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Sample records for rho activation consistently

  1. RhoA/Rho Kinase Mediates Neuronal Death Through Regulating cPLA2 Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiangbing; Walker, Chandler L; Lu, Qingbo; Wu, Wei; Eddelman, Daniel B; Parish, Jonathan M; Xu, Xiao-Ming

    2017-11-01

    Activation of RhoA/Rho kinase leads to growth cone collapse and neurite retraction. Although RhoA/Rho kinase inhibition has been shown to improve axon regeneration, remyelination and functional recovery, its role in neuronal cell death remains unclear. To determine whether RhoA/Rho kinase played a role in neuronal death after injury, we investigated the relationship between RhoA/Rho kinase and cytosolic phospholipase A 2 (cPLA 2 ), a lipase that mediates inflammation and cell death, using an in vitro neuronal death model and an in vivo contusive spinal cord injury model performed at the 10th thoracic (T10) vertebral level. We found that co-administration of TNF-α and glutamate induced spinal neuron death, and activation of RhoA, Rho kinase and cPLA 2 . Inhibition of RhoA, Rho kinase and cPLA 2 significantly reduced TNF-α/glutamate-induced cell death by 33, 52 and 43 %, respectively (p < 0.001). Inhibition of RhoA and Rho kinase also significantly downregulated cPLA 2 activation by 66 and 60 %, respectively (p < 0.01). Furthermore, inhibition of RhoA and Rho kinase reduced the release of arachidonic acid, a downstream substrate of cPLA 2 . The immunofluorescence staining showed that ROCK 1 or ROCK 2 , two isoforms of Rho kinase, was co-localized with cPLA 2 in neuronal cytoplasm. Interestingly, co-immunoprecipitation (Co-IP) assay showed that ROCK 1 or ROCK 2 bonded directly with cPLA 2 and phospho-cPLA 2 . When the Rho kinase inhibitor Y27632 was applied in mice with T10 contusion injury, it significantly decreased cPLA 2 activation and expression and reduced injury-induced apoptosis at and close to the lesion site. Taken together, our results reveal a novel mechanism of RhoA/Rho kinase-mediated neuronal death through regulating cPLA 2 activation.

  2. RhoGDI: multiple functions in the regulation of Rho family GTPase activities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dovas, Athanassios; Couchman, John R

    2005-01-01

    necessary for the correct targeting and regulation of Rho activities by conferring cues for spatial restriction, guidance and availability to effectors. These potential functions are discussed in the context of RhoGDI-associated multimolecular complexes, the newly emerged shuttling capability...... insight as to how RhoGDI exerts its effects on nucleotide binding, the membrane association-dissociation cycling of the GTPase and how these activities are controlled. Despite the initial negative roles attributed to RhoGDI, recent evidence has come to suggest that it may also act as a positive regulator...... of activities....

  3. Amphetamine activates Rho GTPase signaling to mediate dopamine transporter internalization and acute behavioral effects of amphetamine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, David S.; Underhill, Suzanne M.; Stolz, Donna B.; Murdoch, Geoffrey H.; Thiels, Edda; Romero, Guillermo; Amara, Susan G.

    2015-01-01

    Acute amphetamine (AMPH) exposure elevates extracellular dopamine through a variety of mechanisms that include inhibition of dopamine reuptake, depletion of vesicular stores, and facilitation of dopamine efflux across the plasma membrane. Recent work has shown that the DAT substrate AMPH, unlike cocaine and other nontransported blockers, can also stimulate endocytosis of the plasma membrane dopamine transporter (DAT). Here, we show that when AMPH enters the cytoplasm it rapidly stimulates DAT internalization through a dynamin-dependent, clathrin-independent process. This effect, which can be observed in transfected cells, cultured dopamine neurons, and midbrain slices, is mediated by activation of the small GTPase RhoA. Inhibition of RhoA activity with C3 exotoxin or a dominant-negative RhoA blocks AMPH-induced DAT internalization. These actions depend on AMPH entry into the cell and are blocked by the DAT inhibitor cocaine. AMPH also stimulates cAMP accumulation and PKA-dependent inactivation of RhoA, thus providing a mechanism whereby PKA- and RhoA-dependent signaling pathways can interact to regulate the timing and robustness of AMPH’s effects on DAT internalization. Consistent with this model, the activation of D1/D5 receptors that couple to PKA in dopamine neurons antagonizes RhoA activation, DAT internalization, and hyperlocomotion observed in mice after AMPH treatment. These observations support the existence of an unanticipated intracellular target that mediates the effects of AMPH on RhoA and cAMP signaling and suggest new pathways to target to disrupt AMPH action. PMID:26553986

  4. RhoA–Rho kinase and Platelet Activating Factor Stimulation of Ovine Fetal Pulmonary Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Proliferation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renteria, Lissette S.; Austin, Monique; Lazaro, Mariecon; Andrews, Mari Ashley; Lustina, Jennessee; Raj, J. Usha; Ibe, Basil O.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Platelet Activating Factor (PAF) is produced by pulmonary vascular smooth muscle Cells (PVSMC). We studied effect of Rho kinase on PAF stimulation of PVSMC proliferation in an attempt to understand a role for RhoA/Rho kinase on PAF-induced ovine fetal pulmonary vascular remodeling. Our hypothesis is that PAF acts through Rho kinase, as one of its downstream signaling, to induce arterial (SMC-PA) and venous (SMC-PV) growth in the hypoxic lung environment of the fetus in utero. Materials and methods Rho kinase and MAPK effects on PAF receptor (PAFR)-mediated cell growth and PAFR expression were studied by DNA synthesis, Western and immunocytochemistry. Effects of constructs T19N and G14V on PAF-induced cell proliferation was also studied. Results Hypoxia increased PVSMC proliferation and the Rho kinase inhibitors, Y-27632 and Fasudil (HA-1077) as well as MAPK inhibitors PD 98059 and SB 203580 attenuated PAF stimulation of cell proliferation. RhoA T19N and G14V stimulated cell proliferation, but co-incubation with PAF did not affect proliferative effects of the constructs. PAFR protein expression was significantly down-regulated in both cell types by both Y-27632 and HA-1077 with comparable profiles. Also cells treated with Y-27632 showed less PAF receptor fluorescence with significant disruption of the cell morphology. Conclusions Our results show that Rho kinase nonspecifically modulates PAFR-mediated responses via a translational modification of PAFR protein and suggest that, in vivo, activation of Rho kinase by PAF may be one other pathway to sustain PAFR-mediated PVSMC growth. PMID:24033386

  5. RhoA-Rho kinase and platelet-activating factor stimulation of ovine foetal pulmonary vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renteria, L S; Austin, M; Lazaro, M; Andrews, M A; Lustina, J; Raj, J U; Ibe, B O

    2013-10-01

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF) is produced by pulmonary vascular smooth muscle cells (PVSMC). We studied effects of Rho kinase on PAF stimulation of PVSMC proliferation in an attempt to understand the role of RhoA/Rho kinase on PAF-induced ovine foetal pulmonary vascular remodelling. Our hypothesis is that PAF acts through Rho kinase, as one of its downstream signals, to induce arterial (SMC-PA) and venous (SMC-PV) cell proliferation in the hypoxic lung environment of the foetus, in utero. Rho kinase and MAPK effects on PAF receptor (PAFR)-mediated cell population expansion, and PAFR expression, were studied by DNA synthesis, western blot analysis and immunocytochemistry. Effects of constructs T19N and G14V on PAF-induced cell proliferation were also investigated. Hypoxia increased PVSMC proliferation and Rho kinase inhibitors, Y-27632 and Fasudil (HA-1077) as well as MAPK inhibitors PD 98059 and SB 203580 attenuated PAF stimulation of cell proliferation. RhoA T19N and G14V stimulated cell proliferation, but co-incubation with PAF did not affect proliferative effects of the constructs. PAFR protein expression was significantly downregulated in both cell types by both Y-27632 and HA-1077, with comparable profiles. Also, cells treated with Y-27632 had less PAF receptor fluorescence with significant disruption of cell morphology. Our results show that Rho kinase non-specifically modulated PAFR-mediated responses by a translational modification of PAFR protein, and suggest that, in vivo, activation of Rho kinase by PAF may be a further pathway to sustain PAFR-mediated PVSMC proliferation. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. A Conserved RhoGAP Limits M-phase Contractility and Coordinates with Microtubule Asters to Restrict Active RhoA to the Cell Equator During Cytokinesis

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    Zanin, Esther; Desai, Arshad; Poser, Ina; Toyoda, Yusuke; Andree, Cordula; Moebius, Claudia; Bickle, Marc; Conradt, Barbara; Piekny, Alisa; Oegema, Karen

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY During animal cell cytokinesis, the spindle directs contractile ring assembly by activating RhoA in a narrow equatorial zone. Rapid GTPase activating protein (GAP)-mediated inactivation (RhoA flux) is proposed to limit RhoA zone dimensions. Testing the significance of RhoA flux has been hampered by the fact that the GAP targeting RhoA is not known. Here, we identify M-phase GAP (MP-GAP) as the primary GAP targeting RhoA during mitosis/cytokinesis. MP-GAP inhibition caused excessive RhoA activation in M-phase leading to the uncontrolled formation of large cortical protrusions and late cytokinesis failure. RhoA zone width was broadened by attenuation of the centrosomal asters but was not affected by MP-GAP inhibition alone. Simultaneous aster attenuation and MP-GAP inhibition led to RhoA accumulation around the entire cell periphery. These results identify the major GAP restraining RhoA during cell division and delineate the relative contributions of RhoA flux and centrosomal asters in controlling RhoA zone dimensions. PMID:24012485

  7. UNC-73/Trio RhoGEF-2 Activity Modulates Caenorhabditis elegans Motility Through Changes in Neurotransmitter Signaling Upstream of the GSA-1/Gαs Pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Shuang; Pawson, Tony; Steven, Robert M.

    2011-01-01

    Rho-family GTPases play regulatory roles in many fundamental cellular processes. Caenorhabditis elegans UNC-73 RhoGEF isoforms function in axon guidance, cell migration, muscle arm extension, phagocytosis, and neurotransmission by activating either Rac or Rho GTPase subfamilies. Multiple differentially expressed UNC-73 isoforms contain a Rac-specific RhoGEF-1 domain, a Rho-specific RhoGEF-2 domain, or both domains. The UNC-73E RhoGEF-2 isoform is activated by the G-protein subunit Gαq and is required for normal rates of locomotion; however, mechanisms of UNC-73 and Rho pathway regulation of locomotion are not clear. To better define UNC-73 function in the regulation of motility we used cell-specific and inducible promoters to examine the temporal and spatial requirements of UNC-73 RhoGEF-2 isoform function in mutant rescue experiments. We found that UNC-73E acts within peptidergic neurons of mature animals to regulate locomotion rate. Although unc-73 RhoGEF-2 mutants have grossly normal synaptic morphology and weak resistance to the acetylcholinesterase inhibitor aldicarb, they are significantly hypersensitive to the acetylcholine receptor agonist levamisole, indicating alterations in acetylcholine neurotransmitter signaling. Consistent with peptidergic neuron function, unc-73 RhoGEF-2 mutants exhibit a decreased level of neuropeptide release from motor neuron dense core vesicles (DCVs). The unc-73 locomotory phenotype is similar to those of rab-2 and unc-31, genes with distinct roles in the DCV-mediated secretory pathway. We observed that constitutively active Gαs pathway mutations, which compensate for DCV-mediated signaling defects, rescue unc-73 RhoGEF-2 and rab-2 lethargic movement phenotypes. Together, these data suggest UNC-73 RhoGEF-2 isoforms are required for proper neurotransmitter signaling and may function in the DCV-mediated neuromodulatory regulation of locomotion rate. PMID:21750262

  8. UNC-73/trio RhoGEF-2 activity modulates Caenorhabditis elegans motility through changes in neurotransmitter signaling upstream of the GSA-1/Galphas pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Shuang; Pawson, Tony; Steven, Robert M

    2011-09-01

    Rho-family GTPases play regulatory roles in many fundamental cellular processes. Caenorhabditis elegans UNC-73 RhoGEF isoforms function in axon guidance, cell migration, muscle arm extension, phagocytosis, and neurotransmission by activating either Rac or Rho GTPase subfamilies. Multiple differentially expressed UNC-73 isoforms contain a Rac-specific RhoGEF-1 domain, a Rho-specific RhoGEF-2 domain, or both domains. The UNC-73E RhoGEF-2 isoform is activated by the G-protein subunit Gαq and is required for normal rates of locomotion; however, mechanisms of UNC-73 and Rho pathway regulation of locomotion are not clear. To better define UNC-73 function in the regulation of motility we used cell-specific and inducible promoters to examine the temporal and spatial requirements of UNC-73 RhoGEF-2 isoform function in mutant rescue experiments. We found that UNC-73E acts within peptidergic neurons of mature animals to regulate locomotion rate. Although unc-73 RhoGEF-2 mutants have grossly normal synaptic morphology and weak resistance to the acetylcholinesterase inhibitor aldicarb, they are significantly hypersensitive to the acetylcholine receptor agonist levamisole, indicating alterations in acetylcholine neurotransmitter signaling. Consistent with peptidergic neuron function, unc-73 RhoGEF-2 mutants exhibit a decreased level of neuropeptide release from motor neuron dense core vesicles (DCVs). The unc-73 locomotory phenotype is similar to those of rab-2 and unc-31, genes with distinct roles in the DCV-mediated secretory pathway. We observed that constitutively active Gαs pathway mutations, which compensate for DCV-mediated signaling defects, rescue unc-73 RhoGEF-2 and rab-2 lethargic movement phenotypes. Together, these data suggest UNC-73 RhoGEF-2 isoforms are required for proper neurotransmitter signaling and may function in the DCV-mediated neuromodulatory regulation of locomotion rate.

  9. Accurate and reproducible measurements of RhoA activation in small samples of primary cells.

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    Nini, Lylia; Dagnino, Lina

    2010-03-01

    Rho GTPase activation is essential in a wide variety of cellular processes. Measurement of Rho GTPase activation is difficult with limited material, such as tissues or primary cells that exhibit stringent culture requirements for growth and survival. We defined parameters to accurately and reproducibly measure RhoA activation (i.e., RhoA-GTP) in cultured primary keratinocytes in response to serum and growth factor stimulation using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA)-based G-LISA assays. We also established conditions that minimize RhoA-GTP in unstimulated cells without affecting viability, allowing accurate measurements of RhoA activation on stimulation or induction of exogenous GTPase expression. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Fibroblast activation protein (FAP is essential for the migration of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells through RhoA activation.

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    Kuei-Min Chung

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The ability of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs to migrate and localize specifically to injured tissues is central in developing therapeutic strategies for tissue repair and regeneration. Fibroblast activation protein (FAP is a cell surface serine protease expressed at sites of tissue remodeling during embryonic development. It is also expressed in BM-MSCs, but not in normal tissues or cells. The function of FAP in BM-MSCs is not known. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We found that depletion of FAP proteins significantly inhibited the migration of BM-MSCs in a transwell chemotaxis assay. Such impaired migration ability of BM-MSCs could be rescued by re-expressing FAP in these cells. We then demonstrated that depletion of FAP activated intracellular RhoA GTPase. Consistently, inhibition of RhoA activity using a RhoA inhibitor rescued its migration ability. Inhibition of FAP activity with an FAP-specific inhibitor did not affect the activation of RhoA or the migration of BM-MSCs. Furthermore, the inflammatory cytokines interleukin-1beta (IL-1β and transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β upregulated FAP expression, which coincided with better BM-MSC migration. CONCLUSIONS: Our results indicate FAP plays an important role in the migration of BM-MSCs through modulation of RhoA GTPase activity. The peptidase activity of FAP is not essential for such migration. Cytokines IL-1β and TGF-β upregulate the expression level of FAP and thus enhance BM-MSC migration.

  11. RhoA/ROCK downregulates FPR2-mediated NADPH oxidase activation in mouse bone marrow granulocytes.

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    Filina, Julia V; Gabdoulkhakova, Aida G; Safronova, Valentina G

    2014-10-01

    Polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) express the high and low affinity receptors to formylated peptides (mFPR1 and mFPR2 in mice, accordingly). RhoA/ROCK (Rho activated kinase) pathway is crucial for cell motility and oxidase activity regulated via FPRs. There are contradictory data on RhoA-mediated regulation of NADPH oxidase activity in phagocytes. We have shown divergent Rho GTPases signaling via mFPR1 and mFPR2 to NADPH oxidase in PMNs from inflammatory site. The present study was aimed to find out the role of RhoA/ROCK in the respiratory burst activated via mFPR1 and mFPR2 in the bone marrow PMNs. Different kinetics of RhoA activation were detected with 0.1μM fMLF and 1μM WKYMVM operating via mFPR1 and mFPR2, accordingly. RhoA was translocated in fMLF-activated cells towards the cell center and juxtamembrane space versus uniform allocation in the resting cells. Specific inhibition of RhoA by CT04, Rho inhibitor I, weakly depressed the respiratory burst induced via mFPR1, but significantly increased the one induced via mFPR2. Inhibition of ROCK, the main effector of RhoA, by Y27632 led to the same effect on the respiratory burst. Regulation of mFPR2-induced respiratory response by ROCK was impossible under the cytoskeleton disruption by cytochalasin D, whereas it persisted in the case of mFPR1 activation. Thus we suggest RhoA to be one of the regulatory and signal transduction components in the respiratory burst through FPRs in the mouse bone marrow PMNs. Both mFPR1 and mFPR2 binding with a ligand trigger the activation of RhoA. FPR1 signaling through RhoA/ROCK increases NADPH-oxidase activity. But in FPR2 action RhoA/ROCK together with cytoskeleton-linked systems down-regulates NADPH-oxidase. This mechanism could restrain the reactive oxygen species dependent damage of own tissues during the chemotaxis of PMNs and in the resting cells. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. RhoA activation and nuclearization marks loss of chondrocyte phenotype in crosstalk with Wnt pathway.

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    Öztürk, Ece; Despot-Slade, Evelin; Pichler, Michael; Zenobi-Wong, Marcy

    2017-11-15

    De-differentiation comprises a major drawback for the use of autologous chondrocytes in cartilage repair. Here, we investigate the role of RhoA and canonical Wnt signaling in chondrocyte phenotype. Chondrocyte de-differentiation is accompanied by an upregulation and nuclear localization of RhoA. Effectors of canonical Wnt signaling including β-catenin and YAP/TAZ are upregulated in de-differentiating chondrocytes in a Rho-dependent manner. Inhibition of Rho activation with C3 transferase inhibits nuclear localization of RhoA, induces expression of chondrogenic markers on 2D and enhances the chondrogenic effect of 3D culturing. Upregulation of chondrogenic markers by Rho inhibition is accompanied by loss of canonical Wnt signaling markers in 3D or on 2D whereas treatment of chondrocytes with Wnt-3a abrogates this effect. However, induction of canonical Wnt signaling inhibits chondrogenic markers on 2D but enhances chondrogenic re-differentiation on 2D with C3 transferase or in 3D. These data provide insights on the context-dependent role of RhoA and Wnt signaling in de-differentiation and on mechanisms to induce chondrogenic markers for therapeutic approaches. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Ameloblasts require active RhoA to generate normal dental enamel.

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    Xue, Hui; Li, Yong; Everett, Eric T; Ryan, Kathleen; Peng, Li; Porecha, Rakhee; Yan, Yan; Lucchese, Anna M; Kuehl, Melissa A; Pugach, Megan K; Bouchard, Jessica; Gibson, Carolyn W

    2013-08-01

    RhoA plays a fundamental role in regulation of the actin cytoskeleton, intercellular attachment, and cell proliferation. During amelogenesis, ameloblasts (which produce the enamel proteins) undergo dramatic cytoskeletal changes and the RhoA protein level is up-regulated. Transgenic mice were generated that express a dominant-negative RhoA transgene in ameloblasts using amelogenin gene-regulatory sequences. Transgenic and wild-type (WT) molar tooth germs were incubated with sodium fluoride (NaF) or sodium chloride (NaCl) in organ culture. Filamentous actin (F-actin) stained with phalloidin was elevated significantly in WT ameloblasts treated with NaF compared with WT ameloblasts treated with NaCl or with transgenic ameloblasts treated with NaF, thereby confirming a block in the RhoA/Rho-associated protein kinase (ROCK) pathway in the transgenic mice. Little difference in quantitative fluorescence (an estimation of fluorosis) was observed between WT and transgenic incisors from mice provided with drinking water containing NaF. We subsequently found reduced transgene expression in incisors compared with molars. Transgenic molar teeth had reduced amelogenin, E-cadherin, and Ki67 compared with WT molar teeth. Hypoplastic enamel in transgenic mice correlates with reduced expression of the enamel protein, amelogenin, and E-cadherin and cell proliferation are regulated by RhoA in other tissues. Together these findings reveal deficits in molar ameloblast function when RhoA activity is inhibited. © 2013 Eur J Oral Sci.

  14. p115 RhoGEF activates the Rac1 GTPase signaling cascade in MCP1 chemokine-induced vascular smooth muscle cell migration and proliferation.

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    Singh, Nikhlesh K; Janjanam, Jagadeesh; Rao, Gadiparthi N

    2017-08-25

    Although the involvement of Rho proteins in the pathogenesis of vascular diseases is well studied, little is known about the role of their upstream regulators, the Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factors (RhoGEFs). Here, we sought to identify the RhoGEFs involved in monocyte chemotactic protein 1 (MCP1)-induced vascular wall remodeling. We found that, among the RhoGEFs tested, MCP1 induced tyrosine phosphorylation of p115 RhoGEF but not of PDZ RhoGEF or leukemia-associated RhoGEF in human aortic smooth muscle cells (HASMCs). Moreover, p115 RhoGEF inhibition suppressed MCP1-induced HASMC migration and proliferation. Consistent with these observations, balloon injury (BI) induced p115 RhoGEF tyrosine phosphorylation in rat common carotid arteries, and siRNA-mediated down-regulation of its levels substantially attenuated BI-induced smooth muscle cell migration and proliferation, resulting in reduced neointima formation. Furthermore, depletion of p115 RhoGEF levels also abrogated MCP1- or BI-induced Rac1-NFATc1-cyclin D1-CDK6-PKN1-CDK4-PAK1 signaling, which, as we reported previously, is involved in vascular wall remodeling. Our findings also show that protein kinase N1 (PKN1) downstream of Rac1-cyclin D1/CDK6 and upstream of CDK4-PAK1 in the p115 RhoGEF-Rac1-NFATc1-cyclin D1-CDK6-PKN1-CDK4-PAK1 signaling axis is involved in the modulation of vascular wall remodeling. Of note, we also observed that CCR2-G i/o -Fyn signaling mediates MCP1-induced p115 RhoGEF and Rac1 GTPase activation. These findings suggest that p115 RhoGEF is critical for MCP1-induced HASMC migration and proliferation in vitro and for injury-induced neointima formation in vivo by modulating Rac1-NFATc1-cyclin D1-CDK6-PKN1-CDK4-PAK1 signaling. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  15. Nanofibrillar scaffolds induce preferential activation of Rho GTPases in cerebral cortical astrocytes

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    Tiryaki, Volkan Mujdat; Ayres, Virginia M; Khan, Adeel A; Ahmed, Ijaz; Shreiber, David I; Meiners, Sally

    2012-01-01

    Cerebral cortical astrocyte responses to polyamide nanofibrillar scaffolds versus poly-L-lysine (PLL)-functionalized planar glass, unfunctionalized planar Aclar coverslips, and PLL-functionalized planar Aclar surfaces were investigated by atomic force microscopy and immunocytochemistry. The physical properties of the cell culture environments were evaluated using contact angle and surface roughness measurements and compared. Astrocyte morphological responses, including filopodia, lamellipodia, and stress fiber formation, and stellation were imaged using atomic force microscopy and phalloidin staining for F-actin. Activation of the corresponding Rho GTPase regulators was investigated using immunolabeling with Cdc42, Rac1, and RhoA. Astrocytes cultured on the nanofibrillar scaffolds showed a unique response that included stellation, cell–cell interactions by stellate processes, and evidence of depression of RhoA. The results support the hypothesis that the extracellular environment can trigger preferential activation of members of the Rho GTPase family, with demonstrable morphological consequences for cerebral cortical astrocytes. PMID:22915841

  16. Expression and cytoprotective activity of the small GTPase RhoB induced by the Escherichia coli cytotoxic necrotizing factor 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huelsenbeck, Stefanie C; Roggenkamp, Dennis; May, Martin

    2013-01-01

    B expression, based on the inactivation of Rho/Ras proteins. In this study, we report on a long lasting expression of RhoB in cultured cells upon activation of Rho proteins by the cytotoxic necrotizing factor 1 (CNF1) from Escherichia coli. The observations of this study highlight a new pathway involving Rac1...... without any signs of cell death. In conclusion, the cytoprotective RhoB response is not only evoked by bacterial protein toxins inactivating Rho/Ras proteins but also by the Rac1-activating toxin CNF1....

  17. Ornithine decarboxylase regulates the activity and localization of rhoA via polyamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maekitie, Laura T.; Kanerva, Kristiina; Andersson, Leif C.

    2009-01-01

    Ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) is the rate-limiting enzyme of polyamine synthesis. Polyamines and ODC are connected to cell proliferation and transformation. Resting cells display a low ODC activity while normal, proliferating cells display fluctuations in ODC activity that coincide with changes in the actin cytoskeleton during the cell cycle. Cancerous cells display constitutively elevated ODC activity. Overexpression of ODC in NIH 3T3 fibroblasts induces a transformed phenotype. The cytoskeletal rearrangements during cytokinesis and cell transformation are intimately coupled to the ODC activity but the molecular mechanisms have remained elusive. In this study we investigated how ODC and polyamines influence the organization of the cytoskeleton. Given that the small G-proteins of the rho family are key modulators of the actin cytoskeleton, we investigated the molecular interactions of rhoA with ODC and polyamines. Our results show that transglutaminase-catalyzed polyamination of rhoA regulates its activity. The polyamination status of rhoA crucially influences the progress of the cell cycle as well as the rate of transformation of rat fibroblasts infected with temperature-sensitive v-src. We also show that ODC influences the intracellular distribution of rhoA. These findings provide novel insights into the mechanisms by which ODC and polyamines regulate the dynamics of the cytoskeleton during cell proliferation and transformation

  18. Basal and Activated Calcium Sensitization Mediated by RhoA/Rho Kinase Pathway in Rats with Genetic and Salt Hypertension

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Behuliak, Michal; Bencze, Michal; Vaněčková, Ivana; Kuneš, Jaroslav; Zicha, Josef

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 2017, January (2017), č. článku 8029728. ISSN 2314-6133 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GP14-16225P; GA MZd(CZ) NV15-25396A Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : calcium sensitization * RhoA/Rho kinase * fasudil * calcium influx * nifedipine * BAY K8644 Subject RIV: FA - Cardiovascular Diseases incl. Cardiotharic Surgery OBOR OECD: Cardiac and Cardiovascular systems Impact factor: 2.476, year: 2016

  19. Membrane depolarization-induced RhoA/Rho-associated kinase activation and sustained contraction of rat caudal arterial smooth muscle involves genistein-sensitive tyrosine phosphorylation

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    Mita, Mitsuo; Tanaka, Hitoshi; Yanagihara, Hayato; Nakagawa, Jun-ichi; Hishinuma, Shigeru; Sutherland, Cindy; Walsh, Michael P.; Shoji, Masaru

    2013-01-01

    Rho-associated kinase (ROK) activation plays an important role in K+-induced contraction of rat caudal arterial smooth muscle (Mita et al., Biochem J. 2002; 364: 431–40). The present study investigated a potential role for tyrosine kinase activity in K+-induced RhoA activation and contraction. The non-selective tyrosine kinase inhibitor genistein, but not the src family tyrosine kinase inhibitor PP2, inhibited K+-induced sustained contraction (IC50 = 11.3 ± 2.4 µM). Genistein (10 µM) inhibited the K+-induced increase in myosin light chain (LC20) phosphorylation without affecting the Ca2+ transient. The tyrosine phosphatase inhibitor vanadate induced contraction that was reversed by genistein (IC50 = 6.5 ± 2.3 µM) and the ROK inhibitor Y-27632 (IC50 = 0.27 ± 0.04 µM). Vanadate also increased LC20 phosphorylation in a genistein- and Y-27632-dependent manner. K+ stimulation induced translocation of RhoA to the membrane, which was inhibited by genistein. Phosphorylation of MYPT1 (myosin-targeting subunit of myosin light chain phosphatase) was significantly increased at Thr855 and Thr697 by K+ stimulation in a genistein- and Y-27632-sensitive manner. Finally, K+ stimulation induced genistein-sensitive tyrosine phosphorylation of proteins of ∼55, 70 and 113 kDa. We conclude that a genistein-sensitive tyrosine kinase, activated by the membrane depolarization-induced increase in [Ca2+]i, is involved in the RhoA/ROK activation and sustained contraction induced by K+. Ca2+ sensitization, myosin light chain phosphatase, RhoA, Rho-associated kinase, tyrosine kinase PMID:24133693

  20. Cell cycle-dependent Rho GTPase activity dynamically regulates cancer cell motility and invasion in vivo.

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    Kagawa, Yoshinori; Matsumoto, Shinji; Kamioka, Yuji; Mimori, Koshi; Naito, Yoko; Ishii, Taeko; Okuzaki, Daisuke; Nishida, Naohiro; Maeda, Sakae; Naito, Atsushi; Kikuta, Junichi; Nishikawa, Keizo; Nishimura, Junichi; Haraguchi, Naotsugu; Takemasa, Ichiro; Mizushima, Tsunekazu; Ikeda, Masataka; Yamamoto, Hirofumi; Sekimoto, Mitsugu; Ishii, Hideshi; Doki, Yuichiro; Matsuda, Michiyuki; Kikuchi, Akira; Mori, Masaki; Ishii, Masaru

    2013-01-01

    The mechanism behind the spatiotemporal control of cancer cell dynamics and its possible association with cell proliferation has not been well established. By exploiting the intravital imaging technique, we found that cancer cell motility and invasive properties were closely associated with the cell cycle. In vivo inoculation of human colon cancer cells bearing fluorescence ubiquitination-based cell cycle indicator (Fucci) demonstrated an unexpected phenomenon: S/G2/M cells were more motile and invasive than G1 cells. Microarray analyses showed that Arhgap11a, an uncharacterized Rho GTPase-activating protein (RhoGAP), was expressed in a cell-cycle-dependent fashion. Expression of ARHGAP11A in cancer cells suppressed RhoA-dependent mechanisms, such as stress fiber formation and focal adhesion, which made the cells more prone to migrate. We also demonstrated that RhoA suppression by ARHGAP11A induced augmentation of relative Rac1 activity, leading to an increase in the invasive properties. RNAi-based inhibition of Arhgap11a reduced the invasion and in vivo expansion of cancers. Additionally, analysis of human specimens showed the significant up-regulation of Arhgap11a in colon cancers, which was correlated with clinical invasion status. The present study suggests that ARHGAP11A, a cell cycle-dependent RhoGAP, is a critical regulator of cancer cell mobility and is thus a promising therapeutic target in invasive cancers.

  1. Cell cycle-dependent Rho GTPase activity dynamically regulates cancer cell motility and invasion in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshinori Kagawa

    Full Text Available The mechanism behind the spatiotemporal control of cancer cell dynamics and its possible association with cell proliferation has not been well established. By exploiting the intravital imaging technique, we found that cancer cell motility and invasive properties were closely associated with the cell cycle. In vivo inoculation of human colon cancer cells bearing fluorescence ubiquitination-based cell cycle indicator (Fucci demonstrated an unexpected phenomenon: S/G2/M cells were more motile and invasive than G1 cells. Microarray analyses showed that Arhgap11a, an uncharacterized Rho GTPase-activating protein (RhoGAP, was expressed in a cell-cycle-dependent fashion. Expression of ARHGAP11A in cancer cells suppressed RhoA-dependent mechanisms, such as stress fiber formation and focal adhesion, which made the cells more prone to migrate. We also demonstrated that RhoA suppression by ARHGAP11A induced augmentation of relative Rac1 activity, leading to an increase in the invasive properties. RNAi-based inhibition of Arhgap11a reduced the invasion and in vivo expansion of cancers. Additionally, analysis of human specimens showed the significant up-regulation of Arhgap11a in colon cancers, which was correlated with clinical invasion status. The present study suggests that ARHGAP11A, a cell cycle-dependent RhoGAP, is a critical regulator of cancer cell mobility and is thus a promising therapeutic target in invasive cancers.

  2. The activation of p38 MAPK primarily contributes to UV-induced RhoB expression by recruiting the c-Jun and p300 to the distal CCAAT box of the RhoB promoter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, Jiwon; Choi, Jeong-Hae; Won, Misun; Kang, Chang-Mo; Gyun, Mi-Rang; Park, Hee-Moon; Kim, Chun-Ho; Chung, Kyung-Sook

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Regulation of transcriptional activation of RhoB is still unclear. → We examine the effect of p38 MAPK inhibition, and c-Jun and RhoB depletion on UV-induced RhoB expression and apoptosis. → We identify the regions of RhoB promoter necessary to confer UV responsiveness using pRhoB-luciferase reporter assays. → c-Jun, ATF2 and p300 are dominantly associated with NF-Y on the distal CCAAT box. → The activation of p38 MAPK primarily contribute to UV-induced RhoB expression by recruiting the c-Jun and p300 proteins on distal CCAAT box of RhoB promoter. -- Abstract: The Ras-related small GTP-binding protein RhoB is rapidly induced in response to genotoxic stresses caused by ionizing radiation. It is known that UV-induced RhoB expression results from the binding of activating transcription factor 2 (ATF2) via NF-Y to the inverted CCAAT box (-23) of the RhoB promoter. Here, we show that the association of c-Jun with the distal CCAAT box (-72) is primarily involved in UV-induced RhoB expression and p38 MAPK regulated RhoB induction through the distal CCAAT box. UV-induced RhoB expression and apoptosis were markedly attenuated by pretreatment with the p38 MAPK inhibitor. siRNA knockdown of RhoB, ATF2 and c-Jun resulted in decreased RhoB expression and eventually restored the growth of UV-irradiated Jurkat cells. In the reporter assay using luciferase under the RhoB promoter, inhibition of RhoB promoter activity by the p38 inhibitor and knockdown of c-Jun using siRNA occurred through the distal CCAAT box. Immunoprecipitation and DNA affinity protein binding assays revealed the association of c-Jun and p300 via NF-YA and the dissociation of histone deacetylase 1 (HDAC1) via c-Jun recruitment to the CCAAT boxes of the RhoB promoter. These results suggest that the activation of p38 MAPK primarily contributes to UV-induced RhoB expression by recruiting the c-Jun and p300 proteins to the distal CCAAT box of the RhoB promoter in Jurkat cells.

  3. The Rho kinases I and II regulate different aspects of myosin II activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yoneda, Atsuko; Multhaupt, Hinke A B; Couchman, John R

    2005-01-01

    The homologous mammalian rho kinases (ROCK I and II) are assumed to be functionally redundant, based largely on kinase construct overexpression. As downstream effectors of Rho GTPases, their major substrates are myosin light chain and myosin phosphatase. Both kinases are implicated in microfilament...... bundle assembly and smooth muscle contractility. Here, analysis of fibroblast adhesion to fibronectin revealed that although ROCK II was more abundant, its activity was always lower than ROCK I. Specific reduction of ROCK I by siRNA resulted in loss of stress fibers and focal adhesions, despite...

  4. Protein kinase C-α signals P115RhoGEF phosphorylation and RhoA activation in TNF-α-induced mouse brain microvascular endothelial cell barrier dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deng Xiaolu

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α, a proinflammatory cytokine, is capable of activating the small GTPase RhoA, which in turn contributes to endothelial barrier dysfunction. However, the underlying signaling mechanisms remained undefined. Therefore, we aimed to determine the role of protein kinase C (PKC isozymes in the mechanism of RhoA activation and in signaling TNF-α-induced mouse brain microvascular endothelial cell (BMEC barrier dysfunction. Methods Bend.3 cells, an immortalized mouse brain endothelial cell line, were exposed to TNF-α (10 ng/mL. RhoA activity was assessed by pull down assay. PKC-α activity was measured using enzyme assasy. BMEC barrier function was measured by transendothelial electrical resistance (TER. p115RhoGEF phosphorylation was detected by autoradiography followed by western blotting. F-actin organization was observed by rhodamine-phalloidin staining. Both pharmacological inhibitors and knockdown approaches were employed to investigate the role of PKC and p115RhoGEF in TNF-α-induced RhoA activation and BMEC permeability. Results We observed that TNF-α induces a rapid phosphorylation of p115RhoGEF, activation of PKC and RhoA in BMECs. Inhibition of conventional PKC by Gö6976 mitigated the TNF-α-induced p115RhoGEF phosphorylation and RhoA activation. Subsequently, we found that these events are regulated by PKC-α rather than PKC-β by using shRNA. In addition, P115-shRNA and n19RhoA (dominant negative mutant of RhoA transfections had no effect on mediating TNF-α-induced PKC-α activation. These data suggest that PKC-α but not PKC-β acts as an upstream regulator of p115RhoGEF phosphorylation and RhoA activation in response to TNF-α. Moreover, depletion of PKC-α, of p115RhoGEF, and inhibition of RhoA activation also prevented TNF-α-induced stress fiber formation and a decrease in TER. Conclusions Taken together, our results show that PKC-α phosphorylation of p115RhoGEF mediates TNF

  5. Infralimbic cortex Rho-kinase inhibition causes antidepressant-like activity in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inan, Salim Yalcin; Soner, Burak Cem; Sahin, Ayse Saide

    2015-03-03

    Depression is one of the most common psychiatric disorders in the world; however, its mechanisms remain unclear. Recently, a new signal-transduction pathway, namely Rho/Rho-kinase signalling, has been suggested to be involved in diverse cellular events in the central nervous system; such as epilepsy, anxiety-related behaviors, regulation of dendritic and axonal morphology, antinociception, subarachnoid haemorrhage, spinal cord injury and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. However there is no evidence showing the involvement of Rho-kinase pathway in depression. In addition, the infralimbic cortex, rodent equivalent to subgenual cingulate cortex has been shown to be responsible for emotional responses. Thus, in the present study, intracranial guide cannulae were stereotaxically implanted bilaterally into the infralimbic cortex, and the effects of repeated microinjections of a Rho-kinase (ROCK) inhibitor Y-27632 (10 nmol) were investigated in rats. Y-27632 significantly decreased immobility time and increased swimming and climbing behaviors when compared to fluoxetine (10 μg) and saline groups in the forced swim test. In addition, Y-27632 treatment did not affect spontaneous locomotor activity and forelimb use in the open-field and cylinder tests respectively; but it enhanced limb placing accuracy in the ladder rung walking test. Our results suggest that Y-27632 could be a potentially active antidepressant agent. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. RhoA Drives T-Cell Activation and Encephalitogenic Potential in an Animal Model of Multiple Sclerosis

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    Alba Manresa-Arraut

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available T-cells are known to be intimately involved in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis (MS and its animal model experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE. T-cell activation is controlled by a range of intracellular signaling pathways regulating cellular responses such as proliferation, cytokine production, integrin expression, and migration. These processes are crucial for the T-cells’ ability to mediate inflammatory processes in autoimmune diseases such as MS. RhoA is a ubiquitously expressed small GTPase well described as a regulator of the actin cytoskeleton. It is essential for embryonic development and together with other Rho GTPases controls various cellular processes such as cell development, shaping, proliferation, and locomotion. However, the specific contribution of RhoA to these processes in T-cells in general, and in autoreactive T-cells in particular, has not been fully characterized. Using mice with a T-cell specific deletion of the RhoA gene (RhoAfl/flLckCre+, we investigated the role of RhoA in T-cell development, functionality, and encephalitogenic potential in EAE. We show that lack of RhoA specifically in T-cells results in reduced numbers of mature T-cells in thymus and spleen but normal counts in peripheral blood. EAE induction in RhoAfl/flLckCre+ mice results in significantly reduced disease incidence and severity, which coincides with a reduced CNS T-cell infiltration. Besides presenting reduced migratory capacity, both naïve and autoreactive effector T-cells from RhoAfl/flLckCre+ mice show decreased viability, proliferative capacity, and an activation profile associated with reduced production of Th1 pro-inflammatory cytokines. Our study demonstrates that RhoA is a central regulator of several archetypical T-cell responses, and furthermore points toward RhoA as a new potential therapeutic target in diseases such as MS, where T-cell activity plays a central role.

  7. Rho GTPases and cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Hui; Peyrollier, Karine; Kilic, Gülcan

    2014-01-01

    Rho GTPases are a family of small GTPases, which play an important role in the regulation of the actin cytoskeleton. Not surprisingly, Rho GTPases are crucial for cell migration and therefore highly important for cancer cell invasion and the formation of metastases. In addition, Rho GTPases...... are involved in growth and survival of tumor cells, in the interaction of tumor cells with their environment, and they are vital for the cancer supporting functions of the tumor stroma. Recent research has significantly improved our understanding of the regulation of Rho GTPase activity, the specificity of Rho...

  8. Opposing roles for RhoH GTPase during T-cell migration and activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Christina M.; Comrie, William A.; Hyun, Young-Min; Chung, Hung-Li; Fedorchuk, Christine A.; Lim, Kihong; Brakebusch, Cord; McGrath, James L.; Waugh, Richard E.; Meier-Schellersheim, Martin; Kim, Minsoo

    2012-01-01

    T cells spend the majority of their time perusing lymphoid organs in search of cognate antigen presented by antigen presenting cells (APCs) and then quickly recirculate through the bloodstream to another lymph node. Therefore, regulation of a T-cell response is dependent upon the ability of cells to arrive in the correct location following chemokine gradients (“go” signal) as well as to receive appropriate T-cell receptor (TCR) activation signals upon cognate antigen recognition (“stop” signal). However, the mechanisms by which T cells regulate these go and stop signals remain unclear. We found that overexpression of the hematopoietic-specific RhoH protein in the presence of chemokine signals resulted in decreased Rap1–GTP and LFA-1 adhesiveness to ICAM-1, thus impairing T-cell chemotaxis; while in the presence of TCR signals, there were enhanced and sustained Rap1–GTP and LFA-1 activation as well as prolonged T:APC conjugates. RT-PCR analyses of activated CD4+ T cells and live images of T-cell migration and immunological synapse (IS) formation revealed that functions of RhoH took place primarily at the levels of transcription and intracellular distribution. Thus, we conclude that RhoH expression provides a key molecular determinant that allows T cells to switch between sensing chemokine-mediated go signals and TCR-dependent stop signals. PMID:22689994

  9. Microfilament regulatory protein MENA increases activity of RhoA and promotes metastasis of hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ling; Yang, Xiao-Mei; Li, Jun; Zhang, Yan-Li; Qin, Wenxin; Zhang, Zhi-Gang

    2014-09-10

    Mammalian enabled (MENA), usually known as a direct regulator of microfilament polymerization and bundling, promotes metastasis in various cancers. Here we focus on the role of MENA in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) metastasis and the relevant mechanism from the view of RhoA activity regulation. By HCC tissue microarray analysis, we found that MENA expression was positively associated with satellite lesions (PMENA staining in HCC tissues had significantly higher rates of early recurrence in the intermediate MENA expression group. Knockdown of MENA significantly suppressed HCC cell migration and invasion in vitro, as well as their intrahepatic and distant metastasis in vivo. Knockdown of MENA also decreased filopodia and stress fibers in SMMC-7721 cells. Furthermore, a decrease of RhoA activity was detected by a pull-down assay in SMMC-7721-shMENA cells. The ROCK inhibitor, Y-27632, suppressed migration of both MENA knockdown SMMC-7721 cells and control cells, but diminished their difference. Thus, our findings suggest that MENA promotes HCC cell motility by activating RhoA. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Restoration of uridine 5′-triphosphate-suppressed delayed rectifying K+ currents by an NO activator KMUP-1 involves RhoA/Rho kinase signaling in pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zen-Kong Dai

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available We have demonstrated that KMUP-1 (7-[2-[4-(2-chlorobenzenepiperazinyl]ethyl]-1,3-dimethylxanthine blunts monocrotaline-induced pulmonary arterial hypertension by altering Ca2+ sensitivity, K+-channel function, endothelial nitric oxide synthase activity, and RhoA/Rho kinase (ROCK expression. This study further investigated whether KMUP-1 impedes uridine 5′-triphosphate (UTP-inhibited delayed rectifying K+ (KDR current in rat pulmonary arteries involved the RhoA/ROCK signaling. Pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMCs were enzymatically dissociated from rat pulmonary arteries. KMUP-1 (30μM attenuated UTP (30μM-mediated membrane depolarization and abolished UTP-enhanced cytosolic Ca2+ concentration. Whole-cell patch-clamp electrophysiology was used to monitor KDR currents. A voltage-dependent KDR current was isolated and shown to consist of a 4-aminopyridine (5mM-sensitive component and an insensitive component. The 4-aminopyridine sensitive KDR current was suppressed by UTP (30μM. The ROCK inhibitor Y27632 (30μM abolished the ability of UTP to inhibit the KDR current. Like Y27632, KMUP-1 (30μM similarly abolished UTP-inhibited KDR currents. Superfused protein kinase A and protein kinase G inhibitors (KT5720, 300nM and KT5823, 300nM did not affect UTP-inhibited KDR currents, but the currents were restored by adding KMUP-1 (30μM to the superfusate. KMUP-1 reversal of KDR current inhibition by UTP predominantly involves the ROCK inhibition. The results indicate that the RhoA/ROCK signaling pathway plays a key role in eliciting PASMCs depolarization caused by UTP, which would result in pulmonary artery constriction. KMUP-1 blocks UTP-mediated PASMCs depolarization, suggesting that it would prevent abnormal pulmonary vasoconstriction.

  11. Activation of Rho GTPases by Cytotoxic Necrotizing Factor 1 Induces Macropinocytosis and Scavenging Activity in Epithelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorentini, Carla; Falzano, Loredana; Fabbri, Alessia; Stringaro, Annarita; Logozzi, Mariaantonia; Travaglione, Sara; Contamin, Stéphanette; Arancia, Giuseppe; Malorni, Walter; Fais, Stefano

    2001-01-01

    Macropinocytosis, a ruffling-driven process that allows the capture of large material, is an essential aspect of normal cell function. It can be either constitutive, as in professional phagocytes where it ends with the digestion of captured material, or induced, as in epithelial cells stimulated by growth factors. In this case, the internalized material recycles back to the cell surface. We herein show that activation of Rho GTPases by a bacterial protein toxin, the Escherichia coli cytotoxic necrotizing factor 1 (CNF1), allowed epithelial cells to engulf and digest apoptotic cells in a manner similar to that of professional phagocytes. In particular, we have demonstrated that 1) the activation of all Rho, Rac, and Cdc42 by CNF1 was essential for the capture and internalization of apoptotic cells; and 2) such activation allowed the discharge of macropinosomal content into Rab7 and lysosomal associated membrane protein-1 acidic lysosomal vesicles where the ingested particles underwent degradation. Taken together, these findings indicate that CNF1-induced “switching on” of Rho GTPases may induce in epithelial cells a scavenging activity, comparable to that exerted by professional phagocytes. The activation of such activity in epithelial cells may be relevant, in mucosal tissues, in supporting or integrating the scavenging activity of resident macrophages. PMID:11452003

  12. Abnormal Activation of RhoA/ROCK-I Signaling in Junctional Zone Smooth Muscle Cells of Patients With Adenomyosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, S; Duan, H; Zhang, Y; Sun, F Q

    2016-03-01

    Adenomyosis (ADS) is a common estrogen-dependent gynecological disease with unknown etiology. The RhoA/Rho-kinase (ROCK) signaling pathway is involved in various cellular functions, including migration, proliferation, and smooth muscle contraction. Here we examined the potential role of this pathway in junctional zone (JZ) contraction in women with and without ADS. We demonstrated that in the normal JZ, RhoA and ROCK-I messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein expression was significantly higher in the proliferative phase of the menstrual cycle than in the secretory phase. Expression of RhoA and ROCK-I in the JZ from women with ADS was significantly higher than in the control women and showed no significant differences across the menstrual cycle. Treatment of JZ smooth muscle cells (JZSMCs) with estrogen at 0, 1, 10, or 100 nmol/L for 24 hours resulted in increased expression of RhoA, ROCK-I, and myosin light-chain (MLC) phosphorylation (p-MLC) in a dose-dependent manner. In parallel to its effects on p-MLC, estrogen-mediated, dose-dependent contraction responses in JZSMCs. Estrogen-mediated contraction in the ADS group was significantly higher than in the controls and also showed no significant differences across the menstrual cycle. These effects were suppressed in the presence of ICI 182780 or Y27632, supporting an estrogen receptor-dependent and RhoA activation-dependent mechanism. Our results indicate that the level of RhoA and ROCK-I increases in patients with ADS and the cyclic change is lost. Estrogen may affect uterine JZ contraction of ADS by enhancing RhoA/ ROCK-I signaling. © The Author(s) 2015.

  13. Diacylglycerol kinase ζ regulates RhoA activation via a kinase-independent scaffolding mechanism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ard, Ryan; Mulatz, Kirk; Abramovici, Hanan

    2012-01-01

    , but the underlying mechanisms are unclear. Diacylglycerol kinase ζ (DGKζ), which phosphorylates diacylglycerol to yield phosphatidic acid, selectively dissociates Rac1 by stimulating PAK1-mediated phosphorylation of RhoGDI on Ser-101/174. Similarly, phosphorylation of RhoGDI on Ser-34 by protein kinase Cα (PKCα......GDI and was required for efficient interaction of PKCα and RhoA. DGKζ-null fibroblasts had condensed F-actin bundles and altered focal adhesion distribution, indicative of aberrant RhoA signaling. Two targets of the RhoA effector ROCK showed reduced phosphorylation in DGKζ-null cells. Collectively our findings suggest...

  14. A negative modulatory role for rho and rho-associated kinase signaling in delamination of neural crest cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalcheim Chaya

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neural crest progenitors arise as epithelial cells and then undergo a process of epithelial to mesenchymal transition that precedes the generation of cellular motility and subsequent migration. We aim at understanding the underlying molecular network. Along this line, possible roles of Rho GTPases that act as molecular switches to control a variety of signal transduction pathways remain virtually unexplored, as are putative interactions between Rho proteins and additional known components of this cascade. Results We investigated the role of Rho/Rock signaling in neural crest delamination. Active RhoA and RhoB are expressed in the membrane of epithelial progenitors and are downregulated upon delamination. In vivo loss-of-function of RhoA or RhoB or of overall Rho signaling by C3 transferase enhanced and/or triggered premature crest delamination yet had no effect on cell specification. Consistently, treatment of explanted neural primordia with membrane-permeable C3 or with the Rock inhibitor Y27632 both accelerated and enhanced crest emigration without affecting cell proliferation. These treatments altered neural crest morphology by reducing stress fibers, focal adhesions and downregulating membrane-bound N-cadherin. Reciprocally, activation of endogenous Rho by lysophosphatidic acid inhibited emigration while enhancing the above. Since delamination is triggered by BMP and requires G1/S transition, we examined their relationship with Rho. Blocking Rho/Rock function rescued crest emigration upon treatment with noggin or with the G1/S inhibitor mimosine. In the latter condition, cells emigrated while arrested at G1. Conversely, BMP4 was unable to rescue cell emigration when endogenous Rho activity was enhanced by lysophosphatidic acid. Conclusion Rho-GTPases, through Rock, act downstream of BMP and of G1/S transition to negatively regulate crest delamination by modifying cytoskeleton assembly and intercellular adhesion.

  15. Rho GTPase activity modulates paramyxovirus fusion protein-mediated cell-cell fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schowalter, Rachel M.; Wurth, Mark A.; Aguilar, Hector C.; Lee, Benhur; Moncman, Carole L.; McCann, Richard O.; Dutch, Rebecca Ellis

    2006-01-01

    The paramyxovirus fusion protein (F) promotes fusion of the viral envelope with the plasma membrane of target cells as well as cell-cell fusion. The plasma membrane is closely associated with the actin cytoskeleton, but the role of actin dynamics in paramyxovirus F-mediated membrane fusion is unclear. We examined cell-cell fusion promoted by two different paramyxovirus F proteins in three cell types in the presence of constitutively active Rho family GTPases, major cellular coordinators of actin dynamics. Reporter gene and syncytia assays demonstrated that expression of either Rac1 V12 or Cdc42 V12 could increase cell-cell fusion promoted by the Hendra or SV5 glycoproteins, though the effect was dependent on the cell type expressing the viral glycoproteins. In contrast, RhoA L63 decreased cell-cell fusion promoted by Hendra glycoproteins but had little affect on SV5 F-mediated fusion. Also, data suggested that GTPase activation in the viral glycoprotein-containing cell was primarily responsible for changes in fusion. Additionally, we found that activated Cdc42 promoted nuclear rearrangement in syncytia

  16. High energy photoproduction of the rho and rho' vector mesons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bronstein, J.M.

    1977-01-01

    In an experiment in the broad band photon beam at Fermilab diffractive production of 2π + and 4π +- states from Be, Al, Cu, and Pb targets was observed. The 2π + data are dominated by the rho(770) and the 4π +- is dominated by the rho'(1500). The energy dependence of rho photoproduction from Be was measured, and no evidence was seen for energy variation of the forward cross section in the range 30 to 160 GeV. The forward cross section is consistent with its average value d sigma/dtlt. slash 0 = 3.42 +- 0.28 μb/GeV 2 over the entire range. For the /sub rho'// a mass of 1487 +- 20 MeV and a width of 675 +- 60 MeV are obtained. All quoted errors are statistical. A standard optical model analysis of the A dependence of the rho and rho'/ photoproduction yields the following results. f/sub rho'/ 2 /f/sub rho/ 2 = 3.7 +- 0.7, sigma /sub rho'//sigma /sub rho/ = 1.05 +- 0.18. Results for the photon coupling constants are in good agreement with GVMD and with the e + e - storage ring results. The approximate equality of the rho-nucleon and rho'-nucleon total cross sections is inconsistent with the diagonal version of GVMD and provides strong motivation for including transitions between different vector mesons in GVMD

  17. Induction of human microsomal prostaglandin E synthase 1 by activated oncogene RhoA GTPase in A549 human epithelial cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Hye Jin [Laboratory of Systems Mucosal Biomodulation, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Pusan National University School of Medicine, Yangsan (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Dong-Hyung [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Medical Research Institute, Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Park, Seong-Hwan; Kim, Juil; Do, Kee Hun [Laboratory of Systems Mucosal Biomodulation, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Pusan National University School of Medicine, Yangsan (Korea, Republic of); An, Tae Jin; Ahn, Young Sup; Park, Chung Berm [Department of Herbal Crop Research, NIHHS, RDA, Eumseong (Korea, Republic of); Moon, Yuseok, E-mail: moon@pnu.edu [Laboratory of Systems Mucosal Biomodulation, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Pusan National University School of Medicine, Yangsan (Korea, Republic of); Medical Research Institute and Research Institute for Basic Sciences, Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-09-30

    Highlights: {yields} As a target of oncogene RhoA-linked signal, a prostaglandin metabolism is assessed. {yields} RhoA activation increases PGE{sub 2} levels and its metabolic enzyme mPGES-1. {yields} RhoA-activated NF-{kappa}B and EGR-1 are positively involved in mPGES-1 induction. -- Abstract: Oncogenic RhoA GTPase has been investigated as a mediator of pro-inflammatory responses and aggressive carcinogenesis. Among the various targets of RhoA-linked signals, pro-inflammatory prostaglandin E{sub 2} (PGE{sub 2}), a major prostaglandin metabolite, was assessed in epithelial cancer cells. RhoA activation increased PGE{sub 2} levels and gene expression of the rate-limiting PGE{sub 2} producing enzymes, cyclooxygenase-2 and microsomal prostaglandin E synthase 1 (mPGES-1). In particular, human mPGES-1 was induced by RhoA via transcriptional activation in control and interleukin (IL)-1{beta}-activated cancer cells. To address the involvement of potent signaling pathways in RhoA-activated mPGES-1 induction, various signaling inhibitors were screened for their effects on mPGES-1 promoter activity. RhoA activation enhanced basal and IL-1{beta}-mediated phosphorylated nuclear factor-{kappa}B and extracellular signal-regulated kinase1/2 proteins, all of which were positively involved in RhoA-induced gene expression of mPGES-1. As one potent down-stream transcription factor of ERK1/2 signals, early growth response gene 1 product also mediated RhoA-induced gene expression of mPGES-1 by enhancing transcriptional activity. Since oncogene-triggered PGE{sub 2} production is a critical modulator of epithelial tumor cells, RhoA-associated mPGES-1 represents a promising chemo-preventive or therapeutic target for epithelial inflammation and its associated cancers.

  18. Plant Rho-type (Rop) GTPase-dependent activation of receptor-like cytoplasmic kinases in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorjgotov, Dulguun; Jurca, Manuela E; Fodor-Dunai, Csilla; Szucs, Attila; Otvös, Krisztina; Klement, Eva; Bíró, Judit; Fehér, Attila

    2009-04-02

    Plants have evolved distinct mechanisms to link Rho-type (Rop) GTPases to downstream signaling pathways as compared to other eukaryotes. Here, experimental data are provided that members of the Medicago, as well as Arabidopsis, receptor-like cytoplasmic kinase family (RLCK Class VI) were strongly and specifically activated by GTP-bound Rop GTPases in vitro. Deletion analysis indicated that the residues implicated in the interaction might be distributed on various parts of the kinases. Using a chimaeric Rop GTPase protein, the importance of the Rho-insert region in kinase activation could also be verified. These data strengthen the possibility that RLCKs may serve as Rop GTPase effectors in planta.

  19. RhoA Activation Sensitizes Cells to Proteotoxic Stimuli by Abrogating the HSF1-Dependent Heat Shock Response.

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    Roelien A M Meijering

    Full Text Available The heat shock response (HSR is an ancient and highly conserved program of stress-induced gene expression, aimed at reestablishing protein homeostasis to preserve cellular fitness. Cells that fail to activate or maintain this protective response are hypersensitive to proteotoxic stress. The HSR is mediated by the heat shock transcription factor 1 (HSF1, which binds to conserved heat shock elements (HSE in the promoter region of heat shock genes, resulting in the expression of heat shock proteins (HSP. Recently, we observed that hyperactivation of RhoA conditions cardiomyocytes for the cardiac arrhythmia atrial fibrillation. Also, the HSR is annihilated in atrial fibrillation, and induction of HSR mitigates sensitization of cells to this disease. Therefore, we hypothesized active RhoA to suppress the HSR resulting in sensitization of cells for proteotoxic stimuli.Stimulation of RhoA activity significantly suppressed the proteotoxic stress-induced HSR in HL-1 atrial cardiomyocytes as determined with a luciferase reporter construct driven by the HSF1 regulated human HSP70 (HSPA1A promoter and HSP protein expression by Western Blot analysis. Inversely, RhoA inhibition boosted the proteotoxic stress-induced HSR. While active RhoA did not preclude HSF1 nuclear accumulation, phosphorylation, acetylation, or sumoylation, it did impair binding of HSF1 to the hsp genes promoter element HSE. Impaired binding results in suppression of HSP expression and sensitized cells to proteotoxic stress.These results reveal that active RhoA negatively regulates the HSR via attenuation of the HSF1-HSE binding and thus may play a role in sensitizing cells to proteotoxic stimuli.

  20. Increased diacylglycerol kinase ζ expression in human metastatic colon cancer cells augments Rho GTPase activity and contributes to enhanced invasion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai, Kun; Mulatz, Kirk; Ard, Ryan; Nguyen, Thanh; Gee, Stephen H

    2014-01-01

    Unraveling the signaling pathways responsible for the establishment of a metastatic phenotype in carcinoma cells is critically important for understanding the pathology of cancer. The acquisition of cell motility is a key property of metastatic tumor cells and is a prerequisite for invasion. Rho GTPases regulate actin cytoskeleton reorganization and the cellular responses required for cell motility and invasion. Diacylglycerol kinase ζ (DGKζ), an enzyme that phosphorylates diacylglycerol to yield phosphatidic acid, regulates the activity of the Rho GTPases Rac1 and RhoA. DGKζ mRNA is highly expressed in several different colon cancer cell lines, as well as in colon cancer tissue relative to normal colonic epithelium, and thus may contribute to the metastatic process. To investigate potential roles of DGKζ in cancer metastasis, a cellular, isogenic model of human colorectal cancer metastatic transition was used. DGKζ protein levels, Rac1 and RhoA activity, and PAK phosphorylation were measured in the non-metastatic SW480 adenocarcinoma cell line and its highly metastatic variant, the SW620 line. The effect of DGKζ silencing on Rho GTPase activity and invasion through Matrigel-coated Transwell inserts was studied in SW620 cells. Invasiveness was also measured in PC-3 prostate cancer and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells depleted of DGKζ. DGKζ protein levels were elevated approximately 3-fold in SW620 cells compared to SW480 cells. There was a concomitant increase in active Rac1 in SW620 cells, as well as substantial increases in the expression and phosphorylation of the Rac1 effector PAK1. Similarly, RhoA activity and expression were increased in SW620 cells. Knockdown of DGKζ expression in SW620 cells by shRNA-mediated silencing significantly reduced Rac1 and RhoA activity and attenuated the invasiveness of SW620 cells in vitro. DGKζ silencing in highly metastatic MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells and PC-3 prostate cancer cells also significantly attenuated

  1. Diabetes and overexpression of proNGF cause retinal neurodegeneration via activation of RhoA pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed M H Al-Gayyar

    Full Text Available Our previous studies showed positive correlation between accumulation of proNGF, activation of RhoA and neuronal death in diabetic models. Here, we examined the neuroprotective effects of selective inhibition of RhoA kinase in the diabetic rat retina and in a model that stably overexpressed the cleavage-resistance proNGF plasmid in the retina. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were rendered diabetic using streptozotocin or stably express cleavage-resistant proNGF plasmid. The neuroprotective effects of the intravitreal injection of RhoA kinase inhibitor Y27632 were examined in vivo. Effects of proNGF were examined in freshly isolated primary retinal ganglion cell (RGC cultures and RGC-5 cell line. Retinal neurodegeneration was assessed by counting TUNEL-positive and Brn-3a positive retinal ganglion cells. Expression of proNGF, p75(NTR, cleaved-PARP, caspase-3 and p38MAPK/JNK were examined by Western-blot. Activation of RhoA was assessed by pull-down assay and G-LISA. Diabetes and overexpression of proNGF resulted in retinal neurodegeneration as indicated by 9- and 6-fold increase in TUNEL-positive cells, respectively. In vitro, proNGF induced 5-fold cell death in RGC-5 cell line, and it induced >10-fold cell death in primary RGC cultures. These effects were associated with significant upregulation of p75(NTR and activation of RhoA. While proNGF induced TNF-α expression in vivo, it selectively activated RhoA in primary RGC cultures and RGC-5 cell line. Inhibiting RhoA kinase with Y27632 significantly reduced diabetes- and proNGF-induced activation of proapoptotic p38MAPK/JNK, expression of cleaved-PARP and caspase-3 and prevented retinal neurodegeneration in vivo and in vitro. Taken together, these results provide compelling evidence for a causal role of proNGF in diabetes-induced retinal neurodegeneration through enhancing p75(NTR expression and direct activation of RhoA and p38MAPK/JNK apoptotic pathways.

  2. Kindlin-2 Association with Rho GDP-Dissociation Inhibitor α Suppresses Rac1 Activation and Podocyte Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ying; Guo, Chen; Ma, Ping; Lai, Yumei; Yang, Fan; Cai, Jun; Cheng, Zhehao; Zhang, Kuo; Liu, Zhongzhen; Tian, Yeteng; Sheng, Yue; Tian, Ruijun; Deng, Yi; Xiao, Guozhi; Wu, Chuanyue

    2017-12-01

    Alteration of podocyte behavior is critically involved in the development and progression of many forms of human glomerular diseases. The molecular mechanisms that control podocyte behavior, however, are not well understood. Here, we investigated the role of Kindlin-2, a component of cell-matrix adhesions, in podocyte behavior in vivo Ablation of Kindlin-2 in podocytes resulted in alteration of actin cytoskeletal organization, reduction of the levels of slit diaphragm proteins, effacement of podocyte foot processes, and ultimately massive proteinuria and death due to kidney failure. Through proteomic analyses and in vitro coimmunoprecipitation experiments, we identified Rho GDP-dissociation inhibitor α (RhoGDI α ) as a Kindlin-2-associated protein. Loss of Kindlin-2 in podocytes significantly reduced the expression of RhoGDI α and resulted in the dissociation of Rac1 from RhoGDI α , leading to Rac1 hyperactivation and increased motility of podocytes. Inhibition of Rac1 activation effectively suppressed podocyte motility and alleviated the podocyte defects and proteinuria induced by the loss of Kindlin-2 in vivo Our results identify a novel Kindlin-2-RhoGDI α -Rac1 signaling axis that is critical for regulation of podocyte structure and function in vivo and provide evidence that it may serve as a useful target for therapeutic control of podocyte injury and associated glomerular diseases. Copyright © 2017 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  3. RhoA/Rho-Kinase in the Cardiovascular System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimokawa, Hiroaki; Sunamura, Shinichiro; Satoh, Kimio

    2016-01-22

    Twenty years ago, Rho-kinase was identified as an important downstream effector of the small GTP-binding protein, RhoA. Thereafter, a series of studies demonstrated the important roles of Rho-kinase in the cardiovascular system. The RhoA/Rho-kinase pathway is now widely known to play important roles in many cellular functions, including contraction, motility, proliferation, and apoptosis, and its excessive activity induces oxidative stress and promotes the development of cardiovascular diseases. Furthermore, the important role of Rho-kinase has been demonstrated in the pathogenesis of vasospasm, arteriosclerosis, ischemia/reperfusion injury, hypertension, pulmonary hypertension, and heart failure. Cyclophilin A is secreted by vascular smooth muscle cells and inflammatory cells and activated platelets in a Rho-kinase-dependent manner, playing important roles in a wide range of cardiovascular diseases. Thus, the RhoA/Rho-kinase pathway plays crucial roles under both physiological and pathological conditions and is an important therapeutic target in cardiovascular medicine. Recently, functional differences between ROCK1 and ROCK2 have been reported in vitro. ROCK1 is specifically cleaved by caspase-3, whereas granzyme B cleaves ROCK2. However, limited information is available on the functional differences and interactions between ROCK1 and ROCK2 in the cardiovascular system in vivo. Herein, we will review the recent advances about the importance of RhoA/Rho-kinase in the cardiovascular system. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  4. Rho-associated kinase activity is required for proper morphogenesis of the inner cell mass in the mouse blastocyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laeno, Arlene May A; Tamashiro, Dana Ann A; Alarcon, Vernadeth B

    2013-11-01

    The blastocyst consists of the outer layer of trophectoderm and pluripotent inner cell mass (ICM), the precursor of the placenta and fetus, respectively. During blastocyst expansion, the ICM adopts a compact, ovoidal shape, whose proper morphology is crucial for normal embryogenesis. Rho-associated kinase (ROCK), an effector of small GTPase RHO signaling, mediates the diverse cellular processes of morphogenesis, but its role in ICM morphogenesis is unclear. Here, we demonstrate that ROCK is required for cohesion of ICM cells and formation of segregated tissues called primitive endoderm (PrE) and epiblast (Epi) in the ICM of the mouse blastocyst. Blastocyst treatment with ROCK inhibitors Y-27632 and Fasudil caused widening or spreading of the ICM, and intermingling of PrE and Epi. Widening of ICM was independent of trophectoderm because isolated ICMs as well as colonies of mouse embryonic stem cells (mESC) also spread upon Y-27632 treatment. PrE, Epi, and trophectoderm cell numbers were similar between control and treated blastocysts, suggesting that ROCK inhibition affected ICM morphology but not lineage differentiation. Rock1 and Rock2 knockdown via RNA interference in mESC also induced spreading, supporting the conclusion that morphological defects caused by the pharmacological inhibitors were due to ROCK inactivation. When blastocysts were transferred into surrogates, implantation efficiencies were unaffected by ROCK inhibition, but treated blastocysts yielded greater fetal loss. These results show that proper ICM morphology is dependent on ROCK activity and is crucial for fetal development. Our studies have wider implication for improving efficiencies of human assisted reproductive technologies that diminish pregnancy loss and promote successful births.

  5. Nature of extracellular signal that triggers RhoA/ROCK activation for the basal internal anal sphincter tone in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Jagmohan; Kumar, Sumit; Phillips, Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    The extracellular signal that triggers activation of rho-associated kinase (RhoA/ROCK), the major molecular determinant of basal internal anal sphincter (IAS) smooth muscle tone, is not known. Using human IAS tissues, we identified the presence of the biosynthetic machineries for angiotensin II (ANG II), thromboxane A2 (TXA2), and prostaglandin F2α (PGF2α). These end products of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) (ANG II) and arachidonic acid (TXA2 and PGF2α) pathways and their effects in human IAS vs. rectal smooth muscle (RSM) were studied. A multipronged approach utilizing immunocytochemistry, Western blot analyses, and force measurements was implemented. Additionally, in a systematic analysis of the effects of respective inhibitors along different steps of biosynthesis and those of antagonists, their end products were evaluated either individually or in combination. To further describe the molecular mechanism for the IAS tone via these pathways, we monitored RhoA/ROCK activation and its signal transduction cascade. Data showed characteristically higher expression of biosynthetic machineries of RAS and AA pathways in the IAS compared with the RSM. Additionally, specific inhibition of the arachidonic acid (AA) pathway caused ∼80% decrease in the IAS tone, whereas that of RAS lead to ∼20% decrease. Signal transduction studies revealed that the end products of both AA and RAS pathways cause increase in the IAS tone via activation of RhoA/ROCK. Both AA and RAS (via the release of their end products TXA2, PGF2α, and ANG II, respectively), provide extracellular signals which activate RhoA/ROCK for the maintenance of the basal tone in human IAS. PMID:25882611

  6. HMG-CoA reductase regulates CCL17-induced colon cancer cell migration via geranylgeranylation and RhoA activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Haidari, Amr A.; Syk, Ingvar; Thorlacius, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Simvastatin blocked CCL17-induced and CCR4-dependent RhoA activation in HT29 cells. • CCL17/CCR4-mediated migration of colon cancer cells was antagonised by simvastatin. • Cell migration recovered by adding Mevalonate and geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate. • Targeting HMG-CoA reductase might be useful to inhibit colon cancer metastasis. - Abstract: Background: Simvastatin is widely used to lower cholesterol levels in patients with cardiovascular diseases, although accumulating evidence suggests that statins, such as simvastatin, also exert numerous anti-tumoral effects. Aim: The aim of this study was to examine the effect of simvastatin on colon cancer cell migration. Methods: Migration assays were performed to evaluate CCL17-induced colon cancer cell (HT-29) chemotaxis. In vitro tumor growth and apoptosis were assessed using a proliferation assay and annexin V assay, respectively. Active RhoA protein levels in CCL17-stimulated colon cancer cells were quantified using a G-LISA assay. Results: We found that simvastatin dose-dependently decreased CCL17-induced colon cancer cell migration. Simvastatin had no effect on colon cancer cell proliferation or apoptosis. Inhibition of beta chemokine receptor 4, CCR4, reduced CCL17-evoked activation of RhoA in colon cancer cells. Moreover, administration of mevalonate reversed the inhibitory effect of simvastatin on CCL17-induced colon cancer cell migration. Interestingly, co-incubation with geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate (GGPP) antagonized the inhibitory impact of simvastatin on colon cancer cell migration triggered by CCL17. Moreover, we observed that simvastatin decreased CCL17-induced activation of RhoA in colon cancer cells. Administration of mevalonate and GGPP reversed the inhibitory effect of simvastatin on CCL17-provoked RhoA activation in colon cancer cells. Conclusions: Taken together, our findings show for the first time that HMG-CoA reductase regulates CCL17-induced colon cancer cell migration via

  7. The activation of RhoC in vascular endothelial cells is required for the S1P receptor type 2-induced inhibition of angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Galdo, Sabrina; Vettel, Christiane; Heringdorf, Dagmar Meyer Zu; Wieland, Thomas

    2013-12-01

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) is a multifunctional phospholipid inducing a variety of cellular responses in endothelial cells (EC). S1P responses are mediated by five G protein coupled receptors of which three types (S1P1R-S1P3R) have been described to be of importance in vascular endothelial cells (EC). Whereas the S1P1R regulates endothelial barrier function by coupling to Gαi and the monomeric GTPase Rac1, the signaling pathways involved in the S1P-induced regulation of angiogenesis are ill defined. We therefore studied the sprouting of human umbilical vein EC (HUVEC) in vitro and analyzed the activation of the RhoGTPases RhoA and RhoC. Physiological relevant concentrations of S1P (100-300nM) induce a moderate activation of RhoA and RhoC. Inhibition or siRNA-mediated depletion of the S1P2R preferentially decreased the activation of RhoC. Both manipulations caused an increase of sprouting in a spheroid based in vitro sprouting assay. Interestingly, a similar increase in sprouting was detected after effective siRNA-mediated knockdown of RhoC. In contrast, the depletion of RhoA had no influence on sprouting. Furthermore, suppression of the activity of G proteins of the Gα12/13 subfamily by adenoviral overexpression of the regulator of G protein signaling domain of LSC as well as siRNA-mediated knockdown of the Rho specific guanine nucleotide exchange factor leukemia associated RhoGEF (LARG) inhibited the S1P-induced activation of RhoC and concomitantly increased sprouting of HUVEC with similar efficacy. We conclude that the angiogenic sprouting of EC is suppressed via the S1P2R subtype. Thus, the increase in basal sprouting can be attributed to blocking of the inhibitory action of autocrine S1P stimulating the S1P2R. This inhibitory pathway involves the activation of RhoC via Gα12/13 and LARG, while the simultaneously occurring activation of RhoA is apparently dispensable here. © 2013.

  8. Rho kinase activity controls directional cell movements during primitive streak formation in the rabbit embryo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stankova, Viktoria; Tsikolia, Nikoloz; Viebahn, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    During animal gastrulation, the specification of the embryonic axes is accompanied by epithelio-mesenchymal transition (EMT), the first major change in cell shape after fertilization. EMT takes place in disparate topographical arrangements, such as the circular blastopore of amphibians, the straight primitive streak of birds and mammals or in intermediate gastrulation forms of other amniotes such as reptiles. Planar cell movements are prime candidates to arrange specific modes of gastrulation but there is no consensus view on their role in different vertebrate classes. Here, we test the impact of interfering with Rho kinase-mediated cell movements on gastrulation topography in blastocysts of the rabbit, which has a flat embryonic disc typical for most mammals. Time-lapse video microscopy, electron microscopy, gene expression and morphometric analyses of the effect of inhibiting ROCK activity showed - besides normal specification of the organizer region - a dose-dependent disruption of primitive streak formation; this disruption resulted in circular, arc-shaped or intermediate forms, reminiscent of those found in amphibians, fishes and reptiles. Our results reveal a crucial role of ROCK-controlled directional cell movements during rabbit primitive streak formation and highlight the possibility that temporal and spatial modulation of cell movements were instrumental for the evolution of gastrulation forms. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  9. RhoA GTPase regulates radiation-induced alterations in endothelial cell adhesion and migration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rousseau, Matthieu; Gaugler, Marie-Hélène; Rodallec, Audrey; Bonnaud, Stéphanie; Paris, François; Corre, Isabelle

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: ► We explore the role of RhoA in endothelial cell response to ionizing radiation. ► RhoA is rapidly activated by single high-dose of radiation. ► Radiation leads to RhoA/ROCK-dependent actin cytoskeleton remodeling. ► Radiation-induced apoptosis does not require the RhoA/ROCK pathway. ► Radiation-induced alteration of endothelial adhesion and migration requires RhoA/ROCK. -- Abstract: Endothelial cells of the microvasculature are major target of ionizing radiation, responsible of the radiation-induced vascular early dysfunctions. Molecular signaling pathways involved in endothelial responses to ionizing radiation, despite being increasingly investigated, still need precise characterization. Small GTPase RhoA and its effector ROCK are crucial signaling molecules involved in many endothelial cellular functions. Recent studies identified implication of RhoA/ROCK in radiation-induced increase in endothelial permeability but other endothelial functions altered by radiation might also require RhoA proteins. Human microvascular endothelial cells HMEC-1, either treated with Y-27632 (inhibitor of ROCK) or invalidated for RhoA by RNA interference were exposed to 15 Gy. We showed a rapid radiation-induced activation of RhoA, leading to a deep reorganisation of actin cytoskeleton with rapid formation of stress fibers. Endothelial early apoptosis induced by ionizing radiation was not affected by Y-27632 pre-treatment or RhoA depletion. Endothelial adhesion to fibronectin and formation of focal adhesions increased in response to radiation in a RhoA/ROCK-dependent manner. Consistent with its pro-adhesive role, ionizing radiation also decreased endothelial cells migration and RhoA was required for this inhibition. These results highlight the role of RhoA GTPase in ionizing radiation-induced deregulation of essential endothelial functions linked to actin cytoskeleton.

  10. Activation of G protein-coupled estrogen receptor 1 induces coronary artery relaxation via Epac/Rap1-mediated inhibition of RhoA/Rho kinase pathway in parallel with PKA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuan Yu

    Full Text Available Previously, we reported that cAMP/PKA signaling is involved in GPER-mediated coronary relaxation by activating MLCP via inhibition of RhoA pathway. In the current study, we tested the hypothesis that activation of GPER induces coronary artery relaxation via inhibition of RhoA/Rho kinase pathway by cAMP downstream targets, exchange proteins directly activated by cAMP (Epac as well as PKA. Our results show that Epac inhibitors, brefeldin A (BFA, 50 μM, or ESI-09 (20 μM, or CE3F4 (100 μM, all partially inhibited porcine coronary artery relaxation response to the selective GPER agonist, G-1 (0.3-3 μM; while concurrent administration of BFA and PKI (5 μM, a PKA inhibitor, almost completely blocked the relaxation effect of G-1. The Epac specific agonist, 8-CPT-2Me-cAMP (007, 1-100 μM, induced a concentration-dependent relaxation response. Furthermore, the activity of Ras-related protein 1 (Rap1 was up regulated by G-1 (1 μM treatment of porcine coronary artery smooth muscle cells (CASMCs. Phosphorylation of vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (p-VASP was elevated by G-1 (1 μM treatment, but not by 007 (50 μM; and the effect of G-1 on p-VASP was blocked by PKI, but not by ESI-09, an Epac antagonist. RhoA activity was similarly down regulated by G-1 and 007, whereas ESI-09 restored most of the reduced RhoA activity by G-1 treatment. Furthermore, G-1 decreased PGF2α-induced p-MYPT1, which was partially reversed with either ESI-09 or PKI; whereas, concurrent administration of ESI-09 and PKI totally prevented the inhibitory effect of G-1. The inhibitory effects of G-1 on p- MLC levels in CASMCs were mostly restored by either ESI-09 or PKI. These results demonstrate that activation of GPER induces coronary artery relaxation via concurrent inhibition of RhoA/Rho kinase by Epac/Rap1 and PKA. GPER could be a potential drug target for preventing and treating cardiovascular diseases.

  11. PTP-PEST targets a novel tyrosine site in p120 catenin to control epithelial cell motility and Rho GTPase activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espejo, Rosario; Jeng, Yowjiun; Paulucci-Holthauzen, Adriana; Rengifo-Cam, William; Honkus, Krysta; Anastasiadis, Panos Z.; Sastry, Sarita K.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Tyrosine phosphorylation is implicated in regulating the adherens junction protein, p120 catenin (p120), however, the mechanisms are not well defined. Here, we show, using substrate trapping, that p120 is a direct target of the protein tyrosine phosphatase, PTP-PEST, in epithelial cells. Stable shRNA knockdown of PTP-PEST in colon carcinoma cells results in an increased cytosolic pool of p120 concomitant with its enhanced tyrosine phosphorylation and decreased association with E-cadherin. Consistent with this, PTP-PEST knockdown cells exhibit increased motility, enhanced Rac1 and decreased RhoA activity on a collagen substrate. Furthermore, p120 localization is enhanced at actin-rich protrusions and lamellipodia and has an increased association with the guanine nucleotide exchange factor, VAV2, and cortactin. Exchange factor activity of VAV2 is enhanced by PTP-PEST knockdown whereas overexpression of a VAV2 C-terminal domain or DH domain mutant blocks cell motility. Analysis of point mutations identified tyrosine 335 in the N-terminal domain of p120 as the site of PTP-PEST dephosphorylation. A Y335F mutant of p120 failed to induce the ‘p120 phenotype’, interact with VAV2, stimulate cell motility or activate Rac1. Together, these data suggest that PTP-PEST affects epithelial cell motility by controlling the distribution and phosphorylation of p120 and its availability to control Rho GTPase activity. PMID:24284071

  12. rhoCentralRfFoam: An OpenFOAM solver for high speed chemically active flows - Simulation of planar detonations -

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez Marcantoni, L. F.; Tamagno, J.; Elaskar, S.

    2017-10-01

    A new solver developed within the framework of OpenFOAM 2.3.0, called rhoCentralRfFoam which can be interpreted like an evolution of rhoCentralFoam, is presented. Its use, performing numerical simulations on initiation and propagation of planar detonation waves in combustible mixtures H2-Air and H2-O2-Ar, is described. Unsteady one dimensional (1D) Euler equations coupled with sources to take into account chemical activity, are numerically solved using the Kurganov, Noelle and Petrova second order scheme in a domain discretized with finite volumes. The computational code can work with any number of species and its corresponding reactions, but here it was tested with 13 chemically active species (one species inert), and 33 elementary reactions. A gaseous igniter which acts like a shock-tube driver, and powerful enough to generate a strong shock capable of triggering exothermic chemical reactions in fuel mixtures, is used to start planar detonations. The following main aspects of planar detonations are here, treated: induction time of combustible mixtures cited above and required mesh resolutions; convergence of overdriven detonations to Chapman-Jouguet states; detonation structure (ZND model); and the use of reflected shocks to determine induction times experimentally. The rhoCentralRfFoam code was verified comparing numerical results and it was validated, through analytical results and experimental data.

  13. Rational Design of Rho Protein Inhibitors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rojas, Rafael J

    2006-01-01

    ... nucleotide exchange factors (RhoGEFs). We have developed a high throughput screening strategy identify novel inhibitors of Rho activation are currently following up on several compounds which appear to selectively inhibit Rho activation. These compounds may form the basis of future drug development strategies for the treatment of metastatic breast cancer.

  14. Rational Design of Rho Protein Inhibitors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rojas, Rafael J

    2005-01-01

    ... nucleotide exchange factors (RhoGEFs). We have developed a high throughput screening strategy identify novel inhibitors of Rho activation are currently following up on several compounds which appear to selectively inhibit Rho activation. These compounds may form the basis of future drug development strategies for the treatment of metastatic breast cancer.

  15. Low dose of kaempferol suppresses the migration and invasion of triple-negative breast cancer cells by downregulating the activities of RhoA and Rac1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shoushan; Yan, Ting; Deng, Rong; Jiang, Xuesong; Xiong, Huaping; Wang, Yuan; Yu, Qiao; Wang, Xiaohua; Chen, Cheng; Zhu, Yichao

    2017-01-01

    Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) is an especially aggressive and hard-to-treat disease. Although the anticancer role of kaempferol has been reported in breast cancer, the effect of kaempferol on TNBC remains unclear. This experiment investigated the migration-suppressive role of a low dose of kaempferol in TNBC cells. Wound-healing assays and cell invasion assays were used to confirm the migration and invasion of cells treated with kaempferol or transfected indicated constructs. We evaluated the activations of RhoA, Rac1 and Cdc42 in TNBC cells with a Rho activation assay. A panel of inhibitors of estrogen receptor/progesterone receptor/human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (ER/PR/HER2) treated non-TNBC (SK-BR-3 and MCF-7) cells and blocked the ER/PR/HER2 activity. Wound-healing assays and Rho activation assays were employed to measure the effect of kaempferol and ER/PR/HER2 inhibitors on Rho activation and cell migration rates. A low dose of kaempferol (20 μmol/L) had a potent inhibitory effect on the migration and invasion of TNBC cells, but not on the migration of non-TNBC (SK-BR-3 and MCF-7) cells. The low dose of kaempferol downregulated the activations of RhoA and Rac1 in TNBC cells. Moreover, the low dose of kaempferol also inhibited the migration and RhoA activations of HER2-silence SK-BR-3 and ER/PR-silence MCF-7 cells. Overexpressed HER2 rescued the cell migration and RhoA and Rac1 activations of kaempferol-treated MDA-MB-231 cells. The low dose of kaempferol inhibits the migration and invasion of TNBC cells via blocking RhoA and Rac1 signaling pathway.

  16. T1R3 homomeric sweet taste receptor regulates adipogenesis through Gαs-mediated microtubules disassembly and Rho activation in 3T3-L1 cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yosuke Masubuchi

    Full Text Available We previously reported that 3T3-L1 cells express a functional sweet taste receptor possibly as a T1R3 homomer that is coupled to Gs and negatively regulates adipogenesis by a Gαs-mediated but cAMP-independent mechanism. Here, we show that stimulation of this receptor with sucralose or saccharin induced disassembly of the microtubules in 3T3-L1 preadipocytes, which was attenuated by overexpression of the dominant-negative mutant of Gαs (Gαs-G226A. In contrast, overexpression of the constitutively active mutant of Gαs (Gαs-Q227L as well as treatment with cholera toxin or isoproterenol but not with forskolin caused disassembly of the microtubules. Sweetener-induced microtubule disassembly was accompanied by activation of RhoA and Rho-associated kinase (ROCK. This was attenuated with by knockdown of GEF-H1, a microtubule-localized guanine nucleotide exchange factor for Rho GTPase. Furthermore, overexpression of the dominant-negative mutant of RhoA (RhoA-T19N blocked sweetener-induced dephosphorylation of Akt and repression of PPARγ and C/EBPα in the early phase of adipogenic differentiation. These results suggest that the T1R3 homomeric sweet taste receptor negatively regulates adipogenesis through Gαs-mediated microtubule disassembly and consequent activation of the Rho/ROCK pathway.

  17. Viral activation of MK2-hsp27-p115RhoGEF-RhoA signaling axis causes cytoskeletal rearrangements, p-body disruption and ARE-mRNA stabilization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer A Corcoran

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV is the infectious cause of several AIDS-related cancers, including the endothelial cell (EC neoplasm Kaposi's sarcoma (KS. KSHV-infected ECs secrete abundant host-derived pro-inflammatory molecules and angiogenic factors that contribute to tumorigenesis. The precise contributions of viral gene products to this secretory phenotype remain to be elucidated, but there is emerging evidence for post-transcriptional regulation. The Kaposin B (KapB protein is thought to contribute to the secretory phenotype in infected cells by binding and activating the stress-responsive kinase MK2, thereby selectively blocking decay of AU-rich mRNAs (ARE-mRNAs encoding pro-inflammatory cytokines and angiogenic factors. Processing bodies (PBs are cytoplasmic ribonucleoprotein foci in which ARE-mRNAs normally undergo rapid 5' to 3' decay. Here, we demonstrate that PB dispersion is a feature of latent KSHV infection, which is dependent on kaposin protein expression. KapB is sufficient to disperse PBs, and KapB-mediated ARE-mRNA stabilization could be partially reversed by treatments that restore PBs. Using a combination of genetic and chemical approaches we provide evidence that KapB-mediated PB dispersion is dependent on activation of a non-canonical Rho-GTPase signaling axis involving MK2, hsp27, p115RhoGEF and RhoA. PB dispersion in latently infected cells is likewise dependent on p115RhoGEF. In addition to PB dispersion, KapB-mediated RhoA activation in primary ECs caused actin stress fiber formation, increased cell motility and angiogenesis; these effects were dependent on the activity of the RhoA substrate kinases ROCK1/2. By contrast, KapB-mediated PB dispersion occurred in a ROCK1/2-independent manner. Taken together, these observations position KapB as a key contributor to viral reprogramming of ECs, capable of eliciting many of the phenotypes characteristic of KS tumor cells, and strongly contributing to the post

  18. Type 2 diabetes impairs venous, but not arterial smooth muscle cell function: Possible role of differential RhoA activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riches, Kirsten [Division of Cardiovascular and Diabetes Research, Leeds Institute of Genetics, Health and Therapeutics (LIGHT), University of Leeds, Leeds (United Kingdom); Multidisciplinary Cardiovascular Research Centre (MCRC), University of Leeds, Leeds (United Kingdom); Warburton, Philip [Division of Cardiovascular and Diabetes Research, Leeds Institute of Genetics, Health and Therapeutics (LIGHT), University of Leeds, Leeds (United Kingdom); O’Regan, David J. [Multidisciplinary Cardiovascular Research Centre (MCRC), University of Leeds, Leeds (United Kingdom); Department of Cardiac Surgery, The Yorkshire Heart Centre, Leeds General Infirmary, Leeds (United Kingdom); Turner, Neil A. [Division of Cardiovascular and Diabetes Research, Leeds Institute of Genetics, Health and Therapeutics (LIGHT), University of Leeds, Leeds (United Kingdom); Multidisciplinary Cardiovascular Research Centre (MCRC), University of Leeds, Leeds (United Kingdom); Porter, Karen E., E-mail: medkep@leeds.ac.uk [Division of Cardiovascular and Diabetes Research, Leeds Institute of Genetics, Health and Therapeutics (LIGHT), University of Leeds, Leeds (United Kingdom); Multidisciplinary Cardiovascular Research Centre (MCRC), University of Leeds, Leeds (United Kingdom)

    2014-04-15

    Background/purpose: Coronary heart disease is the leading cause of morbidity in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), frequently resulting in a requirement for coronary revascularization using the internal mammary artery (IMA) or saphenous vein (SV). Patency rates of SV grafts are inferior to IMA and further impaired by T2DM whilst IMA patencies appear similar in both populations. Smooth muscle cells (SMC) play a pivotal role in graft integration; we therefore examined the phenotype and proliferative function of IMA- and SV-SMC isolated from non-diabetic (ND) patients or those diagnosed with T2DM. Methods/materials: SMC were cultured from fragments of SV or IMA. Morphology was analyzed under light microscopy (spread cell area measurements) and confocal microscopy (F-actin staining). Proliferation was analyzed by cell counting. Levels of RhoA mRNA, protein and activity were measured by real-time RT-PCR, western blotting and G-LISA respectively. Results: IMA-SMC from T2DM and ND patients were indistinguishable in both morphology and function. By comparison, SV-SMC from T2DM patients exhibited significantly larger spread cell areas (1.5-fold increase, P < 0.05), truncated F-actin fibers and reduced proliferation (33% reduction, P < 0.05). Furthermore, lower expression and activity of RhoA were observed in SV-SMC of T2DM patients (37% reduction in expression, P < 0.05 and 43% reduction in activity, P < 0.01). Conclusions: IMA-SMC appear impervious to phenotypic modulation by T2DM. In contrast, SV-SMC from T2DM patients exhibit phenotypic and functional changes accompanied by reduced RhoA activity. These aberrancies may be epigenetic in nature, compromising SMC plasticity and SV graft adaptation in T2DM patients. Summary: The internal mammary artery (IMA) is the conduit of choice for bypass grafting and is generally successful in all patients, including those with type 2 diabetes (T2DM). By contrast, saphenous vein (SV) is inferior to IMA and furthermore

  19. Activation of RhoA, but Not Rac1, Mediates Early Stages of S1P-Induced Endothelial Barrier Enhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xun E; Adderley, Shaquria P; Breslin, Jerome W

    2016-01-01

    Compromised endothelial barrier function is a hallmark of inflammation. Rho family GTPases are critical in regulating endothelial barrier function, yet their precise roles, particularly in sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P)-induced endothelial barrier enhancement, remain elusive. Confluent cultures of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) or human dermal microvascular endothelial cells (HDMEC) were used to model the endothelial barrier. Barrier function was assessed by determining the transendothelial electrical resistance (TER) using an electrical cell-substrate impedance sensor (ECIS). The roles of Rac1 and RhoA were tested in S1P-induced barrier enhancement. The results show that pharmacologic inhibition of Rac1 with Z62954982 failed to block S1P-induced barrier enhancement. Likewise, expression of a dominant negative form of Rac1, or knockdown of native Rac1 with siRNA, failed to block S1P-induced elevations in TER. In contrast, blockade of RhoA with the combination of the inhibitors Rhosin and Y16 significantly reduced S1P-induced increases in TER. Assessment of RhoA activation in real time using a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) biosensor showed that S1P increased RhoA activation primarily at the edges of cells, near junctions. This was complemented by myosin light chain-2 phosphorylation at cell edges, and increased F-actin and vinculin near intercellular junctions, which could all be blocked with pharmacologic inhibition of RhoA. The results suggest that S1P causes activation of RhoA at the cell periphery, stimulating local activation of the actin cytoskeleton and focal adhesions, and resulting in endothelial barrier enhancement. S1P-induced Rac1 activation, however, does not appear to have a significant role in this process.

  20. Activation of RhoA, but Not Rac1, Mediates Early Stages of S1P-Induced Endothelial Barrier Enhancement.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xun E Zhang

    Full Text Available Compromised endothelial barrier function is a hallmark of inflammation. Rho family GTPases are critical in regulating endothelial barrier function, yet their precise roles, particularly in sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P-induced endothelial barrier enhancement, remain elusive. Confluent cultures of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC or human dermal microvascular endothelial cells (HDMEC were used to model the endothelial barrier. Barrier function was assessed by determining the transendothelial electrical resistance (TER using an electrical cell-substrate impedance sensor (ECIS. The roles of Rac1 and RhoA were tested in S1P-induced barrier enhancement. The results show that pharmacologic inhibition of Rac1 with Z62954982 failed to block S1P-induced barrier enhancement. Likewise, expression of a dominant negative form of Rac1, or knockdown of native Rac1 with siRNA, failed to block S1P-induced elevations in TER. In contrast, blockade of RhoA with the combination of the inhibitors Rhosin and Y16 significantly reduced S1P-induced increases in TER. Assessment of RhoA activation in real time using a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET biosensor showed that S1P increased RhoA activation primarily at the edges of cells, near junctions. This was complemented by myosin light chain-2 phosphorylation at cell edges, and increased F-actin and vinculin near intercellular junctions, which could all be blocked with pharmacologic inhibition of RhoA. The results suggest that S1P causes activation of RhoA at the cell periphery, stimulating local activation of the actin cytoskeleton and focal adhesions, and resulting in endothelial barrier enhancement. S1P-induced Rac1 activation, however, does not appear to have a significant role in this process.

  1. FilGAP, a Rac-specific Rho GTPase-activating protein, is a novel prognostic factor for follicular lymphoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishi, Tatsuya; Takahashi, Hiroyuki; Hashimura, Miki; Yoshida, Tsutomu; Ohta, Yasutaka; Saegusa, Makoto

    2015-01-01

    FilGAP, a Rho GTPase-activating protein (GAP), acts as a mediator of Rho/ROCK (Rho-associated protein kinase)-dependent amoeboid movement, and its knockdown results in Rac-driven mesenchymal morphology. Herein, we focus on the possible roles of FilGAP expression in normal and malignant lymphocytes. Eighty-three cases of follicular lymphoma (FL), 84 of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), and 25 of peripheral T-cell lymphoma (PTCL), as well as 10 of normal lymph nodes, were immunohistochemically investigated. In normal lymph nodes, FilGAP immunoreactivity was significantly higher in lymphocytes in the mantle zone as compared to those in the germinal center and paracortical areas. In contrast, the expression levels of both cytoplasmic and perinuclear Rac1 were significantly lower in the germinal center as compared to paracortical regions, suggesting that changes in the FilGAP/Rac axis may occur in B-cell lineages. In malignant lymphomas, FilGAP expression was significantly higher in B-cell lymphomas than PTCL, and the immunohistochemical scores were positively correlated with cytoplasmic Rac1 scores in FL and DLBCL, but not in PTCL. Patients with FL and germinal center B-cell-like (GCB)-type DLBCL showing high FilGAP scores had poor overall survival rates as compared to the low-score patients. Moreover, multivariate Cox regression analysis showed that a high FilGAP score was a significant and independent unfavorable prognostic factor in FL, but not in DLBCL. In conclusion, FilGAP may contribute to change in cell motility of B-lymphocytes. In addition, its expression appears to be useful for predicting the behavior of B-cell lymphoma, in particular FL

  2. Inhibition of RhoA GTPase and the subsequent activation of PTP1B protects cultured hippocampal neurons against amyloid β toxicity

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    Rodriguez-Tebar Alfredo

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Amyloid beta (Aβ is the main agent responsible for the advent and progression of Alzheimer's disease. This peptide can at least partially antagonize nerve growth factor (NGF signalling in neurons, which may be responsible for some of the effects produced by Aβ. Accordingly, better understanding the NGF signalling pathway may provide clues as to how to protect neurons from the toxic effects of Aβ. Results We show here that Aβ activates the RhoA GTPase by binding to p75NTR, thereby preventing the NGF-induced activation of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B that is required for neuron survival. We also show that the inactivation of RhoA GTPase and the activation of PTP1B protect cultured hippocampal neurons against the noxious effects of Aβ. Indeed, either pharmacological inhibition of RhoA with C3 ADP ribosyl transferase or the transfection of cultured neurons with a dominant negative form of RhoA protects cultured hippocampal neurons from the effects of Aβ. In addition, over-expression of PTP1B also prevents the deleterious effects of Aβ on cultured hippocampal neurons. Conclusion Our findings indicate that potentiating the activity of NGF at the level of RhoA inactivation and PTP1B activation may represent a new means to combat the noxious effects of Aβ in Alzheimer's disease.

  3. VEGF-A/NRP1 stimulates GIPC1 and Syx complex formation to promote RhoA activation and proliferation in skin cancer cells

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    Ayumi Yoshida

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Neuropilin-1 (NRP1 has been identified as a VEGF-A receptor. DJM-1, a human skin cancer cell line, expresses endogenous VEGF-A and NRP1. In the present study, the RNA interference of VEGF-A or NRP1 suppressed DJM-1 cell proliferation. Furthermore, the overexpression of the NRP1 wild type restored shNRP1-treated DJM-1 cell proliferation, whereas NRP1 cytoplasmic deletion mutants did not. A co-immunoprecipitation analysis revealed that VEGF-A induced interactions between NRP1 and GIPC1, a scaffold protein, and complex formation between GIPC1 and Syx, a RhoGEF. The knockdown of GIPC1 or Syx reduced active RhoA and DJM-1 cell proliferation without affecting the MAPK or Akt pathway. C3 exoenzyme or Y27632 inhibited the VEGF-A-induced proliferation of DJM-1 cells. Conversely, the overexpression of the constitutively active form of RhoA restored the proliferation of siVEGF-A-treated DJM-1 cells. Furthermore, the inhibition of VEGF-A/NRP1 signaling upregulated p27, a CDK inhibitor. A cell-penetrating oligopeptide that targeted GIPC1/Syx complex formation inhibited the VEGF-A-induced activation of RhoA and suppressed DJM-1 cell proliferation. In conclusion, this new signaling pathway of VEGF-A/NRP1 induced cancer cell proliferation by forming a GIPC1/Syx complex that activated RhoA to degrade the p27 protein.

  4. Diuretics prevent Rho-kinase activation and expression of profibrotic/oxidative genes in the hypertensive aortic wall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araos, Patricio; Mondaca, David; Jalil, Jorge E; Yañez, Cristián; Novoa, Ulises; Mora, Italo; Ocaranza, María Paz

    2016-12-01

    Diuretics are current antihypertensive drugs since they reduce blood pressure and cardiovascular risk. Increased vascular tone is modulated in a relevant way by the RhoA/Rho-kinase (ROCK) pathway, by acting on vascular smooth muscle cell contraction. This pathway has also proremodeling vascular effects. There are few data on the role of diuretics on both vascular ROCK activation and on proremodeling effects. We assessed the effects of hydrochlorothiazide (HCTZ) and spironolactone (spiro) alone and in combination with the ROCK inhibitor fasudil (FAS) on ROCK activation, gene expression of proremodeling markers and on hypertrophy in the aortic wall of hypertensive rats. Deoxycorticosterone acetate (DOCA)-salt hypertensive rats (male, Sprague-Dawley) were randomized to the specific ROCK inhibitor FAS, HCTZ, spiro or the combinations of FAS/HCTZ or FAS/spiro for 3 weeks. At the end of the study, ROCK activation (by western blot), gene expression of proremodeling markers (by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, RT-PCR) and vascular hypertrophy (by morphometry) were determined in the aortic wall. All treatments significantly reduced blood pressure. In the DOCA rats the p-myosin phosphatase target protein-1 (MYPT1)/t-MYPT1 ratio, index of ROCK activation was higher by 2.8 fold (p diuretics alone or in combination with FAS. In the aortic wall, both HCTZ and spiro in antihypertensive doses reduce ROCK activation, subsequent expression of genes that promote vascular remodeling and hypertrophy in this experimental model of hypertension. These effects could explain some of their clinical benefits in hypertensive patients. © The Author(s), 2016.

  5. Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase-PEST and β8 Integrin Regulate Spatiotemporal Patterns of RhoGDI1 Activation in Migrating Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hye Shin; Cheerathodi, Mujeeburahiman; Chaki, Sankar P.; Reyes, Steve B.; Zheng, Yanhua; Lu, Zhimin; Paidassi, Helena; DerMardirossian, Celine; Lacy-Hulbert, Adam; Rivera, Gonzalo M.

    2015-01-01

    Directional cell motility is essential for normal development and physiology, although how motile cells spatiotemporally activate signaling events remains largely unknown. Here, we have characterized an adhesion and signaling unit comprised of protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP)-PEST and the extracellular matrix (ECM) adhesion receptor β8 integrin that plays essential roles in directional cell motility. β8 integrin and PTP-PEST form protein complexes at the leading edge of migrating cells and balance patterns of Rac1 and Cdc42 signaling by controlling the subcellular localization and phosphorylation status of Rho GDP dissociation inhibitor 1 (RhoGDI1). Translocation of Src-phosphorylated RhoGDI1 to the cell's leading edge promotes local activation of Rac1 and Cdc42, whereas dephosphorylation of RhoGDI1 by integrin-bound PTP-PEST promotes RhoGDI1 release from the membrane and sequestration of inactive Rac1/Cdc42 in the cytoplasm. Collectively, these data reveal a finely tuned regulatory mechanism for controlling signaling events at the leading edge of directionally migrating cells. PMID:25666508

  6. [Effect of antepartum taurine supplementation in regulating the activity of Rho family factors and promoting the proliferation of neural stem cells in neonatal rats with fetal growth restriction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiang-Wen; Li, Fang; Liu, Jing; Wang, Yan; Fu, Wei

    2016-11-01

    To study the possible effect of antepartum taurine supplementation in regulating the activity of Rho family factors and promoting the proliferation of neural stem cells in neonatal rats with fetal growth restriction (FGR), and to provide a basis for antepartum taurine supplementation to promote brain development in children with FGR. A total of 24 pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into three groups: control, FGR, and taurine (n=8 each ). A rat model of FGR was established by food restriction throughout pregnancy. RT-PCR, immunohistochemistry, and Western blot were used to measure the expression of the specific intracellular markers for neural stem cells fatty acid binding protein 7 (FABP7), Rho-associated coiled-coil containing protein kinase 2 (ROCK2), ras homolog gene family, member A (RhoA), and Ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate (Rac). The FGR group had significantly lower OD value of FABP7-positive cells and mRNA and protein expression of FABP7 than the control group, and the taurine group had significantly higher OD value of FABP7-positive cells and mRNA and protein expression of FABP7 than the FGR group (Ptaurine group had significantly higher mRNA expression of RhoA and ROCK2 than the control group and significantly lower expression than the FGR group (Ptaurine group had significantly higher mRNA expression of Rac than the FGR and control groups (Ptaurine group had significantly lower protein expression of RhoA and ROCK2 than the FGR group (Ptaurine supplementation can promote the proliferation of neural stem cells in rats with FGR, and its mechanism may be related to the regulation of the activity of Rho family factors.

  7. A novel role for inhibitor of apoptosis (IAP) proteins as regulators of endothelial barrier function by mediating RhoA activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornburger, Michael C; Mayer, Bettina A; Leonhardt, Stefanie; Willer, Elisabeth A; Zahler, Stefan; Beyerle, Andrea; Rajalingam, Krishnaraj; Vollmar, Angelika M; Fürst, Robert

    2014-04-01

    Inhibitor of apoptosis (IAP) proteins, such as XIAP or cIAP1/2, are important regulators of apoptosis in cancer cells, and IAP antagonists are currently evaluated as antitumor agents. Beyond their function in cancer cells, this study demonstrates a novel role of IAPs as regulators of vascular endothelial permeability. Two structurally different IAP antagonists, ABT and Smac085, as well as silencing of IAPs, reduced the thrombin receptor-activating peptide (TRAP)-induced barrier dysfunction in human endothelial cells as assessed by measuring macromolecular permeability or transendothelial electrical resistance. ABT diminished thrombin-evoked stress fiber formation, activation of myosin light chain 2, and disassembly of adherens junctions independent of calcium signaling, protein kinase C, and mitogen-activated protein kinases. Interestingly, ABT and silencing of IAPs, in particular XIAP, reduced the TRAP-evoked RhoA activation, whereas Rac1 was not affected. XIAP and, to a lesser extent, cIAP1 were found to directly interact with RhoA independently of the RhoA activation status. Under cell-free conditions, XIAP did not induce an ubiquitination of RhoA. In summary, our work discloses IAPs as crucial regulators of endothelial permeability and suggests IAP inhibition as interesting approach for the prevention of endothelial barrier dysfunction.

  8. T1rho, T{sub 2} and focal knee cartilage abnormalities in physically active and sedentary healthy subjects versus early OA patients - a 3.0-Tesla MRI study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stahl, Robert [University of California, San Francisco, Musculoskeletal and Quantitative Imaging Group, Department of Radiology, San Francisco, CA (United States); University Hospitals-Campus Grosshadern, Ludwig Maximilians University of Munich, Department of Clinical Radiology, Munich (Germany); Luke, Anthony; Ma, C.B. [University of California, San Francisco, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, San Francisco, CA (United States); Li, Xiaojuan; Carballido-Gamio, Julio; Majumdar, Sharmila; Link, Thomas M. [University of California, San Francisco, Musculoskeletal and Quantitative Imaging Group, Department of Radiology, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    2009-01-15

    (1) To assess the degree of focal cartilage abnormalities in physically active and sedentary healthy subjects as well as in patients with early osteoarthritis (OA). (2) To determine the diagnostic value of T2 and T1rho measurements in identifying asymptomatic physically active subjects with focal cartilage lesions. Thirteen asymptomatic physically active subjects, 7 asymptomatic sedentary subjects, and 17 patients with mild OA underwent 3.0-T MRI of the knee joint. T1rho and T2 values, cartilage volume and thickness, as well as the WORMS scores were obtained. Nine out of 13 active healthy subjects had focal cartilage abnormalities. T1rho and T2 values in active subjects with and without focal cartilage abnormalities differed significantly (p<0.05). T1rho and T2 values were significantly higher (p<0.05) in early OA patients compared to healthy subjects. T1rho measurements were superior to T2 in differentiating OA patients from healthy subjects, yet T1rho was moderately age-dependent. (1) Active subjects showed a high prevalence of focal cartilage abnormalities and (2) active subjects with and without focal cartilage abnormalities had different T1rho and T2 composition of cartilage. Thus, T1rho and T2 could be a parameter suited to identify active healthy subjects at higher risk for developing cartilage pathology. (orig.)

  9. Distinctive G Protein-Dependent Signaling by Protease-Activated Receptor 2 (PAR2 in Smooth Muscle: Feedback Inhibition of RhoA by cAMP-Independent PKA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wimolpak Sriwai

    Full Text Available We examined expression of protease-activated receptors 2 (PAR2 and characterized their signaling pathways in rabbit gastric muscle cells. The PAR2 activating peptide SLIGRL (PAR2-AP stimulated Gq, G13, Gi1, PI hydrolysis, and Rho kinase activity, and inhibited cAMP formation. Stimulation of PI hydrolysis was partly inhibited in cells expressing PAR2 siRNA, Gaq or Gai minigene and in cells treated with pertussis toxin, and augmented by expression of dominant negative regulator of G protein signaling (RGS4(N88S. Stimulation of Rho kinase activity was abolished by PAR-2 or Ga13 siRNA, and by Ga13 minigene. PAR2-AP induced a biphasic contraction; initial contraction was selectively blocked by the inhibitor of PI hydrolysis (U73122 or MLC kinase (ML-9, whereas sustained contraction was selectively blocked by the Rho kinase inhibitor (Y27632. PAR2-AP induced phosphorylation of MLC20, MYPT1 but not CPI-17. PAR2-AP also caused a decrease in the association of NF-kB and PKA catalytic subunit: the effect of PAR2-AP was blocked by PAR2 siRNA or phosphorylation-deficient RhoA (RhoA(S188A. PAR2-AP-induced degradation of IkBa and activation of NF-kB were abolished by the blockade of RhoA activity by Clostridium botulinum C3 exoenzyme suggesting RhoA-dependent activation of NF-kB. PAR2-AP-stimulated Rho kinase activity was significantly augmented by the inhibitors of PKA (myristoylated PKI, IKK2 (IKKIV or NF-kB (MG132, and in cells expressing dominant negative mutants of IKK (IKK(K44A, IkBa (IkBa (S32A/S36A or RhoA(S188A, suggesting feedback inhibition of Rho kinase activity via PKA derived from NF-kB pathway. PAR2-AP induced phosphorylation of RhoA and the phosphorylation was attenuated in cells expressing phosphorylation-deficient RhoA(S188A. Our results identified signaling pathways activated by PAR2 to mediate smooth muscle contraction and a novel pathway for feedback inhibition of PAR2-stimulated RhoA. The pathway involves activation of the NF-kB to

  10. Selective coupling of the S1P3 receptor subtype to S1P-mediated RhoA activation and cardioprotection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yung, Bryan S; Brand, Cameron S; Xiang, Sunny Y; Gray, Charles B B; Means, Christopher K; Rosen, Hugh; Chun, Jerold; Purcell, Nicole H; Brown, Joan Heller; Miyamoto, Shigeki

    2017-02-01

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), a bioactive lysophospholipid, is generated and released at sites of tissue injury in the heart and can act on S1P 1 , S1P 2 , and S1P 3 receptor subtypes to affect cardiovascular responses. We established that S1P causes little phosphoinositide hydrolysis and does not induce hypertrophy indicating that it does not cause receptor coupling to G q . We previously demonstrated that S1P confers cardioprotection against ischemia/reperfusion by activating RhoA and its downstream effector PKD. The S1P receptor subtypes and G proteins that regulate RhoA activation and downstream responses in the heart have not been determined. Using siRNA or pertussis toxin to inhibit different G proteins in NRVMs we established that S1P regulates RhoA activation through Gα 13 but not Gα 12 , Gα q , or Gα i . Knockdown of the three major S1P receptors using siRNA demonstrated a requirement for S1P 3 in RhoA activation and subsequent phosphorylation of PKD, and this was confirmed in studies using isolated hearts from S1P 3 knockout (KO) mice. S1P treatment reduced infarct size induced by ischemia/reperfusion in Langendorff perfused wild-type (WT) hearts and this protection was abolished in the S1P 3 KO mouse heart. CYM-51736, an S1P 3 -specific agonist, also decreased infarct size after ischemia/reperfusion to a degree similar to that achieved by S1P. The finding that S1P 3 receptor- and Gα 13 -mediated RhoA activation is responsible for protection against ischemia/reperfusion suggests that selective targeting of S1P 3 receptors could provide therapeutic benefits in ischemic heart disease. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields promote mesenchymal stem cell migration by increasing intracellular Ca2+ and activating the FAK/Rho GTPases signaling pathways in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yingchi; Yan, Jiyuan; Xu, Haoran; Yang, Yong; Li, Wenkai; Wu, Hua; Liu, Chaoxu

    2018-05-21

    The ability of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) to migrate to the desired tissues or lesions is crucial for stem cell-based regenerative medicine and tissue engineering. Optimal therapeutics for promoting MSC migration are expected to become an effective means for tissue regeneration. Electromagnetic fields (EMF), as a noninvasive therapy, can cause a lot of biological changes in MSCs. However, whether EMF can promote MSC migration has not yet been reported. We evaluated the effects of EMF on cell migration in human bone marrow-derived MSCs. With the use of Helmholtz coils and an EMF stimulator, 7.5, 15, 30, 50, and 70 Hz/1 mT EMF was generated. Additionally, we employed the L-type calcium channel blocker verapamil and the focal adhesion kinase (FAK) inhibitor PF-573228 to investigate the role of intracellular calcium content, cell adhesion proteins, and the Rho GTPase protein family (RhoA, Rac1, and Cdc42) in EMF-mediated MSC migration. Cell adhesion proteins (FAK, talin, and vinculin) were detected by Western blot analysis. The Rho GTPase protein family activities were assessed by G-LISA, and F-actin levels, which reflect actin cytoskeletal organization, were detected using immunofluorescence. All the 7.5, 15, 30, 50, and 70 Hz/1 mT EMF promoted MSC migration. EMF increased MSC migration in an intracellular calcium-dependent manner. Notably, EMF-enhanced migration was mediated by FAK activation, which was critical for the formation of focal contacts, as evidenced by increased talin and vinculin expression. Moreover, RhoA, Rac1, and Cdc42 were activated by FAK to increase cytoskeletal organization, thus promoting cell contraction. EMF promoted MSC migration by increasing intracellular calcium and activating the FAK/Rho GTPase signaling pathways. This study provides insights into the mechanisms of MSC migration and will enable the rational design of targeted therapies to improve MSC engraftment.

  12. Vascular endothelial growth factor C promotes cervical cancer metastasis via up-regulation and activation of RhoA/ROCK-2/moesin cascade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He, Mian; Cheng, Yang; Li, Wen; Liu, Qiongshan; Liu, Junxiu; Huang, Jinghe; Fu, Xiaodong

    2010-01-01

    The elevated expression of vascular endothelial growth factor C (VEGF-C) is correlated with clinical cervical cancer metastasis and patient survival, which is interpreted by VEGF-C functions to stimulate angiogenesis and lymphatic genesis. However, the direct impact of VEGF-C on cervical cancer cell motility remains largely unknown. In this study, we investigated the effects of VEGF-C on actin cytoskeleton remodeling and on cervical cancer cell migration and invasion and how the actin-regulatory protein, moesin regulated these effects through RhoA/ROCK-2 signaling pathway. On cervical carcinoma cell line SiHa cells, exposure of VEGF-C triggered remodeling of the actin cytoskeleton and the formation of membrane ruffles, which was required for cell movement. VEGF-C significantly enhanced SiHa cells horizontal migration and three-dimensional invasion into matrices. These actions were dependent on increased expression and phosphorylation of the actin-regulatory protein moesin and specific moesin siRNA severely impaired VEGF-C stimulated-cell migration. The extracellular small GTPase RhoA/ROCK-2 cascade mediated the increased moesin expression and phosphorylation, which was discovered by the use of Y-27632, a specific inhibitor of Rho kinase and by transfected constitutively active, dominant-negative RhoA as well as ROCK-2 SiRNA. Furthermore, in the surgical cervical specimen from the patients with FIGO stage at cervical intra-epithelial neoplasia and I-II cervical squamous cell carcinoma, the expression levels of moesin were found to be significantly correlated with tumor malignancy and metastasis. These results implied that VEGF-C promoted cervical cancer metastasis by upregulation and activation of moesin protein through RhoA/ROCK-2 pathway. Our findings offer new insight into the role of VEGF-C on cervical cancer progression and may provide potential targets for cervical cancer therapy

  13. Vascular endothelial growth factor C promotes cervical cancer metastasis via up-regulation and activation of RhoA/ROCK-2/moesin cascade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Jinghe

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The elevated expression of vascular endothelial growth factor C (VEGF-C is correlated with clinical cervical cancer metastasis and patient survival, which is interpreted by VEGF-C functions to stimulate angiogenesis and lymphatic genesis. However, the direct impact of VEGF-C on cervical cancer cell motility remains largely unknown. Methods In this study, we investigated the effects of VEGF-C on actin cytoskeleton remodeling and on cervical cancer cell migration and invasion and how the actin-regulatory protein, moesin regulated these effects through RhoA/ROCK-2 signaling pathway. Results On cervical carcinoma cell line SiHa cells, exposure of VEGF-C triggered remodeling of the actin cytoskeleton and the formation of membrane ruffles, which was required for cell movement. VEGF-C significantly enhanced SiHa cells horizontal migration and three-dimensional invasion into matrices. These actions were dependent on increased expression and phosphorylation of the actin-regulatory protein moesin and specific moesin siRNA severely impaired VEGF-C stimulated-cell migration. The extracellular small GTPase RhoA/ROCK-2 cascade mediated the increased moesin expression and phosphorylation, which was discovered by the use of Y-27632, a specific inhibitor of Rho kinase and by transfected constitutively active, dominant-negative RhoA as well as ROCK-2 SiRNA. Furthermore, in the surgical cervical specimen from the patients with FIGO stage at cervical intra-epithelial neoplasia and I-II cervical squamous cell carcinoma, the expression levels of moesin were found to be significantly correlated with tumor malignancy and metastasis. Conclusions These results implied that VEGF-C promoted cervical cancer metastasis by upregulation and activation of moesin protein through RhoA/ROCK-2 pathway. Our findings offer new insight into the role of VEGF-C on cervical cancer progression and may provide potential targets for cervical cancer therapy.

  14. Escherichia coli α-hemolysin counteracts the anti-virulence innate immune response triggered by the Rho GTPase activating toxin CNF1 during bacteremia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mamady Diabate

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The detection of the activities of pathogen-encoded virulence factors by the innate immune system has emerged as a new paradigm of pathogen recognition. Much remains to be determined with regard to the molecular and cellular components contributing to this defense mechanism in mammals and importance during infection. Here, we reveal the central role of the IL-1β signaling axis and Gr1+ cells in controlling the Escherichia coli burden in the blood in response to the sensing of the Rho GTPase-activating toxin CNF1. Consistently, this innate immune response is abrogated in caspase-1/11-impaired mice or following the treatment of infected mice with an IL-1β antagonist. In vitro experiments further revealed the synergistic effects of CNF1 and LPS in promoting the maturation/secretion of IL-1β and establishing the roles of Rac, ASC and caspase-1 in this pathway. Furthermore, we found that the α-hemolysin toxin inhibits IL-1β secretion without affecting the recruitment of Gr1+ cells. Here, we report the first example of anti-virulence-triggered immunity counteracted by a pore-forming toxin during bacteremia.

  15. Composition consisting of a dendrimer and an active substance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    1995-01-01

    The invention relates to a composition consisting of a dendrimer provided with blocking agents and an active substance occluded in the dendrimer. According to the invention a blocking agent is a compound which is sterically of sufficient size, which readily enters into a chemical bond with the

  16. Rho-kinase signaling controls nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of class IIa Histone Deacetylase (HDAC7) and transcriptional activation of orphan nuclear receptor NR4A1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Compagnucci, Claudia; Barresi, Sabina [Unit of Molecular Medicine for Neuromuscular and Neurodegenerative Disorders, Department of Neurosciences, Bambino Gesù Children’s Hospital, IRCCS, Rome (Italy); Petrini, Stefania [Research Laboratories, Confocal Microscopy Core Facility, Bambino Gesù Children’s Hospital, IRCCS, Rome (Italy); Bertini, Enrico [Unit of Molecular Medicine for Neuromuscular and Neurodegenerative Disorders, Department of Neurosciences, Bambino Gesù Children’s Hospital, IRCCS, Rome (Italy); Zanni, Ginevra, E-mail: ginevra.zanni@opbg.net [Unit of Molecular Medicine for Neuromuscular and Neurodegenerative Disorders, Department of Neurosciences, Bambino Gesù Children’s Hospital, IRCCS, Rome (Italy)

    2015-04-03

    Rho-kinase (ROCK) has been well documented to play a key role in RhoA-induced actin remodeling. ROCK activation results in myosin light chain (MLC) phosphorylation either by direct action on MLC kinase (MLCK) or by inhibition of MLC phosphatase (MLCP), modulating actin–myosin contraction. We found that inhibition of the ROCK pathway in induced pluripotent stem cells, leads to nuclear export of HDAC7 and transcriptional activation of the orphan nuclear receptor NR4A1 while in cells with constitutive ROCK hyperactivity due to loss of function of the RhoGTPase activating protein Oligophrenin-1 (OPHN1), the orphan nuclear receptor NR4A1 is downregulated. Our study identify a new target of ROCK signaling via myosin phosphatase subunit (MYPT1) and Histone Deacetylase (HDAC7) at the nuclear level and provide new insights in the cellular functions of ROCK. - Highlights: • ROCK regulates nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of HDAC7 via phosphorylation of MYPT1. • Nuclear export of HDAC7 and upregulation of NR4A1 occurs with low ROCK activity. • High levels of ROCK activity due to OPHN1 loss of function downregulate NR4A1.

  17. Mechanical stimulation of cyclic tensile strain induces reduction of pluripotent related gene expressions via activation of Rho/ROCK and subsequent decreasing of AKT phosphorylation in human induced pluripotent stem cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teramura, Takeshi; Takehara, Toshiyuki; Onodera, Yuta; Nakagawa, Koichi; Hamanishi, Chiaki; Fukuda, Kanji

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Mechanical stimulation is an important factor for regulation of stem cell fate. ► Cyclic stretch to human induced pluripotent stem cells activated small GTPase Rho. ► Rho-kinase activation attenuated pluripotency via inhibition of AKT activation. ► This reaction could be reproduced only by transfection of dominant active Rho. ► Rho/ROCK are important molecules in mechanotransduction and control of stemness. -- Abstract: Mechanical stimulation has been shown to regulate the proliferation and differentiation of stem cells. However, the effects of the mechanical stress on the stemness or related molecular mechanisms have not been well determined. Pluripotent stem cells such as embryonic stem (ES) cells and induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells are used as good materials for cell transplantation therapy and research of mammalian development, since they can self-renew infinitely and differentiate into various cell lineages. Here we demonstrated that the mechanical stimulation to human iPS cells altered alignment of actin fibers and expressions of the pluripotent related genes Nanog, POU5f1 and Sox2. In the mechanically stimulated iPS cells, small GTPase Rho was activated and interestingly, AKT phosphorylation was decreased. Inhibition of Rho-associated kinase ROCK recovered the AKT phosphorylation and the gene expressions. These results clearly suggested that the Rho/ROCK is a potent primary effector of mechanical stress in the pluripotent stem cells and it participates to pluripotency-related signaling cascades as an upper stream regulator.

  18. Identification of a negative regulatory region for the exchange activity and characterization of T332I mutant of Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factor 10 (ARHGEF10).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaya, Taro; Shibata, Satoshi; Tokuhara, Yasunori; Yamaguchi, Wataru; Matsumoto, Hiroshi; Kawahara, Ichiro; Kogo, Mikihiko; Ohoka, Yoshiharu; Inagaki, Shinobu

    2011-08-26

    The T332I mutation in Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factor 10 (ARHGEF10) was previously found in persons with slowed nerve conduction velocities and thin myelination of peripheral nerves. However, the molecular and cellular basis of the T332I mutant is not understood. Here, we show that ARHGEF10 has a negative regulatory region in the N terminus, in which residue 332 is located, and the T332I mutant is constitutively active. An N-terminal truncated ARHGEF10 mutant, ARHGEF10 ΔN (lacking amino acids 1-332), induced cell contraction that was inhibited by a Rho kinase inhibitor Y27632 and had higher GEF activity for RhoA than the wild type. The T332I mutant also showed the phenotype similar to the N-terminal truncated mutant. These data suggest that the ARHGEF10 T332I mutation-associated phenotype observed in the peripheral nerves is due to activated GEF activity of the ARHGEF10 T332I mutant.

  19. Identification of a Negative Regulatory Region for the Exchange Activity and Characterization of T332I Mutant of Rho Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factor 10 (ARHGEF10)*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaya, Taro; Shibata, Satoshi; Tokuhara, Yasunori; Yamaguchi, Wataru; Matsumoto, Hiroshi; Kawahara, Ichiro; Kogo, Mikihiko; Ohoka, Yoshiharu; Inagaki, Shinobu

    2011-01-01

    The T332I mutation in Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factor 10 (ARHGEF10) was previously found in persons with slowed nerve conduction velocities and thin myelination of peripheral nerves. However, the molecular and cellular basis of the T332I mutant is not understood. Here, we show that ARHGEF10 has a negative regulatory region in the N terminus, in which residue 332 is located, and the T332I mutant is constitutively active. An N-terminal truncated ARHGEF10 mutant, ARHGEF10 ΔN (lacking amino acids 1–332), induced cell contraction that was inhibited by a Rho kinase inhibitor Y27632 and had higher GEF activity for RhoA than the wild type. The T332I mutant also showed the phenotype similar to the N-terminal truncated mutant. These data suggest that the ARHGEF10 T332I mutation-associated phenotype observed in the peripheral nerves is due to activated GEF activity of the ARHGEF10 T332I mutant. PMID:21719701

  20. Effects of chronic Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol treatment on Rho/Rho-kinase signalization pathway in mouse brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halil Mahir Kaplan

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ9-THC shows its effects by activating cannabinoid receptors which are on some tissues and neurons. Cannabinoid systems have role on cell proliferation and development of neurons. Furthermore, it is interesting that cannabinoid system and rho/rho-kinase signalization pathway, which have important role on cell development and proliferation, may have role on neuron proliferation and development together. Thus, a study is planned to investigate rhoA and rho-kinase enzyme expressions and their activities in the brain of chronic Δ9-THC treated mice. One group of mice are treated with Δ9-THC once to see effects of acute treatment. Another group of mice are treated with Δ9-THC three times per day for one month. After this period, rhoA and rho-kinase enzyme expressions and their activities in mice brains are analyzed by ELISA method. Chronic administration of Δ9-THC decreased the expression of rhoA while acute treatment has no meaningful effect on it. Administration of Δ9-THC did not affect expression of rho-kinase on both chronic and acute treatment. Administration of Δ9-THC increased rho-kinase activity on both chronic and acute treatment, however, chronic treatment decreased its activity with respect to acute treatment. This study showed that chronic Δ9-THC treatment down-regulated rhoA expression and did not change the expression level of rho-kinase which is downstream effector of rhoA. However, it elevated the rho-kinase activity. Δ9-THC induced down-regulation of rhoA may cause elevation of cypin expression and may have benefit on cypin related diseases. Furthermore, use of rho-kinase inhibitors and Δ9-THC together can be useful on rho-kinase related diseases.

  1. Electrophysiology of glioma: a Rho GTPase-activating protein reduces tumor growth and spares neuron structure and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vannini, Eleonora; Olimpico, Francesco; Middei, Silvia; Ammassari-Teule, Martine; de Graaf, Erik L; McDonnell, Liam; Schmidt, Gudula; Fabbri, Alessia; Fiorentini, Carla; Baroncelli, Laura; Costa, Mario; Caleo, Matteo

    2016-12-01

    Glioblastomas are the most aggressive type of brain tumor. A successful treatment should aim at halting tumor growth and protecting neuronal cells to prevent functional deficits and cognitive deterioration. Here, we exploited a Rho GTPase-activating bacterial protein toxin, cytotoxic necrotizing factor 1 (CNF1), to interfere with glioma cell growth in vitro and vivo. We also investigated whether this toxin spares neuron structure and function in peritumoral areas. We performed a microarray transcriptomic and in-depth proteomic analysis to characterize the molecular changes triggered by CNF1 in glioma cells. We also examined tumor cell senescence and growth in vehicle- and CNF1-treated glioma-bearing mice. Electrophysiological and morphological techniques were used to investigate neuronal alterations in peritumoral cortical areas. Administration of CNF1 triggered molecular and morphological hallmarks of senescence in mouse and human glioma cells in vitro. CNF1 treatment in vivo induced glioma cell senescence and potently reduced tumor volumes. In peritumoral areas of glioma-bearing mice, neurons showed a shrunken dendritic arbor and severe functional alterations such as increased spontaneous activity and reduced visual responsiveness. CNF1 treatment enhanced dendritic length and improved several physiological properties of pyramidal neurons, demonstrating functional preservation of the cortical network. Our findings demonstrate that CNF1 reduces glioma volume while at the same time maintaining the physiological and structural properties of peritumoral neurons. These data indicate a promising strategy for the development of more effective antiglioma therapies. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Neuro-Oncology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. PKCbeta-dependent activation of RhoA by syndecan-4 during focal adhesion formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dovas, Athanassios; Yoneda, Atsuko; Couchman, John R

    2006-01-01

    Syndecan-4 is a ubiquitously expressed transmembrane heparan sulphate proteoglycan acting in concert with integrins in the formation of focal adhesions and stress fibres. Signalling events studied thus far suggest the formation of a ternary complex between syndecan-4, phosphatidylinositol 4...... necessary for the formation and maintenance of stress fibres in primary rat embryo fibroblasts. Inhibition of PKCalpha activity through the use of specific pharmacological inhibitors, a dominant-negative construct, or siRNA downregulation of protein levels, attenuated focal adhesion formation...

  3. RCP-driven α5β1 recycling suppresses Rac and promotes RhoA activity via the RacGAP1–IQGAP1 complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacquemet, Guillaume; Green, David M.; Bridgewater, Rebecca E.; von Kriegsheim, Alexander; Humphries, Martin J.; Norman, Jim C.

    2013-01-01

    Inhibition of αvβ3 or expression of mutant p53 promotes invasion into fibronectin (FN)-containing extracellular matrix (ECM) by enhancing Rab-coupling protein (RCP)–dependent recycling of α5β1 integrin. RCP and α5β1 cooperatively recruit receptor tyrosine kinases, including EGFR1, to regulate their trafficking and downstream signaling via protein kinase B (PKB)/Akt, which, in turn, promotes invasive migration. In this paper, we identify a novel PKB/Akt substrate, RacGAP1, which is phosphorylated as a consequence of RCP-dependent α5β1 trafficking. Phosphorylation of RacGAP1 promotes its recruitment to IQGAP1 at the tips of invasive pseudopods, and RacGAP1 then locally suppresses the activity of the cytoskeletal regulator Rac and promotes the activity of RhoA in this subcellular region. This Rac to RhoA switch promotes the extension of pseudopodial processes and invasive migration into FN-containing matrices, in a RhoA-dependent manner. Thus, the localized endocytic trafficking of α5β1 within the tips of invasive pseudopods elicits signals that promote the reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton, protrusion, and invasion into FN-rich ECM. PMID:24019536

  4. RCP-driven α5β1 recycling suppresses Rac and promotes RhoA activity via the RacGAP1-IQGAP1 complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacquemet, Guillaume; Green, David M; Bridgewater, Rebecca E; von Kriegsheim, Alexander; Humphries, Martin J; Norman, Jim C; Caswell, Patrick T

    2013-09-16

    Inhibition of αvβ3 or expression of mutant p53 promotes invasion into fibronectin (FN)-containing extracellular matrix (ECM) by enhancing Rab-coupling protein (RCP)-dependent recycling of α5β1 integrin. RCP and α5β1 cooperatively recruit receptor tyrosine kinases, including EGFR1, to regulate their trafficking and downstream signaling via protein kinase B (PKB)/Akt, which, in turn, promotes invasive migration. In this paper, we identify a novel PKB/Akt substrate, RacGAP1, which is phosphorylated as a consequence of RCP-dependent α5β1 trafficking. Phosphorylation of RacGAP1 promotes its recruitment to IQGAP1 at the tips of invasive pseudopods, and RacGAP1 then locally suppresses the activity of the cytoskeletal regulator Rac and promotes the activity of RhoA in this subcellular region. This Rac to RhoA switch promotes the extension of pseudopodial processes and invasive migration into FN-containing matrices, in a RhoA-dependent manner. Thus, the localized endocytic trafficking of α5β1 within the tips of invasive pseudopods elicits signals that promote the reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton, protrusion, and invasion into FN-rich ECM.

  5. CTHRC1 Acts as a Prognostic Factor and Promotes Invasiveness of Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors by Activating Wnt/PCP-Rho Signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Ze Ma

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs are the major gastrointestinal mesenchymal tumors with a variable malignancy ranging from a curable disorder to highly malignant sarcomas. Metastasis and recurrence are the main causes of death in GIST patients. To further explore the mechanism of metastasis and to more accurately estimate the recurrence risk of GISTs after surgery, the clinical significance and functional role of collagen triple helix repeat containing-1 (CTHRC1 in GIST were investigated. We found that CTHRC1 expression was gradually elevated as the risk grade of NIH classification increased, and was closely correlated with disease-free survival and overall survival in 412 GIST patients. In vitro experiments showed that recombinant CTHRC1 protein promoted the migration and invasion capacities of primary GIST cells. A luciferase reporter assay and pull down assay demonstrated that recombinant CTHRC1 protein activated noncanonical Wnt/PCP-Rho signaling but inhibited canonical Wnt signaling. The pro-motility effect of CTHRC1 on GIST cells was reversed by using a Wnt5a neutralizing antibody and inhibitors of Rac1 or ROCK. Taken together, these data indicate that CTHRC1 may serve as a new predictor of recurrence risk and prognosis in post-operative GIST patients and may play an important role in facilitating GIST progression. Furthermore, CTHRC1 promotes GIST cell migration and invasion by activating Wnt/PCP-Rho signaling, suggesting that the CTHRC1-Wnt/PCP-Rho axis may be a new therapeutic target for interventions against GIST invasion and metastasis.

  6. Activation of rho is involved in the mechanism of hydrogen-peroxide-induced lung edema in isolated perfused rabbit lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiba, Y; Ishii, Y; Kitamura, S; Sugiyama, Y

    2001-09-01

    Acute lung injury is attributed primarily to increased vascular permeability caused by reactive oxygen species derived from neutrophils, such as hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Increased permeability is accompanied by the contraction and cytoskeleton reorganization of endothelial cells, resulting in intercellular gap formation. The Rho family of Ras-like GTPases is implicated in the regulation of the cytoskeleton and cell contraction. We examined the role of Rho in H2O2-induced pulmonary edema with the use of isolated perfused rabbit lungs. To our knowledge, this is the first study to examine the role of Rho in increased vascular permeability induced by H2O2 in perfused lungs. Vascular permeability was evaluated on the basis of the capillary filtration coefficient (Kfc, ml/min/cm H2O/100 g). We found that H2O2 (300 microM) increased lung weight, Kfc, and pulmonary capillary pressure. These effects of H2O2 were abolished by treatment with Y-27632 (50 microM), an inhibitor of the Rho effector p160 ROCK. In contrast, the muscular relaxant papaverine inhibited the H2O2-induced rise in pulmonary capillary pressure, but did not suppress the increases in lung weight and Kfc. These findings indicate that H2O2 causes pulmonary edema by elevating hydrostatic pressure and increasing vascular permeability. Y-27632 inhibited the formation of pulmonary edema by blocking both of these H2O2-induced effects. Our results suggest that Rho-related pathways have a part in the mechanism of H2O2-induced pulmonary edema. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  7. {gamma}*{gamma}*->{rho}{rho} at very high energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pire, B. [CPhT, Ecole Polytechnique, 91128 Palaiseau, France, UMR 7644 du CNRS (France); Szymanowski, L. [Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies, Hoza 69, 00-681 Warsaw (Poland) and Universite de Liege, B4000 Liege (Belgium); Wallon, S. [LPT, Universite d' Orsay, F 91405-Orsay (France); UMR 8627 du CNRS (France)

    2005-06-13

    The next generation of e{sup +}e{sup -}-colliders will offer a possibility of clean testing of QCD dynamics in the Regge limit. Recent progress in the theoretical description of exclusive processes permits for many of them a consistent use of the perturbative QCD methods. We advocate that the exclusive diffractive production of two {rho} mesons from virtual photons at very high energies should be measurable at the future linear collider (LC)

  8. Toll-Like Receptor 9-Dependent AMPKα Activation Occurs via TAK1 and Contributes to RhoA/ROCK Signaling and Actin Polymerization in Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Cameron G; Wenceslau, Camilla F; Ogbi, Safia; Szasz, Theodora; Webb, R Clinton

    2018-04-01

    Traditionally, Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9) signals through an MyD88-dependent cascade that results in proinflammatory gene transcription. Recently, it was reported that TLR9 also participates in a stress tolerance signaling cascade in nonimmune cells. In this noncanonical pathway, TLR9 binds to and inhibits sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum Ca 2+ -ATPase 2 (SERCA2), modulating intracellular calcium handling, and subsequently resulting in the activation of 5'-AMP-activated protein kinase α (AMPK α ). We have previously reported that TLR9 causes increased contraction in isolated arteries; however, the mechanisms underlying this vascular dysfunction need to be further clarified. Therefore, we hypothesized that noncanonical TLR9 signaling was also present in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and that it mediates enhanced contractile responses through SERCA2 inhibition. To test these hypotheses, aortic microsomes, aortic VSMCs, and isolated arteries from male Sprague-Dawley rats were incubated with vehicle or TLR9 agonist (ODN2395). Despite clear AMPK α activation after treatment with ODN2395, SERCA2 activity was unaffected. Alternatively, ODN2395 caused the phosphorylation of AMPK α via transforming growth factor β -activated kinase 1 (TAK1), a kinase involved in TLR9 inflammatory signaling. Downstream, we hypothesized that that TLR9 activation of AMPK α may be important in mediating actin cytoskeleton reorganization. ODN2395 significantly increased the filamentous-to-globular actin ratio, as well as indices of RhoA/Rho-associated protein kinase (ROCK) activation, with the latter being prevented by AMPK α inhibition. In conclusion, AMPK α phosphorylation after TLR9 activation in VSMCs appears to be an extension of traditional inflammatory signaling via TAK1, as opposed to SERCA2 inhibition and the noncanonical pathway. Nonetheless, TLR9-AMPK α signaling can mediate VSMC function via RhoA/ROCK activation and actin polymerization. Copyright © 2018 by The

  9. Automated NMR fragment based screening identified a novel interface blocker to the LARG/RhoA complex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia Gao

    Full Text Available The small GTPase cycles between the inactive GDP form and the activated GTP form, catalyzed by the upstream guanine exchange factors. The modulation of such process by small molecules has been proven to be a fruitful route for therapeutic intervention to prevent the over-activation of the small GTPase. The fragment based approach emerging in the past decade has demonstrated its paramount potential in the discovery of inhibitors targeting such novel and challenging protein-protein interactions. The details regarding the procedure of NMR fragment screening from scratch have been rarely disclosed comprehensively, thus restricts its wider applications. To achieve a consistent screening applicable to a number of targets, we developed a highly automated protocol to cover every aspect of NMR fragment screening as possible, including the construction of small but diverse libray, determination of the aqueous solubility by NMR, grouping compounds with mutual dispersity to a cocktail, and the automated processing and visualization of the ligand based screening spectra. We exemplified our streamlined screening in RhoA alone and the complex of the small GTPase RhoA and its upstream guanine exchange factor LARG. Two hits were confirmed from the primary screening in cocktail and secondary screening over individual hits for LARG/RhoA complex, while one of them was also identified from the screening for RhoA alone. HSQC titration of the two hits over RhoA and LARG alone, respectively, identified one compound binding to RhoA.GDP at a 0.11 mM affinity, and perturbed the residues at the switch II region of RhoA. This hit blocked the formation of the LARG/RhoA complex, validated by the native gel electrophoresis, and the titration of RhoA to ¹⁵N labeled LARG in the absence and presence the compound, respectively. It therefore provides us a starting point toward a more potent inhibitor to RhoA activation catalyzed by LARG.

  10. Rational Design of Rho Protein Inhibitors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rojas, Rafael J

    2006-01-01

    Rho GTPases are molecular switches that fluctuate between on and off states. When active, these proteins function to remodel the actin cytoskeleton by interacting with a number of downstream effector molecules...

  11. Rational Design of Rho Protein Inhibitors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rojas, Rafael J

    2005-01-01

    Rho GTPases are molecular switches that fluctuate between on and off states. When active, these proteins function to remodel the actin cytoskeleton by interacting with a number of downstream effector molecules...

  12. Discovery of aminofurazan-azabenzimidazoles as inhibitors of Rho-kinase with high kinase selectivity and antihypertensive activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stavenger, Robert A; Cui, Haifeng; Dowdell, Sarah E; Franz, Robert G; Gaitanopoulos, Dimitri E; Goodman, Krista B; Hilfiker, Mark A; Ivy, Robert L; Leber, Jack D; Marino, Joseph P; Oh, Hye-Ja; Viet, Andrew Q; Xu, Weiwei; Ye, Guosen; Zhang, Daohua; Zhao, Yongdong; Jolivette, Larry J; Head, Martha S; Semus, Simon F; Elkins, Patricia A; Kirkpatrick, Robert B; Dul, Edward; Khandekar, Sanjay S; Yi, Tracey; Jung, David K; Wright, Lois L; Smith, Gary K; Behm, David J; Doe, Christopher P; Bentley, Ross; Chen, Zunxuan X; Hu, Erding; Lee, Dennis

    2007-01-11

    The discovery, proposed binding mode, and optimization of a novel class of Rho-kinase inhibitors are presented. Appropriate substitution on the 6-position of the azabenzimidazole core provided subnanomolar enzyme potency in vitro while dramatically improving selectivity over a panel of other kinases. Pharmacokinetic data was obtained for the most potent and selective examples and one (6n) has been shown to lower blood pressure in a rat model of hypertension.

  13. Sinomenine alleviates high glucose-induced renal glomerular endothelial hyperpermeability by inhibiting the activation of RhoA/ROCK signaling pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yin, Qingqiao [Renal Department of Internal Medicine, The Third Hospital of Wuhan (China); Xia, Yuanyu, E-mail: xiayuanyu.wh@gmail.com [Renal Department of Internal Medicine, The Third Hospital of Wuhan (China); Wang, Guan [Department of Cardiology, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou Medical University (China)

    2016-09-02

    As an early sign of diabetic cardiovascular disease, endothelial dysfunction may contribute to progressive diabetic nephropathy (DN). Endothelial hyperpermeability induced by hyperglycemia (HG) is a central pathogenesis for DN. Sinomenine (SIN) has strong anti-inflammatory and renal protective effects, following an unknown protective mechanism against HG-induced hyperpermeability. We herein explored the role of SIN in vitro in an HG-induced barrier dysfunction model in human renal glomerular endothelial cells (HRGECs). The cells were exposed to SIN and/or HG for 24 h, the permeability of which was significantly increased by HG. Moreover, junction protein occludin in the cell-cell junction area and its total expression in HRGECs were significantly decreased by HG. However, the dysfunction of tight junction and hyperpermeability of HRGECs were significantly reversed by SIN. Furthermore, SIN prevented HG-increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) by activating nuclear factor-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2). Interestingly, activation of RhoA/ROCK induced by HG was reversed by SIN or ROCK inhibitor. HG-induced hyperpermeability was prevented by SIN. High ROS level, tight junction dysfunction and RhoA/ROCK activation were significantly attenuated with knockdown of Nrf2. Mediated by activation of Nrf2, SIN managed to significantly prevent HG-disrupted renal endothelial barrier function by suppressing the RhoA/ROCK signaling pathway through reducing ROS. We successfully identified a novel pathway via which SIN exerted antioxidative and renal protective functions, and provided a molecular basis for potential SIN applications in treating DN vascular disorders.

  14. Sinomenine alleviates high glucose-induced renal glomerular endothelial hyperpermeability by inhibiting the activation of RhoA/ROCK signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Qingqiao; Xia, Yuanyu; Wang, Guan

    2016-09-02

    As an early sign of diabetic cardiovascular disease, endothelial dysfunction may contribute to progressive diabetic nephropathy (DN). Endothelial hyperpermeability induced by hyperglycemia (HG) is a central pathogenesis for DN. Sinomenine (SIN) has strong anti-inflammatory and renal protective effects, following an unknown protective mechanism against HG-induced hyperpermeability. We herein explored the role of SIN in vitro in an HG-induced barrier dysfunction model in human renal glomerular endothelial cells (HRGECs). The cells were exposed to SIN and/or HG for 24 h, the permeability of which was significantly increased by HG. Moreover, junction protein occludin in the cell-cell junction area and its total expression in HRGECs were significantly decreased by HG. However, the dysfunction of tight junction and hyperpermeability of HRGECs were significantly reversed by SIN. Furthermore, SIN prevented HG-increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) by activating nuclear factor-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2). Interestingly, activation of RhoA/ROCK induced by HG was reversed by SIN or ROCK inhibitor. HG-induced hyperpermeability was prevented by SIN. High ROS level, tight junction dysfunction and RhoA/ROCK activation were significantly attenuated with knockdown of Nrf2. Mediated by activation of Nrf2, SIN managed to significantly prevent HG-disrupted renal endothelial barrier function by suppressing the RhoA/ROCK signaling pathway through reducing ROS. We successfully identified a novel pathway via which SIN exerted antioxidative and renal protective functions, and provided a molecular basis for potential SIN applications in treating DN vascular disorders. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor activates GTPase RhoA and inhibits cell invasion in the breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aguilar-Rojas, Arturo; Huerta-Reyes, Maira; Maya-Núñez, Guadalupe; Arechavaleta-Velásco, Fabián; Conn, P Michael; Ulloa-Aguirre, Alfredo; Valdés, Jesús

    2012-01-01

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) and its receptor (GnRHR) are both expressed by a number of malignant tumors, including those of the breast. In the latter, both behave as potent inhibitors of invasion. Nevertheless, the signaling pathways whereby the activated GnRH/GnRHR system exerts this effect have not been clearly established. In this study, we provide experimental evidence that describes components of the mechanism(s) whereby GnRH inhibits breast cancer cell invasion. Actin polymerization and substrate adhesion was measured in the highly invasive cell line, MDA-MB-231 transiently expressing the wild-type or mutant DesK191 GnRHR by fluorometry, flow cytometric analysis, and confocal microscopy, in the absence or presence of GnRH agonist. The effect of RhoA-GTP on stress fiber formation and focal adhesion assembly was measured in MDA-MB-231 cells co-expressing the GnRHRs and the GAP domain of human p190Rho GAP-A or the dominant negative mutant GAP-Y1284D. Cell invasion was determined by the transwell migration assay. Agonist-stimulated activation of the wild-type GnRHR and the highly plasma membrane expressed mutant GnRHR-DesK191 transiently transfected to MDA-MB-231 cells, favored F-actin polymerization and substrate adhesion. Confocal imaging allowed detection of an association between F-actin levels and the increase in stress fibers promoted by exposure to GnRH. Pull-down assays showed that the effects observed on actin cytoskeleton resulted from GnRH-stimulated activation of RhoA GTPase. Activation of this small G protein favored the marked increase in both cell adhesion to Collagen-I and number of focal adhesion complexes leading to inhibition of the invasion capacity of MDA-MB-231 cells as disclosed by assays in Transwell Chambers. We here show that GnRH inhibits invasion of highly invasive breast cancer-derived MDA-MB-231 cells. This effect is mediated through an increase in substrate adhesion promoted by activation of RhoA GTPase and formation of

  16. Gallic acid inhibits gastric cancer cells metastasis and invasive growth via increased expression of RhoB, downregulation of AKT/small GTPase signals and inhibition of NF-κB activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ho, Hsieh-Hsun [Institute of Biochemistry and Biotechnology, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung 402, Taiwan (China); Chang, Chi-Sen [Department of Medicine, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung 402, Taiwan (China); Division of Gastroenterology, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taichung 402, Taiwan (China); Ho, Wei-Chi [Division of Gastroenterology, Jen-Ai Hospital, Taichung 402, Taiwan (China); Liao, Sheng-You [Institute of Biochemistry and Biotechnology, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung 402, Taiwan (China); Lin, Wea-Lung [Department of Pathology, School of Medicine, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung 402, Taiwan (China); Department of Pathology, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Taichung 402, Taiwan (China); Wang, Chau-Jong, E-mail: wcj@csmu.edu.tw [Institute of Biochemistry and Biotechnology, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung 402, Taiwan (China); Department of Medical Research, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Taichung 402, Taiwan (China)

    2013-01-01

    Our previous study demonstrated the therapeutic potential of gallic acid (GA) for controlling tumor metastasis through its inhibitory effect on the motility of AGS cells. A noteworthy finding in our previous experiment was increased RhoB expression in GA-treated cells. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of RhoB expression on the inhibitory effects of GA on AGS cells. By applying the transfection of RhoB siRNA into AGS cells and an animal model, we tested the effect of GA on inhibition of tumor growth and RhoB expression. The results confirmed that RhoB-siRNA transfection induced GA to inhibit AGS cells’ invasive growth involving blocking the AKT/small GTPase signals pathway and inhibition of NF-κB activity. Finally, we evaluated the effect of GA on AGS cell metastasis by colonization of tumor cells in nude mice. It showed GA inhibited tumor cells growth via the expression of RhoB. These data support the inhibitory effect of GA which was shown to inhibit gastric cancer cell metastasis and invasive growth via increased expression of RhoB, downregulation of AKT/small GTPase signals and inhibition of NF-κB activity. Thus, GA might be a potential agent in treating gastric cancer. Highlights: ► GA could downregulate AKT signal via increased expression of RhoB. ► GA inhibits metastasis in vitro in gastric carcinoma. ► GA inhibits tumor growth in nude mice model.

  17. Is Active Tectonics on Madagascar Consistent with Somalian Plate Kinematics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamps, D. S.; Kreemer, C.; Rajaonarison, T. A.

    2017-12-01

    The East African Rift System (EARS) actively breaks apart the Nubian and Somalian tectonic plates. Madagascar finds itself at the easternmost boundary of the EARS, between the Rovuma block, Lwandle plate, and the Somalian plate. Earthquake focal mechanisms and N-S oriented fault structures on the continental island suggest that Madagascar is experiencing east-west oriented extension. However, some previous plate kinematic studies indicate minor compressional strains across Madagascar. This inconsistency may be due to uncertainties in Somalian plate rotation. Past estimates of the rotation of the Somalian plate suffered from a poor coverage of GPS stations, but some important new stations are now available for a re-evaluation. In this work, we revise the kinematics of the Somalian plate. We first calculate a new GPS velocity solution and perform block kinematic modeling to evaluate the Somalian plate rotation. We then estimate new Somalia-Rovuma and Somalia-Lwandle relative motions across Madagascar and evaluate whether they are consistent with GPS measurements made on the island itself, as well as with other kinematic indicators.

  18. Arhgap28 is a RhoGAP that inactivates RhoA and downregulates stress fibers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ching-Yan Chloé Yeung

    Full Text Available The small GTPase RhoA is a major regulator of actin reorganization during the formation of stress fibers; thus identifying molecules that regulate Rho activity is necessary for a complete understanding of the mechanisms that determine cell contractility. Here, we have identified Arhgap28 as a Rho GTPase activating protein (RhoGAP that switches RhoA to its inactive form. We generated an Arhgap28-LacZ reporter mouse that revealed gene expression in soft tissues at E12.5, pre-bone structures of the limb at E15.5, and prominent expression restricted mostly to ribs and limb long bones at E18.5 days of development. Expression of recombinant Arhgap28-V5 in human osteosarcoma SaOS-2 cells caused a reduction in the basal level of RhoA activation and disruption of actin stress fibers. Extracellular matrix assembly studies using a 3-dimensional cell culture system showed that Arhgap28 was upregulated during Rho-dependent assembly of the ECM. Taken together, these observations led to the hypothesis that an Arhgap28 knockout mouse model would show a connective tissue phenotype, perhaps affecting bone. Arhgap28-null mice were viable and appeared normal, suggesting that there could be compensation from other RhoGAPs. Indeed, we showed that expression of Arhgap6 (a closely related RhoGAP was upregulated in Arhgap28-null bone tissue. An upregulation in RhoA expression was also detected suggesting that Arhgap28 may be able to additionally regulate Rho signaling at a transcriptional level. Microarray analyses revealed that Col2a1, Col9a1, Matn3, and Comp that encode extracellular matrix proteins were downregulated in Arhgap28-null bone. Although mutations in these genes cause bone dysplasias no bone phenotype was detected in the Arhgap-28 null mice. Together, these data suggest that the regulation of Rho by RhoGAPs, including Arhgap28, during the assembly and development of mechanically strong tissues is complex and may involve multiple RhoGAPs.

  19. Mechanical stimulation of cyclic tensile strain induces reduction of pluripotent related gene expressions via activation of Rho/ROCK and subsequent decreasing of AKT phosphorylation in human induced pluripotent stem cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teramura, Takeshi, E-mail: teramura@med.kindai.ac.jp [Institute of Advanced Clinical Medicine, Kinki University, Faculty of Medicine, Osaka (Japan); Takehara, Toshiyuki; Onodera, Yuta [Institute of Advanced Clinical Medicine, Kinki University, Faculty of Medicine, Osaka (Japan); Nakagawa, Koichi; Hamanishi, Chiaki [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Kinki University, Faculty of Medicine, Osaka (Japan); Fukuda, Kanji [Institute of Advanced Clinical Medicine, Kinki University, Faculty of Medicine, Osaka (Japan); Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Kinki University, Faculty of Medicine, Osaka (Japan)

    2012-01-13

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mechanical stimulation is an important factor for regulation of stem cell fate. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cyclic stretch to human induced pluripotent stem cells activated small GTPase Rho. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Rho-kinase activation attenuated pluripotency via inhibition of AKT activation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This reaction could be reproduced only by transfection of dominant active Rho. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Rho/ROCK are important molecules in mechanotransduction and control of stemness. -- Abstract: Mechanical stimulation has been shown to regulate the proliferation and differentiation of stem cells. However, the effects of the mechanical stress on the stemness or related molecular mechanisms have not been well determined. Pluripotent stem cells such as embryonic stem (ES) cells and induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells are used as good materials for cell transplantation therapy and research of mammalian development, since they can self-renew infinitely and differentiate into various cell lineages. Here we demonstrated that the mechanical stimulation to human iPS cells altered alignment of actin fibers and expressions of the pluripotent related genes Nanog, POU5f1 and Sox2. In the mechanically stimulated iPS cells, small GTPase Rho was activated and interestingly, AKT phosphorylation was decreased. Inhibition of Rho-associated kinase ROCK recovered the AKT phosphorylation and the gene expressions. These results clearly suggested that the Rho/ROCK is a potent primary effector of mechanical stress in the pluripotent stem cells and it participates to pluripotency-related signaling cascades as an upper stream regulator.

  20. 15 CFR 930.36 - Consistency determinations for proposed activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... necessity of issuing separate consistency determinations for each incremental action controlled by the major... plans), and that affect any coastal use or resource of more than one State. Many States share common...

  1. Hippo-independent activation of YAP by the GNAQ uveal melanoma oncogene through a trio-regulated rho GTPase signaling circuitry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Xiaodong; Degese, Maria Sol; Iglesias-Bartolome, Ramiro; Vaque, Jose P; Molinolo, Alfredo A; Rodrigues, Murilo; Zaidi, M Raza; Ksander, Bruce R; Merlino, Glenn; Sodhi, Akrit; Chen, Qianming; Gutkind, J Silvio

    2014-06-16

    Mutually exclusive activating mutations in the GNAQ and GNA11 oncogenes, encoding heterotrimeric Gαq family members, have been identified in ∼ 83% and ∼ 6% of uveal and skin melanomas, respectively. However, the molecular events underlying these GNAQ-driven malignancies are not yet defined, thus limiting the ability to develop cancer-targeted therapies. Here, we focused on the transcriptional coactivator YAP, a critical component of the Hippo signaling pathway that controls organ size. We found that Gαq stimulates YAP through a Trio-Rho/Rac signaling circuitry promoting actin polymerization, independently of phospholipase Cβ and the canonical Hippo pathway. Furthermore, we show that Gαq promotes the YAP-dependent growth of uveal melanoma cells, thereby identifying YAP as a suitable therapeutic target in uveal melanoma, a GNAQ/GNA11-initiated human malignancy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Rac1 and RhoA: Networks, loops and bistability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Lan K; Kholodenko, Boris N; von Kriegsheim, Alex

    2016-08-17

    Cell migration requires a precise temporal and spatial coordination of several processes which allow the cell to efficiently move. The extension and retraction of membrane protrusion, as well as adhesion are controlled by the Rho-family small GTPases. Two members of the family, Rac1 and RhoA, can show opposite behaviors and spatial localisations, with RhoA being active toward the rear of the cell and regulating its retraction during migration, whereas Rac1 is active toward the front of the cell. In addition to the spatial segregation, RhoA and Rac1 activity at the leading edge of the cells has an element of temporal segregation, with RhoA and Rac1 activities peaking at separate points during the migratory cycle of protrusion and retraction. Elements of this separation have been explained by the presence of 2 mutually inhibitory feedbacks, where Rac1 inhibits RhoA and RhoA in turn can inhibit Rac1. Recently, it was shown that Rac1 and RhoA activity and downstream signaling respond in a bistable manner to perturbations of this network.

  3. cAMP-induced activation of protein kinase A and p190B RhoGAP mediates down-regulation of TC10 activity at the plasma membrane and neurite outgrowth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koinuma, Shingo; Takeuchi, Kohei; Wada, Naoyuki; Nakamura, Takeshi

    2017-11-01

    Cyclic AMP plays a pivotal role in neurite growth. During outgrowth, a trafficking system supplies membrane at growth cones. However, the cAMP-induced signaling leading to the regulation of membrane trafficking remains unknown. TC10 is a Rho family GTPase that is essential for specific types of vesicular trafficking. Recent studies have shown a role of TC10 in neurite growth in NGF-treated PC12 cells. Here, we investigated a mechanical linkage between cAMP and TC10 in neuritogenesis. Plasmalemmal TC10 activity decreased abruptly after cAMP addition in neuronal cells. TC10 was locally inactivated at extending neurite tips in cAMP-treated PC12 cells. TC10 depletion led to a decrease in cAMP-induced neurite outgrowth. Constitutively active TC10 could not rescue this growth reduction, supporting our model for a role of GTP hydrolysis of TC10 in neuritogenesis by accelerating vesicle fusion. The cAMP-induced TC10 inactivation was mediated by PKA. Considering cAMP-induced RhoA inactivation, we found that p190B, but not p190A, mediated inactivation of TC10 and RhoA. Upon cAMP treatment, p190B was recruited to the plasma membrane. STEF depletion and Rac1-N17 expression reduced cAMP-induced TC10 inactivation. Together, the PKA-STEF-Rac1-p190B pathway leading to inactivation of TC10 and RhoA at the plasma membrane plays an important role in cAMP-induced neurite outgrowth. © 2017 Molecular Biology Society of Japan and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  4. Differential binding of RhoA, RhoB, and RhoC to protein kinase C-related kinase (PRK) isoforms PRK1, PRK2, and PRK3: PRKs have the highest affinity for RhoB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchinson, Catherine L; Lowe, Peter N; McLaughlin, Stephen H; Mott, Helen R; Owen, Darerca

    2013-11-12

    Protein kinase C-related kinases (PRKs) are members of the protein kinase C superfamily of serine-threonine kinases and can be activated by binding to members of the Rho family of GTPases via a Rho-binding motif known as an HR1 domain. Three tandem HR1 domains reside at the N-terminus of the PRKs. We have assessed the ability of the HR1a and HR1b domains from the three PRK isoforms (PRK1, PRK2, and PRK3) to interact with the three Rho isoforms (RhoA, RhoB, and RhoC). The affinities of RhoA and RhoC for a construct encompassing both PRK1 HR1 domains were similar to those for the HR1a domain alone, suggesting that these interactions are mediated solely by the HR1a domain. The affinities of RhoB for both the PRK1 HR1a domain and the HR1ab didomain were higher than those of RhoA or RhoC. RhoB also bound more tightly to the didomain than to the HR1a domain alone, implicating the HR1b domain in the interaction. As compared with PRK1 HR1 domains, PRK2 and PRK3 domains bind less well to all Rho isoforms. Uniquely, however, the PRK3 domains display a specificity for RhoB that requires both the C-terminus of RhoB and the PRK3 HR1b domain. The thermal stability of the HR1a and HR1b domains was also investigated. The PRK2 HR1a domain was found to be the most thermally stable, while PRK2 HR1b, PRK3 HR1a, and PRK3 HR1b domains all exhibited lower melting temperatures, similar to that of the PRK1 HR1a domain. The lower thermal stability of the PRK2 and PRK3 HR1b domains may impart greater flexibility, driving their ability to interact with Rho isoforms.

  5. RhoG protein regulates platelet granule secretion and thrombus formation in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goggs, Robert; Harper, Matthew T; Pope, Robert J; Savage, Joshua S; Williams, Christopher M; Mundell, Stuart J; Heesom, Kate J; Bass, Mark; Mellor, Harry; Poole, Alastair W

    2013-11-22

    Rho GTPases such as Rac, RhoA, and Cdc42 are vital for normal platelet function, but the role of RhoG in platelets has not been studied. In other cells, RhoG orchestrates processes integral to platelet function, including actin cytoskeletal rearrangement and membrane trafficking. We therefore hypothesized that RhoG would play a critical role in platelets. Here, we show that RhoG is expressed in human and mouse platelets and is activated by both collagen-related peptide (CRP) and thrombin stimulation. We used RhoG(-/-) mice to study the function of RhoG in platelets. Integrin activation and aggregation were reduced in RhoG(-/-) platelets stimulated by CRP, but responses to thrombin were normal. The central defect in RhoG(-/-) platelets was reduced secretion from α-granules, dense granules, and lysosomes following CRP stimulation. The integrin activation and aggregation defects could be rescued by ADP co-stimulation, indicating that they are a consequence of diminished dense granule secretion. Defective dense granule secretion in RhoG(-/-) platelets limited recruitment of additional platelets to growing thrombi in flowing blood in vitro and translated into reduced thrombus formation in vivo. Interestingly, tail bleeding times were normal in RhoG(-/-) mice, suggesting that the functions of RhoG in platelets are particularly relevant to thrombotic disorders.

  6. Mutant RBL mast cells defective in Fc epsilon RI signaling and lipid raft biosynthesis are reconstituted by activated Rho-family GTPases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, K A; Apgar, J R; Hong-Geller, E; Siraganian, R P; Baird, B; Holowka, D

    2000-10-01

    Characterization of defects in a variant subline of RBL mast cells has revealed a biochemical event proximal to IgE receptor (Fc epsilon RI)-stimulated tyrosine phosphorylation that is required for multiple functional responses. This cell line, designated B6A4C1, is deficient in both Fc epsilon RI-mediated degranulation and biosynthesis of several lipid raft components. Agents that bypass receptor-mediated Ca(2+) influx stimulate strong degranulation responses in these variant cells. Cross-linking of IgE-Fc epsilon RI on these cells stimulates robust tyrosine phosphorylation but fails to mobilize a sustained Ca(2+) response. Fc epsilon RI-mediated inositol phosphate production is not detectable in these cells, and failure of adenosine receptors to mobilize Ca(2+) suggests a general deficiency in stimulated phospholipase C activity. Antigen stimulation of phospholipases A(2) and D is also defective. Infection of B6A4C1 cells with vaccinia virus constructs expressing constitutively active Rho family members Cdc42 and Rac restores antigen-stimulated degranulation, and active Cdc42 (but not active Rac) restores ganglioside and GPI expression. The results support the hypothesis that activation of Cdc42 and/or Rac is critical for Fc epsilon RI-mediated signaling that leads to Ca(2+) mobilization and degranulation. Furthermore, they suggest that Cdc42 plays an important role in the biosynthesis and expression of certain components of lipid rafts.

  7. Rho GTPase function in tumorigenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlsson, R; Pedersen, Esben Ditlev Kølle; Wang, Zhipeng

    2009-01-01

    , for that reason, Rho GTPases, their regulators, and their effectors have been suggested to control tumor formation and progression in humans. However, while the tumor-relevant functions of Rho GTPases are very well documented in vitro, we are only now beginning to assess their contribution to cancer in human...... patients and in animal models. This review will give a very brief overview of Rho GTPase function in general and then focus on in vivo evidence for a role of Rho GTPases in malignant tumors, both in human patients and in genetically modified mice....

  8. Increased rho kinase activity in mononuclear cells of dialysis and stage 3-4 chronic kidney disease patients with left ventricular hypertrophy: Cardiovascular risk implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calò, Lorenzo A; Vertolli, Ugo; Pagnin, Elisa; Ravarotto, Verdiana; Davis, Paul A; Lupia, Mario; Naso, Elena; Maiolino, Giuseppe; Naso, Agostino

    2016-03-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of excess mortality in chronic kidney disease (CKD) and dialysis patients (DP) who have higher prevalence of left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH), the strongest predictor of CV events. Rho kinase (ROCK) activation is linked in hypertensive patients to cardiac remodeling while ROCK inhibition suppresses cardiomyocyte hypertrophy and, in a human clinical condition opposite to hypertension, its downregulation associates with lack of CV remodeling. Information on ROCK activation-LVH link in CKD and DP is lacking. Mononuclear cells (PBMCs) MYPT-1 phosphorylation, a marker of ROCK activity, and the effect of fasudil, a ROCK inhibitor, on MYPT-1 phosphorylation were assessed in 23 DPs, 13 stage 3-4 CKD and 36 healthy subjects (HS) by Western blot. LV mass was assessed by M-mode echocardiography. DP and CKD had higher MYPT-1 phosphorylation compared to HS (p<0.001 and p=0.003). Fasudil (500 and 1000μM) dose dependently reduced MYPT-1 phosphorylation in DP (p<0.01). DP had higher LV mass than CKD (p<0.001). MYPT-1 phosphorylation was higher in patients with LVH (p=0.009) and correlated with LV mass both in DP and CKD with LVH (p<0.001 and p=0.006). In DP and CKD, ROCK activity tracks with LVH. This ROCK activation-LVH link provided in these CVD high-risk patients along with similar findings in hypertensive patients and added to opposite findings in a human model opposite to hypertension and in type 2 diabetic patients, identify ROCK activation as a potential LVH marker and provide further rationale for ROCK activation inhibition as target of therapy in CVD high-risk patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Mouse macrophages completely lacking Rho (RhoA, RhoB and RhoC) have severe lamellipodial retraction defects, but robust chemotactic navigation and increased motility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koenigs, Volker; Jennings, Richard; Vogl, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    RhoA is thought to be essential for coordination of the membrane protrusions and retractions required for immune cell motility and directed migration. Whether the subfamily of Rho (Ras homolog) GTPases (RhoA, RhoB and RhoC) is actually required for the directed migration of primary cells is diffi...

  10. Scambio, a novel guanine nucleotide exchange factor for Rho

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Groffen John

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Small GTPases of the Rho family are critical regulators of various cellular functions including actin cytoskeleton organization, activation of kinase cascades and mitogenesis. For this reason, a major objective has been to understand the mechanisms of Rho GTPase regulation. Here, we examine the function of a novel protein, Scambio, which shares homology with the DH-PH domains of several known guanine nucleotide exchange factors for Rho family members. Results Scambio is located on human chromosome 14q11.1, encodes a protein of around 181 kDa, and is highly expressed in both heart and skeletal muscle. In contrast to most DH-PH-domain containing proteins, it binds the activated, GTP-bound forms of Rac and Cdc42. However, it fails to associate with V14RhoA. Immunofluorescence studies indicate that Scambio and activated Rac3 colocalize in membrane ruffles at the cell periphery. In accordance with these findings, Scambio does not activate either Rac or Cdc42 but rather, stimulates guanine nucleotide exchange on RhoA and its close relative, RhoC. Conclusion Scambio associates with Rac in its activated conformation and functions as a guanine nucleotide exchange factor for Rho.

  11. Flow-induced endothelial cell alignment requires the RhoGEF Trio as a scaffold protein to polarize active Rac1 distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroon, Jeffrey; Heemskerk, Niels; Kalsbeek, Martin J T; de Waard, Vivian; van Rijssel, Jos; van Buul, Jaap D

    2017-07-01

    Endothelial cells line the lumen of the vessel wall and are exposed to flow. In linear parts of the vessel, the endothelial cells experience laminar flow, resulting in endothelial cell alignment in the direction of flow, thereby protecting the vessel wall from inflammation and permeability. In order for endothelial cells to align, they undergo rapid remodeling of the actin cytoskeleton by local activation of the small GTPase Rac1. However, it is not clear whether sustained and local activation of Rac1 is required for long-term flow-induced cell alignment. Using a FRET-based DORA Rac1 biosensor, we show that local Rac1 activity remains for 12 h upon long-term flow. Silencing studies show that the RhoGEF Trio is crucial for keeping active Rac1 at the downstream side of the cell and, as a result, for long-term flow-induced cell alignment. Surprisingly, Trio appears to be not involved in flow-induced activation of Rac1. Our data show that flow induces Rac1 activity at the downstream side of the cell in a Trio-dependent manner and that Trio functions as a scaffold protein rather than a functional GEF under long-term flow conditions. © 2017 Kroon et al. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  12. The dual action of poly(ADP-ribose polymerase -1 (PARP-1 inhibition in HIV-1 infection: HIV-1 LTR inhibition and diminution in Rho GTPase activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slava eRom

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The transcription of HIV-1 (HIV is regulated by complex mechanisms involving various cellular factors and virus-encoded transactivators. Poly(ADP-ribose polymerase 1 (PARP-1 inhibition has emerged recently as a potent anti-inflammatory tool, since PARP-1 is involved in the regulation of some genes through its interaction with various transcription factors. We propose a novel approach to diminish HIV replication via PARP-1 inhibition using human primary monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM as an in vitro model system. PARP-1 inhibitors were able to reduce HIV replication in MDM by 60-80% after 7 days infection. Long Terminal Repeat (LTR acts as a switch in virus replication and can be triggered by several agents such as: Tat, tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα, and phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA. Overexpression of Tat in MDM transfected with an LTR reporter plasmid led to a 4.2-fold increase in LTR activation; PARP inhibition resulted in 70% reduction of LTR activity. LTR activity, which increased 3-fold after PMA or TNFα treatment, was reduced by PARP inhibition (by 85-95%. MDM treated with PARP inhibitors showed 90% reduction in NFκB activity (known to mediate PMA- and TNFα-induced HIV LTR activation. Cytoskeleton rearrangements are important in effective HIV-1 infection. PARP inactivation reduced actin cytoskeleton rearrangements by affecting Rho GTPase machinery. These findings suggest that HIV replication in MDM could be suppressed by PARP inhibition via NFκB suppression, diminution of LTR activation and its effects on the cytoskeleton. PARP appears to be essential for HIV replication and its inhibition may provide a potent approach to treatment of HIV infection.

  13. Receptor for advanced glycation end products - membrane type1 matrix metalloproteinase axis regulates tissue factor expression via RhoA and Rac1 activation in high-mobility group box-1 stimulated endothelial cells.

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    Koichi Sugimoto

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Atherosclerosis is understood to be a blood vessel inflammation. High-mobility group box-1 (HMGB-1 plays a key role in the systemic inflammation. Tissue factor (TF is known to lead to inflammation which promotes thrombus formation. Membrane type1 matrix metalloprotease (MT1-MMP associates with advanced glycation endproducts (AGE triggered-TF protein expression and phosphorylation of NF-κB. However, it is still unclear about the correlation of MT1-MMP and HMBG-1-mediated TF expression. In this study, we investigated the molecular mechanisms of TF expression in response to HMGB-1 stimulation and the involvement of MT1-MMP in endothelial cells. METHODS AND RESULTS: Pull-down assays and Western blotting revealed that HMGB-1 induced RhoA/Rac1 activation and NF-kB phosphorylation in cultured human aortic endothelial cells. HMGB-1 increased the activity of MT1-MMP, and inhibition of RAGE or MT1-MMP by siRNA suppressed HMGB-1-induced TF upregulation as well as HMGB-1-triggered RhoA/Rac1 activation and NF-kB phosphorylation. CONCLUSIONS: The present study showed that RAGE/MT1-MMP axis modified HMBG-1-mediated TF expression through RhoA and Rac1 activation and NF-κB phosphorylation in endothelial cells. These results suggested that MT1-MMP was involved in vascular inflammation and might be a good target for treating atherosclerosis.

  14. 29 CFR 779.205 - Enterprise must consist of “related activities.”

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Enterprise must consist of ârelated activities.â 779.205... STANDARDS ACT AS APPLIED TO RETAILERS OF GOODS OR SERVICES Employment to Which the Act May Apply; Enterprise Coverage Related Activities § 779.205 Enterprise must consist of “related activities.” The enterprise must...

  15. Downregulation of RND3/RhoE in glioblastoma patients promotes tumorigenesis through augmentation of notch transcriptional complex activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Baohui; Lin, Xi; Yang, Xiangsheng; Dong, Huimin; Yue, Xiaojing; Andrade, Kelsey C; Guo, Zhentao; Yang, Jian; Wu, Liquan; Zhu, Xiaonan; Zhang, Shenqi; Tian, Daofeng; Wang, Junmin; Cai, Qiang; Chen, Qizuan; Mao, Shanping; Chen, Qianxue; Chang, Jiang

    2015-01-01

    Activation of Notch signaling contributes to glioblastoma multiform (GBM) tumorigenesis. However, the molecular mechanism that promotes the Notch signaling augmentation during GBM genesis remains largely unknown. Identification of new factors that regulate Notch signaling is critical for tumor treatment. The expression levels of RND3 and its clinical implication were analyzed in GBM patients. Identification of RND3 as a novel factor in GBM genesis was demonstrated in vitro by cell experiments and in vivo by a GBM xenograft model. We found that RND3 expression was significantly decreased in human glioblastoma. The levels of RND3 expression were inversely correlated with Notch activity, tumor size, and tumor cell proliferation, and positively correlated with patient survival time. We demonstrated that RND3 functioned as an endogenous repressor of the Notch transcriptional complex. RND3 physically interacted with NICD, CSL, and MAML1, the Notch transcriptional complex factors, promoted NICD ubiquitination, and facilitated the degradation of these cofactor proteins. We further revealed that RND3 facilitated the binding of NICD to FBW7, a ubiquitin ligase, and consequently enhanced NICD protein degradation. Therefore, Notch transcriptional activity was inhibited. Forced expression of RND3 repressed Notch signaling, which led to the inhibition of glioblastoma cell proliferation in vitro and tumor growth in the xenograft mice in vivo. Downregulation of RND3, however, enhanced Notch signaling activity, and subsequently promoted glioma cell proliferation. Inhibition of Notch activity abolished RND3 deficiency-mediated GBM cell proliferation. We conclude that downregulation of RND3 is responsible for the enhancement of Notch activity that promotes glioblastoma genesis

  16. RhoA Activation Sensitizes Cells to Proteotoxic Stimuli by Abrogating the HSF1-Dependent Heat Shock Response

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijering, Roelien A. M.; Wiersma, Marit; van Marion, Denise M. S.; Zhang, Deli; Hoogstra-Berends, Femke; Dijkhuis, Anne-Jan; Schmidt, Martina; Wieland, Thomas; Kampinga, Harm H.; Henning, Robert H.; Brundel, Bianca J. J. M.

    2015-01-01

    Background The heat shock response (HSR) is an ancient and highly conserved program of stress-induced gene expression, aimed at reestablishing protein homeostasis to preserve cellular fitness. Cells that fail to activate or maintain this protective response are hypersensitive to proteotoxic stress.

  17. Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs enhance metastatic properties of breast cancer cells by activating Rho-associated kinase (ROCK.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sijin Liu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs are a family of structurally related chlorinated aromatic hydrocarbons. Numerous studies have documented a wide spectrum of biological effects of PCBs on human health, such as immunotoxicity, neurotoxicity, estrogenic or antiestrogenic activity, and carcinogenesis. The role of PCBs as etiologic agents for breast cancer has been intensively explored in a variety of in vivo, animal and epidemiologic studies. A number of investigations indicated that higher levels of PCBs in mammary tissues or sera correlated to breast cancer risk, and PCBs might be implicated in advancing breast cancer progression. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In the current study, we for the first time report that PCBs greatly promote the ROCK activity and therefore increase cell motility for both non-metastatic and metastatic human breast cancer cells in vitro. In the in vivo study, PCBs significantly advance disease progression, leading to enhanced capability of metastatic breast cancer cells to metastasize to bone, lung and liver. Additionally, PCBs robustly induce the production of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS in breast cancer cells; ROS mechanistically elevate ROCK activity. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: PCBs enhance the metastatic propensity of breast cancer cells by activating the ROCK signaling, which is dependent on ROS induced by PCBs. Inhibition of ROCK may stand for a unique way to restrain metastases in breast cancer upon PCB exposure.

  18. The Rac-RhoGDI complex and the structural basis for the regulation of Rho proteins by RhoGDI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheffzek, K; Stephan, I; Jensen, Ole Nørregaard

    2000-01-01

    Rho family-specific guanine nucleotide dissociation inhibitors (RhoGDIs) decrease the rate of nucleotide dissociation and release Rho proteins such as RhoA, Rac and Cdc42 from membranes, forming tight complexes that shuttle between cytosol and membrane compartments. We have solved the crystal...

  19. Identification of a GTP-bound Rho specific scFv molecular sensor by phage display selection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chinestra Patrick

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Rho GTPases A, B and C proteins, members of the Rho family whose activity is regulated by GDP/GTP cycling, function in many cellular pathways controlling proliferation and have recently been implicated in tumorigenesis. Although overexpression of Rho GTPases has been correlated with tumorigenesis, only their GTP-bound forms are able to activate the signalling pathways implicated in tumorigenesis. Thus, the focus of much recent research has been to identify biological tools capable of quantifying the level of cellular GTP-bound Rho, or determining the subcellular location of activation. However useful, these tools used to study the mechanism of Rho activation still have limitations. The aim of the present work was to employ phage display to identify a conformationally-specific single chain fragment variable (scFv that recognizes the active, GTP-bound, form of Rho GTPases and is able to discriminate it from the inactive, GDP-bound, Rho in endogenous settings. Results After five rounds of phage selection using a constitutively activated mutant of RhoB (RhoBQ63L, three scFvs (A8, C1 and D11 were selected for subsequent analysis. Further biochemical characterization was pursued for the single clone, C1, exhibiting an scFv structure. C1 was selective for the GTP-bound form of RhoA, RhoB, as well as RhoC, and failed to recognize GTP-loaded Rac1 or Cdc42, two other members of the Rho family. To enhance its production, soluble C1 was expressed in fusion with the N-terminal domain of phage protein pIII (scFv C1-N1N2, it appeared specifically associated with GTP-loaded recombinant RhoA and RhoB via immunoprecipitation, and endogenous activated Rho in HeLa cells as determined by immunofluorescence. Conclusion We identified an antibody, C1-N1N2, specific for the GTP-bound form of RhoB from a phage library, and confirmed its specificity towards GTP-bound RhoA and RhoC, as well as RhoB. The success of C1-N1N2 in discriminating activated

  20. 18- and 24-month-olds' discrimination of gender-consistent and inconsistent activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Sara E; Flom, Ross

    2007-02-01

    18- and 24-month-olds' ability to discriminate gender-stereotyped activities was assessed. Using a preferential looking paradigm, toddlers viewed male and female actors performing masculine and feminine-stereotyped activities. Consistent with our predictions, and previous research, 24-month-olds, but not 18-month-olds, looked longer at the gender-inconsistent activities than the gender-consistent activities. Results are discussed in terms of toddlers emerging gender stereotypes and perception of everyday events.

  1. Rho GTPase expression in human myeloid cells.

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    Suzanne F G van Helden

    Full Text Available Myeloid cells are critical for innate immunity and the initiation of adaptive immunity. Strict regulation of the adhesive and migratory behavior is essential for proper functioning of these cells. Rho GTPases are important regulators of adhesion and migration; however, it is unknown which Rho GTPases are expressed in different myeloid cells. Here, we use a qPCR-based approach to investigate Rho GTPase expression in myeloid cells.We found that the mRNAs encoding Cdc42, RhoQ, Rac1, Rac2, RhoA and RhoC are the most abundant. In addition, RhoG, RhoB, RhoF and RhoV are expressed at low levels or only in specific cell types. More differentiated cells along the monocyte-lineage display lower levels of Cdc42 and RhoV, while RhoC mRNA is more abundant. In addition, the Rho GTPase expression profile changes during dendritic cell maturation with Rac1 being upregulated and Rac2 downregulated. Finally, GM-CSF stimulation, during macrophage and osteoclast differentiation, leads to high expression of Rac2, while M-CSF induces high levels of RhoA, showing that these cytokines induce a distinct pattern. Our data uncover cell type specific modulation of the Rho GTPase expression profile in hematopoietic stem cells and in more differentiated cells of the myeloid lineage.

  2. RhoA and RhoC are involved in stromal cell-derived factor-1-induced cell migration by regulating F-actin redistribution and assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Jixian; Li, Dingyun; Wei, Dan; Wang, Xiaoguang; Wang, Lan; Zeng, Xianlu

    2017-12-01

    Stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1) signaling is important to the maintenance and progression of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia by inducing chemotaxis migration. To identify the mechanism of SDF-1 signaling in the migration of T-ALL, Jurkat acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells were used. Results showed that SDF-1 induces Jurkat cell migration by F-actin redistribution and assembly, which is dependent on Rho activity. SDF-1 induced RhoA and RhoC activation, as well as reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, which was inhibited by Rho inhibitor. The Rho-dependent ROS production led to subsequent cytoskeleton redistribution and assembly in the process of migration. Additionally, RhoA and RhoC were involved in SDF-1-induced Jurkat cell migration. Taken together, we found a SDF-1/CXCR4-RhoA and RhoC-ROS-cytoskeleton pathway that regulates Jurkat cell migration in response to SDF-1. This work will contribute to a clearer insight into the migration mechanism of acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

  3. Regulation of mitotic spindle formation by the RhoA guanine nucleotide exchange factor ARHGEF10

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    Satoh Takaya

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Dbl family guanine nucleotide exchange factor ARHGEF10 was originally identified as the product of the gene associated with slowed nerve-conduction velocities of peripheral nerves. However, the function of ARHGEF10 in mammalian cells is totally unknown at a molecular level. ARHGEF10 contains no distinctive functional domains except for tandem Dbl homology-pleckstrin homology and putative transmembrane domains. Results Here we show that RhoA is a substrate for ARHGEF10. In both G1/S and M phases, ARHGEF10 was localized in the centrosome in adenocarcinoma HeLa cells. Furthermore, RNA interference-based knockdown of ARHGEF10 resulted in multipolar spindle formation in M phase. Each spindle pole seems to contain a centrosome consisting of two centrioles and the pericentriolar material. Downregulation of RhoA elicited similar phenotypes, and aberrant mitotic spindle formation following ARHGEF10 knockdown was rescued by ectopic expression of constitutively activated RhoA. Multinucleated cells were not increased upon ARHGEF10 knockdown in contrast to treatment with Y-27632, a specific pharmacological inhibitor for the RhoA effector kinase ROCK, which induced not only multipolar spindle formation, but also multinucleation. Therefore, unregulated centrosome duplication rather than aberration in cytokinesis may be responsible for ARHGEF10 knockdown-dependent multipolar spindle formation. We further isolated the kinesin-like motor protein KIF3B as a binding partner of ARHGEF10. Knockdown of KIF3B again caused multipolar spindle phenotypes. The supernumerary centrosome phenotype was also observed in S phase-arrested osteosarcoma U2OS cells when the expression of ARHGEF10, RhoA or KIF3B was abrogated by RNA interference. Conclusion Collectively, our results suggest that a novel RhoA-dependent signaling pathway under the control of ARHGEF10 has a pivotal role in the regulation of the cell division cycle. This pathway is not involved in

  4. BAR domain proteins regulate Rho GTPase signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aspenström, Pontus

    2014-01-01

    BAR proteins comprise a heterogeneous group of multi-domain proteins with diverse biological functions. The common denominator is the Bin-Amphiphysin-Rvs (BAR) domain that not only confers targeting to lipid bilayers, but also provides scaffolding to mold lipid membranes into concave or convex surfaces. This function of BAR proteins is an important determinant in the dynamic reconstruction of membrane vesicles, as well as of the plasma membrane. Several BAR proteins function as linkers between cytoskeletal regulation and membrane dynamics. These links are provided by direct interactions between BAR proteins and actin-nucleation-promoting factors of the Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein family and the Diaphanous-related formins. The Rho GTPases are key factors for orchestration of this intricate interplay. This review describes how BAR proteins regulate the activity of Rho GTPases, as well as how Rho GTPases regulate the function of BAR proteins. This mutual collaboration is a central factor in the regulation of vital cellular processes, such as cell migration, cytokinesis, intracellular transport, endocytosis, and exocytosis.

  5. The small GTPase RhoH is an atypical regulator of haematopoietic cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kubatzky Katharina F

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Rho GTPases are a distinct subfamily of the superfamily of Ras GTPases. The best-characterised members are RhoA, Rac and Cdc42 that regulate many diverse actions such as actin cytoskeleton reorganisation, adhesion, motility as well as cell proliferation, differentiation and gene transcription. Among the 20 members of that family, only Rac2 and RhoH show an expression restricted to the haematopoietic lineage. RhoH was first discovered in 1995 as a fusion transcript with the transcriptional repressor LAZ3/BCL6. It was therefore initially named translation three four (TTF but later on renamed RhoH due to its close relationship to the Ras/Rho family of GTPases. Since then, RhoH has been implicated in human cancer as the gene is subject to somatic hypermutation and by the detection of RHOH as a translocation partner for LAZ3/BCL6 or other genes in human lymphomas. Underexpression of RhoH is found in hairy cell leukaemia and acute myeloid leukaemia. Some of the amino acids that are crucial for GTPase activity are mutated in RhoH so that the protein is a GTPase-deficient, so-called atypical Rho GTPase. Therefore other mechanisms of regulating RhoH activity have been described. These include regulation at the mRNA level and tyrosine phosphorylation of the protein's unique ITAM-like motif. The C-terminal CaaX box of RhoH is mainly a target for farnesyl-transferase but can also be modified by geranylgeranyl-transferase. Isoprenylation of RhoH and changes in subcellular localisation may be an additional factor to fine-tune signalling. Little is currently known about its signalling, regulation or interaction partners. Recent studies have shown that RhoH negatively influences the proliferation and homing of murine haematopoietic progenitor cells, presumably by acting as an antagonist for Rac1. In leukocytes, RhoH is needed to keep the cells in a resting, non-adhesive state, but the exact mechanism has yet to be elucidated. RhoH has also been

  6. RhoE deficiency produces postnatal lethality, profound motor deficits and neurodevelopmental delay in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enric Mocholí

    Full Text Available Rnd proteins are a subfamily of Rho GTPases involved in the control of actin cytoskeleton dynamics and other cell functions such as motility, proliferation and survival. Unlike other members of the Rho family, Rnd proteins lack GTPase activity and therefore remain constitutively active. We have recently described that RhoE/Rnd3 is expressed in the Central Nervous System and that it has a role in promoting neurite formation. Despite their possible relevance during development, the role of Rnd proteins in vivo is not known. To get insight into the in vivo function of RhoE we have generated mice lacking RhoE expression by an exon trapping cassette. RhoE null mice (RhoE gt/gt are smaller at birth, display growth retardation and early postnatal death since only half of RhoE gt/gt mice survive beyond postnatal day (PD 15 and 100% are dead by PD 29. RhoE gt/gt mice show an abnormal body position with profound motor impairment and impaired performance in most neurobehavioral tests. Null mutant mice are hypoactive, show an immature locomotor pattern and display a significant delay in the appearance of the hindlimb mature responses. Moreover, they perform worse than the control littermates in the wire suspension, vertical climbing and clinging, righting reflex and negative geotaxis tests. Also, RhoE ablation results in a delay of neuromuscular maturation and in a reduction in the number of spinal motor neurons. Finally, RhoE gt/gt mice lack the common peroneal nerve and, consequently, show a complete atrophy of the target muscles. This is the first model to study the in vivo functions of a member of the Rnd subfamily of proteins, revealing the important role of Rnd3/RhoE in the normal development and suggesting the possible involvement of this protein in neurological disorders.

  7. BFKL resummation effects in gamma* gamma* to rho rho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Enberg, R.; Pire, B.; Szymanowski, L.; Wallon, S.

    2005-08-11

    We calculate the leading order BFKL amplitude for the exclusive diffractive process {gamma}*{sub L}(Q{sub 1}{sup 2}) {gamma}*{sub L}(Q{sub 2}{sup 2}) {yields} {rho}{sub L}{sup 0}{rho}{sub L}{sup 0} in the forward direction, which can be studied in future high energy e{sup +}e{sup -} linear colliders. The resummation effects are very large compared to the fixed-order calculation. We also estimate the next-to-leading logarithmic corrections to the amplitude by using a specific resummation of higher order effects and find a substantial growth with energy, but smaller than in the leading logarithmic approximation.

  8. Rho family GTP binding proteins are involved in the regulatory volume decrease process in NIH3T3 mouse fibroblasts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Stine F; Beisner, Kristine H; Willumsen, Berthe M

    2002-01-01

    The role of Rho GTPases in the regulatory volume decrease (RVD) process following osmotic cell swelling is controversial and has so far only been investigated for the swelling-activated Cl- efflux. We investigated the involvement of RhoA in the RVD process in NIH3T3 mouse fibroblasts, using wild......-type cells and three clones expressing constitutively active RhoA (RhoAV14). RhoAV14 expression resulted in an up to fourfold increase in the rate of RVD, measured by large-angle light scattering. The increase in RVD rate correlated with RhoAV14 expression. RVD in wild-type cells was unaffected by the Rho...

  9. Internal consistency of the CHAMPS physical activity questionnaire for Spanish speaking older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosario, Martín G; Vázquez, Jenniffer M; Cruz, Wanda I; Ortiz, Alexis

    2008-09-01

    The Community Healthy Activities Model Program for Seniors (CHAMPS) is a physical activity monitoring questionnaire for people between 65 to 90 years old. This questionnaire has been previously translated to Spanish to be used in the Latin American population. To adapt the Spanish version of the CHAMPS questionnaire to Puerto Rico and assess its internal consistency. An external review committee adapted the existent Spanish version of the CHAMPS to be used in the Puerto Rican population. Three older adults participated in a second phase with the purpose of training the research team. After the second phase, 35 older adults participated in a third content adaptation phase. During the third phase, the preliminary Spanish version for Puerto Rico of the CHAMPS was given to the 35 participants to assess for clarity, vocabulary and understandability. Interviews to each participant in the third phase were carried out to obtain feedback and create a final Spanish version of the CHAMPS for Puerto Rico. After analyses of this phase, the external review committee prepared a final Spanish version of the CHAMPS for Puerto Rico. The final version was administered to 15 older adults (76 +/- 6.5 years) to assess the internal consistency by using Cronbach's Alpha analysis. The questionnaire showed a strong internal consistency of 0.76. The total time to answer the questionnaire was 17.4 minutes. The Spanish version of the CHAMPS questionnaire for Puerto Rico suggested being an easy to administer and consistent measurement tool to assess physical activity in older adults.

  10. fMRI activation patterns in an analytic reasoning task: consistency with EEG source localization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bian; Vasanta, Kalyana C.; O'Boyle, Michael; Baker, Mary C.; Nutter, Brian; Mitra, Sunanda

    2010-03-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is used to model brain activation patterns associated with various perceptual and cognitive processes as reflected by the hemodynamic (BOLD) response. While many sensory and motor tasks are associated with relatively simple activation patterns in localized regions, higher-order cognitive tasks may produce activity in many different brain areas involving complex neural circuitry. We applied a recently proposed probabilistic independent component analysis technique (PICA) to determine the true dimensionality of the fMRI data and used EEG localization to identify the common activated patterns (mapped as Brodmann areas) associated with a complex cognitive task like analytic reasoning. Our preliminary study suggests that a hybrid GLM/PICA analysis may reveal additional regions of activation (beyond simple GLM) that are consistent with electroencephalography (EEG) source localization patterns.

  11. Consistency in boldness, activity and exploration at different stages of life

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Animals show consistent individual behavioural patterns over time and over situations. This phenomenon has been referred to as animal personality or behavioural syndromes. Little is known about consistency of animal personalities over entire life times. We investigated the repeatability of behaviour in common voles (Microtus arvalis) at different life stages, with different time intervals, and in different situations. Animals were tested using four behavioural tests in three experimental groups: 1. before and after maturation over three months, 2. twice as adults during one week, and 3. twice as adult animals over three months, which resembles a substantial part of their entire adult life span of several months. Results Different behaviours were correlated within and between tests and a cluster analysis showed three possible behavioural syndrome-axes, which we name boldness, exploration and activity. Activity and exploration behaviour in all tests was highly repeatable in adult animals tested over one week. In animals tested over maturation, exploration behaviour was consistent whereas activity was not. Voles that were tested as adults with a three-month interval showed the opposite pattern with stable activity but unstable exploration behaviour. Conclusions The consistency in behaviour over time suggests that common voles do express stable personality over short time. Over longer periods however, behaviour is more flexible and depending on life stage (i.e. tested before/after maturation or as adults) of the tested individual. Level of boldness or activity does not differ between tested groups and maintenance of variation in behavioural traits can therefore not be explained by expected future assets as reported in other studies. PMID:24314274

  12. RhoA determines disease progression by controlling neutrophil motility and restricting hyperresponsiveness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jennings, Richard T; Strengert, Monika; Hayes, Patti

    2014-01-01

    Neutrophil responses are central to host protection and inflammation. Neutrophil activation follows a two-step process where priming amplifies responses to activating stimuli. Priming is essential for life span extension, chemotaxis and respiratory burst activity. Here we show that the cytoskeletal...... organizer RhoA suppresses neutrophil priming via formins. Premature granule exocytosis in Rho-deficient neutrophils activated numerous signaling pathways and amplified superoxide generation. Deletion of Rho altered front-to-back coordination by simultaneously increasing uropod elongation, leading edge...... neutrophils exacerbated LPS-mediated lung injury, deleting Rho in innate immune cells was highly protective in Influenza A virus infection. Hence, Rho is a key regulator of disease progression by maintaining neutrophil quiescence and suppressing hyperresponsiveness....

  13. Upregulated STAT3 and RhoA signaling in colorectal cancer (CRC) regulate the invasion and migration of CRC cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, G-Y; Yang, W-H; Chen, Z

    2016-05-01

    We aimed to reveal the expression and activation of signal transducers and activators of transcription 3 (STAT3) and RhoA/Rho-associated coiled-coil forming kinase 1 (ROCK1) signaling in CRC tissues, and to investigate the regulatory role of STAT3 and RhoA signaling in the invasion and migration of colorectal cancer cells. We examined the expression of STAT3, RhoA and ROCK1 in CRC tissues with real-time PCR and Western blotting methods. And then we examined the interaction between STAT3 and RhoA/ROCK1 signaling in CRC HT-29 cells with gain-of-function and loss-of-function strategies. In addition, we determined the regulation by STAT3 and RhoA/ROCK1 on the invasion and migration of CRC HT-29 cells. Our study demonstrated a significant upregulation of RhoA and ROCK1 expression and STAT3-Y705 phosphorylation in 32 CRC specimens, compared to the 17 normal CRC tissues. Further study demonstrated there was a coordination between STAT3 and RhoA/Rock signaling in the HT-29 cells. Moreover, STAT3 knockdown or RhoA knockdown significantly repressed the migration and invasion in HT-29 cells and vice versa. STAT3 and RhoA signaling regulate the invasion and migration of CRC cells, implying the orchestrated and oncogenic roles of STAT3 and RhoA/ROCK1 signaling in CRC.

  14. Calibration and consistency of results of an ionization-chamber secondary standard measuring system for activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schrader, Heinrich

    2000-01-01

    Calibration in terms of activity of the ionization-chamber secondary standard measuring systems at the PTB is described. The measurement results of a Centronic IG12/A20, a Vinten ISOCAL IV and a radionuclide calibrator chamber for nuclear medicine applications are discussed, their energy-dependent efficiency curves established and the consistency checked using recently evaluated radionuclide decay data. Criteria for evaluating and transferring calibration factors (or efficiencies) are given

  15. Second-Order Perturbation Theory for Generalized Active Space Self-Consistent-Field Wave Functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Dongxia; Li Manni, Giovanni; Olsen, Jeppe; Gagliardi, Laura

    2016-07-12

    A multireference second-order perturbation theory approach based on the generalized active space self-consistent-field (GASSCF) wave function is presented. Compared with the complete active space (CAS) and restricted active space (RAS) wave functions, GAS wave functions are more flexible and can employ larger active spaces and/or different truncations of the configuration interaction expansion. With GASSCF, one can explore chemical systems that are not affordable with either CASSCF or RASSCF. Perturbation theory to second order on top of GAS wave functions (GASPT2) has been implemented to recover the remaining electron correlation. The method has been benchmarked by computing the chromium dimer ground-state potential energy curve. These calculations show that GASPT2 gives results similar to CASPT2 even with a configuration interaction expansion much smaller than the corresponding CAS expansion.

  16. The interdependence of the Rho GTPases and apicobasal cell polarity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mack, Natalie Ann; Georgiou, Marios

    2014-01-01

    Signaling via the Rho GTPases provides crucial regulation of numerous cell polarization events, including apicobasal (AB) polarity, polarized cell migration, polarized cell division and neuronal polarity. Here we review the relationships between the Rho family GTPases and epithelial AB polarization events, focusing on the 3 best-characterized members: Rho, Rac and Cdc42. We discuss a multitude of processes that are important for AB polarization, including lumen formation, apical membrane specification, cell-cell junction assembly and maintenance, as well as tissue polarity. Our discussions aim to highlight the immensely complex regulatory mechanisms that encompass Rho GTPase signaling during AB polarization. More specifically, in this review we discuss several emerging common themes, that include: 1) the need for Rho GTPase activities to be carefully balanced in both a spatial and temporal manner through a multitude of mechanisms; 2) the existence of signaling feedback loops and crosstalk to create robust cellular responses; and 3) the frequent multifunctionality that exists among AB polarity regulators. Regarding this latter theme, we provide further discussion of the potential plasticity of the cell polarity machinery and as a result the possible implications for human disease.

  17. Rho-associated kinase is a therapeutic target in neuroblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyberg, Cecilia; Fransson, Susanne; Andonova, Teodora; Sveinbjörnsson, Baldur; Lännerholm-Palm, Jessika; Olsen, Thale K; Forsberg, David; Herlenius, Eric; Martinsson, Tommy; Brodin, Bertha; Kogner, Per; Johnsen, John Inge; Wickström, Malin

    2017-08-08

    Neuroblastoma is a peripheral neural system tumor that originates from the neural crest and is the most common and deadly tumor of infancy. Here we show that neuroblastoma harbors frequent mutations of genes controlling the Rac/Rho signaling cascade important for proper migration and differentiation of neural crest cells during neuritogenesis. RhoA is activated in tumors from neuroblastoma patients, and elevated expression of Rho-associated kinase (ROCK)2 is associated with poor patient survival. Pharmacological or genetic inhibition of ROCK1 and 2, key molecules in Rho signaling, resulted in neuroblastoma cell differentiation and inhibition of neuroblastoma cell growth, migration, and invasion. Molecularly, ROCK inhibition induced glycogen synthase kinase 3β-dependent phosphorylation and degradation of MYCN protein. Small-molecule inhibition of ROCK suppressed MYCN -driven neuroblastoma growth in TH- MYCN homozygous transgenic mice and MYCN gene-amplified neuroblastoma xenograft growth in nude mice. Interference with Rho/Rac signaling might offer therapeutic perspectives for high-risk neuroblastoma.

  18. Rho GTPases in ameloblast differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keishi Otsu

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available During tooth development, ameloblasts differentiate from inner enamel epithelial cells to enamel-forming cells by modulating the signal pathways mediating epithelial–mesenchymal interaction and a cell-autonomous gene network. The differentiation process of epithelial cells is characterized by marked changes in their morphology and polarity, accompanied by dynamic cytoskeletal reorganization and changes in cell–cell and cell–matrix adhesion over time. Functional ameloblasts are tall, columnar, polarized cells that synthesize and secrete enamel-specific proteins. After deposition of the full thickness of enamel matrix, ameloblasts become smaller and regulate enamel maturation. Recent significant advances in the fields of molecular biology and genetics have improved our understanding of the regulatory mechanism of the ameloblast cell life cycle, mediated by the Rho family of small GTPases. They act as intracellular molecular switch that transduce signals from extracellular stimuli to the actin cytoskeleton and the nucleus. In our review, we summarize studies that provide current evidence for Rho GTPases and their involvement in ameloblast differentiation. In addition to the Rho GTPases themselves, their downstream effectors and upstream regulators have also been implicated in ameloblast differentiation.

  19. Allergic sensitization enhances the contribution of Rho-kinase to airway smooth muscle contraction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaafsma, D.; Gosens, Reinout; Bos, I.S.T.; Meurs, Herman; Zaagsma, Hans; Nelemans, Herman

    2004-01-01

    1 Repeated allergen challenge has been shown to increase the role of Rho-kinase in airway smooth muscle (ASM) contraction. We considered the possibility that active allergic sensitization by itself, that is, without subsequent allergen exposure, could be sufficient to enhance Rho-kinase-mediated ASM

  20. Partial contribution of Rho-kinase inhibition to the bioactivity of Ganoderma lingzhi and its isolated compounds: insights on discovery of natural Rho-kinase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amen, Yhiya; Zhu, Qinchang; Tran, Hai-Bang; Afifi, Mohamed S; Halim, Ahmed F; Ashour, Ahmed; Shimizu, Kuniyoshi

    2017-04-01

    Recent studies identified Rho-kinase enzymes (ROCK-I and ROCK-II) as important targets that are involved in a variety of diseases. Synthetic Rho-kinase inhibitors have emerged as potential therapeutic agents to treat disorders such as hypertension, stroke, cancer, diabetes, glaucoma, etc. Our study is the first to screen the total ethanol extract of the medicinal mushroom Ganoderma lingzhi with thirty-five compounds for Rho-kinase inhibitory activity. Moreover, a molecular binding experiment was designed to investigate the binding affinity of the compounds at the active sites of Rho-kinase enzymes. The structure-activity relationship analysis was investigated. Our results suggest that the traditional uses of G. lingzhi might be in part due to the ROCK-I and ROCK-II inhibitory potential of this mushroom. Structure-activity relationship studies revealed some interesting features of the lanostane triterpenes that potentiate their Rho-kinase inhibition. These findings would be helpful for further studies on the design of Rho-kinase inhibitors from natural sources and open the door for contributions from other researchers for optimizing the development of natural Rho-kinase inhibitors.

  1. Consistent selection towards low activity phenotypes when catchability depends on encounters among human predators and fish.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josep Alós

    Full Text Available Together with life-history and underlying physiology, the behavioural variability among fish is one of the three main trait axes that determines the vulnerability to fishing. However, there are only a few studies that have systematically investigated the strength and direction of selection acting on behavioural traits. Using in situ fish behaviour revealed by telemetry techniques as input, we developed an individual-based model (IBM that simulated the Lagrangian trajectory of prey (fish moving within a confined home range (HR. Fishers exhibiting various prototypical fishing styles targeted these fish in the model. We initially hypothesised that more active and more explorative individuals would be systematically removed under all fished conditions, in turn creating negative selection differentials on low activity phenotypes and maybe on small HR. Our results partly supported these general predictions. Standardised selection differentials were, on average, more negative on HR than on activity. However, in many simulation runs, positive selection pressures on HR were also identified, which resulted from the stochastic properties of the fishes' movement and its interaction with the human predator. In contrast, there was a consistent negative selection on activity under all types of fishing styles. Therefore, in situations where catchability depends on spatial encounters between human predators and fish, we would predict a consistent selection towards low activity phenotypes and have less faith in the direction of the selection on HR size. Our study is the first theoretical investigation on the direction of fishery-induced selection of behaviour using passive fishing gears. The few empirical studies where catchability of fish was measured in relation to passive fishing techniques, such as gill-nets, traps or recreational fishing, support our predictions that fish in highly exploited situations are, on average, characterised by low swimming activity

  2. Childhood Sexual Violence and Consistent, Effective Contraception Use among Young, Sexually Active Urban Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Deborah B; Lepore, Stephen J; Mastrogiannis, Dimitrios S

    2015-05-22

    Unintended pregnancy (UP) is a significant public health problem. The consistent use of effective contraception is the primary method to prevent UP. We examined the role of childhood sexual and physical violence and current interpersonal violence on the risk of unintended pregnancy among young, urban, sexually active women. In particular, we were interested in examining the role of childhood violence and interpersonal violence while recognizing the psychological correlates of experiencing violence (i.e., high depressive symptoms and low self-esteem) and consistent use of contraception. For this assessment, 315 sexually active women living in Philadelphia PA were recruited from family planning clinics in 2013. A self-administered, computer-assisted interview was used to collect data on method of contraception use in the past month, consistency of use, experiences with violence, levels of depressive symptoms, self-esteem and sexual self-efficacy, substance use and health services utilization. Fifty percent of young sexually active women reported inconsistent or no contraception use in the past month. Inconsistent users were significantly more likely to report at least one prior episode of childhood sexual violence and were significantly less likely to have received a prescription for contraception from a health care provider. Inconsistent contraception users also reported significantly higher levels of depressive symptoms and significantly lower levels of self-esteem. The relation between childhood sexual violence and UP remained unchanged in the multivariate models adjusting for self-esteem or depressive symptoms. These findings highlight the long-term consequences of childhood sexual violence, independent of current depressive symptoms and low self-esteem, on consistent use of contraception.

  3. Childhood Sexual Violence and Consistent, Effective Contraception Use among Young, Sexually Active Urban Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah B. Nelson

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Unintended pregnancy (UP is a significant public health problem. The consistent use of effective contraception is the primary method to prevent UP. We examined the role of childhood sexual and physical violence and current interpersonal violence on the risk of unintended pregnancy among young, urban, sexually active women. In particular, we were interested in examining the role of childhood violence and interpersonal violence while recognizing the psychological correlates of experiencing violence (i.e., high depressive symptoms and low self-esteem and consistent use of contraception. For this assessment, 315 sexually active women living in Philadelphia PA were recruited from family planning clinics in 2013. A self-administered, computer-assisted interview was used to collect data on method of contraception use in the past month, consistency of use, experiences with violence, levels of depressive symptoms, self-esteem and sexual self-efficacy, substance use and health services utilization. Fifty percent of young sexually active women reported inconsistent or no contraception use in the past month. Inconsistent users were significantly more likely to report at least one prior episode of childhood sexual violence and were significantly less likely to have received a prescription for contraception from a health care provider. Inconsistent contraception users also reported significantly higher levels of depressive symptoms and significantly lower levels of self-esteem. The relation between childhood sexual violence and UP remained unchanged in the multivariate models adjusting for self-esteem or depressive symptoms. These findings highlight the long-term consequences of childhood sexual violence, independent of current depressive symptoms and low self-esteem, on consistent use of contraception.

  4. Grb2 mediates semaphorin-4D-dependent RhoA inactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Tianliang; Krishnan, Rameshkumar; Swiercz, Jakub M

    2012-08-01

    Signaling through the semaphorin 4D (Sema4D) receptor plexin-B1 is modulated by its interaction with tyrosine kinases ErbB-2 and Met. In cells expressing the plexin-B1-ErbB-2 receptor complex, ligand stimulation results in the activation of small GTPase RhoA and stimulation of cellular migration. By contrast, in cells expressing plexin-B1 and Met, ligand stimulation results in an association with the RhoGTPase-activating protein p190 RhoGAP and subsequent RhoA inactivation--a process that involves the tyrosine phosphorylation of plexin-B1 by Met. Inactivation of RhoA is necessary for Sema4D-mediated inhibition of cellular migration. It is, however, unknown how plexin-B1 phosphorylation regulates RhoGAP interaction and activity. Here we show that the activation of plexin-B1 by Sema4D and its subsequent tyrosine phosphorylation by Met creates a docking site for the SH2 domain of growth factor receptor bound-2 (Grb2). Grb2 is thereby recruited into the plexin-B1 receptor complex and, through its SH3 domain, interacts with p190 RhoGAP and mediates RhoA deactivation. Phosphorylation of plexin-B1 by Met and the recruitment of Grb2 have no effect on the R-RasGAP activity of plexin-B1, but are required for Sema4D-induced, RhoA-dependent antimigratory effects of Sema4D on breast cancer cells. These data show Grb2 as a direct link between plexin and p190-RhoGAP-mediated downstream signaling.

  5. TrkB-T1 regulates the RhoA signaling and actin cytoskeleton in glioma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohira, Koji; Homma, Koichi J.; Hirai, Hirohisa; Nakamura, Shun; Hayashi, Motoharu

    2006-01-01

    Recently, the truncated TrkB receptor, T1, has been reported to be involved in the control of cell morphology via the regulation of Rho proteins, through which T1 binds Rho guanine nucleotide dissociation inhibitor (Rho GDI) 1 and dissociates it in a brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF)-dependent manner. However, it is unclear whether T1 signaling regulates the downstream of Rho signaling and the actin cytoskeleton. In this study, we investigated this question using C6 rat glioma cells, which express T1 endogenously. Rho GDI1 was dissociated from T1 in a BDNF-dependent manner, which also causes decreases in the activities of Rho-signaling molecules such as RhoA, Rho-associated kinase, p21-activated kinase, and extracellular-signal regulated kinase1/2. Moreover, BDNF treatment resulted in the disappearance of stress fibers in the cells treated with lysophosphatidic acid, an activator of RhoA, and in morphological changes in cells. Furthermore, a competitive assay with cyan fluorescent protein fusion proteins of T1-specific sequences reduced the effects of BDNF. These results suggest that T1 regulates the Rho-signaling pathways and the actin cytoskeleton

  6. Measurement of exclusive $\\rho^{+}\\rho^{-}$ production in mid-virtuality two-photon interactions and study of the $\\gamma \\gamma^{*} \\to \\rho\\rho$ process at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Achard, P.; Aguilar-Benitez, M.; Alcaraz, J.; Alemanni, G.; Allaby, J.; Aloisio, A.; Alviggi, M.G.; Anderhub, H.; Andreev, Valery P.; Anselmo, F.; Arefiev, A.; Azemoon, T.; Aziz, T.; Bagnaia, P.; Bajo, A.; Baksay, G.; Baksay, L.; Baldew, S.V.; Banerjee, S.; Banerjee, Sw.; Barczyk, A.; Barillere, R.; Bartalini, P.; Basile, M.; Batalova, N.; Battiston, R.; Bay, A.; Becattini, F.; Becker, U.; Behner, F.; Bellucci, L.; Berbeco, R.; Berdugo, J.; Berges, P.; Bertucci, B.; Betev, B.L.; Biasini, M.; Biglietti, M.; Biland, A.; Blaising, J.J.; Blyth, S.C.; Bobbink, G.J.; Bohm, A.; Boldizsar, L.; Borgia, B.; Bottai, S.; Bourilkov, D.; Bourquin, M.; Braccini, S.; Branson, J.G.; Brochu, F.; Burger, J.D.; Burger, W.J.; Cai, X.D.; Capell, M.; Cara Romeo, G.; Carlino, G.; Cartacci, A.; Casaus, J.; Cavallari, F.; Cavallo, N.; Cecchi, C.; Cerrada, M.; Chamizo, M.; Chang, Y.H.; Chemarin, M.; Chen, A.; Chen, G.; Chen, G.M.; Chen, H.F.; Chen, H.S.; Chiefari, G.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Clare, I.; Clare, R.; Coignet, G.; Colino, N.; Costantini, S.; de la Cruz, B.; Cucciarelli, S.; de Asmundis, R.; Deglon, P.; Debreczeni, J.; Degre, A.; Dehmelt, K.; Deiters, K.; della Volpe, D.; Delmeire, E.; Denes, P.; DeNotaristefani, F.; De Salvo, A.; Diemoz, M.; Dierckxsens, M.; Dionisi, C.; Dittmar, M.; Doria, A.; Dova, M.T.; Duchesneau, D.; Duda, M.; Echenard, B.; Eline, A.; El Hage, A.; El Mamouni, H.; Engler, A.; Eppling, F.J.; Extermann, P.; Falagan, M.A.; Falciano, S.; Favara, A.; Fay, J.; Fedin, O.; Felcini, M.; Ferguson, T.; Fesefeldt, H.; Fiandrini, E.; Field, J.H.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, P.H.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, I.; Forconi, G.; Freudenreich, K.; Furetta, C.; Galaktionov, Iouri; Ganguli, S.N.; Garcia-Abia, Pablo; Gataullin, M.; Gentile, S.; Giagu, S.; Gong, Z.F.; Grenier, Gerald Jean; Grimm, O.; Gruenewald, M.W.; Guida, M.; Gupta, V.K.; Gurtu, A.; Gutay, L.J.; Haas, D.; Hatzifotiadou, D.; Hebbeker, T.; Herve, Alain; Hirschfelder, J.; Hofer, H.; Hohlmann, M.; Holzner, G.; Hou, S.R.; Jin, B.N.; Jindal, P.; Jones, Lawrence W.; de Jong, P.; Josa-Mutuberria, I.; Kaur, M.; Kienzle-Focacci, M.N.; Kim, J.K.; Kirkby, Jasper; Kittel, W.; Klimentov, A.; Konig, A.C.; Kopal, M.; Koutsenko, V.; Kraber, M.; Kraemer, R.W.; Kruger, A.; Kunin, A.; Ladron de Guevara, P.; Laktineh, I.; Landi, G.; Lebeau, M.; Lebedev, A.; Lebrun, P.; Lecomte, P.; Lecoq, P.; Le Coultre, P.; Le Goff, J.M.; Leiste, R.; Levtchenko, M.; Levtchenko, P.; Li, C.; Likhoded, S.; Lin, C.H.; Lin, W.T.; Linde, F.L.; Lista, L.; Liu, Z.A.; Lohmann, W.; Longo, E.; Lu, Y.S.; Luci, C.; Luminari, L.; Lustermann, W.; Ma, W.G.; Malgeri, L.; Malinin, A.; Mana, C.; Mans, J.; Martin, J.P.; Marzano, F.; Mazumdar, K.; McNeil, R.R.; Mele, S.; Merola, L.; Meschini, M.; Metzger, W.J.; Mihul, A.; Milcent, H.; Mirabelli, G.; Mnich, J.; Mohanty, G.B.; Muanza, G.S.; Muijs, A.J.M.; Musicar, B.; Musy, M.; Nagy, S.; Natale, S.; Napolitano, M.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Newman, H.; Nisati, A.; Novak, T.; Kluge, Hannelies; Ofierzynski, R.; Organtini, G.; Pal, I.; Palomares, C.; Paolucci, P.; Paramatti, R.; Passaleva, G.; Patricelli, S.; Paul, Thomas Cantzon; Pauluzzi, M.; Paus, C.; Pauss, F.; Pedace, M.; Pensotti, S.; Perret-Gallix, D.; Piccolo, D.; Pierella, F.; Pioppi, M.; Piroue, P.A.; Pistolesi, E.; Plyaskin, V.; Pohl, M.; Pojidaev, V.; Pothier, J.; Prokofiev, D.; Rahal-Callot, G.; Rahaman, Mohammad Azizur; Raics, P.; Raja, N.; Ramelli, R.; Rancoita, P.G.; Ranieri, R.; Raspereza, A.; Razis, P.; Ren, D.; Rescigno, M.; Reucroft, S.; Riemann, S.; Riles, Keith; Roe, B.P.; Romero, L.; Rosca, A.; Rosemann, C.; Rosenbleck, C.; Rosier-Lees, S.; Roth, Stefan; Rubio, J.A.; Ruggiero, G.; Rykaczewski, H.; Sakharov, A.; Saremi, S.; Sarkar, S.; Salicio, J.; Sanchez, E.; Schafer, C.; Schegelsky, V.; Schopper, H.; Schotanus, D.J.; Sciacca, C.; Servoli, L.; Shevchenko, S.; Shivarov, N.; Shoutko, V.; Shumilov, E.; Shvorob, A.; Son, D.; Souga, C.; Spillantini, P.; Steuer, M.; Stickland, D.P.; Stoyanov, B.; Straessner, A.; Sudhakar, K.; Sultanov, G.; Sun, L.Z.; Sushkov, S.; Suter, H.; Swain, J.D.; Szillasi, Z.; Tang, X.W.; Tarjan, P.; Tauscher, L.; Taylor, L.; Tellili, B.; Teyssier, D.; Timmermans, Charles; Ting, Samuel C.C.; Ting, S.M.; Tonwar, S.C.; Toth, J.; Tully, C.; Tung, K.L.; Ulbricht, J.; Valente, E.; Van de Walle, R.T.; Vasquez, R.; Veszpremi, V.; Vesztergombi, G.; Vetlitsky, I.; Viertel, G.; Villa, S.; Vivargent, M.; Vlachos, S.; Vodopianov, I.; Vogel, H.; Vogt, H.; Vorobiev, I.; Vorobyov, A.A.; Wadhwa, M.; Wang, Q.; Wang, X.L.; Wang, Z.M.; Weber, M.; Wynhoff, S.; Xia, L.; Xu, Z.Z.; Yamamoto, J.; Yang, B.Z.; Yang, C.G.; Yang, H.J.; Yang, M.; Yeh, S.C.; Zalite, An.; Zalite, Yu.; Zhang, Z.P.; Zhao, J.; Zhu, G.Y.; Zhu, R.Y.; Zhuang, H.L.; Zichichi, A.; Zimmermann, B.; Zoller, M.

    2005-01-01

    Exclusive rho+rho- production in two-photon collisions between a quasi-real photon, gamma, and a mid-virtuality photon, gamma*, is studied with data collected at LEP at centre-of-mass energies root(s)=183-209GeV with a total integrated luminosity of 684.8pb^-1. The cross section of the gamma gamma* -> rho+ rho- process is determined as a function of the photon virtuality, Q^2, and the two-photon centre-of-mass energy, W_gg, in the kinematic region: 0.2GeV^2 rho rho process over the Q^2-region 0.2GeV^2 < Q^2 < 30 GeV^2.

  7. The pairwise phase consistency in cortical network and its relationship with neuronal activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Daming

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Gamma-band neuronal oscillation and synchronization with the range of 30-90 Hz are ubiquitous phenomenon across numerous brain areas and various species, and correlated with plenty of cognitive functions. The phase of the oscillation, as one aspect of CTC (Communication through Coherence hypothesis, underlies various functions for feature coding, memory processing and behaviour performing. The PPC (Pairwise Phase Consistency, an improved coherence measure, statistically quantifies the strength of phase synchronization. In order to evaluate the PPC and its relationships with input stimulus, neuronal activation and firing rate, a simplified spiking neuronal network is constructed to simulate orientation columns in primary visual cortex. If the input orientation stimulus is preferred for a certain orientation column, neurons within this corresponding column will obtain higher firing rate and stronger neuronal activation, which consequently engender higher PPC values, with higher PPC corresponding to higher firing rate. In addition, we investigate the PPC in time resolved analysis with a sliding window.

  8. Factor analysis of regional brain activation in bipolar and healthy individuals reveals a consistent modular structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleck, David E; Welge, Jeffrey A; Eliassen, James C; Adler, Caleb M; DelBello, Melissa P; Strakowski, Stephen M

    2018-07-01

    The neurophysiological substrates of cognition and emotion, as seen with fMRI, are generally explained using modular structures. The present study was designed to probe the modular structure of cognitive-emotional processing in bipolar and healthy individuals using factor analysis and compare the results with current conceptions of the neurophysiology of bipolar disorder. Exploratory factor analysis was used to assess patterns of covariation among brain regions-of-interest activated during the Continuous Performance Task with Emotional and Neutral Distractors in healthy and bipolar individuals without a priori constraints on the number or composition of latent factors. Results indicated a common cognitive-emotional network consisting of prefrontal, medial temporal, limbic, parietal, anterior cingulate and posterior cingulate modules. However, reduced brain activation to emotional stimuli in the frontal, medial temporal and limbic modules was apparent in the bipolar relative to the healthy group, potentially accounting for emotional dysregulation in bipolar disorder. This study is limited by a relatively small sample size recruited at a single site. The results have yet to be validated on a larger independent sample. Although the modular structure of cognitive-emotional processing is similar in bipolar and healthy individuals, activation in response to emotional/neutral cues varies. These findings are not only consistent with recent conceptions of mood regulation in bipolar disorder, but also suggest that regional activation can be considered within tighter modular structures without compromising data interpretation. This demonstration may serve as a template for data reduction in future region-of-interest analyses to increase statistical power. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Involvement of RhoA/Rho kinase signaling in VEGF-induced endothelial cell migration and angiogenesis in vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nieuw Amerongen, G.P. van; Koolwijk, P.; Versteilen, A.; Hinsbergh, V.W.M. van

    2003-01-01

    Objective - Growth factor-induced angiogenesis involves migration of endothelial cells (ECs) into perivascular areas and requires active remodeling of the endothelial F-actin cytoskeleton. The small GTPase RhoA previously has been implicated in vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-induced

  10. Exchange mechanisms for $\\pi^{-}p\\rightarrow\\rho^{0}$n and $\\rho-\\omega$ interference

    CERN Document Server

    Estabrooks, P G; Michael, C

    1974-01-01

    The 17 GeV/c pi /sup -/p to rho /sup 0/n production amplitudes are decomposed into pi , A/sub 2/ and non-evasive exchange contributions. Independent support for this description comes from the observed rho - omega interference effects and from the energy dependence of rho /sup 0/ production data. (18 refs).

  11. Molecular characterization of a novel RhoGAP, RRC-1 of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delawary, Mina; Nakazawa, Takanobu; Tezuka, Tohru; Sawa, Mariko; Iino, Yuichi; Takenawa, Tadaomi; Yamamoto, Tadashi

    2007-01-01

    The GTPase-activating proteins for Rho family GTPases (RhoGAP) transduce diverse intracellular signals by negatively regulating Rho family GTPase-mediated pathways. In this study, we have cloned and characterized a novel RhoGAP for Rac1 and Cdc42, termed RRC-1, from Caenorhabditis elegans. RRC-1 was highly homologous to mammalian p250GAP and promoted GTP hydrolysis of Rac1 and Cdc42 in cells. The rrc-1 mRNA was expressed in all life stages. Using an RRC-1::GFP fusion protein, we found that RRC-1 was localized to the coelomocytes, excretory cell, GLR cells, and uterine-seam cell in adult worms. These data contribute toward understanding the roles of Rho family GTPases in C. elegans

  12. RhoG regulates anoikis through a phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-dependent mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaki, Nao; Negishi, Manabu; Katoh, Hironori

    2007-01-01

    In normal epithelial cells, cell-matrix interaction is required for cell survival and proliferation, whereas disruption of this interaction causes epithelial cells to undergo apoptosis called anoikis. Here we show that the small GTPase RhoG plays an important role in the regulation of anoikis. HeLa cells are capable of anchorage-independent cell growth and acquire resistance to anoikis. We found that RNA interference-mediated knockdown of RhoG promoted anoikis in HeLa cells. Previous studies have shown that RhoG activates Rac1 and induces several cellular functions including promotion of cell migration through its effector ELMO and the ELMO-binding protein Dock180 that function as a Rac-specific guanine nucleotide exchange factor. However, RhoG-induced suppression of anoikis was independent of the ELMO- and Dock180-mediated activation of Rac1. On the other hand, the regulation of anoikis by RhoG required phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) activity, and constitutively active RhoG bound to the PI3K regulatory subunit p85α and induced the PI3K-dependent phosphorylation of Akt. Taken together, these results suggest that RhoG protects cells from apoptosis caused by the loss of anchorage through a PI3K-dependent mechanism, independent of its activation of Rac1

  13. Correlates for Consistency of Contraceptive Use Among Sexually Active Female Adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruey-Hsia Wang

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available This study explored the correlates for consistency of contraceptive use among sexually active female adolescents in Kaohsiung County, Taiwan. Overall, 164 female adolescents who had engaged in sexual behavior within the last 6 months and were not pregnant at the time of the study were selected from two vocational high schools in Kaohsiung County, Taiwan. An anonymous questionnaire was used to measure demographic data, contraceptive attitudes, contraceptive knowledge, contraceptive self-efficacy, perception of peers' use of contraceptives, sexual history, and contraceptive use. The results showed that 45.7% of subjects had sex once or more per week, and that 39.6% of subjects always used contraceptives while 15.2% never used contraceptives. Condoms were the most popular contraceptives (51.2% and the withdrawal method was the second most popular (23.8%. Stepwise logistic regression showed that higher contraceptive attitudes (odds ratio, OR, 1.148 and previous contraceptive education in school (OR, 3.394 increased the probability of consistently using contraceptives, correctly classifying 67.2% of the sample.

  14. Effect of electroacupuncture on the mRNA and protein expression of Rho-A and Rho-associated kinase II in spinal cord injury rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    You-jiang Min

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Electroacupuncture is beneficial for the recovery of spinal cord injury, but the underlying mechanism is unclear. The Rho/Rho-associated kinase (ROCK signaling pathway regulates the actin cytoskeleton by controlling the adhesive and migratory behaviors of cells that could inhibit neurite regrowth after neural injury and consequently hinder the recovery from spinal cord injury. Therefore, we hypothesized electroacupuncture could affect the Rho/ROCK signaling pathway to promote the recovery of spinal cord injury. In our experiments, the spinal cord injury in adult Sprague-Dawley rats was caused by an impact device. Those rats were subjected to electroacupuncture at Yaoyangguan (GV3, Dazhui (GV14, Zusanli (ST36 and Ciliao (BL32 and/or monosialoganglioside treatment. Behavioral scores revealed that the hindlimb motor functions improved with those treatments. Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction, fluorescence in situ hybridization and western blot assay showed that electroacupuncture suppressed the mRNA and protein expression of Rho-A and Rho-associated kinase II (ROCKII of injured spinal cord. Although monosialoganglioside promoted the recovery of hindlimb motor function, monosialoganglioside did not affect the expression of Rho-A and ROCKII. However, electroacupuncture combined with monosialoganglioside did not further improve the motor function or suppress the expression of Rho-A and ROCKII. Our data suggested that the electroacupuncture could specifically inhibit the activation of the Rho/ROCK signaling pathway thus partially contributing to the repair of injured spinal cord. Monosialoganglioside could promote the motor function but did not suppress expression of RhoA and ROCKII. There was no synergistic effect of electroacupuncture combined with monosialoganglioside.

  15. The rho-parameter in supersymmetric models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, C.S.; Inami, T.; Sakai, N.

    1983-10-01

    The electroweak rho-parameter is examined in a general class of supersymmetric models. Formulae are given for one-loop contributions to Δrho from scalar quarks and leptons, gauge-Higgs fermions and an extra doublet of Higgs scalars. Mass differences between members of isodoublet scalar quarks and leptons are constrained to be less than about 200 GeV. (author)

  16. RhoA-Mediated Functions in C3H10T1/2 Osteoprogenitors Are Substrate Topography Dependent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogino, Yoichiro; Liang, Ruiwei; Mendonça, Daniela B S; Mendonça, Gustavo; Nagasawa, Masako; Koyano, Kiyoshi; Cooper, Lyndon F

    2016-03-01

    Surface topography broadly influences cellular responses. Adherent cell activities are regulated, in part, by RhoA, a member of the Rho-family of GTPases. In this study, we evaluated the influence of surface topography on RhoA activity and associated cellular functions. The murine mesenchymal stem cell line C3H10T1/2 cells (osteoprogenitor cells) were cultured on titanium substrates with smooth topography (S), microtopography (M), and nanotopography (N) to evaluate the effect of surface topography on RhoA-mediated functions (cell spreading, adhesion, migration, and osteogenic differentiation). The influence of RhoA activity in the context of surface topography was also elucidated using RhoA pharmacologic inhibitor. Following adhesion, M and N adherent cells developed multiple projections, while S adherent cells had flattened and widespread morphology. RhoA inhibitor induced remarkable longer and thinner cytoplasmic projections on all surfaces. Cell adhesion and osteogenic differentiation was topography dependent with S topography roughness dependent (S topography. Smooth surface adherent cells appear highly sensitive to RhoA function, while nano-scale topography adherent cell may utilize alternative cellular signaling pathway(s) to influence adherent cellular functions regardless of RhoA activity. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Foci of cyclin A2 interact with actin and RhoA in mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loukil, Abdelhalim; Izard, Fanny; Georgieva, Mariya; Mashayekhan, Shaereh; Blanchard, Jean-Marie; Parmeggiani, Andrea; Peter, Marion

    2016-06-09

    Cyclin A2 is a key player in the regulation of the cell cycle. Its degradation in mid-mitosis depends primarily on the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS), while autophagy also contributes. However, a fraction of cyclin A2 persists beyond metaphase. In this work, we focus on cyclin A2-rich foci detected in mitosis by high resolution imaging and analyse their movements. We demonstrate that cyclin A2 interacts with actin and RhoA during mitosis, and that cyclin A2 depletion induces a dramatic decrease in active RhoA in mitosis. Our data suggest cyclin A2 participation in RhoA activation in late mitosis.

  18. Binding and Translocation of Termination Factor Rho Studied at the Single-Molecule Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koslover, Daniel J.; Fazal, Furqan M.; Mooney, Rachel A.; Landick, Robert; Block, Steven M.

    2012-01-01

    Rho termination factor is an essential hexameric helicase responsible for terminating 20–50% of all mRNA synthesis in E. coli. We used single- molecule force spectroscopy to investigate Rho-RNA binding interactions at the Rho- utilization (rut) site of the ? tR1 terminator. Our results are consistent with Rho complexes adopting two states, one that binds 57 ±2 nucleotides of RNA across all six of the Rho primary binding sites, and another that binds 85 ±2 nucleotides at the six primary sites plus a single secondary site situated at the center of the hexamer. The single-molecule data serve to establish that Rho translocates 5′-to-3′ towards RNA polymerase (RNAP) by a tethered-tracking mechanism, looping out the intervening RNA between the rut site and RNAP. These findings lead to a general model for Rho binding and translocation, and establish a novel experimental approach that should facilitate additional single- molecule studies of RNA-binding proteins. PMID:22885804

  19. Involvement of rho-gtpases in fibroblast adhesion and fibronectine fibrillogenesis under stretch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guignandon, A.; Lambert, C.; Rattner, A.; Servotte, S.; Lapiere, C.; Nusgens, B.; Vico, L.

    The Rho family small GTPases play a crucial role in mediating cellular adaptation to mechanical stimulation (MS), and possibly to microgravity (μg), through effects on the cytoskeleton and cell adhesion which is, in turn, mainly regulated by fibronectin fibrillogenesis (FnF). It remains unclear how mechanical stimulation is transduced to the Rho signaling pathways and how it impacts on fibronectin (fbn) fibrillogenesis (FnF). μg (2 days, mission STS-095) led to de-adhesion of fibroblasts and modification of the underlying extracellular matrix. To determine whether GTPases modulated FnF, we generated stable cell lines expressing high level of activated RhoA and Rac1 (QL) as compared to wild type (WI26-WT). After MS application [8% deformation, 1Hz, 15 min., 3 times/day for 1-2 days], we quantified focal adhesion (vinculin, paxillin, FAKY397), f-actin stress fibers (Sf) and FnF with home-developed softwares. We reported that after MS, Sf are more rapidly (30min) formed under the nucleus in Wi26-WT (+100%) and Rac1 (+200%) than in RhoA (+20%). Vinculin & paxillin were only restricted to the cell edge in static conditions and homogeneously distributed after MS in WT and Rac1. The relative area of contacts (vinculin & paxillin) was more dramatically enhanced by MS in Rac1 (+80%) than in WT (+40%) and RhoA (+25%) indicating that new focal contacts are formed under MS and supported the presence of Sf. MS Activation of FAK (FAKY397) was clear in WT and Rac1 and reduced in RhoA. FnF was restricted to cell-cell contacts zone without any change in the relative area of fbn after a 2-days MS. However we found more numerous spots of fbn at the cell center in Rac1 as compared with RhoA & WT suggesting that these fibrillar contacts will grow upon maturation and modulate FnF. The results indicate that MS induces formation of Sf and focal adhesions and enhances FF. RhoA has been shown to induce the formation of Sf and focal adhesions, and Rac1 activation decreases Rho activity in

  20. Reduction of Fibrogenesis by Selective Delivery of a Rho Kinase Inhibitor to Hepatic Stellate Cells in Mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Beuge, M. M.; Prakash, J.; Lacombe, M.; Gosens, R.; Post, E.; Reker-Smit, C.; Beljaars, L.; Poelstra, K.

    One of the pathways activated during liver fibrosis is the Rho kinase pathway, which regulates activation, migration, and contraction of hepatic stellate cells (HSC). Inhibition of this kinase by the Rho kinase inhibitor Y27632 [(+)-(R)-trans-4-(1-aminoethyl)-N-(4-pyridyl)cyclohexanecarboxamide

  1. Implications of Rho GTPase signaling in glioma cell invasion and tumor progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shannon Patricia Fortin Ensign

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma (GB is the most malignant of primary adult brain tumors, characterized by a highly locally-invasive cell population, as well as abundant proliferative cells, neoangiogenesis, and necrosis. Clinical intervention with chemotherapy or radiation may either promote or establish an environment for manifestation of invasive behavior. Understanding the molecular drivers of invasion in the context of glioma progression may be insightful in directing new treatments for patients with GB. Here, we review current knowledge on Rho family GTPases, their aberrant regulation in GB, and their effect on GB cell invasion and tumor progression. Rho GTPases are modulators of cell migration through effects on actin cytoskeleton rearrangement; in non-neoplastic tissue, expression and activation of Rho GTPases are normally under tight regulation. In GB, Rho GTPases are deregulated, often via hyperactivity or overexpression of their activators, Rho GEFs. Downstream effectors of Rho GTPases have been shown to promote invasiveness and, importantly, glioma cell survival. The study of aberrant Rho GTPase signaling in GB is thus an important investigation of cell invasion as well as treatment resistance and disease progression.

  2. Mechanisms of RhoGDI2 Mediated Lung Cancer Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition Suppression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huiyan Niu

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of this study was to evaluate the function of RhoGDI2 in lung cancer epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT process and to illustrate the underlying mechanisms that will lead to improvement of lung cancer treatment. Methods: The RhoGDI2 knock-down and overexpressing A549 cell lines were first constructed. The influence of RhoGDI2 on cytoskeleton in A549 cells was studied using two approaches: G-LISA-based Rac1 activity measurement and immunostaining-based F-actin distribution. The expression levels of key EMT genes were analyzed using real time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR, western blot and immunostaining in untreated and RhoGDI2 knock-down or overexpressing A549 cells in both in vivo and in vitro experimental settings. Results: Our study showed that the activity of Rac1, a key gene that is crucial for the initiation and metastasis of human lung adenocarcinoma, causing the redistribution of F-actin with partial loss of cell-cell adhesions and stress fibers, was significantly suppressed by RhoGDI2. RhoGDI2 promoted the expression of EMT marker gene E-cadherin and repressed EMT promoting genes Slug, Snail, α-SMA in both A549 cells and lung and liver organs derived from the mouse models. Knocking-down RhoGDI2 induced abnormal morphology for lung organs. Conclusion: These findings indicate that RhoGDI2 repressed the activity of Rac1 and may be involved in the rearrangement of cytoskeleton in lung cancer cells. RhoGDI2 suppresses the metastasis of lung cancer mediated through EMT by regulating the expression of key genes such as E-cadherin, Slug, Snail and α-SMA in both in vivo and in vitro models.

  3. Convergent use of RhoGAP toxins by eukaryotic parasites and bacterial pathogens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominique Colinet

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Inactivation of host Rho GTPases is a widespread strategy employed by bacterial pathogens to manipulate mammalian cellular functions and avoid immune defenses. Some bacterial toxins mimic eukaryotic Rho GTPase-activating proteins (GAPs to inactivate mammalian GTPases, probably as a result of evolutionary convergence. An intriguing question remains whether eukaryotic pathogens or parasites may use endogenous GAPs as immune-suppressive toxins to target the same key genes as bacterial pathogens. Interestingly, a RhoGAP domain-containing protein, LbGAP, was recently characterized from the parasitoid wasp Leptopilina boulardi, and shown to protect parasitoid eggs from the immune response of Drosophila host larvae. We demonstrate here that LbGAP has structural characteristics of eukaryotic RhoGAPs but that it acts similarly to bacterial RhoGAP toxins in mammals. First, we show by immunocytochemistry that LbGAP enters Drosophila immune cells, plasmatocytes and lamellocytes, and that morphological changes in lamellocytes are correlated with the quantity of LbGAP they contain. Demonstration that LbGAP displays a GAP activity and specifically interacts with the active, GTP-bound form of the two Drosophila Rho GTPases Rac1 and Rac2, both required for successful encapsulation of Leptopilina eggs, was then achieved using biochemical tests, yeast two-hybrid analysis, and GST pull-down assays. In addition, we show that the overall structure of LbGAP is similar to that of eukaryotic RhoGAP domains, and we identify distinct residues involved in its interaction with Rac GTPases. Altogether, these results show that eukaryotic parasites can use endogenous RhoGAPs as virulence factors and that despite their differences in sequence and structure, eukaryotic and bacterial RhoGAP toxins are similarly used to target the same immune pathways in insects and mammals.

  4. 1α,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D3 Ameliorates Seawater Aspiration-Induced Acute Lung Injury via NF-κB and RhoA/Rho Kinase Pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei; Wang, Li; Luo, Ying; Li, Zhichao; Jin, Faguang

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Inflammation and pulmonary edema are involved in the pathogenesis of seawater aspiration-induced acute lung injury (ALI). Although several studies have reported that 1α,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D3 (calcitriol) suppresses inflammation, it has not been confirmed to be effective in seawater aspiration-induced ALI. Thus, we investigated the effect of calcitriol on seawater aspiration-induced ALI and explored the probable mechanism. Methods Male SD rats receiving different doses of calcitriol or not, underwent seawater instillation. Then lung samples were collected at 4 h for analysis. In addition, A549 cells and rat pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (RPMVECs) were cultured with calcitriol or not and then stimulated with 25% seawater for 40 min. After these treatments, cells samples were collected for analysis. Results Results from real-time PCR showed that seawater stimulation up-regulated the expression of vitamin D receptor in lung tissues, A549 cells and RPMVECs. Seawater stimulation also activates NF-κB and RhoA/Rho kinase pathways. However, we found that pretreatment with calcitriol significantly inhibited the activation of NF-κB and RhoA/Rho kinase pathways. Meanwhile, treatment of calcitriol also improved lung histopathologic changes, reduced inflammation, lung edema and vascular leakage. Conclusions These results demonstrated that NF-κB and RhoA/Rho kinase pathways are critical in the development of lung inflammation and pulmonary edema and that treatment with calcitriol could ameliorate seawater aspiration-induced ALI, which was probably through the inhibition of NF-κB and RhoA/Rho kinase pathways. PMID:25118599

  5. RhoA: A therapeutic target for chronic myeloid leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Molli Poonam R

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic Myeloid Leukemia (CML is a malignant pluripotent stem cells disorder of myeloid cells. In CML patients, polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNL the terminally differentiated cells of myeloid series exhibit defects in several actin dependent functions such as adhesion, motility, chemotaxis, agglutination, phagocytosis and microbicidal activities. A definite and global abnormality was observed in stimulation of actin polymerization in CML PMNL. Signalling molecules ras and rhoGTPases regulate spatial and temporal polymerization of actin and thus, a broad range of physiological processes. Therefore, status of these GTPases as well as actin was studied in resting and fMLP stimulated normal and CML PMNL. Methods To study expression of GTPases and actin, Western blotting and flow cytometry analysis were done, while spatial expression and colocalization of these proteins were studied by using laser confocal microscopy. To study effect of inhibitors on cell proliferation CCK-8 assay was done. Significance of differences in expression of proteins within the samples and between normal and CML was tested by using Wilcoxon signed rank test and Mann-Whitney test, respectively. Bivariate and partial correlation analyses were done to study relationship between all the parameters. Results In CML PMNL, actin expression and its architecture were altered and stimulation of actin polymerization was absent. Differences were also observed in expression, organization or stimulation of all the three GTPases in normal and CML PMNL. In normal PMNL, ras was the critical GTPase regulating expression of rhoGTPases and actin and actin polymerization. But in CML PMNL, rhoA took a central place. In accordance with these, treatment with rho/ROCK pathway inhibitors resulted in specific growth inhibition of CML cell lines. Conclusions RhoA has emerged as the key molecule responsible for functional defects in CML PMNL and therefore can be used as a

  6. Rho GTPases, their post-translational modifications, disease-associated mutations and pharmacological inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Michael F

    2018-05-04

    The 20 members of the Rho GTPase family are key regulators of a wide-variety of biological activities. In response to activation, they signal via downstream effector proteins to induce dynamic alterations in the organization of the actomyosin cytoskeleton. In this review, post-translational modifications, mechanisms of dysregulation identified in human pathological conditions, and the ways that Rho GTPases might be targeted for chemotherapy will be discussed.

  7. Termination factor Rho: From the control of pervasive transcription to cell fate determination in Bacillus subtilis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolas, Pierre; Repoila, Francis; Bardowski, Jacek; Aymerich, Stéphane

    2017-01-01

    In eukaryotes, RNA species originating from pervasive transcription are regulators of various cellular processes, from the expression of individual genes to the control of cellular development and oncogenesis. In prokaryotes, the function of pervasive transcription and its output on cell physiology is still unknown. Most bacteria possess termination factor Rho, which represses pervasive, mostly antisense, transcription. Here, we investigate the biological significance of Rho-controlled transcription in the Gram-positive model bacterium Bacillus subtilis. Rho inactivation strongly affected gene expression in B. subtilis, as assessed by transcriptome and proteome analysis of a rho–null mutant during exponential growth in rich medium. Subsequent physiological analyses demonstrated that a considerable part of Rho-controlled transcription is connected to balanced regulation of three mutually exclusive differentiation programs: cell motility, biofilm formation, and sporulation. In the absence of Rho, several up-regulated sense and antisense transcripts affect key structural and regulatory elements of these differentiation programs, thereby suppressing motility and biofilm formation and stimulating sporulation. We dissected how Rho is involved in the activity of the cell fate decision-making network, centered on the master regulator Spo0A. We also revealed a novel regulatory mechanism of Spo0A activation through Rho-dependent intragenic transcription termination of the protein kinase kinB gene. Altogether, our findings indicate that distinct Rho-controlled transcripts are functional and constitute a previously unknown built-in module for the control of cell differentiation in B. subtilis. In a broader context, our results highlight the recruitment of the termination factor Rho, for which the conserved biological role is probably to repress pervasive transcription, in highly integrated, bacterium-specific, regulatory networks. PMID:28723971

  8. Consistency of aerosols above clouds characterization from A-Train active and passive measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deaconu, Lucia T.; Waquet, Fabien; Josset, Damien; Ferlay, Nicolas; Peers, Fanny; Thieuleux, François; Ducos, Fabrice; Pascal, Nicolas; Tanré, Didier; Pelon, Jacques; Goloub, Philippe

    2017-09-01

    This study presents a comparison between the retrieval of optical properties of aerosol above clouds (AAC) from different techniques developed for the A-Train sensors CALIOP/CALIPSO and POLDER/PARASOL. The main objective is to analyse the consistency between the results derived from the active and the passive measurements. We compare the aerosol optical thickness (AOT) above optically thick clouds (cloud optical thickness (COT) larger than 3) and their Ångström exponent (AE). These parameters are retrieved with the CALIOP operational method, the POLDER operational polarization method and the CALIOP-based depolarization ratio method (DRM) - for which we also propose a calibrated version (denominated DRMSODA, where SODA is the Synergized Optical Depth of Aerosols). We analyse 6 months of data over three distinctive regions characterized by different types of aerosols and clouds. Additionally, for these regions, we select three case studies: a biomass-burning event over the South Atlantic Ocean, a Saharan dust case over the North Atlantic Ocean and a Siberian biomass-burning event over the North Pacific Ocean. Four and a half years of data are studied over the entire globe for distinct situations where aerosol and cloud layers are in contact or vertically separated. Overall, the regional analysis shows a good correlation between the POLDER and the DRMSODA AOTs when the microphysics of aerosols is dominated by fine-mode particles of biomass-burning aerosols from southern Africa (correlation coefficient (R2) of 0.83) or coarse-mode aerosols of Saharan dust (R2 of 0.82). A good correlation between these methods (R2 of 0.68) is also observed in the global treatment, when the aerosol and cloud layers are separated well. The analysis of detached layers also shows a mean difference in AOT of 0.07 at 532 nm between POLDER and DRMSODA at a global scale. The correlation between the retrievals decreases when a complex mixture of aerosols is expected (R2 of 0.37) - as in the

  9. A RhoA-FRET Biosensor Mouse for Intravital Imaging in Normal Tissue Homeostasis and Disease Contexts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Max Nobis

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The small GTPase RhoA is involved in a variety of fundamental processes in normal tissue. Spatiotemporal control of RhoA is thought to govern mechanosensing, growth, and motility of cells, while its deregulation is associated with disease development. Here, we describe the generation of a RhoA-fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET biosensor mouse and its utility for monitoring real-time activity of RhoA in a variety of native tissues in vivo. We assess changes in RhoA activity during mechanosensing of osteocytes within the bone and during neutrophil migration. We also demonstrate spatiotemporal order of RhoA activity within crypt cells of the small intestine and during different stages of mammary gestation. Subsequently, we reveal co-option of RhoA activity in both invasive breast and pancreatic cancers, and we assess drug targeting in these disease settings, illustrating the potential for utilizing this mouse to study RhoA activity in vivo in real time.

  10. A High-Throughput Assay for Rho Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factors Based on the Transcreener GDP Assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichman, Melvin; Schabdach, Amanda; Kumar, Meera; Zielinski, Tom; Donover, Preston S; Laury-Kleintop, Lisa D; Lowery, Robert G

    2015-12-01

    Ras homologous (Rho) family GTPases act as molecular switches controlling cell growth, movement, and gene expression by cycling between inactive guanosine diphosphate (GDP)- and active guanosine triphosphate (GTP)-bound conformations. Guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) positively regulate Rho GTPases by accelerating GDP dissociation to allow formation of the active, GTP-bound complex. Rho proteins are directly involved in cancer pathways, especially cell migration and invasion, and inhibiting GEFs holds potential as a therapeutic strategy to diminish Rho-dependent oncogenesis. Methods for measuring GEF activity suitable for high-throughput screening (HTS) are limited. We developed a simple, generic biochemical assay method for measuring GEF activity based on the fact that GDP dissociation is generally the rate-limiting step in the Rho GTPase catalytic cycle, and thus addition of a GEF causes an increase in steady-state GTPase activity. We used the Transcreener GDP Assay, which relies on selective immunodetection of GDP, to measure the GEF-dependent stimulation of steady-state GTP hydrolysis by small GTPases using Dbs (Dbl's big sister) as a GEF for Cdc42, RhoA, and RhoB. The assay is well suited for HTS, with a homogenous format and far red fluorescence polarization (FP) readout, and it should be broadly applicable to diverse Rho GEF/GTPase pairs. © 2015 Society for Laboratory Automation and Screening.

  11. Inclusive rho0 production in anti νsub(μ)p charged current interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graessler, H.; Lanske, D.; Schulte, R.; Barnham, K.W.J.; Clayton, E.F.; Hamisi, F.; Miller, D.B.; Mobayyen, M.M.; Corrigan, G.; Myatt, G.; Radojicic, D.; Saitta, B.; Wells, J.

    1986-01-01

    Inclusive rho 0 production has been studied in antineutrino-proton charged current interactions, using a sample of 3340 events obtained in BEBC filled with hydrogen and exposed to the CERN wideband antineutrino beam. An average multiplicity of 0.11+-0.02 rho 0 per event at a mean hadronic mass W of 4.2 GeV is observed. The rho 0 production characteristics are determined as functions of psub(T), chisub(F), and z. The ratio rho 0 /'π 0 ' is found to be low at small z values consistent with centrally produced pions coming mainly from resonances. At large z values this ratio approaches 0.45+-0.15 which is compatible with a vector/pseudoscalar meson direct production ratio of one. The results are compared with those obtained from neutrino-proton interactions in the same experimental set-up. (orig.)

  12. RhoE interferes with Rb inactivation and regulates the proliferation and survival of the U87 human glioblastoma cell line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poch, Enric; Minambres, Rebeca; Mocholi, Enric; Ivorra, Carmen; Perez-Arago, Amparo; Guerri, Consuelo; Perez-Roger, Ignacio; Guasch, Rosa M.

    2007-01-01

    Rho GTPases are important regulators of actin cytoskeleton, but they are also involved in cell proliferation, transformation and oncogenesis. One of this proteins, RhoE, inhibits cell proliferation, however the mechanism that regulates this effect remains poorly understood. Therefore, we undertook the present study to determine the role of RhoE in the regulation of cell proliferation. For this purpose we generated an adenovirus system to overexpress RhoE in U87 glioblastoma cells. Our results show that RhoE disrupts actin cytoskeleton organization and inhibits U87 glioblastoma cell proliferation. Importantly, RhoE expressing cells show a reduction in Rb phosphorylation and in cyclin D1 expression. Furthermore, RhoE inhibits ERK activation following serum stimulation of quiescent cells. Based in these findings, we propose that RhoE inhibits ERK activation, thereby decreasing cyclin D1 expression and leading to a reduction in Rb inactivation, and that this mechanism is involved in the RhoE-induced cell growth inhibition. Moreover, we also demonstrate that RhoE induces apoptosis in U87 cells and also in colon carcinoma and melanoma cells. These results indicate that RhoE plays an important role in the regulation of cell proliferation and survival, and suggest that this protein may be considered as an oncosupressor since it is capable to induce apoptosis in several tumor cell lines

  13. RhoC is essential for TGF-β1-induced invasive capacity of rat ascites hepatoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukai, M.; Endo, H.; Iwasaki, T.; Tatsuta, M.; Togawa, A.; Nakamura, H.; Inoue, M.

    2006-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) is a multifunctional growth factor that plays a role in cell proliferation, differentiation, extracellular matrix production, apoptosis, and cell motility. We show here that TGF-β1 increased the invasiveness of MM1 cells, which are a highly invasive clone of rat ascites hepatoma cells. Both mRNA and protein levels of RhoC but not RhoA in TGF-β1-treated MM1 cells increased. In parallel with this increase in expression, RhoC activity was induced by TGF-β1 treatment. When RhoC was overexpressed in MM1 cells, the invasive capacity increased. The RhoC-overexpressing cells formed more nodules than did mock cells when injected into rat peritoneum. Furthermore, when RhoC expression was reduced by transfection with shRNA/RhoC, the invasiveness of MM1 cells decreased with concomitant suppression of RhoC expression. Thus, the induced expression of RhoC by TGF-β1 in MM1 cells plays a critical role in TGF-β1-induced cell migration

  14. Wash functions downstream of Rho1 GTPase in a subset of Drosophila immune cell developmental migrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verboon, Jeffrey M.; Rahe, Travis K.; Rodriguez-Mesa, Evelyn; Parkhurst, Susan M.

    2015-01-01

    Drosophila immune cells, the hemocytes, undergo four stereotypical developmental migrations to populate the embryo, where they provide immune reconnoitering, as well as a number of non–immune-related functions necessary for proper embryogenesis. Here, we describe a role for Rho1 in one of these developmental migrations in which posteriorly located hemocytes migrate toward the head. This migration requires the interaction of Rho1 with its downstream effector Wash, a Wiskott–Aldrich syndrome family protein. Both Wash knockdown and a Rho1 transgene harboring a mutation that prevents Wash binding exhibit the same developmental migratory defect as Rho1 knockdown. Wash activates the Arp2/3 complex, whose activity is needed for this migration, whereas members of the WASH regulatory complex (SWIP, Strumpellin, and CCDC53) are not. Our results suggest a WASH complex–independent signaling pathway to regulate the cytoskeleton during a subset of hemocyte developmental migrations. PMID:25739458

  15. A Point Mutation in p190A RhoGAP Affects Ciliogenesis and Leads to Glomerulocystic Kidney Defects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine Stewart

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Rho family GTPases act as molecular switches regulating actin cytoskeleton dynamics. Attenuation of their signaling capacity is provided by GTPase-activating proteins (GAPs, including p190A, that promote the intrinsic GTPase activity of Rho proteins. In the current study we have performed a small-scale ENU mutagenesis screen and identified a novel loss of function allele of the p190A gene Arhgap35, which introduces a Leu1396 to Gln substitution in the GAP domain. This results in decreased GAP activity for the prototypical Rho-family members, RhoA and Rac1, likely due to disrupted ordering of the Rho binding surface. Consequently, Arhgap35-deficient animals exhibit hypoplastic and glomerulocystic kidneys. Investigation into the cystic phenotype shows that p190A is required for appropriate primary cilium formation in renal nephrons. P190A specifically localizes to the base of the cilia to permit axoneme elongation, which requires a functional GAP domain. Pharmacological manipulations further reveal that inhibition of either Rho kinase (ROCK or F-actin polymerization is able to rescue the ciliogenesis defects observed upon loss of p190A activity. We propose a model in which p190A acts as a modulator of Rho GTPases in a localized area around the cilia to permit the dynamic actin rearrangement required for cilia elongation. Together, our results establish an unexpected link between Rho GTPase regulation, ciliogenesis and glomerulocystic kidney disease.

  16. Signaling efficiency of Galphaq through its effectors p63RhoGEF and GEFT depends on their subcellular location

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goedhart, J.; Unen, J. van; Adjobo-Hermans, M.J.W.; Gadella, T.W.

    2013-01-01

    The p63RhoGEF and GEFT proteins are encoded by the same gene and both members of the Dbl family of guanine nucleotide exchange factors. These proteins can be activated by the heterotrimeric G-protein subunit Galphaq. We show that p63RhoGEF is located at the plasma membrane, whereas GEFT is confined

  17. ROCK and RHO Playlist for Preimplantation Development: Streaming to HIPPO Pathway and Apicobasal Polarity in the First Cell Differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alarcon, Vernadeth B; Marikawa, Yusuke

    2018-01-01

    In placental mammalian development, the first cell differentiation produces two distinct lineages that emerge according to their position within the embryo: the trophectoderm (TE, placenta precursor) differentiates in the surface, while the inner cell mass (ICM, fetal body precursor) forms inside. Here, we discuss how such position-dependent lineage specifications are regulated by the RHOA subfamily of small GTPases and RHO-associated coiled-coil kinases (ROCK). Recent studies in mouse show that activities of RHO/ROCK are required to promote TE differentiation and to concomitantly suppress ICM formation. RHO/ROCK operate through the HIPPO signaling pathway, whose cell position-specific modulation is central to establishing unique gene expression profiles that confer cell fate. In particular, activities of RHO/ROCK are essential in outside cells to promote nuclear localization of transcriptional co-activators YAP/TAZ, the downstream effectors of HIPPO signaling. Nuclear localization of YAP/TAZ depends on the formation of apicobasal polarity in outside cells, which requires activities of RHO/ROCK. We propose models of how RHO/ROCK regulate lineage specification and lay out challenges for future investigations to deepen our understanding of the roles of RHO/ROCK in preimplantation development. Finally, as RHO/ROCK may be inhibited by certain pharmacological agents, we discuss their potential impact on human preimplantation development in relation to fertility preservation in women.

  18. Comparisons of actin filament disruptors and Rho kinase inhibitors as potential antiglaucoma medications

    OpenAIRE

    Tian, Baohe; Kaufman, Paul L

    2012-01-01

    Dynamics of the actin cytoskeleton in the trabecular meshwork play a crucial role in the regulation of trabecular outflow resistance. The actin filament disruptors and Rho kinase inhibitors affect the dynamics of the actomyosin system by either disrupting the actin filaments or inhibiting the Rho kinase-activated cellular contractility. Both approaches induce similar morphological changes and resistance decreases in the trabecular outflow pathway, and thus both have potential as antiglaucoma ...

  19. Functional and Behavioral Product Information Representation and Consistency Validation for Collaboration in Product Lifecycle Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baysal, Mehmet Murat

    2012-01-01

    Information models that represent the function, assembly and behavior of artifacts are critical in the conceptual development of a product and its evaluation. Much research has been conducted in this area; however, existing models do not relate function, behavior and structure in a comprehensive and consistent way. In this work, NIST's Core…

  20. Lovastatin-induced RhoA modulation and its effect on senescence in prostate cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jeeyun; Lee, Inkyoung; Park, Chaehwa; Kang, Won Ki

    2006-01-01

    Lovastatin inhibits a 3-hydroxy 3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase and prevents the synthesis of cholesterol precursors, such as farnesyl pyrophosphate (FPP) and geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate (GGPP), responsible for important cell signaling in cell proliferation and migration. Recently, the anti-cancer effect of lovastatin has been suggested in various tumor types. In this study, we showed that a low dose lovastatin induced senescence and G1 cell cycle arrest in human prostate cancer cells. Addition of GGPP or mevalonate, but not FPP, prevented the lovastatin-induced G1 phase cell cycle arrest and cell senescence. We found that constitutively active RhoA (caRhoA) reversed lovastatin-induced senescence in caRhoA-transfected PC-3 cells. Thus, we postulate that modulation of RhoA may be critical in lovastatin-induced senescence in PC-3 cells

  1. A proteomic approach for comprehensively screening substrates of protein kinases such as Rho-kinase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mutsuki Amano

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Protein kinases are major components of signal transduction pathways in multiple cellular processes. Kinases directly interact with and phosphorylate downstream substrates, thus modulating their functions. Despite the importance of identifying substrates in order to more fully understand the signaling network of respective kinases, efficient methods to search for substrates remain poorly explored. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We combined mass spectrometry and affinity column chromatography of the catalytic domain of protein kinases to screen potential substrates. Using the active catalytic fragment of Rho-kinase/ROCK/ROK as the model bait, we obtained about 300 interacting proteins from the rat brain cytosol fraction, which included the proteins previously reported as Rho-kinase substrates. Several novel interacting proteins, including doublecortin, were phosphorylated by Rho-kinase both in vitro and in vivo. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This method would enable identification of novel specific substrates for kinases such as Rho-kinase with high sensitivity.

  2. Active migration is associated with specific and consistent changes to gut microbiota in Calidris shorebirds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risely, Alice; Waite, David W; Ujvari, Beata; Hoye, Bethany J; Klaassen, Marcel

    2018-03-01

    Gut microbes are increasingly recognised for their role in regulating an animal's metabolism and immunity. However, identifying repeatable associations between host physiological processes and their gut microbiota has proved challenging, in part because microbial communities often respond stochastically to host physiological stress (e.g. fasting, forced exercise or infection). Migratory birds provide a valuable system in which to test host-microbe interactions under physiological extremes because these hosts are adapted to predictable metabolic and immunological challenges as they undergo seasonal migrations, including temporary gut atrophy during long-distance flights. These physiological challenges may either temporarily disrupt gut microbial ecosystems, or, alternatively, promote predictable host-microbe associations during migration. To determine the relationship between migration and gut microbiota, we compared gut microbiota composition between migrating and non-migrating ("resident") conspecific shorebirds sharing a flock. We performed this across two sandpiper species, Calidris ferruginea and Calidris ruficollis, in north-western Australia, and an additional C. ruficollis population 3,000 km away in southern Australia. We found that migrants consistently had higher abundances of the bacterial genus Corynebacterium (average 28% abundance) compared to conspecific residents (average gut community variation when excluding Corynebacterium. Our findings suggest a consistent relationship between Corynebacterium and Calidris shorebirds during migration, with further research required to identify causal mechanisms behind the association, and to elucidate functionality to the host. However, outside this specific association, migrating shorebirds broadly maintained gut community structure, which may allow them to quickly recover gut function after a migratory flight. This study provides a rare example of a repeatable and specific response of the gut microbiota to a

  3. Cholesterol modulates the volume-regulated anion current in Ehrlich-Lettre ascites cells via effects on Rho and F-actin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klausen, Thomas Kjaer; Hougaard, Charlotte; Hoffmann, Else K

    2006-01-01

    swollen cells, this reduction was prevented by cholesterol depletion, which also increased isotonic Rho activity. Thrombin, which stimulates Rho and causes actin polymerization, potentiated VRAC in modestly swollen cells. VRAC activity was unaffected by inclusion of a water-soluble PtdIns(4,5)P(2......) analogue or a PtdIns(4,5)P(2)-blocking antibody in the pipette, or neomycin treatment to sequester PtdIns(4,5)P(2). It is suggested that in ELA cells, F-actin and Rho-Rho kinase modulate VRAC magnitude and activation rate, respectively, and that cholesterol depletion potentiates VRAC at least in part......The mechanisms controlling the volume-regulated anion current (VRAC) are incompletely elucidated. Here, we investigate the modulation of VRAC by cellular cholesterol and the potential involvement of F-actin, Rho, Rho kinase, and phosphatidylinositol-(4,5)-bisphosphate [PtdIns(4,5)P(2...

  4. Loss of RhoB expression enhances the myelodysplastic phenotype of mammalian diaphanous-related Formin mDia1 knockout mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron D DeWard

    Full Text Available Myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS is characterized by ineffective hematopoiesis and hyperplastic bone marrow. Complete loss or interstitial deletions of the long arm of chromosome 5 occur frequently in MDS. One candidate tumor suppressor on 5q is the mammalian Diaphanous (mDia-related formin mDia1, encoded by DIAPH1 (5q31.3. mDia-family formins act as effectors for Rho-family small GTP-binding proteins including RhoB, which has also been shown to possess tumor suppressor activity. Mice lacking the Drf1 gene that encodes mDia1 develop age-dependent myelodysplastic features. We crossed mDia1 and RhoB knockout mice to test whether the additional loss of RhoB expression would compound the myelodysplastic phenotype. Drf1(-/-RhoB(-/- mice are fertile and develop normally. Relative to age-matched Drf1(-/-RhoB(+/- mice, the age of myelodysplasia onset was earlier in Drf1(-/-RhoB(-/- animals--including abnormally shaped erythrocytes, splenomegaly, and extramedullary hematopoiesis. In addition, we observed a statistically significant increase in the number of activated monocytes/macrophages in both the spleen and bone marrow of Drf1(-/-RhoB(-/- mice relative to Drf1(-/-RhoB(+/- mice. These data suggest a role for RhoB-regulated mDia1 in the regulation of hematopoietic progenitor cells.

  5. Assessing the reliability of predictive activity coefficient models for molecules consisting of several functional groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. P. Gerber

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Currently, the most successful predictive models for activity coefficients are those based on functional groups such as UNIFAC. In contrast, these models require a large amount of experimental data for the determination of their parameter matrix. A more recent alternative is the models based on COSMO, for which only a small set of universal parameters must be calibrated. In this work, a recalibrated COSMO-SAC model was compared with the UNIFAC (Do model employing experimental infinite dilution activity coefficient data for 2236 non-hydrogen-bonding binary mixtures at different temperatures. As expected, UNIFAC (Do presented better overall performance, with a mean absolute error of 0.12 ln-units against 0.22 for our COSMO-SAC implementation. However, in cases involving molecules with several functional groups or when functional groups appear in an unusual way, the deviation for UNIFAC was 0.44 as opposed to 0.20 for COSMO-SAC. These results show that COSMO-SAC provides more reliable predictions for multi-functional or more complex molecules, reaffirming its future prospects.

  6. Triptolide disrupts the actin-based Sertoli-germ cells adherens junctions by inhibiting Rho GTPases expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xiang; Zhao, Fang [Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Drug Screening, China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing 210009 (China); Lv, Zhong-ming; Shi, Wei-qin [Jiangsu Provincial Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Nanjing (China); Zhang, Lu-yong, E-mail: lyzhang@cpu.edu.cn [Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Drug Screening, China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing 210009 (China); Key Laboratory of Drug Quality Control and Pharmacovigilance, China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing (China); State Key Laboratory of Natural Medicines, China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing 210009 (China); Yan, Ming, E-mail: brookming@cpu.edu.cn [Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Drug Screening, China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing 210009 (China)

    2016-11-01

    Triptolide (TP), derived from the medicinal plant Triterygium wilfordii Hook. f. (TWHF), is a diterpene triepoxide with variety biological and pharmacological activities. However, TP has been restricted in clinical application due to its narrow therapeutic window especially in reproductive system. During spermatogenesis, Sertoli cell cytoskeleton plays an essential role in facilitating germ cell movement and cell-cell actin-based adherens junctions (AJ). At Sertoli cell-spermatid interface, the anchoring device is a kind of AJ, known as ectoplasmic specializations (ES). In this study, we demonstrate that β-actin, an important component of cytoskeleton, has been significantly down-regulated after TP treatment. TP can inhibit the expression of Rho GTPase such as, RhoA, RhoB, Cdc42 and Rac1. Downstream of Rho GTPase, Rho-associated protein kinase (ROCKs) gene expressions were also suppressed by TP. F-actin immunofluorescence proved that TP disrupts Sertoli cells cytoskeleton network. As a result of β-actin down-regulation, TP treatment increased expression of testin, which indicating ES has been disassembled. In summary, this report illustrates that TP induces cytoskeleton dysfunction and disrupts cell-cell adherens junctions via inhibition of Rho GTPases. - Highlights: • Triptolide induced the disruption of Sertoli-germ cell adherens junction. • Rho GTPases expression and actin dynamics have been suppressed by triptolide. • Actin-based adherens junction is a potential antifertility target of triptolide. • Rho-Rock is involved in the regulation of actin dynamics.

  7. Triptolide disrupts the actin-based Sertoli-germ cells adherens junctions by inhibiting Rho GTPases expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Xiang; Zhao, Fang; Lv, Zhong-ming; Shi, Wei-qin; Zhang, Lu-yong; Yan, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Triptolide (TP), derived from the medicinal plant Triterygium wilfordii Hook. f. (TWHF), is a diterpene triepoxide with variety biological and pharmacological activities. However, TP has been restricted in clinical application due to its narrow therapeutic window especially in reproductive system. During spermatogenesis, Sertoli cell cytoskeleton plays an essential role in facilitating germ cell movement and cell-cell actin-based adherens junctions (AJ). At Sertoli cell-spermatid interface, the anchoring device is a kind of AJ, known as ectoplasmic specializations (ES). In this study, we demonstrate that β-actin, an important component of cytoskeleton, has been significantly down-regulated after TP treatment. TP can inhibit the expression of Rho GTPase such as, RhoA, RhoB, Cdc42 and Rac1. Downstream of Rho GTPase, Rho-associated protein kinase (ROCKs) gene expressions were also suppressed by TP. F-actin immunofluorescence proved that TP disrupts Sertoli cells cytoskeleton network. As a result of β-actin down-regulation, TP treatment increased expression of testin, which indicating ES has been disassembled. In summary, this report illustrates that TP induces cytoskeleton dysfunction and disrupts cell-cell adherens junctions via inhibition of Rho GTPases. - Highlights: • Triptolide induced the disruption of Sertoli-germ cell adherens junction. • Rho GTPases expression and actin dynamics have been suppressed by triptolide. • Actin-based adherens junction is a potential antifertility target of triptolide. • Rho-Rock is involved in the regulation of actin dynamics.

  8. ER stress in retinal degeneration in S334ter Rho rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vishal M Shinde

    Full Text Available The S334ter rhodopsin (Rho rat (line 4 bears the rhodopsin gene with an early termination codon at residue 334 that is a model for several such mutations found in human patients with autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (ADRP. The Unfolded Protein Response (UPR is implicated in the pathophysiology of several retinal disorders including ADRP in P23H Rho rats. The aim of this study was to examine the onset of UPR gene expression in S334ter Rho retinas to determine if UPR is activated in ADRP animal models and to investigate how the activation of UPR molecules leads to the final demise of S334ter Rho photoreceptors. RT-PCR was performed to evaluate the gene expression profiles for the P10, P12, P15, and P21 stages of the development and progression of ADRP in S334ter Rho photoreceptors. We determined that during the P12-P15 period, ER stress-related genes are strongly upregulated in transgenic retinas, resulting in the activation of the UPR that was confirmed using western blot analysis and RT-PCR. The activation of UPR was associated with the increased expression of JNK, Bik, Bim, Bid, Noxa, and Puma genes and cleavage of caspase-12 that together with activated calpains presumably compromise the integrity of the mitochondrial MPTP, leading to the release of pro-apoptotic AIF1 into the cytosol of S334ter Rho photoreceptor cells. Therefore, two major cross-talking pathways, the UPR and mitochondrial MPTP occur in S334ter-4 Rho retina concomitantly and eventually promote the death of the photoreceptor cells.

  9. Double-spin asymmetries in the cross section of rho sup 0 and phi production at intermediate energies

    CERN Document Server

    Airapetian, A; Akopov, Z; Amarian, M

    2003-01-01

    Double-spin asymmetries in the cross section of electroproduction of rho sup 0 and phi mesons on the proton and deuteron are measured at the HERMES experiment. The photoabsorption asymmetry in exclusive rho sup 0 electroproduction on the proton exhibits a positive tendency. This is consistent with theoretical predictions that the exchange of an object with unnatural parity contributes to exclusive rho sup 0 electroproduction by transverse photons. The photoabsorption asymmetry on the deuteron is found to be consistent with zero. Double-spin asymmetries in rho sup 0 and phi meson electroproduction by quasi-real photons were also found to be consistent with zero; the asymmetry in the case of the phi meson is compatible with a theoretical prediction which involves s anti s knockout from the nucleon. (orig.)

  10. Expression loss and revivification of RhoB gene in ovary carcinoma carcinogenesis and development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yingwei; Song, Na; Ren, Kexing; Meng, Shenglan; Xie, Yao; Long, Qida; Chen, Xiancheng; Zhao, Xia

    2013-01-01

    RhoB, a member of small GTPases belonging to the Ras protein superfamily, might have a suppressive activity in cancer progression. Here, expression of RhoB gene was evaluated in human benign, borderline and malignant ovary tumors by immunostaining, with normal ovary tissue as control. Malignant tumors were assessed according to Federation Internationale de Gynecologie Obstetrique (FIGO) guidelines and classified in stage I-IV. Revivification of RhoB gene was investigated by analyzing the effect of histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor trichostatin (TSA) and methyltransferase inhibitor 5-azacytidine (5-Aza) on ovarian cancer cells via RT-PCR and western blot. Apoptosis of ovary cancer cells was detected using flowcytometry and fluorescence microscopy. Subsequently, RhoB expression is detected in normal ovary epithelium, borderline tumors, and decreases significantly or lost in the majority of ovarian cancer specimen (Pcancer cells, but 5-Aza couldn't. Interference into Revivification of RhoB gene results in reduction of ovary carcinoma cell apoptosis. It is proposed that loss of RhoB expression occurs frequently in ovary carcinogenesis and progression and its expression could be regulated by histone deacetylation but not by promoter hypermethylation, which may serve as a prospective gene treatment target for the patients with ovarian malignancy not responding to standard therapies.

  11. The Role of RhoA, RhoB and RhoC GTPases in Cell Morphology, Proliferation and Migration in Human Cytomegalovirus (HCMV Infected Glioblastoma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melpomeni Tseliou

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Rho GTPases are crucial regulators of the actin cytoskeleton, membrane trafficking and cell signaling and their importance in cell migration and invasion is well- established. The human cytomegalovirus (HCMV is a widespread pathogen responsible for generally asymptomatic and persistent infections in healthy people. Recent evidence indicates that HCMV gene products are expressed in over 90% of malignant type glioblastomas (GBM. In addition, the HCMV Immediate Early-1 protein (IE1 is expressed in >90% of tumors analyzed. Methods: RhoA, RhoB and RhoC were individually depleted in U373MG glioblastoma cells as well as U373MG cells stably expressing the HCMV IE1 protein (named U373MG-IE1 cells shRNA lentivirus vectors. Cell proliferation assays, migration as well as wound-healing assays were performed in uninfected and HCMV-infected cells. Results: The depletion of RhoA, RhoB and RhoC protein resulted in significant alterations in the morphology of the uninfected cells, which were further enhanced by the cytopathic effect caused by HCMV. Furthermore, in the absence or presence of HCMV, the knockdown of RhoB and RhoC proteins decreased the proliferation rate of the parental and the IE1-expressing glioblastoma cells, whereas the knockdown of RhoA protein in the HCMV infected cell lines restored their proliferation rate. In addition, wound healing assays in U373MG cells revealed that depletion of RhoA, RhoB and RhoC differentially reduced their migration rate, even in the presence or the absence of HCMV. Conclusion: Collectively, these data show for the first time a differential implication of Rho GTPases in morphology, proliferation rate and motility of human glioblastoma cells during HCMV infection, further supporting an oncomodulatory role of HCMV depending on the Rho isoforms' state.

  12. Cdc42 and RhoA reveal different spatio-temporal dynamics upon local stimulation with Semaphorin-3A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico eIseppon

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Small RhoGTPases, such as Cdc42 and RhoA, are key players in integrating external cues and intracellular signaling pathways that regulate growth cone (GC motility. Indeed, Cdc42 is involved in actin polymerization and filopodia formation, whereas RhoA induces GC collapse and neurite retraction through actomyosin contraction. In this study we employed Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET microscopy to study the spatio-temporal dynamics of Cdc42 and RhoA in GCs in response to local Semaphorin-3A stimulation obtained with lipid vesicles filled with Semaphorin-3A and positioned near the selected GC using optical tweezers. We found that Cdc42 and RhoA were activated at the leading edge of NG108-15 neuroblastoma cells during spontaneous cycles of protrusion and retraction, respectively. The release of Semaphorin-3A brought to a progressive activation of RhoA within 30 seconds from the stimulus in the central region of the GC that collapsed and retracted. In contrast, the same stimulation evoked waves of Cdc42 activation propagating away from the stimulated region. A more localized stimulation obtained with Sema3A coated beads placed on the GC, led to Cdc42 active waves that propagated in a retrograde manner with a mean period of 70 seconds, and followed by GC retraction. Therefore, Semaphorin-3A activates both Cdc42 and RhoA with a complex and different spatial-temporal dynamics.

  13. Rho resonance parameters from lattice QCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Dehua; Alexandru, Andrei; Molina, Raquel; Döring, Michael

    2016-08-01

    We perform a high-precision calculation of the phase shifts for $\\pi$-$\\pi$ scattering in the I = 1, J = 1 channel in the elastic region using elongated lattices with two mass-degenerate quark favors ($N_f = 2$). We extract the $\\rho$ resonance parameters using a Breit-Wigner fit at two different quark masses, corresponding to $m_{\\pi} = 226$MeV and $m_{\\pi} = 315$MeV, and perform an extrapolation to the physical point. The extrapolation is based on a unitarized chiral perturbation theory model that describes well the phase-shifts around the resonance for both quark masses. We find that the extrapolated value, $m_{\\rho} = 720(1)(15)$MeV, is significantly lower that the physical rho mass and we argue that this shift could be due to the absence of the strange quark in our calculation.

  14. Dipole moments of the rho meson

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hecht, M.B.; McKellar, B.H.P.

    1997-04-01

    The electric and magnetic dipole moments (EDM) of the rho meson are calculated using the propagators and vertices derived from the quantum chromodynamics Dyson-Schwinger equations. Results obtained from using the Bethe-Salpeter amplitude studied by Chappell, Mitchell et. al., and Pichowsky and Lee, are compared. The rho meson EDM is generated through the inclusion of a quark electric dipole moment, which is left as a free variable. These results are compared to the perturbative results to obtain a measure of the effects of quark interactions and confinement. The two dipole moments are also calculated using the phenomenological MIT bag model to provide a further basis for comparison

  15. Measurement of Exclusive $\\rho^+ \\rho^-$ Production in High-$Q^2$ Two-Photon Collisions at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Achard, P.; Aguilar-Benitez, M.; Alcaraz, J.; Alemanni, G.; Allaby, J.; Aloisio, A.; Alviggi, M.G.; Anderhub, H.; Andreev, Valery P.; Anselmo, F.; Arefev, A.; Azemoon, T.; Aziz, T.; Bagnaia, P.; Bajo, A.; Baksay, G.; Baksay, L.; Baldew, S.V.; Banerjee, S.; Banerjee, Sw.; Barczyk, A.; Barillere, R.; Bartalini, P.; Basile, M.; Batalova, N.; Battiston, R.; Bay, A.; Becattini, F.; Becker, U.; Behner, F.; Bellucci, L.; Berbeco, R.; Berdugo, J.; Berges, P.; Bertucci, B.; Betev, B.L.; Biasini, M.; Biglietti, M.; Biland, A.; Blaising, J.J.; Blyth, S.C.; Bobbink, G.J.; Bohm, A.; Boldizsar, L.; Borgia, B.; Bottai, S.; Bourilkov, D.; Bourquin, M.; Braccini, S.; Branson, J.G.; Brochu, F.; Burger, J.D.; Burger, W.J.; Cai, X.D.; Capell, M.; Cara Romeo, G.; Carlino, G.; Cartacci, A.; Casaus, J.; Cavallari, F.; Cavallo, N.; Cecchi, C.; Cerrada, M.; Chamizo, M.; Chang, Y.H.; Chemarin, M.; Chen, A.; Chen, G.; Chen, G.M.; Chen, H.F.; Chen, H.S.; Chiefari, G.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Clare, I.; Clare, R.; Coignet, G.; Colino, N.; Costantini, S.; de la Cruz, B.; Cucciarelli, S.; van Dalen, J.A.; de Asmundis, R.; Deglon, P.; Debreczeni, J.; Degre, A.; Dehmelt, K.; Deiters, K.; della Volpe, D.; Delmeire, E.; Denes, P.; DeNotaristefani, F.; De Salvo, A.; Diemoz, M.; Dierckxsens, M.; Dionisi, C.; Dittmar, M.; Doria, A.; Dova, M.T.; Duchesneau, D.; Duda, M.; Echenard, B.; Eline, A.; El Hage, A.; El Mamouni, H.; Engler, A.; Eppling, F.J.; Extermann, P.; Falagan, M.A.; Falciano, S.; Favara, A.; Fay, J.; Fedin, O.; Felcini, M.; Ferguson, T.; Fesefeldt, H.; Fiandrini, E.; Field, J.H.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, P.H.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, I.; Forconi, G.; Freudenreich, K.; Furetta, C.; Galaktionov, Iouri; Ganguli, S.N.; Garcia-Abia, Pablo; Gataullin, M.; Gentile, S.; Giagu, S.; Gong, Z.F.; Grenier, Gerald Jean; Grimm, O.; Gruenewald, M.W.; Guida, M.; Gupta, V.K.; Gurtu, A.; Gutay, L.J.; Haas, D.; Hatzifotiadou, D.; Hebbeker, T.; Herve, Alain; Hirschfelder, J.; Hofer, H.; Hohlmann, M.; Holzner, G.; Hou, S.R.; Hu, Y.; Jin, B.N.; Jones, Lawrence W.; de Jong, P.; Josa-Mutuberria, I.; Kaur, M.; Kienzle-Focacci, M.N.; Kim, J.K.; Kirkby, Jasper; Kittel, W.; Klimentov, A.; Konig, A.C.; Kopal, M.; Koutsenko, V.; Kraber, M.; Kraemer, R.W.; Kruger, A.; Kunin, A.; Ladron de Guevara, P.; Laktineh, I.; Landi, G.; Lebeau, M.; Lebedev, A.; Lebrun, P.; Lecomte, P.; Lecoq, P.; Le Coultre, P.; Le Goff, J.M.; Leiste, R.; Levtchenko, M.; Levtchenko, P.; Li, C.; Likhoded, S.; Lin, C.H.; Lin, W.T.; Linde, F.L.; Lista, L.; Liu, Z.A.; Lohmann, W.; Longo, E.; Lu, Y.S.; Luci, C.; Luminari, L.; Lustermann, W.; Ma, W.G.; Malgeri, L.; Malinin, A.; Mana, C.; Mans, J.; Martin, J.P.; Marzano, F.; Mazumdar, K.; McNeil, R.R.; Mele, S.; Merola, L.; Meschini, M.; Metzger, W.J.; Mihul, A.; Milcent, H.; Mirabelli, G.; Mnich, J.; Mohanty, G.B.; Muanza, G.S.; Muijs, A.J.M.; Musicar, B.; Musy, M.; Nagy, S.; Natale, S.; Napolitano, M.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Newman, H.; Nisati, A.; Novak, T.; Kluge, Hannelies; Ofierzynski, R.; Organtini, G.; Pal, I.; Palomares, C.; Paolucci, P.; Paramatti, R.; Passaleva, G.; Patricelli, S.; Paul, Thomas Cantzon; Pauluzzi, M.; Paus, C.; Pauss, F.; Pedace, M.; Pensotti, S.; Perret-Gallix, D.; Petersen, B.; Piccolo, D.; Pierella, F.; Pioppi, M.; Piroue, P.A.; Pistolesi, E.; Plyaskin, V.; Pohl, M.; Pojidaev, V.; Pothier, J.; Prokofev, D.; Quartieri, J.; Rahal-Callot, G.; Rahaman, Mohammad Azizur; Raics, P.; Raja, N.; Ramelli, R.; Rancoita, P.G.; Ranieri, R.; Raspereza, A.; Razis, P.; Ren, D.; Rescigno, M.; Reucroft, S.; Riemann, S.; Riles, Keith; Roe, B.P.; Romero, L.; Rosca, A.; Rosemann, C.; Rosenbleck, C.; Rosier-Lees, S.; Roth, Stefan; Rubio, J.A.; Ruggiero, G.; Rykaczewski, H.; Sakharov, A.; Saremi, S.; Sarkar, S.; Salicio, J.; Sanchez, E.; Schafer, C.; Schegelsky, V.; Schopper, H.; Schotanus, D.J.; Sciacca, C.; Servoli, L.; Shevchenko, S.; Shivarov, N.; Shoutko, V.; Shumilov, E.; Shvorob, A.; Son, D.; Souga, C.; Spillantini, P.; Steuer, M.; Stickland, D.P.; Stoyanov, B.; Straessner, A.; Sudhakar, K.; Sultanov, G.; Sun, L.Z.; Sushkov, S.; Suter, H.; Swain, J.D.; Szillasi, Z.; Tang, X.W.; Tarjan, P.; Tauscher, L.; Taylor, L.; Tellili, B.; Teyssier, D.; Timmermans, Charles; Ting, Samuel C.C.; Ting, S.M.; Tonwar, S.C.; Toth, J.; Tully, C.; Tung, K.L.; Ulbricht, J.; Valente, E.; Van de Walle, R.T.; Vasquez, R.; Veszpremi, V.; Vesztergombi, G.; Vetlitsky, I.; Vicinanza, D.; Viertel, G.; Villa, S.; Vivargent, M.; Vlachos, S.; Vodopianov, I.; Vogel, H.; Vogt, H.; Vorobev, I.; Vorobyov, A.A.; Wadhwa, M.; Wang, Q.; Wang, X.L.; Wang, Z.M.; Weber, M.; Wilkens, H.; Wynhoff, S.; Xia, L.; Xu, Z.Z.; Yamamoto, J.; Yang, B.Z.; Yang, C.G.; Yang, H.J.; Yang, M.; Yeh, S.C.; Zalite, An.; Zalite, Yu.; Zhang, Z.P.; Zhao, J.; Zhu, G.Y.; Zhu, R.Y.; Zhuang, H.L.; Zichichi, A.; Zimmermann, B.; Zoller, M.

    2004-01-01

    Exclusive rho^+ rho^- production in two-photon collisions involving a single highly-virtual photon is studied with data collected at LEP at centre-of-mass energies 89 GeV rho^+ rho^- is determined as a function of the photon virtuality, Q^2, and the two-photon centre-of-mass energy, W_gg, in the kinematic region: 1.2 GeV^2 rho^0 rho^0, measured in the same kinematic region by L3, and to have similar W_gg and Q^2 dependences.

  16. A measurement of the branching ratio Σ+→rhoγ/Σ+→rhoπ0

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-06-01

    In an experiment performed in the CERN SPS hyperon beam a value for the branching ratio, Σ + →rhoγ/Σ + →rhoπ 0 of (2.46 sub(-0.35)sup(+0.30))x10 -3 , has been obtained corresponding to a branching ratio Σ + →rhoγ/Σ + → all of (1.27 sub(-0.18)sup(+0.16))x10 -3 . This result is discussed in the context of present understanding of hyperon radiative decays. (author)

  17. Stepwise high-throughput virtual screening of Rho kinase inhibitors from natural product library and potential therapeutics for pulmonary hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Hao; Yan, Ji; Xu, Jian; Fan, Xi-Zhen; Sun, Xian-Lin; Chen, Kang-Yu

    2015-08-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a devastating disease characterized by progressive elevation of pulmonary arterial pressure and vascular resistance due to pulmonary vasoconstriction and vessel remodeling. The activation of RhoA/Rho-kinase (ROCK) pathway plays a central role in the pathologic progression of PH and thus the Rho kinase, an essential effector of the ROCK pathway, is considered as a potential therapeutic target to attenuate PH. In the current study, a synthetic pipeline is used to discover new potent Rho inhibitors from various natural products. In the pipeline, the stepwise high-throughput virtual screening, quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR)-based rescoring, and kinase assay were integrated. The screening was performed against a structurally diverse, drug-like natural product library, from which six identified compounds were tested to determine their inhibitory potencies agonist Rho by using a standard kinase assay protocol. With this scheme, we successfully identified two potent Rho inhibitors, namely phloretin and baicalein, with activity values of IC50 = 0.22 and 0.95 μM, respectively. Structural examination suggested that complicated networks of non-bonded interactions such as hydrogen bonding, hydrophobic forces, and van der Waals contacts across the complex interfaces of Rho kinase are formed with the screened compounds.

  18. Consistent treatment of one-body dynamics and collective fluctuations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pfitzner, A.

    1986-09-01

    We show how the residual coupling deltaV between collective and intrinsic motion induces correlations, which lead to fluctuations of the collective variables and to a redistribution of single-particle occupation numbers rho/sub α/. The evolution of rho/sub α/ and of the collective fluctuations is consistently described by a coupled system of equations, which accounts for the dependence of the transport coefficients on rho/sub α/, and for the dependence of the transition rates in the master equation on the collective variances. (author)

  19. Downstream components of RhoA required for signal pathway of superoxide formation during phagocytosis of serum opsonized zymosans in macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jun Sub; Kim, Jae Gyu; Jeon, Chan Young; Won, Ha Young; Moon, Mi Young; Seo, Ji Yeon; Kim, Jong Il; Kim, Jaebong; Lee, Jae Yong; Choi, Soo Young; Park, Jinseu; Yoon Park, Jung Han; Ha, Kwon Soo; Kim, Pyeung Hyeun; Park, Jae Bong

    2005-12-31

    Rac1 and Rac2 are essential for the control of oxidative burst catalyzed by NADPH oxidase. It was also documented that Rho is associated with the superoxide burst reaction during phagocytosis of serum- (SOZ) and IgG-opsonized zymosan particles (IOZ). In this study, we attempted to reveal the signal pathway components in the superoxide formation regulated by Rho GTPase. Tat-C3 blocked superoxide production, suggesting that RhoA is essentially involved in superoxide formation during phagocytosis of SOZ. Conversely SOZ activated both RhoA and Rac1/2. Inhibition of RhoA-activated kinase (ROCK), an important downstream effector of RhoA, by Y27632 and myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) by ML-7 abrogated superoxide production by SOZ. Extracellular signaling-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2 and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) were activated during phagocytosis of SOZ, and Tat-C3 and SB203580 reduced ERK1/2 and p38 MAPK activation, suggesting that RhoA and p38 MAPK may be upstream regulators of ERK1/2. Inhibition of ERK1/2, p38 MAPK, phosphatidyl inositol 3-kinase did not block translocation of RhoA to membranes, suggesting that RhoA is upstream to these kinases. Inhibition of RhoA by Tat-C3 blocked phosphorylation of p47(PHOX). Taken together, RhoA, ROCK, p38MAPK, ERK1/2, and p47(PHOX) may be subsequently activated, leading to activation of NADPH oxidase to produce superoxide.

  20. Chiral symmetry breaking and the spin content of the {rho} and {rho}{sup '} mesons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glozman, L.Ya., E-mail: leonid.glozman@uni-graz.at [Institut fuer Physik, FB Theoretische Physik, Universitaet Graz, A-8010 Graz (Austria); Lang, C.B., E-mail: christian.lang@uni-graz.at [Institut fuer Physik, FB Theoretische Physik, Universitaet Graz, A-8010 Graz (Austria); Limmer, M., E-mail: markus.limmer@uni-graz.at [Institut fuer Physik, FB Theoretische Physik, Universitaet Graz, A-8010 Graz (Austria)

    2011-11-03

    Using interpolators with different SU(2){sub L}xSU(2){sub R} transformation properties we study the chiral symmetry and spin contents of the {rho} and {rho}{sup '} mesons in lattice simulations with dynamical quarks. A ratio of couplings of the q-bar {gamma}{sup i}{tau}q and q-bar {sigma}{sup 0}i{tau}q interpolators to a given meson state at different resolution scales tells one about the degree of chiral symmetry breaking in the meson wave function at these scales. Using a Gaussian gauge invariant smearing of the quark fields in the interpolators, we are able to extract the chiral content of mesons up to the infrared resolution of {approx}1 fm. In the ground state {rho} meson the chiral symmetry is strongly broken with comparable contributions of both the (0,1)+(1,0) and (1/2,1/2){sub b} chiral representations with the former being the leading contribution. In contrast, in the {rho}{sup '} meson the degree of chiral symmetry breaking is manifestly smaller and the leading representation is (1/2,1/2){sub b}. Using a unitary transformation from the chiral basis to the {sup 2S+1}L{sub J} basis, we are able to define and measure the angular momentum content of mesons in the rest frame. This definition is different from the traditional one which uses parton distributions in the infinite momentum frame. The {rho} meson is practically a {sup 3}S{sub 1} state with no obvious trace of a 'spin crisis'. The {rho}{sup '} meson has a sizeable contribution of the {sup 3}D{sub 1} wave, which implies that the {rho}{sup '} meson cannot be considered as a pure radial excitation of the {rho} meson.

  1. Silencing of RhoA and RhoC expression by RNA interference suppresses human colorectal carcinoma growth in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Haibo

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background RhoA and RhoC have been proved to be over-expressed in many solid cancers, including colorectal cancer. The reduction of RhoA and RhoC expression by RNA interference (RNAi resulted growth inhibition of cancer cells. The present study was to evaluate the effect of silencing of RhoA and RhoC expression by RNAi on growth of human colorectal carcinoma (CRC in tumor-bearing nude mice in vivo. Methods To establish HCT116 cell transplantable model, the nude mice were subcutaneously inoculated with 1.0 × 107 HCT116 cells and kept growing till the tumor xenografts reached 5-7 mm in diameter. Then the mice were randomly assigned to three groups(seven mice in each group: (1 normal saline(NS group, (2replication-defective recombinant adenovirus carrying the negative control shRNA (Ad-HK group and (3replication-defective recombinant adenovirus carrying the 4-tandem linked RhoA and RhoC shRNAs (Ad-RhoA-RhoC group. Ad-HK (4 × 108 pfu, 30 ul/mouse, Ad-RhoA-RhoC (4 × 108 pfu, 30 ul/mouse or PBS (30 ul/mouse was injected intratumorally four times once every other day. The weight and volumes of tumor xenografts were recorded. The levels of RhoA and RhoC mRNA transcripts and proteins in tumor xenografts were detected by reverse quantitative transcription polymerase chain reaction (QRT-PCR and immunohistochemical staining respectively. The terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL assay was used to detect the death of cells. Results The xenografts in mice could be seen at 5th day from the implantation of HCT116 cells and all had reached 5-7 mm in size at 9th day. After injection intratumorally, the growth speed of tumor xenografts in Ad-RhoA-RhoC group was significantly delayed compared with those in NS and Ad-HK group(P RhoA and RhoC reduced more in Ad-RhoA-RhoC group than those in NS and Ad-HK group. The relative RhoA and RhoC mRNA transcripts were decreased to 48% and 43% respectively (P RhoA and Rho

  2. Time-dependent restricted-active-space self-consistent-field theory for bosonic many-body systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lévêque, Camille; Madsen, Lars Bojer

    2017-01-01

    We develop an ab initio time-dependent wavefunction based theory for the description of a many-body system of cold interacting bosons. Like the multi-configurational time-dependent Hartree method for bosons (MCTDHB), the theory is based on a configurational interaction Ansatz for the many-body wavefunction with time-dependent self-consistent-field orbitals. The theory generalizes the MCTDHB method by incorporating restrictions on the active space of the orbital excitations. The restrictions are specified based on the physical situation at hand. The equations of motion of this time-dependent restricted-active-space self-consistent-field (TD-RASSCF) theory are derived. The similarity between the formal development of the theory for bosons and fermions is discussed. The restrictions on the active space allow the theory to be evaluated under conditions where other wavefunction based methods due to exponential scaling in the numerical effort cannot, and to clearly identify the excitations that are important for an accurate description, significantly beyond the mean-field approach. For ground state calculations we find it to be important to allow a few particles to have the freedom to move in many orbitals, an insight facilitated by the flexibility of the restricted-active-space Ansatz . Moreover, we find that a high accuracy can be obtained by including only even excitations in the many-body self-consistent-field wavefunction. Time-dependent simulations of harmonically trapped bosons subject to a quenching of their noncontact interaction, show failure of the mean-field Gross-Pitaevskii approach within a fraction of a harmonic oscillation period. The TD-RASSCF theory remains accurate at much reduced computational cost compared to the MCTDHB method. Exploring the effect of changes of the restricted-active-space allows us to identify that even self-consistent-field excitations are mainly responsible for the accuracy of the method. (paper)

  3. The atypical Rho GTPase RhoD is a regulator of actin cytoskeleton dynamics and directed cell migration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blom, Magdalena; Reis, Katarina [Department of Microbiology, Tumor and Cell Biology, Karolinska Institutet, SE-171 77 Stockholm (Sweden); Heldin, Johan [Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Science for Life Laboratory, Uppsala SE-751 22 Uppsala (Sweden); Kreuger, Johan [Department of Medical Cell Biology, Science for Life Laboratory, Uppsala University, SE-751 23 Uppsala (Sweden); Aspenström, Pontus, E-mail: pontus.aspenstrom@ki.se [Department of Microbiology, Tumor and Cell Biology, Karolinska Institutet, SE-171 77 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2017-03-15

    RhoD belongs to the Rho GTPases, a protein family responsible for the regulation and organization of the actin cytoskeleton, and, consequently, many cellular processes like cell migration, cell division and vesicle trafficking. Here, we demonstrate that the actin cytoskeleton is dynamically regulated by increased or decreased protein levels of RhoD. Ectopic expression of RhoD has previously been shown to give an intertwined weave of actin filaments. We show that this RhoD-dependent effect is detected in several cell types and results in a less dynamic actin filament system. In contrast, RhoD depletion leads to increased actin filament-containing structures, such as cortical actin, stress fibers and edge ruffles. Moreover, vital cellular functions such as cell migration and proliferation are defective when RhoD is silenced. Taken together, we present data suggesting that RhoD is an important component in the control of actin dynamics and directed cell migration. - Highlights: • Increased RhoD expression leads to loss of actin structures, e.g. stress fibers and gives rise to decreased actin dynamics. • RhoD knockdown induces various actin-containing structures such as edge ruffles, stress fibers and cortical actin, in a cell-type specific manner. • RhoD induces specific actin rearrangements depending on its subcellular localization. • RhoD knockdown has effects on cellular processes, such as directed cell migration and proliferation.

  4. The atypical Rho GTPase RhoD is a regulator of actin cytoskeleton dynamics and directed cell migration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blom, Magdalena; Reis, Katarina; Heldin, Johan; Kreuger, Johan; Aspenström, Pontus

    2017-01-01

    RhoD belongs to the Rho GTPases, a protein family responsible for the regulation and organization of the actin cytoskeleton, and, consequently, many cellular processes like cell migration, cell division and vesicle trafficking. Here, we demonstrate that the actin cytoskeleton is dynamically regulated by increased or decreased protein levels of RhoD. Ectopic expression of RhoD has previously been shown to give an intertwined weave of actin filaments. We show that this RhoD-dependent effect is detected in several cell types and results in a less dynamic actin filament system. In contrast, RhoD depletion leads to increased actin filament-containing structures, such as cortical actin, stress fibers and edge ruffles. Moreover, vital cellular functions such as cell migration and proliferation are defective when RhoD is silenced. Taken together, we present data suggesting that RhoD is an important component in the control of actin dynamics and directed cell migration. - Highlights: • Increased RhoD expression leads to loss of actin structures, e.g. stress fibers and gives rise to decreased actin dynamics. • RhoD knockdown induces various actin-containing structures such as edge ruffles, stress fibers and cortical actin, in a cell-type specific manner. • RhoD induces specific actin rearrangements depending on its subcellular localization. • RhoD knockdown has effects on cellular processes, such as directed cell migration and proliferation.

  5. Time-dependent restricted-active-space self-consistent-field theory for laser-driven many-electron dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miyagi, Haruhide; Madsen, Lars Bojer

    2013-01-01

    We present the time-dependent restricted-active-space self-consistent-field (TD-RASSCF) theory as a framework for the time-dependent many-electron problem. The theory generalizes the multiconfigurational time-dependent Hartree-Fock (MCTDHF) theory by incorporating the restricted-active-space scheme...... well known in time-independent quantum chemistry. Optimization of the orbitals as well as the expansion coefficients at each time step makes it possible to construct the wave function accurately while using only a relatively small number of electronic configurations. In numerical calculations of high...

  6. Regulation of white and brown adipocyte differentiation by RhoGAP DLC1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choon Kiat Sim

    Full Text Available Adipose tissues constitute an important component of metabolism, the dysfunction of which can cause obesity and type II diabetes. Here we show that differentiation of white and brown adipocytes requires Deleted in Liver Cancer 1 (DLC1, a Rho GTPase Activating Protein (RhoGAP previously studied for its function in liver cancer. We identified Dlc1 as a super-enhancer associated gene in both white and brown adipocytes through analyzing the genome-wide binding profiles of PPARγ, the master regulator of adipogenesis. We further observed that Dlc1 expression increases during differentiation, and knockdown of Dlc1 by siRNA in white adipocytes reduces the formation of lipid droplets and the expression of fat marker genes. Moreover, knockdown of Dlc1 in brown adipocytes reduces expression of brown fat-specific genes and diminishes mitochondrial respiration. Dlc1-/- knockout mouse embryonic fibroblasts show a complete inability to differentiate into adipocytes, but this phenotype can be rescued by inhibitors of Rho-associated kinase (ROCK and filamentous actin (F-actin, suggesting the involvement of Rho pathway in DLC1-regulated adipocyte differentiation. Furthermore, PPARγ binds to the promoter of Dlc1 gene to regulate its expression during both white and brown adipocyte differentiation. These results identify DLC1 as an activator of white and brown adipocyte differentiation, and provide a molecular link between PPARγ and Rho pathways.

  7. Identification and characterization of a lymphocytic Rho-GTPase effector: rhotekin-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collier, F.M.; Gregorio-King, C.C.; Gough, T.J.; Talbot, C.D.; Walder, K.; Kirkland, M.A.

    2004-01-01

    Rhotekin belongs to the group of proteins containing a Rho-binding domain that are target peptides (effectors) for the Rho-GTPases. We previously identified a novel cDNA with homology to human rhotekin and in this study we cloned and characterized the coding region of this novel 12-exon gene. The ORF encodes a 609 amino-acid protein comprising a Class I Rho-binding domain and pleckstrin homology (PH) domain. Cellular cDNA expression of this new protein, designated Rhotekin-2 (RTKN2), was shown in the cytosol and nucleus of CHO cells. Using bioinformatics and RTPCR we identified three major splice variants, which vary in both the Rho-binding and PH domains. Real-time PCR studies showed exclusive RTKN2 expression in pooled lymphocytes and further purification indicated sole expression in CD4 pos T-cells and bone marrow-derived B-cells. Gene expression was increased in quiescent T-cells but negligible in activated proliferating cells. In malignant samples expression was absent in myeloid leukaemias, low in most B-cell malignancies and CD8 pos T-cell malignancies, but very high in CD4 pos /CD8 pos T-lymphoblastic lymphoma. As the Rho family is critical in lymphocyte development and function, RTKN2 may play an important role in lymphopoiesis

  8. On $rho$-dilations of commuting operators

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Müller, Vladimír

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 78, č. 1 (2017), s. 3-20 ISSN 0379-4024 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-07880S Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : regular unitary dilation * rho-dilation Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics OBOR OECD: Pure mathematics Impact factor: 0.524, year: 2016 http://www.mathjournals.org/jot/2017-078-001/2017-078-001-001. html

  9. Signaling efficiency of Gαq through its effectors p63RhoGEF and GEFT depends on their subcellular location.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goedhart, J.; van Unen, J.; Adjobo-Hermans, M.J.W.; Gadella (jr.), T.W.J.

    2013-01-01

    The p63RhoGEF and GEFT proteins are encoded by the same gene and both members of the Dbl family of guanine nucleotide exchange factors. These proteins can be activated by the heterotrimeric G-protein subunit Galphaq. We show that p63RhoGEF is located at the plasma membrane, whereas GEFT is confined

  10. Self-consistent expansion for the molecular beam epitaxy equation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katzav, Eytan

    2002-03-01

    Motivated by a controversy over the correct results derived from the dynamic renormalization group (DRG) analysis of the nonlinear molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) equation, a self-consistent expansion for the nonlinear MBE theory is considered. The scaling exponents are obtained for spatially correlated noise of the general form D(r-r('),t-t('))=2D(0)[r-->-r(')](2rho-d)delta(t-t(')). I find a lower critical dimension d(c)(rho)=4+2rho, above which the linear MBE solution appears. Below the lower critical dimension a rho-dependent strong-coupling solution is found. These results help to resolve the controversy over the correct exponents that describe nonlinear MBE, using a reliable method that proved itself in the past by giving reasonable results for the strong-coupling regime of the Kardar-Parisi-Zhang system (for d>1), where DRG failed to do so.

  11. Interface Consistency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staunstrup, Jørgen

    1998-01-01

    This paper proposes that Interface Consistency is an important issue for the development of modular designs. Byproviding a precise specification of component interfaces it becomes possible to check that separately developedcomponents use a common interface in a coherent matter thus avoiding a very...... significant source of design errors. Awide range of interface specifications are possible, the simplest form is a syntactical check of parameter types.However, today it is possible to do more sophisticated forms involving semantic checks....

  12. Inactivation of the small GTP binding protein Rho induces multinucleate cell formation and apoptosis in murine T lymphoma EL4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moorman, J P; Bobak, D A; Hahn, C S

    1996-06-01

    The small G-protein Rho regulates the actin microfilament-dependent cytoskeleton. Exoenzyme C3 of Clostridium botulinum ADP-ribosylates Rho at Asn41, a modification that functionally inactivates Rho. Using a Sindbis virus-based transient gene expression system, we studied the role of Rho in murine EL4 T lymphoma cells. We generated a double subgenomic infectious Sindbis virus (dsSIN:C3) recombinant which expressed C3 in >95% of EL4 cells. This intracellular C3 resulted in modification and inactivation of virtually all endogenous Rho. dsSIN:C3 infection led to the formation of multinucleate cells, likely by inhibiting the actin microfilament-dependent step of cytokinesis. Intriguingly, in spite of the inhibition of cytokinesis, karyokinesis continued, with the result that cells containing a nuclear DNA content as high as 16N (eight nuclei) were observed. In addition, dsSIN:C3-mediated inactivation of Rho was a potent activator of apoptosis in EL4 cells. To discern whether the formation of multinucleate cells was responsible for the activation of apoptosis, 5-fluorouracil (5-FUra) was used to induce cell cycle arrest. As expected, EL4 cells treated with 5-FUra were prevented from forming multinucleate cells upon infection with dsSIN:C3. dsSIN:C3 infection, however, still caused marked apoptosis in 5-FUra-treated cells, indicating that this activation of apoptosis was independent of multinucleate cell formation.

  13. Measurement of the spin density matrix for the $\\rho^0$, $K^{*0}(892)$ and $\\phi$ produced in $Z^0$ Decays

    CERN Document Server

    Abreu, P; Adye, T; Alekseev, G D; Alemany, R; Allport, P P; Almehed, S; Amaldi, Ugo; Amato, S; Andersson, P; Andreazza, A; Antilogus, P; Apel, W D; Arnoud, Y; Åsman, B; Augustin, J E; Augustinus, A; Baillon, Paul; Bambade, P; Barão, F; Barbi, M S; Barbiellini, Guido; Bardin, Dimitri Yuri; Barker, G; Baroncelli, A; Bärring, O; Bates, M J; Battaglia, Marco; Baubillier, M; Baudot, J; Becks, K H; Begalli, M; Beillière, P; Belokopytov, Yu A; Benvenuti, Alberto C; Bérat, C; Berggren, M; Bertini, D; Bertrand, D; Besançon, M; Bianchi, F; Bigi, M; Bilenky, S M; Billoir, P; Bizouard, M A; Bloch, D; Blume, M; Bonesini, M; Bonivento, W; Booth, P S L; Borgland, A W; Borisov, G; Bosio, C; Botner, O; Boudinov, E; Bouquet, B; Bourdarios, C; Bowcock, T J V; Bozzo, M; Branchini, P; Brand, K D; Brenke, T; Brenner, R A; Bricman, C; Brown, R C A; Brückman, P; Brunet, J M; Bugge, L; Buran, T; Burgsmüller, T; Buschmann, P; Cabrera, S; Caccia, M; Calvi, M; Camacho-Rozas, A J; Camporesi, T; Canale, V; Canepa, M; Cao, F; Carena, F; Carroll, L; Caso, Carlo; Castillo-Gimenez, M V; Cattai, A; Cavallo, F R; Chabaud, V; Chapkin, M M; Charpentier, P; Chaussard, L; Checchia, P; Chelkov, G A; Chen, M; Chierici, R; Chliapnikov, P V; Chochula, P; Chorowicz, V; Chudoba, J; Cindro, V; Collins, P; Contri, R; Cortina, E; Cosme, G; Cossutti, F; Cowell, J H; Crawley, H B; Crennell, D J; Crosetti, G; Cuevas-Maestro, J; Czellar, S; Dahm, J; D'Almagne, B; Dam, M; Damgaard, G; Dauncey, P D; Davenport, Martyn; Da Silva, W; Deghorain, A; Della Ricca, G; Delpierre, P A; Demaria, N; De Angelis, A; de Boer, Wim; De Brabandere, S; De Clercq, C; La Vaissière, C de; De Lotto, B; De Min, A; De Paula, L S; Dijkstra, H; Di Ciaccio, Lucia; Di Diodato, A; Djannati, A; Dolbeau, J; Doroba, K; Dracos, M; Drees, J; Drees, K A; Dris, M; Durand, J D; Edsall, D M; Ehret, R; Eigen, G; Ekelöf, T J C; Ekspong, Gösta; Elsing, M; Engel, J P; Erzen, B; Espirito-Santo, M C; Falk, E; Fanourakis, G K; Fassouliotis, D; Feindt, Michael; Fenyuk, A; Ferrari, P; Ferrer, A; Fichet, S; Filippas-Tassos, A; Firestone, A; Fischer, P A; Föth, H; Fokitis, E; Fontanelli, F; Formenti, F; Franek, B J; Frodesen, A G; Frühwirth, R; Fulda-Quenzer, F; Fuster, J A; Galloni, A; Gamba, D; Gandelman, M; García, C; García, J; Gaspar, C; Gasparini, U; Gavillet, P; Gazis, E N; Gelé, D; Gerber, J P; Gerdyukov, L N; Gokieli, R; Golob, B; Gonçalves, P; Gopal, Gian P; Gorn, L; Górski, M; Guz, Yu; Gracco, Valerio; Graziani, E; Green, C; Grefrath, A; Gris, P; Grosdidier, G; Grzelak, K; Günther, M; Guy, J; Hahn, F; Hahn, S; Hajduk, Z; Hallgren, A; Hamacher, K; Harris, F J; Hedberg, V; Henriques, R P; Hernández, J J; Herquet, P; Herr, H; Hessing, T L; Heuser, J M; Higón, E; Holmgren, S O; Holt, P J; Holthuizen, D J; Hoorelbeke, S; Houlden, M A; Hrubec, Josef; Huet, K; Hultqvist, K; Jackson, J N; Jacobsson, R; Jalocha, P; Janik, R; Jarlskog, C; Jarlskog, G; Jarry, P; Jean-Marie, B; Johansson, E K; Jönsson, L B; Jönsson, P E; Joram, Christian; Juillot, P; Kaiser, M; Kapusta, F; Karafasoulis, K; Katsanevas, S; Katsoufis, E C; Keränen, R; Khokhlov, Yu A; Khomenko, B A; Khovanskii, N N; King, B J; Kjaer, N J; Klapp, O; Klein, H; Kluit, P M; Knoblauch, D; Kokkinias, P; Koratzinos, M; Korcyl, K; Kostyukhin, V; Kourkoumelis, C; Kuznetsov, O; Krammer, Manfred; Kreuter, C; Kronkvist, I J; Krstic, J; Krumshtein, Z; Krupinski, W; Kubinec, P; Kucewicz, W; Kurvinen, K L; Lacasta, C; Laktineh, I; Lamsa, J; Lanceri, L; Lane, D W; Langefeld, P; Laugier, J P; Lauhakangas, R; Leder, Gerhard; Ledroit, F; Lefébure, V; Legan, C K; Leisos, A; Leitner, R; Lemonne, J; Lenzen, Georg; Lepeltier, V; Lesiak, T; Libby, J; Liko, D; Lipniacka, A; Lippi, I; Lörstad, B; Loken, J G; López, J M; Loukas, D; Lutz, P; Lyons, L; MacNaughton, J N; Maehlum, G; Mahon, J R; Maio, A; Malmgren, T G M; Malychev, V; Mandl, F; Marco, J; Marco, R P; Maréchal, B; Margoni, M; Marin, J C; Mariotti, C; Markou, A; Martínez-Rivero, C; Martínez-Vidal, F; Martí i García, S; Masik, J; Matorras, F; Matteuzzi, C; Matthiae, Giorgio; Mazzucato, M; McCubbin, M L; McKay, R; McNulty, R; McPherson, G; Medbo, J; Meroni, C; Meyer, S; Meyer, W T; Myagkov, A; Michelotto, M; Migliore, E; Mirabito, L; Mitaroff, Winfried A; Mjörnmark, U; Moa, T; Møller, R; Mönig, K; Monge, M R; Morettini, P; Müller, H; Münich, K; Mulders, M; Mundim, L M; Murray, W J; Muryn, B; Myatt, Gerald; Myklebust, T; Naraghi, F; Navarria, Francesco Luigi; Navas, S; Nawrocki, K; Negri, P; Némécek, S; Neumann, W; Neumeister, N; Nicolaidou, R; Nielsen, B S; Nieuwenhuizen, M; Nikolaenko, V; Nikolenko, M; Niss, P; Nomerotski, A; Normand, Ainsley; Nygren, A; Oberschulte-Beckmann, W; Obraztsov, V F; Olshevskii, A G; Onofre, A; Orava, Risto; Orazi, G; Österberg, K; Ouraou, A; Paganini, P; Paganoni, M; Pain, R; Palka, H; Papadopoulou, T D; Papageorgiou, K; Pape, L; Parkes, C; Parodi, F; Parzefall, U; Passeri, A; Pegoraro, M; Peralta, L; Pernegger, H; Pernicka, Manfred; Perrotta, A; Petridou, C; Petrolini, A; Phillips, H T; Piana, G; Pierre, F; Pimenta, M; Podobnik, T; Podobrin, O; Pol, M E; Polok, G; Poropat, P; Pozdnyakov, V; Privitera, P; Pukhaeva, N; Pullia, Antonio; Radojicic, D; Ragazzi, S; Rahmani, H; Ratoff, P N; Read, A L; Reale, M; Rebecchi, P; Redaelli, N G; Regler, Meinhard; Reid, D; Reinhardt, R; Renton, P B; Resvanis, L K; Richard, F; Rídky, J; Rinaudo, G; Røhne, O M; Romero, A; Ronchese, P; Roos, L; Rosenberg, E I; Rosinsky, P; Roudeau, Patrick; Rovelli, T; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V; Ruiz, A; Rybicki, K; Saarikko, H; Sacquin, Yu; Sadovskii, A; Sajot, G; Salt, J; Sannino, M; Schneider, H; Schwickerath, U; Schyns, M A E; Sciolla, G; Scuri, F; Seager, P; Sedykh, Yu; Segar, A M; Seitz, A; Sekulin, R L; Serbelloni, L; Shellard, R C; Sheridan, A; Siegrist, P; Silvestre, R; Simonetto, F; Sissakian, A N; Skaali, T B; Smadja, G; Smirnov, N; Smirnova, O G; Smith, G R; Sokolov, A; Solovyanov, O; Sosnowski, R; Souza-Santos, D; Spassoff, Tz; Spiriti, E; Sponholz, P; Squarcia, S; Stampfer, D; Stanescu, C; Stanic, S; Stapnes, Steinar; Stavitski, I; Stevenson, K; Stocchi, A; Strauss, J; Strub, R; Stugu, B; Szczekowski, M; Szeptycka, M; Tabarelli de Fatis, T; Tavernet, J P; Tegenfeldt, F; Terranova, F; Thomas, J; Tilquin, A; Timmermans, J; Tkatchev, L G; Todorov, T; Todorova, S; Toet, D Z; Tomaradze, A G; Tonazzo, A; Tortora, L; Tranströmer, G; Treille, D; Tristram, G; Trombini, A; Troncon, C; Tsirou, A L; Turluer, M L; Tyapkin, I A; Tyndel, M; Tzamarias, S; Überschär, B; Ullaland, O; Uvarov, V; Valenti, G; Vallazza, E; van Apeldoorn, G W; van Dam, P; Van Eldik, J; Van Lysebetten, A; Vassilopoulos, N; Vegni, G; Ventura, L; Venus, W A; Verbeure, F; Verlato, M; Vertogradov, L S; Vilanova, D; Vincent, P; Vitale, L; Vlasov, E; Vodopyanov, A S; Vrba, V; Wahlen, H; Walck, C; Weiser, C; Wetherell, Alan M; Wicke, D; Wickens, J H; Wielers, M; Wilkinson, G R; Williams, W S C; Winter, M; Witek, M; Wlodek, T; Yi, J; Yip, K; Yushchenko, O P; Zach, F; Zaitsev, A; Zalewska-Bak, A; Zalewski, Piotr; Zavrtanik, D; Zevgolatakos, E; Zimin, N I; Zucchelli, G C; Zumerle, G

    1997-01-01

    The spin density matrix elements for the $\\rho^0$, K$^{*0}(892)$ and $\\phi$ produced in hadronic Z$^0$ decays are measured in the DELPHI detector. There is no evidence for spin alignment of the K$^{*0}(892)$ and $\\phi$ in the region $x_p \\leq 0.3$ ($x_p = p/p_{beam}$), where $\\rho_{00} = 0.33 \\pm 0.05$ and $\\rho_{00} = 0.30 \\pm 0.04$, respectively. In the fragmentation region, $x_p \\geq 0.4$, there is some indication for spin alignment of the $\\rho^0$ and K$^{*0}(892)$, since $\\rho_{00} = 0.43 \\pm 0.05$ and $\\rho_{00} = 0.46 \\pm 0.08$, respectively. These values are compared with those found in meson-induced hadronic reactions. For the $\\phi$, $\\rho_{00} = 0.30 \\pm 0.04$ for $x_p \\geq 0.4$ and $0.55 \\pm 0.10$ for $x_p \\geq 0.7$. The off-diagonal spin density matrix element $\\rho_{1-1}$ is consistent with zero in all cases.

  14. Double spin asymmetry in exclusive $\\rho^0$ muoproduction at COMPASS

    CERN Document Server

    Alexakhin, V Yu; Alexandrov, Yu A; Alexeev, G D; Amoroso, A; Arbuzov, A; Badelek, B; Balestra, F; Ball, J; Baum, G; Barth, J; Bedfer, Y; Bernet, C; Bertini, R; Bettinelli, M; Birsa, R; Bisplinghoff, J; Bordalo, P; Bradamante, Franco; Bravar, A; Bressan, A; Brona, G; Burtin, E; Bussa, M P; Chapiro, A; Chiosso, M; Cicuttin, A; Colantoni, M L; Costa, S; Crespo, M L; D'Hose, N; Dalla Torre, S; Das, S; Das-Gupta, S S; De Masi, R; Dedek, N; Denisov, O Yu; Dhara, L; Díaz, V; Dinkelbach, A M; Donskov, S V; Dorofeev, V A; Doshita, N; Duic, V; Dünnweber, W; Eversheim, P D; Eyrich, W; Fabro, M; Faessler, M; Falaleev, V; Ferrero, A; Ferrero, L; Finger, M; Finger, M Jr; Fischer, H; Franco, C; Franz, J; Friedrich, J M; Frolov, V; Garfagnini, R; Gautheron, F; Gavrichtchouk, O P; Gazda, R; Gerassimov, S G; Geyer, R; Giorgi, M; Gobbo, B; Görtz, S; Gorin, A M; Grabmuller, S; Grajek, O A; Grasso, A; Grube, B; Gushterski, R; Guskov, A; Haas, F; Hannappel, J; Von Harrach, D; Hasegawa, T; Heckmann, J; Hedicke, S; Heinsius, F H; Hermann, R; Hess, C; Hinterberger, F; Von Hodenberg, M; Horikawa, N; Horikawa, S; Ilgner, C; Ioukaev, A I; Ishimoto, S; Ivanov, O; Ivanshin, Yu; Iwata, T; Jahn, R; Janata, A; Jasinski, P; Joosten, R; Jouravlev, N I; Kabuss, E M; Kang, D; Ketzer, B; Khaustov, G V; Khokhlov, Yu A; Kisselev, Yu; Klein, F; Klimaszewski, K; Koblitz, S; Koivuniemi, J H; Kolosov, V N; Komissarov, E V; Kondo, K; Knigsmann, K; Konorov, I; Konstantinov, V F; Korentchenko, A S; Korzenev, A; Kotzinian, A M; Koutchinski, N A; Kuznetsov, O; Kravchuk, N P; Kral, A; Kroumchtein, Z V; Kühn, R; Kunne, Fabienne; Kurek, K; Ladygin, M E; Lamanna, M; Le Goff, J M; Lednev, A A; Lehmann, A; Lichtenstadt, J; Liska, T; Ludwig, I; Maggiora, A; Maggiora, M; Magnon, A; Mallot, G K; Mann, A; Marchand, C; Marroncle, J; Martin, A; Marzec, J; Massmann, F; Matsuda, T; Maksimov, A N; Meyer, W; Mielech, A; Mikhailov, Yu V; Moinester, M A; Mutter, A; Nahle, O; Nagaytsev, A; Nagel, T; Nassalski, J P; Neliba, S; Nerling, F; Neubert, a S; Neyret, D P; Nikolaenko, V I; Nikolaev, K; Olshevskii, A G; Ostrick, M; Padee, A; Pagano, P; Panebianco, S; Panknin, R; Panzieri, D; Paul, S; Pawlukiewicz-Kaminska, B; Peshekhonov, V D; Piragino, G; Platchkov, S; Pochodzalla, J; Polak, J; Polyakov, V A; Pretz, J; Procureur, S; Quintans, C; Rajotte, J F; Rapatsky, V; Ramos, S; Reicherz, G; Richter, A; Robinet, F; Rocco, E; Rondio, E; Rozhdestvensky, A M; Ryabchikov, D I; Samoylenko, V D; Sandacz, A; Santos, H; Sapozhnikov, M G; Sarkar, S; Savin, I A; Schiavon, Paolo; Schill, C; Schmitt, L; Schonmeier, P; Schroder, W; Shevchenko, O Yu; Siebert, H W; Silva, L; Sinha, L; Sissakian, A N; Slunecka, M; Smirnov, G I; Sosio, S; Sozzi, F; Sugonyaev, V P; Srnka, A; Stinzing, F; Stolarski, M; Sulc, M; Sulej, R; Takabayashi, N; Tchalishev, V V; Tessaro, S; Tessarotto, F; Teufel, A; Tkatchev, L G; Venugopal, G; Virius, M; Vlassov, N V; Vossen, A; Webb, R; Weise, E; Weitzel, Q; Windmolders, R; Wirth, S; Wilicki, W; Zaremba, s K; Zavertyaev, M; Zemlyanichkina, E; Zhao, J; Ziegler, R; Zvyagin, A

    2007-01-01

    The longitudinal double spin asymmetry A_1^rho for exclusive leptoproduction of rho^0 mesons, mu + N -> mu + N + rho, is studied using the COMPASS 2002 and 2003 data. The measured reaction is incoherent exclusive rho^0 production on polarised deuterons. The Q^2 and x dependence of A_1^rho is presented in a wide kinematical range: 3x10^-3 < Q^2 < 7 (GeV/c)^2 and 5x10^-5 < x < 0.05. The presented results are the first measurements of A_1^rho at small Q2 (Q2 < 0.1 (GeV/c)^2) and small x (x < 3x10^-3). The asymmetry is in general compatible with zero in the whole kinematical range.

  15. A bacterial cytotoxin identifies the RhoA exchange factor Net1 as a key effector in the response to DNA damage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lina Guerra

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Exposure of adherent cells to DNA damaging agents, such as the bacterial cytolethal distending toxin (CDT or ionizing radiations (IR, activates the small GTPase RhoA, which promotes the formation of actin stress fibers and delays cell death. The signalling intermediates that regulate RhoA activation and promote cell survival are unknown. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We demonstrate that the nuclear RhoA-specific Guanine nucleotide Exchange Factor (GEF Net1 becomes dephosphorylated at a critical inhibitory site in cells exposed to CDT or IR. Expression of a dominant negative Net1 or Net1 knock down by iRNA prevented RhoA activation, inhibited the formation of stress fibers, and enhanced cell death, indicating that Net1 activation is required for this RhoA-mediated responses to genotoxic stress. The Net1 and RhoA-dependent signals involved activation of the Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase p38 and its downstream target MAPK-activated protein kinase 2. SIGNIFICANCE: Our data highlight the importance of Net1 in controlling RhoA and p38 MAPK mediated cell survival in cells exposed to DNA damaging agents and illustrate a molecular pathway whereby chronic exposure to a bacterial toxin may promote genomic instability.

  16. Exclusive $\\rho^0$ muoproduction on transversely polarised protons and deuterons

    CERN Document Server

    Adolph, C.; Alexakhin, V.Yu.; Alexandrov, Yu.; Alexeev, G.D.; Amoroso, A.; Antonov, A.A.; Austregesilo, A.; Badelek, B.; Balestra, F.; Barth, J.; Baum, G.; Bedfer, Y.; Bernhard, J.; Bertini, R.; Bettinelli, M.; Bicker, K.; Bieling, J.; Birsa, R.; Bisplinghoff, J.; Bordalo, P.; Bradamante, F.; Braun, C.; Bravar, A.; Bressan, A.; Buchele, M.; Burtin, E.; Capozza, L.; Chiosso, M.; Chung, S.U.; Cicuttin, A.; Crespo, M.L.; Dalla Torre, S.; Das, S.; Dasgupta, S.S.; Dasgupta, S.; Denisov, O.Yu.; Dhara, L.; Donskov, S.V.; Doshita, N.; Duic, V.; Dunnweber, W.; Dziewiecki, M.; Efremov, A.; Elia, C.; Eversheim, P.D.; Eyrich, W.; Faessler, M.; Ferrero, A.; Filin, A.; Finger, M.; Finger, M., Jr.; Fischer, H.; Franco, C.; du Fresne von Hohenesche, N.; Friedrich, J.M.; Frolov, V.; Garfagnini, R.; Gautheron, F.; Gavrichtchouk, O.P.; Gerassimov, S.; Geyer, R.; Giorgi, M.; Gnesi, I.; Gobbo, B.; Goertz, S.; Grabmuller, S.; Grasso, A.; Grube, B.; Gushterski, R.; Guskov, A.; Guthorl, T.; Haas, F.; von Harrach, D.; Heinsius, F.H.; Herrmann, F.; Hess, C.; Hinterberger, F.; Horikawa, N.; Hoppner, Ch.; d'Hose, N.; Ishimoto, S.; Ivanov, O.; Ivanshin, Yu.; Iwata, T.; Jahn, R.; Jary, V.; Jasinski, P.; Jegou, G.; Joosten, R.; Kabuss, E.; Kang, D.; Ketzer, B.; Khaustov, G.V.; Khokhlov, Yu.A.; Kisselev, Yu.; Klein, F.; Klimaszewski, K.; Koblitz, S.; Koivuniemi, J.H.; Kolosov, V.N.; Kondo, K.; Konigsmann, K.; Konorov, I.; Konstantinov, V.F.; Korzenev, A.; Kotzinian, A.M.; Kouznetsov, O.; Kramer, M.; Kroumchtein, Z.V.; Kunne, F.; Kurek, K.; Lauser, L.; Lednev, A.A.; Lehmann, A.; Levorato, S.; Lichtenstadt, J.; Liska, T.; Maggiora, A.; Magnon, A.; Makke, N.; Mallot, G.K.; Mann, A.; Marchand, C.; Martin, A.; Marzec, J.; Matsuda, T.; Meshcheryakov, G.; Meyer, W.; Michigami, T.; Mikhailov, Yu.V.; Moinester, M.A.; Morreale, A.; Mutter, A.; Nagaytsev, A.; Nagel, T.; Negrini, T.; Nerling, F.; Neubert, S.; Neyret, D.; Nikolaenko, V.I.; Nowak, W.D.; Nunes, A.S.; Olshevsky, A.G.; Ostrick, M.; Padee, A.; Panknin, R.; Panzieri, D.; Parsamyan, B.; Paul, S.; Perevalova, E.; Pesaro, G.; Peshekhonov, D.V.; Piragino, G.; Platchkov, S.; Pochodzalla, J.; Polak, J.; Polyakov, V.A.; Pretz, J.; Quaresma, M.; Quintans, C.; Rajotte, J.F.; Ramos, S.; Rapatsky, V.; Reicherz, G.; Richter, A.; Rocco, E.; Rondio, E.; Rossiyskaya, N.S.; Ryabchikov, D.I.; Samoylenko, V.D.; Sandacz, A.; Sapozhnikov, M.G.; Sarkar, S.; Savin, I.A.; Sbrizzai, G.; Schiavon, P.; Schill, C.; Schluter, T.; Schmidt, K.; Schmitt, L.; Schonning, K.; Schopferer, S.; Schott, M.; Schroder, W.; Shevchenko, O.Yu.; Silva, L.; Sinha, L.; Sissakian, A.N.; Slunecka, M.; Smirnov, G.I.; Sosio, S.; Sozzi, F.; Srnka, A.; Steiger, L.; Stolarski, M.; Sulc, M.; Sulej, R.; Suzuki, H.; Sznajder, P.; Takekawa, S.; Ter Wolbeek, J.; Tessaro, S.; Tessarotto, F.; Tkatchev, L.G.; Uhl, S.; Uman, I.; Vandenbroucke, M.; Virius, M.; Vlassov, N.V.; Wang, L.; Wilfert, M.; Windmolders, R.; Wislicki, W.; Wollny, H.; Zaremba, K.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zemlyanichkina, E.; Ziembicki, M.; Zhuravlev, N.; Zvyagin, A.

    2012-01-01

    The transverse target spin azimuthal asymmetry A_UT in hard exclusive production of rho^0 mesons was measured at COMPASS by scattering 160 GeV/c muons off transversely polarised protons and deuterons. The measured asymmetry is sensitive to the nucleon helicity-flip generalised parton distributions E^q, which are related to the orbital angular momentum of quarks in the nucleon. The Q^2, x_B and p_t^2 dependence of A_UT is presented in a wide kinematic range. Results for deuterons are obtained for the first time. The measured asymmetry is small in the whole kinematic range for both protons and deuterons, which is consistent with the theoretical interpretation that contributions from GPDs E^u and E^d approximately cancel.

  17. Transverse target spin asymmetries in exclusive $\\rho^0$ muoproduction

    CERN Document Server

    Adolph, C; Alexakhin, V Yu; Alexandrov, Yu; Alexeev, G D; Amoroso, A; Andrieux, V; Austregesilo, A; Badelek, B; Balestra, F; Barth, J; Baum, G; Bedfer, Y; Berlin, A; Bernhard, J; Bertini, R; Bicker, K; Bieling, J; Birsa, R; Bisplinghoff, J; Boer, M; Bordalo, P; Bradamante, F; Braun, C; Bravar, A; Bressan, A; Büchele, M; Burtin, E; Capozza, L; Chiosso, M; Chung, S U; Cicuttin, A; Crespo, M L; Dalla Torre, S; Dasgupta, S S; Dasgupta, S; Denisov, O Yu; Donskov, S V; Doshita, N; Duic, V; Dünnweber, W; Dziewiecki, M; Efremov, A; Elia, C; Eversheim, P D; Eyrich, W; Faessler, M; Ferrero, A; Filin, A; Finger, M; Finger, M jr; Fischer, H; Franco, C; du Fresne von Hohenesche, N; Friedrich, J M; Frolov, V; Garfagnini, R; Gautheron, F; Gavrichtchouk, O P; Gerassimov, S; Geyer, R; Giorgi, M; Gnesi, I; Gobbo, B; Goertz, S; Grabmüller, S; Grasso, A; Grube, B; Gushterski, R; Guskov, A; Guthörl, T; Haas, F; von Harrach, D; Hahne, D; Heinsius, F H; Herrmann, F; Hess, C; Hinterberger, F; Höppner, Ch; Horikawa, N; d'Hose, N; Huber, S; Ishimoto, S; Ivanshin, Yu; Iwata, T; Jahn, R; Jary, V; Jasinski, P; Joosten, R; Kabuss, E; Kang, D; Ketzer, B; Khaustov, G V; Khokhlov, Yu A; Kisselev, Yu; Klein, F; Klimaszewski, K; Koivuniemi, J H; Kolosov, V N; Kondo, K; Königsmann, K; Konorov, I; Konstantinov, V F; Kotzinian, A M; Kouznetsov, O; Krämer, M; Kroumchtein, Z V; Kuchinski, N; Kunne, F; Kurek, K; Kurjata, R P; Lednev, A A; Lehmann, A; Levorato, S; Lichtenstadt, J; Maggiora, A; Magnon, A; Makke, N; Mallot, G K; Marchand, C; Martin, A; Marzec, J; Matousek, J; Matsuda, H; Matsuda, T; Meshcheryakov, G; Meyer, W; Michigami, T; Mikhailov, Yu V; Miyachi, Y; Morreale, A; Nagaytsev, A; Nagel, T; Nerling, F; Neubert, S; Neyret, D; Nikolaenko, V I; Novy, J; Nowak, W D; Nunes, A.S; Olshevsky, A G; Ostrick, M; Panknin, R; Panzieri, D; Parsamyan, B; Paul, S; Pesek, M; Piragino, G; Platchkov, S; Pochodzalla, J; Polak, J; Polyakov, V A; Pretz, J; Quaresma, M; Quintans, C; Ramos, S; Reicherz, G; Rocco, E; Rodionov, V; Rondio, E; Rossiyskaya, N S; Ryabchikov, D I; Samoylenko, V D; Sandacz, A; Sapozhnikov, M G; Sarkar, S; Savin, I A; Sbrizzai, G; Schiavon, P; Schill, C; Schlüter, T; Schmidt, A; Schmidt, K; Schmitt, L; Schmïden, H; Schönning, K; Schopferer, S; Schott, M; Shevchenko, O Yu; Silva, L; Sinha, L; Sirtl, S; Slunecka, M; Sosio, S; Sozzi, F; Srnka, A; Steiger, L; Stolarski, M; Sulc, M; Sulej, R; Suzuki, H; Sznajder, P; Takekawa, S; Ter Wolbeek, J; Tessaro, S; Tessarotto, F; Thibaud, F; Uhl, S; Uman, I; Vandenbroucke, M; Virius, M; Vondra, J; Wang, L; Weisrock, T; Wilfert, M; Windmolders, R; Wislicki, W; Wollny, H; Zaremba, K; Zavertyaev, M; Zemlyanichkina, E; Zhuravlev, N; Ziembicki, M

    2014-01-01

    Exclusive production of $\\rho^0$ mesons was studied at the COMPASS experiment by scattering 160 GeV/$c$ muons off transversely polarised protons. Five single-spin and three double-spin azimuthal asymmetries were measured as a function of $Q^2$, $x_{Bj}$, or $p_{T}^{2}$. The $\\sin \\phi_S$ asymmetry is found to be $-0.019 \\pm 0.008(stat.) \\pm 0.003(syst.)$. All other asymmetries are also found to be of small magnitude and consistent with zero within experimental uncertainties. Very recent calculations using a GPD-based model agree well with the present results. The data is interpreted as evidence for the existence of chiral-odd, transverse generalized parton distributions.

  18. Problems with rho R measurements: what are the ways out

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan, Y.L.; Larsen, J.T.

    1977-01-01

    An important scaling parameter or figure of merit in inertially-confined fusion is the maximum fuel rho R achieved by the target--rho is the density, and R the radius of the fuel. Every technique used, thus far, in laser-initiated-fusion-microexplosion experiments to obtain this data had major deficiencies. We examine critically the merits of the various possible methods of measuring fuel rho R and their ranges of applicability

  19. Rho Ophiuchi Cloud Core Extinction Map

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, D. J.; Rudolph, A.; Barsony, M.

    1997-12-01

    We present an extinction map of a one square degree region ( ~ 2.2pc square) of the core of the star-forming region rho Ophiuchi derived by the method of star counts. Photometry from the near-infrared J, H, and K band images of Barsony et al. (1997) provided the stellar catalog for this study. From this map an estimate of the mass of the region is made and compared with previous estimates from other methods. Reference Barsony, M., Kenyon, S.J., Lada, E.A., & Teuben, P.J. 1997, ApJS, 112, 109

  20. Rho A Regulates Epidermal Growth Factor-Induced Human Osteosarcoma MG63 Cell Migration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinyang Wang

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Osteosarcoma, the most common primary bone tumor, occurs most frequently in children and adolescents and has a 5-year survival rate, which is unsatisfactory. As epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR positively correlates with TNM (tumor-node-metastasis stage in osteosarcoma, EGFR may play an important role in its progression. The purpose of this study was to explore potential mechanisms underlying this correlation. We found that EGF promotes MG63 cell migration and invasion as well as stress fiber formation via Rho A activation and that these effects can be reversed by inhibiting Rho A expression. In addition, molecules downstream of Rho A, including ROCK1, LIMK2, and Cofilin, are activated by EGF in MG63 cells, leading to actin stress fiber formation and cell migration. Moreover, inhibition of ROCK1, LIMK2, or Cofilin in MG63 cells using known inhibitors or short hairpin RNA (shRNA prevents actin stress fiber formation and cell migration. Thus, we conclude that Rho A/ROCK1/LIMK2/Cofilin signaling mediates actin microfilament formation in MG63 cells upon EGFR activation. This novel pathway provides a promising target for preventing osteosarcoma progression and for treating this cancer.

  1. QCD factorizations in {gamma}*{gamma}*->{rho}{sub L}{sup 0}{rho}{sub L}{sup 0}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pire, B. [CPHT, Unite mixte 7644 du CNRS, Ecole Polytechnique, 91128 Palaiseau (France)]. E-mail: pire@cpht.polytechnique.fr; Segond, M. [LPT, Unite mixte 8627 du CNRS, Universite Paris-Sud, 91405 Orsay (France); Szymanowski, L. [LPT, Unite mixte 8627 du CNRS, Universite Paris-Sud, 91405 Orsay (France); Universite de Liege, B-4000 Liege (Belgium); Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies, Hoza 69, 00-681 Warsaw (Poland); Wallon, S. [LPT, Unite mixte 8627 du CNRS. , Universite Paris-Sud, 91405 Orsay (France)

    2006-08-24

    We calculate the lowest order QCD amplitude, i.e. the quark exchange contribution, to the forward production amplitude of a pair of longitudinally polarized {rho} mesons in the scattering of two virtual photons {gamma}*(Q{sub 1}){gamma}*(Q{sub 2})->{rho}{sub L}{sup 0}{rho}{sub L}{sup 0}. We show that the scattering amplitude simultaneously factorizes in two quite different ways: the part with transverse photons is described by the QCD factorization formula involving the generalized distribution amplitude of two final {rho} mesons, whereas the part with longitudinally polarized photons takes the QCD factorized form with the {gamma}{sub L}*->{rho}{sub L}{sup 0} transition distribution amplitude. Perturbative expressions for these, in general, non-perturbative functions are obtained in terms of the {rho}-meson distribution amplitude.

  2. Diffractive {rho} production with an AdS/QCD holographic wavefunction for the {rho} meson

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forshaw, Jeff [University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Sandapen, Ruben [Universite de Moncton, Moncton, N-B, E1A 3E9 (Canada) and Mount Allison University, Sackville, N-B, E46 1E6 (Canada)

    2013-04-15

    We report on the results of our recent research published in [1] that shows that AdS/QCD generates predictions for the rate of diffractive {rho}-meson electroproduction that are in agreement with data collected at the HERA electron-proton collider [2, 3]. Preliminary results of this research were presented in [4].

  3. The ionizing radiation inducible gene PARX/ARAP2 participates in Rho and ARF signaling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, J.A.; Chen, Z.; Zhao, Y.; Vallis, K.A.; Marignani, P.A.; Randazzo, P.A.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: PARX/ARAP2 is a novel protein that we identified in a gene trap screen for ionizing radiation (IR)-regulated genes. It belongs to a recently described family of proteins that link Rho, ADP-ribosilation factor (ARF) and phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3-K) signaling. We have cloned the full length human PARX. Domain analysis of the predicted protein revealed a sterile-alpha motif, five pleckstrin homology domains, a RhoGTPase activating domain (RhoGAP) and an ARF activating domain (ARFGAP). PARX is early inducible by IR in a dose-dependent manner in murine ES cells and in several human B-cell lymphoma lines with up to six-fold induction at the mRNA level at 2 hours (10 Gy). Thus, the kinetics of PARX induction follows the pattern of the rapid response typical of many stress-induced immediate-early genes. PARX expression is also induced in response to other cellular stressors including sorbitol and bleomycin. PARX induction is dependent on PI3-K activity and can be suppressed by the PI3-K inhibitor LY294002. Induction of PARX in response to IR has been observed in cell lines that are p53 mutant indicating up-regulation independent of normal p53 function. The role of p53 in PARX induction is currently being studied using cell lines expressing temperature sensitive p53. Biochemical studies reveal that human PARX has in vivo RhoGAP activity for Rac1 and phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate dependent ARFGAP activity for ARF1, ARF5 and ARF6. Also, temporal changes in PARX cellular localization following IR are currently being investigated using confocal microscopy. PARX is a gene with a potential role in the cellular response to genotoxic stress, and may illuminate the currently unclear role the small GTPases Rho and ARF play in the radiation response

  4. The atypical structure and function of newborn arterial endothelium is mediated by Rho/Rho kinase signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flavahan, Sheila; Flavahan, Nicholas A

    2014-08-15

    Endothelium of fetal or newborn arteries is atypical, displaying actin stress fibers and reduced nitric oxide (NO)-mediated dilatation. This study tested the hypothesis that Rho/Rho kinase signaling, which promotes endothelial stress fibers and inhibits endothelial dilatation, contributed to this phenotype. Carotid arteries were isolated from newborn [postnatal day 1 (P1)], P7, and P21 mice. Endothelial dilatation to acetylcholine (pressure myograph) was minimal at P1, increased at P7, and further increased at P21. Inhibition of Rho (C3 transferase) or Rho kinase (Y27632, fasudil) significantly increased dilatation to acetylcholine in P1 arteries but had no effect in P7 or P21 arteries. After inhibition of NO synthase (N(G)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester), Rho kinase inhibition no longer increased acetylcholine responses in P1 arteries. Rho kinase inhibition did not affect dilatation to the NO donor DEA-NONOate. The endothelial actin cytoskeleton was labeled with phalloidin and visualized by laser-scanning microscopy. In P1 arteries, the endothelium had prominent transcytoplasmic stress fibers, whereas in P7 and P21 arteries, the actin fibers had a significantly reduced intensity and were restricted to cell borders. Phosphorylation of myosin light chains, a Rho kinase substrate, was highest in P1 endothelium and significantly reduced in P7 and P21 endothelium (laser-scanning microscopy). In P1 arteries, inhibition of Rho (C3 transferase) or Rho kinase (Y27632) significantly reduced the intensity of actin fibers, which were restricted to cell borders. Similarly, in P1 arteries, Rho inhibition significantly reduced endothelial levels of phosphorylated myosin light chains. These results indicate that the atypical function and morphology of newborn endothelium is mediated by Rho/Rho kinase signaling. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  5. RhoA signaling modulates cyclin D1 expression in human lung fibroblasts; implications for idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoban PR

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis (IPF is a debilitating disease characterized by exaggerated extracellular matrix deposition and aggressive lung structural remodeling. Disease pathogenesis is driven by fibroblastic foci formation, consequent on growth factor overexpression and myofibroblast proliferation. We have previously shown that both CTGF overexpression and myofibroblast formation in IPF cell lines are dependent on RhoA signaling. As RhoA-mediated regulation is also involved in cell cycle progression, we hypothesise that this pathway is key to lung fibroblast turnover through modulation of cyclin D1 kinetic expression. Methods Cyclin D1 expression was compared in primary IPF patient-derived fibroblasts and equivalent normal control cells. Quantitative real time PCR was employed to examine relative expression levels of cyclin D1 mRNA; protein expression was confirmed by western blotting. Effects of Rho signaling were investigated using transient transfection of constitutively active and dominant negative RhoA constructs as well as pharmacological inhibitors. Cellular proliferation of lung fibroblasts was determined by BrdU incorporation ELISA. To further explore RhoA regulation of cyclin D1 in lung fibroblasts and associated cell cycle progression, an established Rho inhibitor, Simvastatin, was incorporated in our studies. Results Cyclin D1 expression was upregulated in IPF compared to normal lung fibroblasts under exponential growth conditions (p Conclusion These findings report for the first time that cyclin D1 expression is deregulated in IPF through a RhoA dependent mechanism that influences lung fibroblast proliferation. This potentially unravels new molecular targets for future anti-IPF strategies; accordingly, Simvastatin inhibition of Rho-mediated cyclin D1 expression in IPF fibroblasts merits further exploitation.

  6. Measurement of Exclusive $\\rho^0 \\rho^0$ Production in Two-Photon Collisions at High $Q^2$ at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Achard, P.; Aguilar-Benitez, M.; Alcaraz, J.; Alemanni, G.; Allaby, J.; Aloisio, A.; Alviggi, M.G.; Anderhub, H.; Andreev, Valery P.; Anselmo, F.; Arefev, A.; Azemoon, T.; Aziz, T.; Bagnaia, P.; Bajo, A.; Baksay, G.; Baksay, L.; Baldew, S.V.; Banerjee, S.; Banerjee, Sw.; Barczyk, A.; Barillere, R.; Bartalini, P.; Basile, M.; Batalova, N.; Battiston, R.; Bay, A.; Becattini, F.; Becker, U.; Behner, F.; Bellucci, L.; Berbeco, R.; Berdugo, J.; Berges, P.; Bertucci, B.; Betev, B.L.; Biasini, M.; Biglietti, M.; Biland, A.; Blaising, J.J.; Blyth, S.C.; Bobbink, G.J.; Bohm, A.; Boldizsar, L.; Borgia, B.; Bottai, S.; Bourilkov, D.; Bourquin, M.; Braccini, S.; Branson, J.G.; Brochu, F.; Burger, J.D.; Burger, W.J.; Cai, X.D.; Capell, M.; Cara Romeo, G.; Carlino, G.; Cartacci, A.; Casaus, J.; Cavallari, F.; Cavallo, N.; Cecchi, C.; Cerrada, M.; Chamizo, M.; Chang, Y.H.; Chemarin, M.; Chen, A.; Chen, G.; Chen, G.M.; Chen, H.F.; Chen, H.S.; Chiefari, G.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Clare, I.; Clare, R.; Coignet, G.; Colino, N.; Costantini, S.; de la Cruz, B.; Cucciarelli, S.; van Dalen, J.A.; de Asmundis, R.; Deglon, P.; Debreczeni, J.; Degre, A.; Dehmelt, K.; Deiters, K.; della Volpe, D.; Delmeire, E.; Denes, P.; DeNotaristefani, F.; De Salvo, A.; Diemoz, M.; Dierckxsens, M.; Dionisi, C.; Dittmar, M.; Doria, A.; Dova, M.T.; Duchesneau, D.; Duda, M.; Echenard, B.; Eline, A.; El Hage, A.; El Mamouni, H.; Engler, A.; Eppling, F.J.; Extermann, P.; Falagan, M.A.; Falciano, S.; Favara, A.; Fay, J.; Fedin, O.; Felcini, M.; Ferguson, T.; Fesefeldt, H.; Fiandrini, E.; Field, J.H.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, P.H.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, I.; Forconi, G.; Freudenreich, K.; Furetta, C.; Galaktionov, Iouri; Ganguli, S.N.; Garcia-Abia, Pablo; Gataullin, M.; Gentile, S.; Giagu, S.; Gong, Z.F.; Grenier, Gerald Jean; Grimm, O.; Gruenewald, M.W.; Guida, M.; van Gulik, R.; Gupta, V.K.; Gurtu, A.; Gutay, L.J.; Haas, D.; Hatzifotiadou, D.; Hebbeker, T.; Herve, Alain; Hirschfelder, J.; Hofer, H.; Hohlmann, M.; Holzner, G.; Hou, S.R.; Hu, Y.; Jin, B.N.; Jones, Lawrence W.; de Jong, P.; Josa-Mutuberria, I.; Kafer, D.; Kaur, M.; Kienzle-Focacci, M.N.; Kim, J.K.; Kirkby, Jasper; Kittel, W.; Klimentov, A.; Konig, A.C.; Kopal, M.; Koutsenko, V.; Kraber, M.; Kraemer, R.W.; Kruger, A.; Kunin, A.; Ladron de Guevara, P.; Laktineh, I.; Landi, G.; Lebeau, M.; Lebedev, A.; Lebrun, P.; Lecomte, P.; Lecoq, P.; Le Coultre, P.; Le Goff, J.M.; Leiste, R.; Levtchenko, M.; Levtchenko, P.; Li, C.; Likhoded, S.; Lin, C.H.; Lin, W.T.; Linde, F.L.; Lista, L.; Liu, Z.A.; Lohmann, W.; Longo, E.; Lu, Y.S.; Luci, C.; Luminari, L.; Lustermann, W.; Ma, W.G.; Malgeri, L.; Malinin, A.; Mana, C.; Mans, J.; Martin, J.P.; Marzano, F.; Mazumdar, K.; McNeil, R.R.; Mele, S.; Merola, L.; Meschini, M.; Metzger, W.J.; Mihul, A.; Milcent, H.; Mirabelli, G.; Mnich, J.; Mohanty, G.B.; Muanza, G.S.; Muijs, A.J.M.; Musicar, B.; Musy, M.; Nagy, S.; Natale, S.; Napolitano, M.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Newman, H.; Nisati, A.; Novak, T.; Kluge, Hannelies; Ofierzynski, R.; Organtini, G.; Pal, I.; Palomares, C.; Paolucci, P.; Paramatti, R.; Passaleva, G.; Patricelli, S.; Paul, Thomas Cantzon; Pauluzzi, M.; Paus, C.; Pauss, F.; Pedace, M.; Pensotti, S.; Perret-Gallix, D.; Petersen, B.; Piccolo, D.; Pierella, F.; Pioppi, M.; Piroue, P.A.; Pistolesi, E.; Plyaskin, V.; Pohl, M.; Pojidaev, V.; Pothier, J.; Prokofev, D.; Quartieri, J.; Rahal-Callot, G.; Rahaman, Mohammad Azizur; Raics, P.; Raja, N.; Ramelli, R.; Rancoita, P.G.; Ranieri, R.; Raspereza, A.; Razis, P.; Ren, D.; Rescigno, M.; Reucroft, S.; Riemann, S.; Riles, Keith; Roe, B.P.; Romero, L.; Rosca, A.; Rosier-Lees, S.; Roth, Stefan; Rosenbleck, C.; Rubio, J.A.; Ruggiero, G.; Rykaczewski, H.; Sakharov, A.; Saremi, S.; Sarkar, S.; Salicio, J.; Sanchez, E.; Schafer, C.; Schegelsky, V.; Schopper, H.; Schotanus, D.J.; Sciacca, C.; Servoli, L.; Shevchenko, S.; Shivarov, N.; Shoutko, V.; Shumilov, E.; Shvorob, A.; Son, D.; Souga, C.; Spillantini, P.; Steuer, M.; Stickland, D.P.; Stoyanov, B.; Straessner, A.; Sudhakar, K.; Sultanov, G.; Sun, L.Z.; Sushkov, S.; Suter, H.; Swain, J.D.; Szillasi, Z.; Tang, X.W.; Tarjan, P.; Tauscher, L.; Taylor, L.; Tellili, B.; Teyssier, D.; Timmermans, Charles; Ting, Samuel C.C.; Ting, S.M.; Tonwar, S.C.; Toth, J.; Tully, C.; Tung, K.L.; Ulbricht, J.; Valente, E.; Van de Walle, R.T.; Vasquez, R.; Veszpremi, V.; Vesztergombi, G.; Vetlitsky, I.; Vicinanza, D.; Viertel, G.; Villa, S.; Vivargent, M.; Vlachos, S.; Vodopianov, I.; Vogel, H.; Vogt, H.; Vorobev, I.; Vorobyov, A.A.; Wadhwa, M.; Wang, Q.; Wang, X.L.; Wang, Z.M.; Weber, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wilkens, H.; Wynhoff, S.; Xia, L.; Xu, Z.Z.; Yamamoto, J.; Yang, B.Z.; Yang, C.G.; Yang, H.J.; Yang, M.; Yeh, S.C.; Zalite, An.; Zalite, Yu.; Zhang, Z.P.; Zhao, J.; Zhu, G.Y.; Zhu, R.Y.; Zhuang, H.L.; Zichichi, A.; Zimmermann, B.; Zoller, M.

    2003-01-01

    Exclusive rho rho production in two-photon collisions involving a single highly virtual photon is studied with data collected at LEP at centre-of-mass energies 89GeV rho rho is determined as a function of the photon virtuality, Q^2 and the two-photon centre-of-mass energy, Wgg, in the kinematic region: 1.2GeV^2 < Q^2 < 30GeV^2 and 1.1GeV < Wgg < 3GeV.

  7. Measurement of Exclusive $\\rho^{0}\\rho^{0}$ Production in Mid-Virtuality Two-Photon Interactions at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Achard, P.; Aguilar-Benitez, M.; Alcaraz, J.; Alemanni, G.; Allaby, J.; Aloisio, A.; Alviggi, M.G.; Anderhub, H.; Andreev, Valery P.; Anselmo, F.; Arefev, A.; Azemoon, T.; Aziz, T.; Bagnaia, P.; Bajo, A.; Baksay, G.; Baksay, L.; Baldew, S.V.; Banerjee, S.; Banerjee, Sw.; Barczyk, A.; Barillere, R.; Bartalini, P.; Basile, M.; Batalova, N.; Battiston, R.; Bay, A.; Becattini, F.; Becker, U.; Behner, F.; Bellucci, L.; Berbeco, R.; Berdugo, J.; Berges, P.; Bertucci, B.; Betev, B.L.; Biasini, M.; Biglietti, M.; Biland, A.; Blaising, J.J.; Blyth, S.C.; Bobbink, G.J.; Bohm, A.; Boldizsar, L.; Borgia, B.; Bottai, S.; Bourilkov, D.; Bourquin, M.; Braccini, S.; Branson, J.G.; Brochu, F.; Burger, J.D.; Burger, W.J.; Cai, X.D.; Capell, M.; Cara Romeo, G.; Carlino, G.; Cartacci, A.; Casaus, J.; Cavallari, F.; Cavallo, N.; Cecchi, C.; Cerrada, M.; Chamizo, M.; Chang, Y.H.; Chemarin, M.; Chen, A.; Chen, G.; Chen, G.M.; Chen, H.F.; Chen, H.S.; Chiefari, G.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Clare, I.; Clare, R.; Coignet, G.; Colino, N.; Costantini, S.; de la Cruz, B.; Cucciarelli, S.; de Asmundis, R.; Deglon, P.; Debreczeni, J.; Degre, A.; Dehmelt, K.; Deiters, K.; della Volpe, D.; Delmeire, E.; Denes, P.; DeNotaristefani, F.; De Salvo, A.; Diemoz, M.; Dierckxsens, M.; Dionisi, C.; Dittmar, M.; Doria, A.; Dova, M.T.; Duchesneau, D.; Duda, M.; Echenard, B.; Eline, A.; El Hage, A.; El Mamouni, H.; Engler, A.; Eppling, F.J.; Extermann, P.; Falagan, M.A.; Falciano, S.; Favara, A.; Fay, J.; Fedin, O.; Felcini, M.; Ferguson, T.; Fesefeldt, H.; Fiandrini, E.; Field, J.H.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, P.H.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, I.; Forconi, G.; Freudenreich, K.; Furetta, C.; Galaktionov, Iouri; Ganguli, S.N.; Garcia-Abia, Pablo; Gataullin, M.; Gentile, S.; Giagu, S.; Gong, Z.F.; Grenier, Gerald Jean; Grimm, O.; Gruenewald, M.W.; Guida, M.; Gupta, V.K.; Gurtu, A.; Gutay, L.J.; Haas, D.; Hatzifotiadou, D.; Hebbeker, T.; Herve, Alain; Hirschfelder, J.; Hofer, H.; Hohlmann, M.; Holzner, G.; Hou, S.R.; Jin, B.N.; Jindal, P.; Jones, Lawrence W.; de Jong, P.; Josa-Mutuberria, I.; Kaur, M.; Kienzle-Focacci, M.N.; Kim, J.K.; Kirkby, Jasper; Kittel, W.; Klimentov, A.; Konig, A.C.; Kopal, M.; Koutsenko, V.; Kraber, M.; Kraemer, R.W.; Kruger, A.; Kunin, A.; Ladron de Guevara, P.; Laktineh, I.; Landi, G.; Lebeau, M.; Lebedev, A.; Lebrun, P.; Lecomte, P.; Lecoq, P.; Le Coultre, P.; Le Goff, J.M.; Leiste, R.; Levtchenko, M.; Levtchenko, P.; Li, C.; Likhoded, S.; Lin, C.H.; Lin, W.T.; Linde, F.L.; Lista, L.; Liu, Z.A.; Lohmann, W.; Longo, E.; Lu, Y.S.; Luci, C.; Luminari, L.; Lustermann, W.; Ma, W.G.; Malgeri, L.; Malinin, A.; Mana, C.; Mans, J.; Martin, J.P.; Marzano, F.; Mazumdar, K.; McNeil, R.R.; Mele, S.; Merola, L.; Meschini, M.; Metzger, W.J.; Mihul, A.; Milcent, H.; Mirabelli, G.; Mnich, J.; Mohanty, G.B.; Muanza, G.S.; Muijs, A.J.M.; Musicar, B.; Musy, M.; Nagy, S.; Natale, S.; Napolitano, M.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Newman, H.; Nisati, A.; Novak, T.; Kluge, Hannelies; Ofierzynski, R.; Organtini, G.; Pal, I.; Palomares, C.; Paolucci, P.; Paramatti, R.; Passaleva, G.; Patricelli, S.; Paul, Thomas Cantzon; Pauluzzi, M.; Paus, C.; Pauss, F.; Pedace, M.; Pensotti, S.; Perret-Gallix, D.; Piccolo, D.; Pierella, F.; Pioppi, M.; Piroue, P.A.; Pistolesi, E.; Plyaskin, V.; Pohl, M.; Pojidaev, V.; Pothier, J.; Prokofev, D.; Quartieri, J.; Rahal-Callot, G.; Rahaman, Mohammad Azizur; Raics, P.; Raja, N.; Ramelli, R.; Rancoita, P.G.; Ranieri, R.; Raspereza, A.; Razis, P.; Ren, D.; Rescigno, M.; Reucroft, S.; Riemann, S.; Riles, Keith; Roe, B.P.; Romero, L.; Rosca, A.; Rosemann, C.; Rosenbleck, C.; Rosier-Lees, S.; Roth, Stefan; Rubio, J.A.; Ruggiero, G.; Rykaczewski, H.; Sakharov, A.; Saremi, S.; Sarkar, S.; Salicio, J.; Sanchez, E.; Schafer, C.; Schegelsky, V.; Schopper, H.; Schotanus, D.J.; Sciacca, C.; Servoli, L.; Shevchenko, S.; Shivarov, N.; Shoutko, V.; Shumilov, E.; Shvorob, A.; Son, D.; Souga, C.; Spillantini, P.; Steuer, M.; Stickland, D.P.; Stoyanov, B.; Straessner, A.; Sudhakar, K.; Sultanov, G.; Sun, L.Z.; Sushkov, S.; Suter, H.; Swain, J.D.; Szillasi, Z.; Tang, X.W.; Tarjan, P.; Tauscher, L.; Taylor, L.; Tellili, B.; Teyssier, D.; Timmermans, Charles; Ting, Samuel C.C.; Ting, S.M.; Tonwar, S.C.; Toth, J.; Tully, C.; Tung, K.L.; Ulbricht, J.; Valente, E.; Van de Walle, R.T.; Vasquez, R.; Veszpremi, V.; Vesztergombi, G.; Vetlitsky, I.; Vicinanza, D.; Viertel, G.; Villa, S.; Vivargent, M.; Vlachos, S.; Vodopianov, I.; Vogel, H.; Vogt, H.; Vorobev, I.; Vorobyov, A.A.; Wadhwa, M.; Wang, Q.; Wang, X.L.; Wang, Z.M.; Weber, M.; Wynhoff, S.; Xia, L.; Xu, Z.Z.; Yamamoto, J.; Yang, B.Z.; Yang, C.G.; Yang, H.J.; Yang, M.; Yeh, S.C.; Zalite, An.; Zalite, Yu.; Zhang, Z.P.; Zhao, J.; Zhu, G.Y.; Zhu, R.Y.; Zhuang, H.L.; Zichichi, A.; Zimmermann, B.; Zoller, M.

    2004-01-01

    Exclusive rho^0 rho^0 production in two-photon collisions between a quasi-real and a mid-virtuality photon is studied with data collected at LEP at centre-of-mass energies 183GeV rho^0 rho^0 is determined as a function of the photon virtuality, q^2, and the two-photon centre-of-mass energy, Wgg, in the kinematic region: 0.2GeV^2 < q^2 < 0.85GeV^2 and 1.1GeV < Wgg < 3GeV.

  8. Increased RhoA prenylation in the loechrig (loe mutant leads to progressive neurodegeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mandy Cook

    Full Text Available The Drosophila mutant loechrig (loe shows age-dependent degeneration of the nervous system and is caused by the loss of a neuronal isoform of the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK γ-subunit (also known as SNF4Aγ. The trimeric AMPK complex is activated by low energy levels and metabolic insults and regulates multiple important signal pathways that control cell metabolism. A well-known downstream target of AMPK is hydroxyl-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (HMGR, a key enzyme in isoprenoid synthesis, and we have previously shown that HMGR genetically interacts with loe and affects the severity of the degenerative phenotype. Prenylation of proteins like small G-proteins is an important posttranslational modification providing lipid moieties that allow the association of these proteins with membranes, thereby facilitating their subsequent activation. Rho proteins have been extensively studied in neuronal outgrowth, however, much less is known about their function in neuronal maintenance. Here we show that the loe mutation interferes with isoprenoid synthesis, leading to increased prenylation of the small GTPase Rho1, the fly orthologue of vertebrate RhoA. We also demonstrate that increased prenylation and Rho1 activity causes neurodegeneration and aggravates the behavioral and degenerative phenotypes of loe. Because we cannot detect defects in the development of the central nervous system in loe, this suggests that loe only interferes with the function of the RhoA pathway in maintaining neuronal integrity during adulthood. In addition, our results show that alterations in isoprenoids can result in progressive neurodegeneration, supporting findings in vertebrates that prenylation may play a role in neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer's Disease.

  9. P190B RhoGAP Regulates Chromosome Segregation in Cancer Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Melissa; Peddibhotla, Sirisha; McHenry, Peter; Chang, Peggy; Yochum, Zachary; Park, Ko Un; Sears, James Cooper; Vargo-Gogola, Tracy

    2012-01-01

    Rho GTPases are overexpressed and hyperactivated in many cancers, including breast cancer. Rho proteins, as well as their regulators and effectors, have been implicated in mitosis, and their altered expression promotes mitotic defects and aneuploidy. Previously, we demonstrated that p190B Rho GTPase activating protein (RhoGAP) deficiency inhibits ErbB2-induced mammary tumor formation in mice. Here we describe a novel role for p190B as a regulator of mitosis. We found that p190B localized to centrosomes during interphase and mitosis, and that it is differentially phosphorylated during mitosis. Knockdown of p190B expression in MCF-7 and Hela cells increased the incidence of aberrant microtubule-kinetochore attachments at metaphase, lagging chromosomes at anaphase, and micronucleation, all of which are indicative of aneuploidy. Cell cycle analysis of p190B deficient MCF-7 cells revealed a significant increase in apoptotic cells with a concomitant decrease in cells in G1 and S phase, suggesting that p190B deficient cells die at the G1 to S transition. Chemical inhibition of the Rac GTPase during mitosis reduced the incidence of lagging chromosomes in p190B knockdown cells to levels detected in control cells, suggesting that aberrant Rac activity in the absence of p190B promotes chromosome segregation defects. Taken together, these data suggest that p190B regulates chromosome segregation and apoptosis in cancer cells. We propose that disruption of mitosis may be one mechanism by which p190B deficiency inhibits tumorigenesis

  10. P190B RhoGAP Regulates Chromosome Segregation in Cancer Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Melissa [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology and the Indiana University Simon Cancer Center, Indiana University School of Medicine, 1234 Notre Dame Avenue, South Bend, IN 46617 (United States); Peddibhotla, Sirisha [Department of Molecular and Human Genetics, Baylor College of Medicine, John P. McGovern Campus, NABS-0250, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); McHenry, Peter [Department of Biology, Southwestern Adventist University, 100 W. Hillcrest, Keene, TX 76059 (United States); Chang, Peggy; Yochum, Zachary; Park, Ko Un; Sears, James Cooper; Vargo-Gogola, Tracy, E-mail: vargo-gogola.1@nd.edu [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology and the Indiana University Simon Cancer Center, Indiana University School of Medicine, 1234 Notre Dame Avenue, South Bend, IN 46617 (United States)

    2012-04-25

    Rho GTPases are overexpressed and hyperactivated in many cancers, including breast cancer. Rho proteins, as well as their regulators and effectors, have been implicated in mitosis, and their altered expression promotes mitotic defects and aneuploidy. Previously, we demonstrated that p190B Rho GTPase activating protein (RhoGAP) deficiency inhibits ErbB2-induced mammary tumor formation in mice. Here we describe a novel role for p190B as a regulator of mitosis. We found that p190B localized to centrosomes during interphase and mitosis, and that it is differentially phosphorylated during mitosis. Knockdown of p190B expression in MCF-7 and Hela cells increased the incidence of aberrant microtubule-kinetochore attachments at metaphase, lagging chromosomes at anaphase, and micronucleation, all of which are indicative of aneuploidy. Cell cycle analysis of p190B deficient MCF-7 cells revealed a significant increase in apoptotic cells with a concomitant decrease in cells in G1 and S phase, suggesting that p190B deficient cells die at the G1 to S transition. Chemical inhibition of the Rac GTPase during mitosis reduced the incidence of lagging chromosomes in p190B knockdown cells to levels detected in control cells, suggesting that aberrant Rac activity in the absence of p190B promotes chromosome segregation defects. Taken together, these data suggest that p190B regulates chromosome segregation and apoptosis in cancer cells. We propose that disruption of mitosis may be one mechanism by which p190B deficiency inhibits tumorigenesis.

  11. Identification of potential small molecule binding pockets on Rho family GTPases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Manuel Ortiz-Sanchez

    Full Text Available Rho GTPases are conformational switches that control a wide variety of signaling pathways critical for eukaryotic cell development and proliferation. They represent attractive targets for drug design as their aberrant function and deregulated activity is associated with many human diseases including cancer. Extensive high-resolution structures (>100 and recent mutagenesis studies have laid the foundation for the design of new structure-based chemotherapeutic strategies. Although the inhibition of Rho signaling with drug-like compounds is an active area of current research, very little attention has been devoted to directly inhibiting Rho by targeting potential allosteric non-nucleotide binding sites. By avoiding the nucleotide binding site, compounds may minimize the potential for undesirable off-target interactions with other ubiquitous GTP and ATP binding proteins. Here we describe the application of molecular dynamics simulations, principal component analysis, sequence conservation analysis, and ensemble small-molecule fragment mapping to provide an extensive mapping of potential small-molecule binding pockets on Rho family members. Characterized sites include novel pockets in the vicinity of the conformationaly responsive switch regions as well as distal sites that appear to be related to the conformations of the nucleotide binding region. Furthermore the use of accelerated molecular dynamics simulation, an advanced sampling method that extends the accessible time-scale of conventional simulations, is found to enhance the characterization of novel binding sites when conformational changes are important for the protein mechanism.

  12. Hydrostatic pressure promotes the proliferation and osteogenic/chondrogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells: The roles of RhoA and Rac1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yin-Hua Zhao

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Our previous studies have shown that hydrostatic pressure can serve as an active regulator for bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs. The current work further investigates the roles of cytoskeletal regulatory proteins Ras homolog gene family member A (RhoA and Ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1 (Rac1 in hydrostatic pressure-related effects on BMSCs. Flow cytometry assays showed that the hydrostatic pressure promoted cell cycle initiation in a RhoA- and Rac1-dependent manner. Furthermore, fluorescence assays confirmed that RhoA played a positive and Rac1 displayed a negative role in the hydrostatic pressure-induced F-actin stress fiber assembly. Western blots suggested that RhoA and Rac1 play central roles in the pressure-inhibited ERK phosphorylation, and Rac1 but not RhoA was involved in the pressure-promoted JNK phosphorylation. Finally, real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR experiments showed that pressure promoted the expression of osteogenic marker genes in BMSCs at an early stage of osteogenic differentiation through the up-regulation of RhoA activity. Additionally, the PCR results showed that pressure enhanced the expression of chondrogenic marker genes in BMSCs during chondrogenic differentiation via the up-regulation of Rac1 activity. Collectively, our results suggested that RhoA and Rac1 are critical to the pressure-induced proliferation and differentiation, the stress fiber assembly, and MAPK activation in BMSCs.

  13. Hydrostatic pressure promotes the proliferation and osteogenic/chondrogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells: The roles of RhoA and Rac1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yin-Hua; Lv, Xin; Liu, Yan-Li; Zhao, Ying; Li, Qiang; Chen, Yong-Jin; Zhang, Min

    2015-05-01

    Our previous studies have shown that hydrostatic pressure can serve as an active regulator for bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs). The current work further investigates the roles of cytoskeletal regulatory proteins Ras homolog gene family member A (RhoA) and Ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1 (Rac1) in hydrostatic pressure-related effects on BMSCs. Flow cytometry assays showed that the hydrostatic pressure promoted cell cycle initiation in a RhoA- and Rac1-dependent manner. Furthermore, fluorescence assays confirmed that RhoA played a positive and Rac1 displayed a negative role in the hydrostatic pressure-induced F-actin stress fiber assembly. Western blots suggested that RhoA and Rac1 play central roles in the pressure-inhibited ERK phosphorylation, and Rac1 but not RhoA was involved in the pressure-promoted JNK phosphorylation. Finally, real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) experiments showed that pressure promoted the expression of osteogenic marker genes in BMSCs at an early stage of osteogenic differentiation through the up-regulation of RhoA activity. Additionally, the PCR results showed that pressure enhanced the expression of chondrogenic marker genes in BMSCs during chondrogenic differentiation via the up-regulation of Rac1 activity. Collectively, our results suggested that RhoA and Rac1 are critical to the pressure-induced proliferation and differentiation, the stress fiber assembly, and MAPK activation in BMSCs. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. An extracellular-matrix-specific GEF-GAP interaction regulates Rho GTPase crosstalk for 3D collagen migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutys, Matthew L; Yamada, Kenneth M

    2014-09-01

    Rho-family GTPases govern distinct types of cell migration on different extracellular matrix proteins in tissue culture or three-dimensional (3D) matrices. We searched for mechanisms selectively regulating 3D cell migration in different matrix environments and discovered a form of Cdc42-RhoA crosstalk governing cell migration through a specific pair of GTPase activator and inhibitor molecules. We first identified βPix, a guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF), as a specific regulator of migration in 3D collagen using an affinity-precipitation-based GEF screen. Knockdown of βPix specifically blocks cell migration in fibrillar collagen microenvironments, leading to hyperactive cellular protrusion accompanied by increased collagen matrix contraction. Live FRET imaging and RNAi knockdown linked this βPix knockdown phenotype to loss of polarized Cdc42 but not Rac1 activity, accompanied by enhanced, de-localized RhoA activity. Mechanistically, collagen phospho-regulates βPix, leading to its association with srGAP1, a GTPase-activating protein (GAP), needed to suppress RhoA activity. Our results reveal a matrix-specific pathway controlling migration involving a GEF-GAP interaction of βPix with srGAP1 that is critical for maintaining suppressive crosstalk between Cdc42 and RhoA during 3D collagen migration.

  15. Methanol conversion to lower olefins over RHO type zeolite

    KAUST Repository

    Masih, Dilshad

    2013-07-01

    Eight-membered ring small-pore zeolite of RHO-type topology has been synthesized, characterized and tested for methanol-to-olefin (MTO) reaction. The zeolite was hydrothermally crystallized from the gel with Si/Al ratio of 5.0. It showed a high BET specific surface area (812 m2 g-1), micropore volume (0.429 cm3 g-1), and acid amount (2.53 mmol g-1). Scanning electron microscopy observations showed small crystallites of about 1 μm. The zeolite was active for MTO reaction with 100% methanol conversions at 623-723 K, whereas selectivity to lower olefins changed with time. © 2013 Elsevier B.V.

  16. Lysophosphatidic acid-induced RhoA signaling and prolonged macrophage infiltration worsens fibrosis and fatty infiltration following rotator cuff tears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Michael R; Lee, Lawrence; Feeley, Brian T; Kim, Hubert T; Liu, Xuhui

    2017-07-01

    Previous studies have suggested that macrophage-mediated chronic inflammation is involved in the development of rotator cuff muscle atrophy and degeneration following massive tendon tears. Increased RhoA signaling has been reported in chronic muscle degeneration, such as muscular dystrophy. However, the role of RhoA signaling in macrophage infiltration and rotator muscle degeneration remains unknown. Using a previously established rat model of massive rotator cuff tears, we found RhoA signaling is upregulated in rotator cuff muscle following a massive tendon-nerve injury. This increase in RhoA expression is greatly potentiated by the administration of a potent RhoA activator, lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), and is accompanied by increased TNFα and TGF-β1 expression in rotator cuff muscle. Boosting RhoA signaling with LPA significantly worsened rotator cuff muscle atrophy, fibrosis, and fatty infiltration, accompanied with massive monocytic infiltration of rotator cuff muscles. Co-staining of RhoA and the tissue macrophage marker CD68 showed that CD68+ tissue macrophages are the dominant cell source of increased RhoA signaling in rotator cuff muscles after tendon tears. Taken together, our findings suggest that LPA-mediated RhoA signaling in injured muscle worsens the outcomes of atrophy, fibrosis, and fatty infiltration by increasing macrophage infiltraion in rotator cuff muscle. Clinically, inhibiting RhoA signaling may represent a future direction for developing new treatments to improve muscle quality following massive rotator cuff tears. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 35:1539-1547, 2017. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Calculation of electromagnetic rhoπ formfactor from QCD sum rules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eletskij, V.L.; Kogan, Ya.I.

    1982-01-01

    Electromagnetic rhoπγ form factor at intermediate momentum transfer, 0.7 GeV 2 2 2 , is calculated using QCD sum rules for the vertex function of two vector and one axial-vector currents. In this region the results obtained are consistent within 25% accuracy with the vector meson dominance model predictions and can be regarded as its theoretical ustification

  18. Towards a Self-Consistent Physical Framework for Modeling Coupled Human and Physical Activities during the Anthropocene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrett, T. J.

    2014-12-01

    Studies of the response of global climate to anthropogenic activities rely upon scenarios for future human activity to provide a range of possible trajectories for greenhouse gases emissions over the coming century. Sophisticated integrated models are used to explore not only what will happen, but what should happen in order to optimize societal well-being. Hundreds of equations might be used to account for the interplay between human decisions, technological change, and macroeconomic priniciples. In contrast, the model equations used to describe geophysical phenomena look very different because they are a) purely deterministic and b) consistent with basic thermodynamic laws. This inconsistency between macroeconomics and physics suggests a rather unhappy marriage. During the Anthropocene the evolution of humanity and our environment will become increasingly intertwined. Representing such a coupling suggests a need for a common theoretical basis. To this end, the approach that is described here is to treat civilization like any other physical process, that is as an open, non-equilibrium thermodynamic system that dissipates energy and diffuses matter in order to sustain existing circulations and to further its material growth. Theoretical arguments and over 40 years of measurements show that a very general representation of global economic wealth (not GDP) has been tied to rates of global primary energy consumption through a constant 7.1 ± 0.1 mW per year 2005 USD. This link between physics and economics leads to very simple expressions for how fast civilization and its rate of energy consumption grow. These are expressible as a function of rates of energy and material resource discovery and depletion, and of the magnitude of externally imposed decay. The equations are validated through hindcasts that show, for example, that economic conditions in the 1950s can be invoked to make remarkably accurate forecasts of present rates of global GDP growth and primary energy

  19. BFKL resummation effects in {gamma}{sup *}{gamma}{sup *}{yields}{rho}{rho}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Enberg, R. [Ecole Polytechnique, CPHT, Palaiseau (France); Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley (United States); Pire, B. [Ecole Polytechnique, CPHT, Palaiseau (France); Szymanowski, L. [Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies, Warsaw (Poland); Universite de Liege, Liege (Belgium); Wallon, S. [LPT, Universite Paris-Sud, Orsay (France)

    2006-03-15

    We calculate the leading order BFKL amplitude for the exclusive diffractive process {gamma}{sup *}{sub L}(Q{sub 1}{sup 2}){gamma}{sup *}{sub L}(Q{sub 2}{sup 2}){yields}{rho}{sub L}{sup 0}{rho}{sub L}{sup 0} in the forward direction, which can be studied in future high energy e{sup +}e{sup -} linear colliders. The resummation effects are very large compared to the fixed-order calculation. We also estimate the next-to-leading logarithmic corrections to the amplitude by using a specific resummation of higher order effects and find a substantial growth with energy, but smaller than in the leading logarithmic approximation. (orig.)

  20. Rho Kinase ROCK2 Mediates Acid-Induced NADPH Oxidase NOX5-S Expression in Human Esophageal Adenocarcinoma Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Hong

    Full Text Available Mechanisms of the progression from Barrett's esophagus (BE to esophageal adenocarcinoma (EA are not fully understood. We have shown that NOX5-S may be involved in this progression. However, how acid upregulates NOX5-S is not well known. We found that acid-induced increase in NOX5-S expression was significantly decreased by the Rho kinase (ROCK inhibitor Y27632 in BE mucosal biopsies and FLO-1 EA cells. In addition, acid treatment significantly increased the Rho kinase activity in FLO-1 cells. The acid-induced increase in NOX5-S expression and H2O2 production was significantly decreased by knockdown of Rho kinase ROCK2, but not by knockdown of ROCK1. Conversely, the overexpression of the constitutively active ROCK2, but not the constitutively active ROCK1, significantly enhanced the NOX5-S expression and H2O2 production. Moreover, the acid-induced increase in Rho kinase activity and in NOX5-S mRNA expression was blocked by the removal of calcium in both FLO-1 and OE33 cells. The calcium ionophore A23187 significantly increased the Rho kinase activity and NOX5-S mRNA expression. We conclude that acid-induced increase in NOX5-S expression and H2O2 production may depend on the activation of ROCK2, but not ROCK1, in EA cells. The acid-induced activation of Rho kinase may be mediated by the intracellular calcium increase. It is possible that persistent acid reflux present in BE patients may increase the intracellular calcium, activate ROCK2 and thereby upregulate NOX5-S. High levels of reactive oxygen species derived from NOX5-S may cause DNA damage and thereby contribute to the progression from BE to EA.

  1. Gα12/13 signaling promotes cervical cancer invasion through the RhoA/ROCK-JNK signaling axis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan, Bo; Cui, Jinquan; Wang, Wuliang; Deng, Kehong

    2016-01-01

    Several reports have indicated a role for the members of the G12 family of heterotrimeric G proteins (Gα12 and Gα13) in oncogenesis and tumor cell growth. The aims of the present study were to evaluate the role of G12 signaling in cervical cancer. We demonstrated that expression of the G12 proteins was highly upregulated in cervical cancer cells. Additionally, expression of the activated forms of Gα12/Gα13 but not expression of activated Gαq induced cell invasion through the activation of the RhoA family of G proteins, but had no effect on cell proliferation in the cervical cancer cells. Inhibition of G12 signaling by expression of the RGS domain of the p115-Rho-specific guanine nucleotide exchange factor (p115-RGS) blocked thrombin-stimulated cell invasion, but did not inhibit cell proliferation in cervical cells, whereas the inhibition of Gαq (RGS2) had no effect. Furthermore, G12 signaling was able to activate Rho proteins, and this stimulation was inhibited by p115-RGS, and Gα12-induced invasion was blocked by an inhibitor of RhoA/B/C (C3 toxin). Pharmacological inhibition of JNK remarkably decreased G12-induced JNK activation. Both a JNK inhibitor (SP600125) and a ROCK inhibitor (Y27632) reduced G12-induced JNK and c-Jun activation, and markedly inhibited G12-induced cellular invasion. Collectively, these findings demonstrate that stimulation of G12 proteins is capable of promoting invasion through RhoA/ROCK-JNK activation. -- Highlights: •Gα12/Gα13 is upregulated in cervical cancer cell lines. •Gα12/Gα13 is not involved in cervical cancer cell proliferation. •Gα12/Gα13 promotes cervical cancer cell invasion. •The role of Rho G proteins in G12-promoted cervical cancer cell invasion. •G12 promotes cell invasion through activation of the ROCK-JNK signaling axis.

  2. Tetraspanin CD9 regulates cell contraction and actin arrangement via RhoA in human vascular smooth muscle cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J Herr

    Full Text Available The most prevalent cardiovascular diseases arise from alterations in vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC morphology and function. Tetraspanin CD9 has been previously implicated in regulating vascular pathologies; however, insight into how CD9 may regulate adverse VSMC phenotypes has not been provided. We utilized a human model of aortic smooth muscle cells to understand the consequences of CD9 deficiency on VSMC phenotypes. Upon knocking down CD9, the cells developed an abnormally small and rounded morphology. We determined that this morphological change was due to a lack of typical parallel actin arrangement. We also found similar total RhoA but decreased GTP-bound (active RhoA levels in CD9 deficient cells. As a result, cells lacking a full complement of CD9 were less contractile than their control treated counterparts. Upon restoration of RhoA activity in the CD9 deficient cells, the phenotype was reversed and cell contraction was restored. Conversely, inhibition of RhoA activity in the control cells mimicked the CD9-deficient cell phenotype. Thus, alteration in CD9 expression was sufficient to profoundly disrupt cellular actin arrangement and endogenous cell contraction by interfering with RhoA signaling. This study provides insight into how CD9 may regulate previously described vascular smooth muscle cell pathophysiology.

  3. 1α,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D3 Ameliorates Seawater Aspiration-Induced Lung Injury By Inhibiting The Translocation Of NF-κB and RhoA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Minlong; Jin, Faguang

    2017-06-01

    Our previous study have reported that 1α,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D3 (calcitriol) suppresses seawater aspiration-induced ALI in vitro and in vivo. We also have confirmed that treatment with calcitriol ameliorates seawater aspiration-induced inflammation and pulmonary edema via the inhibition of NF-κB and RhoA/Rho kinase pathway activation. In our further work, we investigated the effect of calcitriol on nuclear translocation of NF-κB and membrane translocation of RhoA in vitro. A549 cells and rat pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (RPMVECs) were cultured with calcitriol or not for 48 h and then stimulated with 25% seawater for 40 min. After these treatments, cells were collected and performed with immunofluorescent staining to observe the translocation of NF-κB and RhoA and the cytoskeleton remodeling. In vitro, seawater stimulation activates nuclear translocation of NF-κB and membrane translocation of RhoA in A549 cells. In addition, seawater administration also induced cytoskeleton remodeling in A549 cells and RPMVECs. However, pretreatment with calcitriol significantly inhibited the activation of NF-κB and RhoA/Rho kinase pathways, as demonstrated by the reduced nuclear translocation of NF-κB and membrane translocation of RhoA in A549 cells. Meanwhile, treatment of calcitriol also regulated the cytoskeleton remodeling in both A549 cells and RPMVECs. These results demonstrated that treatment with calcitriol ameliorates seawater aspiration-induced ALI via inhibition of nuclear translocation of NF-κB and membrane translocation of RhoA and protection of alveolar epithelial and pulmonary microvascular endothelial barrier.

  4. MILITARY PERSONNEL: Reserve Components Need Guidance to Accurately and Consistently Account for Volunteers on Active Duty for Operational Support

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Stewart, Derek B

    2006-01-01

    The reserve components have not consistently or accurately identified the number of reservists serving in an operational support capacity since this monthly reporting requirement was adopted in fiscal year 2005...

  5. RhoB mediates antitumor synergy of combined ixabepilone and sunitinib in human ovarian serous cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vishnu, Prakash; Colon-Otero, Gerardo; Kennedy, Gregory T; Marlow, Laura A; Kennedy, William P; Wu, Kevin J; Santoso, Joseph T; Copland, John A

    2012-03-01

    The aim was to evaluate antitumor activity of the combination of ixabepilone and sunitinib in pre-clinical models of chemotherapy naïve and refractory epithelial ovarian tumors, and to investigate the mechanism of synergy of such drug combination. HOVTAX2 cell line was derived from a metastatic serous papillary epithelial ovarian tumor (EOC) and a paclitaxel-resistant derivative was established. Dose response curves for ixabepilone and sunitinib were generated and synergy was determined using combination indexes. The molecular mechanism of antitumor synergy was examined using shRNA silencing. The combination of ixabepilone and sunitinib demonstrated robust antitumor synergy in naïve and paclitaxel-resistant HOVTAX2 cell lines due to increased apoptosis. The GTPase, RhoB, was synergistically upregulated in cells treated with ixabepilone and sunitinib. Using shRNA, RhoB was demonstrated to mediate antitumor synergy. These results were validated in two other EOC cell lines. Ixabepilone plus sunitinib demonstrated antitumor synergy via RhoB in naïve and paclitaxel-resistant cells resulting in apoptosis. This study demonstrates a novel mechanism of action leading to antitumor synergy and provides 'proof-of-principle' for combining molecular targeted agents with cytotoxic chemotherapy to improve antitumor efficacy. RhoB could be envisioned as an early biomarker of response to therapy in a planned Phase II clinical trial to assess the efficacy of ixabepilone combined with a receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor such as sunitinib. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of antitumor synergy between these two classes of drugs in EOC and the pivotal role of RhoB in this synergy. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Raf-1/CK2 and RhoA/ROCK signaling promote TNF-α-mediated endothelial apoptosis via regulating vimentin cytoskeleton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lifeng; Tang, Lian; Dai, Fan; Meng, Guoliang; Yin, Runting; Xu, Xiaole; Yao, Wenjuan

    2017-08-15

    Both RhoA/ROCK and Raf-1/CK2 pathway play essential roles in cell proliferation, apoptosis, differentiation, and multiple other common cellular functions. We previously reported that vimentin is responsible for TNF-α-induced cell apoptosis. Herein, we investigated the regulation of RhoA/ROCK and Raf-1/CK2 signaling on vimentin filaments and endothelial apoptosis mediated by TNF-α. Treatment with TNF-α significantly induced the activation of RhoA and ROCK, and the expression of ROCK1. RhoA deficiency could obviously inhibit ROCK activation and ROCK1 expression induced by TNF-α. Both RhoA deficiency and ROCK activity inhibition (Y-27632) greatly inhibited endothelial apoptosis and preserved cell viability in TNF-α-induced human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Also vimentin phosphorylation and the remodeling of vimentin or phospho-vimentin induced by TNF-α were obviously attenuated by RhoA suppression and ROCK inhibition. TNF-α-mediated vimentin cleavage was significantly inhibited by RhoA suppression and ROCK inhibition through decreasing the activation of caspase3 and 8. Furthermore, TNF-α treatment greatly enhanced the activation of Raf-1. Suppression of Raf-1 or CK2 by its inhibitor (GW5074 or TBB) blocked vimentin phosphorylation, remodeling and endothelial apoptosis, and preserved cell viability in TNF-α-induced HUVECs. However, Raf-1 inhibition showed no significant effect on TNF-α-induced ROCK expression and activation, suggesting that the regulation of Raf-1/CK2 signaling on vimentin was independent of ROCK. Taken together, these results indicate that both RhoA/ROCK and Raf-1/CK2 pathway are responsible for TNF-α-mediated endothelial cytotoxicity via regulating vimentin cytoskeleton. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. RhoA/ROCK pathway is the major molecular determinant of basal tone in intact human internal anal sphincter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rattan, Satish; Singh, Jagmohan

    2012-04-01

    The knowledge of molecular control mechanisms underlying the basal tone in the intact human internal anal sphincter (IAS) is critical for the pathophysiology and rational therapy for a number of debilitating rectoanal motility disorders. We determined the role of RhoA/ROCK and PKC pathways by comparing the effects of ROCK- and PKC-selective inhibitors Y 27632 and Gö 6850 (10(-8) to 10(-4) M), respectively, on the basal tone in the IAS vs. the rectal smooth muscle (RSM). Western blot studies were performed to determine the levels of RhoA/ROCK II, PKC-α, MYPT1, CPI-17, and MLC(20) in the unphosphorylated and phosphorylated forms, in the IAS vs. RSM. Confocal microscopic studies validated the membrane distribution of ROCK II. Finally, to confirm a direct relationship, we examined the enzymatic activities and changes in the basal IAS tone and p-MYPT1, p-CPI-17, and p-MLC(20), before and after Y 27632 and Gö 6850. Data show higher levels of RhoA/ROCK II and related downstream signal transduction proteins in the IAS vs. RSM. In addition, data show a significant correlation between the active RhoA/ROCK levels, ROCK enzymatic activity, downstream proteins, and basal IAS tone, before and after ROCK inhibitor. From these data we conclude 1) RhoA/ROCK and downstream signaling are constitutively active in the IAS, and this pathway (in contrast with PKC) is the critical determinant of the basal tone in intact human IAS; and 2) RhoA and ROCK are potential therapeutic targets for a number of rectoanal motility disorders for which currently there is no satisfactory treatment.

  8. Induction of CTGF by TGF-β1 in normal and radiation enteritis human smooth muscle cells: Smad/Rho balance and therapeutic perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haydont, Valerie; Mathe, Denis; Bourgier, Celine; Abdelali, Jalil; Aigueperse, Jocelyne; Bourhis, Jean; Vozenin-Brotons, Marie-Catherine

    2005-01-01

    Background and purpose: Transforming Growth Factor β1 (TGF-β1) and its downstream effector Connective Tissue Growth Factor (CTGF/CCN2), are well known fibrogenic activators and we previously showed that the Rho/ROCK pathway controls CTGF expression in intestinal smooth muscle cells isolated from patients with delayed radiation enteritis. The aim of the present work was to investigate the balance between Smad and Rho signalling pathways in the TGF-β1 CTGF induction and modulation of radiation-induced fibrogenic differentiation after addition of pravastatin, an inhibitor of Rho isoprenylation. Patients and methods: Primary human smooth muscle cells isolated from normal (N-SMC) or radiation enteritis (RE-SMC) biopsies were incubated with TGF-β1 (10 ng/ml). Induction of CTGF, as well as nucleo-cytoplasmic distribution of phospho-Smad2/3, Smad2/3 and Smad4 were analysed by Western blot and immunocytochemistry. Smad DNA binding was assessed by EMSA and Rho activation was measured by pull-down assay. Results: After TGF-β1 addition, Smads were translocated to the nucleus in both cell types. Nuclear accumulation of Smad as well as their DNA-binding activity were higher in N-SMC than in RE-SMC, whereas the opposite was observed for Rho activation, suggesting a main involvement of Rho pathway in sustained fibrogenic differentiation. This hypothesis was further supported by the antifibrotic effect observed in vitro after cell treatment with pravastatin (i.e. decreased expression of CTGF, TGF-β1 and Collagen Iα2). Conclusions: Our results suggest that TGF-β1-induced CTGF transactivation mainly depends on the Smad pathway in N-SMC, whereas in RE-SMC, Smad and Rho pathways are involved. Inhibition of Rho activity by pravastatin alters fibrogenic differentiation in vitro which opens up new therapeutic perspectives

  9. A Salmonella typhimurium-translocated Glycerophospholipid:Cholesterol Acyltransferase Promotes Virulence by Binding to the RhoA Protein Switch Regions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaRock, Doris L.; Brzovic, Peter S.; Levin, Itay; Blanc, Marie-Pierre; Miller, Samuel I.

    2012-08-24

    Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium translocates a glycerophospholipid: cholesterol acyltransferase (SseJ) into the host cytosol after its entry into mammalian cells. SseJ is recruited to the cytoplasmic face of the host cell phagosome membrane where it is activated upon binding the small GTPase, RhoA. SseJ is regulated similarly to cognate eukaryotic effectors, as only the GTP-bound form of RhoA family members stimulates enzymatic activity. Using NMR and biochemistry, this work demonstrates that SseJ competes effectively with Rhotekin, ROCK, and PKN1 in binding to a similar RhoA surface. The RhoA surface that binds SseJ includes the regulatory switch regions that control activation of mammalian effectors. These data were used to create RhoA mutants with altered SseJ binding and activation. This structure-function analysis supports a model in which SseJ activation occurs predominantly through binding to residues within switch region II. We further defined the nature of the interaction between SseJ and RhoA by constructing SseJ mutants in the RhoA binding surface. These data indicate that SseJ binding to RhoA is required for recruitment of SseJ to the endosomal network and for full Salmonella virulence for inbred susceptible mice, indicating that regulation of SseJ by small GTPases is an important virulence strategy of this bacterial pathogen. The dependence of a bacterial effector on regulation by a mammalian GTPase defines further how intimately host pathogen interactions have coevolved through similar and divergent evolutionary strategies.

  10. Effect of QSKL on MAPK and RhoA Pathways in a Rat Model of Heart Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Xia

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Qishenkeli (QSKL is one of the Chinese medicine formulae for treating heart failure and has been shown to have an antifibrotic effect. However, the mechanism of its therapeutic effects remains unclear. In this study, we aimed to explore whether QSKL could exert an antifibrotic effect by attenuating ras homolog family member A (RhoA and mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK pathways. Rats were randomly divided into sham group, model group, QSKL group, and positive control group. Heart failure was induced by ligation of the left ventricle anterior descending artery. Cardiac functions were measured by echocardiography and collagen deposition was assessed by Masson staining. Expressions of the key molecules involved in the RhoA and MAPK pathways were also measured. Twenty-one days after surgery, cardiac functions were severely impaired and collagen deposition was remarkable, while QSKL treatment could improve heart functions and alleviate collagen deposition. Further results demonstrated that the effects may be mediated by suppressing expressions of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK. Moreover, expressions of RhoA, Rho-associated protein kinase 1/2 (ROCK1/2, and phosphorylated myosin light chain (p-MLC were also downregulated by QSKL compared with the model group. The cardioprotective mechanism of QSKL on heart failure is probably mediated by regulating both the MAPK and RhoA signaling pathways.

  11. Mechanism of RhoB/FTI Action in Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kamasani, Uma

    2003-01-01

    .... What factors dictate FTI efficacy? Work completed earlier in this project defined rules for RhoB and its downstream effector kinase PRK in mediating growth inhibition by FTI in epithelial cells, including human breast epithelial cells...

  12. Mechanism of RhoB/FTI Action in Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kamasani, Uma R; Prendergast, George

    2004-01-01

    .... What factors dictate FTI efficacy? In this period, we advanced our studies of the role of cyclin B1, a key regulator of mitosis, as a critical target for RhoB suppression in FTI-induced apoptosis...

  13. Rho-associated kinase inhibitors: a novel glaucoma therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Toshihiro; Tanihara, Hidenobu

    2013-11-01

    The rho-associated kinase (ROCK) signaling pathway is activated via secreted bioactive molecules or via integrin activation after extracellular matrix binding. These lead to polymerization of actin stress fibers and formation of focal adhesions. Accumulating evidence suggests that actin cytoskeleton-modulating signals are involved in aqueous outflow regulation. Aqueous humor contains various biologically active factors, some of which are elevated in glaucomatous eyes. These factors affect aqueous outflow, in part, through ROCK signaling modulation. Various drugs acting on the cytoskeleton have also been shown to increase aqueous outflow by acting directly on outflow tissue. In vivo animal studies have shown that the trabecular meshwork (TM) actin cytoskeleton in glaucomatous eyes is more disorganized and more randomly oriented than in non-glaucomatous control eyes. In a previous study, we introduced ROCK inhibitors as a potential glaucoma therapy by showing that a selective ROCK inhibitor significantly lowered rabbit IOP. Rho-associated kinase inhibitors directly affect the TM and Schlemm's canal (SC), differing from the target sight of other glaucoma drugs. The TM is affected earlier and more strongly than ciliary muscle cells by ROCK inhibitors, largely because of pharmacological affinity differences stemming from regulatory mechanisms. Additionally, ROCK inhibitors disrupt tight junctions, result in F-actin depolymerization, and modulate intracellular calcium level, effectively increasing SC-cell monolayer permeability. Perfusion of an enucleated eye with a ROCK inhibitor resulted in wider empty spaces in the juxtacanalicular (JCT) area and more giant vacuoles in the endothelial cells of SC, while the endothelial lining of SC was intact. Interestingly, ROCK inhibitors also increase retinal blood flow by relaxing vascular smooth muscle cells, directly protecting neurons against various stresses, while promoting wound healing. These additional effects may help

  14. Modeling, molecular dynamics, and docking assessment of transcription factor rho: a potential drug target in Brucella melitensis 16M

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pradeepkiran JA

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Jangampalli Adi Pradeepkiran,1 Konidala Kranthi Kumar,1 Yellapu Nanda Kumar,2 Matcha Bhaskar11Division of Animal Biotechnology, Department of Zoology, Sri Venkateswara University, Tirupati, 2Biomedical Informatics Centre, Vector Control Research Centre, Indian Council of Medical Research, Pondicherry, India Abstract: The zoonotic disease brucellosis, a chronic condition in humans affecting renal and cardiac systems and causing osteoarthritis, is caused by Brucella, a genus of Gram-negative, facultative, intracellular pathogens. The mode of transmission and the virulence of the pathogens are still enigmatic. Transcription regulatory elements, such as rho proteins, play an important role in the termination of transcription and/or the selection of genes in Brucella. Adverse effects of the transcription inhibitors play a key role in the non-successive transcription challenges faced by the pathogens. In the investigation presented here, we computationally predicted the transcription termination factor rho (TtFRho inhibitors against Brucella melitensis 16M via a structure-based method. In view the unknown nature of its crystal structure, we constructed a robust three-dimensional homology model of TtFRho’s structure by comparative modeling with the crystal structure of the Escherichia coli TtFRho (Protein Data Bank ID: 1PVO as a template in MODELLER (v 9.10. The modeled structure was optimized by applying a molecular dynamics simulation for 2 ns with the CHARMM (Chemistry at HARvard Macromolecular Mechanics 27 force field in NAMD (NAnoscale Molecular Dynamics program; v 2.9 and then evaluated by calculating the stereochemical quality of the protein. The flexible docking for the interaction phenomenon of the template consists of ligand-related inhibitor molecules from the ZINC (ZINC Is Not Commercial database using a structure-based virtual screening strategy against minimized TtFRho. Docking simulations revealed two inhibitors compounds – ZINC

  15. Consistency in Physical Activity and Increase in Mental Health in Elderly over a Decade: Are We Achieving Better Population Health?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tyler C. Smith

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Over the past century, advances in medicine and public health have resulted in an extraordinary increase in life expectancy. As a result, focus has shifted from infectious to chronic diseases. Though current guidelines for healthy behaviors among the elderly exist, it remains unclear whether this growing segment of the population has shifted their behaviors in response to public health campaigns. The objective of this study was to investigate mental health and physical activity trends that may be leading indicators for healthier living and increased life expectancy. Methods: Using nearly a decade of continuous serial cross-sectional data collected in the nationwide Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, this study investigated trends of health behaviors and mental health in a population of nearly 750,000 who were 65 or older from 2003 through 2011. Weighted univariate and multivariable analyses were utilized including investigation of trend analyses over the decade, producing adjusted annual odds of physical activity and mental health. Results: After controlling for demographic and other factors, higher education and income, lower BMI, and current or previous smoking was associated with higher odds of adverse mental health and lower odds of physical activity engagement. Adjusted odds of adverse mental health climbed over the decade of observation whereas the odds of physical activity remained static. Conclusions: These data, encompassing a very large population over a decade of time, suggest that physical activity is stable though mental health challenges are on the rise in this older population. Public health campaigns may face greater barriers in an elderly population due to lifelong habits, dissemination and educational approaches, or decreasing gains. Further research should be conducted to identify more effective approaches towards increasing physical activity in this important and growing subset of the population and

  16. Simvastatin induces apoptosis by a Rho-dependent mechanism in cultured cardiac fibroblasts and myofibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Copaja, Miguel; Venegas, Daniel; Aranguiz, Pablo; Canales, Jimena; Vivar, Raul; Catalan, Mabel; Olmedo, Ivonne; Rodriguez, Andrea E.; Chiong, Mario; Leyton, Lisette; Lavandero, Sergio; Diaz-Araya, Guillermo

    2011-01-01

    Several clinical trials have shown the beneficial effects of statins in the prevention of coronary heart disease. Additionally, statins promote apoptosis in vascular smooth muscle cells, in renal tubular epithelial cells and also in a variety of cell lines; yet, the effects of statins on cardiac fibroblast and myofibroblast, primarily responsible for cardiac tissue healing are almost unknown. Here, we investigated the effects of simvastatin on cardiac fibroblast and myofibroblast viability and studied the molecular cell death mechanism triggered by simvastatin in both cell types. Methods: Rat neonatal cardiac fibroblasts and myofibroblasts were treated with simvastatin (0.1-10 μM) up to 72 h. Cell viability and apoptosis were evaluated by trypan blue exclusion method and by flow cytometry, respectively. Caspase-3 activation and Rho protein levels and activity were also determined by Western blot and pull-down assay, respectively. Results: Simvastatin induces caspase-dependent apoptosis of cardiac fibroblasts and myofibroblasts in a concentration- and time-dependent manner, with greater effects on fibroblasts than myofibroblasts. These effects were prevented by mevalonate, farnesylpyrophosphate and geranylgeranylpyrophosphate, but not squalene. These last results suggest that apoptosis was dependent on small GTPases of the Rho family rather than Ras. Conclusion: Simvastatin triggered apoptosis of cardiac fibroblasts and myofibroblasts by a mechanism independent of cholesterol synthesis, but dependent of isoprenilation of Rho protein. Additionally, cardiac fibroblasts were more susceptible to simvastatin-induced apoptosis than cardiac myofibroblasts. Thus simvastatin could avoid adverse cardiac remodeling leading to a less fibrotic repair of the damaged tissues. - Research Highlights: → Simvastatin decreases CF and CMF viability independent of cholesterol synthesis. → Simvastatin induces CF and CMF apoptosis in a caspase-dependent manner being CMF more resistant

  17. Peptide substrates for Rho-associated kinase 2 (Rho-kinase 2/ROCK2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeong-Hun Kang

    Full Text Available Peptide substrates sensitive for a certain protein kinase could be important for new-drug development and to understand the mechanism of diseases. Rho-associated kinase (Rho-kinase/ROCK is a serine/threonine kinase, and plays an important part in cardiovascular disease, migration and invasion of tumor cells, and in neurological disorders. The purpose of this study was to find substrates with high affinity and sensitivity for ROCK2. We synthesized 136 peptide substrates from protein substrates for ROCK2 with different lengths and charged peptides. Incorporation of (32P [counts per minute (CPM] for each peptide substrate was determined by the radiolabel assay using [γ-(32P]ATP. When the top five peptide substrates showing high CPMs (R4, R22, R133, R134, and R135 were phosphorylated by other enzymes (PKA, PKCα, and ERK1, R22, R133, and R135 displayed the highest CPM level for ROCK2 compared with other enzymes, whereas R4 and R134 showed similar CPM levels for ROCK2 and PKCα. We hypothesize that R22, R133, and R135 can be useful peptide substrates for ROCK2.

  18. Active and reactive power sharing and frequency restoration in a distributed power system consisting of two UPS units

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parlak, Koray Sener; Oezdemir, Mehmet [Dept. of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Firat University, Elazig, 23119 (Turkey); Aydemir, M. Timur [Dept. of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Gazi University, Maltepe-Ankara 06570 (Turkey)

    2009-06-15

    A distributed power system consisting of two uninterrupted power supplies (UPS) is investigated in this paper. Parallel operation of the two sources increases the established power rating of the system. One of the sources can supply the system even when the other system is disconnected due to some faults, and this is an important feature. The control algorithm makes sure that the total load is shared between the supplies in accordance with their rated power levels, and the frequency of the supplies are restored to the rated values after the transitions. As the UPSs operate at an optimum power level, losses and faults due to overloading are prevented. The units safely operate without any means of communication between each other. The focus of the work is on the inverter stages of the UPSs. Simulations performed in Matlab Simulink environment have been verified with experimental work via DS1103 controller card. (author)

  19. Consistently high sports/exercise activity is associated with better sleep quality, continuity and depth in midlife women: the SWAN sleep study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kline, Christopher E; Irish, Leah A; Krafty, Robert T; Sternfeld, Barbara; Kravitz, Howard M; Buysse, Daniel J; Bromberger, Joyce T; Dugan, Sheila A; Hall, Martica H

    2013-09-01

    To examine relationships between different physical activity (PA) domains and sleep, and the influence of consistent PA on sleep, in midlife women. Cross-sectional. Community-based. 339 women in the Study of Women's Health Across the Nation Sleep Study (52.1 ± 2.1 y). None. Sleep was examined using questionnaires, diaries and in-home polysomnography (PSG). PA was assessed in three domains (Active Living, Household/Caregiving, Sports/Exercise) using the Kaiser Physical Activity Survey (KPAS) up to 4 times over 6 years preceding the sleep assessments. The association between recent PA and sleep was evaluated using KPAS scores immediately preceding the sleep assessments. The association between the historical PA pattern and sleep was examined by categorizing PA in each KPAS domain according to its pattern over the 6 years preceding sleep assessments (consistently low, inconsistent/consistently moderate, or consistently high). Greater recent Sports/Exercise activity was associated with better sleep quality (diary "restedness" [P sleep continuity (diary sleep efficiency [SE; P = 0.02]) and depth (higher NREM delta electroencephalographic [EEG] power [P = 0.04], lower NREM beta EEG power [P Sports/Exercise activity was also associated with better Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index scores (P = 0.02) and higher PSG-assessed SE (P sleep and Active Living or Household/Caregiving activity (either recent or historical pattern) were noted. Consistently high levels of recreational physical activity, but not lifestyle- or household-related activity, are associated with better sleep in midlife women. Increasing recreational physical activity early in midlife may protect against sleep disturbance in this population.

  20. Intrinsic, pro-apoptotic effects of IGFBP-3 on breast cancer cells are reversible: Involvement of PKA, Rho and ceramide.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire M Perks

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available We established previously that IGFBP-3 could exert positive or negative effects on cell function depending upon the extracellular matrix composition and by interacting with integrin signalling. To elicit its pro-apoptotic effects IGFBP-3 bound to caveolin-1 and the beta 1 integrin receptor and increased their association culminating in MAPK activation. Disruption of these complexes or blocking the beta 1 integrin receptor reversed these intrinsic actions of IGFBP-3. In this study we have examined the signalling pathway between integrin receptor binding and MAPK activation that mediates the intrinsic, pro-apoptotic actions of IGFBP-3. We found on inhibiting protein kinase A(PKA, Rho associated kinase (ROCK and ceramide, the accentuating effects of IGFBP-3 on apoptotic triggers were reversed, such that IGFBP-3 then conferred cell survival. We established that IGFBP-3 activated Rho, the upstream regulator of ROCK and that beta1 integrin and PKA were upstream of Rho activation, whereas the involvement of ceramide was downstream. The beta 1 integrin, PKA, Rho and ceramide were all upstream of MAPK activation. These data highlight key components involved in the pro-apoptotic effects of IGFBP-3 and that inhibiting them leads to a reversal in the action of IGFBP-3.

  1. RhoA/ROCK signaling regulates smooth muscle phenotypic modulation and vascular remodeling via the JNK pathway and vimentin cytoskeleton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Lian; Dai, Fan; Liu, Yan; Yu, Xiaoqiang; Huang, Chao; Wang, Yuqin; Yao, Wenjuan

    2018-05-20

    The RhoA/ROCK signaling pathway regulates cell morphology, adhesion, proliferation, and migration. In this study, we investigated the regulatory role of RhoA/ROCK signaling on PDGF-BB-mediated smooth muscle phenotypic modulation and vascular remodeling and clarified the molecular mechanisms behind these effects. PDGF-BB treatment induced the activation of RhoA, ROCK, PDGF-Rβ, and the expression of PDGF-Rβ in HA-VSMCs (human aortic vascular smooth muscle cells). PDGF-Rβ inhibition and RhoA suppression blocked PDGF-BB-induced RhoA activation and ROCK induction. In addition, PDGF-BB-mediated cell proliferation and migration were suppressed by PDGF-Rβ inhibition, RhoA suppression, and ROCK inhibition, suggesting that PDGF-BB promotes phenotypic modulation of HA-VSMCs by activating the RhoA/ROCK pathway via the PDGF receptor. Moreover, suppressing both ROCK1 and ROCK2 blocked cell cycle progression from G0/G1 to S phase by decreasing the transcription and protein expression of cyclin D1, CDK2, and CDK4 via JNK/c-Jun pathway, thus reducing cell proliferation in PDGF-BB-treated HA-VSMCs. ROCK1 deletion, rather than ROCK2 suppression, significantly inhibited PDGF-BB-induced migration by reducing the expression of vimentin and preventing the remodeling of vimentin and phospho-vimentin. Furthermore, ROCK1 deletion suppressed vimentin by inhibiting the phosphorylation of Smad2/3 and the nuclear translocation of Smad4. These findings suggested that ROCK1 and ROCK2 might play different roles in PDGF-BB-mediated cell proliferation and migration in HA-VSMCs. In addition, PDGF-BB and its receptor participated in neointima formation and vascular remodeling by promoting cell cycle protein expression via the JNK pathway and enhancing vimentin expression in a rat balloon injury model; effects that were inhibited by treatment with fasudil. Together, the results of this study reveal a novel mechanism through which RhoA/ROCK signaling regulates smooth muscle phenotypic modulation and

  2. Inhibition of NEDD8-activating enzyme induces rereplication and apoptosis in human tumor cells consistent with deregulating CDT1 turnover.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milhollen, Michael A; Narayanan, Usha; Soucy, Teresa A; Veiby, Petter O; Smith, Peter G; Amidon, Benjamin

    2011-04-15

    Loss of NEDD8-activating enzyme (NAE) function by siRNA knockdown or inhibition by the small molecule NAE inhibitor MLN4924 leads to increased steady-state levels of direct Cullin-RING ligase (CRL) substrates by preventing their ubiquitination and proteasome-dependent degradation. Many of these CRL substrates are involved in cell cycle progression, including a critical DNA replication licensing factor CDT1. Cell cycle analysis of asynchronous and synchronous cultures after NAE inhibition revealed effects on cell cycle distribution and activation of DNA break repair signaling pathways similar to that reported for CDT1 overexpression. The siRNA knockdown of cullins critical for the turnover of CDT1 recapitulated the aberrant rereplication phenotype while CDT1 knockdown was suppressing. Although NAE inhibition leads to deregulation of many CRL substrates, these data demonstrate that CDT1 accumulation mediates the DNA rereplication phenotype resulting from loss of NAE function. DNA rereplication is an unrecoverable cellular insult and the small molecule inhibitor MLN4924, currently in phase I trials, represents an unprecedented opportunity to explore this mechanism of cytotoxicity for the treatment of cancer. ©2011 AACR.

  3. Exclusive {rho}{sup 0} production at HERMES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rostomyan, Armine Armand

    2008-11-15

    In this thesis the exclusive electroproduction of {rho}{sup 0} mesons is analyzed using the data accumulated with the HERMES spectrometer in the years 2002-2005 by scattering the lepton beam of the HERA accelerator of the internal target of HERMES filled with transversely polarized hydrogen gas atoms. The {rho}{sup 0} production mechanism and, in a model-dependent way, the structure of the nucleon are studied by measuring the spin-density matrix elements (SDMEs), which parameterize the {rho}{sup 0} production and decay angular distribution. The decomposition of the angular distribution in terms of SDMEs was previously done for both polarized and unpolarized lepton beam and unpolarized target. Recently, the angular distribution was decomposed in terms of SDMEs also for a transversely polarized target. A first measurement of the 30 'transverse' SDMEs is reported in this thesis, yielding information on the degree of s-channel helicity conservation and natural-parity exchange in the case of a transversely polarized target. The measured SDMEs are implemented into the rhoMC Monte Carlo generator, which is currently the only one capable of fully simulating the exclusive {rho}{sup 0} production and decay for both unpolarized and polarized beam and target. The interest in SDMEs for a polarized target arose after it was shown that at leading twist the corresponding SDMEs can be related to the azimuthal transverse target-spin asymmetry in the cross section of exclusive {rho}{sup 0} production which is sensitive to the unknown nucleon helicity-ip GPDs. Since the GPD formalism is only valid for longitudinally polarized vector mesons produced by longitudinal photons, for the first time the transverse target-spin asymmetry of longitudinally polarized {rho}{sup 0} mesons is extracted and compared to the available theoretical predictions, specically considering possible problems with next-to-leading order corrections. (orig.)

  4. Exclusive {rho}{sup 0} production at HERMES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rostomyan, Armine Armand

    2008-11-15

    In this thesis the exclusive electroproduction of {rho}{sup 0} mesons is analyzed using the data accumulated with the HERMES spectrometer in the years 2002-2005 by scattering the lepton beam of the HERA accelerator of the internal target of HERMES filled with transversely polarized hydrogen gas atoms. The {rho}{sup 0} production mechanism and, in a model-dependent way, the structure of the nucleon are studied by measuring the spin-density matrix elements (SDMEs), which parameterize the {rho}{sup 0} production and decay angular distribution. The decomposition of the angular distribution in terms of SDMEs was previously done for both polarized and unpolarized lepton beam and unpolarized target. Recently, the angular distribution was decomposed in terms of SDMEs also for a transversely polarized target. A first measurement of the 30 'transverse' SDMEs is reported in this thesis, yielding information on the degree of s-channel helicity conservation and natural-parity exchange in the case of a transversely polarized target. The measured SDMEs are implemented into the rhoMC Monte Carlo generator, which is currently the only one capable of fully simulating the exclusive {rho}{sup 0} production and decay for both unpolarized and polarized beam and target. The interest in SDMEs for a polarized target arose after it was shown that at leading twist the corresponding SDMEs can be related to the azimuthal transverse target-spin asymmetry in the cross section of exclusive {rho}{sup 0} production which is sensitive to the unknown nucleon helicity-ip GPDs. Since the GPD formalism is only valid for longitudinally polarized vector mesons produced by longitudinal photons, for the first time the transverse target-spin asymmetry of longitudinally polarized {rho}{sup 0} mesons is extracted and compared to the available theoretical predictions, specically considering possible problems with next-to-leading order corrections. (orig.)

  5. Podoplanin, ezrin, and Rho-A proteins may have joint participation in tumor invasion of lip cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assao, Agnes; Nonogaki, Suely; Lauris, José Roberto Pereira; Carvalho, André Lopes; Pinto, Clóvis Antônio Lopes; Soares, Fernando Augusto; Kowalski, Luiz Paulo; Oliveira, Denise Tostes

    2017-06-01

    Podoplanin and ezrin connection through Rho-A phosphorylation have been suggested as part of the activation pathway, in the process of tumor invasion and cell movement in oral squamous cell carcinomas. The aim of this study was to evaluate the correlation among podoplanin, ezrin, and Rho-A immunoexpressions in 91 squamous cells carcinomas of the lower lip and their influence in patient's prognosis. The immunoexpressions of podoplanin, ezrin, and Rho-A were evaluated through a semi-quantitative score method, based on the capture of 10 microscopic fields at the front of tumor invasion. The association and correlation of these proteins with the clinicopathological features were verified by Fischer's exact test and Spearman's test. The prognostic values were analyzed by Kaplan-Meier method and log-rank test. A statistically significant association between strong cytoplasmic podoplanin expression and alcohol (p = 0.024), loco-regional recurrences (p = 0.028), and lymph node metastasis (pN+) (p = 0.010) was found. The membranous (p = 0.000 and r = 0.384) and cytoplasmic (p = 0.000 and r = 0.344) podoplanin expression was statistically correlated with ezrin expression. Also, membranous podoplanin was significantly correlated with Rho-A expression (p = 0.006 and r = 0.282). The expressions of podoplanin, ezrin, and Rho-A were not significant prognostic factors for patients with squamous cell carcinomas of the lower lip. Therefore, our results confirm a correlation among podoplanin, ezrin, and Rho-A expressions in squamous cell carcinoma of the lip suggesting a cooperative participation of these proteins in cell movement and invasion. Furthermore, strong cytoplasmic podoplanin expression could be helpful to identify patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the lip and lower risk of loco-regional recurrences.

  6. Differentially expressed proteins in ER+ MCF7 and ER- MDA- MB-231 human breast cancer cells by RhoGDI-α silencing and overexpression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooshmand, Somayeh; Ghaderi, Abbas; Yusoff, Khatijah; Thilakavathy, Karuppiah; Rosli, Rozita; Mojtahedi, Zahra

    2014-01-01

    The consequence of Rho GDP dissociation inhibitor alpha (RhoGDIα) activity on migration and invasion of estrogen receptor positive (ER+) and negative (ER-) breast cancer cells has not been studied using the proteomic approach. Changes in expression of RhoGDIα and other proteins interacting directly or indirectly with RhoGDIα in MCF7 and MDA-MB-231, with different metastatic potentials is of particular interest. ER+ MCF7 and ER- MDA-MB-231 cell lines were subjected to two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) and spots of interest were identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of- flight/time- of-flight (MALDI-TOF/TOF) mass spectrometry (MS) analysis after downregulation of RhoGDIα using short interfering RNA (siRNA) and upregulated using GFP-tagged ORF clone of RhoGDIα. The results showed a total of 35 proteins that were either up- or down-regulated in these cells. Here we identifed 9 and 15 proteins differentially expressed with silencing of RhoGDIα in MCF-7 and the MDA-MB-231 cells, respectively. In addition, 10 proteins were differentially expressed in the upregulation of RhoGDIα in MCF7, while only one protein was identified in the upregulation of RhoGDIα in MDA-MB-231. Based on the biological functions of these proteins, the results revealed that proteins involved in cell migration are more strongly altered with RhoGDI-α activity. Although several of these proteins have been previously indicated in tumorigenesis and invasiveness of breast cancer cells, some ohave not been previously reported to be involved in breast cancer migration. Hence, these proteins may serve as useful candidate biomarkers for tumorigenesis and invasiveness of breast cancer cells. Future studies are needed to determine the mechanisms by which these proteins regulate cell migration. The combination of RhoGDIα with other potential biomarkers may be a more promising approach in the inhibition of breast cancer cell migration.

  7. The COMT Val/Met polymorphism is associated with reading related skills and consistent patterns of functional neural activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landi, Nicole; Frost, Stephen J.; Mencl, W. Einar; Preston, Jonathan L.; Jacobsen, Leslie K.; Lee, Maria; Yrigollen, Carolyn; Pugh, Kenneth R.; Grigorenko, Elena L.

    2013-01-01

    In both children and adults there is large variability in reading skill, with approximately 5–10% of individuals characterized as having reading disability; these individuals struggle to learn to read despite adequate intelligence and opportunity. Although it is well established that a substantial portion of this variability is attributed to the genetic differences between individuals, specifics of the connections between reading and the genome are not understood. This article presents data that suggest that variation in the COMT gene, which has previously been associated with variation in higher-order cognition, is associated with reading and reading-related skills, both at the level of brain and behavior. In particular, we found that the COMT Val/Met polymorphism at rs4680, which results in the substitution of the ancestral Valine (Val) by Methionine (Met), was associated with better performance on a number of critical reading measures and with patterns of functional neural activation that have been linked to better readers. We argue that this polymorphism, known for its broad effects on cognition, may modulate (likely through frontal lobe function) reading skill. PMID:23278923

  8. The COMT Val/Met polymorphism is associated with reading-related skills and consistent patterns of functional neural activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landi, Nicole; Frost, Stephen J; Mencl, W Einar; Preston, Jonathan L; Jacobsen, Leslie K; Lee, Maria; Yrigollen, Carolyn; Pugh, Kenneth R; Grigorenko, Elena L

    2013-01-01

    In both children and adults there is large variability in reading skill, with approximately 5-10% of individuals characterized as having reading disability; these individuals struggle to learn to read despite adequate intelligence and opportunity. Although it is well established that a substantial portion of this variability is attributed to the genetic differences between individuals, specifics of the connections between reading and the genome are not understood. This article presents data that suggest that variation in the COMT gene, which has previously been associated with variation in higher-order cognition, is associated with reading and reading-related skills, at the level of both brain and behavior. In particular, we found that the COMT Val/Met polymorphism at rs4680, which results in the substitution of the ancestral Valine (Val) by Methionine (Met), was associated with better performance on a number of critical reading measures and with patterns of functional neural activation that have been linked to better readers. We argue that this polymorphism, known for its broad effects on cognition, may modulate (likely through frontal lobe function) reading skill. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  9. Rac and Rho GTPases in cancer cell motility control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parri Matteo

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Rho GTPases represent a family of small GTP-binding proteins involved in cell cytoskeleton organization, migration, transcription, and proliferation. A common theme of these processes is a dynamic reorganization of actin cytoskeleton which has now emerged as a major switch control mainly carried out by Rho and Rac GTPase subfamilies, playing an acknowledged role in adaptation of cell motility to the microenvironment. Cells exhibit three distinct modes of migration when invading the 3 D environment. Collective motility leads to movement of cohorts of cells which maintain the adherens junctions and move by photolytic degradation of matrix barriers. Single cell mesenchymal-type movement is characterized by an elongated cellular shape and again requires extracellular proteolysis and integrin engagement. In addition it depends on Rac1-mediated cell polarization and lamellipodia formation. Conversely, in amoeboid movement cells have a rounded morphology, the movement is independent from proteases but requires high Rho GTPase to drive elevated levels of actomyosin contractility. These two modes of cell movement are interconvertible and several moving cells, including tumor cells, show an high degree of plasticity in motility styles shifting ad hoc between mesenchymal or amoeboid movements. This review will focus on the role of Rac and Rho small GTPases in cell motility and in the complex relationship driving the reciprocal control between Rac and Rho granting for the opportunistic motile behaviour of aggressive cancer cells. In addition we analyse the role of these GTPases in cancer progression and metastatic dissemination.

  10. The Regularity and Irregularity of Travel: an Analysis of the Consistency of Travel Times Associated with Subsistence, Maintenance and Discretionary Activities

    OpenAIRE

    Longden, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Regular and irregular travel patterns coincide with different underlying purposes of travel and days of the week. Within this paper, it is shown that the balance between subsistence (i.e. work) and discretionary (i.e. leisure) activities is related to differences in travel patterns and explains consistency across years. Using eight years of time use diary entries this paper finds that travel time related to subsistence activities tends to be regular and stable. In contrast, travel time associ...

  11. Time-dependent restricted-active-space self-consistent eld theory: Formulation and application to laser-driven many-electron dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miyagi, Haruhide; Madsen, Lars Bojer

    We have developed a new theoretical framework for time-dependent many-electron problems named time-dependent restricted-active-space self-consistent field (TD-RASSCF) theory. The theory generalizes the multicongurational time-dependent Hartree-Fock (MCTDHF) theory by truncating the expansion...

  12. Consistency in PERT problems

    OpenAIRE

    Bergantiños, Gustavo; Valencia-Toledo, Alfredo; Vidal-Puga, Juan

    2016-01-01

    The program evaluation review technique (PERT) is a tool used to schedule and coordinate activities in a complex project. In assigning the cost of a potential delay, we characterize the Shapley rule as the only rule that satisfies consistency and other desirable properties.

  13. Differential effects of Rho-kinase inhibitor and angiotensin II type-1 receptor antagonist on the vascular function in hypertensive rats induced by chronic l-NAME treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bainian Chen

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Little attention has been paid to the effect of Rho-kinase inhibitor on the vascular dysfunction of nitric oxide-deficient hypertension. We aimed to investigate whether the Rho-kinase inhibitor fasudil showed beneficial effect on the vascular dysfunction of the NG-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME treated rat, as well as to compare the differential effects of fasudil and angiotensin II receptor antagonist valsartan on vascular function. In the present study, both valsartan and fasudil exerted antihypertensive action on the l-NAME-treated rats, while only valsartan attenuated the cardiac hypertrophy. Treatment with valsartan showed improvement on vascular reactivity to norepinephrine, KCl and CaCl2, whereas fasudil therapy showed little effect on vasoconstriction. Endothelium-dependent vasodilation to acetylcholine was reduced in the NO-deficient group but was normalized by the fasudil therapy. The increased expression of RhoA and Rho-kinase (ROCK in the vasculature was corrected well to normal level by either valsartan or fasudil administration, which seemed to be at least partially responsible for the beneficial effect of the drug infusion. These findings suggest that the angiotensin II receptor antagonist interferes more with the contractile response than Rho-kinase inhibitor, whereas inhibition of Rho-kinase activity exhibits a better improvement on vasorelaxation than blockade of angiotensin II receptor.

  14. HAWC+/SOFIA observations of Rho Oph A: far-infrared polarization spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Fabio; Dowell, Charles D.; Houde, Martin; Looney, Leslie; Lopez-Rodriguez, Enrique; Novak, Giles; Ward-Thompson, Derek; HAWC+ Science Team

    2018-01-01

    In this work, we present preliminary results from the HAWC+ far-infrared polarimeter that operates on the SOFIA airborne observatory. The densest portions of the Rho Ophiuchi molecular complex, known as Rho Oph A, have been mapped using HAWC+ bands C (89 microns) and D (155 microns). Rho Oph A is a well known nearby star forming region. At the target's distance of approximately 130 pc, our observations provide excellent spatial resolution (~5 mpc in band C).The magnetic field map suggests a compressed and distorted field morphology around Oph S1, a massive B3 star that is the main heat source of Rho Oph A. We compute the ratio p(D)/p(C), where p(C) and p(D) are the polarization degree maps at bands C and D, respectively. This ratio estimates the slope of the polarization spectrum in the far-infrared. Although the slope is predicted to be positive by dust grain models, previous observations of other molecular clouds have revealed that negative slopes are common. In Rho Oph A, we find that there is a smooth gradient of p(D)/p(C) across the mapped field. The change in p(D)/p(C) is well correlated with the integrated NH3 (1,1) emission. A positive slope dominates the lower density and well illuminated portions of the cloud, whereas a transition to a negative slope is observed at the denser and less evenly illuminated cloud core.We interpret the positive to negative slope transition as being consistent with the radiative torques (RATs) grain alignment theory. For the sight lines of higher column density, polarized emission from the warmer outer cloud layers is added to emission from the colder inner well-shielded layers lying along the same line-of-sight. Given that the outer layers receive more radiation from Oph S1, their grain alignment efficiency is expected to be higher according to RATs. The combination of warmer, well aligned grains with cooler, poorly aligned grains is what causes the negative slope. This effect is not present in the sight lines of lower column

  15. Inelastic photoproduction of ω and rho+-mesons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, C.A. Jr.; May, E.N.; Abramson, J.; Andrews, D.E.; Harvey, J.; Lobkowicz, F.; Singer, M.N.; Thorndike, E.H.; Nordberg, M.E. Jr.

    1978-01-01

    We report measurements of inelastic photoproduction of ω and rho +- mesons from hydrogen and deuterium at incident photon energies in the range 7.5-10.5 GeV. For ωΔ and rho - Δ ++ production differential cross sections dsigma/dt' and spin density matrices are presented. For higher missing masses the cross sections dsigma/dM/sub X/ 2 and invariant structure functions F(x) are also given. The data are compared to a one-pion-exchange model. We conclude that pion exchange is dominant for inelastic ω photoproduction, but unimportant for rho +- during annealing, even though the resistively determined transport scattering time increased by a factor of 7.8 during annealing. Orbital depairing was found to follow a relation zeta = zeta 0 + αH 2 and to increase with annealing in a manner expected from the change in mean free path determined from measurements of H/sub cnu/

  16. Rotation in USco and rho Oph with K2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebull, Luisa; Stauffer, John; K2 Clusters Team

    2018-01-01

    K2 observed Upper Scorpius and rho Oph as part of their Campaign 2 in 2014. At ~8 and ~1 Myr respectively, the stars in Upper Sco and rho Oph exhibit greater diversity of light curve shapes than are found in older clusters observed with K2 such as Pleiades or Praesepe. Nonetheless, we are able to derive rotation periods for 85% (971/1136) of the USco members and 80% (71/88) of the rho Oph members. About 25% of the periodic stars have evidence for multiple periods. These light curves sample smaller amplitudes to lower masses and with a far better cadence, than has even been probed before. We can compare USco with similar stars in Praesepe (~700 Myr) and the Pleiades (~125 Myr), all with K2 light curves.

  17. RhoA/Rho kinase signaling regulates transforming growth factor-β1-induced chondrogenesis and actin organization of synovium-derived mesenchymal stem cells through interaction with the Smad pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ting; Wu, Mengjie; Feng, Jianying; Lin, Xinping; Gu, Zhiyuan

    2012-11-01

    Recent studies have suggested that synovium-derived mesenchymal stem cells (SMSCs) may be promising candidates for tissue engineering and play an important role in cartilage regeneration. However, the mechanisms of SMSC chondrogenesis remain to be identified and characterized. The aim of this study was to evaluate the activation of the RhoA/Rho kinase (ROCK) pathway, as well as the manner by which it may contribute to chondrogenesis and the actin cytoskeletal organization of rat temporomandibular SMSCs in response to transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1). Primary isolated SMSCs were treated with TGF-β1, and their actin organization was examined by fluorescein isothiocyanate-phalloidin staining. The specific biochemical inhibitors, C3 transferase, Y27632 and SB431542, were employed to evaluate the function of RhoA/ROCK and Smads. The effect of C3 transferase and Y27632 on the gene expression of chondrocyte-specific markers was evaluated by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. To examine the effect of Y27632 on Smad2/3 phosphorylation induced by TGF-β1, western blot analysis was also performed. The stimulation of TGF-β1 in SMSCs resulted in the activation of the RhoA/ROCK pathway and concomitantly induced cytoskeletal reorganization, which was specifically blocked by C3 transferase and Y27632. The TGF-β-induced gene expression of Sox9, type I collagen, type II collagen and aggrecan was also inhibited by both C3 transferase and Y27632, at different levels. Y27632 treatment reduced the phosphorylation of Smad2/3 in a concentration-dependent manner. These results demonstrate the RhoA/ROCK activation regulates chondrocyte-specific gene transcription and cytoskeletal organization induced by TGF-β1 by interacting with the Smad pathway. This may have significant implications for the successful utilization of SMSCs as a cell source for articular cartilage tissue engineering.

  18. The 'invisible hand': regulation of RHO GTPases by RHOGDIs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Mata, Rafael; Boulter, Etienne; Burridge, Keith

    2011-07-22

    The 'invisible hand' is a term originally coined by Adam Smith in The Theory of Moral Sentiments to describe the forces of self-interest, competition and supply and demand that regulate the resources in society. This metaphor continues to be used by economists to describe the self-regulating nature of a market economy. The same metaphor can be used to describe the RHO-specific guanine nucleotide dissociation inhibitor (RHOGDI) family, which operates in the background, as an invisible hand, using similar forces to regulate the RHO GTPase cycle.

  19. The invisible hand: regulation of RHO GTPases by RHOGDIs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Mata, Rafael; Boulter, Etienne; Burridge, Keith

    2011-01-01

    Preface The 'invisible hand' is a term originally coined by Adam Smith in the Theory of Moral Sentiments to describe the forces of self-interest, competition, and supply and demand that regulate the resources in society. This metaphor continues to be used by economists to describe the self-regulating nature of a market economy. The same metaphor can be used to describe the RHO-specific guanine nucleotide dissociation inhibitor (RHOGDI) family, which operates in the background, as an invisible hand, using similar forces to regulate the RHO GTPase cycle. PMID:21779026

  20. Different roles of the small GTPases Rac1, Cdc42, and RhoG in CALEB/NGC-induced dendritic tree complexity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Jana; Franke, Kristin; Frick, Manfred; Schumacher, Stefan

    2016-10-01

    Rho GTPases play prominent roles in the regulation of cytoskeletal reorganization. Many aspects have been elaborated concerning the individual functions of Rho GTPases in distinct signaling pathways leading to cytoskeletal rearrangements. However, major questions have yet to be answered regarding the integration and the signaling hierarchy of different Rho GTPases in regulating the cytoskeleton in fundamental physiological events like neuronal process differentiation. Here, we investigate the roles of the small GTPases Rac1, Cdc42, and RhoG in defining dendritic tree complexity stimulated by the transmembrane epidermal growth factor family member CALEB/NGC. Combining gain-of-function and loss-of-function analysis in primary hippocampal neurons, we find that Rac1 is essential for CALEB/NGC-mediated dendritic branching. Cdc42 reduces the complexity of dendritic trees. Interestingly, we identify the palmitoylated isoform of Cdc42 to adversely affect dendritic outgrowth and dendritic branching, whereas the prenylated Cdc42 isoform does not. In contrast to Rac1, CALEB/NGC and Cdc42 are not directly interconnected in regulating dendritic tree complexity. Unlike Rac1, the Rac1-related GTPase RhoG reduces the complexity of dendritic trees by acting upstream of CALEB/NGC. Mechanistically, CALEB/NGC activates Rac1, and RhoG reduces the amount of CALEB/NGC that is located at the right site for Rac1 activation at the cell membrane. Thus, Rac1, Cdc42, and RhoG perform very specific and non-redundant functions at different levels of hierarchy in regulating dendritic tree complexity induced by CALEB/NGC. Rho GTPases play a prominent role in dendritic branching. CALEB/NGC is a transmembrane member of the epidermal growth factor (EGF) family that mediates dendritic branching, dependent on Rac1. CALEB/NGC stimulates Rac1 activity. RhoG inhibits CALEB/NGC-mediated dendritic branching by decreasing the amount of CALEB/NGC at the plasma membrane. Palmitoylated, but not prenylated form

  1. RhoA mediates the expression of acidic extracellular pH-induced matrix metalloproteinase-9 mRNA through phospholipase D1 in mouse metastatic B16-BL6 melanoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Toyonobu; Yuzawa, Satoshi; Suzuki, Atsuko; Baba, Yuh; Nishimura, Yukio; Kato, Yasumasa

    2016-03-01

    Solid tumors are characterized by acidic extracellular pH (pHe). The present study examined the contribution of small GTP-binding proteins to phospholipase D (PLD) activation of acidic pHe-induced matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) production. Acidic pHe-induced MMP-9 production was reduced by C3 exoenzyme, which inhibits the Rho family of GTPases; cytochalasin D, which inhibits actin reorganization; and simvastatin, which inhibits geranylgeranylation of Rho. Small interfering RNA (siRNA) against RhoA, but not against Rac1 or Cdc42, significantly inhibited acidic pHe induction of MMP-9. Pull-down assays showed that acidic pHe increased the activated form of RhoA. Forced expression of constitutively active RhoA induced MMP-9 production, even at neutral pHe. RhoA siRNA also reduced acidic pHe induced PLD activity. Specific inhibition of PLD1 and Pld1 gene knockout significantly reduced acidic pHe-induced MMP-9 expression. In contrast, PLD2 inhibition or knockout had no effect on MMP-9 expression. These findings suggested that RhoA-PLD1 signaling is involved in acidic pHe induction of MMP-9.

  2. Industrial PM2.5 cause pulmonary adverse effect through RhoA/ROCK pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Junyan; Lai, Chia-Hsiang; Lung, Shih-Chun Candice; Chen, Chongjun; Wang, Wen-Cheng; Huang, Pin-I; Lin, Chia-Hua

    2017-12-01

    According to the Chinese Ministry of Health, industrial pollution-induced health impacts have been the leading cause of death in China. While industrial fine particulate matter (PM 2.5 ) is associated with adverse health effects, the major action mechanisms of different compositions of PM 2.5 are currently unclear. In this study, we treated normal human lung epithelial BEAS-2B cells with industrial organic and water-soluble PM 2.5 extracts under daily alveolar deposition dose to elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying adverse pulmonary effects induced by PM 2.5 , including oxidative damage, inflammatory response, lung epithelial barrier dysfunction, and the recruitment of macrophages. We found that water-soluble PM 2.5 extracts caused more severe cytotoxic effects on BEAS-2B cells compared with that of organic extracts. Both organic and water-soluble PM 2.5 extracts induced activation of the RhoA/ROCK pathway. Inflammatory response, epithelial barrier dysfunction, and the activation of NF-кB caused by both PM 2.5 extracts were attenuated by ROCK inhibitor Y-27632. This indicated that both PM 2.5 extracts could cause damage to epithelial cells through RhoA/ROCK-dependent NF-кB activation. Furthermore, the upregulation of macrophage adhesion induced by both PM 2.5 extracts was also attenuated by Y-27632 in a co-culture model of macrophages and the epithelial cells. Therefore, our results support that industrial PM 2.5 extracts-induced activation of the RhoA/ROCK-dependent NF-кB pathway induces pulmonary adverse effect. Thus, pharmacological inhibition of ROCK activation might have therapeutic potential in preventing lung disease associated with PM 2.5 . Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. The fibronectin-binding integrins alpha5beta1 and alphavbeta3 differentially modulate RhoA-GTP loading, organization of cell matrix adhesions, and fibronectin fibrillogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danen, Erik H J; Sonneveld, Petra; Brakebusch, Cord

    2002-01-01

    We have studied the formation of different types of cell matrix adhesions in cells that bind to fibronectin via either alpha5beta1 or alphavbeta3. In both cases, cell adhesion to fibronectin leads to a rapid decrease in RhoA activity. However, alpha5beta1 but not alphavbeta3 supports high levels ...... receptors expressed on a cell dictates the ability of fibronectin to stimulate RhoA-mediated organization of cell matrix adhesions.......We have studied the formation of different types of cell matrix adhesions in cells that bind to fibronectin via either alpha5beta1 or alphavbeta3. In both cases, cell adhesion to fibronectin leads to a rapid decrease in RhoA activity. However, alpha5beta1 but not alphavbeta3 supports high levels...... of RhoA activity at later stages of cell spreading, which are associated with a translocation of focal contacts to peripheral cell protrusions, recruitment of tensin into fibrillar adhesions, and fibronectin fibrillogenesis. Expression of an activated mutant of RhoA stimulates alphavbeta3-mediated...

  4. Coding sequence of human rho cDNAs clone 6 and clone 9

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chardin, P; Madaule, P; Tavitian, A

    1988-03-25

    The authors have isolated human cDNAs including the complete coding sequence for two rho proteins corresponding to the incomplete isolates previously described as clone 6 and clone 9. The deduced a.a. sequences, when compared to the a.a. sequence deduced from clone 12 cDNA, show that there are in human at least three highly homologous rho genes. They suggest that clone 12 be named rhoA, clone 6 : rhoB and clone 9 : rhoC. RhoA, B and C proteins display approx. 30% a.a. identity with ras proteins,. mainly clustered in four highly homologous internal regions corresponding to the GTP binding site; however at least one significant difference is found; the 3 rho proteins have an Alanine in position corresponding to ras Glycine 13, suggesting that rho and ras proteins might have slightly different biochemical properties.

  5. Impact of liver fibrosis and fatty liver on T1rho measurements: A prospective study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie, Shuang Shuang; Li, Qing; Cheng, Yue; Shen, Wen; Zhang, Yu; Zhuo, Zhi Zheng; Zhao, Guiming

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the liver T1rho values for detecting fibrosis, and the potential impact of fatty liver on T1rho measurements. This study included 18 healthy subjects, 18 patients with fatty liver, and 18 patients with liver fibrosis, who underwent T1rho MRI and mDIXON collections. Liver T1rho, proton density fat fraction (PDFF) and T2* values were measured and compared among the three groups. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was performed to evaluate the T1rho values for detecting liver fibrosis. Liver T1rho values were correlated with PDFF, T2* values and clinical data. Liver T1rho and PDFF values were significantly different (p 0.05). T1rho MRI is useful for noninvasive detection of liver fibrosis, and may not be affected with the presence of fatty liver

  6. Engineering amount of cell-cell contact demonstrates biphasic proliferative regulation through RhoA and the actin cytoskeleton

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gray, Darren S.; Liu, Wendy F.; Shen, Colette J.; Bhadriraju, Kiran; Nelson, Celeste M.; Chen, Christopher S.

    2008-01-01

    Endothelial cell-cell contact via VE-cadherin plays an important role in regulating numerous cell functions, including proliferation. However, using different experimental approaches to manipulate cell-cell contact, investigators have observed both inhibition and stimulation of proliferation depending on the adhesive context. In this study, we used micropatterned wells combined with active positioning of cells by dielectrophoresis in order to investigate whether the number of contacting neighbors affected the proliferative response. Varying cell-cell contact resulted in a biphasic effect on proliferation; one contacting neighbor increased proliferation, while two or more neighboring cells partially inhibited this increase. We also observed that cell-cell contact increased the formation of actin stress fibers, and that expression of dominant negative RhoA (RhoN19) blocked the contact-mediated increase in stress fibers and proliferation. Furthermore, examination of heterotypic pairs of untreated cells in contact with RhoN19-expressing cells revealed that intracellular, but not intercellular, tension is required for the contact-mediated stimulation of proliferation. Moreover, engagement of VE-cadherin with cadherin-coated beads was sufficient to stimulate proliferation in the absence of actual cell-cell contact. In all, these results demonstrate that cell-cell contact signals through VE-cadherin, RhoA, and intracellular tension in the actin cytoskeleton to regulate proliferation

  7. Observation of the ${B^0 \\to \\rho^0 \\rho^0}$ decay from an amplitude analysis of ${B^0 \\to (\\pi^+\\pi^-)(\\pi^+\\pi^-)}$ decays

    CERN Document Server

    Aaij, Roel; Adinolfi, Marco; Affolder, Anthony; Ajaltouni, Ziad; Akar, Simon; Albrecht, Johannes; Alessio, Federico; Alexander, Michael; Ali, Suvayu; Alkhazov, Georgy; Alvarez Cartelle, Paula; Alves Jr, Antonio Augusto; Amato, Sandra; Amerio, Silvia; Amhis, Yasmine; An, Liupan; Anderlini, Lucio; Anderson, Jonathan; Andreotti, Mirco; Andrews, Jason; Appleby, Robert; Aquines Gutierrez, Osvaldo; Archilli, Flavio; Artamonov, Alexander; Artuso, Marina; Aslanides, Elie; Auriemma, Giulio; Baalouch, Marouen; Bachmann, Sebastian; Back, John; Badalov, Alexey; Baesso, Clarissa; Baldini, Wander; Barlow, Roger; Barschel, Colin; Barsuk, Sergey; Barter, William; Batozskaya, Varvara; Battista, Vincenzo; Bay, Aurelio; Beaucourt, Leo; Beddow, John; Bedeschi, Franco; Bediaga, Ignacio; Bel, Lennaert; Belyaev, Ivan; Ben-Haim, Eli; Bencivenni, Giovanni; Benson, Sean; Benton, Jack; Berezhnoy, Alexander; Bernet, Roland; Bertolin, Alessandro; Bettler, Marc-Olivier; van Beuzekom, Martinus; Bien, Alexander; Bifani, Simone; Bird, Thomas; Bizzeti, Andrea; Blake, Thomas; Blanc, Frédéric; Blouw, Johan; Blusk, Steven; Bocci, Valerio; Bondar, Alexander; Bondar, Nikolay; Bonivento, Walter; Borghi, Silvia; Borsato, Martino; Bowcock, Themistocles; Bowen, Espen Eie; Bozzi, Concezio; Braun, Svende; Brett, David; Britsch, Markward; Britton, Thomas; Brodzicka, Jolanta; Brook, Nicholas; Bursche, Albert; Buytaert, Jan; Cadeddu, Sandro; Calabrese, Roberto; Calvi, Marta; Calvo Gomez, Miriam; Campana, Pierluigi; Campora Perez, Daniel; Capriotti, Lorenzo; Carbone, Angelo; Carboni, Giovanni; Cardinale, Roberta; Cardini, Alessandro; Carniti, Paolo; Carson, Laurence; Carvalho Akiba, Kazuyoshi; Casanova Mohr, Raimon; Casse, Gianluigi; Cassina, Lorenzo; Castillo Garcia, Lucia; Cattaneo, Marco; Cauet, Christophe; Cavallero, Giovanni; Cenci, Riccardo; Charles, Matthew; Charpentier, Philippe; Chefdeville, Maximilien; Chen, Shanzhen; Cheung, Shu-Faye; Chiapolini, Nicola; Chrzaszcz, Marcin; Cid Vidal, Xabier; Ciezarek, Gregory; Clarke, Peter; Clemencic, Marco; Cliff, Harry; Closier, Joel; Coco, Victor; Cogan, Julien; Cogneras, Eric; Cogoni, Violetta; Cojocariu, Lucian; Collazuol, Gianmaria; Collins, Paula; Comerma-Montells, Albert; Contu, Andrea; Cook, Andrew; Coombes, Matthew; Coquereau, Samuel; Corti, Gloria; Corvo, Marco; Counts, Ian; Couturier, Benjamin; Cowan, Greig; Craik, Daniel Charles; Crocombe, Andrew; Cruz Torres, Melissa Maria; Cunliffe, Samuel; Currie, Robert; D'Ambrosio, Carmelo; Dalseno, Jeremy; David, Pieter; Davis, Adam; De Bruyn, Kristof; De Capua, Stefano; De Cian, Michel; De Miranda, Jussara; De Paula, Leandro; De Silva, Weeraddana; De Simone, Patrizia; Dean, Cameron Thomas; Decamp, Daniel; Deckenhoff, Mirko; Del Buono, Luigi; Déléage, Nicolas; Derkach, Denis; Deschamps, Olivier; Dettori, Francesco; Dey, Biplab; Di Canto, Angelo; Di Ruscio, Francesco; Dijkstra, Hans; Donleavy, Stephanie; Dordei, Francesca; Dorigo, Mirco; Dosil Suárez, Alvaro; Dossett, David; Dovbnya, Anatoliy; Dreimanis, Karlis; Dujany, Giulio; Dupertuis, Frederic; Durante, Paolo; Dzhelyadin, Rustem; Dziurda, Agnieszka; Dzyuba, Alexey; Easo, Sajan; Egede, Ulrik; Egorychev, Victor; Eidelman, Semen; Eisenhardt, Stephan; Eitschberger, Ulrich; Ekelhof, Robert; Eklund, Lars; El Rifai, Ibrahim; Elsasser, Christian; Ely, Scott; Esen, Sevda; Evans, Hannah Mary; Evans, Timothy; Falabella, Antonio; Färber, Christian; Farinelli, Chiara; Farley, Nathanael; Farry, Stephen; Fay, Robert; Ferguson, Dianne; Fernandez Albor, Victor; Ferrari, Fabio; Ferreira Rodrigues, Fernando; Ferro-Luzzi, Massimiliano; Filippov, Sergey; Fiore, Marco; Fiorini, Massimiliano; Firlej, Miroslaw; Fitzpatrick, Conor; Fiutowski, Tomasz; Fol, Philip; Fontana, Marianna; Fontanelli, Flavio; Forty, Roger; Francisco, Oscar; Frank, Markus; Frei, Christoph; Frosini, Maddalena; Fu, Jinlin; Furfaro, Emiliano; Gallas Torreira, Abraham; Galli, Domenico; Gallorini, Stefano; Gambetta, Silvia; Gandelman, Miriam; Gandini, Paolo; Gao, Yuanning; García Pardiñas, Julián; Garofoli, Justin; Garra Tico, Jordi; Garrido, Lluis; Gascon, David; Gaspar, Clara; Gastaldi, Ugo; Gauld, Rhorry; Gavardi, Laura; Gazzoni, Giulio; Geraci, Angelo; Gerick, David; Gersabeck, Evelina; Gersabeck, Marco; Gershon, Timothy; Ghez, Philippe; Gianelle, Alessio; Gianì, Sebastiana; Gibson, Valerie; Giubega, Lavinia-Helena; Gligorov, Vladimir; Göbel, Carla; Golubkov, Dmitry; Golutvin, Andrey; Gomes, Alvaro; Gotti, Claudio; Grabalosa Gándara, Marc; Graciani Diaz, Ricardo; Granado Cardoso, Luis Alberto; Graugés, Eugeni; Graverini, Elena; Graziani, Giacomo; Grecu, Alexandru; Greening, Edward; Gregson, Sam; Griffith, Peter; Grillo, Lucia; Grünberg, Oliver; Gui, Bin; Gushchin, Evgeny; Guz, Yury; Gys, Thierry; Hadjivasiliou, Christos; Haefeli, Guido; Haen, Christophe; Haines, Susan; Hall, Samuel; Hamilton, Brian; Hampson, Thomas; Han, Xiaoxue; Hansmann-Menzemer, Stephanie; Harnew, Neville; Harnew, Samuel; Harrison, Jonathan; He, Jibo; Head, Timothy; Heijne, Veerle; Hennessy, Karol; Henrard, Pierre; Henry, Louis; Hernando Morata, Jose Angel; van Herwijnen, Eric; Heß, Miriam; Hicheur, Adlène; Hill, Donal; Hoballah, Mostafa; Hombach, Christoph; Hulsbergen, Wouter; Humair, Thibaud; Hussain, Nazim; Hutchcroft, David; Hynds, Daniel; Idzik, Marek; Ilten, Philip; Jacobsson, Richard; Jaeger, Andreas; Jalocha, Pawel; Jans, Eddy; Jawahery, Abolhassan; Jing, Fanfan; John, Malcolm; Johnson, Daniel; Jones, Christopher; Joram, Christian; Jost, Beat; Jurik, Nathan; Kandybei, Sergii; Kanso, Walaa; Karacson, Matthias; Karbach, Moritz; Karodia, Sarah; Kelsey, Matthew; Kenyon, Ian; Kenzie, Matthew; Ketel, Tjeerd; Khanji, Basem; Khurewathanakul, Chitsanu; Klaver, Suzanne; Klimaszewski, Konrad; Kochebina, Olga; Kolpin, Michael; Komarov, Ilya; Koopman, Rose; Koppenburg, Patrick; Korolev, Mikhail; Kravchuk, Leonid; Kreplin, Katharina; Kreps, Michal; Krocker, Georg; Krokovny, Pavel; Kruse, Florian; Kucewicz, Wojciech; Kucharczyk, Marcin; Kudryavtsev, Vasily; Kurek, Krzysztof; Kvaratskheliya, Tengiz; La Thi, Viet Nga; Lacarrere, Daniel; Lafferty, George; Lai, Adriano; Lambert, Dean; Lambert, Robert W; Lanfranchi, Gaia; Langenbruch, Christoph; Langhans, Benedikt; Latham, Thomas; Lazzeroni, Cristina; Le Gac, Renaud; van Leerdam, Jeroen; Lees, Jean-Pierre; Lefèvre, Regis; Leflat, Alexander; Lefrançois, Jacques; Leroy, Olivier; Lesiak, Tadeusz; Leverington, Blake; Li, Yiming; Likhomanenko, Tatiana; Liles, Myfanwy; Lindner, Rolf; Linn, Christian; Lionetto, Federica; Liu, Bo; Lohn, Stefan; Longstaff, Iain; Lopes, Jose; Lowdon, Peter; Lucchesi, Donatella; Luo, Haofei; Lupato, Anna; Luppi, Eleonora; Lupton, Oliver; Machefert, Frederic; Maciuc, Florin; Maev, Oleg; Malde, Sneha; Malinin, Alexander; Manca, Giulia; Mancinelli, Giampiero; Manning, Peter Michael; Mapelli, Alessandro; Maratas, Jan; Marchand, Jean François; Marconi, Umberto; Marin Benito, Carla; Marino, Pietro; Märki, Raphael; Marks, Jörg; Martellotti, Giuseppe; Martinelli, Maurizio; Martinez Santos, Diego; Martinez Vidal, Fernando; Martins Tostes, Danielle; Massafferri, André; Matev, Rosen; Mathad, Abhijit; Mathe, Zoltan; Matteuzzi, Clara; Mauri, Andrea; Maurin, Brice; Mazurov, Alexander; McCann, Michael; McCarthy, James; McNab, Andrew; McNulty, Ronan; Meadows, Brian; Meier, Frank; Meissner, Marco; Merk, Marcel; Milanes, Diego Alejandro; Minard, Marie-Noelle; Mitzel, Dominik Stefan; Molina Rodriguez, Josue; Monteil, Stephane; Morandin, Mauro; Morawski, Piotr; Mordà, Alessandro; Morello, Michael Joseph; Moron, Jakub; Morris, Adam Benjamin; Mountain, Raymond; Muheim, Franz; Müller, Katharina; Mussini, Manuel; Muster, Bastien; Naik, Paras; Nakada, Tatsuya; Nandakumar, Raja; Nasteva, Irina; Needham, Matthew; Neri, Nicola; Neubert, Sebastian; Neufeld, Niko; Neuner, Max; Nguyen, Anh Duc; Nguyen, Thi-Dung; Nguyen-Mau, Chung; Niess, Valentin; Niet, Ramon; Nikitin, Nikolay; Nikodem, Thomas; Novoselov, Alexey; O'Hanlon, Daniel Patrick; Oblakowska-Mucha, Agnieszka; Obraztsov, Vladimir; Ogilvy, Stephen; Okhrimenko, Oleksandr; Oldeman, Rudolf; Onderwater, Gerco; Osorio Rodrigues, Bruno; Otalora Goicochea, Juan Martin; Otto, Adam; Owen, Patrick; Oyanguren, Maria Aranzazu; Palano, Antimo; Palombo, Fernando; Palutan, Matteo; Panman, Jacob; Papanestis, Antonios; Pappagallo, Marco; Pappalardo, Luciano; Parkes, Christopher; Passaleva, Giovanni; Patel, Girish; Patel, Mitesh; Patrignani, Claudia; Pearce, Alex; Pellegrino, Antonio; Penso, Gianni; Pepe Altarelli, Monica; Perazzini, Stefano; Perret, Pascal; Pescatore, Luca; Petridis, Konstantin; Petrolini, Alessandro; Picatoste Olloqui, Eduardo; Pietrzyk, Boleslaw; Pilař, Tomas; Pinci, Davide; Pistone, Alessandro; Playfer, Stephen; Plo Casasus, Maximo; Poikela, Tuomas; Polci, Francesco; Poluektov, Anton; Polyakov, Ivan; Polycarpo, Erica; Popov, Alexander; Popov, Dmitry; Popovici, Bogdan; Potterat, Cédric; Price, Eugenia; Price, Joseph David; Prisciandaro, Jessica; Pritchard, Adrian; Prouve, Claire; Pugatch, Valery; Puig Navarro, Albert; Punzi, Giovanni; Qian, Wenbin; Quagliani, Renato; Rachwal, Bartolomiej; 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Schune, Marie Helene; Schwemmer, Rainer; Sciascia, Barbara; Sciubba, Adalberto; Semennikov, Alexander; Sepp, Indrek; Serra, Nicola; Serrano, Justine; Sestini, Lorenzo; Seyfert, Paul; Shapkin, Mikhail; Shapoval, Illya; Shcheglov, Yury; Shears, Tara; Shekhtman, Lev; Shevchenko, Vladimir; Shires, Alexander; Silva Coutinho, Rafael; Simi, Gabriele; Sirendi, Marek; Skidmore, Nicola; Skillicorn, Ian; Skwarnicki, Tomasz; Smith, Anthony; Smith, Edmund; Smith, Eluned; Smith, Jackson; Smith, Mark; Snoek, Hella; Sokoloff, Michael; Soler, Paul; Soomro, Fatima; Souza, Daniel; Souza De Paula, Bruno; Spaan, Bernhard; Spradlin, Patrick; Sridharan, Srikanth; Stagni, Federico; Stahl, Marian; Stahl, Sascha; Steinkamp, Olaf; Stenyakin, Oleg; Sterpka, Christopher Francis; Stevenson, Scott; Stoica, Sabin; Stone, Sheldon; Storaci, Barbara; Stracka, Simone; Straticiuc, Mihai; Straumann, Ulrich; Stroili, Roberto; Sun, Liang; Sutcliffe, William; Swientek, Krzysztof; Swientek, Stefan; Syropoulos, Vasileios; Szczekowski, Marek; Szczypka, Paul; Szumlak, Tomasz; T'Jampens, Stephane; Teklishyn, Maksym; Tellarini, Giulia; Teubert, Frederic; Thomas, Christopher; Thomas, Eric; van Tilburg, Jeroen; Tisserand, Vincent; Tobin, Mark; Todd, Jacob; Tolk, Siim; Tomassetti, Luca; Tonelli, Diego; Topp-Joergensen, Stig; Torr, Nicholas; Tournefier, Edwige; Tourneur, Stephane; Trabelsi, Karim; Tran, Minh Tâm; Tresch, Marco; Trisovic, Ana; Tsaregorodtsev, Andrei; Tsopelas, Panagiotis; Tuning, Niels; Ukleja, Artur; Ustyuzhanin, Andrey; Uwer, Ulrich; Vacca, Claudia; Vagnoni, Vincenzo; Valenti, Giovanni; Vallier, Alexis; Vazquez Gomez, Ricardo; Vazquez Regueiro, Pablo; Vázquez Sierra, Carlos; Vecchi, Stefania; Velthuis, Jaap; Veltri, Michele; Veneziano, Giovanni; Vesterinen, Mika; Viana Barbosa, Joao Vitor; Viaud, Benoit; Vieira, Daniel; Vieites Diaz, Maria; Vilasis-Cardona, Xavier; Vollhardt, Achim; Volyanskyy, Dmytro; Voong, David; Vorobyev, Alexey; Vorobyev, Vitaly; Voß, Christian; de Vries, Jacco; Waldi, Roland; Wallace, Charlotte; Wallace, Ronan; Walsh, John; Wandernoth, Sebastian; Wang, Jianchun; Ward, David; Watson, Nigel; Websdale, David; Weiden, Andreas; Whitehead, Mark; Wiedner, Dirk; Wilkinson, Guy; Wilkinson, Michael; Williams, Mark Richard James; Williams, Matthew; Williams, Mike; Wilson, Fergus; Wimberley, Jack; Wishahi, Julian; Wislicki, Wojciech; Witek, Mariusz; Wormser, Guy; Wotton, Stephen; Wright, Simon; Wyllie, Kenneth; Xie, Yuehong; Xu, Zhirui; Yang, Zhenwei; Yuan, Xuhao; Yushchenko, Oleg; Zangoli, Maria; Zavertyaev, Mikhail; Zhang, Liming; Zhang, Yanxi; Zhelezov, Alexey; Zhokhov, Anatoly; Zhong, Liang

    2015-01-01

    Proton-proton collision data recorded in 2011 and 2012 by the LHCb experiment, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3.0 fb$^{-1}$i, are analysed to search for the charmless ${B^0 \\to \\rho^0 \\rho^0}$ decay. More than 600 ${B^0 \\to (\\pi^+\\pi^-)(\\pi^+\\pi^-)}$ signal decays are selected and used to perform an amplitude analysis from which the ${B^0 \\to \\rho^0 \\rho^0}$ decay is observed for the first time with 7.1 standard deviations significance. The fraction of ${B^0 \\to \\rho^0 \\rho^0}$ decays yielding a longitudinally polarised final state is measured to be $fL = 0.745^{+0.048}_{-0.058} ({\\rm stat}) \\pm 0.034 ({\\rm syst})$. The ${B^0 \\to \\rho^0 \\rho^0}$ branching fraction, using the ${B^0 \\to \\phi K^*(892)^{0}}$ decay as reference, is also reported as $\\mathcal B (B^0 \\to \\rho^0 \\rho^0) = (0.94 \\pm 0.17 ({\\rm stat}) \\pm 0.09 ({\\rm syst}) \\pm 0.06 ({\\rm BF})) \\times 10^{-6}$.

  8. Involvement of Rho kinase in the pathogenesis of acute pulmonary embolism-induced polystyrene microspheres in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toba, M; Nagaoka, T; Morio, Y; Sato, K; Uchida, K; Homma, N; Takahashi, K

    2010-03-01

    Acute pulmonary embolism (PE) is a life-threatening disease, and several vasoconstrictors, including endothelin-1 (ET-1), play a key role in vasoconstriction and hypoxemia during the development of PE. Rho kinase is activated by various vasoconstrictors resulting in vascular contraction and remodeling. Recent evidence has revealed an important role of Rho kinase in the pathogenesis of systemic and pulmonary vascular diseases. However, contribution of Rho kinase in PE remains unclear. We thus investigated the role of Rho kinase in the PE rat model induced by intrajugular administration of polystyrene microspheres (mean diameter, 26 microm). At 6 h following the administration of microspheres (1.5 ml/kg), right ventricular systolic pressure (RVSP) was higher in the PE than in the control rats (15.8 +/- 1.6 vs. 32.9 +/- 7.5 mmHg). Arterial oxygen tension was lower (92.3 +/- 12.5 vs. 66.0 +/- 17.7 Torr), and alveolar-arterial difference in oxygen partial pressure was higher (3.9 +/- 3.8 vs. 36.5 +/- 26.9 Torr) in the PE rats. Western blotting analysis revealed upregulation and downregulation in expression of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 and endothelial nitric oxide synthase in lungs from the PE rats, respectively, and radioimmunoassay demonstrated an increase in plasma ET-1 levels. Lung Rho kinase alpha expression was greater in the PE rats. At 5 h following administration of microspheres (0.75 ml/kg), intravenous Rho kinase inhibitors HA1077 and Y27632 (3 mg/kg each) attenuated elevation of RVSP (22.0 +/- 3.7, 17.1 +/- 3.2, 14.3 +/- 2.6 mmHg, PE, PE+HA1077, PE+Y27632) and the severity of hypoxemia (66.3 +/- 16.2, 94.9 +/- 23.0, 89.1 +/- 8.5 Torr, PE, PE+HA1077, PE+Y27632) in the PE rats. These results suggest that pulmonary endothelial dysfunction and activation of Rho kinase may contribute to the potentiation of vasoconstriction and hypoxemia in the PE rats.

  9. Structural Consistency, Consistency, and Sequential Rationality.

    OpenAIRE

    Kreps, David M; Ramey, Garey

    1987-01-01

    Sequential equilibria comprise consistent beliefs and a sequentially ra tional strategy profile. Consistent beliefs are limits of Bayes ratio nal beliefs for sequences of strategies that approach the equilibrium strategy. Beliefs are structurally consistent if they are rationaliz ed by some single conjecture concerning opponents' strategies. Consis tent beliefs are not necessarily structurally consistent, notwithstan ding a claim by Kreps and Robert Wilson (1982). Moreover, the spirit of stru...

  10. Methanol conversion to lower olefins over RHO type zeolite

    KAUST Repository

    Masih, Dilshad; Imai, Hiroyuki; Yokoi, Toshiyuki; Kondo, Junkonomura; Tatsumi, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    Eight-membered ring small-pore zeolite of RHO-type topology has been synthesized, characterized and tested for methanol-to-olefin (MTO) reaction. The zeolite was hydrothermally crystallized from the gel with Si/Al ratio of 5.0. It showed a high BET

  11. Relative Proper Motions in the Rho Ophiuchi Cluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-06

    identified as YSOs and may be newly identified cluster members. Key words: ISM: individual objects (Rho Ophiuchi cloud) – stars: formation – stars: pre-main...sequence 1. INTRODUCTION The majority of stars in the Galaxy form in clusters that once the binding mass of the molecular gas is removed, disperse into

  12. gsub(ωrhoπ) coupling constant from QCD sum rules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eletsky, V.L.; Ioffe, B.L.; Kogan, Ya.I.

    1982-01-01

    QCD sum rules for the vertex function of two vector and one axial vector currents are used to calculate the gsub(ωrhoπ) coupling constant (where gsub(ωrhoπ) is a transition coupling constant for ω → rhoπ process). The obtained value, gsub(ωrhoπ) approximately 17 GeV -1 is in a good agreement with experimental data

  13. Monitoring the quality consistency of Fufang Danshen Pills using micellar electrokinetic chromatography fingerprint coupled with prediction of antioxidant activity and chemometrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Zhengchao; Sun, Wanyang; Sun, Guoxiang; Zhang, Jin

    2016-08-01

    A fast micellar electrokinetic chromatography fingerprint method combined with quantification was developed and validated to evaluate the quality of Fufang Danshen Pills, a traditional Chinese Medicine, which has been used in the treatment of cardiovascular system diseases, in which the tetrahedron optimization method was first used to optimize the background electrolyte solution. Subsequently, the index of the fingerprint information amount of I was performed as an excellent objective indictor to investigate the experimental conditions. In addition, a systematical quantified fingerprint method was constructed for evaluating the quality consistency of 20 batches of test samples obtained from the same drug manufacturer. The fingerprint analysis combined with quantitative determination of two components showed that the quality consistency of the test samples was quite good within the same commercial brand. Furthermore, the partial least squares model analysis was used to explore the fingerprint-efficacy relationship between active components and antioxidant activity in vitro, which can be applied for the assessment of anti-oxidant activity of Fufang Danshen pills and provide valuable medicinal information for quality control. The result illustrated that the present study provided a reliable and reasonable method for monitoring the quality consistency of Fufang Danshen pills. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Problem-Solving Test: The Mechanism of Transcription Termination by the Rho Factor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szeberenyi, Jozsef

    2012-01-01

    Transcription termination comes in two forms in "E. coli" cells. Rho-dependent termination requires the binding of a termination protein called Rho factor to the transcriptional machinery at the terminator region, whereas Rho-independent termination is achieved by conformational changes in the transcript itself. This article presents a test…

  15. Role of contractile prostaglandins and Rho-kinase in growth factor-induced airway smooth muscle contraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaagsma Johan

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In addition to their proliferative and differentiating effects, several growth factors are capable of inducing a sustained airway smooth muscle (ASM contraction. These contractile effects were previously found to be dependent on Rho-kinase and have also been associated with the production of eicosanoids. However, the precise mechanisms underlying growth factor-induced contraction are still unknown. In this study we investigated the role of contractile prostaglandins and Rho-kinase in growth factor-induced ASM contraction. Methods Growth factor-induced contractions of guinea pig open-ring tracheal preparations were studied by isometric tension measurements. The contribution of Rho-kinase, mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK and cyclooxygenase (COX to these reponses was established, using the inhibitors Y-27632 (1 μM, U-0126 (3 μM and indomethacin (3 μM, respectively. The Rho-kinase dependency of contractions induced by exogenously applied prostaglandin F2α (PGF2α and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 was also studied. In addition, the effects of the selective FP-receptor antagonist AL-8810 (10 μM and the selective EP1-antagonist AH-6809 (10 μM on growth factor-induced contractions were investigated, both in intact and epithelium-denuded preparations. Growth factor-induced PGF2α-and PGE2-release in the absence and presence of Y-27632, U-0126 and indomethacin, was assessed by an ELISA-assay. Results Epidermal growth factor (EGF-and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF-induced contractions of guinea pig tracheal smooth muscle preparations were dependent on Rho-kinase, MAPK and COX. Interestingly, growth factor-induced PGF2α-and PGE2-release from tracheal rings was significantly reduced by U-0126 and indomethacin, but not by Y-27632. Also, PGF2α-and PGE2-induced ASM contractions were largely dependent on Rho-kinase, in contrast to other contractile agonists like histamine. The FP-receptor antagonist AL-8810 (10 μM significantly

  16. Merkel Cell Polyomavirus Small T Antigen Drives Cell Motility via Rho-GTPase-Induced Filopodium Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stakaitytė, Gabrielė; Nwogu, Nnenna; Dobson, Samuel J; Knight, Laura M; Wasson, Christopher W; Salguero, Francisco J; Blackbourn, David J; Blair, G Eric; Mankouri, Jamel; Macdonald, Andrew; Whitehouse, Adrian

    2018-01-15

    Cell motility and migration is a complex, multistep, and multicomponent process intrinsic to progression and metastasis. Motility is dependent on the activities of integrin receptors and Rho family GTPases, resulting in the remodeling of the actin cytoskeleton and formation of various motile actin-based protrusions. Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) is an aggressive skin cancer with a high likelihood of recurrence and metastasis. Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV) is associated with the majority of MCC cases, and MCPyV-induced tumorigenesis largely depends on the expression of the small tumor antigen (ST). Since the discovery of MCPyV, a number of mechanisms have been suggested to account for replication and tumorigenesis, but to date, little is known about potential links between MCPyV T antigen expression and the metastatic nature of MCC. Previously, we described the action of MCPyV ST on the microtubule network and how it impacts cell motility and migration. Here, we demonstrate that MCPyV ST affects the actin cytoskeleton to promote the formation of filopodia through a mechanism involving the catalytic subunit of protein phosphatase 4 (PP4C). We also show that MCPyV ST-induced cell motility is dependent upon the activities of the Rho family GTPases Cdc42 and RhoA. In addition, our results indicate that the MCPyV ST-PP4C interaction results in the dephosphorylation of β 1 integrin, likely driving the cell motility pathway. These findings describe a novel mechanism by which a tumor virus induces cell motility, which may ultimately lead to cancer metastasis, and provides opportunities and strategies for targeted interventions for disseminated MCC. IMPORTANCE Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV) is the most recently discovered human tumor virus. It causes the majority of cases of Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC), an aggressive skin cancer. However, the molecular mechanisms implicating MCPyV-encoded proteins in cancer development are yet to be fully elucidated. This study builds

  17. Aging-associated oxidative stress leads to decrease in IAS tone via RhoA/ROCK downregulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Jagmohan; Kumar, Sumit; Krishna, Chadalavada Vijay; Rattan, Satish

    2014-06-01

    Internal anal sphincter (IAS) tone plays an important role in rectoanal incontinence (RI). IAS tone may be compromised during aging, leading to RI in certain patients. We examined the influence of oxidative stress in the aging-associated decrease in IAS tone (AADI). Using adult (4-6 mo old) and aging (24-30 mo old) rats, we determined the effect of oxidative stress on IAS tone and the regulatory RhoA/ROCK signal transduction cascade. We determined the effect of the oxidative stress inducer LY83583, which produces superoxide anions (O2 (·-)), on basal and stimulated IAS tone before and after treatment of intact smooth muscle strips and smooth muscle cells with the O2 (·-) scavenger SOD. Our data showed that AADI was associated with a decrease in RhoA/ROCK expression at the transcriptional and translational levels. Oxidative stress with a LY83583-mediated decrease in IAS tone and relaxation of IAS smooth muscle cells was associated with a decrease in RhoA/ROCK signal transduction, which was reversible by SOD. In addition, LY83583 caused a significant decrease in IAS contraction produced by the RhoA activator and a known RhoA/ROCK agonist, U46619, that was also reversible by SOD. The inhibitory effects of LY83583 and the ROCK inhibitor Y27632 on the U46619-induced increase in IAS tone were similar. We conclude that an increase in oxidative stress plays an important role in AADI in the elderly and may be one of the underlying mechanisms of RI in certain aging patients. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  18. Quasi-two-dimensional Fermi-liquid state in Sr2RhO4-δ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagai, Ichiro; Shirakawa, Naoki; Umeyama, Norio; Ikeda, Shin-ichi

    2010-01-01

    Single crystals of layered perovskite Sr 2 RhO 4-δ (δ=0.0 and 0.1) are successfully grown by the floating-zone method. Stoichiometric single crystals (Sr 2 RhO 4.0 ) are obtained by O 2 -annealing the as-grown crystals (Sr 2 RhO 3.9 ). Sr 2 RhO 4.0 and Sr 2 RhO 3.9 show quasi-two-dimensional Fermi-liquid behavior at low temperatures, whereas there are large differences in the anisotropy of electrical resistivity ρ c (3 K)/ρ ab (3 K) and Wilson ratio R w between Sr 2 RhO 4.0 and Sr 2 RhO 3.9 : ρ c (3 K)/ρ ab (3 K)=2400 (19000) and R w =3.8 (6.4) for Sr 2 RhO 4.0 (Sr 2 RhO 3.9 ). The differences observed between the temperature dependence of the in-plane electrical resistivity (T 2 RhO 4.0 and Sr 2 RhO 3.9 are mainly derived from those between the density of states and band structure near the corresponding Fermi level. This indicates that the changes in these physical properties, which are accompanied by oxygen defects in the Sr 2 RhO 4-δ system, can be explained by the rigid band model. Moreover, these results suggest that t 2g band-filling can be controlled by adjusting the oxygen defect content δ in the Sr 2 RhO 4-δ system. Although many similarities are observed in this study between the physical properties of Sr 2 RhO 4.0 and Sr 2 RuO 4 . Sr 2 RhO 4.0 does not exhibit superconductivity down to 36 mK. (author)

  19. The role of Rho-kinase and calcium ions in constriction triggered by ET-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiciński, Michał; Szadujkis-Szadurska, Katarzyna; Węclewicz, Mateusz M; Malinowski, Bartosz; Matusiak, Grzegorz; Walczak, Maciej; Wódkiewicz, Eryk; Grześk, Grzegorz; Pawlak-Osińska, Katarzyna

    2018-05-05

    Endothelin-1 (ET-1) is one of the key factors regulating tension of smooth muscles in blood vessels. It is believed that ET-1 plays an important role in pathogenesis of hypertension, and cardiovascular diseases; therefore, research in order to limit ET-1-mediated action is still in progress. The main objective of this paper was to evaluate the role of Rho-kinase in the ET-1-induced constriction of arteries. The analysis also included significance of intra- and extracellular pool of calcium ions in constriction triggered by ET-1. The studies were performed on perfused Wistar rat tail arteries. Concentration response curve (CRC) was determined for ET-1 in the presence of increased concentrations of Rho-kinase inhibitor (Y-27632) and IP3-receptor antagonist (2APB), both in reference to constriction triggered by solely ET-1. Afterwards, the influence of calcium ions present in the perfusion fluid was evaluated in terms of the effect triggered by 2APB and occurring in arteries constricted by ET-1. ET-1, in concentration dependent manner, leads to increase in perfusion pressure. Y-27632 and 2APB lead to shift of the concentration response curve for ET-1 to the right with simultaneously lowered maximum effect. There was no difference in reaction of the artery constricted by ET-1 and treated with 2APB in solution containing calcium and in calcium-free solution. Vasoconstrictive action of endothelin is not significantly dependent on the inflow of extracellular calcium, but it is proportional to inflow of Ca 2+ related to activation of IP3 receptors and to Rho-kinase activity. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. AKAP13 Rho-GEF and PKD-binding domain deficient mice develop normally but have an abnormal response to β-adrenergic-induced cardiac hypertrophy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew J Spindler

    Full Text Available A-kinase anchoring proteins (AKAPs are scaffolding molecules that coordinate and integrate G-protein signaling events to regulate development, physiology, and disease. One family member, AKAP13, encodes for multiple protein isoforms that contain binding sites for protein kinase A (PKA and D (PKD and an active Rho-guanine nucleotide exchange factor (Rho-GEF domain. In mice, AKAP13 is required for development as null embryos die by embryonic day 10.5 with cardiovascular phenotypes. Additionally, the AKAP13 Rho-GEF and PKD-binding domains mediate cardiomyocyte hypertrophy in cell culture. However, the requirements for the Rho-GEF and PKD-binding domains during development and cardiac hypertrophy are unknown.To determine if these AKAP13 protein domains are required for development, we used gene-trap events to create mutant mice that lacked the Rho-GEF and/or the protein kinase D-binding domains. Surprisingly, heterozygous matings produced mutant mice at Mendelian ratios that had normal viability and fertility. The adult mutant mice also had normal cardiac structure and electrocardiograms. To determine the role of these domains during β-adrenergic-induced cardiac hypertrophy, we stressed the mice with isoproterenol. We found that heart size was increased similarly in mice lacking the Rho-GEF and PKD-binding domains and wild-type controls. However, the mutant hearts had abnormal cardiac contractility as measured by fractional shortening and ejection fraction.These results indicate that the Rho-GEF and PKD-binding domains of AKAP13 are not required for mouse development, normal cardiac architecture, or β-adrenergic-induced cardiac hypertrophic remodeling. However, these domains regulate aspects of β-adrenergic-induced cardiac hypertrophy.

  1. C3 rho-inhibitor for targeted pharmacological manipulation of osteoclast-like cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Tautzenberger

    Full Text Available The C3 toxins from Clostridium botulinum (C3bot and Clostridium limosum (C3lim as well as C3-derived fusion proteins are selectively taken up into the cytosol of monocytes/macrophages where the C3-catalyzed ADP-ribosylation of Rho results in inhibition of Rho-signalling and characteristic morphological changes. Since the fusion toxin C2IN-C3lim was efficiently taken up into and inhibited proliferation of murine macrophage-like RAW 264.7 cells, its effects on RAW 264.7-derived osteoclasts were investigated. C2IN-C3lim was taken up into differentiated osteoclasts and decreased their resorption activity. In undifferentiated RAW 264.7 cells, C2IN-C3lim-treatment significantly decreased their differentiation into osteoclasts as determined by counting the multi-nucleated, TRAP-positive cells. This inhibitory effect was concentration- and time-dependent and most efficient when C2IN-C3lim was applied in the early stage of osteoclast-formation. A single-dose application of C2IN-C3lim at day 0 and its subsequent removal at day 1 reduced the number of osteoclasts in a comparable manner while C2IN-C3lim-application at later time points did not reduce the number of osteoclasts to a comparable degree. Control experiments with an enzymatically inactive C3 protein revealed that the ADP-ribosylation of Rho was essential for the observed effects. In conclusion, the results indicate that Rho-activity is crucial during the early phase of osteoclast-differentiation. Other bone cell types such as pre-osteoblastic cells were not affected by C2IN-C3lim. Due to their cell-type selective and specific mode of action, C3 proteins and C3-fusions might be valuable tools for targeted pharmacological manipulation of osteoclast formation and activity, which could lead to development of novel therapeutic strategies against osteoclast-associated diseases.

  2. Implementation of Pollard Rho attack on elliptic curve cryptography over binary fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wienardo, Yuliawan, Fajar; Muchtadi-Alamsyah, Intan; Rahardjo, Budi

    2015-09-01

    Elliptic Curve Cryptography (ECC) is a public key cryptosystem with a security level determined by discrete logarithm problem called Elliptic Curve Discrete Logarithm Problem (ECDLP). John M. Pollard proposed an algorithm for discrete logarithm problem based on Monte Carlo method and known as Pollard Rho algorithm. The best current brute-force attack for ECC is Pollard Rho algorithm. In this research we implement modified Pollard Rho algorithm on ECC over GF (241). As the result, the runtime of Pollard Rho algorithm increases exponentially with the increase of the ECC key length. This work also presents the estimated runtime of Pollard Rho attack on ECC over longer bits.

  3. T1rho mapping of entire femoral cartilage using depth- and angle-dependent analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nozaki, Taiki; Kaneko, Yasuhito; Yu, Hon J.; Yoshioka, Hiroshi [University of California Irvine, Department of Radiological Sciences, Orange, CA (United States); Kaneshiro, Kayleigh [University of California Irvine, School of Medicine, Irvine, CA (United States); Schwarzkopf, Ran [University of California Irvine, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Irvine, CA (United States); Hara, Takeshi [Gifu University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Intelligent Image Information, Division of Regeneration and Advanced Medical Sciences, Gifu (Japan)

    2016-06-15

    To create and evaluate normalized T1rho profiles of the entire femoral cartilage in healthy subjects with three-dimensional (3D) angle- and depth-dependent analysis. T1rho images of the knee from 20 healthy volunteers were acquired on a 3.0-T unit. Cartilage segmentation of the entire femur was performed slice-by-slice by a board-certified radiologist. The T1rho depth/angle-dependent profile was investigated by partitioning cartilage into superficial and deep layers, and angular segmentation in increments of 4 over the length of segmented cartilage. Average T1rho values were calculated with normalized T1rho profiles. Surface maps and 3D graphs were created. T1rho profiles have regional and depth variations, with no significant magic angle effect. Average T1rho values in the superficial layer of the femoral cartilage were higher than those in the deep layer in most locations (p < 0.05). T1rho values in the deep layer of the weight-bearing portions of the medial and lateral condyles were lower than those of the corresponding non-weight-bearing portions (p < 0.05). Surface maps and 3D graphs demonstrated that cartilage T1rho values were not homogeneous over the entire femur. Normalized T1rho profiles from the entire femoral cartilage will be useful for diagnosing local or early T1rho abnormalities and osteoarthritis in clinical applications. (orig.)

  4. T1rho mapping of entire femoral cartilage using depth- and angle-dependent analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nozaki, Taiki; Kaneko, Yasuhito; Yu, Hon J.; Yoshioka, Hiroshi; Kaneshiro, Kayleigh; Schwarzkopf, Ran; Hara, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    To create and evaluate normalized T1rho profiles of the entire femoral cartilage in healthy subjects with three-dimensional (3D) angle- and depth-dependent analysis. T1rho images of the knee from 20 healthy volunteers were acquired on a 3.0-T unit. Cartilage segmentation of the entire femur was performed slice-by-slice by a board-certified radiologist. The T1rho depth/angle-dependent profile was investigated by partitioning cartilage into superficial and deep layers, and angular segmentation in increments of 4 over the length of segmented cartilage. Average T1rho values were calculated with normalized T1rho profiles. Surface maps and 3D graphs were created. T1rho profiles have regional and depth variations, with no significant magic angle effect. Average T1rho values in the superficial layer of the femoral cartilage were higher than those in the deep layer in most locations (p < 0.05). T1rho values in the deep layer of the weight-bearing portions of the medial and lateral condyles were lower than those of the corresponding non-weight-bearing portions (p < 0.05). Surface maps and 3D graphs demonstrated that cartilage T1rho values were not homogeneous over the entire femur. Normalized T1rho profiles from the entire femoral cartilage will be useful for diagnosing local or early T1rho abnormalities and osteoarthritis in clinical applications. (orig.)

  5. RhoC a new target for therapeutic vaccination against metastatic cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wenandy, L.; Sorensen, R.B.; Straten, P.T.

    2008-01-01

    Most cancer deaths are due to the development of metastases. Increased expression of RhoC is linked to enhanced metastatic potential in multiple cancers. Consequently, the RhoC protein is an attractive target for drug design. The clinical application of immunotherapy against cancer is rapidly...... of cancer makes RhoC a very attractive target for anti-cancer immunotherapy. Herein, we describe an HLA-A3 restricted epitope from RhoC, which is recognized by cytotoxic T cells. Moreover, RhoC-specific T cells show cytotoxic potential against HLA-matched cancer cells of different origin. Thus, RhoC may...... moving forward in multiple areas, including the adoptive transfer of anti-tumor-reactive T cells and the use of "therapeutic" vaccines. The over-expression of RhoC in cancer and the fact that immune escape by down regulation or loss of expression of this protein would reduce the morbidity and mortality...

  6. RhoA/ROCK Signaling Pathway Mediates Shuanghuanglian Injection-Induced Pseudo-allergic Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jiayin; Zhao, Yong; Zhang, Yushi; Li, Chunying; Yi, Yan; Pan, Chen; Tian, Jingzhuo; Yang, Yifei; Cui, Hongyu; Wang, Lianmei; Liu, Suyan; Liu, Jing; Deng, Nuo; Liang, Aihua

    2018-01-01

    Background: Shuanghuanglian injection (SHLI) is a famous Chinese medicine used as an intravenous preparation for the treatment of acute respiratory tract infections. In the recent years, the immediate hypersensitivity reactions induced by SHLI have attracted broad attention. However, the mechanism involved in these reactions has not yet been elucidated. The present study aims to explore the characteristics of the immediate hypersensitivity reactions induced by SHLI and deciphers the role of the RhoA/ROCK signaling pathway in these reactions. Methods: SHLI-immunized mice or naive mice were intravenously injected (i.v.) with SHLI (600 mg/kg) once, and vascular leakage in the ears was evaluated. Passive cutaneous anaphylaxis test was conducted using sera collected from SHLI-immunized mice. Naive mice were administered (i.v.) with a single dose of 150, 300, or 600 mg/kg of SHLI, and vascular leakage, histamine release, and histopathological alterations in the ears, lungs, and intestines were tested. In vitro , human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) monolayer was incubated with SHLI (0.05, 0.1, or 0.15 mg/mL), and the changes in endothelial permeability and cytoskeleton were observed. Western blot analysis was performed and ROCK inhibitor was employed to investigate the contribution of the RhoA/ROCK signaling pathway in SHLI-induced hypersensitivity reactions, both in HUVECs and in mice. Results: Our results indicate that SHLI was able to cause immediate dose-dependent vascular leakage, edema, and exudates in the ears, lungs, and intestines, and histamine release in mice. These were pseudo-allergic reactions, as SHLI-specific IgE was not elicited during sensitization. In addition, SHLI induced reorganization of actin cytoskeleton and disrupted the endothelial barrier. The administration of SHLI directly activated the RhoA/ROCK signaling pathway both in HUVECs and in the ears, lungs, and intestines of mice. Fasudil hydrochloride, a ROCK inhibitor, ameliorated the

  7. Consistent inter-individual differences in common marmosets (Callithrix jacchus) in Boldness-Shyness, Stress-Activity, and Exploration-Avoidance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šlipogor, Vedrana; Gunhold-de Oliveira, Tina; Tadić, Zoran; Massen, Jorg J M; Bugnyar, Thomas

    2016-09-01

    The study of animal personality, defined as consistent inter-individual differences in correlated behavioral traits stable throughout time and/or contexts, has recently become one of the fastest growing areas in animal biology, with study species ranging from insects to non-human primates. The latter have, however, only occasionally been tested with standardized experiments. Instead their personality has usually been assessed using questionnaires. Therefore, this study aimed to test 21 common marmosets (Callithrix jacchus) living in three family groups, in five different experiments, and their corresponding controls. We found that behavioral differences between our animals were not only consistent over time, but also across different contexts. Moreover, the consistent behaviors formed a construct of four major non-social personality components: Boldness-Shyness in Foraging, Boldness-Shyness in Predation, Stress-Activity, and Exploration-Avoidance. We found no sex or age differences in these components, but our results did reveal differences in Exploration-Avoidance between the three family groups. As social environment can have a large influence on behavior of individuals, our results may suggest group-level similarity in personality (i.e., "group personality") in common marmosets, a species living in highly cohesive social groups. Am. J. Primatol. 78:961-973, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Microemulsion Electrokinetic Chromatography in Combination with Chemometric Methods to Evaluate the Holistic Quality Consistency and Predict the Antioxidant Activity of Ixeris sonchifolia (Bunge Hance Injection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lanping Yang

    Full Text Available In this paper, microemulsion electrokinetic chromatography (MEEKC fingerprints combined with quantification were successfully developed to monitor the holistic quality consistency of Ixeris sonchifolia (Bge. Hance Injection (ISHI. ISHI is a Chinese traditional patent medicine used for its anti-inflammatory and hemostatic effects. The effects of five crucial experimental variables on MEEKC were optimized by the central composite design. Under the optimized conditions, the MEEKC fingerprints of 28 ISHIs were developed. Quantitative determination of seven marker compounds was employed simultaneously, then 28 batches of samples from two manufacturers were clearly divided into two clusters by the principal component analysis. In fingerprint assessments, a systematic quantitative fingerprint method was established for the holistic quality consistency evaluation of ISHI from qualitative and quantitative perspectives, by which the qualities of 28 samples were well differentiated. In addition, the fingerprint-efficacy relationship between the fingerprints and the antioxidant activities was established utilizing orthogonal projection to latent structures, which provided important medicinal efficacy information for quality control. The present study offered a powerful and holistic approach to evaluating the quality consistency of herbal medicines and their preparations.

  9. Vitamin D Proliferates Vaginal Epithelium through RhoA Expression in Postmenopausal Atrophic Vagina tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Arum; Lee, Man Ryul; Lee, Hae-Hyeog; Kim, Yeon-Suk; Kim, Jun-Mo; Enkhbold, Temuulee; Kim, Tae-Hee

    2017-09-30

    Postmenopausal atrophic vagina (PAV) is the thinning of the walls of the vagina and decreased lugae of the vagina. PAV is caused by decreased estrogen levels in postmenopausal women. However, the harmful effects of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) have resulted in considerable caution in its use. Various estrogen agonist treatment options are available. Vitamin D is influences the regulation of differentiation and proliferation of various cells, especially tissues lining stratified squamous epithelium, such as the vaginal epithelium. In this study, we hypothesized that vitamin D could provide an alternative and a safe treatment option for PAV by promoting the proliferation and differentiation of the vaginal epithelium. Thirty six patients were enrolled in this case-control study. Vitamin D associated proteins in a vitamin D and sex hormone treated vaginal epithelial cell line as well as normal and PAV tissues were measured. To confirm of cell-to-cell junction protein expression, cell line and tissue studies included RT-PCR, immunohistochemistry staining, and immunoblot analyses. The expression of cell-to-cell junction proteins was higher in women with symptoms of atrophic vagina tissue compared to women without the symptoms. Vitamin D stimulated the proliferation of the vaginal epithelium by activating p-RhoA and Erzin through the vitamin D receptor (VDR). The results suggest that vitamin D positively regulates cell-to-cell junction by increasing the VDR/p-RhoA/p-Ezrin pathway. This is the first study to verify the relationship of the expression of RhoA and Ezrin proteins in vaginal tissue of PAV.

  10. Anesthetic Sevoflurane Causes Rho-Dependent Filopodial Shortening in Mouse Neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey H Zimering

    Full Text Available Early postnatal anesthesia causes long-lasting learning and memory impairment in rodents, however, evidence for a specific neurotoxic effect on early synaptogenesis has not been demonstrated. Drebrin A is an actin binding protein whose localization in dendritic protrusions serves an important role in dendritic spine morphogenesis, and is a marker for early synaptogenesis. We therefore set out to investigate whether clinically-relevant concentrations of anesthetic sevoflurane, widely- used in infants and children, alters dendritic morphology in cultured fetal day 16 mouse hippocampal neurons. After 7 days in vitro, mouse hippocampal neurons were exposed to four hours of 3% sevoflurane in 95% air/5% CO2 or control condition (95% air/5% CO2. Neurons were fixed in 4% paraformaldehyde and stained with Alexa Fluor555-Phalloidin, and/or rabbit anti-mouse drebrin A/E antibodies which permitted subcellular localization of filamentous (F-actin and/or drebrin immunoreactivity, respectively. Sevoflurane caused acute significant length-shortening in filopodia and thin dendritic spines in days-in-vitro 7 neurons, an effect which was completely rescued by co-incubating neurons with ten micromolar concentrations of the selective Rho kinase inhibitor Y27632. Filopodia and thin spine recovered in length two days after sevoflurane exposure. Yet cluster-type filopodia (a precursor to synaptic filopodia were persistently significantly decreased in number on day-in-vitro 9, in part owing to preferential localization of drebrin immunoreactivity to dendritic shafts versus filopodial stalks. These data suggest that sevoflurane induces F-actin depolymerization leading to acute, reversible length-shortening in dendritic protrusions through a mechanism involving (in part activation of RhoA/Rho kinase signaling and impairs localization of drebrin A to filopodia required for early excitatory synapse formation.

  11. T^{\\sigma}_{\\rho}(G) Theories and Their Hilbert Series

    CERN Document Server

    Cremonesi, Stefano; Mekareeya, Noppadol; Zaffaroni, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    We give an explicit formula for the Higgs and Coulomb branch Hilbert series for the class of 3d N=4 superconformal gauge theories T^{\\sigma}_{\\rho}(G) corresponding to a set of D3 branes ending on NS5 and D5-branes, with or without O3 planes. Here G is a classical group, \\sigma is a partition of G and \\rho a partition of the dual group G^\\vee. In deriving such a formula we make use of the recently discovered formula for the Hilbert series of the quantum Coulomb branch of N=4 superconformal theories. The result can be expressed in terms of a generalization of a class of symmetric functions, the Hall-Littlewood polynomials, and can be interpreted in mathematical language in terms of localization. We mainly consider the case G=SU(N) but some interesting results are also given for orthogonal and symplectic groups.

  12. Color transparency in incoherent electroproduction of {rho} mesons off nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nemchik, J. [Institute of Experimental Physics SAS, Watsonova 47, 04001 Kosice, Slovakia and Czech Technical University, FNSPE, Brehova 7, 11519 Praque (Czech Republic); Kopeliovich, B. Z.; Potashnikova, I. K. [Departamento de Fisica y Centro de Estudios Subatomicos, Universidad Tecnica Federico Santa Maria, Casilla 110-V, Valparaiso (Chile)

    2013-04-15

    Color transparency (CT) phenomena in elastic electroproduction of vector mesons off nuclei are usually infected by the onset of coherence length (CL) effects. However, at low energies corresponding to the CLAS experiment at Jefferson Lab (JLab), one can study practically the net CT effects, since CL is much shorter than the nuclear radius. We investigate various manifestations of CT effects using rigorous quantum mechanical approach based on the path integral technique. We include also the effects of {rho} meson decay inside the nucleus leading to a rise of the nuclear suppression towards small values of Q{sup 2}. Motivated by the last CLAS data we predict the A, Q{sup 2} and l{sub c} dependence of nuclear transparency for {rho}{sup 0} mesons produced incoherently off nuclei. We also perform predictions for expected signal of CT corresponding to the planned JLab upgrade to 12 GeV electron beam.

  13. QCD factorization beyond leading twist in exclusive processes: rhoT-meson production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wallon, S.; Anikin, I.; ); Ivanov, D.; Pire, B.; Szymanowski, L.

    2009-01-01

    Exclusive processes in hard electroproduction with asymptotic γ * p center of mass energy is one of the best place for understanding QCD in the perturbative Regge limit. The HERA experiment recently provided precise data for rho electroproduction, including all spin density matrix elements. From QCD, it is expected that such a process should factorize between a hard (calculable) coefficient function, and hadronic (P and ρ) matrix elements. Such a factorization is up to now only proven for a longitudinally polarized rho. Within the kt-factorization approach (valid at large s γ * p), we evaluate the impact factor of the transition γ * → ρT taking into account the twist 3 contributions. We show that a gauge invariant expression is obtained with the help of QCD equations of motion. More generally, relying on these equations and on the gauge invariance of the factorized amplitude, the non-perturbative Distribution Amplitudes can be reduced to a minimal set. This opens the way to a consistent treatment of factorization for exclusive processes with a transversally polarized vector meson. (author)

  14. Leiomyoma Cells in 3-Dimensional Cultures Demonstrate an Attenuated Response to Fasudil, a Rho-Kinase Inhibitor, When Compared to 2-Dimensional Cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Minnie; Britten, Joy; Segars, James

    2014-01-01

    Uterine leiomyomata are common benign tumors in women of reproductive age and demonstrate an attenuated response to mechanical signaling that involves Rho and integrins. To further characterize the impairment in Rho signaling, we studied the effect of Rho-kinase inhibitor, fasudil, on extracellular matrix production, in 2-dimensional (2D) and 3-dimensional (3D) cultures of leiomyoma and myometrial cells. Leiomyoma 2D cultures demonstrated a rapid decrease in gene transcripts and protein for fibronectin, procollagen 1A, and versican. In 3D cultures, fibronectin and procollagen 1A proteins demonstrated increased levels at lower concentrations of fasudil, followed by a concentration-dependent decrease. Versican protein increased up to 3-fold, whereas fibromodulin demonstrated a significant decrease of 1.92-fold. Myometrial 2D or 3D cultures demonstrated a decrease in all proteins after 72 hours of treatment. The 3D leiomyoma cultures demonstrated a significant increase in active RhoA, followed by a concentration-dependent decrease at higher concentrations. A concentration-dependent increase in phospho-extracellular regulated signal kinase and proapoptotic protein Bax was observed in 3D leiomyoma cultures. Fasudil relaxed the contraction of the 3D collagen gels caused by myometrium and leiomyoma cell growth. These findings indicate that the altered state of Rho signaling in leiomyoma was more clearly observed in 3D cultures. The results also suggest that fasudil may have clinical applicability for treatment of uterine leiomyoma. PMID:25084783

  15. Signaling efficiency of Gαq through its effectors p63RhoGEF and GEFT depends on their subcellular location.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goedhart, Joachim; van Unen, Jakobus; Adjobo-Hermans, Merel J W; Gadella, Theodorus W J

    2013-01-01

    The p63RhoGEF and GEFT proteins are encoded by the same gene and both members of the Dbl family of guanine nucleotide exchange factors. These proteins can be activated by the heterotrimeric G-protein subunit Gαq. We show that p63RhoGEF is located at the plasma membrane, whereas GEFT is confined to the cytoplasm. Live-cell imaging studies yielded quantitative information on diffusion coefficients, association rates and encounter times of GEFT and p63RhoGEF. Calcium signaling was examined as a measure of the signal transmission, revealing more efficient signaling through the membrane-associated p63RhoGEF. A rapamycin dependent recruitment system was used to dynamically alter the subcellular location and concentration of GEFT, showing efficient signaling through GEFT only upon membrane recruitment. Together, our results show efficient signal transmission through membrane located effectors, and highlight a role for increased concentration rather than increased encounter times due to membrane localization in the Gαq mediated pathways to p63RhoGEF and PLCβ.

  16. The invisible hand: regulation of RHO GTPases by RHOGDIs

    OpenAIRE

    Garcia-Mata, Rafael; Boulter, Etienne; Burridge, Keith

    2011-01-01

    The 'invisible hand' is a term originally coined by Adam Smith in the Theory of Moral Sentiments to describe the forces of self-interest, competition, and supply and demand that regulate the resources in society. This metaphor continues to be used by economists to describe the self-regulating nature of a market economy. The same metaphor can be used to describe the RHO-specific guanine nucleotide dissociation inhibitor (RHOGDI) family, which operates in the background, as an invisible hand, u...

  17. Coherent rho+ production in neutrino-neon interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballagh, H.C.; Bingham, H.H.; Lawry, T.J.

    1988-01-01

    Coherent rho + production on neon nuclei has been observed in charged-current events in a neutrino bubble-chamber experiment. The incident neutrino energy was 10--320 GeV, with a median event energy of 80 GeV. The rate per charged-current event was (0.28 +- 0.10)%. Comparison was made to vector-meson-dominance predictions; agreement with the overall rate, but disagreement at high neutrino energies and at high Q 2 , was found

  18. The rho-exchange isovector parity-violating potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKellar, B.H.J.

    1979-01-01

    It is shown that the rho-exchange isovector parity-violating potential is constrained by PCAC to be much weaker than the π-exchange potential and much weaker than recently proposed by Galic et al (J. Phys. G.; 5: L113 (1979)). This potential does not therefore provide a mechanism for suppressing enhanced neutral-current effects in the π-exchange potential. (author)

  19. The Proteoglycan Syndecan 4 Regulates Transient Receptor Potential Canonical 6 Channels via RhoA/ROCK Signaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Ying; Echtermeyer, Frank; Thilo, Florian

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Syndecan 4 (Sdc4) modulates signal transduction and regulates activity of protein channels. Sdc4 is essential for the regulation of cellular permeability. We hypothesized that Sdc4 may regulate transient receptor potential canonical 6 (TRPC6) channels, a determinant of glomerular perme...... permeability, in a RhoA/ROCK-dependent manner. METHODS AND RESULTS: Sdc4 knockout (Sdc4(-/-)) mice showed increased glomerular filtration rate and ameliorated albuminuria under baseline conditions and after bovine serum albumin overload (each P...

  20. The Na+–H+ exchanger-1 induces cytoskeletal changes involving reciprocal RhoA and Rac1 signaling, resulting in motility and invasion in MDA-MB-435 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paradiso, Angelo; Cardone, Rosa Angela; Bellizzi, Antonia; Bagorda, Anna; Guerra, Lorenzo; Tommasino, Massimo; Casavola, Valeria; Reshkin, Stephan J

    2004-01-01

    An increasing body of evidence shows that the tumour microenvironment is essential in driving neoplastic progression. The low serum component of this microenvironment stimulates motility/invasion in human breast cancer cells via activation of the Na + –H + exchanger (NHE) isoform 1, but the signal transduction systems that underlie this process are still poorly understood. We undertook the present study to elucidate the role and pattern of regulation by the Rho GTPases of this serum deprivation-dependent activation of both NHE1 and subsequent invasive characteristics, such as pseudopodia and invadiopodia protrusion, directed cell motility and penetration of normal tissues. The present study was performed in a well characterized human mammary epithelial cell line representing late stage metastatic progression, MDA-MB-435. The activity of RhoA and Rac1 was modified using their dominant negative and constitutively active mutants and the activity of NHE1, cell motility/invasion, F-actin content and cell shape were measured. We show for the first time that serum deprivation induces NHE1-dependent morphological and cytoskeletal changes in metastatic cells via a reciprocal interaction of RhoA and Rac1, resulting in increased chemotaxis and invasion. Deprivation changed cell shape by reducing the amount of F-actin and inducing the formation of leading edge pseudopodia. Serum deprivation inhibited RhoA activity and stimulated Rac1 activity. Rac1 and RhoA were antagonistic regulators of both basal and stimulated tumour cell NHE1 activity. The regulation of NHE1 activity by RhoA and Rac1 in both conditions was mediated by an alteration in intracellular proton affinity of the exchanger. Interestingly, the role of each of these G-proteins was reversed during serum deprivation; basal NHE1 activity was regulated positively by RhoA and negatively by Rac1, whereas RhoA negatively and Rac1 positively directed the stimulation of NHE1 during serum deprivation. Importantly, the same

  1. Role of the strange quark in the rho(770) meson

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molina Peralta, Raquel [George Washington Univ., Washington, DC (United States); Guo, Dehua [George Washington Univ., Washington, DC (United States); Hu, B. [George Washington Univ., Washington, DC (United States); Alexandru, Andrei; Doering, Michael [George Washington Univ., Washington, DC (United States); Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States)

    2017-03-01

    Recently, the GWU lattice group has evaluated high-precision phase-shift data for $\\pi\\pi$ scattering in the $I = 1$, $J = 1$ channel. Unitary Chiral Perturbation Theory describes these data well around the resonance region and for different pion masses. Moreover, it allows to extrapolate to the physical point and estimate the effect of the missing $K\\bar{K}$ channel in the two-flavor lattice calculation. The absence of the strange quark in the lattice data leads to a lower $\\rho$ mass, and the analysis with U$\\chi$PT shows that the $K \\bar{K}$ channel indeed pushes the $\\pi\\pi$-scattering phase shift upward, having a surprisingly large effect on the $\\rho$-mass. The inelasticity is shown to be compatible with the experimental data. The analysis is then extended to all available two-flavor lattice simulations and similar mass shifts are observed. Chiral extrapolations of $N_f = 2 + 1$ lattice simulations for the $\\rho(770)$ are also reported.

  2. Yersinia Virulence Depends on Mimicry of Host Rho-Family Nucleotide Dissociation Inhibitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prehna,G.; Ivanov, M.; Blisha, J.; Stebbins, C.

    2006-01-01

    Yersinia spp. cause gastroenteritis and the plague, representing historically devastating pathogens that are currently an important biodefense and antibiotic resistance concern. A critical virulence determinant is the Yersinia protein kinase A, or YpkA, a multidomain protein that disrupts the eukaryotic actin cytoskeleton. Here we solve the crystal structure of a YpkA-Rac1 complex and find that YpkA possesses a Rac1 binding domain that mimics host guanidine nucleotide dissociation inhibitors (GDIs) of the Rho GTPases. YpkA inhibits nucleotide exchange in Rac1 and RhoA, and mutations that disrupt the YpkA-GTPase interface abolish this activity in vitro and impair in vivo YpkA-induced cytoskeletal disruption. In cell culture experiments, the kinase and the GDI domains of YpkA act synergistically to promote cytoskeletal disruption, and a Y. pseudotuberculosis mutant lacking YpkA GDI activity shows attenuated virulence in a mouse infection assay. We conclude that virulence in Yersinia depends strongly upon mimicry of host GDI proteins by YpkA.

  3. Study of the decay B0(barB0) --> rho+rho-, and constraints on the CKM angle α

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aubert, B.; Babar Collaboration

    2004-01-01

    Using a data sample of 89 million Υ(4S)-->BBbar decays collected with the BaBar detector at the PEP-II asymmetric B Factory at SLAC, we measure the B 0 (barB 0 )-->rho + rho - branching fraction as (30+-4 (stat)+-5(syst)) x 10 -6 and a longitudinal polarization fraction of f L 0.99+-0.03(stat) +0.04 ) -0.03 (syst). We measure the time-dependent-asymmetry parameters of the longitudinally polarized component of this decay as C L = -0.17+-0.27(stat)+-0.14 (syst) and S L -0.42+-0.42(stat)+-0.14(syst). We present constraints on the CKM angle α

  4. Born order study of {gamma}{sup *}{gamma}{sup *} {yields} {rho}{rho} at very high energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pire, B. [Ecole Polytechnique, 91 - Palaiseau (France). Centre de Physique Theorique; Szymanowski, L. [Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies, Warsaw (Poland); Liege Univ. (Belgium); Wallon, S. [Paris-11 Univ., Lab. de Physique Theorique, 91 - Orsay (France)

    2005-07-01

    We calculate the cross-section for the diffractive exclusive process {gamma}{sub L}{sup *}(Q{sub 1}{sup 2}){gamma}{sub L}{sup *}(Q{sub 2}{sup 2}) {yields} {rho}{sub L}{sup 0}{rho}{sub L}{sup 0}, in view of its study in the future high energy e{sup +}e{sup -} linear collider. The Born order approximation of the amplitude is completely calculable in the hard region Q{sub 1}{sup 2},Q{sub 2}{sup 2} >> {lambda}{sup 2}(QCD). The resulting cross-section is large enough for this process to be measurable with foreseen luminosity and energy, for Q{sub 1}{sup 2} and Q{sub 2}{sup 2} in the range of a few GeV{sup 2}. (authors)

  5. Bistable front dynamics in a contractile medium: Travelling wave fronts and cortical advection define stable zones of RhoA signaling at epithelial adherens junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budnar, Srikanth; Yap, Alpha S.

    2017-01-01

    Mechanical coherence of cell layers is essential for epithelia to function as tissue barriers and to control active tissue dynamics during morphogenesis. RhoA signaling at adherens junctions plays a key role in this process by coupling cadherin-based cell-cell adhesion together with actomyosin contractility. Here we propose and analyze a mathematical model representing core interactions involved in the spatial localization of junctional RhoA signaling. We demonstrate how the interplay between biochemical signaling through positive feedback, combined with diffusion on the cell membrane and mechanical forces generated in the cortex, can determine the spatial distribution of RhoA signaling at cell-cell junctions. This dynamical mechanism relies on the balance between a propagating bistable signal that is opposed by an advective flow generated by an actomyosin stress gradient. Experimental observations on the behavior of the system when contractility is inhibited are in qualitative agreement with the predictions of the model. PMID:28273072

  6. Bistable front dynamics in a contractile medium: Travelling wave fronts and cortical advection define stable zones of RhoA signaling at epithelial adherens junctions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rashmi Priya

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Mechanical coherence of cell layers is essential for epithelia to function as tissue barriers and to control active tissue dynamics during morphogenesis. RhoA signaling at adherens junctions plays a key role in this process by coupling cadherin-based cell-cell adhesion together with actomyosin contractility. Here we propose and analyze a mathematical model representing core interactions involved in the spatial localization of junctional RhoA signaling. We demonstrate how the interplay between biochemical signaling through positive feedback, combined with diffusion on the cell membrane and mechanical forces generated in the cortex, can determine the spatial distribution of RhoA signaling at cell-cell junctions. This dynamical mechanism relies on the balance between a propagating bistable signal that is opposed by an advective flow generated by an actomyosin stress gradient. Experimental observations on the behavior of the system when contractility is inhibited are in qualitative agreement with the predictions of the model.

  7. [Obsessive-compulsive symptoms, tics, stereotypic movements or need for absolute consistency? The occurrence of repetitive activities in patients with pervasive developmental disorders--case studies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryńska, Anita; Lipińska, Elzbieta; Matelska, Monika

    2011-01-01

    Repetitive and stereotyped behaviours in the form of stereotyped interests or specific routine activities are one ofthe diagnostic criteria in pervasive developmental disorders. The occurrence of repetitive behaviours in patients with pervasive developmental disorders is a starting point for questions about the type and classification criteria of such behaviours. The aim of the article is to present case studies of patients with pervasive developmental disorders and co-morbid symptoms in the form of routine activities, tics, obsessive-compulsive symptoms or stereotyped behaviours. The first case study describes a patient with Asperger's syndrome and obsessive compulsive symptoms. The diagnostic problems regarding complex motor tics are discussed in the second case study which describes a patient with Asperger's syndrome and Gilles de la Tourette syndrome. The third and fourth case study describes mono-zygotic twins with so called High Functioning Autism whose repetitive activities point to either obsessive compulsive symptoms, stereotypic movements, need for absolute consistency or echopraxia. The possible comorbidity of pervasive developmental disorders and symptoms in the form of repetitive behaviours, possible interactions as well as diagnostic challenges is discussed in the article.

  8. Measurements of Branching Ratios And Search for CP Violation in the Modes B0 to Rho Pi, Rho K

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laplace, Sandrine; /Paris U., VI-VII

    2006-09-18

    The BABAR experiment, at the PEP-II collider at SLAC, has been studying since 1999 CP violation in the B meson system. After the precise measurement of sin2{beta}, one is now concentrating on measuring the angles {alpha} and {gamma} of the unitarity triangle. The work presented in this thesis concerns the measurement of the angle {alpha} in the B{sup 0} {yields} {rho}{pi} mode.

  9. Evaluation of the quality consistency of powdered poppy capsule extractive by an averagely linear-quantified fingerprint method in combination with antioxidant activities and two compounds analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yujing; Sun, Guoxiang; Hou, Zhifei; Yan, Bo; Zhang, Jing

    2017-12-01

    A novel averagely linear-quantified fingerprint method was proposed and successfully applied to monitor the quality consistency of alkaloids in powdered poppy capsule extractive. Averagely linear-quantified fingerprint method provided accurate qualitative and quantitative similarities for chromatographic fingerprints of Chinese herbal medicines. The stability and operability of the averagely linear-quantified fingerprint method were verified by the parameter r. The average linear qualitative similarity SL (improved based on conventional qualitative "Similarity") was used as a qualitative criterion in the averagely linear-quantified fingerprint method, and the average linear quantitative similarity PL was introduced as a quantitative one. PL was able to identify the difference in the content of all the chemical components. In addition, PL was found to be highly correlated to the contents of two alkaloid compounds (morphine and codeine). A simple flow injection analysis was developed for the determination of antioxidant capacity in Chinese Herbal Medicines, which was based on the scavenging of 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radical by antioxidants. The fingerprint-efficacy relationship linking chromatographic fingerprints and antioxidant activities was investigated utilizing orthogonal projection to latent structures method, which provided important pharmacodynamic information for Chinese herbal medicines quality control. In summary, quantitative fingerprinting based on averagely linear-quantified fingerprint method can be applied for monitoring the quality consistency of Chinese herbal medicines, and the constructed orthogonal projection to latent structures model is particularly suitable for investigating the fingerprint-efficacy relationship. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Daphnetin inhibits invasion and migration of LM8 murine osteosarcoma cells by decreasing RhoA and Cdc42 expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukuda, Hiroki [Department of Clinical and Translational Physiology, Kyoto Pharmaceutical University, Kyoto (Japan); Nakamura, Seikou [Department of Pharmacognosy, Kyoto Pharmaceutical University, Kyoto (Japan); Chisaki, Yugo [Education and Research Center for Clinical Pharmacy, Kyoto Pharmaceutical University, Kyoto (Japan); Takada, Tetsuya [Department of Clinical and Translational Physiology, Kyoto Pharmaceutical University, Kyoto (Japan); Toda, Yuki [Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Kyoto Pharmaceutical University, Kyoto (Japan); Murata, Hiroaki [Department of Orthopedics, Graduate School of Medical Science, Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine, Kyoto (Japan); Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Matsushita Memorial Hospital, Osaka (Japan); Itoh, Kazuyuki [Department of Biology, Osaka Medical Center of Cancer and Cardiovascular Diseases, Osaka (Japan); Yano, Yoshitaka [Education and Research Center for Clinical Pharmacy, Kyoto Pharmaceutical University, Kyoto (Japan); Takata, Kazuyuki [Department of Clinical and Translational Physiology, Kyoto Pharmaceutical University, Kyoto (Japan); Ashihara, Eishi, E-mail: ash@mb.kyoto-phu.ac.jp [Department of Clinical and Translational Physiology, Kyoto Pharmaceutical University, Kyoto (Japan)

    2016-02-26

    Daphnetin, 7,8-dihydroxycoumarin, present in main constituents of Daphne odora var. marginatai, has multiple pharmacological activities including anti-proliferative effects in cancer cells. In this study, using a Transwell system, we showed that daphnetin inhibited invasion and migration of highly metastatic murine osteosarcoma LM8 cells in a dose-dependent manner. Following treatment by daphnetin, cells that penetrated the Transwell membrane were rounder than non-treated cells. Immunofluorescence analysis revealed that daphnetin decreased the numbers of intracellular stress fibers and filopodia. Moreover, daphnetin treatment dramatically decreased the expression levels of RhoA and Cdc42. In summary, the dihydroxycoumarin derivative daphnetin inhibits the invasion and migration of LM8 cells, and therefore represents a promising agent for use against metastatic cancer. - Highlights: • Daphnetin, a coumarin-derivative, inhibited invasion and migration of LM8 cells. • Stress fibers and filopodia were decreased by daphnetin treatment. • Daphnetin decreased RhoA and Cdc42 protein expression.

  11. Daphnetin inhibits invasion and migration of LM8 murine osteosarcoma cells by decreasing RhoA and Cdc42 expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukuda, Hiroki; Nakamura, Seikou; Chisaki, Yugo; Takada, Tetsuya; Toda, Yuki; Murata, Hiroaki; Itoh, Kazuyuki; Yano, Yoshitaka; Takata, Kazuyuki; Ashihara, Eishi

    2016-01-01

    Daphnetin, 7,8-dihydroxycoumarin, present in main constituents of Daphne odora var. marginatai, has multiple pharmacological activities including anti-proliferative effects in cancer cells. In this study, using a Transwell system, we showed that daphnetin inhibited invasion and migration of highly metastatic murine osteosarcoma LM8 cells in a dose-dependent manner. Following treatment by daphnetin, cells that penetrated the Transwell membrane were rounder than non-treated cells. Immunofluorescence analysis revealed that daphnetin decreased the numbers of intracellular stress fibers and filopodia. Moreover, daphnetin treatment dramatically decreased the expression levels of RhoA and Cdc42. In summary, the dihydroxycoumarin derivative daphnetin inhibits the invasion and migration of LM8 cells, and therefore represents a promising agent for use against metastatic cancer. - Highlights: • Daphnetin, a coumarin-derivative, inhibited invasion and migration of LM8 cells. • Stress fibers and filopodia were decreased by daphnetin treatment. • Daphnetin decreased RhoA and Cdc42 protein expression.

  12. SDF-1alpha concentration dependent modulation of RhoA and Rac1 modifies breast cancer and stromal cells interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pasquier, Jennifer; Abu-Kaoud, Nadine; Abdesselem, Houari; Madani, Aisha; Hoarau-Véchot, Jessica; Thawadi, Hamda Al.; Vidal, Fabien; Couderc, Bettina; Favre, Gilles; Rafii, Arash

    2015-01-01

    The interaction of SDF-1alpha with its receptor CXCR4 plays a role in the occurrence of distant metastasis in many solid tumors. This interaction increases migration from primary sites as well as homing at distant sites. Here we investigated how SDF-1α could modulate both migration and adhesion of cancer cells through the modulation of RhoGTPases. We show that different concentrations of SDF-1α modulate the balance of adhesion and migration in cancer cells. Increased migration was obtained at 50 and 100 ng/ml of SDF-1α; however migration was reduced at 200 ng/ml. The adhesion between breast cancer cells and BMHC was significantly increased by SDF-1α treatment at 200 ng/ml and reduced using a blocking monoclonal antibody against CXCR4. We showed that at low SDF-1α concentration, RhoA was activated and overexpressed, while at high concentration Rac1 was promoting SDF-1α mediating-cell adhesion. We conclude that SDF-1α concentration modulates migration and adhesion of breast cancer cells, by controlling expression and activation of RhoGTPases. The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/s12885-015-1556-7) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users

  13. The new Be-type star HD 147196 in the Rho Ophiuchi dark cloud region

    Science.gov (United States)

    The, P. S.; Perez, M. R.; De Winter, D.; Van Den Ancker, M. E.

    1993-01-01

    The newly discovered hot-emission line star, HD 147196 in the Rho Oph dark cloud region was observed spectroscopically and photometrically and high and low resolution IUE spectra were obtained. The finding of Irvine (1990) that this relatively bright star show its H-alpha-line in emission is confirmed. Previous H-alpha-surveys of the Rho Oph star-forming region did not detect HD 147196 as an H-alpha-emission star, meaning that it must recently be very active and has perhaps transformed itself from a B-type star at shell phase to a Be-phase. The Mg II h + k resonance lines are in absorption and they appear to be interstellar in nature, which means that either the abundance of Mg in the extended atmosphere of the star is low or that the shell is not extended enough to produce emission lines of Mg II. Photometric observations of this B8 V type star do not show any variations during at least the years covered by our monitoring or any excess of NIR radiation in its spectral energy distribution up to the M-passband at 4.8 microns.

  14. Inhibition of Rho Kinase Induces Antioxidative Molecules and Suppresses Reactive Oxidative Species in Trabecular Meshwork Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomokazu Fujimoto

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To investigate the effect of rho kinase inhibitors on oxidative stress in trabecular meshwork (TM cells. Methods. TM cells were isolated from the eyes of cynomolgus monkeys. Y-27632 and menadione were used to inhibit rho kinase and induce production of reactive oxygen species (ROS, respectively. The cynomolgus monkey array and 12,613 probes were used in DNA microarray analysis, and the affected genes were categorized using gene ontology analysis. The mRNA levels of the target genes were confirmed by real-time RT-PCR. Intracellular oxidative stress was detected using a fluorescent reagent sensitive to ROS. Cell viability was assessed by the WST-8 assay. Results. Gene ontology analysis revealed upregulation of genes involved in antioxidant activity, and upregulation of catalase was confirmed by real-time RT-PCR after 30 min treatment with Y-27632. Production of ROS was increased by menadione, and the effect was partly suppressed by pretreatment with Y-27632. At a lower dose of menadione, Y-27632 stimulated TM cells and significantly increased their viability following menadione treatment compared to control cells. Conclusion. Using microarray analysis, Y-27632 was shown to upregulate antioxidative genes including catalase and partially reduce ROS production and cell death by oxidative stress caused by menadione.

  15. Production of the $\\rho(770)^{0}$ meson in pp and Pb–Pb collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$ = 2.76 TeV

    CERN Document Server

    Acharya, Shreyasi; The ALICE collaboration; Adamova, Dagmar; Adolfsson, Jonatan; Aggarwal, Madan Mohan; Aglieri Rinella, Gianluca; Agnello, Michelangelo; Agrawal, Neelima; Ahammed, Zubayer; Ahn, Sang Un; Aiola, Salvatore; Akindinov, Alexander; Al-turany, Mohammad; Alam, Sk Noor; Silva De Albuquerque, Danilo; Aleksandrov, Dmitry; Alessandro, Bruno; Alfaro Molina, Jose Ruben; Ali, Yasir; Alici, Andrea; Alkin, Anton; Alme, Johan; Alt, Torsten; Altenkamper, Lucas; Altsybeev, Igor; Andrei, Cristian; Andreou, Dimitra; Andrews, Harry Arthur; Andronic, Anton; Angeletti, Massimo; Anguelov, Venelin; Anson, Christopher Daniel; Anticic, Tome; Antinori, Federico; Antonioli, Pietro; Anwar, Rafay; Apadula, Nicole; Aphecetche, Laurent Bernard; Appelshaeuser, Harald; Arcelli, Silvia; Arnaldi, Roberta; Arnold, Oliver Werner; Arsene, Ionut Cristian; Arslandok, Mesut; Audurier, Benjamin; Augustinus, Andre; Averbeck, Ralf Peter; Azmi, Mohd Danish; Badala, Angela; Baek, Yong Wook; Bagnasco, Stefano; Bailhache, Raphaelle Marie; Bala, Renu; Baldisseri, Alberto; Ball, Markus; Baral, Rama Chandra; Barbano, Anastasia Maria; Barbera, Roberto; Barile, Francesco; Barioglio, Luca; Barnafoldi, Gergely Gabor; Barnby, Lee Stuart; Ramillien Barret, Valerie; Bartalini, Paolo; Barth, Klaus; Bartsch, Esther; Bastid, Nicole; Basu, Sumit; Batigne, Guillaume; Batyunya, Boris; Batzing, Paul Christoph; Bazo Alba, Jose Luis; Bearden, Ian Gardner; Beck, Hans; Bedda, Cristina; Behera, Nirbhay Kumar; Belikov, Iouri; Bellini, Francesca; Bello Martinez, Hector; Bellwied, Rene; Espinoza Beltran, Lucina Gabriela; Belyaev, Vladimir; Bencedi, Gyula; Beole, Stefania; Bercuci, Alexandru; Berdnikov, Yaroslav; Berenyi, Daniel; Bertens, Redmer Alexander; Berzano, Dario; Betev, Latchezar; Bhaduri, Partha Pratim; Bhasin, Anju; Bhat, Inayat Rasool; Bhatt, Himani; Bhattacharjee, Buddhadeb; Bhom, Jihyun; Bianchi, Antonio; Bianchi, Livio; Bianchi, Nicola; Bielcik, Jaroslav; Bielcikova, Jana; Bilandzic, Ante; Biro, Gabor; Biswas, Rathijit; Biswas, Saikat; Blair, Justin Thomas; Blau, Dmitry; Blume, Christoph; Boca, Gianluigi; Bock, Friederike; Bogdanov, Alexey; Boldizsar, Laszlo; Bombara, Marek; Bonomi, Germano; Bonora, Matthias; Borel, Herve; Borissov, Alexander; Borri, Marcello; Botta, Elena; Bourjau, Christian; Bratrud, Lars; Braun-munzinger, Peter; Bregant, Marco; Broker, Theo Alexander; Broz, Michal; Brucken, Erik Jens; Bruna, Elena; Bruno, Giuseppe Eugenio; Budnikov, Dmitry; Buesching, Henner; Bufalino, Stefania; Buhler, Paul; Buncic, Predrag; Busch, Oliver; Buthelezi, Edith Zinhle; Bashir Butt, Jamila; Buxton, Jesse Thomas; Cabala, Jan; Caffarri, Davide; Caines, Helen Louise; Caliva, Alberto; Calvo Villar, Ernesto; Soto Camacho, Rabi; Camerini, Paolo; Capon, Aaron Allan; Carena, Francesco; Carena, Wisla; Carnesecchi, Francesca; Castillo Castellanos, Javier Ernesto; Castro, Andrew John; Casula, Ester Anna Rita; Ceballos Sanchez, Cesar; Chandra, Sinjini; Chang, Beomsu; Chang, Wan; Chapeland, Sylvain; Chartier, Marielle; Chattopadhyay, Subhasis; Chattopadhyay, Sukalyan; Chauvin, Alex; Cheshkov, Cvetan Valeriev; Cheynis, Brigitte; Chibante Barroso, Vasco Miguel; Dobrigkeit Chinellato, David; Cho, Soyeon; Chochula, Peter; Chowdhury, Tasnuva; Christakoglou, Panagiotis; Christensen, Christian Holm; Christiansen, Peter; Chujo, Tatsuya; Chung, Suh-urk; Cicalo, Corrado; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, Federico; Cleymans, Jean Willy Andre; Colamaria, Fabio Filippo; Colella, Domenico; Collu, Alberto; Colocci, Manuel; Concas, Matteo; Conesa Balbastre, Gustavo; Conesa Del Valle, Zaida; Contreras Nuno, Jesus Guillermo; Cormier, Thomas Michael; Corrales Morales, Yasser; Cortese, Pietro; Cosentino, Mauro Rogerio; Costa, Filippo; Costanza, Susanna; Crkovska, Jana; Crochet, Philippe; Cuautle Flores, Eleazar; Cunqueiro Mendez, Leticia; Dahms, Torsten; Dainese, Andrea; Danisch, Meike Charlotte; Danu, Andrea; Das, Debasish; Das, Indranil; Das, Supriya; Dash, Ajay Kumar; Dash, Sadhana; De, Sudipan; De Caro, Annalisa; De Cataldo, Giacinto; De Conti, Camila; De Cuveland, Jan; De Falco, Alessandro; De Gruttola, Daniele; De Marco, Nora; De Pasquale, Salvatore; Derradi De Souza, Rafael; Franz Degenhardt, Hermann; Deisting, Alexander; Deloff, Andrzej; Delsanto, Silvia; Deplano, Caterina; Dhankher, Preeti; Di Bari, Domenico; Di Mauro, Antonio; Di Ruzza, Benedetto; Arteche Diaz, Raul; Dietel, Thomas; Dillenseger, Pascal; Ding, Yanchun; Divia, Roberto; Djuvsland, Oeystein; Dobrin, Alexandru Florin; Domenicis Gimenez, Diogenes; Donigus, Benjamin; Dordic, Olja; Van Doremalen, Lennart Vincent; Dubey, Anand Kumar; Dubla, Andrea; Ducroux, Laurent; Dudi, Sandeep; Duggal, Ashpreet Kaur; Dukhishyam, Mallick; Dupieux, Pascal; Ehlers Iii, Raymond James; Elia, Domenico; Endress, Eric; Engel, Heiko; Epple, Eliane; Erazmus, Barbara Ewa; Erhardt, Filip; Ersdal, Magnus Rentsch; Espagnon, Bruno; Eulisse, Giulio; Eum, Jongsik; Evans, David; Evdokimov, Sergey; Fabbietti, Laura; Faggin, Mattia; Faivre, Julien; Fantoni, Alessandra; Fasel, Markus; Feldkamp, Linus; Feliciello, Alessandro; Feofilov, Grigorii; Fernandez Tellez, Arturo; Ferretti, Alessandro; Festanti, Andrea; Feuillard, Victor Jose Gaston; Figiel, Jan; Araujo Silva Figueredo, Marcel; Filchagin, Sergey; Finogeev, Dmitry; Fionda, Fiorella; Fiorenza, Gabriele; Floris, Michele; Foertsch, Siegfried Valentin; Foka, Panagiota; Fokin, Sergey; Fragiacomo, Enrico; Francescon, Andrea; Francisco, Audrey; Frankenfeld, Ulrich Michael; Fronze, Gabriele Gaetano; Fuchs, Ulrich; Furget, Christophe; Furs, Artur; Fusco Girard, Mario; Gaardhoeje, Jens Joergen; Gagliardi, Martino; Gago Medina, Alberto Martin; Gajdosova, Katarina; Gallio, Mauro; Duarte Galvan, Carlos; Ganoti, Paraskevi; Garabatos Cuadrado, Jose; Garcia-solis, Edmundo Javier; Garg, Kunal; Gargiulo, Corrado; Gasik, Piotr Jan; Gauger, Erin Frances; De Leone Gay, Maria Beatriz; Germain, Marie; Ghosh, Jhuma; Ghosh, Premomoy; Ghosh, Sanjay Kumar; Gianotti, Paola; Giubellino, Paolo; Giubilato, Piero; Glassel, Peter; Gomez Coral, Diego Mauricio; Gomez Ramirez, Andres; Gonzalez, Victor; Gonzalez Zamora, Pedro; Gorbunov, Sergey; Gorlich, Lidia Maria; Gotovac, Sven; Grabski, Varlen; Graczykowski, Lukasz Kamil; Graham, Katie Leanne; Greiner, Leo Clifford; Grelli, Alessandro; Grigoras, Costin; Grigoryev, Vladislav; Grigoryan, Ara; Grigoryan, Smbat; Gronefeld, Julius Maximilian; Grosa, Fabrizio; Grosse-oetringhaus, Jan Fiete; Grosso, Raffaele; Guernane, Rachid; Guerzoni, Barbara; Guittiere, Manuel; Gulbrandsen, Kristjan Herlache; Gunji, Taku; Gupta, Anik; Gupta, Ramni; Bautista Guzman, Irais; Haake, Rudiger; Habib, Michael Karim; Hadjidakis, Cynthia Marie; Hamagaki, Hideki; Hamar, Gergoe; Hamon, Julien Charles; Hannigan, Ryan; Haque, Md Rihan; Harris, John William; Harton, Austin Vincent; Hassan, Hadi; Hatzifotiadou, Despina; Hayashi, Shinichi; Heckel, Stefan Thomas; Hellbar, Ernst; Helstrup, Haavard; Herghelegiu, Andrei Ionut; Gonzalez Hernandez, Emma; Herrera Corral, Gerardo Antonio; Herrmann, Florian; Hetland, Kristin Fanebust; Hilden, Timo Eero; Hillemanns, Hartmut; Hills, Christopher; Hippolyte, Boris; Hohlweger, Bernhard; Horak, David; Hornung, Sebastian; Hosokawa, Ritsuya; Hristov, Peter Zahariev; Hughes, Charles; Huhn, Patrick; Humanic, Thomas; Hushnud, Hushnud; Hussain, Nur; Hussain, Tahir; Hutter, Dirk; Hwang, Dae Sung; Iddon, James Philip; Iga Buitron, Sergio Arturo; Ilkaev, Radiy; Inaba, Motoi; Ippolitov, Mikhail; Islam, Md Samsul; Ivanov, Marian; Ivanov, Vladimir; Izucheev, Vladimir; Jacak, Barbara; Jacazio, Nicolo; Jacobs, Peter Martin; Jadhav, Manoj Bhanudas; Jadlovska, Slavka; Jadlovsky, Jan; Jaelani, Syaefudin; Jahnke, Cristiane; Jakubowska, Monika Joanna; Janik, Malgorzata Anna; Jena, Chitrasen; Jercic, Marko; Jimenez Bustamante, Raul Tonatiuh; Jin, Muqing; Jones, Peter Graham; Jusko, Anton; Kalinak, Peter; Kalweit, Alexander Philipp; Kang, Ju Hwan; Kaplin, Vladimir; Kar, Somnath; Karasu Uysal, Ayben; Karavichev, Oleg; Karavicheva, Tatiana; Karczmarczyk, Przemyslaw; Karpechev, Evgeny; Kebschull, Udo Wolfgang; Keidel, Ralf; Keijdener, Darius Laurens; Keil, Markus; Ketzer, Bernhard Franz; Khabanova, Zhanna; Khan, Shaista; Khan, Shuaib Ahmad; Khanzadeev, Alexei; Kharlov, Yury; Khatun, Anisa; Khuntia, Arvind; Kielbowicz, Miroslaw Marek; Kileng, Bjarte; Kim, Byungchul; Kim, Daehyeok; Kim, Dong Jo; Kim, Eun Joo; Kim, Hyeonjoong; Kim, Jinsook; Kim, Jiyoung; Kim, Minjung; Kim, Se Yong; Kim, Taejun; Kim, Taesoo; Kirsch, Stefan; Kisel, Ivan; Kiselev, Sergey; Kisiel, Adam Ryszard; Klay, Jennifer Lynn; Klein, Carsten; Klein, Jochen; Klein-boesing, Christian; Klewin, Sebastian; Kluge, Alexander; Knichel, Michael Linus; Knospe, Anders Garritt; Kobdaj, Chinorat; Varga-kofarago, Monika; Kohler, Markus Konrad; Kollegger, Thorsten; Kondratyeva, Natalia; Kondratyuk, Evgeny; Konevskikh, Artem; Konyushikhin, Maxim; Kovalenko, Oleksandr; Kovalenko, Vladimir; Kowalski, Marek; Kralik, Ivan; Kravcakova, Adela; Kreis, Lukas; Krivda, Marian; Krizek, Filip; Kruger, Mario; Kryshen, Evgeny; Krzewicki, Mikolaj; Kubera, Andrew Michael; Kucera, Vit; Kuhn, Christian Claude; Kuijer, Paulus Gerardus; Kumar, Jitendra; Kumar, Lokesh; Kumar, Shyam; Kundu, Sourav; Kurashvili, Podist; Kurepin, Alexander; Kurepin, Alexey; Kuryakin, Alexey; Kushpil, Svetlana; Kweon, Min Jung; Kwon, Youngil; La Pointe, Sarah Louise; La Rocca, Paola; Lai, Yue Shi; Lakomov, Igor; Langoy, Rune; Lapidus, Kirill; Lara Martinez, Camilo Ernesto; Lardeux, Antoine Xavier; Larionov, Pavel; Lattuca, Alessandra; Laudi, Elisa; Lavicka, Roman; Lea, Ramona; Leardini, Lucia; Lee, Seongjoo; Lehas, Fatiha; Lehner, Sebastian; Lehrbach, Johannes; Lemmon, Roy Crawford; Leogrande, Emilia; Leon Monzon, Ildefonso; Levai, Peter; Li, Xiaomei; Li, Xing Long; Lien, Jorgen Andre; Lietava, Roman; Lim, Bong-hwi; Lindal, Svein; Lindenstruth, Volker; Lindsay, Scott William; Lippmann, Christian; Lisa, Michael Annan; Litichevskyi, Vladyslav; Liu, Alwina; Ljunggren, Hans Martin; Llope, William; Lodato, Davide Francesco; Loginov, Vitaly; Loizides, Constantinos; Loncar, Petra; Lopez, Xavier Bernard; Lopez Torres, Ernesto; Lowe, Andrew John; Luettig, Philipp Johannes; Luhder, Jens Robert; Lunardon, Marcello; Luparello, Grazia; Lupi, Matteo; Maevskaya, Alla; Mager, Magnus; Mahmood, Sohail Musa; Maire, Antonin; Majka, Richard Daniel; Malaev, Mikhail; Malinina, Liudmila; Mal'kevich, Dmitry; Malzacher, Peter; Mamonov, Alexander; Manko, Vladislav; Manso, Franck; Manzari, Vito; Mao, Yaxian; Marchisone, Massimiliano; Mares, Jiri; Margagliotti, Giacomo Vito; Margotti, Anselmo; Margutti, Jacopo; Marin, Ana Maria; Markert, Christina; Marquard, Marco; Martin, Nicole Alice; Martinengo, Paolo; Martinez Hernandez, Mario Ivan; Martinez-garcia, Gines; Martinez Pedreira, Miguel; Masciocchi, Silvia; Masera, Massimo; Masoni, Alberto; Massacrier, Laure Marie; Masson, Erwann; Mastroserio, Annalisa; Mathis, Andreas Michael; Toledo Matuoka, Paula Fernanda; Matyja, Adam Tomasz; Mayer, Christoph; Mazzilli, Marianna; Mazzoni, Alessandra Maria; Meddi, Franco; Melikyan, Yuri; Menchaca-rocha, Arturo Alejandro; Meninno, Elisa; Mercado-perez, Jorge; Meres, Michal; Soncco Meza, Carlos; Mhlanga, Sibaliso; Miake, Yasuo; Micheletti, Luca; Mieskolainen, Matti Mikael; Mihaylov, Dimitar Lubomirov; Mikhaylov, Konstantin; Mischke, Andre; Mishra, Aditya Nath; Miskowiec, Dariusz Czeslaw; Mitra, Jubin; Mitu, Ciprian Mihai; Mohammadi, Naghmeh; Mohanty, Auro Prasad; Mohanty, Bedangadas; Khan, Mohammed Mohisin; Moreira De Godoy, Denise Aparecida; Perez Moreno, Luis Alberto; Moretto, Sandra; Morreale, Astrid; Morsch, Andreas; Muccifora, Valeria; Mudnic, Eugen; Muhlheim, Daniel Michael; Muhuri, Sanjib; Mukherjee, Maitreyee; Mulligan, James Declan; Gameiro Munhoz, Marcelo; Munning, Konstantin; Arratia Munoz, Miguel Ignacio; Munzer, Robert Helmut; Murakami, Hikari; Murray, Sean; Musa, Luciano; Musinsky, Jan; Myers, Corey James; Myrcha, Julian Wojciech; Naik, Bharati; Nair, Rahul; Nandi, Basanta Kumar; Nania, Rosario; Nappi, Eugenio; Narayan, Amrendra; Naru, Muhammad Umair; Nassirpour, Adrian Fereydon; Ferreira Natal Da Luz, Pedro Hugo; Nattrass, Christine; Rosado Navarro, Sebastian; Nayak, Kishora; 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Rasanen, Sami Sakari; Rascanu, Bogdan Theodor; Ratza, Viktor; Ravasenga, Ivan; Read, Kenneth Francis; Redlich, Krzysztof; Rehman, Attiq Ur; Reichelt, Patrick Simon; Reidt, Felix; Ren, Xiaowen; Renfordt, Rainer Arno Ernst; Reshetin, Andrey; Revol, Jean-pierre; Reygers, Klaus Johannes; Riabov, Viktor; Richert, Tuva Ora Herenui; Richter, Matthias Rudolph; Riedler, Petra; Riegler, Werner; Riggi, Francesco; Ristea, Catalin-lucian; Rode, Sudhir Pandurang; Rodriguez Cahuantzi, Mario; Roeed, Ketil; Rogalev, Roman; Rogochaya, Elena; Rohr, David Michael; Roehrich, Dieter; Rokita, Przemyslaw Stefan; Ronchetti, Federico; Dominguez Rosas, Edgar; Roslon, Krystian; Rosnet, Philippe; Rossi, Andrea; Rotondi, Alberto; Roukoutakis, Filimon; Roy, Christelle Sophie; Roy, Pradip Kumar; Vazquez Rueda, Omar; Rui, Rinaldo; Rumyantsev, Boris; Rustamov, Anar; Ryabinkin, Evgeny; Ryabov, Yury; Rybicki, Andrzej; Saarinen, Sampo; Sadhu, Samrangy; Sadovskiy, Sergey; Safarik, Karel; Saha, Sumit Kumar; Sahoo, Baidyanath; 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Yoo, In-kwon; Yoon, Jin Hee; Yurchenko, Volodymyr; Zaccolo, Valentina; Zaman, Ali; Zampolli, Chiara; Correa Zanoli, Henrique Jose; Zardoshti, Nima; Zarochentsev, Andrey; Zavada, Petr; Zavyalov, Nikolay; Zbroszczyk, Hanna Paulina; Zhalov, Mikhail; Zhang, Xiaoming; Zhang, Yonghong; Zhang, Zuman; Zhao, Chengxin; Zherebchevskii, Vladimir; Zhigareva, Natalia; Zhou, Daicui; Zhou, You; Zhou, Zhuo; Zhu, Hongsheng; Zhu, Jianhui; Zhu, Ya; Zichichi, Antonino; Zimmermann, Markus Bernhard; Zinovjev, Gennady; Zmeskal, Johann; Zou, Shuguang

    2018-01-01

    The production of the $\\rho(770)^{0}$ meson has been measured at mid-rapidity (|y| < 0.5) in pp and centrality differential Pb-Pb collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$ = 2.76 TeV with the ALICE detector at the Large Hadron Collider. The particles have been reconstructed in the $\\rho(770)^{0}\\rightarrow \\pi^{+}\\pi^{-}$ decay channel in the transverse momentum ($p_{T}$) range 0.5 − 11 GeV/$c$. A centrality dependent suppression of the ratio of the integrated yields $2\\rho(770)^{0}/(\\pi^{+}+\\pi^{-})$ is observed. The ratio decreases by ~40% from pp to central Pb-Pb collisions. A study of the $p_{T}$-differential $2\\rho(770)^{0}/(\\pi^{+}+\\pi^{-})$ ratio reveals that the suppression occurs at low transverse momenta, $p_{T}$ < 2 GeV/$c$. At higher momentum, particle ratios measured in heavy-ion and pp collisions are consistent. The observed suppression is very similar to that previously measured for the $K^{*}(892)^{0}/K$ ratio and is consistent with EPOS3 predictions that may imply that rescattering in the hadroni...

  16. Progression of Human Renal Cell Carcinoma via Inhibition of RhoA-ROCK Axis by PARG1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junichiro Miyazaki

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Renal cell carcinoma (RCC is the most lethal urological malignancy with high risk of recurrence; thus, new prognostic biomarkers are needed. In this study, a new RCC antigen, PTPL1 associated RhoGAP1 (PARG1, was identified by using serological identification of recombinant cDNA expression cloning with sera from RCC patients. PARG1 protein was found to be differentially expressed in RCC cells among patients. High PARG1 expression is significantly correlated with various clinicopathological factors relating to cancer cell proliferation and invasion, including G3 percentage (P = .0046, Ki-67 score (p expression is also correlated with high recurrence of N0M0 patients (P = .0084 and poor prognosis in RCC patients (P = .0345. Multivariate analysis has revealed that high PARG1 expression is an independent factor for recurrence (P = .0149 of N0M0 RCC patients. In in vitro studies, depletion of PARG1by siRNA in human RCC cell lines inhibited their proliferation through inducing G1 cell cycle arrest via upregulation of p53 and subsequent p21Cip1/Waf1, which are mediated by increased RhoA-ROCK activities. Similarly, PARG1 depletion cells inhibited invasion ability via increasing RhoA-ROCK activities in the RCC cell lines. Conversely, overexpression of PARG1 on human embryonic kidney cell line HEK293T promotes its cell proliferation and invasion. These results indicate that PARG1 plays crucial roles in progression of human RCC in increasing cell proliferation and invasion ability via inhibition of the RhoA-ROCK axis, and PARG1 is a poor prognostic marker, particularly for high recurrence of N0M0 RCC patients.

  17. Inverse relationship between TCTP/RhoA and p53/ /cyclin A/actin expression in ovarian cancer cells Inverse relationship between TCTP/RhoA and p53/ /cyclin A/actin expression in ovarian cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malgorzata Kloc

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The translationally controlled tumor protein (TCTP plays a role in cell growth, cell cycle and cancer
    progression. TCTP controls negatively the stability of the p53 tumor suppressor protein and interacts with the
    cellular cytoskeleton. The deregulation of the actin and cytokeratin cytoskeleton is responsible for the increased
    migratory activity of tumor cells and is linked with poor patient outcome. Recent studies indicate that cyclin A,
    a key regulator of cell cycle, controls actin organization and negatively regulates cell motility via regulation of RhoA
    expression. We studied the organization of actin and cytokeratin cytoskeleton and the expression of TCTP, p53,
    cyclin A, RhoA and actin in HIO180 non-transformed ovarian epithelial cells, and OVCAR3 and SKOV3 (expressing
    low level of inducible p53 ovarian epithelial cancer cells with different metastatic potential. Immunostaining
    and ultrastructural analyses illustrated a dramatic difference in the organization of the cytokeratin and actin
    filaments in non-transformed versus cancer cell lines. We also determined that there is an inverse relationship between
    the level of TCTP/RhoA and actin/p53/cyclin A expression in ovarian cancer cell lines. This previously unidentified
    negative relationship between TCTP/RhoA and actin/p53/cyclin A may suggest that this interaction is linked
    with the high aggressiveness of ovarian cancers.The translationally controlled tumor protein (TCTP plays a role in cell growth, cell cycle and cancer
    progression. TCTP controls negatively the stability of the p53 tumor suppressor protein and interacts with the
    cellular cytoskeleton. The deregulation of the actin and cytokeratin cytoskeleton is responsible for the increased
    migratory activity of tumor cells and is linked with poor patient outcome. Recent studies indicate that cyclin A,
    a key regulator of cell cycle, controls actin organization

  18. RhoA, Rho kinase, JAK2, and STAT3 may be the intracellular determinants of longevity implicated in the progeric influence of obesity: Insulin, IGF-1, and leptin may all conspire to promote stem cell exhaustion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapia, Patrick C

    2006-01-01

    The aging process in higher mammals is increasingly being shown to feature a potentially substantial contribution from the longitudinal deterioration of normative stem cell dynamics seen with the passage of time. The precise mechanistic sequence producing this phenomenon is not entirely understood, but recent evidence has strongly implicated intracellular downstream effectors of endocrinologic pathways thought to be engaged by the obese state, specifically the insulin, IGF-1, and leptin signaling pathways. Among the intracellular effectors of these signals, a uniquely potent influence on stem cell dynamics may be attributable to Rho/ROCK, JAK kinase activity and STAT3 activity. In particular, it has already been shown that specific tyrosine kinase activities, such as that seen with Rho kinase, are presently thought to be associated with adverse health outcomes in numerous clinical contexts. Furthermore, the Rho GTPase is thought to be contributing to end-stage renal disease. However, in addition to its contribution to organ system dysfunction, the Rho/ROCK pathway has recently been shown to be activated by insulin and IGF-1, providing a tantalizing connection to nutrition and aging science. The JAK-STAT pathway, in contrast, has long been associated with pro-inflammatory cytokines, but has recently been implicated in leptin signaling as well. Importantly, JAK-STAT signaling has, similarly to Rho/ROCK signaling, been implicated as capable of accelerating stem cell proliferation. The implications of these recent determinations, in light of the recent finding of telomere attrition in humans associated with obesity, are that the intracellular determinants of aging may already be known, and the known common influence of these signaling elements on longitudinal stem cell dynamics is a pronounced induction of proliferation, an elevation that has been linked to the pathologic evolution of longitudinal organ-level dysfunction and the organismal-level physiologic decline

  19. Self-consistent meson mass spectrum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balazs, L.A.P.

    1982-01-01

    A dual-topological-unitarization (or dual-fragmentation) approach to the calculation of hadron masses is presented, in which the effect of planar ''sea''-quark loops is taken into account from the beginning. Using techniques based on analyticity and generalized ladder-graph dynamics, we first derive the approximate ''generic'' Regge-trajectory formula α(t) = max (S 1 +S 2 , S 3 +S 4 )-(1/2) +2alpha-circumflex'[s/sub a/ +(1/2)(t-summationm/sub i/ 2 )] for any given hadronic process 1+2→3+4, where S/sub i/ and m/sub i/ are the spins and masses of i = 1,2,3,4, and √s/sub a/ is the effective mass of the lowest nonvanishing contribution (a) exchanged in the crossed channel. By requiring a minimization of secondary (background, etc.) contributions to a, and demanding simultaneous consistency for entire sets of such processes, we are then able to calculate the masses of all the lowest pseudoscalar and vector qq-bar states with q = u,d,s and the Regge trajectories on which they lie. By making certain additional assumptions we are also able to do this with q = u,d,c and q = u,d,b. Our only arbitrary parameters are m/sub rho/, m/sub K/*, m/sub psi/, and m/sub Upsilon/, one of which merely serves to fix the energy scale. In contrast to many other approaches, a small m/sub π/ 2 /m/sub rho/ 2 ratio arises quite naturally in the present scheme

  20. Small-Molecule Inhibition of Rho/MKL/SRF Transcription in Prostate Cancer Cells: Modulation of Cell Cycle, ER Stress, and Metastasis Gene Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris R. Evelyn

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Metastasis is the major cause of cancer deaths and control of gene transcription has emerged as a critical contributing factor. RhoA- and RhoC-induced gene transcription via the actin-regulated transcriptional co-activator megakaryocytic leukemia (MKL and serum response factor (SRF drive metastasis in breast cancer and melanoma. We recently identified a compound, CCG-1423, which blocks Rho/MKL/SRF-mediated transcription and inhibits PC-3 prostate cancer cell invasion. Here, we undertook a genome-wide expression study in PC-3 cells to explore the mechanism and function of this compound. There was significant overlap in the genes modulated by CCG-1423 and Latrunculin B (Lat B, which blocks the Rho/MKL/SRF pathway by preventing actin polymerization. In contrast, the general transcription inhibitor 5,6-dichloro-1-β-d-ribofuranosyl-1H-benzimidazole (DRB showed a markedly different pattern. Effects of CCG-1423 and Lat B on gene expression correlated with literature studies of MKL knock-down. Gene sets involved in DNA synthesis and repair, G1/S transition, and apoptosis were modulated by CCG-1423. It also upregulated genes involved in endoplasmic reticulum stress. Targets of the known Rho target transcription factor family E2F and genes related to melanoma progression and metastasis were strongly suppressed by CCG-1423. These results confirm the ability of our compound to inhibit expression of numerous Rho/MKL-dependent genes and show effects on stress pathways as well. This suggests a novel approach to targeting aggressive cancers and metastasis.

  1. An adventitious interaction of filamin A with RhoGDI2(Tyr153Glu)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Mia; He, Qianjing; Berk, Benjamin-Andreas; Hartwig, John H.; Stossel, Thomas P.; Nakamura, Fumihiko

    2016-01-01

    Filamin A (FLNA) is an actin filament crosslinking protein with multiple intracellular binding partners. Mechanical force exposes cryptic FLNA binding sites for some of these ligands. To identify new force-dependent binding interactions, we used a fusion construct composed of two FLNA domains, one of which was previously identified as containing a force-dependent binding site as a bait in a yeast two-hybrid system and identified the Rho dissociation inhibitor 2 (RhoGDI2) as a potential interacting partner. A RhoGDI2 truncate with 81 N-terminal amino acid residues and a phosphomimetic mutant, RhoGDI(Tyr153Glu) interacted with the FLNA construct. However, neither wild-type or full-length RhoGDI2 phosphorylated at Y153 interacted with FLNA. Our interpretation of these contradictions is that truncation and/or mutation of RhoGDI2 perturbs its conformation to expose a site that adventitiously binds FLNA and is not a bona–fide interaction. Therefore, previous studies reporting that a RhoGDI(Y153E) mutant suppresses the metastasis of human bladder cancer cells must be reinvestigated in light of artificial interaction of this point mutant with FLNA. - Highlights: • RhoGDI2 is identified as a potential filamin A (FLNA)-binding partner. • Phosphomimetic mutant, RhoGDI2(Tyr153Glu) interacts with FLNA. • RhoGDI2 phosphorylated (Tyr153) by src kinase does not interact with FLNA. • Mutation of Tyr-153 to Glu of RhoGDI2 does not mimic phosphorylation. • RhoGDI2(Tyr153Glu) provokes an adventitious interaction with FLNA.

  2. An adventitious interaction of filamin A with RhoGDI2(Tyr153Glu)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Mia; He, Qianjing [Hematology Division, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston MA (United States); Berk, Benjamin-Andreas [Faculty of Veterinary Medicine and Faculty of Biosciences and Pharmacy, University of Leipzig, Leipzig (Germany); Hartwig, John H.; Stossel, Thomas P. [Hematology Division, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston MA (United States); Nakamura, Fumihiko, E-mail: fnakamura@partners.org [Hematology Division, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston MA (United States)

    2016-01-15

    Filamin A (FLNA) is an actin filament crosslinking protein with multiple intracellular binding partners. Mechanical force exposes cryptic FLNA binding sites for some of these ligands. To identify new force-dependent binding interactions, we used a fusion construct composed of two FLNA domains, one of which was previously identified as containing a force-dependent binding site as a bait in a yeast two-hybrid system and identified the Rho dissociation inhibitor 2 (RhoGDI2) as a potential interacting partner. A RhoGDI2 truncate with 81 N-terminal amino acid residues and a phosphomimetic mutant, RhoGDI(Tyr153Glu) interacted with the FLNA construct. However, neither wild-type or full-length RhoGDI2 phosphorylated at Y153 interacted with FLNA. Our interpretation of these contradictions is that truncation and/or mutation of RhoGDI2 perturbs its conformation to expose a site that adventitiously binds FLNA and is not a bona–fide interaction. Therefore, previous studies reporting that a RhoGDI(Y153E) mutant suppresses the metastasis of human bladder cancer cells must be reinvestigated in light of artificial interaction of this point mutant with FLNA. - Highlights: • RhoGDI2 is identified as a potential filamin A (FLNA)-binding partner. • Phosphomimetic mutant, RhoGDI2(Tyr153Glu) interacts with FLNA. • RhoGDI2 phosphorylated (Tyr153) by src kinase does not interact with FLNA. • Mutation of Tyr-153 to Glu of RhoGDI2 does not mimic phosphorylation. • RhoGDI2(Tyr153Glu) provokes an adventitious interaction with FLNA.

  3. Agonist-induced CXCR4 and CB2 Heterodimerization Inhibits Gα13/RhoA-mediated Migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarlett, Kisha A; White, El-Shaddai Z; Coke, Christopher J; Carter, Jada R; Bryant, Latoya K; Hinton, Cimona V

    2018-04-01

    G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) heterodimerization has emerged as a means by which alternative signaling entities can be created; yet, how receptor heterodimers affect receptor pharmacology remains unknown. Previous observations suggested a biochemical antagonism between GPCRs, CXCR4 and CB2 (CNR2), where agonist-bound CXCR4 and agonist-bound CB2 formed a physiologically nonfunctional heterodimer on the membrane of cancer cells, inhibiting their metastatic potential in vitro However, the reduced signaling entities responsible for the observed functional outputs remain elusive. This study now delineates the signaling mechanism whereby heterodimeric association between CXCR4 and CB2, induced by simultaneous agonist treatment, results in decreased CXCR4-mediated cell migration, invasion, and adhesion through inhibition of the Gα13/RhoA signaling axis. Activation of CXCR4 by its cognate ligand, CXCL12, stimulates Gα13 (GNA13), and subsequently, the small GTPase RhoA, which is required for directional cell migration and the metastatic potential of cancer cells. These studies in prostate cancer cells demonstrate decreased protein expression levels of Gα13 and RhoA upon simultaneous CXCR4/CB2 agonist stimulation. Furthermore, the agonist-induced heterodimer abrogated RhoA-mediated cytoskeletal rearrangement resulting in the attenuation of cell migration and invasion of an endothelial cell barrier. Finally, a reduction was observed in the expression of integrin α5 (ITGA5) upon heterodimerization, supported by decreased cell adhesion to extracellular matrices in vitro Taken together, the data identify a novel pharmacologic mechanism for the modulation of tumor cell migration and invasion in the context of metastatic disease. Implications: This study investigates a signaling mechanism by which GPCR heterodimerization inhibits cancer cell migration. Mol Cancer Res; 16(4); 728-39. ©2018 AACR . ©2018 American Association for Cancer Research.

  4. Inhibition of Rho kinase regulates specification of early differentiation events in P19 embryonal carcinoma stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roman J Krawetz

    Full Text Available The Rho kinase pathway plays a key role in many early cell/tissue determination events that take place in embryogenesis. Rho and its downstream effector Rho kinase (ROCK play pivotal roles in cell migration, apoptosis (membrane blebbing, cell proliferation/cell cycle, cell-cell adhesion and gene regulation. We and others have previously demonstrated that inhibition of ROCK blocks endoderm differentiation in embryonal carcinoma stem cells, however, the effect of ROCK inhibition on mesoderm and ectoderm specification has not been fully examined. In this study, the role of ROCK within the specification and differentiation of all three germ layers was examined.P19 cells were treated with the specific ROCK inhibitor Y-27623, and increase in differentiation efficiency into neuro-ectodermal and mesodermal lineages was observed. However, as expected a dramatic decrease in early endodermal markers was observed when ROCK was inhibited. Interestingly, within these ROCK-inhibited RA treated cultures, increased levels of mesodermal or ectodermal markers were not observed, instead it was found that the pluripotent markers SSEA-1 and Oct-4 remained up-regulated similar to that seen in undifferentiated cultures. Using standard and widely accepted methods for reproducible P19 differentiation into all three germ layers, an enhancement of mesoderm and ectoderm differentiation with a concurrent loss of endoderm lineage specification was observed with Y-27632 treatment. Evidence would suggest that this effect is in part mediated through TGF-β and SMAD signaling as ROCK-inhibited cells displayed aberrant SMAD activation and did not return to a 'ground' state after the inhibition had been removed.Given this data and the fact that only a partial rescue of normal differentiation capacity occurred when ROCK inhibition was alleviated, the effect of ROCK inhibition on the differentiation capacity of pluripotent cell populations should be further examined to elucidate the

  5. RhoA is dispensable for skin development, but crucial for contraction and directed migration of keratinocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jackson, Ben; Peyrollier, Karine; Pedersen, Esben

    2011-01-01

    RhoA is a small guanosine-5'-triphosphatase (GTPase) suggested to be essential for cytokinesis, stress fiber formation, and epithelial cell-cell contacts. In skin, loss of RhoA was suggested to underlie pemphigus skin blistering. To analyze RhoA function in vivo, we generated mice with a keratino......RhoA is a small guanosine-5'-triphosphatase (GTPase) suggested to be essential for cytokinesis, stress fiber formation, and epithelial cell-cell contacts. In skin, loss of RhoA was suggested to underlie pemphigus skin blistering. To analyze RhoA function in vivo, we generated mice......-cell contacts. Furthermore we observed increased cell spreading due to impaired RhoA-ROCK (Rho-associated protein kinase)-MLC phosphatase-MLC-mediated cell contraction, independent of Rac1. Rho-inhibiting toxins further increased multinucleation of RhoA-null cells but had no significant effect on spreading......, suggesting that RhoB and RhoC have partially overlapping functions with RhoA. Loss of RhoA decreased directed cell migration in vitro caused by reduced migration speed and directional persistence. These defects were not related to the decreased cell contraction and were independent of ROCK, as ROCK...

  6. Rho kinase inhibitor fasudil mitigates high-cholesterol diet-induced hypercholesterolemia and vascular damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdali, Nibrass Taher; Yaseen, Awny H; Said, Eman; Ibrahim, Tarek M

    2017-04-01

    The current study was designed to investigate the potential beneficial therapeutic outcome of Rho kinase inhibitor (fasudil) against hypercholesterolemia-induced myocardial and vascular injury in rabbits together with diet modification. Sixteen male rabbits were randomly divided into four groups: normal control group which received standard rabbit chow, hypercholesterolemic control group, and treated groups which received cholesterol-rich rabbit chow (1.5% cholesterol) for 8 weeks. Treated groups received either fasudil (100 mg/kg/day) or rosuvastatin (2.5 mg/kg/day) starting from the ninth week for further 4 weeks with interruption of the cholesterol-rich chow. Biochemical assessment of serum cholesterol, triglyceride, high-density lipoprotein (HDL), low-density lipoprotein (LDL), and myocardial oxidative/antioxidant biomarkers malondialdehyde (MDA), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and reduced glutathione (GSH), besides biochemical assessment of serum nitric oxide (NO), creatine kinase (CK), and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activities and serum total antioxidant capacity (TAC), was conducted. Serum vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (VCAM-1) and serum Rho-associated protein kinase 1 (ROCK-1) were also evaluated along with histopathological examination of aorta specimens. Fasudil administration significantly decreased serum cholesterol, triglyceride (TG), and LDL and significantly increased serum HDL, with concomitant decrease in serum CK and LDH activities, NO, and restoration of serum TAC. Myocardial MDA significantly declined; SOD activity and GSH contents were restored. Serum ROCK-1 and VCAM-1 levels significantly declined as well. Vascular improvement was confirmed with histopathological examination, which revealed normal aortic intema with the absence of atheromas. Fasudil has promising anti-atherogenic activity mediated primarily via alleviation of hypercholesterolemia-induced oxidative stress and modulation of inflammatory response.

  7. Hybrid white organic light-emitting devices consisting of a non-doped thermally activated delayed fluorescent emitter and an ultrathin phosphorescent emitter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Juan; Wang, Zijun; Wang, Run; Chi, Zhenguo; Yu, Junsheng

    2017-01-01

    Hybrid white organic light-emitting devices (OLEDs) are fabricated by employing non-doped emitting layers (EMLs), which are consisted of a blue thermally activated delayed fluorescent (TADF) emitter 9,9-dimethyl-9,10-dihydroacridine-diphenylsulfone (DMAC-DPS) and an ultrathin yellow iridium complex bis[2-(4-tertbutylphenyl)benzothiazolato-N,C 2′ ] iridium (acetylacetonate) [(tbt) 2 Ir(acac)]. With thickness optimization of DMAC-DPS, a white OLED achieves maximum current efficiency, power efficiency and external quantum efficiency of 34.9 cd/A, 29.2 lm/W and 11.4%, respectively, as well as warm white emission with relatively stable electroluminescence spectra. The results suggest that, bipolar charge carrier transport property and concentration independent property of DMAC-DPS, charge carrier trapping effect of the ultrathin (tbt) 2 Ir(acac), and balanced self-emission process and energy transfer process between DMAC-DPS and (tbt) 2 Ir(acac), contribute to high device performance.

  8. Hybrid white organic light-emitting devices consisting of a non-doped thermally activated delayed fluorescent emitter and an ultrathin phosphorescent emitter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Juan [State Key Laboratory of Electronic Thin Film and Integrated Devices, School of Optoelectronic Information, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu 610054 (China); School of Chemistry, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China); Wang, Zijun; Wang, Run [State Key Laboratory of Electronic Thin Film and Integrated Devices, School of Optoelectronic Information, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu 610054 (China); Chi, Zhenguo, E-mail: chizhg@mail.sysu.edu.cn [School of Chemistry, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China); Yu, Junsheng, E-mail: jsyu@uestc.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Electronic Thin Film and Integrated Devices, School of Optoelectronic Information, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu 610054 (China)

    2017-04-15

    Hybrid white organic light-emitting devices (OLEDs) are fabricated by employing non-doped emitting layers (EMLs), which are consisted of a blue thermally activated delayed fluorescent (TADF) emitter 9,9-dimethyl-9,10-dihydroacridine-diphenylsulfone (DMAC-DPS) and an ultrathin yellow iridium complex bis[2-(4-tertbutylphenyl)benzothiazolato-N,C{sup 2′}] iridium (acetylacetonate) [(tbt){sub 2}Ir(acac)]. With thickness optimization of DMAC-DPS, a white OLED achieves maximum current efficiency, power efficiency and external quantum efficiency of 34.9 cd/A, 29.2 lm/W and 11.4%, respectively, as well as warm white emission with relatively stable electroluminescence spectra. The results suggest that, bipolar charge carrier transport property and concentration independent property of DMAC-DPS, charge carrier trapping effect of the ultrathin (tbt){sub 2}Ir(acac), and balanced self-emission process and energy transfer process between DMAC-DPS and (tbt){sub 2}Ir(acac), contribute to high device performance.

  9. BRAF and RAS oncogenes regulate Rho GTPase pathways to mediate migration and invasion properties in human colon cancer cells: a comparative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirasawa Senji

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Colorectal cancer is a common disease that involves genetic alterations, such as inactivation of tumour suppressor genes and activation of oncogenes. Among them are RAS and BRAF mutations, which rarely coexist in the same tumour. Individual members of the Rho (Ras homology GTPases contribute with distinct roles in tumour cell morphology, invasion and metastasis. The aim of this study is to dissect cell migration and invasion pathways that are utilised by BRAFV600E as compared to KRASG12V and HRASG12V oncoproteins. In particular, the role of RhoA (Ras homolog gene family, member A, Rac1 (Ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1 and Cdc42 (cell division cycle 42 in cancer progression induced by each of the three oncogenes is described. Methods Colon adenocarcinoma cells with endogenous as well as ectopically expressed or silenced oncogenic mutations of BRAFV600E, KRASG12V and HRASG12V were employed. Signalling pathways and Rho GTPases were inhibited with specific kinase inhibitors and siRNAs. Cell motility and invasion properties were correlated with cytoskeletal properties and Rho GTPase activities. Results Evidence presented here indicate that BRAFV600E significantly induces cell migration and invasion properties in vitro in colon cancer cells, at least in part through activation of RhoA GTPase. The relationship established between BRAFV600E and RhoA activation is mediated by the MEK-ERK pathway. In parallel, KRASG12V enhances the ability of colon adenocarcinoma cells Caco-2 to migrate and invade through filopodia formation and PI3K-dependent Cdc42 activation. Ultimately increased cell migration and invasion, mediated by Rac1, along with the mesenchymal morphology obtained through the Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition (EMT were the main characteristics rendered by HRASG12V in Caco-2 cells. Moreover, BRAF and KRAS oncogenes are shown to cooperate with the TGFβ-1 pathway to provide cells with additional transforming

  10. QCD and resonance physics. The rho-ω mixing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shifman, M.A.; Vainshtein, A.I.; Zakharov, V.I.

    1978-01-01

    The QCD-based approach to the resonance physics proposed earlier is extended to cover the rho-ω mixing problem. A two-point function relevant to the problem with account of nonperturbative contributions is considered. The sum rules are derived and related phenomenology is introduced. The rho-ω interference is found to be due to the relatively strong isotopic symmetry breaking in the quark masses, and a solution with msub(u) = 0, msub(d) not equal to 0 seems to be ruled out. It is shown that virtual photon exchanges alone can not explain the observed value of the mixing parameter. The phenomenon gets a natural explanation if one assumes a large isotopic symmetry violation in the mechanical quark masses, (msub(d) - msub(u))/(msub(d) + msub(u)) approximately 0.3. This number is close to that resulting from the well-known pseudoscalar meson analysis. Unlike the latter, the result, however, does not assume an exact SU(3)sub(flavor) symmetry in vacuum-to-vacuum matrix elements

  11. Diffractive Electroproduction of rho and phi Mesons at HERA

    CERN Document Server

    Aaron, F.D.; Alexa, C.; Andreev, V.; Antunovic, B.; Asmone, A.; Backovic, S.; Baghdasaryan, A.; Barrelet, E.; Bartel, W.; Begzsuren, K.; Belousov, A.; Bizot, J.C.; Boudry, V.; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, G.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Bruncko, D.; Bunyatyan, A.; Buschhorn, G.; Bystritskaya, L.; Campbell, A.J.; Cantun Avila, K.B.; Cassol-Brunner, F.; Cerny, K.; Cerny, V.; Chekelian, V.; Cholewa, A.; Contreras, J.G.; Coughlan, J.A.; Cozzika, G.; Cvach, J.; Dainton, J.B.; Daum, K.; Deak, M.; de Boer, Y.; Delcourt, B.; Del Degan, M.; Delvax, J.; De Wolf, E.A.; Diaconu, C.; Dodonov, V.; Dossanov, A.; Dubak, A.; Eckerlin, G.; Efremenko, V.; Egli, S.; Eliseev, A.; Elsen, E.; Falkiewicz, A.; Favart, L.; Fedotov, A.; Felst, R.; Feltesse, J.; Ferencei, J.; Fischer, D.J.; Fleischer, M.; Fomenko, A.; Gabathuler, E.; Gayler, J.; Ghazaryan, S.; Glazov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Goerlich, L.; Gogitidze, N.; Gouzevitch, M.; Grab, C.; Greenshaw, T.; Grell, B.R.; Grindhammer, G.; Habib, S.; Haidt, D.; Helebrant, C.; Henderson, R.C.W.; Hennekemper, E.; Henschel, H.; Herbst, M.; Herrera, G.; Hildebrandt, M.; Hiller, K.H.; Hoffmann, D.; Horisberger, R.; Hreus, T.; Jacquet, M.; Janssen, M.E.; Janssen, X.; Jonsson, L.; Jung, A.W.; Jung, H.; Kapichine, M.; Katzy, J.; Kenyon, I.R.; Kiesling, C.; Klein, M.; Kleinwort, C.; Kluge, T.; Knutsson, A.; Kogler, R.; Kostka, P.; Kraemer, M.; Krastev, K.; Kretzschmar, J.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Kruger, K.; Kutak, K.; Landon, M.P.J.; Lange, W.; Lastovicka-Medin, G.; Laycock, P.; Lebedev, A.; Leibenguth, G.; Lendermann, V.; Levonian, S.; Li, G.; Lipka, K.; Liptaj, A.; List, B.; List, J.; Loktionova, N.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Lubimov, V.; Lytkin, L.; Makankine, A.; Malinovski, E.; Marage, P.; Marti, Ll.; Martyn, H.U.; Maxfield, S.J.; Mehta, A.; Meyer, A.B.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Michels, V.; Mikocki, S.; Milcewicz-Mika, I.; Moreau, F.; Morozov, A.; Morris, J.V.; Mozer, M.U.; Mudrinic, M.; Muller, K.; Murin, P.; Naumann, Th.; Newman, P.R.; Niebuhr, C.; Nikiforov, A.; Nowak, G.; Nowak, K.; Nozicka, M.; Olivier, B.; Olsson, J.E.; Osman, S.; Ozerov, D.; Palichik, V.; Panagoulias, I.; Pandurovic, M.; Papadopoulou, Th.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G.D.; Pejchal, O.; Perez, E.; Petrukhin, A.; Picuric, I.; Piec, S.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Pokorny, B.; Polifka, R.; Povh, B.; Preda, T.; Radescu, V.; Rahmat, A.J.; Raicevic, N.; Raspiareza, A.; Ravdandorj, T.; Reimer, P.; Rizvi, E.; Robmann, P.; Roland, B.; Roosen, R.; Rostovtsev, A.; Rotaru, M.; Ruiz Tabasco, J.E.; Rurikova, Z.; Rusakov, S.; Salek, D.; Sankey, D.P.C.; Sauter, M.; Sauvan, E.; Schmitt, S.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoning, A.; Schultz-Coulon, H.C.; Sefkow, F.; Shaw-West, R.N.; Shtarkov, L.N.; Shushkevich, S.; Sloan, T.; Smiljanic, I.; Soloviev, Y.; Sopicki, P.; South, D.; Spaskov, V.; Specka, A.; Staykova, Z.; Steder, M.; Stella, B.; Stoicea, G.; Straumann, U.; Sunar, D.; Sykora, T.; Tchoulakov, V.; Thompson, G.; Thompson, P.D.; Toll, T.; Tomasz, F.; Tran, T.H.; Traynor, D.; Trinh, T.N.; Truol, P.; Tsakov, I.; Tseepeldorj, B.; Turnau, J.; Urban, K.; Valkarova, A.; Vallee, C.; Van Mechelen, P.; Vargas Trevino, A.; Vazdik, Y.; Vinokurova, S.; Volchinski, V.; von den Driesch, M.; Wegener, D.; Wissing, Ch.; Wunsch, E.; Zacek, J.; Zalesak, J.; Zhang, Z.; Zhokin, A.; Zimmermann, T.; Zohrabyan, H.; Zomer, F.; Zus, R.

    2010-01-01

    Diffractive electroproduction of rho and phi mesons is measured at HERA with the H1 detector in the elastic and proton dissociative channels. The data correspond to an integrated luminosity of 51 pb^-1. About 10500 rho and 2000 phi events are analysed in the kinematic range of squared photon virtuality 2.5 < Q^2 < 60 GeV^2, photon-proton centre of mass energy 35 < W < 180 GeV and squared four-momentum transfer to the proton |t| < 3 GeV^2. The total, longitudinal and transverse cross sections are measured as a function of Q^2, W and |t|. The measurements show a transition to a dominantly "hard" behaviour, typical of high gluon densities and small q\\bar{q} dipoles, for Q^2 larger than 10 to 20 GeV^2. They support flavour independence of the diffractive exchange, expressed in terms of the scaling variable (Q^2 + M_V^2)/4, and proton vertex factorisation. The spin density matrix elements are measured as a function of kinematic variables. The ratio of the longitudinal to transverse cross sections, t...

  12. Consistent model driven architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niepostyn, Stanisław J.

    2015-09-01

    The goal of the MDA is to produce software systems from abstract models in a way where human interaction is restricted to a minimum. These abstract models are based on the UML language. However, the semantics of UML models is defined in a natural language. Subsequently the verification of consistency of these diagrams is needed in order to identify errors in requirements at the early stage of the development process. The verification of consistency is difficult due to a semi-formal nature of UML diagrams. We propose automatic verification of consistency of the series of UML diagrams originating from abstract models implemented with our consistency rules. This Consistent Model Driven Architecture approach enables us to generate automatically complete workflow applications from consistent and complete models developed from abstract models (e.g. Business Context Diagram). Therefore, our method can be used to check practicability (feasibility) of software architecture models.

  13. Bitcoin Meets Strong Consistency

    OpenAIRE

    Decker, Christian; Seidel, Jochen; Wattenhofer, Roger

    2014-01-01

    The Bitcoin system only provides eventual consistency. For everyday life, the time to confirm a Bitcoin transaction is prohibitively slow. In this paper we propose a new system, built on the Bitcoin blockchain, which enables strong consistency. Our system, PeerCensus, acts as a certification authority, manages peer identities in a peer-to-peer network, and ultimately enhances Bitcoin and similar systems with strong consistency. Our extensive analysis shows that PeerCensus is in a secure state...

  14. Piezoelectric ceramic (PZT) modulates axonal guidance growth of rat cortical neurons via RhoA, Rac1, and Cdc42 pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Jianqiang; Liu, Meili

    2014-03-01

    Electrical stimulation is critical for axonal connection, which can stimulate axonal migration and deformation to promote axonal growth in the nervous system. Netrin-1, an axonal guidance cue, can also promote axonal guidance growth, but the molecular mechanism of axonal guidance growth under indirect electric stimulation is still unknown. We investigated the molecular mechanism of axonal guidance growth under piezoelectric ceramic lead zirconate titanate (PZT) stimulation in the primary cultured cortical neurons. PZT induced marked axonal elongation. Moreover, PZT activated the excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) by increasing the frequency and amplitude of EPSCs of the cortical neurons in patch clamp assay. PZT downregulated the expression of Netrin-1 and its receptor Deleted in Colorectal Cancer (DCC). Rho GTPase signaling is involved in interactions of Netrin-1 and DCC. PZT activated RhoA. Dramatic decrease of Cdc42 and Rac1 was also observed after PZT treatment. RhoA inhibitor Clostridium botulinum C3 exoenzyme (C3-Exo) prevented the PZT-induced downregulation of Netrin-1 and DCC. We suggest that PZT can promote axonal guidance growth by downregulation of Netrin-1 and DCC to mediate axonal repulsive responses via the Rho GTPase signaling pathway. Obviously, piezoelectric materials may provide a new approach for axonal recovery and be beneficial for clinical therapy in the future.

  15. Consistent classical supergravity theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muller, M.

    1989-01-01

    This book offers a presentation of both conformal and Poincare supergravity. The consistent four-dimensional supergravity theories are classified. The formulae needed for further modelling are included

  16. HFBR restart activity A2.6: Review of FSAR and 60 MW addendum to assure consistency of operation at 40 MW

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao, D.V.; Ross, S.B.; Darby, J.L.; Clark, R.A.

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of this task (HFBR Restart Activity A2.6) is to perform a review of the design basis accident (DBA) analyses sections of the 1964 HFBR-Final Safety Analysis Report; Volumes I and II, and the 1982 Addendum to the HFBR-FSAR for 60 MW operation to assure that operation at 40 MW will be consistent with these analyses. Additional documents utilized in the review included the Level 1 PRA for HFBR, HFBR-PDMs and HFBR-OPMs. The review indicates that the 1964 FSAR-DBA analysis in incomplete in the sense that it did not analyze some of the important initiators for 1-loop operation that include: Accidental throttling of primary flow control valves; seizure of primary pump; loss of secondary pump; accidental throttling of secondary flow control valves; rupture of secondary piping. The first three initiators were later studied in the 1982 addendum. The other two initiators have not been examined to-date for 1-loop operation. It is recommended that the impact of these initiators be assessed prior to the restart, if 1-loop operation is chosen for the restart. The review demonstrated that at 40 MW operation there are only a few accident initiators that will culminate in core damage (fuel melting and /or cladding failure) regardless of the availability of mitigating systems. For 1-loop Operation these accidents include: Fuel channel blockage, primary pump seizure, and large-large LOCA (a LOCA with effective break diameter > 2.81 in. is referred to as a large-large LOCA in this document as well as in PRA). Although all these accidents listed above could lead to core damage for 1-loop operation as well, the probability is expected be very low

  17. Structural dynamics of phenylisothiocyanate in the light-absorbing excited states: Resonance Raman and complete active space self-consistent field calculation study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ouyang, Bing; Xue, Jia-Dan; Zheng, Xuming; Fang, Wei-Hai

    2014-01-01

    The excited state structural dynamics of phenyl isothiocyanate (PITC) after excitation to the light absorbing S 2 (A′), S 6 (A′), and S 7 (A′) excited states were studied by using the resonance Raman spectroscopy and complete active space self-consistent field method calculations. The UV absorption bands of PITC were assigned. The vibrational assignments were done on the basis of the Fourier transform (FT)-Raman and FT-infrared measurements, the density-functional theory computations, and the normal mode analysis. The A-, B-, and C-bands resonance Raman spectra in cyclohexane, acetonitrile, and methanol solvents were, respectively, obtained at 299.1, 282.4, 266.0, 252.7, 228.7, 217.8, and 208.8 nm excitation wavelengths to probe the corresponding structural dynamics of PITC. The results indicated that the structural dynamics in the S 2 (A′), S 6 (A′), and S 7 (A′) excited states were very different. The conical intersection point CI(S 2 /S 1 ) were predicted to play important role in the low-lying excited state decay dynamics. Two major decay channels were predicted for PITC upon excitation to the S 2 (A′) state: the radiative S 2,min → S 0 transition and the nonradiative S 2 → S 1 internal conversion via CI(S 2 /S 1 ). The differences in the decay dynamics between methyl isothiocyanate and PITC in the first light absorbing excited state were discussed. The role of the intersystem crossing point ISC(S 1 /T 1 ) in the excited state decay dynamics of PITC is evaluated

  18. Consistency of orthodox gravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bellucci, S. [INFN, Frascati (Italy). Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati; Shiekh, A. [International Centre for Theoretical Physics, Trieste (Italy)

    1997-01-01

    A recent proposal for quantizing gravity is investigated for self consistency. The existence of a fixed-point all-order solution is found, corresponding to a consistent quantum gravity. A criterion to unify couplings is suggested, by invoking an application of their argument to more complex systems.

  19. Quasiparticles and thermodynamical consistency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shanenko, A.A.; Biro, T.S.; Toneev, V.D.

    2003-01-01

    A brief and simple introduction into the problem of the thermodynamical consistency is given. The thermodynamical consistency relations, which should be taken into account under constructing a quasiparticle model, are found in a general manner from the finite-temperature extension of the Hellmann-Feynman theorem. Restrictions following from these relations are illustrated by simple physical examples. (author)

  20. p120-catenin differentially regulates cell migration by Rho-dependent intracellular and secreted signals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Epifano, Carolina; Megias, Diego; Perez-Moreno, Mirna

    2014-01-01

    The adherens junction protein p120-catenin is implicated in the regulation of cadherin stability, cell migration and inflammatory responses in mammalian epithelial tissues. How these events are coordinated to promote wound repair is not understood. We show that p120 catenin regulates the intrinsic...... migratory properties of primary mouse keratinocytes, but also influences the migratory behavior of neighboring cells by secreted signals. These events are rooted in the ability of p120-catenin to regulate RhoA GTPase activity, which leads to a two-tiered control of cell migration. One restrains cell...... motility via an increase in actin stress fibers, reduction in integrin turnover and an increase in the robustness of focal adhesions. The other is coupled to the secretion of inflammatory cytokines including interleukin-24, which causally enhances randomized cell movements. Taken together, our results...

  1. Design of Aminobenzothiazole Inhibitors of Rho Kinases 1 and 2 by Using Protein Kinase A as a Structure Surrogate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judge, Russell A; Vasudevan, Anil; Scott, Victoria E; Simler, Gricelda H; Pratt, Steve D; Namovic, Marian T; Putman, C Brent; Aguirre, Ana; Stoll, Vincent S; Mamo, Mulugeta; Swann, Steven I; Cassar, Steven C; Faltynek, Connie R; Kage, Karen L; Boyce-Rustay, Janel M; Hobson, Adrian D

    2018-03-16

    We describe the design, synthesis, and structure-activity relationships (SARs) of a series of 2-aminobenzothiazole inhibitors of Rho kinases (ROCKs) 1 and 2, which were optimized to low nanomolar potencies by use of protein kinase A (PKA) as a structure surrogate to guide compound design. A subset of these molecules also showed robust activity in a cell-based myosin phosphatase assay and in a mechanical hyperalgesia in vivo pain model. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. The RhoGAP Stard13 controls insulin secretion through F-actin remodeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heike Naumann

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Actin cytoskeleton remodeling is necessary for glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in pancreatic β-cells. A mechanistic understanding of actin dynamics in the islet is paramount to a better comprehension of β-cell dysfunction in diabetes. Here, we investigate the Rho GTPase regulator Stard13 and its role in F-actin cytoskeleton organization and islet function in adult mice. Methods: We used Lifeact-EGFP transgenic animals to visualize actin cytoskeleton organization and dynamics in vivo in the mouse islets. Furthermore, we applied this model to study actin cytoskeleton and insulin secretion in mutant mice deleted for Stard13 selectively in pancreatic cells. We isolated transgenic islets for 3D-imaging and perifusion studies to measure insulin secretion dynamics. In parallel, we performed histological and morphometric analyses of the pancreas and used in vivo approaches to study glucose metabolism in the mouse. Results: In this study, we provide the first genetic evidence that Stard13 regulates insulin secretion in response to glucose. Postnatally, Stard13 expression became restricted to the mouse pancreatic islets. We showed that Stard13 deletion results in a marked increase in actin polymerization in islet cells, which is accompanied by severe reduction of insulin secretion in perifusion experiments. Consistently, Stard13-deleted mice displayed impaired glucose tolerance and reduced glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. Conclusions: Taken together, our results suggest a previously unappreciated role for the RhoGAP protein Stard13 in the interplay between actin cytoskeletal remodeling and insulin secretion. Keywords: F-actin, Insulin secretion, Islet, Pancreas, Lifeact, Stard13

  3. 42 CFR 493.859 - Standard; ABO group and D (Rho) typing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Standard; ABO group and D (Rho) typing. 493.859 Section 493.859 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN..., Or Any Combination of These Tests § 493.859 Standard; ABO group and D (Rho) typing. (a) Failure to...

  4. Human Mammary Epithelial Cell Transformation by Rho GTPase Through a Novel Mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-08-01

    87: 635-44. 18. Burbelo P, Wellstein A, Pestell RG. Altered Rho GTPase signaling pathways in breast cancer cells. Breast Cancer Res Treat 2004; 84...Burbelo P, Wellstein A, Pestell RG. Altered Rho GTPase signaling pathways in breast cancer cells. Breast Cancer Res Treat 2004;84:43–8. 19. Band V

  5. An ELMO2-RhoG-ILK network modulates microtubule dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Bradley C; Ivanova, Iordanka A; Dagnino, Lina

    2015-07-15

    ELMO2 belongs to a family of scaffold proteins involved in phagocytosis and cell motility. ELMO2 can simultaneously bind integrin-linked kinase (ILK) and RhoG, forming tripartite ERI complexes. These complexes are involved in promoting β1 integrin-dependent directional migration in undifferentiated epidermal keratinocytes. ELMO2 and ILK have also separately been implicated in microtubule regulation at integrin-containing focal adhesions. During differentiation, epidermal keratinocytes cease to express integrins, but ERI complexes persist. Here we show an integrin-independent role of ERI complexes in modulation of microtubule dynamics in differentiated keratinocytes. Depletion of ERI complexes by inactivating the Ilk gene in these cells reduces microtubule growth and increases the frequency of catastrophe. Reciprocally, exogenous expression of ELMO2 or RhoG stabilizes microtubules, but only if ILK is also present. Mechanistically, activation of Rac1 downstream from ERI complexes mediates their effects on microtubule stability. In this pathway, Rac1 serves as a hub to modulate microtubule dynamics through two different routes: 1) phosphorylation and inactivation of the microtubule-destabilizing protein stathmin and 2) phosphorylation and inactivation of GSK-3β, which leads to the activation of CRMP2, promoting microtubule growth. At the cellular level, the absence of ERI species impairs Ca(2+)-mediated formation of adherens junctions, critical to maintaining mechanical integrity in the epidermis. Our findings support a key role for ERI species in integrin-independent stabilization of the microtubule network in differentiated keratinocytes. © 2015 Jackson et al. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  6. A solution to the rho-π puzzle: Spontaneously broken symmetries of the quark model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caldi, D.G.; Pagels, H.

    1976-01-01

    This article proposes a solution to the long-standing rho-π puzzle: How can the rho and π be members of a quark model U(6) 36 and the π be a Nambu-Goldstone boson satisfying partial conservation of the axial-vector current (PCAC) Our solution to the puzzle requires a revision of conventional concepts regarding the vector mesons rho, ω, K*, and phi. Just as the π is a Goldstone state, a collective excitation of the Nambu--Jona-Lasinio type, transforming as a member of the (3, 3) + (3, 3) representation of the chiral SU(3) x SU(3) group, so also the rho transforms like (3, 3) + (3, 3) and is also a collective state, a ''dormant'' Goldstone boson that is a true Goldstone boson in the static chiral U(6) x U(6) limit. The static chiral U(6) x U(6) is to be spontaneously broken to static U(6) in the vacuum. Relativisitc effects provide for U(6) breaking and a massive rho. This viewpoint has many consequences. Vector-meson dominance is a consequence of spontaneously broken chiral symmetry: the mechanism that couples the axial-vector current to the π couples the vector current to the rho. The transition rate is calculated as γ/sub rho/ -1 = f/sub pi//m/sub rho/ in rough agreement with experiment. This picture requires soft rho's to decouple. The chiral partner of the rho is not the A 1 but the B (1235). The experimental absence of the A 1 is no longer a theoretical embarrassment in this scheme. As the analog of PCAC for the pion we establish a tensor-field identity for the rho meson in which the rho is interpreted as a dormant Goldstone state. The decays delta → eta + π, B → ω + π, epsilon → 2π are estimated and are found to be in agreement with the observed rates. A static U(6) x U(6) generalization of the Σ model is presented with the π, rho, sigma, B in the (6, 6) + (6, 6) representation. The rho emerges as a dormant Goldstone boson in this model

  7. etaγ decays of rho0, ω, and phi mesons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrews, D.E.; Fukushima, Y.; Harvey, J.; Lobkowicz, F.; May, E.N.; Nelson, C.A. Jr.; Thorndike, E.H.

    1977-01-01

    etaγ decays of rho 0 , ω, and phi are studied. We find GAMMA (phi→etaγ) =55 +- 12 keV. Our data admit two solutions for (rho 0 , ω) →etaγ: Either GAMMA (rho 0 →etaγ) =50 +- 13 keV, GAMMA (ω→etaγ) =3.0 +2 /sup ./ 5 /sub -/ 1 /sub ./ 8 keV, and the (ω,rho) →etaγ relative decay phase is near zero; or GAMMA (rho 0 →etaγ) =76 +- 15 keV, GAMMA (ω→etaγ) =29 +- 7 keV, and the decay phase is near 180degree

  8. Involvement of Tiam1, RhoG and ELMO2/ILK in Rac1-mediated phagocytosis in human trabecular meshwork cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peotter, Jennifer L; Phillips, Jenny; Tong, Tiegang; Dimeo, Kaylee; Gonzalez, Jose M; Peters, Donna M

    2016-10-01

    We previously demonstrated that an αvβ5 integrin/FAK- mediated pathway regulated the phagocytic properties of human trabecular meshwork (HTM) cells. Here we demonstrate that this process is mediated by Rac-1 and a previously unreported signaling pathway that utilizes the Tiam1 as well as a novel ILK/RhoG/ELMO2 signaling pathway. Phagocytosis in both a TM-1 cell line and normal HTM cells was mediated by Rac1 and could be significantly decreased by >75% using the Rac1 inhibitor EHop-016. Knockdown of Rac1 in TM-1 cells also inhibited phagocytosis by 40% whereas overexpression of a constitutively active Rac1 or stimulation with PDGF increased phagocytosis by 83% and 32% respectively. Tiam1 was involved in regulating phagocytosis. Knockdown of Tiam1 inhibited phagocytosis by 72% while overexpression of Tiam1 C1199 increased phagocytosis by 75%. Other upstream effectors of Rac1 found to be involved included ELMO2, RhoG, and ILK. Knockdowns of ELMO2, ILK, and RhoG caused a reduction in phagocytosis by 51%, 55% and 46% respectively. In contrast, knockdown of Vav2 and Dock1 or overexpression of Vav2 Y159/172F did not cause a significant change in phagocytosis. These data suggest a novel link between Tiam1 and RhoG/ILK /ELMO2 pathway as upstream effectors of the Rac1-mediated phagocytic process in TM cells. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Endothelial microparticle formation by angiotensin II is mediated via Ang II receptor type I/NADPH oxidase/ Rho kinase pathways targeted to lipid rafts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burger, Dylan; Montezano, Augusto C; Nishigaki, Nobuhiro; He, Ying; Carter, Anthony; Touyz, Rhian M

    2011-08-01

    Circulating microparticles are increased in cardiovascular disease and may themselves promote oxidative stress and inflammation. Molecular mechanisms underlying their formation and signaling are unclear. We investigated the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS), Rho kinase, and lipid rafts in microparticle formation and examined their functional significance in endothelial cells (ECs). Microparticle formation from angiotensin II (Ang II)-stimulated ECs and apolipoprotein E(-/-) mice was assessed by annexin V or by CD144 staining and electron microscopy. Ang II promoted microparticle formation and increased EC O(2)(-) generation and Rho kinase activity. Ang II-stimulated effects were inhibited by irbesartan (Ang II receptor type I blocker) and fasudil (Rho kinase inhibitor). Methyl-β-cyclodextrin and nystatin, which disrupt lipid rafts/caveolae, blocked microparticle release. Functional responses, assessed in microparticle-stimulated ECs, revealed increased O(2)(-) production, enhanced vascular cell adhesion molecule/platelet-EC adhesion molecule expression, and augmented macrophage adhesion. Inhibition of epidermal growth factor receptor blocked the prooxidative and proinflammatory effects of microparticles. In vitro observations were confirmed in apolipoprotein E(-/-) mice, which displayed vascular inflammation and high levels of circulating endothelial microparticles, effects that were reduced by apocynin. We demonstrated direct actions of Ang II on endothelial microparticle release, mediated through NADPH oxidase, ROS, and Rho kinase targeted to lipid rafts. Microparticles themselves stimulated endothelial ROS formation and inflammatory responses. Our findings suggest a feedforward system whereby Ang II promotes EC injury through its own endothelial-derived microparticles.

  10. oxLDL induces endothelial cell proliferation via Rho/ROCK/Akt/p27kip1 signaling: opposite effects of oxLDL and cholesterol loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chongxu; Adamos, Crystal; Oh, Myung-Jin; Baruah, Jugajyoti; Ayee, Manuela A A; Mehta, Dolly; Wary, Kishore K; Levitan, Irena

    2017-09-01

    Oxidized modifications of LDL (oxLDL) play a key role in the development of endothelial dysfunction and atherosclerosis. However, the underlying mechanisms of oxLDL-mediated cellular behavior are not completely understood. Here, we compared the effects of two major types of oxLDL, copper-oxidized LDL (Cu 2+ -oxLDL) and lipoxygenase-oxidized LDL (LPO-oxLDL), on proliferation of human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs). Cu 2+ -oxLDL enhanced HAECs' proliferation in a dose- and degree of oxidation-dependent manner. Similarly, LPO-oxLDL also enhanced HAEC proliferation. Mechanistically, both Cu 2+ -oxLDL and LPO-oxLDL enhance HAEC proliferation via activation of Rho, Akt phosphorylation, and a decrease in the expression of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1B (p27 kip1 ). Both Cu 2+ -oxLDL or LPO-oxLDL significantly increased Akt phosphorylation, whereas an Akt inhibitor, MK2206, blocked oxLDL-induced increase in HAEC proliferation. Blocking Rho with C3 or its downstream target ROCK with Y27632 significantly inhibited oxLDL-induced Akt phosphorylation and proliferation mediated by both Cu 2+ - and LPO-oxLDL. Activation of RhoA was blocked by Rho-GDI-1, which also abrogated oxLDL-induced Akt phosphorylation and HAEC proliferation. In contrast, blocking Rac1 in these cells had no effect on oxLDL-induced Akt phosphorylation or cell proliferation. Moreover, oxLDL-induced Rho/Akt signaling downregulated cell cycle inhibitor p27 kip1 Preloading these cells with cholesterol, however, prevented oxLDL-induced Akt phosphorylation and HAEC proliferation. These findings provide a new understanding of the effects of oxLDL on endothelial proliferation, which is essential for developing new treatments against neovascularization and progression of atherosclerosis. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  11. Effect and mechanism of evodiamine against ethanol-induced gastric ulcer in mice by suppressing Rho/NF-кB pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zhongyan; Gong, Shilin; Wang, Shumin; Ma, Chunhua

    2015-09-01

    Evodiamine (EVD), a major alkaloid compound extracted from the dry unripened fruit Evodia fructus (Evodia rutaecarpa Benth., Rutaceae), has various pharmacological effects. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the possible anti-ulcerogenic potential of EVD and explore the underlying mechanism against ethanol-induced gastric ulcer in mice. Administration of EVD at the doses of 20, 40mg/kg body weight prior to the ethanol ingestion could effectively protect the stomach from ulceration. The gastric lesion was significantly ameliorated in the EVD group compared with that in the model group. Pre-treatment with EVD prevented the oxidative damage and decreased the levels of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) content, interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α). In addition, EVD pretreatment markedly increased the serum levels of glutathione (GSH), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT), decreased malonaldehyde (MDA) content in serum and activity of myeloperoxidase (MPO) in stomach tissues compared with those in the model group. In the mechanistic study, significant elevation of Rho, Rho-kinase 1 (ROCK1), ROCK2, cytosolic and nucleic NF-κBp65 expressions were observed in the gastric mucosa group, whereas EVD effectively suppressed the protein expressions of Rho, Rho-kinase 1 (ROCK1), ROCK2, cytosolic and nucleic NF-κBp65 in mice. Moreover, EVD showed protective activity on ethanol-induced GES-1 cells, while the therapeutic effects were not due to its cytotoxity. Taken together, these results strongly indicated that EVD exerted a gastro-protective effect against gastric ulceration. The underlying mechanism might be associated with the improvement of antioxidant and anti-inflammatory status through Rho/NF-κB pathway. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Inclusive and semi-inclusive rho0 production in π-p interactions at 147 GeV/c

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fong, D.; Heller, M.; Shapiro, A.M.; Widgoff, M.; Bruyant, F.; Bogert, D.; Johnson, M.; Burnstein, R.; Fu, C.; Petersen, D.; Robertson, M.; Rubin, H.; Sard, R.; Snyder, A.; Tortora, J.; Alyea, D.; Chien, C.-Y.; Lucas, P.; Pevsner, A.; Zdanis, R.; Brau, J.; Grunhaus, J.; Hafen, E.S.; Hulsizer, R.I.; Karshon, U.; Kistiakowsky, V.; Levy, A.; Napier, A.; Pless, I.A.; Trepagnier, P.C.; Wolfson, J.; Yamamoto, R.K.; Cohn, H.; Ou, T.C.; Plano, R.; Watts, T.; Brucker, E.; Koller, E.; Stamer, P.; Taylor, S.; Bugg, W.; Condo, G.; Handler, T.; Hart, E.; Kraybill, H.; Ljung, D.; Ludlam, T.; Taft, H.D.

    1975-01-01

    Data on inclusive and semi-inclusive rho 0 production in 147 GeV/c π - p interactions are presented. A total cross section of 7.3+-1.3 mb is found. Most of this cross section is found in the lower topology events ( 2 dependence of rho 0 production, sub(rho 0 ) per event, and the rho 0 /π + ratios are also discussed. (Auth.)

  13. Diffractive electroproduction of {rho} and {phi} mesons at HERA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aaron, F.D. [National Inst. for Physics and Nuclear Engineering (NIPNE), Bucharest (Romania); Bucharest Univ. (Romania). Faculty of Physics; Aldaya Martin, M. [DESY Hamburg (Germany); Alexa, C. [National Inst. for Physics and Nuclear Engineering (NIPNE), Bucharest (RO)] (and others)

    2009-06-15

    Diffractive electroproduction of {rho} and {phi} mesons is measured at HERA with the H1 detector in the elastic and proton dissociative channels. The data correspond to an integrated luminosity of 51 pb{sup -1}. About 10500 {rho} and 2000 {phi} events are analysed in the kinematic range of squared photon virtuality 2.5{<=}Q{sup 2}{<=}60 GeV{sup 2}, photon-proton centre of mass energy 35{<=}W{<=}180 GeV and squared four-momentum transfer to the proton vertical stroke 3 vertical stroke {<=} GeV{sup 2}. The total, longitudinal and transverse cross sections are measured as a function of Q{sup 2}, W and vertical stroke 3 vertical stroke. The measurements show a transition to a dominantly ''hard'' behaviour, typical of high gluon densities and small q anti q dipoles, for Q{sup 2} larger than 10 to 20 GeV{sup 2}. They support flavour independence of the diffractive exchange, expressed in terms of the scaling variable (Q{sup 2}+M{sub V}{sup 2})/4, and proton vertex factorisation. The spin density matrix elements are measured as a function of kinematic variables. The ratio of the longitudinal to transverse cross sections, the ratio of the helicity amplitudes and their relative phases are extracted. Several of these measurements have not been performed before and bring new information on the dynamics of diffraction in a QCD framework. The measurements are discussed in the context of models using generalised parton distributions or universal dipole cross sections. (orig.)

  14. Tetramethylpyrazine Protects Against Oxygen-Glucose Deprivation-Induced Brain Microvascular Endothelial Cells Injury via Rho/Rho-kinase Signaling Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Guang; Qian, Chen; Wang, Ning; Lin, Chenyu; Wang, Yan; Wang, Guangyun; Piao, Xinxin

    2017-05-01

    Tetramethylpyrazine (TMP, also known as Ligustrazine), which is isolated from Chinese Herb Medicine Ligustium wollichii Franchat (Chuan Xiong), has been widely used in China for the treatment of ischemic stroke by Chinese herbalists. Brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMECs) are the integral parts of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), protecting BMECs against oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) which is important for the treatment of ischemic stroke. Here, we investigated the protective mechanisms of TMP, focusing on OGD-injured BMECs and the Rho/Rho-kinase (Rho-associated kinases, ROCK) signaling pathway. The model of OGD-injured BMECs was established in this study. BMECs were identified by von Willebrand factor III staining and exposed to fasudil, or TMP at different concentrations (14.3, 28.6, 57.3 µM) for 2 h before 24 h of OGD injury. The effect of each treatment was examined by cell viability assays, measurement of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), and transendothelial electric resistance and western blot analysis (caspase-3, endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), RhoA, Rac1). Our results show that TMP significantly attenuated apoptosis and the permeability of BMECs induced by OGD. In addition, TMP could notably down-regulate the characteristic proteins in Rho/ROCK signaling pathway such as RhoA and Rac1, which triggered abnormal changes of eNOS and ROS, respectively. Altogether, our results show that TMP has a strong protective effect against OGD-induced BMECs injury and suggest that the mechanism might be related to the inhibition of the Rho/ROCK signaling pathway.

  15. Rho Kinase (ROCK) collaborates with Pak to Regulate Actin Polymerization and Contraction in Airway Smooth Muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wenwu; Bhetwal, Bhupal P; Gunst, Susan J

    2018-05-10

    The mechanisms by which Rho kinase (ROCK) regulates airway smooth muscle contraction were determined in tracheal smooth muscle tissues. ROCK may mediate smooth muscle contraction by inhibiting myosin regulatory light chain (RLC) phosphatase. ROCK can also regulate F-actin dynamics during cell migration, and actin polymerization is critical for airway smooth muscle contraction. Our results show that ROCK does not regulate airway smooth muscle contraction by inhibiting myosin RLC phosphatase or by stimulating myosin RLC phosphorylation. We find that ROCK regulates airway smooth muscle contraction by activating the serine-threonine kinase Pak, which mediates the activation of Cdc42 and Neuronal-Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome protein (N-WASp). N-WASP transmits signals from cdc42 to the Arp2/3 complex for the nucleation of actin filaments. These results demonstrate a novel molecular function for ROCK in the regulation of Pak and cdc42 activation that is critical for the processes of actin polymerization and contractility in airway smooth muscle. Rho kinase (ROCK), a RhoA GTPase effector, can regulate the contraction of airway and other smooth muscle tissues. In some tissues, ROCK can inhibit myosin regulatory light chain (RLC) phosphatase, which increases the phosphorylation of myosin RLC and promotes smooth muscle contraction. ROCK can also regulate cell motility and migration by affecting F-actin dynamics. Actin polymerization is stimulated by contractile agonists in airway smooth muscle tissues and is required for contractile tension development in addition to myosin RLC phosphorylation. We investigated the mechanisms by which ROCK regulates the contractility of tracheal smooth muscle tissues by expressing a kinase inactive mutant of ROCK, ROCK-K121G, in the tissues or by treating them with the ROCK inhibitor, H-1152P. Our results show no role for ROCK in the regulation of non-muscle or smooth muscle myosin RLC phosphorylation during contractile stimulation in this tissue

  16. Valence nucleons in self-consistent fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di Toro, M.; Lomnitz-Adler, J.

    1978-01-01

    An iterative approach to determine directly the best Hartree-Fock one-body density rho is extended by expressing rho in terms of a core and a valence part and allowing for general crossings of occupied and unoccupied levels in the valence part. Results are shown for 152 Sm and a microscopic analysis of the core structure of deformed light nuclei is carried out. (author)

  17. Role of epimorphin in bile duct formation of rat liver epithelial stem-like cells: involvement of small G protein RhoA and C/EBPβ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Yali; Yao, Hailei; Zhou, Junnian; Chen, Lin; Zeng, Quan; Yuan, Hongfeng; Shi, Lei; Nan, Xue; Wang, Yunfang; Yue, Wen; Pei, Xuetao

    2011-11-01

    Epimorphin/syntaxin 2 is a high conserved and very abundant protein involved in epithelial morphogenesis in various organs. We have shown recently that epimorphin (EPM), a protein exclusively expressed on the surface of hepatic stellate cells and myofibroblasts of the liver, induces bile duct formation of hepatic stem-like cells (WB-F344 cells) in a putative biophysical way. Therefore, the aim of this study was to present some of the molecular mechanisms by which EPM mediates bile duct formation. We established a biliary differentiation model by co-culture of EPM-overexpressed mesenchymal cells (PT67(EPM)) with WB-F344 cells. Here, we showed that EPM could promote WB-F344 cells differentiation into bile duct-like structures. Biliary differentiation markers were also elevated by EPM including Yp, Cx43, aquaporin-1, CK19, and gamma glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT). Moreover, the signaling pathway of EPM was analyzed by focal adhesion kinase (FAK), extracellular regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2), and RhoA Western blot. Also, a dominant negative (DN) RhoA-WB-F344 cell line (WB(RhoA-DN)) was constructed. We found that the levels of phosphorylation (p) of FAK and ERK1/2 were up-regulated by EPM. Most importantly, we also showed that RhoA is necessary for EPM-induced activation of FAK and ERK1/2 and bile duct formation. In addition, a dual luciferase-reporter assay and CHIP assay was performed to reveal that EPM regulates GGT IV and GGT V expression differentially, possibly mediated by C/EBPβ. Taken together, these data demonstrated that EPM regulates bile duct formation of WB-F344 cells through effects on RhoA and C/EBPβ, implicating a dual aspect of this morphoregulator in bile duct epithelial morphogenesis. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  18. Ang II-AT2R increases mesenchymal stem cell migration by signaling through the FAK and RhoA/Cdc42 pathways in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiu-Ping; He, Hong-Li; Hu, Shu-Ling; Han, Ji-Bin; Huang, Li-Li; Xu, Jing-Yuan; Xie, Jian-Feng; Liu, Ai-Ran; Yang, Yi; Qiu, Hai-Bo

    2017-07-12

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) migrate via the bloodstream to sites of injury and are possibly attracted by inflammatory factors. As a proinflammatory mediator, angiotensin II (Ang II) reportedly enhances the migration of various cell types by signaling via the Ang II receptor in vitro. However, few studies have focused on the effects of Ang II on MSC migration and the underlying mechanisms. Human bone marrow MSCs migration was measured using wound healing and Boyden chamber migration assays after treatments with different concentrations of Ang II, an AT1R antagonist (Losartan), and/or an AT2R antagonist (PD-123319). To exclude the effect of proliferation on MSC migration, we measured MSC proliferation after stimulation with the same concentration of Ang II. Additionally, we employed the focal adhesion kinase (FAK) inhibitor PF-573228, RhoA inhibitor C3 transferase, Rac1 inhibitor NSC23766, or Cdc42 inhibitor ML141 to investigate the role of cell adhesion proteins and the Rho-GTPase protein family (RhoA, Rac1, and Cdc42) in Ang II-mediated MSC migration. Cell adhesion proteins (FAK, Talin, and Vinculin) were detected by western blot analysis. The Rho-GTPase family protein activities were assessed by G-LISA and F-actin levels, which reflect actin cytoskeletal organization, were detected by using immunofluorescence. Human bone marrow MSCs constitutively expressed AT1R and AT2R. Additionally, Ang II increased MSC migration in an AT2R-dependent manner. Notably, Ang II-enhanced migration was not mediated by Ang II-mediated cell proliferation. Interestingly, Ang II-enhanced migration was mediated by FAK activation, which was critical for the formation of focal contacts, as evidenced by increased Talin and Vinculin expression. Moreover, RhoA and Cdc42 were activated by FAK to increase cytoskeletal organization, thus promoting cell contraction. Furthermore, FAK, Talin, and Vinculin activation and F-actin reorganization in response to Ang II were prevented by PD-123319 but

  19. Lifetime of rho meson in correlation with magnetic-dimensional reduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawaguchi, Mamiya [Nagoya University, Department of Physics, Nagoya (Japan); Matsuzaki, Shinya [Nagoya University, Department of Physics, Nagoya (Japan); Nagoya University, Institute for Advanced Research, Nagoya (Japan)

    2017-04-15

    It is naively expected that in a strong magnetic configuration, the Landau quantization ceases the neutral rho meson to decay to the charged pion pair, so the neutral rho meson will be long-lived. To closely access this naive observation, we explicitly compute the charged pion loop in the magnetic field at the one-loop level, to evaluate the magnetic dependence of the lifetime for the neutral rho meson as well as its mass. Due to the dimensional reduction induced by the magnetic field (violation of the Lorentz invariance), the polarization (spin s{sub z} = 0, ±1) modes of the rho meson, as well as the corresponding pole mass and width, are decomposed in a nontrivial manner compared to the vacuum case. To see the significance of the reduction effect, we simply take the lowest Landau level approximation to analyze the spin-dependent rho masses and widths. We find that the ''fate'' of the rho meson may be more complicated because of the magnetic-dimensional reduction: as the magnetic field increases, the rho width for the spin s{sub z} = 0 starts to develop, reaches a peak, then vanishes at the critical magnetic field to which the folklore refers. On the other side, the decay rates of the other rhos for s{sub z} = ±1 monotonically increase as the magnetic field develops. The correlation between the polarization dependence and the Landau level truncation is also addressed. (orig.)

  20. Reporting consistently on CSR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Christa; Nielsen, Anne Ellerup

    2006-01-01

    This chapter first outlines theory and literature on CSR and Stakeholder Relations focusing on the different perspectives and the contextual and dynamic character of the CSR concept. CSR reporting challenges are discussed and a model of analysis is proposed. Next, our paper presents the results...... of a case study showing that companies use different and not necessarily consistent strategies for reporting on CSR. Finally, the implications for managerial practice are discussed. The chapter concludes by highlighting the value and awareness of the discourse and the discourse types adopted...... in the reporting material. By implementing consistent discourse strategies that interact according to a well-defined pattern or order, it is possible to communicate a strong social commitment on the one hand, and to take into consideration the expectations of the shareholders and the other stakeholders...

  1. Alteration of Pituitary Tumor Transforming Gene-1 Regulates Trophoblast Invasion via the Integrin/Rho-Family Signaling Pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung Mook Lim

    Full Text Available Trophoblast invasion ability is an important factor in early implantation and placental development. Recently, pituitary tumor transforming gene 1 (PTTG1 was shown to be involved in invasion and proliferation of cancer. However, the role of PTTG1 in trophoblast invasion remains unknown. Thus, in this study we analyzed PTTG1 expression in trophoblasts and its effect on trophoblast invasion activity and determined the mechanism through which PTTG1 regulates trophoblast invasion. Trophoblast proliferation and invasion abilities, regardless of PTTG1 expression, were analyzed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis, invasion assay, western blot, and zymography after treatment with small interfering RNA against PTTG1 (siPTTG1. Additionally, integrin/Rho-family signaling in trophoblasts by PTTG1 alteration was analyzed. Furthermore, the effect of PTTG1 on trophoblast invasion was evaluated by microRNA (miRNA mimic and inhibitor treatment. Trophoblast invasion was significantly reduced through decreased matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-2 and MMP-9 expression when PTTG1 expression was inhibited by siPTTG1 (p < 0.05. Furthermore, knockdown of PTTG1 increased expression of integrin alpha 4 (ITGA4, ITGA5, and integrin beta 1 (ITGB1; otherwise, RhoA expression was significantly decreased (p < 0.05. Treatment of miRNA-186-5p mimic and inhibitor controlled trophoblast invasion ability by altering PTTG1 and MMP expression. PTTG1 can control trophoblast invasion ability via regulation of MMP expression through integrin/Rho-family signaling. In addition, PTTG1 expression and its function were regulated by miRNA-186-5p. These results help in understanding the mechanism through which PTTG1 regulates trophoblast invasion and thereby implantation and placental development.

  2. Behavioural effects of basal ganglia rho-kinase inhibition in the unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine rat model of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inan, Salim Yalcin; Soner, Burak Cem; Sahin, Ayse Saide

    2016-08-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is one of the most common neurodegenerative disorders, which affects more than six million people in the world. While current available pharmacological therapies for PD in the early stages of the disease usually improve motor symptoms, they cause side effects, such as fluctuations and dyskinesias in the later stages. In this later stage, high frequency deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (STN-DBS) is a treatment option which is most successful to treat drug resistant advanced PD. It has previously been demonstrated that activation of Rho/Rho-kinase pathway is involved in the dopaminergic cell degeneration which is one of the main characteristics of PD pathology. In addition, the involvement of this pathway has been suggested in diverse cellular events in the central nervous system; such as epilepsy, anxiety-related behaviors, regulation of dendritic and axonal morphology, antinociception, subarachnoid haemorrhage, spinal cord injury and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. However, up to date, to our knowledge there are no previous reports showing the beneficial effects of the potent Rho-kinase inhibitor Y-27632 in the 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) rat model of PD. Therefore, in the present study, we investigated the behavioural effects of basal ganglia Y-27632 microinjections in this PD model. Our results indicated that basal ganglia Y-27632 microinjections significantly decreased the number of contralateral rotations-induced by apomorphine, significantly increased line crossings in the open-field test, contralateral forelimb use in the limb-use asymmetry test and contralateral tape playing time in the somatosensory asymmetry test, which may suggest that Y-27632 could be a potentially active antiparkinsonian agent.

  3. Geometrically Consistent Mesh Modification

    KAUST Repository

    Bonito, A.

    2010-01-01

    A new paradigm of adaptivity is to execute refinement, coarsening, and smoothing of meshes on manifolds with incomplete information about their geometry and yet preserve position and curvature accuracy. We refer to this collectively as geometrically consistent (GC) mesh modification. We discuss the concept of discrete GC, show the failure of naive approaches, and propose and analyze a simple algorithm that is GC and accuracy preserving. © 2010 Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics.

  4. NMR characterization of weak interactions between RhoGDI2 and fragment screening hits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jiuyang; Gao, Jia; Li, Fudong; Ma, Rongsheng; Wei, Qingtao; Wang, Aidong; Wu, Jihui; Ruan, Ke

    2017-01-01

    The delineation of intrinsically weak interactions between novel targets and fragment screening hits has long limited the pace of hit-to-lead evolution. Rho guanine-nucleotide dissociation inhibitor 2 (RhoGDI2) is a novel target that lacks any chemical probes for the treatment of tumor metastasis. Protein-observed and ligand-observed NMR spectroscopy was used to characterize the weak interactions between RhoGDI2 and fragment screening hits. We identified three hits of RhoGDI2 using streamlined NMR fragment-based screening. The binding site residues were assigned using non-uniformly sampled C α - and H α -based three dimensional NMR spectra. The molecular docking to the proposed geranylgeranyl binding pocket of RhoGDI2 was guided by NMR restraints of chemical shift perturbations and ligand-observed transferred paramagnetic relaxation enhancement. We further validated the weak RhoGDI2-hit interactions using mutagenesis and structure-affinity analysis. Weak interactions between RhoGDI2 and fragment screening hits were delineated using an integrated NMR approach. Binders to RhoGDI2 as a potential anti-cancer target have been first reported, and their weak interactions were depicted using NMR spectroscopy. Our work highlights the powerfulness and the versatility of the integrative NMR techniques to provide valuable structural insight into the intrinsically weak interactions between RhoGDI2 and the fragment screening hits, which could hardly be conceived using other biochemical techniques. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Characterization of RhoC Expression in Benign and Malignant Breast Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleer, Celina G.; van Golen, Kenneth L.; Zhang, Yanhong; Wu, Zhi-Fen; Rubin, Mark A.; Merajver, Sofia D.

    2002-01-01

    The most important factor in predicting outcome in patients with early breast cancer is the stage of the disease. There is no robust marker capable of identifying invasive carcinomas that despite their small size have a high metastatic potential, and that would benefit from more aggressive treatment. RhoC-GTPase is a member of the Ras-superfamily and is involved in cell polarity and motility. We hypothesized that RhoC expression would be a good marker to identify breast cancer patients with high risk of developing metastases, and that it would be a prognostic marker useful in the clinic. We developed a specific anti-RhoC antibody and studied archival breast tissues that comprise a broad spectrum of breast disease. One hundred eighty-two specimens from 164 patients were used. Immunohistochemistry was performed on formalin-fixed tissues. Staining intensity was graded 0 to 3+ (0 to 1+ was considered negative and 2 to 3+ was considered positive). RhoC was not expressed in any of the normal, fibrocystic changes, atypical hyperplasia, or ductal carcinoma in situ, but was expressed in 36 of 118 invasive carcinomas and strongly correlated with tumor stage (P = 0.01). RhoC had high specificity (88%) in detecting invasive carcinomas with metastatic potential. Of the invasive carcinomas smaller than 1 cm, RhoC was highly specific in detecting tumors that developed metastases. RhoC expression was associated with negative progesterone receptor and HER-2/neu overexpression. We characterized RhoC expression in human breast tissues. RhoC is specifically expressed in invasive breast carcinomas capable of metastasizing, and it may be clinically useful in patients with tumors smaller than 1 cm to guide treatment. PMID:11839578

  6. Activity of Antifungal Organobismuth(III Compounds Derived from Alkyl Aryl Ketones against S. cerevisiae: Comparison with a Heterocyclic Bismuth Scaffold Consisting of a Diphenyl Sulfone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshihiro Murafuji

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available A series of hypervalent organobismuth(III compounds derived from alkyl aryl ketones [XBi(5-R'C6H3-2-COR(Ar] was synthesized to investigate the effect of the compounds’ structural features on their antifungal activity against the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In contrast to bismuth heterocycles [XBi(5-RC6H3-2-SO2C6H4-1'-] derived from diphenyl sulfones, a systematic quantitative structure-activity relationship study was possible. The activity depended on the Ar group and increased for heavier X atoms, whereas lengthening the alkyl chain (R or introducing a substituent (R' reduced the activity. IBi(C6H4-2-COCH3(4-FC6H4 was the most active. Its activity was superior to that of the related acyclic analogues ClBi[C6H4-2-CH2N(CH32](Ar and ClBi(C6H4-2-SO2 tert-Bu(Ar and also comparable to that of heterocyclic ClBi(C6H4-2-SO2C6H4-1'-, which was the most active compound in our previous studies. Density function theory calculations suggested that hypervalent bismuthanes undergo nucleophilic addition with a biomolecule at the bismuth atom to give an intermediate ate complex. For higher antifungal activity, adjusting the lipophilicity-hydrophilicity balance, modeling the three-dimensional molecular structure around the bismuth atom, and stabilizing the ate complex appear to be more important than tuning the Lewis acidity at the bismuth atom.

  7. Control of Homeostasis and Dendritic Cell Survival by the GTPase RhoA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Shuai; Dislich, Bastian; Brakebusch, Cord H

    2015-01-01

    11b(-)CD8(+) and CD11b(+)Esam(hi) DC subsets, whereas CD11b(+)Esam(lo) DCs were not affected in conditional RhoA-deficient mice. Proteome analyses revealed a defective prosurvival pathway via PI3K/protein kinase B (Akt1)/Bcl-2-associated death promoter in the absence of RhoA. Taken together, our...... findings identify RhoA as a central regulator of DC homeostasis, and its deletion decreases DC numbers below critical thresholds for immune protection and homeostasis, causing aberrant compensatory DC proliferation....

  8. Inclusive rho0 production in anti pp interactions at 22.4 GeV/c

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ermilova, D.I.; Filippova, V.V.; Samojlov, V.V.

    1978-01-01

    Inclusive rho 0 production has been investigated in anti pp reactions at 22.4 GeV/c. The total cross section for rho 0 production is 8.1+-2.0 mb. The average number of rhosup(0') s per event is 0.17+-0.03. The average transverse momentum, as obtained by extrapolation of a simple exponential to the psub(T)sup(2) distribution, is 0.52+-0.12 GeV. The Feynman x and center of mass rapidity distributions show rho 0 to be ''centrally'' produced

  9. Critique of Dilley's N/D generation of the rho resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tryon, E.P.

    1977-01-01

    Rigorous sum rules for negative moments of the discontinuity across the left-hand cut of the ππ P wave are derived and analyzed. A model by Dilley wherein the rho resonance emerges from elastic N/D equations is shown to be severely inconsistent with these sum rules. Dilley's method for selecting the input left cut is analyzed and shown to be strongly biased in favor of generating a rho. Because of this bias, together with the aforementioned violation of sum rules, Dilley's model does not comprise evidence that the rho is generated by forces in the ππ channel. Numerous successes of the quark model suggest otherwise

  10. Inhibition of Cdc42 and Rac1 activities in pheochromocytoma, the adrenal medulla tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croisé, Pauline; Brunaud, Laurent; Tóth, Petra; Gasman, Stéphane; Ory, Stéphane

    2017-04-03

    Altered Rho GTPase signaling has been linked to many types of cancer. As many small G proteins, Rho GTPases cycle between an active and inactive state thanks to specific regulators that catalyze exchange of GDP into GTP (Rho-GEF) or hydrolysis of GTP into GDP (Rho-GAP). Recent studies have shown that alteration takes place either at the level of Rho proteins themselves (expression levels, point mutations) or at the level of their regulators, mostly RhoGEFs and RhoGAPs. Most reports describe Rho GTPases gain of function that may participate to the tumorigenesis processes. In contrast, we have recently reported that decreased activities of Cdc42 and Rac1 as well as decreased expression of 2 Rho-GEFs, FARP1 and ARHGEF1, correlate with pheochromocytomas, a tumor developing in the medulla of the adrenal gland (Croisé et al., Endocrine Related Cancer, 2016). Here we highlight the major evidence and further study the correlation between Rho GTPases activities and expression levels of ARHGEF1 and FARP1. Finally we also discuss how the decrease of Cdc42 and Rac1 activities may help human pheochromocytomas to develop and comment the possible relationship between FARP1, ARHGEF1 and the 2 Rho GTPases Cdc42 and Rac1 in tumorigenesis.

  11. The Rucio Consistency Service

    CERN Document Server

    Serfon, Cedric; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    One of the biggest challenge with Large scale data management system is to ensure the consistency between the global file catalog and what is physically on all storage elements. To tackle this issue, the Rucio software which is used by the ATLAS Distributed Data Management system has been extended to automatically handle lost or unregistered files (aka Dark Data). This system automatically detects these inconsistencies and take actions like recovery or deletion of unneeded files in a central manner. In this talk, we will present this system, explain the internals and give some results.

  12. Deoxypodophyllotoxin suppresses tumor vasculature in HUVECs by promoting cytoskeleton remodeling through LKB1-AMPK dependent Rho A activatio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yurong; Wang, Bin; Guerram, Mounia; Sun, Li; Shi, Wei; Tian, Chongchong; Zhu, Xiong; Jiang, Zhenzhou; Zhang, Luyong

    2015-10-06

    Angiogenesis plays a critical role in the growth and metastasis of tumors, which makes it an attractive target for anti-tumor drug development. Deoxypodophyllotoxin (DPT), a natural product isolated from Anthriscus sylvestris, inhibits cell proliferation and migration in various cancer cell types. Our previous studies indicate that DPT possesses both anti-angiogenic and vascular-disrupting activities. Although the RhoA/ RhoA kinase (ROCK) signaling pathway is implicated in DPT-stimulated cytoskeleton remodeling and tumor vasculature suppressing, the detailed mechanisms by which DPT mediates these effects are poorly understood. In the current study, we found that DPT promotes cytoskeleton remodeling in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) via stimulation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and that this effect is abolished by either treatment with a selective AMPK inhibitor or knockdown. Moreover, the cellular levels of LKB1, a kinase upstream of AMPK, were enhanced following DPT exposure. DPT-induced activation of AMPK in tumor vasculature effect was also verified by transgenic zebrafish (VEGFR2:GFP), Matrigel plug assay, and xenograft model in nude mice. The present findings may lay the groundwork for a novel therapeutic approach in treating cancer.

  13. A Novel Plasma Membrane-Anchored Protein Regulates Xylem Cell-Wall Deposition through Microtubule-Dependent Lateral Inhibition of Rho GTPase Domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiyama, Yuki; Wakazaki, Mayumi; Toyooka, Kiminori; Fukuda, Hiroo; Oda, Yoshihisa

    2017-08-21

    Spatial control of cell-wall deposition is essential for determining plant cell shape [1]. Rho-type GTPases, together with the cortical cytoskeleton, play central roles in regulating cell-wall patterning [2]. In metaxylem vessel cells, which are the major components of xylem tissues, active ROP11 Rho GTPases form oval plasma membrane domains that locally disrupt cortical microtubules, thereby directing the formation of oval pits in secondary cell walls [3-5]. However, the regulatory mechanism that determines the planar shape of active Rho of Plants (ROP) domains is still unknown. Here we show that IQD13 associates with cortical microtubules and the plasma membrane to laterally restrict the localization of ROP GTPase domains, thereby directing the formation of oval secondary cell-wall pits. Loss and overexpression of IQD13 led to the formation of abnormally round and narrow secondary cell-wall pits, respectively. Ectopically expressed IQD13 increased the presence of parallel cortical microtubules by promoting microtubule rescue. A reconstructive approach revealed that IQD13 confines the area of active ROP domains within the lattice of the cortical microtubules, causing narrow ROP domains to form. This activity required the interaction of IQD13 with the plasma membrane. These findings suggest that IQD13 positively regulates microtubule dynamics as well as their linkage to the plasma membrane, which synergistically confines the area of active ROP domains, leading to the formation of oval secondary cell-wall pits. This finding sheds light on the role of microtubule-plasma membrane linkage as a lateral fence that determines the planar shape of Rho GTPase domains. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Is cosmology consistent?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Xiaomin; Tegmark, Max; Zaldarriaga, Matias

    2002-01-01

    We perform a detailed analysis of the latest cosmic microwave background (CMB) measurements (including BOOMERaNG, DASI, Maxima and CBI), both alone and jointly with other cosmological data sets involving, e.g., galaxy clustering and the Lyman Alpha Forest. We first address the question of whether the CMB data are internally consistent once calibration and beam uncertainties are taken into account, performing a series of statistical tests. With a few minor caveats, our answer is yes, and we compress all data into a single set of 24 bandpowers with associated covariance matrix and window functions. We then compute joint constraints on the 11 parameters of the 'standard' adiabatic inflationary cosmological model. Our best fit model passes a series of physical consistency checks and agrees with essentially all currently available cosmological data. In addition to sharp constraints on the cosmic matter budget in good agreement with those of the BOOMERaNG, DASI and Maxima teams, we obtain a heaviest neutrino mass range 0.04-4.2 eV and the sharpest constraints to date on gravity waves which (together with preference for a slight red-tilt) favor 'small-field' inflation models

  15. Consistent Quantum Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, Robert B.

    2001-11-01

    Quantum mechanics is one of the most fundamental yet difficult subjects in physics. Nonrelativistic quantum theory is presented here in a clear and systematic fashion, integrating Born's probabilistic interpretation with Schrödinger dynamics. Basic quantum principles are illustrated with simple examples requiring no mathematics beyond linear algebra and elementary probability theory. The quantum measurement process is consistently analyzed using fundamental quantum principles without referring to measurement. These same principles are used to resolve several of the paradoxes that have long perplexed physicists, including the double slit and Schrödinger's cat. The consistent histories formalism used here was first introduced by the author, and extended by M. Gell-Mann, J. Hartle and R. Omnès. Essential for researchers yet accessible to advanced undergraduate students in physics, chemistry, mathematics, and computer science, this book is supplementary to standard textbooks. It will also be of interest to physicists and philosophers working on the foundations of quantum mechanics. Comprehensive account Written by one of the main figures in the field Paperback edition of successful work on philosophy of quantum mechanics

  16. Infusion of low dose glyceryl trinitrate has no consistent effect on burrowing behavior, running wheel activity and light sensitivity in female rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Sarah Louise T; Petersen, Steffen; Sørensen, Dorte Bratbo

    2016-01-01

    . In the current paper we have studied the effect of glyceryl trinitrate infusion on three different rat behaviors. Methods: The stability of burrowing behavior, running wheel activity and light sensitivity towards repeated testing was evaluated also with respect to estrous cycle. Finally, the effect of glyceryl...... trinitrate on these behaviors in female rats was observed. Results: Burrowing behavior and running wheel activity were stable in the individual rat between experiments. The burrowing behavior was significantly affected by the stage of estrous cycle. The other assays were stable throughout the cycle. None...

  17. The TAM-family receptor Mer mediates production of HGF through the RhoA-dependent pathway in response to apoptotic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyun-Jung; Baen, Ji-Yeon; Lee, Ye-Ji; Choi, Youn-Hee; Kang, Jihee Lee

    2012-08-01

    The TAM receptor protein tyrosine kinases Tyro3, Axl, and Mer play important roles in macrophage function. We investigated the roles of the TAM receptors in mediating the induction of hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) during the interaction of macrophages with apoptotic cells. Mer-specific neutralizing antibody, small interfering RNA (siRNA), and a recombinant Mer protein (Mer/Fc) inhibited HGF mRNA and protein expression, as well as activation of RhoA, Akt, and specific mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases in response to apoptotic cells. Inhibition of Axl or Tyro3 with specific antibodies, siRNA, or Fc-fusion proteins did not prevent apoptotic cell-induced HGF mRNA and protein expression and did not inhibit activation of the postreceptor signaling molecules RhoA and certain MAP kinases, including extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase and c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase. However, Axl- and Tyro3-specific blockers did inhibit the activation of Akt and p38 MAP kinase in response to apoptotic cells. In addition, none of the TAM receptors mediated the effects of apoptotic cells on transforming growth factor-β or epidermal growth factor mRNA expression. However, they were involved in the induction of vascular endothelial growth factor mRNA expression. Our data provide evidence that when macrophages interact with apoptotic cells, only Mer of the TAM-family receptors is responsible for mediating transcriptional HGF production through a RhoA-dependent pathway.

  18. Nucleophilic behavior of lysine-501 of the alpha-polypeptide of sodium and potassium ion activated adenosinetriphosphatase consistent with a role in binding adenosine triphosphate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, K.Y.; Kyte, J.

    1989-01-01

    An immunoadsorbent specific for the carboxy-terminal sequence -GAPER, which comprises residues 502-506 of the alpha-polypeptide of ovine sodium and potassium ion activated adenosinetriphosphatase [(Na+ + K+)-ATPase], was used to isolate the products of the reaction between the lysine immediately preceding this sequence in the intact protein and either [3H]acetic anhydride or fluorescein 5'-isothiocyanate. Changes in the apparent nucleophilicity of this lysine, Lys501, were observed with both reagents when ATP was bound by the intact, native enzyme poised in the E1 conformation or when the structure of the enzyme was changed from the E1 conformation into the E2-P conformation. With both reagents, a decrease of more than 4-fold in the yield of incorporation occurred during the former change, but a decrease of only 2-fold occurred during the latter. Because a much larger decrease occurred when ATP was bound in the absence of a conformational change than occurred when a major conformational change took place in the absence of the occupation of the active site, these changes in the incorporation of [3H]acetyl suggest that Lys501 from the alpha polypeptide is directly involved in binding ATP within the active site of (Na+ + K+)-ATPase. The immunochemical reactions between the specific polyclonal antibodies raised against the sequence-GAPER and denatured or enzymically active (Na+ + K+)-ATPase were also investigated. Western blots and the inhibition of enzymic activity caused by the antibody have shown that it can bind to both the denatured and the native form of the alpha-polypeptide, respectively

  19. Slit and Netrin-1 guide cranial motor axon pathfinding via Rho-kinase, myosin light chain kinase and myosin II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drescher Uwe

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the developing hindbrain, cranial motor axon guidance depends on diffusible repellent factors produced by the floor plate. Our previous studies have suggested that candidate molecules for mediating this effect are Slits, Netrin-1 and Semaphorin3A (Sema3A. It is unknown to what extent these factors contribute to floor plate-derived chemorepulsion of motor axons, and the downstream signalling pathways are largely unclear. Results In this study, we have used a combination of in vitro and in vivo approaches to identify the components of floor plate chemorepulsion and their downstream signalling pathways. Using in vitro motor axon deflection assays, we demonstrate that Slits and Netrin-1, but not Sema3A, contribute to floor plate repulsion. We also find that the axon pathways of dorsally projecting branchiomotor neurons are disrupted in Netrin-1 mutant mice and in chick embryos expressing dominant-negative Unc5a receptors, indicating an in vivo role for Netrin-1. We further demonstrate that Slit and Netrin-1 signalling are mediated by Rho-kinase (ROCK and myosin light chain kinase (MLCK, which regulate myosin II activity, controlling actin retrograde flow in the growth cone. We show that MLCK, ROCK and myosin II are required for Slit and Netrin-1-mediated growth cone collapse of cranial motor axons. Inhibition of these molecules in explant cultures, or genetic manipulation of RhoA or myosin II function in vivo causes characteristic cranial motor axon pathfinding errors, including the inability to exit the midline, and loss of turning towards exit points. Conclusions Our findings suggest that both Slits and Netrin-1 contribute to floor plate-derived chemorepulsion of cranial motor axons. They further indicate that RhoA/ROCK, MLCK and myosin II are components of Slit and Netrin-1 signalling pathways, and suggest that these pathways are of key importance in cranial motor axon navigation.

  20. Testin, a novel binding partner of the calcium-sensing receptor, enhances receptor-mediated Rho-kinase signalling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magno, Aaron L.; Ingley, Evan; Brown, Suzanne J.; Conigrave, Arthur D.; Ratajczak, Thomas; Ward, Bryan K.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → A yeast two-hybrid screen revealed testin bound to the calcium-sensing receptor. → The second zinc finger of LIM domain 1 of testin is critical for interaction. → Testin bound to a region of the receptor tail important for cell signalling. → Testin and receptor interaction was confirmed in mammalian (HEK293) cells. → Overexpression of testin enhanced receptor-mediated Rho signalling in HEK293 cells. -- Abstract: The calcium-sensing receptor (CaR) plays an integral role in calcium homeostasis and the regulation of other cellular functions including cell proliferation and cytoskeletal organisation. The multifunctional nature of the CaR is manifested through ligand-dependent stimulation of different signalling pathways that are also regulated by partner binding proteins. Following a yeast two-hybrid library screen using the intracellular tail of the CaR as bait, we identified several novel binding partners including the focal adhesion protein, testin. Testin has not previously been shown to interact with cell surface receptors. The sites of interaction between the CaR and testin were mapped to the membrane proximal region of the receptor tail and the second zinc-finger of LIM domain 1 of testin, the integrity of which was found to be critical for the CaR-testin interaction. The CaR-testin association was confirmed in HEK293 cells by coimmunoprecipitation and confocal microscopy studies. Ectopic expression of testin in HEK293 cells stably expressing the CaR enhanced CaR-stimulated Rho activity but had no effect on CaR-stimulated ERK signalling. These results suggest an interplay between the CaR and testin in the regulation of CaR-mediated Rho signalling with possible effects on the cytoskeleton.

  1. Measuring activity in children and adolescents using self-report: PAQ-C and PAQ-A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janz, Kathleen F; Lutuchy, Elena M; Wenthe, Phyllis; Levy, Steven M

    2008-04-01

    This study examined the psychometric properties of two versions of a commonly used physical activity 7-d self-report, the Physical Activity Questionnaire for Older Children (PAQ-C) and Physical Activity Questionnaire for Adolescents (PAQ-A). We longitudinally examined the internal consistency, stability, and situational effects of the PAQ-C and PAQ-A in a cohort of children (N = 210) at ages 11 and 13 yr. Statistical analysis included factor loading and standardized Cronbach coefficient alphas. We cross-sectionally examined concurrent validity of the PAQ-A in a subsample of our cohort (N = 49) at age 13 by comparing it with concurrently measured physical activity using an activity monitor (Actigraph). Spearman correlation coefficients were used for this analysis. Standardized Cronbach alphas ranged from 0.72 to 0.88. A subsample analysis suggested that completing the questionnaires during the summer months slightly reduced the standardized alpha for the PAQ-C, but not the PAQ-A. Associations between the PAQ-A (revised) summary score and activity monitor variables were rho = 0.56 for total PA and rho = 0.63 for moderate through vigorous activity (P PAQ-A questions and activity monitor variables for the same time frame ranged from rho = 0.41 to 0.62 (P PAQ-C and PAQ-A show good internal consistency. The PAQ-A has acceptable validity.

  2. Indicaxanthin from Opuntia ficus-indica Crosses the Blood-Brain Barrier and Modulates Neuronal Bioelectric Activity in Rat Hippocampus at Dietary-Consistent Amounts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allegra, Mario; Carletti, Fabio; Gambino, Giuditta; Tutone, Marco; Attanzio, Alessandro; Tesoriere, Luisa; Ferraro, Giuseppe; Sardo, Pierangelo; Almerico, Anna Maria; Livrea, Maria Antonia

    2015-08-26

    Indicaxanthin is a bioactive and bioavailable betalain pigment from the Opuntia ficus-indica fruits. In this in vivo study, kinetic measurements showed that indicaxanthin is revealed in the rat brain within 1 h from oral administration of 2 μmol/kg, an amount compatible with a dietary consumption of cactus pear fruits in humans. A peak (20 ± 2.4 ng of indicaxanthin per whole brain) was measured after 2.5 h; thereafter the molecule disappeared with first order kinetics within 4 h. The potential of indicaxanthin to affect neural activities was in vivo investigated by a microiontophoretic approach. Indicaxanthin, administered in a range between 0.085 ng and 0.34 ng per neuron, dose-dependently modulated the rate of discharge of spontaneously active neurons of the hippocampus, with reduction of the discharge and related changes of latency and duration of the effect. Indicaxanthin (0.34 ng/neuron) showed inhibitory effects on glutamate-induced excitation, indicating activity at the level of glutamatergic synapses. A molecular target of indicaxanthin is suggested by in silico molecular modeling of indicaxanthin with N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR), the most represented of the glutamate receptor family in hippocampus. Therefore, at nutritionally compatible amounts indicaxanthin (i) crosses the rat BBB and accumulates in brain; (ii) can affect the bioelectric activity of hippocampal neurons locally treated with amounts comparable with those measured in the brain; and (iii) modulates glutamate-induced neuronal excitation. The potential of dietary indicaxanthin as a natural neuromodulatory agent deserves further mechanistic and neurophysiologic investigation.

  3. Exclusive rho^0 electroproduction on the proton at CLAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morrow, Steven; Guidal, Michel; Garcon, Michel; Laget, Jean; Smith, Elton; Adams, Gary; Adhikari, Krishna; Aghasyan, Mher; Amaryan, Moscov; Amaryan, Moskov; Anghinolfi, Marco; Asryan, G.; Audit, Gerard; Avagyan, Harutyun; Bagdasaryan, H.; Baillie, Nathan; Ball, J.P.; Ball, Jacques; Baltzell, Nathan; Barrow, Steve; Battaglieri, Marco; Bedlinskiy, Ivan; Bektasoglu, Mehmet; Bellis, Matthew; Benmouna, Nawal; Berman, Barry; Biselli, Angela; Blaszczyk, Lukasz; Bonner, Billy; Bookwalter, Craig; Bouchigny, Sylvain; Boyarinov, Sergey; Bradford, Robert; Branford, Derek; Briscoe, William; Brooks, William; Bultmann, S.; Bueltmann, Stephen; Burkert, Volker; Butuceanu, Cornel; Calarco, John; Careccia, Sharon; Carman, Daniel; Carnahan, Bryan; Casey, Liam; Cazes, Antoine; Chen, Shifeng; Cheng, Lu; Cole, Philip; Collins, Patrick; Coltharp, Philip; Cords, Dieter; Corvisiero, Pietro; Crabb, Donald; Crannell, Hall; Crede, Volker; Cummings, John; Dale, Daniel; Dashyan, Natalya; De Masi, Rita; De Vita, Raffaella; De Sanctis, Enzo; Degtiarenko, Pavel; Denizli, Haluk; Dennis, Lawrence; Deur, Alexandre; Dhamija, Seema; Dharmawardane, Kahanawita; Dhuga, Kalvir; Dickson, Richard; Didelez, Jean-Pierre; Djalali, Chaden; Dodge, Gail; Doughty, David; Dugger, Michael; Dytman, Steven; Dzyubak, Oleksandr; Egiyan, Hovanes; Egiyan, Kim; Elfassi, Lamiaa; Elouadrhiri, Latifa; Eugenio, Paul; Fatemi, Renee; Fedotov, Gleb; Fersch, Robert; Feuerbach, Robert; Forest, Tony; Fradi, Ahmed; Gavalian, Gagik; Gevorgyan, Nerses; Gilfoyle, Gerard; Giovanetti, Kevin; Girod, Francois-Xavier; Goetz, John; Gohn, Wesley; Gordon, Christopher; Gothe, Ralf; Graham, Lewis; Griffioen, Keith; Guillo, Matthieu; Guler, Nevzat; Guo, Lei; Gyurjyan, Vardan; Hadjidakis, Cynthia; Hafidi, Kawtar; Hakobyan, Hayk; Hanretty, Charles; Hardie, John; Hassall, Neil; Heddle, David; Hersman, F.; Hicks, Kenneth; Hleiqawi, Ishaq; Holtrop, Maurik; Hourany, E.; Hyde, Charles; Ilieva, Yordanka; Ireland, David; Ishkhanov, Boris; Isupov, Evgeny; Ito, Mark; Jenkins, David; Jo, Hyon-Suk; Johnstone, John; Joo, Kyungseon; Juengst, Henry; Kalantarians, Narbe; Keller, Dustin; Kellie, James; Khandaker, Mahbubul; Khetarpal, Puneet; Kim, Wooyoung; Klein, Andreas; Klein, Franz; Klimenko, Alexei; Kossov, Mikhail; Kramer, Laird; Kubarovsky, Valery; Kuhn, Joachim; Kuhn, Sebastian; Kuleshov, Sergey; Kuznetsov, Viacheslav; Lachniet, Jeff; Langheinrich, Jorn; Lawrence, Dave; Li, Ji; Livingston, Kenneth; Lu, Haiyun; MacCormick, Marion; Marchand, Claude; Markov, Nikolai; Mattione, Paul; McAleer, Simeon; McCracken, Michael; McKinnon, Bryan; McNabb, John; Mecking, Bernhard; Mehrabyan, Surik; Melone, Joseph; Mestayer, Mac; Meyer, Curtis; Mibe, Tsutomu; Mikhaylov, Konstantin; Minehart, Ralph; Mirazita, Marco; Miskimen, Rory; Mokeev, Viktor; Morand, Ludyvine; Moreno, Brahim; Moriya, Kei; Moteabbed, Maryam; Mueller, James; Munevar Espitia, Edwin; Mutchler, Gordon; Nadel-Turonski, Pawel; Nasseripour, Rakhsha; Niccolai, Silvia; Niculescu, Gabriel; Niculescu, Maria-Ioana; Niczyporuk, Bogdan; Niroula, Megh; Niyazov, Rustam; Nozar, Mina; O' Rielly, Grant; Osipenko, Mikhail; Ostrovidov, Alexander; Park, Kijun; Park, Sungkyun; Pasyuk, Evgueni; Paterson, Craig; Pereira, S.Anefalos; Philips, Sasha; Pierce, Joshua; Pivnyuk, Nikolay; Pocanic, Dinko; Pogorelko, Oleg; Polli, Ermanno; Popa, Iulian; Pozdnyakov, Sergey; Preedom, Barry; Price, John; Procureur, Sebastien; Prok, Yelena; Protopopescu, Dan; Qin, Liming; Raue, Brian; Riccardi, Gregory; Ricco, Giovanni; Ripani, Marco; Ritchie, Barry; Rosner, Guenther; Rossi, Patrizia; Rubin, Philip; Sabatie, Franck; Saini, Mukesh; Salamanca, Julian; Salgado, Carlos; Santoro, Joseph; Sapunenko, Vladimir; Schott, Diane; Schumacher, Reinhard; Serov, Vladimir; Sharabian, Youri; Sharov, Dmitri; Shvedunov, Nikolay; Skabelin, Alexander; Smith, Lee; Sober, Daniel; Sokhan, Daria; Stavinskiy, Aleksey; Stepanyan, Samuel; Stepanyan, Stepan; Stokes, Burnham; Stoler, Paul; Strakovski, Igor; Strauch, Steffen; Taiuti, Mauro

    2009-01-01

    The $e p\\to e^\\prime p \\rho^0$ reaction has been measured, using the 5.754 GeV electron beam of Jefferson Lab and the CLAS detector. This represents the largest ever set of data for this reaction in the valence region. Integrated and differential cross sections are presented. The $W$, $Q^2$ and $t$ dependences of the cross section are compared to theoretical calculations based on $t$-channel meson-exchange Regge theory on the one hand and on quark handbag diagrams related to Generalized Parton Distributions (GPDs) on the other hand. The Regge approach can describe at the $\\approx$ 30% level most of the features of the present data while the two GPD calculations that are presented in this article which succesfully reproduce the high energy data strongly underestimate the present data. The question is then raised whether this discrepancy originates from an incomplete or inexact way of modelling the GPDs or the associated hard scattering amplitude or whether the GPD formalism is simply in

  4. Corrections to the rho-parameter due to a heavy Higgs particle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bij, J.J. van der.

    1983-01-01

    The main part of this thesis is concerned with the calculation of the two-loop contribution to the rho-parameter, i.e. the ratio of charged and neutral vector boson masses, due to a heavy Higgs particle. It involves the calculation of a large number of Feynman diagrams. The result is that a contribution growing like m 2 exists (m = Higgs mass), but it does not correspond to the poles at n=3 in the non-linear model. First the model is introduced, the precise definition of rho is given and the formal connection with the non-linear model is derived. Then the one-loop infinities are calculated. It is shown that no m 2 corrections are observable in one loop and the log m 2 correction to rho is calculated. Finally the two-loop correction to rho is calculated. (Auth.)

  5. Measurement of Branching Fractions and CP-violating Charge Asymmetries in B sup + -> rho sup +pi sup 0 and B sup + -> rho sup 0 pi sup + decays, and search for B sup 0 -> rho sup 0 pi sup 0

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, Z

    2003-01-01

    The present preliminary measurements of branching fractions and CP-violating charge asymmetries in B-meson decays to rho pi. The data sample comprises 89 million UPSILON(4S) -> B(bar B) decays collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy B Factor at SLAC. They find the charge-averaged branching fractions BETA(B sup + -> rho sup +pi sup 0) = (11.0 +- 1.9(stat.) +- 1.9(syst.)) x 10 sup - sup 6 and BETA(B sup + -> rho sup 0 pi sup +) = (9.3 +- 1.0(stat.) +- 0.8(syst.)) x 10 sup - sup 6; they set a 90% confidence-level upper limit of BETA(B sup 0 -> rho sup 0 pi sup 0) < 2.5 x 10 sup - sup 6. They measure the CP-violating charge asymmetries A sub C sub P suprho sup + suppi sup 0 = 0.23 +- 0.16(stat.) +- 0.06(syst.) and A sub C sub P suprho sup 0 suppi sup + = -0.17 +- 0.11(stat.) +- 0.02(syst.).

  6. Expression of a Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factor, Ect2, in the developing mouse pituitary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, M S; Tsuji, T; Higashida, C; Takahashi, M; Higashida, H; Koizumi, K

    2010-05-01

    The pituitary gland is a highly mitotically active tissue after birth. Various cell types are known to undergo proliferation in the anterior pituitary. However, little is known about the mechanisms regulating mitotic activity in this tissue. When searching for genes specifically expressed in the pituitary gland among those that we previously screened in Drosophila, we found epithelial cell-transforming gene 2 (Ect2). Ect2 is a guanine nucleotide exchange factor for Rho GTPases, which is known to play an essential role in cytokinesis. Although there have been many cellular studies regarding the function of Ect2, the temporal and spatial expression patterns of Ect2 in vivo have not been determined. In the present study, we examined the postnatal developmental expression of Ect2 in the mouse pituitary. Enhanced Ect2 expression was detected in the mouse pituitary gland during the first 3 weeks after birth, which coincided well with the period of rapid pituitary expansion associated with increased growth rate. Immunostaining analysis showed that Ect2-expressing cells were distributed in the anterior and intermediate lobes, but not the posterior lobe, of the pituitary. These Ect2-expressing cells frequently incorporated the thymidine analogue, EdU (5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine), indicating that these cells were mitotically active. Taken together, the results demonstrate the functional role of Ect2 in postnatal proliferating cells in the two lobes of the pituitary, thereby suggesting roles in developmental growth of the mammalian pituitary.

  7. Impact of liver fibrosis and fatty liver on T1rho measurements: A prospective study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Shuang Shuang; Li, Qing; Cheng, Yue; Shen, Wen [Dept. of Radiology, Tianjin First Center Hospital, Tianjin (China); Zhang, Yu; Zhuo, Zhi Zheng [Clinical Science, Philips Healthcare, Beijing (China); Zhao, Guiming [Dept. of Hepatology, Tianjin Second People' s Hospital, Tianjin (China)

    2017-11-15

    To investigate the liver T1rho values for detecting fibrosis, and the potential impact of fatty liver on T1rho measurements. This study included 18 healthy subjects, 18 patients with fatty liver, and 18 patients with liver fibrosis, who underwent T1rho MRI and mDIXON collections. Liver T1rho, proton density fat fraction (PDFF) and T2* values were measured and compared among the three groups. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was performed to evaluate the T1rho values for detecting liver fibrosis. Liver T1rho values were correlated with PDFF, T2* values and clinical data. Liver T1rho and PDFF values were significantly different (p < 0.001), whereas the T2* (p = 0.766) values were similar, among the three groups. Mean liver T1rho values in the fibrotic group (52.6 ± 6.8 ms) were significantly higher than those of healthy subjects (44.9 ± 2.8 ms, p < 0.001) and fatty liver group (45.0 ± 3.5 ms, p < 0.001). Mean liver T1rho values were similar between healthy subjects and fatty liver group (p = 0.999). PDFF values in the fatty liver group (16.07 ± 10.59%) were significantly higher than those of healthy subjects (1.43 ± 1.36%, p < 0.001) and fibrosis group (1.07 ± 1.06%, p < 0.001). PDFF values were similar in healthy subjects and fibrosis group (p = 0.984). Mean T1rho values performed well to detect fibrosis at a threshold of 49.5 ms (area under the ROC curve, 0.855), had a moderate correlation with liver stiffness (r = 0.671, p = 0.012), and no correlation with PDFF, T2* values, subject age, or body mass index (p > 0.05). T1rho MRI is useful for noninvasive detection of liver fibrosis, and may not be affected with the presence of fatty liver.

  8. QCD Factorizations in Exclusive {gamma}*{gamma}*{yields}{rho}{sub L}{sup 0}{rho}{sub L}{sup 0}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pire, B. [CPHT, Ecole Polytechnique, CNRS, Palaiseau (France); Segond, M. [LPTHE, Universite Paris 6 and 7, CNRS, Paris (France); LPT, Universite Paris-Sud, CNRS, Orsay (France); Szymanowski, L. [CPHT, Ecole Polytechnique, CNRS, Palaiseau (France); SINS, Warsaw (Poland); Wallon, S. [LPT, Universite Paris-Sud, CNRS, Orsay (France)

    2008-11-15

    The exclusive process e{sup +}e{sup -}{yields}e{sup +}e{sup -}{rho}{sub L}{sup 0}{rho}{sub L}{sup 0} allows to study various dynamics and factorization properties of perturbative QCD. At moderate energy, we demonstrate how collinearQCD factorization emerges, involving either generalized distribution amplitudes (GDA) or transition distribution amplitudes (TDA). At higher energies, in the Regge limit of QCD, we show that it offers a promising probe of the BFKL resummation effects to be studied at ILC.

  9. Cross-talk between Rho and Rac GTPases drives deterministic exploration of cellular shape space and morphological heterogeneity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sailem, Heba; Bousgouni, Vicky; Cooper, Sam; Bakal, Chris

    2014-01-22

    One goal of cell biology is to understand how cells adopt different shapes in response to varying environmental and cellular conditions. Achieving a comprehensive understanding of the relationship between cell shape and environment requires a systems-level understanding of the signalling networks that respond to external cues and regulate the cytoskeleton. Classical biochemical and genetic approaches have identified thousands of individual components that contribute to cell shape, but it remains difficult to predict how cell shape is generated by the activity of these components using bottom-up approaches because of the complex nature of their interactions in space and time. Here, we describe the regulation of cellular shape by signalling systems using a top-down approach. We first exploit the shape diversity generated by systematic RNAi screening and comprehensively define the shape space a migratory cell explores. We suggest a simple Boolean model involving the activation of Rac and Rho GTPases in two compartments to explain the basis for all cell shapes in the dataset. Critically, we also generate a probabilistic graphical model to show how cells explore this space in a deterministic, rather than a stochastic, fashion. We validate the predictions made by our model using live-cell imaging. Our work explains how cross-talk between Rho and Rac can generate different cell shapes, and thus morphological heterogeneity, in genetically identical populations.

  10. Isolation and structure–function characterization of a signaling-active rhodopsin–G protein complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yang; Westfield, Gerwin; Erickson, Jon W.; Cerione, Richard A.; Skiniotis, Georgios; Ramachandran, Sekar

    2017-01-01

    The visual photo-transduction cascade is a prototypical G protein–coupled receptor (GPCR) signaling system, in which light-activated rhodopsin (Rho*) is the GPCR catalyzing the exchange of GDP for GTP on the heterotrimeric G protein transducin (GT). This results in the dissociation of GT into its component αT–GTP and β1γ1 subunit complex. Structural information for the Rho*–GT complex will be essential for understanding the molecular mechanism of visual photo-transduction. Moreover, it will shed light on how GPCRs selectively couple to and activate their G protein signaling partners. Here, we report on the preparation of a stable detergent-solubilized complex between Rho* and a heterotrimer (GT*) comprising a GαT/Gαi1 chimera (αT*) and β1γ1. The complex was formed on native rod outer segment membranes upon light activation, solubilized in lauryl maltose neopentyl glycol, and purified with a combination of affinity and size-exclusion chromatography. We found that the complex is fully functional and that the stoichiometry of Rho* to GαT* is 1:1. The molecular weight of the complex was calculated from small-angle X-ray scattering data and was in good agreement with a model consisting of one Rho* and one GT*. The complex was visualized by negative-stain electron microscopy, which revealed an architecture similar to that of the β2-adrenergic receptor–GS complex, including a flexible αT* helical domain. The stability and high yield of the purified complex should allow for further efforts toward obtaining a high-resolution structure of this important signaling complex. PMID:28655769

  11. Isolation and structure-function characterization of a signaling-active rhodopsin-G protein complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yang; Westfield, Gerwin; Erickson, Jon W; Cerione, Richard A; Skiniotis, Georgios; Ramachandran, Sekar

    2017-08-25

    The visual photo-transduction cascade is a prototypical G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) signaling system, in which light-activated rhodopsin (Rho*) is the GPCR catalyzing the exchange of GDP for GTP on the heterotrimeric G protein transducin (G T ). This results in the dissociation of G T into its component α T -GTP and β 1 γ 1 subunit complex. Structural information for the Rho*-G T complex will be essential for understanding the molecular mechanism of visual photo-transduction. Moreover, it will shed light on how GPCRs selectively couple to and activate their G protein signaling partners. Here, we report on the preparation of a stable detergent-solubilized complex between Rho* and a heterotrimer (G T *) comprising a Gα T /Gα i1 chimera (α T *) and β 1 γ 1 The complex was formed on native rod outer segment membranes upon light activation, solubilized in lauryl maltose neopentyl glycol, and purified with a combination of affinity and size-exclusion chromatography. We found that the complex is fully functional and that the stoichiometry of Rho* to Gα T * is 1:1. The molecular weight of the complex was calculated from small-angle X-ray scattering data and was in good agreement with a model consisting of one Rho* and one G T *. The complex was visualized by negative-stain electron microscopy, which revealed an architecture similar to that of the β 2 -adrenergic receptor-G S complex, including a flexible α T * helical domain. The stability and high yield of the purified complex should allow for further efforts toward obtaining a high-resolution structure of this important signaling complex. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  12. Rasputin, the Drosophila homologue of the RasGAP SH3 binding protein, functions in ras- and Rho-mediated signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pazman, C; Mayes, C A; Fanto, M; Haynes, S R; Mlodzik, M

    2000-04-01

    The small GTPase Ras plays an important role in many cellular signaling processes. Ras activity is negatively regulated by GTPase activating proteins (GAPs). It has been proposed that RasGAP may also function as an effector of Ras activity. We have identified and characterized the Drosophila homologue of the RasGAP-binding protein G3BP encoded by rasputin (rin). rin mutants are viable and display defects in photoreceptor recruitment and ommatidial polarity in the eye. Mutations in rin/G3BP genetically interact with components of the Ras signaling pathway that function at the level of Ras and above, but not with Raf/MAPK pathway components. These interactions suggest that Rin is required as an effector in Ras signaling during eye development, supporting an effector role for RasGAP. The ommatidial polarity phenotypes of rin are similar to those of RhoA and the polarity genes, e.g. fz and dsh. Although rin/G3BP interacts genetically with RhoA, affecting both photoreceptor differentiation and polarity, it does not interact with the gain-of-function genotypes of fz and dsh. These data suggest that Rin is not a general component of polarity generation, but serves a function specific to Ras and RhoA signaling pathways.

  13. A framework for consistent estimation of leaf area index, fraction of absorbed photosynthetically active radiation, and surface albedo from MODIS time-series data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xiao, Zhiqiang; Liang, Shunlin; Wang, Jindi

    2015-01-01

    -series MODerate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) surface reflectance data. If the reflectance data showed snow-free areas, an ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) technique was used to estimate leaf area index (LAI) for a two-layer canopy reflectance model (ACRM) by combining predictions from a phenology...... model and the MODIS surface reflectance data. The estimated LAI values were then input into the ACRM to calculate the surface albedo and the fraction of absorbed photosynthetically active radiation (FAPAR). For snow-covered areas, the surface albedo was calculated as the underlying vegetation canopy...... albedo plus the weighted distance between the underlying vegetation canopy albedo and the albedo over deep snow. The LAI/FAPAR and surface albedo values estimated using this framework were compared with MODIS collection 5 eight-day 1-km LAI/FAPAR products (MOD15A2) and 500-m surface albedo product (MCD43...

  14. Phosphorylation and mRNA splicing of collapsin response mediator protein-2 determine inhibition of rho-associated protein kinase (ROCK) II function in carcinoma cell migration and invasion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morgan-Fisher, Marie; Couchman, John R; Yoneda, Atsuko

    2013-01-01

    The Rho-associated protein kinases (ROCK I and II) are central regulators of important cellular processes such as migration and invasion downstream of the GTP-Rho. Recently, we reported collapsin response mediator protein (CRMP)-2 as an endogenous ROCK II inhibitor. To reveal how the CRMP-2-ROCK II......, the presented data show that CRMP-2-dependent regulation of ROCK II activity is mediated through interaction of the CRMP-2L N terminus with the ROCK II catalytic domain as well as by GSK3-dependent phosphorylation of CRMP-2....

  15. Rho-GTPase effector ROCK phosphorylates cofilin in actin-meditated cytokinesis during mouse oocyte meiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Xing; Liu, Jun; Dai, Xiao-Xin; Liu, Hong-Lin; Cui, Xiang-Shun; Kim, Nam-Hyung; Wang, Zhen-Bo; Wang, Qiang; Sun, Shao-Chen

    2014-02-01

    During oocyte meiosis, a spindle forms in the central cytoplasm and migrates to the cortex. Subsequently, the oocyte extrudes a small body and forms a highly polarized egg; this process is regulated primarily by actin. ROCK is a Rho-GTPase effector that is involved in various cellular functions, such as stress fiber formation, cell migration, tumor cell invasion, and cell motility. In this study, we investigated possible roles for ROCK in mouse oocyte meiosis. ROCK was localized around spindles after germinal vesicle breakdown and was colocalized with cytoplasmic actin and mitochondria. Disrupting ROCK activity by RNAi or an inhibitor resulted in cell cycle progression and polar body extrusion failure. Time-lapse microscopy showed that this may have been due to spindle migration and cytokinesis defects, as chromosomes segregated but failed to extrude a polar body and then realigned. Actin expression at oocyte membranes and in cytoplasm was significantly decreased after these treatments. Actin caps were also disrupted, which was confirmed by a failure to form cortical granule-free domains. The mitochondrial distribution was also disrupted, which indicated that mitochondria were involved in the ROCK-mediated actin assembly. In addition, the phosphorylation levels of Cofilin, a downstream molecule of ROCK, decreased after disrupting ROCK activity. Thus, our results indicated that a ROCK-Cofilin-actin pathway regulated meiotic spindle migration and cytokinesis during mouse oocyte maturation.

  16. Phenobarbital and propiconazole toxicogenomic profiles in mice show major similarities consistent with the key role that constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) activation plays in their mode of action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currie, Richard A.; Peffer, Richard C.; Goetz, Amber K.; Omiecinski, Curtis J.; Goodman, Jay I.

    2014-01-01

    Toxicogenomics (TGx) is employed frequently to investigate underlying molecular mechanisms of the compound of interest and, thus, has become an aid to mode of action determination. However, the results and interpretation of a TGx dataset are influenced by the experimental design and methods of analysis employed. This article describes an evaluation and reanalysis, by two independent laboratories, of previously published TGx mouse liver microarray data for a triazole fungicide, propiconazole (PPZ), and the anticonvulsant drug phenobarbital (PB). Propiconazole produced an increase incidence of liver tumors in male CD-1 mice only at a dose that exceeded the maximum tolerated dose (2500 ppm). Firstly, we illustrate how experimental design differences between two in vivo studies with PPZ and PB may impact the comparisons of TGx results. Secondly, we demonstrate that different researchers using different pathway analysis tools can come to different conclusions on specific mechanistic pathways, even when using the same datasets. Finally, despite these differences the results across three different analyses also show a striking degree of similarity observed for PPZ and PB treated livers when the expression data are viewed as major signaling pathways and cell processes affected. Additional studies described here show that the postulated key event of hepatocellular proliferation was observed in CD-1 mice for both PPZ and PB, and that PPZ is also a potent activator of the mouse CAR nuclear receptor. Thus, with regard to the events which are hallmarks of CAR-induced effects that are key events in the mode of action (MOA) of mouse liver carcinogenesis with PB, PPZ-induced tumors can be viewed as being promoted by a similar PB-like CAR-dependent MOA. PMID:24675475

  17. Phenobarbital and propiconazole toxicogenomic profiles in mice show major similarities consistent with the key role that constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) activation plays in their mode of action

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Currie, Richard A.; Peffer, Richard C.; Goetz, Amber K.; Omiecinski, Curtis J.; Goodman, Jay I.

    2014-01-01

    Toxicogenomics (TGx) is employed frequently to investigate underlying molecular mechanisms of the compound of interest and, thus, has become an aid to mode of action determination. However, the results and interpretation of a TGx dataset are influenced by the experimental design and methods of analysis employed. This article describes an evaluation and reanalysis, by two independent laboratories, of previously published TGx mouse liver microarray data for a triazole fungicide, propiconazole (PPZ), and the anticonvulsant drug phenobarbital (PB). Propiconazole produced an increase incidence of liver tumors in male CD-1 mice only at a dose that exceeded the maximum tolerated dose (2500 ppm). Firstly, we illustrate how experimental design differences between two in vivo studies with PPZ and PB may impact the comparisons of TGx results. Secondly, we demonstrate that different researchers using different pathway analysis tools can come to different conclusions on specific mechanistic pathways, even when using the same datasets. Finally, despite these differences the results across three different analyses also show a striking degree of similarity observed for PPZ and PB treated livers when the expression data are viewed as major signaling pathways and cell processes affected. Additional studies described here show that the postulated key event of hepatocellular proliferation was observed in CD-1 mice for both PPZ and PB, and that PPZ is also a potent activator of the mouse CAR nuclear receptor. Thus, with regard to the events which are hallmarks of CAR-induced effects that are key events in the mode of action (MOA) of mouse liver carcinogenesis with PB, PPZ-induced tumors can be viewed as being promoted by a similar PB-like CAR-dependent MOA

  18. Serine34 phosphorylation of RHO guanine dissociation inhibitor (RHOGDI{alpha}) links signaling from conventional protein kinase C to RHO GTPase in cell adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dovas, Athanassios; Choi, Youngsil; Yoneda, Atsuko

    2010-01-01

    . Phosphospecific antibodies reveal endogenous phosphorylation in several cell types that is sensitive to adhesion events triggered, for example, by hepatocyte growth factor. Phosphorylation is also sensitive to PKC inhibition. Together with FRET microscopy sensing GTP-RhoA levels, the data reveal a common pathway...

  19. Mutations in the Primary Sigma Factor σA and Termination Factor Rho That Reduce Susceptibility to Cell Wall Antibiotics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yong Heon

    2014-01-01

    Combinations of glycopeptides and β-lactams exert synergistic antibacterial activity, but the evolutionary mechanisms driving resistance to both antibiotics remain largely unexplored. By repeated subculturing with increasing vancomycin (VAN) and cefuroxime (CEF) concentrations, we isolated an evolved strain of the model bacterium Bacillus subtilis with reduced susceptibility to both antibiotics. Whole-genome sequencing revealed point mutations in genes encoding the major σ factor of RNA polymerase (sigA), a cell shape-determining protein (mreB), and the ρ termination factor (rho). Genetic-reconstruction experiments demonstrated that the G-to-C substitution at position 336 encoded by sigA (sigAG336C), in the domain that recognizes the −35 promoter region, is sufficient to reduce susceptibility to VAN and works cooperatively with the rhoG56C substitution to increase CEF resistance. Transcriptome analyses revealed that the sigAG336C substitution has wide-ranging effects, including elevated expression of the general stress σ factor (σB) regulon, which is required for CEF resistance, and decreased expression of the glpTQ genes, which leads to fosfomycin (FOS) resistance. Our findings suggest that mutations in the core transcriptional machinery may facilitate the evolution of resistance to multiple cell wall antibiotics. PMID:25112476

  20. Renoprotective Effects of Atorvastatin in Diabetic Mice: Downregulation of RhoA and Upregulation of Akt/GSK3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruder-Nascimento, Thiago; Callera, Glaucia; Montezano, Augusto Cesar; Antunes, Tayze T.; He, Ying; Cat, Aurelie Nguyen Dinh; Ferreira, Nathanne S.; Barreto, Pedro A.; Olivon, Vânia C.; Tostes, Rita C.; Touyz, Rhian M.

    2016-01-01

    Potential benefits of statins in the treatment of chronic kidney disease beyond lipid-lowering effects have been described. However, molecular mechanisms involved in renoprotective actions of statins have not been fully elucidated. We questioned whether statins influence development of diabetic nephropathy through reactive oxygen species, RhoA and Akt/GSK3 pathway, known to be important in renal pathology. Diabetic mice (db/db) and their control counterparts (db/+) were treated with atorvastatin (10 mg/Kg/day, p.o., for 2 weeks). Diabetes-associated renal injury was characterized by albuminuria (albumin:creatinine ratio, db/+: 3.2 ± 0.6 vs. db/db: 12.5 ± 3.1*; *Patorvastatin-treated db/db mice. Increased ROS generation in the renal cortex of db/db mice was also inhibited by atorvastatin. ERK1/2 phosphorylation was increased in the renal cortex of db/db mice. Increased renal expression of Nox4 and proliferating cell nuclear antigen, observed in db/db mice, were abrogated by statin treatment. Atorvastatin also upregulated Akt/GSK3β phosphorylation in the renal cortex of db/db mice. Our findings suggest that atorvastatin attenuates diabetes-associated renal injury by reducing ROS generation, RhoA activity and normalizing Akt/GSK3β signaling pathways. The present study provides some new insights into molecular mechanisms whereby statins may protect against renal injury in diabetes. PMID:27649495

  1. Basis for slow growth on non-fermentable substrates by a saccharomyces cerevisiae mutant UV-sensitive for rho- production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crosby, B.; Colson, A.M.; Briquet, M.; Goffeau, A.; Moustacchi, E.

    1978-01-01

    The mutant uvsp 72 of Saccharomyces cerevisiae UV-sensitive for rho - production displays slower growth on media containing non-fermentable carbon sources such as glycerol or lactate. The slower growth on glycerol is not due to any deficiency in glycerol catabolism or mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation. No modifications of the sensitivity to ethidium bromide of the mitochondrial ATPase activity could be detected. A mathematical model is presented which accounts for slower growth of uvsp 72 on the sole basis of the continuous and elevated rho - production in the mutant strain. This model, which estimates the rate of mutation from the rate of growth and vice versa, has been verified experimentally in the case of uvsp 72. The model has been generalised, so that it can be used for any microbial population subject to constant and high rates of any type of mutation providing that the mutant is stable, and either unable to grow or able to grow at this own rate different from that of the parental strain. (orig.) [de

  2. Modulation of the Rho/ROCK pathway in heart and lung after thorax irradiation reveals targets to improve normal tissue toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monceau, Virginie; Pasinetti, Nadia; Schupp, Charlotte; Pouzoulet, Fred; Opolon, Paule; Vozenin, Marie-Catherine

    2010-11-01

    The medical options available to prevent or treat radiation-induced injury are scarce and developing effective countermeasures is still an open research field. In addition, more than half of cancer patients are treated with radiation therapy, which displays a high antitumor efficacy but can cause, albeit rarely, disabling long-term toxicities including radiation fibrosis. Progress has been made in the definition of molecular pathways associated with normal tissue toxicity that suggest potentially effective therapeutic targets. Targeting the Rho/ROCK pathway seems a promising anti-fibrotic approach, at least in the gut; t