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Sample records for rhythmic electrical modulation

  1. Urinary incontinence: Clinical observation on 30 patients undergoing treatment with F.R.E.M.S (Frequency Rhythmic Electrical Modulation System

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    Massimo Massari

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim of the study: Urge incontinence is considered to be a dysfunctional pathology of social interest due to the psychological and relational implications of such disability, the elevated number of affected patients and the consequent treatment costs. We propose an innovative non-pharmacological and non-invasive care methodology: Frequency rhythmic electrical modulation system (F.R.E.M.S. therapy (FT, based on the administration of electric fields of monophasic pulsed, negative, asymmetric current, generated by a neurostimulator with the characteristics of low variable frequency, high voltage and very low impulse duration. Material and Methods: 30 patients were studied with urodynamic evaluation and radiological diagnostic techniques, and underwent 2 cycles of 15 days therapy, with a 12 months follow-up. Results: In 93% of cases, we obtained a positive result, with either disappearance or improvement of symptoms. Conclusion: Although the Authors believe that clinical results deserve further neurohistological and immunohistochemical studies, in order to define the anathomophysiological and biochemical changes induced by FT, they propose it as a possible alternative to traditional pharmacological therapy and electrical stimulation.

  2. Recovery of 0.1Hz microvascular skin blood flow in dysautonomic diabetic (type 2) neuropathy by using Frequency Rhythmic Electrical Modulation System (FREMS).

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    Bocchi, L; Evangelisti, A; Barrella, M; Scatizzi, L; Bevilacqua, M

    2010-05-01

    Synchronized oscillation of smooth muscle cells tension in arterioles is the main control system of microvascular skin blood flow. An important autogenic vasomotion activity is recognized in 0.1Hz oscillations through power spectrum analysis of laser Doppler flowmetry. Severe dysautonomia in diabetic neuropathy is correlated with loss of 0.1Hz vasomotor activity, hence with impaired blood microcirculation. FREMS is a novel transcutaneous electrotherapy characterized by sequences of electrical stimuli of high voltage and low pulse duration which vary both in frequency and duration. We have evaluated the changes in laser Doppler flow in the volar part of the forearm before, during and after FREMS. Normal controls (n=10, 6 females, age range 21-39 years) demonstrated significant 0.1Hz vasomotion power spectra at baseline conditions associated with large oscillations of adrenergic cutaneous sweat activity sampled from the hand; people with diabetes type 2 and severe dysautonomia (n=10, 5 females, age range 63-75 years) displayed a significant decrease of 0.1Hz vasomotion power spectra. During FREMS application we observed an increase (pautonomic nervous system.

  3. Differential modulation of reciprocal inhibition in ankle muscles during rhythmic arm cycling.

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    Dragert, Katie; Zehr, E Paul

    2013-02-08

    Interlimb neural linkages relay activity related to rhythmic arm movement to the lumbar spinal cord. This is detected by modulated reflex amplitudes in muscles remote from the rhythmic movement. Improved understanding of modulation in ankle flexor and extensor muscles due to rhythmic arm movement can be gained using modulation of spinal excitability as a probe. The modulatory effect of rhythmic arm movement on Ia reciprocal inhibition (RI) between functional antagonists at the ankle has not been studied. We investigated the influence of rhythmic arm cycling on short latency (∼55ms post-stimulus) RI between ankle flexor (tibialis anterior, TA) and extensor (soleus, SOL) muscles at varying (0.9, 1.0, 1.2, 1.5 and 2.0× motor threshold (MT)) stimulus intensities. We hypothesized that arm cycling would increase RI between antagonists, but that movement conditioning would vary depending on stimulus intensity used to evoke the RI response. Amplitude of RI deduced from suppression of ongoing EMG activity was compared in static and arm cycling conditions. Arm cycling significantly (p0.05). Descending signals arising from rhythmic arm movement significantly alter transmission in RI pathways between ankle flexor and extensor muscles differentially. This may be due to differences in descending supraspinal inputs to ankle flexors vs. extensors, and could be related to functional requirements during locomotion.

  4. Effects of sympathetic stimulation on the rhythmical jaw movements produced by electrical stimulation of the cortical masticatory areas of rabbits.

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    Roatta, S; Windhorst, U; Djupsjöbacka, M; Lytvynenko, S; Passatore, M

    2005-03-01

    The somatomotor and sympathetic nervous systems are intimately linked. One example is the influence of peripheral sympathetic fibers on the discharge characteristics of muscle spindles. Since muscle spindles play important roles in various motor behaviors, including rhythmic movements, the working hypothesis of this research was that changes in sympathetic outflow to muscle spindles can change rhythmic movement patterns. We tested this hypothesis in the masticatory system of rabbits. Rhythmic jaw movements and EMG activity induced by long-lasting electrical cortical stimulation were powerfully modulated by electrical stimulation of the peripheral stump of the cervical sympathetic nerve (CSN). This modulation manifested itself as a consistent and marked reduction in the excursion of the mandibular movements (often preceded by a transient modest enhancement), which could be attributed mainly to corresponding changes in masseter muscle activity. These changes outlasted the duration of CSN stimulation. In some of the cortically evoked rhythmic jaw movements (CRJMs) changes in masticatory frequency were also observed. When the jaw-closing muscles were subjected to repetitive ramp-and-hold force pulses, the CRMJs changed characteristics. Masseter EMG activity was strongly enhanced and digastric EMG slightly decreased. This change was considerably depressed during CSN stimulation. These effects of CSN stimulation are similar in sign and time course to the depression exerted by sympathetic activity on the jaw-closing muscle spindle discharge. It is suggested that the change in proprioceptive information induced by an increase in sympathetic outflow (a) has important implications even under normal conditions for the control of motor function in states of high sympathetic activity, and (b) is one of the mechanisms responsible for motor impairment under certain pathological conditions such as chronic musculoskeletal head-neck disorders, associated with stress conditions.

  5. Musical training modulates the early but not the late stage of rhythmic syntactic processing.

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    Sun, Lijun; Liu, Fang; Zhou, Linshu; Jiang, Cunmei

    2017-08-23

    Syntactic processing is essential for musical understanding. Although the processing of harmonic syntax has been well studied, very little is known about the neural mechanisms underlying rhythmic syntactic processing. The present study investigated the neural processing of rhythmic syntax and whether and to what extent long-term musical training impacts such processing. Fourteen musicians and 14 nonmusicians listened to syntactic-regular or syntactic-irregular rhythmic sequences and judged the completeness of these sequences. Nonmusicians, as well as musicians, showed a P600 effect to syntactic-irregular endings, indicating that musical exposure and perceptual learning of music are sufficient to enable nonmusicians to process rhythmic syntax at the late stage. However, musicians, but not nonmusicians, also exhibited an early right anterior negativity (ERAN) response to syntactic-irregular endings, which suggests that musical training only modulates the early but not the late stage of rhythmic syntactic processing. These findings revealed for the first time the neural mechanisms underlying the processing of rhythmic syntax in music, which has important implications for theories of hierarchically organized music cognition and comparative studies of syntactic processing in music and language. © 2017 Society for Psychophysiological Research.

  6. Laterally focused attention modulates asymmetric coupling in rhythmic interlimb coordination.

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    de Poel, Harjo J; Peper, C Lieke E; Beek, Peter J

    2008-03-01

    Peters (J Motor Behav 21:151-155, 1989; Interlimb coordination: neural, dynamical and cognitive constraints, Academic, Orlando, pp 595-615, 1994) suggested that expressions of handedness in bimanual coordination may be reflections of an inherent attentional bias. Indeed, previous results indicated that focusing attention on one of the limbs affected the relative phasing between the limbs in a manner comparable to the effects of hand dominance. The present study extended the comparison between the effects of attentional focus and handedness by testing their impact on the interactions between the limbs. Both left-handed and right-handed participants performed rhythmic bimanual coordination tasks (in-phase and antiphase coordination), while directing attention to either limb. Using brief mechanical perturbations, the degree to which the limbs were influenced by each other was determined. The results revealed that the non-dominant limb was more strongly affected by the dominant limb than vice versa and that, in line with Peters' proposition, this handedness-related asymmetry in coupling strength was reduced when attention was focused on the non-dominant limb, thereby highlighting the potential relation between inherent (handedness-related) asymmetries and voluntary attentional asymmetries. In contrast to previous findings, the (commonly observed) phase lead of the dominant limb was attenuated (rather than accrued) when attention was focused on this limb. This unexpected result was explained in terms of the observed attention-related difference in amplitude between the limbs.

  7. Motor imagery during action observation modulates automatic imitation effects in rhythmical actions

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    Daniel Lloyd Eaves

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available We have previously shown that passively observing a task-irrelevant rhythmical action can bias the cycle time of a subsequently executed rhythmical action. Here we use the same paradigm to investigate the impact of different forms of motor imagery (MI during action observation (AO on this automatic imitation (AI effect. Participants saw a picture of the instructed action followed by a rhythmical distractor movie, wherein cycle time was subtly manipulated across trials. They then executed the instructed rhythmical action. When participants imagined performing the instructed action in synchrony with the distractor action (AO + MI, a strong imitation bias was found that was significantly greater than in our previous study. The bias was pronounced equally for compatible and incompatible trials, wherein observed and imagined actions were different in type (e.g., face washing vs. painting or plane of movement, or both. In contrast, no imitation bias was observed when MI conflicted with AO. In Experiment 2, motor execution synchronised with AO produced a stronger imitation bias compared to AO + MI, showing an advantage in synchronisation for overt execution over MI. Furthermore, the bias was stronger when participants synchronised the instructed action with the distractor movie, compared to when they synchronised the distractor action with the distractor movie. Although we still observed a significant bias in the latter condition, this finding indicates a degree of specificity in AI effects for the identity of the synchronised action. Overall, our data show that MI can substantially modulate the effects of AO on subsequent execution, wherein: (1 combined AO + MI can enhance AI effects relative to passive AO; (2 observed and imagined actions can be flexibly coordinated across different action types and planes; and (3 conflicting AO + MI can abolish AI effects. Therefore, combined AO + MI instructions should be considered in motor training and

  8. Content congruency and its interplay with temporal synchrony modulate integration between rhythmic audiovisual streams.

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    Su, Yi-Huang

    2014-01-01

    Both lower-level stimulus factors (e.g., temporal proximity) and higher-level cognitive factors (e.g., content congruency) are known to influence multisensory integration. The former can direct attention in a converging manner, and the latter can indicate whether information from the two modalities belongs together. The present research investigated whether and how these two factors interacted in the perception of rhythmic, audiovisual (AV) streams derived from a human movement scenario. Congruency here was based on sensorimotor correspondence pertaining to rhythm perception. Participants attended to bimodal stimuli consisting of a humanlike figure moving regularly to a sequence of auditory beat, and detected a possible auditory temporal deviant. The figure moved either downwards (congruently) or upwards (incongruently) to the downbeat, while in both situations the movement was either synchronous with the beat, or lagging behind it. Greater cross-modal binding was expected to hinder deviant detection. Results revealed poorer detection for congruent than for incongruent streams, suggesting stronger integration in the former. False alarms increased in asynchronous stimuli only for congruent streams, indicating greater tendency for deviant report due to visual capture of asynchronous auditory events. In addition, a greater increase in perceived synchrony was associated with a greater reduction in false alarms for congruent streams, while the pattern was reversed for incongruent ones. These results demonstrate that content congruency as a top-down factor not only promotes integration, but also modulates bottom-up effects of synchrony. Results are also discussed regarding how theories of integration and attentional entrainment may be combined in the context of rhythmic multisensory stimuli.

  9. Content congruency and its interplay with temporal synchrony modulate integration between rhythmic audiovisual streams

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    Yi-Huang eSu

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Both lower-level stimulus factors (e.g., temporal proximity and higher-level cognitive factors (e.g., content congruency are known to influence multisensory integration. The former can direct attention in a converging manner, and the latter can indicate whether information from the two modalities belongs together. The present research investigated whether and how these two factors interacted in the perception of rhythmic, audiovisual streams derived from a human movement scenario. Congruency here was based on sensorimotor correspondence pertaining to rhythm perception. Participants attended to bimodal stimuli consisting of a humanlike figure moving regularly to a sequence of auditory beat, and detected a possible auditory temporal deviant. The figure moved either downwards (congruently or upwards (incongruently to the downbeat, while in both situations the movement was either synchronous with the beat, or lagging behind it. Greater cross-modal binding was expected to hinder deviant detection. Results revealed poorer detection for congruent than for incongruent streams, suggesting stronger integration in the former. False alarms increased in asynchronous stimuli only for congruent streams, indicating greater tendency for deviant report due to visual capture of asynchronous auditory events. In addition, a greater increase in perceived synchrony was associated with a greater reduction in false alarms for congruent streams, while the pattern was reversed for incongruent ones. These results demonstrate that content congruency as a top-down factor not only promotes integration, but also modulates bottom-up effects of synchrony. Results are also discussed regarding how theories of integration and attentional entrainment may be combined in the context of rhythmic multisensory stimuli.

  10. Physiological modules for generating discrete and rhythmic movements: Component analysis of EMG signals.

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    Ana eBengoetxea

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A central question in Neuroscience is that of how the nervous system generates the spatiotemporal commands needed to realize complex gestures, such as handwriting. A key postulate is that the CNS builds up complex movements from a set of simpler motor primitives or control modules. In this study we examined the control modules underlying the generation of muscle activations when performing different types of movement: discrete, point-to-point movements in eight different directions and continuous figure-eight movements in both the normal, upright orientation and rotated 90°. To test for the effects of biomechanical constraints, movements were performed in the frontal-parallel or sagittal planes, corresponding to two different nominal flexion/abduction postures of the shoulder. In all cases we measured limb kinematics and surface EMG signals for seven different muscles acting around the shoulder.We first performed principal component analysis (PCA of the EMG signals on a movement-by-movement basis. We found a surprisingly consistent pattern of muscle groupings across movement types and movement planes, although we could detect systematic differences between the PCs derived from movements performed in each shoulder posture and between the principal components associated with the different orientations of the figure. Unexpectedly we found no systematic differences between the figure eights and the point-to-point movements. The first three principal components could be associated with a general co-contraction of all seven muscles plus two patterns of reciprocal activation. From these results, we surmise that both ‘discrete-rhythmic movements’ such as the figure eight, and discrete point-to-point movement may be constructed from three different fundamental modules, one regulating the impedance of the limb over the time span of the movement and two others operating to generate movement, one aligned with the vertical and the other aligned with the

  11. Rhythmic Aortic Contractions Induced by Electrical Stimulation In Vivo in the Rat.

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    Niaz Sahibzada

    Full Text Available For over a century, the behavior of the aorta and other large arteries has been described as passive elastic tubes in which no active contraction occurs in the smooth muscle wall. In response to pulsatile pressure changes, the vessels undergo a 'passive' elastic dilatation-contraction cycle, described as a "Windkessel" effect. However, Mangel and colleagues have presented evidence that is contrary to this view. They reported that in the rabbit, the aorta undergoes rhythmic 'active' (contraction during the cardiac cycle; but these findings have been largely ignored. In the present study, we observed spontaneous contractions in synchrony with the heartbeat in another species (rat. In addition we demonstrate that aorta contractions are of neurogenic origin. Electrical stimulation of the aorta evoked contractions that occur at a rate that is in the range of the animal's heartbeat and are suppressed by tetrodotoxin and the alpha-adrenergic receptor blocker, phentolamine. Altogether, these findings indicate that aortic contractions are under neural control from the heart.

  12. Physiological modules for generating discrete and rhythmic movements: action identification by a dynamic recurrent neural network.

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    Ana eBengoetxea

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study we employed a dynamic recurrent neural network (DRNN in a novel fashion to reveal characteristics of control modules underlying the generation of muscle activations when drawing figures with the outstretched arm. We asked healthy human subjects to perform four different figure-eight movements in each of two workspaces (frontal plane and sagittal plane. We then trained a DRNN to predict the movement of the wrist from information in the EMG signals from seven different muscles. We trained different instances of the same network on a single movement direction, on all four movement directions in a single movement plane, or on all eight possible movement patterns and looked at the ability of the DRNN to generalize and predict movements for trials that were not included in the training set. Within a single movement plane, a DRNN trained on one movement direction was not able to predict movements of the hand for trials in the other three directions, but a DRNN trained simultaneously on all four movement directions could generalize across movement directions within the same plane. Similarly, the DRNN was able to reproduce the kinematics of the hand for both movement planes, but only if it was trained on examples performed in each one. As we will discuss, these results indicate that there are important dynamical constraints on the mapping of EMG to hand movement that depend on both the time sequence of the movement and on the anatomical constraints of the musculoskeletal system. In a second step, we injected EMG signals constructed from different synergies derived by the PCA in order to identify the mechanical significance of each of these components. From these results, one can surmise that discrete-rhythmic movements may be constructed from three different fundamental modules, one regulating the co-activation of all muscles over the time span of the movement and two others patterns of reciprocal activation operating in orthogonal

  13. Physiological modules for generating discrete and rhythmic movements: action identification by a dynamic recurrent neural network.

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    Bengoetxea, Ana; Leurs, Françoise; Hoellinger, Thomas; Cebolla, Ana M; Dan, Bernard; McIntyre, Joseph; Cheron, Guy

    2014-01-01

    In this study we employed a dynamic recurrent neural network (DRNN) in a novel fashion to reveal characteristics of control modules underlying the generation of muscle activations when drawing figures with the outstretched arm. We asked healthy human subjects to perform four different figure-eight movements in each of two workspaces (frontal plane and sagittal plane). We then trained a DRNN to predict the movement of the wrist from information in the EMG signals from seven different muscles. We trained different instances of the same network on a single movement direction, on all four movement directions in a single movement plane, or on all eight possible movement patterns and looked at the ability of the DRNN to generalize and predict movements for trials that were not included in the training set. Within a single movement plane, a DRNN trained on one movement direction was not able to predict movements of the hand for trials in the other three directions, but a DRNN trained simultaneously on all four movement directions could generalize across movement directions within the same plane. Similarly, the DRNN was able to reproduce the kinematics of the hand for both movement planes, but only if it was trained on examples performed in each one. As we will discuss, these results indicate that there are important dynamical constraints on the mapping of EMG to hand movement that depend on both the time sequence of the movement and on the anatomical constraints of the musculoskeletal system. In a second step, we injected EMG signals constructed from different synergies derived by the PCA in order to identify the mechanical significance of each of these components. From these results, one can surmise that discrete-rhythmic movements may be constructed from three different fundamental modules, one regulating the co-activation of all muscles over the time span of the movement and two others elliciting patterns of reciprocal activation operating in orthogonal directions.

  14. A little elastic for a better performance: kinesiotaping of the motor effector modulates neural mechanisms for rhythmic movements

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    Bravi, Riccardo; Quarta, Eros; Cohen, Erez J.; Gottard, Anna; Minciacchi, Diego

    2014-01-01

    A rhythmic motor performance is brought about by an integration of timing information with movements. Investigations on the millisecond time scale distinguish two forms of time control, event-based timing and emergent timing. While event-based timing asserts the existence of a central internal timekeeper for the control of repetitive movements, the emergent timing perspective claims that timing emerges from dynamic control of nontemporal movements parameters. We have recently demonstrated that the precision of an isochronous performance, defined as performance of repeated movements having a uniform duration, was insensible to auditory stimuli of various characteristics (Bravi et al., 2014). Such finding has led us to investigate whether the application of an elastic therapeutic tape (Kinesio® Tex taping; KTT) used for treating athletic injuries and a variety of physical disorders, is able to reduce the timing variability of repetitive rhythmic movement. Young healthy subjects, tested with and without KTT, have participated in sessions in which sets of repeated isochronous wrist's flexion-extensions (IWFEs) were performed under various auditory conditions and during their recall. Kinematics was recorded and temporal parameters were extracted and analyzed. Our results show that the application of KTT decreases the variability of rhythmic movements by a 2-fold effect: on the one hand KTT provides extra proprioceptive information activating cutaneous mechanoreceptors, on the other KTT biases toward the emergent timing thus modulating the processes for rhythmic movements. Therefore, KTT appears able to render movements less audio dependent by relieving, at least partially, the central structures from time control and making available more resources for an augmented performance. PMID:25309355

  15. A little elastic for a better performance: kinesiotaping of the motor effector modulates neural mechanisms for rhythmic movements

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    Riccardo eBravi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available A rhythmic motor performance is brought about by an integration of timing information with movements. Investigations on the millisecond time scale distinguish two forms of time control, event-based timing and emergent timing. While event-based timing asserts the existence of a central internal timekeeper for the control of repetitive movements, the emergent timing perspective claims that timing emerges from dynamic control of nontemporal movements parameters. We have recently demonstrated that the precision of an isochronous performance, defined as performance of repeated movements having a uniform duration, was insensible to auditory stimuli of various characteristics (Bravi et al., 2014. Such finding has led us to investigate whether the application of an elastic therapeutic tape (Kinesio® Tex taping; KTT used for treating athletic injuries and a variety of physical disorders, is able to reduce the timing variability of repetitive rhythmic movement. Young healthy subjects, tested with and without KTT, have participated in sessions in which sets of repeated isochronous wrist's flexion-extensions (IWFEs were performed under various auditory conditions and during their recall. Kinematics was recorded and temporal parameters were extracted and analyzed. Our results show that the application of KTT decreases the variability of rhythmic movements by a twofold effect: on the one hand KTT provides extra proprioceptive information activating cutaneous mechanoreceptors, on the other KTT biases toward the emergent timing thus modulating the processes for rhythmic movements. Therefore, KTT appears able to render movements less audio dependent by relieving, at least partially, the central structures from time control and making available more resources for an augmented performance.

  16. A little elastic for a better performance: kinesiotaping of the motor effector modulates neural mechanisms for rhythmic movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravi, Riccardo; Quarta, Eros; Cohen, Erez J; Gottard, Anna; Minciacchi, Diego

    2014-01-01

    A rhythmic motor performance is brought about by an integration of timing information with movements. Investigations on the millisecond time scale distinguish two forms of time control, event-based timing and emergent timing. While event-based timing asserts the existence of a central internal timekeeper for the control of repetitive movements, the emergent timing perspective claims that timing emerges from dynamic control of nontemporal movements parameters. We have recently demonstrated that the precision of an isochronous performance, defined as performance of repeated movements having a uniform duration, was insensible to auditory stimuli of various characteristics (Bravi et al., 2014). Such finding has led us to investigate whether the application of an elastic therapeutic tape (Kinesio® Tex taping; KTT) used for treating athletic injuries and a variety of physical disorders, is able to reduce the timing variability of repetitive rhythmic movement. Young healthy subjects, tested with and without KTT, have participated in sessions in which sets of repeated isochronous wrist's flexion-extensions (IWFEs) were performed under various auditory conditions and during their recall. Kinematics was recorded and temporal parameters were extracted and analyzed. Our results show that the application of KTT decreases the variability of rhythmic movements by a 2-fold effect: on the one hand KTT provides extra proprioceptive information activating cutaneous mechanoreceptors, on the other KTT biases toward the emergent timing thus modulating the processes for rhythmic movements. Therefore, KTT appears able to render movements less audio dependent by relieving, at least partially, the central structures from time control and making available more resources for an augmented performance.

  17. Muscle activation and cutaneous reflex modulation during rhythmic and discrete arm tasks in orthopaedic shoulder instability.

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    Hundza, Sandra R; Zehr, E Paul

    2007-05-01

    In orthopaedic shoulder instability, muscle activity (EMG) is altered during unconstrained discrete arm movement tasks (e.g. elevation against a load). These findings have been ascribed to deficits in afferent feedback and neural control with glenohumeral instabilities resulting from orthopaedic injury. However, the integrity of neural control during shoulder movements in those with unstable shoulders is unclear. It is not known if there are altered EMG patterns during rhythmic arm movement or during discrete tasks involving no load, as would be experienced in many arm motions performed in daily living. The primary objective of this study was to evaluate neural control of arm movements between those with unstable shoulders and control participants, within a constrained arm movement paradigm involving both rhythmic arm cycling and discrete reaching. To achieve this objective, we determined if the amplitude and timing of EMG related to the movement pattern (background EMG) was significantly different between groups. Cutaneous reflexes were used to simulate a perturbation to the upper limb that would typically evoke a coordinated response. In the elevation phase of the movement path for anterior and posterior deltoid, upper trapezius, infraspinatus and serratus anterior, background EMG during rhythmic arm cycling was significantly (24%, p EMG between the groups during the discrete task. Significant differences (p EMG and the cutaneous reflexes patterns in those with shoulder instabilities suggest that neural control is altered during rhythmic movement.

  18. Circadian rhythmicity of active GSK3 isoforms modulates molecular clock gene rhythms in the suprachiasmatic nucleus.

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    Besing, Rachel C; Paul, Jodi R; Hablitz, Lauren M; Rogers, Courtney O; Johnson, Russell L; Young, Martin E; Gamble, Karen L

    2015-04-01

    The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) drives and synchronizes daily rhythms at the cellular level via transcriptional-translational feedback loops comprising clock genes such as Bmal1 and Period (Per). Glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3), a serine/threonine kinase, phosphorylates at least 5 core clock proteins and shows diurnal variation in phosphorylation state (inactivation) of the GSK3β isoform. Whether phosphorylation of the other primary isoform (GSK3α) varies across the subjective day-night cycle is unknown. The purpose of this study was to determine if the endogenous rhythm of GSK3 (α and β) phosphorylation is critical for rhythmic BMAL1 expression and normal amplitude and periodicity of the molecular clock in the SCN. Significant circadian rhythmicity of phosphorylated GSK3 (α and β) was observed in the SCN from wild-type mice housed in constant darkness for 2 weeks. Importantly, chronic activation of both GSK3 isoforms impaired rhythmicity of the GSK3 target BMAL1. Furthermore, chronic pharmacological inhibition of GSK3 with 20 µM CHIR-99021 enhanced the amplitude and shortened the period of PER2::luciferase rhythms in organotypic SCN slice cultures. These results support the model that GSK3 activity status is regulated by the circadian clock and that GSK3 feeds back to regulate the molecular clock amplitude in the SCN.

  19. Space Charge Modulated Electrical Breakdown

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    Li, Shengtao; Zhu, Yuanwei; Min, Daomin; Chen, George

    2016-09-01

    Electrical breakdown is one of the most important physical phenomena in electrical and electronic engineering. Since the early 20th century, many theories and models of electrical breakdown have been proposed, but the origin of one key issue, that the explanation for dc breakdown strength being twice or higher than ac breakdown strength in insulating materials, remains unclear. Here, by employing a bipolar charge transport model, we investigate the space charge dynamics in both dc and ac breakdown processes. We demonstrate the differences in charge accumulations under both dc and ac stresses and estimate the breakdown strength, which is modulated by the electric field distortion induced by space charge. It is concluded that dc breakdown initializes in the bulk whereas ac breakdown initializes in the vicinity of the sample-electrode interface. Compared with dc breakdown, the lower breakdown strength under ac stress and the decreasing breakdown strength with an increase in applied frequency, are both attributed to the electric field distortion induced by space charges located in the vicinity of the electrodes.

  20. Modulation of reflex responses in hand muscles during rhythmical finger tasks in a subject with writer's cramp.

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    Xia, Ruiping; Bush, Brian M H

    2007-03-01

    The objective of this study was to examine phase- and task-dependent modulation of stretch reflexes during repetitive finger movements in writer's cramp, and compare them with normal controls from our previous study. A subject with writer's cramp conducted two rhythmic tasks, index finger abduction (RFA) and a pen-squeezing (RPS) task akin to handwriting. Stretch reflexes were evoked by mechanical perturbations at random phases of each task. Surface electromyograms (EMG) were recorded from two hand muscles, first dorsal interosseous (FDI) and flexor digitorum superficialis (FDS). The reflex response and background EMG activity of each muscle were modulated in a phase-dependent manner in both tasks. However, they varied largely in phase during the RFA task, but in approximately inverse phase-relationship during RPS. Reflex sensitivity, as represented by the slope of the linear regression between response and background, was much lower for both muscles in the 'writing' task (RPS) than in the RFA task with its positively correlated responses. These phase- and task-related modulation patterns differed dramatically from those observed in our control subjects, where reflex responses were modulated largely in phase with background activity and reflex sensitivity was much higher, particularly in FDI during RFA and FDS during RPS. The altered reflex modulation patterns in writer's cramp may reflect deficiencies of integration of proprioceptive afferent inputs and reduced inhibition at cortical and spinal levels during writing performance. Results from this case study support clinically identified task-specific feature of focal hand dystonia.

  1. Endocannabinoid release modulates electrical coupling between CCK cells connected via chemical and electrical synapses in CA1

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    Jonathan eIball

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Electrical coupling between some subclasses of interneurons is thought to promote coordinated firing that generates rhythmic synchronous activity in cortical regions. Synaptic activity of cholesystokinin (CCK interneurons which co-express cannbinoid type-1 (CB1 receptors are powerful modulators of network activity via the actions of endocannabinoids. We investigated the modulatory actions of endocannabinoids between chemically and electrically connected synapses of CCK cells using paired whole-cell recordings combined with biocytin and double immunofluorescence labelling in acute slices of rat hippocampus at P18-20 days. CA1 stratum radiatum CCK Schaffer collateral associated (SCA cells were coupled electrically with each other as well as CCK basket cells and CCK cells with axonal projections expanding to dentate gyrus. Approximately 50% of electrically coupled cells received facilitating, asynchronously released IPSPs that curtailed the steady-state coupling coefficient by 57%. Tonic CB1 receptor activity which reduces inhibition enhanced electrical coupling between cells that were connected via chemical and electrical synapses. Blocking CB1 receptors with antagonist, AM-251 (5M resulted in the synchronized release of larger IPSPs and this enhanced inhibition further reduced the steady-state coupling coefficient by 85%. Depolarization induced suppression of inhibition (DSI, maintained the asynchronicity of IPSP latency, but reduced IPSP amplitudes by 95% and enhanced the steady-state coupling coefficient by 104% and IPSP duration by 200%. However, DSI did not did not enhance electrical coupling at purely electrical synapses. These data suggest that different morphological subclasses of CCK interneurons are interconnected via gap junctions. The synergy between the chemical and electrical coupling between CCK cells probably plays a role in activity-dependent endocannabinoid modulation of rhythmic synchronization.

  2. Arterial CO2 Fluctuations Modulate Neuronal Rhythmicity: Implications for MEG and fMRI Studies of Resting-State Networks

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    Whittaker, Joseph R.; Bright, Molly G.; Muthukumaraswamy, Suresh D.; Murphy, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    A fast emerging technique for studying human resting state networks (RSNs) is based on spontaneous temporal fluctuations in neuronal oscillatory power, as measured by magnetoencephalography. However, it has been demonstrated recently that this power is sensitive to modulations in arterial CO2 concentration. Arterial CO2 can be modulated by natural fluctuations in breathing pattern, as might typically occur during the acquisition of an RSN experiment. Here, we demonstrate for the first time the fine-scale dependence of neuronal oscillatory power on arterial CO2 concentration, showing that reductions in alpha, beta, and gamma power are observed with even very mild levels of hypercapnia (increased arterial CO2). We use a graded hypercapnia paradigm and participant feedback to rule out a sensory cause, suggesting a predominantly physiological origin. Furthermore, we demonstrate that natural fluctuations in arterial CO2, without administration of inspired CO2, are of a sufficient level to influence neuronal oscillatory power significantly in the delta-, alpha-, beta-, and gamma-frequency bands. A more thorough understanding of the relationship between physiological factors and cortical rhythmicity is required. In light of these findings, existing results, paradigms, and analysis techniques for the study of resting-state brain data should be revisited. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT In this study, we show for the first time that neuronal oscillatory power is intimately linked to arterial CO2 concentration down to the fine-scale modulations that occur during spontaneous breathing. We extend these results to demonstrate a correlation between neuronal oscillatory power and spontaneous arterial CO2 fluctuations in awake humans at rest. This work identifies a need for studies investigating resting-state networks in the human brain to measure and account for the impact of spontaneous changes in arterial CO2 on the neuronal signals of interest. Changes in breathing pattern that are

  3. Electrical power generation by mechanically modulating electrical double layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Jong Kyun; Jeong, Jaeki; Lee, Dongyun; Pak, Hyuk Kyu

    2013-01-01

    Since Michael Faraday and Joseph Henry made their great discovery of electromagnetic induction, there have been continuous developments in electrical power generation. Most people today get electricity from thermal, hydroelectric, or nuclear power generation systems, which use this electromagnetic induction phenomenon. Here we propose a new method for electrical power generation, without using electromagnetic induction, by mechanically modulating the electrical double layers at the interfacial areas of a water bridge between two conducting plates. We find that when the height of the water bridge is mechanically modulated, the electrical double layer capacitors formed on the two interfacial areas are continuously charged and discharged at different phases from each other, thus generating an AC electric current across the plates. We use a resistor-capacitor circuit model to explain the results of this experiment. This observation could be useful for constructing a micro-fluidic power generation system in the near future.

  4. A synaptic input portal for a mapped clock oscillator model of neuronal electrical rhythmic activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zariffa, José; Ebden, Mark; Bardakjian, Berj L.

    2004-09-01

    Neuronal electrical oscillations play a central role in a variety of situations, such as epilepsy and learning. The mapped clock oscillator (MCO) model is a general model of transmembrane voltage oscillations in excitable cells. In order to be able to investigate the behaviour of neuronal oscillator populations, we present a neuronal version of the model. The neuronal MCO includes an extra input portal, the synaptic portal, which can reflect the biological relationships in a chemical synapse between the frequency of the presynaptic action potentials and the postsynaptic resting level, which in turn affects the frequency of the postsynaptic potentials. We propose that the synaptic input-output relationship must include a power function in order to be able to reproduce physiological behaviour such as resting level saturation. One linear and two power functions (Butterworth and sigmoidal) are investigated, using the case of an inhibitory synapse. The linear relation was not able to produce physiologically plausible behaviour, whereas both the power function examples were appropriate. The resulting neuronal MCO model can be tailored to a variety of neuronal cell types, and can be used to investigate complex population behaviour, such as the influence of network topology and stochastic resonance.

  5. Electric modulation of optical absorption in nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakr, M. R.

    2016-11-01

    We have calculated the effect of an external electric field on the intersubband optical absorption of a nanowire subjected to a perpendicular magnetic field and Rashba effect. The absorption peaks due to optical transitions that are forbidden in the absence of the intersubband coupling experience strong amplitude modulation. This effect is quadratic in electric fields applied along the direction of quantum confinement or perpendicularly to tune the Rashba parameter. The electric field also induces frequency modulation in the associated spectrum. On the other hand, transitions that are normally allowed show, to a large extent, a parallel band effect, and accordingly they are responsible for strong optical absorption.

  6. Expression and rhythmic modulation of circulating microRNAs targeting the clock gene Bmal1 in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vikram R Shende

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs interact with 3' untranslated region (UTR elements of target genes to regulate mRNA stability or translation and thus play a role in regulating many different biological processes, including circadian rhythms. However, specific miRNAs mediating the regulation of essential clock genes remain largely unknown. Because vesicles containing membrane-bound miRNAs are present in the circulatory system, we examined miRNAs predicted to target the clock gene, Bmal1, for evidence of rhythmic fluctuations in circulating levels and modulatory effects on the 3' UTR activity of Bmal1. A number of miRNAs with Bmal1 as a predicted target were expressed in the serum of mice exposed to LD 12:12 and of these miRNAs, miR-152 and miR-494 but not miR-142-3p were marked by diurnal oscillations with bimodal peaks in expression occurring near the middle of the day and 8 or 12 hr later during the night. Co-transfection of pre-miR over-expression constructs for miR-494 and miR-142-3p in HEK293 cells had significant effects in repressing luciferase-reported Bmal1 3' UTR activity by as much as 60%, suggesting that these miRNAs may function as post-transcriptional modulators of Bmal1. In conjunction with previous studies implicating miRNAs as extracellular regulatory signals, our results suggest that circulating miRNAs may play a role in the regulation of the molecular clockworks in peripheral circadian oscillators.

  7. Expression and Rhythmic Modulation of Circulating MicroRNAs Targeting the Clock Gene Bmal1 in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shende, Vikram R.; Goldrick, Marianna M.; Ramani, Suchitra; Earnest, David J.

    2011-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) interact with 3′ untranslated region (UTR) elements of target genes to regulate mRNA stability or translation and thus play a role in regulating many different biological processes, including circadian rhythms. However, specific miRNAs mediating the regulation of essential clock genes remain largely unknown. Because vesicles containing membrane-bound miRNAs are present in the circulatory system, we examined miRNAs predicted to target the clock gene, Bmal1, for evidence of rhythmic fluctuations in circulating levels and modulatory effects on the 3′ UTR activity of Bmal1. A number of miRNAs with Bmal1 as a predicted target were expressed in the serum of mice exposed to LD 12∶12 and of these miRNAs, miR-152 and miR-494 but not miR-142-3p were marked by diurnal oscillations with bimodal peaks in expression occurring near the middle of the day and 8 or 12 hr later during the night. Co-transfection of pre-miR over-expression constructs for miR-494 and miR-142-3p in HEK293 cells had significant effects in repressing luciferase-reported Bmal1 3′ UTR activity by as much as 60%, suggesting that these miRNAs may function as post-transcriptional modulators of Bmal1. In conjunction with previous studies implicating miRNAs as extracellular regulatory signals, our results suggest that circulating miRNAs may play a role in the regulation of the molecular clockworks in peripheral circadian oscillators. PMID:21799909

  8. Rhythmic Components in Extracranial Brain Signals Reveal Multifaceted Task Modulation of Overlapping Neuronal Activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roemer van der Meij

    Full Text Available Oscillatory neuronal activity is implicated in many cognitive functions, and its phase coupling between sensors may reflect networks of communicating neuronal populations. Oscillatory activity is often studied using extracranial recordings and compared between experimental conditions. This is challenging, because there is overlap between sensor-level activity generated by different sources, and this can obscure differential experimental modulations of these sources. Additionally, in extracranial data, sensor-level phase coupling not only reflects communicating populations, but can also be generated by a current dipole, whose sensor-level phase coupling does not reflect source-level interactions. We present a novel method, which is capable of separating and characterizing sources on the basis of their phase coupling patterns as a function of space, frequency and time (trials. Importantly, this method depends on a plausible model of a neurobiological rhythm. We present this model and an accompanying analysis pipeline. Next, we demonstrate our approach, using magnetoencephalographic (MEG recordings during a cued tactile detection task as a case study. We show that the extracted components have overlapping spatial maps and frequency content, which are difficult to resolve using conventional pairwise measures. Because our decomposition also provides trial loadings, components can be readily contrasted between experimental conditions. Strikingly, we observed heterogeneity in alpha and beta sources with respect to whether their activity was suppressed or enhanced as a function of attention and performance, and this happened both in task relevant and irrelevant regions. This heterogeneity contrasts with the common view that alpha and beta amplitude over sensory areas are always negatively related to attention and performance.

  9. Neuroactive substances specifically modulate rhythmic body contractions in the nerveless metazoon Tethya wilhelma (Demospongiae, Porifera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nickel Michael

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sponges (Porifera are nerve- and muscleless metazoa, but display coordinated motor reactions. Therefore, they represent a valuable phylum to investigate coordination systems, which evolved in a hypothetical Urmetazoon prior to the central nervous system (CNS of later metazoa. We have chosen the contractile and locomotive species Tethya wilhelma (Demospongiae, Hadromerida as a model system for our research, using quantitative analysis based on digital time lapse imaging. In order to evaluate candidate coordination pathways, we extracorporeally tested a number of chemical messengers, agonists and antagonists known from chemical signalling pathways in animals with CNS. Results Sponge body contraction of T. wilhelma was induced by caffeine, glycine, serotonine, nitric oxide (NO and extracellular cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP. The induction by glycine and cAMP followed patterns varying from other substances. Induction by cAMP was delayed, while glycine lead to a bi-phasic contraction response. The frequency of the endogenous contraction rhythm of T. wilhelma was significantly decreased by adrenaline and NO, with the same tendency for cAMP and acetylcholine. In contrast, caffeine and glycine increased the contraction frequency. The endogenous rhythm appeared irregular during application of caffeine, adrenaline, NO and cAMP. Caffeine, glycine and NO attenuated the contraction amplitude. All effects on the endogenous rhythm were neutralised by the washout of the substances from the experimental reactor system. Conclusion Our study demonstrates that a number of chemical messengers, agonists and antagonists induce contraction and/or modulate the endogenous contraction rhythm and amplitude of our nerveless model metazoon T. wilhelma. We conclude that a relatively complex system of chemical messengers regulates the contraction behaviour through auto- and paracrine signalling, which is presented in a hypothetical model. We assume

  10. Neuroactive substances specifically modulate rhythmic body contractions in the nerveless metazoon Tethya wilhelma (Demospongiae, Porifera)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellwanger, Kornelia; Nickel, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Background Sponges (Porifera) are nerve- and muscleless metazoa, but display coordinated motor reactions. Therefore, they represent a valuable phylum to investigate coordination systems, which evolved in a hypothetical Urmetazoon prior to the central nervous system (CNS) of later metazoa. We have chosen the contractile and locomotive species Tethya wilhelma (Demospongiae, Hadromerida) as a model system for our research, using quantitative analysis based on digital time lapse imaging. In order to evaluate candidate coordination pathways, we extracorporeally tested a number of chemical messengers, agonists and antagonists known from chemical signalling pathways in animals with CNS. Results Sponge body contraction of T. wilhelma was induced by caffeine, glycine, serotonine, nitric oxide (NO) and extracellular cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP). The induction by glycine and cAMP followed patterns varying from other substances. Induction by cAMP was delayed, while glycine lead to a bi-phasic contraction response. The frequency of the endogenous contraction rhythm of T. wilhelma was significantly decreased by adrenaline and NO, with the same tendency for cAMP and acetylcholine. In contrast, caffeine and glycine increased the contraction frequency. The endogenous rhythm appeared irregular during application of caffeine, adrenaline, NO and cAMP. Caffeine, glycine and NO attenuated the contraction amplitude. All effects on the endogenous rhythm were neutralised by the washout of the substances from the experimental reactor system. Conclusion Our study demonstrates that a number of chemical messengers, agonists and antagonists induce contraction and/or modulate the endogenous contraction rhythm and amplitude of our nerveless model metazoon T. wilhelma. We conclude that a relatively complex system of chemical messengers regulates the contraction behaviour through auto- and paracrine signalling, which is presented in a hypothetical model. We assume that adrenergic

  11. MicroRNA-122 modulates the rhythmic expression profile of the circadian deadenylase Nocturnin in mouse liver.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shihoko Kojima

    Full Text Available Nocturnin is a circadian clock-regulated deadenylase thought to control mRNA expression post-transcriptionally through poly(A tail removal. The expression of Nocturnin is robustly rhythmic in liver at both the mRNA and protein levels, and mice lacking Nocturnin are resistant to diet-induced obesity and hepatic steatosis. Here we report that Nocturnin expression is regulated by microRNA-122 (miR-122, a liver specific miRNA. We found that the 3'-untranslated region (3'-UTR of Nocturnin mRNA harbors one putative recognition site for miR-122, and this site is conserved among mammals. Using a luciferase reporter construct with wild-type or mutant Nocturnin 3'-UTR sequence, we demonstrated that overexpression of miR-122 can down-regulate luciferase activity levels and that this effect is dependent on the presence of the putative miR-122 recognition site. Additionally, the use of an antisense oligonucleotide to knock down miR-122 in vivo resulted in significant up-regulation of both Nocturnin mRNA and protein expression in mouse liver during the night, resulting in Nocturnin rhythms with increased amplitude. Together, these data demonstrate that the normal rhythmic profile of Nocturnin expression in liver is shaped in part by miR-122. Previous studies have implicated Nocturnin and miR-122 as important post-transcriptional regulators of both lipid metabolism and circadian clock controlled gene expression in the liver. Therefore, the demonstration that miR-122 plays a role in regulating Nocturnin expression suggests that this may be an important intersection between hepatic metabolic and circadian control.

  12. MicroRNA-122 modulates the rhythmic expression profile of the circadian deadenylase Nocturnin in mouse liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojima, Shihoko; Gatfield, David; Esau, Christine C; Green, Carla B

    2010-06-22

    Nocturnin is a circadian clock-regulated deadenylase thought to control mRNA expression post-transcriptionally through poly(A) tail removal. The expression of Nocturnin is robustly rhythmic in liver at both the mRNA and protein levels, and mice lacking Nocturnin are resistant to diet-induced obesity and hepatic steatosis. Here we report that Nocturnin expression is regulated by microRNA-122 (miR-122), a liver specific miRNA. We found that the 3'-untranslated region (3'-UTR) of Nocturnin mRNA harbors one putative recognition site for miR-122, and this site is conserved among mammals. Using a luciferase reporter construct with wild-type or mutant Nocturnin 3'-UTR sequence, we demonstrated that overexpression of miR-122 can down-regulate luciferase activity levels and that this effect is dependent on the presence of the putative miR-122 recognition site. Additionally, the use of an antisense oligonucleotide to knock down miR-122 in vivo resulted in significant up-regulation of both Nocturnin mRNA and protein expression in mouse liver during the night, resulting in Nocturnin rhythms with increased amplitude. Together, these data demonstrate that the normal rhythmic profile of Nocturnin expression in liver is shaped in part by miR-122. Previous studies have implicated Nocturnin and miR-122 as important post-transcriptional regulators of both lipid metabolism and circadian clock controlled gene expression in the liver. Therefore, the demonstration that miR-122 plays a role in regulating Nocturnin expression suggests that this may be an important intersection between hepatic metabolic and circadian control.

  13. EIA model documentation: Electricity market module - electricity fuel dispatch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-01-01

    This report documents the National Energy Modeling System Electricity Fuel Dispatch Submodule (EFD), a submodule of the Electricity Market Module (EMM) as it was used for EIA`s Annual Energy Outlook 1997. It replaces previous documentation dated March 1994 and subsequent yearly update revisions. The report catalogues and describes the model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, model source code, and forecast results generated through the synthesis and scenario development based on these components. This document serves four purposes. First, it is a reference document providing a detailed description of the model for reviewers and potential users of the EFD including energy experts at the Energy Information Administration (EIA), other Federal agencies, state energy agencies, private firms such as utilities and consulting firms, and non-profit groups such as consumer and environmental groups. Second, this report meets the legal requirement of the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to provide adequate documentation in support of its statistical and forecast reports. Third, it facilitates continuity in model development by providing documentation which details model enhancements that were undertaken for AE097 and since the previous documentation. Last, because the major use of the EFD is to develop forecasts, this documentation explains the calculations, major inputs and assumptions which were used to generate the AE097.

  14. Age-related changes in rhythmic electrical activity in the cervical sympathetic trunk in rats and cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maslyukov, P M; Korzina, M B; Emanuilov, A I

    2010-03-01

    Baseline electrical activity in the cervical sympathetic trunk was studied in neonatal rats and cats and at ages 10, 20, and 30 days and two and six months, using spectral analysis. Rats from the neonatal period to the end of the first month of life and cats to 20 days of life showed increases at the amplitudes of electrical oscillations. From birth, all animals showed oscillations in the respiratory and cardiac rhythms. From day 20, frequencies with a cardiac component in rats dominated the power spectrum. The proportion of other frequencies, not associated with the cardiac or respiratory rhythms, was smaller. In cats, unlike the situation in rats, there were no age-related changes in the spectral composition of baseline electrical activity. High-frequency oscillations were recorded in cats from birth.

  15. Nuclear modules for space electric propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Difilippo, F. C.

    1998-01-01

    Analysis of interplanetary cargo and piloted missions requires calculations of the performances and masses of subsystems to be integrated in a final design. In a preliminary and scoping stage the designer needs to evaluate options iteratively by using fast computer simulations. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been involved in the development of models and calculational procedures for the analysis (neutronic and thermal hydraulic) of power sources for nuclear electric propulsion. The nuclear modules will be integrated into the whole simulation of the nuclear electric propulsion system. The vehicles use either a Brayton direct-conversion cycle, using the heated helium from a NERVA-type reactor, or a potassium Rankine cycle, with the working fluid heated on the secondary side of a heat exchanger and lithium on the primary side coming from a fast reactor. Given a set of input conditions, the codes calculate composition. dimensions, volumes, and masses of the core, reflector, control system, pressure vessel, neutron and gamma shields, as well as the thermal hydraulic conditions of the coolant, clad and fuel. Input conditions are power, core life, pressure and temperature of the coolant at the inlet of the core, either the temperature of the coolant at the outlet of the core or the coolant mass flow and the fluences and integrated doses at the cargo area. Using state-of-the-art neutron cross sections and transport codes, a database was created for the neutronic performance of both reactor designs. The free parameters of the models are the moderator/fuel mass ratio for the NERVA reactor and the enrichment and the pitch of the lattice for the fast reactor. Reactivity and energy balance equations are simultaneously solved to find the reactor design. Thermalhydraulic conditions are calculated by solving the one-dimensional versions of the equations of conservation of mass, energy, and momentum with compressible flow.

  16. Nuclear modules for space electric propulsion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Difilippo, F.C.

    1998-12-31

    Analysis of interplanetary cargo and piloted missions requires calculations of the performances and masses of subsystems to be integrated in a final design. In a preliminary and scoping stage the designer needs to evaluate options iteratively by using fast computer simulations. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been involved in the development of models and calculational procedures for the analysis (neutronic and thermal hydraulic) of power sources for nuclear electric propulsion. The nuclear modules will be integrated into the whole simulation of the nuclear electric propulsion system. The vehicles use either a Brayton direct-conversion cycle, using the heated helium from a NERVA-type reactor, or a potassium Rankine cycle, with the working fluid heated on the secondary side of a heat exchanger and lithium on the primary side coming from a fast reactor. Given a set of input conditions, the codes calculate composition. dimensions, volumes, and masses of the core, reflector, control system, pressure vessel, neutron and gamma shields, as well as the thermal hydraulic conditions of the coolant, clad and fuel. Input conditions are power, core life, pressure and temperature of the coolant at the inlet of the core, either the temperature of the coolant at the outlet of the core or the coolant mass flow and the fluences and integrated doses at the cargo area. Using state-of-the-art neutron cross sections and transport codes, a database was created for the neutronic performance of both reactor designs. The free parameters of the models are the moderator/fuel mass ratio for the NERVA reactor and the enrichment and the pitch of the lattice for the fast reactor. Reactivity and energy balance equations are simultaneously solved to find the reactor design. Thermalhydraulic conditions are calculated by solving the one-dimensional versions of the equations of conservation of mass, energy, and momentum with compressible flow. 10 refs., 1 tab.

  17. Rhythmic neuronal synchronization in visual cortex entails spatial phase relation diversity that is modulated by stimulation and attention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maris, E.G.G.; Womelsdorf, T.; Desimone, R.; Fries, P.

    2013-01-01

    Groups of neurons tend to synchronize in distinct frequency bands. Within a given frequency band, synchronization is defined as the consistency of phase relations between site pairs, over time. This synchronization has been investigated in numerous studies and has been found to be modulated by senso

  18. Plug-in electric vehicle (PEV) smart charging module

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harper, Jason; Dobrzynski, Daniel S.

    2017-09-12

    A smart charging system for charging a plug-in electric vehicle (PEV) includes an electric vehicle supply equipment (EVSE) configured to supply electrical power to the PEV through a smart charging module coupled to the EVSE. The smart charging module comprises an electronic circuitry which includes a processor. The electronic circuitry includes electronic components structured to receive electrical power from the EVSE, and supply the electrical power to the PEV. The electronic circuitry is configured to measure a charging parameter of the PEV. The electronic circuitry is further structured to emulate a pulse width modulated signal generated by the EVSE. The smart charging module can also include a first coupler structured to be removably couple to the EVSE and a second coupler structured to be removably coupled to the PEV.

  19. Nuclear modules for space electric propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Difilippo, F. C.

    1998-01-01

    The analysis of interplanetary cargo and piloted missions requires the calculations of the performances and masses of subsystems to be integrated in a final design. In a preliminary and scoping stage the designer needs to evaluate options in an iterative way by using simulations that run fast on a computer. As a consequence of a collaborative agreement between the National Aeronautic and Space Administration (NASA) and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), ORNL has been involved in the development of models and calculational procedures for the analysis (neutronic and thermal hydraulic) of power sources for nuclear electric propulsion. The nuclear modules will be integrated into the whole simulation of the nuclear electric propulsion system. The vehicles use either a Brayton direct-conversion cycle, using the heated helium from a NERVA-type reactor, or a potassium Rankine cycle, with the working fluid heated on the secondary side of a heat exchanger and lithium on the primary side coming from a fast reactor. Given a set of input conditions, the codes calculate composition, dimensions, volumes, and masses of the core, reflector, control system, pressure vessel, neutron and gamma shields, as well as the thermal hydraulic conditions of the coolant, clad and fuel. Input conditions are power, core life, pressure and temperature of the coolant at the inlet of the core, either the temperature of the coolant at the outlet of the core or the coolant mass flow and the fluences and integrated doses at the cargo area. Using state-of-the-art neutron cross sections and transport codes, a database was created for the neutronic performance of both reactor designs. The free parameters of the models are the moderator/fuel mass ratio for the NERVA reactor and the enrichment and the pitch of the lattice for the fast reactor. Reactivity and energy balance equations are simultaneously solved to find the reactor design. Thermalhydraulic conditions are calculated by solving the one

  20. Photo-Doped Active Electrically Controlled Terahertz Modulator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bo Zhang; Liang Zhong; Ting He; Jing-Ling Shen

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate an electric-controlled terahertz (THz) modulator which can be used to realize amplitude modulation of terahertz waves with slight photo-doping. The THz pulse transmission was efficiently modulated by electrically controlling the monolayer silicon-based device. The modulation depth reached 100% almost when the applied voltage was 7V at an external laser intensity of 0.6W/cm2. The saturation voltage reduced with the increase of the photo-excited intensity. In a THz continuous wave (CW) system, a significant fall in both THz transmission and reflection was also observed with the increase of applied voltage. This reduction in the THz transmission and reflection was induced by the absorption for electron injection. The results show that a high-efficiency and high modulation depth broadband electric-controlled terahertz modulator in a pure Si structure has been realized.

  1. A solar module fabrication process for HALE solar electric UAVs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carey, P.G.; Aceves, R.C.; Colella, N.J.; Williams, K.A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Sinton, R.A. [Private Consultant, San Jose, CA (United States); Glenn, G.S. [Spectrolab, Inc., Sylmar, CA (United States)

    1994-12-12

    We describe a fabrication process used to manufacture high power-to-weight-ratio flexible solar array modules for use on high-altitude-long-endurance (HALE) solar-electric unmanned air vehicles (UAVs). These modules have achieved power-to-weight ratios of 315 and 396 W/kg for 150{mu}m-thick monofacial and 110{mu}m-thick bifacial silicon solar cells, respectively. These calculations reflect average module efficiencies of 15.3% (150{mu}m) and 14.7% (110{mu}m) obtained from electrical tests performed by Spectrolab, Inc. under AMO global conditions at 25{degrees}C, and include weight contributions from all module components (solar cells, lamination material, bypass diodes, interconnect wires, and adhesive tape used to attach the modules to the wing). The fabrication, testing, and performance of 32 m{sup 2} of these modules will be described.

  2. Lunar Module Electrical Power System Design Considerations and Failure Modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Interbartolo, Michael

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the design and redesign considerations of the Apollo lunar module electrical power system. Included in the work are graphics showing the lunar module power system. It describes the in-flight failures, and the lessons learned from these failures.

  3. Module Eight: Induction; Basic Electricity and Electronics Individualized Learning System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bureau of Naval Personnel, Washington, DC.

    The module covers in greater depth electromagnetic induction, its effects, and how it is used to advantage in electrical circuits; and the physical components, called inductors, designed to take advantage of the phenomenon of electromagnetic induction. This module is divided into four lessons: electromagnetism; inductors and flux density, inducing…

  4. Dynamics of Electrically Modulated Colloidal Droplet Transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dey, Ranabir; Ghosh, Udita Uday; Chakraborty, Suman; DasGupta, Sunando

    2015-10-20

    Electrically actuated transport dynamics of colloidal droplets, on a hydrophobic dielectric film covering an array of electrodes, is studied here. Specifically, the effects of the size and electrical properties (zeta-potential) of the colloidal particles on such transport characteristics are investigated. For the colloidal droplets, the application of an electrical voltage leads to additional attenuation of the local dielectric-droplet interfacial tension. This is due to the electrically triggered enhanced colloidal particle adsorption at the dielectric-droplet interface, in the immediate vicinity of the droplet three-phase contact line (TPCL). The extent of such interfacial particle adsorption, and hence, the extent of the consequential reduction in the interfacial tension, is dictated by the combined effects of the three-phase contact line spreading, particle size, the interfacial electrostatic interaction between the colloidal particles (if charged) and the charged dielectric surface above the activated electrode, and the interparticle electrostatic repulsion. The electrical driving force of varying magnitude, stemming from this altered solid-liquid interfacial tension gradient in the presence of the colloidal particles, culminates in different droplet transport velocity and droplet transfer frequency for different colloidal droplets. We substantiate the inferences from our experimental results by a quasi-steady state force balance model for colloidal droplet transport. We believe that the present work will provide an accurate framework for determining the optimal design and operational parameters for digital microfluidic chips handling colloidal droplets, as encountered in a plethora of applications.

  5. Model documentation: Electricity market module, electricity finance and pricing submodule

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-04-07

    The purpose of this report is to define the objectives of the model, describe its basic approach, and provide detail on how it works. The EFP is a regulatory accounting model that projects electricity prices. The model first solves for revenue requirements by building up a rate base, calculating a return on rate base, and adding the allowed expenses. Average revenues (prices) are calculated based on assumptions regarding regulator lag and customer cost allocation methods. The model then solves for the internal cash flow and analyzes the need for external financing to meet necessary capital expenditures. Finally, the EFP builds up the financial statements. The EFP is used in conjunction with the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). Inputs to the EFP include the forecast generating capacity expansion plans, operating costs, regulator environment, and financial data. The outputs include forecasts of income statements, balance sheets, revenue requirements, and electricity prices.

  6. A New Class of Electrically Tunable Metamaterial Terahertz Modulators

    CERN Document Server

    Yan, Rusen; Liu, Lei; Jena, Debdeep; Xing, Huili Grace

    2012-01-01

    Switchable metamaterials offer unique solutions for efficiently manipulating electromagnetic waves, particularly for terahertz waves, which has been difficult since naturally occurring materials rarely respond to terahertz frequencies controllably. However, few terahertz modulators demonstrated to date exhibit simultaneously low attenuation and high modulation depth. In this letter we propose a new class of electrically-tunable terahertz metamaterial modulators employing metallic frequency-selective-surfaces (FSS) in conjunction with capacitively-tunable layers of electrons, promising near 100% modulation depth and < 15% attenuation. The fundamental departure in our design from the prior art is tuning enabled by self-gated electron layers that is independent from the metallic FSS. Our proposal is applicable to all possible electrically tunable elements including graphene, Si, MoS2, oxides etc, thus opening up myriad opportunities for realizing high performance switchable metamaterials over an ultra-wide te...

  7. Evolution of Spiral Waves under Modulated Electric Fields

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Jun; YING He-Ping; PAN Guo-Wei; PU Zhong-Sheng

    2005-01-01

    @@ Spirals generated from the excitable media within the Barkley model is investigated under the gradient electric fields by a numerical simulation. The spiral drift and spiral break up are observed when the amplitude of the electric fields is modulated by a constant signal or a chaotic signal. It is also verified that, even in the presence of the white noise, the whole system can reach homogeneous states after the spiral breakup, by using an adaptive strategy.

  8. Liquid Metal Thermal Electric Converter bench test module

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lukens, L.L.; Andraka, C.E.; Moreno, J.B.

    1988-04-01

    This report describes the design, fabrication, and test of a Liquid Metal Thermal Electric Converter Bench Test Module. The work presented in this document was conducted as a part of Heat Engine Task of the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Solar Thermal Technology Program. The objective of this task is the development and evaluation of heat engine technologies applicable to distributed receiver systems, in particular, dish electric systems.

  9. Modulation of auditory percepts by transcutaneous electrical stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueberfuhr, Margarete Anna; Braun, Amalia; Wiegrebe, Lutz; Grothe, Benedikt; Drexl, Markus

    2017-07-01

    Transcutaneous, electrical stimulation with electrodes placed on the mastoid processes represents a specific way to elicit vestibular reflexes in humans without active or passive subject movements, for which the term galvanic vestibular stimulation was coined. It has been suggested that galvanic vestibular stimulation mainly affects the vestibular periphery, but whether vestibular hair cells, vestibular afferents, or a combination of both are excited, is still a matter of debate. Galvanic vestibular stimulation has been in use since the late 18th century, but despite the long-known and well-documented effects on the vestibular system, reports of the effect of electrical stimulation on the adjacent cochlea or the ascending auditory pathway are surprisingly sparse. The present study examines the effect of transcutaneous, electrical stimulation of the human auditory periphery employing evoked and spontaneous otoacoustic emissions and several psychoacoustic measures. In particular, level growth functions of distortion product otoacoustic emissions were recorded during electrical stimulation with alternating currents (2 Hz, 1-4 mA in 1 mA-steps). In addition, the level and frequency of spontaneous otoacoustic emissions were followed before, during, and after electrical stimulation (2 Hz, 1-4 mA). To explore the effect of electrical stimulation on the retrocochlear level (i.e. on the ascending auditory pathway beyond the cochlea), psychoacoustic experiments were carried out. Specifically, participants indicated whether electrical stimulation (4 Hz, 2 and 3 mA) induced amplitude modulations of the perception of a pure tone, and of auditory illusions after presentation of either an intense, low-frequency sound (Bounce tinnitus) or a faint band-stop noise (Zwicker tone). These three psychoacoustic measures revealed significant perceived amplitude modulations during electrical stimulation in the majority of participants. However, no significant changes of evoked and

  10. Applied Physics Modules Selected for Electrical and Electronic Technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waring, Gene

    Designed for individualized use in an applied physics course in postsecondary vocational-technical education, this series of twenty-three learning modules is equivalent to the content of two quarters of a five-credit hour class in electrical technology, electronic service technology, electronic engineering technology, or electromechanical…

  11. Electrically modulated transparent liquid crystal-optical grating projection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buss, Thomas; Smith, Cameron; Kristensen, Anders

    2013-01-01

    A transparent, fully integrated electrically modulated projection technique is presented based on light guiding through a thin liquid crystal layer covering sub-wavelength gratings. The reported device operates at 10 V with response times of 4.5 ms. Analysis of the liquid crystal alignment shows ...

  12. Effects of Rhythmic and Melodic Alterations on Rhythmic Perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sink, Patricia E.

    1983-01-01

    Results of the study, which involved undergraduate and graduate music students, demonstrated that (1) various rhythmic alterations affect perception of rhythmic dissimilarity; (2) melody alters perception of rhythmic dissimilarity; (3) and the simultaneous presentation of melody and rhythm may result in reduced attention to absolute rhythmic…

  13. A metamaterial modulator based on electrically controllable electromagnetically induced transparency

    CERN Document Server

    Fan, Yuancheng; Zhang, Fuli; Fu, Quanhong; Dong, Jiajia; Kong, Botao

    2016-01-01

    Electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) is a promising technology for the enhancement of light-matter interactions, and recent demonstrations of the quantum EIT realized in artificial micro-structured medium have remarkably reduced the extreme requirement for experimental observation of EIT spectrum. In this paper, we propose to electrically control the EIT spectrum in a metamaterial for an electromagnetic modulator. A diode acting as a tunable resistor is loaded in the gap of two paired wires to inductively tune the magnetic resonance, which induces remarkable modulation on the EIT spectrum through the metamaterial sample. The experimental measurements confirmed that the prediction of electromagnetic modulation in three narrow bands on the EIT spectrum, and a modulation contrast of up to 31 dB was achieved on the transmission through the metamaterial. Our results may facilitate the study on active/dynamical technology in translational metamaterials, which connect extraordinary manipulations on the flo...

  14. Solar Electric Propulsion Module Concept for the BIFROST Architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohrschneider, R. R.; Olds, J. R.; Sakai, T.; Steffes, S.; Grillmayer, G.

    2002-01-01

    Humanity has dreamed of expanding their realm to include space, and other planetary bodies and to use space to improve our own planet. Space solar power is one methods of improving our own planet through the use of space. However, before this becomes practical the cost of access to space must be reduced drastically. Bifrost is one of many concepts designed to reduce the cost of access to space, and hence enable projects such as space solar power. The overall architecture consists of a magnetic-levitation launch track with one end elevated to approximately 20 kilometers. Logistics modules with attached propulsion modules and aerodynamic fairings are accelerated down the track at speeds varying according to the desired orbit. The propulsion module attached to each logistics module must then provide the velocity to achieve the desired final orbit. Bifrost is set up to launch a common hybrid logistics module size with a number of different propulsion modules suited for different in space applications. This paper concentrates on the low thrust propulsion module. After release from the magnetic-levitation track the propulsion module must be capable of circularizing the hybrid logistics module in geosynchronous orbit from geostationary transfer orbit.The initial transfer orbit would cause the spacecraft to re-enter on a subsequent periapsis pass if no velocity addition was provided by the propulsion module. This places a minimum thrust, and reliability constraint on the propulsion module. Volume constraints are imposed by the launch tube diameter and aerodynamic fairings on the vehicle. A solar electric propulsion system was chosen to provide thrust since the time of flight was not constrained, and the high specific impulse would allow a large payload to reach geosynchronous orbit. Several concepts exist for solar electric propulsion systems including the traditional rigid solar wings, thin film solar arrays, solar concentrators using lenses, and solar concentrators using

  15. Entrainment and the cranial rhythmic impulse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPartland, J M; Mein, E A

    1997-01-01

    Entrainment is the integration or harmonization of oscillators. All organisms pulsate with myriad electrical and mechanical rhythms. Many of these rhythms emanate from synchronized pulsating cells (eg, pacemaker cells, cortical neurons). The cranial rhythmic impulse is an oscillation recognized by many bodywork practitioners, but the functional origin of this impulse remains uncertain. We propose that the cranial rhythmic impulse is the palpable perception of entrainment, a harmonic frequency that incorporates the rhythms of multiple biological oscillators. It is derived primarily from signals between the sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous systems. Entrainment also arises between organisms. The harmonizing of coupled oscillators into a single, dominant frequency is called frequency-selective entrainment. We propose that this phenomenon is the modus operandi of practitioners who use the cranial rhythmic impulse in craniosacral treatment. Dominant entrainment is enhanced by "centering," a technique practiced by many healers, for example, practitioners of Chinese, Tibetan, and Ayurvedic medicine. We explore the connections between centering, the cranial rhythmic impulse, and craniosacral treatment.

  16. 柴胡皂甙调节猫睡眠节律电活动机理的初探%Preliminary study on mechanism of saikosaponins in regulating sleep rhythmical electrical activities in cat

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙兵; 郝洪谦

    2000-01-01

    目的:探讨柴胡皂甙调节猫睡眠节律电活动的机理,揭示中药的药理学作用。方法:给猫侧脑室注射色氨酸羟化酶抑制剂对氯苯丙氨酸(PCPA)50μl(0.1mmol/L),以猫睡眠节律电活动为指标,用睡眠多导仪连续纪录 6h。结果:发现 PCPA 可造成猫睡眠剥夺状态。腹腔注射柴胡皂甙可对抗和翻转 PCPA 所致的睡眠剥夺。结论:柴胡皂甙的致眠作用,可能与脑内的 5-羟色氨(5-HT)的浓度变化有关,本实验为中草药的临床应用提供理论基础。%Objective:In order to study the mechanism on regulatory of saikosaponins on rhythmical electric activities of sleep in Cat. Methods: The effects of intracerebroventricular(ICV) injection of parachorophenylalainine(PCPA - inhibitor of tryptophan hydroxylase) 50μl(0.1mmol/L) on sleep(SWS Ⅰ, SWS Ⅱ and PS) were investigated in cat and by rhythmic electrical activities of sleep in cat were used as indicator. Results: Deprivation of sleep can be found in cat resulted by PCPA during six hours consecutive recording. But simultaneous peritoneal cavity injection of saikosaponins 1.5ml/kg in cat can antgaonize and turnover deprivation of sleep caused by PCPA. Conclusion:It is supposed that effects on sleep caused by saikosaponins may be relative with concentration changes of 5 - HT in the brain.

  17. Modulating the rate and rhythmicity of perceptual rivalry alternations with the mixed 5-HT2A and 5-HT1A agonist psilocybin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Olivia L; Pettigrew, John D; Hasler, Felix; Wallis, Guy M; Liu, Guang B; Hell, Daniel; Vollenweider, Franz X

    2005-06-01

    Binocular rivalry occurs when different images are presented simultaneously to corresponding points within the left and right eyes. Under these conditions, the observer's perception will alternate between the two perceptual alternatives. Motivated by the reported link between the rate of perceptual alternations, symptoms of psychosis and an incidental observation that the rhythmicity of perceptual alternations during binocular rivalry was greatly increased 10 h after the consumption of LSD, this study aimed to investigate the pharmacology underlying binocular rivalry and to explore the connection between the timing of perceptual switching and psychosis. Psilocybin (4-phosphoryloxy-N,N-dimethyltryptamine, PY) was chosen for the study because, like LSD, it is known to act as an agonist at serotonin (5-HT)1A and 5-HT2A receptors and to produce an altered state sometimes marked by psychosis-like symptoms. A total of 12 healthy human volunteers were tested under placebo, low-dose (115 microg/kg) and high-dose (250 microg/kg) PY conditions. In line with predictions, under both low- and high-dose conditions, the results show that at 90 min postadministration (the peak of drug action), rate and rhythmicity of perceptual alternations were significantly reduced from placebo levels. Following the 90 min testing period, the perceptual switch rate successively increased, with some individuals showing increases well beyond pretest levels at the final testing, 360 min postadministration. However, as some subjects had still not returned to pretest levels by this time, the mean phase duration at 360 min was not found to differ significantly from placebo. Reflecting the drug-induced changes in rivalry phase durations, subjects showed clear changes in psychological state as indexed by the 5D-ASC (altered states of consciousness) rating scales. This study suggests the involvement of serotonergic pathways in binocular rivalry and supports the previously proposed role of a brainstem

  18. Multi-functional Electric Module for a Vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bluethmann, William J. (Inventor); Waligora, Thomas M. (Inventor); Fraser-Chanpong, Nathan (Inventor); Reed, Ryan (Inventor); Akinyode, Akinjide Akinniyi (Inventor); Spain, Ivan (Inventor); Dawson, Andrew D. (Inventor); Figuered, Joshua M. (Inventor); Herrera, Eduardo (Inventor); Markee, Mason M. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A multi-functional electric module (eModule) is provided for a vehicle having a chassis, a master controller, and a drive wheel having a propulsion-braking module. The eModule includes a steering control assembly, mounting bracket, propulsion control assembly, brake controller, housing, and control arm. The steering control assembly includes a steering motor controlled by steering controllers in response to control signals from the master controller. A mounting feature of the bracket connects to the chassis. The propulsion control assembly and brake controller are in communication with the propulsion-braking module. The control arm connects to the lower portion and contains elements of a suspension system, with the control arm being connectable to the drive wheel via a wheel input/output block. The controllers are responsive to the master controller to control a respective steering, propulsion, and braking function. The steering motor may have a dual-wound stator with windings controlled via the respective steering controllers.

  19. Modulation Electric Field Intensity Sensor in a Conductive Medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. I. Miseyk

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The requirement to conduct measurements across the big water areas and in the ocean depths arises a problem of creating devices to measure an electric field, being either set on the high-speed mobile carriers, or implemented as the sounders, which investigate a vertical or horizontal structure of the electric field of ocean. Manufactured, designed, and hypothetical devices for measuring poor electric fields of the ocean were analyzed. The analysis allowed us to prove that there is a need in creation of modulation sensors (with modulation of a non-electric origin either with periodically changing capabilities of measuring bases, or with space-changing (and therefore, time-changing position of measuring base of primary converters, as the most effective in terms of allocation and measurement of the modulated signal from unmodulated noise.The paper considers the mathematical models of modulation sensors of electric field intensity in the ultralow-frequency range, which are set on the mobile carriers. It justifies a choice of two basic models of primary converters with a change of the measuring base in space, i.e. with the "changing" base and with the "rotating" base. A feature of the offered models with vertical sounding is the minimum value of noise because of rotation of measuring electrodes in a magnetic field of Earth, and hydrodynamic noise. The paper shows that noise caused by the relative movement of sensor and water completely disappears in two cases:1. for a vertical sounder in the autonomous mode or a horizontal sounder with zero buoyancy in the specified shape of water;2. in a case when the sensor has no component of measuring base in the considered area, for example, for the sensor with in-line array of electrodes located in the horizontal plane.The paper proves advantage of the model with "rotating" measuring base, which provides the maximum power transfer from the primary converter to loading for all relative positions of an external

  20. Electrically modulated dynamic spreading of drops on soft surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dey, Ranabir; Daga, Ashish; DasGupta, Sunando; Chakraborty, Suman

    2015-07-01

    The intricate interaction between the deformability of a substrate and the dynamic spreading of a liquid drop on the same, under the application of an electrical voltage, has remained far from being well understood. Here, we demonstrate that electrospreading dynamics on soft substrates is dictated by the combined interplay of electrocapillarity, the wetting line friction, and the viscoelastic energy dissipation at the contact line. Our results reveal that during such electro-elastocapillarity mediated spreading of a sessile drop, the contact radius evolution exhibits a universal power-law in a substrate elasticity based non-dimensional time, with an electrical voltage dependent spreading exponent. Simultaneously, the macroscopic dynamic contact angle variation follows a general power-law in the contact line velocity, normalized by elasticity dependent characteristic velocity scale. These findings will be beneficial for comprehending droplet spreading dynamics stemming from the combination of electrically modulated spreading and "soft wetting." Hence, our results are likely to provide the foundation for the development of a plethora of applications involving droplet manipulations by exploiting the interplay between electrically triggered spreading and substrate-compliance over interfacial scales.

  1. Functionally Graded Interfaces: Role and Origin of Internal Electric Field and Modulated Electrical Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurya, Deepam; Zhou, Yuan; Chen, Bo; Kang, Min-Gyu; Nguyen, Peter; Hudait, Mantu K; Priya, Shashank

    2015-10-14

    We report the tunable electrical response in functionally graded interfaces in lead-free ferroelectric thin films. Multilayer thin film graded heterostructures were synthesized on platinized silicon substrate with oxide layers of varying thickness. Interestingly, the graded heterostructure thin films exhibited shift of the hysteresis loops on electric field and polarization axes depending upon the direction of an applied bias. A diode-like characteristics was observed in current-voltage behavior under forward and reverse bias. This modulated electrical behavior was attributed to the perturbed dynamics of charge carriers under internal bias (self-bias) generated due to the increased skewness of the potential wells. The cyclic sweeping of voltage further demonstrated memristor-like current-voltage behavior in functionally graded heterostructure devices. The presence of an internal bias assisted the generation of photocurrent by facilitating the separation of photogenerated charges. These novel findings provide opportunity to design new circuit components for the next generation of microelectronic device architectures.

  2. Electrical Power Transmission and Distribution Safety. Module SH-40. Safety and Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Center for Occupational Research and Development, Inc., Waco, TX.

    This student module on electrical power transmission and distribution safety is one of 50 modules concerned with job safety and health. This module focuses on some of the general safety rules, techniques, and procedures that are essential in establishing a safe environment for the electrical power transmission worker. Following the introduction,…

  3. Electric field modulation of tunneling anisotropic magnetoresistance in tunnel junctions with antiferromagnetic electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Minori; Nawaoka, Kohei; Miwa, Shinji; Hatanaka, Shohei; Mizuochi, Norikazu; Suzuki, Yoshishige

    2016-08-01

    We present electric field modulation of tunneling anisotropic magnetoresistance (TAMR) in MnIr|MgO|Ta tunnel junctions. TAMR enables direct observation of the antiferromagnetic spin direction at the MnIr|MgO interface. We found that the shape of magnetoresistance (MR) curve can be modulated by an electric field, which can be explained by electric field modulation of the interfacial magnetic anisotropy at MnIr|MgO.

  4. Rhythmic complexity and predictive coding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vuust, Peter; Witek, Maria A G

    2014-01-01

    Musical rhythm, consisting of apparently abstract intervals of accented temporal events,has a remarkable capacity to move our minds and bodies. How does the cognitive systemenable our experiences of rhythmically complex music? In this paper, we describe somecommon forms of rhythmic complexity...... in music and propose the theory of predictivecoding (PC) as a framework for understanding how rhythm and rhythmic complexit y areprocessed in the brain. We also consider why we feel so compelled by rhythmic tensionin music. First, we consider theories of rhythm and meter perception, which...... ofmusic (“meter”). Finally, we review empirical studies of the neural and behavioral effects ofsyncopation, polyrhythm and groove, and propose how these studies can be seen as specialcases of the PC theory.We argue that musical rhythm exploits the brain’s general principlesof prediction and propose...

  5. Neural correlates of rhythmic expectancy

    OpenAIRE

    Zanto, Theodore P.; Snyder, Joel S.; Large, Edward W.

    2006-01-01

    Temporal expectancy is thought to play a fundamental role in the perception of rhythm. This review summarizes recent studies that investigated rhythmic expectancy by recording neuroelectric activity with high temporal resolution during the presentation of rhythmic patterns. Prior event-related brain potential (ERP) studies have uncovered auditory evoked responses that reflect detection of onsets, offsets, sustains,and abrupt changes in acoustic properties such as frequency, intensity, and spe...

  6. Electricity-Electronics Curriculum Guide. Instructional Modules Level II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    California State Dept. of Education, Sacramento. Div. of Vocational Education.

    These teacher's materials are for a 24-unit competency-based secondary education course on electricity and electronics designed for California public schools. The 24 units are: (1) an orientation; (2) an introduction to electricity; (3) safety; (4) history of electricity; (5) basic electrical skills; (6) magnetism; (7) the nature of electricity;…

  7. System and method of modulating electrical signals using photoconductive wide bandgap semiconductors as variable resistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, John Richardson; Caporaso, George J; Sampayan, Stephen E

    2013-10-22

    A system and method for producing modulated electrical signals. The system uses a variable resistor having a photoconductive wide bandgap semiconductor material construction whose conduction response to changes in amplitude of incident radiation is substantially linear throughout a non-saturation region to enable operation in non-avalanche mode. The system also includes a modulated radiation source, such as a modulated laser, for producing amplitude-modulated radiation with which to direct upon the variable resistor and modulate its conduction response. A voltage source and an output port, are both operably connected to the variable resistor so that an electrical signal may be produced at the output port by way of the variable resistor, either generated by activation of the variable resistor or propagating through the variable resistor. In this manner, the electrical signal is modulated by the variable resistor so as to have a waveform substantially similar to the amplitude-modulated radiation.

  8. Modulating human auditory processing by transcranial electrical stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai eHeimrath

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Transcranial electrical stimulation (tES has become a valuable research tool for the investigation of neurophysiological processes underlying human action and cognition. In recent years, striking evidence for the neuromodulatory effects of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS, transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS, and transcranial random noise stimulation (tRNS has emerged. However, while the wealth of knowledge has been gained about tES in the motor domain and, to a lesser extent, about its ability to modulate human cognition, surprisingly little is known about its impact on perceptual processing, particularly in the auditory domain. Moreover, while only a few studies systematically investigated the impact of auditory tES, it has already been applied in a large number of clinical trials, leading to a remarkable imbalance between basic and clinical research on auditory tES. Here, we review the state of the art of tES application in the auditory domain focussing on the impact of neuromodulation on acoustic perception and its potential for clinical application in the treatment of auditory related disorders.

  9. Kit signaling is essential for development and maintenance of interstitial cells of Cajal and electrical rhythmicity in the embryonic gastrointestinal tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckett, Elizabeth A H; Ro, Seungil; Bayguinov, Yulia; Sanders, Kenton M; Ward, Sean M

    2007-01-01

    Interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) are specialized cells in smooth muscle organs that generate and propagate pacemaker activity, receive inputs from motor neurons, and serve as mechanosensors. In the gastrointestinal tract, development and maintenance of the ICC phenotype have been linked to intracellular signaling via Kit, but its role in development of ICC during embryogenesis is controversial. Here we have studied the development of functional ICC-MY during the late gestational period in mice. Blocking Kit with a neutralizing antibody before and after development of spontaneous electrical activity (E17 to P0) caused loss of ICC-MY networks and pacemaker activity. ICC-MY and pacemaker activity developed normally in W/+ and W(V)/+ heterozygotes, but failed to develop between E17 to P0 in W/W(V) embryos with compromised Kit function. Muscles treated with Kit neutralizing antibody or the tyrosine kinase inhibitor, imatinib mesylate (STI571), from E17-P0 for 3 days caused loss of functionally developed ICC-MY networks, but ICC-MY and pacemaker activity recovered within 9 days after discontinuing treatment with neutralizing antibody or imatinib mesylate. These data suggest that Kit signaling is an important factor in lineage decision and in the development of functional ICC in late gestation. ICC-MY demonstrate significant plasticity in gastrointestinal tissues. Manipulation of the ICC phenotype might provide useful therapies in gastrointestinal disease where the Kit-positive cell population is either lost or amplified.

  10. Spontaneous oscillatory rhythms in the degenerating mouse retina modulate retinal ganglion cell responses to electrical stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Sook eGoo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Characterization of the electrical activity of the retina in the animal models of retinal degeneration has been carried out in part to understand the progression of retinal degenerative diseases like age-related macular degeneration (AMD and retinitis pigmentosa (RP, but also to determine optimum stimulus paradigms for use with retinal prosthetic devices. The models most studied in this regard have been the two lines of mice deficient in the β-subunit of phosphodiesterase (rd1 and rd10 mice, where the degenerating retinas exhibit characteristic spontaneous hyperactivity and oscillatory local field potentials (LFPs. Additionally, there is a robust ~10 Hz rhythmic burst of retinal ganglion cell (RGC spikes on the trough of the oscillatory LFP. In rd1 mice, the rhythmic burst of RGC spikes is always phase-locked with the oscillatory LFP and this phase-locking property is preserved regardless of postnatal ages. However, in rd10 mice, the frequency of the oscillatory rhythm changes according to postnatal age, suggesting that this rhythm might be a marker of the stage of degeneration. Furthermore when a biphasic current stimulus is applied to rd10 mice degenerate retina, distinct RGC response patterns that correlate with the stage of degeneration emerge. This review also considers the significance of these response properties.

  11. Effects of rhythmic precursors on perception of stress/syllabicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stilp, Christian E.; Kluender, Keith R.

    2005-09-01

    Rhythmic structure is a common property of many environmental sounds including speech. Here, perceptual effects of preceding rhythmic context are assessed in experiments employing edited words for which perceived stress/syllabicity are assessed. A series of edited naturally spoken words varying perceptually from ``polite'' to ``plight,'' was created by deleting initial-vowel glottal pulses from a recording of ``polite.'' Words were identified following nonspeech precursor sequences having either trochaic (strong-weak) or iambic (weak-strong) rhythmic patterns. Precursors consisted of a harmonic spectrum (-6-dB/octave slope) filtered by four sinusoidally modulated single-pole filters. Trochaic (strong-weak) and iambic (weak-strong) rhythmic patterns were created by varying amplitude, pitch, and duration in successive segments (akin to beats) of the precursors. Precursors were comprised of two to six repetitions of these patterns. Following trochaic precursors, listeners were more likely to report hearing ``polite'' (iambic). This pattern of results indicates that perception did not assimilate to precursor pattern, consistent with rhythmic expectancy. Instead, perception shifted in a way that contrasts with precursor temporal pattern. Additional results with precursors that are more and less like speech are being conducted to further understand how auditory perception adjusts for temporal and spectral regularities. [Work supported by NIDCD.

  12. Thermal and electrical energy yield analysis of a directly water cooled photovoltaic module

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mtunzi Busiso

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Electrical energy of photovoltaic modules drops by 0.5% for each degree increase in temperature. Direct water cooling of photovoltaic modules was found to give improved electrical and thermal yield. A prototype was put in place to analyse the field data for a period of a year. The results showed an initial high performance ratio and electrical power output. The monthly energy saving efficiency of the directly water cooled module was found to be approximately 61%. The solar utilisation of the naturally cooled photovoltaic module was found to be 8.79% and for the directly water cooled module its solar utilisation was 47.93%. Implementation of such systems on households may reduce the load from the utility company, bring about huge savings on electricity bills and help in reducing carbon emissions.

  13. Interaction between electrical modulation of the brain and pharmacotherapy to control pharmacoresistant epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, Luisa

    2013-05-01

    In spite of the high success rate of many surgical procedures for pharmacoresistant epilepsy, a substantial number of patients do not become seizure-free. Different strategies for electrical modulation of the brain such as Deep Brain Stimulation, Vagal Nerve Stimulation and Transcraneal Magnetic Stimulation have gained considerable interest in the last decade as alternative therapies for patients with medically refractory epilepsy. Research into the mechanism of action of the strategies for electrical modulation of the brain suggests a crucial role of different molecules and channels such as glutamate, γ-aminobutyric acid, adenosine, brain-derived neurotrophic factor, calcium channels, sodium channels as well as extracellular potassium. Electrical modulation of the brain may reduce the overexpression of P-glycoprotein, a drug efflux transporter that reduces the absorption of antiepileptic drugs. Electrical modulation of the brain induces long-term effects associated with beneficial consequences on clinical symptoms observed during the postictal state. In addition, electrical modulation of the brain might also promote the neurogenesis in subjects with pharmacoresistant epilepsy in whom this process is decreased. Targeting the regulatory pathways in charge of the effects of electrical modulation of the brain is discussed as a means to improve its efficacy. Electrical modulation of the brain combined with pharmacotherapy may represent an innovative approach to avoid epileptogenesis, reduce seizure activity, induce beneficial effects during the postictal state, diminish the amount of antiepileptic drugs, and improve alertness, memory and mood in pharmacoresistant epilepsy.

  14. Evidence for Multiple Rhythmic Skills.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Tierney

    Full Text Available Rhythms, or patterns in time, play a vital role in both speech and music. Proficiency in a number of rhythm skills has been linked to language ability, suggesting that certain rhythmic processes in music and language rely on overlapping resources. However, a lack of understanding about how rhythm skills relate to each other has impeded progress in understanding how language relies on rhythm processing. In particular, it is unknown whether all rhythm skills are linked together, forming a single broad rhythmic competence, or whether there are multiple dissociable rhythm skills. We hypothesized that beat tapping and rhythm memory/sequencing form two separate clusters of rhythm skills. This hypothesis was tested with a battery of two beat tapping and two rhythm memory tests. Here we show that tapping to a metronome and the ability to adjust to a changing tempo while tapping to a metronome are related skills. The ability to remember rhythms and to drum along to repeating rhythmic sequences are also related. However, we found no relationship between beat tapping skills and rhythm memory skills. Thus, beat tapping and rhythm memory are dissociable rhythmic aptitudes. This discovery may inform future research disambiguating how distinct rhythm competencies track with specific language functions.

  15. Evidence for Multiple Rhythmic Skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tierney, Adam; Kraus, Nina

    2015-01-01

    Rhythms, or patterns in time, play a vital role in both speech and music. Proficiency in a number of rhythm skills has been linked to language ability, suggesting that certain rhythmic processes in music and language rely on overlapping resources. However, a lack of understanding about how rhythm skills relate to each other has impeded progress in understanding how language relies on rhythm processing. In particular, it is unknown whether all rhythm skills are linked together, forming a single broad rhythmic competence, or whether there are multiple dissociable rhythm skills. We hypothesized that beat tapping and rhythm memory/sequencing form two separate clusters of rhythm skills. This hypothesis was tested with a battery of two beat tapping and two rhythm memory tests. Here we show that tapping to a metronome and the ability to adjust to a changing tempo while tapping to a metronome are related skills. The ability to remember rhythms and to drum along to repeating rhythmic sequences are also related. However, we found no relationship between beat tapping skills and rhythm memory skills. Thus, beat tapping and rhythm memory are dissociable rhythmic aptitudes. This discovery may inform future research disambiguating how distinct rhythm competencies track with specific language functions.

  16. Power Module Cooling for Future Electric Vehicle Applications: A Coolant Comparison of Oil and PGW

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-11-01

    POWER MODULE COOLING FOR FUTURE ELECTRIC VEHICLE APPLICATIONS: A COOLANT COMPARISON OF OIL AND PGW T. E. Salem U. S. Naval Academy 105...and efficient power converters are being developed to support the needs of future ground vehicle systems. This progress is being driven by...2006 2. REPORT TYPE N/A 3. DATES COVERED - 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Power Module Cooling For Future Electric Vehicle Applications: A Coolant

  17. Design Elements and Electrical Performance of a Bifacial BIPV Module

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun-Gu Kang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Bifacial BIPV systems have great potential when applied to buildings given their use of a glass-to-glass structure. However, the performance of bifacial solar cells depends on a variety of design factors. Therefore, in order to apply bifacial solar cells to buildings, a bifacial PV module performance analysis should be carried out, including consideration of the various design elements and reflecting a wide range of installation conditions. This study focuses on the performance of a bifacial BIPV module applied to a building envelope. The results here show that the design elements of reflectivity and the transparent space ratio have the greatest impact on performance levels. The distance between the module and the wall had less of an impact on performance. The bifacial BIPV module produced output up to 30% greater than the output of monofacial PV modules, depending on the design elements. Bifacial BIPV modules themselves should have transparent space ratios of at least 30%. When a dark color is used on the external wall with reflectivity of 50% or less, bifacial BIPV modules with transparent space ratios of 40% and above should be used. In order to achieve higher performance through the installation of bifacial BIPV modules, design conditions which facilitate reflectivity exceeding 50% and a transparent space ratio which exceeds 30% must be met.

  18. Electrical Parasitics and Thermal Modeling for Optimized Layout Design of High Power SiC Modules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bahman, Amir Sajjad; Blaabjerg, Frede; Dutta, Atanu

    2016-01-01

    and parasitic inductance models of SiC power modules. These models can replace the models by Finite Element Methods (FEM) to predict temperatures and electrical parasitics of power modules with much faster speed and acceptable errors and will be used for study of real operation of power modules. As a case study......, the presented models are verified by a conventional and an optimized power module layout. The optimized layout is designed based on the reduction of stray inductance and temperature in a P-cell and N-cell half-bridge module. The presented models are verified by FEM simulations and also experiment....

  19. A rhythmic chest pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenzo Cristoni

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available A middle-aged man with a history of ischemic heart disease presented at the emergency department having had a forty-minute long precordial pain at home and with an electrocardiogram showing a wide complex tachycardia with left bundle branch block shaped QRS. While preparing for urgent electrical cardioversion, the physician practiced a carotid sinus massage which helped to i unveil the supraventricular origin of the arrhythmia (by slowing down heart frequency and thus displaying p waves previously hidden and ii to exclude that the aberrancy was the expression of a transmural ischemia, thanks to the narrowing of the QRS complex. The final diagnosis was atrial tachycardia. The patient consequently received amiodarone IV and was discharged in normal sinus rhythm. We emphasize the importance of correctly diagnosing any rhythm disorder before administering the treatment, if the patient’s clinical condition permits it, in order to ensure the best treatment in urgency and the most appropriate prophylaxis.

  20. Phase-sensitive electric modulation of photoluminescence upon bichromatic excitation of atoms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Astapenko, VA

    2005-01-01

    A new type of modulation of the photoluminescence intensity of atoms excited by a bichromatic laser radiation with the frequency ratio 1 : 2 is proposed and analysed. The modulation is produced by alternating electric field acting on atoms and occurs due to the quantum interference of the amplitudes

  1. Phase-sensitive electric modulation of photoluminescence upon bichromatic excitation of atoms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Astapenko, VA

    2005-01-01

    A new type of modulation of the photoluminescence intensity of atoms excited by a bichromatic laser radiation with the frequency ratio 1 : 2 is proposed and analysed. The modulation is produced by alternating electric field acting on atoms and occurs due to the quantum interference of the amplitudes

  2. Glial Cell Regulation of Rhythmic Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, F. Rob; Ng, Fanny S.; Sengupta, Sukanya; You, Samantha; Huang, Yanmei

    2015-01-01

    Brain glial cells, in particular astrocytes and microglia, secrete signaling molecules that regulate glia–glia or glia–neuron communication and synaptic activity. While much is known about roles of glial cells in nervous system development, we are only beginning to understand the physiological functions of such cells in the adult brain. Studies in vertebrate and invertebrate models, in particular mice and Drosophila, have revealed roles of glia–neuron communication in the modulation of complex behavior. This chapter emphasizes recent evidence from studies of rodents and Drosophila that highlight the importance of glial cells and similarities or differences in the neural circuits regulating circadian rhythms and sleep in the two models. The chapter discusses cellular, molecular, and genetic approaches that have been useful in these models for understanding how glia–neuron communication contributes to the regulation of rhythmic behavior. PMID:25707272

  3. Different types of theta rhythmicity are induced by social and fearful stimuli in a network associated with social memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tendler, Alex; Wagner, Shlomo

    2015-02-16

    Rhythmic activity in the theta range is thought to promote neuronal communication between brain regions. In this study, we performed chronic telemetric recordings in socially behaving rats to monitor electrophysiological activity in limbic brain regions linked to social behavior. Social encounters were associated with increased rhythmicity in the high theta range (7-10 Hz) that was proportional to the stimulus degree of novelty. This modulation of theta rhythmicity, which was specific for social stimuli, appeared to reflect a brain-state of social arousal. In contrast, the same network responded to a fearful stimulus by enhancement of rhythmicity in the low theta range (3-7 Hz). Moreover, theta rhythmicity showed different pattern of coherence between the distinct brain regions in response to social and fearful stimuli. We suggest that the two types of stimuli induce distinct arousal states that elicit different patterns of theta rhythmicity, which cause the same brain areas to communicate in different modes.

  4. Modulation of proprioceptive feedback during functional electrical stimulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Mark Schram; Grey, Michael James

    2013-01-01

    Functional electrical stimulation (FES) is sometimes used as a therapeutic modality in motor rehabilitation to augment voluntary motor drive to effect movement that would otherwise not be possible through voluntary activation alone. Effective motor rehabilitation should require that the central...

  5. Cellular recovery from electroporation using synchronisation modulation as a rescue model for electrically injured cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dando, Robin; Chen, Wei

    2008-12-01

    Electroporation of the plasma membrane resulting in a decrement in transmembrane potential is offered as a model in the study of the rescuing effects of the synchronisation modulation technique by electrically activating sodium potassium adenosine triphosphatase. Living cells were first electrically damaged by a pulsed intensive electric field, resulting in cell membrane electroporation, ion leakages and membrane potential depolarisation. Their recovery rate in natural conditions was compared with that of cells in a synchronisation modulation electric field. Fluorescence readings were taken using confocal microscopy and a potentiometric dye. Significantly more rapid recovery was observed after synchronisation modulation, with cell membranes actually polarised to levels higher than the original resting potential, a feature never seen in naturally recovering cells.

  6. Neural correlates of rhythmic expectancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theodore P. Zanto

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Temporal expectancy is thought to play a fundamental role in the perception of rhythm. This review summarizes recent studies that investigated rhythmic expectancy by recording neuroelectric activity with high temporal resolution during the presentation of rhythmic patterns. Prior event-related brain potential (ERP studies have uncovered auditory evoked responses that reflect detection of onsets, offsets, sustains,and abrupt changes in acoustic properties such as frequency, intensity, and spectrum, in addition to indexing higher-order processes such as auditory sensory memory and the violation of expectancy. In our studies of rhythmic expectancy, we measured emitted responses - a type of ERP that occurs when an expected event is omitted from a regular series of stimulus events - in simple rhythms with temporal structures typical of music. Our observations suggest that middle-latency gamma band (20-60 Hz activity (GBA plays an essential role in auditory rhythm processing. Evoked (phase-locked GBA occurs in the presence of physically presented auditory events and reflects the degree of accent. Induced (non-phase-locked GBA reflects temporally precise expectancies for strongly and weakly accented events in sound patterns. Thus far, these findings support theories of rhythm perception that posit temporal expectancies generated by active neural processes.

  7. Electrical and thermal behaviour of a super-capacitor module: on-line characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rizoug, N.; Bartholomeus, P.; Le Moigne, P. [Ecole Centrale de Lille, L2EP, 59 - Villeneuve D' Ascq (France); Vulturescu, B. [INRETS, Lab. des Technologies Nouvelles, 94 - Arcueil (France)

    2004-07-01

    This paper presents an on-line characterization of a super-capacitor module thanks to a test bench which has been developed in our laboratory. Numerous electrical and thermal data are obtained during the cycling test of the module. These data are used to define the equivalent capacity and series resistance of several super-capacitor elements of the tested module. Two methods are used to determine the parameters of each tested element. The results which are obtained without any additional characterisation test, will allow us to know how the super-capacitor parameters of the module vary during all the life of the tested module. The first results confirm the correlation between the temperature and the electrical behaviour of the super-capacitors. (authors)

  8. Tunable photonic Bloch oscillations in electrically modulated photonic crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Gang; Yu, Kin Wah

    2008-01-01

    We exploit theoretically the occurrence and tunability of photonic Bloch oscillations (PBOs) in one-dimensional photonic crystals (PCs) containing nonlinear composites. Because of the enhanced third-order nonlinearity (Kerr type nonlinearity) of composites, photons undergo oscillations inside tilted photonic bands, which are achieved by the application of graded external pump electric fields on such PCs, varying along the direction perpendicular to the surface of layers. The tunability of PBOs (including amplitude and period) is readily achieved by changing the field gradient. With an appropriate graded pump AC or DC electric field, terahertz PBOs can appear and cover a terahertz band in electromagnetic spectrum.

  9. Tunable photonic Bloch oscillations in electrically modulated photonic crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Gang; Huang, Ji Ping; Yu, Kin Wah

    2008-10-01

    We exploit theoretically the occurrence and tunability of photonic Bloch oscillations (PBOs) in one-dimensional photonic crystals (PCs) containing nonlinear composites. Because of the enhanced third-order nonlinearity (Kerr-type nonlinearity) of composites, photons undergo oscillations inside tilted photonic bands, which are achieved by the application of graded external-pump electric fields on such PCs, varying along the direction perpendicular to the surface of layers. The tunability of PBOs (including amplitude and period) is readily achieved by changing the field gradient. With an appropriate graded pump ac or dc electric field, terahertz PBOs can appear and cover a terahertz band in an electromagnetic spectrum.

  10. Neuronal spike initiation modulated by extracellular electric fields.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo-Sheng Yi

    Full Text Available Based on a reduced two-compartment model, the dynamical and biophysical mechanism underlying the spike initiation of the neuron to extracellular electric fields is investigated in this paper. With stability and phase plane analysis, we first investigate in detail the dynamical properties of neuronal spike initiation induced by geometric parameter and internal coupling conductance. The geometric parameter is the ratio between soma area and total membrane area, which describes the proportion of area occupied by somatic chamber. It is found that varying it could qualitatively alter the bifurcation structures of equilibrium as well as neuronal phase portraits, which remain unchanged when varying internal coupling conductance. By analyzing the activating properties of somatic membrane currents at subthreshold potentials, we explore the relevant biophysical basis of spike initiation dynamics induced by these two parameters. It is observed that increasing geometric parameter could greatly decrease the intensity of the internal current flowing from soma to dendrite, which switches spike initiation dynamics from Hopf bifurcation to SNIC bifurcation; increasing internal coupling conductance could lead to the increase of this outward internal current, whereas the increasing range is so small that it could not qualitatively alter the spike initiation dynamics. These results highlight that neuronal geometric parameter is a crucial factor in determining the spike initiation dynamics to electric fields. The finding is useful to interpret the functional significance of neuronal biophysical properties in their encoding dynamics, which could contribute to uncovering how neuron encodes electric field signals.

  11. Nanosecond electric pulses modulate skeletal muscle calcium dynamics and contraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdez, Chris; Jirjis, Michael B.; Roth, Caleb C.; Barnes, Ronald A.; Ibey, Bennett L.

    2017-02-01

    Irreversible electroporation therapy is utilized to remove cancerous tissues thru the delivery of rapid (250Hz) and high voltage (V) (1,500V/cm) electric pulses across microsecond durations. Clinical research demonstrated that bipolar (BP) high voltage microsecond pulses opposed to monophasic waveforms relieve muscle contraction during electroporation treatment. Our group along with others discovered that nanosecond electric pulses (nsEP) can activate second messenger cascades, induce cytoskeletal rearrangement, and depending on the nsEP duration and frequency, initiate apoptotic pathways. Of high interest across in vivo and in vitro applications, is how nsEP affects muscle physiology, and if nuances exist in comparison to longer duration electroporation applications. To this end, we exposed mature skeletal muscle cells to monopolar (MP) and BP nsEP stimulation across a wide range of electric field amplitudes (1-20 kV/cm). From live confocal microscopy, we simultaneously monitored intracellular calcium dynamics along with nsEP-induced muscle movement on a single cell level. In addition, we also evaluated membrane permeability with Yo-PRO-1 and Propidium Iodide (PI) across various nsEP parameters. The results from our findings suggest that skeletal muscle calcium dynamics, and nsEP-induced contraction exhibit exclusive responses to both MP and BP nsEP exposure. Overall the results suggest in vivo nsEP application may elicit unique physiology and field applications compared to longer pulse duration electroporation.

  12. Physics of the rhythmic applause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Néda, Z; Ravasz, E; Vicsek, T; Brechet, Y; Barabási, A L

    2000-06-01

    We report on a series of measurements aimed to characterize the development and the dynamics of the rhythmic applause in concert halls. Our results demonstrate that while this process shares many characteristics of other systems that are known to synchronize, it also has features that are unexpected and unaccounted for in many other systems. In particular, we find that the mechanism lying at the heart of the synchronization process is the period doubling of the clapping rhythm. The characteristic interplay between synchronized and unsynchronized regimes during the applause is the result of a frustration in the system. All results are understandable in the framework of the Kuramoto model.

  13. Characterization of PV modules by combining results of mechanical and electrical analysis methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sander, Martin; Henke, Bastian; Schwarz, Hannes; Dietrich, Sascha; Schweizer, Stefan; Ebert, Matthias; Bagdahn, Jörg

    2010-08-01

    Photovoltaic modules (PV modules) are supposed to have a lifetime of more than 20 years under various environmental conditions like temperature changes, mechanical loads, etc. Common outdoor exposure may influence efficiency and lifetime which necessitates assessment of PV module performance and detection of output deficits. For this purpose reliable and nondestructive testing methods are desirable. Commercially available PV modules were tested by different analysis methods. The PV module's electrical properties were investigated by thermography and electroluminescence measurements. The combination of these two techniques is well-suited to detect many cell and module defects. A crystalline module showed significant cell breakage after temperature cycle test. To observe the mechanisms of this specific defect type laminated test specimens on smaller scales were produced and analyzed over production process and during temperature cycles derived from the international standards IEC 61215 and IEC 61646. The defect study on small scales allows conclusions about the defect's influence on larger PV modules. Further methods capable for mechanical characterization like Laser Doppler vibrometry, surface geometry scan and digital image correlation are presented briefly. The combination of the methods mentioned above allows a very precise assessment of the mechanical and electrical capability which is essential for reliability and lifetime concepts.

  14. Alpha parameter in quantum-dot amplifier under optical and electrical carrier modulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poel, Mike van der; Birkedal, Dan; Hvam, Jørn Märcher;

    2004-01-01

    Alpha parameter of a long-wavelength quantum-dot amplifier near 1.3 ìm is measured to be below one even with saturated gain. A simple model explains difference in apparent alpha parameter under optical and electrical carrier modulation.......Alpha parameter of a long-wavelength quantum-dot amplifier near 1.3 ìm is measured to be below one even with saturated gain. A simple model explains difference in apparent alpha parameter under optical and electrical carrier modulation....

  15. Autonomic Modulation by Electrical Stimulation of the Parasympathetic Nervous System: An Emerging Intervention for Cardiovascular Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Bo; Lu, Zhibing; He, Wenbo; Huang, Bing; Jiang, Hong

    2016-06-01

    The cardiac autonomic nervous system has been known to play an important role in the development and progression of cardiovascular diseases. Autonomic modulation by electrical stimulation of the parasympathetic nervous system, which increases the parasympathetic activity and suppresses the sympathetic activity, is emerging as a therapeutic strategy for the treatment of cardiovascular diseases. Here, we review the recent literature on autonomic modulation by electrical stimulation of the parasympathetic nervous system, including vagus nerve stimulation, transcutaneous auricular vagal stimulation, spinal cord stimulation, and ganglionated plexi stimulation, in the treatment of heart failure, atrial fibrillation, and ventricular arrhythmias.

  16. Impact of multimedia learning modules on an introductory course on electricity and magnetism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stelzer, Timothy; Brookes, David T.; Gladding, Gary; Mestre, José P.

    2010-07-01

    Web-based multimedia learning modules were added as prelectures to our reformed introductory electricity and magnetism course. Each module consisted of approximately 20 min of narrated animation, and students were given credit for completing them before lecture. To compensate for this additional time, lectures were reduced from 75 to 50 min. In addition to a modest increase in exam performance, the changes dramatically improved student attitudes toward the course in general and lectures in particular.

  17. Design of multi-module experiment-rig of vessel electrical propulsion prime mover

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Chun-ling; WANG Yuan-hui

    2005-01-01

    Combined power plant is widely used in large or medium surface vessel for its predominant performance. It is important to research on using combined power plant as electrical propulsion prime mover for developing the electric propulsion warship.This paper, designs a multi-module experiment-rig and introduces its composition, working principle and disposition scheme,and carried out the dynamic characteristic experiment of the GTD350 gas turbine.

  18. Adenosine A1 receptors are involved in the modulation of the rhythmical respiration in neonatal rat brainstem slice in vitro%腺苷A1受体在离体延髓脑片上对节律性呼吸的调制

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王剑莉; 吴中海; 王宁黔

    2005-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate whether adenosine A1 receptors could modulate primary rhythmical respiration in mammals. Experiments were performed in in vitro brainstem slice preparations from neonatal rats. These preparations included the medial region of the nucleus retrofacialis (mNRF) with the hypoglossal nerve rootlets retained. The activity of the inspiration-related neurons (I neurons) in mNRF and respiratory rhythmical discharge activity (RRDA) of the hypoglossal nerve rootlets were simultaneously recorded by using microelectrodes and suction electrodes, respectively. Possible roles of adenosine A 1 receptors in rhythmical respiration were investigated by administration of adenosine A1 receptor agonist R-phenylisopropyl-adenosine (R-PIA) and its specific antagonist 8-cyclopentyl-1,3- dipropylxanthine (DPCPX) into a modified Kreb's perfusion solution (MKS). DPCPX induced a significant decrease in the expiratory time and the respiratory cycles, and an increase in the discharge frequency and peak frequency of I neurons in the middle phase of inspiration. However, R-PIA significantly decreased the inspiratory time and integral amplitude as well as prolonged respiratory cycle. Moreover, the discharge frequency and the peak frequency of I neurons were decreased in the middle phase of inspiration, but not in the initial and terminal phases. The effect of R-PIA on rhythmical discharges could be partially reversed by additional application of DPCPX. These results indicate that adenosine A1-receptors are possibly involved in the modulation of rhythmical respiration through the inhibitory synaptic input from I neurons.%实验旨在探讨腺苷A1受体在对基本呼吸节律调制中的可能作用.制作新生大鼠离体延髓脑片标本,主要包含面神经后核内侧区(themedial regionofthenucleus retrofacialis,mNRF),并保留完整的舌下神经根.以改良Kreb's液灌流脑片,记录mNRF吸气神经元的电活动,并同步记录舌下神经

  19. Electrical energy generation with differently oriented photovoltaic modules as façade elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pantić Lana S.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the results of theoretical and experimental investigation of electrical energy generated with differently oriented PV modules used as facade elements, are presented. It was found that in 2013, optimally oriented monocristalline solar module of 60 Wp generated 62.9 kWh; horizontal module 58.1 kWh; vertical module oriented toward the South 43.9 kWh; vertical module oriented toward the East 25.7 kWh, and vertical module oriented toward the West 22.9 kWh of electrical energy. Also it was found that optimally oriented Building Integrated PV system (BIPV of 1.2 kWp can produce 1081.6 kWh/year; horizontal, vertical oriented toward the South, vertical oriented toward the East and vertical oriented toward the West can generate 7.6%, 30.2%, 59.2% and 63.6 less electrical energy, respectively. The greenhouse-gas payback periods (GPBP for the optimally oriented and horizontal BIPV systems were estimated to be 7.8 and 8.5 years, respectively. The obtained results can be applied in designing residential, commercial and other buildings with BIPV systems in Serbia. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. TR 33009

  20. Phosphorene Nanoribbons: Electronic Structure and Electric Field Modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soleimanikahnoj, Sina; Knezevic, Irena

    Phosphorene, a newcomer among the 2D van der Waals materials, has attracted the attention of many scientists due to its promising electronic properties. Monolayer phosphorene has a direct band gap of 2 eV located at the Gamma point of the Brillouin zone. Increasing the number of layers reduces the bandgap due to the van der Waals interaction. The direct nature of the bandgap makes phosphorene particularly favorable for electronic transport and optoelectronic applications. While multilayer phosphorene sheets have been studied, the electronic properties of their 1D counterparts are still unexplored. An accurate tight-binding model was recently proposed for multilayer phosphorene nanoribbons. Employing this model along with the non-equilibrium Green's function method, we calculate the band structure and electronic properties of phosphorene nanoribbons. We show that, depending on the edge termination, phosphorene nanoribbons can be metallic or semiconducting. Our analysis also shows that the electronic properties of phosphorene nanoribbons are highly tunable by in-plane and out-of-plane electric fields. In metallic ribbons, the conductance can be switched off by a threshold electric field, similar to field effect devices. Support by the NSF through the University of Wisconsin MRSEC Seed (NSF Award DMR-1121288).

  1. Mastering languages with different rhythmic properties enhances musical rhythm perception

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roncaglia-Denissen, M.Paula; Roor, Drikus; Chen, A.; Sadakata, Makiko

    Previous research suggests that mastering languages with distinct rather than similar rhythmic properties enhances musical rhythmic perception. This study investigates whether learning a second language (L2) contributes to enhanced musical rhythmic perception in general, regardless of first and

  2. The enhanced musical rhythmic perception in second language learners

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roncaglia-Denissen, M.P.; Roor, D.A.; Chen, A.; Sadakata, M.

    2016-01-01

    Previous research suggests that mastering languages with distinct rather than similar rhythmic properties enhances musical rhythmic perception. This study investigates whether learning a second language (L2) contributes to enhanced musical rhythmic perception in general, regardless of first and

  3. Multi-aperture ultra-high-speed imaging with lateral electric field charge modulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagawa, K.; Mochizuki, F.; Seo, M.-W.; Yasutomi, K.; Kawahito, S.

    2016-03-01

    The time resolution of charge modulation in CMOS image sensors has entered the sub-nano second regime and is still reducing toward tens of pico-second. The lateral electric field modulators (LEFM) invented at Shizuoka University has significantly contributed to the recent progress in the solid-state time-resolved imaging field. Based on the LEFM technology, we are developing ultra-high-speed CMOS image sensors whose frame rate or time resolution is determined only by the charge modulation speed. In this presentation, the concept, architecture, example of implementation, and demonstration of 200Mfps single-shot video capturing based on our scheme are shown.

  4. Classifying Written Texts Through Rhythmic Features

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Balint, Mihaela; Dascalu, Mihai; Trausan-Matu, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Rhythm analysis of written texts focuses on literary analysis and it mainly considers poetry. In this paper we investigate the relevance of rhythmic features for categorizing texts in prosaic form pertaining to different genres. Our contribution is threefold. First, we define a set of rhythmic featu

  5. Teaching Rhythmic Gymnastics: A Developmentally Appropriate Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Heather C.

    This book is designed to guide teachers through the process of creating a developmentally appropriate rhythmic gymnastics program for children age 5-11. Rhythmic gymnastics programs develop fitness, inspire creativity, and allow all children to work at their own level. The book features 10 chapters in two parts. Part 1, "Getting Started on a…

  6. Teaching Rhythmic Gymnastics: A Developmentally Appropriate Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Heather C.

    This book is designed to guide teachers through the process of creating a developmentally appropriate rhythmic gymnastics program for children age 5-11. Rhythmic gymnastics programs develop fitness, inspire creativity, and allow all children to work at their own level. The book features 10 chapters in two parts. Part 1, "Getting Started on a…

  7. Thermal and Electrical Effects of Partial Shade in Monolithic Thin-Film Photovoltaic Modules: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silverman, Timothy J.; Deceglie, Michael G.; Sun, Xingshu; Garris, Rebekah L.; Alam, Muhammad Ashraful; Deline, Chris; Kurtz, Sarah

    2015-09-02

    Photovoltaic cells can be damaged by reverse bias stress, which arises during service when a monolithically integrated thin-film module is partially shaded. We introduce a model for describing a module's internal thermal and electrical state, which cannot normally be measured. Using this model and experimental measurements, we present several results with relevance for reliability testing and module engineering: Modules with a small breakdown voltage experience less stress than those with a large breakdown voltage, with some exceptions for modules having light-enhanced reverse breakdown. Masks leaving a small part of the masked cells illuminated can lead to very high temperature and current density compared to masks covering entire cells.

  8. Thermal and Electrical Effects of Partial Shade in Monolithic Thin-Film Photovoltaic Modules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silverman, Timothy J.; Deceglie, Michael G.; Sun, Xingshu; Garris, Rebekah L.; Alam, Muhammad Ashraful; Deline, Chris; Kurtz, Sarah

    2015-06-14

    Photovoltaic cells can be damaged by reverse bias stress, which arises during service when a monolithically integrated thin-film module is partially shaded. We introduce a model for describing a module's internal thermal and electrical state, which cannot normally be measured. Using this model and experimental measurements, we present several results with relevance for reliability testing and module engineering: Modules with a small breakdown voltage experience less stress than those with a large breakdown voltage, with some exceptions for modules having light-enhanced reverse breakdown. Masks leaving a small part of the masked cells illuminated can lead to very high temperature and current density compared to masks covering entire cells.

  9. Electrical neuroimaging reveals early generator modulation to emotional words.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortigue, Stephanie; Michel, Christoph M; Murray, Micah M; Mohr, Christine; Carbonnel, Serge; Landis, Theodor

    2004-04-01

    Functional electrical neuroimaging investigated incidental emotional word processing. Previous research suggests that the brain may differentially respond to the emotional content of linguistic stimuli pre-lexically (i.e., before distinguishing that these stimuli are words). We investigated the spatiotemporal brain mechanisms of this apparent paradox and in particular whether the initial differentiation of emotional stimuli is marked by different brain generator configurations using high-density, event-related potentials. Such would support the existence of specific cerebral resources dedicated to emotional word processing. A related issue concerns the possibility of right-hemispheric specialization in the processing of emotional stimuli. Thirteen healthy men performed a go/no-go lexical decision task with bilateral word/non-word or non-word/non-word stimulus pairs. Words included equal numbers of neutral and emotional stimuli, but subjects made no explicit discrimination along this dimension. Emotional words appearing in the right visual field (ERVF) yielded the best overall performance, although the difference between emotional and neutral words was larger for left than for right visual field presentations. Electrophysiologically, ERVF presentations were distinguished from all other conditions over the 100-140 ms period by a distinct scalp topography, indicative of different intracranial generator configurations. A distributed linear source estimation (LAURA) of this distinct scalp potential field revealed bilateral lateral-occipital sources with a right hemisphere current density maximum. These data support the existence of a specialized brain network triggered by the emotional connotation of words at a very early processing stage.

  10. Effects of rhythmic stimulus presentation on oscillatory brain activity: the physiology of cueing in Parkinson’s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik S. te Woerd

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The basal ganglia play an important role in beat perception and patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD are impaired in perception of beat-based rhythms. Rhythmic cues are nonetheless beneficial in gait rehabilitation, raising the question how rhythm improves movement in PD. We addressed this question with magnetoencephalography recordings during a choice response task with rhythmic and non-rhythmic modes of stimulus presentation. Analyses focused on (i entrainment of slow oscillations, (ii the depth of beta power modulation, and (iii whether a gain in modulation depth of beta power, due to rhythmicity, is of predictive or reactive nature. The results show weaker phase synchronisation of slow oscillations and a relative shift from predictive to reactive movement-related beta suppression in PD. Nonetheless, rhythmic stimulus presentation increased beta modulation depth to the same extent in patients and controls. Critically, this gain selectively increased the predictive and not reactive movement-related beta power suppression. Operation of a predictive mechanism, induced by rhythmic stimulation, was corroborated by a sensory gating effect in the sensorimotor cortex. The predictive mode of cue utilisation points to facilitation of basal ganglia-premotor interactions, contrasting with the popular view that rhythmic stimulation confers a special advantage in PD, based on recruitment of alternative pathways.

  11. Fatigue degradation and electric recovery in Silicon solar cells embedded in photovoltaic modules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paggi, Marco; Berardone, Irene; Infuso, Andrea; Corrado, Mauro

    2014-03-28

    Cracking in Silicon solar cells is an important factor for the electrical power-loss of photovoltaic modules. Simple geometrical criteria identifying the amount of inactive cell areas depending on the position of cracks with respect to the main electric conductors have been proposed in the literature to predict worst case scenarios. Here we present an experimental study based on the electroluminescence (EL) technique showing that crack propagation in monocrystalline Silicon cells embedded in photovoltaic (PV) modules is a much more complex phenomenon. In spite of the very brittle nature of Silicon, due to the action of the encapsulating polymer and residual thermo-elastic stresses, cracked regions can recover the electric conductivity during mechanical unloading due to crack closure. During cyclic bending, fatigue degradation is reported. This pinpoints the importance of reducing cyclic stresses caused by vibrations due to transportation and use, in order to limit the effect of cracking in Silicon cells.

  12. Modulating chemotaxis of lung cancer cells by using electric fields in a microfluidic device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Yu-Chiu; Hsieh, Meng-Hua; Liu, Chung-Chun; Pan, Huei-Jyuan; Liao, Wei-Yu; Cheng, Ji-Yen; Kuo, Po-Ling; Lee, Chau-Hwang

    2014-03-01

    We employed direct-current electric fields (dcEFs) to modulate the chemotaxis of lung cancer cells in a microfluidic cell culture device that incorporates both stable concentration gradients and dcEFs. We found that the chemotaxis induced by a 0.5 μM/mm concentration gradient of epidermal growth factor can be nearly compensated by a 360 mV/mm dcEF. When the effect of chemical stimulation was balanced by the electrical drive, the cells migrated randomly, and the path lengths were largely reduced. We also demonstrated electrically modulated chemotaxis of two types of lung cancer cells with opposite directions of electrotaxis in this device.

  13. Using an Artificial Neural Bypass to Restore Cortical Control of Rhythmic Movements in a Human with Quadriplegia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Gaurav; Friedenberg, David A.; Annetta, Nicholas; Glenn, Bradley; Bockbrader, Marcie; Majstorovic, Connor; Domas, Stephanie; Mysiw, W. Jerry; Rezai, Ali; Bouton, Chad

    2016-09-01

    Neuroprosthetic technology has been used to restore cortical control of discrete (non-rhythmic) hand movements in a paralyzed person. However, cortical control of rhythmic movements which originate in the brain but are coordinated by Central Pattern Generator (CPG) neural networks in the spinal cord has not been demonstrated previously. Here we show a demonstration of an artificial neural bypass technology that decodes cortical activity and emulates spinal cord CPG function allowing volitional rhythmic hand movement. The technology uses a combination of signals recorded from the brain, machine-learning algorithms to decode the signals, a numerical model of CPG network, and a neuromuscular electrical stimulation system to evoke rhythmic movements. Using the neural bypass, a quadriplegic participant was able to initiate, sustain, and switch between rhythmic and discrete finger movements, using his thoughts alone. These results have implications in advancing neuroprosthetic technology to restore complex movements in people living with paralysis.

  14. Workshop Physics Activity Guide, Module 4: Electricity and Magnetism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laws, Priscilla W.

    2004-05-01

    The Workshop Physics Activity Guide is a set of student workbooks designed to serve as the foundation for a two-semester calculus-based introductory physics course. It consists of 28 units that interweave text materials with activities that include prediction, qualitative observation, explanation, equation derivation, mathematical modeling, quantitative experiments, and problem solving. Students use a powerful set of computer tools to record, display, and analyze data, as well as to develop mathematical models of physical phenomena. The design of many of the activities is based on the outcomes of physics education research. The Workshop Physics Activity Guide is supported by an Instructor's Website that: (1) describes the history and philosophy of the Workshop Physics Project; (2) provides advice on how to integrate the Guide into a variety of educational settings; (3) provides information on computer tools (hardware and software) and apparatus; and (4) includes suggested homework assignments for each unit. Log on to the Workshop Physics Project website at http://physics.dickinson.edu/ Workshop Physics is a component of the Physics Suite--a collection of materials created by a group of educational reformers known as the Activity Based Physics Group. The Physics Suite contains a broad array of curricular materials that are based on physics education research, including: Understanding Physics, by Cummings, Laws, Redish and Cooney (an introductory textbook based on the best-selling text by Halliday/Resnick/Walker) RealTime Physics Laboratory Modules Physics by Inquiry (intended for use in a workshop setting) Interactive Lecture Demonstration Tutorials in Introductory Physics Activity Based Tutorials (designed primarily for use in recitations)

  15. Rhythmic engagement with music in infancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zentner, Marcel; Eerola, Tuomas

    2010-03-30

    Humans have a unique ability to coordinate their motor movements to an external auditory stimulus, as in music-induced foot tapping or dancing. This behavior currently engages the attention of scholars across a number of disciplines. However, very little is known about its earliest manifestations. The aim of the current research was to examine whether preverbal infants engage in rhythmic behavior to music. To this end, we carried out two experiments in which we tested 120 infants (aged 5-24 months). Infants were exposed to various excerpts of musical and rhythmic stimuli, including isochronous drumbeats. Control stimuli consisted of adult- and infant-directed speech. Infants' rhythmic movements were assessed by multiple methods involving manual coding from video excerpts and innovative 3D motion-capture technology. The results show that (i) infants engage in significantly more rhythmic movement to music and other rhythmically regular sounds than to speech; (ii) infants exhibit tempo flexibility to some extent (e.g., faster auditory tempo is associated with faster movement tempo); and (iii) the degree of rhythmic coordination with music is positively related to displays of positive affect. The findings are suggestive of a predisposition for rhythmic movement in response to music and other metrically regular sounds.

  16. Hybrid Modulation of Bidirectional Three-Phase Dual-Active-Bridge DC Converters for Electric Vehicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yen-Ching Wang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Bidirectional power converters for electric vehicles (EVs have received much attention recently, due to either grid-supporting requirements or emergent power supplies. This paper proposes a hybrid modulation of the three-phase dual-active bridge (3ΦDAB converter for EV charging systems. The designed hybrid modulation allows the converter to switch its modulation between phase-shifted and trapezoidal modes to increase the conversion efficiency, even under light-load conditions. The mode transition is realized in a real-time manner according to the charging or discharging current. The operation principle of the converter is analyzed in different modes and thus design considerations of the modulation are derived. A lab-scaled prototype circuit with a 48V/20Ah LiFePO4 battery is established to validate the feasibility and effectiveness.

  17. Modulating the vibronic correlation in 2D superconductor by electric field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazempour, Ali; Morshedloo, Toktam

    2017-04-01

    Superconductivity in the extreme two-dimensional atomic layers has been suffered because of the strong affection dimensionality confinement on electron-phonon binding. Here, using first-principles method, we study the effect of applied perpendicular and parallel electric field on the strength of phonon renormalization and electron-phonon coupling in bi-layer MgB2 as a known 2D superconductor. The changes of phonon frequency and line-width demonstrate that important E2 g optical modes are strongly sensitive to the applied parallel electric field which directs to sharp reduction of vibronic coupling. Whereas, we show that perpendicular electric field modulates the system to the strong-coupling superconductor and predict the enhancement of critical temperature Tc . Our study opens up the use of electric filed to probe and measure the variation amount of electron-phonon renormalization as a gauge in 2D superconductivity.

  18. Electric-field-modulated nonvolatile resistance switching in VO₂/PMN-PT(111) heterostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhi, Bowen; Gao, Guanyin; Xu, Haoran; Chen, Feng; Tan, Xuelian; Chen, Pingfan; Wang, Lingfei; Wu, Wenbin

    2014-04-09

    The electric-field-modulated resistance switching in VO2 thin films grown on piezoelectric (111)-0.68Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)O3-0.32PbTiO3 (PMN-PT) substrates has been investigated. Large relative change in resistance (10.7%) was observed in VO2/PMN-PT(111) hererostructures at room temperature. For a substrate with a given polarization direction, stable resistive states of VO2 films can be realized even when the applied electric fields are removed from the heterostructures. By sweeping electric fields across the heterostructure appropriately, multiple resistive states can be achieved. These stable resistive states result from the different stable remnant strain states of substrate, which is related to the rearrangements of ferroelectric domain structures in PMN-PT(111) substrate. The resistance switching tuned by electric field in our work may have potential applications for novel electronic devices.

  19. Test of electrical multi-chip module for Belle II pixel detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, Felix [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Muenchen (Germany); Collaboration: Belle II-Collaboration

    2015-07-01

    DEPFET pixel detectors offer excellent signal to noise ratio, resolution and low power consumption with few material. They will be used at Belle II and are a candidate for an ILC vertex detector. The Electrical Multi-Chip Module (EMCM) has been designed to study the back end of line (BEOL) and the metal layer interconnectivity of the DEPFET matrix production for Belle II. The electrical characterization of the EMCM allows studying the signal and control line routings. Having verified the integrity of the electrical network three different types of ASICs are flip-chipped on the EMCM. The electrical characterization of the assembled module allows the analysis and optimization of the ASICs in terms of data integrity. The EMCM serves also as a mechanical test structure to exercise flip-chip and wire bonding. Finally a small DEPFET prototype matrix is mounted on the module which acts as silicon PCB. Consequently, the full study of the complete readout chain can be done. An overview of the EMCM concept and first characterization results with the latest ASIC generation are presented.

  20. Circadian regulation of pineal gland rhythmicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borjigin, Jimo; Zhang, L Samantha; Calinescu, Anda-Alexandra

    2012-02-05

    The pineal gland is a neuroendocrine organ of the brain. Its main task is to synthesize and secrete melatonin, a nocturnal hormone with diverse physiological functions. This review will focus on the central and pineal mechanisms in generation of mammalian pineal rhythmicity including melatonin production. In particular, this review covers the following topics: (1) local control of serotonin and melatonin rhythms; (2) neurotransmitters involved in central control of melatonin; (3) plasticity of the neural circuit controlling melatonin production; (4) role of clock genes in melatonin formation; (5) phase control of pineal rhythmicity; (6) impact of light at night on pineal rhythms; and (7) physiological function of the pineal rhythmicity.

  1. Method for Signal Processing of Electric Field Modulation Sensor in a Conductive Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. I. Miseyk

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In investigating the large waters and deep oceans the most promising are modulation sensors for measuring electric field in a conducting environment in a very low frequency range in devices of autonomous or non-autonomous vertical sounding. When using sensors of this type it is necessary to solve the problem of enhancement and measurement of the modulated signal from the baseband noise.The work analyses hydrodynamic and electromagnetic noise at the input of transducer with "rotating" sensitive axis. By virtue of matching the measuring electrodes with the signal processing circuit a conclusion has been drawn that the proposed basic model of a transducer with "rotating” sensitive axis is the most efficient in terms of enhancement and measurement of modulated signal from the baseband noise. It has been shown that it is undesirable for transducers to have the rotation of electrodes resulting, in this case, in arising noise to be synchronously changed with transducer rotation frequency (modulation frequency. This will complicate the further signal-noise enhancement later in their processing.The paper justifies the choice of demodulation output signal, called synchronous demodulation using a low-pass filter with a cutoff frequency much lower than the carrier frequency to provide an output signal in the range of very low frequency and dc electric fields.The paper offers an original circuit to process the signals taken from the modulation sensor with "rotating" measurement base. This circuit has advantages over the earlier known circuits for measuring electric fields in a conducting (marine environment in the ultralow frequency range of these fields in terms of sensitivity and measuring accuracy of modulation sensors.

  2. Electrical stimulation modulates injury potentials in rats after spinal cord injury*

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guanghao Zhang; Xiaolin Huo; Aihua Wang; Changzhe Wu; Cheng Zhang; Jinzhu Bai

    2013-01-01

    An injury potential is the direct current potential difference between the site of spinal cord injury and the healthy nerves. Its initial amplitude is a significant indicator of the severity of spinal cord injury, and many cations, such as sodium and calcium, account for the major portion of injury potentials. This injury potential, as wel as injury current, can be modulated by direct current field stimulation;however, the appropriate parameters of the electrical field are hard to define. In this paper, injury potential is used as a parameter to adjust the intensity of electrical stimulation. Injury potential could be modulated to slightly above 0 mV (as the anode-centered group) by placing the anodes at the site of the injured spinal cord and the cathodes at the rostral and caudal sections, or around-70 mV, which is resting membrane potential (as the cathode-centered group) by reversing the polarity of electrodes in the anode-centered group. In addition, rats receiving no electrical stimulation were used as the control group. Results showed that the absolute value of the injury potentials acquired after 30 minutes of electrical stimulation was higher than the control group rats and much lower than the initial absolute value, whether the anodes or the cathodes were placed at the site of injury. This phenomenon il ustrates that by changing the polarity of the electrical field, electrical stimulation can effectively modulate the injury potentials in rats after spinal cord injury. This is also beneficial for the spontaneous repair of the cel membrane and the reduction of cation influx.

  3. Electrical stimulation modulates injury potentials in rats after spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guanghao; Huo, Xiaolin; Wang, Aihua; Wu, Changzhe; Zhang, Cheng; Bai, Jinzhu

    2013-09-25

    An injury potential is the direct current potential difference between the site of spinal cord injury and the healthy nerves. Its initial amplitude is a significant indicator of the severity of spinal cord injury, and many cations, such as sodium and calcium, account for the major portion of injury potentials. This injury potential, as well as injury current, can be modulated by direct current field stimulation; however, the appropriate parameters of the electrical field are hard to define. In this paper, injury potential is used as a parameter to adjust the intensity of electrical stimulation. Injury potential could be modulated to slightly above 0 mV (as the anode-centered group) by placing the anodes at the site of the injured spinal cord and the cathodes at the rostral and caudal sections, or around -70 mV, which is resting membrane potential (as the cathode-centered group) by reversing the polarity of electrodes in the anode-centered group. In addition, rats receiving no electrical stimulation were used as the control group. Results showed that the absolute value of the injury potentials acquired after 30 minutes of electrical stimulation was higher than the control group rats and much lower than the initial absolute value, whether the anodes or the cathodes were placed at the site of injury. This phenomenon illustrates that by changing the polarity of the electrical field, electrical stimulation can effectively modulate the injury potentials in rats after spinal cord injury. This is also beneficial for the spontaneous repair of the cell membrane and the reduction of cation influx.

  4. Investigation of surface charge density on solid-liquid interfaces by modulating the electrical double layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Jong Kyun; Song, Myung Won; Pak, Hyuk Kyu

    2015-05-20

    A solid surface in contact with water or aqueous solution usually carries specific electric charges. These surface charges attract counter ions from the liquid side. Since the geometry of opposite charge distribution parallel to the solid-liquid interface is similar to that of a capacitor, it is called an electrical double layer capacitor (EDLC). Therefore, there is an electrical potential difference across an EDLC in equilibrium. When a liquid bridge is formed between two conducting plates, the system behaves as two serially connected EDLCs. In this work, we propose a new method for investigating the surface charge density on solid-liquid interfaces. By mechanically modulating the electrical double layers and simultaneously applying a dc bias voltage across the plates, an ac electric current can be generated. By measuring the voltage drop across a load resistor as a function of bias voltage, we can study the surface charge density on solid-liquid interfaces. Our experimental results agree very well with the simple equivalent electrical circuit model proposed here. Furthermore, using this method, one can determine the polarity of the adsorbed state on the solid surface depending on the material used. We expect this method to aid in the study of electrical phenomena on solid-liquid interfaces.

  5. Electrical production testing of the D0 Silicon microstrip tracker detector modules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D0, SMT Production Testing Group; /Fermilab

    2006-03-01

    The D0 Silicon Microstrip Tracker (SMT) is the innermost system of the D0 detector in Run 2. It consists of 912 detector units, corresponding to 5 different types of assemblies, which add up to a system with 792,576 readout channels. The task entrusted to the Production Testing group was to thoroughly debug, test and grade each detector module before its installation in the tracker. This note describes the production testing sequence and the procedures by which the detector modules were electrically tested and characterized at the various stages of their assembly.

  6. Photonic Implementation of 4-QAM/QPSK Electrical Modulation at Millimeter-Wave Frequency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yu, Xianbin; Jensen, Jesper Bevensee; Tafur Monroy, Idelfonso

    2008-01-01

    We propose a photonic method for generating millimeter-wave 4-QAM/QPSK modulated signals. The method is based on optical phase modulation by multilevel electrical signals and optical carrier-suppression. Simulation results are presented for 2.5 Gsymbol/s 4-QAM and QPSK signals at a 36 GHz carrier....... Furthermore, this method can be extended to generate millimeter-wave m-PSK signals and can be incorporated into broadband radio-over-fiber systems to support wireless/ wireline converged access network....

  7. Gap opening and tuning in single-layer graphene with combined electric and magnetic field modulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lin Xin; Wang Hai-Long; Pan Hui; Xu Huai-Zhe

    2011-01-01

    The energy band structure of single-layer graphene under one-dimensional electric and magnetic field modulation is theoretically investigated. The criterion for bandgap opening at the Dirac point is analytically derived with a two-fold degeneracy second-order perturbation method. It is shown that a direct or an indirect bandgap semiconductor could be realized in a single-layer graphene under some specific configurations of the electric and magnetic field arrangement. Due to the bandgap generated in the single-layer graphene, the Klein tunneling observed in pristine graphene is completely suppressed.

  8. Emerging subspecialties in neurology: deep brain stimulation and electrical neuro-network modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Anhar; Okun, Michael S

    2013-01-29

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is a surgical therapy that involves the delivery of an electrical current to one or more brain targets. This technology has been rapidly expanding to address movement, neuropsychiatric, and other disorders. The evolution of DBS has created a niche for neurologists, both in the operating room and in the clinic. Since DBS is not always deep, not always brain, and not always simply stimulation, a more accurate term for this field may be electrical neuro-network modulation (ENM). Fellowships will likely in future years evolve their scope to include other technologies, and other nervous system regions beyond typical DBS therapy.

  9. Rhythmic Gymnastics: A Challenge with Balls and Ropes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, John P.

    Rhythmic gymnastics is an outgrowth of rhythmic and dance gymnastics and promotes good posture, strength, flexibility, balance, and coordination, along with appreciation of music and movement together. The current status of rhythmic gymnastics and its historical development are briefly discussed. Descriptions are given of rhythmic gymnastic…

  10. POWER ELECTRONIC SYSTEM FOR POWER ELECTRIC VEHICLES WITH ALGORITHMS OF SYNCHRONOUS MODULATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleschuk V.

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Schemes of synchronous space-vector modulation have been adapted for control of split-phase drive for electric vehicle with open-end windings of induction motor, supplied by several voltage source inverters. MATLAB-based simulation of processes in this system has been executed. It has been shown, that the use of algorithms of synchronous modulation provides symmetry of phase voltage waveforms for any ratio between the switching frequency and fundamental frequency, and for any voltage magnitudes of dc-sources. Spectra of the phase voltage of system do not contain even harmonics and subharmonics (of the fundamental frequency, which is especially important for drives for the medium-power and high-power electric vehicles.

  11. Full wave analysis of non-radiative dielectric waveguide modulator for the determination of electrical equivalent circuit

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    N P Pathak; A Basu; S K Koul

    2008-07-01

    This paper reports the determination of electrical equivalent circuit of ON/OFF modulator in non-radiative dielectric (NRD) guide configurations at Ka-band. Schottky barrier mixer diode is used to realize this modulator and its characteristics are determined experimentally using vector network analyzer. Full wave FEM simulator HFSS is used to determine an equivalent circuit for the mounted diode and modulator in ON and OFF states. This equivalent circuit is used to qualitatively explain the experimental characteristics of modulator.

  12. Thyroid hormone and seasonal rhythmicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugues eDardente

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Living organisms show seasonality in a wide array of functions such as reproduction, fattening, hibernation and migration. At temperate latitudes, changes in photoperiod maintain the alignment of annual rhythms with predictable changes in the environment. The appropriate physiological response to changing photoperiod in mammals requires retinal detection of light and pineal secretion of melatonin, but extraretinal detection of light occurs in birds. A common mechanism across all vertebrates is that these photoperiod-regulated systems alter hypothalamic thyroid hormone conversion. Here we review the evidence that a circadian clock within the pars tuberalis of the adenohypophysis links photoperiod decoding to local changes of thyroid hormone signalling within the medio-basal hypothalamus through a conserved thyrotropin/deiodinase axis. We also focus on recent findings which indicate that, beyond the photoperiodic control of its conversion, thyroid hormone might also be involved in longer term timing processes of seasonal programs. Finally, we examine the potential implication of kisspeptin and RFRP3, two RF-amide peptides expressed within the medio-basal hypothalamus, in seasonal rhythmicity.

  13. Thermal to Electrical Energy Conversion of Skutterudite-Based Thermoelectric Modules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salvador, James R. [GM R& D and Planning, Warren, Michigan; Cho, Jung Y [GM R& D and Planning, Warren, Michigan; Ye, Zuxin [GM Research and Development Center; Moczygemba, Joshua E. [Marlow Industries, Inc; Thompson, Alan [Marlow Industries, Inc; Sharp, Jeff W. [Marlow Industries, Inc; Konig, Jan [Fraunhofer-Institute, Freiburg, Germany; Maloney, Ryan [Michigan State University; Thompson, Travis [Michigan State University; Sakamoto, Jeff [Michigan State University; Wang, Hsin [ORNL; Wereszczak, Andrew A [ORNL; Meisner, G P [General Motors Corporation-R& D

    2013-01-01

    The performance of thermoelectric (TE) materials has improved tremendously over the past decade. The intrinsic thermal and electrical properties of state-of-the-art TE materials demonstrate that the potential for widespread practical TE applications is very large and includes TE generators (TEGs) for automotive waste heat recovery. TE materials for automotive TEG applications must have good intrinsic performance, be thermomechanically compatible, and be chemically stable in the 400 K to 850 K temperature range. Both n-type and p-type varieties must be available at low cost, easily fabricated, and durable. They must also form robust junctions and develop good interfaces with other materials to permit efficient flows of electrical and thermal energy. Among the TE materials of interest for automotive waste heat recovery systems are the skutterudite compounds, which are the antimony-based transition-metal compounds RTE4Sb12, where R can be an alkali metal (e.g., Na, K), alkaline earth (e.g., Ba), or rare earth (e.g., La, Ce, Yb), and TE can be a transition metal (e.g., Co, Fe). We synthesized a considerable quantity of n-type and p-type skutterudites, fabricated TE modules, incorporated these modules into a prototype TEG, and tested the TEG on a production General Motors (GM) vehicle. We discuss our progress on skutterudite TE module fabrication and present module performance data for electrical power output under simulated operating conditions for automotive waste heat recovery systems. We also present preliminary durability results on our skutterudite modules.

  14. Hyperpolarization of the membrane potential in cardiomyocyte tissue slices by the synchronization modulation electric field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dando, Robin; Fang, Zhihui; Chen, Wei

    2012-02-01

    Our previous studies have shown that a specially designed, so-called synchronization modulation electric field can entrain active transporter Na/K pumps in the cell membrane. This approach was previously developed in a study of single cells using a voltage clamp to monitor the pump currents. We are now expanding our study from isolated single cells to aggregated cells in a 3-dimensional cell matrix, through the use of a tissue slice from the rat heart. The slice is about 150 μm in thickness, meaning the slices contain many cell layers, resulting in a simplified 3-dimensional system. A fluorescent probe was used to identify the membrane potential and the ionic concentration gradients across the cell membrane. In spite of intrinsic cell-to-cell interactions and the difficulty in stimulating cell aggregation in the tissue slice, the oscillating electric field increased the intracellular fluorescent intensity, indicating elevation of the cell ionic concentration and hyperpolarization of the cell membrane. Blockage of these changes by ouabain confirmed that the results are directly related to Na/K pumps. These results along with the backward modulation indicate that the synchronization modulation electric field can influence the Na/K pumps in tissue cells of a 3-dimensional matrix and therefore hyperpolarize the cell membrane.

  15. Event related desynchronization-modulated functional electrical stimulation system for stroke rehabilitation: A feasibility study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahashi Mitsuru

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We developed an electroencephalogram-based brain computer interface system to modulate functional electrical stimulation (FES to the affected tibialis anterior muscle in a stroke patient. The intensity of FES current increased in a stepwise manner when the event-related desynchronization (ERD reflecting motor intent was continuously detected from the primary cortical motor area. Methods We tested the feasibility of the ERD-modulated FES system in comparison with FES without ERD modulation. The stroke patient who presented with severe hemiparesis attempted to perform dorsiflexion of the paralyzed ankle during which FES was applied either with or without ERD modulation. Results After 20 minutes of training, the range of movement at the ankle joint and the electromyography amplitude of the affected tibialis anterior muscle were significantly increased following the ERD-modulated FES compared with the FES alone. Conclusions The proposed rehabilitation technique using ERD-modulated FES for stroke patients was feasible. The system holds potentials to improve the limb function and to benefit stroke patients.

  16. Module Embedded Micro-inverter Smart Grid Ready Residential Solar Electric System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agamy, Mohammed [GE Global Research Center, Niskayuna, NY (United States)

    2015-10-27

    The “Module Embedded Micro-inverter Smart Grid Ready Residential Solar Electric System” program is focused on developing innovative concepts for residential photovoltaic (PV) systems with the following objectives: to create an Innovative micro-inverter topology that reduces the cost from the best in class micro-inverter and provides high efficiency (>96% CEC - California Energy Commission), and 25+ year warranty, as well as reactive power support; integrate micro-inverter and PV module to reduce system price by at least $0.25/W through a) accentuating dual use of the module metal frame as a large area heat spreader reducing operating temperature, and b) eliminating redundant wiring and connectors; and create micro-inverter controller handles smart grid and safety functions to simplify implementation and reduce cost.

  17. Control of a Dual-Stator Flux-Modulated Motor for Electric Vehicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinhua Guo

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the control strategies for a novel dual-stator flux-modulated (DSFM motor for application in electric vehicles (EVs. The DSFM motor can be applied to EVs because of its simple winding structure, high reliability, and its use of two stators and rotating modulation steels in the air gap. Moreover, it outperforms conventional brushless doubly-fed machines in terms of control performance. Two stator-current-oriented vector controls with different excitation in the primary winding, direct and alternating current excitation, are designed, simulated, and evaluated on a custom-made DSFM prototype allowing the decoupled control of torque. The stable speed response and available current characteristics strongly validate the feasibility of the two control methods. Furthermore, the proposed control methods can be employed in other applications of flux-modulated motors.

  18. Modulation of electrical mobility in Au ion irradiated titanium oxide with crystal field splitting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyun-Woo; Jun, Byung-Hyuk; Choi, Dukhyun; Chung, Kwun-Bum

    2016-11-01

    Electrical modulation of radio frequency (RF) sputtered TiO2- x films were investigated as a function of Au swift heavy ion irradiation dose at room temperature. The prepared TiO2- x films were irradiated with 130 MeV Au swift heavy ion in the range from 1 × 1011 to 5 × 1012 ions/cm2. As the Au ion irradiation dose increased up to 1 × 1012 ions/cm2, the electrical mobility of TiO2- x films were dramatically increased 3.07 × 102 cm2 V-1 s-1 without the change of carrier concentration. These changes in electrical properties of Au irradiated TiO2- x film, are related to the modification of electronic structure such as crystal field splitting of Ti 3d orbital hybridization and sub-band edge states below the conduction band as a function of Au swift heavy ion irradiation dose.

  19. Modulating protein behaviors on responsive surface by external electric fields: A molecular dynamics study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Yun, E-mail: xieyunxx@gdpu.edu.cn; Pan, Yufang; Zhang, Rong; Liang, Ying; Li, Zhanchao

    2015-01-30

    Graphical abstract: The adsorption of Cyt c on phosphorylcholine self-assembled monolayers (N atoms of the choline groups are colored in blue while the P atoms of the phosphate groups in orange). - Highlights: • PC-SAM could sensitively adjust its charge distribution to applied electric fields. • Adsorption of Cyt c on the PC-SAM is promoted or retarded as the charge distribution of the SAM changes. • Orientations of Cyt c on the PC-SAM are regulated by the structural changes of the SAM. • The structural changes of the SAM cause little deformation in Cyt c. - Abstract: Molecular dynamics simulations were employed to investigate the modulation of protein behaviors on the electrically responsive zwitterionic phosphorylcholine self-assembled monolayers (PC-SAMs). Results show that PC-SAMs could sensitively respond to the applied electric fields and exhibit three states with different charge distributions, namely both the negatively charged phosphate groups and the positively charged choline groups are exposed to the solution in the absence of electric fields (state 1), phosphate groups exposed in the presence of positive electric fields (state 2), and choline groups exposed in the presence of negative electric fields (state 3). Under state 1, the adsorption of Cyt c on the PC-SAM is reversible and the orientations of Cyt c are randomly distributed. Under state 2, the adsorption of Cyt c is enhanced due to the electrostatic attractions between the exposed phosphate groups and the positively charged protein; when adsorbed on the PC-SAMs, Cyt c tends to adopt the orientation with the heme plane perpendicular to the surface plane, and the percentage of this orientation increases as the field strength rises up. Under state 3, the adsorption of Cyt c is retarded because of the electrostatic repulsions between the exposed choline groups and the protein; however, if the gaps between PC chains are large enough, Cyt c could insert into the PC-SAM and access the

  20. Effects of Rhythmic and Melodic Alterations and Selected Musical Experiences on Rhythmic Processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sink, Patricia E.

    1984-01-01

    Study showed that music listening habits and preferences and instrument training may affect ways an individual processes the multiple dimensions of rhythm. Apparent alterations in tempo, duration and pitch characteristics, rhythmic and melodic phrase patterning, and monotony may serve as organizers of rhythmic processing. (Author/RM)

  1. Inhibition of midbrain-evoked tonic and rhythmic motor activity by cutaneous stimulation in decerebrate cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyaert, C A; Haouzi, P; Marchal, F

    2003-03-01

    The effect of mechanical and electrical stimulation of cervical cutaneous afferents was analysed on both the centrally induced tonic and rhythmic activities in hindlimb antagonist muscle nerves of 16 decerebrate paralysed cats. Electrical stimulation of dorsal midbrain evoked in the nerve to the tibialis anterior muscle (TAn) either rhythmic discharges (n=14), associated with tonic discharges in ten cats, or only tonic discharges (n=4). Centrally induced activity in the ipsilateral nerve to gastrocnemius medialis (GMn) occurred in fewer cats (n=12) and displayed similar patterns as in TAn. Manual traction of the scruff of the neck reduced the TAn tonic and rhythmic discharges (n=6) by 73% (P<0.05) and 71% (P<0.05), respectively, and reduced only the tonic component of GMn discharges (by 41%, n=3). Electrical stimulation (impulses 0.1-0.5 ms, 50 Hz) of cervical nerves belonging to C5 or C6 dermatomes, the intensity (0.4-4 mA) of which induced minimal inhibition of both TAn and GMn discharges, reduced significantly the tonic component of TAn discharges (by 39%, n=4). At higher intensities of electrical cervical nerve stimulation (2-6 mA) inducing maximal inhibitory effect, both tonic and rhythmic activities in TAn and GMn were both significantly reduced by, respectively, 81% and 94% in TAn (n=7), and by 49% and 43% in GMn (n=7). Electrical cervical nerve stimulation consistently reduced the isolated tonic discharge in TAn by 66% (n=4, P<0.05) and in GMn by 23% (n=3) when present. Thus the tonic component was more sensitive to inhibition than the rhythmic component of hindlimb muscle nerve activity.

  2. Effect of Sintering Temperature on Electrical Properties of Chip on Glass Module with Direct Printing Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Young-Chul; Kim, Yongil; Jung, Seung-Boo

    2012-09-01

    In order to apply the direct printing method to the fabrication of chip on glass (COG) modules, we examined that the effect of the sintering temperature on the electrical properties of a COG module with direct printing method. Firstly, we fabricated an Ag conductive circuit on a glass substrate by the screen-printing method. To investigate its the effect on the electrical properties of the circuit, it was sintered at various temperatures, such as 150, 200, 250, and 300 °C for 30 min. Subsequently, we conducted Au electro-plating for the fabrication of a Si dummy chip. Finally, the flip-chip bonding process was conducted using anisotropic conductive film (ACF). The printed Ag circuits were well formed on the quartz substrate without any shorts or remarkable changes compared with the initial design. The electrical properties of the printed Ag circuits improved with increasing sintering temperature. The conductive particles in the ACF were well deformed in between the Au bumps and printed Ag pads after the bonding process. The four-point probe method was employed to measure the connection resistance of the joints constructed with the Au bumps on the Si chip and printed Ag circuit on the quartz substrate. The resistances of the interconnections drastically decreased with increasing sintering temperature, i.e., subsequently converged from 11.8 Ω to 7.36 mΩ.

  3. Modulation of electrical potential and conductivity in an atomic-layer semiconductor heterojunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Yu; Yoshida, Shoji; Sakurada, Ryuji; Takashima, Kengo; Yamamoto, Takahiro; Saito, Tetsuki; Konabe, Satoru; Taniguchi, Takashi; Watanabe, Kenji; Maniwa, Yutaka; Takeuchi, Osamu; Shigekawa, Hidemi; Miyata, Yasumitsu

    2016-08-01

    Semiconductor heterojunction interfaces have been an important topic, both in modern solid state physics and in electronics and optoelectronics applications. Recently, the heterojunctions of atomically-thin transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs) are expected to realize one-dimensional (1D) electronic systems at their heterointerfaces due to their tunable electronic properties. Herein, we report unique conductivity enhancement and electrical potential modulation of heterojunction interfaces based on TMDC bilayers consisted of MoS2 and WS2. Scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy analyses showed the formation of 1D confining potential (potential barrier) in the valence (conduction) band, as well as bandgap narrowing around the heterointerface. The modulation of electronic properties were also probed as the increase of current in conducting atomic force microscopy. Notably, the observed band bending can be explained by the presence of 1D fixed charges around the heterointerface. The present findings indicate that the atomic layer heterojunctions provide a novel approach to realizing tunable 1D electrical potential for embedded quantum wires and ultrashort barriers of electrical transport.

  4. Modulation of electrical potential and conductivity in an atomic-layer semiconductor heterojunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Yu; Yoshida, Shoji; Sakurada, Ryuji; Takashima, Kengo; Yamamoto, Takahiro; Saito, Tetsuki; Konabe, Satoru; Taniguchi, Takashi; Watanabe, Kenji; Maniwa, Yutaka; Takeuchi, Osamu; Shigekawa, Hidemi; Miyata, Yasumitsu

    2016-08-12

    Semiconductor heterojunction interfaces have been an important topic, both in modern solid state physics and in electronics and optoelectronics applications. Recently, the heterojunctions of atomically-thin transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs) are expected to realize one-dimensional (1D) electronic systems at their heterointerfaces due to their tunable electronic properties. Herein, we report unique conductivity enhancement and electrical potential modulation of heterojunction interfaces based on TMDC bilayers consisted of MoS2 and WS2. Scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy analyses showed the formation of 1D confining potential (potential barrier) in the valence (conduction) band, as well as bandgap narrowing around the heterointerface. The modulation of electronic properties were also probed as the increase of current in conducting atomic force microscopy. Notably, the observed band bending can be explained by the presence of 1D fixed charges around the heterointerface. The present findings indicate that the atomic layer heterojunctions provide a novel approach to realizing tunable 1D electrical potential for embedded quantum wires and ultrashort barriers of electrical transport.

  5. Systems Level Regulation of Rhythmic Growth Rate and Biomass Accumulation in Grasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kay, Steve A. [University of California San Diego

    2013-05-02

    Several breakthroughs have been recently made in our understanding of plant growth and biomass accumulation. It was found that plant growth is rhythmically controlled throughout the day by the circadian clock through a complex interplay of light and phytohormone signaling pathways. While plants such as the C4 energy crop sorghum (Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench) and possibly the C3 grass (Brachypodium distachyon) also exhibit daily rhythms in growth rate, the molecular details of its regulation remain to be explored. A better understanding of diurnally regulated growth behavior in grasses may lead to species-specific mechanisms highly relevant to future strategies to optimize energy crop biomass yield. Here we propose to devise a systems approach to identify, in parallel, regulatory hubs associated with rhythmic growth in C3 and C4 plants. We propose to use rhythmicity in daily growth patterns to drive the discovery of regulatory network modules controlling biomass accumulation.

  6. Rhythmic and dysrhythmic thalamocortical dynamics: GABA systems and the edge effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llinás, Rodolfo; Urbano, Francisco J; Leznik, Elena; Ramírez, Rey R; van Marle, Hein J F

    2005-06-01

    Brain function is fundamentally related in the most general sense to the richness of thalamocortical interconnectivity, and in particular to the rhythmic oscillatory properties of thalamocortical loops. Such rhythmicity is involved in the genesis of cognition, in the sleep-wake cycle, and in several neurological and psychiatric disorders. The role of GABA-mediated transmission in regulating these functional states is addressed here. At the cortical level, inhibition determines the spread of cortical activation by sculpting the precise activity patterns that underlie the details of cognition and motor control. At the thalamic level, GABA-mediated inhibition modulates and resets distribution of the ongoing thalamocortical rhythmic oscillations that bind multisensory inputs into a single cognitive experience and regulate arousal levels.

  7. A comparison between the neural correlates of laser and electric pain stimulation and their modulation by expectation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hird, E J; Jones, A K P; Talmi, D; El-Deredy, W

    2017-09-19

    Pain is modulated by expectation. Event-related potential (ERP) studies of the influence of expectation on pain typically utilise laser heat stimulation to provide a controllable nociceptive-specific stimulus. Painful electric stimulation has a number of practical advantages, but is less nociceptive-specific. We compared the modulation of electric versus laser-evoked pain by expectation, and their corresponding pain-evoked and anticipatory ERPs. We developed understanding of recognised methods of laser and electric stimulation. We tested whether pain perception and neural activity induced by electric stimulation was modulated by expectation, whether this expectation elicited anticipatory neural correlates, and how these measures compared to those associated with laser stimulation by eliciting cue-evoked expectations of high and low pain in a within-participant design. Despite sensory and affective differences between laser and electric pain, intensity ratings and pain-evoked potentials were modulated equivalently by expectation, though ERPs only correlated with pain ratings in the laser pain condition. Anticipatory correlates differentiated pain intensity expectation to laser but not electric pain. Previous studies show that laser-evoked potentials are modulated by expectation. We extend this by showing electric pain-evoked potentials are equally modulated by expectation, within the same participants. We also show a difference between the pain types in anticipation. Though laser-evoked potentials express a stronger relationship with pain perception, both laser and electric stimulation may be used to study the modulation of pain-evoked potentials by expectation. Anticipatory-evoked potentials are elicited by both pain types, but they may reflect different processes. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Rhythmic patterning in Malaysian and Singapore English.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Rachel Siew Kuang; Low, Ee-Ling

    2014-06-01

    Previous work on the rhythm of Malaysian English has been based on impressionistic observations. This paper utilizes acoustic analysis to measure the rhythmic patterns of Malaysian English. Recordings of the read speech and spontaneous speech of 10 Malaysian English speakers were analyzed and compared with recordings of an equivalent sample of Singaporean English speakers. Analysis was done using two rhythmic indexes, the PVI and VarcoV. It was found that although the rhythm of read speech of the Singaporean speakers was syllable-based as described by previous studies, the rhythm of the Malaysian speakers was even more syllable-based. Analysis of the syllables in specific utterances showed that Malaysian speakers did not reduce vowels as much as Singaporean speakers in cases of syllables in utterances. Results of the spontaneous speech confirmed the findings for the read speech; that is, the same rhythmic patterning was found which normally triggers vowel reductions.

  9. [Role of rhythmicity in infant development].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciccone, A

    2015-09-01

    This article deals with rhythm in the experiences of infants, focusing in particular on the function of rhythmicity in the baby's sense of being and its continuity. Infants are inevitably subjected to experiences of discontinuity. These experiences are necessary to development, but they expose the child to chaotic experiences when a basic rhythmicity is not ensured. The rhythmicity of childcare experiences gives the illusion of permanence and enables anticipation. This nourishes the basic feeling of security and supports the development of thought. Interactive and intersubjective exchanges must be rhythmic and must be in keeping with the rhythm of the baby, who needs to withdraw regularly from the interaction to internalize the experience of the exchange. Without this retreat, the interaction is over-stimulating and prevents internalization. Object presence/ absence must also be rhythmic, to enable the infant to keep the object alive inside him/ herself. Observation of babies has demonstrated their ability to manage experiences of discontinuity: they are able to sustain a continuous link via their gaze, look for clues indicating the presence of a lost object, search for support in sensations, and fabricate rhythmicity to remain open to the self and the world. The author gives some examples of infant observations that provide evidence of these capacities. One observation shows how a baby defends itself against a discontinuity by actively maintaining a link via his/her gaze. Another example shows an infant holding on to "hard sensations" in order to stay away from "soft" ones, which represent the fragility of the separation experience. This example pertains to a seven-month-old's prelanguage and "prosodic tonicity". The author takes this opportunity to propose the notion of "psychic bisensuality" to describe these two sensation poles, which must be harmoniously articulated to guarantee an inner sense of security. Such repairs of discontinuity are only possible if the

  10. Short-term solar wind modulation of the global electric circuit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engfer, Daniel William

    Five separate key day sets are used to determine correlations between two candidate solar wind mechanisms and changes in atmospheric parameters at Mauna Loa Observatory in Hawaii and Colaba Observatory in India. We evaluate responses of these parameters to external modulation of the global electric circuit by the solar wind using the superposed epoch method of analysis. The results are interpreted in terms of a simplified global electric circuit model with two parallel return paths, one at low to middle geomagnetic latitudes and the other at middle to high geomagnetic latitudes. We find responses similar to those expected from external modulation, but of marginal statistical significance. The Mauna Loa set contains current density, potential gradient and positive and negative conductivity data for the 1976-1984 period, while the Colaba set contains potential gradient data through the 1936-1966 period. A data reduction technique is devised to increase the signal to noise ratio of our results by removing noisy data and periodic variations from these ground-based data sets. Throughout this process diurnal and annual variations of these parameters at both sites are evaluated and compared with available observations by other researchers. Using two separate key day sets and data from the Dynamics Explorer 2 satellite for the August 1981 to February 1983 time period, we endeavor to determine correlations between changes in ionospheric horizontal potential gradients and solar wind related physical inputs using superposed epoch analysis. In this manner, responses to external inputs are revealed for potential gradients of various latitudinal extents 5md ranges of local time. The local time variation is evaluated and subtracted from all potential gradients to increase the signal to noise ratio of the results. We also consider the possible effects of solar wind-modulated ionospheric potential gradients on the global electric circuit.

  11. An Exploration of Rhythmic Grouping of Speech Sequences by French- and German-Learning Infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abboub, Nawal; Boll-Avetisyan, Natalie; Bhatara, Anjali; Höhle, Barbara; Nazzi, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    Rhythm in music and speech can be characterized by a constellation of several acoustic cues. Individually, these cues have different effects on rhythmic perception: sequences of sounds alternating in duration are perceived as short-long pairs (weak-strong/iambic pattern), whereas sequences of sounds alternating in intensity or pitch are perceived as loud-soft, or high-low pairs (strong-weak/trochaic pattern). This perceptual bias-called the Iambic-Trochaic Law (ITL)-has been claimed to be an universal property of the auditory system applying in both the music and the language domains. Recent studies have shown that language experience can modulate the effects of the ITL on rhythmic perception of both speech and non-speech sequences in adults, and of non-speech sequences in 7.5-month-old infants. The goal of the present study was to explore whether language experience also modulates infants' grouping of speech. To do so, we presented sequences of syllables to monolingual French- and German-learning 7.5-month-olds. Using the Headturn Preference Procedure (HPP), we examined whether they were able to perceive a rhythmic structure in sequences of syllables that alternated in duration, pitch, or intensity. Our findings show that both French- and German-learning infants perceived a rhythmic structure when it was cued by duration or pitch but not intensity. Our findings also show differences in how these infants use duration and pitch cues to group syllable sequences, suggesting that pitch cues were the easier ones to use. Moreover, performance did not differ across languages, failing to reveal early language effects on rhythmic perception. These results contribute to our understanding of the origin of rhythmic perception and perceptual mechanisms shared across music and speech, which may bootstrap language acquisition.

  12. Electric field-induced emission enhancement and modulation in individual CdSe nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vietmeyer, Felix; Tchelidze, Tamar; Tsou, Veronica; Janko, Boldizsar; Kuno, Masaru

    2012-10-23

    CdSe nanowires show reversible emission intensity enhancements when subjected to electric field strengths ranging from 5 to 22 MV/m. Under alternating positive and negative biases, emission intensity modulation depths of 14 ± 7% are observed. Individual wires are studied by placing them in parallel plate capacitor-like structures and monitoring their emission intensities via single nanostructure microscopy. Observed emission sensitivities are rationalized by the field-induced modulation of carrier detrapping rates from NW defect sites responsible for nonradiative relaxation processes. The exclusion of these states from subsequent photophysics leads to observed photoluminescence quantum yield enhancements. We quantitatively explain the phenomenon by developing a kinetic model to account for field-induced variations of carrier detrapping rates. The observed phenomenon allows direct visualization of trap state behavior in individual CdSe nanowires and represents a first step toward developing new optical techniques that can probe defects in low-dimensional materials.

  13. Using multimedia learning modules in a hybrid-online course in electricity and magnetism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadaghiani, Homeyra R.

    2011-06-01

    We have been piloting web-based multimedia learning modules (MLMs), developed by the Physics Education Research Group at the University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign (UIUC), as a “prelecture assignment” in several introductory physics courses at California State Polytechnic University at Pomona. In this study, we report the results from a controlled study utilizing modules on electricity and magnetism as a part of a blended hybrid-online course. We asked students in the experimental section to view the MLMs prior to attending the face-to-face class, and to make sure this would not result in additional instructional time, we reduced the weekly class time by one-third. We found that despite reduced class time, student-learning outcomes were not hindered; in fact, the implementation of the UIUC MLMs resulted in a positive effect on student performance on conceptual tests and classroom discussion questions.

  14. Using multimedia learning modules in a hybrid-online course in electricity and magnetism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Homeyra R. Sadaghiani

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available We have been piloting web-based multimedia learning modules (MLMs, developed by the Physics Education Research Group at the University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign (UIUC, as a “prelecture assignment” in several introductory physics courses at California State Polytechnic University at Pomona. In this study, we report the results from a controlled study utilizing modules on electricity and magnetism as a part of a blended hybrid-online course. We asked students in the experimental section to view the MLMs prior to attending the face-to-face class, and to make sure this would not result in additional instructional time, we reduced the weekly class time by one-third. We found that despite reduced class time, student-learning outcomes were not hindered; in fact, the implementation of the UIUC MLMs resulted in a positive effect on student performance on conceptual tests and classroom discussion questions.

  15. Helical electric potential modulation via zonal-flow coupling to resonant magnetic perturbations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leconte, M.; Kim, J.-H.

    2017-08-01

    Helical modulations of the electric potential were observed in several devices during application of resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs). To address the implication of the helical modulation on RMP-induced transport, we derive a system of 1D equations for zonal flows (ZFs) and helical potential in the presence of RMPs. As ZFs are turbulence-driven, turbulence plays a major role in this plasma self-organization towards a quasi-equilibrium with 3D helical potential. The model reveals how RMPs modify an initially given a saturated-state of coexisting turbulence and ZFs. It is shown that RMPs trigger a transport bifurcation by allowing energy-transfer out of turbulence-driven ZFs into ZF-driven helical potential.

  16. Modulational Instability in a Pair of Non-identical Coupled Nonlinear Electrical Transmission Lines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Eric Tala-Tebue; Aurelien Kenfack-Jiotsa; Marius Hervé Tatchou-Ntemfack; Timoléon Crépin Kofané

    2013-01-01

    In this work,we investigate the dynamics of modulated waves non-identical coupled nonlinear transmission lines.Traditional methods for avoiding mode mixing in identical coupled nonlinear electrical lines consist of adding the same number of linear inductors in each branch.Adding linear inductors in a single line leads to asymmetric coupled nonlinear electrical transmission lines which propagate the signal and the mode mixing.On one hand,the difference between the two lines induced the fission for only one mode of propagation.This fission is influenced by the amplitude of the signal and the amount of the input energy as well; it also narrows the width of the input pulse soliton,leading to a possible increasing of the bit rate.On the other hand,the dissymmetry of the two lines converts the network into a good amplifier for the w_ mode which corresponds to the regime admitting low frequencies.

  17. Cell-stimulation therapy of lateral epicondylitis with frequency-modulated low-intensity electric current.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aliyev, R M; Geiger, G

    2012-03-01

    In addition to the routine therapy, the patients with lateral epicondylitis included into experimental group were subjected to a 12-week cell-stimulation therapy with low-intensity frequency-modulated electric current. The control group received the same routine therapy and sham stimulation (the therapeutic apparatus was not energized). The efficiency of this microcurrent therapy was estimated by comparing medical indices before therapy and at the end of a 12-week therapeutic course using a 10-point pain severity numeric rating scale (NRS) and Roles-Maudsley pain score. The study revealed high therapeutic efficiency of cell-stimulation with low-intensity electric current resulting probably from up-regulation of intracellular transmitters, interleukins, and prostaglandins playing the key role in the regulation of inflammation.

  18. Neurochemical and electrical modulation of the Locus coeruleus: contribution to CO2 drive to breathe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debora eDe Carvalho

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The Locus coeruleus (LC is a dorsal pontine region, situated bilaterally on the floor of the fourth ventricle. It is considered to be the major source of noradrenergic innervation in the brain. These neurons are highly sensitive to CO2 / pH, and chemical lesions of LC neurons largely attenuate the hypercapnic ventilatory response in unanesthetized adult rats. Developmental dysfunctions in these neurons are linked to pathological conditions such as Rett and sudden infant death syndromes, which can impair the control of the cardio-respiratory system. LC is densely innervated by fibers that contain glutamate, serotonin and ATP, and these neurotransmitters strongly affect LC activity, including central chemoreflexes. Aside from neurochemical modulation, LC neurons are also strongly electrically coupled, specifically through gap junctions, which play a role in the CO2 ventilatory response. This article reviews the available data on the role of chemical and electrical neuromodulation of the LC in the control of ventilation.

  19. An electromagnetic modulator based on electrically controllable metamaterial analogue to electromagnetically induced transparency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Yuancheng; Qiao, Tong; Zhang, Fuli; Fu, Quanhong; Dong, Jiajia; Kong, Botao; Li, Hongqiang

    2017-01-01

    Electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) is a promising technology for the enhancement of light-matter interactions, and recent demonstrations of the EIT analogue realized in artificial micro-structured medium have remarkably reduced the extreme requirement for experimental observation of EIT spectrum. In this paper, we propose to electrically control the EIT-like spectrum in a metamaterial as an electromagnetic modulator. A diode acting as a tunable resistor is loaded in the gap of paired wires to inductively tune the magnetic resonance, which induces remarkable modulation on the EIT-like spectrum through the metamaterial sample. The experimental measurements confirmed that the prediction of electromagnetic modulation in three narrow bands on the EIT-like spectrum, and a modulation contrast of up to 31 dB was achieved on the transmission through the metamaterial. Our results may facilitate the study on active/dynamical technology in translational metamaterials, which connect extraordinary manipulations on the flow of light in metamaterials, e.g., the exotic EIT, and practical applications in industry.

  20. An electromagnetic modulator based on electrically controllable metamaterial analogue to electromagnetically induced transparency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Yuancheng; Qiao, Tong; Zhang, Fuli; Fu, Quanhong; Dong, Jiajia; Kong, Botao; Li, Hongqiang

    2017-01-16

    Electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) is a promising technology for the enhancement of light-matter interactions, and recent demonstrations of the EIT analogue realized in artificial micro-structured medium have remarkably reduced the extreme requirement for experimental observation of EIT spectrum. In this paper, we propose to electrically control the EIT-like spectrum in a metamaterial as an electromagnetic modulator. A diode acting as a tunable resistor is loaded in the gap of paired wires to inductively tune the magnetic resonance, which induces remarkable modulation on the EIT-like spectrum through the metamaterial sample. The experimental measurements confirmed that the prediction of electromagnetic modulation in three narrow bands on the EIT-like spectrum, and a modulation contrast of up to 31 dB was achieved on the transmission through the metamaterial. Our results may facilitate the study on active/dynamical technology in translational metamaterials, which connect extraordinary manipulations on the flow of light in metamaterials, e.g., the exotic EIT, and practical applications in industry.

  1. Metastable Electrical Characteristics of Polycrystalline Thin-Film Photovoltaic Modules upon Exposure and Stabilization: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deline, C. A.; del Cueto, J. A.; Albin, D. S.; Rummel, S. R.

    2011-09-01

    The significant features of a series of stabilization experiments conducted at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) between May 2009 and the present are reported. These experiments evaluated a procedure to stabilize the measured performance of thin-film polycrystalline cadmium telluride (CdTe) and copper indium gallium diselenide (CIGS) thin-film photovoltaic (PV) modules. The current-voltage (I-V) characteristics of CdTe and CIGS thin-film PV devices and modules exhibit transitory changes in electrical performance after thermal exposure in the dark and/or bias and light exposures. We present the results of our case studies of module performance versus exposure: light-soaked at 65 degrees C; exposed in the dark under forward bias at 65 degrees C; and, finally, longer-term outdoor exposure. We find that stabilization can be achieved to varying degrees using either light-soaking or dark bias methods and that the existing IEC 61646 light-soaking interval may be appropriate for CdTe and CIGS modules with one caveat: it is likely that at least three exposure intervals are required for stabilization.

  2. An electromagnetic modulator based on electrically controllable metamaterial analogue to electromagnetically induced transparency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Yuancheng; Qiao, Tong; Zhang, Fuli; Fu, Quanhong; Dong, Jiajia; Kong, Botao; Li, Hongqiang

    2017-01-01

    Electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) is a promising technology for the enhancement of light-matter interactions, and recent demonstrations of the EIT analogue realized in artificial micro-structured medium have remarkably reduced the extreme requirement for experimental observation of EIT spectrum. In this paper, we propose to electrically control the EIT-like spectrum in a metamaterial as an electromagnetic modulator. A diode acting as a tunable resistor is loaded in the gap of paired wires to inductively tune the magnetic resonance, which induces remarkable modulation on the EIT-like spectrum through the metamaterial sample. The experimental measurements confirmed that the prediction of electromagnetic modulation in three narrow bands on the EIT-like spectrum, and a modulation contrast of up to 31 dB was achieved on the transmission through the metamaterial. Our results may facilitate the study on active/dynamical technology in translational metamaterials, which connect extraordinary manipulations on the flow of light in metamaterials, e.g., the exotic EIT, and practical applications in industry. PMID:28091539

  3. Composite modulation of Fano resonance in plasmonic microstructures by electric-field and microcavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Fan; Wu, Chenyun; Yang, Hong [State Key Laboratory for Mesoscopic Physics and Department of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Hu, Xiaoyong, E-mail: xiaoyonghu@pku.edu.cn; Gong, Qihuang [State Key Laboratory for Mesoscopic Physics and Department of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center of Quantum Matter, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2014-11-03

    Composite modulation of Fano resonance by using electric-field and microcavity simultaneously is realized in a plasmonic microstructure, which consists of a gold nanowire grating inserted into a Fabry-Perot microcavity composited of a liquid crystal layer sandwiched between two indium tin oxide layers. The Fano resonance wavelength varies with the applied voltage and the microcavity resonance. A large shift of 48 nm in the Fano resonance wavelength is achieved when the applied voltage is 20 V. This may provide a new way for the study of multi-functional integrated photonic circuits and chips based on plasmonic microstructures.

  4. Optical phase encryption by phase contrast using electrically addressed spatial light modulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishchal, Naveen Kumar; Joseph, Joby; Singh, Kehar

    2003-03-01

    We report the use of an electrically addressed liquid crystal spatial light modulator (EALCSLM) operating in the phase mode as a phase-contrast filter (PCF). As an application, an optical phase encryption system has been implemented. We encrypt and decrypt a two-dimensional phase image obtained from an amplitude image. Encrypted image is holographically recorded in a Barium titanate crystal and is then decrypted by generating through phase conjugation, a conjugate of the encrypted image. The decrypted phase image is converted into an amplitude image using an EASLM as a PCF. The idea has been supported by the experimental results.

  5. Electric field modulation of the membrane potential in solid-state ion channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Weihua; Reed, Mark A

    2012-12-12

    Biological ion channels are molecular devices that allow a rapid flow of ions across the cell membrane. Normal physiological functions, such as generating action potentials for cell-to-cell communication, are highly dependent on ion channels that can open and close in response to external stimuli for regulating ion permeation. Mimicking these biological functions using synthetic structures is a rapidly progressing yet challenging area. Here we report the electric field modulation of the membrane potential phenomena in mechanically and chemically robust solid-state ion channels, an abiotic analogue to the voltage-gated ion channels in living systems. To understand the complex physicochemical processes in the electric field regulated membrane potential behavior, both quasi-static and transient characteristics of converting transmembrane ion gradients into electric potential are investigated. It is found that the transmembrane potential can be adequately tuned by an external electrical stimulation, thanks to the unique properties of the voltage-regulated selective ion transport through a nanoscale channel.

  6. Adjustment of the electric current in pulsar magnetospheres and origin of subpulse modulation

    CERN Document Server

    Lyubarsky, Yuri

    2012-01-01

    The subpulse modulation of pulsar radio emission goes to prove that the plasma flow in the open field line tube breaks into isolated narrow streams. I propose a model which attributes formation of streams to the process of the electric current adjustment in the magnetosphere. A mismatch between the magnetospheric current distribution and the current injected by the polar cap accelerator gives rise to reverse plasma flows in the magnetosphere. The reverse flow shields the electric field in the polar gap and thus shuts up the plasma production process. I assume that a circulating system of streams is formed such that the upward streams are produced in narrow gaps separated by downward streams. The electric drift is small in this model because the potential drop in narrow gaps is small. The gaps have to drift because by the time a downward stream reaches the star surface and shields the electric field, the corresponding gap has to shift. The transverse size of the streams is determined by the condition that the ...

  7. Electric field modulated half-metallicity of semichlorinated GaN nanosheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, M. X.; Song, H. Y.; Ao, Z. M.; Xu, T. H.; Wang, L. L.

    2016-11-01

    Through density-functional theory calculations, we investigated the half-metallic properties of semichlorinated gallium nitride (Cl-GaN) nanosheets (NSs) under an electric field F. The results show that the electric field can modulate Cl-GaN NSs efficiently from ferromagnetic metals to half-metals. More interestingly, under a broad range of electric field intensity (-0.10~-1.30 V/Å), Cl-GaN NSs have the excellently half-metallic properties with the band gaps (3.71-0.96 eV) and maximal half-metallic gaps with 0.30 eV in spin-up states and metallic behaviors in spin-down states. Moreover, the total magnetic moment decreases (increases) depending on the negative (positive) F, mainly induced by the unpaired N atoms. Our studies demonstrate that the electronic and magnetic properties of GaN NSs can be delicately tuned by the combined surface modification and electric field, indicating the potential of GaN NSs for developing high-performance spintronic nanodevices.

  8. All-optical DAC using counter-propagating optical and electrical pulses in a Mach-Zehnder modulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowery, Arthur James

    2014-10-20

    A novel method of converting binary-level electrical pulses into multi-level optical pulses using only a conventional traveling-wave optical modulator is presented. The method provides low inter-pulse interference due to the counter-propagating pulses, low amplitude noise, and a timing jitter determined chiefly by the quality of the optical pulse source. The method only requires one electrical drive per modulator and provides low-jitter variable-amplitude optical pulses that are suitable for shaping into a wide variety of modulation formats using a programmable optical filter.

  9. Bilateral Reflex Fluctuations during Rhythmic Movement of Remote Limb Pairs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezzarane, Rinaldo A.; Nakajima, Tsuyoshi; Zehr, E. Paul

    2017-01-01

    The modulation of spinal cord excitability during rhythmic limb movement reflects the neuronal coordination underlying actions of the arms and legs. Integration of network activity in the spinal cord can be assessed by reflex variability between the limbs, an approach so far very little studied. The present work addresses this question by eliciting Hoffmann (H-) reflexes in both limbs to assess if common drive onto bilateral pools of motoneurons influence spinal cord excitability simultaneously or with a delay between sides. A cross-covariance (CCV) sequence between reflexes in both arms or legs was evaluated under conditions providing common drive bilaterally through voluntary muscle contraction and/or rhythmic movement of the remote limbs. For H-reflexes in the flexor carpi radialis (FCR) muscle, either contraction of the FCR or leg cycling induced significant reduction in the amplitude of the peak at the zero lag in the CCV sequence, indicating independent variations in spinal excitability between both sides. In contrast, for H-reflexes in the soleus (SO) muscle, arm cycling revealed no reduction in the amplitude of the peak in the CCV sequence at the zero lag. This suggests a more independent control of the arms compared with the legs. These results provide new insights into the organization of human limb control in rhythmic activity and the behavior of bilateral reflex fluctuations under different motor tasks. From a functional standpoint, changes in the co-variability might reflect dynamic adjustments in reflex excitability that are subsumed under more global control features during locomotion. PMID:28725191

  10. The long term evaluation module of the Dutch electric power model LEMS. De lange termijn evaluatie module. Een onderdeel van het elektriciteitsmodel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verhagen, L.

    1988-12-01

    The Dutch energy model SELPE has been developed to analyse possible developments in energy supply and demand in the future. In order to be able to predict substitutions of energy sources and energy conversion processes all relevant energy sources, energy consumer sectors, and energy conversion processes are described together with its energy, environment, and cost implications. A separate model, called LEMS, has been developed for the electric power sector. The central submodel of LEMS is the long term evaluation module LTE which is able to evaluate supply and demand of electric power over a long planning period (more than 25 years). The module LTE contains the data which are used in the four modules of LEMS. This report describes the structure of the LTE module and how it works. 2 figs.

  11. Thermoelectric Oxide Modules (TOMs for the Direct Conversion of Simulated Solar Radiation into Electrical Energy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petr Tomeš

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The direct conversion of concentrated high temperature solar heat into electrical energy was demonstrated with a series of four–leg thermoelectric oxide modules (TOM. These temperature stable modules were not yet optimized for high efficiency conversion, but served as proof-of-principle for high temperature conversion. They were constructed by connecting two p- (La1.98Sr0.02CuO4 and two n-type (CaMn0.98Nb0.02O3 thermoelements electrically in series and thermally in parallel. The temperature gradient ΔT was applied by a High–Flux Solar Simulator source (HFSS which generates a spectrum similar to solar radiation. The influence of the graphite layer coated on the hot side of the Al2O3 substrate compared to the uncoated surface on ΔT, Pmax and η was studied in detail. The measurements show an almost linear temperature profile along the thermoelectric legs. The maximum output power of 88.8 mW was reached for a TOM with leg length of 5 mm at ΔT = 622 K. The highest conversion efficiency η was found for a heat flux of 4–8 W cm-2 and the dependence of η on the leg length was investigated.

  12. Non-Invasive Electrical Brain Stimulation Montages for Modulation of Human Motor Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curado, Marco; Fritsch, Brita; Reis, Janine

    2016-02-04

    Non-invasive electrical brain stimulation (NEBS) is used to modulate brain function and behavior, both for research and clinical purposes. In particular, NEBS can be applied transcranially either as direct current stimulation (tDCS) or alternating current stimulation (tACS). These stimulation types exert time-, dose- and in the case of tDCS polarity-specific effects on motor function and skill learning in healthy subjects. Lately, tDCS has been used to augment the therapy of motor disabilities in patients with stroke or movement disorders. This article provides a step-by-step protocol for targeting the primary motor cortex with tDCS and transcranial random noise stimulation (tRNS), a specific form of tACS using an electrical current applied randomly within a pre-defined frequency range. The setup of two different stimulation montages is explained. In both montages the emitting electrode (the anode for tDCS) is placed on the primary motor cortex of interest. For unilateral motor cortex stimulation the receiving electrode is placed on the contralateral forehead while for bilateral motor cortex stimulation the receiving electrode is placed on the opposite primary motor cortex. The advantages and disadvantages of each montage for the modulation of cortical excitability and motor function including learning are discussed, as well as safety, tolerability and blinding aspects.

  13. A multiresolution model of rhythmic expectancy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smith, L.M.; Honing, H.; Miyazaki, K.; Hiraga, Y.; Adachi, M.; Nakajima, Y.; Tsuzaki, M.

    2008-01-01

    We describe a computational model of rhythmic cognition that predicts expected onset times. A dynamic representation of musical rhythm, the multiresolution analysis using the continuous wavelet transform is used. This representation decomposes the temporal structure of a musical rhythm into time var

  14. 'Rhythmic Music' in Danish Music Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Peder Kaj

    ), and endeavors to establish courses in jazz in the public educational system were made by Bernhard Christensen and others as early as 1934. The term ‘jazz’ was avoided and the Danish term ‘rytmisk musik’ (‘rhythmic music’) was invented to emphasize the didactically qualified educational content of the activity...

  15. Source localization of rhythmic ictal EEG activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beniczky, Sándor; Lantz, Göran; Rosenzweig, Ivana

    2013-01-01

    Although precise identification of the seizure-onset zone is an essential element of presurgical evaluation, source localization of ictal electroencephalography (EEG) signals has received little attention. The aim of our study was to estimate the accuracy of source localization of rhythmic ictal ...

  16. Rhythmic Characteristics of Colloquial and Formal Tamil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keane, Elinor

    2006-01-01

    Application of recently developed rhythmic measures to passages of read speech in colloquial and formal Tamil revealed some significant differences between the two varieties, which are in diglossic distribution. Both were also distinguished from a set of control data from British English speakers reading an equivalent passage. The findings have…

  17. Rhythmic Patterns in Ragtime and Jazz

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Odekerken, Daphne; Volk, A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304842117; Koops, Hendrik Vincent

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a corpus-based study on rhythmic patterns in ragtime and jazz. Ragtime and jazz are related genres, but there are open questions on what specifies the two genres. Earlier studies revealed that variations of a particular syncopation pattern, referred to as 121, are among the most

  18. Somatosensory driven interpersonal synchrony during rhythmic sway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofianidis, George; Hatzitaki, Vassilia; Grouios, George; Johannsen, Leif; Wing, Alan

    2012-06-01

    Spontaneous synchrony emerges between individuals performing together rhythmic activities while communicating by means of sensory feedback. In this study, we examined the nature of interpersonal synchrony mediated by light fingertip contact when individuals sway rhythmically in the sagittal plane. The effect of traditional dance expertise on interpersonal synchrony was investigated. Sixty participants (30 dancers, 30 novices) formed three types of couples (10 expert couples, 10 novice couples, 10 mixed couples) and performed a rhythmical sway task (40s) that was either self or metronome paced (frequency: 0.25Hz). Cross spectral analysis of the center of pressure (CoP) displacement signals revealed that during self-paced sway fingertip contact evoked a decrease of the dominant sway frequency difference between partners, an increase in the coherence between the sway signals and a concentration of relative phase angles towards the in-phase (0°-20°) region. In metronome paced sway however, only expert dancers were able to benefit from haptic contact to further improve interpersonal synchrony. These findings suggest that haptic contact can stabilize the spontaneous coordination dynamics of two persons performing rhythmic sway together. The strength of the emerged synchrony depends on the individuals' expertise to integrate tactile and auditory information about sway.

  19. Fast Simulation of Mechanical Heterogeneity in the Electrically Asynchronous Heart Using the MultiPatch Module.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Walmsley

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac electrical asynchrony occurs as a result of cardiac pacing or conduction disorders such as left bundle-branch block (LBBB. Electrically asynchronous activation causes myocardial contraction heterogeneity that can be detrimental for cardiac function. Computational models provide a tool for understanding pathological consequences of dyssynchronous contraction. Simulations of mechanical dyssynchrony within the heart are typically performed using the finite element method, whose computational intensity may present an obstacle to clinical deployment of patient-specific models. We present an alternative based on the CircAdapt lumped-parameter model of the heart and circulatory system, called the MultiPatch module. Cardiac walls are subdivided into an arbitrary number of patches of homogeneous tissue. Tissue properties and activation time can differ between patches. All patches within a wall share a common wall tension and curvature. Consequently, spatial location within the wall is not required to calculate deformation in a patch. We test the hypothesis that activation time is more important than tissue location for determining mechanical deformation in asynchronous hearts. We perform simulations representing an experimental study of myocardial deformation induced by ventricular pacing, and a patient with LBBB and heart failure using endocardial recordings of electrical activation, wall volumes, and end-diastolic volumes. Direct comparison between simulated and experimental strain patterns shows both qualitative and quantitative agreement between model fibre strain and experimental circumferential strain in terms of shortening and rebound stretch during ejection. Local myofibre strain in the patient simulation shows qualitative agreement with circumferential strain patterns observed in the patient using tagged MRI. We conclude that the MultiPatch module produces realistic regional deformation patterns in the asynchronous heart and that

  20. Linearized image reconstruction method for ultrasound modulated electrical impedance tomography based on power density distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Xizi; Xu, Yanbin; Dong, Feng

    2017-04-01

    Electrical resistance tomography (ERT) is a promising measurement technique with important industrial and clinical applications. However, with limited effective measurements, it suffers from poor spatial resolution due to the ill-posedness of the inverse problem. Recently, there has been an increasing research interest in hybrid imaging techniques, utilizing couplings of physical modalities, because these techniques obtain much more effective measurement information and promise high resolution. Ultrasound modulated electrical impedance tomography (UMEIT) is one of the newly developed hybrid imaging techniques, which combines electric and acoustic modalities. A linearized image reconstruction method based on power density is proposed for UMEIT. The interior data, power density distribution, is adopted to reconstruct the conductivity distribution with the proposed image reconstruction method. At the same time, relating the power density change to the change in conductivity, the Jacobian matrix is employed to make the nonlinear problem into a linear one. The analytic formulation of this Jacobian matrix is derived and its effectiveness is also verified. In addition, different excitation patterns are tested and analyzed, and opposite excitation provides the best performance with the proposed method. Also, multiple power density distributions are combined to implement image reconstruction. Finally, image reconstruction is implemented with the linear back-projection (LBP) algorithm. Compared with ERT, with the proposed image reconstruction method, UMEIT can produce reconstructed images with higher quality and better quantitative evaluation results.

  1. An image reconstruction framework based on boundary voltages for ultrasound modulated electrical impedance tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Xizi; Xu, Yanbin; Dong, Feng

    2016-11-01

    A new image reconstruction framework based on boundary voltages is presented for ultrasound modulated electrical impedance tomography (UMEIT). Combining the electric and acoustic modalities, UMEIT reconstructs the conductivity distribution with more measurements with position information. The proposed image reconstruction framework begins with approximately constructing the sensitivity matrix of the imaging object with inclusion. Then the conductivity is recovered from the boundary voltages of the imaging object. To solve the nonlinear inverse problem, an optimization method is adopted and the iterative method is tested. Compared with that for electrical resistance tomography (ERT), the newly constructed sensitivity matrix is more sensitive to the inclusion, even in the center of the imaging object, and it contains more effective information about the inclusions. Finally, image reconstruction is carried out by the conjugate gradient algorithm, and results show that reconstructed images with higher quality can be obtained for UMEIT with a faster convergence rate. Both theory and image reconstruction results validate the feasibility of the proposed framework for UMEIT and confirm that UMEIT is a potential imaging technique.

  2. Interface Control Document for the EMPACT Module that Estimates Electric Power Transmission System Response to EMP-Caused Damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Werley, Kenneth Alan [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Mccown, Andrew William [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)ory

    2016-06-26

    The EPREP code is designed to evaluate the effects of an Electro-Magnetic Pulse (EMP) on the electric power transmission system. The EPREP code embodies an umbrella framework that allows a user to set up analysis conditions and to examine analysis results. The code links to three major physics/engineering modules. The first module describes the EM wave in space and time. The second module evaluates the damage caused by the wave on specific electric power (EP) transmission system components. The third module evaluates the consequence of the damaged network on its (reduced) ability to provide electric power to meet demand. This third module is the focus of the present paper. The EMPACT code serves as the third module. The EMPACT name denotes EMP effects on Alternating Current Transmission systems. The EMPACT algorithms compute electric power transmission network flow solutions under severely damaged network conditions. Initial solutions are often characterized by unacceptible network conditions including line overloads and bad voltages. The EMPACT code contains algorithms to adjust optimally network parameters to eliminate network problems while minimizing outages. System adjustments include automatically adjusting control equipment (generator V control, variable transformers, and variable shunts), as well as non-automatic control of generator power settings and minimal load shedding. The goal is to evaluate the minimal loss of customer load under equilibrium (steady-state) conditions during peak demand.

  3. Optogenetic versus electrical stimulation of dopamine terminals in the nucleus accumbens reveals local modulation of presynaptic release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melchior, James R; Ferris, Mark J; Stuber, Garret D; Riddle, David R; Jones, Sara R

    2015-09-01

    The nucleus accumbens is highly heterogeneous, integrating regionally distinct afferent projections and accumbal interneurons, resulting in diverse local microenvironments. Dopamine (DA) neuron terminals similarly express a heterogeneous collection of terminal receptors that modulate DA signaling. Cyclic voltammetry is often used to probe DA terminal dynamics in brain slice preparations; however, this method traditionally requires electrical stimulation to induce DA release. Electrical stimulation excites all of the neuronal processes in the stimulation field, potentially introducing simultaneous, multi-synaptic modulation of DA terminal release. We used optogenetics to selectively stimulate DA terminals and used voltammetry to compare DA responses from electrical and optical stimulation of the same area of tissue around a recording electrode. We found that with multiple pulse stimulation trains, optically stimulated DA release increasingly exceeded that of electrical stimulation. Furthermore, electrical stimulation produced inhibition of DA release across longer duration stimulations. The GABAB antagonist, CGP 55845, increased electrically stimulated DA release significantly more than light stimulated release. The nicotinic acetylcholine receptor antagonist, dihydro-β-erythroidine hydrobromide, inhibited single pulse electrically stimulated DA release while having no effect on optically stimulated DA release. Our results demonstrate that electrical stimulation introduces local multi-synaptic modulation of DA release that is absent with optogenetically targeted stimulation. The nucleus accumbens is highly heterogeneous, integrating regionally distinct afferent projections and accumbal interneurons, resulting in diverse microenvironments. Local electrical stimulation excites all of the neuronal processes in the stimulation field, potentially modulating the dopamine signal - measured using cyclic voltammetry. Optogenetically targeting light stimulation to dopamine

  4. Rhythmic control of endocannabinoids in the rat pineal gland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Marco; Ferreirós, Nerea; Geisslinger, Gerd; Dehghani, Faramarz; Korf, Horst-Werner

    2015-01-01

    Endocannabinoids modulate neuroendocrine networks by directly targeting cannabinoid receptors. The time-hormone melatonin synchronizes these networks with external light condition and guarantees time-sensitive and ecologically well-adapted behaviors. Here, the endocannabinoid arachidonoyl ethanolamide (AEA) showed rhythmic changes in rat pineal glands with higher levels during the light-period and reduced amounts at the onset of darkness. Norepinephrine, the essential stimulus for nocturnal melatonin biosynthesis, acutely down-regulated AEA and other endocannabinoids in cultured pineal glands. These temporal dynamics suggest that AEA exerts time-dependent autocrine and/or paracrine functions within the pineal. Moreover, endocananbinoids may be released from the pineal into the CSF or blood stream.

  5. Thermal analysis of laser diode module by an equivalent electrical network method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Ming-wei; XU Wen-hai; TANG Wen-yan

    2006-01-01

    An equivalent electrical network method is presented in this paper to analyze the cooling characteristics of a laser diode module (LDM).And a modified equivalent model of a thermoelectric cooler (TEC) with an adjunctive thermal resistance and a contact resistance is proposed.The performance of a commercial TEC has been simulated.The thermal analysis of a LDM incorporated with a TEC has been performed by using an equivalent circuit model of the LDM.In the analysis the change of LD current,TEC current,and the ambient temperature are all considered.It shows that the equivalent circuit approach is an effective tool for the qualitative analysis of TEC and LDM.

  6. Confined states and spin polarization on a topological insulator thin film modulated by an electric potential

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Yi-Man; Shao Huai-Hua; Zhou Xiao-Ying; Zhou Guang-Hui

    2013-01-01

    We study the electronic structure and spin polarization of the surface states of a three-dimensional topological insulator thin film modulated by an electrical potential well.By routinely solving the low-energy surface Dirac equation for the system,we demonstrate that confined surface states exist,in which the electron density is almost localized inside the well and exponentially decayed outside in real space,and that their subband dispersions are quasilinear with respect to the propagating wavevector.Interestingly,the top and bottom surface confined states with the same density distribution have opposite spin polarizations due to the hybridization between the two surfaces.Along with the mathematical analysis,we provide an intuitive,topological understanding of the effect.

  7. Practical photon number detection with electric field-modulated silicon avalanche photodiodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, O; Yuan, Z L; Shields, A J

    2012-01-24

    Low-noise single-photon detection is a prerequisite for quantum information processing using photonic qubits. In particular, detectors that are able to accurately resolve the number of photons in an incident light pulse will find application in functions such as quantum teleportation and linear optics quantum computing. More generally, such a detector will allow the advantages of quantum light detection to be extended to stronger optical signals, permitting optical measurements limited only by fluctuations in the photon number of the source. Here we demonstrate a practical high-speed device, which allows the signals arising from multiple photon-induced avalanches to be precisely discriminated. We use a type of silicon avalanche photodiode in which the lateral electric field profile is strongly modulated in order to realize a spatially multiplexed detector. Clearly discerned multiphoton signals are obtained by applying sub-nanosecond voltage gates in order to restrict the detector current.

  8. All-electric spin modulator based on a two-dimensional topological insulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao, Xianbo; Ai, Guoping [School of Computer Science, Jiangxi University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Nanchang 330004 (China); Liu, Ying; Yang, Shengyuan A., E-mail: shengyuan-yang@sutd.edu.sg [Research Laboratory for Quantum Materials, Singapore University of Technology and Design, Singapore 487372 (Singapore); Liu, Zhengfang [School of Science, East China Jiaotong University, Nanchang 330013 (China); Zhou, Guanghui, E-mail: ghzhou@hunnu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory for Low-Dimensional Structures and Quantum Manipulation (Ministry of Education), and Synergetic Innovation Center for Quantum Effects and Applications, Hunan Normal University, Changsha 410081 (China)

    2016-01-18

    We propose and investigate a spin modulator device consisting of two ferromagnetic leads connected by a two-dimensional topological insulator as the channel material. It exploits the unique features of the topological spin-helical edge states, such that the injected carriers with a non-collinear spin-polarization direction would travel through both edges and show interference effect. The conductance of the device can be controlled in a simple and all-electric manner by a side-gate voltage, which effectively rotates the spin-polarization of the carrier. At low voltages, the rotation angle is linear in the gate voltage, and the device can function as a good spin-polarization rotator by replacing the drain electrode with a non-magnetic material.

  9. Rocking-chair configuration in ultrathin lithium vanadate-graphene hybrid nanosheets for electrical modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Haiou; Qin, Xinming; Sun, Xu; Yan, Wensheng; Yang, Jinlong; Xie, Yi

    2013-01-01

    The ability to control electronic property of a material by externally applied voltage is greatly anticipated in modern electronics, and graphene provide potential application foreground for this issue on account of its exotic ambipolar transport property. In this study, we proposed that inorganic-graphene intercalated nanosheet is an effective solution to optimize the transport property of graphene. As an example, lithium vanadate-graphene (LiVO-graphene) alternately intercalated nanosheets were designed and successfully synthesized. Theoretical calculation implied that its rocking chair configuration may provide a new pathway to switch the carrier in graphene layer between p-type and n-type while the position of embedded Li ions is controlled by an external field. Thus, a demo transistor was fabricated with layer-by-layer overlapping of LiVO-graphene nanosheets which proved that this inorganic-graphene structure could be used for electrical modulation in electronic devices.

  10. Electrical Pressurization Concept for the Orion MPCV European Service Module Propulsion System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meiss, Jan-Hendrik; Weber, Jorg; Ierardo, Nicola; Quinn, Frank D.; Paisley, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    The paper presents the design of the pressurization system of the European Service Module (ESM) of the Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV). Being part of the propulsion subsystem, an electrical pressurization concept is implemented to condition propellants according to the engine needs via a bang-bang regulation system. Separate pressurization for the oxidizer and the fuel tank permits mixture ratio adjustments and prevents vapor mixing of the two hypergolic propellants during nominal operation. In case of loss of pressurization capability of a single side, the system can be converted into a common pressurization system. The regulation concept is based on evaluation of a set of tank pressure sensors and according activation of regulation valves, based on a single-failure tolerant weighting of three pressure signals. While regulation is performed on ESM level, commanding of regulation parameters as well as failure detection, isolation and recovery is performed from within the Crew Module, developed by Lockheed Martin Space System Company. The overall design and development maturity presented is post Preliminary Design Review (PDR) and reflects the current status of the MPCV ESM pressurization system.

  11. Reducing muscle fatigue due to functional electrical stimulation using random modulation of stimulation parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thrasher, Adam; Graham, Geoffrey M; Popovic, Milos R

    2005-06-01

    A major limitation of many functional electrical stimulation (FES) applications is that muscles tend to fatigue very rapidly. It was hypothesized that FES-induced muscle fatigue could be reduced by randomly modulating the pulse frequency, amplitude, and pulse width in a range of +/-15%. Seven subjects with spinal-cord injuries participated in this study. FES was applied to quadriceps and tibialis anterior muscles using surface electrodes. Isometric force was measured, and the time for the force to drop by 3 dB (fatigue time) was compared between trials. Four different modes of FES were applied in random order: constant stimulation, randomized frequency, randomized amplitude, and randomized pulse width. There was no significant difference between the fatigue-time measurements for the four modes of stimulation (P=0.329). Therefore, random modulation appeared to have no effect. Based on an observed correlation between maximum force measurements and trial order, we concluded that having 10-min rest periods between trials was insufficient.

  12. Colchicine modulates calcium homeostasis and electrical property of HL-1 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yen-Yu; Chen, Yao-Chang; Kao, Yu-Hsun; Lin, Yung-Kuo; Yeh, Yung-Hsin; Chen, Shih-Ann; Chen, Yi-Jen

    2016-06-01

    Colchicine is a microtubule disruptor that reduces the occurrence of atrial fibrillation (AF) after an operation or ablation. However, knowledge of the effects of colchicine on atrial myocytes is limited. The aim of this study was to determine if colchicine can regulate calcium (Ca(2+) ) homeostasis and attenuate the electrical effects of the extracellular matrix on atrial myocytes. Whole-cell clamp, confocal microscopy with fluorescence, and western blotting were used to evaluate the action potential and ionic currents of HL-1 cells treated with and without (control) colchicine (3 nM) for 24 hrs. Compared with control cells, colchicine-treated HL-1 cells had a longer action potential duration with smaller intracellular Ca(2+) transients and sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca(2+) content by 10% and 47%, respectively. Colchicine-treated HL-1 cells showed a smaller L-type Ca(2+) current, reverse mode sodium-calcium exchanger (NCX) current and transient outward potassium current than control cells, but had a similar ultra-rapid activating outward potassium current and apamin-sensitive small-conductance Ca(2+) -activated potassium current compared with control cells. Colchicine-treated HL-1 cells expressed less SERCA2a, total, Thr17-phosphorylated phospholamban, Cav1.2, CaMKII, NCX, Kv1.4 and Kv1.5, but they expressed similar levels of the ryanodine receptor, Ser16-phosphorylated phospholamban and Kv4.2. Colchicine attenuated the shortening of the collagen-induced action potential duration in HL-1 cells. These findings suggest that colchicine modulates the atrial electrical activity and Ca(2+) regulation and attenuates the electrical effects of collagen, which may contribute to its anti-AF activity.

  13. Distinguishing rhythmic from non-rhythmic brain activity during rest in healthy neurocognitive aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caplan, Jeremy B; Bottomley, Monica; Kang, Pardeep; Dixon, Roger A

    2015-05-15

    Rhythmic brain activity at low frequencies (healthy neurocognitive aging are mixed. Here we address two reasons conventional spectral analyses may have led to inconsistent results. First, spectral-power measures are compared to a baseline condition; when resting activity is the signal of interest, it is unclear what the baseline should be. Second, conventional methods do not clearly differentiate power due to rhythmic versus non-rhythmic activity. The Better OSCillation detection method (BOSC; Caplan et al., 2001; Whitten et al., 2011) avoids these problems by using the signal's own spectral characteristics as a reference to detect elevations in power lasting a few cycles. We recorded electroencephalographic (EEG) signal during rest, alternating eyes open and closed, in healthy younger (18-25 years) and older (60-74 years) participants. Topographic plots suggested the conventional and BOSC analyses measured different sources of activity, particularly at frequencies, like delta (1-4Hz), at which rhythms are sporadic; topographies were more similar in the 8-12Hz alpha band. There was little theta-band activity meeting the BOSC method's criteria, suggesting prior findings of theta power in healthy aging may reflect non-rhythmic signal. In contrast, delta oscillations were present at higher levels than theta in both age groups. In summary, applying strict and standardized criteria for rhythmicity, slow rhythms appear present in the resting brain at delta and alpha, but not theta frequencies, and appear unchanged in healthy aging.

  14. Practical Skills of Rhythmic Gymnastics Judges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Villarino, Maria A.; Bobo-Arce, Marta; Sierra-Palmeiro, Elena

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the practical skills of rhythmic gymnastics judges and to identify how their degree and experience influence the assessment of these skills. Sixty one rhythmic gymnastics judges participated in the study. A questionnaire was used for data collection. This tool was composed of 28 questions and divided into six categories: identification, experience, initial training, continuing education, skills and training needs. The results suggest that the most valued skills are those related to the sport’s technical parameters and the ability to adapt to any level of competition with self-confidence and self-assuredness. Significant differences were found regarding the variables for: the ability to communicate (p = 0.002) and for the ability to observe, identify and register performance (p = 0.005). The results showed that experience was not a decisive factor in assessing skills. This study thus presents evidence that rhythmic gymnastics judges must implement and optimise a set of skills that contribute to the effectiveness of the assessment process. These findings might help in the design of programs and training models that contribute to effective professional development. PMID:24511360

  15. Rhythmic spontaneous activity in the piriform cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Vives, Maria V; Descalzo, V F; Reig, R; Figueroa, N A; Compte, A; Gallego, R

    2008-05-01

    Slow spontaneous rhythmic activity is generated and propagates in neocortical slices when bathed in an artificial cerebrospinal fluid with ionic concentrations similar to the ones in vivo. This activity is extraordinarily similar to the activation of the cortex in physiological conditions (e.g., slow-wave sleep), thus representing a unique in vitro model to understand how cortical networks maintain and control ongoing activity. Here we have characterized the activity generated in the olfactory or piriform cortex and endopiriform nucleus (piriform network). Because these structures are prone to generate epileptic discharges, it seems critical to understand how they generate and regulate their physiological rhythmic activity. The piriform network gave rise to rhythmic spontaneous activity consisting of a succession of up and down states at an average frequency of 1.8 Hz, qualitatively similar to the corresponding neocortical activity. This activity originated in the deep layers of the piriform network, which displayed higher excitability and denser connectivity. A remarkable difference with neocortical activity was the speed of horizontal propagation (114 mm/s), one order of magnitude faster in the piriform network. Properties of the piriform cortex subserving fast horizontal propagation may underlie the higher vulnerability of this area to epileptic seizures.

  16. Group Rhythmic Synchrony and Attention in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander K Khalil

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Synchrony, or the coordinated processing of time, is an often-overlooked yet critical context for human interaction. This study tests the relationship between the ability to synchronize rhythmically in a group setting with the ability to attend in 102 elementary schoolchildren. Impairments in temporal processing have frequently been shown to exist in clinical populations with learning disorders, particularly those with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD. Based on this evidence, we hypothesized that the ability to synchronize rhythmically in a group setting—an instance of the type of temporal processing necessary for successful interaction and learning—would be correlated with the ability to attend across the continuum of the population. A music class is an ideal setting for the study of interpersonal timing. In order to measure synchrony in this context, we constructed instruments that allowed the recording and measurement of individual rhythmic performance. The SWAN teacher questionnaire was used as a measurement of attentional behavior. We find that the ability to synchronize with others in a group music class can predict a child’s attentional behavior.

  17. Rhythmic structure of Hindi and English: new insights from a computational analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Tanusree; Singh, Latika; Singh, Nandini C

    2008-01-01

    Much information about speech rhythm is believed to be embedded in low frequency temporal modulations of the speech envelope. Using novel methods of spectral analysis we construct a spectro-temporal modulation spectrum and extract low frequency temporal modulations of spoken utterances to study the rhythmic structure of English and Hindi. The results of our spectral analysis reveal a narrower temporal bandwidth for Hindi as compared to English. We also calculate variability in syllable durations and find that variability in English is greater than Hindi. We relate temporal bandwidth of the modulation spectrum to variability in syllable duration and suggest that narrow bandwidth in the modulation spectrum implies less variability, whereas broad bandwidth implies greater variability in syllable duration. Our results also demonstrate that syllabic information is contained in low frequency temporal modulations of the speech envelope. Our results suggest that the modulation spectrum can be explored as a promising tool to study the temporal structure of language.

  18. The Enhanced Musical Rhythmic Perception in Second Language Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roncaglia-Denissen, M. Paula; Roor, Drikus A.; Chen, Ao; Sadakata, Makiko

    2016-01-01

    Previous research suggests that mastering languages with distinct rather than similar rhythmic properties enhances musical rhythmic perception. This study investigates whether learning a second language (L2) contributes to enhanced musical rhythmic perception in general, regardless of first and second languages rhythmic properties. Additionally, we investigated whether this perceptual enhancement could be alternatively explained by exposure to musical rhythmic complexity, such as the use of compound meter in Turkish music. Finally, it investigates if an enhancement of musical rhythmic perception could be observed among L2 learners whose first language relies heavily on pitch information, as is the case with tonal languages. Therefore, we tested Turkish, Dutch and Mandarin L2 learners of English and Turkish monolinguals on their musical rhythmic perception. Participants’ phonological and working memory capacities, melodic aptitude, years of formal musical training and daily exposure to music were assessed to account for cultural and individual differences which could impact their rhythmic ability. Our results suggest that mastering a L2 rather than exposure to musical rhythmic complexity could explain individuals’ enhanced musical rhythmic perception. An even stronger enhancement of musical rhythmic perception was observed for L2 learners whose first and second languages differ regarding their rhythmic properties, as enhanced performance of Turkish in comparison with Dutch L2 learners of English seem to suggest. Such a stronger enhancement of rhythmic perception seems to be found even among L2 learners whose first language relies heavily on pitch information, as the performance of Mandarin L2 learners of English indicates. Our findings provide further support for a cognitive transfer between the language and music domain. PMID:27375469

  19. The Enhanced Musical Rhythmic Perception in Second Language Learners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roncaglia-Denissen, M Paula; Roor, Drikus A; Chen, Ao; Sadakata, Makiko

    2016-01-01

    Previous research suggests that mastering languages with distinct rather than similar rhythmic properties enhances musical rhythmic perception. This study investigates whether learning a second language (L2) contributes to enhanced musical rhythmic perception in general, regardless of first and second languages rhythmic properties. Additionally, we investigated whether this perceptual enhancement could be alternatively explained by exposure to musical rhythmic complexity, such as the use of compound meter in Turkish music. Finally, it investigates if an enhancement of musical rhythmic perception could be observed among L2 learners whose first language relies heavily on pitch information, as is the case with tonal languages. Therefore, we tested Turkish, Dutch and Mandarin L2 learners of English and Turkish monolinguals on their musical rhythmic perception. Participants' phonological and working memory capacities, melodic aptitude, years of formal musical training and daily exposure to music were assessed to account for cultural and individual differences which could impact their rhythmic ability. Our results suggest that mastering a L2 rather than exposure to musical rhythmic complexity could explain individuals' enhanced musical rhythmic perception. An even stronger enhancement of musical rhythmic perception was observed for L2 learners whose first and second languages differ regarding their rhythmic properties, as enhanced performance of Turkish in comparison with Dutch L2 learners of English seem to suggest. Such a stronger enhancement of rhythmic perception seems to be found even among L2 learners whose first language relies heavily on pitch information, as the performance of Mandarin L2 learners of English indicates. Our findings provide further support for a cognitive transfer between the language and music domain.

  20. Electrical modulation of static and dynamic spectroscopic properties of coupled nanoscale GaSe quantum dot assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Y. K.; Inman, R. H.; Ferri, C. G. L.; Mirafzal, H.; Ghosh, S. N.; Kelley, D. F.; Hirst, L. S.; Ghosh, S.; Chin, W. C.

    2010-10-01

    We demonstrate the formation and spatial modulation of strongly coupled gallium selenide quantum dot (QD) nanoassemblies suspended in a nematic liquid-crystal (NLC) matrix at room temperature. Using static and dynamic optical techniques we show that the coupled QDs aggregate with a well-defined directionality commensurate with the NLC director axis. This results in highly anisotropic spectral properties of the QD assembly. The spatial orientation of the aggregates is selectively controlled in situ by the application of in-plane electric fields. The strong interdot coupling further increases the excitonic recombination rate which is both direction and electric field dependent. This electrical modulation, a noninvasive process, could potentially be an important functionality for the design and creation of building blocks for novel optoelectronic devices.

  1. Study Modules for Calculus-Based General Physics. [Includes Modules 24-26: Electric Potential; Ohm's Law; and Capacitors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Robert G., Ed.; And Others

    This is part of a series of 42 Calculus Based Physics (CBP) modules totaling about 1,000 pages. The modules include study guides, practice tests, and mastery tests for a full-year individualized course in calculus-based physics based on the Personalized System of Instruction (PSI). The units are not intended to be used without outside materials;…

  2. Electronic structure and its external electric field modulation of PbPdO2 ultrathin slabs with (002) and (211) preferred orientations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yanmin; Zhong, Kehua; Xu, Guigui; Zhang, Jian-Min; Huang, Zhigao

    2017-07-31

    The Electronic structure of PbPdO2 with (002) and (211) preferred orientations were investigated using first-principles calculation. The calculated results indicate that, (002) and (211) orientations exhibit different electric field dependence of band-gap and carrier concentration. The small band gap and more sensitive electric field modulation of band gap were found in (002) orientation. Moreover, the electric field modulation of the resistivity up to 3-4 orders of magnitude is also observed in (002) slab, which reveals that origin of colossal electroresistance. Lastly, electric field modulation of band gap is well explained. This work should be significant for repeating the colossal electroresistance.

  3. Control of the Earth's electric field intensity through solar wind modulation of galactic cosmic radiation: Support for a proposed atmospheric electrical sun-weather mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markson, R.

    1980-01-01

    The ionospheric potential and galactic cosmic radiation, found to be inversely correlated with the solar wind velocity are examined as being germane to weather modification. Since the ionospheric potential is proportional to the fair weather electric field intensity and cosmic radiation is the dominant source of atmospheric ionization, it is concluded that the Earth's overall electric field varies in phase with atmospheric ionization and that the latter is modulated by the solar wind. A proposed mechanism, in which solar control of ionizing radiation influences atmospheric electrification and thus possibly cloud physical processes is discussed. An experimental approach to critically test the proposed mechanism through comparison of the temporal variation of the Earth's electric field with conditions in the interplanetary medium is outlined.

  4. Resistance modulation in VO2 nanowires induced by an electric field via air-gap gates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanki, Teruo; Chikanari, Masashi; Wei, Tingting; Tanaka, Hidekazu; The Institute of Scientific; Industrial Research Team

    Vanadium dioxide (VO2) shows huge resistance change with metal-insulator transition (MIT) at around room temperature. Controlling of the MIT by applying an electric field is a topical ongoing research toward the realization of Mott transistor. In this study, we have successfully switched channel resistance of VO2 nano-wire channels by a pure electrostatic field effect using a side-gate-type field-effect transistor (SG-FET) viaair gap and found that single crystalline VO2 nanowires and the channels with narrower width enhance transport modulation rate. The rate of change in resistance ((R0-R)/R, where R0 and R is the resistance of VO2 channel with off state and on state gate voltage (VG) , respectively) was 0.42 % at VG = 30 V in in-plane poly-crystalline VO2 channels on Al2O3(0001) substrates, while the rate in single crystalline channels on TiO2 (001) substrates was 3.84 %, which was 9 times higher than that using the poly-crystalline channels. With reducing wire width from 3000 nm to 400 nm of VO2 on TiO2 (001) substrate, furthermore, resistance modulation ratio enhanced from 0.67 % to 3.84 %. This change can not be explained by a simple free-electron model. In this presentation, we will compare the electronic properties between in-plane polycrystalline VO2 on Al2O3 (0001) and single crystalline VO2 on TiO2 (001) substrates, and show experimental data in detail..

  5. 10 Gb/s 16-quadrature amplitude modulation signal delivery over a wireless fiber system by using a directly modulated laser for electrical/optical conversion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lun Zhao; Jianguo Yu

    2015-01-01

    We propose and experimentally demonstrate a novel scheme to realize electrical/optical (E/O) conversion on the receiver side of a wireless fiber integration system at the W band.At the receiver,a directly modulated laser (DML) is used to realize E/O conversion.The received 85 GHz wireless millimeter-wave (mm-wave) signal is first down-converted into a 10 GHz electrical intermediate-frequency (IF) signal to overcome the insufficient bandwidth of the subsequent DML.Then,two cascaded electrical amplifiers (EAs) are employed to boost the electrical IF signal before it is used to drive a DML.By using this scheme,we transmit a 10 Gb/s 16 quadrature amplitude modulation (16QAM) signal over a 10 m wireless link,and then deliver it over a 2 km single-mode fiber-28 (SMF-28) wire link with a bit error ratio (BER) that is less than the hard-decision forward error correction threshold of 3.8 × 10-3.Our experimental results show that the DML is good device to be used for the E/O conversion of a 16QAM signal.

  6. Military Curricula for Vocational & Technical Education. Basic Electricity and Electronics. CANTRAC A-100-0010. Module 21: Basic Transistor Theory; Module 21T: Multi-Element Vacuum Tubes. Study Booklet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chief of Naval Education and Training Support, Pensacola, FL.

    This set of individualized learning modules on transistor theory is one in a series of modules for a course in basic electricity and electronics. The course is one of a number of military-developed curriculum packages selected for adaptation to vocational instructional and curriculum development in a civilian setting. Two modules are included in…

  7. Modulation of vagal activity to atria electrical remodeling resulted from rapid atrial pacing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shulong Zhang; Yanzong Yang; Yingxue Dong; Lianjun Gao; Donghui Yang; Chunyue Zhao; Hongwei Zhao; Xiaomeng Yin; Jinqiu Liu; Zhihu Lin

    2008-01-01

    Background Atrial electrical remodeling(AER)plays an important role in the pathogenesis and maintenance of atrialfibrillation.However,little is known about modulation of vagal activilty to AER.This study aimed to investigate the relationshipbetween vagal moduation and AER. Methods Twenty four adult mongrel dogs under general anesthesia were randomized into 3groups.Sympathetic activity was blocked by administration of metoprolol in 3 groups.The changes in vagal modulation to atria afterAER were observed in 10 dogs without vagal interruption in group A.The effects of vagal intervention on AER were investigated in 8dogs with administration of atropine in group B.The impact of aggressively vagal activity on AER was studied in 6 dogs with bilateralcervical vag sympathetic trunLks stimulation during AER in group C.Bilateral cervicall vagosympathetic trunks were decentralized.Multipolar catheters wereplaced into high right atria(RA),coronary sinus(CS)and rightventricle(RV).AER was induced by 600 bpmpacing through RA catheter for 30 minutes.Attial effective refractory period(ERP)and vulnerability window (VW)of atrial fibrillationwere measured with and without vagal stimulation before and after AER.Results In group A,ERP decreased significantly at baselineand during vagal stimulation after AER compared with that beforeAER(all P<0.05).In group B,ERP remaind unchanged at baselineand vagal stimulation after AER compared with tbat before AER (all P>0.05).In group C,ERP shortened significantly at baseline andvagal stimulation after AER compared with that before AER(all P<0.05).ERP shortening after AER in Groups A and C increasedsignificantly than that in group B (all P<0.05).Atrial fibrillation could not be induced at baseline(VW close to 0) before and after AERin three groups.VW became widen significantly during vagal stimulation after AER compared with that before AER in Groups A and C(all P<0.05),while VW remained unchanged in group B (VW close to 0).Conclusions

  8. Low back pain in elite rhythmic gymnasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchinson, M R

    1999-11-01

    Rhythmic gymnastics is a sport that blends the athleticism of a gymnast with the grace of a ballerina. The sport demands both the coordination of handling various apparatus and the flexibility to attain positions not seen in any other sport. To attain perfection and reproducibility of their routines, the athletes must practice and repeat the basic elements of their routines thousands of times. In so doing, the athlete places herself at risk of a myriad of overuse injuries, the most common being low back pain. To document the presence and severity of low back pain in elite rhythmic gymnasts, a prospective study of seven national team members was undertaken that documented injuries and complaints with daily medical reports over a 7-wk period. These findings were correlated with a retrospective review of 11 elite level gymnasts followed over a 10-month period whose complaints ultimately required evaluation by a physician. Eighty-six percent of the gymnasts in the prospective study complained of back pain at some point over the course of the study. The only injury recorded that required a time loss from sport was a low back injury. The most common complaint requiring a physician's evaluation was low back pain with the diagnoses varying from muscle strains to bony stress reaction or complete fracture of the pars inter-articularis (spondylolysis). No athlete had a spondylolisthesis or ruptured disk. Two had mild scolioses which did not appear to be associated with their low back pain. It would appear that rhythmic gymnasts are at relative increased risk of suffering low back complaints secondary to their sport.

  9. Effect of MgO/Fe Interface Oxidation State on Electric-Field Modulation of Interfacial Magnetic Anisotropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, X. W.; Cheng, X. M.; Wang, S.; Huang, T.; Xue, K. H.; Miao, X. S.

    2016-06-01

    The impact of the MgO/Fe interface oxidation state on the electric-field-modified magnetic anisotropy in MgO/Fe has been revealed by density functional calculations. It is shown that the influence of the interface oxidation is strong enough to dominate the effect of the electric field on the magnetic anisotropy of MgO/Fe-based films. The magnetoelectric coefficients are calculated to be positive for the ideal and overoxidized MgO/Fe interface, but an abnormal negative value emerges in the underoxidized case. By analyzing the interface states based on density of states and band structures, we demonstrate that the considerably different electronic structures of the three oxidized MgO/Fe interfaces lead to the strong discrepancy in the electric-field modulation of the interfacial magnetic anisotropy. These results are of considerable interest in the area of electric-field-controlled magnetic anisotropy and switching.

  10. Kairic Rhythmicity in the Turing-Galaxy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Sisse Siggaard

    2001-01-01

    This paper explores problems of time and timing in different spaces with refer-ence to two case studies from the epoch of the Turing-Galaxy. Case study 1 is on networked learning communities and case study 2 is an e-learning project in a small multimedia firm in Denmark. Basic assumptions...... the matrix of Time and Space Manifold suggested by Rämö (Rämö 1999) and the concept of "rhythmicity" as elaborated by Adam (Adam 1990, 1998) are introduced and dis-cussed in relation to the case studies....

  11. Military Curricula for Vocational & Technical Education. Basic Electricity and Electronics Individualized Learning System. CANTRAC A-100-0010. Module Eight: Induction. Study Booklet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chief of Naval Education and Training Support, Pensacola, FL.

    This individualized learning module on induction is one in a series of modules for a course in basic electricity and electronics. The course is one of a number of military-developed curriculum packages selected for adaptation to vocational instructional and curriculum development in a civilian setting. Four lessons are included in the module: (1)…

  12. A Novel Optimization Method for the Electric Topology of Thermoelectric Modules Used in an Automobile Exhaust Thermoelectric Generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quan, Rui; Tang, Xinfeng; Quan, Shuhai; Huang, Liang

    2013-07-01

    Based on Bi2Te3 thermoelectric modules, a kind of automobile exhaust thermoelectric generator (AETEG) with a single-column cold-source structure was designed. To enhance its net power and efficiency, the output performance of all the thermoelectric modules was tested with a temperature monitoring unit and voltage monitoring unit, and modeled using a back-propagation (BP) neural network based on various hot-source temperatures, cold-source temperatures, load currents, and contact pressures according to the temperature distribution of the designed heat exchanger and cooling system. Then, their electric topology (series or parallel hybrid) was optimized using a genetic algorithm to achieve the maximum peak power of the AETEG. From the experimental results, compared with when all the thermoelectric modules were connected only in series or parallel at random, it is concluded that the AETEG performance is evidently affected by the electric topology of all the single thermoelectric modules. The optimized AETEG output power is greatly superior to the other two investigated designs, validating the proposed optimized electric topology as both feasible and practical.

  13. Janus particle microshuttle: 1D directional self-propulsion modulated by AC electrical field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiliang Chen

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available A catalytic Janus particle is capable of gaining energy from the surrounding fuel solution to drive itself to move continuously, which has an important impact in different fields, especially the field of micro-systems. However, the randomness of self-propulsion at the microscale restricts its use in practice. Achieving a directed self-propelled movement would greatly promote the application of the Janus particle. We proved experimentally that an AC electric field was an effective way to suppress Brownian motion and control the direction of self-propelled movement. The self-propulsion and dielectrophoretic response of a 2μm Janus particle were observed and the related basic data were collected. Interdigital electrodes, 20 μm in width, were energized in pulsed style to modulate the self-propulsion, which resulted in a shuttle-style motion in which a single Janus particle moved to and fro inside the strip electrode. The change of direction depends on its unique position: the catalyst side is always pointed outward and the orientation angle relative to the electrode is about 60°. Numerical simulation also proved that this position is reasonable. The present study could be beneficial with regard to self-propulsion and AC electrokinetics of the Janus particle.

  14. A framework for identification of brain network dynamics using a novel binary noise modulated electrical stimulation pattern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yuxiao; Shanechi, Maryam M

    2015-01-01

    Modeling and identification of brain network dynamics is of great importance both for understanding brain function and for closed-loop control of brain states. In this work, we present a multi-input-multi-output (MIMO) linear state-space model (LSSM) to describe the brain network dynamics in response to electrical stimulation. The LSSM maps the parameters of electrical stimulation, such as frequency, amplitude and pulse-width to recorded brain signals such as electrocorticography (ECoG) and electroencephalography (EEG). Effective identification of the LSSM in open-loop stimulation experiments, however, is strongly dependent on the open-loop input stimulation design. We propose a novel input design to accurately identify the LSSM by integrating the concept of binary noise (BN) with practical constraints on stimulation waveforms. The designed input pattern is a pulse train modulated by stochastic BN parameters. We show that this input pattern both satisfies the necessary spectral condition for accurate system identification and can incorporate any desired pulse shape. Using numerical experiments, we show that the quality of identification depends heavily on the input signal pattern and the proposed binary noise modulated pattern achieves satisfactory identification results, reducing the relative estimation error more than 300 times compared with step sequence modulated, single-sinusoid modulated and multi-sinusoids modulated input patterns.

  15. The Rhythmic Group, Liaison, Nouns and Verbs of French

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashby, William J.

    1975-01-01

    The "rhythmic group" in French (noun group or verb group) is described with examples. The aim is to find some relation between the morphophonological phenomena such as "liaison" occurring within such rhythmic groups and the syntactic structure of French. Available from Liber Laeromedel, Box 1205, S-22105 Lund, Sweden. (TL)

  16. Effects of task complexity on rhythmic reproduction performance in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iannarilli, Flora; Vannozzi, Giuseppe; Iosa, Marco; Pesce, Caterina; Capranica, Laura

    2013-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of task complexity on the capability to reproduce rhythmic patterns. Sedentary musically illiterate individuals (age: 34.8±4.2 yrs; M±SD) were administered a rhythmic test including three rhythmic patterns to be reproduced by means of finger-tapping, foot-tapping and walking. For the quantification of subjects' ability in the reproduction of rhythmic patterns, qualitative and quantitative parameters were submitted to analysis. A stereophotogrammetric system was used to reconstruct and evaluate individual performances. The findings indicated a good internal stability of the rhythmic reproduction, suggesting that the present experimental design is suitable to discriminate the participants' rhythmic ability. Qualitative aspects of rhythmic reproduction (i.e., speed of execution and temporal ratios between events) varied as a function of the perceptual-motor requirements of the rhythmic reproduction task, with larger reproduction deviations in the walking task. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. The Rhythmic Group, Liaison, Nouns and Verbs of French

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashby, William J.

    1975-01-01

    The "rhythmic group" in French (noun group or verb group) is described with examples. The aim is to find some relation between the morphophonological phenomena such as "liaison" occurring within such rhythmic groups and the syntactic structure of French. Available from Liber Laeromedel, Box 1205, S-22105 Lund, Sweden. (TL)

  18. Rhythmic components in renal autoregulation: Nonlinear modulation phenomena

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pavlov, A. N.; Sosnovtseva, Olga; Pavlova, O. N.;

    2009-01-01

    Autoregulation of nephron blood flow involves two oscillatory processes: the tubular-flow sensitive tubuloglomerular feedback (TGF) mechanism and the blood-pressure sensitive myogenic mechanism. Both act to regulate the diameter of the afferent arteriole, which carries blood to the nephron...

  19. Optimization of the Mechanical and Electrical Performance of a Thermoelectric Module

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sarhadi, Ali; Bjørk, Rasmus; Pryds, Nini

    2015-01-01

    Finite element (FE) simulation of a thermoelectric (TE) module was conducted to optimize its geometrical dimensions in terms of mechanical reliability and performance. The TE module consisted of bismuth telluride, nand p-type legs. The geometrical dimensions of the module, i.e. leg length and leg...

  20. Reversible Luminescence Modulation upon an Electric Field on a Full Solid-State Device Based on Lanthanide Dimers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Xiaohui; Shang, Jie; Pan, Liang; Tan, Hongwei; Chen, Bin; Liu, Gang; Huang, Gang; Bernot, Kevin; Guillou, Olivier; Li, Run-Wei

    2016-06-22

    Switching luminescence of lanthanide-based molecules through an external electric field is considered as a promising approach toward novel functional molecule-based devices. Classic routes use casted films and liquid electrolyte as media for redox reactions. Such protocol, even if efficient, is relatively hard to turn into an effective solid-state device. In this work, we explicitly synthesize lanthanide-based dimers whose luminescent behavior is affected by the presence of Cu(2+) ions. Excellent evaporability of the dimers and utilization of Cu(2+)-based solid-state electrolyte makes it possible to reproduce solution behavior at the solid state. Reversible modulation of Cu(2+) ions transport can be achieved by an electric field in a solid-state device, where lanthanide-related luminescence is driven by an electric field. These findings provide a proof-of-concept alternative approach for electrically driven modulation of solid-state luminescence and show promising potential for information storage media in the future.

  1. Dopamine Induces Rhythmic Activity and Enhances Postinhibitory Rebound in a Leech Motor Neuron Involved in Swimming and Crawling Behaviors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James D. Angstadt

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Amine neurotransmitters play an important role in controlling motor behavior in many animals, including the medicinal leech (Hirudo medicinalis. Previous studies have established serotonin as an important modulator of swimming behavior. Serotonin levels are elevated in the blood of frequently swimming leeches and bath application of serotonin to isolated nerve cord preparations evokes fictive swimming. Serotonin alters the intrinsic electrical properties of interneurons and motor neurons involved in generating swimming behavior. In particular, serotonin increases the amplitude, but shortens the duration, of postinhibitory rebound (PIR responses in cell DE-3, a motor neuron that innervates the dorsal longitudinal muscle cells of the body wall. More recent studies have implicated dopamine in the suppression of swimming behavior and the initiation of crawling. Here we show that bath application of dopamine to isolated leech ganglia induces rhythmic oscillatory activity in cell DE-3. The long cycle period of these oscillations is consistent with crawling, but not swimming behavior. Dopamine increases the amplitude of PIR responses in cell DE-3, but unlike serotonin does not decrease its duration. These effects provide further support for the hypothesis that dopamine promotes crawling behavior in the leech.

  2. Biological clockwork underlying adaptive rhythmic movements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwasaki, Tetsuya; Chen, Jun; Friesen, W. Otto

    2014-01-01

    Owing to the complexity of neuronal circuits, precise mathematical descriptions of brain functions remain an elusive ambition. A more modest focus of many neuroscientists, central pattern generators, are more tractable neuronal circuits specialized to generate rhythmic movements, including locomotion. The relative simplicity and well-defined motor functions of these circuits provide an opportunity for uncovering fundamental principles of neuronal information processing. Here we present the culmination of mathematical analysis that captures the adaptive behaviors emerging from interactions between a central pattern generator, the body, and the physical environment during locomotion. The biologically realistic model describes the undulatory motions of swimming leeches with quantitative accuracy and, without further parameter tuning, predicts the sweeping changes in oscillation patterns of leeches undulating in air or swimming in high-viscosity fluid. The study demonstrates that central pattern generators are capable of adapting oscillations to the environment through sensory feedback, but without guidance from the brain. PMID:24395788

  3. Rhythmic entrainment source separation: Optimizing analyses of neural responses to rhythmic sensory stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Michael X; Gulbinaite, Rasa

    2017-02-15

    Steady-state evoked potentials (SSEPs) are rhythmic brain responses to rhythmic sensory stimulation, and are often used to study perceptual and attentional processes. We present a data analysis method for maximizing the signal-to-noise ratio of the narrow-band steady-state response in the frequency and time-frequency domains. The method, termed rhythmic entrainment source separation (RESS), is based on denoising source separation approaches that take advantage of the simultaneous but differential projection of neural activity to multiple electrodes or sensors. Our approach is a combination and extension of existing multivariate source separation methods. We demonstrate that RESS performs well on both simulated and empirical data, and outperforms conventional SSEP analysis methods based on selecting electrodes with the strongest SSEP response, as well as several other linear spatial filters. We also discuss the potential confound of overfitting, whereby the filter captures noise in absence of a signal. Matlab scripts are available to replicate and extend our simulations and methods. We conclude with some practical advice for optimizing SSEP data analyses and interpreting the results.

  4. Music Games: Potential Application and Considerations for Rhythmic Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bégel, Valentin; Di Loreto, Ines; Seilles, Antoine; Dalla Bella, Simone

    2017-01-01

    Rhythmic skills are natural and widespread in the general population. The majority can track the beat of music and move along with it. These abilities are meaningful from a cognitive standpoint given their tight links with prominent motor and cognitive functions such as language and memory. When rhythmic skills are challenged by brain damage or neurodevelopmental disorders, remediation strategies based on rhythm can be considered. For example, rhythmic training can be used to improve motor performance (e.g., gait) as well as cognitive and language skills. Here, we review the games readily available in the market and assess whether they are well-suited for rhythmic training. Games that train rhythm skills may serve as useful tools for retraining motor and cognitive functions in patients with motor or neurodevelopmental disorders (e.g., Parkinson's disease, dyslexia, or ADHD). Our criteria were the peripheral used to capture and record the response, the type of response and the output measure. None of the existing games provides sufficient temporal precision in stimulus presentation and/or data acquisition. In addition, games do not train selectively rhythmic skills. Hence, the available music games, in their present form, are not satisfying for training rhythmic skills. Yet, some features such as the device used, the interface or the game scenario provide good indications for devising efficient training protocols. Guidelines are provided for devising serious music games targeting rhythmic training in the future.

  5. Music Games: Potential Application and Considerations for Rhythmic Training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentin Bégel

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Rhythmic skills are natural and widespread in the general population. The majority can track the beat of music and move along with it. These abilities are meaningful from a cognitive standpoint given their tight links with prominent motor and cognitive functions such as language and memory. When rhythmic skills are challenged by brain damage or neurodevelopmental disorders, remediation strategies based on rhythm can be considered. For example, rhythmic training can be used to improve motor performance (e.g., gait as well as cognitive and language skills. Here, we review the games readily available in the market and assess whether they are well-suited for rhythmic training. Games that train rhythm skills may serve as useful tools for retraining motor and cognitive functions in patients with motor or neurodevelopmental disorders (e.g., Parkinson’s disease, dyslexia, or ADHD. Our criteria were the peripheral used to capture and record the response, the type of response and the output measure. None of the existing games provides sufficient temporal precision in stimulus presentation and/or data acquisition. In addition, games do not train selectively rhythmic skills. Hence, the available music games, in their present form, are not satisfying for training rhythmic skills. Yet, some features such as the device used, the interface or the game scenario provide good indications for devising efficient training protocols. Guidelines are provided for devising serious music games targeting rhythmic training in the future.

  6. Interpretation of Simultaneous Mechanical-Electrical-Thermal Failure in a Lithium-Ion Battery Module: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Chao; Santhanagopalan, Shriram; Stock, Mark J.; Brunhart-Lupo, Nicholas; Gruchalla, Kenny

    2016-12-01

    Lithium-ion batteries are currently the state-of- the-art power sources for electric vehicles, and their safety behavior when subjected to abuse, such as a mechanical impact, is of critical concern. A coupled mechanical-electrical-thermal model for simulating the behavior of a lithium-ion battery under a mechanical crush has been developed. We present a series of production-quality visualizations to illustrate the complex mechanical and electrical interactions in this model.

  7. High-Contrast Electro-Optic Modulation of a Photonic Crystal Nanocavity by Electrical Gating of Graphene

    CERN Document Server

    Gan, Xuetao; Gao, Yuanda; Mak, Kin Fai; Yao, Xinwen; Li, Luozhou; Szep, Attila; Walker, Dennis; Hone, James; Heinz, Tony F; Englund, Dirk

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate a high-contrast electro-optic modulation of a photonic crystal nanocavity integrated with an electrically gated monolayer graphene. A high quality (Q) factor air-slot nanocavity design is employed for high overlap between the optical field and graphene sheet. Tuning of graphene's Fermi level up to 0.8 eV enables efficient control of its complex dielectric constant, which allows modulation of the cavity reflection in excess of 10 dB for a swing voltage of only 1.5 V. We also observe a controllable resonance wavelength shift close to 2 nm around a wavelength of 1570 nm and a Q factor modulation in excess of three. These observations allow cavity-enhanced measurements of the graphene complex dielectric constant under different chemical potentials, in agreement with a theoretical model of the graphene dielectric constant under gating. This graphene-based nanocavity modulation demonstrates the feasibility of high-contrast, low-power frequency-selective electro-optic nanocavity modulators in graphene...

  8. Order restricted inference for oscillatory systems for detecting rhythmic signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larriba, Yolanda; Rueda, Cristina; Fernández, Miguel A; Peddada, Shyamal D

    2016-12-15

    Many biological processes, such as cell cycle, circadian clock, menstrual cycles, are governed by oscillatory systems consisting of numerous components that exhibit rhythmic patterns over time. It is not always easy to identify such rhythmic components. For example, it is a challenging problem to identify circadian genes in a given tissue using time-course gene expression data. There is a great potential for misclassifying non-rhythmic as rhythmic genes and vice versa. This has been a problem of considerable interest in recent years. In this article we develop a constrained inference based methodology called Order Restricted Inference for Oscillatory Systems (ORIOS) to detect rhythmic signals. Instead of using mathematical functions (e.g. sinusoidal) to describe shape of rhythmic signals, ORIOS uses mathematical inequalities. Consequently, it is robust and not limited by the biologist's choice of the mathematical model. We studied the performance of ORIOS using simulated as well as real data obtained from mouse liver, pituitary gland and data from NIH3T3, U2OS cell lines. Our results suggest that, for a broad collection of patterns of gene expression, ORIOS has substantially higher power to detect true rhythmic genes in comparison to some popular methods, while also declaring substantially fewer non-rhythmic genes as rhythmic. A user friendly code implemented in R language can be downloaded from http://www.niehs.nih.gov/research/atniehs/labs/bb/staff/peddada/index.cfm CONTACT: peddada@niehs.nih.gov. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research 2016. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  9. Electrical Motor Current Signal Analysis using a Modulation Signal Bispectrum for the Fault Diagnosis of a Gearbox Downstream

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haram, M.; Wang, T.; Gu, F.; Ball, A. D.

    2012-05-01

    Motor current signal analysis has been an effective way for many years of monitoring electrical machines themselves. However, little work has been carried out in using this technique for monitoring their downstream equipment because of difficulties in extracting small fault components in the measured current signals. This paper investigates the characteristics of electrical current signals for monitoring the faults from a downstream gearbox using a modulation signal bispectrum (MSB), including phase effects in extracting small modulating components in a noisy measurement. An analytical study is firstly performed to understand amplitude, frequency and phase characteristics of current signals due to faults. It then explores the performance of MSB analysis in detecting weak modulating components in current signals. Experimental study based on a 10kw two stage gearbox, driven by a three phase induction motor, shows that MSB peaks at different rotational frequencies can be based to quantify the severity of gear tooth breakage and the degrees of shaft misalignment. In addition, the type and location of a fault can be recognized based on the frequency at which the change of MSB peak is the highest among different frequencies.

  10. Room-Temperature Large and Reversible Modulation of Photoluminescence by in Situ Electric Field in Ergodic Relaxor Ferroelectrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Hailing; Wu, Xiao; Peng, Deng Feng; Kwok, K W

    2017-10-04

    Ferroelectric oxides with luminescent ions hold great promise in future optoelectronic devices because of their unique photoluminescence and inherent ferroelectric properties. Intriguingly, the photoluminescence performance of ferroelectric ceramics could be modulated by an external electric field. However, researchers face a current challenge of the diminutive extent and degree of reversibility of the field-driven modification that hinder their use in room-temperature practical applications. Within the scope of current contribution in rare-earth-doped bismuth sodium titanate relaxors, the most important information to be noted is the shifting of the depolarization temperature toward room temperature and the resulting considerable enhancement in ergodicity, as evidenced by the dielectric properties, polarization, and strain hysteresis, as well as the in situ Raman/X-ray diffraction studies. After the introduction of 1 mol % Eu, the induced composition and charge disorders disrupt the original long-range ferroelectric macrodomains into randomly dynamic and weakly correlated polar nanoregions, which facilitates a reversible transformation between polar nanoregions and unstable ferroelectric state under an electric field, engendering a large strain. By virtue of this, both the extent and degree of reversibility of photoluminescence modulation are enhanced (∼60%) considerably, and room-temperature in situ tunable photoluminescence response is then achieved under electric field. These should be helpful for the realization of regulating the physical couplings (photoluminescent-ferroelectrics) in multifunctional inorganic ferroelectrics with a high ergodic state by reversibly tuning the structural symmetry.

  11. Measurements of Electric Performance and Impedance of a 75 Ah NMC Lithium Battery Module

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Søren Højgaard; Engelbrecht, Kurt

    2012-01-01

    Detailed characterization of battery modules is necessary to construct reliable models that incorporate performance related aspects of the modules such as thermodynamics, electrochemical reaction kinetics and degradation mechanisms. Charge-discharge curves, temperature and battery impedance...... measurements can provide information about these aspects. Charge-discharge curves can be used to measure the battery open circuit voltage and the internal resistance. Temperature measurements provide information about the thermodynamic reactions and impedance spectra yield detailed information about...... the reaction kinetics. In this paper we present the measurement methods used to examine the internal resistance, the capacity and the impedance of a 75 Ah NMC battery module. In order to measure the impedance of the battery module and of the individual cells in the module, we combine the single sine technique...

  12. Effects of Gravity on Insect Circadian Rhythmicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoban-Higgins, Tana M.

    2000-01-01

    Circadian rhythms - endogenous daily rhythmic fluctuations in virtually all characteristics of life - are generated and coordinated by the circadian timing system (CTS). The CTS is synchronized to the external 24-hour day by time cues such as the light/dark cycle. In an environment without time cues, the length of an animal's day is determined by the period of its internal pacemaker (tau) and the animal is said to be free-running. All life on earth evolved under the solar day; the CTS exists as an adaptation that allows organisms to anticipate and to prepare for rhythmic environmental fluctuations. All life on earth also evolved under the force of earth's gravitational environment. While it is therefore not surprising that changes in the lighting environment affect the CTS, it is surprising that changes in the gravitational environment would do so. However, recent data from one of our laboratories using the brn-3.1 knockout mouse revealed that this model, which lacks the sensory receptor hair cells within the neurovestibular system, does not respond to exposure to a hyperdynamic environment in the same fashion as normal mice. The brn-3.1 mice did not show the expected suppression of circadian rhythmicity shown by control mice exposed to 2G. Exposure to altered ambient force environments affects the amplitude, mean and timing of circadian rhythms in species from unicellular organisms to man. In addition, there is a circadian influence on the homeostatic response to acute 2G acceleration and pulses of 2G can act as a time cue, synchronizing the CTS. This is of significance because maintenance of internal and external temporal coordination is critical for normal physiological and psychological function. Typically, during adaptation to an increased gravitational environment (+G), an initial acute reaction is followed by adaptation and, eventually, a new steady state (14-16), which can take weeks to months to establish. Until the development of space stations, exposure

  13. SIMULATIVE ANALYSIS OF OSNR AND RECEIVED ELECTRIC RF POWER OF A ROF SYSTEM HAVING VARIABLE FIBER LENGTH, USING DIFFERENT MODULATION TECHNIQUES AND OPTICAL AMPLIFIERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KARANBIR SINGH,

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we analyzed OSNR and received electric RF power of a RoF communication system having variable fiber length, using direct and external modulation techniques and different optical amplifiers. In this work, we have compared and measured the OSNR and received optical power of the RoF system for different modulation techniques, i.e. direct and external modulation. Further, we also compared the received electric RF power for variable fiber lengths for direct and external modulation using different optical amplifiers, i.e. EDFAand SOA. We observe an increase of –11 dB (approx. in the received RF power for External modulation compared to direct modulation with EDFA.

  14. Large Electric-Field Modulation of Magnetic Properties in Fe Films on BiScO3-PbTiO3 Ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Wang

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on the magneto-optical Kerr effect, we report the electric-field modulation of the magnetic properties in Fe/BiScO3-PbTiO3 (BSPT film-on-ceramic substrate structure. The Fe films are directly grown on the fully-poled BSPT ceramic substrates by magnetron sputtering. An electric field applied parallel to the prepolarization direction of the piezoelectric BSPT can induce a reversible increase in the coercive field Hc of about 30%, whereas an electric field antiparallel to the prepolarization direction can cause a persistent, tremendous decrease (as large as 97% in Hc, and a small reversal electric field can resume it back. The strain induced by the inverse piezoelectric effect is the primary mechanism behind. This large modulation of the coercive field by the electric field could inspire further exploration of electric-field-controlled magnetic switching in multiferroic heterostructures.

  15. Military Curricula for Vocational & Technical Education. Basic Electricity and Electronics. CANTRAC A-100-0010. Module 34: Linear Integrated Circuits. Study Booklet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chief of Naval Education and Training Support, Pensacola, FL.

    This individualized learning module on linear integrated circuits is one in a series of modules for a course in basic electricity and electronics. The course is one of a number of military-developed curriculum packages selected for adaptation to vocational instructional and curriculum development in a civilian setting. Two lessons are included in…

  16. Refraction index modulation induced with transverse electric field in double tunnel-coupled GaAs/AlGaAs quantum wells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shumilov, A. A.; Vinnichenko, M. Ya; Balagula, R. M.; Vorobjev, L. E.; Firsov, D. A.; Kulagina, M. M.; Vasil'iev, A. P.; Duque, C. A.; Tiutiunnyk, A.; Akimov, V.; Restrepo, R. L.; Tulupenko, V. N.; Ter-Martirosyan, A. L.

    2015-11-01

    Modulation of refraction index under transverse electric field was studied in structures with multiple tunnel-coupled GaAs/AlGaAs quantum wells in the spectral range corresponding to intersubband light absorption. The change of refraction index in electric field was calculated using Kramers-Kronig relation and experimentally determined spectra of intersubband light absorption in equilibrium conditions and under transverse electric field.

  17. Dual temporal pitch percepts from acoustic and electric amplitude-modulated pulse trains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKay, C M; Carlyon, R P

    1999-01-01

    Two experiments examined the perception of unmodulated and amplitude-modulated pulse trains by normally hearing listeners and cochlear implantees. Four normally hearing subjects listened to acoustic pulse trains, which were band-pass filtered between 3.9 and 5.3 kHz. Four cochlear implantees, all postlinguistically deaf users of the Mini System 22 implant, listened to current pulse trains produced at a single electrode position. In the first experiment, a set of nine loudness-balanced unmodulated stimuli with rates between 60 and 300 Hz were presented in a multidimensional scaling task. The resultant stimulus spaces for both subject groups showed a single dimension associated with the rate of the stimuli. In the second experiment, a set of ten loudness-balanced modulated stimuli was constructed, with carrier rates between 140 and 300 Hz, and modulation rates between 60 and 150 Hz. The modulation rates were integer submultiples of the carrier rates, and each modulation period consisted of one higher-intensity pulse and one or more identical lower-intensity pulses. The modulation depth of each stimulus was adjusted so that its pitch was judged to be higher or lower 50% of the time than that of an unmodulated pulse train having a rate equal to the geometric mean of the carrier and modulation rates. A multidimensional scaling task with these ten stimuli resulted in two-dimensional stimulus spaces, with dimensions corresponding to carrier and modulation rates. A further investigation with one normally hearing subject showed that the perceptual weighting of the two dimensions varied systematically with modulation depth. It was concluded that, when filtered appropriately, acoustic pulse trains can be used to produce percepts in normal listeners that share common features with those experienced by subjects listening through one channel of a cochlear implant, and that the central auditory system can extract two temporal patterns arising from the same cochlear location.

  18. Some effects of rhythmic context on melody recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidd, G; Boltz, M; Jones, M R

    1984-01-01

    The effects of rhythmic context on the ability of listeners to recognize slightly altered versions of 10-tone melodies were examined in three experiments. Listeners judged the melodic equivalence of two auditory patterns when their rhythms were either the same or different. Rhythmic variations produced large effects on a bias measure, indicating that listeners judged melodies to be alike if their rhythms were identical. However, neither rhythm nor pattern rate affected discriminability measures in the first study, in which rhythm was treated as a within subjects variable. The other two studies examined rhythmic context as a between subjects variable. In these, significant effects of temporal uncertainty due to the number and type of rhythms involved in a block of trials, as well as their assignment to standard and comparison melodies on a given trial, were apparent on both discriminability and bias measures. Results were interpreted in terms of the effect of temporal context on the rhythmic targeting of attention.

  19. Some anthropologic factors of performance in rhythmic gymnastics novices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miletić, Durdica; Katić, Ratko; Males, Boris

    2004-12-01

    The aim of the study was to determine motor and morphological factors, and to assess their impact on specific motor skill performance in rhythmic gymnastics (RG). Experimental training process aimed at learning and improving basic movement structures of rhythmic gymnastics was performed for nine months in a sample of 50 female rhythmic gymnastics novices (mean age 7.1 +/- 0.3 years). Seven dimensions in total were isolated by factorial analysis of 13 motor, 11 morphological, and 20 specific rhythmic gymnastics tests. The factors of flexibility (Beta = 0.26; p gymnastics novices should be programmed, with preset objectives for the development of flexibility and explosive strength, speed and peripheral joint strength and adipose tissue reduction.

  20. Electric field modulation of Schottky barrier height in graphene/MoSe{sub 2} van der Waals heterointerface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sata, Yohta; Moriya, Rai, E-mail: moriyar@iis.u-tokyo.ac.jp, E-mail: tmachida@iis.u-tokyo.ac.jp; Morikawa, Sei; Yabuki, Naoto [Institute of Industrial Science, University of Tokyo, 4-6-1 Komaba, Meguro, Tokyo 153-8505 (Japan); Masubuchi, Satoru; Machida, Tomoki, E-mail: moriyar@iis.u-tokyo.ac.jp, E-mail: tmachida@iis.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Institute of Industrial Science, University of Tokyo, 4-6-1 Komaba, Meguro, Tokyo 153-8505 (Japan); Institute for Nano Quantum Information Electronics, University of Tokyo, 4-6-1 Komaba, Meguro, Tokyo 153-8505 (Japan)

    2015-07-13

    We demonstrate a vertical field-effect transistor based on a graphene/MoSe{sub 2} van der Waals (vdW) heterostructure. The vdW interface between the graphene and MoSe{sub 2} exhibits a Schottky barrier with an ideality factor of around 1.3, suggesting a high-quality interface. Owing to the low density of states in graphene, the position of the Fermi level in the graphene can be strongly modulated by an external electric field. Therefore, the Schottky barrier height at the graphene/MoSe{sub 2} vdW interface is also modulated. We demonstrate a large current ON-OFF ratio of 10{sup 5}. These results point to the potential high performance of the graphene/MoSe{sub 2} vdW heterostructure for electronics applications.

  1. Spin and valley dependent line-type resonant peaks in electrically and magnetically modulated silicene quantum structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuanshan; Guo, Yong

    2017-02-01

    A barrier with a tunable spin-valley dependent energy gap in silicene could be used as a spin and valley filter. Meanwhile, special resonant modes in unique quantum structure can act as energy filters. Hence we investigate valley and spin transport properties in the potential silicene quantum structures, i.e., single ferromagnetic barrier, single electromagnetic barrier and double electric barriers. Our quantum transport calculation indicates that quantum devices of high accuracy and efficiency (100% polarization), based on modulated silicene quantum structures, can be designed for valley, spin and energy filtering. These intriguing features are revealed by the spin, valley dependent line-type resonant peaks. In addition, line-type peaks in different structure depend on spin and valley diversely. The filter we proposed is controllable by electric gating.

  2. Modulation of electronic structures of MoSe2/WSe2 van der Waals heterostructure by external electric field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fang; Li, Wei; Dai, Xianqi

    2017-10-01

    By using first-principles calculations, we investigate the electronic structures of MoSe2/WSe2 van der Waals(vdW) heterostructure by applying external electric field(Eext) perpendicular to the layers. It is demonstrated that MoSe2/WSe2 heterostructure is a type-II vdW heterostructure. The band gap of MoSe2/WSe2 is significantly modulated by Eext, eventually a semiconductor-to-metal transition can be realized. The positive and negative Eext have different effects on the band gap due to the intrinsic spontaneous electric polarization in MoSe2/WSe2 heterostructure. Moreover, MoSe2/WSe2 heterobilayer experiences transitions from type-II to type-I and then to type-II under various Eext. The present study provides great application potential of ultrathin MoSe2/WSe2 heterostructure in future nano- and optoelectronics.

  3. Broadband velocity modulation spectroscopy of HfF^+: towards a measurement of the electron electric dipole moment

    CERN Document Server

    Cossel, Kevin C; Sinclair, Laura C; Coffey, Tyler; Skripnikov, Leonid V; Petrov, Alexander N; Mosyagin, Nikolai S; Titov, Anatoly V; Field, Robert W; Meyer, Edmund R; Cornell, Eric A; Ye, Jun

    2012-01-01

    Precision spectroscopy of trapped HfF^+ will be used in a search for the permanent electric dipole moment of the electron (eEDM). While this dipole moment has yet to be observed, various extensions to the standard model of particle physics (such as supersymmetry) predict values that are close to the current limit. We present extensive survey spectroscopy of 19 bands covering nearly 5000 cm^(-1) using both frequency-comb and single-frequency laser velocity-modulation spectroscopy. We obtain high-precision rovibrational constants for eight electronic states including those that will be necessary for state preparation and readout in an actual eEDM experiment.

  4. PFLOTRAN-E4D: A parallel open source PFLOTRAN module for simulating time-lapse electrical resistivity data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Timothy C.; Hammond, Glenn E.; Chen, Xingyuan

    2017-02-01

    Time-lapse electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) is finding increased application for remotely monitoring processes occurring in the near subsurface in three-dimensions (i.e. 4D monitoring). However, there are few codes capable of simulating the evolution of subsurface resistivity and corresponding tomographic measurements arising from a particular process, particularly in parallel and with an open source license. Herein we describe and demonstrate an electrical resistivity tomography module for the PFLOTRAN subsurface simulation code, named PFLOTRAN-E4D. The PFLOTRAN-E4D module operates in parallel using a dedicated set of compute cores in a master-slave configuration. At each time step, the master processes receives subsurface states from PFLOTRAN, converts those states to bulk electrical conductivity, and instructs the slave processes to simulate a tomographic data set. The resulting multi-physics simulation capability enables accurate feasibility studies for ERT imaging, the identification of the ERT signatures that are unique to a given process, and facilitates the joint inversion of ERT data with hydrogeological data for subsurface characterization. PFLOTRAN-E4D is demonstrated herein using a field study of stage-driven groundwater/river water interaction ERT monitoring along the Columbia River, Washington, USA. Results demonstrate the complex nature of changes subsurface electrical conductivity, in both the saturated and unsaturated zones, arising from water table changes and from river water intrusion into the aquifer. The results also demonstrate the sensitivity of surface based ERT measurements to those changes over time. PFLOTRAN-E4D is available with the PFLOTRAN development version with an open-source license at https://bitbucket.org/pflotran/pflotran-dev .

  5. PFLOTRAN-E4D: A parallel open source PFLOTRAN module for simulating time-lapse electrical resistivity data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Timothy C.; Hammond, Glenn E.; Chen, Xingyuan

    2017-02-01

    Time-lapse electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) is finding increased application for remotely monitoring processes occurring in the near subsurface in three-dimensions (i.e. 4D monitoring). However, there are few codes capable of simulating the evolution of subsurface resistivity and corresponding tomographic measurements arising from a particular process, particularly in parallel and with an open source license. Herein we describe and demonstrate an electrical resistivity tomography module for the PFLOTRAN subsurface flow and reactive transport simulation code, named PFLOTRAN-E4D. The PFLOTRAN-E4D module operates in parallel using a dedicated set of compute cores in a master-slave configuration. At each time step, the master processes receives subsurface states from PFLOTRAN, converts those states to bulk electrical conductivity, and instructs the slave processes to simulate a tomographic data set. The resulting multi-physics simulation capability enables accurate feasibility studies for ERT imaging, the identification of the ERT signatures that are unique to a given process, and facilitates the joint inversion of ERT data with hydrogeological data for subsurface characterization. PFLOTRAN-E4D is demonstrated herein using a field study of stage-driven groundwater/river water interaction ERT monitoring along the Columbia River, Washington, USA. Results demonstrate the complex nature of subsurface electrical conductivity changes, in both the saturated and unsaturated zones, arising from river stage fluctuations and associated river water intrusion into the aquifer. The results also demonstrate the sensitivity of surface based ERT measurements to those changes over time. PFLOTRAN-E4D is available with the PFLOTRAN development version with an open-source license at https://bitbucket.org/pflotran/pflotran-dev.

  6. Predictors of attainment in rhythmic sportive gymnastics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hume, P A; Hopkins, W G; Robinson, D M; Robinson, S M; Hollings, S C

    1993-12-01

    Correlates of attainment in rhythmic sportive gymnastics (RSG) were investigated in a cross-sectional study of 106 female gymnasts aged 7-27 years. Physical attributes were obtained by anthropometry and from tests of flexibility, leg power, maximum oxygen uptake and visuo-motor proficiency. Training and psychological measures were derived from self-administered questionnaires that included the Leadership Scale for Sport, Psychological Skills Inventory for Sport, General Health Questionnaire, Sport Competition Anxiety Test, and several questions on sport motivation and enjoyment. Attainment was expressed as competition grade level and mean performance score in 4 competitions. The best correlates of attainment were cumulative and current training time (r = 0.84-0.53). Age, lean body mass and composite measures of flexibility, leg power and visuo-motor proficiency were also significant correlates of attainment (r = 0.69-0.29), as were coach democratic and coach social behaviours (r = 0.41-0.28). The significant positive psychometric correlates of attainment were mental preparation, motivation by creativity, and several dimensions of enjoyment (r = 0.35-0.26); significant negative correlates were recent anxiety-depression and enjoyment of training (r = -0.34-(-)0.32). No previous study has identified the relative contributions of such a comprehensive range of physical, psychological and training measures to performance of a sport.

  7. Modulation bandwidth enhancement of white-LED-based visible light communications using electrical equalizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, D. H.; Yang, S. H.; Han, S. K.

    2015-01-01

    Utilizing the modulation capability of LEDs, there have been many studies about convergence technology to combine illumination and communication. The visible light communication (VLC) system has several advantages such as high security, immunity to RF interference and lower additional cost than comparing to LEDs just for illumination. However, modulation bandwidth of LEDs is not enough for various wireless communication systems. Since the commercial LEDs are designed only for lighting systems; we need an effort to enhance the modulation characteristics of LEDs. When the area of LED is increased, internal junction capacitance of LED is also increased depending on the area of LEDs and then the RC delay time of LED is increased. As a result, the modulation bandwidth of LEDs is limited by large RC delay time. In addition, frequency response of commercial white LED is degraded by the slow response time of the used yellow phosphor. Thus, modulation bandwidth of VLC system is limited to several MHz which is not enough to accommodate high data rate transmission. In this paper, we designed equalization circuit using RLC component for compensating the white LEDs frequency response. Also, we used blue filtering to improve frequency response of white LEDs, which is degraded by yellow phosphorescent component. Power loss by optical filtering and distance is compensated by convex lens. Consequently, we extend the modulation bandwidth of VLC system from 3 MHz to more than 180 MHz, and it allows NRZ-OOK data transmission up to 400 Mbps at 50 cm.

  8. Simulation assisted design of a PV module incorporating electrically conductive adhesive interconnections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meuwissen, M.; Van den Nieuwenhof, M.; Steijvers, H.L.A.H.; Bots, T.L. [TNO Science and Industry, PO Box 6235, 5600 HE Eindhoven (Netherlands); Broek, K.M.; Kloos, M.J.H. [ECN Solar Energy, Petten (Netherlands)

    2006-09-15

    Crystalline cells used in PV modules are becoming thinner, while at the same time the surface area increases. This trend is mainly driven by cost efficiency. Due to the higher fragility of thin solar cells, the admissible limits on mechanical stresses during assembly and during field operation are lower. Nowadays, solar modules are typically assembled using soldered interconnects. The soldering process induces a combination of thermal and mechanical loads on the cell. For thin cells, these loads are expected to lead to unacceptably high breakage levels during module production. By applying conductive adhesives, the thermo-mechanical loads are reduced. The back-contacted cell concept allows for a relatively straightforward introduction of adhesive interconnects into a PV module. An important issue in the design of PV modules is its long term thermo-mechanical reliability. The paper presents the application of computer simulation techniques in addressing this issue. It highlights critical aspects for performing accurate simulations of thermo-mechanical PV module behaviour. The simulation techniques are demonstrated on the design of a suitable adhesive interconnect size in a PV laminate that is subjected to temperature cycling.

  9. Transient features in nanosecond pulsed electric fields differentially modulate mitochondria and viability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen J Beebe

    Full Text Available It is hypothesized that high frequency components of nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEFs, determined by transient pulse features, are important for maximizing electric field interactions with intracellular structures. For monopolar square wave pulses, these transient features are determined by the rapid rise and fall of the pulsed electric fields. To determine effects on mitochondria membranes and plasma membranes, N1-S1 hepatocellular carcinoma cells were exposed to single 600 ns pulses with varying electric fields (0-80 kV/cm and short (15 ns or long (150 ns rise and fall times. Plasma membrane effects were evaluated using Fluo-4 to determine calcium influx, the only measurable source of increases in intracellular calcium. Mitochondria membrane effects were evaluated using tetramethylrhodamine ethyl ester (TMRE to determine mitochondria membrane potentials (ΔΨm. Single pulses with short rise and fall times caused electric field-dependent increases in calcium influx, dissipation of ΔΨm and cell death. Pulses with long rise and fall times exhibited electric field-dependent increases in calcium influx, but diminished effects on dissipation of ΔΨm and viability. Results indicate that high frequency components have significant differential impact on mitochondria membranes, which determines cell death, but lesser variances on plasma membranes, which allows calcium influxes, a primary determinant for dissipation of ΔΨm and cell death.

  10. Transient features in nanosecond pulsed electric fields differentially modulate mitochondria and viability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beebe, Stephen J; Chen, Yeong-Jer; Sain, Nova M; Schoenbach, Karl H; Xiao, Shu

    2012-01-01

    It is hypothesized that high frequency components of nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEFs), determined by transient pulse features, are important for maximizing electric field interactions with intracellular structures. For monopolar square wave pulses, these transient features are determined by the rapid rise and fall of the pulsed electric fields. To determine effects on mitochondria membranes and plasma membranes, N1-S1 hepatocellular carcinoma cells were exposed to single 600 ns pulses with varying electric fields (0-80 kV/cm) and short (15 ns) or long (150 ns) rise and fall times. Plasma membrane effects were evaluated using Fluo-4 to determine calcium influx, the only measurable source of increases in intracellular calcium. Mitochondria membrane effects were evaluated using tetramethylrhodamine ethyl ester (TMRE) to determine mitochondria membrane potentials (ΔΨm). Single pulses with short rise and fall times caused electric field-dependent increases in calcium influx, dissipation of ΔΨm and cell death. Pulses with long rise and fall times exhibited electric field-dependent increases in calcium influx, but diminished effects on dissipation of ΔΨm and viability. Results indicate that high frequency components have significant differential impact on mitochondria membranes, which determines cell death, but lesser variances on plasma membranes, which allows calcium influxes, a primary determinant for dissipation of ΔΨm and cell death.

  11. A self-adaptive foot-drop corrector using functional electrical stimulation (FES) modulated by tibialis anterior electromyography (EMG) dataset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Mo; Wu, Bian; Lou, Xinxin; Zhao, Ting; Li, Jianhua; Xu, Zhisheng; Hu, Xiaoling; Zheng, Xiaoxiang

    2013-02-01

    We developed a functional electrical stimulator for correcting the gait patterns of patients with foot-drop problem. The stimulating electrical pulses of the system are modulated to evoke contractions of the tibialis anterior muscle, by emulating the normal patterns. The modulation is adaptive, i.e. the system can predict the user's step frequency and the generated stimulation can match each step in real-time. In this study, step data from 11 young healthy volunteers were acquired, and five prediction algorithms were evaluated by the acquired data, including the average of Previous N steps (P-N), the Previous Nth step (P-Nth), General Regression Neural Network (GRNN), Autoregressive (AR) and Kalman filter (KF). The algorithm with the best efficiency-accuracy trade-off (P-N, when N=5) was implemented in the FES system. System evaluation results obtained from a post-stroke patient with foot-drop showed that the system of this study demonstrated better performance on gait pattern correction than the methods widely adopted in commercial products.

  12. Electrical stimulation of cardiac adipose tissue-derived progenitor cells modulates cell phenotype and genetic machinery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llucià-Valldeperas, A; Sanchez, B; Soler-Botija, C; Gálvez-Montón, C; Prat-Vidal, C; Roura, S; Rosell-Ferrer, J; Bragos, R; Bayes-Genis, A

    2015-11-01

    A major challenge of cardiac tissue engineering is directing cells to establish the physiological structure and function of the myocardium being replaced. Our aim was to examine the effect of electrical stimulation on the cardiodifferentiation potential of cardiac adipose tissue-derived progenitor cells (cardiac ATDPCs). Three different electrical stimulation protocols were tested; the selected protocol consisted of 2 ms monophasic square-wave pulses of 50 mV/cm at 1 Hz over 14 days. Cardiac and subcutaneous ATDPCs were grown on biocompatible patterned surfaces. Cardiomyogenic differentiation was examined by real-time PCR and immunocytofluorescence. In cardiac ATDPCs, MEF2A and GATA-4 were significantly upregulated at day 14 after stimulation, while subcutaneous ATDPCs only exhibited increased Cx43 expression. In response to electrical stimulation, cardiac ATDPCs elongated, and both cardiac and subcutaneous ATDPCs became aligned following the linear surface pattern of the construct. Cardiac ATDPC length increased by 11.3%, while subcutaneous ATDPC length diminished by 11.2% (p = 0.013 and p = 0.030 vs unstimulated controls, respectively). Compared to controls, electrostimulated cells became aligned better to the patterned surfaces when the pattern was perpendicular to the electric field (89.71 ± 28.47º for cardiac ATDPCs and 92.15 ± 15.21º for subcutaneous ATDPCs). Electrical stimulation of cardiac ATDPCs caused changes in cell phenotype and genetic machinery, making them more suitable for cardiac regeneration approaches. Thus, it seems advisable to use electrical cell training before delivery as a cell suspension or within engineered tissue.

  13. Quantum well saturable absorber mirror with electrical control of modulation depth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Xiaomin; Rafailov, E.U.; Livshits, D.

    2010-01-01

    A saturable absorber mirror comprizing InGaAs/GaAs quantum wells incorporated into a p-i-n structure is demonstrated. Its modulation depth can be reduced from 4.25 % to 1.63 % by applying reverse bias voltage in the range 0–1 V.......A saturable absorber mirror comprizing InGaAs/GaAs quantum wells incorporated into a p-i-n structure is demonstrated. Its modulation depth can be reduced from 4.25 % to 1.63 % by applying reverse bias voltage in the range 0–1 V....

  14. Judging the judges' performance in rhythmic gymnastics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flessas, Konstantinos; Mylonas, Dimitris; Panagiotaropoulou, Georgia; Tsopani, Despina; Korda, Alexandrea; Siettos, Constantinos; Di Cagno, Alessandra; Evdokimidis, Ioannis; Smyrnis, Nikolaos

    2015-03-01

    Rhythmic gymnastics (RG) is an aesthetic event balancing between art and sport that also has a performance rating system (Code of Points) given by the International Gymnastics Federation. It is one of the sports in which competition results greatly depend on the judges' evaluation. In the current study, we explored the judges' performance in a five-gymnast ensemble routine. An expert-novice paradigm (10 international-level, 10 national-level, and 10 novice-level judges) was implemented under a fully simulated procedure of judgment in a five-gymnast ensemble routine of RG using two videos of routines performed by the Greek national team of RG. Simultaneous recordings of two-dimensional eye movements were taken during the judgment procedure to assess the percentage of time spent by each judge viewing the videos and fixation performance of each judge when an error in gymnast performance had occurred. All judge level groups had very modest performance of error recognition on gymnasts' routines, and the best international judges reported approximately 40% of true errors. Novice judges spent significantly more time viewing the videos compared with national and international judges and spent significantly more time fixating detected errors than the other two groups. National judges were the only group that made efficient use of fixation to detect errors. The fact that international-level judges outperformed both other groups, while not relying on visual fixation to detect errors, suggests that these experienced judges probably make use of other cognitive strategies, increasing their overall error detection efficiency, which was, however, still far below optimum.

  15. Rhythmic light stimulation modifies brain oscillations via entrainment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annika eNotbohm

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The functional relevance of brain oscillations in the alpha frequency range (8-13Hz has been repeatedly investigated through the use of rhythmic visual stimulation. The underlying mechanism of the steady-state visual evoked potential (SSVEP measured in EEG during rhythmic stimulation, however, is not known. There are two hypotheses on the origin of the SSVEPs: entrainment of brain oscillations and superposition of event-related responses (ERPs. The entrainment but not the superposition hypothesis justifies rhythmic visual stimulation as a means to manipulate brain oscillations, because superposition assumes a linear summation of single responses, independent from ongoing brain oscillations. Here, we stimulated participants with a rhythmic flickering light of different frequencies and intensities.. We measured entrainment by comparing the phase coupling of brain oscillations stimulated by rhythmic visual flicker with the oscillations induced by arrhythmic jittered stimulation, varying the time, stimulation frequency, and intensity conditions. In line with a theoretical concept of entrainment (the so called Arnold tongue, we found the phase coupling to be more pronounced with increasing stimulation intensity as well as at stimulation frequencies closer to each participant’s intrinsic frequency. Only inside the Arnold tongue did the conditions significantly differ from the jittered stimulation. Furthermore, even in a single sequence of an SSVEP, we found non-linear features (intermittency of phase locking that contradict the linear summation of single responses, as assumed by the superposition hypothesis. Our findings provide unequivocal evidence that visual rhythmic stimulation entrains brain oscillations, thus validating the approach of rhythmic stimulation as a manipulation of brain oscillations.

  16. Characterization of pulse amplitude and pulse rate modulation for a human vestibular implant during acute electrical stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, T. A. K.; DiGiovanna, J.; Cavuscens, S.; Ranieri, M.; Guinand, N.; van de Berg, R.; Carpaneto, J.; Kingma, H.; Guyot, J.-P.; Micera, S.; Perez Fornos, A.

    2016-08-01

    Objective. The vestibular system provides essential information about balance and spatial orientation via the brain to other sensory and motor systems. Bilateral vestibular loss significantly reduces quality of life, but vestibular implants (VIs) have demonstrated potential to restore lost function. However, optimal electrical stimulation strategies have not yet been identified in patients. In this study, we compared the two most common strategies, pulse amplitude modulation (PAM) and pulse rate modulation (PRM), in patients. Approach. Four subjects with a modified cochlear implant including electrodes targeting the peripheral vestibular nerve branches were tested. Charge-equivalent PAM and PRM were applied after adaptation to baseline stimulation. Vestibulo-ocular reflex eye movement responses were recorded to evaluate stimulation efficacy during acute clinical testing sessions. Main results. PAM evoked larger amplitude eye movement responses than PRM. Eye movement response axes for lateral canal stimulation were marginally better aligned with PRM than with PAM. A neural network model was developed for the tested stimulation strategies to provide insights on possible neural mechanisms. This model suggested that PAM would consistently cause a larger ensemble firing rate of neurons and thus larger responses than PRM. Significance. Due to the larger magnitude of eye movement responses, our findings strongly suggest PAM as the preferred strategy for initial VI modulation.

  17. Immediate electrical stimulation enhances regeneration and reinnervation and modulates spinal plastic changes after sciatic nerve injury and repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivó, Meritxell; Puigdemasa, Antoni; Casals, Laura; Asensio, Elena; Udina, Esther; Navarro, Xavier

    2008-05-01

    We have studied whether electrical stimulation immediately after nerve injury may enhance axonal regeneration and modulate plastic changes at the spinal cord level underlying the appearance of hyperreflexia. Two groups of adult rats were subjected to sciatic nerve section followed by suture repair. One group (ES) received electrical stimulation (3 V, 0.1 ms at 20 Hz) for 1 h after injury. A second group served as control (C). Nerve conduction, H reflex, motor evoked potentials, and algesimetry tests were performed at 1, 3, 5, 7 and 9 weeks after surgery, to assess muscle reinnervation and changes in excitability of spinal cord circuitry. The electrophysiological results showed higher levels of reinnervation, and histological results a significantly higher number of regenerated myelinated fibers in the distal tibial nerve in group ES in comparison with group C. The monosynaptic H reflex was facilitated in the injured limb, to a higher degree in group C than in group ES. The amplitudes of motor evoked potentials were similar in both groups, although the MEP/M ratio was increased in group C compared to group ES, indicating mild central motor hyperexcitability. Immunohistochemical labeling of sensory afferents in the spinal cord dorsal horn showed prevention of the reduction in expression of substance P at one month postlesion in group ES. In conclusion, brief electrical stimulation applied after sciatic nerve injury promotes axonal regeneration over a long distance and reduces facilitation of spinal motor responses.

  18. Using Multimedia Learning Modules in a Hybrid-Online Course in Electricity and Magnetism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadaghiani, Homeyra R.

    2011-01-01

    We have been piloting web-based multimedia learning modules (MLMs), developed by the Physics Education Research Group at the University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign (UIUC), as a "prelecture assignment" in several introductory physics courses at California State Polytechnic University at Pomona. In this study, we report the results…

  19. Quantum well saturable absorber mirror with electrical control of modulation depth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Xiaomin; Rafailov, Edik U.; Livshits, Daniil

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate a quantum well QW semiconductor saturable absorber mirror SESAM comprising low-temperature grown InGaAs/GaAs QWs incorporated into a p-i-n structure. By applying the reverse bias voltage in the range 0–2 V to the p-i-n structure, we were able to change the SESAM modulation depth...

  20. Using Multimedia Learning Modules in a Hybrid-Online Course in Electricity and Magnetism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadaghiani, Homeyra R.

    2011-01-01

    We have been piloting web-based multimedia learning modules (MLMs), developed by the Physics Education Research Group at the University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign (UIUC), as a "prelecture assignment" in several introductory physics courses at California State Polytechnic University at Pomona. In this study, we report the results from a…

  1. A Galvanically Isolated Power Converter Module for DC Zonal Electric Distribution Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-03-01

    operating at high speed. Examples of this include such weapons as a long range electromagnetic (EM) “ Railgun ” for the shore bombardment role, and the...18 3. Inductor and Capacitor Sizing .........................................................18 III. STATE SPACE MODELING...EDS Electrical Distribution System EM Electromagnetic EMALS Electromagnetic Aircraft Launch System FBC Full Bridge Converter FBI Full

  2. Electrical Transfer Function and Poling Mechanisms for Nonlinear Optical Polymer Modulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Michael Dale

    2004-01-01

    Electro-Optic Polymers hold great promise in increased electro-optic coefficients as compared to their inorganic corollaries. Many researchers have focused on quantum chemistry to describe how the dipoles respond to temperature and electric fields. Much work has also been done for single layer films to confirm these results. For optical applications, waveguide structures are utilized to guide the optical waves in 3 layer stacks. Electrode poling is the only practical poling method for these structures. This research takes an electrical engineering approach to develop poling models and electrical and optical transfer functions of the waveguide structure. The key aspect of the poling model is the large boundary charge density deposited during the poling process. The boundary charge density also has a large effect on the electrical transfer function which is used to explain the transient response of the system. These models are experimentally verified. Exploratory experiment design is used to study poling parameters including time, temperature, and voltage. These studies verify the poling conditions for CLDX/APC and CLDZ/APEC guest host electro optic polymer films in waveguide stacks predicted by the theoretical developments.

  3. Strain and electric field co-modulation of electronic properties of bilayer boronitrene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rui-Ning; Yang, Ming; Dong, Guo-Yi; Wang, Shu-Fang; Fu, Guang-Sheng; Wang, Jiang-Long

    2016-02-10

    The electronic properties of bilayer strained boronitrenes are investigated under an external electric field using density functional methods. Our result is just the same as the previous conclusion: ie, that the electric field will reduce their band gaps. Except for the decrease of their band gaps, the degeneracy of π valence bands at K points will be lifted and the degenerate gap will increase with the electric field increasing. Moreover, the widths of π valence bands are nearly robust and increase a little. In addition, a simple tight-binding model, where different electrostatic potentials are applied to boronitrene layers, can be sufficient to describe the variations of their band gaps. It is found that the interlayer hopping interaction increases while the intralayer hopping parameter changes little with increasing the electric field. Furthermore, a band gap phase diagram is determined within the in-plane strain [-0.2, 0.2] and the interlayer bias [0, 10] V nm(-1). The strain could make the bottom of conduction bands shift from K to M, then to Γ in the Brillouin zone, while the top of valence bands shifts from K to Γ. Thus, a direct-gap semiconductor at K points is changed into an indirect-gap semiconductor, and then a semiconductor with the direct band gap at Γ points. When bilayer boronitrene is a semiconductor with a direct gap at K points, the electric field and strain are inverse proportional relationships. Particularly, when the compressive strain exceeds  -0.194, there is an insulator-metal transition and the system becomes metallic with sizable pocket Fermi surfaces.

  4. Development of a new module for the measurement of the magneto-electric direct and converse effects based on an alternating current susceptometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bueno-Baques, D.; Hurtado-Lopez, G.; Corral-Flores, V.; Gomez, S.; Diley, N. R.; Glushchenko, A.

    2014-08-01

    A new module for the measurement of magneto-electric properties was developed as an add-on for a magnetic AC susceptibility option of a Physical Properties Measurement System (PPMS). The module is capable of recording direct dynamic and static converse magneto-electric effect, i.e., the change in electric polarization due to the application of a small AC magnetic field with a DC magnetic field bias, or the change in the magnetic moment induced by an applied electric field. The versatile module setup supports both measurements in a sequential order without the need of removing or repositioning the sample. Furthermore, AC and DC magnetic susceptibilities can be recorded while performing direct and inverse magneto-electric measurements, respectively, which adds outstanding capabilities to the existing instrument while saving time and resources. Measurements are fully automated and integrated in the PPMS Multivu software platform. Magneto-electric behavior of a BaTiO3/CoFe2O4 and BaTiO3/NiFe2O4 magneto-electric composites, and a Pb(Fe0.5Nb0.5)O3 single phase compound were recorded as test measurements.

  5. Growth cone neurotransmitter receptor activation modulates electric field-guided nerve growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erskine, L; McCaig, C D

    1995-10-01

    We have studied the interactions between two nerve guidance cues, which alone induce substantial growth cone turning: endogenous neurotransmitters and small dc electric fields. d-tubocurarine, a nicotinic AChR (acetylcholine receptor) antagonist, inhibited field-induced cathodal orientation of cultured neurites, whereas atropine, a muscarinic AChR blocker, and suramin, a P2-purinoceptor antagonist, markedly enhanced the guidance properties of the applied field. These experiments implicate the activation of growth cone nicotinic AChRs by self-released acetylcholine in the mechanism underpinning electric field-induced neurite orientation and raise the possibility that growth cones release neurotransmitter prior to target interaction in order to assist their own pathfinding. Additionally, they provide the first evidence that coactivation of several neurotransmitter receptors may interact to regulate directed nerve growth. Such interaction in vivo, where guidance signals coexist, would add further levels of control to neurite guidance.

  6. Space Station Freedom electric power system photovoltaic power module integrated launch package

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nathanson, Theodore H.; Clemens, Donald D.; Spatz, Raymond R.; Kirch, Luke A.

    1990-01-01

    The launch of the Space Station Freedom solar power module requires a weight efficient structure that will include large components within the limited load capacity of the Space Shuttle cargo bay. The design iterations to meet these requirements have evolved from a proposal concept featuring a separate cradle and integrated equipment assembly (IEA), to a package that interfaces directly with the Shuttle. Size, weight, and cost have been reduced as a result.

  7. Electrical dependencies of optical modulation capabilities in digitally addressed parallel aligned liquid crystal on silicon devices

    OpenAIRE

    Martínez Guardiola, Francisco Javier; Márquez Ruiz, Andrés; Gallego Rico, Sergi; Ortuño Sánchez, Manuel; Francés Monllor, Jorge; Beléndez Vázquez, Augusto; Pascual Villalobos, Inmaculada

    2014-01-01

    Parallel aligned liquid crystal on silicon (PA-LCoS) displays have found wide acceptance in applications requiring phase-only modulation. Among LCoS devices, and PA-LCoS as a specific case, digital addressing has become a very common technology. In principle, modern digital technology provides some benefits with respect to analog addressing such as reduced interpixel cross-talk, lower power consumption and supply voltage, gray level scale repeatability, high programmability, and noise robustn...

  8. Beam-loss-induced electrical stress test on CMS Silicon Strip Modules

    CERN Document Server

    Fahrer, M; Hartmann, F; Heier, S; MacPherson, A; Muller, T H; Weiler, T h

    2004-01-01

    Based on simulated LHC beam loss scenarios, fully depleted CMS silicon tracker modules and sensors were exposed to 42 ns-long beam spills of approximately 10**1**1 protons per spill at the PS at CERN. The ionisation dose was sufficient to short circuit the silicon sensors. The dynamic behaviour of bias voltage, leakage currents and voltages over coupling capacitors were monitored during the impact. Results of pre- and post-qualification as well as the dynamic behaviour are shown.

  9. Modulation of cell function by electric field: a high-resolution analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taghian, T; Narmoneva, D A; Kogan, A B

    2015-06-06

    Regulation of cell function by a non-thermal, physiological-level electromagnetic field has potential for vascular tissue healing therapies and advancing hybrid bioelectronic technology. We have recently demonstrated that a physiological electric field (EF) applied wirelessly can regulate intracellular signalling and cell function in a frequency-dependent manner. However, the mechanism for such regulation is not well understood. Here, we present a systematic numerical study of a cell-field interaction following cell exposure to the external EF. We use a realistic experimental environment that also recapitulates the absence of a direct electric contact between the field-sourcing electrodes and the cells or the culture medium. We identify characteristic regimes and present their classification with respect to frequency, location, and the electrical properties of the model components. The results show a striking difference in the frequency dependence of EF penetration and cell response between cells suspended in an electrolyte and cells attached to a substrate. The EF structure in the cell is strongly inhomogeneous and is sensitive to the physical properties of the cell and its environment. These findings provide insight into the mechanisms for frequency-dependent cell responses to EF that regulate cell function, which may have important implications for EF-based therapies and biotechnology development. © 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  10. Modulation of bandgap in bilayer armchair graphene ribbons by tuning vertical and transverse electric fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vu, Thanh-Tra; Nguyen, Thi-Kim-Quyen; Huynh, Anh-Huy; Phan, Thi-Kim-Loan; Tran, Van-Truong

    2017-02-01

    We investigate the effects of external electric fields on the electronic properties of bilayer armchair graphene nano-ribbons. Using atomistic simulations with Tight Binding calculations and the Non-equilibrium Green's function formalism, we demonstrate that (i) in semi-metallic structures, vertical fields impact more effectively than transverse fields in terms of opening larger bandgap, showing a contrary phenomenon compared to that demonstrated in previous studies in bilayer zigzag graphene nano-ribbons; (ii) in some semiconducting structures, if transverse fields just show usual effects as in single layer armchair graphene nano-ribbons where the bandgap is suppressed when varying the applied potential, vertical fields exhibit an anomalous phenomenon that the bandgap can be enlarged, i.e., for a structure of width of 16 dimer lines, the bandgap increases from 0.255 eV to the maximum value of 0.40 eV when a vertical bias equates 0.96 V applied. Although the combined effect of two fields does not enlarge the bandgap as found in bilayer zigzag graphene nano-ribbons, it shows that the mutual effect can be useful to reduce faster the bandgap in semiconducting bilayer armchair graphene nano-ribbons. These results are important to fully understand the effects of electric fields on bilayer graphene nano-ribbons (AB stacking) and also suggest appropriate uses of electric gates with different edge orientations.

  11. CMOS image sensor with lateral electric field modulation pixels for fluorescence lifetime imaging with sub-nanosecond time response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhuo; Seo, Min-Woong; Kagawa, Keiichiro; Yasutomi, Keita; Kawahito, Shoji

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents the design and implementation of a time-resolved CMOS image sensor with a high-speed lateral electric field modulation (LEFM) gating structure for time domain fluorescence lifetime measurement. Time-windowed signal charge can be transferred from a pinned photodiode (PPD) to a pinned storage diode (PSD) by turning on a pair of transfer gates, which are situated beside the channel. Unwanted signal charge can be drained from the PPD to the drain by turning on another pair of gates. The pixel array contains 512 (V) × 310 (H) pixels with 5.6 × 5.6 µm2 pixel size. The imager chip was fabricated using 0.11 µm CMOS image sensor process technology. The prototype sensor has a time response of 150 ps at 374 nm. The fill factor of the pixels is 5.6%. The usefulness of the prototype sensor is demonstrated for fluorescence lifetime imaging through simulation and measurement results.

  12. A stimulated Raman scattering imager using high-speed lateral electric field modulator and lock-in pixels amplifiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mars, Kamel; Guseul, Beak; Han, Sang Man; Takasawa, Taishi; Yasutomi, Keita; Kagawa, Keiichiro; Hashimoto, Mamoru; Kawahito, Shoji

    2014-03-01

    A high speed Lateral Electric Field Modulator (LEFM) and lock-in pixels amplifiers for stimulated Raman scattering (SRS)imager is presented. Since the generated signal from the SRS process is very small compared to the offset signal, a technique suitable for extracting and amplifying the SRS signal is needed. The offset can be canceled by tuning the phase delay between the demodulated pixel output signal and the sampling clock. The small SRS signal in large offset is amplified by the differential integration. The proposed technique has been investigated with an implementation of 64x8 pixels array using a pinned photodiode LEFM an lock-in pixels amplifiers. Very small signal can be extracted from large offset signal. A ratio of the detected small SRS to offset signal of less 10-5 is achieved.

  13. 1D Modeling of a Bifacial Silicon Solar Cell under Frequency Modulation Monochromatic Illumination: Determination of the Equivalent Electrical Circuit Related to the Surface Recombination Velocity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Ly Diallo

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available We present in this study the determination of the equivalent electrical circuits associated to the recombination velocities for a bifacial silicon solar cell under frequency modulation and monochromatic illumination. This determination is based on Bode and Nyquist diagrams that is the variations of the phase and the module of the back surface and intrinsic junction recombination velocities. Their dependence on illumination wavelength is also shown.

  14. Carrier frequency offset estimation for an acoustic-electric channel using 16 QAM modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Michael T.; Anderson, Leonard A.; Wilt, Kyle R.; Chakraborty, Soumya; Saulnier, Gary J.; Scarton, Henry A.

    2016-05-01

    Acoustic-electric channels can be used to send data through metallic barriers, enabling communications where electromagnetic signals are ineffective. This paper considers an acoustic-electric channel that is formed by mounting piezoelectric transducers on metallic barriers that are separated by a thin water layer. The transducers are coupled to the barriers using epoxy and the barriers are positioned to axially-align the PZTs, maximizing energy transfer efficiency. The electrical signals are converted by the transmitting transducers into acoustic waves, which propagate through the elastic walls and water medium to the receiving transducers. The reverberation of the acoustic signals in these channels can produce multipath distortion with a significant delay spread that introduces inter-symbol interference (ISI) into the received signal. While the multipath effects can be severe, the channel does not change rapidly which makes equalization easier. Here we implement a 16-QAM system on this channel, including a method for obtaining accurate carrier frequency offset (CFO) estimates in the presence of the quasi-static multipath propagation. A raised-power approach is considered but found to suffer from excessive data noise resulting from the ISI. An alternative approach that utilizes a pilot tone burst at the start of a data packet is used for CFO estimation and found to be effective. The autocorrelation method is used to estimate the frequency of the received burst. A real-time prototype of the 16 QAM system that uses a Texas Instruments MSP430 microcontroller-based transmitter and a personal computer-based receiver is presented along with performance results.

  15. Differences between the sexes in technical mastery of rhythmic gymnastics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozanic, Ana; Miletic, Durdica

    2011-02-01

    The aims of this study were to determine possible differences between the sexes in specific rhythmic gymnastics techniques, and to examine the influence of various aspects of technique on rhythmic composition performance. Seventy-five students aged 21 ± 2 years (45 males, 30 female) undertook four test sessions to determine: coefficients of asymmetry, stability, versatility, and the two rhythmic compositions (without apparatus and with rope). An independent-sample t-test revealed sex-based differences in technique acquisition: stability for ball (P < 0.05; effect size = 0.65) and club (P < 0.05; effect size = 0.79) performance and rhythmic composition without apparatus (P < 0.05; effect size = 0.66). Multiple regression analysis revealed that the variables for assessing stability (beta = 0.44; P < 0.05) and versatility (beta = 0.61; P < 0.05) explained 61% of the variance in the rhythmic composition performance of females, and the variables for assessing asymmetry (beta = -0.38; P < 0.05), versatility (beta = 0.32; P < 0.05), and stability (beta = 0.29; P < 0.05) explained 52% of the variance in the rhythmic composition performance of males. The results suggest that female students dominate in body skill technique, while male students have the advantage with apparatus. There was a lack of an expressive aesthetic component in performance for males. The need for ambidexterity should be considered in the planning of training programmes.

  16. Engineering single-valley forward transport in strained graphene by magnetic-electric modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu

    2013-08-01

    Based on the distinct response of valley transport in graphene under the uniform strain, magnetic barrier, and electrostatic barrier manipulation, completely single-valley forward transport has been theoretically demonstrated by aligning deliberately the field profile of magnetic barrier and strain field. Further imposing electrostatic engineering, the receiving single-valley transport can be flexibly tuned to adapt much realistic field modulation, improve its ability to resist the temperature-induced thermal smooth, and even turn on or off this single-valley transport mode, displaying the appealing features for valleytronic device application.

  17. Surface-Controlled Properties of Myosin Studied by Electric Field Modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Zalinge, Harm; Ramsey, Laurence C; Aveyard, Jenny; Persson, Malin; Mansson, Alf; Nicolau, Dan V

    2015-08-04

    The efficiency of dynamic nanodevices using surface-immobilized protein molecular motors, which have been proposed for diagnostics, drug discovery, and biocomputation, critically depends on the ability to precisely control the motion of motor-propelled, individual cytoskeletal filaments transporting cargo to designated locations. The efficiency of these devices also critically depends on the proper function of the propelling motors, which is controlled by their interaction with the surfaces they are immobilized on. Here we use a microfluidic device to study how the motion of the motile elements, i.e., actin filaments propelled by heavy mero-myosin (HMM) motor fragments immobilized on various surfaces, is altered by the application of electrical loads generated by an external electric field with strengths ranging from 0 to 8 kVm(-1). Because the motility is intimately linked to the function of surface-immobilized motors, the study also showed how the adsorption properties of HMM on various surfaces, such as nitrocellulose (NC), trimethylclorosilane (TMCS), poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA), poly(tert-butyl methacrylate) (PtBMA), and poly(butyl methacrylate) (PBMA), can be characterized using an external field. It was found that at an electric field of 5 kVm(-1) the force exerted on the filaments is sufficient to overcome the frictionlike resistive force of the inactive motors. It was also found that the effect of assisting electric fields on the relative increase in the sliding velocity was markedly higher for the TMCS-derivatized surface than for all other polymer-based surfaces. An explanation of this behavior, based on the molecular rigidity of the TMCS-on-glass surfaces as opposed to the flexibility of the polymer-based ones, is considered. To this end, the proposed microfluidic device could be used to select appropriate surfaces for future lab-on-a-chip applications as illustrated here for the almost ideal TMCS surface. Furthermore, the proposed methodology can

  18. Neural entrainment to rhythmically presented auditory, visual, and audio-visual speech in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Power, Alan James; Mead, Natasha; Barnes, Lisa; Goswami, Usha

    2012-01-01

    Auditory cortical oscillations have been proposed to play an important role in speech perception. It is suggested that the brain may take temporal "samples" of information from the speech stream at different rates, phase resetting ongoing oscillations so that they are aligned with similar frequency bands in the input ("phase locking"). Information from these frequency bands is then bound together for speech perception. To date, there are no explorations of neural phase locking and entrainment to speech input in children. However, it is clear from studies of language acquisition that infants use both visual speech information and auditory speech information in learning. In order to study neural entrainment to speech in typically developing children, we use a rhythmic entrainment paradigm (underlying 2 Hz or delta rate) based on repetition of the syllable "ba," presented in either the auditory modality alone, the visual modality alone, or as auditory-visual speech (via a "talking head"). To ensure attention to the task, children aged 13 years were asked to press a button as fast as possible when the "ba" stimulus violated the rhythm for each stream type. Rhythmic violation depended on delaying the occurrence of a "ba" in the isochronous stream. Neural entrainment was demonstrated for all stream types, and individual differences in standardized measures of language processing were related to auditory entrainment at the theta rate. Further, there was significant modulation of the preferred phase of auditory entrainment in the theta band when visual speech cues were present, indicating cross-modal phase resetting. The rhythmic entrainment paradigm developed here offers a method for exploring individual differences in oscillatory phase locking during development. In particular, a method for assessing neural entrainment and cross-modal phase resetting would be useful for exploring developmental learning difficulties thought to involve temporal sampling, such as

  19. BK channels regulate spontaneous action potential rhythmicity in the suprachiasmatic nucleus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jack Kent

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Circadian ( approximately 24 hr rhythms are generated by the central pacemaker localized to the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN of the hypothalamus. Although the basis for intrinsic rhythmicity is generally understood to rely on transcription factors encoded by "clock genes", less is known about the daily regulation of SCN neuronal activity patterns that communicate a circadian time signal to downstream behaviors and physiological systems. Action potentials in the SCN are necessary for the circadian timing of behavior, and individual SCN neurons modulate their spontaneous firing rate (SFR over the daily cycle, suggesting that the circadian patterning of neuronal activity is necessary for normal behavioral rhythm expression. The BK K(+ channel plays an important role in suppressing spontaneous firing at night in SCN neurons. Deletion of the Kcnma1 gene, encoding the BK channel, causes degradation of circadian behavioral and physiological rhythms. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To test the hypothesis that loss of robust behavioral rhythmicity in Kcnma1(-/- mice is due to the disruption of SFR rhythms in the SCN, we used multi-electrode arrays to record extracellular action potentials from acute wild-type (WT and Kcnma1(-/- slices. Patterns of activity in the SCN were tracked simultaneously for up to 3 days, and the phase, period, and synchronization of SFR rhythms were examined. Loss of BK channels increased arrhythmicity but also altered the amplitude and period of rhythmic activity. Unexpectedly, Kcnma1(-/- SCNs showed increased variability in the timing of the daily SFR peak. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results suggest that BK channels regulate multiple aspects of the circadian patterning of neuronal activity in the SCN. In addition, these data illustrate the characteristics of a disrupted SCN rhythm downstream of clock gene-mediated timekeeping and its relationship to behavioral rhythms.

  20. Entrainment of Breast Cell Lines Results in Rhythmic Fluctuations of MicroRNAs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Chacolla-Huaringa

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Circadian rhythms are essential for temporal (~24 h regulation of molecular processes in diverse species. Dysregulation of circadian gene expression has been implicated in the pathogenesis of various disorders, including hypertension, diabetes, depression, and cancer. Recently, microRNAs (miRNAs have been identified as critical modulators of gene expression post-transcriptionally, and perhaps involved in circadian clock architecture or their output functions. The aim of the present study is to explore the temporal expression of miRNAs among entrained breast cell lines. For this purpose, we evaluated the temporal (28 h expression of 2006 miRNAs in MCF-10A, MCF-7, and MDA-MB-231 cells using microarrays after serum shock entrainment. We noted hundreds of miRNAs that exhibit rhythmic fluctuations in each breast cell line, and some of them across two or three cell lines. Afterwards, we validated the rhythmic profiles exhibited by miR-141-5p, miR-1225-5p, miR-17-5p, miR-222-5p, miR-769-3p, and miR-548ay-3p in the above cell lines, as well as in ZR-7530 and HCC-1954 using RT-qPCR. Our results show that serum shock entrainment in breast cells lines induces rhythmic fluctuations of distinct sets of miRNAs, which have the potential to be related to endogenous circadian clock, but extensive investigation is required to elucidate that connection.

  1. Neural entrainment to rhythmically-presented auditory, visual and audio-visual speech in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan James Power

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Auditory cortical oscillations have been proposed to play an important role in speech perception. It is suggested that the brain may take temporal ‘samples’ of information from the speech stream at different rates, phase-resetting ongoing oscillations so that they are aligned with similar frequency bands in the input (‘phase locking’. Information from these frequency bands is then bound together for speech perception. To date, there are no explorations of neural phase-locking and entrainment to speech input in children. However, it is clear from studies of language acquisition that infants use both visual speech information and auditory speech information in learning. In order to study neural entrainment to speech in typically-developing children, we use a rhythmic entrainment paradigm (underlying 2 Hz or delta rate based on repetition of the syllable ba, presented in either the auditory modality alone, the visual modality alone, or as auditory-visual speech (via a talking head. To ensure attention to the task, children aged 13 years were asked to press a button as fast as possible when the ba stimulus violated the rhythm for each stream type. Rhythmic violation depended on delaying the occurrence of a ba in the isochronous stream. Neural entrainment was demonstrated for all stream types, and individual differences in standardized measures of language processing were related to auditory entrainment at the theta rate. Further, there was significant modulation of the preferred phase of auditory entrainment in the theta band when visual speech cues were present, indicating cross-modal phase resetting. The rhythmic entrainment paradigm developed here offers a method for exploring individual differences in oscillatory phase locking during development. In particular, a method for assessing neural entrainment and cross-modal phase resetting would be useful for exploring developmental learning difficulties thought to involve temporal sampling

  2. Failure to observe mitotic rhythmicity in Allium meristems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erickson, S.M.; Hillman, W.S.

    1976-01-01

    Circadian rhythms clearly affect cell division in certain microorganisms and some animal tissue, but reports on mitotic rhythmicity in higher plants are contradictory, even for Allium cepa, the most widely studied material. Mitotic index was determined on root and shoot meristems of seedlings of one cultivar, and on roots of bulbs of another. Various times with respect to 24-h cycles of alternating light and darkness, or light-high temperature and darkness-low temperature were investigated. No evidence for rhythmicity was obtained.

  3. Rhythmic Effects of Syntax Processing in Music and Language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Harim; Sontag, Samuel; Park, YeBin S; Loui, Psyche

    2015-01-01

    Music and language are human cognitive and neural functions that share many structural similarities. Past theories posit a sharing of neural resources between syntax processing in music and language (Patel, 2003), and a dynamic attention network that governs general temporal processing (Large and Jones, 1999). Both make predictions about music and language processing over time. Experiment 1 of this study investigates the relationship between rhythmic expectancy and musical and linguistic syntax in a reading time paradigm. Stimuli (adapted from Slevc et al., 2009) were sentences broken down into segments; each sentence segment was paired with a musical chord and presented at a fixed inter-onset interval. Linguistic syntax violations appeared in a garden-path design. During the critical region of the garden-path sentence, i.e., the particular segment in which the syntactic unexpectedness was processed, expectancy violations for language, music, and rhythm were each independently manipulated: musical expectation was manipulated by presenting out-of-key chords and rhythmic expectancy was manipulated by perturbing the fixed inter-onset interval such that the sentence segments and musical chords appeared either early or late. Reading times were recorded for each sentence segment and compared for linguistic, musical, and rhythmic expectancy. Results showed main effects of rhythmic expectancy and linguistic syntax expectancy on reading time. There was also an effect of rhythm on the interaction between musical and linguistic syntax: effects of violations in musical and linguistic syntax showed significant interaction only during rhythmically expected trials. To test the effects of our experimental design on rhythmic and linguistic expectancies, independently of musical syntax, Experiment 2 used the same experimental paradigm, but the musical factor was eliminated-linguistic stimuli were simply presented silently, and rhythmic expectancy was manipulated at the critical

  4. Rhythmic Effects of Syntax Processing in Music and Language

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harim eJung

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Music and language are human cognitive and neural functions that share many structural similarities. Past theories posit a sharing of neural resources between syntax processing in music and language (Patel, 2003, and a dynamic attention network that governs general temporal processing (Large & Jones, 1999. Both make predictions about music and language processing over time. Experiment 1 of this study investigates the relationship between rhythmic expectancy and musical and linguistic syntax in a reading time paradigm. Stimuli (adapted from Slevc et al., 2009 were sentences broken down into segments; each sentence segment was paired with a musical chord and presented at a fixed inter-onset interval. Linguistic syntax violations appeared in a garden-path design. During the critical region of the garden-path sentence, i.e. the particular segment in which the syntactic unexpectedness was processed, expectancy violations for language, music, and rhythm were each independently manipulated: musical expectation was manipulated by presenting out-of-key chords and rhythmic expectancy was manipulated by perturbing the fixed inter-onset interval such that the sentence segments and musical chords appeared either early or late. Reading times were recorded for each sentence segment and compared for linguistic, musical, and rhythmic expectancy. Results showed main effects of rhythmic expectancy and linguistic syntax expectancy on reading time. There was also an effect of rhythm on the interaction between musical and linguistic syntax: effects of violations in musical and linguistic syntax showed significant interaction only during rhythmically expected trials. To test the effects of our experimental design on rhythmic and linguistic expectancies, independently of musical syntax, Experiment 2 used the same experimental paradigm, but the musical factor was eliminated – linguistic stimuli were simply presented silently, and rhythmic expectancy was manipulated at

  5. Tuning and disrupting the brain – modulating the McGurk illusion with electrical stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas M Marques

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available In the so-called McGurk illusion, when the synchronized presentation of the visual stimulus /ga/ is paired with the auditory stimulus /ba/, people in general hear it as /da/. Multisensory integration processing underlying this illusion seems to occur within the Superior Temporal Sulcus (STS. Herein, we present evidence demonstrating that bilateral cathodal transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS of this area can decrease the McGurk illusion-type responses. Additionally, we show that the manipulation of this audio-visual integrated output occurs irrespective of the number of eye-fixations on the mouth of the speaker. Bilateral anodal tDCS of the Parietal Cortex also modulates the illusion, but in the opposite manner, inducing more illusion-type responses. This is the first demonstration of using non-invasive brain stimulation to modulate multisensory speech perception in an illusory context (i.e., both increasing and decreasing illusion-type responses to a verbal audio-visual integration task. These findings provide clear evidence that both the superior temporal and parietal areas contribute to multisensory integration processing related to speech perception. Specifically, STS seems fundamental for the temporal synchronization and integration of auditory and visual inputs. For its part, PPC may adjust the arrival of incoming audio and visual information to STS thereby enhancing their interaction in this latter area.

  6. Electrical spin injection in modulation-doped GaAs from an in situ grown Fe/MgO layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shim, Seong Hoon [Center for Spintronics, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Physics, Korea University, Seoul 136-713 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyung-jun [Center for Spintronics, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Koo, Hyun Cheol [Center for Spintronics, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); KU-KIST Graduate School of Converging Science and Technology, Korea University, Seoul 136-701 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Yun-Hi [Department of Physics, Korea University, Seoul 136-713 (Korea, Republic of); Chang, Joonyeon, E-mail: presto@kist.re.kr [Center for Spintronics, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Nanomaterials Science and Engineering, Korea University of Science and Technology, Daejeon 305-350 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-09-07

    We study spin accumulation in n-doped GaAs that were electrically injected from Fe via MgO using three-terminal Hanle measurement. The Fe/MgO/GaAs structures were prepared in a cluster molecular beam epitaxy that did not require the breaking of the vacuum. We found the crystal orientation relationship of epitaxial structures Fe[100]//MgO[110]//GaAs[110] without evident defects at the interface. Control of depletion width and interface resistance by means of modulation doping improves spin injection, leading to enhanced spin voltage (ΔV) of 6.3 mV at 10 K and 0.8 mV even at 400 K. The extracted spin lifetime and spin diffusion length of GaAs are 220 ps and 0.77 μm, respectively, at 200 K. MgO tunnel barrier grown in situ with modulation doping at the interface appears to be promising for spin injection into GaAs.

  7. DWDM VSB modulation-format optical transmission: Effects of optical filtering and electrical equalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binh, Le Nguyen

    2008-10-01

    The transmission of 40 Gb/s wavelength multiplexed channels under vestigial single side band modulation format is transmitted over long haul optically amplified fiber systems. Bit-error-rate (BER) of 10 -12 or better can be achieved across all channels. Optical filters are designed with asymmetric roll-off bands. Simulations of the transmission performance, BER versus receiver sensitivity are demonstrated with wavelength channel spacing of 20-40 GHz. An optical filter, whose passband is 28 GHz and 20 dB cut-off band, performs best for 40 Gb/s bit rate due to optimum filtering and minimum noise contribution. Furthermore the single-sideband property of VSB format can assist linear equalization by electronic processing. The transmission performance is accurately evaluated based on the eye opening using a fast statistical method based on an equivalent Gaussian probability density distribution (pdf) which is derived from multiple peaks pdf of distorted eye diagram.

  8. High-fidelity pulse density modulation in neuromorphic electric circuits utilizing natural heterogeneity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utagawa, Akira; Asai, Tetsuya; Amemiya, Yoshihito

    Hospedales et al. have recently proposed a neural network model of the “vestibulo-ocular reflex” (VOR) in which a common input was given to multiple nonidentical spiking neurons that were exposed to uncorrelated temporal noise, and the output was represented by the sum of these neurons. Although the function of the VOR network is equivalent to pulse density modulation, the neurons' non-uniformity and temporal noises given to the neurons were shown to improve the output spike's fidelity to the analog input. In this paper, we propose a CMOS analog circuit for implementing the VOR network that exploits the non-uniformity of real MOS devices. Through extensive laboratory experiments using discrete MOS devices, we show that the output's fidelity to the input pulses is clearly improved by using multiple neuron circuits, in which the non-uniformity is naturally embedded into the devices.

  9. Modulation of the electronic property of phosphorene by wrinkle and vertical electric field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yan; Wei, Zhongming, E-mail: zmwei@semi.ac.cn; Li, Jingbo, E-mail: jbli@semi.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Superlattice and Microstructures, Institute of Semiconductors, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100083 (China)

    2015-09-14

    The electronic properties of wrinkled phosphorene and its response to charge injection and external vertical electric field have been studied using first-principles calculations. It is found that small-size wrinkle systems have lower energy than wrinkle-free monolayer, suggesting that free-standing phosphorene spontaneously forms small protrusion on its nanosheet. The ratio of wrinkle height to curvature radius increases with enlarging height, indicating a promotion of field enhancement factor. Furthermore, the injected charges mostly distribute at peak and valley. Direct-to-indirect band-gap transition has been found for zigzag wrinkle with height of 14.81 Å. The band gaps of wrinkled nanosheets decrease almost linearly with increasing field, which is caused by charge separation of valence band maximum and conduction band minimum.

  10. Noise signals and carrier modulation arising in electrical cables during nuclear pulse irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Both, E.; Bruemmer, H. P.; Lascaro, C. P.; Newberg, J.; Schlosser, W.

    1963-03-15

    Electrical noise signals generated in coaxial and other cables by pulsed nuclear radiation were measured as a function of applied voltage and exposure history. In consecutive exposures the signal magnitude and polarity was found to be strongly affected by training and memory effects. Unexpectedly large signals in the cable shield were identified as the cause for oscillatory signals in the center conductor and for the occurrence of parasitic leakage currents in nearby conductors. A r-f signal transmitted through RG62 A/U cable undergoes a temporary attenuation during the radiation pulse while it passes through RG59 B/U without measurable degradation. Definite rules are given for minimizing cable noise signals in nuclear pulse radiation measurements. (auth)

  11. [ELECTRIC STIMULATION OF VAGUS NERVE MODULATES A PROPAGATION OF OXYGEN EPILEPSY IN RABBITS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhilyaev, S Yu; Moskvin, A N; Platonova, T F; Demchenko, I T

    2015-11-01

    The activation of autonomic afferents (achieved through the vagus nerve (VN) electrical stimulation) on CNS O2 toxicity and cardiovascular function was investigated. In conscious rabbits at 5 ATA 02, prodromal signs of CNS O2 toxicity and convulsion latency were determined with and without vagus nerve (VN) stimulation. EEG, ECG and respiration were also recorded. In rabbits at 5 ATA, sympathetic overdrive and specific patterns on the EEG (synchronization of slow-waves), ECG (tachycardia) and respiration (respiratory minute volume increase) preceded motor convulsions. Vagus nerve stimulation increased parasympathetic component of autonomic drive and significantly delayed prodromal signs of oxygen toxicity and convulsion latency. Autonomic afferent input to the brain is a novel target for preventing CNS toxicity in HBO2.

  12. Evaluation of Motor Neuron Excitability by CMAP Scanning with Electric Modulated Current

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araújo, Tiago; Candeias, Rui; Nunes, Neuza; Gamboa, Hugo

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Compound Muscle Action Potential (CMAP) scan is a noninvasive promissory technique for neurodegenerative pathologies diagnosis. In this work new CMAP scan protocols were implemented to study the influence of electrical pulse waveform on peripheral nerve excitability. Methods. A total of 13 healthy subjects were tested. Stimulation was performed with an increasing intensities range from 4 to 30 mA. The procedure was repeated 4 times per subject, using a different single pulse stimulation waveform: monophasic square and triangular and quadratic and biphasic square. Results. Different waveforms elicit different intensity-response amplitude curves. The square pulse needs less current to generate the same response amplitude regarding the other waves and this effect is gradually decreasing for the triangular, quadratic, and biphasic pulse, respectively. Conclusion. The stimulation waveform has a direct influence on the stimulus-response slope and consequently on the motoneurons excitability. This can be a new prognostic parameter for neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:26413499

  13. Evaluation of Motor Neuron Excitability by CMAP Scanning with Electric Modulated Current

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiago Araújo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Compound Muscle Action Potential (CMAP scan is a noninvasive promissory technique for neurodegenerative pathologies diagnosis. In this work new CMAP scan protocols were implemented to study the influence of electrical pulse waveform on peripheral nerve excitability. Methods. A total of 13 healthy subjects were tested. Stimulation was performed with an increasing intensities range from 4 to 30 mA. The procedure was repeated 4 times per subject, using a different single pulse stimulation waveform: monophasic square and triangular and quadratic and biphasic square. Results. Different waveforms elicit different intensity-response amplitude curves. The square pulse needs less current to generate the same response amplitude regarding the other waves and this effect is gradually decreasing for the triangular, quadratic, and biphasic pulse, respectively. Conclusion. The stimulation waveform has a direct influence on the stimulus-response slope and consequently on the motoneurons excitability. This can be a new prognostic parameter for neurodegenerative disorders.

  14. Magnetic field-modulated photo-thermo-electric effect in Fe/GaAs film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiao, Shuang; Liu, Jihong; Yan, Guoying; Wang, Shufang, E-mail: xinhuiz@semi.ac.cn, E-mail: sfwang@hbu.edu.cn; Fu, Guangsheng [Hebei Key Laboratory of Optic-Electronic Information and Materials, College of Physics Science and Technology, Hebei University, Baoding 071002 (China); Zhao, Jianhua; Zhang, Xinhui, E-mail: xinhuiz@semi.ac.cn, E-mail: sfwang@hbu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Superlattices and Microstructures, Institute of Semiconductors, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 912, Beijing 100083 (China)

    2015-11-02

    Ferromagnet/semiconductor heterostructure, such as Fe/GaAs, is always one of the key issues in spintronics due to its prerequisite for the realization of spin sensitive devices. In this letter, a lateral photoelectric effect (LPE) was observed in Fe/GaAs. Our results show that the sensitivity was not related to laser wavelength, but only proportional to laser power, suggesting that the lateral photovoltage was induced by photo-thermo-electric effect. Moreover, we also observe that the voltage signal increases with the increase in applied field due to decreasing scattering probability for spin-polarized electrons. Our finding of LPE adds another functionality to the Fe/GaAs system and will be useful in development of spin-polarized voltage devices.

  15. Voltage inverter with push-pull topology to inject energy into electrical systems with modulation SPWM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emerson Charles M. Silva

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a proposal for a voltage inverter topology based on push-pull converters, switched at high frequency to inject energy into the grid from a source of DC power. A system using two reverse voltage static converters provides the power grid; energy in the form of alternating current, that can work in conjunction with the provision of utility power. Aiming at the possible use of renewable energy sources, that can be stored in the form of voltage continuous, such as wind, solar, hydroelectric and others. The functioning of topology is presented, such as the power and control circuits, as well as sizing components, theoretical and practical results achieved with the assembly of a prototype 100W of power and switching in 40khz, which after filtering provides the frequency of 60Hz, which is compatible with the Brazilian electrical system.

  16. Transcranial Electrical Stimulation over Dorsolateral Prefrontal Cortex Modulates Processing of Social Cognitive and Affective Information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conson, Massimiliano; Errico, Domenico; Mazzarella, Elisabetta; Giordano, Marianna; Grossi, Dario; Trojano, Luigi

    2015-01-01

    Recent neurofunctional studies suggested that lateral prefrontal cortex is a domain-general cognitive control area modulating computation of social information. Neuropsychological evidence reported dissociations between cognitive and affective components of social cognition. Here, we tested whether performance on social cognitive and affective tasks can be modulated by transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) over dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC). To this aim, we compared the effects of tDCS on explicit recognition of emotional facial expressions (affective task), and on one cognitive task assessing the ability to adopt another person's visual perspective. In a randomized, cross-over design, male and female healthy participants performed the two experimental tasks after bi-hemispheric tDCS (sham, left anodal/right cathodal, and right anodal/left cathodal) applied over DLPFC. Results showed that only in male participants explicit recognition of fearful facial expressions was significantly faster after anodal right/cathodal left stimulation with respect to anodal left/cathodal right and sham stimulations. In the visual perspective taking task, instead, anodal right/cathodal left stimulation negatively affected both male and female participants' tendency to adopt another's point of view. These findings demonstrated that concurrent facilitation of right and inhibition of left lateral prefrontal cortex can speed-up males' responses to threatening faces whereas it interferes with the ability to adopt another's viewpoint independently from gender. Thus, stimulation of cognitive control areas can lead to different effects on social cognitive skills depending on the affective vs. cognitive nature of the task, and on the gender-related differences in neural organization of emotion processing.

  17. Transcranial Electrical Stimulation over Dorsolateral Prefrontal Cortex Modulates Processing of Social Cognitive and Affective Information.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimiliano Conson

    Full Text Available Recent neurofunctional studies suggested that lateral prefrontal cortex is a domain-general cognitive control area modulating computation of social information. Neuropsychological evidence reported dissociations between cognitive and affective components of social cognition. Here, we tested whether performance on social cognitive and affective tasks can be modulated by transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS over dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC. To this aim, we compared the effects of tDCS on explicit recognition of emotional facial expressions (affective task, and on one cognitive task assessing the ability to adopt another person's visual perspective. In a randomized, cross-over design, male and female healthy participants performed the two experimental tasks after bi-hemispheric tDCS (sham, left anodal/right cathodal, and right anodal/left cathodal applied over DLPFC. Results showed that only in male participants explicit recognition of fearful facial expressions was significantly faster after anodal right/cathodal left stimulation with respect to anodal left/cathodal right and sham stimulations. In the visual perspective taking task, instead, anodal right/cathodal left stimulation negatively affected both male and female participants' tendency to adopt another's point of view. These findings demonstrated that concurrent facilitation of right and inhibition of left lateral prefrontal cortex can speed-up males' responses to threatening faces whereas it interferes with the ability to adopt another's viewpoint independently from gender. Thus, stimulation of cognitive control areas can lead to different effects on social cognitive skills depending on the affective vs. cognitive nature of the task, and on the gender-related differences in neural organization of emotion processing.

  18. What is orgasm? A model of sexual trance and climax via rhythmic entrainment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safron, Adam

    2016-01-01

    Orgasm is one of the most intense pleasures attainable to an organism, yet its underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. On the basis of existing literatures, this article introduces a novel mechanistic model of sexual stimulation and orgasm. In doing so, it characterizes the neurophenomenology of sexual trance and climax, describes parallels in dynamics between orgasms and seizures, speculates on possible evolutionary origins of sex differences in orgasmic responding, and proposes avenues for future experimentation. Here, a model is introduced wherein sexual stimulation induces entrainment of coupling mechanical and neuronal oscillatory systems, thus creating synchronized functional networks within which multiple positive feedback processes intersect synergistically to contribute to sexual experience. These processes generate states of deepening sensory absorption and trance, potentially culminating in climax if critical thresholds are surpassed. The centrality of rhythmic stimulation (and its modulation by salience) for surpassing these thresholds suggests ways in which differential orgasmic responding between individuals—or with different partners—may serve as a mechanism for ensuring adaptive mate choice. Because the production of rhythmic stimulation combines honest indicators of fitness with cues relating to potential for investment, differential orgasmic response may serve to influence the probability of continued sexual encounters with specific mates. PMID:27799079

  19. What is orgasm? A model of sexual trance and climax via rhythmic entrainment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Safron

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Orgasm is one of the most intense pleasures attainable to an organism, yet its underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. On the basis of existing literatures, this article introduces a novel mechanistic model of sexual stimulation and orgasm. In doing so, it characterizes the neurophenomenology of sexual trance and climax, describes parallels in dynamics between orgasms and seizures, speculates on possible evolutionary origins of sex differences in orgasmic responding, and proposes avenues for future experimentation. Here, a model is introduced wherein sexual stimulation induces entrainment of coupling mechanical and neuronal oscillatory systems, thus creating synchronized functional networks within which multiple positive feedback processes intersect synergistically to contribute to sexual experience. These processes generate states of deepening sensory absorption and trance, potentially culminating in climax if critical thresholds are surpassed. The centrality of rhythmic stimulation (and its modulation by salience for surpassing these thresholds suggests ways in which differential orgasmic responding between individuals—or with different partners—may serve as a mechanism for ensuring adaptive mate choice. Because the production of rhythmic stimulation combines honest indicators of fitness with cues relating to potential for investment, differential orgasmic response may serve to influence the probability of continued sexual encounters with specific mates.

  20. Physiological and anthropometric determinants of rhythmic gymnastics performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douda, Helen T; Toubekis, Argyris G; Avloniti, Alexandra A; Tokmakidis, Savvas P

    2008-03-01

    To identify the physiological and anthropometric predictors of rhythmic gymnastics performance, which was defined from the total ranking score of each athlete in a national competition. Thirty-four rhythmic gymnasts were divided into 2 groups, elite (n = 15) and nonelite (n = 19), and they underwent a battery of anthropometric, physical fitness, and physiological measurements. The principal-components analysis extracted 6 components: anthropometric, flexibility, explosive strength, aerobic capacity, body dimensions, and anaerobic metabolism. These were used in a simultaneous multiple-regression procedure to determine which best explain the variance in rhythmic gymnastics performance. Based on the principal-component analysis, the anthropometric component explained 45% of the total variance, flexibility 12.1%, explosive strength 9.2%, aerobic capacity 7.4%, body dimensions 6.8%, and anaerobic metabolism 4.6%. Components of anthropometric (r = .50) and aerobic capacity (r = .49) were significantly correlated with performance (P gymnasts, 92.5% of the variation was explained by VO2max (58.9%), arm span (12%), midthigh circumference (13.1%), and body mass (8.5%). Selected anthropometric characteristics, aerobic power, flexibility, and explosive strength are important determinants of successful performance. These findings might have practical implications for both training and talent identification in rhythmic gymnastics.

  1. Central pattern generation underlying Limulus rhythmic behavior patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gordon A. Wyse

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Many behavioral activities of the horseshoe crab Limulus are rhythmic, and most of these are produced in large part by central pattern generators within the CNS. The chain of opisthosomal (‘abdominal’ ganglia controls gill movements of ventilation and gill cleaning, and the prosomal ring of fused ganglia (brain and segmental ‘thoracic’ ganglia controls generation of feeding and locomotor movements of the legs. Both the opisthosomal CNS and the prosomal CNS can generate behaviorally appropriate patterns of motor output in isolation, without movements or sensory input. Preparations of the isolated opisthosomal CNS generate rhythmic output patterns of motor activity characterized as fictive ventilatory and gill cleaning rhythms. Moreover, CNS preparations also express longer-term patterns, such as intermittent ventilation or sequential bouts of ventilation and gill cleaning. Such longer-term patterns are commonly observed in intact animals. The isolated prosomal CNS does not spontaneously generate the activity patterns characteristic of walking, swimming, and feeding. However, perfusion of octopamine in the isolated prosomal CNS activates central pattern generators underlying rhythmic chewing movements, and injection of octopamine into intact Limulus promotes the chewing pattern of feeding, whether or not food is presented. Our understanding of the ability of neuromodulators such as octopamine to elicit or alter central motor programs may help to clarify the central neural circuits of pattern generation that produce and coordinate these rhythmic behaviors [Current Zoology 56 (5: 537–549, 2010].

  2. The formation of rhythmic categories and metric priming

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Desain, P.W.M.; Honing, H.J.

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents two experiments on categorical rhythm perception. It investigates how listeners perceive discrete rhythmic categories while listening to rhythms performed on a continuous time scale. This is studied by considering the space of all temporal patterns (all possible rhythms made up o

  3. Biases in rhythmic sensorimotor coordination: effects of modality and intentionality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debats, Nienke B; Ridderikhoff, Arne; de Boer, Betteco J; Peper, C Lieke E

    2013-08-01

    Sensorimotor biases were examined for intentional (tracking task) and unintentional (distractor task) rhythmic coordination. The tracking task involved unimanual tracking of either an oscillating visual signal or the passive movements of the contralateral hand (proprioceptive signal). In both conditions the required coordination patterns (isodirectional and mirror-symmetric) were defined relative to the body midline and the hands were not visible. For proprioceptive tracking the two patterns did not differ in stability, whereas for visual tracking the isodirectional pattern was performed more stably than the mirror-symmetric pattern. However, when visual feedback about the unimanual hand movements was provided during visual tracking, the isodirectional pattern ceased to be dominant. Together these results indicated that the stability of the coordination patterns did not depend on the modality of the target signal per se, but on the combination of sensory signals that needed to be processed (unimodal vs. cross-modal). The distractor task entailed rhythmic unimanual movements during which a rhythmic visual or proprioceptive distractor signal had to be ignored. The observed biases were similar as for intentional coordination, suggesting that intentionality did not affect the underlying sensorimotor processes qualitatively. Intentional tracking was characterized by active sensory pursuit, through muscle activity in the passively moved arm (proprioceptive tracking task) and rhythmic eye movements (visual tracking task). Presumably this pursuit afforded predictive information serving the coordination process.

  4. Attentional Loads Associated with Interlimb Interactions Underlying Rhythmic Bimanual Coordination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridderikhoff, Arne; Peper, C. E.; Beek, Peter J.

    2008-01-01

    Studies of rhythmic bimanual coordination under dual-task conditions revealed (1) a dependence of secondary task performance on the stability of coordinative tasks, in that secondary task performance was better during in-phase than antiphase coordination, and (2) a shift in the mean relative phasing between the limbs compared to single-task…

  5. Effects of Kindermusik Training on Infants' Rhythmic Enculturation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerry, David W.; Faux, Ashley L.; Trainor, Laurel J.

    2010-01-01

    Phillips-Silver and Trainor (2005) demonstrated a link between movement and the metrical interpretation of rhythm patterns in 7-month-old infants. Infants bounced on every second beat of a rhythmic pattern with no auditory accents later preferred to listen to an accented version of the pattern with accents every second beat (duple or march meter),…

  6. Rhythmic finger tapping reveals cerebellar dysfunction in essential tremor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buijink, A. W. G.; Broersma, M.; van der Stouwe, A. M. M.; van Wingen, G. A.; Groot, P. F. C.; Speelman, J. D.; Maurits, N. M.; van Rootselaar, A. F.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Cerebellar circuits are hypothesized to play a central role in the pathogenesis of essential tremor. Rhythmic finger tapping is known to strongly engage the cerebellar motor circuitry. We characterize cerebellar and, more specifically, dentate nucleus function, and neural correlates of

  7. Danish music education and the 'rhythmic music' concept

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Peder Kaj

    2014-01-01

    The article reflects on Danish music education and the concept of 'rhythmic music'. It highligths the so-called "jazz-oratorio", a unique genre, created by the composer Bernhard Christensen (1906-2004) and the librettist Sven Møller Kristensen (1909-91). The article shows that the term 'jazz' was...

  8. Blood pressure rhythmicity and visceral fat in children with hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemirska, Anna; Litwin, Mieczysław; Feber, Janusz; Jurkiewicz, Elżbieta

    2013-10-01

    Primary hypertension is associated with disturbed activity of the sympathetic nervous system and altered blood pressure rhythmicity. We analyzed changes in cardiovascular rhythmicity and its relation with target organ damage during 12 months of antihypertensive treatment in 50 boys with hypertension (median, 15.0 years). The following parameters were obtained before and after 12 months of antihypertensive treatment: 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure, left ventricular mass, carotid intima-media thickness, and MRI for visceral and subcutaneous adipose tissue. Amplitudes and acrophases of mean arterial pressure and heart rate rhythms were obtained for 24-, 12-, and 8-hour periods. After 1 year of treatment, 68% of patients were normotensive, and left ventricular mass and carotid intima-media thickness decreased in 60% and 62% of patients, respectively. Blood pressure and heart rate rhythmicity patterns did not change. Changes in blood pressure amplitude correlated with the decrease of waist circumference (P=0.035). Moreover, the decrease of visceral fat correlated with the decrease of 24-hour mean arterial pressure and heart rate acrophases (both Phypertension despite effective antihypertensive treatment, which suggests that it may be the primary abnormality. The correlation between changes in cardiovascular rhythmicity and visceral obesity may indicate that the visceral fat plays an important role in the sympathetic activity of adolescents with hypertension.

  9. Crosstalk between circadian rhythmicity, mitochondrial dynamics and macrophage bactericidal activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliva-Ramírez, Jacqueline; Moreno-Altamirano, María Maximina B; Pineda-Olvera, Benjamín; Cauich-Sánchez, Patricia; Sánchez-García, F Javier

    2014-01-01

    Biological functions show rhythmic fluctuations with 24-hr periodicity regulated by circadian proteins encoded by the so-called ‘clock’ genes. The absence or deregulation of circadian proteins in mice leads to metabolic disorders and in vitro models have shown that the synthesis of pro-inflammatory cytokines by macrophages follows a circadian rhythm so showing a link between circadian rhythmicity, metabolism and immunity. Recent evidence reveals that mitochondrial shape, position and size, collectively referred to as mitochondrial dynamics, are related to both cell metabolism and immune function. However, studies addressing the simultaneous crosstalk between circadian rhythm, mitochondrial dynamics and cell immune function are scarce. Here, by using an in vitro model of synchronized murine peritoneal macrophages, we present evidence that the mitochondrial dynamics and the mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm) follow a circadian rhythmic pattern. In addition, it is shown that the fusion of mitochondria along with high Δψm, indicative of high mitochondrial activity, precede the highest phagocytic and bactericidal activity of macrophages on Salmonella typhimurium. Taken together, our results suggest a timely coordination between circadian rhythmicity, mitochondrial dynamics, and the bactericidal capacity of macrophages. PMID:24903615

  10. Rhythmic entrainment as a musical affect induction mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    J Trost, W; Labbé, C; Grandjean, D

    2017-02-01

    One especially important feature of metrical music is that it contains periodicities that listeners' bodily rhythms can adapt to. Recent psychological frameworks have introduced the notion of rhythmic entrainment, among other mechanisms, as an emotion induction principle. In this review paper, we discuss rhythmic entrainment as an affect induction mechanism by differentiating four levels of entrainment in humans-perceptual, autonomic physiological, motor, and social-all of which could contribute to a subjective feeling component. We review the theoretical and empirical literature on rhythmic entrainment to music that supports the existence of these different levels of entrainment by describing the phenomena and characterizing the associated underlying brain processes. The goal of this review is to present the theoretical implications and empirical findings about rhythmic entrainment as an important principle at the basis of affect induction via music, since it rests upon the temporal dimension of music, which is a specificity of music as an affective stimulus. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Perceptual tests of rhythmic similarity: II. Syllable rhythm

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kim, J.; Davis, C.; Cutler, A.

    2008-01-01

    To segment continuous speech into its component words, listeners make use of language rhythm; because rhythm differs across languages, so do the segmentation procedures which listeners use. For each of stress-, syllable-and mora-based rhythmic structure, perceptual experiments have led to the discov

  12. Passive stability and active control in a rhythmic task

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wei, Kunlin; Dijkstra, Tjeerd M. H.; Sternad, Dagmar

    2007-01-01

    Rhythmically bouncing a ball with a racket is a task that affords passively stable solutions as demonstrated by stability analyses of a mathematical model of the task. Passive stability implies that no active control is needed as errors die out without requiring corrective actions. Empirical results

  13. A boy infant with sleep related rhythmic movement disorder showing arm banging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Kohyama

    2014-09-01

    Discussion: We diagnosed him as having arm banging type of sleep related rhythmic movement disorder. To our knowledge, no precise description on this type of sleep related rhythmic movement disorder has been found. In addition, this patient seemed to be the youngest case of sleep related rhythmic movement disorder showing arm banging.

  14. Rhythmic coordination dynamics in children with and without a developmental coordination disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Volman, Michiel Joannes Maria

    1997-01-01

    The aim of the present thesis is to examine the intrinsic dynamics of rhythmic coordinated actions in children with and without DCD by testing the stability of these patterns. Two basically different coordination systems are examined, namely, rhythmic interlimb coordination and rhythmic

  15. Are non-human primates capable of rhythmic entrainment? Evidence for the gradual audiomotor evolution hypothesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Merchant, H.; Honing, H.

    2014-01-01

    We propose a decomposition of the neurocognitive mechanisms that might underlie interval-based timing and rhythmic entrainment. Next to reviewing the concepts central to the definition of rhythmic entrainment, we discuss recent studies that suggest rhythmic entrainment to be specific to humans and a

  16. Rhythmic coordination dynamics in children with and without a developmental coordination disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Volman, Michiel Joannes Maria

    1997-01-01

    The aim of the present thesis is to examine the intrinsic dynamics of rhythmic coordinated actions in children with and without DCD by testing the stability of these patterns. Two basically different coordination systems are examined, namely, rhythmic interlimb coordination and rhythmic perception-a

  17. Energy Multiplier Module (EM{sup 2}) - advanced small modular reactor for electricity generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertch, T.; Schleicher, R.; Choi, H.; Rawls, J., E-mail: timothy.bertch@ga.com [General Atomics, San Diego, California (United States)

    2013-07-01

    In order to provide cost effective nuclear energy in other than large reactor, large grid applications, fission technology needs to make further advances. 'Convert and burn' fast reactors offer long life cores, improved fuel utilization, reduced waste and other benefits while achieving cost effective energy production in a smaller reactor. General Atomics' Energy Multiplier Module (EM{sup 2}), a helium-cooled compact fast reactor that augments its fissile fuel load with either depleted uranium (DU) or used nuclear fuel (UNF). The convert and burn in-situ provides 250 MWe with a 30 year core life. High temperature provides a simple, high efficiency direct cycle gas turbine which along with modular construction, fewer systems, road shipment and minimum on site construction support cost effectiveness. Additional advantages in fuel cycle, non-proliferation and siting flexibility and its ability to meet all safety requirements make for an attractive power source, especially in remote and small grid regions. (author)

  18. TRANSCUTANEOUS ELECTRIC NERVE STIMULATION IN MODULATION OF PAIN OF TENDER POINTS IN SYNDROME FIBROMYALGIA: CASE STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel Mara Magalhães Rori

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available The Fibromyalgia is a syndrome of pain and chronic diffuse, characterized by the presence of at least 11 of 18 points called anatomically specific tender points, painful on palpation. As the pain diffuse the main symptom of fibromyalgia. The current treatment is focused mainly to the reduction of symptoms. Physiotherapy has animportant role in improving the control of pain. This study aimed to verify the effectiveness of the main TENS of low frequency and high intensity in modulating pain of tender points of patients with fibromyalgia. For this was a case study of patient R. S. S., 38-yearold female carrier of the syndrome of fibromyalgia attended school in the clinic of the Faculty of Integrated Ceará (FISIOFIC. The patient was treated with the TENS-pain Acupuncture points in a total of twelve care and pain assessed before starting treatment and after three attendants. There was a significant reduction in pain intensity at 77.7% of the tender points in the second evaluation and 88.8% of the points in the other assessments. It was concluded that there was a reduction in the pain of tender points of the patient showing the analgesia promoted by TENS, so it should be used as a complementary treatment programs associated with other treatments and also served as a good technique to locate the tender points.

  19. Modulation of urban atmospheric electric field measurements with the wind direction in Lisbon (Portugal)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, H. G.; Matthews, J. C.; Conceição, R.; Wright, M. D.; Pereira, S. N.; Reis, A. H.; Shallcross, D. E.

    2015-10-01

    Atmospheric electric field measurements (potential gradient, PG) were retrieved in the urban environment of the city of Lisbon (Portugal). The measurements were performed with a Benndorf electrograph at the Portela Meteorological station in the suburbs of the city (NE from the centre). The period of 1980 to 1990 is considered here. According to wind direction, different content and types of ions and aerosols arrive at the measurement site causing significant variations to the PG. To the south there are significant pollution sources while to the north such sources are scarcer. The Iberian Peninsula is found east of the station and the Atlantic Ocean covers the western sector, Wind directions are divided in four sectors: i) NW: 270° ≤ θ ≤ 360° ii) NE: 0 ≤ θ ≤ 90° iii) SE: 90 ≤ θ ≤ 180° iv) SW: 180° ≤ θ ≤ 270°. Analysis of weekly cycle, caused by anthropogenic pollution related with urban activity, was undertaken for each wind sector. NW sector has been shown to be less affected by this cycle, which is attributed to the effect of marine air. The daily variation of NE sector for weekends reveals a similar behaviour to the Carnegie curve, which corresponds to a clean air daily variation of PG, following universal time, independent of measurement site.

  20. Modulation of Osteogenesis in MC3T3-E1 Cells by Different Frequency Electrical Stimulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Wang

    Full Text Available Electrical stimulation (ES is therapeutic to many bone diseases, from promoting fracture regeneration to orthopedic intervention. The application of ES offers substantial therapeutic potential, while optimal ES parameters and the underlying mechanisms responsible for the positive clinical impact are poorly understood. In this study, we assembled an ES cell culture and monitoring device. Mc-3T3-E1 cells were subjected to different frequency to investigate the effect of osteogenesis. Cell proliferation, DNA synthesis, the mRNA levels of osteosis-related genes, the activity of alkaline phosphatase (ALP, and intracellular concentration of Ca2+ were thoroughly evaluated. We found that 100 Hz could up-regulate the mRNA levels of collagen I, collagen II and Runx2. On the contrary, ES could down-regulate the mRNA levels of osteopontin (OPN. ALP activity assay and Fast Blue RR salt stain showed that 100 Hz could accelerate cells differentiation. Compared to the control group, 100 Hz could promote cell proliferation. Furthermore, 1 Hz to 10 Hz could improve calcium deposition in the intracellular matrix. Overall, these results indicate that 100Hz ES exhibits superior potentialities in osteogenesis, which should be beneficial for the clinical applications of ES for the treatment of bone diseases.

  1. Gait improvement via rhythmic stimulation in Parkinson’s disease is linked to rhythmic skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bella, Simone Dalla; Benoit, Charles-Etienne; Farrugia, Nicolas; Keller, Peter E.; Obrig, Hellmuth; Mainka, Stefan; Kotz, Sonja A.

    2017-01-01

    Training based on rhythmic auditory stimulation (RAS) can improve gait in patients with idiopathic Parkinson’s disease (IPD). Patients typically walk faster and exhibit greater stride length after RAS. However, this effect is highly variable among patients, with some exhibiting little or no response to the intervention. These individual differences may depend on patients’ ability to synchronize their movements to a beat. To test this possibility, 14 IPD patients were submitted to RAS for four weeks, in which they walked to music with an embedded metronome. Before and after the training, patients’ synchronization was assessed with auditory paced hand tapping and walking to auditory cues. Patients increased gait speed and stride length in non-cued gait after training. However, individual differences were apparent as some patients showed a positive response to RAS and others, either no response, or a negative response. A positive response to RAS was predicted by the synchronization performance in hand tapping and gait tasks. More severe gait impairment, low synchronization variability, and a prompt response to a stimulation change foster a positive response to RAS training. Thus, sensorimotor timing skills underpinning the synchronization of steps to an auditory cue may allow predicting the success of RAS in IPD. PMID:28233776

  2. Stimulating forebrain communications: Slow sinusoidal electric fields over frontal cortices dynamically modulate hippocampal activity and cortico-hippocampal interplay during slow-wave states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, Anastasia; Whitten, Tara A; Dickson, Clayton T

    2016-06-01

    Slow-wave states are characterized by the most global physiological phenomenon in the mammalian brain, the large-amplitude slow oscillation (SO; ~1Hz) composed of alternating states of activity (ON/UP states) and silence (OFF/DOWN states) at the network and single cell levels. The SO is cortically generated and appears as a traveling wave that can propagate across the cortical surface and can invade the hippocampus. This cortical rhythm is thought to be imperative for sleep-dependent memory consolidation, potentially through increased interactions with the hippocampus. The SO is correlated with learning and its presumed enhancement via slow rhythmic electrical field stimulation improves subsequent mnemonic performance. However, the mechanism by which such field stimulation influences the dynamics of ongoing cortico-hippocampal communication is unknown. Here we show - using multi-site recordings in urethane-anesthetized rats - that sinusoidal electrical field stimulation applied to the frontal region of the cerebral cortex creates a platform for improved cortico-hippocampal communication. Moderate-intensity field stimulation entrained hippocampal slow activity (likely by way of the temporoammonic pathway) and also increased sharp-wave ripples, the signature memory replay events of the hippocampus, and further increased cortical spindles. Following cessation of high-intensity stimulation, SO interactions in the cortical-to-hippocampal direction were reduced, while the reversed hippocampal-to-cortical communication at both SO and gamma bandwidths was enhanced. Taken together, these findings suggest that cortical field stimulation may function to boost memory consolidation by strengthening cortico-hippocampal and hippocampo-cortical interplay at multiple nested frequencies in an intensity-dependent fashion.

  3. Transitions between Discrete and Rhythmic Primitives in a Unimanual Task

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dagmar eSternad

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Given the vast complexity of human actions and interactions with objects, we proposed that control of sensorimotor behavior may utilize dynamic primitives. However, greater computational simplicity may come at the cost of reduced versatility. Evidence for primitives may be garnered by revealing such limitations. This study tested subjects performing a sequence of progressively faster discrete movements, in order to stress the system. We hypothesized that the increasing pace would elicit a transition to rhythmic movements, assumed to be computationally and neurally more efficient. Abrupt transitions between the two types of movements would support the hypothesis that rhythmic and discrete movements are distinct primitives. Ten subjects performed planar point-to-point arm movements paced by a metronome: Starting at 2s the metronome intervals decreased by 36ms per cycle to 200ms, stayed at 200ms for several cycles, then increased by similar increments. Instructions emphasized to insert explicit stops between each movement with a duration that equaled the movement time. The experiment was performed with eyes open and closed, and with short and long metronome sounds, the latter explicitly specifying the dwell duration. Results showed that subjects matched instructed movement times but did not preserve the dwell times. Rather, they progressively reduced dwell time to zero, transitioning to continuous rhythmic movements before movement times reached their minimum. The acceleration profiles showed an abrupt change between discrete and rhythmic profiles. The loss of dwell time occurred earlier with long auditory specification, when subjects also showed evidence of predictive control. While evidence for hysteresis was weak, taken together, the results clearly indicated a transition between discrete and rhythmic movements, supporting the proposal that representation is based on primitives rather than on veridical internal models.

  4. Extra-gonadal steroids modulate non-breeding territorial aggression in weakly electric fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalabert, Cecilia; Quintana, Laura; Pessina, Paula; Silva, Ana

    2015-06-01

    The neuroendocrine control of intraspecific aggression is a matter of current debate. Although aggression in a reproductive context has been associated with high levels of circulating androgens in a broad range of species, it has also been shown to occur during the non-breeding season when gonads are regressed and plasma steroid hormone levels are low. In mammals and birds the aromatization of androgens into estrogens plays a key role in the regulation of aggression in both the breeding and non-breeding seasons. This is the first study in a teleost fish to explore the role of steroids in the modulation of non-breeding aggression. Gymnotus omarorum is a highly aggressive teleost fish that exhibits aggression all year-round. We analyzed male-male non-breeding agonistic behavior, compared circulating 11-Ketotestosterone (11-KT) levels between dominants and isolated males, assessed the regulatory role of aromatization of androgens into estrogens, and evaluated the gonads as a source of these sex steroids. We found that high levels of aggression occurred in the non-breeding season despite low plasma 11-KT levels, and that there was no difference in 11-KT levels between dominant and isolated males. We demonstrated that acute aromatase inhibition decreased aggression, distorted contest dynamics, and affected expected outcome. We also found that castrated individuals displayed aggressive behavior indistinguishable from non-castrated males. Our results show, for the first time in teleost fish, that territorial aggression of G. omarorum during the non-breeding season depends on a non-gonadal estrogenic pathway.

  5. Spinal cord activation differentially modulates ischaemic electrical responses to different stressors in canine ventricles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardinal, René; Ardell, Jeffrey L; Linderoth, Bengt; Vermeulen, Michel; Foreman, Robert D; Armour, J Andrew

    2004-03-31

    Spinal cord stimulation (SCS) represents an acceptable treatment modality for patients with chronic angina pectoris refractory to standard therapy, but its mechanism of action remains unclear. To develop an experimental paradigm to study this issue, ameroid (AM) constrictors were implanted around the left circumflex coronary artery (LCx) in canines. Six weeks later, unipolar electrograms were recorded from 191 sites in the LCx territory in the open-chest, anesthetized state under basal pacing at 150 beats/min. We investigated the effect of SCS on ST segment displacements induced in the collateral-dependent myocardium in response to two stressors: (i) transient bouts of rapid ventricular pacing (TRP: 240/min for 1 min) and (ii) angiotensin II administered to right atrial neurons via their coronary artery blood supply. ST segment responses to TRP consisted of ST segment elevation in central areas of the LCx territory and ST depression at more peripheral areas. Such responses were unchanged when TRP was applied under SCS. Shortening of repolarization intervals in the metabolically compromised myocardium in response to TRP was also unaffected by SCS. In contrast, ST segment responses to intracoronary angiotensin II, which consisted of increased ST elevation, were attenuated by SCS in 6/8 preparations. The modulator effects of SCS were greatest at sites at which the greatest responses to angiotensin II occurred in the absence of SCS. These data indicate that spinal cord stimulation may attenuate the deleterious effects that stressors exert on the myocardium with reduced coronary reserve, particularly stressors associated with chemical activation of the intrinsic cardiac nervous system. Copyright 2004 Elsevier B.V.

  6. Modulation of the heart's electrical properties by the anticonvulsant drug retigabine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubi, Lena; Kovar, Michael; Zebedin-Brandl, Eva; Koenig, Xaver; Dominguez-Rodriguez, Manuel; Todt, Hannes; Kubista, Helmut; Boehm, Stefan; Hilber, Karlheinz

    2017-08-15

    Retigabine, currently used as antiepileptic drug, has a wide range of potential medical uses. Administration of the drug in patients can lead to QT interval prolongation in the electrocardiogram and to cardiac arrhythmias in rare cases. This suggests that the drug may perturb the electrical properties of the heart, and the underlying mechanisms were investigated here. Effects of retigabine on currents through human cardiac ion channels, heterologously expressed in tsA-201 cells, were studied in whole-cell patch-clamp experiments. In addition, the drug's impact on the cardiac action potential was tested. This was done using ventricular cardiomyocytes isolated from Langendorff-perfused guinea pig hearts and cardiomyocytes derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells. Further, to unravel potential indirect effects of retigabine on the heart which might involve the autonomic nervous system, membrane potential and noradrenaline release from sympathetic ganglionic neurons were measured in the absence and presence of the drug. Retigabine significantly inhibited currents through hKv11.1 potassium, hNav1.5 sodium, as well as hCav1.2 calcium channels, but only in supra-therapeutic concentrations. In a similar concentration range, the drug shortened the action potential in both guinea pig and human cardiomyocytes. Therapeutic concentrations of retigabine, on the other hand, were sufficient to inhibit the activity of sympathetic ganglionic neurons. We conclude that retigabine- induced QT interval prolongation, and the reported cases of cardiac arrhythmias after application of the drug in a typical daily dose range, cannot be explained by a direct modulatory effect on cardiac ion channels. They are rather mediated by indirect actions at the level of the autonomic nervous system. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. Investigation of the effects of transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS) on self-paced rhythmic movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varlet, Manuel; Wade, Alanna; Novembre, Giacomo; Keller, Peter E

    2017-03-18

    Human rhythmic movements spontaneously entrain to external rhythmic stimuli. Such sensory-motor entrainment can attract movements to different tempi and enhance their efficiency, with potential clinical applications for motor rehabilitation. Here we investigate whether entrainment of self-paced rhythmic movements can be induced via transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS), which uses alternating currents to entrain spontaneous brain oscillations at specific frequencies. Participants swung a handheld pendulum at their preferred tempo with the right hand while tACS was applied over their left or right primary motor cortex at frequencies equal to their preferred tempo (Experiment 1) or in the alpha (10Hz) and beta (20Hz) ranges (Experiment 2). Given that entrainment generally occurs only if the frequency difference between two rhythms is small, stimulations were delivered at frequencies equal to participants' preferred movement tempo (≈1Hz) and ±12.5% in Experiment 1, and at 10Hz and 20Hz, and ±12.5% in Experiment 2. The comparison of participants' movement frequency, amplitude, variability, and phase synchrony with and without tACS failed to reveal entrainment or movement modifications across the two experiments. However, significant differences in stimulation-related side effects reported by participants were found between the two experiments, with phosphenes and burning sensations principally occurring in Experiment 2, and metallic tastes reported marginally more often in Experiment 1. Although other stimulation protocols may be effective, our results suggest that rhythmic movements such as pendulum swinging or locomotion that are low in goal-directedness and/or strongly driven by peripheral and mechanical constraints may not be susceptible to modulation by tACS.

  8. MicroRNA mir-16 is anti-proliferative in enterocytes and exhibits diurnal rhythmicity in intestinal crypts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balakrishnan, Anita, E-mail: anita.balakrishnan@doctors.org.uk [Department of Surgery, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Department of Surgery, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); School of Clinical Sciences, Division of Gastroenterology, University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 3GE (United Kingdom); Stearns, Adam T. [Department of Surgery, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Department of Surgery, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Department of Physiology, Anatomy and Genetics, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 2JD (United Kingdom); Park, Peter J. [Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Harvard Medical School, Center for Biomedical Informatics, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Dreyfuss, Jonathan M. [Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Ashley, Stanley W. [Department of Surgery, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Department of Surgery, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Rhoads, David B. [Department of Surgery, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Pediatric Endocrine Unit, MassGeneral Hospital for Children, Boston, MA 02114 (United States); Tavakkolizadeh, Ali, E-mail: atavakkoli@partners.org [Department of Surgery, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Department of Surgery, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115 (United States)

    2010-12-10

    Background and aims: The intestine exhibits profound diurnal rhythms in function and morphology, in part due to changes in enterocyte proliferation. The regulatory mechanisms behind these rhythms remain largely unknown. We hypothesized that microRNAs are involved in mediating these rhythms, and studied the role of microRNAs specifically in modulating intestinal proliferation. Methods: Diurnal rhythmicity of microRNAs in rat jejunum was analyzed by microarrays and validated by qPCR. Temporal expression of diurnally rhythmic mir-16 was further quantified in intestinal crypts, villi, and smooth muscle using laser capture microdissection and qPCR. Morphological changes in rat jejunum were assessed by histology and proliferation by immunostaining for bromodeoxyuridine. In IEC-6 cells stably overexpressing mir-16, proliferation was assessed by cell counting and MTS assay, cell cycle progression and apoptosis by flow cytometry, and cell cycle gene expression by qPCR and immunoblotting. Results: mir-16 peaked 6 hours after light onset (HALO 6) with diurnal changes restricted to crypts. Crypt depth and villus height peaked at HALO 13-14 in antiphase to mir-16. Overexpression of mir-16 in IEC-6 cells suppressed specific G1/S regulators (cyclins D1-3, cyclin E1 and cyclin-dependent kinase 6) and produced G1 arrest. Protein expression of these genes exhibited diurnal rhythmicity in rat jejunum, peaking between HALO 11 and 17 in antiphase to mir-16. Conclusions: This is the first report of circadian rhythmicity of specific microRNAs in rat jejunum. Our data provide a link between anti-proliferative mir-16 and the intestinal proliferation rhythm and point to mir-16 as an important regulator of proliferation in jejunal crypts. This function may be essential to match proliferation and absorptive capacity with nutrient availability.

  9. A New Strategy for Accurately Predicting I-V Electrical Characteristics of PV Modules Using a Nonlinear Five-Point Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sakaros Bogning Dongue

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the modelling of electrical I-V response of illuminated photovoltaic crystalline modules. As an alternative method to the linear five-parameter model, our strategy uses advantages of a nonlinear analytical five-point model to take into account the effects of nonlinear variations of current with respect to solar irradiance and of voltage with respect to cells temperature. We succeeded in this work to predict with great accuracy the I-V characteristics of monocrystalline shell SP75 and polycrystalline GESOLAR GE-P70 photovoltaic modules. The good comparison of our calculated results to experimental data provided by the modules manufacturers makes it possible to appreciate the contribution of taking into account the nonlinear effect of operating conditions data on I-V characteristics of photovoltaic modules.

  10. High resistance modulation by the electric field based on La0.9Sr0.1MnO3/SrTiO3/Si structure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    A field-effect configuration based on La0.9Sr0.1MnO3/SrTiO3/Si structure is fabricated on Si substrate by laser molecular-beam epitaxy. The resistance modulation by electric field of the La0.9Sr0.1MnO3/SrTiO3/Si structure is investigated in detail. An evident resistance modulation effect is observed at 80 K. The channel resistance modulation by field effect reaches 1.4×107% and 2.6×106% when VDS are -2 and -6.5 V, respectively. The ON/OFF ratio of approximately 4000 is obtained. The present results are worthy of further investigations for potential applications of resistance modulation by electrostatic field in the heterostructures consisting of perovskite oxides and Si.

  11. Amplitude modulated, by M1, Earth's oscillating (T = 1 day) electric field triggered by K1 tidal waves. Its relation to the occurrence time of large EQs

    CERN Document Server

    Thanassoulas, C; Verveniotis, G

    2010-01-01

    Starting from the observation that quite often the Earth's oscillating electric field varies in amplitude, a mechanism is postulated that accounts for these observations. That mechanism is the piezoelectric one driven by the M1 and K1 tidal components. It is demonstrated how the system: piezoelectricity triggered in the lithosphere - M1 and K1 tidal components is activated and produces the amplitude modulated Earth's oscillating electric field. This procedure is linked to the strain load conditions met in the seismogenic area before the occurrence of a large EQ. Peaks of the oscillating Earth's electric field are tightly connected to the M1 peak tidal component and to the timing of the occurrence of large EQs. Typical examples from real recordings of the Earth's oscillating electric field, recorded by the ATH (Greece) monitoring site, are given in order to verify the postulated detailed piezoelectric mechanism.

  12. Electric field-modulated amplified spontaneous emission in organo-lead halide perovskite CH3NH3PbI3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Fang; Wu, Zhaoxin; Dong, Hua; Xia, Bin; Xi, Jun; Ning, Shuya; Ma, Lin; Hou, Xun

    2015-12-01

    The electric field-modulation of the spontaneous emission (SE) and amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) in organo-lead halide perovskite CH3NH3PbI3 (aliased as MAPbI3) layer has been investigated. With the increase of the external applied electric field, the electric field-induced quenching of the SE and ASE intensity was observed, accompanying with a blue-shift of the ASE emission peaks, which can be attributed to field-induced ionization of photogenerated excitons in the MAPbI3 layer. Based on the analysis of quenching factor and the dielectric constant, we estimated an exciton binding energy ˜36 meV at room temperature, which will provide useful insights into the optical-electrical characteristics of MAPbI3 and pave the way for the future optoelectronic applications.

  13. The role of subvocalization in rehearsal and maintenance of rhythmic patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pich, J

    2000-05-01

    This experiment analyzed the influence of subvocal activity in retention of rhythmical auditory patterns. Retention of sixteen percussion sequences was studied. Each sequence (a 4-s "door-knocking" pattern) was followed by one of the following six retention conditions: silence, unattended music (blocking the inner ear, i.e., Gregorian chanting), unattended music (blocking the inner ear, i.e., rock-and-roll), articulatory suppression (blocking the inner voice), tracing circles on the table with index finger (spatial task), and tapping (motor control). After silence, unattended music (chanting), or the spatial task, participants successfully reproduced most patterns. Errors increased with unattended music (rock-and-roll), but significant disruptions only occurred with tapping and articulatory suppression. Whereas the latter case supports the role of an articulatory loop in retention, the production of successive taps or syllables in both interference conditions probably relies on a general rhythm module, which disrupted retention of the patterns.

  14. Modeling and Control of a Flux-Modulated Compound-Structure Permanent-Magnet Synchronous Machine for Hybrid Electric Vehicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiyi Song

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The compound-structure permanent-magnet synchronous machine (CS-PMSM, comprising a double rotor machine (DRM and a permanent-magnet (PM motor, is a promising electronic-continuously variable transmission (e-CVT concept for hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs. By CS-PMSM, independent speed and torque control of the vehicle engine is realized without a planetary gear unit. However, the slip rings and brushes of the conventional CS-PMSM are considered a major drawback for vehicle application. In this paper, a brushless flux-modulated CS-PMSM is investigated. The operating principle and basic working modes of the CS-PMSM are discussed. Mathematical models of the CS-PMSM system are given, and joint control of the two integrated machines is proposed. As one rotor of the DRM is mechanically connected with the rotor of the PM motor, special rotor position detection and torque allocation methods are required. Simulation is carried out by Matlab/Simulink, and the feasibility of the control system is proven. Considering the complexity of the controller, a single digital signal processor (DSP is used to perform the interconnected control of dual machines instead of two separate ones, and a typical hardware implementation is proposed.

  15. Modulation of ankle EMG in spinally contused rats through application of neuromuscular electrical stimulation timed to robotic treadmill training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askari, Sina; Kamgar, Parisa; Chao, TeKang; Diaz, Eric; de Leon, Ray D; Won, Deborah S

    2012-01-01

    While neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) has enabled patients of neuromotor dysfunction to effectively regain some functions, analysis of neuromuscular changes underlying these functional improvements is lacking. We have developed an NMES system for a rodent model of SCI with the long term goal of creating a therapy which restores control over stepping back to the spinal circuitry. NMES was applied to the tibialis anterior (TA) and timed to the afferent feedback generated during robotic treadmill training (RTT). The effect of NMES+RTT on modifications in EMG was compared with that of RTT alone. A longitudinal study with a crossover design was conducted in which group 1 (n=7) received 2 weeks of RTT only followed by 2 weeks of NMES+RTT; group 2 (n=7) received 2 weeks of NMES+RTT followed by RTT only. On average, both types of training helped to modulate TA EMG activity over a gait cycle, resulting in EMG profiles across steps with peaks occurring just before or at the beginning of the swing phase, when ankle flexion is most needed. However, NMES+RTT resulted in concentration of EMG activation during the initial swing phase more than RTT only. In conjunction with these improvements in EMG activation presented here, a more complete analyses comparing changes after NMES+RTT vs. RTT is expected to further support the notion that NMES timed appropriately to hindlimb stepping could help to reinforce the motor learning that is induced by afferent activity generated by treadmill training.

  16. Adrenocorticotropic Hormone Enhances the Masculinity of an Electric Communication Signal by Modulating the Waveform and Timing of Action Potentials within Individual Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markham, Michael R.; Stoddard, Philip K.

    2008-01-01

    We report here that melanocortin peptides appear to serve as the mechanism by which weakly electric fish couple socially regulated and stress-regulated brain pathways to unique changes in the intrinsic excitability and action potential waveform of excitable membranes in peripheral cells involved in communication. Gymnotiform electric fish modulate their electric organ discharges (EODs) by reshaping the electric discharges of excitable cells in the periphery. These fish show circadian enhancement of the EOD waveform. They also enhance their EOD waveforms within minutes in response to stressors and changes in the social environment, thus altering the communication value of the signal. Changes in the EOD waveform that occur within minutes result from changes in the discharges of individual electrocytes (μEODs) mediated by the cAMP/protein kinase A (PKA) pathway acting on ion channel kinetics. What activates the cAMP/PKA pathway in electrocytes has not been identified. In vivo injections of the melanocortin peptide adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) increase the amplitude and duration of the electric signal waveform of the gymnotiform Brachyhypopomus pinnicaudatus over the course of 1 h. Applied to single electrocytes in vitro, ACTH increases μEOD amplitude and duration within minutes by differentially modulating the action potentials of the two excitable membranes of the electrocyte and changing the timing of these two spikes. Serotonin modulates the EOD in vivo but has no effect on the μEOD in vitro. The cAMP analog 8-bromo-cAMP mimicked the effects of ACTH, whereas inhibition of PKA by protein kinase A inhibitor 14–22 amide blocked the modulatory effects of ACTH, confirming the role of the cAMP/PKA pathway in μEOD modulation by ACTH. PMID:16177044

  17. 一种应用于电动汽车的复合电池能源模块%A hybrid battery energy module for electric vehicles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王涛; 韦秀磊; 林秋丰; 董小平

    2012-01-01

    The existing battery ower module for electric vehicle can not meet the actual vehicle performance requirements. A new battery power module is carried out in this paper, which is composed of the li-ion batteries and zinc-air fuel cell. Firstly, the different solutions about the vehicle energy short supply are proposed by the global automobile companies. The prospective of electric vehicles becomes optimistic. Secondly, the bottle neck for power battery module applied in pure electric vehicle is analyzed. A new battery power module for electric vehicle is put forward; then, the advantage of the power battery energy-module is analyzed, the feasibility of the module used in electric vehicles is pointed out in the future. Finally, the next specific work on the development of the module is introduced.%就目前现有的电动汽车电池能源模块无法满足车辆实际性能需求的问题,提出了一种全新的电动车用电池能源模块,该模块是由锂离子电池与锌空气燃料电池进行配合组成的.首先分析了全球各个汽车企业就目前车用能源日趋紧张问题所提出的不同解决方案,指出了电动汽车发展前景乐观;其次,分析了应用于纯电动汽车的电池能源模块存在的瓶颈,提出了一个全新的电动车用电池能源模块的构想;然后,对该动力电池能源模块的优势进行分析,指出了该模块未来应用于电动汽车上的可行性;最后,就下一步开发该模块所要做的具体工作进行了介绍.

  18. AN INVESTIGATION INTO THE EFFECT OF PHOTOVOLTAIC MODULE ELECTRIC PROPERTIES ON MAXIMUM POWER POINT TRAJECTORY WITH THE AIM OF ITS ALIGNMENT WITH ELECTROLYZER U-I CHARACTERISTIC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihajlo Firak

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to combine a photovoltaic module and an electrolyzer to produce hydrogen from water, an intermediate DC/DC converter can be used to adapt output power features of the module to input power features of the electrolyzer. This can also be done without using electronics, which results in saving as much as 700 USD/kW, as previous investigation has shown. A more sophisticated investigation should be carried out with the aim of improving high system efficiency, resulting in matching the photovoltaic module maximum power point trajectory (the maximum power point path in the U-I plane as a result of solar irradiance change to the operating characteristic of the electrolyzer. This paper presents an analysis of the influences of photovoltaic module electric properties, such as series and parallel resistance and non-ideality factor, on the maximum power point trajectory at different levels of solar irradiance. The possibility of various inclinations (right - vertical - left in relation to an arbitrary chosen operating characteristic of the electrolyzer is also demonstrated. Simulated results are obtained by using Matlab/Simulink simulations of the well known one-diode model. Simulations have been confirmed with experiments on a real photovoltaic module where solar irradiance, solar cell temperature, electric current, and voltage in the circuit with variable ohmic resistance have been measured.

  19. Improvement of artistry at the qualified sportswomen in rhythmic gymnastics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alla Mullagildina

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to define influence of means of modern choreography on artistic abilities of the qualified sportswomen in rhythmic gymnastics. Material & Methods: art-aesthetic requirements by the technique of V. S. Avanesov were defined at eight candidates of master of sports, choreographic priorities were found out by means of questioning and conversation, the level of coordination abilities of gymnasts by motive tests was defined. Results: Classes by choreography, communication with music are priority in art- aesthetic needs of gymnasts. Most of gymnasts gave their advantage to the use of techniques of contemporary dance and jazz modern from means of modern choreography. Conclusions: the level of musically-rhythmical preparedness, coordinate movements by different parts of body, expressiveness of movements improved considerably under the influence of means of modern choreography at gymnasts that promoted the improvement of artistry of sportswomen.

  20. Deterministic and stochastic features of rhythmic human movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Mourik, Anke M; Daffertshofer, Andreas; Beek, Peter J

    2006-03-01

    The dynamics of rhythmic movement has both deterministic and stochastic features. We advocate a recently established analysis method that allows for an unbiased identification of both types of system components. The deterministic components are revealed in terms of drift coefficients and vector fields, while the stochastic components are assessed in terms of diffusion coefficients and ellipse fields. The general principles of the procedure and its application are explained and illustrated using simulated data from known dynamical systems. Subsequently, we exemplify the method's merits in extracting deterministic and stochastic aspects of various instances of rhythmic movement, including tapping, wrist cycling and forearm oscillations. In particular, it is shown how the extracted numerical forms can be analysed to gain insight into the dependence of dynamical properties on experimental conditions.

  1. Demonstration of zinc/air fuel battery to enhance the range and mission of fleet electric vehicles: Preliminary results in the refueling of a multicell module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, J. F.; Fleming, D.; Keene, L.; Maimoni, A.; Peterman, K.; Koopman, R.

    1994-08-01

    We report progress in an effort to develop and demonstrate a refuelable zinc/air battery for fleet electric vehicle applications. A refuelable module consisting of twelve bipolar cells with internal flow system has been refueled at rates of nearly 4 cells per minute, indicating a refueling time of 10 minutes for a 15 kW, 55 kWh battery. The module is refueled by entrainment of 0.5-mm particles in rapidly flowing electrolyte, which delivers the particles into hoppers above each cell in a parallel-flow hydraulic circuit. The concept of user-recovery is presented as an alternative to centralized service infrastructure during market entry.

  2. Enhanced photo-assisted electrical gating in vanadium dioxide based on saturation-induced gain modulation of erbium-doped fiber amplifier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yong Wook; Kim, Bong-Jun; Choi, Sungyoul; Lee, Yong Wan; Kim, Hyun-Tak

    2009-10-26

    By incorporating saturation-induced gain modulation of an erbium-doped fiber amplifier (EDFA), we have demonstrated a high-speed photo-assisted electrical gating with considerably enhanced switching characteristics in a two-terminal device fabricated by using vanadium dioxide thin film. The gating operation was performed by illuminating the output light of the EDFA, whose transient gain was modulated by adjusting the chopping frequency of the input light down to 1 kHz, onto the device. In the proposed gating scheme, gated signals with a temporal duration of approximately 40 micros were successively generated at a repetition rate of 1 kHz.

  3. Melodic and Rhythmic Contrasts in Emotional Speech and Music

    OpenAIRE

    Quinto, Lena; Thompson, William Forde; Keating, Felicity Louise

    2013-01-01

    Many cues convey emotion similarly in speech and music. Researchers have established that acoustic cues such as pitch height, tempo, and intensity carry important emotional information in both domains. In this investigation, we examined the emotional significance of melodic and rhythmic contrasts between successive syllables or tones in speech and music, referred to as Melodic Interval Variability (MIV) and the normalized Pairwise Variability Index (nPVI). The spoken stimuli were 96 tokens ex...

  4. Mutual stabilization of rhythmic vocalization and whole-body movement.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kohei Miyata

    Full Text Available The current study investigated the rhythmic coordination between vocalization and whole-body movement. Previous studies have reported that spatiotemporal stability in rhythmic movement increases when coordinated with a rhythmic auditory stimulus or other effector in a stable coordination pattern. Therefore, the present study conducted two experiments to investigate (1 whether there is a stable coordination pattern between vocalization and whole-body movement and (2 whether a stable coordination pattern reduces variability in whole-body movement and vocalization. In Experiment 1, two coordination patterns between vocalizations and whole-body movement (hip, knee, and ankle joint flexion-on-the-voice vs. joint extension-on-the-voice in a standing posture were explored at movement frequencies of 80, 130, and 180 beats per minute. At higher movement frequencies, the phase angle in the extension-on-the-voice condition deviated from the intended phase angle. However, the angle of the flexion-on-the-voice was maintained even when movement frequency increased. These results suggest that there was a stable coordination pattern in the flexion-on-the-voice condition. In Experiment 2, variability in whole-body movement and voice-onset intervals was compared between two conditions: one related to tasks performed in the flexion-on-the-voice coordination (coordination condition that was a stable coordination pattern, and the other related to tasks performed independently (control condition. The results showed that variability in whole-body movement and voice-onset intervals was smaller in the coordination condition than in the control condition. Overall, the present study revealed mutual stabilization between rhythmic vocalization and whole-body movement via coordination within a stable pattern, suggesting that coupled action systems can act as a single functional unit or coordinative structure.

  5. The Edit Distance as a Measure of Perceived Rhythmic Similarity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olaf Post

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The ‘edit distance’ (or ‘Levenshtein distance’ measure of distance between two data sets is defined as the minimum number of editing operations – insertions, deletions, and substitutions – that are required to transform one data set to the other (Orpen and Huron, 1992. This measure of distance has been applied frequently and successfully in music information retrieval, but rarely in predicting human perception of distance. In this study, we investigate the effectiveness of the edit distance as a predictor of perceived rhythmic dissimilarity under simple rhythmic alterations. Approaching rhythms as a set of pulses that are either onsets or silences, we study two types of alterations. The first experiment is designed to test the model’s accuracy for rhythms that are relatively similar; whether rhythmic variations with the same edit distance to a source rhythm are also perceived as relatively similar by human subjects. In addition, we observe whether the salience of an edit operation is affected by its metric placement in the rhythm. Instead of using a rhythm that regularly subdivides a 4/4 meter, our source rhythm is a syncopated 16-pulse rhythm, the son. Results show a high correlation between the predictions by the edit distance model and human similarity judgments (r = 0.87; a higher correlation than for the well-known generative theory of tonal music (r = 0.64. In the second experiment, we seek to assess the accuracy of the edit distance model in predicting relatively dissimilar rhythms. The stimuli used are random permutations of the son’s inter-onset intervals: 3-3-4-2-4. The results again indicate that the edit distance correlates well with the perceived rhythmic dissimilarity judgments of the subjects (r = 0.76. To gain insight in the relationships between the individual rhythms, the results are also presented by means of graphic phylogenetic trees.

  6. Perceptual tests of rhythmic similarity: I. Mora Rhythm

    OpenAIRE

    Murty, L.; Otake, T; Cutler, A.

    2007-01-01

    Listeners rely on native-language rhythm in segmenting speech; in different languages, stress-, syllable- or mora-based rhythm is exploited. The rhythmic similarity hypothesis holds that where two languages have similar rhythm, listeners of each language should segment their own and the other language similarly. Such similarity in listening was previously observed only for related languages (English-Dutch; French-Spanish). We now report three experiments in which speakers of Telugu, a Dravidi...

  7. Rhythmic Effects of Syntax Processing in Music and Language

    OpenAIRE

    Harim eJung; Samuel eSontag; YeBin Shiny Park; Psyche eLoui

    2015-01-01

    Music and language are human cognitive and neural functions that share many structural similarities. Past theories posit a sharing of neural resources between syntax processing in music and language (Patel, 2003), and a dynamic attention network that governs general temporal processing (Large & Jones, 1999). Both make predictions about music and language processing over time. Experiment 1 of this study investigates the relationship between rhythmic expectancy and musical and linguistic syntax...

  8. Rhythmic Effects of Syntax Processing in Music and Language

    OpenAIRE

    Jung, Harim; Sontag, Samuel; Park, YeBin S.; Loui, Psyche

    2015-01-01

    Music and language are human cognitive and neural functions that share many structural similarities. Past theories posit a sharing of neural resources between syntax processing in music and language (Patel, 2003), and a dynamic attention network that governs general temporal processing (Large and Jones, 1999). Both make predictions about music and language processing over time. Experiment 1 of this study investigates the relationship between rhythmic expectancy and musical and linguistic synt...

  9. Precompetition warm-up in elite and subelite rhythmic gymnastics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guidetti, Laura; Di Cagno, Alessandra; Gallotta, Maria Chiara; Battaglia, Claudia; Piazza, Marina; Baldari, Carlo

    2009-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate which precompetition warm-up methodologies resulted in the best overall performance in rhythmic gymnastics. The coaches of national and international clubs (60 elite and 90 subelite) were interviewed. The relationship between sport performance and precompetition warm-up routines was examined. A total of 49% of the coaches interviewed spent more than 1 hour to prepare their athletes for the competition, including 45 minutes dedicated to warm-up exercises. In spite of previous studies' suggestions, the time between the end of warm-up and the beginning of competition was more than 5 minutes for 68% of those interviewed. A slow run was the activity of choice used to begin the warm-up (96%). Significant differences between elite and subelite gymnasts were found concerning the total duration of warm-up, duration of slow running, utilization of rhythmic steps and leaps during the warm-up, the use of dynamic flexibility exercises, competition performances repetition (p gymnastics would include static stretching exercises at least 60 minutes prior to the competition starting time and the active stretching exercises alternated with analytic muscle strengthening aimed at increasing muscle temperature. Rhythmic gymnastics coaches at all levels can use this data as a review of precompetition warm-up practices and a possible source of new ideas.

  10. Somatotype of top-level serbian rhythmic gymnasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purenović-Ivanović, Tijana; Popović, Ružena

    2014-03-27

    Body size and build influence performance in many sports, especially in those belonging to the group of female aesthetic sports (rhythmic gymnastics, artistic gymnastics, and figure skating). These sports pose high specific demands upon the functional, energy, motor and psychological capacities of athletes, but also upon the size, body build and composition of the performers, particularly of the top-level female athletes. The study of the top athletes (rhythmic gymnasts, in this case) may provide valuable information on the morphological requirements for achieving success in this sport. Therefore, the main objective of this research was to analyze the somatotype of 40 Serbian top-level rhythmic gymnasts, aged 13.04±2.79, and to form the five age group categories. The anthropometric variables included body height, body mass, the selected diameters, girths and skinfolds, and the Heath-Carter anthropometric somatotype. All of the anthropometric data were collected according to International Biological Programme, and then processed in the Somatotype 1.2. The applied analysis of variance indicated an increase in endomorphic component with age. The obtained results show that the balanced ectomorph is a dominant somatotype, being similar for all of the athletes that took part in the research (3.54-3.24-4.5). These results are in line with the ones obtained in previous studies.

  11. ACE and AGTR1 polymorphisms in elite rhythmic gymnastics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Cagno, Alessandra; Sapere, Nadia; Piazza, Marina; Aquino, Giovanna; Iuliano, Enzo; Intrieri, Mariano; Calcagno, Giuseppe

    2013-02-01

    In the angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) gene, Alu deletion, in intron 16, is associated with higher concentrations of ACE serum activity and this may be associated with elite sprint and power performance. The Alu insertion is associated with lower ACE levels and this could lead to endurance performance. Moreover, recent studies have identified a single-nucleotide polymorphism of the angiotensin type 1 receptor gene AGTR1, which seems to be related to ACE activity. The aim of this study was to examine the involvement of the ACE and the AGTR1 gene polymorphisms in 28 Italian elite rhythmic gymnasts (age range 21 ± 7.6 years), and compare them to 23 middle level rhythmic gymnasts (age range 17 ± 10.9 years). The ACE D allele was significantly more frequent in elite athletes than in the control population (χ(2)=4.07, p=0.04). Comparisons between the middle level and elite athletes revealed significant differences (pAGTR1 A/C genotype or allele distributions between the middle level and elite athletes. In conclusion, the ACE D allele genotype could be a contributing factor to high-performance rhythmic gymnastics that should be considered in athlete development and could help to identify which skills should be trained for talent promotion.

  12. Circadian remodeling of neuronal circuits involved in rhythmic behavior.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Paz Fernández

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Clock output pathways are central to convey timing information from the circadian clock to a diversity of physiological systems, ranging from cell-autonomous processes to behavior. While the molecular mechanisms that generate and sustain rhythmicity at the cellular level are well understood, it is unclear how this information is further structured to control specific behavioral outputs. Rhythmic release of pigment dispersing factor (PDF has been proposed to propagate the time of day information from core pacemaker cells to downstream targets underlying rhythmic locomotor activity. Indeed, such circadian changes in PDF intensity represent the only known mechanism through which the PDF circuit could communicate with its output. Here we describe a novel circadian phenomenon involving extensive remodeling in the axonal terminals of the PDF circuit, which display higher complexity during the day and significantly lower complexity at nighttime, both under daily cycles and constant conditions. In support to its circadian nature, cycling is lost in bona fide clockless mutants. We propose this clock-controlled structural plasticity as a candidate mechanism contributing to the transmission of the information downstream of pacemaker cells.

  13. Study Modules for Calculus-Based General Physics. [Includes Modules 35-37: Reflection and Refraction; Electric Fields and Potentials from Continuous Charge Distributions; and Maxwell's Predictions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Robert G., Ed.; And Others

    This is part of a series of 42 Calculus Based Physics (CBP) modules totaling about 1,000 pages. The modules include study guides, practice tests, and mastery tests for a full-year individualized course in calculus-based physics based on the Personalized System of Instruction (PSI). The units are not intended to be used without outside materials;…

  14. Study Modules for Calculus-Based General Physics. [Includes Modules 21-23: Second Law and Entropy; Coulomb's Law and the Electric Field; and Flux and Gauss' Law].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Robert G., Ed.; And Others

    This is part of a series of 42 Calculus Based Physics (CBP) modules totaling about 1,000 pages. The modules include study guides, practice tests, and mastery tests for a full-year individualized course in calculus-based physics based on the Personalized System of Instruction (PSI). The units are not intended to be used without outside materials;…

  15. Methamphetamine, amphetamine, MDMA ('ecstasy'), MDA and mCPP modulate electrical and cholinergic input in PC12 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hondebrink, Laura; Meulenbelt, Jan; Rietjens, Saskia J; Meijer, Marieke; Westerink, Remco H S

    2012-03-01

    Reversal of the dopamine (DA) membrane transporter is the main mechanism through which many drugs of abuse increase DA levels. However, drug-induced modulation of exocytotic DA release by electrical (depolarization) and neurochemical inputs (e.g., acetylcholine (ACh)) may also contribute. We therefore investigated effects of methamphetamine, amphetamine, 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA), 3,4-methylenedioxyamphetamine (MDA) and meta-chlorophenylpiperazine (mCPP) (1-1000 μM) on these inputs by measuring drug-induced changes in basal, depolarization- and ACh-evoked intracellular calcium concentrations ([Ca(2+)](i)) using a dopaminergic model (PC12 cells) and Fura 2 calcium imaging. The strongest drug-induced effects were observed on cholinergic input. At 0.1mM all drugs inhibited the ACh-evoked [Ca(2+)](i) increases by 40-75%, whereas ACh-evoked [Ca(2+)](i) increases were nearly abolished following higher drug exposure (1mM, 80-97% inhibition). Additionally, high MDMA and mCPP concentrations increased basal [Ca(2+)](i), but only following prior stimulation with ACh. Interestingly, low concentrations of methamphetamine or amphetamine (10 μM) potentiated ACh-evoked [Ca(2+)](i) increases. Depolarization-evoked [Ca(2+)](i) increases were also inhibited following exposure to high drug concentrations, although drugs were less potent on this endpoint. Our data demonstrate that at high drug concentrations all tested drugs reduce stimulation-evoked increases in [Ca(2+)](i), thereby probably reducing dopaminergic output through inhibition of electrical and cholinergic input. Furthermore, the increases in basal [Ca(2+)](i) at high concentrations of MDMA and mCPP likely increases dopaminergic output. Similarly, the increases in ACh-evoked [Ca(2+)](i) upon cholinergic stimulation following exposure to low concentrations of amphetamines can contribute to drug-induced increases in DA levels observed in vivo. Finally, this study shows that mCPP, which is regularly found in

  16. Electric field modulated conduction mechanism in Al/BaTiO3/La0.67Sr0.33MnO3 heterostructures

    KAUST Repository

    Zheng, Dongxing

    2017-08-08

    Mediating a metastable state is a promising way to achieve a giant modulation of physical properties in artificial heterostructures. A metastable state La0.67Sr0.33MnO3 (LSMO) layer suffering tensile strain was grown on MgO substrates. Incorporating with the ferroelectric BaTiO3 (BTO) layer, an accumulation or depletion state controlled by electric fields can be formed at the BTO/LSMO interface, which drives a switching of the conduction mechanism between space charge limited conduction and Poole-Frenkel emission, corresponding to the low and high resistance states. Our results lighten an effective way for electric-field modulated resistance states in multiferroic magnetoelectric devices.

  17. Restricted feeding restores rhythmicity in the pineal gland of arrhythmic suprachiasmatic-lesioned rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feillet, Céline A; Mendoza, Jorge; Pévet, Paul; Challet, Etienne

    2008-12-01

    In mammals, the rhythmic synthesis of melatonin by the pineal gland is tightly controlled by the master clock located in the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN). In behaviourally arrhythmic SCN-lesioned rats, we investigated the effects of daily restricted feeding (RF) on pineal melatonin synthesis. RF restored not only a rhythmic transcription of the rate-limiting enzyme for melatonin biosynthesis [arylalkylamine-N-acetyltransferase (AANAT)] and a rhythmic expression of c-FOS but also a rhythmic synthesis of melatonin in the pineal gland. In control rats without functional SCN and fed ad libitum, a daily immobilization stress did not restore any rhythmicity in the pineal gland. Interestingly, a combination of RF and daily stress prior to the time of food access did not markedly impair AaNat mRNA and c-FOS rhythmicity but did abolish the restoration of rhythmic pineal melatonin. These data indicate that the synchronizing effects of RF on the pineal rhythmicity are not due to, and cannot be mimicked by, high levels of circulating glucocorticoids. In keeping with the multi-oscillatory nature of the circadian system, the rhythmicity of pineal melatonin in mammals, until now an exclusive output of the SCN, can also be controlled by daily feeding cues when the SCN clock is lacking. Thus, the present study demonstrates that daily RF in SCN-lesioned rats provides, probably via sympathetic fibres, synchronizing stimuli strong enough to drive rhythmicity in the pineal gland.

  18. Response Analysis on Electrical Pulses under Severe Nuclear Accident Temperature Conditions Using an Abnormal Signal Simulation Analysis Module

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kil-Mo Koo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Unlike design basis accidents, some inherent uncertainties of the reliability of instrumentations are expected while subjected to harsh environments (e.g., high temperature and pressure, high humidity, and high radioactivity occurring in severe nuclear accident conditions. Even under such conditions, an electrical signal should be within its expected range so that some mitigating actions can be taken based on the signal in the control room. For example, an industrial process control standard requires that the normal signal level for pressure, flow, and resistance temperature detector sensors be in the range of 4~20 mA for most instruments. Whereas, in the case that an abnormal signal is expected from an instrument, such a signal should be refined through a signal validation process so that the refined signal could be available in the control room. For some abnormal signals expected under severe accident conditions, to date, diagnostics and response analysis have been evaluated with an equivalent circuit model of real instruments, which is regarded as the best method. The main objective of this paper is to introduce a program designed to implement a diagnostic and response analysis for equivalent circuit modeling. The program links signal analysis tool code to abnormal signal simulation engine code not only as a one body order system, but also as a part of functions of a PC-based ASSA (abnormal signal simulation analysis module developed to obtain a varying range of the R-C circuit elements in high temperature conditions. As a result, a special function for abnormal pulse signal patterns can be obtained through the program, which in turn makes it possible to analyze the abnormal output pulse signals through a response characteristic of a 4~20 mA circuit model and a range of the elements changing with temperature under an accident condition.

  19. Osmoregulatory inositol transporter SMIT1 modulates electrical activity by adjusting PI(4,5)P2 levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Gucan; Yu, Haijie; Kruse, Martin; Traynor-Kaplan, Alexis; Hille, Bertil

    2016-06-07

    Myo-inositol is an important cellular osmolyte in autoregulation of cell volume and fluid balance, particularly for mammalian brain and kidney cells. We find it also regulates excitability. Myo-inositol is the precursor of phosphoinositides, key signaling lipids including phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate [PI(4,5)P2]. However, whether myo-inositol accumulation during osmoregulation affects signaling and excitability has not been fully explored. We found that overexpression of the Na(+)/myo-inositol cotransporter (SMIT1) and myo-inositol supplementation enlarged intracellular PI(4,5)P2 pools, modulated several PI(4,5)P2-dependent ion channels including KCNQ2/3 channels, and attenuated the action potential firing of superior cervical ganglion neurons. Further experiments using the rapamycin-recruitable phosphatase Sac1 to hydrolyze PI(4)P and the P4M probe to visualize PI(4)P suggested that PI(4)P levels increased after myo-inositol supplementation with SMIT1 expression. Elevated relative levels of PIP and PIP2 were directly confirmed using mass spectrometry. Inositol trisphosphate production and release of calcium from intracellular stores also were augmented after myo-inositol supplementation. Finally, we found that treatment with a hypertonic solution mimicked the effect we observed with SMIT1 overexpression, whereas silencing tonicity-responsive enhancer binding protein prevented these effects. These results show that ion channel function and cellular excitability are under regulation by several "physiological" manipulations that alter the PI(4,5)P2 setpoint. We demonstrate a previously unrecognized linkage between extracellular osmotic changes and the electrical properties of excitable cells.

  20. Electric-Field Modulation of Interface Magnetic Anisotropy and Spin Reorientation Transition in (Co/Pt)3/PMN-PT Heterostructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ying; Ba, You; Chen, Aitian; He, Wei; Wang, Wenbo; Zheng, Xiaoli; Zou, Lvkuan; Zhang, Yijun; Yang, Qu; Yan, Lingjia; Feng, Ce; Zhang, Qinghua; Cai, Jianwang; Wu, Weida; Liu, Ming; Gu, Lin; Cheng, Zhaohua; Nan, Ce-Wen; Qiu, Ziqiang; Wu, Yizheng; Li, Jia; Zhao, Yonggang

    2017-03-16

    We report electric-field control of magnetism of (Co/Pt)3 multilayers involving perpendicular magnetic anisotropy with different Co-layer thicknesses grown on Pb(Mg,Nb)O3-PbTiO3 (PMN-PT) FE substrates. For the first time, electric-field control of the interface magnetic anisotropy, which results in the spin reorientation transition, was demonstrated. The electric-field-induced changes of the bulk and interface magnetic anisotropies can be understood by considering the strain-induced change of magnetoelastic energy and weakening of Pt 5d-Co 3d hybridization, respectively. We also demonstrate the role of competition between the applied magnetic field and the electric field in determining the magnetization of the sample with the coexistence phase. Our results demonstrate electric-field control of magnetism by harnessing the strain-mediated coupling in multiferroic heterostructures with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy and are helpful for electric-field modulations of Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction and Rashba effect at interfaces to engineer new functionalities.

  1. 5-HT1A receptors are involved in the modulation of respiratory rhythmical discharge activity in the medulla oblongata slice preparation of neonatal rats%5-HT1A受体对新生大鼠离体延髓脑片呼吸节律性放电的调制

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    秦峥; 吴中海; 王晓锋

    2007-01-01

    本研究探讨5-HT1A受体在延髓基本节律性呼吸放电发生和调节中的作用.以改良Kreb's液恒温灌流新生Sprague-Dawley大鼠离体延髓脑片标本,稳定记录与之相连的舌下神经根的呼吸节律性放电活动(respiratory rhythmical discharge activity,RRDA)后,第一组在灌流液中分别单独给予5-HT1A受体的特异性激动剂8-羟四氢萘[(+/-)-8-hydroxy-2-(di-N-propylamino)tetralin hydrobromide,8-OHDPAT]和特异性拮抗剂多次甲基多苯基多异氰酸酯[4-iodo-N-[2-[4-methoxyphenyl]-1-piperazinyl]ethyl]-N-2-pyridynyl-benzamide hydrochloride,PMPPI];第二组分别先后给予8-OHDPAT和8-OHDPAT+PMPPI,观察舌下神经根RRDA的变化,探讨5-HT1A受体对其调节作用.结果显示,给予8-OHDPAT后,呼吸周期(respiratory cycle,RC)和呼气时程(expiratory time,TE)显著延长,放电的积分幅度(integral amplitude,IA)持续降低,吸气时程(inspiratory time,TI)无明显变化;给予PMPPI后RC、TI和TE明显缩短,舌下神经根IA无明显变化,且8-OHDPAT的作用可部分被PMPPI逆转.结果提示,5-HT1A受体参与了哺乳动物基本呼吸节律的产生和调节.

  2. Encoding of the amplitude modulation of pulsatile electrical stimulation in the feline cochlear nucleus by neurons in the inferior colliculus; effects of stimulus pulse rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCreery, Douglas; Han, Martin; Pikov, Victor; Yadav, Kamal; Pannu, Satinderpall

    2013-10-01

    Objectives. Persons without a functional auditory nerve cannot benefit from cochlear implants, but some hearing can be restored by an auditory brainstem implant (ABI) with stimulating electrodes implanted on the surface of the cochlear nucleus (CN). Most users benefit from their ABI, but speech recognition tends to be poorer than for users of cochlear implants. Psychophysical studies suggest that poor modulation detection may contribute to the limited performance of ABI users. In a cat model, we determined how the pulse rate of the electrical stimulus applied within or on the CN affects temporal and rate encoding of amplitude modulation (AM) by neurons in the central nucleus of the inferior colliculus (ICC). Approach. Stimulating microelectrodes were implanted chronically in and on the cats' CN, and multi-site recording microelectrodes were implanted chronically into the ICC. Encoding of AM pulse trains by neurons in the ICC was characterized as vector strength (VS), the synchrony of neural activity with the AM, and as the mean rate of neuronal action potentials (neuronal spike rate (NSR)). Main results. For intranuclear microstimulation, encoding of AM as VS was up to 3 dB greater when stimulus pulse rate was increased from 250 to 500 pps, but only for neuronal units with low best acoustic frequencies, and when the electrical stimulation was modulated at low frequencies (10-20 Hz). For stimulation on the surface of the CN, VS was similar at 250 and 500 pps, and the dynamic range of the VS was reduced for pulse rates greater than 250 pps. Modulation depth was encoded strongly as VS when the maximum stimulus amplitude was held constant across a range of modulation depth. This ‘constant maximum’ protocol allows enhancement of modulation depth while preserving overall dynamic range. However, modulation depth was not encoded as strongly as NSR. Significance. The findings have implications for improved sound processors for present and future ABIs. The performance of

  3. Prostaglandin E2 induces spontaneous rhythmic activity in mouse urinary bladder independently of efferent nerves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayter, S; Young, JS; Brain, KL

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE The acute effects of PGE2 on bladder smooth muscle and nerves were examined to determine the origin of PGE2-induced spontaneous rhythmic contractions. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Contraction studies, confocal Ca2+ imaging and electrophysiological recordings in strips of mouse urinary bladder were used to differentiate the effects of PGE2 on bladder smooth muscle and efferent nerves. KEY RESULTS PGE2 (50 µM) increased the tone and caused phasic contractions of detrusor smooth muscle strips. Confocal Ca2+ imaging showed that PGE2 increased the frequency of whole-cell Ca2+ transients (WCTs) (72 ± 5%) and intracellular recordings showed it increased the frequency of spontaneous depolarizations, from 0.31·s−1 to 0.90·s−1. Non-selective inhibition of EP receptors using SC-51322 and AH-6809 (10 µM), or the L-type Ca2+ channel blocker nifedipine (1 µM), prevented these phasic contractions and WCTs, and reduced the tone (by 45 ± 7% and 59 ± 6%, respectively). Blocking P2X1 receptors with NF449 (10 µM) caused a small but significant reduction in the frequency of PGE2-induced phasic contractions (24 ± 9%) and WCTs (28 ± 17%) but had no significant effect on spontaneous depolarizations or tone. Inhibiting muscarinic receptors with cyclopentolate (1 µM) had no significant effect on these measures. Spontaneous WCTs became synchronous in PGE2, implying enhanced functional coupling between neighbouring cells. However, the electrical input resistance was unchanged. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS It was concluded that depolarization alone is sufficient to explain a functional increase in intercellular coupling and the ability of PGE2 to increase detrusor spontaneous rhythmic activity does not require parasympathetic nerves. PMID:21671904

  4. Sex differences in rhythmic preferences in the budgerigar (Melopsittacus undulatus: A comparative study with humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marisa Hoeschele

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available A variety of parrot species have recently gained attention as members of a small group of non-human animals that are capable of coordinating their movements in time with a rhythmic pulse. This capacity is highly developed in humans, who display unparalleled sensitivity to musical beats and appear to prefer rhythmically organized sounds in their music. Do parrots also exhibit a preference for rhythmic over arrhythmic sounds? Here we presented humans and budgerigars (Melopsittacus undulatus – a small parrot species that have been shown to be able to align movements with a beat – with rhythmic and arrhythmic sound patterns in an acoustic place preference paradigm. Both species were allowed to explore an environment for 5 minutes. We quantified how much time they spent in proximity to rhythmic vs. arrhythmic stimuli. The results show that humans spent more time with rhythmic stimuli, and also preferred rhythmic stimuli when directly asked in a post-test survey. Budgerigars did not show any such overall preferences. However, further examination of the budgerigar results showed an effect of sex, such that male budgerigars spent more time with arrthymic stimuli, and female budgerigars spent more time with rhythmic stimuli. Our results support the idea that rhythmic information is interesting to budgerigars. We suggest that future investigations into the temporal characteristics of naturalistic social behaviors in budgerigars, such as courtship vocalizations and head-bobbing displays, may help explain the sex difference we observed.

  5. Sex Differences in Rhythmic Preferences in the Budgerigar (Melopsittacus undulatus): A Comparative Study with Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoeschele, Marisa; Bowling, Daniel L.

    2016-01-01

    A variety of parrot species have recently gained attention as members of a small group of non-human animals that are capable of coordinating their movements in time with a rhythmic pulse. This capacity is highly developed in humans, who display unparalleled sensitivity to musical beats and appear to prefer rhythmically organized sounds in their music. Do parrots also exhibit a preference for rhythmic over arrhythmic sounds? Here, we presented humans and budgerigars (Melopsittacus undulatus) – a small parrot species that have been shown to be able to align movements with a beat – with rhythmic and arrhythmic sound patterns in an acoustic place preference paradigm. Both species were allowed to explore an environment for 5 min. We quantified how much time they spent in proximity to rhythmic vs. arrhythmic stimuli. The results show that humans spent more time with rhythmic stimuli, and also preferred rhythmic stimuli when directly asked in a post-test survey. Budgerigars did not show any such overall preferences. However, further examination of the budgerigar results showed an effect of sex, such that male budgerigars spent more time with arrthymic stimuli, and female budgerigars spent more time with rhythmic stimuli. Our results support the idea that rhythmic information is interesting to budgerigars. We suggest that future investigations into the temporal characteristics of naturalistic social behaviors in budgerigars, such as courtship vocalizations and head-bobbing displays, may help explain the sex difference we observed. PMID:27757099

  6. Linear and nonlinear stiffness and friction in biological rhythmic movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beek, P J; Schmidt, R C; Morris, A W; Sim, M Y; Turvey, M T

    1995-11-01

    Biological rhythmic movements can be viewed as instances of self-sustained oscillators. Auto-oscillatory phenomena must involve a nonlinear friction function, and usually involve a nonlinear elastic function. With respect to rhythmic movements, the question is: What kinds of nonlinear friction and elastic functions are involved? The nonlinear friction functions of the kind identified by Rayleigh (involving terms such as theta3) and van der Pol (involving terms such as theta2theta), and the nonlinear elastic functions identified by Duffing (involving terms such as theta3), constitute elementary nonlinear components for the assembling of self-sustained oscillators, Recently, additional elementary nonlinear friction and stiffness functions expressed, respectively, through terms such as theta2theta3 and thetatheta2, and a methodology for evaluating the contribution of the elementary components to any given cyclic activity have been identified. The methodology uses a quantification of the continuous deviation of oscillatory motion from ideal (harmonic) motion. Multiple regression of this quantity on the elementary linear and nonlinear terms reveals the individual contribution of each term to the oscillator's non-harmonic behavior. In the present article the methodology was applied to the data from three experiments in which human subjects produced pendular rhythmic movements under manipulations of rotational inertia (experiment 1), rotational inertia and frequency (experiment 2), and rotational inertia and amplitude (experiment 3). The analysis revealed that the pendular oscillators assembled in the three experiments were compositionally rich, braiding linear and nonlinear friction and elastic functions in a manner that depended on the nature of the task.

  7. Performance of electric forklift with low-temperature polymer exchange membrane fuel cell power module and metal hydride hydrogen storage extension tank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lototskyy, Mykhaylo V.; Tolj, Ivan; Parsons, Adrian; Smith, Fahmida; Sita, Cordellia; Linkov, Vladimir

    2016-06-01

    We present test results of a commercial 3-tonne electric forklift (STILL) equipped with a commercial fuel cell power module (Plug Power) and a MH hydrogen storage tank (HySA Systems and TF Design). The tests included: (i) performance evaluation of "hybrid" hydrogen storage system during refuelling at low (pressures; (ii) comparison of the forklift performances during heavy-duty operation when changing the powering in the series: standard battery - fuel cell power module (alone) - power module with integrated MH tank; and (iii) performance tests of the forklift during its operation under working conditions. It was found that (a) the forklift with power module and MH tank can achieve 83% of maximum hydrogen storage capacity during 6 min refuelling (for full capacity 12-15 min); (b) heavy-duty operation of the forklift is characterised by 25% increase in energy consumption, and during system operation more uniform power distribution occurs when operating in the fuel cell powering mode with MH, in comparison to the battery powering mode; (c) use of the fully refuelled fuel cell power module with the MH extension tank allows for uninterrupted operation for 3 h 6 min and 7 h 15 min, for heavy- and light-duty operation, respectively.

  8. D1-dopamine receptor is involved in the modulation of the respiratory rhythmical discharge activity in the medulla oblongata slice preparation of neonatal rats in vitro%多巴胺D1受体参与新生鼠离体延髓脑片呼吸节律性放电的调节

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    焦勇钢; 吴中海

    2008-01-01

    本研究旨在探讨多巴胺D1受体在延髓离体脑片基本节律性呼吸放电调节中的作用.以改良的Kreb'S液(modified Kreb,s perfusion,MKS)恒温灌流Sprague-Dawley大鼠(0~3 d)离体延髓脑片标本,稳定记录到与之相连的舌卜神经根的呼吸节律性放电活动(respiratory rhythmical discharge activity,RRDA)后,第一组(n=5)先给予多巴胺Dl受体特异性激动剂[cis-(±)-1-(Aminomethyl)-3,4-dihydro-3-phenyl-1H-2-Benzopyran-5,6-Diolhy.drochlo-fide,A689301灌流10 min,用MKS洗脱后,再给予多巴胺D1受体特异性拮抗剂[R(+)-7-Chloro-8-hydroxy-3-methyl-1-pheny1-2,3,4,5-tetrahydro-1H-3-benzazepine hydrochloride,SCH-23390]灌流10 min;第二组(n=5)先给予A68930持续灌流10 min后再给予A68930+SCH-23390持续灌流10 min;观察各时间点舌下神经根RRDA的变化.结果显示,给予A68930灌流后呼吸周期(respiratory cycle,RC)和呼气时程(expiratory time,TE)显著缩短,放屯积分幅度(integral amplitude,IA)增加,吸气时程(inspiratory time,TI)无明显变化;给予SCH-23390后RC、TE显著延长、TI显著缩短、IA减小,而且A68930的作用可以被SCH一23390部分逆转.这些观察结果提示多巴胺D1受体参与了哺乳动物基本呼吸频率和幅度的调节.

  9. 组胺H1和H2受体在新生大鼠离体延髓脑片呼吸节律性放电调节中的作用%Role of histamine H1 and H2 receptors in the modulation of respiratory rhythmical discharge in medulla oblongata slice preparation of neonatal rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    齐莹; 千智斌; 吴中海

    2008-01-01

    本研究探讨组胺H1和H2受体在新生大鼠基本节律性呼吸的发生和调节中的作用.以改良的Kreb's液恒温灌流新生Sprague-Dawley大鼠离体延髓脑片标本,稳定记录与之相连舌下神经根的呼吸节律性放电活动(respiratory-related rhythmical discharge activity, RRDA).实验分为5组:第1、2、3组分别单独给予组胺(histamine, HA)、 H1受体特异阻断剂pyrilamine和H2受体特异阻断剂cimetidine;第4组分别先后给予HA和HA+pyrilamine;第5组分别先后给予HA和HA+cimetidine,观察舌下神经根RRDA的变化.结果显示,单独给予HA后呼吸周期(respiratory cycle, RC)及呼气时程(expiratory time, TE)明显缩短,而吸气时程(inspiratory time, TI)及放电积分幅度(integral amplitude, IA)无明显变化;给予pyrilamine后RC、 TE明显延长,TI、 IA也无明显变化,且HA的作用可以被pyrilamine逆转;给予cimetidine后RC、 TE、 TI、 IA均无明显变化,且HA的作用不能被cimetidine逆转.结果提示,H1受体参与哺乳动物基本呼吸节律的产生和调节,H2受体对哺乳动物基本节律性呼吸的调控无明显影响.

  10. Rhythmic Parasites: A Virological Analysis of Sound and Dance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stamatia Portanova

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available This article analyses the contagious spread of rhythm across the physical,cultural and technical levels of the dancing body. The first analytical level maps the bio-physical diffusion of rhythm in the cellular population of the human body. The second level follows the diffusion of rhythm, sound and dance rituals across social and geographic limits. The third level shows how the development of new digital technologies of rhythmic engineering (such as digital sound systems allows the microscopic control of physical potential and social mobility (for example in dance clubs, but also the simultaneous emergence of autonomous, self-organised physical and social events (for example at rave parties.

  11. Timing - Rhythmicity - Movement: How We Get from "Hear" to There

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tressa Eubank, OD

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Listening to music and its rhythmic patterns may alter the planning and execution of general body movements, create physiological changes in the autonomic nervous system, and has been shown to affect cognitive processing. The goal of this paper is to provide the springboard for incorporating music into the vision therapy arena to enhance visual motor and visual processing skills. A literature review of internal and external body rhythms is presented to provide a basic introduction to the components of motor planning and execution. The interaction between audition and vision and an introduction of how music is used in the rehabilitation arena is also presented.

  12. Performance-based robotic assistance during rhythmic arm exercises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leconte, Patricia; Ronsse, Renaud

    2016-09-13

    Rhythmic and discrete upper-limb movements are two fundamental motor primitives controlled by different neural pathways, at least partially. After stroke, both primitives can be impaired. Both conventional and robot-assisted therapies mainly train discrete functional movements like reaching and grasping. However, if the movements form two distinct neural and functional primitives, both should be trained to recover the complete motor repertoire. Recent studies show that rhythmic movements tend to be less impaired than discrete ones, so combining both movement types in therapy could support the execution of movements with a higher degree of impairment by movements that are performed more stably. A new performance-based assistance method was developed to train rhythmic movements with a rehabilitation robot. The algorithm uses the assist-as-needed paradigm by independently assessing and assisting movement features of smoothness, velocity, and amplitude. The method relies on different building blocks: (i) an adaptive oscillator captures the main movement harmonic in state variables, (ii) custom metrics measure the movement performance regarding the three features, and (iii) adaptive forces assist the patient. The patient is encouraged to improve performance regarding these three features with assistance forces computed in parallel to each other. The method was tested with simulated jerky signals and a pilot experiment with two stroke patients, who were instructed to make circular movements with an end-effector robot with assistance during half of the trials. Simulation data reveal sensitivity of the metrics for assessing the features while limiting interference between them. The assistance's effectiveness with stroke patients is established since it (i) adapts to the patient's real-time performance, (ii) improves patient motor performance, and (iii) does not lead the patient to slack. The smoothness assistance was by far the most used by both patients, while it provided

  13. Effect of rhythmic attention on the segregation of interleaved melodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devergie, Aymeric; Grimault, Nicolas; Tillmann, Barbara; Berthommier, Frédéric

    2010-07-01

    As previously suggested, attention may increase segregation via enhancement and suppression sensory mechanisms. To test this hypothesis, we proposed an interleaved melody paradigm with two rhythm conditions applied to familiar target melodies and unfamiliar distractor melodies sharing pitch and timbre properties. When rhythms of both target and distractor were irregular, target melodies were identified above chance level. A sensory enhancement mechanism guided by listeners' knowledge may have helped to extract targets from the interleaved sequence. When the distractor was rhythmically regular, performance was increased, suggesting that the distractor may have been suppressed by a sensory suppression mechanism.

  14. Synchronization of neuron population subject to steady DC electric field induced by magnetic stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Kai; Wang, Jiang; Deng, Bin; Wei, Xile

    2013-06-01

    Electric fields, which are ubiquitous in the context of neurons, are induced either by external electromagnetic fields or by endogenous electric activities. Clinical evidences point out that magnetic stimulation can induce an electric field that modulates rhythmic activity of special brain tissue, which are associated with most brain functions, including normal and pathological physiological mechanisms. Recently, the studies about the relationship between clinical treatment for psychiatric disorders and magnetic stimulation have been investigated extensively. However, further development of these techniques is limited due to the lack of understanding of the underlying mechanisms supporting the interaction between the electric field induced by magnetic stimulus and brain tissue. In this paper, the effects of steady DC electric field induced by magnetic stimulation on the coherence of an interneuronal network are investigated. Different behaviors have been observed in the network with different topologies (i.e., random and small-world network, modular network). It is found that the coherence displays a peak or a plateau when the induced electric field varies between the parameter range we defined. The coherence of the neuronal systems depends extensively on the network structure and parameters. All these parameters play a key role in determining the range for the induced electric field to synchronize network activities. The presented results could have important implications for the scientific theoretical studies regarding the effects of magnetic stimulation on human brain.

  15. A One-Credit Hands-On Introductory Course in Electrical and Computer Engineering Using a Variety of Topic Modules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierre, J. W.; Tuffner, F. K.; Anderson, J. R.; Whitman, D. L.; Ula, A. H. M. S.; Kubichek, R. F.; Wright, C. H. G.; Barrett, S. F.; Cupal, J. J.; Hamann, J. C.

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes a one-credit laboratory course for freshmen majoring in electrical and computer engineering (ECE). The course is motivational in nature and exposes the students to a wide range of areas of electrical and computer engineering. The authors believe it is important to give freshmen a broad perspective of what ECE is all about, and…

  16. Stable Transition of Quadruped Rhythmic Motion Using the Tracking Differentiator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaoqi Li; Wei Wang; Jianqiang Yi

    2015-01-01

    Since the quadruped robot possesses predominant environmental adaptability, it is expected to be employed in nature environments. In some situations, such as ice surface and tight space, the quadruped robot is required to lower the height of center of gravity ( COG) to enhance the stability and maneuverability. To properly handle these situations, a quadruped controller based on the central pattern generator ( CPG) model, the discrete tracking differentiator ( TD) and proportional⁃derivative ( PD) sub⁃controllers is presented. The CPG is used to generate basic rhythmic motion for the quadruped robot. The discrete TD is not only creatively employed to implement the transition between two different rhythmic medium values of the CPG which results in the adjustment of the height of COG of the quadruped robot, but also modified to control the transition duration which enables the quadruped robot to achieve the stable transition. Additionally, two specific PD sub⁃controllers are constructed to adjust the oscillation amplitude of the CPG, so as to avoid the severe deviation in the transverse direction during transition locomotion. Finally, the controller is validated on a quadruped model. A tunnel with variable height is built for the quadruped model to travel through. The simulation demonstrates the severe deviation without the PD sub⁃controllers, and the reduced deviation with the PD sub⁃controllers.

  17. Rhythmic Changes in Synapse Numbers in Drosophila melanogaster Motor Terminals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Santiago; Ferreiro, Maria Jose; Menhert, Kerstin I.; Casanova, Gabriela; Olivera, Alvaro; Cantera, Rafael

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that the morphology of the neuromuscular junction of the flight motor neuron MN5 in Drosophila melanogaster undergoes daily rhythmical changes, with smaller synaptic boutons during the night, when the fly is resting, than during the day, when the fly is active. With electron microscopy and laser confocal microscopy, we searched for a rhythmic change in synapse numbers in this neuron, both under light:darkness (LD) cycles and constant darkness (DD). We expected the number of synapses to increase during the morning, when the fly has an intense phase of locomotion activity under LD and DD. Surprisingly, only our DD data were consistent with this hypothesis. In LD, we found more synapses at midnight than at midday. We propose that under LD conditions, there is a daily rhythm of formation of new synapses in the dark phase, when the fly is resting, and disassembly over the light phase, when the fly is active. Several parameters appeared to be light dependent, since they were affected differently under LD or DD. The great majority of boutons containing synapses had only one and very few had either two or more, with a 70∶25∶5 ratio (one, two and three or more synapses) in LD and 75∶20∶5 in DD. Given the maintenance of this proportion even when both bouton and synapse numbers changed with time, we suggest that there is a homeostatic mechanism regulating synapse distribution among MN5 boutons. PMID:23840613

  18. Theta-rhythmic drive between medial septum and hippocampus in slow-wave sleep and microarousal: a Granger causality analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, D.; Ding, M.; Topchiy, I.; Shifflett, L.

    2015-01-01

    Medial septum (MS) plays a critical role in controlling the electrical activity of the hippocampus (HIPP). In particular, theta-rhythmic burst firing of MS neurons is thought to drive lasting HIPP theta oscillations in rats during waking motor activity and REM sleep. Less is known about MS-HIPP interactions in nontheta states such as non-REM sleep, in which HIPP theta oscillations are absent but theta-rhythmic burst firing in subsets of MS neurons is preserved. The present study used Granger causality (GC) to examine the interaction patterns between MS and HIPP in slow-wave sleep (SWS, a nontheta state) and during its short interruptions called microarousals (a transient theta state). We found that during SWS, while GC revealed a unidirectional MS→HIPP influence over a wide frequency band (2–12 Hz, maximum: ∼8 Hz), there was no theta peak in the hippocampal power spectra, indicating a lack of theta activity in HIPP. In contrast, during microarousals, theta peaks were seen in both MS and HIPP power spectra and were accompanied by bidirectional GC with MS→HIPP and HIPP→MS theta drives being of equal magnitude. Thus GC in a nontheta state (SWS) vs. a theta state (microarousal) primarily differed in the level of HIPP→MS. The present findings suggest a modification of our understanding of the role of MS as the theta generator in two regards. First, a MS→HIPP theta drive does not necessarily induce theta field oscillations in the hippocampus, as found in SWS. Second, HIPP theta oscillations entail bidirectional theta-rhythmic interactions between MS and HIPP. PMID:26354315

  19. Powerful, Efficient Electric Vehicle Chargers: Low-Cost, Highly-Integrated Silicon Carbide (SiC) Multichip Power Modules (MCPMs) for Plug-In Hybrid Electric

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2010-09-14

    ADEPT Project: Currently, charging the battery of an electric vehicle (EV) is a time-consuming process because chargers can only draw about as much power from the grid as a hair dryer. APEI is developing an EV charger that can draw as much power as a clothes dryer, which would drastically speed up charging time. APEI's charger uses silicon carbide (SiC)-based power transistors. These transistors control the electrical energy flowing through the charger's circuits more effectively and efficiently than traditional transistors made of straight silicon. The SiC-based transistors also require less cooling, enabling APEI to create EV chargers that are 10 times smaller than existing chargers.

  20. Dietary Habits and Physical Self-Concept of Elite Rhythmic Gymnasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boros, Szilvia

    2009-01-01

    Study aim: To identify main differences in nutrient patterns, food preferences and physical self-concept between the world's elite rhythmic gymnasts and untrained controls. Material and methods: A group of elite rhythmic gymnasts (n = 103) aged 15-21 years volunteered to participate in the study during the 2003 World Championships in Rhythmic…

  1. Motor Performance and Rhythmic Perception of Children with Intellectual and Developmental Disability and Developmental Coordination Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kartasidou, Lefkothea; Varsamis, Panagiotis; Sampsonidou, Anna

    2012-01-01

    Professionals who work with children presenting intellectual and developmental disability (IDD) and developmental coordination disorder (DCD) are concerned with their motor development and their rhythmic perception. The aim of this study is to investigate the correlation between a motor performance test and a music rhythmic test that measures…

  2. Energy efficient and robust rhythmic limb movement by central pattern generators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verdaasdonk, B.W.; Koopman, H.F.J.M.; Helm, van der F.C.T.

    2006-01-01

    Humans show great energy efficiency and robustness in rhythmic tasks, such as walking and arm swinging. In this study a mathematical model of rhythmic limb movement is presented, which shows that tight local coupling of Central Pattern Generators (CPGs) to limbs could explain part of this behavior.

  3. Electric modulation of magnetization at the BaTiO3/La0.67Sr0.33MnO3 interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, H.; George, T. A.; Wang, Y.; Ketsman, I.; Burton, J. D.; Bark, C.-W.; Ryu, S.; Kim, D. J.; Wang, J.; Binek, C.; Dowben, P. A.; Sokolov, A.; Eom, C.-B.; Tsymbal, E. Y.; Gruverman, A.

    2012-06-01

    We report large (>10%) magnetization modulation by ferroelectric polarization reversal in the ferroelectric-ferromagnetic BaTiO3/La0.67Sr0.33MnO3 (BTO/LSMO) heterostructures. We find that the electrically induced change in magnetization is limited to the BTO/LSMO interface but extends about 3 nm deep into the LSMO layer—far beyond the expected screening length of metallic LSMO. It is suggested that this effect is due to a metal-insulator transition occurring at the BTO/LSMO interface as a result of electrostatic doping.

  4. Self-sustained firing activities of the cortical network with plastic rules in weak AC electrical fields

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qin Ying-Mei; Wang Jiang; Men Cong; Zhao Jia; Wei Xi-Le; Deng Bin

    2012-01-01

    Both external and endogenous electrical fields widely exist in the environment of cortical neurons.The effects of a weak alternating current (AC) field on a neural network model with synaptic plasticity are studied.It is found that self-sustained rhythmic firing patterns,which are closely correlated with the cognitive functions,are significantly modified due to the self-organizing of the network in the weak AC field.The activities of the neural networks are affected by the synaptic connection strength,the external stimuli,and so on.In the presence of learning rules,the synaptic connections can be modulated by the external stimuli,which will further enhance the sensitivity of the network to the external signal.The properties of the external AC stimuli can serve as control parameters in modulating the evolution of the neural network.

  5. Band Gap Modulation of Bilayer MoS2 Under Strain Engineering and Electric Field: A Density Functional Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Chuong V.; Hieu, Nguyen N.; Ilyasov, Victor V.

    2016-08-01

    In this work, we investigate band-gap tuning in bilayer MoS2 by an external electric field and by applied biaxial strain. Our calculations show that the band gaps of bilayer MoS2 can be tuned by the perpendicular electric field or biaxial strain. The band gaps of bilayer MoS2 decrease with increasing applied electric field or biaxial strain. When the electric field was introduced, electronic levels are split due to the separation of the valence sub-band and the conduction sub-band states. Our calculations also show that the change in the band gap of bilayer MoS2 is due to the separation of electronic levels by electric field via the Stark effect. At the electric field E_{Field} = 5.5 V/nm or biaxial strain ɛ = 15%, bilayer MoS2 becomes metallic. The semiconductor-metal phase transition in bilayer MoS2 plays an important role in its application for nanodevices.

  6. Implementation of Wi-Ap; An IEEE 802.11b/g Based Electrical Switch Module With Web Enabled Interface for Electrical Appliances Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Adetiba

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research study is to design and implement a Wi-Fi-based control panel for remote control of lights and electrical appliances with a web functionality that allows for wide area control via the intranet or Internet. This eliminates the inconvenience of moving from one switch to another for analog operation of light fixtures and appliance in home, office and campus environment. The wireless technology we adopted is IEEE 802.11 (2008 b/g, also called Wi-Fi (Wireless Fidelity which operates in free band and is easily accessible. Wi-Ap (Wi-Fi Automated Appliance control system contains a web portal which allows for management and control purposes via the intranet or Internet. We built a standalone Wi-Ap console that allows the wireless switching on and off of any appliance(s that is(are plugged into it. The prototype we built was tested within the Electrical and Information Engineering department, Covenant University, Nigeria intranet and the test achieved our aim of remote appliances control from a web portal vial the intranet.

  7. Electrically-controlled near-field radiative thermal modulator made of graphene-coated silicon carbide plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yue; Wang, Liping

    2017-08-01

    In this work, we propose a hybrid near-field radiative thermal modulator made of two graphene-covered silicon carbide (SiC) plates separated by a nanometer vacuum gap. The near-field photon tunneling between the emitter and receiver is modulated by changing graphene chemical potentials with symmetrically or asymmetrically applied voltage biases. The radiative heat flux calculated from fluctuational electrodynamics significantly varies with graphene chemical potentials due to tunable near-field coupling strength between graphene plasmons across the vacuum gap. Thermal modulation and switching, which are the key functionalities required for a thermal modulator, are theoretically realized and analyzed. Newly introduced quantities of the modulation factor, the sensitivity factor and switching factor are studied quite extensively in a large parameter range for both graphene chemical potential and vacuum gap distance. This opto-electronic device with faster operating mode, which is in principle only limited by electronics and not by the thermal inertia, will facilitate the practical application of active thermal management, thermal circuits, and thermal computing with photon-based near-field thermal transport.

  8. Electric field modulation of the band structure in MoS2/WS2 van der waals heterostructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei; Wang, Tianxing; Dai, Xianqi; Wang, Xiaolong; Zhai, Caiyun; Ma, Yaqiang; Chang, Shanshan; Tang, Yanan

    2017-01-01

    Using density functional theory calculations, we investigate the bandstructure of MoS2/WS2 van der waals heterostructure by applying external electric field perpendicular to the layers. It is demonstrated that the MoS2/WS2 is a type-II heterostructure, and therefore the electrons and holes are spatially separated. The band gap of MoS2/WS2 heterostructure continuously decreases with increasing external electric field, eventually a transition from semiconductor to metal is observed. Applying external electric field along +z direction and -z directions has different effects on the band gap due to the intrinsic spontaneous polarization in MoS2/WS2 heterostructure. The calculated result indicates that the band inversion in MoS2/WS2 heterostructure can be induced by changing the strength of the external electric field. The external electric field can significantly tune the band offsets almost linearly and modify the band alignment between MoS2 and WS2. The present study would open a new avenue for application of such transition-metal dichalcogenides heterostructures in future nano- and optoelectronics.

  9. Sustained Rhythmic Brain Activity Underlies Visual Motion Perception in Zebrafish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verónica Pérez-Schuster

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Following moving visual stimuli (conditioning stimuli, CS, many organisms perceive, in the absence of physical stimuli, illusory motion in the opposite direction. This phenomenon is known as the motion aftereffect (MAE. Here, we use MAE as a tool to study the neuronal basis of visual motion perception in zebrafish larvae. Using zebrafish eye movements as an indicator of visual motion perception, we find that larvae perceive MAE. Blocking eye movements using optogenetics during CS presentation did not affect MAE, but tectal ablation significantly weakened it. Using two-photon calcium imaging of behaving GCaMP3 larvae, we find post-stimulation sustained rhythmic activity among direction-selective tectal neurons associated with the perception of MAE. In addition, tectal neurons tuned to the CS direction habituated, but neurons in the retina did not. Finally, a model based on competition between direction-selective neurons reproduced MAE, suggesting a neuronal circuit capable of generating perception of visual motion.

  10. Rhythmic Degradation Explains and Unifies Circadian Transcriptome and Proteome Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Lück

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The rich mammalian cellular circadian output affects thousands of genes in many cell types and has been the subject of genome-wide transcriptome and proteome studies. The results have been enigmatic because transcript peak abundances do not always follow the peaks of gene-expression activity in time. We posited that circadian degradation of mRNAs and proteins plays a pivotal role in setting their peak times. To establish guiding principles, we derived a theoretical framework that fully describes the amplitudes and phases of biomolecules with circadian half-lives. We were able to explain the circadian transcriptome and proteome studies with the same unifying theory, including cases in which transcripts or proteins appeared before the onset of increased production rates. Furthermore, we estimate that 30% of the circadian transcripts in mouse liver and Drosophila heads are affected by rhythmic posttranscriptional regulation.

  11. Sexual arousal and rhythmic synchronization: A possible effect of vasopressin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miani, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Music is ubiquitous. Yet, its biological relevance is still an ongoing debate. Supporting the view that music had an ancestral role in courtship displays, a pilot study presented here provides preliminary evidence on the link between music and sexual selection. The underlying hypothesis is based...... on the fact that the sexually dimorphic neuropeptide vasopressin has its receptors in the part of the brain involved in music and dance performance (the basal ganglia), and its concentrations rise during sexual arousal in men. In addition, music, dance, and courtship phenotypes seem to be in part regulated...... by vasopressin and its genes. Hence, to test this hypothesis, a rhythmic synchronization task was employed here on one male subject during sexual arousal. Results revealed a significant effect of sexual arousal on rhythm synchronization. This is the first report that empirically supports the hypothesis...

  12. Rhythmic gymnastics, a interweaving between body and technical

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hosana Cláudia Matias da Costa Pereira

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The Rhythmic Gymnastics (RG appears to be a highly technical activity. This evidence, the indisputable principle, is due to the fact that it is a sport where the technique is the most visible foundation, when viewed superficially. Therefore this study aims to reflect on the links between body and technique in RG, in addition to expand the discussion about sports considered artistic in the universe of Physical Education. Therefore, we conducted a qualitative study of phenomenological approach that used description, interpretation/ understanding of a Russian video set in the Olympics games in London-2012. This team was selected to be the main reference of the sport in the last Olympic cycle. This broad understanding, we believe that the body in GR is not subjected to the technique simply, but to enter it reflexively, creates and recreates unusual movements that subvert the impositions of high performance sport.

  13. How the brainstem controls orofacial behaviors comprised of rhythmic actions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Jeffrey D.; Kleinfeld, David; Wang, Fan

    2014-01-01

    Mammals perform a multitude of well-coordinated orofacial behaviors such as breathing, sniffing, chewing, licking, swallowing, vocalizing, and in rodents, whisking. The coordination of these actions must occur without fault to prevent fatal blockages of the airway. Deciphering the neuronal circuitry that controls even a single action requires understanding the integration of sensory feedback and executive commands. A far greater challenge is to understand the coordination of multiple actions. Here we focus on brainstem circuits that drive rhythmic orofacial actions. We discuss three neural computational mechanisms that may enable circuits for different actions to operate without interfering with each other. We conclude with proposed experimental programs for delineating the neural control principles that have evolved to coordinate orofacial behaviors. PMID:24890196

  14. Rhythmic patterns as basic units in pronunciation teaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bertha Chela Flores

    1997-09-01

    Full Text Available En este trabajo se propone un modelo para la enseñanza de la pronunciación basado en unidades significativas o grupos tonales, y sugiere el uso de patrones rítmicos como realizaciones fonéticas básicas de éstos. Este modelo basa la instrucción en la longitud silábica, ya que: (a ésta presenta las mayores diferencias fonéticas entre el inglés y varias otras lenguas; (b parece ser la principal dificultad entre aprendientes de inglés y (c es el principal obstáculo para alcanzar una pronunciación adecuada. El modelo propuesto considera el patrón rítmico como unidad básica y propone la enseñanza del ritmo en todos los niveles, e integrada a las actividades orales de un curso comunicativo. (This paper proposes, in the light of relevant research, a model for the teaching of pronunciation based on meaningful units or tone groups and it suggests rhythmic patterns as the basic phonetic realisation of these tone groups. Syllable length is presented as the starting point in pronunciation instruction since (a it presents the most significant phonetic differences between English and various other languages; (b it appears to be the most widely encountered difficulty among foreign learners of English and (c it is a major obstacle in acquiring a near-native pronunciation. A basic model for the teaching of pronunciation is therefore proposed, which derives its primary unit from the rhythmic pattern and a technique is suggested for teaching rythm at all levels and integrated with the oral activities of a communicative course.

  15. Effect of Rhythmic Auditory Stimulation on Hemiplegic Gait Patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Yoon-Kyum; Chong, Hyun Ju

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of our study was to investigate the effect of gait training with rhythmic auditory stimulation (RAS) on both kinematic and temporospatial gait patterns in patients with hemiplegia. Materials and Methods Eighteen hemiplegic patients diagnosed with either cerebral palsy or stroke participated in this study. All participants underwent the 4-week gait training with RAS. The treatment was performed for 30 minutes per each session, three sessions per week. RAS was provided with rhythmic beats using a chord progression on a keyboard. Kinematic and temporospatial data were collected and analyzed using a three-dimensional motion analysis system. Results Gait training with RAS significantly improved both proximal and distal joint kinematic patterns in hip adduction, knee flexion, and ankle plantar flexion, enhancing the gait deviation index (GDI) as well as ameliorating temporal asymmetry of the stance and swing phases in patients with hemiplegia. Stroke patients with previous walking experience demonstrated significant kinematic improvement in knee flexion in mid-swing and ankle dorsiflexion in terminal stance. Among stroke patients, subacute patients showed a significantly increased GDI score compared with chronic patients. In addition, household ambulators showed a significant effect on reducing anterior tilt of the pelvis with an enhanced GDI score, while community ambulators significantly increased knee flexion in mid-swing phase and ankle dorsiflexion in terminal stance phase. Conclusion Gait training with RAS has beneficial effects on both kinematic and temporospatial patterns in patients with hemiplegia, providing not only clinical implications of locomotor rehabilitation with goal-oriented external feedback using RAS but also differential effects according to ambulatory function. PMID:26446657

  16. Megascale rhythmic shoreline forms on a beach with multiple bars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zbigniew Pruszak

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The study, carried out in 2003 and 2006 at the Lubiatowo Coastal ResearchStation (Poland, located on the non-tidal southern Baltic coast(tidal range < 0.06 m, focused on larger rhythmic forms (mega-cusps withwavelengths in the interval 500 m > Lc > 20 m. Statistical analyses of detailed shoreline configurations were performed mostly with the Discrete Wavelet Transformmethod (DWT. The beach is composed of fine sand with grain diameter D50 ≈ 0.22 mm, which produces 4 longshore sandbars and a gently sloping seabed with β = 0.015. The analysis confirms the key role of bars in hydro- and morphodynamic surf zone processes.The hypothesis was therefore set up that, in a surf zone with multiple bars, the bars and mega-scale shoreline rhythmic forms form one integrated physical system; experimental evidence to substantiate this hypothesis was also sought.In such a system not only do self-regulation processes include swash zone phenomena, they also incorporate processes in offshore surf zone locations.The longshore dimensions of large cusps are thus related to the distances between periodically active large bed forms (bars. The spatial dimension of bar system activity (number of active bars depends, at a given time scale, on the associated hydrodynamic conditions. It was assumed that such a time scale could include either the development and duration of a storm, or a period of stable, yet distinct waves, capable of remodelling the beach configuration.The indentation to wavelength ratio of mega-cusps for the studied non-tidal dissipative environment may be one order of magnitude greater than for mesotidal, reflective beaches.

  17. System for electric power generation with photovoltaic solar modules for charging the batteries of an electric wheelchair; Sistema de geracao de energia eletrica com modulos solares fotovoltaicos para o carregamento de baterias de uma cadeira de rodas eletrica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mesquita, Rafael Pimenta; Souza, Teofilo Miguel de [Universidade Estadual Paulista (UNESP), Guaratinguta, SP (Brazil). Fac. de Engenharia. Dept. de Engenharia Eletrica], Emails: pimentamesquita@gmail.com, teofilo@feg.unesp.br

    2006-07-01

    Renewable energy is all kind of energy produced from a natural source that not diminish because its utilization is 'renewable'. More and more renewable energy resources are used, because they offer multiple advantages such as the energy output facility in small scale and because they are entirely compatible with the environment. The renewable energy used in this project is the photovoltaic solar energy, obtained by the direct conversion of the solar energy in electric energy through the use of solar cells, that can be of several kinds, being the most common of silicon. The main advantage of photovoltaic system is the generation of clean electric energy, or either, generates energy without emitting pollutant and without destroying the environment, moreover is an inexhaustible source of energy. The main disadvantage is, nowadays, the high cost and its low efficiency, so to continue developing it is necessary establish capable mechanisms to make it possible. The search of these mechanisms of incentive becomes-itself a lot important, because the renewable energy and not conventional do not produce a financial return to the investor properly said, but brings lots of benefits to the community, the society and to the environment. This project has the purpose of create an electric energy generation system through solar photovoltaic modules to carry batteries of a motorized wheelchair. An electric wheelchair is moved by electric motors of direct current that are feed by batteries, permitting a medium autonomy of 10 km by load. The batteries are recharged by a battery supplier. This operation should be carried out daily in a space of 6 to 8 hours. According to the Demographic Census realized in 2000 carried out by the IBGE, Brazil has around 1.416.060 physical deficient, which 861.196 are men and 554.864 are women. From a request of a user of electric wheelchair the idea of this project was shown up. The user complained that he stayed a long time carrying his seat

  18. An electrically driven terahertz metamaterial diffractive modulator with more than 20 dB of dynamic range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karl, N.; Reichel, K.; Mendis, R.; Mittleman, D. M. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Rice University, MS 378, Houston, Texas 77251-1892 (United States); Chen, H.-T.; Taylor, A. J. [Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies, Los Alamos National Laboratory, P. O. Box 1663, MS K771, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Brener, I.; Benz, A.; Reno, J. L. [Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies, Sandia National Laboratories, P. O. Box 5800, MS 1082, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States)

    2014-03-03

    We design and experimentally demonstrate a switchable diffraction grating for terahertz modulation based on planar active metamaterials, where a Schottky gate structure is implemented to tune the metamaterial resonances in real-time via the application of an external voltage bias. The diffraction grating is formed by grouping the active split-ring resonators into an array of independent columns with alternate columns biased. We observe off-axis diffraction over a wide frequency band in contrast to the narrow-band resonances, which permits operation of the device as a relatively high-speed, wide-bandwidth, high-contrast modulator, with more than 20 dB of dynamic range.

  19. Serotonergic activation of 5HT1A and 5HT2 receptors modulates sexually dimorphic communication signals in the weakly electric fish Apteronotus leptorhynchus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, G Troy; Combs, Nicole

    2008-06-01

    Serotonin modulates agonistic and reproductive behavior across vertebrate species. 5HT(1A) and 5HT(1B) receptors mediate many serotonergic effects on social behavior, but other receptors, including 5HT(2) receptors, may also contribute. We investigated serotonergic regulation of electrocommunication signals in the weakly electric fish Apteronotus leptorhynchus. During social interactions, these fish modulate their electric organ discharges (EODs) to produce signals known as chirps. Males chirp more than females and produce two chirp types. Males produce high-frequency chirps as courtship signals; whereas both sexes produce low-frequency chirps during same-sex interactions. Serotonergic innervation of the prepacemaker nucleus, which controls chirping, is more robust in females than males. Serotonin inhibits chirping and may contribute to sexual dimorphism and individual variation in chirping. We elicited chirps with EOD playbacks and pharmacologically manipulated serotonin receptors to determine which receptors regulated chirping. We also asked whether serotonin receptor activation generally modulated chirping or more specifically targeted particular chirp types. Agonists and antagonists of 5HT(1B/1D) receptors (CP-94253 and GR-125743) did not affect chirping. The 5HT(1A) receptor agonist 8OH-DPAT specifically increased production of high-frequency chirps. The 5HT(2) receptor agonist DOI decreased chirping. Receptor antagonists (WAY-100635 and MDL-11939) opposed the effects of their corresponding agonists. These results suggest that serotonergic inhibition of chirping may be mediated by 5HT(2) receptors, but that serotonergic activation of 5HT(1A) receptors specifically increases the production of high-frequency chirps. The enhancement of chirping by 5HT(1A) receptors may result from interactions with cortisol and/or arginine vasotocin, which similarly enhance chirping and are influenced by 5HT(1A) activity in other systems.

  20. Analysis of the modulation mechanisms of the electric field and breakdown performance in AlGaN/GaN HEMT with a T-shaped field-plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Wei; Fan, Ju-Sheng; Du, Ming; Zhang, Jin-Feng; Zheng, Xue-Feng; Wang, Chong; Ma, Xiao-Hua; Zhang, Jin-Cheng; Hao, Yue

    2016-12-01

    A novel AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) with a source-connected T-shaped field-plate (ST-FP HEMT) is proposed for the first time in this paper. The source-connected T-shaped field-plate (ST-FP) is composed of a source-connected field-plate (S-FP) and a trench metal. The physical intrinsic mechanisms of the ST-FP to improve the breakdown voltage and the FP efficiency and to modulate the distributions of channel electric field and potential are studied in detail by means of two-dimensional numerical simulations with Silvaco-ATLAS. A comparison to the HEMT and the HEMT with an S-FP (S-FP HEMT) shows that the ST-FP HEMT could achieve a broader and more uniform channel electric field distribution with the help of a trench metal, which could increase the breakdown voltage and the FP efficiency remarkably. In addition, the relationship between the structure of the ST-FP, the channel electric field, the breakdown voltage as well as the FP efficiency in ST-FP HEMT is analyzed. These results could open up a new effective method to fabricate high voltage power devices for the power electronic applications. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61574112, 61334002, 61306017, 61474091, and 61574110) and the Natural Science Basic Research Plan in Shaanxi Province, China (Grant No. 605119425012).

  1. Potential energy surface and binding energy in the presence of an external electric field: modulation of anion-π interactions for graphene-based receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foroutan-Nejad, Cina; Marek, Radek

    2014-02-14

    Measuring the binding energy or scanning the potential energy surface (PES) of the charged molecular systems in the presence of an external electric field (EEF) requires a careful evaluation of the origin-dependency of the energy of the system and references. Scanning the PES for charged or purely ionic systems for obtaining the intrinsic energy barriers needs careful analysis of the electric work applied on ions by the EEF. The binding energy in the presence of an EEF is different from that in the absence of an electric field as the binding energy is an anisotropic characteristic which depends on the orientation of molecules with respect to the EEF. In this contribution we discuss various aspects of the PES and the concept of binding energy in the presence of an EEF. In addition, we demonstrate that the anion-π bonding properties can be modulated by applying a uniform EEF, which has a more pronounced effect on the larger, more polarizable π-systems. An analogous behavior is presumed for cation-π systems. We predict that understanding the phenomenon introduced in the present account has enormous potential, for example, for separating charged species on the surface of polarizable two-dimensional materials such as graphene or the surface of carbon nanotubes, in desalination of water.

  2. Quasi-two-dimensional superconductivity in FeSe0.3Te0.7 thin films and electric-field modulation of superconducting transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Zhu; Mei, Chenguang; Wei, Linlin; Sun, Zhangao; Wu, Shilong; Huang, Haoliang; Zhang, Shu; Liu, Chang; Feng, Yang; Tian, Huanfang; Yang, Huaixin; Li, Jianqi; Wang, Yayu; Zhang, Guangming; Lu, Yalin; Zhao, Yonggang

    2015-09-18

    We report the structural and superconducting properties of FeSe0.3Te0.7 (FST) thin films with different thicknesses grown on ferroelectric Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)0.7Ti0.3O3 substrates. It was shown that the FST films undergo biaxial tensile strains which are fully relaxed for films with thicknesses above 200 nm. Electrical transport measurements reveal that the ultrathin films exhibit an insulating behavior and superconductivity appears for thicker films with Tc saturated above 200 nm. The current-voltage curves around the superconducting transition follow the Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless (BKT) transition behavior and the resistance-temperature curves can be described by the Halperin-Nelson relation, revealing quasi-two-dimensional phase fluctuation in FST thin films. The Ginzburg number decreases with increasing film thickness indicating the decrease of the strength of thermal fluctuations. Upon applying electric field to the heterostructure, Tc of FST thin film increases due to the reduction of the tensile strain in FST. This work sheds light on the superconductivity, strain effect as well as electric-field modulation of superconductivity in FST films.

  3. Irregular and frequent cortisol secretory episodes with preserved diurnal rhythmicity in primary adrenal Cushing's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Aken, M O; Pereira, A M; van Thiel, S W; van den Berg, G; Frölich, M; Veldhuis, J D; Romijn, J A; Roelfsema, F

    2005-03-01

    To evaluate the pathophysiology of altered cortisol secretion in patients with primary adrenal hypercortisolism, cortisol secretion was investigated in 12 patients, seven with a unilateral adenoma and five with ACTH-independent macronodular adrenal hyperplasia compared with age- and gender-matched controls and with patients with pituitary-dependent hypercortisolism. Pulsatile secretion was increased 2-fold (P = 0.04), attributable to increased event frequency (P = 0.002). All patients showed a significant diurnal rhythm with a delay in phase shift of 3 h (P = 0.01). Approximate entropy ratio, a feedback-sensitive measure, was increased compared with controls (P = 0.00003) but similar to that of pituitary-dependent hypercortisolism (P = 0.77), denoting loss of autoregulation. Cortisol burst-mass tended to be smaller in patients with ACTH-independent macronodular adrenal hyperplasia than in unilateral adenoma (P = 0.06). In conclusion, increased cortisol secretion in patients with primary adrenal Cushing's syndrome is caused by amplified pulsatile secretion via event frequency modulation. We speculate that partial preservation of secretory regularity and diurnal rhythmicity point to incomplete autonomy of these tumors.

  4. Brain bases of working memory for time intervals in rhythmic sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sundeep eTeki

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Perception of auditory time intervals is critical for accurate comprehension of natural sounds like speech and music. However, the neural substrates and mechanisms underlying the representation of time intervals in working memory are poorly understood. In this study, we investigate the brain bases of working memory for time intervals in rhythmic sequences using functional magnetic resonance imaging.We used a novel behavioral paradigm to investigate time-interval representation in working memory as a function of the temporal jitter and memory load of the sequences containing those time intervals. Human participants were presented with a sequence of intervals and required to reproduce the duration of a particular probed interval. We found that perceptual timing areas including the cerebellum and the striatum were more or less active as a function of increasing and decreasing jitter of the intervals held in working memory respectively whilst the activity of the inferior parietal cortex is modulated as a function of memory load. Additionally, we also analyzed structural correlations between grey and white matter density and behavior and found significant correlations in the cerebellum and the striatum, mirroring the functional results.Our data demonstrate neural substrates of working memory for time intervals and suggest that the cerebellum and the striatum represent core areas for representing temporal information in working memory.

  5. A functional link between rhythmic changes in chromatin structure and the Arabidopsis biological clock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perales, Mariano; Más, Paloma

    2007-07-01

    Circadian clocks rhythmically coordinate biological processes in resonance with the environmental cycle. The clock function relies on negative feedback loops that generate 24-h rhythms in multiple outputs. In Arabidopsis thaliana, the clock component TIMING OF CAB EXPRESSION1 (TOC1) integrates the environmental information to coordinate circadian responses. Here, we use chromatin immunoprecipitation as well as physiological and luminescence assays to demonstrate that proper photoperiodic phase of TOC1 expression is important for clock synchronization of plant development with the environment. Our studies show that TOC1 circadian induction is accompanied by clock-controlled cycles of histone acetylation that favor transcriptionally permissive chromatin structures at the TOC1 locus. At dawn, TOC1 repression relies on the in vivo circadian binding of the clock component CIRCADIAN CLOCK ASSOCIATED1 (CCA1), while histone deacetylase activities facilitate the switch to repressive chromatin structures and contribute to the declining phase of TOC1 waveform around dusk. The use of cca1 late elongated hypocotyl double mutant and CCA1-overexpressing plants suggests a highly repressing function of CCA1, antagonizing H3 acetylation to regulate TOC1 mRNA abundance. The chromatin remodeling activities relevant at the TOC1 locus are distinctively modulated by photoperiod, suggesting a mechanism by which the clock sets the phase of physiological and developmental outputs.

  6. Modulation of cerebral blood flow with transcutaneous electrical neurostimulation (TENS) in patients with cerebral vasospasm after subarachnoid hemorrhage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ter Laan, Mark; van Dijk, J.M.C.; Stewart, Roy; Staal, Michiel J; Elting, Jan-Willem J

    2014-01-01

    ObjectivesTranscutaneous electrical neurostimulation (TENS) and spinal cord stimulation have been shown to increase peripheral and cerebral blood flow. We postulate that certain pathological conditions attenuate cerebral autoregulation, which may result in a relative increase of the importance of ne

  7. Are non-human primates capable of rhythmic entrainment? Evidence for the gradual audiomotor evolution hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merchant, Hugo; Honing, Henkjan

    2013-01-01

    We propose a decomposition of the neurocognitive mechanisms that might underlie interval-based timing and rhythmic entrainment. Next to reviewing the concepts central to the definition of rhythmic entrainment, we discuss recent studies that suggest rhythmic entrainment to be specific to humans and a selected group of bird species, but, surprisingly, is not obvious in non-human primates. On the basis of these studies we propose the gradual audiomotor evolution hypothesis that suggests that humans fully share interval-based timing with other primates, but only partially share the ability of rhythmic entrainment (or beat-based timing). This hypothesis accommodates the fact that non-human primates (i.e., macaques) performance is comparable to humans in single interval tasks (such as interval reproduction, categorization, and interception), but show differences in multiple interval tasks (such as rhythmic entrainment, synchronization, and continuation). Furthermore, it is in line with the observation that macaques can, apparently, synchronize in the visual domain, but show less sensitivity in the auditory domain. And finally, while macaques are sensitive to interval-based timing and rhythmic grouping, the absence of a strong coupling between the auditory and motor system of non-human primates might be the reason why macaques cannot rhythmically entrain in the way humans do.

  8. Different corticospinal control between discrete and rhythmic movement of the ankle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yumeno eGoto

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available We investigated differences in corticospinal and spinal control between discrete and rhythmic ankle movements. Motor evoked potentials (MEPs in the tibialis anterior and soleus muscles and soleus H-reflex were elicited in the middle of the plantar flexion phase during discrete ankle movement or in the initial or later cycles of rhythmic ankle movement. The H-reflex was evoked at an intensity eliciting a small M-wave and MEPs were elicited at an intensity of 1.2 times the motor threshold of the soleus MEPs. Only trials in which background EMG level, ankle angle, and ankle velocity were similar among the movement conditions were included for data analysis. In addition, only trials with a similar M-wave were included for data analysis in the experiment evoking H-reflexes. Results showed that H reflex and MEP amplitudes in the soleus muscle during discrete movement were not significantly different from those during rhythmic movement. MEP amplitude in the tibialis anterior muscle during the later cycles of rhythmic movement was significantly larger than that during the initial cycle of the rhythmic movement or during discrete movement. Higher corticospinal excitability in the tibialis anterior muscle during the later cycles of rhythmic movement may reflect changes in corticospinal control from the initial cycle to the later cycles of rhythmic movement.

  9. DISRUPTION OF CIRCADIAN RHYTHMICITY AND SUPRACHIASMATIC ACTION POTENTIAL FREQUENCY IN A MOUSE MODEL WITH CONSTITUTIVE ACTIVATION OF GLYCOGEN SYNTHASE KINASE-3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Jodi R.; Johnson, Russell L.; Jope, Richard S.; Gamble, Karen L.

    2012-01-01

    Glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3) is a serine/threonine kinase that has been implicated in psychiatric diseases, neurodevelopment, and circadian regulation. Both GSK3 isoforms, α and β, exhibit a 24-hour variation of inhibitory phosphorylation within the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), the primary circadian pacemaker. We examined the hypothesis that rhythmic GSK3 activity is critical for robust circadian rhythmicity using GSK3α21A/21A/β9A/9A knock-in mice with serine-alanine substitutions at the inhibitory phosphorylation sites, making both forms constitutively active. We monitored wheel-running locomotor activity of GSK3 knock-in mice and used loose-patch electrophysiology to examine the effect of chronic GSK3 activity on circadian behavior and SCN neuronal activity. Double transgenic GSK3α/β knock-in mice exhibit disrupted behavioral rhythmicity, including significantly decreased rhythmic amplitude, lengthened active period, and increased activity bouts per day. This behavioral disruption was dependent on chronic activation of both GSK3 isoforms and was not seen in single transgenic GSK3α or GSK3β knock-in mice. Underlying the behavioral changes, SCN neurons from double transgenic GSK3α/β knock-in mice exhibited significantly higher spike rates during the subjective night compared to those from WT controls, with no differences detected during the subjective day. These results suggest that constitutive activation of GSK3 results in loss of the typical day/night variation of SCN neuronal activity. Together, these results implicate GSK3 activity as a critical regulator of circadian behavior and neurophysiological rhythms. Because GSK3 has been implicated in numerous pathologies, understanding how GSK3 modulates circadian rhythms and neurophysiological activity may lead to novel therapeutics for pathological disorders and circadian rhythm dysfunction. PMID:22986169

  10. Disruption of circadian rhythmicity and suprachiasmatic action potential frequency in a mouse model with constitutive activation of glycogen synthase kinase 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, J R; Johnson, R L; Jope, R S; Gamble, K L

    2012-12-13

    Glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3) is a serine/threonine kinase that has been implicated in psychiatric diseases, neurodevelopment, and circadian regulation. Both GSK3 isoforms, α and β, exhibit a 24-h variation of inhibitory phosphorylation within the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), the primary circadian pacemaker. We examined the hypothesis that rhythmic GSK3 activity is critical for robust circadian rhythmicity using GSK3α(21A/21A)/β(9A/9A) knock-in mice with serine-alanine substitutions at the inhibitory phosphorylation sites, making both forms constitutively active. We monitored wheel-running locomotor activity of GSK3 knock-in mice and used loose-patch electrophysiology to examine the effect of chronic GSK3 activity on circadian behavior and SCN neuronal activity. Double transgenic GSK3α/β knock-in mice exhibit disrupted behavioral rhythmicity, including significantly decreased rhythmic amplitude, lengthened active period, and increased activity bouts per day. This behavioral disruption was dependent on chronic activation of both GSK3 isoforms and was not seen in single transgenic GSK3α or GSK3β knock-in mice. Underlying the behavioral changes, SCN neurons from double transgenic GSK3α/β knock-in mice exhibited significantly higher spike rates during the subjective night compared to those from wild-type controls, with no differences detected during the subjective day. These results suggest that constitutive activation of GSK3 results in the loss of the typical day/night variation of SCN neuronal activity. Together, these results implicate GSK3 activity as a critical regulator of circadian behavior and neurophysiological rhythms. Because GSK3 has been implicated in numerous pathologies, understanding how GSK3 modulates circadian rhythms and neurophysiological activity may lead to novel therapeutics for pathological disorders and circadian rhythm dysfunction. Copyright © 2012 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. P2Y receptor mediated inhibitory modulation of noradrenaline release in response to electrical field stimulation and ischemic conditions in superfused rat hippocampus slices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csölle, Cecília; Heinrich, Attila; Kittel, Agnes; Sperlágh, Beáta

    2008-07-01

    In this study, the inhibitory regulation of the release of noradrenaline (NA) by P2 receptors was investigated in hippocampus slices pre-incubated with [(3)H]NA. Electrical field stimulation (EFS; 2 Hz, 240 shocks, and 1 ms) released NA in an outside [Ca(2+)]-dependent manner, and agonists of P2Y receptors inhibited the EFS-evoked [(3)H]NA release with pharmacological profile similar to that of the P2Y(1) and P2Y(13) receptor subtypes. This inhibitory modulation was counteracted by bicuculline and 6-cyano-2,3-dihydroxy-7-nitro-quinoxaline + 2-amino-5-phosphonovalerate and 2-amino-4-phosphonobutyrate. In contrast, the excess release in response to 30 min combined oxygen and glucose deprivation was outside [Ca(2+)] independent, but still sensitive to the inhibition of both facilitatory P2X(1) and inhibitory P2Y(1) receptors. Whereas mRNA encoding P2Y(12) and P2Y(13) receptor subunits were expressed in the brainstem, P2Y(1) receptor immunoreactivity was localized to neuronal somata and dendrites innervated by the mossy fiber terminals in the CA3 region of the hippocampus, as well as somata of granule cells and interneurons in the dentate gyrus. In summary, in addition to the known facilitatory modulation via P2X receptors, EFS-evoked [(3)H]NA outflow in the hippocampus is subject to inhibitory modulation by P2Y(1)/P2Y(13) receptors. Furthermore, endogenous activation of both facilitatory and inhibitory P2 receptors may participate in the modulation of pathological NA release under ischemic-like conditions.

  12. A frequency and pulse-width co-modulation strategy for transcutaneous neuromuscular electrical stimulation based on sEMG time-domain features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yu-Xuan; Wang, Hai-Peng; Bao, Xue-Liang; Lü, Xiao-Ying; Wang, Zhi-Gong

    2016-02-01

    Objective. Surface electromyography (sEMG) is often used as a control signal in neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) systems to enhance the voluntary control and proprioceptive sensory feedback of paralyzed patients. Most sEMG-controlled NMES systems use the envelope of the sEMG signal to modulate the stimulation intensity (current amplitude or pulse width) with a constant frequency. The aims of this study were to develop a strategy that co-modulates frequency and pulse width based on features of the sEMG signal and to investigate the torque-reproduction performance and the level of fatigue resistance achieved with our strategy. Approach. We examined the relationships between wrist torque and two stimulation parameters (frequency and pulse width) and between wrist torque and two sEMG time-domain features (mean absolute value (MAV) and number of slope sign changes (NSS)) in eight healthy volunteers. By using wrist torque as an intermediate variable, customized and generalized transfer functions were constructed to convert the two features of the sEMG signal into the two stimulation parameters, thereby establishing a MAV/NSS dual-coding (MNDC) algorithm. Wrist torque reproduction performance was assessed by comparing the torque generated by the algorithms with that originally recorded during voluntary contractions. Muscle fatigue was assessed by measuring the decline percentage of the peak torque and by comparing the torque time integral of the response to test stimulation trains before and after fatigue sessions. Main Results. The MNDC approach could produce a wrist torque that closely matched the voluntary wrist torque. In addition, a smaller decay in the wrist torque was observed after the MNDC-coded fatigue stimulation was applied than after stimulation using pulse-width modulation alone. Significance. Compared with pulse-width modulation stimulation strategies that are based on sEMG detection, the MNDC strategy is more effective for both voluntary muscle

  13. Method for reworkable packaging of high speed, low electrical parasitic power electronics modules through gate drive integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passmore, Brandon; Cole, Zach; Whitaker, Bret; Barkley, Adam; McNutt, Ty; Lostetter, Alexander

    2016-08-02

    A multichip power module directly connecting the busboard to a printed-circuit board that is attached to the power substrate enabling extremely low loop inductance for extreme environments such as high temperature operation. Wire bond interconnections are taught from the power die directly to the busboard further enabling enable low parasitic interconnections. Integration of on-board high frequency bus capacitors provide extremely low loop inductance. An extreme environment gate driver board allows close physical proximity of gate driver and power stage to reduce overall volume and reduce impedance in the control circuit. Parallel spring-loaded pin gate driver PCB connections allows a reliable and reworkable power module to gate driver interconnections.

  14. Electric field modulation of magnetic anisotropy and microwave absorption properties in Fe50Ni50/Teflon composite films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenjun Xia

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Fe50Ni50 nanoparticle films with the size about 6 nm were deposited by a high energetic cluster deposition source. An electric field of about 0 - 40 kV was applied on the sample platform when the films were prepared. The field assisted deposition technique can dramatically induce in-plane magnetic anisotropy. To probe the microwave absorption properties, the Fe50Ni50 nanoparticles were deliberately deposited on the dielectric Teflon sheet. Then the laminated Fe50Ni50/Teflon composites were used to do reflection loss scan. The results prove that the application of electric field is an effective avenue to improve the GHz microwave absorption performance of our magnetic nanoparticles films expressed by the movement of reflection loss peak to high GHz region for the composites.

  15. Electric field modulation of magnetic anisotropy and microwave absorption properties in Fe50Ni50/Teflon composite films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Zhenjun; He, Jun; Ou, Xiulong; Wang, Yu; He, Shuli; Zhao, Dongliang; Yu, Guanghua

    2016-05-01

    Fe50Ni50 nanoparticle films with the size about 6 nm were deposited by a high energetic cluster deposition source. An electric field of about 0 - 40 kV was applied on the sample platform when the films were prepared. The field assisted deposition technique can dramatically induce in-plane magnetic anisotropy. To probe the microwave absorption properties, the Fe50Ni50 nanoparticles were deliberately deposited on the dielectric Teflon sheet. Then the laminated Fe50Ni50/Teflon composites were used to do reflection loss scan. The results prove that the application of electric field is an effective avenue to improve the GHz microwave absorption performance of our magnetic nanoparticles films expressed by the movement of reflection loss peak to high GHz region for the composites.

  16. Bias induced modulation of electrical and thermal conductivity and heat capacity of BN and BN/graphene bilayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chegel, Raad

    2017-04-01

    By using the tight binding approximation and Green function method, the electronic structure, density of state, electrical conductivity, heat capacity of BN and BN/graphene bilayers are investigated. The AA-, AB1- and AB2- BN/graphene bilayers have small gap unlike to BN bilayers which are wide band gap semiconductors. Unlike to BN bilayer, the energy gap of graphene/BN bilayers increases with external field. The magnitude of the change in the band gap of BN bilayers is much higher than the graphene/BN bilayers. Near absolute zero, the σ(T) is zero for BN bilayers and it increases with temperature until reaches maximum value then decreases. The BN/graphene bilayers have larger electrical conductivity larger than BN bilayers. For both bilayers, the specific heat capacity has a Schottky anomaly.

  17. Electric Field Modulation of Semiconductor Quantum Dot Photoluminescence: Insights Into the Design of Robust Voltage-Sensitive Cellular Imaging Probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowland, Clare E; Susumu, Kimihiro; Stewart, Michael H; Oh, Eunkeu; Mäkinen, Antti J; O'Shaughnessy, Thomas J; Kushto, Gary; Wolak, Mason A; Erickson, Jeffrey S; Efros, Alexander L; Huston, Alan L; Delehanty, James B

    2015-10-14

    The intrinsic properties of quantum dots (QDs) and the growing ability to interface them controllably with living cells has far-reaching potential applications in probing cellular processes such as membrane action potential. We demonstrate that an electric field typical of those found in neuronal membranes results in suppression of the QD photoluminescence (PL) and, for the first time, that QD PL is able to track the action potential profile of a firing neuron with millisecond time resolution. This effect is shown to be connected with electric-field-driven QD ionization and consequent QD PL quenching, in contradiction with conventional wisdom that suppression of the QD PL is attributable to the quantum confined Stark effect.

  18. Bias induced modulation of electrical and thermal conductivity and heat capacity of BN and BN/graphene bilayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chegel, Raad, E-mail: Raad.chegel@gmail.com

    2017-04-15

    By using the tight binding approximation and Green function method, the electronic structure, density of state, electrical conductivity, heat capacity of BN and BN/graphene bilayers are investigated. The AA-, AB{sub 1}- and AB{sub 2}- BN/graphene bilayers have small gap unlike to BN bilayers which are wide band gap semiconductors. Unlike to BN bilayer, the energy gap of graphene/BN bilayers increases with external field. The magnitude of the change in the band gap of BN bilayers is much higher than the graphene/BN bilayers. Near absolute zero, the σ(T) is zero for BN bilayers and it increases with temperature until reaches maximum value then decreases. The BN/graphene bilayers have larger electrical conductivity larger than BN bilayers. For both bilayers, the specific heat capacity has a Schottky anomaly.

  19. Research of dependence of charges of electric power from frequency of rotation of working organs module for a grade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Юрий Иванович Токолов

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available By experimental researches of the ragged process of growing shallow of grain of wheat in the production of wheat flour on the roller crushing module pilot plant with infinitely variable rotor speed of the motor installed power losses dependence and consumption of motor speed of working bodies, the gap between them and the number of contact points of grain-growing material with fluted shallow rollers.

  20. Characterization of electrically evoked field potentials in the medial prefrontal cortex and orbitofrontal cortex of the rat: modulation by monoamines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Joanne; Jackson, Rosanna K; Shotton, Tanya L; Munjal, Ishaana; McQuade, Richard; Gartside, Sarah E

    2014-02-01

    Medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) play critical roles in cognition and behavioural control. Glutamatergic, GABAergic, and monoaminergic dysfunction in the prefrontal cortex has been hypothesised to underlie symptoms in neuropsychiatric disorders. Here we characterised electrically-evoked field potentials in the mPFC and OFC. Electrical stimulation evoked field potentials in layer V/VI of the mPFC and layer V of the OFC. The earliest component (approximately 2 ms latency) was insensitive to glutamate receptor blockade and was presumed to be presynaptic. Later components were blocked by 6,7-dinitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (DNQX (20 µM)) and were assumed to reflect monosynaptic (latency 4-6 ms) and polysynaptic activity (latency 6-40 ms) mediated by glutamate via AMPA/kainate receptor. In the mPFC, but not the OFC, the monosynaptic component was also partly blocked by 2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid (AP-5 (50-100µM)) indicating the involvement of NMDA receptors. Bicuculline (3-10 µM) enhanced the monosynaptic component suggesting electrically-evoked and/or glutamate induced GABA release inhibits the monosynaptic component via GABAA receptor activation. There were complex effects of bicuculline on polysynaptic components. In the mPFC both the mono- and polysynaptic components were attenuated by 5-HT (10-100 µM) and NA (30 and 60 µM) and the monosynaptic component was attenuated by DA (100 µM). In the OFC the mono- and polysynaptic components were also attenuated by 5-HT (100 µM), NA (10-100 µM) but DA (10-100 µM) had no effect. We propose that these pharmacologically characterised electrically-evoked field potentials in the mPFC and OFC are useful models for the study of prefrontal cortical physiology and pathophysiology.

  1. Annealing temperature modulated interfacial chemistry and electrical characteristics of sputtering-derived HfO{sub 2}/Si gate stack

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, J. [School of Physics and Materials Science, Radiation Detection Materials & Devices Lab, Anhui University, Hefei 230601 (China); School of Sciences, Anhui University of Science and Technology, Huainan 232001 (China); He, G., E-mail: ganghe01@issp.ac.cn [School of Physics and Materials Science, Radiation Detection Materials & Devices Lab, Anhui University, Hefei 230601 (China); Zhang, J.W.; Deng, B.; Liu, Y.M. [School of Physics and Materials Science, Radiation Detection Materials & Devices Lab, Anhui University, Hefei 230601 (China)

    2015-10-25

    Sputtering-derived HfO{sub 2} high-k gate dielectric thin films have been deposited on Si substrate by means of high vacuum physics vapor deposition method. Via characterization from x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and electrical measurements, the effect of post-deposition annealing temperature on the interfacial and electrical properties of HfO{sub 2}/Si gate stack has been investigated. XPS analyses show that an interfacial layer between HfO{sub 2} and silicon substrate has been found in the post-deposition annealing process. Increase in Hf-silicate layer and reduction in SiO{sub 2} low-k interface layer have been detected. Electrical measurements of MOS capacitor based on Al/HfO{sub 2}/Si gate stacks indicate that annealing HfO{sub 2} sample at 300 °C demonstrated the improved electrical performance. As a result, the leakage current of 3.60 × 10{sup −5} A/cm{sup 2} at applied substrate voltage of 2 V, which is much lower than those samples annealed at other temperature, has been obtained. The leakage current mechanism for different annealing temperature has been discussed systematically. - Highlights: • Sputtering-derived HfO{sub 2}/Si gate stack has been deposited on Si substrate. • Annealing lead to the increase in Hf silicate layer and reduction in SiO{sub 2} interface layer. • For substrate injection, Schottky emission dominates the conduction mechanism at the low fields. • For gate injection, Poole–Frenkle emission dominates the conduction mechanism at the high field.

  2. Response Analysis on Electrical Pulses under Severe Nuclear Accident Temperature Conditions Using an Abnormal Signal Simulation Analysis Module

    OpenAIRE

    Kil-Mo Koo; Jin-Ho Song; Sang-Baik Kim; Kwang-Il Ahn; Won-Pil Baek; Kil-Nam Oh; Gyu-Tae Kim

    2012-01-01

    Unlike design basis accidents, some inherent uncertainties of the reliability of instrumentations are expected while subjected to harsh environments (e.g., high temperature and pressure, high humidity, and high radioactivity) occurring in severe nuclear accident conditions. Even under such conditions, an electrical signal should be within its expected range so that some mitigating actions can be taken based on the signal in the control room. For example, an industrial process control standard...

  3. Modulating Endogenous Electric Currents in Human Corneal Wounds—A Novel Approach of Bioelectric Stimulation Without Electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Brian; Graue-Hernandez, Enrique O.; Mannis, Mark J.; Zhao, Min

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To measure electric current in human corneal wounds and test the feasibility of pharmacologically enhancing the current to promote corneal wound healing. Methods Using a noninvasive vibrating probe, corneal electric current was measured before and after wounding of the epithelium of donated postmortem human corneas. The effects of drug aminophylline and chloride-free solution on wound current were also tested. Results Unwounded cornea had small outward currents (0.07 μA/cm2). Wounding increased the current more than 5 fold (0.41 μA/cm2). Monitoring the wound current over time showed that it seemed to be actively regulated and maintained above normal unwounded levels for at least 6 hours. The time course was similar to that previously measured in rat cornea. Drug treatment or chloride-free solution more than doubled the size of wound currents. Conclusions Electric current at human corneal wounds can be significantly increased with aminophylline or chloride-free solution. Because corneal wound current directly correlates with wound healing rate, our results suggest a role for chloride-free and/or aminophylline eyedrops to enhance healing of damaged cornea in patients with reduced wound healing such as the elderly or diabetic patient. This novel approach offers bioelectric stimulation without electrodes and can be readily tested in patients. PMID:21099404

  4. Coherence of EMG activity and single motor unit discharge patterns in human rhythmical force production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sosnoff, Jacob J; Vaillancourt, David E; Larsson, Lars; Newell, Karl M

    2005-03-30

    The purpose of this study was to examine the modulation of the motor neuronal pool as a function of task dynamics. Specifically, we investigated the effects of task frequency on the single motor unit discharge pattern, electromyogram (EMG) activity and effector force output. Myoelectric activity and effector force were recorded while young adults isometrically abducted their first dorsal interosseus at five sinusoidal targets (0.5 Hz, 1 Hz, 2 Hz, 3 Hz and 4 Hz) and at two force levels (5% and 25% maximum voluntary contraction (MVC)). Individual motor unit spike trains were isolated from the EMG. Auto-spectral and coherence analyses were performed on the force output, EMG and motor unit spike trains. The frequency of maximal coherence between the EMG and force output closely corresponded to the target frequency in all conditions. There was a broadband distribution of power with multiple peaks in the EMG and motor unit spectrums in the 0.5 Hz and 1 Hz targets. However, the EMG and motor unit spectrums in the 2 Hz, 3 Hz and 4 Hz targets were characterized by an increasingly narrower band of activity with one dominant peak that closely corresponded to the target. There is high coherence between EMG output and target force frequency, but the relative contribution of the fast and slow neuromuscular bands are differentially influenced by the task frequency. The rhythmical organization of neuromuscular output in the 0.5 Hz task is relatively broadband and similar to that shown previously for constant level force output. The frequency structure of neuromuscular organization becomes increasingly more narrowband as the frequency of the target increases (2-4 Hz). The modulation of the motor neuronal pool is adaptive and depends on the relative contribution of feedback and feedforward control processes, which are driven by the task demands.

  5. NMDA and PACAP receptor signaling interact to mediate retinal-induced scn cellular rhythmicity in the absence of light.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian C Webb

    Full Text Available The "core" region of the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN, a central clock responsible for coordinating circadian rhythms, shows a daily rhythm in phosphorylation of extracellular regulated kinase (pERK. This cellular rhythm persists under constant darkness and, despite the absence of light, is dependent upon inputs from the eye. The neural signals driving this rhythmicity remain unknown and here the roles of glutamate and PACAP are examined. First, rhythmic phosphorylation of the NR1 NMDA receptor subunit (pNR1, a marker for receptor activation was shown to coincide with SCN core pERK, with a peak at circadian time (CT 16. Enucleation and intraocular TTX administration attenuated the peak in the pERK and pNR1 rhythms, demonstrating that activation of the NMDA receptor and ERK in the SCN core at CT16 are dependent on retinal inputs. In contrast, ERK and NR1 phosphorylation in the SCN shell region were unaffected by these treatments. Intraventricular administration of the NMDA receptor antagonist MK-801 also attenuated the peak in SCN core pERK, indicating that ERK phosphorylation in this region requires NMDA receptor activation. As PACAP is implicated in photic entrainment and is known to modulate glutamate signaling, the effects of a PAC1 receptor antagonist (PACAP 6-38 on SCN core pERK and pNR1 also were examined. PACAP 6-38 administration attenuated SCN core pERK and pNR1, suggesting that PACAP induces pERK directly, and indirectly via a modulation of NMDA receptor signaling. Together, these data indicate that, in the absence of light, retinal-mediated NMDA and PAC1 receptor activation interact to induce cellular rhythms in the SCN core. These results highlight a novel function for glutamate and PACAP release in the hamster SCN apart from their well-known roles in the induction of photic circadian clock resetting.

  6. Electric-field modulation of photoinduced effect in phase-separated Pr0.65 (Ca0.75Sr0.25)0.35MnO3/PMN-PT heterostructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, W.; Dong, X. L.; Wang, S. H.; Jin, K. X.

    2016-08-01

    In this letter, we report the photoinduced effect modulated by different electric fields in the Pr0.65 (Ca0.75Sr0.25)0.35MnO3/0.7PbMg1/3Nb2/3O3-0.3PbTiO3 heterostructure. The film exhibits a decrease in the resistance up to five orders of magnitude by enhancing applied electric fields, combined with an electric-field-induced insulator-to-metal transition. More interestingly, a reversible bistability arises in the photoinduced change in resistance at T < 80 K as the voltages are increased. The results can be attributed to the phase separation in manganites, which provides a prototype of photoelectric conversion for electric-field modulation of all-oxide heterostructures.

  7. Walking phase modulates H-reflex amplitude in flexor carpi radialis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domingo, Antoinette; Klimstra, Marc; Nakajima, Tsuyoshi; Lam, Tania; Hundza, Sandra R

    2014-01-01

    It is well established that remote whole-limb rhythmic movement (e.g., cycling or stepping) induces suppression of the Hoffman (H-) reflex evoked in stationary limbs. However, the dependence of reflex amplitude on the phase of the movement cycle (i.e., phase-dependence) has not been consistent across this previous research. The authors investigated the phase-dependence of flexor carpi radialis (FCR) H-reflex amplitudes during active walking and in kinematically matched static postures across the gait cycle. FCR H-reflexes were elicited in the stationary forearm with electrical stimulation to the median nerve. Significant phase-dependent modulation occurred during walking when the gait cycle was examined with adequate phase resolution. The suppression was greatest during midstance and midswing, suggesting increased ascending communication during these phases. There was no phase-dependent modulation in static standing postures and no correlation between lower limb background electromyography levels and H-reflex amplitude during active walking. This evidence, along with previous research demonstrating no phase modulation during passive walking, suggests that afferent feedback associated with joint position and leg muscle activation levels are not the sole source of the phase modulation seen during active walking. Possible sources of phase modulation include combinations of afferent feedback related to active movement or central motor commands or both.

  8. The Performance of Bach: Study of Rhythmic Timing by Skilled Musicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Christopher M.

    1999-01-01

    Analyzes 15 performances of "Bach's Suite Number 3 for Violoncello solo, Bourree Number 1" and determines what patterns of rhythmic variation (rubato) were used by soloists. Indicates that the soloists demonstrated four identifiable and similar trends in the performances. (CMK)

  9. Corticomuscular coherence is tuned to the spontaneous rhythmicity of speech at 2-3 Hz.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruspantini, Irene; Saarinen, Timo; Belardinelli, Paolo; Jalava, Antti; Parviainen, Tiina; Kujala, Jan; Salmelin, Riitta

    2012-03-14

    Human speech features rhythmicity that frames distinctive, fine-grained speech patterns. Speech can thus be counted among rhythmic motor behaviors that generally manifest characteristic spontaneous rates. However, the critical neural evidence for tuning of articulatory control to a spontaneous rate of speech has not been uncovered. The present study examined the spontaneous rhythmicity in speech production and its relationship to cortex-muscle neurocommunication, which is essential for speech control. Our MEG results show that, during articulation, coherent oscillatory coupling between the mouth sensorimotor cortex and the mouth muscles is strongest at the frequency of spontaneous rhythmicity of speech at 2-3 Hz, which is also the typical rate of word production. Corticomuscular coherence, a measure of efficient cortex-muscle neurocommunication, thus reveals behaviorally relevant oscillatory tuning for spoken language.

  10. Anatomy of Respiratory Rhythmic Systems in Brain Stem and Cerebellum of the Carp

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jüch, P.J.W.; Luiten, P.G.M.

    1981-01-01

    The afferent and efferent connections of two respiratory rhythmic loci in the dorsal mesencephalic tegmentum were studied by retrograde and anterograde transport of horseradish peroxidase. The injection areas were determined with extracellular activity recording using HRP filled glass micropipettes,

  11. Genome-wide profiling of 24 hr diel rhythmicity in the water flea, Daphnia pulex: network analysis reveals rhythmic gene expression and enhances functional gene annotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rund, Samuel S C; Yoo, Boyoung; Alam, Camille; Green, Taryn; Stephens, Melissa T; Zeng, Erliang; George, Gary F; Sheppard, Aaron D; Duffield, Giles E; Milenković, Tijana; Pfrender, Michael E

    2016-08-18

    Marine and freshwater zooplankton exhibit daily rhythmic patterns of behavior and physiology which may be regulated directly by the light:dark (LD) cycle and/or a molecular circadian clock. One of the best-studied zooplankton taxa, the freshwater crustacean Daphnia, has a 24 h diel vertical migration (DVM) behavior whereby the organism travels up and down through the water column daily. DVM plays a critical role in resource tracking and the behavioral avoidance of predators and damaging ultraviolet radiation. However, there is little information at the transcriptional level linking the expression patterns of genes to the rhythmic physiology/behavior of Daphnia. Here we analyzed genome-wide temporal transcriptional patterns from Daphnia pulex collected over a 44 h time period under a 12:12 LD cycle (diel) conditions using a cosine-fitting algorithm. We used a comprehensive network modeling and analysis approach to identify novel co-regulated rhythmic genes that have similar network topological properties and functional annotations as rhythmic genes identified by the cosine-fitting analyses. Furthermore, we used the network approach to predict with high accuracy novel gene-function associations, thus enhancing current functional annotations available for genes in this ecologically relevant model species. Our results reveal that genes in many functional groupings exhibit 24 h rhythms in their expression patterns under diel conditions. We highlight the rhythmic expression of immunity, oxidative detoxification, and sensory process genes. We discuss differences in the chronobiology of D. pulex from other well-characterized terrestrial arthropods. This research adds to a growing body of literature suggesting the genetic mechanisms governing rhythmicity in crustaceans may be divergent from other arthropod lineages including insects. Lastly, these results highlight the power of using a network analysis approach to identify differential gene expression and provide novel

  12. THERMOELECTRIC POWER MODULES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MODULES (ELECTRONICS), GENERATORS, THERMOELECTRICITY, PERFORMANCE(ENGINEERING), TABLES(DATA), HEAT, ALUMINUM, WEIGHT, SEMICONDUCTORS, SILICON, GERMANIUM, MEASUREMENT, VOLTAGE, ELECTRICAL RESISTANCE, POWER, TEMPERATURE, TIME.

  13. Electrical Design and Performance of Single- and Double-Sided Silicon Modules for the ATLAS Phase II Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Gregor, IM; The ATLAS collaboration

    2012-01-01

    For the planned replacement of the ATLAS tracker during the Phase II Upgrade, the design and construction of a Silicon Strip Detector is currently being planned. In this note, the design plans for the readout structures (hybrids), Silicon-strip modules, readout and powering bus tapes and end-of-substructure cards for the ATLAS Silicon strip system are described. Specific tooling and adhesive requirements are detailed. This document is one of five supporting documents for the silicon strip chapter of the ATLAS Phase II Letter of Intent.

  14. Delta rhythmicity is a reliable EEG biomarker in Angelman syndrome: a parallel mouse and human analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Sidorov, Michael S.; Deck, Gina M.; Dolatshahi, Marjan; Thibert, Ronald L.; Bird, Lynne M.; Chu, Catherine J.; Philpot, Benjamin D.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Clinicians have qualitatively described rhythmic delta activity as a prominent EEG abnormality in individuals with Angelman syndrome, but this phenotype has yet to be rigorously quantified in the clinical population or validated in a preclinical model. Here, we sought to quantitatively measure delta rhythmicity and evaluate its fidelity as a biomarker. Methods: We quantified delta oscillations in mouse and human using parallel spectral analysis methods and measured regional, state...

  15. Enhanced musical rhythmic perception in Turkish early and late learners of German

    OpenAIRE

    Roncaglia-Denissen, M. Paula; Schmidt-Kassow, Maren; Heine, Angela; Vuust, Peter; Kotz, Sonja A.

    2013-01-01

    As language rhythm relies partly on general acoustic properties, such as intensity and duration, mastering two languages with distinct rhythmic properties (i.e., stress position) may enhance musical rhythm perception. We investigated whether competence in a second language (L2) with different rhythmic properties than a L1 affects musical rhythm aptitude. Turkish early (TELG) and late learners (TLLG) of German were compared to German late L2 learners of English (GLE) regarding their musical rh...

  16. Phentolamine-induced rhythmic contractions in bladder detrusor muscle of guinea-pig.

    OpenAIRE

    Satake, N; Shibata, S.; Ueda, S.

    1984-01-01

    Phentolamine caused a rhythmic contraction concentration-dependently without affecting resting tone in the detrusor muscle. Prazosin, yohimbine, propranolol, noradrenaline, clonidine or isoprenaline failed to cause the rhythmic contraction. These agents did not modify the response to phentolamine suggesting no involvement of alpha- or beta-adrenoceptors in the response to phentolamine. Chlorpheniramine, cimetidine, methysergide, SK&F 83566, atropine, bretylium, hemicholinium or tetrodotoxin f...

  17. In-situ Electric Field-Induced Modulation of Photoluminescence in Pr-doped Ba0.85Ca0.15Ti0.90Zr0.10O3 Lead-Free Ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Hai Ling; Wu, Xiao; Chung, Tat Hang; Kwok, K. W.

    2016-01-01

    Luminescent materials with dynamic photoluminescence activity have aroused special interest because of their potential widespread applications. One proposed approach of directly and reversibly modulating the photoluminescence emissions is by means of introducing an external electric field in an in-situ and real-time way, which has only been focused on thin films. In this work, we demonstrate that real-time electric field-induced photoluminescence modulation can be realized in a bulk Ba0.85Ca0.15Ti0.90Zr0.10O3 ferroelectric ceramic doped with 0.2 mol% Pr3+, owing to its remarkable polarization reversal and phase evolution near the morphotropic phase boundary. Along with in-situ X-ray diffraction analysis, our results reveal that an applied electric field induces not only typical polarization switching and minor crystal deformation, but also tetragonal-to-rhombohedral phase transformation of the ceramic. The electric field-induced phase transformation is irreversible and engenders dominant effect on photoluminescence emissions as a result of an increase in structural symmetry. After it is completed in a few cycles of electric field, the photoluminescence emissions become governed mainly by the polarization switching, and thus vary reversibly with the modulating electric field. Our results open a promising avenue towards the realization of bulk ceramic-based tunable photoluminescence activity with high repeatability, flexible controllability, and environmental-friendly chemical process. PMID:27339815

  18. Familiarity with music increases walking speed in rhythmic auditory cuing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leow, Li-Ann; Rinchon, Cricia; Grahn, Jessica

    2015-03-01

    Rhythmic auditory stimulation (RAS) is a gait rehabilitation method in which patients synchronize footsteps to a metronome or musical beats. Although RAS with music can ameliorate gait abnormalities, outcomes vary, possibly because music properties, such as groove or familiarity, differ across interventions. To optimize future interventions, we assessed how initially familiar and unfamiliar low-groove and high-groove music affected synchronization accuracy and gait in healthy individuals. We also experimentally increased music familiarity using repeated exposure to initially unfamiliar songs. Overall, familiar music elicited faster stride velocity and less variable strides, as well as better synchronization performance (matching of step tempo to beat tempo). High-groove music, as reported previously, led to faster stride velocity than low-groove music. We propose two mechanisms for familiarity's effects. First, familiarity with the beat structure reduces cognitive demands of synchronizing, leading to better synchronization performance and faster, less variable gait. Second, familiarity might have elicited faster gait by increasing enjoyment of the music, as enjoyment was higher after repeated exposure to initially low-enjoyment songs. Future studies are necessary to dissociate the contribution of these mechanisms to the observed RAS effects of familiar music on gait.

  19. Growth and body composition in Brazilian female rhythmic gymnastics athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camargo, Cristiane Teixeira Amaral; Gomez-Campos, Rossana Anelice; Cossio-Bolaños, Marco Antonio; Barbeta, Vinicius Justino De Oliveira; Arruda, Miguel; Guerra-Junior, Gil

    2014-01-01

    The aim was to analyse the physical growth and body composition of rhythmic gymnastics athletes relative to their level of somatic maturation. This was a cross-sectional study of 136 athletes on 23 teams from Brazil. Mass, standing height and sitting height were measured. Fat-free and fat masses, body fat percentages and ages of the predicted peak height velocity (PHV) were calculated. The z scores for mass were negative during all ages according to both WHO and Brazilian references, and that for standing height were also negative for all ages according to WHO reference but only until 12 years old according to Brazilian reference. The mean age of the predicted PHV was 12.1 years. The mean mass, standing and sitting heights, body fat percentage, fat-free mass and fat mass increased significantly until 4 to 5 years after the age of the PHV. Menarche was reached in only 26% of these athletes and mean age was 13.2 years. The mass was below the national reference standards, and the standing height was below only for the international reference, but they also had late recovery of mass and standing height during puberty. In conclusion, these athletes had a potential to gain mass and standing height several years after PHV, indicating late maturation.

  20. Effect of temporal separation on synchronization in rhythmic performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chafe, Chris; Cáceres, Juan-Pablo; Gurevich, Michael

    2010-01-01

    A variety of short time delays inserted between pairs of subjects were found to affect their ability to synchronize a musical task. The subjects performed a clapping rhythm together from separate sound-isolated rooms via headphones and without visual contact. One-way time delays between pairs were manipulated electronically in the range of 3 to 78 ms. We are interested in quantifying the envelope of time delay within which two individuals produce synchronous performances. The results indicate that there are distinct regimes of mutually coupled behavior, and that 'natural time delay'--delay within the narrow range associated with travel times across spatial arrangements of groups and ensembles--supports the most stable performance. Conditions outside of this envelope, with time delays both below and above it, create characteristic interaction dynamics in the mutually coupled actions of the duo. Trials at extremely short delays (corresponding to unnaturally close proximity) had a tendency to accelerate from anticipation. Synchronization lagged at longer delays (larger than usual physical distances) and produced an increasingly severe deceleration and then deterioration of performed rhythms. The study has implications for music collaboration over the Internet and suggests that stable rhythmic performance can be achieved by 'wired ensembles' across distances of thousands of kilometers.

  1. Influence of Tempo and Rhythmic Unit in Musical Emotion Regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alicia Fernández-Sotos

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This article is based on the assumption of musical power to change the listener’s mood. The paper studies the outcome of two experiments on the regulation of emotional states in a series of participants who listen to different auditions. The present research focuses on note value, an important musical cue related to rhythm. The influence of two concepts linked to note value is analyzed separately and discussed together. The two musical cues under investigation are tempo and rhythmic unit. The participants are asked to label music fragments by using opposite meaningful words belonging to four semantic scales, namely Tension (ranging from Relaxing to Stressing, Expressiveness (Expressionless to Expressive, Amusement (Boring to Amusing and Attractiveness (Pleasant to Unpleasant. The participants also have to indicate how much they feel certain basic emotions while listening to each music excerpt. The rated emotions are Happiness, Surprise, and Sadness. This study makes it possible to draw some interesting conclusions about the associations between note value and emotions.

  2. Influence of Tempo and Rhythmic Unit in Musical Emotion Regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Sotos, Alicia; Fernández-Caballero, Antonio; Latorre, José M.

    2016-01-01

    This article is based on the assumption of musical power to change the listener's mood. The paper studies the outcome of two experiments on the regulation of emotional states in a series of participants who listen to different auditions. The present research focuses on note value, an important musical cue related to rhythm. The influence of two concepts linked to note value is analyzed separately and discussed together. The two musical cues under investigation are tempo and rhythmic unit. The participants are asked to label music fragments by using opposite meaningful words belonging to four semantic scales, namely “Tension” (ranging from Relaxing to Stressing), “Expressiveness” (Expressionless to Expressive), “Amusement” (Boring to Amusing) and “Attractiveness” (Pleasant to Unpleasant). The participants also have to indicate how much they feel certain basic emotions while listening to each music excerpt. The rated emotions are “Happiness,” “Surprise,” and “Sadness.” This study makes it possible to draw some interesting conclusions about the associations between note value and emotions. PMID:27536232

  3. Physical growth and nutritional status of elite rhythmic gymnasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gómez-Campos, R.1 ; Camargo, C.2 ; Arruda, M.1 ; Cossio-Bolanos, M. A.1

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To compare the physical growth of weightand height of elite rhythmic gymnasts with referenceto the World Health Organization and determine thenutritional status through muscle and fat areas of arm,proposed by Frisancho.Material and Methods: We studied 136 elite rhythmicgymnasts from Brazil. The athletes were selected in anon-probabilistic (intentional. The anthropometric variables evaluated were weight, height, height-cephalictrunk, arm circumference and triceps skinfold relaxedright arm. Weight and height were compared with thereference of the World Health Organization and nutritional status was assessed by muscle and fat area proposed by Frisancho.Results: The gymnasts are low in body weight (p 0.05. Regarding nutritional status, we observed that 13.5% are at risk of malnutrition andmalnutrition 12.5% depending on the subject protein.In the case of caloric reserves, 11.5% are at risk ofmalnutrition and malnutrition 12.5%, respectively. Ingeneral, similar values gymnasts muscle area and lowvalues of fat area in relation to the reference whencompared to the p-50.Conclusion: The results suggest that young people ofthis sport have low caloric values of reserves due tohigh intensity training to which they are exposed.

  4. Comparative study of operation of condensing and traditional boilers equipped with the ORC module for electricity generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikielewicz Dariusz

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Condensing technology applied to boilers is to make full use of thermal energy contained in the fuel. That means that additionaly the heat from condensation of exhaust gases can be used for the purposes of heating the domestic hot water and to cover the demand for central heating. The study analyzed the operation of the “traditional” boiler equipped with the ORC module as the similar arrangement but with the condensing boiler. In the case of a conventional boiler there is noted a greater fuel consumption and the greater power generated than in the case of the unit with the condensing boiler. Postulated is the indicator in the form of a ratio of turbine power to the mass flow rate of fuel, which in turn gives a higher value for the condensing boiler, thus demonstrating that the operation of condensing boiler ORC module will be more economical. Perspective domestic micro CHP with ORC should be installed in boilers with recovery of heat from condensation from the exhaust gases.

  5. Simultaneous backward data transmission and power harvesting in an ultrasonic transcutaneous energy transfer link employing acoustically dependent electric impedance modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozeri, Shaul; Shmilovitz, Doron

    2014-09-01

    The advancement and miniaturization of body implanted medical devices pose several challenges to Ultrasonic Transcutaneous Energy Transfer (UTET), such as the need to reduce the size of the piezoelectric resonator, and the need to maximize the UTET link power-transfer efficiency. Accordingly, the same piezoelectric resonator that is used for energy harvesting at the body implant, may also be used for ultrasonic backward data transfer, for instance, through impedance modulation. This paper presents physical considerations and design guidelines of the body implanted transducer of a UTET link with impedance modulation for a backward data transfer. The acoustic matching design procedure was based on the 2×2 transfer matrix chain analysis, in addition to the Krimholtz Leedom and Matthaei KLM transmission line model. The UTET power transfer was carried out at a frequency of 765 kHz, continuous wave (CW) mode. The backward data transfer was attained by inserting a 9% load resistance variation around its matched value (550 Ohm), resulting in a 12% increase in the acoustic reflection coefficient. A backward data transmission rate of 1200 bits/s was experimentally demonstrated using amplitude shift keying, simultaneously with an acoustic power transfer of 20 mW to the implant.

  6. Frequency-dependent reduction of voltage-gated sodium current modulates retinal ganglion cell response rate to electrical stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, David; Morley, John W.; Suaning, Gregg J.; Lovell, Nigel H.

    2011-10-01

    The ability to elicit visual percepts through electrical stimulation of the retina has prompted numerous investigations examining the feasibility of restoring sight to the blind with retinal implants. The therapeutic efficacy of these devices will be strongly influenced by their ability to elicit neural responses that approximate those of normal vision. Retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) can fire spikes at frequencies greater than 200 Hz when driven by light. However, several studies using isolated retinas have found a decline in RGC spiking response rate when these cells were stimulated at greater than 50 Hz. It is possible that the mechanism responsible for this decline also contributes to the frequency-dependent 'fading' of electrically evoked percepts recently reported in human patients. Using whole-cell patch clamp recordings of rabbit RGCs, we investigated the causes for the spiking response depression during direct subretinal stimulation of these cells at 50-200 Hz. The response depression was not caused by inhibition arising from the retinal network but, instead, by a stimulus-frequency-dependent decline of RGC voltage-gated sodium current. Under identical experimental conditions, however, RGCs were able to spike at high frequency when driven by light stimuli and intracellular depolarization. Based on these observations, we demonstrated a technique to prevent the spiking response depression.

  7. Modulation of electrical properties in Cu/n-type InP Schottky junctions using oxygen plasma treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hogyoung; Cho, Yunae; Jung, Chan Yeong; Kim, Se Hyun; Kim, Dong-Wook

    2015-12-01

    Using current-voltage (I-V) measurements, we investigated the effect of oxygen plasma treatment on the temperature-dependent electrical properties of Cu/n-type indium phosphide (InP) Schottky contacts at temperatures in the range 100-300 K. Changes in the electrical parameters were evident below 180 K for the low-plasma-power sample (100 W), which is indicative of the presence of a wider distribution of regions of low barrier height. Modified Richardson plots were used to obtain Richardson constants, which were similar to the theoretical value of 9.4 A cm-2 K-2 for n-type InP. This suggests that, for all the samples, a thermionic emission model including a spatially inhomogeneous Schottky barrier can be used to describe the charge transport phenomena at the metal/semiconductor interface. The voltage dependence of the reverse-bias current revealed that Schottky emission was dominant for the untreated and high-plasma-power (250 W) samples. For the low-plasma-power sample, Poole-Frenkel emission was dominant at low voltages, whereas Schottky emission dominated at higher voltages. Defect states and nonuniformity of the interfacial layer appear to be significant in the reverse-bias charge transport properties of the low-plasma-power sample.

  8. Modulation of cochlear afferent response by the lateral olivocochlear system: activation via electrical stimulation of the inferior colliculus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groff, J Alan; Liberman, M Charles

    2003-11-01

    The olivocochlear (OC) efferent innervation of the mammalian inner ear consists of two subdivisions, medial (MOC) and lateral (LOC), with different peripheral terminations on outer hair cells and cochlear afferent terminals, respectively. The cochlear effects of electrically activating MOC efferents are well known, i.e., response suppression effected by reducing outer hair cells' contribution to cochlear amplification. LOC peripheral effects are unknown, because their unmyelinated axons are difficult to electrically stimulate. Here, stimulating electrodes are placed in the inferior colliculus (IC) to indirectly activate the LOC system, while recording cochlear responses bilaterally from anesthetized guinea pigs. Shocks at some IC sites produced novel cochlear effects attributable to activation of the LOC system: long-lasting (5-20 min) enhancement or suppression of cochlear neural responses (compound action potentials and round window noise), without changes in cochlear responses dominated by outer hair cells (otoacoustic emissions and cochlear microphonics). These novel effects also differed from classic MOC effects in their lack of dependence on the level and frequency of the acoustic stimulus. These effects disappeared on sectioning the entire OC bundle, but not after selective lesioning of the MOC tracts or the cochlea's autonomic innervation. We conclude that the LOC pathway comprises two functional subdivisions, capable of inducing slow increases or decreases in response magnitudes in the auditory nerve. Such a system may be useful in maintaining accurate binaural comparisons necessary for sound localization in the face of slow changes in interaural sensitivity.

  9. Jazz drummers recruit language-specific areas for the processing of rhythmic structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herdener, Marcus; Humbel, Thierry; Esposito, Fabrizio; Habermeyer, Benedikt; Cattapan-Ludewig, Katja; Seifritz, Erich

    2014-03-01

    Rhythm is a central characteristic of music and speech, the most important domains of human communication using acoustic signals. Here, we investigated how rhythmical patterns in music are processed in the human brain, and, in addition, evaluated the impact of musical training on rhythm processing. Using fMRI, we found that deviations from a rule-based regular rhythmic structure activated the left planum temporale together with Broca's area and its right-hemispheric homolog across subjects, that is, a network also crucially involved in the processing of harmonic structure in music and the syntactic analysis of language. Comparing the BOLD responses to rhythmic variations between professional jazz drummers and musical laypersons, we found that only highly trained rhythmic experts show additional activity in left-hemispheric supramarginal gyrus, a higher-order region involved in processing of linguistic syntax. This suggests an additional functional recruitment of brain areas usually dedicated to complex linguistic syntax processing for the analysis of rhythmical patterns only in professional jazz drummers, who are especially trained to use rhythmical cues for communication.

  10. Rhythmic Cognition in Humans and Animals: Distinguishing Meter and Pulse Perception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W Tecumseh eFitch

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper outlines a cognitive and comparative perspective on human rhythmic cognition that emphasizes a key distinction between pulse perception and meter perception. Pulse perception involves the extraction of a regular pulse or 'tactus' from a stream of events. Meter perception involves grouping of events into hierarchical trees with differing levels of 'strength', or perceptual prominence. I argue that metrically-structured rhythms are required to either perform or move appropriately to music (e.g. to dance. Rhythms, from this metrical perspective, constitute 'trees in time'. Rhythmic syntax represents a neglected form of musical syntax, and warrants more thorough neuroscientific investigation. The recent literature on animal entrainment clearly demonstrates the capacity to extract the pulse from rhythmic music, and to entrain periodic movements to this pulse, in several parrot species and a California sea lion, and a more limited ability to do so in one chimpanzee. However, the ability of these or other species to infer hierarchical rhythmic trees remains, for the most part, unexplored (with some apparent negative results from macaques. The results from this new animal comparative research, combined with new methods to explore rhythmic cognition neurally, provide exciting new routes for understanding not just rhythmic cognition, but hierarchical cognition more generally, from a biological and neural perspective.

  11. Electric and energy modelling of the super-condenser and method of characterization: application to the cycling of a module of super-condensers low tension in great power; Modelisation electrique et energetique des supercondensateurs et methodes de caracterisation: application au cyclage d'un module de supercondensateurs basse tension en grande puissance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rizoug, N.

    2006-02-15

    This document presents a study of the electrical and energetic behaviour of super-capacitors under conditions similar to industrial applications' ones. For that, a test bench has been developed in our laboratory in order to characterize a super-capacitors' module (112 F-48 V) composed of 24 elements of 2700 F/2,3 V. The goal of this work was firstly to evaluate the precision of the existing model about the electrical and energetic characteristics and secondly to improve this precision. For that, two models representing the energetic and electrical behaviour of these components are developed. These models are obtained by a simple identification of the data measured during the cycling tests using frequency and temporal approaches. Numerous electrical and thermal data are obtained during the cycling test of the module. These data are used to observe the evolution of the equivalent capacity and resistance of several super-capacitor elements of the tested module according to the temperature. For the first 200.000 cycles, the ageing process of super-capacitors and the variation of the module parameters during all the life of this tested module are presented. This study allowed to obtain information about the degradation (R, rs and C) according to the number of cycles carried out. Finally, the tests of cycling done without balancing device (except the impedance of the measurement system) allow to observe a natural dispersion of the voltage according to the position of the components in the module. (author)

  12. Unique device operations by combining optical-memory effect and electrical-gate modulation in a photochromism-based dual-gate transistor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishiguro, Yasushi; Hayakawa, Ryoma; Yasuda, Takeshi; Chikyow, Toyohiro; Wakayama, Yutaka

    2013-10-09

    We demonstrate a new device that combines a light-field effect and an electrical-gate effect to control the drain current in a dual-gate transistor. We used two organic layers, photochromic spiropyran (SP)-doped poly(triarylamine) (PTAA) and pristine PTAA, as top and bottom channels, respectively, connected to common source and drain electrodes. The application of voltage to the top and bottom gates modulated the drain current through each layer independently. UV irradiation suppressed the drain current through the top channel. The suppressed current was then maintained even after the UV light was turned off because of an optical memory effect induced by photoisomerization of SP. In contrast, UV irradiation did not change the drain current in the bottom channel. Our dual-gate transistor thus has two organic channels with distinct photosensitivities: an optically active SP-PTAA film and an optically inactive PTAA film. This device configuration allows multi-level switching via top- and bottom-gate electrical fields with an optical-memory effect.

  13. Oxygen content modulation by nanoscale chemical and electrical patterning in epitaxial SrCoO3-δ (0 < δ ≤ 0.5) thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, S.; Seidel, J.

    2016-08-01

    Fast controllable redox reactions in solid materials at room temperature are a promising strategy for enhancing the overall performance and lifetime of many energy technology materials and devices. Easy control of oxygen content is a key concept for the realisation of fast catalysis and bulk diffusion at room temperature. Here, high quality epitaxial brownmillerite SrCoO2.5 thin films have been oxidised to perovskite (P) SrCoO3 with NaClO. X-ray diffraction, scanning probe microscopy and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements were performed to investigate the structural and electronic changes of the material. The oxidised thin films were found to exhibit distinct morphological changes from an atomically flat terrace structure to forming small nanosized islands with boundaries preferentially in [100] or [010] directions all over the surface, relaxing the in-plane strain imposed by the substrate. The conductivity, or oxygen content, of each single island is confined by these textures, which can be locally patterned even further with electric poling. The high charging level at the island boundaries indicates a magnified electric capacity of SCO thin films, which could be exploited in future device geometries. This finding represents a new way of oxygen modulation with associated self-assembled charge confinement to nanoscale boundaries, offering interesting prospects in nanotechnology applications.

  14. Surface state modulation through wet chemical treatment as a route to controlling the electrical properties of ZnO nanowire arrays investigated with XPS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lord, Alex M., E-mail: a.m.lord@swansea.ac.uk [Centre for Nanohealth, College of Engineering, University of Swansea, Singleton Park, SA2 8PP (United Kingdom); Maffeis, Thierry G. [Multidisciplinary Nanotechnology Centre, College of Engineering, University of Swansea, Singleton Park, SA2 8PP (United Kingdom); Allen, Martin W. [MacDiarmid Institute for Advanced Materials and Nanotechnology, University of Canterbury, Private Bag 4800, Christchurch, 8014 (New Zealand); Morgan, David; Davies, Philip R. [Cardiff Catalysis Institute, School of Chemistry, Cardiff University, Park Place, Cardiff, CF10 3AT (United Kingdom); Jones, Daniel R.; Evans, Jonathan E. [Multidisciplinary Nanotechnology Centre, College of Engineering, University of Swansea, Singleton Park, SA2 8PP (United Kingdom); Smith, Nathan A.; Wilks, Steve P. [Multidisciplinary Nanotechnology Centre, Department of Physics, College of Science, University of Swansea, Singleton Park, SA2 8PP (United Kingdom)

    2014-11-30

    Highlights: • Direct measurement of the surface band bending exhibited by ZnO nanowires using monochromatic XPS. • Modulation of the surface depletion region using wet chemical treatment (EtOH, H{sub 2}O{sub 2}). • The measured surface potential barrier agrees with electrical measurements of individual nanowires. • H{sub 2}O{sub 2} depletes the nanowire of charge carriers while EtOH donates electrons at the surface. • EtOH has the effect of restoring the surface potential barrier of oxidised nanowires. - Abstract: ZnO is a wide bandgap semiconductor that has many potential applications including solar cell electrodes, transparent thin film transistors and gas/biological sensors. Since the surfaces of ZnO materials have no amorphous or oxidised layers, they are very environmentally sensitive, making control of their semiconductor properties challenging. In particular, the electronic properties of ZnO nanostructures are dominated by surface effects while surface conduction layers have been observed in thin films and bulk crystals. Therefore, the ability to use the ZnO materials in a controlled way depends on the development of simple techniques to modulate their surface electronic properties. Here, we use monochromatic x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) to investigate the use of different wet chemical treatments (EtOH, H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) to control the electronic properties of ZnO nanowires by modulating the surface depletion region. The valence band and core level XPS spectra are used to explore the relationship between the surface chemistry of the nanowires and the surface band bending.

  15. Long-lasting modulation of human motor cortex following prolonged transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) of forearm muscles: evidence of reciprocal inhibition and facilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinazzi, Michele; Zarattini, Stefano; Valeriani, Massimiliano; Romito, Silvia; Farina, Simona; Moretto, Giuseppe; Smania, Nicola; Fiaschi, Antonio; Abbruzzese, Giovanni

    2005-03-01

    Several lines of evidence indicate that motor cortex excitability can be modulated by manipulation of afferent inputs, like peripheral electrical stimulation. Most studies in humans mainly dealt with the effects of prolonged low-frequency peripheral nerve stimulation on motor cortical excitability, despite its being known from animal studies that high-frequency stimulation can also result in changes of the cortical excitability. To investigate the possible effects of high-frequency peripheral stimulation on motor cortical excitability we recorded motor-evoked potentials (MEPs) to transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) of the left motor cortex from the right flexor carpi radialis (FCR), extensor carpi radialis (ECR), and first dorsal interosseous (FDI) in normal subjects, before and after transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) of 30 min duration applied over the FCR. The amplitude of MEPs from the FRC was significantly reduced from 10 to 35 min after TENS while the amplitude of MEPs from ECR was increased. No effects were observed in the FDI muscle. Indices of peripheral nerve (M-wave) and spinal cord excitability (H waves) did not change throughout the experiment. Electrical stimulation of the lateral antebrachial cutaneous nerve has no significant effect on motor cortex excitability. These findings suggest that TENS of forearm muscles can induce transient reciprocal inhibitory and facilitatory changes in corticomotoneuronal excitability of forearm flexor and extensor muscles lasting several minutes. These changes probably may occur at cortical site and seem to be mainly dependent on stimulation of muscle afferents. These findings might eventually lead to practical applications in rehabilitation, especially in those syndromes in which the excitatory and inhibitory balance between agonist and antagonist is severely impaired, such as spasticity and dystonia.

  16. Reversible air-induced optical and electrical modulation of methylammonium lead bromide (MAPbBr3) single crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Huotian; Liu, Yiting; Lu, Haizhou; Deng, Wan; Yang, Kang; Deng, Zunyi; Zhang, Xingmin; Yuan, Sijian; Wang, Jiao; Niu, Jiaxin; Zhang, Xiaolei; Jin, Qingyuan; Feng, Hongjian; Zhan, Yiqiang; Zheng, Lirong

    2017-09-01

    The photoluminescence (PL) variations of organic-inorganic hybrid lead halide perovskites in different atmospheres are well documented, while the fundamental mechanism still lacks comprehensive understandings. This study reports the reversible optical and electrical properties of methylammonium lead bromide (MAPbBr3 or CH3NH3PbBr3) single crystals caused by air infiltration. With the change in the surrounding atmosphere from air to vacuum, the PL intensity of perovskite single crystals decreases, while the conductivity increases. By means of first-principles computational studies, the shallow trap states are considered as key elements in PL and conductivity changes. These results have important implications for the characterization and application of organic-inorganic hybrid lead halide perovskites in vacuum.

  17. Multi-functional Converter with Integrated Motor Control, Battery Charging and Active Module Balancing for Electric Vehicular Application

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathe, Laszlo; Schaltz, Erik; Teodorescu, Remus

    2014-01-01

    , weight and volume in comparison with other Li-Ion based chemistries. The control of the energy flow has been done through a Modular Multilevel Converter (MMC), which has demonstrated advantages over 2 level converters in terms of efficiency, fault tolerant operation, flexible operation modes. It has been......In order to reduce the fuel consumption and the acoustical noise generated by refuse lorries, electrification of the waste compactor unit is a very promising solution. For the electrical energy storage Lithium-Sulfur (Li-S) battery technology has been selected with potential for reducing the cost...... used successfully in HVDC/FACTS and large drive applications. In this paper the use of MMC for a battery driven waste compactor unit addressed with integrated functionality including: motor driver, battery charge and active balancing is presented. The challenges addressed here are related to the design...

  18. Endogenous and exogenous electric fields as modifiers of brain activity: rational design of noninvasive brain stimulation with transcranial alternating current stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fröhlich, Flavio

    2014-03-01

    Synchronized neuronal activity in the cortex generates weak electric fields that are routinely measured in humans and animal models by electroencephalography and local field potential recordings. Traditionally, these endogenous electric fields have been considered to be an epiphenomenon of brain activity. Recent work has demonstrated that active cortical networks are surprisingly susceptible to weak perturbations of the membrane voltage of a large number of neurons by electric fields. Simultaneously, noninvasive brain stimulation with weak, exogenous electric fields (transcranial current stimulation, TCS) has undergone a renaissance due to the broad scope of its possible applications in modulating brain activity for cognitive enhancement and treatment of brain disorders. This review aims to interface the recent developments in the study of both endogenous and exogenous electric fields, with a particular focus on rhythmic stimulation for the modulation of cortical oscillations. The main goal is to provide a starting point for the use of rational design for the development of novel mechanism-based TCS therapeutics based on transcranial alternating current stimulation, for the treatment of psychiatric illnesses.

  19. Bone Mineralization in Rhythmic Gymnasts Entering Puberty: Associations with Jumping Performance and Body Composition Variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Võsoberg, Kristel; Tillmann, Vallo; Tamm, Anna-Liisa; Maasalu, Katre; Jürimäe, Jaak

    2017-01-01

    This study examined bone mineral density (BMD) accrual in prepubertal rhythmic gymnasts entering puberty and their age-matched untrained control girls, and associations with baseline jumping performance and body composition over the 3-year period. Whole body (WB) and femoral neck (FN) BMD, WB fat mass (FM) and fat free mass (FFM), countermovement jump (CMJ) and rebound jumps for 15 s (RJ15s) were assessed in 25 rhythmic gymnasts and 25 untrained controls at baseline and after 3-year period. The changes over this period were calculated (Δ scores). Pubertal maturation over the 3-year period was slower in rhythmic gymnasts compared to untrained controls, while no difference in bone age development was seen. WB BMD increased similarly in both groups, while the increase in FN BMD was higher in rhythmic gymnasts compared with untrained controls. In rhythmic gymnasts, baseline FFM was the most significant predictor of ΔWB BMD explaining 19.2% of the variability, while baseline RJ15s was the most significant predictor of ΔFN BMD explaining 18.5% of the variability. In untrained controls, baseline FM explained 51.8 and 18.9% of the variability in ΔWB BMD and ΔFN BMD, respectively. In conclusion, mechanical loading of high-intensity athletic activity had beneficial effect on BMD accrual in rhythmic gymnasts and may have counterbalanced such negative factors on bone development as slower pubertal maturation and lower body FM. Baseline FFM and repeated jumps test performance were related to BMD accrual in rhythmic gymnasts, while baseline FM was related to BMD accrual in untrained controls. Key points Sudy examined bone mineralization in prepubertal rhythmic gymnasts entering puberty and their age-matched untrained control girls, and associations with baseline jumping performance and body composition. Jumping performance and fat free mass values predicted bone mineral accrual in rhythmic gymnasts. Fat mass predicted bone mineral accrual in untrained control girls

  20. Analytical and Experimental Investigation on A Dynamic Thermo-Sensitive Electrical Parameter with Maximum dIC/dt during Turn-off for High Power Trench Gate/Field-Stop IGBT Modules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Yuxiang; Luo, Haoze; Li, Wuhua

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, a dynamic thermo-sensitive electrical parameter (DTSEP) for extracting the junction temperature of the trench gate/field-stop insulated gate bipolar transistor (IGBT) modules by using the maximum collector current falling rate is proposed. First, a theoretical model of the transient...

  1. Precise temperature compensation of phase in a rhythmic motor pattern.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lamont S Tang

    Full Text Available Most animal species are cold-blooded, and their neuronal circuits must maintain function despite environmental temperature fluctuations. The central pattern generating circuits that produce rhythmic motor patterns depend on the orderly activation of circuit neurons. We describe the effects of temperature on the pyloric rhythm of the stomatogastric ganglion of the crab, Cancer borealis. The pyloric rhythm is a triphasic motor pattern in which the Pyloric Dilator (PD, Lateral Pyloric (LP, and Pyloric (PY neurons fire in a repeating sequence. While the frequency of the pyloric rhythm increased about 4-fold (Q(10 approximately 2.3 as the temperature was shifted from 7 degrees C to 23 degrees C, the phase relationships of the PD, LP, and PY neurons showed almost perfect temperature compensation. The Q(10's of the input conductance, synaptic currents, transient outward current (I(A, and the hyperpolarization-activated inward current (I(h, all of which help determine the phase of LP neuron activity, ranged from 1.8 to 4. We studied the effects of temperature in >1,000 computational models (with different sets of maximal conductances of a bursting neuron and the LP neuron. Many bursting models failed to monotonically increase in frequency as temperature increased. Temperature compensation of LP neuron phase was facilitated when model neurons' currents had Q(10's close to 2. Together, these data indicate that although diverse sets of maximal conductances may be found in identified neurons across animals, there may be strong evolutionary pressure to restrict the Q(10's of the processes that contribute to temperature compensation of neuronal circuits.

  2. Rhythmical bimanual force production: homologous and non-homologous muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Deanna M; Boyle, Jason B; Rhee, Joohyun; Shea, Charles H

    2015-01-01

    The experiment was designed to determine participants' ability to coordinate a bimanual multifrequency pattern of isometric forces using homologous or non-homologous muscles. Lissajous feedback was provided to reduce perceptual and attentional constraints. The primary purpose was to determine whether the activation of homologous and non-homologous muscles resulted in different patterns of distortions in the left limb forces that are related to the forces produced by the right limb. The task was to rhythmically produce a 1:2 pattern of isometric forces by exerting isometric forces on the left side force transducer with the left arm that was coordinated with the pattern of isometric forces produced on the right side force transducer with the right arm. The results indicated that participants were able to 'tune-in' a 1:2 coordination patterns using homologous (triceps muscles of the left and right limbs) and using non-homologous muscles (biceps left limb and triceps right limb) when provided Lissajous feedback. However, distinct but consistent and identifiable distortions in the left limb force traces were observed for both the homologous and non-homologous tasks. For the homologous task, the interference occurred in the left limb when the right limb was initiating and releasing force. For the non-homologous task, the interference in the left limb force occurred only when the right limb was releasing force. In both conditions, the interference appeared to continue from the point of force initiation and/or release to peak force velocity. The overall results are consistent with the notion that neural crosstalk manifests differently during the coordination of the limbs depending upon whether homologous or non-homologous muscles are activated.

  3. Modulation of electrical and optical properties of gallium-doped ZnO films by radio frequency magnetron sputtering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liang Shuang; Mei Zeng-Xia; Du Xiao-Long

    2012-01-01

    Ga-doped ZnO (GZO) films are prepared on amorphous glass substrates at room temperature by radio frequency magnetron sputtering.The results reveal that the gallium doping efficiency,which will have an important influence on the electrical and optical properties of the film,can be governed greatly by the deposition pressure and film thickness.The position shifts of the ZnO (002) peaks in X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements and the varied Hall mobility and carrier concentration confirms this result.The low Hall mobility is attributed to the grain boundary barrier scattering.The estimated height of barrier decreases with the increase of carrier concentration,and the trapping state density is nearly constant.According to defect formation energies and relevant chemical reactions,the photoluminescence (PL)peaks at 2.46 eV and 3.07 eV are attributed to oxygen vacancies and zinc vacancies,respectively.The substitution of more Ga atoms for Zn vacancies with the increase in film thickness is also confirmed by the PL spectrum.The obvious blueshift of the optical bandgap with an increase of carrier concentration is explained well by the Burstein-Moss (BM)effect.The bandgap difference between 3.18 eV and 3.37 eV,about 0.2 eV,is attributed to the metal-semiconductor transition.

  4. 25th anniversary article: organic photovoltaic modules and biopolymer supercapacitors for supply of renewable electricity: a perspective from Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inganäs, Olle; Admassie, Shimelis

    2014-02-12

    The role of materials in civilization is well demonstrated over the centuries and millennia, as materials have come to serve as the classifier of stages of civilization. With the advent of materials science, this relation has become even more pronounced. The pivotal role of advanced materials in industrial economies has not yet been matched by the influence of advanced materials during the transition from agricultural to modern societies. The role of advanced materials in poverty eradication can be very large, in particular if new trajectories of social and economic development become possible. This is the topic of this essay, different in format from the traditional scientific review, as we try to encompass not only two infant technologies of solar energy conversion and storage by means of organic materials, but also the social conditions for introduction of the technologies. The development of organic-based photovoltaic energy conversion has been rapid, and promises to deliver new alternatives to well-established silicon photovoltaics. Our recent development of organic biopolymer composite electrodes opens avenues towards the use of renewable materials in the construction of wooden batteries or supercapacitors for charge storage. Combining these new elements may give different conditions for introduction of energy technology in areas now lacking electrical grids, but having sufficient solar energy inputs. These areas are found close to the equator, and include some of the poorest regions on earth. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Deposition-power-modulated optical and electrical properties of sputtering-derived HfTiO{sub x} gate dielectrics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, P. [School of Physics and Materials Science, Radiation Detection Materials & Devices Lab, Anhui University, Hefei, 230601 (China); He, G., E-mail: cheriling16@126.com [School of Physics and Materials Science, Radiation Detection Materials & Devices Lab, Anhui University, Hefei, 230601 (China); Liu, M. [Key Laboratory of Materials Physics, Anhui Key Laboratory of Nanomaterials and, Nanostructure, Institute of Solid State Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, 230031 (China); Xiao, D.Q.; Gao, J.; Chen, X.F. [School of Physics and Materials Science, Radiation Detection Materials & Devices Lab, Anhui University, Hefei, 230601 (China); Ma, R. [Key Laboratory of Materials Physics, Anhui Key Laboratory of Nanomaterials and, Nanostructure, Institute of Solid State Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, 230031 (China); Zhang, J.W.; Zhang, M.; Sun, Z.Q.; Liu, Y.M. [School of Physics and Materials Science, Radiation Detection Materials & Devices Lab, Anhui University, Hefei, 230601 (China)

    2015-11-15

    High-k gate dielectric HfTiO{sub x} thin films have been deposited on Si and quartz substrate by radio frequency (RF) magnetron sputtering. The structural and optical properties of HfTiO{sub x} thin films related to deposition power are investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), ultraviolet–visible spectroscopy (UV–Vis), and spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE). Results indicate that the as-deposited HfTiO{sub x} thin films are amorphous state regardless of the deposition power. The increase of band gap of the samples is observed with the increase of deposition power. Moreover, the increase of the thickness, deposition rate, refractive index (n) and the decrease of the extinction coefficient with the increase of deposition power are also confirmed. Additionally, the electrical properties of films are analyzed by measurement of high frequency capacitance–voltage (C–V) and leakage current density-voltage (J-V) characteristics. And the leakage current conduction mechanisms are also discussed. - Highlights: • Sputtering-derived HfTiO{sub x} gate dielectrics have been deposited on Si substrates. • Increase of band gap is observed with the increase of deposition power. • HfTiO{sub x} thin film deposited at 50 W displays excellent performance. • The leakage current conduction mechanisms are also discussed in detail.

  6. Preservation of common rhythmic locomotor control despite weakened supraspinal regulation after stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taryn eKlarner

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The basic pattern of arm and leg movement during rhythmic locomotor tasks is supported by common central neural control from spinal and supraspinal centers in neurologically intact participants. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that following a cerebrovascular accident, shared systems from interlimb cutaneous networks facilitating arm and leg coordination persist across locomotor tasks. Twelve stroke participants (>6 months post CVA performed arm and leg (A&L cycling using a stationary ergometer and walking on a motorized treadmill. In both tasks cutaneous reflexes were evoked via surface stimulation of the nerves innervating the dorsum of the hand (superficial radial; SR and foot (superficial peroneal; SP of the less affected limbs. Electromyographic (EMG activity from the tibialis anterior, soleus, flexor carpi radialis, and posterior deltoid were recorded bilaterally with surface electrodes. Full-wave rectified and filtered EMG data were separated into eight equal parts or phases and aligned to begin with maximum knee extension for both walking and A&L cycling. At each phase of movement, background EMG data were quantified as the peak normalized response for each participant and cutaneous reflexes were quantified as the average cumulative reflex over 150 ms following stimulation. In general, background EMG was similar between walking and A&L cycling, seen especially in the distal leg muscles. Cutaneous reflexes were evident and modified in the less and more affected limbs during walking and A&L cycling and similar modulation patterns were observed suggesting activity in related control networks between tasks. After a stroke common neural patterning from conserved subcortical regulation is seen supporting the notion of a common core in locomotor tasks involving arm and leg movement. This has translational implications for rehabilitation where A&L cycling could be usefully applied to improve walking function.

  7. Locomotor-like leg movements evoked by rhythmic arm movements in humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Sylos-Labini

    Full Text Available Motion of the upper limbs is often coupled to that of the lower limbs in human bipedal locomotion. It is unclear, however, whether the functional coupling between upper and lower limbs is bi-directional, i.e. whether arm movements can affect the lumbosacral locomotor circuitry. Here we tested the effects of voluntary rhythmic arm movements on the lower limbs. Participants lay horizontally on their side with each leg suspended in an unloading exoskeleton. They moved their arms on an overhead treadmill as if they walked on their hands. Hand-walking in the antero-posterior direction resulted in significant locomotor-like movements of the legs in 58% of the participants. We further investigated quantitatively the responses in a subset of the responsive subjects. We found that the electromyographic (EMG activity of proximal leg muscles was modulated over each cycle with a timing similar to that of normal locomotion. The frequency of kinematic and EMG oscillations in the legs typically differed from that of arm oscillations. The effect of hand-walking was direction specific since medio-lateral arm movements did not evoke appreciably leg air-stepping. Using externally imposed trunk movements and biomechanical modelling, we ruled out that the leg movements associated with hand-walking were mainly due to the mechanical transmission of trunk oscillations. EMG activity in hamstring muscles associated with hand-walking often continued when the leg movements were transiently blocked by the experimenter or following the termination of arm movements. The present results reinforce the idea that there exists a functional neural coupling between arm and legs.

  8. Postural trials: expertise in rhythmic gymnastics increases control in lateral directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calavalle, A R; Sisti, D; Rocchi, M B L; Panebianco, R; Del Sal, M; Stocchi, V

    2008-11-01

    The first aim of this paper was to investigate if expertise in rhythmic gymnastics influences postural performance even in an easy non-specific task such as bipedal posture. Rhythmic gymnastics is a unique female sport which encompasses aspects of both artistic gymnastics and ballet and includes the use of a small apparatus (rope, hoop, ball, clubs and ribbon). Most previous studies have shown that expertise achieved by artistic gymnasts and dancers improves postural steadiness only in the situations for which those athletes are trained. Literature has not yet compared rhythmic gymnasts to other athletes in terms of their postural strategies. Hence, the study presented herein tested a group of high level rhythmic gymnasts and a group of female university students, trained in other sports, in the bipedal posture under eyes open and closed conditions. A force platform was used to record body sway. (1) Distance from the centre of sway, (2) lateral and (3) antero-posterior displacements were analyzed in time and frequency domains. Comparing the two groups, it was found that rhythmic gymnasts had better strategies than students in simple postural tasks, especially in lateral directions and in the period from 0.05 to 2 s. The most interesting finding in this study is that rhythmic gymnastics training seems to have a direct effect on the ability to maintain bipedal posture, which may confirm the "transfer" hypothesis of rhythmic gymnastics expertise to bipedal postural sway, especially in medio-lateral displacements. This finding has never been reported in previous studies on artistic gymnasts and ballet dancers. Furthermore, the present study confirmed the visual dependence of all the athletes, irrespective of their disciplines, in their postural trials.

  9. Interactive rhythmic cue facilitates gait relearning in patients with Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchitomi, Hirotaka; Ota, Leo; Ogawa, Ken-ichiro; Orimo, Satoshi; Miyake, Yoshihiro

    2013-01-01

    To develop a method for cooperative human gait training, we investigated whether interactive rhythmic cues could improve the gait performance of Parkinson's disease patients. The interactive rhythmic cues ware generated based on the mutual entrainment between the patient's gait rhythms and the cue rhythms input to the patient while the patient walked. Previously, we found that the dynamic characteristics of stride interval fluctuation in Parkinson's disease patients were improved to a healthy 1/f fluctuation level using interactive rhythmic cues and that this effect was maintained in the short term. However, two problems remained in our previous study. First, it was not clear whether the key factor underpinning the effect was the mutual entrainment between the gait rhythms and the cue rhythms or the rhythmic cue fluctuation itself. Second, it was not clear whether or not the gait restoration was maintained longitudinally and was relearned after repeating the cue-based gait training. Thus, the present study clarified these issues using 32 patients who participated in a four-day experimental program. The patients were assigned randomly to one of four experimental groups with the following rhythmic cues: (a) interactive rhythmic cue, (b) fixed tempo cue, (c) 1/f fluctuating tempo cue, and (d) no cue. It has been reported that the 1/f fluctuation of stride interval in healthy gait is absent in Parkinson's disease patients. Therefore, we used this dynamic characteristic as an evaluation index to analyze gait relearning in the four different conditions. We observed a significant effect in condition (a) that the gait fluctuation of the patients gradually returned to a healthy 1/f fluctuation level, whereas this did not occur in the other conditions. This result suggests that the mutual entrainment can facilitate gait relearning effectively. It is expected that interactive rhythmic cues will be widely applicable in the fields of rehabilitation and assistive technology.

  10. Rhythmic Auditory Cueing in Motor Rehabilitation for Stroke Patients: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Ga Eul; Kim, Soo Ji

    2016-01-01

    Given the increasing evidence demonstrating the effects of rhythmic auditory cueing for motor rehabilitation of stroke patients, this synthesized analysis is needed in order to improve rehabilitative practice and maximize clinical effectiveness. This study aimed to systematically analyze the literature on rhythmic auditory cueing for motor rehabilitation of stroke patients by highlighting the outcome variables, type of cueing, and stage of stroke. A systematic review with meta-analysis of randomized controlled or clinically controlled trials was conducted. Electronic databases and music therapy journals were searched for studies including stroke, the use of rhythmic auditory cueing, and motor outcomes, such as gait and upper-extremity function. A total of 10 studies (RCT or CCT) with 356 individuals were included for meta-analysis. There were large effect sizes (Hedges's g = 0.984 for walking velocity; Hedges's g = 0.840 for cadence; Hedges's g = 0.760 for stride length; and Hedges's g = 0.456 for Fugl-Meyer test scores) in the use of rhythmic auditory cueing. Additional subgroup analysis demonstrated that although the type of rhythmic cueing and stage of stroke did not lead to statistically substantial group differences, the effect sizes and heterogeneity values in each subgroup implied possible differences in treatment effect. This study corroborates the beneficial effects of rhythmic auditory cueing, supporting its expanded application to broadened areas of rehabilitation for stroke patients. Also, it suggests the future investigation of the differential outcomes depending on how rhythmic auditory cueing is provided in terms of type and intensity implemented. © the American Music Therapy Association 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Gut feeling is electric

    Science.gov (United States)

    Familoni, Jide

    2011-06-01

    Although "gut feeling" is a cliché in English parlance, there are neuro-physiological basis for registration of emotions in the gut. Control of the gastro-intestinal (GI) tract is by an integration of neuro-hormonal factors from the local myogenic to the central nervous system. Gastric contractile activity, which is responsible for the motor properties of the stomach, is regulated by this integrated complex. Signatures of the activity include gastric electrical activity (GEA) and bowel sounds. GEA has two distinct components: a high-frequency spike activity or post depolarization potential termed the electrical response activity superimposed on a lower frequency, rhythmic depolarization termed the control activity. These signatures are measured in the clinic with contact sensors and well understood for diagnosis of gut dysmotility. Can these signatures be measured at standoff and employed for purposes of biometrics, malintent and wellness assessment?

  12. Electrical tests of silicon detector modules for the ATLAS experiment and a study of the discovery potential of the $t\\overline{t}H, H \\to W^{+}W^{-}$ process

    CERN Document Server

    Ludwig, Inga

    2011-01-01

    The first part of this thesis was a contribution to the construction of the ATLAS Semiconductor Tracking detector (SCT). About 200 SCT endcap modules were assembled at the University of Freiburg. Before installation in the experiment, each module was subject to thorough testing in order to ensure their functionality within the ATLAS specifications. A large part of these tests concerned the electrical functionality of the readout electronics and the bias current behaviour of the sensors. The responsibility for the electrical characterization of the Freiburg modules was part of this thesis. To be suited for the analysis of physics processes, the signals measured in the detector need to be transferred into particle four-momenta, requiring the reconstruction and identification of different particle types. This thesis contributes to the physics object identification by a study of methods to separate isolated electrons from real electron background produced in the decays of heavy quarks. A standard set of four disc...

  13. ON THE SPECIFICITY OF RHYTHMICAL ORGANIZATION OF MODERN NEWS READER’S SPEECH (ON THE MATERIAL OF TV NEWS PROGRAMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prokhvatilova Olga Aleksandrovna

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper studies the peculiar properties of rhythmic organization, which includes the description of rhythmic devices and their percentage, basic principles of their arrangement. The study defines reading of pre-written text as a main characteristic of news reader's speech. We used tapes of the popular TV news programs which were broadcasted by the main Russian channels in 2000 as a material for this research. The study describes rhythmic devices of different language levels. Quantitative analysis helped to make the conclusion about the predominance of super-segmental devices in news reader's speech of 2000. For example, lexical rhythmic devices amount to 6 %, syntactic rhythmic devices amount to 8 % and the number of super-segmental rhythmic devices reaches 86 %. This article characterizes the main principles of super-segmental rhythmic devices arrangement, such as symmetry and proportion. Structural dependence exists in rhythmic organization of news reader's speech. The feature of structural dependence consists in regular reproduction of rhythmic devices in the initial and final parts of information announcement and partial reproduction – in the central part. Semantic, expressive, arranging and composition functions are the basic functions of the rhythm in news reader's speech; moreover, the semantic function which helps to mark certain words important in terms of information, dominates in news reader's speech of 2000. We noticed the dominance of using high degree rhythmically arranged information announcements, which are characterized by using different language level rhythmic devices in more than 50 % of syntagmas of sounding text. Consequently, rhythmic organization of news reader's speech reflects displacing of argumentative way of verbal influence by the suggestive way of verbal influence as a current trend in modern communication

  14. Context-dependent modulation of cutaneous reflex amplitudes during forward and backward leg cycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zehr, E Paul; Hundza, Sandra R; Balter, Jaclyn E; Loadman, Pamela M

    2009-10-01

    We used amplitude modulation of cutaneous reflexes during leg cycling as a paradigm to investigate neural control mechanisms regulating forward (FWD) and backward (BWD) rhythmic limb movement. Our prediction was a simple reversal of reflex modulation during BWD leg cycling and context-dependent reflex modulation. Cutaneous reflexes were evoked by electrical stimulation delivered to the superficial peroneal (SP) and distal tibial (TIB) nerves at the ankle. EMG recordings were collected from muscles acting at the hip, knee, and ankle. Kinematic data were also collected at these joints. Cutaneous reflexes were analyzed according to the phase of movement in which they were evoked. When functional phases (i.e., flexion or extension) of cycling were matched between FWD and BWD, background EMG and reflex modulation patterns were generally similar. The reflex patterns when compared at similar functional phases presented as a simple reversal suggesting FWD and BWD cycling are regulated by similar neural mechanisms. The general reflex regulation of limb trajectory was maintained between cycling directions in accordance with the task requirements of the movement direction.

  15. Initiation and modulation of locomotor circuitry output with multisite transcutaneous electrical stimulation of the spinal cord in noninjured humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerasimenko, Yury; Gorodnichev, Ruslan; Puhov, Aleksandr; Moshonkina, Tatiana; Savochin, Aleksandr; Selionov, Victor; Roy, Roland R; Lu, Daniel C; Edgerton, V Reggie

    2015-02-01

    The mammalian lumbar spinal cord has the capability to generate locomotor activity in the absence of input from the brain. Previously, we reported that transcutaneous electrical stimulation of the spinal cord at vertebral level T11 can activate the locomotor circuitry in noninjured subjects when their legs are placed in a gravity-neutral position (Gorodnichev RM, Pivovarova EA, Pukhov A, Moiseev SA, Savokhin AA, Moshonkina TR, Shcherbakova NA, Kilimnik VA, Selionov VA, Kozlovskaia IB, Edgerton VR, Gerasimenko IU. Fiziol Cheloveka 38: 46-56, 2012). In the present study we hypothesized that stimulating multiple spinal sites and therefore unique combinations of networks converging on postural and locomotor lumbosacral networks would be more effective in inducing more robust locomotor behavior and more selective control than stimulation of more restricted networks. We demonstrate that simultaneous stimulation at the cervical, thoracic, and lumbar levels induced coordinated stepping movements with a greater range of motion at multiple joints in five of six noninjured subjects. We show that the addition of stimulation at L1 and/or at C5 to stimulation at T11 immediately resulted in enhancing the kinematics and interlimb coordination as well as the EMG patterns in proximal and distal leg muscles. Sequential cessation of stimulation at C5 and then at L1 resulted in a progressive degradation of the stepping pattern. The synergistic and interactive effects of transcutaneous stimulation suggest a multisegmental convergence of descending and ascending, and most likely propriospinal, influences on the spinal neuronal circuitries associated with locomotor activity. The potential impact of using multisite spinal cord stimulation as a strategy to neuromodulate the spinal circuitry has significant implications in furthering our understanding of the mechanisms controlling posture and locomotion and for regaining significant sensorimotor function even after a severe spinal cord

  16. Processing rhythmic pattern during Chinese sentence reading: An eye movement study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingyi eLuo

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Prosodic constraints play a fundamental role during both spoken sentence comprehension and silent reading. In Chinese, the rhythmic pattern of the verb-object (V-O combination has been found to rapidly affect the semantic access/integration process during sentence reading (Luo and Zhou, 2010. Rhythmic pattern refers to the combination of words with different syllabic lengths, with certain combinations disallowed (e.g., [2+1]; numbers standing for the number of syllables of the verb and the noun respectively and certain combinations preferred (e.g., [1+1] or [2+2]. This constraint extends to the situation in which the combination is used to modify other words. A V-O phrase could modify a noun by simply preceding it, forming a V-O-N compound; when the verb is disyllabic, however, the word order has to be O-V-N and the object is preferred to be disyllabic. In this study, we investigated how the reader processes the rhythmic pattern and word order information by recording the reader’s eye-movements. We created four types of sentences by crossing rhythmic pattern and word order in compounding. The compound, embedding a disyllabic verb, could be in the correct O-V-N or the incorrect V-O-N order; the object could be disyllabic or monosyllabic. We found that the reader spent more time and made more regressions on and after the compounds when either type of anomaly was detected during the first pass reading. However, during re-reading (after all the words in the sentence have been viewed, less regressive eye movements were found for the anomalous rhythmic pattern, relative to the correct pattern; moreover, only the abnormal rhythmic pattern, not the violated word order, influenced the regressive eye movements. These results suggest that while the processing of rhythmic pattern and word order information occurs rapidly during the initial reading of the sentence, the process of recovering from the rhythmic pattern anomaly may ease the reanalysis

  17. The effects of rhythmic sensory cues on the temporal dynamics of human gait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sejdić, Ervin; Fu, Yingying; Pak, Alison; Fairley, Jillian A; Chau, Tom

    2012-01-01

    Walking is a complex, rhythmic task performed by the locomotor system. However, natural gait rhythms can be influenced by metronomic auditory stimuli, a phenomenon of particular interest in neurological rehabilitation. In this paper, we examined the effects of aural, visual and tactile rhythmic cues on the temporal dynamics associated with human gait. Data were collected from fifteen healthy adults in two sessions. Each session consisted of five 15-minute trials. In the first trial of each session, participants walked at their preferred walking speed. In subsequent trials, participants were asked to walk to a metronomic beat, provided through visually, aurally, tactile or all three cues (simultaneously and in sync), the pace of which was set to the preferred walking speed of the first trial. Using the collected data, we extracted several parameters including: gait speed, mean stride interval, stride interval variability, scaling exponent and maximum Lyapunov exponent. The extracted parameters showed that rhythmic sensory cues affect the temporal dynamics of human gait. The auditory rhythmic cue had the greatest influence on the gait parameters, while the visual cue had no statistically significant effect on the scaling exponent. These results demonstrate that visual rhythmic cues could be considered as an alternative cueing modality in rehabilitation without concern of adversely altering the statistical persistence of walking.

  18. The effects of rhythmic sensory cues on the temporal dynamics of human gait.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ervin Sejdić

    Full Text Available Walking is a complex, rhythmic task performed by the locomotor system. However, natural gait rhythms can be influenced by metronomic auditory stimuli, a phenomenon of particular interest in neurological rehabilitation. In this paper, we examined the effects of aural, visual and tactile rhythmic cues on the temporal dynamics associated with human gait. Data were collected from fifteen healthy adults in two sessions. Each session consisted of five 15-minute trials. In the first trial of each session, participants walked at their preferred walking speed. In subsequent trials, participants were asked to walk to a metronomic beat, provided through visually, aurally, tactile or all three cues (simultaneously and in sync, the pace of which was set to the preferred walking speed of the first trial. Using the collected data, we extracted several parameters including: gait speed, mean stride interval, stride interval variability, scaling exponent and maximum Lyapunov exponent. The extracted parameters showed that rhythmic sensory cues affect the temporal dynamics of human gait. The auditory rhythmic cue had the greatest influence on the gait parameters, while the visual cue had no statistically significant effect on the scaling exponent. These results demonstrate that visual rhythmic cues could be considered as an alternative cueing modality in rehabilitation without concern of adversely altering the statistical persistence of walking.

  19. Motor control of rhythmic dance from a dynamical systems perspective: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, Akito; Fujii, Shinya; Yamamoto, Yuji; Kudo, Kazutoshi

    2015-03-01

    While dancers and dance educators express great interest in motor control as it relates to rhythmic dance, the subject remains largely uninvestigated. In order to advance our understanding of motor control, a theoretical framework called the dynamical systems approach (DSA) has been used. The DSA was originally developed to describe mathematically the principle of synchronization patterns in nature and their change over time. In recent decades, researchers studying human motor control have attempted to describe the synchronization of rhythmic movement using a DSA. More recently, this approach has been applied specifically to rhythmic dance movements. A series of studies that used the DSA revealed that when people synchronize rhythmic movement of a body part 1. with a different body part, 2. with other people's movement, or 3. with an auditory beat with some phase differences, unintentional and autonomous entrainment to a specific synchronization pattern occurs. However, through practice dancers are able to overcome such entrainment and dance freely. These findings provide practical suggestions for effective ways of training in dance education. The DSA can potentially be an effective tool for furthering our understanding of the motor control utilized in rhythmic dance.

  20. Electrophysiological analysis of rhythmic jaw movements in the freely moving mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Masayuki; Masuda, Yuji; Fujimoto, Yoshiyuki; Matsuya, Tokuzo; Yamamura, Kensuke; Yamada, Yoshiaki; Maeda, Norihiko; Morimoto, Toshifumi

    2002-03-01

    Although rhythmic jaw movement in feeding has been studied in mammals, such as rats, rabbits and monkeys, the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying it are not well understood. Transgenic and gene-targeting technologies enable direct control of the genetic makeup of the mouse, and have led to the development of a new category of reagents that have the potential to elucidate the cellular and molecular mechanisms of neural networks. The present study attempts to characterize rhythmic jaw movements in the mouse and to demonstrate its relevance to rhythmic jaw movements found in higher mammals using newly developed jaw-tracking systems and electromyograms of the masticatory muscles. The masticatory sequence of the mouse during feeding was classified into two stages, incision and chewing. Small and rapid (8 Hz) open-close jaw movements were observed during incision, while large and slow (5 Hz) open-close jaw movements were observed during chewing. Integrated electromyograms of the masseteric and digastric muscles were larger during chewing than those observed during incision. Licking behavior was associated with regular (8 Hz), small open-close jaw movements with smaller masseteric activity than those observed during mastication. Grooming showed variable patterns of jaw movement and electromyograms depending on the grooming site. These results suggest that there are neuronal mechanisms producing different frequencies of rhythmic jaw movements in the mouse, and we conclude that the mouse is useful for understanding rhythmic jaw movements in higher mammals.

  1. Enhanced musical rhythmic perception in Turkish early and late learners of German.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roncaglia-Denissen, M Paula; Schmidt-Kassow, Maren; Heine, Angela; Vuust, Peter; Kotz, Sonja A

    2013-01-01

    As language rhythm relies partly on general acoustic properties, such as intensity and duration, mastering two languages with distinct rhythmic properties (i.e., stress position) may enhance musical rhythm perception. We investigated whether competence in a second language (L2) with different rhythmic properties than a L1 affects musical rhythm aptitude. Turkish early (TELG) and late learners (TLLG) of German were compared to German late L2 learners of English (GLE) regarding their musical rhythmic aptitude. While Turkish and German present distinct linguistic rhythm and metric properties, German and English are rather similar in this regard. To account for inter-individual differences, we measured participants' short-term and working memory (WM) capacity, melodic aptitude, and time they spent listening to music. Both groups of Turkish L2 learners of German perceived rhythmic variations significantly better than German L2 learners of English. No differences were found between early and late learners' performance. Our findings suggest that mastering two languages with different rhythmic properties enhances musical rhythm perception, providing further evidence of shared cognitive resources between language and music.

  2. Fundamentals of electrical drives

    CERN Document Server

    Veltman, André; De Doncker, Rik W

    2007-01-01

    Provides a comprehensive introduction to various aspects of electrical drive systems. This volume provides a presentation of dynamic generic models that cover all major electrical machine types and modulation/control components of a drive as well as dynamic and steady state analysis of transformers and electrical machines.

  3. Movement sonification: Effects on motor learning beyond rhythmic adjustments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfred Oliver Effenberg

    2016-05-01

    learn a closed motor skill (technique acquisition of indoor rowing. One group was treated with visual information and two groups with audiovisual information (sonification vs. natural sounds. For all three groups learning became evident and remained stable. Participants treated with additional movement sonification showed better performance compared to both other groups. Results indicate that movement sonification enhances motor learning of a complex gross motor skill – even exceeding usually expected acoustic rhythmical effects on motor learning.

  4. Electrical modulation of weak-antilocalization and spin-orbit interaction in dual gated Ge/Si core/shell nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, R.; Deacon, R. S.; Yao, J.; Lieber, C. M.; Ishibashi, K.

    2017-09-01

    Magnetic transport of holes in Ge/Si core/shell nanowires (NWs) is investigated under the control of dual electrical gating. The strength of the spin-orbit interaction (SOI) is analyzed from the weak-antilocalization (WAL) of the magnetoconductance (MC) as a function of a perpendicular magnetic field. By superimposing a small alternating signal on the voltage offset of both gates the universal conductance fluctuations are largely removed from the averaged MC traces, enabling a good fitting to WAL theory models. The tuning of both spin lifetime and the SOI strength is observed in the NWs with dual gating while the carrier density is kept constant. We observe an enhancement of spin lifetime with the mean free path due to the effect of geometrical confinement. The measured SOI energy of 1-6 meV may arise from the dipole coupled Rashba SOI, which is predicted to be one order of magnitude larger than the conventional Rashba coefficient in the Ge/Si core/shell NW system. A clear electrostatic modulation of SOI strength by a factor of up to three implies that Ge/Si NWs are a promising platform for the study of helical states, Majorana fermions and spin-orbit qubits.

  5. Delta rhythmicity is a reliable EEG biomarker in Angelman syndrome: a parallel mouse and human analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidorov, Michael S; Deck, Gina M; Dolatshahi, Marjan; Thibert, Ronald L; Bird, Lynne M; Chu, Catherine J; Philpot, Benjamin D

    2017-01-01

    Clinicians have qualitatively described rhythmic delta activity as a prominent EEG abnormality in individuals with Angelman syndrome, but this phenotype has yet to be rigorously quantified in the clinical population or validated in a preclinical model. Here, we sought to quantitatively measure delta rhythmicity and evaluate its fidelity as a biomarker. We quantified delta oscillations in mouse and human using parallel spectral analysis methods and measured regional, state-specific, and developmental changes in delta rhythms in a patient population. Delta power was broadly increased and more dynamic in both the Angelman syndrome mouse model, relative to wild-type littermates, and in children with Angelman syndrome, relative to age-matched neurotypical controls. Enhanced delta oscillations in children with Angelman syndrome were present during wakefulness and sleep, were generalized across the neocortex, and were more pronounced at earlier ages. Delta rhythmicity phenotypes can serve as reliable biomarkers for Angelman syndrome in both preclinical and clinical settings.

  6. The rhythmic, transverse medullary slice preparation in respiratory neurobiology: contributions and caveats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funk, Gregory D; Greer, John J

    2013-04-01

    Our understanding of the sites and mechanisms underlying rhythmic breathing as well as the neuromodulatory control of respiratory rhythm, pattern, and respiratory motoneuron excitability during perinatal development has advanced significantly over the last 20 years. A major catalyst was the development in 1991 of the rhythmically-active medullary slice preparation, which provided precise mechanical and chemical control over the network as well as enhanced physical and optical access to key brainstem regions. Insights obtained in vitro have informed multiple mechanistic hypotheses. In vivo tests of these hypotheses, performed under conditions of reduced control and precision but more obvious physiological relevance, have clearly established the significance for respiratory neurobiology of the rhythmic slice preparation. We review the contributions of this preparation to current understanding/concepts in respiratory control, and outline the limitations of this approach in the context of studying rhythm and pattern generation, homeostatic control mechanisms and murine models of human genetic disorders that feature prominent breathing disturbances.

  7. Enhanced musical rhythmic perception in Turkish early and late learners of German

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Paula eRoncaglia-Denissen

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available As language rhythm relies partly on general acoustic properties, such as intensity and duration, mastering two languages with distinct rhythmic properties (i.e., stress position may enhance musical rhythm perception. We investigated whether second language (L2 competence affects musical rhythm aptitude in Turkish early (TELG and late learners (TLLG of German in comparison to German monolingual speakers (GMC. To account for inter-individual differences, we measured participants’ short-term and working memory capacity, melodic aptitude, and time they spent listening to music. Both L2 speaker groups perceived rhythmic variations significantly better than monolinguals. No differences were found between early and late learners’ performances. Our findings suggest that mastering two languages with different rhythmic properties enhances musical rhythm perception, providing further evidence of cognitive share between language and music.

  8. Modulation of the behavioral and electrical responses to the repellent DEET elicited by the pre-exposure to the same compound in Blattella germanica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sfara, Valeria; Mougabure-Cueto, Gastón A; González-Audino, Paola A

    2016-01-01

    Insects under different stimuli from the environment modify behavioural responses due to changes in the sensitivity of neurons at the peripheral and/or at the central level of the nervous system. This phenomenon is called neuronal plasticity, and sensory adaptation is an example of it. An insect repellent is a chemical that produces oriented movements of the insects away from its source. In this work we studied the modulation of the behavioural and electrical response to the repellent N, N-diethyl-3-methylbenzamide (DEET) in males of the German cockroach B. germanica produced by previous exposure to the same repellent. Methods. We determined repellency using a circular arena, one half of which was treated with DEET. The time spent by insects in each half of the arena was measured, and a repellency coefficient (RC) was calculated. The RCs of pre-exposed and non-pre-exposed insects were compared. To determine a possible role of nitric oxide in the modulation of the response to DEET after pre-exposure, the nitric oxide donor S-nitroso-acetyl-cysteine (SNAC) was applied on cockroaches' antennae. The electrical activity of the cockroaches' antennae in response to DEET was recorded using electroantennogram (EAG) technique. The response to DEET was recorded also after a long stimulation with the same repellent, and after topical application of SNAC and dbcGMP (a cGMP analogue) on the antennae. Results. We found that previous exposure of B. germanica males to the repellent DEET produced an increase of the repellency at the behavioural level, measured as RC. A possible role of nitric oxide (NO) in the transduction pathway of this phenomenon is suggested, since treatment of the cockroaches with the NO donor SNAC also produced an increase of the repellency elicited by DEET. On the other hand, the response of the cockroaches' antennae exposed to DEET was determined electrophysiologically. The electrical activity in response to DEET decreased when the insects' antennae were

  9. Modulation of the behavioral and electrical responses to the repellent DEET elicited by the pre-exposure to the same compound in Blattella germanica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeria Sfara

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Insects under different stimuli from the environment modify behavioural responses due to changes in the sensitivity of neurons at the peripheral and/or at the central level of the nervous system. This phenomenon is called neuronal plasticity, and sensory adaptation is an example of it. An insect repellent is a chemical that produces oriented movements of the insects away from its source. In this work we studied the modulation of the behavioural and electrical response to the repellent N, N-diethyl-3-methylbenzamide (DEET in males of the German cockroach B. germanica produced by previous exposure to the same repellent. Methods. We determined repellency using a circular arena, one half of which was treated with DEET. The time spent by insects in each half of the arena was measured, and a repellency coefficient (RC was calculated. The RCs of pre-exposed and non-pre-exposed insects were compared. To determine a possible role of nitric oxide in the modulation of the response to DEET after pre-exposure, the nitric oxide donor S-nitroso-acetyl-cysteine (SNAC was applied on cockroaches’ antennae. The electrical activity of the cockroaches’ antennae in response to DEET was recorded using electroantennogram (EAG technique. The response to DEET was recorded also after a long stimulation with the same repellent, and after topical application of SNAC and dbcGMP (a cGMP analogue on the antennae. Results. We found that previous exposure of B. germanica males to the repellent DEET produced an increase of the repellency at the behavioural level, measured as RC. A possible role of nitric oxide (NO in the transduction pathway of this phenomenon is suggested, since treatment of the cockroaches with the NO donor SNAC also produced an increase of the repellency elicited by DEET. On the other hand, the response of the cockroaches’ antennae exposed to DEET was determined electrophysiologically. The electrical activity in response to DEET decreased when the

  10. Synchronization modulation of Na/K pump molecules can hyperpolarize the membrane resting potential in intact fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei; Dando, Robin

    2007-02-01

    Previously, we have theoretically studied the possibility of electrical rhythmic entrainment of carrier-mediated ion transporters, and experimentally realized synchronization and acceleration of the Na/K pumping rate in the cell membrane of skeletal muscle fibers by a specially designed synchronization modulation electric field. In these studies we either used cut fibers under a voltage clamp or intact fibers, but in the presence of ion channels blockers. A question remained as to whether the field-induced activation observed in the pump molecules could effectively increase the intracellular ionic concentration and the membrane potential at physiological conditions. In this paper, we studied the effects of the field on intact fibers without any channel blockers. We monitored the field-induced changes in the ionic concentration gradient across the cell membrane and the membrane potential non-invasively by using a fluorescent probe and confocal microscopic imaging techniques. The results clearly show that the entrainment of the pump molecules by the synchronization modulation electric field can effectively increase the ionic concentration gradient, and hence, hyperpolarize the membrane potential.

  11. Predicting blood flow responses to rhythmic handgrip exercise from one second isometric contractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, M; Smart, N A; Van der Touw, T

    2016-11-08

    The aim of this work was to predict blood flow responses to rhythmic handgrip exercise from one second isometric contractions. Seven healthy men were studied. Each subject performed a single 1 s handgrip contraction at 10 %, 20 % and 40 % of the maximum handgrip strength. We then repeatedly summed hyperaemic responses from single contractions to predict hyperaemic response to a prolonged bout of rhythmic exercise. There was similarity between steady state brachial blood flow velocity (BBV) extrapolated from single handgrip contractions and during 2 min of rhythmic exercise for 20 % (10.0+/-3.8 cm/s vs. 10.2+/-2.6 cm/s, r=0.93, p=0.003) and 40 % of maximum contractions (14.2+/-5.5 cm/s vs. 15.6+/-3.4 cm/s, r=0.88, p=0.009), but not for 10 % (7.5+/-4.1 cm/s vs. 5.7+/-3.3 cm/s, r=0.94, p=0.018). BBV progressively rose substantially higher during rhythmic contractions than peak BBV observed during single contractions at matched intensity. Respective peak BBV during single contractions and steady state BBV rhythmic contractions were 4.4+/-2.1 and 5.7+/-3.3 cm.s(-1) at 10 % forearm strength (p=0.14), 5.6+/-2.4 and 10.2+/-2.8 cm.s(-1) at 20 % (p=0.002), and 7.0+/-2.5 and 15.6+/-3.6 cm.s(-1) at 40 % (p=0.003). In conclusion, there is similarity between the summated blood flow velocity calculated from a single 1 s muscle contraction and the steady state blood flow velocity response of rhythmic exercise.

  12. Synchronization-induced rhythmicity of circadian oscillators in the suprachiasmatic nucleus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Bernard

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available The suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN host a robust, self-sustained circadian pacemaker that coordinates physiological rhythms with the daily changes in the environment. Neuronal clocks within the SCN form a heterogeneous network that must synchronize to maintain timekeeping activity. Coherent circadian output of the SCN tissue is established by intercellular signaling factors, such as vasointestinal polypeptide. It was recently shown that besides coordinating cells, the synchronization factors play a crucial role in the sustenance of intrinsic cellular rhythmicity. Disruption of intercellular signaling abolishes sustained rhythmicity in a majority of neurons and desynchronizes the remaining rhythmic neurons. Based on these observations, the authors propose a model for the synchronization of circadian oscillators that combines intracellular and intercellular dynamics at the single-cell level. The model is a heterogeneous network of circadian neuronal oscillators where individual oscillators are damped rather than self-sustained. The authors simulated different experimental conditions and found that: (1 in normal, constant conditions, coupled circadian oscillators quickly synchronize and produce a coherent output; (2 in large populations, such oscillators either synchronize or gradually lose rhythmicity, but do not run out of phase, demonstrating that rhythmicity and synchrony are codependent; (3 the number of oscillators and connectivity are important for these synchronization properties; (4 slow oscillators have a higher impact on the period in mixed populations; and (5 coupled circadian oscillators can be efficiently entrained by light-dark cycles. Based on these results, it is predicted that: (1 a majority of SCN neurons needs periodic synchronization signal to be rhythmic; (2 a small number of neurons or a low connectivity results in desynchrony; and (3 amplitudes and phases of neurons are negatively correlated. The authors conclude that to

  13. Studies of the phase gradient at the boundary of the phase diffusion equation, motivated by peculiar wave patterns of rhythmic contraction in the amoeboid movement of Physarum polycephalum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iima, Makoto; Kori, Hiroshi; Nakagaki, Toshiyuki

    2017-04-01

    The boundary of a cell is the interface with its surroundings and plays a key role in controlling the cell movement adaptations to different environments. We propose a study of the boundary effects on the patterns and waves of the rhythmic contractions in plasmodia of Physarum polycephalum, a tractable model organism of the amoeboid type. Boundary effects are defined as the effects of both the boundary conditions and the boundary shape. The rhythmicity of contraction can be modulated by local stimulation of temperature, light and chemicals, and by local deformation of cell shape via mechanosensitive ion channels as well. First, we examined the effects of boundary cell shapes in the case of a special shape resembling a tadpole, while requiring that the natural frequency in the proximity of the boundary is slightly higher and uniform. The simulation model reproduced the approximate propagated wave, from the tail to the head, while the inward waves were observed only near the periphery of the head section of the tadpole-shape. A key finding was that the frequency of the rhythmic contractions depended on the local shape of cell boundary. This implies that the boundary conditions of the phase were not always homogeneous. To understand the dependency, we reduced the two-dimensional model into a one-dimensional continuum model with Neumann boundary conditions. Here, the boundary conditions reflect the frequency distribution at the boundary. We described the analytic solutions and calculated the relationship between the boundary conditions and the wave propagation for a one-dimensional model of the continuous oscillatory field and a discrete coupled oscillator system. The results obtained may not be limited to cell movement of Physarum, but may be applicable to the other physical systems since the analysis used a generic phase diffusion equation.

  14. Sensorized pacifier to quantify the rhythmicity of non-nutritive sucking: A preliminary study on newborns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassi, A; Cecchi, F; Guzzetta, A; Laschi, C

    2015-01-01

    Non-nutritive sucking (NNS) is one of the most significant spontaneous actions of infants. The suction/expression rhythmicity of NNS remains unknown. We developed a sensorized pacifier for an objective measurement of NNS. Two miniaturized digital pressure sensors are embedded into a commercial pacifier and they acquired suction and expression pressures simultaneously. Experimental tests with nine newborns confirmed that our device is suitable for the measurement of the natural NNS behavior and for the extrapolation of parameters related to the suction/expression rhythmicity. Preliminary results encourage future studies to evaluate the possibility to use these parameters as indicators of oral feeding readiness of premature infants.

  15. Serotonergic modulation of spinal motor control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perrier, Jean-Francois Marie; Cotel, Florence

    2015-01-01

    Serotonin (5-HT) is a monoamine that powerfully modulates spinal motor control by acting on intrasynaptic and extrasynaptic receptors. Here we review the diversity of 5-HT actions on locomotor and motoneuronal activities. Two approaches have been used on in vitro spinal cord preparations: either...... and promotes the excitability of motoneurons, while stronger release inhibits rhythmic activity and motoneuron firing. This latter effect is responsible for central fatigue and secures rotation of motor units....

  16. A Rhythmic Musical Intervention for Poor Readers: A Comparison of Efficacy with a Letter-Based Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhide, Adeetee; Power, Alan; Goswami, Usha

    2013-01-01

    There is growing evidence that children with reading difficulties show impaired auditory rhythm perception and impairments in musical beat perception tasks. Rhythmic musical interventions with poorer readers may thus improve rhythmic entrainment and consequently improve reading and phonological skills. Here we compare the effects of a musical…

  17. A Rhythmic Musical Intervention for Poor Readers: A Comparison of Efficacy with a Letter-Based Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhide, Adeetee; Power, Alan; Goswami, Usha

    2013-01-01

    There is growing evidence that children with reading difficulties show impaired auditory rhythm perception and impairments in musical beat perception tasks. Rhythmic musical interventions with poorer readers may thus improve rhythmic entrainment and consequently improve reading and phonological skills. Here we compare the effects of a musical…

  18. Influence of rhythmic grouping on duration perception: a novel auditory illusion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eveline Geiser

    Full Text Available This study investigated a potential auditory illusion in duration perception induced by rhythmic temporal contexts. Listeners with or without musical training performed a duration discrimination task for a silent period in a rhythmic auditory sequence. The critical temporal interval was presented either within a perceptual group or between two perceptual groups. We report the just-noticeable difference (difference limen, DL for temporal intervals and the point of subjective equality (PSE derived from individual psychometric functions based on performance of a two-alternative forced choice task. In musically untrained individuals, equal temporal intervals were perceived as significantly longer when presented between perceptual groups than within a perceptual group (109.25% versus 102.5% of the standard duration. Only the perceived duration of the between-group interval was significantly longer than its objective duration. Musically trained individuals did not show this effect. However, in both musically trained and untrained individuals, the relative difference limens for discriminating the comparison interval from the standard interval were larger in the between-groups condition than in the within-group condition (7.3% vs. 5.6% of the standard duration. Thus, rhythmic grouping affected sensitivity to duration changes in all listeners, with duration differences being harder to detect at boundaries of rhythm groups than within rhythm groups. Our results show for the first time that temporal Gestalt induces auditory duration illusions in typical listeners, but that musical experts are not susceptible to this effect of rhythmic grouping.

  19. Influence of rhythmic grouping on duration perception: a novel auditory illusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geiser, Eveline; Gabrieli, John D E

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated a potential auditory illusion in duration perception induced by rhythmic temporal contexts. Listeners with or without musical training performed a duration discrimination task for a silent period in a rhythmic auditory sequence. The critical temporal interval was presented either within a perceptual group or between two perceptual groups. We report the just-noticeable difference (difference limen, DL) for temporal intervals and the point of subjective equality (PSE) derived from individual psychometric functions based on performance of a two-alternative forced choice task. In musically untrained individuals, equal temporal intervals were perceived as significantly longer when presented between perceptual groups than within a perceptual group (109.25% versus 102.5% of the standard duration). Only the perceived duration of the between-group interval was significantly longer than its objective duration. Musically trained individuals did not show this effect. However, in both musically trained and untrained individuals, the relative difference limens for discriminating the comparison interval from the standard interval were larger in the between-groups condition than in the within-group condition (7.3% vs. 5.6% of the standard duration). Thus, rhythmic grouping affected sensitivity to duration changes in all listeners, with duration differences being harder to detect at boundaries of rhythm groups than within rhythm groups. Our results show for the first time that temporal Gestalt induces auditory duration illusions in typical listeners, but that musical experts are not susceptible to this effect of rhythmic grouping.

  20. Slowed EEG rhythmicity in patients with chronic pancreatitis: evidence of abnormal cerebral pain processing?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olesen, S.S.; Hansen, T.M.; Graversen, C.; Steimle, K.; Wilder-Smith, O.H.G.; Drewes, A.M.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIM: Intractable pain usually dominates the clinical presentation of chronic pancreatitis (CP). Slowing of electroencephalogram (EEG) rhythmicity has been associated with abnormal cortical pain processing in other chronic pain disorders. The aim of this study was to investigate the sp