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Sample records for rhizospheric strain pseudomonas

  1. Characterization of CMR5c and CMR12a, novel fluorescent Pseudomonas strains from the cocoyam rhizosphere with biocontrol activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perneel, M.; Heyrman, J.; Adiobo, A.; Maeyer, de K.; Raaijmakers, J.M.; Vos, de P.; Höfte, M.

    2007-01-01

    Aim: To screen for novel antagonistic Pseudomonas strains producing both phenazines and biosurfactants that are as effective as Pseudomonas aeruginosa PNA1 in the biocontrol of cocoyam root rot caused by Pythium myriotylum. Material and Results: Forty pseudomonads were isolated from the rhizosphere

  2. Metabolic functions of Pseudomonas fluorescens strains from Populus deltoides depend on rhizosphere or endosphere isolation compartment

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    Collin M Timm

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The bacterial microbiota of plants is diverse, with 1,000s of operational taxonomic units (OTUs associated with any individual plant. In this work we investigate the differences between 19 sequenced Pseudomonas fluorescens strains, isolated from Populus deltoides rhizosphere and endosphere and which represent a single OTU, using phenotypic analysis, comparative genomics, and metabolic models. While no traits were exclusive to either endosphere or rhizosphere P. fluorescens isolates, multiple pathways relevant for plant-bacterial interactions are enriched in endosphere isolate genomes. Further, growth phenotypes such as phosphate solubilization, protease activity, denitrification and root growth promotion are biased towards endosphere isolates. Endosphere isolates have significantly more metabolic pathways for plant signaling compounds and an increased metabolic range that includes utilization of energy rich nucleotides and sugars, consistent with endosphere colonization. Rhizosphere P. fluorescens have fewer pathways representative of plant-bacterial interactions but show metabolic bias towards chemical substrates often found in root exudates. This work reveals the diverse functions that may contribute to colonization of the endosphere by bacteria and are enriched among closely related isolates.

  3. Effect of genomic location on horizontal transfer of a recombinant gene cassette between Pseudomonas strains in the rhizosphere and spermosphere of barley seedlings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sengelov, G.; Kristensen, K. J.; Sørensen, Anders Morten Hay

    2001-01-01

    , horizontal transfer of a recombinant gene cassette inserted into the chromosome of a Pseudomonas strutzeri strain, into a mobilizable plasmid (pAGM42), and into a conjugative plasmid (pKJK5) isolated from barley rhizosphere was investigated. Horizontal transfer efficiencies of the gene cassette inserted...... efficiencies were up to 4.36 x 10(-3) transconjugants/(donors x recipients)(1/2). Transfer of chromosomal encoded genes could not be detected in the microcosms by conjugation or transformation. However, transformation did occur by using the same bacterial strains under laboratory conditions. The rhizosphere...

  4. The bean rhizosphere Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain RZ9 strongly reduces Fusarium culmorum growth and infectiveness of plant roots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haddoudi, I.; Sendi, Y.; Batnini, M.; Romdhane, S.B.; Mhadhbi, H.; Mrabet, M.

    2017-07-01

    A faba bean rhizospheric Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolate RZ9 was used for studying its antifungal activity and protecting effects of faba bean and common bean against the root pathogen Fusarium culmorum strain MZB47. The dual culture tests showed that RZ9 inhibits MZB47 in vitro growth by 56%. When mixing RZ9 cell suspension with MZB47 macroconidia at equal proportion, the macroconidia viability was reduced with 70%. Pathogenicity tests conducted in sterile conditions showed that MZB47 caused an intense root rotting in faba bean ‘Aquadulce’ plantlets and a slight level in common bean ‘Coco blanc’. This was associated to significant decreases in plant growth only in ‘Aquadulce’, reducing shoot dry weight (DW) by 82% and root DW by 70%. In soil samples, MZB47 caused severe root rotting and induced significant decreases in shoot DW (up to 51%) and root DW (up to 60%) for both beans. It was associated to a decrease in nodule number by 73% and 52% for faba bean and common bean, respectively. Biocontrol assays revealed that the inoculation of RZ9 to MZB47-treated plantlets enhanced shoot DWs (25% and 110%) and root DWs (29% and 67%), in faba bean and common bean, respectively. Moreover, root rotting levels decreased and nodule number increased in treated compared to untreated plantlets. Collected data highlighted the disease severity of F. culmorum and demonstrated the potential of using RZ9 in controlling Fusaria root diseases in beans. Thereby, the current study represents the first report on the biocontrol effectiveness of P. aeruginosa against F. culmorum in beans.

  5. The bean rhizosphere Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain RZ9 strongly reduces Fusarium culmorum growth and infectiveness of plant roots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imen Haddoudi

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available A faba bean rhizospheric Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolate RZ9 was used for studying its antifungal activity and protecting effects of faba bean and common bean against the root pathogen Fusarium culmorum strain MZB47. The dual culture tests showed that RZ9 inhibits MZB47 in vitro growth by 56%. When mixing RZ9 cell suspension with MZB47 macroconidia at equal proportion, the macroconidia viability was reduced with 70%. Pathogenicity tests conducted in sterile conditions showed that MZB47 caused an intense root rotting in faba bean ‘Aquadulce’ plantlets and a slight level in common bean ‘Coco blanc’. This was associated to significant decreases in plant growth only in ‘Aquadulce’, reducing shoot dry weight (DW by 82% and root DW by 70%. In soil samples, MZB47 caused severe root rotting and induced significant decreases in shoot DW (up to 51% and root DW (up to 60% for both beans. It was associated to a decrease in nodule number by 73% and 52% for faba bean and common bean, respectively. Biocontrol assays revealed that the inoculation of RZ9 to MZB47-treated plantlets enhanced shoot DWs (25% and 110% and root DWs (29% and 67%, in faba bean and common bean, respectively. Moreover, root rotting levels decreased and nodule number increased in treated compared to untreated plantlets. Collected data highlighted the disease severity of F. culmorum and demonstrated the potential of using RZ9 in controlling Fusaria root diseases in beans. Thereby, the current study represents the first report on the biocontrol effectiveness of P. aeruginosa against F. culmorum in beans.

  6. Indigenous Pseudomonas spp. Strains from the Olive (Olea europaea L.) Rhizosphere as Effective Biocontrol Agents against Verticillium dahliae: From the Host Roots to the Bacterial Genomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Lama Cabanás, Carmen; Legarda, Garikoitz; Ruano-Rosa, David; Pizarro-Tobías, Paloma; Valverde-Corredor, Antonio; Niqui, José L.; Triviño, Juan C.; Roca, Amalia; Mercado-Blanco, Jesús

    2018-01-01

    The use of biological control agents (BCA), alone or in combination with other management measures, has gained attention over the past decades, driven by the need to seek for sustainable and eco-friendly alternatives to confront plant pathogens. The rhizosphere of olive (Olea europaea L.) plants is a source of bacteria with potential as biocontrol tools against Verticillium wilt of olive (VWO) caused by Verticillium dahliae Kleb. A collection of bacterial isolates from healthy nursery-produced olive (cultivar Picual, susceptible to VWO) plants was generated based on morphological, biochemical and metabolic characteristics, chemical sensitivities, and on their in vitro antagonistic activity against several olive pathogens. Three strains (PIC25, PIC105, and PICF141) showing high in vitro inhibition ability of pathogens' growth, particularly against V. dahliae, were eventually selected. Their effectiveness against VWO caused by the defoliating pathotype of V. dahliae was also demonstrated, strain PICF141 being the rhizobacteria showing the best performance as BCA. Genotypic and phenotypic traits traditionally associated with plant growth promotion and/or biocontrol abilities were evaluated as well (e.g., phytase, xylanase, catalase, cellulase, chitinase, glucanase activities, and siderophore and HCN production). Multi-locus sequence analyses of conserved genes enabled the identification of these strains as Pseudomonas spp. Strain PICF141 was affiliated to the “Pseudomonas mandelii subgroup,” within the “Pseudomonas fluorescens group,” Pseudomonas lini being the closest species. Strains PIC25 and PIC105 were affiliated to the “Pseudomonas aeruginosa group,” Pseudomonas indica being the closest relative. Moreover, we identified P. indica (PIC105) for the first time as a BCA. Genome sequencing and in silico analyses allowed the identification of traits commonly associated with plant-bacteria interactions. Finally, the root colonization ability of these olive

  7. Quantification of Pseudomonas fluorescens strains F113, CHA0 and Pf153 in the rhizosphere of maize by strain-specific real-time PCR unaffected by the variability of DNA extraction efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Von Felten, Andreas; Défago, Geneviève; Maurhofer, Monika

    2010-05-01

    Pseudomonas fluorescens strains F113 and CHA0 are well-known plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) often used as model strains in biocontrol experiments. To monitor their persistence in large scale field experiments, culture-independent methods are needed. In this study, a strain-specific real-time PCR quantification tool was developed based on sequence-characterized amplified regions (SCAR) for P. fluorescens strains F113, CHA0 and Pf153. Differences in DNA extraction efficiencies from rhizosphere samples were circumvented using plasmid APA9 as internal standard to normalize C(T) values after real-time amplification. The detection limits of the real-time PCR assays for all three strains were approximately 10 cells for genomic DNA and 10(4)cells/g rhizosphere for maize samples grown in different natural soils. Population sizes of the three strains in the rhizosphere of maize measured by the new real-time PCR approaches were similar to those measured by most probable number (MPN)-PCR. A persistence study of the three strains indicated that the strains persisted differently over a period of 5weeks. In conclusion the newly developed real-time PCR approach is a fast and resource efficient method for monitoring individual biocontrol strains in natural soil, which makes it an apt quantification tool for future large-scale field experiments. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Pesticide tolerant and phosphorus solubilizing Pseudomonas sp. strain SGRAJ09 isolated from pesticides treated Achillea clavennae rhizosphere soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajasankar, R; Manju Gayathry, G; Sathiavelu, A; Ramalingam, C; Saravanan, V S

    2013-05-01

    In this study, an attempt was made to identify an effective phosphate solubilizing bacteria from pesticide polluted field soil. Based on the formation of solubilization halo on Pikovskaya's agar, six isolates were selected and screened for pesticide tolerance and phosphate (P) solubilization ability through liquid assay. The results showed that only one strain (SGRAJ09) obtained from Achillea clavennae was found to tolerate maximum level of the pesticides tested and it was phylogenetically identified as Pseudomonas sp. It possessed a wide range of pesticide tolerance, ranging from 117 μg mL(-1) for alphamethrin to 2,600 μg mL(-1) for endosulfan. The available P concentrations increased with the maximum and double the maximum dose of monocrotophos and imidacloprid, respectively. On subjected to FT-IR and HPLC analysis, the presence of organic acids functional group in the culture broth and the production of gluconic acid as dominant acid aiding the P solubilization were identified. On comparison with control broth, monocrotophos and imidacloprid added culture broth showed quantitatively high organic acids production. In addition to gluconic acid production, citric and acetic acids were also observed in the pesticide amended broth. Furthermore, the Pseudomonas sp. strain SGRAJ09 possessed all the plant growth promoting traits tested. In presence of monocrotophos and imidacloprid, its plant growth promoting activities were lower than that of the pesticides unamended treatment.

  9. Biodegradation of propargite by Pseudomonas putida, isolated from tea rhizosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Soumik; Seenivasan, Subbiah; Asir, Robert Premkumar Samuel

    2010-02-15

    Biodegradation of miticide propargite was carried out in vitro by selected Pseudomonas strains isolated from tea rhizosphere. A total number of 13 strains were isolated and further screened based on their tolerance level to different concentrations of propargite. Five best strains were selected and further tested for their nutritional requirements. Among the different carbon sources tested glucose exhibited the highest growth promoting capacity and among nitrogen sources ammonium nitrate supported the growth to the maximum. The five selected Pseudomonas strain exhibited a range of degradation capabilities. Mineral salts medium (MSM) amended with glucose provided better environment for degradation with the highest degradation potential in strain SPR 13 followed by SPR 8 (71.9% and 69.0% respectively).

  10. Different Ancestries of R Tailocins in Rhizospheric Pseudomonas Isolates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghequire, Maarten G.K.; Dillen, Yörg; Lambrichts, Ivo; Proost, Paul; Wattiez, Ruddy; De Mot, René

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial genomes accommodate a variety of mobile genetic elements, including bacteriophage-related clusters that encode phage tail-like protein complexes playing a role in interactions with eukaryotic or prokaryotic cells. Such tailocins are unable to replicate inside target cells due to the lack of a phage head with associated DNA. A subset of tailocins mediate antagonistic activities with bacteriocin-like specificity. Functional characterization of bactericidal tailocins of two Pseudomonas putida rhizosphere isolates revealed not only extensive similarity with the tail assembly module of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa R-type pyocins but also differences in genomic integration site, regulatory genes, and lytic release modules. Conversely, these three features are quite similar between strains of the P. putida and Pseudomonas fluorescens clades, although phylogenetic analysis of tail genes suggests them to have evolved separately. Unlike P. aeruginosa R pyocin elements, the tailocin gene clusters of other pseudomonads frequently carry cargo genes, including bacteriocins. Compared with P. aeruginosa, the tailocin tail fiber sequences that act as specificity determinants have diverged much more extensively among the other pseudomonad species, mostly isolates from soil and plant environments. Activity of the P. putida antibacterial particles requires a functional lipopolysaccharide layer on target cells, but contrary to R pyocins from P. aeruginosa, strain susceptibilities surpass species boundaries. PMID:26412856

  11. Genome Sequence of the Biocontrol Strain Pseudomonas fluorescens F113

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redondo-Nieto, Miguel; Barret, Matthieu; Morrisey, John P.; Germaine, Kieran; Martínez-Granero, Francisco; Barahona, Emma; Navazo, Ana; Sánchez-Contreras, María; Moynihan, Jennifer A.; Giddens, Stephen R.; Coppoolse, Eric R.; Muriel, Candela; Stiekema, Willem J.; Rainey, Paul B.; Dowling, David; O'Gara, Fergal; Martín, Marta

    2012-01-01

    Pseudomonas fluorescens F113 is a plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium (PGPR) that has biocontrol activity against fungal plant pathogens and is a model for rhizosphere colonization. Here, we present its complete genome sequence, which shows that besides a core genome very similar to those of other strains sequenced within this species, F113 possesses a wide array of genes encoding specialized functions for thriving in the rhizosphere and interacting with eukaryotic organisms. PMID:22328765

  12. Effect of Genetically Modified Pseudomonas putida WCS358r on the Fungal Rhizosphere Microflora of Field-Grown Wheat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Glandorf, D.C.M.; Verheggen, Patrick; Jansen, Timo; Jorritsma, J.-W.; Smit, Eric; Leeflang, Paula; Wernars, Karel; Thomashow, L.S.; Laureijs, Eric; Thomas-Oates, J.E.; Bakker, P.A.H.M.; Loon, L.C. van

    2001-01-01

    We released genetically modified Pseudomonas putida WCS358r into the rhizospheres of wheat plants. The two genetically modified derivatives, genetically modified microorganism (GMM) 2 and GMM 8, carried the phz biosynthetic gene locus of strain P. fluorescens 2-79 and constitutively produced the

  13. Lettuce and rhizosphere microbiome responses to growth promoting Pseudomonas species under field conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cipriano, Matheus A P; Lupatini, Manoeli; Lopes-Santos, Lucilene; da Silva, Márcio J; Roesch, Luiz F W; Destéfano, Suzete A L; Freitas, Sueli S; Kuramae, Eiko E

    2016-12-01

    Plant growth promoting rhizobacteria are well described and recommended for several crops worldwide. However, one of the most common problems in research into them is the difficulty in obtaining reproducible results. Furthermore, few studies have evaluated plant growth promotion and soil microbial community composition resulting from bacterial inoculation under field conditions. Here we evaluated the effect of 54 Pseudomonas strains on lettuce (Lactuca sativa) growth. The 12 most promising strains were phylogenetically and physiologically characterized for plant growth-promoting traits, including phosphate solubilization, hormone production and antagonism to pathogen compounds, and their effect on plant growth under farm field conditions. Additionally, the impact of beneficial strains on the rhizospheric bacterial community was evaluated for inoculated plants. The strains IAC-RBcr4 and IAC-RBru1, with different plant growth promoting traits, improved lettuce plant biomass yields up to 30%. These two strains also impacted rhizosphere bacterial groups including Isosphaera and Pirellula (phylum Planctomycetes) and Acidothermus, Pseudolabrys and Singusphaera (phylum Actinobacteria). This is the first study to demonstrate consistent results for the effects of Pseudomonas strains on lettuce growth promotion for seedlings and plants grown under tropical field conditions. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Diversity and activity of biosurfactant-producing Pseudomonas in the rhizosphere of black pepper in Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, H; Kruijt, M; Raaijmakers, J M

    2008-03-01

    Phytophthora capsici is a major pathogen of black pepper and zoospores play an important role in the infection process. Fluorescent pseudomonads that produce biosurfactants with zoosporicidal activities were isolated from the black pepper rhizosphere in Vietnam, and their genotypic diversity and potential to control Phy. capsici root rot was determined. Biosurfactant-producing pseudomonads were genotypically and biochemically characterized by BOX-polymerase chain reaction (PCR), 16S-rDNA sequencing, reverse-phase-high-performance liquid chromatography and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analyses. Biosurfactant-producing fluorescent pseudomonads make up c. 1.3% of the culturable Pseudomonas population in the rhizosphere of black pepper. Although BOX-PCR revealed substantial genotypic diversity, the isolates were shown to produce the same biosurfactants and were all identified as Pseudomonas putida. When applied to black pepper stem cuttings, several of the biosurfactant-producing strains provided significant disease control. In absence of the disease, several of the bacterial strains promoted shoot and root growth of black pepper stem cuttings. Biosurfactant-producing pseudomonads indigenous to the rhizosphere of black pepper plants are genotypically diverse and provide a novel resource for the control of Phy. capsici root rot and growth promotion of black pepper stem cuttings. The results of this study provide a strong basis for further development of supplementary strategies with antagonistic bacteria to control foot and root rot of black pepper and to promote plant growth.

  15. Rhizosphere-associated Pseudomonas induce systemic resistance to herbivores at the cost of susceptibility to bacterial pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haney, Cara H; Wiesmann, Christina L; Shapiro, Lori R; Melnyk, Ryan A; O'Sullivan, Lucy R; Khorasani, Sophie; Xiao, Li; Han, Jiatong; Bush, Jenifer; Carrillo, Juli; Pierce, Naomi E; Ausubel, Frederick M

    2017-10-31

    Plant-associated soil microbes are important mediators of plant defence responses to diverse above-ground pathogen and insect challengers. For example, closely related strains of beneficial rhizosphere Pseudomonas spp. can induce systemic resistance (ISR), systemic susceptibility (ISS) or neither against the bacterial foliar pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 (Pto DC3000). Using a model system composed of root-associated Pseudomonas spp. strains, the foliar pathogen Pto DC3000 and the herbivore Trichoplusia ni (cabbage looper), we found that rhizosphere-associated Pseudomonas spp. that induce either ISS and ISR against Pto DC3000 all increased resistance to herbivory by T. ni. We found that resistance to T. ni and resistance to Pto DC3000 are quantitative metrics of the jasmonic acid (JA)/salicylic acid (SA) trade-off and distinct strains of rhizosphere-associated Pseudomonas spp. have distinct effects on the JA/SA trade-off. Using genetic analysis and transcriptional profiling, we provide evidence that treatment of Arabidopsis with Pseudomonas sp. CH267, which induces ISS against bacterial pathogens, tips the JA/SA trade-off towards JA-dependent defences against herbivores at the cost of a subset of SA-mediated defences against bacterial pathogens. In contrast, treatment of Arabidopsis with the ISR strain Pseudomonas sp. WCS417 disrupts JA/SA antagonism and simultaneously primes plants for both JA- and SA-mediated defences. Our findings show that ISS against the bacterial foliar pathogens triggered by Pseudomonas sp. CH267, which is a seemingly deleterious phenotype, may in fact be an adaptive consequence of increased resistance to herbivory. Our work shows that pleiotropic effects of microbiome modulation of plant defences are important to consider when using microbes to modify plant traits in agriculture. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Soil Type Dependent Rhizosphere Competence and Biocontrol of Two Bacterial Inoculant Strains and Their Effects on the Rhizosphere Microbial Community of Field-Grown Lettuce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiter, Susanne; Sandmann, Martin; Smalla, Kornelia; Grosch, Rita

    2014-01-01

    Rhizosphere competence of bacterial inoculants is assumed to be important for successful biocontrol. Knowledge of factors influencing rhizosphere competence under field conditions is largely lacking. The present study is aimed to unravel the effects of soil types on the rhizosphere competence and biocontrol activity of the two inoculant strains Pseudomonas jessenii RU47 and Serratia plymuthica 3Re4-18 in field-grown lettuce in soils inoculated with Rhizoctonia solani AG1-IB or not. Two independent experiments were carried out in 2011 on an experimental plot system with three soil types sharing the same cropping history and weather conditions for more than 10 years. Rifampicin resistant mutants of the inoculants were used to evaluate their colonization in the rhizosphere of lettuce. The rhizosphere bacterial community structure was analyzed by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis of 16S rRNA gene fragments amplified from total community DNA to get insights into the effects of the inoculants and R. solani on the indigenous rhizosphere bacterial communities. Both inoculants showed a good colonization ability of the rhizosphere of lettuce with more than 106 colony forming units per g root dry mass two weeks after planting. An effect of the soil type on rhizosphere competence was observed for 3Re4-18 but not for RU47. In both experiments a comparable rhizosphere competence was observed and in the presence of the inoculants disease symptoms were either significantly reduced, or at least a non-significant trend was shown. Disease severity was highest in diluvial sand followed by alluvial loam and loess loam suggesting that the soil types differed in their conduciveness for bottom rot disease. Compared to effect of the soil type of the rhizosphere bacterial communities, the effects of the pathogen and the inoculants were less pronounced. The soil types had a surprisingly low influence on rhizosphere competence and biocontrol activity while they significantly affected

  17. Soil type dependent rhizosphere competence and biocontrol of two bacterial inoculant strains and their effects on the rhizosphere microbial community of field-grown lettuce.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanne Schreiter

    Full Text Available Rhizosphere competence of bacterial inoculants is assumed to be important for successful biocontrol. Knowledge of factors influencing rhizosphere competence under field conditions is largely lacking. The present study is aimed to unravel the effects of soil types on the rhizosphere competence and biocontrol activity of the two inoculant strains Pseudomonas jessenii RU47 and Serratia plymuthica 3Re4-18 in field-grown lettuce in soils inoculated with Rhizoctonia solani AG1-IB or not. Two independent experiments were carried out in 2011 on an experimental plot system with three soil types sharing the same cropping history and weather conditions for more than 10 years. Rifampicin resistant mutants of the inoculants were used to evaluate their colonization in the rhizosphere of lettuce. The rhizosphere bacterial community structure was analyzed by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis of 16S rRNA gene fragments amplified from total community DNA to get insights into the effects of the inoculants and R. solani on the indigenous rhizosphere bacterial communities. Both inoculants showed a good colonization ability of the rhizosphere of lettuce with more than 10(6 colony forming units per g root dry mass two weeks after planting. An effect of the soil type on rhizosphere competence was observed for 3Re4-18 but not for RU47. In both experiments a comparable rhizosphere competence was observed and in the presence of the inoculants disease symptoms were either significantly reduced, or at least a non-significant trend was shown. Disease severity was highest in diluvial sand followed by alluvial loam and loess loam suggesting that the soil types differed in their conduciveness for bottom rot disease. Compared to effect of the soil type of the rhizosphere bacterial communities, the effects of the pathogen and the inoculants were less pronounced. The soil types had a surprisingly low influence on rhizosphere competence and biocontrol activity while they

  18. Soil type dependent rhizosphere competence and biocontrol of two bacterial inoculant strains and their effects on the rhizosphere microbial community of field-grown lettuce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiter, Susanne; Sandmann, Martin; Smalla, Kornelia; Grosch, Rita

    2014-01-01

    Rhizosphere competence of bacterial inoculants is assumed to be important for successful biocontrol. Knowledge of factors influencing rhizosphere competence under field conditions is largely lacking. The present study is aimed to unravel the effects of soil types on the rhizosphere competence and biocontrol activity of the two inoculant strains Pseudomonas jessenii RU47 and Serratia plymuthica 3Re4-18 in field-grown lettuce in soils inoculated with Rhizoctonia solani AG1-IB or not. Two independent experiments were carried out in 2011 on an experimental plot system with three soil types sharing the same cropping history and weather conditions for more than 10 years. Rifampicin resistant mutants of the inoculants were used to evaluate their colonization in the rhizosphere of lettuce. The rhizosphere bacterial community structure was analyzed by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis of 16S rRNA gene fragments amplified from total community DNA to get insights into the effects of the inoculants and R. solani on the indigenous rhizosphere bacterial communities. Both inoculants showed a good colonization ability of the rhizosphere of lettuce with more than 10(6) colony forming units per g root dry mass two weeks after planting. An effect of the soil type on rhizosphere competence was observed for 3Re4-18 but not for RU47. In both experiments a comparable rhizosphere competence was observed and in the presence of the inoculants disease symptoms were either significantly reduced, or at least a non-significant trend was shown. Disease severity was highest in diluvial sand followed by alluvial loam and loess loam suggesting that the soil types differed in their conduciveness for bottom rot disease. Compared to effect of the soil type of the rhizosphere bacterial communities, the effects of the pathogen and the inoculants were less pronounced. The soil types had a surprisingly low influence on rhizosphere competence and biocontrol activity while they significantly affected

  19. Genetic Diversity of Nitrogen-Fixing and Plant Growth Promoting Pseudomonas Species Isolated from Sugarcane Rhizosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hai-Bi; Singh, Rajesh K; Singh, Pratiksha; Song, Qi-Qi; Xing, Yong-Xiu; Yang, Li-Tao; Li, Yang-Rui

    2017-01-01

    The study was designed to isolate and characterize Pseudomonas spp. from sugarcane rhizosphere, and to evaluate their plant- growth- promoting (PGP) traits and nitrogenase activity. A biological nitrogen-fixing microbe has great potential to replace chemical fertilizers and be used as a targeted biofertilizer in a plant. A total of 100 isolates from sugarcane rhizosphere, belonging to different species, were isolated; from these, 30 isolates were selected on the basis of preliminary screening, for in vitro antagonistic activities against sugarcane pathogens and for various PGP traits, as well as nitrogenase activity. The production of IAA varied from 312.07 to 13.12 μg mL -1 in tryptophan supplemented medium, with higher production in AN15 and lower in CN20 strain. The estimation of ACC deaminase activity, strains CY4 and BA2 produced maximum and minimum activity of 77.0 and 15.13 μmoL mg -1 h -1 . For nitrogenase activity among the studied strains, CoA6 fixed higher and AY1 fixed lower in amounts (108.30 and 6.16 μmoL C 2 H 2 h -1 mL -1 ). All the strains were identified on the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequencing, and the phylogenetic diversity of the strains was analyzed. The results identified all strains as being similar to Pseudomonas spp. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of nifH and antibiotic genes was suggestive that the amplified strains had the capability to fix nitrogen and possessed biocontrol activities. Genotypic comparisons of the strains were determined by BOX, ERIC, and REP PCR profile analysis. Out of all the screened isolates, CY4 ( Pseudomonas koreensis ) and CN11 ( Pseudomonas entomophila ) showed the most prominent PGP traits, as well as nitrogenase activity. Therefore, only these two strains were selected for further studies; Biolog profiling; colonization through green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged bacteria; and nifH gene expression using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) analysis. The Biolog

  20. Taxonomy of Streptomyces strains isolated from rhizospheres of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Taxonomy of Streptomyces strains isolated from rhizospheres of various plant species grown in Taif region, KSA, having antagonistic activities against some microbial tissue ... African Journal of Biotechnology ... Keywords: Taxonomy, Streptomyces, microbial tissue culture contaminants, antagonistic activities, 16S rRNA

  1. Antifungal activity of bacterial strains from the rhizosphere of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study evaluated the antifungal action of biomolecules produced from the secondary metabolism of bacterial strains found in the rhizosphere of semi arid plants against human pathogenic Candida albicans. Crude extracts were obtained using ethyl acetate as an organic solvent and the bioactivity was assessed with a ...

  2. Characterization of Pseudomonas chlororaphis from Theobroma cacao L. rhizosphere with antagonistic activity against Phytophthora palmivora (Butler).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acebo-Guerrero, Y; Hernández-Rodríguez, A; Vandeputte, O; Miguélez-Sierra, Y; Heydrich-Pérez, M; Ye, L; Cornelis, P; Bertin, P; El Jaziri, M

    2015-10-01

    To isolate and characterize rhizobacteria from Theobroma cacao with antagonistic activity against Phytophthora palmivora, the causal agent of the black pod rot, which is one of the most important diseases of T. cacao. Among 127 rhizobacteria isolated from cacao rhizosphere, three isolates (CP07, CP24 and CP30) identified as Pseudomonas chlororaphis, showed in vitro antagonistic activity against P. palmivora. Direct antagonism tested in cacao detached leaves revealed that the isolated rhizobacteria were able to reduce symptom severity upon infection with P. palmivora Mab1, with Ps. chlororaphis CP07 standing out as a potential biocontrol agent. Besides, reduced symptom severity on leaves was also observed in planta where cacao root system was pretreated with the isolated rhizobacteria followed by leaf infection with P. palmivora Mab1. The production of lytic enzymes, siderophores, biosurfactants and HCN, as well as the detection of genes encoding antibiotics, the formation of biofilm, and bacterial motility were also assessed for all three rhizobacterial strains. By using a mutant impaired in viscosin production, derived from CP07, it was found that this particular biosurfactant turned out to be crucial for both motility and biofilm formation, but not for the in vitro antagonism against Phytophthora, although it may contribute to the bioprotection of T. cacao. In the rhizosphere of T. cacao, there are rhizobacteria, such as Ps. chlororaphis, able to protect plants against P. palmivora. This study provides a theoretical basis for the potential use of Ps. chlororaphis CP07 as a biocontrol agent for the protection of cacao plants from P. palmivora infection. © 2015 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  3. Pseudomonas community structure and antagonistic potential in the rhizosphere : insights gained by combining phylogenetic and functional gene-based analyses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Costa, Rodrigo; Gomes, Newton C. M.; Kroegerrecklenfort, Ellen; Opelt, Katja; Berg, Gabriele; Smalla, Kornelia

    The Pseudomonas community structure and antagonistic potential in the rhizospheres of strawberry and oilseed rape (host plants of the fungal phytopathogen Verticillium dahliae) were assessed. The use of a new PCR-DGGE system, designed to target Pseudomonas-specific gacA gene fragments in

  4. Antifungal activity and genetic diversity of selected Pseudomonas spp. from maize rhizosphere in Vojvodina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jošić Dragana

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotic production by plant-associated microorganisms represents an environmentally compatible method of disease control in agriculture. However, a vide application of bacterial strains needs careful selection and genetic characterization. In this investigation, selected Pseudomonas strains were characterized by rep-PCR methods using ERIC and (GTG5 primers, and partial 16S rDNA sequence analysis. None of strains produced homoserine lactones (C4, C6, C8 as quorum sensing signal molecules. Very poor production of phenazines and no significant fungal inhibition was observed for PS4 and PS6 strains. High amount of phenazines were produced by Pseudomonas sp. strain PS2, which inhibited mycelial growth of 10 phytopatogenic fungi in percent of 25 (Verticillium sp. to 65 (Fusarium equiseti. Genetic characterization of the Pseudomonas sp. PS2 and evaluation of phenazines production, as the main trait for growth inhibition of phytopathogenic fungi, will allow its application as a biosafe PGPR for field experiments of plant disease control. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. III 46007: New indigenous bacterial isolates Lysobacter and Pseudomonas as an important sources of metabolites useful for biotechnology, plant growth stimulation and disease control: From isolates to inoculants

  5. Isolation and characterization of a new Pseudomonas-related strain ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    % with Pseudomonas putida ()AB680847). The phylogenetic tree formed by 16S rDNA sequences from both strain SKDP-1 and its most related bacteria also proved strain SKDP-1 to be one member of the genus Pseudomonas. Strain SKDP-1 ...

  6. Draft Genome Sequence of the Antagonistic Rhizosphere Bacterium Serratia plymuthica Strain PRI-2C

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garbeva, P.; van Elsas, J.D.; de Boer, W.

    Serratia plymuthica strain PRI-2C is a rhizosphere bacterial strain with antagonistic activity against different plant pathogens. Here we present the 5.39-Mb (G+C content, 55.67%) draft genome sequence of S. plymuthica strain PRI-2C with the aim of providing insight into the genomic basis of its

  7. Isolation and characterization of deleterious Pseudomonas aeruginosa KC1 from rhizospheric soils and its interaction with weed seedlings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijaya Lakshmi

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The bacterial isolate KC1 was screened from the rhizosphere of castor plants (Ricinus communis indigenous to agricultural fields of Bihar. The isolate was Gram negative, non-spore forming, and exhibited fluorescence under UV light. Its molecular characterization is based on the sequencing of 16S rDNA (1450 bp and alignment at GeneBank (NCBI, MaryLand. The strain has been validated as Pseudomonas aeruginosa (HM195190. The bacterium grew at 4–42 °C, with a temperature optima of 30 °C. The strain KC1 was found to produce cyanide (4.78 nmol l−1 over a period of 36 h. Data revealed enhanced cyanogenesis (6.98 nmol l−1, when glycine was provided in the King’s B medium. Seed bacterization exhibited reduction in root length, shoot length of weed seedlings (Amaranthus spinosus, Portulaca oleracea, which was significant (p < 0.05 in both laboratory and glasshouse experiments. Biomass was significantly reduced (p < 0.05 for the weed seedlings in glasshouse experiments. However, KC1 inoculated crop seedlings (Triticum aestivum were found to be less inhibitory as compared to weed seedlings. The observations are significant to establish, that the secondary metabolites producing KC1 rhizobacterium, P. aeruginosa KC1 could be exploited as a weed biocontrol agent. The innate potential of KC1 could be further formulated and utilized in field applications for agricultural sustainability.

  8. Benzoxazinoids in root exudates of maize attract Pseudomonas putida to the rhizosphere.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew L Neal

    Full Text Available Benzoxazinoids, such as 2,4-dihydroxy-7-methoxy-2H-1,4-benzoxazin-3(4H-one (DIMBOA, are secondary metabolites in grasses. In addition to their function in plant defence against pests and diseases above-ground, benzoxazinoids (BXs have also been implicated in defence below-ground, where they can exert allelochemical or antimicrobial activities. We have studied the impact of BXs on the interaction between maize and Pseudomonas putida KT2440, a competitive coloniser of the maize rhizosphere with plant-beneficial traits. Chromatographic analyses revealed that DIMBOA is the main BX compound in root exudates of maize. In vitro analysis of DIMBOA stability indicated that KT2440 tolerance of DIMBOA is based on metabolism-dependent breakdown of this BX compound. Transcriptome analysis of DIMBOA-exposed P. putida identified increased transcription of genes controlling benzoate catabolism and chemotaxis. Chemotaxis assays confirmed motility of P. putida towards DIMBOA. Moreover, colonisation essays in soil with Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP-expressing P. putida showed that DIMBOA-producing roots of wild-type maize attract significantly higher numbers of P. putida cells than roots of the DIMBOA-deficient bx1 mutant. Our results demonstrate a central role for DIMBOA as a below-ground semiochemical for recruitment of plant-beneficial rhizobacteria during the relatively young and vulnerable growth stages of maize.

  9. Hydrocarbonoclastic bacteria of the genus Pseudomonas in Samanea saman (Jacq. Merr. rhizosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Coromoto Mayz

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The research goal includes isolation, characterization and identification of Pseudomonas species existing in the rhizosphere of a legume present (colonizing or survivor in a savanna soil polluted by an oil spill, in order to explain the support of the growth of this leguminous plant through the reduction of the toxicity of spilled oil (hydrocarbonoclastic effects. The site is located at Amana del Tamarindo village entrance, Monagas State, Venezuela (9 ° 38' 52 "N, 63 ° 7' 20" E, 46 masl. An area of 50 m2 was sampled.  In concordance to the descriptions, keys, and comparison with the UOJ Herbarium exsiccatae, the legume collected was identified as Samanea saman (Jacq. Merr., which belongs to the Fabaceae family. The results of the biochemical characterization and the production of pyocyanine and fluorescein pigments allowed identifying 10 isolates as P. fluorescens, 5 as P. putida and 5 as P. aeruginosa. Samanea saman is recommended for re-vegetation of the contaminated area.

  10. Diversity of Paenibacillus polymyxa strains isolated from the rhizosphere of maize planted in Cerrado soil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weid, von der I.; Paiva, E.; Nobrega, A.; Elsas, van J.D.; Seldin, L.

    2000-01-01

    Paenibacillus polymyxa populations present in the rhizosphere of maize (cultivar BR-201) planted in Cerrado soil were investigated in order to assess their diversity at four stages of plant growth. A total of 67 strains were isolated and all strains were identified as P. polymyxa by classical

  11. OXIDATION OF POLYCHLORINATED BIPHENYLS BY PSEUDOMONAS SP. STRAIN LB400 AND PSEUDOMONAS PSEUDOALCALIGENES KF707

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biphenyl-grown cells and cell extracts prepared from biphenyl-grown cells of Pseudomonas sp. strain LB400 oxidize a much wider range of chlorinated biphenyls than do analogous preparations from Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes KF707. These results are attributed to differences in th...

  12. Impact of biocontrol Pseudomonas fluorescens CHA0 and a genetically modified derivative on the diversity of culturable fungi in the cucumber rhizosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girlanda, M; Perotto, S; Moenne-Loccoz, Y; Bergero, R; Lazzari, A; Defago, G; Bonfante, P; Luppi, A M

    2001-04-01

    Little is known about the effects of Pseudomonas biocontrol inoculants on nontarget rhizosphere fungi. This issue was addressed using the biocontrol agent Pseudomonas fluorescens CHA0-Rif, which produces the antimicrobial polyketides 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol (Phl) and pyoluteorin (Plt) and protects cucumber from several fungal pathogens, including Pythium spp., as well as the genetically modified derivative CHA0-Rif(pME3424). Strain CHA0-Rif(pME3424) overproduces Phl and Plt and displays improved biocontrol efficacy compared with CHA0-Rif. Cucumber was grown repeatedly in the same soil, which was left uninoculated, was inoculated with CHA0-Rif or CHA0-Rif(pME3424), or was treated with the fungicide metalaxyl (Ridomil). Treatments were applied to soil at the start of each 32-day-long cucumber growth cycle, and their effects on the diversity of the rhizosphere populations of culturable fungi were assessed at the end of the first and fifth cycles. Over 11,000 colonies were studied and assigned to 105 fungal species (plus several sterile morphotypes). The most frequently isolated fungal species (mainly belonging to the genera Paecilomyces, Phialocephala, Fusarium, Gliocladium, Penicillium, Mortierella, Verticillium, Trichoderma, Staphylotrichum, Coniothyrium, Cylindrocarpon, Myrothecium, and Monocillium) were common in the four treatments, and no fungal species was totally suppressed or found exclusively following one particular treatment. However, in each of the two growth cycles studied, significant differences were found between treatments (e.g., between the control and the other treatments and/or between the two inoculation treatments) using discriminant analysis. Despite these differences in the composition and/or relative abundance of species in the fungal community, treatments had no effect on species diversity indices, and species abundance distributions fit the truncated lognormal function in most cases. In addition, the impact of treatments at the 32-day

  13. Effect of biosurfactant from two strains of Pseudomonas on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Two Pseudomonas strains isolated from oil-contaminated soil which produce biosurfactant were studied. The biosurfactant containing broth formed stable emulsions with liquid light paraffin, cooking medium vegetable oil and toluene. The strains under study produce extra cellular biosurfactant in the culture media.

  14. Degradation of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons by two strains of Pseudomonas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nwinyi, Obinna C; Ajayi, Oluseyi O; Amund, Olukayode O

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this investigation was to isolate competent polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons degraders that can utilize polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons of former industrial sites at McDoel Switchyard in Bloomington, Indiana. Using conventional enrichment method based on soil slurry, we isolated, screened and purified two bacterial species strains PB1 and PB2. Applying the ribotyping technique using the 16S rRNA gene analysis, the strains were assigned to the genus Pseudomonas (Pseudomonas plecoglossicida strain PB1 and Pseudomonas sp. PB2). Both isolates showed promising metabolic capacity on pyrene sprayed MS agar plates during the preliminary investigations. Using time course studies in the liquid cultures at calculated concentrations 123, 64, 97 and 94ppm for naphthalene, chrysene, fluroanthene and pyrene, P. plecoglossicida strain PB1 and Pseudomonas sp. PB2 showed partial utilization of the polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons. Naphthalene was degraded between 26% and 40%, chrysene 14% and 16%, fluroanthene 5% and 7%; pyrene 8% and 13% by P. plecoglossicida strain PB1 and Pseudomonas sp. PB2 respectively. Based on their growth profile, we developed a model R(2)=1 to predict the degradation rate of slow polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbon-degraders where all the necessary parameters are constant. From this investigation, we confirm that the former industrial site soil microbial communities may be explored for the biorestoration of the industrial site. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda.

  15. Antimicrobial properties of Pseudomonas strains producing the antibiotic mupirocin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthijs, Sandra; Vander Wauven, Corinne; Cornu, Bertrand; Ye, Lumeng; Cornelis, Pierre; Thomas, Christopher M; Ongena, Marc

    2014-10-01

    Mupirocin is a polyketide antibiotic with broad antibacterial activity. It was isolated and characterized about 40 years ago from Pseudomonas fluorescens NCIMB 10586. To study the phylogenetic distribution of mupirocin producing strains in the genus Pseudomonas a large collection of Pseudomonas strains of worldwide origin, consisting of 117 Pseudomonas type strains and 461 strains isolated from different biological origins, was screened by PCR for the mmpD gene of the mupirocin gene cluster. Five mmpD(+) strains from different geographic and biological origin were identified. They all produced mupirocin and were strongly antagonistic against Staphylococcus aureus. Phylogenetic analysis showed that mupirocin production is limited to a single species. Inactivation of mupirocin production leads to complete loss of in vitro antagonism against S. aureus, except on certain iron-reduced media where the siderophore pyoverdine is responsible for the in vitro antagonism of a mupirocin-negative mutant. In addition to mupirocin some of the strains produced lipopeptides of the massetolide group. These lipopeptides do not play a role in the observed in vitro antagonism of the mupirocin producing strains against S. aureus. Copyright © 2014 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Biotransformation of Tributyltin chloride by Pseudomonas stutzeri strain DN2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dnyanada S. Khanolkar

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A bacterial isolate capable of utilizing tributyltin chloride (TBTCl as sole carbon source was isolated from estuarine sediments of west coast of India and identified as Pseudomonas stutzeri based on biochemical tests and Fatty acid methyl ester (FAME analysis. This isolate was designated as strain DN2. Although this bacterial isolate could resist up to 3 mM TBTCl level, it showed maximum growth at 2 mM TBTCl in mineral salt medium (MSM. Pseudomonas stutzeri DN2 exposed to 2 mM TBTCl revealed significant alteration in cell morphology as elongation and shrinkage in cell size along with roughness of cell surface. FTIR and NMR analysis of TBTCl degradation product extracted using chloroform and purified using column chromatography clearly revealed biotransformation of TBTCl into Dibutyltin dichloride (DBTCl2 through debutylation process. Therefore, Pseudomonas stutzeri strain DN2 may be used as a potential bacterial strain for bioremediation of TBTCl contaminated aquatic environmental sites.

  17. Biotransformation of Tributyltin chloride by Pseudomonas stutzeri strain DN2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanolkar, Dnyanada S.; Naik, Milind Mohan; Dubey, Santosh Kumar

    2014-01-01

    A bacterial isolate capable of utilizing tributyltin chloride (TBTCl) as sole carbon source was isolated from estuarine sediments of west coast of India and identified as Pseudomonas stutzeri based on biochemical tests and Fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) analysis. This isolate was designated as strain DN2. Although this bacterial isolate could resist up to 3 mM TBTCl level, it showed maximum growth at 2 mM TBTCl in mineral salt medium (MSM). Pseudomonas stutzeri DN2 exposed to 2 mM TBTCl revealed significant alteration in cell morphology as elongation and shrinkage in cell size along with roughness of cell surface. FTIR and NMR analysis of TBTCl degradation product extracted using chloroform and purified using column chromatography clearly revealed biotransformation of TBTCl into Dibutyltin dichloride (DBTCl2) through debutylation process. Therefore, Pseudomonas stutzeri strain DN2 may be used as a potential bacterial strain for bioremediation of TBTCl contaminated aquatic environmental sites. PMID:25763027

  18. Differential impact of some Aspergillus species on Meloidogyne javanica biocontrol by Pseudomonas fluorescens strain CHA0.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiqui, I A; Shaukat, S S; Khan, A

    2004-01-01

    The aim was to determine the influence of some Aspergillus species on the production of nematicidal agent(s) in vitro and biocontrol of Meloidogyne javanica in tomato by Pseudomonas fluorescens strains CHA0 and CHA0/pME3424. Six species of Aspergillus, isolated from the rhizosphere of certain crops, produced a variety of secondary metabolites in vitro. Culture filtrate (CF) obtained from Ps. fluorescens strain CHA0 and its2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol overproducing mutant CHA0/pME3424 grown in King's B liquid medium caused significant mortality of M. javanica juveniles in vitro. Bacterial growth medium amended with CF of A. niger enhanced nematicidal and beta-galactosidase activities of fluorescent pseudomonads while A. quadrilineatus repressed such activities. Methanol or ethyl acetate extracts of the CF of A. niger markedly optimized bacterial efficacy to cause nematode deaths while hexane extract of the fungus had no influence on the nematicidal activity of the bacterial strains. A. niger applied alone or in conjunction with the bacterial inoculants inhibited root-knot nematode galling in tomato. On the other hand, A. quadrilineatus used alone or together with CHA0 did not inhibit nematode galling but when used in combination with strain CHA0/pME3424 did reduce galling intensity. Aspergillus niger enhances the production of nematicidal compounds by Ps. fluorescensin vitro and improves biocontrol potential of the bacterial inoculants in tomato while A. quadrilineatus reduces bacterial performance to suppress root-knot nematodes. Rhizosphere harbours a variety of micro-organisms including bacteria, fungi and viruses. Aspergillus species are ubiquitous in most agricultural soils and generally produce a variety of secondary metabolites. Such metabolites synthesized by Aspergillus species may influence the production of nematicidal agents and subsequent biocontrol performance of the bacterial inoculants against plant-parasitic nematodes. This fact needs to be taken into

  19. Antibiotic and biosurfactant properties of cyclic lipopeptides produced by fluorescent Pseudomonas spp. from the sugar beet rhizosphere

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, T.H.; Sørensen, D.; Tobiasen, C.

    2002-01-01

    Cyclic lipopeptides (CLPs) with antibiotic and biosurfactant properties are produced by a number of soil bacteria, including fluorescent Pseudomonas spp. To provide new and efficient strains for the biological control of root-pathogenic fungi in agricultural crops, we isolated approximately 600...... fluorescent Pseudomonas spp. from two different agricultural soils by using three different growth media. CLP production was observed in a large proportion of the strains (approximately 60%) inhabiting the sandy soil, compared to a low proportion (approximately 6%) in the loamy soil. Chemical structure...... in the peptide moiety. Production of specific CLPs could be affiliated with Pseudomonas fluorescens strain groups belonging to biotype I, V, or VI. In vitro analysis using both purified CLPs and whole-cell P. fluorescens preparations demonstrated that all CLPs exhibited strong biosurfactant properties...

  20. Antibiotic and biosurfactant properties of cyclic lipopeptides produced by fluorescent Pseudomonas spp. from the sugar beet rhizosphere

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, T H; Sørensen, D; Tobiasen, C

    2002-01-01

    Cyclic lipopeptides (CLPs) with antibiotic and biosurfactant properties are produced by a number of soil bacteria, including fluorescent Pseudomonas spp. To provide new and efficient strains for the biological control of root-pathogenic fungi in agricultural crops, we isolated approximately 600...... in the peptide moiety. Production of specific CLPs could be affiliated with Pseudomonas fluorescens strain groups belonging to biotype I, V, or VI. In vitro analysis using both purified CLPs and whole-cell P. fluorescens preparations demonstrated that all CLPs exhibited strong biosurfactant properties...

  1. Diversity and activity of biosurfactant-producing Pseudomonas in the rhizosphere of black pepper in Vietnam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tran, H.; Kruijt, M.; Raaijmakers, J.M.

    2008-01-01

    Aims: Phytophthora capsici is a major pathogen of black pepper and zoospores play an important role in the infection process. Fluorescent pseudomonads that produce biosurfactants with zoosporicidal activities were isolated from the black pepper rhizosphere in Vietnam, and their genotypic diversity

  2. The Antimicrobial Volatile Power of the Rhizospheric Isolate Pseudomonas donghuensis P482.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ossowicki, A.; Jafra, S.; Garbeva, P.V.

    2017-01-01

    Soil and rhizosphere bacteria produce an array of secondary metabolites including a wide range of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). These compounds play an important role in the long-distance interactions and communication between (micro)organisms. Furthermore, bacterial VOCs are involved in plant

  3. Impacts of endophyte infection of ryegrass on rhizosphere metabolome and microbial community

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wakelin, S.; Harrison, Scott James; Mander, C.

    2015-01-01

    37, within a genetically uniform breeding line of perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne cv. Samson 11104) on the rhizosphere metabolome and the composition of the fungal, bacterial, and Pseudomonas communities. There were strong differences in the rhizosphere metabolomes between infested and non......-infested ryegrass strains (P=0.06). These were attributed to shifts in various n-alkane hydrocarbon compounds. The endophyte-associated alteration in rhizosphere metabolome was linked to changes in the total bacterial (P

  4. Potato seed dressing with Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain RZ9 enhances yield and reduces black scurf

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moncef MRABET

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available A rhizospheric strain RZ9 of Pseudomonas aeruginosa was assessed for in-vitro growth inhibition of Rhizoctonia solani and effectiveness to control black scurf on potatoes (Solanum tuberosum L. of the cultivars Spunta and Nicola, in greenhouse and field experiments. The strain RZ9 inhibited R. solani mycelial growth by more than 60% and completely inhibited the germination of sclerotia from infested potato tubers in in-vitro tests. In greenhouse assays, seed potato treatment with RZ9 cell suspension increased stem length, decreased the relative weight of infected potato tubers (by 67%, and increased the potato yield (by 16% compared to pathogen-inoculated plants for both potato cultivars. In field trials conducted on sandy soils during 2012 and 2013, strain RZ9 reduced black scurf incidence and increased potato yield by an average of 5.3 t ha-1 for ′Spunta′ and 5 t ha-1 for ′Nicola′. This study showed that the selected strain of P. aeruginosa is an efficient bacterium for enhancing yield and reducing black scurf of field-grown potatoes.

  5. Rhizosphere competence of wild-type and genetically-engineered Pseudomonas brassicacearum is affected by the crop species

    Science.gov (United States)

    2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol (2,4-DAPG)-producing Pseudomonas brassicacearum Q8r1-96 is a highly effective biocontrol agent of take-all disease of wheat. Strain Z30-97, a recombinant derivative of Q8r1-96 containing the phzABCDEFG operon from P. synxantha (formerly P. fluorescens) 2-79 inserted into ...

  6. Characterization of the biocontrol activity of pseudomonas fluorescens strain X reveals novel genes regulated by glucose.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerasimos F Kremmydas

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas fluorescens strain X, a bacterial isolate from the rhizosphere of bean seedlings, has the ability to suppress damping-off caused by the oomycete Pythium ultimum. To determine the genes controlling the biocontrol activity of strain X, transposon mutagenesis, sequencing and complementation was performed. Results indicate that, biocontrol ability of this isolate is attributed to gcd gene encoding glucose dehydrogenase, genes encoding its co-enzyme pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ, and two genes (sup5 and sup6 which seem to be organized in a putative operon. This operon (named supX consists of five genes, one of which encodes a non-ribosomal peptide synthase. A unique binding site for a GntR-type transcriptional factor is localized upstream of the supX putative operon. Synteny comparison of the genes in supX revealed that they are common in the genus Pseudomonas, but with a low degree of similarity. supX shows high similarity only to the mangotoxin operon of Ps. syringae pv. syringae UMAF0158. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis indicated that transcription of supX is strongly reduced in the gcd and PQQ-minus mutants of Ps. fluorescens strain X. On the contrary, transcription of supX in the wild type is enhanced by glucose and transcription levels that appear to be higher during the stationary phase. Gcd, which uses PQQ as a cofactor, catalyses the oxidation of glucose to gluconic acid, which controls the activity of the GntR family of transcriptional factors. The genes in the supX putative operon have not been implicated before in the biocontrol of plant pathogens by pseudomonads. They are involved in the biosynthesis of an antimicrobial compound by Ps. fluorescens strain X and their transcription is controlled by glucose, possibly through the activity of a GntR-type transcriptional factor binding upstream of this putative operon.

  7. Exploring the Potentiality of Novel Rhizospheric Bacterial Strains against the Rice Blast Fungus Magnaporthe oryzae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amruta, Narayanappa; Prasanna Kumar, M. K.; Puneeth, M. E.; Sarika, Gowdiperu; Kandikattu, Hemanth Kumar; Vishwanath, K.; Narayanaswamy, Sonnappa

    2018-01-01

    Rice blast caused by Magnaporthe oryzae is a major disease. In the present study, we aimed to identify and evaluate the novel bacterial isolates from rice rhizosphere for biocontrol of M. oryzae pathogen. Sixty bacterial strains from the rice plant’s rhizosphere were tested for their biocontrol activity against M. oryzae under in vitro and in vivo. Among them, B. amyloliquefaciens had significant high activity against the pathogen. The least disease severity and highest germination were recorded in seeds treated with B. amyloliquefaciens UASBR9 (0.96 and 98.00%) compared to untreated control (3.43 and 95.00%, respectively) under in vivo condition. These isolates had high activity of enzymes in relation to growth promoting activity upon challenge inoculation of the pathogen. The potential strains were identified based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing and dominance of these particular genes were associated in Bacillus strains. These strains were also confirmed for the presence of antimicrobial peptide biosynthetic genes viz., srfAA (surfactin), fenD (fengycin), spaS (subtilin), and ituC (iturin) related to secondary metabolite production (e.g., AMPs). Overall, the results suggested that application of potential bacterial strains like B. amyloliquefaciens UASBR9 not only helps in control of the biological suppression of one of the most devastating rice pathogens, M. grisea but also increases plant growth along with a reduction in application of toxic chemical pesticides. PMID:29628819

  8. Interspecific cooperation: enhanced growth, attachment and strain-specific distribution in biofilms through Azospirillum brasilense-Pseudomonas protegens co-cultivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagnussat, Luciana A; Salcedo, Florencia; Maroniche, Guillermo; Keel, Christoph; Valverde, Claudio; Creus, Cecilia M

    2016-10-01

    Plant-growth-promoting bacteria belonging to Azospirillum and Pseudomonas genera are major inhabitants of the rhizosphere. Both are increasingly commercialized as crops inoculants. Interspecific interaction in the rhizosphere is critical for inoculants aptness. The objective of this work was to evaluate Azospirillum and Pseudomonas interaction in mixed biofilms by co-cultivation of the model strains Azospirillum brasilense Sp245 and Pseudomonas protegens CHA0. The results revealed enhanced growth of both strains when co-cultured in static conditions. Moreover, Sp245 biofilm formed in plastic surfaces was increased 2-fold in the presence of CHA0. Confocal microscopy revealed highly structured mixed biofilms showing Sp245 mainly on the bottom and CHA0 towards the biofilm surface. In addition, A. brasilense biofilm was thicker and denser when co-cultured with P. protegens. In a colony-colony interaction assay, Sp245 changed nearby CHA0 producing small colony phenotype, which accounts for a diffusible metabolite mediator; though CHA0 spent medium did not affect Sp245 colony phenotype. Altogether, these results point to a cooperative interaction between A. brasilense Sp245 and P. protegens CHA0 in which both strains increase their static growth and produce structured mixed biofilms with a strain-specific distribution. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Functional, genetic and chemical characterization of biosurfactants produced by plant growth-promoting Pseudomonas putida 267

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruijt, M.; Tran, H.; Raaijmakers, J.M.

    2009-01-01

    Aims: Plant growth-promoting Pseudomonas putida strain 267, originally isolated from the rhizosphere of black pepper, produces biosurfactants that cause lysis of zoospores of the oomycete pathogen Phytophthora capsici. The biosurfactants were characterized, the biosynthesis gene(s) partially

  10. Biosurfactant production by Pseudomonas strains isolated from floral nectar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Belgacem, Z; Bijttebier, S; Verreth, C; Voorspoels, S; Van de Voorde, I; Aerts, G; Willems, K A; Jacquemyn, H; Ruyters, S; Lievens, B

    2015-06-01

    To screen and identify biosurfactant-producing Pseudomonas strains isolated from floral nectar; to characterize the produced biosurfactants; and to investigate the effect of different carbon sources on biosurfactant production. Four of eight nectar Pseudomonas isolates were found to produce biosurfactants. Phylogenetic analysis based on three housekeeping genes (16S rRNA gene, rpoB and gyrB) classified the isolates into two groups, including one group closely related to Pseudomonas fluorescens and another group closely related to Pseudomonas fragi and Pseudomonas jessenii. Although our nectar pseudomonads were able to grow on a variety of water-soluble and water-immiscible carbon sources, surface active agents were only produced when using vegetable oil as sole carbon source, including olive oil, sunflower oil or waste frying sunflower oil. Structural characterization based on thin layer chromatography (TLC) and ultra high performance liquid chromatography-accurate mass mass spectrometry (UHPLC-amMS) revealed that biosurfactant activity was most probably due to the production of fatty acids (C16:0; C18:0; C18:1 and C18:2), and mono- and diglycerides thereof. Four biosurfactant-producing nectar pseudomonads were identified. The active compounds were identified as fatty acids (C16:0; C18:0; C18:1 and C18:2), and mono- and diglycerides thereof, produced by hydrolysis of triglycerides of the feedstock. Studies on biosurfactant-producing micro-organisms have mainly focused on microbes isolated from soils and aquatic environments. Here, for the first time, nectar environments were screened as a novel source for biosurfactant producers. As nectars represent harsh environments with high osmotic pressure and varying pH levels, further screening of nectar habitats for biosurfactant-producing microbes may lead to the discovery of novel biosurfactants with broad tolerance towards different environmental conditions. © 2015 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  11. Rhizosphere colonization and arsenic translocation in sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) by arsenate reducing Alcaligenes sp. strain Dhal-L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalca, Lucia; Corsini, Anna; Bachate, Sachin Prabhakar; Andreoni, Vincenza

    2013-10-01

    In the present study, six arsenic-resistant strains previously isolated were tested for their plant growth promoting characteristics and heavy metal resistance, in order to choose one model strain as an inoculum for sunflower plants in pot experiments. The aim was to investigate the effect of arsenic-resistant strain on sunflower growth and on arsenic uptake from arsenic contaminated soil. Based on plant growth promoting characteristics and heavy metal resistance, Alcaligenes sp. strain Dhal-L was chosen as an inoculum. Beside the ability to reduce arsenate to arsenite via an Ars operon, the strain exhibited 1-amino-cyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid deaminase activity and it was also able to produce siderophore and indole acetic acid. Pot experiments were conducted with an agricultural soil contaminated with arsenic (214 mg kg⁻¹). A real time PCR method was set up based on the quantification of ACR3(2) type of arsenite efflux pump carried by Alcaligenes sp. strain Dhal-L, in order to monitor presence and colonisation of the strain in the bulk and rhizospheric soil. As a result of strain inoculation, arsenic uptake by plants was increased by 53 %, whereas ACR3(2) gene copy number in rhizospheric soil was 100 times higher in inoculated than in control pots, indicating the colonisation of strain. The results indicated that the presence of arsenate reducing strains in the rhizosphere of sunflower influences arsenic mobilization and promotes arsenic uptake by plant.

  12. The anti-Phytophthora effect of selected potato-associated Pseudomonas strains: from the laboratory to the field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anouk eGuyer

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Late blight, caused by the oomycete Phytophthora infestans, is the most devastating disease of potato. In organic farming, late Late blight, caused by the oomycete Phytophthora infestans, is the most devastating disease of potato. In organic farming, late blight is controlled by repeated applications of copper-based products, which negatively impact the environment. To find alternative solutions for late blight management, we have previously isolated a large collection of bacteria from the phyllosphere and the rhizosphere of potatoes. Here we report the antagonistic potential of these strains when co-cultivated with P. infestans as well as with other potato pathogens. We then focused on three Pseudomonas strains and compared their protective impact against late blight to that of well-known biocontrol strains in planta using a high-throughput leaf disc assay with automated picture analysis. When sprayed on the leaves of potatoes in the greenhouse, the strains were able to survive for at least 15 days. Under field conditions, populations decreased faster but all tested strains could still be retrieved after 8 days. The most active strain in vitro, P. chlororaphis R47, was also the best protectant on leaf discs from plants grown in the greenhouse experiment, but its protection potential could not be verified in the field due to unfavourable infection conditions. However, its protective effect against P. infestans in planta, its survival in the phyllosphere as well as its ability to colonise the potato rhizosphere in very high population densities, suggest a potential for field application, e.g. in the form of tuber treatment or leaf spray.

  13. Effect of Application of Pseudomonas fluorescent Strains on Yield and Yield Components of Rapeseed Cultivars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Najafi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Plant growth promoting rhizobacteria has been identified as an alternative to chemical fertilizer to enhance plant growth and yield directly and indirectly. Use of rhizosphere free living bacteria is one of the methods for crop production and leads to improvement of resources absorption. In order to study of yield, yield components and radiation use efficiency, under application of PGPR condition, an experiment was carried out in 2008 growing season at Agriculture and natural resources research station of Mashhad. The cultivars selected from three rapeseed species belong to Brassica napus, Brassica rapa and Brassica juncea (landrace, BP.18، Goldrush، Parkland، Hyola330، Hyola401. Experimental factorial design was randomized in complete block with three replications. Treatments included six varieties of Rapeseed and inoculations were four levels as non–inoculation, inoculation with P. fluorescens169, P. putida108 and use then together. Results showed that strains of fluorescent pseudomonas bacteria had greatest effects on yield and yield components cultivars. A significant difference in the number of pods per plant and 1000 seed weight observed. The cultivars were different in all treats except 1000 seed weight. Overall results indicated that application of growth stimulating bacteria in combination with different cultivars, had a positive effect growth, yield characteristics of plant varieties of rapeseed plants.

  14. Inhibitory and Toxic Effects of Volatiles Emitted by Strains of Pseudomonas and Serratia on Growth and Survival of Selected Microorganisms, Caenorhabditis elegans, and Drosophila melanogaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra A. Popova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In previous research, volatile organic compounds (VOCs emitted by various bacteria into the chemosphere were suggested to play a significant role in the antagonistic interactions between microorganisms occupying the same ecological niche and between bacteria and target eukaryotes. Moreover, a number of volatiles released by bacteria were reported to suppress quorum-sensing cell-to-cell communication in bacteria, and to stimulate plant growth. Here, volatiles produced by Pseudomonas and Serratia strains isolated mainly from the soil or rhizosphere exhibited bacteriostatic action on phytopathogenic Agrobacterium tumefaciens and fungi and demonstrated a killing effect on cyanobacteria, flies (Drosophila melanogaster, and nematodes (Caenorhabditis elegans. VOCs emitted by the rhizospheric Pseudomonas chlororaphis strain 449 and by Serratia proteamaculans strain 94 isolated from spoiled meat were identified using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis, and the effects of the main headspace compounds—ketones (2-nonanone, 2-heptanone, 2-undecanone and dimethyl disulfide—were inhibitory toward the tested microorganisms, nematodes, and flies. The data confirmed the role of bacterial volatiles as important compounds involved in interactions between organisms under natural ecological conditions.

  15. Degradation of paracetamol by Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain HJ1012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jun; Zhang, Li L; Chen, Jian M; Liu, Yu

    2013-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain HJ1012 was isolated on paracetamol as a sole carbon and energy source. This organism could completely degrade paracetamol as high as 2200 mg/L. Following paracetamol consumption, a CO₂ yield rate up to 71.4% proved that the loss of paracetamol was mainly via mineralization. Haldane's equation adequately described the relationship between the specific growth rate and substrate concentration. The maximum specific growth rate and yield coefficient were 0.201 g-Paracetamol/g-VSS·h and 0.101 mg of biomass yield/mg of paracetamol consumed, respectively. A total of 8 metabolic intermediates was identified and classified into aromatic compounds, carboxylic acids, and inorganic species (nitrite and nitrate ions). P-aminophenol and hydroquinone are the two key metabolites of the initial steps in the paracetamol catabolic pathway. Paracetamol is degraded predominantly via p-aminophenol to hydroquinone with subsequent ring fission, suggesting partially new pathways for paracetamol-degrading bacteria.

  16. Uranium uptake by immobilized cells of Pseudomonas strain EPS 5028

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pons, M.P.; Fuste, M.C.

    1993-01-01

    Polyacrylamide-gel-immobilized cells of Pseudomonas strain EPS 5028 were effective in the removal of uranium (U) from synthetic effluents. Metal accumulation was performed in an open system in columns filled with immobilized cells that were challenged with continuous flows containing U. Possible variable of the system were studied. Uranium uptake by the immobilized cells of this microorganism was affected by pH but not by temperature or flow rate. In addition, U binding could be interpreted in terms of the Freundlich adsorption isotherm indicating single-layer adsorption. The feasibility of reusing the immobilized cells was suggested after the recovery of U with a solution of 0.1 M sodium carbonate. (orig.)

  17. Comparative genomic analysis of multiple strains of two unusual plant pathogens: Pseudomonas corrugata and Pseudomonas mediterranea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanouil A Trantas

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The non-fluorescent pseudomonads, Pseudomonas corrugata (Pcor and P. mediterranea (Pmed, are closely related species that cause pith necrosis, a disease of tomato that causes severe crop losses. However, they also show strong antagonistic effects against economically important pathogens, demonstrating their potential for utilization as biological control agents. In addition, their metabolic versatility makes them attractive for the production of commercial biomolecules and bioremediation. An extensive comparative genomics study is required to dissect the mechanisms that Pcor and Pmed employ to cause disease, prevent disease caused by other pathogens, and to mine their genomes for commercially significant chemical pathways. Here, we present the draft genomes of nine Pcor and Pmed strains from different geographical locations. This analysis covered significant genetic heterogeneity and allowed in-depth genomic comparison. All examined strains were able to trigger symptoms in tomato plants but not all induced a hypersensitive-like response in Nicotiana benthamiana. Genome-mining revealed the absence of a type III secretion system and of known type III effectors from all examined Pcor and Pmed strains. The lack of a type III secretion system appears to be unique among the plant pathogenic pseudomonads. Several gene clusters coding for type VI secretion system were detected in all genomes.

  18. 40 CFR 180.1212 - Pseudomonas chlororaphis Strain 63-28; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Pseudomonas chlororaphis Strain 63-28... RESIDUES IN FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1212 Pseudomonas chlororaphis Strain 63-28; exemption... for residues of the microbial pesticide Pseudomonas chlororaphis Strain 63-28 in or on all food...

  19. 40 CFR 180.1200 - Pseudomonas fluorescens strain PRA-25; temporary exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Pseudomonas fluorescens strain PRA-25... RESIDUES IN FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1200 Pseudomonas fluorescens strain PRA-25; temporary... established for residues of the microbial pesticide, pseudomonas fluorescens strain PRA-25 when used on peas...

  20. Biodegradation of isoproturon using a novel Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain JS-11 as a multi-functional bioinoculant of environmental significance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwivedi, Sourabh; Singh, Braj Raj; Al-Khedhairy, Abdulaziz A; Musarrat, Javed

    2011-01-30

    Biodegradation of phenylurea herbicide isoproturon was studied in soil microcosm bioaugmented with a novel bacterial strain JS-11 isolated from wheat rhizosphere. The molecular characterization based on 16SrDNA sequence homology confirmed its identity as Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain JS-11. The herbicide was completely degraded within 20 days at ambient temperature with the rate constant of 0.08 day(-1), following the first-order rate kinetics. In stationary phase, at a cell density of 6.5 × 10(9) CFU mL(-1), the bacteria produced substantially increased amounts of indole acetic acid (IAA) in the presence of tryptophan as compared with the control. Also, the bacteria exhibited a time-dependent increase in the amount of tri-calcium phosphate solubilization in Pikovskaya's medium. Further screening of the strain JS-11 for auxiliary activities revealed its remarkable capability of producing the siderophores and hydrogen cyanide (HCN), besides antifungal activity against a common phytopathogen Fusarium oxysporum. Thus, the versatile P. aeruginosa strain JS-11 with innate potential for multifarious biological activities is envisaged as a super-bioinoculant for exploitation in the integrated bioremediation, plant growth and disease management (IBPDM) in contaminated agricultural soils. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Comparative genomic analysis of multiple strains of two unusual plant pathogens: Pseudomonas corrugata and Pseudomonas mediterranea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trantas, Emmanouil A.; Licciardello, Grazia; Almeida, Nalvo F.; Witek, Kamil; Strano, Cinzia P.; Duxbury, Zane; Ververidis, Filippos; Goumas, Dimitrios E.; Jones, Jonathan D. G.; Guttman, David S.; Catara, Vittoria; Sarris, Panagiotis F.

    2015-01-01

    The non-fluorescent pseudomonads, Pseudomonas corrugata (Pcor) and P. mediterranea (Pmed), are closely related species that cause pith necrosis, a disease of tomato that causes severe crop losses. However, they also show strong antagonistic effects against economically important pathogens, demonstrating their potential for utilization as biological control agents. In addition, their metabolic versatility makes them attractive for the production of commercial biomolecules and bioremediation. An extensive comparative genomics study is required to dissect the mechanisms that Pcor and Pmed employ to cause disease, prevent disease caused by other pathogens, and to mine their genomes for genes that encode proteins involved in commercially important chemical pathways. Here, we present the draft genomes of nine Pcor and Pmed strains from different geographical locations. This analysis covered significant genetic heterogeneity and allowed in-depth genomic comparison. All examined strains were able to trigger symptoms in tomato plants but not all induced a hypersensitive-like response in Nicotiana benthamiana. Genome-mining revealed the absence of type III secretion system and known type III effector-encoding genes from all examined Pcor and Pmed strains. The lack of a type III secretion system appears to be unique among the plant pathogenic pseudomonads. Several gene clusters coding for type VI secretion system were detected in all genomes. Genome-mining also revealed the presence of gene clusters for biosynthesis of siderophores, polyketides, non-ribosomal peptides, and hydrogen cyanide. A highly conserved quorum sensing system was detected in all strains, although species specific differences were observed. Our study provides the basis for in-depth investigations regarding the molecular mechanisms underlying virulence strategies in the battle between plants and microbes. PMID:26300874

  2. Transformation of carbon tetrachloride by Pseudomonas sp. strain KC under denitrification conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Criddle, C.S.; DeWitt, J.T.; Grbic-Galic, D.; McCarty, P.L.

    1990-01-01

    A denitrifying Pseudomonas sp. (strain KC) capable of transforming carbon tetrachloride (CT) was isolated from groundwater aquifer solids. Major products of the transformation of 14 C-labeled CT by Pseudomonas strain KC under denitrification conditions were 14 CO 2 and an unidentified water-soluble fraction. Little or no chloroform was produced. Addition of dissolved trace metals, notably, ferrous iron and cobalt, to the growth medium appeared to enhance growth of Pseudomonas strain KC while inhibiting transformation of CT. It is hypothesized that transformation of CT by this organism is associated with the mechanism of trace-metal scavenging

  3. Genome Sequence of Bacillus velezensis S141, a New Strain of Plant Growth-Promoting Rhizobacterium Isolated from Soybean Rhizosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibponkrung, Surachat; Kondo, Takahiko; Tanaka, Kosei; Tittabutr, Panlada; Boonkerd, Nantakorn; Teaumroong, Neung; Yoshida, Ken-Ichi

    2017-11-30

    Bacillus velezensis strain S141 is a plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium isolated from soybean ( Glycine max ) rhizosphere that enhances soybean growth, nodulation, and N 2 fixation efficiency by coinoculation with Bradyrhizobium diazoefficiens USDA110. The S141 genome was identified to comprise a 3,974,582-bp-long circular DNA sequence encoding at least 3,817 proteins. Copyright © 2017 Sibponkrung et al.

  4. Comparison of 432 Pseudomonas strains through integration of genomic, functional, metabolic and expression data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koehorst, Jasper J.; Dam, van Jesse C.J.; Heck, van Ruben G.A.; Saccenti, Edoardo; Martins dos Santos, Vitor; Suarez-Diez, Maria; Schaap, Peter J.

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas is a highly versatile genus containing species that can be harmful to humans and plants while others are widely used for bioengineering and bioremediation. We analysed 432 sequenced Pseudomonas strains by integrating results from a large scale functional comparison using protein

  5. Assessment of the rhizosphere competency and pentachlorophenol-metabolizing activity of a pesticide-degrading strain of Trichoderma harzianum introduced into the root zone of corn seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigot, Jerĵme; Matsumura, Fumio

    2002-05-01

    To develop a dependable approach to introduce laboratory selected, pesticide-degrading microorganisms into soil environments for the purpose of in situ bioremediation, we tested the possibility of utilizing plant rhizospheres as the vehicle. We first established the rhizosphere competency of a strain of the soil fungus Trichoderma harzianum, a biocontrol species well studied by plant pathologists to colonize plant rhizosphere in many parts of the world. The strain we chose, T.h.2023 is resistant to many fungicides, and it has been shown to metabolize several pesticides. Second, we found that it readily metabolized pentachlorophenol (PCP), which is quickly and stochiometrically converted to pentachloroanisole (PCA) in liquid culture. Taking advantage of this specific feature, we have developed a sensitive metabolic marker approach that allowed us to monitor for the continuous presence and activity of this fungal strain in the corn rhizosphere soil in situ over time.

  6. Typing of Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains in Norwegian cystic fibrosis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fluge, G; Ojeniyi, B; Høiby, N

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Typing of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from Norwegian cystic fibrosis (CF) patients with chronic Pseudomonas lung infection in order to see whether cross-infection might have occurred. METHODS: Isolates from 60 patients were collected during the years 1994-98, and typed by pulsed...

  7. Genetic labelling and application of the isoproturon-mineralizing Sphingomonas sp. strain SRS2 in soil and rhizosphere

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, K.E.; Jacobsen, C.S.; Hansen, L.H.

    2006-01-01

    AIMS: To construct a luxAB-labelled Sphingomonas sp. strain SRS2 maintaining the ability to mineralize the herbicide isoproturon and usable for monitoring the survival and distribution of strain SRS2 on plant roots in laboratory systems. METHODS AND RESULTS: We inserted the mini-Tn5-luxAB marker...... into strain SRS2 using conjugational mating. In the transconjugant mutants luciferase was produced in varying levels. The mutants showed significant differences in their ability to degrade isoproturon. One luxAB-labelled mutant maintained the ability to mineralize isoproturon and was therefore selected...... for monitoring colonization of barley roots. CONCLUSIONS: We successfully constructed a genetically labelled isoproturon-mineralizing-strain SRS2 and demonstrated its ability to survive in soil and its colonization of rhizosphere. SIGNIFICANCE AND IMPACT OF THE STUDY: The construction of a luxAB-labelled strain...

  8. Genetic labelling and application of the isoproturon-mineralizing Sphingomonas sp. strain SRS2 in soil and rhizosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristensen, K E; Jacobsen, C S; Hansen, L H; Aamand, J; Morgan, J A W; Sternberg, C; Sørensen, S R

    2006-09-01

    To construct a luxAB-labelled Sphingomonas sp. strain SRS2 maintaining the ability to mineralize the herbicide isoproturon and usable for monitoring the survival and distribution of strain SRS2 on plant roots in laboratory systems. We inserted the mini-Tn5-luxAB marker into strain SRS2 using conjugational mating. In the transconjugant mutants luciferase was produced in varying levels. The mutants showed significant differences in their ability to degrade isoproturon. One luxAB-labelled mutant maintained the ability to mineralize isoproturon and was therefore selected for monitoring colonization of barley roots. We successfully constructed a genetically labelled isoproturon-mineralizing-strain SRS2 and demonstrated its ability to survive in soil and its colonization of rhizosphere. The construction of a luxAB-labelled strain SRS2 maintaining the degradative ability, provides a powerful tool for ecological studies serving as the basis for evaluating SRS2 as a bioremediation agent.

  9. ANOMALOUS BLUE COLOURING OF MOZZARELLA CHEESE INTENTIONALLY CONTAMINATED WITH PIGMENT PRODUCING STRAINS OF PSEUDOMONAS FLUORESCENS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Sechi

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available In summer 2010 a large outbreak of anomalous blue coloration of mozzarella cheese was recorded in Italy and some northern European countries. Official laboratory analysis and health authorities linked the outbreak to the contamination of processing water with strains of Pseudomonas fluorescens, although several expert raised the question of how to unequivocally link the blue coloring to the presence of the micro-organism. In an attempt to set-up a method to determine whether a given Pseudomonas spp. strain is responsible of the defect, an in vitro system for the evaluation of blue colouring of mozzarella cheese intentionally contaminated with strains of Pseudomonas fluorescens. was developed The system is aimed to ascertain whether P. fluorescens strains, isolated from mozzarella cheese with anomalous blue coloration, are able to reproduce the blue coloration under controlled experimental condition. 96 trials of experimental inoculation of mozzarella cheese in different preservation liquids, were conducted using various suspension of Pseudomonas spp. (P. fluorescens ATCC 13525, P. fluorescens CFBP 3150, one P. fluorescens field strain isolated from blue-colored mozzarella cheese and P. aeruginosa ATCC 10145 as positive control at different concentrations and incubated at different temperatures. Growth curve of all Pseudomonas spp. strains tested demonstrated that after three days of incubation the concentration was generally higher than 106 CFU/g of mozzarella cheese incubated in Tryptic Soy Broth (TSB, and higher than 105 CFU/g of mozzarella cheese incubated in preservation liquid. All mozzarella cheeses inoculated with the field strain of Pseudomonas fluorescens showed the characteristic anomalous blue coloration, which is often associated with Pseudomonas fluorescens contamination of water used during mozzarella cheesemaking. With the proposed system, which enabled a considerable amount of samples to be analysed under controlled experimental

  10. Anaerobic oxidation of 2-chloroethanol under denitrifying conditions by Pseudomonas stutzeri strain JJ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dijk, J A; Stams, A J M; Schraa, G; Ballerstedt, H; de Bont, J A M; Gerritse, J

    2003-11-01

    A bacterium that uses 2-chloroethanol as sole energy and carbon source coupled to denitrification was isolated from 1,2-dichloroethane-contaminated soil. Its 16 S rDNA sequence showed 98% similarity with the type strain of Pseudomonas stutzeri (DSM 5190) and the isolate was tentatively identified as Pseudomonas stutzeri strain JJ. Strain JJ oxidized 2-chloroethanol completely to CO(2) with NO(3)(- )or O(2) as electron acceptor, with a preference for O(2) if supplied in combination. Optimum growth on 2-chloroethanol with nitrate occurred at 30 degrees C with a mu(max) of 0.14 h(-1) and a yield of 4.4 g protein per mol 2-chloroethanol metabolized. Under aerobic conditions, the mu(max) was 0.31 h(-1). NO(2)(-) also served as electron acceptor, but reduction of Fe(OH)(3), MnO(2), SO(4)(2-), fumarate or ClO(3)(-) was not observed. Another chlorinated compound used as sole energy and carbon source under aerobic and denitrifying conditions was chloroacetate. Various different bacterial strains, including some closely related Pseudomonas stutzeri strains, were tested for their ability to grow on 2-chloroethanol as sole energy and carbon source under aerobic and denitrifying conditions, respectively. Only three strains, Pseudomonas stutzeri strain LMD 76.42, Pseudomonas putida US2 and Xanthobacter autotrophicus GJ10, grew aerobically on 2-chloroethanol. This is the first report of oxidation of 2-chloroethanol under denitrifying conditions by a pure bacterial culture.

  11. Twenty-one genome sequences from Pseudomonas species and 19 genome sequences from diverse bacteria isolated from the rhizosphere and endosphere of Populus deltoides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Steven D; Utturkar, Sagar M; Klingeman, Dawn M; Johnson, Courtney M; Martin, Stanton L; Land, Miriam L; Lu, Tse-Yuan S; Schadt, Christopher W; Doktycz, Mitchel J; Pelletier, Dale A

    2012-11-01

    To aid in the investigation of the Populus deltoides microbiome, we generated draft genome sequences for 21 Pseudomonas strains and 19 other diverse bacteria isolated from Populus deltoides roots. Genome sequences for isolates similar to Acidovorax, Bradyrhizobium, Brevibacillus, Caulobacter, Chryseobacterium, Flavobacterium, Herbaspirillum, Novosphingobium, Pantoea, Phyllobacterium, Polaromonas, Rhizobium, Sphingobium, and Variovorax were generated.

  12. Colonization of the Arabidopsis rhizosphere by fluorescent Pseudomonas spp. activates a root-specific, ethylene-responsive PR-5 gene in the vascular bundle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Léon-Kloosterziel, K.M.; Verhagen, B.W.M.; Keurentjes, J.J.B.; Pelt, J.A. van; Rep, M.; Loon, L.C. van; Pieterse, C.M.J.

    2005-01-01

    Plants of which the roots are colonized by selected strains of non-pathogenic, fluorescent Pseudomonas spp. develop an enhanced defensive capacity against a broad spectrum of foliar pathogens. In Arabidopsis thaliana, this rhizobacteria-induced systemic resistance (ISR) functions independently of

  13. Biodegradation of Chlorpyrifos by Pseudomonas Resinovarans Strain AST2.2 Isolated from Enriched Cultures.

    OpenAIRE

    Anish Sharma*,; Jyotsana Pandit; Ruchika Sharma and; Poonam Shirkot

    2016-01-01

    A bacterial strain AST2.2 with chlorpyrifos degrading ability was isolated by enrichment technique from apple orchard soil with previous history of chlorpyrifos use. Based on the morphological, biochemical tests and 16S rRNA sequence analysis, AST2.2 strain was identified as Pseudomonas resinovarans. The strain AST2.2 utilized chlorpyrifos as the sole source of carbon and energy. This strain exhibited growth upto 400mg/l concentration of chlorpyrifos and exhibited high extracellular organopho...

  14. Exploiting genotypic diversity of 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol-producing Pseudomonas spp.: characterization of superior root-colonizing P. fluorescens strain Q8r1-96.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raaijmakers, J M; Weller, D M

    2001-06-01

    The genotypic diversity that occurs in natural populations of antagonistic microorganisms provides an enormous resource for improving biological control of plant diseases. In this study, we determined the diversity of indigenous 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol (DAPG)-producing Pseudomonas spp. occurring on roots of wheat grown in a soil naturally suppressive to take-all disease of wheat. Among 101 isolates, 16 different groups were identified by random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analysis. One RAPD group made up 50% of the total population of DAPG-producing Pseudomonas spp. Both short- and long-term studies indicated that this dominant genotype, exemplified by P. fluorescens Q8r1-96, is highly adapted to the wheat rhizosphere. Q8r1-96 requires a much lower dose (only 10 to 100 CFU seed(-1) or soil(-1)) to establish high rhizosphere population densities (10(7) CFU g of root(-1)) than Q2-87 and 1M1-96, two genotypically different, DAPG-producing P. fluorescens strains. Q8r1-96 maintained a rhizosphere population density of approximately 10(5) CFU g of root(-1) after eight successive growth cycles of wheat in three different, raw virgin soils, whereas populations of Q2-87 and 1M1-96 dropped relatively quickly after five cycles and were not detectable after seven cycles. In short-term studies, strains Q8r1-96, Q2-87, and 1M1-96 did not differ in their ability to suppress take-all. After eight successive growth cycles, however, Q8r1-96 still provided control of take-all to the same level as obtained in the take-all suppressive soil, whereas Q2-87 and 1M1-96 gave no control anymore. Biochemical analyses indicated that the superior rhizosphere competence of Q8r1-96 is not related to in situ DAPG production levels. We postulate that certain rhizobacterial genotypes have evolved a preference for colonization of specific crops. By exploiting diversity of antagonistic rhizobacteria that share a common trait, biological control can be improved significantly.

  15. Lethality and Developmental Delay of Drosophila melanogaster Following Ingestion of Selected Pseudomonas fluorescens Strains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pseudomonas fluorescens secretes antimicrobial compounds that promote plant health and provide protection from pathogens. We used a non-invasive feeding assay to study the toxicity of P. fluorescens strains Pf0-1, SBW25, and Pf-5 to Drosophila melanogaster. The three strains of P. fluorescens varie...

  16. Genetic diversity of culturable bacteria in oil-contaminated rhizosphere of Galega orientalis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jussila, Minna M.; Jurgens, German; Lindstroem, Kristina; Suominen, Leena

    2006-01-01

    A collection of 50 indigenous meta-toluate tolerating bacteria isolated from oil-contaminated rhizosphere of Galega orientalis on selective medium was characterized and identified by classical and molecular methods. 16S rDNA partial sequencing showed the presence of five major lineages of the Bacteria domain. Gram-positive Rhodococcus, Bacillus and Arthrobacter and gram-negative Pseudomonas were the most abundant genera. Only one-fifth of the strains that tolerated m-toluate also degraded m-toluate. The inoculum Pseudomonas putida PaW85 was not found in the rhizosphere samples. The ability to degrade m-toluate by the TOL plasmid was detected only in species of the genus Pseudomonas. However, a few Rhodococcus erythropolis strains were found which were able to degrade m-toluate. A new finding was that Pseudomonas migulae strains and a few P. oryzihabitans strains were able to grow on m-toluate and most likely contained the TOL plasmid. Because strain specific differences in degradation abilities were found for P. oryzihabitans, separation at the strain level was important. For strain specific separation (GTG) 5 fingerprinting was the best method. A combination of the single locus ribotyping and the whole genomic fingerprinting techniques with the selective partial sequencing formed a practical molecular toolbox for studying genetic diversity of culturable bacteria in oil-contaminated rhizosphere. - Bacterial diversity during rhizoremediation in oil-contaminated soil is characterized by a combination of molecular methods

  17. Genomic insights into the broad antifungal activity, plant-probiotic properties, and their regulation, in Pseudomonas donghuensis strain SVBP6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iriarte, Andrés; Valverde, Claudio Fabián

    2018-01-01

    Plant-growth promotion has been linked to the Pseudomonas genus since the beginning of this research field. In this work, we mined the genome of an Argentinean isolate of the recently described species P. donghuensis. Strain SVBP6, isolated from bulk soil of an agricultural plot, showed a broad antifungal activity and several other plant-probiotic activities. As this species has been recently described, and it seems like some plant-growth promoting (PGP) traits do not belong to the classical pseudomonads toolbox, we decide to explore the SVBP6 genome via an bioinformatic approach. Genome inspection confirmed our previous in vitro results about genes involved in several probiotic activities. Other genetic traits possibly involved in survival of SVBP6 in highly competitive environments, such as rhizospheres, were found. Tn5 mutagenesis revealed that the antifungal activity against the soil pathogen Macrophomina phaseolina was dependent on a functional gacS gene, from the regulatory cascade Gac-Rsm, but it was not due to volatile compounds. Altogether, our genomic analyses and in vitro tests allowed the phylogenetic assignment and provided the first insights into probiotic properties of the first P. donghuensis isolate from the Americas. PMID:29538430

  18. Isolation, identification, and the growth promoting effects of two antagonistic actinomycete strains from the rhizosphere of Mikania micrantha Kunth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Dandan; Wang, Lanying; Luo, Yanping

    2018-03-01

    Actinomycetes are an important group of gram-positive bacteria that play an essential role in the rhizosphere ecosystem. The confrontation culture and Oxford cup method were used to evaluate the antagonistic activities of strains, which were isolated from the rhizosphere soil of Mikania micrantha. The two isolates were identified using morphological and physiological tests combined with 16S rRNA-based molecular analysis, respectively. The type I polyketone synthase (PKS-I) was amplified. The constituents of fermentation metabolites were analyzed by gas chromatography mass spectrometry. The plant growth promoting effect was determined. Finally, the growth of wheat seedlings was assessed using the Petri dish method. Overall, of the isolated twelve strains, WZS1-1 and WZS2-1 could significantly inhibit target fungi. Isolate WZS1-1 was identified as Streptomyces rochei, and WZS2-1 was identified as Streptomyces sundarbansensis. In particular, Fusarium graminearum (FG) from wheat was inhibited by more than 80%, and the inhibitory bandwidths against FG were 31 ± 0.3 mm and 19 ± 0.5 mm, respectively. The genes PKS-I were successfully amplified, confirming that these strains are capable of producing biosynthetic secondary metabolites. Major component analysis revealed aliphatic ketones, carboxylic acids, and esters, with n-hexadecanoic acid being the most abundant compound. Plant growth promoting test indicated that both strains produced IAA, presented with orange loops on CAS plates, dissolved phosphorus and potassium, fixed nitrogen, but did not generate organic acids; both strains colonized in soil, while only WZS1-1 colonized in wheat roots. Additionally, the fermentation broth significantly promoted the growth of wheat. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  19. Analysis of preference for carbon source utilization among three strains of aromatic compounds degrading Pseudomonas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karishma, M; Trivedi, Vikas D; Choudhary, Alpa; Mhatre, Akanksha; Kambli, Pranita; Desai, Jinal; Phale, Prashant S

    2015-10-01

    Soil isolates Pseudomonas putida CSV86, Pseudomonas aeruginosa PP4 and Pseudomonas sp. C5pp degrade naphthalene, phthalate isomers and carbaryl, respectively. Strain CSV86 displayed a diauxic growth pattern on phenylpropanoid compounds (veratraldehyde, ferulic acid, vanillin or vanillic acid) plus glucose with a distinct second lag-phase. The glucose concentration in the medium remained constant with higher cell respiration rates on aromatics and maximum protocatechuate 3,4-dioxygenase activity in the first log-phase, which gradually decreased in the second log-phase with concomitant depletion of the glucose. In strains PP4 and C5pp, growth profile and metabolic studies suggest that glucose is utilized in the first log-phase with the repression of utilization of aromatics (phthalate or carbaryl). All three strains utilize benzoate via the catechol 'ortho' ring-cleavage pathway. On benzoate plus glucose, strain CSV86 showed preference for benzoate over glucose in contrast to strains PP4 and C5pp. Additionally, organic acids like succinate were preferred over aromatics in strains PP4 and C5pp, whereas strain CSV86 co-metabolizes them. Preferential utilization of aromatics over glucose and co-metabolism of organic acids and aromatics are found to be unique properties of P. putida CSV86 as compared with strains PP4 and C5pp and this property of strain CSV86 can be exploited for effective bioremediation. © FEMS 2015. All rights reserved.

  20. Soil and Rhizosphere Populations of Fluorescent Pseudomonas spp. Associated with Field-grown Plants are Affected by Sorghum Genotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorghum [Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench] is valued for bioenergy, feed and food. Potential of sorghum genotypes to support differing populations of root- and soil-associated fluorescent Pseudomonas spp. or Fusarium spp., in two soils, was assessed. Pseudomonads and Fusarium spp. were assessed from root...

  1. A rhizosphere-associated symbiont, Photobacterium spp. strain MELD1, and its targeted synergistic activity for phytoprotection against mercury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dony Chacko Mathew

    Full Text Available Though heavy metal such as mercury is toxic to plants and microorganisms, the synergistic activity between them may offer benefit for surviving. In this study, a mercury-reducing bacterium, Photobacterium spp. strain MELD1, with an MIC of 33 mg x kg(-1 mercury was isolated from a severely mercury and dioxin contaminated rhizosphere soil of reed (Phragmites australis. While the whole genome sequencing of MELD1 confirmed the presence of a mer operon, the mercury reductase MerA gene showed 99% sequence identity to Vibrio shilloni AK1 and implicates its route resulted from the event of horizontal gene transfer. The efficiency of MELD1 to vaporize mercury (25 mg x kg(-1, 24 h and its tolerance to toxic metals and xenobiotics such as lead, cadmium, pentachlorophenol, pentachloroethylene, 3-chlorobenzoic acid, 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin and 1,2,3,7,8,9-hexachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin is promising. Combination of a long yard bean (Vigna unguiculata ssp. Sesquipedalis and strain MELD1 proved beneficial in the phytoprotection of mercury in vivo. The effect of mercury (Hg on growth, distribution and tolerance was examined in root, shoot, leaves and pod of yard long bean with and without the inoculation of strain MELD1. The model plant inoculated with MELD1 had significant increases in biomass, root length, seed number, and increased mercury uptake limited to roots. Biolog plate assay were used to assess the sole-carbon source utilization pattern of the isolate and Indole-3-acetic acid (IAA productivity was analyzed to examine if the strain could contribute to plant growth. The results of this study suggest that, as a rhizosphere-associated symbiont, the synergistic activity between the plant and MELD1 can improve the efficiency for phytoprotection, phytostabilization and phytoremediation of mercury.

  2. A rhizosphere-associated symbiont, Photobacterium spp. strain MELD1, and its targeted synergistic activity for phytoprotection against mercury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathew, Dony Chacko; Ho, Ying-Ning; Gicana, Ronnie Gicaraya; Mathew, Gincy Marina; Chien, Mei-Chieh; Huang, Chieh-Chen

    2015-01-01

    Though heavy metal such as mercury is toxic to plants and microorganisms, the synergistic activity between them may offer benefit for surviving. In this study, a mercury-reducing bacterium, Photobacterium spp. strain MELD1, with an MIC of 33 mg x kg(-1) mercury was isolated from a severely mercury and dioxin contaminated rhizosphere soil of reed (Phragmites australis). While the whole genome sequencing of MELD1 confirmed the presence of a mer operon, the mercury reductase MerA gene showed 99% sequence identity to Vibrio shilloni AK1 and implicates its route resulted from the event of horizontal gene transfer. The efficiency of MELD1 to vaporize mercury (25 mg x kg(-1), 24 h) and its tolerance to toxic metals and xenobiotics such as lead, cadmium, pentachlorophenol, pentachloroethylene, 3-chlorobenzoic acid, 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin and 1,2,3,7,8,9-hexachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin is promising. Combination of a long yard bean (Vigna unguiculata ssp. Sesquipedalis) and strain MELD1 proved beneficial in the phytoprotection of mercury in vivo. The effect of mercury (Hg) on growth, distribution and tolerance was examined in root, shoot, leaves and pod of yard long bean with and without the inoculation of strain MELD1. The model plant inoculated with MELD1 had significant increases in biomass, root length, seed number, and increased mercury uptake limited to roots. Biolog plate assay were used to assess the sole-carbon source utilization pattern of the isolate and Indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) productivity was analyzed to examine if the strain could contribute to plant growth. The results of this study suggest that, as a rhizosphere-associated symbiont, the synergistic activity between the plant and MELD1 can improve the efficiency for phytoprotection, phytostabilization and phytoremediation of mercury.

  3. A Rhizosphere-Associated Symbiont, Photobacterium spp. Strain MELD1, and Its Targeted Synergistic Activity for Phytoprotection against Mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathew, Dony Chacko; Ho, Ying-Ning; Gicana, Ronnie Gicaraya; Mathew, Gincy Marina; Chien, Mei-Chieh; Huang, Chieh-Chen

    2015-01-01

    Though heavy metal such as mercury is toxic to plants and microorganisms, the synergistic activity between them may offer benefit for surviving. In this study, a mercury-reducing bacterium, Photobacterium spp. strain MELD1, with an MIC of 33 mg . kg-1 mercury was isolated from a severely mercury and dioxin contaminated rhizosphere soil of reed (Phragmites australis). While the whole genome sequencing of MELD1 confirmed the presence of a mer operon, the mercury reductase MerA gene showed 99% sequence identity to Vibrio shilloni AK1 and implicates its route resulted from the event of horizontal gene transfer. The efficiency of MELD1 to vaporize mercury (25 mg . kg-1, 24 h) and its tolerance to toxic metals and xenobiotics such as lead, cadmium, pentachlorophenol, pentachloroethylene, 3-chlorobenzoic acid, 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin and 1,2,3,7,8,9-hexachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin is promising. Combination of a long yard bean (Vigna unguiculata ssp. Sesquipedalis) and strain MELD1 proved beneficial in the phytoprotection of mercury in vivo. The effect of mercury (Hg) on growth, distribution and tolerance was examined in root, shoot, leaves and pod of yard long bean with and without the inoculation of strain MELD1. The model plant inoculated with MELD1 had significant increases in biomass, root length, seed number, and increased mercury uptake limited to roots. Biolog plate assay were used to assess the sole-carbon source utilization pattern of the isolate and Indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) productivity was analyzed to examine if the strain could contribute to plant growth. The results of this study suggest that, as a rhizosphere-associated symbiont, the synergistic activity between the plant and MELD1 can improve the efficiency for phytoprotection, phytostabilization and phytoremediation of mercury. PMID:25816328

  4. Draft genome sequence of Pseudomonas sp. strain M47T1, carried by Bursaphelenchus xylophilus isolated from Pinus pinaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proença, Diogo Neves; Espírito Santo, Christophe; Grass, Gregor; Morais, Paula V

    2012-09-01

    The draft genome sequence of Pseudomonas sp. strain M47T1, carried by the Bursaphelenchus xylophilus pinewood nematode, the causative agent of pine wilt disease, is presented. In Pseudomonas sp. strain M47T1, genes that make this a plant growth-promoting bacterium, as well as genes potentially involved in nematotoxicity, were identified.

  5. Comparison of some indigenous bacterial strains of pseudomonas ssp. for production of biosurfactants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahafeeq, M.; Kokub, D.; Khalid, Z.M.; Malik, K.A.

    1991-01-01

    Some indigenous pseudomonas spp. were found to have the ability of emulsification, lowering the surface and interfacial tensions, and formation of high reciprocal CMCs. Six strains of Pseudomonas spp were compared for biosurfactant production grown on hexadecane. Supernatant from whole culture broth of these strains could lower surface tension from 65 mN/m to 28-32 nM/m, interfacial tension from 40 nM/m to 1-3 mN/m and had high reciprocal CMCs. When compared for emulsification ability by the culture broth of these strains, the emulsification index (E24) was found to range between 60-65. Biosurfactant containing culture broth of some strains could retain the property up to 80 C, pH of 13 and sodium chloride concentration for 17% which indicates their possible role in some depleted oil well. (author)

  6. OXIDATION OF BIPHENYL BY A MULTICOMPONENT ENZYME SYSTEM FROM PSEUDOMONAS SP. STRAIN LB400

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pseudomonas sp. strain LB400 grows on biphenyl as the sole carbon and energy source. This organism also cooxidizes several chlorinated biphenyl congeners. Biphenyl dioxygenase activity in cell extract required addition of NAD(P)H as an electron donor for the conversion of bipheny...

  7. Combining fluorescent Pseudomonas spp. strains to enhance suppression of fusarium wilt of radish

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boer, Marjan de; Sluis, Ientse van der; Loon, L.C. van; Bakker, P.A.H.M.

    1999-01-01

    Fusarium wilt diseases, caused by the fungus Fusarium oxysporum, lead to significant yield losses of crops. One strategy to control fusarium wilt is the use of antagonistic, root-colonizing Pseudomonas spp. It has been demonstrated that different strains of these bacteria suppress disease by

  8. Draft Genome Sequence of a Kale (Brassica oleracea L.) Root Endophyte, Pseudomonas sp. Strain C9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laugraud, Aurelie; Young, Sandra; Gerard, Emily; O'Callaghan, Maureen; Wakelin, Steven

    2017-04-13

    Pseudomonas sp. strain C9 is a plant growth-promoting bacterium isolated from the root tissue of Brassica oleracea L. grown in soil from Marlborough, New Zealand. Its draft genome of 6,350,161 bp contains genes associated with plant growth promotion and biological control. Copyright © 2017 Laugraud et al.

  9. Three Strains of Pseudomonas fluorescens Exhibit Differential Toxicity Against Drosophila melanogaster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Three strains of Pseudomonas fluorescens were tested for toxicity to Drosophila melanogaster in an insect feeding assay. Insect eggs were placed on the surface of a non-nutritive agar plate supplemented with a food source that was non-inoculated or inoculated with P. fluorescens Pf0-1, SBW25, or Pf-...

  10. RESEARCH IN SENSITIVITY TO ANTIBIOTICS, ANTISEPTICS IN PSEUDOMONAS AERUGINOSA STRAINS ISOLATED FROM PATIENTS WITH INFECTIOUS COMPLICATIONS

    OpenAIRE

    O. A. Nazarchuk; D. V. Paliy; N. I. Osadchuk

    2017-01-01

    Background. Infections caused by Pseudomonas are one of the topical issues of medicine. Objective. The aim of the research was to study sensityvity to antibiotics, antiseptics of P. aeruginosa clinical strains that cause infectious complications in patients with burns. Methods. Microbiological study of biological material, received from 435 patients with burns of the 3rd-4th stages (2011-2015 years). In early terms of burn disease 127 clinical strains of P. aeruginosa were isolated fr...

  11. Study on Antibiotic compounds from Pseudomonas aeruginosa NO4 Strain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nam, Ji Young; Kim, Jin Kyu [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Jeongeup (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-05-15

    As important human and veterinary medicines, antibiotics are being produced and consumed in large quantities around the world. For example, more than 50 million pounds (22,000 tons) of antibiotics are produced in the U.S. each year and annual production in Germany is about 2,000 tons. Antibiotics are low molecular weight microbial metabolites that at low concentrations inhibit the growth of other microorganisms. Resistant bacteria may also spread and become broader infection-control problems, not only within health care institutions, but in communities as well. Clinically important bacteria, such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). MRSA is a common cause of infection among hospitalized patients. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a major cause of opportunistic infections among immunocompromised individuals. The spread of this organism in health care settings is often difficult to control due to the presence of multiple intrinsic and acquired mechanisms of antimicrobial resistance. In this study, we isolated novel bacterium which had strong antagonistic activity and separated antibiotic compounds from Pseudomonas sp., and analyzed characteristics and molecular weight of the antibiotic compound

  12. Study on Antibiotic compounds from Pseudomonas aeruginosa NO4 Strain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nam, Ji Young; Kim, Jin Kyu

    2011-01-01

    As important human and veterinary medicines, antibiotics are being produced and consumed in large quantities around the world. For example, more than 50 million pounds (22,000 tons) of antibiotics are produced in the U.S. each year and annual production in Germany is about 2,000 tons. Antibiotics are low molecular weight microbial metabolites that at low concentrations inhibit the growth of other microorganisms. Resistant bacteria may also spread and become broader infection-control problems, not only within health care institutions, but in communities as well. Clinically important bacteria, such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). MRSA is a common cause of infection among hospitalized patients. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a major cause of opportunistic infections among immunocompromised individuals. The spread of this organism in health care settings is often difficult to control due to the presence of multiple intrinsic and acquired mechanisms of antimicrobial resistance. In this study, we isolated novel bacterium which had strong antagonistic activity and separated antibiotic compounds from Pseudomonas sp., and analyzed characteristics and molecular weight of the antibiotic compound

  13. Visualization of N-acylhomoserine lactone-mediated cell-cell communication between bacteria colonizing the tomato rhizosphere

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steidle, A.; Sigl, K.; Schuhegger, R.

    2001-01-01

    developed and characterized novel Gfp-based monitor strains that allow in situ visualization of AHL-mediated communication between individual cells in the plant rhizosphere. For this purpose, three Gfp-based AHL sensor plasmids that respond to different spectra of AHL molecules were transferred into AHL......-negative derivatives of Pseudomonas putida IsoF and Serratia liquefaciens MG1, two strains that are capable of colonizing tomato roots. These AHL monitor strains were used to visualize communication between defined bacterial populations in the rhizosphere of axenically grown tomato plants. Furthermore, we integrated...

  14. Efficacy of selected Pseudomonas strains for biocontrol of Rhizoctonia solani in potato

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moncef MRABET

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Thirty seven bacterial isolates from faba bean (Vicia faba L. root-nodules were screened for their antagonistic activity against eight Rhizoctonia solani strains isolated from infected potato (Solanum tuberosum L. tubers. Two bacterial strains (designated as Kl.Fb14 and S8.Fb11 gave 50% in vitro inhibition of R. solani mycelial growth. 16S rDNA sequence analysis indicated that strain Kl.Fb14 exhibited 99.5% identity with Pseudomonas moraviensis, and that S8.Fb11 exhibited 99.8% identity with Pseudomonas reinekei. Greenhouse trials in soil showed that strain S8.Fb11 reduced the percentage of sclerotia on potato tubers and amounts of tuber infection for the potato cultivars Spunta and Nicola. In a field trial conducted in South Tunisia, infection with R. solani reduced potato yield by approximately 40% for ‘Spunta’ and 17% for ‘Nicola’; about 20% of the total tuber production was severely infected. However, when potato tubers were treated with strain S8.Fb11 prior to sowing, disease incidence was reduced to 6% of total production with low infection levels; potato yield was enhanced by about 6 kg per 10 m row in comparison to R. solani infected plants. The second selected Pseudomonas sp. (strain Kl.Fb14 did not affect either the levels of sclerotia on tubers or potato yield.

  15. [Characteristics of natural strains of naphthalene-utilizing bacteria of the genus Pseudomonas].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levchuk, A A; Vasilenko, S L; Bulyga, I M; Titok, M A; Thomas, K M

    2005-01-01

    Sixty-three strains of bacteria capable of utilizing naphthalene as the sole source of carbon and energy were isolated from 137 samples of soil taken in different sites in Belarus. All isolated bacteria contained extrachromosomal genetic elements of 45 to 150 kb in length. It was found that bacteria of 31 strains contained the IncP-9 incompatibility group plasmids, bacteria of one strain carried a plasmid containing replicons IncP-9 and IncP-7, and bacteria of 31 strains contained unidentified plasmids. Primary identification showed that the hosts of plasmids of naphthalene biodegradation are fluorescent bacteria of the genus Pseudomonas (P. putida and P. aeruginosa; a total of 47 strains) and unidentified nonfluorescent microorganisms (a total of 16 strains). In addition to the ability to utilize naphthalene, some strains exhibited the ability to stimulate the growth and development of the root system of Secale cereale.

  16. Draft genome sequence of a caprolactam degrader bacterium: Pseudomonas taiwanensis strain SJ9

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung-Jun Hong

    Full Text Available Abstract Pseudomonas taiwanensis strain SJ9 is a caprolactam degrader, isolated from industrial wastewater in South Korea and considered to have the potential for caprolactam bioremediation. The genome of this strain is approximately 6.2 Mb (G + C content, 61.75% with 6,010 protein-coding sequences (CDS, of which 46% are assigned to recognized functional genes. This draft genome of strain SJ9 will provide insights into the genetic basis of its caprolactam-degradation ability.

  17. In-planta Sporulation Capacity Enhances Infectivity and Rhizospheric Competitiveness of Frankia Strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotin-Galvan, Laetitia; Pozzi, Adrien C; Schwob, Guillaume; Fournier, Pascale; Fernandez, Maria P; Herrera-Belaroussi, Aude

    2016-01-01

    Frankia Sp+ strains maintain their ability to sporulate in symbiosis with actinorhizal plants, producing abundant sporangia inside host plant cells, in contrast to Sp- strains, which are unable to perform in-planta sporulation. We herein examined the role of in-planta sporulation in Frankia infectivity and competitiveness for root infection. Fifteen strains belonging to different Sp+ and Sp- phylogenetic lineages were inoculated on seedlings of Alnus glutinosa (Ag) and A. incana (Ai). Strain competitiveness was investigated by performing Sp-/Sp+ co-inoculations. Plant inoculations were standardized using crushed nodules obtained under laboratory-controlled conditions (same plant species, age, and environmental factors). Specific oligonucleotide primers were developed to identify Frankia Sp+ and/or Sp- strains in the resulting nodules. Single inoculation experiments showed that (i) infectivity by Sp+ strains was significantly greater than that by Sp- strains, (ii) genetically divergent Sp+ strains exhibited different infective abilities, and (iii) Sp+ and Sp- strains showed different host preferences according to the origin (host species) of the inocula. Co-inoculations of Sp+ and Sp- strains revealed the greater competitiveness of Sp+ strains (98.3 to 100% of Sp+ nodules, with up to 15.6% nodules containing both Sp+ and Sp- strains). The results of the present study highlight differences in Sp+/Sp- strain ecological behaviors and provide new insights to strengthen the obligate symbiont hypothesis for Sp+ strains.

  18. methoxyethanol by a new bacterium isolate Pseudomonas sp. Strain

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Michael Horsfall

    A 2-methoxyethanol degrading bacterium was isolated from anaerobic sludge of a municipal sewage from ... Stoichiometrically, the strain utilized one mole of oxygen per one mole of 2-methoxyethanol instead of ... physiological and biochemical characterization of the .... observed with acetate and the intact resting cells.

  19. Identification of novel transaminases from a 12-aminododecanoic acid-metabolizing Pseudomonas strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilding, Matthew; Walsh, Ellen F A; Dorrian, Susan J; Scott, Colin

    2015-07-01

    A Pseudomonas species [Pseudomonas sp. strain amino alkanoate catabolism (AAC)] was identified that has the capacity to use 12-aminododecanoic acid, the constituent building block of homo-nylon-12, as a sole nitrogen source. Growth of Pseudomonas sp. strain AAC could also be supported using a range of additional ω-amino alkanoates. This metabolic function was shown to be most probably dependent upon one or more transaminases (TAs). Fourteen genes encoding putative TAs were identified from the genome of Pseudomonas sp. AAC. Each of the 14 genes was cloned, 11 of which were successfully expressed in Escherichia coli and tested for activity against 12-aminododecanoic acid. In addition, physiological functions were proposed for 9 of the 14 TAs. Of the 14 proteins, activity was demonstrated in 9, and of note, 3 TAs were shown to be able to catalyse the transfer of the ω-amine from 12-aminododecanoic acid to pyruvate. Based on this study, three enzymes have been identified that are promising biocatalysts for the production of nylon and related polymers. © 2015 The Authors. Microbial Biotechnology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Society for Applied Microbiology.

  20. Aflatoxin B1 Degradation by a Pseudomonas Strain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lancine Sangare

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Aflatoxin B1 (AFB1, one of the most potent naturally occurring mutagens and carcinogens, causes significant threats to the food industry and animal production. In this study, 25 bacteria isolates were collected from grain kernels and soils displaying AFB1 reduction activity. Based on its degradation effectiveness, isolate N17-1 was selected for further characterization and identified as Pseudomonas aeruginosa. P. aeruginosa N17-1 could degrade AFB1, AFB2 and AFM1 by 82.8%, 46.8% and 31.9% after incubation in Nutrient Broth (NB medium at 37 °C for 72 h, respectively. The culture supernatant of isolate N17-1 degraded AFB1 effectively, whereas the viable cells and intra cell extracts were far less effective. Factors influencing AFB1 degradation by the culture supernatant were investigated. Maximum degradation was observed at 55 °C. Ions Mn2+ and Cu2+ were activators for AFB1 degradation, however, ions Mg2+, Li+, Zn2+, Se2+, Fe3+ were strong inhibitors. Treatments with proteinase K and proteinase K plus SDS significantly reduced the degradation activity of the culture supernatant. No degradation products were observed based on preliminary LC-QTOF/MS analysis, indicating AFB1 was metabolized to degradation products with chemical properties different from that of AFB1. The results indicated that the degradation of AFB1 by P. aeruginosa N17-1 was enzymatic and could have a great potential in industrial applications. This is the first report indicating that the isolate of P. aeruginosa possesses the ability to degrade aflatoxin.

  1. Amplified fragment length polymorphism fingerprinting of Pseudomonas strains from a poultry processing plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geornaras, I; Kunene, N F; von Holy, A; Hastings, J W

    1999-09-01

    Molecular typing has been used previously to identify and trace dissemination of pathogenic and spoilage bacteria associated with food processing. Amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) is a novel DNA fingerprinting technique which is considered highly reproducible and has high discriminatory power. This technique was used to fingerprint 88 Pseudomonas fluorescens and Pseudomonas putida strains that were previously isolated from plate counts of carcasses at six processing stages and various equipment surfaces and environmental sources of a poultry abattoir. Clustering of the AFLP patterns revealed a high level of diversity among the strains. Six clusters (clusters I through VI) were delineated at an arbitrary Dice coefficient level of 0.65; clusters III (31 strains) and IV (28 strains) were the largest clusters. More than one-half (52.3%) of the strains obtained from carcass samples, which may have represented the resident carcass population, grouped together in cluster III. By contrast, 43.2% of the strains from most of the equipment surfaces and environmental sources grouped together in cluster IV. In most cases, the clusters in which carcass strains from processing stages grouped corresponded to the clusters in which strains from the associated equipment surfaces and/or environmental sources were found. This provided evidence that there was cross-contamination between carcasses and the abattoir environment at the DNA level. The AFLP data also showed that strains were being disseminated from the beginning to the end of the poultry processing operation, since many strains associated with carcasses at the packaging stage were members of the same clusters as strains obtained from carcasses after the defeathering stage.

  2. Pseudomonas cremoricolorata Strain ND07 Produces N-acyl Homoserine Lactones as Quorum Sensing Molecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Yusrina Muhamad Yunos

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Quorum sensing (QS is a bacterial cell-to-cell communication system controlling QS-mediated genes which is synchronized with the population density. The regulation of specific gene activity is dependent on the signaling molecules produced, namely N-acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs. We report here the identification and characterization of AHLs produced by bacterial strain ND07 isolated from a Malaysian fresh water sample. Molecular identification showed that strain ND07 is clustered closely to Pseudomonas cremoricolorata. Spent culture supernatant extract of P. cremoricolorata strain ND07 activated the AHL biosensor Chromobacterium violaceum CV026. Using high resolution triple quadrupole liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, it was confirmed that P. cremoricolorata strain ND07 produced N-octanoyl-l-homoserine lactone (C8-HSL and N-decanoyl-l-homoserine lactone (C10-HSL. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first documentation on the production of C10-HSL in P. cremoricolorata strain ND07.

  3. Degradation of carbazole, dibenzothiophene, and dibenzofuran at low temperature by Pseudomonas sp. strain C3211.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Anne-Mette; Finster, Kai Waldemar; Karlson, Ulrich

    2003-04-01

    Pseudomonas sp. strain C3211 was isolated from a temperate climate soil contaminated with creosote. This strain was able to degrade carbazole, dibenzothiophene and dibenzofuran at 10 degrees C with acetone as a co-substrate. When dibenzothiophene was degraded by strain C3211, an orange compound, which absorbed at 472 nm, accumulated in the medium. Degradation of dibenzofuran was followed by accumulation of a yellowish compound, absorbing at 462 nm. The temperature optimum of strain C3211 for degradation of dibenzothiophene and dibenzofuran was at 20 to 21 degrees C, while the maximum temperature for degradation was at 27 degrees C. Both compounds were degraded at 4 degrees C. Degradation at 10 degrees C was faster than degradation at 25 degrees C. This indicates that strain C3211 is adapted to life at low temperatures.

  4. Biodegradation of Methyl tert-Butyl Ether by Co-Metabolism with a Pseudomonas sp. Strain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shanshan Li

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Co-metabolic bioremediation is supposed to be an impressive and promising approach in the elimination technology of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE, which was found to be a common pollutant worldwide in the ground or underground water in recent years. In this paper, bacterial strain DZ13 (which can co-metabolically degrade MTBE was isolated and named as Pseudomonas sp. DZ13 based on the result of 16S rRNA gene sequencing analysis. Strain DZ13 could grow on n-alkanes (C5-C8, accompanied with the co-metabolic degradation of MTBE. Diverse n-alkanes with different carbon number showed a significant influence on the degradation rate of MTBE and accumulation of tert-butyl alcohol (TBA. When Pseudomonas sp. DZ13 co-metabolically degraded MTBE with n-pentane as the growth substrate, a higher MTBE-degrading rate (Vmax = 38.1 nmol/min/mgprotein, Ks = 6.8 mmol/L and lower TBA-accumulation was observed. In the continuous degradation experiment, the removal efficiency of MTBE by Pseudomonas sp. Strain DZ13 did not show an obvious decrease after five times of continuous addition.

  5. Draft Genome Sequences of Pseudomonas aeruginosa B3 Strains Isolated from a Cystic Fibrosis Patient Undergoing Antibiotic Chemotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marvig, Rasmus Lykke; Jochumsen, Nicholas; Johansen, Helle Krogh

    2013-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa frequently establishes chronic infections in the airways of patients suffering from cystic fibrosis (CF). Here, we report the draft genome sequences of four P. aeruginosa B3 strains isolated from a chronically infected CF patient undergoing antibiotic chemotherapy.......Pseudomonas aeruginosa frequently establishes chronic infections in the airways of patients suffering from cystic fibrosis (CF). Here, we report the draft genome sequences of four P. aeruginosa B3 strains isolated from a chronically infected CF patient undergoing antibiotic chemotherapy....

  6. Genomics-guided discovery of secondary metabolites and their regulation in Pseudomonas protegens Pf-5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pseudomonas protegens strain Pf-5 is a well-characterized rhizosphere bacterium known for its production of a diverse spectrum of secondary metabolites and its capacity to suppress plant diseases caused by soilborne fungal, bacterial and oomycete pathogens. Metabolites produced by Pf-5 include 2,4-...

  7. Rhizoplane colonisation of peas by Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. viceae and a deleterious Pseudomonas putida

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berggren, I.; Alstrom, S.; Vuurde, van J.W.L.; Martensson, A.M.

    2005-01-01

    Pseudomonas putida strain angstrom 313, a deleterious rhizosphere bacterium, reduced pea nitrogen content when inoculated alone or in combination with Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. viceae on plants in the presence of soil under greenhouse conditions. When plants were grown gnotobiotically in liquid

  8. Two draft genome sequences of Pseudomonas jessenii strains isolated from a copper contaminated site in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qin, Yanan; Wang, Dan; Brandt, Kristian Koefoed

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas jessenii C2 and Pseudomonas jessenii H16 were isolated from low-Cu and high-Cu industrially contaminated soil, respectively. P. jessenii H16 displayed significant resistance to copper when compared to P. jessenii C2. Here we describe genome sequences and interesting features of these ......Pseudomonas jessenii C2 and Pseudomonas jessenii H16 were isolated from low-Cu and high-Cu industrially contaminated soil, respectively. P. jessenii H16 displayed significant resistance to copper when compared to P. jessenii C2. Here we describe genome sequences and interesting features...... of these two strains. The genome of P. jessenii C2 comprised 6,420,113 bp, with 5814 protein-coding genes and 67 RNA genes. P. jessenii H16 comprised 6,807,788 bp, with 5995 protein-coding genes and 70 RNA genes. Of special interest was a specific adaptation to this harsh copper-contaminated environment as P....... jessenii H16 contained a novel putative copper resistance genomic island (GI) of around 50,000 bp....

  9. Rhizospheric bacterial strain Brevibacterium casei MH8a colonizes plant tissues and enhances Cd, Zn, Cu phytoextraction by white mustard

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz ePłociniczak

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Environmental pollution by heavy metals has become a serious problem in the world. Phytoextraction, which is one of the plant-based technologies, has attracted the most attention for the bioremediation of soils polluted with these contaminants.The aim of this study was to determine whether the multiple-tolerant bacterium, Brevibacterium casei MH8a isolated from the heavy metal-contaminated rhizosphere soil of Sinapis alba L., is able to promote plant growth and enhance Cd, Zn and Cu uptake by white mustard under laboratory conditions. Additionally, the ability of the rifampicin-resistant spontaneous mutant of MH8a to colonize plant tissues and its mechanisms of plant growth promotion were also examined. In order to assess the ecological consequences of bioaugmentation on autochthonous bacteria, the phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA analysis was used. The MH8a strain exhibited the ability to produce ammonia, 1-amino-cyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid deaminase, indole 3-acetic acid and HCN but was not able to solubilize inorganic phosphate and produce siderophores. Introduction of MH8a into soil significantly increased S. alba biomass and the accumulation of Cd (208%, Zn (86% and Cu (39% in plant shoots in comparison with those grown in non-inoculated soil. Introduced into the soil, MH8a was able to enter the plant and was found in the roots and leaves of inoculated plants thus indicating its endophytic features. PLFA analysis revealed that the MH8a that was introduced into soil had a temporary influence on the structure of the autochthonous bacterial communities. The plant growth-promoting features of the MH8a strain and its ability to enhance the metal uptake by white mustard and its long-term survival in soil as well as its temporary impact on autochthonous microorganisms make the strain a suitable candidate for the promotion of plant growth and the efficiency of phytoextraction.

  10. Rhizospheric Bacterial Strain Brevibacterium casei MH8a Colonizes Plant Tissues and Enhances Cd, Zn, Cu Phytoextraction by White Mustard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Płociniczak, Tomasz; Sinkkonen, Aki; Romantschuk, Martin; Sułowicz, Sławomir; Piotrowska-Seget, Zofia

    2016-01-01

    Environmental pollution by heavy metals has become a serious problem in the world. Phytoextraction, which is one of the plant-based technologies, has attracted the most attention for the bioremediation of soils polluted with these contaminants. The aim of this study was to determine whether the multiple-tolerant bacterium, Brevibacterium casei MH8a isolated from the heavy metal-contaminated rhizosphere soil of Sinapis alba L., is able to promote plant growth and enhance Cd, Zn, and Cu uptake by white mustard under laboratory conditions. Additionally, the ability of the rifampicin-resistant spontaneous mutant of MH8a to colonize plant tissues and its mechanisms of plant growth promotion were also examined. In order to assess the ecological consequences of bioaugmentation on autochthonous bacteria, the phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) analysis was used. The MH8a strain exhibited the ability to produce ammonia, 1-amino-cyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid deaminase, indole 3-acetic acid and HCN but was not able to solubilize inorganic phosphate and produce siderophores. Introduction of MH8a into soil significantly increased S. alba biomass and the accumulation of Cd (208%), Zn (86%), and Cu (39%) in plant shoots in comparison with those grown in non-inoculated soil. Introduced into the soil, MH8a was able to enter the plant and was found in the roots and leaves of inoculated plants thus indicating its endophytic features. PLFA analysis revealed that the MH8a that was introduced into soil had a temporary influence on the structure of the autochthonous bacterial communities. The plant growth-promoting features of the MH8a strain and its ability to enhance the metal uptake by white mustard and its long-term survival in soil as well as its temporary impact on autochthonous microorganisms make the strain a suitable candidate for the promotion of plant growth and the efficiency of phytoextraction.

  11. Optimization of Culture Parameters for Maximum Polyhydroxybutyrate Production by Selected Bacterial Strains Isolated from Rhizospheric Soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lathwal, Priyanka; Nehra, Kiran; Singh, Manpreet; Jamdagni, Pragati; Rana, Jogender S

    2015-01-01

    The enormous applications of conventional non-biodegradable plastics have led towards their increased usage and accumulation in the environment. This has become one of the major causes of global environmental concern in the present century. Polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB), a biodegradable plastic is known to have properties similar to conventional plastics, thus exhibiting a potential for replacing conventional non-degradable plastics. In the present study, a total of 303 different bacterial isolates were obtained from soil samples collected from the rhizospheric area of three crops, viz., wheat, mustard and sugarcane. All the isolates were screened for PHB (Poly-3-hydroxy butyric acid) production using Sudan Black staining method, and 194 isolates were found to be PHB positive. Based upon the amount of PHB produced, the isolates were divided into three categories: high, medium and low producers. Representative isolates from each category were selected for biochemical characterization; and for optimization of various culture parameters (carbon source, nitrogen source, C/N ratio, different pH, temperature and incubation time periods) for maximizing PHB accumulation. The highest PHB yield was obtained when the culture medium was supplemented with glucose as the carbon source, ammonium sulphate at a concentration of 1.0 g/l as the nitrogen source, and by maintaining the C/N ratio of the medium as 20:1. The physical growth parameters which supported maximum PHB accumulation included a pH of 7.0, and an incubation temperature of 30 degrees C for a period of 48 h. A few isolates exhibited high PHB accumulation under optimized conditions, thus showing a potential for their industrial exploitation.

  12. Strain- and Substrate-Dependent Redox Mediator and Electricity Production by Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosire, Erick M; Blank, Lars M; Rosenbaum, Miriam A

    2016-08-15

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an important, thriving member of microbial communities of microbial bioelectrochemical systems (BES) through the production of versatile phenazine redox mediators. Pure culture experiments with a model strain revealed synergistic interactions of P. aeruginosa with fermenting microorganisms whereby the synergism was mediated through the shared fermentation product 2,3-butanediol. Our work here shows that the behavior and efficiency of P. aeruginosa in mediated current production is strongly dependent on the strain of P. aeruginosa We compared levels of phenazine production by the previously investigated model strain P. aeruginosa PA14, the alternative model strain P. aeruginosa PAO1, and the BES isolate Pseudomonas sp. strain KRP1 with glucose and the fermentation products 2,3-butanediol and ethanol as carbon substrates. We found significant differences in substrate-dependent phenazine production and resulting anodic current generation for the three strains, with the BES isolate KRP1 being overall the best current producer and showing the highest electrochemical activity with glucose as a substrate (19 μA cm(-2) with ∼150 μg ml(-1) phenazine carboxylic acid as a redox mediator). Surprisingly, P. aeruginosa PAO1 showed very low phenazine production and electrochemical activity under all tested conditions. Microbial fuel cells and other microbial bioelectrochemical systems hold great promise for environmental technologies such as wastewater treatment and bioremediation. While there is much emphasis on the development of materials and devices to realize such systems, the investigation and a deeper understanding of the underlying microbiology and ecology are lagging behind. Physiological investigations focus on microorganisms exhibiting direct electron transfer in pure culture systems. Meanwhile, mediated electron transfer with natural redox compounds produced by, for example, Pseudomonas aeruginosa might enable an entire microbial

  13. ANTIMICROBIAL, ENTOMOPATHOGENIC AND ANTIVIRAL ACTIVITY OF GAUPSIN BIOPREPARATION CREATED ON THE BASIS OF Pseudomonas chlororaphis STRAINS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. A. Kiprianova

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this review was to present the results of more than ten-year study of gaupsin biopreparation created on the basis of two strains Pseudomonas chlororaphis subsp. aureofaciens UCM В-111 and UCM В-306 with antifungal, entomopathogenic and antiviral activities. Data about antibiotic substances produced by these strains — phenazine and phenylpyrrole derivatives — are presented. Entomocidal properties against the wide spectrum of insect pests have been found out in the strains-producers. Antiviral activity of gaupsin due to the production of thermostable exopolymers containing neutral monosaccharides has been shown using the tobacco mosaic virus as a model. Lipopolysaccharides of the strains В-111 and В-306 also appeared to be highly active antiviral agents. Structure of their O-specific polysaccharides has been established. The last one are structurally heterogenic, presented by linear tri-and tetrasaccharide repeated links and have specific structure that has not been described previously.

  14. Assessment of strains of Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato from Tanzania for resistance to copper and streptomycin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shenge, K.C.; Wydra, K.; Mabagala, M.B.

    2008-01-01

    Fifty-six strains of Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (P.s. pv. tomato) were collected from tomato-producing areas in Tanzania and assessed for resistance to copper and antibiotics. The collection was done from three tomato-producing regions (Morogoro, Arusha and Iringa), representing three...... different ecological conditions in the country. After isolation and identification, the P. s. pv. tomato strains were grown on King's medium B (KB) amended with 20% copper sulphate (w/v). The strains were also assessed for resistance to antibiotics. Results indicated that there was widespread resistance...... strains of the pathogen were moderately resistant to copper sulphate, such that 54.0% of them were able to grow on the KB medium amended with 20% (w/v) of the copper compound....

  15. An Interspecies Signaling System Mediated by Fusaric Acid Has Parallel Effects on Antifungal Metabolite Production by Pseudomonas protegens Strain Pf-5 and Antibiosis of Fusarium spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quecine, Maria Carolina; Kidarsa, Teresa A.; Goebel, Neal C.; Shaffer, Brenda T.; Henkels, Marcella D.; Zabriskie, T. Mark

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas protegens strain Pf-5 is a rhizosphere bacterium that suppresses soilborne plant diseases and produces at least seven different secondary metabolites with antifungal properties. We derived mutants of Pf-5 with single and multiple mutations in biosynthesis genes for seven antifungal metabolites: 2,4-diacetylphoroglucinol (DAPG), pyrrolnitrin, pyoluteorin, hydrogen cyanide, rhizoxin, orfamide A, and toxoflavin. These mutants were tested for inhibition of the pathogens Fusarium verticillioides and Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. pisi. Rhizoxin, pyrrolnitrin, and DAPG were found to be primarily responsible for fungal antagonism by Pf-5. Previously, other workers showed that the mycotoxin fusaric acid, which is produced by many Fusarium species, including F. verticillioides, inhibited the production of DAPG by Pseudomonas spp. In this study, amendment of culture media with fusaric acid decreased DAPG production, increased pyoluteorin production, and had no consistent influence on pyrrolnitrin or orfamide A production by Pf-5. Fusaric acid also altered the transcription of biosynthetic genes, indicating that the mycotoxin influenced antibiotic production by Pf-5 at the transcriptional level. Addition of fusaric acid to the culture medium reduced antibiosis of F. verticillioides by Pf-5 and derivative strains that produce DAPG but had no effect on antibiosis by Pf-5 derivatives that suppressed F. verticillioides due to pyrrolnitrin or rhizoxin production. Our results demonstrated the importance of three compounds, rhizoxin, pyrrolnitrin, and DAPG, in suppression of Fusarium spp. by Pf-5 and confirmed that an interspecies signaling system mediated by fusaric acid had parallel effects on antifungal metabolite production and antibiosis by the bacterial biological control organism. PMID:26655755

  16. An Interspecies Signaling System Mediated by Fusaric Acid Has Parallel Effects on Antifungal Metabolite Production by Pseudomonas protegens Strain Pf-5 and Antibiosis of Fusarium spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quecine, Maria Carolina; Kidarsa, Teresa A; Goebel, Neal C; Shaffer, Brenda T; Henkels, Marcella D; Zabriskie, T Mark; Loper, Joyce E

    2015-12-11

    Pseudomonas protegens strain Pf-5 is a rhizosphere bacterium that suppresses soilborne plant diseases and produces at least seven different secondary metabolites with antifungal properties. We derived mutants of Pf-5 with single and multiple mutations in biosynthesis genes for seven antifungal metabolites: 2,4-diacetylphoroglucinol (DAPG), pyrrolnitrin, pyoluteorin, hydrogen cyanide, rhizoxin, orfamide A, and toxoflavin. These mutants were tested for inhibition of the pathogens Fusarium verticillioides and Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. pisi. Rhizoxin, pyrrolnitrin, and DAPG were found to be primarily responsible for fungal antagonism by Pf-5. Previously, other workers showed that the mycotoxin fusaric acid, which is produced by many Fusarium species, including F. verticillioides, inhibited the production of DAPG by Pseudomonas spp. In this study, amendment of culture media with fusaric acid decreased DAPG production, increased pyoluteorin production, and had no consistent influence on pyrrolnitrin or orfamide A production by Pf-5. Fusaric acid also altered the transcription of biosynthetic genes, indicating that the mycotoxin influenced antibiotic production by Pf-5 at the transcriptional level. Addition of fusaric acid to the culture medium reduced antibiosis of F. verticillioides by Pf-5 and derivative strains that produce DAPG but had no effect on antibiosis by Pf-5 derivatives that suppressed F. verticillioides due to pyrrolnitrin or rhizoxin production. Our results demonstrated the importance of three compounds, rhizoxin, pyrrolnitrin, and DAPG, in suppression of Fusarium spp. by Pf-5 and confirmed that an interspecies signaling system mediated by fusaric acid had parallel effects on antifungal metabolite production and antibiosis by the bacterial biological control organism. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  17. Type III secretion system and virulence markers highlight similarities and differences between human- and plant-associated Pseudomonads related to Pseudomonas fluorescens and P-putida

    OpenAIRE

    Mazurier, Sylvie; Merieau, Annabelle; Bergeau, Dorian; Decoin, Victorien; Sperandio, Daniel; Crepin, Alexandre; Barbey, Corinne; Jeannot, Katy; Vicre-Gibouin, Maité; Plesiat, Patrick; Lemanceau, Philippe; Latour, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas fluorescens is commonly considered a saprophytic rhizobacterium devoid of pathogenic potential. Nevertheless, the recurrent isolation of strains from clinical human cases could indicate the emergence of novel strains originating from the rhizosphere reservoir, which could be particularly resistant to the immune system and clinical treatment. The importance of type three secretion systems (T3SSs) in the related Pseudomonas aeruginosa nosocomial species and the occurrence of this se...

  18. Optimal decolorization and kinetic modeling of synthetic dyes by Pseudomonas strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, J; Wang, X; Yue, P L

    2001-10-01

    Pseudomonas spp were isolated from an anaerobic-aerobic dyeing house wastewater treatment facility as the most active azo-dye degraders. Decolorization of azo dyes and non-azo dyes including anthraquinone, metal complex and indigo was compared with individual strains and a bacterial consortium consisting of the individual strain and municipal sludge (50 50wt). The consortium showed a significant improvement on decolorization of two recalcitrant non-azo dyes, but little effect on the dyes that the individual strains could degrade to a great or moderate extent. Decolorization of Acid violet 7 (monoazo) by a Pseudomonas strain GM3 was studied in detail under various conditions. The optimum decolorization activity was observed in a narrow pH range (7-8), a narrow temperature range (35-40 degrees C), and at the presence of organic and ammonium nitrogen. Nitrate had a severe inhibitory effect on azo dye decolorization: 10 mg/L led to 50% drop in decolorization activity and 1000 mg/L to complete activity depression. A kinetic model is established giving the dependence of decolorization rate on cell mass concentration (first-order) and dye concentration (half order). The rate increased with temperature from 10 to 35 C, which can be predicted by Arrhenius equation with the activation energy of 16.87 kcal/mol and the frequency factor of 1.49 x 10(11) (mg L)1/2/g DCM min.

  19. Isolation, identification, and environmental adaptability of heavy-metal-resistant bacteria from ramie rhizosphere soil around mine refinery

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang, Jie; Pan, Chaohu; Xiao, Aiping; Yang, Xiai; Zhang, Guimin

    2017-01-01

    Six bacteria strains from heavy-metal-polluted ramie rhizosphere soil were isolated through Cd2+ stress, which were numbered as JJ1, JJ2, JJ10, JJ11, JJ15, and JJ18. Sequence alignment and phylogenic analysis showed that strain JJ1 belonged to Pseudomonas, strain JJ2 belonged to Cupriavidus, strains JJ11 and JJ15 belonged to Bacillus, and strains JJ10 and JJ18 belonged to Acinetobacter. The tolerance capability of all the strains was the trend of Pb2+?>?Zn2+?>?Cu2+?>?Cd2+, the maximum toleran...

  20. Establishment of pseudomonas putida strains for sensitive detection of heavy metals in effluents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Genthe, B.

    1987-09-01

    The objective of this study was to isolate a mutant of Pseudomonas putida that is more sensitive to heavy metal toxicants in water than the wild type. P. putida was the organism chosen in this study as it occurs naturally in unpolluted waters, is nonpathogenic, aerobic and because it is commonly applied in bacterial toxicity assays due to its sensitivity to toxicants. Three methods of mutagenesis were employed, which included N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (NG) ; ultraviolet light and transposon-mediated mutagenesis in order to generate as wide a range of mutants as possible. Four mutants, which were more sensitive to mercury, copper, lead, zinc, cadmium and silver were isolated using the NG method of mutagenesis. These mutants were designated strains 53, 56, 60 and 61 and were characterized as P. putida strains on the basis of Gram staining, biochemical reactions and immunological properties. The sensitivity of the mutants to a variety of industrial effluents was compared to that of the parent strain using a bacterial growth test. Using industrial effluents, one of the mutants, namely strain 56 was found to be more sensitive than the parent strain on 71.4% of the tests. Strains 60 and 61 were also both more sensitive than the parent strain on 42.9% of the occasions using industrial effluents. The uptake rates of radioactive mercury were measured for the parent strain of P. putida and the mutants that were found to be more sensitive to mercury

  1. Phenolic compounds as antioxidants and chemopreventive drugs from Streptomyces cellulosae strain TES17 isolated from rhizosphere of Camellia sinensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rani, Riveka; Arora, Saroj; Kaur, Jeevanjot; Manhas, Rajesh Kumari

    2018-03-09

    strain TES17 isolated from the rhizosphere of Camellia sinensis (tea) plant; produces potent compounds with antioxidant activity, further might be developed into therapeutic drugs to combat oxidative stress.

  2. Survival of a Rifampicin-Resistant Pseudomonas fluorescens Strain in Nine Mollisols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tami L. Stubbs

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas fluorescens strain D7 (P.f. D7 is a naturally occurring soil bacterium that shows promise as a biological herbicide to inhibit growth of annual grass weeds, including downy brome (Bromus tectorum L., in crop- and rangelands. Pseudomonas fluorescens strain D7rif (P.f. D7rif is a rifampicin-resistant strain of P.f. D7. One of the greatest obstacles to successful biological weed control is survival of the organism under field conditions. Nine soils in the taxonomic order of Mollisols, collected from downy brome-infested areas of the Western and Central United States, were inoculated with P.f. D7rif and incubated in the laboratory to determine the effects of soil type, soil properties, incubation temperature, and soil water potential on survival of P.f. D7rif over 63 days. Silt loam soils from Lind, Washington, and Moro, Oregon, sustained the highest P.f. D7rif populations, and recovery was the lowest from Pendleton, Oregon soil. Survival and recovery of P.f. D7rif varied with soil type and temperature but not with the two soil water potentials tested. After 63 days, P.f. D7rif was recovered at levels greater than log 5.5 colony forming units (CFU g−1 soil from five of the nine test soils, a level adequate to suppress downy brome under field or range conditions.

  3. Antifungal activity of plant essential oils and selected Pseudomonas strains against Phomopsis theicola

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Starović Mira

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Development of natural plant protection products as an alternative to synthetic fungicides is of significant importance regarding the environment. This study was carried out with an objective to investigate in vitro antifungal activities of several essential oils extracted from oregano, basil, myrtle and Turkish pickling herb, and the plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria in the genus Pseudomonas, against the phytopathogenic fungus Phomopsis theicola. Microdilution methods were used to determine the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC of selected antimicrobial essential oils (EOs. All EOs exhibited significant levels of antifungal activity against the tested fungal isolates. The oregano EO was found the most potent one (MIC - 5.5 µg/mL, followed by basil (MIC - 75.0µg/mL, myrtle (MIC - 775 µg/mL and Turkish pickling herb (MIC - 7750 µg/mL. Inhibition of Ph. theicola mycelial growth was observed for all tested Pseudomonas spp. strains. K113 and L1 strains were highly effective and achieved more than 60% of fungal growth inhibition using the overnight culture and more than 57% inhibition by applying cell-free supernatants of both strains. A future field trial with K113 and L1 cultures and cell-free supernatants, containing extracellular metabolites toward Ph. theicola, will estimate their effectiveness and applicability as an alternative to chemical protection of apple trees.

  4. RESEARCH IN SENSITIVITY TO ANTIBIOTICS, ANTISEPTICS IN PSEUDOMONAS AERUGINOSA STRAINS ISOLATED FROM PATIENTS WITH INFECTIOUS COMPLICATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. A. Nazarchuk

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background. Infections caused by Pseudomonas are one of the topical issues of medicine. Objective. The aim of the research was to study sensityvity to antibiotics, antiseptics of P. aeruginosa clinical strains that cause infectious complications in patients with burns. Methods. Microbiological study of biological material, received from 435 patients with burns of the 3rd-4th stages (2011-2015 years. In early terms of burn disease 127 clinical strains of P. aeruginosa were isolated from patients. Standard methods were used to identify clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa by their morphological, tinctirial, culture and biochemical properties. The research of antimicrobial action of antiseptics, antibiotics against Pseudomonas were carried out by means of standard methods according to the Directive of the Ministry of Health of Ukraine (No. 167 from 05.04.2007 р. and guidelines of National Committee of Clinical and Laboratory Study (NCCLS, 2002. Results. It was established that P. aeruginosa caused infectious complications in 23.9% of patients among other pathogens. Clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa were found to be low sensitive to amoxicillin/clavulanate (30.76%, ceftazidime (25.92%, cefoperazonum/sulbactam (46.15%, aztreonam (51.85%, tobramycin (38.46%, amicacin (70.34%, doxiciclini (26.92%, fluoroquinolones (59.26%. The analitical progistic criteria of decrease of sensitivity to ceftazidime, cefepim, meropenem and gatifloxacin were found in P. aeruginosa. This pathogen was determined to be sensitive to decasan ®, antimicrobial composition of decamethoxine ®, iodine pvidone. Conclusions. Clinical strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, being highly resistant to antibiotics, are also very sensitive to antiseptics decasan ®, antimicrobial of decamethoxine®, povidone iodine.

  5. Membrane-aerated biofilm reactor for the removal of 1,2-dichloroethane by Pseudomonas sp strain DCA1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hage, J.C.; Houten, R.T.; Tramper, J.; Hartmans, S.

    2004-01-01

    A membrane-aerated biofilm reactor (MBR) with a biofilm of Pseudomonas sp. strain DCA1 was studied for the removal of 1,2-dichloroethane (DCA) from water. A hydrophobic membrane was used to create a barrier between the liquid and the gas phase. Inoculation of the MBR with cells of strain DCA1 grown

  6. LETHALITY OF PSEUDOMONAS FLUORESCENS STRAIN CLO145A TO THE 2 ZEBRA MUSSEL SPECIES PRESENT IN NORTH AMERICA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molloy, Daniel P.

    2001-01-01

    These experiments indicated that bacterial strain CL0145A of Pseudomonas fluorescens is equally lethal to the 2 zebra mussel species present in North America, Dreissena polymorpha and Dreissena bugensis. Thus, this bacterial strain should be equally effective at killing zebra mussels in power plant pipes, irrespective of which species is present

  7. Genome Sequences of Two Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato Race 1 Strains, Isolated from Tomato Fields in California

    OpenAIRE

    Thapa, Shree P.; Coaker, Gitta

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato race 1 strains have evolved to overcome genetic resistance in tomato. Here, we present the draft genome sequences of two race 1 P.?syringae pv. tomato strains, A9 and 407, isolated from diseased tomato plants in California.

  8. Genomotyping of Pseudomonas putida strains using P. putida KT2440-based high-density DNA microarrays: Implications for transcriptomics studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ballerstedt, H.; Volkers, R.J.M.; Mars, A.E.; Hallsworth, J.E.; Santos, V.A.M.D.; Puchalka, J.; Duuren, J. van; Eggink, G.; Timmis, K.N.; Bont, J.A.M. de; Wery, J.

    2007-01-01

    Pseudomonas putida KT2440 is the only fully sequenced P. putida strain. Thus, for transcriptomics and proteomics studies with other P. putida strains, the P. putida KT2440 genomic database serves as standard reference. The utility of KT2440 whole-genome, high-density oligonucleotide microarrays for

  9. LETHALITY OF PSEUDOMONAS FLUORESCENS STRAIN CLO145A TO THE 2 ZEBRA MUSSEL SPECIES PRESENT IN NORTH AMERICA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniel P. Molloy

    2001-10-28

    These experiments indicated that bacterial strain CL0145A of Pseudomonas fluorescens is equally lethal to the 2 zebra mussel species present in North America, Dreissena polymorpha and Dreissena bugensis. Thus, this bacterial strain should be equally effective at killing zebra mussels in power plant pipes, irrespective of which species is present.

  10. Accumulation of a Polyhydroxyalkanoate Containing Primarily 3-Hydroxydecanoate from Simple Carbohydrate Substrates by Pseudomonas sp. Strain NCIMB 40135

    OpenAIRE

    Haywood, Geoffrey W.; Anderson, Alistair J.; Ewing, David F.; Dawes, Edwin A.

    1990-01-01

    A number of Pseudomonas species have been identified which accumulate a polyhydroxyalkanoate containing mainly 3-hydroxydecanoate monomers from sodium gluconate as the sole carbon source. One of these, Pseudomonas sp. strain NCIMB 40135, was further investigated and shown to accumulate such a polyhydroxyalkanoate from a wide range of carbon sources (C2 to C6); however, when supplied with octanoic acid it produced a polyhydroxyalkanoate containing mainly 3-hydroxyoctanoate monomers. Polymer sy...

  11. Roles of Rhizoxin and 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol in Suppression of Fusarium spp. by the Rhizobacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf-5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pseudomonas fluorescens strain Pf-5 is a rhizosphere bacterium that acts as a biocontrol agent of soilborne plant diseases and produces at least 10 different secondary metabolites, including several with antifungal properties. We derived site-directed mutants of Pf-5 with single and multiple mutatio...

  12. Effects of ambroxol on biofilm adhesion and viability of Pseudomonas aeruginosa quorum sensing defective strain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi LU

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the effects of ambroxol on the biofilm viability and pristine adhesion of Pseudomonas aeruginosa wild (PAO1 and quorum sensing defective strain (QS, gene deletion of ∆lasI and ∆rhlI. Methods The biofilm was treated by different concentrations (0, 1.875, 3.75mg/ml of ambroxol. The number of colony was measured with agar plate, multifunction fluorometer was used to measure the fluorescence intensity of PAO1 and QS strains at the bottom of 96-well plate. The adhesion ratio (% was calculated to determine the effects of ambroxol on bacterial biofilm adhesion. Results Ambroxol treatment reduced the survival rate of the mutant strains compared to that of wild strain, even though the QS strain had increased the adhesion in the presence of ambroxol compared to that of wild strain (P<0.05. Conclusion Ambroxol has a property of significantly antagonizing quorum-sensing system, suggesting that it might be of importance in treatment against chronic Pseudomonasaeruginosainfections.

  13. Inhibition of food-related bacteria by antibacterial substances produced by Pseudomonas sp. strains isolated from pasteurized milk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Beatriz Ferreira Rangel

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the production of antimicrobial substances by strains of Pseudomonas sp. isolated from pasteurized milk and their potential action against food-related bacteria were investigated. Samples of pasteurized milk were purchased from arbitrarily chosen commercial establishments in the city of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Of the four samples analyzed, three presented several typical colonies of Pseudomonas. About 100 colonies were chosen and subjected to biochemical tests for confirmation of their identity. Eighteen strains of the Pseudomonas genus were identified and submitted to tests for the production of antimicrobial substances. Twelve strains (66.7% were identified as Pseudomonas fluorescens, four (22.2% as P. aeruginosa, one (5.5% as P. mendocina and one (5.5% as P. pseudoalcaligenes. Only two P. fluorescens strains were unable to produce any antimicrobial substance against any of the indicator strains tested. Most of the strains presented a broad spectrum of action, inhibiting reference and food-related strains such as Proteus vulgaris, Proteus mirabilis, Hafnia alvei, Yersinia enterocolitica, Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhi. Five antimicrobial substance-producing strains, which presented the broadest spectrum of action, were also tested against Staphylococcus aureus reference strains and 26 Staphylococcus sp. strains isolated from foods, some of which were resistant to antibiotics. The producer strains 8.1 and 8.3, both P. aeruginosa, were able to inhibit all the staphylococcal strains tested. The antimicrobial substances produced by strains 8.1 and 8.3 did not seem to be typical bacteriocins, since they were resistant to the three proteolytic enzymes tested. Experiments involving the characterization of these substances are being carried out in order to evaluate their biotechnological application.

  14. Draft genome sequence of Bacillus velezensis 2A-2B strain: a rhizospheric inhabitant of Sporobolus airoides (Torr.) Torr., with antifungal activity against root rot causing phytopathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Raudales, Inés; De La Cruz-Rodríguez, Yumiko; Alvarado-Gutiérrez, Alejandro; Vega-Arreguín, Julio; Fraire-Mayorga, Ahuitz; Alvarado-Rodríguez, Miguel; Balderas-Hernández, Victor; Fraire-Velázquez, Saúl

    2017-01-01

    A Bacillus velezensis strain from the rhizosphere of Sporobolus airoides (Torr.) Torr . , a grass in central-north México, was isolated during a biocontrol of phytopathogens scrutiny study. The 2A-2B strain exhibited at least 60% of growth inhibition of virulent isolates of phytopathogens causing root rot. These phytopathogens include Phytophthora capsici , Fusarium solani , Fusarium oxysporum and Rhizoctonia solani . Furthermore, the 2A-2B strain is an indolacetic acid producer, and a plant inducer of PR1, which is an induced systemic resistance related gene in chili pepper plantlets. Whole genome sequencing was performed to generate a draft genome assembly of 3.953 MB with 46.36% of GC content, and a N50 of 294,737. The genome contains 3713 protein coding genes and 89 RNA genes. Moreover, comparative genome analysis revealed that the 2A-2B strain had the greatest identity (98.4%) with Bacillus velezensis.

  15. [Degradation characteristics of naphthalene with a Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain isolated from soil contaminated by diesel].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wen-Chao; Wu, Bin-Bin; Li, Xiao-Sen; Lu, Dian-Nan; Liu, Yong-Min

    2015-02-01

    Abstract: A naphthalene-degrading bacterium (referred as HD-5) was isolated from the diesel-contaminated soil and was assigned to Pseudomonas aeruginosa according to 16S rDNA sequences analysis. Gene nah, which encodes naphthalene dioxygenase, was identified from strain HD-5 by PCR amplification. Different bioremediation approaches, including nature attenuation, bioaugmentation with strain Pseudomonas aeruginosa, biostimulation, and an integrated degradation by bioaugmentation and biostimulation, were evaluated for their effectiveness in the remediating soil containing 5% naphthalene. The degradation rates of naphthalene in the soil were compared among the different bioremediation approaches, the FDA and dehydrogenase activity in bioremediation process were measured, and the gene copy number of 16S rRNA and nah in soil were dynamically monitored using real-time PCR. It was shown that the naphthalene removal rate reached 71.94%, 62.22% and 83.14% in approaches of bioaugmentation (B), biostimulation(S) and integrated degradation composed of bioaugmentation and biostimulation (BS), respectively. The highest removal rate of naphthalene was achieved by using BS protocol, which also gives the highest FDA and dehydrogenase activity. The gene copy number of 16S rRNA and nah in soil increased by about 2.67 x 10(11) g(-1) and 8.67 x 10(8) g(-1) after 31 days treatment using BS protocol. Above-mentioned results also demonstrated that the screened bacterium, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, could grow well in naphthalene-contaminated soil and effectively degrade naphthalene, which is of fundamental importance for bioremediation of naphthalene-contaminated soil.

  16. Enhancement of the potential to utilize octopine in the nonfluorescent Pseudomonas sp. strain 92

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gill, S.S.; Boivin, R.; Dion, P.

    1991-01-01

    The nonfluorescent Pseudomonas sp. strain 92 requires the presence of a supplementary carbon source for growth on octopine, whereas the spontaneous mutant RB100 has acquired the capacity to utilize this opine as the sole carbon and nitrogen source. Insertional mutagenesis of RB100 with transposon Tn5 generated mutants which were unable to grow on octopine and others which grew slowly on this substrate. Both types of mutants yielded revertants that had regained the ability to utilize octopine. Some of the revertants had lost the transposon, whereas in others the transposon was retained but with rearrangements of the insertion site. Genes of octopine catabolism from strain 92 were cloned on a cosmid vector to generate pK3. The clone pK3 conferred the ability to utilize octopine as the sole carbon and nitrogen source on the host Pseudomonas putida KT2440. Although they conferred an equivalent growth phenotype, the mutant genes carried by RB100 and the cloned genes on pK3 differed in their regulation. Utilization of [ 14 C]octopine was inducible by octopine in RB100 and was constitutive in KT2440(pK3)

  17. Antibacterial properties of Chinese herbal medicines against nosocomial antibiotic resistant strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ching-Shen; Cham, Thau-Ming; Yang, Cheng-Hong; Chang, Hsueh-Wei; Chen, Chia-Hong; Chuang, Li-Yeh

    2007-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is well-recognized as a nosocomial pathogen, which exhibits inherent drug resistance. In this study, the antibacterial activity of ethanol extracts of 58 Chinese herbal medicines used in Taiwan were tested against 89 nosocomial antibiotic resistant strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The results gathered by the disc diffusion method showed that 26 out of the 58 herbal extracts exhibited antibacterial activity. Among the 26 herbal extracts, 10 extracts showed broad-spectrum antibacterial activities and were selected for further antibacterial property assay. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) of the active partition fractions ranged from 0.25 to 11.0 mg/L. The presence of flavonoid compounds in the active fractions of test herbal extracts was observed by the TLC-bioautography. The results from the time-kill assay revealed that most of the herbal extracts completely killed the test organisms within 4 hours. Exposure of the test strains to a sub-MIC level of the herbal extracts for 10 consecutive subcultures did not induce resistance to the active components. A combination of the active herbal fractions with antibiotics showed that one of the herbal medicines, the hexane fraction of Ramulus Cinnamomi, possessed a synergistic effect with tetracycline, gentamycin, and streptomycin. In conclusion, the tested Chinese medical herbs have the potential to be developed into natural antibiotics. This is the first evaluation for screening large amounts of medical plants against nosocomial antibiotic resistant bacteria in Taiwan.

  18. Biotoxic impact of heavy metals on growth, oxidative stress and morphological changes in root structure of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) and stress alleviation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain CPSB1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizvi, Asfa; Khan, Mohd Saghir

    2017-10-01

    Rapid industrialization and uncontrolled metal discharge into environment is a global concern for crop production. Metal tolerant bacterium isolated from chilli rhizosphere was identified as Pseudomonas aeruginosa by 16S rDNA sequence analysis. Pseudomonas aeruginosa tolerated high concentrations of Cu (1400 μg ml -1 ), Cd (1000 μg ml -1 ) and Cr (1000 μg ml -1 ). Pseudomonas aeruginosa CPSB1 produced multiple plant growth promoting biomolecules in the presence and absence of metals. Strain CPSB1 solubilized P at 400 μg ml -1 of Cd, Cr and Cu. The strain was positive for indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), siderophores, hydrogen cyanide (HCN), ammonia (NH 3 ) and 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) deaminase when grown with/without metals. The phytotoxic effects on wheat increased with increasing Cd, Cr and Cu rates. The P. aeruginosa CPSB1 inoculated wheat in contrast had better growth and yields under Cu, Cd and Cr stress. The root dry biomass of inoculated plants was enhanced by 44, 28 and 48% at 2007 mg Cu kg -1 , 36 mg Cd kg -1 and 204 mg Cr kg -1 , respectively. The bioinoculant enhanced number of spikes, grain and straw yields by 25, 17 and 12%, respectively. Pseudomonas aeruginosa CPSB1 significantly declined the levels of catalase (CAT), glutathione reductase (GR) and superoxide dismutase SOD), proline and malondialdehyde (MDA), and reduced metal uptake by wheat. The study demonstrated that P. aeruginosa CPSB1 possessed plant growth promoting potentials, showed metal tolerance capability and had ability to counteract deleterious metal impacts. Due to these, P. aeruginosa CPSB1 could be used as bioinoculant for enhancing wheat production even in metal contaminated soils. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. PFGE and antibiotic susceptibility phenotype analysis of Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain chronically infecting Cystic Fibrosis patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanna Pulcrano

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the leading cause of chronic lung infection and following pulmonary worsening of cystic fibrosis patients. To verify whether bacterial modifications regarding motility, mucoidy, and serum susceptibility proceeded from an adaptation to chronic infection or a replacement with a new strain, sequential P. aeruginosa isolates of known phenotype collected from 5 cystic fibrosis patients were typed by pulsed-field gel electophoresis (PFGE. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing of all isolates was performed by the disc diffusion method. PFGE typing demonstrated that strains dissimilar in colony morphotype and of different antibiotic susceptibility patterns could be of the same genotype. Some patients were colonized with a rather constant P. aeruginosa flora, with strains of different phenotypes but of one genotype. Instead, some patients may be colonized by more than one genotype. Secretion of mucoid exopolysaccharide and acquisition of a new antibiotic susceptibility phenotype in these strain appear to evolve during chronic colonization in cystic fibrosis patients from specific adaptation to infection rather than from acquisition of new bacterial strains.

  20. Antibiotic resistance determinants in a Pseudomonas putida strain isolated from a hospital.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lázaro Molina

    Full Text Available Environmental microbes harbor an enormous pool of antibiotic and biocide resistance genes that can impact the resistance profiles of animal and human pathogens via horizontal gene transfer. Pseudomonas putida strains are ubiquitous in soil and water but have been seldom isolated from humans. We have established a collection of P. putida strains isolated from in-patients in different hospitals in France. One of the isolated strains (HB3267 kills insects and is resistant to the majority of the antibiotics used in laboratories and hospitals, including aminoglycosides, ß-lactams, cationic peptides, chromoprotein enediyne antibiotics, dihydrofolate reductase inhibitors, fluoroquinolones and quinolones, glycopeptide antibiotics, macrolides, polyketides and sulfonamides. Similar to other P. putida clinical isolates the strain was sensitive to amikacin. To shed light on the broad pattern of antibiotic resistance, which is rarely found in clinical isolates of this species, the genome of this strain was sequenced and analysed. The study revealed that the determinants of multiple resistance are both chromosomally-borne as well as located on the pPC9 plasmid. Further analysis indicated that pPC9 has recruited antibiotic and biocide resistance genes from environmental microorganisms as well as from opportunistic and true human pathogens. The pPC9 plasmid is not self-transmissible, but can be mobilized by other bacterial plasmids making it capable of spreading antibiotic resistant determinants to new hosts.

  1. Degradation of ethyl mercaptan and its major intermediate diethyl disulfide by Pseudomonas sp. strain WL2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiangqian; Wu, Chao; Liu, Nan; Li, Sujing; Li, Wei; Chen, Jianmeng; Chen, Dongzhi

    2015-04-01

    A Pseudomonas sp. strain WL2 that is able to efficiently metabolize ethyl mercaptan (EM) into diethyl disulfide (DEDS) through enzymatic oxidation was isolated from the activated sludge of a pharmaceutical wastewater plant. One hundred percent removal of 113.5 mg L(-1) EM and 110.3 mg L(-1) DEDS were obtained within 14 and 32 h, respectively. A putative EM degradation pathway that involved the catabolism via DEDS was proposed, which indicated DEDS were further mineralized into carbon dioxide (CO2), bacterial cells, and sulfate (SO4 (2-)) through the transformation of element sulfur and ethyl aldehyde. Degradation kinetics for EM and DEDS with different initial concentrations by strain WL2 were evaluated using Haldane-Andrews model with maximum specific degradation rates of 3.13 and 1.33 g g(-1) h(-1), respectively, and maximum degradation rate constants of 0.522 and 0.175 h(-1) using pseudo-first-order kinetic model were obtained. Results obtained that aerobic degradation of EM by strain WL2 was more efficient than those from previous studies. Substrate range studies of strain WL2 demonstrated its ability to degrade several mercaptans, disulfides, aldehydes, and methanol. All the results obtained highlight the potential of strain WL2 for the use in the biodegradation of volatile organic sulfur compounds (VOSCs).

  2. A diagnostic PCR assay for the detection of an Australian epidemic strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Chronic lung infection with the bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa is one of the hallmarks of cystic fibrosis (CF) and is associated with worsening lung function, increased hospitalisation and reduced life expectancy. A virulent clonal strain of P. aeruginosa (Australian epidemic strain I; AES-I) has been found to be widespread in CF patients in eastern Australia. Methods Suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) was employed to identify genetic sequences that are present in the AES-I strain but absent from the sequenced reference strain PAO1. We used PCR to evaluate the distribution of several of the AES-I loci amongst a collection of 188 P. aeruginosa isolates which was comprised of 35 AES-I isolates (as determined by PFGE), 78 non-AES-I CF isolates including other epidemic CF strains as well as 69 P. aeruginosa isolates from other clinical and environmental sources. Results We have identified a unique AES-I genetic locus that is present in all 35 AES-I isolates tested and not present in any of the other 153 P. aeruginosa strains examined. We have used this unique AES-I locus to develop a diagnostic PCR and a real-time PCR assay to detect the presence of P. aeruginosa and AES-I in patient sputum samples. Conclusions We have developed diagnostic PCR assays that are 100% sensitive and 100% specific for the P. aeruginosa strain AES-I. We have also shown that Whatman FTA® Elute cards may be used with PCR-based assays to rapidly detect the presence of P. aeruginosa strains in CF sputum. PMID:20637114

  3. A diagnostic PCR assay for the detection of an Australian epidemic strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murphy Anna

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic lung infection with the bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa is one of the hallmarks of cystic fibrosis (CF and is associated with worsening lung function, increased hospitalisation and reduced life expectancy. A virulent clonal strain of P. aeruginosa (Australian epidemic strain I; AES-I has been found to be widespread in CF patients in eastern Australia. Methods Suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH was employed to identify genetic sequences that are present in the AES-I strain but absent from the sequenced reference strain PAO1. We used PCR to evaluate the distribution of several of the AES-I loci amongst a collection of 188 P. aeruginosa isolates which was comprised of 35 AES-I isolates (as determined by PFGE, 78 non-AES-I CF isolates including other epidemic CF strains as well as 69 P. aeruginosa isolates from other clinical and environmental sources. Results We have identified a unique AES-I genetic locus that is present in all 35 AES-I isolates tested and not present in any of the other 153 P. aeruginosa strains examined. We have used this unique AES-I locus to develop a diagnostic PCR and a real-time PCR assay to detect the presence of P. aeruginosa and AES-I in patient sputum samples. Conclusions We have developed diagnostic PCR assays that are 100% sensitive and 100% specific for the P. aeruginosa strain AES-I. We have also shown that Whatman FTA® Elute cards may be used with PCR-based assays to rapidly detect the presence of P. aeruginosa strains in CF sputum.

  4. Biodegradation of hexavalent chromium (Cr+6) in wastewater using Pseudomonas sp. and Bacillus sp. bacterial strains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qasim, Muhammad [Department of Chemical Engineering, American University of Sharjah (United Arab Emirates)

    2013-07-01

    The recovery of toxic metal compounds is a deep concern in all industries. Hexavalent chromium is particularly worrying because of its toxic influence on human health. In this paper, biodegradation of hexavalent chromium (Cr+6) present in wastewater has been studied using two different bacterial strains; Pseudomonas sp. and Bacillus sp. A chemostat (with and without recycle of cells) with 10 L liquid culture volume was used to study the substrate and the biomass cell concentrations with time. Also, the degree of substrate conversion was studied by the varying the dilution rate as an independent parameter. The dilution rate (ratio of feed flow rate to the culture volume) was varied by varying the feed volumetric rate from 110-170 mL/h for inlet hexavalent chromium concentrations of 70 mg/dm3. The results show that a chemostat with recycle gives a better performance in terms of substrate conversion than a chemostat without a recycle. Moreover, the degree of substrate conversion decreases as the dilution rate is increased. Also, Bacillus sp. was found to give higher conversions compared to pseudomonas sp.

  5. Complexity of resistance mechanisms to imipenem in intensive care unit strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fournier, Damien; Richardot, Charlotte; Müller, Emeline; Robert-Nicoud, Marjorie; Llanes, Catherine; Plésiat, Patrick; Jeannot, Katy

    2013-08-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa can become resistant to carbapenems by both intrinsic (mutation-driven) and transferable (β-lactamase-based) mechanisms. Knowledge of the prevalence of these various mechanisms is important in intensive care units (ICUs) in order to define optimal prevention and therapeutic strategies. A total of 109 imipenem-non-susceptible (MIC >4 mg/L) strains of P. aeruginosa were collected in June 2010 from the ICUs of 26 French public hospitals. Their resistance mechanisms were characterized by phenotypic, enzymatic, western blotting and molecular methods. Single or associated imipenem resistance mechanisms were identified among the 109 strains. Seven isolates (6.4%) were found to produce a metallo-β-lactamase (one VIM-1, four VIM-2, one VIM-4 and one IMP-29). Porin OprD was lost in 94 (86.2%) strains as a result of mutations or gene disruption by various insertion sequences (ISPa1635, ISPa1328, IS911, ISPs1, IS51, IS222 and ISPa41). Thirteen other strains were shown to be regulatory mutants in which down-regulation of oprD was coupled with overexpressed efflux pumps CzcCBA (n = 1), MexXY (n = 9) and MexEF-OprN (n = 3). The lack of OprD was due to disruption of the oprD promoter by ISPsy2 in one strain and alteration of the porin signal sequence in another. Imipenem resistance in ICU P. aeruginosa strains may result from multiple mechanisms involving metallo-β-lactamase gene acquisition and genetic events (mutations and ISs) inactivating oprD, turning down its expression while increasing efflux activities or preventing insertion of porin OprD in the outer membrane. This diversity of mechanisms allows P. aeruginosa, more than any other nosocomial pathogen, to rapidly adapt to carbapenems in ICUs.

  6. [The antibacterial activity of oregano essential oil (Origanum heracleoticum L.) against clinical strains of Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sienkiewicz, Monika; Wasiela, Małgorzata; Głowacka, Anna

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the antibacterial properties of oregano (Origanum heracleoticum L.) essential oil against clinical strains of Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The antibacterial activity of oregano essential oil was investigate against 2 tested and 20 clinical bacterial strains of Escherichia coli and 20 clinical strains o Pseudomonas aeruginosa come from patients with different clinical conditions. The agar dilution method was used for microbial growth inhibition at various concentrations ofoil. Susceptibility testing to antibiotics was carried out using disc-diffusion method. The results of experiments showed that the tested oil was active against all of the clinical strains from both genus of bacteria, but strains of Escherichia coli were more sensitive to tested oil. Essential oil from Origanum heracleoticum L. inhibited the growth of Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical strains with different patters of resistance. The obtained outcomes will enable further investigations using oregano essential oil obtained from Origanum heracleoticum L. as alternative antibacterial remedies enhancing healing process in bacterial infections and as an effective means for the prevention of antibiotic-resistant strain development.

  7. Entomopathogenicity to Two Hemipteran Insects Is Common but Variable across Epiphytic Pseudomonas syringae Strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smee, Melanie R; Baltrus, David A; Hendry, Tory A

    2017-01-01

    Strains of the well-studied plant pathogen Pseudomonas syringae show large differences in their ability to colonize plants epiphytically and to inflict damage to hosts. Additionally, P. syringae can infect some sap-sucking insects and at least one P. syringae strain is highly virulent to insects, causing death to most individuals within as few as 4 days and growing to high population densities within insect hosts. The likelihood of agricultural pest insects coming into contact with transient populations of P. syringae while feeding on plants is high, yet the ecological implications of these interactions are currently not well understood as virulence has not been tested across a wide range of strains. To investigate virulence differences across strains we exposed the sweet potato whitefly, Bemisia tabaci , and the pea aphid, Acyrthosiphon pisum , both of which are cosmopolitan agricultural pests, to 12 P. syringae strains. We used oral inoculations with bacteria suspended in artificial diet in order to assay virulence while controlling for other variables such as differences in epiphytic growth ability. Generally, patterns of pathogenicity remain consistent across the two species of hemipteran insects, with bacterial strains from phylogroup II, or genomospecies 1, causing the highest rate of mortality with up to 86% of individuals dead after 72 h post infection. The rate of mortality is highly variable across strains, some significantly different from negative control treatments and others showing no discernable difference. Interestingly, one of the most pathogenic strains to both aphids and whiteflies (Cit7) is thought to be non-pathogenic on plants. We also found Cit7 to establish the highest epiphytic population after 48 h on fava beans. Between the nine P. syringae strains tested for epiphytic ability there is also much variation, but epiphytic ability was positively correlated with pathogenicity to insects, suggesting that the two traits may be linked and that

  8. Entomopathogenicity to Two Hemipteran Insects Is Common but Variable across Epiphytic Pseudomonas syringae Strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melanie R. Smee

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Strains of the well-studied plant pathogen Pseudomonas syringae show large differences in their ability to colonize plants epiphytically and to inflict damage to hosts. Additionally, P. syringae can infect some sap-sucking insects and at least one P. syringae strain is highly virulent to insects, causing death to most individuals within as few as 4 days and growing to high population densities within insect hosts. The likelihood of agricultural pest insects coming into contact with transient populations of P. syringae while feeding on plants is high, yet the ecological implications of these interactions are currently not well understood as virulence has not been tested across a wide range of strains. To investigate virulence differences across strains we exposed the sweet potato whitefly, Bemisia tabaci, and the pea aphid, Acyrthosiphon pisum, both of which are cosmopolitan agricultural pests, to 12 P. syringae strains. We used oral inoculations with bacteria suspended in artificial diet in order to assay virulence while controlling for other variables such as differences in epiphytic growth ability. Generally, patterns of pathogenicity remain consistent across the two species of hemipteran insects, with bacterial strains from phylogroup II, or genomospecies 1, causing the highest rate of mortality with up to 86% of individuals dead after 72 h post infection. The rate of mortality is highly variable across strains, some significantly different from negative control treatments and others showing no discernable difference. Interestingly, one of the most pathogenic strains to both aphids and whiteflies (Cit7 is thought to be non-pathogenic on plants. We also found Cit7 to establish the highest epiphytic population after 48 h on fava beans. Between the nine P. syringae strains tested for epiphytic ability there is also much variation, but epiphytic ability was positively correlated with pathogenicity to insects, suggesting that the two traits may be

  9. Effects of some organic pollutants on the exopolysaccharides (EPSs) produced by some Pseudomonas spp. strains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onbasli, Dilsad; Aslim, Belma

    2009-01-01

    In this study, isolation and characterization of exopolysaccharides produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa B1, P. fluorescens B5, P. stutzeri B11 and P. putida B15 which had been seen to produce exopolymers of potential interest in biotechnological applications were examined. To initiate the observation of the organic pollutants-polymer interactions, the yield and properties of their extracellular polysaccharide were researched. The exopolysaccharide production by these strains during growth in nutrient broth medium (control) was 41-75 mg L -1 . Also, P. aeruginosa B1, P. fluorescens B5, P. stutzeri B11 and P. putida B15 had exhibited high production of EPSs in presence of various organic pollutants (2,4-D, benzene, BTX and gasoline, respectively) in mineral salt medium (MSM) as a sole carbon source. EPS production by the 4 strains ranged from 40 mg L -1 to 8 mg L -1 . Monosaccharide composition of EPS produced by these cultures were analyzed by HPLC. Results indicated that EPSs of strains contained neutral sugars and acetylated amino sugars. The neutral sugars in the EPS were mainly composed of glucose, arabinose, glycerol, ribose. The presence of galactronic acid, N-acetyl-D-galactosamin and N-acetyl-D-glucosamine indicated the acidic nature of the polysaccharide. Glycerol was the basic structural unit of EPS produced by the strains except P. stutzeri B11 (MSM with 1% BTX). Strain B1 (in NB medium) was found to be composed of neutral sugars (100%) while strain B1 [in MSM medium with 0.2% (v/v) 2.4-D] contained neutral sugars (70.0%), acetylated amino sugars (30.0%). Also, EPS content of strain B5 (in the NB medium) was neutral sugars (99.8%), acetylated amino sugars (0.2%) while the strain B5 [in MSM medium containing the 1% (v/v) benzene] was found to contain neutral sugars (99.9%), acetylated amino sugars (0.1%). However, EPS monomer composition by strain B11 was detected as neutral sugars (99.77%), acetylated amino sugars (0.23%) in NB medium while the strain B11

  10. An inter-species signaling system mediated by fusaric acid has parallel effects on antifungal metabolite production by Pseudomonas protegens Pf-5 and antibiosis of Fusarium spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pseudomonas protegens strain Pf-5 is a rhizosphere bacterium that acts as a biocontrol agent of soilborne plant diseases, and produces at least seven different secondary metabolites with antifungal properties. We derived site-directed mutants of Pf-5 with single and multiple mutations in the biosynt...

  11. Rhizoxin analogs, orfamide A and chitinase production contribute to the toxicity of Pseudomonas protegens strain Pf-5 to Drosophila melanogaster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pseudomonas protegens strain Pf-5 is a soil bacterium that was first described for its activity in biological control of plant diseases and has since been shown to be lethal to certain insects. Among these is the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, a well-established model organism for studies evalu...

  12. Genome Sequence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Strain DK1-NH57388A, a Stable Mucoid Cystic Fibrosis Isolate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norman, Anders; Ciofu, Oana; Amador Hierro, Cristina Isabel

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an important opportunistic pathogen associated with chronic pulmonary infections and mortality in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. Here, we present the complete genome sequence of stable mucoid P. aeruginosa strain DK1-NH57388A, a CF isolate which has previously been used...

  13. Draft Genome Sequence of an Invasive Multidrug-Resistant Strain, Pseudomonas aeruginosa BK1, Isolated from a Keratitis Patient

    KAUST Repository

    Jeganathan, Lakshmi Priya

    2014-03-27

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections are difficult to treat due to the presence of a multitude of virulence factors and antibiotic resistance. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of P. aeruginosa BK1, an invasive and multidrug-resistant strain, isolated from a bacterial keratitis patient in southern India.

  14. Whole-Genome Sequence of Pseudomonas graminis Strain UASWS1507, a Potential Biological Control Agent and Biofertilizer Isolated in Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crovadore, Julien; Calmin, Gautier; Chablais, Romain; Cochard, Bastien; Schulz, Torsten; Lefort, François

    2016-10-06

    We report here the whole-genome shotgun sequence of the strain UASWS1507 of the species Pseudomonas graminis, isolated in Switzerland from an apple tree. This is the first genome registered for this species, which is considered as a potential and valuable resource of biological control agents and biofertilizers for agriculture. Copyright © 2016 Crovadore et al.

  15. Draft Genome Sequence of an Invasive Multidrug-Resistant Strain, Pseudomonas aeruginosa BK1, Isolated from a Keratitis Patient

    KAUST Repository

    Jeganathan, Lakshmi Priya; Prakash, Logambiga; Neelamegam, Sivakumar; Antony, Aju; Alqarawi, Sami; Prajna, Lalitha; Devarajan, Bharanidharan; Mohankumar, Vidyarani

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections are difficult to treat due to the presence of a multitude of virulence factors and antibiotic resistance. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of P. aeruginosa BK1, an invasive and multidrug-resistant strain

  16. Insights into metabolism and sodium chloride adaptability of carbaryl degrading halotolerant Pseudomonas sp. strain C7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trivedi, Vikas D; Bharadwaj, Anahita; Varunjikar, Madhushri S; Singha, Arminder K; Upadhyay, Priya; Gautam, Kamini; Phale, Prashant S

    2017-08-01

    Pseudomonas sp. strain C7 isolated from sediment of Thane creek near Mumbai, India, showed the ability to grow on glucose and carbaryl in the presence of 7.5 and 3.5% of NaCl, respectively. It also showed good growth in the absence of NaCl indicating the strain to be halotolerant. Increasing salt concentration impacted the growth on carbaryl; however, the specific activity of various enzymes involved in the metabolism remained unaffected. Among various enzymes, 1-naphthol 2-hydroxylase was found to be sensitive to chloride as compared to carbaryl hydrolase and gentisate 1,2-dioxygenase. The intracellular concentration of Cl - ions remained constant (6-8 mM) for cells grown on carbaryl either in the presence or absence of NaCl. Thus the ability to adapt to the increasing concentration of NaCl is probably by employing chloride efflux pump and/or increase in the concentration of osmolytes as mechanism for halotolerance. The halotolerant nature of the strain will be beneficial to remediate carbaryl from saline agriculture fields, ecosystems and wastewaters.

  17. Pulmonary bacteriophage therapy on Pseudomonas aeruginosa cystic fibrosis strains: first steps towards treatment and prevention.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Morello

    Full Text Available Multidrug-resistant bacteria are the cause of an increasing number of deadly pulmonary infections. Because there is currently a paucity of novel antibiotics, phage therapy--the use of specific viruses that infect bacteria--is now more frequently being considered as a potential treatment for bacterial infections. Using a mouse lung-infection model caused by a multidrug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa mucoid strain isolated from a cystic fibrosis patient, we evaluated bacteriophage treatments. New bacteriophages were isolated from environmental samples and characterized. Bacteria and bacteriophages were applied intranasally to the immunocompetent mice. Survival was monitored and bronchoalveolar fluids were analysed. Quantification of bacteria, bacteriophages, pro-inflammatory and cytotoxicity markers, as well as histology and immunohistochemistry analyses were performed. A curative treatment (one single dose administrated 2 h after the onset of the infection allowed over 95% survival. A four-day preventive treatment (one single dose resulted in a 100% survival. All of the parameters measured correlated with the efficacy of both curative and preventive bacteriophage treatments. We also showed that in vitro optimization of a bacteriophage towards a clinical strain improved both its efficacy on in vivo treatments and its host range on a panel of 20 P. aeruginosa cystic fibrosis strains. This work provides an incentive to develop clinical studies on pulmonary bacteriophage therapy to combat multidrug-resistant lung infections.

  18. Characterization of cefalexin degradation capabilities of two Pseudomonas strains isolated from activated sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Bokun; Lyu, Jinling; Lyu, Xian-jin; Yu, Han-qing; Hu, Zhong; Lam, James C W; Lam, Paul K S

    2015-01-23

    Pharmaceuticals have recently been regarded as contaminants of emerging concern. To date, there is limited knowledge about antibiotic-degrading microorganisms in conventional activated sludge treatment systems and their characteristics toward antibiotic degradation especially in the presence of a pharmaceutical mixture. As such, antibiotic-degrading microorganisms were investigated and isolated from the activated sludge, and their degradation capabilities were evaluated. Two strains of cefalexin-degrading bacteria CE21 and CE22 were isolated and identified as Pseudomonas sp. in the collected activated sludge. Strain CE22 was able to degrade over 90% of cefalexin, while CE21 was able to remove 46.7% of cefalexin after incubation for 24h. The removal efficiency of cefalexin by CE22, different from that of CE21, was not significantly affected by an increase in cefalexin concentration, even up to 10ppm, however the presence of 1ppm of other pharmaceuticals had a significant effect on the degradation of cefalexin by CE22, but no significant effect on CE21. The degradation product of cefalexin by the two strains was identified to be 2-hydroxy-3-phenyl pyrazine. Our results also indicated that CE21 and CE22 were able to degrade caffeine, salicylic acid and chloramphenicol. Moreover, CE21 was found to be capable of eliminating sulfamethoxazole and naproxen. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Isolation and characterization of rhizosphere bacteria for the biocontrol of the damping-off disease of tomatoes in Tunisia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammami, Inés; Ben Hsouna, Anis; Hamdi, Naceur; Gdoura, Radhouane; Triki, Mohamed Ali

    2013-01-01

    Fluorescent Pseudomonas spp., isolated from tomato and pepper plants rhizosphere soil, was evaluated in vitro as a potential antagonist of fungal pathogens. Pseudomonas strains were tested against the causal agents of tomatoes damping-off (Sclerotinia sclerotiorum), root rot (Fusarium solani), and causal agents of stem canker and leaf blight (Alternaria alternata). For this purpose, dual culture antagonism assays were carried out on 25% tryptic soy agar, King B medium and potato dextrose agar to determine the effect of the strains on mycelial growth of the pathogens. In addition, strains were screened for their ability to produce exoenzymes and siderophores. All the strains significantly inhibited Alternaria alternata, particularly in 25% TSA medium. Antagonistic effect on Sclerotinia sclerotiorum and Fusarium solani was greater on King B medium. Protease was produced by 30% of the strains, but no strain produced cellulase or chitinase. Finally, the selected Pseudomonas strain, Psf5, was evaluated on tomato seedling development and as a potential candidate for controlling tomato damping-off caused by Sclerotinia sclerotiorum, under growth chamber conditions. In vivo studies resulted in significant increases in plant stand as well as in root dry weight. Psf5 was able to establish and survive in tomato plants rhizosphere after 40days following the planting of bacterized seeds. © 2013 Académie des sciences. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. The effect of rhamnolipid biosurfactant produced by Pseudomonas fluorescens on model bacterial strains and isolates from industrial wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasileva-Tonkova, Evgenia; Sotirova, Anna; Galabova, Danka

    2011-02-01

    In this study, the effect of rhamnolipid biosurfactant produced by Pseudomonas fluorescens on bacterial strains, laboratory strains, and isolates from industrial wastewater was investigated. It was shown that biosurfactant, depending on the concentration, has a neutral or detrimental effect on the growth and protein release of model Gram (+) strain Bacillus subtilis 168. The growth and protein release of model Gram (-) strain Pseudomonas aeruginosa 1390 was not influenced by the presence of biosurfactant in the medium. Rhamnolipid biosurfactant at the used concentrations supported the growth of some slow growing on hexadecane bacterial isolates, members of the microbial community. Changes in cell surface hydrophobicity and permeability of some Gram (+) and Gram (-) isolates in the presence of rhamnolipid biosurfactant were followed in experiments in vitro. It was found that bacterial cells treated with biosurfactant became more or less hydrophobic than untreated cells depending on individual characteristics and abilities of the strains. For all treated strains, an increase in the amount of released protein was observed with increasing the amount of biosurfactant, probably due to increased cell permeability as a result of changes in the organization of cell surface structures. The results obtained could contribute to clarify the relationships between members of the microbial community as well as suggest the efficiency of surface properties of rhamnolipid biosurfactant from Pseudomonas fluorescens making it potentially applicable in bioremediation of hydrocarbon-polluted environments.

  1. Characterization of rhizosphere bacteria for control of phytopathogenic fungi of tomato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastor, Nicolás; Carlier, Evelin; Andrés, Javier; Rosas, Susana B; Rovera, Marisa

    2012-03-01

    Fluorescent Pseudomonas spp., isolated from rhizosphere soil of tomato and pepper plants, were evaluated in vitro as potential antagonists of fungal pathogens. Strains were characterized using the API 20NE biochemical system, and tested against the causal agents of stem canker and leaf blight (Alternaria alternata f. sp. lycopersici), southern blight (Sclerotium rolfsii Sacc.), and root rot (Fusarium solani). To this end, dual culture antagonism assays were carried out on 25% Tryptic Soy Agar, King B medium, and Potato Dextrose Agar to determine the effect of the strains on mycelial growth of the pathogens. The effect of two concentrations of FeCl(3) on antagonism against Alternaria alternata f. sp. lycopersici was also tested. In addition, strains were screened for ability to produce exoenzymes and siderophores. Finally, the selected Pseudomonas strain, PCI2, was evaluated for effect on tomato seedling development and as a potential candidate for controlling tomato damping-off caused by Sclerotium rolfsii Sacc., under growth chamber conditions. All strains significantly inhibited Alternaria alternata f. sp. lycopersici, particularly in 25% TSA medium. Antagonistic effect on Sclerotium rolfsii Sacc. and Fusarium solani was greater on King B medium. Protease was produced by 30% of the strains, but no strains produced cellulase or chitinase. Growth chamber studies resulted in significant increases in plant stand as well as in root dry weight. PCI2 was able to establish and survive in tomato plants rhizosphere after 40 days following planting of bacterized seeds. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Characterization of Bacteria Isolation of Bacteria from Pinyon Rhizosphere,

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Two hundred and fifty bacterial strains were isolated from pinyon rhizosphere and screened for biosurfactants production. Among them, six bacterial strains were selected for their potential to produce biosurfactants using two low cost wastes, crude glycerol and lactoserum, as raw material. Both wastes were useful for producing biosurfactants because of their high content in fat and carbohydrates. The six strains were identified by 16S rDNA with an identity percentage higher than 95%, three strains belonged to Enterobacter sp., Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Bacillus pumilus and Rhizobium sp. All strains assayed were able to grow and showed halos around the colonies as evidence of biosurfactants production on Cetyl Trimethyl Ammonium Bromide agar with crude glycerol and lactoserum as substrate. In a mineral salt liquid medium enriched with both wastes, the biosurfactants were produced and collected from free cell medium after 72 h incubation. The biosurfactants produced reduced the surface tension from 69 to 30 mN/m with an emulsification index of diesel at approximately 60%. The results suggest that biosurfactants produced by rhizosphere bacteria from pinyon have promising environmental applications.

  3. Genotypic Diversity within a Single Pseudomonas aeruginosa Strain Commonly Shared by Australian Patients with Cystic Fibrosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Sze Tai

    Full Text Available In cystic fibrosis (CF, Pseudomonas aeruginosa undergoes intra-strain genotypic and phenotypic diversification while establishing and maintaining chronic lung infections. As the clinical significance of these changes is uncertain, we investigated intra-strain diversity in commonly shared strains from CF patients to determine if specific gene mutations were associated with increased antibiotic resistance and worse clinical outcomes. Two-hundred-and-one P. aeruginosa isolates (163 represented a dominant Australian shared strain, AUST-02 from two Queensland CF centres over two distinct time-periods (2001-2002 and 2007-2009 underwent mexZ and lasR sequencing. Broth microdilution antibiotic susceptibility testing in a subset of isolates was also performed. We identified a novel AUST-02 subtype (M3L7 in adults attending a single Queensland CF centre. This M3L7 subtype was multi-drug resistant and had significantly higher antibiotic minimum inhibitory concentrations than other AUST-02 subtypes. Prospective molecular surveillance using polymerase chain reaction assays determined the prevalence of the 'M3L7' subtype at this centre during 2007-2009 (170 patients and 2011 (173 patients. Three-year clinical outcomes of patients harbouring different strains and subtypes were compared. MexZ and LasR sequences from AUST-02 isolates were more likely in 2007-2009 than 2001-2002 to exhibit mutations (mexZ: odds ratio (OR = 3.8; 95% confidence interval (CI: 1.1-13.5 and LasR: OR = 2.5; 95%CI: 1.3-5.0. Surveillance at the adult centre in 2007-2009 identified M3L7 in 28/509 (5.5% P. aeruginosa isolates from 13/170 (7.6% patients. A repeat survey in 2011 identified M3L7 in 21/519 (4.0% P. aeruginosa isolates from 11/173 (6.4% patients. The M3L7 subtype was associated with greater intravenous antibiotic and hospitalisation requirements, and a higher 3-year risk of death/lung transplantation, than other AUST-02 subtypes (adjusted hazard ratio [HR] = 9.4; 95%CI: 2

  4. Exploring the In Vitro Thrombolytic Activity of Nattokinase From a New Strain Pseudomonas aeruginosa CMSS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrasekaran, Subathra Devi; Vaithilingam, Mohanasrinivasan; Shanker, Ravi; Kumar, Sanjeev; Thiyur, Swathi; Babu, Vaishnavi; Selvakumar, Jemimah Naine; Prakash, Suyash

    2015-10-01

    Thrombolytic therapy has become a conventional treatment for acute myocardial infarction (AMI), yet currently, clinically prescribed thrombolytic drugs have problems such as delayed action and other side effects. Fibrinolytic enzymes have attracted interest as thrombolytic agents because of their efficiency in the fibrinolytic process, including plasmin activation. Nattokinase (NK) is a potent fibrinolytic agent for thrombosis therapy. The aim of this study was to enhance the production of NK from Pseudomonas aeruginosa CMSS by media optimization and strain improvement. In the present study, a potent NK-producing strain was isolated from cow milk and identified. To enhance the yield of NK, effect of various parameters such as pH, temperature, carbon source, nitrogen source and inoculum size were optimized. Strain improvement of P. aeruginosa CMSS was done by random UV-mutagenesis. Nattokinase was partially purified and the activity was determined by the casein digestion method, blood clot lysis and fibrin degradation assay. Based on morphological, biochemical and molecular characterization, the strain was confirmed as P. aeruginosa (GenBank accession number: JX112657), designated as P. aeruginosa CMSS. The optimum condition at pH 7 and temperature at 25˚C showed activity of NK as 1514 U mL(-1) and 1532 U mL(-1), respectively. Sucrose as the carbon source and shrimp shell powder (SSP) as the nitrogen source expressed NK activity of 1721 U mL(-1) and 2524 U mL(-1), respectively. At 1% inoculum size, the maximum rate of enzyme production was achieved with 2581 U mL(-1). The NK activity of the mutant strain UV60 was 4263 U mL(-1), indicating a two-fold increase in activity compared to the wild strain (2581 UmL(-1)). Nattokinase produced from mutant strain P. aeruginosa CMSS UV60 showed 94% blood clot lysis at ten minutes. The degradation of fibrin clot by the produced NK was observed after two hours of incubation. Sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel

  5. Identification and Characterization of Putative Integron-Like Elements of the Heavy-Metal-Hypertolerant Strains of Pseudomonas spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciok, Anna; Adamczuk, Marcin; Bartosik, Dariusz; Dziewit, Lukasz

    2016-11-28

    Pseudomonas strains isolated from the heavily contaminated Lubin copper mine and Zelazny Most post-flotation waste reservoir in Poland were screened for the presence of integrons. This analysis revealed that two strains carried homologous DNA regions composed of a gene encoding a DNA_BRE_C domain-containing tyrosine recombinase (with no significant sequence similarity to other integrases of integrons) plus a three-component array of putative integron gene cassettes. The predicted gene cassettes encode three putative polypeptides with homology to (i) transmembrane proteins, (ii) GCN5 family acetyltransferases, and (iii) hypothetical proteins of unknown function (homologous proteins are encoded by the gene cassettes of several class 1 integrons). Comparative sequence analyses identified three structural variants of these novel integron-like elements within the sequenced bacterial genomes. Analysis of their distribution revealed that they are found exclusively in strains of the genus Pseudomonas .

  6. Early Arabidopsis root hair growth stimulation by pathogenic strains of Pseudomonas syringae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pecenková, Tamara; Janda, Martin; Ortmannová, Jitka; Hajná, Vladimíra; Stehlíková, Zuzana; Žárský, Viktor

    2017-09-01

    Selected beneficial Pseudomonas spp. strains have the ability to influence root architecture in Arabidopsis thaliana by inhibiting primary root elongation and promoting lateral root and root hair formation. A crucial role for auxin in this long-term (1week), long-distance plant-microbe interaction has been demonstrated. Arabidopsis seedlings were cultivated in vitro on vertical plates and inoculated with pathogenic strains Pseudomonas syringae pv. maculicola (Psm) and P. syringae pv. tomato DC3000 (Pst), as well as Agrobacterium tumefaciens (Atu) and Escherichia coli (Eco). Root hair lengths were measured after 24 and 48h of direct exposure to each bacterial strain. Several Arabidopsis mutants with impaired responses to pathogens, impaired ethylene perception and defects in the exocyst vesicle tethering complex that is involved in secretion were also analysed. Arabidopsis seedling roots infected with Psm or Pst responded similarly to when infected with plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria; root hair growth was stimulated and primary root growth was inhibited. Other plant- and soil-adapted bacteria induced similar root hair responses. The most compromised root hair growth stimulation response was found for the knockout mutants exo70A1 and ein2. The single immune pathways dependent on salicylic acid, jasmonic acid and PAD4 are not directly involved in root hair growth stimulation; however, in the mutual cross-talk with ethylene, they indirectly modify the extent of the stimulation of root hair growth. The Flg22 peptide does not initiate root hair stimulation as intact bacteria do, but pretreatment with Flg22 prior to Psm inoculation abolished root hair growth stimulation in an FLS2 receptor kinase-dependent manner. These early response phenomena are not associated with changes in auxin levels, as monitored with the pDR5::GUS auxin reporter. Early stimulation of root hair growth is an effect of an unidentified component of living plant pathogenic bacteria. The root

  7. A Pseudomonas putida strain genetically engineered for 1,2,3-trichloropropane bioremediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samin, Ghufrana; Pavlova, Martina; Arif, M Irfan; Postema, Christiaan P; Damborsky, Jiri; Janssen, Dick B

    2014-09-01

    1,2,3-Trichloropropane (TCP) is a toxic compound that is recalcitrant to biodegradation in the environment. Attempts to isolate TCP-degrading organisms using enrichment cultivation have failed. A potential biodegradation pathway starts with hydrolytic dehalogenation to 2,3-dichloro-1-propanol (DCP), followed by oxidative metabolism. To obtain a practically applicable TCP-degrading organism, we introduced an engineered haloalkane dehalogenase with improved TCP degradation activity into the DCP-degrading bacterium Pseudomonas putida MC4. For this purpose, the dehalogenase gene (dhaA31) was cloned behind the constitutive dhlA promoter and was introduced into the genome of strain MC4 using a transposon delivery system. The transposon-located antibiotic resistance marker was subsequently removed using a resolvase step. Growth of the resulting engineered bacterium, P. putida MC4-5222, on TCP was indeed observed, and all organic chlorine was released as chloride. A packed-bed reactor with immobilized cells of strain MC4-5222 degraded >95% of influent TCP (0.33 mM) under continuous-flow conditions, with stoichiometric release of inorganic chloride. The results demonstrate the successful use of a laboratory-evolved dehalogenase and genetic engineering to produce an effective, plasmid-free, and stable whole-cell biocatalyst for the aerobic bioremediation of a recalcitrant chlorinated hydrocarbon. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  8. Biosorption of uranium by Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain CSU: Characterization and comparison studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, M.Z.C.; Norman, J.M.; Faison, B.D.; Reeves, M.E.

    1996-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain CSU, a nongenetically engineered bacterial strain known to bind dissolved hexavalent uranium (as UO 2 2+ and/or its cationic hydroxo complexes) was characterized with respect to its sorptive activity. The uranium biosorption equilibrium could be described by the Langmuir isotherm. The rate of uranium adsorption increased following permeabilization of the outer and/or cytoplasmic membrane by organic solvents such as acetone. P. aeruginosa CSU biomass was significantly more sorptive toward uranium than certain novel, patented biosorbents derived from algal or fungal biomass sources. P. aeruginosa CSU biomass was also competitive with commercial cation-exchange resins, particularly in the presence of dissolved transition metals. Uranium binding by P. aeruginosa CSU was clearly pH dependent. Uranium loading capacity increased with increasing pH under acidic conditions, presumably as a function of uranium speciation and due to the H + competition at some binding sites. Nevertheless, preliminary evidence suggests that this microorganism is also capable of binding anionic hexavalent uranium complexes. Ferric iron was a strong inhibitor of uranium binding to P. aeruginosa CSU biomass, and the presence of uranium also decreased the Fe 3+ loading when the biomass was not saturated with Fe 3+ . Thus, a two-state process in which iron and uranium are removed in consecutive steps was proposed for efficient use of the biomass as a biosorbent in uranium removal from mine wastewater, especially acidic leachates

  9. Uranium biomineralization by a metal resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain isolated from contaminated mine waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choudhary, Sangeeta [Department of Biotechnology, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur 721302 (India); Sar, Pinaki, E-mail: sarpinaki@yahoo.com [Department of Biotechnology, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur 721302 (India)

    2011-02-15

    Uranium biomineralization by a metal-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain isolated from uranium mine waste was characterized for its potential in bioremediation. Uranium resistance, its cellular localization and chemical nature of uranium-bacteria interaction were elucidated. Survival and uranium biomineralization from mine water were investigated using microcosm experiments. The selected bacterium showed U resistance and accumulation (maximum of 275 mg U g{sup -1} cell dry wt.) following incubation in 100 mg U L{sup -1}, pH 4.0, for 6 h. Transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction analyses revealed that bioaccumulated uranium was deposited within the cell envelope as needle shaped U-phosphate compounds that attain crystallinity only at pH 4.0. A synergistic involvement of deprotonated phosphate and carboxyl moieties in facilitating bioprecipitation of uranium was evident from FTIR analysis. Based on these findings we attribute the localized U sequestration by this bacterium as innocuous complex to its possible mechanism of uranium resistance. Microcosm data confirmed that the strain can remove soluble uranium (99%) and sequester it as U oxide and phosphate minerals while maintaining its viability. The study showed that indigenous bacteria from contaminated site that can survive uranium and other heavy metal toxicity and sequester soluble uranium as biominerals could play important role in uranium bioremediation.

  10. Purification and characterization of an eggshell membrane decomposing protease from Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain ME-4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Minyi; Takenaka, Shinji; Aoki, Shunsuke; Murakami, Shuichiro; Aoki, Kenji

    2009-04-01

    A bacterial strain, ME-4, isolated from farm soil and identified as Pseudomonas aeruginosa, grew well on a medium containing eggshell membrane (ESM). P. aeruginosa strain ME-4 decomposed the ESM by producing an extracellular protease able to solubilize it. The protease was purified to homogeneity from culture supernatant by fractionation with (NH(4))(2)SO(4), as well as CM52 cellulose and DE52 cellulose column chromatography, with a final yield of 47%. The molecular mass of the enzyme was 33 kDa. The isolated enzyme was a metalloprotease and was strongly inhibited by EDTA, o-phenanthroline, and phosphoramidon. The enzyme inhibited by these reagents was reactivated in the presence of several metal ions. The enzyme acted on various proteins and showed higher activity with collagen than collagenase from Clostridium histolyticum. Results of assays with the FRETS combinatorial libraries revealed that the enzyme preferred Ser at the P1 position and Lys at the P2 position. It also preferred hydrophobic amino acid residues at the P1' and P2' positions. The enzyme showed a much higher solubilization activity with the ESM substrate than commercially obtained enzymes. The enzyme decomposed ESM to produce water-soluble peptides, Val-Leu-Pro-Pro and (X)-Val-Pro-Pro, and a free amino acid, tryptophan.

  11. Uranium biomineralization by a metal resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain isolated from contaminated mine waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhary, Sangeeta; Sar, Pinaki

    2011-02-15

    Uranium biomineralization by a metal-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain isolated from uranium mine waste was characterized for its potential in bioremediation. Uranium resistance, its cellular localization and chemical nature of uranium-bacteria interaction were elucidated. Survival and uranium biomineralization from mine water were investigated using microcosm experiments. The selected bacterium showed U resistance and accumulation (maximum of 275 mg U g(-1)cell dry wt.) following incubation in 100 mg U L(-1), pH 4.0, for 6 h. Transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction analyses revealed that bioaccumulated uranium was deposited within the cell envelope as needle shaped U-phosphate compounds that attain crystallinity only at pH 4.0. A synergistic involvement of deprotonated phosphate and carboxyl moieties in facilitating bioprecipitation of uranium was evident from FTIR analysis. Based on these findings we attribute the localized U sequestration by this bacterium as innocuous complex to its possible mechanism of uranium resistance. Microcosm data confirmed that the strain can remove soluble uranium (99%) and sequester it as U oxide and phosphate minerals while maintaining its viability. The study showed that indigenous bacteria from contaminated site that can survive uranium and other heavy metal toxicity and sequester soluble uranium as biominerals could play important role in uranium bioremediation. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Biodegradation of Maya crude oil fractions by bacterial strains and a defined mixed culture isolated from Cyperus laxus rhizosphere soil in a contaminated site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diaz-Ramirez, I. J.; Gutierrez-Rojas, M.; Favela-Torres, E. [Autonomous Metropolitan University (UAM)- Iztapalapa, Dept. of Biotechnology, Federal District (Mexico); Ramirez-Sada, H. [Autonomous Metropolitan University (UAM)-Xochimilco, Dept. of Biological Systems, Federal District (Mexico)

    2003-12-01

    Biodegradation of aliphatic, aromatic, and polar constituents of Maya crude oil by a set of isolated bacterial strains and a defined mixed culture made up with all isolated strains, was evaluated. The bacterial strains were obtained from the rhizosphere of Cyperus laxus, a native plant on a highly hydrocarbon-polluted site. Oxygen uptake rate was used to determine the culture transfer timing during the enrichment culture. Results showed that five of the isolated strains were able to degrade 50 per cent of the aliphatic fractions of Maya crude oil. With the defined mixed culture the level of biodegradation was 47 per cent for aliphatics and 6 per cent of the aromatic-polar mixture. When grown in the presence of total hydrocarbons, the defined mixed culture was able to degrade 40 per cent of the aliphatic fraction and 26 per cent of the aromatic fraction. By combining enrichment cultures with oxygen uptake rate to determine the culture transfer timing during the enrichment cultures allowed the isolation of bacterial strains that are able to degrade specific hydrocarbon fractions at high consumption rates. 28 refs., 4 tabs., 1 fig.

  13. Characterization of a cold-adapted esterase and mutants from a psychotolerant Pseudomonas sp. strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Juan; Gasmalla, Mohammed A A; Zhao, Wei; Sun, Jingtao; Liu, Wenyu; Wang, Mingming; Han, Liang; Yang, Ruijin

    2017-09-01

    A cold-adapted esterase-producing strain named T1-39 was isolated from Glacier No. 1, Tianshan, People's Republic of China and identified as Pseudomonas sp. from 16S rRNA sequence analysis. The esterase (EstT1-39) secreted by this strain preferentially hydrolyzed esters of glycerol with short- and medium-chain fatty acids. Mutants of T1-39 were generated by the atmospheric and room temperature plasma method and screened for enhanced esterase activity. Among all the mutants, strain TB11 had 4.45-fold higher esterase productivity than T1-39, with high genetic stability over 10 generations of continuous cultivation. Maximum activity of EstT1-39 and EstTB11 was observed at 30 ℃, pH 9.0 and 25 ℃, pH 8.5, respectively. EstTB11 was thermally more stable (50 ℃ for 1 H) and active over a broader pH range than EstT1-39. EstTB11 also retained 38% of its maximal activity at 0 ℃ and was found to be able to hydrolyze milk fats into short- and medium-chain fatty acids at 4 ℃. The characteristics of EstT1-39 made it a cold-adapted enzyme and the EstTB11 from the mutant, with its higher activity at lower temperatures, may be suitable for the production of aromas and flavors in the dairy industry. © 2016 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  14. The Survey of Withani somnifera Extraction against Resistant Strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Bacteria to Selective Antibiotics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Bokaeian

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction:  Due  to  more  resistance  of  pathogenic  bacteria  to  new  and  current antibiotics  researchers  are  looking  to  find  the  agents  of  herbal  with  antimicrobial activities in order to replace chemical drugs.Methods:   The herbal extract of Withani somnifera was done by using a rotary vacuum,20 strains of Pseudomons aeruginosa were isolated from urinary infections hospitalized patients  in  city of Zabol  hospital.  The  MIC  Withani  somnifera  were  determined  by dilution method in various concentrations. Sensitivity of strains to multiple antibiotics was evaluated by standard disk diffusion Kirby-Bauer.Results:    The  result  showed  that  P.  aeruginosa  were  resistance  to  4  of the  agents including ampicillin  (85%, nitrofurantoin  (65%, nalidixic acid  (65%, ciprofloxacin (15% and for 5 strains of Pseudomonas showed MIC with activity of 100 ppm.Conclusion:   This  study  has  suggested  the  effect  of  winter  cherry  extract  on  P. aeruginosa in the in vitro assay. It s effectiveness of on in vivo system can be examined in future.

  15. Differential infection properties of three inducible prophages from an epidemic strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Chloe E

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the most common bacterial pathogen infecting the lungs of patients with cystic fibrosis (CF. The Liverpool Epidemic Strain (LES is transmissible, capable of superseding other P. aeruginosa populations and is associated with increased morbidity. Previously, multiple inducible prophages have been found to coexist in the LES chromosome and to constitute a major component of the accessory genome not found in other sequenced P. aerugionosa strains. LES phages confer a competitive advantage in a rat model of chronic lung infection and may, therefore underpin LES prevalence. Here the infective properties of three LES phages were characterised. Results This study focuses on three of the five active prophages (LESφ2, LESφ3 and LESφ4 that are members of the Siphoviridae. All were induced from LESB58 by norfloxacin. Lytic production of LESφ2 was considerably higher than that of LESφ3 and LESφ4. Each phage was capable of both lytic and lysogenic infection of the susceptible P. aeruginosa host, PAO1, producing phage-specific plaque morphologies. In the PAO1 host background, the LESφ2 prophage conferred immunity against LESφ3 infection and reduced susceptibility to LESφ4 infection. Each prophage was less stable in the PAO1 chromosome with substantially higher rates of spontaneous phage production than when residing in the native LESB58 host. We show that LES phages are capable of horizontal gene transfer by infecting P. aeruginosa strains from different sources and that type IV pili are required for infection by all three phages. Conclusions Multiple inducible prophages with diverse infection properties have been maintained in the LES genome. Our data suggest that LESφ2 is more sensitive to induction into the lytic cycle or has a more efficient replicative cycle than the other LES phages.

  16. Comparative genomic and functional analyses: unearthing the diversity and specificity of nematicidal factors in Pseudomonas putida strain 1A00316

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jing; Jing, Xueping; Peng, Wen-Lei; Nie, Qiyu; Zhai, Yile; Shao, Zongze; Zheng, Longyu; Cai, Minmin; Li, Guangyu; Zuo, Huaiyu; Zhang, Zhitao; Wang, Rui-Ru; Huang, Dian; Cheng, Wanli; Yu, Ziniu; Chen, Ling-Ling; Zhang, Jibin

    2016-01-01

    We isolated Pseudomonas putida (P. putida) strain 1A00316 from Antarctica. This bacterium has a high efficiency against Meloidogyne incognita (M. incognita) in vitro and under greenhouse conditions. The complete genome of P. putida 1A00316 was sequenced using PacBio single molecule real-time (SMRT) technology. A comparative genomic analysis of 16 Pseudomonas strains revealed that although P. putida 1A00316 belonged to P. putida, it was phenotypically more similar to nematicidal Pseudomonas fluorescens (P. fluorescens) strains. We characterized the diversity and specificity of nematicidal factors in P. putida 1A00316 with comparative genomics and functional analysis, and found that P. putida 1A00316 has diverse nematicidal factors including protein alkaline metalloproteinase AprA and two secondary metabolites, hydrogen cyanide and cyclo-(l-isoleucyl-l-proline). We show for the first time that cyclo-(l-isoleucyl-l-proline) exhibit nematicidal activity in P. putida. Interestingly, our study had not detected common nematicidal factors such as 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol (2,4-DAPG) and pyrrolnitrin in P. putida 1A00316. The results of the present study reveal the diversity and specificity of nematicidal factors in P. putida strain 1A00316. PMID:27384076

  17. Isolation and Characterization of Pseudomonas spp. Strains That Efficiently Decompose Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa M. Furmanczyk

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Due to their particular properties, detergents are widely used in household cleaning products, cosmetics, pharmaceuticals, and in agriculture as adjuvants tailoring the features of pesticides or other crop protection agents. The continuously growing use of these various products means that water soluble detergents have become one of the most problematic groups of pollutants for the aquatic and terrestrial environments. Thus it is important to identify bacteria having the ability to survive in the presence of large quantities of detergent and efficiently decompose it to non-surface active compounds. In this study, we used peaty soil sampled from a surface flow constructed wetland in a wastewater treatment plant to isolate bacteria that degrade sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS. We identified and initially characterized 36 Pseudomonas spp. strains that varied significantly in their ability to use SDS as their sole carbon source. Five isolates having the closest taxonomic relationship to the Pseudomonas jessenii subgroup appeared to be the most efficient SDS degraders, decomposing from 80 to 100% of the SDS present in an initial concentration 1 g/L in less than 24 h. These isolates exhibited significant differences in degree of SDS degradation, their resistance to high detergent concentration (ranging from 2.5 g/L up to 10 g/L or higher, and in chemotaxis toward SDS on a plate test. Mass spectrometry revealed several SDS degradation products, 1-dodecanol being dominant; however, traces of dodecanal, 2-dodecanol, and 3-dodecanol were also observed, but no dodecanoic acid. Native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis zymography revealed that all of the selected isolates possessed alkylsulfatase-like activity. Three isolates, AP3_10, AP3_20, and AP3_22, showed a single band on native PAGE zymography, that could be the result of alkylsulfatase activity, whereas for isolates AP3_16 and AP3_19 two bands were observed. Moreover, the AP3_22 strain exhibited a band

  18. Nitrogen Source Stabilization of Quorum Sensing in the Pseudomonas aeruginosa Bioaugmentation Strain SD-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mei-Zhen; Lai, Bai-Min; Dandekar, Ajai A; Yang, Yu-Sheng; Li, Na; Yin, Jun; Shen, Dong-Sheng

    2017-08-15

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa SD-1 is efficient at degrading aromatic compounds and can therefore contribute to the bioremediation of wastewater. P. aeruginosa uses quorum sensing (QS) to regulate the production of numerous secreted "public goods." In wastewater bioaugmentation applications, there are myriad nitrogen sources, and we queried whether various nitrogen sources impact the stabilities of both QS and the bacterial populations. In a laboratory strain of P. aeruginosa , PAO1, the absence of a nitrogen source has been shown to destabilize these populations through the emergence of QS mutant "cheaters." We tested the ability of SD-1 to grow in casein broth, a condition that requires QS for growth, when the nitrogen source with either NH 4 Cl, NaNO 3 , or NaNO 2 or with no added nitrogen source. There was great variability in susceptibility to invasion by QS mutant cheaters and, by extension, the stability of the SD-1 population. When grown with NH 4 Cl as an extra nitrogen source, no population collapse was observed; by contrast, two-thirds of cultures grown in the presence of NaNO 2 collapsed. In the populations that collapsed, the frequency of social cheaters exceeded 40%. NaNO 3 and NaNO 2 directly favor QS mutants of P. aeruginosa SD-1. Although the mechanism by which these nitrogen sources act is not clear, these data indicate that the metabolism of nitrogen can affect the stability of bacterial populations, an important observation for continuing industrial applications with this species. IMPORTANCE Bioaugmentation as a method to help remediate wastewater pollutant streams holds significant potential to enhance traditional methods of treatment. Addition of microbes that can catabolize organic pollutants can be an effective method to remove several toxic compounds. Such bioaugmented strains of bacteria have been shown to be susceptible to competition from the microbiota that are present in wastewater streams, limiting their potential effectiveness. Here, we

  19. Soil and Rhizosphere Populations of Fusarium and Fluorescent Pseudomonas spp. Associated with Field-Grown Plants are Affected by Sorghum Genotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorghum [Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench] is valued for bioenergy, feed and food. Potential of sorghum genotypes to support differing populations of root- and soil-associated fluorescent Pseudomonas spp. or Fusarium spp., in two soils, was assessed. Pseudomonad and Fusarium numbers were assessed from ro...

  20. Twenty-One Genome Sequences from Pseudomonas Species and 19 Genome Sequences from Diverse Bacteria Isolated from the Rhizosphere and Endosphere of Populus deltoides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Steven D [ORNL; Utturkar, Sagar M [ORNL; Klingeman, Dawn Marie [ORNL; Johnson, Courtney M [ORNL; Martin, Stanton [ORNL; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Lu, Tse-Yuan [ORNL; Schadt, Christopher Warren [ORNL; Doktycz, Mitchel John [ORNL; Pelletier, Dale A [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    To aid in the investigation of the Populus deltoides microbiome we generated draft genome sequences for twenty one Pseudomonas and twenty one other diverse bacteria isolated from Populus deltoides roots. Genome sequences for isolates similar to Acidovorax, Bradyrhizobium, Brevibacillus, Burkholderia, Caulobacter, Chryseobacterium, Flavobacterium, Herbaspirillum, Novosphingobium, Pantoea, Phyllobacterium, Polaromonas, Rhizobium, Sphingobium and Variovorax were generated.

  1. pltM is important in the phloroglucinol-mediated crosstalk between biosynthetic gene clusters for the antibiotics 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol and pyoluteorin in Pseudomonas protegens Pf-5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pseudomonas protegens strain Pf-5 is a well-characterized rhizosphere bacterium known for its production of a diverse spectrum of antimicrobial secondary metabolites. The production of two of these metabolites, 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol (2,4-DAPG) and pyoluteorin, is coordinately regulated. Each of...

  2. Production of metabolites from chloro biphenyls by resting cells of Pseudomonas strain LB400 after growth on different carbon sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Billingsley, K.A.; Ward, O.P.

    1999-01-01

    The transformation of polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB), when exposed to microorganisms, into chlorobenzoic acid metabolites was studied. PCBs are widely used in electrical transformers and have become widely dispersed in the environment. A proposed system for clean up of PCBs involves the combined use of anaerobic reductive dehalogenation of highly chlorinated congeners followed by aerobic degradation of moderately chlorinated PCBs, mediated by oxidative ring attack. Much of this work focused on biphenyl-grown cells, in particular Pseudomonas strain LB400 grown on biphenyl, which contains a multicomponent enzyme system. It was shown that resting cells of Pseudomonas strain LB400, grown on glycerol or glucose, could also transform purified PCB congeners and mixtures of PCBs in Aroclors, however, transformation rates were less than those observed with biphenyl-grown cells. 29 refs., 2 tabs., 2 figs

  3. The Facultative Symbiont Rickettsia Protects an Invasive Whitefly against Entomopathogenic Pseudomonas syringae Strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendry, Tory A; Hunter, Martha S; Baltrus, David A

    2014-12-01

    Facultative endosymbionts can benefit insect hosts in a variety of ways, including context-dependent roles, such as providing defense against pathogens. The role of some symbionts in defense may be overlooked, however, when pathogen infection is transient, sporadic, or asymptomatic. The facultative endosymbiont Rickettsia increases the fitness of the sweet potato whitefly (Bemisia tabaci) in some populations through mechanisms that are not yet understood. In this study, we investigated the role of Rickettsia in mediating the interaction between the sweet potato whitefly and Pseudomonas syringae, a common environmental bacterium, some strains of which are pathogenic to aphids. Our results show that P. syringae multiplies within whiteflies, leading to host death, and that whiteflies infected with Rickettsia show a decreased rate of death due to P. syringae. Experiments using plants coated with P. syringae confirmed that whiteflies can acquire the bacteria at a low rate while feeding, leading to increased mortality, particularly when the whiteflies are not infected with Rickettsia. These results suggest that P. syringae may affect whitefly populations in nature and that Rickettsia can ameliorate this effect. This study highlights the possible importance of interactions among opportunistic environmental pathogens and endosymbionts of insects. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  4. Isolation and identification of a novel strain of Pseudomonas chlororaphis capable of transforming isoeugenol to vanillin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasana, Ramesh C; Sharma, Upendra K; Sharma, Nandini; Sinha, Arun K

    2007-06-01

    Vanillin is undoubtedly one of the most popular and widely used flavoring agents in the world. Taking into consideration the worldwide demand for natural vanillin and its limited supply, alternative routes for its production including biotransformation are being constantly explored. In this regard, a novel soil bacterium capable of converting isoeugenol to vanillin was isolated by conventional enrichment process from soils of Ocimum field. On the basis of morphological and physiochemical characteristics and 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, the isolate was identified as Pseudomonas chlororaphis CDAE5 (EMBL # AM158279). Vanillin formation was analyzed by gas chromatography (GC), and its structure was confirmed by GC-mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance. After 24-h reaction, the vanillin concentration reached 1.2 g L(-1) from 10 g L(-1) isoeugenol in 20-mL reaction solution at 25 degrees C and 180 rpm. The strain showed potential to be a good candidate for biotechnological production of vanillin from isoeugenol. Further studies for standardization and optimization for higher yield of vanillin production needs to be investigated.

  5. Daya Tahan Hidup Pseudomonas putida Strain Pf-20 dalam Beberapa Macam Inokulum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yenny Wuryandari

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available For any crop-protection agent, an efficient formulation is a necessity to translate laboratory activity into adequate field performance. There are particular challenges to be faced in formulation of biological control agents, because the active ingredient is a living organism that must be kept relatively immobile and inactive while in storage, but quickly resume its  normal metabolic processes once applied to the target site. The objective of the research was  to study survival of Pseudomonas putida strain Pf-20 in various formulations at the storage  time and germination. The twelve formulations include carriers, additives and concentration  of Pf-20. The efficacy of various formulation in maintaining the population of Pf-20 in storage was assessed. The research result showed that population of Pf 20  in the formulation  number seven was the highest, with the combination peat+talc, CMC+arginin and  concentration of Pf[20 10^10 CFU/ml. In peat+talc, CMC+arginin, Pf-20 10^10  CFU/ml based formulation the bacteria survived even up to 84 days of storage although the population declined. In all formulations, population of Pf-20 increased at the time of seed germination. At the time of seed germination, formulation number seven was the highest too.

  6. Cyanide Degradation by Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes Strain W_2 Isolated from Mining Effluent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belinda Tiong; Zaratulnur Mohd Bahari; Nor Sahslin Irwan Shah Lee; Jafariah Jaafar; Zaharah Ibrahim; Shafinaz Shahir

    2015-01-01

    Cyanide is highly toxic to the living organisms as it inhibits respiration system in the cell mitochondria. Cyanide is commonly used in gold extraction process and its discharge into the environment not only causes pollution but it also brings harm to the surrounding population. Chemical treatment is expensive and the use of hazardous compound can exacerbate the problem. Biodegradation offers cheap and safe alternative as it overcomes the problems faced by chemical treatment. In this study, indigenous bacteria from mining wastewater were isolated. Cyanide degradation was done via shake flask method. A bacterium, designated W2 was found able to grow in the mining wastewater. 16S rRNA analysis identified the strain as Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes which could tolerate up to 39 mg/L cyanide concentration and growth was depleted at 52 mg/L. 60 % cyanide degradation was achieved in wastewater containing medium. End-product analysis from high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) detected formamide implicating the role of cyanide hydratase in cyanide degradation. It can be concluded that P. pseudoalcaligenes is capable of biodegrading cyanide and its potential in wastewater treatment containing cyanide is feasible. (author)

  7. Complete genome of Pseudomonas sp. strain L10.10, a psychrotolerant biofertilizer that could promote plant growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    See-Too, Wah Seng; Lim, Yan-Lue; Ee, Robson; Convey, Peter; Pearce, David A; Yin, Wai-Fong; Chan, Kok Gan

    2016-03-20

    Pseudomonas sp. strain L10.10 (=DSM 101070) is a psychrotolerant bacterium which was isolated from Lagoon Island, Antarctica. Analysis of its complete genome sequence indicates its possible role as a plant-growth promoting bacterium, including nitrogen-fixing ability and indole acetic acid (IAA)-producing trait, with additional suggestion of plant disease prevention attributes via hydrogen cyanide production. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Draft Genome Sequence of the Phosphate-Solubilizing Bacterium Pseudomonas argentinensis Strain SA190 Isolated from the Desert Plant Indigofera argentea

    KAUST Repository

    Lafi, Feras Fawzi; Alam, Intikhab; Geurts, Rene; Bisseling, Ton; Bajic, Vladimir B.; Hirt, Heribert; Saad, Maged

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas argentinensis strain SA190 is a plant endophytic-inhabiting bacterium that was isolated from root nodules of the desert plant Indigofera argentea collected from the Jizan region of Saudi Arabia. Here, we report the genome sequence of SA

  9. Kinetics of mercury reduction by Serratia marcescens mercuric reductase expressed by pseudomonas putida strains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, M.; Deckwer, W.D. [GBF-Gesellschaft fuer Biotechnologische Forschung mbH, Abteilung TU-BCE, Mascheroder Weg 1, D-38124 Braunschweig (Germany)

    2005-10-01

    Mercury (Hg) resistance is widespread among microorganisms and is based on the intracellular transformation of Hg(II) to less toxic elemental Hg(0). The use of microbial consortia to demercurize polluted wastewater streams and environments has been demonstrated. To develop efficient and versatile microbial cleanup strategies requires detailed knowledge of transport and reaction rates. This study focuses on the kinetics of the key enzyme of the microbial transformation, e.g., the mercuric reductase (MerA) under conditions closely resembling the cell interior. To this end, previously constructed and characterized Pseudomonas putida strains expressing MerA from Serratia marcescens were applied. Of the P. putida strains considered in this study P. putida KT2442::mer73 constitutively expressing broad spectrum mercury resistance (merTPAB) yielded the highest mercuric reductase (MerA) activity directly after cell disruption. MerA in the raw extract was further purified (about 100 fold). Reduction rates were measured for various substrates (HgCl{sub 2}, Hg{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, Hg(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} and phenyl mercury acetate) up to high concentrations dependent on the purification grade. In all cases, a pronounced substrate inhibition was found. The kinetic constants determined for the cell raw extract are in agreement with those measured for intact cells. However, the rate data exhibit reduced affinity and inhibition with rising purification grade (specific activity). Therefore, the findings seemingly point to reactions preceding the catalytic reduction. Based on simplified assumptions, a kinetic model is suggested which reasonably describes the experimental findings and can advantageously be applied to the bioreactor design. (Abstract Copyright [2005], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  10. Rhizosphere size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzyakov, Yakov; Razavi, Bahar

    2017-04-01

    Estimation of the soil volume affected by roots - the rhizosphere - is crucial to assess the effects of plants on properties and processes in soils and dynamics of nutrients, water, microorganisms and soil organic matter. The challenges to assess the rhizosphere size are: 1) the continuum of properties between the root surface and root-free soil, 2) differences in the distributions of various properties (carbon, microorganisms and their activities, various nutrients, enzymes, etc.) along and across the roots, 3) temporal changes of properties and processes. Thus, to describe the rhizosphere size and root effects, a holistic approach is necessary. We collected literature and own data on the rhizosphere gradients of a broad range of physico-chemical and biological properties: pH, CO2, oxygen, redox potential, water uptake, various nutrients (C, N, P, K, Ca, Mg, Mn and Fe), organic compounds (glucose, carboxylic acids, amino acids), activities of enzymes of C, N, P and S cycles. The collected data were obtained based on the destructive approaches (thin layer slicing), rhizotron studies and in situ visualization techniques: optodes, zymography, sensitive gels, 14C and neutron imaging. The root effects were pronounced from less than 0.5 mm (nutrients with slow diffusion) up to more than 50 mm (for gases). However, the most common effects were between 1 - 10 mm. Sharp gradients (e.g. for P, carboxylic acids, enzyme activities) allowed to calculate clear rhizosphere boundaries and so, the soil volume affected by roots. The first analyses were done to assess the effects of soil texture and moisture as well as root system and age on these gradients. The most properties can be described by two curve types: exponential saturation and S curve, each with increasing and decreasing concentration profiles from the root surface. The gradient based distribution functions were calculated and used to extrapolate on the whole soil depending on the root density and rooting intensity. We

  11. Detection of Quorum Sensing Activity in the Multidrug-Resistant Clinical Isolate Pseudomonas aeruginosa Strain GB11

    OpenAIRE

    Huey Jia Cheng; Robson Ee; Yuet Meng Cheong; Wen-Si Tan; Wai-Fong Yin; Kok-Gan Chan

    2014-01-01

    A multidrug-resistant clinical bacteria strain GB11 was isolated from a wound swab on the leg of a patient. Identity of stain GB11 as Pseudomonas aeruginosa was validated by using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). Detection of the production of signaling molecules, N-acylhomoserine lactones (AHLs), was conducted using three different bacterial biosensors. A total of four different AHLs were found to be produced by strain GB11, namely...

  12. Stereospecific oxidation of (R)- and (S)-1-indanol by naphthalene dioxygenase from Pseudomonas sp. strain NCIB 9816-4.

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, K; Resnick, S M; Gibson, D T

    1997-01-01

    A recombinant Escherichia coli strain which expresses naphthalene dioxygenase (NDO) from Pseudomonas sp. strain NCIB 9816-4 oxidized (S)-1-indanol to trans-(1S,3S)-indan-1,3-diol (95.5%) and (R)-3-hydroxy-1-indanone (4.5%). The same cells oxidized (R)-1-indanol to cis-1,3-indandiol (71%), (R)-3-hydroxy-1-indanone (18.2%), and cis-1,2,3-indantriol (10.8%). Purified NDO oxidized (S)-1-indenol to both syn- and anti-2,3-dihydroxy-1-indanol.

  13. Stereospecific oxidation of (R)- and (S)-1-indanol by naphthalene dioxygenase from Pseudomonas sp. strain NCIB 9816-4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, K; Resnick, S M; Gibson, D T

    1997-05-01

    A recombinant Escherichia coli strain which expresses naphthalene dioxygenase (NDO) from Pseudomonas sp. strain NCIB 9816-4 oxidized (S)-1-indanol to trans-(1S,3S)-indan-1,3-diol (95.5%) and (R)-3-hydroxy-1-indanone (4.5%). The same cells oxidized (R)-1-indanol to cis-1,3-indandiol (71%), (R)-3-hydroxy-1-indanone (18.2%), and cis-1,2,3-indantriol (10.8%). Purified NDO oxidized (S)-1-indenol to both syn- and anti-2,3-dihydroxy-1-indanol.

  14. Characterization and Genome Analysis of a Nicotine and Nicotinic Acid-Degrading Strain Pseudomonas putida JQ581 Isolated from Marine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Aiwen; Qiu, Jiguo; Chen, Dongzhi; Ye, Jiexu; Wang, Yuhong; Tong, Lu; Jiang, Jiandong; Chen, Jianmeng

    2017-05-31

    The presence of nicotine and nicotinic acid (NA) in the marine environment has caused great harm to human health and the natural environment. Therefore, there is an urgent need to use efficient and economical methods to remove such pollutants from the environment. In this study, a nicotine and NA-degrading bacterium-strain JQ581-was isolated from sediment from the East China Sea and identified as a member of Pseudomonas putida based on morphology, physio-biochemical characteristics, and 16S rDNA gene analysis. The relationship between growth and nicotine/NA degradation suggested that strain JQ581 was a good candidate for applications in the bioaugmentation treatment of nicotine/NA contamination. The degradation intermediates of nicotine are pseudooxynicotine (PN) and 3-succinoyl-pyridine (SP) based on UV, high performance liquid chromatography, and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analyses. However, 6-hydroxy-3-succinoyl-pyridine (HSP) was not detected. NA degradation intermediates were identified as 6-hydroxynicotinic acid (6HNA). The whole genome of strain JQ581 was sequenced and analyzed. Genome sequence analysis revealed that strain JQ581 contained the gene clusters for nicotine and NA degradation. This is the first report where a marine-derived Pseudomonas strain had the ability to degrade nicotine and NA simultaneously.

  15. Draft genome sequences of eight bacteria isolated from the indoor environment: Staphylococcus capitis strain H36, S. capitis strain H65, S. cohnii strain H62, S. hominis strain H69, Microbacterium sp. strain H83, Mycobacterium iranicum strain H39, Plantibacter sp. strain H53, and Pseudomonas oryzihabitans strain H72.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lymperopoulou, Despoina S; Coil, David A; Schichnes, Denise; Lindow, Steven E; Jospin, Guillaume; Eisen, Jonathan A; Adams, Rachel I

    2017-01-01

    We report here the draft genome sequences of eight bacterial strains of the genera Staphylococcus , Microbacterium, Mycobacterium, Plantibacter, and Pseudomonas . These isolates were obtained from aerosol sampling of bathrooms of five residences in the San Francisco Bay area. Taxonomic classifications as well as the genome sequence and gene annotation of the isolates are described. As part of the "Built Environment Reference Genome" project, these isolates and associated genome data provide valuable resources for studying the microbiology of the built environment.

  16. Draft genome sequences of eight bacteria isolated from the indoor environment: Staphylococcus capitis strain H36, S. capitis strain H65, S. cohnii strain H62, S. hominis strain H69, Microbacterium sp. strain H83, Mycobacterium iranicum strain H39, Plantibacter sp. strain H53, and Pseudomonas oryzihabitans strain H72

    OpenAIRE

    Lymperopoulou, Despoina S.; Coil, David A.; Schichnes, Denise; Lindow, Steven E.; Jospin, Guillaume; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Adams, Rachel I.

    2017-01-01

    We report here the draft genome sequences of eight bacterial strains of the genera Staphylococcus, Microbacterium, Mycobacterium, Plantibacter, and Pseudomonas. These isolates were obtained from aerosol sampling of bathrooms of five residences in the San Francisco Bay area. Taxonomic classifications as well as the genome sequence and gene annotation of the isolates are described. As part of the ?Built Environment Reference Genome? project, these isolates and associated genome data provide val...

  17. A Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain isolated from a contact lens-induced acute red eye (CLARE) is protease-deficient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrellas, P S; Alionte, L G; Hobden, J A

    2000-03-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa proteases are thought to be important virulence factors in the pathogenesis of corneal disease. This study examined protease production from two strains of P. aeruginosa responsible for two very distinct clinical diseases: strain Paer1, isolated from a Contact Lens-induced Acute Red Eye (CLARE), and strain KEI 1025, isolated from a corneal ulcer. Strains were compared to a laboratory strain (ATCC 19660) known to produce severe keratitis in experimentally infected mice for protease production and for ocular virulence. Protease production was examined with colorimetric assays, gelatin zymography and western blots. Elastase A activity was quantitated with a staphylolytic assay. Ocular virulence was examined using a mouse scratch model of keratitis. In contrast to strains KEI 1025 or ATCC 19660, Paer1 was unable to produce enzymatically active elastase A, elastase, and protease IV. All three strains produced active alkaline protease. Strains KEI 1025 and ATCC 19660 produced a fulminant keratitis in mice whereas Paer1 produced a mild transient infection. Restoration of elastase activity in Paer1 via genetic complementation did not result in a virulent phenotype. Co-infection of mouse eyes with strains Paer1 and ATCC 19660 resulted in the eventual loss of Paer1 from corneal tissue. These studies suggest that P. aeruginosa elastase A and/or protease IV, but not alkaline protease or elastase, contribute to the ocular virulence of this organism.

  18. Carbapenem-resistant-only Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in patients formerly infected by carbapenem-susceptible strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Ming-Han; Wu, Tsu-Lan; Su, Lin-Hui; Lo, Wei-Lin; Chen, Chyi-Liang; Liang, Yi-Hua; Chiu, Cheng-Hsun

    2014-12-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates that were initially carbapenem-susceptible and later became selective carbapenem-resistant following antimicrobial therapy were identified from individual cases during the same hospitalisation. Cross-resistance to other β-lactams was not found and their susceptibilities remained identical in consecutive isolates. Real-time quantitative reverse transcription PCR was performed to investigate the role of OprD, an outer membrane protein regulating the entry of carbapenems, in the appearance of carbapenem-resistant-only P. aeruginosa (CROPA). Fifteen paired isolates of carbapenem-susceptible P. aeruginosa (CS-PA) and CROPA were identified. All of the cases had carbapenem exposure history within 1 month before the appearance of CROPA (mean 10 days). Reduced OprD expression was found in 93% (14/15) of the isolates, suggesting that oprD inactivation was the major contributor to selective carbapenem resistance. Of the 14 cases with CROPA due to oprD mutation, 71% (10/14) were persistent infection, as genotype analysis revealed that their paired strains were isogenic; 29% (4/14) represented re-infections as they were heterogenic, suggesting that oprD-deficient CROPA existed in the hospital and that carbapenem selective pressure promoted its spread to patients. We conclude that CROPA may occur soon after the use of carbapenems to treat CS-PA infections and that oprD mutation is the major mechanism of resistance in CROPA. Restriction of empirical use of carbapenems by antibiotic stewardship is important to halt the occurrence of CROPA. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. and the International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  19. Control of foodborne pathogens on fresh-cut fruit by a novel strain of Pseudomonas graminis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alegre, Isabel; Viñas, Inmaculada; Usall, Josep; Teixidó, Neus; Figge, Marian J; Abadias, Maribel

    2013-06-01

    The consumption of fresh-cut fruit has substantially risen over the last few years, leading to an increase in the number of outbreaks associated with fruit. Moreover, consumers are currently demanding wholesome, fresh-like, safe foods without added chemicals. As a response, the aim of this study was to determine if the naturally occurring microorganisms on fruit are "competitive with" or "antagonistic to" potentially encountered pathogens. Of the 97 and 107 isolates tested by co-inoculation with Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella and Listeria innocua on fresh-cut apple and peach, respectively, and stored at 20 °C, seven showed a strong antagonistic capacity (more than 1-log unit reduction). One of the isolates, CPA-7, achieved the best reduction values (from 2.8 to 5.9-log units) and was the only isolate able to inhibit E. coli O157:H7 at refrigeration temperatures on both fruits. Therefore, CPA-7 was selected for further assays. Dose-response assays showed that CPA-7 should be present in at least the same amount as the pathogen to adequately reduce the numbers of the pathogen. From the results obtained in in vitro assays, competition seemed to be CPA-7's mode of action against E. coli O157:H7. The CPA-7 strain was identified as Pseudomonas graminis. Thus, the results support the potential use of CPA-7 as a bioprotective agent against foodborne pathogens in minimally processed fruit. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Effectiveness of halo-tolerant, auxin producing Pseudomonas and Rhizobium strains to improve osmotic stress tolerance in mung bean (Vigna radiata L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maqshoof Ahmad

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Halo-tolerant, auxin producing bacteria could be used to induce salt tolerance in plants. A number of Rhizobium and auxin producing rhizobacterial strains were assessed for their ability to tolerate salt stress by conducting osmoadaptation assay. The selected strains were further screened for their ability to induce osmotic stress tolerance in mung bean seedlings under salt-stressed axenic conditions in growth pouch/jar trials. Three most effective strains of Rhizobium and Pseudomonas containing ACC-deaminase were evaluated in combination, for their ability to induce osmotic stress tolerance in mung bean at original, 4, and 6 dS m-1 under axenic conditions. Results showed that sole inoculation of Rhizobium and Pseudomonas strains improved the total dry matter up to 1.4, and 1.9 fold, respectively, while the increase in salt tolerance index was improved up to 1.3 and 2.0 fold by the Rhizobium and Pseudomonas strains, respectively. However, up to 2.2 fold increase in total dry matter and salt tolerance index was observed due to combined inoculation of Rhizobium and Pseudomonas strains. So, combined application of Rhizobium and Pseudomonas strains could be explored as an effective strategy to induce osmotic stress tolerance in mung bean.

  1. Molecular characterization of genes of Pseudomonas sp. strain HR199 involved in bioconversion of vanillin to protocatechuate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priefert, H; Rabenhorst, J; Steinbüchel, A

    1997-01-01

    The gene loci vdh, vanA, and vanB, which are involved in the bioconversion of vanillin to protocatechuate by Pseudomonas sp. strain HR199 (DSM 7063), were identified as the structural genes of a novel vanillin dehydrogenase (vdh) and the two subunits of a vanillate demethylase (vanA and vanB), respectively. These genes were localized on an EcoRI fragment (E230), which was cloned from a Pseudomonas sp. strain HR199 genomic library in the cosmid pVK100. The vdh gene was identified on a subfragment (HE35) of E230, and the vanA and vanB genes were localized on a different subfragment (H110) of E230. The nucleotide sequences of fragment HE35 and part of fragment H110 were determined, revealing open reading frames of 1062, 951, and 1446 bp, representing vanA, vanB, and vdh, respectively. The vdh gene was organized in one operon together with a fourth open reading frame (ORF2), of 735 bp, which was located upstream of vdh. The deduced amino acid sequences of vanA and vanB exhibited 78.8 and 62.1% amino acid identity, respectively, to the corresponding gene products from Pseudomonas sp. strain ATCC 19151 (F. Brunel and J. Davison, J. Bacteriol. 170:4924-4930, 1988). The deduced amino acid sequence of the vdh gene exhibited up to 35.3% amino acid identity to aldehyde dehydrogenases from different sources. The deduced amino acid sequence of ORF2 exhibited up to 28.4% amino acid identity to those of enoyl coenzyme A hydratases. Escherichia coli strains harboring fragment E230 cloned in pBluescript SK- converted vanillin to protocatechuate via vanillate, indicating the functional expression of vdh, vanA, and vanB in E. coli. High expression of vdh in E. coli was achieved with HE35 cloned in pBluescript SK-. The resulting recombinant strains converted vanillin to vanillate at a rate of up to 0.3 micromol per min per ml of culture. Transfer of vanA, vanB, and vdh to Alcaligenes eutrophus and to different Pseudomonas strains, which were unable to utilize vanillin or vanillate as

  2. Accumulation of a Polyhydroxyalkanoate Containing Primarily 3-Hydroxydecanoate from Simple Carbohydrate Substrates by Pseudomonas sp. Strain NCIMB 40135.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haywood, G W; Anderson, A J; Ewing, D F; Dawes, E A

    1990-11-01

    A number of Pseudomonas species have been identified which accumulate a polyhydroxyalkanoate containing mainly 3-hydroxydecanoate monomers from sodium gluconate as the sole carbon source. One of these, Pseudomonas sp. strain NCIMB 40135, was further investigated and shown to accumulate such a polyhydroxyalkanoate from a wide range of carbon sources (C(2) to C(6)); however, when supplied with octanoic acid it produced a polyhydroxyalkanoate containing mainly 3-hydroxyoctanoate monomers. Polymer synthesis occurred in batch culture after cessation of growth due to exhaustion of nitrogen. In continuous culture under nitrogen limitation up to 16.9% (wt/wt) polyhydroxyalkanoate was synthesized from glucose as the carbon source. The monomer units are mainly of the R-(-) configuration. Nuclear magnetic resonance studies confirmed the composition of the polymer. Differential scanning calorimetry suggested that the solvent-extracted polymer contained a significant proportion of crystalline material. The weight-average molecular weight of the polymer from glucose-grown cells was 143,000.

  3. Effect of Indigenous Pseudomonas sp. and Bacillus sp. Strains on Yield and Main Chemical Growth Parameters of Radicchio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanojković-Sebić Aleksandra

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas sp. and Bacillus sp. belong to plant growth promoting rhizobacteria which are able to colonize the plants roots and stimulate growth. In this study, the effect of two indigenous plant growth promoting rhizobacterial strains Pseudomonas sp. Q4 and Bacillus sp. Q10 and their mixture (mix Q4+Q10 on content of the main chemical growth parameters (nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium, calcium and magnesium and the yield of dry biomass of radicchio (Cichorium spp. var. rossa di treviso aerial parts and root, was investigated. The study was carried out with stagnosol type of soil in pot experiments under semi-controlled conditions in the Institute of Soil Science (Belgrade, in the period from July to October in 2013. Phosphorus was determined by spectrophotometer, potassium - by flame emission photometry and total nitrogen and carbon - using elemental CNS analyzer, while calcium and magnesium were determined by AAS. The data on yield of both aerial parts and root dry biomass of radicchio showed that its treatment with Q4 and Q10 strains, as well as with their mixture, caused noticeably increase in this parameter in relation to the control, whereby the strain Q4 was more effective for aerial parts, while mix Q4+Q10 - for roots. The obtained data on the studied chemical parameters of radicchio root and aerial parts were in total accordance with their yield. Concluding, studied strains have a potential in promoting the biomass yield and main chemical growth parameters of both aerial parts and root of radicchio.

  4. Mining Genomes of Biological Control Strains of Pseudomonas spp.: Unexpected Gems and Tailings

    Science.gov (United States)

    The biocontrol bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf-5 suppresses numerous soilborne plant diseases and produces an array of structurally-characterized secondary metabolites that are toxic to plant pathogenic bacteria, fungi and Oomycetes. Biosynthetic gene clusters for these metabolites compose nea...

  5. Promotion of plant growth by Pseudomonas fluorescens strain SS101 via novel volatile organic compounds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Park, Yong-Soon; Dutta, Swarnalee; Ann, Mina; Raaijmakers, Jos M.; Park, Kyungseok

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) play key roles in modulating plant growth and induced systemic resistance (ISR) to pathogens. Despite their significance, the physiological functions of the specific VOCs produced by Pseudomonas fluorescens

  6. Toxicity of fungal-generated silver nanoparticles to soil-inhabiting Pseudomonas putida KT2440, a rhizospheric bacterium responsible for plant protection and bioremediation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, Indarchand R.; Anderson, Anne J.; Rai, Mahendra

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • This study incorporates the mycosynthesis of AgNPs and their characterisation by various methods. • A first attempt demonstrating the toxicity assessment of AgNPs on beneficial soil microbe. • Use of biosensor in Pseudomonas putida KT2440, gave accurate antimicrobial results. - Abstract: Silver nanoparticles have attracted considerable attention due to their beneficial properties. But toxicity issues associated with them are also rising. The reports in the past suggested health hazards of silver nanoparticles at the cellular, molecular, or whole organismal level in eukaryotes. Whereas, there is also need to examine the exposure effects of silver nanoparticle to the microbes, which are beneficial to humans as well as environment. The available literature suggests the harmful effects of physically and chemically synthesised silver nanoparticles. The toxicity of biogenically synthesized nanoparticles has been less studied than physically and chemically synthesised nanoparticles. Hence, there is a greater need to study the toxic effects of biologically synthesised silver nanoparticles in general and mycosynthesized nanoparticles in particular. In the present study, attempts have been made to assess the risk associated with the exposure of mycosynthesized silver nanoparticles on a beneficial soil microbe Pseudomonas putida. KT2440. The study demonstrates mycosynthesis of silver nanoparticles and their characterisation by UV–vis spectrophotometry, FTIR, X-ray diffraction, nanosight LM20 – a particle size distribution analyzer and TEM. Silver nanoparticles obtained herein were found to exert the hazardous effect at the concentration of 0.4 μg/ml, which warrants further detailed investigations concerning toxicity

  7. Toxicity of fungal-generated silver nanoparticles to soil-inhabiting Pseudomonas putida KT2440, a rhizospheric bacterium responsible for plant protection and bioremediation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, Indarchand R. [Nanobiotechnology Laboratory, Department of Biotechnology, S.G.B. Amravati University, Amravati 444602, Maharashtra (India); Department of Biotechnology, Institute of Science, Nipat Niranjan Nagar, Caves Road, Aurangabad 431004, Maharashtra (India); Anderson, Anne J. [Department of Biology, Utah State University, Logan, Utah 84321 (United States); Rai, Mahendra, E-mail: mahendrarai@sgbau.ac.in [Nanobiotechnology Laboratory, Department of Biotechnology, S.G.B. Amravati University, Amravati 444602, Maharashtra (India); Laboratório de Química Biológica, Instituto de Química, UNICAMP, Cidade Universitária “Zefferino Vaz” Barão Geraldo, CEP 13083-970, Caixa Postal 6150, Campinas, SP (Brazil)

    2015-04-09

    Highlights: • This study incorporates the mycosynthesis of AgNPs and their characterisation by various methods. • A first attempt demonstrating the toxicity assessment of AgNPs on beneficial soil microbe. • Use of biosensor in Pseudomonas putida KT2440, gave accurate antimicrobial results. - Abstract: Silver nanoparticles have attracted considerable attention due to their beneficial properties. But toxicity issues associated with them are also rising. The reports in the past suggested health hazards of silver nanoparticles at the cellular, molecular, or whole organismal level in eukaryotes. Whereas, there is also need to examine the exposure effects of silver nanoparticle to the microbes, which are beneficial to humans as well as environment. The available literature suggests the harmful effects of physically and chemically synthesised silver nanoparticles. The toxicity of biogenically synthesized nanoparticles has been less studied than physically and chemically synthesised nanoparticles. Hence, there is a greater need to study the toxic effects of biologically synthesised silver nanoparticles in general and mycosynthesized nanoparticles in particular. In the present study, attempts have been made to assess the risk associated with the exposure of mycosynthesized silver nanoparticles on a beneficial soil microbe Pseudomonas putida. KT2440. The study demonstrates mycosynthesis of silver nanoparticles and their characterisation by UV–vis spectrophotometry, FTIR, X-ray diffraction, nanosight LM20 – a particle size distribution analyzer and TEM. Silver nanoparticles obtained herein were found to exert the hazardous effect at the concentration of 0.4 μg/ml, which warrants further detailed investigations concerning toxicity.

  8. Field release of genetically modified Pseudomonas putida WCS358r : molecular analysis of effects on microbial communities in the rhizosphere of wheat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Viebahn, Mareike

    2005-01-01

    Genetically modified microorganisms (GMMs) with enhanced biocontrol activity are attractive to apply in agriculture. To investigate potential ecological risks of field introduction of GMMs, effects of P. putida strain WCS358r and two genetically modified derivatives of this strain on the indigenous

  9. Removal of Nitrate in Simulated Water at Low Temperature by a Novel Psychrotrophic and Aerobic Bacterium, Pseudomonas taiwanensis Strain J

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tengxia He

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Low temperatures and high pH generally inhibit the biodenitrification. Thus, it is important to explore the psychrotrophic and alkali-resisting microorganism for degradation of nitrogen. This research was mainly focused on the identification of a psychrotrophic strain and preliminary explored its denitrification characteristics. The new strain J was isolated using the bromothymol blue solid medium and identified as Pseudomonas taiwanensis on the basis of morphology and phospholipid fatty acid as well as 16S rRNA gene sequence analyses, which is further testified to work efficiently for removing nitrate from wastewater at low temperature circumstances. This is the first report that Pseudomonas taiwanensis possessed excellent tolerance to low temperature, with 15°C as its optimum and 5°C as viable. The Pseudomonas taiwanensis showed unusual ability of aerobic denitrification with the nitrate removal efficiencies of 100% at 15°C and 51.61% at 5°C. Single factor experiments showed that the optimal conditions for denitrification were glucose as carbon source, 15°C, shaking speed 150 r/min, C/N 15, pH≥7, and incubation quantity 2.0 × 106 CFU/mL. The nitrate and total nitrogen removal efficiencies were up to 100% and 93.79% at 15°C when glucose is served as carbon source. These results suggested that strain J had aerobic denitrification ability, as well as the notable ability to tolerate the low temperature and high pH.

  10. Removal of Nitrate in Simulated Water at Low Temperature by a Novel Psychrotrophic and Aerobic Bacterium, Pseudomonas taiwanensis Strain J

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Tengxia; Ye, Qing; Sun, Quan; Cai, Xi; Ni, Jiupai

    2018-01-01

    Low temperatures and high pH generally inhibit the biodenitrification. Thus, it is important to explore the psychrotrophic and alkali-resisting microorganism for degradation of nitrogen. This research was mainly focused on the identification of a psychrotrophic strain and preliminary explored its denitrification characteristics. The new strain J was isolated using the bromothymol blue solid medium and identified as Pseudomonas taiwanensis on the basis of morphology and phospholipid fatty acid as well as 16S rRNA gene sequence analyses, which is further testified to work efficiently for removing nitrate from wastewater at low temperature circumstances. This is the first report that Pseudomonas taiwanensis possessed excellent tolerance to low temperature, with 15°C as its optimum and 5°C as viable. The Pseudomonas taiwanensis showed unusual ability of aerobic denitrification with the nitrate removal efficiencies of 100% at 15°C and 51.61% at 5°C. Single factor experiments showed that the optimal conditions for denitrification were glucose as carbon source, 15°C, shaking speed 150 r/min, C/N 15, pH ≥ 7, and incubation quantity 2.0 × 106 CFU/mL. The nitrate and total nitrogen removal efficiencies were up to 100% and 93.79% at 15°C when glucose is served as carbon source. These results suggested that strain J had aerobic denitrification ability, as well as the notable ability to tolerate the low temperature and high pH. PMID:29789796

  11. Draft Genome Sequence of the Plant Growth–Promoting Pseudomonas punonensis Strain D1-6 Isolated from the Desert Plant Erodium hirtum in Jordan

    KAUST Repository

    Lafi, Feras Fawzi

    2017-01-13

    Pseudomonas punonensis strain D1-6 was isolated from roots of the desert plant Erodium hirtum, near the Dead Sea in Jordan. The genome of strain D1-6 reveals several key plant growth-promoting and herbicide-resistance genes, indicating a possible specialized role for this endophyte.

  12. CHARACTERIZATION AND NUCLEOTIDE SEQUENCE DETERMINATION OF A REPEAT ELEMENT ISOLATED FROM A 2,4,5,-T DEGRADING STRAIN OF PSEUDOMONAS CEPACIA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pseudomonas cepacia strain AC1100, capable of growth on 2,4,5-trichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4,5-T), was mutated to the 2,4,5-T− strain PT88 by a ColE1 :: Tn5 chromosomal insertion. Using cloned DNA from the region flanking the insertion, a 1477-bp sequence (designated RS1100) wa...

  13. Draft Genome Sequence of the Plant Growth–Promoting Pseudomonas punonensis Strain D1-6 Isolated from the Desert Plant Erodium hirtum in Jordan

    KAUST Repository

    Lafi, Feras Fawzi; AL Bladi, Maha Lafi Saleh; Salem, Nida M.; Al-Banna, Luma; Alam, Intikhab; Bajic, Vladimir B.; Hirt, Heribert; Saad, Maged

    2017-01-01

    Pseudomonas punonensis strain D1-6 was isolated from roots of the desert plant Erodium hirtum, near the Dead Sea in Jordan. The genome of strain D1-6 reveals several key plant growth-promoting and herbicide-resistance genes, indicating a possible specialized role for this endophyte.

  14. Evaluation of the biocontrol efficacy of a Serratia marcescens strain indigenous to tea rhizosphere for the management of root rot disease in tea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gargee Dhar Purkayastha

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study is to evaluate plant growth promoting and biocontrol efficacy of a Serratia marcescens strain ETR17 isolated from tea rhizosphere for the effective management of root rot disease in tea. Isolated bacterial culture ETR17 showed significant level of in vitro antagonism against nine different foliar and root pathogens of tea. The phenotypic and molecular characterization of ETR17 revealed the identity of the bacterium as Serratia marcescens. The bacterium was found to produce several hydrolytic enzymes like chitinase, protease, lipase, cellulase and plant growth promoting metabolites like IAA and siderophore. Scanning electron microscopic studies on the interaction zone between pathogen and antagonistic bacterial isolate revealed severe deformities in the fungal mycelia. Spectral analyses (LC-ESI-MS, UV-VIS spectrophotometry and HPLC and TLC indicated the presence of the antibiotics pyrrolnitrin and prodigiosin in the extracellular bacterial culture extracts. Biofilm formation by ETR17 on polystyrene surface was also observed. In vivo application of talc-based formulations prepared with the isolate ETR17 in tea plantlets under green house conditions revealed effective reduction of root-rot disease as well as plant growth promotion to a considerable extent. Viability studies with the ETR17 talc formulation showed the survivability of the isolate up to six months at room temperature. The sustenance of ETR17 (concentration of 8-9x108 cfu g-1 in the soil after the application of talc formulation was recorded by ELISA. Safety studies revealed that ETR17 did not produce hemolysin as observed in pathogenic Serratia strains. The biocontrol strain reported in this study can be used for field application in order to minimize the use of chemical fungicides for disease control in tea gardens.

  15. Evaluation of the biocontrol efficacy of a Serratia marcescens strain indigenous to tea rhizosphere for the management of root rot disease in tea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhar Purkayastha, Gargee; Mangar, Preeti; Saha, Aniruddha; Saha, Dipanwita

    2018-01-01

    The aim of the present study is to evaluate plant growth promoting and biocontrol efficacy of a Serratia marcescens strain ETR17 isolated from tea rhizosphere for the effective management of root rot disease in tea. Isolated bacterial culture ETR17 showed significant level of in vitro antagonism against nine different foliar and root pathogens of tea. The phenotypic and molecular characterization of ETR17 revealed the identity of the bacterium as Serratia marcescens. The bacterium was found to produce several hydrolytic enzymes like chitinase, protease, lipase, cellulase and plant growth promoting metabolites like IAA and siderophore. Scanning electron microscopic studies on the interaction zone between pathogen and antagonistic bacterial isolate revealed severe deformities in the fungal mycelia. Spectral analyses (LC-ESI-MS, UV-VIS spectrophotometry and HPLC) and TLC indicated the presence of the antibiotics pyrrolnitrin and prodigiosin in the extracellular bacterial culture extracts. Biofilm formation by ETR17 on polystyrene surface was also observed. In vivo application of talc-based formulations prepared with the isolate ETR17 in tea plantlets under green house conditions revealed effective reduction of root-rot disease as well as plant growth promotion to a considerable extent. Viability studies with the ETR17 talc formulation showed the survivability of the isolate up to six months at room temperature. The sustenance of ETR17 (concentration of 8-9x108 cfu g-1) in the soil after the application of talc formulation was recorded by ELISA. Safety studies revealed that ETR17 did not produce hemolysin as observed in pathogenic Serratia strains. The biocontrol strain reported in this study can be used for field application in order to minimize the use of chemical fungicides for disease control in tea gardens.

  16. Diversity and Abundance of Ice Nucleating Strains of Pseudomonas syringae in a Freshwater Lake in Virginia, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietsch, Renée B; Vinatzer, Boris A; Schmale, David G

    2017-01-01

    The bacterium Pseudomonas syringae is found in a variety of terrestrial and aquatic environments. Some strains of P. syringae express an ice nucleation protein (hereafter referred to as Ice+) allowing them to catalyze the heterogeneous freezing of water. Though P. syringae has been sampled intensively from freshwater sources in France, little is known about the genetic diversity of P. syringae in natural aquatic habitats in North America. We collected samples of freshwater from three different depths in Claytor Lake, Virginia, USA between November 2015 and June 2016. Samples were plated on non-selective medium (TSA) and on medium selective for Pseudomonas (KBC) and closely related species to estimate the total number of culturable bacteria and of Pseudomonas , respectively. A droplet freezing assay was used to screen colonies for the Ice+ phenotype. Ice+ colonies were then molecularly identified based on the cts (citrate synthase) gene and the 16S rDNA gene. Phylogenetic analysis of cts sequences showed a surprising diversity of phylogenetic subgroups of P. syringae . Frequencies of Ice+ isolates on P. syringae selective medium ranged from 0 to 15% per sample with the highest frequency being found in spring. Our work shows that freshwater lakes can be a significant reservoir of Ice+ P. syringae . Future work is needed to determine the contribution of P. syringae from freshwater lakes to the P. syringae populations present in the atmosphere and on plants and, in particular, if freshwater lakes could be an inoculum source of P. syringae -caused plant disease outbreaks.

  17. Pseudomonas fluorescens strain CL145A - a biopesticide for the control of zebra and quagga mussels (Bivalvia: Dreissenidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molloy, Daniel P; Mayer, Denise A; Gaylo, Michael J; Morse, John T; Presti, Kathleen T; Sawyko, Paul M; Karatayev, Alexander Y; Burlakova, Lyubov E; Laruelle, Franck; Nishikawa, Kimi C; Griffin, Barbara H

    2013-05-01

    Zebra mussels (Dreissena polymorpha) and quagga mussels (Dreissena rostriformis bugensis) are the "poster children" of high-impact aquatic invasive species. In an effort to develop an effective and environmentally acceptable method to control their fouling of raw-water conduits, we have investigated the potential use of bacteria and their natural metabolic products as selective biological control agents. An outcome of this effort was the discovery of Pseudomonas fluorescens strain CL145A - an environmental isolate that kills these dreissenid mussels by intoxication (i.e., not infection). In the present paper, we use molecular methods to reconfirm that CL145A is a strain of the species P. fluorescens, and provide a phylogenetic analysis of the strain in relation to other Pseudomonas spp. We also provide evidence that the natural product lethal to dreissenids is associated with the cell wall of P. fluorescens CL145A, is a heat-labile secondary metabolite, and has degradable toxicity within 24 h when applied to water. CL145A appears to be an unusual strain of P. fluorescens since it was the only one among the ten strains tested to cause high mussel mortality. Pipe trials conducted under once-through conditions indicated: (1) P. fluorescens CL145A cells were efficacious against both zebra and quagga mussels, with high mortalities achieved against both species, and (2) as long as the total quantity of bacterial cells applied during the entire treatment period was the same, similar mussel mortality could be achieved in treatments lasting 1.5-12.0 h, with longer treatment durations achieving lower mortalities. The efficacy data presented herein, in combination with prior demonstration of its low risk of non-target impact, indicate that P. fluorescens CL145A cells have significant promise as an effective and environmentally safe control agent against these invasive mussels. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis of multidrug-resistant and -sensitive strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa from a Malaysian hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thong, Kwai Lin; Lai, Kin Seng; Ganeswrie, R; Puthucheary, S D

    2004-10-01

    Over a period of 6 months from January to June 2002, an unusual increase in the isolation of highly resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains was observed in the various wards and intensive care units of a large general hospital in Johor Bahru, Malaysia. An equal number of multidrug resistant (MDR) and drug-susceptible strains were collected randomly from swabs, respiratory specimens, urine, blood, cerebral spinal fluid, and central venous catheters to determine the clonality and genetic variation of the strains. Macrorestriction analysis by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis showed that the 19 MDR strains were genetically very homogenous; the majority showed the dominant profile S1 (n = 10), the rest very closely related profiles S1a (n = 1), S2 (n = 4), and S2a (n = 3), indicating the endemicity of these strains. In contrast, the 19 drug-sensitive strains isolated during the same time period were genetically more diverse, showing 17 pulsed-field profiles (F = 0.50-1.00), and probably derived from the patients themselves. The presence of the MDR clone poses serious therapeutic problems as it may become endemic in the hospital and give rise to future clonal outbreaks. There is also the potential for wider geographical spread.

  19. Arsenic-contaminated soils. Genetically modified Pseudomonas spp. and their arsenic-phytoremediation potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sizova, O.I.; Kochetkov, V.V.; Validov, S.Z.; Boronin, A.M. [Inst. of Biochemistry and Physiology of Microorganisms, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Kosterin, P.V.; Lyubun, Y.V. [Inst. of Biochemistry and Physiology of Plants and Microorganisms, Russian Academy of Sciences, Saratov (Russian Federation)

    2002-07-01

    Sorghum was inoculated with Pseudomonas bacteria, including strains harboring an As-resistance plasmid, pBS3031, to enhance As-extraction by the plants. Pseudomonas strains (P. fluorescens 38a, P. putida 53a, and P. aureofaciens BS1393) were chosen because they are antagonistic to a wide range of phytopathogenic fungi and bacteria, and they can stimulate plant growth. The resistance of natural rhizospheric pseudomonads to sodium arsenite was assessed. Genetically modified Pseudomonas strains resistant to As(III)/As(V) were obtained via conjugation or transformation. The effects of the strains on the growth of sorghum on sodium-arsenite-containing soils were assessed. The conclusions from this study are: (1) It is possible to increase the survivability of sorghum growing in sodium-arsenite-containing soil by using rhizosphere pseudomonads. (2) The presence of pBS3031 offers the strains a certain selective advantage in arsenite-contaminated soil. (3) The presence of pBS3031 impairs plant growth, due to the As-resistance mechanism determined by this plasmid: the transformation of the less toxic arsenate into the more toxic, plant-root-available arsenite by arsenate reductase and the active removal of arsenite from bacterial cells. (4) Such a mechanism makes it possible to develop a bacteria-assisted phytoremediation technology for the cleanup of As-contaminated soils and is the only possible way of removing the soil-sorbed arsenates from the environment. (orig.)

  20. Genetic regulation of phenazine-1-carboxamide synthesis by Pseudomonas chlororaphis strain PCL1391

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Girard, Genevieve

    2006-01-01

    A general overview of regulation of secondary metabolism in Pseudomonas species is given in Chapter 1. Several approaches were combined to identify novel genes involved in the regulation of PCN synthesis and to study their interactions with other regulators. Site-directed mutagenesis was used to

  1. Development of a lipase fermentation process that uses a recombinant Pseudomonas alcaligenes strain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerritse, G; Hommes, R.W J; Quax, Wim

    Pseudomonas alcaligenes M-l secretes an alkaline lipase, which has excellent characteristics for the removal of fatty stains under modern washing conditions. A fed-batch fermentation process based on the secretion of the alkaline lipase from P. alcaligenes was developed. Due to the inability of P.

  2. Variation in hydrogen cyanide production between different strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gilchrist, F. J.; Alcock, A.; Belcher, J.; Brady, M.; Jones, A.; Smith, D.; Španěl, Patrik; Webb, K.; Lenney, W.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 38, č. 2 (2011), s. 409-414 ISSN 0903-1936 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : microbiology * pseudomonas aeruginosa Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 5.895, year: 2011

  3. Detection of Quorum Sensing Activity in the Multidrug-Resistant Clinical Isolate Pseudomonas aeruginosa Strain GB11

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huey Jia Cheng

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available A multidrug-resistant clinical bacteria strain GB11 was isolated from a wound swab on the leg of a patient. Identity of stain GB11 as Pseudomonas aeruginosa was validated by using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS. Detection of the production of signaling molecules, N-acylhomoserine lactones (AHLs, was conducted using three different bacterial biosensors. A total of four different AHLs were found to be produced by strain GB11, namely N-butyryl homoserine lactone (C4-HSL, N-hexanoylhomoserine lactone (C6-HSL, N-octanoyl homoserine lactone (C8-HSL and N-3-oxo-dodecanoylhomoserine lactone (3-oxo-C12-HSL using high resolution liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS. Of these detected AHLs, 3-oxo-C12-HSL was found to be the most abundant AHL produced by P. aeruginosa GB11.

  4. Co-existence of Rhizobia and Diverse Non-rhizobial Bacteria in the Rhizosphere and Nodules of Dalbergia odorifera Seedlings Inoculated with Bradyrhizobium elkanii, Rhizobium multihospitium–Like and Burkholderia pyrrocinia–Like Strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junkun Lu

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Rhizobia induce root nodules and fix atmospheric N2 for most legume species in exchange for carbon. However, the diverse endophytic non-rhizobial bacteria in legume nodules that co-exist with rhizobia are often ignored because they are difficult to cultivate using routine cultivation approaches. To enhance our understanding of the incidence and diversity of legume–bacteria associations, a high-throughput sequencing analysis of bacterial 16S rRNA genes was used to examine the bacterial community in the rhizospheres and root nodules of Dalbergia odorifera seedlings that were uninoculated or inoculated with Bradyrhizobium elkanii H255, Rhizobium multihospitium–like HT221, or Burkholderia pyrrocinia–like H022238, in two growth media (nitrogen [N]-supplied soil or N-omitted potting mix. Seedlings inoculated with Bradyrhizobium had significantly more nodules than seedlings in the other inoculation conditions, regardless of growth media. Using the 15N natural abundance method, it was shown that the inoculated plants had significantly higher N2 fixation efficiency (48–57% and specific nodule activity [269–313 μg N mg−1 of dry weight (dwt nodule] compared to the uninoculated plants (203 μg N mg−1 dwt nodule. The 16S rRNA gene analysis showed that there was generally a higher bacterial diversity in the rhizosphere than in the nodules in the corresponding condition. Both rhizobial inoculation and media status significantly altered the bacterial communities in the rhizospheres and nodules (P < 0.05, with the exception of the inoculated soil rhizospheres. Regarding non-rhizobial bacteria, three genera, i.e., Lactococcus, Bacillus, and Pseudomonas, were consistently enriched in the rhizosphere and Bradyrhizobium, Chloroplast norank (which belongs to Cyanobacteria, and Lactococcus were commonly found in the nodules. In contrast, common rhizobial genera (including Rhizobium, Mesorhizobium, and Burkholderia were only present in the nodules at low

  5. THE FORMATION OF BIOFILMS BY PSEUDOMONAS AERUGINOSA STRAINS, AND METHODS OF ITS CONTROL (REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarkis-Ivanova VV

    2017-03-01

    fission; development of preparations that block intercellular signaling (quorum sensing, and cause disconnection of cells from biofilm and their transition into plankton existence or resist pathogenicity factor expression. Nowadays the influence of certain physical factors on biological properties of biofilms is studied as well. At the present time the new technology that is photodynamic therapy is in intensive progress. Low intensity electromagnetic radiation has widespread application practically in all areas of medicine. In fact, under the influence of light emitting diode radiation metabolic and functional properties of biological system variety can be significantly changed. According to a number of investigators a direct method of light emitting diode radiation effect provides direct influence on cellular structure elements, moreover it has been proved that membrane structures of cell are the most sensitive to optical radiation effect. It was found that under influence of light emitting diode radiation a breakdown of daily biofilms with inhibition of plankton cells production capacity was observed. All the above allows to assess current problem of medical science and practice that is process of biofilm formation in microorganisms particularly in Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains. Analysis of literature sources shows practicability of research line of specific subject that is proved by crisis of antibiotic therapy observed for now and characterized not only by multitude of resistant microorganisms but also by absence of preparations and infection pathology therapeutic regimen that have assuring effectiveness and therefore search for alternative control methods is critical and challenging.

  6. Early Arabidopsis root hair growth stimulation by pathogenic strains of Pseudomonas syringae

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pečenková, Tamara; Janda, Martin; Ortmannová, Jitka; Hajná, Vladimíra; Stehlíková, Zuzana; Žárský, Viktor

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 120, č. 3 (2017), s. 437-446 ISSN 0305-7364 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA15-14886S; GA ČR GA14-09685S Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : Arabidopsis * dde2/ein2/pad4/sid2 * exocyst * Flg22 * Pseudomonas * Root hair * vesicle trafficking Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology OBOR OECD: Plant sciences, botany Impact factor: 4.041, year: 2016

  7. Phenotypic and Genotypic Comparison of Epidemic and Non-Epidemic Strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa from Individuals with Cystic Fibrosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Duong

    Full Text Available Epidemic strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa have been found worldwide among the cystic fibrosis (CF patient population. Using pulse-field gel electrophoresis, the Prairie Epidemic Strain (PES has recently been found in one-third of patients attending the Calgary Adult CF Clinic in Canada. Using multi-locus sequence typing, PES isolates from unrelated patients were found to consistently have ST192. Though most patients acquired PES prior to enrolling in the clinic, some patients were observed to experience strain replacement upon transitioning to the clinic whereby local non-epidemic P. aeruginosa isolates were displaced by PES. Here we genotypically and phenotypically compared PES to other P. aeruginosa epidemic strains (OES found around the world as well as local non-epidemic CF P. aeruginosa isolates in order to characterize PES. Since some epidemic strains are associated with worse clinical outcomes, we assessed the pathogenic potential of PES to determine if these isolates are virulent, shared properties with OES, and if its phenotypic properties may offer a competitive advantage in displacing local non-epidemic isolates during strain replacement. As such, we conducted a comparative analysis using fourteen phenotypic traits, including virulence factor production, biofilm formation, planktonic growth, mucoidy, and antibiotic susceptibility to characterize PES, OES, and local non-epidemic isolates. We observed that PES and OES could be differentiated from local non-epidemic isolates based on biofilm growth with PES isolates being more mucoid. Pairwise comparisons indicated that PES produced significantly higher levels of proteases and formed better biofilms than OES but were more susceptible to antibiotic treatment. Amongst five patients experiencing strain replacement, we found that super-infecting PES produced lower levels of proteases and elastases but were more resistant to antibiotics compared to the displaced non-epidemic isolates. This

  8. Occurrence of Ambler Class B Metallo-β-Lactamase Gene in Imipenem-Resistant Pseudomonas Aeruginosa Strains Isolated from Clinical Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeynab Golshani

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: 5TMetallo-β-lactamase (MBLs can hydrolyze a broad spectrum of beta-lactams, including penicillins, cephalosporins, and carbapenems. Genes encoding these enzymes are located on the plasmid that can easily be transferred to other bacteria. The aim of this study was to isolate and identify the Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains encoding VIM1 gene, in clinical samples, using the PCR technique. Materials and Methods: During a 4 month period, 100 strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa from clinical specimens were collected. Standard tests were performed to identify strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Resistance to antibiotics was examined and then the PCR was used to detect VIM1gene. Results:In this study, the highest rates of resistance to antibiotics, amikacin and cefotaxime was observed (65% and 62%, the lowest resistance to antibiotics piperacillin (48% and imipenem and cefepime with 55% resistance was reported. DDST method was performed for 37 strains for the MBl detection. Among the 37 isolate, 30 strains were MBL-producing with imipenem-EDTA method. Twelve strains (18% were carriers of VIM1 gene using the PCR method. Conclusion: In the present study, the prevalence of strains producing MBL genes in strains of hospitals is a growing trend; correct prescription of medications can prevent the spread of resistant pathogens. It is suggested that molecular methods for rapid detection of resistance genes can be used to prevent the spread of this genes.

  9. Isolation and identification of biosurfactant-producing strains from the genus Pseudomonas aeruginosa and antibacterial effects of biosurfactant production in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salman Ahmady-Asbchin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Biosurfactants are amphiphilic biological compounds produced extracellularly or as part of the cell membranes by a variety of microorganisms. Because of their use in various industries, they are of a particular importance. The aim of this study was to identify a strain of bacteria of the genus Pseudomonas aeruginosa biosurfactant producers. Materials and methods: In this study, different samples of oil, water and soil contaminated with oil were prepared. Hemolytic activity, emulsification activity and measurement of surface tension were used and selected strains were identified by biochemical tests. The nature and effect of antibacterial biosurfactant was evaluated for strain selection.Results: In this study, eighty eight bacterial strains were isolated. Twenty four strains were isolated from the isolated strains with hemolytic activity. Among which, 14 strains have emulsification activity more than 70% and at last four strains reached surface tension to be less than 40 mN/m. Selected strain based on biochemical tests was recognized as a Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The nature of biosurfactant was determined by TLC, and proved to be of glycolipid kind. Therefore, the produced biosurfactant of the selected strain had antibacterial activity against six bacterial infectious. Sensitive bacteria to the effects of biosurfactant extract of Pseudomonas aeruginosa83, was Staphylococcus aureus and the most resistant bacteria to these extract, was the Proteus mirabilis. The results of MIC, MBC showed that MIC of the extract in concentration of 63 and 125 mg/ml on Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus epidermidis and Staphylococcus aureus respectively. Also, the MBC were extract in concentration of 63 and 125mg/ml on Staphylococcus epidermidis and Staphylococcus aureus respectively.Discussion and conclusion: Pseudomonas aeruginosa had high potential in reducing the surface tension and biosurfactant extracted had high antibacterial effects. Therefore, it

  10. Polyclonal endemicity of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in a teaching hospital from Brazil: molecular typing of decade-old strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CMCB Fortaleza

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections cause significant mortality and morbidity in health care settings. Strategies to prevent and control the emergence and spread of P. aeruginosa within hospitals involve implementation of barrier methods and antimicrobial stewardship programs. However, there is still much debate over which of these measures holds the utmost importance. Molecular strain typing may help elucidate this issue. In our study, 71 nosocomial isolates from 41 patients and 23 community-acquired isolates from 21 patients were genotyped. Enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus-polymerase chain reaction (ERIC-PCR was performed. Band patterns were compared using similarity coefficients of Dice, Jaccard and simple matching. Strain similarity for nosocomial strains varied from 0.14 to 1.00 (Dice; 0.08 to 1.00 (Jaccard and 0.58 to 1.00 (simple matching. Forty patterns were identified. In most units, several clones coexisted. However, there was evidence of clonal dissemination in the high risk nursery, neurology and two surgical units. Each and every community-acquired strain produced a unique distinct pattern. Results suggest that cross transmission of P. aeruginosa was an uncommon event in our hospital. This points out to a minor role for barrier methods in the control of P. aeruginosa spread.

  11. Monitoring the persistence of a genetically modified strain of the Azorhizobium caulinodans in the rhizosphere of Triticum aestivum L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Jacek Slaski

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A protocol was developed to monitor persistence and spread of a genetically modified strain of the growth promoting diazotroph Azorhizobium caulinodans used to inoculate field grown wheat. The protocol was used to identify an endogluconase (egl overproducing strain of A. caulinodans isolated from inoculated soils. A detection limit of 2500 cfu g-1 and 108_1010cfu g-1 of soil was determined using the BIOLOG® fingerprinting method and PCR technique, respectively. Since none of the tested samples were positive for the bacteria or the Egl 1 gene construct, it was concluded that A. caulinodans ORS 571 pGV910-C1 did not persist or spread in any of the tested field locations. This result may be due to low soil temperatures and competition of indigenous microorganisms: environmental factors that were not favorable for the diazotroph to thrive in the test locations. The application of different inoculation methodologies, as well as the study of other rhizobial genera for the inoculation of wheat in further experiments, is strongly recommended. Key words: detection, diazotroph, endogluconase, ORS 571, wheat

  12. Molecular analysis of exotoxin A associated with antimicrobial resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains isolated from patients in Tehran hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nour Amirmozafari

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim:  Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a unique bacteria that in order to survive in different environments by complex adaptation process can make changes in his virulence genes expression and drug resistance. The aim of this research is the investigation of existence of a logical association between toxA gene and antibiotic resistance in strains possess the gene. Materials and Methods: Antibiogram test by disk diffusion method (Kirby Bauer was performed according to CLSI protocols. In this study, the existence of toxA gene with the help of polymerase chain reaction (PCR in 102 clinical isolates from blood samples, wound, urine and trachea was examined. Chi-square test was used to investigate the relationship between exotoxin A and antibiotic resistance. Results: The 81 strains (79.4% had toxA gene. Frequency of toxA genes in isolated strains from different infections were wound (91.4%, blood (85.7%, trachea (72.7%, and urine (42.1%. Multiple resistance index in strains possess the toxA gene was calculated 75%. Chi 2 test to determine the relationship between drug resistance and gene toxA was significant (P<0.05. Conclusions: The significant chi-square test and an increase in multi-resistant strains possessing the toxA gene, can represent a considerable genetic switch between exotoxin A activity and resistance to antibiotics in the blood, urine, tracheal, wound infections Respectively, which lead to turn genes on of drug resistance regulating in bacteria. The results of this study will be verified by southern blot, analysis of the expression of toxA gene and determine the mechanism of resistance in resistant strains Methods.

  13. Characterization of a Pyrethroid-Degrading Pseudomonas fulva Strain P31 and Biochemical Degradation Pathway of D-Phenothrin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingjing Yang

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available D-phenothrin is one of the most popular pyrethroid insecticides for its broad spectrum and high insecticidal activity. However, continuous use of D-phenothrin has resulted in serious environmental contamination and raised public concern about its impact on human health. Biodegradation of D-phenothrin has never been investigated and its metabolic behaviors remain unknown. Here, a novel bacterial strain P31 was isolated from active sludge, which completely degraded (100% D-phenothrin at 50 mg⋅L-1 in 72 h. Based on the morphology, 16S rRNA gene and Biolog tests, the strain was identified as Pseudomonas fulva. Biodegradation conditions were optimized as 29.5°C and pH 7.3 by utilizing response surface methodology. Strain P31 depicted high tolerance and strong D-phenothrin degradation ability through hydrolysis pathway. Strain P31 degraded D-phenothrin at inhibition constant (Ki of 482.1673 mg⋅L-1 and maximum specific degradation constant (qmax of 0.0455 h-1 whereas critical inhibitor concentration remained as 41.1189 mg⋅L-1. The 3-Phenoxybenzaldehyde and 1,2-benzenedicarboxylic butyl dacyl ester were identified as the major intermediate metabolites of D-phenothrin degradation pathway through high-performance liquid chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Bioaugmentation of D-phenothrin-contaminated soils with strain P31 dramatically enhanced its degradation, and over 75% of D-phenothrin was removed from soils within 10 days. Moreover, the strain illustrated a remarkable capacity to degrade other synthetic pyrethroids, including permethrin, cyhalothrin, β-cypermethrin, deltamethrin, fenpropathrin, and bifenthrin, exhibiting great potential in bioremediation of pyrethroid-contaminated environment.

  14. Plant growth promotion properties of bacterial strains isolated from the rhizosphere of the Jerusalem artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus L.) adapted to saline-alkaline soils and their effect on wheat growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaolin; Li, Xiangyue; Li, Yan; Li, Runzhi; Xie, Zhihong

    2017-03-01

    The Jerusalem artichoke (JA; Helianthus tuberosus), known to be tolerant to saline-alkaline soil conditions, has been cultivated for many years in the Yellow River delta, Shandong Province coastal zone, in China. The aim of our study was to isolate nitrogen-fixing bacteria colonizing the rhizosphere of JA and to characterize other plant growth promotion properties. The ultimate goal was to identify isolates that could be used as inoculants benefiting an economic crop, in particular for improving wheat growth production in the Yellow River delta. Bacterial strains were isolated from the rhizosphere soil of JA on the basis of growth on nitrogen-free Ashby medium. Identification and phylogenetic analysis was performed after nucleotide sequencing of 16S rRNA gene. Plant-growth-promoting traits, such as nitrogen fixation activity, phosphate solubilization activity, indole-3-acetic acid production, were determined using conventional methods. Eleven strains were isolated and 6 of them were further examined for their level of salt tolerance and their effect on plant growth promotion. Inoculation of Enterobacter sp. strain N10 on JA and wheat led to significant increases in both root and shoot dry mass and shoot height. Enterobacter sp. strain N10 appeared to be the best plant-growth-promoting rhizobacteria to increase wheat productivity in future field applications.

  15. Comparative genomic analysis of four representative plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria in Pseudomonas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Some Pseudomonas strains function as predominant plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR). Within this group, Pseudomonas chlororaphis and Pseudomonas fluorescens are non-pathogenic biocontrol agents, and some Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Pseudomonas stutzeri strains are PGPR. P. chlororaphis GP72 is a plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium with a fully sequenced genome. We conducted a genomic analysis comparing GP72 with three other pseudomonad PGPR: P. fluorescens Pf-5, P. aeruginosa M18, and the nitrogen-fixing strain P. stutzeri A1501. Our aim was to identify the similarities and differences among these strains using a comparative genomic approach to clarify the mechanisms of plant growth-promoting activity. Results The genome sizes of GP72, Pf-5, M18, and A1501 ranged from 4.6 to 7.1 M, and the number of protein-coding genes varied among the four species. Clusters of Orthologous Groups (COGs) analysis assigned functions to predicted proteins. The COGs distributions were similar among the four species. However, the percentage of genes encoding transposases and their inactivated derivatives (COG L) was 1.33% of the total genes with COGs classifications in A1501, 0.21% in GP72, 0.02% in Pf-5, and 0.11% in M18. A phylogenetic analysis indicated that GP72 and Pf-5 were the most closely related strains, consistent with the genome alignment results. Comparisons of predicted coding sequences (CDSs) between GP72 and Pf-5 revealed 3544 conserved genes. There were fewer conserved genes when GP72 CDSs were compared with those of A1501 and M18. Comparisons among the four Pseudomonas species revealed 603 conserved genes in GP72, illustrating common plant growth-promoting traits shared among these PGPR. Conserved genes were related to catabolism, transport of plant-derived compounds, stress resistance, and rhizosphere colonization. Some strain-specific CDSs were related to different kinds of biocontrol activities or plant growth promotion. The GP72 genome

  16. [Persistence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains in patients of Federal Scientific Center of Transplantology and Artificial Organs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avetisian, L R; Voronina, O L; Chernukha, M Iu; Kunda, M S; Gabrielian, N I; Lunin, V G; Shaginian, I A

    2012-01-01

    Study genetic diversity of P. aeruginosa strains persisting in patients of Federal Scientific Center of Transplantology and Artificial Organs, and main factors facilitating persistence of strains in the hospital. 136 P. aeruginosa strains isolated from patients of the center for 3 years 6 months were genotyped by RAPD-PCR and MLST methods and studied for antibiotics resistance and presence of integrons. Genetic diversity of strains persisting in hospital was established. Strains of main genotypes ST235, ST446, ST598 were isolated from patients of various surgical departments. Patients were shown to be colonized by these strains during stay in reanimation and intensive therapy department (RITD) of the hospital. Strains of dominant genotype 235 were isolated from 47% of examined patients during more than 3 years. Only genotype 235 strains contained integron with cassettes of antibiotics resistance genes blaGES5 and aadA6 in the genome. The data obtained show that over the period of observation in the center 1 clone of P. aeruginosa that belonged to genotype 235 dominated. This clone was endemic for this hospital and in the process of prolonged persistence became more resistant to antibiotics. Colonization of patients with these strains occurs in RITD. This confirms the necessity of constant monitoring of hospital microflora for advance detection of potentially dangerous epidemic hospital strains able to cause hospital infections.

  17. Exposure-related effects of Pseudomonas fluorescens, strain CL145A, on coldwater, coolwater, and warmwater fish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luoma, James A.; Weber, Kerry L.; Denise A. Mayer,

    2015-01-01

    The exposure-related effects of a commercially prepared spray-dried powder (SDP) formulation of Pseudomonas fluorescens, strain CL145A, were evaluated on coldwater, coolwater, and warmwater fish endemic to the Great Lakes and Upper Mississippi River Basins. Nine species of young-of-the-year fish were exposed to SDP for 24 hours by using continuous-flow, serial-dilution exposure systems at temperatures of 12 degrees Celsius (°C; 2 species; Oncorhynchus mykiss [rainbow trout] and Salvelinus fontinalis [brook trout]), 17 °C (3 species; Perca flavescens [yellow perch], Sander vitreus [walleye], and Acipenser fulvescens [lake sturgeon]), or 22 °C (4 species; Micropterus salmoides [largemouth bass], Micropterus dolomieu [smallmouth bass], Lepomis macrochirus [bluegill sunfish], and Ictalurus punctatus [channel catfish]).

  18. Study of anti mutagenic and mutagenic effect of different chemicals on clinically isolated strains of pseudomonas aeruginosa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qureshi, A.M.; Durrani, F.; Janjua, M.

    1994-01-01

    This project was undertaken to study the effect of twelve different compounds to test their anti mutagenic and mutagenic activity against clinically isolated strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The effect of these compounds was estimated by counting the number of rifampicin resistant colonies growing in a particular time in a compound. The results were interpreted by plotting graphs between 10g N/NO (Rif R Colonies/ ml) and time to estimate the forward mutation rat. The results revealed that acridine, Basic fuchsin, Caffeine, cycloheximide, Ethidium bromide and Histidine probably have an anti mutagenic effect, while Cysteine, folic acid, Ethyl methane, suplphonate, Manganous Chloride and N-nitrosodietylamine acted as mutagen. Ecoli was used as control through out the study. (author)

  19. Effects of Organic Solvents on Indigo Formation by Pseudomonas sp. strain ST-200 Grown with High Levels of Indole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doukyu, N; Arai, T; Aono, R

    1998-01-01

    The indole tolerance level of Pseudomonas sp. strain ST-200 was 0.25 mg/ml. The level was raised to 4 mg/ml when diphenylmethane was added to the medium to 20% by volume. ST-200 grown in this two-phase culture system containing indole (1 mg/ml) and diphenylmethane (0.2 ml/ml) produced a water-soluble yellow pigment, isatic acid, and two water-insoluble and diphenylmethane-soluble pigments, blue indigo and purple indirubin. The amounts of the water-insoluble pigments corresponded to 0.5% (indigo) and 0.2% (indirubin) of the indole added to the medium. Of the conditions tried, indigo and indirubin were formed only when ST-200 was grown in the two-phase system overlaid with organic solvents with appropriate polarity.

  20. Exposure-related effects of formulated Pseudomonas fluorescens strain CL145A to glochidia from seven unionid mussel species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luoma, James A.; Weber, Kerry L.; Severson, Todd J.; Schreier, Theresa M.; Mayer, Denise A.; Aloisi, Douglas B.; Eckert, Nathan L.

    2015-01-01

    The study was completed to evaluate the exposure-related effects of a biopesticide for dreissenid mussel (Dreissena polymorpha, zebra mussel and Dreissena rostriformis bugensis, quagga mussel) control on glochidia from unionid mussels endemic to the Great Lakes and Upper Mississippi River Basins. The commercially prepared biopesticide was either a spray-dried powder (SDP) or freeze-dried powder (FDP) formulation of Pseudomonas fluorescens, strain CL145A. Glochidia of the unionid mussel species Lampsilis cardium, Lampsilis siliquoidea,Lampsilis higginsii, Ligumia recta, Obovaria olivaria, and Actinonaias ligamentina were exposed to SDP-formulated P. fluorescens andLampsilis cardium and Megalonaias nervosa were exposed to FDP-formulated P. fluorescens.

  1. Genome Sequence of Pseudomonas sp. Strain Chol1, a Model Organism for the Degradation of Bile Salts and Other Steroid Compounds

    KAUST Repository

    Holert, Johannes; Alam, Intikhab; Larsen, Michael; Antunes, Andre; Bajic, Vladimir B.; Stingl, Ulrich; Philipp, Bodo

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial degradation of steroid compounds is of high ecological and biotechnological relevance. Pseudomonas sp. strain Chol1 is a model organism for studying the degradation of the steroid compound cholate. Its draft genome sequence is presented and reveals one gene cluster responsible for the metabolism of steroid compounds.

  2. NUCLEOTIDE SEQUENCING AND TRANSCRIPTIONAL MAPPING OF THE GENES ENCODING BIPHENYL DIOXYGENASE, A MULTICOM- PONENT POLYCHLORINATED-BIPHENYL-DEGRADING ENZYME IN PSEUDOMONAS STRAIN LB400

    Science.gov (United States)

    The DNA region encoding biphenyl dioxygenase, the first enzyme in the biphenyl-polychlorinated biphenyl degradation pathway of Pseudomonas species strain LB400, was sequenced. Six open reading frames were identified, four of which are homologous to the components of toluene dioxy...

  3. Genome Sequence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Strain DK1-NH57388A, a Stable Mucoid Cystic Fibrosis Isolate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norman, Anders; Ciofu, Oana; Amador Hierro, Cristina Isabel

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an important opportunistic pathogen associated with chronic pulmonary infections and mortality in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. Here, we present the complete genome sequence of stable mucoid P. aeruginosa strain DK1-NH57388A, a CF isolate which has previously been used ...

  4. Genome Sequence of Pseudomonas sp. Strain Chol1, a Model Organism for the Degradation of Bile Salts and Other Steroid Compounds

    KAUST Repository

    Holert, Johannes

    2013-01-15

    Bacterial degradation of steroid compounds is of high ecological and biotechnological relevance. Pseudomonas sp. strain Chol1 is a model organism for studying the degradation of the steroid compound cholate. Its draft genome sequence is presented and reveals one gene cluster responsible for the metabolism of steroid compounds.

  5. Identification and characterization of an N-acylhomoserine lactone-dependent quorum-sensing system in Pseudomonas putida strain IsoF

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steidle, A.; Allesen-Holm, M.; Riedel, K.

    2002-01-01

    Recent reports have shown that several strains of Pseudomonas putida produce N-acylhomoserine lactones (AHLs). These signal molecules enable bacteria to coordinately express certain phenotypic traits in a density-dependent manner in a process referred to as quorum sensing. In this study we have...

  6. Draft Genome Sequence of the Phosphate-Solubilizing Bacterium Pseudomonas argentinensis Strain SA190 Isolated from the Desert Plant Indigofera argentea

    KAUST Repository

    Lafi, Feras Fawzi

    2016-12-23

    Pseudomonas argentinensis strain SA190 is a plant endophytic-inhabiting bacterium that was isolated from root nodules of the desert plant Indigofera argentea collected from the Jizan region of Saudi Arabia. Here, we report the genome sequence of SA190, highlighting several functional genes related to plant growth-promoting activity, environment adaption, and antifungal activity.

  7. Membrane-aerated biofilm reactor for the removal of 1,2-dichloroethane by Pseudomonas sp. strain DCA1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hage, J C; Van Houten, R T; Tramper, J; Hartmans, S

    2004-06-01

    A membrane-aerated biofilm reactor (MBR) with a biofilm of Pseudomonas sp. strain DCA1 was studied for the removal of 1,2-dichloroethane (DCA) from water. A hydrophobic membrane was used to create a barrier between the liquid and the gas phase. Inoculation of the MBR with cells of strain DCA1 grown in a continuous culture resulted in the formation of a stable and active DCA-degrading biofilm on the membrane. The maximum removal rate of the MBR was reached at a DCA concentration of approximately 80 micro M. Simulation of the DCA fluxes into the biofilm showed that the MBR performance at lower concentrations was limited by the DCA diffusion rate rather than by kinetic constraints of strain DCA1. Aerobic biodegradation of DCA present in anoxic water could be achieved by supplying oxygen solely from the gas phase to the biofilm grown on the liquid side of the membrane. As a result, direct aeration of the water, which leads to undesired coagulation of iron oxides, could be avoided.

  8. In-vivo expression profiling of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections reveals niche-specific and strain-independent transcriptional programs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr Bielecki

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a threatening, opportunistic pathogen causing disease in immunocompromised individuals. The hallmark of P. aeruginosa virulence is its multi-factorial and combinatorial nature. It renders such bacteria infectious for many organisms and it is often resistant to antibiotics. To gain insights into the physiology of P. aeruginosa during infection, we assessed the transcriptional programs of three different P. aeruginosa strains directly after isolation from burn wounds of humans. We compared the programs to those of the same strains using two infection models: a plant model, which consisted of the infection of the midrib of lettuce leaves, and a murine tumor model, which was obtained by infection of mice with an induced tumor in the abdomen. All control conditions of P. aeruginosa cells growing in suspension and as a biofilm were added to the analysis. We found that these different P. aeruginosa strains express a pool of distinct genetic traits that are activated under particular infection conditions regardless of their genetic variability. The knowledge herein generated will advance our understanding of P. aeruginosa virulence and provide valuable cues for the definition of prospective targets to develop novel intervention strategies.

  9. Chemotaxis and degradation of organophosphate compound by a novel moderately thermo-halo tolerant Pseudomonas sp. strain BUR11: evidence for possible existence of two pathways for degradation

    OpenAIRE

    Pailan, Santanu; Saha, Pradipta

    2015-01-01

    An organophosphate (OP) degrading chemotactic bacterial strain BUR11 isolated from an agricultural field was identified as a member of Pseudomonas genus on the basis of its 16S rRNA gene sequence. The strain could utilize parathion, chlorpyrifos and their major hydrolytic intermediates as sole source of carbon for its growth and exhibited positive chemotactic response towards most of them. Optimum concentration of parathion for its growth was recorded to be 200 ppm and 62% of which was degrad...

  10. Identification and characterization of rhizospheric microbial diversity by 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Naveed

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, samples of rhizosphere and root nodules were collected from different areas of Pakistan to isolate plant growth promoting rhizobacteria. Identification of bacterial isolates was made by 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis and taxonomical confirmation on EzTaxon Server. The identified bacterial strains were belonged to 5 genera i.e. Ensifer, Bacillus, Pseudomona, Leclercia and Rhizobium. Phylogenetic analysis inferred from 16S rRNA gene sequences showed the evolutionary relationship of bacterial strains with the respective genera. Based on phylogenetic analysis, some candidate novel species were also identified. The bacterial strains were also characterized for morphological, physiological, biochemical tests and glucose dehydrogenase (gdh gene that involved in the phosphate solublization using cofactor pyrroloquinolone quinone (PQQ. Seven rhizoshperic and 3 root nodulating stains are positive for gdh gene. Furthermore, this study confirms a novel association between microbes and their hosts like field grown crops, leguminous and non-leguminous plants. It was concluded that a diverse group of bacterial population exist in the rhizosphere and root nodules that might be useful in evaluating the mechanisms behind plant microbial interactions and strains QAU-63 and QAU-68 have sequence similarity of 97 and 95% which might be declared as novel after further taxonomic characterization.

  11. [Nah-plasmids of IncP-9 group from natural strains of Pseudomonas].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levchuk, A A; Bulyga, I M; Izmalkova, T Iu; Sevast'ianovich, Ia R; Kosheleva, I A; Thomas, C M; Titok, M A

    2006-01-01

    Use of polymerase chain reaction helped to establish that the most frequent among naphthalene utilizing bacteria, isolated on the territory of Belarus, are Nah-plasmids of IncP-9 incompatibility group and those with indefinite systematic belonging. With the help of classical test of incompatibility, restriction and sequence analyses three new subgroups within the IncP-9 group were discovered (zeta, eta and IncP-9-like replicons). Conducting of restriction analysis for amplification products of nahG and nahAc genes allowed us to reveal, in addition to known sequences of stated determinants, two new types of nahG gene. Restriction analysis performed on amplification products of 16S RNA genes (ARDRA method) showed that native hosts of Nah-plasmids of IncP-9 group are not only fluorescent bacteria from genus Pseudomonas (P. fluorescens, P. putida, P. aeruginosa, P. species), but also non-fluorescent bacteria with indefinite specific belonging.

  12. Chromosomal insertion of the entire Escherichia coli lactose operon, into two strains of Pseudomonas, using a modified mini-Tn5 delivery system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, L. H.; Sørensen, S. J.; Jensen, Lars Bogø

    1997-01-01

    A 12-kb PstI fragment including the entire E. coli lactose operon (lacIPOZYA) was inserted in one copy into the chromosome of Pseudomonas putida, Pseudomonas fluorescens and an E. coli strain with lac(-) phenotype. This was made possible by improvements of an already existing mini-Tn5 transposon...... flanked by NotI sites needed in the mini-Tn5 delivery system; (b) the generation of E. coli nonlysogenic strains expressing the pi protein thus being capable of maintaining and delivering R6K-based mini-Tn5 vectors to other E. coli strains; (c) the successful insertion of the E. coli lactose operon...... into the P. fluorescens chromosome giving P. fluorescens the ability to grow on lactose; (d) evidence from Southern blotting that contradicts the assumption that the mini-Tn5 delivery system always creates one-copy inserts. These improvements allow insertion of large DNA fragments encoding highly expressed...

  13. Systemic resistance and lipoxygenase-related defence response induced in tomato by Pseudomonas putida strain BTP1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dommes Jacques

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous studies showed the ability of Pseudomonas putida strain BTP1 to promote induced systemic resistance (ISR in different host plants. Since ISR is long-lasting and not conducive for development of resistance of the targeted pathogen, this phenomenon can take part of disease control strategies. However, in spite of the numerous examples of ISR induced by PGPR in plants, only a few biochemical studies have associated the protective effect with specific host metabolic changes. Results In this study, we showed the protective effect of this bacterium in tomato against Botrytis cinerea. Following treatment by P. putida BTP1, analyses of acid-hydrolyzed leaf extracts showed an accumulation of antifungal material after pathogen infection. The fungitoxic compounds thus mainly accumulate as conjugates from which active aglycones may be liberated through the activity of hydrolytic enzymes. These results suggest that strain BTP1 can elicit systemic phytoalexin accumulation in tomato as one defence mechanism. On another hand, we have shown that key enzymes of the lipoxygenase pathway are stimulated in plants treated with the bacteria as compared with control plants. Interestingly, this stimulation is observed only after pathogen challenge in agreement with the priming concept almost invariably associated with the ISR phenomenon. Conclusion Through the demonstration of phytoalexin accumulation and LOX pathway stimulation in tomato, this work provides new insights into the diversity of defence mechanisms that are inducible by non-pathogenic bacteria in the context of ISR.

  14. Association and Expression of Virulence from Plasmids of the Group B Strain in Pseudomonas syringae pv. eriobotryae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tran Dang Khanh

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas syringae pv. eriobotryae causes serious stem canker in loquat (Eriobotrya japonica trees. This study was conducted to determine whether plasmids are involved with its virulence. The strain NAE89, which belonged to the B group, harbored two plasmids at approximately 6.2 and 50 Mdal that caused stem canker and halo leaf spots on loquat plants. Following digestion with BamHI and ligation into the BamHI cloning site of the broad range host cosmid pLAFR3, four DNA fragments at 3.8, 6.6, 12.3, and 22.8 kb were generated. Although the plasmid-encoded virulence gene psvA was undigested with the BamHI, the halo leaf spot gene may be adjacent to the psvA gene was digested. A pLAFR3 cosmid clone was introduced into the non-pathogenic PE0 and NAE89-1 strains by triparental matings and the pathogenicity was recovered. As a result, the pLAFR3 cosmid clone was introduced into the largest size DNA fragment of 22.8 kb and determined to be the causal agent of canker on the stem of the loquat. This study revealed that the psvA gene, previously found in the 50 Mdal plasmid, was also observed in the 22.8 kb DNA fragment.

  15. Unexpected diversity in the mobilome of a Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain isolated from a dental unit waterline revealed by SMRT Sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Antony T; Charette, Steve J; Barbeau, Jean

    2018-05-01

    The Gram-negative bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa is found in several habitats, both natural and human-made, and is particularly known for its recurrent presence as a pathogen in the lungs of patients suffering from cystic fibrosis, a genetic disease. Given its clinical importance, several major studies have investigated the genomic adaptation of P. aeruginosa in lungs and its transition as acute infections become chronic. However, our knowledge about the diversity and adaptation of the P. aeruginosa genome to non-clinical environments is still fragmentary, in part due to the lack of accurate reference genomes of strains from the numerous environments colonized by the bacterium. Here, we used PacBio long-read technology to sequence the genome of PPF-1, a strain of P. aeruginosa isolated from a dental unit waterline. Generating this closed genome was an opportunity to investigate genomic features that are difficult to accurately study in a draft genome (contigs state). It was possible to shed light on putative genomic islands, some shared with other reference genomes, new prophages, and the complete content of insertion sequences. In addition, four different group II introns were also found, including two characterized here and not listed in the specialized group II intron database.

  16. Inhibitory effect of Thymus vulgaris and Origanum vulgare essential oils on virulence factors of phytopathogenic Pseudomonas syringae strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carezzano, M E; Sotelo, J P; Primo, E; Reinoso, E B; Paletti Rovey, M F; Demo, M S; Giordano, W F; Oliva, M de Las M

    2017-07-01

    Pseudomonas syringae is a phytopathogenic bacterium that causes lesions in leaves during the colonisation process. The damage is associated with production of many virulence factors, such as biofilm and phytotoxins. The essential oils of Thymus vulgaris (thyme) and Origanum vulgare (oregano) have been demonstrated to inhibit P. syringae. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of T. vulgaris and O. vulgare essential oils on production of virulence factors of phytopathogenic P. syringae strains, including anti-biofilm and anti-toxins activities. The broth microdilution method was used for determination of MIC and biofilm inhibition assays. Coronatine, syringomycin and tabtoxin were pheno- and genotypically evaluated. Both oils showed good inhibitory activity against P. syringae, with MIC values from 1.43 to 11.5 mg·ml -1 for thyme and 5.8 to 11.6 mg·ml -1 for oregano. Biofilm formation, production of coronatine, syringomycin and tabtoxin were inhibited by thyme and oregano essential oil in most strains. The results presented here are promising, demonstrating the bactericidal activity and reduction of virulence factor production after treatment with thyme and oregano oil, providing insight into how they exert their antibacterial activity. These natural products could be considered in the future for the control of diseases caused by P. syringae. © 2017 German Botanical Society and The Royal Botanical Society of the Netherlands.

  17. Diversity of Pseudomonas Genomes, Including Populus-Associated Isolates, as Revealed by Comparative Genome Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, Se-Ran; Wassenaar, Trudy M; Nookaew, Intawat; Hauser, Loren; Wanchai, Visanu; Land, Miriam; Timm, Collin M; Lu, Tse-Yuan S; Schadt, Christopher W; Doktycz, Mitchel J; Pelletier, Dale A; Ussery, David W

    2016-01-01

    The Pseudomonas genus contains a metabolically versatile group of organisms that are known to occupy numerous ecological niches, including the rhizosphere and endosphere of many plants. Their diversity influences the phylogenetic diversity and heterogeneity of these communities. On the basis of average amino acid identity, comparative genome analysis of >1,000 Pseudomonas genomes, including 21 Pseudomonas strains isolated from the roots of native Populus deltoides (eastern cottonwood) trees resulted in consistent and robust genomic clusters with phylogenetic homogeneity. All Pseudomonas aeruginosa genomes clustered together, and these were clearly distinct from other Pseudomonas species groups on the basis of pangenome and core genome analyses. In contrast, the genomes of Pseudomonas fluorescens were organized into 20 distinct genomic clusters, representing enormous diversity and heterogeneity. Most of our 21 Populus-associated isolates formed three distinct subgroups within the major P. fluorescens group, supported by pathway profile analysis, while two isolates were more closely related to Pseudomonas chlororaphis and Pseudomonas putida. Genes specific to Populus-associated subgroups were identified. Genes specific to subgroup 1 include several sensory systems that act in two-component signal transduction, a TonB-dependent receptor, and a phosphorelay sensor. Genes specific to subgroup 2 contain hypothetical genes, and genes specific to subgroup 3 were annotated with hydrolase activity. This study justifies the need to sequence multiple isolates, especially from P. fluorescens, which displays the most genetic variation, in order to study functional capabilities from a pangenomic perspective. This information will prove useful when choosing Pseudomonas strains for use to promote growth and increase disease resistance in plants. Copyright © 2015 Jun et al.

  18. Preparation, characterization and in vitro antimicrobial activity of liposomal ceftazidime and cefepime against Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Ieda Maria Sapateiro; Bento, Etiene Barbosa; Almeida, Larissa da Cunha; de Sá, Luisa Zaiden Carvalho Martins; Lima, Eliana Martins

    2012-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic microorganism with the ability to respond to a wide variety of environmental changes, exhibiting a high intrinsic resistance to a number of antimicrobial agents. This low susceptibility to antimicrobial substances is primarily due to the low permeability of its outer membrane, efflux mechanisms and the synthesis of enzymes that promote the degradation of these drugs. Cephalosporins, particularty ceftazidime and cefepime are effective against P. aeruginosa, however, its increasing resistance has limited the usage of these antibiotics. Encapsulating antimicrobial drugs into unilamellar liposomes is an approach that has been investigated in order to overcome microorganism resistance. In this study, antimicrobial activity of liposomal ceftazidime and cefepime against P. aeruginosa ATCC 27853 and P. aeruginosa SPM-1 was compared to that of the free drugs. Liposomal characterization included diameter, encapsulation efficiency and stability. Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) was determined for free and liposomal forms of both drugs. Minimum Bactericidal Concentration (MBC) was determined at concentrations 1, 2 and 4 times MIC. Average diameter of liposomes was 131.88 nm and encapsulation efficiency for cefepime and ceftazidime were 2.29% end 5.77%, respectively. Improved stability was obtained when liposome formulations were prepared with a 50% molar ratio for cholesterol in relation to the phospholipid. MIC for liposomal antibiotics for both drugs were 50% lower than that of the free drug, demonstrating that liposomal drug delivery systems may contribute to increase the antibacterial activity of these drugs. PMID:24031917

  19. Comparing insertion libraries in two Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains to assess gene essentiality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liberati, Nicole T; Urbach, Jonathan M; Thurber, Tara K; Wu, Gang; Ausubel, Frederick M

    2008-01-01

    Putative essential genes can be identified by comparing orthologs not disrupted in multiple near-saturated transposon insertion mutation libraries in related strains of the same bacterial species. Methods for identifying all orthologs between two bacterial strains and putative essential orthologs are described. In addition, protocols detailing near-saturation transposon insertion mutagenesis of bacteria are presented, including (1) conjugation-mediated mutagenesis, (2) automated colony picking and liquid handling of mutant cultures, and (3) arbitrary polymerase chain reaction amplification and sequencing of genomic DNA adjacent to transposon insertion sites.

  20. Crude petroleum-oil biodegradation efficiency of Bacillus subtilis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains isolated from a petroleum-oil contaminated soil from North-East India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Kishore; Mukherjee, Ashis K

    2007-05-01

    The efficiency of Bacillus subtilis DM-04 and Pseudomonas aeruginosa M and NM strains isolated from a petroleum contaminated soil sample from North-East India was compared for the biodegradation of crude petroleum-oil hydrocarbons in soil and shake flask study. These bacterial strains could utilize crude petroleum-oil hydrocarbons as sole source of carbon and energy. Bioaugmentation of TPH contaminated microcosm with P. aeruginosa M and NM consortia and B. subtilis strain showed a significant reduction of TPH levels in treated soil as compared to control soil at the end of experiment (120 d). P. aeruginosa strains were more efficient than B. subtilis strain in reducing the TPH content from the medium. The plate count technique indicated expressive growth and biosurfactant production by exogenously seeded bacteria in crude petroleum-oil rich soil. The results showed that B. subtilis DM-04 and P. aeruginosa M and NM strains could be effective for in situ bioremediation.

  1. Colonization of lettuce rhizosphere and roots by tagged Streptomyces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria eBonaldi

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Beneficial microorganisms are increasingly used in agriculture, but their efficacy often fails due to limited knowledge of their interactions with plants and other microorganisms present in rhizosphere. We studied spatio-temporal colonization dynamics of lettuce roots and rhizosphere by genetically modified Streptomyces spp. Five Streptomyces strains, strongly inhibiting in vitro the major soil-borne pathogen of horticultural crops, Sclerotinia sclerotiorum, were transformed with pIJ8641 plasmid harboring an enhanced green fluorescent protein marker and resistance to apramycin. The fitness of transformants was compared to the wild-type strains and all of them grew and sporulated at similar rates and retained the production of enzymes and selected secondary metabolites as well as in vitro inhibition of S. sclerotiorum. The tagged ZEA17I strain was selected to study the dynamics of lettuce roots and rhizosphere colonization in non-sterile growth substrate. The transformed strain was able to colonize soil, developing roots and rhizosphere. When the strain was inoculated directly on the growth substrate, significantly more t-ZEA17I was re-isolated both from the rhizosphere and the roots when compared to the amount obtained after seed coating. The re-isolation from the rhizosphere and the inner tissues of surface-sterilized lettuce roots demonstrated that t-ZEA17I is both rhizospheric and endophytic.

  2. Colonization of lettuce rhizosphere and roots by tagged Streptomyces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonaldi, Maria; Chen, Xiaoyulong; Kunova, Andrea; Pizzatti, Cristina; Saracchi, Marco; Cortesi, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Beneficial microorganisms are increasingly used in agriculture, but their efficacy often fails due to limited knowledge of their interactions with plants and other microorganisms present in rhizosphere. We studied spatio-temporal colonization dynamics of lettuce roots and rhizosphere by genetically modified Streptomyces spp. Five Streptomyces strains, strongly inhibiting in vitro the major soil-borne pathogen of horticultural crops, Sclerotinia sclerotiorum, were transformed with pIJ8641 plasmid harboring an enhanced green fluorescent protein marker and resistance to apramycin. The fitness of transformants was compared to the wild-type strains and all of them grew and sporulated at similar rates and retained the production of enzymes and selected secondary metabolites as well as in vitro inhibition of S. sclerotiorum. The tagged ZEA17I strain was selected to study the dynamics of lettuce roots and rhizosphere colonization in non-sterile growth substrate. The transformed strain was able to colonize soil, developing roots, and rhizosphere. When the strain was inoculated directly on the growth substrate, significantly more t-ZEA17I was re-isolated both from the rhizosphere and the roots when compared to the amount obtained after seed coating. The re-isolation from the rhizosphere and the inner tissues of surface-sterilized lettuce roots demonstrated that t-ZEA17I is both rhizospheric and endophytic.

  3. Interaction between the Bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens strain CHA0, its genetic derivatives and vermiculite: Effects on chemical, mineralogical and mechanical properties of vermiculite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Barbara

    2016-04-01

    Using bacteria of the strain Pseudomonas fluorescens wild type CHA0 and its genetic derivative strains CHA77, CHA89, CHA400, CHA631 and CHA661 (which differ in one gene only) the changes in chemical, mineralogical and rheological properties of the clay mineral vermiculite affected by microbial activity were studied in order to test whether the individually different production of metabolites by the genetically engineered strains may alter the clay mineral vermiculite in distinct ways. With the novel strategy of working with living wild type bacteria, their genetic derivatives and clay, the following properties of the mineral altered by the various strains of Pseudomonas fluorescens were determined: grain size, X-Ray diffraction pattern, intercrystalline swelling with glycerol, layer charge, CEC, BET surface and uptake of trace elements. Laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) was used to determine the changes in major, minor and trace elements of the clay vermiculite affected by microbial activity. Among all analyzed trace elements, Fe, Mn and Cu are the most interesting. Fe and Mn are taken up from the clay mineral by all bacterial strains whereas Cu is only removed from vermiculite by strains CHA0, CHA77, CHA400 and CHA661. The latter mentioned strains all produce the antibiotics 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol and monoacetylphloroglucinol which can complex Cu efficiently. Therefore the alteration of only one gene of the bacteria is causing significant effects on the clay mineral.

  4. Biological control of potato black scurf by rhizosphere associated bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohsin Tariq

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The present work was carried out to study the potential of plant rhizosphere associated bacteria for the biocontrol of potato black scurf disease caused by Rhizoctonia solani Khun AG-3. A total of twenty-eight bacteria isolated from diseased and healthy potato plants grown in the soil of Naran and Faisalabad, Pakistan were evaluated for their antagonistic potential. Nine bacterial strains were found to be antagonistic in vitro, reduced the fungal growth and caused the lysis of sclerotia of R. solani in dual culture assay as well as in extracellular metabolite efficacy test. The selected antagonistic strains were further tested for the production and efficacy of volatile and diffusible antibiotics, lytic enzymes and siderophores against R. solani. Selected antagonistic bacteria were also characterized for growth promoting attributes i.e., phosphate solubilization, nitrogen fixation and indole acetic acid production. Biocontrol efficacy and percent yield increase by these antagonists was estimated in greenhouse experiment. Statistical analysis showed that two Pseudomonas spp. StT2 and StS3 were the most effective with 65.1 and 73.9 percent biocontrol efficacy, as well as 87.3 and 98.3 percent yield increase, respectively. Potential antagonistic bacterial strain StS3 showed maximum homology to Pseudomonas sp. as determined by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. These results suggest that bacterial isolates StS3 and StT2 have excellent potential to be used as effective biocontrol agents promoting plant growth with reduced disease incidence.

  5. The Effect of Phenazine-1-Carboxylic Acid on Mycelial Growth of Botrytis cinerea Produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa LV Strain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ane S. Simionato

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available One of the most important postharvest plant pathogens that affect strawberries, grapes and tomatoes is Botrytis cinerea, known as gray mold. The fungus remains in latent form until spore germination conditions are good, making infection control difficult, causing great losses in the whole production chain. This study aimed to purify and identify phenazine-1-carboxylic acid (PCA produced by the Pseudomonas aeruginosa LV strain and to determine its antifungal activity against B. cinerea. The compounds produced were extracted with dichloromethane and passed through a chromatographic process. The purity level of PCA was determined by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography semi-preparative. The structure of PCA was confirmed by nuclear magnetic resonance and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. Antifungal activity was determined by the dry paper disk and minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC methods and identified by scanning electron microscopy and confocal microscopy. The results showed that PCA inhibited mycelial growth, where MIC was 25 μg mL-1. Microscopic analysis revealed a reduction in exopolysaccharide (EPS formation, showing distorted and damaged hyphae of B. cinerea. The results suggested that PCA has a high potential in the control of B. cinerea and inhibition of EPS (important virulence factor. This natural compound is a potential alternative to postharvest control of gray mold disease.

  6. Effect of exopolymers on oxidative dissolution of natural rhodochrosite by Pseudomonas putida strain MnB1: An electrochemical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Huawei; Zhang, Daoyong; Song, Wenjuan; Pan, Xiangliang; Al-Misned, Fahad A.; Golam Mortuza, M.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The biogeochemical behavior of natural rhodochrosite was investigated by electrochemical methods. • Bacterial exopolymers contributed to the increasing dissolution of natural rhodochrosite. • Oxidative dissolution of natural rhodochrosite was well explained by Tafel and EIS analysis. - Abstract: Oxidative dissolution of natural rhodochrosite by the Mn(II) oxidizing bacterium Pseudomonas putida strain MnB1 was investigated based on batch and electrochemical experiments using natural rhodochrosite as the working electrode. Tafel curves and batch experiments revealed that bacterial exopolymers (EPS) significantly increased dissolution of natural rhodochrosite. The corrosion current significantly increased with reaction time for EPS treatment. However, the corrosion process was blocked in the presence of cells plus extra EPS due to formation of the passivation layer. Moreover, the scanning electron microscopy and the energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM–EDS) results showed that the surface of the natural rhodochrosite was notably changed in the presence of EPS alone or/and bacterial cells. This study is helpful for understanding the role of EPS in bacterially oxidation of Mn(II). It also indicates that the Mn(II) oxidizing bacteria may exert their effects on Mn(II) cycle and other biological and biogeochemical processes much beyond their local ambient environment because of the catalytically dissolution of solid Mn(II) by EPS and the possible long distance transport of the detached EPS

  7. The draft genome sequence of multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain CCBH4851, a nosocomial isolate belonging to clone SP (ST277 that is prevalent in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melise Silveira

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The high occurrence of nosocomial multidrug-resistant (MDR microorganisms is considered a global health problem. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of a MDR Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain isolated in Brazil that belongs to the endemic clone ST277. The genome encodes important resistance determinant genes and consists of 6.7 Mb with a G+C content of 66.86% and 6,347 predicted coding regions including 60 RNAs.

  8. Influence of introduced potential biocontrol agents on maize seedling growth and bacterial community structure in the rhizosphere

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kozdroj, J; Trevors, JT; van Elsas, JD

    Two species of Pseudomonas chromosomally tagged with gfp, which had shown antagonistic activity against the tomato pathogen Ralstonia solanacearum in a previous study, were assessed for their impact in the rhizosphere of maize. Plant growth characteristics, numbers of indigenous heterotrophic

  9. Synthesis of Medium-Chain-Length Polyhydroxyalkanoate Homopolymers, Random Copolymers, and Block Copolymers by an Engineered Strain of Pseudomonas entomophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying; Chung, Ahleum; Chen, Guo-Qiang

    2017-04-01

    Medium-chain-length polyhydroxyalkanoates (mcl-PHAs), widely used in medical area, are commonly synthesized by Pseudomonas spp. This study tries to use β-oxidation pathways engineered P. entomophila to achieve single source of a series of mcl-monomers for microbial production of PHA homopolymers. The effort is proven successful for the first time to obtain a wide range of mcl-PHA homopolymers from engineered P. entomophila LAC23 grown on various fatty acids, respectively, ranging from poly(3-hydroxyheptanoate) to poly(3-hydroxytetradecanoate). Effects of a PHA monomer chain length on thermal and crystallization properties including the changes of T m , T g , and T d5% are investigated. Additionally, strain LAC23 is used to synthesize random copolymers of 3-hydroxyoctanoate (3HO) and 3-hydroxydodecanoate (3HDD) or 3-hydroxytetradecanoates, their compositions could be controlled by adjusting the ratios of two related fatty acids. Meanwhile, block copolymer P(3HO)-b-P(3HDD) is synthesized by the same strain. It is found for the first time that even- and odd number mcl-PHA homopolymers have different physical properties. When the gene of the PHA synthase in the engineered P. entomophila is replaced by phaC from Aeromonas hydrophila 4AK4, poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-30 mol%-3-hydroxyhexanoate) is synthesized. Therefore, P. entomophila can be used to synthesize the whole range of PHA (C7-C14) homopolymers, random- and block copolymers. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Gene sequencing, cloning, and expression of the recombinant L- Asparaginase of Pseudomonas aeruginosa SN4 strain in Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arastoo Badoei-dalfard

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: L- asparaginase is in an excessive demand in medical applications and in food treating industries, the request for this therapeutic enzyme is growing several folds every year. Materials and methods: In this study, a L- asparaginase gene from Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain SN4 was sequenced and cloned in E. coli. Primers were designed based on L- asparaginase from P. aeruginosa DSM 50071, which show high similarity to SN4 strain, according to 16S rRNA sequence. The L- asparaginase gene was exposed to restriction digestion with NdeI and XhoI enzymes and then ligated into pET21a plasmid. The ligated sample was transformed into competent E. coli (DE3 pLysS DH5a cells, according to CaCl2 method. The transformed E. coli cells were grown into LB agar plate containing 100 µg/ml ampicillin, IPTG (1 mM. Results: Recombinant L- asparaginase from E. coli BL21 induced after 9 h of incubation and showed high L- asparaginase activity about 93.4 IU/ml. Recombinant L- asparaginase sequencing and alignments showed that the presumed amino acid sequence composed of 350 amino acid residues showed high similarity with P. aeruginosa L- asparaginases about 99%. The results also indicated that SN4 L- asparaginase has the catalytic residues and conserve region similar to other L- asparaginases. Discussion and conclusion: This is the first report on cloning and expression of P. aeruginosa L- asparaginases in Escherichia coli. These results indicated a potent source of L- asparaginase for in vitro and in vivio anticancer consideration. 

  11. Evaluation of Synergistic Interactions Between Cell-Free Supernatant of Lactobacillus Strains and Amikacin and Genetamicin Against Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aminnezhad, Sargol; Kermanshahi, Rouha Kasra; Ranjbar, Reza

    2015-04-01

    The indiscriminate use of antibiotics in the treatment of infectious diseases can increase the development of antibiotic resistance. Therefore, there is a big demand for new sources of antimicrobial agents and alternative treatments for reduction of antibiotic dosage required to decrease the associated side effects. In this study, the synergistic action of aminoglycoside antibiotics and cell-free supernatant (CFS) of probiotic (Lactobacillus rahmnosus and L. casei) against Pseudomonas aeruginosa PTCC 1430 was evaluated. A growth medium for culturing of probiotic bacteria was separated by centrifugation. The antimicrobial effects of CFS of probiotic bacteria were evaluated using the agar well diffusion assay. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) were evaluated using the micro dilution method. Finally, an interaction between CFS and amikacin or gentamicin against P. aeruginosa PTCC 1430 was examined through the checkerboard method and fractional inhibitory concentration (FIC). Furthermore, CFSs from Lactobacillus strains were analyzed by reversed phase HPLC (RP-HPLC) for antimicrobial compounds. The results showed a significant effect of CFS on the growth of P. aeruginosa. The MIC and MBC of CFS from L. casei were 62.5 µL⁄mL while the MIC and MBC of CFS from L. rhamnosus were 62.5 μL⁄mL and 125 μL⁄mL, respectively. Using the FIC indices, synergistic interactions were observed in combination of CFS and antibiotics. Fractional Inhibitory Concentration indices of CFS from L. casei and aminoglycoside antibiotics were 0.124 and 0.312 while FIC indices of CFS from L. rhamnosus and aminoglycoside antibiotics were 0.124 and 0.56, respectively showing a synergism effect. The results of RP-HPLC showed that CFS of Lactobacillus strains contained acetic acid, lactic acid and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Our findings indicate that probiotic bacterial strains of Lactobacillus have a significant inhibitory effect on the

  12. Draft Genome Sequence Analysis of a Pseudomonas putida W15Oct28 Strain with Antagonistic Activity to Gram-Positive and Pseudomonas sp. Pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Lumeng; Hildebrand, Falk; Dingemans, Jozef; Ballet, Steven; Laus, George; Matthijs, Sandra; Berendsen, Roeland; Cornelis, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas putida is a member of the fluorescent pseudomonads known to produce the yellow-green fluorescent pyoverdine siderophore. P. putida W15Oct28, isolated from a stream in Brussels, was found to produce compound(s) with antimicrobial activity against the opportunistic pathogens Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and the plant pathogen Pseudomonas syringae, an unusual characteristic for P. putida. The active compound production only occurred in media with low iron content and without organic nitrogen sources. Transposon mutants which lost their antimicrobial activity had the majority of insertions in genes involved in the biosynthesis of pyoverdine, although purified pyoverdine was not responsible for the antagonism. Separation of compounds present in culture supernatants revealed the presence of two fractions containing highly hydrophobic molecules active against P. aeruginosa. Analysis of the draft genome confirmed the presence of putisolvin biosynthesis genes and the corresponding lipopeptides were found to contribute to the antimicrobial activity. One cluster of ten genes was detected, comprising a NAD-dependent epimerase, an acetylornithine aminotransferase, an acyl CoA dehydrogenase, a short chain dehydrogenase, a fatty acid desaturase and three genes for a RND efflux pump. P. putida W15Oct28 genome also contains 56 genes encoding TonB-dependent receptors, conferring a high capacity to utilize pyoverdines from other pseudomonads. One unique feature of W15Oct28 is also the presence of different secretion systems including a full set of genes for type IV secretion, and several genes for type VI secretion and their VgrG effectors. PMID:25369289

  13. Pseudomonas chlororaphis Produces Two Distinct R-Tailocins That Contribute to Bacterial Competition in Biofilms and on Roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorosky, Robert J; Yu, Jun Myoung; Pierson, Leland S; Pierson, Elizabeth A

    2017-08-01

    R-type tailocins are high-molecular-weight bacteriocins that resemble bacteriophage tails and are encoded within the genomes of many Pseudomonas species. In this study, analysis of the P. chlororaphis 30-84 R-tailocin gene cluster revealed that it contains the structural components to produce two R-tailocins of different ancestral origins. Two distinct R-tailocin populations differing in length were observed in UV-induced lysates of P. chlororaphis 30-84 via transmission electron microscopy. Mutants defective in the production of one or both R-tailocins demonstrated that the killing spectrum of each tailocin is limited to Pseudomonas species. The spectra of pseudomonads killed by the two R-tailocins differed, although a few Pseudomonas species were either killed by or insusceptible to both tailocins. Tailocin release was disrupted by deletion of the holin gene within the tailocin gene cluster, demonstrating that the lysis cassette is required for the release of both R-tailocins. The loss of functional tailocin production reduced the ability of P. chlororaphis 30-84 to compete with an R-tailocin-sensitive strain within biofilms and rhizosphere communities. Our study demonstrates that Pseudomonas species can produce more than one functional R-tailocin particle sharing the same lysis cassette but differing in their killing spectra. This study provides evidence for the role of R-tailocins as determinants of bacterial competition among plant-associated Pseudomonas in biofilms and the rhizosphere. IMPORTANCE Recent studies have identified R-tailocin gene clusters potentially encoding more than one R-tailocin within the genomes of plant-associated Pseudomonas but have not demonstrated that more than one particle is produced or the ecological significance of the production of multiple R-tailocins. This study demonstrates for the first time that Pseudomonas strains can produce two distinct R-tailocins with different killing spectra, both of which contribute to bacterial

  14. Genetically engineered Pseudomonas putida X3 strain and its potential ability to bioremediate soil microcosms contaminated with methyl parathion and cadmium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rong; Xu, Xingjian; Chen, Wenli; Huang, Qiaoyun

    2016-02-01

    A multifunctional Pseudomonas putida X3 strain was successfully engineered by introducing methyl parathion (MP)-degrading gene and enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) gene in P. putida X4 (CCTCC: 209319). In liquid cultures, the engineered X3 strain utilized MP as sole carbon source for growth and degraded 100 mg L(-1) of MP within 24 h; however, this strain did not further metabolize p-nitrophenol (PNP), an intermediate metabolite of MP. No discrepancy in minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) to cadmium (Cd), copper (Cu), zinc (Zn), and cobalt (Co) was observed between the engineered X3 strain and its host strain. The inoculated X3 strain accelerated MP degradation in different polluted soil microcosms with 100 mg MP kg(-1) dry soil and/or 5 mg Cd kg(-1) dry soil; MP was completely eliminated within 40 h. However, the presence of Cd in the early stage of remediation slightly delayed MP degradation. The application of X3 strain in Cd-contaminated soil strongly affected the distribution of Cd fractions and immobilized Cd by reducing bioavailable Cd concentrations with lower soluble/exchangeable Cd and organic-bound Cd. The inoculated X3 strain also colonized and proliferated in various contaminated microcosms. Our results suggested that the engineered X3 strain is a potential bioremediation agent showing competitive advantage in complex contaminated environments.

  15. Glutathione-Disrupted Biofilms of Clinical Pseudomonas aeruginosa Strains Exhibit an Enhanced Antibiotic Effect and a Novel Biofilm Transcriptome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Theerthankar; Ibugo, Amaye; Buckle, Edwina; Manefield, Mike; Manos, Jim

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections result in high morbidity and mortality rates for individuals with cystic fibrosis (CF), with premature death often occurring. These infections are complicated by the formation of biofilms in the sputum. Antibiotic therapy is stymied by antibiotic resistance of the biofilm matrix, making novel antibiofilm strategies highly desirable. Within P. aeruginosa biofilms, the redox factor pyocyanin enhances biofilm integrity by intercalating with extracellular DNA. The antioxidant glutathione (GSH) reacts with pyocyanin, disrupting intercalation. This study investigated GSH disruption by assaying the physiological effects of GSH and DNase I on biofilms of clinical CF isolates grown in CF artificial sputum medium (ASMDM+). Confocal scanning laser microscopy showed that 2 mM GSH, alone or combined with DNase I, significantly disrupted immature (24-h) biofilms of Australian epidemic strain (AES) isogens AES-1R and AES-1M. GSH alone greatly disrupted mature (72-h) AES-1R biofilms, resulting in significant differential expression of 587 genes, as indicated by RNA-sequencing (RNA-seq) analysis. Upregulated systems included cyclic diguanylate and pyoverdine biosynthesis, the type VI secretion system, nitrate metabolism, and translational machinery. Biofilm disruption with GSH revealed a cellular physiology distinct from those of mature and dispersed biofilms. RNA-seq results were validated by biochemical and quantitative PCR assays. Biofilms of a range of CF isolates disrupted with GSH and DNase I were significantly more susceptible to ciprofloxacin, and increased antibiotic effectiveness was achieved by increasing the GSH concentration. This study demonstrated that GSH, alone or with DNase I, represents an effective antibiofilm treatment when combined with appropriate antibiotics, pending in vivo studies. PMID:27161630

  16. Aerobic degradation of N-methyl-4-nitroaniline (MNA by Pseudomonas sp. strain FK357 isolated from soil.

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    Fazlurrahman Khan

    Full Text Available N-Methyl-4-nitroaniline (MNA is used as an additive to lower the melting temperature of energetic materials in the synthesis of insensitive explosives. Although the biotransformation of MNA under anaerobic condition has been reported, its aerobic microbial degradation has not been documented yet. A soil microcosms study showed the efficient aerobic degradation of MNA by the inhabitant soil microorganisms. An aerobic bacterium, Pseudomonas sp. strain FK357, able to utilize MNA as the sole carbon, nitrogen, and energy source, was isolated from soil microcosms. HPLC and GC-MS analysis of the samples obtained from growth and resting cell studies showed the formation of 4-nitroaniline (4-NA, 4-aminophenol (4-AP, and 1, 2, 4-benzenetriol (BT as major metabolic intermediates in the MNA degradation pathway. Enzymatic assay carried out on cell-free lysates of MNA grown cells confirmed N-demethylation reaction is the first step of MNA degradation with the formation of 4-NA and formaldehyde products. Flavin-dependent transformation of 4-NA to 4-AP in cell extracts demonstrated that the second step of MNA degradation is a monooxygenation. Furthermore, conversion of 4-AP to BT by MNA grown cells indicates the involvement of oxidative deamination (release of NH2 substituent reaction in third step of MNA degradation. Subsequent degradation of BT occurs by the action of benzenetriol 1, 2-dioxygenase as reported for the degradation of 4-nitrophenol. This is the first report on aerobic degradation of MNA by a single bacterium along with elucidation of metabolic pathway.

  17. Does S-metolachlor affect the performance of Pseudomonas sp. strain ADP as bioaugmentation bacterium for atrazine-contaminated soils?

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    Cristina A Viegas

    Full Text Available Atrazine (ATZ and S-metolachlor (S-MET are two herbicides widely used, often as mixtures. The present work examined whether the presence of S-MET affects the ATZ-biodegradation activity of the bioaugmentation bacterium Pseudomonas sp. strain ADP in a crop soil. S-MET concentrations were selected for their relevance in worst-case scenarios of soil contamination by a commercial formulation containing both herbicides. At concentrations representative of application of high doses of the formulation (up to 50 µg g(-1 of soil, corresponding to a dose approximately 50× higher than the recommended field dose (RD, the presence of pure S-MET significantly affected neither bacteria survival (~10(7 initial viable cells g(-1 of soil nor its ATZ-mineralization activity. Consistently, biodegradation experiments, in larger soil microcosms spiked with 20× or 50 × RD of the double formulation and inoculated with the bacterium, revealed ATZ to be rapidly (in up to 5 days and extensively (>96% removed from the soil. During the 5 days, concentration of S-MET decreased moderately to about 60% of the initial, both in inoculated and non-inoculated microcosms. Concomitantly, an accumulation of the two metabolites S-MET ethanesulfonic acid and S-MET oxanilic acid was found. Despite the dissipation of almost all the ATZ from the treated soils, the respective eluates were still highly toxic to an aquatic microalgae species, being as toxic as those from the untreated soil. We suggest that this high toxicity may be due to the S-MET and/or its metabolites remaining in the soil.

  18. Evaluación de la actividad desulfurizadora de aislados nativos de Pseudomonas spp. en presencia de hidrocarburo Desulfurization activity evaluation of native strains of Pseudomonas spp. in the presence of hydrocarbon

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    Alméciga-Díaz Carlos Javier

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available El principal inconveniente en la combustión de los hidrocarburos es la conversión del azufre y el nitrógeno a sus respectivos óxidos, los cuales participan en la formación de lluvia acida y deterioran el medio ambiente e infraestructuras. La remoción de azufre a partir de compuestos órgano-azufrados mediante el uso de microorganismos ha surgido como una alternativa frente al proceso catalítico de hidrodesulfurización (HDS. En el presente trabajo se evaluó la actividad desulfurizadora de veintitrés aislados nativos de Pseudomonas spp. sobre dibenzotiofeno (DBT, usando un sistema de fermentación con igual proporción de fase acuosa y orgánica (n-hexano en presencia de oleato de etanolamina. Los aislados 02,05 y 06 conservaron su viabilidad en este medio y presentaron una remoción de azufre entre 6,0 y 9,4%, generando los metabolitos DBT-sulfona, DBT-sulfóxido, 2-hidroxibifenilo (2-HBP y sulfato presentes en la ruta metabólica 4S. Con estos aislados se evaluó la actividad desulfurizadora sobre keroseno y se observó una remoción de azufre entre 19,9 y 62,6% y una disminución del poder calorífico entre 0,45 y 5,55%. Palabras clave: dibenzotiofeno, desulfurización, Pseudomonas spp., keroseno.The main difficulty with fossil fuel combustión lies in sulphur and nitrogen becoming converted to their respective oxides, forming part of the acid rain which deteriorates the environment and infrastructure. Removing sulphur from organo-sulfur compounds by using micro-organisms has become an alternative to hydrodesulphurisation (HDS. Twenty-three Pseudomonas spp. native strains' desulphurisation activity on dibenzothiophene (DBT was evaluated by using a fermentation system having equal proportions of aqueous and organic (n-hexane phases in the presence of ethanolamine oléate. The 02, 05 and 06 strains maintained their viability in this médium, presenting 6,0% to 9,4% sulphur removal, producing DBT-sulphone, DBT-sulphoxide, 2

  19. Comparative Genomic Analyses of Multiple Pseudomonas Strains Infecting Corylus avellana Trees Reveal the Occurrence of Two Genetic Clusters with Both Common and Distinctive Virulence and Fitness Traits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcelletti, Simone; Scortichini, Marco

    2015-01-01

    The European hazelnut (Corylus avellana) is threatened in Europe by several pseudomonads which cause symptoms ranging from twig dieback to tree death. A comparison of the draft genomes of nine Pseudomonas strains isolated from symptomatic C. avellana trees was performed to identify common and distinctive genomic traits. The thorough assessment of genetic relationships among the strains revealed two clearly distinct clusters: P. avellanae and P. syringae. The latter including the pathovars avellanae, coryli and syringae. Between these two clusters, no recombination event was found. A genomic island of approximately 20 kb, containing the hrp/hrc type III secretion system gene cluster, was found to be present without any genomic difference in all nine pseudomonads. The type III secretion system effector repertoires were remarkably different in the two groups, with P. avellanae showing a higher number of effectors. Homologue genes of the antimetabolite mangotoxin and ice nucleation activity clusters were found solely in all P. syringae pathovar strains, whereas the siderophore yersiniabactin was only present in P. avellanae. All nine strains have genes coding for pectic enzymes and sucrose metabolism. By contrast, they do not have genes coding for indolacetic acid and anti-insect toxin. Collectively, this study reveals that genomically different Pseudomonas can converge on the same host plant by suppressing the host defence mechanisms with the use of different virulence weapons. The integration into their genomes of a horizontally acquired genomic island could play a fundamental role in their evolution, perhaps giving them the ability to exploit new ecological niches. PMID:26147218

  20. Isolation of a buprofezin co-metabolizing strain of Pseudomonas sp. DFS35-4 and identification of the buprofezin transformation pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kai; Liu, Xiao-Mei; Li, Rong; Liu, Yuan; Hu, Hai; Li, Shun-Peng; Jiang, Jian-Dong

    2011-11-01

    Buprofezin is a widely used insecticide that has caused environmental pollution in many areas. However, biodegradation of buprofezin by pure cultures has not been extensively studied, and the transformation pathway of buprofezin remains unclear. In this paper, a buprofezin co-metabolizing strain of DFS35-4 was isolated from a buprofezin-polluted soil in China. Strain DFS35-4 was preliminarily identified as Pseudomonas sp. based on its morphological, physiological, and biochemical properties, as well as 16S rRNA gene analysis. In the presence of 2.0 g l(-1) sodium citrate, strain DFS35-4 degraded over 70% of 50 mg l(-1) buprofezin in 3 days. Strain DFS35-4 efficiently degraded buprofezin in the pH range of 5.0-10.0 and at temperatures between 20 and 30°C. Three metabolites, 2-imino-5-phenyl-3-(propan-2-yl)-1,3,5-thiadiazinan-4-one, 2-imino-5-phenyl-1,3,5-thiadiazinan-4-one, and methyl(phenyl) carbamic acid, were identified during the degradation of buprofezin using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). A partial transformation pathway of buprofezin in Pseudomonas sp. DFS35-4 was proposed based on these metabolites.

  1. Genotypic and phenotypic analyses of a Pseudomonas aeruginosa chronic bronchiectasis isolate reveal differences from cystic fibrosis and laboratory strains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Varga, J.J.; Barbier, Mariette; Mulet, Xavier; Bielecki, Piotr; Bartell, J.A.; Owings, J.P.; Martinez-Ramos, Inmaculada; Hittle, L.E.; Davis, M.R.; Damron, F.H.; Liechti, G.W.; Puchałka, Jacek; Martins dos Santos, Vitor; Ernst, R.K.; Papin, J.A.; Albertí, Sebastian; Oliver, Antonio; Goldberg, J.B.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an environmentally ubiquitous Gram-negative bacterium and important opportunistic human pathogen, causing severe chronic respiratory infections in patients with underlying conditions such as cystic fibrosis (CF) or bronchiectasis. In order to identify

  2. Cost modeling of biocontrol strains Pseudomonas chlororaphis and P. flurorescens for competitive exclusion of Salmonella enterica on tomatoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biological control of foodborne pathogens may complement postharvest intervention measures to enhance food safety of minimally processed produce. The purpose of this research was to develop cost model estimates for application of competitive exclusion process (CEM) using Pseudomonas chlororaphis and...

  3. Chemical Analysis of Cellular and Extracellular Carbohydrates of a Biofilm-Forming Strain Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA14

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coulon, Charlène; Vinogradov, Evgeny; Filloux, Alain; Sadovskaya, Irina

    2010-01-01

    Background Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a Gram-negative bacterium and an opportunistic pathogen, which causes persisting life-threatening infections in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. Biofilm mode of growth facilitates its survival in a variety of environments. Most P. aeruginosa isolates, including the non-mucoid laboratory strain PA14, are able to form a thick pellicle, which results in a surface-associated biofilm at the air-liquid (A–L) interface in standing liquid cultures. Exopolysaccharides (EPS) are considered as key components in the formation of this biofilm pellicle. In the non-mucoid P. aeruginosa strain PA14, the “scaffolding” polysaccharides of the biofilm matrix, and the molecules responsible for the structural integrity of rigid A–L biofilm have not been identified. Moreover, the role of LPS in this process is unclear, and the chemical structure of the LPS O-antigen of PA14 has not yet been elucidated. Principal Findings In the present work we carried out a systematic analysis of cellular and extracellular (EC) carbohydrates of P. aeruginosa PA14. We also elucidated the chemical structure of the LPS O-antigen by chemical methods and 2-D NMR spectroscopy. Our results showed that it is composed of linear trisaccharide repeating units, identical to those described for P. aeruginosa Lanýi type O:2a,c (Lanýi-Bergman O-serogroup 10a, 10c; IATS serotype 19) and having the following structure: -4)-α-L-GalNAcA-(1–3)-α-D-QuiNAc-(1–3)- α-L-Rha-(1-. Furthermore, an EC O-antigen polysaccharide (EC O-PS) and the glycerol-phosphorylated cyclic β-(1,3)-glucans were identified in the culture supernatant of PA14, grown statically in minimal medium. Finally, the extracellular matrix of the thick biofilm formed at the A-L interface contained, in addition to eDNA, important quantities (at least ∼20% of dry weight) of LPS-like material. Conclusions We characterized the chemical structure of the LPS O-antigen and showed that the O-antigen polysaccharide is

  4. A Cyanide-Induced 3-Cyanoalanine Nitrilase in the Cyanide-Assimilating Bacterium Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes Strain CECT 5344.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acera, Felipe; Carmona, María Isabel; Castillo, Francisco; Quesada, Alberto; Blasco, Rafael

    2017-05-01

    Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes CECT 5344 is a bacterium able to assimilate cyanide as a sole nitrogen source. Under this growth condition, a 3-cyanoalanine nitrilase enzymatic activity was induced. This activity was encoded by nit4 , one of the four nitrilase genes detected in the genome of this bacterium, and its expression in Escherichia coli enabled the recombinant strain to fully assimilate 3-cyanoalanine. P. pseudoalcaligenes CECT 5344 showed a weak growth level with 3-cyanoalanine as the N source, unless KCN was also added. Moreover, a nit4 knockout mutant of P. pseudoalcaligenes CECT 5344 became severely impaired in its ability to grow with 3-cyanoalanine and cyanide as nitrogen sources. The native enzyme expressed in E. coli was purified up to electrophoretic homogeneity and biochemically characterized. Nit4 seems to be specific for 3-cyanoalanine, and the amount of ammonium derived from the enzymatic activity doubled in the presence of exogenously added asparaginase activity, which demonstrated that the Nit4 enzyme had both 3-cyanoalanine nitrilase and hydratase activities. The nit4 gene is located downstream of the cyanide resistance transcriptional unit containing cio1 genes, whose expression levels are under the positive control of cyanide. Real-time PCR experiments revealed that nit4 expression was also positively regulated by cyanide in both minimal and LB media. These results suggest that this gene cluster including cio1 and nit4 could be involved both in cyanide resistance and in its assimilation by P. pseudoalcaligenes CECT 5344. IMPORTANCE Cyanide is a highly toxic molecule present in some industrial wastes due to its application in several manufacturing processes, such as gold mining and the electroplating industry. The biodegradation of cyanide from contaminated wastes could be an attractive alternative to physicochemical treatment. P. pseudoalcaligenes CECT 5344 is a bacterial strain able to assimilate cyanide under alkaline conditions, thus

  5. [Comparative study of aromatic ring meta-cleavage enzymes in Pseudomonas strains with plasmid and chromosomal genetic control of the catabolism of biphenyl and m-toluate].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selifonov, S A; Starozoĭtov, I I

    1990-12-01

    It was shown that two different enzymes of aromatic ring oxidative meta-cleavage (2,3-dihydroxybiphenyl-1,2-dioxygenase), DBO and catechol-2,3-dioxygenase, C230) function in Pseudomonas strains with a plasmid and chromosomal genetic control of biphenyl and toluate catabolism. A comparative analysis of DBO's and C230's expressed by the pBS241 biphenyl degradative plasmid in P. putida BS893, pBS311 in P. putida U83, chromosomal genes in P. putida BF and C230 from P. putida PaW160 (pWWO) was carried out. It was found that the DBO's of all strains under study are highly specialized enzymes in respect of 2,3-dihydroxybiphenyl cleavage and are also able to cleave 3-methyl-catechol and catechol (but not 4-methylcatechol) at low rates. In contrast with DBO's, in Pseudomonas strains the substrate specificities of all C230's are variable. The C230's expressed by the D-plasmids pBS241 and pBC311 have a moderate affinity for catechol, 3-methyl- and 4-methylcatechol, but are unable to cleave 2,3-dihydroxybiphenyl. The C230 which is encoded by the chromosomal structure gene from P. putida BF is very similar to C230 which codes for the TOL-plasmid pWWO. These plasmid differ from C230's expressed by biphenyl D-plasmids due to their capability to cleave 2,3-dihydroxybiphenyl in addition to catechol cleavage. All DBO's and C230's under study possess a number of properties that are typical for the enzymes having an oxidative meta-cleaving effect. The different roles of these enzymes in biphenyl and toluate catabolism in Pseudomonas strains are discussed.

  6. Establishing quality control ranges for antimicrobial susceptibility testing of Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Staphylococcus aureus: a cornerstone to develop reference strains for Korean clinical microbiology laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Sung Kuk; Choi, Seung Jun; Shin, Saeam; Lee, Wonmok; Pinto, Naina; Shin, Nari; Lee, Kwangjun; Hong, Seong Geun; Kim, Young Ah; Lee, Hyukmin; Kim, Heejung; Song, Wonkeun; Lee, Sun Hwa; Yong, Dongeun; Lee, Kyungwon; Chong, Yunsop

    2015-11-01

    Quality control (QC) processes are being performed in the majority of clinical microbiology laboratories to ensure the performance of microbial identification and antimicrobial susceptibility testing by using ATCC strains. To obtain these ATCC strains, some inconveniences are encountered concerning the purchase cost of the strains and the shipping time required. This study was focused on constructing a database of reference strains for QC processes using domestic bacterial strains, concentrating primarily on antimicrobial susceptibility testing. Three strains (Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Staphylococcus aureus) that showed legible results in preliminary testing were selected. The minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) and zone diameters (ZDs) of eight antimicrobials for each strain were determined according to the CLSI M23. All resulting MIC and ZD ranges included at least 95% of the data. The ZD QC ranges obtained by using the CLSI method were less than 12 mm, and the MIC QC ranges extended no more than five dilutions. This study is a preliminary attempt to construct a bank of Korean QC strains. With further studies, a positive outcome toward cost and time reduction can be anticipated.

  7. Antimicrobial activity of gallic acid against food-related Pseudomonas strains and its use as biocontrol tool to improve the shelf life of fresh black truffles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorrentino, Elena; Succi, Mariantonietta; Tipaldi, Luca; Pannella, Gianfranco; Maiuro, Lucia; Sturchio, Marina; Coppola, Raffaele; Tremonte, Patrizio

    2018-02-02

    Refrigeration alone or in combination with other technologies represents the main tool used in the last decades to preserve the freshness of black truffles. This is principally due to the delicateness and vulnerability of this edible hypogeous fungus, so that other invasive preservation practices cannot be adopted. However, the proliferation of some microbial species during the cold storage still represents an unsolved problem. Pseudomonads are among the main spoiler bacteria responsible for the deterioration of refrigerated black truffles. Their growth ability at low temperatures requires the use of additional hurdles to prolong the shelf-life of truffles without altering their major features. The use of natural compounds may represent an alternative system for the biocontrol of this kind of product. Specifically, gallic acid (GA) is a phenolic acid naturally present in different foods, whose effectiveness was in vitro demonstrated against Pseudomonas spp. In our study, we reported the antimicrobial activity expressed by GA not only in vitro, using as target bacteria Pseudomonas putida DSMZ 291 T , P. fluorescens DSMZ 50090 T , P. fragi DSMZ 3456 T and Pseudomonas spp. P30-4, previously isolated from black truffles, but also in situ on fresh black truffles stored at 4°C for 28days. Our results showed Minimum Inhibitory Concentrations (MIC) of 2.5mg/mL GA for all tested strains, except for P. fluorescens DSMZ 50090 T , having a MIC corresponding to 5mg/mL GA. The Minimum Bactericidal Concentration (MBC) was 10mg/mL for all strains. The analysis of kinetic parameters showed that the survival declined passing from 2.5 to 10mg/mL GA concentrations, with P. fluorescens confirmed to be the most resistant strain. Moreover, images obtained from Scanning Electron Microscopy revealed that Pseudomonas cells were strongly injured by the treatment with GA at 2.5mg/mL concentration, displaying visible pores on the cellular surfaces, absence of flagella and lysis with loss of

  8. Diversity and Antimicrobial Properties of Lactic Acid Bacteria Isolated from Rhizosphere of Olive Trees and Desert Truffles of Tunisia

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    Imene Fhoula

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A total of 119 lactic acid bacteria (LAB were isolated, by culture-dependant method, from rhizosphere samples of olive trees and desert truffles and evaluated for different biotechnological properties. Using the variability of the intergenic spacer 16S-23S and 16S rRNA gene sequences, the isolates were identified as the genera Lactococcus, Pediococcus, Lactobacillus, Weissella, and Enterococcus. All the strains showed proteolytic activity with variable rates 42% were EPS producers, while only 10% showed the ability to grow in 9% NaCl. In addition, a low rate of antibiotic resistance was detected among rhizospheric enterococci. Furthermore, a strong antibacterial activity against plant and/or pathogenic bacteria of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, Pantoea agglomerans, Pseudomonas savastanoi, the food-borne Staphylococcus aureus, and Listeria monocytogenes was recorded. Antifungal activity evaluation showed that Botrytis cinerea was the most inhibited fungus followed by Penicillium expansum, Verticillium dahliae, and Aspergillus niger. Most of the active strains belonged to the genera Enterococcus and Weissella. This study led to suggest that environmental-derived LAB strains could be selected for technological application to control pathogenic bacteria and to protect food safety from postharvest deleterious microbiota.

  9. Global Genome Comparative Analysis Reveals Insights of Resistome and Life-Style Adaptation of Pseudomonas putida Strain T2-2 in Oral Cavity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Yue Chan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Most Pseudomonas putida strains are environmental microorganisms exhibiting a wide range of metabolic capability but certain strains have been reported as rare opportunistic pathogens and some emerged as multidrug resistant P. putida. This study aimed to assess the drug resistance profile of, via whole genome analysis, P. putida strain T2-2 isolated from oral cavity. At the same time, we also compared the nonenvironmental strain with environmentally isolated P. putida. In silico comparative genome analysis with available reference strains of P. putida shows that T2-2 has lesser gene counts on carbohydrate and aromatic compounds metabolisms, which suggested its little versatility. The detection of its edd gene also suggested T2-2’s catabolism of glucose via ED pathway instead of EMP pathway. On the other hand, its drug resistance profile was observed via in silico gene prediction and most of the genes found were in agreement with drug-susceptibility testing in laboratory by automated VITEK 2. In addition, the finding of putative genes of multidrug resistance efflux pump and ATP-binding cassette transporters in this strain suggests a multidrug resistant phenotype. In summary, it is believed that multiple metabolic characteristics and drug resistance in P. putida strain T2-2 helped in its survival in human oral cavity.

  10. Characterisation of the thermostable protease AprX in strains of Pseudomonas fluorescens and impact on the shelf-life of dairy products: preliminary results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadia Andrea Andreani

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial proteases are involved in food spoilage and shelf-life reduction. Among the bacterial proteases, a predominant role in spoilage of dairy products seems to be played by the thermostable metallo-protease AprX, which is produced by various strains of Pseudomonas fluorescens. Differences in AprX enzyme activity among different strains were highlighted, but the most proteolytic strains were not identified. In this study, the presence of the aprX gene was evaluated in 69 strains isolated from food matrices and 18 reference strains belonging to the P. fluorescens group, which had been previously typed by the multi locus sequence typing method. Subsequently, a subset of reference strains was inoculated in ultra-high temperature milk, and the expression of the aprX gene was evaluated at 22 and 6°C. On the same milk samples, the proteolytic activity was then evaluated through Azocasein and trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid solution assays. Finally, to assess the applicability of the former assay directly on dairy products the proteolityc activity was tested on industrial ricotta samples using the Azocasein assay. These results demonstrate the spread of aprX gene in most strains tested and the applicability of Azocasein assay to monitor the proteolytic activity in dairy products.

  11. Microbial Culturomics Application for Global Health: Noncontiguous Finished Genome Sequence and Description of Pseudomonas massiliensis Strain CB-1T sp. nov. in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardet, Lucie; Cimmino, Teresa; Buffet, Clémence; Michelle, Caroline; Rathored, Jaishriram; Tandina, Fatalmoudou; Lagier, Jean-Christophe; Khelaifia, Saber; Abrahão, Jônatas; Raoult, Didier; Rolain, Jean-Marc

    2018-02-01

    Culturomics is a new postgenomics field that explores the microbial diversity of the human gut coupled with taxono-genomic strategy. Culturomics, and the microbiome science more generally, are anticipated to transform global health diagnostics and inform the ways in which gut microbial diversity contributes to human health and disease, and by extension, to personalized medicine. Using culturomics, we report in this study the description of strain CB1 T ( = CSUR P1334 = DSM 29075), a new species isolated from a stool specimen from a 37-year-old Brazilian woman. This description includes phenotypic characteristics and complete genome sequence and annotation. Strain CB1 T is a gram-negative aerobic and motile bacillus, exhibits neither catalase nor oxidase activities, and presents a 98.3% 16S rRNA sequence similarity with Pseudomonas putida. The 4,723,534 bp long genome contains 4239 protein-coding genes and 74 RNA genes, including 15 rRNA genes (5 16S rRNA, 4 23S rRNA, and 6 5S rRNA) and 59 tRNA genes. Strain CB1 T was named Pseudomonas massiliensis sp. nov. and classified into the family Pseudomonadaceae. This study demonstrates the usefulness of microbial culturomics in exploration of human microbiota in diverse geographies and offers new promise for incorporating new omics technologies for innovation in diagnostic medicine and global health.

  12. In vitro production of biofilm in a flow cell system in a strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus and determination of efficiency of ciprofloxacin against them

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soham Gupta

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Microorganisms develop biofilm on various medical devices. The process is particularly relevant in public health since biofilm associated organisms are much more resistant to antibiotics and have a potential to cause infections in patients with indwelling medical devices. Materials and Methods: To determine the efficiency of an antibiotic against the biofilm it is inappropriate to use traditional technique of determining Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC on the free floating laboratory phenotype. Thus we have induced formation of biofilm in two strains (Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus, which showed heavy growth of biofilm in screening by Tube method in a flow cell system and determined their antibiotic susceptibility against ciprofloxacin by agar dilution method in the range (0.25 mg/ml to 8 mg/ml. The MIC value of ciprofloxacin for the biofilm produced organism was compared with its free form and a standard strain as control on the same plates. Observations: Both the biofilm produced strains showed a higher resistance (MIC > 8 mg/ml than its free form, which were 2 μg/ml for Pseudomonas aeruginosa and 4 mg/ml for Staphylococcus aureus. Thus biofilm can pose a threat in the patient treatment.

  13. Evaluation of gamma irradiation effect and Pseudomonas ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Antagonistic effect of Pseudomonas fluorescens and influence of gamma irradiation on the development of Penicillium expansum, the causal agent of postharvest disease on apple fruit was studied. P. fluorescens was originally isolated from rhizosphere of the apple trees. Suspension of P. fluorescens and P. expansum ...

  14. Insertional inactivation of oprD in carbapenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains isolated from burn patients in Tehran, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shariati, A; Azimi, T; Ardebili, A; Chirani, A S; Bahramian, A; Pormohammad, A; Sadredinamin, M; Erfanimanesh, S; Bostanghadiri, N; Shams, S; Hashemi, A

    2018-01-01

    In this study, we report the insertion sequence IS Ppu 21 in the opr D porin gene of carbapenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from burn patients in Tehran, Iran. Antibiotic susceptibility tests for P. aeruginosa isolates were determined. Production of metallo-β-lactamases (MBLs) and carbapenemase was evaluated and the β-lactamase-encoding and aminoglycoside-modifying enzyme genes were investigated by PCR and sequencing methods. The mRNA transcription level of oprD and mex efflux pump genes were evaluated by real-time PCR. The outer membrane protein profile was determined by SDS-PAGE. The genetic relationship between the P. aeruginosa isolates was assessed by random amplified polymorphic DNA PCR. In all, 10.52% (10/95) of clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa harboured the IS Ppu 21 insertion element in the opr D gene. The extended-spectrum β-lactamase-encoding gene in IS Ppu 21-carrying isolates was bla TEM . PCR assays targeting MBL and carbapenemase-encoding genes were also negative in all ten isolates. The rmt A, aad A, aad B and arm A genes were positive in all IS Ppu 21 harbouring isolates. The relative expression levels of the mex X, mex B, mex T and mex D genes in ten isolates ranged from 0.1- to 1.4-fold, 1.1- to 3.68-fold, 0.3- to 8.22-fold and 1.7- to 35.17-fold, respectively. The relative expression levels of the oprD in ten isolates ranged from 0.57- to 35.01-fold, which was much higher than those in the control strain P. aeruginosa PAO1. Evaluation of the outer membrane protein by SDS-PAGE suggested that opr D was produced at very low levels by all isolates. Using random amplified polymorphic DNA PCR genotyping, eight of the ten isolates containing IS Ppu 21 were shown to be clonally related. The present study describes a novel molecular mechanism, IS Ppu 21 insertion of the opr D gene, associated with carbapenem resistance in clinical P. aeruginosa isolates.

  15. Pyrrolnitrin and Hydrogen Cyanide Production by Pseudomonas chlororaphis Strain PA23 Exhibits Nematicidal and Repellent Activity against Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Munmun Nandi

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas chlororaphis strain PA23 is a biocontrol agent able to suppress growth of the fungal pathogen Sclerotinia sclerotiorum. This bacterium produces an arsenal of exometabolites including pyrrolnitrin (PRN, phenazine (PHZ, hydrogen cyanide (HCN, and degradative enzymes. Production of these compounds is controlled at both the transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels by the Gac-Rsm system, RpoS, PsrA, and the Phz quorum-sensing system. Beyond pathogen-suppression, the success of a biocontrol agent is dependent upon its ability to establish itself in the environment where predation by bacterivorous organisms, including nematodes, may threaten persistence. The focus of this study was to investigate whether PA23 is able to resist grazing by Caenorhabditis elegans and to define the role played by exoproducts in the bacterial-nematode interaction. We discovered that both PRN and HCN contribute to fast- and slow-killing of C. elegans. HCN is well-established as having lethal effects on C. elegans; however, PRN has not been reported to be nematicidal. Exposure of L4 stage nematodes to purified PRN reduced nematode viability in a dose-dependent fashion and led to reduced hatching of eggs laid by gravid adults. Because bacterial metabolites can act as chemoattractants or repellents, we analyzed whether PA23 exhibited attractant or repulsive properties towards C. elegans. Both PRN and HCN were found to be potent repellents. Next we investigated whether the presence of C. elegans would elicit changes in PA23 gene activity. Co-culturing the two organisms increased expression of a number of genes associated with biocontrol, including phzA, hcnA, phzR, phzI, rpoS and gacS. Exoproduct analysis showed that PHZ and autoinducer signals were upregulated, consistent with the gene expression profiles. Collectively, these findings indicate that PA23 is able to sense the presence of C. elegans and it is able to both repel and kill the nematodes, which

  16. Antimicrobial activity of honey of africanized bee (Apis mellifera) and stingless bee, tiuba (Melipona fasciculata) against strains of Escherichia coli, Pseudomona aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenório, Eleuza Gomes; Alves, Natália Furtado; Mendes, Bianca Evanita Pimenta

    2017-11-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the antimicrobial activity of honey of Africanized bees (Apis mellifera) and stingless bees (Melipona fasciculata), produced under the same flowering conditions, in municipalities of Baixada Maranhese, Brazil, against strains of pathogenic bacteria, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus. In each municipality, the apiary and meliponario were less than 150 meters away from each other. The Kirby-Bauer method, and the diffusion technique of the agar plate through the extension of the inhibition in millimeters were used. The test results were negative for all samples, which did not demonstrate antimicrobial activity in any of the microorganisms tested.

  17. Safety of spray-dried powder formulated Pseudomonas fluorescens strain CL145A exposure to subadult/adult unionid mussels during simulated open-water treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luoma, James A.; Weber, Kerry L.; Waller, Diane L.; Wise, Jeremy K.; Mayer, Denise A.; Aloisi, Douglas B.

    2015-01-01

    The exposure effects of a commercially prepared spray dried powder (SDP) formulation ofPseudomonas fluorescens (strain CL145A) on the survival of seven species of unionid mussels endemic to the Great Lakes and Mississippi River basins was evaluated in this study. The study exposures were completed within replicated 350-liter test tanks contained within a mobile bioassay laboratory sited on the shores of the Black River near La Crosse, Wisconsin. The test tanks were supplied with flowing, filtered river water which was interrupted during the exposure period.

  18. Use of Silica-Encapsulated Pseudomonas sp. Strain NCIB 9816-4 in Biodegradation of Novel Hydrocarbon Ring Structures Found in Hydraulic Fracturing Waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aukema, Kelly G.; Kasinkas, Lisa; Aksan, Alptekin

    2014-01-01

    The most problematic hydrocarbons in hydraulic fracturing (fracking) wastewaters consist of fused, isolated, bridged, and spiro ring systems, and ring systems have been poorly studied with respect to biodegradation, prompting the testing here of six major ring structural subclasses using a well-characterized bacterium and a silica encapsulation system previously shown to enhance biodegradation. The direct biological oxygenation of spiro ring compounds was demonstrated here. These and other hydrocarbon ring compounds have previously been shown to be present in flow-back waters and waters produced from hydraulic fracturing operations. Pseudomonas sp. strain NCIB 9816-4, containing naphthalene dioxygenase, was selected for its broad substrate specificity, and it was demonstrated here to oxidize fundamental ring structures that are common in shale-derived waters but not previously investigated with this or related enzymes. Pseudomonas sp. NCIB 9816-4 was tested here in the presence of a silica encasement, a protocol that has previously been shown to protect bacteria against the extremes of salinity present in fracking wastewaters. These studies demonstrate the degradation of highly hydrophobic compounds by a silica-encapsulated model bacterium, demonstrate what it may not degrade, and contribute to knowledge of the full range of hydrocarbon ring compounds that can be oxidized using Pseudomonas sp. NCIB 9816-4. PMID:24907321

  19. Colonization of lettuce rhizosphere and roots by tagged Streptomyces

    OpenAIRE

    Maria eBonaldi; Xiaoyulong eChen; Andrea eKunova; Cristina ePizzatti; Marco eSaracchi; Paolo eCortesi

    2015-01-01

    Beneficial microorganisms are increasingly used in agriculture, but their efficacy often fails due to limited knowledge of their interactions with plants and other microorganisms present in rhizosphere. We studied spatio-temporal colonization dynamics of lettuce roots and rhizosphere by genetically modified Streptomyces spp. Five Streptomyces strains, strongly inhibiting in vitro the major soil-borne pathogen of horticultural crops, Sclerotinia sclerotiorum, were transformed with pIJ8641 plas...

  20. Isolation and characterization of novel bacteria containing acc deaminase from the rhizosphere resource on dry-farming lands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng, P.; Tian, L.; Chen, F.; Cui, Z.

    2014-01-01

    Soil-microbe-plant interactions are known to be intricate and they can greatly influence the crop vigor and yield. Plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) containing ACC deaminase can markedly affect plant metabolic processes under stress conditions. In the present study, we isolated 300 bacterial strains from the rhizosphere of maize or apple grown in drought-hit soil including four different locations of the Loess Plateau, China. Of all isolated strains, four with ACC deaminase activity (ranging from 28.88 to 155.12 nmol alpha-ketobutyrate mg-1 h-1) were further studied by determining their biological characters and sequencing the 16S rRNA gene. All four strains showed positive performance in terms of arabinose, citrate utilization, urease, indol, glucose and melibiose. In connection with the results of biochemical characters and phylogenetic analysis, these strains commonly belong to three different genera: Klebsiella, Pseudomonas and Raoultella and four different species: Klebsiella oxytoca, Klebsiella variicola, Pseudomonas fluorescens and Raoultella planticola. Although some researchers have reported their performance under stress conditions, we are the first to report Klebsiella oxytoca, Klebsiella variicola and Raoultella planticola containing ACC deaminase under drought stress. These findings are a reasonable explanation to their superb ability of causing stress-resistance in maize (Zea mays) or apple (Malus domestica) plants. The presence of diverse PGPR possessing potential ACC deaminase activity may be beneficial for enhancing crop production under different stress conditions. (author)

  1. Whole genome sequence analysis of an Alachlor and Endosulfan degrading Pseudomonas strain W15Feb9B isolated from Ochlockonee River, Florida

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashvini Chauhan

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available We recently isolated a Pseudomonas sp. strain W15Feb9B from Ochlockonee River, Florida and demonstrated potent biodegradative activity against two commonly used pesticides - Alachlor [(2-chloro-2′,6′-diethylphenyl-N (methoxymethylacetanilide] and Endosulfan [(6,7,8,9,10,10-hexachloro-1,5,5a,6,9,9a-hexahydro-6,9methano-2,3,4-benzo(edi-oxathiepin-3-oxide], respectively. To further identify the repertoire of metabolic functions possessed by strain W15Feb9B, a draft genome sequence was obtained, assembled, annotated and analyzed. The genome sequence of strain 2385 has been deposited in GenBank under accession number JTKF00000000; BioSample number SAMN03151543. The sequences obtained from strain 2385 assembled into 192 contigs with a genome size of 6,031,588, G + C content of 60.34, and 5512 total number of putative genes. RAST annotated a total of 542 subsystems in the genome of strain W15Feb9B along with the presence of 5360 coding sequences. A genome wide survey of strain W15Feb9B indicated that it has the potential to degrade several other pollutants including atrazine, caprolactam, dioxin, PAHs (such as naphthalene and several chloroaromatic compounds.

  2. Bioavailability enhanced rhizosphere remediation of petroleum hydrocarbon contaminated soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marchenko, A.; Vorobyov, A.; Zharikov, G.; Ermolenko, Z.; Dyadishchev, N.; Borovick, R.; Sokolov, M.; Ortega-Calvo, J.J.

    2005-01-01

    contain were analyzed by gas chromatography method. Four bioassays were used to measure toxicity during bio-remediation of soil contaminated by petroleum hydrocarbons: Microtox(R) test, SOSchromotest, lettuce seed germination and sheep red blood cell (RBS) hemolysis assay. Rhizosphere remediation was found to be effective for removal of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPHs) from soil with the use of alfalfa inoculated by the Pseudomonas stutzeri MEV-S1 strain (RU 2228952 patent) and oats inoculated by the Pseudomonas alcaligenes MEV strain (RU 2228953 patent) in vegetation and field experiments. The reduction of the TPH and PAH concentrations in soil was accompanied by the reduction of integral toxicity and genotoxicity, evaluated by bio-testing. It is conceivable, therefore, that a possible way to optimize petroleum hydrocarbons phyto-remediation is the use of selected plants and microbial inoculants with specific chemotactic affinities and bio-surfactant production. The proposed technology for soil bio-remediation with the use of integrated plant-microbial system is ecologically and toxicologically safe and economically attractive

  3. Bioavailability enhanced rhizosphere remediation of petroleum hydrocarbon contaminated soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marchenko, A.; Vorobyov, A.; Zharikov, G.; Ermolenko, Z.; Dyadishchev, N.; Borovick, R.; Sokolov, M. [Research Centre for Toxicology and Hygienic Regulation of Biopreparations, Moscow region (Russian Federation); Ortega-Calvo, J.J. [Instituto de Recursos Naturales y Agrobiologia, CSIC, Sevilla (Spain)

    2005-07-01

    contain were analyzed by gas chromatography method. Four bioassays were used to measure toxicity during bio-remediation of soil contaminated by petroleum hydrocarbons: Microtox(R) test, SOSchromotest, lettuce seed germination and sheep red blood cell (RBS) hemolysis assay. Rhizosphere remediation was found to be effective for removal of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPHs) from soil with the use of alfalfa inoculated by the Pseudomonas stutzeri MEV-S1 strain (RU 2228952 patent) and oats inoculated by the Pseudomonas alcaligenes MEV strain (RU 2228953 patent) in vegetation and field experiments. The reduction of the TPH and PAH concentrations in soil was accompanied by the reduction of integral toxicity and genotoxicity, evaluated by bio-testing. It is conceivable, therefore, that a possible way to optimize petroleum hydrocarbons phyto-remediation is the use of selected plants and microbial inoculants with specific chemotactic affinities and bio-surfactant production. The proposed technology for soil bio-remediation with the use of integrated plant-microbial system is ecologically and toxicologically safe and economically attractive.

  4. Draft Genome Sequence of Pseudomonas sp. Strain In5 Isolated from a Greenlandic Disease Suppressive Soil with Potent Antimicrobial Activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hennessy, Rosanna C.; Glaring, Mikkel Andreas; Frydenlund Michelsen, Charlotte

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas sp. In5 is an isolate of disease suppressive soil with potent activity against pathogens. Its antifungal activity has been linked to a gene cluster encoding nonribosomal peptide synthetases producing the peptides nunamycin and nunapeptin. The genome sequence will provide insight into ...

  5. In-Vivo Expression Profiling of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Infections Reveals Niche-Specific and Strain-Independent Transcriptional Programs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bielecki, P.; Puchalka, J.; Wos-Oxley, M.L.; Martins Dos Santos, V.A.P.

    2011-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a threatening, opportunistic pathogen causing disease in immunocompromised individuals. The hallmark of P. aeruginosa virulence is its multi-factorial and combinatorial nature. It renders such bacteria infectious for many organisms and it is often resistant to antibiotics.

  6. Biofilm and metallo beta-lactamase production among the strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter spp. at a Tertiary Care Hospital in Kathmandu, Nepal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bandana Baniya

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter spp. are found to be associated with biofilm and metallo-β-lactamase production and are the common causes of serious infections mainly in hospitalized patients. So, the main aims of this study were to determine the rates of biofilm production and metallo beta-lactamase production (MBL among the strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter spp. isolated from hospitalized patients. Methods A total of 85 P. aeruginosa isolates and 50 Acinetobacter spp. isolates isolated from different clinical specimens from patients admitted to Shree Birendra Hospital, Kathmandu, Nepal from July 2013 to May 2014 were included in this study. The bacterial isolates were identified with the help of biochemical tests. Modified Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion technique was used for antimicrobial susceptibility testing. Combined disc diffusion technique was used for the detection of MBL production, while Congo red agar method and tube adherence method were used for detection of biofilm production. Results Around 16.4% of P. aeruginosa isolates and 22% of the strains of Acinetobacter spp. were metallo β-lactamase producers. Out of 85 P. aeruginosa isolates, 23 (27.05% were biofilm producers according to tube adherence test while, only 13 (15.29% were biofilm producers as per Congo red agar method. Similarly, out of 50 Acinetobacter spp. 7 (14% isolates were biofilm producers on the basis of tube adherence test, while only 5 (10% were positive for biofilm production by Congo red agar method. Highest rates of susceptibility of P. aeruginosa as well as Acinetobacter spp. were seen toward colistin. Conclusion In our study, biofilm production and metallo beta-lactamase production were observed among Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter spp. However, no statistically significant association could be established between biofilm production and metallo beta-lactamase production.

  7. Bacterial Feeders, the Nematode Caenorhabditis elegans and the Flagellate Cercomonas longicauda, have different Effects on Outcome of Competition among the Pseudomonas Biocontrol Strains CHA0 and DSS73

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Annette; Nybroe, Ole; Winding, Anne

    2009-01-01

    How bacterial feeding fauna affects colonization and survival of bacteria in soil is not well understood, which constrains the applicability of bacterial inoculants in agriculture. This study aimed to unravel how food quality of bacteria and bacterial feeders with different feeding habits (the......50090 or one of two biocontrol strains P. fluorescens CHA0 or Pseudomonas sp. DSS73) or combinations of two bacterial strains. DSM50090 is a suitable food bacterium, DSS73 is of intermediate food quality, and CHA0 is inedible to the bacterial feeders. Bacterial and protozoan cell numbers were measured...... predation pressure. Hence, the results suggested that the outcome of competition among bacteria depended on their ability to cope with the prevailing bacterial predator....

  8. The influence of the marine aerobic Pseudomonas strain on the corrosion of 70/30 Cu-Ni alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan, S.J.; Choong, Amy M.F.; Pehkonen, S.O.

    2007-01-01

    A comparative study of the corrosion behavior of the 70/30 Cu-Ni alloy in a nutrient-rich simulated seawater-based nutrient-rich medium in the presence and the absence of a marine aerobic Pseudomonas bacterium was carried out by electrochemical experiments, microscopic methods and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The results of Tafel plot measurements showed the noticeable increase in the corrosion rate of the alloy in the presence of the Pseudomonas bacteria as compared to the corresponding control samples. The E1S data demonstrated that the charge transfer resistance, R ct , and the resistance of oxide film, R f , gradually increased with time in the abiotic medium; whereas, both of them dramatically decreased with time in the biotic medium inoculated with the Pseudomonas, indicative of the acceleration of corrosion rates of the alloy. The bacterial cells preferentially attached themselves to the alloy surface to form patchy or blotchy biofilms, as observed by fluorescent microscopy (FM). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images revealed the occurrence of micro-pitting corrosion underneath the biofilms on the alloy surface after the biofilm removal. XPS studies presented the evolution of the passive film on the alloy surface with time in the presence and the absence of the Pseudomonas bacteria under experimental conditions, and further revealed that the presence of the Pseudomonas cells and its extra-cellular polymers (EPS) on the alloy surface retarded the formation process or impaired the protective nature of the oxide film. Furthermore, XPS results verified the difference in the chelating functional groups between the conditioning layers and the bacterial cells and the EPS in the biofilms, which was believed to connect with the loss of the passivity of the protective oxide film

  9. Identification and characterisation of potential biofertilizer bacterial strains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karagöz, Kenan; Kotan, Recep; Dadaşoǧlu, Fatih; Dadaşoǧlu, Esin

    2016-04-01

    In this study we aimed that isolation, identification and characterizations of PGPR strains from rhizosphere of legume plants. 188 bacterial strains isolated from different legume plants like clover, sainfoin and vetch in Erzurum province of Turkey. These three plants are cultivated commonly in the Erzurum province. It was screen that 50 out of 188 strains can fix nitrogen and solubilize phosphate. These strains were identified via MIS (Microbial identification system). According to MIS identification results, 40 out of 50 strains were identified as Bacillus, 5 as Pseudomonas, 3 as Paenibacillus, 1 as Acinetobacter, 1 as Brevibacterium. According to classical test results, while the catalase test result of all isolates are positive, oxidase, KOH and starch hydrolysis rest results are variable.

  10. Draft Genome Sequence of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens EBL11, a New Strain of Plant Growth-Promoting Bacterium Isolated from Rice Rhizosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yinghuan; Greenfield, Paul; Jin, Decai

    2014-01-01

    Bacillus amyloliquefaciens strain EBL11 is a bacterium that can promote plant growth by inhibiting the growth of fungi on plant surfaces and providing nutrients as a nonchemical biofertilizer. The estimated genome of this strain is 4.05 Mb in size and harbors 3,683 coding genes (CDSs). PMID:25059875

  11. Non-target trials with Pseudomonas fluorescens strain CL145A, a lethal control agent of dreissenid mussels (Bivalvia: Dreissenidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel P. Molloy

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In an effort to develop an efficacious and environmentally safe method for managing zebra mussels (Dreissena polymorpha and quaggamussels (Dreissena rostriformis bugensis, we initiated a research project investigating the potential use of bacteria and their naturalmetabolic products as biocontrol agents. This project resulted in the discovery of an environmental isolate lethal to dreissenid mussels,Pseudomonas fluorescens strain CL145A (Pf-CL145A. In previous published reports we have demonstrated that: 1 Pf-CL145A’s mode ofaction is intoxication (not infection; 2 natural product within ingested bacterial cells lyse digestive tract epithelial cells leading to dreisseniddeath; and 3 high dreissenid kill rates (>90% are achievable following treatment with Pf-CL145A cells, irrespective of whether thebacterial cells are dead or alive. Investigating the environmental safety of Pf-CL145A was also a key element in our research efforts, andherein, we report the results of non-target trials demonstrating Pf-CL145A’s high specificity to dreissenids. These acute toxicity trials weretypically single-dose, short-term (24-72 h exposures to Pf-CL145A cells under aerated conditions at concentrations highly lethal todreissenids (100 or 200 mg/L. These trials produced no evidence of mortality among the ciliate Colpidium colpoda, the cladoceran Daphniamagna, three fish species (Pimephales promelas, Salmo trutta, and Lepomis macrochirus, and seven bivalve species (Mytilus edulis,Pyganodon grandis, Pyganodon cataracta, Lasmigona compressa, Strophitus undulatus, Lampsilis radiata, and Elliptio complanata. Lowmortality (3-27% was recorded in the amphipod Hyalella azteca, but additional trials suggested that most, if not all, of the mortality couldbe attributed to some other unidentified factor (e.g., possibly particle load or a water quality issue rather than Pf-CL145A’s dreissenidkillingnatural product. In terms of potential environmental safety, the results of

  12. The Ssr protein (T1E_1405) from Pseudomonas putida DOT-T1E enables oligonucleotide-based recombineering in platform strain P. putida EM42

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aparicio, Tomás; Ingemann Jensen, Sheila; Nielsen, Alex Toftgaard

    2016-01-01

    Some strains of the soil bacterium Pseudomonas putida have become in recent years platforms of choice for hosting biotransformations of industrial interest. Despite availability of many genetic tools for this microorganism, genomic editing of the cell factory P. putida EM42 (a derivative of refer......Some strains of the soil bacterium Pseudomonas putida have become in recent years platforms of choice for hosting biotransformations of industrial interest. Despite availability of many genetic tools for this microorganism, genomic editing of the cell factory P. putida EM42 (a derivative...

  13. The change of antibiotic resistance profiles over the years in Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumannii strains isolated from intensive care units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Cem Şirin

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to determine the antibiotic resistance profiles of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumannii strains isolated from patients in our hospital intensive care units (ICUs between the years 2011-2014 and to investigate the changes of these profiles over the years. Methods: Identification and antibiotic susceptibility testing of the strains were performed by automated system. Cefoperazone-sulbactam and tigecycline susceptibility was determined by disk diffusion method. Imipenem, meropenem and colistin resistance was confirmed by E-test method. Chi-square and Fisher's exact test were used to compare the antibiotic susceptibilities statistically. Results: The highest resistance rates were determined for imipenem (50.2%, meropenem (51.9% and piperacillin-tazobactam (64.0% in P. aeruginosa strains (n=722. The changes in the rates of antibiotic resistance were not statistically significant in P. aeruginosa strains between the years 2011 and 2014. The decrease in gentamicin, amikacin and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole resistance and the increase in cefoperazone-sulbactam and tigecycline resistance was found to be statistically significant in A. baumannii strains (n=1044 between the years 2011 and 2014. The increase in imipenem and meropenem resistance was found to be statistically significant between the years 2012 and 2013. Piperacillin-tazobactam, ceftazidime, cefepime, imipenem and meropenem resistances in A. baumannii strains were found to be over 95% in all the years. Colistin was found to be the most effective antimicrobial agent for both bacteria. Conclusion: The determination of considerably high antibiotic resistance rates in P. aeruginosa and A. baumannii strains isolated from our hospital ICUs has indicated that rational antibiotic use policies and more effective infection control programs should be applied along with monitoring the antibiotic susceptibility profiles constantly. J Clin Exp Invest 2015

  14. Role of ptsP, orfT, and sss recombinase genes in root colonization by Pseudomonas fluorescens Q8r1-96.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavrodi, Olga V; Mavrodi, Dmitri V; Weller, David M; Thomashow, Linda S

    2006-11-01

    Pseudomonas fluorescens Q8r1-96 produces 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol (2,4-DAPG), a polyketide antibiotic that suppresses a wide variety of soilborne fungal pathogens, including Gaeumannomyces graminis var. tritici, which causes take-all disease of wheat. Strain Q8r1-96 is representative of the D-genotype of 2,4-DAPG producers, which are exceptional because of their ability to aggressively colonize and maintain large populations on the roots of host plants, including wheat, pea, and sugar beet. In this study, three genes, an sss recombinase gene, ptsP, and orfT, which are important in the interaction of Pseudomonas spp. with various hosts, were investigated to determine their contributions to the unusual colonization properties of strain Q8r1-96. The sss recombinase and ptsP genes influence global processes, including phenotypic plasticity and organic nitrogen utilization, respectively. The orfT gene contributes to the pathogenicity of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in plants and animals and is conserved among saprophytic rhizosphere pseudomonads, but its function is unknown. Clones containing these genes were identified in a Q8r1-96 genomic library, sequenced, and used to construct gene replacement mutants of Q8r1-96. Mutants were characterized to determine their 2,4-DAPG production, motility, fluorescence, colony morphology, exoprotease and hydrogen cyanide (HCN) production, carbon and nitrogen utilization, and ability to colonize the rhizosphere of wheat grown in natural soil. The ptsP mutant was impaired in wheat root colonization, whereas mutants with mutations in the sss recombinase gene and orfT were not. However, all three mutants were less competitive than wild-type P. fluorescens Q8r1-96 in the wheat rhizosphere when they were introduced into the soil by paired inoculation with the parental strain.

  15. Ocorrência de linhagens de Pseudomonas aeruginosa cloro resistentes em águas de diferentes origens = Ocurrence of chlorine resistant strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa from different water sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glícia Maria Torres Calazans

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa é conhecida por sua versatilidade metabólica e extrema capacidade de adaptação a diferentes ambientes, inclusive aquáticos. Para desinfecção de águas, o cloro e agentes que contêm cloro continuam sendo os mais usados no mundo. O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar a resistência ao cloro de linhagens de P. aeruginosa, isoladas de amostras de águas de diversos ambientes. Foram testados diferentes tempos de contato (1, 5, 10, 20, 30 e 40 minutos e soluções aquosas de cloro, com concentrações definidascom base na legislação vigente no país para água potável: 0,5; 1,0 e 2,0 ppm. O teste de resistência ao cloro foi desenvolvido por meio da exposição direta das bactérias às soluções. Os resultados revelaram que P. aeruginosa, isoladas de diferentes fontes de água, têm ahabilidade de sobreviver a diferentes concentrações de cloro. Na concentração de 1 ppm, a maioria das linhagens não foi inibida. As linhagens mais resistentes ao cloro também apresentaram relação de multirresistência à maioria dos antibióticos testados.The nutritional versatility and the adaptability of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to different environments, including water, are well known. Chlorine and other chlorine agents are used as water disinfecting all around the world. The aim of this work was to evaluate the possible chlorine resistance amongst P. aeruginosa strains isolated from different aquatic sources by using different contact time (1, 5, 10, 20, 30 and 40 minutes in solutions with known chlorine concentrations according current legislation in the country to potable water: 0.5; 1.0 and 2.0 ppm. The chlorine resistance test was done by direct exposure of P. aeruginosa under a solution with known chlorine concentration. Results showed that P. aeruginosa strains isolated from different aquatic sources are able tosurvive in different chlorine concentrations. At 1 ppm, most of them were not inhibited. It was also observed

  16. Comparison of arbitrarily primed-polymerase chain reaction and plasmid profiles typing of Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains from burn patients and hospital environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Japoni, A.; Farshad, S.; Alborzi, A.; Kalani, M.; Mohamadzadegan, R.

    2007-01-01

    Objective was to identify the strengths and weakness of arbitrary primed-polymerase chain reaction (A P-PCR) and plasmid profiles for typing of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) and tracking of source of infections. Seventy-four strains of P. aeruginosa were isolated from burn patients and hospital environment between January to April 2003 in Ghotbadden Burn Hospital, Shiraz, Iran. The strains were classified by photo Capt Mw program, similarity and clustering of strains were assessed using NTSYS-PC version 2.02K software. Based on 50% and 64.7% and 67.5% similarity on the plotted dendrogram, 38 plasmid profiles were classified into: 2, 3 and 5 clusters, respectively. Photo Capt Mw program categorized AP-PCR products to 47 different types of 6 to 12 bands between 0.376 to 3.7 kb. Based on dendrogram pattern 3 levels (62 %, 81% and 84.6%) of similarity were selected. Using these criteria 2, 5and 11 clusters were obtained, respectively. As compared with plasmid profiles, AP-PCR analysis protocol is rapid, reproducible and differentiated the isolates with higher discrimination power. These results suggest that during admission of patients in burn center a limited number of common strains cross-contaminate burn victims. However, transmissions of infection from hospital environment to patients also occur in the minority of the victims. To control cross-contamination of the patient wounds with antibiotics resistant isolates, strong disinfection of patients' bathroom after scrubbing of each patient wounds is mandatory. (author)

  17. Characterization of hydrocarbon-degrading and biosurfactant-producing Pseudomonas sp. P-1 strain as a potential tool for bioremediation of petroleum-contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacwa-Płociniczak, Magdalena; Płaza, Grażyna Anna; Poliwoda, Anna; Piotrowska-Seget, Zofia

    2014-01-01

    The Pseudomonas sp. P-1 strain, isolated from heavily petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated soil, was investigated for its capability to degrade hydrocarbons and produce a biosurfactant. The strain degraded crude oil, fractions A5 and P3 of crude oil, and hexadecane (27, 39, 27 and 13% of hydrocarbons added to culture medium were degraded, respectively) but had no ability to degrade phenanthrene. Additionally, the presence of gene-encoding enzymes responsible for the degradation of alkanes and naphthalene in the genome of the P-1 strain was reported. Positive results of blood agar and methylene blue agar tests, as well as the presence of gene rhl, involved in the biosynthesis of rhamnolipid, confirmed the ability of P-1 for synthesis of glycolipid biosurfactant. 1H and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance, Fourier transform infrared spectrum and mass spectrum analyses indicated that the extracted biosurfactant was affiliated with rhamnolipid. The results of this study indicate that the P-1 and/or biosurfactant produced by this strain have the potential to be used in bioremediation of hydrocarbon-contaminated soils.

  18. A laminar flow model of aerosol survival of epidemic and non-epidemic strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from people with cystic fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denton Miles

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cystic fibrosis (CF is an inherited multi-system disorder characterised by chronic airway infection with pathogens such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Acquisition of P. aeruginosa by patients with CF is usually from the environment, but recent studies have demonstrated patient to patient transmission of certain epidemic strains, possibly via an airborne route. This study was designed to examine the survival of P. aeruginosa within artificially generated aerosols. Results Survival was effected by the solution used for aerosol generation. Within the aerosols it was adversely affected by an increase in air temperature. Both epidemic and non-epidemic strains of P. aeruginosa were able to survive within the aerosols, but strains expressing a mucoid phenotype had a survival advantage. Conclusion This would suggest that segregating individuals free of P. aeruginosa from those with chronic P. aeruginosa infection who are more likely to be infected with mucoid strains may help reduce the risk of cross-infection. Environmental factors also appear to influence bacterial survival. Warming and drying the air within clinical areas and avoidance of humidification devices may also be beneficial in reducing the risk of cross-infection.

  19. Potential applications of Pseudomonas sp. (strain CPSB21) to ameliorate Cr6+ stress and phytoremediation of tannery effluent contaminated agricultural soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Pratishtha; Rani, Rupa; Chandra, Avantika; Kumar, Vipin

    2018-03-20

    Contamination of agricultural soil with heavy metals has become a serious concern worldwide. In the present study, Cr 6+ resistant plant growth promoting Pseudomonas sp. (strain CPSB21) was isolated from the tannery effluent contaminated agricultural soils and evaluated for the plant growth promoting activities, oxidative stress tolerance, and Cr 6+ bioremediation. Assessment of different plant growth promotion traits, such as phosphate solubilization, indole-3-acetic acid production, siderophores, ammonia and hydrogen cyanide production, revealed that the strain CPSB21 served as an efficient plant growth promoter under laboratory conditions. A pot experiment was performed using sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) and tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) as a test crop. Cr 6+ toxicity reduced plant growth, pigment content, N and P uptake, and Fe accumulation. However, inoculation of strain CPSB21 alleviated the Cr 6+ toxicity and enhanced the plant growth parameters and nutrient uptake. Moreover, Cr toxicity had varied response on oxidative stress tolerance at graded Cr 6+ concentration on both plants. An increase in superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) activity and reduction in malonialdehyde (MDA) was observed on inoculation of strain CPSB21. Additionally, inoculation of CPSB21 enhanced the uptake of Cr 6+ in sunflower plant, while no substantial enhancement was observed on inoculation in tomato plant.

  20. Phenylacetic acid-producing Rhizoctonia solani represses the biosynthesis of nematicidal compounds in vitro and influences biocontrol of Meloidogyne incognita in tomato by Pseudomonas fluorescens strain CHA0 and its GM derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiqui, I A; Shaukat, S S

    2005-01-01

    The aim of the present investigation was to determine the influence of Rhizoctonia solani and its pathogenicity factor on the production of nematicidal agent(s) by Pseudomonas fluorescens strain CHA0 and its GM derivatives in vitro and nematode biocontrol potential by bacterial inoculants in tomato. One (Rs7) of the nine R. solani isolates from infected tomato roots inhibited seedling emergence and caused root rot in tomato. Thin layer chromatography revealed that culture filtrates of two isolates (Rs3 and Rs7) produced brown spots at Rf-values closely similar to synthetic phenylacetic acid (PAA), a phytotoxic factor. Filtrates from isolate Rs7, amended with the growth medium of P. fluorescens, markedly repressed nematicidal activity and PhlA'-'LacZ reporter gene expression of the bacteria in vitro. On the contrary, isolate Rs4 enhanced nematicidal potential of a 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol overproducing mutant, CHA0/pME3424, of P. fluorescens strain CHA0 in vitro. Therefore, R. solani isolates Rs4 and Rs7 were tested more rigorously for their potential to influence biocontrol effectiveness of the bacterial agents. Methanol extract of the culture filtrates of PAA-producing isolate Rs7 resulting from medium amended with phenylalanine enhanced fungal repression of the production of nematicidal agents by bacteria, while amendments with zinc or molybdenum eliminated such fungal repression, thereby restoring bacterial potential to cause nematode mortality in vitro. A pot experiment was carried out, 3-week-old tomato seedlings were infested with R. solani isolates Rs4 or Rs7 and/or inoculated with Meloidogyne incognita, the root-knot nematode. The infested soil was treated with aqueous cell suspensions (10(8) CFU) of P. fluorescens strain CHA0 or its GM derivatives or left untreated (as a control). Observations taken 45 days after nematode inoculation revealed that, irrespective of the bacterial treatments, galling intensity per gram of fresh tomato roots was markedly

  1. Studies on the O-specific polysaccharide of the lipopolysaccharide from the Pseudomonas mediterranea strain C5P1rad1, a bacterium pathogenic of tomato and chrysanthemum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zdorovenko, Evelina L; Cimmino, Alessio; Marchi, Guido; Shashkov, Alexander S; Fiori, Mario; Knirel, Yuriy A; Evidente, Antonio

    2017-08-07

    An O-specific polysaccharide (OPS) was isolated from the lipopolysaccharide of Pseudomonas mediterranea strain C5P1rad1, the causal agents of tomato pith necrosis and Chrysanthemum stem rot, and studied by one- and two-dimensional 1 H and 13 C NMR spectroscopy. The following structure of the trisaccharide repeating unit of the OPS was established, which, to our knowledge, is unique among the known bacterial polysaccharide structures: →4)-β-d-ManpNAc3NAcA-(1 → 4)-β-d-ManpNAc3NAcA-(1 → 3)-α-d-QuipNAc4NAc-(1→ where QuiNAc4NAc and ManNAc3NAcA indicate 2,4-diacetamido-2,4,6-trideoxyglucose and 2,3-diacetamido-2,3-dideoxymannuronic acid, respectively. Pre-treatment of leaves with LPS or OPS preparations at 250 and 50 μg mL -1 did not inhibit development of a hypersensitivity reaction induced by P. mediterranea C5P1rad1 on tobacco, tomato and chrysanthemum plants. The same preparations at 250 μg mL -1 partially prevented elicitation of the hypersensitivity reaction by Pseudomonas syringae KVPT7RC on chrysanthemum but not tobacco and tomato. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. Proof of concept for the simplified breakdown of cellulose by combining Pseudomonas putida strains with surface displayed thermophilic endocellulase, exocellulase and β-glucosidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tozakidis, Iasson E P; Brossette, Tatjana; Lenz, Florian; Maas, Ruth M; Jose, Joachim

    2016-06-10

    The production and employment of cellulases still represents an economic bottleneck in the conversion of lignocellulosic biomass to biofuels and other biocommodities. This process could be simplified by displaying the necessary enzymes on a microbial cell surface. Such an approach, however, requires an appropriate host organism which on the one hand can withstand the rough environment coming along with lignocellulose hydrolysis, and on the other hand does not consume the generated glucose so that it remains available for subsequent fermentation steps. The robust soil bacterium Pseudomonas putida showed a strongly reduced uptake of glucose above a temperature of 50 °C, while remaining structurally intact hence recyclable, which makes it suitable for cellulose hydrolysis at elevated temperatures. Consequently, three complementary, thermophilic cellulases from Ruminiclostridium thermocellum were displayed on the surface of the bacterium. All three enzymes retained their activity on the cell surface. A mixture of three strains displaying each one of these enzymes was able to synergistically hydrolyze filter paper at 55 °C, producing 20 μg glucose per mL cell suspension in 24 h. We could establish Pseudomonas putida as host for the surface display of cellulases, and provided proof-of-concept for a fast and simple cellulose breakdown process at elevated temperatures. This study opens up new perspectives for the application of P. putida in the production of biofuels and other biotechnological products.

  3. The consistent differential expression of genetic pathways following exposure of an industrial Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain to preservatives and a laundry detergent formulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amézquita, Alejandro; Le Marc, Yvan; Bull, Matthew J; Connor, Thomas R; Mahenthiralingam, Eshwar

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a common contaminant associated with product recalls in the home and personal care industry. Preservation systems are used to prevent spoilage and protect consumers, but greater knowledge is needed of preservative resistance mechanisms used by P. aeruginosa contaminants. We aimed to identify genetic pathways associated with preservative exposure by using an industrial P. aeruginosa strain and implementing RNA-Seq to understand gene expression changes in response to industry relevant conditions. The consistent differential expression of five genetic pathways during exposure to multiple industrial growth conditions associated with benzisothiazolone (BIT) and phenoxyethanol (POE) preservatives, and a laundry detergent (LD) formulation, was observed. A MexPQ-OpmE Resistance Nodulation Division efflux pump system was commonly upregulated in response to POE, a combination of BIT and POE, and LD together with BIT. In response to all industry conditions, a putative sialic acid transporter and isoprenoid biosynthesis gnyRDBHAL operon demonstrated consistent upregulation. Two operons phnBA and pqsEDCBA involved in Pseudomonas quinolone signaling production and quorum-sensing were also consistently downregulated during exposure to all the industry conditions. The ability to identify consistently differentially expressed genetic pathways in P. aeruginosa can inform the development of future targeted preservation systems that maintain product safety and minimise resistance development. PMID:29548026

  4. Augmented effect of early antibiotic treatment in mice with experimental lung infections due to sequentially adapted mucoid strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Gennip, M; Moser, Claus; Christensen, Louise D

    2009-01-01

    : A significant reduction in the number of bacteria was observed when initiating treatment 1 h post-infection compared with initiating treatment after 24 h, although the latest isolate avoided complete clearance. Early antibiotic treatment directed at the mucoid phenotype in mice also reduced the inflammation and......Background: Effects of treatment with tobramycin initiated 1 or 24 h post-infection were investigated in a new version of a pulmonary infection model in mice. The model reflects the differentiated behaviour of Pseudomonas aeruginosa mucoid strains isolated from the lungs of one chronically infected......, histopathology, and measurement of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) and macrophage inflammatory protein 2 (MIP-2). Results: There was a significant reduction of bacteria when comparing treatment initiated 1 h post-infection with treatment initiated after 24 h for isolates 1997 and 2003. Treatment...

  5. Antimicrobial activity of honey of stingless bees, tiúba (Melipona fasciculata) and jandaira (Melipona subnitida) compared to the strains of Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenório, Eleuza Gomes; de Jesus, Natália Rocha; Nascimento, Adenilde Ribeiro; Teles, Amanda Mara

    2015-12-01

    This study aimed to investigate the antimicrobial activity of honeys of stingless bees produced in Maranhão, tiúba (Melipona fasciculata) and jandaira (Melipona subnitida), opposite the strains of pathogenic bacteria, namely, Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The honey samples were collected from different regions of Maranhão. Of the 17 samples collected, twelve samples were honey M. fasciculata and five were honey M. subnitida. We used the Kirby-Bauer method, and the technique of agar disk diffusion through the extent of inhibition in milimetros. Results were negative for all samples from M. fasciculata. However, the tests for M. subnitida demonstrated bacteriostatic halos ranging from 12 to 32,6mm.

  6. Draft Genome Sequence of Pseudomonas sp. Strain Ep R1 Isolated from Echinacea purpurea Roots and Effective in the Growth Inhibition of Human Opportunistic Pathogens Belonging to the Burkholderia cepacia Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maggini, Valentina; Presta, Luana; Miceli, Elisangela; Fondi, Marco; Bosi, Emanuele; Chiellini, Carolina; Fagorzi, Camilla; Bogani, Patrizia; Di Pilato, Vincenzo; Rossolini, Gian Maria; Mengoni, Alessio; Firenzuoli, Fabio; Perrin, Elena; Fani, Renato

    2017-05-18

    In this announcement, we detail the draft genome sequence of the Pseudomonas sp. strain Ep R1, isolated from the roots of the medicinal plant Echinacea purpurea The elucidation of this genome sequence may allow the identification of genes associated with the production of antimicrobial compounds. Copyright © 2017 Maggini et al.

  7. A newly isolated Pseudomonas putida S-1 strain for batch-mode-propanethiol degradation and continuous treatment of propanethiol-containing waste gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Dong-Zhi, E-mail: cdz@zjut.edu.cn [College of Biological and Environmental Engineering, Zhejiang University of Technology, Hangzhou 310032 (China); Sun, Yi-Ming; Han, Li-Mei [College of Biological and Environmental Engineering, Zhejiang University of Technology, Hangzhou 310032 (China); Chen, Jing [College of Food and Pharmacy, Zhejiang Ocean University, Zhoushan 316004 (China); Ye, Jie-Xu; Chen, Jian-Meng [College of Biological and Environmental Engineering, Zhejiang University of Technology, Hangzhou 310032 (China)

    2016-01-25

    Highlights: • A novel strain capable of effectively degrading 1-propanethiol (PT) was isolated. • Cells could be feasibly cultured in nutrition-rich media for PT degradation. • A possible pathway for PT degradation was proposed. • Pseudomonas putida S-1 could degrade mixed pollutants with diauxic growth. • Continuous removal of gaseous PT with or without isopropanol was demonstrated. - Abstract: Pseudomonas putida S-1 was isolated from activated sludge. This novel strain was capable of degrading malodorous 1-propanethiol (PT). PT degradation commenced with no lag phase by cells pre-grown in nutrition-rich media, such as Luria–Bertani (LB), and PT-contained mineral medium at specific growth rates of 0.10–0.19 h{sup −1}; this phenomenon indicated the operability of a large-scale cell culture. A possible PT degradation pathway was proposed on the basis of the detected metabolites, including dipropyl disulfide, 3-hexanone, 2-hexanone, 3-hexanol, 2-hexanol, S{sup 0}, SO{sub 4}{sup 2−}, and CO{sub 2}. P. putida S-1 could degrade mixed pollutants containing PT, diethyl disulfide, isopropyl alcohol, and acetaldehyde, and LB-pre-cultured cells underwent diauxic growth. Waste gas contaminated with 200–400 mg/m{sup 3} PT was continuously treated by P. putida S-1 pre-cultured in LB medium in a completely stirred tank reactor. The removal efficiencies exceeded 88% when PT stream was mixed with 200 mg/m{sup 3} isopropanol; by contrast, the removal efficiencies decreased to 60% as the empty bed residence time was shortened from 40 s to 20 s.

  8. Characterization of a marine-isolated mercury-resistant Pseudomonas putida strain SP1 and its potential application in marine mercury reduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Weiwei; Chen, Lingxin; Liu, Dongyan [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Yantai, SD (China). Yantai Inst. of Coastal Zone Research (YICCAS); Chinese Academy of Sciences, Yantai, SD (China). Shandong Provincial Key Lab. of Coastal Zone Environmental Processes

    2012-02-15

    The Pseudomonas putida strain SP1 was isolated from marine environment and was found to be resistant to 280 {mu}M HgCl{sub 2}. SP1 was also highly resistant to other metals, including CdCl{sub 2}, CoCl{sub 2}, CrCl{sub 3}, CuCl{sub 2}, PbCl{sub 2}, and ZnSO{sub 4}, and the antibiotics ampicillin (Ap), kanamycin (Kn), chloramphenicol (Cm), and tetracycline (Tc). mer operon, possessed by most mercury-resistant bacteria, and other diverse types of resistant determinants were all located on the bacterial chromosome. Cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry and a volatilization test indicated that the isolated P. putida SP1 was able to volatilize almost 100% of the total mercury it was exposed to and could potentially be used for bioremediation in marine environments. The optimal pH for the growth of P. putida SP1 in the presence of HgCl{sub 2} and the removal of HgCl{sub 2} by P. putida SP1 was between 8.0 and 9.0, whereas the optimal pH for the expression of merA, the mercuric reductase enzyme in mer operon that reduces reactive Hg{sup 2+} to volatile and relatively inert monoatomic Hg{sup 0} vapor, was around 5.0. LD50 of P. putida SP1 to flounder and turbot was 1.5 x 10{sup 9} CFU. Biofilm developed by P. putida SP1 was 1- to 3-fold lower than biofilm developed by an aquatic pathogen Pseudomonas fluorescens TSS. The results of this study indicate that P. putida SP1 is a low virulence strain that can potentially be applied in the bioremediation of HgCl{sub 2} contamination over a broad range of pH. (orig.)

  9. Mercury (II) removal by resistant bacterial isolates and mercuric (II) reductase activity in a new strain of Pseudomonas sp. B50A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giovanella, Patricia; Cabral, Lucélia; Bento, Fátima Menezes; Gianello, Clesio; Camargo, Flávio Anastácio Oliveira

    2016-01-25

    This study aimed to isolate mercury resistant bacteria, determine the minimum inhibitory concentration for Hg, estimate mercury removal by selected isolates, explore the mer genes, and detect and characterize the activity of the enzyme mercuric (II) reductase produced by a new strain of Pseudomonas sp. B50A. The Hg removal capacity of the isolates was determined by incubating the isolates in Luria Bertani broth and the remaining mercury quantified by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. A PCR reaction was carried out to detect the merA gene and the mercury (II) reductase activity was determined in a spectrophotometer at 340 nm. Eight Gram-negative bacterial isolates were resistant to high mercury concentrations and capable of removing mercury, and of these, five were positive for the gene merA. The isolate Pseudomonas sp. B50A removed 86% of the mercury present in the culture medium and was chosen for further analysis of its enzyme activity. Mercuric (II) reductase activity was detected in the crude extract of this strain. This enzyme showed optimal activity at pH 8 and at temperatures between 37 °C and 45 °C. The ions NH4(+), Ba(2+), Sn(2+), Ni(2+) and Cd(2+) neither inhibited nor stimulated the enzyme activity but it decreased in the presence of the ions Ca(2+), Cu(+) and K(+). The isolate and the enzyme detected were effective in reducing Hg(II) to Hg(0), showing the potential to develop bioremediation technologies and processes to clean-up the environment and waste contaminated with mercury. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. A newly isolated Pseudomonas putida S-1 strain for batch-mode-propanethiol degradation and continuous treatment of propanethiol-containing waste gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Dong-Zhi; Sun, Yi-Ming; Han, Li-Mei; Chen, Jing; Ye, Jie-Xu; Chen, Jian-Meng

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A novel strain capable of effectively degrading 1-propanethiol (PT) was isolated. • Cells could be feasibly cultured in nutrition-rich media for PT degradation. • A possible pathway for PT degradation was proposed. • Pseudomonas putida S-1 could degrade mixed pollutants with diauxic growth. • Continuous removal of gaseous PT with or without isopropanol was demonstrated. - Abstract: Pseudomonas putida S-1 was isolated from activated sludge. This novel strain was capable of degrading malodorous 1-propanethiol (PT). PT degradation commenced with no lag phase by cells pre-grown in nutrition-rich media, such as Luria–Bertani (LB), and PT-contained mineral medium at specific growth rates of 0.10–0.19 h"−"1; this phenomenon indicated the operability of a large-scale cell culture. A possible PT degradation pathway was proposed on the basis of the detected metabolites, including dipropyl disulfide, 3-hexanone, 2-hexanone, 3-hexanol, 2-hexanol, S"0, SO_4"2"−, and CO_2. P. putida S-1 could degrade mixed pollutants containing PT, diethyl disulfide, isopropyl alcohol, and acetaldehyde, and LB-pre-cultured cells underwent diauxic growth. Waste gas contaminated with 200–400 mg/m"3 PT was continuously treated by P. putida S-1 pre-cultured in LB medium in a completely stirred tank reactor. The removal efficiencies exceeded 88% when PT stream was mixed with 200 mg/m"3 isopropanol; by contrast, the removal efficiencies decreased to 60% as the empty bed residence time was shortened from 40 s to 20 s.

  11. Chemotaxis and degradation of organophosphate compound by a novel moderately thermo-halo tolerant Pseudomonas sp. strain BUR11: evidence for possible existence of two pathways for degradation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santanu Pailan

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available An organophosphate (OP degrading chemotactic bacterial strain BUR11 isolated from an agricultural field was identified as a member of Pseudomonas genus on the basis of its 16S rRNA gene sequence. The strain could utilize parathion, chlorpyrifos and their major hydrolytic intermediates as sole source of carbon for its growth and exhibited positive chemotactic response towards most of them. Optimum concentration of parathion for its growth was recorded to be 200 ppm and 62% of which was degraded within 96 h at 37 °C. Growth studies indicated the strain to be moderately thermo-halo tolerant in nature. Investigation based on identification of intermediates of parathion degradation by thin layer chromatography (TLC, high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC, gas chromatography (GC and liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS provided evidence for possible existence of two pathways. The first pathway proceeds via 4-nitrophenol (4-NP while the second proceeds through formation of 4-aminoparathion (4-APar, 4-aminophenol (4-AP and parabenzoquinone (PBQ. This is the first report of chemotaxis towards organophosphate compound by a thermo-halo tolerant bacterium.

  12. Analysis of biosurfactants from industrially viable Pseudomonas strain isolated from crude oil suggests how rhamnolipids congeners affect emulsification property and antimicrobial activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Palashpriya; Yang, Xin-Ping; Ma, Luyan Z

    2014-01-01

    Rhamnolipid biosurfactants produced mainly by Pseudomonas sp. had been reported to possess a wide range of potential industrial application. These biosurfactants are produced as monorhamnolipid (MRL) and di-rhamnolipid (DRL) congeners. The present study deals with rhamnolipid biosurfactants produced by three bacterial isolates from crude oil. Biosurfactants produced by one of the strains (named as IMP67) was found to be very efficacious based on its critical micelle concentration value and hydrocarbon emulsification property. Strikingly, antimicrobial, and anti-biofilm potential of this biosurfactant were higher than biosurfactants produced by other two strains. Thin layer chromatography analysis and rhamnose quantification showed that the rhamnolipids of IMP67 had more MRL congeners than biosurfactants of the other two strains. Emulsification and antimicrobial actions were affected by manual change of MRL and DRL congener proportions. Increase of MRL proportion enhanced emulsification index and antimicrobial property to Gram negative bacteria. This result indicated that the ratio of MRL and DRL affected the emulsification potentials of rhamnolipids, and suggested that high emulsification potentials might enhance rhamnolipids to penetrate the cell wall of Gram negative bacteria. In line with this finding, rhamnolipids of IMP67 also reduced the MIC of some antibiotics against bacteria, suggesting their synergistic role with the antibiotics.

  13. Analysis of biosurfactants from industrially-viable Pseudomonas strain isolated from crude oil suggests how rhamnolipids congeners affect on emulsification property and antimicrobial activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palashpriya eDas

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Rhamnolipid biosurfactants produced mainly by Pseudomonas sp. had been reported to possess a wide range of potential industrial application. These biosurfactants are produced as monorhamnolipid (MRL and di-rhamnolipid (DRL congeners. The present study deals with rhamnolipid biosurfactants produced by three bacterial isolates from crude oil. Biosurfactants produced by one of the strains (named as IMP67 was found to be very efficacious based on its critical micelle concentration (CMC value and hydrocarbon emulsification property. Strikingly, antimicrobial and anti-biofilm potential of this biosurfactant were higher than biosurfactants produced by other two strains. Thin layer chromatography (TLC analysis and rhamnose quantification showed that the rhamnolipids of IMP67 had more MRL congeners than biosurfactants of the other two strains. Emulsification and antimicrobial actions were affected by manual change of MRL and DRL congener proportions. Increase of MRL proportion enhanced emulsification index and antimicrobial property to Gram negative bacteria. This result indicated that the ratio of MRL and DRL affect the emulsification potentials of rhamnolipids, and suggested that high emulsification potentials might enhance rhamnolipids to penetrate the cell wall of Gram negative bacteria. In consistent, rhamnolipids of IMP67 reduced the MIC of some antibiotics against bacteria, suggesting the potential of biosurfactant as antibiotics synergist.

  14. Lipid transfer proteins and protease inhibitors as key factors in the priming of barley responses to Fusarium head blight disease by a biocontrol strain of Pseudomonas fluorescens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petti, Carloalberto; Khan, Mojibur; Doohan, Fiona

    2010-11-01

    Strains of non-pathogenic pseudomonad bacteria, can elicit host defence responses against pathogenic microorganisms. Pseudomonas fluorescens strain MKB158 can protect cereals from pathogenesis by Fusarium fungi, including Fusarium head blight which is an economically important disease due to its association with both yield loss and mycotoxin contamination of grain. Using the 22 K barley Affymetrix chip, trancriptome studies were undertaken to determine the local effect of P. fluorescens strain MKB158 on the transcriptome of barley head tissue, and to discriminate transcripts primed by the bacterium to respond to challenge by Fusarium culmorum, a causal agent of the economically important Fusarium head blight disease of cereals. The bacterium significantly affected the accumulation of 1203 transcripts and primed 74 to positively, and 14 to negatively, respond to the pathogen (P = 0.05). This is the first study to give insights into bacterium priming in the Triticeae tribe of grasses and associated transcripts were classified into 13 functional classes, associated with diverse functions, including detoxification, cell wall biosynthesis and the amplification of host defence responses. In silico analysis of Arabidopsis homologs of bacterium-primed barley genes indicated that, as is the case in dicots, jasmonic acid plays a role in pseudomonad priming of host responses. Additionally, the transcriptome studies described herein also reveal new insights into bacterium-mediated priming of host defences against necrotrophs, including the positive effects on grain filling, lignin deposition, oxidative stress responses, and the inhibition of protease inhibitors and proteins that play a key role in programmed cell death.

  15. Selection of antagonistic bacteria isolated from the Physalis peruviana rhizosphere against Fusarium oxysporum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urrea, R; Cabezas, L; Sierra, R; Cárdenas, M; Restrepo, S; Jiménez, P

    2011-09-01

    Cape gooseberries (Physalis peruviana) have become increasingly important in Colombia for both domestic consumption and the international export market. Vascular wilting caused by Fusarium oxysporum is the most damaging disease to P. peruviana crops in Colombia. The control of this pathogen is mainly carried out by chemical and cultural practices, increasing production costs and generating resistance. Therefore, the objectives of this study were to test rhizobacteria isolates from P. peruviana rhizosphere against F. oxysporum under in vitro and in vivo conditions. Over 120 strains were isolated, and five were selected for their high inhibition of F. oxysporum growth and conidia production under in vitro conditions. These strains inhibited growth by 41-58% and reduced three- to fivefold conidia production. In the in vivo assays, all the tested isolates significantly reduced fungal pathogenicity in terms of virulence. Isolate B-3.4 was the most efficient in delaying the onset of the first symptoms. All isolates were identified as belonging to the genus Pseudomonas except for A-19 (Bacillus sp.). Our results confirmed that there are prospective rhizobacteria strains that can be used as biological control agents; some of them being able to inhibit in vitro F. oxysporum growth and sporulation. Incorporating these bacteria into biological control strategies for the disease that causes high economical losses in the second most exported fruit from Colombia would result in a reduced impact on environment and economy. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Applied Microbiology © 2011 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  16. The complete genome sequence of the plant growth-promoting bacterium Pseudomonas sp. UW4.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Duan

    Full Text Available The plant growth-promoting bacterium (PGPB Pseudomonas sp. UW4, previously isolated from the rhizosphere of common reeds growing on the campus of the University of Waterloo, promotes plant growth in the presence of different environmental stresses, such as flooding, high concentrations of salt, cold, heavy metals, drought and phytopathogens. In this work, the genome sequence of UW4 was obtained by pyrosequencing and the gaps between the contigs were closed by directed PCR. The P. sp. UW4 genome contains a single circular chromosome that is 6,183,388 bp with a 60.05% G+C content. The bacterial genome contains 5,423 predicted protein-coding sequences that occupy 87.2% of the genome. Nineteen genomic islands (GIs were predicted and thirty one complete putative insertion sequences were identified. Genes potentially involved in plant growth promotion such as indole-3-acetic acid (IAA biosynthesis, trehalose production, siderophore production, acetoin synthesis, and phosphate solubilization were determined. Moreover, genes that contribute to the environmental fitness of UW4 were also observed including genes responsible for heavy metal resistance such as nickel, copper, cadmium, zinc, molybdate, cobalt, arsenate, and chromate. Whole-genome comparison with other completely sequenced Pseudomonas strains and phylogeny of four concatenated "housekeeping" genes (16S rRNA, gyrB, rpoB and rpoD of 128 Pseudomonas strains revealed that UW4 belongs to the fluorescens group, jessenii subgroup.

  17. The Complete Genome Sequence of the Plant Growth-Promoting Bacterium Pseudomonas sp. UW4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Jin; Jiang, Wei; Cheng, Zhenyu; Heikkila, John J.; Glick, Bernard R.

    2013-01-01

    The plant growth-promoting bacterium (PGPB) Pseudomonas sp. UW4, previously isolated from the rhizosphere of common reeds growing on the campus of the University of Waterloo, promotes plant growth in the presence of different environmental stresses, such as flooding, high concentrations of salt, cold, heavy metals, drought and phytopathogens. In this work, the genome sequence of UW4 was obtained by pyrosequencing and the gaps between the contigs were closed by directed PCR. The P. sp. UW4 genome contains a single circular chromosome that is 6,183,388 bp with a 60.05% G+C content. The bacterial genome contains 5,423 predicted protein-coding sequences that occupy 87.2% of the genome. Nineteen genomic islands (GIs) were predicted and thirty one complete putative insertion sequences were identified. Genes potentially involved in plant growth promotion such as indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) biosynthesis, trehalose production, siderophore production, acetoin synthesis, and phosphate solubilization were determined. Moreover, genes that contribute to the environmental fitness of UW4 were also observed including genes responsible for heavy metal resistance such as nickel, copper, cadmium, zinc, molybdate, cobalt, arsenate, and chromate. Whole-genome comparison with other completely sequenced Pseudomonas strains and phylogeny of four concatenated “housekeeping” genes (16S rRNA, gyrB, rpoB and rpoD) of 128 Pseudomonas strains revealed that UW4 belongs to the fluorescens group, jessenii subgroup. PMID:23516524

  18. Virulence determinants of Pseudomonas syringae strains isolated from grasses in the context of a small type III effector repertoire

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dudnik, Alexey; Dudler, Robert

    2014-01-01

    derivative that inhibits the eukaryotic proteasome. In strains colonizing dicotyledonous plants, the compound was demonstrated to suppress the salicylic-acid-dependent defense pathway. Here, we analyze virulence factors of three strains colonizing wheat (Triticum aestivum): P. syringae pathovar syringae (Psy...

  19. Dynamics of Panax ginseng Rhizospheric Soil Microbial Community and Their Metabolic Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The bacterial communities of 1- to 6-year ginseng rhizosphere soils were characterized by culture-independent approaches, random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD, and amplified ribosomal DNA restriction analysis (ARDRA. Culture-dependent method (Biolog was used to investigate the metabolic function variance of microbe living in rhizosphere soil. Results showed that significant genetic and metabolic function variance were detected among soils, and, with the increasing of cultivating years, genetic diversity of bacterial communities in ginseng rhizosphere soil tended to be decreased. Also we found that Verrucomicrobia, Acidobacteria, and Proteobacteria were the dominants in rhizosphere soils, but, with the increasing of cultivating years, plant disease prevention or plant growth promoting bacteria, such as Pseudomonas, Burkholderia, and Bacillus, tended to be rare.

  20. Genetic and functional characterization of the gene cluster directing the biosynthesis of putisolvin I and II in Pseudomonas putida strain PCL1445

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dubern, J.F.; Coppoolse, E.R.; Stiekema, W.J.; Bloemberg, G.V.

    2008-01-01

    Pseudomonas putida PCL1445 secretes two cyclic lipopeptides, putisolvin I and putisolvin II, which possess a surface-tension-reducing ability, and are able to inhibit biofilm formation and to break down biofilms of Pseudomonas species including Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The putisolvin synthetase gene

  1. Novel Phl-producing genotypes of finger millet rhizosphere associated pseudomonads and assessment of their functional and genetic diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekar, Jegan; Prabavathy, Vaiyapuri Ramalingam

    2014-07-01

    Genetic diversity of phlD gene, an essential gene in the biosynthesis of 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol, was studied by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) in 20 Phl-producing pseudomonads isolated from finger millet rhizosphere. RFLP analysis of phlD gene displayed three patterns with HaeIII and TaqI enzymes. phlD gene sequence closely correlated with RFLP results and revealed the existence of three new genotypes G, H and I. Further, the phylogenetic and concatenated sequence analysis of the 16S rRNA, rpoB, gyrB, rpoD genes supported the hypothesis that these genotypes G, H and I were different from reported genotypes A-F. In all phylogenetic studies, the genotype G formed a distant clade from the groups of Pseudomonas putida and P. aeruginosa (sensu strictu), but the groups H and I were closely related to P. aeruginosa/P. stutzeri group. The Phl-producing pseudomonads exhibited antagonistic activity against Pyricularia grisea (TN508), Gaeumannomyces graminis (DSM1463), Fusarium oxysporum (DSM62297), Xanthomonas campestris (DSM3586) and Erwinia persicina (HMGU155). In addition, these strains exhibited various plant growth-promoting traits. In conclusion, this study displays the existence of novel Phl-producing pseudomonads genotypes G, H and I from finger millet rhizosphere, which formed taxonomically outward phylogenetic lineage from the groups of P. putida and P. aeruginosa (sensu strictu). © 2014 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Impact of the microscale distribution of a Pseudomonas strain introduced into soil on potential contacts with indigenous bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dechesne, Arnaud; Pallud, C.; Bertolla, F.

    2005-01-01

    Soil bioaugmentation is a promising approach in soil bioremediation and agriculture. Nevertheless, our knowledge of the fate and activity of introduced bacteria in soil and thus of their impact on the soil environment is still limited. The microscale spatial distribution of introduced bacteria has...... rarely been studied, although it determines the encounter probability between introduced cells and any components of the soil ecosystem and thus plays a role in the ecology of introduced bacteria. For example, conjugal gene transfer from introduced bacteria to indigenous bacteria requires cell......-to-cell contact, the probability of which depends on their spatial distribution. To quantitatively characterize the microscale distribution of an introduced bacterial population and its dynamics, a gfp-tagged derivative of Pseudomonas putida KT2440 was introduced by percolation in repacked soil columns. Initially...

  3. rhizosphere and non-rhizosphere soil mycoflora of corchorus olitorius

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Olahan et. al

    11.24% (percentage moisture content), 0.29ml/g (water holding ... into two types, namely rhizosphere soil and non-rhizosphere soil. ... α-tocopherol equivalent to vitamin E (Oyedele et al., 2006). The ... Ilorin and stored in a sterile polythene bag prior to use. ... Organic matter content, texture and water holding capacity of soil.

  4. Purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of DehI, a group I α-haloacid dehalogenase from Pseudomonas putida strain PP3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidberger, Jason W. [School of Pharmacology and Medicine, University of Western Australia, Crawley, Western Australia (Australia); Wilce, Jackie A. [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria (Australia); Weightman, Andrew J. [School of Biosciences, Cardiff University, Cardiff,Wales (United Kingdom); Wilce, Matthew C. J., E-mail: matthew.wilce@med.monash.edu.au [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria (Australia); School of Pharmacology and Medicine, University of Western Australia, Crawley, Western Australia (Australia)

    2008-07-01

    The α-haloacid dehalogenase DehI from P. putida strain PP3 was cloned into a vector with an N-terminal His tag and expressed in E. coli Nova Blue strain. Purified protein was crystallized in a primitive monoclinic form and a complete native data set was collected and analysed. Pseudomonas putida strain PP3 produces two dehalogenases, DehI and DehII, which belong to the group I and II α-haloacid dehalogenases, respectively. Group I dehalogenases catalyse the removal of halides from d-haloalkanoic acids and in some cases also the l-enantiomers, both substituted at their chiral centres. Studies of members of this group have resulted in the proposal of general catalytic mechanisms, although no structural information is available in order to better characterize their function. This work presents the initial stages of the structural investigation of the group I α-haloacid dehalogenase DehI. The DehI gene was cloned into a pET15b vector with an N-terminal His tag and expressed in Escherichia coli Nova Blue strain. Purified protein was crystallized in 25% PEG 3350, 0.4 M lithium sulfate and 0.1 M bis-tris buffer pH 6.0. The crystals were primitive monoclinic (space group P2{sub 1}), with unit-cell parameters a = 68.32, b = 111.86, c = 75.13 Å, α = 90, β = 93.7, γ = 90°, and a complete native data set was collected. Molecular replacement is not an option for structure determination, so further experimental phasing methods will be necessary.

  5. Purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of DehI, a group I α-haloacid dehalogenase from Pseudomonas putida strain PP3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidberger, Jason W.; Wilce, Jackie A.; Weightman, Andrew J.; Wilce, Matthew C. J.

    2008-01-01

    The α-haloacid dehalogenase DehI from P. putida strain PP3 was cloned into a vector with an N-terminal His tag and expressed in E. coli Nova Blue strain. Purified protein was crystallized in a primitive monoclinic form and a complete native data set was collected and analysed. Pseudomonas putida strain PP3 produces two dehalogenases, DehI and DehII, which belong to the group I and II α-haloacid dehalogenases, respectively. Group I dehalogenases catalyse the removal of halides from d-haloalkanoic acids and in some cases also the l-enantiomers, both substituted at their chiral centres. Studies of members of this group have resulted in the proposal of general catalytic mechanisms, although no structural information is available in order to better characterize their function. This work presents the initial stages of the structural investigation of the group I α-haloacid dehalogenase DehI. The DehI gene was cloned into a pET15b vector with an N-terminal His tag and expressed in Escherichia coli Nova Blue strain. Purified protein was crystallized in 25% PEG 3350, 0.4 M lithium sulfate and 0.1 M bis-tris buffer pH 6.0. The crystals were primitive monoclinic (space group P2 1 ), with unit-cell parameters a = 68.32, b = 111.86, c = 75.13 Å, α = 90, β = 93.7, γ = 90°, and a complete native data set was collected. Molecular replacement is not an option for structure determination, so further experimental phasing methods will be necessary

  6. Determination of antimicrobial resistance pattern and Extended-Spectrum Beta Lactamases producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains isolated from clinical specimens of Hajar and Kashani Hospitals,Shahrekord 1387

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mana Shojapour

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pseudomonas aeruginosa is one of the leading causes of hospital infections in patients hospitalized for a 10 day period or over. It is also considered to be the most important cause of the burn wound infection. Approximately 75% of deaths in burned patients are due to wound infection and the subsequent septicemia. Clinical use of antibiotics has increasingly led to the global distribution of P. aeruginosa isolates with multi-drug resistance. The study was launched to determine the antimicrobial susceptibility pattern and the presence of the extended-spectrum-beta lactamase (ESBL in P.aeruginosa strains isolated from clinical specimens. Methods: Totally, 175 P. aeruginosa strains were isolated from clinical samples and identified by standard methods. The pattern of antimicrobial resistance was then performed on the isolates using Disk Agar Diffusion (DAD according to CLSI Guideline. Primary screening test for ESBL producing strains was performed by ceftazidim antibiotic disk using disk diffusion method. Combined disk method was used to confirm ESBL producing bacteria. Results: The rate of antimicrobial resistance of P.aeruginosa isolates were 64% to ticarcillin, 52.2% to cefepime, 68.6% to ticarcillin/clavolanic acid, 68.6% to ceftazidime, 67.4% to amikacin, 68.6% to gentamicin, 48% to imipenem, 77.7% to ciprofloxacin and 5.1% to polymixcine B. In the primary screening test, 120 isolates of P.aeruginosa strains were resistant to ceftazidime. In the combined disk method, 66 isolates (55% were positive for ESBLs. Conclusion: Polymixcine B was found to be the most effective antimicrobial agent in this study. Bacteria carrying ESBL genes may increase mortality and morbidity. Thus, their accurate diagnosis is of extreme importance to prevent from the treatment failure resulted from improper antibiotic administration.

  7. Forage Quantity and Quality of Berseem Clover (Trifolium ‎alexandrinum L. as Affected by Uses of Pseudomonas putida ‎Strains and Phophorus Fertilizer in the Second Crop

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Hossein Ansari

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Effects of phosphate fertilizer and pseudomonas putida strains on the quantity and quality of forage of berseem clover as a second crop was studied in a factorial field experiment using randomized complete block design with three replications at Fooman, Guilan province, Iran. Treatments consisted of phosphate fertilizer with three levels (0, 75 and 150 kg/ha as triple super phosphate and Pseudomonas putida strains with four levels (M21, M5, M168 and control. The results showed that use of phosphate fertilizers increased the soil pH during growing season while bacterial inoculation adjusted soil pH. The bacterial inoculation increased amount of crude protein, digestible protein, acidic and alkaline phosphatase activity compared to non-inoculated treatment, but it decreased crude fiber of the forage. Clover forage yield, protein yield and phosphorus content of foliage also were influenced by the interaction of bacterial strains and phosphate fertilizer. The highest forage and protein yield were obtained by using strain M5+150 kg P ha-1. Significant increases in forage and protein yield were found to be 16.49% and 8.01%, respectively, as compared with non-inoculated treatment. Based on the result of this experiment, application of 150 kg P ha-1 and Pseudomonas putida strain M5 inoculation can be used to obtain highest forage yield and quality of berseem clover as second crop in the experimental site.

  8. Gentamicin in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    infections by Ps. aeruginosa is contra-indicated. In our study only 2,3 % of the Ps. aeruginosa strains were resistant to gentamicin (MIC 25 Ilg/ml). In view of the synergy reported for combined gentamicin and carbeni- cillin therapy," a combination of these two drugs may be recommended in the treatment of all Pseudomonas.

  9. Characterization of Pb2+ biosorption by psychrotrophic strain Pseudomonas sp. I3 isolated from permafrost soil of Mohe wetland in Northeast China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dandan; Xu, Xingjian; Yu, Hongwen; Han, Xuerong

    2017-07-01

    Due to the long and severe winter in Northeast China, wastewater containing lead (Pb) is treated inefficiently, resulting in irregular disposal. In order to solve this problem, a Pb-resistant psychrotrophic bacterium, Pseudomonas sp. I3, was isolated from permafrost soil of Mohe wetland and served as biosorbent for Pb 2+ removal under 15 °C. The minimum inhibitory concentration of strain I3 for Pb 2+ was 7.5 mM, which was higher than that of Escherichia coli DH5α (1.5 mM). However, acid digestion results showed that these two bacteria had a comparable biosorption capacity for Pb 2+ , suggesting no direct relationship between biosorption ability of bacteria and their metal-resistance. Acid digestion results also proved that intracellular Pb accumulation was mainly contributed to the distinct performance between living and non-living biosorbents, which was further confirmed by the analyses of TEM-EDS. Results of FTIR revealed that functional groups including CH 2 , CO, CN, NH, COO and SO 3 were participated in the biosorption process of the tested biosorbents no matter bacteria were living or not. The effects of environmental factors including pH, temperature, biomass dose, operation time and initial Pb 2+ concentration were investigated through a batch of biosorption experiments. The equilibrium data for living and non-living biosorbent were well fitted to Langmuir model with their maximum Pb 2+ biosorption capacities of 49.48 and 42.37 mg/g, respectively. The kinetic data for each biosorbent were well described by pseudo-second order kinetic model. Overall, Pseudomonas sp. I3 seemed to be an effective biosorbent for cleansing Pb 2+ from contaminated wastewater at low temperature. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Reclassification of Alcaligenes latus strains IAM 12599T and IAM 12664 and Pseudomonas saccharophila as Azohydromonas lata gen. nov., comb. nov., Azohydromonas australica sp. nov. and Pelomonas saccharophila gen. nov., comb. nov., respectively.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Cheng-Hui; Yokota, Akira

    2005-11-01

    The aim of this study was to clarify the taxonomic position of the nitrogen-fixing and hydrogen-oxidizing bacteria Alcaligenes latus strains IAM 12599T, IAM 12664 and IAM 12665 and Pseudomonas saccharophila IAM 14368T. It was found that the type strain of Alcaligenes latus, IAM 12599T, showed 99 x 9 and 96 x 1 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity to strains IAM 12665 and IAM 12664, respectively. A comparison using DNA-DNA hybridization suggested that strains IAM 12599T and IAM 12665 belong to a single species (89 x 7 %) and that strain IAM 12664 (35 x 1 %) forms a separate species. The phenotypic characteristics also support the conclusion that these bacteria should be identified as two species of a new genus: Azohydromonas lata gen. nov., comb. nov. (type strain IAM 12599T=DSM 1122T=LMG 3321T=ATCC 29712T; reference strain IAM 12665=DSM 1123=LMG 3325=ATCC 29714) and Azohydromonas australica sp. nov. (type strain IAM 12664T=DSM 1124T=LMG 3324T=ATCC 29713T). Pseudomonas saccharophila IAM 14368T was found to be closely related to the phototrophic bacterium Roseateles depolymerans, with 96 x 8 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity, but the two bacteria are quite different with respect to their metabolism and some significant phenotypic characteristics, suggesting that they cannot be included in a single genus. Further studies on their nifH gene sequences, G+C content of the DNA and cellular fatty acid composition confirm that Pseudomonas saccharophila should be reclassified: the name Pelomonas saccharophila gen. nov., comb. nov. is proposed, with the type strain IAM 14368T (=LMG 2256T=ATCC 15946T).

  11. Rhizosphere priming: a nutrient perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feike Auke Dijkstra

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Rhizosphere priming is the change in decomposition of soil organic matter (SOM caused by root activity. Rhizosphere priming plays a crucial role in soil carbon (C dynamics and their response to global climate change. Rhizosphere priming may be affected by soil nutrient availability, but rhizosphere priming itself can also affect nutrient supply to plants. These interactive effects may be of particular relevance in understanding the sustained increase in plant growth and nutrient supply in response to a rise in atmospheric CO2 concentration. We examined how these interactions were affected by elevated CO2 in two similar semiarid grassland field studies. We found that an increase in rhizosphere priming enhanced the release of nitrogen (N through decomposition of a larger fraction of SOM in one study, but not in the other. We postulate that rhizosphere priming may enhance N supply to plants in systems that are N limited, but that rhizosphere priming may not occur in systems that are phosphorus (P limited. Under P limitation, rhizodeposition may be used for mobilisation of P, rather than for decomposition of SOM. Therefore, with increasing atmospheric CO2 concentrations, rhizosphere priming may play a larger role in affecting C sequestration in N poor than in P poor soils.

  12. Selection rhizosphere-competent microbes for development of microbial products as biocontrol agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashinistova, A. V.; Elchin, A. A.; Gorbunova, N. V.; Muratov, V. S.; Kydralieva, K. A.; Khudaibergenova, B. M.; Shabaev, V. P.; Jorobekova, Sh. J.

    2009-04-01

    Rhizosphere-borne microorganisms reintroduced to the soil-root interface can establish without inducing permanent disturbance in the microbial balance and effectively colonise the rhizosphere due to carbon sources of plant root exudates. A challenge for future development of microbial products for use in agriculture will be selection of rhizosphere-competent microbes that both protect the plant from pathogens and improve crop establishment and persistence. In this study screening, collection, identification and expression of stable and technological microbial strains living in soils and in the rhizosphere of abundant weed - couch-grass Elytrigia repens L. Nevski were conducted. A total of 98 bacteria isolated from the rhizosphere were assessed for biocontrol activity in vitro against phytopathogenic fungi including Fusarium culmorum, Fusarium heterosporum, Fusarium oxysporum, Drechslera teres, Bipolaris sorokiniana, Piricularia oryzae, Botrytis cinerea, Colletothrichum atramentarium and Cladosporium sp., Stagonospora nodorum. Biocontrol activity were performed by the following methods: radial and parallel streaks, "host - pathogen" on the cuts of wheat leaves. A culture collection comprising 64 potential biocontrol agents (BCA) against wheat and barley root diseases has been established. Of these, the most effective were 8 isolates inhibitory to at least 4 out of 5 phytopathogenic fungi tested. The remaining isolates inhibited at least 1 of 5 fungi tested. Growth stimulating activity of proposed rhizobacteria-based preparations was estimated using seedling and vegetative pot techniques. Seeds-inoculation and the tests in laboratory and field conditions were conducted for different agricultural crops - wheat and barley. Intact cells, liquid culture filtrates and crude extracts of the four beneficial bacterial strains isolated from the rhizosphere of weed were studied to stimulate plant growth. As a result, four bacterial strains selected from rhizosphere of weed

  13. Biofilm Filtrates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Strains Isolated from Cystic Fibrosis Patients Inhibit Preformed Aspergillus fumigatus Biofilms via Apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirazi, Fazal; Ferreira, Jose A G; Stevens, David A; Clemons, Karl V; Kontoyiannis, Dimitrios P

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa (Pa) and Aspergillus fumigatus (Af) colonize cystic fibrosis (CF) patient airways. Pa culture filtrates inhibit Af biofilms, and Pa non-CF, mucoid (Muc-CF) and nonmucoid CF (NMuc-CF) isolates form an ascending inhibitory hierarchy. We hypothesized this activity is mediated through apoptosis induction. One Af and three Pa (non-CF, Muc-CF, NMuc-CF) reference isolates were studied. Af biofilm was formed in 96 well plates for 16 h ± Pa biofilm filtrates. After 24 h, apoptosis was characterized by viability dye DiBAc, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, mitochondrial membrane depolarization, DNA fragmentation and metacaspase activity. Muc-CF and NMuc-CF filtrates inhibited and damaged Af biofilm (pbiofilms (3.7- fold) compared to treatment with filtrates from Muc-CF- (2.5- fold) or non-CF Pa (1.7- fold). Depolarization of mitochondrial potential was greater upon exposure to NMuc-CF (2.4-fold) compared to Muc-CF (1.8-fold) or non-CF (1.25-fold) (pbiofilm, compared to control, mediated by metacaspase activation. In conclusion, filtrates from CF-Pa isolates were more inhibitory against Af biofilms than from non-CF. The apoptotic effect involves mitochondrial membrane damage associated with metacaspase activation.

  14. Epidemiology and Drug Susceptibility of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Strains isolated from Patients admitted to Zabol hospitals: Short Communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Forough Heydari

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Pseudomonas aeruginosa is one of the most important causative agents of nosocomial infections that threatens many lives .. Regarding the innate and adaptive ability of the bacteria species to become resistant to many antimicrobial agents, recognition of different antibiotic resistance patterns is extremely significant in assessing the validity of the monitoring programs. Also, the pattern of genetic isolates is essential in the management of infections caused by these bacteria. The purpose of this study was to determine genetic diversity and patterns of antimicrobial resistance of P. aeruginosa isolates using RAPD-PCR. Materials and Methods: The present study aimed at assessing the genetic diversity and antibiotic resistant pattern of P. aeruginosa isolates in the educational Zabol hospitals. Thus, antibiotic susceptibility of 100 isolates was determined applying Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion method. Results: RAPD-PCR data revealed  a high level of polymorphism among the isolates of P. aeruginosa in Sistan. But, no association was observed between antibiotic susceptibility and genetic diversity pattern. Conclusion: In the present study, we RAPD-PCR technique was found to be a useful means for the investigation of the genetic variation and epidemiological study among P. aeruginosa isolates collected from Sistan region.

  15. Impact of phenazine-1-carboxylic acid upon iron speciation and microbial biomass in the rhizosphere of wheat

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeTourneau, M.; Marshall, M.; Grant, M.; Freeze, P.; Cliff, J. B.; Lai, B.; Strawn, D. G.; Thomashow, L. S.; Weller, D. M.; Harsh, J. B.

    2015-12-01

    Phenazine-1-carboxylic acid (PCA) is a redox-active antibiotic produced by diverse bacterial taxa, and has been shown to facilitate interactions between biofilms and iron (hydr)oxides in culture systems (Wang et al. 2011, J Bacteriol 192: 365). Because rhizobacterial biofilms are a major sink for plant-derived carbon and source for soil organic matter (SOM), and Fe (hydr)oxides have reactive surfaces that influence the stability of microbial biomass and SOM, PCA-producing rhizobacteria could influence soil carbon fluxes. Large populations of Pseudomonas fluorescens strains producing PCA in concentrations up to 1 μg/g root have been observed in the rhizosphere of non-irrigated wheat fields covering 1.56 million hectares of central Washington state. This is one of the highest concentrations ever reported for a natural antibiotic in a terrestrial ecosystem (Mavrodi et al. 2012, Appl Environ Microb 78: 804). Microscopic comparisons of PCA-producing (PCA+) and non-PCA-producing (PCA-) rhizobacterial colony morphologies, and comparisons of Fe extractions from rhizosphere soil inoculated with PCA+ and PCA- strains suggest that PCA promotes biofilm development as well as dramatic Fe transformations throughout the rhizosphere (unpublished data). In order to illustrate PCA-mediated interactions between biofilms and Fe (hydr)oxides in the rhizosphere, identify the specific Fe phases favored by PCA, and establish the ramifications for stability and distribution of microbial biomass and SOM, we have collected electron micrographs, X-ray fluorescence images, X-ray absorption near-edge spectra, and secondary-ion mass spectrometry images of wheat root sections inoculated with 15N-labelled PCA+ or PCA- rhizobacteria. These images and spectra allow us to assess the accumulation, turnover, and distribution of microbial biomass, the associations between Fe and other nutrients such as phosphorus, and the redox status and speciation of iron in the presence and absence of PCA. This

  16. Identification of a Candidate Gene in Solanum habrochaites for Resistance to a Race 1 Strain of Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhilong Bao

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial speck disease caused by pv. ( is a persistent problem on tomato ( L.. Resistance against race 0 strains is conferred by the Pto protein, which recognizes either of two pathogen effectors: AvrPto or AvrPtoB. However, current tomato varieties do not have resistance to the increasingly common race 1 strains, which lack these effectors. We identified accessions of S. Knapp & D. M. Spooner that are resistant to the race 1 strain T1. Genome sequence comparisons of T1 and two strains that are virulent on these accessions suggested that known microbe-associated molecular patterns (MAMPs or effectors are not involved in the resistance. We developed an F population from a cross between one T1-resistant accession, LA2109, and a susceptible tomato cultivar to investigate the genetic basis of this resistance. Linkage analysis using whole-genome sequence of 58 F plants identified quantitative trait loci (QTL, , in a 5.8-Mb region on chromosome 2, and , in a 52.4-Mb region on chromosome 8, which account for 24 and 26% of the phenotypic variability, respectively. High-resolution mapping of confirmed it contributed to T1 resistance and delimited it to a 1060-kb region containing 139 genes, including three encoding receptor-like proteins (RLPs and 17 encoding receptor-like protein kinases (RLKs. One RLK gene, Solyc02g072470, is a promising candidate for , as it is highly expressed in LA2109 and induced on treatment with MAMPs. might be useful for enhancing resistance to race 1 strains and its future characterization could provide insights into the plant immune system.

  17. Effect of the soil type on the microbiome in the rhizosphere of field-grown lettuce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiter, Susanne; Ding, Guo-Chun; Heuer, Holger; Neumann, Günter; Sandmann, Martin; Grosch, Rita; Kropf, Siegfried; Smalla, Kornelia

    2014-01-01

    The complex and enormous diversity of microorganisms associated with plant roots is important for plant health and growth and is shaped by numerous factors. This study aimed to unravel the effects of the soil type on bacterial communities in the rhizosphere of field-grown lettuce. We used an experimental plot system with three different soil types that were stored at the same site for 10 years under the same agricultural management to reveal differences directly linked to the soil type and not influenced by other factors such as climate or cropping history. Bulk soil and rhizosphere samples were collected 3 and 7 weeks after planting. The analysis of 16S rRNA gene fragments amplified from total community DNA by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and pyrosequencing revealed soil type dependent differences in the bacterial community structure of the bulk soils and the corresponding rhizospheres. The rhizosphere effect differed depending on the soil type and the plant growth developmental stage. Despite the soil type dependent differences in the bacterial community composition several genera such as Sphingomonas, Rhizobium, Pseudomonas, and Variovorax were significantly increased in the rhizosphere of lettuce grown in all three soils. The number of rhizosphere responders was highest 3 weeks after planting. Interestingly, in the soil with the highest numbers of responders the highest shoot dry weights were observed. Heatmap analysis revealed that many dominant operational taxonomic units were shared among rhizosphere samples of lettuce grown in diluvial sand, alluvial loam, and loess loam and that only a subset was increased in relative abundance in the rhizosphere compared to the corresponding bulk soil. The findings of the study provide insights into the effect of soil types on the rhizosphere microbiome of lettuce.

  18. Effect of the soil type on the microbiome in the rhizosphere of field-grown lettuce

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanne eSchreiter

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The complex and enormous diversity of microorganisms associated with plant roots is important for plant health and growth and is shaped by numerous factors. This study aimed to unravel the effects of the soil type on bacterial communities in the rhizosphere of field-grown lettuce. We used an experimental plot system with three different soil types that were stored at the same site for ten years under the same agricultural management to reveal differences directly linked to the soil type and not influenced by other factors such as climate or cropping history. Bulk soil and rhizosphere samples were collected three and seven weeks after planting. The analysis of 16S rRNA gene fragments amplified from total community DNA by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and pyrosequencing revealed soil type-dependent differences in the bacterial community structure of the bulk soils and the corresponding rhizospheres. The rhizosphere effect differed depending on the soil type and the plant growth developmental stage. Despite the soil type-dependent differences in the bacterial community composition several genera such as Sphingomonas, Rhizobium, Pseudomonas and Variovorax were significantly increased in the rhizosphere of lettuce grown in all three different soils. The number of rhizosphere responders was highest three weeks after planting. Interestingly, in the soil with the highest numbers of responders the highest shoot dry weights were observed. Heatmap analysis revealed that many dominant operational taxonomic units were shared among rhizosphere samples of lettuce grown in diluvial sand, alluvial loam, and loess loam and that only a subset was increased in relative abundance in the rhizosphere compared to the corresponding bulk soil. The findings of the study provide insights into the effect of soil types on the rhizosphere microbiome of lettuce.

  19. Profile of Virulence Factors in the Multi-Drug Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa Strains of Human Urinary Tract Infections (UTI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habibi, Asghar; Honarmand, Ramin

    2015-12-01

    Putative virulence factors are responsible for the pathogenicity of UTIs caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa). Resistance of P. aeruginosa to commonly used antibiotics is caused by the extreme overprescription of those antibiotics. The goal of the present study was to investigate the prevalence of virulence factors and the antibiotic resistance patterns of P. aeruginosa isolates in UTI cases in Iran. Two hundred and fifty urine samples were collected from patients who suffered from UTIs. Samples were cultured immediately, and those that were P. aeruginosa-positive were analyzed for the presence of virulence genes using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) testing. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing (AST) was performed using the disk diffusion method. Of the 250 urine samples analyzed, 8 samples (3.2%) were positive for P. aeruginosa. The prevalence of P. aeruginosa in male and female patients was 2.7% and 3.5%, respectively, (P = 0.035). In patients less than 10 years old, it was 4.2%, and in patients more than 55 years old, it was 4.2%. These were the most commonly infected groups. The highest levels of resistance were seen against ampicillin (87.5%), norfloxacin (62.5%), gentamycin (62.5%), amikacin (62.5%), and aztreonam (62.5%), while the lowest were seen for meropenem (0%), imipenem (12.5%), and polymyxin B (12.5%). LasB (87.5%), pclH (75%), pilB (75%), and exoS (75%) were the most commonly detected virulence factors in the P. aeruginosa isolates. It is logical to first prescribe meropenem, imipenem, and polymyxin B in cases of UTIs caused by P. aeruginosa. Medical practitioners should be aware of the presence of levels of antibiotic resistance in hospitalized UTI patients in Iran.

  20. Characterization and effect of Azotobacter, Azospirillum and Pseudomonas associated with Ipomoea Batatas of Colombian Caribbean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jazmín Vanessa Pérez-Pazos

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The use of plant growth promoting Rhizobacteria (PGPR is an alternative to replace chemical fertilizers for the cultivation of agricultural crops. The aim of this research was to search, selection and characterization of PGPR from the genus Azotobacter, Azospirillum and Pseudomonas natives from sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas plants and rhizosphere of representative production regions of the Colombian Caribbean. Selected isolates were identified by molecular methods and they were screened in vitro for activities related to plant growth such as phosphate solubilization, indole production and acetylene reduction. The strains were tested in the greenhouse on plants of Ipomoea batatas produced in vitro. The height, root length, dry mass of the shot and root were evaluated. Associated with sweet potato crop us finded strains identificated as Azotobacter vinelandii, Azotobacter chroococcum, Azospirillum lipoferum, Azospirillum brasilense and Pseudomonas denitrificans. The strains were able to solubilize phosphate, synthesize indole-3-acetic acid (IAA and reduce acetylene. The inoculation of bacteria selected increased growth parameters such as root length, height, dry weight root and shoot in plants of sweet potato in greenhouse. Those results catalog to the isolated obtained as possible microorganisms with potential as biofertilizers in sweet potato.

  1. Inhibitory effect and possible mechanism of a Pseudomonas strain QBA5 against gray mold on tomato leaves and fruits caused by Botrytis cinerea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Pan; Qin, Jiaxing; Li, Delong; Zhou, Shanyue

    2018-01-01

    The fungal pathogen Botrytis cinerea causes gray mold disease on various hosts, which results in serious economic losses. Over the past several decades, many kinds of fungicides have been used to successfully control the disease. Meanwhile, the uses of fungicides lead to environmental pollution as well as a potential threat to the human health by the chemical residues in tomato fruit. Also, the gray mold disease is difficult to control with fungicides. Therefore, exploring alternative measures such as biological controls could be the best choice to control the disease and alleviate damages caused by fungicides. In this study, we isolated and identified a novel Pseudomonas strain termed as QBA5 from healthy tomato plant based on the morphological, biochemical characteristics and molecular detection. The antifungal activity assays revealed that, in the presence of QBA5, conidia germination, germ tube elongation and mycelial growth of B. cinerea were significantly inhibited. Most importantly, QBA5 exerted a significant preventive effectiveness against gray mold on tomato fruits and plants. The possible mechanism of QBA5 involved in the inhibition of B. cinerea was investigated. It revealed that the conidia plasma membrane of B. cinerea was severely damaged by QBA5. Further, four different antifungal compounds in the supernatant of QBA5 were separated by preparative high performance liquid chromatography (PHPLC). Overall, the data indicate that there is a considerable potential for QBA5 to reduce the damage caused by gray mold disease on tomato.

  2. Inhibitory effect and possible mechanism of a Pseudomonas strain QBA5 against gray mold on tomato leaves and fruits caused by Botrytis cinerea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pan Gao

    Full Text Available The fungal pathogen Botrytis cinerea causes gray mold disease on various hosts, which results in serious economic losses. Over the past several decades, many kinds of fungicides have been used to successfully control the disease. Meanwhile, the uses of fungicides lead to environmental pollution as well as a potential threat to the human health by the chemical residues in tomato fruit. Also, the gray mold disease is difficult to control with fungicides. Therefore, exploring alternative measures such as biological controls could be the best choice to control the disease and alleviate damages caused by fungicides. In this study, we isolated and identified a novel Pseudomonas strain termed as QBA5 from healthy tomato plant based on the morphological, biochemical characteristics and molecular detection. The antifungal activity assays revealed that, in the presence of QBA5, conidia germination, germ tube elongation and mycelial growth of B. cinerea were significantly inhibited. Most importantly, QBA5 exerted a significant preventive effectiveness against gray mold on tomato fruits and plants. The possible mechanism of QBA5 involved in the inhibition of B. cinerea was investigated. It revealed that the conidia plasma membrane of B. cinerea was severely damaged by QBA5. Further, four different antifungal compounds in the supernatant of QBA5 were separated by preparative high performance liquid chromatography (PHPLC. Overall, the data indicate that there is a considerable potential for QBA5 to reduce the damage caused by gray mold disease on tomato.

  3. ISOLATION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF A MOLYBDENUM-REDUCING, PHENOL- AND CATECHOL-DEGRADING PSEUDOMONAS PUTIDA STRAIN AMR-12 IN SOILS FROM EGYPT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Abd. AbdEl-Mongy

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Sites contaminated with both heavy metals and organic xenobiotic pollutants warrants the effective use of either a multitude of bacterial degraders or bacteria having the capacity to detoxify numerous toxicants simultaneously. A molybdenum-reducing bacterium with the capacity to degrade phenolics is reported. Molybdenum (sodium molybdate reduction was optimum between pH 6.0 and 7.0 and between 20 and 30 °C. The most suitable electron donor was glucose. A narrow range of phosphate concentrations between 5.0 and 7.5 mM was required for optimal reduction, while molybdate between 20 and 30 mM were needed for optimal reduction. The scanning absorption spectrum of the molybdenum blue produced indicated that Mo-blue is a reduced phosphomolybdate. Molybdenum reduction was inhibited by the heavy metals mercury, silver and chromium. Biochemical analysis identified the bacterium as Pseudomonas putida strain Amr-12. Phenol and phenolics cannot support molybdenum reduction. However, the bacterium was able to grow on the phenolic compounds (phenol and catechol with observable lag periods. Maximum growth on phenol and catechol occurred around the concentrations of 600 mg∙L-1. The ability of this bacterium to detoxify molybdenum and grown on toxic phenolic makes this bacterium an important tool for bioremediation.

  4. Computation of interactive effects and optimization of process parameters for alkaline lipase production by mutant strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa using response surface methodology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepali Bisht

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Alkaline lipase production by mutant strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa MTCC 10,055 was optimized in shake flask batch fermentation using response surface methodology. An empirical model was developed through Box-Behnken experimental design to describe the relationship among tested variables (pH, temperature, castor oil, starch and triton-X-100. The second-order quadratic model determined the optimum conditions as castor oil, 1.77 mL.L-1; starch, 15.0 g.L-1; triton-X-100, 0.93 mL.L-1; incubation temperature, 34.12 ºC and pH 8.1 resulting into maximum alkaline lipase production (3142.57 U.mL-1. The quadratic model was in satisfactory adjustment with the experimental data as evidenced by a high coefficient of determination (R² value (0.9987. The RSM facilitated the analysis and interpretation of experimental data to ascertain the optimum conditions of the variables for the process and recognized the contribution of individual variables to assess the response under optimal conditions. Hence Box-Behnken approach could fruitfully be applied for process optimization.

  5. Efficacy of Pseudomonas fluorescens strain CL145A spray dried powder for controlling zebra mussels adhering to native unionid mussels within field enclosures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luoma, James A.; Weber, Kerry L.; Severson, Todd J.; Mayer, Denise A.

    2015-01-01

    The efficacy of a commercially prepared spray dried powder (SDP) formulation of Pseudomonas fluorescens (strain CL145A) was evaluated for removing zebra mussels (Dreissena polymorpha) adhering to a population of unionid mussels in Lake Darling (Alexandria, Minnesota). Two groups of unionid mussels were used in the study. Unionid mussels were collected near the test area, weighed, photographed, individually tagged, and randomly allocated to one of nine test enclosures in equal proportions and then divided into two groups. The first group of unionid mussels (Group 1, n = 5 per test enclosure) were indiscriminately selected from each test enclosure and used to estimate the number of zebra mussels adhering to unionid mussels prior to exposure. The second group of unionid mussels (Group 2, n = 22 per test enclosure) were used to evaluate the efficacy of SDP for removal of adhering zebra mussels. Both Group 1 and Group 2 mussels were used to evaluate the effects of SDP exposure on unionid mussel survival.

  6. Computation of interactive effects and optimization of process parameters for alkaline lipase production by mutant strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa using response surface methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisht, Deepali; Yadav, Santosh Kumar; Darmwal, Nandan Singh

    2013-01-01

    Alkaline lipase production by mutant strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa MTCC 10,055 was optimized in shake flask batch fermentation using response surface methodology. An empirical model was developed through Box-Behnken experimental design to describe the relationship among tested variables (pH, temperature, castor oil, starch and triton-X-100). The second-order quadratic model determined the optimum conditions as castor oil, 1.77 mL.L−1; starch, 15.0 g.L−1; triton-X-100, 0.93 mL.L−1; incubation temperature, 34.12 °C and pH 8.1 resulting into maximum alkaline lipase production (3142.57 U.mL−1). The quadratic model was in satisfactory adjustment with the experimental data as evidenced by a high coefficient of determination (R2) value (0.9987). The RSM facilitated the analysis and interpretation of experimental data to ascertain the optimum conditions of the variables for the process and recognized the contribution of individual variables to assess the response under optimal conditions. Hence Box-Behnken approach could fruitfully be applied for process optimization. PMID:24159311

  7. Production of lipase and protease from an indigenous Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain and their evaluation as detergent additives: compatibility study with detergent ingredients and washing performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grbavčić, Sanja; Bezbradica, Dejan; Izrael-Živković, Lidija; Avramović, Nataša; Milosavić, Nenad; Karadžić, Ivanka; Knežević-Jugović, Zorica

    2011-12-01

    An indigenous Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain has been studied for lipase and protease activities for their potential application in detergents. Produced enzymes were investigated in order to assess their compatibility with several surfactants, oxidizing agents and commercial detergents. The crude lipase appeared to retain high activity and stability in the presence of several surfactants and oxidizing agents and it was insusceptible to proteolysis. Lutensol® XP80 and Triton® X-100 strongly activated the lipase for a long period (up to 40 and 30% against the control after 1h) while the protease activity was enhanced by the addition of Triton® WR1339 and Tween® 80. The washing performance of the investigated surfactants was significantly improved with the addition of the crude enzyme preparation. Studies were further undertaken to improve enzymes production. The optimization of fermentation conditions led to an 8-fold increase of lipase production, while the production of protease was enhanced by 60%. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Study on screening of anti-predator rhizosphere bacterium against Caenorhabditis elegans and its anti predation mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HE Qingling

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Althoughmicrobial fertilizer is multi-effect,environmental friendly and long-term efficient,its practical application effect is but decreased for being prey by the other creators living in soil frequently.Many bacterium have developed their mechanisms that expel or kill worms to defend themselves from predators.Screening of anti-predator rhizosphere bacterium helps us to find out competitive plant growth promoting rhizobacteria(PGPR.Using Caenorhabditis elegans as sample,this study roughly observed two strains of biocontrol:Pseudomonas aurantiaca JD37 and Pseudomonas fluorescens P13.Using Escherichia coli OP50 as control group,we find the preference order of worms,from highest to lowest,is P13,OP50 and JD37.In slow killing assay,the death rate of worms for JD37 and P13 are 26.12% and 18.66% respectively.The activity and reproduction rate of C.elegans decrease when it is fed on JD37.The results of chemical and micro-biological study show that JD37 cannot produce any currently studied second metabolites which kill worms,while P13 can produce Hydrogen cyanide (HCN.All these results show that JD37 has the ability of anti-predator,and is more competitive under predation pressure,which suggests its broad application prospect as microbial fertilizer.

  9. Biosorption of the metal-complex dye Acid Black 172 by live and heat-treated biomass of Pseudomonas sp. strain DY1: Kinetics and sorption mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Du, Lin-Na; Wang, Bing [College of Life Science, Zhejiang University, 310058, Hangzhou, Zhejiang Province (China); Li, Gang [Department of Agriculture and Biotechnology, Wenzhou Vocational College of Science and Technology, 325006 Wenzhou, Zhejiang Province (China); Wang, Sheng [College of Life Science, Zhejiang University, 310058, Hangzhou, Zhejiang Province (China); Crowley, David E., E-mail: crowley@ucr.edu [Department of Environmental Science, University of California, Riverside, CA 92521 (United States); Zhao, Yu-Hua, E-mail: yhzhao225@zju.edu.cn [College of Life Science, Zhejiang University, 310058, Hangzhou, Zhejiang Province (China)

    2012-02-29

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The maximum amount of Acid Black 172 sorption was about 2.98 mmol/g biomass. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Amine groups played a major role in the biosorption of Acid Black 172. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The reasons of increased dye sorption by heat-treated biomass were proposed. - Abstract: The ability of Pseudomonas sp. strain DY1 to adsorb Acid Black 172 was studied to determine the kinetics and mechanisms involved in biosorption of the dye. Kinetic data for adsorption fit a pseudo-second-order model. Increased initial dye concentration could significantly enhance the amount of dye adsorbed by heat-treated biomass in which the maximum amount of dye adsorbed was as high as 2.98 mmol/g biomass, whereas it had no significant influence on dye sorption by live biomass. As treated temperature increased, the biomass showed gradual increase of dye sorption ability. Experiments using potentiometric titration and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) indicated that amine groups (NH{sub 2}) played a prominent role in biosorption of Acid Black 172. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis indicated that heat treatment of the biomass increased the permeability of the cell walls and denatured the intracellular proteins. The results of biosorption experiments by different cell components confirmed that intracellular proteins contributed to the increased biosorption of Acid Black 172 by heat-treated biomass. The data suggest that biomass produced by this strain may have application for removal of metal-complex dyes from wastewater streams generated from the dye products industry.

  10. Bacterial diversity of Taxus rhizosphere: culture-independent and culture-dependent approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Da Cheng; Ge, Guang Bo; Yang, Ling

    2008-07-01

    The regional variability of Taxus rhizosphere bacterial community composition and diversity was studied by comparative analysis of three large 16S rRNA gene clone libraries from the Taxus rhizosphere in different regions of China (subtropical and temperate regions). One hundred and forty-six clones were screened for three libraries. Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences demonstrated that the abundance of sequences affiliated with Gammaproteobacteria, Betaproteobacteria, and Actinobacteria was higher in the library from the T. xmedia rhizosphere of the temperate region compared with the subtropical Taxus mairei rhizosphere. On the other hand, Acidobacteria was more abundant in libraries from the subtropical Taxus mairei rhizosphere. Richness estimates and diversity indices of three libraries revealed major differences, indicating a higher richness in the Taxus rhizosphere bacterial communities of the subtropical region and considerable variability in the bacterial community composition within this region. By enrichment culture, a novel Actinobacteria strain DICP16 was isolated from the T. xmedia rhizosphere of the temperate region and was identified as Leifsonia shinshuensis sp. via 16S rRNA gene and gyrase B sequence analyses. DICP16 was able to remove the xylosyl group from 7-xylosyl-10-deacetylbaccatin III and 7-xylosyl-10-deacetylpaclitaxel, thereby making the xylosyltaxanes available as sources of 10-deacetylbaccatin III and the anticancer drug paclitaxel. Taken together, the present studies provide, for the first time, the knowledge of the biodiversity of microorganisms populating Taxus rhizospheres.

  11. Metabolic fingerprinting of bacterial strains isolated from northern areas of Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaheer, A.; Latif, Z.

    2017-01-01

    The diversity of Plant Growth Promoting Rhizobacteria (PGPR) in the rhizosphere plays a key role in the maintenance of sustainable agricultural system. In this study, samples were obtained from northern areas of Pakistan. Thirty bacterial strains were isolated, purified, characterized biochemically and subjected to the metabolic fingerprinting by performing nitrogen fixation, phosphate solubilization, protease, indole acetic acid (IAA) production, antibiotic susceptibility and heavy metal resistance test, lead acetate assay for the H2S production. Strains showing distinct characteristics were further characterized by 16S rDNA sequencing and characterized as Bacillus pumilus (KT273321), Acinetobacter baumanii (KT273323), Acinetobacter junii (KT273324), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (KT273325), Bacillus circulans (KT273326) and Bacillus cereus (KT273327). As most of the strains show positive results for resistance against heavy metals, phosphate solubilization, nitrogen fixation, IAA production, and so these strains might be utilized for the removal of heavy metals from the ecosystem as well as biofertilizer in agriculture lands of northern areas. (author)

  12. Isolation and identification of plant growth promoting rhizobacteria from maize (Zea mays L. rhizosphere and their plant growth promoting effect on rice (Oryza sativa L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karnwal Arun

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The use of plant growth promoting rhizobacteria is increasing in agriculture and gives an appealing manner to replace chemical fertilizers, pesticides, and dietary supplements. The objective of our research was to access the plant growth promotion traits of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, P. fluorescens and Bacillus subtilis isolated from the maize (Zea mays L. rhizosphere. In vitro studies showed that isolates have the potential to produce indole acetic acid (IAA, hydrogen cyanide, phosphate solubilisation, and siderophore. RNA analysis revealed that two isolates were 97% identical to P. aeruginosa strain DSM 50071 and P. aeruginosa strain NBRC 12689 (AK20 and AK31, while two others were 98% identical to P. fluorescens strain ATCC 13525, P. fluorescens strain IAM 12022 (AK18 and AK45 and one other was 99% identical to B. subtilis strain NCDO 1769 (AK38. Our gnotobiotic study showed significant differences in plant growth variables under control and inoculated conditions. In the present research, it was observed that the isolated strains had good plant growth promoting effects on rice.

  13. Prokaryotic Homologs of the Eukaryotic 3-Hydroxyanthranilate 3,4-Dioxygenase and 2-Amino-3-Carboxymuconate-6-Semialdehyde Decarboxylase in the 2-Nitrobenzoate Degradation Pathway of Pseudomonas fluorescens Strain KU-7†

    OpenAIRE

    Muraki, Takamichi; Taki, Masami; Hasegawa, Yoshie; Iwaki, Hiroaki; Lau, Peter C. K.

    2003-01-01

    The 2-nitrobenzoic acid degradation pathway of Pseudomonas fluorescens strain KU-7 proceeds via a novel 3-hydroxyanthranilate intermediate. In this study, we cloned and sequenced a 19-kb DNA locus of strain KU-7 that encompasses the 3-hydroxyanthranilate meta-cleavage pathway genes. The gene cluster, designated nbaEXHJIGFCDR, is organized tightly and in the same direction. The nbaC and nbaD gene products were found to be novel homologs of the eukaryotic 3-hydroxyanthranilate 3,4-dioxygenase a...

  14. Reverse transcriptase-real time PCR analysis of heavy metal stress response in a uranium resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain isolated from Jaduguda uranium mine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choudhary, Sangeeta; Sar, Pinaki

    2011-01-01

    A multimetal resistant Pseudomonas strain isolated from a uranium mine waste site of Jaduguda, India, was characterized for its potential application in bioremediation. Nearly complete 16 Sr RNA gene sequence and fatty acid methyl ester analyses confirmed the identity of this bacterium as Pseudomonas aeruginosa. This bacterium exhibited high U-resistance i.e. up to an exposure of 6 h in 100 mg UL -1 solution (pH 4.0) and accumulation (maximum of 275 mg Ug -1 cell dry wt.) properties. Microcosm studies further proved the ability of the strain to remove soluble uranium (99%) from U-mine effluent and sequester it as U oxide and phosphate minerals while maintaining its viability. Considering the survival of this strain in U-mine site co-contaminated with other heavy metals, genetic basis of metal resistance was investigated. The bacterium was resistant to 3, 2 or 6 mM of Cu, Cd, or Zn, respectively. Polymerase chain reaction based detection followed by sequence identity and phylogenetic analysis revealed presence of specific metal resistance genes copA (copper resistance determinant) and czcA (RND type heavy metal efflux) in this isolate. Real-time PCR expression studies of these genes indicated significantly increased expression of both the genes in response to Cu, Cd, or Zn. Maximum up regulation of copA and czcA genes was observed following exposure (30 mm) to 25 μm of Cu or 10 μm Cd respectively. High levels of mRNA transcripts of copA and czcA genes in response to specific metals suggest that these resistance systems have important role in conferring metal resistance to the bacterium. Response of sodA an antioxidant Mn-cofactored superoxide dismutase gene to metal stress revealed that induction of this stress gene was not evident at lower concentration(s) of metals, the concentration(s) that cause maximum up- regulation of metal resistance genes. Higher test metal concentration or extended period of exposure, however, resulted in expression of sodA gene. The

  15. Complete genome sequence of Pseudomonas rhizosphaerae IH5T (=DSM 16299T), a phosphate-solubilizing rhizobacterium for bacterial biofertilizer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwak, Yunyoung; Jung, Byung Kwon; Shin, Jae-Ho

    2015-01-10

    Pseudomonas rhizosphaerae IH5(T) (=DSM 16299(T)), isolated from the rhizospheric soil of grass growing in Spain, has been reported as a novel species of the genus Pseudomonas harboring insoluble phosphorus solubilizing activity. To understanding the multifunctional biofertilizer better, we report the complete genome sequence of P. rhizosphaerae IH5(T). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Comparative effectiveness of Pseudomonas and Serratia sp. containing ACC-deaminase for improving growth and yield of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) under salt-stressed conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahir, Zahir Ahmad; Ghani, Usman; Naveed, Muhammad; Nadeem, Sajid Mahmood; Asghar, Hafiz Naeem

    2009-05-01

    Ethylene synthesis is accelerated in response to various environmental stresses like salinity. Ten rhizobacterial strains isolated from wheat rhizosphere taken from different salt affected areas were screened for growth promotion of wheat under axenic conditions at 1, 5, 10 and 15 dS m(-1). Three strains, i.e., Pseudomonas putida (N21), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (N39) and Serratia proteamaculans (M35) showing promising performance under axenic conditions were selected for a pot trial at 1.63 (original), 5, 10 and 15 dS m(-1). Results showed that inoculation was effective even in the presence of higher salinity levels. P. putida was the most efficient strain compared to the other strains and significantly increased the plant height, root length, grain yield, 100-grain weight and straw yield up to 52, 60, 76, 19 and 67%, respectively, over uninoculated control at 15 dS m(-1). Similarly, chlorophyll content and K(+)/Na(+) of leaves also increased by P. putida over control. It is highly likely that under salinity stress, 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid-deaminase activity of these microbial strains might have caused reduction in the synthesis of stress (salt)-induced inhibitory levels of ethylene. The results suggested that these strains could be employed for salinity tolerance in wheat; however, P. putida may have better prospects in stress alleviation/reduction.

  17. Pseudomonas - Fact Sheet

    OpenAIRE

    Public Health Agency

    2012-01-01

    Fact sheet on Pseudomonas, including:What is Pseudomonas?What infections does it cause?Who is susceptible to pseudomonas infection?How will I know if I have pseudomonas infection?How can Pseudomonas be prevented from spreading?How can I protect myself from Pseudomonas?How is Pseudomonas infection treated?

  18. Antimicrobial Resistance Pattern and Their Beta-Lactamase Encoding Genes among Pseudomonas aeruginosa Strains Isolated from Cancer Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mai M. Zafer

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was designed to investigate the prevalence of metallo-β-lactamases (MBL and extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBL in P. aeruginosa isolates collected from two different hospitals in Cairo, Egypt. Antibiotic susceptibility testing and phenotypic screening for ESBLs and MBLs were performed on 122 P. aeruginosa isolates collected in the period from January 2011 to March 2012. MICs were determined. ESBLs and MBLs genes were sought by PCR. The resistant rate to imipenem was 39.34%. The resistance rates for P. aeruginosa to cefuroxime, cefoperazone, ceftazidime, aztreonam, and piperacillin/tazobactam were 87.7%, 80.3%, 60.6%, 45.1%, and 25.4%, respectively. Out of 122 P. aeruginosa, 27% and 7.4% were MBL and ESBL, respectively. The prevalence of blaVIM-2, blaOXA-10-, blaVEB-1, blaNDM-, and blaIMP-1-like genes were found in 58.3%, 41.7%, 10.4%, 4.2%, and 2.1%, respectively. GIM-, SPM-, SIM-, and OXA-2-like genes were not detected in this study. OXA-10-like gene was concomitant with VIM-2 and/or VEB. Twelve isolates harbored both OXA-10 and VIM-2; two isolates carried both OXA-10 and VEB. Only one strain contained OXA-10, VIM-2, and VEB. In conclusion, blaVIM-2- and blaOXA-10-like genes were the most prevalent genes in P. aeruginosa in Egypt. To our knowledge, this is the first report of blaVIM-2, blaIMP-1, blaNDM, and blaOXA-10 in P. aeruginosa in Egypt.

  19. Isolation and characterization of bacteria from mercury contaminated sites in Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil, and assessment of methylmercury removal capability of a Pseudomonas putida V1 strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabral, Lucélia; Giovanella, Patrícia; Gianello, Clésio; Bento, Fátima Menezes; Andreazza, Robson; Camargo, Flávio Anastácio Oliveira

    2013-06-01

    Methylmercury (MeHg) is one of the most dangerous heavy metal for living organisms that may be found in environment. Given the crescent industrialization of Brazil and considering that mercury is a residue of several industrial processes, there is an increasing need to encounter and develop remediation approaches of mercury contaminated sites. The aim of this study was to isolate and characterize methylmercury resistant bacteria from soils and sludge sewage from Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. Sixteen bacteria were isolated from these contaminated sites and some isolates were highly resistant to methylmercury (>8.7 μM). All the isolates were identified by 16S rDNA. Pseudomonas putida V1 was able to volatilize approximately 90 % of methylmercury added to growth media and to resist to copper, lead, nickel, chromate, zinc, cobalt, manganese and barium. In the presence of high concentrations of methylmercury (12 μM), cell growth was limited, but P. putida V1 was still able to remove up to 29 % of this compound from culture medium. This bacterium removed an average of 77 % of methylmercury from culture medium with pH in the range 4.0-6.0. In addition, methylmercury was efficiently removed (>80 %) in temperature of 21-25 °C. Polymerase chain reactions indicated the presence of merA but not merB in P. putida V1. The growth and ability of P. putida V1 to remove methylmercury in a wide range of pH (4.0 and 8.0) and temperature (10-35 °C), its tolerance to other heavy metals and ability to grow in the presence of up to 11.5 μM of methylmercury, suggest this strain as a new potential resource for degrading methylmercury contaminated sites.

  20. Functional, genetic and chemical characterization of biosurfactants produced by plant growth-promoting Pseudomonas putida 267.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruijt, Marco; Tran, Ha; Raaijmakers, Jos M

    2009-08-01

    Plant growth-promoting Pseudomonas putida strain 267, originally isolated from the rhizosphere of black pepper, produces biosurfactants that cause lysis of zoospores of the oomycete pathogen Phytophthora capsici. The biosurfactants were characterized, the biosynthesis gene(s) partially identified, and their role in control of Phytophthora damping-off of cucumber evaluated. The biosurfactants were shown to lyse zoospores of Phy. capsici and inhibit growth of the fungal pathogens Botrytis cinerea and Rhizoctonia solani. In vitro assays further showed that the biosurfactants of strain 267 are essential in swarming motility and biofilm formation. In spite of the zoosporicidal activity, the biosurfactants did not play a significant role in control of Phytophthora damping-off of cucumber, since both wild type strain 267 and its biosurfactant-deficient mutant were equally effective, and addition of the biosurfactants did not provide control. Genetic characterization revealed that surfactant biosynthesis in strain 267 is governed by homologues of PsoA and PsoB, two nonribosomal peptide synthetases involved in production of the cyclic lipopeptides (CLPs) putisolvin I and II. The structural relatedness of the biosurfactants of strain 267 to putisolvins I and II was supported by LC-MS and MS-MS analyses. The biosurfactants produced by Ps. putida 267 were identified as putisolvin-like CLPs; they are essential in swarming motility and biofilm formation, and have zoosporicidal and antifungal activities. Strain 267 provides excellent biocontrol activity against Phytophthora damping-off of cucumber, but the lipopeptide surfactants are not involved in disease suppression. Pseudomonas putida 267 suppresses Phy. capsici damping-off of cucumber and provides a potential supplementary strategy to control this economically important oomycete pathogen. The putisolvin-like biosurfactants exhibit zoosporicidal and antifungal activities, yet they do not contribute to biocontrol of Phy

  1. Biphenyl-metabolizing bacteria in the rhizosphere of horseradish and bulk soil contaminated by polychlorinated biphenyls as revealed by stable isotope probing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhlik, Ondrej; Jecna, Katerina; Mackova, Martina; Vlcek, Cestmir; Hroudova, Miluse; Demnerova, Katerina; Paces, Vaclav; Macek, Tomas

    2009-10-01

    DNA-based stable isotope probing in combination with terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism was used in order to identify members of the microbial community that metabolize biphenyl in the rhizosphere of horseradish (Armoracia rusticana) cultivated in soil contaminated with polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) compared to members of the microbial community in initial, uncultivated bulk soil. On the basis of early and recurrent detection of their 16S rRNA genes in clone libraries constructed from [(13)C]DNA, Hydrogenophaga spp. appeared to dominate biphenyl catabolism in the horseradish rhizosphere soil, whereas Paenibacillus spp. were the predominant biphenyl-utilizing bacteria in the initial bulk soil. Other bacteria found to derive carbon from biphenyl in this nutrient-amended microcosm-based study belonged mostly to the class Betaproteobacteria and were identified as Achromobacter spp., Variovorax spp., Methylovorus spp., or Methylophilus spp. Some bacteria that were unclassified at the genus level were also detected, and these bacteria may be members of undescribed genera. The deduced amino acid sequences of the biphenyl dioxygenase alpha subunits (BphA) from bacteria that incorporated [(13)C]into DNA in 3-day incubations of the soils with [(13)C]biphenyl are almost identical to that of Pseudomonas alcaligenes B-357. This suggests that the spectrum of the PCB congeners that can be degraded by these enzymes may be similar to that of strain B-357. These results demonstrate that altering the soil environment can result in the participation of different bacteria in the metabolism of biphenyl.

  2. Molecular identification of microorganisms associated to the rhizosphere of vanilla plants in Colombia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarez Lopez, Claudia Lucia; Osorio Vega, Nelson Walter; Marin Montoya, Mauricio Alejandro

    2013-01-01

    The cultivation of vanilla (Vanilla planifolia) is highly promising in Colombia, but more research is needed on its agronomical management and beneficial microorganisms that grow associated to its rhizosphere, on which the plant depends for its nutrition and growth. This study involved the identification of microorganisms associated to the rhizosphere of vanilla plants in a crop located in Sopetran, Colombia. The microbes were isolated in selective media for functional groups such as cellulolytic, proteolytic, inorganic and organic phosphate (phytate) solubilizers, and asymbiotic nitrogen fixing bacteria. After isolation and purification, 109 microbial isolates were obtained. DNA was extracted from 52 selected isolates for molecular identification based on its and 16s RDNA sequencing, for fungi and bacteria, respectively. The diversity of rhizosphere microorganisms found was significant. Bacteria such as Bacillus Megaterium, Pseudomonas koreensis and Acinetobacter sp., and the Fungus Plectosphaerella sp., may have a high potential to be used as biofertilizers to improve vanilla plant nutrition and growth.

  3. Detection of Tox A Gene in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Strains Isolated from Dairy Products Using PCR and Determining the Antibiotic Resistance Pattern

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faeze Zadsafar

    2017-08-01

    Conclusion: Due to high presence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in raw milk and existence of antibiotic resistance genes in this bacterium, applying appropriate strategies for hygiene control in animal husbandries, is necessary to prevent the spread of bacteria.

  4. Early immune response in susceptible and resistant mice strains with chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection determines the type of T-helper cell response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moser, C; Hougen, H P; Song, Z

    1999-01-01

    Most cystic fibrosis (CF) patients become chronically infected with Pseudomonas aeruginosa in the lungs. The infection is characterized by a pronounced antibody response and a persistant inflammation dominated by polymorphonuclear neutrophils. Moreover a high antibody response correlates with a p...

  5. Molecular epidemiology of outbreak-related pseudomonas aeruginosa strains carrying the novel variant blaVIM-17 metallo-beta-lactamase gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siarkou, Victoria I; Vitti, Danai; Protonotariou, Efthimia; Ikonomidis, Alexandros; Sofianou, Danai

    2009-04-01

    A study was designed to investigate the molecular epidemiological characteristics of multidrug-resistant outbreak-related Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates collected in a university hospital in northern Greece. Of 29 nonreplicate P. aeruginosa isolates resistant to carbapenems and ceftazidime, 14 were positive for metallo-beta-lactamase production. PCR analyses with primers specific for bla(VIM) and bla(IMP) revealed that 13 isolates carried a novel bla(VIM-2) gene variant, designated bla(VIM-17), and only 1 isolate carried bla(VIM-2), a gene predominant among P. aeruginosa strains in Greek hospitals. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis of XbaI-digested genomic DNAs showed a close genetic relationship for 12 of 13 bla(VIM-17)-carrying outbreak-related isolates, which were of the O11 serotype; the clonally unrelated isolate carrying bla(VIM-17) was of the O12 serotype. PCR mapping strategies for the detection of class 1 integrons and sequencing approaches revealed the presence of integrons containing one bla(VIM) cassette flanked by two aacA29 cassettes. These integrons were similar but not identical to In59 (GenBank accession number AF263519) initially described in France. All isolates carrying bla(VIM-17), regardless of their genetic profile, had an identical integron, named In59.3, indicating that although the hospital outbreak was mainly due to clonal dissemination, the horizontal transmission of the bla(VIM-17)-containing integron among P. aeruginosa isolates should also have occurred. An outbreak-related isolate and a control strain, both of which carried the bla(VIM-2) gene but which were clonally distinct, had an identical integron, named In59.2, which differed only at the level of the bla(VIM) gene from In59.3 integrons, suggesting a common ancestry. The spread of the bla(VIM-17)-containing integron in clonally unrelated P. aeruginosa isolates without any evidence of plasmid carriage is probably associated with a transposon.

  6. Survival of Potentially Pathogenic Human-Associated Bacteria in the Rhizosphere of Hydroponically Grown Wheat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Anabelle; Garland, Jay L.; Lim, Daniel V.

    1996-01-01

    Plants may serve as reservoirs for human-associated bacteria (H-AB) in long-term space missions containing bioregenerative life support systems. The current study examined the abilities of five human-associated potential pathogens, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Pseudomonas cepacia, Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pyogenes, and Escherichia coli, to colonize and grow in the rhizosphere of hydroponically grown wheat, a candidate crop for life support. All of these bacteria have been recovered from past NASA missions and present potential problems for future missions. The abilities of these organisms to adhere to the roots of axenic five-day-old wheat (Triticum aestivum L. cv. Yecora rojo) were evaluated by enumeration of the attached organisms after a one hour incubation of roots in a suspension (approximately 10(exp 8 cu/ml)) of the H-AB. Results showed that a greater percentage of P. aeruginosa cells adhered to the wheat roots than the other four H-AB. Similarly incubated seedlings were also grown under attempted axenic conditions for seven days to examine the potential of each organism to proliferate in the rhizosphere (root colonization capacity). P. cepacia and P. aeruginosa showed considerable growth. E. coli and S. aureus showed no significant growth, and S. pyogenes died off in the wheat rhizosphere. Studies examining the effects of competition on the survival of these microorganisms indicated that P. aeruginosa was the only organism that survived in the rhizosphere of hydroponically grown wheat in the presence of different levels of microbial competition.

  7. Plant-associated fluorescent Pseudomonas from red lateritic soil: Beneficial characteristics and their impact on lettuce growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maroniche, Guillermo A; Rubio, Esteban J; Consiglio, Adrián; Perticari, Alejandro

    2016-11-25

    Fluorescent Pseudomonas are ubiquitous soil bacteria that usually establish mutualistic associations with plants, promoting their growth and health by several mechanisms. This makes them interesting candidates for the development of crop bio-inoculants. In this work, we isolated phosphate-solubilizing fluorescent Pseudomonas from the rhizosphere and inner tissues of different plant species growing in red soil from Misiones, Argentina. Seven isolates displaying strong phosphate solubilization were selected for further studies. Molecular identification by rpoD genotyping indicated that they belong to different species within the P. fluorescens and P. putida phylogenetic groups. Screening for in vitro traits such as phosphate solubilization, growth regulators synthesis or degradation, motility and antagonism against phytopathogens or other bacteria, revealed a unique profile of characteristics for each strain. Their plant growth-promoting potential was assayed using lettuce as a model for inoculation under controlled and greenhouse conditions. Five of the strains increased the growth of lettuce plants. Overall, the strongest lettuce growth promoter under both conditions was strain ZME4, isolated from inner tissues of maize. No clear association between lettuce growth promotion and in vitro beneficial traits was detected. In conclusion, several phosphate solubilizing pseudomonads from red soil were isolated that display a rich array of plant growth promotion traits, thus showing a potential for the development of new inoculants.

  8. Screening of Gibberellic Acid Production by Pseudomonas SPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khine Zar Wynn Myint; Khin Mya Lwin; Myo Myint

    2010-12-01

    The microbial gibberellic acid (GA3) production of Pseudomonas spp., was studied and qualitatively indentified by UV spectrophotometer. 20 strains of Pseudomonas spp., were isolated and screened the gibberellic acid productivily in King's B medium. Among them, only four strains can produce microbial gibberellic acid. The Rf values and colour appearance under UV were the same as authentic gibberellic acid. Moreover, the gibberellic acid producer strains were identified as Pseudomonas spp., by cultural, biochemical and drug sensitivity pattern.

  9. Plant-microbe rhizosphere interactions mediated by Rehmannia glutinosa root exudates under consecutive monoculture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Linkun; Wang, Juanying; Huang, Weimin; Wu, Hongmiao; Chen, Jun; Yang, Yanqiu; Zhang, Zhongyi; Lin, Wenxiong

    2015-10-01

    Under consecutive monoculture, the biomass and quality of Rehmannia glutinosa declines significantly. Consecutive monoculture of R. glutinosa in a four-year field trial led to significant growth inhibition. Most phenolic acids in root exudates had cumulative effects over time under sterile conditions, but these effects were not observed in the rhizosphere under monoculture conditions. It suggested soil microbes might be involved in the degradation and conversion of phenolic acids from the monocultured plants. T-RFLP and qPCR analysis demonstrated differences in both soil bacterial and fungal communities during monoculture. Prolonged monoculture significantly increased levels of Fusarium oxysporum, but decreased levels of Pseudomonas spp. Abundance of beneficial Pseudomonas spp. with antagonistic activity against F. oxysporum was lower in extended monoculture soils. Phenolic acid mixture at a ratio similar to that found in the rhizosphere could promote mycelial growth, sporulation, and toxin (3-Acetyldeoxynivalenol, 15-O-Acetyl-4-deoxynivalenol) production of pathogenic F. oxysporum while inhibiting growth of the beneficial Pseudomonas sp. W12. This study demonstrates that extended monoculture can alter the microbial community of the rhizosphere, leading to relatively fewer beneficial microorganisms and relatively more pathogenic and toxin-producing microorganisms, which is mediated by the root exudates.

  10. Cucumber Rhizosphere Microbial Community Response to Biocontrol Agent Bacillus subtilis B068150

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lihua Li

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Gram-positive bacteria Bacillus subtilis B068150 has been used as a biocontrol agent against the pathogen Fusarium oxysporum cucumerinum. Cucumber was grown in three soils with strain B068150 inoculated in a greenhouse for 90 days, and the colonization ability of strain B068150 in cucumber rhizosphere and non-rhizosphere soils was determined. Changes in total bacteria and fungi community composition and structures using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE and sequencing were determined. Colony counts showed that B068150 colonization in the rhizosphere was significantly higher (p < 0.001 than in non-rhizosphere soils. Based on our data, the introduction of B. bacillus B068150 did not change the diversity of microbial communities significantly in the rhizosphere of three soils. Our data showed that population density of B068150 in clay soil had a significant negative correlation on bacterial diversity in cucumber rhizosphere in comparison to loam and sandy soils, suggesting that the impact of B068150 might be soil specific.

  11. Alterations of OprD in Carbapenem-Intermediate and -Susceptible Strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolated from Patients with Bacteremia in a Spanish Multicenter Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabot, Gabriel; Rodríguez, Cristina; Roman, Elena; Tubau, Fe; Macia, María D.; Moya, Bartolomé; Zamorano, Laura; Suárez, Cristina; Peña, Carmen; Domínguez, María A.; Moncalián, Gabriel; Oliver, Antonio; Martínez-Martínez, Luis

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the presence of OprD mutations in 60 strains of metallo-ß-lactamase-negative Pseudomonas aeruginosa intermediately susceptible (IS [n = 12]; MIC = 8 μg/ml) or susceptible (S [n = 48]; MICs ≤ 1 to 4 μg/ml) to imipenem and/or meropenem that were isolated from patients with bacteremia in order to evaluate their impact on carbapenem susceptibility profiles. The presence of mutations in oprD was detected by sequencing analysis. OprD expression was assessed by both outer membrane protein (OMP) analysis and real-time PCR (RT-PCR). Fourteen (23%) isolates had an OprD identical to that of PAO1, and OprD modifications were detected in 46 isolates (77%). Isolates were classified as OprD “full-length types” (T1 [n = 40, including both wild-type OprD and variants showing several polymorphisms]) and OprD “deficient types” (T2 [n = 3 for OprD frameshift mutations] and T3 [n = 17 for premature stop codons in oprD]). RT-PCR showed that 5 OprD type T1 isolates presented reduced transcription of oprD (0.1- to 0.4-fold compared to PAO1), while oprD levels increased more than 2-fold over that seen with PAO1 in 4 OprD type T1 isolates. A total of 50% of the isolates belonging to OprD “deficient types” were susceptible to both carbapenems, and 40% were susceptible to meropenem and intermediately susceptible to imipenem. Only one isolate (5%) within this group was intermediately susceptible to both carbapenems, and one (5%) was susceptible to imipenem and intermediately susceptible to meropenem. We concluded that OprD inactivating mutations in clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa are not restricted only to carbapenem-resistant isolates but are also found in isolates with imipenem or meropenem MICs of only 0.06 to 4 μg/ml. PMID:22290967

  12. Molecular Characterization of the Genes pcaG and pcaH, Encoding Protocatechuate 3,4-Dioxygenase, Which Are Essential for Vanillin Catabolism in Pseudomonas sp. Strain HR199

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overhage, Jörg; Kresse, Andreas U.; Priefert, Horst; Sommer, Horst; Krammer, Gerhard; Rabenhorst, Jürgen; Steinbüchel, Alexander

    1999-01-01

    Pseudomonas sp. strain HR199 is able to utilize eugenol (4-allyl-2-methoxyphenol), vanillin (4-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzaldehyde), or protocatechuate as the sole carbon source for growth. Mutants of this strain which were impaired in the catabolism of vanillin but retained the ability to utilize eugenol or protocatechuate were obtained after nitrosoguanidine mutagenesis. One mutant (SK6169) was used as recipient of a Pseudomonas sp. strain HR199 genomic library in cosmid pVK100, and phenotypic complementation was achieved with a 5.8-kbp EcoRI fragment (E58). The amino acid sequences deduced from two corresponding open reading frames (ORF) identified on E58 revealed high degrees of homology to pcaG and pcaH, encoding the two subunits of protocatechuate 3,4-dioxygenase. Three additional ORF most probably encoded a 4-hydroxybenzoate 3-hydroxylase (PobA) and two putative regulatory proteins, which exhibited homology to PcaQ of Agrobacterium tumefaciens and PobR of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, respectively. Since mutant SK6169 was also complemented by a subfragment of E58 that harbored only pcaH, this mutant was most probably lacking a functional β subunit of the protocatechuate 3,4-dioxygenase. Since this mutant was still able to grow on protocatechuate and lacked protocatechuate 4,5-dioxygenase and protocatechuate 2,3-dioxygenase, the degradation had to be catalyzed by different enzymes. Two other mutants (SK6184 and SK6190), which were also impaired in the catabolism of vanillin, were not complemented by fragment E58. Since these mutants accumulated 3-carboxy muconolactone during cultivation on eugenol, they most probably exhibited a defect in a step of the catabolic pathway following the ortho cleavage. Moreover, in these mutants cyclization of 3-carboxymuconic acid seems to occur by a syn absolute stereochemical course, which is normally only observed for cis,cis-muconate lactonization in pseudomonads. In conclusion, vanillin is degraded through the ortho-cleavage pathway

  13. cis-Chlorobenzene Dihydrodiol Dehydrogenase (TcbB) from Pseudomonas sp. Strain P51, Expressed in Escherichia coli DH5α(pTCB149), Catalyzes Enantioselective Dehydrogenase Reactions

    OpenAIRE

    Raschke, Henning; Fleischmann, Thomas; Van Der Meer, Jan Roelof; Kohler, Hans-Peter E.

    1999-01-01

    cis-Chlorobenzene dihydrodiol dehydrogenase (CDD) from Pseudomonas sp. strain P51, cloned into Escherichia coli DH5α(pTCB149) was able to oxidize cis-dihydrodihydroxy derivatives (cis-dihydrodiols) of dihydronaphthalene, indene, and four para-substituted toluenes to the corresponding catechols. During the incubation of a nonracemic mixture of cis-1,2-indandiol, only the (+)-cis-(1R,2S) enantiomer was oxidized; the (−)-cis-(S,2R) enantiomer remained unchanged. CDD oxidized both enantiomers of ...

  14. Biofilm formation is determinant in tomato rhizosphere colonization by Bacillus velezensis FZB42.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Ali, Ameen; Deravel, Jovana; Krier, François; Béchet, Max; Ongena, Marc; Jacques, Philippe

    2017-10-23

    In this work, the behavior in tomato rhizosphere of Bacillus velezensis FZB42 was analyzed taking into account the surfactin production, the use of tomato roots exudate as substrates, and the biofilm formation. B. velezensis FZB42 and B. amyloliquefaciens S499 have a similar capability to colonize tomato rhizosphere. Little difference in this colonization was observed with surfactin non producing B. velezensis FZB42 mutant strains. B. velezensis is able to grow in the presence of root exudate and used preferentially sucrose, maltose, glutamic, and malic acids as carbon sources. A mutant enable to produce exopolysaccharide (EPS - ) was constructed to demonstrate the main importance of biofilm formation on rhizosphere colonization. This mutant had completely lost its ability to form biofilm whatever the substrate present in the culture medium and was unable to efficiently colonize tomato rhizosphere.

  15. Effect of Producing Different Phenazines on Bacterial Fitness and Biological Control in Pseudomonas chlororaphis 30-84

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Myoung Yu

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas chlororaphis 30-84 is a biological control agent selected for its ability to suppress diseases caused by fungal pathogens. P. chlororaphis 30-84 produces three phenazines: phenazine-1-carboxylic acid (PCA, 2-hydroxy-phenazine-1-carboxylic acid (2OHPCA and a small amount of 2-hydroxy-phenazine (2OHPHZ, and these are required for fungal pathogen inhibition and wheat rhizosphere competence. The two, 2-hydroxy derivatives are produced from PCA via the activity of a phenazine-modifying enzyme encoded by phzO. In addition to the seven biosynthetic genes responsible for the production of PCA, many other Pseudomonas strains possess one or more modifying genes, which encode enzymes that act independently or together to convert PCA into other phenazine derivatives. In order to understand the fitness effects of producing different phenazines, we constructed isogenic derivatives of P. chlororaphis 30-84 that differed only in the type of phenazines produced. Altering the type of phenazines produced by P. chlororaphis 30-84 enhanced the spectrum of fungal pathogens inhibited and altered the degree of take-all disease suppression. These strains also differed in their ability to promote extracellular DNA release, which may contribute to the observed differences in the amount of biofilm produced. All derivatives were equally important for survival over repeated plant/harvest cycles, indicating that the type of phenazines produced is less important for persistence in the wheat rhizosphere than whether or not cells produce phenazines. These findings provide a better understanding of the effects of different phenazines on functions important for biological control activity with implications for applications that rely on introduced or native phenazine producing populations.

  16. Growth of Pseudomonas fluorescens on Cassava Starch ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Michael Horsfall

    ABSTRACT: The potential of local strains of microorganism (Pseudomonas fluorescens) in polyhydroxbutyrate production ... The demand for the use of biopolymers ... This work therefore investigates the production of polyhydroxybutyrate from.

  17. Antifungal Rhizosphere Bacteria Can increase as Response to the Presence of Saprotrophic Fungi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wietse de Boer

    Full Text Available Knowledge on the factors that determine the composition of bacterial communities in the vicinity of roots (rhizosphere is essential to understand plant-soil interactions. Plant species identity, plant growth stage and soil properties have been indicated as major determinants of rhizosphere bacterial community composition. Here we show that the presence of saprotrophic fungi can be an additional factor steering rhizosphere bacterial community composition and functioning. We studied the impact of presence of two common fungal rhizosphere inhabitants (Mucor hiemalis and Trichoderma harzianum on the composition of cultivable bacterial communities developing in the rhizosphere of Carex arenaria (sand sedge in sand microcosms. Identification and phenotypic characterization of bacterial isolates revealed clear shifts in the rhizosphere bacterial community composition by the presence of two fungal strains (M. hiemalis BHB1 and T. harzianum PvdG2, whereas another M. hiemalis strain did not show this effect. Presence of both M. hiemalis BHB1 and T. harzianum PvdG2 resulted in a significant increase of chitinolytic and (in vitro antifungal bacteria. The latter was most pronounced for M. hiemalis BHB1, an isolate from Carex roots, which stimulated the development of the bacterial genera Achromobacter and Stenotrophomonas. In vitro tests showed that these genera were strongly antagonistic against M. hiemalis but also against the plant-pathogenic fungus Rhizoctonia solani. The most likely explanation for fungal-induced shifts in the composition of rhizosphere bacteria is that bacteria are being selected which are successful in competing with fungi for root exudates. Based on the results we propose that measures increasing saprotrophic fungi in agricultural soils should be explored as an alternative approach to enhance natural biocontrol against soil-borne plant-pathogenic fungi, namely by stimulating indigenous antifungal rhizosphere bacteria.

  18. Exploiting genotypic diversity of 2,4-Diacetylphloroglucinol-producing Pseudomonas spp.: characterization of superior root-colonizing P. fluorescens strain Q8r1-96

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raaijmakers, J.M.; Weller, D.M.

    2001-01-01

    The genotypic diversity that occurs in natural populations of antagonistic microorganisms provides an enormous resource for improving biological control of plant diseases. In this study, we determined the diversity of indigenous 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol (DAPG)-producing Pseudomonas spp. occurring

  19. Use of Endophytic and Rhizosphere Bacteria To Improve Phytoremediation of Arsenic-Contaminated Industrial Soils by Autochthonous Betula celtiberica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesa, Victoria; Navazas, Alejandro; González-Gil, Ricardo; González, Aida; Weyens, Nele; Lauga, Béatrice; Gallego, Jose Luis R; Sánchez, Jesús; Peláez, Ana Isabel

    2017-04-15

    The aim of this study was to investigate the potential of indigenous arsenic-tolerant bacteria to enhance arsenic phytoremediation by the autochthonous pseudometallophyte Betula celtiberica The first goal was to perform an initial analysis of the entire rhizosphere and endophytic bacterial communities of the above-named accumulator plant, including the cultivable bacterial species. B. celtiberica 's microbiome was dominated by taxa related to Flavobacteriales , Burkholderiales , and Pseudomonadales , especially the Pseudomonas and Flavobacterium genera. A total of 54 cultivable rhizobacteria and 41 root endophytes, mainly affiliated with the phyla Proteobacteria , Bacteroidetes , Firmicutes , and Actinobacteria , were isolated and characterized with respect to several potentially useful features for metal plant accumulation, such as the ability to promote plant growth, metal chelation, and/or mitigation of heavy-metal stress. Seven bacterial isolates were further selected and tested for in vitro accumulation of arsenic in plants; four of them were finally assayed in field-scale bioaugmentation experiments. The exposure to arsenic in vitro caused an increase in the total nonprotein thiol compound content in roots, suggesting a detoxification mechanism through phytochelatin complexation. In the contaminated field, the siderophore and indole-3-acetic acid producers of the endophytic bacterial consortium enhanced arsenic accumulation in the leaves and roots of Betula celtiberica , whereas the rhizosphere isolate Ensifer adhaerens strain 91R mainly promoted plant growth. Field experimentation showed that additional factors, such as soil arsenic content and pH, influenced arsenic uptake in the plant, attesting to the relevance of field conditions in the success of phytoextraction strategies. IMPORTANCE Microorganisms and plants have developed several ways of dealing with arsenic, allowing them to resist and metabolize this metalloid. These properties form the basis of

  20. Pseudomonas helleri sp. nov. and Pseudomonas weihenstephanensis sp. nov., isolated from raw cow's milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Neubeck, M; Huptas, C; Glück, C; Krewinkel, M; Stoeckel, M; Stressler, T; Fischer, L; Hinrichs, J; Scherer, S; Wenning, M

    2016-03-01

    Analysis of the microbiota of raw cow's milk and semi-finished milk products yielded seven isolates assigned to the genus Pseudomonas that formed two individual groups in a phylogenetic analysis based on partial rpoD and 16S rRNA gene sequences. The two groups could be differentiated from each other and also from their closest relatives as well as from the type species Pseudomonas aeruginosa by phenotypic and chemotaxonomic characterization and average nucleotide identity (ANIb) values calculated from draft genome assemblies. ANIb values within the groups were higher than 97.3 %, whereas similarity values to the closest relatives were 85 % or less. The major cellular lipids of strains WS4917T and WS4993T were phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylglycerol and diphosphatidylglycerol; the major quinone was Q-9 in both strains, with small amounts of Q-8 in strain WS4917T. The DNA G+C contents of strains WS4917T and WS4993T were 58.08 and 57.30 mol%, respectively. Based on these data, strains WS4917T, WS4995 ( = DSM 29141 = LMG 28434), WS4999, WS5001 and WS5002 should be considered as representatives of a novel species of the genus Pseudomonas, for which the name Pseudomonas helleri sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain of Pseudomonas helleri is strain WS4917T ( = DSM 29165T = LMG 28433T). Strains WS4993T and WS4994 ( = DSM 29140 = LMG 28438) should be recognized as representing a second novel species of the genus Pseudomonas, for which the name Pseudomonas weihenstephanensis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain of Pseudomonas weihenstephanensis is strain WS4993T ( = DSM 29166T = LMG 28437T).

  1. Diazotrophic diversity in the rhizosphere of two exotic weed plants, Prosopis juliflora and Parthenium hysterophorus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cibichakravarthy, B; Preetha, R; Sundaram, S P; Kumar, K; Balachandar, D

    2012-02-01

    This study is aimed at assessing culturable diazotrophic bacterial diversity in the rhizosphere of Prosopis juliflora and Parthenium hysterophorus, which grow profusely in nutritionally-poor soils and environmentally-stress conditions so as to identify some novel strains for bioinoculant technology. Diazotrophic isolates from Prosopis and Parthenium rhizosphere were characterized for nitrogenase activity by Acetylene Reduction Assay (ARA) and 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Further, the culture-independent quantitative PCR (qPCR) was performed to compare the abundance of diazotrophs in rhizosphere with bulk soils. The proportion of diazotrophs in total heterotrophs was higher in rhizosphere than bulk soils and 32 putative diazotrophs from rhizosphere of two plants were identified by nifH gene amplification. The ARA activity of the isolates ranged from 40 to 95 nmol ethylene h(-1) mg protein(-1). The 16S rRNA gene analysis identified the isolates to be members of alpha, beta and gamma Proteobacteria and firmicutes. The qPCR assay also confirmed that abundance of nif gene in rhizosphere of these two plants was 10-fold higher than bulk soil.

  2. Characterization of the SPI-1 and Rsp type three secretion systems in Pseudomonas fluorescens F113.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barret, Matthieu; Egan, Frank; Moynihan, Jennifer; Morrissey, John P; Lesouhaitier, Olivier; O'Gara, Fergal

    2013-06-01

    Pseudomonas fluorescens F113 is a plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium (PGPR) isolated from the sugar beet rhizosphere. The recent annotation of the F113 genome sequence has revealed that this strain encodes a wide array of secretion systems, including two complete type three secretion systems (T3SSs) belonging to the Hrp1 and SPI-1 families. While Hrp1 T3SSs are frequently encoded in other P. fluorescens strains, the presence of a SPI-1 T3SS in a plant-beneficial bacterial strain was unexpected. In this work, the genetic organization and expression of these two T3SS loci have been analysed by a combination of transcriptional reporter fusions and transcriptome analyses. Overexpression of two transcriptional activators has shown a number of genes encoding putative T3 effectors. In addition, the influence of these two T3SSs during the interaction of P. fluorescens F113 with some bacterial predators was also assessed. Our data revealed that the transcriptional activator hilA is induced by amoeba and that the SPI-1 T3SS could potentially be involved in resistance to amoeboid grazing. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Society for Applied Microbiology.

  3. Biosynthesis of the antimicrobial cyclic lipopeptides nunamycin and nunapeptin by Pseudomonas fluorescens strain In5 is regulated by the LuxR‐type transcriptional regulator NunF

    OpenAIRE

    Hennessy, Rosanna C.; Phippen, Christopher B. W.; Nielsen, Kristian F.; Olsson, Stefan; Stougaard, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Nunamycin and nunapeptin are two antimicrobial cyclic lipopeptides (CLPs) produced by Pseudomonas fluorescens In5 and synthesized by nonribosomal synthetases (NRPS) located on two gene clusters designated the nun–nup regulon. Organization of the regulon is similar to clusters found in other CLP‐producing pseudomonads except for the border regions where putative LuxR‐type regulators are located. This study focuses on understanding the regulatory role of the LuxR‐type‐encoding gene nun...

  4. Pseudomonas lactis sp. nov. and Pseudomonas paralactis sp. nov., isolated from bovine raw milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Neubeck, Mario; Huptas, Christopher; Glück, Claudia; Krewinkel, Manuel; Stoeckel, Marina; Stressler, Timo; Fischer, Lutz; Hinrichs, Jörg; Scherer, Siegfried; Wenning, Mareike

    2017-06-01

    Five strains, designated WS 4672T, WS 4998, WS 4992T, WS 4997 and WS 5000, isolated from bovine raw milk formed two individual groups in a phylogenetic analysis. The most similar species on the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequences were Pseudomonas azotoformans IAM 1603T, Pseudomonas gessardii CIP 105469T and Pseudomonas libanensis CIP 105460T showing 99.7-99.6 % similarity. Using rpoD gene sequences Pseudomonas veronii LMG 17761T (93.3 %) was most closely related to strain WS 4672T and Pseudomonas libanensis CIP 105460T to strain WS 4992T (93.3 %). The five strains could be differentiated from their closest relatives and from each other by phenotypic and chemotaxonomic characterization and ANIb values calculated from draft genome assemblies. ANIb values of strains WS 4992T and WS4671T to the closest relatives are lower than 90 %. The major cellular polar lipids of both strains are phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylglycerol, a phospholipid and diphosphatidylglycerol, and their major quinone is Q-9. The DNA G+C content of strains WS 4992T and WS 4672T were 60.0  and 59.7  mol%, respectively. Based on these genotypic and phenotypic traits two novel species of the genus Pseudomonas are proposed: Pseudomonas lactis sp. nov. [with type strain WS 4992T (=DSM 29167T=LMG 28435T) and the additional strains WS 4997 and WS 5000], and Pseudomonasparalactis sp. nov. [with type strain WS 4672T (=DSM 29164T=LMG 28439T) and additional strain WS 4998].

  5. Potential of Finger Millet Indigenous Rhizobacterium Pseudomonas sp. MSSRFD41 in Blast Disease Management—Growth Promotion and Compatibility With the Resident Rhizomicrobiome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jegan Sekar

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Finger millet [Eleusine coracona (L. Gaertner] “Ragi” is a nutri-cereal with potential health benefits, and is utilized solely for human consumption in semi-arid regions of Asia and Africa. It is highly vulnerable to blast disease caused by Pyricularia grisea, resulting in 50–100% yield loss. Chemical fungicides are used for the management of blast disease, but with great safety concern. Alternatively, bioinoculants are widely used in promoting seedling efficiency, plant biomass, and disease control. Little is known about the impact of introduced indigenous beneficial rhizobacteria on the rhizosphere microbiota and growth promotion in finger millet. Strain MSSRFD41 exhibited a 22.35 mm zone of inhibition against P. grisea, produces antifungal metabolites, siderophores, hydrolytic enzymes, and IAA, and solubilizes phosphate. Environmental SEM analysis indicated the potential of MSSRFD41 to inhibit the growth of P. grisea by affecting cellular functions, which caused deformation in fungal hyphae. Bioprimed finger millet seeds exhibited significantly higher levels of germination, seedling vigor index, and enhanced shoot and root length compared to control seeds. Cross streaking and RAPD analysis showed that MSSRFD41 is compatible with different groups of rhizobacteria and survived in the rhizosphere. In addition, PLFA analysis revealed no significant difference in microbial biomass between the treated and control rhizosphere samples. Field trials showed that MSSRFD41 treatment significantly reduced blast infestation and enhanced plant growth compared to other treatments. A liquid formulated MSSRFD41 product maintained shelf life at an average of 108 CFU ml−1 over 150 days of storage at 25°C. Overall, results from this study demonstrated that Pseudomonas sp. MSSRFD41, an indigenous rhizobacterial strain, is an alternative, effective, and sustainable resource for the management of P. grisea infestation and growth promotion of finger millet.

  6. Potential of Finger Millet Indigenous Rhizobacterium Pseudomonas sp. MSSRFD41 in Blast Disease Management—Growth Promotion and Compatibility With the Resident Rhizomicrobiome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekar, Jegan; Raju, Kathiravan; Duraisamy, Purushothaman; Ramalingam Vaiyapuri, Prabavathy

    2018-01-01

    Finger millet [Eleusine coracona (L). Gaertner] “Ragi” is a nutri-cereal with potential health benefits, and is utilized solely for human consumption in semi-arid regions of Asia and Africa. It is highly vulnerable to blast disease caused by Pyricularia grisea, resulting in 50–100% yield loss. Chemical fungicides are used for the management of blast disease, but with great safety concern. Alternatively, bioinoculants are widely used in promoting seedling efficiency, plant biomass, and disease control. Little is known about the impact of introduced indigenous beneficial rhizobacteria on the rhizosphere microbiota and growth promotion in finger millet. Strain MSSRFD41 exhibited a 22.35 mm zone of inhibition against P. grisea, produces antifungal metabolites, siderophores, hydrolytic enzymes, and IAA, and solubilizes phosphate. Environmental SEM analysis indicated the potential of MSSRFD41 to inhibit the growth of P. grisea by affecting cellular functions, which caused deformation in fungal hyphae. Bioprimed finger millet seeds exhibited significantly higher levels of germination, seedling vigor index, and enhanced shoot and root length compared to control seeds. Cross streaking and RAPD analysis showed that MSSRFD41 is compatible with different groups of rhizobacteria and survived in the rhizosphere. In addition, PLFA analysis revealed no significant difference in microbial biomass between the treated and control rhizosphere samples. Field trials showed that MSSRFD41 treatment significantly reduced blast infestation and enhanced plant growth compared to other treatments. A liquid formulated MSSRFD41 product maintained shelf life at an average of 108 CFU ml−1 over 150 days of storage at 25°C. Overall, results from this study demonstrated that Pseudomonas sp. MSSRFD41, an indigenous rhizobacterial strain, is an alternative, effective, and sustainable resource for the management of P. grisea infestation and growth promotion of finger millet. PMID:29875748

  7. Potential of Finger Millet Indigenous Rhizobacterium Pseudomonas sp. MSSRFD41 in Blast Disease Management-Growth Promotion and Compatibility With the Resident Rhizomicrobiome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekar, Jegan; Raju, Kathiravan; Duraisamy, Purushothaman; Ramalingam Vaiyapuri, Prabavathy

    2018-01-01

    Finger millet [ Eleusine coracona (L). Gaertner] "Ragi" is a nutri-cereal with potential health benefits, and is utilized solely for human consumption in semi-arid regions of Asia and Africa. It is highly vulnerable to blast disease caused by Pyricularia grisea , resulting in 50-100% yield loss. Chemical fungicides are used for the management of blast disease, but with great safety concern. Alternatively, bioinoculants are widely used in promoting seedling efficiency, plant biomass, and disease control. Little is known about the impact of introduced indigenous beneficial rhizobacteria on the rhizosphere microbiota and growth promotion in finger millet. Strain MSSRFD41 exhibited a 22.35 mm zone of inhibition against P. grisea , produces antifungal metabolites, siderophores, hydrolytic enzymes, and IAA, and solubilizes phosphate. Environmental SEM analysis indicated the potential of MSSRFD41 to inhibit the growth of P. grisea by affecting cellular functions, which caused deformation in fungal hyphae. Bioprimed finger millet seeds exhibited significantly higher levels of germination, seedling vigor index, and enhanced shoot and root length compared to control seeds. Cross streaking and RAPD analysis showed that MSSRFD41 is compatible with different groups of rhizobacteria and survived in the rhizosphere. In addition, PLFA analysis revealed no significant difference in microbial biomass between the treated and control rhizosphere samples. Field trials showed that MSSRFD41 treatment significantly reduced blast infestation and enhanced plant growth compared to other treatments. A liquid formulated MSSRFD41 product maintained shelf life at an average of 10 8 CFU ml -1 over 150 days of storage at 25°C. Overall, results from this study demonstrated that Pseudomonas sp. MSSRFD41, an indigenous rhizobacterial strain, is an alternative, effective, and sustainable resource for the management of P. grisea infestation and growth promotion of finger millet.

  8. Effect of nematodes on rhizosphere colonization by seed-applied bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knox, Oliver G G; Killham, Ken; Artz, Rebekka R E; Mullins, Chris; Wilson, Michael

    2004-08-01

    There is much interest in the use of seed-applied bacteria for biocontrol and biofertilization, and several commercial products are available. However, many attempts to use this strategy fail because the seed-applied bacteria do not colonize the rhizosphere. Mechanisms of rhizosphere colonization may involve active bacterial movement or passive transport by percolating water or plant roots. Transport by other soil biota is likely to occur, but this area has not been well studied. We hypothesized that interactions with soil nematodes may enhance colonization. To test this hypothesis, a series of microcosm experiments was carried out using two contrasting soils maintained under well-defined physical conditions where transport by mass water flow could not occur. Seed-applied Pseudomonas fluorescens SBW25 was capable of rhizosphere colonization at matric potentials of -10 and -40 kPa in soil without nematodes, but colonization levels were substantially increased by the presence of nematodes. Our results suggest that nematodes can have an important role in rhizosphere colonization by bacteria in soil.

  9. Growth response and nutrient uptake of blue pine (Pinus wallichiana seedlings inoculated with rhizosphere microorganisms under temperate nursery conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.A. Ahangar

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Microbial inoculants (Trichoderma harzianum, Pseudomonas fluorescens,Laccaria laccata inoculated either individually or in combinationsignificantly improved the growth and biomass of blue pine seedlings. The ECM fungus Laccaria laccata, when inoculated individually, showed significantly higher plant growth, followed by Pseudomonas fluorescens and Trichoderma harzianum. The combined inoculation of rhizosphere microorganisms showed synergistic growth promoting action and proved superior in enhancing the growth of blue pine than individual inoculation. Co-inoculation of L. laccata with P. fluorescens resulted in higher ectomycorrhizal root colonization. Uptake of nutrients (N, P, K was significantly improved by microbial inoculants, tested individually or in combination. Combined inoculation of L. laccata with T. harzianum and P. fluorescens significantly increased in N, P and K contents in blue pine seedlings as compared to control. Acid phosphatase activity in the rhizosphere of blue pine seedlings was also enhanced by these microorganisms. L. laccata exhibited higher acid phosphatase activity followed by P. fluorescens.

  10. Purification and characterization of extracellular lipase from a new strain: Pseudomonas aeruginosa SRT 9 Purificação e caracterização de uma lipase extracelular produzida por uma nova cepa: Pseudomonas aeruginosa SRT9

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    Prita S. Borkar

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available An extra cellular lipase was isolated and purified from the culture broth of Pseudomonas aeruginosa SRT 9 to apparent homogeneity using ammonium sulfate precipitation followed by chromatographic techniques on phenyl Sepharose CL- 4B and Mono Q HR 5/5 column, resulting in a purification factor of 98 fold with specific activity of 12307.8 U/mg. The molecular weight of the purified lipase was estimated by SDS-PAGE to be 29 kDa with isoelectric point of 4.5. Maximum lipase activity was observed in a wide range of temperature and pH values with optimum temperature of 55ºC and pH 6.9. The lipase preferably acted on triacylglycerols of long chain (C14-C16 fatty acids. The lipase was inhibited strongly by EDTA suggesting the enzyme might be metalloprotein. SDS and metal ions such as Hg2+, Zn2+, Cu2+, Ag2+ and Fe2+ decreased the lipase activity remarkedly. Its marked stability and activity in organic solvents suggest that this lipase is highly suitable as a biotechnological tool with a variety of applications including organo synthetic reactions and preparation of enantiomerically pure pharmaceuticals. The Km and Vmax value of the purified enzyme for triolein hydrolysis were calculated to be 1.11 mmol/L and 0.05 mmol/L/minrespectively.Uma lipase extracelular foi isolada e purificada a partir de um caldo de cultura de Pseudomonas aeruginosa SRT9 até homogeneidade visível empregando-se precipitação com sulfato de amônia, seguida de técnicas cromatográficas em colunas de fenil sefarose CL-4B e Mono Q HR 5/5, obtendo-se um fator de purificação de 98 vezes, e atividade especifica de 12307,8 U/mg. Por SDS_PAGE, estimou-se que o peso molecular da lipase purificada é 29kDa, com um ponto isoelétrico de 4,5. A lipase apresentou atividade máxima em uma ampla faixa de temperatura e pH, com ótimos a 55ºC e pH 6,9. A lípase foi mais ativa sobre triacilglicerois de cadeia longa (C14-C16. A lipase foi fortemente inibida por EDTA, o que sugere que a

  11. Tipificación molecular de aislamientos de Pseudomonas aeruginosa obtenidos de pacientes con fibrosis quística Molecular typification of Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains isolated from patients with cystic fibrosis

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    N. G. Iglesias

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available La fibrosis quística es la enfermedad genética letal de mayor frecuencia en la población caucásica. La infección pulmonar crónica es la principal causa de morbilidad de la enfermedad, siendo la infección por Pseudomonas aeruginosa la más importante, ya que resulta de difícil erradicación. El Centro de Referencia Provincial de Fibrosis Quística que funciona en el Hospital de Niños "Sor María Ludovica" de La Plata asiste a alrededor de 220 pacientes con fibrosis quística cuyas edades oscilan entre los dos meses y los 45 años. La edad de sobrevida depende de una serie de factores entre los que se encuentran el diagnóstico temprano de la enfermedad y la adquisición de la infección pulmonar crónica por P. aeruginosa. La misma puede adquirirse en forma directa, por transmisión persona a persona o de forma indirecta a través del uso de elementos hospitalarios contaminados. El objetivo de este trabajo fue la tipificación molecular de aislamientos de P. aeruginosa obtenidos de pacientes con fibrosis quística, con el fin de evaluar la relación genómica entre los mismos. El estudio se llevó a cabo mediante RAPD-PCR. El análisis demostró que existe gran heterogeneidad genética entre los aislamientos. La separación en cohortes de pacientes de acuerdo con su bacteriología, que implica la asistencia en días diferentes y las hospitalizaciones en habitaciones aisladas ha demostrado, junto a otras estrategias, disminuir las infecciones cruzadas.Cystic fibrosis is the most frequent lethal genetic disease that affects the caucasian population. The main cause of morbidity is the chronic lung infection, being the infection caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa the most difficult to eradicate. This bacteria can be acquired in direct form, by person-to-person transfer, or indirectly, by hospital acquired infection. The Centro Provincial de Referencia de Fibrosis Quística functioning in the Hospital de Niños "Sor María Ludovica", in La

  12. Structural Adaptation of Cold-Active RTX Lipase from Pseudomonas sp. Strain AMS8 Revealed via Homology and Molecular Dynamics Simulation Approaches

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    Mohd. Shukuri Mohamad Ali

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The psychrophilic enzyme is an interesting subject to study due to its special ability to adapt to extreme temperatures, unlike typical enzymes. Utilizing computer-aided software, the predicted structure and function of the enzyme lipase AMS8 (LipAMS8 (isolated from the psychrophilic Pseudomonas sp., obtained from the Antarctic soil are studied. The enzyme shows significant sequence similarities with lipases from Pseudomonas sp. MIS38 and Serratia marcescens. These similarities aid in the prediction of the 3D molecular structure of the enzyme. In this study, 12 ns MD simulation is performed at different temperatures for structural flexibility and stability analysis. The results show that the enzyme is most stable at 0°C and 5°C. In terms of stability and flexibility, the catalytic domain (N-terminus maintained its stability more than the noncatalytic domain (C-terminus, but the non-catalytic domain showed higher flexibility than the catalytic domain. The analysis of the structure and function of LipAMS8 provides new insights into the structural adaptation of this protein at low temperatures. The information obtained could be a useful tool for low temperature industrial applications and molecular engineering purposes, in the near future.

  13. HapX-Mediated Iron Homeostasis Is Essential for Rhizosphere Competence and Virulence of the Soilborne Pathogen Fusarium oxysporum[C][W][OA

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Berges, Manuel S.; Capilla, Javier; Turrà, David; Schafferer, Lukas; Matthijs, Sandra; Jöchl, Christoph; Cornelis, Pierre; Guarro, Josep; Haas, Hubertus; Di Pietro, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    Soilborne fungal pathogens cause devastating yield losses and are highly persistent and difficult to control. During the infection process, these organisms must cope with limited availability of iron. Here we show that the bZIP protein HapX functions as a key regulator of iron homeostasis and virulence in the vascular wilt fungus Fusarium oxysporum. Deletion of hapX does not affect iron uptake but causes derepression of genes involved in iron-consuming pathways, leading to impaired growth under iron-depleted conditions. F. oxysporum strains lacking HapX are reduced in their capacity to invade and kill tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) plants and immunodepressed mice. The virulence defect of ΔhapX on tomato plants is exacerbated by coinoculation of roots with a biocontrol strain of Pseudomonas putida, but not with a siderophore-deficient mutant, indicating that HapX contributes to iron competition of F. oxysporum in the tomato rhizosphere. These results establish a conserved role for HapX-mediated iron homeostasis in fungal infection of plants and mammals. PMID:22968717

  14. Physiological and biochemical changes in Matricaria chamomilla induced by Pseudomonas fluorescens and water deficit stress

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    Hamid MOHAMMADI

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Environmental stresses and rhizosphere microorganisms affect growth parameters and accumulation of active ingredients especially in plants with medicinal properties. The present study examined the effects of chamomile (Matricaria chamomilla L. seedling inoculation with Pseudomonas fluorescens PF-135 strain on its growth parameters, photosynthetic pigments, proline, malondialdehyde (MDA, and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 content, and essential oil concentration at both regular watering and water deficit experiments. Based on the obtained results, water deficit stress reduced root dry mass, and flower fresh and dry mass as well. However, amount of H2O2 and MDA in root and shoot tissues were considerably lower in inoculated plants compared to non-inoculated ones under both normal watering and water deficit regimes. It indicates that lipid peroxidation and production of reactive oxygen species has been diminished in inoculated plants. Also, essential oil content in inoculated plants significantly increased compared with that of non-inoculated ones under water deficit stress condition. It can be concluded that P. fluorescens PF-135 strain has an outstanding potential to alleviate adverse effects of water deficit on plant growth, and hence can be used as an excellent PGPR in order to boost chamomile productivity especially under water deficit stress condition.

  15. Caracterización, por RAPD-PCR, de aislados de Pseudomonas aeruginosa obtenidos de pacientes con fibrosis quística RAPD-PCR characterization of Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains obtained from cystic fibrosis patients

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    Maribel Ortiz-Herrera

    2004-04-01

    fibrosis quística permite llevar a cabo estudios más precisos de la epidemiología de esta importante relación huésped-parásito.OBJECTIVE: To characterize P aeruginosa strains isolated from bronchoalveolar lavage fluid of cystic fibrosis (CF patients over a 3 year period. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A prospective follow-up study was carried out in a population of cystic fibrosis patients. The random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD technique was used to amplify DNA of P aeruginosa strains isolated from bronchoalveolar lavage fluid samples of five CF patients from the Servicio de Neumología y Cirugía del Tórax del Instituto Nacional de Pediatría (Mexico City Chest Clinic of the National Pediatrics Institute in Mexico City, between June 1996 and June 2002. Amplification patterns were established for each isolate to accurately identify all strains and to carry out an epidemiological analysis of P aeruginosa among the selected CF patients. RESULTS: Eighteen different DNA amplification patterns were defined and used to identify each P aeruginosa strain isolated from the different bronchoalveolar lavage samples. No correlation was observed between the different P aeruginosa strain genotypes and mucoid or non-mucoid phenotypes, as strains with different phenotypes showed similar amplification patterns. Several strains with different amplification patterns were identified in samples obtained from the same patient, suggesting coinfection with more than one P aeruginosa strain. Two siblings with CF shared similar genotypes, suggesting the occurrence of cross-contamination. Similar genotypes of P aeruginosa strains were isolated throughout the study period. CONCLUSION: Genotypic characterization of P aeruginosa strains in CF patients allows more accurate epidemiological analyses of this important host-agent relationship.

  16. Genome Sequencing of a Mung Bean Plant Growth Promoting Strain of P. aeruginosa with Biocontrol Ability

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    Devaraj Illakkiam

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa PGPR2 is a mung bean rhizosphere strain that produces secondary metabolites and hydrolytic enzymes contributing to excellent antifungal activity against Macrophomina phaseolina, one of the prevalent fungal pathogens of mung bean. Genome sequencing was performed using the Ion Torrent Personal Genome Machine generating 1,354,732 reads (6,772,433 sequenced bases achieving ~25-fold coverage of the genome. Reference genome assembly using MIRA 3.4.0 yielded 198 contigs. The draft genome of PGPR2 encoded 6803 open reading frames, of which 5314 were genes with predicted functions, 1489 were genes of known functions, and 80 were RNA-coding genes. Strain specific and core genes of P. aeruginosa PGPR2 that are relevant to rhizospheric habitat were identified by pangenome analysis. Genes involved in plant growth promoting function such as synthesis of ACC deaminase, indole-3-acetic acid, trehalose, mineral scavenging siderophores, hydrogen cyanide, chitinases, acyl homoserine lactones, acetoin, 2,3-butanediol, and phytases were identified. In addition, niche-specific genes such as phosphate solubilising 3-phytase, adhesins, pathway-specific transcriptional regulators, a diguanylate cyclase involved in cellulose synthesis, a receptor for ferrienterochelin, a DEAD/DEAH-box helicase involved in stress tolerance, chemotaxis/motility determinants, an HtpX protease, and enzymes involved in the production of a chromanone derivative with potent antifungal activity were identified.

  17. Biphenyl-Metabolizing Bacteria in the Rhizosphere of Horseradish and Bulk Soil Contaminated by Polychlorinated Biphenyls as Revealed by Stable Isotope Probing▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhlik, Ondrej; Jecna, Katerina; Mackova, Martina; Vlcek, Cestmir; Hroudova, Miluse; Demnerova, Katerina; Paces, Vaclav; Macek, Tomas

    2009-01-01

    DNA-based stable isotope probing in combination with terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism was used in order to identify members of the microbial community that metabolize biphenyl in the rhizosphere of horseradish (Armoracia rusticana) cultivated in soil contaminated with polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) compared to members of the microbial community in initial, uncultivated bulk soil. On the basis of early and recurrent detection of their 16S rRNA genes in clone libraries constructed from [13C]DNA, Hydrogenophaga spp. appeared to dominate biphenyl catabolism in the horseradish rhizosphere soil, whereas Paenibacillus spp. were the predominant biphenyl-utilizing bacteria in the initial bulk soil. Other bacteria found to derive carbon from biphenyl in this nutrient-amended microcosm-based study belonged mostly to the class Betaproteobacteria and were identified as Achromobacter spp., Variovorax spp., Methylovorus spp., or Methylophilus spp. Some bacteria that were unclassified at the genus level were also detected, and these bacteria may be members of undescribed genera. The deduced amino acid sequences of the biphenyl dioxygenase α subunits (BphA) from bacteria that incorporated [13C]into DNA in 3-day incubations of the soils with [13C]biphenyl are almost identical to that of Pseudomonas alcaligenes B-357. This suggests that the spectrum of the PCB congeners that can be degraded by these enzymes may be similar to that of strain B-357. These results demonstrate that altering the soil environment can result in the participation of different bacteria in the metabolism of biphenyl. PMID:19700551

  18. Biosynthesis of the antimicrobial cyclic lipopeptides nunamycin and nunapeptin by Pseudomonas fluorescens strain In5 is regulated by the LuxR-type transcriptional regulator NunF

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hennessy, Rosanna Catherine; Phippen, Christopher; Nielsen, Kristian Fog

    2017-01-01

    -producing pseudomonads except for the border regions where putative LuxR-type regulators are located. This study focuses on understanding the regulatory role of the LuxR-type-encoding gene nunF in CLP production of P. fluorescens In5. Functional analysis of nunF coupled with liquid chromatography-high-resolution mass......Nunamycin and nunapeptin are two antimicrobial cyclic lipopeptides (CLPs) produced by Pseudomonas fluorescens In5 and synthesized by nonribosomal synthetases (NRPS) located on two gene clusters designated the nun-nup regulon. Organization of the regulon is similar to clusters found in other CLP...... spectrometry (LC-HRMS) showed that CLP biosynthesis is regulated by nunF. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis indicated that transcription of the NRPS genes catalyzing CLP production is strongly reduced when nunF is mutated indicating that nunF is part of the nun-nup regulon. Swarming and biofilm formation...

  19. Phenotypic and Genotypic Evaluation of Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae Strains, Causing Citrus Blast in the West of Mazandaran and the East of Guilan

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    S. Sameie-Shirkadeh

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: P. syringae pv. syringae (P.s.s, the causal agent of blast of citrus trees, is one of the most important plant pathogens in the world. P.s.s is unique among most P. syringae pathovars according to its ability to cause disease in over 180 species of plants in several unrelated genera. Traditionally, Strains of P.s.s are identified on the basis of biochemical and nutritional tests and symptom expression in host plants. Genomic fingerprinting methods based on the polymerase chain reaction (PCR have been applied for identification and classification of plant-associated bacteria to the subspecies level. The objectives of this study were the phenotypic and molecular evaluation of P.s. pv. syringae strains causing citrus blast in the West of Mazandaran and the East of Guilan, and study of genetic diversity of P.s.s isolates of citrus by using ERIC and REP-PCR markers. Materials and Methods: During 2011 to 2012, citrus infected tissues were sampled from different orchards in the West of Mazandaran and the East of Guilan. Bacterial phenotypes were studied based on standard physiological and biochemical tests. Gram reaction was determined by potassium hydroxide solubility test (KOH test. Strains were grown on King'B medium (KB and fluorescent pigment production was evaluated. Levan formation, oxidase reaction, potato soft rot, Arginine dihydrolase and induction of the hypersensitive reaction in tobacco leaves (LOPAT tests, were done as described by Schadd et al. The standard strains of P.s. pv. syringae form IVIA were used as reference strains in this study. Pathogenicity Test was done as described by Yessad et al. Citrus seedlings were maintained in a greenhouse at 20°C. In addition, a PCR-based method was used to confirm the genus and species of bacteria by using bacterial specific primer pair’s designed for a specific gene of syringomycin B. Genetic diversity among the strains, was studied by rep-PCR fingerprinting. Genomic

  20. Rhizosphere bacterial diversity and heavy metal accumulation in Nymphaea pubescens in aid of phytoremediation potential

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    RAISA KABEER

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The present work aims to characterize the bacterial diversity of the rhizosphere system of Nymphaea pubescens and the sediment system where it grows naturally. Heavy metal content in the sediment and Nymphea plant from the selected wetland system were also studied. Results of the current study showed that the concentration of copper, zinc and lead in the sediment ranged from 43 to 182 mg/Kg, from 331 to 1382 mg/Kg and from 121 to 1253 mg/Kg, respectively. Cadmium concentration in sediment samples was found to be zero and the order of abundance of heavy metals in the sediment samples was Zn>Pb>Cu>Cd. The abundance patterns of heavy metals in leaf, petiole and root were Cd>Cu>Pb>Zn. Microbial load in rhizosphere of Nymphea pubescens ranged from 93×102 to 69×103 and that of sediment was 62×102 to 125×103. Bacterial load in rhizosphere was higher than that of growing sediment. Four bacterial genera were identified from the rhizosphere of Nymphaea pubescens which include Acinetobacter, Alcaligens, Listeria and Staphylococcus. Acinetobacter, Alcaligens and Listeria are the three bacterial genera isolated from sediment samples. Copper resistance studies of the 14 bacterial isolates from rhizosphere and 7 strains from sediment samples revealed that most of them showed low resistance (<100 μg/ml and very few isolates showed high resistance of 400-500 μg/ml.

  1. Isolation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains from dental office environments and units in Barretos, state of São Paulo, Brazil, and analysis of their susceptibility to antimicrobial drugs Isolamento de cepas de Pseudomonas aeruginosa provenientes do meio ambiente e de equipos dentarios em clinicas dentarias em Barretos, São Paulo, Brasil; analises da susceptibilidade das cepas a drogas antimicrobianas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Claudia de Oliveira

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available A wide variety of opportunistic pathogens has been detected in the tubing supplying water to odontological equipment, in special in the biofilm lining of these tubes. Among these pathogens, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, one of the leading causes of nosocomial infections, is frequently found in water lines supplying dental units. In the present work, 160 samples of water, and 200 fomite samples from forty dental units were collected in the city of Barretos, State of São Paulo, Brazil and evaluated between January and July, 2005. Seventy-six P. aeruginosa strains, isolated from the dental environment (5 strains and water system (71 strains, were tested for susceptibility to six antimicrobial drugs most frequently used against P. aeruginosa infections. Susceptibility to ciprofloxacin, followed by meropenem was the predominant profile. The need for effective means of reducing the microbial burden within dental unit water lines is emphasized, and the risk of exposure and cross-infection in dental practice, in special when caused by opportunistic pathogens like P. aeruginosa, are highlighted.Uma ampla variedade de patógenos oportunistas tem sido detectadas nos tubos de alimentação de água dos equipos odontológicos, particularmente no biofilme formado na superfície do tubo. Entre os patógenos oportunistas encontrados nos tubos de água, Pseudomonas aeruginosa é reconhecida como uma das principais causadoras de infecções nosocomiais. Foram coletadas 160 amostras de água e 200 amostras de fomites em quarenta clinicas odontológicas na cidade de Barretos, São Paulo, Brasil, durante o período de Janeiro a Julho de 2005. Setenta e seis cepas de P. aeruginosa, isoladas a partir dos fomites (5 cepas e das amostras de água (71 cepas, foram analisadas quanto à susceptibilidade à seis drogas antimicrobianas freqüentemente utilizadas para o tratamento de infecções provocadas por P. aeruginosa. As principais suscetibilidades observadas foram para a

  2. Ocorrência de linhagens de Pseudomonas aeruginosa cloro resistentes em águas de diferentes origens - DOI: 10.4025/actascibiolsci.v29i3.488 Ocurrence of chlorine resistant strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa from different water sources - DOI: 10.4025/actascibiolsci.v29i3.488

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrich Vasconcelos

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa é conhecida por sua versatilidade metabólica e extrema capacidade de adaptação a diferentes ambientes, inclusive aquáticos. Para desinfecção de águas, o cloro e agentes que contêm cloro continuam sendo os mais usados no mundo. O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar a resistência ao cloro de linhagens de P. aeruginosa, isoladas de amostras de águas de diversos ambientes. Foram testados diferentes tempos de contato (1, 5, 10, 20, 30 e 40 minutos e soluções aquosas de cloro, com concentrações definidas com base na legislação vigente no país para água potável: 0,5; 1,0 e 2,0 ppm. O teste de resistência ao cloro foi desenvolvido por meio da exposição direta das bactérias às soluções. Os resultados revelaram que P. aeruginosa, isoladas de diferentes fontes de água, têm a habilidade de sobreviver a diferentes concentrações de cloro. Na concentração de 1 ppm, a maioria das linhagens não foi inibida. As linhagens mais resistentes ao cloro também apresentaram relação de multirresistência à maioria dos antibióticos testados.The nutritional versatility and the adaptability of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to different environments, including water, are well known. Chlorine and other chlorine agents are used as water disinfecting all around the world. The aim of this work was to evaluate the possible chlorine resistance amongst P. aeruginosa strains isolated from different aquatic sources by using different contact time (1, 5, 10, 20, 30 and 40 minutes in solutions with known chlorine concentrations according current legislation in the country to potable water: 0.5; 1.0 and 2.0 ppm. The chlorine resistance test was done by direct exposure of P. aeruginosa under a solution with known chlorine concentration. Results showed that P. aeruginosa strains isolated from different aquatic sources are able to survive in different chlorine concentrations. At 1 ppm, most of them were not inhibited. It was also

  3. Involvement of phenazines and biosurfactants in biocontrol of Pythium myriotylum root rot on cocoyam by Pseudomonas sp. CMR12A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pseudomonas sp. CMR12a was isolated from the rhizosphere of the tropical tuber crop cocoyam and produces both phenazines and cyclic lipopeptide (CLP) biosurfactants. CMR12a was shown to be an efficient biocontrol agent of P. myriotylum on cocoyam. To assess the importance of phenazine and biosurfact...

  4. Trigonella foenum-graceum (Seed Extract Interferes with Quorum Sensing Regulated Traits and Biofilm Formation in the Strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Aeromonas hydrophila

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fohad Mabood Husain

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Trigonella foenum-graecum L. (Fenugreek is an important plant of the Leguminosae family known to have medicinal properties. However, fraction based antiquorum sensing and antibiofilm activities have not been reported from this plant. In the present study T. foenum-graecum seed extract was sequentially fractionated and sub-MICs were tested for above activities. The methanol fraction of the extract demonstrated significant inhibition of AHL regulated virulence factors: protease, LasB elastase, pyocyanin production, chitinase, EPS, and swarming motility in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 and PAF79. Further, QS dependent virulence factor in the aquatic pathogen Aeromonas hydrophila WAF38 was also reduced. Application of T. foenum-graecum seed extract to PAO1, PAF79, and WAF38 decreased the biofilm forming abilities of the pathogens by significant levels. The extract also exhibited reduced AHL levels and subsequent downregulation of lasB gene. In vivo study showed an enhanced survival of PAO1-preinfected C. elegans after treatment with extract at 1 mg/mL. Further, the major compound detected by GC-MS, caffeine, reduced the production of QS regulated virulence factors and biofilm at 200 µg/mL concentration indicating its role in the activity of the methanol extract. The results of the present study reveal the potential anti-QS and antibiofilm property of T. foenum-graceum extract and caffeine.

  5. Biosynthesis of the antimicrobial cyclic lipopeptides nunamycin and nunapeptin by Pseudomonas fluorescens strain In5 is regulated by the LuxR-type transcriptional regulator NunF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennessy, Rosanna C; Phippen, Christopher B W; Nielsen, Kristian F; Olsson, Stefan; Stougaard, Peter

    2017-12-01

    Nunamycin and nunapeptin are two antimicrobial cyclic lipopeptides (CLPs) produced by Pseudomonas fluorescens In5 and synthesized by nonribosomal synthetases (NRPS) located on two gene clusters designated the nun-nup regulon. Organization of the regulon is similar to clusters found in other CLP-producing pseudomonads except for the border regions where putative LuxR-type regulators are located. This study focuses on understanding the regulatory role of the LuxR-type-encoding gene nunF in CLP production of P. fluorescens In5. Functional analysis of nunF coupled with liquid chromatography-high-resolution mass spectrometry (LC-HRMS) showed that CLP biosynthesis is regulated by nunF. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis indicated that transcription of the NRPS genes catalyzing CLP production is strongly reduced when nunF is mutated indicating that nunF is part of the nun-nup regulon. Swarming and biofilm formation was reduced in a nunF knockout mutant suggesting that these CLPs may also play a role in these phenomena as observed in other pseudomonads. Fusion of the nunF promoter region to mCherry showed that nunF is strongly upregulated in response to carbon sources indicating the presence of a fungus suggesting that environmental elicitors may also influence nunF expression which upon activation regulates nunamycin and nunapeptin production required for the growth inhibition of phytopathogens. © 2017 The Authors. MicrobiologyOpen published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Biosynthesis and regulation of cyclic lipopeptides in Pseudomonas fluorescens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruijn, de I.

    2009-01-01

    Cyclic lipopeptides (CLPs) are surfactant and antibiotic metabolites produced by a variety of bacterial
    genera. For the genus Pseudomonas, many structurally different CLPs have been identified. CLPs play an
    important role in surface motility of Pseudomonas strains, but also in virulence

  7. Conservation of the response regulator gene gacA in Pseudomonas species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Souza, J.T.; Mazzola, M.; Raaijmakers, J.M.

    2003-01-01

    The response regulator gene gacA influences the production of several secondary metabolites in both pathogenic and beneficial Pseudomonas spp. In this study, we developed primers and a probe for the gacA gene of Pseudomonas species and sequenced a 425 bp fragment of gacA from ten Pseudomonas strains

  8. Reclassification of rhizosphere bacteria including strains causing corky root of lettuce and proposal of Rhizorhapis suberifaciens gen. nov., comb. nov., Sphingobium mellinum sp. nov., Sphingobium xanthum sp. nov. and Rhizorhabdus argentea gen. nov., sp. nov.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, Isolde M; Jochimsen, Kenneth N; De Vos, Paul; van Bruggen, Ariena H C

    2014-04-01

    The genus Rhizorhapis gen. nov. (to replace the illegitimate genus name Rhizomonas) is proposed for strains of Gram-negative bacteria causing corky root of lettuce, a widespread and important lettuce disease worldwide. Only one species of the genus Rhizomonas was described, Rhizomonas suberifaciens, which was subsequently reclassified as Sphingomonas suberifaciens based on 16S rRNA gene sequences and the presence of sphingoglycolipid in the cell envelope. However, the genus Sphingomonas is so diverse that further reclassification was deemed necessary. Twenty new Rhizorhapis gen. nov.- and Sphingomonas-like isolates were obtained from lettuce or sow thistle roots, or from soil using lettuce seedlings as bait. These and previously reported isolates were characterized in a polyphasic study including 16S rRNA gene sequencing, DNA-DNA hybridization, DNA G+C content, whole-cell fatty acid composition, morphology, substrate oxidation, temperature and pH sensitivity, and pathogenicity to lettuce. The isolates causing lettuce corky root belonged to the genera Rhizorhapis gen. nov., Sphingobium, Sphingopyxis and Rhizorhabdus gen. nov. More specifically, we propose to reclassify Rhizomonas suberifaciens as Rhizorhapis suberifaciens gen. nov., comb. nov. (type strain, CA1(T) = LMG 17323(T) = ATCC 49355(T)), and also propose the novel species Sphingobium xanthum sp. nov., Sphingobium mellinum sp. nov. and Rhizorhabdus argentea gen. nov., sp. nov. with the type strains NL9(T) ( = LMG 12560(T) = ATCC 51296(T)), WI4(T) ( = LMG 11032(T) = ATCC 51292(T)) and SP1(T) ( = LMG 12581(T) = ATCC 51289(T)), respectively. Several strains isolated from lettuce roots belonged to the genus Sphingomonas, but none of them were pathogenic.

  9. The Genome of the Toluene-Degrading Pseudomonas veronii Strain 1YdBTEX2 and Its Differential Gene Expression in Contaminated Sand.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marian Morales

    Full Text Available The natural restoration of soils polluted by aromatic hydrocarbons such as benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and m- and p-xylene (BTEX may be accelerated by inoculation of specific biodegraders (bioaugmentation. Bioaugmentation mainly involves introducing bacteria that deploy their metabolic properties and adaptation potential to survive and propagate in the contaminated environment by degrading the pollutant. In order to better understand the adaptive response of cells during a transition to contaminated material, we analyzed here the genome and short-term (1 h changes in genome-wide gene expression of the BTEX-degrading bacterium Pseudomonas veronii 1YdBTEX2 in non-sterile soil and liquid medium, both in presence or absence of toluene. We obtained a gapless genome sequence of P. veronii 1YdBTEX2 covering three individual replicons with a total size of 8 Mb, two of which are largely unrelated to current known bacterial replicons. One-hour exposure to toluene, both in soil and liquid, triggered massive transcription (up to 208-fold induction of multiple gene clusters, such as toluene degradation pathway(s, chemotaxis and toluene efflux pumps. This clearly underlines their key role in the adaptive response to toluene. In comparison to liquid medium, cells in soil drastically changed expression of genes involved in membrane functioning (e.g., lipid composition, lipid metabolism, cell fatty acid synthesis, osmotic stress response (e.g., polyamine or trehalose synthesis, uptake of potassium and putrescine metabolism, highlighting the immediate response mechanisms of P. veronii 1YdBTEX2 for successful establishment in polluted soil.

  10. Environmental fate and effects of granular pesta formulation from strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa C1501 and Lasiodiplodia pseudotheobromae C1136 on soil activity and weeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adetunji, Charles Oluwaseun; Oloke, Julius Kola; Osemwegie, Osarenkhoe Omorefosa

    2018-03-01

    This work investigated the effect of variably formulated pesta granules containing wild and UV mutated Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Lasiodiplodia pseudotheobromae on the rate of CO 2 evolution, organic carbon content, enzymatic activity (acidic and alkaline phosphatase, dehydrogenases, urease and protease) and representative soil microorganisms in the soils using different assay techniques. After the 35th day period of experiment, the pesta granule formulation BH4 showed the best evolution of CO 2 (824 ± 6.2 mg CO 2 kg -1 soil hr -1 ) as against control treatment (689 ± 3.7 mg CO 2 kg -1 soil hr -1 ). Enzymes activities, organic carbon content of 3.8% on the 15th day of study and stable representation of microorganisms that include actinomycetes, fungi, heterogenous as well as soil nitrogen-mediatory bacteria were equally at their maximum level BH4 treatments. The phytotoxic assay showed no inhibitory effect on Solanum lycopersicum seeds and seedlings compared to the observed growth inhibition on the tested weeds (Amaranthus hybridus and Echinocholoa crus-galli) which corresponds with positive control glyphosate treatment. The glyphosate treated soil had the least critical results on parameters investigated during the study. The order of bioherbicidal activity is BH4>BH2>BH6>BH3>BH1>BH5>positive control. Results from this study confirmed the target efficacy of variably formulated pesta granules which is sustainable, cheap, ecologically suitable and recent. This is in addition to recognizing the microbial-derived formulations as characteristically potent alternative to chemical herbicides utility in agrosystems practice. Further study of the underlining factor responsible for the bioherbicidal performances of the variably formulated pesta granules and field trials are critical for their future commercialization. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Comparative genome and transcriptome analysis reveals distinctive surface characteristics and unique physiological potentials of Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 27853

    KAUST Repository

    Cao, Huiluo; Lai, Yong; Bougouffa, Salim; Xu, Zeling; Yan, Aixin

    2017-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 27853 was isolated from a hospital blood specimen in 1971 and has been widely used as a model strain to survey antibiotics susceptibilities, biofilm development, and metabolic activities of Pseudomonas spp.. Although four

  12. Advances of naphthalene degradation in Pseudomonas putida ND6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Fu; Shi, Yifei; Jia, Shiru; Tan, Zhilei; Zhao, Huabing

    2018-03-01

    Naphthalene is one of the most common and simple polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Degradation of naphthalene has been greatly concerned due to its economic, free-pollution and its fine effect in Pseudomonas putida ND6. This review summarizes the development history of naphthalene degradation, the research progress of naphthalene degrading gene and naphthalene degradation pathway of Pseudomonas putida ND6, and the researching path of this strain. Although the study of naphthalene degradation is not consummate in Pseudomonas putida ND6, there is a potential capability for Pseudomonas putida ND6 to degrade the naphthalene in the further research.

  13. Pseudomonas wadenswilerensis sp. nov. and Pseudomonas reidholzensis sp. nov., two novel species within the Pseudomonas putida group isolated from forest soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frasson, David; Opoku, Michael; Picozzi, Tara; Torossi, Tanja; Balada, Stefanie; Smits, Theo H M; Hilber, Urs

    2017-08-01

    Within the frame of a biotechnological screening, we isolated two Pseudomonas strains from forest soil. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis indicated that strain CCOS 864T shared 99.8 % similarity with Pseudomonas donghuensis HYST, while strain CCOS 865T shared 99.0 % similarity with Pseudomonas putida DSM 291T and lower similarity with other P. putida group type strains. Based on multilocus sequence analysis, the two strains were genotypically distinct from each other, each forming a separate clade. Strains CCOS 864T and CCOS 865T were Gram-stain-negative, motile and rod-shaped, growing at a temperature range of 4-37 °C. Strain CCOS 864T could be phenotypically distinguished from P. putida group species by the combination of gelatinase-positive reaction and positive growth on N-acetyl-d-glucosamine, p-hydroxyphenylacetic acid and inosine but lack of fluorescein production on King's B medium, while strain CCOS 865T could be distinguished from P. putida group species by the combination of positive growth with saccharic acid and negative growth with p-hydroxyphenylacetic acid and l-pyroglutamic acid. The major polar lipid for both strains was phosphatidylethanolamine; the major quinone was ubiquinone Q-9. DNA-DNA hybridization and average nucleotide identities confirmed the novel species status for the two strains. The DNA G+C contents of CCOS 864T and CCOS 865T were 62.1 and 63.8 mol%, respectively. The phenotypic, phylogenetic and DNA-DNA relatedness data support the suggestion that CCOS 864T and CCOS 865T represent two novel Pseudomonas species. The names Pseudomonas wadenswilerensis sp. nov. (type strain CCOS 864T=LMG 29327T) and Pseudomonas reidholzensis sp. nov. (type strain CCOS 865T=LMG 29328T) are proposed.

  14. Application of Endophytic Pseudomonas fluorescens and a Bacterial Consortium to Brassica napus Can Increase Plant Height and Biomass under Greenhouse and Field Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard D. Lally

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Plant associated bacteria with plant growth promotion (PGP properties have been proposed for use as environmentally friendly biofertilizers for sustainable agriculture; however, analysis of their efficacy in the field is often limited. In this study, greenhouse and field trials were carried out using individual endophytic Pseudomonas fluorescens strains, the well characterized rhizospheric P. fluorescens F113 and an endophytic microbial consortium of 10 different strains. These bacteria had been previously characterized with respect to their PGP properties in vitro and had been shown to harbor a range of traits associated with PGP including siderophore production, 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC deaminase activity, and inorganic phosphate solubilization. In greenhouse experiments individual strains tagged with gfp and Kmr were applied to Brassica napus as a seed coat and were shown to effectively colonize the rhizosphere and root of B. napus and in addition they demonstrated a significant increase in plant biomass compared with the non-inoculated control. In the field experiment, the bacteria (individual and consortium were spray inoculated to winter oilseed rape B. napus var. Compass which was grown under standard North Western European agronomic conditions. Analysis of the data provides evidence that the application of the live bacterial biofertilizers can enhance aspects of crop development in B. napus at field scale. The field data demonstrated statistically significant increases in crop height, stem/leaf, and pod biomass, particularly, in the case of the consortium inoculated treatment. However, although seed and oil yield were increased in the field in response to inoculation, these data were not statistically significant under the experimental conditions tested. Future field trials will investigate the effectiveness of the inoculants under different agronomic conditions.

  15. Detection of Pseudomonas fluorescens from broth, water and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    sonal

    2015-04-08

    Apr 8, 2015 ... Author(s) agree that this article remains permanently open access under the terms of ... grown in nutrient broth overnight, pond water, mucus and kidney ... a rapid test for detection of Pseudomonas strains in milk is required.

  16. Accelerated storage testing of freeze-dried Pseudomonas ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Accelerated storage testing of freeze-dried Pseudomonas fluorescens BTP1, ... of all P. fluorescens strains were not significantly different and thermal inactivation ... useful to the development of improved reference materials and samples held ...

  17. Sulfur source-mediated transcriptional regulation of the rhlABC genes involved in biosurfactants production by Pseudomonas sp. strain AK6U.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Wael; El Nayal, Ashraf M; Ramadan, Ahmed R; Abotalib, Nasser

    2014-01-01

    Despite the nutritional significance of sulfur, its influence on biosurfactants production has not been sufficiently studied. We investigated the expression of key biosurfactants production genes, rhlABC, in cultures of Pseudomonas sp. AK6U grown with inorganic or organic sulfur sources. AK6U grew with either inorganic sulfate (MgSO4), dibenzothiophene (DBT), or DBT-sulfone as a sole sulfur source in the presence of glucose as a carbon source. The AK6U cultures produced variable amounts of biosurfactants depending on the utilized sulfur source. Biosurfactants production profile of the DBT cultures was significantly different from that of the DBT-sulfone and inorganic sulfate cultures. The last two cultures were very similar in terms of biosurfactants productivity. Biosurfactants yield in the DBT cultures (1.3 g/L) was higher than that produced by the DBT-sulfone (0.5 g/L) and the inorganic sulfate (0.44 g/L) cultures. Moreover, the surface tension reduction in the DBT cultures (33 mN/m) was much stronger than that measured in the DBT-sulfone (58 mN/m) or inorganic sulfate (54 mN/m) cultures. RT-qPCR revealed variations in the expression levels of the rhlABC genes depending on the sulfur source. The DBT cultures had higher expression levels for the three genes as compared to the DBT-sulfone and inorganic sulfate cultures. There was no significant difference in the expression profiles between the DBT-sulfone and the MgSO4 cultures. The increased expression of rhlC in the DBT cultures is indicative for production of higher amounts of dirhamnolipids compared to the DBT-sulfone and inorganic sulfate cultures. The gene expression results were in good agreement with the biosurfactants production yields and surface tension measurements. The sulfur source mediates a fine-tuned mechanism of transcriptional regulation of biosurfactants production genes. Our findings can have an impact on industrial production of biosurfactants and other biotechnological processes like

  18. Effects of Silver Nanoparticles on Multiple Drug-Resistant Strains of Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa from Mastitis-Infected Goats: An Alternative Approach for Antimicrobial Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Guo Yuan

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Recently, silver nanoparticles (AgNPs have been widely used in various applications as antimicrobial agents, anticancer, diagnostics, biomarkers, cell labels, and drug delivery systems for the treatment of various diseases. Microorganisms generally acquire resistance to antibiotics through the course of antibacterial therapy. Multi-drug resistance (MDR has become a growing problem in the treatment of infectious diseases, and the widespread use of broad-spectrum antibiotics has resulted in the development of antibiotic resistance by numerous human and animal bacterial pathogens. As a result, an increasing number of microorganisms are resistant to multiple antibiotics causing continuing economic losses in dairy farming. Therefore, there is an urgent need for the development of alternative, cost-effective, and efficient antimicrobial agents that overcome antimicrobial resistance. Here, AgNPs synthesized using the bio-molecule quercetin were characterized using various analytical techniques. The synthesized AgNPs were highly spherical in shape and had an average size of 11 nm. We evaluated the efficacy of synthesized AgNPs against two MDR pathogenic bacteria, namely, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus, which were isolated from milk samples produced by mastitis-infected goats. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs of AgNPs against P. aeruginosa and S. aureus were found to be 1 and 2 μg/mL, respectively. Our findings suggest that AgNPs exert antibacterial effects in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Results from the present study demonstrate that the antibacterial activity of AgNPs is due to the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS, malondialdehyde (MDA, and leakage of proteins and sugars in bacterial cells. Results of the present study showed that AgNP-treated bacteria had significantly lower lactate dehydrogenase activity (LDH and lower adenosine triphosphate (ATP levels compared to the control. Furthermore, Ag

  19. cis-chlorobenzene dihydrodiol dehydrogenase (TcbB) from Pseudomonas sp. strain P51, expressed in Escherichia coli DH5alpha(pTCB149), catalyzes enantioselective dehydrogenase reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raschke, H; Fleischmann, T; Van Der Meer, J R; Kohler, H P

    1999-12-01

    cis-Chlorobenzene dihydrodiol dehydrogenase (CDD) from Pseudomonas sp. strain P51, cloned into Escherichia coli DH5alpha(pTCB149) was able to oxidize cis-dihydrodihydroxy derivatives (cis-dihydrodiols) of dihydronaphthalene, indene, and four para-substituted toluenes to the corresponding catechols. During the incubation of a nonracemic mixture of cis-1,2-indandiol, only the (+)-cis-(1R,2S) enantiomer was oxidized; the (-)-cis-(S,2R) enantiomer remained unchanged. CDD oxidized both enantiomers of cis-1,2-dihydroxy-1,2,3, 4-tetrahydronaphthalene, but oxidation of the (+)-cis-(1S,2R) enantiomer was delayed until the (-)-cis-(1R,2S) enantiomer was completely depleted. When incubated with nonracemic mixtures of para-substituted cis-toluene dihydrodiols, CDD always oxidized the major enantiomer at a higher rate than the minor enantiomer. When incubated with racemic 1-indanol, CDD enantioselectively transformed the (+)-(1S) enantiomer to 1-indanone. This stereoselective transformation shows that CDD also acted as an alcohol dehydrogenase. Additionally, CDD was able to oxidize (+)-cis-(1R,2S)-dihydroxy-1, 2-dihydronaphthalene, (+)-cis-monochlorobiphenyl dihydrodiols, and (+)-cis-toluene dihydrodiol to the corresponding catechols.

  20. cis-Chlorobenzene Dihydrodiol Dehydrogenase (TcbB) from Pseudomonas sp. Strain P51, Expressed in Escherichia coli DH5α(pTCB149), Catalyzes Enantioselective Dehydrogenase Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raschke, Henning; Fleischmann, Thomas; Van Der Meer, Jan Roelof; Kohler, Hans-Peter E.

    1999-01-01

    cis-Chlorobenzene dihydrodiol dehydrogenase (CDD) from Pseudomonas sp. strain P51, cloned into Escherichia coli DH5α(pTCB149) was able to oxidize cis-dihydrodihydroxy derivatives (cis-dihydrodiols) of dihydronaphthalene, indene, and four para-substituted toluenes to the corresponding catechols. During the incubation of a nonracemic mixture of cis-1,2-indandiol, only the (+)-cis-(1R,2S) enantiomer was oxidized; the (−)-cis-(S,2R) enantiomer remained unchanged. CDD oxidized both enantiomers of cis-1,2-dihydroxy-1,2,3,4-tetrahydronaphthalene, but oxidation of the (+)-cis-(1S,2R) enantiomer was delayed until the (−)-cis-(1R,2S) enantiomer was completely depleted. When incubated with nonracemic mixtures of para-substituted cis-toluene dihydrodiols, CDD always oxidized the major enantiomer at a higher rate than the minor enantiomer. When incubated with racemic 1-indanol, CDD enantioselectively transformed the (+)-(1S) enantiomer to 1-indanone. This stereoselective transformation shows that CDD also acted as an alcohol dehydrogenase. Additionally, CDD was able to oxidize (+)-cis-(1R,2S)-dihydroxy-1,2-dihydronaphthalene, (+)-cis-monochlorobiphenyl dihydrodiols, and (+)-cis-toluene dihydrodiol to the corresponding catechols. PMID:10583971

  1. Cis-Chlorobenzene dihydrodiol dehydrogenase (TcbB) from Pseudomonas sp. strain P51, expressed in Escherichia coli DH5{alpha}(pTCB149), catalyzes enantioselective dehydrogenase reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raschke, H.; Fleischmann, T.; Meer, J.R. van der; Kohler, H.P.E.

    1999-12-01

    cis-Chlorobenzene dihydrodiol dehydrogenase (CDD) from Pseudomonas sp. strain P51, cloned into Escherichia coli DH5{alpha}(pTCB149) was able to oxidize cis-dihydrodihydroxy derivatives (cis-dihydrodiols) of dihydronaphthalene, indene, and four para-substituted toluenes to the corresponding catechols. During the incubation of a nonracemic mixture of cis-1,2-indandiol, only the (+)-cis-(1R,2S) enantiomer was oxidized; the (-)-cis-(S,2R) enantiomer remained unchanged, CDD oxidized both enantiomers of cis-1,2-dihydroxy-1,2,3,4-tetrahydronaphthalene, but oxidation of the (+)-cis-(1S,2R) enantiomer was delayed until the (-)-cis-(1R,2S) enantiomer was completely depleted. When incubated with nonracemic mixtures of para-substituted cis-toluene dihydrodiols, CDD always oxidized the major enantiomer at a higher rate than the minor enantiomer. When incubated with racemic 1-indanol, CDD enantioselectively transformed the (+)-(1S) enatiomer to 1-indanone. This stereoselective transformation shows that CDD also acted as an alcohol dehydrogenase. Additionally, CDD was able to oxidize (+)-cis-(1R,2S)-dihydroxy-1,2-dihydronaphthalene, (+)-cis-monochlorobiphenyl dihydrodiols, and (+)-cis-toluene dihydrodiol to the corresponding catechols.

  2. Effect of Azotobacter croococcum on productive traits and microorganisms in sugar beet rhizosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuzevski Janja

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the effects of three different inoculation methods with selected Azotobacter chroococcum strains on productive and technological traits of sugar beet, as well as on the total number of microorganisms and azotobacter in rhizosphere. The results of this two-year study showed that effectiveness of the tested inoculation methods in increasing root yield and sugar content varies greatly, depending on year and azotobacter strains. Effectiveness of inoculation methods was not largely impacted by year on granulated sugar. Achieved granulated sugar yield was significantly higher by using pre-sowing azotobacter application, than by using seed inoculation. A significantly increased number of microorganisms in sugar beet rhizosphere was determined, not only by using pre-sowing azotobacter application but also by using sugar beet seed inoculation. Pre-sowing azotobacter application and inter-row cultivation both caused an equal increase in the number of these bacteria in sugar beet rhizosphere (42.2% and 46.9%. Use of sugar beet seed inoculation caused an increase of 33.7% in the number of azotobacter. In order to achieve higher effectiveness in applying azotobacter on productive and technological traits of sugar beet, and considering determined interaction between a certain year, an inoculation method and a strain, it is necessary for future research to focus on determining efficiency of these strains when they are in a mixture.

  3. Biofilm inhibition formation of clinical strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa mutans, photocatalytic activity of azo dye and GC-MS analysis of leaves of Lagerstroemia speciosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sai Saraswathi, V; Kamarudheen, Neethu; Bhaskara Rao, K V; Santhakumar, K

    2017-04-01

    The investigation was conducted to analyse the bioactive compounds from the leaf extracts of L. speciosa by GC-MS. The extracts were screened for antibacterial and antibiofilm activities against potential clinical strains. The bioactive compounds from the leaves of L. speciosa were extracted by soxhlet continuous extraction method and their chemical composition was analysed by Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectroscopy (GC-MS). The antibacterial activity was evaluated against clinical strain like Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, P. aeruginosa and Salmonella typhi by well diffusion technique. We also screened for antibacterial property against common food borne pathogens namely Listeria monocytogenes and Bacillus cereus at varied concentration 250μml -1 to 1000μml -1 . Thereafter antibiofilm assay was carried out at from 250 to 1000μg/ml against P. aeruginosa (high biofilm forming pathogen) clinical strain by cover slip technique and the morphology of the pathogen was observed using Scanning Electron Microscopy-(SEM). It was observed that diverse class of secondary metabolites were found by GC-MS analysis for all the extracts upon the continuous extraction. It was found that only minimum inhibition was seen in alcoholic extract for antibacterial activity, whereas all other extracts showed negligible activity. P. aeruginosa biofilm inhibited to 93.0±2% and 91±2% at higher concentration (1000μg/ml) for methanolic and ethanolic extract respectively. Absence of extracellular matrix structure and the surface cracking of biofilm were viewed by SEM, which confirmed the antibiofilm activity. Hence this study reveals that L. speciosa showed significant antibiofilm activity against P. aeruginosa due to the phytoconstituents present in the leaf extracts which was well documented in the alcoholic extracts by GC-MS analysis. The methanolic and ethanolic extract showed good photocatalytic activity of 77.44% and 96.66% against azo dye degradation respectively. Further

  4. Population densities of indigenous Acidobacteria change in the presence of plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) in rhizosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalam, Sadaf; Das, Subha Narayan; Basu, Anirban; Podile, Appa Rao

    2017-05-01

    Rhizosphere microbial community has diverse metabolic capabilities and plays a crucial role in maintaining plant health. Oligotrophic plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR), along with difficult-to-culture microbial fractions, might be involved synergistically in microbe-microbe and plant-microbe interactions in the rhizosphere. Among the difficult-to-culture microbial fractions, Acidobacteria constitutes the most dominant phylum thriving in rhizospheric soils. We selected effective PGPR for tomato and black gram and studied their effect on population densities of acidobacterial members. Three facultatively oligotrophic PGPR were identified through 16S rRNA gene sequencing as Sphingobacterium sp. (P3), Variovorax sp. (P4), and Roseomonas sp. (A2); the latter being a new report of PGPR. In presence of selected PGPR strains, the changes in population densities of Acidobacteria were monitored in metagenomic DNA extracted from bulk and rhizospheric soils of tomato and black gram using real time qPCR. A gradual increase in equivalent cell numbers of Acidobacteria members was observed over time along with a simultaneous increase in plant growth promotion by test PGPR. We report characterization of three effective PGPR strains and their effects on indigenous, underexplored difficult-to-culture phylum-Acidobacteria. We suggest that putative interactions between these two bacterial groups thriving in rhizospheric soils could be beneficial for plant growth. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Ciprofloxacin interactions with imipenem and amikacin against multiresistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    OpenAIRE

    Giamarellou, H; Petrikkos, G

    1987-01-01

    In vitro interactions of ciprofloxacin with imipenem and amikacin were evaluated by the killing-curve technique against 26 Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains resistant to amikacin and resistant or moderately susceptible to ciprofloxacin and imipenem. Imipenem enhanced killing by ciprofloxacin in tests with 11 strains, whereas amikacin enhanced killing in tests with only 4 strains.

  6. Interaction of bacteria-feeding soil flagellates and Pseudomonas spp

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Annette; Ekelund, Flemming; Johansen, Anders

    2010-01-01

    Pseudomonas strains may be used as alternatives to fungicides as some of them produce secondary metabolites, which can inhibit growth of plant pathogenic fungi. Increased knowledge of non-target effects of the antagonistic bacteria on other soil organisms as well as of the survival and predation...... resistance of the antagonistic bacteria is necessary for risk assessment and increased performance of antagonistic bacteria as biological control agents. In the present study, we aimed to investigate the difference between Pseudomonas spp. with respect to their predation resistance to and effects...... on the three different and common soil flagellates Bodo caudatus, Cercomonas longicauda, and Neocercomonas jutlandica. Two antagonistic Pseudomonas: Pseudomonas fluorescens CHA0 and P. fluorescens DR54 and two positive control strains: P. fluorescens DSM 50090T and Pseudomonas chlororaphis ATCC 43928 were...

  7. Effects of Bacterial Strains to Inhibit Growth of Phytophthora pistaciae under Different Electrical Conductivities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moslem Hajabdolahi

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Root and crown rot (gummosis is known as the most destructive disease affecting pistachio in Iran. The efficiency of bacterial strains to reduce the growth rate of Phytophthora pistaciae was studied under different electrical conductivities (EC, 0, 2, 4, 8, 12 ds/m. Soil and rhizosphere samples were collected from pistachio growing regions in Kerman province, Iran, during 2011 - 2012. Overall, the strains of bacteria were presented in all sampling areas in both infected and uninfected orchards. Out of 400 bacterial isolates, 63% and 37% were collected from soil and rhizosphere samples, respectively. Among 400 bacterial isolates, 19 exhibited the highest ability to reduce the growth of P. pistaciae in dual culture, volatile and non-volatile compounds, though by different degrees. The degrees of inhibitory activities against mycelial growth of P. pistaciae by Pseudomonas fluorescens strains ranged from 40 to 97.5%, 8 to 97.5% and 7.5 to 90% in dual culture, non-volatile and volatile assays, respectively. The Bacillus subtilis strains reduced the growth of P. pistaciae by 22-92.5%, 17-85%, 21-92.5% in dual culture, non-volatile and volatile assays, respectively. The negative effects of ECs on the growth of P. pistaciae in modified CMA were observed in 8 and 12 ECs. ECs had no effect until 8 ds/m on the growth of P. pistaciae, while the mycelial growth decreased by ECs higher than 8 ds/m. No mycelial growth was observed at EC 14 ds/m. There were significant differences between different bacterial isolates, ECs and their interactions on the mycelial growth of P. pistaciae. The highest mycelial suppression belonged to isolates Nos. 123 and 112 in dual culture, volatile and non-volatile compounds test. More research is required to understand the native mechanisms involved in biological control under natural conditions in pistachio orchards

  8. Heterogeneity of heat-resistant proteases from milk Pseudomonas species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchand, Sophie; Vandriesche, Gonzalez; Coorevits, An; Coudijzer, Katleen; De Jonghe, Valerie; Dewettinck, Koen; De Vos, Paul; Devreese, Bart; Heyndrickx, Marc; De Block, Jan

    2009-07-31

    Pseudomonas fragi, Pseudomonas lundensis and members of the Pseudomonas fluorescens group may spoil Ultra High Temperature (UHT) treated milk and dairy products, due to the production of heat-stable proteases in the cold chain of raw milk. Since the aprX gene codes for a heat-resistant protease in P. fluorescens, the presence of this gene has also been investigated in other members of the genus. For this purpose an aprX-screening PCR test has been developed. Twenty-nine representatives of important milk Pseudomonas species and thirty-five reference strains were screened. In 42 out of 55 investigated Pseudomonas strains, the aprX gene was detected, which proves the potential of the aprX-PCR test as a screening tool for potentially proteolytic Pseudomonas strains in milk samples. An extensive study of the obtained aprX-sequences on the DNA and the amino acid level, however, revealed a large heterogeneity within the investigated milk isolates. Although this heterogeneity sets limitations to a general detection method for all proteolytic Pseudomonas strains in milk, it offers a great potential for the development of a multiplex PCR screening test targeting individual aprX-genes. Furthermore, our data illustrated the potential use of the aprX gene as a taxonomic marker, which may help in resolving the current taxonomic deadlock in the P. fluorescens group.

  9. Genotypic and phenotypic diversity in populations of plant-probiotic Pseudomonas spp. colonizing roots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picard, Christine; Bosco, Marco

    2008-01-01

    Several soil microorganisms colonizing roots are known to naturally promote the health of plants by controlling a range of plant pathogens, including bacteria, fungi, and nematodes. The use of theses antagonistic microorganisms, recently named plant-probiotics, to control plant-pathogenic fungi is receiving increasing attention, as they may represent a sustainable alternative to chemical pesticides. Many years of research on plant-probiotic microorganisms (PPM) have indicated that fluorescent pseudomonads producing antimicrobial compounds are largely involved in the suppression of the most widespread soilborne pathogens. Phenotype and genotype analysis of plant-probiotic fluorescent pseudomonads (PFP) have shown considerable genetic variation among these types of strains. Such variability plays an important role in the rhizosphere competence and the biocontrol ability of PFP strains. Understanding the mechanisms by which genotypic and phenotypic diversity occurs in natural populations of PFP could be exploited to choose those agricultural practices which best exploit the indigenous PFP populations, or to isolate new plant-probiotic strains for using them as inoculants. A number of different methods have been used to study diversity within PFP populations. Because different resolutions of the existing microbial diversity can be revealed depending on the approach used, this review first describes the most important methods used for the assessment of fluorescent Pseudomonas diversity. Then, we focus on recent data relating how differences in genotypic and phenotypic diversity within PFP communities can be attributed to geographic location, climate, soil type, soil management regime, and interactions with other soil microorganisms and host plants. It becomes evident that plant-related parameters exert the strongest influence on the genotypic and phenotypic variations in PFP populations.

  10. Draft Genome Sequence of Bacillus velezensis Lzh-a42, a Plant Growth-Promoting Rhizobacterium Isolated from Tomato Rhizosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhenghua; Chen, Mei; Ran, Kun; Wang, Jihua; Zeng, Qiangcheng; Song, Feng

    2018-03-22

    The plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium Bacillus velezensis strain Lzh-a42, which has antimicrobial activity, was isolated from tomato rhizosphere. Here, we report its genome sequence, which includes several predicted functional genes related to secondary metabolite biosynthesis, antimicrobial activity, and biofilm synthesis. Copyright © 2018 Li et al.

  11. Paenibacillus brasilensis sp nov., a novel nitrogen-fixing species isolated from the maize rhizosphere in Brazil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weid, von der I.; Duarte, G.F.; Elsas, van J.D.; Seldin, L.

    2002-01-01

    Sixteen nitrogen-fixing strains isolated from the rhizosphere of maize planted in Cerrado soil, Brazil, which showed morphological and biochemical characteristics similar to the gas-forming Paenibacillus spp., were phenotypically and genetically characterized. Their identification as members of the

  12. Fate of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) in the rhizosphere and myco-rhizosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leyval, C.; Beguiristain, T.; Corgie, S.; Joner, E.

    2005-01-01

    Organic pollutants such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) can reach high concentrations in soils due to man-made pollution related to industrial, agricultural or urban activities. Such concentrations can reach toxic values and create major environmental and health problems. One of the first entry point of pollutants in plant ecosystems is the rhizosphere, defined as the soil under the influence of roots. In the rhizosphere, the plant release root exudates, feeding soil microorganisms, and take up water and nutrients. Among the rhizosphere inhabitants, arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi are ubiquitous root symbiotic fungi, contributing to plant growth and plant nutrition. In PAH-polluted soils, biodegradation of PAH increases, which is attributed to increased microbial activity in the rhizosphere..We studied the contribution of the rhizosphere of mycorrhizal and non-mycorrhizal plants to the biodegradation of PAH in the rhizosphere, taking into account microbial community structure. Different experiments were performed with industrial contaminated soils and PAH-spiked soils, in pot cultures as well as compartmented devices allowing to analyze rhizosphere processes in consecutive sections as a function of distance to roots. Clover and ryegrass, inoculated or not with the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus Glomus mosseae were used.. After different time periods, plants were harvested, biomass and mycorrhizal root colonization were estimated. Microbial Density of microbial heterotrophs and of degrading bacteria was estimated by MPN techniques in micro-plates. Microbial community structure was estimated by DNA extraction from the rhizosphere, amplification by PCR and analysed by TGGE (temperature gradient gel electrophoresis), or by PLFA (phospholipid fatty acid analysis). PAH in soil were extracted by Soxhlet and analysed by GC-MS. We showed that the concentration of PAH increased with the distance to roots (Corgie et al, 2003) and was lower in the myco-rhizosphere

  13. Introduction of Endophytic Pseudomonas rhodesiae and Acinetobacter sp. Effective on Seed Germination and Cucumber Growth Factors Improvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farkhondeh Amini

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Some bacteria are capable of entering the plant as endophytes that do not cause harm and could establish a mutualistic association with host plants. Endophytic bacteria are bacteria that live in plant tissues without doing substantive harm. They enter plant tissue primarily through different plant zones. Both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria have been isolated from several tissue types in several plant species. In addition, several different bacterial species have been isolated from a single plant. Variation in endophytic bacteria populations referred to the time of sampling, type of plant tissue, age and environment conditions, as well. In general endophytic bacteria occur at lower population densities than rhizospheric bacteria or bacterial pathogens. Endophytic populations, like rhizospheric populations, are conditioned by biotic and abiotic factors, but endophytic bacteria could be better protected from biotic and abiotic stresses than rhizospheric bacteria. It is clear that the interaction between plants and some endophytic bacteria is associated with beneficial effects such as plant growth promotion and biocontrol potential against plant pathogens. These types of bacteria are often capable of eliciting significant physiological changes that modulate the growth and development of the plant. Most of the time, these beneficial effects of endophytes are greater than those of many rhizosphere-colonizing bacteria. Endophytic bacteria affect bacterial growth by numerous mechanisms directly or indirectly. Some genus of bacteria such as Azosprillium, Enterobacter, Azotobacter and Pseudomonas produces plant growth regulators which lead to plant growth improvement. Microorganism profit from plants due to the enhanced availability of nutrients, whereas plants can receive benefits from bacterial associates by growth enhancement or stress reduction. Therefore, mutualistic interactions between host plants and associated

  14. Bioremediation of polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs using rhizosphere technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep Bisht

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The remediation of polluted sites has become a priority for society because of increase in quality of life standards and the awareness of environmental issues. Over the past few decades there has been avid interest in developing in situ strategies for remediation of environmental contaminants, because of the high economic cost of physicochemical strategies, the biological tools for remediation of these persistent pollutants is the better option. Major foci have been considered on persistent organic chemicals i.e.polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs due to their ubiquitous occurrence, recalcitrance, bioaccumulation potential and carcinogenic activity. Rhizoremediation, a specific type of phytoremediation that involves both plants and their associated rhizospheric microbes is the creative biotechnological approach that has been explored in this review. Moreover, in this review we showed the significance of rhizoremediation of PAHs from other bioremediation strategies i.e. natural attenuation, bioaugmentation and phytoremediation and also analyze certain environmental factor that may influence the rhizoremediation technique. Numerous bacterial species were reported to degrade variety of PAHs and most of them are isolated from contaminated soil, however few reports are available from non contaminated soil. Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Pseudomons fluoresens, Mycobacterium spp., Haemophilus spp., Rhodococcus spp., Paenibacillus spp. are some of the commonly studied PAH-degrading bacteria. Finally, exploring the molecular communication between plants and microbes, and exploiting this communication to achieve better results in the elimination of contaminants, is a fascinating area of research for future perspective.

  15. Bioremediation of polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) using rhizosphere technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisht, Sandeep; Pandey, Piyush; Bhargava, Bhavya; Sharma, Shivesh; Kumar, Vivek; Sharma, Krishan D.

    2015-01-01

    The remediation of polluted sites has become a priority for society because of increase in quality of life standards and the awareness of environmental issues. Over the past few decades there has been avid interest in developing in situ strategies for remediation of environmental contaminants, because of the high economic cost of physicochemical strategies, the biological tools for remediation of these persistent pollutants is the better option. Major foci have been considered on persistent organic chemicals i.e. polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) due to their ubiquitous occurrence, recalcitrance, bioaccumulation potential and carcinogenic activity. Rhizoremediation, a specific type of phytoremediation that involves both plants and their associated rhizospheric microbes is the creative biotechnological approach that has been explored in this review. Moreover, in this review we showed the significance of rhizoremediation of PAHs from other bioremediation strategies i.e. natural attenuation, bioaugmentation and phytoremediation and also analyze certain environmental factor that may influence the rhizoremediation technique. Numerous bacterial species were reported to degrade variety of PAHs and most of them are isolated from contaminated soil, however few reports are available from non contaminated soil. Pseudomonas aeruginosa , Pseudomons fluoresens , Mycobacterium spp., Haemophilus spp., Rhodococcus spp., Paenibacillus spp. are some of the commonly studied PAH-degrading bacteria. Finally, exploring the molecular communication between plants and microbes, and exploiting this communication to achieve better results in the elimination of contaminants, is a fascinating area of research for future perspective. PMID:26221084

  16. Rhizosphere biodegradation of xenobiotics: Microbiological study of a rice field polluted by oil refinery residues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rasolomanana, J.L.; Balandreau, J.

    1987-07-01

    A rice field had been studied in which the disposal of oil residues from a refinery plant seemed to improve rice growth and soil N content. To check the hypothesis that nitrogen fixation by oil-adapted bacteria could explain this observation we isolated and studied dominant diazotrophic bacteria from the rhizosphere of an actively N/sub 2/-fixing rice plant growing on the polluted soil; for this purpose we used an axenic plant as an enrichment step. The rhizosphere did not contain more than 10/sup 5/ N/sub 2/-fixing bacteria per g dry soil, essentially Bacillus polymyxa; one of the isolates, strain R3 could grow and reduce C/sub 2/H/sub 2/ on oil residues only in the presence of glucose or of exudates from an axenic plant (spermosphere model); the presence of R3 diminished the inhibition of rice growth due to the oil residues; R3 nitrogenase activity in the rhizosphere of rice was increased in the presence of these residues. This cometabolism of oil residues in the presence of exudates and their stimulating effect on N/sub 2/ fixation provide a likely explanation for observed positive effects of the disposal of oil residues on arable lands, and are conducive to the hypothesis that rhizosphere cometabolism could greatly enhance soil organic matter turn over and humification rates.

  17. In Vivo Activities of Ceftolozane, a New Cephalosporin, with and without Tazobactam against Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Enterobacteriaceae, Including Strains with Extended-Spectrum β-Lactamases, in the Thighs of Neutropenic Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andes, D. R.

    2013-01-01

    Ceftolozane is a new cephalosporin with potent activity against Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Enterobacteriaceae. A neutropenic murine thigh infection model was used to determine which pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic index and magnitude drives the efficacy of ceftolozane with Gram-negative bacilli, to compare the rates of in vivo killing of P. aeruginosa by ceftolozane and ceftazidime, and to determine the impact of different ratios of ceftolozane plus tazobactam on Enterobacteriaceae containing extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs). Neutropenic mice had 106.2-7.1 CFU/thigh when treated with ceftolozane for 24 h with (i) various doses (3.12 to 1,600 mg/kg) and dosage intervals (3, 6, 12, and 24 h) against two Enterobacteriaceae strains, (ii) 0.39 to 800 mg/kg every 6 h for four Enterobacteriaceae and four P. aeruginosa strains, and (iii) 400 or 800 mg/kg with 2:1. 4:1, and 8:1 ratios of tazobactam against five Enterobacteriaceae strains with ESBLs. The pharmacokinetics of ceftolozane at 25, 100, and 400 mg/kg were linear with peak/dose values of 1.0 to 1.4 and half-lives of 12 to 14 min. T>MIC was the primary index driving efficacy. For stasis (1 log kill), T>MIC was 26.3% ± 2.1% (31.6% ± 1.6%) for wild-type Enterobacteriaceae, 31.1% ± 4.9% (34.8% ± 4.4%) for Enterobacteriaceae with ESBLs, and 24.0% ± 3.3% (31.5% ± 3.9%) for P. aeruginosa. At 200 mg/kg every 3 h, the rate of in vivo killing of P. aeruginosa was faster with ceftolozane than with ceftazidime (−0.34 to −0.41 log10 CFU/thigh/h versus −0.21 to −0.24 log10 CFU/thigh/h). The 2:1 ratio of ceftolozane with tazobactam was the most potent combination studied. The T>MIC required for ceftolozane is less than with other cephalosporins and may be due to more rapid killing. PMID:23274659

  18. EVALUATION OF PHOSPHATE SOLUBILIZING MICROORGANISMS (PSMs FROM RHIZOSPHERE SOIL OF DIFFERENT CROP PLANTS AND ITS ANTAGONISTIC ACTIVITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samikan Krishnakumar

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Indigenous rhizosphere soil samples were collected during study period (October 2011 – March 2012 of different crop plant from Thiruvannamalai District, Tamilnadu, India for the enumeration of Phosphate solubilizing microorganisms (PSMs. Efficient phosphate solubilizing bacteria, fungi and heterotrophic bacteria were enumerated. Maximum heterotrophic bacterial populations (19.4 X105, phosphate solubilizing bacteria (4.7 X 105 were recorded in the month of February and phosphate solubilizing fungi (3.9 X 102 were documented in the month of December in rhizosphere soil of ground nut. Minimum bacterial populations (14.3 X 105 were observed in rhizosphere soil of chilli in the month of March. Lowest phosphate solubilizing bacteria (1.2 X105 and phosphate solubilzing fungi (1.2 X 102 were observed in rhizosphere soil of paddy during the month of October. Phosphate solubilizing bacteria Pseudomonassp. - BS1, Bacillus sp. – BS2, Micrococcus sp. – BS3 and fungi Aspergillus sp. – FS1, Penicillium sp. – FS2.and Trichoderma sp. – FS3 were identified. Pseudomonas sp. - BS1. exhibited maximum solubilizing efficiency (SE and solubilizing index (SI of 300.0 and 4.0 respectively. In fungi Aspergillus sp. – FS1 showed a maximum solubilizing efficiency (SE and solubilizing index(SI of 283.3 and 3.8 respectively. Antagonistic activity of P-solubilizing Pseudomonassp. - BS1 was deliberated against selected fungal plant pathogens. Among pathogens studied Aspergillus sp. showed a maximum inhibition activity (16 mm and minimum activity (12 mm was observed against Fusarium sp. Moreover inhibition efficiency (IE and inhibition index (II of Pseudomonas sp. - BS1. also calculated base on the antagonistic activity. Aspergillus sp. exhibited highest inhibition efficiency and inhibition index of 166.6 and 3.6 respectively.

  19. Biodegradation of spent engine oil by bacteria isolated from the rhizosphere of legumes grown in contaminated soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HY Ismail

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Biodegradation of spent engine oil (SEO by bacteria isolated from the rhizosphere of Cajan cajan and Lablab purpureus was investigated. It was with a view to determining most efficient bacterial species that could degrade SEO in phytoremediation studies. Hydrocarbon degrading bacteria were isolated and identified by enrichment culture technique using oil agar supplemented with 0.1% v/v SEO. Total heterotrophic and oil utilizing bacterial count showed the occurrence of large number of bacteria predominantly in the rhizosphere soil, ranging between 54×108 - 144×108 CFU/g and 4×108- 96×108 CFU/g respectively. Percentage of oil utilizing bacteria ranged between 0% (uncontaminated non rhizosphere soil to 76% (contaminated rhizosphere. Turbidimetrically, five bacterial species namely Pseudomonas putrefacience CR33, Klebsiella pneumonia CR23, Pseudomonas alcaligenes LR14, Klebsiella aerogenes CR21, and Bacillus coagulans CR31 were shown to grow maximally and degraded the oil at the rate of 68%, 62%, 59%, 58%and 45% respectively. Chromatographic analysis using GC-MS showed the presence of lower molecular weight hydrocarbons in the residual oil (indicating degradation after 21 days, whereas the undegraded oil (control had higher molecular weight hydrocarbons after the same period. The species isolated were shown to have high ability of SEO biodegradation and therefore could be important tools in ameliorating SEO contaminated soil. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3126/ije.v3i2.10515 International Journal of the Environment Vol.3(2 2014: 63-75

  20. PHOSPHATE-SOLUBILISING RHIZOBACTERIA ASSOCIATED WITH PHASEOLUS COCCINEUS L. RHIZOSPHERE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marius Stefan

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Native phosphate solubilizing bacteria were isolated from runner bean rhizosphere in order to study their effect on releases of soluble phosphorus from inorganic P sources. 34.37% of the rhizobacteria isolates solubilized CaHPO4 in the qualitative P-solubilization plate method after seven days of incubation. The best PSB isolates were selected for further study concerning P-solubilization in liquid culture. All these isolates showed higher potential for solubilization of inorganic P as indicated by the increase of P amount in the RPAM medium. Our results showed that PSB strains play a significant role in the acidification of the medium facilitating the P solubilization probably due to organic acid production.

  1. Pyrosequencing assessment of rhizosphere fungal communities from a soybean field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiyama, Akifumi; Ueda, Yoshikatsu; Takase, Hisabumi; Yazaki, Kazufumi

    2014-10-01

    Soil fungal communities play essential roles in soil ecosystems, affecting plant growth and health. Rhizosphere bacterial communities have been shown to undergo dynamic changes during plant growth. This study utilized 454 pyrosequencing to analyze rhizosphere fungal communities during soybean growth. Members of the Ascomycota and Basiodiomycota dominated in all soils. There were no statistically significant changes at the phylum level among growth stages or between bulk and rhizosphere soils. In contrast, the relative abundance of small numbers of operational taxonomic units, 4 during growth and 28 between bulk and rhizosphere soils, differed significantly. Clustering analysis revealed that rhizosphere fungal communities were different from bulk fungal communities during growth stages of soybeans. Taken together, these results suggest that in contrast to rhizosphere bacterial communities, most constituents of rhizosphere fungal communities remained stable during soybean growth.

  2. Roseomonas oryzae sp. nov., isolated from paddy rhizosphere soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramaprasad, E V V; Sasikala, Ch; Ramana, Ch V

    2015-10-01

    A non-motile, coccus-shaped, pale-pink-pigmented bacterium, designated strain JC288T, was isolated from a paddy rhizosphere soil collected from Western Ghats, Kankumbi, Karnataka, India. Cells were found to be Gram-stain-negative, and catalase- and oxidase-positive; the major fatty acids were C16 : 0, C16 : 1ω7c/C16 : 1ω6c, C18 : 1ω7c/C18 : 1ω6c and C18 : 1 2-OH. The predominant respiratory quinone was Q-10 and the genomic DNA G+C content was 67.5 mol%. Strain JC288T contained diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylcholine, four unidentified aminolipids, three unidentified phospholipids, two unidentified lipids, an aminophospholipid and a glycolipid. Hydroxyspirilloxanthin was the major carotenoid of strain JC288T. 16S rRNA gene sequence comparisons indicated that strain JC288T represents a member of the genus Roseomonas within the family Acetobacteraceae of the phylum Proteobacteria. Strain JC288T shared the highest 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity with Roseomonas rhizosphaerae YW11T (97.3 %), Roseomonas aestuarii JC17T (97.1 %), Roseomonas cervicalis CIP 104027T (95.9 %) and other members of the genus Roseomonas ( < 95.5 %). The distinct genomic difference and morphological, physiological and chemotaxonomic differences from the previously described taxa support the classification of strain JC288T as a representative of a novel species of the genus Roseomonas, for which the name Roseomonas oryzae sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is JC288T ( = KCTC 42542T = LMG 28711T).

  3. The effect of mulching and soil compaction on fungi composition and microbial communities in the rhizosphere of soybean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frac, M.; Siczek, A.; Lipiec, J.

    2009-04-01

    The soil environment is the habitat of pathogenic and saprotrophic microorganisms. The composition of the microbial community are related to biotic and abiotic factors, such as root exudates, crop residues, climate factors, mulching, mineral fertilization, pesticides introduction and soil compaction. The aim of the study was to determine the effect of the mulching and soil compaction on the microorganism communities in the rhizosphere soil of soybean. The studies were carried out on silty loam soil (Orthic Luvisol) developed from loess (Lublin, Poland). The experiment area was 192m2 divided into 3 sections consisted of 6 micro-plots (7m2). Three levels of soil compaction low, medium and heavy obtained through tractor passes were compared. The soil was compacted and loosened within seedbed layer 2 weeks before sowing. Soybean "Aldana" seeds were inoculated with Bradyrhizobium japonicum and were sown with interrow spacing of 0.3m. Wheat straw (as mulch) was uniformly spread on the half of each micro-plot at an amount of 0.5kg m-1 after sowing. Rhizosphere was collected three times during growing season of soybean. Microbiological analyses were conducted in 3 replications and included the determination of: the total number of bacteria and fungi, the number of bacteria Pseudomonas sp. and Bacillus sp., the genus identification of fungi isolated from rhizosphere of soybean. Results indicated a positive effect of mulching on the increase number of all groups of examined rhizosphere microorganisms (fungi, bacteria, Pseudomonas sp., Bacillus sp.). The highest number of the microorganisms was found in the low and medium compacted soil and markedly decreased in the most compacted soil. Relatively high number of antagonistic fungi (Penicillium sp., Trichoderma sp.) was recorded in the rhizosphere of low and medium compacted soil, particularly in mulched plots. The presence of these fungi can testify to considerable biological activity, which contributes to the improvement of

  4. Plant uptake of radionuclides and rhizosphere factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arie, Tsutomu; Gouthu, S.; Ambe, Shizuko; Yamaguchi, Isamu [Institute of Physical and Chemical Research, Wako, Saitama (Japan); Hirata, Hiroaki

    1999-03-01

    Influence of soil factors such as nuclide availability, pH, organic carbon, cation exchange capacity (CEC), exchangeable cations (Ca{sup 2+}, Mg{sup 2+}, and K{sup +}), phosphate absorption coefficient (PAC), physical composition of soil (coarse sand, fine sand, silt, and clay), soil texture, and rhizosphere microbes on uptake of radionuclides by plants are studied. (author)

  5. Volatile-mediated interactions in the rhizosphere

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cordovez da Cunha, Viviane

    2016-01-01

    Plants and microorganisms are constantly engaged in highly dynamic interactions both above- and belowground. Several of these interactions are mediated by volatile organic compounds (VOCs), small carbon-based compounds with high vapor pressure at ambient temperature. In the rhizosphere, VOCs have

  6. Plant uptake of radionuclides and rhizosphere factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arie, Tsutomu; Gouthu, S.; Ambe, Shizuko; Yamaguchi, Isamu; Hirata, Hiroaki

    1999-01-01

    Influence of soil factors such as nuclide availability, pH, organic carbon, cation exchange capacity (CEC), exchangeable cations (Ca 2+ , Mg 2+ , and K + ), phosphate absorption coefficient (PAC), physical composition of soil (coarse sand, fine sand, silt, and clay), soil texture, and rhizosphere microbes on uptake of radionuclides by plants are studied. (author)

  7. Microbial diversity and metagenomic analysis of the rhizosphere of para grass (Urochloa mutica) growing under saline conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukhtar, S.; Awan, H. A.; Maqbool, A.; Mehnaz, S.; Malik, K. A.

    2016-01-01

    Para grass is a salt tolerant plant, grown on salt affected soils of Punjab, Pakistan. The aim of this study was to investigate the distribution of culturable and non-culturable bacteria in the rhizosphere, rhizoplane and histoplane of para grass, growing under saline conditions. A total of seventy four, bacterial strains were isolated and characterized. Among these, thirty two from rhizosphere, twenty two from rhizoplane and twenty were from the histoplane. Cultureable bacteria were characterized by biochemical tests and 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. Non-culturable bacteria were identified by PCR amplification of 16S rRNA gene, using metagenomic approach. Seventy seven percent bacterial isolates from rhizosphere and rhizoplane fractions were identified as member of Proteobacteria. Twenty five percent isolates of histoplane fraction were members of firmicutes while 68.75 percent were of Proteobacteria. Of total isolates, 50 percent could grow in nitrogen free medium and 21.67 percent on halophilic medium. Nitrogen fixers and halophilic bacteria were more abundant in the rhizosphere as compared to roots. 16S rRNA gene clone library analysis showed that out of 48 clones, 14 were uncultured, classified; eighteen un-cultured un-classified, while others related to 16 different known cultured groups of bacteria. Results for cultured and uncultured bacteria revealed a wide diversity of bacterial population present in the rhizosphere of para grass. (author)

  8. Salicornia strobilacea (synonym of Halocnemum strobilaceum Grown Under Different Tidal Regimes Selects Rhizosphere Bacteria Capable of Promoting Plant Growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramona Marasco

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Halophytes classified under the common name of salicornia colonize salty and coastal environments across tidal inundation gradients. To unravel the role of tide-related regimes on the structure and functionality of root associated bacteria, the rhizospheric soil of Salicornia strobilacea (synonym of Halocnemum strobilaceum plants was studied in a tidal zone of the coastline of Southern Tunisia. Although total counts of cultivable bacteria did not change in the rhizosphere of plants grown along a tidal gradient, significant differences were observed in the diversity of both the cultivable and uncultivable bacterial communities. This observation indicates that the tidal regime is contributing to the bacterial species selection in the rhizosphere. Despite the observed diversity in the bacterial community structure, the PGP potential of cultivable rhizospheric bacteria, assessed through in vitro and in vivo tests, was equally distributed along the tidal gradient. Root colonization tests with selected strains proved that halophyte rhizospheric bacteria (i stably colonize S. strobilacea rhizoplane and the plant shoot suggesting that they move from the root to the shoot and (ii are capable of improving plant growth. The versatility in the root colonization, the overall PGP traits and the in vivo plant growth promotion under saline condition suggest that such beneficial activities likely take place naturally under a range of tidal regimes.

  9. Salicornia strobilacea (Synonym of Halocnemum strobilaceum) Grown under Different Tidal Regimes Selects Rhizosphere Bacteria Capable of Promoting Plant Growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marasco, Ramona; Mapelli, Francesca; Rolli, Eleonora; Mosqueira, Maria J; Fusi, Marco; Bariselli, Paola; Reddy, Muppala; Cherif, Ameur; Tsiamis, George; Borin, Sara; Daffonchio, Daniele

    2016-01-01

    Halophytes classified under the common name of salicornia colonize salty and coastal environments across tidal inundation gradients. To unravel the role of tide-related regimes on the structure and functionality of root associated bacteria, the rhizospheric soil of Salicornia strobilacea (synonym of Halocnemum strobilaceum) plants was studied in a tidal zone of the coastline of Southern Tunisia. Although total counts of cultivable bacteria did not change in the rhizosphere of plants grown along a tidal gradient, significant differences were observed in the diversity of both the cultivable and uncultivable bacterial communities. This observation indicates that the tidal regime is contributing to the bacterial species selection in the rhizosphere. Despite the observed diversity in the bacterial community structure, the plant growth promoting (PGP) potential of cultivable rhizospheric bacteria, assessed through in vitro and in vivo tests, was equally distributed along the tidal gradient. Root colonization tests with selected strains proved that halophyte rhizospheric bacteria (i) stably colonize S. strobilacea rhizoplane and the plant shoot suggesting that they move from the root to the shoot and (ii) are capable of improving plant growth. The versatility in the root colonization, the overall PGP traits and the in vivo plant growth promotion under saline condition suggest that such beneficial activities likely take place naturally under a range of tidal regimes.

  10. Salicornia strobilacea (synonym of Halocnemum strobilaceum) Grown Under Different Tidal Regimes Selects Rhizosphere Bacteria Capable of Promoting Plant Growth

    KAUST Repository

    Marasco, Ramona

    2016-04-01

    Halophytes classified under the common name of salicornia colonize salty and coastal environments across tidal inundation gradients. To unravel the role of tide-related regimes on the structure and functionality of root associated bacteria, the rhizospheric soil of Salicornia strobilacea (synonym of Halocnemum strobilaceum) plants was studied in a tidal zone of the coastline of Southern Tunisia. Although total counts of cultivable bacteria did not change in the rhizosphere of plants grown along a tidal gradient, significant differences were observed in the diversity of both the cultivable and uncultivable bacterial communities. This observation indicates that the tidal regime is contributing to the bacterial species selection in the rhizosphere. Despite the observed diversity in the bacterial community structure, the PGP potential of cultivable rhizospheric bacteria, assessed through in vitro and in vivo tests, was equally distributed along the tidal gradient. Root colonization tests with selected strains proved that halophyte rhizospheric bacteria (i) stably colonize S. strobilacea rhizoplane and the plant shoot suggesting that they move from the root to the shoot and (ii) are capable of improving plant growth. The versatility in the root colonization, the overall PGP traits and the in vivo plant growth promotion under saline condition suggest that such beneficial activities likely take place naturally under a range of tidal regimes.

  11. Salicornia strobilacea (Synonym of Halocnemum strobilaceum) Grown under Different Tidal Regimes Selects Rhizosphere Bacteria Capable of Promoting Plant Growth

    KAUST Repository

    Marasco, Ramona

    2016-08-22

    Halophytes classified under the common name of salicornia colonize salty and coastal environments across tidal inundation gradients. To unravel the role of tide-related regimes on the structure and functionality of root associated bacteria, the rhizospheric soil of Salicornia strobilacea (synonym of Halocnemum strobilaceum) plants was studied in a tidal zone of the coastline of Southern Tunisia. Although total counts of cultivable bacteria did not change in the rhizosphere of plants grown along a tidal gradient, significant differences were observed in the diversity of both the cultivable and uncultivable bacterial communities. This observation indicates that the tidal regime is contributing to the bacterial species selection in the rhizosphere. Despite the observed diversity in the bacterial community structure, the plant growth promoting (PGP) potential of cultivable rhizospheric bacteria, assessed through in vitro and in vivo tests, was equally distributed along the tidal gradient. Root colonization tests with selected strains proved that halophyte rhizospheric bacteria (i) stably colonize S. strobilacea rhizoplane and the plant shoot suggesting that they move from the root to the shoot and (ii) are capable of improving plant growth. The versatility in the root colonization, the overall PGP traits and the in vivo plant growth promotion under saline condition suggest that such beneficial activities likely take place naturally under a range of tidal regimes.

  12. Salicornia strobilacea (synonym of Halocnemum strobilaceum) Grown Under Different Tidal Regimes Selects Rhizosphere Bacteria Capable of Promoting Plant Growth

    KAUST Repository

    Marasco, Ramona; Mapelli, Francesca; Rolli, Eleonora; Mosqueira Santillá n, Marí a José ; Fusi, Marco; Bariselli, Paola; Reddy, Muppala P.; Cherif, Ameur; Tsiamis, George; Borin, Sara; Daffonchio, Daniele

    2016-01-01

    Halophytes classified under the common name of salicornia colonize salty and coastal environments across tidal inundation gradients. To unravel the role of tide-related regimes on the structure and functionality of root associated bacteria, the rhizospheric soil of Salicornia strobilacea (synonym of Halocnemum strobilaceum) plants was studied in a tidal zone of the coastline of Southern Tunisia. Although total counts of cultivable bacteria did not change in the rhizosphere of plants grown along a tidal gradient, significant differences were observed in the diversity of both the cultivable and uncultivable bacterial communities. This observation indicates that the tidal regime is contributing to the bacterial species selection in the rhizosphere. Despite the observed diversity in the bacterial community structure, the PGP potential of cultivable rhizospheric bacteria, assessed through in vitro and in vivo tests, was equally distributed along the tidal gradient. Root colonization tests with selected strains proved that halophyte rhizospheric bacteria (i) stably colonize S. strobilacea rhizoplane and the plant shoot suggesting that they move from the root to the shoot and (ii) are capable of improving plant growth. The versatility in the root colonization, the overall PGP traits and the in vivo plant growth promotion under saline condition suggest that such beneficial activities likely take place naturally under a range of tidal regimes.

  13. Salicornia strobilacea (Synonym of Halocnemum strobilaceum) Grown under Different Tidal Regimes Selects Rhizosphere Bacteria Capable of Promoting Plant Growth

    KAUST Repository

    Marasco, Ramona; Mapelli, Francesca; Rolli, Eleonora; Mosqueira, Maria J.; Fusi, Marco; Bariselli, Paola; Reddy, Muppala P.; Cherif, Ameur; Tsiamis, George; Borin, Sara; Daffonchio, Daniele

    2016-01-01

    Halophytes classified under the common name of salicornia colonize salty and coastal environments across tidal inundation gradients. To unravel the role of tide-related regimes on the structure and functionality of root associated bacteria, the rhizospheric soil of Salicornia strobilacea (synonym of Halocnemum strobilaceum) plants was studied in a tidal zone of the coastline of Southern Tunisia. Although total counts of cultivable bacteria did not change in the rhizosphere of plants grown along a tidal gradient, significant differences were observed in the diversity of both the cultivable and uncultivable bacterial communities. This observation indicates that the tidal regime is contributing to the bacterial species selection in the rhizosphere. Despite the observed diversity in the bacterial community structure, the plant growth promoting (PGP) potential of cultivable rhizospheric bacteria, assessed through in vitro and in vivo tests, was equally distributed along the tidal gradient. Root colonization tests with selected strains proved that halophyte rhizospheric bacteria (i) stably colonize S. strobilacea rhizoplane and the plant shoot suggesting that they move from the root to the shoot and (ii) are capable of improving plant growth. The versatility in the root colonization, the overall PGP traits and the in vivo plant growth promotion under saline condition suggest that such beneficial activities likely take place naturally under a range of tidal regimes.

  14. Medicago truncatula Gaertn. as a model for understanding the mechanism of growth promotion by bacteria from rhizosphere and nodules of alfalfa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisiel, Anna; Kępczyńska, Ewa

    2016-05-01

    The present study showed all the 16 strains isolated and identified from the alfalfa rhizosphere and nodules, and registered in GenBank, to be good candidates for targeted use in studies addressing the rather weak known mechanism of plant growth promotion, including that of Medicago truncatula, a molecular crop model. Based on physiological, biochemical and molecular analysis, the 16 isolates obtained were ascribed to the following five families: Bacillaceae, Rhizobiaceae, Xantomonadaceae, Enterobacteriaceae and Pseudomonadaceae, within which 9 genera and 16 species were identified. All these bacteria were found to significantly enhance fresh and dry weight of root, shoots and whole 5-week-old seedlings. The bacteria were capable of the in vitro use of tryptophan to produce indolic compounds at various concentrations. The ability of almost all the strains to enhance growth of seedlings and individual roots was positively correlated with the production of the indolic compounds (r = 0.69; P = 0.0001), but not with the 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate deaminase (ACCD) activity (no correlation). For some strains, it was difficult to conclude whether the growth promotion was related to the production of indolic compounds or to the ACCD activity. It is likely that promotion of M. truncatula root development involves also root interaction with pseudomonads, known to produce 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol (DAPG), a secondary metabolite reported to alter the root architecture by interacting with an auxin-dependent signaling pathway. Inoculation of seedlings with Pseudomonas brassicacearum KK 5, a bacterium known for its lowest ability to produce indolic compounds, the highest ACCD activity and the presence of the phlD gene responsible for DAPG precursor synthesis, resulted in a substantial promotion of root development. Inoculation with the strain increased the endogenous IAA level in M. truncatula leaves after inoculation of 5-week-old seedlings. Three other strains examined

  15. Importance of PGPR application and its effect on microbial activity in maize rhizosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mrkovački Nastasija

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Microorganisms are involved in the formation of soil fertility, both potential and effective. They facilitate the processes of humification and dehumification and play a key role in the cycling of nutrients - macro and microelements. Rhizosphere is the soil in direct contact with plant roots and influenced by plant exudates. Root exudates of maize significantly affect the composition and abundance of microorganisms in the rhizosphere. Bio-fertilizers are microbial fertilizers composed of highly effective strains of bacteria, algae and fungi isolated from soil. Their application activates microbial processes that secure a better and steadier supply of plants with nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium and some micronutrients. The application of PGPR-containing biofertilizers reduces the need for expensive nitrogen fertilizers, facilitates phosphorus uptake by plants and affects the direction and dynamics of microbial processes.

  16. A Carbenicillin R Factor from Pseudomonas aeruginosa | van ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Of 64 carbenicillin-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains 40 transferred this resistance to Escherichia coli. R factor RP-638 isolated from Ps. aeruginosa strain 638 conferred resistance to ampicillin, carbenicillin, kanamycin, neomycin and tetracycline. This R factor was transferred at frequencies 01 10-7 to 10-4 between ...

  17. Interactions between biosurfactant-producing Pseudomonas and Phytophthora species

    OpenAIRE

    Tran, H.

    2007-01-01

    Fluorescent Pseudomonas bacteria produce a wide variety of antimicrobial metabolites, including soap-like compounds referred to as biosurfactants. The results of this thesis showed that biosurfactant-producing Pseudomonas bacteria are effective in controlling Phytophthora foot rot disease of black pepper in Vietnam and promote root and shoot development of the ‘King of Spices’. Biosurfactant-producing P. fluorescens strain SS101 was also effective in controlling tomato late blight caused by P...

  18. Diversity of small RNAs expressed in Pseudomonas species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gomez-Lozano, Mara; Marvig, Rasmus Lykke; Molina-Santiago, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) has revealed several hundreds of previously undetected small RNAs (sRNAs) in all bacterial species investigated, including strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Pseudomonas putida and Pseudomonas syringae. Nonetheless, only little is known about the extent of conservation...... of expressed sRNAs across strains and species. In this study, we have used RNA-seq to identify sRNAs in P.putidaDOT-T1E and Pseudomonas extremaustralis 14-3b. This is the first strain of P.extremaustralis and the second strain of P.putida to have their transcriptomes analysed for sRNAs, and we identify...... the presence of around 150 novel sRNAs in each strain. Furthermore, we provide a comparison based on sequence conservation of all the sRNAs detected by RNA-seq in the Pseudomonas species investigated so far. Our results show that the extent of sRNA conservation across different species is very limited...

  19. Petroleum-hydrocarbons biodegradation by Pseudomonas strains ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The capability of these isolates to degrade petroleum was performed by measuring the optical density, colony forming unit counts (CFU/ml) and concentration of total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH). Degradation of Isomerate by these isolates was analyzed by gas chromatography with flame ionization detector (FID). Results ...

  20. Lipolytic and antimicrobial activities of Pseudomonas strains ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    admin

    Purpose: To identify and determine lipolytic and antimicrobial activities, and antibiotic susceptibility of ... reverse-phase C-18 column high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). ..... arabinose, D-cellobiose, D-fructose, D-galactose,.