracture of the neck of the mandible is still difficult to diagnose definitely. Therefore, a new CT scanning method was developed for diagnosing fractures of the neck of the condylar mandible. The CT axis is projected along the length of the mandible, extending from the condyle to the symphysis. This projection visualizes both the condyle and the mandibular symphysis in the same plane. The patient is placed in a supine position with the head fully extended. The base line, a line extending from the midpoint of the glenoid fossa to the menton, is determined with a lateral facial cephalogram. CT scanning with a 5 mm window is performed in parallel with and 2 cm anterior to and 2 cm posterior to the base line. When CT scanning was performed in a healthy volunteer, the condition of the condyle and the condylar neck of the mandible was clearly shown, and the view extended from the condyle to the symphysis. For automobile accident patients in whom fracture of the neck of the mandible was associated with fracture of the symphysis, two fractures were found in the same plane. A newly developed CT scanning technique is useful in the diagnosis of fractures of the condylar neck of the mandible and in the identification of fractures at other mandibular sites. It also allows scanning of patients in a supine position, which may aid in managing patients with multiple traumas. (N.K.).

  19. Traumatic Rib Injury: Patterns, Imaging Pitfalls, Complications, and Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talbot, Brett S; Gange, Christopher P; Chaturvedi, Apeksha; Klionsky, Nina; Hobbs, Susan K; Chaturvedi, Abhishek

    2017-01-01

    The ribs are frequently affected by blunt or penetrating injury to the thorax. In the emergency department setting, it is vital for the interpreting radiologist to not only identify the presence of rib injuries but also alert the clinician about organ-specific injury, specific traumatic patterns, and acute rib trauma complications that require emergent attention. Rib injuries can be separated into specific morphologic fracture patterns that include stress, buckle, nondisplaced, displaced, segmental, and pathologic fractures. Specific attention is also required for flail chest and for fractures due to pediatric nonaccidental trauma. Rib fractures are associated with significant morbidity and mortality, both of which increase as the number of fractured ribs increases. Key complications associated with rib fracture include pain, hemothorax, pneumothorax, extrapleural hematoma, pulmonary contusion, pulmonary laceration, acute vascular injury, and abdominal solid-organ injury. Congenital anomalies, including supernumerary or accessory ribs, vestigial anterior ribs, bifid ribs, and synostoses, are common and should not be confused with traumatic pathologic conditions. Nontraumatic mimics of traumatic rib injury, with or without fracture, include metastatic disease, primary osseous neoplasms (osteosarcoma, chondrosarcoma, Ewing sarcoma, Langerhans cell histiocytosis, and osteochondroma), fibrous dysplasia, and Paget disease. Principles of management include supportive and procedural methods of alleviating pain, treating complications, and stabilizing posttraumatic deformity. By recognizing and accurately reporting the imaging findings, the radiologist will add value to the care of patients with thoracic trauma. Online supplemental material is available for this article. © RSNA, 2017.

  20. MRI of penile fracture: diagnosis and therapeutic follow-up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uder, Michael; Gohl, Dietrich; Takahashi, Masahide; Kramann, Bernhard; Schneider, Guenther

    2002-01-01

    A rupture of corpus cavernosum (CC) is a rare injury of the erect penis. The present study describes the role of MRI for diagnosis and follow-up of this injury. Four patients with clinically suspected acute penile fractures underwent MRI. Imaging findings were confirmed at surgery. In three patients, follow-up MRI was also available at 1, 6 and 16 weeks after surgical repair. In all patients pre-contrast T1-weighted images (T1WI) clearly disclosed ruptures of CC, which depicted as discontinuity of low signal intensity of the tunica albuginea (TA). Concomitant subcutaneous haematoma were well visualised both on T1-weighted (T1WI) and T2-weighted images, whereas haematoma in CC were optimally demonstrated on contrast-enhanced T1WI. On follow-up MRI all fractures presented similar healing process. Shortly after the repair, the tunical suture showed an increase in signal intensity on pre-contrast T1WI and was strongly enhanced with the administration of contrast material. Then the tear site gradually recovered low signal intensity on all spin-echo sequences by 4 months after surgery. These serial findings may suggest the formation of vascularised granulation tissue during cicatrisation. Magnetic resonance imaging is of great value for the diagnosis and follow-up in patients with penile fracture. (orig.)

  1. Observer agreement in pediatric semiquantitative vertebral fracture diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siminoski, Kerry; Lentle, Brian; Matzinger, Mary Ann; Shenouda, Nazih; Ward, Leanne M.

    2014-01-01

    The Genant semiquantitative (GSQ) method has been a standard procedure for diagnosis of vertebral fractures in adults but has only recently been shown to be of clinical utility in children. Observer agreement using the GSQ method in this age group has not been described. To evaluate observer agreement on vertebral readability and vertebral fracture diagnosis using the GSQ method in pediatric vertebral morphometry. Spine radiographs of 186 children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia were evaluated independently by three radiologists using the same GSQ methodology as in adults. A subset of 100 radiographs was evaluated on two occasions. An average of 4.7% of vertebrae were unreadable for the three radiologists. Intraobserver Cohen's kappa (κ) on readability ranged from 0.434 to 0.648 at the vertebral level and from 0.416 to 0.611 at the patient level, while interobserver κ for readability had a range of 0.330 to 0.504 at the vertebral level and 0.295 to 0.467 at the patient level. Intraobserver κ for the presence of vertebral fracture had a range of 0.529 to 0.726 at the vertebral level and was 0.528 to 0.767 at the patient level. Interobserver κ for fracture at the vertebral level ranged from 0.455 to 0.548 and from 0.433 to 0.486 at the patient level. Most κ values for both intra- and interobserver agreement in applying the GSQ method to pediatric spine radiographs were in the moderate to substantial range, comparable to the performance of the technique in adult studies. The GSQ method should be considered for use in pediatric research and clinical practice. (orig.)

  2. Observer agreement in pediatric semiquantitative vertebral fracture diagnosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siminoski, Kerry [University of Alberta, Department of Radiology and Diagnostic Imaging and Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Department of Medicine, Edmonton (Canada); Lentle, Brian [University of British Columbia, Department of Radiology, Vancouver (Canada); BC Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Vancouver (Canada); Matzinger, Mary Ann; Shenouda, Nazih [University of Ottawa, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Ottawa (Canada); Children' s Hospital of Eastern Ontario, Department of Medical Imaging, Ottawa (Canada); Ward, Leanne M. [University of Ottawa, Department of Pediatrics, Children' s Hospital of Eastern Ontario, Ottawa (Canada); Children' s Hospital of Eastern Ontario, Research Institute, Ottawa (Canada); Collaboration: The Canadian STOPP Consortium

    2014-04-15

    The Genant semiquantitative (GSQ) method has been a standard procedure for diagnosis of vertebral fractures in adults but has only recently been shown to be of clinical utility in children. Observer agreement using the GSQ method in this age group has not been described. To evaluate observer agreement on vertebral readability and vertebral fracture diagnosis using the GSQ method in pediatric vertebral morphometry. Spine radiographs of 186 children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia were evaluated independently by three radiologists using the same GSQ methodology as in adults. A subset of 100 radiographs was evaluated on two occasions. An average of 4.7% of vertebrae were unreadable for the three radiologists. Intraobserver Cohen's kappa (κ) on readability ranged from 0.434 to 0.648 at the vertebral level and from 0.416 to 0.611 at the patient level, while interobserver κ for readability had a range of 0.330 to 0.504 at the vertebral level and 0.295 to 0.467 at the patient level. Intraobserver κ for the presence of vertebral fracture had a range of 0.529 to 0.726 at the vertebral level and was 0.528 to 0.767 at the patient level. Interobserver κ for fracture at the vertebral level ranged from 0.455 to 0.548 and from 0.433 to 0.486 at the patient level. Most κ values for both intra- and interobserver agreement in applying the GSQ method to pediatric spine radiographs were in the moderate to substantial range, comparable to the performance of the technique in adult studies. The GSQ method should be considered for use in pediatric research and clinical practice. (orig.)

  3. Comparative evaluation of continuous intercostal nerve block or epidural analgesia on the rate of respiratory complications, intensive care unit, and hospital stay following traumatic rib fractures: a retrospective review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Britt T

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Todd Britt, Ryan Sturm, Rick Ricardi, Virginia Labond Department of Emergency Medicine, Genesys Regional Medical Center, Grand Blanc, MI, USA Background: Thoracic trauma accounts for 10%–15% of all trauma admissions. Rib fractures are the most common injury following blunt thoracic trauma. Epidural analgesia improves patient outcomes but is not without problems. The use of continuous intercostal nerve blockade (CINB may offer superior pain control with fewer side effects. This study's objective was to compare the rate of pulmonary complications when traumatic rib fractures were treated with CINB vs epidurals. Methods: A hospital trauma registry provided retrospective data from 2008 to 2013 for patients with 2 or more traumatic rib fractures. All subjects were admitted and were treated with either an epidural or a subcutaneously placed catheter for continuous intercostal nerve blockade. Our primary outcome was a composite of either pneumonia or respiratory failure. Secondary outcomes included total hospital days, total ICU days, and days on the ventilator. Results: 12.5% (N=8 of the CINB group developed pneumonia or had respiratory failure compared to 16.3% (N=7 in the epidural group. No statistical difference (P=0.58 in the incidence of pneumonia or vent dependent respiratory failure was observed. There was a significant reduction (P=0.05 in hospital days from 9.72 (SD 9.98 in the epidural compared to 6.98 (SD 4.67 in the CINB group. The rest of our secondary outcomes showed no significant difference. Conclusion: This study did not show a difference in the rate of pneumonia or ventilator-dependent respiratory failure in the CINB vs epidural groups. It was not sufficiently powered. Our data supports a reduction in hospital days when CINB is used vs epidural. CINB may have advantages over epidurals such as fewer complications, fewer contraindications, and a shorter time to placement. Further studies are needed to confirm these statements

  4. Two years of debilitating pain in a football spearing victim: slipping rib syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Laurie L; Cavanaugh, Daniel G

    2003-10-01

    Blunt chest trauma can occur in a variety of sports, and lead to rib fractures and less commonly known and diagnosed injuries. We report the case of a 14-yr-old student athlete who was speared (helmet tackled) in a practice scrimmage sustaining a painful injury that eluded diagnosis and treatment for more than 2 yr. The case history of pain treatments and radiological evaluations is presented. Ultimately, a definitive diagnosis of "slipping rib syndrome" was achieved through a simple clinical manipulation (the hooking maneuver), combined with a history of symptomatic relief provided with costochondral blockade. Surgical resection of the slipping rib provided total resolution of the problem. Very few clinicians are aware either of the syndrome or the maneuver used to diagnose this condition. Although spearing has been outlawed in American football for years, it remains a commonplace occurrence, and sports physicians should be aware of the potential consequences to the victim as well as those to the perpetrator.

  5. Nineth Rib Syndrome after 10th Rib Resection

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Hyun Jeong; Jeong, Yu Sub; Lee, Dong Hoon; Yim, Kyoung Hoon

    2016-01-01

    The 12th rib syndrome is a disease that causes pain between the upper abdomen and the lower chest. It is assumed that the impinging on the nerves between the ribs causes pain in the lower chest, upper abdomen, and flank. A 74-year-old female patient visited a pain clinic complaining of pain in her back, and left chest wall at a 7 on the 0-10 Numeric Rating scale (NRS). She had a lateral fixation at T12-L2, 6 years earlier. After the operation, she had multiple osteoporotic compression fractur...

  6. Comparative study between rib imaging of DR dual energy subtraction technology and chest imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Jianming; Lei Ziqiao; Kong Xiangchuang

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the application value of DR dual energy subtraction technology in rib lesions. Methods: 200 patients were performed with chest DR dual energy subtraction, comparing the rib imaging between DR of thorax and chest imaging using ROC analysis. Results: Among the total of 200 patients, there are 50 cases of rib calcification, 7 cases of rib destruction, 22 cases of rib fracture. The calcification, destruction and fracture were displayed respectively by ribs below diaphragm and rib markings. The analytic parameter of rib imaging of DR dual energy subtraction Az is 0.9367, while that of rib imaging of chest Az is 0.6830. Conclusion: DR dual energy subtraction technology is superior to chest imaging in the displaying of rib lesion and ribs below diaphragm. (authors)

  7. Automatic three-dimensional rib centerline extraction from CT scans for enhanced visualization and anatomical context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramakrishnan, Sowmya; Alvino, Christopher; Grady, Leo; Kiraly, Atilla

    2011-03-01

    We present a complete automatic system to extract 3D centerlines of ribs from thoracic CT scans. Our rib centerline system determines the positional information for the rib cage consisting of extracted rib centerlines, spinal canal centerline, pairing and labeling of ribs. We show an application of this output to produce an enhanced visualization of the rib cage by the method of Kiraly et al., in which the ribs are digitally unfolded along their centerlines. The centerline extraction consists of three stages: (a) pre-trace processing for rib localization, (b) rib centerline tracing, and (c) post-trace processing to merge the rib traces. Then we classify ribs from non-ribs and determine anatomical rib labeling. Our novel centerline tracing technique uses the Random Walker algorithm to segment the structural boundary of the rib in successive 2D cross sections orthogonal to the longitudinal direction of the ribs. Then the rib centerline is progressively traced along the rib using a 3D Kalman filter. The rib centerline extraction framework was evaluated on 149 CT datasets with varying slice spacing, dose, and under a variety of reconstruction kernels. The results of the evaluation are presented. The extraction takes approximately 20 seconds on a modern radiology workstation and performs robustly even in the presence of partial volume effects or rib pathologies such as bone metastases or fractures, making the system suitable for assisting clinicians in expediting routine rib reading for oncology and trauma applications.

  8. Training Improves Interobserver Reliability for the Diagnosis of Scaphoid Fracture Displacement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buijze, Geert A.; Guitton, Thierry G.; van Dijk, C. Niek; Ring, David; Osterman, A. Lee; Wahegaonkar, Abhijeet L.; Ladd, Amy; Barquet, Antonio; van Vugt, Arie B.; Shyam, Ashok K.; Swigart, Carrie; Coles, Chad P.; Zalavras, Charalampos; Goldfarb, Charles A.; Cassidy, Charles; Allan, Christopher; Beingessner, Daphne; Kalainov, David M.; Eygendaal, Denise; Sancheti, Parag; Feibel, Robert J.; Rocha, Steve; Grosso, Elena; Frihagen, Frede; Dyer, George S. M.; Athwal, George S.; Goslings, J. Carel; Della Rocca, Gregory J.; Harris, Ian; Fanuele, Jason C.; Lawton, Jeff; Jiuliano, John; McAuliffe, John; Capo, John T.; Conflitti, Joseph M.; Segalman, Keith; Egol, Kenneth; Ponsen, Kornelis J.; Jeray, Kyle; Lattanza, Lisa; Catalano, Louis; Swiontkowski, Marc; Boyer, Martin; Richardson, Martin; Soong, Maximillian; Baskies, Michael; Prayson, Michael; McKee, Michael; Chen, Neal C.; Kloen, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The diagnosis of displacement in scaphoid fractures is notorious for poor interobserver reliability. We tested whether training can improve interobserver reliability and sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy for the diagnosis of scaphoid fracture displacement on radiographs and CT scans. Sixty-four

  9. Multiple growing fractures and cerebral venous anomaly after penetrating injuries: delayed diagnosis in a battered child

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makkat, S.; Vandevenne, J.E.; Parizel, P.M.; Schepper, A.M. de

    2001-01-01

    A growing fracture usually results from a skull fracture with dural tear after blunt head trauma during infancy. We present a case of child abuse with multiple growing fractures resulting from penetrating head trauma by scissors. MR imaging confirmed the presence of growing fractures and revealed a presumably post-traumatic venous anomaly (occluded left cavernous sinus and aberrant posterior venous drainage via the internal cerebral veins). Diagnosis of the growing fractures and venous anomaly was delayed until the age of 15 years. Medical expertise should be more readily available to battered children, and MR imaging is advocated in growing skull fracture to exclude associated post-traumatic brain lesions. (orig.)

  10. Multiple growing fractures and cerebral venous anomaly after penetrating injuries: delayed diagnosis in a battered child

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makkat, S.; Vandevenne, J.E.; Parizel, P.M.; Schepper, A.M. de [Dept. of Radiology, Universitair Ziekenhuis Antwerpen, Edegem (Belgium)

    2001-05-01

    A growing fracture usually results from a skull fracture with dural tear after blunt head trauma during infancy. We present a case of child abuse with multiple growing fractures resulting from penetrating head trauma by scissors. MR imaging confirmed the presence of growing fractures and revealed a presumably post-traumatic venous anomaly (occluded left cavernous sinus and aberrant posterior venous drainage via the internal cerebral veins). Diagnosis of the growing fractures and venous anomaly was delayed until the age of 15 years. Medical expertise should be more readily available to battered children, and MR imaging is advocated in growing skull fracture to exclude associated post-traumatic brain lesions. (orig.)

  11. Diagnosis of alveolar and root fractures: an in vitro study comparing CBCT imaging with periapical radiographs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solange KOBAYASHI-VELASCO

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective To compare periapical radiograph (PR and cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT in the diagnosis of alveolar and root fractures. Material and Methods Sixty incisor teeth (20 higid and 40 with root fracture from dogs were inserted in 60 anterior alveolar sockets (40 higid and 20 with alveolar fracture of 15 macerated canine maxillae. Each fractured socket had a root fractured tooth inserted in it. Afterwards, each maxilla was submitted to PR in two different vertical angulation incidences, and to CBCT imaging with a small field of view (FOV and high-definition protocol. Images were randomized and posteriorly analyzed by two oral and maxillofacial radiologists two times, with a two-week interval between observations. Results Sensitivity and specificity values were good for root fractures for PR and CBCT. For alveolar fractures, sensitivity ranged from 0.10 to 0.90 for PR and from 0.50 to 0.65 for CBCT. Specificity for alveolar fractures showed lower results than for root fractures for PR and CBCT. Areas under the ROC curve showed good results for both PR and CBCT for root fractures. However, results were fair for both PR and CBCT for alveolar fractures. When submitted to repeated measures ANOVA tests, there was a statistically significant difference between PR and CBCT for root fractures. Root fracture intraobserver agreement ranged from 0.90 to 0.93, and alveolar fracture intraobserver agreement ranged from 0.30 to 0.57. Interobserver agreement results were substantial for root fractures and poor/fair for alveolar fractures (0.11 for PR and 0.30 for CBCT. Conclusion Periapical radiograph with two different vertical angulations may be considered an accurate method to detect root fractures. However, PR showed poorer results than CBCT for the diagnosis of alveolar fractures. When no fractures are diagnosed in PR and the patient describes pain symptoms, the subsequent exam of choice is CBCT.

  12. Computed tomography in the diagnosis of fractures of the maxillofacial area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angelova, I.; Yordanov, G.; Sirakov, V.; Velkova, K.

    2013-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is the current method of study in maxillofacial region, which produces cross-sectional images of a specific area. There are still questions about methodology and radiation exposure. The aim of the present study is to evaluate the CT in diagnosis of fractures in maxillofacial region. 42 patients with traumatic injuries to the facial skeleton are examined. Fractures of maxilla are occurring in 14.6 % of patients with traumatic diseases. Fractures of maxilla and zygomatic bone are found in 29.3 percent of the traumatic event. Isolated nasal bone fracture is observed in 2.4% of ail fractures. Compound fractures constitute 17.1% of the tested fractures. This group of patients are positioned at second place in frequency. Mandibular fractures ranked first in frequency -36.6% of all traumatic lesions. The methods include: 1. Slice computed tomography in the axial and coronary projection 2. Spiral CT in axial projection and coronary one. 3. Cone Beam Computed Tomography. CT diagnosis is based on an analysis of all the images. It must comply with the data from other studies. When analyzing the results we found that the percentage of patients with primary diagnosis of fractured upper jaw is 11 %, while CT diagnosis of this percentage increases to 16%. The percentage of patients with primary diagnosis fracture of mandibula and CT diagnosis is almost identical. In the present study, 3D and CT have similar results in the detection of fractures. Three-dimensional images dearly show the spatial anatomy of the face, the presence of fragments, as well as monitoring of fracture lines. Key words; Fractures. Maxillofacial Area. CT

  13. Evaluation of the Rib Lesions by Bone Scanning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Hyung Gun; Lee, Dong Soo; Lee, Myung Chul; Cho, Bo Youn; Koh, Chang Soon

    1983-01-01

    In order to establish criteria for distinguishing between occult fracture and metastases, we have reviewed 52 records of cancer patients and 24 of rib fracture patients referred for bone scanning. In 52 patients with biopsy-proven malignancy, multiple linear increased uptake of the ribs was found in 32 cases(61.5%), and was the most common finding. In 24 patients with rib fracture, all but 1 had fecal increased uptake of the ribs, and lesions almost always aligned in a row. By analyzing the appearance of rib lesions in total 76 patients, it was concluded that there is a high probability that rib lesions detected by bone scanning are bony metastases if 1) they are multiple linear as opposed to fecal, and 2) they are not aligned in the same location

  14. A missed injury leading to delayed diagnosis and postoperative infection of an unstable thoracic spine fracture - case report of a potentially preventable complication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stahel Philip F

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patients suffering from polytrauma often present with altered mental status and have varying levels of examinability. This makes evaluation difficult. Physicians are often required to rely on advanced imaging techniques to make prompt and accurate diagnoses. Occasionally, injury detection on advanced imaging studies can be challenging given the subtle findings associated with certain conditions, such as diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH. Delayed or missed diagnoses in the setting of spinal fracture can lead to catastrophic neurological injury. Case presentation A man struck by a motor vehicle suffered multiple traumatic injuries including numerous rib fractures, a mechanically unstable pelvic fracture, and also had suspicion for an aortic injury. Unfortunately, the upper thoracic segment (T1-5 was only visualized with axial images based on the electronic data. Several days later, a contrast CT scan obtained to check the status of suspected aortic injury revealed T3-T4 subluxation indicative of an unstable extension-type fracture in the setting of DISH. Due to the missed injury and delay in diagnosis, surgery was not performed until eight days after the injury. At surgery, the patient was found to have left T3-T4 facet joint infection as well as infected hematoma surrounding a left T4 transverse process fracture and a traumatic T4 costo-transverse joint fracture-subluxation. Despite presence of infection, an instrumented posterior spinal fusion from T1-T6 was performed and the patient recovered well after antibiotic treatment. Conclusion A T3-T4 unstable DISH extension-type fracture was initially missed in a polytrauma patient due to inadequate imaging acquisition, which caused a delay in treatment and bacterial seeding of fracture hematoma. Complete imaging is especially needed in obtunded patients that cannot be thoroughly examined.

  15. Tomosynthesis: A new radiologic technique for rapid diagnosis of scaphoid fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Compton, N; Murphy, L; Lyons, F; Jones, J; MacMahon, P; Cashman, J

    2016-12-21

    Scaphoid fractures constitute 71% of all carpal bone fractures. 1 Early diagnosis and treatment has significant bearing on fracture union rates and better clinical outcomes. While displaced fractures can be readily seen on plain radiograph, undisplaced fractures can require advanced imaging modalities to confirm that diagnosis. Advanced imaging such as Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), Computerised tomography (CT) and bone scintigraphy are routinely used for the diagnosis of scaphoid fractures but require significant radiation exposure, increased cost and can be difficult to access. 2 Tomosynthesis is an emerging imaging modality which uses conventional x-ray systems to produce cross-sectional images. There has yet to be extensive research carried out investigating the diagnostic value of tomosynthesis in scaphoid fractures. The aim of this study is to optimise patient positioning for the diagnosis of scaphoid fractures in a cadaveric model and compare the diagnostic yield of tomography to conventional CT. Using four cadaveric specimens, three limb positions were examined in unfractured and fractured scaphoids to determine the optimal limb positions required for visualisation of the scaphoid. As a result of this study, the optimal position for visualisation of the scaphoid and diagnosis of scaphoid fractures has been determined. The results demonstrate that tomosynthesis is as effective as CT scanning in identifying scaphoid fractures in both sensitivity and specificity. By comparison to CT, tomosynthesis is cheaper, has lower radiation exposure, requires fewer hospital resources and can be performed quickly. Tomosynthesis is a valid diagnostic tool for the diagnosis of scaphoid fractures. Copyright © 2016 Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh (Scottish charity number SC005317) and Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Scintigraphic diagnosis of spiral fracture in young children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hossein-Foucher, C.; Venel, H.; Legouffe, P.; Ythier, H.; Legghe, R.; Marchandise, X.

    1988-01-01

    The authors report 8 cases of unsuspected bone fracture in children, identified at bone scan. Common features were the children's young age (1 to 3 years), the absence of clinical suspicion, the initially normal X-rays, the fracture type (sprial fracture of the tibia undisplaced), and the uniform of appearance the bone scan. These data confirm the value of the bone scan in limping children and suggest that spiral fracture of the tibia is a frequent and underdiagnosed condition in children [fr

  17. Scintigraphic diagnosis of spiral fracture in young children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hossein-Foucher, C.; Venel, H.; Lecouffe, P.; Ythier, H.; Legghe, R.; Marchandise, X.

    1988-01-01

    8 cases of unsuspected bone fracture in children, identified at bone scan are reported. Common features were the children's young age (1 to 3 years), the absence of clinical suspicion, the initially normal X-rays, the fracture type (spiral fracture of the tibia undisplaced), and the uniform appearance of the bone scan. These data confim the value of bone scan in limping children and suggest that spiral fracture of the tibia is a frequent and underdiagnosed condition in children [fr

  18. Three-dimensional reconstruction used in the diagnosis and treatment of depressed fracture of skull

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Liang; Luo Zhikun; Lin Xiaohui; Liu Shuyi; Chen Xu; Liu Chenghui

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate three-dimensional reconstruction used in the diagnosis and management of depressed fracture of skull. Methods: The images of CT scan and three-dimensional reconstruction in 23 patients with depressed fracture of skull were studied. The clinical treatment was guided by the images. Results: The fracture site and depth in all 23 cases were well demonstrated in the imaging of three-dimensional reconstruction, which successfully guided the clinical management in every case. Conclusion: Three-dimensional reconstruction is a valuable modality for the diagnosis and management of depressed fracture of skull. (authors)

  19. Comparative evaluation of continuous intercostal nerve block or epidural analgesia on the rate of respiratory complications, intensive care unit, and hospital stay following traumatic rib fractures: a retrospective review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britt, Todd; Sturm, Ryan; Ricardi, Rick; Labond, Virginia

    2015-01-01

    Thoracic trauma accounts for 10%-15% of all trauma admissions. Rib fractures are the most common injury following blunt thoracic trauma. Epidural analgesia improves patient outcomes but is not without problems. The use of continuous intercostal nerve blockade (CINB) may offer superior pain control with fewer side effects. This study's objective was to compare the rate of pulmonary complications when traumatic rib fractures were treated with CINB vs epidurals. A hospital trauma registry provided retrospective data from 2008 to 2013 for patients with 2 or more traumatic rib fractures. All subjects were admitted and were treated with either an epidural or a subcutaneously placed catheter for continuous intercostal nerve blockade. Our primary outcome was a composite of either pneumonia or respiratory failure. Secondary outcomes included total hospital days, total ICU days, and days on the ventilator. 12.5% (N=8) of the CINB group developed pneumonia or had respiratory failure compared to 16.3% (N=7) in the epidural group. No statistical difference (P=0.58) in the incidence of pneumonia or vent dependent respiratory failure was observed. There was a significant reduction (P=0.05) in hospital days from 9.72 (SD 9.98) in the epidural compared to 6.98 (SD 4.67) in the CINB group. The rest of our secondary outcomes showed no significant difference. This study did not show a difference in the rate of pneumonia or ventilator-dependent respiratory failure in the CINB vs epidural groups. It was not sufficiently powered. Our data supports a reduction in hospital days when CINB is used vs epidural. CINB may have advantages over epidurals such as fewer complications, fewer contraindications, and a shorter time to placement. Further studies are needed to confirm these statements.

  20. Cone-beam CT in diagnosis of scaphoid fractures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edlund, Rolf; Lapidus, Gunilla; Baecklund, Jenny [Capio St Goeran' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Stockholm (Sweden); Skorpil, Mikael [Karolinska University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Stockholm (Sweden); Karolinska Institutet, Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2016-02-15

    This prospective study investigated the sensitivity of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT), a low dose technique recently made available for extremity examinations, in detecting scaphoid fractures. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used as gold standard for scaphoid fractures. A total of 95 patients with a clinically suspected scaphoid fracture were examined with radiography and CBCT in the acute setting. A negative CBCT exam was followed by an MRI within 2 weeks. When a scaphoid fracture was detected on MRI a new CBCT was performed. Radiography depicted seven scaphoid fractures, all of which were also seen with CBCT. CBCT detected another four scaphoid fractures. With MRI another five scaphoid fractures were identified that were not seen with radiography or with CBCT. These were also not visible on the reexamination CBCT. Sensitivity for radiography was 44, 95 % confidence interval 21-69 %, and for CBCT 69 %, 95 % confidence interval 41-88 % (p = 0.12). Several non-scaphoid fractures in the carpal region were identified, radiography and CBCT depicted 7 and 34, respectively (p < 0.0001). CBCT is a superior alternative to radiography, entailing more accurate diagnoses of carpal region fractures, and thereby requiring fewer follow-up MRI examinations. However, CBCT cannot be used to exclude scaphoid fractures, since MRI identified additional occult scaphoid fractures. (orig.)

  1. Diagnosis of occipital condyle fractures; Diagnostik von Frakturen der Okzipitalkondylen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hefele-Roedel, B. [Radiologische Klinik Innenstadt, Univ. Muenchen (Germany); Vogl, T.J. [Radiologische Klinik Innenstadt, Univ. Muenchen (Germany); Lochbuehler, H. [Dr. v. Haunersches Kinderspital, Kinderchirurgische Klinik, Univ. Muenchen (Germany); Lissner, J. [Radiologische Klinik Innenstadt, Univ. Muenchen (Germany)

    1995-01-01

    Following the conventional X-ray diagnosis of the skull and upper cervical spine, CT proved to be the primary diagnostic method after a skull and brain injury: For all 4 cases we succeeded in detecting the occipital condyle fracture and in determing its size and location by reconstructions (coronal, sagittal, 3-D). In the case of complex occompanying injuries like soft tissue hematomas (cerebral, in the spinal cord, and the soft tissue of the neck) or for the detection of brain stem contusion, MRT had significant advantages. MRT can offer a higher image quality in soft tissue, especially in the spinal cord and the brain. (orig.) [Deutsch] Im Anschluss an die konventionelle Roentgendiagnostik des Schaedels und der Halswirbelsaeule, erwies sich die Computertomographie als primaer einzusetzendes diagnostisches Verfahren, nach erlittenem Schaedel-Hirn-Trauma. In allen Faellen gelang der exakte Frakturnachweis an den Okzipitalkondylen, die Bestimmung des Frakturausmasses und die genaue Frakturlokalisation in Rekonstruktionen (koronar, sagittal, 3-D). Bei komplexen Begleitverletzungen, wie Blutungen (zerebral, spinal und in den Halsweichteilen) oder zum Nachweis einer Hirnstammkontusion, erwies sich der Einsatz der MRT als vorteilhaft. Mit der MRT laesst sich ein deutlich hoeherer Weichteilkontrast, insbesondere spinal und zerebral, erzielen. (orig.)

  2. Diagnosis of vertebral fractures on lateral chest X-ray: Intraobserver agreement of semi-quantitative vertebral fracture assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jagt-Willems, H.C. van der; Munster, B.C. van; Leeflang, M.; Beuerle, E.; Tulner, C.R.; Lems, W.F.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • (Lateral) chest X-ray's are often performed in older individuals for various reasons. • Vertebral fractures are visualized on lateral chest X-ray, but the diagnosis of vertebral fractures is until now only validated on (lateral) spine X-ray's. • This study shows that a (lateral) chest X-ray is sufficient for the diagnosis of vertebral fractures. • Older individuals with a vertebral fracture on a (lateral) chest X-ray do not need further radiography with thoracic spine X-ray or vertebral fracture assessment with DXA. - Abstract: Background: In clinical practice lateral images of the chest are performed for various reasons. As these lateral chest X rays show the vertebrae of the thoracic and thoraco-lumbar region, we wondered if these X-rays can be used for evaluation of vertebral fractures instead of separate thoracic spine X-rays. Methods: To evaluate the agreement and intraobserver reliability of the semi-quantitative method for vertebral fractures on the lateral chest X-ray (X-chest) in comparison to the lateral thoracic spine X-ray (X-Tspine), two observers scored vertebral fractures on X-Tspine and twice on X-chest, separately, blinded and in different time periods. Agreement and Cohens’ kappa were calculated for a diagnosis of any fracture on patient level and on vertebral body level. The study was done in patients visiting an outpatient geriatric day clinic, with a high prevalence of vertebral fractures. Results: 109 patients were included. The intraobserver agreement for X-chest versus X-Tspine was 95–98% for the two levels of fracturing, with a Cohen's kappa of 0.88–0.91. The intraobserver agreement and reliability of the re-test on the X-chest showed an agreement between 91 and 98% with a Cohen's kappa of 0.81–0.93. More vertebrae were visible on the X-chest, mean 10.2, SD 0.66 versus mean 9.8, SD 0.73 on the X-Tspine (p < 0.001). Conclusion: The results show good agreement and intraobserver reliability on

  3. Diagnosis of vertebral fractures on lateral chest X-ray: Intraobserver agreement of semi-quantitative vertebral fracture assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jagt-Willems, H.C. van der, E-mail: Hvanderjagt@spaarneziekenhuis.nl [Department of Geriatrics, Slotervaart Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Department of Internal Medicine, Spaarne Hospital, Hoofddorp (Netherlands); Munster, B.C. van [Department of Internal Medicine, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Department of Geriatrics, Gelre Hospitals, Apeldoorn (Netherlands); Leeflang, M. [Department of Geriatrics, Gelre Hospitals, Apeldoorn (Netherlands); Beuerle, E. [Department of Radiology, Slotervaart Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Tulner, C.R. [Department of Geriatrics, Slotervaart Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Lems, W.F. [Department of Rheumatology, VU Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • (Lateral) chest X-ray's are often performed in older individuals for various reasons. • Vertebral fractures are visualized on lateral chest X-ray, but the diagnosis of vertebral fractures is until now only validated on (lateral) spine X-ray's. • This study shows that a (lateral) chest X-ray is sufficient for the diagnosis of vertebral fractures. • Older individuals with a vertebral fracture on a (lateral) chest X-ray do not need further radiography with thoracic spine X-ray or vertebral fracture assessment with DXA. - Abstract: Background: In clinical practice lateral images of the chest are performed for various reasons. As these lateral chest X rays show the vertebrae of the thoracic and thoraco-lumbar region, we wondered if these X-rays can be used for evaluation of vertebral fractures instead of separate thoracic spine X-rays. Methods: To evaluate the agreement and intraobserver reliability of the semi-quantitative method for vertebral fractures on the lateral chest X-ray (X-chest) in comparison to the lateral thoracic spine X-ray (X-Tspine), two observers scored vertebral fractures on X-Tspine and twice on X-chest, separately, blinded and in different time periods. Agreement and Cohens’ kappa were calculated for a diagnosis of any fracture on patient level and on vertebral body level. The study was done in patients visiting an outpatient geriatric day clinic, with a high prevalence of vertebral fractures. Results: 109 patients were included. The intraobserver agreement for X-chest versus X-Tspine was 95–98% for the two levels of fracturing, with a Cohen's kappa of 0.88–0.91. The intraobserver agreement and reliability of the re-test on the X-chest showed an agreement between 91 and 98% with a Cohen's kappa of 0.81–0.93. More vertebrae were visible on the X-chest, mean 10.2, SD 0.66 versus mean 9.8, SD 0.73 on the X-Tspine (p < 0.001). Conclusion: The results show good agreement and intraobserver reliability on

  4. A mechanical chest compressor closed-loop controller with an effective trade-off between blood flow improvement and ribs fracture reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guang; Wu, Taihu; Song, Zhenxing; Wang, Haitao; Lu, Hengzhi; Wang, Yalin; Wang, Dan; Chen, Feng

    2015-06-01

    Chest compression (CC) is a significant emergency medical procedure for maintaining circulation during cardiac arrest. Although CC produces the necessary blood flow for patients with heart arrest, improperly deep CC will contribute significantly to the risk of chest injury. In this paper, an optimal CC closed-loop controller for a mechanical chest compressor (OCC-MCC) was developed to provide an effective trade-off between the benefit of improved blood perfusion and the risk of ribs fracture. The trade-off performance of the OCC-MCC during real automatic mechanical CCs was evaluated by comparing the OCC-MCC and the traditional mechanical CC method (TMCM) with a human circulation hardware model based on hardware simulations. A benefit factor (BF), risk factor (RF) and benefit versus risk index (BRI) were introduced in this paper for the comprehensive evaluation of risk and benefit. The OCC-MCC was developed using the LabVIEW control platform and the mechanical chest compressor (MCC) controller. PID control is also employed by MCC for effective compression depth regulation. In addition, the physiological parameters model for MCC was built based on a digital signal processor for hardware simulations. A comparison between the OCC-MCC and TMCM was then performed based on the simulation test platform which is composed of the MCC, LabVIEW control platform, physiological parameters model for MCC and the manikin. Compared with the TMCM, the OCC-MCC obtained a better trade-off and a higher BRI in seven out of a total of nine cases. With a higher mean value of cardiac output (1.35 L/min) and partial pressure of end-tidal CO2 (15.7 mmHg), the OCC-MCC obtained a larger blood flow and higher BF than TMCM (5.19 vs. 3.41) in six out of a total of nine cases. Although it is relatively difficult to maintain a stable CC depth when the chest is stiff, the OCC-MCC is still superior to the TMCM for performing safe and effective CC during CPR. The OCC-MCC is superior to the TMCM in

  5. Diagnosis, treatment, and rehabilitation of stress fractures in the lower extremity in runners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahanov, Leamor; Eberman, Lindsey E; Games, Kenneth E; Wasik, Mitch

    2015-01-01

    Stress fractures account for between 1% and 20% of athletic injuries, with 80% of stress fractures in the lower extremity. Stress fractures of the lower extremity are common injuries among individuals who participate in endurance, high load-bearing activities such as running, military and aerobic exercise and therefore require practitioner expertise in diagnosis and management. Accurate diagnosis for stress fractures is dependent on the anatomical area. Anatomical regions such as the pelvis, sacrum, and metatarsals offer challenges due to difficulty differentiating pathologies with common symptoms. Special tests and treatment regimes, however, are similar among most stress fractures with resolution between 4 weeks to a year. The most difficult aspect of stress fracture treatment entails mitigating internal and external risk factors. Practitioners should address ongoing risk factors to minimize recurrence. PMID:25848327

  6. Comparison of CT and MRI for Diagnosis of Suspected Scaphoid Fractures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mallee, Wouter; Doornberg, Job N.; Ring, David; van Dijk, C. Niek; Maas, Mario; Goslings, J. Carel

    2011-01-01

    Background: There is no consensus on the optimum imaging method to use to confirm the diagnosis of true scaphoid fractures among patients with suspected scaphoid fractures. This study tested the null hypothesis that computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have the same

  7. Radiographic diagnosis of scapholunate dissociation among intra-articular fractures of the distal radius: interobserver reliability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gradl, Gertraud; Neuhaus, Valentin; Fuchsberger, Thomas; Guitton, Thierry G.; Prommersberger, Karl-Josef; Ring, David; Wahegaonkar, Abhijeet L.; Shafritz, Adam B.; Garcia, Aida E.; Caputo, Andrew E.; Terrono, Andrew L.; Spoor, Andy B.; Eschler, Anica; Vochteloo, Anne J. H.; Beumer, Annechien; Barquet, Antonio; Kristan, Anze; van der Zwan, Arnard L.; Berner, Arne; Ilyas, Asif; Jubel, Axel; Sutker, Ben; Nolan, Betsy M.; Petrisor, Brad; Cross, Brian J.; Wills, Brian P. D.; Barreto, Camilo J. R.; Fernandes, Carlos H.; Swigart, Carrie; Zalavras, Charalampos; Goldfarb, Charles A.; Cassidy, Charles; Eaton, Charles; Wilson, Chris; Cheng, Christine J.; Wall, Christopher J.; Walsh, Christopher J.; Jones, Christopher M.; Garnavos, Christos; Klostermann, Cyrus; Kirkpatrick, D. Kay; Eygendaal, Denise; Verbeek, Diederik O. F.; Beeres, Frank J. P.; Thomas, George; Ponsen, Kornelis J.; van den Bekerom, Michel P. J.; Schep, Niels; Kloen, Peter; Haverlag, Robert

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the reliability and accuracy of diagnosis of scapholunate dissociation (SLD) among AO type C (compression articular) fractures of the distal radius. A total of 217 surgeons evaluated 21 sets of radiographs with type C fractures of the distal radius for which the status of the

  8. The Contribution of SPECT/CT in the Diagnosis of Stress Fracture of the Proximal Tibia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okudan, Berna; Coşkun, Nazım; Arıcan, Pelin

    2018-02-01

    Stress fractures are injuries most commonly seen in the lower limbs and are usually caused by repetitive stress. While the distal and middle third of the tibia is the most frequent site for stress fractures (almost 50%), stress fractures of the proximal tibia is relatively rare and could be confused with other types of tibial fractures, thus altering management plans for the clinician. Early diagnosis of stress fractures is also important to avoid complications. Imaging plays an important role in the diagnosis of stress fractures, especially bone scan. Combined with single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT) it is an important imaging technique for stress fractures in both upper and lower extremities, and is widely preferred over other imaging techniques. In this case, we present the case of a 39-year-old male patient diagnosed with stress fracture of the proximal tibia and demonstrate the contribution of CT scan fused with SPECT imaging in the early diagnosis of stress fracture prior to other imaging modalities.

  9. The Contribution of SPECT/CT in the Diagnosis of Stress Fracture of the Proximal Tibia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berna Okudan

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Stress fractures are injuries most commonly seen in the lower limbs and are usually caused by repetitive stress. While the distal and middle third of the tibia is the most frequent site for stress fractures (almost 50%, stress fractures of the proximal tibia is relatively rare and could be confused with other types of tibial fractures, thus altering management plans for the clinician. Early diagnosis of stress fractures is also important to avoid complications. Imaging plays an important role in the diagnosis of stress fractures, especially bone scan. Combined with single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT it is an important imaging technique for stress fractures in both upper and lower extremities, and is widely preferred over other imaging techniques. In this case, we present the case of a 39-year-old male patient diagnosed with stress fracture of the proximal tibia and demonstrate the contribution of CT scan fused with SPECT imaging in the early diagnosis of stress fracture prior to other imaging modalities.

  10. Core curriculum illustration: rib fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunham, Gregor M; Perez-Girbes, Alexandre; Linnau, Ken F

    2017-06-01

    This is the 24th installment of a series that will highlight one case per publication issue from the bank of cases available online as part of the American Society of Emergency Radiology (ASER) educational resources. Our goal is to generate more interest in and use of our online materials. To view more cases online, please visit the ASER Core Curriculum and Recommendations for Study online at http://www.aseronline.org/curriculum/toc.htm .

  11. Cause analysis of missing diagnosis for vertebral fracture on lateral chest radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Wei; Yao Jinpeng; Lin Qiang; Mu Wenbin

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the cause of missing diagnosis for vertebral fracture on lateral chest radiography. Methods: Lateral chest radiographies of 1638 hospitalized patients (871 males and 767 females) were retrospectively reviewed for identifying vertebral fractures. Their ages ranged from 50 to 91 years with the mean of 63.5 years. Complains and application for chest radiography in all patients were not related to osteoporosis and vertebral fracture. Vertebral fracture and fracture severity were evaluated using Genant's semiquantitative visual method, taking approximately a 20%-25% vertebral height reduction as mild grade, 26%--40% as moderate grade and 41% or greater as severe grade. Evaluation results of the vertebral fracture, original X-ray reports, as well as medical records were compared for further analysis. Results: Eighty-four in 1638 patients showed vertebral fractures on the lateral chest radiographies. Of them, vertebral fractures were reported in 30 cases and 54 patients were not reported on their original X-ray reports. There were 63 vertebral fractures in 54 un-reported patients, most of which were single fracture (75% or 47/63). Grade I fracture accounted for 54% (34/63), Grade II fracture 33% (21/63), while 13% presented grade III fracture (8/63). In all 84 patients with vertebral fractures, only 5 cases (6%) underwent dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) measurement, 5 cases (6%) were recorded to have vertebral fractures on the medical papers, as well as 15 cases (18%) were prescribed drugs related to the osteoporosis when discharged from hospital. All drugs prescribed for the 15 patients were limited only to calcium. Conclusions: More attention should be paid to osteoporosis by doctors including radiologists. Vertebral fracture on lateral chest radiography should be completely diagnosed, which is helpful for both prevention and treatment. (authors)

  12. Radionuclide scintimetry for diagnosis of complications following femoral neck fracture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alberts, K.A.; Dahlborn, M.; Hindmarsh, J.; Soederborg, B.; Ringertz, H.

    1984-01-01

    A scintimetric study using Tc-99m MDP was made of 54 patients with delayed union, nonunion, or late segmental collapse of the femoral head, 4-92 months after femoral neck fracture. In radiographically verified collapse, the radionuclide uptake ratio between the femoral head on the fractured and on the intact side (HHR) was significantly higher than in fractures resulting in delayed union or nonunion. On the basis of scintimetric and radiographic findings, the patients with healing disturbances could be divided into three groups, characterized by the following features: (1) Satisfactory post-reduction position of the fracture without subsequent redisplacement and a high HHR, which as a rule turned out to be delayed union; (2) The same radiographic pattern but with a lower HHR, which in most cases resulted in nonunion; (3) Inadequate reduction or early redisplacement of the fracture with a high HHR, which resulted in nonunion. The fractional precision in discriminating between different types of disturbed fracture healing by means of skeletal scintimetry was 0.86 in this study. This non-invasive and technically simple method would therefore be a valuable complement to radiography in the assessment of healing, more than 4 months after fracture of the femoral neck. (author)

  13. For early diagnosis of the fracture healing, nonunion and avascular necorsis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Y. C.; Lee, S. H.; Lee, Y. C.; Whang, I. S.; Kim, H. S.

    1981-01-01

    Complications of non-union and avascular necrosis during fracture healing process are the most important problems. Early detection of the evidence of non-union and avascular necrosis and follow-up study of fracture healing process will reduce complications and sequellae in fracture patients. Femoral neck and tibial shaft are the most important fracture sites where non-union and/or avascular necorsis are frequently developed. Osteomedullography was performed in 30 cases of fracture, 21 femoral neck, 8 tibial shafts and 1 talar neck, in the Department of Radiology of national Medical Center during the period form August 1977 to March 1981. The following results were obtained: 1. 16 patients of femoral neck fracture were performed osteomedullography one. Non-union showing no crossing vein through the fracture site was noted in 12 cases from 16 patients. 4 cases from the 12 patients of non-union showed decreased viability but 2 case revealed good viability of the femoral head. 1 case from 4 case of good union of fracture showed no evidence of viability of the femoral head. 2. More than twice of osteomedullography were performed in 5 cases of femoral neck fracture, and crossing vein was not appeared in 4 cases at 3 weeks after fracture. 3 cases showed crossing veins at 6 weeks, and 1 case revealed evidence of avascular necrosis of the femoral head at 9 weeks. 3. In 8 cases of tibial shaft fracture, 4 cases were non-union. Another 4 cases revealed intraosseous veins crossing in fracture site or additional Kaski's osteomedullographic signs, indicating bony union. 4. One talar neck fracture showed bony union with decreased viability of the bony on 12 months after fracture. 5. Osteomedullography is considered as very important study for the early diagnosis of the fracture healing, non-union and avascular necrosis

  14. For early diagnosis of the fracture healing, nonunion and avascular necorsis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Y C; Lee, S H; Lee, Y C; Whang, I S; Kim, H S [National Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1981-09-15

    Complications of non-union and avascular necrosis during fracture healing process are the most important problems. Early detection of the evidence of non-union and avascular necrosis and follow-up study of fracture healing process will reduce complications and sequellae in fracture patients. Femoral neck and tibial shaft are the most important fracture sites where non-union and/or avascular necorsis are frequently developed. Osteomedullography was performed in 30 cases of fracture, 21 femoral neck, 8 tibial shafts and 1 talar neck, in the Department of Radiology of national Medical Center during the period form August 1977 to March 1981. The following results were obtained: 1. 16 patients of femoral neck fracture were performed osteomedullography one. Non-union showing no crossing vein through the fracture site was noted in 12 cases from 16 patients. 4 cases from the 12 patients of non-union showed decreased viability but 2 case revealed good viability of the femoral head. 1 case from 4 case of good union of fracture showed no evidence of viability of the femoral head. 2. More than twice of osteomedullography were performed in 5 cases of femoral neck fracture, and crossing vein was not appeared in 4 cases at 3 weeks after fracture. 3 cases showed crossing veins at 6 weeks, and 1 case revealed evidence of avascular necrosis of the femoral head at 9 weeks. 3. In 8 cases of tibial shaft fracture, 4 cases were non-union. Another 4 cases revealed intraosseous veins crossing in fracture site or additional Kaski's osteomedullographic signs, indicating bony union. 4. One talar neck fracture showed bony union with decreased viability of the bony on 12 months after fracture. 5. Osteomedullography is considered as very important study for the early diagnosis of the fracture healing, non-union and avascular necrosis.

  15. Osteomedullography: for early diagnosis of the fracture healing, nonunion and avascular necrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Y. C.; Lee, S. H.; Lee, Y. C.; Whang, I. S.; Kim, H. S.

    1981-01-01

    Complications of non-union and avascular necrosis during fracture healing process are the most important problem. Early detection of the evidence of non-union and avascular necrosis and follow-up study of fracture healing process will reduce complications and sequellae in fracture patients. Femoral neck and tibial shaft are the most important fracture sites where non-union and/or avascular necrosis are frequently developed. Osteomedullography was performed in 30 cases of fracture, 21 femoral neck, 8 tibial shafts and 1 talar neck, in the Department of Radiology of National Medical Center during the period from August 1977 to March 1981. The following results were obtained: 1. 16 patients of femoral neck fracture were performed osteomedullography once. Non-union showing no crossing vein through the fracture site was noted in 12 cases from 16 patients. 4 cases from the 12 patients of non-union showed decreased viability but 2 case revealed good viability of the femoral head. 1 case from 4 cases of good union of fracture showed no evidence of viability of the femoral head. 2. More than twice of osteomedullography were performed in 5 cases of femoral neck fracture, and crossing vein was not appeared in 4 cases at 3 weeks after fracture. 3 cases showed crossing veins at 6 weeks, and 1 case revealed evidence of avascular necrosis of the femoral head at 9 weeks. 3. In 8 cases of tibial shaft fracture, 4 cases were non-union. Another 4 cases revealed intraosseous veins crossing in fracture site or additional Kaski's osteomedullographic signs, indicating bony union. 4. One talar neck fracture showed bony union with decreased viability of the body on 12 month after fracture. 5. Osteomedullography is considered as very important study for the early diagnosis of the fracture healing, non-union and avascular necrosis

  16. Osteomedullography: for early diagnosis of the fracture healing, nonunion and avascular necrosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Y C; Lee, S H; Lee, Y C; Whang, I S; Kim, H S [National Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1981-12-15

    Complications of non-union and avascular necrosis during fracture healing process are the most important problem. Early detection of the evidence of non-union and avascular necrosis and follow-up study of fracture healing process will reduce complications and sequellae in fracture patients. Femoral neck and tibial shaft are the most important fracture sites where non-union and/or avascular necrosis are frequently developed. Osteomedullography was performed in 30 cases of fracture, 21 femoral neck, 8 tibial shafts and 1 talar neck, in the Department of Radiology of National Medical Center during the period from August 1977 to March 1981. The following results were obtained: 1. 16 patients of femoral neck fracture were performed osteomedullography once. Non-union showing no crossing vein through the fracture site was noted in 12 cases from 16 patients. 4 cases from the 12 patients of non-union showed decreased viability but 2 case revealed good viability of the femoral head. 1 case from 4 cases of good union of fracture showed no evidence of viability of the femoral head. 2. More than twice of osteomedullography were performed in 5 cases of femoral neck fracture, and crossing vein was not appeared in 4 cases at 3 weeks after fracture. 3 cases showed crossing veins at 6 weeks, and 1 case revealed evidence of avascular necrosis of the femoral head at 9 weeks. 3. In 8 cases of tibial shaft fracture, 4 cases were non-union. Another 4 cases revealed intraosseous veins crossing in fracture site or additional Kaski's osteomedullographic signs, indicating bony union. 4. One talar neck fracture showed bony union with decreased viability of the body on 12 month after fracture. 5. Osteomedullography is considered as very important study for the early diagnosis of the fracture healing, non-union and avascular necrosis.

  17. Fatigue stress fractures of the sacrum: diagnosis with MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahovuo, J.A.; Vusuri, T.

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the MRI findings and clinical observations in a fatigue stress fracture of the sacrum. In this retrospective study, 380 conscripts (53 women, 327 men; age range 18-29 years, mean age 20.7 years) who suffered from stress-related hip pain were studied with MRI of the pelvis. The findings of MRI were evaluated with regard to stress fracture of the sacrum. Thirty-one (8%) patients had MRI changes in signal intensity of the cranial part of the sacrum, extending to the first and second sacral foramina. The MRI changes in signal intensity were intermediate on T1-weighted images, and high on short tau inversion recovery or T2-weighted fat-suppressed images. A linear signal void fracture line was also seen. Multiple stress injuries to the pelvic bones were also seen in 7 of 31 (23%) patients. Five patients (16%) had bilateral sacral stress fracture. Fatigue sacral stress fractures appeared more commonly in women than in men (p<0.001). During recovery time 20 of the 31 patients underwent control MRI, and fatty marrow conversion was seen in 8 (40%) cases as high signal intensity on T1-weighted images, which disappeared 5-6 months after the onset of symptoms. Fatigue sacral stress fractures are associated with stress-related hip pain. These fractures were more common in women than in men. Other stress injuries of the pelvis may be seen simultaneously with sacral stress fractures. Signal intensity of the sacrum was normal after 5-6 months

  18. Determinants of rib motion in flail chest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappello, M; Legrand, A; De Troyer, A

    1999-03-01

    We have previously developed a canine model of isolated flail chest to assess the effects of this condition on the mechanics of breathing, and these studies have led to the conclusion that the respiratory displacement of the fractured ribs is primarily determined by the fall in pleural pressure (Delta Ppl) and the action of the parasternal intercostal muscles. The present studies were designed to test the validity of this conclusion. A flail was induced in six supine anesthetized animals by fracturing both dorsally and ventrally the second to fifth ribs on the right side of the chest, after which the phrenic nerve roots were bilaterally sectioned in the neck. Sectioning the phrenic nerves caused a 34% decrease in Delta Ppl, associated with a 39% increase in parasternal intercostal inspiratory EMG activity (p Delta Ppl during the subsequent inspiration, all animals again showed a clear-cut inward rib displacement. These observations therefore confirm that in dogs with flail chest, the inspiratory displacement of the fractured ribs is set by the balance between the force related to pleural pressure and that generated by the parasternal intercostals. These observations also point to the critical importance of the pattern of inspiratory muscle activation in determining the magnitude of rib cage paradox in such patients.

  19. CLINICAL FEATURES AND PATTERN OF FRACTURES AT THE TIME OF DIAGNOSIS OF OSTEOGENESIS IMPERFECTA IN CHILDREN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brizola, Evelise; Zambrano, Marina Bauer; Pinheiro, Bruna de Souza; Vanz, Ana Paula; Félix, Têmis Maria

    2017-01-01

    To characterize the fracture pattern and the clinical history at the time of diagnosis of osteogenesis imperfecta. In this retrospective study, all patients with osteogenesis imperfecta, of both genders, aged 0-18 years, who were treated between 2002 and 2014 were included. Medical records were assessed to collect clinical data, including the presence of blue sclerae, dentinogenesis imperfecta, positive familial history of osteogenesis imperfecta, and the site of the fractures. In addition, radiographic findings at the time of the diagnosis were reviewed. Seventy-six patients (42 females) were included in the study. Individuals' age ranged from 0 to 114 months, with a median (interquartile range) age of 38 (6-96) months. Blue sclerae were present in 93.4% of patients, dentinogenesis imperfecta was observed in 27.6% of patients, and wormian bones in 29.4% of them. The number of fractures at diagnosis ranged from 0 to 17, with a median of 3 (2-8) fractures. Forty (57%) patients had fractures of the upper and lower extremities, and 9 patients also had spinal fractures. The diagnosis was performed at birth in 85.7% of patients with type 3, and 39.3% of those with type 4/5 of the disorder. Osteogenesis imperfecta is a genetic disorder with distinctive clinical features such as bone fragility, recurrent fractures, blue sclerae, and dentinogenesis imperfecta. It is important to know how to identify these characteristics in order to facilitate the diagnosis, optimize the treatment, and differentiate osteogenesis imperfecta from other disorders that also can lead to fractures.

  20. Improvement of diagnostic confidence for detection of multiple myeloma involvement of the ribs by a new CT software generating rib unfolded images: Comparison with 5- and 1-mm axial images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Homann, Georg; Mustafa, Deedar Farhad; Nikolaou, Konstantin; Horger, Marius [Eberhard Karls University Tuebingen, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Tuebingen (Germany); Weisel, Katja [Eberhard Karls University Tuebingen, Department of Internal Medicine II, Tuebingen (Germany); Ditt, Hendrik [Healthcare Sector Imaging and Therapy Division, Siemens AG, Forchheim (Germany)

    2015-04-02

    To investigate the performance of a new CT software generating rib unfolded images for improved detection of rib osteolyses in patients with multiple myeloma. One hundred sixteen patients who underwent whole-body reduced-dose multidetector computed tomography (WBRD-MDCT) for multiple myeloma diagnosis and during follow-up were retrospectively evaluated. Nonenhanced CT scans with 5- and 1-mm slice thickness were interpreted by two readers with focus on detection of rib involvement (location, number, fracture). Image analysis of ''unfolded,'' 1-mm-based CT rib images was subsequently undertaken. We classified the number of lytic bone lesions into 0, 1, 2, <5, <10 and ≥10. For all three data sets the reading time was registered. An approximated sum of 6,727 myeloma-related rib lesions was found. On a patient-based analysis, CT (5 mm), CT (1 mm) and CT (1 mm ''unfolded rib'') yielded a sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of 79.7/94.7/87.1, 88.1/93/90.5 and 98.3/96.5/97.4, respectively. In a lesion-based analysis, the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of the three evaluations were 69.7/87.2/70.5, 79.8/55.9/78 and 96.5/89.7/96.1. Mean reading time for 5 mm/1 mm axial images and unfolded images was 178.7/215.1/90.8 s, respectively. The generation of ''unfolded rib'' images improves detection of rib involvement in patients with multiple myeloma and significantly reduces reading time. (orig.)

  1. Clinical value of the Ottawa ankle rules for diagnosis of fractures in acute ankle injuries.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Wang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The Ottawa ankle rules (OAR are clinical decision guidelines used to identify whether patients with ankle injuries need to undergo radiography. The OAR have been proven that their application reduces unnecessary radiography. They have nearly perfect sensitivity for identifying clinically significant ankle fractures. OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study was to assess the applicability of the OAR in China, to examine their accuracy for the diagnosis of fractures in patients with acute ankle sprains, and to assess their clinical utility for the detection of occult fractures. METHODS: In this prospective study, patients with acute ankle injuries were enrolled during a 6-month period. The eligible patients were examined by emergency orthopedic specialists using the OAR, and then underwent ankle radiography. The results of examination using the OAR were compared with the radiographic results to assess the accuracy of the OAR for ankle fractures. Patients with OAR results highly suggestive of fracture, but no evidence of a fracture on radiographs, were advised to undergo 3-dimensional computed tomography (3D-CT. RESULTS: 183 patients with ankle injuries were enrolled in the study and 63 of these injuries involved fractures. The pooled sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of the OAR for detection of fractures of the ankle were 96.8%, 45.8%, 48.4% and 96.5%, respectively. Our results suggest that clinical application of the OAR could decrease unnecessary radiographs by 31.1%. Of the 21 patients with positive OAR results and negative radiographic findings who underwent 3D-CT examination, five had occult fractures of the lateral malleolus. CONCLUSIONS: The OAR are applicable in the Chinese population, and have high sensitivity and modest specificity for the diagnosis of fractures associated with acute ankle injury. They may detect some occult fractures of the malleoli that are not visible on

  2. Digital diagnosis and treatment of mandibular condylar fractures based on Extensible Neuro imaging Archive Toolkit (XNAT.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZhongWei Zhou

    Full Text Available The treatment of condylar fractures has long been controversial. In this paper, we established a database for accurate measurement, storage, management and analysis of patients' data, in order to help determine the best treatment plan.First of all, the diagnosis and treatment database was established based on XNAT, including 339 cases of condylar fractures and their related information. Then image segmentation, registration and three-dimensional (3D measurement were used to measure and analyze the condyle shapes. Statistical analysis was used to analyze the anatomical structure changes of condyle and the surrounding tissues at different stages before and after treatment. The processes of condylar fracture reestablishment at different stages were also dynamically monitored. Finally, based on all these information, the digital diagnosis and treatment plans for condylar fractures were developed.For the patients less than 18 years old with no significant dislocation, surgical treatment and conservative treatment were equally effective for intracapsular fracture, and had no significant difference for neck and basal fractures. For patients above 18 years old, there was no significant difference between the two treatment methods for intracapsular fractures; but for condylar neck and basal fractures, surgical treatment was better than conservative treatment. When condylar fracture shift angle was greater than 11 degrees, and mandibular ramus height reduction was greater than 4mm, the patients felt the strongest pain, and their mouths opening was severely restricted. There were 170 surgical cases with condylar fracture shift angel greater than 11 degrees, and 118 of them (69.4% had good prognosis, 52 of them (30.6% had complications such as limited mouth opening. There were 173 surgical cases with mandibular ramus height reduction more than 4mm, and 112 of them (64.7% had good prognosis, 61 of them (35.3% had complications such as limited mouth opening

  3. Contribution of computerized tomography to orbit fracture diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nemeth, T.; Sobota, J.

    1984-01-01

    Suitability and specificity of examinations using computerized tomography are discussed for diagnoses fractures of the orbit including accurate anatomical localization of traumatic changes. The possibility of accurate assessment of the drop of the floor of the orbit which is essential for determination of the thickness of the bone or cartilaginous graft under the eyeball is also important

  4. Model based rib-cage unfolding for trauma CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Berg, Jens; Klinder, Tobias; Lorenz, Cristian

    2018-03-01

    A CT rib-cage unfolding method is proposed that does not require to determine rib centerlines but determines the visceral cavity surface by model base segmentation. Image intensities are sampled across this surface that is flattened using a model based 3D thin-plate-spline registration. An average rib centerline model projected onto this surface serves as a reference system for registration. The flattening registration is designed so that ribs similar to the centerline model are mapped onto parallel lines preserving their relative length. Ribs deviating from this model appear deviating from straight parallel ribs in the unfolded view, accordingly. As the mapping is continuous also the details in intercostal space and those adjacent to the ribs are rendered well. The most beneficial application area is Trauma CT where a fast detection of rib fractures is a crucial task. Specifically in trauma, automatic rib centerline detection may not be guaranteed due to fractures and dislocations. The application by visual assessment on the large public LIDC data base of lung CT proved general feasibility of this early work.

  5. Late diagnosis of a McFarland fracture: imaging and treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Symeonidis, Panagiotis D. [Aristotelian University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki (Greece); Konstantinidis, George Ath; Givisis, Panagiotis G. [Aristotelian University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki (Greece); Dionellis, Panagiotis S. [Hippocration General Hospital of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki (Greece); Ousatzopoulos, John [Private Practice Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki (Greece)

    2014-01-15

    McFarland fractures represent a type of oblique medial malleolar fracture in children that can be challenging to diagnose and treat. A 14-year-old junior league soccer player with a Salter Harris type IV McFarland fracture presented late, as the initial routine two views radiological assessment failed to reveal a clear fracture line. The addition of a mortise ankle view led to the correct diagnosis and subsequent MRI findings guided nonsurgical treatment with an excellent outcome. The debate between obtaining two or three views in closed pediatric ankle injuries according to the so-called Ottawa rules and the usefulness of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the decision making for the choice of treatment of McFarland fractures are discussed in this case report. (orig.)

  6. Late diagnosis of a McFarland fracture: imaging and treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Symeonidis, Panagiotis D.; Konstantinidis, George Ath; Givisis, Panagiotis G.; Dionellis, Panagiotis S.; Ousatzopoulos, John

    2014-01-01

    McFarland fractures represent a type of oblique medial malleolar fracture in children that can be challenging to diagnose and treat. A 14-year-old junior league soccer player with a Salter Harris type IV McFarland fracture presented late, as the initial routine two views radiological assessment failed to reveal a clear fracture line. The addition of a mortise ankle view led to the correct diagnosis and subsequent MRI findings guided nonsurgical treatment with an excellent outcome. The debate between obtaining two or three views in closed pediatric ankle injuries according to the so-called Ottawa rules and the usefulness of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the decision making for the choice of treatment of McFarland fractures are discussed in this case report. (orig.)

  7. Talar Fractures and Dislocations: A Radiologist's Guide to Timely Diagnosis and Classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melenevsky, Yulia; Mackey, Robert A; Abrahams, R Brad; Thomson, Norman B

    2015-01-01

    The talus, the second largest tarsal bone, has distinctive imaging characteristics and injury patterns. The predominantly extraosseous vascular supply of the talus predisposes it to significant injury in the setting of trauma. In addition, the lack of muscular attachments and absence of a secondary blood supply can lead to subsequent osteonecrosis. Although talar fractures account for less than 1% of all fractures, they commonly result from high-energy trauma and may lead to complications and long-term morbidity if not recognized and managed appropriately. While initial evaluation is with foot and ankle radiographs, computed tomography (CT) is often performed to evaluate the extent of the fracture, displacement, comminution, intra-articular extension, and associated injuries. Talar fractures are divided by anatomic region: head, neck, and body. Talar head fractures can be treated conservatively if nondisplaced, warranting careful radiographic and CT evaluation to assess rotation, displacement, and extension into the neck. The modified Hawkins-Canale classification of talar neck fractures is most commonly used due to its simplicity, usefulness in guiding treatment, and prognostic value, as it correlates associated malalignment with risk of subsequent osteonecrosis. Isolated talar body fractures may be more common than previously thought. The Sneppen classification further divides talar body fractures into osteochondral talar dome, lateral and posterior process, and shear and crush comminuted central body fractures. Crush comminuted central body fractures carry a poor prognosis due to nonanatomic reduction, bone loss, and subsequent osteonecrosis. Lateral process fractures can be radiographically occult and require a higher index of suspicion for successful diagnosis. Subtalar dislocations are often accompanied by fractures, necessitating postreduction CT. Familiarity with the unique talar anatomy and injury patterns is essential for radiologists to facilitate

  8. Sensitivity and specificity of thallium-201 scintigraphy for the diagnosis of malignant vertebral fractures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thariat, Juliette; Toubeau, Michel; Ornetti, Paul; Coudert, Bruno; Berrielo-Riedinger, Alina; Fargeot, Pierre; Tavernier, Christian; Brunotte, Francois; Maillefert, Jean Francis

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the accuracy of thallium-201 ( 201 TI) scintigraphy in distinguishing a benign from a malignant recent non-traumatic vertebral fracture. Methods: Study design--Single center, prospective study. Participants--Patients hospitalized for a recent non-traumatic vertebral fracture. Evaluation--Usual clinical, laboratory and radiological assessment; 201 TI vertebral scintigraphy: patients were injected with iv 3 mCi 201 TI. Early and delayed images of the fractured vertebra were obtained. Data analysis--(1) Two examinators, unaware of the other findings, rated the images as hyperfixation or not of the fractured vertebra; (2) the ratio (average count per pixel of the fractured vertebra/normal adjacent vertebrae) were calculated. The final diagnosis was established on the result of vertebral biopsy or on follow-up. Results: Twenty-one patients were included. The final diagnosis was a benign vertebral fracture in 14 patients and a malignant vertebral fracture in 7. The sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values for a malignant fracture on early 201 TI vertebral scintigraphy images were 28.6, 92.9, 66.6, and 72.2%, respectively, and on delayed images were 28.6, 100, 100, and 73.7%, respectively. The ratio of lesioned over normal tissue was not increased in malignant, compared with benign fractures. Conclusion: The weak sensitivity does not support the wide use of 201 TI bone scintigraphy to distinguish a benign from a malignant recent non traumatic vertebral fracture. However, the high specificity suggests that such evaluation might be proposed prior to vertebral biopsy in some difficult cases

  9. Diagnosis, treatment, and rehabilitation of stress fractures in the lower extremity in runners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kahanov L

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Leamor Kahanov,1 Lindsey E Eberman,2 Kenneth E Games,2 Mitch Wasik2 1College of Health Science, Misericordia University, Dallas, PA, USA; 2Department of Applied Medicine and Rehabilitation, Indiana State University, Terre Haute, IN, USA Abstract: Stress fractures account for between 1% and 20% of athletic injuries, with 80% of stress fractures in the lower extremity. Stress fractures of the lower extremity are common injuries among individuals who participate in endurance, high load-bearing activities such as running, military and aerobic exercise and therefore require practitioner expertise in diagnosis and management. Accurate diagnosis for stress fractures is dependent on the anatomical area. Anatomical regions such as the pelvis, sacrum, and metatarsals offer challenges due to difficulty differentiating pathologies with common symptoms. Special tests and treatment regimes, however, are similar among most stress fractures with resolution between 4 weeks to a year. The most difficult aspect of stress fracture treatment entails mitigating internal and external risk factors. Practitioners should address ongoing risk factors to minimize recurrence. Keywords: medial tibial stress syndrome, stress injury, nonunion stress fracture

  10. Intra-articular Physeal Fractures of the Distal Femur: A Frequently Missed Diagnosis in Adolescent Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennock, Andrew T; Ellis, Henry B; Willimon, Samuel C; Wyatt, Charles; Broida, Samuel E; Dennis, M Morgan; Bastrom, Tracey

    2017-10-01

    Intra-articular physeal fractures of the distal femur are an uncommon injury pattern, with only a few small case series reported in the literature. To pool patients from 3 high-volume pediatric centers to better understand this injury pattern, to determine outcomes of surgical treatment, and to assess risk factors for complications. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. A multicenter retrospective review of all patients presenting with an intra-articular physeal fracture between 2006 and 2016 was performed. Patient demographic and injury data, surgical data, and postoperative outcomes were documented. Radiographs were evaluated for fracture classification (Salter-Harris), location, and displacement. Differences between patients with and without complications were compared by use of analysis of variance or chi-square tests. A total of 49 patients, with a mean age of 13.5 years (range, 7-17 years), met the inclusion criteria. The majority of fractures were Salter-Harris type III fractures (84%) involving the medial femoral condyle (88%). Football was responsible for 50% of the injuries. The initial diagnosis was missed in 39% of cases, and advanced imaging showed greater mean displacement (6 mm) compared with radiographs (3 mm). All patients underwent surgery and returned to sport with "good to excellent" results after 2 years. Complications were more common in patients with wide-open growth plates, patients with fractures involving the lateral femoral condyle, and patients who were casted ( P < .05). Clinicians evaluating skeletally immature athletes (particularly football players) with acute knee injuries should maintain a high index of suspicion for an intra-articular physeal fracture. These fractures are frequently missed, and advanced imaging may be required to establish the diagnosis. Leg-length discrepancies and angular deformities are not uncommon, and patients should be monitored closely. Surgical outcomes are good when fractures are identified, with high rates

  11. Early diagnosis of thoracolumbar spine fractures in children. A prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leroux, J; Vivier, P-H; Ould Slimane, M; Foulongne, E; Abu-Amara, S; Lechevallier, J; Griffet, J

    2013-02-01

    Early detection of spine fractures in children is difficult because the clinical examination does not always raise worrisome symptoms and the vertebrae are still cartilaginous, and consequently incompletely visualized on routine X-rays. Therefore, diagnosis is often delayed or missed. The search for a "breath arrest" sensation at the moment of the trauma improves early detection of thoracolumbar spine fractures in children. This was a prospective monocentric study including all children consulting at the paediatric emergency unit of a single university hospital with a thoracolumbar spine trauma between January 2008 and March 2009. All children had the same care. Pain was quantified when they arrived using the visual analog scale. Clinical examination searched for a "breath arrest" sensation at the moment of the trauma and noted the circumstances of the accident. X-rays and MRI were done in all cases. Fifty children were included with a mean age of 11.4 years. Trauma occurred during games or sports in 94% of the cases. They fell on the back in 72% cases. Twenty-three children (46%) had fractures on the MRI, with a mean number of four fractured vertebrae (range, 1-10). Twenty-one of them (91%) had a "breath arrest" sensation. Fractures were not visualized on X-rays in five cases (22%). Twenty-seven children had no fracture; 19 of them (70%) did not feel a "breath arrest". Fractures were suspected on X-rays in 15 cases (56%). The search for a "breath arrest" sensation at the moment of injury improves early detection of thoracolumbar spine fractures in children (Se=87%, Sp=67%, PPV=69%, NPV=86%). When no fracture is apparent on X-rays and no "breath arrest" sensation is expressed by the child, the clinician can be sure there is no fracture (Se=26%, Sp=100%, PPV=100%, NPV=53%). Level III. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Accuracy of Single Periapical Radiography in Diagnosis of Horizontal Root Fracture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fazlolah Soleymani Najafabadi

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Radiographic examination is a necessary step in diagnosis of horizontal root fracture. The purpose of this study was to determine the sensitivity and specificity of single radiograph for detection of horizontal root fracture. Materials and Methods: In this analytical-descriptive study, 30 human freshly extracted teeth were used. Using a hammer and clamp, the teeth were divided into two sections accidentally and then sections were attached together by cyanoacrylate glue. Two radiographs were taken; with and without a piece of human mandibular bone. Afterward, radiographs were analyzed by three expert dentists using a slide show device. Results: The diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of single radiograph for detection of horizontal root fracture without bone was 100%, but in radiographs of teeth with bone was 82.7% and 100%, respectively. Conclusion: Based on the results of this study, in most cases, the horizontal root fractures can be detected by a single periapical radiograph.

  13. Diagnosis of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for blowout fracture. Three advantages of MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishida, Yasuhiro; Aoki, Yoshiko; Hayashi, Osamu; Kimura, Makiko; Murata, Toyotaka; Ishida, Youichi; Iwami, Tatsuya; Kani, Kazutaka

    1999-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) gives a much more detailed picture of the soft tissue than computerized tomography (CT). In blowout fracture cases, it is very easy to observe the incarcerated orbital tissue. We performed MRI in 19 blowout fracture cases. After evaluating the images, we found three advantages of MRI. The first is that even small herniation of the orbital contents can easily be detected because the orbital fatty tissue contrasts well around the other tissues in MRI. The second is that the incarcerated tissues can be clearly differentiated because a clear contrast between the orbital fatty tissue and the extraocular muscle can be seen in MRI. The third is that the running images of the incarcerated muscle belly can be observed because any necessary directional slies can be taken in MRI. These advantages are very important in the diagnosis of blowout fractures. MRI should be employed in blowout fracture cases in addition to CT. (author)

  14. Diagnosis and Managment of Maxillary Incisor with Vertical Root Fracture: A Clinical Report with Three-Year Follow-Up

    OpenAIRE

    Kallel, Ines; Moussaoui, Eya; Chtioui, Fadwa; Douki, Nabiha

    2018-01-01

    According to the American Association of Endodontists, “a ‘true’ vertical root fracture is defined as a complete or incomplete fracture initiated from the root at any level, usually directed buccolingually.” Vertical root fracture (VRF) usually starts from an internal dentinal crack and develops over time, due to masticatory forces and occlusal loads. When they occur in teeth, those types of fractures can present difficulties in diagnosis, and there are however many clinic and radiographical ...

  15. Diagnostic significance of rib series in minor thorax trauma compared to plain chest film and computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffstetter, Patrick; Dornia, Christian; Schäfer, Stephan; Wagner, Merle; Dendl, Lena M; Stroszczynski, Christian; Schreyer, Andreas G

    2014-01-01

    Rib series (RS) are a special radiological technique to improve the visualization of the bony parts of the chest. The aim of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of rib series in minor thorax trauma. Retrospective study of 56 patients who received RS, 39 patients where additionally evaluated by plain chest film (PCF). All patients underwent a computed tomography (CT) of the chest. RS and PCF were re-read independently by three radiologists, the results were compared with the CT as goldstandard. Sensitivity, specificity, negative and positive predictive value were calculated. Significance in the differences of findings was determined by McNemar test, interobserver variability by Cohens kappa test. 56 patients were evaluated (34 men, 22 women, mean age =61 y.). In 22 patients one or more rib fracture could be identified by CT. In 18 of these cases (82%) the correct diagnosis was made by RS, in 16 cases (73%) the correct number of involved ribs was detected. These differences were significant (p = 0.03). Specificity was 100%, negative and positive predictive value were 85% and 100%. Kappa values for the interobserver agreement was 0.92-0.96. Sensitivity of PCF was 46% and was significantly lower (p = 0.008) compared to CT. Rib series does not seem to be an useful examination in evaluating minor thorax trauma. CT seems to be the method of choice to detect rib fractures, but the clinical value of the radiological proof has to be discussed and investigated in larger follow up studies.

  16. Subtrochanteric Femur Fractures in an Irish Trauma Centre over 9 years: How the Impact of Hospital Coding on Diagnosis of Subtrochanteric Femur Fractures Leads to Inaccurate Occurrence Rates

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Coveney, EI

    2018-06-01

    Our aim was to assess the occurrence rates of subtrochanteric femur fractures in an orthopaedic tertiary referral centre and to assess the correlation of patient’s actual diagnosis with national hospital inpatient enquiry data.

  17. Role of MRI in the diagnosis and management of patients with clinical scaphoid fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tibrewal, Saket; Jayakumar, Prakash; Vaidya, Sujit; Ang, Swee Chai

    2012-01-01

    The American College of Radiologists (ACR) recognises the value of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as the investigation of choice in patients with a clinically suspected scaphoid fracture but normal plain radiographs. The Royal College of Radiologists (RCR) in the UK produces no similar guidelines, as evidenced by the inconsistent management of such cases in hospitals around the UK. In discussion with our musculoskeletal radiologists, we implemented new guidelines to standardise management of our patients and now report our findings. A consecutive series of 137 patients referred to the orthopaedic department with clinically suspected scaphoid fracture but normal series of plain radiographs were prospectively followed up over a two-year period. We implemented the use of early MRI for these patients and determined its incidence of detected scaphoid injury in addition to other occult injuries. We then prospectively examined results of these findings on patient management. Thirty-seven (27%) MRI examinations were normal with no evidence of a bony or soft-tissue injury. Soft-tissue injury was diagnosed in 59 patients (43.4%). Of those, 46 were triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) tears (33.8%) and 18 were intercarpal ligament injuries (13.2 %). Bone marrow oedema with no distinct fracture was discovered in 55 cases (40.4%). In 17 (12.5%) cases, this involved only the scaphoid. In the remainder, it also involved the other carpal bones or distal radius. Fracture(s) were diagnosed on 30 examinations (22.0%). MRI should be regarded as the gold standard investigation for patients in whom a scaphoid fracture is suspected clinically. It allows the diagnosis of occult bony and soft-tissue injuries that can present clinically as a scaphoid fracture; it also helps exclude patients with no fracture. We believe that there is a need to implement national guidelines for managing occult scaphoid fractures.

  18. A new method of CT scanning for the diagnosis of mandibular fractures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsukagoshi, Taku; Satoh, Kaneshige; Onizuka, Takuya

    1990-01-01

    The condylar neck of the mandible is one of the most common fracture sites in the facial skeleton. Such a fracture is routinely diagnosed by A-P, lateral oblique, and Towne projection roentgenography or orthopantomography. Despite the combination of these films, fracture of the neck of the mandible is still difficult to diagnose definitely. Therefore, a new CT scanning method was developed for diagnosing fractures of the neck of the condylar mandible. The CT axis is projected along the length of the mandible, extending from the condyle to the symphysis. This projection visualizes both the condyle and the mandibular symphysis in the same plane. The patient is placed in a supine position with the head fully extended. The base line, a line extending from the midpoint of the glenoid fossa to the menton, is determined with a lateral facial cephalogram. CT scanning with a 5 mm window is performed in parallel with and 2 cm anterior to and 2 cm posterior to the base line. When CT scanning was performed in a healthy volunteer, the condition of the condyle and the condylar neck of the mandible was clearly shown, and the view extended from the condyle to the symphysis. For automobile accident patients in whom fracture of the neck of the mandible was associated with fracture of the symphysis, two fractures were found in the same plane. A newly developed CT scanning technique is useful in the diagnosis of fractures of the condylar neck of the mandible and in the identification of fractures at other mandibular sites. It also allows scanning of patients in a supine position, which may aid in managing patients with multiple traumas. (N.K.)

  19. Case report 467: Cystic chondroblastoma left 4th rib

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sundaram, M.; McGuire, M.H.; Naunheim, K.; Schajowicz, F.

    1988-03-01

    A case of chondroblastoma in an 18-year-old female arising from a rib near the costotransverse articulation (presumably from the epiphysis of the articular process) has been described. The destructive pattern noted in the rib, associated with a large soft tissue mass, favored a malignant lesion rather than a benign one. Histologically, this tumor had large cystic and hemorrhagic components, consistent with the diagnosis of a cystic chondroblastoma of a rib. Curiously, this patient, like two others with chondroblastoma in a rib was asymptomatic, and attention to the abnormality was drawn from a routine chest radiography. The patient remains disease-free one and a half-years following surgery.

  20. The prevalence of cervical ribs in Enugu, Nigeria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-11-18

    Nov 18, 2015 ... ... prevalence of cervical ribs and its variation with sex and age among patients ... The patients' identities were removed from the ... syndrome, only 8–10% actually has cervical rib as ... Anatomy, symptoms, diagnosis, and treatment. ... Illinois: American Association of Neurological Surgeons; 1998. p. 157-70.

  1. Bifid rib – usefulness of chest ultrasound. A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Kryger

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the possibility of using ultrasonography in the diagnosis of a congenital rib anomaly in the form of bifid rib. Bifid rib is a rare congenital abnormality of anterior chest wall. It manifests as a chest “lump.” Such lesions are detected during a routine physical examination or chest X-ray which is often performed for other reasons. The overall prevalence of bifid rib is estimated at 0.15% to 3.4% (mean 2% and it accounts for approximately 20% of all congenital rib anomalies. It is usually an unilateral lesion. The cases presented herein constitute the first pediatric cases in the available literature in which bifid rib anomaly was visualized by ultrasound examination.

  2. Training improves interobserver reliability for the diagnosis of scaphoid fracture displacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buijze, Geert A; Guitton, Thierry G; van Dijk, C Niek; Ring, David

    2012-07-01

    The diagnosis of displacement in scaphoid fractures is notorious for poor interobserver reliability. We tested whether training can improve interobserver reliability and sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy for the diagnosis of scaphoid fracture displacement on radiographs and CT scans. Sixty-four orthopaedic surgeons rated a set of radiographs and CT scans of 10 displaced and 10 nondisplaced scaphoid fractures for the presence of displacement, using a web-based rating application. Before rating, observers were randomized to a training group (34 observers) and a nontraining group (30 observers). The training group received an online training module before the rating session, and the nontraining group did not. Interobserver reliability for training and nontraining was assessed by Siegel's multirater kappa and the Z-test was used to test for significance. There was a small, but significant difference in the interobserver reliability for displacement ratings in favor of the training group compared with the nontraining group. Ratings of radiographs and CT scans combined resulted in moderate agreement for both groups. The average sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of diagnosing displacement of scaphoid fractures were, respectively, 83%, 85%, and 84% for the nontraining group and 87%, 86%, and 87% for the training group. Assuming a 5% prevalence of fracture displacement, the positive predictive value was 0.23 in the nontraining group and 0.25 in the training group. The negative predictive value was 0.99 in both groups. Our results suggest training can improve interobserver reliability and sensitivity, specificity and accuracy for the diagnosis of scaphoid fracture displacement, but the improvements are slight. These findings are encouraging for future research regarding interobserver variation and how to reduce it further.

  3. Differential diagnosis of trampoline fracture from osteomyelitis by bone scan with pinhole collimator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauthé, Mathieu; Mestas, Danielle; Canavese, Federico; Samba, Antoine; Cachin, Florent

    2014-02-01

    A 2-year-old girl with recent history of trampoline fall presented to the A&E Department for complete functional impairment of the left lower extremity and fever. Blood examination revealed an inflammatory syndrome, while plain radiographs were normal. As magnetic resonance imaging was unavailable, a bone scintigraphy was performed. While standard acquisition found an intense uptake focused on the left proximal tibial metaphysis whose appearance was suggestive of acute hematogenous osteomyelitis, complementary acquisition with the pinhole collimator demonstrated that this abnormal uptake was clearly distinct from the cartilage growth plate. One month follow-up radiographs showed a fracture that confirmed the diagnosis of trampoline fracture.

  4. Fracture of an unossified humeral medial epicondyle: use of magnetic resonance imaging for diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanabe, Katsuhisa; Miyamoto, Nao

    2016-01-01

    Fracture of the humeral medial epicondyle is a relatively common injury in children. Surgery is a good option for treatment, but correct diagnosis is important. Most fractures occur after the ossification of the medial epicondylar apophysis. If a fracture occurs before the ossification of the medial epicondyle, it is undetectable by radiographs. Here we report a case of an unossified medial epicondyle fracture of the humerus. A 9-year-old boy had persistent pain in the medial side of the right elbow after a fall. Despite his pain, he could move his injured elbow with a range from 60 to 90 . Radiographs and computed tomography showed neither fracture nor dislocation in the injured elbow, and soft tissue swelling was the only finding. Neither the trochlea nor the medial epicondyle was ossified. Magnetic resonance imaging showed that the medial epicondyle was separated from the medial metaphysis and displaced. This clear finding led us to surgical fixation. Under general anesthesia, valgus stress showed gross instability of the injured elbow. Two years after the operation, he had no complaints and could play sports with the same range of motion as the left elbow. It is important to keep in mind that medial epicondylar fractures may be hidden in a normal radiograph before the ossification of the medial epicondylar apophysis. (orig.)

  5. Fracture of an unossified humeral medial epicondyle: use of magnetic resonance imaging for diagnosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanabe, Katsuhisa; Miyamoto, Nao [Nishinomiya Municipal Central Hospital, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Nishinomiya (Japan)

    2016-10-15

    Fracture of the humeral medial epicondyle is a relatively common injury in children. Surgery is a good option for treatment, but correct diagnosis is important. Most fractures occur after the ossification of the medial epicondylar apophysis. If a fracture occurs before the ossification of the medial epicondyle, it is undetectable by radiographs. Here we report a case of an unossified medial epicondyle fracture of the humerus. A 9-year-old boy had persistent pain in the medial side of the right elbow after a fall. Despite his pain, he could move his injured elbow with a range from 60 to 90 . Radiographs and computed tomography showed neither fracture nor dislocation in the injured elbow, and soft tissue swelling was the only finding. Neither the trochlea nor the medial epicondyle was ossified. Magnetic resonance imaging showed that the medial epicondyle was separated from the medial metaphysis and displaced. This clear finding led us to surgical fixation. Under general anesthesia, valgus stress showed gross instability of the injured elbow. Two years after the operation, he had no complaints and could play sports with the same range of motion as the left elbow. It is important to keep in mind that medial epicondylar fractures may be hidden in a normal radiograph before the ossification of the medial epicondylar apophysis. (orig.)

  6. The value of MR imaging of PDFASAT sequence in the diagnosis of extremities occult fractures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Lingquan; Xu Mingshen; Wu Qianzhi; Mao Chunnan; Wang Shuzi; Zhou Xingfan; Wang Liping

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the value of MR imaging of proton density weighted-fat saturated (PDFASAT) sequence in detecting the occult fracture of extremities. Methods: Thirty-one patients with acute trauma were studied using radiography and MR imaging within 45 days. MR sequences included FSE T 1 WI, T 2 WI, and PDFASAT. 21 occult fractures occurred in the knee joint, 6 in the hip joint, 1 in the elbow joint, 2 in the shoulder, and 1 in the ankle. Results: All 31 cases had normal radiographic results. 10 cases with proximal fibula, 4 with proximal tibia and 7 with femur condyle occult fractures were found in 21 knee joint acute trauma cases. 2 cases with intertrochanteric, 2 with femoral neck and 2 with cotyle occult fractures were found in 6 hip joint trauma cases. 2 proximal humerus occult fractures were found in 2 shoulder cases. 1 distal humerus and 1 distal fibula occult fracture was found in elbow and ankle cases. MR imaging demonstrated irregular linear low signal in the subcortical region on both T 1 WI and T 2 WI, and high signal changes around low signal were seen on T 2 WI in some cases. The high signal in PDFASAT sequence was more remarkable and wider than that on both T 1 WI and T 2 WI. Conclusion: MR imaging could determine the diagnosis of acute and chronic occult fractures. MRI should be the next choice when plain films fail to reveal suspected fractures in setting of suggestive symptoms and positive physical examination. PDFASAT would be the best effective sequence among the T 1 WI, T 2 WI, and PDFASAT. (author)

  7. Fixation of a human rib by an intramedullary telescoping splint anchored by bone cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liovic, Petar; Šutalo, Ilija D; Marasco, Silvana F

    2016-09-01

    A novel concept for rib fixation is presented that involves the use of a bioresorbable polymer intramedullary telescoping splint. Bone cement is used to anchor each end of the splint inside the medullary canal on each side of the fracture site. In this manner, rib fixation is achieved without fixation device protrusion from the rib, making the splint completely intramedullary. Finite element analysis is used to demonstrate that such a splint/cement composite can preserve rib fixation subjected to cough-intensity force loadings. Computational fluid dynamics and porcine rib experiments were used to study the anchor formation process required to complete the fixation.

  8. Measurement of Bone: Diagnosis of SCI-Induced Osteoporosis and Fracture Risk Prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troy, Karen L; Morse, Leslie R

    2015-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is associated with a rapid loss of bone mass, resulting in severe osteoporosis and a 5- to 23-fold increase in fracture risk. Despite the seriousness of fractures in SCI, there are multiple barriers to osteoporosis diagnosis and wide variations in treatment practices for SCI-induced osteoporosis. We review the biological and structural changes that are known to occur in bone after SCI in the context of promoting future research to prevent or reduce risk of fracture in this population. We also review the most commonly used methods for assessing bone after SCI and discuss the strengths, limitations, and clinical applications of each method. Although dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry assessments of bone mineral density may be used clinically to detect changes in bone after SCI, 3-dimensional methods such as quantitative CT analysis are recommended for research applications and are explained in detail.

  9. Differential diagnosis of benign and malignant vertebral compression fractures with MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staebler, A.; Krimmel, K.; Seiderer, M.; Gaertner, C.; Fritsch, S.; Raum, W.

    1992-01-01

    42 patients with known malignancy and vertebral compressions underwent MRI. Sagittal T 1 -weighted spin-echo images pre and post Gd-DTPA, out of phase long TR gradient-echo images (GE) and short T 1 inversion recovery images (STIR) were obtained at 1.0 T. In 39 of 42 cases a correct differentiation between osteoporotic and tumorous vertebral compression fractures was possible by quantification and correlation of SE and GE signal intensities. Gd-DTPA did not improve differential diagnosis, since both tumour infiltration and bone marrow oedema in acute compression fracture showed comparable enhancement. STIR-sequences were most sensitive for pathology but unspecific due to a comparable amount of water in tumour tissue and bone marrow oedema. Susceptibility-induced signal reduction in GE images and morphologic criteria proved to be most reliable for differentiation of benign and tumour-related fractures. (orig./GDG) [de

  10. [Rib cage ostheosynthesis. Literature review and case reports].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Quijano, Andrés; Varón-Cotés, Juan Carlos; García-Herreros-Hellal, Luis Gerardo; Espinosa-Moya, Beatriz; Rivero-Rapalino, Oscar; Salazar-Marulanda, Michelle

    2015-01-01

    Fractures of the chest wall include sternum and rib fractures. Traditionally they are managed conservatively due to the anatomy of the rib cage that allows most of them to remain stable and to form a callus that unites the fractured segments. In spite of this management, some patients present with chronic pain or instability of the wall which makes them require some type of fixation. The present article performs a literature review based on 4 cases. The first case was a 61 year-old man with blunt chest trauma, with a great deformity of the chest wall associated with subcutaneous emphysema, and pneumothorax. The second case was a 51 year-old man with blunt chest trauma, initially managed at another institution, who despite treatment, had persistent pain and dyspnoea. The third case was a 30 year-old man that suffered a motor vehicle accident, with resulting pain and crepitation of the rib cage and with diagnostic images showing multiple rib fractures. The last case is a 62 year-old man that fell down the stairs, with blunt chest trauma with high intensity pain, dyspnoea and basal ipsilateral hypoventilation. Rib fracture fixation offers a good alternative in selected patients to decrease associated morbidity, leading to a patient's fast return to his or her working life. Copyright © 2015 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  11. Mild traumatic brain injury diagnosis frequently remains unrecorded in subjects with craniofacial fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puljula, Jussi; Cygnel, Hanna; Mäkinen, Elina; Tuomivaara, Veli; Karttunen, Vesa; Karttunen, Ari; Hillbom, Matti

    2012-12-01

    Traumatic brain injuries (TBI) in subjects with craniofacial fractures are usually diagnosed by emergency room physicians. We investigated how often TBI remains unrecorded in these subjects, and whether diagnostic accuracy has improved after the implementation of new TBI guidelines. All subjects with craniofacial fractures admitted to Oulu University Hospital in 1999 and in 2007 were retrospectively identified. New guidelines for improving the diagnostic accuracy of TBI were implemented between 2000 and 2006. Clinical symptoms of TBI were gathered from notes on hospital charts and compared to the recorded diagnoses at discharge. Logistic regression was used to identify independent predictors for TBI to remain unrecorded. Of 194 subjects with craniofacial fracture, 111(57%) had TBI, 40 in 1999 and 71 in 2007. Fifty-one TBIs (46%) remained unrecorded at discharge, 48 being mild and 3 moderate-to-severe. Subjects with unrecorded TBI were significantly less frequently referred to follow-up visits. Failures to record the TBI diagnosis were less frequent (29/71, 41%) in 2007 than in 1999 (22/40, 55%), but the difference was not statistically significant. The most significant independent predictor for this failure was the clinical specialty (other than neurology/neurosurgery) of the examining physician (palcohol intoxication did not hamper the diagnosis of TBI. TBIs remain frequently unrecorded in subjects with craniofacial fractures. Recording of mild TBI slightly but insignificantly improved after the implementation of new guidelines. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. The value of magnetic resonance imaging in the diagnosis of orbital floor fractures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freund, Michael; Haehnel, Stefan; Sartor, Klaus

    2002-01-01

    The value of MRI in the diagnosis of acute orbital floor fractures has not been clearly defined. We therefore compared MR findings with CT findings in patients with orbital trauma. In 30 patients with isolated orbital trauma both coronal CT and coronal MRI were used to examine the orbits and the adjacent paranasal sinuses. Visualization of anatomical landmarks, the kind and extent of traumatic lesions, as well as artifacts were scored. The scores were compared using the Wilcoxon matched-pairs signed-rank test. Interexamination agreement between the two methods was calculated using a kappa analysis. All examinations had diagnostic quality: 30 fractures of the orbital floor (9 right and 21 left orbital floor fractures) were identified. In addition, CT showed fractures of the medial orbital wall in 19 patients (63.3%), of the lateral wall in 10 patients (33.3%), of the zygomatic arch in 2 patients (6.7%), and of the maxillary sinus in 4 patients (13.3%). Soft tissue herniation was shown in 13 patients (inferior rectus muscle twice, orbital fat in 11 cases). Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated soft tissue herniation in 21 patients: muscle in 4, orbital fat in 17 cases. Magnetic resonance imaging is able to demonstrate orbital floor fractures as sensitively as CT, but CT is superior to MRI in showing small and associated fractures; therefore, CT remains in orbital fractures the imaging modality of choice. Magnetic resonance imaging is superior to CT in showing soft tissue herniations; therefore, MRI may have a role as an adjunct to CT if soft tissue entrapment remains unclear. (orig.)

  13. Introducing a Clinical Practice Guideline Using Early CT in the Diagnosis of Scaphoid and Other Fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pincus, Steven

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: We developed and implemented clinical practice guideline (CPG using computerized tomography (CT as the initial imaging method in the emergency department management of scaphoid fractures. We hypothesized that this CPG would decrease unnecessary immobilization and lead to earlier return to work.Methods: This observational study evaluated implementation of our CPG, which incorporated early wrist CT in patients with “clinical scaphoid fracture”: a mechanism of injury consistent with scaphoid fracture, anatomical snuff box tenderness, and normal initial plain x-rays. Outcome measures were the final diagnosis as determined by orthopaedic review of the clinical and imaging data. Patient outcomes included time to return to work and patient satisfaction as determined by telephone interview at ten days.Results: Eighty patients completed the study protocol in a regional emergency department.In this patient population CT detected 28 fractures in 25 patients, including six scaphoid fractures, five triquetral fractures, four radius fractures, and 13 other related fractures. Fifty-three patients had normal CT. Eight of these patients had significant ongoing pain at follow up and had an MRI, with only two bone bruises identified. The patients with normal CTs avoided prolonged immobilization (mean time in plaster 2.7 days and had no or minimal time off work (mean 1.6 days. Patient satisfaction was an average 4.2/5.Conclusion: This CPG resulted in rapid and accurate management of patients with suspected occult scaphoid injury, minimized unnecessary immobilization and was acceptable to patients.[WestJEM. 2009;10(4:227-232.

  14. A comparison of radiography, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging for the diagnosis of palmar process fractures in foals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaneps, A.J.; Koblik, P.D.; Freeman, D.M.; Pool, R.R.; O'Brien, T.R.

    1995-01-01

    The relative sensitivity of radiography, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging for detecting palmar process fractures of the distal phalanx in foals was determined and the imaging findings were compared with histomorphologic evaluations of the palmar processes. Compared to radiography, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging did not improve the sensitivity for detection of palmar process fractures. Statistical agreement for palmar process fracture diagnosis was excellent among the three imaging modalities. Histomorphologic evaluations were more sensitive for diagnosis of palmar process fracture than any of the imaging modalities. Three-dimensional image reconstructions and volume measurements of distal phalanges and palmar process fracture fragments from computed tomography studies provided more complete anatomical information than radiography. Magnetic resonance imaging confirmed that the deep digital flexor tendon insertion on the distal phalanx is immediately axial to the site where palmar process fractures occur, and differentiated cartilage, bone, and soft tissue structures of the hoof

  15. Fractures in infants and toddlers with rickets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chapman, Teresa; Done, Stephen [Seattle Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Seattle, WA (United States); Sugar, Naomi; Feldman, Kenneth [Seattle Children' s Hospital, Children' s Protection Program, Seattle, WA (United States); Marasigan, Joanne; Wambold, Nicolle [University of Washington, College of Arts and Sciences, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2010-07-15

    Rickets affects young infants and toddlers. However, there is a paucity of literature regarding the types of fractures that occur in rachitic patients. To evaluate the age of patients at which radiographically evident rickets occurs, and to characterize the age incidence and fractures that are observed in infants and toddlers with radiographically evident rickets. A retrospective study of children younger than 24 months was performed. Clinical data and radiographs were reviewed. Radiographs obtained within 1 month of the diagnosis were evaluated for the presence or absence of osteopenia, presence or absence of fraying-cupping, and presence and characterization of fractures. After exclusion criteria were applied, 45 children were included in the study. Children with rickets evident by radiograph were in the age range of 2-24 months. Fractures were present in 17.5% of the study group, exclusively in mobile infants and toddlers. Fracture types included transverse long bone fractures, anterior and anterior-lateral rib fractures, and metaphyseal fractures. All fractures occurred exclusively in patients with severe, overtly evident rickets. Fractures occur in older infants and toddlers with overt rickets and can be seen by radiograph. Fractures do not resemble high-risk non-accidental trauma fractures. (orig.)

  16. Digital radiography with computerized conventional monitors compared to medical monitors in vertical root fracture diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tofangchiha, Maryam; Adel, Mamak; Bakhshi, Mahin; Esfehani, Mahsa; Nazeman, Pantea; Ghorbani Elizeyi, Mojgan; Javadi, Amir

    2013-01-01

    Vertical root fracture (VRF) is a complication which is chiefly diagnosed radiographically. Recently, film-based radiography has been substituted with digital radiography. At the moment, there is a wide range of monitors available in the market for viewing digital images. The present study aims to compare the diagnostic accuracy, sensitivity and specificity of medical and conventional monitors in detection of vertical root fractures. In this in vitro study 228 extracted single-rooted human teeth were endodontically treated. Vertical root fractures were induced in 114 samples. The teeth were imaged by a digital charge-coupled device radiography using parallel technique. The images were evaluated by a radiologist and an endodontist on two medical and conventional liquid-crystal display (LCD) monitors twice. Z-test was used to analyze the sensitivity, accuracy and specificity of each monitor. Significance level was set at 0.05. Inter and intra observer agreements were calculated by Cohen's kappa. Accuracy, specificity and sensitivity for conventional monitor were calculated as 67.5%, 72%, 62.5% respectively; and data for medical grade monitor were 67.5%, 66.5% and 68% respectively. Statistical analysis showed no significant differences in detecting VRF between the two techniques. Inter-observer agreement for conventional and medical monitor was 0.47 and 0.55 respectively (moderate). Intra-observer agreement was 0.78 for medical monitor and 0.87 for conventional one (substantial). The type of monitor does not influence diagnosis of vertical root fractures.

  17. Synergism of clinical evaluation and penile sonographic imaging in diagnosis of penile fracture: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bello Jibril

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Penile fracture is an uncommon urologic emergency, and is the traumatic rupture of the tunica albuginea covering the corpus cavernosa. This usually occurs following blunt trauma sustained during coitus, masturbation or self-manipulations to hide or suppress an erection. Clinical diagnosis can often be easily made with typical history and examination findings. However, the patient may present atypically and/or with a suspicion of associated urethral injury. The roles of various diagnostic investigations are being evaluated in these situations. Case presentation We report the case of a 31-year-old African man with penile fracture and suspected associated urethral injury that occurred after self-manipulations to hide an erection. Conclusions Penile ultrasound and sonourethrography provide useful additional diagnostic information to supplement clinical history and physical examination findings and can be performed easily, at low cost and with no delays to surgery.

  18. Bone scintigraphy in the diagnosis of fracture and infection of the temporal bone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Djupesland, G.; Nakken, K.F.; Mueller, C.; Skjoerten, F.; Roehrt, T.; Eldevik, P.

    1983-01-01

    The sensivit of Tc99m-MDP-bone-scintiscanning in the diagnosis of temporal bone fracture was found to that of conventional radiography if the patients were examined 10 days after the trauma. Temporal bone osteomyelitis with concomitant moderate osteosclerosis was demonstrated by bone scintigraphy in 5 cases of mastoiditis with atypical symptoms. A case of apicitis was for the first time demonstrated by scintigraphy. A low sensivity of 67 Ga-scintigraphy was demonstrated by positive Tc99m-bone-scintigraphy and negative 67 Ga-scintigraphy in a patient with atypical mastoiditis. Tc99m-scintigraphy was negative in 5 cases of otitis media suppurative and in 3 cases of otitis media chronica cum cholesteatoma, all with slight degree of osteosclerosis in the mastoid. The sensitivity of Tc99m-bone-scintigraphy in fracture and osteomyelitis of the temporal bone seems to be a function of the amount of reactive new bone formed. (Authors)

  19. Risk factors for fractures in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (preliminary results of the multicenter program «Osteoporosis in rheumatoid arthritis: Diagnosis, risk factors, fractures, treatment»

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Mikhailovna Podvorotova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA, bone fractures occur 1.5-2 times more frequently than in the population. They often lead to reduced quality of life, to disability and death in the patients. It should be noted that risk factors (RFs for fractures have not been studied on a sufficient sample in Russia; there are no recommendations on the prevention of fractures in this category of patients. Objective: to compare groups of RA patients with and without a history of fractures to further identify possible RFs for fractures. Subjects and methods. The trial included 254 patients aged 18 to 85 years, diagnosed with RA, from the database of the multicenter program «Osteoporosis in rheumatoid arthritis: Diagnosis, risk factors, fractures, treatment», who had been followed up in 2010 to 2011. The patients were divided into two groups: 1 101 (39.8% patients with a history of low-trauma fractures and 2 153 (60.2% patients without a history of fractures. In Group 1, the patients were older than in Group 2 (mean age 59.8 and 56.1 years, respectively. Menopause was recorded in 88.1 and 77.8% of cases, respectively. The groups differed in the duration of RA an average of 15.5 and 11.5 years, respectively Results. The fractures in the history were associated with the use of glucocorticoids (GC, their higher cumulative dose and use duration. In Group 1 patients, the bone mineral density (BMD was lower in all study skeleton portions and more frequently corresponded to osteoporosis. RA complications, such as amyloidosis and osteonecrosis, were more common in the patients with a history of fractures. Conclusion. In RA patients, the most likely RFs of fractures are age, the long-term intake of large-dose GC, low BMD, the severe course of RA, and the presence of its complications.

  20. Diagnosis of blow-out fracture of the orbital floor using a computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishikawa, Yoshimi; Aoki, Shinjiroh; Ono, Shigeru; Fujita, Kiyohide

    1986-01-01

    Diagnosis of a blow-out fracture of the orbital floor is relatively easy from clinical and roentogen findings but information from these findings are not adequate for the decision for surgical indication. Until recently, computed tomography for the orbital region was generally performed only in axial plane. But the axial plane is parallel to the orbital structure, therefore it is difficult to visualize the orbital floor and inferior rectus muscle. On the other hand, coronal plane is cross-section to the orbital structure, and we can visualize the all orbital soft tissues including extraocular muscles. We examined 3 cases diagnosed as a blow-out fracture of the orbital floor by conventional roentogen films and clinical findings. After axial CT was performed firstly, the coronal CT was scanned with 60 degrees to 70 degrees from OM line, setting the patient in the hanging head position. Case 1 used coronal reformation of the axial CT data. Case 2 and case 3 used direct coronal scanning. By bi-plane CT we could diagnose whether inferior rectus muscle was entrapped or not, and confirm surgical indication. Using of a cadaver, we studied the mechanism for limitation of eye movement. These studies revealed that it is rare that the inferior rectus muscle is entrapped directly by fractured segments at the orbital anterior floor. Because there is a lot of orbital fat-pad between the inferior rectus muscle and the orbital floor, and it may play an important role. The limited mobility of the inferior rectus muscle may occur as a result of increased tension of the fibrous bands that attach to the muscle sheath from the prolapsed fat-pad, and contructure by scar formed secondarily. Diagnosis of the location of a fracture in the orbital floor and cause of the limitation of eye movement must be done as early as possible and from this information we can confirm surgical indication. (J.P.N.)

  1. The value of magnetic resonance imaging in the diagnosis of penile fracture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim Guler

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose We studied the use of magnetic resonance imaging in the diagnosis of penile fracture. Materials and Methods Between 1997 and 2012, fifteen patients (age range 17-48 years, mean age 37 years with suspected penile fracture underwent MRI examinations. Ten patients were injured during sexual intercourse, whereas four patients were traumatized by non-physiological bending of the penis during self manupilation, one patient was traumatized falling from the bed. Investigations were performed with 1.5T MR unit. With the patient in the supine position, the penis was taped against the abdominal wall and surface coil was placed on the penis. All patients were studied with axial, coronal, sagittal precontrast and postcontrast T1-weighted TSE(TR/TE:538/13 msn and T2-weighted TSE(5290/110 msn sequences. All patient underwent surgical exploration. The follow-up ranged from 3 months to 72 months. Clinically all patients showed normal healing process without complications. In 11 patients a shortening and thickening of tunica albuginea was observed. Three patients have post traumatic erectil disfunction. Results In all patient corpus cavernosum fractures were clearly depicted on a discontinuity of the low signal intensity of tunica albuginea. These findings were most evident on T1WI and also depicted on T2W sequences. Images obtained shortly after contrast medium administration showed considerable enhancement only in rupture site. Subcutaneous extratunical haematoma in all patients were also recognizable on T2 WI. MRI findings were confirmed at surgery. Conclusions Magnetic resonance imaging is of great value for the diagnosis of penile fracture. Furthermore this method is well suited for visualising the post-operative healing process

  2. The value of magnetic resonance imaging in the diagnosis of penile fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guler, Ibrahim; Ödev, Kemal; Kalkan, Havva; Simsek, Cihan; Keskin, Suat; Kilinç, Mehmet

    2015-01-01

    We studied the use of magnetic resonance imaging in the diagnosis of penile fracture. Between 1997 and 2012, fifteen patients (age range 17-48 years, mean age 37 years) with suspected penile fracture underwent MRI examinations. Ten patients were injured during sexual intercourse, whereas four patients were traumatized by non-physiological bending of the penis during self manupilation, one patient was traumatized falling from the bed. Investigations were performed with 1.5 T MR unit. With the patient in the supine position, the penis was taped against the abdominal wall and surface coil was placed on the penis. All patients were studied with axial, coronal, sagittal precontrast and postcontrast T1-weighted TSE(TR/TE:538/13 msn) and T2-weighted TSE(5290/110 msn) sequences. All patient underwent surgical exploration. The follow-up ranged from 3 months to 72 months. Clinically all patients showed normal healing process without complications. In 11 patients a shortening and thickening of tunica albuginea was observed. Three patients have post traumatic erectile disfunction. In all patient corpus cavernosum fractures were clearly depicted on a discontinuity of the low signal intensity of tunica albuginea. These findings were most evident on T1WI and also depicted on T2W sequences. Images obtained shortly after contrast medium administration showed considerable enhancement only in rupture site. Subcutaneous extratunical haematoma in all patients were also recognizable on T2 WI. MRI findings were confirmed at surgery. Magnetic resonance imaging is of great value for the diagnosis of penile fracture. Furthermore this method is well suited for visualising the post-operative healing process.

  3. Bifid rib: A rare anomaly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mythili Krishnan Rathinasabapathi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A case of the bifid rib was found during routine bone study. The distal part of the osseous rib bifurcated into two divisions with an angle of 60°. Both divisions had their own costal cartilage. Bifid rib is a congenital abnormality of the rib cage and usually asymptomatic, often discovered incidentally on chest X-ray. Effects of this neuroskeletal anomaly can include respiratory difficulties and neurological limitations.

  4. 99mTc-MDP bone scintigraphy in the diagnosis of stress fracture of the metatarsal bones mimicking oligoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jauković Ljiljana

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Stress fractures are the injuries of soft tissues and bones caused by intensive and repeated stress on a bone. Repeated submaximal stress disturbs the balance between the processes of bone production and resorption that results in fracture. Case report. We presented a case of a patient with stress fracture of metatarsal bone. The patient was diagnosed and treated as having reactive oligoarthritis caused by Chlamydia trachomatis and administered antibiotics. Initial plain radiography was negative for bone fracture. Tc-99m bone scintigraphy suggested stress fracture of the second metatarsal. Plain radiography was became positive three weeks later, showing callus formation in the proximal part of the second metatarsal. Conclusion. Bone scintigraphy is a diagnostic test of choice in early diagnosis of stress fracture, and it is important to apply it timely in order to include the entire therapy and prevent complications, as well as to let a patient return to previous daily activites.

  5. Usefulness of Reformatted CT Rib Series in Patients with Thoracic Trauma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, Sung Nam; Park, Seong Hoon; Kim, Na Hyung; Juhng, Seon Kwan; Yoon, Kwon Ha [Dept. of Radiology and Institute for Radiological Imaging Science, Wonkwang University School of Medicine, Iksan (Korea, Republic of); Bang, Dong Ho [Dept. of Radiology, Aerospace Medical Center, Cheongwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-01-15

    To assess the value of adding a reformatted computed tomography (CT) rib series to transversely reconstructed CT imaging in the evaluation of rib fractures in patients with suspected traumatic thoracic injuries. One hundred consecutive patients with suspected traumatic thoracic injuries underwent 128-section multi-detector row CT. Transverse CT images with 5-mm-thick sections were reconstructed and rib series were reformatted using isotropic vogel data. Three independent radiologists, who were blinded to the data, interpreted the CT scans at 2 sessions with a 4-week interval between the sessions. Only transverse CT images were reviewed at the first session. At the second session, the CT images were reviewed along with the reformatted CT rib series. The following parameters were analyzed: receiver operating characteristic (Roc) curve, pairwise comparisons of Roc curves, sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value. There were 153 rib fractures in 29 patients. The level of the area under the Roc curve, Az improved for all observers. The diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of each observer tended to improve in the second session. The mean confidence scores for all observers of patients with rib fractures improved significantly in the second session. A reformatted CT rib series together with transverse CT scan is useful for the evaluation of rib fracture.

  6. Diagnosis and Managment of Maxillary Incisor with Vertical Root Fracture: A Clinical Report with Three-Year Follow-Up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ines Kallel

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available According to the American Association of Endodontists, “a ‘true’ vertical root fracture is defined as a complete or incomplete fracture initiated from the root at any level, usually directed buccolingually.” Vertical root fracture (VRF usually starts from an internal dentinal crack and develops over time, due to masticatory forces and occlusal loads. When they occur in teeth, those types of fractures can present difficulties in diagnosis, and there are however many clinic and radiographical signs which can guide clinicians to the existence of the fracture. Prognosis, most often, is hopeless, and differential diagnosis from other etiologies may be difficult sometimes. In this paper, we present a case of VRF diagnosed after surgical exploration; the enlarged fracture line was filled with a fluid resin. A 36-month clinical and radiological follow-up showed an asymptomatic tooth, reduction of the periodontal probing depth from 7 mm prior to treatment to 4 mm with no signs of ankylosis. In this work, the diagnosis and treatment alternatives of vertical root fracture were discussed through the presented clinical case.

  7. Diagnosis and Managment of Maxillary Incisor with Vertical Root Fracture: A Clinical Report with Three-Year Follow-Up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallel, Ines; Moussaoui, Eya; Chtioui, Fadwa; Douki, Nabiha

    2018-01-01

    According to the American Association of Endodontists, "a 'true' vertical root fracture is defined as a complete or incomplete fracture initiated from the root at any level, usually directed buccolingually." Vertical root fracture (VRF) usually starts from an internal dentinal crack and develops over time, due to masticatory forces and occlusal loads. When they occur in teeth, those types of fractures can present difficulties in diagnosis, and there are however many clinic and radiographical signs which can guide clinicians to the existence of the fracture. Prognosis, most often, is hopeless, and differential diagnosis from other etiologies may be difficult sometimes. In this paper, we present a case of VRF diagnosed after surgical exploration; the enlarged fracture line was filled with a fluid resin. A 36-month clinical and radiological follow-up showed an asymptomatic tooth, reduction of the periodontal probing depth from 7 mm prior to treatment to 4 mm with no signs of ankylosis. In this work, the diagnosis and treatment alternatives of vertical root fracture were discussed through the presented clinical case.

  8. Vertebral Compression Fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and monitored to avoid putting pressure on the ribs that can cause new fractures. Surgical Procedures • When there is severe incapacitating pain • When healing is delayed or when bone fragments ...

  9. Outcomes after operative management of symptomatic rib nonunion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauger, Erich M; Hill, Brian W; Lafferty, Paul M; Cole, Peter A

    2015-06-01

    To report the outcomes of rib reconstruction after painful nonunion. Retrospective case series. Level I trauma center. Between November 2007 and May 2013, 10 patients who presented with 16 rib nonunions and disabling pain were treated with reconstruction of their nonunited rib fractures. Rib nonunion reconstruction predominately with iliac crest bone graft and a tension band plate with a locked precontoured plating system for ribs. Demographic data, mechanism of injury, and number of rib nonunions were recorded. Operative procedure, length of follow-up, complications, Short Form Survey 36, and a patient questionnaire were also captured and documented. Eight of the 10 patients sustained their original fractures from a fall. Outcomes were available for the 10 patients at a mean follow-up of up of 18.6 months (range, 3-46 months). All 16 ribs went on to union with a mean time from reconstruction to union of 14.7 weeks (range, 12-24 weeks). At final follow-up, the mean mental and physical component Short Form Survey 36 scores were 54.4 and 43.5, respectively. Eight of the 10 patients were able to return to work and/or previous activities without limitations. Complications included 1 wound infection that resolved after irrigation and debridement with adjunctive antibiotics. One symptomatic implant was removed. Ten patients with 16 symptomatic rib nonunions were reconstructed using autologous bone graft and implant/mesh fixation manifesting in successful union with improved patient function and a low rate of complications. Therapeutic Level IV. See Instructions for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

  10. Modified Carpal Box Technique in the Diagnosis of Suspected Scaphoid Fractures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toth, F.; Mester, S.; Cseh, G.; Bener, A.; Nyarady, J.; Lovasz, G. [Pecs Univ. (Hungary). Medical School

    2003-05-01

    Purpose: To establish and test the clinical efficacy of a new diagnostic algorithm with the extensive utilization of modified carpal box radiography (mX-CB) in the detection of scaphoid fractures. Material and Methods: Initial and early follow-up radiographic evaluation of 146 suspected scaphoid fractures were carried out by mX-CB. Patients with unconfirmed diagnosis were referred to CT. Patients were followed for 1 year after injury. Sensitivity, specificity and interobserver agreement of reading mX-CB images were determined statistically. Results: No non-union or avascular necrosis was seen at 1 year after the injury. 90% of the fractures were diagnosed by mX-CB, only 6.8% of the patients needed referral to CT. Sensitivity of mX-CB at initial presentation was 81.6%. Interobserver agreement was very high among evaluators of mX-CB images. Conclusion: Extensive utilization of mX-CB as primary and early follow-up investigation resulted in high initial diagnostic accuracy and low referral rate to a more expensive diagnostic modality.

  11. Stress fractures of the foot and ankle, part 2: site-specific etiology, imaging, and treatment, and differential diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandell, Jacob C; Khurana, Bharti; Smith, Stacy E

    2017-09-01

    Stress fractures of the foot and ankle are a commonly encountered problem among athletes and individuals participating in a wide range of activities. This illustrated review, the second of two parts, discusses site-specific etiological factors, imaging appearances, treatment options, and differential considerations of stress fractures of the foot and ankle. The imaging and clinical management of stress fractures of the foot and ankle are highly dependent on the specific location of the fracture, mechanical forces acting upon the injured site, vascular supply of the injured bone, and the proportion of trabecular to cortical bone at the site of injury. The most common stress fractures of the foot and ankle are low risk and include the posteromedial tibia, the calcaneus, and the second and third metatarsals. The distal fibula is a less common location, and stress fractures of the cuboid and cuneiforms are very rare, but are also considered low risk. In contrast, high-risk stress fractures are more prone to delayed union or nonunion and include the anterior tibial cortex, medial malleolus, navicular, base of the second metatarsal, proximal fifth metatarsal, hallux sesamoids, and the talus. Of these high-risk types, stress fractures of the anterior tibial cortex, the navicular, and the proximal tibial cortex may be predisposed to poor healing because of the watershed blood supply in these locations. The radiographic differential diagnosis of stress fracture includes osteoid osteoma, malignancy, and chronic osteomyelitis.

  12. Clinical applications for multiplanar- and three-dimensional-reconstructions by helical-CT for the diagnosis of acetabular fractures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stroszczynski, C.; Schedel, H.; Stoeckle, U.; Wellmann, A.; Beier, J.; Wicht, L.; Hoffmann, R.; Felix, R.

    1996-01-01

    This review describes recent visualizations of computed tomography for the diagnosis of acetabular fractures. The techniques of conventional and helical-CT for the imaging of the acetabulum are compared. Furthermore, the different methods of multiplaner and three-dimensional reconstructions e.g. shaded surface display, maximum intensity projection, and volume rendering are presented. Figures of multiplanar and three-dimensional imaging for fractures of the pelvis is discussed. (orig.) [de

  13. Whole-body low-dose computed tomography in multiple myeloma staging: Superior diagnostic performance in the detection of bone lesions, vertebral compression fractures, rib fractures and extraskeletal findings compared to radiography with similar radiation exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Lukas; Ourednicek, Petr; Meckova, Zuzana; Gavelli, Giampaolo; Straub, Jan; Spicka, Ivan

    2017-04-01

    The primary objective of the present prospective study was to compare the diagnostic performance of conventional radiography (CR) and whole-body low-dose computed tomography (WBLDCT) with a comparable radiation dose reconstructed using hybrid iterative reconstruction technique, in terms of the detection of bone lesions, skeletal fractures, vertebral compressions and extraskeletal findings. The secondary objective was to evaluate lesion attenuation in relation to its size. A total of 74 patients underwent same-day skeletal survey by CR and WBLDCT. In CR and WBLDCT, two readers assessed the number of osteolytic lesions at each region and stage according to the International Myeloma Working Group (IMWG) criteria. A single reader additionally assessed extraskeletal findings and their significance, the number of vertebral compressions and bone fractures. The radiation exposure was 2.7±0.9 mSv for WBLDCT and 2.5±0.9 mSv for CR (P=0.054). CR detected bone involvement in 127 out of 486 regions (26%; Prib fractures compared with CR (188 vs. 47; Pfractures, vertebral compressions and extraskeletal findings, which results in up- or downstaging in 24% patients according to the IMWG criteria. The attenuation of osteolytic lesions can be measured with the avoidance of the partial volume effect.

  14. [Injury to the Scapholunate Ligament in Distal Radius Fractures: Peri-Operative Diagnosis and Treatment Results].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajdoš, R; Pilný, J; Pokorná, A

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE OF THE STUDY Injury to the scapholunate ligament is frequently associated with a fracture of the distal radius. At present neither a unified concept of treatment nor a standard method of diagnosis in these concomitant injuries is available. The aim of the study was to evaluate a group of surgically treated patients with distal radius fractures in order to assess a contribution of combined conventional X-ray and intra-operative fluoroscopic examinations to the diagnosis of associated lesions and to compare short-term functional outcomes of sugically treated patients with those of patients treated conservatively. MATERIAL AND METHODS A group of patients undergoiong surgery for distal radius fractures using plate osteosynthesis was evaluated retrospectively. The peri-operative diagnosis of associated injury to the scapholunate ligament was based on pre-operative standard X-ray views and intra-operative fluoroscopy. The latter consisted of images of maximum radial and ulnar deviation as well as an image of the forearm in traction exerted manually along the long axis. All views were in postero-anterior projection. Results were read directly on the monitor of a fluoroscopic device after its calibration or were obtained by comparing the thickness of an attached Kirschner wire with the distance to be measured. Subsequently, pixels were converted to millimetres. When a scapholunate ligament injury was found and confirmed by examination of the contralateral wrist, the finding was verified by open reduction or arthroscopy. Both static and dynamic instabilities were treated together with the distal radius fracture at one-stage surgery. After surgery, the patients without ligament injury had the wrist immobilised for 4 weeks, then rehabilitation followed. In the patients with a damaged ligament, immobilisation in a short brace lasted until transarticular wires were removed. All patients were followed up for a year at least. At follow-up, the injured wrist was examined

  15. Osteoradionecrosis of the Ribs following Breast Radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luke Nicholls

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Osteoradionecrosis (ORN of the chest wall is a rare complication after whole-breast radiotherapy (RT. Herein, we report a case of ORN involving the underlying ribs following adjuvant whole-breast RT using standard fractionation and conduct a review of the literature. Case Report: A previously well 43-year-old female with right-sided, early-stage, node-negative breast cancer was treated with breast-conserving surgery. She subsequently underwent adjuvant whole-breast RT receiving 50 Gy in 25 fractions over 5 weeks using standard tangential photon fields with 6 MV photons followed by an electron boost of 10 Gy in 5 fractions according to International Commission on Radiation Units (ICRU requirements. Eleven months after RT, the patient developed right lateral chest wall pain, with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI demonstrating two fractures involving the underlying right fifth and sixth ribs associated with fatty marrow changes in the second to sixth ribs, thus raising the possibility of ORN. Treatments including hyperbaric oxygen, pentoxifylline and vitamin E were used with symptomatic improvements. There was demonstrable resolution on follow-up MRI at 2.5 years. Conclusion: The incidence of ORN utilising modern RT techniques and standard fractionation is rare. Numerous treatments are available, with variable response rates. Emerging evidence of predictive gene profiling to estimate the risk of radiation sensitivity may assist in individualising preventative strategies to mitigate the risk of ORN.

  16. [Tuberculosis of the spine and ribs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wishnitzer, R; Landow, Z; Sagiv, S; Rozenhack, M; Eliraz, A

    1991-11-15

    Tuberculosis of the spine or ribs is uncommon, occurring in less than 1% of patients with tuberculosis (TB). 2 women are presented who recently immigrated from Ethiopia and India, respectively. One, aged 55, presented with chest pain, fatigue and several masses under the skin of the scalp. Chest X-ray and CT scan suggested Pancoast tumor, and the lateral parts of the first 2 right ribs were absent. The origin of the patient, clinical findings and positive PPD suggested TB of the ribs and anti-TB therapy resulted in cure. The diagnosis was later confirmed by a positive culture. The other woman, aged 68, presented with fatigue, mild abdominal pain and axillary lymphadenopathy. The PPD was positive and X-ray showed widening of the mediastinum. A caseating granuloma with Langhans epithelioid cells was found in a lymph node. Flaccid paraparesis developed before therapy was started. CT scan showed a typical picture of TB affecting the T3-T6 vertebrae. Drainage of a cold abscess of the spine via the anterior approach was followed by anti-TB therapy. Culture of a biopsied lymph node and of pus obtained at operation confirmed the diagnosis of TB. The patient died 2 months later from gastrointestinal bleeding. Awareness of the unusual presentations of various forms of TB is mandatory in countries with immigration from countries in which TB is still common.

  17. Novel approach to the diagnosis of fractures in an austere environment using a stethoscope and a cellular phone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matzek, Brett A; Fivecoat, Phillip T; Ritz, Reis B

    2014-03-01

    Fracture diagnosis in the austere environment where radiographic tests are not available can be a challenge. In the past, a diagnostic technique has been described using a tuning fork and stethoscope to assess decreased sound conduction in the fractured extremity. In this study, we evaluate the use of a cellular phone's vibrate function and a stethoscope to limit equipment carried by expeditionary practitioners. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of fracture diagnosis using a cellular phone and stethoscope. This is a pilot study to assess the usefulness of the above technique before clinical implementation. In 3 cadavers, we created fractures of the humerus and femur. Twenty-seven emergency medicine residents and an attending physician performed the diagnostic technique. Overall, the use of the cellular phone and stethoscope resulted in a sensitivity of 73% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.64 to 0.81) and a specificity of 83% (95% CI: 0.77 to 0.88), with a positive predicted value of 68% (95% CI: 0.59 to 0.77) and a negative predicted value of 86% (95% CI: 0.81 to 0.90). Positive likelihood ratio was 4.3, and negative likelihood ratio was 0.32. The use of a cellular phone and stethoscope may be a useful tool for the diagnosis of fractures in the austere environment. However, further study is needed to validate these findings in the clinical environment. Published by Wilderness Medical Society on behalf of Wilderness Medical Society.

  18. Usefulness of three dimensional reconstructive images for thoracic trauma induced fractures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koh, Kyung Hun; Kim, Dong Hun; Kim, Young Sook; Byun, Joo Nam [Chosun University Hospital, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-09-15

    We wanted to evaluate the usefulness of three-dimensional reconstructive images using multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) for thoracic traumatic patients visiting emergency room. 76 patients with fractures of the 105 patients who visited our emergency room with complaints of thoracic trauma were analyzed retrospectively. All the patients had thoracic MDCT performed and the three-dimensional reconstructive images were taken. The fractures were confirmed by axial CT, the clinical information, whole body bone scanning and the multiplanar reformation images. Plain x-ray images were analyzed by the fractured sites in a blind comparison of two radiologists' readings, and then that finding was compared with the axial CT scans and the three-dimensional reconstructive images. The fracture sites were rib (n 68), sternum (n = 14), clavicle (n = 6), scapula (n = 3), spine (n = 5) and combined fractures (n = 14). Plain x-ray and axial CT scans had a correspondency of 0.555 for the rib fractures. Axial CT scans and the three-dimensional reconstructive images had a correspondency of .952. For sternal fractures, those values were 0.692 and 0.928, respectively. The axial CT scans and three-dimensional reconstructive images showed sensitivities of 94% and 91% for rib and other fractures, respectively, and 93% and 100% for sternal fracture, respectively. Three-dimensional reconstructive image had an especially high sensitivity for the diagnosis of sternal fracture. While evaluating thoracic trauma at the emergency room, the three-dimensional reconstructive image was useful to easily diagnose the extent of fracture and it was very sensitive for detecting sternal fracture.

  19. Usefulness of three dimensional reconstructive images for thoracic trauma induced fractures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koh, Kyung Hun; Kim, Dong Hun; Kim, Young Sook; Byun, Joo Nam

    2006-01-01

    We wanted to evaluate the usefulness of three-dimensional reconstructive images using multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) for thoracic traumatic patients visiting emergency room. 76 patients with fractures of the 105 patients who visited our emergency room with complaints of thoracic trauma were analyzed retrospectively. All the patients had thoracic MDCT performed and the three-dimensional reconstructive images were taken. The fractures were confirmed by axial CT, the clinical information, whole body bone scanning and the multiplanar reformation images. Plain x-ray images were analyzed by the fractured sites in a blind comparison of two radiologists' readings, and then that finding was compared with the axial CT scans and the three-dimensional reconstructive images. The fracture sites were rib (n 68), sternum (n = 14), clavicle (n = 6), scapula (n = 3), spine (n = 5) and combined fractures (n = 14). Plain x-ray and axial CT scans had a correspondency of 0.555 for the rib fractures. Axial CT scans and the three-dimensional reconstructive images had a correspondency of .952. For sternal fractures, those values were 0.692 and 0.928, respectively. The axial CT scans and three-dimensional reconstructive images showed sensitivities of 94% and 91% for rib and other fractures, respectively, and 93% and 100% for sternal fracture, respectively. Three-dimensional reconstructive image had an especially high sensitivity for the diagnosis of sternal fracture. While evaluating thoracic trauma at the emergency room, the three-dimensional reconstructive image was useful to easily diagnose the extent of fracture and it was very sensitive for detecting sternal fracture

  20. [Missed diagnosis of hiding posterior marginal fracture of ankle with pronation-external rotation type and its treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jia; Zhang, Yun-Tong; Zhang, Chun-Cai; Tang, Yang

    2014-01-01

    To analyze causes of missed diagnosis of hiding post-malleolar fractures in treating ankle joint fractures of pronation-external rotation type according to Lauge-Hansen classification and assess its medium-term outcomes. Among 103 patients with ankle joint fracture of pronation-external rotation type treated from March 2002 to June 2010,9 patients were missed diagnosis,including 6 males and 3 females,with a mean age of 35.2 years old (ranged, 18 to 55 years old) . Four patients were diagnosed during operation, 2 patients were diagnosed 2 or 3 days after first surgery and 3 patients came from other hospital. All the patients were treated remedially with lag screws and lock plates internal fixation. After operation,ankle joint function was evaluated according to American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS). All the 9 patients were followed up, and the duration ranged from 14 to 30 months (averaged, 17 months). No incision infection was found, and all incision healed at the first stage. At the latest follow-up, AOFAS was 83.0 +/- 4.4, the score of 4 patients diagnosed during operation was 85.0 +/- 2.9, and the score of 5 patients treated by secondary operation was 81.0 +/- 5.3. All the patients got fracture union observed by X-ray at a mean time of 2.2 months after operation. There were no complications such as internal fixation loosing, broken and vascular or nerve injuries. Ankle joint fracture of pronation-external rotation type may be combined with hiding post-malleolar fractures. So to patients with ankle joint fracture of pronation-external rotation type, lateral X-ray should be read carefully, and if necessary, CT or MRI examination should be performed. If adding lateral X-ray examination after reduction of exterior and interior ankle joint fixation, the missed diagnosis may be avoided.

  1. Comparison of CT and MRI in diagnosis of cerebrospinal leak induced by multiple fractures of skull base

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Xuhui; Xu, Minhui; Liang, Hong; Xu, Lunshan

    2011-01-01

    Multiple basilar skull fracture and cerebrospinal leak are common complications of traumatic brain injury, which required a surgical repair. But due to the complexity of basilar skull fracture after severe trauma, preoperatively an exact radiological location is always difficult. Multi-row spiral CT and MRI are currently widely applied in the clinical diagnosis. The present study was performed to compare the accuracy of cisternography by multi-row spiral CT and MRI in the diagnosis of cerebrospinal leak. A total of 23 patients with multiple basilar skull fracture after traumatic brain injury were included. The radiological and surgical data were retrospectively analyzed. 64-row CT (mm/row) scan and three-dimensional reconstruction were performed in 12 patients, while MR plain scan and cisternography were performed in another 11 patients. The location of cerebrospinal leak was diagnosed by 2 experienced physicians majoring neurological radiology. Surgery was performed in all patients. The cerebrospinal leak location was confirmed and repaired during surgery. The result was considered as accurate when cerebrospinal leak was absent after surgery. According to the surgical exploration, the preoperative diagnosis of the active cerebrospinal leak location was accurate in 9 out of 12 patients with CT scan. The location could not be confirmed by CT because of multiple fractures in 2 patients and the missed diagnosis occurred in 1 patient. The preoperative diagnosis was accurate in 10 out of 11 patients with MRI examination. MRI cisternography is more advanced than multi-row CT scan in multiple basilar skull fracture. The combination of the two examinations may increase the diagnostic ratio of active cerebrospinal leak

  2. Chondroblastoma of rib : case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Dong Hun; Kim, Kyung Rae; Ryu, Sang Wan

    2004-01-01

    Chondroblastoma is an uncommon, benign, cartilaginous neoplasm originating in an epiphysis or apophysis of a long tubular bone. The rib is an unusual site for chondroblastoma. The authors describe a case of chondroblastoma of the rib and present a brief review of the literature

  3. Chondroblastoma of rib : case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dong Hun; Kim, Kyung Rae; Ryu, Sang Wan [Kwangju Hospital, Kwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-07-01

    Chondroblastoma is an uncommon, benign, cartilaginous neoplasm originating in an epiphysis or apophysis o