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Sample records for rhodium complex immobilized

  1. Immobilization of rhodium complexes at thiolate monolayers on gold surfaces : Catalytic and structural studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Belser, T; Stöhr, Meike; Pfaltz, A

    2005-01-01

    Chiral rhodium-diphosphine complexes have been incorporated into self-assembled thiolate monolayers (SAMS) on gold colloids. Catalysts of this type are of interest because they combine properties of homogeneous and heterogeneous systems. In addition, it should be possible to influence the catalytic

  2. Rhodium thioacetate complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baranovskij, I.B.; Golubnichaya, M.A.; Mazo, G.Ya.

    1976-01-01

    Thioacetato-complexes of rhodium(II) were prepared by the reaction of thioacetic acid with rhodium(II) carboxylates. Diamagnetic compounds of the type Rh 2 (CH 3 COS) 4 2A, where A=H 2 O, Py, N 2 H 4 .HCl, Thio, KNCS, DMSO, CH 3 CN, CsCl, or CH 3 COSH, were isolated. Their infrared spectra were recorded, and the principal vibrational wavenumbers assigned. The X-ray electron spectra confirm that rhodium is divalent. The thioacetato-complexes are dimeric, with a metal-metal bond. [Rh(NH 3 ) 5 (CH 3 COS)]I 2 was prepared, and its properties studied. The significant decrease in the strength of the bonds formed by the axial ligands with rhodium is due to the strong trans-influence of the covalent rhodium-rhodium sigma-bond

  3. Rhodium complexes as therapeutic agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Dik-Lung; Wang, Modi; Mao, Zhifeng; Yang, Chao; Ng, Chan-Tat; Leung, Chung-Hang

    2016-02-21

    The landscape of inorganic medicinal chemistry has been dominated by the investigation of platinum, and to a lesser extent ruthenium, complexes over the past few decades. Recently, complexes based on other metal centers such as rhodium have attracted attention due to their tunable chemical and biological properties as well as distinct mechanisms of action. This perspective highlights recent examples of rhodium complexes that show diverse biological activities against various targets, including enzymes and protein-protein interactions.

  4. Hydroformylation of methyl oleate catalyzed by rhodium complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendes, Ana Nery Furlan; Rosa, Ricardo Gomes da; Gregorio, Jose Ribeiro

    2012-01-01

    In this work, we describe the hydroformylation of methyl oleate catalyzed by several rhodium complexes. Parameters including total pressure, phosphorous/rhodium and CO/H 2 ratio, temperature and phosphorous ligands were scanned. Total conversion of the starting double bonds was achieved while maintaining excellent selectivity in aldehydes. (author)

  5. Cyclopentadiene-mediated hydride transfer from rhodium complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitman, C L; Finster, O N L; Miller, A J M

    2016-07-12

    Attempts to generate a proposed rhodium hydride catalytic intermediate instead resulted in isolation of (Cp*H)Rh(bpy)Cl (1), a pentamethylcyclopentadiene complex, formed by C-H bond-forming reductive elimination from the fleeting rhodium hydride. The hydride transfer ability of diene 1 was explored through thermochemistry and hydride transfer reactions, including the reduction of NAD(+).

  6. Antagonizing STAT3 dimerization with a rhodium(III) complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Dik-Lung; Liu, Li-Juan; Leung, Ka-Ho; Chen, Yen-Ting; Zhong, Hai-Jing; Chan, Daniel Shiu-Hin; Wang, Hui-Min David; Leung, Chung-Hang

    2014-08-25

    Kinetically inert metal complexes have arisen as promising alternatives to existing platinum and ruthenium chemotherapeutics. Reported herein, to our knowledge, is the first example of a substitutionally inert, Group 9 organometallic compound as a direct inhibitor of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) dimerization. From a series of cyclometalated rhodium(III) and iridium(III) complexes, a rhodium(III) complex emerged as a potent inhibitor of STAT3 that targeted the SH2 domain and inhibited STAT3 phosphorylation and dimerization. Significantly, the complex exhibited potent anti-tumor activities in an in vivo mouse xenograft model of melanoma. This study demonstrates that rhodium complexes may be developed as effective STAT3 inhibitors with potent anti-tumor activity. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Electrochemical behavior of rhodium acetamidate immobilized on a carbon paste electrode: a hydrazine sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gil Eric de S.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The electrochemical behavior of rhodium acetamidate immobilized in carbon paste electrode and the consequences for sensor construction were evaluated. The electrode showed good stability and redox properties. Two reversible redox couples with midpoint potentials between 0.15 and 0.55 V vs SCE were observed. However, peak resolution in voltammetric studies was very dependent on the supporting electrolyte. The correlation between coordinating power of the electrolyte and peak potential suggests that the electrolyte can coordinate through the axial position of the complexes. Furthermore, the axial position may be also the catalytic site, as a catalytical response was observed for hydrazine oxidation. A good linear response range for hydrazine was fit by the equation i = 23.13 (± 0.34 c , where i = current in mA and c = concentration in mol dm-3 in the range of 10-5 up to 10-2 mol dm-3. The low applied potential (<300 mV indicates a good device for hydrazine sensor, minimizing interference problems. The short response time (~1 s may be useful in flow injection analysis. Furthermore, this system was very stable presenting good repeatability even after 30 measurements with a variance of 0.5 %.

  8. Diphosphinoazine Rhodium(I) and Iridium(I) Complexes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pošta, Martin; Čermák, Jan; Vojtíšek, P.; Císařová, I.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 71, č. 2 (2006), s. 197-206 ISSN 0010-0765 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA203/01/0554; GA ČR(CZ) GA203/99/M037 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : diphosphinoazines * rhodium complexes * iridium complexes Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 0.881, year: 2006

  9. Synthesis and characterization of the Rhodium (II) citrate complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Najjar, R.; Santos, F.S. dos; Seidel, W.

    1987-01-01

    The preparation and characterization of the rhodium (II) citrate is described. Rhodium citrate was prepared by reacting citric acid trihydrated (3,4 g, 16 mmols) with anhydrous rhodium acetate (0,44 g, 1 mmol). Th electronic instruments, thermogravimetric curve and spectrum of rhodium (II) citrate are analysed. (M.J.C.) [pt

  10. A MECHANISTIC STUDY OF RHODIUM TRI(ORTHO-TERT-BUTYLPHENYL)PHOSPHITE COMPLEXES AS HYDROFORMYLATION CATALYSTS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    JONGSMA, T; CHALLA, G; VANLEEUWEN, PWNM

    1991-01-01

    A mechanistic study of the hydroformylation cycle with a rhodium tri(o-t-butylphenyl)phosphite complex as catalyst is presented. Spectroscopic experiments prove that under hydroformylation conditions this complex is coordinated by only one phosphite. The complex has a high activity in the

  11. Interaction between water-soluble rhodium complex RhCl(CO)(TPPTS)₂ and surfactants probed by spectroscopic methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Li-Mei; Guo, Cai-Hong; Fu, Hai-Yan; Jiang, Xiao-Hui; Chen, Hua; Li, Rui-Xiang; Li, Xian-Jun

    2012-07-01

    The interactions of rhodium complex RhCl(CO)(TPPTS)(2) [TPPTS=P(m-C(6)H(4)SO(3)Na)(3)] with cationic, nonionic, and anionic surfactants have been investigated by UV-vis, fluorescence and (1)H NMR measurements. The presence of four different species of RhCl(CO)(TPPTS)(2) in cationic cetyltrimethylammonium (CTAB) solution has been demonstrated: free rhodium complex, rhodium complex bound to CTAB monomer, rhodium complex bound to CTAB premicelles, rhodium complex bound to CTAB micelles. The spectroscopy data show that RhCl(CO)(TPPTS)(2) can adsorb on the interface of cationic CTAB micelles by strong electrostatic attraction, weakly bind to the nonionic polyoxyethylene (20) sorbitan monolaurate (Tween 20) micelles by hydrophobic interaction, and does not interact with anion sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) micelles due to the strong electrostatic repulsion. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Hydroformylation of methyl oleate catalyzed by rhodium complexes; Hidroformilacao do oleato de metila catalisada por complexos de rodio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendes, Ana Nery Furlan [Universidade Federal do Espirito Santo (UFES), Sao Mateus, ES (Brazil). Centro Universitario Norte do Espirito Santo. Dept. de Ciencias Naturais; Rosa, Ricardo Gomes da; Gregorio, Jose Ribeiro, E-mail: jrg@iq.ufrgs.br [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica

    2012-07-01

    In this work, we describe the hydroformylation of methyl oleate catalyzed by several rhodium complexes. Parameters including total pressure, phosphorous/rhodium and CO/H{sub 2} ratio, temperature and phosphorous ligands were scanned. Total conversion of the starting double bonds was achieved while maintaining excellent selectivity in aldehydes. (author)

  13. Olefins hydro-formylation catalysed by rhodium complexes using ionic liquids; Hydroformylation des olefines par les complexes du rhodium dans les liquides ioniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Favre, F.

    2000-10-26

    Biphasic long chain olefins hydro-formylation catalysed by rhodium complexes using ionic liquids allows a selective reaction and an easy separation of the products from the catalyst. This study reports the synthesis of ionic liquids that were used as the catalyst's solvent. Their physical and chemical properties (melting point, solubility of organic substrates) can be varied with the structure of the organic cation (imidazolium, pyridinium, pyrrolydinium) and with its substituents (nature, length, number). It depends also on the nature of the inorganic anion (hexa-fluoro-phosphate, tetrafluoroborate, tri-fluoro-acetate, triflate, bistriflylamidure...). The use of phosphorus ligands bearing ionic functions proved to be efficient to maintain the onerous rhodium catalyst in the ionic liquid phase. Phosphines, phosphites and phosphinites including anionic (sulfonate, carboxylate) or cationic (imidazolium, pyridinium, guanidinium, phosphonium) groups have been synthesised. Finally, the influences of the ligand and of the ionic liquid on the catalytic system performances are described. Selectivities in aldehydes and reaction rates proved to be highly dependent on the nature of the ligand and of the ionic liquid. The different possibilities of recycling the ionic phase containing the rhodium catalyst have been also studied. (author)

  14. Spectrophotometric determination of ruthenium(III) and rhodium(III) after extraction of their cyclohexylthioglycolate complexes into chloroform

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao, A.L.J.; Gupta, Usha; Puri, B.K.

    1986-01-01

    Cyclohexylthioglycolate has been used as a reagent for the spectrophotometric determination of ruthenium(III) and rhodium(III) after the extraction of their complexes into chloroform. Various parameters involved in the extraction have been studied and the composition of the extracted complex has been established in each instance. Ruthenium and rhodium complexes are extracted into chloroform in the pH ranges 5.0-9.0 and 9.0-12.5, respectively. The ruthenium complex absorbs strongly at 365 nm, whereas the rhodium complex shows a maximum absorption at 345 nm. Beer's law is obeyed over the concentration range 6-96 μg for ruthenium and 2-41 μg for rhodium in 10 ml of the chloroform solution. The molar absorptivities are 5.02 x 10 3 l mol -1 cm -1 for ruthenium and 1.60 x 10 4 l mol -1 cm -1 for rhodium. Ten replicate determinations on a sample solution containing 60.3 μg of ruthenium or 20.6 μg of rhodium gave mean absorbances of 0.300 and 0.320 with standard deviations of 0.0021 and 0.0025 and relative standard deviations of 0.70% and 0.78%, respectively. The interference of various ions has been studied and the method has been applied to the determination of the metals in various synthetic samples. Conditions have also been developed for the simultaneous determination of ruthenium and rhodium. (author)

  15. Immobile Complex Verbs in Germanic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vikner, Sten

    2005-01-01

    the V° requirements or the V* requirements. Haider (1993, p. 62) and Koopman (1995), who also discuss such immobile verbs, only account for verbs with two prefix-like parts (e.g., German uraufführen ‘to perform (a play) for the first time' or Dutch herinvoeren ‘to reintroduce'), not for the more...... frequent type with only one prefix-like part (e.g., German bauchreden/Dutch buikspreken ‘to ventriloquize'). This analysis will try to account not only for the data discussed in Haider (1993) and Koopman (1995) but also for the following: - why immobile verbs include verbs with only one prefix-like part...... are immobile, - why such verbs are not found in Germanic VO-languages such as English and Scandinavian....

  16. Effects of human serun albumin in some biological properties of rhodium(II complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Espósito Breno P.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The affinities for human albumin (HSA of five rhodium(II complexes of general formula [Rh2(bridge4] (bridge = acetate, propionate, butyrate, trifluoroacetate and trifluoroacetamidate were determined by spectrophotometry. In the case of the alkylcarboxylates, an inverse correlation of affinity with their liposolubilities was observed. Diffusion of the free or protein-bound complexes into Ehrlich cells in vitro seems to be primarily governed by the hydrophobic character of the complex. The complex [Rh2(tfc4] exhibited affinity towards the protein (K = 214.1 as well as cell partition both in the absence (32.1% and presence (48.6% of HSA. The compound HSA: [Rh2(tfc4] has had its antitumoral action in tumor-bearing Balb-c mice investigated, showing that HSA can be a drug reservoir for the rhodium complex.

  17. Complexes of technetium, rhenium, and rhodium with sexidentate Schiff-base ligands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunter, G.; Kilcullen, N.

    1989-01-01

    The monocationic technetium (IV) and rhenium (IV) complexes with the sexidentate Schiff-base ligands tris[2-(2'-hydroxybenzylideneethyl)]amine and its substituted derivatives have been prepared and their electrochemical properties studied. The variable-temperature 90.6 MHz 13 C-{ 1 H} n.m.r. spectrum of the rhodium (III) complex of tris[2-(2-hydroxy-5'-isopropylbenzylideneethyl)-amine] has been observed, indicating fluxionality at temperatures above 218 K. (author)

  18. Functionalized cyclopentadienyl rhodium(III) bipyridine complexes: synthesis, characterization, and catalytic application in hydrogenation of ketones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wan-Hui; Suna, Yuki; Himeda, Yuichiro; Muckerman, James T; Fujita, Etsuko

    2013-07-14

    A series of highly functionalized cyclopentadienyl rhodium(III) complexes, [Cp'Rh(bpy)Br](ClO4) (Cp' = substituted cyclopentadienyl), was synthesized from various multi-substituted cyclopentadienes (Cp'H). [Rh(cod)Cl]2 and Cp'H were firstly converted to [Cp'Rh(cod)] complexes, which were then treated with Br2 to give the rhodium(III) dibromides [Cp'RhBr2]2. The novel complexes [Cp'Rh(bpy)Br](ClO4) were obtained readily by the reaction of 2,2'-bipyridine with [Cp'RhBr2]2. These rhodium complexes [Cp'Rh(bpy)Br](ClO4) were fully characterized and utilized in the hydrogenation of cyclohexanone and acetophenone with generally high yields, but they did not exhibit the same reactivity trends for the two substrate ketones. The different activity of these complexes for the different substrates may be due to the influence of the substituents on the Cp' rings.

  19. Examining Rhodium Catalyst complexes for Use with Conducting Polymers Designed for Fuel Cells in Preparing Biosensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carpio, M.M.; Kerr, J.B.

    2005-01-01

    Biosensing devices are important because they can detect, record, and transmit information regarding the presence of, or physiological changes in, different chemical or biological materials in the environment. The goal of this research is to prepare a biosensing device that is effective, quick, and low cost. This is done by examining which chemicals will work best when placed in a biosensor. The first study involved experimenting on a rhodium catalyst complexed with ligands such as bipyridine and imidazole. The rhodium catalyst is important because it is reduced from RhIII to RhI, forms a hydride by reaction with water and releases the hydride to react with nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) to selectively produce 1,4-NADH, the reduced form of NAD+. The second study looked at different types of ketones and enzymes for the enzyme-substrate reaction converting a ketone into an alcohol. Preliminary results showed that the rhodium complexed with bipyridine was able to carry out all the reactions, while the rhodium complexed with imidazole was not able to produce and release hydrides. In addition, the most effective ketone to use is benzylacetone with the enzyme alcohol dehydrogenase from baker’s yeast. Future work includes experimenting with bis-imidazole, which mimics the structure of bipyridine to see if it has the capability to reduce and if the reduction rate is comparable to the bipyridine complex. Once all testing is completed, the fastest catalysts will be combined with polymer membranes designed for fuel cells to prepare biosensing devices that can be used in a variety of applications including ones in the medical and environmental fields.

  20. Intramolecular Hydroamination of Unbiased and Functionalized Primary Aminoalkenes Catalyzed by a Rhodium Aminophosphine Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julian, Lisa D.; Hartwig, John F.

    2010-01-01

    We report a rhodium catalyst that exhibits high reactivity for the hydroamination of primary aminoalkenes that are unbiased toward cyclization and that possess functional groups that would not be tolerated in hydroaminations catalyzed by more electrophilic systems. This catalyst contains an unusual diaminophosphine ligand that binds to rhodium in a κ3-P,O,P mode. The reactions catalyzed by this complex typically proceed at mild temperatures (room temperature to 70 °C), occur with primary aminoalkenes lacking substituents on the alkyl chain that bias the system toward cyclization, occur with primary aminoalkenes containing chloride, ester, ether, enolizable ketone, nitrile, and unprotected alcohol functionality, and occur with primary aminoalkenes containing internal olefins. Mechanistic data imply that these reactions occur with a turnover-limiting step that is different from that of reactions catalyzed by late transition metal complexes of Pd, Pt, and Ir. This change in the turnover-limiting step and resulting high activity of the catalyst stem from favorable relative rates for protonolysis of the M-C bond to release the hydroamination product vs reversion of the aminoalkyl intermediate to regenerate the acyclic precursor. Probes for the origin of the reactivity of the rhodium complex of L1 imply that the aminophosphine groups lead to these favorable rates by effects beyond steric demands and simple electron donation to the metal center. PMID:20839807

  1. Hydrolysis of Letrozole catalyzed by macrocyclic Rhodium (I) Schiff-base complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, P Muralidhar; Shanker, K; Srinivas, V; Krishna, E Ravi; Rohini, R; Srikanth, G; Hu, Anren; Ravinder, V

    2015-03-15

    Ten mononuclear Rhodium (I) complexes were synthesized by macrocyclic ligands having N4 and N2O2 donor sites. Square planar geometry is assigned based on the analytical and spectral properties for all complexes. Rh(I) complexes were investigated as catalysts in hydrolysis of Nitrile group containing pharmaceutical drug Letrozole. A comparative study showed that all the complexes are efficient in the catalysis. The percent yields of all the catalytic reaction products viz. drug impurities were determined by spectrophotometric procedures and characterized by spectral studies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Ruthenium, osmium and rhodium complexes of polypyridyl ligands ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Discipline of Silicates and Catalysis, Central Salt and Marine Chemicals ... However, synthetic methods have also been developed to prepare complexes with ... 3.2 Synthesis and characterisation of ruthenium(II) and osmium(II) complexes18, ...

  3. Correlation between the Stereochemistry and Bioactivity in Octahedral Rhodium Prolinato Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajaratnam, Rajathees; Martin, Elisabeth K; Dörr, Markus; Harms, Klaus; Casini, Angela; Meggers, Eric

    2015-08-17

    Controlling the relative and absolute configuration of octahedral metal complexes constitutes a key challenge that needs to be overcome in order to fully exploit the structural properties of octahedral metal complexes for applications in the fields of catalysis, materials sciences, and life sciences. Herein, we describe the application of a proline-based chiral tridentate ligand to decisively control the coordination mode of an octahedral rhodium(III) complex. We demonstrate the mirror-like relationship of synthesized enantiomers and differences between diastereomers. Further, we demonstrate, using the established pyridocarbazole pharmacophore ligand as part of the organometallic complexes, the importance of the relative and absolute stereochemistry at the metal toward chiral environments like protein kinases. Protein kinase profiling and inhibition data confirm that the proline-based enantiopure rhodium(III) complexes, despite having all of the same constitution, differ strongly in their selectivity properties despite their unmistakably mutual origin. Moreover, two exemplary compounds have been shown to induce different toxic effects in an ex vivo rat liver model.

  4. A multi-target caffeine derived rhodium(i) N-heterocyclic carbene complex: evaluation of the mechanism of action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jing-Jing; Muenzner, Julienne K; Abu El Maaty, Mohamed A; Karge, Bianka; Schobert, Rainer; Wölfl, Stefan; Ott, Ingo

    2016-08-16

    A rhodium(i) and a ruthenium(ii) complex with a caffeine derived N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC) ligand were biologically investigated as organometallic conjugates consisting of a metal center and a naturally occurring moiety. While the ruthenium(ii) complex was largely inactive, the rhodium(i) NHC complex displayed selective cytotoxicity and significant anti-metastatic and in vivo anti-vascular activities and acted as both a mammalian and an E. coli thioredoxin reductase inhibitor. In HCT-116 cells it increased the reactive oxygen species level, leading to DNA damage, and it induced cell cycle arrest, decreased the mitochondrial membrane potential, and triggered apoptosis. This rhodium(i) NHC derivative thus represents a multi-target compound with promising anti-cancer potential.

  5. Platinum, palladium, and rhodium analyses of ultramafic and mafic rocks from the Stillwater Complex, Montana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Norman J; Riley, Leonard Benjamin; Haffty, Joseph

    1969-01-01

    Analyses by a combination fire- assay-solution-optical-emission spectrographic method of 137 rocks from the Stillwater Complex, Mont., indicate that platinum, palladium, and rhodium are preferentially concentrated in chromitite zones. The A chromitite zone (21 samples) has an average of 988.9 ppb (pans per billion, 10-9) Pt, 2290.2 ppb Pd, and 245.9 ppb Rh and reaches a maximum (to date) of 8,000 ppb Pt, 11,000 ppb Pd, and 1,700 ppb Rh.

  6. Complexation of diphenyl(phenylacetenyl)phosphine to rhodium(III) tetraphenyl porphyrins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stulz, Eugen; Scott, Sonya M; Bond, Andrew D

    2003-01-01

    ). The methylide on rhodium in 3 is not displaced, leading selectively to the mono-phosphine complex (DPAP)(Me)Rh(TPP) (5). The first and second association constants, as determined by isothermal titration calorimetry and UV-vis titrations, are in the range 10(4)-10(7) M(-1) (in CH(2)Cl(2)). Using LDI-TOF mass....... The largest values of DeltaG degrees are found for 6. The thermodynamic and UV-vis data reveal that the methylide and the phosphine ligand have an almost identical electronic trans-influence on the sixth ligand....

  7. Mechanism of intermolecular hydroacylation of vinylsilanes catalyzed by a rhodium(I) olefin complex: a DFT study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Qingxi; Shen, Wei; Li, Ming

    2012-03-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) was used to investigate the Rh(I)-catalyzed intermolecular hydroacylation of vinylsilane with benzaldehyde. All intermediates and transition states were optimized completely at the B3LYP/6-31G(d,p) level (LANL2DZ(f) for Rh). Calculations indicated that Rh(I)-catalyzed intermolecular hydroacylation is exergonic, and the total free energy released is -110 kJ mol(-1). Rh(I)-catalyzed intermolecular hydroacylation mainly involves the active catalyst CA2, rhodium-alkene-benzaldehyde complex M1, rhodium-alkene-hydrogen-acyl complex M2, rhodium-alkyl-acyl complex M3, rhodium-alkyl-carbonyl-phenyl complex M4, rhodium-acyl-phenyl complex M5, and rhodium-ketone complex M6. The reaction pathway CA2 + R2 → M1b → T1b → M2b → T2b1 → M3b1 → T4b → M4b → T5b → M5b → T6b → M6b → P2 is the most favorable among all reaction channels of Rh(I)-catalyzed intermolecular hydroacylation. The reductive elimination reaction is the rate-determining step for this pathway, and the dominant product predicted theoretically is the linear ketone, which is consistent with Brookhart's experiments. Solvation has a significant effect, and it greatly decreases the free energies of all species. The use of the ligand Cp' (Cp' = C(5)Me(4)CF(3)) decreased the free energies in general, and in this case the rate-determining step was again the reductive elimination reaction.

  8. Carbonyl complexes of rhodium with N-donor ligands: factors determining the formation of terminal versus bridging carbonyls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dzik, W.I.; Creusen, C.; de Gelder, R.; Peters, T.P.J.; Smits, J.M.M.; de Bruin, B.

    2010-01-01

    Cationic rhodium carbonyl complexes supported by a series of different N-3- and N-4-donor ligands were prepared, and their ability to form carbonyl-bridged species was evaluated. Complex [Rh(K3-bpa)(cod)r (1(+)) (bpa = bis(2-picolyBamine, cod = cis,cis-1,5-cyclooctadiene) reacts with I bar of CO to

  9. Tris-(1,3-diaryltriazenide) complexes of rhodium – Synthesis ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    structure and, spectral and electrochemical properties. CHHANDASI ... Cl, NO2) with [Rh(PPh3)2(CO)Cl] in ethanol in the presence of NEt3 produces a series of tris- ... Rh(III)–Rh(IV) oxidation (within 0⋅84–1⋅67 V vs SCE), followed by an oxidation of the coordinated tri- ..... bient temperature (298 K) all the complexes have.

  10. Bimetallic poly- and oligo-nuclear complexes based on a rhodium(III) metalloligand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasilchenko, Danila B.; Venediktov, Anatoliy B.; Korenev, Sergey V.; Filatov, Evgeniy Yu.; Baidina, Iraida A.; Nadolinnyi, Vladimir A.

    2012-10-01

    Interaction of trans-[Rh(i-Nic)4Cl2]3- anions (i-Nic- - isonicotinate anion) with Cuaq2+ and Coaq2+ cations in water has afforded complex salts Co3[Rh(i-Nic)4Cl2]2·17H2O (1) and Cu3[Rh(i-Nic)4Cl2]2·14H2O (2). Oligonuclear character of 1 and 2 has been established. A coordination polymer Cu5[Rh(i-Nic)4Cl2]2(i-Nic)2(OH)2·2H2O (3) has been crystallized by hydrothermal treatment of 2 at 160 °C, and its structure was determined by X-ray structural analysis. EPR data for the complexes has been collected and interpreted. Thermal decomposition of the salts was studied by c-DTA. Bimetallic alloys rhodium-copper and rhodium-cobalt have been obtained as final products of thermal decomposition.

  11. Mono and dinuclear iridium, rhodium and ruthenium complexes containing chelating carboxylato pyrazine ligands: Synthesis, molecular structure and electrochemistry

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Govindaswamy, P.; Therrien, B.; Süss-Fink, G.; Štěpnička, P.; Ludvík, Jiří

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 692, č. 8 (2007), s. 1661-1671 ISSN 0022-328X R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC510; GA MŠk(CZ) LC06070 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : dinuclear complexes * iridium * rhodium * ruthenium * electrochemistry Subject RIV: CG - Electrochemistry Impact factor: 2.168, year: 2007

  12. Complexation of rhodium(II) tetracarboxylates with aliphatic diamines in solution: 1H and 13C NMR and DFT investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaźwiński, Jarosław; Sadlej, Agnieszka

    2013-10-01

    The complexation of rhodium(II) tetraacetate, tetrakistrifluoroaceate and tetrakisoctanoate with a set of diamines (ethane-1,diamine, propane-1,3-diamine and nonane-1,9-diamine) and their N,N'-dimethyl and N,N,N',N'-tetramethyl derivatives in chloroform solution has been investigated by (1) H and (13) C NMR spectroscopy and density functional theory (DFT) modelling. A combination of two bifunctional reagents, diamines and rhodium(II) tetracarboxylates, yielded insoluble coordination polymers as main products of complexation and various adducts in the solution, being in equilibrium with insoluble material. All diamines initially formed the 2 : 1 (blue), (1 : 1)n oligomeric (red) and 1 : 2 (red) axial adducts in solution, depending on the reagents' molar ratio. Adducts of primary and secondary diamines decomposed in the presence of ligand excess, the former via unstable equatorial complexes. The complexation of secondary diamines slowed down the inversion at nitrogen atoms in NH(CH3 ) functional groups and resulted in the formation of nitrogenous stereogenic centres, detectable by NMR. Axial adducts of tertiary diamines appeared to be relatively stable. The presence of long aliphatic chains in molecules (adducts of nonane-1,9-diamines or rhodium(II) tetrakisoctanoate) increased adduct solubility. Hypothetical structures of the equatorial adduct of rhodium(II) tetraacetate with ethane-1,2-diamine and their NMR parameters were explored by means of DFT calculations. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Bibliographies on radiation chemistry. 9. Metal ions and complexes. Part A: Cobalt, rhodium, iridium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffman, M Z; Ross, A B

    1986-01-01

    The one-electron oxidation and reduction of metal ions and complexes can yield species in unusual oxidation states, and ligand-radicals coordinated to the central metal. These often unstable species can be mechanistically important intermediates in thermal, photochemical, and electrochemical reactions involving metal-containing substances. Their generation via radiolysis provides an alternate means of characterizing them using kinetic and spectroscopic techniques. We hope these bibliographies on the radiation chemistry of metal ions and complexes, presented according to periodic groups, will prove useful to researchers in metallo-redox chemistry. These bibliographies contain only primary literature sources; reviews are not included. However, a list of general review articles on the radiation chemistry of metal ions and complexes is presented here in the first section which covers cobalt, rhodium and iridium, Group 9 in the new IUPAC notation. Additional parts of the bibliography are planned, covering other periodic groups. Part A of the bibliography was prepared by a search of the Radiation Chemistry Data Center Bibliographic Data Base (RCDCbib) through January 1986 for papers on rhodium, iridium and cobalt compounds, and radiolysis (both continuous and pulsed). Papers in which the use of metal compounds was incidental to the primary objective of the study were excluded. Excluded also were publications in unrefereed and obscure sources such as meeting proceedings, internal reports, dissertations, and patents. The majority of the studies in the resultant compilation deal with experiments performed on solutions, mainly aqueous, although a substantial fraction is devoted to solid-state esr measurements. The references are listed in separate sections for each of the metals, and are presented in approximate chronological order.

  14. Dimerisation, rhodium complex formation and rearrangements of N-heterocyclic carbenes of indazoles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zong Guan

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Deprotonation of indazolium salts at low temperatures gives N-heterocyclic carbenes of indazoles (indazol-3-ylidenes which can be trapped as rhodium complexes (X-ray analysis. In the absence of Rh, the indazol-3-ylidenes spontaneously dimerize under ring cleavage of one of the N,N-bonds and ring closure to an indazole–indole spiro compound which possesses an exocyclic imine group. The E/Z isomers of the imines can be separated by column chromatography when methanol is used as eluent. We present results of a single crystal X-ray analysis of one of the E-isomers, which equilibrate in solution as well as in the solid state. Heating of the indazole–indole spiro compounds results in the formation of quinazolines by a ring-cleavage/ring-closure sequence (X-ray analysis. Results of DFT calculations are presented.

  15. Synthesis and structures of a pincer-type rhodium(iii) complex: reactivity toward biomolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milutinović, Milan M; Bogojeski, Jovana V; Klisurić, Olivera; Scheurer, Andreas; Elmroth, Sofi K C; Bugarčić, Živadin D

    2016-10-04

    A novel rhodium(iii) complex [Rh III (H 2 L tBu )Cl 3 ] (1) (H 2 L tBu = 2,6-bis(5-tert-butyl-1H-pyrazol-3-yl)pyridine) containing a pincer type, tridentate nitrogen-donor chelate system was synthesized. Single crystal X-ray structure analysis revealed that 1 crystallizes in the orthorhombic space group Pbcn with a = 20.7982(6), b = 10.8952(4), c = 10.9832(4) Å, V = 2488.80(15) Å 3 , and eight molecules in the unit cell. The rhodium center in the complex [Rh III (H 2 L tBu )Cl 3 ] (1) is coordinated in a slightly distorted octahedral geometry by the tridentate N,N,N-donor and three chloro ligands, adopting a mer arrangement with an essentially planar ligand skeleton. Due to the tridentate coordination of the N,N,N-donor, the central nitrogen atom N1 is located closer to the Rh III center. The reactivity of the synthesized complex toward small biomolecules (l-methionine (l-Met), guanosine-5'-monophosphate (5'-GMP), l-histidine (l-His) and glutathione (GSH)) and to a series of duplex DNAs and RNA was investigated. The order of reactivity of the studied small biomolecules is: 5'-GMP > GSH > l-Met > l-His. Duplex RNA reacts faster with the [Rh III (H 2 L tBu )Cl 3 ] complex than duplex DNA, while shorter duplex DNA (15mer GG) reacts faster compared with 22mer GG duplex DNA. In addition, a higher reactivity is achieved with a DNA duplex with a centrally located GG-sequence than with a 22GTG duplex DNA, in which the GG-sequence is separated by a T base. Furthermore, the interaction of this metal complex 1 with calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) was examined by absorption (UV-Vis) and emission spectral studies (EthBr displacement studies). Overall, the studied complex exhibited good DNA and BSA interaction ability.

  16. Synthesis and structural studies of Cp{sup *} rhodium and Cp{sup *} iridium complexes of picolinic hydrazine ligand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palepu, Narasinga Rao; Kollipara, Mohan Rao [Centre for Advanced Studies in Chemistry, North-Eastern Hill University, Shillong (India); Kaminsky Werner [Dept. of Chemistry, University of Washington, Seattle (United States)

    2017-01-15

    A series of Cp{sup *}Rh and Cp{sup *}Ir complexes of picolinic hydrazine ligand are synthesized and characterized. Picolinic hydrazine has yielded only dinuclear complexes in the case of rhodium metal whereas both mono and dinuclear complexes with iridium metal. Iridium complexes are formed as quaternary salts by the migration of the N–H proton onto the adjacent amine group of the hydrazine after binding to the metal. Picolinic hydrazine acts as nitrogen and oxygen donor ligand in the form of bi and tetradentate bonding modes.

  17. Versatile deprotonated NHC: C,N-bridged dinuclear iridium and rhodium complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albert Poater

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Bearing the versatility of N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC ligands, here density functional theory (DFT calculations unravel the capacity of coordination of a deprotonated NHC ligand (pNHC to generate a doubly C2,N3-bridged dinuclear complex. Here, in particular the discussion is based on the combination of the deprotonated 1-arylimidazol (aryl = mesityl (Mes with [M(cod(μ-Cl] (M = Ir, Rh generated two geometrical isomers of complex [M(cod{µ-C3H2N2(Mes-κC2,κN3}]2. The latter two isomers display conformations head-to-head (H-H and head-to-tail (H-T of CS and C2 symmetry, respectively. The isomerization from the H-H to the H-T conformation is feasible, whereas next substitutions of the cod ligand by CO first, and PMe3 later confirm the H-T coordination as the thermodynamically preferred. It is envisaged the exchange of the metal, from iridium to rhodium, confirming here the innocence of the nature of the metal for such arrangements of the bridging ligands.

  18. A rhodium(III) complex for high-affinity DNA base-pair mismatch recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junicke, Henrik; Hart, Jonathan R.; Kisko, Jennifer; Glebov, Oleg; Kirsch, Ilan R.; Barton, Jacqueline K.

    2003-01-01

    A rhodium(III) complex, rac-[Rh(bpy)2phzi]3+ (bpy, 2,2′-bipyridine; phzi, benzo[a]phenazine-5,6-quinone diimine) has been designed as a sterically demanding intercalator targeted to destabilized mismatched sites in double-helical DNA. The complex is readily synthesized by condensation of the phenazine quinone with the corresponding diammine complex. Upon photoactivation, the complex promotes direct strand scission at single-base mismatch sites within the DNA duplex. As with the parent mismatch-specific reagent, [Rh(bpy)2(chrysi)]3+ [chrysene-5,6-quinone diimine (chrysi)], mismatch selectivity depends on the helix destabilization associated with mispairing. Unlike the parent chrysi complex, the phzi analogue binds and cleaves with high affinity and efficiency. The specific binding constants for CA, CC, and CT mismatches within a 31-mer oligonucleotide duplex are 0.3, 1, and 6 × 107 M−1, respectively; site-specific photocleavage is evident at nanomolar concentrations. Moreover, the specificity, defined as the ratio in binding affinities for mispaired vs. well paired sites, is maintained. The increase in affinity is attributed to greater stability in the mismatched site associated with stacking by the heterocyclic aromatic ligand. The high-affinity complex is also applied in the differential cleavage of DNA obtained from cell lines deficient in mismatch repair vs. those proficient in mismatch repair. Agreement is found between photocleavage by the mismatch-specific probes and deficiency in mismatch repair. This mismatch-specific targeting, therefore, offers a potential strategy for new chemotherapeutic design. PMID:12610209

  19. The liquid-liquid extraction of chloro-(trichlorostannato)-rhodium(I/III) and -ruthenium (II) complexes from dilute hydrochloric acid into 4-methylpentan-2-one

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wyrley-Birch, J.M.

    1984-10-01

    The effect of stannous chloride on the liquid-liquid extraction of rhodium and ruthenium from hydrochloric acid solutions into 4-methyl-pentan-2-one (MIBK)/hexane mixtures was studied in detail. Stannous chloride concentrations were found to considerably increase the efficiency of the extraction of rhodium and ruthenium into the organic phase. Chloro-(trichlorostannato)-rhodium (I/III) complexes were formed at room temperature. The rate of chloro-(trichlorostannato)-ruthenium (II) complex formation was extremely slow at room temperature, but increased on heating of the aqueous solutions. The amount of rhodium and ruthenium extracted into the organic phase depend on the Sn(II):M molar ratio, the HCl, H sup(+) and Cl sup(-) concentrations, as well as the equilibration time. A 119 Sn NMR study of the MIBK extracts, showed that the stoichiometry of the chloro-(trichlorostannato)-rhodium (I/III) complexes extracted into the organic phase was dependent on the Sn(II):Rh(III) molar ratio as well as the HCl, H sup(+) and Cl sup(-) concentrations in the aqueous phase. The predominant species observed in the organic phase from HCl solutions containing Sn(II):Rh(III) ratios >= 5:1, was shown to be an hydrido complex having the form [RhH(SnCl 3 ) 4 Cl] 3 sup(-) or [RhH(SnCl 3 ) 4 ]2 sup(-). An essentially quantitative separation of rhodium and ruthenium was achieved utilising the variation in the rates of rhodium-tin and ruthenium-tin complex formation

  20. A rhodium(III) complex inhibits LPS-induced nitric oxide production and angiogenic activity in cellulo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Li-Juan; Lin, Sheng; Chan, Daniel Shiu-Hin; Vong, Chi Teng; Hoi, Pui Man; Wong, Chun-Yuen; Ma, Dik-Lung; Leung, Chung-Hang

    2014-11-01

    Metal-containing complexes have arisen as viable alternatives to organic molecules as therapeutic agents. Metal complexes possess a number of advantages compared to conventional carbon-based compounds, such as distinct geometries, interesting electronic properties, variable oxidation states and the ability to arrange different ligands around the metal centre in a precise fashion. Meanwhile, nitric oxide (NO) plays key roles in the regulation of angiogenesis, vascular permeability and inflammation. We herein report a novel cyclometalated rhodium(III) complex as an inhibitor of lipopolysaccharides (LPS)-induced NO production in RAW264.7 macrophages. Experiments suggested that the inhibition of NO production in cells by complex 1 was mediated through the down-regulation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) activity. Furthermore, complex 1 inhibited angiogenesis in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) as revealed by an endothelial tube formation assay. This study demonstrates that kinetically inert rhodium(III) complexes may be potentially developed as effective anti-angiogenic agents. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Glucose biosensor based on a platinum electrode modified with rhodium nanoparticles and with glucose oxidase immobilized on gold nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, Xishan; Jian, Jinming; Liang, Bo; Ye, Xuesong; Zhang, Yelei

    2014-01-01

    We have developed an enzymatic glucose biosensor that is based on a flat platinum electrode which was covered with electrophoretically deposited rhodium (Rh) nanoparticles and then sintered to form a large surface area. The biosensor was obtained by depositing glucose oxidase (GOx), Nafion, and gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) on the Rh electrode. The electrical potential and the fractions of Nafion and GOx were optimized. The resulting biosensor has a very high sensitivity (68.1 μA mM −1 cm −2 ) and good linearity in the range from 0.05 to 15 mM (r = 0.989). The limit of detection is as low as 0.03 mM (at an SNR of 3). The glucose biosensor also is quite selective and is not interfered by electroactive substances including ascorbic acid, uric acid and acetaminophen. The lifespan is up to 90 days. It was applied to the determination of glucose in blood serum, and the results compare very well with those obtained with a clinical analyzer. (author)

  2. Coupling of Electron Transfer and Bond Dissociation Processes in Dinuclear Complexes with Rhodium and Iridium Reaction Centers Bridged by 2,2'-Bipyrimidine

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kaim, W.; Reinhardt, R.; Greulich, S.; Sieger, M.; Klein, A.; Fiedler, Jan

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 66, č. 2 (2001), s. 291-306 ISSN 0010-0765 R&D Projects: GA MŠk OC D15.10 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4040901 Keywords : EPR spectroscopy * iridium complexes * rhodium complexes Subject RIV: CG - Electrochemistry Impact factor: 0.778, year: 2001

  3. A chemical-biological evaluation of rhodium(I) N-heterocyclic carbene complexes as prospective anticancer drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oehninger, Luciano; Küster, Laura Nadine; Schmidt, Claudia; Muñoz-Castro, Alvaro; Prokop, Aram; Ott, Ingo

    2013-12-23

    Rhodium(I) complexes bearing N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC) ligands have been widely used in catalytic chemistry, but there are very few reports of biological properties of these organometallics. A series of Rh(I)-NHC derivatives with 1,5-cyclooctadiene and CO as secondary ligands were synthesized, characterized, and biologically investigated as prospective antitumor drug candidates. Pronounced antiproliferative effects were noted for all complexes, along with moderate inhibitory activity of thioredoxin reductase (TrxR) and efficient binding to biomolecules (DNA, albumin). Biodistribution studies showed that the presence of albumin lowered the cellular uptake and confirmed the transport of rhodium into the nuclei. Changes in the mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) were observed as well as DNA fragmentation in wild-type and daunorubicin- or vincristine-resistant Nalm-6 leukemia cells. Overall, these studies indicated that Rh(I)-NHC fragments could be used as partial structures of new antitumor agents, in particular in those drugs designed to address resistant malignant tissues. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Kinetics and thermodynamics of small molecule binding to pincer-PCP rhodium(I) complexes

    KAUST Repository

    Doherty, Mark D.

    2013-04-15

    The kinetics and thermodynamics of the binding of several small molecules, L (L = N2, H2, D2, and C2H 4), to the coordinatively unsaturated pincer-PCP rhodium(I) complexes Rh[tBu2PCH2(C6H3)CH 2PtBu2] (1) and Rh[tBu 2P(CH2)2(CH)(CH2)2P tBu2] (2) in organic solvents (n-heptane, toluene, THF, and cyclohexane-d12) have been investigated by a combination of kinetic flash photolysis methods, NMR equilibrium studies, and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Using various gas mixtures and monitoring by NMR until equilibrium was established, the relative free energies of binding of N2, H2, and C2H4 in cyclohexane-d12 were found to increase in the order C 2H4 < N2 < H2. Time-resolved infrared (TRIR) and UV-vis transient absorption spectroscopy revealed that 355 nm excitation of 1-L and 2-L results in the photoejection of ligand L. The subsequent mechanism of binding of L to 1 and 2 to regenerate 1-L and 2-L is determined by the structure of the PCP ligand framework and the nature of the solvent. In both cases, the primary transient is a long-lived, unsolvated species (τ = 50-800 ns, depending on L and its concentration in solution). For 2, this so-called less-reactive form (LRF) is in equilibrium with a more-reactive form (MRF), which reacts with L at diffusion-controlled rates to regenerate 2-L. These two intermediates are proposed to be different conformers of the three-coordinate (PCP)Rh fragment. For 1, a similar mechanism is proposed to occur, but the LRF to MRF step is irreversible. In addition, a parallel reaction pathway was observed that involves the direct reaction of the LRF of 1 with L, with second-order rate constants that vary by almost 3 orders of magnitude, depending on the nature of L (in n-heptane, k = 6.7 × 10 5 M-1 s-1 for L = C2H4; 4.0 × 106 M-1 s-1 for L = N2; 5.5 × 108 M-1 s-1 for L = H2). Experiments in the more coordinating solvent, THF, revealed the binding of THF to 1 to generate 1-THF, and its subsequent reaction with L, as a

  5. Kinetics and thermodynamics of small molecule binding to pincer-PCP rhodium(I) complexes

    KAUST Repository

    Doherty, Mark D.; Grills, David C.; Huang, Kuo-Wei; Muckerman, James T.; Polyansky, Dmitry E.; Van Eldik, Rudi V.; Fujita, Etsuko

    2013-01-01

    The kinetics and thermodynamics of the binding of several small molecules, L (L = N2, H2, D2, and C2H 4), to the coordinatively unsaturated pincer-PCP rhodium(I) complexes Rh[tBu2PCH2(C6H3)CH 2PtBu2] (1) and Rh[tBu 2P(CH2)2(CH)(CH2)2P tBu2] (2) in organic solvents (n-heptane, toluene, THF, and cyclohexane-d12) have been investigated by a combination of kinetic flash photolysis methods, NMR equilibrium studies, and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Using various gas mixtures and monitoring by NMR until equilibrium was established, the relative free energies of binding of N2, H2, and C2H4 in cyclohexane-d12 were found to increase in the order C 2H4 < N2 < H2. Time-resolved infrared (TRIR) and UV-vis transient absorption spectroscopy revealed that 355 nm excitation of 1-L and 2-L results in the photoejection of ligand L. The subsequent mechanism of binding of L to 1 and 2 to regenerate 1-L and 2-L is determined by the structure of the PCP ligand framework and the nature of the solvent. In both cases, the primary transient is a long-lived, unsolvated species (τ = 50-800 ns, depending on L and its concentration in solution). For 2, this so-called less-reactive form (LRF) is in equilibrium with a more-reactive form (MRF), which reacts with L at diffusion-controlled rates to regenerate 2-L. These two intermediates are proposed to be different conformers of the three-coordinate (PCP)Rh fragment. For 1, a similar mechanism is proposed to occur, but the LRF to MRF step is irreversible. In addition, a parallel reaction pathway was observed that involves the direct reaction of the LRF of 1 with L, with second-order rate constants that vary by almost 3 orders of magnitude, depending on the nature of L (in n-heptane, k = 6.7 × 10 5 M-1 s-1 for L = C2H4; 4.0 × 106 M-1 s-1 for L = N2; 5.5 × 108 M-1 s-1 for L = H2). Experiments in the more coordinating solvent, THF, revealed the binding of THF to 1 to generate 1-THF, and its subsequent reaction with L, as a

  6. Oxidative Olefination of Anilides with Unactivated Alkenes Catalyzed by an (Electron-Deficient η(5) -Cyclopentadienyl)Rhodium(III) Complex Under Ambient Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahama, Yuji; Shibata, Yu; Tanaka, Ken

    2015-06-15

    The oxidative olefination of sp(2) C-H bonds of anilides with both activated and unactivated alkenes using an (electron-deficient η(5) -cyclopentadienyl)rhodium(III) complex is reported. In contrast to reactions using this electron-deficient rhodium(III) catalyst, [Cp*RhCl2 ]2 showed no activity against olefination with unactivated alkenes. In addition, the deuterium kinetic isotope effect (DKIE) study revealed that the C-H bond cleavage step is thought to be the turnover-limiting step. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. A monofunctional platinum complex coordinated to a rhodium metalloinsertor selectively binds mismatched DNA in the minor groove.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidmann, Alyson G; Barton, Jacqueline K

    2015-10-05

    We report the synthesis and characterization of a bimetallic complex derived from a new family of potent and selective metalloinsertors containing an unusual Rh-O axial coordination. This complex incorporates a monofunctional platinum center containing only one labile site for coordination to DNA, rather than two, and coordinates DNA nonclassically through adduct formation in the minor groove. This conjugate displays bifunctional, interdependent binding of mismatched DNA via metalloinsertion at a mismatch as well as covalent platinum binding. DNA sequencing experiments revealed that the preferred site of platinum coordination is not the traditional N7-guanine site in the major groove, but rather N3-adenine in the minor groove. The complex also displays enhanced cytotoxicity in mismatch repair-deficient and mismatch repair-proficient human colorectal carcinoma cell lines compared to the chemotherapeutic cisplatin, and it triggers cell death via an apoptotic pathway, rather than the necrotic pathway induced by rhodium metalloinsertors.

  8. Identification of a rhodium(iii) complex as a Wee1 inhibitor against TP53-mutated triple-negative breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Guan-Jun; Zhong, Hai-Jing; Ko, Chung-Nga; Wong, Suk-Yu; Vellaisamy, Kasipandi; Ye, Min; Ma, Dik-Lung; Leung, Chung-Hang

    2018-03-06

    The rhodium(iii) complex 1 was identified as a potent Wee1 inhibitor in vitro and in cellulo. It decreased Wee1 activity and unscheduled mitotic entry, and induced cell damage and death in TP53-mutated triple-negative breast cancer cells. 1 represents a promising scaffold for further development of more potent metal-based Wee1 antagonists.

  9. A Rhodium(III) Complex as an Inhibitor of Neural Precursor Cell Expressed, Developmentally Down-Regulated 8-Activating Enzyme with in Vivo Activity against Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Hai-Jing; Wang, Wanhe; Kang, Tian-Shu; Yan, Hui; Yang, Yali; Xu, Lipeng; Wang, Yuqiang; Ma, Dik-Lung; Leung, Chung-Hang

    2017-01-12

    We report herein the identification of the rhodium(III) complex [Rh(phq) 2 (MOPIP)] + (1) as a potent and selective ATP-competitive neural precursor cell expressed, developmentally down-regulated 8 (NEDD8)-activating enzyme (NAE) inhibitor. Structure-activity relationship analysis indicated that the overall organometallic design of complex 1 was important for anti-inflammatory activity. Complex 1 showed promising anti-inflammatory activity in vivo for the potential treatment of inflammatory bowel disease.

  10. Oligomeric complexes of some heteroaromatic ligands and aromatic diamines with rhodium and molybdenum tetracarboxylates: 13C and 15N CPMAS NMR and density functional theory studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leniak, Arkadiusz; Kamieński, Bohdan; Jaźwiński, Jarosław

    2015-05-01

    Seven new oligomeric complexes of 4,4'-bipyridine; 3,3'-bipyridine; benzene-1,4-diamine; benzene-1,3-diamine; benzene-1,2-diamine; and benzidine with rhodium tetraacetate, as well as 4,4'-bipyridine with molybdenum tetraacetate, have been obtained and investigated by elemental analysis and solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, (13)C and (15)N CPMAS NMR. The known complexes of pyrazine with rhodium tetrabenzoate, benzoquinone with rhodium tetrapivalate, 4,4'-bipyridine with molybdenum tetrakistrifluoroacetate and the 1 : 1 complex of 2,2'-bipyridine with rhodium tetraacetate exhibiting axial-equatorial ligation mode have been obtained as well for comparison purposes. Elemental analysis revealed 1 : 1 complex stoichiometry of all complexes. The (15)N CPMAS NMR spectra of all new complexes consist of one narrow signal, indicating regular uniform structures. Benzidine forms a heterogeneous material, probably containing linear oligomers and products of further reactions. The complexes were characterized by the parameter complexation shift Δδ (Δδ = δcomplex  - δligand). This parameter ranged from around -40 to -90 ppm in the case of heteroaromatic ligands, from around -12 to -22 ppm for diamines and from -16 to -31 ppm for the complexes of molybdenum tetracarboxylates with 4,4'-bipyridine. The experimental results have been supported by a density functional theory computation of (15)N NMR chemical shifts and complexation shifts at the non-relativistic Becke, three-parameter, Perdew-Wang 91/[6-311++G(2d,p), Stuttgart] and GGA-PBE/QZ4P levels of theory and at the relativistic scalar and spin-orbit zeroth order regular approximation/GGA-PBE/QZ4P level of theory. Nucleus-independent chemical shifts have been calculated for the selected compounds. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Rhodium(I)-Complexes Catalyzed 1,4-Conjugate Addition of Arylzinc Chlorides to N-Boc-4-pyridone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Fenghai; McGilvary, Matthew A; Jeffries, Malcolm C; Graves, Briana N; Graham, Shekinah A; Wu, Yuelin

    2017-05-01

    Rhodium(I)-complexes catalyzed the 1,4-conjugate addition of arylzinc chlorides to N -Boc-4-pyridone in the presence of chlorotrimethylsilane (TMSCl). A combination of [RhCl(C₂H₄)₂]₂ and BINAP was determined to be the most effective catalyst to promote the 1,4-conjugate addition reactions of arylzinc chlorides to N -Boc-4-pyridone. A broad scope of arylzinc reagents with both electron-withdrawing and electron-donating substituents on the aromatic ring successfully underwent 1,4-conjugate addition to N -Boc-4-pyridone to afford versatile 1,4-adducts 2-substituted-2,3-dihydropyridones in good to excellent yields (up to 91%) and excellent ee (up to 96%) when ( S )-BINAP was used as chiral ligand.

  12. Mixed N-Heterocyclic Carbene-Bis(oxazolinyl)borato Rhodium and Iridium Complexes in Photochemical and Thermal Oxidative Addition Reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Songchen [Ames Laboratory; Manna, Kuntal [Ames Laboratory; Ellern, Arkady [Ames Laboratory; Sadow, Aaron D [Ames Laboratory

    2014-12-08

    In order to facilitate oxidative addition chemistry of fac-coordinated rhodium(I) and iridium(I) compounds, carbene–bis(oxazolinyl)phenylborate proligands have been synthesized and reacted with organometallic precursors. Two proligands, PhB(OxMe2)2(ImtBuH) (H[1]; OxMe2 = 4,4-dimethyl-2-oxazoline; ImtBuH = 1-tert-butylimidazole) and PhB(OxMe2)2(ImMesH) (H[2]; ImMesH = 1-mesitylimidazole), are deprotonated with potassium benzyl to generate K[1] and K[2], and these potassium compounds serve as reagents for the synthesis of a series of rhodium and iridium complexes. Cyclooctadiene and dicarbonyl compounds {PhB(OxMe2)2ImtBu}Rh(η4-C8H12) (3), {PhB(OxMe2)2ImMes}Rh(η4-C8H12) (4), {PhB(OxMe2)2ImMes}Rh(CO)2 (5), {PhB(OxMe2)2ImMes}Ir(η4-C8H12) (6), and {PhB(OxMe2)2ImMes}Ir(CO)2 (7) are synthesized along with ToMM(η4-C8H12) (M = Rh (8); M = Ir (9); ToM = tris(4,4-dimethyl-2-oxazolinyl)phenylborate). The spectroscopic and structural properties and reactivity of this series of compounds show electronic and steric effects of substituents on the imidazole (tert-butyl vs mesityl), effects of replacing an oxazoline in ToM with a carbene donor, and the influence of the donor ligand (CO vs C8H12). The reactions of K[2] and [M(μ-Cl)(η2-C8H14)2]2 (M = Rh, Ir) provide {κ4-PhB(OxMe2)2ImMes'CH2}Rh(μ-H)(μ-Cl)Rh(η2-C8H14)2 (10) and {PhB(OxMe2)2ImMes}IrH(η3-C8H13) (11). In the former compound, a spontaneous oxidative addition of a mesityl ortho-methyl to give a mixed-valent dirhodium species is observed, while the iridium compound forms a monometallic allyl hydride. Photochemical reactions of dicarbonyl compounds 5 and 7 result in C–H bond oxidative addition providing the compounds {κ4-PhB(OxMe2)2ImMes'CH2}RhH(CO) (12) and {PhB(OxMe2)2ImMes}IrH(Ph)CO (13). In 12, oxidative addition results in cyclometalation of the mesityl ortho-methyl similar to 10, whereas the iridium compound reacts with the benzene solvent to give a rare crystallographically characterized cis

  13. A Bulky Rhodium Complex Bound to an Adenosine-Adenosine DNA Mismatch: General Architecture of the Metalloinsertion Binding Mode†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeglis, Brian M.; Pierre, Valérie C.; Kaiser, Jens T.; Barton, Jacqueline K.

    2009-01-01

    Two crystal structures are determined for Δ-Rh(bpy)2(chrysi)3+ (chrysi = 5,6-chrysenequinone diimine) bound to the oligonucleotide duplex 5′-CGGAAATTACCG-3′ containing two adenosine-adenosine mismatches (italics) through metalloinsertion. Diffraction quality crystals with two different space groups (P3221 and P43212) were obtained under very similar crystallization conditions. In both structures, the bulky rhodium complex inserts into the two mismatched sites from the minor groove side, ejecting the mismatched bases into the major groove. The conformational changes are localized to the mismatched site; the metal complex replaces the mismatched base pair without an increase in base pair rise. The expansive metal complex is accommodated in the duplex by a slight opening in the phosphodiester backbone; all sugars retain a C2′-endo puckering, and flanking base pairs neither stretch nor shear. The structures differ, however, in that in one of the structures, an additional metal complex is bound by intercalation from the major groove at the central 5′-AT-3′ step. We conclude that this additional metal complex is intercalated into this central step because of crystal packing forces. The structures described here of Δ-Rh(bpy)2(chrysi)3+ bound to thermodynamically destabilized AA mismatches share critical features with binding by metalloinsertion in two other oligonucleotides containing different single base mismatches. These results underscore the generality of the metalloinsertion as a new mode of non-covalent binding by small molecules with a DNA duplex. PMID:19374348

  14. Organometallic rhodium(III) and iridium(III) cyclopentadienyl complexes with curcumin and bisdemethoxycurcumin co-ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettinari, Riccardo; Marchetti, Fabio; Pettinari, Claudio; Condello, Francesca; Petrini, Agnese; Scopelliti, Rosario; Riedel, Tina; Dyson, Paul J

    2015-12-21

    A series of half-sandwich cyclopentadienyl rhodium(III) and iridium(III) complexes of the type [Cp*M(curc/bdcurc)Cl] and [Cp*M(curc/bdcurc)(PTA)][SO3CF3], in which Cp* = pentamethylcyclopentadienyl, curcH = curcumin and bdcurcH = bisdemethoxycurcumin as O^O-chelating ligands, and PTA = 1,3,5-triaza-7-phosphaadamantane, is described. The X-ray crystal structures of three of the complexes, i.e. [Cp*Rh(curc)(PTA)][SO3CF3] (5), [Cp*Rh(bdcurc)(PTA)][SO3CF3] (6) and [Cp*Ir(bdcurc)(PTA)][SO3CF3] (8), confirm the expected "piano-stool" geometry. With the exception of 5, the complexes are stable under pseudo-physiological conditions and are moderately cytotoxic to human ovarian carcinoma (A2780 and A2780cisR) cells and also to non-tumorigenic human embryonic kidney (HEK293) cells, but lack the cancer cell selectivity observed for related arene ruthenium(II) complexes.

  15. Rhodium, iridium and nickel complexes with a 1,3,5-triphenylbenzene tris-MIC ligand. Study of the electronic properties and catalytic activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Mejuto

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The coordination versatility of a 1,3,5-triphenylbenzene-tris-mesoionic carbene ligand is illustrated by the preparation of complexes with three different metals: rhodium, iridium and nickel. The rhodium and iridium complexes contained the [MCl(COD] fragments, while the nickel compound contained [NiCpCl]. The preparation of the tris-MIC (MIC = mesoionic carbene complex with three [IrCl(CO2] fragments, allowed the estimation of the Tolman electronic parameter (TEP for the ligand, which was compared with the TEP value for a related 1,3,5-triphenylbenzene-tris-NHC ligand. The electronic properties of the tris-MIC ligand were studied by cyclic voltammetry measurements. In all cases, the tris-MIC ligand showed a stronger electron-donating character than the corresponding NHC-based ligands. The catalytic activity of the tri-rhodium complex was tested in the addition reaction of arylboronic acids to α,β-unsaturated ketones.

  16. Complexes of rhodium (I) and iridium (I) with mixed phosphorus-oxygen and phosphorus-nitrogen glands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meintjies, E.; Singleton, E.; Schmutzler, R.; Sell, M.

    1985-01-01

    A series of four- and five-coordinate rhodium(I) and iridium(I) complexes of the type [MCl(cod)L] and [M(COD)L 2 ] sup(+)[M = Rh or Ir;cod = cycloocta-1,5-diene; L = P(C 6 H 4 OMe-o) 3 ,PMe 2 (C 6 H 4 OMe-o), PPh 2 (C 6 H 4 OMe-o),PPh 2 -(C 6 H 4 NMe 2 -o),PMe(C 6 H 4 OMe-o) 2 and PPh 2 (C 6 H 4 OPr sup(i)-o)] have been prepared from the reactions of [(MCl(cod)) 2 ] (M = Rh or Ir) with the appropriate stoichiometric amount of L in diethyl ether or methanol solution. N.m.r. evidence ( 1 H and 13 C) is presented for non-chelation in the case of the ether ligands and chelation for the amine ligand. Thus, the complexes [MCl(cod)L](L = ether ligand) are mononuclear square-planar species, whereas the amine ligand chelates to the metal atom, and a distorted trigonal bipyramidal structure is proposed. Attempts at displacing cod from the complexes [MCl(cod)L] with these ether and amine ligands, or with small phosphines, were unsuccessful. However, treatment of [MCl(cod)[P(C 6 H 4 OMe-o) 3

  17. Pentamethylcyclopentadienyl-rhodium and iridium complexes containing (N^N and N^O) bound chloroquine analogue ligands: synthesis, characterization and antimalarial properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekengard, Erik; Kumar, Kamlesh; Fogeron, Thibault; de Kock, Carmen; Smith, Peter J; Haukka, Matti; Monari, Magda; Nordlander, Ebbe

    2016-03-07

    The synthesis and characterization of twenty new pentamethylcyclopentadienyl-rhodium and iridium complexes containing N^N and N^O-chelating chloroquine analogue ligands are described. The in vitro antimalarial activity of the new ligands as well as the complexes was evaluated against the chloroquine sensitive (CQS) NF54 and the chloroquine resistant (CQR) Dd2 strains of Plasmodium falciparum. The antimalarial activity was found to be good to moderate; although all complexes are less active than artesunate, some of the ligands and complexes showed better activity than chloroquine (CQ). In particular, rhodium complexes were found to be considerably more active than iridium complexes against the CQS NF54 strain. Salicylaldimine Schiff base ligands having electron-withdrawing groups (F, Cl, Br, I and NO2) in para position of the salicyl moiety and their rhodium complexes showed good antiplasmodial activity against both the CQS-NF54 and the CQR-Dd2 strains. The crystal structures of (η(5)-pentamethylcyclopentadienyl){N(1)-(7-chloroquinolin-4-yl)-N(2)-(pyridin-2-ylmethyl)ethane-1,2-diamine)} chlororhodium(III) chloride and (η(5)-pentamethylcyclopentadienyl){(4-chloro-2-(((2-((7-chloroquinolin-4-yl)amino)ethyl)imino)methyl)phenolate)}chlororhodium(III) chloride are reported. The crystallization of the amino-pyridyl complex (η(5)-pentamethylcyclopentadienyl){(N(1)-(7-chloroquinolin-4-yl)-N(2)-(pyridin-2-ylmethyl)ethane-1,2-diamine)}chloroiridium(III) chloride in acetone resulted in the formation of the imino-pyridyl derivative (η(5)-pentamethylcyclopentadienyl){(N1-(7-chloroquinolin-4-yl)-N2-(pyridin-2-ylmethylene)ethane-1,2-diamine)}chloroiridium(III) chloride, the crystal structure of which is also reported.

  18. Rhodium segregation in dilute silver-rhodium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krolas, K.; Sternik, M.

    1995-01-01

    Segregation of Rh in Ag-based alloys has been studied using the perturbed angular correlation of γ-rays emitted in the nuclear decay of radioactive 111 In. The formation of impurity complexes, consisting of an 111 In probe atom and one or more Rh atoms, was observed as a function of annealing time and temperature. Rhodium atom aggregation starts at about 600 K. From the fraction of 111 In bound to isolated Rh atoms the solute rhodium atom concentration was determined. It increases with the nominal alloy concentration up to about 0.04 at.% and then it is essentially constant for the nominal Rh concentration varying between 0.1 and 0.5 at.%. The solute rhodium atom concentration is 3 times larger at the melting point than at 750 K

  19. Charge-delocalized κ2 C, N-NHC-amine complexes of rhodium, iridium, and ruthenium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, Eveline; Lutz, Martin; Bruin, Bas De; Elsevier, Cornelis J.

    2014-01-01

    The development of a novel set of complexes bearing an NHC-amine ligand (CNHC-NH2) is described. M(cod) complexes (M = Ir, Rh) and a Ru complex have been synthesized in which three different coordination modes of the ligand were established: monodentate, neutral bidentate, and anionic bidentate. The

  20. Crystal structures of bis[2-(pyridin-2-ylphenyl-κ2N,C1]rhodium(III complexes containing an acetonitrile or monodentate thyminate(1− ligand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mika Sakate

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The crystal structures of bis[2-(pyridin-2-ylphenyl]rhodium(III complexes with the metal in an octahedral coordination containing chloride and acetonitrile ligands, namely (OC-6-42-acetonitrilechloridobis[2-(pyridin-2-ylphenyl-κ2N,C1]rhodium(III, [RhCl(C11H8N2(CH3CN] (1, thyminate(1− and methanol, namely (OC-6-42-methanol(5-methyl-2,4-dioxo-1,2,3,4-tetrahydropyrimidin-1-ido-κN1bis[2-(pyridin-2-ylphenyl-κ2N,C1]rhodium(III, [Rh(C11H8N2(C5H5N2O2(CH3OH]·CH3OH·0.5H2O (2, and thyminate(1− and ethanol, namely (OC-6-42-ethanol(5-methyl-2,4-dioxo-1,2,3,4-tetrahydropyrimidin-1-ido-κN1bis[2-(pyridin-2-ylphenyl-κ2N,C1]rhodium(III, [Rh(C11H8N2(C5H5N2O2(C2H5OH]·C2H5OH (3, are reported. The acetonitrile complex, 1, is isostructural with the IrIII analog. In complexes 2 and 3, the monodeprotonated thyminate (Hthym− ligand coordinates to the RhIII atom through the N atom, and the resulting Rh—N(Hthym bond lengths are relatively long [2.261 (2 and 2.252 (2 Å for 2 and 3, respectively] as compared to the Rh—N bonds in the related thyminate complexes. In each of the crystals of 2 and 3, the complexes are linked via a pair of intermolecular N—H...O hydrogen bonds between neighbouring Hthym− ligands, forming an inversion dimer. A strong intramolecular O—H...O hydrogen bond between the thyminate(1− and alcohol ligands in mutually cis positions to each other is also observed.

  1. Complexes of rhodium (I) and iridium (I) with mixed phosphorus-oxygen and phosphorus-nitrogen glands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meintjies, E.; Singleton, E.; Schmutzler, R.; Sell, M.

    1985-09-01

    A series of four- and five-coordinate rhodium(I) and iridium(I) complexes of the type (MCl(cod)L) and (M(COD)L/sub 2/) sup(+)(M = Rh or Ir;cod = cycloocta-1,5-diene; L = P(C/sub 6/H/sub 4/OMe-o)/sub 3/, PMe/sub 2/(C/sub 6/H/sub 4/OMe-o), PPh/sub 2/(C/sub 6/H/sub 4/OMe-o), PPh/sub 2/-(C/sub 6/H/sub 4/NMe/sub 2/-o), PMe(C/sub 6/H/sub 4/OMe-o)/sub 2/ and PPh/sub 2/(C/sub 6/H/sub 4/OPr sup(i)-o)) have been prepared from the reactions of ((MCl(cod))/sub 2/) (M = Rh or Ir) with the appropriate stoichiometric amount of L in diethyl ether or methanol solution. N.M.R. evidence (/sup 1/H and /sup 13/C) is presented for non-chelation in the case of the ether ligands and chelation for the amine ligand. Thus, the complexes (MCl(cod)L)(L = ether ligand) are mononuclear square-planar species, whereas the amine ligand chelates to the metal atom, and a distorted trigonal bipyramidal structure is proposed. Attempts at displacing cod from the complexes (MCl(cod)L) with these ether and amine ligands, or with small phosphines, were unsuccessful. However, treatment of (MCl(cod)(P(C/sub 6/H/sub 4/OMe-o)/sub 3/))(M = Rh or Ir) with carbon monoxide gave (MCl(CO)/sub 2/ (P(C/sub 6/H/sub 4/OMe-o)/sub 3/)). In contrast, a disproportionation product, (RhCl(CNBu sup(t)/sub 2/(PPh/sub 2/ (C/sub 6/H/sub 4/OPr sup(i)-o))/sub 2/), was obtained from treatment of (RhCl(cod)(PPh/sub 2/(C/sub 6/H/sub 4/OPr sup(i)-o))) with t-butyl isocyanide. N.M.R. data (/sup 1/H and /sup 13/C) for the complexes are described.

  2. Rigid, non-porous and tunable hybrid p-aminobenzoate/TiO2 materials: Toward a fine structural determination of the immobilized RhCl(Ph3)3 complex

    KAUST Repository

    Espinas, Jeff

    2015-05-01

    By exchange of ligands, Wilkinson complex RhCl(PPh3)3 are immobilized on p-aminobenzoate/TiO2 with different organic loading (6, 11 and 16%). This new hybrid material exhibit a linear correlation between the ligand content of the starting TiO2 and the rhodium loading, showing the accessibility of all surfaces amines fonctions on the non-porous parent materials. 1H, 13C, and 1D, 2D INAQUEDATE refocused and J-resolved 31P solid-state NMR confirm the well-defined structure [(≡TiO)2(n{right tail}2-O2C-C6H4-NH2)RhCl-cis-(PPh3)2]. New immobilized catalysts show interesting activity in cyclohexene hydroformylation.

  3. Rigid, non-porous and tunable hybrid p-aminobenzoate/TiO2 materials: Toward a fine structural determination of the immobilized RhCl(Ph3)3 complex

    KAUST Repository

    Espinas, Jeff; Rahal, Raed; Abou-Hamad, Edy; El Eter, Mohamad; Basset, Jean-Marie

    2015-01-01

    By exchange of ligands, Wilkinson complex RhCl(PPh3)3 are immobilized on p-aminobenzoate/TiO2 with different organic loading (6, 11 and 16%). This new hybrid material exhibit a linear correlation between the ligand content of the starting TiO2 and the rhodium loading, showing the accessibility of all surfaces amines fonctions on the non-porous parent materials. 1H, 13C, and 1D, 2D INAQUEDATE refocused and J-resolved 31P solid-state NMR confirm the well-defined structure [(≡TiO)2(n{right tail}2-O2C-C6H4-NH2)RhCl-cis-(PPh3)2]. New immobilized catalysts show interesting activity in cyclohexene hydroformylation.

  4. Investigation of Gasochromic Rhodium Complexes Towards Their Reactivity to CO and Integration into an Optical Gas Sensor for Fire Gas Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolin Pannek

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available The detection of the toxic gas carbon monoxide (CO in the low ppm range is required in different applications. We present a study of the reactivity of different gasochromic rhodium complexes towards the toxic gas carbon monoxide (CO. Therefore, variations of binuclear rhodium complexes with different ligands were prepared. They were characterized by FTIR spectroscopy, 1H NMR spectroscopy, and differential scanning calorimetry. All complexes are spectroscopically distinguishable and temperature stable up to at least 187 °C. The gasochromic behavior of all different compounds was tested. Therefore, the compounds were dissolved in toluene and exposed to 100 ppm CO for 10 min to investigate their gas sensitivity and reaction velocity. The changes in the transmission spectra were recorded by UV/vis spectroscopy. Furthermore, a significant influence of the solvent to the color dyes’ gasochromic reaction and behavior was observed. After characterization, one complex was transferred as sensing element into an optical gas sensor. Two different measurement principles (reflection- and waveguide-based were built up and tested towards their capability as gasochromic CO sensors. Finally, different gas-dependent measurements were carried out.

  5. Tetramethyl(perfluoroalkyl)cyclopentadienyl Rhodium(I) Complexes with Ethylene or Diene Ligands. Crystal Structure of [(eta-5-C5Me4C6F13)Rh(CO)2

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Čermák, Jan; Krupková, Alena; Auerová, Kateřina; Zamrzla, M.; Nguyen Thi, T.H.; Vojtíšek, P.; Císařová, I.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 695, č. 3 (2010), s. 375-381 ISSN 0022-328X R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA4072203; GA MŠk(CZ) LC06070 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : fluorous cyclopentadienes * rhodium complexes * alkene complexes Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 2.205, year: 2010

  6. Synthesis of a Benzodiazepine-derived Rhodium NHC Complex by C-H Bond Activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergman, Roberg G.; Gribble, Jr., Michael W.; Ellman, Jonathan A.

    2008-01-30

    The synthesis and characterization of a Rh(I)-NHC complex generated by C-H activation of 1,4-benzodiazepine heterocycle are reported. This complex constitutes a rare example of a carbene tautomer of a 1,4-benzodiazepine aldimine stabilized by transition metal coordination and demonstrates the ability of the catalytically relevant RhCl(PCy{sub 3}){sub 2} fragment to induce NHC-forming tautomerization of heterocycles possessing a single carbene-stabilizing heteroatom. Implications for the synthesis of benzodiazepines and related pharmacophores via C-H functionalization are discussed.

  7. Rhodium(I) complexes of αα-keto-stabilised 1,2-bis ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    spectroscopic and X-ray structural methods. The dppe-yl behaves as an ambidentate ligand; it functions as a monodentate P-donor ligand with a dangling ylidic carbon in the neutral chloro complex, [(COD)Rh(Cl)(dppe-yl)] (1), whereas replacement of the chloride by a non-coordinating counter anion results in the formation ...

  8. PALLADIUM, PLATINUM, RHODIUM, RUTHENIUM AND IRIDIUM IN PERIDOTITES AND CHROMITITES FROM OPHIOLITE COMPLEXES IN NEWFOUNDLAND.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Norman J; Talkington, Raymond W.

    1984-01-01

    Samples of spinel lherzolite, harzburgite, dunite, and chromitite from the Bay of Islands, Lewis Hills, Table Mountain, Advocate, North Arm Mountain, White Hills Periodite Point Rousse, Great Bend and Betts Cove ophiolite complexes in Newfoundland were analyzed for the platinum-group elements (PGE) Pd, Pt, Rh, Ru and Ir. The ranges of concentration (in ppb) observed for all rocks are: less than 0. 5 to 77 (Pd), less than 1 to 120 (Pt), less than 0. 5 to 20 (Rh), less than 100 to 250 (Ru) and less than 20 to 83 (Ir). Chondrite-normalized PGE ratios suggest differences between rock types and between complexes. Samples of chromitite and dunite show relative enrichment in Ru and Ir and relative depletion in Pt and Pd.

  9. Palladium, platinum, and rhodium contents of rocks near the lower margin of the Stillwater complex, Montana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zientek, M.L.; Foose, M.P.; Leung, Mei

    1986-01-01

    Statistical summaries are reported for Pd, Pt and Rh contents of rocks from the lower part of the Stillwater complex, the underlying contact-metamorphosed sediments, and post-metamorphic dykes and sills wholly within the hornfelses. Variability of the data among the rock types is attributed largely to differences in sulphide content. Non-correlation of sulphur with platinum-group assays of many rock types leads to the suggestion that the immiscible sulphide and silicate liquids did not completely equilibrate with respect to platinum-group elements. -G.J.N.

  10. Hydroformylation of dihydrofurans catalyzed by rhodium complex encapsulated hexagonal mesoporous silica

    KAUST Repository

    Khokhar, Munir; Shukla, Ram S.; Jasra, Raksh Vir

    2015-01-01

    HRh(CO)(PPh3)3 encapsulated hexagonal mesoporous silica (HMS) is found to be an efficient heterogeneous catalyst for the selective hydroformylation of 2,3-dihydrofuran (2,3DHF) and 2,5-dihydrofuran (2,5DHF). The Rh-complex encapsulated in situ in the organic phase of template inside the pores of HMS was found to act as nano phase reactors. Conversion of 2,3-DHF and 2,5-DHF and selectivity of the corresponding aldehydes were thoroughly investigated by studying the reaction parameters: catalyst amount, substrate concentration, partial as well as total pressure of CO and H2, and temperature. The selectivity for the formation of tetrahydrofuran-2-carbaldehyde (THF-2-carbaldehyde) from the hydroformylation of 2,3-DHF was found to be more than the selectivity of the formation of tetrahydrofuran-3-carbaldehyde (THF-3-carbaldehyde) from 2,5-DHF. The reaction paths are suggested and discussed for the selective formation of the corresponding aldehydes. The catalyst was elegantly separated and effectively recycled for six times.

  11. Photochemistry of monodentate and bidentate carbonato complexes of rhodium (3). [applications to spacecraft fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheridan, P. S.

    1980-01-01

    A scheme for the photochemical fixation of water is proposed which involves a five-step reaction sequence; the first step involves the 2 electron reduction of a metal by a coordinated carbonate ligand, with corresponding oxidation of the carbonate to CO2 and O2. Ligand field photolysis of trans- (RH(en)2 H2O CO3) ClO4, and (Rh(en)2 CO3) CLO4 have been studied in the solid state and in aqueous solution at various pH values. Both salts are photoinert in the solid phase, but are quite photoreactive in aqueous solution. In solution, the monodentate ion undergoes efficient isomerization to a mixture of cis and trans - (Rh(en)2 H2O CO3)+, presumably with water exchange. A minor pH increase upon photolysis is evidence of inefficient carbonate (CO3 =) release, with formation of (Rh(en)2 (H2O)2)3+. In contrast, aqueous solutions of the bidentate carbonato complex undergo efficient pH decrease upon ligand field photolysis. Changes in the electronic spectrum (200-500 nm) and pH changes indicate that the desired redox is occurring. The pH increase is due to the aqueous behavior of CO2.

  12. Hydroformylation of dihydrofurans catalyzed by rhodium complex encapsulated hexagonal mesoporous silica

    KAUST Repository

    Khokhar, Munir

    2015-05-01

    HRh(CO)(PPh3)3 encapsulated hexagonal mesoporous silica (HMS) is found to be an efficient heterogeneous catalyst for the selective hydroformylation of 2,3-dihydrofuran (2,3DHF) and 2,5-dihydrofuran (2,5DHF). The Rh-complex encapsulated in situ in the organic phase of template inside the pores of HMS was found to act as nano phase reactors. Conversion of 2,3-DHF and 2,5-DHF and selectivity of the corresponding aldehydes were thoroughly investigated by studying the reaction parameters: catalyst amount, substrate concentration, partial as well as total pressure of CO and H2, and temperature. The selectivity for the formation of tetrahydrofuran-2-carbaldehyde (THF-2-carbaldehyde) from the hydroformylation of 2,3-DHF was found to be more than the selectivity of the formation of tetrahydrofuran-3-carbaldehyde (THF-3-carbaldehyde) from 2,5-DHF. The reaction paths are suggested and discussed for the selective formation of the corresponding aldehydes. The catalyst was elegantly separated and effectively recycled for six times.

  13. Rhodium. Suppl. Vol. B1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffith, W.P.; Jehn, H.; McCleverty, J.A.; Raub, C.J.; Robinson, S.D.

    1982-01-01

    The present rhodium vol. B1 is concerned largely with linary compounds and coordination complexes of this important metal, which is used either alone or in alloy form for fabrication of other materials or for heterogeneous catalysis. In first two chapters are devoted for hydrides, oxides, ternary and quaternary oxorhodates. Third chapter is on different type of complexes with nitrogen. From chapter four to seven is on halogen complexes with this metal. Next chapters are on sulphides, sulphoxide and sulphito complexes, sulphates and sulphato complexes, selenides and tellurides, borides, borane complexes, carbides, carbonato, cyno, fulminato and thiocyanato complexes. Finally, silicide, phosphides, phosphito and arsenides are treated over here. (AB)

  14. Synthesis and crystal structure of the rhodium(I) cyclooctadiene complex with bis(3-tert-butylimidazol-2-ylidene)borate ligand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, F.; Shao, K.-J.; Xiao, Y.-C.; Pu, X.-J.; Zhu, B., E-mail: zhubao-999@126.com [Affiliated Wuxi Peoples Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Nanjing Medical University (China); Jiang, M.-J., E-mail: jmj16888@126.com [Affiliated Wuxi Peoples Hospital, Department of Clinical Laboratory Science, Nanjing Medical University (China)

    2015-12-15

    The rhodium(I) cyclooctadiene complex with the bis(3-tert-butylimidazol-2-ylidene)borate ligand [H{sub 2}B(Im{sup t}Bu){sup 2}]Rh(COD) C{sup 22}H{sup 36}BN{sup 4}Rh, has been prepared, and its crystal structure is determined by X-ray diffraction. Complex exhibits slightly distorted square planar configurations around the metal center, which is coordinated by the bidentate H{sup 2}B(Im{sup t}Bu){sub 2} and one cyclooctadiene group. The Rh–C{sub carbene} bond lengths are 2.043(4) and 2.074(4) Å, and the bond angle C–Rh1–C is 82.59°. The dihedral angle between two imidazol-2-ylidene rings is 67.30°.

  15. 9,10-phenanthrenesemiquinone radical complexes of ruthenium(III), osmium(III) and rhodium(III) and redox series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Manas Kumar; Patra, Sarat Chandra; Maity, Amarendra Nath; Ke, Shyue-Chu; Weyhermüller, Thomas; Ghosh, Prasanta

    2013-05-14

    Reactions of 9,10-phenanthrenequinone (PQ) in toluene with [M(II)(PPh3)3X2] at 298 K afford green complexes, trans-[M(PQ)(PPh3)2X2] (M = Ru, X = Cl, 1; M = Os, X = Br, 2) in moderate yields. Reaction of anhydrous RhCl3 with PQ and PPh3 in boiling ethanol affords the dark brown paramagnetic complex, cis-[Rh(PQ)(PPh3)2Cl2] (3) in good yields. Diffusion of iodine solution in n-hexane to the trans-[Os(PQ) (PPh3)2(CO)(Br)] solution in CH2Cl2 generates the crystals of trans-[Os(PQ)(PPh3)2(CO)(Br)](+)I3(-), (4(+))I3(-)), in lower yields. Single crystal X-ray structure determinations of 1·2toluene, 2·CH2Cl2 and 4(+)I3(-), UV-vis/NIR absorption spectra, EPR spectra of 3, electrochemical activities and DFT calculations on 1, 2, trans-[Ru(PQ)(PMe3)2Cl2] (1Me), trans-[Os(PQ)(PMe3)2Br2] (2Me), cis-[Rh(PQ)(PMe3)2Cl2] (3Me) and their oxidized and reduced analogues including trans-[Os(PQ)(PMe3)2(CO)(Br)](+) (4Me(+)) substantiated that 1-3 are the 9,10-phenanthrenesemiquinone radical (PQ(˙-)) complexes of ruthenium(III), osmium(III) and rhodium(III) and are defined as trans/cis-[M(III)(PQ(˙-))(PPh3)2X2] with a minor contribution of the resonance form trans/cis-[M(II)(PQ)(PPh3)2X2]. Two comparatively longer C-O (1.286(4) Å) and the shorter C-C lengths (1.415(7) Å) of the OO-chelate of 1·2toluene and 2·CH2Cl2 and the isotropic fluid solution EPR signal at g = 1.999 of 3 are consistent with the existence of the reduced PQ(˙-) ligand in 1-3 complexes. Anisotropic EPR spectra of the frozen glasses (g11 = g22 = 2.0046 and g33 = 1.9874) and solids (g11 = g22 = 2.005 and g33 = 1.987) instigate the contribution of the resonance form, cis-[Rh(II)(PQ)(PPh3)2Cl2] in 3. DFT calculations established that the closed shell singlet (CSS) solutions of 1Me and 2Me are unstable due to open shell singlet (OSS) perturbation. However, the broken symmetry (BS) (1,1) Ms = 0 solutions of 1Me and 2Me are respectively 22.6 and 24.2 kJ mole(-1) lower in energy and reproduced the experimental bond

  16. Spectroscopic characterization of schiff base-copper complexes immobilized in smectite clays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia M. Dias

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Herein, the immobilization of some Schiff base-copper(II complexes in smectite clays is described as a strategy for the heterogenization of homogeneous catalysts. The obtained materials were characterized by spectroscopic techniques, mostly UV/Vis, EPR, XANES and luminescence spectroscopy. SWy-2 and synthetic Laponite clays were used for the immobilization of two different complexes that have previously shown catalytic activity in the dismutation of superoxide radicals, and disproportionation of hydrogen peroxide. The obtained results indicated the occurrence of an intriguing intramolecular redox process involving copper and the imine ligand at the surface of the clays. These studies are supported by computational calculations.

  17. Synthesis and characterization of rhodium(I) complexes with P-N donor ligands and their catalytic application in transfer hydrogenation of carbonyl group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barah, Geetika; Sarmah, Podma Poliov; Boruah, Devajani [Dept. of Chemistry, Dibrugarh University, Dibrugarh (India)

    2015-04-15

    Three rhodium(I) complexes of the types [Rh(COE)Cl(η{sup 2}-L)] (1a,1b) and [RhCl(η{sup 2}-L) (η{sup 1}-L)] (1c), where L = P⁓N donor ligands 2-[2-(diphenylphosphino) ethyl]pyridine, (PPh{sub 2}Etpy) (a), 2-(diphenylphosphino)pyridine (PPh{sub 2}py) (b), and 3-(diphenylphosphino)-1-propylamine (PPh{sub 2}(CH{sub 2}){sub 3}NH{sub 2}) (c), have been synthesized by reacting [Rh(coe){sub 2}Cl]{sub 2} with the respective ligands in 1:2 molar ratio for 1a, 1b and 1:4 molar ratio for 1c in DCM under refluxing condition. The complexes were characterized using different analytical techniques such as FT-IR, ESI(+) mass spectrometry, {sup 1}H and {sup 31}P{"1H} NMR spectrometry, conductivity measurements, and melting point determination. The synthesized complexes were found to exhibit good catalytic activity for the transfer hydrogenation of carbonyl compounds to corresponding alcohols with high conversion rate.

  18. 1,3-dialkyl- and 1,3-diaryl-3,4,5,6-tetrahydropyrimidin-2-ylidene rhodium(i) and palladium(II) complexes: synthesis, structure, and reactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayr, Monika; Wurst, Klaus; Ongania, Karl-Hans; Buchmeiser, Michael R

    2004-03-05

    The synthesis of novel 1,3-diaryl- and 1,3-dialkylpyrimidin-2-ylidene-based N-heterocyclic carbenes (NHCs) and their rhodium(i) and palladium(II) complexes is described. The rhodium compounds bromo(cod)[1,3-bis(2-propyl)-3,4,5,6-tetrahydropyrimidin-2-ylidene]rhodium (7), bromo(cod)(1,3-dimesityl-3,4,5,6-tetrahydropyrimidin-2-ylidene)rhodium (8) (cod=eta(4)-1,5-cyclooctadiene, mesityl=2,4,6-trimethylphenyl), chloro(cod)(1,3-dimesityl-3,4,5,6-tetrahydropyrimidin-2-ylidene)rhodium (9), and chloro(cod)[1,3-bis(2-propyl)-3,4,5,6-tetrahydropyrimidin-2-ylidene]rhodium (10) were prepared by reaction of [[Rh(cod)Cl](2)] with lithium tert-butoxide followed by addition of 1,3-dimesityl-3,4,5,6-tetrahydropyrimidinium bromide (3), 1,3-dimesityl-3,4,5,6-tetrahydropyrimidinium tetrafluoroborate (4), 1,3-di-2-propyl-3,4,5,6-tetrahydropyrimidinium bromide (6), and 1,3-di-2-propyl-3,4,5,6-tetrahydropyrimidinium tetrafluoroborate, respectively. Complex 7 crystallizes in the monoclinic space group P2(1)/n, and 8 in the monoclinic space group P2(1). Complexes 9 and 10 were used for the synthesis of the corresponding dicarbonyl complexes dicarbonylchloro(1,3-dimesityl-3,4,5,6-tetrahydropyrimidin-2-ylidene)rhodium (11), and dicarbonylchloro[1,3-bis(2-propyl)-3,4,5,6-tetrahydropyrimidin-2-ylidene]rhodium (12). The wavenumbers nu(CO I)/nu(CO II) for 11 and 12 were used as a quantitative measure for the basicity of the NHC ligand. The values of 2062/1976 and 2063/1982 cm(-1), respectively, indicate that the new NHCs are among the most basic cyclic ligands reported so far. Compounds 3 and 6 were additionally converted to the corresponding cationic silver(i) bis-NHC complexes [Ag(1,3-dimesityl-3,4,5,6-tetrahydropyrimidin-2-ylidene)(2)]AgBr(2) (13) and [Ag[1,3-bis(2-propyl)-3,4,5,6-tetrahydropyrimidin-2-ylidene](2)]AgBr(2) (14), which were subsequently used in transmetalation reactions for the synthesis of the corresponding palladium(II) complexes Pd(1,3-dimesityl-3,4,5,6-tetrahydropyrimidin-2

  19. Rhodium-Catalyzed Decarbonylation of Aldoses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Monrad, Rune; Madsen, Robert

    2007-01-01

    A catalytic procedure is described for decarbonylation of unprotected aldoses to afford alditols with one less carbon atom. The reaction is performed with the rhodium complex Rh(dppp)2Cl in a refluxing diglyme - DMA solution. A slightly improved catalyst turnover is observed when a catalytic amount...

  20. Manganese–Schiff base complex immobilized silica materials for ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    Curtailment of platinum catalysts loading in fuel cell is a recent central issue. As substitutes ... catalytic activity of manganese–Schiff base complexes for oxygen reduction reaction in 0⋅05 M HClO4 at room ... producing industries (Adzic et al 1998; Subhramannia et ..... Chronoamperometry is carried out to calculate the.

  1. Synthesis, structure, DNA/protein binding, and cytotoxic activity of a rhodium(III) complex with 2,6-bis(2-benzimidazolyl)pyridine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteghamat-Panah, Roya; Hadadzadeh, Hassan; Farrokhpour, Hossein; Simpson, Jim; Abdolmaleki, Amir; Abyar, Fatemeh

    2017-02-15

    A new mononuclear rhodium(III) complex, [Rh(bzimpy)Cl 3 ] (bzimpy = 2,6-bis(2-benzimidazolyl)pyridine), was synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis and spectroscopic methods. The molecular structure of the complex was confirmed by single-crystal X-ray crystallography. The interaction of the complex with fish sperm DNA (FS-DNA) was investigated by UV spectroscopy, emission titration, and viscosity measurement in order to evaluate the possible DNA-binding mode and to calculate the corresponding DNA-binding constant. The results reveal that the Rh(III) complex interacts with DNA through groove binding mode with a binding affinity on the order of 10 4 . In addition, the binding of the Rh(III) complex to bovine serum albumin (BSA) was monitored by UV-Vis and fluorescence emission spectroscopy at different temperatures. The mechanism of the complex interaction was found to be static quenching. The thermodynamic parameters (ΔH, ΔS, and ΔG) obtained from the fluorescence spectroscopy data show that van der Waals interactions and hydrogen bonds play a major role in the binding of the Rh(III) complex to BSA. For the comparison of the DNA- and BSA-binding affinities of the free bzimpy ligand with its Rh(III) complex, the absorbance titration and fluorescence quenching experiments of the free bzimpy ligand with DNA and BSA were carried out. Competitive experiments using eosin Y and ibuprofen as site markers indicated that the complex was mainly located in the hydrophobic cavity of site I of the protein. These experimental results were confirmed by the results of molecular docking. Finally, the in vitro cytotoxicity properties of the Rh(III) complex against the MCF-7, K562, and HT-29 cell lines were evaluated and compared with those of the free ligand (bzimpy). It was found that the complexation process improved the anticancer activity significantly. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Comparative solution equilibrium studies on pentamethylcyclopentadienyl rhodium complexes of 2,2'-bipyridine and ethylenediamine and their interaction with human serum albumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enyedy, Éva A; Mészáros, János P; Dömötör, Orsolya; Hackl, Carmen M; Roller, Alexander; Keppler, Bernhard K; Kandioller, Wolfgang

    2015-11-01

    Complex formation equilibrium processes of the (N,N) donor containing 2,2'-bipyridine (bpy) and ethylenediamine (en) with (η(5)-pentamethylcyclopentadienyl)rhodium(III) were investigated in aqueous solution via pH-potentiometry, (1)H NMR spectroscopy, and UV-vis spectrophotometry in the absence and presence of chloride ions. The structure of [RhCp*(en)Cl]ClO4 (Cp*, pentamethylcyclopentadienyl) was also studied by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. pKa values of 8.56 and 9.58 were determined for [RhCp*(bpy)(H2O)](2+) and [RhCp*(en)(H2O)](2+), respectively resulting in the formation of negligible amount of mixed hydroxido complexes at pH 7.4. Stability and the H2O/Cl(-) co-ligand exchange constants of bpy and en complexes considerably exceed those of the bidentate O-donor deferiprone. The strong affinity of the bpy and en complexes to chloride ions most probably contributes to their low antiproliferative effect. Interactions between human serum albumin (HSA) and [RhCp*(H2O)3](2+), its complexes formed with deferiprone, bpy and en were also monitored by (1)H NMR spectroscopy, ultrafiltration/UV-vis and spectrofluorometry. Numerous binding sites (≥ 8) are available for [RhCp*(H2O)3](2+); and the interaction takes place most probably via covalent bonds through the imidazole nitrogen of His. According to the various fluorescence studies [RhCp*(H2O)3](2+) binds on sites I and II, and coordination of surface side chain donor atoms of the protein is also feasible. The binding of the bpy and en complex is weaker and slower compared to that of [RhCp*(H2O)3](2+), and formation of ternary HSA-RhCp*-ligand adducts was proved. In the case of the deferiprone complex, the RhCp* fragment is cleaved off when HSA is loaded with low equivalents of the compound.

  3. Preparation of Rhodium(III) complexes with 2(1H)-quinolinone derivatives and evaluation of their in vitro and in vivo antitumor activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xing; Wu, Yi-Ming; Yang, Jing-Mei; Ma, Feng-E; Li, Liang-Ping; Chen, Sheng; Zhang, Ye; Ni, Qing-Ling; Pan, Ying-Ming; Hong, Xue; Peng, Yan

    2018-05-10

    A series of 2(1H)-quinolinone derivatives and their rhodium (III) complexes were designed and synthesized. All the rhodium (III) complexes exhibited higher in vitro cytotoxicity for Hep G2, HeLa 229, MGC80-3, and NCI-H460 human tumor cell lines than their ligands and cisplatin, and among them complex 9 was found to be selectively cytotoxic to tumor cells. Further investigation revealed that complex 9 caused cell cycle arrest at the G2/M phase and induced apoptosis, and inhibited the proliferation of Hep G2 cells by impeding the phosphorylation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and its downstream enzymes. Complex 9 also up-regulated the proapoptotic proteins Bak, Bax, and Bim, which altogether activated caspase-3/9 to initiate cell apoptosis. Notably, complex 9 effectively inhibited tumor growth in the NCI-H460 xenograft mouse model with less adverse effect than cisplatin. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Studies of Immobilized Homogeneous Metal Catalysts on Silica Supports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stanger, Keith James [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2003-01-01

    The tethered, chiral, chelating diphosphine rhodium complex, which catalyzes the enantioselective hydrogenation of methyl-α-acetamidocinnamate (MAC), has the illustrated structure as established by 31P NMR and IR studies. Spectral and catalytic investigations also suggest that the mechanism of action of the tethered complex is the same as that of the untethered complex in solution. The rhodium complexes, [Rh(COD)H]4, [Rh(COD)2]+BF4-, [Rh(COD)Cl]2, and RhCl3• 3H2O, adsorbed on SiO2 are optimally activated for toluene hydrogenation by pretreatment with H2 at 200 C. The same complexes on Pd-SiO2 are equally active without pretreatments. The active species in all cases is rhodium metal. The catalysts were characterized by XPS, TEM, DRIFTS, and mercury poisoning experiments. Rhodium on silica catalyzes the hydrogenation of fluorobenzene to produce predominantly fluorocyclohexane in heptane and 1,2-dichloroethane solvents. In heptane/methanol and heptane/water solvents, hydrodefluorination to benzene and subsequent hydrogenation to cyclohexane occurs exclusively. Benzene inhibits the hydrodefluorination of fluorobenzene. In DCE or heptane solvents, fluorocyclohexane reacts with hydrogen fluoride to form cyclohexene. Reaction conditions can be chosen to selectively yield fluorocyclohexane, cyclohexene, benzene, or cyclohexane. The oxorhenium(V) dithiolate catalyst [-S(CH2)3s-]Re(O)(Me)(PPh3) was modified by linking it to a tether that could be attached to a silica support. Spectroscopic investigation and catalytic oxidation reactivity showed the heterogenized catalyst's structure and reactivity to be similar to its homogeneous analog. However, the immobilized catalyst offered additional advantages of recyclability, extended stability, and increased resistance to deactivation.

  5. Charge-Delocalized κC-2,N-NHC-Amine Complexes of Rhodium, Iridium, and Ruthenium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, E.; Lutz, M.; de Bruin, B.; Elsevier, C.J.

    2014-01-01

    The development of a novel set of complexes bearing an NHC-amine ligand (C-NHC-NH2) is described. M(cod) complexes (M = 1r, Rh) and a Ru complex have been synthesized in which three different coordination modes of the ligand were established: monodentate, neutral bidentate, and anionic bidentate.

  6. Synthesis and Properties of Chelating N-Heterocyclic Carbene Rhodium(I) Complexes: Synthetic Experiments in Current Organometallic Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mata, Jose A.; Poyatos, Macarena; Mas-Marza, Elena

    2011-01-01

    The preparation and characterization of two air-stable Rh(I) complexes bearing a chelating N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC) ligand is described. The synthesis involves the preparation of a Ag(I)-NHC complex and its use as carbene transfer agent to a Rh(I) precursor. The so obtained complex can be further reacted with carbon monoxide to give the…

  7. Rhodium trichloride as a homogeneous catalyst for isotopic hydrogen exchange. Comparison with heterogeneous rhodium in the deuteriation of aromatic compounds and alkanes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blake, M R; Garnett, J L; Gregor, I K; Hannan, W; Hoa, K; Long, M A [New South Wales Univ., Kensington (Australia)

    1975-12-03

    The use of rhodium trichloride as a homogeneous catalyst for the exchange of aromatic compounds and alkanes is described; comparison of the results with corresponding data from heterogeneous rhodium metal and other homogeneous systems, e.g., platinum and iridium, supports the proposal that specific type of ..pi..-complex mechanisms are common to all such exchange systems.

  8. The isomerization of allylrhodium intermediates in the rhodium-catalyzed nucleophilic allylation of cyclic imines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepburn, Hamish B; Lam, Hon Wai

    2014-10-20

    Allylrhodium species generated from potassium allyltrifluoroborates can undergo isomerization by 1,4-rhodium(I) migration to give more complex isomers, which then react with cyclic imines to provide products with up to three new stereochemical elements. High enantioselectivities are obtained using chiral diene-rhodium complexes. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Rhodium Catalyzed Decarbonylation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garcia Suárez, Eduardo José; Kahr, Klara; Riisager, Anders

    2017-01-01

    Rhodium catalyzed decarbonylation has developed significantly over the last 50 years and resulted in a wide range of reported catalyst systems and reaction protocols. Besides experimental data, literature also includes mechanistic studies incorporating Hammett methods, analysis of kinetic isotope...

  10. REGIOSELECTIVE OXIDATIONS OF EQUILENIN DERIVATIVES CATALYZED BY A RHODIUM (III) PORPHYRIN COMPLEX-CONTRAST WITH THE MANGANESE (III) PORPHYRIN. (R826653)

    Science.gov (United States)

    AbstractEquilenin acetate and dihydroequilenin acetate were oxidized with iodosobenzene and a rhodium(III) porphyrin catalyst. The selectivity of the reactions differs from that with the corresponding Mn(III) catalyst, or from that of free radical chain oxidation.

  11. Rhodium platings – experimental study

    OpenAIRE

    Rudolf, R.; Budić, B.; Stamenković, D.; Čolić, M.; Ivanič, A.; Kosec, B.

    2013-01-01

    Modern rhodium plating solutions are based on either sulphate or phosphate. Although in theory there are four possible combinations, in practice only three different rhodium electrolytes are used. These are based on dilutions of rhodium sulphate or phosphate concentrates with added sulphuric or phosphoric acid. These processes are be discussed in this paper with a demonstration of Rh platings in the Slovenian firm Zlatarna Celje d.d.

  12. Rhodium platings – experimental study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Rudolf

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Modern rhodium plating solutions are based on either sulphate or phosphate. Although in theory there are four possible combinations, in practice only three different rhodium electrolytes are used. These are based on dilutions of rhodium sulphate or phosphate concentrates with added sulphuric or phosphoric acid. These processes are be discussed in this paper with a demonstration of Rh platings in the Slovenian firm Zlatarna Celje d.d.

  13. UV-visible spectroscopy of macrocyclic alkyl, nitrosyl and halide complexes of cobalt and rhodium. Experiment and calculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hull, Emily A; West, Aaron C; Pestovsky, Oleg; Kristian, Kathleen E; Ellern, Arkady; Dunne, James F; Carraher, Jack M; Bakac, Andreja; Windus, Theresa L

    2015-02-28

    Transition metal complexes (NH3)5CoX(2+) (X = CH3, Cl) and L(H2O)MX(2+), where M = Rh or Co, X = CH3, NO, or Cl, and L is a macrocyclic N4 ligand are examined by both experiment and computation to better understand their electronic spectra and associated photochemistry. Specifically, irradiation into weak visible bands of nitrosyl and alkyl complexes (NH3)5CoCH3(2+) and L(H2O)M(III)X(2+) (X = CH3 or NO) leads to photohomolysis that generates the divalent metal complex and ˙CH3 or ˙NO, respectively. On the other hand, when X = halide or NO2, visible light photolysis leads to dissociation of X(-) and/or cis/trans isomerization. Computations show that visible bands for alkyl and nitrosyl complexes involve transitions from M-X bonding orbitals and/or metal d orbitals to M-X antibonding orbitals. In contrast, complexes with X = Cl or NO2 exhibit only d-d bands in the visible, so that homolytic cleavage of the M-X bond requires UV photolysis. UV-Vis spectra are not significantly dependent on the structure of the equatorial ligands, as shown by similar spectral features for (NH3)5CoCH3(2+) and L(1)(H2O)CoCH3(2+).

  14. Immobilization of Mo(IV) complex in hybrid matrix obtained via sol-gel technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marques, C.; Sousa, A.M.; Freire, C.; Neves, I.C.; Fonseca, A.M.; Silva, C.J.R

    2003-10-06

    A molybdenum(IV) complex, trans-bis-[1,2-bis(diphenylphosphino)ethane]-fluoro-(diazopropano) -molybdenum tetraphenylborate, [MoF(DIAZO)(dppe){sub 2}][BPh{sub 4}], was prepared and immobilized in a hybrid matrix synthesized by the sol-gel process. The host matrix, designated as U(500), is an organic-inorganic network material, classed as ureasil, that combines a reticulated siliceous backbone linked by short polyether-based segments. Urea bridges make the link between these two components, and the polymerization of silicate substituted terminal groups generates the inorganic network. The free Mo(IV) complex and all new materials were characterized by spectroscopic techniques (FT-IR and UV-Vis) and thermal analysis (DSC). The ionic conductivity of the resulting material was also studied. The results indicate that immobilized Mo(IV) complex has kept its solid-state structure, although there is evidence of inter-molecular interactions between the Mo(IV) complex and some groups/atoms of the hybrid host matrix.

  15. Hydrogenation of unactivated enamines to tertiary amines: rhodium complexes of fluorinated phosphines give marked improvements in catalytic activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey Tin

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In the hydrogenation of sluggish unactivated enamine substrates, Rh complexes of electron-deficient phosphines are demonstrated to be far more reactive catalysts than those derived from triphenylphosphine. These operate at low catalyst loadings (down to 0.01 mol % and are able to reduce tetrasubstituted enamines. The use of the sustainable and environmentally benign solvent (R-limonene for the reaction is also reported with the amine isolated by acid extraction.

  16. Hydroformylation of propene and 1-hexene catalysed by a alpha-zirconium phosphate supported rhodium-phosphine complex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlsson, Magnus; Andersson, C; Hjortkjær, Jes

    2001-01-01

    The reaction of the amphiphilic ligand {4-[bis(diethylaminoethyl)aminomethyl]diphenyl}phosphine with alpha -zirconium phosphate, of intermediate surface area (24m(2) g(-1)), provided a phosphine functionalised support in which electrostatic interaction between ammonium groups on the ligand and de......-protonated surface hydroxyl groups on the support provided the binding force. The X-ray powder diffractogram of the material showed that the binding lowers the crystallinity of the carrier and that the ligand is not intercalated but bound at the outer surface and at the entrances to the interlamellar space. Reaction...... of the phosphine functionalised support with Rh(CO)(2)(acac) led to CO-phosphine exchange and formation of an immobilised complex of the composition LRh(CO)(acac) (L = surface bound phosphine). When applied as catalyst in continuous gas-phase hydroformylation of propene and in liquid phase hydroformylation of 1...

  17. Immobilization of selenium by biofilm of Shewanella putrefaciens with and without Fe(III)-citrate complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Yoshinori; Sakama, Yosuke; Saiki, Hiroshi; Kitamura, Akira; Yoshikawa, Hideki; Tanaka, Kazuya

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the effect of biofilms on selenium migration, we examined selenite reduction by biofilms of an iron-reducing bacterium, Shewanella putrefaciens, under anaerobic conditions. The biofilms were grown under static conditions on culture cover glasses coated with poly-L-lysine. Optical microscopic observation of the biofilms after staining with 0.1% crystal violet solution revealed that the cells were surrounded by filamentous extracellular polymer substances. Exposure of the biofilms to aqueous selenite resulted in the formation of red precipitates, which were assigned to nanoparticulate elemental selenium using X-ray absorption near-edge structure analysis. Micrographic observation showed that the precipitates immobilized at the biofilms. We also examined the selenite reduction in the presence of Fe(III)-citrate complex. In this case, a dark brown precipitate formed at the biofilms. X-ray absorption near-edge structure analysis revealed that the precipitate was a mixed compound with elemental selenium and iron selenide. These findings indicate that biofilms of iron-reducing bacteria in the environment can immobilize selenium by reducing Se(IV) to Se(0), and Fe(III)-citrate complex promotes the reduction of Se(0) to Se(-II). (author)

  18. PMO-immobilized Au(I)-NHC complexes: Heterogeneous catalysts for sustainable processes

    KAUST Repository

    van der Voort, Pascal

    2017-11-08

    A stable Periodic Mesoporous Organosilica (PMO) with accessible sulfonic acid functionalities is prepared via a one-pot-synthesis and is used as solid support for highly active catalysts, consisting of gold(I)-N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC) complexes. The gold complexes are successfully immobilized on the nanoporous hybrid material via a straightforward acid-base reaction with the corresponding [Au(OH)(NHC)] synthon. This catalyst design strategy results in a boomerang-type catalyst, allowing the active species to detach from the surface to perform the catalysis and then to recombine with the solid after all the starting material is consumed. This boomerang behavior is assessed in the hydration of alkynes. The tested catalysts were found to be active in the latter reaction, and after an acidic work-up, the IPr*-based gold catalyst can be recovered and then reused several times without any loss in efficiency

  19. Type III odontoid fractures: A subgroup analysis of complex, high-energy fractures treated with external immobilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas E Niemeier

    2018-01-01

    Conclusions: Complex Type III odontoid fractures are distinctly different from low-energy injuries. In the current study, 21% of patients were unsuccessfully treated nonoperatively with external immobilization and required surgery. For complex Type III fractures, we recommend initial conservative treatment, while maintaining close monitoring throughout patient recovery and fracture union.

  20. Dinuclear ditertiary phosphite derivatives of rhodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meintjies, E.

    1981-08-01

    The overall objective of the research described in this thesis was the design, synthesis, characterization and chemistry of dinuclear complexes of rhodium in which the metal atoms are held in close proximity to each other. Complexes of this nature are of considerable interest owing, in part, to their potential as models for multicentred metal catalysts, as well as to the highly novel and unusual chemistry already discovered for a number of them. A survey of dinuclear complexes of rhodium containing carbonyl and group V donor ligands has been presented as a background introduction to the research reported in this thesis. The coordination behaviour of the diphosphazane ligands, (RO) 2 PN(R')P(OR) 2 (R=Ph or Me, R' = Et; R = Et or Pr/i, R' = Me), and the ditertiary phosphite ligand, (EtO) 2 POP(OEt) 2 , towards certain rhodium precursors has been investigated. A number of highly unusual neutral dinuclear complexes of rhodium, in which these ligands bridge-bond the two rhodium atoms, have been synthesized. Two types of monocarbonyl decarbonylation products are observed for compounds of the type, [Rh 2 Cl 2 (CO) 2 (μ-diphosphazane) 2 ]. 1 H and 31 P[ 1 H] n.m.r. spectral studies have been carried out with the object of establishing the nature of the bridging halogen ligands in the tricarbonyl species. Asymetric zerovalent dinuclear species of the type, [Rh 2 (CO) 3 -[μ-(RO) 2 PN(R')P(OR) 2 ] 2 ] (R = Ph or Me, R' = Et; R = Pr/i, R' = Me), are obtained. A single crystal X-ray analysis has been carried out. Homoleptic cationic species are obtained by reaction of the alkoxydiphosphazane ligands with [Rh(C 8 H 12 )(solvent)(n)] + under the appropriate reaction conditions. The solution and solid-state infrared spectra and the 31 P[ 1 H] n.m.r. spectra of all new compounds synthesized in this study are discussed in terms of possible structures for these compounds. Where appropriate, the n.m.r. spectral data are also discussed in terms of fluxional behaviour

  1. Efficient sample preparation from complex biological samples using a sliding lid for immobilized droplet extractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casavant, Benjamin P; Guckenberger, David J; Beebe, David J; Berry, Scott M

    2014-07-01

    Sample preparation is a major bottleneck in many biological processes. Paramagnetic particles (PMPs) are a ubiquitous method for isolating analytes of interest from biological samples and are used for their ability to thoroughly sample a solution and be easily collected with a magnet. There are three main methods by which PMPs are used for sample preparation: (1) removal of fluid from the analyte-bound PMPs, (2) removal of analyte-bound PMPs from the solution, and (3) removal of the substrate (with immobilized analyte-bound PMPs). In this paper, we explore the third and least studied method for PMP-based sample preparation using a platform termed Sliding Lid for Immobilized Droplet Extractions (SLIDE). SLIDE leverages principles of surface tension and patterned hydrophobicity to create a simple-to-operate platform for sample isolation (cells, DNA, RNA, protein) and preparation (cell staining) without the need for time-intensive wash steps, use of immiscible fluids, or precise pinning geometries. Compared to other standard isolation protocols using PMPs, SLIDE is able to perform rapid sample preparation with low (0.6%) carryover of contaminants from the original sample. The natural recirculation occurring within the pinned droplets of SLIDE make possible the performance of multistep cell staining protocols within the SLIDE by simply resting the lid over the various sample droplets. SLIDE demonstrates a simple easy to use platform for sample preparation on a range of complex biological samples.

  2. Immobilized copper(II) macrocyclic complex on MWCNTs with antibacterial activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tarlani, Aliakbar, E-mail: Tarlani@ccerci.ac.ir [Inorganic Nanostructures and Catalysts Research Lab., Chemistry & Chemical Engineering Research Center of Iran, Pajoohesh Blvd., km 17, Karaj Hwy, Tehran 14968-13151 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Narimani, Khashayar [Inorganic Nanostructures and Catalysts Research Lab., Chemistry & Chemical Engineering Research Center of Iran, Pajoohesh Blvd., km 17, Karaj Hwy, Tehran 14968-13151 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mohammadipanah, Fatemeh; Hamedi, Javad [Department of Microbial Biotechnology, School of Biology and Center of Excellence in Phylogeny of Living Organisms, College of Science, University of Tehran, Tehran 14155-6455 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); University of Tehran Biocompound Collection (UTBC), Microbial Technology and Products Research Center, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Tahermansouri, Hasan [Department of Chemistry, Ayatollah Amoli Branch, Islamic Azad University, Amol (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Amini, Mostafa M. [Department of Chemistry, Shahid Behshti University, 1983963113, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-06-30

    Graphical abstract: In an antibacterial test, grafted copper(II) macrocyclic complex on the surface of MWCNT showed higher antibacterial activity against Bacillus subtilis compared to the individual MWCNT-COOH and the complex. - Highlights: • Copper(II) tetraaza macrocyclic complex covalently bonded to modified MWCNT. • Grafting of the complex carried out via an interaction between −C(=O)Cl group and NH of the ligand. • The samples were subjected in an antibacterial assessment to compare their activity. • Immobilized complex showed higher antibacterial activity against Bacillus subtilis ATCC 6633 compared to separately MWCNT-C(C=O)-OH and CuTAM. - Abstract: In a new approach, a copper(II) tetraaza macrocyclic complex (CuTAM) was covalently bonded on modified multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). To achieve this purpose, MWCNTs were converted to MWCNT-COCl and then reacted to NH groups of TAM ligand. The prepared material was characterized by Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA), and FESEM (field emission scanning electron microscopy). FT-IR and TGA demonstrated the presence of the organic moieties, and XRD proved that the structure of MWCNTs remained intact during the three modification steps. An increase in the I{sub D}/I{sub G} ratio in Raman spectra confirmed the surface modifications. Finally, the samples were subjected to an antibacterial assessment to compare their biological activity. The antibacterial test showed that the grafted complex on the surface of the nanotube (MWCNT-CO-CuTAM) has higher antibacterial activity against Bacillus subtilis ATCC 6633 than the MWCNT-COOH and CuTAM with 1000 and 2000 μg/mL.

  3. Separation of carrier-free rhodium isotopes from ruthenium cyclotron targets by the extraction of nitrosylruthenium from hydrochloric acid solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haasbroek, F.J.; Strelow, F.W.E.; Van der Walt, T.N.

    1981-01-01

    A method is presented for the separation of rhodium isotopes from ruthenium cyclotron targets. After bombardment with deuterons and dissolution of the target material, the ruthenium is converted into a nitrosyl complex by treatment with hydroxylammonium chloride. Aluminium and other elements which have been introduced in the dissolution step, are separated by cation exchange. Ruthenium is then separated by extraction with a mixture of tri-n-butyl phosphate and hexane (4:1), leaving the rhodium in the aqueous phase. No ruthenium is found in the rhodium fraction and the recovery of rhodium is better than 90 per cent [af

  4. Atmosphere-Controlled Chemoselectivity: Rhodium-Catalyzed Alkylation and Olefination of Alkylnitriles with Alcohols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Junjun; Liu, Yuxuan; Tang, Weijun; Xue, Dong; Li, Chaoqun; Xiao, Jianliang; Wang, Chao

    2017-10-17

    The chemoselective alkylation and olefination of alkylnitriles with alcohols have been developed by simply controlling the reaction atmosphere. A binuclear rhodium complex catalyzes the alkylation reaction under argon through a hydrogen-borrowing pathway and the olefination reaction under oxygen through aerobic dehydrogenation. Broad substrate scope is demonstrated, permitting the synthesis of some important organic building blocks. Mechanistic studies suggest that the alkylation product may be formed through conjugate reduction of an alkene intermediate by a rhodium hydride, whereas the formation of olefin product may be due to the oxidation of the rhodium hydride complex with molecular oxygen. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Chemical Posttranslational Modification with Designed Rhodium(II) Catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, S C; Minus, M B; Ball, Z T

    2016-01-01

    Natural enzymes use molecular recognition to perform exquisitely selective transformations on nucleic acids, proteins, and natural products. Rhodium(II) catalysts mimic this selectivity, using molecular recognition to allow selective modification of proteins with a variety of functionalized diazo reagents. The rhodium catalysts and the diazo reactivity have been successfully applied to a variety of protein folds, the chemistry succeeds in complex environments such as cell lysate, and a simple protein blot method accurately assesses modification efficiency. The studies with rhodium catalysts provide a new tool to study and probe protein-binding events, as well as a new synthetic approach to protein conjugates for medical, biochemical, or materials applications. © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Antitumor effect and toxicity of free rhodium (II) citrate and rhodium (II) citrate-loaded maghemite nanoparticles in mice bearing breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carneiro, Marcella Lemos Brettas; Peixoto, Raphael C A; Joanitti, Graziela A; Oliveira, Ricardo G S; Telles, Luis A M; Miranda-Vilela, Ana L; Bocca, Anamélia L; Vianna, Leonora M S; da Silva, Izabel C R; de Souza, Aparecido R; Lacava, Zulmira G M; Báo, Sônia N

    2013-02-16

    Magnetic fluids containing superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles represent an attractive platform as nanocarriers in chemotherapy. Recently, we developed a formulation of maghemite nanoparticles coated with rhodium (II) citrate, which resulted in in vitro cytotoxicity enhanced up to 4.6 times when compared to free rhodium (II) citrate formulation on breast carcinoma cells. In this work, we evaluate the antitumor activity and toxicity induced by these formulations in Balb/c mice bearing orthotopic 4T1 breast carcinoma. Mice were evaluated with regard to the treatments' toxicity through analyses of hemogram, serum levels of alanine aminotransferase, iron, and creatinine; DNA fragmentation and cell cycle of bone marrow cells; and liver, kidney and lung histology. In addition, the antitumor activity of rhodium (II) citrate and maghemite nanoparticles coated with rhodium (II) citrate was verified by tumor volume reduction, histology and immunohistochemistry. Regarding the treatments' toxicity, no experimental groups had alterations in levels of serum ALT or creatinine, and this suggestion was corroborated by the histopathologic examination of liver and kidney of mice. Moreover, DNA fragmentation frequency of bone marrow cells was lower than 15% in all experimental groups. On the other hand, the complexes rhodium (II) citrate-functionalized maghemite and free rhodium (II) citrate led to a marked growth inhibition of tumor and decrease in CD31 and Ki-67 staining. In summary, we demonstrated that both rhodium (II) citrate and maghemite nanoparticles coated with rhodium (II) citrate formulations exhibited antitumor effects against 4T1 metastatic breast cancer cell line following intratumoral administration. This antitumor effect was followed by inhibition of both cell proliferation and microvascularization and by tumor tissue injury characterized as necrosis and fibrosis. Remarkably, this is the first published report demonstrating the therapeutic efficacy of maghemite

  7. Rhodium-103m generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mamadaliev, N.; Levin, V.I.; Malinin, A.B.

    1978-01-01

    103 Pd separated from metal rhodium irradiated with deuterons has been used without a carrier for sup( 03m)Rh generator The generator of sup(103m)Rh is a column 6mm in diameter filled with an anionite in Cl - form (Dowex-2,8,200-400 mesh) with an adsorbed parent isotope of 103 Pd. As a result of its decay, a 103 Rh daughter isotope is accumulated, which can be washed out from the generator from time to time with a corresponding solution. To prepare the generator, 0.5g of the resin with an adsorbed 103 Pd is charged into the column containing 1g of the same resin. Washing out with 2N HCl yields more than 90% of sup(103m)Rh with a radionuclide purity of more than 99.99%

  8. Microalgal-biochar immobilized complex: A novel efficient biosorbent for cadmium removal from aqueous solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Ying; Li, Huan; Zhu, Wenzhe; Ho, Shih-Hsin; Yuan, Wenqiao; Chen, Jianfeng; Xie, Youping

    2017-11-01

    The feasibility of the bioremediation of cadmium (Cd) using microalgal-biochar immobilized complex (MBIC) was investigated. Major operating parameters (e.g., pH, biosorbent dosage, initial Cd(II) concentration and microalgal-biochar ratio) were varied to compare the treatability of viable algae (Chlorella sp.), biochar and MBIC. The biosorption isotherms obtained by using algae or biochar were found to have satisfactory Langmuir predictions, while the best fitting adsorption isotherm model for MBIC was the Sips model. The maximum Cd(II) adsorption capacity of MBIC with a Chlorella sp.: biochar ratio of 2:3 (217.41mgg -1 ) was higher than that of Chlorella sp. (169.92mgg -1 ) or biochar (95.82mgg -1 ) alone. The pseudo-second-order model fitted the biosorption process of MBIC well (R 2 >0.999). Moreover, zeta potential, SEM and FTIR studies revealed that electrostatic attraction, ion exchange and surface complexation were the main mechanisms responsible for Cd removal when using MBIC. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Aerobic Asymmetric Dehydrogenative Cross-Coupling between Two C(sp3)-H Groups Catalyzed by a Chiral-at-Metal Rhodium Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Yuqi; Yuan, Wei; Gong, Lei; Meggers, Eric

    2015-10-26

    A sustainable C-C bond formation is merged with the catalytic asymmetric generation of one or two stereocenters. The introduced catalytic asymmetric cross-coupling of two C(sp3)-H groups with molecular oxygen as the oxidant profits from the oxidative robustness of a chiral-at-metal rhodium(III) catalyst and exploits an autoxidation mechanism or visible-light photosensitized oxidation. In the latter case, the catalyst serves a dual function, namely as a chiral Lewis acid for catalyzing enantioselective enolate chemistry and at the same time as a visible-light-driven photoredox catalyst. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Biooxidation of 2-phenylethanol to phenylacetic acid by whole-cell Gluconobacter oxydans biocatalyst immobilized in polyelectrolyte complex capsules

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bertóková, A.; Vikartovská, A.; Bučko, M.; Gemeiner, P.; Tkáč, J.; Chorvát, D.; Štefuca, V.; Neděla, Vilém

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 33, č. 2 (2015), s. 111-120 ISSN 1024-2422 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-22777S Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : Gluconobacter oxydans * natural flavors * phenylacetic acid * immobilized whole-cell biocatalyst * polyelectrolyte complex capsules * environmental scanning electron microscopy Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 0.892, year: 2015

  11. Measurement of the hyperfine magnetic field on rhodium in chromium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peretto, P.; Teisseron, G.; Berthier, J.

    1978-01-01

    Hyperfine magnetic field of rhodium in a chromium matrix is studied. Anisotropy of rhodium 100 is + 0.17. Time dependence of angular correlation is given with a sample containing 145 ppm of rhodium despite the short life [fr

  12. DNA Mismatch Binding and Antiproliferative Activity of Rhodium Metalloinsertors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, Russell J.; Song, Hang; Barton, Jacqueline K.

    2009-01-01

    Deficiencies in mismatch repair (MMR) are associated with carcinogenesis. Rhodium metalloinsertors bind to DNA base mismatches with high specificity and inhibit cellular proliferation preferentially in MMR-deficient cells versus MMR-proficient cells. A family of chrysenequinone diimine complexes of rhodium with varying ancillary ligands that serve as DNA metalloinsertors has been synthesized, and both DNA mismatch binding affinities and antiproliferative activities against the human colorectal carcinoma cell lines HCT116N and HCT116O, an isogenic model system for MMR deficiency, have been determined. DNA photocleavage experiments reveal that all complexes bind to the mismatch sites with high specificities; DNA binding affinities to oligonucleotides containing single base CA and CC mismatches, obtained through photocleavage titration or competition, vary from 104 to 108 M−1 for the series of complexes. Significantly, binding affinities are found to be inversely related to ancillary ligand size and directly related to differential inhibition of the HCT116 cell lines. The observed trend in binding affinity is consistent with the metalloinsertion mode where the complex binds from the minor groove with ejection of mismatched base pairs. The correlation between binding affinity and targeting of the MMR-deficient cell line suggests that rhodium metalloinsertors exert their selective biological effects on MMR-deficient cells through mismatch binding in vivo. PMID:19175313

  13. Guest-Host Complex Formed between Ascorbic Acid and β-Cyclodextrin Immobilized on the Surface of an Electrode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Teresa Ramírez-Silva

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This work deals with the formation of supramolecular complexes between ascorbic acid (AA, the guest, and β-cyclodextrin (β-CD, the host, that was first potentiodynamically immobilized on the surface of a carbon paste electrode (CPE throughout the formation of a β-CD-based conducting polymer (poly-β-CD. With the bare CPE and the β-CD-modified CPE, an electrochemical study was performed to understand the effect of such surface modification on the electrochemical response of the AA. From this study it was shown that on the modified-CPE, the AA was surface-immobilized through formation of an inclusion complex with β-CD, which provoked the adsorption of AA in such a way that this stage became the limiting step for the electrochemical oxidation of AA. Moreover, from the analysis of the experimental voltammetric plots recorded during AA oxidation on the CPE/poly-β-CD electrode surfaces, the Gibbs’ standard free energy of the inclusion complex formed by the oxidation product of AA and β-CD has been determined for the first time, ∆G0inclus = −36.4 kJ/mol.

  14. Spectrophotometric determination of ruthenium (III) and rhodium (III) with 9,10-phenanthrenequinone monoxime after extraction into molten naphthalene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wasey, A.; Bansal, R.K.; Puri, B.K.; Satake, Masatada.

    1983-01-01

    9,10-Phenanthrenequinone monoxime has been used as a reagent for the spectrophotometric determination of ruthenium(III) and rhodium(III) after extraction into molten naphthalene. The extracted mixture of the metal complex and naphthalene was dissolved in chloroform and ruthenium and rhodium were determined spectrophotometrically. Beer's law holds in the concentration range of 0.2-4.1 μg/cm 3 for ruthenium and 0.3-5.3 μg/cm 3 for rhodium in 10 cm 3 of the final solution. The molar absorptivities and Sandell sensitivities are calculated to be 9.70 x 10 3 l mol -1 cm -1 and 0.01 μg/cmsup(2 ) (660 nm) for ruthenium and 1.13 x 10 4 l mol -1 cm -1 and 0.009 μg/cm 2 (410 nm) for rhodium respectively. Aliquots containing 2.0 μg of ruthenium and 4.1 μg of rhodium give mean absorbances of 0.192 and 0.451 with standard deviations of 0.0017 and 0.0039, respectively. Interference of various ions has been studied and the method has been applied to the determination of ruthenium and rhodium in various synthetic mixtures. This procedure is also applied to the simultaneous determination of ruthenium and rhodium present together in a solution. (author)

  15. Dihydropyranone Formation by Ipso C–H Activation in a Glucal 3-Carbamate-Derived Rhodium Acyl Nitrenoid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurlocker, Brisa; Abascal, Nadia C.; Repka, Lindsay M.; Santizo-Deleon, Elsy; Smenton, Abigail L.; Baranov, Victoria; Gupta, Ritu; Bernard, Sarah E.; Chowdhury, Shenjuti; Rojas, Christian M.

    2011-01-01

    By using (N-tosyloxy)-3-O-carbamoyl-D-glucal 10, which removes the need for a hypervalent iodine(III) oxidant, we provide evidence for rhodium nitrenoid-mediated ipso C–H activation as the origin of a C3-oxidized dihydropyranone product 3. This system may be especially susceptible to such a pathway due to the ease of forming a cation upon hydride transfer to the rhodium-complexed acyl nitrene. PMID:21381715

  16. Reactivity of rhodium during co-deposition of rhodium and carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marot, Laurent; Steiner, Roland; De Temmerman, Gregory; Oelhafen, Peter

    2009-01-01

    The detailed characterizations of rhodium/carbon films prepared by co-deposition using a dual magnetron sputtering have been carried out on silicon substrates at room temperature. Effects of the carbon incorporated in the film on the chemical bonding state, optical reflectivity and crystallinity were investigated using XPS, reflectivity measurements, XRD and SEM. The incorporation of carbon changes the films' crystallinity and thus producing amorphous films. The reflectivity of the films decreases linearly as the rhodium concentration decreases. It is important to note that no chemical bonding was observed between rhodium and carbon whatever the deposition conditions, even at high deposition temperature. Concerning the reactivity of rhodium films with oxygen, after long term storage in air the rhodium surface is covered with a thin rhodium oxide (few nanometers). However, for these films no variation of the optical reflectivity was observed after long air storage.

  17. Scalar Relativistic Study of the Structure of Rhodium Acetate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily E. Edwards

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Rhodium acetate, related rhodium carboxylates, and rhodium amide complexes are powerful catalysts for carbene chemistry. They readily promote the decomposition of diazo compounds and transfer the resulting carbene to a variety of substrates. There have been several quantum chemistry studies of these compounds, particularly of the acetate. These have all used non-relativistic methods, and all have shown optimized Rh-Rh bond lengths significantly longer than the experimental value. In this study we have surveyed several scalar relativistic DFT methods using Gaussian, Slater, and numerical basis functions (in DGAUSS, ADF, and DMOL3. Several combinations of exchange-correlation functionals with relativistic and non-relativistic effective core potentials (ECP were investigated, as were non-relativistic and all electron scalar relativistic methods. The combination of the PW91 exchange and PW91 correlation functional with the Christiansen-Ermler ECP gave the best results: 2.3918 Å compared to the experimental value of 2.3855±0.0005 Å.

  18. Investigations of the uptake of transuranic radionuclides by humic and fulvic acids chemically immobilized on silica gel and their competitive release by complexing agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bulman, R.A.; Szabo, G.; Clayton, R.F.; Clayton, C.R.

    1998-01-01

    The chemistry of the interactions of transuranic elements (TUs) with humic substances needs to be understood so that humate-mediated movement of transuranic radionuclides through the environment can be predicted. This paper reports the chemical immobilization on silica gel of humic and fulvic acids and evaluates the potential of these new materials for the retention of Pu and Am. In addition to the preparation of the foregoing immobilized humic substances, other low molecular weight metal-binding ligands have also been immobilized on silica gel to investigate the binding sites for transuranic elements (TUs) in humic substances. The X-ray photoelectron spectra (XPS) of Th(IV) complexed by humic acid and the immobilized humic acid are similar thus it appears that immobilization of humic acid does not generate any configurational changes in the Th(IV)-binding sites of the macromolecule. A variety of chelating agents partly mobilize these TUs sorbed on the solid phases. A batch method was used to determine the distribution coefficients (R d ) of Pu and Am between the silica gels and aqueous solutions of phosphate and citrate. The effects of the immobilized ligands, the anions and pH in the solution on sorption were assessed. Distributed coefficients (R d ) for the uptake of Pu and Am by these prepared solid phases are, in some cases, of a similar order of magnitude as those determined for soil and particles suspended in terrestrial surface waters

  19. From betaines to anionic N-heterocyclic carbenes. Borane, gold, rhodium, and nickel complexes starting from an imidazoliumphenolate and its carbene tautomer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Liu

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The mesomeric betaine imidazolium-1-ylphenolate forms a borane adduct with tris(pentafluorophenylborane by coordination with the phenolate oxygen, whereas its NHC tautomer 1-(2-phenolimidazol-2-ylidene reacts with (triphenylphosphinegold(I chloride to give the cationic NHC complex [Au(NHC2][Cl] by coordination with the carbene carbon atom. The anionic N-heterocyclic carbene 1-(2-phenolateimidazol-2-ylidene gives the complexes [K][Au(NHC−2], [Rh(NHC−3] and [Ni(NHC−2], respectively. Results of four single crystal analyses are presented.

  20. Peptide aptamer-assisted immobilization of green fluorescent protein for creating biomolecule-complexed carbon nanotube device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nii, Daisuke; Nozawa, Yosuke; Miyachi, Mariko; Yamanoi, Yoshinori; Nishihara, Hiroshi; Tomo, Tatsuya; Shimada, Yuichiro

    2017-10-01

    Carbon nanotubes are a novel material for next-generation applications. In this study, we generated carbon nanotube and green fluorescent protein (GFP) conjugates using affinity binding peptides. The carbon nanotube-binding motif was introduced into the N-terminus of the GFP through molecular biology methods. Multiple GFPs were successfully aligned on a single-walled carbon nanotube via the molecular recognition function of the peptide aptamer, which was confirmed through transmission electron microscopy and optical analysis. Fluorescence spectral analysis results also suggested that the carbon nanotube-GFP complex was autonomously formed with orientation and without causing protein denaturation during immobilization. This simple process has a widespread potential for fabricating carbon nanotube-biomolecule hybrid devices.

  1. Cooperative double deprotonation of Bis(2-picolyl)amine leading to unexpected bimetallic mixed valence (M(-1), M(1)) rhodium and iIridium complexes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tejel, C.; del Río, M.P.; Asensio, L.; van den Bruele, F.J.; Ciriano, M.A.; Tsichlis i Spithas, N.; Hetterscheid, D.G.H.; de Bruin, B.

    2011-01-01

    Cooperative reductive double deprotonation of the complex [RhI(bpa)(cod)]+ ([4]+, bpa = PyCH2NHCH2Py) with one molar equivalent of base produces the bimetallic species [(cod)Rh(bpa-2H)Rh(cod)] (7), which displays a large Rh-I,RhI contribution to its electronic structure. The doubly deprotonated

  2. Mono and dinuclear rhodium, iridium and ruthenium complexes containing chelating 2,2´-bipyrimidine ligands: Synthesis, molecular structure, electrochemistry and catalytic properties

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Govindaswamy, P.; Canivet, J.; Therrien, B.; Süss-Fink, G.; Štěpnička, P.; Ludvík, Jiří

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 692, č. 17 (2007), s. 3664-3675 ISSN 0022-328X R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC06070 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : arene ligands * electrochemistry * dinuclear complexes * transfer hydrogenation Subject RIV: CG - Electrochemistry Impact factor: 2.168, year: 2007

  3. Comparison of platinum, palladium, and rhodium distributions in some layered intrusions with special reference to the late differentiates (upper zone) of the Bushveld complex, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, N.J.; Von Gruenewaldt, G.; Haffty, J.; Aruscavage, P. J.

    1982-01-01

    The Stillwater, Fiskenaesset and Bushveld complexes have many similarities. The trends of the Pt/(Pt + Pd) and its correlation with Mg/(Mg + Fe2+) are presented. Presumably the Pt/(Pt + Pd) variations are related to changes in major mineral compositions. -K.A.R.

  4. C-H and H-H Bond Activation via Ligand Dearomatization/Rearomatization of a PN3P-Rhodium(I) Complex

    KAUST Repository

    Huang, Kuo-Wei; Wang, Yuan; Zheng, Bin; Pan, Yupeng; Pan, Chengling; He, Lipeng

    2015-01-01

    A neutral complex PN3P-Rh(I)Cl (2) was prepared from a reaction of the PN3P pincer ligand (1) with [Rh(COD)Cl]2 (COD = 1,5-cyclooctadiene). Upon treatment with a suitable base, H–H and Csp2–H activation reactions can be achieved through

  5. Molecular recognition in protein modification with rhodium metallopeptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Zachary T.

    2015-01-01

    Chemical manipulation of natural, unengineered proteins is a daunting challenge which tests the limits of reaction design. By combining transition-metal or other catalysts with molecular recognition ideas, it is possible to achieve site-selective protein reactivity without the need for engineered recognition sequences or reactive sites. Some recent examples in this area have used ruthenium photocatalysis, pyridine organocatalysis, and rhodium(II) metallocarbene catalysis, indicating that the fundamental ideas provide opportunities for using diverse reactivity on complex protein substrates and in complex cell-like environments. PMID:25588960

  6. Reduced Graphene Oxide-Immobilized Tris(bipyridine)ruthenium(II) Complex for Efficient Visible-Light-Driven Reductive Dehalogenation Reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaoyan; Hao, Zhongkai; Zhang, Fang; Li, Hexing

    2016-05-18

    A sodium benzenesulfonate (PhSO3Na)-functionalized reduced graphene oxide was synthesized via a two-step aryl diazonium coupling and subsequent NaCl ion-exchange procedure, which was used as a support to immobilize tris(bipyridine)ruthenium(II) complex (Ru(bpy)3Cl2) by coordination reaction. This elaborated Ru(bpy)3-rGO catalyst exhibited excellent catalytic efficiency in visible-light-driven reductive dehalogenation reactions under mild conditions, even for ary chloride. Meanwhile, it showed the comparable reactivity with the corresponding homogeneous Ru(bpy)3Cl2 catalyst. This high catalytic performance could be attributed to the unique two-dimensional sheet-like structure of Ru(bpy)3-rGO, which efficiently diminished diffusion resistance of the reactants. Meanwhile, the nonconjugated PhSO3Na-linkage between Ru(II) complex and the support and the very low electrical conductivity of the catalyst inhibited energy/electron transfer from Ru(II) complex to rGO support, resulting in the decreased support-induced quenching effect. Furthermore, it could be easily recycled at least five times without significant loss of catalytic reactivity.

  7. Iron(III) diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid complex on polyallylamine functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotubes: immobilization, direct electrochemistry and electrocatalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hailing; Cui, Yanyun; Li, Pan; Zhou, Yiming; Zhu, Xiaoshu; Tang, Yawen; Chen, Yu; Lu, Tianhong

    2013-05-07

    A nonenzymatic iron(III) diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (Fe(III)-DETPA) complex based amperometric sensor for the analytical determination of hydrogen peroxide was developed. By combining the electrostatic interaction between the Fe(III)-DETPA complex and polyallylamine (PAH) functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) as well as the ionotropic crosslinking interaction between PAH and ethylenediamine-tetramethylene phosphonic acid (EDTMP), the electroactive Fe(III)-DETPA complex was successfully incorporated within the MWCNT matrix, and firmly immobilized on the Au substrate electrode. The fabricated electrochemical sensor was characterized with scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and electrochemical methods. The influences of solution pH and ionic strength on the electrochemical sensor were investigated. The prepared electrochemical sensor had a fast response to hydrogen peroxide (<3 s) and an excellent linear range of concentration from 1.25 × 10(-8) to 4.75 × 10(-3) M with a detection limit of 6.3 × 10(-9) M under the optimum conditions.

  8. C-H and H-H Bond Activation via Ligand Dearomatization/Rearomatization of a PN3P-Rhodium(I) Complex

    KAUST Repository

    Huang, Kuo-Wei

    2015-04-13

    A neutral complex PN3P-Rh(I)Cl (2) was prepared from a reaction of the PN3P pincer ligand (1) with [Rh(COD)Cl]2 (COD = 1,5-cyclooctadiene). Upon treatment with a suitable base, H–H and Csp2–H activation reactions can be achieved through the deprotonation/reprotonation of one of the N–H arms and dearomatization/rearomatization of the central pyridine ring with the oxidation state of Rh remaining I.

  9. Rhodium(I) catalysis in olefin photoreactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salomon, R.G.; El Sanadi, N.

    1975-01-01

    The photorearrangement (254 nm) of 1,5-cyclooctadiene (1) in the presence of rhodium(I) chloride to give 1,4-cyclooctadiene (4) was found by deuterium labeling to involve an intramolecular [1,3] shift of hydrogen. A rate-determining cleavage of an allylic C--H bond is indicated by a deuterium isotope effect, k/sub H//k/sub D/ = 1.55 +- 0.03 for the 1 → 4 rearrangement. The acyclic 1,5-diene, 3,3-dimethyl-1,5-hexadiene (8), rearranges in the presence of rhodium(I) chloride upon uv irradiation (254 nm) to give cis-3,3-dimethyl-1,4-hexadiene (10) and the trans isomer 11 in a 1:4 ratio, respectively. This observation supports a mechanism for the photorearrangement of olefins catalyzed by rhodium(I) involving an initial photodissociation of one of two rhodium(I) coordinated carbon-carbon double bonds. This results in an increase in the coordinative unsaturation of rhodium(I) and enhances the proclivity of this d/sub s/ metal atom toward oxidative addition of an allylic C--H bond. A eta 3 -allylrhodium hydride intermediate then gives rearranged olefin by reductive elimination. Lastly, a novel photochemical, rhodium(I) catalyzed hydrogen transfer is reported which gives cyclooctene (7) from cyclooctadienes under unprecedentedly mild conditions. (auth)

  10. Quantification of Rhodium in a Series of Inorganic and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    NICO

    ... such as rhodium hydridocarbonyl tristriphenylphosphine, [HRh(CO)(PPh3)3], .... The selection of the most suitable wavelengths for rhodium, yttrium and cobalt ... chloride ions were removed from the CRM samples as chlorine gas with the ...

  11. Activity of iridium-ruthenium and iridium-rhodium adsorption catalysts in decomposition of hydrogen peroxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zubovich, I A; Mikhaylov, V A; Migulina, N N [Yaroslavskij Politekhnicheskij Inst. (USSR)

    1976-06-01

    Experimental data for the activities of iridium-ruthenium and iridium-rhodium adsorption catalysts in the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide are considered and the results of magnetic susceptibility measurements are presented. It is concluded that surface structures (complexes) may be formed and that micro-electronic feaures play a role in heterogeneous catalysis.

  12. STABLE SILICA-GRAFTED POLYMER-BOUND BULKY-PHOSPHITE MODIFIED RHODIUM HYDROFORMYLATION CATALYSTS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    JONGSMA, T; VANAERT, H; FOSSEN, M; CHALLA, G; VANLEEUWEN, PWNM

    1993-01-01

    The present study demonstrates that silica-grafted polymer-bound phosphite modified rhodium complexes can be used in continuous flow reactors. The hydroformylation of styrene was carried out at moderate pressure (p(CO/H-2) = 30 bar) and temperature (T = 100-degrees-C), yielding constant conversions

  13. Komplexe zouten van trans-1-2-diaminocyclohexaan met driewaardig rhodium en kobalt

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijkerk, Lucas

    1937-01-01

    Some complex salts of trans-I-2-díominocyclohexane with trivalent cobaltum and rhodium were prepared and their properties described in detail. Diaminocyclohexanwe as obtained by the following series of reactions: cyclohexanone --> cyclohexanone-I-oxalylicester --> cyclohexonone-I-carboxylicester-2

  14. Determination of rhodium in metallic alloy and water samples using cloud point extraction coupled with spectrophotometric technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassem, Mohammed A.; Amin, Alaa S.

    2015-02-01

    A new method to estimate rhodium in different samples at trace levels had been developed. Rhodium was complexed with 5-(4‧-nitro-2‧,6‧-dichlorophenylazo)-6-hydroxypyrimidine-2,4-dione (NDPHPD) as a complexing agent in an aqueous medium and concentrated by using Triton X-114 as a surfactant. The investigated rhodium complex was preconcentrated with cloud point extraction process using the nonionic surfactant Triton X-114 to extract rhodium complex from aqueous solutions at pH 4.75. After the phase separation at 50 °C, the surfactant-rich phase was heated again at 100 °C to remove water after decantation and the remaining phase was dissolved using 0.5 mL of acetonitrile. Under optimum conditions, the calibration curve was linear for the concentration range of 0.5-75 ng mL-1 and the detection limit was 0.15 ng mL-1 of the original solution. The enhancement factor of 500 was achieved for 250 mL samples containing the analyte and relative standard deviations were ⩽1.50%. The method was found to be highly selective, fairly sensitive, simple, rapid and economical and safely applied for rhodium determination in different complex materials such as synthetic mixture of alloys and environmental water samples.

  15. A Recyclable Nanoparticle-Supported Rhodium Catalyst for Hydrogenation Reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Michela Dell’Anna

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Catalytic hydrogenation under mild conditions of olefins, unsaturated aldeydes and ketones, nitriles and nitroarenes was investigated, using a supported rhodium complex obtained by copolymerization of Rh(cod(aaema [cod: 1,5-cyclooctadiene, aaema–: deprotonated form of 2-(acetoacetoxyethyl methacrylate] with acrylamides. In particular, the hydrogenation reaction of halonitroarenes was carried out under 20 bar hydrogen pressure with ethanol as solvent at room temperature, in order to minimize hydro-dehalogenation. The yields in haloanilines ranged from 85% (bromoaniline to 98% (chloroaniline.

  16. Preparation of rhodium target for cyclone-30 accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng Xuesong; Li Dakang; Xie Xiangqian; Li Chao

    2002-01-01

    The rhodium target for Cyclone-30 accelerator is prepared by pulse electroplating method. The effects of pulse parameters, rhodium concentration, acidity and temperature on the properties of the target layer are studied, and the optimal process is determined. The rhodium target, mass thickness is more than 150 mg/cm 2 , adapts to producing 103 Pd on Cyclone-30 accelerator

  17. Constitutional studies in the palladium-rhodium-tellurium (-oxygen) system. A contribution to elucidate the behaviour of Pd, Rh and Te in the vitrification process of high-level waste concentrates (HLWC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartmann, T.

    1996-01-01

    In the vitrification process of high-level waste concentrates (HLWC) from the reprocessing of nuclear spent fuel elements, about 30 different elements have to be immobilized in a solid matrix consisting of an alkali borosilicate glass. Most of the waste oxides are dissolved in the alkali borosilicate melt and become structural elements of the glasses when cooled. This, however, applies only partly to the platinum metals Ru, which forms RuO 2 , and palladium and rhodium, which deposit as sparingly soluble and electrically conducting tellurides. This might considerably impair the technical process of HLWC vitrification. Therefore, constitutional studies on the Pd-Rh-Te system became necessary. The phase diagram of the Pd-Rh-Te ternary system at temperatures of 1150, 1100, 1050, 1000, 950, 900 and 750 C was determined under inertial conditions. Oxygen exerts a major influence on the system. Already under limited availability of oxygen, the rhodium contents of the solid solution phases α 1 and α 2 are clearly diminished. Rhodium of the phases becomes oxidized selectively. The three-phase field α 1 +α 2 +L is shifted to higher palladium and tellurium contents, even oxygen is available to a limited extend only. With the oxygen in the air, the extension of the three-phase space is reduced markedly. The complex process chemistry of Pf, Rh and Te during the vitrification can be described by the state of the Pd-Rh-Te ternary system after annealing in (air) oxygen for limited periods of time. (orig./MM) [de

  18. Energy transfer between surface-immobilized light-harvesting chlorophyll a/b complex (LHCII) studied by surface plasmon field-enhanced fluorescence spectroscopy (SPFS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauterbach, Rolf; Liu, Jing; Knoll, Wolfgang; Paulsen, Harald

    2010-11-16

    The major light-harvesting chlorophyll a/b complex (LHCII) of the photosynthetic apparatus in green plants can be viewed as a protein scaffold binding and positioning a large number of pigment molecules that combines rapid and efficient excitation energy transfer with effective protection of its pigments from photobleaching. These properties make LHCII potentially interesting as a light harvester (or a model thereof) in photoelectronic applications. Most of such applications would require the LHCII to be immobilized on a solid surface. In a previous study we showed the immobilization of recombinant LHCII on functionalized gold surfaces via a 6-histidine tag (His tag) in the protein moiety. In this work the occurrence and efficiency of Förster energy transfer between immobilized LHCII on a functionalized surface have been analyzed by surface plasmon field-enhanced fluorescence spectroscopy (SPFS). A near-infrared dye was attached to some but not all of the LHC complexes, serving as an energy acceptor to chlorophylls. Analysis of the energy transfer from chlorophylls to this acceptor dye yielded information about the extent of intercomplex energy transfer between immobilized LHCII.

  19. Rhodium Phosphine-π-Arene Intermediates in the Hydroamination of Alkenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhijian; Yamamichi, Hideaki; Madrahimov, Sherzod T.; Hartwig, John F.

    2011-01-01

    A detailed mechanistic study of the intramolecular hydroamination of alkenes with amines catalyzed by rhodium complexes of a biaryldialkylphosphine are reported. The active catalyst is shown to contain the phosphine ligand bound in a κ1, η6 form in which the arene is π-bound to rhodium. Addition of deuterated amine to an internal olefin showed that the reaction occurs by trans addition of the N-H bond across the C=C bond, and this stereochemistry implies that the reaction occurs by nucleophilic attack of the amine on a coordinated alkene. Indeed, the cationic rhodium fragment binds the alkene over the secondary amine, and the olefin complex was shown to be the catalyst resting state. The reaction was zero-order in substrate, when the concentration of olefin was high, and a primary isotope effect was observed. The primary isotope effect, in combination with the observation of the alkene complex as the resting state, implies that nucleophilic attack of the amine on the alkene is reversible and is followed by turnover-limiting protonation. This mechanism constitutes an unusual pathway for rhodium-catalyzed additions to alkenes and is more closely related to the mechanism for palladium-catalyzed addition of amide N-H bonds to alkenes. PMID:21309512

  20. Effect of chitosan molecular weight on the formation of chitosan-pullulanase soluble complexes and their application in the immobilization of pullulanase onto Fe3O4-κ-carrageenan nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Jie; Xu, Enbo; Li, Xingfei; Wu, Zhengzong; Wang, Fang; Xu, Xueming; Jin, Zhengyu; Jiao, Aiquan; Zhan, Xiaobei

    2016-07-01

    The interactions between pullulanase and chitosans of different molecular weights (Mw) were comprehensively studied, and their applications in pullulanase immobilization onto Fe3O4-κ-carrageenan nanoparticles upon chitosan-pullulanase complexation were also evaluated. Chitosan (CS) complexation with pullulanase was found to be dependent on pH and chitosan Mw. The critical pH of structure-forming events during complexation shifted significantly (pproperties of immobilized pullulanase. Pullulanase immobilized upon CS-50 complexation exhibited the most desirable enzymatic properties. These results indicated that the complexation behavior was mainly dependent on chitosan Mw. This study presents a technique for the production of immobilized pullulanase upon complexation that exhibits potential for applications in continuous syrup production. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Hybrid Nanomaterials with Single-Site Catalysts by Spatially Controllable Immobilization of Nickel Complexes via Photoclick Chemistry for Alkene Epoxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Dwaipayan; Febriansyah, Benny; Gupta, Disha; Ng, Leonard Kia-Sheun; Xi, Shibo; Du, Yonghua; Baikie, Tom; Dong, ZhiLi; Soo, Han Sen

    2018-05-22

    Catalyst deactivation is a persistent problem not only for the scientific community but also in industry. Isolated single-site heterogeneous catalysts have shown great promise to overcome these problems. Here, a versatile anchoring strategy for molecular complex immobilization on a broad range of semiconducting or insulating metal oxide ( e. g., titanium dioxide, mesoporous silica, cerium oxide, and tungsten oxide) nanoparticles to synthesize isolated single-site catalysts has been studied systematically. An oxidatively stable anchoring group, maleimide, is shown to form covalent linkages with surface hydroxyl functionalities of metal oxide nanoparticles by photoclick chemistry. The nanocomposites have been thoroughly characterized by techniques including UV-visible diffuse reflectance spectroscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, infrared spectroscopy, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). The IR spectroscopic studies confirm the covalent linkages between the maleimide group and surface hydroxyl functionalities of the oxide nanoparticles. The hybrid nanomaterials function as highly efficient catalysts for essentially quantitative oxidations of terminal and internal alkenes and show molecular catalyst product selectivities even in more eco-friendly solvents. XAS studies verify the robustness of the catalysts after several catalytic cycles. We have applied the photoclick anchoring methodology to precisely control the deposition of a luminescent variant of our catalyst on the metal oxide nanoparticles. Overall, we demonstrate a general approach to use irradiation to anchor molecular complexes on oxide nanoparticles to create recyclable, hybrid, single-site catalysts that function with high selectivity in a broad range of solvents. We have achieved a facile, spatially and temporally controllable photoclick method that can potentially be extended to other ligands, catalysts, functional molecules, and surfaces.

  2. Immobilization of metal-humic acid complexes in anaerobic granular sludge for their application as solid-phase redox mediators in the biotransformation of iopromide in UASB reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz-Zavala, Aracely S; Pat-Espadas, Aurora M; Rangel-Mendez, J Rene; Chazaro-Ruiz, Luis F; Ascacio-Valdes, Juan A; Aguilar, Cristobal N; Cervantes, Francisco J

    2016-05-01

    Metal-humic acid complexes were synthesized and immobilized by a granulation process in anaerobic sludge for their application as solid-phase redox mediators (RM) in the biotransformation of iopromide. Characterization of Ca- and Fe-humic acid complexes revealed electron accepting capacities of 0.472 and 0.556milli-equivalentsg(-1), respectively. Once immobilized, metal-humic acid complexes significantly increased the biotransformation of iopromide in upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactors. Control UASB reactor (without humic material) achieved 31.6% of iopromide removal, while 80% was removed in UASB reactors supplied with each metal-humic acid complex. Further analyses indicated multiple transformation reactions taking place in iopromide including deiodination, N-dealkylation, decarboxylation and deacetylation. This is the first successful application of immobilized RM, which does not require a supporting material to maintain the solid-phase RM in long term operation of bioreactors. The proposed redox catalyst could be suitable for enhancing the redox conversion of different recalcitrant pollutants present in industrial effluents. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Adducts of nitrogenous ligands with rhodium(II) tetracarboxylates and tetraformamidinate: NMR spectroscopy and density functional theory calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cmoch, Piotr; Głaszczka, Rafał; Jaźwiński, Jarosław; Kamieński, Bohdan; Senkara, Elżbieta

    2014-03-01

    Complexation of tetrakis(μ2-N,N'-diphenylformamidinato-N,N')-di-rhodium(II) with ligands containing nitrile, isonitrile, amine, hydroxyl, sulfhydryl, isocyanate, and isothiocyanate functional groups has been studied in liquid and solid phases using (1)H, (13)C and (15)N NMR, (13)C and (15)N cross polarisation-magic angle spinning NMR, and absorption spectroscopy in the visible range. The complexation was monitored using various NMR physicochemical parameters, such as chemical shifts, longitudinal relaxation times T1 , and NOE enhancements. Rhodium(II) tetraformamidinate selectively bonded only unbranched amine (propan-1-amine), pentanenitrile, and (1-isocyanoethyl)benzene. No complexation occurred in the case of ligands having hydroxyl, sulfhydryl, isocyanate, and isothiocyanate functional groups, and more expanded amine molecules such as butan-2-amine and 1-azabicyclo[2.2.2]octane. Such features were opposite to those observed in rhodium(II) tetracarboxylates, forming adducts with all kind of ligands. Special attention was focused on the analysis of Δδ parameters, defined as a chemical shift difference between signal in adduct and corresponding signal in free ligand. In the case of (1)H NMR, Δδ values were either negative in adducts of rhodium(II) tetraformamidinate or positive in adducts of rhodium(II) tetracarboxylates. Experimental findings were supported by density functional theory molecular modelling and gauge independent atomic orbitals chemical shift calculations. The calculation of chemical shifts combined with scaling procedure allowed to reproduce qualitatively Δδ parameters. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Synthesis and characterization of rhodium sulfide nanoparticles and thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sosibo, Ndabenhle M.; Revaprasadu, Neerish

    2008-01-01

    The synthesis and characterization of a rhodium complex, [Rh(S 2 CNEt 2 ) 2 ] is described. The complex was thermolysed at a high temperature (280 deg. C) in the presence of capping agent, hexadecylamine (HDA) to form Rh 2 S 3 nanoparticles. Rod-shaped Rh 2 S 3 nanoparticles with an average length of 26.7 nm and an average breadth of 7.8 nm were synthesized. The complex was also used as a single molecule precursor for the deposition of Rh 2 S 3 thin films on a glass substrate at 350 deg. C and 450 deg. C using the Aerosol Assisted Chemical Vapour Deposition (AACVD) technique. The resultant thin films showed temperature dependent morphologies and showed (0 2 2), (4 1 1) and (6 1 1) lattice planes characteristic of to the orthorhombic Rh 2 S 3 phase. X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy techniques were used to characterize the films

  5. Line profile analyses of rhodium metal obtained by decomposition of rhodium carbonyl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chandra, D.; Mandalia, H.; Garner, M.L.; Blakely, M.K.; Lau, K.H.

    1995-01-01

    Metal carbonyls are important for chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of metals and alloys and formation of high surface area metallic particles which have potential applications as catalysts. Rhodium carbonyl [Rh 6 (CO) 16 ] produces high surface area metallic particles whose structure has been reported as monoclinic (I2/a) with lattice dimensions, a=17.00(±0.03)Angstrom, b=9.78(±0.02)Angstrom, c=17.53(±0.03)Angstrom and Β=121 degrees 45' ± 30' at room temperature. Generally, metal carbonyl crystals dissociate under vacuum as carbonyl gas and decompose to metallic crystals and carbon monoxide at higher temperatures. However, the behavior of rhodium carbonyl crystals is different; they decompose directly to metallic rhodium without the formation of rhodium carbonyl gas in vacuum. Several residual fine grains of rhodium metal are found after the decomposition in vacuum at relatively low temperatures. The metallic samples of rhodium were obtained from vapor pressure experiments using torsion Knudsen-effusion apparatus. X-ray diffraction analyses performed on these gains showed severely broadened Bragg reflections indicative of small particle size and/or lattice microgram. In this study, a comparison of lattice strains and domain sizes obtained by integral breadth and Fourier methods has been made. In addition a comparison of the lattice strains and domain sizes has been made between the Cauchy, Gaussian, Cauchy-Gaussian and Aqua integral breadth methods

  6. Mesoporous silica nanoparticles supported copper(II) and nickel(II) Schiff base complexes: Synthesis, characterization, antibacterial activity and enzyme immobilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahmasbi, Leila; Sedaghat, Tahereh; Motamedi, Hossein; Kooti, Mohammad

    2018-02-01

    Mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) were prepared by sol-gel method and functionalized with 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane. Schiff base grafted mesoporous silica nanoparticle was synthesized by the condensation of 2-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzaldehyde and amine-functionalized MSNs. The latter material was then treated with Cu(II) and Ni(II) salts separately to obtain copper and nickel complexes anchored mesoporous composites. The newly prepared hybrid organic-inorganic nanocomposites have been characterized by several techniques such as FT-IR, LA-XRD, FE-SEM, TEM, EDS, BET and TGA. The results showed all samples have MCM-41 type ordered mesoporous structure and functionalization occurs mainly inside the mesopore channel. The presence of all elements in synthesized nanocomposites and the coordination of Schiff base via imine nitrogen and phenolate oxygen were confirmed. MSNs and all functionalized MSNs have uniform spherical nanoparticles with a mean diameter less than 100 nm. The as-synthesized mesoporous nanocomposites were investigated for antibacterial activity against Gram-positive (B. subtilis and S. aureus) and Gram-negative (E. coli and P. aeruginosa) bacteria, as carrier for gentamicin and also for immobilization of DNase, coagulase and amylase enzymes. MSN-SB-Ni indicated bacteriocidal effect against S.aureus and all compounds were found to be good carrier for gentamicin. Results of enzyme immobilization for DNase and coagulase and α-amylase revealed that supported metal complexes efficiently immobilized enzymes.

  7. Superconductivity in zirconium-rhodium alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zegler, S. T.

    1969-01-01

    Metallographic studies and transition temperature measurements were made with isothermally annealed and water-quenched zirconium-rhodium alloys. The results clarify both the solid-state phase relations at the Zr-rich end of the Zr-Rh alloy system and the influence upon the superconducting transition temperature of structure and composition.

  8. A bioinspired copper 2,2-bipyridyl complex immobilized MWCNT modified electrode prepared by a new strategy for elegant electrocatalytic reduction and sensing of hydrogen peroxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayuri, Pinapeddavari; Saravanan, Natarajan; Senthil Kumar, Annamalai

    2017-01-01

    Owing to facile electron-transfer reaction, metal complex based molecular architecture has attracted much interest in electrochemistry, especially for bioinspired electrocatalytic and electrochemical sensor applications. Indeed, preparation of stable surface-confined molecular system is a challenging task. In general, derivatization methodology, in which, a specific functional groups such as thiol, carboxylic acid, pyrene and amino bearing inorganic complexes synthesized discreetly by chemical approach have been attached suitably on electrode surface via any one of the following techniques; self-assembly, covalent immobilization, electrostatic interaction, ionic exchange and encapsulation. Herein, we report a copper-bipyridyl complex immobilized multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWCNT)-Nafion (Nf) modified glassy carbon electrode (GCE/Nf-MWCNT@bpy-Cu"2"+) prepared by a new strategy in which sequential modification of bipyridyl (bpy) ligand on MWCNT via π-π interaction followed by in-situ complexation with copper ion for efficient electrochemical reduction of H_2O_2. The copper species chemically modified electrode showed highly stable and well-defined surface-confined Cu"2"+"/"1"+ redox peak response, without any Cu"1"+"/"0 redox transition, at an equilibrium potential, E_1_/_2 = −135 mV vs Ag/AgCl in a pH 7 phosphate buffer solution. Detailed physico-chemical characterization by SEM, FT-IR, Raman and ESI-MS and electrochemical characterization reveals that [Cu(bpy)_2(H_2O)_2]"+ (molecular weight 413.4) like species was immobilized as a major species on the modified electrode. A bioinspired electro-catalytic reduction of H_2O_2 was studied using cyclic voltammetric and rotating disc electrode techniques. In further, electrochemical sensing of H_2O_2 by amperometric i-t and flow injection analysis methods with a detection limit values 4.5 and 0.49 μM respectively were demonstrated.

  9. Chemo- and regioselective homogeneous rhodium-catalyzed hydroamidomethylation of terminal alkenes to N-alkylamides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raoufmoghaddam, Saeed; Drent, Eite; Bouwman, Elisabeth

    2013-09-01

    A rhodium/xantphos homogeneous catalyst system has been developed for direct chemo- and regioselective mono-N-alkylation of primary amides with 1-alkenes and syngas through catalytic hydroamidomethylation with 1-pentene and acetamide as model substrates. For appropriate catalyst performance, it appears to be essential that catalytic amounts of a strong acid promoter, such as p-toluenesulfonic acid (HOTs), as well as larger amounts of a weakly acidic protic promoter, particularly hexafluoroisopropyl alcohol (HOR(F) ) are applied. Apart from the product N-1-hexylacetamide, the isomeric unsaturated intermediates, hexanol and higher mass byproducts, as well as the corresponding isomeric branched products, can be formed. Under optimized conditions, almost full alkene conversion can be achieved with more than 80% selectivity to the product N-1-hexylamide. Interestingly, in the presence of a relatively high concentration of HOR(F) , the same catalyst system shows a remarkably high selectivity for the formation of hexanol from 1-pentene with syngas, thus presenting a unique example of a selective rhodium-catalyzed hydroformylation-hydrogenation tandem reaction under mild conditions. Time-dependent product formation during hydroamidomethylation batch experiments provides evidence for aldehyde and unsaturated intermediates; this clearly indicates the three-step hydroformylation/condensation/hydrogenation reaction sequence that takes place in hydroamidomethylation. One likely role of the weakly acidic protic promoter, HOR(F) , in combination with the strong acid HOTs, is to establish a dual-functionality rhodium catalyst system comprised of a neutral rhodium(I) hydroformylation catalyst species and a cationic rhodium(III) complex capable of selectively reducing the imide and/or ene-amide intermediates that are in a dynamic, acid-catalyzed condensation equilibrium with the aldehyde and amide in a syngas environment. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. The Formation of Metal (M=Co(II), Ni(II), and Cu(II)) Complexes by Aminosilanes Immobilized within Mesoporous Molecular Sieves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Dong Ho; Park, Sung Soo; Choe, Sang Joon

    1999-01-01

    The immobilization of APTMS(3-(2-aminoethylamino)propyltrimethoxysilane) and AAPTMS(3-(2-(2-aminoethyl) aminoethylamino)propyltrimethoxysilane) on the surface of high quality mesoporous molecular sieves MCM-41 and MCM-48 have been confirmed by F.T.-IR spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, 29 Si solid state NMR, and a surface polarity measurement using Reichardt's dye. The formation of metal (Co(II), Ni(II), and Cu(II)) complexes by immobilized aminosilanes have been investigated by photoacoustic spectroscopy(PAS). The assignment of UV-Vis. PAS bands makes it possible to identify the structure of metal complexes within mesoporous molecular sieves. Co(II) ion may be coordinated mainly in a tetrahedral symmetry by two APTMS onto MCM-41, and in an octahedral one by two AAPTMS. Both Ni(II) and Cu(II) coordinated by aminosilanes within MCM-41 form possibly the octahedral complexes such as [Ni(APTMS) 2 (H 2 O) 2 ] 2+ , [Ni(AAPTMS) 2 ] 2+ , [Cu(APTMS) 2 (H 2 O) 2 ] 2+ , and [Cu(AAPTMS)(H 2 O) 3 ] 2+ , respectively. The PAS band shapes of complexes onto MCM-48 are similar to those of corresponding MCM-41 with the variation of PAS intensity. Most of metal ion(II) within MCM-41 and MCM-48 are coordinated by aminosilanes without the impregnation on the surface

  11. Correction of rhodium detector signals for comparison to design calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Judd, J.L.; Chang, R.Y.; Gabel, C.W.

    1989-01-01

    Rhodium detectors are used in many commercial pressurized water reactors PWRs [pressurized water reactor] as in-core neutron detectors. The signals from the detectors are the result of neutron absorption in 103 Rh and the subsequent beta decay of 104 Rh to 104 Pd. The rhodium depletes ∼1% per full-power month, so corrections are necessary to the detector signal to account for the effects of the rhodium depletion. These corrections result from the change in detector self-shielding with rhodium burnup and the change in rhodium concentration itself. Correction for the change in rhodium concentration is done by multiplication of the factor N(t)/N 0 , where N(t) is the rhodium concentration at time t and N 0 is the initial rhodium concentration. The calculation of the self-shielding factor is more complicated and is presented. A self-shielding factor based on the fraction of rhodium remaining was calculated with the CASMO-3 code. The results obtained from our comparisons of predicted and measured in-core detector signals show that the CASMO-3/SIMULATE-3 code package is an effective tool for estimating pin peaking and power distributions

  12. Reaction pathways for reduction of nitrate ions on platinum, rhodium, and platinum-rhodium alloy electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cunha, M.C.P.M. da; De Souza, J.P.I.; Nart, F.C.

    2000-01-01

    The reduction of nitrate ions on platinum, rhodium, and platinum-rhodium alloy electrodes has been investigated using differential electrochemical mass spectrometry and in situ FTIR measurements. For 3 M HNO 3 concentration it has been found that nitrate starts the reduction with partial N-O bond dissociation and N-N bond formation generating NO and N 2 O. At potentials lower than 0.2 V the reaction proceeds forming dissolved NH 4 + . For potentials lower than 0 V the reduction continues via a multiple pathway reaction leading to the nonselective production of N 2 , NH 2 OH, and N 2 H 2 . On the alloyed electrodes, the production of NO and N 2 O has been observed in both cathodic and anodic scans, while on pure platinum and rhodium electrodes the reaction has been observed only during the cathodic scan. Contrasting with the pure platinum and rhodium alloys, where the N-O bond break starts forming NO and N 2 O, on the alloys HNO 2 has been observed as the first reaction step. For alloys with higher rhodium composition, like Pt 75 Rh 25 , no N 2 has been detected for potentials lower than 0 V

  13. Investigation into cathode polarization during deposition of rhodium-nickel and rhodium-indium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evdokimova, N.V.; Byacheslavov, P.M.; Lokshtanova, O.G.

    1979-01-01

    The results of kinetic regularities experimental investigations during electrodeposition of rhodium-nickel and rhonium-indium alloys are presented. Methods of general and partial polarization curves have been used to show the nature of polarization during the rhonium-nickel and rhodium-indium alloys deposition. It is shown that indium into the rhodium-indium alloy and nickel into the rhodium-nickel alloy deposit with great depolarization ( PHIsub(In)sup(0)=-0.33B, PHIsub(Ni)sup(0)=-0.23B). Indium and nickel in pure form do not deposit from the electrolytes of the given composition (H 2 SO 4 - 50 g/l, HNH 2 SO 3 -10 g/l). The recalculation of partial polarization curve of indium precipitation into the rhodium-indium alloy in the mixed kinetics coordinates gives a straight line with 40 mV inclination angle. This corresponds to the delayed stage of the second electron addition with the imposition of diffusion limitations

  14. Distribution of Rhodium in Mice Submitted to Treatment With the Adduct of Rhodium Propionate and Sodium Isonicotinate

    OpenAIRE

    de Souza, Aparecido Ribeiro; Najjar, Renato; de Oliveira, Elizabeth; Zyngier, Szulim Ber

    1997-01-01

    The distribution of rhodium in Balb/c mice following intraperitoneal (ip) administration of a solution of adduct of rhodium propionate and sodium isonicotinate has been investigated. The metal concentration was determined in blood and in the following organ tissues: brain, heart, lung, liver, spleen, kidney, testes, and uterus/ovary, and the rhodium concentration was obtained by Inductively Coupled Argon Atomic Emission Spectroscopy (ICP-AES). The metal was detected in all organ tissues exami...

  15. Polyelectrolyte Complex Beads by Novel Two-Step Process for Improved Performance of Viable Whole-Cell Baeyer-Villiger Monoxygenase by Immobilization

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Krajčovič, T.; Bučko, M.; Vikartovská, A.; Lacík, I.; Uhelská, L.; Chorvát, D.; Neděla, Vilém; Tihlaříková, Eva; Gericke, M.; Heinze, T.; Gemeiner, P.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 11 (2017), s. 353-364 ISSN 2073-4344 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : polyelectrolyte complex beads * environmental scanning electron microscopy * confocal laser scanning microscopy * Baeyer-Villiger biooxidation * cyclohexanone monoxygenase * immobilization * viable whole-cell biocatalyst Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering OBOR OECD: Bioprocessing technologies (industrial processes relying on biological agents to drive the process) biocatalysis, fermentation Impact factor: 3.082, year: 2016 http://www.mdpi.com/2073-4344/7/11/353

  16. Pd-isatin Schiff base complex immobilized onγ-Fe2O3 as a magnetically recyclable catalyst for the Heck and Suzuki cross-coupling reactions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sara Sobhani; Farzaneh Zarifi

    2015-01-01

    A Pd‐isatin Schiff base complex immobilized onγ‐Fe2O3 (Pd‐isatin Schiff base‐γ‐Fe2O3) was synthe‐sized and characterized by Fourier transform infrared, scanning electron microscopy, high resolu‐tion transmission electron microscopy, X‐ray diffraction, thermogravimetric gravimetric analysis, inductively‐coupled plasma, X‐ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and elemental analysis. It was used as a magnetically reusable Pd catalyst for the Heck and Suzuki cross‐coupling reactions.

  17. Terbutaline causes immobilization of single β2-adrenergic receptor-ligand complexes in the plasma membrane of living A549 cells as revealed by single-molecule microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sieben, Anne; Kaminski, Tim; Kubitscheck, Ulrich; Häberlein, Hanns

    2011-02-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors are important targets for various drugs. After signal transduction, regulatory processes, such as receptor desensitization and internalization, change the lateral receptor mobility. In order to study the lateral diffusion of β2-adrenergic receptors (β2AR) complexed with fluorescently labeled noradrenaline (Alexa-NA) in plasma membranes of A549 cells, trajectories of single receptor-ligand complexes were monitored using single-particle tracking. We found that a fraction of 18% of all β2ARs are constitutively immobile. About 2/3 of the β2ARs moved with a diffusion constant of D2 = 0.03+/-0.001 μm2/s and about 17% were diffusing five-fold faster (D3 = 0.15+/-0.02 μm2/s). The mobile receptors moved within restricted domains and also showed a discontinuous diffusion behavior. Analysis of the trajectory lengths revealed two different binding durations with τ1 = 77+/-1 ms and τ2 = 388+/-11 ms. Agonistic stimulation of the β2AR-Alexa-NA complexes with 1 μM terbutaline caused immobilization of almost 50% of the receptors within 35 min. Simultaneously, the mean area covered by the mobile receptors decreased significantly. Thus, we demonstrated that agonistic stimulation followed by cell regulatory processes results in a change in β2AR mobility suggesting that different receptor dynamics characterize different receptor states.

  18. Electrochemical properties of the hexacyanoferrate(II)–ruthenium(III) complex immobilized on silica gel surface chemically modified with zirconium(IV) oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panice, Lucimara B.; Oliveira, Elisangela A. de; Filho, Ricardo A.D. Molin; Oliveira, Daniela P. de; Lazarin, Angélica M.; Andreotti, Elza I.S.; Sernaglia, Rosana L.; Gushikem, Yoshitaka

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The cyano-bridged mixed valence ruthenium composite material was synthesized. • This newly synthesized compound was incorporated into a carbon paste electrode. • The electrode did not show significant changes in response after six months of use. • The modified electrode is very stable and reproducible. • The electrode sensor was successfully applied for ascorbic acid determination. - Abstract: The chemically modified silica gel with zirconium(IV) oxide was used to immobilize the [Fe(CN) 6 ] 4− complex ion initially. The reaction of this material with [Ru(edta)H 2 O] − complex ion formed the immobilized cyano-bridged mixed valence ruthenium complex, (≡Zr) 5 [(edta)RuNCFe(CN) 5 ]. This material was incorporated into a carbon paste electrode and, its electrochemical properties were investigated. However, for an ascorbic acid solution, an enhancement of the anodic peak current was detected due to electrocatalytic oxidation. The electrode presented the same response for at least 150 successive measurements, with a good repeatability. The modified electrode is very stable and reproducible. The sensor was applied for ascorbic acid determination in pharmaceutical preparation with success

  19. Direct Synthesis of 5-Aryl Barbituric Acids by Rhodium(II)-Catalyzed Reactions of Arenes with Diazo Compounds**

    Science.gov (United States)

    Best, Daniel; Burns, David J; Lam, Hon Wai

    2015-01-01

    A commercially available rhodium(II) complex catalyzes the direct arylation of 5-diazobarbituric acids with arenes, allowing straightforward access to 5-aryl barbituric acids. Free N—H groups are tolerated on the barbituric acid, with no complications arising from N—H insertion processes. This method was applied to the concise synthesis of a potent matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) inhibitor. PMID:25959544

  20. Microorganism immobilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Compere, Alicia L.; Griffith, William L.

    1981-01-01

    Live metabolically active microorganisms are immobilized on a solid support by contacting particles of aggregate material with a water dispersible polyelectrolyte such as gelatin, crosslinking the polyelectrolyte by reacting it with a crosslinking agent such as glutaraldehyde to provide a crosslinked coating on the particles of aggregate material, contacting the coated particles with live microorganisms and incubating the microorganisms in contact with the crosslinked coating to provide a coating of metabolically active microorganisms. The immobilized microorganisms have continued growth and reproduction functions.

  1. Selective C–C Coupling Reaction of Dimethylphenol to Tetramethyldiphenoquinone Using Molecular Oxygen Catalyzed by Cu Complexes Immobilized in Nanospaces of Structurally-Ordered Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zen Maeno

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Two high-performance Cu catalysts were successfully developed by immobilization of Cu ions in the nanospaces of poly(propylene imine (PPI dendrimer and magadiite for the selective C–C coupling of 2,6-dimethylphenol (DMP to 3,3',5,5'-tetramethyldiphenoquinone (DPQ with O2 as a green oxidant. The PPI dendrimer encapsulated Cu ions in the internal nanovoids to form adjacent Cu species, which exhibited significantly high catalytic activity for the regioselective coupling reaction of DMP compared to previously reported enzyme and metal complex catalysts. The magadiite-immobilized Cu complex acted as a selective heterogeneous catalyst for the oxidative C–C coupling of DMP to DPQ. This heterogeneous catalyst was recoverable from the reaction mixture by simple filtration, reusable without loss of efficiency, and applicable to a continuous flow reactor system. Detailed characterization using ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR, electronic spin resonance (ESR, and X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS spectroscopies and the reaction mechanism investigation revealed that the high catalytic performances of these Cu catalysts were ascribed to the adjacent Cu species generated within the nanospaces of the PPI dendrimer and magadiite.

  2. Electrosorption of Os(III)-complex at single-wall carbon nanotubes immobilized on a glassy carbon electrode: Application to nanomolar detection of bromate, periodate and iodate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salimi, Abdollah; Kavosi, Begard; Babaei, Ali; Hallaj, Rahman

    2008-01-01

    A simple procedure was developed to prepare a glassy carbon electrode modified with single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and Os(III)-complex. The glassy carbon (GC) electrode modified with CNTs was immersed into Os(III)-complex solution (direct deposition) for a short period of time (60 s). 1,4,8,12-Tetraazacyclotetradecane osmium(III) chloride, (Os(III)LCl 2 ).ClO 4 , irreversibly and strongly adsorbed on SWCNTs immobilized on the surface of GC electrode. Cyclic voltammograms of the Os(III)-complex-incorporated-SWCNTs indicate a pair of well defined and nearly reversible redox couple with surface confined characteristic at wide pH range (1-8). The surface coverage (Γ) and charge transfer rate constant (k s ) of the immobilized Os-complex on SWCNTs were 3.07 x 10 -9 mol cm -2 , 5.5 (±0.2) s -1 , 2.94 x 10 -9 mol cm -2 , 7.3 (±0.3) s -1 at buffer solution with pH 2 and 7, respectively, indicate high loading ability of SWCNTs for Os(III) complex and great facilitation of the electron transfer between electroactive redox center and carbon nanotubes immobilized on the electrode surface. Modified electrodes showed higher electrocatalytic activity toward reduction of BrO 3 - , IO 3 - and IO 4 - in acidic solutions. The catalytic rate constants for catalytic reduction bromate, periodate and iodate were 3.79 (±0.2) x 10 3 , 7.32 (±0.2) x 10 3 and 1.75 (±0.2) x 10 3 M -1 s -1 , respectively. The hydrodynamic amperometry of rotating modified electrode at constant potential (0.3 V) was used for nanomolar detection of selected analytes. Excellent electrochemical reversibility of the redox couple, good reproducibility, high stability, low detection limit, long life time, fast amperometric response time, wide linear concentration range, technical simplicity and possibility of rapid preparation are great advantage of this sensor

  3. Labeling of human serum albumin with 105Rh-cysteine complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lo, J.M.; Pillai, M.R.A.; John, C.S.; Troutner, D.E.

    1990-01-01

    The conjugation of a complex formed by reacting RhCl 3 with cysteine to human serum albumin has been investigated. Approximately 50% of the rhodium (labelled with 105 Rh) was converted to the complex. Conjugation of the complex to HSA via the ECDI method resulted in yields of ∼ 40% of the total rhodium or ∼ 80% of the Rh-cysteine complex. No conjugation was observed in the absence of the ECDI. At approximately equal molar concentrations of rhodium and HSA, an average of ∼ 0.4 rhodium atoms per HSA molecule was achieved. (author)

  4. Selective Cytotoxicity of Rhodium Metalloinsertors in Mismatch Repair-Deficient Cells†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, Russell J.; Komor, Alexis C.; Barton, Jacqueline K.

    2011-01-01

    Mismatches in DNA occur naturally during replication and as a result of endogenous DNA damaging agents, but the mismatch repair (MMR) pathway acts to correct mismatches before subsequent rounds of replication. Rhodium metalloinsertors bind to DNA mismatches with high affinity and specificity and represent a promising strategy to target mismatches in cells. Here we examine the biological fate of rhodium metalloinsertors bearing dipyridylamine ancillary ligands in cells deficient in MMR versus those that are MMR-proficient. These complexes are shown to exhibit accelerated cellular uptake which permits the observation of various cellular responses, including disruption of the cell cycle, monitored by flow cytometry assays, and induction of necrosis, monitored by dye exclusion and caspase inhibition assays, that occur preferentially in the MMR-deficient cell line. These cellular responses provide insight into the mechanisms underlying the selective activity of this novel class of targeted anti-cancer agents. PMID:22103240

  5. Asymmetric Synthesis of Hydrocarbazoles Catalyzed by an Octahedral Chiral-at-Rhodium Lewis Acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yong; Song, Liangliang; Gong, Lei; Meggers, Eric

    2015-12-01

    A bis-cyclometalated chiral-at-metal rhodium complex catalyzes the Diels-Alder reaction between N-Boc-protected 3-vinylindoles (Boc = tert-butyloxycarbonyl) and β-carboxylic ester-substituted α,β-unsaturated 2-acyl imidazoles with good-to-excellent regioselectivity (up to 99:1) and excellent diastereoselectivity (>50:1 d.r.) as well as enantioselectivity (92-99% ee) under optimized conditions. The rhodium catalyst serves as a chiral Lewis acid to activate the 2-acyl imidazole dienophile by two-point binding and overrules the preferred regioselectivity of the uncatalyzed reaction. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Extraction of ruthenium thiocyanate and its separation from rhodium by polyurethane foam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Bazi, S.J.; Chow, A.

    1984-01-01

    Conditions for the formation and extraction of the thiocyanate complex of ruthenium are reported. Distribution coefficients of more than 10 4 and a capacity of about 0.24 mole per kg of foam were obtained. The effect of the chloride salts of various univalent cations on the extraction of Ru(SCN) 6 3- indicated that the efficiency of ruthenium extraction depends on how well the cation fits into the polyether segment of the polyurethane foam, which agrees with the 'cation-chelation' mechanism. The separation of ruthenium and rhodium indicated that more than 95% of the rhodium remained in the aqueous phase and about 95% of the ruthenium was retained by the polyurethane foam and could be easily recovered. (author)

  7. Initial Stages in the Rhodium(III)-Catalyzed C-H Bond Activation of Primary Alcohols in Aqueous Solution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, J.; Monsted, L.; Monsted, O.

    2010-01-01

    The mechanism of the catalytic HID exchange in primary alcohol substrates derived from aldopentoses, promoted by a macrocyclic rhodium(III) complex, has been shown to occur by a reversible redox reaction that gives aldehyde and a rhodium hydride complex. Hydride exchange in the latter complex...... promotes the introduction of solvent hydrogen in the primary alcohol formed by the reverse reaction. The hydride complex has been crystallographically characterized as a trifluoromethanesulfonate salt that contains the trans-[Rh(cycb)(H)(OH2)](2+) (cycb = rac-5,5,7,12,12,14-hexamethyl-1......,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradecane) cation. The hydride complex is stable for extended periods of time in acidic solution in the absence of oxidants. In basic solutions a series of base-catalyzed reactions take place to yield ultimately the same mixture of [Rh(cycb)(OH)(2)](+) isomers as produced by base hydrolysis of the trans...

  8. Rhodium mediated bond activation: from synthesis to catalysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ho, Hung-An [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Recently, our lab has developed monoanionic tridentate ligand, ToR, showing the corresponding coordination chemistry and catalyst reactivity of magnesium, zirconium, zinc and iridium complexes. This thesis details synthetic chemistry, structural study and catalytic reactivity of the ToR-supported rhodium compounds. Tl[ToR] has been proved to be a superior ligand transfer agent for synthesizing rhodium complexes. The salt metathesis route of Tl[ToM] with [Rh(μ-Cl)(CO)]2 and [Rh(μ- Cl)(COE)]2 gives ToMRh(CO)2 (2.2) and ToMRhH(β3-C8H13) (3.1) respectively while Tl[ToM] with [Rh(μ-Cl)(CO)]2 affords ToPRh(CO)2 (2.3). 2.2 reacts with both strong and weak electrophiles, resulting in the oxazoline N-attacked and the metal center-attacked compounds correspondingly. Using one of the metal center-attacked electrophiles, 2.3 was demonstrated to give high diastereoselectivity. Parallel to COE allylic C-H activation complex 3.1, the propene and allylbenzene allylic C-H activation products have also been synthesized. The subsequent functionalization attempts have been examined by treating with Brønsted acids, Lewis acids, electrophiles, nucleophiles, 1,3-dipolar reagents and reagents containing multiple bonds able to be inserted. Various related complexes have been obtained under these conditions, in which one of the azide insertion compounds reductively eliminates to give an allylic functionalization product stoichiometrically. 3.1 reacts with various primary alcohols to give the decarbonylation dihydride complex ToMRh(H)2CO (4.1). 4.1 shows catalytic reactivity for primary alcohol decarbonylation under a photolytic condition. Meanwhile, 2.2 has been found to be more reactive than 4.1 for catalytic alcohol decarbonylation under the same condition. Various complexes and primary

  9. Rhodium-Coordinated Poly(arylene-ethynylene)-alt-Poly(arylene-vinylene) Copolymer Acting as Photocatalyst for Visible-Light-Powered NAD+/NADH Reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    A 2,2′-bipyridyl-containing poly(arylene-ethynylene)-alt-poly(arylene-vinylene) polymer, acting as a light-harvesting ligand system, was synthesized and coupled to an organometallic rhodium complex designed for photocatalytic NAD+/NADH reduction. The material, which absorbs over a wide spectral range, was characterized by using various analytical techniques, confirming its chemical structure and properties. The dielectric function of the material was determined from spectroscopic ellipsometry measurements. Photocatalytic reduction of nucleotide redox cofactors under visible light irradiation (390–650 nm) was performed and is discussed in detail. The new metal-containing polymer can be used to cover large surface areas (e.g. glass beads) and, due to this immobilization step, can be easily separated from the reaction solution after photolysis. Because of its high stability, the polymer-based catalyst system can be repeatedly used under different reaction conditions for (photo)chemical reduction of NAD+. With this concept, enzymatic, photo-biocatalytic systems for solar energy conversion can be facilitated, and the precious metal catalyst can be recycled. PMID:25130570

  10. Stereoselective hydrogenation of olefins using rhodium-substituted carbonic anhydrase--a new reductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Qing; Okrasa, Krzysztof; Kazlauskas, Romas J

    2009-01-01

    One useful synthetic reaction missing from nature's toolbox is the direct hydrogenation of substrates using hydrogen. Instead nature uses cofactors like NADH to reduce organic substrates, which adds complexity and cost to these reductions. To create an enzyme that can directly reduce organic substrates with hydrogen, researchers have combined metal hydrogenation catalysts with proteins. One approach is an indirect link where a ligand is linked to a protein and the metal binds to the ligand. Another approach is direct linking of the metal to protein, but nonspecific binding of the metal limits this approach. Herein, we report a direct hydrogenation of olefins catalyzed by rhodium(I) bound to carbonic anhydrase (CA-[Rh]). We minimized nonspecific binding of rhodium by replacing histidine residues on the protein surface using site-directed mutagenesis or by chemically modifying the histidine residues. Hydrogenation catalyzed by CA-[Rh] is slightly slower than for uncomplexed rhodium(I), but the protein environment induces stereoselectivity favoring cis- over trans-stilbene by about 20:1. This enzyme is the first cofactor-independent reductase that reduces organic molecules using hydrogen. This catalyst is a good starting point to create variants with tailored reactivity and selectivity. This strategy to insert transition metals in the active site of metalloenzymes opens opportunities to a wider range of enzyme-catalyzed reactions.

  11. Column preconcentration and electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometric determination of rhodium in some food and standard samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taher, Mohammad Ali; Pourmohammad, Fatemeh; Fazelirad, Hamid

    2015-12-01

    In the present work, an electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometric method has been developed for the determination of ultra-trace amounts of rhodium after adsorption of its 2-(5-bromo-2-pyridylazo)-5-diethylaminophenol/tetraphenylborate ion associated complex at the surface of alumina. Several factors affecting the extraction efficiency such as the pH, type of eluent, sample and eluent flow rates, sorption capacity of alumina and sample volume were investigated and optimized. The relative standard deviation for eight measurements of 0.1 ng/mL of rhodium was ±6.3%. In this method, the detection limit was 0.003 ng/mL in the original solution. The sorption capacity of alumina and the linear range for Rh(III) were evaluated as 0.8 mg/g and 0.015-0.45 ng/mL in the original solution, respectively. The proposed method was successfully applied for the extraction and determination of rhodium content in some food and standard samples with high recovery values. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Relaxation of polarized nuclei in superconducting rhodium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knuuttila, T.A.; Tuoriniemi, J.T.; Lefmann, K.

    2000-01-01

    Nuclear spin lattice relaxation rates were measured in normal and superconducting (sc) rhodium with nuclear polarizations up to p = 0.55. This was sufficient to influence the sc state of Rh, whose T, and B-c, are exceptionally low. Because B-c ... is unchanged, the nuclear spin entropy was fully sustained across the sc transition. The relaxation in the sc state was slower at all temperatures without the coherence enhancement close to T-c. Nonzero nuclear polarization strongly reduced the difference between the relaxation rates in the sc and normal...

  13. Adhesion of rhodium films on metallic substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marot, L.; Covarel, G.; Tuilier, M.-H.; Steiner, R.; Oelhafen, P.

    2008-01-01

    Rhodium coated metallic films were prepared by magnetron sputtering on metallic substrates. All films were elaborated in same conditions on copper, molybdenum and stainless steel. Adhesion strength tests were carried out by scratch test. The results reveal that the adhesion strength between the film and the substrate is influenced by the hardness of the substrate. Increase of deposition temperature improves the adhesion of the coating. In addition, pre-treatment of substrates by a filtered cathodic vacuum arc and the layer thickness have has some effects on the final adhesion strength

  14. Adhesion of rhodium films on metallic substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marot, L. [Department of Physics, University of Basel, Klingelbergstrasse 82, CH-4056 Basel (Switzerland)], E-mail: laurent.marot@unibas.ch; Covarel, G.; Tuilier, M.-H. [Laboratoire Mecanique, Materiaux et Procedes de Fabrication, Pole STIC-SPI-Math 61 rue Albert Camus, Universite de Haute-Alsace, F-68093 - Mulhouse Cedex (France); Steiner, R.; Oelhafen, P. [Department of Physics, University of Basel, Klingelbergstrasse 82, CH-4056 Basel (Switzerland)

    2008-09-01

    Rhodium coated metallic films were prepared by magnetron sputtering on metallic substrates. All films were elaborated in same conditions on copper, molybdenum and stainless steel. Adhesion strength tests were carried out by scratch test. The results reveal that the adhesion strength between the film and the substrate is influenced by the hardness of the substrate. Increase of deposition temperature improves the adhesion of the coating. In addition, pre-treatment of substrates by a filtered cathodic vacuum arc and the layer thickness have has some effects on the final adhesion strength.

  15. Electronic and magnetic properties of ultrathin rhodium nanowires

    CERN Document Server

    Wang Bao Lin; Ren-Yun; Sun Hou Qian; Chen Xiao Shuang; Zhao Ji Jun

    2003-01-01

    The structures of ultrathin rhodium nanowires are studied using empirical molecular dynamics simulations with a genetic algorithm. Helical multishell cylindrical and pentagonal packing structures are found. The electronic and magnetic properties of the rhodium nanowires are calculated using an spd tight-binding Hamiltonian in the unrestricted Hartree-Fock approximation. The average magnetic moment and electronic density of states are obtained. Our results indicate that the electronic and magnetic properties of the rhodium nanowires depend not only on the size of the wire but also on the atomic structure. In particular, centred pentagonal and hexagonal structures can be unusually ferromagnetic.

  16. Decreased expression of extracellular matrix proteins and trophic factors in the amygdala complex of depressed mice after chronic immobilization stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung Soonwoong

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The amygdala plays an essential role in controlling emotional behaviors and has numerous connections to other brain regions. The functional role of the amygdala has been highlighted by various studies of stress-induced behavioral changes. Here we investigated gene expression changes in the amygdala in the chronic immobilization stress (CIS-induced depression model. Results Eight genes were decreased in the amygdala of CIS mice, including genes for neurotrophic factors and extracellular matrix proteins. Among these, osteoglycin, fibromodulin, insulin-like growth factor 2 (Igf2, and insulin-like growth factor binding protein 2 (Igfbp2 were further analyzed for histological expression changes. The expression of osteoglycin and fibromodulin simultaneously decreased in the medial, basolateral, and central amygdala regions. However, Igf2 and Igfbp2 decreased specifically in the central nucleus of the amygdala. Interestingly, this decrease was found only in the amygdala of mice showing higher immobility, but not in mice displaying lower immobility, although the CIS regimen was the same for both groups. Conclusions These results suggest that the responsiveness of the amygdala may play a role in the sensitivity of CIS-induced behavioral changes in mice.

  17. Synthesis and characterization of rhodium sulfide nanoparticles and thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sosibo, Ndabenhle M. [Department of Chemistry, University of Zululand, Private Bag X1001, KwaDlangezwa 3886 (South Africa); Revaprasadu, Neerish [Department of Chemistry, University of Zululand, Private Bag X1001, KwaDlangezwa 3886 (South Africa)], E-mail: nrevapra@pan.uzulula.za

    2008-05-15

    The synthesis and characterization of a rhodium complex, [Rh(S{sub 2}CNEt{sub 2}){sub 2}] is described. The complex was thermolysed at a high temperature (280 deg. C) in the presence of capping agent, hexadecylamine (HDA) to form Rh{sub 2}S{sub 3} nanoparticles. Rod-shaped Rh{sub 2}S{sub 3} nanoparticles with an average length of 26.7 nm and an average breadth of 7.8 nm were synthesized. The complex was also used as a single molecule precursor for the deposition of Rh{sub 2}S{sub 3} thin films on a glass substrate at 350 deg. C and 450 deg. C using the Aerosol Assisted Chemical Vapour Deposition (AACVD) technique. The resultant thin films showed temperature dependent morphologies and showed (0 2 2), (4 1 1) and (6 1 1) lattice planes characteristic of to the orthorhombic Rh{sub 2}S{sub 3} phase. X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy techniques were used to characterize the films.

  18. Platinum, palladium, and rhodium in volcanic and plutonic rocks from the Gravina-Nutzotin belt, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Norman J; Berg, Henry C.; Haffty, Joseph

    1977-01-01

    The Gravina-Nutzotin belt of Middle (?) Jurassic to middle Cretaceous sedimentary and volcanic rocks in south and southeastern Alaska includes concentrically zoned ultramafic complexes known to contain platinum-group metals. Previous isotopic, petrologic, and geologic studies suggested a close relation in time and space between the volcanic rocks and the ultramafic complexes. Interpretation of 40 analyses for platinum, palladium, and rhodium in volcanic and plutonic rocks of the belt indicates a strong geochemical correlation between the two groups of rocks and is in support of their being cogenetic either from directly connected magma chambers and flows or indirectly by selective concentration processes from similar mantle material.

  19. Structural properties of small rhodium clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soon, Yee Yeen; Yoon, Tiem Leong [School of Physics, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 11800 USM, Penang (Malaysia); Lim, Thong Leng [Faculty of Engineering and Technology, Multimedia University, Melaka Campus, 75450 Melaka (Malaysia)

    2015-04-24

    We report a systematic study of the structural properties of rhodium clusters at the atomistic level. A novel global-minimum search algorithm, known as parallel tempering multicanonical basin hopping plus genetic algorithm (PTMBHGA), is used to obtain the geometrical structures with lowest minima at the semi-empirical level where Gupta potential is used to describe the atomic interaction among the rhodium atoms. These structures are then re-optimized at the density functional theory (DFT) level with exchange-correlation energy approximated by Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof (PBE) generalized gradient approximation (GGA). The structures are optimized for different spin multiplicities. The ones with lowest energies will be taken as ground-state structures. In most cases, we observe only minor changes in the geometry and bond length of the clusters as a result of DFT-level re-optimization. Only in some limited cases, the initial geometries obtained from the PTMBHGA are modified by the re-optimization. The variation of structural properties, such as ground-state geometry, symmetry and binding energy, with respect to the cluster size is studied and agreed well with other results available in the literature.

  20. A rhodium(III)-based inhibitor of autotaxin with antiproliferative activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Tian-Shu; Wang, Wanhe; Zhong, Hai-Jing; Liang, Jia-Xin; Ko, Chung-Nga; Lu, Jin-Jian; Chen, Xiu-Ping; Ma, Dik-Lung; Leung, Chung-Hang

    2017-02-01

    Cancer of the skin is by far the most common of all cancers. Melanoma accounts for only about 1% of skin cancers but causes a large majority of skin cancer deaths. Autotaxin (ATX), also known as ectonucleotide pyrophosphatase/phosphodiesterase 2 (ENPP2), regulates physiological and pathological functions of lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), and is thus an important therapeutic target. We synthesized ten metal-based complexes and a novel cyclometalated rhodium(III) complex 1 was identified as an ATX enzymatic inhibitor using multiple methods, including ATX enzymatic assay, thermal shift assay, western immunoblotting and so on. Protein thermal shift assays showed that 1 increased the melting temperature (T m ) of ATX by 3.5°C. 1 also reduced ATX-LPA mediated downstream survival signal pathway proteins such as ERK and AKT, and inhibited the activation of the transcription factor nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3). 1 also exhibited strong anti-proliferative activity against A2058 melanoma cells (IC 50 =0.58μM). Structure-activity relationship indicated that both the rhodium(III) center and the auxiliary ligands of complex 1 are important for bioactivity. 1 represents a promising scaffold for the development of small-molecule ATX inhibitors for anti-tumor applications. To our knowledge, complex 1 is the first metal-based ATX inhibitor reported to date. Rhodium complexes will have the increased attention in therapeutic and bioanalytical applications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Rhodium-Catalyzed Dehydrogenative Borylation of Cyclic Alkenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondoh, Azusa; Jamison, Timothy F.

    2010-01-01

    A rhodium-catalyzed dehydrogenative borylation of cyclic alkenes is described. This reaction provides direct access to cyclic 1-alkenylboronic acid pinacol esters, useful intermediates in organic synthesis. Suzuki-Miyaura cross-coupling applications are also presented. PMID:20107646

  2. Low gravity containerless processing of immiscible gold rhodium alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, J. Barry

    1986-01-01

    Under normal one-g conditions immiscible alloys segregate extensively during solidification due to sedementation of the more dense of the immiscible liquid phases. However, under low-g conditions it should be possible to form a dispersion of the two immiscible liquids and maintain this dispersed structure during solidification. Immiscible (hypermonotectic) gold-rhodium alloys were processed in the Marshall Space Flight Center 105 meter drop tube in order to investigate the influence of low gravity, containerless solidification on their microstructure. Hypermonotectic alloys composed of 65 atomic % rhodium exhibited a tendency for the gold rich liquid to wet the outer surface of the containerless processed samples. This tendency led to extensive segregation in several cases. However, well dispersed microstructures consisting of 2 to 3 micron diameter rhodium-rich spheres in a gold-rich matrix were produced in 23.4 atomic % rhodium alloys. This is one of the best dispersions obtained in research on immiscible alloy-systems to data.

  3. Covalent co-immobilization of heparin/laminin complex that with different concentration ratio on titanium surface for selectively direction of platelets and vascular cells behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Jian; Chen, Yuan; Liu, Tao; Wang, Xue; Liu, Yang; Wang, Yuan; Chen, Junying; Huang, Nan

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Extracellular matrix inspired surface modification with fibronectin, heparin and VEGF to construct a favorable microenvironment for selectively anticoagulant and promote endothelialization. • Take the advantage of specific intermolecular interaction, the bioactivity of above biomolecules was more efficiently maintained in compared with the common used covalent immobilization method. • Poly-l-lysine was used as a novel interlayer for surface amination, and in comparison, PLL coating was more feasible and the degradation product had no harm to human body. - Abstract: Surface biofunctional modification of coronary artery stent to improve the hemocompatibility and selectively accelerate endothelium regeneration but prevent restenosis have been become a new hotspot. For this, a novel method was developed in this work by co-immobilization of Ln and heparin complex on poly-L-lysine modified Ti surface. Take the advantage of the specific interaction between Ln and heparin, Ln and heparin complexes with different concentration ratios were set up for creating different exposure density of these two types of biomolecules. According to biocompatibility evaluation results, the Hep/Ln complexes modified surface displayed less platelet adhesion and activation. Especially, on L(150)H and L(200)H surface, the AT III binding quantity, APTT value and anti-coagulation property of modified surface were significantly promoted. Furthermore, the adherent density and proliferation activity of ECs and EPCs were positively correlated with Ln concentration. Notably, the proliferation of both ECs and EPCs on L(100)H, L(150)H and L(200)H surface were greatly promoted. Another hand, the proliferation activity of SMCs was significantly inhibited on Hep/Ln modified surfaces, which was considered mainly due to the inhibitory effect of heparin to SMCs. According to the existing results, this study demonstrated that in a certain range of heparin and laminin concentration ratio

  4. Biological effects of simple changes in functionality on rhodium metalloinsertors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidmann, Alyson G.; Komor, Alexis C.; Barton, Jacqueline K.

    2013-01-01

    DNA mismatch repair (MMR) is crucial to ensuring the fidelity of the genome. The inability to correct single base mismatches leads to elevated mutation rates and carcinogenesis. Using metalloinsertors–bulky metal complexes that bind with high specificity to mismatched sites in the DNA duplex–our laboratory has adopted a new chemotherapeutic strategy through the selective targeting of MMR-deficient cells, that is, those that have a propensity for cancerous transformation. Rhodium metalloinsertors display inhibitory effects selectively in cells that are deficient in the MMR machinery, consistent with this strategy. However, a highly sensitive structure–function relationship is emerging with the development of new complexes that highlights the importance of subcellular localization. We have found that small structural modifications, for example a hydroxyl versus a methyl functional group, can yield profound differences in biological function. Despite similar binding affinities and selectivities for DNA mismatches, only one metalloinsertor shows selective inhibition of cellular proliferation in MMR-deficient versus -proficient cells. Studies of whole-cell, nuclear and mitochondrial uptake reveal that this selectivity depends upon targeting DNA mismatches in the cell nucleus. PMID:23776288

  5. The influence of rhodium burn-up on the sensitivity of rhodium self-powered neutron detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erben, O.

    1980-01-01

    Depression and self-shielding coefficients are presented for thermal and epithermal neutron flux densities. Functions are shown describing the distribution of beta particle sources on the emitter cross section for 0 to 50% rhodium burnup. The values are calculated of detector sensitivity to thermal and epithermal neutron flux densities for the said burnup for main types of rhodium SPN detectors made by SODERN. (J.B.)

  6. Electrocatalytic Azide Oxidation Mediated by a Rh(PNP) Pincer Complex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rebreyend, Christophe; Gloaguen, Yann; Lutz, Martin; Van Der Vlugt, Jarl Ivar; Siewert, Inke; Schneider, Sven; Bruin, Bas De

    2017-01-01

    One-electron oxidation of the rhodium(I) azido complex [Rh(N3)(PNP)] (5), bearing the neutral, pyridine-based PNP ligand 2,6-bis(di-tert-butylphosphinomethyl)pyridine, leads to instantaneous and selective formation of the mononuclear rhodium(I) dinitrogen complex [Rh(N2)(PNP)]+ (9+). Interestingly,

  7. Electrocatalytic Azide Oxidation Mediated by a Rh(PNP) Pincer Complex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rebreyend, C.; Gloaguen, Y.; Lutz, M.; van der Vlugt, J.I.; Siewert, I.; Schneider, S.; de Bruin, B.

    2017-01-01

    One-electron oxidation of the rhodium(I) azido complex [Rh(N3)(PNP)] ( 5 ), bearing the neutral, pyridine-based PNP ligand 2,6-bis(di-tert-butylphosphinomethyl)pyridine, leads to instantaneous and selective formation of the mononuclear rhodium(I) dinitrogen complex [Rh(N2)(PNP)]+ ( 9 +).

  8. Rhodium and Hafnium Influence on the Microstructure, Phase Composition, and Oxidation Resistance of Aluminide Coatings

    OpenAIRE

    Maryana Zagula-Yavorska; Małgorzata Wierzbińska; Jan Sieniawski

    2017-01-01

    A 0.5 μm thick layer of rhodium was deposited on the CMSX 4 superalloy by the electroplating method. The rhodium-coated superalloy was hafnized and aluminized or only aluminized using the Chemical vapour deposition method. A comparison was made of the microstructure, phase composition, and oxidation resistance of three aluminide coatings: nonmodified (a), rhodium-modified (b), and rhodium- and hafnium-modified (c). All three coatings consisted of two layers: the additive layer and the interdi...

  9. New polymer-supported ion-complexing agents: Design, preparation and metal ion affinities of immobilized ligands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexandratos, Spiro D.

    2007-01-01

    Polymer-supported reagents are comprised of crosslinked polymer networks that have been modified with ligands capable of selective metal ion complexation. Applications of these polymers are in environmental remediation, ion chromatography, sensor technology, and hydrometallurgy. Bifunctional polymers with diphosphonate/sulfonate ligands have a high selectivity for actinide ions. The distribution coefficient for the uranyl ion from 1 M nitric acid is 70,000, compared to 900 for the monophosphonate/sulfonate polymer and 200 for the sulfonic acid ion-exchange resin. A bifunctional trihexyl/triethylammonium polymer has a high affinity and selectivity for pertechnetate and perchlorate anions from groundwater. In one example, its distribution coefficient for perchlorate ions in the presence of competing anions is 3,300,000, compared to 203,180 for a commercially available anion-exchange resin. Polystyrene modified with N-methyl-D-glucamine ligands is capable of selectively complexing arsenate from groundwater. It complexes 99% of the arsenate present in a solution of 100 mg/L arsenate with 560 mg/L sulfate ions. Its selectivity is retained even in the presence of 400 mg/L phosphate. There is no affinity for arsenate above pH 9, allowing for the polymer to be regenerated with moderate alkali solution. In studies aimed at developing a Hg(II)-selective resin, simple amine resins were found to have a high Hg(II) affinity and that affinity is dependent upon the solution pH and the counterion

  10. Rhodium deposition onto a 4-mercaptopyridine SAM on Au(1 1 1)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manolova, M. [Institute of Electrochemistry, University of Ulm, 89069 Ulm (Germany); Kayser, M. [Institute of Electrochemistry, University of Ulm, 89069 Ulm (Germany); Kolb, D.M. [Institute of Electrochemistry, University of Ulm, 89069 Ulm (Germany)]. E-mail: dieter.kolb@uni-ulm.de; Boyen, H.-G. [Institute of Solid State Physics, University of Ulm, 89069 Ulm (Germany); Ziemann, P. [Institute of Solid State Physics, University of Ulm, 89069 Ulm (Germany); Mayer, D. [BASF Electronic Materials GmbH, 67056 Ludwigshafen (Germany); Wirth, A. [BASF Electronic Materials GmbH, 67056 Ludwigshafen (Germany)

    2007-02-10

    The application of a recently developed method for the deposition of Pd and Pt on top of a SAM, has been successfully extended to Rh, thus proving the versatility of the new concept. Experimental evidence from cyclic voltammetry, in situ STM and ex situ X-ray photoemission spectroscopy is presented for the deposition of monoatomic high rhodium islands onto a 4-mercaptopyridine self-assembled monolayer on a Au(1 1 1) electrode. By repetitive complexation of the Rh ions to the ring-nitrogen and reduction in a Rh-ion free solution, an almost completely covered SAM is obtained. The consequences of making contacts for molecular electronics are briefly discussed.

  11. Stereoselective 1,3-Insertions of Rhodium(II) Azavinyl Carbenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuprakov, Stepan; Worrell, Brady T.; Selander, Nicklas; Sit, Rakesh K.; Fokin, Valery V.

    2014-01-01

    Rhodium(II) azavinyl carbenes, conveniently generated from 1-sulfonyl-1,2,3-triazoles, undergo a facile, mild and convergent formal 1,3-insertion into N–H and O–H bonds of primary and secondary amides, various alcohols, and carboxylic acids to afford a wide range of vicinally bis-functionalized Z-olefins with perfect regio- and stereoselectively. Utilizing the distinctive functionality installed through these reactions, a number of subsequent rearrangements and cyclizations expand the repertoire of valuable organic building blocks constructed by reactions of transition metal carbene complexes, including α-allenyl ketones and amino-substituted heterocycles. PMID:24295389

  12. Enantioselective Access to Spirocyclic Sultams by Chiral Cp(x) -Rhodium(III)-Catalyzed Annulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Manh V; Cramer, Nicolai

    2016-02-12

    Chiral spirocyclic sultams are a valuable compound class in organic and medicinal chemistry. A rapid entry to this structural motif involves a [3+2] annulation of an N-sulfonyl ketimine and an alkyne. Although the directing-group properties of the imino group for C-H activation have been exploited, the developments of related asymmetric variants have remained very challenging. The use of rhodium(III) complexes equipped with a suitable atropchiral cyclopentadienyl ligand, in conjunction with a carboxylic acid additive, enables an enantioselective and high yielding access to such spirocyclic sultams. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. In-Situ Immobilization of Ni Complex on Amine-Grafted SiO₂ for Ethylene Polymerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang Yun; Ko, Young Soo

    2018-02-01

    The results on the In-Situ synthesis of Ni complex on amine-grafted SiO2 and its ethylene polymerization were explained. SiO2/2NS/(DME)NiBr2 and SiO2/3NS/(DME)NiBr2(Ni(II) bromide ethylene glycol dimethyl ether) catalysts were active for ethylene polymerization. The highest activity was shown at the polymerization temperature of 25 °C, and SiO2/2NS/(DME)NiBr2 exhibited higher activity than SiO2/3NS/(DME)NiBr2. The PDI values of SiO2/2NS/(DME)NiBr2 were in the range of 8~18. The aminosilane compounds and Ni were evenly grafted and distributed in the silica. It was proposed that DME ligand was mostly removed during the supporting process, and only NiBr2 was complexed with the amine group of 2NS based on the results of FT-IR and ethylene polymerization.

  14. Complex effect of lignocellulosic biomass pretreatment with 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride ionic liquid on various aspects of ethanol and fumaric acid production by immobilized cells within SSF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dotsenko, Anna S; Dotsenko, Gleb S; Senko, Olga V; Stepanov, Nikolay A; Lyagin, Ilya V; Efremenko, Elena N; Gusakov, Alexander V; Zorov, Ivan N; Rubtsova, Ekaterina A

    2018-02-01

    The pretreatment of softwood and hardwood samples (spruce and hornbeam wood) with 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride ([Bmim]Cl) was undertaken for further simultaneous enzymatic saccharification of renewable non-food lignocellulosic biomass and microbial fermentation of obtained sugars to ethanol and fumaric acid. A multienzyme cocktail based on cellulases and yeast or fungus cells producing ethanol and fumaric acid were the main objects of [Bmim]Cl influence studies. A complex effect of lignocellulosic biomass pretreatment with [Bmim]Cl on various aspects of the process (both action of cellulases and microbial conversion of hydrolysates to target products) was revealed. Positive effects of the pretreatment with [Bmim]Cl included decreasing the lignin content in the biomass, and increasing the effectiveness of enzymatic hydrolysis and microbial transformation of pretreated biomass. Immobilized cells of both yeasts and fungi possessed improved productive characteristics in the biotransformation of biomass pretreated with [Bmim]Cl to ethanol and fumaric acid. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Ion flotation of rhodium(III) and palladium(II) with anionic surfactants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, X C

    1991-03-01

    The ion flotation of rhodium(III) and palladium(II) with some anionic surfactants has been investigated. Two flotation procedures are proposed for the separation of some platinum metals, based on differences in the kinetic properties of the chloro-complexes of rhodium(III), palladium(II) and platinum(IV). The first involves the selective flotation of Rh(H(2)O)(3+)(6) from PdCl(2-)(4) and PtCl(2-)(6) in dilute hydrochloric acid with sodium dodecylbenzenesulfonate (SDBS). After precipitation of the hydroxide and redissolution in dilute acid, the Rh(III) is converted into Rh(H(2)O)(3+)(6), Pd(II) and Pt(IV) remaining as PdCl(2-)(4) and PtCl(2-)(6) respectively, and separation is achieved by floating the Rh(H(2)O)(3+)(6) with SDBS. The second is for separation of Pd(II). Prior to flotation, the solution of PdCl(2-)(4) and PtCl(2-)(6) is heated with ammonium acetate to convert PdCl(2-)(4) into Pd(NH(3))(2+)(4). The chloro-complex of Pt(IV) is unaffected. The complex cation, Pd(NH(3))(2+)(4), is then selectively floated with SDBS. The procedures are fast, simple and do not require expensive reagents and apparatus.

  16. INTEGRATED QUANTITATIVE ASSESSMENT OF CHANGES IN NEURO-ENDOCRINE-IMMUNE COMPLEX AND METABOLISM IN RATS EXPOSED TO ACUTE COLD-IMMOBILIZATION STRESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sydoruk O Sydoruk

    2016-09-01

        Abstracts Background. It is known that the reaction of the neuroendocrine-immune complex to acute and chronic stress are different. It is also known about sex differences in stress reactions. Previously we have been carry out integrated quantitative estimation of neuroendocrine and immune responses to chronic restraint stress at male rats. The purpose of this study - to carry out integrated quantitative estimation of neuroendocrine, immune and metabolic responses to acute stress at male and female rats. Material and research methods. The experiment is at 58 (28 male and 30 female white rats Wistar line weighing 170-280 g (Mean=220 g; SD=28 g. The day after acute (water immersion restraint stress determined HRV, endocrine, immune and metabolic parameters as well as gastric mucosa injuries and comparing them with parameters of intact animals. Results. Acute cold-immobilization stress caused moderate injuries the stomach mucosa as erosions and ulcers. Among the metabolic parameters revealed increased activity Acid Phosphatase, Asparagine and Alanine Aminotranspherase as well as Creatinephosphokinase. It was also found to reduce plasma Testosterone as well as serum Potassium and Phosphate probably due to increased Parathyrine and Mineralocorticoid activity and Sympathotonic shift of sympatho-vagal balance. Integrated quantitative measure manifestations of Acute Stress as mean of modules of Z-Scores makes for 10 metabolic parameters 0,75±0,10 σ and for 8 neuro-endocrine parameters 0,40±0,07 σ. Among immune parameters some proved resistant to acute stress factors, while 10 significant suppressed and 12 activated. Integrated quantitative measure poststressory changes makes 0,73±0,08 σ. Found significant differences integrated status intact males and females, whereas after stress differences are insignificant. Conclusion. The approach to integrated quantitative assessment of neuroendocrine-immune complex and metabolism may be useful for testing the

  17. About the extraction recovery of fission rhodium from radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khaperskaya, A.V.; Renard, E.V.; Koltunov, V.S.

    2000-01-01

    The report will cover a radically new approach to the problem of rhodium recovery from HLLW after the transformation of kinetically inert poly-aqua cation of trivalent rhodium (which is not recoverable by the majority known extractants) to Rh (IV) form by chemical methods. Presented are the research results of Rh (IV) extraction from nitric acid solutions by several extractants that are of considerable current use in noble metals and radiochemical industries (tri-n-butyl phosphate, di-octyl-sulphide, tri-n-octylamine, quaternary ammonium bases). High level of rhodium extraction has been found for the above extractants: for several systems, for example, tri-n-octylamine - diethyl-benzene, rhodium distribution coefficient achieves high values (10-plus), as well as the sufficient extraction kinetics. Rhodium extraction increases with a decrease of the acidity, a rise in phase mixing time and in the following series: tri-n-butyl phosphate → di-octyl-sulphide → quaternary ammonium bases → tri-n-octylamine. Rh (IV) can be easily reduced to non-extractable Rh (III) by such reductants as Fe (II), HCOOH, C 6 H 8 O 6 , NH 2 OH, N 2 H 4 et al, that may be applied for the re-extraction process. (authors)

  18. Block copolymer lithography of rhodium nanoparticles for high temperature electrocatalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, David A; Hao, Yong; Li, Changyi; Goodwin, David G; Haile, Sossina M

    2013-06-25

    We present a method for forming ordered rhodium nanostructures on a solid support. The approach makes use of a block copolymer to create and assemble rhodium chloride nanoparticles from solution onto a surface; subsequent plasma and thermal processing are employed to remove the polymer and fully convert the nanostructures to metallic rhodium. Films cast from a solution of the triblock copolymer poly(styrene-b-2-vinyl pyridine-b-ethylene oxide) dissolved in toluene with rhodium(III) chloride hydrate were capable of producing a monolayer of rhodium nanoparticles of uniform size and interparticle spacing. The nanostructures were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and atomic force microscopy. The electrocatalytic performance of the nanoparticles was investigated with AC impedance spectroscopy. We observed that the addition of the particles to a model solid oxide fuel cell anode provided up to a 14-fold improvement in the anode activity as evidenced by a decrease in the AC impedance resistance. Examination of the anode after electrochemical measurement revealed that the basic morphology and distribution of the particles were preserved.

  19. Kalman filtering for rhodium self-powered neutron detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kantrowitz, M.L.

    1988-01-01

    Rhodium self-powered neutron detectors are utilized in many pressurized water reactors to determine the neutronic behavior within the core. In order to compensate for the inherent time delay associated with the response of these detectors, a dynamic compensation algorithm is currently used in Combustion Engineering plants to reconstruct the dynamic flux signal which is being sensed by the rhodium detectors. This paper describes a new dynamic compensation algorithm, based on Kalman filtering, which improves on the noise gain and response time characteristics of the algorithm currently used, and offers the possibility of utilizing the proven rhodium detector based fixed in-core detector system as an integral part of advanced core control and/or protection systems

  20. A solid-state sensor based on ruthenium (II) complex immobilized on polytyramine film for the simultaneous determination of dopamine, ascorbic acid and uric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khudaish, Emad A.; Al-Ajmi, Khawla Y.; Al-Harthi, Salim H.

    2014-01-01

    A solid-state sensor based on a polytyramine (Pty) film deposited on a glassy carbon electrode doped with a tris(2,2′-bipyridyl)Ru(II) complex (Ru/Pty/GCE) was constructed electrochemically. The surface morphology of the film modified electrode was characterized using electrochemical and surface scanning techniques. A redox property represented by a [Ru(bpy) 3 ] 3+/2+ couple immobilized at the Pty moiety was characterized using typical voltammetric techniques. A distinct Ru 3d peak obtained at 280.9 eV confirms doping of the Ru species onto the Pty moiety characterized by X-ray photoelectron (XPS). Atomic force microscopy (AFM) images demonstrate that incorporation of Ru decreases the surface roughness of the native Pty film modified electrode. The Ru/Pty/GCE exhibits efficient electrochemical sensing toward the oxidation of dopamine (DA), ascorbic acid (AA) and uric acid (UA) in their mixture. Three well-defined peaks were resolved with a large peak to peak separation and the detection limits of AA, DA and UA are brought down to 0.31, 0.08 and 0.58 μM, respectively. Interference studies and application for DA determination in real samples were conducted with satisfactory results. - Highlights: • XPS data confirm doping of ruthenium onto the polytyramine moiety. • The voltammetric signals of ascorbic acid, dopamine and uric acid are well defined. • The sensor is stable and offers a large adsorption facility for all species. • The sensor is highly sensitive to dopamine oxidation. • The sensor is applied to a real sample with a satisfactory recovery percentage

  1. A solid-state sensor based on ruthenium (II) complex immobilized on polytyramine film for the simultaneous determination of dopamine, ascorbic acid and uric acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khudaish, Emad A., E-mail: ejoudi@squ.edu.om [Sultan Qaboos University, College of Science, Chemistry Department, PO Box 36, PC 123 Muscat (Oman); Al-Ajmi, Khawla Y. [Sultan Qaboos University, College of Science, Chemistry Department, PO Box 36, PC 123 Muscat (Oman); Al-Harthi, Salim H. [Sultan Qaboos University, College of Science, Department of Physics, PO Box 36, PC 123 Muscat (Oman)

    2014-08-01

    A solid-state sensor based on a polytyramine (Pty) film deposited on a glassy carbon electrode doped with a tris(2,2′-bipyridyl)Ru(II) complex (Ru/Pty/GCE) was constructed electrochemically. The surface morphology of the film modified electrode was characterized using electrochemical and surface scanning techniques. A redox property represented by a [Ru(bpy){sub 3}]{sup 3+/2+} couple immobilized at the Pty moiety was characterized using typical voltammetric techniques. A distinct Ru 3d peak obtained at 280.9 eV confirms doping of the Ru species onto the Pty moiety characterized by X-ray photoelectron (XPS). Atomic force microscopy (AFM) images demonstrate that incorporation of Ru decreases the surface roughness of the native Pty film modified electrode. The Ru/Pty/GCE exhibits efficient electrochemical sensing toward the oxidation of dopamine (DA), ascorbic acid (AA) and uric acid (UA) in their mixture. Three well-defined peaks were resolved with a large peak to peak separation and the detection limits of AA, DA and UA are brought down to 0.31, 0.08 and 0.58 μM, respectively. Interference studies and application for DA determination in real samples were conducted with satisfactory results. - Highlights: • XPS data confirm doping of ruthenium onto the polytyramine moiety. • The voltammetric signals of ascorbic acid, dopamine and uric acid are well defined. • The sensor is stable and offers a large adsorption facility for all species. • The sensor is highly sensitive to dopamine oxidation. • The sensor is applied to a real sample with a satisfactory recovery percentage.

  2. Asymmetric transfer hydrogenation of ketones in aqueous solution catalyzed by Rhodium(III) complexes with C2-symmetric fluorene-ligands containing chiral (1R,2R)-cyclohexane-1,2-diamine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montalvo-Gonzalez, Ruben [Universidad Autonoma de Nayarit, Tepic, Nay (Mexico). Unidad Academica de Ciencias Quimico Biologicas y Farmaceuticas; Chavez, Daniel; Aguirre, Gerardo; Parra-Hake, Miguel; Somanathan, Ratnasamy, E-mail: somanatha@sundown.sdsu.ed [Instituto Tecnologico de Tijuana, B.C. (Mexico). Centro de Graduados e Investigacion

    2010-07-01

    Two C{sub 2}-symmetric bis(sulfonamide) ligands containing fluorene-chiral (1R, 2R)-cyclohexane-1,2-diamine were complexed to Rh{sup III}(Cp{sup *}) and used as catalyst to reduce aromatic ketones. The corresponding chiral secondary alcohols were obtained in 87-100% ee and 85-99% yield, under asymmetric transfer hydrogenation (ATH) conditions using aqueous sodium formate as the hydride source. With acetophenone, 94% ee and 86-97% yield was achieved with substrate/catalyst (S/C) ratio of 10,000. (author)

  3. Asymmetric transfer hydrogenation of ketones in aqueous solution catalyzed by Rhodium(III) complexes with C2-symmetric fluorene-ligands containing chiral (1R,2R)-cyclohexane-1,2-diamine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montalvo-Gonzalez, Ruben; Chavez, Daniel; Aguirre, Gerardo; Parra-Hake, Miguel; Somanathan, Ratnasamy

    2010-01-01

    Two C 2 -symmetric bis(sulfonamide) ligands containing fluorene-chiral (1R, 2R)-cyclohexane-1,2-diamine were complexed to Rh III (Cp * ) and used as catalyst to reduce aromatic ketones. The corresponding chiral secondary alcohols were obtained in 87-100% ee and 85-99% yield, under asymmetric transfer hydrogenation (ATH) conditions using aqueous sodium formate as the hydride source. With acetophenone, 94% ee and 86-97% yield was achieved with substrate/catalyst (S/C) ratio of 10,000. (author)

  4. Snapshot analysis for rhodium fixed incore detector using BEACON methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cha, Kyoon Ho; Choi, Yu Sun; Lee, Eun Ki; Park, Moon Ghu; Morita, Toshio; Heibel, Michael D.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to process the rhodium detector data of the Yonggwang nuclear unit 4 cycle 5 core for the measured power distribution by using the BEACON methodology. Rhodium snapshots of the YGN 4 cycle 5 have been analyzed by both BEACON/SPINOVA and CECOR to compare the results of both codes. By analyzing a large number of snapshots obtained during normal plant operation. Reviewing the results of this analysis, the BEACON/SPNOVA can be used for the snapshot analysis of Korean Standard Nuclear Power (KSNP) plants

  5. Rhodium-catalyzed regioselective olefination directed by a carboxylic group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mochida, Satoshi; Hirano, Koji; Satoh, Tetsuya; Miura, Masahiro

    2011-05-06

    The ortho-olefination of benzoic acids can be achieved effectively through rhodium-catalyzed oxidative coupling with alkenes. The carboxylic group is readily removable to allow ortho-olefination/decarboxylation in one pot. α,β-Unsaturated carboxylic acids such as methacrylic acid also undergo the olefination at the β-position. Under the rhodium catalysis, the cine-olefination of heteroarene carboxylic acids such as thiophene-2-carboxylic acid proceeds smoothly accompanied by decarboxylation to selectively produce the corresponding vinylheteroarene derivatives. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  6. In Situ Structure-Function Studies of Oxide Supported Rhodium Catalysts by Combined Energy Dispersive XAFS and DRIFTS Spectroscopies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, John; Dent, Andrew J.; Diaz-Moreno, Sofia; Fiddy, Steven G.; Jyoti, Bhrat; Tromp, Moniek; Newton, Mark A.

    2007-01-01

    The techniques of energy dispersive EXAFS (EDE), diffuse reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (DRIFTS) and mass spectrometry (MS) have been combined to study the structure and function of an oxide supported metal catalyst, namely 5 wt% Rh/Al2O3. Using a FreLoN camera as the EDE detector and a rapid-scanning IR spectrometer, experiments could be performed with a repetition rate of 50 ms. The results show that the nature of the rhodium centers is a function of the partial pressures of the reacting gases (CO and NO) and also temperature. This combination of gases oxidizes metallic rhodium particles to Rh(CO)2 at room temperature. The proportion of the rhodium adopting this site increases as the temperature is raised (up to 450 K). Above that temperature the dicarbonyl decomposes and the metal reclusters. Once this condition is met, catalysis ensues. Gas switching techniques show that at 573 K with NO in excess, the clusters can be oxidized rapidly to afford a linear nitrosyl complex; re-exposure to CO also promotes reclustering and the CO adopts terminal (atop) and bridging (2-fold) sites

  7. Rhodium enalcarbenoids: direct synthesis of indoles by rhodium(II)-catalyzed [4+2] benzannulation of pyrroles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawande, Sudam Ganpat; Kanchupalli, Vinaykumar; Kalepu, Jagadeesh; Chennamsetti, Haribabu; Lad, Bapurao Sudam; Katukojvala, Sreenivas

    2014-04-14

    Disclosed herein is the design of an unprecedented electrophilic rhodium enalcarbenoid which results from rhodium(II)-catalyzed decomposition of a new class of enaldiazo compounds. The synthetic utility of these enalcarbenoids has been successfully demonstrated in the first transition-metal-catalyzed [4+2] benzannulation of pyrroles, thus leading to substituted indoles. The new benzannulation has been applied to the efficient synthesis of the natural product leiocarpone as well as a potent adipocyte fatty-acid binding protein inhibitor. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Effects of knee immobilization on morphological changes in the semitendinosus muscle-tendon complex after hamstring harvesting for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Evaluation using three-dimensional computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamae, Atsuo; Adachi, Nobuo; Nakasa, Tomoyuki; Nishimori, Makoto; Ochi, Mitsuo; Deie, Masataka

    2012-01-01

    It is desirable to maintain the morphology of the semitendinosus muscle-tendon complex after tendon harvesting for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of knee immobilization on morphological changes in the semitendinosus muscle-tendon complex. In total, 39 patients who underwent ACL reconstruction with autologous semitendinosus tendons were included in this study. After surgery, the knee was immobilized for 3 days in 1 group of patients (group 1; 24 patients; control group) and for a longer period (10-14 days) in the other group (group 2; 15 patients). Three-dimensional computed tomography (3D CT) examination was performed at 6 and/or 12 months after the surgery for all patients. Morphological changes in the semitendinosus muscle-tendon complex (proximal shift of the semitendinosus muscle-tendon junction, width of the regenerated semitendinosus tendons, re-insertion sites of the regenerated tendons, and rate of semitendinosus tendon regeneration) were evaluated. Successful regeneration of the semitendinosus tendon was confirmed in all patients in group 2. In group 1, 3D CT showed that regeneration of the semitendinosus tendon was unsuccessful in 1 of the 24 patients. The average length of the proximal shift of the semitendinosus muscle-tendon junction was 7.3±2.5 cm in group 1 and 7.2±1.9 cm in group 2. There were no significant differences between the 2 groups with regard to the morphological changes in the semitendinosus muscle-tendon complex. This study showed that the structure of regenerated tendons could be clearly identified in 38 of 39 cases (97.4%) after ACL reconstruction. However, prolonged knee immobilization (10-14 days) could not prevent morphological changes in the semitendinosus muscle-tendon complex. (author)

  9. Rhodium-catalysed syn-carboamination of alkenes via a transient directing group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piou, Tiffany; Rovis, Tomislav

    2015-11-05

    Alkenes are the most ubiquitous prochiral functional groups--those that can be converted from achiral to chiral in a single step--that are accessible to synthetic chemists. For this reason, difunctionalization reactions of alkenes (whereby two functional groups are added to the same double bond) are particularly important, as they can be used to produce highly complex molecular architectures. Stereoselective oxidation reactions, including dihydroxylation, aminohydroxylation and halogenation, are well established methods for functionalizing alkenes. However, the intermolecular incorporation of both carbon- and nitrogen-based functionalities stereoselectively across an alkene has not been reported. Here we describe the rhodium-catalysed carboamination of alkenes at the same (syn) face of a double bond, initiated by a carbon-hydrogen activation event that uses enoxyphthalimides as the source of both the carbon and the nitrogen functionalities. The reaction methodology allows for the intermolecular, stereospecific formation of one carbon-carbon and one carbon-nitrogen bond across an alkene, which is, to our knowledge, unprecedented. The reaction design involves the in situ generation of a bidentate directing group and the use of a new cyclopentadienyl ligand to control the reactivity of rhodium. The results provide a new way of synthesizing functionalized alkenes, and should lead to the convergent and stereoselective assembly of amine-containing acyclic molecules.

  10. Electronic and magnetic properties of small rhodium clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soon, Yee Yeen; Yoon, Tiem Leong [School of Physics, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 11800 USM, Penang (Malaysia); Lim, Thong Leng [Faculty of Engineering and Technology, Multimedia University, Melaka Campus, 75450 Melaka (Malaysia)

    2015-04-24

    We report a theoretical study of the electronic and magnetic properties of rhodium-atomic clusters. The lowest energy structures at the semi-empirical level of rhodium clusters are first obtained from a novel global-minimum search algorithm, known as PTMBHGA, where Gupta potential is used to describe the atomic interaction among the rhodium atoms. The structures are then re-optimized at the density functional theory (DFT) level with exchange-correlation energy approximated by Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof generalized gradient approximation. For the purpose of calculating the magnetic moment of a given cluster, we calculate the optimized structure as a function of the spin multiplicity within the DFT framework. The resultant magnetic moments with the lowest energies so obtained allow us to work out the magnetic moment as a function of cluster size. Rhodium atomic clusters are found to display a unique variation in the magnetic moment as the cluster size varies. However, Rh{sub 4} and Rh{sub 6} are found to be nonmagnetic. Electronic structures of the magnetic ground-state structures are also investigated within the DFT framework. The results are compared against those based on different theoretical approaches available in the literature.

  11. Ring Expansion and Rearrangements of Rhodium(II) Azavinyl Carbenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selander, Nicklas; Worrell, Brady T.

    2013-01-01

    An efficient, regioselective and convergent method for the ring expansion and rearrangement of 1-sulfonyl-1,2,3-triazoles under rhodium(II)-catalyzed conditions is described. These denitrogenative reactions form substituted enaminone and olefin-based products, which in the former case can be further functionalized to unique products rendering the sulfonyl triazole traceless. PMID:23161725

  12. In vitro permeation of platinum and rhodium through Caucasian skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franken, A; Eloff, F C; Du Plessis, J; Badenhorst, C J; Jordaan, A; Du Plessis, J L

    2014-12-01

    During platinum group metals (PGMs) refining the possibility exists for dermal exposure to PGM salts. The dermal route has been questioned as an alternative route of exposure that could contribute to employee sensitisation, even though literature has been focused on respiratory exposure. This study aimed to investigate the in vitro permeation of platinum and rhodium through intact Caucasian skin. A donor solution of 0.3mg/ml of metal, K2PtCl4 and RhCl3 respectively, was applied to the vertical Franz diffusion cells with full thickness abdominal skin. The receptor solution was removed at various intervals during the 24h experiment, and analysed with high resolution ICP-MS. Skin was digested and analysed by ICP-OES. Results indicated cumulative permeation with prolonged exposure, with a significantly higher mass of platinum permeating after 24h when compared to rhodium. The mass of platinum retained inside the skin and the flux of platinum across the skin was significantly higher than that of rhodium. Permeated and skin retained platinum and rhodium may therefore contribute to sensitisation and indicates a health risk associated with dermal exposure in the workplace. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Kinetic method of determination of rhodium trace amounts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalinina, V.E.; Lyakushina, V.M.; Rybina, A.E.

    1978-01-01

    A catalytic action of rhodium compounds has been detected and studied in the reaction of copper (2) tellurate oxidation with hypobromite to ditelluratocuprate (3) in an alkaline medium. The relationships between the reaction rate and concentrations of copper, tellurate, and hypobromite have been established. The optimum concentrations of the used compounds have been found: Csub(Cu(2))=4x10 -5 g-ion/l; Csub(OHsup(-))=3.0 g-ion/l; Csub(Te)=1.4x10 -2 g-ion/l; Csub(NaBrO)=2.17x10 -3 M. It has been established for chloride, sulphate, and perchlorate solutions of rhodium (3) and (4) that the reaction sensitivity increases by 2-3-fold with a temperature rise from 25-60 deg C. The technique of determining rhodium traces has been developed based on its catalytic action. The low limit of determined rhodium amounts is about 10 -3 mkg/ml

  14. Extraction of fission product rhodium from nitric acid solutions. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorski, B.; Beer, M.; Russ, L.

    1988-01-01

    The extraction of noble metals from nitric acid solutions represents one problem of separating valueable substances from nuclear wastes in nuclear fuel reprocessing. Results of distribution experiments demonstrate the possibility of solvent extraction of rhodium using tertiary amines in presence of nitrite. Even short mixing times realize high distribution coefficients allowing quantitative separation from aqueous solutions. (author)

  15. Rhodium(iii)-catalyzed ortho-olefination of aryl phosphonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chary, Bathoju Chandra; Kim, Sunggak

    2013-09-25

    Rhodium(iii)-catalyzed C-H olefination of aryl phosphonic esters is reported for the first time. In this mild and efficient process, the phosphonic ester group is utilized successfully as a new directing group. In addition, mono-olefination for aryl phosphonates is observed using a phosphonic diamide directing group.

  16. Structure of Rhodium in an Ultradispersed Rhodium/Alumina Catalyst as Studied by EXAFS and Other Technique

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koningsberger, D.C.; Blik, H.F.J. van 't; Zon, J.B.A.D. van; Huizinga, T.; Vis, J.C.; Prins, R.

    1985-01-01

    The structure of rhodium in an ultradispersed 0.57 wt % Rh/y-Al,O, catalyst before and after CO adsorption was studied with extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), electron spin resonance (ESR), temperature programmed reduction (TPR), CO infrared

  17. Immobilization of [Cu(bpy)2]Br2 complex onto a glassy carbon electrode modified with alpha-SiMo12O40(4-) and single walled carbon nanotubes: application to nanomolar detection of hydrogen peroxide and bromate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salimi, Abdollah; Korani, Aazam; Hallaj, Rahman; Khoshnavazi, Roshan; Hadadzadeh, Hasan

    2009-03-02

    A simple procedure has been used for preparation of modified glassy carbon electrode with carbon nanotubes and copper complex. Copper complex [Cu(bpy)(2)]Br(2) was immobilized onto glassy carbon (GC) electrode modified with silicomolybdate, alpha-SiMo(12)O(40)(4-) and single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). Copper complex and silicomolybdate irreversibly and strongly adsorbed onto GC electrode modified with CNTs. Electrostatic interactions between polyoxometalates (POMs) anions and Cu-complex, cations mentioned as an effective method for fabrication of three-dimensional structures. The modified electrode shows three reversible redox couples for polyoxometalate and one redox couple for Cu-complex at wide range of pH values. The electrochemical behavior, stability and electron transfer kinetics of the adsorbed redox couples were investigated using cyclic voltammetry. Due to electrostatic interaction, copper complex immobilized onto GC/CNTs/alpha-SiMo(12)O(40)(4-) electrode shows more stable voltammetric response compared to GC/CNTs/Cu-complex modified electrode. In comparison to GC/CNTs/Cu-complex the GC/CNTs/alpha-SiMo(12)O(40)(4-) modified electrodes shows excellent electrocatalytic activity toward reduction H(2)O(2) and BrO(3)(-) at more reduced overpotential. The catalytic rate constants for catalytic reduction hydrogen peroxide and bromate were 4.5(+/-0.2)x10(3) M(-1) s(-1) and 3.0(+/-0.10)x10(3) M(-1) s(-1), respectively. The hydrodynamic amperommetry technique at 0.08 V was used for detection of nanomolar concentration of hydrogen peroxide and bromate. Detection limit, sensitivity and linear concentration range proposed sensor for bromate and hydrogen peroxide detection were 1.1 nM and 6.7 nA nM(-1), 10 nM-20 microM, 1 nM, 5.5 nA nM(-1) and 10 nM-18 microM, respectively.

  18. Local Electric Field Effects on Rhodium-Porphyrin and NHC-Gold Catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-05

    AFRL-OSR-VA-TR-2015-0023 (NII) - Local Electric Field Effects on Rhodium -Porphyrin and NHC-Gold Catalysts MATTHEW KANAN LELAND STANFORD JUNIOR UNIV...Effects on Rhodium -Porphyrin and NHC-Gold Catalysts Principal Investigator: Matthew W. Kanan Project Publications: 1. “An Electric Field–Induced Change...Stanford University Grant/Contract Title The full title of the funded effort. (NII)-Local Electric Field Effects on Rhodium -Porphyrin and NHC-Gold

  19. Rhodium self-powered neutron detector's lifetime for korean standard nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoo, Choon Sung; Kim, Byoung Chul; Park, Jong Ho; Fero, Arnold H.; Anderson, S. L.

    2005-01-01

    A method to estimate the relative sensitivity of a self-powered rhodium detector for an upcoming cycle is developed by combining the rhodium depletion data from a nuclear design with the site measurement data. This method can be used both by nuclear power plant designers and by site staffs of Korean standard nuclear power plants for determining which rhodium detectors should be replaced during overhauls

  20. Tris-(1,3-diaryltriazenide) complexes of rhodium – Synthesis ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    structure and, spectral and electrochemical properties. CHHANDASI .... Microanalyses (C, H, N) were done using a Heraeus. Carlo Erba ... For an unambiguous characterization of these com- plexes ..... signals are marked with an asterisk. 11.

  1. Diphosphinoazine Rhodium(III) and Iridium(III) Octahedral Complexes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pošta, Martin; Čermák, Jan; Vojtíšek, P.; Sýkora, Jan; Císařová, I.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 362, č. 1 (2009), s. 208-216 ISSN 0020-1693 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/01/0554; GA ČR GA203/06/0738; GA MŠk(CZ) LC06070 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : polydentate ligands * diphosphinoazines * hemilabile ligands Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry Impact factor: 2.322, year: 2009

  2. Half-sandwich ruthenium, rhodium and iridium complexes of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    p-cymene/benzene/Cp* and M = Ru/Rh/Ir) with ligand L in methanol. The reaction in 1:2 ... drazine with dipyridyl ketone using glacial acetic acid, we ended up with the .... dimethyl sulphoxide, soluble in hot water (up to 40. ◦. C) and they are ...

  3. Conclusive evidence on the mechanism of the rhodium-mediated decyanative borylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteruelas, Miguel A; Oliván, Montserrat; Vélez, Andrea

    2015-09-30

    The stoichiometric reactions proposed in the mechanism of the rhodium-mediated decyanative borylation have been performed and all relevant intermediates isolated and characterized including their X-ray structures. Complex RhCl{xant(P(i)Pr2)2} (1, xant(P(i)Pr2)2 = 9,9-dimethyl-4,5-bis(diisopropylphosphino)xanthene) reacts with bis(pinacolato)diboron (B2pin2), in benzene, to give the rhodium(III) derivative RhHCl(Bpin){xant(P(i)Pr2)2} (4) and PhBpin. The reaction involves the oxidative addition of B2pin2 to 1 to give RhCl(Bpin)2{xant(P(i)Pr2)2}, which eliminates ClBpin generating Rh(Bpin){xant(P(i)Pr2)2} (2). The reaction of the latter with the solvent yields PhBpin and the monohydride RhH{xant(P(i)Pr2)2} (6), which adds the eliminated ClBpin. Complex 4 and its catecholboryl counterpart RhHCl(Bcat){xant(P(i)Pr2)2} (7) have also been obtained by oxidative addition of HBR2 to 1. Complex 2 is the promoter of the decyanative borylation. Thus, benzonitrile and 4-(trifluoromethyl)benzonitrile insert into the Rh-B bond of 2 to form Rh{C(R-C6H4)═NBpin}{xant(P(i)Pr2)2} (R = H (8), p-CF3 (9)), which evolve into the aryl derivatives RhPh{xant(P(i)Pr2)2} (3) and Rh(p-CF3-C6H4){xant(P(i)Pr2)2} (10), as a result of the extrusion of CNBpin. The reactions of 3 and 10 with B2pin2 yield the arylBpin products and regenerate 2.

  4. Interfacial bonding stabilizes rhodium and rhodium oxide nanoparticles on layered Nb oxide and Ta oxide supports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strayer, Megan E; Binz, Jason M; Tanase, Mihaela; Shahri, Seyed Mehdi Kamali; Sharma, Renu; Rioux, Robert M; Mallouk, Thomas E

    2014-04-16

    Metal nanoparticles are commonly supported on metal oxides, but their utility as catalysts is limited by coarsening at high temperatures. Rhodium oxide and rhodium metal nanoparticles on niobate and tantalate supports are anomalously stable. To understand this, the nanoparticle-support interaction was studied by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), environmental transmission electron microscopy (ETEM), and synchrotron X-ray absorption and scattering techniques. Nanosheets derived from the layered oxides KCa2Nb3O10, K4Nb6O17, and RbTaO3 were compared as supports to nanosheets of Na-TSM, a synthetic fluoromica (Na0.66Mg2.68(Si3.98Al0.02)O10.02F1.96), and α-Zr(HPO4)2·H2O. High surface area SiO2 and γ-Al2O3 supports were also used for comparison in the ITC experiments. A Born-Haber cycle analysis of ITC data revealed an exothermic interaction between Rh(OH)3 nanoparticles and the layered niobate and tantalate supports, with ΔH values in the range -32 kJ·mol(-1) Rh to -37 kJ·mol(-1) Rh. In contrast, the interaction enthalpy was positive with SiO2 and γ-Al2O3 supports. The strong interfacial bonding in the former case led to "reverse" ripening of micrometer-size Rh(OH)3, which dispersed as 0.5 to 2 nm particles on the niobate and tantalate supports. In contrast, particles grown on Na-TSM and α-Zr(HPO4)2·H2O nanosheets were larger and had a broad size distribution. ETEM, X-ray absorption spectroscopy, and pair distribution function analyses were used to study the growth of supported nanoparticles under oxidizing and reducing conditions, as well as the transformation from Rh(OH)3 to Rh nanoparticles. Interfacial covalent bonding, possibly strengthened by d-electron acid/base interactions, appear to stabilize Rh(OH)3, Rh2O3, and Rh nanoparticles on niobate and tantalate supports.

  5. Direct Synthesis of 5-Aryl Barbituric Acids by Rhodium(II)-Catalyzed Reactions of Arenes with Diazo Compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Best, Daniel; Burns, David J; Lam, Hon Wai

    2015-06-15

    A commercially available rhodium(II) complex catalyzes the direct arylation of 5-diazobarbituric acids with arenes, allowing straightforward access to 5-aryl barbituric acids. Free N-H groups are tolerated on the barbituric acid, with no complications arising from N-H insertion processes. This method was applied to the concise synthesis of a potent matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) inhibitor. © 2015 The Authors. Published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

  6. Ionic Liquids as Solvents for Rhodium and Platinum Catalysts Used in Hydrosilylation Reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Witold Zielinski

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available A group of imidazolium and pyridinium based ionic liquids has been synthetized, and their ability to dissolve and activate the catalysts used in hydrosilylation reaction of 1-octane and 1,1,1,3,5,5,5-heptamethyltrisiloxane was investigated. An organometallic catalyst as well as inorganic complexes of platinum and rhodium dissolved in ionic liquids were used, forming liquid solutions not miscible with the substrates or with the products of the reaction. The results show that application of such a simple biphasic catalytic system enables reuse of ionic liquid phase with catalysts in multiple reaction cycles reducing the costs and decreasing the amount of catalyst needed per mole of product.

  7. Highly enantioselective rhodium(I)-catalyzed carbonyl carboacylations initiated by C-C bond activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souillart, Laetitia; Cramer, Nicolai

    2014-09-01

    The lactone motif is ubiquitous in natural products and pharmaceuticals. The Tishchenko disproportionation of two aldehydes, a carbonyl hydroacylation, is an efficient and atom-economic access to lactones. However, these reaction types are limited to the transfer of a hydride to the accepting carbonyl group. The transfer of alkyl groups enabling the formation of CC bonds during the ester formation would be of significant interest. Reported herein is such asymmetric carbonyl carboacylation of aldehydes and ketones, thus affording complex bicyclic lactones in excellent enantioselectivities. The rhodium(I)-catalyzed transformation is induced by an enantiotopic CC bond activation of a cyclobutanone and the formed rhodacyclic intermediate reacts with aldehyde or ketone groups to give highly functionalized lactones. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Activation of heterogenised rhodium carbonylation catalyst infrared spectroscopic study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scurrell, M S

    1977-01-01

    In a study related to heterogeneous versions of homogeneous catalysts active in carbonylation of methanol to acetic acid, the catalyst consisted of 1Vertical Bar3< rhodium as rhodium trichloride supported on 13X zeolite and evacuated at 437/sup 0/K. Contacting the catalyst with carbon monoxide caused two bands, at 2025 and 2095 cm/sup -1/, to appear. Contact with a mixture of carbon monoxide and methyl iodide (the usual promoter) caused bands at 2085, 1710, 1440, and 1370 cm/sup -1/ to appear; the first two correspond to the bands at 2062 and 1711 cm/sup -1/ in homogeneous catalysts attributed to the formation of Rh(CH/sup 3/CO)(CO)X/sup 2/I/sup -/. Spectra.

  9. Bioenvironmental aspects of europium and rhodium: a selected bibliography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fore, C.S.; Carrier, R.F.; Talmage, S.S.; Fielden, J.M.; Daniel, E.W.

    1983-09-01

    This bibliography of 428 abstracted references represents a summary of the domestic and foreign literature relevant to the biological and environmental aspects of europium and rhodium. The collected data are organized by current NAEG interests - research highlighting inventory and distribution of the radionulcides, ecological studies covering terrestrial and aquatic systems, and biological studies in both man and animals. Studies that focus directly on research conducted at specific sites (e.g., the Nevada Test Site) are emphasized throughout the bibliography

  10. Arylation of Rhodium(II) Azavinyl Carbenes with Boronic Acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selander, Nicklas; Worrell, Brady T.; Chuprakov, Stepan; Velaparthi, Subash; Fokin, Valery V.

    2013-01-01

    A highly efficient and stereoselective arylation of in situ generated azavinyl carbenes affording 2,2-diaryl enamines at ambient temperatures has been developed. These transition metal carbenes are directly produced from readily available and stable 1-sulfonyl-1,2,3-triazoles in the presence of a rhodium carboxylate catalyst. In several cases, the enamines generated in this reaction can be cyclized into substituted indoles employing copper catalysts. PMID:22913576

  11. Rhodium(II)-catalyzed enantioselective synthesis of troponoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murarka, Sandip; Jia, Zhi-Jun; Merten, Christian; Daniliuc, Constantin-G; Antonchick, Andrey P; Waldmann, Herbert

    2015-06-22

    We report a rhodium(II)-catalyzed highly enantioselective 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition reaction between the carbonyl moiety of tropone and carbonyl ylides to afford troponoids in good to high yields with excellent enantioselectivity. We demonstrate that α-diazoketone-derived carbonyl ylides, in contrast to carbonyl ylides derived from diazodiketoesters, undergo [6+3] cycloaddition reactions with tropone to yield the corresponding bridged heterocycles with excellent stereoselectivity. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Inter-diffusion study of rhodium and tantalum by RBS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuttens, V.E.; Hubert, R.L.; Bodart, F.; Lucas, S.

    2005-01-01

    The inter-diffusion of rhodium and tantalum has been studied with the goal of synthesizing an alloy acting as a diffusion barrier for high temperature applications. Rh/Ta sandwiched samples were annealed in vacuum at temperature ranging from 800 to 900 deg. C and from 1000 to 1075 deg. C. The diffusion profiles were obtained by RBS. They suggest the formation of two clearly different phases in each temperature range considered

  13. Rhodium coated mirrors deposited by magnetron sputtering for fusion applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marot, L.; De Temmerman, G.; Oelhafen, P.; Covarel, G.; Litnovsky, A.

    2007-01-01

    Metallic mirrors will be essential components of all optical spectroscopy and imaging systems for ITER plasma diagnostics. Any change in the mirror performance, in particular, its reflectivity, due to erosion of the surface by charge exchange neutrals or deposition of impurities will influence the quality and reliability of the detected signals. Due to its high reflectivity in the visible wavelength range and its low sputtering yield, rhodium appears as an attractive material for first mirrors in ITER. However, the very high price of the raw material calls for using it in the form of a film deposited onto metallic substrates. The development of a reliable technique for the preparation of high reflectivity rhodium films is therefore of the highest importance. Rhodium layers with thicknesses of up to 2 μm were produced on different substrates of interest (Mo, stainless steel, Cu) by magnetron sputtering. Produced films exhibit a low roughness and crystallite size of about 10 nm with a dense columnar structure. No impurities were detected on the surface after deposition. Scratch tests demonstrate that adhesion properties increase with substrate hardness. Detailed optical characterizations of Rh-coated mirrors as well as results of erosion tests performed both under laboratory conditions and in the TEXTOR tokamak are presented in this paper

  14. Electrochemical Sensor Based on Rh(III) Ion-Imprinted Polymer as a New Modifying Agent for Rhodium Determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Huiping; Xiong, Caiyun; Wang, Chunqiong; Liu, Peng; Dong, Su; Cao, Qiue

    2018-05-01

    A rhodium (III) ion carbon paste electrode (CPE) based on an ion imprinted polymer (IIP) as a new modifying agent has been prepared and studied. Rh(III) ion imprinted polymer was synthesized by copolymerization of acrylamide-Rh(III) complex and ethylene glycol dimethacrylate according to the precipitation polymerization. Acrylamide acted as both functional monomer and complexing agent to create selective coordination sites in a cross-linked polymer. The ion imprinted carbon paste electrode (IIP-CPE) was prepared by mixing rhodium IIP-nanoparticles and graphite powder in n-eicosane as an adhesive and then embedding them in a Teflon tube. Amperometric i-t curve method was applied as the determination technique. Several parameters, including the functional monomer, molar ratio of template, monomer and cross-linking agent, the amounts of IIP, the applied potential, the buffer solution and pH have been studied. According to the results, IIP-CPE showed a considerably higher response in comparison with the electrode embedded with non-imprinted polymer (NIP), indicating the formation of suitable recognition sites in the IIP structure during the polymerization stage. The introduced electrode showed a linear range of 1.00×10-8~3.0×10-5 mol·L-1 and detection limit of 6.0 nmol L-1 (S/N = 3). The IIP-CPE was successfully applied for the trace rhodium determination in catalyst and plant samples with RSD of less than 3.3% (n = 5) and recoveries in the range of 95.5~102.5%.

  15. A Rhodium(III)-Based Inhibitor of Lysine-Specific Histone Demethylase 1 as an Epigenetic Modulator in Prostate Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chao; Wang, Wanhe; Liang, Jia-Xin; Li, Guodong; Vellaisamy, Kasipandi; Wong, Chun-Yuen; Ma, Dik-Lung; Leung, Chung-Hang

    2017-03-23

    We report herein a novel rhodium(III) complex 1 as a new LSD1 targeting agent and epigenetic modulator. Complex 1 disrupted the interaction of LSD1-H3K4me2 in human prostate carcinoma cells and enhanced the amplification of p21, FOXA2, and BMP2 gene promoters. Complex 1 was selective for LSD1 over other histone demethylases, such as KDM2b, KDM7, and MAO activities, and also showed antiproliferative activity toward human cancer cells. To date, complex 1 is the first metal-based inhibitor of LSD1 activity.

  16. Electrochemical behavior of rhodium(III) in 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride ionic liquid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jayakumar, M.; Venkatesan, K.A. [Fuel Chemistry Division, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603102 (India); Srinivasan, T.G. [Fuel Chemistry Division, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603102 (India)], E-mail: tgs@igcar.gov.in

    2008-02-15

    Electrochemical behavior of rhodium(III) chloride in 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride was investigated by various electrochemical transient techniques at glassy carbon working electrode at different temperatures (343-373 K). Cyclic voltammogram of rhodium(III) in bmimCl consisted of a surge in reduction current occurring at a potential of -0.48 V (vs. Pd) is due to the reduction of Rh(III) to metallic rhodium and a very small oxidation wave occurring at -0.1 V. Increase of scan rate increases the peak current and remarkably shifts the cathodic peak potential (E{sub p}{sup c1}) in negative direction indicating the irreversibility of electroreduction of rhodium(III). The diffusion coefficient of rhodium(III) in bmimCl ({approx}10{sup -9} cm{sup 2}/s) was determined and the energy of activation ({approx}25 kJ/mol) was deduced from cyclic voltammograms at various temperatures. The cathodic ({tau}{sub r}) and anodic ({tau}{sub o}) transition times were measured from chronopotential transients and the ratio {tau}{sub o}/{tau}{sub r} was found to be 1:7. Electrowinning of rhodium from bmimCl medium results in a deposition of metallic rhodium with lower (20-25%) Faradaic efficiency. A separation factor of rhodium from co-existing noble metal fission product palladium in bmimCl was determined during electrodeposition.

  17. Inhibiting prolyl isomerase activity by hybrid organic-inorganic molecules containing rhodium(II) fragments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coughlin, Jane M; Kundu, Rituparna; Cooper, Julian C; Ball, Zachary T

    2014-11-15

    A small molecule containing a rhodium(II) tetracarboxylate fragment is shown to be a potent inhibitor of the prolyl isomerase FKBP12. The use of small molecules conjugates of rhodium(II) is presented as a general strategy for developing new protein inhibitors based on distinct structural and sequence features of the enzyme active site. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Energetic driving force of H spillover between rhodium and titania surfaces : a DFT view

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Conradie, J.; Gracia, J.; Niemantsverdriet, J.W.

    2012-01-01

    Hydrogen spillover from a rhodium particle, over the most stable (111) surface, to a TiO2 rutile support occurs at low hydrogen coverage because the adsorption energy of H atoms at low hydrogen coverage on rutile is larger than that on rhodium. H diffuses over the support with an activation barrier

  19. "On-water" rhodium-catalysed hydroformylation for the production of linear alcohols

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diebolt, O.H.; Müller, Christian; Vogt, D.

    2012-01-01

    Optimisation of the reaction conditions for the rhodium-catalysed aldehyde hydrogenation under hydroformylation conditions showed that water used as co-solvent enhances both rate and selectivity towards primary alcohols. One-pot hydroformylation–hydrogenation using rhodium as the only transition

  20. Immobilized enzymes and cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bucke, C; Wiseman, A

    1981-04-04

    This article reviews the current state of the art of enzyme and cell immobilization and suggests advances which might be made during the 1980's. Current uses of immobilized enzymes include the use of glucoamylase in the production of glucose syrups from starch and glucose isomerase in the production of high fructose corn syrup. Possibilities for future uses of immobilized enzymes and cells include the utilization of whey and the production of ethanol.

  1. Amperometric immunosensor for {alpha}-fetoprotein antigen in human serum based on co-immobilizing dinuclear copper complex and gold nanoparticle doped chitosan film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gan Ning; Meng Linghua; Wang Feng [State Key Laboratory Base of Novel Functional Materials and Preparation science, Faculty of Material Science and Chemical Engineering of Ninbo University, Ningbo, 315211 (China)], E-mail: ganning@nbu.edu.cn

    2009-09-01

    A sensitive amperometric immunosensor for {alpha}-fetoprotein (AFP), a tumor marker for the diagnosis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), was constructed, The immunosensor is prepared by co-immobilizing [Cu{sub 2}(phen){sub 2}Cl{sub 2}] ({mu}-Cl){sub 2} (CuL), nano-Au/Chitosan(Chit) composite, horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and AFP antibody(anti-AFP) on a glassy carbon electrode (GCE). Firstly, CuL was irreversibly absorb on GCE electrode through {pi}-{pi} stacking interaction; then nano-Au/Chit composite was immobilized onto the electrode because of its excellent membrane-forming ability, finally HRP and anti-AFP was adsorbed onto the surface of the gold nanoparticles to construct GCE | CuL/nanoAu-chit/HRP/anti-AFP immunosensor. The preparation procedure of the electrode was characterized by electrochemical and spectroscopy method. The results showed that this immunosensor exhibited an excellent electrocatalytic response to the reduction of hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) without the aid of an electron mediator, offers a high-sensitivity (1710 nA {center_dot} ng{sup -1} {center_dot} ml{sup -1}) for the detection of AFP and has good correlation for detection of AFP in the range of 0.2 to 120.0 ng/ml with a detection limit of 0.05 ng/ml. The biosensor showed high selectivity as well as good stability and reproductivity.

  2. Free Rhodium (II) citrate and rhodium (II) citrate magnetic carriers as potential strategies for breast cancer therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Rhodium (II) citrate (Rh2(H2cit)4) has significant antitumor, cytotoxic, and cytostatic activity on Ehrlich ascite tumor. Although toxic to normal cells, its lower toxicity when compared to carboxylate analogues of rhodium (II) indicates Rh2(H2cit)4 as a promising agent for chemotherapy. Nevertheless, few studies have been performed to explore this potential. Superparamagnetic particles of iron oxide (SPIOs) represent an attractive platform as carriers in drug delivery systems (DDS) because they can present greater specificity to tumor cells than normal cells. Thus, the association between Rh2(H2cit)4 and SPIOs can represent a strategy to enhance the former's therapeutic action. In this work, we report the cytotoxicity of free rhodium (II) citrate (Rh2(H2cit)4) and rhodium (II) citrate-loaded maghemite nanoparticles or magnetoliposomes, used as drug delivery systems, on both normal and carcinoma breast cell cultures. Results Treatment with free Rh2(H2cit)4 induced cytotoxicity that was dependent on dose, time, and cell line. The IC50 values showed that this effect was more intense on breast normal cells (MCF-10A) than on breast carcinoma cells (MCF-7 and 4T1). However, the treatment with 50 μM Rh2(H2cit)4-loaded maghemite nanoparticles (Magh-Rh2(H2cit)4) and Rh2(H2cit)4-loaded magnetoliposomes (Lip-Magh-Rh2(H2cit)4) induced a higher cytotoxicity on MCF-7 and 4T1 than on MCF-10A (p rhodium (II) citrate-loaded maghemite nanoparticles and magnetoliposomes induced more specific cytotoxicity on breast carcinoma cells than on breast normal cells, which is the opposite of the results observed with free Rh2(H2cit)4 treatment. Thus, magnetic nanoparticles represent an attractive platform as carriers in Rh2(H2cit)4 delivery systems, since they can act preferentially in tumor cells. Therefore, these nanopaticulate systems may be explored as a potential tool for chemotherapy drug development. PMID:21443799

  3. An Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure Study of Rhodium-Oxygen Bonds in a Highly Dispersed Rhodium/Aluminum Oxide Catalyst

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koningsberger, D.C.; Zon, J.B.A.D. van; Blik, H.F.J. van 't; Visser, G.J.; Prins, R.; Mansour, A.N.; Sayers, D.E.; Short, D.R.

    1985-01-01

    Analysis of in situ EXAFS measurements on a 2.4 wt % Rh/A120, catalyst, reduced at 473 K after calcination at 623 K, shows the presence of two different rhodium-oxygen bonds (viz. 2.05 and 2.68 A). The oxygen neighbors of rhodium at a distance of 2.05 A disappear after reduction at 673 K. The

  4. Immobilized waste leaching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suarez, A.A.

    1989-01-01

    The main mechanism by which the immobilized radioactive materials can return to biosphere is the leaching due to the intrusion of water into the repositories. Some mathematical models and experiments utilized to evaluate the leaching rates in different immobilization matrices are described. (author) [pt

  5. Exploration of the potential of complex fluids and liquid mineral crystals as templates for obtaining meso-porous monoliths for actinides immobilization; Exploration du potentiel de fluides complexes et cristaux liquides mineraux comme templates pour l'obtention de monolithes mesoporeux pour l'immobilisation d'actinides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guiot, C. [Montpellier-2 Univ., 34 (France)]|[CEA Valrho, Lab. de Chimie des Actinides (LCA), 30 - Marcoule (France)

    2006-07-01

    In the framework of generation IV reactors, the implementation of a closed cycle involves a grouped management of actinides, as well as their united insertion in a new fuel material. The researches carried out for the main variant of fuel cycle are then centred on the synthesis of a material allowing to immobilize these radioelements in an ordered way inside a solid phase of known composition and structure, and in which they have to be dispersed in an homogeneous way. In this work, is considered the study of the synthesis of innovating materials by a molecular engineering approach. The aim is to explore the properties of matrices based on complex mineral fluids for actinides immobilization, to study the confinement potential of these new mineral liquid crystal phases and to understand their interaction with the actinides. (O.M.)

  6. The fission products palladium and rhodium: Their state in solutions, their behavior in the regeneration of fuel of atomic power stations, and the search for selective extraction techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arseenkov, L.V.; Zakharkin, B.S.; Lunichkina, K.P.; Renard, E.V.; Rogozhkin, V.Yu.; Shorokhov, N.A.

    1992-01-01

    At the present time many research centers are working on the extraction of noble metals in the form of fission fragments. Consistent data has been obtained on the mass accumulation of noble metals in various forms of processed nuclear fuel. Requirements are noted that must be met for obtaining industrial and economic efficiency in the extraction of noble metals by the Purex process. Presently there is a lack of information on the extraction of noble metals from spent fuel, particularly as far as the nitric acid media of the Purex process are concerned. The authors will discuss individual test observations on simulating systems and real systems with noble metals. The investigations focused on the noble metals of lowest radioactivity, namely palladium and rhodium. The complexity of the chemistry of ruthenium, on the one hand, and the possible selective, clearing distillation of ruthenium tetroxide from nitric acid solutions, on the other hand, make it necessary to focus the attention on the unresolved problems of the extraction of palladium and rhodium. The article further includes discussion on the following topics: noble metals in solutions of purex process, electrochemical operations involving noble metals, extraction systems for rhodium and palladium, separation of palladium from real solutions

  7. Industrial tests of rhodium self-powered detectors: the Golfech 2 experimentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mourlevat, J.L.; Janvier, D.; Warren, H.D.

    2000-01-01

    In co-operation with Electricite de France (EDF), FRAMATOME has been testing two in-core strings which are equipped with rhodium self-powered detectors (SPDs) in the Golfech Unit 2 reactor (1300 MW, 4L plant) since August 1997. The rhodium SPDs and the strings which support them were designed and built by the US FRAMATOME subsidiary FRAMATOME-COGEMA-FUEL (FCF). The rhodium signals and some other plant parameters are acquired through the use of a specific device designed by the CEA (Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique) and are processed off-line by FRAMATOME. This demonstration test is planned to last until mid-2000. The following presentation is focused on the results obtained during the first demonstration cycle (from 08/97 to 12/98). The tests that have been conducted consist of checking the rhodium depletion and of comparing the rhodium signals to the movable probes. In order to compensate for the delay in the rhodium signals, a deconvolution algorithm has also been tested. Up to now, the results are very satisfactory and a future large scale industrial application is being discussed with the EDF. The main objective of the next experimentation phase is to test - under industrial conditions - a prototype of an on-line monitoring unit known as the Partial In-Core Monitoring System (PIMS). This system will include 16 rhodium in-core strings and will use an on-line 3-D core model. (authors)

  8. Methane Steam Reforming Kinetics for a Rhodium-Based Catalyst

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Jon Geest; Jakobsen, M.; Chorkendorff, Ib

    2010-01-01

    Methane steam reforming is the key reaction to produce synthesis gas and hydrogen at the industrial scale. Here the kinetics of methane steam reforming over a rhodium-based catalyst is investigated in the temperature range 500-800 A degrees C and as a function of CH4, H2O and H-2 partial pressures....... The methane steam reforming reaction cannot be modeled without taking CO and H coverages into account. This is especially important at low temperatures and higher partial pressures of CO and H-2. For methane CO2 reforming experiments, it is also necessary to consider the repulsive interaction of CO...

  9. Hydrogen adsorption on skeletal rhodium-tantalum electrodes-catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsinstevich, V.M.; Krejnina, N.M.

    1975-01-01

    Skeleton rhodium-tantalic catalyst electrodes with a tantalum mass percentage of 0 to 100 have been obtained by the methodology of Crupp and others. The hydrogen adsorption is studied through the method of removing the galvano-static and potentiodynamic curves of charging in sulfuric acid and potassium hydroxide. It has been discovered that the maximum adsorption ability relatively to the hydrogen can be observed in an alloy with a 5% tantalum contents. The energetic characteristics of the alloys are higher in alkali than in acid

  10. Rhodium in car exhaust tips by total automatic activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grass, F.; Westphal, G.P.; Lemmel, H.; Sterba, J.

    2007-01-01

    Exhaust systems of modern cars contain catalysts for the reduction of CO, NO x and hydrocarbons. These catalysts are made of ceramic materials with a large surface on which platinum metals catalyse the oxidation. The catalysts contain approximately 2 g of platinum and 0.4 g of rhodium. Recently platinum is being replaced by palladium. During driving the platinum-group elements (PGEs) are expelled from the tip in fine particles and are deposited in the environment. For a projected study of emissions from cars driven on streets and highways it is important to know which elements can be measured by short time activation analysis without any chemical procedure. (author)

  11. Plutonium Disposition by Immobilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gould, T.; DiSabatino, A.; Mitchell, M.

    2000-01-01

    The ultimate goal of the Department of Energy (DOE) Immobilization Project is to develop, construct, and operate facilities that will immobilize between 17 to 50 tonnes (MT) of U.S. surplus weapons-usable plutonium materials in waste forms that meet the ''spent fuel'' standard and are acceptable for disposal in a geologic repository. Using the ceramic can-in-canister technology selected for immobilization, surplus plutonium materials will be chemically combined into ceramic forms which will be encapsulated within large canisters of high level waste (HLW) glass. Deployment of the immobilization capability should occur by 2008 and be completed within 10 years. In support of this goal, the DOE Office of Fissile Materials Disposition (MD) is conducting development and testing (D and T) activities at four DOE laboratories under the technical leadership of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The Savannah River Site has been selected as the site for the planned Plutonium Immobilization Plant (PIP). The D and T effort, now in its third year, will establish the technical bases for the design, construction, and operation of the U. S. capability to immobilize surplus plutonium in a suitable and cost-effective manner. Based on the D and T effort and on the development of a conceptual design of the PIP, automation is expected to play a key role in the design and operation of the Immobilization Plant. Automation and remote handling are needed to achieve required dose reduction and to enhance operational efficiency

  12. Synthetic murataite-3C, a complex form for long-term immobilization of nuclear waste. Crystal structure and its comparison with natural analogues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pakhomova, Anna S.; Krivovichev, Sergey V. [St. Petersburg State Univ. (Russian Federation). Dept. of Crystallography; Yudintsev, Sergey V. [Institute of Geology of Ore Deposits, Petrography, Mineralogy and Geochemistry, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Stefanovsky, Sergey V. [MosNPO Radon, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2013-03-01

    The structure of synthetic murataite-3C intended for long-term immobilization of high-level radioactive waste has been solved using crystals prepared by melting in an electric furnace at 1500 C. The material is cubic, F- anti 43m, a = 14.676(15) A, V = 3161.31(57) A{sup 3}. The structure is based upon a three-dimensional framework consisting of {alpha}-Keggin [Al{sup [4]}Ti{sub 12}{sup [6]}O{sub 40}] clusters linked by sharing the O5 atoms. The Keggin-cluster-framework interpenetrates with the metal-oxide substructure that can be considered as a derivative of the fluorite structure. The crystal chemical formula of synthetic murataite-3C derived from the obtained structure model can be written as {sup [8]}Ca{sub 6}{sup [8]}Ca{sub 4}{sup [6]}Ti{sub 12}{sup [5]}Ti{sub 4}{sup [4]}AlO{sub 42}. Its comparison with the natural murataite shows that the synthetic material has a noticeably less number of vacancies in the cation substructure and contains five instead of four symmetrically independent cation positions. The presence of the additional site essentially increases the capacity of synthetic murataite with respect to large heavy cations such as actinides, rare earth and alkaline earth metals in comparison with the material of natural origin. (orig.)

  13. Electrochemical behavior of ruthenium (III), rhodium (III) and palladium (II) in 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride ionic liquid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jayakumar, M.; Venkatesan, K.A. [Fuel Chemistry Division, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603102 (India); Srinivasan, T.G. [Fuel Chemistry Division, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603102 (India)], E-mail: tgs@igcar.gov.in; Vasudeva Rao, P.R. [Fuel Chemistry Division, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603102 (India)

    2009-11-01

    Electrochemical behavior of ruthenium (III), rhodium (III) and palladium (II) in 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride (bmimCl) and their ternary and binary solutions in bmimCl was studied at various working electrodes at 373 K by cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometry. Ruthenium (III) chloride forms a stable solution with bmimCl and the cyclic voltammogram of ruthenium (III) in bmimCl recorded at glassy carbon electrode consisted of several redox waves due to the complex nature of ruthenium to exist in several oxidation states. Electrolysis of ruthenium (III) chloride in bmimCl at the cathodic limit of bmimCl (-1.8 V (vs. Pd)) did not result in ruthenium metal deposition. However, it was deposited from bmimPF{sub 6} and bmimNTf{sub 2} room temperature ionic liquids at -0.8 V (vs. Pd). The electrochemical behavior of ruthenium (III) in bmimCl in the presence of palladium (II) and rhodium (III) was studied by cyclic voltammetry. The presence of palladium (II) in bmimCl favors underpotential deposition of ruthenium metal. The nuclear loop at -0.5 V (vs. Pd) was observed in all solutions when palladium (II) co-existed with other two metal ions. Nucleation and growth of the metal on glassy carbon working electrode was investigated by chronoamperometry. The growth and decay of chronocurrents has been found to follow the instantaneous nucleation model with three-dimensional growth of nuclei.

  14. An operando FTIR spectroscopic and kinetic study of carbon monoxide pressure influence on rhodium-catalyzed olefin hydroformylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubis, Christoph; Sawall, Mathias; Block, Axel; Neymeyr, Klaus; Ludwig, Ralf; Börner, Armin; Selent, Detlef

    2014-09-08

    The influence of carbon monoxide concentration on the kinetics of the hydroformylation of 3,3-dimethyl-1-butene with a phosphite-modified rhodium catalyst has been studied for the pressure range p(CO)=0.20-3.83 MPa. Highly resolved time-dependent concentration profiles of the organometallic intermediates were derived from IR spectroscopic data collected in situ for the entire olefin-conversion range. The dynamics of the catalyst and organic components are described by enzyme-type kinetics with competitive and uncompetitive inhibition reactions involving carbon monoxide taken into account. Saturation of the alkyl-rhodium intermediates with carbon monoxide as a cosubstrate occurs between 1.5 and 2 MPa of carbon monoxide pressure, which brings about a convergence of aldehyde regioselectivity. Hydrogenolysis of the acyl intermediate is fast at 30 °C and low pressure of p(CO)=0.2 MPa, but is of minus first order with respect to the solution concentration of carbon monoxide. Resting 18-electron hydrido and acyl complexes that correspond to early and late rate-determining states, respectively, coexist as long as the conversion of the substrate is not complete. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. A density functional theory study of the electronic properties of Os(II) and Os(III) complexes immobilized on Au(111)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O'Boyle, N.M.; Albrecht, Tim; Murgida, D.H.

    2007-01-01

    We present a density functional theory (DFT) study of an osmium polypyridyl complex adsorbed on Au(111). The osmium polypyridyl complex [Os(bpy)(2)(P0P)Cl](n+) [bpy is 2,2'-bipyridine, P0P is 4,4'-bipyridine, n = 1 for osmium(II), and n = 2 for osmium(III)] is bound to the surface through the fre...

  16. Rhodium-Catalyzed Enantioselective Cyclopropanation of Olefins with N-Sulfonyl 1,2,3-Triazoles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuprakov, Stepan; Kwok, Sen Wai; Zhang, Li; Lercher, Lukas; Fokin, Valery V.

    2009-01-01

    N-Sulfonyl 1,2,3-triazoles readily form rhodium(II) azavinyl carbenes, which react with olefins to produce cyclopropanes with excellent diastereo- and enantioselectivity and in high yield. PMID:19928917

  17. First-principles study of hydrogen diffusion in transition metal Rhodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bao, Wulijibilige; Cui, Xin; Wang, Zhi-Ping

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the diffuse pattern and path of hydrogen in transition metal rhodium are investigated by the first-principles calculations. Density functional theory is used to calculate the system energies of hydrogen atom occupying different positions in rhodium crystal lattice. The results indicate that the most stable position of hydrogen atom in rhodium crystal lattice locates at the octahedral interstice, and the tetrahedral interstice is the second stable site. The activation barrier energy for the diffusion of atomic hydrogen in transition metal rhodium is quantified by determining the most favorable path, i.e., the minimum-energy pathway for diffusion, that is the indirect octahedral-tetrahedral-octahedral (O-T-O) pathway, and the activation energy is 0.8345eV

  18. Rhodium-catalyzed Chemo- and Regioselective Cross-dimerization of Two Terminal Alkynes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Hua-Dong; Zhang, Ren-Wei; Li, Xiaoxun; Huang, Suyu; Tang, Weiping; Hu, Wen-Hao

    2013-01-01

    Cross-dimerization of terminal arylacetylenes and terminal propargylic alcohols/amides has been achieved in the effect of a rhodium catalyst. This method features high chemo- and regioselectivities rendering convenient and atom economical access to functionalized enynes. PMID:23356993

  19. Crystal structures of fac-tri?chlorido?tris?(tri?methyl?phosphane-?P)rhodium(III) monohydrate and fac-tri?chlorido?tris?(tri?methyl?phosphane-?P)rhodium(III) methanol hemisolvate: rhodium structures that are isotypic with their iridium analogs

    OpenAIRE

    Merola, Joseph S.; Franks, Marion A.

    2015-01-01

    The crystal structures of two solvates of fac-tri-chlorido-tris-(tri-methyl-phosphane-κP)rhodium(III) are reported, i.e. one with water in the crystal lattice, fac-[RhCl3(Me3P)3]·H2O, and one with methanol in the crystal lattice, fac-[RhCl3(Me3P)3]·0.5CH3OH. These rhodium compounds exhibit distorted octahedral coordination spheres at the metal and are isotypic with the analogous iridium compounds previously reported by us [Merola et al. (2013 ▶). Polyhedron, 54, 67-73]. Comparison is made bet...

  20. Synthesis and Characterization of Magnetic Carriers Based on Immobilized Enzyme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, F. H.; Tang, N.; Wang, Y. Q.; Zhang, L.; Du, W.; Xiang, J.; Cheng, P. G.

    2018-05-01

    Several new types of carriers and technologies have been implemented to improve traditional enzyme immobilization in industrial biotechnology. The magnetic immobilized enzyme is a kind of new method of enzyme immobilization developed in recent years. An external magnetic field can be used to control the motion mode and direction of immobilized enzyme, and to improve the catalytic efficiency of immobilized enzyme. In this paper, Fe3O4-CaCO3-PDA complex and CaCO3/Fe3O4 composite modified by PEI were prepared. The results show that the morphology of Fe3O4-CaCO3-PDA complex formation is irregular, while the morphology of CaCO3/Fe3O4 composite modified by PEI is regular and has a porous structure.

  1. Modifiers in rhodium catalysts for carbon monoxide hydrogenation: Structure-activity relationships

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhore, N. A.

    1989-05-01

    This report is aimed at identifying interesting modified rhodium systems and elucidating structure-activity relationships in these systems with the overall goal of understanding the scientific issues in the catalytic conversion of syngas to oxygenates. Specific additives (sodium and molybdenum) are selected based on the scoping experiments. The effect of the additives on supported rhodium catalysts is then investigated. Throughout the investigation, experiments and analysis were performed on real systems instead of ideal systems. 374 refs., 82 figs., 57 tabs.

  2. Rhodium-Catalyzed Linear Codimerization and Cycloaddition of Ketenes with Alkynes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teruyuki Kondo

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available A novel rhodium-catalyzed linear codimerization of alkyl phenyl ketenes with internal alkynes to dienones and a novel synthesis of furans by an unusual cycloaddition of diaryl ketenes with internal alkynes have been developed. These reactions proceed smoothly with the same rhodium catalyst, RhCl(PPh33, and are highly dependent on the structure and reactivity of the starting ketenes.

  3. The effects of primary beam filters on the analysis of rhodium and cadmium using a rhodium target x-ray tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anzelmo, J.A.; Boyer, B.W.

    1986-01-01

    Since its introduction in 1964, the thin end-window rhodium target x-ray tube has been considered to be an excellent general purpose source of excitation. Heavy elements are efficiently excited by high Bremsstrahlung and the K lines of rhodium while the light elements are excited by the L lines of rhodium. The ability to efficiently excite both heavy and light elements is essential to special applications such as auto catalysts, which are composed of precious metals in a clay-like matrix. Close control of the light elements, including sodium, phosphorous, aluminum and silicon, and the heavy element precious metals, such as rhodium, are necessary to keep operating characteristics and manufacturing expense at desired levels. A quick survey of typical x-ray tube targets shows that some targets are more efficient for light elements while others are more efficient for heavy elements. The few general purpose x-ray tubes that are available have characteristic lines which overlap on elements to be determined. The rhodium target, which is a good excitation source for most of the elements mentioned, contains line overlaps on cadmium (RHKB) and rhodium (RHKA). When using a sequential wavelength dispersive XRF spectrometer, the characteristic lines of the tube scattered from the sample can be removed by a programmable primary beam filter having an absorption edge just higher in wavelength than the wavelengths to be removed. The thickness and composition of the filter, as well as the choice of KV and MA, will determine the operating parameter necessary to achieve the optimum precision and lowest limits of detection. For this study, synthetic samples are made up using Kaolin as the matrix

  4. New La(III) complex immobilized on 3-aminopropyl-functionalized silica as an efficient and reusable catalyst for hydrolysis of phosphate ester bonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muxel, Alfredo A; Neves, Ademir; Camargo, Maryene A; Bortoluzzi, Adailton J; Szpoganicz, Bruno; Castellano, Eduardo E; Castilho, Nathalia; Bortolotto, Tiago; Terenzi, Hernán

    2014-03-17

    Described herein is the synthesis, structure, and monoesterase and diesterase activities of a new mononuclear [La(III)(L(1))(NO3)2] (1) complex (H2L(1) = 2-bis[{(2-pyridylmethyl)-aminomethyl}-6-[N-(2-pyridylmethyl) aminomethyl)])-4-methyl-6-formylphenol) in the hydrolysis of 2,4-bis(dinitrophenyl)phosphate (2,4-BDNPP). When covalently linked to 3-aminopropyl-functionalized silica, 1 undergoes disproportionation to form a dinuclear species (APS-1), whose catalytic efficiency is increased when compared to the homogeneous reaction due to second coordination sphere effects which increase the substrate to complex association constant. The anchored catalyst APS-1 can be recovered and reused for subsequent hydrolysis reactions (five times) with only a slight loss in activity. In the presence of DNA, we suggest that 1 is also converted into the dinuclear active species as observed with APS-1, and both were shown to be efficient in DNA cleavage.

  5. Immobilization of microorganisms. Part 1. Preparation of immobilized Lactobacillus bulgaricus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, K H

    1981-01-01

    The immobilization of Lactobacillus bulgaricus on polyacrylamide and on alginate beads was investigated. The most active immobilized cells were obtained by entrapment in Ca alginate beads. These immobilized microbial cells, when introduced into 4.5% lactose solution and whey solution showed maximum relative activity of 28% for lactose and 18% for whey compared to free cells.

  6. Rhodium/chiral diene-catalyzed asymmetric 1,4-addition of arylboronic acids to chromones: a highly enantioselective pathway for accessing chiral flavanones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Qijie; So, Chau Ming; Bian, Zhaoxiang; Hayashi, Tamio; Wang, Jun

    2015-03-01

    Chromone has been noted to be one of the most challenging substrates in the asymmetric 1,4-addition of α,β-unsaturated carbonyl compounds. By employing the rhodium complex associated with a chiral diene ligand, (R,R)-Ph-bod*, the 1,4-addition of a variety of arylboronic acids was realized to give high yields of the corresponding flavanones with excellent enantioselectivities (≥97% ee, 99% ee for most substrates). Ring-opening side products, which would lead to erosion of product enantioselectivity, were not observed under the stated reaction conditions. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Limb immobilization and corticobasal syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graff-Radford, Jonathan; Boeve, Bradley F; Drubach, Daniel A; Knopman, David S; Ahlskog, J Eric; Golden, Erin C; Drubach, Dina I; Petersen, Ronald C; Josephs, Keith A

    2012-12-01

    Recently, we evaluated two patients with corticobasal syndrome (CBS) who reported symptom onset after limb immobilization. Our objective was to investigate the association between trauma, immobilization and CBS. The charts of forty-four consecutive CBS patients seen in the Mayo Clinic Alzheimer Disease Research Center were reviewed with attention to trauma and limb immobilization. 10 CBS patients (23%) had immobilization or trauma on the most affected limb preceding the onset or acceleration of symptoms. The median age at onset was 61. Six patients manifested their first symptoms after immobilization from surgery or fracture with one after leg trauma. Four patients had pre-existing symptoms of limb dysfunction but significantly worsened after immobilization or surgery. 23 percent of patients had immobilization or trauma of the affected limb. This might have implications for management of CBS, for avoiding injury, limiting immobilization and increasing movement in the affected limb. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Insights into finding a mismatch through the structure of a mispaired DNA bound by a rhodium intercalator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierre, Valérie C.; Kaiser, Jens T.; Barton, Jacqueline K.

    2007-01-01

    We report the 1.1-Å resolution crystal structure of a bulky rhodium complex bound to two different DNA sites, mismatched and matched in the oligonucleotide 5′-(dCGGAAATTCCCG)2-3′. At the AC mismatch site, the structure reveals ligand insertion from the minor groove with ejection of both mismatched bases and elucidates how destabilized mispairs in DNA may be recognized. This unique binding mode contrasts with major groove intercalation, observed at a matched site, where doubling of the base pair rise accommodates stacking of the intercalator. Mass spectral analysis reveals different photocleavage products associated with the two binding modes in the crystal, with only products characteristic of mismatch binding in solution. This structure, illustrating two clearly distinct binding modes for a molecule with DNA, provides a rationale for the interrogation and detection of mismatches. PMID:17194756

  9. Actinide immobilization in the subsurface environment by in-situ treatment with a hydrolytically unstable organophosphorus complexant: Uranyl uptake by calcium phytate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nash, K.L.; Jensen, M.P.; Schmidt, M.A.

    1997-01-01

    In addition to naturally occurring uranium and thorium, actinide ions exist in the subsurface environment as a result of accidental releases and intentional disposal practices associated with nuclear weapons production. These species present a significant challenge to cost-effective remediation of contaminated environments. An attractive approach to decreasing the probability of actinide migration in the subsurface is to transform the ions into a less mobile form by remote treatment. We have under development a process which relies on a polyfunctional organophosphorus complexant to sequester the mobile metal ions by complexation/cation exchange in the near term, and to subsequently decompose, transforming the actinides into insoluble phosphate mineral forms in the long term. Studies to date include identification of a suitable organophosphorus reagent, profiling of its decomposition kinetics, verification of the formation of phosphate mineral phases upon decomposition of the reagent, and extensive comparison of the actinide uptake ability of the calcium salt of the reagent as compared with hydroxyapatite. In this report, we briefly describe the process with focus on the cation exchange behavior of the calcium salt of the organophosphorus sequestrant

  10. Rhodium metalloinsertor binding generates a lesion with selective cytotoxicity for mismatch repair-deficient cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailis, Julie M; Weidmann, Alyson G; Mariano, Natalie F; Barton, Jacqueline K

    2017-07-03

    The DNA mismatch repair (MMR) pathway recognizes and repairs errors in base pairing and acts to maintain genome stability. Cancers that have lost MMR function are common and comprise an important clinical subtype that is resistant to many standard of care chemotherapeutics such as cisplatin. We have identified a family of rhodium metalloinsertors that bind DNA mismatches with high specificity and are preferentially cytotoxic to MMR-deficient cells. Here, we characterize the cellular mechanism of action of the most potent and selective complex in this family, [Rh(chrysi)(phen)(PPO)] 2+ (Rh-PPO). We find that Rh-PPO binding induces a lesion that triggers the DNA damage response (DDR). DDR activation results in cell-cycle blockade and inhibition of DNA replication and transcription. Significantly, the lesion induced by Rh-PPO is not repaired in MMR-deficient cells, resulting in selective cytotoxicity. The Rh-PPO mechanism is reminiscent of DNA repair enzymes that displace mismatched bases, and is differentiated from other DNA-targeted chemotherapeutics such as cisplatin by its potency, cellular mechanism, and selectivity for MMR-deficient cells.

  11. trans-Carbonylchloridobis[dicyclohexyl(4-isopropylphenylphosphane]rhodium(I acetone monosolvate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sizwe Makhoba

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The title rhodium Vaska-type complex, trans-[RhCl{P(C6H112(C6H4-4-C3H72}2(CO], crystallizes with an accompanying acetone solvent molecule. The metal atom shows a distorted square-planar coordination environment with selected important geometrical parameters of Rh—P = 2.3237 (6 and 2.3253 (6 Å, Rh—Cl = 2.3724 (6 Å, Rh—C = 1.802 (2 Å, P—Rh—P = 173.42 (2° and Cl—Rh—C = 179.13 (7°. Effective cone angles for the two P atoms are 165 and 161°, respectively. Both isopropyl groups and the acetone molecule are disordered with occupancy values of 0.523 (5:0.477 (5, 0.554 (8:0.446 (8 and 0.735 (4:0.265 (4, respectively. The crystal packing is stabilized by weak C—H...O and C—H...Cl contacts.

  12. Electron beam technology for production of preparations of immobilized enzymes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonchar, A.M.; Auslender, V.L.; Polyakov, V.A.

    1995-01-01

    Possibility of electron beam usage for proteases immobilization on 1,4-polyalkylene oxide (1,4-PAO) was studied to obtain biologically active complex for multi-purpose usage. It is shown that immobilization of Bacillus Subtilis protease is done due to free-radical linking of enzyme and carrier with formation of mycelium-like structures. Immobilization improves heat resistance of enzyme up to 60 centigrade without substrate and up to 80 centigrade in presence of substrate, widens range pH activity in comparison with non-immobilized forms. Immobilized proteases does not contain peroxides and long-live radicals. Our results permitted to create technologies for production of medical and veterinary preparations, active components for wool washing agents and leather fabrication technology

  13. A study on the sensitivity depletion laws for rhodium self-powered neutron detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Gil Gon

    1999-02-01

    The rhodium self-powered neutron detectors (SPND) in a reactor core provide the operator with the on-line 3-dimensional nuclear power distribution. The signal produced by rhodium SPND is interpreted into the local neutron flux by using a sensitivity depletion law and the local neutron flux is interpreted into the local power by using a power conversion factor. This work on the sensitivity depletion laws for rhodium self-powered neutron detectors (SPND) is performed to improve the uncertainty of the sensitivity depletion law used in ABB-CE reactors employing a rhodium SPND and to develop a calculational tool for providing the sensitivity depletion laws to interpret the signal of the newly designed rhodium SPND into the local neutron flux. The calculational tools for a time dependent neutron flux distribution in the rhodium emitter during depletion and for a time dependent beta escape probability that a beta generated in the emitter is escaped into the collector were developed. Due to the cost, the exposure to the radiation, and the longer fuel cycle, there is a strong incentive that the loading density of an in-core instrumentation is reduced and the lifetime of the detector is lengthened. These objectives can be achieved by reducing the uncertainty which is amplified as it depletes. The calculational tools above provide the sensitivity depletion law and show the reduction of the uncertainty to about 1 % in interpreting the signal into the local neutron flux compared to the method employed by ABB-CE. The reduction in the uncertainty of 1 % in interpreting the signal into the local neutron flux is equivalent to the reduction in the uncertainty of 1 % or more in interpreting the signal into the local power and to the extension of the lifetime of rhodium SPND to about 10 % as reported by ABB-CE

  14. Membranes suited for immobilizing biomolecules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2009-01-01

    The present invention relates to flow-through membranes suitable for the immobilization of biomols., methods for the prepn. of such membranes and the use of such membranes for the immobilization of biomols. and subsequent detection of immobilized biomols. The invention concerns a flow-through

  15. Ionic liquid ultrasound assisted dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction method for preconcentration of trace amounts of rhodium prior to flame atomic absorption spectrometry determination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molaakbari, Elaheh [Chemistry Department, Shahid Bahonar University of Kerman, Kerman (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Young Research Society, Shahid Bahonar University of Kerman, Kerman (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mostafavi, Ali, E-mail: mostafavi.ali@gmail.com [Chemistry Department, Shahid Bahonar University of Kerman, Kerman (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Afzali, Daryoush [Environment and Nanochemistry Department, Research Institute of Environmental Science, International Center for Science, High Technology and Environmental Science, Kerman (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mineral Industries Research Center, Shahid Bahonar University of Kerman, Kerman (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-01-30

    In this article, we consider ionic liquid based ultrasound-assisted dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction of trace amounts of rhodium from aqueous samples and show that this is a fast and reliable sample pre-treatment for the determination of rhodium ions by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. The Rh(III) was transferred into its complex with 2-(5-bromo-2-pyridylazo)-5-diethylamino phenol as a chelating agent, and an ultrasonic bath with the ionic liquid, 1-octyl-3-methylimidazolium bis (trifluoromethylsulfonyl) imide at room temperature was used to extract the analyte. The centrifuged rhodium complex was then enriched in the form of ionic liquid droplets and prior to its analysis by flame atomic absorption spectrometry, 300 {mu}L ethanol was added to the ionic liquid-rich phase. Finally, the influence of various parameters on the recovery of Rh(III) was optimized. Under optimum conditions, the calibration graph was linear in the range of 4.0-500.0 ng mL{sup -1}, the detection limit was 0.37 ng mL{sup -1} (3S{sub b}/m, n = 7) and the relative standard deviation was {+-}1.63% (n = 7, C = 200 ng mL{sup -1}). The results show that ionic liquid based ultrasound assisted dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction, combined with flame atomic absorption spectrometry, is a rapid, simple, sensitive and efficient analytical method for the separation and determination of trace amounts of Rh(III) ions with minimum organic solvent consumption.

  16. Electrodeposition of carrier-free 57Co on rhodium as an approach to the preparation of Moessbauer sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cieszykowska, Izabela; ZoLtowska, MaLgorzata; Mielcarski, MieczysLaw

    2011-01-01

    Electrodeposition of carrier-free 57 Co on a rhodium matrix as the first step of preparing Moessbauer sources was studied. To optimize the plating parameters, the influences of current density, volume and pH of the electrolyte solution, shape, thickness, and surface area of the rhodium cathode, mode of cathode pretreatment, concentration of 57 Co and duration of electrolysis were investigated.

  17. Transient-response study of CO insertion into CHx surface intermediates on a vanadium-promoted rhodium catalyst

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koerts, T.; Santen, van R.A.

    1992-01-01

    The rate of CO insertion into surface CHx species was investigated on silica-supported rhodium and rhodium-vanadium catalysts. Isotopically labelled 13CO was used in a transient kinetic experiment under steady-state conditions. A main conclusion is that vanadium promotion does not affect the rate of

  18. Exposure of the German general population to platinum and rhodium - Urinary levels and determining factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munker, Sven; Kilo, Sonja; Röß, Christoph; Jeitner, Peter; Schierl, Rudolf; Göen, Thomas; Drexler, Hans

    2016-11-01

    In this study the exposure of the general population in Germany to platinum and rhodium and its determinants was investigated in 259 participants (subdivided in three groups) by urine analyses and assessment of the dental status. Complementary, an interview including questions characterising possible exposure to traffic exhaust was conducted. The median excretion was 2.42ng platinum/g creatinine and 7.27ng rhodium/g creatinine. The detailed analysis of the collected data showed significant higher platinum excretion values with increasing number of surfaces covered with restorations containing precious metals (R=0.389; prhodium excretion values (median=7.27ng/g; 95th percentile=13.5 ng/g). In summary, the study showed that exhaust emissions have an influence on platinum and rhodium excretion, but for platinum this influence is rather low compared to the influence of precious metals containing restorations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  19. Co-deposition of rhodium and tungsten films for the first-mirror on ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marot, Laurent; Steiner, Roland; Gantenbein, Markus; Mathys, Daniel; Meyer, Ernst

    2011-01-01

    The detailed characterizations of rhodium/tungsten films prepared by co-deposition using a dual magnetron sputtering have been carried out on silicon substrates at room temperature. Effects of the tungsten incorporated in the film on the chemical bonding state, optical reflectivity and crystallinity were investigated using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), reflectivity measurements, X-rays diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The incorporation of tungsten changes the films crystalline structure i.e. leading to Rh 3 W formation. The reflectivity of the films decreases linearly with the decrease of rhodium concentration. XPS and ultraviolet photoemission spectroscopy (UPS) measurements show a positive shift of the core level binding energy of rhodium which is coupled to a shift of the Rh d-band ΔE d away from the Fermi level. Opposite shifts are observed for tungsten.

  20. Rhodium(III)-Catalyzed Amidation of Unactivated C(sp(3) )-H Bonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, He; Tang, Guodong; Li, Xingwei

    2015-10-26

    Nitrogenation by direct functionalization of C-H bonds represents an important strategy for constructing C-N bonds. Rhodium(III)-catalyzed direct amidation of unactivated C(sp(3) )-H bonds is rare, especially under mild reaction conditions. Herein, a broad scope of C(sp(3) )-H bonds are amidated under rhodium catalysis in high efficiency using 3-substituted 1,4,2-dioxazol-5-ones as the amide source. The protocol broadens the scope of rhodium(III)-catalyzed C(sp(3) )-H activation chemistry, and is applicable to the late-stage functionalization of natural products. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Monodisperse Platinum and Rhodium Nanoparticles as Model Heterogeneous Catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grass, Michael Edward [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2008-09-01

    Model heterogeneous catalysts have been synthesized and studied to better understand how the surface structure of noble metal nanoparticles affects catalytic performance. In this project, monodisperse rhodium and platinum nanoparticles of controlled size and shape have been synthesized by solution phase polyol reduction, stabilized by polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP). Model catalysts have been developed using these nanoparticles by two methods: synthesis of mesoporous silica (SBA-15) in the presence of nanoparticles (nanoparticle encapsulation, NE) to form a composite of metal nanoparticles supported on SBA-15 and by deposition of the particles onto a silicon wafer using Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) monolayer deposition. The particle shapes were analyzed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and high resolution TEM (HRTEM) and the sizes were determined by TEM, X-ray diffraction (XRD), and in the case of NE samples, room temperature H2 and CO adsorption isotherms. Catalytic studies were carried out in homebuilt gas-phase reactors. For the nanoparticles supported on SBA-15, the catalysts are in powder form and were studied using the homebuilt systems as plug-flow reactors. In the case of nanoparticles deposited on silicon wafers, the same systems were operated as batch reactors. This dissertation has focused on the synthesis, characterization, and reaction studies of model noble metal heterogeneous catalysts. Careful control of particle size and shape has been accomplished though solution phase synthesis of Pt and Rh nanoparticles in order to elucidate further structure-reactivity relationships in noble metal catalysis.

  2. The UV Plasmonic Behavior of Distorted Rhodium Nanocubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yael Gutiérrez

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available For applications of surface-enhanced spectroscopy and photocatalysis, the ultraviolet (UV plasmonic behavior and charge distribution within rhodium nanocubes is explored by a detailed numerical analysis. The strongest plasmonic hot-spots and charge concentrations are located at the corners and edges of the nanocubes, exactly where they are the most spectroscopically and catalytically active. Because intense catalytic activity at corners and edges will reshape these nanoparticles, distortions of the cubical shape, including surface concavity, surface convexity, and rounded corners and edges, are also explored to quantify how significantly these distortions deteriorate their plasmonic and photocatalytic properties. The fact that the highest fields and highest carrier concentrations occur in the corners and edges of Rh nanocubes (NCs confirms their tremendous potential for plasmon-enhanced spectroscopy and catalysis. It is shown that this opportunity is fortuitously enhanced by the fact that even higher field and charge concentrations reside at the interface between the metal nanoparticle and a dielectric or semiconductor support, precisely where the most chemically active sites are located.

  3. Tandem rhodium catalysis: exploiting sulfoxides for asymmetric transition-metal catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kou, K G M; Dong, V M

    2015-06-07

    Sulfoxides are uncommon substrates for transition-metal catalysis due to their propensity to inhibit catalyst turnover. In a collaborative effort with Ken Houk, we developed the first dynamic kinetic resolution (DKR) of allylic sulfoxides using asymmetric rhodium-catalyzed hydrogenation. A detailed mechanistic analysis of this transformation using both experimental and theoretical methods revealed rhodium to be a tandem catalyst that promoted both hydrogenation of the alkene and racemization of the allylic sulfoxide. Using a combination of deuterium labelling and DFT studies, a novel mode of allylic sulfoxide racemization via a Rh(III)-π-allyl intermediate was identified.

  4. The extraction of rhodium from aqueous nitric acid by dinonylnaphthalene sulphonic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patel, N.M.; Miles, J.H.; Thornback, J.R.

    1987-01-01

    The extraction of rhodium from aqueous nitric acid using dinonylnaphthalene sulphonic acid has been investigated. The extraction occurs readily from 0.1 M to 1.0 M nitric acid and, since the rhodium is extracted as {Rh(H 2 O) 6 } 3+ into the inverted micelles of the organic solution, equilibration times are less than 5 minutes. Extraction is enhanced by addition of nitrite ion to form {Rh(H 2 O) 5 NO 2 } 2+ as the extracted species. (author)

  5. Sorption properties study of nitron fibre S-3 relative to rhodium (III)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rustamov, S.; Khusainov, A.D.; Shadieva, S.F.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of present work is studying of sorption properties of nitron fibre S-3 relative to rhodium (III) from chloride solutions. Nitron sorbent S-3 was synthesised by reprocessing of wastes of production of nitron fibre by sulfited compound Na 2 Sn:NH 4 SCN=50:50 during 3 hours at temperature 90 d ig C . The sulfur containing in the sorbent was about 9%. During investigation by authors was determined that fibre nitron-S has good kinetic characteristics relative to rhodium (III), limitative stage of sorption process is diffusion and kinetics of sorption has mixed-diffusion character

  6. Rhodium-catalyzed C-H alkynylation of arenes at room temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Chao; Loh, Teck-Peng

    2014-03-03

    The rhodium(III)-catalyzed ortho C-H alkynylation of non-electronically activated arenes is disclosed. This process features a straightforward and highly effective protocol for the synthesis of functionalized alkynes and represents the first example of merging a hypervalent iodine reagent with rhodium(III) catalysis. Notably, this reaction proceeds at room temperature, tolerates a variety of functional groups, and more importantly, exhibits high selectivity for monoalkynylation. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. A Concise Synthesis of the Erythrina Alkaloid 3–Demethoxyerythratidinone via Combined Rhodium Catalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joo, Jung Min; David, Ramoncito A.; Yuan, Yu; Lee, Chulbom

    2010-01-01

    The total synthesis of the erythrina alkaloid 3–demethoxyerythratidinone has been achieved via a strategy based on combined rhodium catalysis. The catalytic tandem cyclization effected by the interplay of alkynyl and vinylidene rhodium species allows for efficient access to the A and B rings of the tetracyclic erythrinane skeleton in a single step. The synthesis also features rapid preparation of the requisite precursor for the double ring closure and thus has been completed in only 7 total steps in 41% overall yield. PMID:21090648

  8. Immobilization of enzymes by radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaetsu, I.; Kumakura, M.; Yoshida, M.; Asano, M.; Himei, M.; Tamura, M.; Hayashi, K.

    1979-01-01

    Immobilization of various enzymes was performed by radiation-induced polymerization of glass-forming monomers at low temperatures. Alpha-amylase and glucoamylase were effectively immobilized in hydrophilic polymer carrier such as poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) and also in rather hydrophobic carrier such as poly(tetraethylene-glycol diacrylate). Immobilized human hemoglobin underwent the reversible oxygenation concomitantly with change of oxygen concentration outside of the matrices. (author)

  9. Effects of immobilization on spermiogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meitner, E. R.

    1980-01-01

    The influence of immobilization stress on spermiogenesis in rats was investigated. After 96 hour immobilization, histological changes began to manifest themselves in the form of practically complete disappearance of cell population of the wall of seminiferous tubule as well as a markedly increased number of cells with pathologic mitoses. Enzymological investigations showed various changes of activity (of acid and alkaline phosphatase and nonspecific esterase) in the 24, 48, and 96 hour immobilization groups.

  10. Enantioselective Rhodium-Catalyzed [2+2+2] Cycloadditions of Terminal Alkynes and Alkenyl Isocyanates: Mechanistic Insights Lead to a Unified Model that Rationalizes Product Selectivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalton, Derek M.; Oberg, Kevin M.; Yu, Robert T.; Lee, Ernest E.; Perreault, Stéphane; Oinen, Mark Emil; Pease, Melissa L.; Malik, Guillaume; Rovis, Tomislav

    2009-01-01

    This manuscript describes the development and scope of the asymmetric rhodium-catalyzed [2+2+2] cycloaddition of terminal alkynes and alkenyl isocyanates leading to the formation of indolizidine and quinolizidine scaffolds. The use of phosphoramidite ligands proved crucial for avoiding competitive terminal alkyne dimerization. Both aliphatic and aromatic terminal alkynes participate well, with product selectivity a function of both the steric and electronic character of the alkyne. Manipulation of the phosphoramidite ligand leads to tuning of enantio- and product selectivity, with a complete turnover in product selectivity seen with aliphatic alkynes when moving from Taddol-based to biphenol-based phosphoramidites. Terminal and 1,1-disubstituted olefins are tolerated with nearly equal efficacy. Examination of a series of competition experiments in combination with analysis of reaction outcome shed considerable light on the operative catalytic cycle. Through a detailed study of a series of X-ray structures of rhodium(cod)chloride/phosphoramidite complexes, we have formulated a mechanistic hypothesis that rationalizes the observed product selectivity. PMID:19817441

  11. Biodegradation of chlorobenzene using immobilized crude extracts ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SERVER

    2007-10-04

    Oct 4, 2007 ... immobilized crude extracts were reused for all other experiments and found that immobilization .... India which are of analytical reagent grade. .... 9. 60. 3. 1. Figure 3. Degradation of chlorobenzene by immobilized crude.

  12. Supramolecular protein immobilization on lipid bilayers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosmans, R.P.G.; Hendriksen, W.E.; Verheijden, Mark Lloyd; Eelkema, R.; Jonkheijm, Pascal; van Esch, J.H.; Brunsveld, Luc

    2015-01-01

    Protein immobilization on surfaces, and on lipid bilayers specifically, has great potential in biomolecular and biotechnological research. Of current special interest is the immobilization of proteins using supramolecular noncovalent interactions. This allows for a reversible immobilization and

  13. Iodine immobilization in apatites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Audubert, F.; Lartigue, J.E.

    2000-01-01

    In the context of a scientific program on long-lived radionuclide conditioning, a matrix for iodine 129 immobilization has been studied. A lead vanado-phosphate apatite was prepared from the melt of lead vanado-phosphate Pb 3 (VO 4 ) 1.6 (PO 4 ) 0.4 and lead iodide PbI 2 in stoichiometric proportions by calcination at 700 deg. C during 3 hours. Natural sintering of this apatite is not possible because the product decomposition occurs at 400 deg. C. Reactive sintering is the solution. The principle depends on the coating of lead iodide with lead vanado-phosphate. Lead vanado-phosphate coating is used as iodo-apatite reactant and as dense covering to confine iodine during synthesis. So the best condition to immobilize iodine during iodo-apatite synthesis is a reactive sintering at 700 deg. C under 25 MPa. We obtained an iodo-apatite surrounded with dense lead vanadate. Leaching behaviour of the matrix synthesized by solid-solid reaction is under progress in order to determine chemical durability, basic mechanisms of the iodo-apatite alteration and kinetic rate law. Iodo-apatite dissolution rates were pH and temperature dependent. We obtained a rate of 2.5 10 -3 g.m -2 .d -1 at 90 deg. C in initially de-ionised water. (authors)

  14. Direct C-H alkylation and indole formation of anilines with diazo compounds under rhodium catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Neeraj Kumar; Choi, Miji; Jo, Hyeim; Oh, Yongguk; Sharma, Satyasheel; Han, Sang Hoon; Jeong, Taejoo; Han, Sangil; Lee, Seok-Yong; Kim, In Su

    2015-12-18

    The rhodium(III)-catalyzed direct functionalization of aniline C-H bonds with α-diazo compounds is described. These transformations provide a facile construction of ortho-alkylated anilines with diazo malonates or highly substituted indoles with diazo acetoacetates.

  15. Rhodium(II)-Catalyzed Asymmetric Sulfur(VI) Reduction of Diazo Sulfonylamidines

    OpenAIRE

    Selander, Nicklas; Fokin, Valery V.

    2012-01-01

    Diazo sulfonylamidines readily undergo enantioselective oxygen transfer from sulfur to carbon atom in the presence of chiral rhodium(II) carboxylates resulting in chiral sulfinylamidines. This unusual asymmetric atom transfer “reduction” occurs rapidly under mild conditions, and sulfinylamidines are obtained in excellent yield.

  16. Enantioselective rhodium enolate protonations. A new methodology for the synthesis of beta2-amino acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibi, Mukund P; Tatamidani, Hiroto; Patil, Kalyani

    2005-06-23

    [reaction: see text] Rhodium-catalyzed conjugate addition of an aryl boronic acid to alpha-methylamino acrylates followed by enantioselective protonation of the oxa-pi-allylrhodium intermediate provides access to aryl-substituted beta(2)-amino acids. The impact of the different variables of the reaction on the levels of enantioselectivity has been assessed.

  17. Rhodium-catalyzed chemo- and regioselective decarboxylative addition of β-ketoacids to alkynes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Changkun; Grugel, Christian P; Breit, Bernhard

    2016-04-30

    A highly efficient rhodium-catalyzed chemo- and regioselective addition of β-ketoacids to alkynes is reported. Applying a Rh(i)/(S,S)-DIOP catalyst system, γ,δ-unsaturated ketones were prepared with exclusively branched selectivity under mild conditions. This demonstrates that readily available alkynes can be an alternative entry to allyl electrophiles in transition-metal catalyzed allylic alkylation reactions.

  18. The Role of the Element Rhodium in the Hyperbolic Law of the Periodic Table of Elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albert Khazan

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available The role of the element rhodium as an independent affirmation of calculations by the Hyperbolic Law and validity of all its relations is shown herein. The deviation in calculation by this method of the atomic mass of heaviest element is 0.0024%, and its coefficient of scaling 0.001-0.005%.

  19. A NEW TYPE OF HIGHLY-ACTIVE POLYMER-BOUND RHODIUM HYDROFORMYLATION CATALYST

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    JONGSMA, T; KIMKES, P; CHALLA, G; VANLEEUWEN, PWNM

    1992-01-01

    A new route of attaching phosphites to a (co)polymer chain is described. These copolymers are used for the preparation of a rhodium phosphite hydroformylation catalyst. The catalytic activity of this polymer-bound system is identical to that of the low molecular weight analogue. The catalysts show a

  20. Enantioselective Rhodium Enolate Protonations. A New Methodology for the Synthesis of β2-Amino Acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibi, Mukund P.; Tatamidani, Hiroto; Patil, Kalyani

    2008-01-01

    Rhodium catalyzed conjugate addition of an aryl boronic acid to α-methylamino acrylates followed by enantioselective protonation of the oxa-π-allylrhodium intermediate provides access to aryl substituted β2-amino acids. The impact of the different variables of the reaction on the levels of enantioselectivity has been assessed. PMID:15957893

  1. Double-spin-flip resonance of rhodium nuclei at positive and negative spin temperatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tuoriniemi, J.T.; Knuuttila, T.A.; Lefmann, K.

    2000-01-01

    Sensitive SQUID-NMR measurements were used to study the mutual interactions in the highly polarized nuclear-spin system of rhodium metal. The dipolar coupling gives rise to a weak double-spin-flip resonance. The observed frequency shifts allow deducing separately the dipolarlike contribution...

  2. Rhodium Catalyzed Annulation of N-Benzoylsulfonamide with Isocyanide via C-H Activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Chen; Xie, Weiqing; Falck, John R.

    2012-01-01

    Isocyanide insertion: the first rhodium-catalyzed annulation of N-benzoylsulfonamide incorporating with isocyanide via C-H activation is described. The transformation is broadly compatible with N-benzoylsulfonamides bearing various electron-properties as well as isocyanides. From practical point of view, this methodology provides the most straightforward approach to a series of 3-(imino)isoindolinones. PMID:21972033

  3. Rhodium-Catalyzed Regioselective C7-Olefination of Indazoles Using an N-Amide Directing Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Lei; Chen, Yanyu; Zhang, Rong; Peng, Qiujun; Xu, Lanting; Pan, Xianhua

    2017-02-01

    A rhodium-catalyzed regioselective C-H olefination of indazole is described. This protocol relies on the use of an efficient and removable N,N-diisopropylcarbamoyl directing group, which offers facile access to C7-olefinated indazoles with high regioselectivity, ample substrate scope and broad functional group tolerance. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. The influence of pH on the in vitro permeation of rhodium through human skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen Van Rensburg, Sané; Franken, Anja; Du Plessis, Jeanetta; Du Plessis, Johannes Lodewykus

    2017-06-01

    Workers in precious metals refineries are at risk of exposure to salt compounds of the platinum group metals through inhalation, as well as through the skin. Rhodium salt permeation through the skin has previously been proven using rhodium trichloride (RhCl 3 ) dissolved in synthetic sweat at a pH of 6.5. However, the skin surface pH of refinery workers may be lower than 6.5. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of pH 6.5 and 4.5 on the in vitro permeation of rhodium through intact Caucasian skin using Franz diffusion cells. A concentration of 0.3 mg mL -1 rhodium was used and analyses were performed using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry. Results indicated a cumulative increase in permeation over 24 h. Rhodium permeation after 12 h was significantly greater at pH 4.5 (1.56 ± 0.24 ng cm -2 ) than at 6.5 (0.85 ± 0.13 ng cm -2 ; p = 0.02). At both pH levels, there was a highly significant difference ( p rhodium remaining in the skin (1428.68 ± 224.67 ng cm -2 at pH 4.5 and 1029.90 ± 115.96 ng cm -2 at pH 6.5) and the mass that diffused through (0.88 ± 0.17 ng cm -2 at pH 4.5 and 0.62 ± 0.10 ng cm -2 at pH 6.5). From these findings, it is evident that an acidic working environment or low skin surface pH may enhance permeation of rhodium salts, contributing to sensitization and adverse health effects.

  5. Assessing attitudes toward spinal immobilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouland, Andrew J; Jenkins, J Lee; Levy, Matthew J

    2013-10-01

    Prospective studies have improved knowledge of prehospital spinal immobilization. The opinion of Emergency Medical Services (EMS) providers regarding spinal immobilization is unknown, as is their knowledge of recent research advances. To examine the attitudes, knowledge, and comfort of prehospital and Emergency Department (ED) EMS providers regarding spinal immobilization performed under a non-selective protocol. An online survey was conducted from May to July of 2011. Participants were drawn from the Howard County Department of Fire and Rescue Services and the Howard County General Hospital ED. The survey included multiple choice questions and responses on a modified Likert scale. Correlation analysis and descriptive data were used to analyze results. Comfort using the Kendrick Extrication Device was low among ED providers. Experienced providers were more likely to indicate comfort using this device. Respondents often believed that spinal immobilization is appropriate in the management of penetrating trauma to the chest and abdomen. Reported use of padding decreased along with the frequency with which providers practice and encounter immobilized patients. Respondents often indicated that they perform spinal immobilization due solely to mechanism of injury. Providers who feel as if spinal immobilization is often performed unnecessarily were more likely to agree that immobilization causes an unnecessary delay in patient care. The results demonstrate the need for improved EMS education in the use of the Kendrick Extrication Device, backboard padding, and spinal immobilization in the management of penetrating trauma. The attitudes highlighted in this study are relevant to the implementation of a selective spinal immobilization protocol. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Efficient Synthesis of Spirobarbiturates and Spirothiobarbiturates Bearing Cyclopropane Rings by Rhodium(II)-Catalyzed Reactions of Cyclic Diazo Compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Xue; Lee, Yong Rok

    2013-01-01

    Rhodium(II)-catalyzed reactions of cyclic diazo compounds derived from barbituric acid and thiobarbituric acid with a variety of styrene moieties were examined. These reactions provide rapid synthetic routes to the preparations of spirobarbiturates and spirothiobarbiturates bearing cyclopropane rings

  7. Efficient Synthesis of Spirobarbiturates and Spirothiobarbiturates Bearing Cyclopropane Rings by Rhodium(II)-Catalyzed Reactions of Cyclic Diazo Compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xue; Lee, Yong Rok [Yeungnam Univ., Gyeongsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-06-15

    Rhodium(II)-catalyzed reactions of cyclic diazo compounds derived from barbituric acid and thiobarbituric acid with a variety of styrene moieties were examined. These reactions provide rapid synthetic routes to the preparations of spirobarbiturates and spirothiobarbiturates bearing cyclopropane rings.

  8. Burnup Estimation of Rhodium Self-Powered Neutron Detector Emitter in VVER Reactor Core Using Monte Carlo Simulations

    OpenAIRE

    Khrutchinsky, А. А.; Kuten, S. A.; Babichev, L. F.

    2011-01-01

    Estimation of burn-up in a rhodium-103 emitter of self-powered neutron detector in VVER-1000 reactor core has been performed using Monte Carlo simulations within approximation of a constant neutron flux.

  9. HLW immobilization in glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leroy, P.; Jacquet-Francillon, N.; Runge, S.

    1992-01-01

    The immobilization of High Level Waste in glass in France is a long history which started as early as in the 1950's. More than 30 years of Research and Development have been invested in that field. Two industrial facilities are operating (AVM and R7) and a third one (T7), under cold testing, is planned to start active operation in the mid-92. While vitrification has been demonstrated to be an industrially mastered process, the question of the quality of the final waste product, i.e. the HLW glass, must be addressed. The scope of the present paper is to focus on the latter point from both standpoints of the R and D and of the industrial reality

  10. Selective catalytic reduction system and process for treating NOx emissions using a palladium and rhodium or ruthenium catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobolevskiy, Anatoly [Orlando, FL; Rossin, Joseph A [Columbus, OH; Knapke, Michael J [Columbus, OH

    2011-07-12

    A process for the catalytic reduction of nitrogen oxides (NOx) in a gas stream (29) in the presence of H.sub.2 is provided. The process comprises contacting the gas stream with a catalyst system (38) comprising zirconia-silica washcoat particles (41), a pre-sulfated zirconia binder (44), and a catalyst combination (40) comprising palladium and at least one of rhodium, ruthenium, or a mixture of ruthenium and rhodium.

  11. Homoleptic mono- and dinuclear cationic alkoxydiphosphazane derivatives of rhodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edwards, K.J.; Haines, R.J.; Meintjies, E.; Sigwarth, B.

    1990-01-01

    Treatment of the solvento species [Rh(C 8 H 12 )(solvent) 2 ][SbF 6 ] (solvent = methanol, ethanol, or tetrahydrofuran) with a twice-molar amount of the diphosphazane ligands (RO) 2 PN(R') P(OR) 2 (R' = Me or Et; R = Me, Et, or Pr i ) in the appropriate solvent leads to the ready formation of monocationic [Rh{(RO) 2 PN(R')P(OR) 2 } 2 ] + and/or dicationic [Rh 2 {μ-(RO) 2 PN(R')P(OR) 2 } 2 {(RO) 2 PN(R')P(OR) 2 } 2 ] 2+ hexafluoroantimonate salts, with the tendency to afford dinuclear derivatives decreasing along the series Me>Et>Pr i . Carbon monoxide readily forms addition products with these ionic species, giving rise to five-coordinate derivatives of the type [Rh(CO){(RO) 2 PN(R')P (OR) 2 } 2 ][SbF 6 ] in the case of the mononuclear derivatives, and inserting across the two rhodium atoms to afford [Rh 2 (μ-CO){μ-(MeO) 2 PN(Et)P(OMe) 2 } 2 {(MeO) 2 PN(Et)P(OMe) 2 } 2 ][SbF 6 ] 2 in the case of [Rh 2 {μ-(MeO) 2 PN (Et)P(OMe) 2 } 2 {(MeO) 2 PN(Et)P(OMe) 2 } 2 ][SbF 6 ] 2 . These mono- and dicationic derivatives also react readily with iodine affording [RhI 2 {(RO) 2 PN(R')P(OR) 2 } 2 ][SbF 6 ] and [Rh 2 (μ-I){μ-(MeO) 2 PN(Et)P(OMe) 2 } 2 {(MeO) 2 PN(Et)P(OMe) 2 } 2 ][SbF 6 ] n (n = 2 or 3) respectively. The coordination behaviour of the diphosphorus ligands (MeO) 2 PCH 2 P(OMe) 2 and Me 2 PCH 2 PMe 2 towards [Rh(C 8 H 12 )(solvent) 2 ][SbF 6 ] has also been investigated. 1 fig., 1 tab., 19 refs

  12. Relationship between electronic structure and electric conductivity of double rhodium oxides from X-ray spectral data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Firsov, M.N.; Nefedov, V.I.; Shaplygin, I.S.

    1983-01-01

    Quantum yield spectra of X-ray photoemission of O K - and Rh M 3 -bands of double rhodium oxides with Be, Mg, Ca, Sr, Ba, Cd, V, Nb, Ta, Mo, W are obtained. Quantum yield spectra are analogous to absorption spectra and reflect vacant states in a crystal, in particular, the quantum yield spectrum of O K-band is associated with oxygen vacant states of p-symmetry while Rh M 3 -band spectrum with rhomium vacant states of d-symmetry. In all rhodium compounds investigated the first vacant band is formed by the rhodium 4d-states. The forbidden zone between the last occupied and first free states of rhodiUm has a small width (eV fractions), which explains the semiconductor character of electric conductivity of the investigated compounds. Electric resistance variation in investigated series of rhodium compounds is in agreement with peculiarities of their electronic structure and entirely depends on variation in the electron density on rhodium atoms

  13. Synthesis and crystal structure of a dinuclear rhodium complex. Catalytic activity of mono- and di-nuclear rhodium phosphite complexes in hydroformylation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beuken, Esther K. van den; Lange, Wim G.J. de; Leeuwen, Piet W.N.M. van; Veldman, Nora; Spek, Anthony L.; Feringa, Bernard

    1996-01-01

    A new bidentate phosphite, {bis[2-(diphenoxyphosphinoxy)-1-naphthyl]methyl}benzene L(1) and a tetradentate phosphite, 1,4-bis{bis[2-(diphenoxyphosphinoxy)-1-naphthyl]methyl}benzene L(2) were prepared in a facile two-step procedure involving condensation of 2-naphthol with respectively benzaldehyde

  14. An Unusual Ligand Coordination Gives Rise to a New Family of Rhodium Metalloinsertors with Improved Selectivity and Potency

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Rhodium metalloinsertors are octahedral complexes that bind DNA mismatches with high affinity and specificity and exhibit unique cell-selective cytotoxicity, targeting mismatch repair (MMR)-deficient cells over MMR-proficient cells. Here we describe a new generation of metalloinsertors with enhanced biological potency and selectivity, in which the complexes show Rh–O coordination. In particular, it has been found that both Δ- and Λ-[Rh(chrysi)(phen)(DPE)]2+ (where chrysi =5,6 chrysenequinone diimmine, phen =1,10-phenanthroline, and DPE = 1,1-di(pyridine-2-yl)ethan-1-ol) bind to DNA containing a single CC mismatch with similar affinities and without racemization. This is in direct contrast with previous metalloinsertors and suggests a possible different binding disposition for these complexes in the mismatch site. We ascribe this difference to the higher pKa of the coordinated immine of the chrysi ligand in these complexes, so that the complexes must insert into the DNA helix with the inserting ligand in a buckled orientation; spectroscopic studies in the presence and absence of DNA along with the crystal structure of the complex without DNA support this assignment. Remarkably, all members of this new family of compounds have significantly increased potency in a range of cellular assays; indeed, all are more potent than cisplatin and N-methyl-N′-nitro-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG, a common DNA-alkylating chemotherapeutic agent). Moreover, the activities of the new metalloinsertors are coupled with high levels of selective cytotoxicity for MMR-deficient versus proficient colorectal cancer cells. PMID:25254630

  15. Rhodium nanoparticle-modified screen-printed graphite electrodes for the determination of hydrogen peroxide in tea extracts in the presence of oxygen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatselou, Vasiliki A; Giokas, Dimothenis L; Vlessidis, Athanasios G; Prodromidis, Mamas I

    2015-03-01

    In this work we describe the fabrication of nanostructured electrocatalytic surfaces based on polyethyleneimine (PEI)-supported rhodium nanoparticles (Rh-NP) over graphite screen-printed electrodes (SPEs) for the determination of hydrogen peroxide in the presence of oxygen. Rh-NP, electrostatically stabilized by citrate anions, were immobilized over graphite SPEs, through coulombic attraction on a thin film of positively charged PEI. The functionalized sensors, polarized at 0.0 V vs. Ag/AgCl/3 M KCl, exhibited a linear response to H2O2 over the concentration range from 5 to 600 μmol L(-1) H2O2 in the presence of oxygen. The 3σ limit of detection was 2 μmol L(-1) H2O2, while the reproducibility of the method at the concentration level of 10 μmol L(-1) H2O2 (n=10) and between different sensors (n=4) was lower than 3 and 5%, respectively. Most importantly, the sensors showed an excellent working and storage stability at ambient conditions and they were successfully applied to the determination of H2O2 produced by autooxidation of polylphenols in tea extracts with ageing. Recovery rates ranged between 97 and 104% suggesting that the as-prepared electrodes can be used for the development of small-scale, low-cost chemical sensors for use in on-site applications. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Phosphopeptide enrichment by immobilized metal affinity chromatography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thingholm, Tine E.; Larsen, Martin R.

    2016-01-01

    Immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC) has been the method of choice for phosphopeptide enrichment prior to mass spectrometric analysis for many years and it is still used extensively in many laboratories. Using the affinity of negatively charged phosphate groups towards positively...... charged metal ions such as Fe3+, Ga3+, Al3+, Zr4+, and Ti4+ has made it possible to enrich phosphorylated peptides from peptide samples. However, the selectivity of most of the metal ions is limited, when working with highly complex samples, e.g., whole-cell extracts, resulting in contamination from...

  17. High-level-waste immobilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crandall, J.L.

    1982-01-01

    Analysis of risks, environmental effects, process feasibility, and costs for disposal of immobilized high-level wastes in geologic repositories indicates that the disposal system safety has a low sensitivity to the choice of the waste disposal form

  18. Metallacarborane chemistry of the hypho-[6,7-C2B6H13](-)1-anion: the formation of uniquely structured metallacarboranes [5-Cp*-arachno-5,4,6-RhC2B6H12] and [2,5-Cp-2(*)-10-Me-nido-2,5,1-Rh2CB6H9] (Cp-* = eta(5)-C5Me5-): complete rhodium analogues of arachno-4,6-C2B7H13 and nido-1-CB8H12

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Londesborough, Michael Geoffrey Stephen; Janoušek, Zbyněk; Štíbr, Bohumil; Císařová, I.

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 689, č. 16 (2004), s. 2702-2706 ISSN 0022-328X R&D Projects: GA MŠk LN00A028 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4032918 Keywords : boranes * metallacarboranes * rhodium complex Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry Impact factor: 1.905, year: 2004

  19. Antitumor effect of free rhodium (II) citrate and rhodium (II) citrate-loaded maghemite nanoparticles on mice bearing breast cancer: a systemic toxicity assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peixoto, Raphael Cândido Apolinário; Miranda-Vilela, Ana Luisa; de Souza Filho, José; Carneiro, Marcella Lemos' Brettas; Oliveira, Ricardo G S; da Silva, Matheus Oliveira; de Souza, Aparecido R; Báo, Sônia Nair

    2015-05-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most prevalent cancer types among women. The use of magnetic fluids for specific delivery of drugs represents an attractive platform for chemotherapy. In our previous studies, it was demonstrated that maghemite nanoparticles coated with rhodium (II) citrate (Magh-Rh2Cit) induced in vitro cytotoxicity and in vivo antitumor activity, followed by intratumoral administration in breast carcinoma cells. In this study, our aim was to follow intravenous treatment to evaluate the systemic antitumor activity and toxicity induced by these formulations in Balb/c mice bearing orthotopic 4T1 breast carcinoma. Female Balb/c mice were evaluated with regard to toxicity of intravenous treatments through analyses of hemogram, serum levels of alanine aminotransferase, iron, and creatinine and liver, kidney, and lung histology. The antitumor activity of rhodium (II) citrate (Rh2Cit), Magh-Rh2Cit, and maghemite nanoparticles coated with citrate (Magh-Cit), used as control, was evaluated by tumor volume reduction, histology, and morphometric analysis. Magh-Rh2Cit and Magh-Cit promoted a significant decrease in tumor area, and no experimental groups presented hematotoxic effects or increased levels of serum ALT and creatinine. This observation was corroborated by the histopathological examination of the liver and kidney of mice. Furthermore, the presence of nanoparticles was verified in lung tissue with no morphological changes, supporting the idea that our nanoformulations did not induce toxicity effects. No studies about the systemic action of rhodium (II) citrate-loaded maghemite nanoparticles have been carried out, making this report a suitable starting point for exploring the therapeutic potential of these compounds in treating breast cancer.

  20. Enantioselective rhodium/ruthenium photoredox catalysis en route to chiral 1,2-aminoalcohols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jiajia; Harms, Klaus; Meggers, Eric

    2016-08-09

    A rhodium-based chiral Lewis acid catalyst combined with [Ru(bpy)3](PF6)2 as a photoredox sensitizer allows for the visible-light-activated redox coupling of α-silylamines with 2-acyl imidazoles to afford, after desilylation, 1,2-amino-alcohols in yields of 69-88% and with high enantioselectivity (54-99% ee). The reaction is proposed to proceed via an electron exchange between the α-silylamine (electron donor) and the rhodium-chelated 2-acyl imidazole (electron acceptor), followed by a stereocontrolled radical-radical reaction. Substrate scope and control experiments reveal that the trimethylsilyl group plays a crucial role in this reductive umpolung of the carbonyl group.

  1. Bifunctional Rhodium Intercalator Conjugates as Mismatch-Directing DNA Alkylating Agents

    OpenAIRE

    Schatzschneider, Ulrich; Barton, Jacqueline K.

    2004-01-01

    A conjugate of a DNA mismatch-specific rhodium intercalator, containing the bulky chrysenediimine ligand, and an aniline mustard has been prepared, and targeting of mismatches in DNA by this conjugate has been examined. The preferential alkylation of mismatched over fully matched DNA is found by a mobility shift assay at concentrations where untethered organic mustards show little reaction. The binding site of the Rh intercalator was determined by DNA photocleavage, and the position of covale...

  2. Dynamical model of computation of the rhodium self-powered neutron detector current

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erben, O.; Slovacek, M.; Zerola, L.

    1992-01-01

    A model is presented for the calculation of the rhodium self-powered neutron detector current in dependence on the neutron flux density during reactor core transients. The total signal consists of a beta emission, prompt, and gamma component and a background signal. The model has been verified by means of experimental data obtained during measurements on the LVR-15 research reactor and at the Dukovany nuclear power plant. (author) 9 figs., 21 refs

  3. Rhodium-catalyzed asymmetric hydroboration of γ,δ-unsaturated amide derivatives: δ-borylated amides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoang, G L; Zhang, S; Takacs, J M

    2018-05-08

    γ,δ-Unsaturated amides in which the alkene moiety bears an aryl or heteroaryl substituent undergo regioselective rhodium-catalyzed δ-borylation by pinacolborane to afford chiral secondary benzylic boronic esters. The results contrast the γ-borylation of γ,δ-unsaturated amides in which the disubstituted alkene moiety bears only alkyl substituents; the reversal in regiochemistry is coupled with a reversal in the sense of π-facial selectivity.

  4. Substrate-induced antiferromagnetism of ultrathin iron overlayers on the iridium and rhodium (001) surfaces

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Máca, František; Kudrnovský, Josef; Drchal, Václav; Turek, Ilja; Bengone, O.; Redinger, J.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 11, - (2009), s. 38-40 ISSN 1642-6037 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/07/0456; GA MŠk OC09028 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520; CEZ:AV0Z20410507 Keywords : iridium * rhodium * iron * magnetismus in thin layers * density functional calculations Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism

  5. Identification of short-lived neutron-rich ruthenium and rhodium isotopes in fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franz, G.; Herrmann, G.

    1975-01-01

    Short-lived ruthenium and rhodium isotopes ( 107 Ru, 108 Ru, 108 Rh, 109 Ru, 109 Rh, 110 Ru, 110 Rh, 111 Ru, 111 Rh, 112 Ru, 112 Rh, 113 Ru) have been separated from fission products by a rapid chemical procedure and identified by means of γ-ray spectroscopy. Nuclides with half-lives down to 3 sec were accessible. Ruthenium isotopes up to mass number 113 have been identified. (author)

  6. Rhodium-catalyzed C-H functionalization with N-acylsaccharins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hongxiang; Liu, Tingting; Cui, Ming; Li, Yue; Jian, Junsheng; Wang, Hui; Zeng, Zhuo

    2017-01-18

    A rhodium-catalyzed C-H functionalization with activated amides by decarbonylation has been developed. Notably, this is the first C-H arylation employing N-acylsaccharins as coupling partners to give biaryls in good to excellent yields. The highlight of the work is the high tolerance of functional groups such as formyl, ester, and vinyl and the use of a removable directing group.

  7. Rhodium-catalyzed asymmetric hydrogenation of unprotected NH imines assisted by a thiourea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Qingyang; Wen, Jialin; Tan, Renchang; Huang, Kexuan; Metola, Pedro; Wang, Rui; Anslyn, Eric V; Zhang, Xumu

    2014-08-04

    Asymmetric hydrogenation of unprotected NH imines catalyzed by rhodium/bis(phosphine)-thiourea provided chiral amines with up to 97% yield and 95% ee. (1)H NMR studies, coupled with control experiments, implied that catalytic chloride-bound intermediates were involved in the mechanism through a dual hydrogen-bonding interaction. Deuteration experiments proved that the hydrogenation proceeded through a pathway consistent with an imine. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Regioselective syntheses of 1,2-benzothiazines by rhodium-catalyzed annulation reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Ying; Bolm, Carsten

    2015-10-12

    Rhodium-catalyzed directed carbene insertions into aromatic CH bonds of S-aryl sulfoximines lead to intermediates, which upon dehydration provide 1,2-benzothiazines in excellent yields. The domino-type process is regioselective and shows a high functional-group tolerance. It is scalable, and the only by-products are dinitrogen and water. Three illustrative transformations underscore the synthetic value of the products. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Rhodium-catalyzed chemo-, regio-, and enantioselective addition of 2-pyridones to terminal allenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Changkun; Kähny, Matthias; Breit, Bernhard

    2014-12-08

    A rhodium-catalyzed chemo-, regio-, and enantioselective addition of 2-pyridones to terminal allenes to give branched N-allyl 2-pyridones is reported. Preliminary mechanistic studies support the hypothesis that the reaction was initiated from the more acidic 2-hydroxypyridine form, and the initial kinetic O-allylation product was finally converted into the thermodynamically more stable N-allyl 2-pyridones. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Rhodium-catalyzed triarylphosphine synthesis via cross-coupling of aryl iodides and acylphosphines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiefang Yang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Rhodium(I-catalyzed C–P cross-coupling reaction with aryl iodides and acylphosphines was disclosed for a straight forward synthesis of triarylphosphines. The acylphosphines were successfully employed as both the phosphorus source and the ligand to the Rh(I catalyst. The triarylphosphines could be afforded in a yield up to 98% with good toleration of wide functional groups.

  11. Divergent Reactivity of Rhodium(I) Carbenes Derived from Indole Annulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaoxun; Li, Hui; Song, Wangze; Tseng, Po-Sen; Liu, Lingyan; Guzei, Ilia A; Tang, Weiping

    2015-10-26

    Rhodium(I) carbenes were generated from propargylic alcohol derivatives as the result of a dehydrative indole annulation. Depending on the choice of the electron-withdrawing group on the aniline nitrogen nucleophile, either a cyclopropanation product or dimerization product was obtained chemoselectively. Intramolecular hydroamidation occurred for the same type of propargylic alcohol derivatives when other transition-metal catalysts were employed. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Ammonia synthesis in the presence of rhodium-ruthenium-iridium carbonyl clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fedoseev, I.V.; Solov'ev, N.V.

    2007-01-01

    Researches in the field of platinum metal coordination compounds, where nitrogen enters as a ligand in coordination sphere of metal, are discussed. Results of experiments on the ammonia synthesis during the CO+N 2 mixture passing through alkali solution containing mixture of carbonyl clusters of rhodium, ruthenium and iridium at atmospheric pressure are given. Technique of the experiment and steps of assumed reactions of nitrogen fixation by Rh, Ir and Ru carbonyl clusters are demonstrated [ru

  13. Rhodium SPND's Error Reduction using Extended Kalman Filter combined with Time Dependent Neutron Diffusion Equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jeong Hun; Park, Tong Kyu; Jeon, Seong Su

    2014-01-01

    The Rhodium SPND is accurate in steady-state conditions but responds slowly to changes in neutron flux. The slow response time of Rhodium SPND precludes its direct use for control and protection purposes specially when nuclear power plant is used for load following. To shorten the response time of Rhodium SPND, there were some acceleration methods but they could not reflect neutron flux distribution in reactor core. On the other hands, some methods for core power distribution monitoring could not consider the slow response time of Rhodium SPND and noise effect. In this paper, time dependent neutron diffusion equation is directly used to estimate reactor power distribution and extended Kalman filter method is used to correct neutron flux with Rhodium SPND's and to shorten the response time of them. Extended Kalman filter is effective tool to reduce measurement error of Rhodium SPND's and even simple FDM to solve time dependent neutron diffusion equation can be an effective measure. This method reduces random errors of detectors and can follow reactor power level without cross-section change. It means monitoring system may not calculate cross-section at every time steps and computing time will be shorten. To minimize delay of Rhodium SPND's conversion function h should be evaluated in next study. Neutron and Rh-103 reaction has several decay chains and half-lives over 40 seconds causing delay of detection. Time dependent neutron diffusion equation will be combined with decay chains. Power level and distribution change corresponding movement of control rod will be tested with more complicated reference code as well as xenon effect. With these efforts, final result is expected to be used as a powerful monitoring tool of nuclear reactor core

  14. Rhodium SPND's Error Reduction using Extended Kalman Filter combined with Time Dependent Neutron Diffusion Equation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jeong Hun; Park, Tong Kyu; Jeon, Seong Su [FNC Technology Co., Ltd., Yongin (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    The Rhodium SPND is accurate in steady-state conditions but responds slowly to changes in neutron flux. The slow response time of Rhodium SPND precludes its direct use for control and protection purposes specially when nuclear power plant is used for load following. To shorten the response time of Rhodium SPND, there were some acceleration methods but they could not reflect neutron flux distribution in reactor core. On the other hands, some methods for core power distribution monitoring could not consider the slow response time of Rhodium SPND and noise effect. In this paper, time dependent neutron diffusion equation is directly used to estimate reactor power distribution and extended Kalman filter method is used to correct neutron flux with Rhodium SPND's and to shorten the response time of them. Extended Kalman filter is effective tool to reduce measurement error of Rhodium SPND's and even simple FDM to solve time dependent neutron diffusion equation can be an effective measure. This method reduces random errors of detectors and can follow reactor power level without cross-section change. It means monitoring system may not calculate cross-section at every time steps and computing time will be shorten. To minimize delay of Rhodium SPND's conversion function h should be evaluated in next study. Neutron and Rh-103 reaction has several decay chains and half-lives over 40 seconds causing delay of detection. Time dependent neutron diffusion equation will be combined with decay chains. Power level and distribution change corresponding movement of control rod will be tested with more complicated reference code as well as xenon effect. With these efforts, final result is expected to be used as a powerful monitoring tool of nuclear reactor core.

  15. Status of plutonium ceramic immobilization processes and immobilization forms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ebbinghaus, B.B.; Van Konynenburg, R.A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Vance, E.R.; Jostsons, A. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization, Menai (Australia)] [and others

    1996-05-01

    Immobilization in a ceramic followed by permanent emplacement in a repository or borehole is one of the alternatives currently being considered by the Fissile Materials Disposition Program for the ultimate disposal of excess weapons-grade plutonium. To make Pu recovery more difficult, radioactive cesium may also be incorporated into the immobilization form. Valuable data are already available for ceramics form R&D efforts to immobilize high-level and mixed wastes. Ceramics have a high capacity for actinides, cesium, and some neutron absorbers. A unique characteristic of ceramics is the existence of mineral analogues found in nature that have demonstrated actinide immobilization over geologic time periods. The ceramic form currently being considered for plutonium disposition is a synthetic rock (SYNROC) material composed primarily of zirconolite (CaZrTi{sub 2}O{sub 7}), the desired actinide host phase, with lesser amounts of hollandite (BaAl{sub 2}Ti{sub 6}O{sub 16}) and rutile (TiO{sub 2}). Alternative actinide host phases are also being considered. These include pyrochlore (Gd{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 7}), zircon (ZrSiO{sub 4}), and monazite (CePO{sub 4}), to name a few of the most promising. R&D activities to address important technical issues are discussed. Primarily these include moderate scale hot press fabrications with plutonium, direct loading of PuO{sub 2} powder, cold press and sinter fabrication methods, and immobilization form formulation issues.

  16. Status of plutonium ceramic immobilization processes and immobilization forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebbinghaus, B.B.; Van Konynenburg, R.A.; Vance, E.R.; Jostsons, A.

    1996-01-01

    Immobilization in a ceramic followed by permanent emplacement in a repository or borehole is one of the alternatives currently being considered by the Fissile Materials Disposition Program for the ultimate disposal of excess weapons-grade plutonium. To make Pu recovery more difficult, radioactive cesium may also be incorporated into the immobilization form. Valuable data are already available for ceramics form R ampersand D efforts to immobilize high-level and mixed wastes. Ceramics have a high capacity for actinides, cesium, and some neutron absorbers. A unique characteristic of ceramics is the existence of mineral analogues found in nature that have demonstrated actinide immobilization over geologic time periods. The ceramic form currently being considered for plutonium disposition is a synthetic rock (SYNROC) material composed primarily of zirconolite (CaZrTi 2 O 7 ), the desired actinide host phase, with lesser amounts of hollandite (BaAl 2 Ti 6 O 16 ) and rutile (TiO 2 ). Alternative actinide host phases are also being considered. These include pyrochlore (Gd 2 Ti 2 O 7 ), zircon (ZrSiO 4 ), and monazite (CePO 4 ), to name a few of the most promising. R ampersand D activities to address important technical issues are discussed. Primarily these include moderate scale hot press fabrications with plutonium, direct loading of PuO 2 powder, cold press and sinter fabrication methods, and immobilization form formulation issues

  17. Colloidal stability, surface characterisation and intracellular accumulation of Rhodium(II) citrate coated superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles in breast tumour: a promising platform for cancer therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva Nunes, Eloiza da [Universidade Federal de Goias, Campus Samambaia, Instituto de Quimica (Brazil); Lemos Brettas Carneiro, Marcella; Guirelli Simoes de Oliveira, Ricardo; Nair Bao, Sonia [Universidade de Brasilia (UnB), Instituto de Ciencias Biologicas (Brazil); Ribeiro de Souza, Aparecido, E-mail: ardsouza@quimica.ufg.br [Universidade Federal de Goias, Campus Samambaia, Instituto de Quimica (Brazil)

    2013-06-15

    The colloidal stability of a rhodium(II) citrate, Rh{sub 2}(H{sub 2}cit){sub 4}, coating on the surface of maghemite ({gamma}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) nanoparticles was studied and compared in different dispersion media. The adsorption of Rh{sub 2}(H{sub 2}cit){sub 4} at the water-maghemite interface was evaluated as a function of pH and complex concentration. A slight pH-dependent adsorption of the complex was observed with a maximum at pH 3. The colloidal stability of the functionalised nanoparticles with different amounts of Rh{sub 2}(H{sub 2}cit){sub 4} as a function of pH was evaluated using dynamic light scattering measurements. The particles have a mean magnetic core size of 5.6 nm and the hydrodynamic diameters are approximately 60 nm, which remained unchanged in the pH range in which the samples were a stable sol. The tolerance to different dispersion media, which were deionised water, saline, phosphate-buffered saline (PBS), foetal bovine serum (FBS) and NaCl solutions with different concentrations, was investigated. At moderate ionic strength, the colloidal stability of the dispersions was similar in saline and in PBS compared to the stability of dispersions diluted in water. Moreover, the intracellular accumulation of nanoparticles in 4T1 breast tumour was examined by ultrastructural analysis performed by transmission electron microscopy. The rhodium(II) citrate-coated nanoparticles were found mostly in the cytoplasm and nucleus. Thus, we suggest that these SPIO nanoparticles functionalized with Rh{sub 2}(H{sub 2}Cit){sub 4} can be potential tools for anticancer therapy.

  18. Selectivity of a heterogeneous rhodium catalyst for the carbonylation of monohydric alcohols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christensen, B; Scurrell, M S

    1977-01-01

    Selectivity of a heterogeneous rhodium catalyst for the carbonylation of monohydric alcohols with carbon monoxide in the presence of the corresponding alkyl iodides as promotors was studied in a glass reactor at approx. 0.05:1 alcohol/carbon monoxide ratio. The 1% by wt rhodium-zeolite catalyst was prepared by immersing a Linde molecular sieve zeolite Type 13X in rhodium trichloride at 80/sup 0/C for 15 hr. Methanol was converted to methyl acetate at 433/sup 0/-513/sup 0/K with selectivites > 90% even at the highest temperatures, and dimethyl ether was by-produced. In the absence of methyl iodide, the carbonylation rate decreased drastically but the dehydration was virtually unaffected. The selectivity for ethanol carbonylation decreased from 99% at 383/sup 0/K to 6% at 523/sup 0/K due to the formation of ethylene (predominant at > 470/sup 0/K) and diethyl ether. The only product of the reaction with propan-2-ol studied at 433/sup 0/ or 473/sup 0/K was propene with 100% conversion at 473/sup 0/K. These results are consistent with the relative ease of reactant dehydration on polar catalysts. Table and 13 references.

  19. Spatial and temporal distribution of platinum, palladium and rhodium in Zagreb air.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinkovec, Jasmina; Pehnec, Gordana; Godec, Ranka; Davila, Silvije; Bešlić, Ivan

    2018-09-15

    Platinum (Pt), palladium (Pd) and rhodium (Rh) are most widely used in the production of automotive catalytic converters that serve to reduce toxic emissions from motor vehicles. The aim of this study was to quantitatively determine the levels of platinum, palladium and rhodium in the PM 10 and PM 2.5 fraction of airborne particle matter and find their spatial and temporal distribution at different polluted areas of the city of Zagreb, Croatia. The method used in this paper included weekly sampling of airborne particle matter on quartz filters, microwave digestion in acid under high pressure and temperature, and analysis by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP MS). The results have shown that the highest mean values at all three sampling stations (North, Center, South) were obtained for palladium (3.856 pg m -3 , 5.396 pg m -3 , 5.600 pg m -3 ) and the lowest for rhodium (0.444 pg m -3 , 0.643 pg m -3 , 0.750 pg m -3 ). The average mass concentrations of platinum group elements (PGE) in PM 10 increased for all three elements in the direction North Zagreb are the first results of their kind for this area and will provide insights into the contribution of catalytic converters to the presence of these elements in the environment. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Rhodium self-powered detector for monitoring neutron fluence, energy production, and isotopic composition of fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sokolov, A.P.; Pochivalin, G.P.; Shipovskikh, Yu.M.; Garusov, Yu.V.; Chernikov, O.G.; Shevchenko, V.G.

    1993-01-01

    The use of self-powered detectors (SPDs) with a rhodium emitter customarily involves monitoring of neutron fields in the core of a nuclear reactor. Since current in an SPD is generated primarily because of the neutron flux, which is responsible for the dynamics of particular nuclear transformations, including fission reactions of heavy isotopes, the detector signal can be attributed unambiguously to energy release at the location of the detector. Computation modeling performed with the KOMDPS package of programs of the current formation in a rhodium SPD along with the neutron-physical processes that occur in the reactor core makes it possible to take account of the effect of the principal factors characterizing the operating conditions and the design features of the fuel channel and the detector, reveal quantitative relations between the generated signal and individual physical parameters, and determine the metrological parameters of the detector. The formation and transport of changed particles in the sensitive part of the SPC is calculated by the Monte Carlo method. The emitter activation, neutron transport, and dynamics of the isotopic composition in the fuel channel containing the SPD are determined by solving the kinetic equation in the multigroup representation of the neutron spectrum, using the discrete ordinate method. In this work the authors consider the operation of a rhodium SPD in a bundle of 49 fuel channels of the RBMK-1000 reactor with a fuel enrichment of 2.4% from the time it is inserted into a fresh channel

  1. Rhodium (II) cycle alkanecarboxylate: synthesis, spectroscopic and thermo analytic studies and evaluation of the antitumor potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza, Aparecido Ribeiro de

    1995-01-01

    Four new rhodium(II) carboxylates (cyclopropane, cyclobutane, cyclopentane, and cyclohexanecarboxylate), and other already known rhodium (II) carboxylates (acetate, propionate, butyrate, metoxyacetate, dichloroacetate, and trifluoroacetate), have been prepared for study in this work. The compounds were characterized by elementary and thermogravimetric analysis, magnetic susceptibility, and electronic, Raman, and infrared spectroscopy. The reaction of Rh CL 3 .aq with the sodium carboxylates was studied aiming to improve the understanding of the redox process involved. Spectroscopy studies (Raman and electronic) were made to examine the transition involved in the Rh-Rh and Rh-O bonds. The results have shown a direct relation between the force of the carboxylic acid and the Rh-O force, but show a inverse relation with the Rh-Rh bond force. Thermal analysis studies were undertaken and the obtained date show a resemblance of the TG/DTG curves with that found in literature. In the other hand, the DSC curves show a different results: in open crucible, the peaks associated with the cage breakdown are exothermic and, in closed crucible this peaks are endothermic. The thermodecomposition products were analyzed. The evolved gases were identified by GC?MS and 1 H and 13 C NMR spectra. The residues were analyzed by X-ray diffraction. Antitumor activity of rhodium cyclopropanecarboxylate was evaluated in vitro (cell cultures K562 and Ehrlich) and in vivo (Balb-c mice with ascite Ehrlich tumor), indicating an increased life span (87.5%) of the treated animals. (author)

  2. Rhodium-coated mirrors deposited by magnetron sputtering for fusion applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marot, L.; Temmermann, G. de; Oelhafen, P.; Mathys, D.; Covarel, G.; Litnovsky, A.

    2007-01-01

    Metallic mirrors will be essential components of all optical spectroscopy and imaging systems for plasma diagnostics that will be used in ITER. Any change in the mirror performance, in particular its reflectivity, will influence the quality and reliability of detected signals. Due to its high reflectivity in the visible wavelength range and its low sputtering yield, rhodium may be a good candidate material for first mirrors in ITER. However, the very high price of the raw material calls for using it in the form of a film deposited onto metallic substrates. The development of a reliable technique for the preparation of high reflectivity rhodium films is therefore of the highest importance. Rhodium layers with thicknesses of up to 2 μm were produced on different relevant substrates (Mo, Stainless Steel, Cu) by magnetron sputtering. Produced films exhibit a low roughness, crystallite size of about 10 nm with a dense columnar structure. No impurities were detected on the surface after deposition. Scratch test results demonstrate that adhesion properties increase with the substrate hardness. The detailed optical characterizations of Rh coated mirrors as well as the results of erosion tests performed both under laboratory conditions and in TEXTOR will be presented in this paper. (orig.)

  3. Cell-Selective Biological Activity of Rhodium Metalloinsertors Correlates with Subcellular Localization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komor, Alexis C.; Schneider, Curtis J.; Weidmann, Alyson G.; Barton, Jacqueline K.

    2013-01-01

    Deficiencies in the mismatch repair (MMR) pathway are associated with several types of cancers, as well as resistance to commonly used chemotherapeutics. Rhodium metalloinsertors have been found to bind DNA mismatches with high affinity and specificity in vitro, and also exhibit cell-selective cytotoxicity, targeting MMR-deficient cells over MMR-proficient cells. Ten distinct metalloinsertors with varying lipophilicities have been synthesized and their mismatch binding affinities and biological activities determined. Although DNA photocleavage experiments demonstrate that their binding affinities are quite similar, their cell-selective antiproliferative and cytotoxic activities vary significantly. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) experiments have uncovered a relationship between the subcellular distribution of these metalloinsertors and their biological activities. Specifically, we find that all of our metalloinsertors localize in the nucleus at sufficient concentrations for binding to DNA mismatches. However, the metalloinsertors with high rhodium localization in the mitochondria show toxicity that is not selective for MMR-deficient cells, whereas metalloinsertors with less mitochondrial rhodium show activity that is highly selective for MMR-deficient versus proficient cells. This work supports the notion that specific targeting of the metalloinsertors to nuclear DNA gives rise to their cell-selective cytotoxic and antiproliferative activities. The selectivity in cellular targeting depends upon binding to mismatches in genomic DNA. PMID:23137296

  4. Immobilization needs and technology programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gray, L.W.; Kan, T.; Shaw, H.; Armantrout, G.

    1995-01-01

    In the aftermath of the Cold War, the US and Russia agreed to large reductions in nuclear weapons. To aid in the selection of long-term management options, DOE has undertaken a multifaceted study to select options for storage and disposition of plutonium in keeping with US policy that plutonium must be subjected to the highest standards of safety, security, and accountability. One alternative being considered is immobilization. To arrive at a suitable immobilization form, we first reviewed published information on high-level waste immobilization technologies and identified 72 possible plutonium immobilization forms to be prescreened. Surviving forms were further screened using multi-attribute utility analysis to determine the most promising technology families. Promising immobilization families were further evaluated to identify chemical, engineering, environmental, safety, and health problems that remain to be solved prior to making technical decisions as to the viability of using the form for long- term disposition of plutonium. From this evaluation, a detailed research and development plan has been developed to provide answers to these remaining questions

  5. The reaction mechanism of the partial oxidation of methane to synthesis gas: a transient kinetic study over rhodium and a comparison with platinum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mallens, E.P.J.; Hoebink, J.H.B.J.; Marin, G.B.M.M.

    1997-01-01

    The partial oxidation of methane to synthesis gas over rhodium sponge has been investigated by admitting pulses of pure methane and pure oxygen as well as mixtures of methane and oxygen to rhodium sponge at temperatures from 873 to 1023 K. Moreover, pulses of oxygen followed by methane and vice

  6. Controlled Oxygen Chemisorption on an Alumina Supported Rhodium Catalyst. The Formation of a New Metal-Metal Oxide Interface Determined with EXAFS.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koningsberger, D.C.; Martens, J.H.A.; Prins, R.

    1989-01-01

    An alumina-supported rhodium catalyst has been studied with EXAFS. After reduction and evacuation, oxygen was admitted at 100 and 300 K. EXAFS spectra of the catalyst after oxygen admission at 100 K indicated the beginning of oxidation. At 300 K only a small part of the rhodium particles remained

  7. Immobilization of cellulase by radiation polymerization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumakura, M.; Kaetsu, I.

    1983-01-01

    Immobilization of cellulase by radiation polymerization at low temperatures was studied. The enzymatic activity of immobilized cellulase pellets varied with the monomer, enzyme concentration, and the thickness of immobilized cellulase pellets. The optimum monomer concentration in the immobilization of cellulase was 30-50% at the pellet thickness of 1.0 mm, in which the enzymatic activity was 50%. The enzymatic activity of immobilized cellulase pellets was examined using various substrates such as cellobiose, carboxymethylcellulose, and paper pretreated by radiation. It was found that irradiated paper can be hydrolyzed by immobilized cellulase pellets. (author)

  8. MUCOADHESIVE GEL WITH IMMOBILIZED LYSOZYME: PREPARATION AND PROPERTIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dekina S. S.

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The study of non-covalent immobilized lysozyme, as well as physico-chemical and biochemical properties of obtained mucoadhesive gel was the aim of the research. Lysozyme activity was determined by bacteriolytic method (Micrococcus lysodeikticus cells acetone powder was a substrate. Lysozyme immobilization was conducted by the method of entrapment in gel. Enzyme carrier interaction was studied by viscometric, spectrophotometric and spectrofluorimetric methods. Mucoadhesive gel with immobilized lysozyme, possessing antiinflammatory and antimicrobial activities, was prepared. Due to immobilization, protein-polymer complex with the original enzymatic activity was formed. The product is characterized by high mucoadhesive properties, quantitative retaining of protein and bacteriolytic activity, prolonged release of the enzyme, improved biochemical characteristics (extended pH-activity profile, stability in acidic medium and during storage for 2 years, and it is perspective for further studies. The proposed method for lysozyme immobilization in the carboxymethyl cellulose sodium salt gel allows to obtain a stable, highly efficient product, with high adhesive properties for attachment to the mucous membranes, that is promising for use in biomedicine.

  9. Effective L-Tyrosine Hydroxylation by Native and Immobilized Tyrosinase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Małgorzata Cieńska

    Full Text Available Hydroxylation of L-tyrosine to 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA by immobilized tyrosinase in the presence of ascorbic acid (AH2, which reduces DOPA-quinone to L-DOPA, is characterized by low reaction yields that are mainly caused by the suicide inactivation of tyrosinase by L-DOPA and AH2. The main aim of this work was to compare processes with native and immobilized tyrosinase to identify the conditions that limit suicide inactivation and produce substrate conversions to L-DOPA of above 50% using HPLC analysis. It was shown that immobilized tyrosinase does not suffer from partitioning and diffusion effects, allowing a direct comparison of the reactions performed with both forms of the enzyme. In typical processes, additional aeration was applied and boron ions to produce the L-DOPA and AH2 complex and hydroxylamine to close the cycle of enzyme active center transformations. It was shown that the commonly used pH 9 buffer increased enzyme stability, with concomitant reduced reactivity of 76%, and that under these conditions, the maximal substrate conversion was approximately 25 (native to 30% (immobilized enzyme. To increase reaction yield, the pH of the reaction mixture was reduced to 8 and 7, producing L-DOPA yields of approximately 95% (native enzyme and 70% (immobilized. A three-fold increase in the bound enzyme load achieved 95% conversion in two successive runs, but in the third one, tyrosinase lost its activity due to strong suicide inactivation caused by L-DOPA processing. In this case, the cost of the immobilized enzyme preparation is not overcome by its reuse over time, and native tyrosinase may be more economically feasible for a single use in L-DOPA production. The practical importance of the obtained results is that highly efficient hydroxylation of monophenols by tyrosinase can be obtained by selecting the proper reaction pH and is a compromise between complexation and enzyme reactivity.

  10. Effective L-Tyrosine Hydroxylation by Native and Immobilized Tyrosinase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewańczuk, Marcin; Koźlecki, Tomasz; Liesiene, Jolanta; Bryjak, Jolanta

    2016-01-01

    Hydroxylation of L-tyrosine to 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA) by immobilized tyrosinase in the presence of ascorbic acid (AH2), which reduces DOPA-quinone to L-DOPA, is characterized by low reaction yields that are mainly caused by the suicide inactivation of tyrosinase by L-DOPA and AH2. The main aim of this work was to compare processes with native and immobilized tyrosinase to identify the conditions that limit suicide inactivation and produce substrate conversions to L-DOPA of above 50% using HPLC analysis. It was shown that immobilized tyrosinase does not suffer from partitioning and diffusion effects, allowing a direct comparison of the reactions performed with both forms of the enzyme. In typical processes, additional aeration was applied and boron ions to produce the L-DOPA and AH2 complex and hydroxylamine to close the cycle of enzyme active center transformations. It was shown that the commonly used pH 9 buffer increased enzyme stability, with concomitant reduced reactivity of 76%, and that under these conditions, the maximal substrate conversion was approximately 25 (native) to 30% (immobilized enzyme). To increase reaction yield, the pH of the reaction mixture was reduced to 8 and 7, producing L-DOPA yields of approximately 95% (native enzyme) and 70% (immobilized). A three-fold increase in the bound enzyme load achieved 95% conversion in two successive runs, but in the third one, tyrosinase lost its activity due to strong suicide inactivation caused by L-DOPA processing. In this case, the cost of the immobilized enzyme preparation is not overcome by its reuse over time, and native tyrosinase may be more economically feasible for a single use in L-DOPA production. The practical importance of the obtained results is that highly efficient hydroxylation of monophenols by tyrosinase can be obtained by selecting the proper reaction pH and is a compromise between complexation and enzyme reactivity. PMID:27711193

  11. Effective L-Tyrosine Hydroxylation by Native and Immobilized Tyrosinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cieńska, Małgorzata; Labus, Karolina; Lewańczuk, Marcin; Koźlecki, Tomasz; Liesiene, Jolanta; Bryjak, Jolanta

    2016-01-01

    Hydroxylation of L-tyrosine to 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA) by immobilized tyrosinase in the presence of ascorbic acid (AH2), which reduces DOPA-quinone to L-DOPA, is characterized by low reaction yields that are mainly caused by the suicide inactivation of tyrosinase by L-DOPA and AH2. The main aim of this work was to compare processes with native and immobilized tyrosinase to identify the conditions that limit suicide inactivation and produce substrate conversions to L-DOPA of above 50% using HPLC analysis. It was shown that immobilized tyrosinase does not suffer from partitioning and diffusion effects, allowing a direct comparison of the reactions performed with both forms of the enzyme. In typical processes, additional aeration was applied and boron ions to produce the L-DOPA and AH2 complex and hydroxylamine to close the cycle of enzyme active center transformations. It was shown that the commonly used pH 9 buffer increased enzyme stability, with concomitant reduced reactivity of 76%, and that under these conditions, the maximal substrate conversion was approximately 25 (native) to 30% (immobilized enzyme). To increase reaction yield, the pH of the reaction mixture was reduced to 8 and 7, producing L-DOPA yields of approximately 95% (native enzyme) and 70% (immobilized). A three-fold increase in the bound enzyme load achieved 95% conversion in two successive runs, but in the third one, tyrosinase lost its activity due to strong suicide inactivation caused by L-DOPA processing. In this case, the cost of the immobilized enzyme preparation is not overcome by its reuse over time, and native tyrosinase may be more economically feasible for a single use in L-DOPA production. The practical importance of the obtained results is that highly efficient hydroxylation of monophenols by tyrosinase can be obtained by selecting the proper reaction pH and is a compromise between complexation and enzyme reactivity.

  12. Immobilization of acid digestion residue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenhalgh, W.O.; Allen, C.R.

    1983-01-01

    Acid digestion treatment of nuclear waste is similar to incineration processes and results in the bulk of the waste being reduced in volume and weight to some residual solids termed residue. The residue is composed of various dispersible solid materials and typically contains the resultant radioactivity from the waste. This report describes the immobilization of the residue in portland cement, borosilicate glass, and some other waste forms. Diagrams showing the cement and glass virtification parameters are included in the report as well as process steps and candidate waste product forms. Cement immobilization is simplest and probably least expensive; glass vitrification exhibits the best overall volume reduction ratio

  13. Supported Rh-phosphine complex catalysts for continuous gas-phase decarbonylation of aldehydes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malcho, Phillip; Garcia-Suarez, Eduardo J.; Mentzel, Uffe Vie

    2014-01-01

    Heterogeneous silica supported rhodium-phosphine complex catalysts are employed for the first time in the catalytic decarbonylation of aldehydes in continuous gas-phase. The reaction protocol is exemplified for the decarbonylation of p-tolualdehyde to toluene and further extended to other aromatic...

  14. Radiation immobilization of catalase and its application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Guanghui; Ha Hongfei; Wang Xia; Wu Jilan

    1988-01-01

    Catalase was immobilized by a chemical method on porous polyacrylamide particles produced by radiation polymerization of acrylamide monomer at low temperature (-78 0 C). Activity of immobilized catalase was enhanced distinctly by joining a chemical arm to the support. The method of recovery of catalase activity on immobilized polymer was found by soaking it in certain buffer. The treatment of H 2 O 2 both in aqueous solution and alcoholic solution by using the immobilized catalase was performed. (author)

  15. Kinetics and mechanism of the reactions of hexaaqua rhodium (III ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    oxidation states ranging from +1 to +6. Interest on ... reactivity, anti tumour activity, electronic structure, and catalytic functions of its complexes with poten- tial industrial ... aminecobalt (III) complexes in which it is S-bonded to the metal centre.8 ...

  16. Immobilization of bacterial proteases on water-solved polymer by means of electron beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonchar, A. M.; Auslender, V. L.

    1996-12-01

    Possibility of electron beam usage for proteases' immobilization on 1,4-polyalkylene oxide (1,4-PAO) was studied to obtain biologically active complex for multi-purpose usage. It is shown that immobilization of Bacillus Subtilis protease takes place due to free-radical linking of enzyme and carrier with formation of mycellium-like structures. Immobilization improves heat resistance of enzyme up to 60°C without substrate and up to 80°C in presence of substrate, widens range of pH activity in comparison with non-immobilized forms. Immobilized proteases do not contain peroxides or long-live radicals. Our results permitted to create technologies for production of medical and veterinary preparations, active components for wool washing agents and leather fabrication technology.

  17. Immobilization of bacterial proteases on water-solved polymer by means of electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonchar, A.M.; Auslender, V.L.

    1996-01-01

    Possibility of electron beam usage for proteases' immobilization on 1,4-polyalkylene oxide (1,4-PAO) was studied to obtain biologically active complex for multi-purpose usage. It is shown that immobilization of Bacillus Subtilis protease takes place due to free-radical linking of enzyme and carrier with formation of mycellium-like structures. Immobilization improves heat resistance of enzyme up to 60 o C without substrate and up to 80 o C in presence of substrate, widens range of pH activity in comparison with non-immobilized forms. Immobilized proteases do not contain peroxides or long-live radicals. Our results permitted to create technologies for production of medical and veterinary preparations, active components for wool washing agents and leather fabrication technology. (Author)

  18. Immobilization and characterization of inulinase from Ulocladium

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ulocladium atrum inulinase was immobilized on different composite membranes composed of chitosan/nonwoven fabrics. Km values of free and immobilized U. atrum inulinase on different composite membranes were calculated. The enzyme had optimum pH at 5.6 for free and immobilized U. atrum inulinase on polyester ...

  19. Immobilization of Mitochondria on Graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-29

    poly-L-lysine has also been reported for immobilization of yeast mitochondria. Coating was performed by repetitive washing of cover slips with 0.02...of Poly-L-lysine Applications of PLL PLL is a production of bacterial fermentation and is used as a food preservative. In biology, PLL is used in

  20. Moessbauer spectroscopic characterisation of catalysts obtained by interaction between tetra-n-butyl-tin and silica or silica supported rhodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Millet, J.M.M.; Toyir, J.; Didillon, B.; Candy, J.P.; Nedez, C.; Basset, J.M.

    1997-01-01

    Moessbauer spectroscopy at 78 K was used to study the interaction between tetra-n-butyl-tin and the surfaces of silica or silica supported rhodium. At room temperature, the tetra-n-butyl-tin was physically adsorbed on the surfaces. After reaction under hydrogen at 373 K, the formation of grafted organometallic fragments on the Rh surface was confirmed whereas with pure silica, ≡SiO-Sn(n-C 4 H 9 ) 3 moieties were observed. After treatment at 523 K, the rhodium grafted organometallic species was completely decomposed and there was formation of a defined bimetallic RhSn compound

  1. Electrooxidative Rhodium-Catalyzed C-H/C-H Activation: Electricity as Oxidant for Cross-Dehydrogenative Alkenylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Youai; Kong, Wei-Jun; Struwe, Julia; Sauermann, Nicolas; Rogge, Torben; Scheremetjew, Alexej; Ackermann, Lutz

    2018-04-06

    Rhodium(III) catalysis has enabled a plethora of oxidative C-H functionalizations, which predominantly employ stoichiometric amounts of toxic and/or expensive metal oxidants. In contrast, we describe the first electrochemical C-H activation by rhodium catalysis that avoids hazardous chemical oxidants. Thus, environmentally-benign twofold C-H/C-H functionalizations were accomplished with weakly-coordinating benzoic acids and benzamides, employing electricity as the terminal oxidant with H2 as the sole byproduct. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Cadmium immobilization by hydroxyapatite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smičiklas Ivana D.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The contamination of air, soil and water by cadmium is a great environmental problem. If cadmium occurs in nature in ionic form, soluble in water, it easily enters into the food chain. Hydroxyapatite (HAP, Ca-o(POAe(OH2 is a sparingly soluble salt and an excellent matrix for the removal of heavy metals from solutions. Considerable research attention has been paid to the bond between Cc/2+ ions and synthetic hydroxyapatite of known composition. The sorption mechanism is complex. The dominant process is ion exchange, but surface adsorption, surface complexation and coprecipitation can also contribute to the overall mechanism. The sorption capacity depends on the characteristics of hydroxyapatite itself and on the experimental conditions. Under optimum conditions a maximum capacity of 0.8 mol Cd2+/mol HAP can be achieved. HAP is a potential sorbent for the remediation of contaminated water and soil, for industrial waste treatment, and it is also referenced as a material that can be used as a barrier around waste depositories.

  3. Permeation of platinum and rhodium nanoparticles through intact and damaged human skin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mauro, Marcella; Crosera, Matteo; Bianco, Carlotta; Adami, Gianpiero; Montini, Tiziano; Fornasiero, Paolo; Jaganjac, Morana; Bovenzi, Massimo; Filon, Francesca Larese

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate percutaneous penetration of platinum and rhodium nanoparticles (PtNPs: 5.8 ± 0.9 nm, RhNPs: 5.3 ± 1.9 nm) through human skin. Salts compounds of these metals are sensitizers and some also carcinogenic agents. In vitro permeation experiments were performed using Franz diffusion cells with intact and damaged skin. PtNPs and RhNPs, stabilized with polyvinylpyrrolidone, were synthesized by reduction of Na 2 PtC l6 and RhCl 3 ·3H 2 O respectively. Suspensions with a concentration of 2.0 g/L of PtNPs and RhNPs were dispersed separately in synthetic sweat at pH 4.5 and applied as donor phases to the outer surface of the skin for 24 h. Measurements of the content of the metals in the receiving solution and in the skin were performed subsequently. Rhodium skin permeation was demonstrated through damaged skin, with a permeation flux of 0.04 ± 0.04 μg cm −2  h −1 and a lag time of 7.9 ± 1.1 h, while no traces of platinum were found in receiving solutions. Platinum and rhodium skin-analysis showed significantly higher concentrations of the metals in damaged skin. Rh and Pt applied as NPs can penetrate the skin barrier and Rh can be found in receiving solutions. These experiments pointed out the need for skin contamination prevention, since even a minor injury to the skin barrier can significantly increase penetration

  4. Thermodynamic assessment of the rhodium-ruthenium-oxygen (Rh-Ru-O) system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gossé, S.; Bordier, S.; Guéneau, C.; Brackx, E.; Domenger, R.; Rogez, J.

    2018-03-01

    Ruthenium (Ru) and rhodium (Rh) are abundant platinum-group metals formed during burn-up of nuclear fuels. Under normal operating conditions, Rh and Ru accumulate and predominantly form metallic precipitates with other fission products like Mo, Pd and Tc. In the framework of vitrification of high-level nuclear waste, these fission products are poorly soluble in molten glasses. They precipitate as metallic particles and oxide phases. Moreover, these Ru and Rh rich phases strongly depend on temperature and the oxygen fugacity of the glass melt. In case of severe accidental conditions with air ingress, oxidation of the Ru and Rh is possible. At low temperatures (T 1422 K for rhodium sesquioxide and T > 1815 K for ruthenium dioxide), they may decompose into (Rh)-FCC or (Ru)-HCP metallic phases and radiotoxic volatile gaseous species. A thermodynamic assessment of the Rh-Ru-O system will enable the prediction of: (1) the metallic and oxide phases that form during the vitrification of high-level nuclear wastes and (2) the release of volatile gaseous species during a severe accident. The Calphad method developed herein employs a thermodynamic approach in the investigation of the thermochemistry of rhodium and ruthenium at high temperatures. Current literature on the thermodynamic properties and phase diagram data enables preliminary thermodynamic assessments of the Rh-O and Ru-O systems. Additionally, select compositions in the ternary Rh-Ru-O system underwent experimental tests to complement data found in literature and to establish the phase equilibria in the ternary system.

  5. Permeation of platinum and rhodium nanoparticles through intact and damaged human skin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mauro, Marcella [University of Trieste, Clinical Unit of Occupational Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences (Italy); Crosera, Matteo; Bianco, Carlotta; Adami, Gianpiero; Montini, Tiziano; Fornasiero, Paolo [University of Trieste, Department of Chemical and Pharmaceutical Sciences (Italy); Jaganjac, Morana [Rudjer Boskovic Institute, Laboratory for Oxidative Stress, Department of Molecular Medicine (Croatia); Bovenzi, Massimo; Filon, Francesca Larese, E-mail: larese@units.it [University of Trieste, Clinical Unit of Occupational Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences (Italy)

    2015-06-15

    The aim of the study was to evaluate percutaneous penetration of platinum and rhodium nanoparticles (PtNPs: 5.8 ± 0.9 nm, RhNPs: 5.3 ± 1.9 nm) through human skin. Salts compounds of these metals are sensitizers and some also carcinogenic agents. In vitro permeation experiments were performed using Franz diffusion cells with intact and damaged skin. PtNPs and RhNPs, stabilized with polyvinylpyrrolidone, were synthesized by reduction of Na{sub 2}PtC{sub l6} and RhCl{sub 3}·3H{sub 2}O respectively. Suspensions with a concentration of 2.0 g/L of PtNPs and RhNPs were dispersed separately in synthetic sweat at pH 4.5 and applied as donor phases to the outer surface of the skin for 24 h. Measurements of the content of the metals in the receiving solution and in the skin were performed subsequently. Rhodium skin permeation was demonstrated through damaged skin, with a permeation flux of 0.04 ± 0.04 μg cm{sup −2} h{sup −1} and a lag time of 7.9 ± 1.1 h, while no traces of platinum were found in receiving solutions. Platinum and rhodium skin-analysis showed significantly higher concentrations of the metals in damaged skin. Rh and Pt applied as NPs can penetrate the skin barrier and Rh can be found in receiving solutions. These experiments pointed out the need for skin contamination prevention, since even a minor injury to the skin barrier can significantly increase penetration.

  6. Synthesis and structural study of the transition metal doped rhodium perovskites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ting, J.; Kennedy, B.; Zhang, Z.

    2009-01-01

    Full text: One of the most common structures encountered in solid state chemistry is the perovskite structure. With a general formula of AB0 3, the A-type cations are 12-coordinate within a cubo-octahedral environment, while the B-type cations are 6-coordinate, forming an interconnecting three-dimensional octahedral network with neighbouring oxygen anions. While the ideal perovskite structure is cubic in Pm 3 m, many perovskites exhibit symmetry lowering tilting of the corner-sharing B0 6o ctahedral units as a result of A- and B-type cation size disparity. This is also evident in substituted perovskites, where two cations occupy the smaller octahedral site, AB 1- xB' x0 3' Electronic effects can also lower the symmetry. The two most commonly observed effects are the polarisation of the B-cation with a d 0 electronic configuration and Jahn-Teller distortion where the B-cation has a d 4 or d 9 electronic configuration, such as Mn 3+ or Cu 2+ respectively. Manganese containing perovskites have been shown in some compounds to exhibit long-range orbital ordering, giving rise to interesting properties. Heavier transition metals such as ruthenium and iridium have been previously incorporated into these perovskites as an avenue to regulate the properties of these materials. Two orthorhombic rhodium perovskite structures are presented, LaMn 0 . 5 Rh 0 . 5 O 3 and LaCu 05 Rh 0 . 5 O 3 ' A combination of synchrotron x-ray and neutron powder diffraction has been used to elucidate their structures, and have shown both B- and B'-type cations to be disordered across the same crystallographic site for both compounds. x-ray absorption spectroscopy measurements have been used to provide an insight into the valence states of the cations, which show a valency of +3.5 for rhodium due to an extensive charge delocalisation between copper and rhodium.

  7. Methyl Iodide Oxidative Addition to Rhodium(I) Complexes: a DFT ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    NJD

    to the understanding of the role of the steric and electronic prop- erties of the different .... The pure Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations were carried out using .... Since quantum computational methods are applied for the first time to ...

  8. Biodiesel production with immobilized lipase: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Tianwei; Lu, Jike; Nie, Kaili; Deng, Li; Wang, Fang

    2010-01-01

    Fatty acid alkyl esters, also called biodiesel, are environmentally friendly and show great potential as an alternative liquid fuel. Biodiesel is produced by transesterification of oils or fats with chemical catalysts or lipase. Immobilized lipase as the biocatalyst draws high attention because that process is "greener". This article reviews the current status of biodiesel production with immobilized lipase, including various lipases, immobilization methods, various feedstocks, lipase inactivation caused by short chain alcohols and large scale industrialization. Adsorption is still the most widely employed method for lipase immobilization. There are two kinds of lipase used most frequently especially for large scale industrialization. One is Candida antartica lipase immobilized on acrylic resin, and the other is Candida sp. 99-125 lipase immobilized on inexpensive textile membranes. However, to further reduce the cost of biodiesel production, new immobilization techniques with higher activity and stability still need to be explored. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Trans-Selective Rhodium Catalysed Conjugate Addition of Organoboron Reagents to Dihydropyranones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannah J. Edwards

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The selective synthesis of 2,6-trans-tetrahydropyran derivatives employing the rhodium catalysed addition of organoboron reagents to dihydropyranone templates, derived from a zinc-catalysed hetero-Diels-Alder reaction, is reported. The addition of both arylboronic acids and potassium alkenyltrifluoroborates have been accomplished in high yields using commercially-available [Rh(cod(OH]2 catalyst. The selective formation of the 2,6-trans-tetrahydropyran stereoisomer is consistent with a mechanism involving alkene association and carbometalation on the less hindered face of the dihydropyranone.

  10. Experimental demonstration of H∞ filter performance for dynamic compensation of rhodium neutron detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Moon-Ghu; Choi, Yu-Sun; Lee, Kwang-Dae

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes the experimental demonstration of the theoretical result of the previous work on LMI (linear matrix inequality) based H ∞ filter for time-delay compensation of self-powered neutron detectors. The filter gains are optimized in the sense of noise attenuation level of H ∞ setting. By introducing bounded real lemma, the conventional algebraic Riccati inequalities are converted into linear matrix inequalities (LMIs). Finally, the filter design problem is solved via the convex optimization framework using LMIs. The experimental measurements of rhodium detector signal from a research reactor show that the predicted theoretical filter performance is verified by showing successful reconstruction of the reference power signal

  11. Study of heat transfer parameters on rhodium target for 103Pd production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadeghi, M.; Tenreiro, C.; Van den Winkel, P.

    2009-01-01

    The efficiency of cooling and the particle beam characteristics are important when high beam current irradiations are intended for production of radionuclides. The efficiency of cooling is determined by both the target carrier geometry and the flow rate of coolant, while the beam characteristics deal with the current density distribution on the irradiated surface area. Heat transfer on rhodium target to produce 103 Pd via the 103 Rh(p,n) 103 Pd reaction was investigated and the beam current was obtained more than 500 μA. (authors)

  12. Predictable and Regioselective Insertion of Internal Unsymmetrical Alkynes in Rhodium-Catalyzed Cycloadditions with Alkenyl Isocyanates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Rebecca Keller; Rovis, Tomislav

    2009-01-01

    A regioselective, rhodium-catalyzed cycloaddition between a variety of internal, unsymmetrical alkynes is described. We document the impact of both steric and electronic properties of the alkyne on reaction course, efficiency and enantioselectivity. The substituent that better stabilizes a positive charge or the larger group, all else being equal, inserts distal to the carbonyl moiety in a predictable and controllable fashion. The reaction scope is broad and the enantioselectivities are high, providing an ‘instruction manual’ for substrate choice when utilizing this reaction as a synthetic tool. PMID:19569692

  13. Rhodium(III) as a potentiator of the effects of X-rays on cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richmond, R C; Centilli, M A; Cross, M H; Powers, E L

    1986-08-01

    A rhodium compound, Rh(NH/sub 3/)/sub 3/Cl/sub 3/, does not sensitize the spores of Bacillus megaterium to X-rays. However, it is a very effective sensitizer of vegetative cells of Staphylococcus aureus, raising the sensitivity four times in O/sub 2/ and over 100 times in anoxia. The inhibition by oxygen of the sensitizing action of Rh(III), which operates over a wide range of (O/sub 2/), is noteworthy. These experiments were performed in saline-phosphate buffer using 50 kVp X-rays. The results are discussed in terms of the known radiation chemistry of this compound.

  14. Sensitivity change of rhodium self -powered detectors with burn-up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Girgis, R.; Akimov, I.S.; Hamouda, I.

    1976-01-01

    The scope of the present paper is to obtain the calculation formulae to evaluate the rate of sensitivity change of the neutron self-powered detectors with burn-up. A code written in FORTRAN 4 was developed to be operational on the IBM-1130 computer. It has been established in the case of rhodium detectors that neglecting the β-particle absorption in the calculations leads to the underestimation of the detector sensitivity decrease up to 40%. The derived formulae can be used for other self-powered detectors. (author)

  15. Redox-Neutral Rhodium-Catalyzed [4+1] Annulation through Formal Dehydrogenative Vinylidene Insertion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Huan; Song, Shengjin; Wang, Cheng-Qiang; Feng, Chao; Loh, Teck-Peng

    2017-01-10

    A synthetic protocol for the expedient construction of 5-methylene-1H-pyrrol-2(5H)-one derivatives through rhodium-catalyzed [4+1] annulation with gem-difluoroacrylate as the C 1 component was reported. By taking advantage of the twofold C-F bond cleavage occurring during the annulation, this reaction not only allows the synthesis of these heterocyclic compounds under overall oxidant-free conditions but also renders the transformation stereospecific. The very mild reaction conditions employed ensure compatibility with a wide variety of synthetically useful functional groups. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Rhodium-catalyzed redox-neutral coupling of phenidones with alkynes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Zhoulong; Lu, Heng; Li, Wei; Geng, Kaijun; Zhang, Ao

    2017-07-21

    A switchable synthesis of N-substituted indole derivatives from phenidones via rhodium-catalyzed redox-neutral C-H activation has been achieved. In this protocol, we firstly disclosed that the reactivity of Rh(iii) catalysis could be enhanced through employing palladium acetate as an additive. Some representative features include external oxidant-free, applicable to terminal alkynes, short reaction time and operational simplicity. The utility of this method is further showcased by the economical synthesis of potent anticancer PARP-1 inhibitors.

  17. Light-induced reduction of rhodium(III) and palladium(II) on titanium dioxide dispersions and the selective photochemical separation and recovery of gold(III), platinum(IV), and rhodium(III) in chloride media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borgarello, E.; Serpone, N.; Emo, G.; Harris, R.; Pelizzetti, E.; Minero, C.

    1986-12-03

    Irradiation of aqueous TiO/sub 2/ dispersions containing palladium(II) or rhodium(III) chloride salts with AM1 simulated sunlight leads to the photoreduction of these metals, which are deposited on the semiconductor particle surface. Oxygen is detrimental to the photoreduction of rhodium(III) but not the photoreduction of palladium(II). However, in both cases the reduction process is most efficient if the solution contains CH/sub 3/OH, which acts to scavenge valence band holes of the illuminated TiO/sub 2/ semiconductor. The selective photoreduction and recovery of precious metals from a dilute solution (as might be found in industrial wastes) have been investigated for a mixture of gold(III), platinum(IV), and rhodium(III) chloride salts as a function of various parameters (pH, presence or absence of O/sub 2/, presence or absence of a hole scavenger, and the concentration of the semiconductor). At pH 0, gold is easily separated from platinum and rhodium. The rate of photoreduction of gold(III) on TiO/sub 2/ is nearly independent of the concentration of the semiconductor, under the experimental conditions employed; the limiting rate is 2.7 x 10/sup -7/ M s/sup -1/. The potential utility of this selective photochemical technique is discussed.

  18. Excess Substrate is a Spectator Ligand in a Rhodium-Catalyzed Asymmetric [2+2+2] Cycloaddition of Alkenyl Isocyanates with Tolanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oinen, Mark Emil; Yu, Robert T.; Rovis, Tomislav

    2009-01-01

    Excess substrate has been identified as an unintended spectator ligand affecting enantioselectivity in the [2+2+2] cycloaddition of alkenyl isocyanates with tolanes. Replacement of excess substrate with an exogenous additive affords products with consistent and higher ee’s. The increase in enantioselectivity is the result of a change in composition of a proposed rhodium(III) intermediate on the catalytic cycle. The net result is a rational probe of a short-lived rhodium(III) intermediate, and gives insight that may have applications in many rhodium catalyzed reactions. PMID:19803471

  19. Radiopharmaceuticals based on the scandium or rhodium radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majkowska, A.; Pruszynski, M.; Bilewicz, A.

    2006-01-01

    Radionuclides 103m Rh, 105 Rh emitting β-radiation or 47 Sc (Auger electrons emitter) are suitable for treatment small tumors spread over the human tissues. Presented communication describes preliminary results obtained in the Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology, Warsaw (Poland) in the field of obtaining new complexes containing the aforementioned radionuclides. The radionuclides can be produced in the laboratory scale from simple and cheap generators. 103m Rh and 105 Rh cations were complexed with the thioetheric ligand (1,5,9,13-tetrathiacyclahexadecane-3,11-diole) and in the future, after funcionalization with certain biomolecules, are promising radiopharmaceuticals. 47 Sc cation was complexes by one from the following tri- or tetraaza macoryclic ligands: 1,4,7,10-triazacyclononane-1,4,7-triacetic acid (NOTA), 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,7-diacetic acid (DO2A) or 1,4,7,10-triazacyclononane-1,4,7-triacetic acid (NOTA), 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA). Composition and the stability constants of the complexes were determined

  20. Immobilization of iodine in concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Walter E.; Thompson, Clarence T.

    1977-04-12

    A method for immobilizing fission product radioactive iodine recovered from irradiated nuclear fuel comprises combining material comprising water, Portland cement and about 3-20 wt. % iodine as Ba(IO.sub.3).sub.2 to provide a fluid mixture and allowing the fluid mixture to harden, said Ba(IO.sub.3).sub.2 comprising said radioactive iodine. An article for solid waste disposal comprises concrete prepared by this method. BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION This invention was made in the course of, or under a contract with the Energy Research and Development Administration. It relates in general to reactor waste solidification and more specifically to the immobilization of fission product radioactive iodine recovered from irradiated nuclear fuel for underground storage.

  1. Contaminant immobilization via microbial activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-11-01

    The aim of this study was to search the literature to identify biological techniques that could be applied to the restoration of contaminated groundwaters near uranium milling sites. Through bioremediation it was hypothesized that the hazardous heavy metals could be immobilized in a stable, low-solubility form, thereby halting their progress in the migrating groundwater. Three basic mechanisms were examined: reduction of heavy metals by microbially produced hydrogen sulfide; direct microbial mediated reduction; and biosorption

  2. Immobilization of iodine in concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, W.E.; Thompson, C.T.

    1977-01-01

    A method for immobilizing fission product radioactive iodine recovered from irradiated nuclear fuel comprises combining material comprising water, Portland cement and about 3 to 20 wt percent iodine as Ba(IO 3 ) 2 to provide a fluid mixture and allowing the fluid mixture to harden, said Ba(IO 3 ) 2 comprising said radioactive iodine. An article for solid waste disposal comprises concrete prepared by this method. 10 claims, 2 figures

  3. Materials Science of High-Level Nuclear Waste Immobilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, William J.; Navrotsky, Alexandra; Stefanovsky, S. V.; Vance, E. R.; Vernaz, Etienne Y.

    2009-01-01

    With the increasing demand for the development of more nuclear power comes the responsibility to address the technical challenges of immobilizing high-level nuclear wastes in stable solid forms for interim storage or disposition in geologic repositories. The immobilization of high-level nuclear wastes has been an active area of research and development for over 50 years. Borosilicate glasses and complex ceramic composites have been developed to meet many technical challenges and current needs, although regulatory issues, which vary widely from country to country, have yet to be resolved. Cooperative international programs to develop advanced proliferation-resistant nuclear technologies to close the nuclear fuel cycle and increase the efficiency of nuclear energy production might create new separation waste streams that could demand new concepts and materials for nuclear waste immobilization. This article reviews the current state-of-the-art understanding regarding the materials science of glasses and ceramics for the immobilization of high-level nuclear waste and excess nuclear materials and discusses approaches to address new waste streams

  4. Fludized-bed process for complex municipal sewage treatment systems using micro-organisms immobilized on heterogenous polymer structures (biocompounds); Wirbelbettverfahren zur komplexen kommunalen Abwasserreinigung unter Verwendung von auf heterogenen Polymerstrukturen (Biocompounds) immobilisierten Mikroorganismen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ochmann, C.

    2004-07-01

    Within the context of the present work, novel carriers for immobilizing microorganisms have been developed and tested both in the laboratory and on a semi-industrial scale. It was the primary target to optimize the known processes in deep biofilms such that, besides carbon compounds decomposition and nitrification, a directed (and sufficient) denitrification would also become possible. Prerequisite for purposefully influencing denitrification processes is to realize biofilms of a definite thickness. This cannot be ensured by means of the carriers used hitherto in practice. The approach consists in the use of heterogeneous polymer structures (biocompounds) made of two differently rapidly degradable biopolymers. The biopolymer that is more slowly degradable forms a matrix into which the rapidly degradable biopolymer is inserted in form of particles arranged from one another at a distance. Based on the primary biological decomposition of the more rapidly degradable component (''biocorrosion''), porosity is generated in the substrate, releasing carbon at the same time. In this way, anoxic zones are formed based on the existent material gradient, besides protection of the biofilm forming in the pores from mechanical wear and tear. Simultaneously this ensures the supply of carbon to the anoxic zone for denitrification. In examinations (laboratory and semi-technology), it has been shown that simultaneous and continuous degradation of carbon and nitrogen compounds can be achieved in a completely and steadily aerated reaction space through the use of biocompounds. No problems arose both in carbon compounds degradation and nitrification. The removal of nitrogen compounds from wastewater was limited by the denitrification performance, which allowed to identify denitrification as the limiting process within the total process. It was possible to show that the N{sub tot} elimination rate is a function of the C/N ratio in crude wastewater. (orig.)

  5. Conversion of radioactive ferrocyanide compounds to immobile glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulz, W.W.; Dressen, A.L.

    1977-01-01

    Complex radioactive ferrocyanide compounds result from the scavenging of cesium from waste products produced in the chemical reprocessing of nuclear fuel. These ferrocyanides, in accordance with this process, are converted to an immobile glass, resistant to leaching by water, by fusion together with sodium carbonate and a mixture of (a) basalt and boron trioxide (B 2 O 3 ) or (b) silica (SiO 2 ) and lime (CaO). 7 claims

  6. Selective cesium removal from radioactive liquid waste by crown ether immobilized new class conjugate adsorbent

    OpenAIRE

    Awual, M. R.; 矢板 毅; 田口 富嗣; 塩飽 秀啓; 鈴木 伸一; 岡本 芳浩

    2014-01-01

    Conjugate materials can provide chemical functionality, enabling an assembly of the ligand complexation ability to metal ions that are important for applications, such as separation and removal devices. In this study, we developed ligand immobilized conjugate adsorbent for selective cesium (Cs) removal from wastewater. The adsorbent was synthesized by direct immobilization of DB24C8 onto inorganic mesoporous silica. The obtained results revealed that adsorbent had higher selectivity towards C...

  7. Extraction of carrier-free 103Pd from thin rhodium wire irradiated with a proton beam in U-150 cyclotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuldashev, B.S.; Khudajbergenov, U.; Gulamov, I.R.; Mirzarva, M.A.; Rylov, A.A.

    2003-01-01

    A procedure for preparation of 103 Pd isotope of 99.9 % purity from a thin rhodium wire irradiated by 21 MeV proton beam in a cyclotron was developed. The desired product was prepared by electrolytic dissolution of the irradiated target in 6 M HCl with subsequent extraction of 103 Pd isotope without carrier by dimethylglyoxime in chloroform [ru

  8. Solvent extraction of no-carrier-added 103Pd from irradiated rhodium target with α-furyldioxime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahdi Sadeghi; Behrouz Shirazi; Nami Shadanpour

    2006-01-01

    Solvent extraction of no-carrier-added 103 Pd was investigated from irradiated rhodium target with a-furyldioxime in chloroform from diluted hydrochloric acid. Extraction yield was 85.3% for a single extraction from 0.37M HCl and 103 Pd purity was better than 99%. (author)

  9. Dispersive oxidation of rhodium clusters in Na-Y by the combined action of zeolite protons and carbon monoxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, T.T.T.; Sachtler, W.M.H.; Stakheev, A.Yu.

    1992-01-01

    This paper uses x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and temperature programmed mass-spectrometric analysis to study the interaction of Na-Y supported rhodium with hydrogen, carbon monoxide, and zeolite protons. This report attempts to clarify the mechanism of dispersive oxidation of reduced Rh particles in the presence of CO, leading to the formation of Rh + (CO) 2 cations

  10. PipPhos and MorfPhos : Privileged monodentate phosphoramidite ligands for rhodium-catalyzed asymmetric hydrogenation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bernsmann, Heiko; van den Berg, M; Hoen, Robert; Minnaard, AJ; Mehler, G; Reetz, MT; De Vries, JG; Feringa, BL

    2005-01-01

    A library of 20 monodentate phosphoramidite ligands has been prepared and applied in rhodium-catalyzed asymmetric hydrogenation. This resulted in the identification of two ligands, PipPhos and MorfPhos, that afford excellent and in several cases unprecedented enantioselectivities in the

  11. Reversible switching of the sol- gel transition with ultrasound in rhodium(I) and iridium(I) coordination networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paulusse, J.M.J.; Beek, van D.J.M.; Sijbesma, R.P.

    2007-01-01

    Reversible coordination networks were prepared by combining diphenylphosphinite telechelic polytetrahydrofuran (2) with [RhCl(COD)]2 or [IrCl(COD)]2 in chloroform. Both systems resulted in stable gels at concentrations above 50 and 30 g/L for the rhodium(I) and iridium(I) networks, respectively. The

  12. The Rôle of the Element Rhodium in the Hyperbolic Law of the Periodic Table of Elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khazan A.

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available The role of the element rhodium as an independent affirmation of calculations by the Hyperbolic Law and validity of all its relations is shown herein. The deviation in cal- culation by this method of the atomic mass of heaviest element is 0.0024%, and its coefficient of scaling 0.001–0.005%

  13. Intermolecular rhodium-catalyzed [2 + 2 + 2] carbocyclization reactions of 1,6-enynes with symmetrical and unsymmetrical alkynes†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew Evans, P.; Sawyer, James R.; Lai, Kwong Wah; Huffman, John C.

    2006-01-01

    The crossed intermolecular rhodium-catalyzed [2 + 2 + 2] carbocyclization of carbon and heteroatom tethered 1,6-enynes can be accomplished with symmetrical and unsymmetrical alkynes, to afford the corresponding bicyclohexadienes in an efficient and highly selective manner. PMID:16075089

  14. Gravimetric preparation and characterization of primary reference solutions of molybdenum and rhodium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaltenbach, Angela; Noordmann, Janine; Görlitz, Volker; Pape, Carola; Richter, Silke; Kipphardt, Heinrich; Kopp, Gernot; Jährling, Reinhard; Rienitz, Olaf; Güttler, Bernd

    2015-04-01

    Gravimetrically prepared mono-elemental reference solutions having a well-known mass fraction of approximately 1 g/kg (or a mass concentration of 1 g/L) define the very basis of virtually all measurements in inorganic analysis. Serving as the starting materials of all standard/calibration solutions, they link virtually all measurements of inorganic analytes (regardless of the method applied) to the purity of the solid materials (high-purity metals or salts) they were prepared from. In case these solid materials are characterized comprehensively with respect to their purity, this link also establishes direct metrological traceability to The International System of Units (SI). This, in turn, ensures the comparability of all results on the highest level achievable. Several national metrology institutes (NMIs) and designated institutes (DIs) have been working for nearly two decades in close cooperation with commercial producers on making an increasing number of traceable reference solutions available. Besides the comprehensive characterization of the solid starting materials, dissolving them both loss-free and completely under strict gravimetric control is a challenging problem in the case of several elements like molybdenum and rhodium. Within the framework of the European Metrology Research Programme (EMRP), in the Joint Research Project (JRP) called SIB09 Primary standards for challenging elements, reference solutions of molybdenum and rhodium were prepared directly from the respective metals with a relative expanded uncertainty associated with the mass fraction of U rel(w) methods required to assist with the preparation and as dissemination tools.

  15. A simple gold nanoparticle-mediated immobilization method to fabricate highly homogeneous DNA microarrays having higher capacities than those prepared by using conventional techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Cheulhee; Mun, Hyo Young; Li, Taihua; Park, Hyun Gyu

    2009-01-01

    A simple, highly efficient immobilization method to fabricate DNA microarrays, that utilizes gold nanoparticles as the mediator, has been developed. The fabrication method begins with electrostatic attachment of amine-modified DNA to gold nanoparticles. The resulting gold-DNA complexes are immobilized on conventional amine or aldehyde functionalized glass slides. By employing gold nanoparticles as the immobilization mediator, implementation of this procedure yields highly homogeneous microarrays that have higher binding capacities than those produced by conventional methods. This outcome is due to the increased three-dimensional immobilization surface provided by the gold nanoparticles as well as the intrinsic effects of gold on emission properties. This novel immobilization strategy gives microarrays that produce more intense hybridization signals for the complementary DNA. Furthermore, the silver enhancement technique, made possible only in the case of immobilized gold nanoparticles on the microarrays, enables simple monitoring of the integrity of the immobilized DNA probe.

  16. Recent Advances in Immobilization Strategies for Glycosidases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karav, Sercan; Cohen, Joshua L.; Barile, Daniela; de Moura Bell, Juliana Maria Leite Nobrega

    2017-01-01

    Glycans play important biological roles in cell-to-cell interactions, protection against pathogens, as well as in proper protein folding and stability, and are thus interesting targets for scientists. Although their mechanisms of action have been widely investigated and hypothesized, their biological functions are not well understood due to the lack of deglycosylation methods for large-scale isolation of these compounds. Isolation of glycans in their native state is crucial for the investigation of their biological functions. However, current enzymatic and chemical deglycosylation techniques require harsh pretreatment and reaction conditions (high temperature and use of detergents) that hinder the isolation of native glycan structures. Indeed, the recent isolation of new endoglycosidases that are able to cleave a wider variety of linkages and efficiently hydrolyze native proteins has opened up the opportunity to elucidate the biological roles of a higher variety of glycans in their native state. As an example, our research group recently isolated a novel Endo-β-N-acetylglucosaminidase from Bifidobacterium longum subsp. infantis ATCC 15697 (EndoBI-1) that cleaves N-N′-diacetyl chitobiose moieties found in the N-linked glycan (N-glycan) core of high mannose, hybrid, and complex N-glycans. This enzyme is also active on native proteins, which enables native glycan isolation, a key advantage when evaluating their biological activities. Efficient, stable, and economically viable enzymatic release of N-glycans requires the selection of appropriate immobilization strategies. In this review, we discuss the state-of-the-art of various immobilization techniques (physical adsorption, covalent binding, aggregation, and entrapment) for glycosidases, as well as their potential substrates and matrices. PMID:27718339

  17. Covalent immobilization of β-glucosidase on magnetic particles for lignocellulose hydrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alftrén, Johan; Hobley, Timothy John

    2013-04-01

    β-Glucosidase hydrolyzes cellobiose to glucose and is an important enzyme in the consortium used for hydrolysis of cellulosic and lignocellulosic feedstocks. In the present work, β-glucosidase was covalently immobilized on non-porous magnetic particles to enable re-use of the enzyme. It was found that particles activated with cyanuric chloride and polyglutaraldehyde gave the highest bead-related immobilized enzyme activity when tested with p-nitrophenyl-β-D-glucopyranoside (104.7 and 82.2 U/g particles, respectively). Furthermore, the purified β-glucosidase preparation from Megazyme gave higher bead-related enzyme activities compared to Novozym 188 (79.0 and 9.8 U/g particles, respectively). A significant improvement in thermal stability was observed for immobilized enzyme compared to free enzyme; after 5 h (at 65 °C), 36 % of activity remained for the former, while there was no activity in the latter. The performance and recyclability of immobilized β-glucosidase on more complex substrate (pretreated spruce) was also studied. It was shown that adding immobilized β-glucosidase (16 U/g dry matter) to free cellulases (8 FPU/g dry matter) increased the hydrolysis yield of pretreated spruce from ca. 44 % to ca. 65 %. In addition, it was possible to re-use the immobilized β-glucosidase in the spruce and retain activity for at least four cycles. The immobilized enzyme thus shows promise for lignocellulose hydrolysis.

  18. Immobilized cell technology in beer brewing: Current experience and results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leskošek-Čukalov Ida J.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Immobilized cell technology (ICT has been attracting continual attention in the brewing industry over the past 30 years. Some of the reasons are: faster fermentation rates and increased volumetric productivity, compared to those of traditional beer production based on freely suspended cells, as well as the possibility of continuous operation. Nowadays, ICT technology is well established in secondary fermentation and alcohol- free and low-alcohol beer production. In main fermentation, the situation is more complex and this process is still under scrutiny on both the lab and pilot levels. The paper outlines the most important ICT processes developed for beer brewing and provides an overview of carrier materials, bioreactor design and examples of their industrial applications, as well as some recent results obtained by our research group. We investigated the possible applications of polyvinyl alcohol in the form of LentiKats®, as a potential porous matrices carrier for beer fermentation. Given are the results of growth studies of immobilized brewer's yeast Saccharomyces uvarum and the kinetic parameters obtained by using alginate microbeads with immobilized yeast cells and suspension of yeast cells as controls. The results indicate that the immobilization procedure in LentiKat® carriers has a negligible effect on cell viability and growth. The apparent specific growth rate of cells released in medium was comparable to that of freely suspended cells, implying preserved cell vitality. A series of batch fermentations performed in shaken flasks and an air-lift bioreactor indicated that the immobilized cells retained high fermentation activity. The full attenuation in green beer was reached after 48 hours in shaken flasks and less than 24 hours of fermentation in gas-lift bioreactors.

  19. Properties of immobilized papain by radiation polymerization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumakura, Minoru; Kaetsu, Isao

    1984-01-01

    Papain was immobilized by the radiation polymerization of various monomers at low temperatures and the effects of the polymer matrix on the enzyme activity and thermal stability of the immobilized enzymes were studied. The activity of the immobilized enzymes prepared from monofunctional (acrylate and methacrylate) monomers was higher than that from bifunctional (bismethacrylate) monomers and that from polyoxyethylene dimethacrylate monomers increased with an increase in the number of oxyethylene units. The thermal stability of the immobilized enzymes prepared from hydrophilic monomers was higher than that from hydrophobic monomers and increased markedly with increasing monomer concentration. (author)

  20. Mechanism of Intramolecular Rhodium- and Palladium-Catalyzed Alkene Alkoxyfunctionalizations

    KAUST Repository

    Vummaleti, Sai V. C.; Alghamdi, Miasser; Poater, Albert; Falivene, Laura; Scaranto, Jessica; Beetstra, Dirk J.; Morton, Jason G.; Cavallo, Luigi

    2015-01-01

    Density functional theory calculations have been used to investigate the reaction mechanism for the [Rh]-catalyzed intramolecular alkoxyacylation ([Rh] = [RhI(dppp)+] (dppp, 1,3-bis(diphenylphosphino)propane) and [Pd]/BPh3 dual catalytic system assisted intramolecular alkoxycyanation ([Pd] = Pd-Xantphos) using acylated and cyanated 2-allylphenol derivatives as substrates, respectively. Our results substantially confirm the proposed mechanism for both [Rh]- and [Pd]/ BPh3-mediated alkoxyfunctionalizations, offering a detailed geometrical and energetical understanding of all the elementary steps. Furthermore, for the [Rh]-mediated alkoxyacylation, our observations support the hypothesis that the quinoline group of the substrate is crucial to stabilize the acyl metal complex and prevent further decarbonylation. For [Pd]/BPh3-catalyzed alkoxycyanation, our findings clarify how the Lewis acid BPh3 cocatalyst accelerates the only slow step of the reaction, corresponding to the oxidative addition of the cyanate O-CN bond to the Pd center. © 2015 American Chemical Society.

  1. Mechanism of Intramolecular Rhodium- and Palladium-Catalyzed Alkene Alkoxyfunctionalizations

    KAUST Repository

    Vummaleti, Sai V. C.

    2015-11-13

    Density functional theory calculations have been used to investigate the reaction mechanism for the [Rh]-catalyzed intramolecular alkoxyacylation ([Rh] = [RhI(dppp)+] (dppp, 1,3-bis(diphenylphosphino)propane) and [Pd]/BPh3 dual catalytic system assisted intramolecular alkoxycyanation ([Pd] = Pd-Xantphos) using acylated and cyanated 2-allylphenol derivatives as substrates, respectively. Our results substantially confirm the proposed mechanism for both [Rh]- and [Pd]/ BPh3-mediated alkoxyfunctionalizations, offering a detailed geometrical and energetical understanding of all the elementary steps. Furthermore, for the [Rh]-mediated alkoxyacylation, our observations support the hypothesis that the quinoline group of the substrate is crucial to stabilize the acyl metal complex and prevent further decarbonylation. For [Pd]/BPh3-catalyzed alkoxycyanation, our findings clarify how the Lewis acid BPh3 cocatalyst accelerates the only slow step of the reaction, corresponding to the oxidative addition of the cyanate O-CN bond to the Pd center. © 2015 American Chemical Society.

  2. Platinum Group Thiophenoxyimine Complexes: Syntheses,Crystallographic and Computational Studies of Structural Properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krinsky, Jamin L.; Arnold, John; Bergman, Robert G.

    2006-10-03

    Monomeric thiosalicylaldiminate complexes of rhodium(I) and iridium(I) were prepared by ligand transfer from the homoleptic zinc(II) species. In the presence of strongly donating ligands, the iridium complexes undergo insertion of the metal into the imine carbon-hydrogen bond. Thiophenoxyketimines were prepared by non-templated reaction of o-mercaptoacetophenone with anilines, and were complexed with rhodium(I), iridium(I), nickel(II) and platinum(II). X-ray crystallographic studies showed that while the thiosalicylaldiminate complexes display planar ligand conformations, those of the thiophenoxyketiminates are strongly distorted. Results of a computational study were consistent with a steric-strain interpretation of the difference in preferred ligand geometries.

  3. The creation of an antithrombotic surface by apyrase immobilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Per H; Engberg, Anna E; Bäck, Jennie; Faxälv, Lars; Lindahl, Tomas L.; Nilsson, Bo; Ekdahl, Kristina Nilsson

    2010-01-01

    Blood incompatibility reactions caused by surfaces often involve platelet activation and subsequent platelet-initiated activation of the coagulation and complement cascades. The goal of this study was to immobilize apyrase on a biomaterial surface in order to develop an enzymatically active surface that would have the capacity to inhibit platelet activation by degrading ADP. We were able to immobilize apyrase on a polystyrene surface with preservation of the enzymatic activity. We then analyzed the hemocompatibility of the apyrase surface and of control surfaces by incubation with platelet-rich plasma (PRP) or whole blood. Monitoring of markers of platelet, coagulation, and complement activation and staining of the surfaces revealed decreased levels of platelet and coagulation activation parameters on the apyrase surface. The formation of antithrombin-thrombin and antithrombin-factor XIa complexes and the extent of platelet consumption were significantly lower on the apyrase surface than on any of the control surfaces. No significant differences were seen in complement activation (C3a levels). Staining of the apyrase surface revealed low platelet adherence and no formation of granulocyte-platelet complexes. These results demonstrate that it is possible to create an anti-thrombotic surface targeting the ADP amplification of platelet activation by immobilizing apyrase. PMID:20211488

  4. Reactions of rhodium(I) carbonyl chloride with olefins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varshavskii, Yu.S.; Kiseleva, N.V.; Cherkasova, T.G.; Buzina, N.A.; Bresler, L.S.

    1987-01-01

    The reactions of [Rh(CO) 2 Cl] 2 (Y 0 ) with cyclooctene and several other olefins (1-heptene, 1-hexene, ethylene, and cyclohexene) have been studied by IR and 13 C NMR spectroscopy. The main reaction products are the binuclear complexes Rh 2 L(CO) 3 Cl 2 (Y 1 ) and [RhL(CO)Cl] 2 (Y 2 ), where L denotes the olefin. The extent of replacement of the carbonyl groups depends on the nature of the olefin and the conditions under which the reaction is carried out (the L:Rh ratio and the removal of CO from the reaction sphere). The liquid olefins form the following series according to their ability to replace the carbonyl groups: C 8 H 14 > C 7 H 14 , C 6 H 12 > C 6 H 10 . In the presence of an excess of C 8 H 14 , Y 2 disproportionates with the formation of a dicarbonyl product, which presumably corresponds to the formula Rh(C 8 H 14 ) 2 (CO) 2 Cl (a pentacoordinate complex with a trigonal-bipyramidal structure). The 13 C signal in the NMR spectrum of a solution of Y 2 in C 8 H 14 is a singlet with σ( 13 C) 180.3 ppm, which is an indication of the rapid exchange of the carbonyl groups. Rapid exchange of the CO ligands is also observed in solutions of Y 0 in the olefins (with the exception of C 6 H 10 ). For example, the 13 C signal in the spectrum of a solution of Y 0 in C 8 H 14 is a singlet with σ( 13 C) 179.8 ppm. The spectrum of Y 0 in C 6 H 10 is a doublet with σ( 13 C) = 178.5 ppm and 1 J(CRh) = 76.3 Hz. A scheme for the interaction of Y 0 with olefins based on the conception of the trans antagonism of π-acceptor ligands has been proposed

  5. Production of Biodiesel Using Immobilized Lipase and the Characterization of Different Co-Immobilizing Agents and Immobilization Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kang Zhao

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Lipase from Candida sp. 99–125 is widely employed to catalyzed transesterification and can be used for biodiesel production. In this study, the lipase was immobilized by combined adsorption and entrapment to catalyze biodiesel production from waste cooking oil (WCO via transesterification, and investigating co-immobilizing agents as additives according to the enzyme activity. The addition of the mixed co-immobilizing agents has positive effects on the activities of the immobilized lipase. Three different immobilizing methods were compared by the conversion ratio of biodiesel and structured by Atom Force Microscopy (AFM and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM, respectively. It was found that entrapment followed by adsorption was the best method. The effect of the co-immobilizing agent amount, lipase dosage, water content, and reuse ability of the immobilized lipase was investigated. By comparison with previous research, this immobilized lipase showed good reuse ability: the conversion ratio excesses 70% after 10 subsequent reactions, in particular, was better than Novozym435 and TLIM on waste cooking oil for one unit of lipase.

  6. Technetium Immobilization Forms Literature Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westsik, Joseph H.; Cantrell, Kirk J.; Serne, R. Jeffrey; Qafoku, Nikolla

    2014-05-01

    Of the many radionuclides and contaminants in the tank wastes stored at the Hanford site, technetium-99 (99Tc) is one of the most challenging to effectively immobilize in a waste form for ultimate disposal. Within the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP), the Tc will partition between both the high-level waste (HLW) and low-activity waste (LAW) fractions of the tank waste. The HLW fraction will be converted to a glass waste form in the HLW vitrification facility and the LAW fraction will be converted to another glass waste form in the LAW vitrification facility. In both vitrification facilities, the Tc is incorporated into the glass waste form but a significant fraction of the Tc volatilizes at the high glass-melting temperatures and is captured in the off-gas treatment systems at both facilities. The aqueous off-gas condensate solution containing the volatilized Tc is recycled and is added to the LAW glass melter feed. This recycle process is effective in increasing the loading of Tc in the LAW glass but it also disproportionally increases the sulfur and halides in the LAW melter feed which increases both the amount of LAW glass and either the duration of the LAW vitrification mission or the required supplemental LAW treatment capacity.

  7. Synthesis of New Chiral Benzimidazolylidene–Rh Complexes and Their Application in Asymmetric Addition Reactions of Organoboronic Acids to Aldehydes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiping He

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available A series of novel chiral N-heterocyclic carbene rhodium complexes (NHC–Rh based on benzimidazole have been prepared, and all of the NHC–Rh complexes were fully characterized by NMR and mass spectrometry. These complexes could be used as catalysts for the asymmetric 1,2-addition of organoboronic acids to aldehydes, affording chiral diarylmethanols with high yields and moderate enantioselectivities.

  8. Optimization of Adsorptive Immobilization of Alcohol Dehydrogenases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trivedi, Archana; Heinemann, Matthias; Spiess, Antje C.; Daussmann, Thomas; Büchs, Jochen

    2005-01-01

    In this work, a systematic examination of various parameters of adsorptive immobilization of alcohol dehydrogenases (ADHs) on solid support is performed and the impact of these parameters on immobilization efficiency is studied. Depending on the source of the enzymes, these parameters differently

  9. Plutonium Immobilization Can Loading Equipment Review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kriikku, E.; Ward, C.; Stokes, M.; Randall, B.; Steed, J.; Jones, R.; Hamilton, L.

    1998-05-01

    This report lists the operations required to complete the Can Loading steps on the Pu Immobilization Plant Flow Sheets and evaluates the equipment options to complete each operation. This report recommends the most appropriate equipment to support Plutonium Immobilization Can Loading operations

  10. Strong and Reversible Monovalent Supramolecular Protein Immobilization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Young, Jacqui F.; Nguyen, Hoang D.; Yang, Lanti; Huskens, Jurriaan; Jonkheijm, Pascal; Brunsveld, Luc

    2010-01-01

    Proteins with an iron clasp: Site-selective incorporation of a ferrocene molecule into a protein allows for easy, strong, and reversible supramolecular protein immobilization through a selective monovalent interaction of the ferrocene with a cucurbit[7]uril immobilized on a gold surface. The

  11. Drug immobilization of walrus (Odobenus rosmarus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeMaster, D.P.; Faro, J.B.; Estes, J.A.; Taggart, James; Zabel, C.

    1981-01-01

    Five out of nine walrus (Odobenus rosmarus) were successfully immobilized at Round Island, Alaska, in May of 1978 by combinations of phencyclidine hydrochloride and acepromazine hydrochloride. A crossbow was an effective delivery technique. Walruses that had recently hauled out were more suitable for immobilization than well-rested animals. Care was taken to prevent walruses from overheating or suffocating.

  12. New data on some short-lived isotopes of ruthenium and rhodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baumgartner, F.; Plata Bedmar, A.

    1961-01-01

    Ru and Rd isotopes with mass numbers 107 and 108 and 1 09Rh, has been obtained from fission products. 1 07 Ru has also been prepared by the nuclear process 1 10Pd (n,α) 1 07 Ru. Beta and gamma energies of these nuclides have been studied spectropolarimetry and the gamma lines found for 1 07 Ru and 1 08Ru ( and daughter) have been very useful for the precise determination of their half-lives. 1 09Rh has been identified through its daughter 1 09Pd in the mixture of rhodium isotopes from fission products. Irradiation of natural palladium with fast neutrons has lead to an activity that may only be attributed to 1 10rh. Neither its half life nor its decay energy have been possible to determine accurately. (Author) 1 refs

  13. Electrochemical and mass variation behaviour of rhodium oxide electrodes prepared by the polymeric precursor method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, M.C.; Oliveira, R.T.S.; Pereira, E.C.; Bulhoes, L.O.S.

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes an investigation of the charging processes of Rh 2 O 3 electrodes in acidic medium using Electrochemical Quartz Crystal Microbalance. The Rh 2 O 3 was prepared by the Pechini method. The microstructural characterization of the rhodium oxide was performed using Scanning Electron Microscopy and the structure was determined by X-ray diffraction. The Rh 2 O 3 oxidizes at potentials higher than 0.8 V. A mass loss of 60 ng was observed during the anodic sweep. The same amount is gained during the cathodic sweep indicating that the process is reversible. From the mass versus charge plots a slope of 8.5 g mol -1 is calculated. Considering a process that involves a two-electron transfer, the oxidation of Rh 2 O 3 to RhO 2 with the loss of a water molecule (18 g mol -1 ) is proposed

  14. Scanning tunneling microscopy studies of organic monolayers adsorbed on the rhodium(111) crystal surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cernota, Paul Davis [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1999-08-01

    Scanning Tunneling Microscopy studies were carried out on ordered overlayers on the (111) surface of rhodium. These adsorbates include carbon monoxide (CO), cyclohexane, cyclohexene, 1,4-cyclohexadiene, para-xylene, and meta-xylene. Coadsorbate systems included: CO with ethylidyne, CO with para- and meta-xylene, and para-xylene with meta-xylene. In the case of CO, the structure of the low coverage (2x2) overlayer has been observed. The symmetry of the unit cell in this layer suggests that the CO is adsorbed in the 3-fold hollow sites. There were also two higher coverage surface structures with (√7x√7) unit cells. One of these is composed of trimers of CO and has three CO molecules in each unit cell. The other structure has an additional CO molecule, making a total of four. This extra CO sits on a top site.

  15. Mapping of the radiation field of a mammography equipment using molybdenum and rhodium filters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barreira, Jacqueline S.; Campos, Daniela; Vivolo, Vitor

    2014-01-01

    The use of X rays for diagnostic radiology is very common and important to Medicine, including mammographic diagnosis focusing decreasing of the doses applied to the patients and preserving high quality of the diagnostic image. A quality control program of the irradiation systems it is very necessary. The Instruments Calibration Laboratory (LCI) of IPEN perform calibration in dosemeters used in radiation dosimetry (in diagnostic radiology) for many years. The objective of that paper is determining the point of greatest intensity of the beam issued by the mammography equipment. Exposures were made with filters Rhodium and Molybdenum. That mapping is important before applied a routine quality control program of the mammography equipment and the calibration of instruments in the diagnosis. (author)

  16. Hydroformylation and kinetics of 1-hexene over ruthenium, cobalt and rhodium zerolite catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, C.; Wei, W.

    1989-01-01

    In this paper, six kinds of catalysts were prepared by cation exchange with rhodium, ruthenium and cobalt chloropentaamino dichoride and zeolites. Effects such as support materials, PPH 3 to metal ratio, reaction temperature, total pressure, H 2 /CO ratio, reaction time and solvents have been investigated in an autoclave. The most favorable results of 1-hexene hydroformylation were obtained in the temperature range 100-150 degrees C at a pressure of 5.0MPa (H 2 /CO=1:1) and the addition of free PPh 3 . The bimetallic catalysts showed high catalytic activing for hydroformylation because of the synergistic effect of bimetallic systems. This paper reports the results of experiments and catalysts characterization by means of IR and XRD spectroscopy

  17. Bifunctional rhodium intercalator conjugates as mismatch-directing DNA alkylating agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schatzschneider, Ulrich; Barton, Jacqueline K

    2004-07-21

    A conjugate of a DNA mismatch-specific rhodium intercalator, containing the bulky chrysenediimine ligand, and an aniline mustard has been prepared, and targeting of mismatches in DNA by this conjugate has been examined. The preferential alkylation of mismatched over fully matched DNA is found by a mobility shift assay at concentrations where untethered organic mustards show little reaction. The binding site of the Rh intercalator was determined by DNA photocleavage, and the position of covalent modification was established on the basis of the enhanced depurination associated with N-alkylation. The site-selective alkylation at mismatched DNA renders these conjugates useful tools for the covalent tagging of DNA base pair mismatches and new chemotherapeutic design.

  18. An investigation of models of rhodium emitter used in self-powered neutron detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borisenko, V.I.; Piontkovskij, Yu.F.; Goranchuk, V.V.

    2017-01-01

    he paper presents the results of MCNP simulation of the self-powered neutron detector (SPND) signal formation as a result of emitter nuclei activation under the irradiation with neutrons generated in the fuel assemblies. To account for the non-uniformity of emitter burnup along the radius, its model was divided radially into 10 layers of equal thickness. It has been shown that the main contribution of about 88 % of SPND signal is provided by the four peripheral emitter layers. The contribution of different parts of emitter to the SPND signal formation throughout the lifetime of the SPND in the In-Core Monitoring System was found. Simulation results allow us to determine the SPND signal when the spectral characteristics of the neutron flux at the detector location change during the fuel campaign. The study has investigated and proposed a SPND model with the higher neutron sensitivity even though a smaller amount of expensive rhodium is used.

  19. Mathematical model of rhodium self-powered detectors and algorithms for correction of their time delay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bur'yan, V.I.; Kozlova, L.V.; Kuzhil', A.S.; Shikalov, V.F.

    2005-01-01

    The development of algorithms for correction of self-powered neutron detector (SPND) inertial is caused by necessity to increase the fast response of the in-core instrumentation systems (ICIS). The increase of ICIS fast response will permit to monitor in real time fast transient processes in the core, and in perspective - to use the signals of rhodium SPND for functions of emergency protection by local parameters. In this paper it is proposed to use mathematical model of neutron flux measurements by means of SPND in integral form for creation of correction algorithms. This approach, in the case, is the most convenient for creation of recurrent algorithms for flux estimation. The results of comparison for estimation of neutron flux and reactivity by readings of ionization chambers and SPND signals, corrected by proposed algorithms, are presented [ru

  20. Optimization of Rhodium-Based Catalysts for Mixed Alcohol Synthesis – 2012 Progress Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerber, Mark A.; Gray, Michel J.; Albrecht, Karl O.; Thompson, Becky L.

    2012-11-01

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory has been conducting research to investigate the feasibility of producing mixed alcohols from biomass-derived synthesis gas (syngas). In recent years, this research has primarily involved the further development of catalysts containing rhodium and manganese based on the results of earlier catalyst screening tests. Testing continued in FY 2012 to further improve the Ir-promoted RhMn catalysts on both silica and carbon supports for producing mixed oxygenates from synthesis gas. This testing re-examined selected alternative silica and carbon supports to follow up on some uncertainties in the results with previous test results. Additional tests were conducted to further optimize the total and relative concentrations of Rh, Mn, and Ir, and to examine selected promoters and promoter combinations based on earlier results. To establish optimum operating conditions, the effects of the process pressure and the feed gas composition also were evaluated.

  1. Rhodium Nanoparticle-mesoporous Silicon Nanowire Nanohybrids for Hydrogen Peroxide Detection with High Selectivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Zhiqian; Chang, Hucheng; Zhu, Weiqin; Xu, Chenlong; Feng, Xinjian

    2015-01-01

    Developing nanostructured electrocatalysts, with low overpotential, high selectivity and activity has fundamental and technical importance in many fields. We report here rhodium nanoparticle and mesoporous silicon nanowire (RhNP@mSiNW) hybrids for hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) detection with high electrocatalytic activity and selectivity. By employing electrodes that loaded with RhNP@mSiNW nanohybrids, interference caused from both many electroactive substances and dissolved oxygen were eliminated by electrochemical assaying at an optimal potential of +75 mV. Furthermore, the electrodes exhibited a high detection sensitivity of 0.53 μA/mM and fast response (< 5 s). This high-performance nanohybrid electrocatalyst has great potential for future practical application in various oxidase-base biosensors. PMID:25588953

  2. Highly Stereoselective Synthesis of Cyclopentanes bearing Four Stereocenters by a Rhodium Carbene–Initiated Domino Sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parr, Brendan T.; Davies, Huw M. L.

    2014-01-01

    Stereoselective synthesis of a cyclopentane nucleus by convergent annulations constitutes a significant challenge for synthetic chemists. Though a number of biologically relevant cyclopentane natural products are known, more often than not, the cyclopentane core is assembled in a stepwise fashion due to lack of efficient annulation strategies. Herein, we report the rhodium-catalyzed reactions of vinyldiazoacetates with (E)-1,3-disubstituted 2-butenols generate cyclopentanes, containing four new stereogenic centers with very high levels of stereoselectivity (99% ee, >97 : 3 dr). The reaction proceeds by a carbene–initiated domino sequence consisting of five distinct steps: rhodium–bound oxonium ylide formation, [2,3]-sigmatropic rearrangement, oxy-Cope rearrangement, enol–keto tautomerization, and finally an intramolecular carbonyl ene reaction. A systematic study is presented detailing how to control chirality transfer in each of the four stereo-defining steps of the cascade, consummating in the development of a highly stereoselective process. PMID:25082301

  3. Impurities determination in precious metals like rhodium, palladium and platinum by neutron activation without separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    May, S.; Piccot, D.; Pinte, G.

    1978-01-01

    The possibilities of the method explored using an installation of gamma or X ray spectrometry of good performance. The irradiations were realized in the reactors EL.3 (flux approximately 6.10 12 n.cm -2 .s -1 ) and Osiris (flux > 10 14 n.cm -2 .s -1 ) of the CEN Saclay. In rhodium the presence of iridium limits the analysis possibilities. However gold, silver and platinum are easily determined, just as the other elements (As, Br, Cl, Co, Mn, Na, Sb). In platinum it is possible to determine the elements of long period, especially antimony, silver, cobalt, iridium, tantalum and zinc. As for palladium the principal impurities are gold, silver and ruthenium for what is of precious metals and particularly zinc among the other metals. For the three matrices considered the detection limits of a certain number of elements are indicated [fr

  4. Exploring cellular uptake of iron oxide nanoparticles associated with rhodium citrate in breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaves, Natalia L; Estrela-Lopis, Irina; Böttner, Julia; Lopes, Cláudio Ap; Guido, Bruna C; de Sousa, Aparecido R; Báo, Sônia N

    2017-01-01

    Nanocarriers have the potential to improve the therapeutic index of currently available drugs by improving their efficacy and achieving therapeutic steady-state levels over an extended period. The association of maghemite-rhodium citrate (MRC) nanoparticles (NPs) has the potential to increase specificity of the cytotoxic action. However, the interaction of these NPs with cells, their uptake mechanism, and subcellular localization need to be elucidated. This work evaluates the uptake mechanism of MRC NPs in metastatic and nonmetastatic breast cancer-cell models, comparing them to a nontumor cell line. MRC NPs uptake in breast cancer cells was more effective than in normal cells, with regard to both the amount of internalized material and the achievement of more strategic intracellular distribution. Moreover, this process occurred through a clathrin-dependent endocytosis pathway with different basal expression levels of this protein in the cell lines tested.

  5. Water resistant rhodium plated reflectors for use in the DIRC BaBar Cherenkov detector

    CERN Document Server

    Benkebil, M; Plaszczynski, S; Schune, M H; Wormser, G

    2000-01-01

    Early simulation studies showed that reflectors mounted on the photomultipliers would be useful for the DIRC BaBar Cherenkov detector, showing a gain between 20% and 30% in the number of Cherenkov photons. The proof of principle for these reflectors has been obtained during the beam test of a large-scale prototype of the DIRC detector. An extensive R and D has been conducted in order to test different metallization procedures. Indeed, the challenge was to find a metallization technique which can resist the pure de-ionized water (>15 M OMEGA) up to 10 yr. The chosen technology was rhodium plated reflectors. During the first BaBar cosmic run, the measured performance confirmed the results of the simulation, the prototype-II and the R and D.

  6. Selective rhodium-catalyzed reduction of tertiary amides in amino acid esters and peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Shoubhik; Li, Yuehui; Bornschein, Christoph; Pisiewicz, Sabine; Kiersch, Konstanze; Michalik, Dirk; Gallou, Fabrice; Junge, Kathrin; Beller, Matthias

    2015-10-12

    Efficient reduction of the tertiary amide bond in amino acid derivatives and peptides is described. Functional group selectivity has been achieved by applying a commercially available rhodium precursor and bis(diphenylphosphino)propane (dppp) ligand together with phenyl silane as a reductant. This methodology allows for specific reductive derivatization of biologically interesting peptides and offers straightforward access to a variety of novel peptide derivatives for chemical biology studies and potential pharmaceutical applications. The catalytic system tolerates a variety of functional groups including secondary amides, ester, nitrile, thiomethyl, and hydroxy groups. This convenient hydrosilylation reaction proceeds at ambient conditions and is operationally safe because no air-sensitive reagents or highly reactive metal hydrides are needed. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Immobilized fluid membranes for gas separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei; Canfield, Nathan L; Zhang, Jian; Li, Xiaohong Shari; Zhang, Jiguang

    2014-03-18

    Provided herein are immobilized liquid membranes for gas separation, methods of preparing such membranes and uses thereof. In one example, the immobilized membrane includes a porous metallic host matrix and an immobilized liquid fluid (such as a silicone oil) that is immobilized within one or more pores included within the porous metallic host matrix. The immobilized liquid membrane is capable of selective permeation of one type of molecule (such as oxygen) over another type of molecule (such as water). In some examples, the selective membrane is incorporated into a device to supply oxygen from ambient air to the device for electrochemical reactions, and at the same time, to block water penetration and electrolyte loss from the device.

  8. Separation of 103Pd from metal Rhodium by dry distillation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szuecs, Z.; Takacs, S.

    2009-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. Introduction. The use of Auger emitters as potential radiopharmaceuticals is increasingly investigated. One such radionuclide of interest is 103m Rh. This can be produced from 103 Ru or from 103 Pd in an in vivo generator. It has been proven on theoretical considerations that use of 103 Pd/ 103m Rh in vivo generator will be successful in delivering 103 mRh to a target site when complexed to a tumor selective carrier. 103 Pd is widely used in internal radiotherapy with one of the production routes via the irradiation of Rh by protons in a cyclotron. The charged particle production of 103 Pd is the only way for no-carrier -added production of this radionuclide, which is required for use in nuclear medicine. However, the widely used separation technique to get 103 Pd from the target material (as well as recovery of the Rh) by wet chemistry is a very complicated, labour intensive and expensive procedure, resulting in low yields of 103 Pd and high amounts of radioactive waste. An alternative more efficient separation and production technology can be developed based on differential evaporation. The principle is the following: The produced 103 Pd 'contaminating' new element within the crystal structure of the Rh target can be forced to diffuse out from the deformed crystal lattice by heating up the target. In this process the 103 Pd accumulates on the surface of the target from where it can be evaporated. A prerequisite for this process is that the target metal (Rh) has a different partial pressure than the evaporated metal (Pd). The thick target yield is 6MBq/μ Ah and the activities of potential contaminating radioisotopes produced by side reaction are negligible, if the energy of the irradiating beam will be chosen precisely. The natural abundance of 116 Cd is 7,5%, it means that the price of the enriched material is reasonable. A potential cyclotron facility with α-beam was found at JINR, Dubna, Russia where the radiochemical

  9. Rhodium target preparation from homemade chloride plating baths used for the industrial cyclotron production of palladium-L03

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadeghi, M.; Van den Winkel, P.; Afarideh, H.; Haji-Saeid, M.; Syrafi Nafis, H.

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: To avoid acquisition problems of commercially available western rhodium plating solutions in developing countries, a new plating/recovery cycle for Rh-103 electroplated target material (1 g Rh per target) used for the industrial cyclotron production of Pd-103 was developed. Rhodium chloride plating solutions can be prepared by dissolution of the analytical grade compound or from rhodium recovery solutions obtained after electrosolubilisation of irradiated targets and extraction of palladium. Methods: The technology involves the selective removal of the copper target backing of an irradiated target in concentrated nitric acid using a homemade flow-through stripper. The resulting rhodium fragments are dissolved in a constant-volume (40 ml), homemade graphite centrifugal ac-electrodissolution mini-reactor operating at 90 degree C, 2 A.cm-2 and 1000-rpm rotation speed. The system allows time-controlled 99 % solubilisation of up to 3g rhodium (as fragments, powder or small pieces of wire) in less than 3 hours when 12 N hydrochloric acid is applied. Upon solvent-solvent extraction of the non-carrier added Pd-103 from the resulting HCI solution; the following procedure can be used for the simultaneous preparation of 4 targets showing a surface area of 11.69 cm 2 and a physical thickness of 48 Um. Dissolve an amount of hydrated RhC13 containing 2.8 g of rhodium in 400 ml of water. Alternatively, the filtered (0.45 μm filter) combined recovery solutions containing the same weight of rhodium can be evaporated to near dryness (350 degree C at the start, 150 degree C near the end) and residue taken up (gentle stirring, 50 degree C) in 400 ml of distilled water, After filtration, a stress reducing agent (sulfamic acid) is added and the pH sodium hydroxide. Upon make up to volume (450 ml) adjusted to the optimum value (pH = 2) with and preheating to 40 degree C, the resulting solution is introduced in a cylindrical home-made constant-volume, 4- target plating vessel

  10. A Mixed-Ligand Chiral Rhodium(II) Catalyst Enables the Enantioselective Total Synthesis of Piperarborenine B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panish, Robert A; Chintala, Srinivasa R; Fox, Joseph M

    2016-04-11

    A novel, mixed-ligand chiral rhodium(II) catalyst, Rh2(S-NTTL)3(dCPA), has enabled the first enantioselective total synthesis of the natural product piperarborenine B. A crystal structure of Rh2(S-NTTL)3(dCPA) reveals a "chiral crown" conformation with a bulky dicyclohexylphenyl acetate ligand and three N-naphthalimido groups oriented on the same face of the catalyst. The natural product was prepared on large scale using rhodium-catalyzed bicyclobutanation/ copper-catalyzed homoconjugate addition chemistry in the key step. The route proceeds in ten steps with an 8% overall yield and 92% ee. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Plutonium Immobilization Can Loading Concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kriikku, E.; Ward, C.; Stokes, M.; Randall, B.; Steed, J.; Jones, R.; Hamilton, L.; Rogers, L.; Fiscus, J.; Dyches, G.

    1998-05-01

    The Plutonium Immobilization Facility will encapsulate plutonium in ceramic pucks and seal the pucks inside welded cans. Remote equipment will place these cans in magazines and the magazines in a Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) canister. The DWPF will fill the canister with glass for permanent storage. This report discusses five can loading conceptual designs and the lists the advantages and disadvantages for each concept. This report identifies loading pucks into cans and backfilling cans with helium as the top priority can loading development areas. The can loading welder and cutter are very similar to the existing Savannah River Site (SRS) FB-Line bagless transfer welder and cutter and thus they are a low priority development item

  12. Immobilization of organic liquid wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenhalgh, W.O.

    1985-01-01

    This report describes a portland cement immobilization process for the disposal treatment of radioactive organic liquid wastes which would be generated in a a FFTF fuels reprocessing line. An incineration system already on-hand was determined to be too costly to operate for the 100 to 400 gallons per year organic liquid. Organic test liquids were dispersed into an aqueous phosphate liquid using an emulsifier. A total of 109 gallons of potential and radioactive aqueous immiscible organic liquid wastes from Hanford 300 Area operations were solidified with portland cement and disposed of as solid waste during a 3-month test program with in-drum mixers. Waste packing efficiencies varied from 32 to 40% and included pump oils, mineral spirits, and TBP-NPH type solvents

  13. Uranium Immobilization in Wetland Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffe, Peter R.; Koster van Groos, Paul G.; Li, Dien; Chang, Hyun-Shik; Seaman, John C.; Kaplan, Daniel I.; Peacock, Aaron D.; Scheckel, Kirk

    2014-05-01

    stronger for the mesocosms with the higher Fe(II) load. Analysis via XANES showed that a fraction (up to ~1/3) of uranium was reduced to U(IV), for mesocosms operated under low iron loading, indicating that iron cycling in the rhizosphere also results in uranium reduction and immobilization. For mesocosms operating under the higher iron loading, the fraction of uranium immobilized as U(IV) was much lower, indicating that uranium co-precipitation with iron might have been the dominant immobilization process. In parallel to these mesocosm experiments, dialysis samplers have been deployed at the Savannah River National Laboratory near a creek with uranium contamination, to determine dissolved species, including Fe(II) and U(VI) in these wetland soils and their seasonal variability. The results show that there is a strong seasonal variability in dissolved iron and uranium, indicating a strong immobilization during the growing season, which is consistent with the mesocosm experimental results that the rhizosphere iron and uranium cycling are closely linked.

  14. Enantioselective synthesis of chiral 3-aryl-1-indanones through rhodium-catalyzed asymmetric intramolecular 1,4-addition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yue-Na; Xu, Ming-Hua

    2013-03-15

    Enantioselective synthesis of potentially useful chiral 3-aryl-1-indanones was achieved through a rhodium-catalyzed asymmetric intramolecular 1,4-addition of pinacolborane chalcone derivatives using extraordinary simple MonoPhos as chiral ligand under relatively mild conditions. This novel protocol offers an easy access to a wide variety of enantioenriched 3-aryl-1-indanone derivatives in high yields (up to 95%) with excellent enantioselectivities (up to 95% ee).

  15. Enantioselective Construction of 3-Hydroxypiperidine Scaffolds by Sequential Action of Light and Rhodium upon N-Allylglyoxylamides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishida, Naoki; Nečas, David; Masuda, Yusuke; Murakami, Masahiro

    2015-06-15

    3-Hydroxypiperidine scaffolds were enantioselectively constructed in an atom-economical way by sequential action of light and rhodium upon N-allylglyoxylamides. In a formal sense, the allylic C-H bond was selectively cleaved and enantioselectively added across the ketonic carbonyl group with migration of the double bond (carbonyl-ene-type reaction). © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Sequential rhodium/palladium catalysis: enantioselective formation of dihydroquinolinones in the presence of achiral and chiral ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lei; Qureshi, Zafar; Sonaglia, Lorenzo; Lautens, Mark

    2014-12-08

    Compatible combinations of achiral and chiral ligands can be used in rhodium/palladium catalysis to achieve highly enantioselective domino reactions. The difference in rates of catalysis and minimal effects of ligand interference confer control in the domino sequence. The "all-in-one" 1,4-conjugate arylation and C-N cross-coupling through sequential Rh/Pd catalysis provides access to enantioenriched dihydroquinolinone building blocks. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Applying Adjacent Hyperbolas to Calculation of the Upper Limit of the Periodic Table of Elements, with Use of Rhodium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khazan A.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In the earlier study (Khazan A. Upper Limit in Mendeleev’s Periodic Table — Ele- ment No. 155. 2nd ed., Svenska fysikarkivet, Stockholm, 2010 the author showed how Rhodium can be applied to the hyperbolic law of the Periodic Table of Elements in or- der to calculate, with high precision, all other elements conceivable in the Table. Here we obtain the same result, with use of fraction linear functions (adjacent hyperbolas.

  18. Construction of axial chirality by rhodium-catalyzed asymmetric dehydrogenative Heck coupling of biaryl compounds with alkenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Jun; You, Shu-Li

    2014-11-24

    Enantioselective construction of axially chiral biaryls by direct C-H bond functionalization reactions has been realized. Novel axially chiral biaryls were synthesized by the direct C-H bond olefination of biaryl compounds, using a chiral [Cp*Rh(III)] catalyst, in good to excellent yields and enantioselectivities. The obtained axially chiral biaryls were found as suitable ligands for rhodium-catalyzed asymmetric conjugate additions. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Rhodium(III)-catalyzed three-component reaction of imines, alkynes, and aldehydes through C-H activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ji-Rong; Song, Qiang; Zhu, Yu-Qin; Qin, Liu; Qian, Zhi-Yong; Dong, Lin

    2014-12-15

    An efficient rhodium(III)-catalyzed tandem three-component reaction of imines, alkynes and aldehydes through CH activation has been developed. High stereo- and regioselectivity, as well as good yields were obtained in most cases. The simple and atom-economical approach offers a broad scope of substrates, providing polycyclic skeletons with potential biological properties. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Applying Adjacent Hyperbolas to Calculation of the Upper Limit of the Periodic Table of Elements, with Use of Rhodium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khazan A.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In the earlier study (Khazan A. Upper Limit in Mendeleev's Periodic Table - Element No.155. 2nd ed., Svenska fysikarkivet, Stockholm, 2010 the author showed how Rhodium can be applied to the hyperbolic law of the Periodic Table of Elements in order to calculate, with high precision, all other elements conceivable in the Table. Here we obtain the same result, with use of fraction linear functions (adjacent hyperbolas.

  1. Radioactive seed immobilization techniques for interstitial brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan, K.; Podder, T.; Buzurovic, I.; Hu, Y.; Dicker, A.; Valicenti, R.; Yu, Y.; Messing, E.; Rubens, D.; Sarkar, N.; Ng, W.

    2008-01-01

    In prostate brachytherapy, seeds can detach from their deposited sites and move locally in the pelvis or migrate to distant sites including the pulmonary and cardiac regions. Undesirable consequences of seed migration include inadequate dose coverage of the prostate and tissue irradiation effects at the site of migration. Thus, it is clinically important to develop seed immobilization techniques. We first analyze the possible causes for seed movement, and propose three potential techniques for seed immobilization: (1) surgical glue, (2) laser coagulation and (3) diathermy coagulation. The feasibility of each method is explored. Experiments were carried out using fresh bovine livers to investigate the efficacy of seed immobilization using surgical glue. Results have shown that the surgical glue can effectively immobilize the seeds. Evaluation of the radiation dose distribution revealed that the non-immobilized seed movement would change the planned isodose distribution considerably; while by using surgical glue method to immobilize the seeds, the changes were negligible. Prostate brachytherapy seed immobilization is necessary and three alternative mechanisms are promising for addressing this issue. Experiments for exploring the efficacy of the other two proposed methods are ongoing. Devices compatible with the brachytherapy procedure will be designed in future. (orig.)

  2. Catalytic wet oxidation of ammonia solution: Activity of the nanoscale platinum-palladium-rhodium composite oxide catalyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hung, C.-M.

    2009-01-01

    Aqueous solutions of 400-1000 mg/L of ammonia were oxidized in a trickle-bed reactor (TBR) in this study of nanoscale platinum-palladium-rhodium composite oxide catalysts, which were prepared by the co-precipitation of H 2 PtCl 6 , Pd(NO 3 ) 3 and Rh(NO 3 ) 3 . Hardly any of the dissolved ammonia was removed by wet oxidation in the absence of any catalyst, whereas about 99% of the ammonia was reduced during wet oxidation over nanoscale platinum-palladium-rhodium composite oxide catalysts at 503 K in an oxygen partial pressure of 2.0 MPa. A synergistic effect exists in the nanoscale platinum-palladium-rhodium composite structure, which is the material with the highest ammonia reduction activity. The nanometer-sized particles were characterized by TEM, XRD and FTIR. The effect of the initial concentration and reaction temperature on the removal of ammonia from the effluent streams was also studied at a liquid hourly space velocity of under 9 h -1 in the wet catalytic processes

  3. Catalytic wet oxidation of ammonia solution: Activity of the nanoscale platinum-palladium-rhodium composite oxide catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hung, C.-M. [Department of Industry Engineering and Management, Yung-Ta Institute of Technology and Commerce, 316 Chung-shan Road, Linlo, Pingtung 909, Taiwan (China)], E-mail: hungcm1031@gmail.com

    2009-04-15

    Aqueous solutions of 400-1000 mg/L of ammonia were oxidized in a trickle-bed reactor (TBR) in this study of nanoscale platinum-palladium-rhodium composite oxide catalysts, which were prepared by the co-precipitation of H{sub 2}PtCl{sub 6}, Pd(NO{sub 3}){sub 3} and Rh(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}. Hardly any of the dissolved ammonia was removed by wet oxidation in the absence of any catalyst, whereas about 99% of the ammonia was reduced during wet oxidation over nanoscale platinum-palladium-rhodium composite oxide catalysts at 503 K in an oxygen partial pressure of 2.0 MPa. A synergistic effect exists in the nanoscale platinum-palladium-rhodium composite structure, which is the material with the highest ammonia reduction activity. The nanometer-sized particles were characterized by TEM, XRD and FTIR. The effect of the initial concentration and reaction temperature on the removal of ammonia from the effluent streams was also studied at a liquid hourly space velocity of under 9 h{sup -1} in the wet catalytic processes.

  4. Catalytic wet oxidation of ammonia solution: activity of the nanoscale platinum-palladium-rhodium composite oxide catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Chang-Mao

    2009-04-15

    Aqueous solutions of 400-1000 mg/L of ammonia were oxidized in a trickle-bed reactor (TBR) in this study of nanoscale platinum-palladium-rhodium composite oxide catalysts, which were prepared by the co-precipitation of H(2)PtCl(6), Pd(NO(3))(3) and Rh(NO(3))(3). Hardly any of the dissolved ammonia was removed by wet oxidation in the absence of any catalyst, whereas about 99% of the ammonia was reduced during wet oxidation over nanoscale platinum-palladium-rhodium composite oxide catalysts at 503 K in an oxygen partial pressure of 2.0 MPa. A synergistic effect exists in the nanoscale platinum-palladium-rhodium composite structure, which is the material with the highest ammonia reduction activity. The nanometer-sized particles were characterized by TEM, XRD and FTIR. The effect of the initial concentration and reaction temperature on the removal of ammonia from the effluent streams was also studied at a liquid hourly space velocity of under 9 h(-1) in the wet catalytic processes.

  5. Enhancement of ethanol oxidation at Pt and PtRu nanoparticles dispersed over hybrid zirconia-rhodium supports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutkowska, Iwona A.; Koster, Margaretta D.; Blanchard, Gary J.; Kulesza, Pawel J.

    2014-12-01

    A catalytic material for electrooxidation of ethanol that utilizes PtRu nanoparticles dispersed over thin films of rhodium-free and rhodium-containing zirconia (ZrO2) supports is described here. The enhancement of electrocatalytic activity (particularly in the potential range as low as 0.25-0.5 V vs. RHE), that has been achieved by dispersing PtRu nanoparticles (loading, 100 μg cm-2) over the hybrid Rh-ZrO2 support composed of nanostructured zirconia and metallic rhodium particles, is clearly evident from comparison of the respective voltammetric and chronoamperometric current densities recorded at room temperature (22 °C) in 0.5 mol dm-3 H2SO4 containing 0.5 mol dm-3 ethanol. Porous ZrO2 nanostructures, that provide a large population of hydroxyl groups in acidic medium in the vicinity of PtRu sites, are expected to facilitate the ruthenium-induced removal of passivating CO adsorbates from platinum, as is apparent from the diagnostic experiments with a small organic molecule such as methanol. Although Rh itself does not show directly any activity toward ethanol oxidation, the metal is expected to facilitate C-C bond splitting in C2H5OH. It has also been found during parallel voltammetric and chronoamperometric measurements that the hybrid Rh-ZrO2 support increases activity of the platinum component itself toward ethanol oxidation in the low potential range.

  6. The determination, by atomic-absorption spectrophotometry using electrothermal atomization, of platinum, palladium, rhodium, ruthenium, and iridium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haines, J.; Robert, R.V.D.

    1982-01-01

    A method that involves measurement by atomic-absorption spectrophotometry using electrothermal atomization has been developed for the determination of trace quantities of platinum, palladium, rhodium, ruthenium, and iridium in mineralogical samples. The elements are separated and concentrated by fusion, nickel sulphide being used as the collector, and the analyte elements are measured in the resulting acid solution. An organic extraction procedure was found to offer no advantages over the proposed method. Mutual interferences between the five platinum-group metals examined, as well as interferences from gold, silver, and nickel were determined. The accuracy of the measurement was established by the analysis of a platinum-ore reference material. The lower limits of determination of each of the analyte elements in a sample material are as follows: platinum 1,6μg/l, palladium 0,2μg/1, rhodium 0,5μg/l, ruthenium 3μg/l, and iridium 2,5μg/l. The relative standard deviations range from 0,05 for rhodium to 0.08 for iridium. The method, which is described in detail in the Appendix, is applicable to the determination of these elements in ores, tailings, and geological materials in which the total concentration of the noble metals is less than 1g/t

  7. Photocatalytic carbon dioxide reduction with rhodium-based catalysts in solution and heterogenized within metal-organic frameworks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, Matthew B; Wang, Xia; Elgrishi, Noémie; Hendon, Christopher H; Walsh, Aron; Bonnefoy, Jonathan; Canivet, Jérôme; Quadrelli, Elsje Alessandra; Farrusseng, David; Mellot-Draznieks, Caroline; Fontecave, Marc

    2015-02-01

    The first photosensitization of a rhodium-based catalytic system for CO2 reduction is reported, with formate as the sole carbon-containing product. Formate has wide industrial applications and is seen as valuable within fuel cell technologies as well as an interesting H2 -storage compound. Heterogenization of molecular rhodium catalysts is accomplished via the synthesis, post-synthetic linker exchange, and characterization of a new metal-organic framework (MOF) Cp*Rh@UiO-67. While the catalytic activities of the homogeneous and heterogeneous systems are found to be comparable, the MOF-based system is more stable and selective. Furthermore it can be recycled without loss of activity. For formate production, an optimal catalyst loading of ∼10 % molar Rh incorporation is determined. Increased incorporation of rhodium catalyst favors thermal decomposition of formate into H2 . There is no precedent for a MOF catalyzing the latter reaction so far. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Factors affecting the immobilization of fungal biomass on CNT as a biosorbent for textile dyes removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adebayo Bello, Ibrahim; Kabbashi, Nassereldeen A.; Zahangir Alam, Md; Alkhatib, Ma'an F.; Nabilah Murad, Fatin

    2017-07-01

    Effluents from dye and textile industries are highly contaminated and toxic to the environment. High concentration of non-biodegradable compounds contributes to increased biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) and chemical oxygen demand (COD) of the wastewater bodies. Dyes found in wastewater from textile industries are carcinogenic, mutagenic or teratogenic. Biological processes involving certain bacteria, fungi and activated carbon have been employed in treating wastewater. These methods are either inefficient or ineffective. These complexities necessitates search for new approaches that will offset all the shortcomings of the present solutions to the challenges faced with textile wastewater management. This study produced a new biosorbent by the immobilization of fungal biomass on carbon nanotubes. The new biosorbent is called “carbon nanotubes immobilized biomass (CNTIB)” which was produced by immobilization technique. A potential fungal strain, Aspergillus niger was selected on the basis of biomass production. It was found out in this studies that fungal biomass were better produced in acidic medium. Aspergillus niger was immobilized on carbon nanotubes. One-factor-at-a time (OFAT) was employed to determine the effect of different factors on the immobilization of fungal biomass on carbon nanotubes and optimum levels at which the three selected parameters (pH, culture time and agitation rate) would perform. Findings from OFAT showed that the optimum conditions for immobilization are a pH of 5, agitation rate of 150rpm and a culture time of 5 days.

  9. Enhancing the functional properties of thermophilic enzymes by chemical modification and immobilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowan, Don A; Fernandez-Lafuente, Roberto

    2011-09-10

    The immobilization of proteins (mostly typically enzymes) onto solid supports is mature technology and has been used successfully to enhance biocatalytic processes in a wide range of industrial applications. However, continued developments in immobilization technology have led to more sophisticated and specialized applications of the process. A combination of targeted chemistries, for both the support and the protein, sometimes in combination with additional chemical and/or genetic engineering, has led to the development of methods for the modification of protein functional properties, for enhancing protein stability and for the recovery of specific proteins from complex mixtures. In particular, the development of effective methods for immobilizing large multi-subunit proteins with multiple covalent linkages (multi-point immobilization) has been effective in stabilizing proteins where subunit dissociation is the initial step in enzyme inactivation. In some instances, multiple benefits are achievable in a single process. Here we comprehensively review the literature pertaining to immobilization and chemical modification of different enzyme classes from thermophiles, with emphasis on the chemistries involved and their implications for modification of the enzyme functional properties. We also highlight the potential for synergies in the combined use of immobilization and other chemical modifications. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. The removal of thermo-tolerant coliform bacteria by immobilized waste stabilization pond algae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, H W; Marcon, A E; Melo, H N

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the potential of laboratory- scale columns of immobilized micro-algae to disinfect effluents using thermo-tolerant coliforms (TTC) as a model system. Cells of a Chlorella species isolated from a waste stabilization pond complex in Northeast Brazil were immobilized in calcium alginate, packed into glass columns and incubated in contact with TTC suspensions for up to 24 hours. Five to six log removals of TTC were achieved in 6 hours and 11 log removals in 12 hours contact time. The results were similar under artificial light and shaded sunlight. However little or no TTC removal occurred in the light in columns of alginate beads without immobilized algae present or when the immobilized algae were incubated in the dark suggesting that the presence of both algae and light were necessary for TTC decay. There was a positive correlation between K(b) values for TTC and increasing pH in the effluent from the immobilized algal columns within the range pH 7.2 and 8.9. The potential of immobilized algal technology for wastewater disinfection may warrant further investigation.

  11. Improvement of the stability and activity of immobilized glucose oxidase on modified iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbasi, Mahboube, E-mail: mahbubeabbasi@yahoo.com; Amiri, Razieh, E-mail: razieh.amiri@gmail.com; Bordbar, Abdol-Kalegh, E-mail: bordbar@chem.ui.ac.ir; Ranjbakhsh, Elnaz, E-mail: e.ranjbakhsh@yahoo.com; Khosropour, Ahmad-Reza, E-mail: khosropour@chem.ui.ac.ir

    2016-02-28

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Modified iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles were synthesized by co-precipitation method and characterized by TEM and XRD. • Covalent attachment of GOX to MIMNs was confirmed by FT-IR technique. • Optimization of the reaction time and initial amount of the GOX were carried out. • Improvement of activity and stability of immobilized GOX have been increased in comparison of free GOX. - Abstract: Immobilized proteins and enzymes are widely investigated in the medical field as well as the food and environmental fields. In this study, glucose oxidase (GOX) was covalently immobilized on the surface of modified iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles (MIMNs) to produce a bioconjugate complex. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) were used to the size, shape and structure characterization of the MIMNs. Binding of GOX to these MIMNs was confirmed by using FT-IR spectroscopy. The stability of the immobilized and free enzyme at different temperature and pH values was investigated by measuring the enzymatic activity. These studies reveal that the enzyme's stability is enhanced by immobilization. Further experiments showed that the storage stability of the enzyme is improved upon binding to the MIMNs. The results of kinetic measurements suggest that the effect of the immobilization process on substrate and product diffusion is small. Such bioconjugates can be considered as a catalytic nanodevice for accelerating the glucose oxidation reaction for biotechnological purposes.

  12. Surface cell immobilization within perfluoroalkoxy microchannels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stojkovič, Gorazd; Krivec, Matic [Faculty of Chemistry and Chemical Technology, University of Ljubljana, Aškerčeva 5, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Vesel, Alenka [Jožef Stefan Institute, Jamova cesta 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Marinšek, Marjan [Faculty of Chemistry and Chemical Technology, University of Ljubljana, Aškerčeva 5, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Žnidaršič-Plazl, Polona, E-mail: polona.znidarsic@fkkt.uni-lj.si [Faculty of Chemistry and Chemical Technology, University of Ljubljana, Aškerčeva 5, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2014-11-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • A very efficient approach for immobilization of cells into microreactors is presented. • It is applicable to various materials, including PFA and cyclic olefin (co)polymers. • It was used to immobilize different prokaryotic and eukaryotic microbes. • Cells were immobilized on the surface in high density and showed good stability. • Mechanisms of APTES interactions with target materials are proposed. - Abstract: Perfluoroalkoxy (PFA) is one of the most promising materials for the fabrication of cheap, solvent resistant and reusable microfluidic chips, which have been recently recognized as effective tools for biocatalytic process development. The application of biocatalysts significantly depends on efficient immobilization of enzymes or cells within the reactor enabling long-term biocatalyst use. Functionalization of PFA microchannels by 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (ATPES) and glutaraldehyde was used for rapid preparation of microbioreactors with surface-immobilized cells. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy were used to accurately monitor individual treatment steps and to select conditions for cell immobilization. The optimized protocol for Saccharomyces cerevisiae immobilization on PFA microchannel walls comprised ethanol surface pretreatment, 4 h contacting with 10% APTES aqueous solution, 10 min treatment with 1% glutaraldehyde and 20 min contacting with cells in deionized water. The same protocol enabled also immobilization of Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas putida and Bacillus subtilis cells on PFA surface in high densities. Furthermore, the developed procedure has been proved to be very efficient also for surface immobilization of tested cells on other materials that are used for microreactor fabrication, including glass, polystyrene, poly (methyl methacrylate), polycarbonate, and two olefin-based polymers, namely Zeonor{sup ®} and Topas{sup ®}.

  13. The effect of bound to dialdehudecellulose protein concentration on the activity of immobilized trypsin after γ-irradiation and in process of storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belov, A.A.; Ryl'tsev, V.V.; Ignatyuk, T.E.; Filatov, V.N.

    1994-01-01

    It is found the complex effect of the bound enzyme concentration on the proteolytic activity of trypsin immobilized to dialdehydecellulose (preriodate oxidation) after γ-irradiation and in process of storage. It is shown the occurance of three stages of immobilized enzyme inactivation in process of immobilization and storage. The velocity of inactivation did not depend on bound trypsin concentration. The ratio of proteolytic activity of samples before and after γ-irradiation was increased with the increase of immobilized to carrier enzyme concentration and was not change (in range of experiment error) in process of storage. The results were compared with that of cryctlline trypsin

  14. Immobilization of cellulase using porous polymer matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumakura, M.; Kaetsu, I.

    1984-01-01

    A new method is discussed for the immobilization of cellulase using porous polymer matrices, which were obtained by radiation polymerization of hydrophilic monomers. In this method, the immobilized enzyme matrix was prepared by enzyme absorbtion in the porous polymer matrix and drying treatment. The enzyme activity of the immobilized enzyme matrix varied with monomer concentration, cooling rate of the monomer solution, and hydrophilicity of the polymer matrix, takinn the change of the nature of the porous structure in the polymer matrix. The leakage of the enzymes from the polymer matrix was not observed in the repeated batch enzyme reactions

  15. Immobilization of Peroxidase onto Magnetite Modified Polyaniline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Fernandes Barbosa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study describes the immobilization of horseradish peroxidase (HRP on magnetite-modified polyaniline (PANImG activated with glutaraldehyde. After the optimization of the methodology, the immobilization of HRP on PANImG produced the same yield (25% obtained for PANIG with an efficiency of 100% (active protein. The optimum pH for immobilization was displaced by the effect of the partition of protons produced in the microenvironment by the magnetite. The tests of repeated use have shown that PANImG-HRP can be used for 13 cycles with maintenance of 50% of the initial activity.

  16. Preparation and characterization of immobilized lipase on magnetic hydrophobic microspheres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guo, Zheng; Bai, Shu; Sun, Yan

    2003-01-01

    H for the immobilized CCL were determined. Activity amelioration of the immobilized CCL for the hydrolysis of olive oil was observed, indicating an interfacial activation of the enzyme after immobilization. Moreover, the immobilized CCL showed enhanced thermal stability and good durability in the repeated use after...

  17. Immobilized low-level waste disposal options configuration study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitchell, D.E.

    1995-02-01

    This report compiles information that supports the eventual conceptual and definitive design of a disposal facility for immobilized low-level waste. The report includes the results of a joint Westinghouse/Fluor Daniel Inc. evaluation of trade-offs for glass manufacturing and product (waste form) disposal. Though recommendations for the preferred manufacturing and disposal option for low-level waste are outside the scope of this document, relative ranking as applied to facility complexity, safety, remote operation concepts and ease of retrieval are addressed

  18. Antimicrobial activity of immobilized lactoferrin and lactoferricin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Renxun; Cole, Nerida; Dutta, Debarun; Kumar, Naresh; Willcox, Mark D P

    2017-11-01

    Lactoferrin and lactoferricin were immobilized on glass surfaces via two linkers, 4-azidobenzoic acid (ABA) or 4-fluoro-3-nitrophenyl azide (FNA). The resulting surfaces were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and contact angle measurements. The antimicrobial activity of the surfaces was determined using Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus strains by fluorescence microscopy. Lactoferrin and lactoferricin immobilization was confirmed by XPS showing significant increases (p lactoferricin immobilized on glass significantly (p lactoferricin were successfully immobilized on glass surfaces and showed promising antimicrobial activity against pathogenic bacteria. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 105B: 2612-2617, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Immobilization of Rocky Flats Graphite Fines Residue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rudisill, T.S.

    1999-01-01

    The development of the immobilization process for graphite fines has proceeded through a series of experimental programs. The experimental procedures and results from each series of experiments are discussed in this report

  20. Immobilization and characterization of inulinase from Ulocladium ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-10-20

    Oct 20, 2014 ... The enzyme had optimum pH at 5.6 for free and immobilized U. atrum inulinase on polyester ... ceutical industry because of their beneficial effects in ..... Hanover LWJ 1993 Manufacturing, composing and applications of.

  1. Plutonium Immobilization Bagless Transfer Can Size Evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kriikku, E.; Stokes, M.; Rogers, L.; Ward, C.

    1998-02-01

    This report identifies and documents the most appropriate bagless transfer can size to support Plutonium Immobilization Can Loading operations. Also, this report considers can diameter, can wall thickness, and can length

  2. Modeling intrinsic kinetics in immobilized photocatalytic microreactors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visan, Aura; Rafieian Boroujeni, Damon; Ogieglo, Wojciech; Lammertink, Rob G.H.

    2014-01-01

    The article presents a simple model for immobilized photocatalytic microreactors following a first order reaction rate with either light independency or light dependency described by photon absorption carrier generation semiconductor physics. Experimental data obtained for various residence times,

  3. A simplified technique for nasoendotracheal tube immobilization.

    OpenAIRE

    Berardo, N.; Leban, S. G.; Williams, F. A.

    1989-01-01

    A simplified technique for immobilization of a nasoendotracheal tube is described in which a wide strap of open cell, hypoallergenic, foam-backed fabric is secured to the patient's head with a Velcro fastener.

  4. Rhodium-Catalyzed C-C Bond Formation via Heteroatom-Directed C-H Bond Activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colby, Denise; Bergman, Robert; Ellman, Jonathan

    2010-05-13

    Once considered the 'holy grail' of organometallic chemistry, synthetically useful reactions employing C-H bond activation have increasingly been developed and applied to natural product and drug synthesis over the past decade. The ubiquity and relative low cost of hydrocarbons makes C-H bond functionalization an attractive alternative to classical C-C bond forming reactions such as cross-coupling, which require organohalides and organometallic reagents. In addition to providing an atom economical alternative to standard cross - coupling strategies, C-H bond functionalization also reduces the production of toxic by-products, thereby contributing to the growing field of reactions with decreased environmental impact. In the area of C-C bond forming reactions that proceed via a C-H activation mechanism, rhodium catalysts stand out for their functional group tolerance and wide range of synthetic utility. Over the course of the last decade, many Rh-catalyzed methods for heteroatom-directed C-H bond functionalization have been reported and will be the focus of this review. Material appearing in the literature prior to 2001 has been reviewed previously and will only be introduced as background when necessary. The synthesis of complex molecules from relatively simple precursors has long been a goal for many organic chemists. The ability to selectively functionalize a molecule with minimal pre-activation can streamline syntheses and expand the opportunities to explore the utility of complex molecules in areas ranging from the pharmaceutical industry to materials science. Indeed, the issue of selectivity is paramount in the development of all C-H bond functionalization methods. Several groups have developed elegant approaches towards achieving selectivity in molecules that possess many sterically and electronically similar C-H bonds. Many of these approaches are discussed in detail in the accompanying articles in this special issue of Chemical Reviews. One approach

  5. Immobilization technology for krypton in amorphous zeolite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takusagawa, Atsushi; Ishiyama, Keiichi

    1989-01-01

    Radioactive krypton recovered from the offgas of a reprocessing plant requires long-term storage on the order of 100 years. Immobilization technology for krypton into amorphous zeolite 5A is considered one of the best methods for long-term storage. In this report, conditions for immobilization treatment and stability of amorphous zeolite 5A loaded krypton against heat, radiation and water are discussed, and a treatment system using this technology is described. (author)

  6. Immobilization Technologies in Probiotic Food Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregoria Mitropoulou

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Various supports and immobilization/encapsulation techniques have been proposed and tested for application in functional food production. In the present review, the use of probiotic microorganisms for the production of novel foods is discussed, while the benefits and criteria of using probiotic cultures are analyzed. Subsequently, immobilization/encapsulation applications in the food industry aiming at the prolongation of cell viability are described together with an evaluation of their potential future impact, which is also highlighted and assessed.

  7. Ceramification: A plutonium immobilization process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rask, W.C. [Dept. of Energy, Golden, CO (United States); Phillips, A.G. [Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, Golden, CO (United States)

    1996-05-01

    This paper describes a low temperature technique for stabilizing and immobilizing actinide compounds using a combination process/storage vessel of stainless steel, in which measured amounts of actinide nitrate solutions and actinide oxides (and/or residues) are systematically treated to yield a solid article. The chemical ceramic process is based on a coating technology that produces rare earth oxide coatings for defense applications involving plutonium. The final product of this application is a solid, coherent actinide oxide with process-generated encapsulation that has long-term environmental stability. Actinide compounds can be stabilized as pure materials for ease of re-use or as intimate mixtures with additives such as rare earth oxides to increase their degree of proliferation resistance. Starting materials for the process can include nitrate solutions, powders, aggregates, sludges, incinerator ashes, and others. Agents such as cerium oxide or zirconium oxide may be added as powders or precursors to enhance the properties of the resulting solid product. Additives may be included to produce a final product suitable for use in nuclear fuel pellet production. The process is simple and reduces the time and expense for stabilizing plutonium compounds. It requires a very low equipment expenditure and can be readily implemented into existing gloveboxes. The process is easily conducted with less associated risk than proposed alternative technologies.

  8. Biotechnological production of vanillin using immobilized enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furuya, Toshiki; Kuroiwa, Mari; Kino, Kuniki

    2017-02-10

    Vanillin is an important and popular plant flavor, but the amount of this compound available from plant sources is very limited. Biotechnological methods have high potential for vanillin production as an alternative to extraction from plant sources. Here, we report a new approach using immobilized enzymes for the production of vanillin. The recently discovered oxygenase Cso2 has coenzyme-independent catalytic activity for the conversion of isoeugenol and 4-vinylguaiacol to vanillin. Immobilization of Cso2 on Sepabeads EC-EA anion-exchange carrier conferred enhanced operational stability enabling repetitive use. This immobilized Cso2 catalyst allowed 6.8mg yield of vanillin from isoeugenol through ten reaction cycles at a 1mL scale. The coenzyme-independent decarboxylase Fdc, which has catalytic activity for the conversion of ferulic acid to 4-vinylguaiacol, was also immobilized on Sepabeads EC-EA. We demonstrated that the immobilized Fdc and Cso2 enabled the cascade synthesis of vanillin from ferulic acid via 4-vinylguaiacol with repetitive use of the catalysts. This study is the first example of biotechnological production of vanillin using immobilized enzymes, a process that provides new possibilities for vanillin production. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Radiation technology for immobilization of bioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-12-01

    Within the framework of the Agency's coordinated research programme on ''Application of Radiation Technology in Immobilization of Bioactive Materials'', the third and final research coordination meeting was held at Beijing University, Beijing, People's Republic of China, 15-18 June 1987. The present publication compiles all presentations made at the meeting. Fundamental processes for the immobilization of enzymes, antibodies, cells and drugs were developed and established using gamma radiation, electron beams and plasma discharge. Applications of various biofunctional components, immobilized by radiation techniques in different processes, were studied. A range of backbone polymers has been examined together with various monomers. Coupling procedures have been developed which are relevant to our particular requirements. Enzymes of various types and characteristics have been immobilized with considerable efficiency. The immobilized biocatalysts have been shown to possess significant activity and retention of activity on storage. There appears to be a high degree of specificity associated with the properties of the immobilised biocatalysts, their activity and the ease of their preparation. Novel additives which lower the total radiation dose in grafting have been discovered and their value in immobilization processes assessed. Potential applications include: medical (diagnostic, therapeutic), and industrial processes (fermentation, bioseparation, etc.). Refs, figs and tabs

  10. Enzymatic transesterification of soybean oil with ethanol using lipases immobilized on highly crystalline PVA microspheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergamasco, Juliana; Araujo, Marcelo V. de; Vasconcellos, Adriano de; Luizon Filho, Roberto A.; Hatanaka, Rafael R.; Giotto, Marcus V.; Aranda, Donato A.G.; Nery, José G.

    2013-01-01

    Polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) microspheres with different degree of crystallinity were used as solid supports for Rhizomucor miehei lipase immobilization, and the enzyme-PVA complexes were used as biocatalysts for the transesterification of soybean oil to fatty acid ethyl esters (FAEE). The amounts of immobilized enzyme on the polymeric supports were similar for both the amorphous microspheres (PVA4) and the high crystalline microspheres (PVA25). However, the enzymatic activity of the immobilized enzymes was depended on the crystallinity degree of the PVA microspheres: enzymes immobilized on the PVA4 microspheres have shown low enzymatic activity (6.13 U mg −1 ), in comparison with enzymes immobilized on the high crystalline PVA25 microspheres (149.15 U mg −1 ). A synergistic effect was observed for the enzyme-PVA25 complex during the transesterification reaction of soybean oil to FAEE: transesterification reactions with free enzyme with the equivalent amount of enzyme that were immobilized onto the PVA25 microspheres (5.4 U) have yielded only 20% of FAEE, reactions with the pure highly crystalline microsphere PVA25 have not yielded FAEE, however reactions with the enzyme-PVA25 complexes have yielded 66.3% of FAEE. This synergistic effect of an immobilized enzyme on a polymeric support has not been observed before for transesterification reaction of triacylglycerides into FAEE. Based on ATR-FTIR, 23 Na- and 13 C-NMR-MAS spectroscopic data and the interaction of the polymeric network intermolecular hydrogen bonds with the lipases residual amino acids a possible explanation for this synergistic effect is provided. Highlights: • Rhizomucor miehei lipase was immobilized on PVA microspheres (PVA4, PVA12, PVA25). • Polymer-enzyme complex was characterized by XDR, SEM, ATR-FTIR, 13 C-CPMAS-NMR, 23 Na-MAS-NMR. • Polymer-enzymes (PVA12 and PVA25) enzymes yielded considerable amount of ethyl esters. • Synergistic effect was observed for the polymer-enzyme complexes

  11. Light induced electron transfer reactions of metal complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sutin, N.; Creutz, C.

    1980-01-01

    Properties of the excited states of tris(2,2'-bipyridine) and tris(1,10-phenanthroline) complexes of chromium(III), iron(II), ruthenium(II), osmium(II), rhodium(III), and iridium(III) are described. The electron transfer reactions of the ground and excited states are discussed and interpreted in terms of the driving force for the reaction and the distortions of the excited states relative to the corresponding ground states. General considerations relevant to the conversion of light into chemical energy are presented and progress in the use of polypyridine complexes to effect the light decomposition of water into hydrogen and oxygen is reviewed

  12. Geochemical behaviour of palladium in soils and Pd/PdO model substances in the presence of the organic complexing agents L-methionine and citric acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zereini, Fathi; Wiseman, Clare L S; Vang, My; Albers, Peter; Schneider, Wolfgang; Schindl, Roland; Leopold, Kerstin

    2016-01-01

    Risk assessments of platinum group metal (PGE) emissions, notably those of platinum (Pt), palladium (Pd) and rhodium (Rh), have been mostly based on data regarding the metallic forms used in vehicular exhaust converters, known to be virtually biologically inert and immobile. To adequately assess the potential impacts of PGE, however, data on the chemical behaviour of these metals under ambient conditions post-emission is needed. Complexing agents with a high affinity for metals in the environment are hypothesized to contribute to an increased bioaccessibility of PGE. The purpose of this study is to examine the modulating effects of the organic complexing agents, L-methionine and citric acid, on the geochemical behavior of Pd in soils and model substances (Pd black and PdO). Batch experimental tests were conducted with soils and model substances to examine the impacts of the concentration of complexing agents, pH and length of extraction period on Pd solubility and its chemical transformation. Particle surface chemistry was examined using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) on samples treated with solutions under various conditions, including low and high O2 levels. Pd was observed to be more soluble in the presence of organic complexing agents, compared to Pt and Rh. Pd in soils was more readily solubilized with organic complexing agents compared to the model substances. After 7 days of extraction, L-methionine (0.1 M) treated soil and Pd black samples, for instance, had mean soluble Pd fractions of 12.4 ± 5.9% and 0.554 ± 0.024%, respectively. Surface chemistry analyses (XPS) confirmed the oxidation of metallic Pd surfaces when treated with organic complexing agents. The type of organic complexing agent used for experimental purposes was observed to be the most important factor influencing solubility, followed by solution pH and time of extraction. The results demonstrate that metallic Pd can be transformed into more bioaccessible species in the presence of

  13. Reversible thermal denaturation of immobilized rhodanese

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horowitz, P.; Bowman, S.

    1987-01-01

    For the first time, the enzyme rhodanese had been refolded after thermal denaturation. This was previously not possible because of the strong tendency for the soluble enzyme to aggregate at temperatures above 37 degrees C. The present work used rhodanese that was covalently coupled to a solid support under conditions that were found to preserve enzyme activity. Rhodanese was immobilized using an N-hydroxymalonimidyl derivative of Sepharose containing a 6-carbon spacer. The number of immobilized competent active sites was measured by using [ 35 S]SO 3 (2-) to form an active site persulfide that is the obligatory catalytic intermediate. Soluble enzyme was irreversibly inactivated in 10 min at 52 degrees C. The immobilized enzyme regained at least 30% of its original activity even after boiling for 20 min. The immobilized enzyme had a Km and Vmax that were each approximately 3 times higher than the corresponding values for the native enzyme. After preincubation at high temperatures, progress curves for the immobilized enzyme showed induction periods of up to 5 min before attaining apparently linear steady states. The pH dependence of the activity was the same for both the soluble and the immobilized enzyme. These results indicate significant stabilization of rhodanese after immobilization, and instabilities caused by adventitious solution components are not the sole reasons for irreversibility of thermal denaturation seen with the soluble enzyme. The results are consistent with models for rhodanese that invoke protein association as a major cause of inactivation of the enzyme. Furthermore, the induction period in the progress curves is consistent with studies which show that rhodanese refolding proceeds through intermediate states

  14. Manganese–Schiff base complex immobilized silica materials

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    III)]+ and [Mn(salophen)]+: [N,N′-bis(salicylaldehyde)-1,2-phenylenediimino manganese(III)]+ were introduced into/onto the MCM-41 type silica spheres and used for the electrocatalytic reduction of oxygen. Synthesized materials were ...

  15. Elucidation of structural isomers from the homogeneous rhodium-catalyzed isomerization of vegetable oils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andjelkovic, Dejan D; Min, Byungrok; Ahn, Dong; Larock, Richard C

    2006-12-13

    The structural isomers formed by the homogeneous rhodium-catalyzed isomerization of several vegetable oils have been elucidated. A detailed study of the isomerization of the model compound methyl linoleate has been performed to correlate the distribution of conjugated isomers, the reaction kinetics, and the mechanism of the reaction. It has been shown that [RhCl(C8H8)2]2 is a highly efficient and selective isomerization catalyst for the production of highly conjugated vegetable oils with a high conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) content, which is highly desirable in the food industry. The combined fraction of the two major CLA isomers [(9Z,11E)-CLA and (10E,12Z)-CLA] in the overall CLA mixture is in the range from 76.2% to 93.4%. The high efficiency and selectivity of this isomerization method along with the straightforward purification process render this approach highly promising for the preparation of conjugated oils and CLA. Proposed improvements in catalyst recovery and reusability will only make this method more appealing to the food, paint, coating, and polymer industries in the future.

  16. Separation of Hydridocarbonyltris(triphenylphosphine) Rhodium (I) Catalyst Using Solvent Resistant Nano filtration Membrane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Razak, N.S.A.; Hilmi Mukhtar; Maizatul, S. Shaharun; Mohd, F. Taha

    2013-01-01

    An investigation was conducted into the nano filtration of rhodium tris(triphenyl-phosphine) [HRh(CO)(PPh3)3] catalyst used in the hydroformylation of olefins. The large size of the catalyst (>400 Da) - relative to other components of the reaction provides the opportunity for a membrane separation based on retention of the catalyst species while permeating the solvent. The compatibility of the solvent-polyimide membrane (STARMEMTM 122 and STARMEMTM 240) combinations was assessed in terms of the membrane stability in solvent plus non-zero solvent flux at 2.0 MPa. The morphology of the membrane was studied by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM). The solvent flux and membrane rejection of HRh(CO)(PPh3)3 was then determined for the catalyst-solvent-membrane combination in a dead-end pressure cell. Good HRh(CO)(PPh3)3 rejection (>0.93) coupled with good solvent fluxes (>72 L/ m 2 h 1 at 2.0 MPa) were obtained in one of the systems tested. The effect of pressure and catalyst concentration on the solvent flux and catalyst rejection was conducted. Increasing pressure substantially improved both solvent flux and catalyst rejection, while increasing catalyst concentration was found to be beneficial in terms of substantial increases in catalyst rejection without significantly affecting the solvent flux. (author)

  17. Enhanced electrocatalytic oxidation of isoniazid at electrochemically modified rhodium electrode for biological and pharmaceutical analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheemalapati, Srikanth; Chen, Shen-Ming; Ali, M Ajmal; Al-Hemaid, Fahad M A

    2014-09-01

    A simple and sensitive electrochemical method has been proposed for the determination of isoniazid (INZ). For the first time, rhodium (Rh) modified glassy carbon electrode (GCE) has been employed for the determination of INZ by linear sweep voltammetry technique (LSV). Compared with the unmodified electrode, the proposed Rh modified electrode provides strong electrocatalytic activity toward INZ with significant enhancement in the anodic peak current. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) results reveal the morphology of Rh particles. With the advantages of wide linearity (70-1300μM), good sensitivity (0.139μAμM(-1)cm(-2)) and low detection limit (13μM), this proposed sensor holds great potential for the determination of INZ in real samples. The practicality of the proposed electrode for the detection of INZ in human urine and blood plasma samples has been successfully demonstrated using LSV technique. Through the determination of INZ in commercially available pharmaceutical tablets, the practical applicability of the proposed method has been validated. The recovery results are found to be in good agreement with the labeled amounts of INZ in tablets, thus showing its great potential for use in clinical and pharmaceutical analysis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Laser cleaning of pulsed laser deposited rhodium films for fusion diagnostic mirrors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uccello, A.; Maffini, A.; Dellasega, D.; Passoni, M.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Pulsed laser deposition is exploited to produce Rh films for first mirrors. ► Pulsed laser deposition is exploited to produce tokamak-like C contaminants. ► Rh laser damage threshold has been evaluated for infrared pulses. ► Laser cleaning of C contaminated Rh films gives promising results. -- Abstract: In this paper an experimental investigation on the laser cleaning process of rhodium films, potentially candidates to be used as tokamak first mirrors (FMs), from redeposited carbon contaminants is presented. A relevant issue that lowers mirror's performance during tokamak operations is the redeposition of sputtered material from the first wall on their surface. Among all the possible techniques, laser cleaning, in which a train of laser pulses is launched to the surface that has to be treated, is a method to potentially mitigate this problem. The same laser system (Q-switched Nd:YAG laser with a fundamental wavelength of 1064-nm and 7-ns pulses) has been employed with three aims: (i) production by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) of Rh film mirrors, (ii) production by PLD of C deposits with controlled morphology, and (iii) investigation of the laser cleaning method onto C contaminated Rh samples. The evaluation of Rh films laser damage threshold, as a function of fluence and number of pulses, is discussed. Then, the C/Rh films have been cleaned by the laser beam. The exposed zones have been characterized by visual inspection and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), showing promising results

  19. Comparative analysis for the measured and the predicted relative sensitivity of rhodium In core detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moon, Sang Rae; Cha, Kyoon Ho; Bae, Seong Man

    2012-01-01

    Self-powered neutron detector (SPND) is widely used as in-core flux monitoring in nuclear power plants. OPR1000 has applied a rhodium (Rh) as the emitter of the SPND. The SPND contains a neutron-sensitive metallic emitter surrounded by a ceramic insulator. When capturing a neutron, the Rh will be decayed by emitting some electrons which is crossing the sheath and produce current. This current can be measured externally using pico-ammeter. The sensitivity of detectors is closely related with the geometry and material of the detectors. The lifetime of in-core detector is determined by calculating the relative sensitivity of Rh detector. It is required that the Rh detector should be replaced before the burn-up of Rh detector has reached 66% of its original compositions. To predict Rh detector's relative sensitivity ANC code, advanced nodal code capable of two-dimensional and three-dimensional calculations, is used. It is determined that the Rh detectors should be replaced on the basis of the predicted sensitivity value calculated by ANC code. When evaluating the life of Rh detectors using ANC code, it is assumed that the uncertainty of the sensitivity calculation include the measurement error of 5%. As a result of the analysis of measured and predicted data for the Rh detector's relative sensitivity, it is possible to reduce the assumed uncertainty

  20. Size effects on rhodium nanoparticles related to hydrogen-storage capability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Chulho; Yang, Anli; Sakata, Osami; Kumara, L S R; Hiroi, Satoshi; Cui, Yi-Tao; Kusada, Kohei; Kobayashi, Hirokazu; Kitagawa, Hiroshi

    2018-06-06

    To unveil the origin of the hydrogen-storage properties of rhodium nanoparticles (Rh NPs), we investigated the electronic and crystal structures of the Rh NPs using various synchrotron based X-ray techniques. Electronic structure studies revealed that the hydrogen-storage capability of Rh NPs could be attributed to their more unoccupied d-DOSs than that of the bulk near the Fermi level. Crystal structure studies indicated that lattice distortion and mean-square displacement increase while coordination number decreases with decreasing particle size and the hydrogen-absorption capability of Rh NPs improves to a greater extent with increased structural disorder in the local structure than with that in the mean structure. The smallest Rh NPs, having the largest structural disorder/increased vacancy spaces and the smallest coordination number, exhibited excellent hydrogen-storage capacity. Finally, from the bond-orientational order analysis, we confirmed that the localized disordering is distributed more over the surface part than the core part and hydrogen can be trapped on the surface part of Rh NPs which increases with a decrease in NP diameter.

  1. Manifestation of external size reduction effects on the yield point of nanocrystalline rhodium using nanopillars approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alshehri, Omar; Yavuz, Mustafa; Tsui Ting

    2013-01-01

    In this study, pure rhodium was fabricated and mechanically investigated at the nanoscale for the first time. The nanopillars approach was employed to study the effects of size on the yield point. Nanopillars with different diameters were fabricated using electroplating followed by uniaxial compression tests. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used as a quality control technique by imaging the pillars before and after compression to ensure the absence of cracks, buckling, barrelling or any other problems. Transmission electron microscopy and SEM were used as microstructural characterization techniques. Due to substrate-induced effects, only the plastic region of the stress–strain curves were investigated, and it was revealed that the yield point increases with size reduction up to certain limit, then decreases with further reduction of the nanopillar size (diameter). The later weakening effect is consistent with the literature, which demonstrates the reversed size effect (the failure of the plasticity theory) in nanocrystalline metals, i.e. smaller is weaker. In this study, however, the effect of size reduction is not only weakening, but is strengthening-then-weakening, which the authors believe is the true behavior of nanocrystalline materials.

  2. Reactivity Control of Rhodium Cluster Ions by Alloying with Tantalum Atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mafuné, Fumitaka; Tawaraya, Yuki; Kudoh, Satoshi

    2016-02-18

    Gas phase, bielement rhodium and tantalum clusters, RhnTam(+) (n + m = 6), were prepared by the double laser ablation of Rh and Ta rods in He carrier gas. The clusters were introduced into a reaction gas cell filled with nitric oxide (NO) diluted with He and were subjected to collisions with NO and He at room temperature. The product species were observed by mass spectrometry, demonstrating that the NO molecules were sequentially adsorbed on the RhnTam(+) clusters to form RhnTam(+)NxOx (x = 1, 2, 3, ...) species. In addition, oxide clusters, RhnTam(+)O2, were also observed, suggesting that the NO molecules were dissociatively adsorbed on the cluster, the N atoms migrated on the surface to form N2, and the N2 molecules were released from RhnTam(+)N2O2. The reactivity, leading to oxide formation, was composition dependent: oxide clusters were dominantly formed for the bielement clusters containing both Rh and Ta atoms, whereas such clusters were hardly formed for the single-element Rhn(+) and Tam(+) clusters. DFT calculations indicated that the Ta atoms induce dissociation of NO on the clusters by lowering the dissociation energy, whereas the Rh atoms enable release of N2 by lowering the binding energy of the N atoms on the clusters.

  3. Comparative analysis for the measured and the predicted relative sensitivity of rhodium In core detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, Sang Rae; Cha, Kyoon Ho; Bae, Seong Man [Nuclear Reactor Safety Lab., KHNP Central Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-10-15

    Self-powered neutron detector (SPND) is widely used as in-core flux monitoring in nuclear power plants. OPR1000 has applied a rhodium (Rh) as the emitter of the SPND. The SPND contains a neutron-sensitive metallic emitter surrounded by a ceramic insulator. When capturing a neutron, the Rh will be decayed by emitting some electrons which is crossing the sheath and produce current. This current can be measured externally using pico-ammeter. The sensitivity of detectors is closely related with the geometry and material of the detectors. The lifetime of in-core detector is determined by calculating the relative sensitivity of Rh detector. It is required that the Rh detector should be replaced before the burn-up of Rh detector has reached 66% of its original compositions. To predict Rh detector's relative sensitivity ANC code, advanced nodal code capable of two-dimensional and three-dimensional calculations, is used. It is determined that the Rh detectors should be replaced on the basis of the predicted sensitivity value calculated by ANC code. When evaluating the life of Rh detectors using ANC code, it is assumed that the uncertainty of the sensitivity calculation include the measurement error of 5%. As a result of the analysis of measured and predicted data for the Rh detector's relative sensitivity, it is possible to reduce the assumed uncertainty.

  4. The effects of rhodium on the renal function of female Wistar rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iavicoli, Ivo; Leso, Veruscka; Fontana, Luca; Marinaccio, Alessandro; Bergamaschi, Antonio; Calabrese, Edward J

    2014-06-01

    In recent years, the increased use of rhodium (Rh) as an active catalyst material in modern three-way automobile catalytic converters has led to a parallel rise in environmental levels of this metal. In spite of this, the literature contains few studies of the effects of Rh on human health. The aim of this study is to assess the effects of Rh on the renal function of female Wistar rats. Our findings show that sub-acute exposure to six increasing concentrations, ranging from 0.001 to 1 mg L(-1), of Rh (III) chloride hydrate in drinking water does not induce alterations in urinary albumin levels, while, at concentrations from 0.1 to 1 mg L(-1), a significant rise in urinary levels of Retinol Binding Protein is evident and an increasing trend in urinary β2-microglobulin, which becomes significant at 1 mg L(-1), is observed. These results therefore demonstrate a nephrotoxic action of Rh at tubular level in a wide range of doses. Interestingly, because of the recent increase in environmental Rh levels, these findings may have relevant implications both for occupationally exposed subjects and for the general population, especially children. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Characterization of agarose as immobilization matrix model for a microbial biosensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pernetti Mimma

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Microbial biosensors are promising tools for the detection of specific substances in different fields, such as environmental, biomedical, food or agricultural. They allow rapid measurements, no need for complex sample preparation or specialized personnel and easy handling. In order to enhance the managing, miniaturization and stability of the biosensor and to prevent cell leaching, bacteria immobilization is desirable. A systematic characterization procedure to choose a suitable immobilization method and matrix, was proposed in this study. Physical properties, storage stability mass transport phenomena and biocompatibility were evaluated, employing agarose as the model matrix. Preliminary essays with bioluminescent bacteria detecting Tributyltin were also carried out.

  6. Characteristics of Immobilized Urease on Grafted Alginate Bead Systems

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    Enas N. Danial

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the biological importance of immobilized urease enzyme over the free urease. The support material used for urease immobilization was alginate. Generally, the immobilization of urease in alginate gel showed a marked increase in Km and Vmax. However, the immobilized urease showed higher thermal stability than that of free enzyme. The rate of thermal inactivation of the immobilized enzyme decreased due to entrapment in gel matrix. Also, the activity of the immobilized urease was more stable in retention than that of the free enzyme during the storage in solution, although the activity of the immobilized enzyme was lower in comparison with the free enzyme. A stable immobilized system and long storage life are convenient for applications that would not be feasible with a soluble enzyme system. These results highlighted the technical and biochemical benefits of immobilized urease over the free enzyme.

  7. Characterization plan for the immobilized low-activity waste borehole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reidel, S.P.; Reynolds, K.D.

    1998-03-01

    The US Department of Energy's (DOE's) Hanford Site has the most diverse and largest amounts of radioactive tank waste in the US. High-level radioactive waste has been stored at Hanford in large underground tanks since 1944. Approximately 209,000 m 3 (54 Mgal) of waste are currently stored in 177 tanks. Vitrification and onsite disposal of low activity tank waste (LAW) are embodied in the strategy described in the Tri-Party Agreement. The tank waste is to be retrieved, separated into low- and high-level fractions, and then immobilized by private vendors. The DOE will receive the vitrified waste from private vendors and dispose of the low-activity fraction in the Hanford Site 200 East Area. The Immobilized Low-Activity Waste Disposal Complex (ILAWDC) is part of the disposal complex. This report is a plan to drill the first characterization borehole and collect data at the ILAWDC. This plan updates and revises the deep borehole portion of the characterization plan for the ILAWDC by Reidel and others (1995). It describes data collection activities for determining the physical and chemical properties of the vadose zone and the saturated zone at and in the immediate vicinity of the proposed ILAWDC. These properties then will be used to develop a conceptual geohydrologic model of the ILAWDC site in support of the Hanford ILAW Performance Assessment

  8. Immobilization/Stabilization of Ficin Extract on Glutaraldehyde-Activated Agarose Beads. Variables That Control the Final Stability and Activity in Protein Hydrolyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El-Hocine Siar

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Ficin extract has been immobilized on different 4% aminated-agarose beads. Using just ion exchange, immobilization yield was poor and expressed activity did not surpass 10% of the offered enzyme, with no significant effects on enzyme stability. The treatment with glutaraldehyde of this ionically exchanged enzyme produced an almost full enzyme inactivation. Using aminated supports activated with glutaraldehyde, immobilization was optimal at pH 7 (at pH 5 immobilization yield was 80%, while at pH 9, the immobilized enzyme became inactivated. At pH 7, full immobilization was accomplished maintaining 40% activity versus a small synthetic substrate and 30% versus casein. Ficin stabilization upon immobilization could be observed but it depended on the inactivation pH and the substrate employed, suggesting the complexity of the mechanism of inactivation of the immobilized enzyme. The maximum enzyme loading on the support was determined to be around 70 mg/g. The loading has no significant effect on the enzyme stability or enzyme activity using the synthetic substrate but it had a significant effect on the activity using casein; the biocatalysts activity greatly decreased using more than 30 mg/g, suggesting that the near presence of other immobilized enzyme molecules may generate some steric hindrances for the casein hydrolysis.

  9. Rhodium(I)-catalyzed cyclization of allenynes with a carbonyl group through unusual insertion of a C-O bond into a rhodacycle intermediate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oonishi, Yoshihiro; Yokoe, Takayuki; Hosotani, Akihito; Sato, Yoshihiro

    2014-01-20

    Rhodium(I)-catalyzed cyclization of allenynes with a tethered carbonyl group was investigated. An unusual insertion of a CO bond into the C(sp(2) )-rhodium bond of a rhodacycle intermediate occurs via a highly strained transition state. Direct reductive elimination from the obtained rhodacyle intermediate proceeds to give a tricyclic product containing an 8-oxabicyclo[3.2.1]octane skeleton, while β-hydride elimination from the same intermediate gives products that contain fused five- and seven-membered rings in high yields. Copyright © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. The divergent synthesis of nitrogen heterocycles by rhodium(II)-catalyzed cycloadditions of 1-sulfonyl 1,2,3-triazoles with 1,3-dienes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Hai; Wang, Yuanhao; Tian, Yu; Feng, Juan; Tang, Yefeng

    2014-05-26

    The first rhodium(II)-catalyzed aza-[4+3] cycloadditions of 1-sulfonyl 1,2,3-triazoles with 1,3-dienes have been developed, and enable the efficient synthesis of highly functionalized 2,5-dihydroazepines from readily available precursors. In some cases, the reaction pathway could divert to formal aza-[3+2] cycloadditions, thus leading to 2,3-dihydropyrroles. In this context, the titled reaction represents a capable tool for the divergent synthesis of two types of synthetically valuable aza-heterocycles from common rhodium(II) iminocarbene intermediates. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. One-pot synthesis of 2,5-dihydropyrroles from terminal alkynes, azides, and propargylic alcohols by relay actions of copper, rhodium, and gold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, Tomoya; Tanaka, Takamasa; Matsumoto, Kohei; Murakami, Masahiro

    2014-12-01

    Relay actions of copper, rhodium, and gold formulate a one-pot multistep pathway, which directly gives 2,5-dihydropyrroles starting from terminal alkynes, sulfonyl azides, and propargylic alcohols. Initially, copper-catalyzed 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition of terminal alkynes with sulfonyl azides affords 1-sulfonyl-1,2,3-triazoles, which then react with propargylic alcohols under the catalysis of rhodium. The resulting alkenyl propargyl ethers subsequently undergo the thermal Claisen rearrangement to give α-allenyl-α-amino ketones. Finally, a gold catalyst prompts 5-endo cyclization to produce 2,5-dihydropyrroles. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Excess Weapons Plutonium Immobilization in Russia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jardine, L.; Borisov, G.B.

    2000-01-01

    The joint goal of the Russian work is to establish a full-scale plutonium immobilization facility at a Russian industrial site by 2005. To achieve this requires that the necessary engineering and technical basis be developed in these Russian projects and the needed Russian approvals be obtained to conduct industrial-scale immobilization of plutonium-containing materials at a Russian industrial site by the 2005 date. This meeting and future work will provide the basis for joint decisions. Supporting R and D projects are being carried out at Russian Institutes that directly support the technical needs of Russian industrial sites to immobilize plutonium-containing materials. Special R and D on plutonium materials is also being carried out to support excess weapons disposition in Russia and the US, including nonproliferation studies of plutonium recovery from immobilization forms and accelerated radiation damage studies of the US-specified plutonium ceramic for immobilizing plutonium. This intriguing and extraordinary cooperation on certain aspects of the weapons plutonium problem is now progressing well and much work with plutonium has been completed in the past two years. Because much excellent and unique scientific and engineering technical work has now been completed in Russia in many aspects of plutonium immobilization, this meeting in St. Petersburg was both timely and necessary to summarize, review, and discuss these efforts among those who performed the actual work. The results of this meeting will help the US and Russia jointly define the future direction of the Russian plutonium immobilization program, and make it an even stronger and more integrated Russian program. The two objectives for the meeting were to: (1) Bring together the Russian organizations, experts, and managers performing the work into one place for four days to review and discuss their work with each other; and (2) Publish a meeting summary and a proceedings to compile reports of all the

  13. Disposition of surplus fissile materials via immobilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gray, L.W.; Kan, T.; Sutcliffe, W.G.; McKibben, J.M.; Danker, W.

    1995-01-01

    In the Cold War aftermath, the US and Russia have agreed to large reductions in nuclear weapons. To aid in the selection of long-term management options, the USDOE has undertaken a multifaceted study to select options for storage and disposition of surplus plutonium (Pu). One disposition alternative being considered is immobilization. Immobilization is a process in which surplus Pu would be embedded in a suitable material to produce an appropriate form for ultimate disposal. To arrive at an appropriate form, we first reviewed published information on HLW immobilization technologies to identify forms to be prescreened. Surviving forms were screened using multi-attribute utility analysis to determine promising technologies for Pu immobilization. We further evaluated the most promising immobilization families to identify and seek solutions for chemical, chemical engineering, environmental, safety, and health problems; these problems remain to be solved before we can make technical decisions about the viability of using the forms for long-term disposition of Pu. All data, analyses, and reports are being provided to the DOE Office of Fissile Materials Disposition to support the Record of Decision that is anticipated in Summer of 1996

  14. Production of cellulase from immobilized Trichoderma reesei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasai, Noboru; Tamada, Masao; Kumakura, Minoru

    1989-05-01

    This report completed the results that obtained on the study of the enzyme activity in the culture of immobilized Trichoderma reesei cells in flask scale (100ml) and bench scale (30l). In the flask scale culture, the batch and repeated batch culture were carried out, and in the bench scale culture, the batch, repeated batch and continuous culture were done by using a culture equipment that is an unit process of the bench scale test plant for saccharification of cellulosic wastes. The enzyme activity of the immobilized cells was higher than that of the intact cells in the flask scale culture and it was confirmed that the enzyme activity was not decreased on the repeated batch culture of six times even. In the bench scale culture, it was found that a optimum culture condition of the immobilized cells was not different from that of the free cells and the immobilized cells gave the enzyme solution with a high enzyme activity in the culture condition of 450rpm stirring speed and air supply of 0.1v/v/m above. The technique of the repeated batch and continuous culture for long times in bench scale without contamination was established. The enzyme activity of the immobilized cells in continuous culture became to be 85 % to that in batch culture and it was found that the enzyme solution with high enzyme activity was continuously obtained in the continuous culture for long times. (author)

  15. Haloalkane hydrolysis with an immobilized haloalkane dehalogenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dravis, B C; Swanson, P E; Russell, A J

    2001-11-20

    Haloalkane dehalogenase from Rhodococcus rhodochrous was covalently immobilized onto a polyethyleneimine impregnated gamma-alumina support. The dehalogenating enzyme was found to retain greater than 40% of its original activity after immobilization, displaying an optimal loading (max. activity/supported protein) of 70 to 75 mg/g with an apparent maximum (max. protein/support) of 156 mg/g. The substrate, 1,2,3-trichloropropane, was found to favorably partition (adsorb) onto the inorganic alumina carrier (10 to 20 mg/g), thereby increasing the local reactant concentration with respect to the catalyst's environment, whereas the product, 2,3-dichloropropan-1-ol, demonstrated no affinity. Additionally, the inorganic alumina support exhibited no adverse effects because of solvent/component incompatibilities or deterioration due to pH variance (pH 7.0 to 10.5). As a result of the large surface area to volume ratio of the support matrix and the accessibility of the bound protein, the immobilized biocatalyst was not subject to internal mass transfer limitations. External diffusional restrictions could be eliminated with simple agitation (mixing speed: 50 rpm; flux: 4.22 cm/min). The pH-dependence of the immobilized dehalogenase was essentially the same as that for the native enzyme. Finally, both the thermostability and resistance toward inactivation by organic solvent were improved by more than an order of magnitude after immobilization. Copyright 2001 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  16. Improvement of the stability and activity of immobilized glucose oxidase on modified iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbasi, Mahboube; Amiri, Razieh; Bordbar, Abdol-Kalegh; Ranjbakhsh, Elnaz; Khosropour, Ahmad-Reza

    2016-02-01

    Immobilized proteins and enzymes are widely investigated in the medical field as well as the food and environmental fields. In this study, glucose oxidase (GOX) was covalently immobilized on the surface of modified iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles (MIMNs) to produce a bioconjugate complex. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) were used to the size, shape and structure characterization of the MIMNs. Binding of GOX to these MIMNs was confirmed by using FT-IR spectroscopy. The stability of the immobilized and free enzyme at different temperature and pH values was investigated by measuring the enzymatic activity. These studies reveal that the enzyme's stability is enhanced by immobilization. Further experiments showed that the storage stability of the enzyme is improved upon binding to the MIMNs. The results of kinetic measurements suggest that the effect of the immobilization process on substrate and product diffusion is small. Such bioconjugates can be considered as a catalytic nanodevice for accelerating the glucose oxidation reaction for biotechnological purposes.

  17. p53 and ATF4 mediate distinct and additive pathways to skeletal muscle atrophy during limb immobilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Daniel K.; Ebert, Scott M.; Bongers, Kale S.; Dyle, Michael C.; Bullard, Steven A.; Dierdorff, Jason M.; Kunkel, Steven D.

    2014-01-01

    Immobilization causes skeletal muscle atrophy via complex signaling pathways that are not well understood. To better understand these pathways, we investigated the roles of p53 and ATF4, two transcription factors that mediate adaptations to a variety of cellular stresses. Using mouse models, we demonstrate that 3 days of muscle immobilization induces muscle atrophy and increases expression of p53 and ATF4. Furthermore, muscle fibers lacking p53 or ATF4 are partially resistant to immobilization-induced muscle atrophy, and forced expression of p53 or ATF4 induces muscle fiber atrophy in the absence of immobilization. Importantly, however, p53 and ATF4 do not require each other to promote atrophy, and coexpression of p53 and ATF4 induces more atrophy than either transcription factor alone. Moreover, muscle fibers lacking both p53 and ATF4 are more resistant to immobilization-induced atrophy than fibers lacking only p53 or ATF4. Interestingly, the independent and additive nature of the p53 and ATF4 pathways allows for combinatorial control of at least one downstream effector, p21. Using genome-wide mRNA expression arrays, we identified p21 mRNA as a skeletal muscle transcript that is highly induced in immobilized muscle via the combined actions of p53 and ATF4. Additionally, in mouse muscle, p21 induces atrophy in a manner that does not require immobilization, p53 or ATF4, and p21 is required for atrophy induced by immobilization, p53, and ATF4. Collectively, these results identify p53 and ATF4 as essential and complementary mediators of immobilization-induced muscle atrophy and discover p21 as a critical downstream effector of the p53 and ATF4 pathways. PMID:24895282

  18. Immobilization of indigenous holocellulase on iron oxide (Fe2O3) nanoparticles enhanced hydrolysis of alkali pretreated paddy straw.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Ajay; Singh, Surender; Tiwari, Rameshwar; Goel, Renu; Nain, Lata

    2017-03-01

    The holocellulase from Aspergillus niger SH3 was characterized and found to contain 125 proteins including cellulases (26), hemicellulases (21), chitinases (10), esterases (6), amylases (4) and hypothetical protein (32). The crude enzyme was immobilized on five different nanoparticles (NPs) via physical adsorption and covalent coupling methods. The enzyme-nanoparticle complexes (ENC) were screened for protein binding, enzymatic activities and immobilization efficiency. Magnetic enzyme-nanoparticle complexes (MENC) showed higher immobilization efficiency (60-80%) for most of the enzymes. MENC also showed better catalytic efficiencies in term of higher V max and lower K m than free enzyme. Saccharification yields from alkali treated paddy straw were higher (375.39mg/gds) for covalently immobilized MENC than free enzyme (339.99mg/gds). The immobilized enzyme was used for two cycles of saccharification with 55% enzyme recovery. Hence, this study for the first time demonstrated the immobilization of indigenous enzyme and its utilization for saccharification of paddy straw. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Immobilization of Dystrophin and Laminin α2-Chain Deficient Zebrafish Larvae In Vivo Prevents the Development of Muscular Dystrophy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei Li

    Full Text Available Muscular dystrophies are often caused by genetic alterations in the dystrophin-dystroglycan complex or its extracellular ligands. These structures are associated with the cell membrane and provide mechanical links between the cytoskeleton and the matrix. Mechanical stress is considered a pathological mechanism and muscle immobilization has been shown to be beneficial in some mouse models of muscular dystrophy. The zebrafish enables novel and less complex models to examine the effects of extended immobilization or muscle relaxation in vivo in different dystrophy models. We have examined effects of immobilization in larvae from two zebrafish strains with muscular dystrophy, the Sapje dystrophin-deficient and the Candyfloss laminin α2-chain-deficient strains. Larvae (4 days post fertilization, dpf of both mutants have significantly lower active force in vitro, alterations in the muscle structure with gaps between muscle fibers and altered birefringence patterns compared to their normal siblings. Complete immobilization (18 hrs to 4 dpf was achieved using a small molecular inhibitor of actin-myosin interaction (BTS, 50 μM. This treatment resulted in a significantly weaker active contraction at 4 dpf in both mutated larvae and normal siblings, most likely reflecting a general effect of immobilization on myofibrillogenesis. The immobilization also significantly reduced the structural damage in the mutated strains, showing that muscle activity is an important pathological mechanism. Following one-day washout of BTS, muscle tension partly recovered in the Candyfloss siblings and caused structural damage in these mutants, indicating activity-induced muscle recovery and damage, respectively.

  20. Rhodium-Catalyzed Insertion Reaction of PhP Group of Pentaphenylcyclopentaphosphine with Acyclic and Cyclic Disulfides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arisawa, Mieko; Sawahata, Kyosuke; Yamada, Tomoki; Sarkar, Debayan; Yamaguchi, Masahiko

    2018-02-16

    Organophosphorus compounds with a phosphorus atom attached to a phenyl group and two organothio/organoseleno groups were synthesized using the rhodium-catalyzed insertion reaction of the PhP group of pentaphenylcyclopentaphosphine (PhP) 5 with acyclic disulfides and diselenides. The method was applied to the synthesis of heterocyclic compounds containing the S-P-S group by the reaction of (PhP) 5 and cyclic disulfides such as 1,2-dithietes, 1,2-dithiocane, 1,4,5-dithiopane, and 1,2-dithiolanes.