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Sample records for rhinitis hay fever

  1. Allergies and Hay Fever

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ENTCareers Marketplace Find an ENT Doctor Near You Allergies and Hay Fever Allergies and Hay Fever Patient ... life more enjoyable. Why does the body develop allergies? Allergy symptoms appear when the immune system reacts ...

  2. Rhinitis (Hay Fever)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is caused by allergens like molds, pollen and animals. These are substances which are usually harmless, but can cause allergic reactions in certain people. Allergy symptoms are the result of a chain reaction that starts in the immune system. Your immune system controls how your body defends ...

  3. Seasonal Allergies (Hay Fever)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Seasonal Allergies (Hay Fever) KidsHealth / For Parents / Seasonal Allergies (Hay ... español Alergia estacional (fiebre del heno) About Seasonal Allergies "Achoo!" It's your son's third sneezing fit of ...

  4. Treatment of hay fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, S F

    1989-01-01

    The range of treatments for hay fever available to the general practitioner has changed considerably in recent years. New antihistamines have addressed the problem of sedation and moved towards one daily dose; nasally applied corticosteroids avoid the need for systemic steroid therapy and its potential adverse effect; and regulatory decisions have set a trend away from immunotherapy in general practice. However, knowledge about the mechanism of action of immunotherapy is increasing and new developments with improved safety profiles include allergen polymers, allergoids, oral immunotherapy and nasal immunotherapy. Choice of treatment depends, as always, on the individual circumstances of the patient and his or her disease. PMID:2556545

  5. Hay fever & homeopathy: a case series evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Vinita

    2016-05-01

    Seasonal allergic rhinitis (hay fever) is common and can considerably reduce the quality of life of sufferers. Despite the wide everyday application and promising results with homeopathy, scientific evidence of its effectiveness for most ailments is scarce. The assessment of the clinical effectiveness of homeopathic remedies in the alleviation of hay fever symptoms in a typical clinical setting. We performed a clinical observational study of eight patients in the treatment of hay fever symptoms over a two-year period (2012 and 2013) using Measure Yourself Medical Outcome Profile (MYMOP) self-evaluation questionnaires at baseline and again after two weeks and four weeks of homeopathic treatment. The individualized prescription - either a single remedy or multiple remedies - was based on the totality of each patient's symptoms. The average MYMOP scores for the eyes, nose, activity and wellbeing had improved significantly after two and four weeks of homeopathic treatment. The overall average MYMOP profile score at baseline was 3.83 (standard deviation, SD, 0.78). After 14 and 28 days of treatment the average score had fallen to 1.14 (SD, 0.36; PHomeopathy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. FastStats: Allergies/Hay Fever

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button NCHS Home Allergies and Hay Fever Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share ... 12 months: 7.5% Number with reported respiratory allergies in the past 12 months: 7.6 million ...

  7. Shared genetic origin of asthma, hay fever and eczema elucidates allergic disease biology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ferreira, Manuel A; Vonk, Judith M; Baurecht, Hansjörg; Marenholz, Ingo; Tian, Chao; Hoffman, Joshua D; Helmer, Quinta; Tillander, Annika; Ullemar, Vilhelmina; van Dongen, Jenny; Lu, Yi; Rüschendorf, Franz; Esparza-Gordillo, Jorge; Medway, Chris W; Mountjoy, Edward; Burrows, Kimberley; Hummel, Oliver; Grosche, Sarah; Brumpton, Ben M; Witte, John S; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Willemsen, Gonneke; Zheng, Jie; Rodríguez, Elke; Hotze, Melanie; Franke, Andre; Revez, Joana A; Beesley, Jonathan; Matheson, Melanie C; Dharmage, Shyamali C; Bain, Lisa M; Fritsche, Lars G; Gabrielsen, Maiken E; Balliu, Brunilda; Nielsen, Jonas B; Zhou, Wei; Hveem, Kristian; Langhammer, Arnulf; Holmen, Oddgeir L; Løset, Mari; Abecasis, Gonçalo R; Willer, Cristen J; Arnold, Andreas; Homuth, Georg; Schmidt, Carsten O; Thompson, Philip J; Martin, Nicholas G; Duffy, David L; Novak, Natalija; Boomsma, Dorret I

    2017-01-01

    Asthma, hay fever (or allergic rhinitis) and eczema (or atopic dermatitis) often coexist in the same individuals, partly because of a shared genetic origin. To identify shared risk variants, we performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS; n = 360,838) of a broad allergic disease phenotype that

  8. Allergic rhinitis - self-care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hay fever - self-care; Seasonal rhinitis - self-care; Allergies - allergic rhinitis - self-care ... in a row. Talk to your child's health care provider before giving your child decongestants. Nasal corticosteroid ...

  9. CHANGES OF IMMUNE INDEXES DURING SUBLINGUAL ALLERGEN-SPECIFIC IMMUNOTHERAPY IN CHILDREN WITH HAY FEVER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. M. Gaiduk

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims of study: evaluation of immunological parameters in course of sublingual allergen-specific immunotherapy with tree pollen mixture in children with hay fever.Materials and methods: the study included one-hundred patients 5 to 18 years of age with hay fever (pollen rhinitis, rhinoconjunctivitis and/or asthma. Allergen-specific immunotherapy was administered pre-seasonally for three consecutive years. Cytokinechanges were studied in blood serum and in lavages from nasal cavity. Samples assessed before treatment and after 2nd and 3rd courses SLIT completion.Results: increased serum concentrations of IL-10, IFNγ, and decreased IL-4 contents were revealed in the course of treatment. No significant changes in cytokineconcentrations were detectable in nasal lavages.Conclusions: the changes revealed correspond to a shift of T cell response profile towards Th1 pathway, thus confirming pathogenetic effects of sublingual allergen-specific

  10. 'Help for Hay Fever', a goal-focused intervention for people with intermittent allergic rhinitis, delivered in Scottish community pharmacies: study protocol for a pilot cluster randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Porteous, T.; Wyke, S.; Smith, S.; Bond, C.; Francis, J.; Lee, A.J.; Lowrie, R.; Scotland, G.; Sheikh, A.; Thomas, M.; Smith, L.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Despite the availability of evidence-based guidelines for managing allergic rhinitis in primary care, management of the condition in the United Kingdom (UK) remains sub-optimal. Its high prevalence and negative effects on quality of life, school performance, productivity and co-morbid

  11. Genetic and environmental contributions to hay fever among young adult twins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Simon Francis; Suppli Ulrik, Charlotte; Kyvik, Kirsten Ohm

    2006-01-01

    environment, whereas the aetiology of 'sporadic' hay fever was mainly genetic. CONCLUSIONS: The susceptibility to develop hay fever is attributable to major genetic influences. However, effects of family environment and upbringing are also of importance in families where asthma is present. These results......BACKGROUND: The susceptibility to develop hay fever is putatively the result both of genetic and environmental causes. We estimated the significance and magnitude of genetic and environmental contributions to hay fever among young adult twins. METHODS: From the birth cohorts 1953-82 of The Danish...... effects accounted for 29% of the individual susceptibility to hay fever. The same genes contributed to the susceptibility to hay fever both in males and in females. In families with asthma, the susceptibility to develop hay fever was, in addition to genes, to a great extent ascribable to family...

  12. Rhinitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, J W; Thomsen, S F; Nolte, H

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Asthma and rhinitis often co-occur, and this potentially increases the disease severity and impacts negatively on the quality of life. We studied disease severity, airway responsiveness, atopy, quality of life and treatment in subjects with both asthma and rhinitis compared to patient...... diseases were undertreated in 85% of the cases. CONCLUSION: We encourage that these observations be used in the evaluation and treatment of patients with asthma and rhinitis and that they contribute to the understanding of asthma and rhinitis as a uniform airways disease....

  13. Date of birth and hay fever risk in children and adolescents of Kazakhstan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhumambayeva, Saule; Rozenson, Rafail; Tawfik, Ali; Awadalla, Nabil Joseph; Zhumambayeva, Roza

    2014-02-01

    Introduction the first months of life are the most vulnerable period in allergic disease development and it is not clear enough whether inhalant pollen allergen exposure predisposes the risk of consequent allergic reactions. To study the clinical and epidemiological criteria of hay fever with special emphasis on investigation of the relationship between the date of birth and seasonal allergic rhinitis development in children and adolescents in Kazakhstan. The prospective hospital based study was conducted during pollen season from the beginning of May to the end of October in two consequent years 2010 and 2011. 184 children and adolescents at the age of 1--17 years underwent consultations and skin prick tests in the allergological center "Umit" (Astana, Kazakhstan). Special allergological questionnaires were developed and adapted for local residents. The assessment of symptoms severity was performed using a scoring system. Skin prick tests were performed in 112 patients. The number of patients was explained by the age limitations. Correlation analysis between skin prick test results and the month of birth were performed. It was found that in summer months there were the highest number of patients with seasonal allergic rhinitis 68 (36.9%), followed by spring 44 (23.9%), then autumn 37 (20.1%) and the lowest percent of patients 35 (19.1%) was born in winter. Rhinoconjunctival syndrome was diagnosed in 180 (97.8%) patients, pollen induced bronchial asthma in 76 (41.3%) and pollen induced urticaria in 35 (19.0%) patients. Mono sensitization among Kazakhstan children and adolescents was determined only to several species of the plants, mainly to Artemisia Absinthium (68.2%) and Sunflower (25.7%), whereas multiple sensitization to the mix of weeds was determined in 75 (66.9%) patients, to the mix of meadow grass in 33 (29.4%), mix of meadow grass+mix of weeds in 25 (22.3%) and mix of trees in 9 (7.1%) patients. The mean of symptoms severity of total scoring (24) was 15

  14. Mental health associations with eczema, asthma and hay fever in children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hammer-Helmich, Lene; Linneberg, Allan; Obel, Carsten

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to examine the association of eczema, asthma and hay fever with mental health in a general child population and to assess the influence of parental socioeconomic position on these associations. METHODS: We conducted a cross-sectional health survey of children aged 3, 6......, 11 and 15 years in the City of Copenhagen, Denmark. Individual questionnaire data on eczema, asthma, and hay fever and mental health problems assessed using the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ) was linked to register data on demographics and parental socioeconomic position. 9215 (47...... with eczema, asthma or hay fever had more emotional, conduct and hyperactivity problems, but not peer problems, compared with children without these diseases. Atopic diseases added equally to the burden of mental health problems independent of socioeconomic position....

  15. The combined effects of family size and farm exposure on childhood hay fever and atopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genuneit, Jon; Strachan, David P; Büchele, Gisela; Weber, Juliane; Loss, Georg; Sozanska, Barbara; Boznanski, Andrzej; Horak, Elisabeth; Heederik, Dick; Braun-Fahrländer, Charlotte; von Mutius, Erika

    2013-05-01

    Exposure to farming environments and siblings is associated with reduced risks of childhood hay fever and atopy. We explored the independence and interaction of these protective effects in the GABRIELA study. Questionnaire surveys on farming, asthma, and allergies were conducted in four central European areas among 79,888 6-12-yr-old children. Aeroallergen-specific serum IgE was measured in a stratified sample of 8,023 children. Multiple logistic regression was used to compare gradients in allergy prevalence by sibship size across three categories of exposure to farming environments. The prevalence of hay fever ranged from 2% (95% confidence interval 1.6%; 2.7%) among farmers' children with more than two siblings to 12% (11.2%; 13.0%) among children with no farm exposure and no siblings. Farming families were larger on average. More siblings and exposure to farming environments independently conferred protection from hay fever and atopy. There was no substantial effect modification between family size and exposure to farming environments. The odds ratios for hay fever per additional sibling were 0.79 among unexposed non-farm children, 0.77 among farm-exposed non-farm children, and 0.72 among children from farming families (2df interaction test: p = 0.41). The inverse association of exposure to farming environments with hay fever is found in all sizes of family, with no substantial tendency to saturation or synergism. This suggests that different biological mechanisms may underlie these two protective factors. Combinations of a large family and exposure to farming environments markedly reduce the prevalence of hay fever and indicate the strength of its environmental determinants. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  16. Radioimmunological allergy diagnostics in infants suffering from asthmatoid bronchitis, bronchial asthma, and hay fever

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siafarikas, K.; Glaubitt, D.; Wanzeck, E.; Staedtische Krankenanstalten Krefeld

    1975-01-01

    The occurence of circulating specific antibodies against milk protein, hen protein, fish (cod), against cat, dog and horse epithelium as well as against 2 types of house dust was investigated with 11 children in the age of 1-6 years having asthmatoid bronchitis, 23 children aging from 2-15 years with bronchial asthma and 3 children aging from 6-13 years with hay fever, using the radioallergosorbens test (RAST). Children having asthmatoid bronchitis for the first time exhibited a smaller number and a lesser extent of positive radioallergosorben test results then children with bronchial asthma. The children with hay fever exhibited exclusively negative test results. (orig./LN) [de

  17. A single dose desensitization for summer hay fever. Results of a double blind study-1988.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fell, P; Brostoff, J

    1990-01-01

    A new type of desensitising vaccine, enzyme potentiated was subjected to a double-blind randomised study during the hay fever season. The vaccine is a convenient single injection given in March and the results show good protection throughout the grass pollen season.

  18. Association between parental socioeconomic position and prevalence of asthma, atopic eczema and hay fever in children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hammer-Helmich, Lene; Linneberg, Allan; Thomsen, Simon Francis

    2014-01-01

    with a decreased risk of atopic eczema and eczema symptoms. There was no independent association between household income and any of the outcomes. CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence of asthma and hay fever, but not atopic eczema, increased with increasing age. Atopic eczema was associated with high parental educational...

  19. Health service use among children with and without eczema, asthma, and hay fever

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hammer-Helmich L

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Lene Hammer-Helmich,1,2 Allan Linneberg,1,3,4 Simon Francis Thomsen,5,6 Line Tang,1 Charlotte Glümer1,7 1Research Center for Prevention and Health, The Capital Region of Denmark, Copenhagen, 2Department of Real World Evidence and Epidemiology, H. Lundbeck A/S, Valby, 3Department of Clinical Experimental Research, Rigshospitalet, 4Department of Clinical Medicine, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, 5Department of Dermatology, Bispebjerg Hospital, 6Department of Biomedical Sciences, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, 7Department of Health Science and Technology, Faculty of Medicine, Aalborg University, Aalborg, Denmark Background: Atopic diseases, for example, eczema, asthma, and hay fever, are among the most common chronic diseases of childhood. Knowledge on health service use among children with atopic disease is limited. This study aimed to investigate the total use and costs of health services for children with and without eczema, asthma, and hay fever in a Danish general population. Methods: We conducted a health survey with four complete birth cohorts from the City of Copenhagen. Individual questionnaire data on eczema, asthma, and hay fever for children aged 3, 6, 11, and 15 years were linked to register information on use and costs of health services and prescribed medication and parental education. In total 9,720 children participated (50.5%. Results: We found increased health service use (number of additional consultations per year [95% confidence interval] among children with current eczema symptoms (1.77 [1.29–2.26], current asthma symptoms (2.53 [2.08–2.98], and current hay fever symptoms (1.21 [0.74–1.67], compared with children without these symptoms. We also found increased use of prescribed medication and most subtypes of health services. Current asthma symptoms and current eczema symptoms, but not current hay fever symptoms, increased the health

  20. Genome-wide association analysis identifies 11 risk variants associated with the asthma with hay fever phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Manuel A R; Matheson, Melanie C; Tang, Clara S; Granell, Raquel; Ang, Wei; Hui, Jennie; Kiefer, Amy K; Duffy, David L; Baltic, Svetlana; Danoy, Patrick; Bui, Minh; Price, Loren; Sly, Peter D; Eriksson, Nicholas; Madden, Pamela A; Abramson, Michael J; Holt, Patrick G; Heath, Andrew C; Hunter, Michael; Musk, Bill; Robertson, Colin F; Le Souëf, Peter; Montgomery, Grant W; Henderson, A John; Tung, Joyce Y; Dharmage, Shyamali C; Brown, Matthew A; James, Alan; Thompson, Philip J; Pennell, Craig; Martin, Nicholas G; Evans, David M; Hinds, David A; Hopper, John L

    2014-06-01

    To date, no genome-wide association study (GWAS) has considered the combined phenotype of asthma with hay fever. Previous analyses of family data from the Tasmanian Longitudinal Health Study provide evidence that this phenotype has a stronger genetic cause than asthma without hay fever. We sought to perform a GWAS of asthma with hay fever to identify variants associated with having both diseases. We performed a meta-analysis of GWASs comparing persons with both physician-diagnosed asthma and hay fever (n = 6,685) with persons with neither disease (n = 14,091). At genome-wide significance, we identified 11 independent variants associated with the risk of having asthma with hay fever, including 2 associations reaching this level of significance with allergic disease for the first time: ZBTB10 (rs7009110; odds ratio [OR], 1.14; P = 4 × 10(-9)) and CLEC16A (rs62026376; OR, 1.17; P = 1 × 10(-8)). The rs62026376:C allele associated with increased asthma with hay fever risk has been found to be associated also with decreased expression of the nearby DEXI gene in monocytes. The 11 variants were associated with the risk of asthma and hay fever separately, but the estimated associations with the individual phenotypes were weaker than with the combined asthma with hay fever phenotype. A variant near LRRC32 was a stronger risk factor for hay fever than for asthma, whereas the reverse was observed for variants in/near GSDMA and TSLP. Single nucleotide polymorphisms with suggestive evidence for association with asthma with hay fever risk included rs41295115 near IL2RA (OR, 1.28; P = 5 × 10(-7)) and rs76043829 in TNS1 (OR, 1.23; P = 2 × 10(-6)). By focusing on the combined phenotype of asthma with hay fever, variants associated with the risk of allergic disease can be identified with greater efficiency. Copyright © 2013 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Estimating the causal effect of body mass index on hay fever, asthma and lung function using Mendelian randomization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skaaby, T; Taylor, A E; Thuesen, B H

    2018-01-01

    effects. We examined the causal effect of BMI on asthma, hay fever, allergic sensitization, serum total immunoglobulin E (IgE), forced expiratory volume in one-second (FEV1) and forced vital capacity (FVC). METHODS: We included 490 497 participants in the observational and 162 124 participants...... support the conclusion that increasing BMI is causally related to higher prevalence of asthma and decreased lung function, but not with hay fever or biomarkers of allergy....

  2. Mental health associations with eczema, asthma and hay fever in children:a cross-sectional survey

    OpenAIRE

    Hammer-Helmich, Lene; Linneberg, Allan; Obel, Carsten; Thomsen, Simon Francis; Tang Møllehave, Line; Glümer, Charlotte

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to examine the association of eczema, asthma and hay fever with mental health in a general child population and to assess the influence of parental socioeconomic position on these associations. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional health survey of children aged 3, 6, 11 and 15?years in the City of Copenhagen, Denmark. Individual questionnaire data on eczema, asthma, and hay fever and mental health problems assessed using the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnair...

  3. Mental health associations with eczema, asthma and hay fever in children: a cross-sectional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer-Helmich, Lene; Linneberg, Allan; Obel, Carsten; Thomsen, Simon Francis; Tang Møllehave, Line; Glümer, Charlotte

    2016-10-14

    This study aimed to examine the association of eczema, asthma and hay fever with mental health in a general child population and to assess the influence of parental socioeconomic position on these associations. We conducted a cross-sectional health survey of children aged 3, 6, 11 and 15 years in the City of Copenhagen, Denmark. Individual questionnaire data on eczema, asthma, and hay fever and mental health problems assessed using the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ) was linked to register data on demographics and parental socioeconomic position. 9215 (47.9%) children were included in the analyses. Linear regression analyses showed that children with current eczema symptoms had higher SDQ scores (mean difference, 95% CI) of emotional problems (0.26, 0.12 to 0.39), conduct problems (0.19, 0.09 to 0.29) and hyperactivity problems (0.32, 0.16 to 0.48); children with current asthma symptoms had higher SDQ scores of emotional problems (0.45, 0.32 to 0.58), conduct problems (0.28, 0.18 to 0.38) and hyperactivity problems (0.52, 0.35 to 0.69); and children with current hay fever symptoms had higher SDQ scores of emotional problems (0.57, 0.42 to 0.72), conduct problems (0.22, 0.11 to 0.33), hyperactivity problems (0.44, 0.26 to 0.61) and peer problems (0.14, 0.01 to 0.26), compared with children without current symptoms of the relevant disease. For most associations, parental socioeconomic position did not modify the effect. Children with eczema, asthma or hay fever had more emotional, conduct and hyperactivity problems, but not peer problems, compared with children without these diseases. Atopic diseases added equally to the burden of mental health problems independent of socioeconomic position. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  4. Associations of genetic determinants of serum vitamin B12 and folate concentrations with hay fever and asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skaaby, Tea; Taylor, Amy E; Jacobsen, Rikke K

    2017-01-01

    Background/objectives: Studies of the effect of vitamin B12 and folate on the risk of asthma and hay fever have shown inconsistent results that may be biased by reverse causation and confounding. We used a Mendelian randomization approach to examine a potential causal effect of vitamin B12 and fo...

  5. Hay fever, a post industrial revolution epidemic: a history of its growth during the 19th century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emanuel, M B

    1988-05-01

    Although other forms of allergic disease were described in antiquity, hay fever is surprisingly modern. Very rare descriptions can be traced back to Islamic texts of the 9th century and European texts of the 16th century. It was only in the early 19th century that the disease was carefully described and at that time was regarded as most unusual. By the end of the 19th century it had become commonplace in both Europe and North America. This paper attempts to chart the growth of hay fever through the medical literature of the 19th century. It is hoped that an understanding of the increase in prevalence between 1820 and 1900 may provide an insight for modern researchers and give some clues into possible reasons for the epidemic nature of the disease today.

  6. Asthma, hay fever, and food allergy are associated with caregiver-reported speech disorders in US children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strom, Mark A; Silverberg, Jonathan I

    2016-09-01

    Children with asthma, hay fever, and food allergy may have several factors that increase their risk of speech disorder, including allergic inflammation, ADD/ADHD, and sleep disturbance. However, few studies have examined a relationship between asthma, allergic disease, and speech disorder. We sought to determine whether asthma, hay fever, and food allergy are associated with speech disorder in children and whether disease severity, sleep disturbance, or ADD/ADHD modified such associations. We analyzed cross-sectional data on 337,285 children aged 2-17 years from 19 US population-based studies, including the 1997-2013 National Health Interview Survey and the 2003/4 and 2007/8 National Survey of Children's Health. In multivariate models, controlling for age, demographic factors, healthcare utilization, and history of eczema, lifetime history of asthma (odds ratio [95% confidence interval]: 1.18 [1.04-1.34], p = 0.01), and one-year history of hay fever (1.44 [1.28-1.62], p speech disorder. Children with current (1.37 [1.15-1.59] p = 0.0003) but not past (p = 0.06) asthma had increased risk of speech disorder. In one study that assessed caregiver-reported asthma severity, mild (1.58 [1.20-2.08], p = 0.001) and moderate (2.99 [1.54-3.41], p speech disorder; however, severe asthma was associated with the highest odds of speech disorder (5.70 [2.36-13.78], p = 0.0001). Childhood asthma, hay fever, and food allergy are associated with increased risk of speech disorder. Future prospective studies are needed to characterize the associations. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Allergic rhinitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... by the wind. (Flower pollen is carried by insects and does not cause hay fever.) Types of ... invader References Baroody FM, Naclerio RM. Allergy and immunology of the upper airway. In: Flint PW, Haughey ...

  8. IL-33 polymorphisms are associated with increased risk of hay fever and reduced regulatory T cells in a birth cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schröder, Paul C; Casaca, Vera I; Illi, Sabina; Schieck, Maximilian; Michel, Sven; Böck, Andreas; Roduit, Caroline; Frei, Remo; Lluis, Anna; Genuneit, Jon; Pfefferle, Petra; Roponen, Marjut; Weber, Juliane; Braun-Fahrländer, Charlotte; Riedler, Josef; Lauener, Roger; Vuitton, Dominique Angèle; Dalphin, Jean-Charles; Pekkanen, Juha; von Mutius, Erika; Kabesch, Michael; Schaub, Bianca

    2016-11-01

    IL-33 polymorphisms influence the susceptibility to asthma. IL-33 indirectly induces Th2-immune responses via dendritic cell activation, being important for development of atopic diseases. Furthermore, IL-33 upregulates regulatory T cells (Tregs), which are critical for healthy immune homeostasis. This study investigates associations between IL-33 polymorphisms during the development of childhood atopic diseases and underlying mechanisms including immune regulation of Tregs. Genotyping of IL-33-polymorphisms (rs928413, rs1342326) was performed by MALDI-TOF-MS in 880 of 1133 PASTURE/EFRAIM children. In 4.5-year-old German PASTURE/EFRAIM children (n = 99), CD4 + CD25 high FOXP3 + Tregs were assessed by flow cytometry following 24-h incubation of PBMCs with PMA/ionomycin, LPS or without stimuli (U). SOCS3, IL1RL1, TLR4 mRNA expression and sST2 protein levels ex vivo were measured in PASTURE/EFRAIM children by real-time PCR or ELISA, respectively. Health outcomes (hay fever, asthma) were assessed by questionnaires at the age of 6 years. rs928413 and rs1342326 were positively associated with hay fever (OR = 1.77, 95%CI = 1.02-3.08; OR = 1.79, 95%CI = 1.04-3.11) and CD4 + CD25 high FOXP3 + Tregs (%) decreased in minor allele homozygotes/heterozygotes compared to major allele homozygotes (p(U) = 0.004; p(LPS) = 0.005; p(U) = 0.001; p(LPS) = 0.012). SOCS3 mRNA expression increased in minor allele homozygotes and heterozygotes compared with major allele homozygotes for both IL-33-polymorphisms (p(rs928413) = 0.032, p(rs1342326) = 0.019) and negatively correlated to Tregs. IL-33-polymorphisms rs928413 and rs1342326 may account for an increased risk of hay fever with the age of 6 years. Lower Tregs and increased SOCS3 in combined heterozygotes and minor allele homozygotes may be relevant for hay fever development, pointing towards dysbalanced immune regulation and insufficient control of allergic inflammation. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Nasal hyperreactivity and inflammation in allergic rhinitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. M. Garrelds

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available The history of allergic disease goes back to 1819, when Bostock described his own ‘periodical affection of the eyes and chest’, which he called ‘summer catarrh’. Since they thought it was produced by the effluvium of new hay, this condition was also called hay fever. Later, in 1873, Blackley established that pollen played an important role in the causation of hay fever. Nowadays, the definition of allergy is ‘An untoward physiologic event mediated by a variety of different immunologic reactions’. In this review, the term allergy will be restricted to the IgE-dependent reactions. The most important clinical manifestations of IgE-dependent reactions are allergic conjunctivitis, allergic rhinitis, allergic asthma and atopic dermatitis. However, this review will be restricted to allergic rhinitis. The histopathological features of allergic inflammation involve an increase in blood flow and vascular permeability, leading to plasma exudation and the formation of oedema. In addition, a cascade of events occurs which involves a variety of inflammatory cells. These inflammatory cells migrate under the influence of chemotactic agents to the site of injury and induce the process of repair. Several types of inflammatory cells have been implicated in the pathogenesis of allergic rhinitis. After specific or nonspecific stimuli, inflammatory mediators are generated from cells normally found in the nose, such as mast cells, antigen-presenting cells and epithelial cells (primary effector cells and from cells recruited into the nose, such as basophils, eosinophils, lymphocytes, platelets and neutrophils (secondary effector cells. This review describes the identification of each of the inflammatory cells and their mediators which play a role in the perennial allergic processes in the nose of rhinitis patients.

  10. The link between parental allergy and offspring allergic and nonallergic rhinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westman, M; Kull, I; Lind, T; Melén, E; Stjärne, P; Toskala, E; Wickman, M; Bergström, A

    2013-12-01

    Parental allergy-related disease increases the risk for rhinitis, but it remains unknown how different phenotypes of parental allergy affect this risk. The aim of this study was to investigate how parental hay fever, asthma, and eczema affect the risk of allergic rhinitis (AR) and nonallergic rhinitis (NAR) at 8 years of age. Information on 2413 children from a population-based birth cohort was used combining questionnaire data and IgE to inhalant allergens. Logistic regression was used to estimate the association between parental allergy-related disease and AR and NAR. In addition, cluster analysis was used to search for latent phenotypes of heredity likely to be associated with AR and NAR. At age 8 years, 13.8% of the children had AR, while 6.4% had NAR. Parental isolated hay fever increased the odds of AR (OR 2.2, 95% CI 1.6-3.2), whereas isolated asthma or eczema did not. The odds of NAR increased when one parent had two or more allergy-related diseases. In the cluster analysis, the highest proportion of AR, 37.5%, was seen in a cluster where both parents had hay fever and pollen allergy and that of NAR, 11.0%, in a cluster where one parent had hay fever, pollen allergy, and eczema. Parental allergy-related disease may be an important risk factor for NAR as well as AR, and the risk is comparable for maternal and paternal allergy. Parental hay fever seems to be the dominating hereditary risk factor for AR. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Obesity and rhinitis in a nationwide study of children and adults in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yueh-Ying; Forno, Erick; Gogna, Mudita; Celedón, Juan C

    2016-05-01

    Obesity has been associated with higher risk of asthma and asthma severity both in children and adults. However, studies evaluating the relation between obesity and rhinitis have yielded conflicting results. We performed a cross-sectional study of obesity indicators and rhinitis using data from 8165 participants in the 2005-2006 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Allergic rhinitis was defined as physician-diagnosed hay fever or allergy, the presence of symptoms in the past 12 months, and at least 1 positive allergen-specific IgE level. Nonallergic rhinitis was defined as a physician's diagnosis and symptoms but no positive allergen-specific IgE levels. Multivariate regression was used to assess the relationship between obesity and rhinitis in children and adults. In adults, overweight or obesity was associated with increased odds of nonallergic rhinitis (adjusted odds ratio, 1.43; 95% CI, 1.06-1.93; P = .02). Similarly, central obesity was associated with increased odds of nonallergic rhinitis in adults (adjusted odds ratio, 1.61; 95% CI, 1.20-2.16; P obesity, or central obesity were not associated with allergic rhinitis in adults. In children, central obesity was associated with reduced odds of allergic rhinitis (adjusted odds ratio, 0.35; 95% CI, 0.19-0.64; P children. In adults, obesity is associated with increased odds of nonallergic rhinitis, particularly in male subjects. In children, central obesity is associated with reduced odds of allergic rhinitis, regardless of sex. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Children and adolescents' health-related quality of life in relation to eczema, asthma and hay fever: results from a population-based cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matterne, Uwe; Schmitt, Jochen; Diepgen, Thomas L; Apfelbacher, Christian

    2011-10-01

    Several studies have looked at the relationship between childhood atopic disease and health-related quality of life (HRQoL), but existing research is limited by selected populations, small samples or lack to consider each of the three atopic conditions simultaneously. Impact of 4-week and 12-month occurrences of the three conditions on HRQoL were analysed by the use of complex sample general linear models alone and adjusted for the other atopic conditions, sociodemographics and mental health in a population-based sample (n = 6,518) of children and adolescents aged 11-17. In univariate analyses, total HRQoL was significantly impacted by eczema and hay fever but not asthma with stronger effects for 4-week occurrence. In multivariate analyses, 12-month occurrence of hay fever and 4-week occurrence of eczema and hay fever significantly impacted on total HRQoL. Although most of the variance in HRQoL was explained by mental health, independent effects of the atopic conditions remained. Atopic conditions impact HRQoL over and above mental health. When analysing the relationship between atopic conditions and HRQoL, it is important to consider more immediate versus less immediate effects of the conditions. Extent of impairment and the domains affected appear to vary when different time intervals are used.

  13. Allergies and Hay Fever

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Inquiries Find an ENT News About Us Our Campaigns Foundation Governance Diversity Honorary Awards & Lectures Employment Opportunities Renting Space Advocacy Medicare Advocacy Legislative & Political Affairs ENT PAC foundation Guidelines Patient Health Quality ...

  14. Hay Fever Medications

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Academy of Allergy Asthma & Immunology Menu Search Main navigation Skip to content Conditions & Treatments Allergies Asthma Primary Immunodeficiency Disease Related Conditions Drug Guide Conditions Dictionary Just ...

  15. [Rhinitis in adults].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalogjera, Livije

    2011-01-01

    Rhinitis is a very common disorder caused by inflammation or irritation of nasal mucosa. Dominant symptoms are nasal obstruction; however, in some patients, runny nose, excessive sneezing or nasal itch may be the most bothersome symptoms. The most common causes of nasal inflammation are viral infections and allergic response to airborne allergens. Response to irritants may cause similar symptoms, although signs of inflammation may not always be present. Viral rhinitis is lasting up to 10 days and it is part of the common cold syndrome. In short-lived rhinitis, lasting for 7 to 10 days, sometimes it is not easy to differentiate between the potential causes of the disorder, if general symptoms of infection like fever and malaise are not present. In long-living rhinitis, it is important to differentiate between infectious, allergic, non-allergic non-infectious rhinitis, and chronic rhinosinusitis. Itch and ocular symptoms are more common in allergic rhinitis, while other symptoms like nasal obstruction, rhinorrhea and sneezing may affect patients with allergic and non-allergic rhinitis. Patients with allergic rhinitis often have symptoms after exposure to irritants, temperature and humidity changes, like patients with non-allergic rhinitis, and such exposure may sometimes cause more severe symptoms than exposure to allergens. Sensitivity to a non-specific trigger is usually called non-specific nasal hyperreactivity. Allergic rhinitis occurs due to immunoglobulin E (IgE) interaction with allergen in contact with nasal mucosa in a sensitized patient. Sensitization to certain airborne allergen, like pollens, dust, molds, animal dander, etc. usually occurs in families with allergy background, which is helpful in making diagnosis in patients who have rhinitis in a certain period of the year, or aggravation of nasal symptoms occurs in the environment typical of certain allergen. The diagnosis is clinically confirmed by proving sensitivity to certain allergen on skin prick

  16. Paediatric rhinitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roberts, G; Xatzipsalti, M; Borrego, L M

    2013-01-01

    Rhinitis is a common problem in childhood and adolescence and impacts negatively on physical, social and psychological well-being. This position paper, prepared by the European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology Taskforce on Rhinitis in Children, aims to provide evidence...... decongestant, saline douches and nasal anticholinergics. Allergen-specific immunotherapy is helpful in IgE-mediated AR and may prevent the progression of allergic disease. There are still a number of areas that need to be clarified in the management of rhinitis in children and adolescents....

  17. Occupational rhinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrick, Maria M; Slavin, Raymond G

    2003-05-01

    This article aims to define occupational rhinitis, classify its various causes, review the steps in its diagnosis, and describe its nonpharmacologic and pharmacologic principles of management. Occupational rhinitis frequently coexists with asthma but also occurs alone. Although it does not have the same impact as occupational asthma, occupational rhinitis causes distress, discomfort, and work inefficiency. By concentrating on the patient's workplace, the clinician has an opportunity to practice preventive medicine: to recognize substances in the patient's micro- and macroenvironment that are causing the problems and then to intervene by altering the environment or removing the patient from the environment.

  18. Allergic Rhinitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... immunologist)? Resources American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology Medline Plus, Allergic Rhinitis Last Updated: December 8, 2017 This article was contributed by: familydoctor.org editorial staff Categories: ...

  19. Allergic Rhinitis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    inflammation may persist and the treatment strategy may need to include managing .... pruritis and rhinitis are produced by mediators preformed in mast cells and ... reactivity caused by inflammator y cell accumulation at the site of the previous ...

  20. Fever

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... also cause fevers. Some examples are: Arthritis or connective tissue illnesses such as rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus Ulcerative colitis and Crohn disease Vasculitis or periarteritis nodosa The first symptom of a cancer may be a fever. This is particularly true ...

  1. Fever

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamas Bartfai

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Measurement of body temperature remains one of the most common ways to assess health. An increase in temperature above what is considered to be a normal value is inevitably regarded as a sure sign of disease and referred to with one simple word: fever. In this review, we summarize how research on fever allowed the identification of the exogenous and endogenous molecules and pathways mediating the fever response. We also show how temperature elevation is common to different pathologies and how the molecular components of the fever-generation pathway represent drug targets for antipyretics, such as acetylsalicylic acid, the first “blockbuster drug”. We also show how fever research provided new insights into temperature and energy homeostasis, and into treatment of infection and inflammation.

  2. Environmental allergens in patients with allergic rhinitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anwar, M.S.; Bokhari, S.R.

    2002-01-01

    Objective: to find out the common environmental allergens responsible for sensitivity in patients with allergic rhinitis. Design: Descriptive cross sectional study. Place and Duration of Study: A local allergy clinic in an urban area of Lahore during the year 2000-2001. Subjects and Methods: Eighty patients with allergic rhinitis irrespective of age and sex were studied. These cases were selected on the basis of symptoms like sneezing, itching, watery nasal discharge and eosinophilia in nasal secretions. Forty matched healthy subjects as controls were also studied. Allergy test was performed on all the subjects by skin prick test to determine sensitivity to common environmental allergens using Bencard (England) allergy kit. Results: common environmental allergens responsible for sensitivity in allergic rhinitis patients were house dust (82.5 %), house dust mites (73.7%), mixed threshing (80%), straw dust (58.7%, hay dust (63.7%), mixed feathers (45%), cat fur (57.5%), cotton flock (56.2%), tree pollens (45%) and grass pollens (48.7%). Sensitivity to these allergens was observed in significantly higher (P<0.01) percentage of allergic rhinitis patients as compared with control subjects. Sensitivity to house dust, house dust mites and cat fur was of severe degree in majority of allergic rhinitis patients. While sensitivity to mixed threshing, straw dust, hay dust and mixed feathers was of moderate to severe degree in majority of these patients. Conclusion: Skin prick tests provide an effective and definitive mean to find out sensitivity to different allergens in cases with allergic rhinitis. Based on these findings, the physician can manage these patients in better way. (author)

  3. Mast cell stabilization, lipoxygenase inhibition, hyaluronidase inhibition, antihistaminic and antispasmodic activities of Aller-7, a novel botanical formulation for allergic rhinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amit, A; Saxena, V S; Pratibha, N; D'Souza, P; Bagchi, M; Bagchi, D; Stohs, S J

    2003-01-01

    Allergic rhinitis, also known as hay fever, rose fever or summer catarrh, is a major challenge to health professionals. A large number of the world's population, including approximately 40 million Americans, suffers from allergic rhinitis. A novel, botanical formulation (Aller-7) has been developed for the treatment of allergic rhinitis using a combination of extracts from seven medicinal plants, including Phyllanthus emblica, Terminalia chebula, T. bellerica, Albizia lebbeck, Piper nigrum, Zingiber officinale and P. longum, which have a proven history of efficacy and health benefits. The clinical manifestations of allergy are due to a number of mediators that are released from mast cells. The effect of Aller-7 on rat mesenteric mast cell degranulation was studied by incubating different concentrations of Aller-7 and challenging them with a degranulating agent, compound 48/80. The inhibitory activity of Aller-7 was determined against lipoxygenase and hyaluronidase, the key enzymes involved in the initiation and maintenance of inflammatory responses. Furthermore, most of these manifestations are due to histamine, which causes vasodilatation, increasing capillary permeability and leading to bronchoconstriction. Hence, the antihistaminic activity of Aller-7 was determined is isolated guinea pig ileum substrate using cetirizine as a positive control. The antispasmodic effect of Aller-7 on contractions of guinea pig tracheal chain was determined using papaverine and cetirizine as controls. Aller-7 exhibited potent activity in all these in vitro models tested, thus demonstrating the novel anti-allergic potential of Aller-7.

  4. Google Trends terms reporting rhinitis and related topics differ in European countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bousquet, J; Agache, I; Anto, J M; Bergmann, K C; Bachert, C; Annesi-Maesano, I; Bousquet, P J; D'Amato, G; Demoly, P; De Vries, G; Eller, E; Fokkens, W J; Fonseca, J; Haahtela, T; Hellings, P W; Just, J; Keil, T; Klimek, L; Kuna, P; Lodrup Carlsen, K C; Mösges, R; Murray, R; Nekam, K; Onorato, G; Papadopoulos, N G; Samolinski, B; Schmid-Grendelmeier, P; Thibaudon, M; Tomazic, P; Triggiani, M; Valiulis, A; Valovirta, E; Van Eerd, M; Wickman, M; Zuberbier, T; Sheikh, A

    2017-08-01

    Google Trends (GT) searches trends of specific queries in Google and reflects the real-life epidemiology of allergic rhinitis. We compared Google Trends terms related to allergy and rhinitis in all European Union countries, Norway and Switzerland from 1 January 2011 to 20 December 2016. The aim was to assess whether the same terms could be used to report the seasonal variations of allergic diseases. Using the Google Trend 5-year graph, an annual and clear seasonality of queries was found in all countries apart from Cyprus, Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania and Malta. Different terms were found to demonstrate seasonality depending on the country - namely 'hay fever', 'allergy' and 'pollen' - showing cultural differences. A single set of terms cannot be used across all European countries, but allergy seasonality can be compared across Europe providing the above three terms are used. Using longitudinal data in different countries and multiple terms, we identified an awareness-related spike of searches (December 2016). © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Botulinum Toxin for Rhinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozcan, Cengiz; Ismi, Onur

    2016-08-01

    Rhinitis is a common clinical entity. Besides nasal obstruction, itching, and sneezing, one of the most important symptoms of rhinitis is nasal hypersecretion produced by nasal glands and exudate from the nasal vascular bed. Allergic rhinitis is an IgE-mediated inflammatory reaction of nasal mucosa after exposure to environmental allergens. Idiopathic rhinitis describes rhinitis symptoms that occur after non-allergic, noninfectious irritants. Specific allergen avoidance, topical nasal decongestants, nasal corticosteroids, immunotherapy, and sinonasal surgery are the main treatment options. Because the current treatment modalities are not enough for reducing rhinorrhea in some patients, novel treatment options are required to solve this problem. Botulinum toxin is an exotoxin generated by Clostridium botulinum. It disturbs the signal transmission at the neuromuscular and neuroglandular junction by inhibiting the acetylcholine release from the presynaptic nerve terminal. It has been widely used in neuromuscular, hypersecretory, and autonomic nerve system disorders. There have been a lot of published articles concerning the effect of this toxin on rhinitis symptoms. Based on the results of these reports, intranasal botulinum toxin A administration appears to be a safe and effective treatment method for decreasing rhinitis symptoms in rhinitis patients with a long-lasting effect. Botulinum toxin type A will be a good treatment option for the chronic rhinitis patients who are resistant to other treatment methods.

  6. Allergic rhinitis - what to ask your doctor - child

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... child References Baroody FM, Naclerio RM. Allergy and immunology of the upper airway. In: Flint PW, Haughey ... D.A.M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Allergy Hay Fever Browse the Encyclopedia A.D. ...

  7. Immunopathogenesis of allergic rhinitis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EL-HAKIM

    Druce HM. Allergic and non allergic rhinitis. In: Middleton EM Jr, Reed CE, Ellis EF, Adkinson NF. Jr, Yunginger JW, Busse WW, eds. Allergy: Principles and Practice. 5th ed. St. Louis,. Mo: Mosby, Year-Book;1998.p.1005-16. 3. Blaiss MS. Quality of life in allergic rhinitis. Ann. Allergy Asthma Immunol 1999;83(5):449-54. 4.

  8. Allergic Rhinitis Quiz

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... rhinitis, allergic asthma, conjunctivitis (eye allergy) or stinging insect allergy. Allergy shots often lead to lasting relief ... AAAAI Foundation Donate American Academy of Allergy Asthma & Immunology 555 East Wells Street Suite 1100, Milwaukee , WI ...

  9. Snoring and Nasal Congestion

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cystic Fibrosis Sinusitis Q&A Complications of Sinusitis Epistaxis (Nosebleeds) Allergic Rhinitis (Hay Fever) Headaches and Sinus ... Cystic Fibrosis Sinusitis Q&A Complications of Sinusitis Epistaxis (Nosebleeds) Allergic Rhinitis (Hay Fever) Headaches and Sinus ...

  10. Sibship Characteristics and Risk of Allergic Rhinitis and Asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westergaard, Tine; Rostgaard, Klaus; Wohlfahrt, Jan

    2005-01-01

    asthma; birth order; hypersensitivity; rhinitis; allergic; perennial; rhinitis; allergic; seasonal; risk factors; siblings......asthma; birth order; hypersensitivity; rhinitis; allergic; perennial; rhinitis; allergic; seasonal; risk factors; siblings...

  11. Nettle extract (Urtica dioica) affects key receptors and enzymes associated with allergic rhinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roschek, Bill; Fink, Ryan C; McMichael, Matthew; Alberte, Randall S

    2009-07-01

    A nettle (Urtica dioica) extract shows in vitro inhibition of several key inflammatory events that cause the symptoms of seasonal allergies. These include the antagonist and negative agonist activity against the Histamine-1 (H(1)) receptor and the inhibition of mast cell tryptase preventing degranulation and release of a host of pro-inflammatory mediators that cause the symptoms of hay fevers. The nettle extract also inhibits prostaglandin formation through inhibition of Cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1), Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), and Hematopoietic Prostaglandin D(2) synthase (HPGDS), central enzymes in pro-inflammatory pathways. The IC(50) value for histamine receptor antagonist activity was 251 (+/-13) microg mL(-1) and for the histamine receptor negative agonist activity was 193 (+/-71) microg mL(-1). The IC(50) values for inhibition of mast cell tryptase was 172 (+/-28) microg mL(-1), for COX-1 was 160 (+/-47) microg mL(-1), for COX-2 was 275 (+/-9) microg mL(-1), and for HPGDS was 295 (+/-51) microg mL(-1). Through the use of DART TOF-MS, which yields exact masses and relative abundances of compounds present in complex mixtures, bioactives have been identified in nettle that contribute to the inhibition of pro-inflammatory pathways related to allergic rhinitis. These results provide for the first time, a mechanistic understanding of the role of nettle extracts in reducing allergic and other inflammatory responses in vitro. Copyright 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Allergic rhinitis in children

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    and is also associated with co-morbidities such as sinusitis, otitis media ... nose, chronic infective sinusitis and nasal polyps may mimic the signs .... fungal spores. Gauteng. Add: tree pollen (cypress). Farming areas. Add: Zea mays, horse, Blomia tropicalis. Table ii. Effect of medications on symptoms of allergic rhinitis.

  13. Prevention of allergic rhinitis by ginger and the molecular basis of immunosuppression by 6-gingerol through T cell inactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamoto, Yoshiyuki; Ueno, Yuki; Nakahashi, Emiko; Obayashi, Momoko; Sugihara, Kento; Qiao, Shanlou; Iida, Machiko; Kumasaka, Mayuko Y; Yajima, Ichiro; Goto, Yuji; Ohgami, Nobutaka; Kato, Masashi; Takeda, Kozue

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of allergies has recently been increasing worldwide. Immunoglobulin E (IgE)-mediated hypersensitivity is central to the pathogenesis of asthma, hay fever and other allergic diseases. Ginger (Zingiber officinale Roscoe) and its extracts have been valued for their medical properties including antinausea, antiinflammation, antipyresis and analgesia properties. In this study, we investigated the antiallergic effects of ginger and 6-gingerol, a major compound of ginger, using a mouse allergy model and primary/cell line culture system. In mice with ovalbumin (OVA)-induced allergic rhinitis, oral administration of 2% ginger diet reduced the severity of sneezing and nasal rubbing by nasal sensitization of OVA and suppressed infiltration of mast cells in nasal mucosa and secretion of OVA-specific IgE in serum. 6-Gingerol inhibited the expression of not only Th2 cytokines but also Th1 cytokines in OVA-sensitized spleen cells. Accordingly, 6-gingerol suppressed in vitro differentiation of both Th1 cells and Th2 cells from naïve T cells. In addition, 6-gingerol suppressed both superantigen staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB)- and anti-CD3-induced T cell proliferation. 6-Gingerol also abrogated PMA plus ionomycin- and SEB-induced IL-2 production in T cells, suggesting that 6-gingerol affected T cell receptor-mediated signal transduction rather than the antigen-presentation process. Indeed, 6-gingerol inhibited the phosphorylation of MAP kinases, calcium release and nuclear localization of c-fos and NF-κB by PMA and ionomycin stimulation. Thus, our results demonstrate that 6-gingerol suppresses cytokine production for T cell activation and proliferation, thereby not causing B cell and mast cell activation and resulting in prevention or alleviation of allergic rhinitis symptoms. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Characteristics of Nonallergic Vasomotor Rhinitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Nonallergic rhinitis (NAR) conditions are currently considered diagnoses by exclusion. A diagnosis of NAR requires negative specific IgE responses by skin or serologic testing and more recently testing to exclude localized production of specific IgE in the nose. Symptoms are classically aggravated by irritant triggers such as tobacco smoke, perfumes/fragrances, and temperature or barometric pressure changes. A previously developed questionnaire survey designed to help physicians recognize differences between allergic rhinitis and nonallergic rhinitis subtypes found that patients with symptom onset later in life (> 35 years), no family history of allergies, no seasonality or cat-induced symptoms, and symptoms induced by perfumes and fragrances had > 95% likelihood of having a physician diagnosis of NAR. Of note, clinical symptoms were not generally useful for differentiating chronic rhinitis subtypes which has also been confirmed in a more recent study investigating the relationship between headaches and chronic rhinitis subtypes (Table 1). In subsequent studies it was found that a significant percentage of NAR patients did not experience irritant-induced symptoms, suggesting that these triggers are not a clinical characteristic that can be uniformly used for all NAR patients. However, a newly developed Irritant Index Scale can be used to reliably differentiate pure allergic rhinitis from nonallergic rhinitis with trigger phenotypes. The use of standardized and validated questionnaires allows objective characterization of chronic rhinitis subtypes that appears to improve the accuracy of clinically diagnosing these patients. PMID:24228982

  15. Rhinitis and pregnancy: literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fábio Azevedo Caparroz

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT INTRODUCTION: There is a controversy concerning the terminology and definition of rhinitis in pregnancy. Gestational rhinitis is a relatively common condition, which has drawn increasing interest in recent years due to a possible association with maternal obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS and unfavorable fetal outcomes. OBJECTIVE: To review the current knowledge on gestacional rhinitis, and to assess its evidence. METHODS: Structured literature search. RESULTS: Gestational rhinitis and rhinitis "during pregnancy" are somewhat similar conditions regarding their physiopathology and treatment, but differ regarding definition and prognosis. Hormonal changes have a presumed etiological role, but knowledge about the physiopathology of gestational rhinitis is still lacking. Management of rhinitis during pregnancy focuses on the minimal intervention required for symptom relief. CONCLUSION: As it has a great impact on maternal quality of life, both the otorhinolaryngologist and the obstetrician must be careful concerning the early diagnosis and treatment of gestational rhinitis, considering the safety of treatment measures and drugs and their current level of evidence.

  16. Rhinitis: a complication to asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, J W; Thomsen, S F; Nolte, H

    2010-01-01

    Asthma and rhinitis often co-occur, and this potentially increases the disease severity and impacts negatively on the quality of life. We studied disease severity, airway responsiveness, atopy, quality of life and treatment in subjects with both asthma and rhinitis compared to patients with asthma...

  17. Risk factors and prevalence of asthma and rhinitis among primary school children in Lisbon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.N. Pegas

    Full Text Available Aims: A cross-sectional study was carried out with the objective of identifying nutrition habits and housing conditions as risk factors for respiratory problems in schoolchildren in Lisbon. Material and methods: Between October and December 2008, parents of 900 students of the elementary schools of Lisbon were invited to answer a questionnaire of the International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood Program (ISAAC. The response rate was 40 %. Logistic regression was used in the analysis of results. Results: The prevalence of asthma, allergic rhinitis and wheeze was 5.6 %, 43.0 % and 43.3 %, respectively. Risk factors independently associated with asthma were wheezing attacks, and dry cough at night not related to common cold in the last 12 months. Wheezing crises were found to affect children daily activities. Risk factors for wheeze were hay fever and the presence of a pet at home. A risk factor for rhinitis was cough at night. The frequent consumption of egg was also associated with increased risk of rhinitis. Conclusion: Contrarily to asthma, the prevalence of allergic rhinitis and wheeze increased in comparison with previous ISAAC studies. Wheezing attacks were associated with asthma and hay fever was identified as a risk factor of manifesting wheezing symptoms. Having pets at home was pointed out as a significant risk factor for rhinitis, but not smoking exposure, mould, plush toys, diet (except egg consumption, breastfeeding or other conditions. Resumo: Objectivos: Com o objectivo de identificar hábitos alimentares e características habitacionais como factores de risco para a prevalência de problemas respiratórios na população escolar do 1.° ciclo da cidade de Lisboa foi realizado um estudo transversal. Material e métodos: De Outubro a Dezembro de 2008, os pais de 900 alunos das escolas do 1° ciclo de Lisboa foram convidados a responder a um questionário similar ao do Programa Internacional de Estudo de Asma e Alergias na

  18. Remission of allergic rhinitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bødtger, Uffe; Linneberg, Allan

    2004-01-01

    in only 22% of remitting subjects yet was seen significantly more often than in nonremitting subjects (7.4%). Remission of sensitization occurred in 6% (HDM) to 11% (pollen-furry animal) and was predicted on the basis of low s-IgE levels (class 2) at baseline. CONCLUSION: Remission of AR symptoms...... months and s-IgE levels of class 2 or greater against pollen (birch, grass, or mugwort). This was similar for AR to animals (cat or dog) or house dust mites (HDMs). Remission of AR was defined as AR at baseline but no rhinitis symptoms at follow-up and sensitization (s-IgE level class > or =2 at baseline...... and class HDM AR; overall, 17%) and was predicted by low s-IgE levels. Age, sex, asthma, atopic predisposition, age at AR onset, and AR duration had no predictive value. A decrease in s-IgE level was observed...

  19. Safety of a novel botanical extract formula for ameliorating allergic rhinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amit, A; Saxena, V S; Pratibha, N; Bagchi, M; Bagchi, D; Stohs, S J

    2003-01-01

    Allergic rhinitis (also known as hay fever) is the most commonly occurring immunological disorder, and it affects 40 million men, women, and children in the United States. Symptomatically, it is an inflammation and irritation of the mucous membranes that line the nose. Allergy is defined as a state of hypersensitivity or hyperimmunity caused by exposure to a particular antigen (allergen) that results in increased reactivity upon subsequent exposure. A novel botanical formulation, Aller-7/NR-A2, was developed for the treatment of allergic rhinitis; it is a combination of medicinal plant extracts from Phyllanthus emblica, Terminalia chebula, Terminalia bellerica, Albizia lebbeck, Piper nigrum, Zingiber officinale, and Piper longum. This novel formulation has demonstrated potent antihistaminic, anti-inflammatory, antispasmodic, antioxidant, and mast-cell-stabilization activities. All of the doses for these toxicity studies were selected according to the guidelines of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, the World Health Organization, and the Environmental Protection Agency. Acute toxicity of Aller-7 was evaluated in Swiss Albino mice at doses of 125, 250, 500, 1000, and 1500 mg/kg. After 15 days of treatment, the animals were sacrificed. No histopathological changes were observed in major vital organs. A similar study was conducted in Albino Wistar rats, which were sacrificed at the end of 15 days. No histopathological changes or toxicity was observed at up to 2 g/kg body weight. Subacute toxicity was conducted in Albino Wistar rats at a dose of 90 mg/kg body weight for 3 days, then at 180 mg/kg for the next 3 days, and then at 270 mg/kg for 3 weeks. After 28 days, the animals were sacrificed and tested; no toxicity was observed. In a subchronic toxicity study, there was no observed adverse effect level at 1 g/kg body weight in rats. In a teratological assay, at doses of 3.0 g/kg (20 times the recommended dose) and 1.8 g/kg, respectively, no

  20. Burden of allergic rhinitis: allergies in America, Latin America, and Asia-Pacific adult surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meltzer, Eli O; Blaiss, Michael S; Naclerio, Robert M; Stoloff, Stuart W; Derebery, M Jennifer; Nelson, Harold S; Boyle, John M; Wingertzahn, Mark A

    2012-01-01

    Allergic rhinitis (AR; also nasal allergies or "hay fever") is a chronic upper airway inflammatory disease that affects ∼60 million adults and children in the United States. The duration and severity of AR symptoms contribute to a substantial burden on patients' quality of life (QoL), sleep, work productivity, and activity. This study was designed to examine symptoms, QoL, productivity, comorbidities, disease management, and pharmacologic treatment of AR in United States and ex-U.S. sufferers. Allergies in America was a comprehensive telephone-based survey of 2500 adults with AR. These data are compared and contrasted with findings from the Pediatric Allergies in America, Allergies in Latin America, and Allergies in Asia-Pacific telephone surveys. The prevalence of physician-diagnosed AR was 14% in U.S. adults, 7% in Latin America adults, and 9% in Asia-Pacific adults. Nasal congestion is the most common and bothersome symptom for adults. Approximately two-thirds of adults rely on medication to relieve intolerable AR symptoms. Incomplete relief, slow onset, <24-hour relief, and reduced efficacy with sustained use were commonly reported with AR medications, including intranasal corticosteroids. One in seven U.S. adults reported achieving little to no relief with AR medications. Bothersome adverse effects of AR medications included drowsiness, a drying feeling, medication dripping down the throat, and bad taste. Perception of inadequate efficacy was the leading cause of medication discontinuation or change and contributed to treatment dissatisfaction. These findings support the assertion that AR burden has been substantially underestimated and identify several important challenges to successful management of AR.

  1. Yellow Fever

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Testing Vaccine Information Testing for Vaccine Adverse Events Yellow fever Vaccine Continuing Education Course Yellow Fever Home Prevention Vaccine Vaccine Recommendations Reactions to Yellow Fever Vacine Yellow Fever Vaccine, Pregnancy, & ... Transmission Symptoms, Diagnosis, & Treatment Maps Africa ...

  2. Characteristics of Nonallergic Vasomotor Rhinitis

    OpenAIRE

    Bernstein, Jonathan A

    2009-01-01

    Nonallergic rhinitis (NAR) conditions are currently considered diagnoses by exclusion. A diagnosis of NAR requires negative specific IgE responses by skin or serologic testing and more recently testing to exclude localized production of specific IgE in the nose. Symptoms are classically aggravated by irritant triggers such as tobacco smoke, perfumes/fragrances, and temperature or barometric pressure changes. A previously developed questionnaire survey designed to help physicians recognize dif...

  3. Controlling Hay Fever Symptoms with Accurate Pollen Counts

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Academy of Allergy Asthma & Immunology Menu Search Main navigation Skip to content Conditions & Treatments Allergies Asthma Primary Immunodeficiency Disease Related Conditions Drug Guide Conditions Dictionary Just ...

  4. Work productivity in rhinitis using cell phones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bousquet, J.; Bewick, Bridgette M; Arnavielhe, S

    2017-01-01

    Allergic rhinitis often impairs social life and performance. The aim of this cross-sectional study was to use cell phone data to assess the impact on work productivity of uncontrolled rhinitis assessed by visual analogue scale (VAS). A mobile phone app (Allergy Diary, Google Play Store and Apple ...

  5. Sublingual immunotherapy in children with allergic rhinitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Röder (Esther)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractAllergic rhinitis is one of the most prevalent chronic diseases in Europe. Besides nose symptoms such as sneezing and a blocked nose, patients also suffer from general complaints like fatigue, sleeping problems and difficulty concentrating. Allergic rhinitis can have a serious impact on

  6. Trends in prevalence of allergic rhinitis and correlation with pollen counts in Switzerland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frei, Thomas; Gassner, Ewald

    2008-11-01

    In recent decades, a large number of epidemiological studies investigating the change of prevalence of hay fever showed an increase in the occurrence of this disease. However, other studies carried out in the 1990s yielded contradictory results. Many environmental factors have been hypothesized to contribute to the increasing hay fever rate, including both indoor and ambient air pollution, reduced exposure to microbial stimulation and changes in diets. However, the observed increase has not convincingly been explained by any of these factors and there is limited evidence of changes in exposure to these risk factors over time. Additionally, recent studies show that no further increase in asthma, hay fever and atopic sensitisation in adolescents and adults has been observed during the 1990s and the beginning of the new century. As the pattern of pollen counts has changed over the years, partly due to the global warming but also as a consequence of a change in the use of land, the changing prevalence of hay fever might partly be driven by this different pollen exposure. Epidemiological data for hay fever in Switzerland are available from 1926 until 2000 (with large gaps between 1926 and 1958 and 1958 to 1986) whereas pollen data are available from 1969 until the present. This allows an investigation as to whether these data are correlated provided the same time spans are compared. It would also be feasible to correlate the pollen data with meteorological data which, however, is not the subject of our investigation. Our study focuses on analyzing time series of pollen counts and of pollen season lengths in order to identify their trends, and to ascertain whether there is a relationship between these trends and the changes in the hay fever prevalence. It is shown in this paper that the pollen exposure has been decreasing in Basel since the beginning of the 1990s whereas the rate of the hay fever prevalence in Switzerland remained approximately unchanged in this period

  7. Dengue fever

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    symptoms and research has been limited to studies ... severity and problems with vaccination (4). History of ... Americas in 1970s reduced the spread of dengue fever. After this .... Reiter P. Yellow fever and dengue: a threat to Europe? 9.

  8. Yellow fever

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to thrive. Blood tests can confirm the diagnosis. Treatment There is no specific treatment for yellow fever. ... SJ, Endy TP, Rothman AL, Barrett AD. Flaviviruses (dengue, yellow fever, Japanese encephalitis, West Nile encephalitis, St. ...

  9. Typhoid fever

    Science.gov (United States)

    Typhoid fever is an infection that causes diarrhea and a rash . It is most commonly caused due to ... in their stools for years, spreading the disease. Typhoid fever is common in developing countries. Most cases in ...

  10. [Definition and clinic of the allergic rhinitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spielhaupter, Magdalena

    2016-03-01

    The allergic rhinitis is the most common immune disorder with a lifetime prevalence of 24% and one of the most common chronic diseases at all--with tendency to rise. It occurs in childhood and influences the patients' social life, school performance and labour productivity. Furthermore the allergic rhinitis is accompanied by a lot of comorbidities, including conjunctivitis, asthma bronchiale, food allergy, neurodermatitis and sinusitis. For example the risk for asthma is 3.2-fold higher for adults with allergic rhinitis than for healthy people.

  11. Laser application for hypertrophic rhinitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inouye, Tetsuzo; Tanabe, Tetsuya; Nakanoboh, Manabu; Ogura, Masami

    1995-05-01

    The CO2 and KTP/532 lasers have been used in the treatment of an allergic and hypertrophic rhinitis for the past several years. As we know, the laser enables a surgeon to perform the operation with minimum hemorrhage and minimized pain, during and after the procedure. Additionally many of these operations can be performed under local anesthesia instead of general anesthesia, on an outpatient basis. The laser is used to irradiate the mucous membranes of the inferior turbinates. Vaporization and cutting is easily done. Post operative management of the local operated area is easy. The advantages of laser surgery over regular surgical techniques are supreme for intranasal operations when performed under local anesthesia.

  12. Japanese guidelines for allergic rhinitis 2017

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimihiro Okubo

    2017-04-01

    To incorporate evidence based medicine (EBM introduced from abroad, the most recent collection of evidence/literature was supplemented to the Practical Guideline for the Management of Allergic Rhinitis in Japan 2016. The revised guideline includes assessment of diagnosis/treatment and prescriptions for children and pregnant women, for broad clinical applications. An evidence-based step-by-step strategy for treatment is also described. In addition, the QOL concept and cost benefit analyses are also addressed. Along with Allergic Rhinitis and its Impact of Asthma (ARIA, this guideline is widely used for various clinical purposes, such as measures for patients with sinusitis, childhood allergic rhinitis, oral allergy syndrome, and anaphylaxis and for pregnant women. A Q&A section regarding allergic rhinitis in Japan was added to the end of this guideline.

  13. Is allergic rhinitis a trivial disease?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dirceu Solé

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Asthma and rhinitis often coexist, which potentially increases the disease severity and can negatively impact a patients' quality of life. However, there are few reports based on data obtained from the International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood examining asthma severity in combination with rhinitisrelated symptoms. OBJECTIVE: To demonstrate whether current rhinitis and current rhinoconjunctivitis are associated with the development of asthma or its increasing severity in Brazilian adolescents. METHODS: The prevalence of current asthma was correlated with the prevalence of current rhinitis and current rhinoconjunctivitis in adolescents (13 to 14 year olds from 16 Brazilian centers (based on Spearman's rank correlation index. The influence of current rhinitis and current rhinoconjunctivitis on asthma presentation was also evaluated using the chi-squared test and was expressed as odds ratios with 95% confidence intervals (95%CI. RESULTS: A significant positive correlation was observed between the prevalence of current asthma and current rhinitis (rs = 0.82; 95%CI: 0.60-0.93, p< 0.0001 and between the prevalence of current asthma and current rhinoconjunctivitis (rs = 0.75; 95%CI: 0.47-0.89, p < 0.0001. Current rhinitis was associated with a significantly increased risk of current asthma and of more severe asthma. Similar results were observed for current rhinoconjunctivitis. CONCLUSION: In this epidemiologic study of Brazilian adolescents, the presence of current rhinitis and current rhinoconjunctivitis was associated with a high risk of developing asthma and increased asthma severity. The mutual evaluation of rhinitis and asthma is necessary to establish an adequate treatment plan.

  14. The Glaser–Hay reaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vilhelmsen, Mie Højer; Jensen, Jonas; Tortzen, Christian

    2013-01-01

    The oxidative Glaser–Hay coupling of two terminal alkynes to furnish a butadiyne is a key reaction for acetylenic scaffolding. Although the reaction is performed under rather simple conditions [CuCl/TMEDA/O2 (air)], the mechanism is still under debate. Herein we present detailed studies...... on the scope of this reaction by using both 13C NMR and UV/Vis spectroscopic methods. The former method was used to study the kinetics of the coupling of aryl-substituted alkynes as the aryl carbon resonances of the reactants and products have similar NOEs and relaxation times. The reaction was found...... to be zero-order with respect to the terminal alkyne reactant under standard preparative conditions. Moreover, as the reaction proceeded, a clear change to slower reaction kinetics was observed, but it was still apparently zero-order. The onset of this change was found to depend on the catalyst loading...

  15. MACVIA-ARIA Sentinel NetworK for allergic rhinitis (MASK-rhinitis)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bousquet, J; Schunemann, H J; Fonseca, J

    2015-01-01

    Several unmet needs have been identified in allergic rhinitis: identification of the time of onset of the pollen season, optimal control of rhinitis and comorbidities, patient stratification, multidisciplinary team for integrated care pathways, innovation in clinical trials and, above all, patien...

  16. Diagnosing allergic rhinitis – is there a need?

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    eczema, asthma, rhinitis, conjunctivitis, food allergies and others. Rhinitis is the ... teenagers is 28%.1 ... This may be due to limited access to health care, but without ... particularly in black families, where repeated respiratory infections become ...

  17. The burden of allergic rhinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nathan, Robert A

    2007-01-01

    Although formerly regarded as a nuisance disease, allergic rhinitis (AR) has a considerable effect on quality of life and can have significant consequences if left untreated. The total burden of this disease lies not only in impaired physical and social functioning but also in a financial burden made greater when considering evidence that AR is a possible causal factor in comorbid diseases such as asthma or sinusitis. Compared with matched controls, patients with AR have an approximate twofold increase in medication costs and 1.8-fold the number of visits to health practitioners. Hidden direct costs include the treatment of comorbid asthma, chronic sinusitis, otitis media, upper respiratory infection, and nasal polyposis. Nasal congestion, the most prominent symptom in AR, is associated with sleep-disordered breathing, a condition that can have a profound effect on mental health, including increased psychiatric disorders, depression, anxiety, and alcohol abuse. Furthermore, sleep-disordered breathing in childhood and adolescence is associated with increased disorders of learning performance, behavior, and attention. In the United States, AR results in 3.5 million lost workdays and 2 million lost schooldays annually. Patients struggle to alleviate their misery, frequently self-adjusting their treatment regimen of over-the-counter and prescription medications because of lack of efficacy, deterioration of efficacy, lack of 24-hour relief, and bothersome side effects. Ironically, health care providers overestimate patient satisfaction with therapy. Therefore, improvement in patient-practitioner communication may enhance patient adherence with prescribed regimens.

  18. Validation of the MASK-rhinitis visual analogue scale on smartphone screens to assess allergic rhinitis control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Caimmi, D.; Baiz, N.; Tanno, L. K.; Demoly, P.; Arnavielhe, S.; Murray, R.; Bedbrook, A.; Bergmann, K. C.; de Vries, G.; Fokkens, W. J.; Fonseca, J.; Haahtela, T.; Keil, T.; Kuna, P.; Mullol, J.; Papadopoulos, N.; Passalacqua, G.; Samolinski, B.; Tomazic, P. V.; Valiulis, A.; van Eerd, M.; Wickman, M.; Annesi-Maesano, I.; Bousquet, J.; Agache, I.; Angles, R.; Anto, J. M.; Asayag, E.; Bacci, E.; Bachert, C.; Baroni, I.; Barreto, B. A.; Bedolla-Barajas, M.; Bertorello, L.; Bewick, M.; Bieber, T.; Birov, S.; Bindslev-Jensen, C.; Blua, A.; Bochenska Marciniak, M.; Bogus-Buczynska, I.; Bosnic-Ancevich, S.; Bosse, I.; Bourret, R.; Bucca, C.; Buonaiuto, R.; Caiazza, D.; Caillot, D.; Caimmi, D. P.; Camargos, P.; Canfora, G.; Cardona, V.; Carriazo, A. M.; Cartier, C.; Castellano, G.; Chavannes, N. H.; Ciaravolo, M. M.; Cingi, C.; Ciceran, A.; Colas, L.; Colgan, E.; Coll, J.; Conforti, D.; Correira de Sousa, J.; Cortés-Grimaldo, R. M.; Corti, F.; Costa, E.; Courbis, A. L.; Cruz, A.; Custovic, A.; Dario, C.; da Silva, M.; Dauvilliers, Y.; de Blay, F.; Dedeu, T.; de Feo, G.; de Martino, B.; Di Capua, S.; Di Carluccio, N.; Dray, G.; Dubakiene, R.; Eller, E.; Emuzyte, R.; Espinoza-Contreras, J. M.; Estrada-Cardona, A.; Farrell, J.; Ferrero, J.; Fontaine, J. F.; Forti, S.; Gálvez-Romero, J. L.; Garcia Cruz, M. H.; García-Cobas, C. I.; Gemicioğlu, B.; Gerth van Wijck, R.; Guidacci, M.; Gómez-Vera, J.; Guldemond, N. A.; Gutter, Z.; Hajjam, J.; Hellings, P.; Hernández-Velázquez, L.; Illario, M.; Ivancevich, J. C.; Jares, E.; Joos, G.; Just, J.; Kalayci, O.; Kalyoncu, A. F.; Karjalainen, J.; Khaltaev, N.; Klimek, L.; Kull, I.; Kuna, T. P.; Kvedariene, V.; Kolek, V.; Krzych-Fałta, E.; Kupczyk, M.; Lacwik, P.; Larenas-Linnemann, D.; Laune, D.; Lauri, D.; Lavrut, J.; Lessa, M.; Levato, G.; Lewis, L.; Lieten, I.; Lipiec, A.; Louis, R.; Luna-Pech, J. A.; Magnan, A.; Malva, J.; Maspero, J. F.; Mayora, O.; Medina-Ávalos, M. A.; Melen, E.; Menditto, E.; Millot-Keurinck, J.; Moda, G.; Morais-Almeida, M.; Mösges, R.; Mota-Pinto, A.; Muraro, A.; Noguès, M.; Nalin, M.; Napoli, L.; Neffen, H.; O'Hehir, R.; Olivé Elias, M.; Onorato, G.; Palkonen, S.; Pépin, J. L.; Pereira, A. M.; Persico, M.; Pfaar, O.; Pozzi, A. C.; Prokopakis, E. P.; Raciborski, F.; Rizzo, J. A.; Robalo-Cordeiro, C.; Rodríguez-González, M.; Rolla, G.; Roller-Wirnsberger, R. E.; Romano, A.; Romano, M.; Salimäki, J.; Serpa, F. S.; Shamai, S.; Sierra, M.; Sova, M.; Sorlini, M.; Stellato, C.; Stelmach, R.; Strandberg, T.; Stroetman, V.; Stukas, R.; Szylling, A.; Tibaldi, V.; Todo-Bom, A.; Toppila-Salmi, S.; Tomazic, P.; Trama, U.; Triggiani, M.; Valero, A.; Valovirta, E.; Vasankari, T.; Vatrella, A.; Ventura, M. T.; Verissimo, M. T.; Viart, F.; Williams, S.; Wagenmann, M.; Wanscher, C.; Westman, M.; Young, I.; Yorgancioglu, A.; Zernotti, E.; Zurbierber, T.; Zurkuhlen, A.; de Oliviera, B.; Senn, A.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) is a validated tool to assess control in allergic rhinitis patients. Objective: The aim of this study was to validate the use of VAS in the MASK-rhinitis (MACVIA-ARIA Sentinel NetworK for allergic rhinitis) app (Allergy Diary) on smartphones screens to

  19. Aetiology of allergic rhinitis in Hong Kong

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher W.K. Lam

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available In a 1993 survey, allergic rhinitis was identified as the most common allergic disease in Hong Kong, affecting 29.1% of schoolchildren. Recently (1995, the International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood (ISAAC also reported 44.5% current rhinitis among Hong Kong teenagers. Our objective was to study the aetiology of allergic rhinitis in Hong Kong using serological tests of allergen sensitization. In 57 allergic rhinitis patients and in the same number of age- and sex-matched controls the following were measured: serum total IgE, mixed aeroallergen IgE (Phadiatop™ and specific IgE versus house dust mite (HDM, cockroach, cat and dog dander, mould mixture (Penicillium, Cladosporium, Aspergillus and Alternaria species and four local pollens (Bermuda grass, Timothy, ragweed and mugwort. Compared with controls, allergic rhinitis patients (26 males, 31 females; mean (± SD age 25 ±11 years had a significantly elevated serum total IgE concentration (mean ± SEM: 496 ± 88 vs 179 ± 38 kU/L and an increased proportion of positive Phadiatop (95 vs 33% and specific IgE tests versus HDM (90 vs 44% and cockroach (42 vs 9%; Mann-Whitney U-test and χ2 tests all P < 0.005. There was no significant difference in sensitization to other allergens tested. House dust mite and cockroach are ubiquitous in Hong Kong with a warm, humid climate and crowded living conditions. Their identification as aetiological agents of allergic rhinitis should help in the development of environmental strategies for reducing the inhalant allergen load to prevent and control this prevalent and costly health problem in our community.

  20. Laboratory Exercise to Evaluate Hay Preservatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGraw, R. L.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Presented is a laboratory exercise designed to demonstrate the effects of moisture on hay preservation products in a manner that does not require large amounts of equipment or instructor time. Materials, procedures, and probable results are discussed. (CW)

  1. Rat bite fever without fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stehle, P; Dubuis, O; So, A; Dudler, J

    2003-09-01

    Rat bite fever is a rarely reported acute febrile bacterial illness caused by Streptobacillus moniliformis or Spirillum minus following a rat bite. It is classically characterised by abrupt onset of fever with rigors, myalgias, headache, and the appearance of a generalised maculopapular petechial skin rash. Polyarthritis complicates the course of the disease in up to 50% of infected patients, and numerous hurdles can make the diagnosis particularly difficult in the absence of fever or rash, as in the present case. A high degree of awareness is necessary to make the correct diagnosis in such cases. Diagnosis has important prognostic implications as the disease is potentially lethal, but easily treatable.

  2. A survey for rhinitis in an automotive ring manufacturing plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Dong-Uk; Jin, Ku-Won; Koh, Dong-Hee; Kim, Byung-Kyu; Kim, Kyu-Sang; Park, Doo-Yong

    2008-08-01

    We report findings regarding otolaryngologist-confirmed rhinitis, current exposure to MWF aerosols, fungi, and endotoxins for workers in a plant manufacturing automobile piston rings. Questionnaire data showed that 61.5% of 187 workers exhibited rhinitis-related symptoms. Rhinitis was confirmed in 99 of 115 workers whom were medically examined. Otolaryngologist-confirmed rhinitis was present in 10 of 19 grinding workers (52.6%), 67 of 142 production workers (47.2%), and 22 of 26 quality control (QC) workers (84.6%). These rates are much higher than the rates of rhinitis-related symptoms in automobile plants and other occupational settings and quite high even allowing for the common occurrence of rhinitis in the general population. We found that rhinitis could develop even in workers exposed to less than 0.5mg/m(3) MWF aerosol. The average exposure to fungi exceeded 10 x 10(3) CFU/m(3), a level higher than that reported for other automobile plants. Although we were unable to identify significant risk factors for rhinitis using only the physician-confirmed rhinitis cases, this study concludes that exposure to MWF aerosol, which would include microbes and metals, could contribute to a high occurrence of rhinitis in grinding and production workers. Forty-nine workers (63.6%) of 77 rhinitis patients in grinding and production operations were determined to handle synthetic MWF directly. For QC workers, for whom the prevalence of physician-confirmed rhinitis was highest, exposure to a low level of MWF aerosol, including specific microbe species we couldn't identify, bright light, dry air, and certain work characteristics during inspection are possible risk factors for development of rhinitis. Further studies including identification of fungi species should be conducted so a firm conclusion can be made regarding the development of rhinitis in QC manufacturing plant workers.

  3. Allergic Rhinitis | Sommers | South African Family Practice

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... but the antihistamines are less effective for nasal congestion and minimally address the problem of inflammation. Immune-based specifically targeted molecules, such as the cloned humanised monoclonal antibody-inhibiting human IgE omalizumab, are presently being studied in patients with seasonal allergic rhinitis.

  4. Steroids vs immunotherapy for allergic rhinitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aasbjerg, Kristian; Backer, Vibeke

    2014-01-01

    Treatment for seasonal allergic rhinitis induced by airborne allergens can be divided into two major groups: symptom-dampening drugs, such as antihistamines and corticosteroids, and disease-modifying drugs in the form of immunotherapy. It has been speculated that depot-injection corticosteroids g...

  5. Clinical practice guideline: Allergic rhinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidman, Michael D; Gurgel, Richard K; Lin, Sandra Y; Schwartz, Seth R; Baroody, Fuad M; Bonner, James R; Dawson, Douglas E; Dykewicz, Mark S; Hackell, Jesse M; Han, Joseph K; Ishman, Stacey L; Krouse, Helene J; Malekzadeh, Sonya; Mims, James Whit W; Omole, Folashade S; Reddy, William D; Wallace, Dana V; Walsh, Sandra A; Warren, Barbara E; Wilson, Meghan N; Nnacheta, Lorraine C

    2015-02-01

    Allergic rhinitis (AR) is one of the most common diseases affecting adults. It is the most common chronic disease in children in the United States today and the fifth most common chronic disease in the United States overall. AR is estimated to affect nearly 1 in every 6 Americans and generates $2 to $5 billion in direct health expenditures annually. It can impair quality of life and, through loss of work and school attendance, is responsible for as much as $2 to $4 billion in lost productivity annually. Not surprisingly, myriad diagnostic tests and treatments are used in managing this disorder, yet there is considerable variation in their use. This clinical practice guideline was undertaken to optimize the care of patients with AR by addressing quality improvement opportunities through an evaluation of the available evidence and an assessment of the harm-benefit balance of various diagnostic and management options. The primary purpose of this guideline is to address quality improvement opportunities for all clinicians, in any setting, who are likely to manage patients with AR as well as to optimize patient care, promote effective diagnosis and therapy, and reduce harmful or unnecessary variations in care. The guideline is intended to be applicable for both pediatric and adult patients with AR. Children under the age of 2 years were excluded from the clinical practice guideline because rhinitis in this population may be different than in older patients and is not informed by the same evidence base. The guideline is intended to focus on a limited number of quality improvement opportunities deemed most important by the working group and is not intended to be a comprehensive reference for diagnosing and managing AR. The recommendations outlined in the guideline are not intended to represent the standard of care for patient management, nor are the recommendations intended to limit treatment or care provided to individual patients. The development group made a strong

  6. Effect of aflatoxin B1 on in vitro ruminal fermentation of rations high in alfalfa hay or ryegrass hay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jiang, Y H; Yang, H J; Lund, Peter

    2012-01-01

    A 2 × 4 factorial experiment was conducted to determine the effect of aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) at dose rates of 0, 320, 640, 960 ng/ml on ruminal fermentation of substrates high in alfalfa hay (HA, alfalfa hay: maize meal = 4:1) and ryegrass hay (HR, ryegrass hay: maize meal = 4:1). In vitro dry matter...

  7. Dengue fever (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dengue fever, or West Nile fever, is a mild viral illness transmitted by mosquitoes which causes fever, ... second exposure to the virus can result in Dengue hemorrhagic fever, a life-threatening illness.

  8. Typhoid fever

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wain, John; Hendriksen, Rene S.; Mikoleit, Matthew L.

    2015-01-01

    Control of typhoid fever relies on clinical information, diagnosis, and an understanding for the epidemiology of the disease. Despite the breadth of work done so far, much is not known about the biology of this human-adapted bacterial pathogen and the complexity of the disease in endemic areas...... with shifting trends in enteric fever. This knowledge is crucial, both to control the disease and to manage cases. Additionally, salmonella serovars that cause human infection can change over time and location. In areas of Asia, multidrug-resistant Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi (S Typhi) has been the main...... cause of enteric fever, but now S Typhi is being displaced by infections with drug-resistant S enterica serovar Paratyphi A. New conjugate vaccines are imminent and new treatments have been promised, but the engagement of local medical and public health institutions in endemic areas is needed to allow...

  9. Valley Fever

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... valley fever. These fungi are commonly found in soil in specific regions. The fungi's spores can be stirred into the air by ... species have a complex life cycle. In the soil, they grow as a mold with long filaments that break off into airborne ...

  10. Scarlet Fever

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2011-06-09

    Katherine Fleming-Dutra, pediatrician, discusses scarlet fever, its cause, how to treat it, and how to prevent its spread.  Created: 6/9/2011 by National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD).   Date Released: 6/9/2011.

  11. Occupational allergic rhinitis from guar gum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanerva, L; Tupasela, O; Jolanki, R; Vaheri, E; Estlander, T; Keskinen, H

    1988-05-01

    Three cases of allergic rhinitis from a vegetable gum, guar gum, have been detected. Two subjects were exposed to fine guar gum powder (Emco Gum 563, Meyhall Chemical AG, Switzerland), an insulator in rubber cables, when opening cables in a power cable laboratory. After 1-2 years' exposure the patients developed rhinitis. Scratch-chamber tests, nasal provocation tests, nasal eosinophilia and a RAST test proved their allergy. A third subject developed allergic rhinitis from another guar gum product (Meyproid 5306, Meyhall Chemical AG) after 2 years' exposure in a paper factory. A positive skin test and nasal provocation test confirmed the diagnosis. A fourth case of possible allergy to guar gum after exposure to Meyproid 5306 in a paper factory is also presented. No final diagnosis was reached in this case (in 1974). The present subjects, only one of whom was atopic, developed allergy within 2 years, although their exposure to guar gum was not especially heavy. Therefore, when handling guar, adequate ventilation facilities should be provided and protective clothing, including a respiratory mask, should be worn.

  12. Tri-phasic fever in dengue fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D, Pradeepa H; Rao, Sathish B; B, Ganaraj; Bhat, Gopalakrishna; M, Chakrapani

    2018-04-01

    Dengue fever is an acute febrile illness with a duration of 2-12 days. Our observational study observed the 24-h continuous tympanic temperature pattern of 15 patients with dengue fever and compared this with 26 others with fever due to a non-dengue aetiology. A tri-phasic fever pattern was seen among two-thirds of dengue fever patients, but in only one with an inflammatory disease. One-third of dengue fever patients exhibited a single peak temperature. Continuous temperature monitoring and temperature pattern analysis in clinical settings can aid in the early differentiation of dengue fever from non-dengue aetiology.

  13. Jungle fever

    OpenAIRE

    Waeckerlé, Emmanuelle

    2011-01-01

    This project developed from the premise that the global economy and media have transformed the world and its inhabitants into tourist attractions – so it sets out to reclaim not tourism, but everyday life. Jungle Fever explores the poetics and politics of the everyday, using the body and mind as tools: it offers a 42-page user guide in three languages, with a map and three accompanying posters, proposing destinations, activities and excursions for 8-hour and 24-hour journeys. The instructions...

  14. Increased exhaled nitric oxide predicts new-onset rhinitis and persistent rhinitis in adolescents without allergic symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malinovschi, A; Alving, K; Kalm-Stephens, P; Janson, C; Nordvall, L

    2012-03-01

    The fraction of nitric oxide in exhaled air (FE(NO)) is increased in rhinitis and asthma. We have previously suggested that elevated FE(NO) levels in the absence of asthma symptoms may be a sign of 'early asthma'. In the present study, we hypothesize that elevated exhaled NO levels may also precede rhinitis symptoms. To investigate in a cohort of adolescents whether or not increased exhaled NO levels at the age of 13-14 years predicted new-onset or persistent rhinitis within a 4-year period. A total of 959 randomly selected adolescents (13-14 years) completed a questionnaire on respiratory symptoms at baseline and follow-up, 4 years later. Exhaled NO was measured at baseline. After exclusion of subjects with asthma diagnosis or asthma symptoms at baseline, 657 participants were eligible for the present study. Higher FE(NO) levels at baseline were associated with increased risk for new-onset (P = 0.009) and persistent rhinitis (P = 0.03) within a 4-year period. The risk of new-onset rhinitis was 2.32 (1.23, 4.37) [OR (95% CI)] times higher if FE(NO) > 90th percentile of the group without rhinitis at baseline. This increased risk for new-onset rhinitis was significant [2.49 (1.24, 5.01)] after excluding subjects with allergic symptoms. The risk of persistent rhinitis was 5.11 (1.34, 19.57) times higher if FE(NO) > 90th percentile of the group without rhinitis at baseline. Elevated exhaled nitric oxide levels predicted incident and persistent rhinitis in this population-based study of adolescents. Moreover, these findings were consistent after excluding subjects with allergic symptoms. Thus, it appears that elevation of exhaled NO precedes airway symptoms and predicts development of rhinitis in subjects without allergic symptoms or family history of allergic disease. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  15. Expression of Pendrin Periostin in Allergic Rhinitis Chronic Rhinosinusitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akihiro Ishida

    2012-01-01

    Conclusions: : Production of pendrin and periostin is upregulated in allergic rhinitis, chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps, and aspirin-induced asthma. These findings suggest that pendrin can induce mucus production and that periostin can induce tissue fibrosis and remodeling in the nasal mucosa. Therefore, these mediators may be therapeutic target candidates for allergic rhinitis, chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps, and aspirin- induced asthma.

  16. Advances in pharmacotherapy for the treatment of allergic rhinitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bousquet, Jean; Bachert, Claus; Bernstein, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    , surpassing the efficacy of gold standard treatment, intranasal corticosteroids (INS), for the first time. It is indicated for the treatment of moderate-to-severe seasonal allergic rhinitis and perennial allergic rhinitis when monotherapy with either intranasal antihistamine or INS is NOT considered...

  17. The link between allergic rhinitis and allergic asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linneberg, A; Henrik Nielsen, N; Frølund, L

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It has been hypothesized that allergic rhinitis and allergic asthma are manifestations of the same disease entity. We aimed to investigate the relationship between allergic rhinitis and allergic asthma. METHODS: Participants in a population-based study of 15-69-year-olds in 1990 were ...

  18. STUDY OF PREVALENCE OF EOSINOPHILIA IN ALLERGIC RHINITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravi Kumar

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Allergic rhinitis is a common condition, though not life threatening, causes significant morbidity in terms of quality of life. Confirmation of allergen as etiological agent is cumbersome. Hence need for a simple test is vital and eosinophil parameters were looked at to answer the quest. AIM: To find out the prevalence of e osinophilia in Allergic rhinitis . To assess the value of nasal cytogram as an alternative investigation in diagnosing allergic rhinitis . MATERIALS & METHODS: Prospective study of 200 cases divided into two groups of 100 each was done. One group clinically with allergic rhinitis and other without. All cases had clinical examination after history was taken, Blood Absolute eosinophil count, Nasal smear for eosinophils done and assessed. RESULTS: Of the 200 patients examined in two groups of 100 each, mean age of allergic rhinitis patients was 26.22 years . Allergic rhinitis was more common in males than females. Prevalence of nasal eosinophilia was 61%.and blood eosinophilia was 57% in allergic rhinitis patients. Nasal smear sensitivity was 61% and specificity w as 87% . CONCLUSION: Nasal smear eosinophilia is a valid test, can be quickly and easily performed and read. Being an in - expensive test can be used to screen the patients of allergic rhinitis

  19. Occupational rhinitis and occupational asthma; one airway two diseases?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seed, M J; Gittins, M; De Vocht, F; Agius, R M.

    2009-01-01

    The concept of 'one airway, one disease' refers to the frequent comorbidity of asthma and rhinitis. However, only limited research has been done on this association for the diverse range of occupational respiratory sensitisers. The relative frequency of rhinitis was determined for the 15 respiratory sensitisers reported to cause at least 10 cases of rhinitis or asthma to The Health and Occupation Reporting (THOR) network between 1997 and 2006. Of 1408 cases, 1190 were sole diagnoses of asthma, 138 sole diagnoses of rhinitis and in 80 cases asthma coexisted with rhinitis. The six sensitisers for which rhinitis featured in over 15% of cases were all particulates and known to cause release of mast cell mediators, either directly or through IgE antibodies. Four of the other nine sensitisers often exist as vapours and only two have been consistently associated with IgE-mediated disease mechanisms. Particle size did not appear to correlate with the relative frequency of rhinitis. Despite its limitations this study would support the hypothesis that there are at least two mechanistic categories of respiratory sensitisation with rhinitis being relatively more common where the mechanism is IgE-mediated. Particulate nature may be another important factor to consider in future studies.

  20. Managing puncturevine in alfalfa hay and along field edges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puncturevine (Tribulus terrestris) is a nuisance and difficult to control weed in alfalfa hay field edges and borders. Puncturevine contaminated hay can contain high levels of nitrates and burs can injure mouths of livestock, lowering the value and quality of the hay. Puncturevine is a summer annual...

  1. MACVIA-ARIA Sentinel NetworK for allergic rhinitis (MASK-rhinitis) : the new generation guideline implementation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bousquet, J.; Schunemann, H. J.; Fonseca, J.; Samolinski, B.; Bachert, C.; Canonica, G. W.; Casale, T.; Cruz, A. A.; Demoly, P.; Hellings, P.; Valiulis, A.; Wickman, M.; Zuberbier, T.; Bosnic-Anticevitch, S.; Bedbrook, A.; Bergmann, K. C.; Caimmi, D.; Dahl, R.; Fokkens, W. J.; Grisle, I.; Lodrup Carlsen, K.; Mullol, J.; Muraro, A.; Palkonen, S.; Papadopoulos, N.; Passalacqua, G.; Ryan, D.; Valovirta, E.; Yorgancioglu, A.; Aberer, W.; Agache, I.; Adachi, M.; Akdis, C. A.; Akdis, M.; Annesi-Maesano, I.; Ansotegui, I. J.; Anto, J. M.; Arnavielhe, S.; Arshad, H.; Baiardini, I.; Baigenzhin, A. K.; Barbara, C.; Bateman, E. D.; Beghe, B.; Bel, E. H.; Ben Kheder, A.; Bennoor, K. S.; Benson, M.; Bewick, M.; Bieber, T.; Bindslev-Jensen, C.; Bjermer, L.; Blain, H.; Boner, A. L.; Boulet, L. P.; Bonini, M.; Bonini, S.; Bosse, I.; Bourret, R.; Bousquet, P. J.; Braido, F.; Briggs, A. H.; Brightling, C. E.; Brozek, J.; Buhl, R.; Burney, P. G.; Bush, A.; Caballero-Fonseca, F.; Calderon, M. A.; Camargos, P. A. M.; Camuzat, T.; Carlsen, K. H.; Carr, W.; Sarabia, A. M. Cepeda; Chavannes, N. H.; Chatzi, L.; Chen, Y. Z.; Chiron, R.; Chkhartishvili, E.; Chuchalin, A. G.; Ciprandi, G.; Cirule, I.; Correia de Sousa, J.; Cox, L.; Crooks, G.; Costa, D. J.; Custovic, A.; Dahlen, S. E.; Darsow, U.; De Carlo, G.; De Blay, F.; Dedeu, T.; Deleanu, D.; Denburg, J. A.; Devillier, P.; Didier, A.; Dinh-Xuan, A. T.; Dokic, D.; Douagui, H.; Dray, G.; Dubakiene, R.; Durham, S. R.; Dykewicz, M. S.; El-Gamal, Y.; Emuzyte, R.; Wagner, A. Fink; Fletcher, M.; Fiocchi, A.; Forastiere, F.; Gamkrelidze, A.; Gemicioglu, B.; Gereda, J. E.; Gonzalez Diaz, S.; Gotua, M.; Grouse, L.; Guzman, M. A.; Haahtela, T.; Hellquist-Dahl, B.; Heinrich, J.; Horak, F.; Hourihane, J. O. B.; Howarth, P.; Humbert, M.; Hyland, M. E.; Ivancevich, J. C.; Jares, E. J.; Johnston, S. L.; Joos, G.; Jonquet, O.; Jung, K. S.; Just, J.; Kaidashev, I.; Kalayci, O.; Kalyoncu, A. F.; Keil, T.; Keith, P. K.; Khaltaev, N.; Klimek, L.; N'Goran, B. Koffi; Kolek, V.; Koppelman, G. H.; Kowalski, M. L.; Kull, I.; Kuna, P.; Kvedariene, V.; Lambrecht, B.; Lau, S.; Larenas-Linnemann, D.; Laune, D.; Le, L. T. T.; Lieberman, P.; Lipworth, B.; Li, J.; Louis, R.; Magard, Y.; Magnan, A.; Mahboub, B.; Majer, I.; Makela, M. J.; Manning, P.; De Manuel Keenoy, E.; Marshall, G. D.; Masjedi, M. R.; Maurer, M.; Mavale-Manuel, S.; Melen, E.; Melo-Gomes, E.; Meltzer, E. O.; Merk, H.; Miculinic, N.; Mihaltan, F.; Milenkovic, B.; Mohammad, Y.; Molimard, M.; Momas, I.; Montilla-Santana, A.; Morais-Almeida, M.; Moesges, R.; Namazova-Baranova, L.; Naclerio, R.; Neou, A.; Neffen, H.; Nekam, K.; Niggemann, B.; Nyembue, T. D.; O'Hehir, R. E.; Ohta, K.; Okamoto, Y.; Okubo, K.; Ouedraogo, S.; Paggiaro, P.; Pali-Schoell, I.; Palmer, S.; Panzner, P.; Papi, A.; Park, H. S.; Pavord, I.; Pawankar, R.; Pfaar, O.; Picard, R.; Pigearias, B.; Pin, I.; Plavec, D.; Pohl, W.; Popov, T. A.; Portejoie, F.; Postma, D.; Potter, P.; Price, D.; Rabe, K. F.; Raciborski, F.; Pontal, F. Radier; Repka-Ramirez, S.; Robalo-Cordeiro, C.; Rolland, C.; Rosado-Pinto, J.; Reitamo, S.; Rodenas, F.; Roman Rodriguez, M.; Romano, A.; Rosario, N.; Rosenwasser, L.; Rottem, M.; Sanchez-Borges, M.; Scadding, G. K.; Serrano, E.; Schmid-Grendelmeier, P.; Sheikh, A.; Simons, F. E. R.; Sisul, J. C.; Skrindo, I.; Smit, H. A.; Sole, D.; Sooronbaev, T.; Spranger, O.; Stelmach, R.; Strandberg, T.; Sunyer, J.; Thijs, C.; Todo-Bom, A.; Triggiani, M.; Valenta, R.; Valero, A. L.; van Hage, M.; Vandenplas, O.; Vezzani, G.; Vichyanond, P.; Viegi, G.; Wagenmann, M.; Walker, S.; Wang, D. Y.; Wahn, U.; Williams, D. M.; Wright, J.; Yawn, B. P.; Yiallouros, P. K.; Yusuf, O. M.; Zar, H. J.; Zernotti, M. E.; Zhang, L.; Zhong, N.; Zidarn, M.; Mercier, J.

    2015-01-01

    Several unmet needs have been identified in allergic rhinitis: identification of the time of onset of the pollen season, optimal control of rhinitis and comorbidities, patient stratification, multidisciplinary team for integrated care pathways, innovation in clinical trials and, above all, patient

  2. MACVIA-ARIA Sentinel NetworK for allergic rhinitis (MASK-rhinitis): the new generation guideline implementation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bousquet, J.; Schunemann, H. J.; Fonseca, J.; Samolinski, B.; Bachert, C.; Canonica, G. W.; Casale, T.; Cruz, A. A.; Demoly, P.; Hellings, P.; Valiulis, A.; Wickman, M.; Zuberbier, T.; Bosnic-Anticevitch, S.; Bedbrook, A.; Bergmann, K. C.; Caimmi, D.; Dahl, R.; Fokkens, W. J.; Grisle, I.; Lodrup Carlsen, K.; Mullol, J.; Muraro, A.; Palkonen, S.; Papadopoulos, N.; Passalacqua, G.; Ryan, D.; Valovirta, E.; Yorgancioglu, A.; Aberer, W.; Agache, I.; Adachi, M.; Akdis, C. A.; Akdis, M.; Annesi-Maesano, I.; Ansotegui, I. J.; Anto, J. M.; Arnavielhe, S.; Arshad, H.; Baiardini, I.; Baigenzhin, A. K.; Barbara, C.; Bateman, E. D.; Beghé, B.; Bel, E. H.; Ben Kheder, A.; Bennoor, K. S.; Benson, M.; Bewick, M.; Bieber, T.; Bindslev-Jensen, C.; Bjermer, L.; Blain, H.; Boner, A. L.; Boulet, L. P.; Bonini, M.; Bonini, S.; Bosse, I.; Bourret, R.; Bousquet, P. J.; Braido, F.; Briggs, A. H.; Brightling, C. E.; Brozek, J.; Buhl, R.; Burney, P. G.; Bush, A.; Caballero-Fonseca, F.; Calderon, M. A.; Camargos, P. A. M.; Camuzat, T.; Carlsen, K. H.; Carr, W.; Cepeda Sarabia, A. M.; Chavannes, N. H.; Chatzi, L.; Chen, Y. Z.; Chiron, R.; Chkhartishvili, E.; Chuchalin, A. G.; Ciprandi, G.; Cirule, I.; Correia de Sousa, J.; Cox, L.; Crooks, G.; Costa, D. J.; Custovic, A.; Dahlen, S. E.; Darsow, U.; de Carlo, G.; de Blay, F.; Dedeu, T.; Deleanu, D.; Denburg, J. A.; Devillier, P.; Didier, A.; Dinh-Xuan, A. T.; Dokic, D.; Douagui, H.; Dray, G.; Dubakiene, R.; Durham, S. R.; Dykewicz, M. S.; El-Gamal, Y.; Emuzyte, R.; Fink Wagner, A.; Fletcher, M.; Fiocchi, A.; Forastiere, F.; Gamkrelidze, A.; Gemicioğlu, B.; Gereda, J. E.; González Diaz, S.; Gotua, M.; Grouse, L.; Guzmán, M. A.; Haahtela, T.; Hellquist-Dahl, B.; Heinrich, J.; Horak, F.; Hourihane, J. O. 'b; Howarth, P.; Humbert, M.; Hyland, M. E.; Ivancevich, J. C.; Jares, E. J.; Johnston, S. L.; Joos, G.; Jonquet, O.; Jung, K. S.; Just, J.; Kaidashev, I.; Kalayci, O.; Kalyoncu, A. F.; Keil, T.; Keith, P. K.; Khaltaev, N.; Klimek, L.; Koffi N'goran, B.; Kolek, V.; Koppelman, G. H.; Kowalski, M. L.; Kull, I.; Kuna, P.; Kvedariene, V.; Lambrecht, B.; Lau, S.; Larenas-Linnemann, D.; Laune, D.; Le, L. T. T.; Lieberman, P.; Lipworth, B.; Li, J.; Louis, R.; Magard, Y.; Magnan, A.; Mahboub, B.; Majer, I.; Makela, M. J.; Manning, P.; de Manuel Keenoy, E.; Marshall, G. D.; Masjedi, M. R.; Maurer, M.; Mavale-Manuel, S.; Melén, E.; Melo-Gomes, E.; Meltzer, E. O.; Merk, H.; Miculinic, N.; Mihaltan, F.; Milenkovic, B.; Mohammad, Y.; Molimard, M.; Momas, I.; Montilla-Santana, A.; Morais-Almeida, M.; Mösges, R.; Namazova-Baranova, L.; Naclerio, R.; Neou, A.; Neffen, H.; Nekam, K.; Niggemann, B.; Nyembue, T. D.; O'Hehir, R. E.; Ohta, K.; Okamoto, Y.; Okubo, K.; Ouedraogo, S.; Paggiaro, P.; Pali-Schöll, I.; Palmer, S.; Panzner, P.; Papi, A.; Park, H. S.; Pavord, I.; Pawankar, R.; Pfaar, O.; Picard, R.; Pigearias, B.; Pin, I.; Plavec, D.; Pohl, W.; Popov, T. A.; Portejoie, F.; Postma, D.; Potter, P.; Price, D.; Rabe, K. F.; Raciborski, F.; Radier Pontal, F.; Repka-Ramirez, S.; Robalo-Cordeiro, C.; Rolland, C.; Rosado-Pinto, J.; Reitamo, S.; Rodenas, F.; Roman Rodriguez, M.; Romano, A.; Rosario, N.; Rosenwasser, L.; Rottem, M.; Sanchez-Borges, M.; Scadding, G. K.; Serrano, E.; Schmid-Grendelmeier, P.; Sheikh, A.; Simons, F. E. R.; Sisul, J. C.; Skrindo, I.; Smit, H. A.; Solé, D.; Sooronbaev, T.; Spranger, O.; Stelmach, R.; Strandberg, T.; Sunyer, J.; Thijs, C.; Todo-Bom, A.; Triggiani, M.; Valenta, R.; Valero, A. L.; van Hage, M.; Vandenplas, O.; Vezzani, G.; Vichyanond, P.; Viegi, G.; Wagenmann, M.; Walker, S.; Wang, D. Y.; Wahn, U.; Williams, D. M.; Wright, J.; Yawn, B. P.; Yiallouros, P. K.; Yusuf, O. M.; Zar, H. J.; Zernotti, M. E.; Zhang, L.; Zhong, N.; Zidarn, M.; Mercier, J.

    2015-01-01

    Several unmet needs have been identified in allergic rhinitis: identification of the time of onset of the pollen season, optimal control of rhinitis and comorbidities, patient stratification, multidisciplinary team for integrated care pathways, innovation in clinical trials and, above all, patient

  3. Rhinitis symptoms and IgE sensitization as risk factors for development of later allergic rhinitis in adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bødtger, Uffe; Poulsen, L K; Linneberg, A

    2006-01-01

    -examined in 1998. On both occasions questionnaires on rhinitis symptoms were completed and serum IgE (against birch, grass, mugwort, cat, dog, and Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus) were determined (positive if >or=0.35 kUA/l). Asymptomatic sensitization: positive IgE levels without any rhinitis symptoms. Nonallergic...

  4. A genome-wide meta-analysis of genetic variants associated with allergic rhinitis and grass sensitization and their interaction with birth order.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramasamy, Adaikalavan; Curjuric, Ivan; Coin, Lachlan J; Kumar, Ashish; McArdle, Wendy L; Imboden, Medea; Leynaert, Benedicte; Kogevinas, Manolis; Schmid-Grendelmeier, Peter; Pekkanen, Juha; Wjst, Matthias; Bircher, Andreas J; Sovio, Ulla; Rochat, Thierry; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Balding, David J; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Probst-Hensch, Nicole; Strachan, David P; Jarvis, Deborah L

    2011-11-01

    Hay fever or seasonal allergic rhinitis (AR) is a chronic disorder associated with IgE sensitization to grass. The underlying genetic variants have not been studied comprehensively. There is overwhelming evidence that those who have older siblings have less AR, although the mechanism for this remains unclear. We sought to identify common genetic variant associations with prevalent AR and grass sensitization using existing genome-wide association study (GWAS) data and to determine whether genetic variants modify the protective effect of older siblings. Approximately 2.2 million genotyped or imputed single nucleotide polymorphisms were investigated in 4 large European adult cohorts for AR (3,933 self-reported cases vs 8,965 control subjects) and grass sensitization (2,315 cases vs 10,032 control subjects). Three loci reached genome-wide significance for either phenotype. The HLA variant rs7775228, which cis-regulates HLA-DRB4, was strongly associated with grass sensitization and weakly with AR (P(grass) = 1.6 × 10(-9); P(AR) = 8.0 × 10(-3)). Variants in a locus near chromosome 11 open reading frame 30 (C11orf30) and leucine-rich repeat containing 32 (LRRC32), which was previously associated with atopic dermatitis and eczema, were also strongly associated with both phenotypes (rs2155219; P(grass) = 9.4 × 10(-9); P(AR) = 3.8 × 10(-8)). The third genome-wide significant variant was rs17513503 (P(grass) = 1.2 × 10(-8); PAR = 7.4 × 10(-7)) which was located near transmembrane protein 232 (TMEM232) and solute carrier family 25, member 46 (SLC25A46). Twelve further loci with suggestive associations were also identified. Using a candidate gene approach, where we considered variants within 164 genes previously thought to be important, we found variants in 3 further genes that may be of interest: thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP), Toll-like receptor 6 (TLR6) and nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain containing 1 (NOD1/CARD4). We found no evidence for variants

  5. Anhidrotic ectodermal dysplasia presenting as atrophic rhinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barman, Debasis; Mandal, Satadal; Nandi, Santanu; Banerjee, Pranabashish; Rashid, M A

    2011-11-01

    Ectodermal dysplasia is a complex group of familial disorders with numerous clinical characteristics, with an incidence of 7 in 10000 born alive children. Ectodermal dysplasia affects structures of ectodermal origin like the skin and its appendages as well as other non-ectodermal structures. The most common sites of involvement are the defects in the skin, hair, teeth, nails and sweat glands,which are of ectodermal origin. Though the dermatologists and paediatricians often manage such cases, we report one case of ectodermal dysplasia presenting with atrophic rhinitis.

  6. Cerebrospinal fluid leak mimicking allergic rhinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricketti, Anthony J; Cleri, Dennis J; Porwancher, Richard B; Panesar, Mandip; Villota, Francisco J; Seelagy, Marc M

    2005-01-01

    Rhinitis and rhinorrhea are common clinical complaints that may be allergic or nonallergic in etiology. Distinguishing between allergic and nonallergic etiologies can be difficult but necessary for treatment. Here, we present a case of a 50-year-old woman with > 20 years of rhinorrhea before a diagnosis of cerebrospinal fluid leak and a life-threatening complication occurred. It is essential that no symptom, especially that which persists and resists treatment, is trivialized. Here, we establish how a careful history and evaluation will direct the clinician to the correct diagnosis.

  7. Yellow fever

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Nóbrega Litvoc

    Full Text Available Summary The yellow fever (YF virus is a Flavivirus, transmitted by Haemagogus, Sabethes or Aedes aegypti mosquitoes. The disease is endemic in forest areas in Africa and Latin America leading to epizootics in monkeys that constitute the reservoir of the disease. There are two forms of YF: sylvatic, transmitted accidentally when approaching the forests, and urban, which can be perpetuated by Aedes aegypti. In Brazil, the last case of urban YF occurred in 1942. Since then, there has been an expansion of transmission areas from the North and Midwest regions to the South and Southeast. In 2017, the country faced an important outbreak of the disease mainly in the states of Minas Gerais, Espírito Santo and Rio de Janeiro. In 2018, its reach extended from Minas Gerais toward São Paulo. Yellow fever has an incubation period of 3 to 6 days and sudden onset of symptoms with high fever, myalgia, headache, nausea/vomiting and increased transaminases. The disease ranges from asymptomatic to severe forms. The most serious forms occur in around 15% of those infected, with high lethality rates. These forms lead to renal, hepatic and neurological impairment, and bleeding episodes. Treatment of mild and moderate forms is symptomatic, while severe and malignant forms depend on intensive care. Prevention is achieved by administering the vaccine, which is an effective (immunogenicity at 90-98% and safe (0.4 severe events per 100,000 doses measure. In 2018, the first transplants in the world due to YF were performed. There is also an attempt to evaluate the use of active drugs against the virus in order to reduce disease severity.

  8. Rocky Mountain spotted fever

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... spotted fever on the foot Rocky Mountain spotted fever, petechial rash Antibodies Deer and dog tick References McElligott SC, Kihiczak GG, Schwartz RA. Rocky Mountain spotted fever and other rickettsial infections. In: Lebwohl MG, Heymann ...

  9. [Work-related rhinitis - Is it always an occupational disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salski, Witold; Wiszniewska, Marta; Salska, Agata; Tymoszuk, Diana; Walusiak-Skorupa, Jolanta

    2016-12-22

    Rhinitis is a chronic inflammatory disease of the upper respiratory tract, characterized by a high prevalence and a complex pathogenesis. Work-related rhinitis (WRR) can be divided into occupational rhinitis (OR) and work-exacerbated rhinitis (WER). It is not only considered as a disease entity but also in the context of medical certification as the allergic disease associated with occupational exposure. Epidemiology of work-related rhinitis has been found to vary depending on the occupation and specific exposure, on the other hand the prevalence data may be underestimated due to the lack of uniform diagnostic criteria. This paper reviews the issues comprising the pathogenesis, epidemiology, diagnosis and treatment of patients with work-related rhinitis. It also discusses the significance of the disease in occupational medicine, particularly in terms of preventive worker care, general principles of good practice in primary and secondary WRR prevention and the necessary directions of changes in medical certification in the cases of occupational rhinitis. Med Pr 2016;67(6):801-815. This work is available in Open Access model and licensed under a CC BY-NC 3.0 PL license.

  10. Rhinitis and sleep disorders: The trigeminocardiac reflex link?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bindu, Barkha; Singh, Gyaninder Pal; Chowdhury, Tumul; Schaller, Bernhard

    2017-06-01

    Rhinitis, allergic or non-allergic, is an inflammatory condition of the nose. It is associated with a wide range of sleep disorders that are generally attributed to nasal congestion and presence of inflammatory mediators like cytokines and interleukins. However, the pathophysiological mechanisms behind these sleep disorders remain unclear. On the other hand, the trigeminocardiac reflex (TCR) has recently been linked to various sleep disorders like obstructive sleep apnea, sleep bruxism and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep apnea. TCR can be incited by stimulation of the trigeminal nerve or the area innervated by its branches including the nasal mucosa. Trigeminal nasal afferents can be activated on exposure to noxious stimuli (mechanical or chemical) like ammonia vapors, carbon-dioxide, nicotine, hypertonic saline, air-puffs and smoke. In rhinitis, there is associated neuronal hyper-responsiveness of sensory nasal afferents due to inflammation (which can be suppressed by steroids). This may further lead to increased occurrence of TCR in rhinitis. Moreover, there is involvement of autonomic nervous system both in rhinitis and TCR. In TCR, parasympathetic over activity and sympathetic inhibition leads to sudden onset bradycardia, hypotension, apnea and gastric motility. Also, the autonomic imbalance reportedly plays a significant role in the pathophysiology of rhinitis. Thus, considering these facts we hypothesize that the TCR could be the link between rhinitis and sleep disorders and we believe that further research in this direction may yield significant development in our understanding of sleep disorders in rhinitis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. The HayWired Earthquake Scenario

    Science.gov (United States)

    Detweiler, Shane T.; Wein, Anne M.

    2017-04-24

    ForewordThe 1906 Great San Francisco earthquake (magnitude 7.8) and the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake (magnitude 6.9) each motivated residents of the San Francisco Bay region to build countermeasures to earthquakes into the fabric of the region. Since Loma Prieta, bay-region communities, governments, and utilities have invested tens of billions of dollars in seismic upgrades and retrofits and replacements of older buildings and infrastructure. Innovation and state-of-the-art engineering, informed by science, including novel seismic-hazard assessments, have been applied to the challenge of increasing seismic resilience throughout the bay region. However, as long as people live and work in seismically vulnerable buildings or rely on seismically vulnerable transportation and utilities, more work remains to be done.With that in mind, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and its partners developed the HayWired scenario as a tool to enable further actions that can change the outcome when the next major earthquake strikes. By illuminating the likely impacts to the present-day built environment, well-constructed scenarios can and have spurred officials and citizens to take steps that change the outcomes the scenario describes, whether used to guide more realistic response and recovery exercises or to launch mitigation measures that will reduce future risk.The HayWired scenario is the latest in a series of like-minded efforts to bring a special focus onto the impacts that could occur when the Hayward Fault again ruptures through the east side of the San Francisco Bay region as it last did in 1868. Cities in the east bay along the Richmond, Oakland, and Fremont corridor would be hit hardest by earthquake ground shaking, surface fault rupture, aftershocks, and fault afterslip, but the impacts would reach throughout the bay region and far beyond. The HayWired scenario name reflects our increased reliance on the Internet and telecommunications and also alludes to the

  12. Septoplasty and Turbinate Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cystic Fibrosis Sinusitis Q&A Complications of Sinusitis Epistaxis (Nosebleeds) Allergic Rhinitis (Hay Fever) Headaches and Sinus ... is given only in an emergency. You should stop use of blood thinners such as aspirin, ibuprofen, ...

  13. Computational analysis of multimorbidity between asthma, eczema and rhinitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aguilar, Daniel; Pinart, Mariona; Koppelman, Gerard H.; Saeys, Yvan; Nawijn, Martijn C.; Postma, Dirkje S.; Akdis, Muebeccel; Auffray, Charles; Ballereau, Stephane; Benet, Marta; Garcia-Aymerich, Judith; Ramon Gonzalez, Juan; Guerra, Stefano; Keil, Thomas; Kogevinas, Manolis; Lambrecht, Bart N.; Lemonnier, Nathanael; Melen, Erik; Sunyer, Jordi; Valenta, Rudolf; Valverde, Sergi; Wickman, Magnus; Bousquet, Jean; Oliva, Baldo; Anto, Josep M.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The mechanisms explaining the co-existence of asthma, eczema and rhinitis (allergic multimorbidity) are largely unknown. We investigated the mechanisms underlying multimorbidity between three main allergic diseases at a molecular level by identifying the proteins and cellular processes

  14. Interaction between rhinitis and asthma: state of the art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frieri, Marianne

    2003-01-01

    Rhinitis and asthma are very prevalent allergic disorders with comorbid features, similar risk factors, and environmental triggers. Pathophysiological processes are linked via tissue histopathology, immunologic pathway, and inflammatory mediators. Allergen challenge of the upper airway can increase lower-airway responsiveness and allergen challenge of the lower airway can lead to upper-airway inflammation. Both allergic rhinitis and asthma exert a high social and economic burden in significant loss of work and school days as well as impairment for children and adults.

  15. Heart Rate Variability Analysis in Patients with Allergic Rhinitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Ying Lan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Very few studies investigate the role of the autonomic nervous system in allergic rhinitis. In this study, we evaluated the autonomic nervous system in allergic rhinitis patients using heart rate variability (HRV analysis. Methods. Eleven patients with allergic rhinitis and 13 healthy controls, aged between 19 and 40 years old, were enrolled in the study. Diagnosis of allergic rhinitis was based on clinical history, symptoms, and positive Phadiatop test. Electrocardiographic recordings on the sitting and supine positions were obtained for HRV analysis. Results. In the supine position, there were no significant statistical differences in very-low-frequency power (VLF, ≤0.04 Hz, low-frequency power (LF, 0.04–0.15 Hz, high-frequency power (HF, 0.15–0.40 Hz, and the ratio of LF to HF (LF/HF between the patient and control groups. The mean RR intervals significantly increased, while LF% and LF/HF significantly decreased in the patient group in the sitting position. Moreover, mean RR intervals, LF, and LF/HF, which were significantly different between the two positions in the control group, did not show a significant change with the posture change in the patient group. Conclusion. These suggest that patients with allergic rhinitis may have poor sympathetic modulation in the sitting position. Autonomic dysfunction may therefore play a role in the pathophysiology of allergic rhinitis.

  16. Asthma and allergic rhinitis in adoptees and their adoptive parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, J M; Cadoret, R J; Burns, T L; Troughton, E P

    1998-08-01

    Since the highest risk for the development of atopic disease is in early life, environmental risk factors need to be separated from the genetic component in this high risk period. Adoptees removed at birth and placed in adoptive families present a way to separate environmental and genetic factors at this early susceptible age. An opportunity for a pilot study of asthma and allergic rhinitis in adoptive families was presented when a psychiatrist (RC) was planning a behavioral study of young adult adoptees and their adoptive parents. A detailed questionnaire about allergic rhinitis and asthma was added after the psychiatrists' interview. Placement was not influenced by a history of allergy in adoptive or natural parents. The adoptee and at least one adoptive parent completed questionnaires in 367 families. The adoptees had been removed at birth and placed in the adoptive family within 3 months (83% within 1 month). Compared with adoptive families without asthma or allergic rhinitis, an adoptive mother with asthma or rhinitis, when the adoptive father was not affected, increased the risk for asthma in the adoptee (OR = 3.2, P adoptive mother alone (OR = 3.2, P Adoptive father asthma or allergic rhinitis showed a trend toward increased asthma in the adoptee (OR = 1.9, P adoption by parents with asthma or allergic rhinitis suggests that further well planned adoptee studies should be made.

  17. Birch pollen allergy: molecular characterization and hypoallergenic products

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schenk, M.F.

    2008-01-01

    Allergic diseases, such as hay fever and food allergy, affect a substantial part of the population in westernized countries. Pollen of the European white birch (Betula pendula) is a considerable cause of hay fever (seasonal allergic rhinitis) in northern and central Europe. The major birch pollen

  18. MACVIA-ARIA Sentinel NetworK for allergic rhinitis (MASK-rhinitis): the new generation guideline implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bousquet, J; Schunemann, H J; Fonseca, J; Samolinski, B; Bachert, C; Canonica, G W; Casale, T; Cruz, A A; Demoly, P; Hellings, P; Valiulis, A; Wickman, M; Zuberbier, T; Bosnic-Anticevitch, S; Bedbrook, A; Bergmann, K C; Caimmi, D; Dahl, R; Fokkens, W J; Grisle, I; Lodrup Carlsen, K; Mullol, J; Muraro, A; Palkonen, S; Papadopoulos, N; Passalacqua, G; Ryan, D; Valovirta, E; Yorgancioglu, A; Aberer, W; Agache, I; Adachi, M; Akdis, C A; Akdis, M; Annesi-Maesano, I; Ansotegui, I J; Anto, J M; Arnavielhe, S; Arshad, H; Baiardini, I; Baigenzhin, A K; Barbara, C; Bateman, E D; Beghé, B; Bel, E H; Ben Kheder, A; Bennoor, K S; Benson, M; Bewick, M; Bieber, T; Bindslev-Jensen, C; Bjermer, L; Blain, H; Boner, A L; Boulet, L P; Bonini, M; Bonini, S; Bosse, I; Bourret, R; Bousquet, P J; Braido, F; Briggs, A H; Brightling, C E; Brozek, J; Buhl, R; Burney, P G; Bush, A; Caballero-Fonseca, F; Calderon, M A; Camargos, P A M; Camuzat, T; Carlsen, K H; Carr, W; Cepeda Sarabia, A M; Chavannes, N H; Chatzi, L; Chen, Y Z; Chiron, R; Chkhartishvili, E; Chuchalin, A G; Ciprandi, G; Cirule, I; Correia de Sousa, J; Cox, L; Crooks, G; Costa, D J; Custovic, A; Dahlen, S E; Darsow, U; De Carlo, G; De Blay, F; Dedeu, T; Deleanu, D; Denburg, J A; Devillier, P; Didier, A; Dinh-Xuan, A T; Dokic, D; Douagui, H; Dray, G; Dubakiene, R; Durham, S R; Dykewicz, M S; El-Gamal, Y; Emuzyte, R; Fink Wagner, A; Fletcher, M; Fiocchi, A; Forastiere, F; Gamkrelidze, A; Gemicioğlu, B; Gereda, J E; González Diaz, S; Gotua, M; Grouse, L; Guzmán, M A; Haahtela, T; Hellquist-Dahl, B; Heinrich, J; Horak, F; Hourihane, J O 'b; Howarth, P; Humbert, M; Hyland, M E; Ivancevich, J C; Jares, E J; Johnston, S L; Joos, G; Jonquet, O; Jung, K S; Just, J; Kaidashev, I; Kalayci, O; Kalyoncu, A F; Keil, T; Keith, P K; Khaltaev, N; Klimek, L; Koffi N'Goran, B; Kolek, V; Koppelman, G H; Kowalski, M L; Kull, I; Kuna, P; Kvedariene, V; Lambrecht, B; Lau, S; Larenas-Linnemann, D; Laune, D; Le, L T T; Lieberman, P; Lipworth, B; Li, J; Louis, R; Magard, Y; Magnan, A; Mahboub, B; Majer, I; Makela, M J; Manning, P; De Manuel Keenoy, E; Marshall, G D; Masjedi, M R; Maurer, M; Mavale-Manuel, S; Melén, E; Melo-Gomes, E; Meltzer, E O; Merk, H; Miculinic, N; Mihaltan, F; Milenkovic, B; Mohammad, Y; Molimard, M; Momas, I; Montilla-Santana, A; Morais-Almeida, M; Mösges, R; Namazova-Baranova, L; Naclerio, R; Neou, A; Neffen, H; Nekam, K; Niggemann, B; Nyembue, T D; O'Hehir, R E; Ohta, K; Okamoto, Y; Okubo, K; Ouedraogo, S; Paggiaro, P; Pali-Schöll, I; Palmer, S; Panzner, P; Papi, A; Park, H S; Pavord, I; Pawankar, R; Pfaar, O; Picard, R; Pigearias, B; Pin, I; Plavec, D; Pohl, W; Popov, T A; Portejoie, F; Postma, D; Potter, P; Price, D; Rabe, K F; Raciborski, F; Radier Pontal, F; Repka-Ramirez, S; Robalo-Cordeiro, C; Rolland, C; Rosado-Pinto, J; Reitamo, S; Rodenas, F; Roman Rodriguez, M; Romano, A; Rosario, N; Rosenwasser, L; Rottem, M; Sanchez-Borges, M; Scadding, G K; Serrano, E; Schmid-Grendelmeier, P; Sheikh, A; Simons, F E R; Sisul, J C; Skrindo, I; Smit, H A; Solé, D; Sooronbaev, T; Spranger, O; Stelmach, R; Strandberg, T; Sunyer, J; Thijs, C; Todo-Bom, A; Triggiani, M; Valenta, R; Valero, A L; van Hage, M; Vandenplas, O; Vezzani, G; Vichyanond, P; Viegi, G; Wagenmann, M; Walker, S; Wang, D Y; Wahn, U; Williams, D M; Wright, J; Yawn, B P; Yiallouros, P K; Yusuf, O M; Zar, H J; Zernotti, M E; Zhang, L; Zhong, N; Zidarn, M; Mercier, J

    2015-11-01

    Several unmet needs have been identified in allergic rhinitis: identification of the time of onset of the pollen season, optimal control of rhinitis and comorbidities, patient stratification, multidisciplinary team for integrated care pathways, innovation in clinical trials and, above all, patient empowerment. MASK-rhinitis (MACVIA-ARIA Sentinel NetworK for allergic rhinitis) is a simple system centred around the patient which was devised to fill many of these gaps using Information and Communications Technology (ICT) tools and a clinical decision support system (CDSS) based on the most widely used guideline in allergic rhinitis and its asthma comorbidity (ARIA 2015 revision). It is one of the implementation systems of Action Plan B3 of the European Innovation Partnership on Active and Healthy Ageing (EIP on AHA). Three tools are used for the electronic monitoring of allergic diseases: a cell phone-based daily visual analogue scale (VAS) assessment of disease control, CARAT (Control of Allergic Rhinitis and Asthma Test) and e-Allergy screening (premedical system of early diagnosis of allergy and asthma based on online tools). These tools are combined with a clinical decision support system (CDSS) and are available in many languages. An e-CRF and an e-learning tool complete MASK. MASK is flexible and other tools can be added. It appears to be an advanced, global and integrated ICT answer for many unmet needs in allergic diseases which will improve policies and standards. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. The effect of lucerne ( Medicago sativa ) hay quality on milk ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The influence of lucerne hay quality on the milk production potential and milk composition of Jersey cows was investigated. Three different grades of lucerne hay (Prime, Grade 1, Grade 2; selected according to the New Lucerne Quality Index) were included in a total mixed ration (TMR) and fed to lactating cows. The three ...

  20. Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... with facebook share with twitter share with linkedin Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever Credit: CDC A male cayenne tick, Amblyomma cajennense, ... and New Mexico. Why Is the Study of Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever a Priority for NIAID? Tickborne diseases are becoming ...

  1. Digestibility by lambs offered alfalfa hay treated with a propionic acid hay preservative and baled at different concentrations of moisture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eighteen crossbred wether lambs (76.1 ± 8.18 lb initial BW) were used for a 2 period digestion study to evaluate the effect of hay preservative concentration (0, 0.56, or 0.98% buffered propionic acid) and hay moisture concentration at baling (19.6, 23.8, or 27.4% moisture) on digestibility of alfal...

  2. Investigational new drugs for allergic rhinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricketti, Peter A; Alandijani, Sultan; Lin, Chen Hsing; Casale, Thomas B

    2017-03-01

    Allergic rhinitis (AR) is a multifactorial disease characterized by paroxysmal symptoms of sneezing, rhinorrhea, postnasal drip and nasal congestion. For over a century, subcutaneous allergen immunotherapy (SCIT) has been recognized as the most effective therapy to date that may modify the underlying disease course and provide long-term benefits for individuals refractory to pharmacotherapy. However, over the past 25 years, there has been substantial growth in developing alternative therapies to traditional SCIT. Areas covered: This article will review the most current literature focusing on advancements of AR therapies. Novel AR therapies that are currently under investigation include: the addition of omalizumab, an anti-immunoglobulin E (IgE) monoclonal antibody (mAb), to SCIT; altering the method of delivery of allergen immunotherapy (AIT) including sublingual (SLIT), epicutaneous (EIT), intralymphatic (ILIT), intranasal (INIT) and oral mucosal immunotherapy (OMIT); use of capsaicin spray; novel H3 and H4 antihistamines; activation of the innate immune system through Toll-like receptor agonists; and the use of chemically altered allergens, allergoids, recombinant allergens and relevant T-cell epitope peptides to improve the efficacy and safety of AIT. Expert opinion: These promising novel therapies may offer more effective and/or safer treatment options for AR patients, and in some instances, induce immunologic tolerance.

  3. Pilot study of mobile phone technology in allergic rhinitis in European countries: the MASK-rhinitis study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bousquet, J; Caimmi, D P; Bedbrook, A; Bewick, M; Hellings, P W; Devillier, P; Arnavielhe, S; Bachert, C; Bergmann, K C; Canonica, G W; Chavannes, N H; Cruz, A A; Dahl, R; Demoly, P; De Vries, G; Mathieu-Dupas, E; Finkwagner, A; Fonseca, J; Guldemond, N; Haahtela, T; Hellqvist-Dahl, B; Just, J; Keil, T; Klimek, L; Kowalski, M L; Kuitunen, M; Kuna, P; Kvedariene, V; Laune, D; Pereira, A M; Carreiro-Martins, P; Melén, E; Morais-Almeida, M; Mullol, J; Muraro, A; Murray, R; Nogueira-Silva, L; Papadopoulos, N G; Passalacqua, G; Portejoie, F; Price, D; Ryan, D; Samolinski, B; Sheikh, A; Siroux, V; Spranger, O; Todo Bom, A; Tomazic, P V; Valero, A; Valovirta, E; Valiulis, A; VandenPlas, O; van der Meulen, S; van Eerd, M; Wickman, M; Zuberbier, T

    2017-06-01

    The use of Apps running on smartphones and tablets profoundly affects medicine. The MASK-rhinitis (MACVIA-ARIA Sentinel NetworK for allergic rhinitis) App (Allergy Diary) assesses allergic rhinitis symptoms, disease control and impact on patients' lives. It is freely available in 20 countries (iOS and Android platforms). To assess in a pilot study whether (i) Allergy Diary users were able to properly provide baseline characteristics (ii) simple phenotypic characteristics based upon data captured by the Allergy Diary could be identified and (iii) information gathered by this study could suggest novel research questions. The Allergy Diary users were classified into six groups according to the baseline data that they entered into the App: (i) asymptomatic; (ii) nasal symptoms excluding rhinorrhea; (iii) rhinorrhea; (iv) rhinorrhea plus 1-2 nasal/ocular symptoms; (v) rhinorrhea plus ≥3 nasal/ocular symptoms; and (vi) rhinorrhea plus all nasal/ocular symptoms. By 1 June 2016, 3260 users had registered with the Allergy Diary and 2710 had completed the baseline questionnaire. Troublesome symptoms were found mainly in the users with the most symptoms. Around 50% of users with troublesome rhinitis and/or ocular symptoms suffered work impairment. Sleep was impaired by troublesome symptoms and nasal obstruction. This is the first App (iOS and Android) to have tested for allergic rhinitis and conjunctivitis. A simple questionnaire administered by cell phones enables the identification of phenotypic differences between a priori defined rhinitis groups. The results suggest novel concepts and research questions in allergic rhinitis that may not be identified using classical methods. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Q fever in Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch, Anders; Svendsen, Claus Bo; Christensen, Jens Jorgen

    2010-01-01

    We report a patient with Q fever endocarditis in a settlement in eastern Greenland (Isortoq, Ammassalik area). Likely animal sources include sled dogs and seals. Q fever may be underdiagnosed in Arctic areas but may also represent an emerging infection.......We report a patient with Q fever endocarditis in a settlement in eastern Greenland (Isortoq, Ammassalik area). Likely animal sources include sled dogs and seals. Q fever may be underdiagnosed in Arctic areas but may also represent an emerging infection....

  5. Psychological stress and its relationship with persistent allergic rhinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Hennawi, Diaa El Din Mohamed; Ahmed, Mohamed Rifaat; Farid, Alaa Mohamed

    2016-04-01

    Allergic rhinitis is considered to be a major health problem that impairs quality of life. A possible relationship with psychological stress may exist. The aim of this study is to verify the relationship between persistent allergic rhinitis (PAR) and psychological stress aiming to improve treatment and thereby quality of life (QOL) of patients. Patients with PAR (166) were diagnosed then analyzed using the Kessler Psychological Distress Scale. Patients with allergic rhinitis and who were positive on the Kessler scale (122) were randomly divided equally into a control group which received levocetirizine and a study group which received levocetirizine and imipramine. Nasal symptom assessment and QOL assessment were performed in all patients after treatment. Of the 166 patients with PAR, 122 (73.5 %) were positive on the Kessler Psychological Distress Scale. There was a marked improvement in the study group compared with the control group as regards nasal symptoms with better QOL in the study group (6.93) compared with the control group (2.13). Psychological stress has a strong impact on persistent allergic rhinitis. When stress is controlled by a combined treatment of imipramine and levocetirizine, allergic rhinitis symptoms improved and a better QOL was obtained. 3b.

  6. Sports activities enhance the prevalence of rhinitis symptoms in schoolchildren.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusunoki, Takashi; Takeuchi, Jiro; Morimoto, Takeshi; Sakuma, Mio; Mukaida, Kumiko; Yasumi, Takahiro; Nishikomori, Ryuta; Heike, Toshio

    2016-03-01

    To evaluate the association between sports activities and allergic symptoms, especially rhinitis, among schoolchildren. This longitudinal survey of schoolchildren collected data from questionnaires regarding allergic symptoms based on the International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood (ISAAC) program and sports participation that were distributed to the parents of children at all 12 public primary schools in Ohmi-Hachiman City, Shiga Prefecture, Japan. Data were collected annually from 2011 until 2014, when the children reached 10 years of age. Blood samples were obtained in 2014, and the levels of immunoglobulin (Ig)E specific to four inhalant allergens were measured. Data from 558 children were analyzed. At 10 years of age, prevalence of asthma and eczema did not differ significantly, while rhinitis was significantly higher (p = 0.009) among children who participated in sports. Prevalence of rhinitis increased as the frequency or duration of sports participation increased (p sports (p = 0.03). Among those who participated in continuous sports activities, the prevalence of rhinitis was significantly higher with prolonged eczema (p = 0.006). Sports activities did not increase sensitization to inhalant allergens. Sports activities enhance the prevalence of rhinitis in schoolchildren. Prolonged eczema, together with sports participation, further promotes the symptoms. The mechanisms of these novel findings warrant further investigation. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. The cost of productivity losses associated with allergic rhinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crystal-Peters, J; Crown, W H; Goetzel, R Z; Schutt, D C

    2000-03-01

    To measure the cost of absenteeism and reduced productivity associated with allergic rhinitis. The National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) was used to obtain information on days lost from work and lost productivity due to allergic rhinitis. Wage estimates for occupations obtained from the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) were used to calculate the costs. Productivity losses associated with a diagnosis of allergic rhinitis in the 1995 NHIS were estimated to be $601 million. When additional survey information on the use of sedating over-the-counter (OTC) allergy medications, as well as workers' self-assessments of their reduction in at-work productivity due to allergic rhinitis, were considered, the estimated productivity loss increased dramatically. At-work productivity losses were estimated to range from $2.4 billion to $4.6 billion. Despite the inherent difficulty of measuring productivity losses, our lowest estimate is several times higher than previous estimates of the indirect medical costs associated with allergic rhinitis treatment. The most significant productivity losses resulted not from absenteeism but from reduced at-work productivity associated with the use of sedating OTC antihistamines.

  8. Non-allergic rhinitis: a case report and review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Betty Lew D

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Rhinitis is characterized by rhinorrhea, sneezing, nasal congestion, nasal itch and/or postnasal drip. Often the first step in arriving at a diagnosis is to exclude or diagnose sensitivity to inhalant allergens. Non-allergic rhinitis (NAR comprises multiple distinct conditions that may even co-exist with allergic rhinitis (AR. They may differ in their presentation and treatment. As well, the pathogenesis of NAR is not clearly elucidated and likely varied. There are many conditions that can have similar presentations to NAR or AR, including nasal polyps, anatomical/mechanical factors, autoimmune diseases, metabolic conditions, genetic conditions and immunodeficiency. Here we present a case of a rare condition initially diagnosed and treated as typical allergic rhinitis vs. vasomotor rhinitis, but found to be something much more serious. This case illustrates the importance of maintaining an appropriate differential diagnosis for a complaint routinely seen as mundane. The case presentation is followed by a review of the potential causes and pathogenesis of NAR.

  9. The ARIA score of allergic rhinitis using mobile technology correlates with quality-of-life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bousquet, J; Arnavielhe, S; Bedbrook, A

    2018-01-01

    Mobile technology has been used to appraise allergic rhinitis control but more data are needed. In order to better assess the importance of mobile technologies in rhinitis control, the ARIA (Allergic Rhinitis and its Impact on Asthma) score ranging from 0 to 4 of the Allergy Diary was compared wi...

  10. Non-allergic rhinitis: Position paper of the European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hellings, P. W.; Klimek, L.; Cingi, C.; Agache, I.; Akdis, C.; Bachert, C.; Bousquet, J.; Demoly, P.; Gevaert, P.; Hox, V.; Hupin, C.; Kalogjera, L.; Manole, F.; Mösges, R.; Mullol, J.; Muluk, N. B.; Muraro, A.; Papadopoulos, N.; Pawankar, R.; Rondon, C.; Rundenko, M.; Seys, S. F.; Toskala, E.; van Gerven, L.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, N.; Fokkens, W. J.

    2017-01-01

    This EAACI position paper aims at providing a state-of-the-art overview on nonallergic rhinitis (NAR). A significant number of patients suffering from persistent rhinitis are defined as nonallergic noninfectious rhinitis (NANIR) patients, often denominated in short as having NAR. NAR is defined as a

  11. Non-allergic rhinitis: Position paper of the European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellings, P W; Klimek, L; Cingi, C; Agache, I; Akdis, C; Bachert, C; Bousquet, J; Demoly, P; Gevaert, P; Hox, V; Hupin, C; Kalogjera, L; Manole, F; Mösges, R; Mullol, J; Muluk, N B; Muraro, A; Papadopoulos, N; Pawankar, R; Rondon, C; Rundenko, M; Seys, S F; Toskala, E; Van Gerven, L; Zhang, L; Zhang, N; Fokkens, W J

    2017-11-01

    This EAACI position paper aims at providing a state-of-the-art overview on nonallergic rhinitis (NAR). A significant number of patients suffering from persistent rhinitis are defined as nonallergic noninfectious rhinitis (NANIR) patients, often denominated in short as having NAR. NAR is defined as a symptomatic inflammation of the nasal mucosa with the presence of a minimum of two nasal symptoms such as nasal obstruction, rhinorrhea, sneezing, and/or itchy nose, without clinical evidence of endonasal infection and without systemic signs of sensitization to inhalant allergens. Symptoms of NAR may have a wide range of severity and be either continuously present and/or induced by exposure to unspecific triggers, also called nasal hyperresponsiveness (NHR). NHR represents a clinical feature of both AR and NAR patients. NAR involves different subgroups: drug-induced rhinitis, (nonallergic) occupational rhinitis, hormonal rhinitis (including pregnancy rhinitis), gustatory rhinitis, senile rhinitis, and idiopathic rhinitis (IR). NAR should be distinguished from those rhinitis patients with an allergic reaction confined to the nasal mucosa, also called "entopy" or local allergic rhinitis (LAR). We here provide an overview of the current consensus on phenotypes of NAR, recommendations for diagnosis, a treatment algorithm, and defining the unmet needs in this neglected area of research. © 2017 EAACI and John Wiley and Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley and Sons Ltd.

  12. Treating rhinitis in the older population: special considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slavin Raymond G

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Rhinitis in the elderly is a common but often neglected condition. Structural changes in the nose associated with aging, predisposes the elderly to rhinitis. There are a number of specific factors that affect medical treatment of the elderly including polypharmacy, cognitive dysfunction, changes in body composition, impairment of liver and renal function and the cost of medications in the face of limited resources. Rhinitis in the elderly can be placed in several categories and treatment should be appropriate for each condition. The most important aim is to moisten the nasal mucosa since the nose of the elderly is so dry. Great caution should be used in treatment with first generation antihistamines and decongestants. Medications generally well tolerated by the elderly are second generation antihistamines, intra-nasal anti-inflammatory agents, leukotriene modifiers and iprapropium nasal spray.

  13. Effects of haying on breeding birds in CRP grasslands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igl, Lawrence D.; Johnson, Douglas H.

    2016-01-01

    The Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) is a voluntary program that is available to agricultural producers to help protect environmentally sensitive or highly erodible land. Management disturbances of CRP grasslands generally are not allowed unless authorized to provide relief to livestock producers during severe drought or a similar natural disaster (i.e., emergency haying and grazing) or to improve the quality and performance of the CRP cover (i.e., managed haying and grazing). Although CRP grasslands may not be hayed or grazed during the primary bird-nesting season, these disturbances may have short-term (1 yr after disturbance) and long-term (≥2 yr after disturbance) effects on grassland bird populations. We assessed the effects of haying on 20 grassland bird species in 483 CRP grasslands in 9 counties of 4 states in the northern Great Plains, USA between 1993 and 2008. We compared breeding bird densities (as determined by total-area counts) in idle and hayed fields to evaluate changes 1, 2, 3, and 4 years after haying. Haying of CRP grasslands had either positive or negative effects on grassland birds, depending on the species, the county, and the number of years after the initial disturbance. Some species (e.g., horned lark [Eremophila alpestris], bobolink [Dolichonyx oryzivorus]) responded positively after haying, and others (e.g., song sparrow [Melospiza melodia]) responded negatively. The responses of some species changed direction as the fields recovered from haying. For example, densities for common yellowthroat (Geothlypis trichas), sedge wren (Cistothorus platensis), and clay-colored sparrow (Spizella pallida) declined the first year after haying but increased in the subsequent 3 years. Ten species showed treatment × county interactions, indicating that the effects of haying varied geographically. This long-term evaluation on the effects of haying on breeding birds provides important information on the strength and direction of changes in

  14. The role of nasal corticosteroids in the treatment of rhinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meltzer, Eli O

    2011-08-01

    Intranasal corticosteroids (INSs) are the first choice for rhinitis pharmacotherapy. This preference is because of their broad range of actions that result in reductions of proinflammatory mediators, cytokines, and cells. Over the past 30 years, INSs have been modified to improve their pharmacodynamic, pharmacokinetic, and delivery system properties, with attention to improving characteristics such as receptor binding affinity, lipophilicity, low systemic bioavailability, and patient preference. Clinically, they have been shown to be the most effective class of nasal medications for treating allergic rhinitis and nonallergic rhinopathy, with no clear evidence that any specific INS is superior to others. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. The treatment of allergic rhinitis improves the recovery from asthma and upper respiratory infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Willy Sarti

    Full Text Available Forty-six asthmatic children with repeated respiratory infections presented symptoms of allergic rhinitis. All patients were treated locally for allergic rhinitis either with disodium cromoglycate or beclomethasone dipropionate. After six months of treatment, 95% of the children showed improvement of allergic rhinitis and 84% improvement of bronchial asthma, as well as fewer infections. We concluded that allergic rhinitis plays an important role in facilitating infections of the upper respiratory tract, and a possible association of rhinitis, viral infections and bronchial asthma is discussed.

  16. Increase in the prevalence of rhinitis among Danish children from 1986 to 2001

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Håkansson, K; Thomsen, SF; Ulrik, Charlotte Suppli

    2007-01-01

    In recent decades, there has been a worldwide increase in the prevalence of atopic diseases. The aim of this study was to investigate whether there has been a change in the prevalence of rhinitis among children in Denmark from 1986 to 2001. We compared data from two random population-based samples.......001). The increase was most pronounced among subjects who suffered from non-allergic rhinitis (p disease were...... strong predictors of non-allergic rhinitis, whereas a history of asthma, parental atopic disease, bronchial hyperresponsiveness, eczema, and age at examination were statistically significant predictors of allergic rhinitis. The prevalence of non-allergic rhinitis among Danish children has increased...

  17. Volatile fatty acid profile for grass hay or alfalfa hay fed to alpacas (Vicugna pacos).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oldham, C L; Robinson, T F; Hunter, Z R; Taylor, L; White, J; Johnston, N P

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the diurnal composition and concentration of volatile fatty acids (VFA) and to determine VFA composition and concentration differences between stomach compartment 1 (C1) and caecum of alpacas fed grass and alfalfa hay. The study was divided into two experiments. In Experiment 1 (EXP 1), 10 male alpacas (3+ years old, 65 kg BW) were divided into two groups, housed in drylot pens, provided ad libitum water and fed alfalfa (AH) or grass hay (GH) for 30 days. The alpacas were slaughtered and the digestive tract collected, divided into sub-tract sections, weighed and digesta sampled for pH, dry matter (DM) and NDF. Volatile fatty acid composition and concentration were determined on C1 and caecal material. Four adult male (3+ years old, 60 kg BW), C1 fistulated alpacas were housed in metabolism crates and divided into two forage groups for Experiment 2 (EXP 2). Alpacas were fed the forages as in EXP 1. Diurnal C1 VFA samples were drawn at 1, 3, 6, 9, 12, 18 and 24 h post-feeding. There were no differences between forages for tract weight, C1 and caecum digesta DM or NDF. Differences were noted (p alpacas and the diurnal VFA patterns. Composition of VFA is similar to other ruminant species. Journal of Animal Physiology and Animal Nutrition © 2013 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  18. Allergic rhinitis and arterial blood pressure: a population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakallioglu, O; Polat, C; Akyigit, A; Cetiner, H; Duzer, S

    2018-05-01

    To investigate the likelihood of allergic rhinitis and potential co-morbidities, and to assess whether allergic rhinitis is associated with arterial blood pressure and hypertension. In this population-based study, 369 adults with allergic rhinitis and asthma were assessed via a questionnaire and immunoglobulin E levels. There were four groups: control (n = 90), allergic rhinitis (n = 99), asthma (n = 87) and hypertension (n = 93). Arterial blood pressure was measured in all groups. There were no significant differences in systolic or diastolic blood pressure between males and females in any group. Pairwise comparisons revealed no significant differences between: the control and allergic rhinitis groups, the control and asthma groups, or the allergic rhinitis and asthma groups. The systolic and diastolic blood pressure values of males and females were significantly higher in the hypertension group than the allergic rhinitis group. There were no significant differences in systolic blood pressure or diastolic blood pressure for seasonal and perennial allergic rhinitis patients. Rhinitis was not associated with increased blood pressure. Allergic rhinitis can coincide with asthma and hypertension. The findings do not support the need for blood pressure follow up in allergic rhinitis patients.

  19. Homeopathy for Allergic Rhinitis: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Kushal; Mathie, Robert T; Costelloe, Céire; Howick, Jeremy

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and effectiveness of homeopathic intervention in the treatment of seasonal or perennial allergic rhinitis (AR). Randomized controlled trials evaluating all forms of homeopathic treatment for AR were included in a systematic review (SR) of studies published up to and including December 2015. Two authors independently screened potential studies, extracted data, and assessed risk of bias. Primary outcomes included symptom improvement and total quality-of-life score. Treatment effect size was quantified as mean difference (continuous data), or by risk ratio (RR) and odds ratio (dichotomous data), with 95% confidence intervals (CI). Meta-analysis was performed after assessing heterogeneity and risk of bias. Eleven studies were eligible for SR. All trials were placebo-controlled except one. Six trials used the treatment approach known as isopathy, but they were unsuitable for meta-analysis due to problems of heterogeneity and data extraction. The overall standard of methods and reporting was poor: 8/11 trials were assessed as "high risk of bias"; only one trial, on isopathy for seasonal AR, possessed reliable evidence. Three trials of variable quality (all using Galphimia glauca for seasonal AR) were included in the meta-analysis: nasal symptom relief at 2 and 4 weeks (RR = 1.48 [95% CI 1.24-1.77] and 1.27 [95% CI 1.10-1.46], respectively) favored homeopathy compared with placebo; ocular symptom relief at 2 and 4 weeks also favored homeopathy (RR = 1.55 [95% CI 1.33-1.80] and 1.37 [95% CI 1.21-1.56], respectively). The single trial with reliable evidence had a small positive treatment effect without statistical significance. A homeopathic and a conventional nasal spray produced equivalent improvements in nasal and ocular symptoms. The low or uncertain overall quality of the evidence warrants caution in drawing firm conclusions about intervention effects. Use of either Galphimia glauca or a homeopathic nasal spray

  20. Role of Predatory Mites in Persistent Nonoccupational Allergic Rhinitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paloma Poza Guedes

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Mites can sensitize and induce atopic disease in predisposed individuals and are an important deteriorating factor in patients with allergic rhinitis, asthma, and atopic dermatitis. Although Pyroglyphidae mites have been extensively studied, very scarce reports are available on Cheyletidae spp. especially regarding human respiratory pathology. The main objective of the present study is to investigate the clinical role of this predator mite (Cheyletus eruditus as a respiratory antigen in a selected sensitized human population. Fifty-two adult patients were recruited from the outpatient allergy clinic to assess their eligibility for the study. The thirty-seven subjects with persistent allergic rhinitis (PAR who fulfilled the ARIA criteria had a positive IgE response confirmed by skin prick test (SPT to C. eruditus. Only those individuals (37/47 with a positive SPT to C. eruditus showed a positive nasal provocation test (NPT, while 10 patients with nonallergic mild-to-moderate persistent rhinitis, control group, had a negative NPT with C. eruditus. The present paper describes a new role for the predator mite Cheyletus eruditus as a respiratory allergen in a selected subset of patients in a subtropical environment afflicted with persistent nonoccupational allergic rhinitis.

  1. Prevalence of asthma, allergic rhinitis and dermatitis in primary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: to establish the relative increase in the prevalence of asthma, allergic rhinitis and eczema in primary school children aged 13-14 years over a six year interval. Design: Cross sectional comparative study. Setting: Primary schools in three rural divisions at Uasin Gishu district in the Rift Valley Province of Kenya.

  2. Computational analysis of multimorbidity between asthma, eczema and rhinitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aguilar, D. (Daniel); M. Pinart (Mariona); G.H. Koppelman (Gerard); Y. Saeys (Yvan); M.C. Nawijn (Martijn); D.S. Postma (Dirkje); C.A. Akdis; C. Auffray (C.); Ballereau, S. (Stephane); M. Benet (M.); Garcõa-Aymerich, J. (Judith); Ramon Gonzalez, J. (Juan); Guerra, S. (Stefano); M. Keil (Mark); M. Kogevinas (Manolis); B.N.M. Lambrecht (Bart); Lemonnier, N. (Nathanael); E. Melén (Erik); J. Sunyer (Jordi); R. Valenta; Valverde, S. (Sergi); M. Wickman (Magnus); J. Bousquet (Jean); B. Oliva (Baldomero); J.M. Antó (Josep M.)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractBackground The mechanisms explaining the co-existence of asthma, eczema and rhinitis (allergic multimorbidity) are largely unknown. We investigated the mechanisms underlying multimorbidity between three main allergic diseases at a molecular level by identifying the proteins and cellular

  3. Fever in Infants and Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or higher that is unresponsive to fever-reducing medicine?YesNoDoes your child have a low-grade fever (up to 101°) ... fever, give your child a nonaspirin fever-reducing medicine. Call your child’s doctor after 24 hours if the fever continues ...

  4. Psychosis in dengue fever

    OpenAIRE

    Suprakash Chaudhury; Biswajit Jagtap; Deepak Kumar Ghosh

    2017-01-01

    An 18-year-old male student developed abnormal behavior while undergoing treatment for dengue fever. He was ill-kempt, irritable and had auditory and visual hallucinations and vague persecutory delusions in clear sensorium with impaired insight. The psychotic episode had a temporal correlation with dengue fever. Psychiatric comorbidities of dengue fever including mania, anxiety, depression, and catatonia are mentioned in literature but the literature on the psychosis following dengue is spars...

  5. Oropouche Fever: A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Hercules Sakkas; Petros Bozidis; Ashley Franks; Chrissanthy Papadopoulou

    2018-01-01

    Oropouche fever is an emerging zoonotic disease caused by Oropouche virus (OROV), an arthropod transmitted Orthobunyavirus circulating in South and Central America. During the last 60 years, more than 30 epidemics and over half a million clinical cases attributed to OROV infection have been reported in Brazil, Peru, Panama, Trinidad and Tobago. OROV fever is considered the second most frequent arboviral febrile disease in Brazil after dengue fever. OROV is transmitted through both urban and s...

  6. Effects of omalizumab therapy on allergic rhinitis: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masieri, S; Cavaliere, C; Begvarfaj, E; Rosati, D; Minni, A

    2016-12-01

    The use of omalizumab, a humanized monoclonal antibody able to binding Ig-E, is currently authorized only for treatment of severe bronchial asthma. The use of omalizumab in other Ig-E related diseases is off-label, although some studies have provided promising results about it. The aim of this study was to evaluate if therapy with omalizumab in patients affected by asthma and allergic rhinitis has an impact also on allergic rhinitis-related symptoms. A longitudinal study was conducted on 11 patients affected by severe asthma and a periodic allergic rhinitis. Patients were treated with omalizumab for 24 weeks with a monthly subcutaneous administration at the dosage recommended by the current guidelines. We observed at the start and at the end of treatment: rhinitis symptoms using the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS); the state of nasal mucosa with fiberoptic nasal endoscopy; airways inflammation by measuring the Fractional Exhaled Nitric Oxide (FeNO); asthmatic symptomatology by means of the Asthma Control Test; the amount of total Ig-E in a blood sample; and the use of symptomatic drugs before and after treatment. VAS scores to measure general symptomatology and symptoms including nasal obstruction, rhinorrhea, itching and sneezing were significantly reduced. Turbinate hypertrophy was resolved in six of nine patients. Furthermore, eight patients (73%) reduced or eliminated the use of symptomatic drugs. Our data confirm the efficacy of omalizumab in the treatment of allergic rhinitis. Controlled studies will now have to be carried out to confirm these preliminary data and will specify indications for a very efficacious but still significantly expensive therapy.

  7. Sheep fed with banana leaf hay reduce ruminal protozoa population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitas, Cláudio Eduardo Silva; Duarte, Eduardo Robson; Alves, Dorismar David; Martinele, Isabel; D'Agosto, Marta; Cedrola, Franciane; de Moura Freitas, Angélica Alves; Dos Santos Soares, Franklin Delano; Beltran, Makenzi

    2017-04-01

    A ciliate protozoa suppression can reduce methane production increasing the energy efficiency utilization by ruminants. The physicochemical characteristics of rumen fluid and the profile of the rumen protozoa populations were evaluated for sheep fed banana leaf hay in replacement of the Cynodon dactylon cv. vaqueiro hay. A total of 30 male sheep were raised in intensive system during 15 days of adaptation and 63 days of experimental period. The animals were distributed in a completely randomized design that included six replicates of five treatments with replacement levels (0, 25, 50, 75, and 100%) of the grass vaquero for the banana leaf hay. Samples of fluid were collected directly from the rumen with sterile catheters. Color, odor, viscosity, and the methylene blue reduction potential (MBRP) were evaluated and pH estimated using a digital potentiometer. After decimal dilutions, counts of genus protozoa were performed in Sedgewick Rafter chambers. The averages of pH, MBRP, color, odor, and viscosity were not influenced by the inclusion of the banana leaf hay. However, the total number of protozoa and Entodinium spp. population significantly decreased at 75 and 100% inclusions of banana leaf hay as roughage.

  8. Hemorrhagic Fevers - Multiple Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... dialect) (繁體中文) Expand Section Vaccine Information Statement (VIS) -- Yellow Fever Vaccine: What You Need to Know - English PDF Vaccine Information Statement (VIS) -- Yellow Fever Vaccine: What You Need to Know - 繁體中文 (Chinese, Traditional ( ...

  9. Treating viral hemorrhagic fever.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mairuhu, A.T.; Brandjes, D.P.; Gorp, E. van

    2003-01-01

    Viral hemorrhagic fevers are illnesses associated with a number of geographically restricted, mostly tropical areas. Over recent decades a number of new hemorrhagic fever viruses have emerged. Advances in our understanding of the pathophysiology of these diseases have improved our initial supportive

  10. Rat bite fever.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gaastra, W.; Boot, R.G.A.; Ho, H.; Lipman, L.J.A.

    2009-01-01

    Rat bite fever (RBF) is a bacterial zoonosis for which two causal bacterial species have been identified: Streptobacillis moniliformis and Spirillum minus. Haverhill fever (HF) is a form of S. moniliformis infection believed to develop after ingestion of contaminated food or water. Here the

  11. Dengue Fever in American Military Personnel in the Philippines: Clinical Observations on Hospitalized Patients during a 1984 Epidemic

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-03-01

    the mean maximum temperature was Hypotenson 15 (62.5) 102.0 + 1.3 F. A "saddle back" or dip- Rash (Non- Petechial ) 13 (54.2) hasic fever pattern was not...DENGUE FEVER IN AMERICAN MILITARY PERSONNEL IN THE PHILIPPINES: CLINICAL OBSERVATIONS ON HOSPITALIZED PATIENS DURING A 1984 EPIDEMIC C.G. Hayes, T.F...Accession Tr~I Jti ti DENGUE FEVER IN AMERICAN MILITARY PERSONNEL IN THE PHILIPPINES: CLINICAL OBSERVATIONS ON HOSPITALIZED PATIENTS DURING A 1984

  12. Fever with Rashes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soman, Letha

    2018-07-01

    Fever with rashes is one of the commonest clinical problems a general practitioner or pediatrician has to face in day-to-day clinical practice. It can be a mild viral illness or a life-threatening illness like meningococcemia or Dengue hemorrhagic fever or it can be one with a lifelong consequence like Kawasaki disease. It is very important to arrive at a clinical diagnosis as early as possible with the minimum investigational facilities. The common causes associated with fever and rashes are infections, viral followed by other infections. There can be so many non-infectious causes also for fever and rashes like auto immune diseases, drug allergies etc. The type of rashes, their appearance in relation to the fever and pattern of spread to different parts of body and the disappearance, all will help in making a diagnosis. Often the diagnosis is clinical. In certain situations laboratory work up becomes essential.

  13. Environmental impact assessment of alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) hay production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacenetti, Jacopo; Lovarelli, Daniela; Tedesco, Doriana; Pretolani, Roberto; Ferrante, Valentina

    2018-09-01

    On-farm production of hay and high-protein-content feed has several advantages such as diversification of on-farm cultivated crops, reduction of off-farm feed concentrates transported over long distances and a reduction in runoff during the winter season if grown crops are perennial. Among those crops cultivated for high-protein-content feed, alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) is one of the most important in the Italian context. Nevertheless, up to now, only a few studies have assessed the environmental performance of alfalfa hay production. In this study, using the Life Cycle Assessment approach, the environmental impact of alfalfa hay production in Northern Italy was analyzed. More in detail, two production practices (without and with irrigation) were compared. The results show that alfalfa hay production in irrigated fields has a better environmental performance compared to non-irrigated production, mainly because of the yield increase achieved with irrigation. In particular, for the Climate Change impact category, the impact is equal to 84.54 and 80.21kgCO 2 /t of hay for the scenario without and with irrigation, respectively. However, for two impact categories (Ozone Depletion and Human Toxicity-No Cancer Effect), the impact of irrigation completely offsets the yield increase, and the cultivation practice without irrigation shows the best environmental performance. For both scenarios, the mechanization of harvest is the main environmental hotspot, mostly due to fuel consumption and related combustion emissions. Wide differences were highlighted by comparing the two scenarios with the Ecoinvent process of alfalfa hay production; these differences are mostly due to the cultivation practice and, in particular, to the more intensive fertilization in Swiss production. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. [Modern Diagnosis and Therapy of the rhinitis allergica].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauswald, B; Yarin, Y M

    2015-05-01

    The prevalence of allergic diseases is increasing worldwide. The highest increase rate is observed in rhinitis allergica. Apart from the anamnesis, the diagnosis relies mainly on skin tests, laboratory analyses and if necessary provocation tests. Symptomatic and causal therapy with abstention and specific immunotherapy are available as therapeutic means. Specific immunotherapy should be aspired as the method of choice. It is comprised of subcutane and sublingular immunity therapy. Usually native allergens and allergoids are used as therapeutics. Recombinant allergens are currently under development. Modern therapy procedures involving these drugs consist of year-round or pre- and co-seasonal treatment which spans at least 3-4 years. In cases of polyvalent allergy, different types of drugs and therapy procedures can be combined. The future of rhinitis allergica treatment lies in further development of specific immunotherapy. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  15. Sublingual immunotherapy for allergic rhinitis: where are we now?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Incorvaia, Cristoforo; Mauro, Marina; Ridolo, Erminia

    2015-01-01

    Sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) was introduced in the 1980s as a safer option to subcutaneous immunotherapy and in the latest decade achieved significant advances. Its efficacy in allergic rhinitis is supported by a number of meta-analyses. The development of SLIT preparations in tablets to fulfill the requirements of regulatory agencies for quality of allergen extracts made available optimal products for grass-pollen-induced allergic rhinitis. Preparations of other allergens based on the same production methods are currently in progress. A notable outcome of SLIT, that is shared with subcutaneous immunotherapy, is the evident cost-effectiveness, showing significant cost savings as early as 3 months from starting the treatment, that become as high as 80% compared with drug treatment in the ensuing years.

  16. Quality of life in children and adolescents with allergic rhinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Carlos Henrique Martins da; Silva, Taís Estevão da; Morales, Nívea Macedo O; Fernandes, Karla P; Pinto, Rogério M C

    2009-01-01

    Allergic rhinitis (AR) remains a significant pediatric health problem because of the burden of uncontrolled symptoms on daily activities and on general well being. to assess the impact of AR on health-related quality of life (HRQL) of children and adolescents using a generic instrument, the Child Health Questionnaire (CHQ - PF50). Between January and November 2004, parents or caregivers of 23 children and adolescents with AR without comorbidities and with positive prick tests for at least one air allergen were invited to participate of a cross-sectional study and asked to answer the self-administered CHQ-PF50. The scores were compared to those of healthy children and adolescents. Patient scores were lower (psize effect was higher in the physical score compared to the psychosocial summary score. allergic rhinitis has a global negative impact on the HRQL of children and adolescents, with major repercussions in physical function; AR also negatively affects family relations.

  17. Oropouche Fever: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hercules Sakkas

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Oropouche fever is an emerging zoonotic disease caused by Oropouche virus (OROV, an arthropod transmitted Orthobunyavirus circulating in South and Central America. During the last 60 years, more than 30 epidemics and over half a million clinical cases attributed to OROV infection have been reported in Brazil, Peru, Panama, Trinidad and Tobago. OROV fever is considered the second most frequent arboviral febrile disease in Brazil after dengue fever. OROV is transmitted through both urban and sylvatic transmission cycles, with the primary vector in the urban cycle being the anthropophilic biting midge Culicoides paraensis. Currently, there is no evidence of direct human-to-human OROV transmission. OROV fever is usually either undiagnosed due to its mild, self-limited manifestations or misdiagnosed because its clinical characteristics are similar to dengue, chikungunya, Zika and yellow fever, including malaria as well. At present, there is no specific antiviral treatment, and in the absence of a vaccine for effective prophylaxis of human populations in endemic areas, the disease prevention relies solely on vector control strategies and personal protection measures. OROV fever is considered to have the potential to spread across the American continent and under favorable climatic conditions may expand its geographic distribution to other continents. In view of OROV’s emergence, increased interest for formerly neglected tropical diseases and within the One Health concept, the existing knowledge and gaps of knowledge on OROV fever are reviewed.

  18. Oropouche Fever: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakkas, Hercules; Bozidis, Petros; Franks, Ashley; Papadopoulou, Chrissanthy

    2018-04-04

    Oropouche fever is an emerging zoonotic disease caused by Oropouche virus (OROV), an arthropod transmitted Orthobunyavirus circulating in South and Central America. During the last 60 years, more than 30 epidemics and over half a million clinical cases attributed to OROV infection have been reported in Brazil, Peru, Panama, Trinidad and Tobago. OROV fever is considered the second most frequent arboviral febrile disease in Brazil after dengue fever. OROV is transmitted through both urban and sylvatic transmission cycles, with the primary vector in the urban cycle being the anthropophilic biting midge Culicoides paraensis . Currently, there is no evidence of direct human-to-human OROV transmission. OROV fever is usually either undiagnosed due to its mild, self-limited manifestations or misdiagnosed because its clinical characteristics are similar to dengue, chikungunya, Zika and yellow fever, including malaria as well. At present, there is no specific antiviral treatment, and in the absence of a vaccine for effective prophylaxis of human populations in endemic areas, the disease prevention relies solely on vector control strategies and personal protection measures. OROV fever is considered to have the potential to spread across the American continent and under favorable climatic conditions may expand its geographic distribution to other continents. In view of OROV's emergence, increased interest for formerly neglected tropical diseases and within the One Health concept, the existing knowledge and gaps of knowledge on OROV fever are reviewed.

  19. Yellow fever: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monath, T P

    2001-08-01

    Yellow fever, the original viral haemorrhagic fever, was one of the most feared lethal diseases before the development of an effective vaccine. Today the disease still affects as many as 200,000 persons annually in tropical regions of Africa and South America, and poses a significant hazard to unvaccinated travellers to these areas. Yellow fever is transmitted in a cycle involving monkeys and mosquitoes, but human beings can also serve as the viraemic host for mosquito infection. Recent increases in the density and distribution of the urban mosquito vector, Aedes aegypti, as well as the rise in air travel increase the risk of introduction and spread of yellow fever to North and Central America, the Caribbean and Asia. Here I review the clinical features of the disease, its pathogenesis and pathophysiology. The disease mechanisms are poorly understood and have not been the subject of modern clinical research. Since there is no specific treatment, and management of patients with the disease is extremely problematic, the emphasis is on preventative vaccination. As a zoonosis, yellow fever cannot be eradicated, but reduction of the human disease burden is achievable through routine childhood vaccination in endemic countries, with a low cost for the benefits obtained. The biological characteristics, safety, and efficacy of live attenuated, yellow fever 17D vaccine are reviewed. New applications of yellow fever 17D virus as a vector for foreign genes hold considerable promise as a means of developing new vaccines against other viruses, and possibly against cancers.

  20. The relationships between atopy, rhinitis and asthma: pathophysiological considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulay, Marie-Eve; Boulet, Louis-Philippe

    2003-02-01

    A close relationship has been described between atopy, allergic rhinitis and asthma. The purpose of this work was to review recent data that have become available on the interactions between these conditions and the ways in which they influence one another. Recent findings support previous observations suggesting that atopic dermatitis and rhinitis often accompany or precede the development of asthma. Further data support the notion that early-life exposure to domestic animals, a farming environment, passive smoking, and being raised in a large family, may be protective against the development of atopy and/or allergic diseases, although this seems modulated by genetic factors. Furthermore, the appearance of house-dust-mite-specific immunoglobulin E antibodies in early childhood has been identified as a major risk factor for the development of asthma in children with atopic dermatitis; and the association between sensitization to specific allergens and airway hyperresponsiveness was reported to be the strongest for indoor allergens such as house-dust-mite and cat. Allergen exposure can increase airway responsiveness in non-asthmatic subjects with allergic rhinitis and is associated with an increase in markers of lower airway inflammation, particularly with indoor allergens. Furthermore, nasal allergen provocation can induce bronchial inflammation and vice versa, suggesting close interrelations between upper and lower airways. In summary, the recent observations on the relationships between atopy, rhinitis and asthma support the hypothesis of a unique systemic condition with variable manifestations, which may develop following an imbalance between T helper cell types 1 and 2 lymphocyte populations. The latter may be influenced by environmental exposure in early life. Upper- and lower-airway inflammatory events influence each other, supporting the concept of 'united airways'. Further studies should look at the relationships between these conditions to identify

  1. Intake and digestion of wethers fed with dwarf elephant grass hay with or without the inclusion of peanut hay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnaider, Maria Alice; Ribeiro-Filho, Henrique Mendonça Nunes; Vilmar Kozloski, Gilberto; Reiter, Tatiana; Dall Orsoletta, Aline Cristina; Dallabrida, Ademar Luiz

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of the inclusion of peanut (Arachis pintoi cv. Amarillo) hay in diets based on dwarf elephant grass (DEG, Pennisetum purpureum Schum cv. Kurumi) hay of different regrowth ages on forage intake and digestibility in wether lambs. The experimental treatments consisted of DEG hay with an interval of regrowth of 30 or 45 days offered as the only feed or in mixture with peanut hay (300 g/kg of total dry matter (DM)), which were tested in eight Texel × Suffolk crossbred wethers in a replicated 4 × 4 Latin square experiment. Both organic matter (OM) and digestible OM intakes were higher (P < 0.05) in animals receiving the legume forage. Total apparent OM digestibility was higher (P < 0.05) at an increased grass regrowth age. Ruminal OM digestibility increased (P < 0.05) with legume inclusion and at a higher grass regrowth age. The nitrogen (N) intake was higher (P < 0.05) in legume treatments and lower (P < 0.05) as the grass regrowth age increased, but retention of N was not affected by treatments. Duodenal flow of both, non-ammonia N and microbial N, were not affected by legume inclusion and were lower (P < 0.05) as grass regrowth age increased. The efficiency of rumen microbial protein synthesis (ERMPS) was negatively affected (P < 0.05) by legume inclusion and was lower (P < 0.05) as the grass regrowth age increased. Supplementation of dwarf elephant grass hay cut at the vegetative stage with peanut legume hay improves nutritional supply to wethers due to an increase in the forage intake.

  2. [Clinical effect of bipolar radiofrequency thermotherapy on allergic rhinitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyake, Daisuke; Ochi, Kentaro; Takatsu, Mitsuharu; Shintani, Toshiharu; Umehara, Tsuyoshi; Koizuka, Izumi

    2004-07-01

    The clinical effect of bipolar radiofrequency thermotherapy on allergic rhinitis was evaluated. A bipolar radiofrequency system (CelonLab ENT) was used to treat 16 patients suffering from allergic rhinitis between February 2003 and August 2003. The thermotherapy was performed under local anesthesia at the otolaryngology outpatient clinic of St. Marianna University Toyoko Hospital. Data were collected by questionnaire and rhinomanometry preoperatively and 2 months postoperatively. The mean visual analogue scale (VAS) score for intraoperative pain was 31 mm (range, 0-100), and nearly all the patients felt no or a subtle pain during the thermotherapy. Postoperative pain was also well tolerated, with nearly all the patients not requiring analgesic drugs. Postoperative bleeding was minor, and none of the patients required additional treatment for bleeding. Nearly all the patients reported an improvement in their nasal patency, rhinorrhea, headaches, and sleeping. Statistically significant improvements were observed for all the measured VAS scores: nasal patency, rhinorrhea, headache, and olfactory function. Nasal resistance, as measured by anterior rhinomanometry, significantly improved after treatment. The effect of decongestion was also measured using anterior rhinomanometry. The ratio of nasal resistance before and after decongestion was significantly higher after thermotherapy, suggesting that nasal decongestion had a smaller effect on nasal patency after treatment. The current results suggest that the CelonLab ENT device is an effective and safe treatment for allergic rhinitis.

  3. Lithotrites and postoperative fever

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chu, David I; Lipkin, Michael E; Wang, Agnes J

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare the risks of fever from different lithotrites after percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PNL). MATERIALS AND METHODS: The Clinical Research Office of the Endourological Society (CROES) PNL database is a prospective, multi-institutional, international PNL registry. Of 5,803 total...... with fever [Odds Ratio (OR) 1.17, p = 0.413], while diabetes (OR 1.32, p = 0.048), positive urine culture (OR 2.08, p PNL...... fever was not significantly different among the various lithotrites used in the CROES PNL study....

  4. A different voice: Mary Hays's the Memoirs of Emma Courtney.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, A

    2001-01-01

    Mary Hays wrote in the decade of the 1790s, a period of intense creative flowering in England. Writing in a period enshrined to the works of the canonical Wordsworth and Coleridge, Hays explored through her Jacobinical novel, The Memoirs of Emma Courtney, the contentious relationship between self and society. Like other Jacobin women writers - Elizabeth Inchbald, Charlotte Smith and Mary Wollstonecraft - Mary Hays too used her novel to explode the insidious connection between education and gender construction. Emma Courtney is a landmark novel that wrestles with the paradigm of decorum and propriety which disallows women from voicing their aspirations. In the process, Hays merges the plots of the domestic novel of courtship and love with the novel of ideas to create a searing portrait of women's intellectual confinement and psychic dissonance in a society that only projects them in terms of their gender construction. Memoirs of Emma Courtney is a remarkable novel in its depiction of the emotional imbalance created by thwarted desire: intellectual and sexual.

  5. Sample preparation of Medicago sativa L. hay for chemical analysis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The objective of this study was to quantify the effect of the grinding procedure on the moisture and crude protein concentration of a ground Medicago sativa L. hay sample for quality grading. An additional aim was to investigate the accuracy of electronic moisture testers (EMT). Variance of analyses revealed significant ...

  6. Residue studies of Methabenzthiazuron in Soil, Lentils and Hay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Maghrabi, K.I.

    2002-01-01

    Over two years, replicate plots of lentils (Lens culinaris L.) were treated before seeding with methabenzthiazuron at a rate of 0.5 kg a.i. ha-1. In each year representative soil, lentil and hay samples were randomly collected from plots of each treatment. Soil samples were tested for residues 24 hours after treatment and harvest. Lentil and hay samples were tested at harvest. A cleanup step was conducted after extraction. Gas chromatograph equipped with a nitrogen/phosphorus detector was used to detect methabenzthiazuron. Overall average of residue levels in soil decreased significantly from 1.16+-0.15 mg kg, 24 hours after treatment, 0.12 +-0.01 mg kg at harvest. No significant difference in the maximum average residue was found in lentil and hay samples collected from various plots and tested at harvest (0.10+-0.01 and 0.19 +-0.02 mg kg in lentils and hay, respectively). Recovery tests were conducted with each group of samples tested in order to determine the efficiency of analytical procedure. (author)

  7. Uudised : Isaac Hayes loobub koka rollist. Bergeni festival soomestub

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2006-01-01

    Satiirilises animaseriaalis "South Park" mustanahalise koolikoka rollis lugenud soulilauljast Isaak Hayes'ist. 24. maist 6. juunini kestval Bergeni kultuurifestivalil Norras tulevad esitusele Jean Sibeliuse sümfooniad, Magnus Lindbergi heliteosed, koreograaf Tomi Paasoneni teos "Olotila" ja pianist Juho Pohjoneni klverikontsert

  8. Effects of phenolic acid structures on meadow hay digestibility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodrigues, M.A.M.; Guedes, C.M.; Cone, J.W.; Gelder, van A.H.; Ferreira, L.M.M.; Sequeira, C.A.

    2007-01-01

    The objectives were to evaluate effects of phenolic acid content and composition on the digestibility of six meadow hays from Northern Portugal. Digestibility was assessed by gas production, in vitro and in situ degradation methods. Four cows fed diets at energy maintenance were used for in situ

  9. Fulbright-Hays Seminars Abroad Program: Malaysia 1995. Participants' Reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malaysian-American Commission on Educational Exchange, Kuala Lumpur.

    These reports and lesson plans were developed by teachers and coordinators who traveled to Malaysia during the summer of 1995 as part of the U.S. Department of Education's Fulbright-Hays Seminars Abroad Program. Sections of the report include: (1) "Gender and Economics: Malaysia" (Mary C. Furlong); (2) "Malaysia: An Integrated,…

  10. A model for assessing Medicago Sativa L. hay quality | Scholtz ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A study was conducted to identify chemical parameters and/or models for assessing. Medicago sativa L. (L) hay quality, using near infrared reflectance spectroscopy (NIRS) analysis and Cornell Net Carbohydrate and Protein System (CNCPS) milk prediction as a criterion of accuracy. Milk yield (MY) derived from the ...

  11. A broader definition of occupancy: Comment on Hayes and Monfils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quresh S. Latif; Martha M. Ellis; Courtney L. Amundson

    2016-01-01

    Occupancy models are widely used to analyze presence-absence data for a variety of taxa while accounting for observation error (MacKenzie et al. 2002, 2006; Tyre et al. 2003; Royle and Dorazio 2008). Hayes and Monfils (2015) question their use for analyzing avian point count data based on purported violations of model assumptions incurred by avian mobility....

  12. Substitution of lucerne hay by ammoniated wheat straw in growth ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Lucerne hay (LH) was substituted by urea-ammoniated wheat straw (AWS) in four lamb-growth diets, all containing 60% roughage. ... Die ekonomiese voordeel van die verplasing van 'n hoë kwaliteit ruvoer, soos LH, met'n goedkoper bron (AKS), moet opgeweeg word teen die laer DMI en GDT, sowel as die nadelige effek ...

  13. Evaluation of Inferior Turbinate Stroma with Ultrasound Elastography in Allergic Rhinitis Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Göksel Turhal

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Diagnosis of allergic rhinitis is primarily based on history, physical examination and allergy testing. A technique that noninvasively evaluates the soft tissue changes in the nasal mucosa of allergic rhinitis patients has not been defined. Aims: To assess nasal mucosal changes and measure the submucosal fibrosis in allergic rhinitis patients with sonoelastography. Study Design: Case control study. Methods: Eighty-eight turbinates of 44 patients were included in the study. There were 23 prick test positive allergic rhinitis patients. The control group constituted 21 patients. The rhinitis quality of life questionnaire and the visual analogue scale were applied to the allergic rhinitis patients. A higher visual analogue scale score indicated more severe allergic rhinitis symptoms. Sonoelastographic measurements were made from the lateral nasal wall. The propagation speed of sound waves was recorded in m/s. The presence of asthma and the type of allergic rhinitis (seasonal or perennial was noted. Results: Ten patients had seasonal allergic rhinitis and thirteen patients had perennial allergic rhinitis. Six patients (26.1% had accompanying asthma along with allergic rhinitis. The median visual analogue scale score was 7 (3-9 in allergic rhinitis patients. The median symptom duration was 7 (1-24 months. The median quality of life questionnaire score was 3.39 (1.68-5.43 points. The median sonoelastography scores of allergic rhinitis patients and healthy subjects were 2.38 m/s (0.9-4.47 and 2.42 m/s (1.62-3.50, respectively. Sonoelastographic measurements of seasonal and perennial allergic rhinitis patients did not differ significantly (p>0.05. The presence of asthma did not have a significant impact on the elastography measurements (p>0.05. However, regression analysis revealed a significant inverse correlation (coefficients: B=0.005, standard error=0.097, beta 0=0.008 between the visual analogue scale and sonoelastography scores (p<0

  14. STUDIES ON TUBERCULIN FEVER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Charles H.; Atkins, Elisha

    1959-01-01

    Evidence has been presented that the fever elicited by intravenous administration of old tuberculin (O.T.) in BCG-infected rabbits is a specific property of this hypersensitivity system and is probably not due to contamination of tuberculin with bacterial endotoxins. Daily injections of O.T. in sensitized animals resulted in a rapid tolerance to its pyrogenic effect. Tuberculin tolerance can be differentiated from that occurring with endotoxins and was invariably associated with the development of a negative skin test. The mechanism of this tolerance would thus appear to be desensitization. A circulating pyrogen found during tuberculin fever was indistinguishable in its biologic effects from endogenous pyrogens obtained in several other types of experimental fever. This material produced fevers in normal recipients and therefore may be clearly differentiated from O.T. itself which was pyrogenic only to sensitized animals. Since the titer of serum pyrogen was directly proportional to the degree of fever induced by injection of O.T. in the donor animals, a causal relation is suggested. On the basis of these findings, it is postulated that tuberculin fever is due to a circulating endogenous pyrogen released by a specific action of O.T. on sensitized cells of the host. PMID:13641561

  15. Síndrome de Hay-Wells: relato de caso Hay-Wells syndrome: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dário Júnior de Freitas Rosa

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available A síndrome de Hay-Wells é uma forma rara de displasia ectodérmica, descrita inicialmente em 1976 por Hay e Wells, de caráter autossômico dominante com expressão variável, composta por anomalias congênitas da pele, cabelos, dentes, unhas e glândulas sudoríparas. Descrevemos o caso de um paciente de 17 anos, filho de pais não consangüíneos, que apresentava anquiloblefaron filiforme adenatum, displasia ectodérmica e fenda palatina ao nascimento, sinais considerados cardinais pela maioria dos autores. Destacamos também a importância do acompanhamento multidiscliplinar dos pacientes.Hay-Wells syndrome is a rare form of ectodermal dysplasia initially described by Hay and Wells in 1976. It is an autosomal dominant disorder with varying forms of expression featuring congenital abnormalities of the skin, hair, teeth, nails and sweat glands. The present report describes the case of a 17-yearold white boy, the son of nonconsanguineous parents, who presented ankyloblepharon filiforme adnatum, ectodermal dysplasia and a cleft palate at birth, which are considered cardinal signs of this syndrome by most authors. We also highlight the importance of implementing multidisciplinary follow-up of these patients.

  16. Yellow Fever Vaccine: What You Need to Know

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... How can I prevent yellow fever? Yellow fever vaccine Yellow fever vaccine can prevent yellow fever. Yellow fever vaccine ... such as those containing DEET. 3 Yellow fever vaccine Yellow fever vaccine is a live, weakened virus. It is ...

  17. ARIA 2016: Care pathways implementing emerging technologies for predictive medicine in rhinitis and asthma across the life cycle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Bousquet (Jean); P.W. Hellings (Peter); I. Agache; A. Bedbrook (A.); C. Bachert (Claus); K.-C. Bergmann (Karl-Christian); Bewick, M.; C. Bindslev-Jensen; Bosnic-Anticevitch, S.; Bucca, C.; Caimmi, D.P.; P. Camargos; G. Canonica (Gwalter); T.B. Casale (Thomas); N.H. Chavannes (Nicolas); A.A. Cruz; De Carlo, G.; R. Dahl; P. Demoly; Devillier, P.; J. Fonseca; W.J. Fokkens (Wytske); Guldemond, N.A.; T. Haahtela (Tari); Illario, M.; P.M. Just; M. Keil (Mark); L. Klimek (Ludger); P. Kuna; D. Larenas-Linnemann (Désirée); M. Morais-Almeida; Mullol, J.; Murray, R.; R. Naclerio; R.E. O'hehir; N. Papadopoulos; R. Pawankar (Ruby); Potter, P.; D. Ryan (Dermot); Samolinski, B.; H.J. Schünemann (Holger); A. Sheikh (Aziz); F.E.R. Simons; Stellato, C.; A. Todo Bom; Tomazic, P.V.; A. Valiulis (Arunas); E. Valovirta (Erkka); Ventura, M.T.; M. Wickman (Magnus); Young, I.; A. Yorgancioglu; T. Zuberbier (Torsten); W. Aberer (W.); C.A. Akdis; C.A. Akdis; I. Annesi-Maesano; Ankri, J.; I.J. Ansotegui (I.); J.M. Antó (Josep M.); Arnavielhe, S.; Asarnoj, A.; Arshad, H.; Avolio, F.; I. Baiardini (Ilaria); Barbara, C.; Barbagallo, M.; E.D. Bateman (Eric); B. Beghe; E.H. Bel; K.S. Bennoor (K.); Benson, M.; Białoszewski, A.Z.; T. Bieber (Thomas); L. Bjermer (Leif); Blain, H.; F. Blasi (Francesco); A.L. Boner; M. Bonini (Matteo); S. Bonini (Sergio); Bosse, I.; J. Bouchard (Jacques); L.P. Boulet; Bourret, R.; J. Bousquet (Jean); F. Braido (Fulvio); A. Briggs (Andrew); C.E. Brightling (C.); J. Brozek; Buhl, R.; Bunu, C.; Burte, E.; A. Bush (Andrew); Caballero-Fonseca, F.; M. Calderon (Moises); Camuzat, T.; D. Cardona (Doris); Carreiro-Martins, P.; Carriazo, A.M.; K.H. Carlsen (Karin); W.W. Carr (Warner); Cepeda Sarabia, A.M.; Cesari, M.; L. Chatzi (Leda); Chiron, R.; Chivato, T.; Chkhartishvili, E.; A.G. Chuchalin; Chung, K.F.; G. Ciprandi (G.); De Sousa, J.C. (J. Correia); L. Cox (Linda); Crooks, G.; A. Custovic; S.E. Dahlen; U. Darsow (U.); Dedeu, T.; D. Deleanu (D.); J. Denburg; De Vries, G.; Didier, A.; Dinh-Xuan, A.T.; D. Dokic (D.); H. Douagui; Dray, G.; R. Dubakiene (R.); S.R. Durham (Stephen); G. Du Toit (George); Dykewicz, M.S.; Eklund, P.; Y. El-Gamal (Y.); Ellers, E.; R. Emuzyte; Farrell, J.; A. Fink-Wagner (A.); A. Fiocchi (Alessandro); M. Fletcher (M.); Forastiere, F.; M. Gaga (Mina); A. Gamkrelidze (Amiran); Gemicioǧlu, B.; J.E. Gereda (J.); Van Wick, R.G. (R. Gerth); S. González Diaz (S.); Grisle, I.; L. Grouse; Gutter, Z.; M.A. Guzmán (M.); B. Hellquist-Dahl (B.); J. Heinrich (Joachim); Horak, F.; J.O.B. Hourihane; Humbert, M.; Hyland, M.; Iaccarino, G.; Jares, E.J.; Jeandel, C.; S.L. Johnston; G.F. Joos (Guy); Jonquet, O.; Jung, K.S.; M. Jutel (M.); Kaidashev, I.; Khaitov, M.; O. Kalayci; A.F. Kalyoncu (A.); Kardas, P.; P.K. Keith; M. Kerkhof (Marjan); H.A.M. Kerstjens (Huib); N. Khaltaev; M. Kogevinas (Manolis); Kolek, V.; G.H. Koppelman (Gerard); M.L. Kowalski; Kuitunen, M.; C.A. Kull (Christian); V. Kvedariene (V.); B.N.M. Lambrecht (Bart); S. Lau (Susanne); Laune, D.; L.T. Le; A.P. Lieberman (Andrew); B. Lipworth; J. Li (J.); K.C. Lødrup Carlsen (K. C.); R. Louis (Renaud); Lupinek, C.; W. MacNee; Magar, Y.; Magnan, A.; B. Mahboub; Maier, D.; Majer, I.; Malva, J.; Manning, P.; De Manuel Keenoy, E.; G.D. Marshall; M.R. Masjedi (M.); Mathieu-Dupas, E.; Maurer, M.; S. Mavale-Manuel; E. Melén (Erik); Melo-Gomes, E.; E.O. Meltzer; Mercier, J.; J. Merk (Jeroen); Miculinic, N.; F. Mihaltan (F.); B. Milenkovic (Branislava); Millot-Keurinck, J.; Y. Mohammad; I. Momas (I.); R. Mösges; Muraro, A.; L. Namazova-Baranova (L.); R. Nadif (Rachel); Neffen, H.; Nekam, K.; A. Nieto (Antonio); B. Niggemann; Nogueira-Silva, L.; Nogues, M.; T.D. Nyembue (T.); K. Ohta; Y. Okamoto; Okubo, K.; Olive-Elias, M.; S. Ouedraogo; P. Paggiaro (Pierluigi); I. Pali-Schöll (I.); S. Palkonen; P. Panzner (P.); Papi, A.; Park, H.S.; G. Passalacqua (Giovanni); S.E. Pedersen (Soren E.); Pereira, A.M.; O. Pfaar (Oliver); Picard, R.; B. Pigearias (B.); I. Pin (Isabelle); Plavec, D.; Pohl, W.; T.A. Popov; Portejoie, F.; D.S. Postma (Dirkje); L.K. Poulsen; D. Price (David); K.F. Rabe (Klaus F.); Raciborski, F.; G. Roberts; Robalo-Cordeiro, C.; Rodenas, F.; L. Rodríguez-Mañas (Leocadio); Rolland, C.; M. Roman Rodriguez (M.); A. Romano; J. Rosado-Pinto; K. Rosario (Karyna); Rottem, M.; M. Sanchez-Borges; Sastre-Dominguez, J.; G.K. Scadding; Scichilone, N.; P. Schmid-Grendelmeier (Peter); Serrano, E.; M.D. Shields; V. Siroux (V.); J.C. Sisul (J.); Skrindo, I.; H.A. Smit (Henriëtte); D. Solé (D.); Sooronbaev, T.; O. Spranger; Stelmach, R.; P.J. Sterk (Peter); Strandberg, T.; J. Sunyer (Jordi); C. Thijs (Carel); M. Triggiani (M.); R. Valenta; A.L. Valero (A.); Van Eerd, M.; Van Ganse, E.; Van Hague, M.; O. Vandenplas (Olivier); Varona, L.L.; Vellas, B.; Vezzani, G.; Vazankari, T.; G. Viegi; Vontetsianos, T.; Wagenmann, M.; Walker, S.; D.Y. Wang (De Yun); U. Wahn (Ulrich); Werfel, T.; Whalley, B.; D. Williams; Williams, S.; Wilson, N.; J. Wright (Juliet); B.P. Yawn (Barbara); P.K. Yiallouros (P.); O.M. Yusuf (Osman); Zaidi, A.; H.J. Zar; M. Zernotti; Zhang, L.; Zhong, N.; M. Zidarn (M.)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractThe Allergic Rhinitis and its Impact on Asthma (ARIA) initiative commenced during a World Health Organization workshop in 1999. The initial goals were (1) to propose a new allergic rhinitis classification, (2) to promote the concept of multi-morbidity in asthma and rhinitis and (3) to

  18. Long-term agricultural management maximizing hay production can significantly reduce belowground C storage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sochorová, L.; Jansa, J.; Verbruggen, E.; Hejcman, M.; Schellberg, J.; Kiers, E.T.

    2016-01-01

    Liming and fertilization of grasslands have been used for centuries to sustain hay production. Besides improving hay yields, these practices induce compositional shifts in plant and soil microbial communities, including symbiotic arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi. However, in spite of increasing

  19. Incidence of rhinitis and asthma related to welding in Northern Europe.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Storaas, T.; Zock, J.P.; Morano, A.E; Holm, M.; Bjornsson, E.; Forsberg, B.; Janson, C.; Norbäck, D.; Omenass, E.; Schlünssen, V.; Torén, K.; Svanes, C.

    2015-01-01

    Welding-related asthma is well recognised but less is known about rhinitis in relation to welding. The aim here, was to study associations between welding, rhinitis and asthma in a general population sample, and factors influencing selection into and out of a welding occupation. Adult-onset asthma

  20. Quality of life is significantly impaired in non-allergic rhinitis patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Segboer, Christine L.; Terreehorst, Ingrid; Gevorgyan, Artur; Hellings, Peter W.; van Drunen, Cornelis M.; Fokkens, Wytske J.

    2017-01-01

    In contrast to the well-known significant impairment of quality of life (QoL) in allergic rhinitis (AR), the degree of impairment in QoL in non-allergic rhinitis (NAR) remained unknown for a long time, due to a lack of a validated questionnaire to assess QoL in the NAR patient group. In this study a

  1. Nonallergic rhinitis and its association with smoking and lower airway disease: A general population study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Håkansson, Kåre; von Buchwald, Christian; Thomsen, Simon F

    2011-01-01

    The cause of nonallergic rhinitis (NAR) and its relation to lower airway disease remains unclear. The purpose of this study was to perform a descriptive analysis of the occurrence of rhinitis in a Danish general population with focus on NAR and its association with smoking and lower airway disease....

  2. Nasal hyper-reactivity is a common feature in both allergic and nonallergic rhinitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Segboer, C. L.; Holland, C. T.; Reinartz, S. M.; Terreehorst, I.; Gevorgyan, A.; Hellings, P. W.; van Drunen, C. M.; Fokkens, W. J.

    2013-01-01

    Nasal hyper-reactivity is an increased sensitivity of the nasal mucosa to various nonspecific stimuli. Both allergic rhinitis (AR) and nonallergic rhinitis (NAR) patients can elicit nasal hyper-reactivity symptoms. Differences in the prevalence or type of nasal hyper-reactivity in AR and NAR

  3. Up-date on neuro-immune mechanisms involved in allergic and non-allergic rhinitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Gerven, L.; Boeckxstaens, G.; Hellings, P.

    2012-01-01

    Non-allergic rhinitis (NAR) is a common disorder, which can be defined as chronic nasal inflammation, independent of systemic IgE-mediated mechanisms. Symptoms of NAR patients mimic those of allergic rhinitis (AR) patients. However, AR patients can easily be diagnosed with skin prick test or

  4. Control of Allergic Rhinitis and Asthma Test (CARAT) : dissemination and applications in primary care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Azevedo, Pedro; Correia-de-Sousa, Jaime; Bousquet, Jean; Bugalho-Almeida, Antonio; Del Giacco, Stefano R.; Demoly, Pascal; Haahtela, Tari; Jacinto, Tiago; Garcia-Larsen, Vanessa; van der Molen, Thys; Morais-Almeida, Mario; Nogueira-Silva, Luis; Pereira, Ana M.; Roman-Rodrigues, Miguel; Silva, Barbara G.; Tsiligianni, Ioanna G.; Yaman, Hakan; Yawn, Barbara; Fonseca, Joao A.

    Asthma frequently occurs in association with allergic rhinitis and a combined management approach has been suggested. The Control of Allergic Rhinitis and Asthma Test (CARAT) is the first questionnaire to assess control of both diseases concurrently. However, to have an impact on healthcare it needs

  5. Google Trends terms reporting rhinitis and related topics differ in European countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bousquet, J.; Agache, I; Anto, J M

    2017-01-01

    Google Trends (GT) searches trends of specific queries in Google and reflects the real-life epidemiology of allergic rhinitis. We compared Google Trends terms related to allergy and rhinitis in all European Union countries, Norway and Switzerland from 1 January 2011 to 20 December 2016. The aim w...

  6. Development and implementation of guidelines in allergic rhinitis – an ARIA-GA2LEN paper

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bousquet, Jean; Schünemann, H. J.; Zuberbier, T.; Bachert, C.; Baena-Cagnani, C. E.; Bousquet, P. J.; Brozek, J.; Canonica, G. W.; Casale, T. B.; Demoly, P.; Gerth van Wijk, R.; Ohta, K.; Bateman, E. D.; Calderon, M.; Cruz, A. A.; Dolen, W. K.; Haughney, J.; Lockey, R. F.; Lötvall, J.; O'Byrne, P.; Spranger, O.; Togias, A.; Bonini, S.; Boulet, L. P.; Camargos, P.; Carlsen, K. H.; Chavannes, N. H.; Delgado, L.; Durham, S. R.; Fokkens, W. J.; Fonseca, J.; Haahtela, T.; Kalayci, O.; Kowalski, M. L.; Larenas-Linnemann, D.; Li, J.; Mohammad, Y.; Mullol, J.; Naclerio, R.; O'Hehir, R. E.; Papadopoulos, N.; Passalacqua, G.; Rabe, K. F.; Pawankar, R.; Ryan, D.; Samolinski, B.; Simons, F. E. R.; Valovirta, E.; Yorgancioglu, A.; Yusuf, O. M.; Agache, I.; Aït-Khaled, N.; Annesi-Maesano, I.; Beghe, B.; Ben Kheder, A.; Blaiss, M. S.; Boakye, D. A.; Bouchard, J.; Burney, P. G.; Busse, W. W.; Chan-Yeung, M.; Chen, Y.; Chuchalin, A. G.; Costa, D. J.; Custovic, A.; Dahl, R.; Denburg, J.; Douagui, H.; Emuzyte, R.; Grouse, L.; Humbert, M.; Jackson, C.; Johnston, S. L.; Kaliner, M. A.; Keith, P. K.; Kim, Y. Y.; Klossek, J. M.; Kuna, P.; Le, L. T.; Lemiere, C.; Lipworth, B.; Mahboub, B.; Malo, J. L.; Marshall, G. D.; Mavale-Manuel, S.; Meltzer, E. O.; Morais-Almeida, M.; Motala, C.; Naspitz, C.; Nekam, K.; Niggemann, B.; Nizankowska-Mogilnicka, E.; Okamoto, Y.; Orru, M. P.; Ouedraogo, S.; Palkonen, S.; Popov, T. A.; Price, D.; Rosado-Pinto, J.; Scadding, G. K.; Sooronbaev, T. M.; Stoloff, S. W.; Toskala, E.; van Cauwenberge, P.; Vandenplas, O.; van Weel, C.; Viegi, G.; Virchow, J. C.; Wang, D. Y.; Wickman, M.; Williams, D.; Yawn, B. P.; Zar, H. J.; Zernotti, M.; Zhong, N.

    2010-01-01

    The links between asthma and rhinitis are well characterized. The Allergic Rhinitis and its Impact on Asthma (ARIA) guidelines stress the importance of these links and provide guidance for their prevention and treatment. Despite effective treatments being available, too few patients receive

  7. The pathogenesis of allergic rhinitis : cellular aspects with special emphasis on Langerhans cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.J. Fokkens (Wytske)

    1991-01-01

    textabstractPresent ideas concerning the pathogenesis of allergic rhinitis are largely deduced from systemic investigations and extrapolated from studies in the skin and the lung. Studies on allergic rhinitis generally comprise clinical aspects and/or biochemical, humoral and cellular features of

  8. Prevalence of rhinitis allergic in populations of several states of Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleazar Mancilla-Hernández

    2015-07-01

    Conclusions: With the use of the questionnaire diagnosis of allergic rhinitis for epidemiological studies in the four cities in four different states, we found a prevalence of allergic rhinitis of 15% in ≥13 yearpopulation and 13% in ≤12 year-old children.

  9. Yellow fever: epidemiology and prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, Elizabeth D

    2007-03-15

    Yellow fever continues to occur in regions of Africa and South America, despite the availability of effective vaccines. Recently, some cases of severe neurologic disease and multiorgan system disease have been described in individuals who received yellow fever vaccine. These events have focused attention on the need to define criteria for judicious use of yellow fever vaccine and to describe the spectrum of adverse events that may be associated with yellow fever vaccine. Describing host factors that would increase risk of these events and identifying potential treatment modalities for yellow fever and yellow fever vaccine-associated adverse events are subjects of intense investigation.

  10. Effect of mid-summer haying on growth and reproduction in prairie forbs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becky Begay; Helen M. Alexander; Erin Questad

    2011-01-01

    Mid-summer haying is a common management practice for prairies; plant species could differ in the effect of haying on subsequent growth and reproduction. We examined the effect of haying on prairie species by performing a clipping experiment. For each of seven species, sixteen plants were chosen and half were randomly assigned to a clipping treatment and half to a...

  11. Recommendations for the pharmacologic management of allergic rhinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyte, Flavia C L; Meltzer, Eli O; Ostrom, Nancy K; Nelson, Harold S; Bensch, Greg W; Spangler, Dennis L; Storms, William W; Weinstein, Steven F; Katial, Rohit K

    2014-01-01

    Allergic rhinitis (AR) affects at least 60 million people in the United States each year, resulting in a major impact on patient quality of life, productivity, and direct and indirect costs. As new therapies, data, and literature emerge in the management of AR, there is a need to communicate and disseminate important information to health care professionals to advance the practice of medicine and lessen the disease burden from AR. Treatment recommendations for AR have not been updated since the 2012 Food and Drug Administration approval of nonaqueous intranasal aerosol agents using hydrofluoroalkane propellants and the first aqueous intranasal combination product. Here, we present an updated algorithm for the pharmacologic treatment of AR that includes these new treatment options. Treatment recommendations are categorized by disease severity (mild versus moderate/severe) and duration of symptoms (episodic versus nonepisodic, with episodic defined as well as alternative options for consideration by clinicians in the context of individual patient needs. This recommendation article also outlines the importance of treatment monitoring, which can be conducted using the recently developed Rhinitis Control Assessment Test. Successful therapeutic outcomes depend on multiple factors, including use of the most effective pharmacologic agents as well as patient adherence to therapy. Therefore, it is imperative that rhinitis patients not only receive the most effective therapeutic options, but that they also understand and are able to adhere to the comprehensive treatment regimen. Successful treatment, with all of these considerations in mind, results in better disease outcomes, improved quality of life for patients, and greater economic productivity in the home and workplace.

  12. Hay se agt Bybelse beginsels vir die ekonomiese lewe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.S. van Zyl

    1996-03-01

    Full Text Available Hay’s eight Biblical principles for economic lifeDonald Hay used the idea of stewardship to derive eight Biblical principles for economic life. The purpose of this article is to contribute commentary on and criticism of Hay's approach. The eight Biblical principles cover three main issues, namely creation and man's dominion, man and his work, and the distribution of goods. While social principles can be in conflict with each other, Biblical principles ought not to be in conflict. The test to determine whether the principles have been correctly derived is to revert back to the original text constantly. Upon further reflection it is possible to arrive at further applications of Biblical principles in relation to the sphere of economic life.

  13. Chevilly Larue, L'Hay les Roses: twin geothermal plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeanson, E.

    1995-01-01

    The Chevilly Larue/L'Hay les Roses (Paris region, France) low energy geothermal plants are interconnected and thus represent the greatest geothermal heat network in Europe. The two plants are 2.5 km apart and supply 13000 collective lodgings in energy using a 60 km network with a 75 MW power. Gas or fuel auxiliary heating systems are used in winter to increase water temperature up to 105 C, but the part of energy released by geothermics remains of about 70 to 80%. The network will be extended in the next years to Fresnes and Villejuif neighbouring towns. In 1996, the SEMHACH company, which manage the two plants, will put into service a mixed electricity and heat production plant in L'Hay les Roses. (J.S.). 2 photos

  14. Homeopathy for allergic rhinitis: protocol for a systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Allergic rhinitis is a global health problem that is often treated with homeopathy. The objective of this review will be to evaluate the effectiveness of homeopathic treatment of allergic rhinitis. Methods/Design The authors will conduct a systematic review. We will search Medline, CENTRAL, CINAHL, EMBASE, AMED, CAM-Quest, Google Scholar and reference lists of identified studies up to December 2013. The review will include randomized controlled trials that evaluate homeopathic treatment of allergic rhinitis. Studies with participants of all ages, with acute or chronic comorbidities will be included. Patients with immunodeficiency will not be included. The diagnosis will be based on the published guidelines of diagnosis and classification. Studies of all homeopathy modalities (clinical, complex and classical homeopathy, and isopathy) will be included. We will include trials with both active controls (conventional therapy, standard care) and placebo controls. The primary outcomes are: an improvement of global symptoms recorded in validated daily or weekly diaries and any scores from validated visual analogue scales; the total Quality of Life Score (such as the Juniper RQLQ);individual symptoms scores which include any appropriate measures of nasal obstruction, runny nose, sneezing, itching, and eye symptoms; and number of days requiring medication. Secondary outcomes selected will include serum immunoglobin E (IgE) levels, individual ocular symptoms, adverse events, and the use of rescue medication. Treatment effects will be measured by calculating the mean difference and the standardized mean difference with 95% confidence interval (CI) for continuous data. Risk ratio or, if feasible, odds ratio will be calculated with 95% CI for dichotomous data. After assessing clinical and statistical heterogeneity, meta-analysis will be performed, if appropriate. The individual participant will be the unit of analysis. Descriptive information on missing data will be

  15. Travelers' Health: Typhoid and Paratyphoid Fever

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... days should raise suspicion of typhoid or paratyphoid fever. Typhoid fever is a nationally notifiable disease. TREATMENT Specific ... typhoid-fever Table 3-21. Vaccines to prevent typhoid fever VACCINA- TION AGE (y) DOSE, MODE OF ADMINISTRA- ...

  16. Familial Mediterranean Fever

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adem Kucuk

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Familial Mediterranean Fever is an autosomal recessive inherited disease with a course of autoinflammation, which is characterized by the episodes of fever and serositis. It affects the populations from Mediterranean basin. Genetic mutation of the disease is on MEFV gene located on short arm of Chromosome 16. The disease is diagnosed based on clinical evaluation. Amyloidosis is the most important complication. The only agent that decreases the development of amyloidosis and the frequency and severity of the episodes is colchicine, which has been used for about 40 years. In this review, we aimed to discuss especially the most recent advances about Familial Mediterranean Fever which is commonly seen in our population.

  17. Rift Valley Fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, Amy

    2017-06-01

    Rift Valley fever (RVF) is a severe veterinary disease of livestock that also causes moderate to severe illness in people. The life cycle of RVF is complex and involves mosquitoes, livestock, people, and the environment. RVF virus is transmitted from either mosquitoes or farm animals to humans, but is generally not transmitted from person to person. People can develop different diseases after infection, including febrile illness, ocular disease, hemorrhagic fever, or encephalitis. There is a significant risk for emergence of RVF into new locations, which would affect human health and livestock industries. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Effects of corticosteroids on hyposmia in persistent allergic rhinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catana, Iuliu V; Chirila, Magdalena; Negoias, Simona; Bologa, Ramona; Cosgarea, Marcel

    2013-01-01

    To asses the effects of two topical nasal corticosteroids sprays on hyposmia in patients with persistent allergic rhinitis. The study was a prospective clinical trial and it included twenty four patients with persistent allergic rhinitis (PER) and hyposmia (H). The patients were divided into two groups depending on the type of corticosteroid topical nasal spray treatment: group A, 200 micrograms dose of mometasone furoate (MF) and group B, 110 micrograms dose of fluticasone furoate (FF) both administered in the morning for 4 weeks. The olfactory function of the patients was evaluated with the extended Test battery "Sniffin' Sticks". The visual analogue scale (VAS) was used for the assessment of hyposmia, nasal discharge. The level of the nasal obstruction, before and after the treatment, was evaluated through the anterior rhinomanometry. The comparisons between the two types of topical corticosteroids showed a significant improvement separately between scores of the odor threshold (OT), odor discrimination (OD) and odor identification (OI) and also on the final olfactory score (SDI) before and after 4 weeks of the treatment. The comparisons of the VAS scores pre and post treatment showed a significant improvement in hyposmia and nasal obstruction. The nasal airflow and the nasal discharge scores were improved, but the differences were not statistically significant between the groups. The final statistical analysis found no significant differences between the two patients groups. The study concludes that fluticasone furoate and mometasone furoate have quite the same effects on hyposmia and on the classical symptoms from PER.

  19. Healthcare professional versus patient goal setting in intermittent allergic rhinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, J; Seeto, C; Saini, B; Bosnic-Anticevich, S; Krass, I; Armour, C; Smith, L

    2008-01-01

    To examine the impact of healthcare professional versus patient goal setting for the self-management of intermittent allergic rhinitis (AR) on symptom severity and quality of life. This was a 6 week, parallel group study. Group A participants, with pharmacist facilitation, nominated personally relevant goals and strategies relating to their AR. Group B participants had their goals and strategies set by the pharmacist. The main outcome measures used included perceived symptom severity and quality of life. In addition, goals and strategies data from participants of both groups were collected and analysed. Both groups demonstrated significant improvements in symptom severity and quality of life scores however Group B symptom severity scores improved more. Group B set a greater number of goals and strategies which were better structured and more task specific. This is the first study to investigate the impact of goal setting on patient behaviour in a chronic yet episodic illness. Our results suggest that self-management goals set by the healthcare professional which are clinically indicated but tailored to the patient's nominated symptoms yields better outcomes than goals nominated by the patient. A brief, structured intervention, tailored to patient symptoms, can enhance self-management of intermittent allergic rhinitis.

  20. Work-related rhinitis – Is it always an occupational disease?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Witold Salski

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Rhinitis is a chronic inflammatory disease of the upper respiratory tract, characterized by a high prevalence and a complex pathogenesis. Work-related rhinitis (WRR can be divided into occupational rhinitis (OR and work-exacerbated rhinitis (WER. It is not only considered as a disease entity but also in the context of medical certification as the allergic disease associated with occupational exposure. Epidemiology of work-related rhinitis has been found to vary depending on the occupation and specific exposure, on the other hand the prevalence data may be underestimated due to the lack of uniform diagnostic criteria. This paper reviews the issues comprising the pathogenesis, epidemiology, diagnosis and treatment of patients with work-related rhinitis. It also discusses the significance of the disease in occupational medicine, particularly in terms of preventive worker care, general principles of good practice in primary and secondary WRR prevention and the necessary directions of changes in medical certification in the cases of occupational rhinitis. Med Pr 2016;67(6:801–815

  1. [Prevalence of rhinitis allergic in populations of several states of Mexico].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancilla-Hernández, Eleazar; Medina-Ávalos, Miguel Alejandro; Barnica-Alvarado, Raúl Humberto; Soto-Candia, Diego; Guerrero-Venegas, Rosario; Zecua-Nájera, Yahvéh

    2015-01-01

    Allergic rhinitis is an inflammatory disorder of the nasal mucosa, characterized by symptoms of itching, rhinorrhea, nasal congestion and sneezing induced by an IgE-mediated response. In Mexico we have reports of prevalence, with fluctuations of 5.5% to 47.7% with the question of rhinitis symptoms the past 12 months. To determine the prevalence of allergic rhinitis in schoolchildren from various states of Mexico. A descriptive study of prevalence in which a questionnaire was applied to preschool, elementary-, middle- and high-school population. It was performed in four cities in four states of Mexico: Puebla, Puebla, Tulancingo, Hidalgo, Tlaxcala, Tlaxcala and Cancun, Quintana Roo. Parents answered questionnaires of preschool and elementary school and middle- and high-school students answered their questionnaires. The study was conducted from June 2014 to January 2015. The instrument used was: questionnaire diagnosis of allergic rhinitis for epidemiological studies. Of the surveys, 8,159 completed questionnaires were obtained, in the city of Puebla: 2,267, Tulancingo, Hidalgo: 2,478, Tlaxcala, Tlaxcala: 2,574, Cancun, Quintana Roo: 840; total male: 4,190 (51%). The overall average rate of prevalence of allergic rhinitis among four states including all respondents ages was 15%. With the use of the questionnaire diagnosis of allergic rhinitis for epidemiological studies in the four cities in four different states, we found a prevalence of allergic rhinitis of 15% in ≥13 yearpopulation and 13% in ≤12 year-old children.

  2. Cough reflex sensitivity is increased in the guinea pig model of allergic rhinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brozmanova, M; Plevkova, J; Tatar, M; Kollarik, M

    2008-12-01

    Increased cough reflex sensitivity is found in patients with allergic rhinitis and may contribute to cough caused by rhinitis. We have reported that cough to citric acid is enhanced in the guinea pig model of allergic rhinitis. Here we address the hypothesis that the cough reflex sensitivity is increased in this model. The data from our previous studies were analyzed for the cough reflex sensitivity. The allergic inflammation in the nose was induced by repeated intranasal instillations of ovalbumin in the ovalbumin-sensitized guinea pigs. Cough was induced by inhalation of doubling concentrations of citric acid (0.05-1.6 M). Cough threshold was defined as the lowest concentration of citric acid causing two coughs (C2, expressed as geometric mean [95% confidence interval]). We found that the cough threshold was reduced in animals with allergic rhinitis. C2 was 0.5 M [0.36-0.71 M] and 0.15 M [0.1-0.23 M] prior and after repeated intranasal instillations of ovalbumin, respectively, Preflex sensitivity. C2 was reduced in animals with allergic rhinitis treated orally with vehicle (0.57 M [0.28-1.1] vs. 0.09 M [0.04-0.2 M], Preflex sensitivity is increased in the guinea pig model of allergic rhinitis. Our results suggest that guinea pig is a suitable model for mechanistic studies of increased cough reflex sensitivity in rhinitis.

  3. Hereditary periodic fever syndromes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McDermott, MF; Frenkel, J

    Hereditary periodic fever syndromes are defined by recurrent attacks of generalised inflammation for which no infectious or auto-immune cause can be identified. For most of these disorders, the molecular basis has recently been elucidated. This has opened the prospect of novel therapeutic

  4. Breathing Valley Fever

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2014-02-04

    Dr. Duc Vugia, chief of the Infectious Diseases Branch in the California Department of Public Health, discusses Valley Fever.  Created: 2/4/2014 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 2/5/2014.

  5. [Frequency of rhinitis and orofacial disorders in patients with dental malocclusion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imbaud, Tamara Christine de Souza; Mallozi, Márcia Carvalho; Domingos, Vanda Beatriz Teixeira Coelho; Solé, Dirceu

    2016-06-01

    To describe the frequency and etiology of rhinitis, oral breathing, types of malocclusion and orofacial disorders in patients treated for dental malocclusion. Patients with poor dental occlusion (n=89, 8-15 years) undergoing orthodontic treatment at the Postgraduate Orthodontics Center (Sao Paulo, Brazil) participated in the study. Rhinitis and oral breathing were diagnosed by anamnesis, clinical assessment and allergic etiology of rhinitis through immediate hypersensitivity skin prick test (SPT) with airborne allergens. The association between types of breathing (oral or nasal), rhinitis and types of dental malocclusion, bruxism and cephalometric alterations (increased Y axis of facial growth) compared to standard cephalometric tracing (Escola de Odontologia da Universidade de São Paulo) were assessed. The frequency of rhinitis in patients with dental malocclusion was 76.4% (68), and, of these, 81.7% were allergic (49/60 positive skin prick test), whereas the frequency of oral breathing was 62.9%. There was a significant association between an increased Y axis of facial growth and oral breathing (p<0.001), as well as between oral breathing and rhinitis (p=0.009). There was no association between rhinitis and bruxism. The frequency of rhinitis in children with dental malocclusion is higher than that in the general population, which is approximately 30%. Patients with oral breathing have a tendency to a dolichofacial growth pattern (increased Y axis of facial growth). In patients with rhinitis, regardless of the presence of oral breathing, the dolichofacial growth tendency was not observed. Copyright © 2015 Sociedade de Pediatria de São Paulo. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  6. Frequency of rhinitis and orofacial disorders in patients with dental malocclusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamara Christine de Souza Imbaud

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: To describe the frequency and etiology of rhinitis, oral breathing, types of malocclusion and orofacial disorders in patients treated for dental malocclusion. Methods: Patients with poor dental occlusion (n=89, 8-15 years undergoing orthodontic treatment at the Postgraduate Orthodontics Center (São Paulo, Brazil participated in the study. Rhinitis and oral breathing were diagnosed by anamnesis, clinical assessment and allergic etiology of rhinitis through immediate hypersensitivity skin prick test with airborne allergens. The association between types of breathing (oral or nasal, rhinitis and types of dental malocclusion, bruxism and cephalometric alterations (increased Y axis of facial growth compared to standard cephalometric tracing (Escola de Odontologia da Universidade de São Paulo were assessed. Results: The frequency of rhinitis in patients with dental malocclusion was 76.4% (68, and, of these, 81.7% were allergic (49/60 positive skin prick test, whereas the frequency of oral breathing was 62.9%. There was a significant association between an increased Y axis of facial growth and oral breathing (p<0.001, as well as between oral breathing and rhinitis (p=0.009. There was no association between rhinitis and bruxism. Conclusions: The frequency of rhinitis in children with dental malocclusion is higher than that in the general population, which is approximately 30%. Patients with oral breathing have a tendency to a dolichofacial growth pattern (increased Y axis of facial growth. In patients with rhinitis, regardless of the presence of oral breathing, the dolichofacial growth tendency was not observed.

  7. Local Effect of Neurotrophin-3 in Neuronal Inflammation of Allergic Rhinitis: Preliminary Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    İsmi, Onur; Özcan, Cengiz; Karabacak, Tuba; Polat, Gürbüz; Vayisoğlu, Yusuf; Güçlütürk, Taylan; Görür, Kemal

    2015-10-01

    Allergic rhinitis is a common inflammatory nasal mucosal disease characterized by sneezing, watery nasal discharge, nasal obstruction and itching. Although allergen-specific antibodies play a main role in the allergic airway inflammation, neuronal inflammation may also contribute to the symptoms of allergic rhinitis. Neuronal inflammation is primarily caused by the stimulation of sensory nerve endings with histamine. It has been shown that neurotrophins may also have a role in allergic reactions and neuronal inflammation. Nerve growth factor, neurotrophin 3 (NT-3), neurotrophin 4/5 and brain-derived neurotrophic factor are members of the neurotrophin family. Although nerve growth factor and brain-derived neurotrophic factor are well studied in allergic rhinitis patients, the exact role of Neurotrophin-3 is not known. To investigate the possible roles of neurotrophin-3 in allergic rhinitis patients. Case-control study. Neurotrophin-3 levels were studied in the inferior turbinate and serum samples of 20 allergic rhinitis and 13 control patients. Neurotrophin-3 staining of nasal tissues was evaluated by immunohistochemistry and ELISA was used for the determination of serum Neurotrophin-3 levels. Neurotrophin-3 staining scores were statistically higher in the study group than in the control patients (p=0.001). Regarding serum Neurotrophin-3 levels, no statistically significant difference could be determined between allergic rhinitis and control patients (p=0.156). When comparing the serum NT-3 levels with tissue staining scores, there were no statistically significant differences in the allergic rhinitis and control groups (p=0.254 for allergic rhinitis and p=0.624 for control groups). We suggest that Neurotrophin-3 might affect the nasal mucosa locally without being released into the systemic circulation in allergic rhinitis patients.

  8. Allergic rhinitis is associated with poor asthma control in children with asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Groot, Eric P; Nijkamp, Anke; Duiverman, Eric J; Brand, Paul L P

    2012-07-01

    Asthma and allergic rhinitis are the two most common chronic disorders in childhood and adolescence. To date, no study has examined the impact of comorbid allergic rhinitis on asthma control in children. To examine the prevalence of allergic rhinitis in children with asthma, and the impact of the disease and its treatment on asthma control. A cross-sectional survey in 203 children with asthma (5-18 years) using validated questionnaires on rhinitis symptoms (stuffy or runny nose outside a cold) and its treatment, and the paediatric Asthma Control Questionnaire (ACQ). Fraction of nitric oxide in exhaled air (FeNO) was measured with a Niox Mino analyser; total and specific IgE levels were assessed by the Immunocap system. 157 children (76.2%) had symptoms of allergic rhinitis but only 88 of these (56.1%) had been diagnosed with the condition by a physician. ACQ scores were worse in children with allergic rhinitis than in those without the condition (p=0.012). An ACQ score ≥ 1.0 (incomplete asthma control) was significantly more likely in children with allergic rhinitis than in those without (OR 2.74, 95% CI 1.28 to 5.91, p=0.0081), also after adjustment for FeNO levels and total serum IgE. After adjustment for nasal corticosteroid therapy, allergic rhinitis was no longer associated with incomplete asthma control (OR 0.72, 95% CI 0.47 to 1.12, p=0.150). Allergic rhinitis is common in children with asthma, and has a major impact on asthma control. The authors hypothesise that recognition and treatment of this condition with nasal corticosteroids may improve asthma control in children, but randomised clinical trials are needed to test this hypothesis.

  9. Assessment of sensitization to insect aeroallergens among patients with allergic rhinitis in Yazd City, Iran.

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammad Hassan Bemanian; Narges Alizadeh Korkinejad; Shima Shirkhoda; Mohammad Nabavi; Zahra Pourpak

    2012-01-01

    The  frequency of  allergic diseases such  as allergic rhinitis is considerable in general population. Insect aeroallergens are important allergens which can induce airway inflammation. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of sensitization to insect aeroallergens in allergic rhinitis patients in Yazd as a desert city in Iran.A cross-sectional study was undertaken on 95 allergic rhinitis patients who were referred to allergy clinic of Yazd city. Skin prick tests (SPT) by stand...

  10. Ammoniated babassu palm hay in anglo-nubian goat diets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonia Leidiana Moreira

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Leaves of babassu may be used in diets for goats under maintenance, however, it is a low-quality roughage due to its high fiber content. The chemical treatment by ammonia causes reduction in the proportion of the cell wall, in addition to providing non-protein nitrogen for the microbial protein synthesis in the rumen. Babassu palm hay ammoniated with 4% urea (BHAU4% was evaluated in this study as a substitute for guinea grass hay in the maintenance diets of goats in terms of intake, digestibility in vivo, and the partitioning of energy and nitrogen compounds. Twenty Anglo-Nubian male goats were used in a randomised block design with four treatments (diets containing 0, 33, 66, or 100% BHAU4% and five replicates (animals/block. The chemical compositions of the feeds, leftovers, faeces, nitrogen and crude energy of the urine were evaluated. In addition, the rumen fluid pH, the rumen N-NH3, and the blood serum urea were evaluated. The digestibility of the dry matter (DM, organic matter (OM, crud protein (CP, neutral detergent fiber (NDFap and detergent acid (ADFap, corrected for ash and protein, declined (P<0.05 0.0939, 0.0722, 0.0953, 0.1113, and 0.2666%, respectively, with the 1% inclusion of babassu palm hay in the diet. A negative linear effect (P<0.05 was observed in the ingested nitrogen (N, excretion of N in the urine, retained N, and N balance, with decreases of 0.15711, 0.0225 and 0.1071 g/day and 0.1388%, respectively, per percentage unit of the babassu palm hay included in the diet. The intake and digestibility of the DM and nutrients are reduced with the inclusion of BHAU4% in maintenance diets for goats, with positive nitrogen balance and stability of the ruminal pH and N-NH3 as well as blood urea, which presented values within the normal physiological range for goats.

  11. Game and Digital Culture: A Study on Hay Day Game

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mia Angeline

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Digital games are a commercial product developed and distributed by media companies and often uses characters or scenarios of movies, books, and comics. The digital game play comes from individual media consumption patterns. Playing digital games also offer experience and satisfaction based on interactive communication technologies and immersive gameplay. In this digital age, digital games became more social-based, which means they implement the need to invite friends on social media to come into play and help each other in the game. The problems of this study was to determine what factors make Hay Day popular among the players and to find out how Hay Day changing the social patterns interaction of the players. This study aims to look at the functions of digital games in the context of communication with relations in social media and why certain games can achieve very high popularity, while other games failed miserably. This research focuses on Hay Day. The method used is descriptive qualitative approach with case study method. Data collection is using interviews with players active in the game, as well as observation and literature studies. The results showed that a game may gain popularity if someone has a social media environment prior to play. Interactive concept, simulation, and fantasy game technology are also the reason Hay Day became very popular. The perception that the digital game player who formerly regarded as anti-social experience has shifted in the concept of digital game-based social bookmark. Players who have a lot of friends in games are seen as someone who has a lot of friends and a high social level. This is in line with the functions of a traditional game in Indonesian culture, where the region has a wide variety of games to be played together and motivate positive social interaction. Function of digital games also increased, other than playing the game as entertainment, but also now the game became one of the effective

  12. Feeding behavior of lambs fed with diets containing mulberry hay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luís Gabriel Alves Cirne

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The experiment was conducted to evaluate the feeding behavior of lambs fed with diets containing 0, 12.5 and 25.0% of mulberry hay as a substitute for the concentrate. Twenty four Ile de France lambs, non castrated, with 25 kg of body weight and four months old, confined, in a completely randomized design, were used. The feeding daily time (242.01 minutes, rumination (435.48 minutes and leisure (762.50 minutes, the numbers of cakes ruminated per day (658.36 and the time spent per cake (40.03 sec were not affected (P>0.05 by different levels of hay in mulberry concentrate. The dry matter voluntary intake (1.258 kg/day and neutral detergent fiber intake (0.302 kg/day, as well as the efficiency of dry matter intake and rumination (316.24 and 173.54 g/h, respectively and efficiency of neutral detergent fiber intake and rumination (75.89 and 41.68 g/h, respectively were similar in all treatments. The ruminating chew expressed in hour/day (11.29 and the number of chews expressed per cake (72.65 and per day (47.638.06, as well as the number and the feeding time (22.02 meals and 11.23 min/meal, rumination (25.95 ruminations and 17.29 min/rumination and idle (41.81 idle and 18.30 min/idle time, were also not affected (P>0.05. The inclusion of mulberry hay did not change the rumination expressed in g of DM and NDF/cake (1.91 and 0.46, respectively and min/kg of DM and NDF (361.51 and 1.505.78, respectively, as well as the total chew expressed in min/kg of DM and NDF (563.70 and 2.347.19, respectively. The use of mulberry hay partially replacing the concentrated, does not change the feeding behavior of feedlot lambs.

  13. Dung matters : An experimental study into the effectiveness of using dung from hay-fed livestock to reconstruct local vegetation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schepers, Mans; Van Haaster, Henk

    2015-01-01

    This paper explores the relationship between standing vegetation and dung from hay-fed cattle and sheep. In an experimental study, hay is retrieved from a known hay field, surrounded by a semi-open landscape of hedgerows, forests and heather fields. The hay is fed to cattle and sheep, after which

  14. Preliminary results of a novel hay-hole fall prevention initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batra, Erich K; Gross, Brian W; Jammula, Shreya; Bradburn, Eric H; Baier, Ronald D; Reihart, Michael J; Murphy, Dennis; Moyer, Kay; Hess, Joseph; Lackmann, Susan; Miller, Jo Ann; Rogers, Frederick B

    2018-02-01

    Hay-hole falls are a prevalent source of trauma among Anabaptists-particularly Anabaptist youth. We sought to decrease hay-hole falls in South Central Pennsylvania through the development and distribution of all-weather hay-hole covers to members of the at-risk Anabaptist community. Following the creation of a rural trauma prevention syndicate, hay-hole cover prototypes co-designed and endorsed by the Pennsylvania Amish Safety Committee were developed and distributed throughout South Central Pennsylvania. Preintervention and postintervention surveys were distributed to recipients to gain an understanding of the hay-hole fall problem in this population, to provide insight into the acceptance of the cover within the community, and to determine the efficacy of the cover in preventing falls. A total of 231 hay-hole covers were distributed throughout eight rural trauma-prone counties in Pennsylvania. According to preintervention survey data, 52% of cover recipients reported at least one hay-hole fall on their property, with 46% reporting multiple falls (median fall rate, 1.00 [1.00-2.00] hay-hole falls per respondent). The median self-reported distance from hay-hole to ground floor was 10.0 (8.00-12.0) feet, and the median number of hay-holes present on-property was 3.00 (2.00-4.00) per respondent. Postintervention survey data found 98% compliance with hay-hole cover installation and no subsequent reported hay-hole falls. With the support of the Pennsylvania Amish Safety Committee, we developed a well-received hay-hole cover which could effectively reduce fall trauma across other rural communities in the United States. Epidemiological study, Level III.

  15. Ebola haemorrhagic fever

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldmann, Heinz; Geisbert, Thomas W

    2012-01-01

    Ebola viruses are the causative agents of a severe form of viral haemorrhagic fever in man, designated Ebola haemorrhagic fever, and are endemic in regions of central Africa. The exception is the species Reston Ebola virus, which has not been associated with human disease and is found in the Philippines. Ebola virus constitutes an important local public health threat in Africa, with a worldwide effect through imported infections and through the fear of misuse for biological terrorism. Ebola virus is thought to also have a detrimental effect on the great ape population in Africa. Case-fatality rates of the African species in man are as high as 90%, with no prophylaxis or treatment available. Ebola virus infections are characterised by immune suppression and a systemic inflammatory response that causes impairment of the vascular, coagulation, and immune systems, leading to multiorgan failure and shock, and thus, in some ways, resembling septic shock. PMID:21084112

  16. Does allergic rhinitis affect communication skills in young adults?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cingi, Can Cemal; Sakallıoğlu, Öner; Muluk, Nuray Bayar; Cingi, Cemal

    2016-01-01

    Allergic rhinitis (AR) is a chronic disorder with a high prevalence in the general population. The symptoms of AR can impair the cognitive capabilities of the affected people. The study of communication skills and AR interaction has not been adequately discussed. We aimed to analyze Social Communication Skills of university students with AR. Fifty patients suffering from AR and 50 healthy subjects were studied. All participants completed two questionnaires [Social Communication Skills Rating Scale (SCSRS) and Communication Questionnaire] for the assessment of social communication skills. Total scores of both SCSRS and Communication Questionnaire were higher in participants with AR than controls. When the questions of SCSRS were compared between the groups one by one, significant difference was observed between the groups for questions numbered 1-9 and 11, 12 (p Communication Questionnaire (p communication skills of the patients with AR. More research is however needed to validate this hypothesis.

  17. Guiding principles of subcutaneous immunotherapy for allergic rhinitis in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Yoshitaka; Ohta, Nobuo; Okano, Mitsuhiro; Kamijo, Atsushi; Gotoh, Minoru; Suzuki, Motohiko; Takeno, Sachio; Terada, Tetsuya; Hanazawa, Toyoyuki; Horiguchi, Shigetoshi; Honda, Kohei; Matsune, Shoji; Yamada, Takechiyo; Yuta, Atsushi; Nakayama, Takeo; Fujieda, Shigeharu

    2014-02-01

    In anticipation of the development of guidelines for antigen-specific subcutaneous immunotherapy (SCIT), we present recommendations that can serve as guiding principles based on a review of the scientific literature. Clinical questions (CQs) concerning SCIT were prepared. Literature searches for publications between January 1990 and February 2011 were performed in PubMed, the Cochrane Library, and Japana Centra Revuo Medicina Web version 4. Qualified studies were analyzed and the results were evaluated, consolidated, and codified. We present answers for 13 CQs on the indications, methods, effectiveness and mechanisms of SCIT, with evidence-based recommendations. The guiding principles are intended to be applied to children (≤15 years old) and adults (≥16 years old) with allergic rhinitis (AR). These principles can be used by otorhinolaryngologists for diagnosis of AR, evaluation of severity and rhinoscopic findings, performance of antigen challenge tests, and management of systemic anaphylactic reactions associated with SCIT. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. MACVIA clinical decision algorithm in adolescents and adults with allergic rhinitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bousquet, Jean; Schünemann, Holger J; Hellings, Peter W

    2016-01-01

    The selection of pharmacotherapy for patients with allergic rhinitis (AR) depends on several factors, including age, prominent symptoms, symptom severity, control of AR, patient preferences, and cost. Allergen exposure and the resulting symptoms vary, and treatment adjustment is required. Clinica...

  19. Upper and lower airway pathology in young children with allergic- and non-allergic rhinitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chawes, Bo Lk

    2011-01-01

    Allergic- and non-allergic rhinitis are very common diseases in childhood in industrialized countries. Although these conditions are widely trivialized by both parents and physicians they induce a major impact on quality of life for the affected children and a substantial drainage of health care...... children may contribute to the discovery of new mechanisms involved in pathogenesis and help direct future research to develop correctly timed preventive measures as well as adequate monitoring and treatment of children with rhinitis. Asthma is a common comorbidity in subjects with allergic rhinitis...... understood and there is a paucity of data objectivizing this association in young children. The aim of this thesis was to describe pathology in the upper and lower airways in young children from the COPSAC birth cohort with investigator-diagnosed allergic- and non-allergic rhinitis. Nasal congestion is a key...

  20. Extranasal symptoms of allergic rhinitis are difficult to treat and affect quality of life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veeravich Jaruvongvanich

    2016-04-01

    Conclusions: Extranasal symptom scores correlated well with physical health and mental health in allergic rhinitis patients. Assessment of extranasal symptoms should be included to evaluate disease severity and assess therapeutic outcomes. Clinical trial NCT02000648, http://www.clinicaltrials.gov.

  1. Treatment of dengue fever

    OpenAIRE

    Rajapakse, Senaka; Rodrigo,Chaturaka; Rajapakse,Anoja Chamarie

    2012-01-01

    Senaka Rajapakse,1,2 Chaturaka Rodrigo,1 Anoja Rajapakse31Department of Clinical Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Colombo, Sri Lanka; 2Lincoln County Hospital, United Lincolnshire NHS Trust, Lincoln, UK; 3Kings Mill Hospital, Sherwood Forest NHS Foundation Trust, Mansfield, UKAbstract: The endemic area for dengue fever extends over 60 countries, and approximately 2.5 billion people are at risk of infection. The incidence of dengue has multiplied many times over the last five decad...

  2. Fever and rash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlossberg, D

    1996-03-01

    The combination of fever and rash comprises an extensive differential diagnosis. Many of the causes of this presentation are life-threatening. In this article, rashes are categorized as petechial, maculopapular, vesicular, erythematous, and urticarial. Each type of rash is then divided into infectious etiologies, both treatable and nontreatable, and noninfectious etiologies. It is usually possible to arrive at a workable differential diagnosis when clinical, historical, and epidemiologic factors are considered.

  3. Sporotrichosis outbreak and mouldy 
hay in NSW.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhingra, Deeksha; Durrheim, David; Porigneaux, Philippe

    2015-04-01

    Sporotrichosis is a subacute/chronic fungal infection caused by Sporothrix schenckii. The fungus thrives on organic matter including hay, wood, moss, soil and plants. Zoonotic transmission has also been reported. Lesions present as superficial skin nodules that become purulent and ulcerate. Lymphocutaneous spread is common. Haematogenous spread is uncommon and case fatality is rare. The aim of this article is to describe an outbreak of sporotrichosis in New South Wales. A cluster of six cases was identified in the NSW mid-north coast area in the first half of 2013. Telephone interviews were conducted in an attempt to identify possible exposures. General practitioners were contacted to report on patients with chronic non-healing skin lesions. A batch of mouldy hay supplied by a local farmer was identified as the potential source of exposure. Despite effective treatment with oral antifungals, diagnosis of sporotrichosis is often delayed and prolonged courses of antibiotics are unnecessarily prescribed. Timely detection and management (including referral to a dermatologist or infectious diseases specialist) significantly reduces morbidity. Personal protection is the key to prevention.

  4. Efficacy of montelukast for treating perennial allergic rhinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philip, George; Williams-Herman, Debora; Patel, Piyush; Weinstein, Steven F; Alon, Achilles; Gilles, Leen; Tozzi, Carol A; Dass, S Balachandra; Reiss, Theodore F

    2007-01-01

    Perennial allergic rhinitis (PAR) is a chronic inflammatory nasal condition in individuals exposed year-round to allergens. This was a double-blind study of 15- to 85-year-old patients randomly allocated to montelukast, 10 mg (n=630), placebo (n=613), or the positive control cetirizine, 10 mg (n=122) for 6 weeks. The primary efficacy end point was change from baseline in Daytime Nasal Symptoms Score (DNSS; mean of congestion, rhinorrhea, sneezing, and itching scores, rated daily by patients [scale: 0=none to 3=severe]) averaged during the initial 4 weeks (primary analysis) or entire 6 weeks of treatment. Also assessed were combined post hoc results of primary end point data from this study and another similarly designed study (Patel P, et al. Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study of montelukast for treating perennial allergic rhinitis, Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 95:551, 2005). Over 4 weeks, montelukast showed numerical improvement over placebo in DNSS (least-squares mean difference of -0.04 [95% confidence interval (CI}, -0.09, 0.01]); the difference between cetirizine and placebo was significant: -0.10 (95% CI, -0.19, -0.01). However, when averaged over 6 weeks, neither active treatment was significantly different from placebo. The Rhinoconjunctivitis Quality-of-Life score was significantly improved by montelukast (p < 0.05), but not by cetirizine, during 4 and 6 weeks. The treatment effect of montelukast, but not cetirizine, generally remained consistent through the 6 weeks of treatment. In pooled data, montelukast consistently improved DNSS versus placebo during all 6 weeks of treatment (-0.07 [95% CI, -0.10, -0.041). In conclusion, montelukast produced numerical improvement in daytime nasal symptoms and significant improvement in quality of life. In a pooled post hoc analysis, montelukast provided consistent improvement in daytime nasal symptoms over 6 weeks, supportive of an overall benefit in PAR.

  5. Fever of unknown origin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Misaki, Takashi; Matsui, Akira; Tanaka, Fumiko; Okuno, Yoshishige; Mitsumori, Michihide; Torizuka, Tatsurou; Dokoh, Shigeharu; Hayakawa, Katsumi; Shimbo, Shin-ichirou

    1990-01-01

    Gallium-67 scintigraphy is a commonly performed imaging modality in deteting pyrogenic lesions in cases of long-standing inexplainable fever. To re-evaluate the significance of gallium imaging in such cases, a retrospective review was made of 56 scans performed in febrile patients in whom sufficient clinical and laboratory findings were obtained. Gallium scans were true positive in 30 patients, false positive in 3, true negative in 19, and false negative in 4. In the group of true positive, local inflammatory lesions were detected in 23 patients with a final diagnosis of lung tuberculosis, urinary tract infection, and inflammatory joint disease. Abnormal gallium accumulation, as shown in the other 7 patients, provided clues to the diagnosis of generalized disorders, such as hematological malignancies (n=3), systemic autoimmune diseases (n=3), and severe infectious mononucleosis (n=one). In the group of false positive, gallium imaging revealed intestinal excretion of gallium in 2 patients and physiological pulmonary hilar accumulation in one. In the true negative group of 19 patients, fever of unknown origin was resolved spontaneously in 12 patients, and with antibiotics and corticosteroids in 2 and 5 patients, respectively. Four patients having false negative scans were finally diagnosed as having urinary tract infection (n=2), bacterial meningitis (n=one), and polyarteritis (n=one). Gallium imaging would remain the technique of choice in searching for origin of unknown fever. It may also be useful for early diagnosis of systemic disease, as well as focal inflammation. (N.K.)

  6. A Q fever case mimicking crimean-congo haemorrhagic fever

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O Karabay

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Coxiella burnetii is the bacterium that causes Q fever. Human infection is mainly transmitted from cattle, goats and sheep. The disease is usually self-limited. Pneumonia and hepatitis are the most common clinical manifestations. In this study, we present a case of Q fever from the western part of Turkey mimicking Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever (CCHF in terms of clinical and laboratory findings.

  7. Does treatment of gastro-esophageal reflux disease with omeprazole decrease allergic rhinitis symptoms?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afshin Shirkani

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Allergic rhinitis is the most common type of allergic disease among population. Its accurate treatment is very important for cutting of allergic march. On the other hand, gasteroesophageal reflux disease (GERD is one of the most common gastrointestinal problems among allergic patients mainly asthmatic cases. It might conflict treatment. Despite of asthma, a few studies have been conducted on the impact of GERD treatment on allergic rhinitis symptoms. In this study, we assessed GERD treatment and its effects on improving of allergic rhinitis patients with GERD. Materials and Methods: In a prospective cross-sectional study, March - September 2012, 103 consecutive patients with persistent moderate to severe seasonal allergic rhinitis enrolled. For allergic rhinitis patients with GERD 20 mg omeperazole once daily for 6 weeks prescribed, empirically. Conventional allergy treatment continued and finally the allergic rhinitis symptoms were assessed clinically and recorded before, 5th, 10th and 30th days of omeprazole treatment period. Results: Our study included 103 patients with seasonal allergic rhinitis who were divided into GERD (n=33, 38% and non-GERD (n=70, 68% groups with the mean age 28 and 25.7 years, respectively. The first group developed significant improvement for GERD symptoms on days 5, 10 and 30 after beginning of therapy (P=0.03. No association was found between GERD treatment and relief of allergic symptoms or TNSS improvement (P>0.05. Data analyzed by Epi info (ver 7 and SPSS software (ver 11.5, and by Chi squeare test and paired T test. P lower than 0.05 was considered as significant. Conclusion: This study showed no significant association between empirical treatment of GERD and improvement of allergic symptoms in patients with allergic rhinitis. However, further studies with a larger sample size might be needed.

  8. Asthma and Allergic Rhinitis Correlation in Palm Tree Workers of Jahrom City in 2016

    OpenAIRE

    Farahmand Fard, Mohammad Amin; Khanjani, Narges; Arabi Mianroodi, Aliasghar; Ashrafi Asgarabad, Ahad

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Allergic rhinitis and asthma can be related to occupation. The present study aimed to investigate the correlation between asthma or allergic rhinitis and employment in the palm tree gardens of Jahrom, Iran.   Materials and Methods: This was a cross-sectional study including 50 palm tree garden workers and a control group of 50 office employees. Data collection included demographics, as well as standard International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood (ISAAC) and A New Sy...

  9. Hormonal factors and incident asthma and allergic rhinitis during puberty in girls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Junxiang; Gerlich, Jessica; Genuneit, Jon; Nowak, Dennis; Vogelberg, Christian; von Mutius, Erika; Radon, Katja

    2015-07-01

    Accumulating evidence is indicating that hormonal factors play a role in new-onset allergic rhinitis and asthma after puberty. To determine whether age at menarche and use of hormonal contraceptives predict new-onset allergic rhinitis and asthma after puberty in young German women. A prospective community-based cohort study followed 1,191 girls 9 to 11 years old to early adulthood (19-24 years old). Self-administrated questionnaires concerning age at menarche, use of hormonal contraceptives, and status and age at onset of physician-diagnosed allergic rhinitis and asthma were collected at 16 to 18 and 19 to 24 years of age. Logistic regression models were used to analyze the incidence of asthma and allergic rhinitis after puberty and pooled estimates were obtained from the final model. Eleven percent of girls developed allergic rhinitis after menarche and 3% reported new-onset asthma. Late menarche (>13 years of age) was statistically significantly inversely related to allergic rhinitis (adjusted odds ratio [OR] 0.32, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.14-0.74) but did not reach the level of statistical significance for asthma (OR 0.32, 95% CI 0.07-1.42). Use of hormonal contraceptives was inversely associated with new-onset allergic rhinitis (OR 0.14, 95% CI 0.08-0.23) and asthma (OR 0.27, 95% CI 0.12-0.58) after puberty. This study shows that girls with late onset of menarche are less likely to develop allergic rhinitis after puberty compared with those who have menarche at an average age. These findings also suggest that, in addition to endogenous hormones, hormonal contraceptives play a role and might protect young women from allergies and asthma. Copyright © 2015 American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Factors associated with allergen sensitizations in patients with asthma and/or rhinitis in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing; Huang, Ying; Lin, Xiaoping; Zhao, Deyu; Tan, Guolin; Wu, Jinzhun; Zhao, Changqing; Zhao, Jing; Spangfort, Michael D; Lai, Xuxin; Zhong, Nanshan

    2012-01-01

    Allergen sensitization is influenced by genetic and environmental factors; however, the factors related to sensitizations in patients with rhinitis and asthma in China are largely unknown. This study investigated the factors associated with allergen sensitizations in patients with asthma and rhinitis in China. A cross-sectional survey was performed in 6304 patients with asthma and/or rhinitis from four regions of China. Patients completed a standardized questionnaire related to respiratory and allergic symptoms, family history of allergic diseases, smoking history, environmental exposure, and eating behaviors. They underwent skin-prick tests (SPTs) with 13 common aeroallergens. Blood samples were collected from 2268 of patients for specific IgE (sIgE) measurements against 16 common aeroallergens. Patients with both asthma and rhinitis had higher prevalence of SPT and sIgE positivity to most allergens than those with asthma or rhinitis alone (p history of allergic rhinitis, air-conditioner usage, sleeping on a mattress, and frequently eating meat were associated with increased risk of SPT and sIgE positivity. Using air-conditioner and sleeping on a mattress were further found to be associated with sIgE positivity to mites and molds. However, increased age and fish, fruit, and raw vegetable intake decreased the risk of SPT and sIgE positivity. Family history of allergic rhinitis, male gender, using an air conditioner, sleeping on a mattress, and frequent meat consumption are risk factors for allergen sensitizations, whereas increased age and frequent fish, fruit, and raw vegetable consumption may protect patients with asthma and/or rhinitis from developing sensitizations in China.

  11. The efficacy of Otirin Nasal Spray® in the treatment of allergic rhinitis

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    M.Tech. (Homoeopathy) Allergic Rhinitis (AR) is the inflammation of the nasal and often conjunctival mucous membrane. It manifests due to the exposure of inhaled allergic agents and results in an immunoglobulin E (lgE) mediated reaction (DiPiro et al., 2002; Shargel et al., 2001). Allergic rhinitis is characterised by four principle symptoms, watery rhinorrhoea, nasal obstruction, nasal itching and sneezing (Min, 2010). In addition to the cardinal symptoms experienced during AR other commo...

  12. [Allergic Rhinitis and its Impact on Asthma (ARIA) in Latin America].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baena-Cagnani, Carlos E

    2002-01-01

    Allergic rhinitis is the commonest chronic respiratory disorder in children and young adults having an important impact for those suffering this condition, as well as for the public health. Allergic rhinitis is frequently associated to other co-morbidities, particularly asthma and conjunctivitis but, also, sinusitis and otitis media. Most of patients suffering rhinitis are cared by GPs and pediatricians and there are evidences that allergic rhinitis is undertreated, particularly the moderate/severe persistent forms. Clinical guidelines have become an important tool providing recommendations for diagnosis and treatment of different medical conditions. They help the process of decision making for GPs and pediatricians, and many of them, contain an update on basic science and epidemiology. In respiratory medicine, guidelines on asthma and rhinitis are available; however, they do not look at the patients globally and focus the disorder on an organ-specific basis without recommendations on co-morbidities. ARIA, Allergic rhinitis and its impact on asthma, has not been developed only to update specialists in allergy/immunology, otorhinolaryngology and neumology on rhinitis and its comorbidities but, also, to provide recommendations for non-specialists. A new classification and severity of allergic rhinitis is proposed replacing the classic perennial and seasonal forms for persistent and intermittent, mild to moderate/severe. ARIA is an initiative in collaboration with the World Health Organization and the master document has been endorsed by many national and international scientific societies and organizations. ARIA is an evidence-based document also stressing on pediatric aspects and providing recommendations for low-income countries.

  13. Prevalence of rhinitis and associated factors in schoolchildren who live in the Amazon islands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitas, Marly Sarmanho; de Córdoba Lanza, Fernanda; Monteiro, Julius Caesar Soares; Solé, Dirceu

    2016-05-01

    The prevalence of rhinitis has been reported to be higher in urban areas. To determine the prevalence of rhinitis in schoolchildren who lived on two islands in the Brazilian Amazon, including a rural island and an urban island, and to identify the associated risk factors. Four hundred children (200 per island) were evaluated by using the International Study of Asthma and Allergy in Childhood standard written questionnaire (rhinitis module). A convenience sample for both islands was selected based on the age group of the study (5-8 years). The children were assessed for potential risk factors (complementary written questionnaire) identified by logistic regression. The prevalence of active rhinitis was significantly higher in the children who lived on Outeiro Island compared with Combú Island (34.5% versus 18.0%, respectively). The associated risk factors for rhinitis symptoms on Combú Island included parental history of rhinitis (odds ratio [OR] 9.4 [95% confidence interval {CI}, 2.1-41.4]) and delivery by caesarean-section (OR 5.2 [95% CI, 1.2-21.9]), and for Outeiro Island included parental history of rhinitis (OR 4.5 [95% CI, 1.7-11.2]) and of asthma (OR 3.8 [95% CI, 1.5-9.8]), nocturnal cough in the previous year (OR 5.8 [95% CI, 2.1-16.0]), breast-feeding (≥6 months) (OR 9.6 [95% CI, 1.1-82.1]), moisture (OR 2.4 [95% CI, 0.9-6.4]), and consumption of fruit juice more than two times a week (OR 4.3 [95% CI, 1.2-15.0]). The different risk factors identified for rhinitis on each island indicated the role of the urban environment in the development of the disease.

  14. Hemorrhagic Fever with Renal Syndrome (Korean Hemorrhagic Fever).

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-07-23

    fever , chills, nausea, headache and muscle ache in July 1985. One day after admission he developed petechial haemorrhage over his body and limbs and in...ftOA179 565 NENORNAGIC FEVER WI TH RENAL SYNDOMNE (KOREAN HEMORRHAIC FEVER )(U) KOREN UNIV SEOUL COLL OF MEDICINE N N LEE 23 JUL " DAD7-94-G-4616...34,, , " S , S S .S =. 5 5 . S S S * B M Lfl IC) uIeuCc FVM WITH RENAL SYNDR~OME (KOREAN EMORRHAGIC FEVER ) ANNUAL AND FINAL REPORT S HO WANG LIZB N.D. 5

  15. Allergic rhinitis in northern vietnam: increased risk of urban living according to a large population survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lâm Hoàng

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Little is known about prevalence and risk factors of allergic rhinitis and chronic nasal symptoms among adults in Vietnam. We aimed to estimate the prevalence, risk factor patterns and co-morbidities of allergic rhinitis and chronic nasal symptoms in one urban and one rural area in northern Vietnam. Methods A cross-sectional questionnaire survey was conducted from August 2007 to January 2008 in urban Hoankiem and rural Bavi in Hanoi among adults aged 21-70 years. Of 7008 randomly selected subjects, 91.7% participated in Bavi and 70.3% in Hoankiem. Results Allergic rhinitis ever or chronic nasal symptoms were reported by 50.2%. The prevalence of allergic rhinitis ever was considerably higher in Hoankiem compared to Bavi, 29.6% vs 10.0% (p Conclusions Allergic rhinitis ever was considerably more common in the urban area. Nasal blocking and runny nose was each reported by about one third of the studied sample with no major urban-rural difference. Further, exposure to air pollution at work was significantly associated with allergic rhinitis ever, nasal blocking and runny nose.

  16. Assessment of sensitization to insect aeroallergens among patients with allergic rhinitis in Yazd City, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bemanian, Mohammad Hassan; Alizadeh Korkinejad, Narges; Shirkhoda, Shima; Nabavi, Mohammad; Pourpak, Zahra

    2012-09-01

    The frequency of allergic diseases such as allergic rhinitis is considerable in general population. Insect aeroallergens are important allergens which can induce airway inflammation. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of sensitization to insect aeroallergens in allergic rhinitis patients in Yazd as a desert city in Iran.A cross-sectional study was undertaken on 95 allergic rhinitis patients who were referred to allergy clinic of Yazd city. Skin prick tests (SPT) by standard extracts of three insect aeroallergens including Mosquito, Corn moth, Cockroach and two species of mites as common aeroallergens in allergic rhinitis (Dermatophagoid Farina, Dermatophagoid Peteronysinus) were done.SPT results showed that the most common insect aeroallergens were: mosquito (32.6%) followed by corn moth (26.3%) and cockroach (13.7%).The prevalence of SPT positive response to Dermatophagoid Peteronysinus, Dermatophagoid Farina were 8.4% and 7.4%, respectively. These results demonstrated that sensitization to insect aeroallergens was significantly more common compared to mites in patients with allergic rhinitis in Yazd city, a city surrounded by deserts. High prevalence of skin reactivity to mosquito and corn moth as insect aeroallergens in Yazd city with hot and dry climate in contrast to humid regions such as north of Iran, where mites are more frequent, indicates differences in the prevalence of aeroallergen reactivity in various areas with different climates. Our study could highlight the importance of insect aeroallergens for clinicians for better diagnosis and management of patients with allergic rhinitis.

  17. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms of TNFA and IL1 in allergic rhinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasiri, R; Amirzargar, A Akbar; Movahedi, M; Hirbod-Mobarakeh, A; Farhadi, E; Behniafard, N; Tavakkol, M; Ansaripour, B; Moradi, B; Zare, A; Rezaei, N

    2013-01-01

    Allergic rhinitis is a complex polygenic disorder of the upper respiratory tract. Given that proinflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and interleukin (IL) 1 seem to play a role in the development of allergic rhinitis, we evaluated the associations between various single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of the TNF and IL1 genes in a case-control study. The study population comprised 98 patients with allergic rhinitis. Genotyping was performed using polymerase chain reaction with sequence-specific primers for 2 TNFA promoter variants (rs1800629 and rs361525), 1 variant in the promoter region of IL1A (rs1800587), 2 SNPs in the IL1B gene (rs16944 and rs1 143634), 1 variant in the IL1 receptor (rs2234650), and 1 in IL1RA (rs315952). Patients who were homozygous for the T allele of rs16944 in IL1B had an 8.1-fold greater risk of allergic rhinitis than those with the C allele. In TNFA, a significant relationship was also detected between rs1800629 and rs361525 and allergic rhinitis. Except for rs1800587 in IL1A and rs315952 in IL1RA, significant differences were found between the patient and control groups for all other SNPs. We found that allelic variants in the TNFA and IL1 genes were not only associated with the risk of developing allergic rhinitis, but also affected disease course and severity.

  18. The HayWired Earthquake Scenario—Earthquake Hazards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Detweiler, Shane T.; Wein, Anne M.

    2017-04-24

    The HayWired scenario is a hypothetical earthquake sequence that is being used to better understand hazards for the San Francisco Bay region during and after an earthquake of magnitude 7 on the Hayward Fault. The 2014 Working Group on California Earthquake Probabilities calculated that there is a 33-percent likelihood of a large (magnitude 6.7 or greater) earthquake occurring on the Hayward Fault within three decades. A large Hayward Fault earthquake will produce strong ground shaking, permanent displacement of the Earth’s surface, landslides, liquefaction (soils becoming liquid-like during shaking), and subsequent fault slip, known as afterslip, and earthquakes, known as aftershocks. The most recent large earthquake on the Hayward Fault occurred on October 21, 1868, and it ruptured the southern part of the fault. The 1868 magnitude-6.8 earthquake occurred when the San Francisco Bay region had far fewer people, buildings, and infrastructure (roads, communication lines, and utilities) than it does today, yet the strong ground shaking from the earthquake still caused significant building damage and loss of life. The next large Hayward Fault earthquake is anticipated to affect thousands of structures and disrupt the lives of millions of people. Earthquake risk in the San Francisco Bay region has been greatly reduced as a result of previous concerted efforts; for example, tens of billions of dollars of investment in strengthening infrastructure was motivated in large part by the 1989 magnitude 6.9 Loma Prieta earthquake. To build on efforts to reduce earthquake risk in the San Francisco Bay region, the HayWired earthquake scenario comprehensively examines the earthquake hazards to help provide the crucial scientific information that the San Francisco Bay region can use to prepare for the next large earthquake, The HayWired Earthquake Scenario—Earthquake Hazards volume describes the strong ground shaking modeled in the scenario and the hazardous movements of

  19. Th17 immunity in children with allergic asthma and rhinitis: a pharmacological approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giusy Daniela Albano

    Full Text Available Th17 cells and IL-17A play a role in the development and progression of allergic diseases. We analyzed the IL-17A levels in sputum supernatants (Ss, nasal wash (NW and plasma (P from Healthy Controls (HC and children with Asthma/Rhinitis. We tested the expression of IL-17A, RORγ(t and FOXP3 in peripheral blood T-lymphocytes from intermittent and mild-moderate asthma. The effect of Budesonide and Formoterol was tested "in vitro" on IL-17A, RORγ(t and FOXP3 expression in cultured T-lymphocytes from mild-moderate asthma/persistent rhinitis patients, and on nasal and bronchial epithelial cells stimulated with NW and Ss from mild-moderate asthma/persistent rhinitis. Further, the effect of 12 weeks of treatment with Budesonide and Formoterol was tested "in vivo" in T-lymphocytes from mild-moderate asthma/persistent rhinitis patients. IL-17A was increased in Ss, NW and P from children with mild-moderate asthma compared with intermittent and HC. In cultured T-lymphocytes IL-17A and RORγ(t expression were higher in mild-moderate asthma/persistent rhinitis than in mild-moderate asthma/intermittent rhinitis, while FOXP3 was reduced. Budesonide with Formoterol reduced IL-17A and RORγ(t, while increased FOXP3 in cultured T-lymphocytes from mild-moderate asthma/persistent rhinitis, and reduced the IL-8 release mediated by IL-17A present in NW and Ss from mild-moderate asthma/persistent rhinitis in nasal and bronchial epithelial cells. Finally, Budesonide with Formoterol reduced IL-17A levels in P and Ss, CD4(+IL-17A(+T-cells, in naïve children with mild-moderate asthma/persistent rhinitis after 12 weeks of treatment. Th17 mediated immunity may be involved in the airway disease of children with allergic asthma and allergic rhinitis. Budesonide with Formoterol might be a useful tool for its therapeutic control.

  20. The HayWired earthquake scenario—Engineering implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Detweiler, Shane T.; Wein, Anne M.

    2018-04-18

    The HayWired Earthquake Scenario—Engineering Implications is the second volume of U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Scientific Investigations Report 2017–5013, which describes the HayWired scenario, developed by USGS and its partners. The scenario is a hypothetical yet scientifically realistic earthquake sequence that is being used to better understand hazards for the San Francisco Bay region during and after a magnitude-7 earthquake (mainshock) on the Hayward Fault and its aftershocks.Analyses in this volume suggest that (1) 800 deaths and 16,000 nonfatal injuries result from shaking alone, plus property and direct business interruption losses of more than $82 billion from shaking, liquefaction, and landslides; (2) the building code is designed to protect lives, but even if all buildings in the region complied with current building codes, 0.4 percent could collapse, 5 percent could be unsafe to occupy, and 19 percent could have restricted use; (3) people expect, prefer, and would be willing to pay for greater resilience of buildings; (4) more than 22,000 people could require extrication from stalled elevators, and more than 2,400 people could require rescue from collapsed buildings; (5) the average east-bay resident could lose water service for 6 weeks, some for as long as 6 months; (6) older steel-frame high-rise office buildings and new reinforced-concrete residential buildings in downtown San Francisco and Oakland could be unusable for as long as 10 months; (7) about 450 large fires could result in a loss of residential and commercial building floor area equivalent to more than 52,000 single-family homes and cause property (building and content) losses approaching $30 billion; and (8) combining earthquake early warning (ShakeAlert) with “drop, cover, and hold on” actions could prevent as many as 1,500 nonfatal injuries out of 18,000 total estimated nonfatal injuries from shaking and liquefaction hazards.

  1. Ebola hemorrhagic Fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnett, Mark W

    2014-01-01

    Ebola hemorrhagic fever is an often-fatal disease caused by a virus of the Filoviridae family, genus Ebolavirus. Initial signs and symptoms of the disease are nonspecific, often progressing on to a severe hemorrhagic illness. Special Operations Forces Medical Providers should be aware of this disease, which occurs in sporadic outbreaks throughout Africa. Treatment at the present time is mainly supportive. Special care should be taken to prevent contact with bodily fluids of those infected, which can transmit the virus to caregivers. 2014.

  2. Need yellow fever vaccine? Plan ahead

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Submit What's this? Submit Button Past Emails Need yellow fever vaccine? Plan ahead. Language: English (US) Español (Spanish) ... none were from the United States). What is yellow fever? Yellow fever is caused by a virus that ...

  3. Frequent use of household cleaning products is associated with rhinitis in Chinese children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xudong; Lao, Xiang Qian; Wong, Claudie Chiu-Yi; Tan, Lixing; Zhang, Zilong; Wong, Tze Wai; Tse, Lap-Ah; Lau, Arthur P S; Yu, Ignatius T S

    2016-09-01

    Despite the popular use of household cleaning products worldwide, there is no published study investigating the health effects of these products on rhinitis in children. We sought to investigate the household use of cleaning products and rhinitis patterns in Chinese children. A total of 2299 children were recruited from 21 primary schools with wide geographic coverage in Hong Kong. Self-administered questionnaires were completed by parents/guardians to collect detailed information on respiratory symptoms and household use of 14 types of chemical cleaning products, as well as clean water. Students were categorized into 4 mutually exclusive rhinitis patterns (never, occasional, frequent, and persistent). The total chemical burden (TCB) score was used as the exposure indicator by calculating the total time of exposure to the 14 cleaning products. Multinomial logistic regression was used to assess the relationship between rhinitis patterns and the use of household cleaning products. Every 10-unit increment of TCB score was associated with an increase in the odds of occasional (odds ratio [OR], 1.21; 95% CI, 1.05-1.41), frequent (OR, 1.36; 95% CI, 1.13-1.60), and persistent (OR, 1.21; 95% CI, 1.01-1.56) rhinitis after adjustment for a wide range of potential confounders. Compared with the children within the lowest tertile of TCB scores, the adjusted ORs of occasional, frequent, and persistent rhinitis in children within the highest tertile were 1.29 (95% CI, 1.01-1.65), 1.97 (95% CI, 1.40-2.76), and 1.67 (95% CI, 1.10-2.54), respectively. Frequent use of chemical cleaning products at home is associated with an increase in the odds of rhinitis in Chinese primary school children. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Radiographic findings in cats with intranasal neoplasia or chronic rhinitis: 29 cases (1982-1988)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Brien, R.T.; Evans, S.M.; Wortman, J.A.; Hendrick, M.J.

    1996-01-01

    Objective: To compare radiographic findings and determine useful criteria to differentiate between intranasal neoplasia and chronic rhinitis in cats. Design: Retrospective study. Animals: Cats with chronic nasal disease caused by neoplasia (n = 18) or by chronic rhinitis (n = 11). Procedure: Radiographs were reviewed by 3 radiologists, followed by group review. Diagnosis was determined by intranasal biopsy or necropsy, and specimens were reviewed by a pathologist to confirm cause and histologic diagnosis. Results: Lymphosarcoma was the most common (n = 5) of the 6 histopathologic types in the neoplasia group. Cats in the neoplasia and chronic rhinitis groups had a high prevalence of aggressive radiographic lesions. Prevalence of a facial mass in cats with neoplasia (8/18) versus in those with chronic rhinitis (4/11) and of deviation (9/18 vs 6/11, respectively) or lysis (12/18 vs 7/11) of the nasal septum was similar. However, significantly (P = 0.02) more cats with neoplasia than with chronic rhinitis (13/16 vs 3/7, respectively) had unilateral turbinate destruction/lysis. Additionally, unilateral lateral bone erosion and loss of teeth associated with adjacent intranasal disease were more prevalent in cats with neoplasia (7/8 and 5/18, respectively) than in cats with chronic rhinitis (1/3 and 0/11, respectively). Clinical Implications: Features that may assist in radiographic diagnosis of neoplasia include the appearance of unilateral aggressive lesions, such as lysis of lateral bones, nasal turbinate destruction, and loss of teeth. Bilaterally symmetric lesions are more suggestive of chronic rhinitis than of neoplasia

  5. Comparative study of specific IgE for cockroach between asthma and allergic rhinitis patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Yinshi; Xu Yiping; Zhu Lijun; Wang Limin; Cao Lingxian; Yao Suhang

    2005-01-01

    To compare the degrees of allergic reaction and the cross-reactive allergens for three strains of cockroach (Periplanceta fuliginosa , Periplaneta americana and Blattella germanica) between patients with asthma and allergic rhinitis, the specific IgE(sIgE) in asthma and allergic rhinitis for these three strains of cockroach were determined with ELISA. The results showed that the sIgE positive rates for Periplaneta americana, Periplaneta fuliginosa and Blattella germanica in patients with asthma were 23.5%, 16.0% and 14.8%, respectively. The reactive coincidence rate between Periplaneta americana and Periplaneta fuliginoas was 74.0%, between Periplaneta americana and Blattella germanica was 73.5%, and between Periplaneta fuliginosa and Blattella germanica was 85.0% in asthma patients. The IgE positive rates for Periplaneta americana, Periplaneta fuliginosa and Blattella gerraanica in allergic rhinitis patients were 24.8%, 17.6% and 15.8%, respectively. The reactive coincidence rate between Periplaneta americana and Periplaneta fuliginosa was 73.9%, between Periplaneta americana and Blattella germanica was 75.2%, and between Periplaneta fuliginosa and Blattella germanica was 86.1% in allergic rhinitis patients. There was no significant difference between asthma and allergic rhinitis patients although the sIgE positive rates of allergic rhinitis patients were higher than those of asthma patients for these three strains of cock- roach. All these results indicated that the degrees of allergic reaction are similar between asthma and allergic rhinitis patients and there are some cross-reactive allergic components among these three strains of cockroach. (authors)

  6. How safe are the biologicals in treating asthma and rhinitis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cox Linda S

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A number of biological agents are available or being investigated for the treatment of asthma and rhinitis. The safety profiles of these biologic agents, which may modify allergic and immunological diseases, are still being elucidated. Subcutaneous allergen immunotherapy, the oldest biologic agent in current use, has the highest of frequency of the most serious and life-threatening reaction, anaphylaxis. It is also one of the only disease modifying interventions for allergic rhinitis and asthma. Efforts to seek safer and more effective allergen immunotherapy treatment have led to investigations of alternate routes of delivery and modified immunotherapy formulations. Sublingual immunotherapy appears to be associated with a lower, but not zero, risk of anaphylaxis. No fatalities have been reported to date with sublingual immunotherapy. Immunotherapy with modified formulations containing Th1 adjuvants, DNA sequences containing a CpG motif (CpG and 3-deacylated monophospholipid A, appears to provide the benefits of subcutaneous immunotherapy with a single course of 4 to 6 preseasonal injections. There were no serious treatment-related adverse events or anaphylaxis in the clinical trials of these two immunotherapy adjuvants. Omalizumab, a monoclonal antibody against IgE, has been associated with a small risk of anaphylaxis, affecting 0.09% to 0.2% of patients. It may also be associated with a higher risk of geohelminth infection in patients at high risk for parasitic infections but it does not appear to affect the response to treatment or severity of the infection. Clinical trials with other biologic agents that have targeted IL-4/IL-13, or IL-5, have not demonstrated any definite serious treatment-related adverse events. However, these clinical trials were generally done in small populations of asthma patients, which may be too small for uncommon side effects to be identified. There is conflicting information about the safety TNF

  7. Rocky Mountain spotted fever, Colombia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidalgo, Marylin; Orejuela, Leonora; Fuya, Patricia; Carrillo, Pilar; Hernandez, Jorge; Parra, Edgar; Keng, Colette; Small, Melissa; Olano, Juan P; Bouyer, Donald; Castaneda, Elizabeth; Walker, David; Valbuena, Gustavo

    2007-07-01

    We investigated 2 fatal cases of Rocky Mountain spotted fever that occurred in 2003 and 2004 near the same locality in Colombia where the disease was first reported in the 1930s. A retrospective serosurvey of febrile patients showed that > 21% of the serum samples had antibodies aaainst spotted fever group rickettsiae.

  8. Q Fever: Statistics and Epidemiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Q Fever in the United States Hospitalization Rates Geography Seasonal trends People at Risk Q fever was first recognized as a human disease in Australia in 1935 and in the United States in the early 1940s. The “Q” stands for “query” and was applied at a time when the cause was unknown. ...

  9. Febre amarela Yellow fever

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Fernando da Costa Vasconcelos

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available A febre amarela é doenca infecciosa não-contagiosa causada por um arbovírus mantido em ciclos silvestres em que macacos atuam como hospedeiros amplificadores e mosquitos dos gêneros Aedes na África, e Haemagogus e Sabethes na América, são os transmissores. Cerca de 90% dos casos da doença apresentam-se com formas clínicas benignas que evoluem para a cura, enquanto 10% desenvolvem quadros dramáticos com mortalidade em torno de 50%. O problema mostra-se mais grave em África onde ainda há casos urbanos. Nas Américas, no período de 1970-2001, descreveram-se 4.543 casos. Os países que mais diagnosticaram a doença foram o Peru (51,5%, a Bolívia (20,1% e o Brasil (18,7%. Os métodos diagnósticos utilizados incluem a sorologia (IgM, isolamento viral, imunohistoquímica e RT-PCR. A zoonose não pode ser erradicada, mas, a doença humana é prevenível mediante a vacinação com a amostra 17D do vírus amarílico. A OMS recomenda nova vacinação a cada 10 anos. Neste artigo são revistos os principais conceitos da doença e os casos de mortes associados à vacina.Yellow fever is an infectious and non-contagious disease caused by an arbovirus, the yellow fever virus. The agent is maintained in jungle cycles among primates as vertebrate hosts and mosquitoes, especially Aedes in Africa, and Haemagogus and Sabethes in America. Approximately 90% of the infections are mild or asymptomatic, while 10% course to a severe clinical picture with 50% case-fatality rate. Yellow fever is largely distributed in Africa where urban epidemics are still reported. In South America, between 1970-2001, 4,543 cases were reported, mostly from Peru (51.5%, Bolivia (20.1% and Brazil (18.7%. The disease is diagnosed by serology (detection of IgM, virus isolation, immunohistochemistry and RT-PCR. Yellow fever is a zoonosis and cannot be eradicated, but it is preventable in man by using the 17D vaccine. A single dose is enough to protect an individual for at least

  10. Similarity, Induction, Naming, and Categorization (SINC): Generalization or Inductive Reasoning? Reply to Heit and Hayes (2005)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sloutsky, Vladimir M.; Fisher, Anna V.

    2006-01-01

    This article is a response to E. Heit and B. K. Hayes's comment on the target article "Induction and Categorization in Young Children: A Similarity-Based Model" (V. M. Sloutsky & A. V. Fisher, 2004a). The response discusses points of agreement and disagreement with Heit and Hayes; phenomena predicted by similarity, induction, naming, and…

  11. The nutritional value of peanut hay (Arachis hypogaea L.) as an alternate forage source for sheep

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khan, M.T.; Khan, N.A.; Bezabih, M.; Qureshi, M.S.; Rahman, A.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the nutritional and feeding value of peanut hay (Arachis hypogaea L.) produced under tropical environment as an alternate forage resource for sheep. Peanut hay was appreciably high in crude protein [CP; 105 g/kg dry matter (DM)] and lower in neutral detergent

  12. Round-bale feeder design affects hay waste and economics during horse feeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinson, K; Wilson, J; Cleary, K; Lazarus, W; Thomas, W; Hathaway, M

    2012-03-01

    Many horse owners find round bales convenient, less labor intensive, and more affordable than other hay types, but report an inability to control horse BW gain and excessive hay waste. The objectives were to compare hay waste, hay intake, and payback of 9 round-bale feeders and a no-feeder control when used during horse feeding. Nine round-bale feeders were tested: Cinch Net, Cone, Covered Cradle, Hayhut, Hay Sleigh, Ring, Tombstone, Tombstone Saver, and Waste Less. Each feeder design was placed on the ground in a dirt paddock. Five groups of 5 horses were fed in rotation for a 4-d period with each feeder. Every fourth day, groups were rotated among paddocks and a new round bale was placed in each feeder. In the 5 paddocks used, 5 feeders were installed for d 1 through 20, and the remaining 4 feeders and no-feeder control were installed for d 21 through 40. Groups of horses were sequentially assigned to feeders using two 5 × 5 Latin squares, the first for d 1 through 20, the second for d 21 through 40. Horse groups of similar age, BW, breed, and sex were formed from 25 Quarter Horse and Thoroughbred geldings and open mares (means: 11 yr; 541 kg of BW). Hay on the ground surrounding the feeder was collected daily, dried, and weighed. The total amount of hay removed around each feeder for a 4-d period was considered waste. Dry matter intake was estimated as the difference between hay disappearance and waste. Number of months for the reduction in waste to repay feeder cost (payback) were calculated using hay valued at $110/t, and improved feeder efficiency over the control. Feeder design did not affect hay intake (P > 0.05); all feeders resulted in an estimated hay intake of 2.0 to 2.4% BW; the no-feeder control resulted in a reduced intake of 1.3% BW (P = 0.001). Mean percentage of hay waste differed among feeders (P feeder control, 57%. Feeder design also affected payback (P feeder design affected hay waste and payback, but not estimated hay intake or BW change

  13. The association between the parenting stress of the mother and the incidence of allergic rhinitis in their children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min Bum; Kim, Jeong Hong; Lee, Keun-Hwa; Hong, Seong-Chul; Lee, Hye-Sook; Kang, Ju Wan

    2017-10-01

    The prevalence of allergic rhinitis and the social burden related to the management of allergic rhinitis have persistently increased. There are many studies investigating the association between the allergic diseases of children and the stress of their parent. However, the relationship between parenting stress and the incidence of allergic rhinitis among children requires further investigation. We aimed to investigate the significance of parenting stress for mothers with children treated for allergic rhinitis. The mothers of 250 children in the second and third grade of elementary school were involved in this study. The Parenting Stress Index-Short Form (PSI-SF) was used to measure parenting stress. Additionally, the monthly household income, treatment history for allergic diseases (atopic dermatitis, asthma, and allergic rhinitis) during the past 12 months, and maternal education status were investigated using the questionnaire. Parenting stress index score was significantly higher among the mothers of children treated for allergic rhinitis (76.41 ± 9.35) compared with the parents of children without treatment history for allergic rhinitis (70.06 ± 13.74). Nonetheless, there were no significant differences between the cases of children with atopic dermatitis and those with asthma. We analyzed the association between allergic rhinitis and parenting stress adjusted for the monthly household income, and maternal education status, and showed that a treatment history of allergic rhinitis was significantly associated with parenting stress (coefficient 7.477, 95% interval 1.703-13.252; p = 0.011). Treatment of the children for allergic rhinitis significantly affects the parenting stress of their mother. We recommend that mothers with children with allergic rhinitis should receive appropriate counseling about parenting stress. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. INTAKE AND APPARENT DIGESTIBILITY OF Andropogon gayanus HAY AT THREE DIFFERENT AGES

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    André Cayô Cavalcanti

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the voluntary intake and apparent digestibility of dry matter, crude protein, fiber fractions, energy, and the nitrogen balance of Andropogon gayanus hay at three different stages (56, 84 and 112 days. The statistical design was completely randomized, with three treatments and six replicates. Dry matter, fiber fractions, and energy apparent digestibility were higher (P<0.05 for hay harvested at 56 and 84 days. Crude protein intake and apparent digestibility of A. gayanus hay harvested at 56 days of growth were greater (P<0.05 than the hay harvested at 84 and 112 days. The A. gayanus hay showed the best voluntary intake and digestibility at 56 and 84 days of age. Keywords: forage; nutritive value; sheep.

  15. Complementary and alternative medicine for allergic rhinitis in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yonekura, Syuji; Okamoto, Yoshitaka; Sakurai, Daiju; Sakurai, Toshioki; Iinuma, Tomohisa; Yamamoto, Heizaburou; Hanazawa, Toyoyuki; Horiguchi, Shigetoshi; Kurono, Yuichi; Honda, Kohei; Majima, Yuichi; Masuyama, Keisuke; Takeda, Noriaki; Fujieda, Shigeharu; Okano, Mitsuhiro; Ogino, Satoshi; Okubo, Kimihiro

    2017-07-01

    Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is extensively used in patients with allergic diseases worldwide. The purpose of this study was to investigate the actual situation of CAM practice in the treatment of allergic rhinitis. We distributed questionnaires to otolaryngologists at 114 facilities in Japan. The subjects who participated in this study included children effective. The main reasons for CAM use were safety, convenience and low price. However, the group who spent more than $1000 on CAM felt more dissatisfaction and anxiety related to treatment at the hospital. The situation of CAM practice was not consistent and was instead influenced by the backgrounds of the subjects. Many patients who receive CAM report feeling that the effects of treatment provided by hospitals are insufficient and have concerns about the side effects of such treatments. Information regarding standard treatments, as described in the guidelines, should become widely known and diffused, and strong communication with patients should be considered. Copyright © 2016 Japanese Society of Allergology. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. The history and progression of treatments for allergic rhinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostrom, Nancy K

    2014-01-01

    This article intends to place new treatments in the context of allergic rhinitis (AR) treatment history. The medical literature was searched for significant advances and changes in AR treatment. Historical data on AR treatment options and management were selected. Reviews of AR management published throughout the 20th century were included to provide context for treatment advances. Modern AR treatment began in the early 20th century with immunotherapy and was soon followed by the emergence of antihistamine therapy in the 1930s. Numerous treatments for AR have been used over the ensuing decades, including decongestants, mast cell stabilizers, and leukotriene receptor antagonists. Topical corticosteroid options were developed the 1950s, and, added to baseline antihistamine therapy, became the foundation of AR treatment. Treatment options were significantly impacted after the 1987 Montreal Protocol, which phased out the use of chlorofluorocarbon propellant aerosols because of environmental concerns. From the mid-1990s until recently, this left only aqueous solution options for intranasal corticosteroids (INSs). The approval of the first hydrofluoroalkane propellant aerosol INSs for AR in 2012 restored a "dry" aerosol treatment option. The first combination intranasal antihistamine/INSs was also approved in 2012, providing a novel treatment option for AR. Treatment of AR has progressed with new therapeutic options now available. This should continue to move forward with agents to alter the allergic mechanism itself and impact the disease burden that has a significant impact on patient outcomes.

  17. Impact of allergic rhinitis in school going children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mir, Elias; Panjabi, Chandramani; Shah, Ashok

    2012-04-01

    Allergic rhinitis (AR) is the most common chronic pediatric disorder. The International Study for Asthma and Allergies in Childhood phase III found that the global average of current rhinoconjunctivitis symptoms in the 13-14 year age-group was 14.6% and the average prevalence of rhinoconjunctivitis symptoms in the 6-7 year age-group was 8.5%. In addition to classical symptoms, AR is associated with a multidimensional impact on the health related quality of life in children. AR affects the quality of sleep in children and frequently leads to day-time fatigue as well as sleepiness. It is also thought to be a risk factor for sleep disordered breathing. AR results in increased school absenteeism and distraction during class hours. These children are often embarrassed in school and have decreased social interaction which significantly hampers the process of learning and school performance. All these aspects upset the family too. Multiple co-morbidities like sinusitis, asthma, conjunctivitis, eczema, eustachian tube dysfunction and otitis media are generally associated with AR. These mostly remain undiagnosed and untreated adding to the morbidity. To compound the problems, medications have bothersome side effects which cause the children to resist therapy. Children customarily do not complain while parents and health care professionals, more often than not, fail to accord the attention that this not so trivial disease deserves. AR, especially in developing countries, continues to remain a neglected disorder.

  18. Analysis of the potentiality haying of native forage species in semiarid region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enoque de Sousa Leão

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate the potential hay production from Spiny Amaranth (Amaranthus spinosus, Hairy Woodrose (Merremia aegyptia, Malva (Sida galheirensis, Mucuna (Mucuna pruriens and Ervanço (Froelichia humboldtiana, native forage species of the semiarid region of Brazil by observing morphological components of the plant, such as the dehydration curve, crude protein loss (CPL curve, chemical composition of plant and hay and hay degradability in situ. There were differences (P < 0.05 among species on leaf, stem and inflorescence quantification with Ervanço, Hairy Woodrose, and Mucuna having a greater number of leaves. There was a linearly increasing response for the dehydration curve of the five forage plants species. Mucuna forage had the greatest hay point at 800 g kg-1 dried matter (DM after 11.8 hours and Woodrose had a lower dehydration efficiency, which required 25 hours of sun exposure. There was no difference in CPL. Mucuna had the lowest crude protein (CP, neutral detergent fiber (NDF and acid detergent fiber (ADF content, 8.4, 67.7 and 73.8 g kg DM-1 in hay in relation to the plant, respectively. Ervanço, Spiny Amaranth, Hairy Woodrose and Malva hay had more of soluble fraction “a” of DM of 31.0, 26.2, 22.1 and 9.7 g kg-1 DM than Mucuna, respectively. Spiny Amaranth and Malva hay had values of 335.4 and 193.2 g kg-1 DM of fraction “b” more than Ervanço hay, respectively. For fraction “a’’ of CP, Spiny Amaranth and Hairy Woodrose hay obtained 312.6 and 227.4 g kg-1 CP more than that observed for Malva, respectively. Mucuna had better hay potential among the forage studied in the semiarid region of Brazil.

  19. Effects of hay management and native species sowing on grassland community structure, biomass, and restoration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Bryan L; Kindscher, Kelly; Houseman, Greg R; Murphy, Cheryl A

    2009-10-01

    Prairie hay meadows are important reservoirs of grassland biodiversity in the tallgrass prairie regions of the central United States and are the object of increasing attention for conservation and restoration. In addition, there is growing interest in the potential use of such low-input, high-diversity (LIHD) native grasslands for biofuel production. The uplands of eastern Kansas, USA, which prior to European settlement were dominated by tallgrass prairie, are currently utilized for intensive agriculture or exist in a state of abandonment from agriculture. The dominant grasslands in the region are currently high-input, low-diversity (HILD) hay fields seeded to introduced C3 hay grasses. We present results from a long-term experiment conducted in a recently abandoned HILD hay field in eastern Kansas to evaluate effects of fertilization, haying, and native species sowing on community dynamics, biomass, and potential for restoration to native LIHD hay meadow. Fertilized plots maintained dominance by introduced grasses, maintained low diversity, and were largely resistant to colonization throughout the study. Non-fertilized plots exhibited rapid successional turnover, increased diversity, and increased abundance of C4 grasses over time. Haying led to modest changes in species composition and lessened the negative impact of fertilization on diversity. In non-fertilized plots, sowing increased representation by native species and increased diversity, successional turnover, and biomass production. Our results support the shifting limitations hypothesis of community organization and highlight the importance of species pools and seed limitations in constraining successional turnover, community structure, and ecosystem productivity under conditions of low fertility. Our findings also indicate that several biological and functional aspects of LIHD hay meadows can be restored from abandoned HILD hay fields by ceasing fertilization and reintroducing native species through

  20. Discovering susceptibility genes for allergic rhinitis and allergy using a genome-wide association study strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jingyun; Zhang, Yuan; Zhang, Luo

    2015-02-01

    Allergic rhinitis and allergy are complex conditions, in which both genetic and environmental factors contribute to the pathogenesis. Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) employing common single-nucleotide polymorphisms have accelerated the search for novel and interesting genes, and also confirmed the role of some previously described genes which may be involved in the cause of allergic rhinitis and allergy. The aim of this review is to provide an overview of the genetic basis of allergic rhinitis and the associated allergic phenotypes, with particular focus on GWASs. The last decade has been marked by the publication of more than 20 GWASs of allergic rhinitis and the associated allergic phenotypes. Allergic diseases and traits have been shown to share a large number of genetic susceptibility loci, of which IL33/IL1RL1, IL-13-RAD50 and C11orf30/LRRC32 appear to be important for more than two allergic phenotypes. GWASs have further reflected the genetic heterogeneity underlying allergic phenotypes. Large-scale genome-wide association strategies are underway to discover new susceptibility variants for allergic rhinitis and allergic phenotypes. Characterization of the underlying genetics provides us with an insight into the potential targets for future studies and the corresponding interventions.

  1. ROLE OF INTRANASAL STEROIDAL SPRAY IN SEASONAL ALLERGIC RHINITIS WITH OCULAR SYMPTOMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vineel Muppidi

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND The eye is especially susceptible to the symptoms of allergic rhinitis, itching (pruritus, tearing (epiphora and redness (erythema because it lacks a mechanical barrier that could prevent the deposition of allergens, such as pollen on the conjunctival surface. These ocular symptoms have been described as examples of the type 1 immediate hypersensitivity reaction. A number of recently published clinical studies apparently support the positive effect of intranasal steroidal sprays on ocular allergy symptoms. The aim of the study is to evaluate the role of intranasal steroids in relieving ocular symptoms in allergic rhinitis. MATERIALS AND METHODS 60 subjects who had seasonal allergic rhinitis with ocular symptoms came to Outpatient Department of Chalmeda Anand Rao Hospital in the year 2015-2016. Randomly, each intranasal steroid is given to 12 patients to a total of 60 patients for 4 weeks 2 puffs in each nostril twice daily and the clinical response is observed. RESULTS A subjective improvement in ocular symptoms was observed in 11 of the 12 patients treated with fluticasone furoate, 8 of 12 patients with fluticasone propionate, 7 of the 12 patients with mometasone furoate, 6 of the 12 patients with beclomethasone and 6 of the 12 patients with budesonide. CONCLUSION Intranasal corticosteroids, which are used for seasonal allergic rhinitis with ocular symptoms are effective in controlling of ocular symptoms. Among these, intranasal corticosteroids, which are used for allergic rhinitis, fluticasone furoate is more effective in relieving ocular symptoms in our study.

  2. IQ Score of Children with Persistent or Perennial Allergic Rhinitis: A Comparison with Healthy Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaffari, Javad; Abbaskhanian, Ali; Jalili, Masumeh; Yazdani Charati, Jamshid

    2014-01-01

    Prevalence of allergies is different around the world. Allergic rhinitis is a common chronic disease in children. Intelligence quotient (IQ) is an indicator of efficacy and many factors including chronic diseases may affect it. This study compares the IQs of children diagnosed with persistent or perennial allergic rhinitis with healthy children. This was a comparative study that was conducted from June 2011-May 2013 in an academic referral clinic. In this study, 90 patients aged 6- to 14-yearsold who were diagnosed with persistent or perennial allergic rhinitis and were compared to 90 age and gender match healthy patients from their respective families. The Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children was used to divide and calculate overall IQ, verbal IQ, and practical IQ. The t-test and chi square were used to analyze quantitative variables and qualitative variables, respectively. In this study, out of total 180 children, 90 (50%) in the case group and 90 children (50%), the control group participated for IQ comparison. One hundred (57%) were male and 80 (43%) were female. The overall IQ for allergic rhinitis patients and healthy patients was 109.2 and 107.5, respectively. This difference was not considered significant. Furthermore, there was no significant difference between the IQ scores of males and females. Although allergic rhinitis is a chronic disease and effects quality of life, there were no identifiable negative effects on IQ.

  3. Masticatory Changes in Oral Breath Secondary to Allergic Rhinitis: Integrative Review

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    Bezerra, Luciana Ângelo

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction The III Brazilian Consensus on Rhinitis (2012 defines allergic rhinitis as a nasal mucosa inflammation, mediated by immunoglobulin E, after exposure to allergens. The classic signs and symptoms of allergic rhinitis are nasal obstruction, watery rhinorrhea, sneezing, and nasal itching, often reversible either spontaneously or with treatment, and mouth breathing (breathing predominantly through the mouth, regardless of the cause, due to a nasal breathing impairment in some cases. Objective To evaluate the literature on masticatory changes in children with mouth breathing due to allergic rhinitis. Methods We conducted a search of the past 10 years, at Bireme and MEDLINE databases, for articles that covered masticatory changes in children with mouth breathing secondary to allergic rhinitis. Results We found 1,986 articles, including 15 repeated in databases, but only two articles met the inclusion criteria fully. Discussion We found few studies to answer the question raised in this review, and those studies have some methodological limitations. Most articles claimed no have statistically significant differences in masticatory changes in this population. Conclusion A better controlled study (isolating diseases, exposure time, with a larger sample (sample calculation appropriate, would be necessary to examine such changes.

  4. Differential skin test reactivity to pollens in pollen food allergy syndrome versus allergic rhinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ta, Von; Scott, David R; Chin, William K; Wineinger, Nathan E; Kelso, John M; White, Andrew A

    2015-01-01

    Pollen food allergy syndrome (PFAS), also called oral allergy syndrome, is a form of food allergy in which uncooked foods cause allergic symptoms generally limited to the oral mucosa. It occurs in a subset of patients with pollen allergy, although not all patients have prominent rhinitis symptoms. PFAS is related to antigenic similarity between the pollen and food allergen. The size of skin test reactions in a group of subjects with pollen sensitivity with PFAS was compared with a group of subjects who were pollen sensitive and without PFAS. Self-reported rhinitis symptoms between the two groups were compared to identify if symptom severity differed. Twenty subjects with PFAS and 20 subjects with seasonal allergic rhinitis without PFAS were enrolled in the study. All the subjects underwent standard skin-prick testing to a panel of common allergens, including select fresh fruits and vegetables. The subjects completed a Mini Rhinoconjunctivitis Quality of Life Questionnaire as part of their clinical evaluation. The subjects with PFAS and those without PFAS were compared statistically. The subjects with PFAS had significantly larger-sized skin-prick test results specific to pollens (p PFAS reported milder nasal symptoms in relation to pollen skin test result size when compared with allergic rhinitis controls without PFAS. Our study outlined basic differences between two seemingly similar patient groups with a particularly striking discordance between skin test result sizes and rhinitis symptoms. This discordance should be explored further to increase mechanistic understanding of allergen cross-reactivity in PFAS.

  5. Validating app and 1-week version of the ´Control of allergic rhinitis and asthma test´ (CARAT)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, Corina; Flokstra-de Blok, Bertine M.J.; de Kroon, Jorn; van Heijst, Elisabeth; Tsiligianni, Ioanna; Fonseca, Joao; van der Molen, Thys

    2016-01-01

    The Control of allergic rhinitis and asthma test (CARAT) has been designed to assess control of both asthma and allergic rhinitis (AR), covering a 4 week period, using paper-and-pencil (4wCARAT). It met al COSMIN criteria for patient reported outcomes. The aim is validation of the 1-week digital

  6. [ARIA (Allergic Rhinitis and its Impact on Asthma). Achievements in 10 years and future needs in Latin America].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baena-Cagnani, Carlos E; Sánchez-Borges, Mario; Zernotti, Mario E; Larenas-Linnemann, Désireé; Cruz, Alvaro A; González-Díaz, Sandra N; Ivancevich, Juan C; Aldrey-Palacios, Oscar; Sisul, Juan C; Solé, Dirceu; Cepeda, Alfonso M; Jares, Edgardo J; Calvo Gil, Mario; Valentin-Rostán, Marylin; Yáñez, Anahí; Gereda, José; Cardona-Villa, Ricardo; Rosario, Nelson; Croce, Víctor H; Bachert, Claus; Canonica, G Walter; Demoly, Pascal; Passalacqua, Giovanni; Samolinski, Boleslaw; Schünemann, Holger J; Yorgancioglu, Arzu; Ansotegui, Ignacio J; Khaltaev, Nikolai; Bedbrook, Anna; Zuberbier, Torsten; Bousquet, Jean

    2013-01-01

    Allergic rhinitis and asthma represent global problems of public health affecting all age groups; asthma and allergic rhinitis frequently coexist in the same patients. In Latin American prevalence of allergic rhinitis, although variable, is very high. Allergic rhinitis and its Impact on Asthma (ARIA) started during a workshop of the World Health Organization performed in 1999 and was published in 2001. ARIA proposed a new classification of allergic rhinitis in intermittent or persistent and mild or moderate-severe. This approach of classification reflects more nearly the impact of allergic rhinitis in patients. In its review of 2010 ARIA developed guidelines for diagnosis and treatment of allergic rhinitis and of clinical practices for management of comorbidities of allergic rhinitis and asthma based on GRADE (Grading of Recommendations, Development and Evaluation). ARIA has been spread and implemented in more than 50 countries. In Latin American an intense activity has been developed to spread these recommendations in almost all the countries of the region and it is important to record the obtained goals in the diffusion and implementation of ARIA, as well as to identify the unsatisfied needs from the clinical, research and implementation points of view. Final objective is to reinforce the priority that allergy and asthma should have, especially in children, in the programs of public health, as they have been prioritized in European Union in 2011.

  7. ETIOLOGY OF OROYA FEVER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noguchi, Hideyo

    1926-01-01

    The experiments reported here were carried on in the main with passage strains of Bartonella bacilliformis, and the results indicate that the virulence of the organism has been considerably enhanced by passage through susceptible animals. While the animals of the earlier experimental series showed no anemia, some of the present group manifested a definite reduction in the number of red cells and in hemoglobin, and in one instance (M. rhesus 25) anemia was of the extreme type so often associated with Oroya fever in man. The anemic condition appeared to be secondary in character, however, nucleated red cells being few in number. In this animal also Bartonella bacilliformis was readily demonstrated in the erythrocytes by means of stained smears, though the number of cells invaded by the parasites was by no means so great as in the human infection. In most instances of experimental Bartonella infection so far induced the demonstration of the parasites by ordinary routine examination of stained film preparations is possible only when the titer of the blood exceeds 1:1,000. Prolonged search of many slides has not been attempted, however. The number of microorganisms in the blood, as shown by culture tests of ascending dilutions, was in most instances highest (1:100,000 to 1:10,000,000) during the early period of the infection coincident usually with the period of highest fever, falling to a titer of 1:10 during the last half of the disease. In one of the fatally infected monkeys, however, the titer increased from 1:10 on the 4th day to 1:1,000,000 on the 24th day. The titer of the blood was equally great in Monkeys 5 and 6, although the former was inoculated locally, the other intravenously and intraperitoneally. The largest proportion of infected red cells was found in Monkey 25, while the blood titer, as shown by culture test, was highest in Monkey 7. The febrile reaction varied in the animals of this series from a severe continuous fever of 104–105°F., lasting 2 to

  8. Prevalence of allergic rhinitis among elementary and middle school students in Changsha city and its impact on quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Y; Wang, M; Xie, J; Li, W; Zhang, X; Wang, T; Tan, G

    2015-11-01

    To investigate the prevalence of allergic rhinitis among elementary and middle school students and examine its impact on their quality of life. Stratified sampling and cluster sampling surveys were performed among 10-17-year-old students in Changsha city from June 2011 to April 2012. In the stratified sampling survey, the self-reported allergic rhinitis rate was 42.5 per cent. Further examination demonstrated that the average prevalence of allergic rhinitis was 19.4 per cent. The cluster sampling survey demonstrated that 214 of 814 students appeared to be atopic (26.3 per cent). The prevalence of allergic rhinitis and asthma was 17.2 and 2.1 per cent, respectively. In total, 71 atopic individuals (8.7 per cent) were without any symptoms of allergic disease. Further analysis showed that allergic rhinitis influenced the students' sleep, emotions and memory (p students' sleep, emotions and memory.

  9. Nasal inhalation of budesonide from a spacer in children with perennial rhinitis and asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, W; Hjuler, Inga Merete; Bisgaard, H

    1998-01-01

    and asthma inhaled budesonide through the nose from a pressurized aerosol, attached to a spacer device, in a double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study. Compared with placebo, budesonide treatment resulted in a significant reduction of nasal symptoms (Pasthma symptoms (P...The standard treatment of allergic rhinitis and asthma consists of topical corticosteroids administered intranasally and inhaled through the mouth. Although this therapy is highly effective, and side-effects are few and mild, it may be possible further to improve the therapeutic index and patient...... compliance with the treatment. In the present study, we evaluated a nasal inhalation system used for the simultaneous treatment of rhinitis and asthma. In principle, it results in an airway deposition of the corticosteroid similar to that of inhaled allergens. Twenty-four children with perennial rhinitis...

  10. Upper and lower airway pathology in young children with allergic- and non-allergic rhinitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chawes, Bo

    2011-01-01

    Allergic- and non-allergic rhinitis are very common diseases in childhood in industrialized countries. Although these conditions are widely trivialized by both parents and physicians they induce a major impact on quality of life for the affected children and a substantial drainage of health care...... resources. Unfortunately, diagnostic specificity is hampered by nonspecific symptom history and lack of reliable diagnostic tests which may explain why the pathology behind such diagnoses is poorly understood. Improved understanding of the pathophysiology of allergic- and non-allergic rhinitis in young......, and filaggrin mutations; levels of total IgE, FeNO, and blood-eosinophils; lung function and bronchial responsiveness to cold dry air. We found that asthma was similarly associated with allergic- and non-allergic rhinitis suggesting a link between upper and lower airway diseases beyond an allergy associated...

  11. Phylogeny of Yellow Fever Virus, Uganda, 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Holly R; Kayiwa, John; Mossel, Eric C; Lutwama, Julius; Staples, J Erin; Lambert, Amy J

    2018-08-17

    In April 2016, a yellow fever outbreak was detected in Uganda. Removal of contaminating ribosomal RNA in a clinical sample improved the sensitivity of next-generation sequencing. Molecular analyses determined the Uganda yellow fever outbreak was distinct from the concurrent yellow fever outbreak in Angola, improving our understanding of yellow fever epidemiology.

  12. Hygiene, atopy and wheeze-eczema-rhinitis symptoms in schoolchildren from urban and rural Ecuador.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Philip J; Vaca, Maritza; Rodriguez, Alejandro; Chico, Martha E; Santos, Darci N; Rodrigues, Laura C; Barreto, Mauricio L

    2014-03-01

    Rural residence is protective against atopy and wheeze-rhinitis-eczema symptoms in developed countries, an effect attributed to farming and poor hygiene exposures. There are few data from developing countries addressing this question. We compared atopy and wheeze-rhinitis-eczema symptoms between urban and rural Ecuador, and explored the effects of farming and poor hygiene exposures. We performed cross sectional studies of schoolchildren living in rural and urban Ecuador. Data on symptoms and farming/hygiene exposures were collected by parental questionnaire, atopy by allergen skin prick test reactivity and geohelminth infections by stool examinations. Among 2526 urban and 4295 rural schoolchildren, prevalence was: atopy (10.0% vs 12.5%, p=0.06), wheeze (9.4% vs 10.1%, p=0.05), rhinitis (8.1% vs 6.4%, p=0.02) and eczema (5.9% vs 4.7%, p=0.06). A small proportion of symptoms were attributable to atopy (range 3.9-10.7%) with greater attributable fractions for respiratory symptoms observed in urban schoolchildren. Respiratory symptoms were associated with poor hygiene/farming exposures: wheeze with lack of access to potable water; and rhinitis with household pets, no bathroom facilities and contact with large farm animals. Birth order was inversely associated with respiratory symptoms. Area of residence and atopy had few effects on these associations. Urban schoolchildren living in Ecuador have a similar prevalence of atopy, eczema and wheeze but a higher prevalence of rhinitis compared with rural children. Some farming and poor hygiene exposures were associated with an increase in the prevalence of wheeze or rhinitis while birth order was inversely associated with these symptoms.

  13. Nasal budesonide offers superior symptom relief in perennial allergic rhinitis in comparison to nasal azelastine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, M A; Wade, A G; Ridout, S M; Cambell, L M

    1998-10-01

    Allergic rhinitis is usually treated with oral antihistamines or nasal steroids. Topically active nasal antihistamine is a new treatment modality for allergic rhinitis. The efficacy in comparison to well established topical treatment alternatives is not fully known. To compare the efficacy of intranasally administered azelastine to budesonide, at their respectively recommended dosage, on the symptoms of perennial rhinitis patients. A placebo-controlled, randomized, parallel group study was conducted to compare the efficacy and tolerability of intranasal budesonide aqueous suspension (256 microg once daily) with azelastine hydrochloride nasal spray (280 microg twice daily (560 microg/day)) and with placebo in the treatment of perennial allergic rhinitis. The 195 patients (with at least a 2-year history of perennial allergic rhinitis) recorded individual nasal symptom scores, the degree of symptom control achieved and any adverse events experienced over a 2-week baseline period and a 6-week treatment period. Following treatment, the reductions in mean combined and individual nasal symptom scores from baseline values were significantly greater in the budesonide group compared with the placebo group (P < .0001 for all variables except runny nose P = .01). In patients treated with budesonide, there were also significantly larger reductions from baseline values in combined nasal symptom scores (P < .01) and in scores for all individual nasal symptoms (P < or = .05) compared with those treated with azelastine. The reductions from baseline in both combined and individual nasal symptom scores did not differ between azelastine and placebo. The study medications were well tolerated, producing no unexpected or serious treatment-related adverse events. A once-daily dose of 256 microg of intranasal budesonide aqueous suspension is significantly more effective at relieving the symptoms of perennial allergic rhinitis compared with a twice daily dose of 280 microg of azelastine

  14. Fungal levels in the home and allergic rhinitis by 5 years of age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, Paul C; Celedón, Juan C; Chew, Ginger L; Ryan, Louise M; Burge, Harriet A; Muilenberg, Michael L; Gold, Diane R

    2005-10-01

    Studies have repeatedly demonstrated that sensitization to fungi, such as Alternaria, is strongly associated with allergic rhinitis and asthma in children. However, the role of exposure to fungi in the development of childhood allergic rhinitis is poorly understood. In a prospective birth cohort of 405 children of asthmatic/allergic parents from metropolitan Boston, Massachusetts, we examined in-home high fungal concentrations (> 90th percentile) measured once within the first 3 months of life as predictors of doctor-diagnosed allergic rhinitis in the first 5 years of life. In multivariate Cox regression analyses, predictors of allergic rhinitis included high levels of dust-borne Aspergillus [hazard ratio (HR) = 3.27; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.50-7.14], Aureobasidium (HR = 3.04; 95% CI, 1.33-6.93), and yeasts (HR = 2.67; 95% CI, 1.26-5.66). The factors controlled for in these analyses included water damage or mild or mildew in the building during the first year of the child's life, any lower respiratory tract infection in the first year, male sex, African-American race, fall date of birth, and maternal IgE to Alternaria > 0.35 U/mL. Dust-borne Alternaria and nonsporulating and total fungi were also predictors of allergic rhinitis in models excluding other fungi but adjusting for all of the potential confounders listed above. High measured fungal concentrations and reports of water damage, mold, or mildew in homes may predispose children with a family history of asthma or allergy to the development of allergic rhinitis.

  15. Influence of feeding hay on the alopecia of breeding guinea pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerold, S; Huisinga, E; Iglauer, F; Kurzawa, A; Morankic, A; Reimers, S

    1997-08-01

    Animals with partial alopecia were seen frequently in a breeding colony of guinea pigs. No pathologic aetiology could be determined. An influence of nutrition on the density of the hair coat was considered. Breeding groups were fed one of the commercial guinea pig diets of differing composition, with or without the addition of hay. Observation occurred over a period of months and the quality of the hair coat was evaluated periodically using a semi-quantitative scoring system. More extensive and more frequent fur defects were found is guinea pigs receiving a breeding diet with a high content of crude protein (23%) and a low level of crude fibre (12%), offered hay only restrictively compared with animals receiving a diet with a lower content of crude protein (15.5%) and a higher level of crude fibre (19.5%), offered the same amount of hay. The amount of hay offered is of paramount importance. Animals fed only the diet with the higher level of crude fibre (19.5%), according to the manufacturer's instructions as a complete food, without the addition of hay, showed a less dense hair coat within 4 weeks. In our colony a group of five breeding animals and their young required 200 g of hay daily in order to improve their hair coat quality to normal. Conversely, animals receiving less hay had progressively deteriorating hair coat density. Not only the amount of hay offered, but also the accessibility for all animals plays a role in preventing alopecia in guinea pigs. In larger cages (twice the usual ground surface area) fur defects were seen when the same amount of hay (200 g) was offered in only one central area, rather than spread out evenly throughout the cage. Hair loss was observed to be the result of trichophagia between adult animals kept in the same cage. The need for crude fibre of breeding animals does not appear to be completely met by pellets rich in fibre segments.

  16. Discriminating fever behavior in house flies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert D Anderson

    Full Text Available Fever has generally been shown to benefit infected hosts. However, fever temperatures also carry costs. While endotherms are able to limit fever costs physiologically, the means by which behavioral thermoregulators constrain these costs are less understood. Here we investigated the behavioral fever response of house flies (Musca domestica L. challenged with different doses of the fungal entomopathogen, Beauveria bassiana. Infected flies invoked a behavioral fever selecting the hottest temperature early in the day and then moving to cooler temperatures as the day progressed. In addition, flies infected with a higher dose of fungus exhibited more intense fever responses. These variable patterns of fever are consistent with the observation that higher fever temperatures had greater impact on fungal growth. The results demonstrate the capacity of insects to modulate the degree and duration of the fever response depending on the severity of the pathogen challenge and in so doing, balance the costs and benefits of fever.

  17. [Research on prevalence and related factors in allergic rhinitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ze-hai; Lin, Wen-sen; Li, Shu-yan; Zhao, Shao-cheng; Wang, Li; Yang, Zhong-gang; Chen, Jie; Zhang, Zhen-fu; Yu, Jin-zhen

    2011-03-01

    To obtain the prevalence and related factors in allergic rhinitis (AR) and other allergic diseases in rural area in China through epidemiological investigation with large sample and multi-faceted survey data. Face to face survey was conducted in different regions (rural areas of Cangzhou, Hebei, coastal fishing village of Bohai Bay, area of Wuling Mountain, Chengde, urban areas of Tianjin) from April 2007 to May 2009. In the same time, serum specific IgE (sIgE) was detected in the digits of every 0, 1or 5 in them. SPSS 13.0 software was used to analyze the data. Five thousand and ten cases were investigated. There were 823 cases with the symptoms or signs of AR (16.4%). Four hundred and two cases were found to have positive serum sIgE antibody in 1576 detected cases (25.5%). One hundred and fourty-six cases with nasal allergic symptoms or signs were diagnosed as AR. The incidence of AR was 9.3% (146/1576). The occurrence of allergic symptoms or signs had a significant statistical difference with factors such as age, occupation, atopic constitution (χ(2) value were 7.96, 9.73, 16.53, 8.95 respectively, all P cat epithelium in rural areas and dust mites in city. The incidence of AR is higher whether in urban or rural areas, it should be taken seriously as the impact on human health. The occurrence is closely related to physical characteristics and environmental factors.

  18. Determinants of allergic rhinitis in young children with asthma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lise Moussu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In the preschool period, allergic rhinitis (AR is infrequent and thus under-diagnosed. However, recent works have highlighted the occurrence of AR in toddlers although the causes of AR in this young population remain unknown. The objective of this study was to identify determinants of AR in young children with asthma. METHODS: We carried out a case-control study of 227 children with active asthma and enrolled in the Trousseau Asthma Program. AR and other allergic diseases (asthma, food allergy and eczema were diagnosed by medical doctors using standardized questionnaires. Parental history of AR and asthma, biological markers of atopy (total IgE, blood eosinophilia, allergic sensitization towards food and aeroallergens and environmental parameters were also collected. RESULTS: Forty one of the children (18.1% had AR. By univariate logistic regression analysis, AR was mainly associated with peanut sensitization (OR = 6.75; p = 0.002; food allergy (OR = 4.31; p = 0.026; mold exposure (OR = 3.81 p<0.01 and parental history of AR (OR = 1.42; p = 0.046. Due to the strong link between food allergy and peanut sensitization three models of multivariate logistic regression were performed and confirmed that AR is associated with peanut sensitization but also food allergy and mold exposure. A random forest analysis was also performed to explain AR. The results reinforced the logistic analysis that peanut sensitization and mold exposure were the principal determinants of AR. CONCLUSIONS & CLINICAL RELEVANCE: These results stress the importance of investigating AR in young children with asthma to potentially diagnose a particularly severe allergic asthmatic phenotype. Moreover, these data evoke the hypothesis that peanut could be an aeroallergen.

  19. Impact of Rhinitis on Work Productivity: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenplas, Olivier; Vinnikov, Denis; Blanc, Paul D; Agache, Ioana; Bachert, Claus; Bewick, Michael; Cardell, Lars-Olaf; Cullinan, Paul; Demoly, Pascal; Descatha, Alexis; Fonseca, Joao; Haahtela, Tari; Hellings, Peter W; Jamart, Jacques; Jantunen, Juha; Kalayci, Ömer; Price, David; Samolinski, Boleslaw; Sastre, Joaquin; Tian, Longxiu; Valero, Antonio L; Zhang, Xinyi; Bousquet, Jean

    2017-10-07

    Allergic rhinitis (AR) is increasingly acknowledged as having a substantial socioeconomic impact associated with impaired work productivity, although available information remains fragmented. This systematic review summarizes recently available information to provide a quantitative estimate of the burden of AR on work productivity including lost work time (ie, absenteeism) and reduced performance while working (ie, presenteeism). A Medline search retrieved original studies from 2005 to 2015 pertaining to the impact of AR on work productivity. A pooled analysis of results was carried out with studies reporting data collected through the validated Work Productivity and Activity Impairment (WPAI) questionnaire. The search identified 19 observational surveys and 9 interventional studies. Six studies reported economic evaluations. Pooled analysis of WPAI-based studies found an estimated 3.6% (95% confidence interval [CI], 2.4; 4.8%) missed work time and 35.9% (95% CI, 29.7; 42.1%) had impairment in at-work performance due to AR. Economic evaluations indicated that indirect costs associated with lost work productivity are the principal contributor to the total AR costs and result mainly from impaired presenteeism. The severity of AR symptoms was the most consistent disease-related factor associated with a greater impact of AR on work productivity, although ocular symptoms and sleep disturbances may independently affect work productivity. Overall, the pharmacologic treatment of AR showed a beneficial effect on work productivity. This systematic review provides summary estimates of the magnitude of work productivity impairment due to AR and identifies its main determinant factors. This information may help guide both clinicians and health policy makers. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Increased aryl hydrocarbon receptor expression in patients with allergic rhinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, P; Hu, G-H; Kang, H-Y; Yao, H-B; Kou, W; Liu, H; Hong, S-L

    2014-02-01

    A predominant Th17 population is a marker of allergic rhinitis (AR). As a ligand-activated transcription factor, the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) plays a vital role in promoting or inhibiting the development of specific Th cells. However, its role in AR remains undefined. To analyze the potential role of AhR in the pathogenesis of AR. In total, 30 AR patients and 13 healthy controls were recruited for this study and AR patients had clinical features, as demonstrated by rhinoconjunctivitis quality of life questionnaires, total symptom scores and visual analog scale scores. The expression of AhR, IL-17 and IL-22 and the presence of Th17 cells in peripheral blood mononuclear cells were measured before and after treatment with the nontoxic AhR ligand 2-(1'H-indole-3'-carbonyl)-thiazole-4-carboxylic acid methyl ester (ITE). Pretreatment ITE studies revealed that all AR patients had a significant increase in AhR expression compared with controls and AhR expression positively correlated with clinical parameters. After ITE intervention, a severe reduction in the differentiation of Th17 cells and the production of IL-17 and IL-22 was noted in both AR patients and normal subjects. Simultaneously, a dramatic enhancement of AhR expression was also observed in all healthy controls, but not in AR patients. The results suggested that the AhR may be one of the mechanisms underlying the Th17 response during the pathogenesis of AR and AhR levels were closely related to clinical severity in all AR patients. Additionally, ITE may represent a new drug candidate in the treatment of AR.

  1. Prevalence of asthma and allergic rhinitis among adults in Yaounde, Cameroon.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Walter Pefura-Yone

    Full Text Available Population-based estimates of asthma and allergic rhinitis in sub-Saharan African adults are lacking. We assessed the prevalence and determinants of asthma and allergic rhinitis in urban adult Cameroonians.A community-based survey was conducted from December 2013 to April 2014 among adults aged 19 years and above (N = 2,304, 57.3% women, selected through multilevel stratified random sampling across all districts of Yaounde (Capital city. Internationally validated questionnaires were used to investigate the presence of allergic diseases. Logistic regressions were employed to investigate the determinants of allergic conditions.Prevalence rates were 2.7% (95% CI: 2.1-3.4 for asthma-ever, 6.9% (5.9-7.9 for lifetime wheezing, 2.9% (92.2-3.6 for current wheezing and 11.4% (10.1-12.7 for self-reported lifetime allergic rhinitis; while 240 (10.4% participants reported current symptoms of allergic rhinitis, and 125 (5.4% had allergic rhino-conjunctivitis. The prevalence of current asthma medication use and self-reported asthma attack was 0.8 (0.4-1.2 and 1 (0.6-1.4 respectively. Multivariable adjusted determinants of current wheezing were signs of atopic eczema [2.91 (1.09-7.74] and signs of allergic rhinitis [3.24 (1.83-5.71]. Age group 31-40 years [0.27(0.09-0.78, p = 0.016] was an independent protective factor for wheezing. Determinants of current rhinitis symptoms were active smoking [2.20 (1.37-3.54, p<0.001], signs of atopic eczema [2.84 (1.48-5.46] and current wheezing [3.02 (1.70-5.39].Prevalence rates for asthma and allergic rhinitis among adults in this population were at the lower tails of those reported in other regions of the world. Beside the classical interrelation between allergic diseases found in this study, active smoking was an independent determinant of allergic rhinitis symptoms. Nationwide surveys are needed to investigate regional variations.

  2. POSSIBILITY OF PHARMACOMODULATION OF THE HYPERSENSITIVE RHINITIS JOINED WITH THE NASAL POLYPOSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dejan Ursulović

    2001-11-01

    Full Text Available The research goai is to examine the effects of the local corticosteroidapplication to the number of eosinophils in the nasal secretion of the patients withhypersensitive rhinitis joined with the nasal polyposis. The study comprises 13patients with hypersensitive rhinitis joined with the nasal polyposis; 9 of them madeup the experimental group. The local corticosteroid (bechomethasone dipropionatein water spray was given at 12 hours in individual doses of 200 micrograms to theexperimental group patients in six weeks. During the treatment it was confirmed thatthere was a highly important reduction of the number of eosinophils of the nasalsecretion in the experimental group patients.

  3. Rhinitis and disseminated disease in a ferret (Mustela putorius furo) naturally infected with Sarcocystis neurona.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britton, Ann P; Dubey, J P; Rosenthal, Benjamin M

    2010-04-19

    Naturally occurring Sarcocystis neurona infection in a ferret (Mustela putorius furo) with rhinitis and disseminated disease are described for the first time. The ferret exhibited severe rhinitis with intra-lesional S. neurona merozoites and schizonts. Diagnosis was confirmed immunohistochemically by staining with S. neurona-specific antibodies, and by phylogenetic analyses of conserved and variable portions of nuclear ribosomal DNA. On the basis of intense schizogony in the nasal mucosa, we propose the possibility of an olfactory nerve pathway route of infection for S. neurona meningoencephalitis.

  4. The prevalence of skin-test-positive allergic rhinitis in Danish adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linneberg, A; Jørgensen, T; Nielsen, N H

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It is disputed whether increases in self-reported respiratory allergy represent a true increase or merely increased recognition. We aimed to investigate whether the prevalence of skin-prick-test (SPT)-positive allergic rhinitis had increased in an adult general population in Copenhagen...... (participation rate 74.6%) and 482 (participation rate 53.4%) subjects were examined in 1990 and 1998, respectively. Diagnoses of SPT-positive allergic rhinitis were based on a history of nasal symptoms on exposure to allergens and SPT positivity to allergens. RESULTS: The prevalence of a diagnosis of SPT...

  5. Smoking at home is strongly associated with symptoms of asthma and rhinitis in children of primary school age in Trinidad and Tobago Asociación entre fumar dentro de la casa y síntomas de asma y de rinitis en escolares de primaria en Trinidad y Tabago

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele A. Monteil

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To compare, in the twin-island republic of Trinidad and Tobago, the prevalence of symptoms of asthma and rhinitis among children of primary school age who are exposed to household environmental tobacco smoke with the prevalence of these symptoms in their colleagues without this exposure. METHODS: Between September and December 2002, questionnaires based on the instrument developed for the International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood (ISAAC were distributed, via the children in their schools, to parents of 6 611 Year 2 pupils (typically 6 years old or Year 3 pupils (typically 7 years old in 106 randomly selected schools in Trinidad and Tobago (5 511 pupils on Trinidad and 1 100 pupils on Tobago. We added to the standard ISAAC questionnaires two questions, one on household smoking and one on the ethnicity of the children. RESULTS: A total of 3 170 completed questionnaires were suitable for further analysis (2 618 from Trinidad and 552 from Tobago. On Trinidad 782 of the children (29.9% lived in homes where one or both parents smoked, and 513 (19.6% had other relatives in the household who smoked. On Tobago 94 of the pupils (17.0% had parents who smoked, and 84 (15.4% came from homes where other residents smoked. Parental smoking was significantly associated with wheezing (odds ratio (OR: 1.43; 95% confidence interval (CI: 1.11-1.83, exercise-induced wheezing (OR: 2.12; 95% CI: 1.59-2.82, nocturnal coughing (OR: 1.64; 95% CI: 1.37-1.97, and symptoms of rhinitis (OR: 1.35; 95% CI: 1.10-1.65 in the last 12 months as well as a history of hay fever/sinus problems (OR: 1.39; 95% CI: 1.11-1.74. Smoking in the home by adult residents other than parents was also significantly associated with all of these symptoms as well as a history of asthma (OR: 1.49; 95% CI: 1.13-1.97. In terms of ethnic differences, parental smoking was most prevalent in the homes of South Asian students, while smoking by other adults in the home occurred most

  6. Hay que preparar a Colombia para el turismo de naturaleza

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Teresa Becerra

    2002-11-01

    Full Text Available El turismo que se basa en su entorno natural es responsable por aproximadamente el 40% de los ingresos de turismo y es un mercado en crecimiento. Sin embargo, el turismo ha sido una actividad que ha generado graves impactos ambientales y sociales a nivel mundial. En el contexto ambiental ha transformado áreas de alto valor de conservación en ciudades de cemento y ladrillo, ha contaminado los recursos hídricos, ha erosionado terrenos, ha disminuido los hábitats de muchos animales ante la presencia no planificada de las actividades humanas y ha interrumpido el flujo de especies y de información genética ante la construcción de carreteras, complejos turísticos y otras edificaciones, entre otros impactos. En el contexto social, ha transformado culturalmente a muchas poblaciones locales, sin que hayan tenido la posibilidad y la capacidad de decidir sobre sus mejores opciones económicas y sociales. En muchos casos las poblaciones locales no han tenido la oportunidad, por fallas institucionales y de mercado, de participar activamente en la captura de beneficios de la actividad turística. Estos son ejemplos de los impactos negativos de la globalización cuando no hay la información, la capacidad y la participación ciudadana para la toma de decisión acertadas. Este artículo demuestra, mediante el uso de casos prácticos, cómo un turismo de naturaleza bien manejado, que permita la toma de buenas decisiones por parte de las personas relacionadas directa e indirectamente de sus actividades y que disminuya al máximo sus impactos negativos sociales y ambientales, es una actividad deseable para el desarrollo sostenible de una región y un país como Colombia.

  7. Substituting oat hay or maize silage for portion of alfalfa hay affects growth performance, ruminal fermentation, and nutrient digestibility of weaned calves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Zou

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective The impact of forage feeding strategy on growth performance, ruminal fermentation and nutrient digestibility in post-weaning calves was investigated. Methods Forty-five female Holstein calves (body weight [BW] = 79.79±0.38 kg were enrolled in the 35-d study at one week after weaning and randomly assigned to one of three dietary treatments. All diets were fed as total mixed ration containing 60% (dry matter [DM] basis of basal starter feed and 40% (DM basis of forage, but varied in composition of forage source including i alfalfa (40% DM, AH; ii alfalfa hay (26.7% DM+oat hay (13.3% DM; OH; iii alfalfa hay (26.7% DM+corn silage (13.3% DM; WS. Results Dry matter intake was not different among treatment groups (p>0.05. However, BW (p<0.05 and average daily gain (p<0.05 of calves fed AH and OH were greater than WS-fed calves, whereas heart girth was greater in OH-fed calves than those fed AH and WS (p<0.05. Ruminal fermentation parameters including proportion of butyric acid, acetated-to-propionate ratio, concentration of total volatile fatty acid, protozoal protein, bacterial protein, and microbial protein in rumen were the highest in OH (p<0.05 and the lowest in WS. Compared with the AH and WS, feeding oat hay to postweaning calves increased crude protein digestibility (p<0.05, and decreased duration of diarrhea (p<0.05 and fecal index (p<0.05. Conclusion Our results suggested that partially replacing alfalfa hay with oat hay improved ruminal fermentation, nitrogen utilization, and reduced incidence of diarrhea in post-weaning dairy calves.

  8. SQ house dust mite sublingually administered immunotherapy tablet (ALK) improves allergic rhinitis in patients with house dust mite allergic asthma and rhinitis symptoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mosbech, Holger; Canonica, G Walter; Backer, Vibeke

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: House dust mite (HDM) allergy is associated with persistent allergic rhinitis (AR) and allergic asthma. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the efficacy and safety of a SQ HDM sublingually administered immunotherapy tablet (ALK, Hørsholm, Denmark) in adults and adolescents with HDM respiratory...... allergic disease and report the AR results. METHODS: Six hundred four subjects at least 14 years old with HDM AR and mild to moderate HDM allergic asthma were randomized 1:1:1:1 to double-blinded daily treatment with 1, 3, 6 SQ-HDM or placebo. End-of-treatment rhinoconjunctivitis symptoms and medication...... score were predefined extrapulmonary end points. A subgroup analysis was conducted post hoc in subjects with a total combined rhinitis score (TCRS) > 0 (ie, with AR symptoms and/or AR medication use during the 4-week baseline period). The subgroup was comprised of 498 subjects (82%). RESULTS...

  9. Treatment of dengue fever

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajapakse S

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Senaka Rajapakse,1,2 Chaturaka Rodrigo,1 Anoja Rajapakse31Department of Clinical Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Colombo, Sri Lanka; 2Lincoln County Hospital, United Lincolnshire NHS Trust, Lincoln, UK; 3Kings Mill Hospital, Sherwood Forest NHS Foundation Trust, Mansfield, UKAbstract: The endemic area for dengue fever extends over 60 countries, and approximately 2.5 billion people are at risk of infection. The incidence of dengue has multiplied many times over the last five decades at an alarming rate. In the endemic areas, waves of infection occur in epidemics, with thousands of individuals affected, creating a huge burden on the limited resources of a country's health care system. While the illness passes off as a simple febrile episode in many, a few have a severe illness marked by hypovolemic shock and bleeding. Iatrogenic fluid overload in the management may further complicate the picture. In this severe form dengue can be fatal. Tackling the burden of dengue is impeded by several issues, including a lack of understanding about the exact pathophysiology of the infection, inability to successfully control the vector population, lack of specific therapy against the virus, and the technical difficulties in developing a vaccine. This review provides an overview on the epidemiology, natural history, management strategies, and future directions for research on dengue, including the potential for development of a vaccine.Keywords: dengue, treatment, fluid resuscitation

  10. Toxicosis in dairy cattle exposed to poison hemlock (Conium maculatum) in hay: isolation of Conium alkaloids in plants, hay, and urine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galey, F D; Holstege, D M; Fisher, E G

    1992-01-01

    Cattle in two herds developed signs of bloating, increased salivation and lacrimation, depression, respiratory distress, ataxia, and death after ingestion of hay that contained large amounts of poison hemlock (Conium maculatum). Twenty of 30 Angus cows and calves were affected in the first herd (2 died). In the second herd, 5 of 30 Holstein heifers were affected (1 died). The Conium alkaloids, coniine and gamma-coniceine, were quantified in the hay, the plants from the responsible hayfield, and the urine of affected animals.

  11. The effect of Typha domingensis Pers. pollen on Balb/c mice mimicking local allergic rhinitis like symptoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, S.; Khan, N.

    2018-01-01

    Airborne pollen grains found commonly in the air usually cause hay fever or pollinosis. Typha sp. pollen grain has been frequently reported in various aerobiological surveys from Pakistan. This study was designed to investigate the allergenic potential of Typha domingensis Pers. Animal model was developed for In vivo testing of pollen allergy. Freshly collected pollen powder was used for intranasal sensitization of Balb/c mice. In vitro testing of the pollen was also done quantitatively (Bradford's method) and qualitatively (SDS-PAGE analysis). The results of In vivo study showed that the group of mice exposed to the dried pollen powder, experienced allergy symptoms including itching and rubbing of eyes, feet, and tail along with frequent episodes of sneezing. The results were confirmed by performing differential blood count of mice. Obtained data was statistically analyzed by using Sigma plot that revealed significant 4-fold increase in eosinophil count in sensitized mice as compared to control (Two tailed t-test with p-value <0.001). SDS-PAGE analysis of extracted proteins showed that the proteins resolved into six bands of molecular weight ranging from 20 KDa- 55 KDa. In current study, data strongly depicts that T. domingensis could be possible allergenic particle. This study would also aid in allergy suffering patient therapy. (author)

  12. Steam explosion pretreatment for enhancing biogas production of late harvested hay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Alexander; Lizasoain, Javier; Theuretzbacher, Franz; Agger, Jane W; Rincón, María; Menardo, Simona; Saylor, Molly K; Enguídanos, Ramón; Nielsen, Paal J; Potthast, Antje; Zweckmair, Thomas; Gronauer, Andreas; Horn, Svein J

    2014-08-01

    Grasslands are often abandoned due to lack of profitability. Extensively cultivating grassland for utilization in a biogas-based biorefinery concept could mend this problem. Efficient bioconversion of this lignocellulosic biomass requires a pretreatment step. In this study the effect of different steam explosion conditions on hay digestibility have been investigated. Increasing severity in the pretreatment induced degradation of the hemicellulose, which at the same time led to the production of inhibitors and formation of pseudo-lignin. Enzymatic hydrolysis showed that the maximum glucose yields were obtained under pretreatment at 220 °C for 15 min, while higher xylose yields were obtained at 175 °C for 10 min. Pretreatment of hay by steam explosion enhanced 15.9% the methane yield in comparison to the untreated hay. Results indicate that hay can be effectively converted to methane after steam explosion pretreatment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Rapid analysis of hay attributes using NIRS. Final report, Task II alfalfa supply system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-10-24

    This final report provides technical information on the development of a near infrared reflectance spectroscopy (NIRS) system for the analysis of alfalfa hay. The purpose of the system is to provide consistent quality for processing alfalfa stems for fuel and alfalfa leaf meal products for livestock feed. Project tasks were to: (1) develop an NIRS driven analytical system for analysis of alfalfa hay and processed alfalfa products; (2) assist in hiring a qualified NIRS technician and recommend changes in testing equipment necessary to provide accurate analysis; (3) calibrate the NIRS instrument for accurate analyses; and (4) develop prototype equipment and sampling procedures as a first step towards development of a totally automated sampling system that would rapidly sample and record incoming feedstock and outbound product. An accurate hay testing program was developed, along with calibration equations for analyzing alfalfa hay and sun-cured alfalfa pellets. A preliminary leaf steam calibration protocol was also developed. 7 refs., 11 figs., 10 tabs.

  14. Effect of hay on performance of Holstein calves at suckling and post-weaning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robson Kyoshi Ueno

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to evaluate the performance of Holstein calves in suckling and post-weaning phases, intensively managed during suckling in the absence or presence of hay. Twenty-four male Holstein calves, at an average age of 15 days and initial weight of 43 kg were used in the experiment. The experimental design was completely randomized, consisting of two treatments and six replications. The treatments were as follows: 1 suckling with milk substitute + initial concentrate for calves, ad libitum + temperate grass hay (oat/ryegrass, ad libitum; 2 suckling with milk substitute + initial concentrate for calves, ad libitum. No significant difference was found between treatments for weight gain and feed conversion. However, the supply of hay caused an increase in daily dry matter intake (2.127 vs 1.894 kg. The intake of hay promoted greater stimulus to consumption of concentrate and greater weight at weaning.

  15. Motivation for hay: effects of a pelleted diet on behavior and physiology of horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elia, Jamie B; Erb, Hollis N; Houpt, Katherine Albro

    2010-12-02

    The natural diet of free-ranging horses is grass, which is typically high in fiber and calorically dilute, however diets for high performance domestic horses are often low in fiber and calorically dense. The aim of the study was to determine the motivation of horses for hay when fed a low roughage diet. Their motivation could be used to determine if low roughage diets compromise the welfare of horses. Eight mares were fed two different diets in counterbalanced order: ad libitum orchard grass hay; a complete pelleted feed (pellets). Each trial lasted three weeks, with a one-week transition period between diets. To determine the motivation of horses for fiber they were taught to press a panel to obtain a food reward. The fixed ratio (FR) was increased using a progressive ratio ((1,2,4,7,11…) technique. When fed pellets, the horses worked for a median FR of 1 (Range=1-497) to attain pellets, and when fed hay, they worked for a median FR of 25.5 (4-497) to attain pellets. When fed hay, the horses worked for a median FR of 0 (0-0) to attain hay, and when fed pellets, they worked for a FR of 13 (2-79) to attain hay. These results indicate a greater motivation for hay, a high fiber diet, when fed a low fiber diet. The horses spent 10 (5-19.4)% of their time during a 24-hour period eating pellets compared to 61.5 (29-76) % of their time eating hay. Horses spent 58% of their time standing when fed the pellets and only 37% of their time standing when fed hay. Searching behavior (i.e. sifting through wood shaving bedding for food particles) took up 11.5 (1.4-32) % of the horse's day when fed pellets, but only 1.2 (0-3.5) % of the daily time budget when fed hay. Horses chew more times when eating a hay diet (43,476chews/day) than when eating a pellet diet (10,036chews/day). Fecal pH was lower in horses fed the pelleted diet. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Distribution and dynamics of the invasive native hay-scented fern

    Science.gov (United States)

    Songlin Fei; Peter Gould; Melanie Kaeser; Kim. Steiner

    2010-01-01

    The spread and dominance of the invasive native hay-scented fern in the understory is one of the most significant changes to affect the forest ecosystems in the northeastern United States in the last century. We studied changes in the distribution and dynamics of hay-scented fern at a large scale over a 10-yr period in Pennsylvania. The study included 56 stands...

  17. A Three-Year Course of House Dust Mite Sublingual Immunotherapy Appears Effective in Controlling the Symptoms of Allergic Rhinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novakova, Silviya M; Novakova, Plamena I; Yakovliev, Plamen H; Staevska, Maria T; Mateva, Nonka G; Dimcheva, Teodora D; Peichev, Jivko L

    2018-05-01

    Background Allergic rhinitis is the most common allergic disorder. Although the management of the disease is successful in many patients, based on guidelines, some of them remain with symptoms uncontrolled with pharmacotherapy. Presently, there is no substantiated information on the control of allergic rhinitis in patients who underwent sublingual immunotherapy. Objective The purpose of this prospective follow-up study was to assess the control of allergic rhinitis in adults after a three-year course of house dust mite sublingual immunotherapy. Methods This prospective real-life study was designed to include adults with moderate to severe allergic rhinitis sensitized to house dust mite who underwent a three-year course of sublingual immunotherapy. Control of symptoms was assessed by Rhinitis Control Assessment Test (RCAT) after three years of house dust mite sublingual immunotherapy. Additionally, patients assessed their symptoms by utilizing a visual analog scale. Results A total number of 86 consecutively enrolled patients (46 (53.49%) men; mean age 26.10 years (SD = 5.85)) with moderate to severe allergic rhinitis and clinically relevant sensitization to house dust mite were evaluated. When assessed by RCAT on the third year, 74 (86.05%) had well-controlled symptoms and 20 (27.03%) of them were completely controlled. A significant reduction in visual analog scale scores-from 7.52 cm at baseline to 2.31 cm-was established ( P house dust mite sublingual immunotherapy appears effective in controlling the symptoms of allergic rhinitis.

  18. Seasonal Allergies at a Glance: What the Science Says

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... T U V W X Y Z Seasonal Allergies at a Glance If you have an allergy, your immune system reacts to something that doesn’t bother most other people. People with seasonal allergies (also called hay fever or allergic rhinitis) react ...

  19. Occupational rhinitis and bronchial asthma due to artichoke (Cynara scolymus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miralles, Juan-Carlos; García-Sells, Javier; Bartolomé, Borja; Negro, José-María

    2003-07-01

    The artichoke is a perennial horticultural plant that belongs to the Compositae family. To present case studies of 2 vegetable warehouse workers who developed occupational rhinitis and bronchial asthma by sensitization to artichoke. Skin prick tests with common inhalants and foods were performed. Specific IgE to artichoke, Parietaria judaica pollen, and Olea europaea pollen extracts was measured by a specific IgE enzyme immunosorbent assay kit. Molecular mass of the allergens was studied by the sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) immunoblotting technique. Patients underwent a nasal challenge test, and one patient provided peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR) measurements in her workplace. In both patients, results of skin prick tests to artichoke were positive. Levels of specific IgE for artichoke were 0.68 kU/L in patient 1 and 2.14 kU/L in patient 2. The protein composition of the artichoke extract, studied by SDS-PAGE, showed that most bands ranged from 30 to 14 kDa. The IgE-binding bands with the serum samples of patient 1 showed apparent molecular masses of 56, 48, 38, 31, 27, 25, 16, and 15 kDa; however, the serum samples of patient 2 showed IgE bands of 21 and 19 kDa. Western blotting of artichoke extract showed a complete inhibition of IgE-binding bands when serum samples were preincubated with P. judaica pollen extract. Nasal challenge with artichoke extract triggered a peak nasal inspiratory flow decrease of 81% and 85% in patient 1 and patient 2, respectively. Finally, patient 1 recorded a PEFR decrease of up to 36% after exposure to artichoke in her workplace. SDS-PAGE immunoblotting inhibition performed for the artichoke extract showed a total disappearance of the specific IgE binding bands when serum samples were previously incubated with P. judaica pollen extract, thus establishing the existence of a serologic cross-reactivity between artichoke and P. judaica pollen.

  20. Real-life study showing better control of allergic rhinitis by immunotherapy than regular pharmacotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Droessaert, V.; Timmermans, M.; Dekimpe, E.; Seys, S.; Ceuppens, J. J.; Fokkens, W. J.; Hellings, P. W.

    2016-01-01

    Treatment for allergic rhinitis (AR) aims at reducing the burden of allergic inflammation, either by suppression of the nasal inflammation with pharmacotherapy or by inducing tolerance via immunotherapy (IT). At present, we lack information on the comparison between the degree of symptom control in

  1. FEV 1 , FVC, FEV 1 /FVVC as predictors of rhinitis among saw mill ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Data on sociodemographic variables, symptoms of rhinitis, etc was obtained using a modified semi structured British medical research council questionnaire while respiratory function data was measured using a spirometry. Result: A total of 400 responds comprising of 200 saw mill workers and 200 controls participated in ...

  2. Important research questions in allergy and related diseases: nonallergic rhinitis: a GA2LEN paper

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bousquet, J.; Fokkens, W.; Burney, P.; Durham, S. R.; Bachert, C.; Akdis, C. A.; Canonica, G. W.; Dahlen, S.-E.; Zuberbier, T.; Bieber, T.; Bonini, S.; Bousquet, P. J.; Brozek, J. L.; Cardell, L.-O.; Crameri, R.; Custovic, A.; Demoly, P.; van Wijk, R. G.; Gjomarkaj, M.; Holland, C.; Howarth, P.; Humbert, M.; Johnston, S. L.; Kauffmann, F.; Kowalski, M. L.; Lambrecht, B.; Lehmann, S.; Leynaert, B.; Lodrup-Carlsen, K.; Mullol, J.; Niggemann, B.; Nizankowska-Mogilnicka, E.; Papadopoulos, N.; Passalacqua, G.; Schünemann, H. J.; Simon, H.-U.; Todo-Bom, A.; Toskala, E.; Valenta, R.; Wickman, M.; Zock, J. P.

    2008-01-01

    Nonallergic rhinitis (NAR) can be defined as a chronic nasal inflammation which is not caused by systemic IgE-dependent mechanisms. It is common and probably affects far more than 200 million people worldwide. Both children and adults are affected. However, its exact prevalence is unknown and its

  3. Age: An effect modifier of the association between allergic rhinitis and Otitis media with effusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roditi, Rachel E; Veling, Maria; Shin, Jennifer J

    2016-07-01

    1) To determine whether there is a significant relationship between allergic rhinitis and otitis media with effusion (OME), Eustachian tube dysfunction (ETD), or tympanic membrane retraction (TMR) in children in a nationally representative population; and 2) to determine whether age is an effect modifier of any such association because this hypothesis has yet to be tested. Retrospective analysis of cross-sectional national databases with limited potential for referral bias. National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey and National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey, 2005-2010. Univariate, multivariate, stratified, and subgroup analyses were performed as defined a priori. The primary outcomes were OME, ETD, or TMR; the primary predictor variable was allergic rhinitis, with age evaluated as an effect modifier. Data representing 1,491,045,375 pediatric visits were examined and demonstrated that age was an effect modifier of the assessed association. More specifically, in children 6 years of age or older, the presence of allergic rhinitis significantly increased the odds of OME, ETD, or TMR (odds ratio [OR] 4.20; 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.17, 8.09; P effect modifier of the association between allergic rhinitis and OME; a significant relationship is observed in children 6 years of age and older, whereas there is no significant association in younger children. 2c. Laryngoscope, 126:1687-1692, 2016. © 2015 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  4. Asthma and Allergic Rhinitis Correlation in Palm Tree Workers of Jahrom City in 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farahmand Fard, Mohammad Amin; Khanjani, Narges; Arabi Mianroodi, Aliasghar; Ashrafi Asgarabad, Ahad

    2017-05-01

    Allergic rhinitis and asthma can be related to occupation. The present study aimed to investigate the correlation between asthma or allergic rhinitis and employment in the palm tree gardens of Jahrom, Iran. This was a cross-sectional study including 50 palm tree garden workers and a control group of 50 office employees. Data collection included demographics, as well as standard International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood (ISAAC) and A New Symptom-Based Questionnaire for Predicting the Presence of Asthma (ASQ) questionnaires. Data were analyzed using SPSS22. Descriptive statistics, chi-square test, t-test, and logistics regression were used to analyze data. The correlation between asthma and occupation was significant ( P=0.046); and asthma prevalence was higher in palm tree garden workers. However, no relationship was observed between age, duration of employment, smoking cigarettes, hookah, or opium addiction with asthma. Furthermore, in this study, no significant relation was observed between the prevalence of asthma and contact with dust, contact with pets' skin and hair, family history of asthma, or the use of perfume and air freshener. The symptoms of allergic rhinitis (including sneezing, runny nose, and blocked nose) were significantly greater in palm tree garden workers (P=0.038). These symptoms in both workers and office employees were higher in spring. In our study, allergic rhinitis and asthma were more common in palm tree garden workers than in the general population. According to our study, people working in this occupation should take necessary precautions.

  5. The sex-shift in single disease and multimorbid asthma and rhinitis during puberty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keller, Theresa; Hohmann, C; Standl, M

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cross-sectional studies suggested that allergy prevalence in childhood is higher in boys compared to girls, but it remains unclear if this inequality changes after puberty. We examined the sex-specific prevalence of asthma and rhinitis as single and as multimorbid diseases before and ...

  6. Association between allergic rhinitis and hospital resource use among asthmatic children in Norway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sazonov Kocevar, V; Thomas, J; Jonsson, L

    2005-01-01

    of hospital admissions during a 2-year period, 1998-1999. Multivariate linear regression, adjusting for risk factors including age, gender, year of admission, urban/rural residence and severity of asthma episode, estimated the association between allergic rhinitis and total hospital days. A multivariate Cox...

  7. The sex‐shift in single disease and multimorbid asthma and rhinitis during puberty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keller, Theresa; Hohmann, C; Standl, M

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cross-sectional studies suggested that allergy prevalence in childhood is higher in boys compared to girls, but it remains unclear if this inequality changes after puberty. We examined the sex-specific prevalence of asthma and rhinitis as single and as multimorbid diseases before...

  8. Predicting occupational asthma and rhinitis in bakery workers referred for clinical evaluation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonaid, Badri Sadat; Rooyackers, Jos; Stigter, Erik; Portengen, Lützen; Krop, Esmeralda; Heederik, Dick

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Occupational allergic diseases are a major problem in some workplaces like in the baking industry. Diagnostic rules have been used in surveillance but not yet in the occupational respiratory clinic. OBJECTIVE: To develop diagnostic models predicting baker's asthma and rhinitis among

  9. Smoking, environmental tobacco smoke and occupational irritants increase the risk of chronic rhinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hisinger-Mölkänen, Hanna; Piirilä, Päivi; Haahtela, Tari; Sovijärvi, Anssi; Pallasaho, Paula

    2018-01-01

    Allergic and non-allergic rhinitis cause a lot of symptoms in everyday life. To decrease the burden more information of the preventable risk factors is needed. We assessed prevalence and risk factors for chronic nasal symptoms, exploring the effects of smoking, environmental tobacco smoke, exposure to occupational irritants, and their combinations. In 2016, a postal survey was conducted among a random population sample of 8000 adults in Helsinki, Finland with a 50.5% response rate. Smoking was associated with a significant increase in occurrence of chronic rhinitis (longstanding nasal congestion or runny nose), but not with self-reported or physician diagnosed allergic rhinitis. The highest prevalence estimates of nasal symptoms, 55.1% for chronic rhinitis, 49.1% for nasal congestion, and 40.7% for runny nose, were found among smokers with occupational exposure to gases, fumes or dusts.Besides active smoking, also exposure to environmental tobacco smoke combined with occupational exposure increased the risk of nasal symptoms. Smoking, environmental tobacco smoke, and occupational irritants are significant risk factors for nasal symptoms with an additive pattern. The findings suggest that these factors should be systematically inquired in patients with nasal symptoms for appropriate preventive measures. (192 words).

  10. Transforming growth factor beta and platelets in allergic rhinitis and sinusitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosas, Alejandro; Valencia, Martha P; Sánchez, Manuel; Bautista, Maura; Rico, Guadalupe; Vega, Gloria B

    2011-01-01

    To determine the TGF-? concentration in plasma and platelets in patients with allergic rhinitis or rhinosinusitis. The study group included 36 adult females, 6 with clinical and laboratory diagnoses of allergic rhinitis, 18 with allergic rhinitis and sinusitis (rhino-sinusitis) and 12 clinically healthy controls. The samples were obtained from venous blood. TGF-? was measured in plasma and in the supernatant fluid of platelets by a solid phase Enzymo-immun assay, and IL-11 was quantified using a commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kit. In both patient groups platelet numbers (106/mL) were greater than in controls. Plasma concentration (pg/ml) of TGF-? in the allergic rhinitis group (276 ± 16) was lower than in control group (932 ± 99) (p platelet TGF-? concentration was smaller than in control, but only significant (p platelet number and intraplatelet TGF-? levels. The inverse correlation between intra-platelet TGF-? and circulating platelets number found in all individuals studied suggests that platelets do not alter the regulating mechanism of TGF-? production in allergy or infection.

  11. Efficacy and safety of the probiotic Lactobacillus paracasei LP-33 in allergic rhinitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Costa, D J; Marteau, P; Amouyal, M

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: An imbalance between Th1 and Th2 cells is involved in allergic rhinitis (AR) that may be improved by probiotics. To test the efficacy of the probiotic Lactobacillus paracasei subsp. paracasei LP-33, a double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized trial was carried out in pat...

  12. Compare of the effect of doxepin and citerizine in treatment of allergic rhinitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zamani Barsari F

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: Allergic rhinitis is a common disease which is present in 20% of general population. Major symptoms include sneezing, rhinorrhea, nasal congestion, and nasal pruritus. It seems that tricyclic antidepressants blocking histamine receptors may be used as an effective treatment in allergic rhinitis. Materials and Methods: In this clinical trial study, 84 patients with allergic rhinitis entered the study and randomly divided into two groups. Patients of 1st group received cetirizine and 2nd group received doxepin for 2 weeks. After 2 weeks patients were evaluated about sneezing, rhinorrhea, nasal congestion, and nasal pruritus. Results: The results of our study showed that clinical score of patients after 2 weeks was not different in both groups (p=0.261. The only symptom that was affected by the kind of treatment and was significantly different between groups was sneezing (p=0.005. Conclusion: It seems that there is not much difference in using cetirizine and doxepin in treatment of seasonal allergic rhinitis sympotoms. It is recommended that future studies use TCAs with more potent blocking anti-histamine receptors feature and on more samples.

  13. Exhaled Leukotrienes and Bronchial Responsiveness to Methacholine in Patients with Seasonal Allergic Rhinitis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Čáp, P.; Malý, Marek; Pehal, F.; Pelikán, Z.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 102, č. 2 (2009), s. 103-109 ISSN 1081-1206 Grant - others:GA MZd(CZ) NL7024 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : allergic rhinitis * asthma * breath condensate * leukotrienes * gas chromatography * mass spectrometry analysis Subject RIV: FN - Epidemiology, Contagious Diseases ; Clinical Immunology Impact factor: 2.457, year: 2009

  14. Analysis of Exhaled Leukotrienes in Nonasthmatic Adult Patients with Seasonal Allergic Rhinitis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Čáp, P.; Pehal, F.; Malý, Marek; Chládek, J.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 60, č. 2 (2005), s. 171-176 ISSN 0105-4538 Source of funding: V - iné verejné zdroje Keywords : allergic rhinitis * asthma * breath condensate * gas-chromatography/mass spectrometry analysis * leukotrienes Subject RIV: BB - Applied Statistics, Operational Research Impact factor: 4.120, year: 2005

  15. Markers in breath condensate in patients with occupational asthma and rhinitis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lebedová, J.; Klusáčková, P.; Kačer, P.; Kuzma, M.; Pelclová, D.; Navrátil, Tomáš; Fenclová, Z.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 128, č. 4 (2005), 346S ISSN 0012-3692. [CHEST 2005. 29.10.-3.11. 2005, Montréal] R&D Projects: GA MZd NR8109 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : asthma * rhinitis Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry

  16. Prevalence and risk factors for allergic rhinitis in primary schoolchildren in Budapest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sultész, Monika; Katona, Gábor; Hirschberg, Andor; Gálffy, Gabriella

    2010-05-01

    There is growing evidence that the prevalence of allergic diseases is increasing, especially among children. The aim of this study was to evaluate the incidence and risk factors of allergic rhinitis in 6-12-year-old schoolchildren in Budapest. A total of 6335 children aged between 6 and 12 years attending 21 randomly selected primary schools in Budapest were surveyed in September 2007 by using a questionnaire consisting in part of questions compiled by the International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood and in part of questions based on our own experience. 3933 of the questionnaires (1976 M/1957 F) were appropriately completed by the parents. The prevalence of current allergic rhinitis was 14.9% (n=530), that of physician-diagnosed allergic rhinitis was 11.6% (n=413), and that of cumulative allergic rhinitis was 26.5% (n=943). Male gender (pBudapest was 14.9%, which is higher than reported from other European countries. Our findings differ from those on other cohorts in that exposure to ragweed and to indoor environmental factors in concrete housing estates in Budapest may be of particular importance as concerns allergic sensitization. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Comparison of Th17 cells mediated immunological response among asthmatic children with or without allergic rhinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qing, Miao; Yongge, Liu; Wei, Xu; Yan, Wang; Zhen, Li; Yixin, Ren; Hui, Guan; Li, Xiang

    2018-03-31

    To investigate whether there were differences in Th17 cells mediated immunological responses among asthmatics with or without allergic rhinitis. A case-control comparison was conducted in a cohort of 67 children with asthma (AS), 50 children with allergic rhinitis (AR), 52 children with both AS and AR (ASR), 25 infectious rhinitis (IR), and 55 healthy controls (HC). The percentages of circulating Th17 cells were determined by flow cytometry. The Th2- and Th17-related cytokines in plasma and culture supernatants were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The effect of proinflammation cytokine IL-17E on Th2 cytokines production from human T helper (Th) lymphocytes was analyzed. (1) A inter-group comparison revealed that Th17 cells levels were highest in ASR group [(0.89% ± 0.27) %], following by AS group [(0.82 ± 0.29) %] and AR group[(0.78 ± 0.17) %] (Pimmunological characteristics among asthmatic children with or without allergic rhinitis.

  18. Beclomethasone Dipropionate Nasal Aerosol in Patients with Perennial Allergic Rhinitis (BALANCE) study: 6-month results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukstein, Donald; Parikh, Ruchir; Eid, Sherrine; Ferro, Thomas; Morello, Jean-Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Perennial allergic rhinitis (PAR) exerts significant quality-of-life and economic burdens on society. Beclomethasone dipropionate (BDP) nasal aerosol is the first nonaqueous, hydrofluoroalkane-propelled intranasal corticosteroid approved for patients in the United States to treat PAR and seasonal allergic rhinitis. To evaluate real-world effectiveness of BDP nasal aerosol from the patient's perspective by using a postmarketing observational registry. Patients (N = 824) from 43 U.S. study sites completed monthly patient-reported outcome instruments, including the Rhinitis Control Assessment Test (primary outcome variable), Treatment Satisfaction Questionnaire for Medication, Work Productivity and Activity Impairment Questionnaire plus Classroom Impairment Questions: Allergy-Specific, Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, and Mini Rhinoconjunctivitis Quality of Life Questionnaire for 6 months. The primary outcome assessment (Rhinitis Control Assessment Test score) (N = 527) indicated significant symptomatic improvement over baseline beginning at month 1 (p 78.8% of respondents who achieved clinically meaningful improvement over 6 months. Secondary outcome measures Mini Rhinoconjunctivitis Quality of Life Questionnaire (p Work Productivity and Activity Impairment Questionnaire plus Classroom Impairment Questions: Allergy-Specific, with the exception of work time missed and class time missed, were significantly (p life, work, and school-related activities, and is associated with high patient satisfaction, reduced productivity loss and activity impairment, and improvement in sleep quality.

  19. Comparison of turbinoplasty surgery efficacy in patients with and without allergic rhinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamerschmidt, Rodrigo; Hamerschmidt, Rogério; Moreira, Ana Tereza Ramos; Tenório, Sérgio Bernardo; Timi, Jorge Rufno Ribas

    2016-01-01

    Turbinoplasty is a procedure that aims to reduce the size of the inferior turbinate through exuberant bone removal with high mucosal preservation. The procedure is recommended for patients with or without allergic rhinitis and those showing irreversible hypertrophy of inferior turbinates. To evaluate the efficacy of inferior turbinoplasty for obstructive and non-obstructive symptoms in patients with or without allergic rhinitis. Prospective study with 57 patients who underwent inferior turbinoplasty. They were evaluated for nasal obstruction, snoring, facial pressure, smell alterations, sneezing, nasal itching and runny nose symptoms, surgery time, and intraoperative bleeding. The last evaluation took place three months after surgery. Thirty-nine patients with allergic rhinitis and 18 without were assessed. Ninety days after surgery, 94.7% of patients showed degrees IV and V of breathing improvement; 89.5% showed moderate or complete improvement in snoring; all patients showed smell improvement (only one showed moderate improvement; all the others had full improvement); 95.5% experienced complete facial pressure improvement; and 89.7% showed moderate to complete improvement in nasal itching and runny nose symptoms, as well as in sneezing. The efficacy of inferior turbinoplasty was confirmed not only for obstructive symptoms, but also for non-obstructive symptoms in patients with and without allergic rhinitis. Copyright © 2015 Associação Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia Cérvico-Facial. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  20. Comparison of turbinoplasty surgery efficacy in patients with and without allergic rhinitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Hamerschmidt

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT INTRODUCTION: Turbinoplasty is a procedure that aims to reduce the size of the inferior turbinate through exuberant bone removal with high mucosal preservation. The procedure is recommended for patients with or without allergic rhinitis and those showing irreversible hypertrophy of inferior turbinates. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the efficacy of inferior turbinoplasty for obstructive and non-obstructive symptoms in patients with or without allergic rhinitis. METHODS: Prospective study with 57 patients who underwent inferior turbinoplasty. They were evaluated for nasal obstruction, snoring, facial pressure, smell alterations, sneezing, nasal itching and runny nose symptoms, surgery time, and intraoperative bleeding. The last evaluation took place three months after surgery. RESULTS: Thirty-nine patients with allergic rhinitis and 18 without were assessed. Ninety days after surgery, 94.7% of patients showed degrees IV and V of breathing improvement; 89.5% showed moderate or complete improvement in snoring; all patients showed smell improvement (only one showed moderate improvement; all the others had full improvement; 95.5% experienced complete facial pressure improvement; and 89.7% showed moderate to complete improvement in nasal itching and runny nose symptoms, as well as in sneezing. CONCLUSION: The efficacy of inferior turbinoplasty was confirmed not only for obstructive symptoms, but also for non-obstructive symptoms in patients with and without allergic rhinitis.

  1. Laryngeal effects of nasal allergen provocation in singers with allergic rhinitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verguts, Monique M. L.; Eggermont, Anita; Decoster, Wivine; de Jong, Felix I. C. R. S.; Hellings, Peter W.

    2011-01-01

    In spite of our recent insight into nasobronchial interaction mechanisms in allergic airway disease, the association between allergic rhinitis and voice complaints remains obscure. To evaluate the effects of nasal allergen provocation and seasonal grass pollen exposure on subjective and objective

  2. Allergic Rhinitis and its Impact on Asthma (ARIA) guidelines-2016 revision

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brożek, Jan L.; Bousquet, Jean; Agache, Ioana; Agarwal, Arnav; Bachert, Claus; Bosnic-Anticevich, Sinthia; Brignardello-Petersen, Romina; Canonica, G. Walter; Casale, Thomas; Chavannes, Niels H.; Correia de Sousa, Jaime; Cruz, Alvaro A.; Cuello-Garcia, Carlos A.; Demoly, Pascal; Dykewicz, Mark; Etxeandia-Ikobaltzeta, Itziar; Florez, Ivan D.; Fokkens, Wytske; Fonseca, Joao; Hellings, Peter W.; Klimek, Ludger; Kowalski, Sergio; Kuna, Piotr; Laisaar, Kaja-Triin; Larenas-Linnemann, Désirée E.; Lødrup Carlsen, Karin C.; Manning, Peter J.; Meltzer, Eli; Mullol, Joaquim; Muraro, Antonella; O'Hehir, Robyn; Ohta, Ken; Panzner, Petr; Papadopoulos, Nikolaos; Park, Hae-Sim; Passalacqua, Gianni; Pawankar, Ruby; Price, David; Riva, John J.; Roldán, Yetiani; Ryan, Dermot; Sadeghirad, Behnam; Samolinski, Boleslaw; Schmid-Grendelmeier, Peter; Sheikh, Aziz; Togias, Alkis; Valero, Antonio; Valiulis, Arunas; Valovirta, Erkka; Ventresca, Matthew; Wallace, Dana; Waserman, Susan; Wickman, Magnus; Wiercioch, Wojtek; Yepes-Nuñez, Juan José; Zhang, Luo; Zhang, Yuan; Zidarn, Mihaela; Zuberbier, Torsten; Schünemann, Holger J.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Allergic rhinitis (AR) affects 10% to 40% of the population. It reduces quality of life and school and work performance and is a frequent reason for office visits in general practice. Medical costs are large, but avoidable costs associated with lost work productivity are even larger than

  3. Sublingual immunotherapy in children with allergic rhinitis : quality of systematic reviews

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Bot, Cindy M. A.; Moed, Heleen; Berger, Marjolein Y.; Roeder, Esther; van Wijk, Roy G.; van der Wouden, Johannes C.

    Systematic reviews have gained popularity as a way to combine the increasing amount of research information. This study assessed the quality of systematic reviews and meta-analyses of sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) for allergic rhinitis in children, published since 2000. Eligible reviews were

  4. Evaluation of impermeable covers for bedding in patients with allergic rhinitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Terreehorst, Ingrid; Hak, Eelko; Oosting, Albert J.; Tempels-Pavlica, Zana; de Monchy, Jan G. R.; Bruijnzeel-Koomen, Carla A. F. M.; Aalberse, Rob C.; Gerth van Wijk, Roy

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Encasing bedding in impermeable covers reduces exposure to house-dust mites, but the clinical benefit of this intervention as part of mite-avoidance measures for patients with allergic rhinitis is not known. We performed a multicenter, randomized, placebo-controlled trial of one year of

  5. Prevalence and risk factors for allergic rhinitis in two resource-limited settings in Peru with disparate degrees of urbanization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, L M; Romero, K M; Robinson, C L; Hansel, N N; Gilman, R H; Hamilton, R G; Lima, J J; Wise, R A; Checkley, W

    2015-01-01

    Allergic rhinitis is a disease with a high global disease burden, but risk factors that contribute to this condition are not well understood. To assess the prevalence and risk factors of allergic rhinitis in two Peruvian populations with disparate degrees of urbanization. We conducted a population-based, cross-sectional study on 1441 children aged 13-15 years at enrollment (mean age 14.9 years, 51% boys) to investigate the prevalence of allergic disease. We used a standardized, Spanish validated questionnaire to determine the prevalence of allergic rhinitis and asked about sociodemographics and family history of allergies. Children also underwent spirometry, exhaled nitric oxide, allergy skin testing to 10 common household allergens and provided a blood sample for measurement of 25OH vitamin D and total serum IgE. Overall prevalence of allergic rhinitis was 18% (95% CI 16% to 20%). When stratified by site, the prevalence of allergic rhinitis was 23% Lima vs. 13% in Tumbes (P overweight (1.5, 1.0-2.3); exhaled nitric oxide ≥ 20 ppb (1.9, 1.3-2.7); and total serum IgE ≥ 95th percentile (2.4, 1.2-4.8). Population attributable risk of important factors for allergic rhinitis were 25% for high exhaled nitric oxide, 22% for allergic sensitization to common household aeroallergens, 22% for paternal rhinitis, 10% for being overweight and 7% for an elevated total serum IgE. Allergic rhinitis was prevalent in both settings, and important risk factors include elevated exhaled nitric oxide, allergic sensitization to common household aeroallergens, parental rhinitis, being overweight and high total serum IgE. When considering subject-specific factors, the difference in prevalence between the urban and rural settings became non-important. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Typhoid fever vaccination strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Date, Kashmira A; Bentsi-Enchill, Adwoa; Marks, Florian; Fox, Kimberley

    2015-06-19

    Typhoid vaccination is an important component of typhoid fever prevention and control, and is recommended for public health programmatic use in both endemic and outbreak settings. We reviewed experiences with various vaccination strategies using the currently available typhoid vaccines (injectable Vi polysaccharide vaccine [ViPS], oral Ty21a vaccine, and injectable typhoid conjugate vaccine [TCV]). We assessed the rationale, acceptability, effectiveness, impact and implementation lessons of these strategies to inform effective typhoid vaccination strategies for the future. Vaccination strategies were categorized by vaccine disease control strategy (preemptive use for endemic disease or to prevent an outbreak, and reactive use for outbreak control) and vaccine delivery strategy (community-based routine, community-based campaign and school-based). Almost all public health typhoid vaccination programs used ViPS vaccine and have been in countries of Asia, with one example in the Pacific and one experience using the Ty21a vaccine in South America. All vaccination strategies were found to be acceptable, feasible and effective in the settings evaluated; evidence of impact, where available, was strongest in endemic settings and in the short- to medium-term. Vaccination was cost-effective in high-incidence but not low-incidence settings. Experience in disaster and outbreak settings remains limited. TCVs have recently become available and none are WHO-prequalified yet; no program experience with TCVs was found in published literature. Despite the demonstrated success of several typhoid vaccination strategies, typhoid vaccines remain underused. Implementation lessons should be applied to design optimal vaccination strategies using TCVs which have several anticipated advantages, such as potential for use in infant immunization programs and longer duration of protection, over the ViPS and Ty21a vaccines for typhoid prevention and control. Copyright © 2015. Published by

  7. INFLUENCE OF THE BRONCHIAL ASTHMA, ALLERGIC RHINITIS AND ATOPIC DERMATITIS ON THE QUALITY OF THE CHILDREN'S LIFE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.A. Dzhumagaziev

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This article is devoted to the study of the life quality of the children, suffering from bronchial asthma, allergic rhinitis and atopic dermatitis. The authors identified that children with atopic dermatitis have the lowest level of the life quality, while children, suffering from allergic rhinitis, have the highest values of the given property. It is typical that children and their parents evaluate the life at school extremely low against rather high figures of the physical and emotional functioning.Key words: bronchial asthma, allergic rhinitis, atopic dermatitis, children, life quality.

  8. Allergic rhinitis - a total genome-scan for susceptibility genes suggests a locus on chromosome 4q24-q27

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haagerup, A; Bjerke, T; Schøitz, P O

    2001-01-01

    Allergic rhinitis is a common disease of complex inheritance and is characterised by mucosal inflammation caused by allergen exposure. The genetics of closely related phenotypes such as asthma, atopy and to some extend atopic dermatitis has attracted attention in recent years. Genetic reports...... of allergic rhinitis on the contrary have as yet been most sparse. To identify candidate regions holding genes for allergic rhinitis we performed a total genome-scan on affected sib-pair families. From 100 Danish sib-pair families selected for allergy, families containing sib-pairs matching a phenotype...

  9. Substituting oat hay or maize silage for portion of alfalfa hay affects growth performance, ruminal fermentation, and nutrient digestibility of weaned calves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Yang; Zou, XinPing; Li, XiZhi; Guo, Gang; Ji, Peng; Wang, Yan; Li, ShengLi; Wang, YaJing; Cao, ZhiJun

    2018-01-01

    Objective The impact of forage feeding strategy on growth performance, ruminal fermentation and nutrient digestibility in post-weaning calves was investigated. Methods Forty-five female Holstein calves (body weight [BW] = 79.79±0.38 kg) were enrolled in the 35-d study at one week after weaning and randomly assigned to one of three dietary treatments. All diets were fed as total mixed ration containing 60% (dry matter [DM] basis) of basal starter feed and 40% (DM basis) of forage, but varied in composition of forage source including i) alfalfa (40% DM, AH); ii) alfalfa hay (26.7% DM)+oat hay (13.3% DM; OH); iii) alfalfa hay (26.7% DM)+corn silage (13.3% DM; WS). Results Dry matter intake was not different among treatment groups (p>0.05). However, BW (pcalves fed AH and OH were greater than WS-fed calves, whereas heart girth was greater in OH-fed calves than those fed AH and WS (pfeeding oat hay to postweaning calves increased crude protein digestibility (pcalves. PMID:28728373

  10. 17DD yellow fever vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Reinaldo M.; Maia, Maria de Lourdes S.; Farias, Roberto Henrique G.; Camacho, Luiz Antonio B.; Freire, Marcos S.; Galler, Ricardo; Yamamura, Anna Maya Yoshida; Almeida, Luiz Fernando C.; Lima, Sheila Maria B.; Nogueira, Rita Maria R.; Sá, Gloria Regina S.; Hokama, Darcy A.; de Carvalho, Ricardo; Freire, Ricardo Aguiar V.; Filho, Edson Pereira; Leal, Maria da Luz Fernandes; Homma, Akira

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To verify if the Bio-Manguinhos 17DD yellow fever vaccine (17DD-YFV) used in lower doses is as immunogenic and safe as the current formulation. Results: Doses from 27,476 IU to 587 IU induced similar seroconversion rates and neutralizing antibodies geometric mean titers (GMTs). Immunity of those who seroconverted to YF was maintained for 10 mo. Reactogenicity was low for all groups. Methods: Young and healthy adult males (n = 900) were recruited and randomized into 6 groups, to receive de-escalating doses of 17DD-YFV, from 27,476 IU to 31 IU. Blood samples were collected before vaccination (for neutralization tests to yellow fever, serology for dengue and clinical chemistry), 3 to 7 d after vaccination (for viremia and clinical chemistry) and 30 d after vaccination (for new yellow fever serology and clinical chemistry). Adverse events diaries were filled out by volunteers during 10 d after vaccination. Volunteers were retested for yellow fever and dengue antibodies 10 mo later. Seropositivity for dengue was found in 87.6% of volunteers before vaccination, but this had no significant influence on conclusions. Conclusion: In young healthy adults Bio-Manguinhos/Fiocruz yellow fever vaccine can be used in much lower doses than usual. International Register ISRCTN 38082350. PMID:23364472

  11. Increased Frequency of Rheumatoid Arthritis and Allergic Rhinitis among Pesticide Sprayers and Associations with Pesticide Use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koureas, Michalis; Rachiotis, George; Tsakalof, Andreas; Hadjichristodoulou, Christos

    2017-08-01

    Objective : The aim of this study was to identify diseases linked with the pesticide sprayer occupation and explore possible associations with exposure history data. Methods : Α cross sectional study was conducted among pesticide sprayers ( n = 80) and the general population ( n = 90) in Thessaly (Greece). Medical history, demographic characteristics and detailed exposure history were recorded by conducting personal interviews. Lifetime exposure indicators were calculated for several pesticide chemical subclasses. Moreover, organophosphate metabolite levels were quantified in urine samples of all participants by using gas chromatography -mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Multinomial analysis was used to determine associations between occupational pesticide exposure and diseases or disorders. Results : In the pesticide sprayers group, significantly higher frequencies for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and allergic rhinitis were observed compared with the control group ( p = 0.002 and p = 0.024 respectively). Within the pesticide sprayers group, high lifetime pesticide exposure was associated with increased risk for reporting RA (OR: 43.07 95% CI: 3.09-600.67) and allergic rhinitis (OR: 9.72 95% CI: 2.31-40.89), compared with low pesticide exposure. Exposure to organophsphate, guanidine and quinone pesticides were associated with RA while organophosphates, pyrethroids and paraquat were associated with allergic rhinitis. Despite the higher levels of certain pesticide metabolites observed among participants with rheumatoid arthritis, the differences were not statistically significant. One metabolite (diethylthiophosphate) was found to be significantly increased in allergic rhinitis cases ( p = 0.037). Conclusion s : The results from the current study suggest a possible association of occupational pesticide exposure with RA and allergic rhinitis that should be further investigated.

  12. Managing Rocky Mountain spotted fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minniear, Timothy D; Buckingham, Steven C

    2009-11-01

    Rocky Mountain spotted fever is caused by the tick-borne bacterium Rickettsia rickettsii. Symptoms range from moderate illness to severe illness, including cardiovascular compromise, coma and death. The disease is prevalent in most of the USA, especially during warmer months. The trademark presentation is fever and rash with a history of tick bite, although tick exposure is unappreciated in over a third of cases. Other signature symptoms include headache and abdominal pain. The antibiotic therapy of choice for R. rickettsii infection is doxycycline. Preventive measures for Rocky Mountain spotted fever and other tick-borne diseases include: wearing long-sleeved, light colored clothing; checking for tick attachment and removing attached ticks promptly; applying topical insect repellent; and treating clothing with permethrin.

  13. Autoinflammatory Diseases with Periodic Fevers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sag, Erdal; Bilginer, Yelda; Ozen, Seza

    2017-07-01

    One purpose of this review was to raise awareness for the new autoinflammatory syndromes. These diseases are increasingly recognized and are in the differential diagnosis of many disease states. We also aimed to review the latest recommendations for the diagnosis, management, and treatment of these patients. Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF), cryopyrin-associated periodic syndrome (CAPS), tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated periodic fever syndrome (TRAPS), and hyperimmunoglobulinemia D and periodic fever syndrome/mevalonate kinase deficiency (HIDS/MVKD) are the more common autoinflammatory diseases that are characterized by periodic fevers and attacks of inflammation. Recently much collaborative work has been done to understand the characteristics of these patients and to develop recommendations to guide the physicians in the care of these patients. These recent recommendations will be summarized for all four diseases. FMF is the most common periodic fever disease. We need to further understand the pathogenesis and the role of single mutations in the disease. Recently, the management and treatment of the disease have been nicely reviewed. CAPS is another interesting disease associated with severe complications. Anti-interleukin-1 (anti-IL-1) treatment provides cure for these patients. TRAPS is characterized by the longest delay in diagnosis; thus, both pediatricians and internists should be aware of the characteristic features and the follow-up of these patients. HIDS/MVKD is another autoinflammatory diseases characterized with fever attacks. The spectrum of disease manifestation is rather large in this disease, and we need further research on biomarkers for the optimal management of these patients.

  14. Dengue fever: diagnosis and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiwanitkit, Viroj

    2010-07-01

    Dengue fever is a common tropical infection. This acute febrile illness can be a deadly infection in cases of severe manifestation, causing dengue hemorrhagic shock. In this brief article, I will summarize and discuss the diagnosis and treatment of this disease. For diagnosis of dengue, most tropical doctors make use of presumptive diagnosis; however, the definite diagnosis should be based on immunodiagnosis or viral study. Focusing on treatment, symptomatic and supportive treatment is the main therapeutic approach. The role of antiviral drugs in the treatment of dengue fever has been limited, but is currently widely studied.

  15. Overview of Classical Swine Fever (Hog Cholera, Classical Swine fever)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Classical swine fever is a contagious often fatal disease of pigs clinically characterized by high body temperature, lethargy, yellowish diarrhea, vomits and purple skin discoloration of ears, lower abdomen and legs. It was first described in the early 19th century in the USA. Later, a condition i...

  16. Dengue fever: a Wikipedia clinical review

    OpenAIRE

    Heilman, James M; Wolff, Jacob De; Beards, Graham M; Basden, Brian J

    2014-01-01

    Dengue fever, also known as breakbone fever, is a mosquito-borne infectious tropical disease caused by the dengue virus. Symptoms include fever, headache, muscle and joint pains, and a characteristic skin rash that is similar to measles. In a small proportion of cases, the disease develops into life-threatening dengue hemorrhagic fever, which results in bleeding, thrombocytopenia, and leakage of blood plasma, or into dengue shock syndrome, in which dangerously low blood pressure occurs. Treat...

  17. Modulation of neurotrophin and neurotrophin receptor expression in nasal mucosa after nasal allergen provocation in allergic rhinitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raap, U.; Fokkens, W.; Bruder, M.; Hoogsteden, H.; Kapp, A.; Braunstahl, G.-J.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patients with allergic rhinitis (AR) feature both allergic airway inflammation and a hyperresponsiveness to nonspecific stimuli which is partly neuronally controlled. Still, it is unclear whether or not neurotrophins are involved in airway pathophysiology of AR and in nasobronchial

  18. Effect of dietary restriction and hay inclusion in the diet of slow-growing broilers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karla P. Picoli

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of dietary restriction and inclusion of alfalfa (Medicago sativa L. and Bermudagrass (Cynodon dactylon cv Coastal hays in the diets of ISA Label JA57 slow-growing male broilers on performance, gastrointestinal tract characteristics, and economic viability. A total of 272 broilers at 21 days old were distributed in a randomized experimental design with four treatments, four replicates, and 17 birds per experimental unit. The treatments consisted of ad libitum concentrated feed (control intake, feed restriction (80% of the control intake, and feed restrictions with supplementation of alfalfa hay (80% of the control intake+20% alfalfa or Bermudagrass hay (80% control intake+20% Bermuda. Dietary restriction, with and without hay inclusion, negatively affected (P<0.05 the weight gain of the birds; however, feed conversion was improved (P<0.05 for animals that underwent only restricted feeding, which also had the best economic indices. Birds subjected to dietary restriction and inclusion of hays showed changes (P<0.05 in the gastrointestinal organs and intestinal morphology.

  19. Bitumen on Water: Charred Hay as a PFD (Petroleum Flotation Device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nusrat Jahan

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Global demand for petroleum keeps increasing while traditional supplies decline. One alternative to the use of conventional crude oils is the utilization of Canadian bitumen. Raw bitumen is a dense, viscous, semi-liquid that is diluted with lighter crude oil to permit its transport through pipelines to terminals where it can then be shipped to global markets. When spilled, it naturally weathers to its original form and becomes dense enough to sink in aquatic systems. This severely limits oil spill recovery and remediation options. Here we report on the application of charred hay as a method for modifying the surface behavior of bitumen in aquatic environments. Waste or surplus hay is abundant in North America. Its surface can easily be modified through charring and/or chemical treatment. We have characterized the modified and charred hay using solid-state NMR, contact angle measurements and infrared spectroscopy. Tests of these materials to treat spilled bitumen in model aquatic systems have been undertaken. Our results indicate that bitumen spills on water will retain their buoyancy for longer periods after treatment with charred hay, or charred hay coated with calcium oxide, improving recovery options.

  20. Fermentation characteristics in hay from Cynodon and crop stubble treated with exogenous enzymes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yânez André Gomes Santana

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The effect of treatment with xylanase and β-glucanase was evaluated for gas production and the ruminal degradation of nutrients from the hay of Tifton 85 grass and the stubble of maize, sorghum, peanut, sunflower and sesame crops. Two commercial fibrolytic enzymes were used (Dyadic xylanase PLUS - Xylanase; BrewZyme LP-β-glucanase, added to the hay at doses of 7.5 units of endoglucanase and 0.46 units of xylanase per 500 mg/gDM, for the cellulase and xylanase products respectively. The chemical composition of the hay was determined for no enzyme application and 24 hours after enzyme treatment, and the in vitro gas production and in situ microbial degradation was estimated for dry matter, organic matter, neutral detergent fibre and truly-degradable organic matter after 24 hours of incubation in the rumen. Enzyme treatment of the hay from Tifton 85 grass and the stubble of maize, sorghum, sunflower, peanut and sesame crops with the exogenous fibrolytic enzymes β-glucanase and xylanase influences in vitro gas production, and the in situ degradation of dry matter, organic matter, neutral detergent fibre and truly-degradable organic matter in the rumen. This variation can be attributed to differences in the chemical composition of the hay from the grass and the crop stubble, and to the different ways the enzymes act upon the cell wall.

  1. Radiological observation in typhoid fever

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, K Y; Park, H Y; Kim, J D; Rhee, H S [Presbyterian Medical Center, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of)

    1985-12-15

    Radiographic findings in plain abdominal films, chest PA and liver scanning are considered to be ancillary diagnostic methods for uncomplicated typhoid fever and a valuable method for detection of complication such as intestinal perforation. 189 cases of clinically proven typhoid fever from Mar. 1973 to Feb. 1979 in this Hospital were reviewed and radiographic findings were analyzed carefully. The results are as follows: 1. Most (73.6%) cases were between 20 and 40 years of age. 2. Three of the most common radiographic findings were as follows: 1) Localized paralytic ileus in RLQ or diffuse paralytic ileus (96.3%). 2) Hepatomegaly (56.5%). 3) Splenomegaly (49.7%). 3. In cases of typhoid fever with intestinal perforation there were additional significant findings such as free air under diaphragm (85%), free fluid in peritoneal cavity (90%) and air fluid levels in RLQ (80%). 4. The most frequent chest x-ray finding was elevation of diaphragm (11.1%). 5. 8 cases of complicated typhoid fever which eventually came to operation were diagnosed only by radiographic method.

  2. Diarrhea associated with typhoid fever

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roy, S. K.; Speelman, P.; Butler, T.; Nath, S.; Rahman, H.; Stoll, B. J.

    1985-01-01

    To study the pathogenesis of diarrhea occurring with typhoid fever, we selected 42 patients with diarrhea and blood cultures positive for Salmonella typhi or Salmonella paratyphi A, but without diarrheal copathogens, for measurement of stool output and examination of fecal composition. The mean

  3. Radiological observation in typhoid fever

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, K. Y.; Park, H. Y.; Kim, J. D.; Rhee, H. S.

    1985-01-01

    Radiographic findings in plain abdominal films, chest PA and liver scanning are considered to be ancillary diagnostic methods for uncomplicated typhoid fever and a valuable method for detection of complication such as intestinal perforation. 189 cases of clinically proven typhoid fever from Mar. 1973 to Feb. 1979 in this Hospital were reviewed and radiographic findings were analyzed carefully. The results are as follows: 1. Most (73.6%) cases were between 20 and 40 years of age. 2. Three of the most common radiographic findings were as follows: 1) Localized paralytic ileus in RLQ or diffuse paralytic ileus (96.3%). 2) Hepatomegaly (56.5%). 3) Splenomegaly (49.7%). 3. In cases of typhoid fever with intestinal perforation there were additional significant findings such as free air under diaphragm (85%), free fluid in peritoneal cavity (90%) and air fluid levels in RLQ (80%). 4. The most frequent chest x-ray finding was elevation of diaphragm (11.1%). 5. 8 cases of complicated typhoid fever which eventually came to operation were diagnosed only by radiographic method.

  4. Monoacylglycerol Lipase Regulates Fever Response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Sanchez-Alavez

    Full Text Available Cyclooxygenase inhibitors such as ibuprofen have been used for decades to control fever through reducing the levels of the pyrogenic lipid transmitter prostaglandin E2 (PGE2. Historically, phospholipases have been considered to be the primary generator of the arachidonic acid (AA precursor pool for generating PGE2 and other eicosanoids. However, recent studies have demonstrated that monoacyglycerol lipase (MAGL, through hydrolysis of the endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoylglycerol, provides a major source of AA for PGE2 synthesis in the mammalian brain under basal and neuroinflammatory states. We show here that either genetic or pharmacological ablation of MAGL leads to significantly reduced fever responses in both centrally or peripherally-administered lipopolysaccharide or interleukin-1β-induced fever models in mice. We also show that a cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonist does not attenuate these anti-pyrogenic effects of MAGL inhibitors. Thus, much like traditional nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, MAGL inhibitors can control fever, but appear to do so through restricted control over prostaglandin production in the nervous system.

  5. Katayama fever ID scuba divers

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1991-03-02

    Mar 2, 1991 ... A. C. EVANS, D. J. MARTIN, B. D. GINSBURG. Summary. Katayama fever or acute schistosomiasis probably occurs more commonly than is recorded. Interviews with a 3-man scuba diving team who had had contact with a large dam in an·endemic area of the eastern Transvaal Lowveld at the same time ...

  6. Rocky Mountain spotted fever, Panama.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estripeaut, Dora; Aramburú, María Gabriela; Sáez-Llorens, Xavier; Thompson, Herbert A; Dasch, Gregory A; Paddock, Christopher D; Zaki, Sherif; Eremeeva, Marina E

    2007-11-01

    We describe a fatal pediatric case of Rocky Mountain spotted fever in Panama, the first, to our knowledge, since the 1950s. Diagnosis was established by immunohistochemistry, PCR, and isolation of Rickettsia rickettsii from postmortem tissues. Molecular typing demonstrated strong relatedness of the isolate to strains of R. rickettsii from Central and South America.

  7. Pilot study of personality traits assessed by the Karolinska Scales of Personality (KSP) in asthma, atopy, and rhinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runeson, Roma; Wahlstedt, Kurt; Norbäck, Dan

    2011-12-01

    Asthma and atopy are common diseases. To study associations between personality and asthma, atopy, rhinitis, and personality traits were measured on the Karolinska Scales of Personality for 193 persons working in 19 buildings with suspected indoor air problems. In addition, information on history of atopy, asthma, and rhinitis was collected by postal questionnaire. In analyses, asthma was associated with higher impulsiveness scores, and atopy in non-asthmatics was associated with higher social desirability scores and lower irritability, guilt, and impulsiveness scores. Non-atopic rhinitis was associated with scores on several anxiety-related scales, while atopic rhinitis was not associated with scores on the Karolinska Scales of Personality. This exploration implies that asthma, atopy, and rhinitis may be associated with various but different personality trait scores. The finding of such personality trait associations in persons with non-asthmatic atopy raises the question of a potential role of an emotional conflict in atopy and the role of personality in asthma, atopy, and rhinitis.

  8. Soy, isoflavones, and prevalence of allergic rhinitis in Japanese women: the Osaka Maternal and Child Health Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyake, Yoshihiro; Sasaki, Satoshi; Ohya, Yukihiro; Miyamoto, Shoichi; Matsunaga, Ichiro; Yoshida, Toshiaki; Hirota, Yoshio; Oda, Hajime

    2005-06-01

    It has been hypothesized that isoflavones reduce the risk of many chronic diseases, but there are no data on the effects of dietary soy and isoflavone consumption on allergic disorders. This cross-sectional study examined the relationship between dietary soy products and isoflavone intake and the prevalence of allergic rhinitis. Study subjects were 1002 Japanese pregnant women. Allergic rhinitis (including cedar pollinosis) was defined as present if subjects had received drug treatment at some point during the previous 12 months. Adjustment was made for age; gestation; parity; cigarette smoking; passive smoking at home and at work; indoor domestic pets; family history of asthma, atopic eczema, and allergic rhinitis; family income; education; mite allergen level in house dust; changes in diet in the previous month; season when data were collected; and body mass index. Compared with dietary intake of total soy product, soy protein, daidzein, and genistein in the first quartile, consumption of these substances in the fourth quartile was independently associated with a reduced prevalence of allergic rhinitis, although no significant dose-response relationships were observed. A clear inverse linear trend for miso intake across quartiles was found, whereas the adjusted odds ratio for comparison of the highest with the lowest quartile was not statistically significant. Consumption of tofu, tofu products, fermented soybeans, boiled soybeans, and miso soup was not related to the prevalence of allergic rhinitis. A high intake of soy and isoflavones may be associated with a reduced prevalence of allergic rhinitis.

  9. Fibrolytic enzyme and ammonia application effects on the nutritive value, intake, and digestion kinetics of bermudagrass hay in beef cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, J J; Zarate, M A; Queiroz, O C M; Han, J H; Shin, J H; Staples, C R; Brown, W F; Adesogan, A T

    2013-09-01

    The objectives were to compare the effect of exogenous fibrolytic enzyme (Biocellulase A20) or anhydrous ammonia (4% DM) treatment on the nutritive value, voluntary intake, and digestion kinetics of bermudagrass (Cynodon dactylon cultivar Coastal) hay harvested after 2 maturities (5- and 13-wk regrowths). Six individually housed, ruminally cannulated Brangus steers (BW 325 ± 10 kg) were used in an experiment with a 6 × 6 Latin square design with a 3 (additives) × 2 (maturities) factorial arrangement of treatments. Each period consisted of 14 d of adaptation and 7, 4, 1, 1, and 4 d for measuring in vivo digestibility, in situ degradability, no measurements, rumen liquid fermentation and passage indices, and rate of solid passage, respectively. Steers were fed hay for ad libitum intake and supplemented with sugarcane molasses and distillers grain (supplement total of 2.88 kg DM/d). Enzyme did not affect the nutritional composition of hay but ammonia treatment decreased hay NDF, hemicellulose, and ADL concentrations and increased the CP concentration particularly for the mature lignified 13-wk hay. The enzyme increased NDF and hemicellulose digestibility of the 5-wk hay but decreased those of the 13-wk hay. Ammoniation decreased intake of hay but increased digestibility of DM, OM, NDF, hemicellulose, ADF, and cellulose and increased the ruminal in situ soluble and potentially digestible fractions and the rate of DM degradation of the 13-wk hay. Also, ammoniation increased the concentrations of ruminal NH3, total VFA, acetate, and butyrate but enzyme treatment did not. Neither enzyme addition nor ammoniation affected rate of liquid and solid passage. In conclusion, ammoniation decreased the concentration of most fiber fractions, decreased the intake of hays, and increased their CP concentration, in vivo digestibility, and in situ degradability at both maturities whereas enzyme application increased fiber digestibility of the 5-wk hay but decreased it in the case of

  10. The HayWired earthquake scenario—We can outsmart disaster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudnut, Kenneth W.; Wein, Anne M.; Cox, Dale A.; Porter, Keith A.; Johnson, Laurie A.; Perry, Suzanne C.; Bruce, Jennifer L.; LaPointe, Drew

    2018-04-18

    The HayWired earthquake scenario, led by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), anticipates the impacts of a hypothetical magnitude-7.0 earthquake on the Hayward Fault. The fault is along the east side of California’s San Francisco Bay and is among the most active and dangerous in the United States, because it runs through a densely urbanized and interconnected region. One way to learn about a large earthquake without experiencing it is to conduct a scientifically realistic scenario. The USGS and its partners in the HayWired Coalition and the HayWired Campaign are working to energize residents and businesses to engage in ongoing and new efforts to prepare the region for such a future earthquake.

  11. Report on intercomparison IAEA/V-10 of the determination of trace elements in hay powder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pszonicki, L.; Hanna, A.N.

    1985-07-01

    Hay plays an important role in the natural production circle of human nutrition. The level of its pollution is an important factor which can effect various branches of the food industry. The aim of the reported exercise organized by the IAEA was to provide the participating laboratories an opportunity to check their analytical performance by comparing their results with the results of other laboratories and to establish the concentration level of trace elements for certification purposes. The hay powder was analyzed by 50 laboratories from 25 countries for 42 elements. Neutron activation, atomic absorption, atomic emission and X-ray spectroscopy were predominantly used as analytical methods. The results provided by the participants of the reported intercomparison exercise have enabled to certify the concentration of eighteen trace and minor elements and to establish non-certified information values for the concentration of an additional twelve elements in Hay Powder IAEA/V-10

  12. Passage kinetics of digesta in horses fed with coastcross hay ground to different degrees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinicius Pimentel Silva

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to evaluate the kinetics, physicochemical characteristics and particle size of digesta in the right ventral colon (RVC of horses fed coastcross hay ground to different degrees. Four horses fitted with cannulae in the RVC were used and were fed the following forms of hay: long, chopped, ground to 5 mm and ground to 3 mm. A Latin Square 4x4 study design was used. Each experimental period included 10 days for diet adaptation, four days for feces collection and one day for digesta collection. The kinetics of the particulate and solute phases of digesta were evaluated based on the mean retention time (MRT, passage rate (k and transit time (TT using two external markers: Cr-NDF and Co-EDTA. The TT of solid phase digesta was 3 hours longer (P0.05 in k or MRT in either the liquid or solid phase of digesta as a function of the different degrees of hay grinding. However, the liquid phase of digesta presented a higher k than the solid phase, with values of 3.28 and 2.73 h-1 being obtained, respectively. The smallest particle size and the lowest neutral detergent fiber contents in colon digesta were observed when hay ground to 3 mm was offered, leading to values of 0.51 mm and 53.46%, respectively. Grinding the hay increased the transit time of the liquid phase in the digestive tract of the horses, whereas no change in the kinetics of the solid phase digesta was observed. The grinding of hay reduced the NDF and the average particle size in the right ventral colon.

  13. Climate change impacts on pollinic productivity and allergic rhinitis in Montreal between 1994 and 2002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garneau, M.; Breton, M.; Fortier, I. [Quebec Univ., Montreal, PQ (Canada)

    2005-07-01

    This presentation defined the correlation between pollinic concentrations of ragweed and medical consultations for allergic rhinitis in Montreal between 1994 and 2002, taking into account meteorological variables and socio-economic factors. The spatio-temporal dynamic of pollinic, meteorological, socio-economic and epidemiological values was reconstituted from descriptive, geographical and statistical analyses. Throughout the ragweed pollinic seasons (August to October) between 1994 and 2002 in the Montreal island area, there were 7,138 consultations for allergic rhinitis. The study concluded that the lengthening of the pollinic seasons, as well as the increase in the average number of medical consultations, combined with the significant correlation linking the temperature to pollinic concentrations suggests that the population affected by pollen allergies will increase over the coming decades in Montreal, and that it will affect certain areas more than others, which is consistent with the anticipated impacts of the rise in temperatures forecasted by different models of climate scenarios.

  14. Allergic Rhinitis in Children: Principles of Early Diagnosis and Effective Therapy. Overview of Clinical Recommendations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander A. Baranov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The article briefly summarizes the key provisions of the clinical recommendations on medical care delivery for children with allergic rhinitis: modern approaches to diagnosis and therapy. The current document was developed by the professional association of pediatric specialists —the Union of Pediatricians of Russia — together with the leading experts of the Russian Association of Allergists and Clinical Immunologists. The recommendations are regularly updated due to the latest evidence-based results of effectiveness and safety of various medical interventions. The article presents information on the epidemiology of allergic rhinitis in children, specific diagnostic features which provide the opportunity for the timely and correct diagnosis and an effective therapy with personal approach.

  15. [Examination of acute phase proteins concentrations in children with allergic rhinitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, Iwona; Sobieska, Magdalena; Pucher, Beata; Grzegorowski, Michał; Samborski, Włodzimierz

    2006-01-01

    Allergic rhinitis is an inflammatory disorder of upper respiratory tract (about 15 per cent of the population in industrialized countries suffer from this condition), characterized by frequent sneezing and a runny or stuffy nose sometimes accompanied by watery eyes. As the most common allergic condition, allergic rhinitis affects people of all ages. Boys are twice as likely to get allergic rhinitis than girls. The median age of onset of the condition is 10 years old, meaning that equal numbers of children develop the condition before and after age 10. Symptoms usually appear in childhood first and then lessen by the age of 30 or 40. Seasonal allergic rhinitis usually results from tree, grass or weed pollen. With this type of rhinitis, symptoms will decrease with the arrival of cold weather. Perennial allergic rhinitis can cause year-round symptoms. This allergic reaction is the result of indoor irritants such as feathers, mold spores, animal dander (hair and skin shed by pets) or dust mites. It is often aggravated by a food allergy, the most common being an allergy to milk. Acute phase proteins (APP) belong to the most ancient part of the unspecific immunity and contribute markedly to the keeping of homeostasis. As much as 30 various proteins are for the moment regarded as APP. Being multifunctional regulators and effectors APP stay in multiple relations to practically all types of cells and molecules. Among APP following functional groups may be described: transport proteins (transferrin, ceruloplasmin and haptoglobin), clotting factors (fibrinogen), antiproteases (alpha1-antitrypsin, alpha1-antichymotrypsin, alpha2-macroglobulin), complement components (C3, C4) and several proteins of hardly known function, like C-reactive protein (CRP), serum amyloid A, acid alpha1-glycoprotein (AGP) and others. From a group of 32 children, aged from 5 to 14 years, with symptoms of seasonal allergic rhinitis, and from a control group of 10 healthy children sex and age matched

  16. Highly significant linkage to chromosome 3q13.31 for rhinitis and related allergic diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Charlotte Brasch; Haagerup, Annette; Børglum, Anders D.

    2006-01-01

    or all are still inconclusive. Following genome-wide scans on multiple phenotypes, we previously suggested that chromosome 3q13.12-q21.2 harbours an allergy locus. OBJECTIVE: To identify candidate loci in the Danish population, two additional independent sets of sib-pair families were fine-scale mapped......BACKGROUND: Allergic diseases such as asthma and rhinitis have closely related phenotypes and often occur with atopy. They show strong familial and intra-individual clustering, suggesting overlapping disease aetiology. Various loci and candidate genes have been suggested to underlie allergy. Many...... in candidate regions showing maximum likelihood scores (MLS) > or =1.5 in the genome-wide scans. RESULTS: Twenty eight microsatellite markers in a denser map on chromosome 3q were analysed in 236 allergy sib-pair families including 125 sib pairs with rhinitis. We report significant evidence for linkage...

  17. Hot topics in paediatric immunology: IgE-mediated food allergy and allergic rhinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rueter, Kristina; Prescott, Susan

    2014-10-01

    The epidemic of allergic disease is a major public health crisis. The greatest burden of allergies is in childhood, when rapidly rising rates of disease are also most evident. General practitioners (GP) have a key role in recognising and addressing aller-gy-related problems and identifying whether a child requires referral to a paediatric allergist. This article focuses on IgE-mediated food allergies and allergic rhinitis, the most commonly seen conditions in paediatric im-munology. We will discuss prevention, diagnosis, management and treatment strategies. Currently there is no cure for food allergy. Oral tolerance induction continues to be a significant focus of research. All children with a possible food allergy should be referred to an allergist for further testing and advice. Children who develop allergic rhinitis need a regular review by their GP. Immunotherapy should be discussed early in the disease process and needs to be com-menced by an allergist.

  18. Effects of feeding steers extruded flaxseed on its own before hay or mixed with hay on animal performance, carcass quality, and meat and hamburger fatty acid composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vahmani, P; Rolland, D C; McAllister, T A; Block, H C; Proctor, S D; Guan, L L; Prieto, N; López-Campos, Ó; Aalhus, J L; Dugan, M E R

    2017-09-01

    The objective of the present experiment was to determine if carcass quality and fatty acid profiles of longissimus thoracis (LT) and hamburger would be affected by feeding steers extruded flaxseed on its own followed by hay (non-TMR) compared to when hay and extruded flaxseed were fed together (TMR). Forty-eight steers in six pens were assigned to TMR or non-TMR for an average of 242days. Dry matter intake was lower for non-TMR versus TMR steers (10.56 vs. 11.42kg/d; P=0.02), but final live weight (610±0.50kg) and average daily gain (1.18±0.02kg/d) did not differ. Compared to TMR, feeding non-TMR enriched LT and hamburger with α-linolenic acid (ALA; 18:3n-3) by 14%, vaccenic acid (VA; t11-18:1) by 44%, rumenic acid (RA; c9,t11-18:2) by 40%, and conjugated linolenic acid (CLnA) by 58%. Overall, feeding extruded flaxseed separately from hay in a non-TMR was more effective at enhancing deposition of ALA, VA, RA and CLnA in beef. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Effects of feeding ratio of beet pulp to alfalfa hay or grass hay on ruminal mat characteristics and chewing activity in Holstein dry cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izumi, Kenichi; Unno, Chigusa

    2010-04-01

    The influence of the feeding ratio of a non-forage fiber source and hay on ruminal mat characteristics and chewing activity was evaluated in dairy dry cows. Cows were fed four different diets: the ratios of alfalfa hay (AH) to beet pulp (BP) were 8:2 (dry matter basis, A8B2) and 2:8 (A2B8), and those of grass hay (GH) to BP were 8:2 (G8B2) and 2:8 (G2B8). Total eating time was decreased with increasing BP content (P rumination time for AH was shorter than that for GH (P content (P ruminal mat was detected by using a penetration resistance test of the rumen digesta. Penetration resistance value (PRV) of ruminal mat was highest with the G8B2 diet and PRV decreased with increasing BP content (P ruminal mat was greater for increasing BP content (P ruminal mat PRV on total rumination time resulted in a high positive correlation (r = 0.744; P ruminal mat stimulated rumination activity and a ruminal mat could be formed, although it was soft even when cows were offered a large quantity of BP.

  20. FT-IR spectroscopic analysis for studying Clostridium cell response to conversion of enzymatically hydrolyzed hay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grube, Mara; Gavare, Marita; Nescerecka, Alina; Tihomirova, Kristina; Mezule, Linda; Juhna, Talis

    2013-07-01

    Grass hay is one of assailable cellulose containing non-food agricultural wastes that can be used as a carbohydrate source by microorganisms producing biofuels. In this study three Clostridium strains Clostridium acetobutylicum, Clostridium beijerinckii and Clostridium tetanomorphum, capable of producing acetone, butanol and ethanol (ABE) were adapted to convert enzymatically hydrolyzed hay used as a growth media additive. The results of growth curves, substrate degradation kinetics and FT-IR analyses of bacterial biomass macromolecular composition showed diverse strain-specific cell response to the growth medium composition.

  1. Quality of aged shoulder from lambs fed with different oldman saltbush hay levels (Atriplex nummularia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tharcilla Isabella Rodrigues Costa Alvarenga

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This study assessed the effects of different levels of oldman saltbush hay and ageing time on the physical characteristics of Santa Inês lamb meat. Sixty shoulders from 32 male lambs fed with 30, 40, 50 or 60% oldman saltbush hay for 60 days were vacuum-packaged and stored in a refrigerator at 0 ± 1°C for 0, 7 or 14 days of ageing. The shear force, cooking loss and water holding capacity were 3.06kgf cm-2, 37.28% and 76.71%, respectively, and there were no significant changed by studied factors (P>0.05

  2. Impulse oscillometry in evaluation bronchial hyperresponsivness in patients with persistent allergic rhinitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koruga Dragan

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Impulse oscillometry (IOS is a method for estimating lung function which is used for early detection of bronchial hyperresponsiveness (BHR and asthma. The aim of the study was to determine the prevalence of BHR, the correlation between spirometry and IOS and sensitivity and specificity of IOS in proving BHR in patients with persistent allergic rhinitis. Methods. The study included 81 patients with allergic rhinitis. From all of them, medical history was taken, allergy testing was done, as well as measurements of parameters of lung function by the IOS and spirometry before and after nonspecific bronchial provocation test with histamin via Aerosol provocative system. Changes of the IOS parameters to fall in FEV1 of 20% were measured and compared with changes in the spirometry parameters. After bronchial challenge test subjects were divided into two groups: the group with BHR (group 1 and that without BHR (group 2. Results. The mean age of participants was 25.7 ± 5.7 years, and 50.5% were men. Out of the total number of subjects with allergy rhinitis, 56 (58.9% had a positive BPT. After bronchoprovocation an average increase in the group 1 was 88.15% for Rrs5, 111.98% for Fres, and for AX 819.69%. The high degree of correlation between the IOS and spirometry was proven in the group 2, while the whole group 1 had a weak correlation between parameters of these two methods. High sensitivity and low specificity for Rrs5 and Fres compared to FEV1 in diagnosing BHR was proven. Conclusion. The study demonstrated a high prevalence of BHR in the study group of patients with persistent allergic rhinitis, poor correlation in relation to the spirometric measurements in the group with BHR and a high sensitivity and low specificity of IOS for the detection of early changes in the airways.

  3. Concealing Emotions at Work Is Associated with Allergic Rhinitis in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seok, Hongdeok; Yoon, Jin-Ha; Won, Jong-Uk; Lee, Wanhyung; Lee, June-Hee; Jung, Pil Kyun; Roh, Jaehoon

    2016-01-01

    Concealing emotions at work can cause considerable psychological stress. While there is extensive research on the adverse health effects of concealing emotions and the association between allergic diseases and stress, research has not yet investigated whether concealing emotions at work is associated with allergic rhinitis. Allergic rhinitis is a common disease in many industrialized countries, and its prevalence is increasing. Thus, our aim was to determine the strength of this association using data from three years (2007-2009) of the 4th Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Participants (aged 20-64) were 8,345 individuals who were economically active and who had completed the questionnaire items on concealing emotions at work. Odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) were calculated for allergic rhinitis using logistic regression models. Among all participants, 3,140 subjects (37.6%) reported concealing their emotions at work: 1,661 men and 1,479 women. The OR (95% CIs) for allergic rhinitis among those who concealed emotions at work versus those who did not was 1.318 (1.148-1.512). Stratified by sex, the OR (95% CIs) was 1.307 (1.078-1.585) among men and 1.346 (1.105-1.639) among women. Thus, individuals who concealed their emotions at work were significantly more likely to have a diagnosis of AR in comparison to those who did not. Because concealing emotions at work has adverse health effects, labor policies that aim to reduce this practice are needed.

  4. Asthma and Allergic Rhinitis Correlation in Palm Tree Workers of Jahrom City in 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farahmand Fard, Mohammad Amin; Khanjani, Narges; Arabi Mianroodi, Aliasghar; Ashrafi Asgarabad, Ahad

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Allergic rhinitis and asthma can be related to occupation. The present study aimed to investigate the correlation between asthma or allergic rhinitis and employment in the palm tree gardens of Jahrom, Iran. Materials and Methods: This was a cross-sectional study including 50 palm tree garden workers and a control group of 50 office employees. Data collection included demographics, as well as standard International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood (ISAAC) and A New Symptom-Based Questionnaire for Predicting the Presence of Asthma (ASQ) questionnaires. Data were analyzed using SPSS22. Descriptive statistics, chi-square test, t-test, and logistics regression were used to analyze data. Results: The correlation between asthma and occupation was significant ( P=0.046); and asthma prevalence was higher in palm tree garden workers. However, no relationship was observed between age, duration of employment, smoking cigarettes, hookah, or opium addiction with asthma. Furthermore, in this study, no significant relation was observed between the prevalence of asthma and contact with dust, contact with pets’ skin and hair, family history of asthma, or the use of perfume and air freshener. The symptoms of allergic rhinitis (including sneezing, runny nose, and blocked nose) were significantly greater in palm tree garden workers (P=0.038). These symptoms in both workers and office employees were higher in spring. Conclusion: In our study, allergic rhinitis and asthma were more common in palm tree garden workers than in the general population. According to our study, people working in this occupation should take necessary precautions. PMID:28589108

  5. Hygiene, atopy and wheeze–eczema–rhinitis symptoms in schoolchildren from urban and rural Ecuador

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Philip J; Vaca, Maritza; Rodriguez, Alejandro; Chico, Martha E; Santos, Darci N; Rodrigues, Laura C; Barreto, Mauricio L

    2014-01-01

    Background Rural residence is protective against atopy and wheeze–rhinitis–eczema symptoms in developed countries, an effect attributed to farming and poor hygiene exposures. There are few data from developing countries addressing this question. We compared atopy and wheeze–rhinitis–eczema symptoms between urban and rural Ecuador, and explored the effects of farming and poor hygiene exposures. Methods We performed cross sectional studies of schoolchildren living in rural and urban Ecuador. Data on symptoms and farming/hygiene exposures were collected by parental questionnaire, atopy by allergen skin prick test reactivity and geohelminth infections by stool examinations. Results Among 2526 urban and 4295 rural schoolchildren, prevalence was: atopy (10.0% vs 12.5%, p=0.06), wheeze (9.4% vs 10.1%, p=0.05), rhinitis (8.1% vs 6.4%, p=0.02) and eczema (5.9% vs 4.7%, p=0.06). A small proportion of symptoms were attributable to atopy (range 3.9–10.7%) with greater attributable fractions for respiratory symptoms observed in urban schoolchildren. Respiratory symptoms were associated with poor hygiene/farming exposures: wheeze with lack of access to potable water; and rhinitis with household pets, no bathroom facilities and contact with large farm animals. Birth order was inversely associated with respiratory symptoms. Area of residence and atopy had few effects on these associations. Conclusions Urban schoolchildren living in Ecuador have a similar prevalence of atopy, eczema and wheeze but a higher prevalence of rhinitis compared with rural children. Some farming and poor hygiene exposures were associated with an increase in the prevalence of wheeze or rhinitis while birth order was inversely associated with these symptoms. PMID:24105783

  6. Immunological role of nasal staphylococcus aureus carriage in patients with persistent allergic rhinitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Yousif Atia

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Nasal carriage of staphylococcus aureus (S.aureus exerts immunomodulatory effect in patients with atopic dermatitis and it may contribute to airway inflammation and allergic response in patients with allergic rhinitis. We Aim to investigate the frequency of nasal S.aureus carriage in patients with persistent allergic rhinitis and its possible influence on their symptoms and immune markers. We chosed 20 non smoker patients with house dust mite (HDM allergy causing allergic rhinitis and 20 non smoker healthy subjects matched for age and sex. For all subjects rhinoscopy was done, skin prick test, nasal culture for S.aureus, nasal interleukin 4,nasal total IgE, serum total IgE and serum specific IgE(SSIgE for HDM. Nasal S.aureus was detected in 16/20 patients (80% and 5/20 (25% in healthy subjects with highly significant statistical difference plt0.01. Correlation of nasal staph.aureus count and different systemic and local immune markers revealed highly significant positive correlation between nasal S.aureus count and serum total IgE (r = 0.78, plt0.01 and significant positive correlation with SSIgE (HDM (r = 0.53, plt0.05, nasal total IgE (r = 0.39, plt0.05 and nasal IL-4 (r = 0.55, plt0.05. Nasal staph.aureus actively modulated the immune reaction in persistent allergic rhinitis patients by promoting local IgE production, so we recommend early detection and treatment of S.aureus carriage in patients

  7. Airway function indicators and blood indicators in children with dust mite allergic rhinitis after sublingual immunotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua Xiang

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the airway function indicators and blood indicators in children with dust mite allergic rhinitis after sublingual immunotherapy. Methods: A total of 68 children with dust mite allergic rhinitis treated in our hospital from November, 2012 to October, 2015 were selected as the research subjects and randomly divided into observation group 34 cases and control group 34 cases. The control group received clinical routine therapy for allergic rhinitis, the observation group received sublingual immunotherapy, and then differences in basic lung function indicator values, small airway function indicator values and levels of serum inflammatory factors as well as serum ECP, TARC, Eotaxin-2 and VCAM were compared between two groups after treatment. Results: The FVC, FEV1, PEF and FEV1/FVC values of the observation group after treatment were higher than those of the control group (P<0.05; the MMEF, MEF50% and MEF25% values of the observation group were higher than those of the control group, and the proportion of AHR was lower than that of the control group (P<0.05; the serum IL-4, IL-9, IL-12, IL-13 and IL-16 levels of the observation group after treatment were lower than those of the control group, and the IL-10 and IL-12 levels are higher than those of the control group (P<0.05; the serum ECP, TARC, Eotaxin-2 and VCAM levels of the observation group children after treatment were lower than those of the control group (P<0.05. Conclusions: Sublingual immunotherapy for children with dust mite allergic rhinitis can optimize the airway function, reduce the systemic inflammatory response and eventually improve the children’s overall state, and it’s has positive clinical significance.

  8. Asthma and Allergic Rhinitis Correlation in Palm Tree Workers of Jahrom City in 2016

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Amin Farahmand fard

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Allergic rhinitis and asthma can be related to occupation. The present study aimed to investigate the correlation between asthma or allergic rhinitis and employment in the palm tree gardens of Jahrom, Iran.   Materials and Methods: This was a cross-sectional study including 50 palm tree garden workers and a control group of 50 office employees. Data collection included demographics, as well as standard International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood (ISAAC and A New Symptom-Based Questionnaire for Predicting the Presence of Asthma (ASQ questionnaires. Data were analyzed using SPSS22. Descriptive statistics, chi-square test, t-test, and logistics regression were used to analyze data.   Results: The correlation between asthma and occupation was significant (       P=0.046; and asthma prevalence was higher in palm tree garden workers. However, no relationship was observed between age, duration of employment, smoking cigarettes, hookah, or opium addiction with asthma. Furthermore, in this study, no significant relation was observed between the prevalence of asthma and contact with dust, contact with pets’ skin and hair, family history of asthma, or the use of perfume and air freshener. The symptoms of allergic rhinitis (including sneezing, runny nose, and blocked nose were significantly greater in palm tree garden workers (P=0.038. These symptoms in both workers and office employees were higher in spring.   Conclusion: In our study, allergic rhinitis and asthma were more common in palm tree garden workers than in the general population. According to our study, people working in this occupation should take necessary precautions.

  9. Association of indoor air pollution with rhinitis symptoms, atopy and nitric oxide levels in exhaled air

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hersoug, Lars-Georg; Husemoen, Lise Lotte N; Thomsen, Simon Francis

    2010-01-01

    Exposure to particulate matter (PM) outdoors can induce airway inflammation and exacerbation of asthma in adults. However, there is limited knowledge about the effects of exposure to indoor PM. The aim of this study was to investigate the association of exposure to indoor sources of PM...... with rhinitis symptoms, atopy and nitric oxide in exhaled air (FeNO) as a measure of airway inflammation....

  10. [The effect of hypertonic seawater and isotonic seawater for nasal mucosa of allergic rhinitis mice model].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Zhifeng; Xu, Yu; Ou, Jin; Xiang, Rong; Tao, Zezhang

    2014-12-01

    To study the effect of hypertonic seawater and isotonic seawater for nasal mucosa of allergic rhinitis mice model, and explore the possible mechanism of nasal irrigation with seawater in treatment of allergic rhinitis. We used Der pl to make allergic rhinitis model of BALB/c mice, and divided them into three groups randomly. Nasal irrigation with hypertonic seawater (HS) or isotonic seawater (IS) in the treatment group 1-14 days after modeling, and black control (BC) group was given no treatment after modeling. Normal control (NC) group was given no treatment, the number of rubs and sneezings in each group were counted in 30 min after the last nasal irrigation. Mice were then killed 24 h after the last therapy. The noses of mice from each group were removed and fixed, then the slices were stained with hematoxylin and eosin, the others were observed by transmission electron microscope. Mice with hypertonic seawater and isotonic seawater were significantly improved in rubs and sneezings compared to the black control group (P 0. 05); Ciliated columnar epithelium cells in mucosal tissues of HS group and IS group were arranged trimly, better than that in the black control group. Morphology and microstructure in nasal mucosal of HS group was closer to the normal group than in IS group. The injury of nasal mucosa ciliated epithelium was significantly improved by nasal irrigation with hypertonic seawater and isotonic seawater, and the former is better than the latter, the mechanism of nasal irrigation with seawater in treatment of allergic rhinitis may rely on repairing the injured nasal mucosa ciliated epithelium, thereby the symptoms of nasal was reduced.

  11. Dengue fever and dengue haemorrhagic fever in adolescents and adults

    OpenAIRE

    Tantawichien, Terapong

    2012-01-01

    Dengue fever (DF) is endemic in tropical and subtropical zones and the prevalence is increasing across South-east Asia, Africa, the Western Pacific and the Americas. In recent years, the spread of unplanned urbanisation, with associated substandard housing, overcrowding and deterioration in water, sewage and waste management systems, has created ideal conditions for increased transmission of the dengue virus in tropical urban centres. While dengue infection has traditionally been considered a...

  12. Relation of the Timing of Onset of Rhinitis and Cough to Asthma Attack in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimura, Tetsu; Ozaki, Yukiko; Tananari, Yoshifumi; Yamakawa, Rumi; Hirata, Rumiko

    2016-01-01

    If the risk of progression to asthma could be predicted in patients with rhinitis, prevention of asthma might become possible. The purpose of this study was to clarify the relationship between the duration of rhinitis symptoms and acute asthma attacks in children with a history of asthma who were not on treatment for asthma. In 94 children with a history of asthma who were asymptomatic after completing asthma treatment, we investigated the onset and duration of nasal discharge and cough related to allergic rhinitis. Then the children were followed up for 2 weeks and were classified into either an asthma attack group (Group A) or non-asthma group(Group B). A total of 78 subjects were evaluated after 16 were excluded. The duration of nasal discharge was significantly shorter in Group A than in Group B (5.5±1.9 days vs. 10.4±3.1 days, Pasthma attack may be higher when the onset of cough precedes nasal discharge or when nasal discharge has a short duration and cough shows an early onset. These results may provide assistance when selecting patients for early anti-allergy therapy from among those presenting with upper respiratory tract symptoms.

  13. Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase expression in patients with allergic rhinitis: a case-control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luukkainen Annika

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO is a tryptophan catalyzing enzyme. It has been suggested that it has a role in lower airway allergic inflammations, but its role in allergic rhinitis has not been investigated. Objective Our aim was to evaluate the expression of IDO in the nasal mucosa of allergic rhinitis patients allergic to birch pollen during peak exposure to birch pollen allergen and compare it to non-atopic patients. Methods IDO expression was immunohistochemically evaluated from nasal specimens obtained in- and off-season from otherwise healthy non-smoking volunteers both allergic to birch pollen (having mild or moderate allergic rhinoconjunctivitis and non-allergic controls. Results: The IDO expression levels were low in healthy controls and remained low also in patients allergic to birch pollen. There were no differences in the expression of IDO in- and off-season in either healthy or allergic subjects. Conclusions There is a controversy in the role of IDO in upper and lower airways during allergic airway disease. It seems that IDO is associated to allergic inflammations of the lower airways, but does not have a local role in the nasal cavity at least in mild or moderate forms of allergic rhinitis.

  14. [Efficacy of the dust mites drops sublingual immunotherapy in pediatric allergic rhinitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Lisheng; Jiang, Yinzhu; Li, Qi

    2016-03-01

    To observe the role of the dust mites drops sublingual immunotherapy(SLIT) in pediatric allergic rhiriitis caused by dust mites and compare its efficacy between monosensitized and polysensitized children. A total of 77 pediatric allergic rhinitis patients received Dermatophagoides farina extracts sublingual immunotherapy for 2 years were enrolled as desensitization group and were allocated into monosensitized group (41 cases) and polysensitized group (36 cases) according to the number of coexisting allergens. Meanwhile another 33 allergic rhinitis children treated by pharmacotherapy during the period were collected as control group. The total symptom scores (TNSS), total medication scores (TMS) and visual analogue scale(VAS) were assessed at the beginning, six months, 1 year and 2 years of the treatment. SPSS 13. 0 software was used to analyze the data. the score of TNSS and VAS in desensitization was slightly higher than the control after six months treatment, but without difference at l year and 2 years; the score of TMS had significantly improved in desensitization compared with the corresponding points in control. All the parameters in monosensitized group were equivalent with polysensitizend group, except the score of TMS was slightly lower than the polysensitizend group at six months. Dust mite drops sublingual immunotherapy is effective for the allergic rhinitis children caused by mites. And it has similar immunotherapy efficacy between monosensitized and polysensitized children.

  15. Allergic rhinitis and asthma: inflammation in a one-airway condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haahtela Tari

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Allergic rhinitis and asthma are conditions of airway inflammation that often coexist. Discussion In susceptible individuals, exposure of the nose and lungs to allergen elicits early phase and late phase responses. Contact with antigen by mast cells results in their degranulation, the release of selected mediators, and the subsequent recruitment of other inflammatory cell phenotypes. Additional proinflammatory mediators are released, including histamine, prostaglandins, cysteinyl leukotrienes, proteases, and a variety of cytokines, chemokines, and growth factors. Nasal biopsies in allergic rhinitis demonstrate accumulations of mast cells, eosinophils, and basophils in the epithelium and accumulations of eosinophils in the deeper subepithelium (that is, lamina propria. Examination of bronchial tissue, even in mild asthma, shows lymphocytic inflammation enriched by eosinophils. In severe asthma, the predominant pattern of inflammation changes, with increases in the numbers of neutrophils and, in many, an extension of the changes to involve smaller airways (that is, bronchioli. Structural alterations (that is, remodeling of bronchi in mild asthma include epithelial fragility and thickening of its reticular basement membrane. With increasing severity of asthma there may be increases in airway smooth muscle mass, vascularity, interstitial collagen, and mucus-secreting glands. Remodeling in the nose is less extensive than that of the lower airways, but the epithelial reticular basement membrane may be slightly but significantly thickened. Conclusion Inflammation is a key feature of both allergic rhinitis and asthma. There are therefore potential benefits for application of anti-inflammatory strategies that target both these anatomic sites.

  16. Genetic Ancestry and Asthma and Rhinitis Occurrence in Hispanic Children: Findings from the Southern California Children's Health Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad T Salam

    Full Text Available Asthma and rhinitis are common childhood health conditions. Being an understudied and rapidly growing population in the US, Hispanic children have a varying risk for these conditions that may result from sociocultural (including acculturative factors, exposure and genetic diversities. Hispanic populations have varying contributions from European, Amerindian and African ancestries. While previous literature separately reported associations between genetic ancestry and acculturation factors with asthma, whether Amerindian ancestry and acculturative factors have independent associations with development of early-life asthma and rhinitis in Hispanic children remains unknown. We hypothesized that genetic ancestry is an important determinant of early-life asthma and rhinitis occurrence in Hispanic children independent of sociodemographic, acculturation and environmental factors.Subjects were Hispanic children (5-7 years who participated in the southern California Children's Health Study. Data from birth certificates and questionnaire provided information on acculturation, sociodemographic and environmental factors. Genetic ancestries (Amerindian, European, African and Asian were estimated based on 233 ancestry informative markers. Asthma was defined by parental report of doctor-diagnosed asthma. Rhinitis was defined by parental report of a history of chronic sneezing or runny or blocked nose without a cold or flu. Sample sizes were 1,719 and 1,788 for investigating the role of genetic ancestry on asthma and rhinitis, respectively.Children had major contributions from Amerindian and European ancestries. After accounting for potential confounders, per 25% increase in Amerindian ancestry was associated with 17.6% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.74-0.99 and 13.6% (95% CI: 0.79-0.98 lower odds of asthma and rhinitis, respectively. Acculturation was not associated with either outcome.Earlier work documented that Hispanic children with significant

  17. Can early household exposure influence the development of rhinitis symptoms in infancy? Findings from the PARIS birth cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herr, Marie; Nikasinovic, Lydia; Foucault, Christophe; Le Marec, Anne-Marie; Giordanella, Jean-Pierre; Just, Jocelyne; Momas, Isabelle

    2011-10-01

    Allergic rhinitis (AR) has become the most prevalent chronic allergic disorder in childhood, and the role of environment has been questioned, particularly in early life. To investigate the risk factors for rhinitis symptoms in infants included in the PARIS (Pollution and Asthma Risk: an Infant Study) birth cohort. Infants were invited to participate at age 18 months in a health examination conducted by a pediatrician. Allergic rhinitis was defined as the presence of rhinitis symptoms (runny nose, blocked nose, sneezing in the absence of a cold) combined with biological atopy (elevated total immunoglobulin E [IgE], specific IgE, or eosinophilia) and nonallergic rhinitis (NAR) as symptoms without biological atopy. Information about indoor exposures and lifestyle was collected during a telephone interview when the child was 1 month of age. Risk factors for AR and NAR were studied by using a polytomous regression model. The prevalence of AR and NAR was 70/1,850 (3.8%) and 99/1,850 (5.4%), respectively. Allergic rhinitis and NAR did not share similar risk factors. Male sex (odds ratio [OR] = 1.99 [1.19-3.32]), parental history of AR (OR = 1.89 [1.16-3.08]), low socioeconomic class (OR = 2.23 [1.05-4.72] for low vs high level), and the presence of cockroaches in the home (OR = 3.15 [1.67-5.96]) were risk factors for AR. Conversely, the presence of particle-board furniture less than 12 months old in the child's bedroom was associated with an increased risk of NAR (OR = 1.87 [1.21-2.90]). This study should raise awareness about the impact of indoor exposures, particularly with regard to cockroaches and particle-board furniture, because they could influence the occurrence of noninfectious rhinitis. Copyright © 2011 American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Allergic rhinitis, atopic dermatitis, and asthma are associated with differences in school performance among Korean adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, So Young; Kim, Min-Su; Park, Bumjung; Kim, Jin-Hwan; Choi, Hyo Geun

    2017-01-01

    Several studies have reported negative relations between allergic diseases and school performance but have not simultaneously considered various allergic diseases, including allergic rhinitis, asthma, and atopic dermatitis, and only examined a limited number of participants. The present study investigated the associations of allergic rhinitis, asthma, and atopic dermatitis with school performance in a large, representative Korean adolescent population. A total of 299,695 7th through 12th grade students participated in the Korea Youth Risk Behaviour Web-based Survey (KYRBWS) from 2009 to 2013. The subjects' history of allergic rhinitis, asthma, and atopic dermatitis and number of school absences due to these diseases in the previous 12 months were examined and compared. School performance was classified into 5 levels. The relations between allergic disorders and school performance were analyzed using multiple logistic regressions with complex sampling and adjusted for the subjects' durations of sleep, days of physical activity, body mass indexes (BMIs), regions of residence, economic levels, parents' education levels, stress levels, smoking status, and alcohol use. A subgroup analysis of the economic groups was performed. Allergic rhinitis was positively correlated with better school performance in a dose-dependent manner (adjusted odds ratios, AOR, [95% confidence interval, CI] = 1.50 [1.43-1.56 > 1.33 [1.28-1.38] > 1.17 [1.13-1.22] > 1.09 [1.05-1.14] for grades A > B > C > D; P school performance (AOR [95% CI] = 0.74 [0.66-0.83], 0.87 [0.79-0.96], 0.83 [0.75-0.91], 0.93 [0.85-1.02] for performance A, B, C, and D, respectively; P school performance. The subgroup analysis of the students' economic levels revealed associations between allergic diseases and school performance. Compared to other allergic disorders, the asthma group had more school absences due to their symptoms (P School performance was positively correlated with allergic rhinitis and negatively

  19. Childhood intermittent and persistent rhinitis prevalence and climate and vegetation: a global ecologic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuertes, Elaine; Butland, Barbara K; Ross Anderson, H; Carlsten, Chris; Strachan, David P; Brauer, Michael

    2014-10-01

    The effect of climate change and its effects on vegetation growth, and consequently on rhinitis, are uncertain. To examine between- and within-country associations of climate measures and the normalized difference vegetation index with intermittent and persistent rhinitis symptoms in a global context. Questionnaire data from 6- to 7-year-olds and 13- to 14-year-olds were collected in phase 3 of the International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood. Associations of intermittent (>1 symptom report but not for 2 consecutive months) and persistent (symptoms for ≥2 consecutive months) rhinitis symptom prevalences with temperature, precipitation, vapor pressure, and the normalized difference vegetation index were assessed in linear mixed-effects regression models adjusted for gross national income and population density. The mean difference in prevalence per 100 children (with 95% confidence intervals [CIs]) per interquartile range increase of exposure is reported. The country-level intermittent symptom prevalence was associated with several country-level climatic measures, including the country-level mean monthly temperature (6.09 °C; 95% CI, 2.06-10.11°C per 10.4 °C), precipitation (3.10 mm; 95% CI, 0.46-5.73 mm; per 67.0 mm), and vapor pressure (6.21 hPa; 95% CI, 2.17-10.24 hPa; per 10.4 hPa) among 13- to 14-year-olds (222 center in 94 countries). The center-level persistent symptom prevalence was positively associated with several center-level climatic measures. Associations with climate were also found for the 6- to 7-year-olds (132 center in 57 countries). Several between- and within-country spatial associations between climatic factors and intermittent and persistent rhinitis symptom prevalences were observed. These results provide suggestive evidence that climate (and future changes in climate) may influence rhinitis symptom prevalence. Copyright © 2014 American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. [Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saijo, Masayuki; Moriikawa, Shigeru; Kurane, Ichiro

    2004-12-01

    Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF) is an acute infectious disease caused by CCHF virus (CCHFV), a member of the family Bunyaviridae, genus Nairovirus. The case fatality rate of CCHF ranges from 10-40%. Because CCHF is not present in Japan, many Japanese virologists and clinicians are not very familiar with this disease. However, there remains the possibility of an introduction of CCHFV or other hemorrhagic fever viruses into Japan from surrounding endemic areas. Development of diagnostic laboratory capacity for viral hemorrhagic fevers is necessary even in countries without these diseases. At the National Institute of Infectious Diseases, Tokyo, Japan, laboratory-based systems such as recombinant protein-based antibody detection, antigen-capture and pathological examination have been developed. In this review article, epidemiologic and clinical data on CCHF in the Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region, compiled through field investigations and diagnostic testing utilizing the aforementioned laboratory systems, are presented. CCHFV infections are closely associated with the environmental conditions, life styles, religion, occupation, and human economic activities. Based on these data, preventive measures for CCHFV infections are also discussed.

  1. Predicting TDN losses from heat damaged hays and haylages with NIR

    Science.gov (United States)

    During the storage of hay or haylage, heating damage may occur and lead to losses of available protein and digestible nutrients. Recent research indicates that losses of TDN may be more significant economically than losses of available protein. Our objectives for this study were to establish a near-...

  2. Diversity of lowland hay meadows and pastures in Western and Central Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodríguez-Rojo, Maria Pilar; Jiménez-Alfaro, Borja; Jandt, Ute; Bruelheide, Helge; Rodwell, John S.; Schaminée, Joop H.J.; Perrin, Philip M.; Kacki, Zygmunt; Willner, Wolfgang; Fernández-González, Federico; Chytrý, Milan

    2017-01-01

    Questions: Which are the main vegetation types of lowland hay meadows and pastures in Western and Central Europe? What are the main environmental gradients that drive patterns of species composition? Is it possible to classify these grasslands to phytosociological alliances that reflect management

  3. Do glyphosate resistant feral plants and hay fields spread the transgene to conventional alfalfa seed fields?

    Science.gov (United States)

    In addition to meeting domestic needs, large amounts of alfalfa seed and hay produced in the US are being exported overseas. Because alfalfa is an insect pollinated crop, gene flow is a concern. Adding to this alfalfa readily naturalizes along roadsides, irrigation ditches, and unmanaged habitats; a...

  4. 75 FR 26945 - International Education Programs Service-Fulbright-Hays Group Projects Abroad Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-13

    .... Schools and/or departments of education have a role to play in creating greater exposure since they are... DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION International Education Programs Service--Fulbright-Hays Group Projects... Postsecondary Education, Department of Education. ACTION: Notice of proposed priorities. SUMMARY: The Assistant...

  5. Fulbright-Hays Seminars Abroad Program 1992: Morocco and Tunisia. Final Projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AMIDEAST, Washington, DC.

    The projects described in this document were submitted by U.S. teachers who spent time in Morocco and Tunisia as part of the 1992 Fulbright-Hays Seminars Abroad Program. The following are among the titles of the projects included: "Formal Education in Rural Morocco: Problems and Constraints" (Victoria Baker); "Continuity and Change…

  6. Evaluation of methodological aspects of digestibility meaurements in ponies fed different grass hays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaafstra, F.J.W.C.; Doorn, van D.A.; Schonewille, J.T.; Wartena, F.C.; Zoon, van M.; Blok, M.C.; Hendriks, W.H.

    2015-01-01

    Methodological aspects of digestibility measurements of feedstuffs for equines were studied in four Welsh pony geldings consuming four grass-hay diets in a 4 × 4 Latin square design. Diets contained either a low (L), medium (M), high (H), or very high (VH) ADF content (264, 314, 375, or 396 g·kg-1

  7. 1.8. Brand*, HA Badenhorst, FK 8iebrits and EH Kemm JP Hayes et ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Brand*, H.A. Badenhorst, F.K. 8iebrits and E.H. Kemm. Animal and Dairy Science Research Institute, Private Bag X2, Irene 1675, Republic of South Africa. J.P. Hayes. Department of Poultry Science, University of Stellenbosch, Stellenbosch 7600, Republic of South Africa. The experiment was conducted to compare the ...

  8. Characterisation of Arabica Coffee Pulp - Hay from Kintamani - Bali as Prospective Biogas Feedstocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hendroko Setyobudi Roy

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The huge amount of coffee pulp waste is an environmental problem. Anaerobic fermentation is one of the alternative solutions. However, availability of coffee pulp does not appear for year-round, whereas biogas needs continuous feedstocks for digester stability. This research uses coffee pulp from Arabica Coffee Factory at Mengani, Kintamani, Bali–Indonesia. The coffee pulp was transformed into coffee pulp-hay product by sun drying for preservations to extend the raw materials through the year. Characterization of coffee pulp-hay was conducted after to keep for 15 mo for review the prospect as biogas feedstocks. Several parameters were analyzed such as C/N ratio, volatile solids, carbohydrate, protein, fat, lignocellulose content, macro-micro nutrients, and density. The review results indicated that coffee pulp-hay is prospective raw material for biogas feedstock. This well-proven preservation technology was able to fulfill the continuous supply. Furthermore, some problems were found in the recent preliminary experiment related to the density and fungi growth in the conventional laboratory digester. Further investigation was needed to implement the coffee pulp – hay as biogas feedstocks.

  9. Interaction of bale size and preservative rate for large-round bales of alfalfa hay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recently, two studies conducted at the US Dairy Forage Research Center have reported inconsistent storage responses following the application of propionic-acid-based preservatives to alfalfa or alfalfa-orchardgrass hays. One of these studies utilized 5-foot-diameter round bales, and produced disappo...

  10. Hayes Receives 2012 Ronald Greeley Early Career Award in Planetary Science: Citation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leshin, Laurie A.

    2013-10-01

    Alexander G. Hayes Jr. received the 2012 Ronald Greeley Early Career Award in Planetary Science at the 2012 AGU Fall Meeting, held 3-7 December in San Francisco, Calif. The award recognizes significant early-career contributions to planetary science.

  11. Ron Hays: A Story of Art as Self Treatment for Alzheimer's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Robin M. N.; Hays, Nancy Scheller

    2016-01-01

    Ronald E. Hays is the former Director of the Hahnemann Creative Arts in Therapy Department at Drexel University in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and the cofounder of the graduate art therapy program at Eastern Virginia Medical School in Norfolk, Virginia. At the age of 62 he was diagnosed with early onset Alzheimer's disease, a form of dementia. In…

  12. Digestibility Nutrient Contents on Acacia Seyal, Balanities Aegyptiaca and Chloris Gayana Hay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiliti, J.K

    2002-01-01

    A study was carried to determine the nutrients and their digestibility in Acacia seyal and Balanities aegyptiaca legume browses and compared with Chloris gayana hay. Samples were taken from these two leguminous forages at Mogotio and Emining divisions of Koibatek district and fed to sheep in a change over design. The sheep were housed in individual pens and fitted with faecal collection bags. They were fed and faeces collected twice daily. An adaptation period of 14 days, Faecal collection of 7 days and changeover of 10 days were enforced. Nutrients analysed for during digestibility included DM, OM, CP, NDF, Hemicellulose and Cellulose. The nutrients compositions were 651, 916, 112, 370, 339, 59 and 84; 665, 920, 152, 443, 341, 89 and 80, 845, 924, 68, 730, 463, 57, and 76 for DM, OM, CP, NDF, ADF, and ash in Acacia seal, Balanities aegyptiaca and Chloris gayana hay. The in vivio digestibility results were different (p<0.05) for all nutrients. The digestibilities of DM, OM, CP NDF, Hemicellulose and Cellulose in Acacia seyal, Balanities aegyptiaca and Chloris gayana hay were 54.7, 66.5, 32.8, 40.3, 51.7, and 82.7; 48.5, 58.9, 67.4, 36.9, 36.3, and 40.6 and 48.1, 50.4, 41.7, 53.7, 63.0 and 62.3% respectively. The two legume forages had nutrients that had higher digestibility than hay except for fibre

  13. The effect of feeding barley or hay alone or in combination with molassed sugar beet pulp on the metabolic responses in plasma and caecum of horses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, R B; Austbø, Dag; Blache, D

    2016-01-01

    only (HAY), hay and molassed SBP (HAY + SBP), hay and pelleted barley (BAR), and hay, pelleted barley and molassed SBP (BAR + SBP). The amount of barley (2 g starch/kg body weight (BW)) fed in the test meals was similar for the BAR and BAR + SBP diets. Each diet was fed for 16 days followed by data...... to the large intestine in response to the dietary carbohydrate composition. In conclusion, there was no effect of adding molassed SBP to a meal of barley compared to feeding barley alone, and fluctuations in plasma and caecal variables were more stable when feeding hay and molassed SBP than feeding barley...

  14. Religious Literacy or Spiritual Awareness? Comparative Critique of Andrew Wright's and David Hay's Approaches to Spiritual Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filipsone, Anta

    2009-01-01

    On the basis of a comparison of the educational approaches of Andrew Wright and David Hay this paper illustrates the persisting problem of dichotomising cognitive and trans-cognitive aspects of spiritual development and education. Even though both Wright and Hay speak of the same topic--spirituality and spiritual education--they define these terms…

  15. 34 CFR 664.40 - Can participation in a Fulbright-Hays Group Projects Abroad be terminated?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... PROJECTS ABROAD PROGRAM What Conditions Must Be Met by a Grantee? § 664.40 Can participation in a Fulbright-Hays Group Projects Abroad be terminated? (a) Participation may be terminated only by the J. William... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Can participation in a Fulbright-Hays Group Projects...

  16. TGF-β Signaling May Play a Role in the Development of Goblet Cell Hyperplasia in a Mouse Model of Allergic Rhinitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuhui Ouyang

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Background: Transforming growth factor-p (TGF-β levels are elevated in the nasal mucosa in allergic rhinitis. However, because TGF-β is secreted extracellulary in latent complexes, it remains unclear whether the local TGF-β expression actually drives active signaling and affects the pathophysiology of allergic rhinitis. The objective of this study is to investigate whether TGF-β signaling is activated in allergic rhinitis and plays a role in the pathophysiology of allergic rhinitis. Methods: An ovabumin (OVA-sensitized and -nasally challenged mouse model of allergic rhinitis was established and phosphorylation of Smad2 in the nasal mucosa was examined by immunohistochemistry. In addition, the effects of the pharmacological inhibition of endogenous TGF-β signaling on the allergic rhinitis model were histologically examined. Furthermore, phosphorylation of Smad2 in the nasal mucosa samples obtained from patients with allergic rhinitis was also evaluated. Results: In the mouse model of allergic rhinitis, OVA challenge induced phosphorylation of Smad2 predominantly in epithelial cells in the nasal mucosa. In addition, the administration of an inhibitor of TGF-β type I receptor kinase activity during OVA challenge suppressed goblet cell hyperplasia in the nasal mucosa. Furthermore, phosphorylated Smad2 expression increased in nasal epithelial cells in patients with allergic rhinitis. Conclusions: These results suggest that TGF-β signaling is activated in epithelial cells in the nasal mucosa in allergic rhinitis and may contribute to the development of goblet cell hyperplasia. KEY WORDS: allergic rhinitis, epithelial cells, Smad, TGF-p

  17. Effects of alfalfa hay and its physical form (chopped versus pelleted) on performance of Holstein calves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahani-Moghadam, M; Mahjoubi, E; Hossein Yazdi, M; Cardoso, F C; Drackley, J K

    2015-06-01

    Inclusion of forage and its physical form in starter may affect rumen development, average daily gain (ADG), and dry matter intake (DMI) of dairy calves. To evaluate the effects of forage and its physical form (chopped vs. pelleted) on growth of calves under a high milk feeding regimen, 32 Holstein calves (38.8±1.1kg) were assigned at birth to 1 of 3 treatments in a completely randomized block design. Dietary treatments (% of dry matter) were (1) 100% semi-texturized starter (CON); (2) 90% semi-texturized starter + 10% chopped alfalfa hay (mean particle size=5.4mm) as a total mixed ration (TMR; CH); and (3) 90% semi-texturized starter + 10% pelleted alfalfa (mean=5.8mm) hay as a TMR (PH). Data were subjected to mixed model analysis with contrasts used to evaluate effect of forage inclusion. Calves were weaned at 76 d of age and the experiment finished 2 wk after weaning. Individual milk and solid feed consumption were recorded daily. Solid feed consumption and ADG increased as age increased (effect of week), but neither forage inclusion nor physical form of forage affected these variables pre- or postweaning. Plasma urea N was affected by treatments such that the CON group had a lower concentration than forage-fed groups. Forage inclusion, but not physical form, resulted in increased total protein in plasma. Although days with elevated rectal temperature, fecal score, and general appearance were not affected by dietary treatments, calves fed alfalfa hay during the first month of life had fewer days with respiratory issues, regardless of physical form of hay. We concluded that provision of forage does have some beneficial effects in calves fed large amounts of milk replacer, but pelleted alfalfa hay did not result in any improvement in calf performance or health. Copyright © 2015 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Typhoid fever: case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanhueza Palma, Natalia Carolina; Farías Molina, Solange; Calzadilla Riveras, Jeannette; Hermoso, Amalia

    2016-06-21

    Typhoid fever remains a major health problem worldwide, in contrast to Chile, where this disease is an isolated finding. Clinical presentation is varied, mainly presenting with fever, malaise, abdominal discomfort, and nonspecific symptoms often confused with other causes of febrile syndrome. We report a six-year-old, male patient presenting with fever of two weeks associated with gastrointestinal symptoms, malaise, hepatomegaly and elevated liver enzymes. Differential diagnoses were considered and a Widal reaction and two blood cultures were requested; both came back positive, confirming the diagnosis of typhoid fever caused by Salmonella typhi. Prior to diagnosis confirmation, empirical treatment was initiated with ceftriaxone and metronidazole, with partial response; then drug therapy was adjusted according to ciprofloxacin susceptibility testing with a favorable clinical response. We discuss diagnostic methods and treatment of enteric fever with special emphasis on typhoid fever.

  19. Rocky Mountain spotted fever in Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paddock, Christopher D; Fernandez, Susana; Echenique, Gustavo A; Sumner, John W; Reeves, Will K; Zaki, Sherif R; Remondegui, Carlos E

    2008-04-01

    We describe the first molecular confirmation of Rickettsia rickettsii, the cause of Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF), from a tick vector, Amblyomma cajennense, and from a cluster of fatal spotted fever cases in Argentina. Questing A. cajennense ticks were collected at or near sites of presumed or confirmed cases of spotted fever rickettsiosis in Jujuy Province and evaluated by polymerase chain reaction assays for spotted fever group rickettsiae. DNA of R. rickettsii was amplified from a pool of A. cajennense ticks and from tissues of one of four patients who died during 2003-2004 after illnesses characterized by high fever, severe headache, myalgias, and petechial rash. The diagnosis of spotted fever rickettsiosis was confirmed in the other patients by indirect immunofluorescence antibody and immunohistochemical staining techniques. These findings show the existence of RMSF in Argentina and emphasize the need for clinicians throughout the Americas to consider RMSF in patients with febrile rash illnesses.

  20. NNDSS - Table II. Salmonellosis (excluding typhoid fever and paratyphoid fever) to Shigellosis

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table II. Salmonellosis (excluding typhoid fever and paratyphoid fever) to Shigellosis - 2018. In this Table, provisional cases of selected notifiable...

  1. Efficacy of chlorophyll c2 for seasonal allergic rhinitis: single-center double-blind randomized control trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, Takashi; Nishida, Naoya; Nota, Jumpei; Kitani, Takashi; Aoishi, Kunihide; Takahashi, Hirotaka; Sugahara, Takuya; Hato, Naohito

    2016-12-01

    Chlorophyll c2 extracted from Sargassum horneri improved allergic symptoms in an animal model of allergic rhinitis. In the present study, we explored the efficacy of chlorophyll c2 in patients with seasonal allergic rhinitis. This was a single-center, randomized, double-blind placebo-controlled trial. Sixty-six patients aged 20-43 years, each with a 2-year history of seasonal allergic rhinitis, were randomly assigned to receive either a single daily dose (0.7 mg) of chlorophyll c2 or placebo for 12 weeks. The use of medications including H1-antihistamines and topical nasal steroids was recorded by rescue medication scores (RMSs) noted after 4, 8, and 12 weeks of treatment. Disease-specific quality of life was measured using the Japan Rhinitis Quality of Life Questionnaire (JRQLQ) both before and after 4, 8, and 12 weeks of treatment. The RMS at 8 weeks was significantly better in the chlorophyll c2 than the placebo group (mean RMS difference = -3.09; 95 % confidence interval = -5.96 to -0.22); the mean RMS at 4 weeks was only slightly better in the chlorophyll c2 group. The JRQLQ scores did not differ significantly between the two groups. Chlorophyll c2 would have a potential to be an alternative treatment for allergic rhinitis.

  2. Physical Activity, Sedentary Habits, Sleep, and Obesity are Associated with Asthma, Allergic Rhinitis, and Atopic Dermatitis in Korean Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Man Sup; Lee, Chang Hee; Sim, Songyong; Hong, Sung Kwang; Choi, Hyo Geun

    2017-09-01

    Since pathophysiologic evidence has been raised to suggest that obesity could facilitate an allergic reaction, obesity has been known as an independent risk factor for allergic disease such as asthma. However, the relationship between sedentary behavior and lifestyle which could lead to obesity, and those allergic diseases remains unclear. We analyzed the relations between physical activity, including sitting time for study, sitting time for leisure and sleep time, and obesity, asthma, allergic rhinitis, and atopic dermatitis using the Korea Youth Risk Behavior Web-based Survey, which was conducted in 2013. Total 53769 adolescent participants (12 through 18 years old) were analyzed using simple and multiple logistic regression analyses with complex sampling. Longer sitting time for study and short sitting time for leisure were associated with allergic rhinitis. High physical activity and short sleep time were associated with asthma, allergic rhinitis, and atopic dermatitis. Underweight was negatively associated with atopic dermatitis, whereas overweight was positively correlated with allergic rhinitis and atopic dermatitis. High physical activity, and short sleep time were associated with asthma, allergic rhinitis, and atopic dermatitis. © Copyright: Yonsei University College of Medicine 2017

  3. Perinatal Yellow Fever: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diniz, Lilian Martins Oliveira; Romanelli, Roberta Maia Castro; de Carvalho, Andréa Lucchesi; Teixeira, Daniela Caldas; de Carvalho, Luis Fernando Andrade; Cury, Verônica Ferreira; Filho, Marcelo Pereira Lima; Perígolo, Graciele; Heringer, Tiago Pires

    2018-04-09

    An outbreak of yellow fever in Brazil made it possible to assess different presentations of disease such as perinatal transmission. A pregnant woman was admitted to hospital with yellow fever symptoms. She was submitted to cesarean section and died due to fulminant hepatitis. On the 6th day the newborn developed liver failure and died 13 days later. Yellow fever PCR was positive for both.

  4. Rat bite fever in a pet lover.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, B B; Paller, A S; Katz, B Z

    1998-02-01

    Rat-bite fever is an uncommon bacterial illness resulting from infection with Streptobacillus moniliformis that is often transmitted by the bite of a rat. The cutaneous findings in rat-bite fever are nonspecific but have been described as maculopapular or petechial. We describe a 9-year-old girl with acrally distributed hemorrhagic pustules, fever, and arthralgias. Diagnosis was delayed because of difficulty in identifying the pathologic organism. She was successfully treated with 10 days of ceftriaxone.

  5. Vaccines for preventing typhoid fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milligan, Rachael; Paul, Mical; Richardson, Marty; Neuberger, Ami

    2018-05-31

    Typhoid fever and paratyphoid fever continue to be important causes of illness and death, particularly among children and adolescents in south-central and southeast Asia. Two typhoid vaccines are widely available, Ty21a (oral) and Vi polysaccharide (parenteral). Newer typhoid conjugate vaccines are at varying stages of development and use. The World Health Organization has recently recommended a Vi tetanus toxoid (Vi-TT) conjugate vaccine, Typbar-TCV, as the preferred vaccine for all ages. To assess the effects of vaccines for preventing typhoid fever. In February 2018, we searched the Cochrane Infectious Diseases Group Specialized Register, CENTRAL, MEDLINE, Embase, LILACS, and mRCT. We also searched the reference lists of all included trials. Randomized and quasi-randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing typhoid fever vaccines with other typhoid fever vaccines or with an inactive agent (placebo or vaccine for a different disease) in adults and children. Human challenge studies were not eligible. Two review authors independently applied inclusion criteria and extracted data, and assessed the certainty of the evidence using the GRADE approach. We computed vaccine efficacy per year of follow-up and cumulative three-year efficacy, stratifying for vaccine type and dose. The outcome addressed was typhoid fever, defined as isolation of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi in blood. We calculated risk ratios (RRs) and efficacy (1 - RR as a percentage) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). In total, 18 RCTs contributed to the quantitative analysis in this review: 13 evaluated efficacy (Ty21a: 5 trials; Vi polysaccharide: 6 trials; Vi-rEPA: 1 trial; Vi-TT: 1 trial), and 9 reported on adverse events. All trials but one took place in typhoid-endemic countries. There was no information on vaccination in adults aged over 55 years of age, pregnant women, or travellers. Only one trial included data on children under two years of age.Ty21a vaccine (oral vaccine, three doses

  6. Evaluation of Clinical and Immunological Responses: A 2-Year Follow-Up Study in Children with Allergic Rhinitis due to House Dust Mite

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moed, H.; van Wijk, R.G.; Hendriks, R.W.; van der Wouden, J.C.

    2013-01-01

    Background. Allergic rhinitis is a disease with polarization towards Thand a defect of regulatory T cells. Immunological changes have been reported after immunotherapy treatment. However, there is not much known about the natural course of allergic rhinitis with respect to clinical manifestation and

  7. Supplementary feeding of roe deer (Capreolus capreolus L with late harvested hay. A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Rehbinder

    1985-05-01

    Full Text Available In order to increase the fodder available for roedeer during wintertime, late harvested hay was placed on racks early in November in three consecutive years. Freeezing kept the hay dry and fresh during all three winters. In the first winter, with much snow, the bulk of the hay was consumed whereas consumption in the two subsequent mild winters was low and selective. The crude protein content of the hay was low (3.5 - 8.4% dry matter. Metabolizable energy estimated from digestion in vitro was 3.5 — 5.6 MJ per kg dry matter. Rumen liquor from roe deer during a mild winter gave lower in vitro digestion than liquor from sheep fed with ordinary rations. The value of this poor hay for roe deer is discussed with respect to the animals requirements, seasonal adaption, the energy and protein content of the hay, water consumption and normal behavior. The results indicate that late harvested hay may be more suitable than regularly harvested hay or concentrates to help roe deer to survive spells of severe winter conditions. With late harvested hay placed out at several localized feeding sites, the risks of indigestion and dehydration, associated with a more concentrated, feed, are minimized and the ranking among the roe deer in particular will be less important and thus more animals will have improved prospects of gaining access to the fodder.Tilskottsutfodring av rådjur (Capreolus capreolus L med sent skordat ho. En pilotstudie.Abstract in Swedish / Sammanfattning: I avsikt att, for rådjur, oka mångden tillgångligt foder under vintertid, skordades och håssjades ho i borjan av november under tre på varandra foljande år. Hoet fros torn och holl sig fårskt alla vintrarna. Forstå vintern med mycket sno konsumerades huvuddelen av hoet medan de två foljande milda vintrarna konsumptionen var låg och selektiv. Mångden råprotein i hoet var lågt (3.5 — 8.4 % i torrsubstans. Innehållet av omsåttbar energi beråknad från digestion in vitro var 3

  8. Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever

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    Emadi Koochak H

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF was first described in the Crimea in 1944 and then in 1956 in congo. CCHF is a viral hemorrhagic fever of the Nairovirus group that belongs to Bunyaviridae family virus. It is transmitted to human by tick bite. The most efficient and common tick that is the vectors of CCHF is a member of the Hyalomma genus which infected many mammals such as livestock, this tick is the main reservoire of virus in nature. Humans also become infected with CCHF virus by direct contact with blood or other infected tissues from livestock or human patients (nosocomial infection. Disease has been found in saharic Africa, Eastern Europe, Pakistan, India and Middle East (specially Iran and Iraq. This disease recently spread in Iran so in 1999 to 2001 at least 222 suspected case(81 definite case reported that led to the death of 15 of 81 cases. It is estimated that 30 percent of the country's cattle are contaminated with this virus."nIn humans, after a short incubation period it appears suddenly with fever, chills, myalgia and GI symptoms followed by severe bleeding and DIC that led to death .If the patient improved, has a long {2-4 weeks convalescence period. Disease diagnosed by clinical manifestations, serologic tests, viral culture and PCR and its specific treatment is oral ribavirin for 10 days, for prevention of disease personal protective measures from tick bite, spraying poison of mews to reduce of ticks crowd, isolation of patients and dis-infection of contaminated personal equipments that who suffering from CCHF is recommended.

  9. Dengue fever and dengue haemorrhagic fever in adolescents and adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tantawichien, Terapong

    2012-05-01

    Dengue fever (DF) is endemic in tropical and subtropical zones and the prevalence is increasing across South-east Asia, Africa, the Western Pacific and the Americas. In recent years, the spread of unplanned urbanisation, with associated substandard housing, overcrowding and deterioration in water, sewage and waste management systems, has created ideal conditions for increased transmission of the dengue virus in tropical urban centres. While dengue infection has traditionally been considered a paediatric disease, the age distribution of dengue has been rising and more cases have been observed in adolescents and adults. Furthermore, the development of tourism in the tropics has led to an increase in the number of tourists who become infected, most of whom are adults. Symptoms and risk factors for dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF) and severe dengue differ between children and adults, with co-morbidities and incidence in more elderly patients associated with greater risk of mortality. Treatment options for DF and DHF in adults, as for children, centre round fluid replacement (either orally or intravenously, depending on severity) and antipyretics. Further data are needed on the optimal treatment of adult patients.

  10. THROMBOCYTOPENIA IN DENGUE HAEMORRHAGIC FEVER

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    I Wayan Putu Sutirta-Yasa

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The incidence and geographical distribution of dengue has gradually increased during the past decade. Today, dengue is considered one of the most important arthropod-borne viral diseasases in humans in term of morbidity and mortality. Dengue infection   a potential life-threatening dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF / dengue shock syndrome(DSS, characterized by thrombocytopenia and increased vascular permiability. Thrombocytopenia causes bleeding, but in   DHF patients with thrombocytopenia do not always develop bleeding manifestation. The pathogenesis of thrombocytopenia are not cleared. Multiple factors  may be involved in the machanisms leading to thrombocytopenia in DHF/DSS patients.

  11. Fever-Induced Brugada Syndrome

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    Sandhya Manohar MD

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Brugada syndrome is increasingly recognized as a cause of sudden cardiac death. Many of these patients do not get diagnosed due its dynamic and often hidden nature. We have come a long way in understanding the disease process, and its electrophysiology appears to be intimately linked with sodium channel mutations or disorders. The cardiac rhythm in these patients can deteriorate into fatal ventricular arrhythmias. This makes it important for the clinician to be aware of the conditions in which arrhythmogenicity of Brugada syndrome is revealed or even potentiated. We present such an instance where our patient’s Brugada syndrome was unmasked by fever.

  12. Hay intake improves performance and rumen development of calves fed higher quantities of milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, M A; Weary, D M; von Keyserlingk, M A G

    2011-07-01

    Research to date has suggested that access to forage before weaning can limit rumen development in calves, but no research has yet addressed the role of forage for calves fed higher quantities of milk. This study compared performance and rumen development of calves provided high volumes (equivalent to approximately 20% of calf birth weight) of milk with and without access to hay. At d 3 of age, individually housed calves were randomly assigned to treatment (either ad libitum access to chopped grass hay or no forage; n=15 calves per treatment, 10 heifers, and 5 bulls). All calves were provided ad libitum access to water and starter throughout the study. All calves were offered 8L of milk/d from a nipple bottle from d 3 to 35, 4 L/d from d 36 to 53, and 2L/d until weaning at d 56. Solid feed intake and growth parameters were monitored from d 3 to 70. At d 70, males from both treatments were slaughtered to measure rumen development parameters. Overall dry matter (DM) intake from solid feed did not differ between treatments before wk 5. However, during wk 6 to 10, calves fed forage consumed more total DM (starter plus hay) than did calves fed no forage. Hip and wither height, heart girth, and body barrel at d 3, 56, and 70 did not differ between treatments. Reticulorumen weight was heavier in calves fed hay versus those fed only starter (12.77±1.29 vs. 7.99±0.69 kg with digesta; 1.89±0.05 vs.1.60±0.09 kg without digesta). Body weight without digesta was similar in calves fed forage or no forage. Mean rumen pH was higher in calves fed hay compared with those fed no forage (5.49±0.08 vs. 5.06±0.04). In conclusion, provision of chopped hay to calves fed high volumes of milk can promote solid feed DM intake and rumen development without affecting BW gain. Copyright © 2011 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Repeated intranasal TLR7 stimulation reduces allergen responsiveness in allergic rhinitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greiff Lennart

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interactions between Th1 and Th2 immune responses are of importance to the onset and development of allergic disorders. A Toll-like receptor 7 agonist such as AZD8848 may have potential as a treatment for allergic airway disease by skewing the immune system away from a Th2 profile. Objective To evaluate the efficacy and safety of intranasal AZD8848. Methods In a placebo-controlled single ascending dose study, AZD8848 (0.3-600 μg was given intranasally to 48 healthy subjects and 12 patients with allergic rhinitis (NCT00688779. In a placebo-controlled repeat challenge/treatment study, AZD8848 (30 and 60 μg was given once weekly for five weeks to 74 patients with allergic rhinitis out of season: starting 24 hours after the final dose, daily allergen challenges were given for seven days (NCT00770003. Safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics, and biomarkers were monitored. During the allergen challenge series, nasal symptoms and lavage fluid levels of tryptase and α2-macroglobulin, reflecting mast cell activity and plasma exudation, were monitored. Results AZD8848 produced reversible blood lymphocyte reductions and dose-dependent flu-like symptoms: 30–100 μg produced consistent yet tolerable effects. Plasma interleukin-1 receptor antagonist was elevated after administration of AZD8848, reflecting interferon production secondary to TLR7 stimulation. At repeat challenge/treatment, AZD8848 reduced nasal symptoms recorded ten minutes after allergen challenge up to eight days after the final dose. Tryptase and α2-macroglobulin were also reduced by AZD8848. Conclusions Repeated intranasal stimulation of Toll-like receptor 7 by AZD8848 was safe and produced a sustained reduction in the responsiveness to allergen in allergic rhinitis. Trial registration NCT00688779 and NCT00770003 as indicated above.

  14. Nasal hyper-reactivity is a common feature in both allergic and nonallergic rhinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segboer, C L; Holland, C T; Reinartz, S M; Terreehorst, I; Gevorgyan, A; Hellings, P W; van Drunen, C M; Fokkens, W J

    2013-11-01

    Nasal hyper-reactivity is an increased sensitivity of the nasal mucosa to various nonspecific stimuli. Both allergic rhinitis (AR) and nonallergic rhinitis (NAR) patients can elicit nasal hyper-reactivity symptoms. Differences in the prevalence or type of nasal hyper-reactivity in AR and NAR patients are largely unknown. In this study, we quantitatively and qualitatively assessed nasal hyper-reactivity in AR and NAR. In the first part, an analysis of a prospectively collected database was performed to reveal patient-reported symptoms of hyper-reactivity. In the second part, cold dry air provocation (CDA) was performed as a hyper-reactivity measure in AR and NAR patients and healthy controls, and symptoms scores, nasal secretions and peak nasal inspiratory flow were measured. Comparisons were made between AR and NAR patients in both studies. The database analysis revealed high hyper-reactivity prevalence in AR (63.4%) and NAR (66.9%). There were no differences between AR and NAR in terms of the number or type of hyper-reactivity stimuli. Hyper-reactivity to physical stimuli did not exclude a response to chemical stimuli, or vice versa. CDA provocation resulted in a significant increase in rhinitis symptoms and the amount of nasal secretions in AR and NAR patients, but not in controls. We found no quantitative or qualitative differences in nasal hyper-reactivity between AR and NAR patients. It is not possible to differentiate NAR subpopulations based on physical or chemical stimuli. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Up-regulation of Toll-like receptors 2, 3 and 4 in allergic rhinitis

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    Uddman Rolf

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Toll-like receptors enable the host to recognize a large number of pathogen-associated molecular patterns such as bacterial lipopolysaccharide, viral RNA, CpG-containing DNA and flagellin. Toll-like receptors have also been shown to play a pivotal role in both innate and adaptive immune responses. The role of Toll-like receptors as a primary part of our microbe defense system has been shown in several studies, but their possible function as mediators in allergy and asthma remains to be established. The present study was designed to examine the expression of Toll-like receptors 2, 3 and 4 in the nasal mucosa of patients with intermittent allergic rhinitis, focusing on changes induced by exposure to pollen. Methods 27 healthy controls and 42 patients with seasonal allergic rhinitis volunteered for the study. Nasal biopsies were obtained before and during pollen season as well as before and after allergen challenge. The seasonal material was used for mRNA quantification of Toll-like receptors 2, 3 and 4 with real-time polymerase chain reaction, whereas specimens achieved in conjunction with allergen challenge were used for immunohistochemical localization and quantification of corresponding proteins. Results mRNA and protein representing Toll-like receptors 2, 3 and 4 could be demonstrated in all specimens. An increase in protein expression for all three receptors could be seen following allergen challenge, whereas a significant increase of mRNA only could be obtained for Toll-like receptor 3 during pollen season. Conclusion The up-regulation of Toll-like receptors 2, 3 and 4 in the nasal mucosa of patients with symptomatic allergic rhinitis supports the idea of a role for Toll-like receptors in allergic airway inflammation.

  16. Effects of dietary habits and risk factors on allergic rhinitis prevalence among Turkish adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamay, Zeynep; Akcay, Ahmet; Ergin, Ahmet; Guler, Nermin

    2013-09-01

    Allergic rhinitis (AR) is a global health problem affecting many people from childhood to adulthood. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of AR and related symptoms, and to assess the risk factors, dietary habits and the Mediterranean diet affecting AR. In a cross-sectional study design, 9991 children, aged 13-14 years in 61 primary schools in 32 districts of Istanbul were evaluated. The prevalence of AR symptoms among the children was evaluated using the ISAAC protocol. In our study, total of 10,984 questionnaires were distributed to 13-14yr-old schoolchildren to 61 schools in 32 district of Istanbul and 9991 questionnaires were suitable for analysis with an overall response of 91.7%. The rates of lifetime rhinitis, rhinitis in last 12 months and lifetime doctor diagnosed AR prevalence were 53.5%, 38.3% and 4.5%, respectively. The variation among districts in the prevalence of doctor diagnosed AR was very high. The highest prevalence was about 10 times higher than in the district with the lowest prevalence (range: 1.4-14.5) of Istanbul. A family history of atopy, mother with a university degree, presence of cat at home during last 12 months and adenoidectomy were significant for increased doctor diagnosed AR risk. Additionally, although fish and other sea foods, fermented drinks made from millets and various seeds, animal fats and butter were independent risk factors for doctor diagnosed AR, fish oil and hamburger were protective foods for doctor diagnosed AR. The MD was not associated with the prevalence of doctor diagnosed AR. This study shows that that there are wide variations for the prevalence of AR related symptoms in 13-14yr-old schoolchildren among districts of Istanbul in Turkey. Socio-economical, environmental factors, some dietary habits, but not Mediterranean diet may affect the prevalence of AR. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. A novel case of mealworm-induced occupational rhinitis in a school teacher.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernstein, Jonathan A; Bernstein, I Leonard

    2002-01-01

    A 47-year-old African American female elementary schoolteacher presented with itchy, watery eyes, rhinorrhea, postnasal drainage, and nasal congestion complicated by recurrent epistaxis for 2 months. She had similar symptoms the previous year from September to May but was symptom free during the summer. Her symptoms began within 1 hour after entering the classroom and improved in the evening at home, on weekends, and vacation. She denied symptoms around dust, freshly cut grass, or pets and had no prior history of underlying allergic rhinitis and asthma. She had a 20-pack-a-year smoking history but quit 1 1/2 years ago. A detailed history of her classroom environment revealed the presence of mealworms that were used to teach the children about life cycles. Physical exam revealed swollen, erythematous nasal turbinates but was otherwise unremarkable. Prick skin testing was positive for oak tree, grasses, feathers, and cockroaches. Mealworm whole body extracts were prepared using standard methodology. Titration intracutaneous skin testing revealed a positive reaction at a 1:1000 concentration associated with a large delayed reaction 8 hours later that persisted for 24 hours. Specific nasal provocation using acoustic rhinometry revealed a dose response change in nasal volume (48% decrease at 1:100; 53% decrease at 1:50) and cross-sectional area (32% decrease at 1:100; 48% decrease at 1:50) in response to mealworm challenge compared with a saline control. Removal of the mealworms from the classroom resulted in complete relief of her symptoms. This is the first reported case of mealworm-induced rhinitis in a schoolteacher. Because mealworm demonstrations are now part of the standard curriculum in public school elementary classrooms in Ohio, it is important that school administrators recognize the sensitizing nature of these insects and their potential for causing allergic rhinitis and asthma in the workplace.

  18. Pollen concentrations and prevalence of asthma and allergic rhinitis in Italy: Evidence from the GEIRD study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchetti, Pierpaolo; Pesce, Giancarlo; Villani, Simona; Antonicelli, Leonardo; Ariano, Renato; Attena, Francesco; Bono, Roberto; Bellisario, Valeria; Fois, Alessandro; Gibelli, Nadia; Nicolis, Morena; Olivieri, Mario; Pirina, Pietro; Scopano, Eugenio; Siniscalco, Consolata; Verlato, Giuseppe; Marcon, Alessandro

    2017-04-15

    Pollen exposure has acute adverse effects on sensitized individuals. Information on the prevalence of respiratory diseases in areas with different pollen concentrations is scanty. We performed an ecologic analysis to assess whether the prevalence of allergic rhinitis and asthma in young adults varied across areas with different pollen concentrations in Italy. A questionnaire on respiratory diseases was delivered to random samples of 20-44year-old subjects from six centers in 2005-2010. Data on the daily air concentrations of 7 major allergologic pollens (Poaceae, Urticaceae, Oleaceae, Cupressaceae, Coryloideae, Betula and Ambrosia) were collected for 2007-2008. Center-specific pollen exposure indicators were calculated, including the average number of days per year with pollens above the low or high concentration thresholds defined by the Italian Association of Aerobiology. Associations between pollen exposure and disease prevalence, adjusted for potential confounders, were estimated using logistic regression models with center as a random-intercept. Overall, 8834 subjects (56.8%) filled in the questionnaire. Allergic rhinitis was significantly less frequent in the centers with longer periods with high concentrations of at least one (OR per 10days=0.989, 95%CI: 0.979-0.999) or at least two pollens (OR=0.974, 95%CI: 0.951-0.998); associations with the number of days with at least one (OR=0.988, 95%CI: 0.972-1.004) or at least two (OR=0.985, 95%CI: 0.970-1.001) pollens above the low thresholds were borderline significant. Asthma prevalence was not associated with pollen concentrations. Our study does not support that the prevalence of allergic rhinitis and asthma is greater in centers with higher pollen concentrations. It is not clear whether the observed ecologic associations hold at the individual level. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Evaluation of Prevalence of Allergic Rhinitis Symptoms in Kurdistan, a Western Province in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasoul Nasiri

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Allergic rhinitis, like other allergic diseases, is one of the most common disorders during childhood; this study was conducted to assess and compare the prevalence and severity of allergic rhinitis in children and adolescents living in Kurdistan province. The study was aimed to provide a ground for the identification of likely causes and risk factors of this disorder. Materials and Methods This study was a cross-sectional study. In order to collect data, 4,000 questionnaires were distributed to elementary schools and junior high schools and 3,890 questionnaires were completed; as a result, the survey response rate was 97%. The study was carried out based on International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood (ISAAC: ISAAC questionnaire. After entering the data into SPSS version 13, they were analyzed using logistic regression and Chi- square test. Results Of a total 3,890 people, 29.7% of the subjects in this study reported a history of sneezing or runny nose in the past 12 months; it was reported more in boys in the age group 13-14 years and the difference between the sexes was significant [Odds ratio(OR=1.35, Confidence interval (CI]: 1.09-1.67, P < 0.01. Based on physician diagnosis, 9.37% of the subjects were overtaken by allergic rhinitis and it was more prevalent in boys at both educational levels and the difference was statistically significant in subjects aged 13-14 years old (OR=1.44 CI: 1.07-1.94, P

  20. Evaluating the impact of allergic rhinitis on quality of life among Thai students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapsaprang, Siwaporn; Setabutr, Dhave; Kulalert, Prapasri; Temboonnark, Panipak; Poachanukoon, Orapan

    2015-09-01

    The prevalence of allergic rhinitis (AR) in Thailand continues to rise. We report the prevalence and evaluate its impact upon quality of life (QoL) in students on a metropolitan campus. From March 2013 to February 2014, 222 students from Thammasat University Medical School were evaluated using the International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood Questionnaire (ISAAC) questionnaire and the rhinoconjunctivitis QoL questionnaire (Rcq-36) to assess subjective symptoms. Those students with clinical symptoms of AR underwent skin prick testing (SPT) using 5 common allergens found in Thailand. The association between AR and QoL was then determined using a paired t test. A total of 222 students were enrolled in the study; 86 (38.7%) were men. There were 183 (81.9%) students with AR symptoms and 130 (71.4%) students with positive results for SPT. The students' QoL as defined by the Rcq-36 revealed a significant worsening in students who self-reported rhinitis symptoms within the past 12 months. Compared to the non-AR group, in those with AR, eye symptoms were significantly more common. The prevalence of AR at a college campus was 58.5%. The presence of rhinitis symptoms was the highest predictor of the presence of AR, with 67.7% having subsequent positive SPT. Students with AR had poorer scores in every dimension of QoL as defined by the Rcq-36 when compared to their non-AR counterparts. Educational performances among the 2 groups were unaffected. © 2015 ARS-AAOA, LLC.

  1. [Rhinitis and asthma related to cotton dust exposure in apprentices in the clothing industry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaari, N; Amri, C; Khalfallah, T; Alaya, A; Abdallah, B; Harzallah, L; Henchi, M-A; Bchir, N; Kamel, A; Akrout, M

    2009-01-01

    Respiratory allergies are the most common occupational diseases in the world. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of rhinitis and asthma among apprentices exposed to cotton dust in the clothing industry and to describe their epidemiologic and clinical profiles. We carried out a descriptive study of 600 apprentices in a textile and clothing vocational training centre in the Monastir area. The investigation comprised a questionnaire exploring risk factors and symptoms appearing during their training. Subjects who developed allergic respiratory symptoms at the work-place underwent a clinical examination, rhinomanometry and investigation of their allergic status and respiratory function. One hundred twenty apprentices (20%) developed allergic respiratory reactions due to exposure to textile dust (exclusively cotton) during their training, with a positive withdrawal-re-exposure test. Conjunctivitis (14.3%) and rhinitis (8.5%) were the most frequent allergic symptoms. Twenty eight apprentices (4.6%) presented symptoms of asthma. Rhinitis was associated with asthma in 45% of cases. Two cases of asthma were diagnosed clinically at the work-place following their exposure to textile dust. The prick test performed in 120 symptomatic apprentices was positive in 41.6% of cases. There was sensitization to pollens in 29 cases and to dermatophagoides in 13 cases. Cotton and wool allergy was noted in two cases. Allergic symptoms developing during the training were significantly more frequent in the atopic group, and they varied according to the intensity of textile dust exposure. In the textile and clothing industry the frequency of respiratory disorders caused by allergens remains high, especially in atopic apprentices who constitute a population at high risk.

  2. Weather/temperature-sensitive vasomotor rhinitis may be refractory to intranasal corticosteroid treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Robert; Lieberman, Philip; Kent, Edward; Silvey, MaryJane; Locantore, Nicholas; Philpot, Edward E

    2009-01-01

    Vasomotor rhinitis (VMR) is a common but poorly understood disorder of which there are two major subgroups: VMR(w/t), triggered by weather/temperature and VMR(ir), triggered by airborne irritants. No specific biological pathways or specific treatments for VMR(w/t) or VMR(ir) have been identified. However, intranasal corticosteroids (INSs) are effective in treating many forms of nonallergic rhinitis that include these conditions. A recently introduced INS with established efficacy in allergic rhinitis and enhanced affinity, fluticasone furoate, may possess the potency and safety profile required to treat chronic VMR(w/t). Two replicate studies (FFR30006 and FFR30007) were conducted in six countries to evaluate the efficacy and safety of fluticasone furoate nasal spray in subjects with VMR(w/t). After a 7- to 14-day screening period, subjects (n = 699) with symptomatic VMR(w/t) received fluticasone furoate, 110 mug q.d. or placebo for 4 weeks in these two randomized, double-blind, parallel-group studies. Subjects rated their nasal symptoms (congestion, rhinorrhea, and postnasal drip) twice daily on a 4-point categorical scale and evaluated their overall response to treatment at study end. Fluticasone furoate did not significantly improve daily reflective total nasal symptom scores, the primary end point, versus placebo (p = 0.259) and there was no improvement in any other measure of efficacy. The active treatment was well tolerated. Fluticasone furoate was not effective in treating subjects with a newly defined condition, weather-sensitive VMR. These unexpected results suggest that VMR(w/t) is a distinct subgroup of VMR that is refractory to treatment with INSs. Additional study of other treatments for VMR(w/t) (including INSs) is warranted.

  3. Safety update regarding intranasal corticosteroids for the treatment of allergic rhinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaiss, Michael S

    2011-01-01

    Intranasal corticosteroids (INSs) are the most efficacious medication for the treatment of allergic rhinitis. In 2006, the Joint Task Force of the American College of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology, and the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology, published a white paper on the potential over-the-counter switch of INS (Bielory L, Blaiss M, Fineman SM, et al. Concerns about intranasal corticosteroids for over-the-counter use: Position statement of the Joint Task Force for the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology and the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology. Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 96:514-525, 2006). The concern of the paper was the safety of the use of these agents without oversight by a health care professional. The objective of this paper was to review published literature on the safety of INS since the publication of the task force white paper. Recent studies, which evaluated topical and systemic adverse events associated with ciclesonide (CIC), fluticasone furoate (FF), mometasone furoate (MF), triamcinolone acetonide, fluticasone propionate, budesonide, and beclomethasone dipropionate were summarized. In general, no significant topical or systemic complications were observed in these studies, although none were >1 year in duration. The newer formulations of topical corticosteroids for allergic rhinitis, such as CIC, FF, and MF, which have less systemic bioavailability, may be safer for long-term use. New studies continue to add to the reassurance of the safety of INSs in the treatment of allergic rhinitis but still do not answer the question if these agents are appropriate for long-term use without oversight by a health care professional.

  4. Allergic rhinitis and the common cold--high cost to society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellgren, J; Cervin, A; Nordling, S; Bergman, A; Cardell, L O

    2010-06-01

    The common cold and allergic rhinitis constitute a global health problem that affects social life, sleep, school and work performance and is likely to impose a substantial economic burden on society because of absence from work and reduced working capacity. This study assesses the loss of productivity as a result of both allergic rhinitis and the common cold in the Swedish working population. Four thousand questionnaires were sent to a randomized adult population, aged 18-65 years, in Sweden, stratified by gender and area of residence (metropolitan area vs rest of the country). The human capital approach was used to assign monetary value to lost productivity in terms of absenteeism (absence from work), presenteeism (reduced working capacity while at work) and caregiver absenteeism (absence from work to take care of a sick child). Thousand two hundred and thirteen individuals responded, response rate 32%. The mean productivity loss was estimated at 5.1 days or euro 653 per worker and year, yielding a total productivity loss in Sweden of euro 2.7 billion a year. Of the total costs, absenteeism (44%) was the dominant factor, followed by presenteeism (37%) and caregiver absenteeism (19%). Poisson regression analyses revealed that women, people in the 18-29 year age group, and respondents with 'doctor-diagnosed asthma' reported more lost days than the rest of the group. In Sweden, the cost of rhinitis is euro 2.7 billion a year in terms of lost productivity. A reduction in lost productivity of 1 day per individual and year would potentially save euro 528 million.

  5. Rumen volatile fatty acids and milk composition from cows fed hay, haylage, or urea-treated corn silage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schingoethe, D J; Voelker, H H; Beardsley, G L; Parsons, J G

    1976-05-01

    Alfalfa-brome hay, haylage, .5% urea-treated corn silage, or .5% urea plus 1% dried whey-treated corn silage was fed as the only forage to one of four groups of 10 lactating cows per group for a lactation trial of 10 wk. Rumen samples were collected via stomach tube 3 to 4 h after the morning feeding. The pH of the rumen samples from cows fed hay was higher than for cows fed haylage, urea-treated corn silage, and urea-whey corn silage, 6.69 versus 6.36, 6.40, and 6.50. Total volatile fatty acids and propionate were highest from cows fed urea-whey corn silage and were higher on all three fermented forages than cows fed hay. Acetate/propionate ratio was highest from cows fed hay and lowest from cows fed corn silages. Butyrate was highest from cows fed haylage or hay. Milk protein composition was not affected by ration although nonprotein nitrogen of milk was highest from cows fed the urea-treated corn silages. Oleic acid and total unsaturated fatty acids were lowest in milk fat from cows fed hay while palmitic acid was highest from cows fed hay and haylage. These results suggest that type of forage fed may cause small changes in rumen fermentation and in milk composition. The importance of these changes is unknown but may affect properties of dairy products produced from this milk.

  6. PENGARUH CARA PENGAWETAN TERHADAP KOMPOSISI KIMIA DAN EFISIENSI DALAM BENTUK HAY DAN SILASE PADA DAUN 16 PROVENAN GAMAL (GLIRICIDIA SEPIUM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. W. Puger

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available RINGKASAN Percobaan yang bertujuan untuk mengetahui pengaruh cara pengawetan terhadap kandungan zat-zat makanan dan efisiensinya pada daun 16 provenan gamal telah dilaksanakan selama 3 bulan. Penelitian menggunakan rancangan acak lengkap yang terdiri atas 3 perlakuan pengawetan (gamal segar, gamal hay, dan gamal silase dan 3 blok sebagai ulangan. Setiap perlakuan terdiri atas 16 provenan, yaitu 6 dari Mexico (M, 4 dari Guatemala (G, dan satu provenan masing-masing dari Colombia (C, Indonesia (I, Nicaragua (N, Panama (P, Costa Rica (R, dan Venezuela (V. Sampel setiap daun (helai dan tangkai provenan sebelum dan setelah diawetkan dianalisis kandungan zat-zat makanannya dan dihitung efisiensinya setelah dibuat hay dan silase. Kandungan DM dan CP dari hay adalah tertinggi (P0,05 setelah diawetkan menjadi hay dan silase, sedangkan efisiensi DM, OM, dan CP dari hay lebih tinggi (P<0,05 daripada silase. Provenan P13, R12, dan M34 mengandung zat-zat makanan lebih tinggi; sementara provenan G14 dan G17 lebih efisien bila diawetkan dalam bentuk hay dan silase. Pada pertanian lahan kering pengawetan gamal dalam bentuk hay lebih efektif dan efisien jika dibandingkan dengan dalam bentuk silase.

  7. Adverse Events During Immunotherapy Against Grass Pollen-Induced Allergic Rhinitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aasbjerg, Kristian; Dalhoff, Kim Peder; Backer, Vibeke

    2015-01-01

    Allergic rhinitis (AR) triggered by grass pollen is a common disease, affecting millions of people worldwide. Treatment consists of symptom-alleviating drugs, such as topical corticosteroids or antihistamines. Another option is potentially curative immunotherapy, currently available as sublingual...... and subcutaneous treatment. We investigated the potential differences in the prevalence and severity of adverse events related to subcutaneous and sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) against grass pollen-induced AR. A thorough literature search was performed with PubMed and EMBASE. The findings were compared...

  8. Anti-inflammatory activities of Aller-7, a novel polyherbal formulation for allergic rhinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratibha, N; Saxena, V S; Amit, A; D'Souza, P; Bagchi, M; Bagchi, D

    2004-01-01

    Allergic rhinitis is an immunological disorder and an inflammatory response of nasal mucosal membranes. Allergic rhinitis, a state of hypersensitivity, occurs when the body overreacts to a substance such as pollens or dust. A novel, safe polyherbal formulation (Aller-7/NR-A2) has been developed for the treatment of allergic rhinitis using a unique combination of extracts from seven medicinal plants including Phyllanthus emblica, Terminalia chebula, Terminalia bellerica, Albizia lebbeck, Piper nigrum, Zingiber officinale and Piper longum. Since inflammation is an integral mechanistic component of allergy, the present study aimed to determine the anti-inflammatory activity of Aller-7 in various in vivo models. The efficacy of Aller-7 was investigated in compound 48/80-induced paw edema both in Balb/c mice and Swiss Albino mice, carrageenan-induced paw edema in Wistar Albino rats and Freund's adjuvant-induced arthritis in Wistar Albino rats. The trypsin inhibitory activity of Aller-7 was also determined and compared with ovomucoid. At a dose of 250 mg/kg, Aller-7 demonstrated 62.55% inhibition against compound 48/80-induced paw edema in Balb/c mice, while under the same conditions prednisolone at an oral dose of 14 mg/kg exhibited 44.7% inhibition. Aller-7 significantly inhibited compound 48/80-induced paw edema at all three doses of 175, 225 or 275 mg/kg in Swiss Albino mice, while the most potent effect was observed at 225 mg/kg. Aller-7 (120 mg/kg, p.o.) demonstrated 31.3% inhibition against carrageenan-induced acute inflammation in Wistar Albino rats, while ibuprofen (50 mg/kg, p.o.) exerted 68.1% inhibition. Aller-7 also exhibited a dose-dependent (150-350 mg/kg) anti-inflammatory effect against Freund's adjuvant-induced arthritis in Wistar Albino rats and an approximately 63% inhibitory effect was observed at a dose of 350 mg/kg. The trypsin inhibitory activity of Aller-7 was determined, using ovomucoid as a positive control. Ovomucoid and Aller-7 demonstrated

  9. The Association between Ambient Air Pollution and Allergic Rhinitis: Further Epidemiological Evidence from Changchun, Northeastern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, Bo; Zhang, Xuelei; Yi, Chunhui; Zhang, Yan; Ye, Shufeng; Wang, Yafang; Tong, Daniel Q.; Lu, Binfeng

    2017-01-01

    With the continuous rapid urbanization process over the last three decades, outdoors air pollution has become a progressively more serious public health hazard in China. To investigate the possible associations, lag effects and seasonal differences of urban air quality on respiratory health (allergic rhinitis) in Changchun, a city in Northeastern China, we carried out a time-series analysis of the incidents of allergic rhinitis (AR) from 2013 to 2015. Environmental monitoring showed that PM2.5 and PM10 were the major air pollutants in Changchun, followed by SO2, NO2 and O3. The results also demonstrated that the daily concentrations of air pollutants had obvious seasonal differences. PM10 had higher daily mean concentrations in spring (May, dust storms), autumn (October, straw burning) and winter (November to April, coal burning). The mean daily number of outpatient AR visits in the warm season was higher than in the cold season. The prevalence of allergic rhinitis was significantly associated with PM2.5, PM10, SO2 and NO2, and the increased mobility was 10.2% (95% CI, 5.5%–15.1%), 4.9% (95% CI, 0.8%–9.2%), 8.5% (95% CI, −1.8%–19.8%) and 11.1% (95% CI, 5.8%–16.5%) for exposure to each 1-Standard Deviation (1-SD) increase of pollutant, respectively. Weakly or no significant associations were observed for CO and O3. As for lag effects, the highest Relative Risks (RRs) of AR from SO2, NO2, PM10 and PM2.5 were on the same day, and the highest RR from CO was on day 4 (L4). The results also indicated that the concentration of air pollutants might contribute to the development of AR. To summarize, this study provides further evidence of the significant association between ambient particulate pollutants (PM2.5 and PM10, which are usually present in high concentrations) and the prevalence of respiratory effects (allergic rhinitis) in the city of Changchun, located in Northeastern China. Environmental control and public health strategies should be enforced to

  10. The Association between Ambient Air Pollution and Allergic Rhinitis: Further Epidemiological Evidence from Changchun, Northeastern China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Teng

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available With the continuous rapid urbanization process over the last three decades, outdoors air pollution has become a progressively more serious public health hazard in China. To investigate the possible associations, lag effects and seasonal differences of urban air quality on respiratory health (allergic rhinitis in Changchun, a city in Northeastern China, we carried out a time-series analysis of the incidents of allergic rhinitis (AR from 2013 to 2015. Environmental monitoring showed that PM2.5 and PM10 were the major air pollutants in Changchun, followed by SO2, NO2 and O3. The results also demonstrated that the daily concentrations of air pollutants had obvious seasonal differences. PM10 had higher daily mean concentrations in spring (May, dust storms, autumn (October, straw burning and winter (November to April, coal burning. The mean daily number of outpatient AR visits in the warm season was higher than in the cold season. The prevalence of allergic rhinitis was significantly associated with PM2.5, PM10, SO2 and NO2, and the increased mobility was 10.2% (95% CI, 5.5%–15.1%, 4.9% (95% CI, 0.8%–9.2%, 8.5% (95% CI, −1.8%–19.8% and 11.1% (95% CI, 5.8%–16.5% for exposure to each 1-Standard Deviation (1-SD increase of pollutant, respectively. Weakly or no significant associations were observed for CO and O3. As for lag effects, the highest Relative Risks (RRs of AR from SO2, NO2, PM10 and PM2.5 were on the same day, and the highest RR from CO was on day 4 (L4. The results also indicated that the concentration of air pollutants might contribute to the development of AR. To summarize, this study provides further evidence of the significant association between ambient particulate pollutants (PM2.5 and PM10, which are usually present in high concentrations and the prevalence of respiratory effects (allergic rhinitis in the city of Changchun, located in Northeastern China. Environmental control and public health strategies should be enforced to

  11. Current issues on sublingual allergen-specific immunotherapy in children with asthma and allergic rhinitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Živković Zorica

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In 1993 the European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology was the first official organization to recognize that sublingual administration could be “promising route” for allergic desensitization. A few years later, the World Health Organization recommended this therapy as “a viable alternative to the injection route in adults.” The first meta-analysis showed sublingual allergen specific immunotherapy (SLIT effectiveness for allergic rhinitis and another study showed SLIT can actually help prevent the development of asthma both in adults and in children. The main goal of this review article is to present insight into the most up-to-date understanding of the clinical efficacy and safety of immunotherapy in the treatment of pediatric patients with allergic rhinitis and asthma. A literature review was performed on PubMed from 1990 to 2015 using the terms “asthma,” “allergic rhinitis,” “children,” “allergen specific immune therapy.” Evaluating data from double-blind placebo-controlled randomized clinical trials (DB-PC-RCTs, the clinical efficacy (assessed as the reduction of symptom score and the need of rescue medicament of SLIT for allergic rhinitis and allergic asthma, has been confirmed in various meta-analysis Outcomes such as rhinoconjunctivitis score and medication scores, combined scores, quality of life, days with severe symptoms, immunological endpoints, and safety parameters were all improved in the SLIT-tablet compared with placebo group. SLIT safety has been already proven in many DB-PC-RCTs and real-life settings. In accordance with all of the above mentioned, the goals for future trials and studies are the development of comprehensive guidelines for clinical practice on immunotherapy, embracing all the different potential participants. The importance of allergen immunotherapy is of special relevance in the pediatric age, when the plasticity and modulability of the immune system are maximal, and when

  12. A clear urban-rural gradient of allergic rhinitis in a population-based study in Northern Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Stine Holmegaard; Timm, Signe; Janson, Christer

    2016-01-01

    categories of place of upbringing were defined: farm with livestock, farm without livestock, village in rural area, small town, city suburb, and inner city. Pets in the home at birth and during childhood were recorded. Data were analysed using adjusted logistic regression models. RESULTS: Livestock farm.......68-0.88) and during childhood (OR 0.83, 0.74-0.93) were associated with less subsequent allergic rhinitis. Pet keeping did not explain the protective effect of place of upbringing. CONCLUSION: Risk of allergic rhinitis and nasal symptoms in adulthood was inversely associated with the level of urbanisation during...

  13. Fever

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your children to do the same, especially before eating, after using the toilet, after spending time in a crowd or around someone who's sick, after petting animals, and during travel on public transportation. Show your ...

  14. A model of dengue fever

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boutayeb A

    2003-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dengue is a disease which is now endemic in more than 100 countries of Africa, America, Asia and the Western Pacific. It is transmitted to the man by mosquitoes (Aedes and exists in two forms: Dengue Fever and Dengue Haemorrhagic Fever. The disease can be contracted by one of the four different viruses. Moreover, immunity is acquired only to the serotype contracted and a contact with a second serotype becomes more dangerous. Methods The present paper deals with a succession of two epidemics caused by two different viruses. The dynamics of the disease is studied by a compartmental model involving ordinary differential equations for the human and the mosquito populations. Results Stability of the equilibrium points is given and a simulation is carried out with different values of the parameters. The epidemic dynamics is discussed and illustration is given by figures for different values of the parameters. Conclusion The proposed model allows for better understanding of the disease dynamics. Environment and vaccination strategies are discussed especially in the case of the succession of two epidemics with two different viruses.

  15. Orbital cellulitis in course of typhoid fever

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nowacka, K.; Szreter, M.; Mikolajewicz, J.

    1993-01-01

    In 18 months girl with exophthalmus of the left eye and extensive swelling of the soft tissues in both orbits during continued fever was observed. Typhoid fever with a non-typical course and ophthalmic complications were diagnosed on the basis of serological tests. Complete cure after treatment with augmenting was obtained. (author)

  16. Antimicrobial resistance problems in typhoid fever

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saragih, R. H.; Purba, G. C. F.

    2018-03-01

    Typhoid fever (enteric fever) remains a burden in developing countries and a major health problem in Southern and Southeastern Asia. Salmonella typhi (S. typhi), the causative agent of typhoid fever, is a gram-negative, motile, rod-shaped, facultative anaerobe and solely a human pathogen with no animal reservoir. Infection of S. typhi can cause fever, abdominal pain and many worsenonspecific symptoms, including gastrointestinal symptoms suchas nausea, vomiting, constipation, and diarrhea. Chloramphenicol, ampicillin,and cotrimoxazole were the first-recommended antibiotics in treating typhoid fever. In the last two decades though, these three traditional drugs started to show resistance and developed multidrug resistance (MDR) S. typhi strains. In many parts of the world, the changing modes ofpresentation and the development of MDR have made typhoid fever increasingly difficult to treat.The use of first-line antimicrobials had been recommended to be fluoroquinolone as a replacement. However, this wassoonfollowedbyreportsof isolates ofS. typhi showing resistancetofluoroquinolones as well. These antimicrobial resistance problems in typhoid fever have been an alarming situation ever since and need to be taken seriously or else typhoid fever will no longer be taken care completely by administering antibiotics.

  17. [Familial Mediterranean fever: not to be missed

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frenkel, J.; Bemelman, F.J.; Potter van Loon, B.J.; Simon, A.

    2013-01-01

    Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) is common among Turkish and Moroccan migrants. We describe three patients with FMF. A 3-year-old girl with recurrent fever and abdominal pain who was diagnosed early with FMF and treated effectively with colchicine. An adolescent girl who required interleukin

  18. Rocky Mountain spotted fever in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Charles R

    2013-04-01

    Rocky Mountain spotted fever is typically undifferentiated from many other infections in the first few days of illness. Treatment should not be delayed pending confirmation of infection when Rocky Mountain spotted fever is suspected. Doxycycline is the drug of choice even for infants and children less than 8 years old. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever: Statistics and Epidemiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Search Form Controls Cancel Submit Search the CDC Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever (RMSF) Note: Javascript is disabled or is not ... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever (RMSF) Transmission Signs and Symptoms Diagnosis and Testing ...

  20. Towards a political ontology of state power: a comment on Colin Hay's article.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jessop, Bob

    2014-09-01

    This article offers some critical realist, strategic-relational comments on Colin Hay's proposal to treat the state as an 'as-if-real' concept. The critique first develops an alternative account of ontology, which is more suited to analyses of the state and state power; it then distinguishes the 'intransitive' properties of the real world as an object of investigation from the 'transitive' features of its scientific investigation and thereby provides a clearer understanding of what is at stake in 'as-if-realism'; and it ends with the suggestion that a concern with the modalities of state power rather than with the state per se offers a more fruitful approach to the genuine issues raised in Hay's article and in his earlier strategic-relational contributions to political analysis. © London School of Economics and Political Science 2014.

  1. Comparison of silage and hay of dwarf Napier grass (Pennisetum purpureum) fed to Thai native beef bulls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mapato, Chaowarit; Wanapat, Metha

    2018-03-23

    Both quantity and quality of forages are important in dry season feeding. Eight Thai native beef bulls were arranged in a Completely randomized design to evaluate dwarf Napier namely Sweet grass (Pennisetum purpureum cv. Mahasarakham) preserved as silage or hay on feed intake, digestibility, and rumen fermentation. The animals were fed with forage ad libitum supplemented with concentrate mixture at 1.0% of BW for 21 days; data were collected during the last 7 days. The results showed that there were differences (P  0.05) in animals fed silage and hay. Sweet grass is better preserved as hay rather than silage.

  2. Educational Fever and South Korean Higher Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeong-Kyu Lee

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the influence of educational fever on the development of the Republic of Korea education and economy in the context of the cultural history of this country. In order to examine this study, the author explains the concept of educational fever and discusses the relation between Confucianism and education zeal. Educational fever and human capitalization in South Korean higher education are analyzed from a comparative viewpoint. The study evaluates the effects and problems of education fever this country’s current higher education, and it concludes that Koreans’ educational fever has been a core factor by which to achieve the development of the national economy as well as the rapid expansion of higher education.

  3. Dengue fever: a Wikipedia clinical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heilman, James M; De Wolff, Jacob; Beards, Graham M; Basden, Brian J

    2014-01-01

    Dengue fever, also known as breakbone fever, is a mosquito-borne infectious tropical disease caused by the dengue virus. Symptoms include fever, headache, muscle and joint pains, and a characteristic skin rash that is similar to measles. In a small proportion of cases, the disease develops into life-threatening dengue hemorrhagic fever, which results in bleeding, thrombocytopenia, and leakage of blood plasma, or into dengue shock syndrome, in which dangerously low blood pressure occurs. Treatment of acute dengue fever is supportive, with either oral or intravenous rehydration for mild or moderate disease and use of intravenous fluids and blood transfusion for more severe cases. Along with attempts to eliminate the mosquito vector, work is ongoing to develop a vaccine and medications targeted directly at the virus.

  4. PATHOGENETIC MECHANISMS IN EXPERIMENTAL IMMUNE FEVER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Root, Richard K.; Wolff, Sheldon M.

    1968-01-01

    When rabbits sensitized to human serum albumin (HSA) are challenged intravenously with specific antigen, fever develops and two transferable pyrogens can be demonstrated in the circulation. The first appears prior to the development of fever and has properties consistent with soluble antigen-antibody complexes. These have been shown to be pyrogenic when prepared in vitro and to produce a state of febrile tolerance when repeatedly administered. The second pyrogen, demonstrable during fever in donor rabbits, appears to be similar to endogenous pyrogen described in other experimental fevers. It is postulated that the formation of antigen-antibody complexes constitutes an important initial phase of the febrile reaction in this type of immune fever. PMID:4873023

  5. Electro-microscopic observations of liver lesions after intravenous inoculation of mouldy hay extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shadmi, A; Griffel, B

    1985-01-01

    With the aid of the electron microscope, a number of histopathological changes in the liver of mice caused by mycotoxins from mouldy hay were examined and studied. These changes were observed in the mitochondria, the cell nucleus, and the cell membranes, and included fatty and parenchymal degeneration, plasma granulation, vacuolisation and vesiculation, glycogen secretion, incorporation into RNA, karyolysis and karyolaxis, and space of Disse constriction.

  6. The influence of feedback on hay pastures. | N.F.G. | African Journal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The feeding of hay to sheep or cattle on an Eragrostis curvula pasture during the winter months has a most beneficial effect on the response of the pasture to fertilization in subsequent seasons. Low rates of feedback (10 t/ha) had an effect for two seasons whilst the effect of 30 t/ha lasted for at least three seasons and was ...

  7. Willet M. Hays, great benefactor to plant breeding and the founder of our association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troyer, A F; Stoehr, H

    2003-01-01

    Willet M. Hays was a great benefactor to plant breeding and the founder of the American Genetic Association (AGA). We commemorate the AGA's centennial. We mined university archives, U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) yearbooks, plant breeding textbooks, scientific periodicals, and descendants for information. Willet Hays first recognized the individual plant as the unit of selection and started systematic pure-line selection and progeny tests in 1888. He developed useful plant breeding methods. He selected superior flax (Linum usitatissimum L.), wheat (Triticum vulgare L.), corn (Zea mays L.), barley (Hordeum vulgare L.), and oat (Avena sativa L.) varieties, and discovered Grimm alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.); all became commercially important. He initiated branch stations for better performance testing. Willet Hays befriended colleagues in other universities, in federal stations, in a London conference, and in Europe. He gathered and spread the scientific plant breeding gospel. He also improved rural roads and initiated animal breeding records and agricultural economics records. He started the AGA in 1903, serving as secretary for 10 years. He became assistant secretary of agriculture in 1904. He introduced the project system for agricultural research. He authored or coauthored the Nelson Amendment, the Smith-Lever Act, the Smith-Hughes Act, and the protocol leading to the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization-all involved teaching agricultural practices that improved the world.

  8. Precision and accuracy of the NDF rumen degradability of hays measured by the Daisy fermenter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Zanfi

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available An inventory of 162 hay samples from Austrian permanent grasslands was used to obtain information about the precision of the in vitro NDF degradability (NDFd measured by the Daisy fermenter and its accuracy to predict in situ NDFd. The within forage standard error of the in vitro NDFd triplicate, obtained in five consecutive incubations, was equal to 2.8%, while the effect of the four jar positions in the fermenter was not significant. The cutting frequency had a great impact on the in situ effective NDFd of hays, which ranged (P<0.01 from values of 32.9, 43.1 and 48.3% in hays obtained from 2, 3 and 4 cuts/season, respectively. The regression analysis between the in vitro and in situ NDFd values (measured at 48h and effective, k=3%/h allowed to obtain medium degrees of correlation (r2 = 0.69 – 0.71; P<0.01 and low levels of accuracy (RSE = 4.0 -4.6 %.

  9. [Experimental study of metabonomics in the diagnosis of allergic rhinitis in mice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, A; Li, Q F; Zhang, G Q; Zhao, C Q

    2016-02-01

    To investigate the application of metabonomics in the diagnosis of allergic rhinitis. Eighty male Kunming mice were randomly divided into two groups, control group (30 mice) and allergic rhinitis (AR) group (50 mice). After modeling, removal behavior score more than 6 and retain 30 mice behavior score equal to 6.Collect the mice peripheral blood and preparate blood serum, using UPLC-MS chromatographic separation and detection. The data were pretreated by SPSS and Excel, after chromatographic peak matching by MZmine. Firstly , delete interference data in accordance with the 80% rule .Then, the investigate data were analyzed by PLS-DA and PCA-X. Three-dimensional view of the control group (30 mice) and AR group (30 mice) blood serum data was drawn using PCA-X and PLS-DA method. The two groups of samples could be completely separated through views, which showed that there was a significant difference between the two groups of data. There were some differences in the blood metabolites between the control group and AR group . The study showed that it was scientific and feasible to diagnose AR using the metabonomics.

  10. Visualization of nasal airflow patterns in a patient affected with atrophic rhinitis using particle image velocimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, G J M [Hamner Institutes for Health Sciences, NC (United States); Mitchell, G [The Queens University of Belfast, Belfast (United Kingdom); Bailie, N [The Queens University of Belfast, Belfast (United Kingdom); Thornhill, D [The Queens University of Belfast, Belfast (United Kingdom); Watterson, J [The Queens University of Belfast, Belfast (United Kingdom); Kimbell, J S [Hamner Institutes for Health Sciences, NC (United States)

    2007-10-15

    The relationship between airflow patterns in the nasal cavity and nasal function is poorly understood. This paper reports an experimental study of the interplay between symptoms and airflow patterns in a patient affected with atrophic rhinitis. This pathology is characterized by mucosal dryness, fetor, progressive atrophy of anatomical structures, a spacious nasal cavity, and a paradoxical sensation of nasal congestion. A physical replica of the patient's nasal geometry was made and particle image velocimetry (PIV) was used to visualize and measure the flow field. The nasal replica was based on computed tomography (CT) scans of the patient and was built in three steps: three-dimensional reconstruction of the CT scans; rapid prototyping of a cast; and sacrificial use of the cast to form a model of the nasal passage in clear silicone. Flow patterns were measured by running a water-glycerol mixture through the replica and evaluating the displacement of particles dispersed in the liquid using PIV. The water-glycerol flow rate used corresponded to an air flow rate representative of a human breathing at rest. The trajectory of the flow observed in the left passage of the nose (more affected by atrophic rhinitis) differed markedly from what is considered normal, and was consistent with patterns of epithelial damage observed in cases of the condition. The data are also useful for validation of computational fluid dynamics predictions.

  11. The Effect of PM10 on Allergy Symptoms in Allergic Rhinitis Patients During Spring Season

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Il Gyu Kang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Asian sand dust (ASD that originates in the Mongolian Desert in the spring induces serious respiratory health problems throughout East Asia (China, Korea, Japan. PM10 (particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter <10 μm is a major air pollutant component in ASD. We studied the effects of PM10 on allergy symptoms in patients with allergic rhinitis during the spring season, when ASD frequently develops. Methods: We investigated the changes in allergic symptoms in 108 allergic patients and 47 healthy subjects by comparing their 120-day symptom scores from February to May 2012. At the same time, the contributions of pollen count and PM10 concentration were also assessed. We also compared symptom scores before and 2 days after the daily PM10 concentration was >100 μg/m3. Results: The PM10 concentration during the 120 days was <150 μg/m3. No significant correlations were observed between changes in the PM10 concentration and allergic symptom scores (p > 0.05. However, allergic symptoms were significantly correlated with outdoor activity time (p < 0.001. Conclusions: These results demonstrate that a PM10 concentration <150 μg/m3 did not influence allergy symptoms in patients with allergic rhinitis during the 2012 ASD season.

  12. Risk of bipolar disorder among adolescents with allergic rhinitis: A nationwide longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Mu-Hong; Lan, Wen-Hsuan; Hsu, Ju-Wei; Huang, Kai-Lin; Chen, Ying-Sheue; Li, Cheng-Ta; Lin, Wei-Chen; Chang, Wen-Han; Chen, Tzeng-Ji; Pan, Tai-Long; Su, Tung-Ping; Bai, Ya-Mei

    2015-12-01

    Previous studies have suggested an immunological dysfunction in bipolar disorder, but none has investigated the temporal association between allergic rhinitis (AR) and bipolar disorder. Using Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database, 9506 adolescents aged 12-18 years with allergic rhinitis were enrolled between 2000 and 2008 and compared to 38,024 age-and gender-matched (1:4) control groups. Subjects of bipolar disorder that occurred up to the end of follow-up (December 31, 2011) were identified. Adolescents with AR had a significantly higher incidence of developing bipolar disorder (0.77 vs. 0.18 per 1000 person-years, pAdolescents with AR had an increased risk (hazard ratio [HR]: 4.62, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 3.17-6.75) of developing bipolar disorder in their later life compared to the control group after adjusting for demographic data and comorbid allergic diseases. This is the first study showing a temporal association between AR and bipolar disorder, in that patients who had AR in adolescence exhibited an increased risk of developing bipolar disorder in later life. Further study would be required to investigate the underlying mechanism about this association. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Effect of Inhalation of Aromatherapy Oil on Patients with Perennial Allergic Rhinitis: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Seo Yeon

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effects of aromatherapy oil inhalation on symptoms, quality of life, sleep quality, and fatigue level among adults with perennial allergic rhinitis (PAR). Fifty-four men and women aged between 20 and 60 were randomized to inhale aromatherapy oil containing essential oil from sandalwood, geranium, and Ravensara or almond oil (the placebo) for 5 minutes twice daily for 7 days. PAR symptoms determined by Total Nasal Symptom Score (TNSS), the Rhinoconjunctivitis Quality of Life Questionnaire (RQLQ), sleep quality by Verran Synder-Halpern (VSH) scale, and fatigue level by Chalder Fatigue Scale (CFS) were assessed before and after intervention period. Compared with the placebo, the experimental group showed significant improvement in TNSS, especially in nasal obstruction. The aromatherapy group also showed significantly higher improvements in total score of RQLQ and CFS. These findings indicate that inhalation of certain aromatherapy oil helps relieve PAR symptoms, improve rhinitis-specific quality of life, and reduce fatigue in patients with PAR. In conclusion, inhalation of aromatherapy essential oil may have potential as an effective intervention to alleviate PAR. PMID:27034695

  14. Progressive atrophic rhinitis in a medium-scale pig farm in Kiambu, Kenya : case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.K. Wabacha

    2000-07-01

    Full Text Available Forty-two pigs in a herd of 117 displayed various clinical signs of progressive atrophic rhinitis. The main signs included sneezing, coughing, lachrymation, serous to muco-purulent nasal discharge, and nasal bleeding in 1 pig. Three pigs had lateral deviation of the snout, while 4 had brachygnathia superior with obvious deformation of the face. Four acutely affected weaner pigs appeared weak, while the 7 chronically-affected pigs appeared smaller than their apparently unaffected penmates of the same age. Treatment of the acutely affected pigs with long-acting oxytetracycline at 20 mg/kg body weight intra-muscularly, repeated once after 7 days, reduced the severity but did not clear the sneezing from all the pigs. Fifteen pigs were slaughtered 2 months after the clinical diagnosis was made. The carcasses of the chronically affected pigs were about 15 % lighter than those of the apparently normal pigs of the same age and from the same pen, which translated to a loss of 921.00 Kenya shillings per pig (US$13.7. Diagnosis of progressive atrophic rhinitis was confirmed by sectioning the snouts of randomly selected slaughtered pigs with obvious deformation of the snout. Sections were madeat the level of the 1st/2nd upper premolar tooth. Varying degrees of turbinate atrophy, from mild to complete, were noted. Histopathology of the turbinates revealed metaplasia of nasal epithelium and fibrosis in the lamina propria.

  15. Allergic rhinitis and its impact on asthma update (ARIA 2008)--western and Asian-Pacific perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawankar, Ruby; Bunnag, Chaweewan; Chen, Yuzhi; Fukuda, Takeshi; Kim, You-Young; Le, Lan Thi Tuyet; Huong, Le Thi Thu; O'Hehir, Robyn E; Ohta, Ken; Vichyanond, Pakit; Wang, De-Yun; Zhong, Nanshan; Khaltaev, Nikolai; Bousquet, Jean

    2009-12-01

    The prevalence of allergic diseases such as allergic rhinitis (AR) and asthma is markedly increasing worldwide as societies adopt western life styles. Allergic sensitization is an important risk factor for asthma and AR, and asthma often co-exists with AR. An estimated 300 million people worldwide have asthma, about 50% of whom live in developing countries and about 400 million people suffer from AR. Yet, AR is often under-diagnosed and under-treated due to a lack of appreciation of the disease burden and its impact on quality of life, as well as its social impact at school and at the workplace. However, AR with or without asthma is a huge economic burden. Thus, there was clearly a need for a global evidence-based document which would highlight the interactions between the upper and lower airways including diagnosis, epidemiology, common risk factors, management and prevention. The Allergic Rhinitis and its Impact on Asthma (ARIA) document was first published in 2001 as a state-of-the-art guideline for the specialist, the general practitioner and other health care professionals. Subsequent new evidence regarding the pathomechanisms, new drugs and increased knowledge have resulted in the publication of the ARIA 2008 update. The present review summarizes the ARIA update with particular emphasis on the current status of AR and asthma in the Asia-Pacific region and discusses the Western and Asian perspective.

  16. Incidence rates of asthma, rhinitis and eczema symptoms and influential factors in young children in Sweden

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsson, M.; Hagerhed-Engman, L.; Sigsgaard, T.

    2008-01-01

    questionnaire based on an ISAAC protocol to all children in the age of 1-6 years. Five years later a follow-up questionnaire was sent to the children that were 1-3 years at baseline. In total, 4779 children (response rate = 73%) participated in both surveys and constitute the study population in this cohort...... study. Results: The 5-year incidence of doctor-diagnosed asthma was 4.9% (95% CI 4.3-5.3), rhinitis was 5.7% (5.0-6.4) and eczema was 13.4% (12.3-14.5). However, incidence rates strongly depend on the health status of the baseline population. Risk factors for incident asthma were male gender and short...... period of breast-feeding. Allergic symptoms in parents were also a strong risk factor for incident asthma, as well as for rhinitis and eczema. Conclusion: When comparing incident rates of asthma between different studies it is important to realize that different definitions of the healthy baseline...

  17. IMPROVEMENT OF QUALITY OF LIFE AS THE MAIN OBJECTIVE OF ALLERGIC RHINITIS THERAPY IN CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.T. Saygitov

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Traditionally, efficacy of treating allergic rhinitis (AR in children is evaluated on the basis of subjective and objective criteria connected with the more or less express character of symptoms. At the same time, there are all reasons to say that the evaluation of the quality of life (QOL of a child more fully reflects his health than sole consideration of AR symptoms. As a result, the change of QOL in the course of treating AR may more precisely reflect the efficacy of illness treatment. This is especially noticeable when analyzing the results of treatment with the use of sedative antihistamine drugs, which arrest AR symptoms but exert a negative influence over the QOL indicators, such as activity, learning ability, social adaptation. New generation antihistamine drugs and intranasal corticosteroids do not have such influence over children's QOL. moreover, their regular use may help in decreasing the risk of development bronchial asthma and atopic dermatitis in children, which is another objective of AR therapy.Key words: children, quality of life, allergic rhinitis, treatment.

  18. Effect of Inhalation of Aromatherapy Oil on Patients with Perennial Allergic Rhinitis: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seo Yeon Choi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to investigate the effects of aromatherapy oil inhalation on symptoms, quality of life, sleep quality, and fatigue level among adults with perennial allergic rhinitis (PAR. Fifty-four men and women aged between 20 and 60 were randomized to inhale aromatherapy oil containing essential oil from sandalwood, geranium, and Ravensara or almond oil (the placebo for 5 minutes twice daily for 7 days. PAR symptoms determined by Total Nasal Symptom Score (TNSS, the Rhinoconjunctivitis Quality of Life Questionnaire (RQLQ, sleep quality by Verran Synder-Halpern (VSH scale, and fatigue level by Chalder Fatigue Scale (CFS were assessed before and after intervention period. Compared with the placebo, the experimental group showed significant improvement in TNSS, especially in nasal obstruction. The aromatherapy group also showed significantly higher improvements in total score of RQLQ and CFS. These findings indicate that inhalation of certain aromatherapy oil helps relieve PAR symptoms, improve rhinitis-specific quality of life, and reduce fatigue in patients with PAR. In conclusion, inhalation of aromatherapy essential oil may have potential as an effective intervention to alleviate PAR.

  19. Interactions of alfalfa hay and sodium propionate on dairy calf performance and rumen development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beiranvand, H; Ghorbani, G R; Khorvash, M; Nabipour, A; Dehghan-Banadaky, M; Homayouni, A; Kargar, S

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this experiment was to investigate the effects of different levels of alfalfa hay (AH) and sodium propionate (Pro) added to starter diets of Holstein calves on growth performance, rumen fermentation characteristics, and rumen development. Forty-two male Holstein calves (40±2kg of birth weight) were used in a complete randomized design with a 3×2 factorial arrangement of treatments. Dietary treatments were as follows: (1) control = concentrate only; (2) Pro = concentrate with 5% sodium propionate [dry matter (DM) basis]; (3) 5% AH = concentrate + 5% alfalfa hay (DM basis); (4) 5% AH + Pro = concentrate + 5% alfalfa hay + 5% sodium propionate (DM basis); (5) 10% AH = concentrate + 10% alfalfa hay (DM basis); and (6) 10% AH + Pro = concentrate + 10% alfalfa hay + 5% sodium propionate (DM basis). All calves were housed in individual pens bedded with sawdust until 10wk of age. They were given ad libitum access to water and starter throughout the experiment and were fed 2L of milk twice daily. Dry matter intake was recorded daily and body weight weekly. Calves from the control, 10% AH, and 10% AH + Pro treatments were euthanized after wk 10, and rumen wall samples were collected. Feeding of forage was found to increase overall dry matter intake, average daily gain, and final weight; supplementing sodium propionate had no effect on these parameters. Calves consuming forage had lower feed efficiency than those on the Pro diet. Rumen fluid in calves consuming forage had higher pH and greater concentrations of total volatile fatty acids and molar acetate. Morphometric parameters of the rumen wall substantiated the effect of AH supplementation, as plaque formation decreased macroscopically. Overall, the interaction between forage and sodium propionate did not affect calf performance parameters measured at the end of the experiment. Furthermore, inclusion of AH in starter diets positively enhanced the growth performance of male Holstein calves and influenced

  20. Hay-Wells syndrome is caused by heterozygous missense mutations in the SAM domain of p63.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McGrath, J.A.; Duijf, P.H.; Doetsch, V.; Irvine, A.D.; Waal, R.M.W. de; Vanmolkot, K.R.; Wessagowit, V.; Kelly, A.E.; Atherton, D.J.; Griffiths, W.A.; Orlow, S.J.; Haeringen, A. van; Ausems, M.G.E.M.; Yang, A.; McKeon, F.; Bamshad, M.; Brunner, H.G.; Hamel, B.C.J.; Bokhoven, J.H.L.M. van

    2001-01-01

    Hay-Wells syndrome, also known as ankyloblepharon-ectodermal dysplasia-clefting (AEC) syndrome (OMIM 106260), is a rare autosomal dominant disorder characterized by congenital ectodermal dysplasia, including alopecia, scalp infections, dystrophic nails, hypodontia, ankyloblepharon and cleft lip

  1. Hay-Wells syndrome is caused by heterozygous missense mutations in the SAM domain of p63

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McGrath, JA; Duijf, PHG; Doetsch, [No Value; Irvine, AD; de Waal, R; Vanmolkot, KRJ; Wessagowit, [No Value; Kelly, A; Atherton, DJ; Griffiths, WAD; Orlow, SJ; van Haeringen, A; Ausems, MGEM; Yang, A; McKeon, F; Bamshad, MA; Brunner, HG; Hamel, BCJ; van Bokhoven, H

    2001-01-01

    Hay-Wells syndrome, also known as ankyloblepharon-ectodermal dysplasia-clefting (AEC) syndrome (OMIM 106260), is a rare autosomal dominant disorder characterized by congenital ectodermal dysplasia, including alopecia, scalp infections, dystrophic nails, hypodontia, ankyloblepharon and cleft lip

  2. Viga on öelda, et me ei vaja PRi / Roger Hayes, Alasdair Sutherland ; interv. Tiiu Värbu

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Hayes, Roger

    2001-01-01

    Eesti Suhtekorraldajate Liidu 5. aastapäeva seminaril osalevad Rahvusvahelise Kommunikatsiooni Instituudi direktor R. Hayes ja maailma ühe juhtiva suhtekorraldusfirma Manning, Selvage & Lee asepresident A. Sutherland

  3. Pediatric myth: fever and petechiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klinkhammer, Martin D; Colletti, James E

    2008-09-01

    A child presenting with petechiae and fever is assumed to have meningococcemia or another form of bacterial sepsis and therefore to require antibiotics, blood cultures, cerebrospinal fluid analysis and hospital admission. A review of the literature challenges this statement and suggests that a child presenting with purpura (or petechiae), an ill appearance and delayed capillary refill time or hypotension should be admitted and treated for meningococcal disease without delay. Conversely, a child with a petechial rash, which is confined to the distribution of the superior vena cava, is unlikely to have meningococcal disease. Outpatient therapy in this context is appropriate. In other children, a reasonable approach would be to draw blood for culture and C-reactive protein (CRP) while administering antibiotics. If the CRP is normal, these children could be discharged to follow-up in 1 day, whereas children with CRP values greater than 6 mg/L would be admitted.

  4. Climatic change: back to the IIF talk at La Haye; Changements climatiques: retour sur la communication de l'IIF a La Haye

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dupont, J.L.

    2002-07-01

    This document reprints the communication given by F. Billiard, head of the international institute of refrigeration (IIF), at the COP-6 conference of La Haye (November 2000). In his talk, F. Billiard explains the contribution of the refrigeration industry to the global warming which is mainly due to the leaks of refrigerants (CFC, HCFC, HFC) and to the carbon dioxide emissions corresponding to the electric power consumption of refrigerating machineries, air-conditioners and heat pumps. Thus, the abatement of these greenhouse gas emissions requires an improvement of the confinement of the refrigeration equipments and a continuous optimization of their energy efficiency. A second part analyzes the key points of this communication and the choice of some objective appreciation criteria for the remedial actions to be implemented. A glossary completes the document. (J.S.)

  5. Hemodynamics in Korean Hemorrhagic Fever

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Ji Young; Lee, Jung Sang; Koh, Chang Soon; Lee, Mun Ho

    1974-01-01

    The author in an attempt to evaluate hemodynamic changes in the clinical stages of Korean hemorrhagic fever measured plasma volume, cardiac output and effective renal plasma flow utilizing radioisoto as during various phases of the disease. Cardiac output was measured by radiocardiography with external monitoring method using RIHSA. Effective renal plasma flow was obtained from blood clearance curve drawn by external monitoring after radiohippuran injection according to the method described by Razzak et al. The study was carried out in thirty-eight cases of Korean hemorrhagic fever and the following conclusions were obtained. 1) Plasma volume was increased in the patients during the oliguric and hypertensive-diuretic phases, while it was normal in the patients during the normotensive-diuretic phase. 2) Cardiac index was increased in the patients during the oliguric phase and was slightly increased in the patients at the hypertensive diuretic phase. It was normal in the other phases. 3) Total peripheral resistance was increased in the hypertensive patients during diuretic phase, while it was normal in the rest of phases. 4) Effective renal plasma flow was significantly reduced in the patients during the oliguric and diuretic phases as well as at one month after the oliguric onset. There was no significant difference between the oliguric and the early diuretic phases. Renal plasma flow in the group of patients at one month after the oliguric onset was about 45% of the normal, however, it returned to normal level at six months after the onset. 5) Clinical syndrome of relative hypervolemia was observed in some patients during the oliguric phase or hypertensive diuretic phase. Characteristic hemodynamic findings were high cardiac output and normal to relatively increased peripheral resistance these cases. Relatively increased circulating blood volumes due to decreased effective vascular space was suggested for the mechanism of relative hypervolemia. 6) Cardiac

  6. The effect of five different wetting treatments on the nutrient content and microbial concentration in hay for horses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meriel Jean Scott Moore-Colyer

    Full Text Available Five different hays were used to determine the effect of 5 different soaking and steaming treatments on the water soluble carbohydrate and microbial (bacteria and mould contents of UK hay. Hays were subjected to the following 5 treatments: 1. Dry; 2. Steamed for 50 minutes in the Haygain- 600 steamer; 3. Soaked in water at 16°C for 9 hours; 4. Steamed then soaked and 5. Soaked then steamed. Post treatment hays were tested for water soluble carbohydrates, bacteria and mould contents. Differences between means were determined using ANOVA and least significant difference with hay (5, bale (3 and treatment (5 as fixed factors, thus n = 75. Protein and ash proportions were unaltered in any of the treatments. Soaked, steamed then soaked and soaked then steamed treatments were all equally effective at reducing water soluble carbohydrates, with significantly (P<0.05 lower mean contents (79-83 g/kg DM compared with 126 and 122 g/kg dry matter (DM for dry and steamed respectively. Steamed and soaked then steamed had significantly (P<0.05 less bacteria (1.04×103 and 4.9×102 CFU/g DM compared with soaked which increased CFU/g DM from 6.0×104 in dry hay up to 3.5×105. Mould contents CFU/g DM were significantly (P<0.05 reduced by steaming (2 and soaking then steaming (1.9 but no difference was seen between dry (1148, soaked (692 or steamed then soaked (501. Soaking for 9 hours followed by steaming for 50 minutes in the Haygain steamer was the most effective method for reducing water soluble carbohydrates and microbial contamination in hay. Soaking or steaming+soaking lowered water soluble carbohydrates but significantly reduced the hygienic quality of the hay which could potentially compromise the health of the horse.

  7. Dengue fever outbreak: a clinical management experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, S.; Illyas, M.

    2008-01-01

    To determine the frequency of dengue as a cause of fever and compare the clinical and haematological characteristics of Dengue-probable and Dengue-proven cases. All patients with age above 14 years, who were either hospitalized or treated in medical outdoor clinic due to acute febrile illness, were evaluated for clinical features of Dengue Fever (DF), Dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF) and Dengue Shock Syndrome (DSS). Patients showing typical clinical features and haematological findings suggestive of Dengue fever (As per WHO criteria) were evaluated in detail for comparison of probable and confirmed cases of Dengue fever. All other cases of acute febrile illness, not showing clinical features or haematological abnormalities of Dengue fever, were excluded. The clinical and laboratory features were recorded on SPSS 11.0 programme and graded where required, for descriptive and statistical analysis. Out of 5200 patients with febrile illness, 107 (2%) presented with typical features of DF, 40/107 (37%) were Dengue-proven while 67/107 (63%) were Dengue-probable. Out of Dengue-proven cases, 38 were of DF and 2 were of DHF. Day 1 temperature ranged from 99-105 degreeC (mean 101 degree C). Chills and rigors were noticed in 86 (80%), myalgia in 67%, headache in 54%, pharyngitis in 35%, rash in 28%, and bleeding manifestations in 2% cases. Hepatomegaly in 1(0.5%), lymphadenopathy in 1 (0.5%) and splenomegaly in 12 (11.2%) cases. Leucopoenia (count 40 U/L in 57% cases. Frequency of clinically suspected dengue virus infection was 107 (2%), while confirmed dengue fever cases were 40 (0.8%) out of 5200 fever cases. Fever with chills and rigors, body aches, headache, myalgia, rash, haemorrhagic manifestations, platelet count, total leukocyte count, and ALT, are parameters to screen the cases of suspected dengue virus infection, the diagnosis cannot be confirmed unless supported by molecular studies or dengue specific IgM. (author)

  8. CHRODIS criteria applied to the MASK (MACVIA-ARIA Sentinel NetworK) Good Practice in allergic rhinitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bousquet, J; Onorato, G L; Bachert, C

    2017-01-01

    A Good Practice is a practice that works well, produces good results, and is recommended as a model. MACVIA-ARIA Sentinel Network (MASK), the new Allergic Rhinitis and its Impact on Asthma (ARIA) initiative, is an example of a Good Practice focusing on the implementation of multi-sectoral care pa...

  9. Efficacy and safety of sublingual tablets of house dust mite allergen extracts in adults with allergic rhinitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergmann, Karl-Christian; Demoly, Pascal; Worm, Margitta; Fokkens, Wytske J.; Carrillo, Teresa; Tabar, Ana I.; Nguyen, Hélène; Montagut, Armelle; Zeldin, Robert K.

    2014-01-01

    Preliminary studies have suggested the efficacy of sublingual tablets of house dust mite (HDM) extracts in adults with allergic rhinitis. We sought to assess the efficacy and safety of 2 doses of HDM sublingual tablets over 1 treatment year and the subsequent immunotherapy-free year. Adults with

  10. Effect of intranasal mometasone furoate administered in children with coexisting allergic rhinitis and asthma towards asthma attacks and lung function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellen P. Gandaputra

    2009-12-01

    during the study. There was >50% improvement in allergic rhinitis symptoms after 4 weeks of treatment (P50% after 8 weeks of treatment (P50% of asthma symptoms, however it is not followed with significant improvement in lung function. No side effects are reported during 8 weeks use of intranasal mometasone furoate.

  11. Bioinformatics and molecular analysis of the evolutionary relationship between bovine rhinitis A viruses and foot-and-mouth disease virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bovine rhinitis viruses (BRV) cause mild respiratory disease of cattle. In this study, a near full length genome sequence of a virus named RS3X, formerly classified as bovine rhinovirus type 1, isolated from infected cattle from the United Kingdom in the 1960s, was obtained and analyzed. Phylogeneti...

  12. Early indoor aeroallergen exposure is not associated with development of sensitization or allergic rhinitis in high-risk children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schoos, A-M M; Chawes, B L; Jelding-Dannemand, E

    2016-01-01

    Prospective Study on Asthma in Childhood2000 birth cohort. Rhinitis was diagnosed at 7 and 13 years. Allergen exposure was defined as dog or cat in the home during the 3rd trimester of pregnancy or the first year of life and as allergen levels of dog, cat, and house dust mite in bed dust samples at 1 year...

  13. Pharmacologic and anti-IgE treatment of allergic rhinitis ARIA update (in collaboration with GA2LEN)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bousquet, J.; van Cauwenberge, P.; Aït Khaled, N.; Bachert, C.; Baena-Cagnani, C. E.; Bouchard, J.; Bunnag, C.; Canonica, G. W.; Carlsen, K.-H.; Chen, Y.-Z.; Cruz, A. A.; Custovic, A.; Demoly, P.; Dubakiene, R.; Durham, S.; Fokkens, W.; Howarth, P.; Kemp, J.; Kowalski, M. L.; Kvedariene, V.; Lipworth, B.; Lockey, R.; Lund, V.; Mavale-Manuel, S.; Meltzer, E. O.; Mullol, J.; Naclerio, R.; Nekam, K.; Ohta, K.; Papadopoulos, N.; Passalacqua, G.; Pawankar, R.; Popov, T.; Potter, P.; Price, D.; Scadding, G.; Simons, F. E. R.; Spicak, V.; Valovirta, E.; Wang, D.-Y.; Yawn, B.; Yusuf, O.

    2006-01-01

    The pharmacologic treatment of allergic rhinitis proposed by ARIA is an evidence-based and step-wise approach based on the classification of the symptoms. The ARIA workshop, held in December 1999, published a report in 2001 and new information has subsequently been published. The initial ARIA

  14. A common language to assess allergic rhinitis control: results from a survey conducted during EAACI 2013 Congress

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hellings, Peter W.; Muraro, Antonella; Fokkens, Wytske; Mullol, Joaquim; Bachert, Claus; Canonica, G. Walter; Price, David; Papadopoulos, Nikos; Scadding, Glenis; Rasp, Gerd; Demoly, Pascal; Murray, Ruth; Bousquet, Jean

    2015-01-01

    Background: The concept of control is gaining importance in the field of allergic rhinitis (AR), with a visual analogue scale (VAS) score being a validated, easy and attractive tool to evaluate AR symptom control. The doctors' perception of a VAS score as a good tool for evaluating AR symptom

  15. Effect of Ganoderma lucidum on pollen-induced biphasic nasal blockage in a guinea pig model of allergic rhinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizutani, Nobuaki; Nabe, Takeshi; Shimazu, Masaji; Yoshino, Shin; Kohno, Shigekatsu

    2012-03-01

    Ganoderma lucidum (GL), an oriental medical mushroom, has been used in Asia for the prevention and treatment of a variety of diseases. However, the effect of GL on allergic rhinitis has not been well defined. The current study describes the inhibitory effect of GL on the biphasic nasal blockage and nasal hyperresponsiveness induced by repeated antigen challenge in a guinea pig model of allergic rhinitis. Intranasally sensitized guinea pigs were repeatedly challenged by inhalation of Japanese cedar pollen once every week. Ganoderma lucidum was orally administered once daily for 8 weeks from the time before the first challenge. The treatment with GL dose-dependently inhibited the early and late phase nasal blockage at the fifth to ninth antigen challenges. Furthermore, nasal hyperresponsiveness to intranasally applied leukotriene D₄ on 2 days after the eighth antigen challenge was also inhibited by the treatment with GL. However, Cry j 1-specific IgE antibody production was not affected by the treatment. In conclusion, we demonstrated that the pollen-induced biphasic nasal blockage and nasal hyperresponsiveness were suppressed by the daily treatment with GL in the guinea pig model of allergic rhinitis. These results suggest that GL may be a useful therapeutic drug for treating patients with allergic rhinitis. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Expression of CD152 and CD137 on T regulatory cells in rhinitis and bronchial asthma patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrique Rojas-Ramos

    2015-04-01

    Conclusions: Subjects with bronchial asthma and bronchial asthma and allergic rhinitis disorders have a deficiency of CD4+, CD25hight and FoxP3+ Treg in peripheral blood; however, subjects with bronchial asthma had a higher frequency of CD152+ and CD137+ Treg cells.

  17. The incidence of Common Allergens in Patients with Allergic Rhinitis Referred to Shahid Mofatteh Clinic, Yasuj, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SH Nabavizadeh

    2013-12-01

    Background & Aim: Allergic diseases are one of the most common diseases which are more prevalent in certain seasons. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of respiratory and food allergies to common allergens in patients with allergic rhinitis. Methods: This cross-sectional study was performed on 184 patients including 120 males and 64 females referred to the Shahid Mofatteh Clinic with the respiratory allergy symptoms including rhinitis, sneezing and coughing during 2012-2013. Data collection, checklist registered, including demographic information and data associated with sensitivity of skin prick test of 21 allergens were selected. Data were analyzed using descriptive and inferential statistical. Results: A number of 153 patients (83.2% were allergic to one or more of the 21 allergens tested, whereas 31 patients (16.8 of them showed no sensitivity. The most common allergic reactions to insect allergens were 73 cases (47.7%, grass and turf 58 cases (37.9% percent, Beetle 55 cases (35.9%, wheat flour, 51 (33.3% walnuts, 37 (24.4% and cat fur 36 (5/23.5% respectively.. Conclusion: Susceptibility to insects, beetles and grass had the highest prevalence in patients with allergic rhinitis referred to Super Specialized clinic in Yasuj. Because susceptibility to allergens depends on the environment, therefore, being aware of them can lead to avoidance and control allergic reactions. Key words: Allergic Disease, Skin Prick Test, Rhinitis

  18. The effect of generalist and specialist care on quality of life in asthma patients with and without allergic rhinitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harmsen, Lotte; Nolte, Hendrik; Backer, Vibeke

    2010-01-01

    Treatment of asthma and rhinitis patients is often provided by both generalists (GPs) and specialists (SPs). Studies have shown differences in clinical outcomes of treatment between these settings. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of GP and SP care on health-related quality of life...

  19. [A review on studies and applications of near infrared spectroscopy technique(NIRS) in detecting quality of hay].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Wu-Rong; Gan, You-Min; Guo, Xu-Sheng; Yang, Fu-Yu

    2009-02-01

    The quality of hay can directly affect the price of hay and also livestock productivity. Many kinds of methods have been developed for detecting the quality of hay and the method of near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) has been widely used with consideration of its fast, effective and nondestructive characteristics during detecting process. In the present paper, the feasibility and effectiveness of application of NIRS to detecting hay quality were expounded. Meanwhile, the advance in the study of using NIRS to detect chemical compositions, extent of incursion by epiphyte, amount of toxicant excreted by endogenetic epiphyte and some minim components that can not be detected by using chemical methods were also introduced detailedly. Based on the review of the progresses in using NIRS to detect the quality of hay, it can be concluded that using NIRS to detect hay quality can avoid the disadvantages of time wasting, complication and high cost when using traditional chemical method. And for better utilization of NIRS in practice, some more studies still need to be implemented to further perfect and improve the utilization of NIRS for detecting forage quality, and more accurate modes and systematic analysis software need to be established in times to come.

  20. Appendicular perforation in dengue fever: our experience

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    Gunjan Desai

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Dengue viral infections have become one of major emerging infectious diseases in the tropics. Acute abdomen occurring in dengue viral infection is not uncommon. The spectrums of acute surgical emergencies which raise suspicion of an abdominal catastrophe in patients presenting with dengue fever include acute pancreatitis, acute acalculous cholecystitis, non-specific peritonitis and very rarely acute appendicitis. The presence of low white cell count and platelet count can raise suspicion of a diagnosis of dengue in a patient presenting with acute abdominal pain, during a dengue epidemic. We herein report three patients with dengue fever who had appendicular perforation during the course of their viral fever.

  1. Epidural Labor Analgesia and Maternal Fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharpe, Emily E; Arendt, Katherine W

    2017-06-01

    Women receiving an epidural for labor analgesia are at increased risk for intrapartum fever. This relationship has been supported by observational, before and after, and randomized controlled trials. The etiology is not well understood but is likely a result of noninfectious inflammation as studies have found women with fever have higher levels of inflammatory markers. Maternal pyrexia may change obstetric management and women are more likely to receive antibiotics or undergo cesarean delivery. Maternal pyrexia is associated with adverse neonatal outcomes. With these consequences, understanding and preventing maternal fever is imperative.

  2. [Effects of quantity of Japanese cedar pollen, air pollution and urbanization on allergic rhinitis morbidity in Ibaraki prefecture].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chunling, Wu; Tamura, Kenji; Matsumoto, Yukio; Endo, Tomohiko; Watari, Chisato; Arai, Takashi; Murakami, Masataka

    2002-07-01

    It has been reported that morbidity from allergic rhinitis in the National Health Insurance records in Ibaraki Prefecture for May correlated with the quantity of Japan cedar pollen scattered in each year. The purpose of the present investigation was to clarify the Japanese cedar pollinosis contribution to morbidity, and also clarifying the influence of air pollution and medical resources on the crisis and symptoms of allergic rhinitis. The charts in four otolaryngology facilities were used for analyzing the Japan cedar pollinosis content with reference to the allergic rhinitis during the pollen season. The age-adjusted morbidity of allergic rhinitis was annually compared employing data of National Health Insurance records for medical examinations made in May during the period between 1988 and 1996 in Ibaraki Prefecture. The quantity of Japanese cedar pollen was measured at seven area points in Ibaraki Prefecture during the three-year period from 1994 to 1996, and was compared with the degree of Japan cedar wood occupation in each municipality. Traffic volume according to municipalities in Ibaraki Prefecture was taken as a surrogate indicator of air pollution. The area otolaryngology facilities and doctors were taken as medical resources. Values were thus compared with allergic rhinitis morbidity. Sixty to eighty percent of the allergic rhinitis patients examined in May were found to be suffering from pollinosis. The quantities of Japanese cedar pollen scatter at the seven points in Ibaraki Prefecture varied in concert every year, the quantities correlating well with the area of Japanese cedar woods stands in each municipality in some but not in other years. The morbidity in the records of allergic rhinitis according to municipalities correlated negatively with the proportion of the population occupied in farming (r = -0.38) and with the area of Japanese cedar woods in each municipality (r = -0.40). The traffic volume calculated according to municipalities in

  3. Clinical Features Of Malaria And Typhoid Fever | Mba | Journal of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Features to distinguish Malaria from Typhoid fever. These can be discerned from a good and detailed clinical history, in addition to a thorough physical examination. The following would help. The paroxysms of malaria fever as against the step ladder pattern fever of typhoid fever. The prominence of headaches in typhoid ...

  4. Variation in Uteroglobin-Related Protein 1 (UGRP1 gene is associated with Allergic Rhinitis in Singapore Chinese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang De Yun

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Uteroglobin-Related Protein 1 (UGRP1 is a secretoglobulin protein which has been suggested to play a role in lung inflammation and allergic diseases. UGRP1 has also been shown to be an important pneumoprotein, with diagnostic potential as a biomarker of lung damage. Previous genetic studies evaluating the association between variations on UGRP1 and allergic phenotypes have yielded mixed results. The aim of this present study was to identify genetic polymorphisms in UGRP1 and investigate if they were associated with asthma and allergic rhinitis in the Singapore Chinese population. Methods Resequencing of the UGRP1 gene was conducted on 40 randomly selected individuals from Singapore of ethnic Chinese origin. The polymorphisms identified were then tagged and genotyped in a population of 1893 Singapore Chinese individuals. Genetic associations were evaluated in this population comparing 795 individuals with allergic rhinitis, 718 with asthma (of which 337 had both asthma and allergic rhinitis and 717 healthy controls with no history of allergy or allergic diseases. Results By resequencing the UGRP1 gene within our population, we identified 11 novel and 16 known single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs. TagSNPs were then genotyped, revealing a significant association between rs7726552 and allergic rhinitis (Odds Ratio: 0.81, 95% Confidence Interval: 0.66-0.98, P = 0.039. This association remained statistically significant when it was analyzed genotypically or when stratified according to haplotypes. When variations on UGRP1 were evaluated against asthma, no association was observed. Conclusion This study documents the association between polymorphisms in UGRP1 and allergic rhinitis, suggesting a potential role in its pathogenesis.

  5. Quality of Life in Pediatric Patients with Allergic Rhinitis treated at the Medical Clinic of Integrated Education – Unisul

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dziekanski, Mariana; Marcelino, Taíse de Freitas

    2017-01-01

    Introduction  Allergic rhinitis is a common disease among children and adolescents, reaching up to 40% of the population. During childhood, it is usually underdiagnosed because it has nonspecific symptoms. It has a negative impact on quality of life and may predispose to comorbidities. The diagnosis is clinical and treatment aims prevention. Objective  The objective of this study is to evaluate the quality of life in pediatric patients with allergic rhinitis. Methods This is an observational study with cross-sectional design. The population consisted of pediatric patients with allergic rhinitis treated at the Medical Clinic of Integrated Education (MCIE) – Universidade do Sul de Santa Catarina - Unisul, Tubarão, SC, Brazil. We collected data from March to June 2016 through the application of the Sociodemographic and Health Questionnaire, rhinitis module of the International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood Questionnaire and the Rhinoconjunctivitis Quality of Life Questionnaire Modified. Results  Out of the 69 respondents, 52.2% were boys with a mean age of 10.13 years old. The predominant education level of parents/guardians was incomplete second grade and average income level was two minimum wages. 81.2% said they had previous treatment for AR, 30.4% had asthma and 7.2% eczema. Incidence of patients smoking was absent and family (parents/guardians) smoking was 17.4%. March to July were the months of highest symptom occurrence, slightly disturbing daily activities. The mean value of severity was 51.9, nasal symptoms were the most uncomfortable, and nasal itchiness was the most cited. Conclusion  Our results highlight that allergic symptoms negatively impact the life of people with allergic rhinitis, with a predominance of nasal symptoms, especially nasal itchy, representing a poor quality of life of the interviewed. PMID:29018501

  6. Computational fluid dynamics: a suitable assessment tool for demonstrating the antiobstructive effect of drugs in the therapy of allergic rhinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achilles, N; Pasch, N; Lintermann, A; Schröder, W; Mösges, R

    2013-02-01

    This systematic review aims first to summarize the previous areas of application of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and then to demonstrate that CFD is also a suitable instrument for generating three-dimensional images that depict drug effects on nasal mucosa. Special emphasis is placed on the three-dimensional visualization of the antiobstructive effect of nasal steroids and antihistamines in the treatment of allergic rhinitis. In the beginning, CFD technology was only used to demonstrate physiological and pathophysiological airflow conditions in the nose and to aid in preoperative planning and postoperative monitoring of surgical outcome in the field of rhinosurgery. The first studies using CFD examined nasal respiratory physiology, important functions of the nose, such as conditioning and warming of inspired air, and the influence of pathophysiological changes on nasal breathing. Also, postoperative outcome of surgical procedures could be "predicted" using the nasal airflow model. Later studies focused on the three-dimensional visualization of the effect of nasal sprays in healthy subjects and postoperative patients. A completely new approach, however, was the use of CFD in the area of allergic rhinitis and the treatment of its cardinal symptom of nasal obstruction. In two clinical trials, a suitable patient with a positive history of allergic rhinitis was enrolled during a symptom-free period after the pollen season. The patient developed typical allergic rhinitis symptoms after provocation with birch pollen. The 3-D visualization showed that the antiallergic treatment successfully counteracted the effects of nasal allergen provocation on nasal airflow. These observations were attributed to the antiobstructive effect of a nasal steroid (mometasone furoate) and a systemic antihistamine (levocetirizine), respectively. CFD therefore constitutes a non-invasive, precise, reliable and objective examination procedure for generating three-dimensional images that

  7. Decision-making analysis for allergen immunotherapy versus nasal steroids in the treatment of nasal steroid-responsive allergic rhinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Joshua L; Robinson, Derek; Christophel, Jared; Borish, Larry; Payne, Spencer

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine the age at which initiation of specific subcutaneous immunotherapy (SCIT) becomes more cost-effective than continued lifetime intranasal steroid (NS) therapy in the treatment of allergic rhinitis, with the use of a decision analysis model. A Markov decision analysis model was created for this study. Economic analyses were performed to identify "break-even" points in the treatment of allergic rhinitis with the use of SCIT and NS. Efficacy rates for therapy and cost data were collected from the published literature. Models in which there was only incomplete improvement while receiving SCIT were also evaluated for economic break-even points. The primary perspective of the study was societal. Multiple break-even point curves were obtained corresponding to various clinical scenarios. For patients with seasonal allergic rhinitis requiring NS (i.e., fluticasone) 6 months per year, the age at which initiation of SCIT provides long-term direct cost advantage is less than 41 years. For patients with perennial rhinitis symptoms requiring year-round NS, the cut-off age for SCIT cost-effectiveness increases to 60 years. Hypothetical subjects who require continued NS treatment (50% reduction of previous dosage) while receiving SCIT also display break-even points, whereby it is economically advantageous to consider allergy referral and SCIT, dependent on the cost of the NS prescribed. The age at which SCIT provides economic advantages over NS in the treatment of allergic rhinitis depends on multiple clinical factors. Decision analysis models can assist the physician in accounting for these factors and customize patient counseling with regard to treatment options.

  8. Typhoid fever and paratyphoid fever: Systematic review to estimate global morbidity and mortality for 2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geoffrey C. Buckle

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Typhoid and paratyphoid fever remain important causes of morbidity worldwide. Accurate disease burden estimates are needed to guide policy decisions and prevention and control strategies.

  9. THE MEANING OF FEVER IN CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Polyakova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Fever is a normal physiological response to illness in young children and it is often associated with a self-limiting viral infection. Fever is not a diagnosis, but a symptom of illness. A diagnosis of the underlying illness is essential to institute appropriate treatment. Although it is a normal response, that facilitates and accelerates recovery, some people, including many doctors, believe that fever should be treated to reduce temperature without determining the underlying illness causing the fever. Antipyretics should be used to make the child more comfortable and not used routinely with the sole aim of reducing the temperature. This article aims to acquaint primary healthcare workers and general practitioners with last guidelines to assist the measurement of body temperature, deciding on when to refer and the appropriate use of antipyretic medication in children, efficacy and safety of paracetamol and ibuprofen in oral and rectal forms. 

  10. Hemorrhagic Fever with Renal Syndrome (HFRS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Care includes careful management of the patient’s fluid (hydration) and electrolyte (e.g., sodium, potassium, chloride) levels, ... TG, Peters CJ. Viral Hemorrhagic Fevers. Seminars in Pediatric Infectious Diseases 1997;8(Suppl 1):64-73 . ...

  11. Legionella (Legionnaires' Disease and Pontiac Fever): Diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Search Form Controls Cancel Submit Search The CDC Legionella (Legionnaires' Disease and Pontiac Fever) Note: Javascript is ... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Legionella Home About the Disease Causes, How it Spreads, & ...

  12. Dengue Fever in the United States

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    Dr. Amesh Adalja, an associate at the Center for Biosecurity and clinical assistant professor at the University of Pittsburgh School, of Medicine, discusses dengue fever outbreaks in the United States.

  13. Nutritional management in Ebola haemorrhagic fever

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamon Chaiyasit

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Ebola haemorrhagic fever is a viral infection causing a major health problem worldwide. In this short article, the authors briefly review and discuss on the nutritional management (energy, protein, fat and micronutrient in management of Ebola infection.

  14. Alkhurma Hemorrhagic Fever in Saudi Arabia

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    This podcast looks at the epidemiologic characteristics of Alkhurma Hemorrhagic Fever in humans in Najran City, Saudi Arabia. CDC epidemiologist Dr. Adam MacNeil discusses the severity and risk factors for the illness.

  15. STUDIES ON THE PATHOGENESIS OF FEVER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkins, Elisha; Wood, W. Barry

    1955-01-01

    Further studies have been made of a pyrogenic substance which appears in the circulation of rabbits during the course of experimental fever induced by injection of typhoid vaccine. With the use of a passive transfer method and pyrogen-tolerant recipients, the biological properties of this substance have been differentiated from those of the uncleared vaccine in the circulation. The newly identified factor resembles leucocytic pyrogen in the rapidity with which it produces fever and in its failure to exhibit cross-tolerance with bacterial pyrogen. This striking similarity of properties suggests that the circulating factor is of endogenous origin and may arise from cell injury. A close correlation between its presence in the circulation and the existence of fever has been demonstrated. The possible relationship of these findings to the pathogenesis of fever is evident. PMID:13271667

  16. Weaned beef calves fed selenium-biofortified alfalfa hay have an enriched nasal microbiota compared with healthy controls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Jean A.; Isaiah, Anitha; Estill, Charles T.; Pirelli, Gene J.; Suchodolski, Jan S.

    2017-01-01

    Selenium (Se) is an essential trace mineral important for immune function and overall health of cattle. The nasopharyngeal microbiota in cattle plays an important role in overall respiratory health, especially when stresses associated with weaning, transport, and adaptation to a feedlot affect the normal respiratory defenses. Recent evidence suggests that cattle diagnosed with bovine respiratory disease complex have significantly less bacterial diversity. The objective of this study was to determine whether feeding weaned beef calves Se-enriched alfalfa (Medicago sativa) hay for 9 weeks in a preconditioning program prior to entering the feedlot alters nasal microbiota. Recently weaned beef calves (n = 45) were blocked by sex and body weight, randomly assigned to 3 treatment groups with 3 pens of 5 calves per treatment group, and fed an alfalfa hay based diet for 9 weeks. Alfalfa hay was harvested from fields fertilized with sodium selenate at a rate of 0, 45.0 or 89.9 g Se/ha. Blood samples were collected biweekly and analyzed for whole-blood Se concentrations. Nasal swabs were collected during week 9 from one or two calves from each pen (total n = 16). Calculated Se intake from dietary sources was 3.0, 15.6, and 32.2 mg Se/head/day for calves consuming alfalfa hay with Se concentrations of 0.34 to 2.42 and 5.17 mg Se/kg dry matter, respectively. Whole-blood Se concentrations after 8 weeks of feeding Se-fertilized alfalfa hay were dependent upon Se-application rates (0, 45.0, or 89.9 g Se/ha) and were 155, 345, and 504 ng/mL (PLinear calves fed selenium-biofortified alfalfa hay compared with control calves showed that Se-supplementation tended to be associated with an enriched nasal microbiota. ANOSIM of unweighted UniFrac distances showed that calves fed high Se-biofortified alfalfa hay clustered separately when compared with control calves in the PCoA plot (R = 0.216, P = 0.04). The bacterial orders Lactobacillales and Flavobacteriales were increased in healthy

  17. Inhibitory Effect of Pycnogenol® on Airway Inflammation in Ovalbumin-Induced Allergic Rhinitis

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    Ceren Günel

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The supplement Pycnogenol® (PYC has been used for the treatment of several chronic diseases including allergic rhinitis (AR. However, the in vivo effects on allergic inflammation have not been identified to date. Aims: To investigate the treatment results of PYC on allergic inflammation in a rat model of allergic rhinitis. Study Design: Animal experimentation. Methods: Allergic rhinitis was stimulated in 42 rats by intraperitoneal sensitization and intranasal challenge with Ovalbumin. The animals were divided into six subgroups: healthy controls, AR group, AR group treated with corticosteroid (dexamethasone 1 mg/kg; CS+AR, healthy rats group that were given only PYC of 10 mg/kg (PYC10, AR group treated with PYC of 3mg/kg (PYC3+AR, and AR group treated with PYC of 10 mg/kg (PYC10+AR. Interferon-γ (IFN-γ, interleukin-4 (IL-4, interleukin-10 (IL-10, and OVA-specific immunoglobulin E (Ig-E levels of serum were measured. Histopathological changes in nasal mucosa and expression of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α and IL-1β were evaluated. Results: The levels of the IL-4 were significantly decreased in the PYC3+AR, PYC10+AR and CS+AR groups compared with the AR group (p=0.002, p<0.001, p=0.006. The production of the IFN-γ was significantly decreased in the PYC3+AR and PYC10+AR groups compared with the AR group (p=0.013, p=0.001. The administration of PYC to allergic rats suppressed the elevated IL-10 production, especially in the PYC3+AR group (p=0.006. Mucosal edema was significantly decreased respectively after treatment at dose 3 mg/kg and 10 mg/kg PYC (both, p<0.001. The mucosal expression of TNF-α has significantly decreased in the PYC3+AR and PYC10+AR groups (p=0.005, p<0.001, while the IL-1β expression significantly decreased in the CS+AR, PYC3+AR, and PYC10+AR groups (p<0.001, p=0.003, p=0.001. Conclusion: PYC has multiple suppressive effects on allergic response. Thus, PYC may be used as a supplementary agent in allergic

  18. Safety of a Novel Botanical Extract Formula for Ameliorating Allergic rhinitis. Part II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amit, A; Joshua, A J; Bagchi, M; Bagchi, D

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Each year more than 50 million Americans suffer from allergic rhinitis, which is a state of hypersensitivity or hyperimmunity. Basically, allergic rhinitis is symptomatically recognized as the inflammation and irritation of the nasal mucosal membranes; sneezing; stuffy/runny nose; nasal congestion; and itchy; watery, and swollen eyes; and defined as a state of hypersensitivity/ hyperimmunity caused by exposure to a particular allergen (antigen) that results in increased reactivity upon subsequent exposure. A novel polyherbal formulation (Aller-7/NR-A2) was developed for the treatment of allergic rhinitis using a unique combination of extracts from seven medicinal plants, including Phyllanthus emblica, Terminalia chebula, Terminalia bellerica, Albizia lebbeck, Piper nigrum, Zingiber officinale, and Piper longum. Earlier studies in our laboratories have demonstrated potent antihistaminic, anti-inflammatory, antispasmodic, antioxidant, and mast-cell stabilization activities of Aller-7 in addition to its efficacy in a clinical setting. A series of preliminary toxicological evaluations were also conducted in the past, which demonstrated its safety. In this study, we have conducted further safety studies on Aller-7, including acute oral, acute dermal, acute dermal irritation, eye irritation, and 90-day repeated dose toxicity studies. Acute oral toxicity of Aller-7 was found to be greater than 5,000 mg/kg body weight in both male and female rats and no mortality or toxicity was observed at this dose, while the acute dermal toxicity was found to be greater than 2,000 mg/kg body weight. In the acute dermal irritation study, the skin irritancy index was found to be 0.0, which classifies Aller-7 as a nonirritant to rabbit skin. In the acute eye irritation study, Aller-7 was found to have minimal irritancy to eyes of rabbits. In the repeated-dose 90-day oral toxicity study, Aller-7 was administered at dose levels of 100, 300, and 1,000 mg/kg rat body weight for 90

  19. Antioxidant properties of Aller-7, a novel polyherbal formulation for allergic rhinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Souza, P; Amit, A; Saxena, V S; Bagchi, D; Bagchi, M; Stohs, S J

    2004-01-01

    Allergic rhinitis, a frequently occurring immunological disorder affecting men, women and children worldwide, is a state of hypersensitivity that occurs when the body overreacts to a substance such as pollen, mold, mites or dust. Allergic rhinitis exerts inflammatory response and irritation of the nasal mucosal membranes leading to sneezing; stuffy/runny nose; nasal congestion; and itchy, watery and swollen eyes. A novel, safe polyherbal formulation (Aller-7/NR-A2) has been developed for the treatment of allergic rhinitis using a unique combination of extracts from seven medicinal plants including Phyllanthus emblica, Terminalia chebula, Terminalia bellerica, Albizia lebbeck, Piper nigrum, Zingiber officinale and Piper longum. In this study, the antioxidant efficacy of Aller-7 was investigated by various assays including hydroxyl radical scavenging assay, superoxide anion scavenging assay, 1,1-diphenyl-2-picryl hydrazyl (DPPH) and 2,2-azinobis-ethyl-benzothiozoline-sulphonic acid diammonium salt (ABTS) radical scavenging assays. The protective effect of Aller-7 on free radical-induced lysis of red blood cells and inhibition of nitric oxide release by Aller-7 in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated murine macrophages were determined. Aller-7 exhibited concentration-dependent scavenging activities toward biochemically generated hydroxyl radicals (IC50 741.73 microg/ml); superoxide anion (IC50 24.65 microg/ml by phenazine methosulfate-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide [PMS-NADH] assay and IC50 4.27 microg/ml by riboflavin/nitroblue tetrazolium [NBT] light assay), nitric oxide (IC50 16.34 microg/ml); 1,1-diphenyl-2-picryl hydrazyl (DPPH) radical (IC50 5.62 microg/ml); and 2,2-azinobis-ethyl-benzothiozoline-sulphonic acid diammonium salt (ABTS) radical (IC50 7.35 microg/ml). Aller-7 inhibited free radical-induced hemolysis in the concentration range of 20-80 microg/ml. Aller-7 also significantly inhibited nitric oxide release from lipopolysaccharide-stimulated murine

  20. Effect of feeding selenium-fertilized alfalfa hay on performance of weaned beef calves.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean A Hall

    Full Text Available Selenium (Se is an essential micronutrient in cattle, and Se-deficiency can affect morbidity and mortality. Calves may have greater Se requirements during periods of stress, such as during the transitional period between weaning and movement to a feedlot. Previously, we showed that feeding Se-fertilized forage increases whole-blood (WB Se concentrations in mature beef cows. Our current objective was to test whether feeding Se-fertilized forage increases WB-Se concentrations and performance in weaned beef calves. Recently weaned beef calves (n = 60 were blocked by body weight, randomly assigned to 4 groups, and fed an alfalfa hay based diet for 7 wk, which was harvested from fields fertilized with sodium-selenate at a rate of 0, 22.5, 45.0, or 89.9 g Se/ha. Blood samples were collected weekly and analyzed for WB-Se concentrations. Body weight and health status of calves were monitored during the 7-wk feeding trial. Increasing application rates of Se fertilizer resulted in increased alfalfa hay Se content for that cutting of alfalfa (0.07, 0.95, 1.55, 3.26 mg Se/kg dry matter for Se application rates of 0, 22.5, 45.0, or 89.9 g Se/ha, respectively. Feeding Se-fertilized alfalfa hay during the 7-wk preconditioning period increased WB-Se concentrations (P Linear<0.001 and body weights (P Linear = 0.002 depending upon the Se-application rate. Based upon our results we suggest that soil-Se fertilization is a potential management tool to improve Se-status and performance in weaned calves in areas with low soil-Se concentrations.