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Sample records for rhizoprionodon lalandii chondrichthyes

  1. Panbiogeographical analysis of the shark genus Rhizoprionodon (Chondrichthyes, Carcharhiniformes, Carcharhinidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallo, V; Cavalcanti, M J; da Silva, R F L; da Silva, H M A; Pagnoncelli, D

    2010-05-01

    The distributional patterns of the seven species of Rhizoprionodon were analysed using the panbiogeographical method of track analysis. The individual tracks of Rhizoprionodon suggest that the genus is mainly an Indian-Atlantic Ocean group. Five generalized tracks were found: (1) Caribbean, defined by R. porosus and R. terraenovae; (2) eastern coast of South America, defined by R. porosus and R. lalandei; (3) Indian Ocean, defined by R. acutus and R. oligolinx; (4) north-western Australia, defined by R. acutus, R. oligolinx and R. taylori; (5) north-north-eastern Australia, defined by R. acutus and R. taylori. Only R. longurio was not included in any generalized track, and its distribution is restricted to the eastern Pacific Ocean. Two biogeographical nodes were found at the intersection of the generalized tracks 1 and 2 (Caribbean Sea) and generalized tracks 4 and 5 (north Australia). The generalized tracks overlap with those found in several unrelated marine taxa. Overall, the generalized tracks are associated with warm currents. The biogeographical nodes found (Caribbean and Australian) are coincident with the global distribution of mangroves.

  2. Estudo anatômico comparativo da região cefálica pré-branquial de Sphyrna lewini (Griffith & Smith) e Rhizoprionodon lalandii (Valenciennes) (Elasmobranchii, Carcharhiniformes) relacionados com a presença do cefalofólio em Sphyrna Rafinesque Anatomical study on the pre branchial region of Sphyrna lewini (Griffith & Smith) and Rhizoprionodon lalandii (Valenciennes) (Elasmobranchii, Carcharhiniformes) related with the cephalofoil in Sphyrna Rafinesque

    OpenAIRE

    Maisa da Cruz Lima; Ulisses Leite Gomes; Wallace de Souza-Lima; Cristina Paragó

    1997-01-01

    A comparative study on the pre-branchial cranial anatomy of the scalloped hammerhead sharks [Sphyrna lewini (Griffith & Smith, 1834)] and the Brazilian sharpnose shark [Rhizoprionodon lalandii (Valenciennes, 1839)] was carried out to check the modification in the musculature, inervation and optic stalk related to the appearance of the cephalofoil in Sphyrna Rafinesque, 1810. A total of seven adults and one juvenile of R. lalandii and eight juveniles of S. lewini were examined. In S. lewini th...

  3. Estudo anatômico comparativo da região cefálica pré-branquial de Sphyrna lewini (Griffith & Smith e Rhizoprionodon lalandii (Valenciennes (Elasmobranchii, Carcharhiniformes relacionados com a presença do cefalofólio em Sphyrna Rafinesque Anatomical study on the pre branchial region of Sphyrna lewini (Griffith & Smith and Rhizoprionodon lalandii (Valenciennes (Elasmobranchii, Carcharhiniformes related with the cephalofoil in Sphyrna Rafinesque

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    Maisa da Cruz Lima

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available A comparative study on the pre-branchial cranial anatomy of the scalloped hammerhead sharks [Sphyrna lewini (Griffith & Smith, 1834] and the Brazilian sharpnose shark [Rhizoprionodon lalandii (Valenciennes, 1839] was carried out to check the modification in the musculature, inervation and optic stalk related to the appearance of the cephalofoil in Sphyrna Rafinesque, 1810. A total of seven adults and one juvenile of R. lalandii and eight juveniles of S. lewini were examined. In S. lewini the levator palaliquadrati and the levator labii superioris were the most modified cephalic muscles, as they became dorsalventrally attached and laterally developed. Among the oculomotor muscles, the recti followed the lateral expansion of the head constituting the rectal stalk associated with the nerves II, III, IV and VI and the optic stalk. It was observed that the oculomolorius branch "a" does not inervate the adductor mandibulae as it was mentioned in a previous paper. The myological structures and the inervation pattern presented diagnostic characters. Despite the shared characters between Carcharhinidae and the Sphyrnidae, the cephalofoil represents an autapomorphy which includes all the hammerhead sharks in the family Sphyrnidae.

  4. Historical commercial West Coast rock lobster Jasus lalandii ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Historic data from 1891 to 2001 on the annual exports of rock lobster Jasus lalandii products (canned, frozen tails, raw whole frozen, cooked whole frozen and live) from the South African west coast are used to estimate the annual commercial landings by this fishery. Conversion factors were developed to convert canned, ...

  5. Characterisation of the carotenoprotein found in carapace shells of Jasus lalandii

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Timme, E

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available from the carapace shells of the lobster, Jasus lalandii. The material, with a molecular mass of around 400 000 Da and λmax 525nm (α- crustacyanin), was readily converted under the conditions used for extraction and on standing to the subunit (β... indicator. KEY WORDS Bathochromic shift, carotenoprotein, crustacyanin, Jasus lalandii, lobster 3 1. Introduction When lobsters are cooked, the well known colour change from the dull dark hues ideal for camouflage within a marine...

  6. Field hearing measurements of the Atlantic sharpnose shark Rhizoprionodon terraenovae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casper, B M; Mann, D A

    2009-12-01

    Field measurements of hearing thresholds were obtained from the Atlantic sharpnose shark Rhizoprionodon terraenovae using the auditory evoked potential method (AEP). The fish had most sensitive hearing at 20 Hz, the lowest frequency tested, with decreasing sensitivity at higher frequencies. Hearing thresholds were lower than AEP thresholds previously measured for the nurse shark Ginglymostoma cirratum and yellow stingray Urobatis jamaicensis at frequencies sharks which have been observed in acoustic field attraction experiments. The sound pressure levels that would be equivalent to the particle acceleration thresholds of R. terraenovae were much higher than the sound levels which attracted closely related sharks suggesting a discrepancy between the hearing threshold experiments and the field attraction experiments.

  7. The distribution of the West Coast rock lobster Jasus lalandii ranges ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    spamer

    Key words: abalone Haliotis midae, Jasus lalandii, predation, sea urchins. * Formerly Marine Biology Research Institute, Zoology Department, University of Cape Town, Rondebosch 7701, South Africa; now. 1/19 Alpha Road, Prospect 5082, South Australia. † Formerly Marine Biology Research Institute; now SARDI Aquatic ...

  8. The subcellular localization of natural 210Po in the hepatopancreas of the rock lobster (Jasus lalandii)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heyraud, M.; Dowdle, E.B.; Cherry, R.D.

    1987-01-01

    The subcellular localization of the naturally occurring nuclide 210 Po in the hepatopancreas of the South African rock lobster, Jasus lalandii, has been studied using centrifugation, ultrafiltration and chromatography. Just over half of the 210 Po was found to be associated with a component in the microsomal pellet. Most of the 210 Po was tightly bound to a component of high molecular mass. Dissociation of the 210 Po from this component required incubation with sulphydryl-reducing reagents, after which the 210 Po appeared to associate with a fraction having a molecular mass of 1500 daltons or less. A search for negatively-charged, hydrophobic, sulphur-containing membrane proteins which bind 210 Po is suggested. (author)

  9. Subcellular localization of natural /sup 210/Po in the hepatopancreas of the rock lobster (Jasus lalandii)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heyraud, M; Dowdle, E B; Cherry, R D

    1987-01-01

    The subcellular localization of the naturally occurring nuclide /sup 210/Po in the hepatopancreas of the South African rock lobster, Jasus lalandii, has been studied using centrifugation, ultrafiltration and chromatography. Just over half of the /sup 210/Po was found to be associated with a component in the microsomal pellet. Most of the /sup 210/Po was tightly bound to a component of high molecular mass. Dissociation of the /sup 210/Po from this component required incubation with sulphydryl-reducing reagents, after which the /sup 210/Po appeared to associate with a fraction having a molecular mass of 1500 daltons or less. A search for negatively-charged, hydrophobic, sulphur-containing membrane proteins which bind /sup 210/Po is suggested.

  10. The mitogenomic phylogeny of the Elasmobranchii (Chondrichthyes).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaral, Cesar R L; Pereira, Filipe; Silva, Dayse A; Amorim, António; de Carvalho, Elizeu F

    2017-09-20

    Here we present a mitogenomic perspective on the evolution of sharks and rays, being a first glance on the complete mitochondrial history of such an old and diversified group of vertebrates. The Elasmobranchii is a diverse subclass of Chondrichthyes, or cartilaginous fish, with about 1200 species of ocean- and freshwater-dwelling fishes spread all over the world's seas, including some of the ocean's largest fishes. The group dates back about 400 million years near the Devonian-Silurian boundary, being nowadays represented by several derivative lineages, mainly related to Mesozoic forms. Although considered of ecological, commercial and conservation importance, the phylogeny of this old group is poorly studied and still under debate. Here we apply a molecular systematic approach on 82 complete mitochondrial genomes to investigate the phylogeny of the Elasmobranchii. By using maximum likelihood (ML) and Bayesian analyses, we found a clear separation within the shark clade between the Galeomorphii and the Squalomorphii, as well as sister taxa relationships between the Carcharhiniformes and the Lamniformes. Moreover, we found that Pristoidei clusters within the Rhinobatoidei, having been recovered as the sister taxon of the Rhinobatos genus in a clade which also includes the basal Zapteryx. Our results also reject the Hypnosqualea hypothesis, which proposes that the Batoidea should be placed within the Selachii.

  11. Total mercury in female Pacific sharpnose sharks Rhizoprionodon longurio and their embryos

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    Martín G Frías-Espericueta

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available We determined the Hg content of blood, placenta and umbilical cord of 20 pregnant females of the viviparous Pacific sharpnose shark, Rhizoprionodon longurio and of the livers of the embryos contained in their right and left uterus, aiming to provide information on the amount of this metal offloaded during pregnancy by the mother to the embryos. Hg content varied by close or higher than one order of magnitude in all tissues and showed the decreasing trend: maternal blood > umbilical cord > placenta > embryonic livers, with placenta and embryonic livers significantly lower than maternal blood. There were highly significant correlations (P 0.05. The results suggest transplacental Hg transfer and that the liver is not the main site of Hg accumulation.

  12. Endocrine control of embryonic diapause in the Australian sharpnose shark Rhizoprionodon taylori.

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    Daniela Waltrick

    Full Text Available The reproductive cycle of the Australian sharpnose shark, Rhizoprionodon taylori, includes a temporary suspension of development at the commencement of embryogenesis termed embryonic diapause. This study investigated levels of 17β-estradiol (E2, testosterone (T and progesterone (P4 in plasma samples of mature wild female R. taylori captured throughout the reproductive cycle and correlated them with internal morphological changes. Levels of T were elevated through most of the embryonic diapause period, suggesting a role of this hormone in the maintenance of this condition. Increasing plasma T concentrations from late diapause to early active development were associated with a possible role of androgens in the termination of embryonic diapause. As in other elasmobranchs, a concomitant increase of E2 with ovarian follicle size indicated a direct role of this hormone in regulating vitellogenesis, while a peak in P4 suggested this hormone is associated with preovulation and ovulation. Additionally, significant correlations between photoperiod or water temperature and maximum follicular diameter and hepatosomatic index suggest that these abiotic factors may also play a role triggering and regulating the synchrony and timing of reproductive events.

  13. A streamlined DNA tool for global identification of heavily exploited coastal shark species (genus Rhizoprionodon.

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    Danillo Pinhal

    Full Text Available Obtaining accurate species-specific landings data is an essential step toward achieving sustainable shark fisheries. Globally distributed sharpnose sharks (genus Rhizoprionodon exhibit life-history characteristics (rapid growth, early maturity, annual reproduction that suggests that they could be fished in a sustainable manner assuming an investment in monitoring, assessment and careful management. However, obtaining species-specific landings data for sharpnose sharks is problematic because they are morphologically very similar to one another. Moreover, sharpnose sharks may also be confused with other small sharks (either small species or juveniles of large species once they are processed (i.e., the head and fins are removed. Here we present a highly streamlined molecular genetics approach based on seven species-specific PCR primers in a multiplex format that can simultaneously discriminate body parts from the seven described sharpnose shark species commonly occurring in coastal fisheries worldwide. The species-specific primers are based on nucleotide sequence differences among species in the nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer 2 locus (ITS2. This approach also distinguishes sharpnose sharks from a wide range of other sharks (52 species and can therefore assist in the regulation of coastal shark fisheries around the world.

  14. Reproductive biology of the milk shark Rhizoprionodon acutus (Rüppell, 1837 from the Gulf of Suez, Red Sea, Egypt

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    Amgad M. Shaaban

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The milk shark, Rhizoprionodon acutus (Rüppell, 1837, is one of the most abundant shark species landed at Ataka fishing port at the Gulf of Suez. A total of 357 individuals (165 males and 192 females were collected from the trawl and artisanal fisheries. Males ranged from 44.6 to 88.5 cm TL, while females ranged from 47.8 to 97.2 cm TL. The total sex ratio was estimated at 1:1.16 for males and females respectively. Lengths at 50% maturity were estimated to be 76.5 cm TL for males and 74 cm TL for females. Females possess one functional ovary and two functional uteri. The vitellogenesis and gestation occur concurrently and thus females seem to have a reproductive cycle of one year with no resting period. The mean embryo lengths in different months and the presence of neonates in virtually all months, however, indicated that parturition takes place throughout the year with a peak in summer. Length and weight at birth, depending on term embryos and neonates ranged from 39.5 to 44.6 cm TL (mean 42.05 ± 2.55. Ovarian fecundity ranged from one to nine (mean 5.56 ± 0.33. Uterine fecundity ranged from one to six embryos (mean 3.22 ± 0.24. The sex ratio of embryos was approximately 1:1. Keywords: Gulf of Suez, Rhizoprionodon acutus, Reproductive biology

  15. Nascimento da Raia-viola, Zapteryx brevirostris (Müller & Henle (Chondrichthyes, Rhinobatidae, em cativeiro Birth of guitarfish, Zapteryx brevirostris (Müller & Henle (Chondrichthyes, Rhinobatidae in captivity

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    Manoel M. B. Gonzalez

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Um exemplar fêmea de Zapteryx brevirostris foi capturada na Ilha Queimada Grande, Itanhaém, São Paulo em 19/II/2002, e transportada para o cativeiro do Núcleo de Pesquisa e Estudo em Chondrichthyes (NUPEC. Em 21/II/2002, a fêmea pariu seis filhotes (três machos e três fêmeas. Este é o primeiro registro de nascimento de Z. brevirostris em cativeiro.A female of Zapteryx brevirostris were caught at Queimada Grande Island, Itanhaém, São Paulo on 19/II/2002, and transported to Núcleo de Pesquisa e Estudo em Chondrichthyes (NUPEC captivities. At 21/II/2002, the female gave birth to six pups (three males and three females. This is a first birth record of Z. brevirostris in captivity.

  16. Stomach contents of the Pacific sharpnose shark, Rhizoprionodon longurio (Carcharhiniformes, Carcharhinidae in the southeastern Gulf of California

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    Yolene R Osuna-Peralta

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The feeding habits of the sharpnose shark Rhizoprionodon longurio of the SE Gulf of California are described using the stomach contents of 250 specimens (135 males and 115 females obtained weekly from December 2007 to March 2008 in the two main landing sites of the artisanal fishing fleet of Mazatlan. The mean total length (TL was 77.7 ± 12.8 cm and the respective ranges for males and females were 60-120 cm and 52120 cm. Size distribution showed two modal groups (juveniles: 52-80 cm, mode 72.5 cm, and adults: 85-140 cm, mode 92.5 cm. Out of the 395 preys identified in 235 stomachs with identifiable contents, the most important were cephalopods (Index of Relative Importance, IRI = 93.1%, mainly Argonauta spp. (IRI = 92.9%. The total IRI value for fish was 5.9%, mostly represented by Oligoplites refulgens and Oligoplites sp. (joint IRI value = 4.8%. The diversity of the stomach contents of males and females was not significantly different, and although the values of diversity, equitability and dietary breadth indexes were lower in juveniles than in adults, ANOSIM analysis did not show differences in dietary habits related to age and sex. The results indicate a specialized feeding behaviour, with Argonauta spp. as preferred prey. This behaviour does not agree with all previous information on R. longurio, and is probably due to local availability of this prey during the sampling period.

  17. Insights on the identities of sharks of the Rhizoprionodon acutus (Elasmobranchii: Carcharhiniformes) species complex based on three new species of Phoreiobothrium (Cestoda: Onchoproteocephalidea).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caira, J N; Jensen, K

    2015-12-22

    Recent molecular work on milk sharks (Rhizoprionodon acutus [Rüppell]) suggests that, rather than a single widely distributed species, R. acutus represents a complex of four narrowly distributed cryptic species. Examination of the cestodes in three of the four members of that complex globally led to the discovery and description of three new species in the onchoproteocephalidean genus Phoreiobothrium Linton, 1889. The host associations and geographic distributions of the new species are fully congruent with the geographic distributions and species boundaries inferred for the sharks from molecular data: Phoreiobothrium jahki n. sp. parasitizes Rhizoprionodon cf. acutus 3 off Borneo, P. nadiae n. sp. parasitizes R. cf. acutus 1 off Senegal, and P. swaki n. sp. parasitizes R. cf. acutus 2 off northern Australia. The new cestodes differ from one another and from their 11 valid congeners in morphological features such as sublocular configuration and number, hook size, and testis number. Given the notoriously oioxenous nature of elasmobranch-hosted onchoproteocephalidean cestodes, these results provide further support for recognition of the milk shark species complex. This work also raises questions about the Phoreiobothrium species reported in cursory descriptions from India; further examination of these cestodes is key because they are potentially hosted by the fourth member of the R. acutus complex. To encourage future taxonomic work on the morphology of sharks in this complex, comparative photographs of representatives of the four potential host species are provided.

  18. Acid-base balance and changes in haemolymph properties of the South African rock lobsters, Jasus lalandii, a palinurid decapod, during chronic hypercapnia.

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    Knapp, Jarred L; Bridges, Christopher R; Krohn, Janina; Hoffman, Louwrens C; Auerswald, Lutz

    2015-06-05

    Few studies exist reporting on long-term exposure of crustaceans to hypercapnia. We exposed juvenile South African rock lobsters, Jasus lalandii, to hypercapnic conditions of pH 7.3 for 28 weeks and subsequently analysed changes in the extracellular fluid (haemolymph). Results revealed, for the first time, adjustments in the haemolymph of a palinurid crustacean during chronic hypercapnic exposure: 1) acid-base balance was adjusted and sustained by increased bicarbonate and 2) quantity and oxygen binding properties of haemocyanin changed. Compared with lobsters kept under normocapnic conditions (pH 8.0), during prolonged hypercapnia, juvenile lobsters increased bicarbonate buffering of haemolymph. This is necessary to provide optimum pH conditions for oxygen binding of haemocyanin and functioning of respiration in the presence of a strong Bohr Effect. Furthermore, modification of the intrinsic structure of the haemocyanin molecule, and not the presence of molecular modulators, seems to improve oxygen affinity under conditions of elevated pCO2. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Mesobathic chondrichthyes of the Juan Fernández seamounts: are they different from those of the central Chilean continental slope?

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    Isabel Andrade

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available We compared the geographic distribution of groups of chondrychthid fishes of two physically proximal, although geographically different, regions that include the Juan Fernández seamounts and the central Chilean continental slope, both sampled at mesopelagic and mesobenthonic depths. The ridge is in the Nazca Plate, while the slope region in on the South American Plate, and is closer to the South American continent. We found six species of Chondrichthyes for the seamounts (four orders, four families. The slope sampling produced ten species of Chondrichthyes, of which Torpedo tremens De Buen 1959, was the only species in common with the Juan Fernández area. There are clear differences between the Chondrichthyes of the two regions. These fisheries require adequate administrative modes. Rev. Biol. Trop. 56 (1: 181-190. Epub 2008 March 31.

  20. Stiffening the stingray skeleton - an investigation of durophagy in myliobatid stingrays (Chondrichthyes, batoidea, myliobatidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summers, A P

    2000-02-01

    The stingray family Myliobatidae contains five durophagous (hard prey specialist) genera and two planktivorous genera. A suite of morphological features makes it possible for the hard prey specialists to crush mollusks and crustaceans in their cartilaginous jaws. These include: 1) flat, pavement-like tooth plates set in an elastic dental ligament; 2) multiple layers of calcified cartilage on the surface of the jaws; 3) calcified struts running through the jaws; and 4) a lever system that amplifies the force of the jaw adductors. Examination of a range of taxa reveals that the presence of multiple layers of calcified cartilage, previously described from just a few species, is a plesiomorphy of Chondrichthyes. Calcified struts within the jaw, called "trabecular cartilage," are found only in the myliobatid genera, including the planktivorous Manta birostris. In the durophagous taxa, the struts are concentrated under the area where prey is crushed, thereby preventing local buckling of the jaws. Trabecular cartilage develops early in ontogeny, and does not appear to develop as a direct result of the stresses associated with feeding on hard prey. A "nutcracker" model of jaw function is proposed. In this model, the restricted gape, fused mandibular and palatoquadrate symphyses, and asynchronous contraction of the jaw adductors function to amplify the closing force by 2-4 times. Copyright 2000 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  1. Early Pliocene fishes (Chondrichthyes, Osteichthyes) from Gran Canaria and Fuerteventura (Canary Islands, Spain)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Betancort, J.F.; Lomoschitz, A.; Meco, J.

    2016-07-01

    Fossil fish teeth are contained in marine deposits dated at ca 4.8 Ma found on the islands of Gran Canaria and Fuerteventura (Canary Islands, Spain). These islands, situated in the North Atlantic Subtropical Gyre, can be considered a mid-way stopover point between the Caribbean Sea, with the Central American Seaway about to close in this epoch, and the Mediterranean, in the first stage of its post-Messinian Gibraltar Seaway period. Accordingly, there existed extensive pantropical communication, particularly for nektonic animals capable of travelling large distances. In this paper, we present a number of fossil fishes, most of which are identified for the first time on the basis of their teeth: the Chondrichthyes species Carcharocles megalodon, Parotodus benedeni, Cosmopolitodus hastalis, Isurus oxyrinchus, Carcharias cf. acutissima, Carcharhinus cf. leucas, Carcharhinus cf. priscus, Galeocerdo cf. aduncus, and the Osteichthyes species Archosargus cinctus, Labrodon pavimentatum, and Diodon scillae. Coincidences are observed between these ichthyofauna and specimens found in the Azores Islands, the Pacific coast of America and the Mediterranean Sea. (Author)

  2. Early Pliocene fishes (Chondrichthyes, Osteichthyes from Gran Canaria and Fuerteventura (Canary Islands, Spain

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    J. F. Betancort

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Fossil fish teeth are contained in marine deposits dated at ca 4.8 Ma found on the islands of Gran Canaria and Fuerteventura (Canary Islands, Spain. These islands, situated in the North Atlantic Subtropical Gyre, can be considered a mid-way stopover point between the Caribbean Sea, with the Central American Seaway about to close in this epoch, and the Mediterranean, in the first stage of its post-Messinian Gibraltar Seaway period. Accordingly, there existed extensive pantropical communication, particularly for nektonic animals capable of travelling large distances. In this paper, we present a number of fossil fishes, most of which are identified for the first time on the basis of their teeth: the Chondrichthyes species Carcharocles megalodon, Parotodus benedeni, Cosmopolitodus hastalis, Isurus oxyrinchus, Carcharias cf. acutissima, Carcharhinus cf. leucas, Carcharhinus cf. priscus, Galeocerdo cf. aduncus, and the Osteichthyes species Archosargus cinctus, Labrodon pavimentatum, and Diodon scillae. Coincidences are observed between these ichthyofauna and specimens found in the Azores Islands, the Pacific coast of America and the Mediterranean Sea.

  3. Huffmanela markgracei sp. n. (Nematoda: Trichosomoididae) from buccal cavity of Atlantic sharpnose shark, Rhizoprionodon terraenovae (Carcharhiniformes: Carcharhinidae), in the northwestern Gulf of Mexico off Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Carlos F; Bullard, Stephen A

    2013-09-01

    Eggs of Huffmanela markgracei sp. n. infected one of three Atlantic sharpnose sharks, Rhizoprionodon terraenovae (Richardson) (Carcharhiniformes: Carcharhinidae) captured by bottom long-line in the northwestern Gulf of Mexico off Padre Island, Texas. Eggs in the skin formed sinuous tracks (1-8 eggs wide; 1-4 eggs deep; 150 eggs/mm2) occupying a swath of the skin 22 cm x 2 cm on the tongue, branchial arches and the dorsal surface of the buccal cavity. Eggs had transverse eggshell ridges (branching and non-branching), had shells that were clear, amber or brown, and measured 90-113 microm (x = 102 +/- 4; n = 190) long, 38-54 microm (43 +/- 3; 190) wide, 3-5 microm (4 +/- 0; 190) in eggshell thickness with protruding polar plugs 8-12 microm (10 +/- 1; 190) wide. Apparently fully developed larvae in eggs were 255-335 microm (299 +/- 26; 30) long, 8-10 microm (9 +/- 1; 30) wide, and in-folded 5-6 (6 +/- 0; 30) times. Some of these larvae were emerging from eggs in the skin. The new species differs from congeners by the combination of having a large, spindle-shaped egg, transverse eggshell ridges, an envelope that is smooth, tightly-apposed to the eggshell and surrounds the entire eggshell inclusive of the polar plugs, and a large larva. This is the first report of a species of Huffmanela Moravec, 1987 from a chondrichthyan in the Gulf of Mexico and from a shark not assigned to Carcharhinus.

  4. Morfometria de raias continentais (Chondrichthyes, Potamotrygonidae do alto rio Paraná, Brasil = Morphometry of upper Paraná river freshwater stingrays (Chondrichthyes, Potamotrygonidae

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    Antonio Guilherme Cândido da Silva

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Potamotrygonidae constitui o único grupo recente de Chondrichthyes cujo habitat está restrito, exclusivamente, a águas continentais. Na planície de inundação do Alto rio Paraná, espécies desta família estabeleceram-se após o fechamento das comportas da usina hidrelétrica de Itaipu, a jusante. O objetivo deste trabalho foi, utilizando medidas corporais, identificar diferenças morfométricas entre indivíduos de Potamotrygon cf. motoro (Natterer in Müller & Henle, 1841 e Potamotrygon falkneri Castex & Maciel, 1963 capturadosnesta região, bem como estimar o tamanho com que machos destas espécies atingem a maturidade gonadal. Machos de P. falkneri e P. cf. motoro das populações avaliadas atingem a maturidade gonadal com largura do disco variando em torno de 26 cm e 23 cm, respectivamente. Na comparação das espécies, P. cf. motoro apresentou maior distânciaproporcional entre as narinas e maior comprimento proporcional da cauda e dos espiráculos. Identificou-se dimorfismo sexual secundário para P. falkneri, consistindo da presença de fileiras laterais de espinhos na cauda das fêmeas. Estudos futuros de morfologiafuncional e ecomorfologia poderão esclarecer o significado das diferenças morfométricas para o modo de vida destas espécies.Potamotrygonidae is the only extant chondrichthyan group restricted exclusively to freshwater. This family invaded the UpperParaná river system after the closing of Itaipu Dam. This study aimed to identify morphometric differences between Potamotrygon cf. motoro (Natterer in Müller & Henle, 1841 and Potamotrygon falkneri Castex & Maciel, 1963 sampled in that area, and estimate male size at gonadal maturation. P. falkneri and P. cf. motoro males reach gonadal maturation at 26 cm and 23 cm disc width, respectively. Comparing both species, P. cf. motoro presented larger tail, spiracles and distance between nostrils. Lateral small stings on tails ofP. falkneri females were observed as secondary

  5. CHONDRICHTHYES, Knorpelfische

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldschmid, Alfred

    Die über 1.100 Arten der Knorpelfische sind nur etwa 4% aller heute lebenden Fischarten. Ihrknorpeliges Endoskelett kann zwar verkalken, wird abernie zu Knochen umgebaut. Der Schädel besteht nur aus Neurocranium und Viscerocranium, ein Dermatocranium fehlt. Knochen findet sich nur in den Plakoidschuppen der Körperdecke. Eine Schwimmblase wie bei den Knochenfischen wird nie gebildet. Mund- und Nasenöffnungen liegen ventral; der Endolymphgang bleibt zeitlebens mit der Epidermis verbunden. Der mediale Teil der Beckenflosse der Männchen dient als Kopulationsorgan (Mixopterygium, Klasper) (Abb. 208, 209B) bei der inneren Befruchtung.

  6. Development of the Synarcual in the Elephant Sharks (Holocephali; Chondrichthyes: Implications for Vertebral Formation and Fusion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zerina Johanson

    Full Text Available The synarcual is a structure incorporating multiple elements of two or more anterior vertebrae of the axial skeleton, forming immediately posterior to the cranium. It has been convergently acquired in the fossil group 'Placodermi', in Chondrichthyes (Holocephali, Batoidea, within the teleost group Syngnathiformes, and to varying degrees in a range of mammalian taxa. In addition, cervical vertebral fusion presents as an abnormal pathology in a variety of human disorders. Vertebrae develop from axially arranged somites, so that fusion could result from a failure of somite segmentation early in development, or from later heterotopic development of intervertebral bone or cartilage. Examination of early developmental stages indicates that in the Batoidea and the 'Placodermi', individual vertebrae developed normally and only later become incorporated into the synarcual, implying regular somite segmentation and vertebral development. Here we show that in the holocephalan Callorhinchus milii, uniform and regular vertebral segmentation also occurs, with anterior individual vertebra developing separately with subsequent fusion into a synarcual. Vertebral elements forming directly behind the synarcual continue to be incorporated into the synarcual through growth. This appears to be a common pattern through the Vertebrata. Research into human disorders, presenting as cervical fusion at birth, focuses on gene misexpression studies in humans and other mammals such as the mouse. However, in chondrichthyans, vertebral fusion represents the normal morphology, moreover, taxa such Leucoraja (Batoidea and Callorhinchus (Holocephali are increasingly used as laboratory animals, and the Callorhinchus genome has been sequenced and is available for study. Our observations on synarcual development in three major groups of early jawed vertebrates indicate that fusion involves heterotopic cartilage and perichondral bone/mineralised cartilage developing outside the regular

  7. The marine leech Stibarobdella loricata (Harding, 1924 (Hirudinea, Piscicolidae, parasitic on the angel shark Squatina spp. and sandtiger shark Carcharias taurus Rafinesque, 1810 (Chondrichthyes: Squatinidae, Carchariidae in Southern Brazilian waters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soto J. M. R.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The presence of the marine leech, Stibarobdella loricata (Harding, 1924 (Hirudinea, Piscicolidae, is reported on the southern coast of Brazil, based on seven lots with 47 specimens, between 71 and 182 mm in total length, collected on the dorsal region of angel sharks, Squatina argentina (Marini, 1930; S. guggenheim Marini, 1936; S. punctata Marini, 1936 (Chondrichthyes, Squatinidae; and on the head of a sandtiger shark, Carcharias taurus Rafinesque, 1810 (Chondrichthyes, Carchariidae. This is the first record of S. loricata in the western Atlantic and of its parasitic association with S. argentina, S. guggenheim, S. punctata, and C. taurus.

  8. Baseline health parameters and species comparisons among free-ranging Atlantic sharpnose (Rhizoprionodon terraenovae), bonnethead (Sphyrna tiburo), and spiny dogfish (Squalus acanthias) sharks in Georgia, Florida, and Washington, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haman, Katherine H; Norton, Terry M; Thomas, Austen C; Dove, Alistair D M; Tseng, Florina

    2012-04-01

    Sharks are of commercial, research, conservation, and exhibition importance but we know little regarding health parameters and population status for many species. Here we present health indicators and species comparisons for adults of three common wild-caught species: 30 Atlantic sharpnose sharks (Rhizoprionodon terraenovae) and 31 bonnethead sharks (Sphyrna tiburo) from the western Atlantic, and 30 spiny dogfish sharks (Squalus acanthias) from the eastern Pacific. All animals were captured during June-July 2009 and 2010. Median values and preliminary reference intervals were calculated for hematology, plasma biochemistry, trace nutrients, and vitamin A, E, and D concentrations. Significant differences, attributable to physiologic differences among the species, were found in the basic hematologic and plasma biochemistry variables. Significant species differences in arsenic and selenium plasma concentrations were found and appear to coincide with diet and habitat variability among these three species. Vitamin E was significantly higher in the bonnethead shark, again related to the foraging ecology and ingestion of plant material by this species. The Atlantic sharpnose had significantly higher vitamin A concentrations, supported by the higher proportion of teleosts in the diet. Vitamin D was below the limit of quantification in all three species. These preliminary reference intervals for health variables can be used to assess and monitor the population health and serve as indicators of nutritional status in these populations of wild elasmobranchs.

  9. Testing morphologically based phylogenetic theories within the cartilaginous fishes with molecular data, with special reference to the catshark family (Chondrichthyes; Scyliorhinidae) and the interrelationships within them.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Human, Brett A; Owen, E Patricia; Compagno, Leonard J V; Harley, Eric H

    2006-05-01

    A molecular phylogenetic investigation was conducted to examine phylogenetic relationships between various members of the catsharks (Chondrichthyes; Carcharhiniformes; Scyliorhinidae), and is the largest chondrichthyan data set yet analysed, consisting of nearly 130,000 nucleotides. Three mitochondrial DNA genes were used to construct the phylogenies, cytochrome b, NADH-2, and NADH-4, with 41 sequences from 18 taxa being novel. These sequences were either used separately or combined into a single data set, and phylogenies were constructed using various methods, however, only the Bayesian inference tree derived from the cytochrome b data set was resolved sufficiently for phylogenetic inferences to be made. Interestingly, the family Scyliorhinidae was not supported by the results and was found to be paraphyletic. The Scyliorhininae and Pentanchinae were supported, whereas the Pentanchini clade was present, but not well supported. The Halaelurini hypothesis was supported with Holohalaelurus identified as the basal genus of that clade, and Haploblepharus edwardsii identified as the basal taxon for that genus. Elsewhere within the Chondrichthyes, the Carcharhiniformes and the Lamniformes were found to be monophyletic, and the Heterodontiformes was placed within the Squalimorphs. The placement of the skates and rays in these analyses support the Batoidea as being sister to the Elasmobranchii.

  10. Digenea, Nematoda, Cestoda, and Acanthocephala, parasites in Potamotrygonidae (Chondrichthyes from the upper Paraná River floodplain, states of Paraná and Mato Grosso do Sul, Brazil.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavanelli, G. C.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The present paper represents the first study on the endoparasitic fauna of Potamotrygon falkneri and P.motoro in the upper Paraná River floodplain. Fishes were collected by fishing rod and gillnetting in different stations ofthe floodplain, from March, 2005 to September, 2006. Parasites were sampled, fixed and preserved according tospecialized literature. About half of the analyzed fish were parasitized by at least one of the following species ofendoparasites: Clinostomum complanatum, Genarchella sp. and Tylodelphys sp. (metacercaria (Digenea;Acanthobothrium regoi, Rhinebothrium paratrygoni, Paroncomegas araya and Potamotrygonocestus travassosi(Cestoidea; Brevimulticaecum sp. (larva, Cucullanus sp., Echinocephalus sp. and Spinitectus sp. (Nematoda; andQuadrigyrus machadoi (Acanthocephala. Some species were already registered in Chondrichthyes and others werepreviously recorded in Osteichthyes from the study area. The study listed ten new records of parasites in the host P.falkneri, one new record in the host P. motoro and five new records in the locality upper Paraná River.

  11. Longevity of Atlantic Sharpnose Sharks Rhizoprionodon terraenovae and Blacknose Sharks Carcharhinus acronotus in the western North Atlantic Ocean based on tag-recapture data and direct age estimates [v2; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/4fj

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    Bryan S. Frazier

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Longevity of Rhizoprionodon terraenovae and Carcharhinus acronotus in the western North Atlantic Ocean was examined using direct age estimates from vertebral sections and tag-recapture data. Time-at-liberty ranged from 7.7-14.0 years (mean =10.1 for R. terraenovae and 10.9-12.8 years (mean =11.9 for C. acronotus. Maximum estimated longevity was determined to be 19.8 years through tag-recapture data and 18.5 years from direct age estimates for R. terraenovae and 22.8 years through tag-recapture data and 20.5 years through direct age estimates for C. acronotus. These longevity estimates represent a large increase over previous estimates and may have significant effects on analyses that depend on longevity including lifetime fecundity, mortality rates, demographic analyses and stock assessments.

  12. Feeding ecology of elasmobranch species in southeastern Brazil

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    Alessandra F. Viana

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The feeding ecology of five elasmobranch species was studied on the southern coast of Rio de Janeiro, southwestern Atlantic Ocean. The specimens were caught with a trawl or bottom longline between January 2006 and August 2007. The diets of Psammobatis rutrum and Psammobatis extenta appeared to be basically carcino-benthophagous, with a very small niche width. Rioraja agassizii was basically carcino/ichthyo-benthophagous, also with a narrow niche, including teleost fish and shrimp, but in different proportions according to age and sex. Rhizoprionodon lalandii was ichthyophagous, not influenced by age or sex. The analyses of these species and Atlantoraja cyclophora indicated two trophic groups: one composed of the smaller rays, P. extenta and P. rutrum, which basically fed on small crustaceans, polychaetes and nematodes; and the other of R. lalandii and the larger rays R. agassizii and A. cyclophora, which preyed on teleost fish and brachyurans.

  13. Morfometria de raias continentais (Chondrichthyes, Potamotrygonidae do alto rio Paraná, Brasil - DOI: 10.4025/actascibiolsci.v29i4.885 Morphometry of upper Paraná river freshwater stingrays (Chondrichthyes, Potamotrygonidae - DOI: 10.4025/actascibiolsci.v29i4.885

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erivelto Goulart

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Potamotrygonidae constitui o único grupo recente de Chondrichthyes cujo habitat está restrito, exclusivamente, a águas continentais. Na planície de inundação do Alto rio Paraná, espécies desta família estabeleceram-se após o fechamento das comportas da usina hidrelétrica de Itaipu, a jusante. O objetivo deste trabalho foi, utilizando medidas corporais, identificar diferenças morfométricas entre indivíduos de Potamotrygon cf. motoro (Natterer in Müller & Henle, 1841 e Potamotrygon falkneri Castex & Maciel, 1963 capturados nesta região, bem como estimar o tamanho com que machos destas espécies atingem a maturidade gonadal. Machos de P. falkneri e P. cf. motoro das populações avaliadas atingem a maturidade gonadal com largura do disco variando em torno de 26 cm e 23 cm, respectivamente. Na comparação das espécies, P. cf. motoro apresentou maior distância proporcional entre as narinas e maior comprimento proporcional da cauda e dos espiráculos. Identificou-se dimorfismo sexual secundário para P. falkneri, consistindo da presença de fileiras laterais de espinhos na cauda das fêmeas. Estudos futuros de morfologia funcional e ecomorfologia poderão esclarecer o significado das diferenças morfométricas para o modo de vida destas espécies.Potamotrygonidae is the only extant chondrichthyan group restricted exclusively to freshwater. This family invaded the Upper Paraná river system after the closing of Itaipu Dam. This study aimed to identify morphometric differences between Potamotrygon cf. motoro (Natterer in Müller & Henle, 1841 and Potamotrygon falkneri Castex & Maciel, 1963 sampled in that area, and estimate male size at gonadal maturation. P. falkneri and P. cf. motoro males reach gonadal maturation at 26 cm and 23 cm disc width, respectively. Comparing both species, P. cf. motoro presented larger tail, spiracles and distance between nostrils. Lateral small stings on tails of P. falkneri females were observed as

  14. Reproductive biology of the milk shark Rhizoprionodon acutus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mature individuals were dominant at the northern landing sites whereas immature individuals were more abundant in the southern regions. Our observations suggest a possible seasonal migration towards the north for reproductive purposes. The size at first sexual maturity was 92 cm TL for females and 82 cm TL for males.

  15. Potencial atrator de tubarões costeiros em recife artificial no litoral norte do estado do Rio de Janeiro, Brasil Attractive potential of coastal sharks in artificial reef on the Northern Coast of Rio de Janeiro State, Brazil

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    Vicente Vieira Faria

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available Artificial reefs have been used in many countries to increase coastal fishery productivity. In order to increase fish attraction to the Northern Coast of Rio de Janeiro State, it was installed an artificial reef (1,500 m² 5 nautical miles off Manguinhos's Bay (São Francisco de ltabapoana, Rio de Janeiro. The artificial structures were made of tires, concrete and cement blocks. A gill net of 125 x 3 m was monthly used in the artificial reef (AR and in a control area (CA to determine the effect of the experimental structures on the stock and diversity of coastal sharks. Considering the complexity of a sustainable elasmobranch exploitation, sharks were focused in this study. During 24 months of investigation (April/96 to March/98, a total of 325 individuais distributed in four shark species were captured in the two areas (AR and CA: Mustelus higmani (Springer & Lowe, 1963 (AR = 70; CA = 82 individuals, Rhizoprionodon lalandii (Valenciennes, 1839 (AR = 86; CA = 56 individuals, R. porosus (Poey, 1861 (AR = 16; CA = 14 individuals and Carcharhinus brachyurus (Günther, 1870 (AR = 1 individual. The attractive potential of the artificial reef is suggested by the predominance of the shark R. lalandii in the reef complex after the first year of monitoring, with the increase of the structures.

  16. Eocene squalomorph sharks (Chondrichthyes, Elasmobranchii) from Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelbrecht, Andrea; Mörs, Thomas; Reguero, Marcelo A.; Kriwet, Jürgen

    2017-10-01

    Rare remains of predominantly deep-water sharks of the families Hexanchidae, Squalidae, Dalatiidae, Centrophoridae, and Squatinidae are described from the Eocene La Meseta Formation, Seymour Island, Antarctic Peninsula, which has yielded the most abundant chondrichthyan assemblage from the Southern Hemisphere to date. Previously described representatives of Hexanchus sp., Squalus weltoni, Squalus woodburnei, Centrophorus sp., and Squatina sp. are confirmed and dental variations are documented. Although the teeth of Squatina sp. differ from other Palaeogene squatinid species, we refrain from introducing a new species. A new dalatiid taxon, Eodalatias austrinalis gen. et sp. nov. is described. This new material not only increases the diversity of Eocene Antarctic elasmobranchs but also allows assuming that favourable deep-water habitats were available in the Eocene Antarctic Ocean off Antarctica in the Eocene. The occurrences of deep-water inhabitants in shallow, near-coastal waters of the Antarctic Peninsula agrees well with extant distribution patterns.

  17. Eocene squalomorph sharks (Chondrichthyes, Elasmobranchii) from Antarctica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelbrecht, Andrea; Mörs, Thomas; Reguero, Marcelo A; Kriwet, Jürgen

    2017-10-01

    Rare remains of predominantly deep-water sharks of the families Hexanchidae, Squalidae, Dalatiidae, Centrophoridae, and Squatinidae are described from the Eocene La Meseta Formation, Seymour Island, Antarctic Peninsula, which has yielded the most abundant chondrichthyan assemblage from the Southern Hemisphere to date. Previously described representatives of Hexanchus sp., Squalus weltoni , Squalus woodburnei , Centrophorus sp., and Squatina sp. are confirmed and dental variations are documented. Although the teeth of Squatina sp. differ from other Palaeogene squatinid species, we refrain from introducing a new species. A new dalatiid taxon, Eodalatias austrinalis gen. et sp. nov. is described. This new material not only increases the diversity of Eocene Antarctic elasmobranchs but also allows assuming that favourable deep-water habitats were available in the Eocene Antarctic Ocean off Antarctica in the Eocene. The occurrences of deep-water inhabitants in shallow, near-coastal waters of the Antarctic Peninsula agrees well with extant distribution patterns.

  18. West Coast rock lobster Jasus lalandii are dis- tributed from about ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    spamer

    and a ban on the retention of lobster in a soft shell state or ... However, a diver operating from shore could also collect ... The permit system was discontinued during 1986 ... person's place of residence at any one time was re- ..... real situation.

  19. After an initial, localized decline in rock lobster Jasus lalandii growth ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    spamer

    Pacific Ocean. In the southern Benguela, the most obvious signature of this ENSO was the reduced fre- quency and intensity of southerly, upwelling-inducing winds, with a concomitant increase in westerly winds. This study attempts to relate the reduction in lobster growth and productivity to environmental factors which.

  20. Diet of the west coast rock lobster Jasus Lalandii : Influence of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The diet of small lobsters (<75mm CL) consisted of a wide range of species, which included, in order of importance, coralline algae, barnacles Notomegabalanus algicola, sponges and ribbed mussels Aulacomya ater. However, prey items rich in inorganic material were not dominant in their diet, as had been predicted.

  1. Occurrence of Hydrolagus macrophthalmus (Chondrichthyes: Holocephali: Chimaeridae in the northeastern Pacific Presencia de Hydrolagus macrophthalmus (Chondrichthyes: Holocephali: Chimaeridae en el Pacífico nororiental

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrián F. González-Acosta

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The southeastern Pacific chimaeroid Hydrolagus macrophthalmus De Buen, 1959, is reported for the first time in the northeastern Pacific on the basis of 1 male specimen (945 mm TL caught on 13 April 1995 off Manzanillo, Colima (Mexico: 18° 30'N, 104° 15'W at the surface above deep water (2 000 m. The first occurrence of this species increases the number of chimaeroid species known in the northeastern Pacific and expands their known range.Se registra por primera vez la presencia de la quimera Hydrolagus macrophthalmus De Buen, 1959, en aguas del Pacífico nororiental; especie cuya distribución se consideraba como exclusiva del Pacífico sur oriental. El 13 de abril de 1995, se recolectó 1 ejemplar macho (945 mm TL en la superficie del mar frente a Manzanillo, Colima (México: 18° 30'N, 104° 15'O, en una zona de gran profundidad (2 000 m. Su presencia, incrementa el número de quimeras del Pacífico nororiental y asimismo, amplía su distribución hacia el hemisferio norte.

  2. From coexistence to competitive exclusion: can overfishing change the outcome of competition in skates (Chondrichthyes, Rajidae?

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    Natalia L Ruocco

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Competition for food could be a major force driving changes in the community structure of skates (Rajidae subjected to fishing exploitation. Under this hypothesis, small skates are released from competition with larger skates after fishing has depleted the larger species. Here, we compare the abundance patterns of two sympatric skates with similar niches but different life histories, Bathyraja albomaculata (larger and slow-reproducing and Bathyraja macloviana (smaller and faster-reproducing, before (1971, 1978 and after (1998-2004 a 108% increase in industrial bottom trawling on the southeastern South American shelf in order to test the prediction that B. macloviana should competitively exclude B. albomaculata after the increase in fishing mortality. In 1971 and 1978, there was no relationship between the abundance of both species, indicating that they coexisted over large scales. In 1998-2004, the relationship between the abundances of these skates was bell-shaped, indicating that both species increased in abundance at low densities until peaking, after which B. albomaculata decreased when B. macloviana became more abundant, consistent with resource competition. We tested whether food may be a potential limiting resource by comparing the diet of both species. The two species consumed mostly polychaetes, differing only in the consumption of polychaetes from the family Nephthyidae, which was much higher for B. macloviana. Bathyraja macloviana could replace B. albomaculata at high densities when food resources may become scarce. These results support the hypothesis that competition release is an important factor explaining the changes in skate communities in overexploited areas.

  3. Multiple prismatic calcium phosphate layers in the jaws of present-day sharks (Chondrichthyes; Selachii).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dingerkus, G; Séret, B; Guilbert, E

    1991-01-15

    Jaws of large individuals, over 2 m in total length, of the shark species Carcharodon carcharias (great white shark) and Isurus oxyrinchus (mako shark) of the family Lamnidae, and Galeocerdo cuvieri (tiger shark) and Carcharhinus leucas (bull shark) of the family Carcharhinidae were found to have multiple, up to five, layers of prismatic calcium phosphate surrounding the cartilages. Smaller individuals of these species and other known species of living chondrichthyans have only one layer of prismatic calcium phosphate surrounding the cartilages, as also do most species of fossil chondrichthyans. Two exceptions are the fossil shark genera Xenacanthus and Tamiobatis. Where it is found in living forms, this multiple layered calcification does not appear to be phylogenetic, as it appears to be lacking in other lamnid and carcharhinid genera and species. Rather it appears to be functional, only appearing in larger individuals and species of these two groups, and hence may be necessary to strengthen the jaw cartilages of such individuals for biting.

  4. The complete mitochondrial genome of the great white shark, Carcharodon carcharias (Chondrichthyes, Lamnidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chia-Hao; Shao, Kwang-Tsao; Lin, Yeong-Shin; Fang, Yi-Chiao; Ho, Hsuan-Ching

    2014-10-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome of the great white shark having 16,744 bp and including 13 protein-coding genes, 2 ribosomal RNA, 22 transfer RNA genes, 1 replication origin region and 1 control region. The mitochondrial gene arrangement of the great white shark is the same as the one observed in the most vertebrates. Base composition of the genome is A (30.6%), T (28.7%), C (26.9%) and G (13.9%).

  5. Morphological description of Dipturus mennii (Chondrichthyes: Elasmobranchii: Rajidae and its differentiation from Dipturus trachyderma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renan A Moreira

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Squamation patterns and skeletal anatomy (neurocranium, visceral arches, synarcual cartilage, scapulocoracoid, puboischiadic bar, and mixopterigium of Dipturus mennii Gomes & Paragó, 2001 are described as a contribution to our limited knowledge of the anatomy of species of Dipturus Rafinesque, 1810. The hyoid and branchial arches, as well as the synarcual cartilage, are described for the first time in this species. We provide morphological comparisons of this species with Dipturus trachyderma (Krefft & Stehmann, 1975, a species that may be confused with D. mennii; we further corroborate, through anatomical features, that these species warrant separate taxonomic recognition. The main differences between D. mennii and D. trachyderma were found in squamation of the nuchal and middisc region, neurocranium, pectoral girdle, and principally the clasper skeleton. The morphology of the pelvic girdle is similar in both species. Dipturus is characterized by having the ventral terminal cartilage J-shaped (as opposed to the Z-shaped ventral terminal cartilage in Zearaja, whose species were, until recently, placed in Dipturus. Additional characters that may be derived for Dipturus include the anterior rostral groove and elevated rostral proportions

  6. The use of pelvic fins for benthic locomotion during foraging behavior in Potamotrygon motoro (Chondrichthyes: Potamotrygonidae

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    Akemi Shibuya

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Synchronized bipedal movements of the pelvic fins provide propulsion (punting during displacement on the substrate in batoids with benthic locomotion. In skates (Rajidae this mechanism is mainly generated by the crural cartilages. Although lacking these anatomical structures, some stingray species show modifications of their pelvic fins to aid in benthic locomotion. This study describes the use of the pelvic fins for locomotory performance and body re-orientation in the freshwater stingray Potamotrygon motoro (Müller & Henle, 1841 during foraging. Pelvic fin movements of juvenile individuals of P. motoro were recorded in ventral view by a high-speed camera at 250-500 fields/s-1. Potamotrygon motoro presented synchronous, alternating and unilateral movements of the pelvic fins, similar to those reported in skates. Synchronous movements were employed during straightforward motion for pushing the body off the substrate as well as for strike feeding, whereas unilateral movements were used to maneuver the body to the right or left during both locomotion and prey capture. Alternating movements of the pelvic fins are similar to bipedal movements in terrestrial and semi-aquatic tetrapods. The pelvic fins showed coordinated movements during feeding even when stationary, indicating that they have an important function in maintaining body posture (station holding during prey capture and manipulation. The use of pelvic fins during prey stalking may be advantageous because it results in less substrate disturbance when compared to movements generated by pectoral fin undulation. The range of pelvic fin movements indicates more complex control and coordination of the pelvic radial muscles.

  7. Structure and mechanical implications of the pectoral fin skeleton in the Longnose Skate (Chondrichthyes, Batoidea).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wei; Hongjamrassilp, Watcharapong; Jung, Jae-Young; Hastings, Philip A; Lubarda, Vlado A; McKittrick, Joanna

    2017-03-15

    Animal propulsion systems are believed to show high energy and mechanical efficiency in assisting movement compared to artificial designs. As an example, batoid fishes have very light cartilaginous skeletons that facilitate their elegant swimming via enlarged wing-like pectoral fins. The aim of this work is to illustrate the hierarchical structure of the pectoral fin of a representative batoid, the Longnose Skate (Raja rhina), and explain the mechanical implications of its structural design. At the macro level, the pectoral fins are comprised of radially oriented fin rays, formed by staggered mineralized skeletal elements stacked end-to-end. At the micro level, the midsection of each radial element is composed of three mineralized components, which consist of discrete segments (tesserae) that are mineralized cartilage and embedded in unmineralized cartilage. The radial elements are wrapped with aligned, unmineralized collagen fibers. This is the first report of the detailed structure of the ray elements, including the observation of a 3-chain mineralized tesserae. Structural analyses demonstrate that this configuration enhances stiffness in multiple directions. A two-dimensional numerical model based on the morphological analysis demonstrated that the tessera structure helps distributing shear, tensile and compressive stress more ideally, which can better support both lift and thrust forces when swimming without losing flexibility. Batoid fishes have very light cartilaginous skeletons that facilitate their elegant swimming by applying their enlarged wing-like pectoral fins. Previous studies have shown structural features and mechanical properties of the mineralized cartilage skeleton in various batoid fishes. However, the details of the pectoral fin structure at different length scales, as well as the relationship between the mechanical properties and structural design remains unknown. The present work illustrates the hierarchical structure of the pectoral fin of the Longnose Skate (a representative batoid fish) and verifies the materials configuration and structural design increases the stiffness of fin skeleton without a loss in flexibility. These results have implications for the design of strong but flexible materials and bio-inspired autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs). Copyright © 2017 Acta Materialia Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Reproductive biology of the southern thorny skate Amblyraja doellojuradoi (Chondrichthyes, Rajidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delpiani, G

    2016-04-01

    The total lengths (L(T)) of 193 males (209-556 mm) and 130 females (275-515 mm) of Amblyraja doellojuradoi, a commercial by-catch species on the Argentinean continental shelf, which are increasingly retained, were analysed. No sexual dimorphism was observed in the L(T) at which 50% of individuals were sexually mature; males matured at 448 mm and females at 411 mm, c. 80 and 82% of maximum L(T). The hepato-somatic index was similar among sexes, but significantly different between maturity stages, being lower in mature than immature specimens. Males had no seasonal difference in the hepato-somatic index and females had the lowest index in autumn. The gonado-somatic index was lower in males than in females and significantly higher in mature than immature specimens of both sexes. Males had the highest index in autumn and females had no seasonal difference. Collectively, these results would indicate that A. doellojuradoi breeds in autumn. © 2016 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.

  9. Historical and contemporary records of the angular rough shark Oxynotus centrina (Chondrichthyes; Oxynotidae in Turkish waters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. KABASAKAL

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available During the last 58 years, only 12 angular rough sharks were recorded in Turkish waters. Rare captures of the species in the area needs an immediate action for the conservation of O. centrina. To protect the habitat of O. centrina, strict regulations should be implemented for diving in the localities, where the angular rough sharks occur regularly. Protecting the habitat of the angular rough shark is an urgent need before subjecting O. centrina to 100% protection in the seas of Turkey.

  10. Shark tales: a molecular species-level phylogeny of sharks (Selachimorpha, Chondrichthyes).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vélez-Zuazo, Ximena; Agnarsson, Ingi

    2011-02-01

    Sharks are a diverse and ecologically important group, including some of the ocean's largest predatory animals. Sharks are also commercially important, with many species suffering overexploitation and facing extinction. However, despite a long evolutionary history, commercial, and conservation importance, phylogenetic relationships within the sharks are poorly understood. To date, most studies have either focused on smaller clades within sharks, or sampled taxa sparsely across the group. A more detailed species-level phylogeny will offer further insights into shark taxonomy, provide a tool for comparative analyses, as well as facilitating phylogenetic estimates of conservation priorities. We used four mitochondrial and one nuclear gene to investigate the phylogenetic relationships of 229 species (all eight Orders and 31 families) of sharks, more than quadrupling the number of taxon sampled in any prior study. The resulting Bayesian phylogenetic hypothesis agrees with prior studies on the major relationships of the sharks phylogeny; however, on those relationships that have proven more controversial, it differs in several aspects from the most recent molecular studies. The phylogeny supports the division of sharks into two major groups, the Galeomorphii and Squalimorphii, rejecting the hypnosqualean hypothesis that places batoids within sharks. Within the squalimorphs the orders Hexanchiformes, Squatiniformes, Squaliformes, and Pristiophoriformes are broadly monophyletic, with minor exceptions apparently due to missing data. Similarly, within Galeomorphs, the orders Heterodontiformes, Lamniformes, Carcharhiniformes, and Orectolobiformes are broadly monophyletic, with a couple of species 'misplaced'. In contrast, many of the currently recognized shark families are not monophyletic according to our results. Our phylogeny offers some of the first clarification of the relationships among families of the order Squaliformes, a group that has thus far received relatively little phylogenetic attention. Our results suggest that the genus Echinorhinus is not a squaliform, but rather related to the saw sharks, a hypothesis that might be supported by both groups sharing 'spiny' snouts. In sum, our results offer the most detailed species-level phylogeny of sharks to date and a tool for comparative analyses. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Assessing the relationships between phylogenetic and functional singularities in sharks (Chondrichthyes).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cachera, Marie; Le Loc'h, François

    2017-08-01

    The relationships between diversity and ecosystem functioning have become a major focus of science. A crucial issue is to estimate functional diversity, as it is intended to impact ecosystem dynamics and stability. However, depending on the ecosystem, it may be challenging or even impossible to directly measure ecological functions and thus functional diversity. Phylogenetic diversity was recently under consideration as a proxy for functional diversity. Phylogenetic diversity is indeed supposed to match functional diversity if functions are conservative traits along evolution. However, in case of adaptive radiation and/or evolutive convergence, a mismatch may appear between species phylogenetic and functional singularities. Using highly threatened taxa, sharks, this study aimed to explore the relationships between phylogenetic and functional diversities and singularities. Different statistical computations were used in order to test both methodological issue (phylogenetic reconstruction) and overall a theoretical questioning: the predictive power of phylogeny for function diversity. Despite these several methodological approaches, a mismatch between phylogeny and function was highlighted. This mismatch revealed that (i) functions are apparently nonconservative in shark species, and (ii) phylogenetic singularity is not a proxy for functional singularity. Functions appeared to be not conservative along the evolution of sharks, raising the conservational challenge to identify and protect both phylogenetic and functional singular species. Facing the current rate of species loss, it is indeed of major importance to target phylogenetically singular species to protect genetic diversity and also functionally singular species in order to maintain particular functions within ecosystem.

  12. Revision of the Xenacanthida (Chondrichthyes : Elasmobranchii) from the Carboniferous of the British Isles

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    Hampe, O. [Humboldt University, Berlin (Germany)

    2003-07-01

    Xenacanthids were a very successful group of elasmobranchs that ranged from the Lower Carboniferous to the Upper Triassic. The history of discovery of the xenacanthids, which is closely connected with the history of coal prospecting in England, began with the finding of the type specimen of Xenacanthus laevissimus in the Westphalian B of the West Midlands. In this first review of British Carboniferous xenacanthids, the number of taxa, mainly erected during Victorian times, is reduced to 14 species distributed among six genera. Determinable remains are recorded from at least 96 localities in the British Isles. Unique characteristics of the Dinantian Diplodoselache suggest that the lineage to which this taxon belongs marks a dead end in xenacanthid evolution. This investigation also shows that the Pendleian Dicentrodus, formerly described as Cladodus, belongs to the xenacanthids. The occurrence of Orthacanthus cf. kounoviensis in the Pennines, also known from the German Saar-Nahe basin, the Saale depression and from Bohemia, indicates a faunal exchange between these intramontainous basins during the Carboniferous. The genus Triodus is identified from British deposits for the first time. A cladistic analysis of the xenacanthids suggests that they evolved from phoebodontid elasmobranchs. This analysis also confirms separation of the Middle Devonian Antarctilamna from a relationship with xenacanthid sharks.

  13. Polonium-210 in cartilaginous fishes (Chondrichthyes) from south-eastern Australian waters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, D.J.; Towler, H.

    1993-01-01

    A study was made of the concentration of the naturally occurring radionuclide polonium-210 in the livers of cartilaginous fishes (chondrichthyans) caught in the waters of Port Phillip Bay, Victoria, Australia in 1991. Five elasmobranch species had 210 Po concentrations in the range 1-31 Bq kg -1 (wet weight) and one holocephalian species, the elephant fish (Callorhynchus milii), was exceptional with a 210 Po range of 60-270 Bq kg -1 (n-3, mean 180 Bq kg -1 ). Lead-210 was present at 0.1-1.1 Bq kg -1 and activity concentration ratios of 210 Po: 210 Pb were all greater than 1, indicating that the 210 Po could not all have grown in from in situ decay of 210 Pb within the chondrichthyan liver. The concentration of 210 Po in the livers appeared to be species related. Concentrations of the trace metals Cu, Fe and Zn showed no correlation with the 210 Po and were not species-related. The mean concentration of 210 Po measured in Port Phillip Bay water was 0.32 mBq kg -1 . This yields concentration factors of 3.2 x 10 3 to 8.4 x 10 5 for unsupported 210 Po in the livers of the chondrichthyans. The total 210 Po (using Q=20) exposes the livers to a weighted absorbed dose of up to 140 mGy year -1 (16 μGy h -1 ), which is >99% of the total internal dose and three orders of magnitude greater than the external dose based on estimated levels of 40 K. 18 refs., 3 tabs., 2 figs

  14. New Carcharhiniform Sharks (Chondrichthyes, Elasmobranchii) from the Early to Middle Eocene of Seymour Island, Antarctic Peninsula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelbrecht, Andrea; Mörs, Thomas; Reguero, Marcelo A.; Kriwet, Jürgen

    2018-01-01

    Seymour Island, Antarctic Peninsula, is known for its wealth of fossil remains. This island provides one of the richest fossiliferous Paleogene sequences in the world. Chondrichthyans seemingly dominate this Eocene marine fauna and offer a rare insight into high-latitude faunas during the Palaeogene. So far, only a few isolated teeth of carcharhinid sharks have been reported from Seymour Island. Bulk sampling in the well-exposed La Meseta and Submeseta formations yielded new and abundant chondrichthyan material, including numerous teeth of carcharhinid and triakid sharks. Here, we present a reevaluation of the previously described carcharhinid remains and a description of new taxa: Meridiogaleus cristatus, gen. et sp. nov., Kallodentis rythistemma, gen. et sp. nov., Abdounia richteri, sp. nov., and Abdounia mesetae, sp. nov. The carcharhiniforms Mustelus sp. and Galeorhinus sp. are reported based on rare material, whereas teeth previously assigned to Scoliodon represent a nomen dubium. PMID:29551850

  15. Evolutionary origins and development of saw-teeth on the sawfish and sawshark rostrum (Elasmobranchii; Chondrichthyes).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welten, Monique; Smith, Moya Meredith; Underwood, Charlie; Johanson, Zerina

    2015-09-01

    A well-known characteristic of chondrichthyans (e.g. sharks, rays) is their covering of external skin denticles (placoid scales), but less well understood is the wide morphological diversity that these skin denticles can show. Some of the more unusual of these are the tooth-like structures associated with the elongate cartilaginous rostrum 'saw' in three chondrichthyan groups: Pristiophoridae (sawsharks; Selachii), Pristidae (sawfish; Batoidea) and the fossil Sclerorhynchoidea (Batoidea). Comparative topographic and developmental studies of the 'saw-teeth' were undertaken in adults and embryos of these groups, by means of three-dimensional-rendered volumes from X-ray computed tomography. This provided data on development and relative arrangement in embryos, with regenerative replacement in adults. Saw-teeth are morphologically similar on the rostra of the Pristiophoridae and the Sclerorhynchoidea, with the same replacement modes, despite the lack of a close phylogenetic relationship. In both, tooth-like structures develop under the skin of the embryos, aligned with the rostrum surface, before rotating into lateral position and then attaching through a pedicel to the rostrum cartilage. As well, saw-teeth are replaced and added to as space becomes available. By contrast, saw-teeth in Pristidae insert into sockets in the rostrum cartilage, growing continuously and are not replaced. Despite superficial similarity to oral tooth developmental organization, saw-tooth spatial initiation arrangement is associated with rostrum growth. Replacement is space-dependent and more comparable to that of dermal skin denticles. We suggest these saw-teeth represent modified dermal denticles and lack the 'many-for-one' replacement characteristic of elasmobranch oral dentitions.

  16. Calliobothrium spp. (Eucestoda: Tetraphyllidea: Onchobothriidae) in Mustelus schmitti (Chondrichthyes: Carcharhiniformes) from Argentina and Uruguay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Verónica A; Brooks, Daniel R

    2002-12-01

    Three species of Calliobothrium inhabit the spiral intestine of Mustelus schmitti in Argentina and Uruguay. Calliobothrium verticillatum australis is redescribed and its taxonomic status modified to species as C. australis. Calliobothrium barbarae n. sp. can be distinguished from all other species of Calliobothrium, which are small bodied, nonlaciniate, and without accessory piece between the bases of axial hook, by worm length, number of segments, cocoon morphology, and hooks shape. Calliobothrium lunae n. sp. is different from other Calliobothrium spp., which are small bodied, nonlaciniate. and have an accessory piece, by the number of segments and testes, hook shape, cocoon morphology, and the presence of ciliumlike projections on the distal surface of muscular pads. Calliobothrium australis is clearly distinguished from other large-bodied, laciniate species of the genus by worm length, number of testes, ovary shape, cocoon morphology, hook shape, and in being hyperapolytic. The oioxenous specificity involving Calliobothrium spp. and Mustelus spp. described by previous authors is confirmed in this study.

  17. Echinobothrium notoguidoi n. sp. (Cestoda: Diphyllidea) from Mustelus schmitti (Chondrichthyes: Carcharhiniformes) in the Argentine Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, V A

    1997-10-01

    A new cestode, Echinobothrium notoguidoi n. sp., is described from the spiral intestine of the shark Mustelus schmitti, from coastal waters off Mar del Plata, Argentina. This species is distinguished from all others in the genus by a rostellar armature consisting of 2 apical groups of 31 large hooks each, arranged in 2 rows (16 anterior, 15 posterior) with 13 hooklets per side, a wide corona of 8-11 rows of spines posterior to the rostellum, 8 rows of 24-26 spines on the cephalic peduncle, and 11-15 testes per proglottid. The new species most closely resembles 2 congeners that also parasitize sharks, Echinobothrium musteli and Echinobothrium scoliodoni, on the basis of the armature of the rostellum and cephalic peduncle and the presence of a corona of small spines. Echinobothrium notoguidoi can be differentiated from E. musteli by the number of hooklets (3) and testes (22), and from E. scoliodoni by the number of large hooks (10-13), spines on the cephalic peduncle (> 100), and segments (40-50). Echinobothrium notoguidoi is clearly distinguished from Echinobothrium pigmentatum described previously from Zapteryx brevirostris in Argentine waters by the following combination of characters: corona of hooks lacking, possession of fewer apical hooks (20), hooklets in a continuous row instead of separate groups, fewer spines in the cephalic peduncle (9-13 per row), and fewer testes (5-7) per proglottid.

  18. A review of the genus Cephaloscyllium (Chondrichthyes: Carcharhiniformes: Scyliorhinidae) from Taiwanese waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakaya, Kazuhiro; Inoue, Shinsuke; Ho, Hsuan-Ching

    2013-01-01

    Sharks of the genus Cephaloscyllium from Taiwan were reviewed. After extensive survey of the specimens deposited in useums, universities and fisheries institutions in Taiwan and Japan, the following four species were recognized as valid n Taiwanese waters: C. umbratile Jordan & Fowler, 1903, C. fasciatum Chan, 1966, C. sarawakensis Yano, Ahmad & Gambang, 2005, and C. formosanum Teng, 1962. Cephaloscyllium formosanum is resurrected herein. Four species (C. circulopullum Yano, Ahmad & Gambang, 2005, C. parvum Inoue & Nakaya, 2006, C. pardelotum Schaaf-da Silva & Ebert, 2008, C. maculatum Schaaf-da Silva & Ebert, 2008) are concluded to be junior synonyms. The four valid species here recognized are fully described, and a key to Taiwanese species is provided. The original description of C. formosanum was translated into English from Japanese and is included as an Appendix.

  19. Scyliorhinus ugoi, a new species of catshark from Brazil (Chondrichthyes: Carcharhiniformes: Scyliorhinidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Karla D A; Gadig, Otto F B; Gomes, Ulisses L

    2015-03-25

    A new species of catshark (Carcharhiniformes, Scyliorhinidae), Scyliorhinus ugoi sp. nov., is described from off Northeastern and Southeastern Brazil. The new species is closest to the Scyliorhinus haeckelii/besnardi group and S. hesperius but differs in background coloration, head width, sexual maturity, and in cranial and body proportions.

  20. Introduction to the systematics and biodiversity of sharks, rays, and chimaeras (Chondrichthyes) of Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebert, David A; Ho, Hsuan-Ching; White, William T; De Carvalho, Marcelo R

    2013-01-01

    All 13 orders of chondrichthyan fishes occur in Taiwanese waters, representing 52 chondrichthyan families (31 shark, 19 batoid, 2 chimaeroid) and 98 genera (64 shark, 31 batoid, 3 chimaeroid). A total of 119 shark, 58 batoid, and 4 chimaera species may occur in the waters surrounding Taiwan, pending taxonomic resolution of some groups. Of the 34 nominally described species from Taiwan, 17 are currently considered valid. The majority of named species occurred during two peak periods in Taiwanese chondrichthyan research; the first between 1959-63, when 13 nominal species were described, of which 7 remain valid today, and a second peak period between 2003-13 when 9 nominal species were described, of which 6 remain valid. The overall species diversity of Taiwan's chondrichthyan fauna is comparable to that of other adjacent marine zoogeographic hotspots, e.g. Japan (126 shark, 75 batoid, 11 chimaeroid species) and the Philippines (81 shark, 46 batoid, 2 chimaeroid species). The Carcharhiniformes, Squaliformes, Myliobatiformes, and Rajiformes are the most dominant orders in terms of abundance and species-richness within this region. Each of these groups may increase in relative diversity with improved taxonomic resolution resulting from the incorporation of molecular tools and renewed morphological studies. Improved identification of Taiwan's chondrichthyan fauna will aid in developing better conservation and management practices.

  1. A review of the genus Apristurus (Chondrichthyes: Carcharhiniformes: Scyliorhinidae) from Taiwanese waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakaya, Kazuhiro; Kawauchi, Junro

    2013-01-01

    Sharks of the genus Apristurus from Taiwanese waters are reviewed for the first time, and incorrect scientific names and wrong taxonomic information given in the literature are corrected. After extensive examination of specimens deposited in various museums, universities and fisheries institutions in Taiwan, Japan and China, the following five species are recognized from Taiwanese waters: Apristurus herklotsi (Fowler, 1934), A. longicephalus Nakaya, 1975, A. gibbosus Meng, Chu & Li, 1985, A. macrostomus Chu, Meng & Li, 1985, and A. platyrhynchus (Tanaka, 1909). Apristurus herklotsi, A. longicephalus, A. gibbosus and A. macrostomus are reported from Taiwanese waters for the first time, and the presence of A. platyrhynchus is formally recognized based on a single voucher specimen. Each species is fully described, and a key to the species of Apristurus in Taiwanese waters is provided. Morphological and biological information of each species is also provided.

  2. Mandibular and hyoid muscles of Galeomorph sharks (Chondrichthyes: Elasmobranchii), with remarks on their phylogenetic intrarelationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Mateus C; de Carvalho, Marcelo R

    2013-10-01

    The superorder Galeomorph comprises the orders Heterodontiformes, Orectolobiformes, Lamniformes, and Carcharhiniformes. Recent morphological and molecular support that it is a monophyletic taxon. The phyletic relationship within the Galeomorphi are also well resolved. However, only few morphological characters of the mandibular and hyoid muscles have been employed, and a detailed description of these muscles and their variations may contribute new interpretations of homology and to the discussion of different hypothesis of intrarelationships. This paper provides a detailed description of mandibular and hyoid arch muscles in galeomorph sharks, within a comparative elasmobranch framework, with the objective to discuss putative homologies that may elucidate our understanding of galeomorph evolution. Twenty-eight galeomorph species were dissected, described, illustrated and compared with other elasmobranchs and with data from the literature. The Galeomorphi are supported as monophyletic by presenting the m. levator labii superioris attached directly to the neurocranium, different from the attachment through a tendon in basal squalomorphs. Heterodontiformes and Orectolobiformes share particular variations in the position and insertion of the m. levator labii superioris and the presence of a well-defined m. levator hyomandibulae. Lamniformes and Carcharhiniformes show similar patterns in the position and attachment of the m. levator labii superioris, subdivision of the m. adductor mandibulae, and the presence of an almost indivisible m. levator hyomandibulae and m. constrictor hyoideus dorsalis, similar to the condition, albeit independently, in basal squalomorphs. No specific mandibular or hyoid arch muscle character was found to support the clade composed of Orectolobiformes, Lamniformes, and Carcharhiniformes, as advocated by recent phylogenetic analyses. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Claves taxonómicas para el reconocimiento dentario en taxa del superorden Rajomorphii de Chile (Chondrichthyes, Batoidea Taxonomic dental keys for the Chilean taxa of the superorder Rajomorphii (Chondrichthyes, Batoidea

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    Sylvia Sáez

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Se presenta claves taxonómicas basadas en características morfológicas dentarias externas e internas, que permiten el reconocimiento de cada orden, familia y género de los batoídeos conocidos en Chile. En algunos casos, como en las familias Rhinobatidae, Torpedinidae, Narcinidae, Myliobatidae, Mobulidae, Dasyatidae y Urotrygonidae, las claves permiten el reconocimiento específico pero, en otros casos, sólo se puede discriminar hasta género, dadas las limitaciones impuestas por los conocimientos existentes. Estas claves son una herramienta complementaria a la diagnosis de rayas y están orientadas al reconocimiento de fragmentos dentales, hallazgos paleontológicos de dientes así como para las piezas dentales asociadas con la mandíbula. De esta manera, se entrega un apoyo taxonómico nuevo con características dentales diferentes a las consideradas actualmente para este superorden.A series of keys with external and internal dental morphologic features for the identification of each order, family and genus of rays and skates of the batoids known in Chile, are presented. In the case of families Rhinobatidae, Torpedinidae, Narcinidae, Myliobatidae, Mobulidae, Dasyatidae and Urotrygonidae, an identification at the species level is possible. In other cases, due to limitations imposed by the existing knowledge, only discrimination up to genus is allowed. These keys are a complementary tool for the diagnosis of rays suitable for the identification of dental fragments, paleontological discoveries of teeth as well as for jaw teeth. This tool offers a novel taxonomic support, which includes dental features different from those considered nowadays for this superorder.

  4. Diet of the freshwater stingray Potamotrygon motoro (Chondrichthyes: Potamotrygonidae on Marajó Island (Pará, Brazil Dieta da raia de água doce Potamotrygon motoro (Chondrichthyes: Potamotrygonidae na Ilha de Marajó (Pará, Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MP. Almeida

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The stomach contents of 137 examples of Potamotrygon motoro caught in 3 locations (Muaná, Afuá and Lake Arari on Marajó Island were analysed. The values of the Index of Relative Importance (IRI and its respective percentage (%IRI were calculated. The level of repletion 1 (¼ full was the most representative for both sexes, as well as for immature and mature specimens. Most of the food items found were well-digested. The food items identification indicated the presence of 15 orders, including insects, mollusks, crustaceans, annelids and fish. Differences in diet were observed among the locations studied when comparing %IRI, crustaceans being the most preferred in Afuá, fish in Lake Arari and mollusks in Muaná.O conteúdo estomacal de 137 exemplares de Potamotrygon motoro provenientes de 3 localidades (Muaná, Afuá e Lago Arari na ilha de Marajó foi analisado. Os valores do Índice Relativo de Importância (IRI e respectiva porcentagem (%IRI foram calculados. O nível de repleção 1 (¼ cheio foi o mais representativo para ambos os sexos, assim como para exemplares imaturos e maduros. A maioria dos itens alimentares analisados encontrava-se bastante digerido. A identificação dos itens alimentares indicou a presença de 15 ordens, incluindo insetos, moluscos, crustáceos, anelídeos e peixes. Diferenças na dieta entre os locais amostrados foram observadas ao se comparar as %IRI, sendo crustáceos o item preferencial em Afuá, peixes no Lago Arari e moluscos em Muaná.

  5. New specimens and records of chondrichthyan fishes (Vertebrata: Chondrichthyes off the Mexican Pacific coast Nuevos ejemplares y nuevos registros de peces cartilaginosos (Vertebrata: Chondrichthyes de la costa del Pacífico mexicano

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gorgonio Ruiz-Campos

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available New specimens and new records of occurrence for 10 species of chondrichthyan (elasmobranch and chimaeroid fishes previously unknown or little documented for the continental shelf of the Mexican Pacific are reported. This contribution provides the first record of Centroscyllium nigrum, Isurus paucus, and Bathyraja trachura for the Mexican Pacific, as well as new specimens of Hydrolagus colliei, Hexanchus griseus, Echinorhinus cookei, Pseudocarcharias kamoharai, and Raja velezi for the western coast of the Baja California Peninsula, including the intermediate record within the known distribution range for Apristurus kampae, and the southernmost record for Raja inornata.Se reportan nuevos ejemplares y nuevos registros de concurrencia para 10 especies de elasmobranquios previamente desconocidos o con muy poca documentación en aguas del Pacífico mexicano. Esta contribución ofrece el primer registro de Centroscyllium nigrum, Isurus paucus, y Bathyraja trachura en el Pacífico mexicano; así como nuevos ejemplares de Hydrolagus colliei, Hexanchus griseus, Echinorhinus cookei, Pseudocarcharias kamoharai y Raja velezi en la costa occidental de la península de Baja California, con la inclusión del registro intermedio en el ámbito de distribución conocida para Apristurus kampae, y el registro más meridional para Raja inornata.

  6. A new Xenacanthiformes shark (Chondrichthyes, Elasmobranchii from the Late Paleozoic Rio do Rasto Formation (Paraná Basin, Southern Brazil

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    VICTOR E. PAULIV

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The Brazilian records on Xenacanthiformes include teeth and cephalic spines from the Parnaíba, Amazonas and Paraná basins. This work describes a new species of Xenacanthidae, collected in an outcrop of Serrinha Member of Rio do Rasto Formation (Wordian to Wuchiapingian, Paraná Basin, municipality of Jacarezinho, State of Paraná. The teeth of the new species are two or three-cuspidated and the aboral surface show a smooth concavity and one rounded basal tubercle. The coronal surface presents one semi-spherical and subcircular coronal button, and also two lateral main cusps and one central (when present with less than one fifth of the size of the lateral cusps in the labial portion. The lateral cusps are asymmetric or symmetric, rounded in transversal section, lanceolate in longitudinal section, devoid of lateral carinae and lateral serrations, and with few smooth cristae of enameloid. In optical microscope the teeth show a trabecular dentine (osteodentine base, while the cusps are composed by orthodentine, and the pulp cavities are non-obliterated by trabecular dentine. The fossil assemblage in the same stratigraphical level and in the whole Rio do Rasto Formation indicates another freshwater record for xenacanthid sharks.

  7. The first Western Gondwanan species of Triodus Jordan 1849: A new Xenacanthiformes (Chondrichthyes) from the late Paleozoic of Southern Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauliv, Victor E.; Martinelli, Agustín G.; Francischini, Heitor; Dentzien-Dias, Paula; Soares, Marina B.; Schultz, Cesar L.; Ribeiro, Ana M.

    2017-12-01

    Triodus is a well-known genus of Xenacanthiformes, previously recorded from the late Bashkirian (Lower Pennsylvanian, Carboniferous) to the middle Artinskian (Cisuralian, Permian), mainly from Laurasian deposits (Europe and USA). For the first time, this genus is recorded from the Western Gondwana, based on isolated teeth that are referred to Triodus richterae sp. nov. The new species were found associated with other shark teeth (another xenacanthiforms and a possible euselachian), palaeoniscoid teeth and scales, labyrinthodont teeth, tetrapod bony remains, macroscopic charcoal and leaf fragments. This fossil assemblage was collected in a conglomerate layer from the Barro Alto site (São Gabriel municipality, Rio Grande do Sul State, Brazil), with an estimated Capitanian age, from the Morro Pelado Member, Rio do Rasto Formation, Paraná Basin. The new species has teeth with an almost oval base and the aboral surface has a smooth concavity and a rounded to horseshoe-shaped basal tubercle. The coronal surface of these teeth has a tricuspid crown, a rhomboid-shaped coronal button with rounded edges with a lingually directed shaft and some oral foramina predominantly situated at the lingual margin of the base and flanking the lingual shaft. The lateral cusps bear a variable number of non-branching vertical cristae, distributed from the apex to their proximal portion, making the transversal section of these cusps asterisk-shaped. Microstructurally, these teeth have both base and cusps composed of orthodentine with an opened pulp cavity. T. richterae sp. nov. represents the youngest species of Triodus, considering it comes from Capitanian (late Guadalupian) beds, which are at least 15 Ma younger than T. kraetschmeri, the previously youngest species of this genus. The depositional interpretation, as well as the fossil assemblage in the type locality of the new species and of the Rio do Rasto Formation as a whole, indicates another freshwater record for xenacanthid sharks.

  8. A new Xenacanthiformes shark (Chondrichthyes, Elasmobranchii) from the Late Paleozoic Rio do Rasto Formation (Paraná Basin), Southern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauliv, Victor E; Dias, Eliseu V; Sedor, Fernando A; Ribeiro, Ana Maria

    2014-03-01

    The Brazilian records on Xenacanthiformes include teeth and cephalic spines from the Parnaíba, Amazonas and Paraná basins. This work describes a new species of Xenacanthidae, collected in an outcrop of Serrinha Member of Rio do Rasto Formation (Wordian to Wuchiapingian), Paraná Basin, municipality of Jacarezinho, State of Paraná. The teeth of the new species are two or three-cuspidated and the aboral surface show a smooth concavity and one rounded basal tubercle. The coronal surface presents one semi-spherical and subcircular coronal button, and also two lateral main cusps and one central (when present) with less than one fifth of the size of the lateral cusps in the labial portion. The lateral cusps are asymmetric or symmetric, rounded in transversal section, lanceolate in longitudinal section, devoid of lateral carinae and lateral serrations, and with few smooth cristae of enameloid. In optical microscope the teeth show a trabecular dentine (osteodentine) base, while the cusps are composed by orthodentine, and the pulp cavities are non-obliterated by trabecular dentine. The fossil assemblage in the same stratigraphical level and in the whole Rio do Rasto Formation indicates another freshwater record for xenacanthid sharks.

  9. Paratrygon aiereba (Müller & Henle, 1841: the senior synonym of the freshwater stingray disceus thayeri Garman, 1913 (chondrichthyes: potamotrygonidae

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    Ricardo S. Rosa

    1990-01-01

    Full Text Available A review of the original descriptions and available types of the South American freshwater stingrays Trygon aiereba Müller & Henle, 1841, Trygon strogylopterus Schomburgk, 1843 and Disceus thayeri Garman, 1913 indicates that these three nominal species are synonymous. The senior name, placed in the monotypic genus Paratrygon Duméril, 1865, established for Trygon aiereba, is available and valid. Based on its description, T. aiereba is a freshwater stingray. Therefore, this taxon is not the same as Raja ajereba Walbaum and Raja orbicularis Schneider, both names established for the marine "Aiereba" of Marcgrave, and which preferably should be treated as nomina dubia. Paratrygon does not replace Potamotrygon Garman, 1877 as the type genus, because the family name Potamotrygonidae Garman, 1877 has priority over Paratrygonidade Gill, 1893.A revisão das descrições originais e dos tipos existentes das raias de água doce Trygon aiereba Müller & Henle, 1841, Trygon strogylopterus Schomburgk, 1843, e Disceus thayeri Garman, 1913, indica que essas três espécies nominais são sinônimas. O nome sênior, colocado no gênero monotípico Paratrygon Duméril, 1865, estabelecido para T. aiereba, é disponível e válido. A descrição de T. aiereba corresponde claramente a uma raia de agua doce; portanto esta espécie não é um sinônimo de Raja ajereba Walbaum e de Raja orbicularis Schneider, ambos os nomes propostos para a "Aiereba " marinha de Marcgrave, e que preferivelmente devem ser tratados como nomina dubia. Paratrygon não substitui Potamotrygon Garman, 1877 como gênero-tipo, porque o nome de família Potamotrygonidae Garman, 1877 tem prioridade sobre Paratrygonidae Gill. 1893.

  10. Scyphophyllidium uruguayense n. sp. (Eucestoda: Tetraphyllidea) in Mustelus mento (Cope, 1877) (Chondrichthyes: Carcharhiniformes: Triakidae) from La Paloma, Uruguay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, D R; Marques, F; Perroni, C; Sidagis, C

    1999-06-01

    A new species of Scyphophyllidium inhabits Mustelus mento near La Paloma, Uruguay. It resembles Scyphophyllidium giganteum from the Atlantic Ocean and specimens identified as S. giganteum from California by having anapolytic strobilae 155-258 mm long, 250-300 craspedote proglottids, scoleces 1.2-1.4 mm wide, necks 34-41 mm long, immature and mature proglottids wider than long, gravid proglottids wider than long to longer than wide, genital pores averaging 28% of proglottid length from the anterior end, relatively flat ovaries with digitiform lobes reaching the lateralmost extent of the testicular field, vitellaria in 2 fields converging toward the proglottid midline, straight and short cirrus sacs, and postvaginal vas deferens. The bothridia of the new species have accessory bothridial suckers that are smaller than those of California specimens; European specimens reportedly lack accessory bothridial suckers. The new species possesses a uterine duct that joins the uterus at the level of the genital atrium and ventral osmoregulatory ducts medial rather than lateral to the dorsal ducts, an arrangement described for Californian but not European specimens. It differs from both European and Californian specimens by having longer cirri, more testes per proglottid, prominent scales covering the neck, and vaginae and uterine ducts coiled immediately preovarially. Pithophorus, Marsupiobothrium, and Scyphophyllidium may form a clade.

  11. A new paleozoic Symmoriiformes (Chondrichthyes from the late Carboniferous of Kansas (USA and cladistic analysis of early chondrichthyans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan Pradel

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The relationships of cartilaginous fishes are discussed in the light of well preserved three-dimensional Paleozoic specimens. There is no consensus to date on the interrelationship of Paleozoic chondrichthyans, although three main phylogenetic hypotheses exist in the current literature: 1. the Paleozoic shark-like chondrichthyans, such as the Symmoriiformes, are grouped along with the modern sharks (neoselachians into a clade which is sister group of holocephalans; 2. the Symmoriiformes are related to holocephalans, whereas the other Paleozoic shark-like chondrichthyans are related to neoselachians; 3. many Paleozoic shark-like chondrichthyans, such as the Symmoriiformes, are stem chondrichthyans, whereas stem and crown holocephalans are sister group to the stem and crown neoselachians in a crown-chondrichthyan clade. This third hypothesis was proposed recently, based mainly on dental characters. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: On the basis of two well preserved chondrichthyan neurocrania from the Late Carboniferous of Kansas, USA, we describe here a new species of Symmoriiformes, Kawichthys moodiei gen. et sp. nov., which was investigated by means of computerized X-ray synchrotron microtomography. We present a new phylogenetic analysis based on neurocranial characters, which supports the third hypothesis and corroborates the hypothesis that crown-group chondrichthyans (Holocephali+Neoselachii form a tightly-knit group within the chondrichthyan total group, by providing additional, non dental characters. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results highlight the importance of new well preserved Paleozoic fossils and new techniques of observation, and suggest that a new look at the synapomorphies of the crown-group chondrichthyans would be worthwhile in terms of understanding the adaptive significance of phylogenetically important characters.

  12. Functional analysis of the musculo-skeletal system of the gill apparatus in Heptranchias perlo (Chondrichthyes: Hexanchidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kryukova, Nadezhda V

    2017-08-01

    Musculo-skeletal morphology is an indispensable source for understanding functional adaptations. Analysis of morphology of the branchial apparatus of Hexanchiform sharks can provide insight into aspects of their respiration that are difficult to observe directly. In this study, I compare the structure of the musculo-skeletal system of the gill apparatus of Heptranchias perlo and Squalus acanthias in respect to their adaptation for one of two respiratory mechanisms known in sharks, namely, the active two-pump (oropharyngeal and parabranchial) ventilation and the ram-jet ventilation. In both species, the oropharyngeal pump possesses two sets of muscles, one for compression and the other for expansion. The parabranchial pump only has constrictors. Expansion of this pump occurs only due to passive elastic recoil of the extrabranchial cartilages. In Squalus acanthias the parabranchial chambers are large and equipped by powerful superficial constrictors. These muscles and the outer walls of the parabranchial chambers are much reduced in Heptranchias perlo, and thus it likely cannot use this pump. However, this reduction allows for vertical elongation of outer gill slits which, along with greater number of gill pouches, likely decreases branchial resistance and, at the same time, increases the gill surface area, and can be regarded as an adaptation for ram ventilation at lower speeds. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Taxonomy and morphology of species of the genus Squalus Linnaeus, 1758 from the Southwestern Atlantic Ocean (Chondrichthyes: Squaliformes: Squalidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viana, Sarah T De F; Carvalho, Marcelo R De; Gomes, Ulisses L

    2016-07-04

    Squalus is a genus of reportedly cosmopolitan shark species that have a high taxonomic complexity due to difficulties in their morphological differentiation; many of its species need revision. Currently, there are 26 valid species of Squalus, which have been divided into three species-groups according to overall morphological similarity, the S. acanthias, S. megalops, and S. mitsukurii groups. Loss of type specimens, propagation of erroneous identifications in the literature, and difficulties in obtaining representative series for comparison are secondary challenges that have impeded a global taxonomic revision of the genus. This problem applies clearly to species from the Southwestern Atlantic Ocean, including species that occur off Brazil. Following a current global tendency, a regional taxonomic revision of Squalus was conducted in order to investigate which species are valid in the Southwestern Atlantic Ocean and provide diagnostic morphological characters that can be efficiently used for identifying species. Comparative detailed analysis of external (e.g. morphometrics, dentition, and color pattern) and skeletal morphology (primarily meristic data, neurocrania and claspers) of specimens of Squalus from the region revealed four new species that are herein described (S. albicaudus sp. nov., S. bahiensis sp. nov., S. lobularis sp. nov., and S. quasimodo sp. nov.), as well as S. acanthias, which is redescribed from the region based on new material. Comparisons are offered based on examinations of congeneric species; this work is part of a global systematic revision of Squalus.

  14. Redescription of Paraleptus chiloscyllii Yin et Zhang, 1983 (Nematoda: Physalopteridae) from the Arabian carpetshark Chiloscyllium arabicum (Chondrichthyes: Hemiscylliidae) off Iraq

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    González-Solís, David; Ali, A. H.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 60, č. 4 (2015), s. 759-766 ISSN 1230-2821 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP505/12/G112 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Arabian Gulf * elasmobranchs * nematode Subject RIV: GJ - Animal Vermins ; Diseases, Veterinary Medicine Impact factor: 1.293, year: 2015

  15. DNA barcoding unveils skate (Chondrichthyes: Rajidae) species diversity in 'ray' products sold across Ireland and the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, Andrew Mark; Miller, Dana D; Egan, Aaron; Fox, Jennifer; Greenfield, Adam; Mariani, Stefano

    2013-01-01

    Skates are widely consumed across the globe, but many large species are subject to considerable concern regarding their conservation and management. Within Europe such issues have recently driven policy changes so that, for the first time, reports of skate landings now have to be made under species-specific names. Total allowable catches have also been established for many groups, which have been set to zero for a number of the most vulnerable species (e.g., Dipturus batis, Raja undulata and Rostoraja alba). Whilst accurate species identification has become an important issue for landings, the sale of skates is still usually made under a blanket term of "skate" or "ray". The matter of identifying species of skate is further complicated by their morphologically conservative nature and the fact that they are commercially valued for their wings. Thus, before sale their bodies are usually discarded (i.e., "winged") and often skinned, making morphological identification impossible. For the first time, DNA barcoding (of the mitochondrial COI gene) was applied to samples of skate wings from retail outlets across the British Isles, providing insight into which species are sold for consumption. A total of 98 wing samples were analysed, revealing that six species were sold; blonde ray (Raja brachyura), spotted ray (Raja montagui), thornback ray (Raja clavata), cuckoo ray (Leucoraja naevus) small-eyed ray (Raja microocellata) and shagreen ray (Leucoraja fullonica). Statistical testing demonstrated that there were significant differences in the species sold in the distinct retail groups which suggests complex drivers behind the patterns of sale in skates. The results also indicate that endangered species are not commonly being passed on to consumers. In addition, the practice of selling skate wings under ambiguous labels is highlighted as it makes it extremely difficult for consumers to exercise a right to avoid species of conservation concern. Interestingly, a single retailer chain labelled their wings as originating from three smaller-growing species (generally to be considered of lower conservation concern); of the six samples analysed from this company a third were mislabelled and originated from the thornback ray (a larger species that is currently undergoing population declines).

  16. Reproductive biology of Sympterygia bonapartii (Chondrichthyes: Rajiformes: Arhynchobatidae in San Matías Gulf, Patagonia, Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María L. Estalles

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT This study estimates and analyses the reproductive parameters and cycle of Sympterygia bonapartii in San Matías Gulf, northern Patagonia, Argentina. A total of 827 males and 1,299 females were analysed. Males ranged from 185 to 687 mm of total length (TL and females from 180 to 742 mm TL. Sexual dimorphism was detected; females were larger, heavier, exhibited heavier livers, wider discs and matured at lager sizes than males. Immature females ranged from 180 to 625 mm TL, maturing females from 408 to 720 mm TL, mature ones from 514 to 742 mm TL and females with egg capsules from 580 to 730 mm TL. Immature males ranged from 185 to 545 mm TL, maturing ones from 410 to 620 mm TL and mature males from 505 to 687 mm TL. Size at which 50% of the skates reached maturity was estimated to be 545 mm TL for males and 594 mm TL for females. According to the reproductive indexes analysed, S. bonapartii exhibited a seasonal reproductive pattern. Mating may occur during winter-early spring and the egg-laying season, during spring and summer.

  17. Food habits of the broad nose skate, Bathyraja brachyurops (Chondrichthyes, Rajidae, in the south-west Atlantic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro Belleggia

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Food habits of Bathyraja brachyurops were studied based on stomach content analyses of 346 specimens collected from research cruises carried out from 2003 to 2005 on the Argentinean continental shelf (36ºS-55ºS. A total of 265 stomachs (76.6% contained food, and thirty-five taxonomic levels of prey were identified. The most important prey were fishes followed by isopods. Trophic level analysis revealed that B. brachyurops is a tertiary consumer throughout its life history. There were no differences between sexes and regions in the diet composition, but dietary shifts with ontogeny were found. The Levins’ standardized index indicated wider niche breadth for small skates, whereas larger skate specimens showed a narrow niche breadth with a specialization in fishes.

  18. DNA barcoding unveils skate (Chondrichthyes: Rajidae) species diversity in ‘ray’ products sold across Ireland and the UK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egan, Aaron; Fox, Jennifer; Greenfield, Adam; Mariani, Stefano

    2013-01-01

    Skates are widely consumed across the globe, but many large species are subject to considerable concern regarding their conservation and management. Within Europe such issues have recently driven policy changes so that, for the first time, reports of skate landings now have to be made under species-specific names. Total allowable catches have also been established for many groups, which have been set to zero for a number of the most vulnerable species (e.g., Dipturus batis, Raja undulata and Rostoraja alba). Whilst accurate species identification has become an important issue for landings, the sale of skates is still usually made under a blanket term of “skate” or “ray”. The matter of identifying species of skate is further complicated by their morphologically conservative nature and the fact that they are commercially valued for their wings. Thus, before sale their bodies are usually discarded (i.e., “winged”) and often skinned, making morphological identification impossible. For the first time, DNA barcoding (of the mitochondrial COI gene) was applied to samples of skate wings from retail outlets across the British Isles, providing insight into which species are sold for consumption. A total of 98 wing samples were analysed, revealing that six species were sold; blonde ray (Raja brachyura), spotted ray (Raja montagui), thornback ray (Raja clavata), cuckoo ray (Leucoraja naevus) small-eyed ray (Raja microocellata) and shagreen ray (Leucoraja fullonica). Statistical testing demonstrated that there were significant differences in the species sold in the distinct retail groups which suggests complex drivers behind the patterns of sale in skates. The results also indicate that endangered species are not commonly being passed on to consumers. In addition, the practice of selling skate wings under ambiguous labels is highlighted as it makes it extremely difficult for consumers to exercise a right to avoid species of conservation concern. Interestingly, a single retailer chain labelled their wings as originating from three smaller-growing species (generally to be considered of lower conservation concern); of the six samples analysed from this company a third were mislabelled and originated from the thornback ray (a larger species that is currently undergoing population declines). PMID:24024082

  19. DNA barcoding unveils skate (Chondrichthyes: Rajidae species diversity in ‘ray’ products sold across Ireland and the UK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Mark Griffiths

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Skates are widely consumed across the globe, but many large species are subject to considerable concern regarding their conservation and management. Within Europe such issues have recently driven policy changes so that, for the first time, reports of skate landings now have to be made under species-specific names. Total allowable catches have also been established for many groups, which have been set to zero for a number of the most vulnerable species (e.g., Dipturus batis, Raja undulata and Rostoraja alba. Whilst accurate species identification has become an important issue for landings, the sale of skates is still usually made under a blanket term of “skate” or “ray”. The matter of identifying species of skate is further complicated by their morphologically conservative nature and the fact that they are commercially valued for their wings. Thus, before sale their bodies are usually discarded (i.e., “winged” and often skinned, making morphological identification impossible. For the first time, DNA barcoding (of the mitochondrial COI gene was applied to samples of skate wings from retail outlets across the British Isles, providing insight into which species are sold for consumption. A total of 98 wing samples were analysed, revealing that six species were sold; blonde ray (Raja brachyura, spotted ray (Raja montagui, thornback ray (Raja clavata, cuckoo ray (Leucoraja naevus small-eyed ray (Raja microocellata and shagreen ray (Leucoraja fullonica. Statistical testing demonstrated that there were significant differences in the species sold in the distinct retail groups which suggests complex drivers behind the patterns of sale in skates. The results also indicate that endangered species are not commonly being passed on to consumers. In addition, the practice of selling skate wings under ambiguous labels is highlighted as it makes it extremely difficult for consumers to exercise a right to avoid species of conservation concern. Interestingly, a single retailer chain labelled their wings as originating from three smaller-growing species (generally to be considered of lower conservation concern; of the six samples analysed from this company a third were mislabelled and originated from the thornback ray (a larger species that is currently undergoing population declines.

  20. Stomach contents and notes on the reproduction of the Onefin Skate Gurgesiella dorsalifera (Chondrichthyes: Rajidae off Southern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Getulio Rincon

    Full Text Available The Brazilian endemic deep-water onefin skate (Gurgesiella dorsalifera is a rare small species recently described in the 80's. No biological information is available on this species and its extremely restricted geographic distribution has been used to classify it as a vulnerable species under IUCN red list criteria. Twenty four specimens (115 to 207 mm disc width were captured off southern Brazilian coast at the region of Cape Santa Marta Grande (State of Santa Catarina by deep-water otter trawl (430-524 m. The analysis of stomach contents revealed an apparent opportunistic predation on juveniles of Urophycis brasiliensis (IRI = 6944, with an average total length of 21 mm, followed by mysidaceans (IRI = 2938, unidentified teleosts (IRI = 1969, the copepod Bradyidius plinioi (IRI = 393, and decapod crustaceans (IRI = 297. One mature female with 207 mm DW had two egg cases in its uteri.

  1. Exploited but Unevaluated: DNA Barcoding Reveals Skates and Stingrays (Chordata, Chondrichthyes Species Landed in the Indonesian Fish Market

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hawis Madduppa

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Reliable and precise species identification is important to fisheries management and conservation. However, many rays and skates in Indonesia are currently being exploited and landed into traditional fish market without a proper identification. Therefore, this study was conducted to identify species of skates and stingrays that were landed and traded in three fish markets in Indonesia (Palabuhanratu, Muara Saban, and Lampung using molecular techniques and to determine the conservation status of the identified species based on IUCN (International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources as well as defined by CITES (Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species. The mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase I (COI gene was amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR using a pair of primer, fish-BCL and fish-BCH. Of 29 tissue samples collected from the study sites, a total of five species were successfully identified: Dipturus chilensis (4, Himantura walga (1, Neotrygon kuhlii (11, Taeniura lymma (9 and Rhinoptera javanica (4. The Neighbor Joining phylogeny of mitochondrial lineages, based on partial COI gene sequences, the ingroup haplotypes were clustered into five main clades representing each species. The identified stingrays were being listed as vulnerable (D. chilensis and R. javanica, near threatened (H. walga and T. lymma, and data deficient (N. kuhlii by IUCN, with two species (D. chilensis and H. walga population were indicated decreased. Unfortunately, all of identified species have not been evaluated by CITES regarding their trade status. As a consequences, a valuable effort should be placed to create a scientific network for monitoring programmes not only on a local scale, and to make pressure on governments for adopting molecular techniques as tools for controlling and avoiding misidentification. Keywords: Mitochondrial DNA, Phylogeny, Coral Triangle, Taxonomy, Fisheries

  2. Taxonomic review of catsharks of the Scyliorhinus haeckelii group, with the description of a new species (Chondrichthyes: Carcharhiniformes: Scyliorhinidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Karla D A; Gomes, Ulisses L; Carvalho, Marcelo R De

    2016-01-19

    Sharks of the genus Scyliorhinus from the southwestern Atlantic are reviewed; identification problems and taxonomic misinformation given in the literature are rectified. After extensive examination of the external and internal morphology of specimens collected mostly off southeastern and southern Brazil, Scyliorhinus besnardi Springer & Sadowsky, 1970 is placed in the synonymy of S. haeckelii (Miranda Ribeiro, 1907), which is thoroughly redescribed. Additionally, a new species, Scyliorhinus cabofriensis, sp. nov., is described from the state of Rio de Janeiro, distinguished from all southwestern Atlantic congeners by its color pattern, clasper and neurocranial morphology, and proportional measurements. A key to Scyliorhinus species occurring in the southwestern Atlantic is also provided.

  3. Apristurus breviventralis, a new species of deep-water catshark (Chondrichthyes: Carcharhiniformes: Scyliorhinidae) from the Gulf of Aden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawauchi, Junro; Weigmann, Simon; Nakaya, Kazuhiro

    2014-11-03

    A new deep-water catshark of the genus Apristurus Garman, 1913 is described based on nine specimens from the Gulf of Aden in the northwestern Indian Ocean. Apristurus breviventralis sp. nov. belongs to the 'brunneus group' of the genus and is characterized by having pectoral-fin tips reaching beyond the midpoint between the paired fin bases, a much shorter pectoral-pelvic space than the anal-fin base, a low and long-based anal fin, and a first dorsal fin located behind pelvic-fin insertion. The new species most closely resembles the western Atlantic species Apristurus canutus, but is distinguishable in having greater nostril length than internarial width and longer claspers in adult males. Apristurus breviventralis sp. nov. represents the sixth species of Apristurus from the western Indian Ocean and the 38th species globally. 

  4. New tropical carcharhinids (chondrichthyes, carcharhiniformes) from the late Eocene early Oligocene of Balochistan, Pakistan: Paleoenvironmental and paleogeographic implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adnet, S.; Antoine, P.-O.; Hassan Baqri, S. R.; Crochet, J.-Y.; Marivaux, L.; Welcomme, J.-L.; Métais, G.

    2007-04-01

    New selachians (sharks and rays) have been collected from several late Eocene and early Oligocene marine localities in the Bugti Hills (Balochistan, Pakistan). Two new species of Requiem sharks (close to the Recent "Bull shark") are described : Carcharhinus balochensis and Carcharhinus perseus. The rest of the fauna is notable for the strong representation of Carcharhiniformes. These selachian faunas represent a unique tropical association for the Oligocene period and one of the first modern tropical selachian faunas, with modern taxa such as the two new species of "Bull sharks", Negaprion sp. and one of the first occurrences of Sphyrna sp. Moreover, these faunas permit paleoenvironmental interpretation of adjacent land masses. The relatively modern aspect of these faunas, compared with other contemporaneous and younger selachian associations from Atlantic and Mediterranean seas, suggests biogeographic isolation of selachian communities living in eastern and western parts of the Tethys before its final closure during the early-middle Miocene.

  5. Annotated checklist of the living sharks, batoids and chimaeras (Chondrichthyes) of the world, with a focus on biogeographical diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weigmann, S

    2016-03-01

    An annotated checklist of the chondrichthyan fishes (sharks, batoids and chimaeras) of the world is presented. As of 7 November 2015, the number of species totals 1188, comprising 16 orders, 61 families and 199 genera. The checklist includes nine orders, 34 families, 105 genera and 509 species of sharks; six orders, 24 families, 88 genera and 630 species of batoids (skates and rays); one order, three families, six genera and 49 species of holocephalans (chimaeras). The most speciose shark orders are the Carcharhiniformes with 284 species, followed by the Squaliformes with 119. The most species-rich batoid orders are the Rajiformes with 285 species and the Myliobatiformes with 210. This checklist represents the first global checklist of chondrichthyans to include information on maximum size, geographic and depth distributions, as well as comments on taxonomically problematic species and recent and regularly overlooked synonymizations. Furthermore, a detailed analysis of the biogeographical diversity of the species across 10 major areas of occurrence is given, including updated figures for previously published hotspots of chondrichthyan biodiversity, providing the detailed numbers of chondrichthyan species per major area, and revealing centres of distribution for several taxa. © 2016 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.

  6. Parmaturus nigripalatum n. sp., a new species of deep-sea catshark (Chondrichthyes: Carcharhiniformes: Scyliorhinidae) from Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahmi, Fahmi; Ebert, David A

    2018-04-23

    Parmaturus nigripalatum, a new species of catshark of the genus Parmaturus is described from a single specimen collected from a deep-water shark longliner operating in south Sumbawa waters, Indonesia. This new species is distinguished from its closest geographic congener P. lanatus by having prominent enlarged caudal crests, well-developed labial furrows with the uppers and lowers of equal lengths, mouth roof blackish with dark pores, first dorsal fin origin more posteriorly positioned on body trunk, and much lower tooth counts than all other known Parmaturus species. This is the second Parmaturus species recorded from Indonesian waters.

  7. As abalone grow, they change their habitat and be- haviour ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    spamer

    rock lobster Jasus lalandii, which eat sea urchins, have been ... change with abalone size (McCormick et al. 1994), .... rock faces. Any boulder too large to roll was classified as a ..... Social behaviour of juvenile red sea urchins, Strongylo-.

  8. Reproductive biology and diet of Mustelus punctulatus (Risso, 1826 (Chondrichthyes: Triakidae from the Gulf of Gabès, central Mediterranean Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bechir Saïdi

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Specimens of Mustelus punctulatus were collected between January 2002 and December 2005 from commercial fisheries in the Gulf of Gabès (central Mediterranean Sea. Males and females reached a maximum total length (TL of 111 and 122 cm respectively. Males matured between 76 and 88.5 cm TL, with a size at maturity (TL50 of 81.4 cm TL. Females matured between 88 and 100 cm TL with a TL50 of 95.6 cm. Females had an annual reproductive cycle. Mating occurred through late-May and June. Ovulation occurred from early July to mid-August with parturition occurring from mid-May to early June, after a gestation period of 11 months. The size at birth was estimated to be 24.5 to 30.5 cm TL. Positive linear relationships were detected between the TL of mature females and ovarian and uterine fecundities. Mustelus punctulatus is an opportunistic predator that consumes a wide range of demersal and benthic prey items. It preys mainly on crustaceans, teleosts and molluscs. Polychaetes, sipunculids, echinoderms and tunicates are also consumed. The species change their main food item as they grow, from crustaceans to teleosts then to molluscs.

  9. Review of the enigmatic Eocene shark genus Xiphodolamia (Chondrichthyes, Lamniformes) and description of a new species recovered from Angola, Iran and Jordan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adnet, S.; Hosseinzadeh, R.; Antunes, M. T.; Balbino, A. C.; Kozlov, V. A.; Cappetta, H.

    2009-10-01

    Little is known about the extinct Xiphodolamia, a peculiar lamnid shark which inhabited the Eocene seas. The reexamination of a large set of fossilized teeth specimens from the Ypresian of Kazakhstan has enabled the reconstitution of the tooth series of this enigmatic taxa of lamnid shark. Five distinct tooth morphologies seem to occur in X. ensis Leidy [Leidy, J., 1877. Description of vertebrate remains, chiefly from the phosphate beds of South Carolina. Journal of the Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia 8, 209-261] species revealing a weak ontogenetic variation. Such specific variation in tooth shape means that the other described species may be their junior synonyms. Dental morphology perfectly conforms with a Lamniforme but does not prove the current attribution to the Lamnidae family due to some inconsistent dental features observed, such as the presence of symphysial teeth. This genus could be regarded as an old lineage branched from the stem group of Lamnidae, close to the Isuroids sharks. Several Xiphodolamia teeth, originating both from old collections and new acquisitions, are reported and illustrated in order to provide information about a new species described here: Xiphodolamia serrata nov. sp. This species, currently limited to deposits in Angola, Jordan and Iran and dated at the Late Eocene, is easily distinguishable from the Early-Middle Eocene material belonging to the genus by the presence of serrated cutting edges. Adding to the type species considered here as the only valid taxa during the Early-Middle Eocene period, the temporal range of this genus extends to the Late Eocene, thus setting its upper stratigraphic limit prior to its disappearance as enigmatic as its appearance in the Early Eocene was.

  10. Towards sustainable fishery management for skates in South America: The genetic population structure of Zearaja chilensis and Dipturus trachyderma (Chondrichthyes, Rajiformes in the south-east Pacific Ocean.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Vargas-Caro

    Full Text Available The longnose skates (Zearaja chilensis and Dipturus trachyderma are the main component of the elasmobranch fisheries in the south-east Pacific Ocean. Both species are considered to be a single stock by the fishery management in Chile however, little is known about the level of demographic connectivity within the fishery. In this study, we used a genetic variation (560 bp of the control region of the mitochondrial genome and ten microsatellite loci to explore population connectivity at five locations along the Chilean coast. Analysis of Z. chilensis populations revealed significant genetic structure among off-shore locations (San Antonio, Valdivia, two locations in the Chiloé Interior Sea (Puerto Montt and Aysén and Punta Arenas in southern Chile. For example, mtDNA haplotype diversity was similar across off-shore locations and Punta Arenas (h = 0.46-0.50, it was significantly different to those in the Chiloé Interior Sea (h = 0.08. These results raise concerns about the long-term survival of the species within the interior sea, as population resilience will rely almost exclusively on self-recruitment. In contrast, little evidence of genetic structure was found for D. trachyderma. Our results provide evidence for three management units for Z. chilensis, and we recommend that separate management arrangements are required for each of these units. However, there is no evidence to discriminate the extant population of Dipturus trachyderma as separate management units. The lack of genetic population subdivision for D. trachyderma appears to correspond with their higher dispersal ability and more offshore habitat preference.

  11. Peces Chimaeriformes (Chondrichthyes, Holocephali) del Neógeno de la Formación Bahía Inglesa (Región de Atacama, Chile)

    OpenAIRE

    Suárez, Mario E.; Lamilla, Julio; Marquardt, Carlos

    2004-01-01

    Se describen los primeros restos fósiles de peces condrictios holocéfalos para el Neógeno de la Formación Bahía Inglesa, Atacama, Chile. El material comprende una placa dental palatina y un mandibular que fueron recolectados al sureste de Caldera desde niveles fosilíferos asignados al Mioceno Medio-Mioceno tardío. Rasgos morfológicos característicos y comparaciones con otras placas de quimeras callorrínquidas, actuales y fósiles, permiten designar el material como Callorhinchus sp. The fir...

  12. A new species of Neotropical freshwater stingray of the genus Potamotrygon Garman, 1877 from the Río Madrede Díos, Peru (Chondrichthyes: Potamotrygonidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Paulo C.B. da Silva

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Potamotrygon tatianae sp. nov., is described from Río Madre de Díos, Peru, upper Rio Madeira basin. The new species is distinguished from all congeners by a unique combination of characters, including its dorsal color pattern formed by a relatively slender, highly convoluted, beige to dark brown vermicular pattern, a single row of dorsal tail spines, and a relatively longer tail posterior to caudal stings. Potamotrygon tatianae sp. nov., occurs sympatrically with other species of Potamotrygon (P. falkneri, P. orbignyi and P. motoro. From the similar species P. falkneri, P. tatianae sp. nov., is further distinguished by the absence of circular, reniform, and oval spots, by its proportionally much longer tail, by having dorsal tail spines in one irregular row, and by features of the ventral lateral-line canal, dermal denticles and neurocranium. From P. orbignyi, the new species is distinct by lacking a reticulate pattern on dorsal disc and by the presence of two angular cartilages. From P. motoro, P. tatianae sp. nov., is further separated by the lack of ocelli formed by strong black concentric rings, by the more flattened aspect of its head and disc, and by having smaller and more numerous teeth. The discovery of a new species that so closely resembles a congeneric form in color pattern, a feature highly variable within the latter, highlights the importance of examining large series of individuals and of detailed morphological analyses in revealing the potentially highly cryptic nature of the diversity within the family.

  13. A partial braincase and other skeletal remains of Oligocene angel sharks (Chondrichthyes, Squatiniformes) from northwest Belgium, with comments on squatinoid taxonomy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mollen, F.H.; Bakel , van B.W.M.; Jagt, J.W.M.

    2016-01-01

    A detailed redescription of a chondrocranium from the basal Boom Clay Formation (Rupelian, Upper Oligocene) at the SVK clay pit, Sint-Niklaas (province of Oost-Vlaanderen, Belgium), previously assigned to the sawshark Pristiophorus rupeliensis, is presented. The chondrocranium is re-identified as

  14. [An intriguing model for 5S rDNA sequences dispersion in the genome of freshwater stingray Potamotrygon motoro (Chondrichthyes: Potamotrygonidae)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, V P; Oliveira, C; Foresti, F

    2015-01-01

    5S rDNA genes of the stingray Potamotrygon motoro were PCR replicated, purified, cloned and sequenced. Two distinct classes of segments of different sizes were obtained. The smallest, with 342 bp units, was classified as class I, and the largest, with 1900 bp units, was designated as class II. Alignment with the consensus sequences for both classes showed changes in a few bases in the 5S rDNA genes. TATA-like sequences were detected in the nontranscribed spacer (NTS) regions of class I and a microsatellite (GCT) 10 sequence was detected in the NTS region of class II. The results obtained can help to understand the molecular organization of ribosomal genes and the mechanism of gene dispersion.

  15. Ontogenetic scaling of caudal fin shape in Squalus acanthias (Chondrichthyes, Elasmobranchii): a geometric morphometric analysis with implications for caudal fin functional morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiss, Katie L; Bonnan, Matthew F

    2010-07-01

    The shark heterocercal caudal fin and its contribution to locomotion are of interest to biologists and paleontologists. Current hydrodynamic data show that the stiff dorsal lobe leads the ventral lobe, both lobes of the tail are synchronized during propulsion, and tail shape reflects its overall locomotor function. Given the difficulties surrounding the analysis of shark caudal fins in vivo, little is known about changes in tail shape related to ontogeny and sex in sharks. A quantifiable analysis of caudal fin shape may provide an acceptable proxy for inferring gross functional morphology where direct testing is difficult or impossible. We examined ontogenetic and sex-related shape changes in the caudal fins of 115 Squalus acanthias museum specimens, to test the hypothesis that significant shape changes in the caudal fin shape occur with increasing size and between the sexes. Using linear and geometric morphometrics, we examined caudal shape changes within the context of current hydrodynamic models. We found no statistically significant linear or shape difference between sexes, and near-isometric scaling trends for caudal dimensions. These results suggest that lift and thrust increase linearly with size and caudal span. Thin-plate splines results showed a significant allometric shape change associated with size and caudal span: the dorsal lobe elongates and narrows, whereas the ventral lobe broadens and expands ventrally. Our data suggest a combination of caudal fin morphology with other body morphology aspects, would refine, and better elucidate the hydrodynamic factors (if any) that underlie the significant shape changes we report here for S. acanthias.

  16. Distribution of radioactivity in the chondrichthyes Squalus acanthias and the osteichthyes salmo gairdneri following intragastric administration of (9-/sup 14/C)phenanthrene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solbakken, J.E.; Palmork, K.H.

    1980-12-01

    The fate of polycyclic hydrocarbons (PAH) in marine animals has received increasing attention in the last decade. The present studies dealing with spiny dogfish (Squalus acanthias) and rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri) are part of a series of experiments with different marine organisms. All the experiments were performed under the same laboratory conditions using intragastric administration of the PAH-component, /sup 14/C-labelled phenanthrene. Thus it is possible to compare species differences of disposition of PAH in various marine organisms. The most pronounced differences in the disposition of phenanthrene between bony fish and cartilaginous fish in our studies are that the maximum value of radioactivity in the liver of cartilaginous fish occurred several days later than the corresponding value in bony fish. Furthermore, the radioactivity in cartilaginous fish was retained at a high level beyond 672 h (28 days), a time at which the radioactivity in bony fish is near the background values.

  17. Ontogenetic dietary shift and feeding strategy of Raja undulata Lacepède, 1802 (Chondrichthyes: Rajidae on the Portuguese continental shelf

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa Moura

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Under the scope of an ecosystem approach to fisheries, the understanding of trophic interactions is important for the assessment and consequently the proposal of suitable management measures. Raja undulata, like other rajids, is an important demersal predator in the Portuguese coastal community for which the biological and ecological information is still scarce. The ontogenetic dietary shift was investigated. Major length groups were defined through cluster analysis of the mean abundance of prey items. Prey diversity and feeding strategy were evaluated by length group. Multivariate analysis of variance was performed to test the influence of the factors sex, season and maturity on the diet of this species. It was concluded that R. undulata has a dietary ontogenetic shift within the definition of three major length groups (MLGs: 200-550 mm; 550-750 mm and 750-1000 mm. Diet varied from small and semi-pelagic to large and benthic prey. The feeding strategy of the species also changed from a generalised to a specialised diet. The decapod Polybius henslowi was the main prey item, especially for larger predators. Differences were found between sexes, maturity stages and seasons in each MLG.

  18. Female reproductive traits of a commercially exploited skate: Atlantoraja platana (Günther, 1880) (Chondrichthyes, Rajidae). Ovarian morphology, gametogenesis and microscopic verification of maturity criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moya, A C; Wehitt, A; Díaz Andrade, M C; Di Giacomo, E E; Galíndez, E J

    2017-10-01

    Atlantoraja platana is an endemic species of the Southwest Atlantic Ocean, and is one of the most captured by the local bottom trawl industrial fisheries. In this work, the microscopic architecture of mature female's gonads and the dynamics of follicle development are studied as a contribution to raise awareness of reproductive biology of the species. Folliculogenesis depicts the same histologic pattern as in other Elasmobranchs. Follicles in different degrees of maturation coexist in mature animals. The oogonia were only found in immature individuals. Likewise, atretic follicles were recorded in ovaries of all sexual maturity stages. The microscopic size recorded from the beginning of yolk input is smallest than the detected with the necked eye. This study provides valuable information about female's gametogenesis that could be taken into account in the development of fisheries management. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Redescription and sexual dimorphism of Andaman leg-skate Cruriraja andamanica (Chondrichthyes: Rajiformes) with comments on the zoogeography of the genus Cruriraja.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinu, J; Rajeeshkumar, M P; Parmeswaran, U V; Sumod, K S; Akhilesh, K V; Manjebrayakath, H; Sanjeevan, V N

    2017-08-01

    This paper redescribes sexually dimorphic Cruriraja andamanica based on five juvenile (four males, one female) and four adult specimens (three males, one female) collected from Andaman waters. Morphometric comparison of the present specimens with a female specimen collected off the coast of Tanzania reveals considerable dissimilarities between them. These findings, along with the wide geographical distance between collection locations, support a need for revision of the Tanzanian specimen, which, in all probability, represents a new species in the genus. The paper also addresses zoogeography of genus Cruriraja across the world's oceans and provides a revised key to the species. © 2017 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.

  20. Geo(Im)pulseBite marks on early Holocene Tursiops truncatus fossils from the North Sea indicate scavenging by rays (Chondrichthyes, Rajidae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Netten, H.H. van; Reumer, J.W.F.

    A number of Tursiops truncatus mandibles in the collection of fossil marine mammals in the Rotterdam Natural History Museum have marks consisting of several parallel linear grooves. These marks are also found on four atlas complexes, a scapula and on one vertebra. The hypothesis that they are bite

  1. Catch and size selectivity of small-scale fishing gear for the smooth-hound shark Mustelus mustelus (Linnaeus, 1758 (Chondrichthyes: Triakidae from the Aegean Turkish coast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. CEYHAN

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Catch rate, CPUE, biomass ratios and size selectivity from traditional longline and trammel nets of Turkish coastal small-scale fisheries were investigated in order to describe the Smooth-hound shark (Mustelus mustelus fishery. The SELECT method was used to estimate the selectivity parameters of a variety of models for the trammel nets inner panel of 150 and 170 mm mesh sizes. Catch composition and proportion of the species were significantly different in longline and trammel nets. While mean CPUE of longline was 119.2±14.3 kg/1000 hooks, these values for 150 and 170 mm trammel nets were 5.3±1.2 kg/1000 m of net and 12.7±3.9 kg/1000 m of net, respectively. Biomass ratios of the by catch to Smooth-hound catch were found to be 1:0.32 for 150 mm trammel net, 1:0.65 for longline and 1:0.73 for 170 mm trammel net. The estimated modal lengths and spreads were found to be 91.1 and 16.2 cm for 150 mm and 103.2 and 18.4 cm for 170 mm, respectively. The modal lengths of the species as well as the spread values increased with mesh size.

  2. Ecological patterns, distribution and population structure of Prionace glauca (Chondrichthyes: Carcharhinidae) in the tropical-subtropical transition zone of the north-eastern Pacific.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vögler, Rodolfo; Beier, Emilio; Ortega-García, Sofía; Santana-Hernández, Heriberto; Valdez-Flores, J Javier

    2012-02-01

    Regional ecological patterns, distribution and population structure of Prionace glauca were analyzed based on samples collected on-board two long-line fleets operating in oceanic waters (1994-96/2000-02) and in coastal oceanic waters (2003-2009) of the eastern tropical Pacific off México. Generalized additive models were applied to catch per unit of effort data to evaluate the effect of spatial, temporal and environmental factors on the horizontal distribution of the life stages (juvenile, adult) and the sexes at the estimated depth of catch. The presence of breeding areas was explored. The population structure was characterized by the presence of juveniles' aggregations and pregnant females towards coastal waters and the presence of adult males' aggregations towards oceanic waters. The species exhibited horizontal segregation by sex-size and vertical segregation by sex. Distribution of the sex-size groups at oceanic waters was seasonally affected by the latitude; however, at coastal oceanic waters mainly females were influenced by the longitude. Latitudinal changes on the horizontal distribution were coupled to the seasonal forward and backward of water masses through the study area. Adult males showed positive relationship with high temperatures and high-salinities waters (17.0°-20.0 °C; 34.2-34.4) although they were also detected in low-salinities waters. The distribution of juvenile males mainly occurred beyond low temperatures and low-salinities waters (14.0°-15.0 °C; 33.6-34.1), suggesting a wide tolerance of adult males to explore subartic and subtropical waters. At oceanic areas, adult females were aggregated towards latitudes ecological key region to the reproductive cycle of P. glauca. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Morphological indicators of initial reproductive commitment in Mustelus schmitti (Springer 1939 (Chondrichthyes, Triakidae: folliculogenesis and ovarian structure over the life cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EJ Galíndez

    Full Text Available This work provides information about the sexual commitment and the folliculogenesis of the gatuzo, Mustelus schmitti. A total of 112 females of all maturity stages were fished in the Bahía Blanca estuary, between 2009 and 2010. The oogonia were present throughout the life cycle of the animals. The folliculogenesis follows a pattern similar to other elasmobranchs. The granulosa layer keeps monolayered throughout the folliculogenesis, but with two cell types in the vitellogenic follicle. The zona pellucida forms in the primordial follicles. The thecal system shows a connective inner layer and a glandular outer sheath. The microscopic beginning of the sexual commitment, indicated by the vitello hoarding, takes place in follicles from 500 micrometres, while the macroscopic evidence appears in follicles of 2500-3000 micrometres. The results presented in this study suggest that the fishery pressure may affect a susceptible range of sizes of the species, not previously considered and provides a biological framework for the development of fisheries policy.

  4. A synoptic review of the Eocene (Ypresian) cartilaginous fishes (Chondrichthyes: Holocephali, Elasmobranchii) of the Bolca Konservat-Lagerstätte, Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marramà, Giuseppe; Carnevale, Giorgio; Engelbrecht, Andrea; Claeson, Kerin M.; Zorzin, Roberto; Fornasiero, Mariagabriella; Kriwet, Jürgen

    2018-01-01

    Here, we review and discuss the records and taxonomy of the Ypresian (Eocene) chondrichthyans from the famous Bolca Konservat-Lagerstätte in northeastern Italy. Despite the outstanding diversity and the numerous studies focusing on the actinopterygian faunas from Pesciara and Monte Postale, the current knowledge about the systematics, taxonomy and phylogenetic relationships of the cartilaginous fishes from these Eocene sites remains elusive and largely inadequate. The celebrated Eocene Bolca Lagerstätte has yielded several exquisitely preserved articulated remains of chondrichthyan fishes in which delicate structures and soft tissues are preserved, as well as isolated teeth. The cartilaginous fish assemblage of Bolca comprises at least 17 species-level taxa belonging to 10 families in 6 orders, including selachians (Carcharhiniformes, Lamniformes), batoids (Torpediniformes, Myliobatiformes, Rajiformes) and holocephalans (Chimaeriformes). The occurrence of holocephalans represented by an isolated fin-spine of the chimeroid Ischyodus in the Bolca assemblage is reported here for the first time and represents the first record of chimeroids in the Eocene of Italy and also southern Europe. The Bolca chondrichthyan assemblage is remarkably different from those of other contemporaneous Boreal or Tethyan deposits, suggesting that its taxonomic composition is largely influenced by the palaeoenvironmental context. However, this synoptic review also highlights the importance of detailed revisions of all chondrichthyan remains from the Bolca Konservat-Lagerstätten.

  5. ATSH ATL DIET (stomach contents of Atlantic sharpnose shark on east coast of FL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A reassessment of the diet of the Atlantic sharpnose shark Rhizoprionodon terraenovae was conducted to provide an update on their trophic level (n390)....

  6. ATSH CIS IP DIET (stomach contents of Atlantic sharpnose shark in Crooked Island Sound and Gulf of Mexico side of St. Vincent Island, FL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Atlantic sharpnose shark Rhizoprionodon terraenovae diet is described from Crooked Island Sound, an embayment of the northeast Gulf of Mexico. Diet was assessed by...

  7. From coexistence to competitive exclusion: can overfishing change the outcome of competition in skates (Chondrichthyes, Rajidae? De la coexistencia a la exclusión competitiva: ¿Puede la sobrepesca cambiar el resultado de la competencia en rayas (Chondrichthyes, Rajidae?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia L Ruocco

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Competition for food could be a major force driving changes in the community structure of skates (Rajidae subjected to fishing exploitation. Under this hypothesis, small skates are released from competition with larger skates after fishing has depleted the larger species. Here, we compare the abundance patterns of two sympatric skates with similar niches but different life histories, Bathyraja albomaculata (larger and slow-reproducing and Bathyraja macloviana (smaller and faster-reproducing, before (1971, 1978 and after (1998-2004 a 108% increase in industrial bottom trawling on the southeastern South American shelf in order to test the prediction that B. macloviana should competitively exclude B. albomaculata after the increase in fishing mortality. In 1971 and 1978, there was no relationship between the abundance of both species, indicating that they coexisted over large scales. In 1998-2004, the relationship between the abundances of these skates was bell-shaped, indicating that both species increased in abundance at low densities until peaking, after which B. albomaculata decreased when B. macloviana became more abundant, consistent with resource competition. We tested whether food may be a potential limiting resource by comparing the diet of both species. The two species consumed mostly polychaetes, differing only in the consumption of polychaetes from the family Nephthyidae, which was much higher for B. macloviana. Bathyraja macloviana could replace B. albomaculata at high densities when food resources may become scarce. These results support the hypothesis that competition release is an important factor explaining the changes in skate communities in overexploited areas.La competencia por el alimento podría ser una fuerza importante detrás de los cambios en la estructura de las comunidades de rayas (Rajidae bajo explotación pesquera. Según esta hipótesis, las rayas pequeñas son liberadas de la competencia por las rayas de mayor tamaño, al disminuir la abundancia de éstas últimas por la pesca. En este trabajo, se comparan los patrones de abundancia de dos rayas simpátricas con nichos similares pero con diferentes historias de vida, Bathyraja albomaculata (mayor y de reproducción lenta y Bathyraja macloviana (más pequeña y de reproducción más rápida, antes (1971, 1978 y después (1998-2004 de un incremento del 108% en el arrastre de fondo industrial en la plataforma sudeste de América del Sur, para evaluar la predicción que B. macloviana excluiría competitivamente a B. albomaculata después del aumento en la mortalidad por pesca. En 1971 y 1978, no hubo relación entre las abundancias de ambas especies, indicando que, a escalas grandes, coexistían. En 1998-2004, la relación entre las abundancias de ambas especies tuvo forma de campana, indicando que ambas incrementaron su abundancia a densidades bajas hasta alcanzar un máximo, a partir del cual la abundancia de B. albomaculata disminuyó a medida que aumentaba la de B. macloviana, patrón consistente con la competencia por uso de recursos. Se evaluó si el alimento puede ser un recurso limitante mediante la comparación de la dieta de ambas especies. Ambas especies consumieron predominantemente poliquetos y difirieron sólo en el consumo de poliquetos Nephthyidae, mucho mayor en B. macloviana. B. macloviana remplazaría a B. albomaculata a altas densidades, cuando el alimento podría ser escaso. Estos resultados apoyan la hipótesis de que la liberación de la competencia es un factor importante en los cambios en las comunidades de rayas sobreexplotadas.

  8. Hábitos alimentares e sobreposição trófica das raias Potamotrygon falkneri e Potamotrygon motoro (Chondrichthyes, Potamotrygonidae na planície alagável do alto rio Paraná, Brasil = Feeding habitats and trophic overlap of the freshwater stingrays Potamotrygon falkneri e Potamotrygon motoro (Chondrichthyes, Potamotrygonidae in the upper Paraná river floodplain, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milza Celi Fedatto Abelha

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available As raias Potamotrygon falkneri e Potamotrygon motoro foram avaliadas em relação à composição de suas dietas e a sobreposição do nicho trófico nos períodos de seca (agosto/2004 e cheia (janeiro/2005 na planície alagável do alto rio Paraná, em três estações de coleta próximas à ilha Mutum. Foram analisados 49 conteúdos estomacais de P. falkneri e 16 de P. motoro, obtidos de espécimes capturados através de pesca com anzol, fisga (arpão e espinhel. Os conteúdos estomacais foram analisados de acordo com os métodos de freqüência volumétrica e de ocorrência. A similaridade da dieta foi quantificada pelo índicede sobreposição de Pianka. As espécies revelaram flexibilidade alimentar, com ambas consumindo predominantemente moluscos na cheia, enquanto na seca a dieta de P. falkneri foi composta principalmente por peixes e a de P. motoro por insetos aquáticos. Os valores doíndice de sobreposição de nicho variaram entre 0,38 na seca (moderado e 0,94 na cheia (acentuado. A variação da composição das dietas foi atribuída às oscilações na disponibilidade dos recursos alimentares no ambiente.Feeding habits and trophic overlap of freshwater stingrays Potamotrygon falkneri e Potamotrygon motoro were evaluated in the upper Paraná river floodplain. Samples were collected during periods of drought (August/2004 and flood (January/2005 near Mutum island. Fishhook, harpoon and long line were used to capture the individuals and a total of 49 stomach contents of P. falkneri and 16 of P. motorowere analyzed. Diet composition was analyzed by the relative occurrence and volumetric frequencies. The trophic overlap was quantified by the index of niche overlap of Pianka. Results indicated that both species predominantly consumed mollusks during the floodseason, while in the drought season the diet of P. falkneri was composed mainly by fish and P. motoro for aquatic insects. The values of the index of niche overlap varied from 0.38, in drought (moderate, to 0.94 in flood (accentuated. The seasonal variation of the composition of the diets was attributed to fluctuations in the availability of food resources in the floodplain.

  9. Simultaneous extraction of chitin and astaxanthin from waste of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This work investigates simple methods for simultaneous extraction of astaxanthin and chitin from industrial waste of the South African West Coast rock lobster Jasus lalandii. Removal of proteins from waste is the critical step to yield intact chitin and astaxanthin. Because common chemical methods destroy astaxanthin and ...

  10. Exposure to 3,3’,4,4’,5-pentachlorobiphenyl (PCB 126) impacts multiple organ systems in developing little skate (Leucoraja erinacea).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Effects of exposure to coplanar polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and other dioxin-like chemicals on developing vertebrates involve many organ systems, including the skeletal and cardiovascular systems. Apex predators, including those from the class Chondrichthyes (sharks, skates,...

  11. Systematic revision of the Potamotrygon motoro (Müller & Henle, 1841 species complex in the Paraná-Paraguay basin, with description of two new ocellated species (Chondrichthyes: Myliobatiformes: Potamotrygonidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiago Silva Loboda

    Full Text Available A systematic revision of the Potamotrygon motoro (Müller & Henle, 1841 species complex in the Paraná-Paraguay basin based on morphological characters was undertaken. Morphological systems analyzed include external morphology, coloration, dermal denticles, and spines, canals of the ventral lateral-line system, and skeletal components. Potamotrygon motoro is widely distributed in the Paraná-Paraguay basin and some of its diagnostic characters are: ocelli present on dorsal disc tricolored, well-defined and evenly distributed, with diameter similar or greater than eye-length; ventral coloration with relatively large whitish central region, with gray or brown area predominant on outer ventral disc margins; dermal denticles well-developed and star-shaped over central disc; labial grooves absent; monognathic heterodonty present in upper and lower jaws of adults. Potamotrygon pauckei Castex, 1963 and Potamotrygon labradori Castex, Maciel & Achenbach, 1963, are synonymized with P. motoro; Potamotrygon alba Castex, 1963, is a nomen dubium in accordance with previous authors. Additionally, two new ocellated species of Potamotrygon from the Paraná-Paraguay basin are described: Potamotrygon pantanensis, sp. nov. and Potamotrygon amandae, sp. nov. These are described and compared with P. motoro and other congeners. Potamotrygon pantanensis, sp. nov. is described from the northern Pantanal region; Potamotrygon amandae, sp. nov. is widespread in the Paraná-Paraguay basin.

  12. Record of the freshwater stingrays Potamotrygon brachyura and P. motoro (Chondrichthyes, Potamotrygonidae in the lower Uruguay river, South America Registro das raias de água doce Potamotrygon brachyura e P. motoro (Potamotrygonidae no baixo rio Uruguai, America do Sul

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Cristina Oddone

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Freshwater stingrays, or potamotrygonids, are restricted to Neotropical river drainages. These elasmobranchs are well adapted to freshwater environments and the number of described species gradually increases as further research is carried out. Some of the first studies on their systematics and natural history were carried out in the 1960s and 1970s in southern South America. However, there is no new published data on potamotrygonids from Uruguayan waters since then (except for local journal reports from sportive fishermen and specimens deposited in Uruguayan collections. The present study aims to record the recent occurrence of two species of potamotrygonids caught by sport fishermen, with comments on other published historical records for the same area. As many other elasmobranchs, these species have an important, but not always well understood, role in the Uruguayan rivers ecosystems.As raias de água doce ou potamotrigonídeos estão restritas às drenagens dos rios Neotropicais. Estas raias tem se adaptado bem aos ambientes de água doce e o número de espécies descritas aumenta gradualmente conforme as pesquisas na área se intensificam. Alguns dos primeiros estudos sobre a sistemática e a historia natural deste grupo foram realizados nas décadas de 1960 e 1970 na região Sul de América do Sul. Porém, há poucos dados publicados sobre potamotrigonídeos em águas uruguaias desde então (com exceção de registros de pescadores esportivos publicados em jornais locais, e espécimes depositados em coleções uruguaias. O presente estudo, portanto, tem como objetivo registrar a ocorrência de duas espécies de potamotrigonídeos no Uruguai capturados por pescadores esportivos assim como realizar uma compilação de ocorrências anteriores presentes na literatura. Como muitos outros elasmobrânquios, estas espécies possuem um papel importante nos ecossistemas dos rios uruguaios, embora não completamente compreendido.

  13. Description of a new species of skate of the genus Malacoraja Stehmann, 1970: the first species from the southwestern Atlantic Ocean, with notes on generic monophyly and composition (Chondrichthyes: Rajidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo R. de Carvalho

    Full Text Available The first report of a western South Atlantic soft skate, genus Malacoraja Stehmann, 1970, is described as Malacoraja obscura, new species, from the southeastern Brazilian continental slope off the states of Espírito Santo and Rio de Janeiro, in depths ranging from 808-1105 m. The new species is known from five specimens and is distinguished from congeners by its unique dorsal coloration with small, faded white spots on disc and pelvic fins, by retaining in larger specimens an irregular row of thorns along dorsal midline of tail (extending from tail base to two-thirds of tail length in 680 mm total length female, and by presenting a ventral tail midline devoid of small denticles only at base (naked region not extending posterior to pelvic fin rear margin. Further diagnostic characters in combination include the lack of scapular thorns in larger specimens, elevated number of tooth rows (64/62 tooth rows in subadult male of 505 mm TL, and 76/74 in large female of 680 mm TL and vertebrae (27-28 Vtr, 68-75 Vprd, ventral disc and tail with a uniform dark brown coloration, paired postventral fenestrae on scapulocoracoid, enlarged posterior postventral fenestra, circular foramen magnum and paired internal carotid foramina on braincase floor. Adult males were unavailable for study, but an anatomical description of M. obscura, n. sp., is provided. Comparisons are made with all known material of M. kreffti, literature accounts of M. senta, and with abundant material of South African M. spinacidermis; M. obscura, n. sp., most closely resembles M. spinacidermis from the eastern South Atlantic in squamation, coloration and size. Malacoraja is monophyletic due to its unique squamation and rostral appendices, and apparently comprises two species-groups, one for M. obscura and M. spinacidermis, and the other for M. kreffti and M. senta, but clarification of species-level relationships must await more anatomical information, particularly of the latter two species.

  14. Claves para el reconocimiento taxonómico dentario en taxa del Superorden Squalomorphi de Chile (Chondrichthyes: Elasmobranchii Taxonomic dental keys for the Chilean taxa of the Superorder Squalomorphi (Chondricthyes: Elasmobranchii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvia Sáez

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Se presenta una serie de claves para el reconocimiento dentario de diferentes taxa del Superorden Squalomorphi de Chile. Se seleccionaron características dentarias externas que permitan obtener una observación más expedita que conduzcan a un estudio más acabado, de la diagnosis de los diferentes taxa constituyentes de este grupo de peces, haciéndolas extensibles para estudios de piezas dentales fósiles.A series of taxonomic dental keys is presented for the Chilean taxa of the Superorder Squalomorphi. External dental characteristics were selected for easier observation, leading to more thorough studies. This allows diagnoses of the different taxa comprising this group of fishes and, moreover, can be extended to studies of fossil teeth.

  15. Short Communication Composition of elasmobranch landings in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The first detailed elasmobranch fisheries data for the Kingdom of Bahrain are presented, based on surveys of fish markets in April 2012. At least 25 species were recorded, including undescribed taxa. The milk shark Rhizoprionodon acutus was the most frequently recorded species; together with the Arabian smoothhound ...

  16. Hábitos alimentares e sobreposição trófica das raias Potamotrygon falkneri e Potamotrygon motoro (Chondrichthyes, Potamotrygonidae na planície alagável do alto rio Paraná, Brasil - DOI: 10.4025/actascibiolsci.v28i3.208 Feeding habitats and trophic overlap of the freshwater stingrays Potamotrygon falkneri e Potamotrygon motoro (Chondrichthyes, Potamotrygonidae in the upper Paraná river floodplain, Brazil - DOI: 10.4025/actascibiolsci.v28i3.208

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edson Fontes de Oliveira

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available As raias Potamotrygon falkneri e Potamotrygon motoro foram avaliadas em relação à composição de suas dietas e a sobreposição do nicho trófico nos períodos de seca (agosto/2004 e cheia (janeiro/2005 na planície alagável do alto rio Paraná, em três estações de coleta próximas à ilha Mutum. Foram analisados 49 conteúdos estomacais de P. falkneri e 16 de P. motoro, obtidos de espécimes capturados através de pesca com anzol, fisga (arpão e espinhel. Os conteúdos estomacais foram analisados de acordo com os métodos de freqüência volumétrica e de ocorrência. A similaridade da dieta foi quantificada pelo índice de sobreposição de Pianka. As espécies revelaram flexibilidade alimentar, com ambas consumindo predominantemente moluscos na cheia, enquanto na seca a dieta de P. falkneri foi composta principalmente por peixes e a de P. motoro por insetos aquáticos. Os valores do índice de sobreposição de nicho variaram entre 0,38 na seca (moderado e 0,94 na cheia (acentuado. A variação da composição das dietas foi atribuída à s oscilações na disponibilidade dos recursos alimentares no ambiente.Feeding habits and trophic overlap of freshwater stingrays Potamotrygon falkneri e Potamotrygon motoro were evaluated in the upper Paraná river floodplain. Samples were collected during periods of drought (August/2004 and flood (January/2005 near Mutum island. Fishhook, harpoon and long line were used to capture the individuals and a total of 49 stomach contents of P. falkneri and 16 of P. motoro were analyzed. Diet composition was analyzed by the relative occurrence and volumetric frequencies. The trophic overlap was quantified by the index of niche overlap of Pianka. Results indicated that both species predominantly consumed mollusks during the flood season, while in the drought season the diet of P. falkneri was composed mainly by fish and P. motoro for aquatic insects. The values of the index of niche overlap varied from 0.38, in drought (moderate, to 0.94 in flood (accentuated. The seasonal variation of the composition of the diets was attributed to fluctuations in the availability of food resources in the floodplain.

  17. A bio-economic application to the Cape Rock Lobster resource using a delay difference modelling approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Roos

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available In many species, like the Cape Rock Lobster (Jasus lalandii, the life cycles of males and females differ. This may motivate the use of two-sex models in a stock-assessment analysis. It is also true for this resource, that juveniles do not reach sexual maturity immediately. Therefore a delay-difference model is appropriate. In this study we follow a bio-economic approach and use a two-sex delay-difference model to determine a maximum economic yield strategy. Thus we determine an economic optimum steady state solution at which to harvest this resource subject to the biological constraints of the species.

  18. Jenis dan Status Konservasi Ikan Hiu yang Tertangkap di Tempat Pelelangan Ikan (TPI Labuan Bajo, Manggarai Barat, Flores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismail Syakurachman Alaydrus

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The study aimed to determine the types of sharks are caught, sold and conservation status in the fish auction place (TPI Labuan Bajo, West Manggarai, Flores, East Nusa Tenggara have been conducted in February and March 2014 in Labuan Bajo. The research method was the survey method and used Market Survey sampling techniques and identification by Rapid Assessment method. Descriptively analyzed data, displayed in the form of narration and a table. Based on the results of the study, found 114 individual sharks, 55 individual males, 59 females were classified into three orders, namely Orectolobiformes, Lamniformes, and Carcharhiniformes; 4 families that Carcharhinidae, Odontaspididae, Rhynchobatidae, and Ginglymostomatidae; 5 genera namely Carcharhinus, Triaenodon, Rhyncobatus, Prionace, and Rhizoprionodon and 9 types of sharks that Carcharhinus melanopterus, Triaenodon obesus, Carcharhinus limbatus, Carcharhinus taurus, Carcharhinus amblyrhynchos, Rhynchobatus australiae, Prionace glauca, Rhizoprionodon acutus, and Nebrius ferrugineus. Based on the state of conservation, shark found in Labuan Bajo TPI classified Vulnerable and Near Threatened, the dominant type of shark found is Carcharhinus melanopterus (91 fishes while the least was found is Rhynchobatus australiae, Prionace glauca, Rhizoprionodon acutus, and Nebrius ferrugineus (each 1 individual.

  19. Construction of a nurse shark (Ginglymostoma cirratum) bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library and a preliminary genome survey

    OpenAIRE

    Luo, Meizhong; Kim, HyeRan; Kudrna, Dave; Sisneros, Nicholas B; Lee, So-Jeong; Mueller, Christopher; Collura, Kristi; Zuccolo, Andrea; Buckingham, E Bryan; Grim, Suzanne M; Yanagiya, Kazuyo; Inoko, Hidetoshi; Shiina, Takashi; Flajnik, Martin F; Wing, Rod A

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background Sharks are members of the taxonomic class Chondrichthyes, the oldest living jawed vertebrates. Genomic studies of this group, in comparison to representative species in other vertebrate taxa, will allow us to theorize about the fundamental genetic, developmental, and functional characteristics in the common ancestor of all jawed vertebrates. Aims In order to obtain mapping and sequencing data for comparative genomics, we constructed a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) ...

  20. New Record of the Rare Shark Parmaturus melanobranchius (Scyliorhinidae from Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Po-Feng Lee

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The specimen of Parmaturus melanobranchius (Chondrichthyes: Carcharhiniformes was collected in the waters off south-western Taiwan. After the description in 1966, only three specimens of P. melanobranchius were collected, one from South China Sea, one from Philippines and the other from Aragusuku Island of Japan. In this study, the fourth specimen was reported and its diagnostic characters, color photos and distribution map are given.

  1. Development of the Early Axon Scaffold in the Rostral Brain of the Small Spotted Cat Shark (Scyliorhinus canicula) Embryo

    OpenAIRE

    Ware, Michelle; Waring, Colin P.; Schubert, Frank R.

    2014-01-01

    International audience; The cat shark is increasingly used as a model for Chondrichthyes, an evolutionarily important sister group of the bony vertebrates that include teleosts and tetrapods. In the bony vertebrates, the first axon tracts form a highly conserved early axon scaffold. The corresponding structure has not been well characterised in cat shark and will prove a useful model for comparative studies. Using pan-neural markers, the early axon scaffold of the cat shark, Scyliorhinus cani...

  2. Contribuição ao conhecimento da ictiofauna do Manguezal de Cacha Pregos, Ilha de Itaparica, Baía de Todos os Santos, Bahia Contribution to knowledge of ichthyofauna of Mangrove Cacha Pregos, Itaparica island, Todos os Santos bay, Bahia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Roberto Duarte Lopes

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available A check-list of fishes collected in a mangrove in Cacha Pregos, south of ltaparic Island, State of Bahia, Brazil (about 13o07'S,38o48'W from 1988-1989 and 1991-1992 is presented. Fifteen orders, 46 families and 85 species (Teleostei except one Chondrichthyes were identified, represented specimens whose adults live in different marine ecossystems.

  3. The complete mitochondrial genome of the endangered spotback skate, Atlantoraja castelnaui.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duckett, Drew J L; Naylor, Gavin J P

    2016-05-01

    Chondrichthyes are a highly threatened class of organisms, largely due to overfishing and other human activities. The present study describes the complete mitochondrial genome (16,750 bp) of the endangered spotback skate, Atlantoraja castelnaui. The mitogenome is arranged in a typical vertebrate fashion, containing 13 protein-coding genes, 22 tRNA genes, 2 rRNA genes and 1 control region.

  4. Characterization of Fluorescence in the Marine Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-06-14

    University of Oldenburg * University of Ulm, Department of General Zoology and Endocrinology * University of Ulm, Laboratory Animals Research...Classes Osteichthyes, the bony fish, and Chondrichthyes, the sharks and rays (cartilaginous fish). The more time people spend in the water with the...or sting rays during SCUBA dives without observing any effect. On one occasion during each of the 2004 and 2005 NOAA DeepScope missions a

  5. Diseno de una matriz de soporte compuesta de colageno de piel de tiburon-aloe para ingenier a tisular (Design of Shark Skin Collagen-Aloe Composite Scaffold for Tissue Engineering)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    colágeno es un nuevo biomaterial utilizado para la administración de fármacos, la fabri- cación de apósitos o como sustrato para ingeniería tisular cuya...crecimiento de fi broblastos in vitro. MATERIALES Y MÉTODOS Materiales El tiburón lechoso (Rhizoprionodon acutus) se capturó en la costa local y se...1000 rpm durante 3-5 minutos, se suspendieron de nuevo en medio fresco con FCS al 10%, se sembraron por la matriz de soporte (25.000 células

  6. Living on the edge: latitudinal variations in the reproductive biology of two coastal species of sharks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, S M; Harry, A V; Bennett, M B

    2016-11-01

    Differences in the reproductive biology of both the Australian weasel shark Hemigaleus australiensis and the Australian sharpnose shark Rhizoprionodon taylori were apparent between individuals from the southern-most extent of their range in eastern Australia (Moreton Bay) and those from northern Australia. For H. australiensis from Moreton Bay the total length (L T ) at which 50% of individuals were mature (L T50 ) was 759 mm for females and 756 mm for males, values that were respectively 17-26% larger than reported for the species in northern Australia. The relatively low percentage (63%) of pregnant mature females and presence of small, similar-sized, embryos in utero in both May and November suggested a semi-synchronous, annual reproductive cycle in Moreton Bay, whereas a synchronous, biannual reproductive cycle occurred in northern Australia. It is likely that H. australiensis has a resting phase between gestation cycles at the southern-most extent of its range. For R. taylori from Moreton Bay the L T50 s were 588 and 579 mm for females and males, respectively, values 2-3% larger than for individuals from the mid-Queensland coast and 31-35% larger than for individuals from northern Australia. The length at which 50% of the females were maternal (611 mm L T ) in Moreton Bay was greater than the L T50 , indicating that not all sharks mate immediately after maturing. Rhizoprionodon taylori in the south had an annual reproductive cycle incorporating a 7-8 month embryonic diapause, with pups probably born in February. A mean fecundity of 7·5 was almost double that reported from northern Australia. Regional variations in the reproductive characteristics of H. australiensis and R. taylori may influence their resilience to fishing and other anthropogenic pressures. The substantial differences reported here highlight the importance of region-specific life-history parameters to successful management and conservation. © 2016 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.

  7. Species richness and distribution of chondrichthyan fishes in the Arctic Ocean and adjacent seas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lynghammar, A.; Christiansen, J. S.; Mecklenburg, C. W.

    2013-01-01

    The sea ice cover decreases and human activity increases in Arctic waters. Fisheries and bycatch issues, shipping and petroleum exploitation (pollution issues) make it imperative to establish biological baselines for the marine fishes inhabiting the Arctic Ocean and adjacent seas (AOAS). Species...... richness, zoogeographic affiliations and Red List statuses among chondrichthyan fishes (Chondrichthyes) were examined across 16 AOAS regions as a first step towards credible conservation actions. Published literature and museum vouchers were consulted for presence/absence data. Although many regions...... are poorly sampled, 49 chondrichthyan species have been reported from the AOAS. Skates and rays are the most species-rich taxon, represented by 27 species in family Rajidae and one species in family Dasyatidae. The sharks comprise 20 species in 13 families and the chimaeras one species in family Chimaeridae...

  8. Biodiversity, Life History, and Conservation of Northeastern Pacific Chondrichthyans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebert, David A; Bigman, Jennifer S; Lawson, Julia M

    The sharks, batoids, and chimaeras, collectively the class Chondrichthyes, are one of the most successful groups of fishes, with over 1250 species globally. Recent taxonomic revisions have increased their diversity by about 20% over the past 17 years (2000-2016). The Northeast Pacific Ocean is one of the top 20 most diverse regions/countries on the globe with 77 chondrichthyan species, a number less than a quarter that of the most species-rich area (Australia) but that has increased by 10% since 2000 to include three new species (two skates and a chimaera). In this chapter we discuss the species richness of chondrichthyans occurring in the Northeast Pacific Ocean, characterize their life histories, briefly review several fisheries, and summarize the conservation status of those chondrichthyans occurring in the region. Detailed descriptions and evaluations of fisheries can be found in Chapter 7 of AMB Volume 78. © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Development of revolutionizing biomaterials substituting various mammalian organs by means of sintered bioceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ueda, T. [West Saitama National Central Hospital, Tokorozawa (Japan); Hirota, K. [National Inst. for Research in Inorganic Materials Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Nishihara, K. [Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Oral Surgery

    2001-07-01

    Development of biomaterials substituting various mammalian organs can be carried out by means of experimental evolutionary studies using collagen -hydroxyapatite composite, derived from adult cattle. The revolution of the tissue-immune system can be studies by compound-ceramics of collagen-hydroxyapatite composite. Collagen-hydroxyapatite composite was sintered by high-pressure technique using collagen extracted from cattle skin, which had antigenicity. Artificial bone marrow chambers were fabricated with the sintered collagen-hydroxyapatite composite. Experimental evolutionary studies using mammals (dogs) and chondrichthyes (sharks) were carried out implanting the chambers into their muscles. The result showed that around the collagen composed chambers implanted into dorsal muscle of dogs, marked cell differentiation as well as dedifferentiation with atypia could be observed, which resembled a part the digestive tract of intestine histologically. Around the chambers implanted into dorsal muscle of sharks hemopoietic nests could be observed, which were quite similar to those induced by the chambers of conventionally sintered hydroxyapatite. Hemopoiesis and osteoid formation 4 months after surgery were observed around the collagen-apatite chamber implanted in the shark muscle as well as in upper site of vertebral cartilage of the spinal cord. No bone marrow in the cartilaginous tissue in upper site of the spinal cord is evident in control sharks. Xenotransplantation of skin, i.e., skin grafts between sharks of different kinds of species, as well as between sharks and xenopus (amphibian), sharks and mammals (rat) are carried out. All of them are successful and chimera placoids between them are developed. After that, the author successfully carried out xenotransplantation of various organs of chondrichthyes into those of dogs. (orig.)

  10. Analysis and functional annotation of expressed sequence tags from in vitro cell lines of elasmobranchs: Spiny dogfish shark (Squalus acanthias) and little skate (Leucoraja erinacea).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parton, Angela; Bayne, Christopher J; Barnes, David W

    2010-09-01

    Elasmobranchs are the most commonly used experimental models among the jawed, cartilaginous fish (Chondrichthyes). Previously we developed cell lines from embryos of two elasmobranchs, Squalus acanthias the spiny dogfish shark (SAE line), and Leucoraja erinacea the little skate (LEE-1 line). From these lines cDNA libraries were derived and expressed sequence tags (ESTs) generated. From the SAE cell line 4303 unique transcripts were identified, with 1848 of these representing unknown sequences (showing no BLASTX identification). From the LEE-1 cell line, 3660 unique transcripts were identified, and unknown, unique sequences totaled 1333. Gene Ontology (GO) annotation showed that GO assignments for the two cell lines were in general similar. These results suggest that the procedures used to derive the cell lines led to isolation of cell types of the same general embryonic origin from both species. The LEE-1 transcripts included GO categories "envelope" and "oxidoreductase activity" but the SAE transcripts did not. GO analysis of SAE transcripts identified the category "anatomical structure formation" that was not present in LEE-1 cells. Increased organelle compartments may exist within LEE-1 cells compared to SAE cells, and the higher oxidoreductase activity in LEE-1 cells may indicate a role for these cells in responses associated with innate immunity or in steroidogenesis. These EST libraries from elasmobranch cell lines provide information for assembly of genomic sequences and are useful in revealing gene diversity, new genes and molecular markers, as well as in providing means for elucidation of full-length cDNAs and probes for gene array analyses. This is the first study of this type with members of the Chondrichthyes. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Fishing activity in Northern Rio de Janeiro State (Brazil and its relation with small cetaceans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula Madeira Di Beneditto

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Research on fishing activity at Atafona village, in Northern Rio de Janeiro, Brazil (21°35'S, was carried out between 1987-96 for the purpose of relating it to the accidental capture of small cetaceans and of estimating the relationship between fishing activity and the diet of small cetaceans. Data on fishing operations were obtained at the cold storage plants management, from interviews with fishermen and personal observations. The most representative fishing resources were Xyphopenaeus kroyeri, Micropogonias furnieri, Carcharhinus plumbeus, C. acronotus,and Rhizoprionodon porosus. Gillnets are responsible for the accidental capture of small cetaceans in the region, mainly Pontoporia blainvillei and Sotalia fluviatilis (marine form. Four types of gillnets that are used on the region ("minjuada", "sarda", "caçoá" and "pescadinha" were dangerous to these species because they are placed in their preferred habitat. There is no competition between fishermen and small cetaceans due to the selection in the capture of commercialized fishesInvestigação sobre a atividade pesqueira na localidade de Atafona, Norte do Rio de Janeiro, Brasil (21º25`S, foi conduzida entre 1987-96 com o objetivo de relacioná-la com a captura acidental e a dieta dos pequenos cetáceos. Dados sobre as operações pesqueiras foram obtidos na administração dos entrepostos de pesca, através de entrevistas com pescadores e observações pessoais. Os recursos pesqueiros mais representativos foram Xyphopenaeus kroyeri, Micropogonias furnieri, Carcharhinus plumbeus, C. acronotus, and Rhizoprionodon porosus. As redes de espera são responsáveis pela captura acidental de pequenos cetáceos na região, principalmente de Pontoporia blainvillei e Sotalia fluviatilis (forma marinha. Quatro tipos de redes de espera que são usadas na região ("minjuada", "sarda", "caçoá" and "pescadinha" foram mais perigosas para essas espécies pois são colocadas no seu hábitat preferencial

  12. Defining ecologically relevant scales for spatial protection with long-term data on an endangered seabird and local prey availability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherley, Richard B; Botha, Philna; Underhill, Les G; Ryan, Peter G; van Zyl, Danie; Cockcroft, Andrew C; Crawford, Robert J M; Dyer, Bruce M; Cook, Timothée R

    2017-12-01

    Human activities are important drivers of marine ecosystem functioning. However, separating the synergistic effects of fishing and environmental variability on the prey base of nontarget predators is difficult, often because prey availability estimates on appropriate scales are lacking. Understanding how prey abundance at different spatial scales links to population change can help integrate the needs of nontarget predators into fisheries management by defining ecologically relevant areas for spatial protection. We investigated the local population response (number of breeders) of the Bank Cormorant (Phalacrocorax neglectus), a range-restricted endangered seabird, to the availability of its prey, the heavily fished west coast rock lobster (Jasus lalandii). Using Bayesian state-space modeled cormorant counts at 3 colonies, 22 years of fisheries-independent data on local lobster abundance, and generalized additive modeling, we determined the spatial scale pertinent to these relationships in areas with different lobster availability. Cormorant numbers responded positively to lobster availability in the regions with intermediate and high abundance but not where regime shifts and fishing pressure had depleted lobster stocks. The relationships were strongest when lobsters 20-30 km offshore of the colony were considered, a distance greater than the Bank Cormorant's foraging range when breeding, and may have been influenced by prey availability for nonbreeding birds, prey switching, or prey ecology. Our results highlight the importance of considering the scale of ecological relationships in marine spatial planning and suggest that designing spatial protection around focal species can benefit marine predators across their full life cycle. We propose the precautionary implementation of small-scale marine protected areas, followed by robust assessment and adaptive-management, to confirm population-level benefits for the cormorants, their prey, and the wider ecosystem, without

  13. Fish market surveys indicate unsustainable elasmobranch fisheries in the Saudi Arabian Red Sea

    KAUST Repository

    Spaet, Julia L.Y.

    2015-01-01

    Elasmobranch populations worldwide are severely threatened due to overexploited and unregulated fisheries. Despite the fact that sharks and rays are captured in fisheries operating along the Red Sea coast of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA), information on any aspects of these fisheries are very limited. Here we document the structure, composition and biological characteristics of eastern Red Sea elasmobranch fisheries based on genetic identification and market survey data over an intensive two-year sampling period at the biggest Red Sea fish market in the KSA (Jeddah). Market surveys conducted two times per month between 2011 and 2013 revealed that 24 previously confirmed elasmobranch species for the Red Sea were landed by fishers and offered for sale. Genetic identification revealed two potentially undescribed guitarfish species as well as four batoid species not formerly reported from the Red Sea. Five coastal carcharhinid species dominated the landings-. Carcharhinus sorrah, C. amblyrhynchos, C. falciformis, C. limbatus, Rhizoprionodon acutus, together comprising 73% numerically of the total catch. Targeted shark fisheries reportedly exist in shark nursery areas. Most elasmobranchs outside of these areas were reportedly landed as bycatch. Most strikingly, the large majority of landed elasmobranchs were immature males or females below their reported size of sexual maturity, which suggests potential for both growth and recruitment overfishing and emphasizes the urgent need to implement region-specific management and conservation strategies to avoid the loss of these critical predators.

  14. Identification and phylogenetic inferences on stocks of sharks affected by the fishing industry off the Northern coast of Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Fernando da Silva Rodrigues-Filho

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The ongoing decline in abundance and diversity of shark stocks, primarily due to uncontrolled fishery exploitation, is a worldwide problem. An additional problem for the development of conservation and management programmes is the identification of species diversity within a given area, given the morphological similarities among shark species, and the typical disembarkation of processed carcasses which are almost impossible to differentiate. The main aim of the present study was to identify those shark species being exploited off northern Brazil, by using the 12S-16S molecular marker. For this, DNA sequences were obtained from 122 specimens collected on the docks and the fish market in Bragança, in the Brazilian state of Pará. We identified at least 11 species. Three-quarters of the specimens collected were either Carcharhinus porosus or Rhizoprionodon sp, while a notable absence was the daggernose shark, Isogomphodon oxyrhyncus, previously one of the most common species in local catches. The study emphasises the value of molecular techniques for the identification of cryptic shark species, and the potential of the 12S-16S marker as a tool for phylogenetic inferences in a study of elasmobranchs.

  15. APORTES A LA BIOLOGÍA DE TIBURONES Y RAYAS DEMERSALES EN LA REGIÓN NORTE DEL CARIBE COLOMBIANO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabian Moreno

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available El presente estudio es una contribución al conocimiento biológico de los peces cartilaginosos en la región norte del Caribe colombiano. Los ejemplares examinados se capturaron con una red demersal, se determinó su peso, longitud total y estado de madurez sexual. Adicionalmente se realizó la ubicación espacial de las capturas y la relación con las variables ambientales. Se capturaron un total de 21 individuos, colectando tres especies de rayas, Dasyatis americana, D. guttata y Rhinobatos percellens, dos de tiburones Mustelus minicanis y Rhizoprionodon porosus, la más común fue D. guttata con 56%, las tallas (longitud total fluctuaron entre los 1.760 - 394 mm en rayas y 595 - 585 mm en tiburones. Se obtuvieron más hembras que machos para todas las especies, con predominio de estados inmaduros y en maduración, solo se registró una hembra grávida deM. Minicanis con dos embriones.

  16. Assessing reproductive status in elasmobranch fishes using steroid hormones extracted from skeletal muscle tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prohaska, Bianca K.; Tsang, Paul C. W.; Driggers, William B.; Hoffmayer, Eric R.; Wheeler, Carolyn R.; Brown, A. Christine; Sulikowski, James A.

    2013-01-01

    Elasmobranch fishes (sharks, skates, and rays) are particularly susceptible to anthropogenic threats, making a thorough understanding of their life history characteristics essential for proper management. Historically, elasmobranch reproductive data have been collected by lethal sampling, an approach that is problematic for threatened and endangered species. However, recent studies have demonstrated that non-lethal approaches can be as effective as lethal ones for assessment of the reproductive status of an animal. For example, plasma has been used to examine concentrations of steroid hormones. Additionally, skeletal muscle tissue, which can be obtained non-lethally and with minimal stress, can also be used to quantify concentrations of steroid hormones. Skeletal muscle progesterone, testosterone, and estradiol concentrations were determined to be statistically significant indicators of reproductive status in the oviparous Leucoraja erinacea, the yolk-dependent viviparous Squalus acanthias, and the yolk-sac placental viviparous Rhizoprionodon terraenovae. The results of the present study demonstrate that steroid hormones present in non-lethally harvested skeletal muscle tissue can be used as reliable indicators of reproductive status in elasmobranchs. PMID:27293612

  17. DNA barcoding reveals the diversity of sharks in Guyana coastal markets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew A. Kolmann

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT A fundamental challenge for both sustainable fisheries and biodiversity protection in the Neotropics is the accurate determination of species identity. The biodiversity of the coastal sharks of Guyana is poorly understood, but these species are subject to both artisanal fishing as well as harvesting by industrialized offshore fleets. To determine what species of sharks are frequently caught and consumed along the coastline of Guyana, we used DNA barcoding to identify market specimens. We sequenced the mitochondrial co1 gene for 132 samples collected from six markets, and compared our sequences to those available in the Barcode of Life Database (BOLD and GenBank. Nearly 30% of the total sample diversity was represented by two species of Hammerhead Sharks (Sphyrna mokarran and S. lewini, both listed as Endangered by the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN. Other significant portions of the samples included Sharpnose Sharks (23% - Rhizoprionodon spp., considered Vulnerable in Brazilian waters due to unregulated gillnet fisheries, and the Smalltail Shark (17% - Carcharhinus porosus. We found that barcoding provides efficient and accurate identification of market specimens in Guyana, making this study the first in over thirty years to address Guyana’s coastal shark biodiversity.

  18. Identification and evaluation of shark bycatch in Georgia's commercial shrimp trawl fishery with implications for management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belcher, C.N.; Jennings, C.A.

    2011-01-01

    Many US states have recreational and commercial fisheries that occur in nursery areas occupied by subadult sharks and can potentially affect their survival. Georgia is one of few US states without a directed commercial shark fishery, but the state has a large, nearshore penaeid shrimp trawl fishery in which small sharks occur as bycatch. During our 1995–1998 investigation of bycatch in fishery-dependent sampling events, 34% of 127 trawls contained sharks. This bycatch totalled 217 individuals from six species, with Atlantic sharpnose shark, Rhizoprionodon terraenovae (Richardson), the most common and finetooth shark, Carcharhinus isodon (Müller & Henle) and spinner shark, Carcharhinus brevipinna (Müller & Henle), the least common. The highest catch rates for sharks occurred during June and July and coincided with the peak months of the pupping season for many species. Trawl tow speed and tow time did not significantly influence catch rates for shark species. Gear configurations [net type, turtle excluder device (TED), bycatch reduction device] affected catch rates for shark species. Results of this study indicate gear restrictions, a delayed season opening, or reduced bar spacing on TEDs may reduce shark bycatch in this fishery.

  19. Identification and evaluation of shark bycatch in Georgia’s commercial shrimp trawl fishery with implications for management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belcher, C.N.; Jennings, Cecil A.

    2011-01-01

    Many US states have recreational and commercial fisheries that occur in nursery areas occupied by subadult sharks and can potentially affect their survival. Georgia is one of few US states without a directed commercial shark fishery, but the state has a large, nearshore penaeid shrimp trawl fishery in which small sharks occur as bycatch. During our 1995-1998 investigation of bycatch in fishery-dependent sampling events, 34% of 127 trawls contained sharks. This bycatch totalled 217 individuals from six species, with Atlantic sharpnose shark, Rhizoprionodon terraenovae (Richardson), the most common and finetooth shark, Carcharhinus isodon (Müller & Henle) and spinner shark, Carcharhinus brevipinna (Müller & Henle), the least common. The highest catch rates for sharks occurred during June and July and coincided with the peak months of the pupping season for many species. Trawl tow speed and tow time did not significantly influence catch rates for shark species. Gear configurations [net type, turtle excluder device (TED), bycatch reduction device] affected catch rates for shark species. Results of this study indicate gear restrictions, a delayed season opening, or reduced bar spacing on TEDs may reduce shark bycatch in this fishery.

  20. Utility of mesohabitat features for determining habitat associations of subadult sharks in Georgia’s estuaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belcher, C.N.; Jennings, Cecil A.

    2010-01-01

    We examined the affects of selected water quality variables on the presence of subadult sharks in six of nine Georgia estuaries. During 231 longline sets, we captured 415 individuals representing nine species. Atlantic sharpnose shark (Rhizoprionodon terranovae), bonnethead (Sphyrna tiburo), blacktip shark (Carcharhinus limbatus) and sandbar shark (C. plumbeus) comprised 96.1% of the catch. Canonical correlation analysis (CCA) was used to assess environmental influences on the assemblage of the four common species. Results of the CCA indicated Bonnethead Shark and Sandbar Shark were correlated with each other and with a subset of environmental variables. When the species occurred singly, depth was the defining environmental variable; whereas, when the two co-occurred, dissolved oxygen and salinity were the defining variables. Discriminant analyses (DA) were used to assess environmental influences on individual species. Results of the discriminant analyses supported the general CCA findings that the presence of bonnethead and sandbar shark were the only two species that correlated with environmental variables. In addition to depth and dissolved oxygen, turbidity influenced the presence of sandbar shark. The presence of bonnethead shark was influenced primarily by salinity and turbidity. Significant relationships existed for both the CCA and DA analyses; however, environmental variables accounted for shark species among sites.

  1. Use of a fishery-independent trawl survey to evaluate distribution patterns of subadult sharks in Georgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belcher, C.N.; Jennings, Cecil A.

    2009-01-01

    We investigated the utility of a fishery-independent trawl survey for assessing a potential multispecies shark nursery in Georgia's nearshore and inshore waters. A total of 234 subadult sharks from six species were captured during 85 of 216 trawls. Catch rates and size distributions for subadult sharks and the ratio of neonates to juveniles were consistent among areas. The highest concentrations of subadult sharks occurred in creeks and sounds. Species composition varied among areas. The Atlantic sharpnose shark Rhizoprionodon terraenovae was the most abundant species in sound and nearshore stations, whereas the bonnethead Sphyrna tiburo was the most abundant species in creeks. The aggregate of other species occurred with higher frequency in the sounds and nearshore. Sampling characteristics of the trawl survey were compared with those from a fishery-independent longline survey of subadult sharks to assess the similarity of the two gears. A total of 193 subadult sharks from seven species were captured during 57 of 96 longline sets, whereas 52 subadults from four species were captured during 20 of 48 trawls. Selectivity and efficiency differed between the two gears. The trawl had lower catch rates, caught smaller sharks, and encountered a different suite of species than the longline. General seasonal trends in relative abundance also differed between the two gears; the longline showed an increasing trend in abundance, whereas the trawl showed a stable trend. Although trawls were not found to be efficient for sampling subadult sharks from most species, they can be a useful source of supplemental data.

  2. Mercury accumulation in sharks from the coastal waters of southwest Florida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumbold, Darren; Wasno, Robert; Hammerschlag, Neil; Volety, Aswani

    2014-10-01

    As large long-lived predators, sharks are particularly vulnerable to exposure to methylmercury biomagnified through the marine food web. Accordingly, nonlethal means were used to collect tissues for determining mercury (Hg) concentrations and stable isotopes of carbon (δ(13)C) and nitrogen (δ(15)N) from a total of 69 sharks, comprising 7 species, caught off Southwest Florida from May 2010 through June 2013. Species included blacknose (Carcharhinus acronotus), blacktip (C. limbatus), bull (C. leucas), great hammerhead (Sphyrna mokarran), lemon (Negaprion brevirostris), sharpnose (Rhizoprionodon terraenovae), and tiger sharks (Galeocerdo cuvier). The sharks contained Hg concentrations in their muscle tissues ranging from 0.19 mg/kg (wet-weight basis) in a tiger shark to 4.52 mg/kg in a blacktip shark. Individual differences in total length and δ(13)C explained much of the intraspecific variation in Hg concentrations in blacknose, blacktip, and sharpnose sharks, but similar patterns were not evident for Hg and δ(15)N. Interspecific differences in Hg concentration were evident with greater concentrations in slower-growing, mature blacktip sharks and lower concentrations in faster-growing, young tiger sharks than other species. These results are consistent with previous studies reporting age-dependent growth rate can be an important determinant of intraspecific and interspecific patterns in Hg accumulation. The Hg concentrations observed in these sharks, in particular the blacktip shark, also suggested that Hg may pose a threat to shark health and fitness.

  3. Population genetics of four heavily exploited shark species around the Arabian Peninsula

    KAUST Repository

    Spaet, Julia L.Y.

    2015-05-01

    The northwestern Indian Ocean harbors a number of larger marine vertebrate taxa that warrant the investigation of genetic population structure given remarkable spatial heterogeneity in biological characteristics such as distribution, behavior, and morphology. Here, we investigate the genetic population structure of four commercially exploited shark species with different biological characteristics (Carcharhinus limbatus, Carcharhinus sorrah, Rhizoprionodon acutus, and Sphyrna lewini) between the Red Sea and all other water bodies surrounding the Arabian Peninsula. To assess intraspecific patterns of connectivity, we constructed statistical parsimony networks among haplotypes and estimated (1) population structure; and (2) time of most recent population expansion, based on mitochondrial control region DNA and a total of 20 microsatellites. Our analysis indicates that, even in smaller, less vagile shark species, there are no contemporary barriers to gene flow across the study region, while historical events, for example, Pleistocene glacial cycles, may have affected connectivity in C. sorrah and R. acutus. A parsimony network analysis provided evidence that Arabian S. lewini may represent a population segment that is distinct from other known stocks in the Indian Ocean, raising a new layer of conservation concern. Our results call for urgent regional cooperation to ensure the sustainable exploitation of sharks in the Arabian region.

  4. Size, sex and seasonal patterns in the assemblage of Carcharhiniformes in a sub-tropical bay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, S M; Bennett, M B

    2013-01-01

    Size, sex and seasonal patterns among Carcharhiniformes were examined in shallow regions of Moreton Bay, Queensland, Australia. A total of 1259 sharks were caught, comprising 13 species. The Australian sharpnose shark Rhizoprionodon taylori and the blacktip complex Carcharhinus limbatus-Carcharhinus tilstoni comprised 55% of all shark individuals. Neonates were observed for five species including the dusky shark Carcharhinus obscurus, which contrary to previous reports was relatively abundant in shallow, predominantly estuarine waters. Three contrasting patterns of occurrence were observed: smaller species were abundant and present throughout much of their ontogeny, larger species were mainly caught as neonates or juveniles and vagrant species were only caught during the warmer months. The shark assemblage differed significantly among seasons. While many species were observed during the warmer months, species diversity was lower in winter when C. obscurus comprised 43% of the catch. Overall, the results indicated that spatial and temporal distribution patterns were not synchronous for all species. The capture of small numbers of neonate C. obscurus in late autumn and winter demonstrates that parturition among Carcharhiniformes is not confined to spring and summer in sub-tropical waters. © 2012 The Authors. Journal of Fish Biology © 2012 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.

  5. Nitric oxide production by nurse shark (Ginglymostoma cirratum) and clearnose skate (Raja eglanteria) peripheral blood leucocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Cathy J; Toranto, Jason D; Gilliland, C Taylor; Noyes, David R; Bodine, Ashby B; Luer, Carl A

    2006-01-01

    Reactive nitrogen intermediates, such as nitric oxide (NO), are important immunomodulators in vertebrate immune systems, but have yet to be identified as mediators of host defence in any member of class Chondrichthyes, the cartilaginous fishes. In the present study, production of NO by nurse shark (Ginglymostoma cirratum) peripheral blood leucocytes (PBL) stimulated with bacterial cell wall lipopolysaccharide (LPS) was investigated. PBL were cultured for 24 to 96 h following stimulation with LPS at concentrations ranging from 0 to 25 microg ml(-1), in both serum-supplemented and serum-free culture conditions. Production of NO was measured indirectly using the Griess reaction, with maximal NO production occurring after 72 h using 10% FBS and 10 microg LPS ml(-1). Application of these culture conditions to PBL from another cartilaginous fish (clearnose skate, Raja eglanteria) resulted in a similar NO response. Addition of a specific inhibitor of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), L-N(6)-(1-iminoethyl)lysine (L-NIL), resulted in a significant decrease in the production of NO by PBL from both species.

  6. The epidemiology, evaluation, and management of stingray injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, James H

    2007-01-01

    A descriptive analysis and review of the world's salient scientific literature on stingray injuries was conducted in light of recent high-profile cases of fatal and near-fatal thoracic stingray injuries to guide clinicians in evaluating and managing stingray injuries. Data was extracted from observational and longitudinal studies over the period, 1950-2006, to permit (1) a stratification of stingray injuries as bites, penetrating lacerations with and without envenoming, and combinations of deeply penetrating and envenoming wounds; and (2) an assessment of new management strategies for thoracoabdominal penetrating trauma and non-healing, necrotic stingray wounds. Unlike their Chondrichthyes classmates, the sharks, stingrays are docile and non-aggressive; and will not attack with their spined tails, unless provoked. Although some occupations are predisposed to stingray injuries, most stingray injuries can be avoided by observing seafloors and adopting simple practices when wading, swimming, diving, or fishing in temperate oceans and some tropical freshwater river systems. All stingray injuries should be managed initially with wound irrigation to dislodge retained spine fragments and envenoming tissues and warm water immersion to inactivate heat-labile toxins.

  7. Coding early naturalists' accounts into long-term fish community changes in the Adriatic Sea (1800-2000.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomaso Fortibuoni

    Full Text Available The understanding of fish communities' changes over the past centuries has important implications for conservation policy and marine resource management. However, reconstructing these changes is difficult because information on marine communities before the second half of the 20(th century is, in most cases, anecdotal and merely qualitative. Therefore, historical qualitative records and modern quantitative data are not directly comparable, and their integration for long-term analyses is not straightforward. We developed a methodology that allows the coding of qualitative information provided by early naturalists into semi-quantitative information through an intercalibration with landing proportions. This approach allowed us to reconstruct and quantitatively analyze a 200-year-long time series of fish community structure indicators in the Northern Adriatic Sea (Mediterranean Sea. Our analysis provides evidence of long-term changes in fish community structure, including the decline of Chondrichthyes, large-sized and late-maturing species. This work highlights the importance of broadening the time-frame through which we look at marine ecosystem changes and provides a methodology to exploit, in a quantitative framework, historical qualitative sources. To the purpose, naturalists' eyewitness accounts proved to be useful for extending the analysis on fish community back in the past, well before the onset of field-based monitoring programs.

  8. A Severe Accident Caused by an Ocellate River Stingray (Potamotrygon motoro) in Central Brazil: How Well Do We Really Understand Stingray Venom Chemistry, Envenomation, and Therapeutics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Nelson Jorge; Ferreira, Kalley Ricardo Clementino; Pinto, Raimundo Nonato Leite; Aird, Steven Douglas

    2015-06-18

    Freshwater stingrays cause many serious human injuries, but identification of the offending species is uncommon. The present case involved a large freshwater stingray, Potamotrygon motoro (Chondrichthyes: Potamotrygonidae), in the Araguaia River in Tocantins, Brazil. Appropriate first aid was administered within ~15 min, except that an ice pack was applied. Analgesics provided no pain relief, although hot compresses did. Ciprofloxacin therapy commenced after ~18 h and continued seven days. Then antibiotic was suspended; however, after two more days and additional tests, cephalosporin therapy was initiated, and proved successful. Pain worsened despite increasingly powerful analgesics, until debridement of the wound was performed after one month. The wound finally closed ~70 days after the accident, but the patient continued to have problems wearing shoes even eight months later. Chemistry and pharmacology of Potamotrygon venom and mucus, and clinical management of freshwater stingray envenomations are reviewed in light of the present case. Bacterial infections of stingray puncture wounds may account for more long-term morbidity than stingray venom. Simultaneous prophylactic use of multiple antibiotics is recommended for all but the most superficial stingray wounds. Distinguishing relative contributions of venom, mucus, and bacteria will require careful genomic and transcriptomic investigations of stingray tissues and contaminating bacteria.

  9. Oldest near-complete acanthodian: the first vertebrate from the Silurian Bertie Formation Konservat-Lagerstätte, Ontario.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carole J Burrow

    Full Text Available The relationships between early jawed vertebrates have been much debated, with cladistic analyses yielding little consensus on the position (or positions of acanthodians with respect to other groups. Whereas one recent analysis showed various acanthodians (classically known as 'spiny sharks' as stem osteichthyans (bony fishes and others as stem chondrichthyans, another shows the acanthodians as a paraphyletic group of stem chondrichthyans, and the latest analysis shows acanthodians as the monophyletic sister group of the Chondrichthyes.A small specimen of the ischnacanthiform acanthodian Nerepisacanthus denisoni is the first vertebrate fossil collected from the Late Silurian Bertie Formation Konservat-Lagerstätte of southern Ontario, Canada, a deposit well-known for its spectacular eurypterid fossils. The fish is the only near complete acanthodian from pre-Devonian strata worldwide, and confirms that Nerepisacanthus has dentigerous jaw bones, body scales with superposed crown growth zones formed of ondontocytic mesodentine, and a patch of chondrichthyan-like scales posterior to the jaw joint.The combination of features found in Nerepisacanthus supports the hypothesis that acanthodians could be a group, or even a clade, on the chondrichthyan stem. Cladistic analyses of early jawed vertebrates incorporating Nerepisacanthus, and updated data on other acanthodians based on publications in press, should help clarify their relationships.

  10. A Severe Accident Caused by an Ocellate River Stingray (Potamotrygon motoro in Central Brazil: How Well Do We Really Understand Stingray Venom Chemistry, Envenomation, and Therapeutics?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson Jorge da Silva

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Freshwater stingrays cause many serious human injuries, but identification of the offending species is uncommon. The present case involved a large freshwater stingray, Potamotrygon motoro (Chondrichthyes: Potamotrygonidae, in the Araguaia River in Tocantins, Brazil. Appropriate first aid was administered within ~15 min, except that an ice pack was applied. Analgesics provided no pain relief, although hot compresses did. Ciprofloxacin therapy commenced after ~18 h and continued seven days. Then antibiotic was suspended; however, after two more days and additional tests, cephalosporin therapy was initiated, and proved successful. Pain worsened despite increasingly powerful analgesics, until debridement of the wound was performed after one month. The wound finally closed ~70 days after the accident, but the patient continued to have problems wearing shoes even eight months later. Chemistry and pharmacology of Potamotrygon venom and mucus, and clinical management of freshwater stingray envenomations are reviewed in light of the present case. Bacterial infections of stingray puncture wounds may account for more long-term morbidity than stingray venom. Simultaneous prophylactic use of multiple antibiotics is recommended for all but the most superficial stingray wounds. Distinguishing relative contributions of venom, mucus, and bacteria will require careful genomic and transcriptomic investigations of stingray tissues and contaminating bacteria.

  11. Questioning hagfish affinities of the enigmatic Devonian vertebrate Palaeospondylus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johanson, Zerina; Smith, Moya; Sanchez, Sophie; Senden, Tim; Trinajstic, Kate; Pfaff, Cathrin

    2017-07-01

    Palaeospondylus gunni Traquair, 1890 is an enigmatic Devonian vertebrate whose taxonomic affinities have been debated since it was first described. Most recently, Palaeospondylus has been identified as a stem-group hagfish (Myxinoidea). However, one character questioning this assignment is the presence of three semicircular canals in the otic region of the cartilaginous skull, a feature of jawed vertebrates. Additionally, new tomographic data reveal that the following characters of crown-group gnathostomes (chondrichthyans + osteichthyans) are present in Palaeospondylus: a longer telencephalic region of the braincase, separation of otic and occipital regions by the otico-occipital fissure, and vertebral centra. As well, a precerebral fontanelle and postorbital articulation of the palatoquadrate are characteristic of certain chondrichthyans. Similarities in the structure of the postorbital process to taxa such as Pucapampella, and possible presence of the ventral cranial fissure, both support a resolution of Pa. gunni as a stem chondrichthyan. The internally mineralized cartilaginous skeleton in Palaeospondylus may represent a stage in the loss of bone characteristic of the Chondrichthyes.

  12. Runx family genes in a cartilaginous fish, the elephant shark (Callorhinchus milii.

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    Giselle Sek Suan Nah

    Full Text Available The Runx family genes encode transcription factors that play key roles in hematopoiesis, skeletogenesis and neurogenesis and are often implicated in diseases. We describe here the cloning and characterization of Runx1, Runx2, Runx3 and Runxb genes in the elephant shark (Callorhinchus milii, a member of Chondrichthyes, the oldest living group of jawed vertebrates. Through the use of alternative promoters and/or alternative splicing, each of the elephant shark Runx genes expresses multiple isoforms similar to their orthologs in human and other bony vertebrates. The expression profiles of elephant shark Runx genes are similar to those of mammalian Runx genes. The syntenic blocks of genes at the elephant shark Runx gene loci are highly conserved in human, but represented by shorter conserved blocks in zebrafish indicating a higher degree of rearrangements in this teleost fish. Analysis of promoter regions revealed conservation of binding sites for transcription factors, including two tandem binding sites for Runx that are totally conserved in the distal promoter regions of elephant shark Runx1-3. Several conserved noncoding elements (CNEs, which are putative cis-regulatory elements, and miRNA binding sites were identified in the elephant shark and human Runx gene loci. Some of these CNEs and miRNA binding sites are absent in teleost fishes such as zebrafish and fugu. In summary, our analysis reveals that the genomic organization and expression profiles of Runx genes were already complex in the common ancestor of jawed vertebrates.

  13. Allergenicity of bony and cartilaginous fish - molecular and immunological properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephen, J N; Sharp, M F; Ruethers, T; Taki, A; Campbell, D E; Lopata, A L

    2017-03-01

    Allergy to bony fish is common and probably increasing world-wide. The major heat-stable pan-fish allergen, parvalbumin (PV), has been identified and characterized for numerous fish species. In contrast, there are very few reports of allergic reactions to cartilaginous fish despite widespread consumption. The molecular basis for this seemingly low clinical cross-reactivity between these two fish groups has not been elucidated. PV consists of two distinct protein lineages, α and β. The α-lineage of this protein is predominant in muscle tissue of cartilaginous fish (Chondrichthyes), while β-PV is abundant in muscle tissue of bony fish (Osteichthyes). The low incidence of allergic reactions to ingested rays and sharks is likely due to the lack of molecular similarity, resulting in reduced immunological cross-reactivity between the two PV lineages. Structurally and physiologically, both protein lineages are very similar; however, the amino acid homology is very low with 47-54%. Furthermore, PV from ancient fish species such as the coelacanth demonstrates 62% sequence homology to leopard shark α-PV and 70% to carp β-PV. This indicates the extent of conservation of the PV isoforms lineages across millennia. This review highlights prevalence data on fish allergy and sensitization to fish, and details the molecular diversity of the two protein lineages of the major fish allergen PV among different fish groups, emphasizing the immunological and clinical differences in allergenicity. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. By-catch composition of the Patagonian scallop fishery: the fishes Composición de la captura incidental en la pesquería de vieira patagónica: los peces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Schejter

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available An inventory of 24 fish species incidentally caught by the Patagonian scallop fleet in the SW Atlantic Ocean is provided for the first time. The most frequent species were Psammobatis spp. (81.4%, Bathyraja brachyurops (75.1%, B. macloviana (73.5%, Patagonotothen ramsayi (66.1%, Merluccius hubbsi (53.7% and B. albomaculata (50.3%. Many of the recorded chondrichthyes are considered vulnerable or endangered species. The number of taxa (fishes + invertebrates that conforms the by-catch of the fishery was increased and updated to nearly 200 species.Este estudio presenta por primera vez un inventario con 24 especies de peces registradas en la captura incidental de la pesca de la vieira patagónica en el Océano Atlántico sudoccidental por la flota pesquera comercial. Las especies más frecuentes fueron Psammobatis spp. (81,4%, Bathyraja brachyurops (75,1%, B. macloviana (73,5%, Patagonotothen ramsayi (66,1%, Merluccius hubbsi (53,7% y B. albomaculata (50,3%. Muchos de los condrictios registrados se encuentran actualmente considerados como especies vulnerables o en peligro. El número de taxa (peces + invertebrados que conforman la captura incidental de esta pesquería se incrementó y actualizó con estos resultados a aproximadamente 200 especies.

  15. Evolutionary Relations of Hexanchiformes Deep-Sea Sharks Elucidated by Whole Mitochondrial Genome Sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Keiko; Tomita, Taketeru; Suzuki, Shingo; Hosomichi, Kazuyoshi; Sano, Kazumi; Doi, Hiroyuki; Kono, Azumi; Inoko, Hidetoshi; Kulski, Jerzy K.; Tanaka, Sho

    2013-01-01

    Hexanchiformes is regarded as a monophyletic taxon, but the morphological and genetic relationships between the five extant species within the order are still uncertain. In this study, we determined the whole mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequences of seven sharks including representatives of the five Hexanchiformes, one squaliform, and one carcharhiniform and inferred the phylogenetic relationships among those species and 12 other Chondrichthyes (cartilaginous fishes) species for which the complete mitogenome is available. The monophyly of Hexanchiformes and its close relation with all other Squaliformes sharks were strongly supported by likelihood and Bayesian phylogenetic analysis of 13,749 aligned nucleotides of 13 protein coding genes and two rRNA genes that were derived from the whole mDNA sequences of the 19 species. The phylogeny suggested that Hexanchiformes is in the superorder Squalomorphi, Chlamydoselachus anguineus (frilled shark) is the sister species to all other Hexanchiformes, and the relations within Hexanchiformes are well resolved as Chlamydoselachus, (Notorynchus, (Heptranchias, (Hexanchus griseus, H. nakamurai))). Based on our phylogeny, we discussed evolutionary scenarios of the jaw suspension mechanism and gill slit numbers that are significant features in the sharks. PMID:24089661

  16. The toxinology of stingrays

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    Gholamhossein Mohebbi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Stingrays belong to Chondrichthyes class.They live in freshwaters and oceans all over the world. They have venomous spines next to the root of the tail. Their barbed stingers covered with secretory cells that cause a large number of serious human injuries. In this review, we evaluate the toxinology of these venomous animals. Results: Some of inoculated venom symptoms included the immediate and intense pain, inflammation and skin necrosis, bleeding wounds, acute edema, salivation, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, fever, headaches, muscle cramps, tremors, paralysis, dyspnea, cardiovascular collapse, local vasoconstriction, seizures, coma, and rarely death. The venom contains 5-HT, 5-nucleotidase, acetylcholine , phosphodiesterase, proteolytic enzymes against casein, gelatin, and fibrinogen, and several toxins such as cystatins, galectin, peroxiredoxin 6, orpotrin and porflan, and other peptids and proteins including alpha subunit haemoglobin, ganglioside GM2 activator, glutathione s-transferase µ, leukocyte elastase inhibitor, transaldolase, ATP synthase, nucleoside diphosphate kinase and type III intermediate filament. Galectin has a diverse functions including anticoagulant, procoagulant, platelet-modulating, myotoxic and haemagglutination activities. Cystatins are potent inhibitors of cysteine proteinases, including papain and the cathepsins. Hydrolysis of lipids through PLA2 activity is one of the most important functions of peroxiredoxin-6. Orpotrin and porflan have vasoconstrictive and inflammatory effects, respectively. Conclusion: Stingray venoms have different toxins and bioactive molecules with diverse mechanisms of toxicities. A thorough understanding of the toxicities mechanisms and clinical manifestations of stingrays’ venoms will provide the ability to treat effectively and manage injuries with this animals by clinicians and toxinologists.

  17. Gross anatomy and histology of the olfactory rosette of the shark Heptranchias perlo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrando, Sara; Gallus, Lorenzo; Amaroli, Andrea; Gambardella, Chiara; Waryani, Baradi; Di Blasi, Davide; Vacchi, Marino

    2017-06-01

    Sharks belonging to the family Hexanchidae have six or seven gill slits, unlike all other elasmobranchs, which have five gill slits. Their olfactory organs have a round shape, which is common for holocephalans, but not for elasmobranchs. Thus, the shape of the olfactory organ represents a further, less striking, peculiarity of this family among elasmobranchs. Despite that, the microscopic anatomy and histology of the olfactory organ have not yet been studied in any species of this family. Here, an anatomical and histological description of the olfactory organ of the sharpnose sevengill shark Heptranchias perlo is given. The organ is a rosette, with a central raphe and 31-34 primary lamellae, which bear secondary lamellae with a more or less branched shape. The elastic connective capsule which envelops the olfactory rosette possibly changes its shape along with water influx. In the olfactory epithelium, the supporting cells also have a secretory function, while no specialized mucous cells are visible; regarding this feature the olfactory epithelium of H. perlo differs from that of other chondrichthyan species. The immunohistochemical investigation of the sensory epithelium shows the absence of immunoreactivity for Gαolf in receptor neurons, which confirms previous observations in Chondrichthyes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  18. ANÁLISIS DE LAS CAPTURAS DE TIBURONES Y RAYAS EN LAS PESQUERÍAS ARTESANALES DE TÁRCOLES, PACÍFICO CENTRAL DE COSTA RICA

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    Andrés López Garro

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Se analizaron las capturas de tiburones y rayas látigo realizadas por pescadores artesanales de Tárcoles  en el Pacífico de Costa Rica, desde febrero del 2006 hasta febrero del 2007. Se observaron 415 faenas de pesca (línea de fondo, trasmallo y línea rayera: 340 correspondieron a observaciones de descarga y 75 (18.1% a observaciones a bordo. Durante las descargas se analizaron 3299 tiburones y rayas látigo: el tiburón mamón enano (Mustelus henlei dominó en la captura total (63.7%, seguido por el tiburón mamón común (Mustelus lunulatus (16.7%, el tiburón picudo común (Rhizoprionodon longurio 6.9% y el tiburón martillo común (Sphyrna lewini 6.1%. A su vez, la raya látigo (D. longa y el tiburón picudo fucsia (Nasolamia velox representaron un 3.5% y 2.6% de la captura total, respectivamente. En los 75 viajes a bordo se capturó un total de 6.458 peces, de los cuales solo el 4.4% (240 individuos fueron tiburones y rayas látigo. M. henlei fue nuevamente la especie más abundante (50.4%, le siguieron R. longurio (21.7%, D. longa (13.8, N. velox (5.8%, S. lewini (5.8%, y por último, M. lunulatus (2.5%. Debido a la estacionalidad y abundancia de tiburones mamones en la zona de Herradura, se recomienda un cierre técnico en enero-febrero y setiembre-octubre, meses con las mayores capturas. También se recomienda la protección de la zona del Peñón, ya que es utilizada por la raya látigo y por los juveniles del tiburón martillo. From February 2006 to February 2007, we analyzed shark and rays captures by the artisanal fishermen from Tárcoles, in the Pacific of Costa Rica. We observed 415 fishing operations (bottom line, gillnet and ray line: 340 dock landing observations and 75 (18.1% on board observations. During the landing observations, we analyzed 3299 sharks and rays: the brown smooth hound (Mustelus henlei was the most common species (63.7%, followed by the common smooth hound (Mustelus lunulatus (16.7%, the Pacific

  19. Registro Fossílifero das Raias (Chondrichtes-Batomorphi em Bacias Sedimentares Brasileiras.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paloma Tâmega da Silva Abreu Moreira

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available A classe dos Chondrichthyes é representadapelos Elasmobranchii (tubarões e raias e Holocephali(quimeras. A presença de fósseis de raias em baciassedimentares brasileiras é conhecida desde o séculoXIX, sendo representadas atualmente por seisfamílias. São estruturas de difícil preservação, sendo,portanto raras no registro fossilífero. A grande maioriados registros é de espinhos e dentes, mas ocorrênciasextraordinárias de exemplares quase completos deraias e tubarão foram encontradas na Chapada doAraripe, nordeste do Brasil. A primeira espécie foidescrita da bacia de Pernambuco e posteriormentemais três espécies foram assinaladas nas baciasde Sergipe, Pernambuco e Araripe. O restante domaterial é conhecido apenas em nível de gêneroou família. Com base na literatura, foi realizadoum inventário destas ocorrências, pertencentes aoacervo de várias instituições de pesquisa, permitindorecuperar e atualizar as informações, sistematizandoas ocorrências e o material depositado nas diversascoleções. No Museu de Ciências da Terra/DNPM,Rio de Janeiro foram encontrados 69 dentes isolados,provenientes das bacias de Pernambuco, Sergipe ePirabas e um exemplar quase completo da bacia doAraripe. Constam sete placas dentárias, 118 dentese quatro espinhos caudais provenientes das baciasde São Luís, Pirabas, Acre, Pernambuco, Sergipee Pelotas. Dentre os gêneros estudados, os maisrepresentativos são: Myliobatis sp. com 60 dentes eRhombodus binkhorsti com 52 dentes.

  20. Construction of a nurse shark (Ginglymostoma cirratum) bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library and a preliminary genome survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Meizhong; Kim, Hyeran; Kudrna, Dave; Sisneros, Nicholas B; Lee, So-Jeong; Mueller, Christopher; Collura, Kristi; Zuccolo, Andrea; Buckingham, E Bryan; Grim, Suzanne M; Yanagiya, Kazuyo; Inoko, Hidetoshi; Shiina, Takashi; Flajnik, Martin F; Wing, Rod A; Ohta, Yuko

    2006-05-03

    Sharks are members of the taxonomic class Chondrichthyes, the oldest living jawed vertebrates. Genomic studies of this group, in comparison to representative species in other vertebrate taxa, will allow us to theorize about the fundamental genetic, developmental, and functional characteristics in the common ancestor of all jawed vertebrates. In order to obtain mapping and sequencing data for comparative genomics, we constructed a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library for the nurse shark, Ginglymostoma cirratum. The BAC library consists of 313,344 clones with an average insert size of 144 kb, covering ~4.5 x 1010 bp and thus providing an 11-fold coverage of the haploid genome. BAC end sequence analyses revealed, in addition to LINEs and SINEs commonly found in other animal and plant genomes, two new groups of nurse shark-specific repetitive elements, NSRE1 and NSRE2 that seem to be major components of the nurse shark genome. Screening the library with single-copy or multi-copy gene probes showed 6-28 primary positive clones per probe of which 50-90% were true positives, demonstrating that the BAC library is representative of the different regions of the nurse shark genome. Furthermore, some BAC clones contained multiple genes, making physical mapping feasible. We have constructed a deep-coverage, high-quality, large insert, and publicly available BAC library for a cartilaginous fish. It will be very useful to the scientific community interested in shark genomic structure, comparative genomics, and functional studies. We found two new groups of repetitive elements specific to the nurse shark genome, which may contribute to the architecture and evolution of the nurse shark genome.

  1. Distributional shift of urea production site from the extraembryonic yolk sac membrane to the embryonic liver during the development of cloudy catshark (Scyliorhinus torazame).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takagi, Wataru; Kajimura, Makiko; Tanaka, Hironori; Hasegawa, Kumi; Ogawa, Shuntaro; Hyodo, Susumu

    2017-09-01

    Urea is an essential osmolyte for marine cartilaginous fishes. Adult elasmobranchs and holocephalans are known to actively produce urea in the liver, muscle and other extrahepatic organs; however, osmoregulatory mechanisms in the developing cartilaginous fish embryo with an undeveloped urea-producing organ are poorly understood. We recently described the contribution of extraembryonic yolk sac membranes (YSM) to embryonic urea synthesis during the early developmental period of the oviparous holocephalan elephant fish (Callorhinchus milii). In the present study, to test whether urea production in the YSM is a general phenomenon among oviparous Chondrichthyes, we investigated gene expression and activities of ornithine urea cycle (OUC) enzymes together with urea concentrations in embryos of the elasmobranch cloudy catshark (Scyliorhinus torazame). The intracapsular fluid, in which the catshark embryo develops, had a similar osmolality to seawater, and embryos maintained a high concentration of urea at levels similar to that of adult plasma throughout development. Relative mRNA expressions and activities of catshark OUC enzymes were significantly higher in YSM than in embryos until stage 32. Concomitant with the development of the embryonic liver, the expression levels and activities of OUC enzymes were markedly increased in the embryo from stage 33, while those of the YSM decreased from stage 32. The present study provides further evidence that the YSM contributes to embryonic urea homeostasis until the liver and other extrahepatic organs become fully functional, and that urea-producing tissue shifts from the YSM to the embryonic liver in the late developmental period of oviparous marine cartilaginous fishes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. First shark from the Late Devonian (Frasnian) Gogo Formation, Western Australia sheds new light on the development of tessellated calcified cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, John A; Burrow, Carole J; Ginter, Michal; Maisey, John G; Trinajstic, Kate M; Coates, Michael I; Young, Gavin C; Senden, Tim J

    2015-01-01

    Living gnathostomes (jawed vertebrates) comprise two divisions, Chondrichthyes (cartilaginous fishes, including euchondrichthyans with prismatic calcified cartilage, and extinct stem chondrichthyans) and Osteichthyes (bony fishes including tetrapods). Most of the early chondrichthyan ('shark') record is based upon isolated teeth, spines, and scales, with the oldest articulated sharks that exhibit major diagnostic characters of the group--prismatic calcified cartilage and pelvic claspers in males--being from the latest Devonian, c. 360 Mya. This paucity of information about early chondrichthyan anatomy is mainly due to their lack of endoskeletal bone and consequent low preservation potential. Here we present new data from the first well-preserved chondrichthyan fossil from the early Late Devonian (ca. 380-384 Mya) Gogo Formation Lägerstatte of Western Australia. The specimen is the first Devonian shark body fossil to be acid-prepared, revealing the endoskeletal elements as three-dimensional undistorted units: Meckel's cartilages, nasal, ceratohyal, basibranchial and possible epibranchial cartilages, plus left and right scapulocoracoids, as well as teeth and scales. This unique specimen is assigned to Gogoselachus lynnbeazleyae n. gen. n. sp. The Meckel's cartilages show a jaw articulation surface dominated by an expansive cotylus, and a small mandibular knob, an unusual condition for chondrichthyans. The scapulocoracoid of the new specimen shows evidence of two pectoral fin basal articulation facets, differing from the standard condition for early gnathostomes which have either one or three articulations. The tooth structure is intermediate between the 'primitive' ctenacanthiform and symmoriiform condition, and more derived forms with a euselachian-type base. Of special interest is the highly distinctive type of calcified cartilage forming the endoskeleton, comprising multiple layers of nonprismatic subpolygonal tesserae separated by a cellular matrix, interpreted

  3. First shark from the Late Devonian (Frasnian Gogo Formation, Western Australia sheds new light on the development of tessellated calcified cartilage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John A Long

    Full Text Available Living gnathostomes (jawed vertebrates comprise two divisions, Chondrichthyes (cartilaginous fishes, including euchondrichthyans with prismatic calcified cartilage, and extinct stem chondrichthyans and Osteichthyes (bony fishes including tetrapods. Most of the early chondrichthyan ('shark' record is based upon isolated teeth, spines, and scales, with the oldest articulated sharks that exhibit major diagnostic characters of the group--prismatic calcified cartilage and pelvic claspers in males--being from the latest Devonian, c. 360 Mya. This paucity of information about early chondrichthyan anatomy is mainly due to their lack of endoskeletal bone and consequent low preservation potential.Here we present new data from the first well-preserved chondrichthyan fossil from the early Late Devonian (ca. 380-384 Mya Gogo Formation Lägerstatte of Western Australia. The specimen is the first Devonian shark body fossil to be acid-prepared, revealing the endoskeletal elements as three-dimensional undistorted units: Meckel's cartilages, nasal, ceratohyal, basibranchial and possible epibranchial cartilages, plus left and right scapulocoracoids, as well as teeth and scales. This unique specimen is assigned to Gogoselachus lynnbeazleyae n. gen. n. sp.The Meckel's cartilages show a jaw articulation surface dominated by an expansive cotylus, and a small mandibular knob, an unusual condition for chondrichthyans. The scapulocoracoid of the new specimen shows evidence of two pectoral fin basal articulation facets, differing from the standard condition for early gnathostomes which have either one or three articulations. The tooth structure is intermediate between the 'primitive' ctenacanthiform and symmoriiform condition, and more derived forms with a euselachian-type base. Of special interest is the highly distinctive type of calcified cartilage forming the endoskeleton, comprising multiple layers of nonprismatic subpolygonal tesserae separated by a cellular matrix

  4. Feeding biomechanics and theoretical calculations of bite force in bull sharks (Carcharhinus leucas) during ontogeny.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habegger, Maria L; Motta, Philip J; Huber, Daniel R; Dean, Mason N

    2012-12-01

    Evaluations of bite force, either measured directly or calculated theoretically, have been used to investigate the maximum feeding performance of a wide variety of vertebrates. However, bite force studies of fishes have focused primarily on small species due to the intractable nature of large apex predators. More massive muscles can generate higher forces and many of these fishes attain immense sizes; it is unclear how much of their biting performance is driven purely by dramatic ontogenetic increases in body size versus size-specific selection for enhanced feeding performance. In this study, we investigated biting performance and feeding biomechanics of immature and mature individuals from an ontogenetic series of an apex predator, the bull shark, Carcharhinus leucas (73-285cm total length). Theoretical bite force ranged from 36 to 2128N at the most anterior bite point, and 170 to 5914N at the most posterior bite point over the ontogenetic series. Scaling patterns differed among the two age groups investigated; immature bull shark bite force scaled with positive allometry, whereas adult bite force scaled isometrically. When the bite force of C. leucas was compared to those of 12 other cartilaginous fishes, bull sharks presented the highest mass-specific bite force, greater than that of the white shark or the great hammerhead shark. A phylogenetic independent contrast analysis of anatomical and dietary variables as determinants of bite force in these 13 species indicated that the evolution of large adult bite forces in cartilaginous fishes is linked predominantly to the evolution of large body size. Multiple regressions based on mass-specific standardized contrasts suggest that the evolution of high bite forces in Chondrichthyes is further correlated with hypertrophication of the jaw adductors, increased leverage for anterior biting, and widening of the head. Lastly, we discuss the ecological significance of positive allometry in bite force as a possible

  5. Mechanics of biting in great white and sandtiger sharks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrara, T L; Clausen, P; Huber, D R; McHenry, C R; Peddemors, V; Wroe, S

    2011-02-03

    Although a strong correlation between jaw mechanics and prey selection has been demonstrated in bony fishes (Osteichthyes), how jaw mechanics influence feeding performance in cartilaginous fishes (Chondrichthyes) remains unknown. Hence, tooth shape has been regarded as a primary predictor of feeding behavior in sharks. Here we apply Finite Element Analysis (FEA) to examine form and function in the jaws of two threatened shark species, the great white (Carcharodon carcharias) and the sandtiger (Carcharias taurus). These species possess characteristic tooth shapes believed to reflect dietary preferences. We show that the jaws of sandtigers and great whites are adapted for rapid closure and generation of maximum bite force, respectively, and that these functional differences are consistent with diet and dentition. Our results suggest that in both taxa, insertion of jaw adductor muscles on a central tendon functions to straighten and sustain muscle fibers to nearly orthogonal insertion angles as the mouth opens. We argue that this jaw muscle arrangement allows high bite forces to be maintained across a wider range of gape angles than observed in mammalian models. Finally, our data suggest that the jaws of sub-adult great whites are mechanically vulnerable when handling large prey. In addition to ontogenetic changes in dentition, further mineralization of the jaws may be required to effectively feed on marine mammals. Our study is the first comparative FEA of the jaws for any fish species. Results highlight the potential of FEA for testing previously intractable questions regarding feeding mechanisms in sharks and other vertebrates. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Construction of a nurse shark (Ginglymostoma cirratum bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC library and a preliminary genome survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inoko Hidetoshi

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sharks are members of the taxonomic class Chondrichthyes, the oldest living jawed vertebrates. Genomic studies of this group, in comparison to representative species in other vertebrate taxa, will allow us to theorize about the fundamental genetic, developmental, and functional characteristics in the common ancestor of all jawed vertebrates. Aims In order to obtain mapping and sequencing data for comparative genomics, we constructed a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC library for the nurse shark, Ginglymostoma cirratum. Results The BAC library consists of 313,344 clones with an average insert size of 144 kb, covering ~4.5 × 1010 bp and thus providing an 11-fold coverage of the haploid genome. BAC end sequence analyses revealed, in addition to LINEs and SINEs commonly found in other animal and plant genomes, two new groups of nurse shark-specific repetitive elements, NSRE1 and NSRE2 that seem to be major components of the nurse shark genome. Screening the library with single-copy or multi-copy gene probes showed 6–28 primary positive clones per probe of which 50–90% were true positives, demonstrating that the BAC library is representative of the different regions of the nurse shark genome. Furthermore, some BAC clones contained multiple genes, making physical mapping feasible. Conclusion We have constructed a deep-coverage, high-quality, large insert, and publicly available BAC library for a cartilaginous fish. It will be very useful to the scientific community interested in shark genomic structure, comparative genomics, and functional studies. We found two new groups of repetitive elements specific to the nurse shark genome, which may contribute to the architecture and evolution of the nurse shark genome.

  7. A comparative study of the ocular skeleton of fossil and modern chondrichthyans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilgrim, Brettney L; Franz-Odendaal, Tamara A

    2009-01-01

    Many vertebrates have an ocular skeleton composed of cartilage and/or bone situated within the sclera of the eye. In this study we investigated whether modern and fossil sharks have an ocular skeleton, and whether it is conserved in morphology. We describe the scleral skeletal elements of three species of modern sharks and compare them to those found in fossil sharks from the Cleveland Shale (360 Mya). We also compare the elements to contemporaneous arthrodires from the same deposit. Surprisingly, the morphology of the skeletal support of the eye was found to differ significantly between modern and fossil sharks. All three modern shark species examined (spiny dogfish shark Squalus acanthias, porbeagle shark Lamna nasus and blue shark Prionace glauca) have a continuous skeletal element that encapsulates much of the eyeball; however, the tissue composition is different in each species. Histological and morphological examination revealed scleral cartilage with distinct tesserae in parts of the sclera of the porbeagle and blue shark, and more diffuse calcification in the dogfish. Strengthening of the scleral cartilage by means of tesserae has not been reported previously in the shark eye. In striking contrast, the ocular skeleton of fossil sharks comprises a series of individual elements that are arranged in a ring, similar to the arrangement in modern and fossil reptiles. Fossil arthrodires also have a multi-unit sclerotic ring but these are composed of fewer elements than in fossil sharks. The morphology of these elements has implications for the behaviour and visual capabilities of sharks that lived during the Devonian Period. This is the first time that such a dramatic variation in the morphology of scleral skeletal elements has been observed in a single lineage (Chondrichthyes), making this lineage important for broadening our understanding of the evolution of these elements within jawed vertebrates. PMID:19538630

  8. Early development of rostrum saw-teeth in a fossil ray tests classical theories of the evolution of vertebrate dentitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Moya Meredith; Riley, Alex; Fraser, Gareth J; Underwood, Charlie; Welten, Monique; Kriwet, Jürgen; Pfaff, Cathrin; Johanson, Zerina

    2015-10-07

    In classical theory, teeth of vertebrate dentitions evolved from co-option of external skin denticles into the oral cavity. This hypothesis predicts that ordered tooth arrangement and regulated replacement in the oral dentition were also derived from skin denticles. The fossil batoid ray Schizorhiza stromeri (Chondrichthyes; Cretaceous) provides a test of this theory. Schizorhiza preserves an extended cartilaginous rostrum with closely spaced, alternating saw-teeth, different from sawfish and sawsharks today. Multiple replacement teeth reveal unique new data from micro-CT scanning, showing how the 'cone-in-cone' series of ordered saw-teeth sets arrange themselves developmentally, to become enclosed by the roots of pre-existing saw-teeth. At the rostrum tip, newly developing saw-teeth are present, as mineralized crown tips within a vascular, cartilaginous furrow; these reorient via two 90° rotations then relocate laterally between previously formed roots. Saw-tooth replacement slows mid-rostrum where fewer saw-teeth are regenerated. These exceptional developmental data reveal regulated order for serial self-renewal, maintaining the saw edge with ever-increasing saw-tooth size. This mimics tooth replacement in chondrichthyans, but differs in the crown reorientation and their enclosure directly between roots of predecessor saw-teeth. Schizorhiza saw-tooth development is decoupled from the jaw teeth and their replacement, dependent on a dental lamina. This highly specialized rostral saw, derived from diversification of skin denticles, is distinct from the dentition and demonstrates the potential developmental plasticity of skin denticles. © 2015 The Authors.

  9. Determination Methods for the Exoskeletal Remains of Early Vertebrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Karatajute-Talimaa

    1998-01-01

    üher Vertebraten (Astraspiden, Tesakoviaspiden, Heterostraken, Thelodontier, Mongolepiden, Chondrichthyer und Acanthodier, die im frühen Paläozoikum weit verbreitet sind, werden als Beispiele benutzt. doi:10.1002/mmng.19980010103

  10. Evolutionary history of glucose-6-phosphatase encoding genes in vertebrate lineages: towards a better understanding of the functions of multiple duplicates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marandel, Lucie; Panserat, Stéphane; Plagnes-Juan, Elisabeth; Arbenoits, Eva; Soengas, José Luis; Bobe, Julien

    2017-05-02

    Glucose-6-phosphate (G6pc) is a key enzyme involved in the regulation of the glucose homeostasis. The present study aims at revisiting and clarifying the evolutionary history of g6pc genes in vertebrates. g6pc duplications happened by successive rounds of whole genome duplication that occurred during vertebrate evolution. g6pc duplicated before or around Osteichthyes/Chondrichthyes radiation, giving rise to g6pca and g6pcb as a consequence of the second vertebrate whole genome duplication. g6pca was lost after this duplication in Sarcopterygii whereas both g6pca and g6pcb then duplicated as a consequence of the teleost-specific whole genome duplication. One g6pca duplicate was lost after this duplication in teleosts. Similarly one g6pcb2 duplicate was lost at least in the ancestor of percomorpha. The analysis of the evolution of spatial expression patterns of g6pc genes in vertebrates showed that all g6pc were mainly expressed in intestine and liver whereas teleost-specific g6pcb2 genes were mainly and surprisingly expressed in brain and heart. g6pcb2b, one gene previously hypothesised to be involved in the glucose intolerant phenotype in trout, was unexpectedly up-regulated (as it was in liver) by carbohydrates in trout telencephalon without showing significant changes in other brain regions. This up-regulation is in striking contrast with expected glucosensing mechanisms suggesting that its positive response to glucose relates to specific unknown processes in this brain area. Our results suggested that the fixation and the divergence of g6pc duplicated genes during vertebrates' evolution may lead to adaptive novelty and probably to the emergence of novel phenotypes related to glucose homeostasis.

  11. Draft sequencing and assembly of the genome of the world's largest fish, the whale shark: Rhincodon typus Smith 1828.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Read, Timothy D; Petit, Robert A; Joseph, Sandeep J; Alam, Md Tauqeer; Weil, M Ryan; Ahmad, Maida; Bhimani, Ravila; Vuong, Jocelyn S; Haase, Chad P; Webb, D Harry; Tan, Milton; Dove, Alistair D M

    2017-07-14

    The whale shark (Rhincodon typus) has by far the largest body size of any elasmobranch (shark or ray) species. Therefore, it is also the largest extant species of the paraphyletic assemblage commonly referred to as fishes. As both a phenotypic extreme and a member of the group Chondrichthyes - the sister group to the remaining gnathostomes, which includes all tetrapods and therefore also humans - its genome is of substantial comparative interest. Whale sharks are also listed as an endangered species on the International Union for Conservation of Nature's Red List of threatened species and are of growing popularity as both a target of ecotourism and as a charismatic conservation ambassador for the pelagic ecosystem. A genome map for this species would aid in defining effective conservation units and understanding global population structure. We characterised the nuclear genome of the whale shark using next generation sequencing (454, Illumina) and de novo assembly and annotation methods, based on material collected from the Georgia Aquarium. The data set consisted of 878,654,233 reads, which yielded a draft assembly of 1,213,200 contigs and 997,976 scaffolds. The estimated genome size was 3.44Gb. As expected, the proteome of the whale shark was most closely related to the only other complete genome of a cartilaginous fish, the holocephalan elephant shark. The whale shark contained a novel Toll-like-receptor (TLR) protein with sequence similarity to both the TLR4 and TLR13 proteins of mammals and TLR21 of teleosts. The data are publicly available on GenBank, FigShare, and from the NCBI Short Read Archive under accession number SRP044374. This represents the first shotgun elasmobranch genome and will aid studies of molecular systematics, biogeography, genetic differentiation, and conservation genetics in this and other shark species, as well as providing comparative data for studies of evolutionary biology and immunology across the jawed vertebrate lineages.

  12. Forelimb-hindlimb developmental timing changes across tetrapod phylogeny

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selwood Lynne

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tetrapods exhibit great diversity in limb structures among species and also between forelimbs and hindlimbs within species, diversity which frequently correlates with locomotor modes and life history. We aim to examine the potential relation of changes in developmental timing (heterochrony to the origin of limb morphological diversity in an explicit comparative and quantitative framework. In particular, we studied the relative time sequence of development of the forelimbs versus the hindlimbs in 138 embryos of 14 tetrapod species spanning a diverse taxonomic, ecomorphological and life-history breadth. Whole-mounts and histological sections were used to code the appearance of 10 developmental events comprising landmarks of development from the early bud stage to late chondrogenesis in the forelimb and the corresponding serial homologues in the hindlimb. Results An overall pattern of change across tetrapods can be discerned and appears to be relatively clade-specific. In the primitive condition, as seen in Chondrichthyes and Osteichthyes, the forelimb/pectoral fin develops earlier than the hindlimb/pelvic fin. This pattern is either retained or re-evolved in eulipotyphlan insectivores (= shrews, moles, hedgehogs, and solenodons and taken to its extreme in marsupials. Although exceptions are known, the two anurans we examined reversed the pattern and displayed a significant advance in hindlimb development. All other species examined, including a bat with its greatly enlarged forelimbs modified as wings in the adult, showed near synchrony in the development of the fore and hindlimbs. Conclusion Major heterochronic changes in early limb development and chondrogenesis were absent within major clades except Lissamphibia, and their presence across vertebrate phylogeny are not easily correlated with adaptive phenomena related to morphological differences in the adult fore- and hindlimbs. The apparently conservative nature of this

  13. Devonian (Emsian-Eifelian) fish from the Lower Bokkeveld Group (Ceres Subgroup), South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, M. E.; Almond, J. E.; Evans, F. J.; Long, J. A.

    1999-07-01

    Four major groups of fish are represented by fragmentary remains from South Africa's Lower Bokkeveld Group of Early to Middle Devonian age: the Acanthodii, Chondrichthyes, Placodermi and Osteichthyes. These represent the oldest known occurrences of these groups in southern Africa, as well as an important addition to the very meagre record of earlier Devonian fish from the Malvinokaffric Province of southwestern Gondwana. Bokkeveld fish material comes from the Gydo (Late Emsian) and Tra Tra (Middle Eifelian) Formations of the Western Cape and Eastern Cape Provinces. The cosmopolitan marine acanthodian Machæracanthus is represented only by isolated fin spines which may belong to two different species on the basis of their external ornamentation, cross-sectional outline and internal histology. The elasmobranchs are represented by four elements: (1) a flattened chondrocranium which bears affinity to the Late Devonian-Carboniferous symmoriid (protacrodont) 'cladodont' sharks. It is probably the earliest known (Emsian) shark chondrocranium; (2) an isolated, primitive scapulocoracoid with a very short coracoidal ridge; (3) ankylosed and isolated radials, interpreted as parts of pterygial plates of a paired fin of an unknown chondrichthyan bearing affinity to the Middle Devonian Zamponiopteron from Bolivia; and (4) isolated barlike structures, perhaps gill arch or a jaw elements, thought to be from the same taxon as (3). The placoderms are represented by an incomplete trunk armour and fragmentary, finely ornamented plates of a primitive antiarch. The Osteichthyes are represented by a single large scale of an unidentified dipnoan from the Eifelian of the Cedarberg range, as well as a probable sarcopterygian dermal plate from the Emsian of the Prince Albert area. These are among the earliest sarcopterygian remains recorded from the Malvinokaffric Province.

  14. Community structure of elasmobranchs in estuaries along the northwest Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plumlee, Jeffrey D.; Dance, Kaylan M.; Matich, Philip; Mohan, John A.; Richards, Travis M.; TinHan, Thomas C.; Fisher, Mark R.; Wells, R. J. David

    2018-05-01

    Estuaries promote high levels of productivity and biodiversity by providing habitat for many biological communities due to their wide range of environmental conditions. Estuarine systems serve as nurseries, areas for parturition, and feeding grounds for elasmobranchs. However, estuaries face an array of anthropogenic pressures, including overfishing, altered flow regimes, pollution, and habitat destruction. Given the vulnerability of estuarine ecosystems, observing long-term changes in community structure is essential to understanding the effects of anthropogenic stressors. Elasmobranch community structure was analyzed among eight estuaries in the northwest Gulf of Mexico to evaluate spatial and temporal variability in species abundance and diversity using bi-annual fisheries independent gillnet survey data over three decades (1985-2014). Ten species comprised 99.4% of elasmobranchs caught which included 35.3% bull sharks (Carcharhinus leucas), 18.1% bonnetheads (Sphyrna tiburo), 17.0% cownose rays (Rhinoptera bonasus), 13.4% blacktip sharks (Carcharhinus limbatus), 5.9% Atlantic stingrays (Dasyatis sabina), 3.1% Atlantic sharpnose sharks (Rhizoprionodon terraenovae), 2.7% spinner sharks (Carcharhinus brevipinna), 2.1% scalloped hammerheads (Sphyrna lewini), 1.7% finetooth sharks (Carcharhinus isodon), and 0.7% lemon sharks (Negaprion brevirostris). During the study period, elasmobranch community structure changed among estuaries and among decades. Bull sharks, bonnetheads, cownose rays, blacktip sharks, and spinner sharks all increased in abundance during the study period, whereas finetooth sharks and lemon sharks decreased over time. Higher latitude estuaries were dominated by bull sharks while lower latitude estuaries were dominated by cownose rays. Salinity was the most important environmental variable in predicting individual elasmobranch species abundance (deviance explained: 14.4 ± 6.5 SD), while temperature and depth also played a role in shaping community

  15. The neuroecology of cartilaginous fishes: sensory strategies for survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collin, Shaun P

    2012-01-01

    As apex predators, chondrichthyans, or cartilaginous fishes, hold an important position within a range of aquatic ecosystems and influence the balance between species' abundance and biodiversity. Having been in existence for over 400 million years and representing the earliest stages of the evolution of jawed vertebrates, this group also covers a diverse range of eco-morphotypes, occupying both marine and freshwater habitats. The class Chondrichthyes is divided into two subclasses: the Elasmobranchii (sharks, skates, and rays) and the Holocephali (elephant sharks and chimaeras). However, many of their life history traits, such as low fecundity, the production of small numbers of highly precocious young, slow growth rates, and late maturity, make them highly susceptible to human exploitation. To mitigate the negative effects of human impacts, it is important that we understand the sensory strategies that elasmobranchs use for navigating within their environment, forming reproductive aggregations, feeding, and even communicating. One approach to investigate the sensory bases of their behavior is to examine the peripheral sense organs mediating vision, olfaction, gustation, lateral line, electroreception, and audition in a large range of species in order to identify specific adaptations, the range of sensitivity thresholds, and the compromise between sensory spatial resolution and sensitivity. In addition, we can quantitatively assess the convergence of sensory input to the central nervous system and the relative importance of different sensory modalities. Using a comparative approach and often a combination of anatomical, electrophysiological, and molecular techniques, significant variation has been identified in the spatial and chromatic sampling of the photoreceptors in the eye, the surface area and the number of olfactory lamellae within the nasal cavity, the level of gustatory sampling within the oral cavity, the type and innervation of neuromasts of the lateral

  16. Early vertebrate origin and diversification of small transmembrane regulators of cellular ion transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirkmajer, Sergej; Kirchner, Henriette; Lundell, Leonidas S; Zelenin, Pavel V; Zierath, Juleen R; Makarova, Kira S; Wolf, Yuri I; Chibalin, Alexander V

    2017-07-15

    Small transmembrane proteins such as FXYDs, which interact with Na + ,K + -ATPase, and the micropeptides that interact with sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca 2+ -ATPase play fundamental roles in regulation of ion transport in vertebrates. Uncertain evolutionary origins and phylogenetic relationships among these regulators of ion transport have led to inconsistencies in their classification across vertebrate species, thus hampering comparative studies of their functions. We discovered the first FXYD homologue in sea lamprey, a basal jawless vertebrate, which suggests small transmembrane regulators of ion transport emerged early in the vertebrate lineage. We also identified 13 gene subfamilies of FXYDs and propose a revised, phylogeny-based FXYD classification that is consistent across vertebrate species. These findings provide an improved framework for investigating physiological and pathophysiological functions of small transmembrane regulators of ion transport. Small transmembrane proteins are important for regulation of cellular ion transport. The most prominent among these are members of the FXYD family (FXYD1-12), which regulate Na + ,K + -ATPase, and phospholamban, sarcolipin, myoregulin and DWORF, which regulate the sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca 2+ -ATPase (SERCA). FXYDs and regulators of SERCA are present in fishes, as well as terrestrial vertebrates; however, their evolutionary origins and phylogenetic relationships are obscure, thus hampering comparative physiological studies. Here we discovered that sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus), a representative of extant jawless vertebrates (Cyclostomata), expresses an FXYD homologue, which strongly suggests that FXYDs predate the emergence of fishes and other jawed vertebrates (Gnathostomata). Using a combination of sequence-based phylogenetic analysis and conservation of local chromosome context, we determined that FXYDs markedly diversified in the lineages leading to cartilaginous fishes (Chondrichthyes) and bony

  17. Fish genomes provide novel insights into the evolution of vertebrate secretin receptors and their ligand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, João C R; Félix, Rute C; Trindade, Marlene; Power, Deborah M

    2014-12-01

    The secretin receptor (SCTR) is a member of Class 2 subfamily B1 GPCRs and part of the PAC1/VPAC receptor subfamily. This receptor has long been known in mammals but has only recently been identified in other vertebrates including teleosts, from which it was previously considered to be absent. The ligand for SCTR in mammals is secretin (SCT), an important gastrointestinal peptide, which in teleosts has not yet been isolated, or the gene identified. This study revises the evolutionary model previously proposed for the secretin-GPCRs in metazoan by analysing in detail the fishes, the most successful of the extant vertebrates. All the Actinopterygii genomes analysed and the Chondrichthyes and Sarcopterygii fish possess a SCTR gene that shares conserved sequence, structure and synteny with the tetrapod homologue. Phylogenetic clustering and gene environment comparisons revealed that fish and tetrapod SCTR shared a common origin and diverged early from the PAC1/VPAC subfamily group. In teleosts SCTR duplicated as a result of the fish specific whole genome duplication but in all the teleost genomes analysed, with the exception of tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus), one of the duplicates was lost. The function of SCTR in teleosts is unknown but quantitative PCR revealed that in both sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax) and tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus) transcript abundance is high in the gastrointestinal tract suggesting it may intervene in similar processes to those in mammals. In contrast, no gene encoding the ligand SCT was identified in the ray-finned fishes (Actinopterygii) although it was present in the coelacanth (lobe finned fish, Sarcopterygii) and in the elephant shark (holocephalian). The genes in linkage with SCT in tetrapods and coelacanth were also identified in ray-finned fishes supporting the idea that it was lost from their genome. At present SCTR remains an orphan receptor in ray-finned fishes and it will be of interest in the future to establish why SCT was