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Sample records for rheumatology criteria acr20

  1. Systematic review and network meta-analysis of combination and monotherapy treatments in disease-modifying antirheumatic drug-experienced patients with rheumatoid arthritis: analysis of American College of Rheumatology criteria scores 20, 50, and 70

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orme, Michelle E; MacGilchrist, Katherine S; Mitchell, Stephen; Spurden, Dean; Bird, Alex

    2012-01-01

    Background Biologic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (bDMARDs) extend the treatment choices for rheumatoid arthritis patients with suboptimal response or intolerance to conventional DMARDs. The objective of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to compare the relative efficacy of EU-licensed bDMARD combination therapy or monotherapy for patients intolerant of or contraindicated to continued methotrexate. Methods Comprehensive, structured literature searches were conducted in Medline, Embase, and the Cochrane Library, as well as hand-searching of conference proceedings and reference lists. Phase II or III randomized controlled trials reporting American College of Rheumatology (ACR) criteria scores of 20, 50, and 70 between 12 and 30 weeks’ follow-up and enrolling adult patients meeting ACR classification criteria for rheumatoid arthritis previously treated with and with an inadequate response to conventional DMARDs were eligible. To estimate the relative efficacy of treatments whilst preserving the randomized comparisons within each trial, a Bayesian network meta-analysis was conducted in WinBUGS using fixed and random-effects, logit-link models fitted to the binomial ACR 20/50/70 trial data. Results The systematic review identified 10,625 citations, and after a review of 2450 full-text papers, there were 29 and 14 eligible studies for the combination and monotherapy meta-analyses, respectively. In the combination analysis, all licensed bDMARD combinations had significantly higher odds of ACR 20/50/70 compared to DMARDs alone, except for the rituximab comparison, which did not reach significance for the ACR 70 outcome (based on the 95% credible interval). The etanercept combination was significantly better than the tumor necrosis factor-α inhibitors adalimumab and infliximab in improving ACR 20/50/70 outcomes, with no significant differences between the etanercept combination and certolizumab pegol or tocilizumab. Licensed-dose etanercept, adalimumab

  2. Pros and cons of conjoint analysis of discrete choice experiments to define classification and response criteria in rheumatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, William J

    2016-03-01

    Conjoint analysis of choice or preference data has been used in marketing for over 40 years but has appeared in healthcare settings much more recently. It may be a useful technique for applications within the rheumatology field. Conjoint analysis in rheumatology contexts has mainly used the approaches implemented in 1000Minds Ltd, Dunedin, New Zealand, Sawtooth Software, Orem UT, USA. Examples include classification criteria, composite response criteria, service prioritization tools and utilities assessment. Limitations imposed by very many attributes can be managed using new techniques. Conjoint analysis studies of classification and response criteria suggest that the assumption of equal weighting of attributes cannot be met, which challenges traditional approaches to composite criteria construction. Weights elicited through choice experiments with experts can derive more accurate classification criteria, than unweighted criteria. Studies that find significant variation in attribute weights for composite response criteria for gout make construction of such criteria problematic. Better understanding of various multiattribute phenomena is likely to increase with increased use of conjoint analysis, especially when the attributes concern individual perceptions or opinions. In addition to classification criteria, some applications for conjoint analysis that are emerging in rheumatology include prioritization tools, remission criteria, and utilities for life areas.

  3. 2015 Gout classification criteria: an American College of Rheumatology/European League Against Rheumatism collaborative initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neogi, Tuhina; Jansen, Tim L Th A; Dalbeth, Nicola; Fransen, Jaap; Schumacher, H Ralph; Berendsen, Dianne; Brown, Melanie; Choi, Hyon; Edwards, N Lawrence; Janssens, Hein J E M; Lioté, Frédéric; Naden, Raymond P; Nuki, George; Ogdie, Alexis; Perez-Ruiz, Fernando; Saag, Kenneth; Singh, Jasvinder A; Sundy, John S; Tausche, Anne-Kathrin; Vaquez-Mellado, Janitzia; Yarows, Steven A; Taylor, William J

    2015-01-01

    Objective Existing criteria for the classification of gout have suboptimal sensitivity and/or specificity, and were developed at a time when advanced imaging was not available. The current effort was undertaken to develop new classification criteria for gout. Methods An international group of investigators, supported by the American College of Rheumatology and the European League Against Rheumatism, conducted a systematic review of the literature on advanced imaging of gout, a diagnostic study in which the presence of monosodium urate monohydrate (MSU) crystals in synovial fluid or tophus was the gold standard, a ranking exercise of paper patient cases, and a multi-criterion decision analysis exercise. These data formed the basis for developing the classification criteria, which were tested in an independent data set. Results The entry criterion for the new classification criteria requires the occurrence of at least one episode of peripheral joint or bursal swelling, pain, or tenderness. The presence of MSU crystals in a symptomatic joint/bursa (ie, synovial fluid) or in a tophus is a sufficient criterion for classification of the subject as having gout, and does not require further scoring. The domains of the new classification criteria include clinical (pattern of joint/bursa involvement, characteristics and time course of symptomatic episodes), laboratory (serum urate, MSU-negative synovial fluid aspirate), and imaging (double-contour sign on ultrasound or urate on dual-energy CT, radiographic gout-related erosion). The sensitivity and specificity of the criteria are high (92% and 89%, respectively). Conclusions The new classification criteria, developed using a data-driven and decision-analytic approach, have excellent performance characteristics and incorporate current state-of-the-art evidence regarding gout. PMID:26359487

  4. The 2010 American College of Rheumatology/European League Against Rheumatism Classification Criteria for Rheumatoid Arthritis Phase 2 Methodological Report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neogi, Tuhina; Aletaha, Daniel; Silman, Alan J.; Naden, Raymond L.; Felson, David T.; Aggarwal, Rohit; Bingham, Clifton O.; Birnbaum, Neal S.; Burmester, Gerd R.; Bykerk, Vivian P.; Cohen, Marc D.; Combe, Bernard; Costenbader, Karen H.; Dougados, Maxime; Emery, Paul; Ferraccioli, Gianfranco; Hazes, Johanna M. W.; Hobbs, Kathryn; Huizinga, Tom W. J.; Kavanaugh, Arthur; Kay, Jonathan; Khanna, Dinesh; Kvien, Tore K.; Laing, Timothy; Liao, Katherine; Mease, Philip; Ménard, Henri A.; Moreland, Larry W.; Nair, Raj; Pincus, Theodore; Ringold, Sarah; Smolen, Josef S.; Stanislawska-Biernat, Ewa; Symmons, Deborah; Tak, Paul P.; Upchurch, Katherine S.; Vencovský, Jiří; Wolfe, Frederick; Hawker, Gillian

    2010-01-01

    Objective. The American College of Rheumatology and the European League Against Rheumatism have developed new classification criteria for rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The aim of Phase 2 of the development process was to achieve expert consensus on the clinical and laboratory variables that should

  5. The 2010 American College of Rheumatology/European League Against Rheumatism classification criteria for rheumatoid arthritis: Phase 2 methodological report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T. Neogi (Tuhina); D. Aletaha (Daniel); A.J. Silman (Alan); R.L. Naden (Raymond); D. Felson; R. Aggarwal (Rohit); C.O. Bingham (Clifton); N.S. Birnbaum (Neal); G.R. Burmester (Gerd); V.P. Bykerk (Vivian); M.D. Cohen (Marc); B. Combe (Bernard); K.H. Costenbader (Karen); M. Dougados (Maxime); P. Emery (Paul); G. Ferraccioli (Gianfranco); J.M.W. Hazes (Mieke); K. Hobbs (Kathryn); T.W.J. Huizinga (Tom); A. Kavanaugh (Arthur); J. Kay (Jonathan); D. Khanna (Dinesh); T.K. Kvien (Tore); T. Laing (Timothy); K. Liao (Katherine); P. Mease (Philip); H.A. Ménard (Henri); L.W. Moreland (Larry); R. Nair (Raj); T. Pincus (Theodore); S. Ringold (Sarah); J.S. Smolen (Josef); E. Stanislawska-Biernat (Ewa); D. Symmons (Deborah); P.P. Tak (Paul); K.S. Upchurch (Katherine); J. Vencovský (Jiří); F. Wolfe (Frederick); G. Hawker (Gillian)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractObjective. The American College of Rheumatology and the European League Against Rheumatism have developed new classification criteria for rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The aim of Phase 2 of the development process was to achieve expert consensus on the clinical and laboratory variables that

  6. 2016 American College of Rheumatology/European League Against Rheumatism Criteria for Minimal, Moderate, and Major Clinical Response in Juvenile Dermatomyositis An International Myositis Assessment and Clinical Studies Group/Paediatric Rheumatology International Trials Organisation Collaborative Initiative

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rider, Lisa G.; Aggarwal, Rohit; Pistorio, Angela; Bayat, Nastaran; Erman, Brian; Feldman, Brian M.; Huber, Adam M.; Cimaz, Rolando; Cuttica, Rubén J.; de Oliveira, Sheila Knupp; Lindsley, Carol B.; Pilkington, Clarissa A.; Punaro, Marilynn; Ravelli, Angelo; Reed, Ann M.; Rouster-Stevens, Kelly; van Royen-Kerkhof, Annet; Dressler, Frank; Magalhaes, Claudia Saad; Constantin, Tamás; Davidson, Joyce E.; Magnusson, Bo; Russo, Ricardo; Villa, Luca; Rinaldi, Mariangela; Rockette, Howard; Lachenbruch, Peter A.; Miller, Frederick W.; Vencovsky, Jiri; Ruperto, Nicolino; Hansen, Paul; Apaz, Maria; Bowyer, Suzanne; Curran, Megan; Davidson, Joyce; Griffin, Thomas; Huber, Adam H.; Jones, Olcay; Kim, Susan; Lang, Bianca; Lindsley, Carol; Lovell, Daniel; Saad Magalhaes, Claudia; Pachman, Lauren M.; Pilkington, Clarissa; Ponyi, Andrea; Quartier, Pierre; Ramanan, Athimalaipet V.; Reed, Ann; Rennebohm, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Objective. To develop response criteria for juvenile dermatomyositis (DM). Methods. We analyzed the performance of 312 definitions that used core set measures from either the International Myositis Assessment and Clinical Studies Group (IMACS) or the Paediatric Rheumatology International Trials

  7. 2016 American College of Rheumatology/European League Against Rheumatism Criteria for Minimal, Moderate, and Major Clinical Response in Juvenile Dermatomyositis : An International Myositis Assessment and Clinical Studies Group/Paediatric Rheumatology International Trials Organisation Collaborative Initiative

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rider, Lisa G.; Aggarwal, Rohit; Pistorio, Angela; Bayat, Nastaran; Erman, Brian; Feldman, Brian M.; Huber, Adam M.; Cimaz, Rolando; Cuttica, Rubén J.; De Oliveira, Sheila Knupp; Lindsley, Carol B.; Pilkington, Clarissa A.; Punaro, Marilynn; Ravelli, Angelo; Reed, Ann M.; Rouster-Stevens, Kelly; van Royen-Kerkhof, Annet; Dressler, Frank; Magalhaes, Claudia Saad; Constantin, Tamás; Davidson, Joyce E.; Magnusson, Bo; Russo, Ricardo; Villa, Luca; Rinaldi, Mariangela; Rockette, Howard; Lachenbruch, Peter A.; Miller, Frederick W.; Vencovsky, Jiri; Ruperto, Nicolino; Rider, Lisa G.; Ruperto, Nicolino; Miller, Frederick W.; Aggarwal, Rohit; Erman, Brian; Bayat, Nastaran; Pistorio, Angela; Huber, Adam M.; Feldman, Brian M.; Hansen, Paul; Rockette, Howard; Lachenbruch, Peter A.; Ruperto, Nicolino; Rider, Lisa G.; Apaz, Maria T; Bowyer, Suzanne; Cimaz, Rolando; Constantin, Tamás; Curran, Megan; Davidson, Joyce E.; Feldman, Brian M.; Griffin, Thomas; Huber, Adam H.; Jones, Olcay; Kim, Susan; Lang, Bianca; Lindsley, Carol; Lovell, Daniel J.; Saad Magalhaes, Claudia; Pachman, Lauren M.; Pilkington, Clarissa; Ponyi, Andrea; Punaro, Marilynn; Quartier, Pierre; Ramanan, Athimalaipet V; Ravelli, Angelo; Reed, Ann M.; Rennebohm, Robert; Sherry, David D.; Silva, Clovis A.; Stringer, Elizabeth; van Royen-Kerkhof, Annet; Wallace, Carol; Miller, Frederick W.; Oddis, Chester V.; Reed, Ann M.; Rider, Lisa G.; Ruperto, Nicolino; Apaz, Maria T; Avcin, Tadej; Becker, Mara; Beresford, Michael W.; Cimaz, Rolando; Constantin, Tamás; Curran, Megan; Cuttica, Ruben; Davidson, Joyce E.; Dressler, Frank; Dvergsten, Jeffrey; Feitosa de Oliveira, Sheila Knupp; Feldman, Brian M.; Leme Ferriani, Virginia Paes; Flato, Berit; Gerloni, Valeria; Griffin, Thomas; Henrickson, Michael; Hinze, Claas; Hoeltzel, Mark; Huber, Adam M.; Ibarra, Maria; Ilowite, Norman T; Imundo, Lisa; Jones, Olcay; Kim, Susan; Kingsbury, Daniel; Lang, Bianca; Lindsley, Carol; Lovell, Daniel J.; Martini, Alberto; Saad Magalhaes, Claudia; Magnusson, Bo; Maguiness, Sheilagh; Maillard, Susan; Mathiesen, Pernille; McCann, Liza J.; Nielsen, Susan; Pachman, Lauren M.; Passo, Murray; Pilkington, Clarissa; Punaro, Marilynn; Quartier, Pierre; Rabinovich, Egla; Ramanan, Athimalaipet V; Ravelli, Angelo; Reed, Ann M.; Rennebohm, Robert; Rider, Lisa G.; Rivas-Chacon, Rafael; Byun Robinson, Angela; Rouster-Stevens, Kelly; Russo, Ricardo; Rutkowska-Sak, Lidia; Sallum, Adriana; Sanner, Helga; Schmeling, Heinrike; Selcen, Duygu; Shaham, Bracha; Sherry, David D.; Silva, Clovis A.; Spencer, Charles H.; Sundel, Robert; Tardieu, Marc; Thatayatikom, Akaluck; van der Net, Janjaap; van Royen-Kerkhof, Annet; Wahezi, Dawn; Wallace, Carol; Zulian, Francesco; analysis, Conjoint; Cimaz, Rolando; Constantin, Tamás; Cuttica, Ruben; Davidson, Joyce E.; Dressler, Frank; Knupp Feitosa de Oliveira, Sheila; Feldman, Brian M.; Griffin, Thomas; Henrickson, Michael; Huber, Adam M.; Imundo, Lisa; Lang, Bianca; Lindsley, Carol; Saad Magalhaes, Claudia; Magnusson, Bo; Maillard, Susan; Pachman, Lauren M.; Passo, Murray; Pilkington, Clarissa; Punaro, Marilynn; Ravelli, Angelo; Reed, Ann M.; Rider, Lisa G.; Rouster-Stevens, Kelly; Russo, Ricardo; Shaham, Bracha; Sundel, Robert; van der Net, Janjaap; van Royen-Kerkhof, Annet; Cimaz, Rolando; Cuttica, Rubén J.; Knupp Feitosa de Oliveira, Sheila; Feldman, Brian M.; Huber, Adam M.; Lindsley, Carol B.; Pilkington, Clarissa; Punaro, Marilynn; Ravelli, Angelo; Reed, Ann M.; Rouster-Stevens, Kelly; van Royen-Kerkhof, Annet; Amato, Anthony A; Chinoy, Hector; Cooper, Robert G.; Dastmalchi, Maryam; de Visser, Marianne; Fiorentino, David; Isenberg, David; Katz, James; Mammen, Andrew; Oddis, Chester V.; Ytterberg, Steven R.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To develop response criteria for juvenile dermatomyositis (DM). Methods: We analyzed the performance of 312 definitions that used core set measures from either the International Myositis Assessment and Clinical Studies Group (IMACS) or the Paediatric Rheumatology International Trials

  8. American College of Rheumatology provisional criteria for defining clinical inactive disease in select categories of juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Carol A; Giannini, Edward H; Huang, Bin; Itert, Lukasz; Ruperto, Nicolino

    2011-07-01

    To prospectively validate the preliminary criteria for clinical inactive disease (CID) in patients with select categories of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). We used the process for development of classification and response criteria recommended by the American College of Rheumatology Quality of Care Committee. Patient-visit profiles were extracted from the phase III randomized controlled trial of infliximab in polyarticular-course JIA (i.e., patients considered to resemble those with select categories of JIA) and sent to an international group of expert physician raters. Using the physician ratings as the gold standard, the sensitivity and specificity were calculated using the preliminary criteria. Modifications to the criteria were made, and these were sent to a larger group of pediatric rheumatologists to determine quantitative, face, and content validity. Variables weighted heaviest by physicians when making their judgment were the number of joints with active arthritis, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), physician's global assessment, and duration of morning stiffness. Three modifications were made: the definition of uveitis, the definition of abnormal ESR, and the addition of morning stiffness. These changes did not alter the accuracy of the preliminary set. The modified criteria, termed the "criteria for CID in select categories of JIA," have excellent feasibility and face, content, criterion, and discriminant validity to detect CID in select categories of JIA. The small changes made to the preliminary criteria set did not alter the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (0.954) or accuracy (91%), but have increased face and content validity. Copyright © 2011 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  9. The Spanish version of the 2010 American College of Rheumatology Preliminary Diagnostic Criteria for fibromyalgia: reliability and validity assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casanueva, Benigno; García-Fructuoso, Ferrán; Belenguer, Rafael; Alegre, Cayetano; Moreno-Muelas, José V; Hernández, José L; Pina, Tinitario; González-Gay, Miguel Á

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the reliability and validity of the Spanish version of the 2010 American College of Rheumatology (ACR) Preliminary Diagnostic Criteria for Fibromyalgia (FM) in patients with chronic pain. The 2010 ACR Preliminary Diagnostic Criteria for FM were adapted to a Spanish version following the guidelines of the Rheumatology Spanish Society Study Group of FM. Based on the 1990 ACR classi cation criteria for FM, patients with chronic pain were initially divided into two groups: a FM group and another group of non-FM individuals. Patients from the FM group were evaluated by tender points (TP) examination, Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ), Widespread Pain Index (WPI), and Symptom Severity Scale (SSS). The non-FM (control) group included patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and osteoarthritis (OA). They were evaluated by WPI and SSS. We included 1,169 patients divided into two groups: FM group (n=803; 777 women and 26 men) and non-FM group (n= 366; 147 patients with RA, and 219 with OA). The median value of TP and FIQ in the FM group was 16 and 74 respectively. The preliminary 2010 ACR criteria were met by 665 (82.8%) FM patients and by 112 (30.6%) patients from the non-FM group (pFIQ (p<0.0001), WPI (p<0.0001) and SSS (p<0.0001) were observed when FM patients fulfilling the 2010 ACR criteria were compared with the remaining FM patients who did not fulfill these criteria. Sensitivity of the Spanish version of the 2010 ACR criteria was 85.6% (95%CI: 83.1-88.1), speci city 73.2% (95%CI: 68.4-78), positive predictive value 87.7% (95%CI: 85.3-90.1) and negative predictive value 69.4% (95%CI: 64.5-74.2). Our results indicate that the 2010 ACR Preliminary Diagnostic Criteria for FM may be useful to establish a diagnosis of FM in Spanish individuals with chronic pain.

  10. American College of Rheumatology classification criteria for Sjögren's syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shiboski, S C; Shiboski, C H; Criswell, L A

    2012-01-01

    We propose new classification criteria for Sjögren's syndrome (SS), which are needed considering the emergence of biologic agents as potential treatments and their associated comorbidity. These criteria target individuals with signs/symptoms suggestive of SS.......We propose new classification criteria for Sjögren's syndrome (SS), which are needed considering the emergence of biologic agents as potential treatments and their associated comorbidity. These criteria target individuals with signs/symptoms suggestive of SS....

  11. 2013 American College of Rheumatology/European League against rheumatism classification criteria for systemic sclerosis outperform the 1980 criteria: data from the Canadian Scleroderma Research Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhajeri, Hebah; Hudson, Marie; Fritzler, Marvin; Pope, Janet; Tatibouet, Solène; Markland, Janet; Robinson, David; Jones, Niall; Khalidi, Nader; Docherty, Peter; Kaminska, Elzbieta; Masetto, Ariel; Sutton, Evelyn; Mathieu, Jean-Pierre; Ligier, Sophie; Grodzicky, Tamara; LeClercq, Sharon; Thorne, Carter; Gyger, Geneviève; Smith, Douglas; Fortin, Paul R; Larché, Maggie; Baron, Murray

    2015-04-01

    The goal of this study was to determine the sensitivity of the new 2013 classification criteria for systemic sclerosis (SSc; scleroderma) in an independent cohort of SSc subjects and to assess the contribution of individual items of the criteria to the overall sensitivity. SSc subjects from the Canadian Scleroderma Research Group cohort were assessed. Sensitivity was determined in several subgroups of patients. In patients without the criterion of skin thickening proximal to the metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joints, we recalculated sensitivity after removing the individual criterion. A total of 724 SSc patients were included. Most were women (86%), mean age was 55.8 years, mean disease duration was 10.9 years, and 59% had limited cutaneous SSc (lcSSc). Overall, the sensitivity of the 2013 criteria was 98.3% compared to 88.3% for the 1980 criteria. This pattern was consistent among those with lcSSc (98.8% versus 85.6%), anticentromere antibodies (98.9% versus 79.8%), disease duration ≤3 years (98.7% versus 84.7%), and no skin involvement proximal to the MCP joints (97% versus 60%). In the latter subgroup, removing Raynaud's phenomenon and sclerodactyly from the criteria reduced the sensitivity to 77% and 79%, respectively. Removing both sclerodactyly and puffy fingers reduced the sensitivity to 62%. The 2013 SSc classification criteria classify more SSc patients than the 1980 criteria. The improvement in sensitivity is most striking in those with lcSSc, especially those without skin involvement proximal to the MCP joints. The addition of Raynaud's phenomenon and puffy fingers to the 2013 criteria accounts for important gains in sensitivity. Copyright © 2015 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  12. The Paediatric Rheumatology International Trials Organisation provisional criteria for the evaluation of response to therapy in juvenile dermatomyositis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruperto, Nicolino; Pistorio, Angela; Ravelli, Angelo

    2010-01-01

    To develop a provisional definition for the evaluation of response to therapy in juvenile dermatomyositis (DM) based on the Paediatric Rheumatology International Trials Organisation juvenile DM core set of variables....

  13. 2016 American College of Rheumatology/European League Against Rheumatism Criteria for Minimal, Moderate, and Major Clinical Response in Juvenile Dermatomyositis: An International Myositis Assessment and Clinical Studies Group/Paediatric Rheumatology International Trials Organisation Collaborative Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rider, Lisa G; Aggarwal, Rohit; Pistorio, Angela; Bayat, Nastaran; Erman, Brian; Feldman, Brian M; Huber, Adam M; Cimaz, Rolando; Cuttica, Rubén J; de Oliveira, Sheila Knupp; Lindsley, Carol B; Pilkington, Clarissa A; Punaro, Marilynn; Ravelli, Angelo; Reed, Ann M; Rouster-Stevens, Kelly; van Royen-Kerkhof, Annet; Dressler, Frank; Saad Magalhaes, Claudia; Constantin, Tamás; Davidson, Joyce E; Magnusson, Bo; Russo, Ricardo; Villa, Luca; Rinaldi, Mariangela; Rockette, Howard; Lachenbruch, Peter A; Miller, Frederick W; Vencovsky, Jiri; Ruperto, Nicolino

    2017-05-01

    To develop response criteria for juvenile dermatomyositis (DM). We analysed the performance of 312 definitions that used core set measures from either the International Myositis Assessment and Clinical Studies Group (IMACS) or the Paediatric Rheumatology International Trials Organisation (PRINTO) and were derived from natural history data and a conjoint analysis survey. They were further validated using data from the PRINTO trial of prednisone alone compared to prednisone with methotrexate or cyclosporine and the Rituximab in Myositis (RIM) trial. At a consensus conference, experts considered 14 top candidate criteria based on their performance characteristics and clinical face validity, using nominal group technique. Consensus was reached for a conjoint analysis-based continuous model with a total improvement score of 0-100, using absolute per cent change in core set measures of minimal (≥30), moderate (≥45), and major (≥70) improvement. The same criteria were chosen for adult DM/polymyositis, with differing thresholds for improvement. The sensitivity and specificity were 89% and 91-98% for minimal improvement, 92-94% and 94-99% for moderate improvement, and 91-98% and 85-86% for major improvement, respectively, in juvenile DM patient cohorts using the IMACS and PRINTO core set measures. These criteria were validated in the PRINTO trial for differentiating between treatment arms for minimal and moderate improvement (p=0.009-0.057) and in the RIM trial for significantly differentiating the physician's rating for improvement (p<0.006). The response criteria for juvenile DM consisted of a conjoint analysis-based model using a continuous improvement score based on absolute per cent change in core set measures, with thresholds for minimal, moderate, and major improvement. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  14. The Paediatric Rheumatology International Trials Organisation provisional criteria for the evaluation of response to therapy in juvenile dermatomyositis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruperto, Nicolino; Pistorio, Angela; Ravelli, Angelo; Rider, Lisa G; Pilkington, Clarissa; Oliveira, Sheila; Wulffraat, Nico; Espada, Graciela; Garay, Stella; Cuttica, Ruben; Hofer, Michael; Quartier, Pierre; Melo-Gomes, Jose; Reed, Ann M; Wierzbowska, Malgorzata; Feldman, Brian M; Harjacek, Miroslav; Huppertz, Hans-Iko; Nielsen, Susan; Flato, Berit; Lahdenne, Pekka; Michels, Harmut; Murray, Kevin J; Punaro, Lynn; Rennebohm, Robert; Russo, Ricardo; Balogh, Zsolt; Rooney, Madeleine; Pachman, Lauren M; Wallace, Carol; Hashkes, Philip; Lovell, Daniel J; Giannini, Edward H; Gare, Boel Andersson; Martini, Alberto

    2010-11-01

    To develop a provisional definition for the evaluation of response to therapy in juvenile dermatomyositis (DM) based on the Paediatric Rheumatology International Trials Organisation juvenile DM core set of variables. Thirty-seven experienced pediatric rheumatologists from 27 countries achieved consensus on 128 difficult patient profiles as clinically improved or not improved using a stepwise approach (patient's rating, statistical analysis, definition selection). Using the physicians' consensus ratings as the "gold standard measure," chi-square, sensitivity, specificity, false-positive and-negative rates, area under the receiver operating characteristic curve, and kappa agreement for candidate definitions of improvement were calculated. Definitions with kappa values >0.8 were multiplied by the face validity score to select the top definitions. The top definition of improvement was at least 20% improvement from baseline in 3 of 6 core set variables with no more than 1 of the remaining worsening by more than 30%, which cannot be muscle strength. The second-highest scoring definition was at least 20% improvement from baseline in 3 of 6 core set variables with no more than 2 of the remaining worsening by more than 25%, which cannot be muscle strength (definition P1 selected by the International Myositis Assessment and Clinical Studies group). The third is similar to the second with the maximum amount of worsening set to 30%. This indicates convergent validity of the process. We propose a provisional data-driven definition of improvement that reflects well the consensus rating of experienced clinicians, which incorporates clinically meaningful change in core set variables in a composite end point for the evaluation of global response to therapy in juvenile DM. Copyright © 2010 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  15. Prevalence of the American College of Rheumatology hematological classification criteria and associations with serological and clinical variables in 460 systemic lupus erythematosus patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thelma Skare

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study systemic lupus erythematosus in a Brazilian population using the American College of Rheumatology hematological classification criteria and report associations of the disease with serological and clinical profiles. Methods: This is a retrospective study of 460 systemic lupus erythematosus patients followed in a single rheumatologic center during the last 10 years. Hematological manifestations considered for this study were hemolysis, leukopenia, lymphocytopenia and thrombocytopenia. Results: The cumulative prevalences of leukopenia, thrombocytopenia, lymphocytopenia and hemolytic anemia were 29.8%, 21.08%, 17.7% and 8.4%, respectively. A higher percentage of patients with hemolysis had anticardiolipin IgM (p-value = 0.002. Those with leukopenia had more lymphopenia (p-value = 0.02, psychosis (p-value = 0.01, thrombocy- topenia (p-value <0.0001 and anti-double stranded DNA antibodies (p-value = 0.03. Patients with lymphopenia had more leukopenia (OR = 1.8; 95% CI = 1.01-3.29 and lupus anticoagulant antibodies (OR = 2.2; 95% CI = 1.16-4.39 and those with thrombocytopenia had more leukopenia (OR = 3.1; 95% CI = 1.82-5.44 and antiphospholipid syndrome (OR = 3.1; 95% CI = 1.28-7.87. Conclusion: The most common hematological finding was leukopenia and the least common was hemolysis. Associations of low platelet count and hemolysis were found with antiphospholipid syndrome and anticardiolipin IgM positivity, respectively. Leukopenia and lymphocytopenia are correlated and leukopenia is more common in systemic lupus erythe- matosus patients with psychosis, thrombocytopenia and anti-double stranded DNA.

  16. Performance of the 2012 Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics classification criteria versus the 1997 American College of Rheumatology classification criteria in adult and juvenile systemic lupus erythematosus. A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, Esther A R; van Royen-Kerkhof, Annet; Jacobs, Johannes W G; Welsing, Paco M J; Fritsch-Stork, Ruth D E

    2018-03-01

    To evaluate the performance in classifying systemic lupus erythematosus by the 2012 Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics criteria (SLICC'12), versus the revised American College of Rheumatology criteria from 1997 (ACR'97) in adult and juvenile SLE patients. A systematic literature search was conducted in PubMed and Embase for studies comparing SLICC'12 and ACR'97 with clinical diagnosis. A meta-analysis was performed to estimate the sensitivity and specificity of SLICC'12 and ACR'97. To assess classification earlier in the disease by either set, sensitivity and specificity were compared for patients with disease duration <5years. Sensitivity and specificity of individual criteria items were also assessed. In adult SLE (nine studies: 5236 patients, 1313 controls), SLICC'12 has higher sensitivity (94.6% vs. 89.6%) and similar specificity (95.5% vs. 98.1%) compared to ACR'97. For juvenile SLE (four studies: 568 patients, 339 controls), SLICC'12 demonstrates higher sensitivity (99.9% vs. 84.3%) than ACR'97, but much lower specificity (82.0% vs. 94.1%). SLICC'12 classifies juvenile SLE patients earlier in disease course. Individual items contributing to diagnostic accuracy are low complement, anti-ds DNA and acute cutaneous lupus in SLICC'12, and the immunologic and hematologic disorder in ACR'97. Based on sensitivity and specificity SLICC'12 is best for adult SLE. Following the view that higher specificity, i.e. avoidance of false positives, is preferable, ACR'97 is best for juvenile SLE even if associated with lower sensitivity. Our results on the contribution of the individual items of SLICC'12 and ACR´97 may be of value in future efforts to update classification criteria. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Utility of the American-European Consensus Group and American College of Rheumatology Classification Criteria for Sjögren's syndrome in patients with systemic autoimmune diseases in the clinical setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Molina, Gabriela; Avila-Casado, Carmen; Nuñez-Alvarez, Carlos; Cárdenas-Velázquez, Francisco; Hernández-Hernández, Carlos; Luisa Calderillo, María; Marroquín, Verónica; Recillas-Gispert, Claudia; Romero-Díaz, Juanita; Sánchez-Guerrero, Jorge

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility and performance of the American-European Consensus Group (AECG) and ACR Classification Criteria for SS in patients with systemic autoimmune diseases. Three hundred and fifty patients with primary SS, SLE, RA or scleroderma were randomly selected from our patient registry. Each patient was clinically diagnosed as probable/definitive SS or non-SS following a standardized evaluation including clinical symptoms and manifestations, confirmatory tests, fluorescein staining test, autoantibodies, lip biopsy and medical chart review. Using the clinical diagnosis as the gold standard, the degree of agreement with each criteria set and between the criteria sets was estimated. One hundred fifty-four (44%) patients were diagnosed with SS. The AECG criteria were incomplete in 36 patients (10.3%) and the ACR criteria in 96 (27.4%; P vs 62.3 and a specificity of 94.3 vs 91.3, respectively. Either set of criteria was met by 123 patients (80%); 95 (61.7%) met the AECG criteria and 96 (62.3%) met the ACR criteria, but only 68 (44.2%) patients met both sets. The concordance rate between clinical diagnosis and AECG or ACR criteria was moderate (k statistic 0.58 and 0.55, respectively). Among 99 patients with definitive SS sensitivity was 83.3 vs 77.7 and specificity was 90.8 vs 85.6, respectively. A discrepancy between clinical diagnosis and criteria was seen in 59 patients (17%). The feasibility of the SS AECG criteria is superior to that of the ACR criteria, however, their performance was similar among patients with systemic autoimmune diseases. A subset of SS patients is still missed by both criteria sets. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Rheumatology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. 2016 Classification criteria for macrophage activation syndrome complicating systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis : A European league against Rheumatism/American college of Rheumatology/Paediatric rheumatology international trials organisation collaborative initiative

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ravelli, Angelo; Minoia, Francesca; Davì, Sergio; Horne, Anna Carin; Bovis, Francesca; Pistorio, Angela; Aricò, Maurizio; Avcin, Tadej; Behrens, Edward M.; De Benedetti, Fabrizio; Filipovic, Lisa; Grom, Alexei A.; Henter, Jan Inge; Ilowite, Norman T.; Jordan, Michael B.; Khubchandani, Raju; Kitoh, Toshiyuki; Lehmberg, Kai; Lovell, Daniel J.; Miettunen, Paivi; Nichols, Kim E.; Ozen, Seza; Schmid, Jana Pachlopnik; Ramanan, Athimalaipet V.; Russo, Ricardo; Schneider, Rayfel; Sterba, Gary; Uziel, Yosef; Wallace, Carol; Wouters, Carine; Wulffraat, Nico; Demirkaya, Erkan; Brunner, Hermine I.; Martini, Alberto; Ruperto, Nicolino; Cron, Randy Q.

    2016-01-01

    To develop criteria for the classification of macrophage activation syndrome (MAS) in patients with systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). A multistep process, based on a combination of expert consensus and analysis of real patient data, was conducted. A panel of 28 experts was first asked to

  19. 2016 American College of Rheumatology/European League Against Rheumatism criteria for minimal, moderate, and major clinical response in adult dermatomyositis and polymyositis: An International Myositis Assessment and Clinical Studies Group/Paediatric Rheumatology International Trials Organisation Collaborative Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Rohit; Rider, Lisa G; Ruperto, Nicolino; Bayat, Nastaran; Erman, Brian; Feldman, Brian M; Oddis, Chester V; Amato, Anthony A; Chinoy, Hector; Cooper, Robert G; Dastmalchi, Maryam; Fiorentino, David; Isenberg, David; Katz, James D; Mammen, Andrew; de Visser, Marianne; Ytterberg, Steven R; Lundberg, Ingrid E; Chung, Lorinda; Danko, Katalin; García-De la Torre, Ignacio; Song, Yeong Wook; Villa, Luca; Rinaldi, Mariangela; Rockette, Howard; Lachenbruch, Peter A; Miller, Frederick W; Vencovsky, Jiri

    2017-05-01

    To develop response criteria for adult dermatomyositis (DM) and polymyositis (PM). Expert surveys, logistic regression, and conjoint analysis were used to develop 287 definitions using core set measures. Myositis experts rated greater improvement among multiple pairwise scenarios in conjoint analysis surveys, where different levels of improvement in 2 core set measures were presented. The PAPRIKA (Potentially All Pairwise Rankings of All Possible Alternatives) method determined the relative weights of core set measures and conjoint analysis definitions. The performance characteristics of the definitions were evaluated on patient profiles using expert consensus (gold standard) and were validated using data from a clinical trial. The nominal group technique was used to reach consensus. Consensus was reached for a conjoint analysis-based continuous model using absolute per cent change in core set measures (physician, patient, and extramuscular global activity, muscle strength, Health Assessment Questionnaire, and muscle enzyme levels). A total improvement score (range 0-100), determined by summing scores for each core set measure, was based on improvement in and relative weight of each core set measure. Thresholds for minimal, moderate, and major improvement were ≥20, ≥40, and ≥60 points in the total improvement score. The same criteria were chosen for juvenile DM, with different improvement thresholds. Sensitivity and specificity in DM/PM patient cohorts were 85% and 92%, 90% and 96%, and 92% and 98% for minimal, moderate, and major improvement, respectively. Definitions were validated in the clinical trial analysis for differentiating the physician rating of improvement (p<0.001). The response criteria for adult DM/PM consisted of the conjoint analysis model based on absolute per cent change in 6 core set measures, with thresholds for minimal, moderate, and major improvement. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not

  20. ERGOTHERAPY IN RHEUMATOLOGY

    OpenAIRE

    Tat’yana Vladimirovna Dubinina; M L Sukhareva; Sh F Erdes

    2014-01-01

    The article reports one of the most affordable rehabilitation methods, i.e. occupational therapy. The issues related to the history of occupational therapy as a treatment method, its application in rheumatology and promising directions of development are covered.

  1. History of rheumatology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shrikant Deshpande

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This article describes the history and various milestones of rheumatology from ancient to modern times. The origin of rheumatology can be traced to ancient times. Diseases such as gout and osteoarthritis were prevalent in ancient people. Many ancient skeletons show signs of gout and osteoarthritis. The ancient book on Indian Medicine, Charaka Samhita, gives a vivid description of many variants of arthritis. Charaka, an eminent Ayurvedic physician, described rheumatoid arthritis (RA in Charaka Samhitha as "Vishkantha," meaning painful joints. The word rheumatology has its origin in the word "rheuma," which means flowing, and is mentioned in Hippocratic corpus. Hippocrates made several observations about gout, popularly known as "aphorisms of gout." Many famous paintings in the medieval era depict joint diseases. Hand lesions resembling those of RA are found in paintings of the Flemish school. "The virgin with canon van der paele," a painting by Jan Van Eyck (1436, shows thickened arteries in the temple, suggestive of temporal arthritis. The famous portrait of Federigo de Montefeltre, thought to have been painted by Joos (Justus van Gent, shows arthritis of the proximal interphalangeal joint of the left index finger. Rheumatology developed as a well-recognized specialty of medicine in the 20th century. American Physicians Bernard Comroe and Joseph Lee Hollander coined the term rheumatologist in 1940. Rheumatology has rapidly advanced during the last 50 years due to improved diagnosis as a result of progress in immunology, molecular biology, genetics and imaging.

  2. The challenge of the definition of early symptomatic knee osteoarthritis: a proposal of criteria and red flags from an international initiative promoted by the Italian Society for Rheumatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migliore, Alberto; Scirè, Carlo Alberto; Carmona, Loreto; Herrero-Beaumont, Gabriel; Bizzi, Emanuele; Branco, Jaime; Carrara, Greta; Chevalier, Xavier; Collaku, Ledio; Aslanidis, Spiros; Denisov, Lev; Di Matteo, Luigi; Bianchi, Gerolamo; Diracoglu, Demirhan; Frediani, Bruno; Maheu, Emmanuel; Martusevich, Natalia; Bagnato, Gian Filippo; Scarpellini, Magda; Minisola, Giovanni; Akkoc, Nurullah; Ramonda, Roberta; Barskova, Tatiana; Babic-Naglic, Durda; Muelas, Jose Vicente Moreno; Ionescu, Ruxandra; Rashkov, Rasho; Damjanov, Nemanja; Cerinic, Marco Matucci

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study was to establish consensus for potential early symptomatic knee osteoarthritis (ESKOA) clinical definition and referral criteria from primary care to rheumatologists, based on available data from literature and a qualitative approach, in order to perform studies on patients fulfilling such criteria and to validate the obtained ESKOA definition. A complex methodological approach was followed including: (1) three focus groups (FG), including expert clinicians, researchers and patients; (2) a systematic literature review (SLR); (3) two discussion groups followed by a Delphi survey. FG and SLR were performed in parallel to inform discussion groups in order to identify relevant constructs to be included in the modified Delphi survey. ESKOA is defined in the presence of: (a) two mandatory symptoms (knee pain in the absence of any recent trauma or injury and very short joint stiffness, lasting for less than 10 min, when starting movement) even in the absence of risk factors, or (b) knee pain, and 1 or 2 risk factors or (c) three or more risk factors in the presence of at least one mandatory symptom, with symptoms lasting less than 6 months. These criteria are applicable in the absence of active inflammatory arthritis, generalized pain, Kellgren-Lawrence grade >0, any recent knee trauma or injury, and age lower than 40 years. Knee pain in the absence of any recent trauma lasting for less than 6 months was considered as the referral criterion to the rheumatologist for the suspicion of ESKOA. This consensus process has identified provisional clinical definition of ESKOA and defined potential referral criterion to rheumatologist, in order to test ESKOA obtained definition in prospective validation studies.

  3. Etoricoxib (arcoxia in rheumatology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatima Magomedovna Kudaeva

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper gives information on the selective COX-2 inhibitor etoricoxib registered for use in many countries of the world. It gives a brief description of a few key trials of the efficacy and tolerability of etoricoxib in rheumatology

  4. Etoricoxib (arcoxia in rheumatology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatima Magomedovna Kudaeva

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper gives information on the selective COX-2 inhibitor etoricoxib registered for use in many countries of the world. It gives a brief description of a few key trials of the efficacy and tolerability of etoricoxib in rheumatology

  5. African Journal of Rheumatology

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The journal aims to publish papers on basic and clinical research in rheumatology and be a vessel of sharing knowledge across the globe. Original research work, reviews, case reports and other relevant scientific work will be published in the journal. The readers of the journal are mainly practicing rheumatologists, ...

  6. Educational issues in Rheumatology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rasker, Johannes J.; Dequeker, Jan; Woolf, Anthony D.

    2000-01-01

    Musculoskeletal conditions are the most common cause of severe long-term pain and physical disability, affecting hundreds of millions of people around the world. Nearly a quarter of all consultations in primary care are concerned with rheumatic disease, yet undergraduate education in rheumatology is

  7. ERGOTHERAPY IN RHEUMATOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tat’yana Vladimirovna Dubinina

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The article reports one of the most affordable rehabilitation methods, i.e. occupational therapy. The issues related to the history of occupational therapy as a treatment method, its application in rheumatology and promising directions of development are covered.

  8. Textbook of rheumatology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, R.A.; Wise, C.M.

    1986-01-01

    This book contains 23 papers. Some of the titles are: Diagnostic Radiology in the Rheumatic Diseases; Laboratory Testing in Rheumatology; Arthritis Nursing and the Team Approach in the Management of Rheumatic Disease; The Surgical Management of Arthritis; Vasculities; Neoplasms of Bone and Joints; and Rheumatic Disease of Childhood

  9. The 2010 American college of rheumatology fibromyalgia survey diagnostic criteria and symptom severity scale is a valid and reliable tool in a French speaking fibromyalgia cohort

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fitzcharles Mary-Ann

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fibromyalgia (FM is a pain condition with associated symptoms contributing to distress. The Fibromyalgia Survey Diagnostic Criteria and Severity Scale (FSDC is a patient-administered questionnaire assessing diagnosis and symptom severity. Locations of body pain measured by the Widespread Pain Index (WPI, and the Symptom Severity scale (SS measuring fatigue, unrefreshing sleep, cognitive and somatic complaints provide a score (0–31, measuring a composite of polysymptomatic distress. The reliability and validity of the translated French version of the FSDC was evaluated. Methods The French FSDC was administered twice to 73 FM patients, and was correlated with measures of symptom status including: Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ, Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ, McGill Pain Questionnaire (MPQ, and a visual analogue scale (VAS for global severity and pain. Test-retest reliability, internal consistency, and construct validity were evaluated. Results Test-retest reliability was between .600 and .888 for the 25 single items of the FSDC, and .912 for the total FSDC, with all correlations significant (p  Conclusions The French FSDC is a valid instrument in French FM patients with reliability and construct validity. It is easily completed, simple to score, and has the potential to become the standard for measurement of polysymptomatic distress in FM.

  10. [Rehabilitation in rheumatology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luttosch, F; Baerwald, C

    2010-10-01

    Rehabilitation in rheumatology focuses on prevention of functional disorders of the musculoskeletal system, maintenance of working ability and prevention of care dependency. Drug treatment alone rarely results in long-term remission, therefore rehabilitative measures must be integrated into rheumatic care. Rehabilitative therapy in rheumatology includes physiotherapy, patient education and occupational therapy. Positive effects of physical therapy methods have been proven by various studies. Patient education and occupational therapy are important tools for stabilizing the course of the disease. To maintain positive rehabilitative results patients have to be involved in the selection of treatment measures and should take an active part in the long-term treatment process. Despite proven efficacy of physical measures there is evidence for a lack of utilization of rehabilitative therapy due to increasing cost pressure in the health care system which will further increase over time.

  11. PROCALCITONIN TESTING IN RHEUMATOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. V. Bukhanova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently, differential diagnosis of systemic bacterial infection and active rheumatic process remains a challenging problem in rheumatology. In the review, current data on the role of procalcitonin biomarker in diagnosis and differential diagnosis of rheumatic diseases (RD and infectious pathology are presented. In particular, some authors recommend procalcitonin (PCT test as a marker of bacterial infection in bones and joints at levels above 0.5 ng/ml; at PCT level below 0.3 ng/ml, infection can be ruled out. In patients with microcrystalline arthritis, data on the significance of PCT for differential diagnosis are contradictory. PCT level doesn’t correlate with systemic lupus erythematosus activity and is elevated only during bacterial infection proportionally to its systematicity. In some studies, elevated PCT level was observed in ANCA-associated vasculitis with high activity without bacterial infection. It was shown that in 80 % of adults with Still’s disease, PCT level was higher than the threshold value even without infection. For patients with RD hospitalized in intensive care units, PCT clearance is a more informative predictive characteristic than its level, regardless of the cause of PCT elevation (infection, injury, severe organ damage, etc.; slowdown of its decrease is a factor of poor prognosis and is associated with higher mortality. At the same time, PCT level positively correlates with the SOFA score in presence of bacterial infection. For some rheumatic diseases, the threshold PCT value at which the test has optimal sensitivity and specificity is yet to be established. Nonetheless, PCT should be evaluated in relation to the clinical picture and data of additional examinations. The effect of various therapy methods used in rheumatology on PCT level requires further research.

  12. Expanding access to rheumatology care: the rheumatology general practice toolbox.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Conway, R

    2015-02-01

    Management guidelines for many rheumatic diseases are published in specialty rheumatology literature but rarely in general medical journals. Musculoskeletal disorders comprise 14% of all consultations in primary care. Formal post-graduate training in rheumatology is limited or absent for many primary care practitioners. Primary care practitioners can be trained to effectively treat complex diseases and have expressed a preference for interactive educational courses. The Rheumatology General Practice (GP) Toolbox is an intensive one day course designed to offer up to date information to primary care practitioners on the latest diagnostic and treatment guidelines for seven common rheumatic diseases. The course structure involves a short lecture on each topic and workshops on arthrocentesis, joint injection and DXA interpretation. Participants evaluated their knowledge and educational experience before, during and after the course. Thirty-two primary care practitioners attended, who had a median of 13 (IQR 6.5, 20) years experience in their specialty. The median number of educational symposia attended in the previous 5 years was 10 (IQR-5, 22.5), with a median of 0 (IQR 0, 1) in rheumatology. All respondents agreed that the course format was appropriate. Numerical improvements were demonstrated in participant\\'s confidence in diagnosing and managing all seven common rheumatologic conditions, with statistically significant improvements (p < 0.05) in 11 of the 14 aspects assessed. The Rheumatology Toolbox is an effective educational method for disseminating current knowledge in rheumatology to primary care physicians and improved participant\\'s self-assessed competence in diagnosis and management of common rheumatic diseases.

  13. BIOSIMILARS IN RHEUMATOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. L. Nasonov

    2016-01-01

     stage. Preliminary provisions and recommendations of the All-Russian public organization «Association of Rheumatologists of Russia» concerning the place of biosimilars in rheumatology are formulated.

  14. Hot topics in modern rheumatology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. E. Karateev

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The Expert Council for Tofacitinib (TOFA and two symposiums on New Possibilities for Targeted Therapy of Rheumatoid Arthritis and on Success Factor of Biological Therapy for Rheumatic Diseases were held within the annual scientific-and-practical conference of the V.A. Nasonova Research Institute of Rheumatology on Comorbidity in Rheumatic Diseases in Moscow on 14–15 October 2014.

  15. Bases and principles of rheumatology. Book

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vidal, L.; Chavez, J.; Quevedo, H.; Castaneda, L.

    1993-01-01

    This book describes in 7 sections (42 chapters) the bases and principles of rheumatology. Section I bases and principles of rheumatology, Section II diffuse disorders of conjunctive tissue, Section III serum negatives spondyloarthropathies, Section IV arthropathies associated to infectious agents, Section V osteoarthritis diseases and different disorders, Section VI rational management rheumatic patients, Section VII therapeutics in rheumatology. In the chapter 34, the uses of radioisotope scanning in rheumatology are described. Every chapter contains also references, figures and tables

  16. VACCINATION IN RHEUMATOLOGY: CURRENT ASPECTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. S. Belov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Infectious diseases still remain a serious social and medical problem. The importance of comorbid infections in rheumatology has increased substantially in recent years, particularly due to the clinical introduction of biologicals. The investigation and active use of different vaccines are one of the ways to solve the above problem. This review considers the issues concerning the use of vaccines against influenza, infections caused by pneumococci, herpesviruses, human papillomavirus, and hepatitis B virus in rheumatology patients. It discusses the safety and immunogenicity of vaccination associated with the prevention of airway infections as the most common cause of a poor outcome in rheumatic diseases. The main areas of future investigations in the problem under consideration are defined.

  17. Update on rheumatology: part 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neal-Boylan, Leslie

    2009-05-01

    There are many rheumatic diseases. Part 1 of this 2 part series on rheumatology presented a few of those most commonly seen in the community. Home health clinicians can be helpful in managing these diseases and preventing progression by watching for new symptoms or acute attacks of pain or disability, ensuring that patients take their medications appropriately, reminding patients to see their rheumatology providers and have their lab work done regularly, and reporting adverse effects to medications promptly. Additionally, as with most home health patients, an interdisciplinary approach that includes physical and occupational therapy, social work, nursing, nutrition, and other disciplines as needed should be implemented so that all patient needs are met and the patient is discharged at the highest level of self-care that is possible. Part 2 of this series will discuss the care of the patient with rheumatic disease at home and will provide a more in-depth look at lab diagnosis of rheumatic diseases.

  18. [Amendment of the structural quality for inpatient rheumatology. A forward-looking concept].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakomek, H-J; Braun, J; Gromnica-Ihle, E; Fiehn, C; Claus, S; Specker, C; Jung, J; Krause, A; Lorenz, H-M; Robbers, J

    2011-09-01

    In 2010 a total of 9 guidelines on structural quality were endorsed by the Association of Rheumatology Clinics in Germany (VRA). These 9 structural criteria replace the regulations published in 2002 and were elaborated with the support of the German Rheumatology League. With guideline number 9 even the structural requirements for university hospitals are defined for the first time.Along with taking part in the quality project "Kobra" (continuous outcome benchmarking in rheumatology inpatient treatment) compliance with the new structural criteria constitutes a prerequisite for acquiring a quality certificate, which is awarded by an external institution.By this means the VRA sets the stage for its members to be prepared for future challenges and quality competition among hospitals. Furthermore, the provision of a high quality treatment for chronically diseased patients in rheumatology clinics will be effectively supported.

  19. Rheumatology outpatient nurse clinics: a valuable addition?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Temmink, D.; Hutten, J.B.F.; Francke, A.L.; Rasker, J.J.; Huijer Abu-Saad, H.; Zee, J. van der

    2001-01-01

    Objectives: "Transmural rheumatology nurse clinics," where nursing care is provided under the joint responsibility of a home care organization and a hospital, were recently introduced into Dutch health care. This article gives insight into outcomes of the transmural rheumatology nurse clinics.

  20. Rheumatology outpatient nurse clinics: a valuable addition?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Temmink, Denise; Hutten, Jack B.F.; Francke, Anneke L.; Rasker, Johannes J.; Abu-Saad, Huda Huijer

    2001-01-01

    Objectives: Transmural rheumatology nurse clinics, where nursing care is provided under the joint responsibility of a home care organization and a hospital, were recently introduced into Dutch health care. This article gives insight into outcomes of the transmural rheumatology nurse clinics. -

  1. Musculoskeletal ultrasound in pediatric rheumatology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özçakar Levent

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Although musculoskeletal ultrasound (MSUS has emerged as an indispensible tool among physicians involved in musculoskeletal medicine in the last two decades, only recently has it become more attractive to pediatric rheumatologists. Thereafter, the use of MSUS in pediatric rheumatology has started to increase. Yet, an ever-growing body of literature shows parity and even superiority of MSUS when compared to physical examination and other imaging modalities. MSUS is suitable for examination of children of all ages and it has certain advantages over other imaging modalities; as it is cheaper, mobile, instantly accessible bedside, easy to combine with clinical assessment (interactivity and non-invasive. It does not require sedation, which facilitates repetitive examinations. Assessment of multiple locations is possible during the same session. Agitation is rarely a problem and small children can be seated in their parents' lap or they can even play while being examined.

  2. Autoimmune thyroiditis in antinuclear antibody positive children without rheumatologic disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arkachaisri Thaschawee

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Children are commonly referred to a pediatric rheumatology center for the laboratory finding of an Anti-nuclear antibody (ANA of undetermined significance. Previous studies regarding adult rheumatology patients have supported an association between ANA and anti-thyroid antibodies, with the prevalence of thyroid antibodies being significantly higher in patients referred to a rheumatology center for an ANA without evidence of connective tissue disease compared to the general population. The purpose of the present study was to determine the frequency of thyroid antibodies in children referred to a pediatric rheumatology center for a positive ANA without evidence of a connective tissue disease. Methods A retrospective chart review was performed on children who were referred to our pediatric rheumatology center between August 2003 and March 2007 for positive ANA with concurrent thyroid antibody and thyroid function tests performed who did not fulfill criteria for a specific connective tissue disease. Laboratory and clinical features were recorded and analyzed. Mean and standard deviation were used to describe continuous data. Chi-square or Fisher's exact tests were used to compare proportions between variables. Results One-hundred and four ANA-positive patients with concurrent thyroid studies were evaluated (88% female, 93% Caucasian, mean age 11.9 ± 4.0 years. Half of patients had an ANA titer ≥ 1:320. The ANA pattern was speckled in 60% of the patients. Thyroid antibodies were detected in 30% of the patients. Anti-Thyroglobulin (ATG was detected in 29% and Anti-thyroid peroxidase (ATPO in 21% of the patients; of these children, 14% had hypothyroidism. ANA pattern and titer were not associated with anti-thyroid antibody positivity. Conclusion Thyroid antibodies associated with chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis, ATG and ATPO, were detected significantly higher in ANA-positive children without a rheumatologic condition (30% as

  3. Semiconductor lasers in rheumatological treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascu, Mihail-Lucian; Suteanu, S.; Ignat, P.; Pruna, Simion; Chitu, A.

    1995-03-01

    A computer controlled equipment, containing 6 lasers (HeNe and 5 diode lasers--DL) conceived to be used in rheumatological treatment is reported. DL emit at 895 nm and for typical applications, their expanded spots are superposed within the irradiation plane, on the HeNE defocused spot used to define the surface to be irradiated. DL emit 100 nsec pulses between 0.5 KHz and 1.5 KHz repetition rate and 0.5 mW average power (measured at 1 KHz). 150 patients with rheumathologic diseases were treated: lumbar spondylosis (75), gonarthrosis (30), cervical spondylosis (21), coxarthrosis (15), Heberden and Bouchard (9). The treatment consisted of: group I, 50 patients--laser therapy, 10 min/day, 10 days; group II, 50 patients--classical antirheumatic treatment; group III, 50 patients--mixed treatment. Assessment of sympathetic skin activity made using reactometry measurements, shows that latency time was longer before irradiation, 1867 +/- 289) msec then after, (1234 +/- 321) msec. Pain rating indexes decreasing for all three groups of patients were measured. Better results for more superficial diseases were obtained and best results were observed after irradiation with 1 KHz - 1.5 KHz repetition rate IR pulses. Better results were obtained when spot irradiation in a few points combined with zone irradiations was used.

  4. A brief history of ultrasound in rheumatology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    D'Agostino, Maria Antonietta; Terslev, Lene

    2014-01-01

    Musculoskeletal ultrasound is an evolving technique widely used in rheumatology thanks to the numerous advances and the improved work on standardisation. This article deals with the new developments in terms of technology and validation.......Musculoskeletal ultrasound is an evolving technique widely used in rheumatology thanks to the numerous advances and the improved work on standardisation. This article deals with the new developments in terms of technology and validation....

  5. Rheumatology training in Poland vs. United Kingdom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karina Lazarewicz

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available When evaluating the quality of Rheumatology specialty training, it can be useful to explore similarities and differences between countries. In this article we compare the training in the UK and Poland. The two training programmes are similar in length and in the competencies that must be achieved, although they do have significant differences in the way the training is structured. The UK-based system is more out-patient based, which can be advantageous, as after completion of training the doctor is more confident in treating common rheumatological problems. On the other hand, having exposure to paediatric rheumatology and orthopaedics like one has in Polish-based training, despite a short placement time, is definitely beneficial for the trainee in gaining all-round knowledge. In conclusion, each system has its merits and can be further enhanced by observing how junior doctors are sub-speciality trained in different countries.

  6. An insight into rheumatology in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louthrenoo, Worawit

    2015-01-01

    Despite the fact that rheumatic diseases constitute a common health care problem in Thailand, improvements in rheumatology education, research and health care are still required. Low numbers of rheumatologists, their uneven distribution, lack of time to perform both clinical and basic research, lack of patient compliance and restricted access to effective medication comprise some of the barriers that need to be overcome to establish rheumatology education, research and care with a Western-country benchmark. The annual academic activities provided by the Thai Rheumatism Association for rheumatologists, general practitioners, allied health professionals and patients can advance only some forms of education and health care. Better cooperation between the Thai Rheumatism Association, the Royal College of Physicians of Thailand, the Ministry of Public Health and the Thai government is needed to improve rheumatology training, care and research in the country.

  7. Ananyeva Rational antibiotic use in rheumatology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boris Sergeyevich Belov

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available To control infections and infectious complications is one of the most urgent challenges in medicine under present-day conditions. At the same time, rational therapy with anti-infective drugs occupies a highly importance place. In rheumatology, the necessity of using antibiotics is associated with at least two factors, such as eradication of a pathogen trigger (an infectious agent that triggers the immunopathological mechanisms of inflammation and treatment of comorbid infection. The paper gives information on etiological agents and detailed antimicrobial therapy regimens for the major infections observed in modern rheumatology.

  8. Ananyeva Rational antibiotic use in rheumatology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boris Sergeyevich Belov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available To control infections and infectious complications is one of the most urgent challenges in medicine under present-day conditions. At the same time, rational therapy with anti-infective drugs occupies a highly importance place. In rheumatology, the necessity of using antibiotics is associated with at least two factors, such as eradication of a pathogen trigger (an infectious agent that triggers the immunopathological mechanisms of inflammation and treatment of comorbid infection. The paper gives information on etiological agents and detailed antimicrobial therapy regimens for the major infections observed in modern rheumatology.

  9. The patient's role in rheumatology care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, T J

    1998-03-01

    This article reviews narrative and empiric studies in rheumatology and related literature to explicate the patient's role in rheumatology care. In contrast to early conceptualizations, such as Parsons' sick role that emphasized compliance, current literature describes chronic disease patients as active participants in their care, rather than passive recipients of care. Active patients roles include participant in shared decision making, self-manager, and help and information seeker. All of these roles are colored by the individual's need to preserve a personally defined acceptable lifestyle. Suggestions for strategies that physicians and health professionals can use to engage and support these essential patient roles are also reviewed.

  10. Joint hypermobility syndrome in rheumatology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Satybaldyev

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Joint hypermobility syndrome (JHS is a disease characterized by symptoms of locomotor system involvement in the absence of obvious systemic rheumatic diseases (RDs. JHS accompanied by the symptomatology of RDs should be distinguished from isolated joint hypermobility, in which there are no complaints even in cases of its generalized manifestations and the patients feel virtually healthy. The paper provides an overview of the literature on the JHS. It gives diagnostic criteria for JHS (the Brighton criteria encompasses the Beighton score and the clinical manifestation of damages to the locomotor apparatus, visceral organs, and skin in this syndrome. Autonomic nervous system dysfunction as a possible manifestation of JHS and its impact on the daily life of patients are discussed. Attention is paid to the prevention and treatment of JHS. 

  11. Validation of the 2010 ACR/EULAR classification criteria for rheumatoid arthritis: slight improvement over the 1987 ACR criteria.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Britsemmer, K.; Ursum, J.; Gerritsen, M.; Tuyl, L. van; Schaardenburg, D. van

    2011-01-01

    Abstract: Background Recently, an American College of Rheumatology (ACR)/European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) collaboration developed new classification criteria for rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Objective:To evaluate the diagnostic and discriminative ability of these new criteria compared with

  12. [Complicated gastroduodenal ulcers in rheumatology patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barashkov, V G; Shemerovskaia, T G; Sergeev, P V; Bokovanov, V E

    1998-01-01

    An analysis of observations of 250 patients with different rheumatological diseases has shown that 18% of the patients had ulcer disease with complications. The greatest risk of bleedings and perforations took place during the first year of treatment with nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs. The main risk factors of complications were determined. They are: male sex, high parameters of gastric secretion.

  13. Pharmacology of biosimilar candidate drugs in rheumatology: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araújo, F; Cordeiro, I; Teixeira, F; Gonçalves, J; Fonseca, J E

    2014-01-01

    To review current evidence concerning pharmacology of biosimilar candidates to be used in rheumatology. A PubMed search up to August 2013 was performed using relevant search terms to include all studies assessing pharmacological properties of biosimilar candidates to be used in rheumatology. Data on study characteristics, type of intervention, pharmacokinetics (PK), pharmacodynamics (PD) and bioequivalence ratios was extracted. Of 280 articles screened, 5 fulfilled our inclusion criteria. Two trials, PLANETAS and PLANETRA, compared CT-P13 and infliximab in patients with active ankylosing spondylitis and rheumatoid arthritis, respectively. PK bioequivalence was demonstrated in the phase 1 PLANETAS trial by highly comparable area under the curve (AUC) and maximum drug concentrations (Cmax), whose geometric mean ratios fell between the accepted bioequivalence range of 80-125%. Equivalence in efficacy and safety was demonstrated in the phase 3 PLANETRA trial. Two phase 1 trials comparing etanercept biosimilar candidates TuNEX and HD203 in healthy volunteers showed a high degree of similarity in AUC and Cmax, with respective geometric mean ratios between PK bioequivalence range. The last included trial referred to GP2013, a rituximab biosimilar candidate, which demonstrated PK and PD bioequivalence to reference product in three different dosing regimens in cynomolgus monkeys. Infliximab, etanercept and rituximab biosimilar candidates have demonstrated PK bioequivalence in the trials included in this review. CT-P13 has recently been approved for use in the European market and the remaining biosimilar candidates are currently being tested in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

  14. [Nailfold capillaroscopy: relevance to the practice of rheumatology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Eduardo José do Rosário E; Kayser, Cristiane

    2015-01-01

    Nailfold capillaroscopy is a simple, low-cost method, that is extremely important in the evaluation of patients with Raynaud's phenomenon and of patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc) spectrum diseases. Besides its importance for the early diagnosis of SSc, nailfold capillaroscopy is a useful tool to identify scleroderma patients with high risk for development of vascular and visceral complications and death. The inclusion of capillaroscopy in the new classification criteria for SSc of the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) and European League Against Rheumatism (Eular) gives a new impetus to the use and dissemination of the method. In this paper, we present a didactic, non-systematic review on the subject, with emphasis on advances recently described. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  15. INTRAVENOUS IMMUNOGLOBULIN IN PEDIATRIC RHEUMATOLOGY PRACTICE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. I. Alexeeva

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Modern successful treatment of rheumatic diseases is impossible without the use of intravenous immunoglobulin. The use of intravenous immunoglobulin is based on strict indications developed as a result of long-term multicenter controlled studies. The article highlights the issues of using immunoglobulin in pediatric rheumatology practice, and provides the review of literature with the results from the evaluation of the efficiency of intravenous immunoglobulin confirming the efficiency of the drug only for certain rheumatic diseases. 

  16. Gout treatment: survey of Brazilian rheumatology residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amorim, Rodrigo Balbino Chaves; Vargas-Santos, Ana Beatriz; Pereira, Leticia Rocha; Coutinho, Evandro Silva Freire; da Rocha Castelar-Pinheiro, Geraldo

    2017-05-01

    To assess the current practices in gout management among Brazilian rheumatology residents. We performed a cross-sectional online survey among all the rheumatology residents and those rheumatologists who had just completed their training (post-residency (PR)) regarding their approach to gout management. Results were compared with the 2012 American College of Rheumatology (ACR) gout guidelines and with the responses of a previous survey with a representative sample of practicing Brazilian rheumatologists (RHE). We received 224 responses (83%) from 271 subjects. Among all respondents, the first-choice treatment for gout flares was the combination of a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug + colchicine for otherwise healthy patients. A target serum urate 75%. Less than 70% reported starting allopurinol at low doses (≤100 mg/day) for patients with normal renal function and gout guidelines, especially among PR. However, some important aspects of gout management need improvement. These results will guide the development of a physician education program to improve the management of gout patients in Brazil.

  17. Rheumatologic services in Central Asian countries: current state of development of rheumatology in Central Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omurzakova, Nazgul A; Yamano, Yoshihisa; Saatova, Guli M; Shukurova, Surayo M; Mirzakhanova, Mavliuda I; Kydyralieva, Ryskul B; Jumagulova, Aynagul S; Mirrakhimov, Erkin M; Seisenbaev, Askar Sh; Nishioka, Kusuki; Nakajima, Toshihiro

    2009-12-01

    Rheumatologic and public health services of Central Asia's republics have suffered hugely as a result of social and economic declines following the dissolution of the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics (USSR) and transition of these republics to market economies. Between 1990 and 2000 there was a mass outflow of highly skilled rheumatologists and teachers and researchers in rheumatology to countries abroad, leading to significant deprivation of rheumatological service in Central Asian countries. During this time, there was continued growth of various rheumatic diseases (RDs) including rheumatic fever, and musculoskeletal and connective tissue disorders. The medical and social burden of RDs imposed on society was strongly underestimated until recent times. There is an urgent need to define the epidemiology of RDs and their impact on the quality of life of people afflicted by these conditions, and to improve the diagnostics and treatment of these conditions.

  18. Rheumatology Research Foundation Clinician Scholar Educator Award: Fifteen Years Promoting Rheumatology Educators and Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berman, Jessica R; O'Rourke, Kenneth S; Kolasinski, Sharon L; Aizer, Juliet; Wheatley, Mary J; Battistone, Michael J; Siaton, Bernadette C; Criscione-Schreiber, Lisa; Pillinger, Michael H; Lazaro, Deana M

    2016-11-01

    The Rheumatology Research Foundation's Clinician Scholar Educator (CSE) award is a 3-year career development award supporting medical education research while providing opportunities for mentorship and collaboration. Our objective was to document the individual and institutional impact of the award since its inception, as well as its promise to strengthen the subspecialty of rheumatology. All 60 CSE Award recipients were surveyed periodically. Fifty-six of those 60 awardees (90%) responded to requests for survey information that included post-award activities, promotions, and further funding. Data were also collected from yearly written progress reports for each grant. Of the total CSE recipients to date, 48 of 60 (80%) are adult rheumatologists, 11 of 60 (18%) are pediatric rheumatologists, and 1 is an adult and pediatric rheumatologist. Two-thirds of survey respondents spend up to 30% of their total time in educational activities, and one-third spend greater than 30%. Thirty-one of the 60 CSE recipients (52%) have published a total of 86 medical education papers. Twenty-six of 52 (50%) had received an academic promotion following the award. Eleven awardees earned advanced degrees. We describe the creation and evolution of a grant program from a medical subspecialty society foundation and the impact on producing education research, individual identity formation, and ongoing support for educators. This community of rheumatology scholar educators now serves as an important resource at the national level for the American College of Rheumatology and its membership. We believe that this grant may serve as a model for other medical societies that want to promote education scholarship and leadership within their specialties. © 2016, American College of Rheumatology.

  19. Validation of potential classification criteria for systemic sclerosis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Johnson, S.R.; Fransen, J.; Khanna, D.; Baron, M.; Hoogen, F. van den; Medsger TA, J.r.; Peschken, C.A.; Carreira, P.E.; Riemekasten, G.; Tyndall, A.; Matucci-Cerinic, M.; Pope, J.E.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Classification criteria for systemic sclerosis (SSc; scleroderma) are being updated jointly by the American College of Rheumatology and European League Against Rheumatism. Potential items for classification were reduced to 23 using Delphi and nominal group techniques. We evaluated the

  20. 2012 Provisional classification criteria for polymyalgia rheumatica

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dasgupta, Bhaskar; Cimmino, Marco A; Kremers, Hilal Maradit

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to develop European League Against Rheumatism/American College of Rheumatology classification criteria for polymyalgia rheumatica (PMR). Candidate criteria were evaluated in a 6-month prospective cohort study of 125 patients with new-onset PMR and 169 non-PMR compa...

  1. The 2017 EULAR standardised procedures for ultrasound imaging in rheumatology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Möller, Ingrid; Janta, Iustina; Backhaus, Marina

    2017-01-01

    of MSUS evaluable structures; (2) a Delphi survey among rheumatologist and radiologist experts in MSUS to select MS and non-MS anatomic structures evaluable by US that are relevant to rheumatology, to select abnormalities evaluable by US and to prioritise these pathologies for rheumatology and (3...

  2. Performance on the adult rheumatology in-training examination and relationship to outcomes on the rheumatology certification examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohr, Kristine M; Clauser, Amanda; Hess, Brian J; Gelber, Allan C; Valeriano-Marcet, Joanne; Lipner, Rebecca S; Haist, Steven A; Hawley, Janine L; Zirkle, Sarah; Bolster, Marcy B

    2015-11-01

    The American College of Rheumatology (ACR) Adult Rheumatology In-Training Examination (ITE) is a feedback tool designed to identify strengths and weaknesses in the content knowledge of individual fellows-in-training and the training program curricula. We determined whether scores on the ACR ITE, as well as scores on other major standardized medical examinations and competency-based ratings, could be used to predict performance on the American Board of Internal Medicine (ABIM) Rheumatology Certification Examination. Between 2008 and 2012, 629 second-year fellows took the ACR ITE. Bivariate correlation analyses of assessment scores and multiple linear regression analyses were used to determine whether ABIM Rheumatology Certification Examination scores could be predicted on the basis of ACR ITE scores, United States Medical Licensing Examination scores, ABIM Internal Medicine Certification Examination scores, fellowship directors' ratings of overall clinical competency, and demographic variables. Logistic regression was used to evaluate whether these assessments were predictive of a passing outcome on the Rheumatology Certification Examination. In the initial linear model, the strongest predictors of the Rheumatology Certification Examination score were the second-year fellows' ACR ITE scores (β = 0.438) and ABIM Internal Medicine Certification Examination scores (β = 0.273). Using a stepwise model, the strongest predictors of higher scores on the Rheumatology Certification Examination were second-year fellows' ACR ITE scores (β = 0.449) and ABIM Internal Medicine Certification Examination scores (β = 0.276). Based on the findings of logistic regression analysis, ACR ITE performance was predictive of a pass/fail outcome on the Rheumatology Certification Examination (odds ratio 1.016 [95% confidence interval 1.011-1.021]). The predictive value of the ACR ITE score with regard to predicting performance on the Rheumatology Certification Examination

  3. The changing landscape of biosimilars in rheumatology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dörner, Thomas; Strand, Vibeke; Cornes, Paul; Gonçalves, João; Gulácsi, László; Kvien, Tore K; Tanaka, Yoshiya; Burmester, Gerd R

    2016-01-01

    Biosimilars remain a hot topic in rheumatology, and some physicians are cautious about their application in the real world. With many products coming to market and a wealth of guidelines and recommendations concerning their use, there is a need to understand the changing landscape and the real clinical and health-economic potential offered by these agents. Notably, rheumatologists will be at the forefront of the use of biosimilar monoclonal antibodies/soluble receptors. Biosimilars offer cost savings and health gains for our patients and will play an important role in treating rheumatic diseases. We hope that these lower costs will compensate for inequities in access to therapy based on economic differences across countries. Since approved biosimilars have already demonstrated highly similar efficacy, it will be most important to establish pharmacovigilance databases across countries that are adequate to monitor long-term safety after marketing approval. PMID:26964144

  4. Promoting transparent and accurate reporting of research studies in rheumatology: endorsement of reporting guidelines in rheumatology journals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marušić, Ana; Gasparyan, Armen Yuri; Kitas, George D

    2013-10-01

    To adequately translate research into practice, research results should be reported in a way that is useful to practicing clinicians and policymakers. Based on evidence from systematic reviews, the implementation of reporting guidelines, such as CONSORT for randomized controlled trials, may improve the quality of research reporting. We assessed the endorsement of reporting guidelines in rheumatology journals. We analyzed guidelines for authors of all (n = 28) journals indexed in the "Rheumatology" Subject Category of the Journal Citation Reports published in 2012. Journal websites were reviewed for information relevant to reporting guidelines. Out of 28 indexed journals, only about a third (n = 10) endorsed 1 or more reporting guidelines, most commonly CONSORT. General editorial policies, such as those from the International Committee of Medical Journal editors (ICMJE), were endorsed by 19 journals (all 10 journals with and 9 out of 18 without reporting guidelines). Two rheumatology journals introduced specific reporting guidelines about economic studies and genetic association studies. The endorsement of reporting guidelines is low in rheumatology journals. To continue to serve their research community, rheumatology journals should provide the platform for the discussion on most relevant reporting guidelines and adopt them as a group, especially those specific for rheumatology research. Coordinated action of journals and other stakeholders in rheumatology research in the promotion of accurate and transparent reporting of health research studies would be an important part of knowledge translation into practice and well-being of rheumatology patients. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Integrating rheumatology care in the community: can shared care work?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita YN Lim

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Singapore's rapidly ageing population and chronic disease burden at public hospital specialist clinics herald a silver tsunami. In Singapore, “right siting” aims to manage stable chronic disease in primary care at a lower cost. To improve the quality of rheumatology care, we created shared care between rheumatologist and family physician to reduce hospital visits. Methods: Clinical practice improvement methodology was used to structure shared care of stable patients between hospital rheumatologists and eleven community family physicians; one ran a hospital clinic. A case manager coordinated the workflow. Results: About 220 patients entered shared care over 29 months. Patients without hospital subsidies (private patients and private family physicians independently predicted successful shared care, defined as one cycle of alternating care. Discussion: Our shared care model incorporated a case manager, systematic workflows, patient selection criteria, willing family physician partners and rheumatologists in the absence of organizational integration. Health care affordability impacts successful shared care. Government subsidy hindered right siting to private primary care. Conclusions: Financing systems in Singapore, at health policy level, must allow transfer of hospital subsidies to primary care, both private and public, to make it more affordable than hospital care. Structural integration will create a seamless continuum between hospital and primary care.

  6. Integrating rheumatology care in the community: can shared care work?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita YN Lim

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Singapore's rapidly ageing population and chronic disease burden at public hospital specialist clinics herald a silver tsunami. In Singapore, “right siting” aims to manage stable chronic disease in primary care at a lower cost. To improve the quality of rheumatology care, we created shared care between rheumatologist and family physician to reduce hospital visits.Methods: Clinical practice improvement methodology was used to structure shared care of stable patients between hospital rheumatologists and eleven community family physicians; one ran a hospital clinic. A case manager coordinated the workflow.Results: About 220 patients entered shared care over 29 months. Patients without hospital subsidies (private patients and private family physicians independently predicted successful shared care, defined as one cycle of alternating care.Discussion: Our shared care model incorporated a case manager, systematic workflows, patient selection criteria, willing family physician partners and rheumatologists in the absence of organizational integration. Health care affordability impacts successful shared care. Government subsidy hindered right siting to private primary care.Conclusions: Financing systems in Singapore, at health policy level, must allow transfer of hospital subsidies to primary care, both private and public, to make it more affordable than hospital care. Structural integration will create a seamless continuum between hospital and primary care.

  7. Integrating rheumatology care in the community: can shared care work?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Anita Yn; Tan, Chuen Seng; Low, Bernadette Pl; Lau, Tang Ching; Tan, Tze Lee; Goh, Lee Gan; Teng, Gim Gee

    2015-01-01

    Singapore's rapidly ageing population and chronic disease burden at public hospital specialist clinics herald a silver tsunami. In Singapore, "right siting" aims to manage stable chronic disease in primary care at a lower cost. To improve the quality of rheumatology care, we created shared care between rheumatologist and family physician to reduce hospital visits. Clinical practice improvement methodology was used to structure shared care of stable patients between hospital rheumatologists and eleven community family physicians; one ran a hospital clinic. A case manager coordinated the workflow. About 220 patients entered shared care over 29 months. Patients without hospital subsidies (private patients) and private family physicians independently predicted successful shared care, defined as one cycle of alternating care. Our shared care model incorporated a case manager, systematic workflows, patient selection criteria, willing family physician partners and rheumatologists in the absence of organizational integration. Health care affordability impacts successful shared care. Government subsidy hindered right siting to private primary care. Financing systems in Singapore, at health policy level, must allow transfer of hospital subsidies to primary care, both private and public, to make it more affordable than hospital care. Structural integration will create a seamless continuum between hospital and primary care.

  8. AUTOINFLAMMATORY DISEASES IN RHEUMATOLOGY: RUSSIAN EXPERIENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. O. Salugina

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Autoinflammatory diseases (AIDs are characterized by periodic, sometimes self-limiting attacks that appear as fever and clinical symptoms resembling rheumatic ones, in the absence of autoimmune or infectious diseases. The group of AIDs encompasses a broad spectrum of nosological entities; some of them have been recently dealt with by rheumatologists.Objective: to define the spectrum of AIDs in the practice of a pediatric rheumatologist from the results of visits to the Russian Federal Rheumatology Center.Subjects and methods. The investigation enrolled patients who had visited the V.A. Nasonova Research Institute of Rheumatology in 2007 to 2015 for fever and other signs of a systemic inflammatory process in order to specify their diagnosis and to rule out infections, blood cancer, and other diseases. All underwent conventional rheumatologic examination, HLA Class A typing, and molecular genetic testing.Results and discussion. 101 patients aged 6.5 months to 60 years with AIDs were identified over 9 years and diagnosed as having the following diseases. Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF was detected in 17 patients (the female to male (M/F ratio was 6:11; Behсet's disease (BD in 25 children (M/F, 14:11, cryopyrin-associated periodic syndromes (CAPS in 17 patients, including Muckle–Wells syndrome in 13 (M/F, 4:9; chronic infantile neurologic cutaneous articular and neonatal onset multisystem inflammatory disease (CINCA/NOMID syndrome in 4 (M/F, 3:1, periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis, cervical adenitis (PFAPA syndrome in 17 (M/F, 10:7, hyper-IgD syndrome/mevalonate kinase deficiency syndrome in 3 (M/F, 0:3, tumor necrosis factor receptor periodic syndrome (TRAPS in 7 (M/F, 4:3, undifferentiated AID in 14, and Blau syndrome in one patient. The patients with BD were rather ethnically diverse: among them, there were representatives of North Caucasian peoples, Tatars, Uzbeks, Moldavians, and others; there were 7 ethnic Russians. There

  9. 2015 American College of Rheumatology Workforce Study: Supply and Demand Projections of Adult Rheumatology Workforce, 2015-2030.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battafarano, Daniel F; Ditmyer, Marcia; Bolster, Marcy B; Fitzgerald, John D; Deal, Chad; Bass, Ann R; Molina, Rodolfo; Erickson, Alan R; Hausmann, Jonathan S; Klein-Gitelman, Marisa; Imundo, Lisa F; Smith, Benjamin J; Jones, Karla; Greene, Kamilah; Monrad, Seetha U

    2018-04-01

    To describe the character and composition of the 2015 US adult rheumatology workforce, evaluate workforce trends, and project supply and demand for clinical rheumatology care for 2015-2030. The 2015 Workforce Study of Rheumatology Specialists in the US used primary and secondary data sources to estimate the baseline adult rheumatology workforce and determine demographic and geographic factors relevant to workforce modeling. Supply and demand was projected through 2030, utilizing data-driven estimations regarding the proportion and clinical full-time equivalent (FTE) of academic versus nonacademic practitioners. The 2015 adult workforce (physicians, nurse practitioners, and physician assistants) was estimated to be 6,013 providers (5,415 clinical FTE). At baseline, the estimated demand exceeded the supply of clinical FTE by 700 (12.9%). By 2030, the supply of rheumatology clinical providers is projected to fall to 4,882 providers, or 4,051 clinical FTE (a 25.2% decrease in supply from 2015 baseline levels). Demand in 2030 is projected to exceed supply by 4,133 clinical FTE (102%). The adult rheumatology workforce projections reflect a major demographic and geographic shift that will significantly impact the supply of the future workforce by 2030. These shifts include baby-boomer retirements, a millennial predominance, and an increase of female and part-time providers, in parallel with an increased demand for adult rheumatology care due to the growing and aging US population. Regional and innovative strategies will be necessary to manage access to care and reduce barriers to care for rheumatology patients. © 2018, American College of Rheumatology.

  10. Pediatric rheumatology: what does the future hold?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emery, Helen

    2004-08-01

    Effectiveness of the traditional rehabilitation approaches used in pediatric rheumatology has been difficult to prove and, in times of cost containment, this lack of evidence may lead to undertreatment with physical and occupational therapies. Quantitative methods such as those described in this issue by Broström and colleagues can be used to validate those approaches and to reinforce the need for careful attention to the effects of even minor loss of range and strength in children with juvenile arthritis. Historically, up to half of the children affected by polyarticular juvenile arthritis became disabled. Some factors that have led to improved outcomes for childhood rheumatic diseases are discussed, including medications (use of weekly low-dose methotrexate, intra-articular steroid injections, new biologic agents that specifically block mediators of inflammation, for example, tumor necrosis factor and interleukin-1), surgery (joint replacements), and psychosocial interventions (with schools and families). The importance of maintaining range of movement, strength, weight bearing, and ambulation, in an effort to prevent sequelae such as osteoporosis and wheelchair dependence, is emphasized. Early identification of children with rheumatic diseases and aggressive intervention, with a combined medical, rehabilitation, psychosocial, and, rarely, surgical approach, should now allow most affected children to reach adulthood with little or no disability.

  11. Wars in the history of rheumatology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Marson

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Some important discoveries in the history of rheumatology happened during war periods. It is well known that arthritis associated with conjunctivitis and urethritis, following dysenteric episodes, has been described during the First World War from the German Hans Reiter and, nearly contemporarily, from the French Nöel Fiessinger and Edgar Leroy. Less known is instead the fact that the first cases of sympathetic algoneurodystrophy have been reported by the American Silas Weir Mitchell in soldiers wounded by fire-arms, during the Civil War of Secession. Other war episodes have been crucial for the development of some drugs now abundantly applied to the care of rheumatic diseases. The discovery of therapeutic effects of immunosuppressive agents, in fact, happened as an indirect consequence of the use of poison gas, already during the First World War (mustard gas, but above all after an episode in the port of Bari in 1943, where an American cargo boat was sunk. It had been loaded with a quantity of cylinders containing a nitrogenous mustard, whose diffusion in the environment provoked more than 80 deaths owing to bone marrow aplasia.Moreover, the history of the cortisone shows a strict link to the Second World War, when Germany imported large quantities of bovine adrenal glands from Argentina, with the purpose of producing some gland extracts for the Luftwasse aviators, in order to increase their performance ability.

  12. Herpes zoster infection, vaccination and immunocompromised rheumatology patients.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Connor, Mortimer B

    2013-01-01

    Varicella is a self-limiting and relatively mild disease of childhood, although it is frequently more severe and complicated among the immunocompromised rheumatology patients on immunomodulator therapies. In addition, future reactivation of the dormant virus in dorsal root ganglia may cause herpes zoster infection, which can be very debilitating. In this manuscript, we discuss the nature of this infection along with its potential vaccine especially among rheumatology patients.

  13. Pure analgesics in a rheumatological outpatient clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.A. Cimmino

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Pure analgesics are only rarely used by Italian clinicians and this holds true also for rheumatologists. This work is concerned with an evaluation of the use of analgesics in a rheumatological outpatient clinic during the period 1989-1999. Methods: The records of 1705 patients consecutively seen at the clinic were downloaded on a specifically built website. Results: 4469 visits were considered. In 260 of them (5.8%, analgesics were prescribed to 234 (13.7% patients. The number of patients with a prescription of analgesics steadily increased during the years 1989-1999. The diagnoses in patients assuming analgesics were: osteoarthritis (47.1%, inflammatory arthritis (24.2%, soft tissue rheumatisms (13.7%, nonspecific arthralgia/myalgia (7.5%, and connective tissue diseases (2.6%. Peripheral analgesics were used in 188 (82.5% patients and central analgesics were used in the remaining 40 patients (17.5%. Analgesic drugs were used mainly in degenerative joint conditions. The indications for analgesics in the 55 patients with inflammatory arthrits were: (a partial or total remission of arthritis; for this reason non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs were no longer required in 18 patients; (b to increase the analgesic effect of NSAIDs in 23 patients; (c contraindications to NSAIDs in 14 patients (renal failure in 2 patients, gastritis in 10, allergy and bleeding in the remaining two. Conclusions: About 14% of our outpatients were treated with analgesics with an increasing trend in the examined period. The main indications for analgesics are degenerative conditions but they can be used also in selected patients with arthritis.

  14. Derivation and validation of the Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics classification criteria for systemic lupus erythematosus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petri, Michelle; Orbai, Ana-Maria; Alarcón, Graciela S

    2012-01-01

    The Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics (SLICC) group revised and validated the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) classification criteria in order to improve clinical relevance, meet stringent methodology requirements, and incorporate new...

  15. Efficacy of an Interinstitutional Mentoring Program Within Pediatric Rheumatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moorthy, Lakshmi Nandini; Muscal, Eyal; Riebschleger, Meredith; Klein-Gitelman, Marisa; Nigrovic, Lise E; Horon, Jeffrey R; Rouster-Stevens, Kelly; Ferguson, Polly J; Eberhard, B Anne; Brunner, Hermine I; Prahalad, Sampath; Schneider, Rayfel; Nigrovic, Peter A

    2016-05-01

    The small size of many pediatric rheumatology programs translates into limited mentoring options for early career physicians. To address this problem, the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) and the Childhood Arthritis and Rheumatology Research Alliance (CARRA) developed a subspecialty-wide interinstitutional mentoring program, the ACR/CARRA Mentoring Interest Group (AMIGO). We sought to assess the impact of this program on mentoring within pediatric rheumatology. In a longitudinal 3-year study, participant ratings from the AMIGO pilot program were compared with those after the program was opened to general enrollment. Access to mentoring as a function of career stage was assessed by surveys of the US and Canadian pediatric rheumatologists in 2011 and 2014, before and after implementation of AMIGO. Participants in the pilot phase (19 dyads) and the general implementation phase (112 dyads) reported comparable success in establishing mentor contact, suitability of mentor-mentee pairing, and benefit with respect to career development, scholarship, and work-life balance. Community surveys showed that AMIGO participation as mentee was high among fellows (86%) and modest among junior faculty (31%). Implementation correlated with significant gains in breadth of mentorship and in overall satisfaction with mentoring for fellows but not junior faculty. AMIGO is a career mentoring program that serves most fellows and many junior faculty in pediatric rheumatology across the US and Canada. Program evaluation data confirm that a subspecialty-wide interinstitutional mentoring program is feasible and can translate into concrete improvement in mentoring, measurable at the level of the whole professional community. © 2016, American College of Rheumatology.

  16. [Hospital financing in 2016. Relevant changes for rheumatology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiori, W; Bunzemeier, H; Lakomek, H-J; Buscham, K; Lehmann, H; Fuchs, A-K; Bessler, F; Roeder, N

    2016-03-01

    Hospital financing 2016 will be influenced by the prospects of the approaching considerable changes. It is assumed that the following years will lead to a considerable reallocation of financial resources between hospitals. While not directly targeted by new regulations, reallocations always also affect specialties like rheumatology. Compared to the alterations in the legislative framework the financial effects of the yearly adaptation of the German diagnosis-related groups system are subordinate. Only by comprehensive consideration of current and expected changes a forward-looking and sustainable strategy can be developed. The following article presents the relevant changes and discusses the consequences for hospitals specialized in rheumatology.

  17. Proceedings from the 7th Annual International Society for Musculoskeletal Imaging in Rheumatology (ISEMIR) conference

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Troum, Orrin M; Pimienta, Olga L; Schmidt, Wolfgang A

    2015-01-01

    The International Society for Musculoskeletal Imaging in Rheumatology (ISEMIR) was founded in 2005 with the goal of discussing matters related to imaging in rheumatology, particularly, validation, education, and use in clinical practice and research. Because the field of musculoskeletal (MSK...

  18. Pediatric rheumatology: An under-recognized subspecialty in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akhila Kavirayani

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Pediatrics in India at the levels of both undergraduate and postgraduate training is often viewed upon as an acute disease specialty with little emphasis on chronic medical musculoskeletal diseases. Pediatric rheumatology is an under-recognized subspecialty of pediatrics which deals specifically with childhood arthritis, noninflammatory joint pains, connective tissue diseases, autoimmune diseases, vasculitis, and other rare inflammatory disorders. This article aims to give a bird's eye view of the repertoire of commonly encountered problems seen by a pediatric rheumatologist, via a classical case vignette for each topic followed by discussion. There is also mention of some rare diseases managed within pediatric rheumatology to give a flavor of the spectrum of diseases encountered. This is to raise awareness of the importance of pediatric rheumatology as a subspecialty within India and to prompt readers to seek specialist advice when encountering challenging cases. Pediatric rheumatologists network and work collaboratively with many other specialties such as ophthalmology, dermatology, neurology, orthopedics, nephrology, infectious diseases, immunology, and gastroenterology for combined care of diverse conditions. There is an unmet need in India to develop a training program for pediatric rheumatology so that shared care pathways with sensitized pediatricians and other specialists can be developed nationwide, to serve these children better to achieve optimal outcomes.

  19. Globalization of rheumatology: activities of ILAR. Think global - act local

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dequeker, Jan; Rasker, Johannes J.; El-Hadidi, Tahsin

    2001-01-01

    In 1997 a distinguished EULAR rheumatologist involved in the development of biologics asked somewhat ironically, “What is ILAR [International League of Associations for Rheumatology] doing?” Now, 3 years later, we are in a position to review ILAR’s activities in recent years and its plans for the

  20. Rheumatology training experience across Europe: analysis of core competences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sivera, Francisca; Ramiro, Sofia; Cikes, Nada; Cutolo, Maurizio; Dougados, Maxime; Gossec, Laure; Kvien, Tore K.; Lundberg, Ingrid E.; Mandl, Peter; Moorthy, Arumugam; Panchal, Sonia; Da Silva, José A. P.; Bijlsma, Johannes W.; Ҫollaku, Ledio; Aroyan, Armine; Radner, Helga; Tushina, Anastasyia; de Langhe, Ellen; Sokolovic, Sekib; Shumnalieva, Russka; Baresic, Marko; Senolt, Ladislav; Holland-Fischer, Mette; Kull, Mart; Puolitaival, Antti; Gobejishvili, Nino; Hueber, Axel; Fanouriakis, Antonis; MacMullan, Paul; Rimar, Doron; Bugatti, Serena; Zepa, Julija; Menassa, Jeanine; Karpec, Diana; Misevska-Percinkova, Snezana; Cassar, Karen; Deseatnicova, Elena; Tas, SanderW; Lie, Elisabeth; Sznajd, Jan; Berghea, Florian; Povzun, Anton; Jeremic, Ivica; Mlynarikova, Vanda; Frank-Bertoncelj, Mojca; Chatzidionysiou, Katerina; Dumusc, Alexandre; Hatemi, Gulen; Ozdemirel, Erhan; Biliavska, Iuliia

    2016-01-01

    Background: The aim of this project was to analyze and compare the educational experience in rheumatology specialty training programs across European countries, with a focus on self-reported ability. Method: An electronic survey was designed to assess the training experience in terms of

  1. [INTERNATIONAL COOPERATION IN PEDIATRIC RHEUMATOLOGY: THE SHARE PROJECT].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uziel, Yosef

    2017-07-01

    The SHARE initiative is a project initiated by the European Society of Pediatric Rheumatology for the purpose of improving clinical care in the field of pediatric rheumatology. Towards this goal numerous working plans and surveys were conducted. All pediatric rheumatology centers were mapped in terms of staff members, quality and types of treatments in each country, in order to improve and plan the best way for the diagnosis and treatment of rheumatic disease in children. After termination of the optimal clinical approach and care, position papers were written including all recommendations based on the scientific literature in the field. In addition, recommendations were set regarding the encouragement of international research, especially in light of the major advances achieved in the genetic aspects of pediatric rheumatology diseases, and the need for sharing biological samples between researchers from different countries and continents. Information for patients became more available regarding the diseases and the medical centers in each country. Futhermore, educational programs for interns and young fellows were written for the promotion of higher and identical academic levels in different countries.

  2. Educational needs of health professionals working in rheumatology in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vliet Vlieland, Theodora P M; van den Ende, Cornelia H M; Alliot-Launois, Francoise; Beauvais, Catherine; Gobbo, Milena; Iagnocco, Annamaria; Lundberg, Ingrid E; Munuera-Martínez, Pedro V; Opava, Christina H; Prior, Yeliz; Redmond, Anthony; Smucrova, Hana; Wiek, Dieter

    2016-01-01

    To explore the availability of postgraduate education for health professionals (HPs) working in rheumatology in Europe, and their perceived educational needs and barriers for participation in current educational offerings. Structured interviews were conducted with national representatives of rheumatology HPs' organisations and an online survey among individual HPs was disseminated through existing European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) networks (10 languages including English). These comprised questions on: availability of postgraduate education, familiarity with EULAR and its educational offerings, unmet needs regarding the contents and mode of delivery and potential barriers to participate in education (0-10 scales). According to 17 national representatives, postgraduate rheumatology education was most common for nurses, physical and occupational therapists. There were 1041 individuals responding to the survey, of whom 48% completed all questions. More than half (56%) were familiar with EULAR as an organisation, whereas rheumatology education for HPs in most countries. There are opportunities to raise awareness regarding EULAR educational offerings and to develop courses provided in HPs' own country, tailored to national needs and barriers and taking language barriers into consideration.

  3. Research priorities in pediatric rheumatology: The Childhood Arthritis and Rheumatology Research Alliance (CARRA consensus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mellins Elizabeth D

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background North American pediatric rheumatologists have created an investigator-initiated research network (the Childhood Arthritis and Rheumatology Research Alliance – CARRA to facilitate multi-centre studies. One of the first projects undertaken by this network was to define, by consensus, research priorities for the group, and if possible a first group-sponsored clinical trial in which all members could participate. Methods We determined consensus using the Delphi approach. This approach has been used extensively in health research to reach consensus in large groups. It uses several successive iterations of surveys eliciting ideas and opinions from specialists in the field. Three surveys were designed based on this method and were distributed to members of CARRA to elicit and rank-order research priorities. Results A response rate of 87.6% was achieved in the final survey. The most highly ranked research suggestion was to study infliximab treatment of uveitis unresponsive to methotrexate. Other highly ranked suggestions were to study i the treatment of systemic arthritis with anakinra and ii the treatment of pediatric systemic lupus erythematosus with mycophenolate mofetil. Conclusion The Delphi approach was an effective and practical method to define research priorities in this group. Ongoing discussion and cooperation among pediatric rheumatologists in CARRA and others world-wide will help in developing further research priorities and to facilitate the execution of clinical trials in the future.

  4. Rheumatoid arthritis disease activity measures: American College of Rheumatology recommendations for use in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Jaclyn; Caplan, Liron; Yazdany, Jinoos; Robbins, Mark L; Neogi, Tuhina; Michaud, Kaleb; Saag, Kenneth G; O'Dell, James R; Kazi, Salahuddin

    2012-05-01

    Although the systematic measurement of disease activity facilitates clinical decision making in rheumatoid arthritis (RA), no recommendations currently exist on which measures should be applied in clinical practice in the US. The American College of Rheumatology (ACR) convened a Working Group (WG) to comprehensively evaluate the validity, feasibility, and acceptability of available RA disease activity measures and derive recommendations for their use in clinical practice. The Rheumatoid Arthritis Clinical Disease Activity Measures Working Group conducted a systematic review of the literature to identify RA disease activity measures. Using exclusion criteria, input from an Expert Advisory Panel (EAP), and psychometric analysis, a list of potential measures was created. A survey was administered to rheumatologists soliciting input. The WG used these survey results in conjunction with the psychometric analyses to derive final recommendations. Systematic review of the literature resulted in identification of 63 RA disease activity measures. Application of exclusion criteria and ratings by the EAP narrowed the list to 14 measures for further evaluation. Practicing rheumatologists rated 9 of these 14 measures as most useful and feasible. From these 9 measures, the WG selected 6 with the best psychometric properties for inclusion in the final set of ACR-recommended RA disease activity measures. We recommend the Clinical Disease Activity Index, Disease Activity Score with 28-joint counts (erythrocyte sedimentation rate or C-reactive protein), Patient Activity Scale (PAS), PAS-II, Routine Assessment of Patient Index Data with 3 measures, and Simplified Disease Activity Index because they are accurate reflections of disease activity; are sensitive to change; discriminate well between low, moderate, and high disease activity states; have remission criteria; and are feasible to perform in clinical settings. Copyright © 2012 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  5. Consenso em reumatologia pediátrica: parte I - definição dos critérios de doença inativa e remissão em artrite idiopática juvenil/artrite reumatóide juvenil Consensus in pediatric rheumatology: part I - criteria definition of inactive disease and remission in juvenile idiopathic arthritis / juvenile rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Machado

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Não há critérios universalmente aceitos para a remissão clínica em artrite idiopática juvenil/artrite reumatóide juvenil (AIJ/ARJ. OBJETIVO: formar consenso sobre estes critérios. MÉTODOS: foi utilizado um inquérito pelo método Delphi para reunir os critérios vigentes e utilizados por especialistas em reumatologia pediátrica (RP no mundo todo. A análise dos resultados constituiu a base para uma Consensus Conference utilizando a nominal group technique (NGT para alcançar o consenso nas questões não resolvidas após a análise dos questionários deste inquérito. Cento e trinta RP de 34 países responderam ao inquérito e 20 RP de nove países elegeram os critérios durante dois dias, em processo de discussão estruturada, para formar consenso pela NGT. RESULTADOS: os critérios de doença inativa deveriam incluir: 1 nenhuma articulação com artrite em atividade; 2 ausência de febre, rash, serosite, esplenomegalia ou linfadenopatia generalizada atribuída à AIJ/ARJ; 3 ausência de uveíte em atividade; 4 VHS ou PCR negativas (se ambos forem testados, ambos devem ser normais; 5 a avaliação global pelo médico deve indicar o melhor escore possível, indicando doença inativa. CONCLUSÕES: de acordo com o voto de consenso, seis meses contínuos de doença inativa são necessários para se considerar um paciente em estado de remissão com medicação; 12 meses contínuos de doença inativa e sem medicação são necessários para considerar um paciente em estado de remissão sem medicação. O critério para remissão sem medicação deve prever com acurácia de 95% a probabilidade inferior a 20% de recaída em cinco anos.Validated and widely accepted criteria for clinical remission in JIA/JRA do not currently exist. OBJECTIVE: To achieve consensus in this matter. METHODS: The Delphi consensus-formation approach was used to gather the criteria in use by pediatric rheumatologists (PR worldwide. Results from the questionnaires

  6. A brief history of ultrasound in rheumatology: where we were.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassi, Walter; Filippucci, Emilio

    2014-01-01

    Ultrasonography in the '70s was a well-known and widely used method within several medical specialties but not in rheumatology. Initial development of the field was led by radiologists who mainly investigated the potential of ultrasound in the assessment of large joints. In the late '80s, the first studies supporting the role of ultrasound in the detection of soft tissue changes and bone erosions in the hands of patients with rheumatoid arthritis were published. In the '90s, the dramatic improvement of spatial resolution due to the new generation high frequency probes opened up new avenues for the exploration of otherwise undetectable anatomical details. Ultrasound research during this period was enhanced by the growing use of colour Doppler and power Doppler and by the first prototypes of three dimensional ultrasound. Over the last 10 years, the buzz words in ultrasound research in rheumatology have been standardisation, early diagnosis and therapy monitoring.

  7. [G-DRG system 2009: relevant changes for rheumatology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiori, W; Liedtke-Dyong, A; Lakomek, H-J; Buscham, K; Lehmann, H; Liman, W; Fuchs, A-K; Bessler, F; Roeder, N

    2009-08-01

    The following article presents the main general and specific changes in the G-DRG (German diagnosis-related groups) system in terms of the classification systems for diagnoses and procedures as well as the billing process for 2009. Of fundamental relevance is the national weighting of the G-DRG I97Z (complex rheumatologic treatment), which up to now had to be negotiated individually by each hospital. Emphasis is also put on case auditing by the health insurers. Being primarily a tool for redistribution of resources, every hospital has to analyze the economic effects of the 2009 G-DRG system by applying the G-DRG transition grouper to its own cases. Depending on their clinical focus rheumatological departments may experience positive or negative consequences from the development. The strain imposed on hospitals by inadequate refunding of rising costs has to be assessed separately from the effects of redistribution by the G-DRG system.

  8. [The G-DRG system 2008. Relevant changes for rheumatology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiori, W; Lakomek, H-J; Buscham, K; Lehmann, H; Liman, W; Fuchs, A-K; Hülsemann, J L; Roeder, N

    2008-05-01

    The G-DRG system 2008 once again brings many changes to rheumatological departments in Germany. The following article presents the main general and specific changes in the G-DRG system, as well as in the classification systems for diagnoses and procedures and in invoicing for 2008. Since the G-DRG system is only a tool for the redistribution of resources, every hospital needs to analyze the economic effects of the system by applying the G-DRG transition grouper to its own cases. Depending on their clinical focus, rheumatological departments may experience positive or negative effects from the system's application. The strain placed on hospitals by the inadequate funding of increased costs needs to be assessed separately from the effects of redistribution by the G-DRG system.

  9. Rheumatology training experience across Europe: analysis of core competences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivera, Francisca; Ramiro, Sofia; Cikes, Nada; Cutolo, Maurizio; Dougados, Maxime; Gossec, Laure; Kvien, Tore K; Lundberg, Ingrid E; Mandl, Peter; Moorthy, Arumugam; Panchal, Sonia; da Silva, José A P; Bijlsma, Johannes W

    2016-09-23

    The aim of this project was to analyze and compare the educational experience in rheumatology specialty training programs across European countries, with a focus on self-reported ability. An electronic survey was designed to assess the training experience in terms of self-reported ability, existence of formal education, number of patients managed and assessments performed during rheumatology training in 21 core competences including managing specific diseases, generic competences and procedures. The target population consisted of rheumatology trainees and recently certified rheumatologists across Europe. The relationship between the country of training and the self-reported ability or training methods for each competence was analyzed through linear or logistic regression, as appropriate. In total 1079 questionnaires from 41 countries were gathered. Self-reported ability was high for most competences, range 7.5-9.4 (0-10 scale) for clinical competences, 5.8-9.0 for technical procedures and 7.8-8.9 for generic competences. Competences with lower self-reported ability included managing patients with vasculitis, identifying crystals and performing an ultrasound. Between 53 and 91 % of the trainees received formal education and between 7 and 61 % of the trainees reported limited practical experience (managing ≤10 patients) in each competence. Evaluation of each competence was reported by 29-60 % of the respondents. In adjusted multivariable analysis, the country of training was associated with significant differences in self-reported ability for all individual competences. Even though self-reported ability is generally high, there are significant differences amongst European countries, including differences in the learning structure and assessment of competences. This suggests that educational outcomes may also differ. Efforts to promote European harmonization in rheumatology training should be encouraged and supported.

  10. On-spot rheumatology consultations in a multilevel geriatric hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubart, Emily; Leibovitz, Arthur; Shapir, Vadim; Segal, Refael

    2014-01-01

    Musculoskeletal and joint disorders are extremely common in the elderly. They directly affect mobility, gait stability, quality of life, and independence. To assess the nature of joint problems encountered in a geriatric inpatient population and evaluate the contribution of a rheumatologist. We reviewed the rheumatology consultation records that were conducted in a geriatric medical center over a 10 year period. A total of 474 consultations were held; most of these patients (86%) were hospitalized in the acute geriatric departments, 10% in the rehabilitation ward and 4% in the long-term care wards. Some patients were seen more than once. A rheumatologic joint problem was the main reason for hospitalization in 53% of these patients. Monoarthritis was the most frequent complaint (50%), followed by pauciarticular arthritis (two to five joints) in 30% of patients. Arthrocentesis, diagnostic and therapeutic, was performed in 225 patients, most of them in knee joints (81%). The most frequent diagnosis was osteoarthritis with acute exacerbation (28%), followed by gout (18%), pseudo-gout (9%) and rheumatoid arthritis (9%). In 86 cases (18%) the diagnosis was a non-specific rheumatologic problem: arthralgia, nonspecific generalized pain, or fibromyalgia. Prompt and appropriate evaluation, as well as arthrocentesis and treatment initiation, including local injections, were made possible by the presence of an in-house rheumatologist.

  11. Role of Tai Chi in the treatment of rheumatologic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chenchen

    2012-12-01

    Rheumatologic diseases (e.g., fibromyalgia, osteoarthritis, and rheumatoid arthritis) consist of a complex interplay between biologic and psychological aspects, resulting in therapeutically challenging chronic conditions to control. Encouraging evidence suggests that Tai Chi, a multi-component Chinese mind-body exercise, has multiple benefits for patients with a variety of chronic disorders, particularly those with musculoskeletal conditions. Thus, Tai Chi may modulate complex factors and improve health outcomes in patients with chronic rheumatologic conditions. As a form of physical exercise, Tai Chi enhances cardiovascular fitness, muscular strength, balance, and physical function. It also appears to be associated with reduced stress, anxiety, and depression, as well as improved quality of life. Thus, Tai Chi can be safely recommended to patients with fibromyalgia, osteoarthritis, and rheumatoid arthritis as a complementary and alternative medical approach to improve patient well-being. This review highlights the current body of knowledge about the role of this ancient Chinese mind-body medicine as an effective treatment of rheumatologic diseases to better inform clinical decision-making for our patients.

  12. [Max Hirsch founder of rheumatology in Germany: banished and murdered].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keitel, W

    2014-08-01

    The Jewish physician and scientist Dr. Max Hirsch (1875-1941) made a substantial contribution to consolidation of the foundations of his professional discipline, balneology, and in particular developed the social aspects. He recognized the economic significance of diseases of the musculoskeletal system very early on and gathered important ideas from abroad. Together with the department head in the Prussian Ministry of Education and Cultural Affairs, the Privy Councillor Prof. Dr. Eduard Dietrich and later alone, he was editor of various balneological journals. He worked as general secretary of the Deutsche Gesellschaft für Rheumatologie (German Society of Rheumatology) from the beginning of its existence (1927) and created the publication series Veröffentlichungen der Deutschen Gesellschaft für Rheumabekämpfung (Publications of the German Society against Rheumatism) and Rheuma-Jahrbuch (Annual review of rheumatology) in 1929, 1930 and 1931 and organized seven rheumatology congresses up to 1933. After the accession to power of the National Socialists, Max Hirsch and Eduard Dietrich were deposed from office. Hirsch emigrated to Latvia via Switzerland and the Soviet Union with his wife and one son where they were murdered in the course of the Jewish pogrom. The second son escaped with his family to Sweden.

  13. Musculoskeletal ultrasound in rheumatology in Korea: targeted ultrasound initiative survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Taeyoung; Wakefield, Richard J; Emery, Paul

    2016-04-01

    In collaboration with the Targeted Ultrasound Initiative (TUI), to conduct the first study in Korea to investigate current practices in ultrasound use among Korean rheumatologists. We translated the TUI Global Survey into Korean and added questions to better understand the specific challenges facing rheumatologists in Korea. To target as many rheumatologists in Korea as possible, we created an on-line version of this survey, which was conducted from March to April 2013. Rheumatologists are in charge of ultrasound in many Korean hospitals. Rheumatologists in hospitals and private clinics use ultrasound to examine between one and five patients daily; they use ultrasound for diagnosis more than monitoring and receive compensation of about US$30-50 per patient. There are marked differences in the rates of ultrasound usage between rheumatologists who work in private practice compared with tertiary hospitals. Korean rheumatologists not currently using ultrasound in their practice appear eager to do so. This survey provides important insights into the current status of ultrasound in rheumatology in Korea and highlights several priorities; specifically, greater provision of formal training, standardization of reporting and accrual of greater experience among ultrasound users. If these needs are addressed, all rheumatology departments in Korea are likely to use ultrasound or have access to it in the future. © 2014 Asia Pacific League of Associations for Rheumatology and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  14. An audit of influenza and pneumococcal vaccination in rheumatology outpatients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitchell William S

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Influenza and pneumococcal vaccination are recommended for a number of clinical risk groups including patients treated with major immunosuppressant disease modifying anti-rheumatic drugs. Such immunisation is not only safe but immunogenic in patients with rheumatic diseases. We sought to establish dual vaccination rates and significant influencing factors amongst our hospital rheumatology outpatients. Method We audited a sample of 101 patients attending hospital rheumatology outpatient clinics on any form of disease modifying treatment by clinical questionnaire and medical record perusal. Further data were collected from the local immunisation coordinating agency and analysed by logistic regression modelling. Results Although there was a high rate of awareness with regard to immunisation, fewer patients on major immunosuppressants were vaccinated than patients with additional clinical risk factors against influenza (53% vs 93%, p Conclusion Influenza and pneumococcal immunisation is suboptimal amongst patients on current immunosuppressant treatments attending rheumatology outpatient clinics. Raising awareness amongst patients may not be sufficient to improve vaccination rates and alternative strategies such as obligatory pneumococcal vaccination prior to treatment initiation and primary care provider education need to be explored.

  15. [Pain in Spanish rheumatology outpatient offices: EPIDOR epidemiological study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamero Ruiz, F; Gabriel Sánchez, R; Carbonell Abello, J; Tornero Molina, J; Sánchez-Magro, I

    2005-04-01

    To establish the prevalence and characteristics of rheumatologic pain in Spanish adult population cared in specialized rheumatology offices. Cross selection study in a population of patients cared in rheumatology offices of public Spanish hospitals. 1,134 patients selected through random sampling based on waiting lists of patients, during a period of 1 week, in rheumatology offices of each participating hospital. MAIN OUTCOMES OF THE STUDY: Reason behind the consultation (a new patient [NP] or a patient for revision [RP]), characteristics of the patient (sex, age, habits [alcohol/tobacco], marital status), location, type, intensity, duration, tolerance and management of pain; treatment (pharmacological or non-pharmacological) carried out; satisfaction with the treatment; and association with fibromyalgia. The prevalence of pain in NP was 98.6% and in RP 95.1%, with a global prevalence of 96%, predominating mainly in adult sedentary women with fibromyalgia. The frequency of acute pain was 20.9% and this of chronic pain 79.1% [corrected] The prevalence of fibromyalgia was 12% (2.2% in men, and 15.5% in women). The most prevalent pattern of current dominant pain was this of the mechanical type. More frequent associated pathologies were: hypertension (21.7%), depression (14.4%), gastrointestinal diseases (13.8%) and anxiety (13.4%). All variables analyzed in the study showed changes according to age, sex, and type of patient (NP or RP). Most used treatment was pharmacological; more than 57.6% of patients were receiving NSAIDs. In NP, medical prescriber of the treatment was first the general practitioner (56.1%) followed by the rheumatologist (14.1%); in PR the first one was the rheumatologist (69.9%) followed by the general practitioner (16.5%). Our results show that the prevalence of the rheumatologic pain is very high, predominating mainly in adult women with fibromyalgia. Pain location, intensity, and type, associated pathology, and treatment vary according to age

  16. Challenges and Opportunities in Using Patient-Reported Outcomes in Quality Measurement in Rheumatology

    OpenAIRE

    Wahl, Elizabeth; Yazdany, Jinoos

    2016-01-01

    Use of Patient-reported outcome measures (PROs) in rheumatology research is widespread, but use of PRO data to evaluate the quality of rheumatologic care delivered is less well established. This article reviews the use of PROs in assessing healthcare quality, and highlights challenges and opportunities specific to their use in rheumatology quality measurement. We first explore other countries’ experiences collecting and evaluating national PRO data to assess quality of care. We describe the c...

  17. An audit of influenza and pneumococcal vaccination in rheumatology outpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sowden, Evin; Mitchell, William S

    2007-07-04

    Influenza and pneumococcal vaccination are recommended for a number of clinical risk groups including patients treated with major immunosuppressant disease modifying anti-rheumatic drugs. Such immunisation is not only safe but immunogenic in patients with rheumatic diseases. We sought to establish dual vaccination rates and significant influencing factors amongst our hospital rheumatology outpatients. We audited a sample of 101 patients attending hospital rheumatology outpatient clinics on any form of disease modifying treatment by clinical questionnaire and medical record perusal. Further data were collected from the local immunisation coordinating agency and analysed by logistic regression modelling. Although there was a high rate of awareness with regard to immunisation, fewer patients on major immunosuppressants were vaccinated than patients with additional clinical risk factors against influenza (53% vs 93%, p risk factors was confirmed as significant in determining vaccination status by logistic regression for both influenza (OR 10.89, p < 0.001) and streptococcus pneumoniae (OR 4.55, p = 0.002). The diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis was also found to be a significant factor for pneumococcal vaccination (OR 5.1, p = 0.002). There was a negative trend suggesting that patients on major immunosuppressants are less likely to be immunised against pneumococcal antigen (OR 0.35, p = 0.067). Influenza and pneumococcal immunisation is suboptimal amongst patients on current immunosuppressant treatments attending rheumatology outpatient clinics. Raising awareness amongst patients may not be sufficient to improve vaccination rates and alternative strategies such as obligatory pneumococcal vaccination prior to treatment initiation and primary care provider education need to be explored.

  18. Case mix in paediatric rheumatology: implications for training in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Sern Chin; Allen, Roger C; Munro, Jane E; Akikusa, Jonathan D

    2012-05-01

    Despite a move towards the provision of specialist training in Australia in settings that extend beyond the public hospital system, formal comparisons of case mix between public and private specialty clinics have rarely been performed. It is therefore unclear for many specialties how well training in one setting prepares trainees for practice in the other. This study aims to compare the case mix of paediatric rheumatology patients seen in public and private settings and the referral sources of patients in each. An audit of all new patients seen in the public and private paediatric rheumatology clinics on campus at Royal Children's Hospital between June 2009 and January 2011. Data related to demographics, primary diagnosis, referral source and location seen were abstracted and compared. Eight hundred and seventy-six new patients were seen during the period of interest. Of these, 429 patients (48.9%) were seen in private clinics. The commonest diagnostic categories for both type of clinics were non-inflammatory musculoskeletal pain/orthopaedic conditions (public 39.4%, private 33.6%) followed by juvenile idiopathic arthritis (public 16.6%, %, private 18.6%), other skin/soft tissue disorders (public 8.7%, private 9.6%) and pain syndromes (public 4.9%, private 11.4%). Patients with haematological and vasculitic disorders were predominantly seen in public clinics. The commonest source of referrals to both clinics was general practitioners (public 40.6%, private 53.1%). The case mix in private paediatric rheumatology clinics closely mirrors that of public clinics at our centre. Training in either setting would provide sufficient case-mix exposure to prepare trainees for practice in the other. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health © 2011 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (Royal Australasian College of Physicians).

  19. Modern psychometrics applied in rheumatology--a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siemons, Liseth; Ten Klooster, Peter M; Taal, Erik; Glas, Cees Aw; Van de Laar, Mart Afj

    2012-10-31

    Although item response theory (IRT) appears to be increasingly used within health care research in general, a comprehensive overview of the frequency and characteristics of IRT analyses within the rheumatic field is lacking. An overview of the use and application of IRT in rheumatology to date may give insight into future research directions and highlight new possibilities for the improvement of outcome assessment in rheumatic conditions. Therefore, this study systematically reviewed the application of IRT to patient-reported and clinical outcome measures in rheumatology. Literature searches in PubMed, Scopus and Web of Science resulted in 99 original English-language articles which used some form of IRT-based analysis of patient-reported or clinical outcome data in patients with a rheumatic condition. Both general study information and IRT-specific information were assessed. Most studies used Rasch modeling for developing or evaluating new or existing patient-reported outcomes in rheumatoid arthritis or osteoarthritis patients. Outcomes of principle interest were physical functioning and quality of life. Since the last decade, IRT has also been applied to clinical measures more frequently. IRT was mostly used for evaluating model fit, unidimensionality and differential item functioning, the distribution of items and persons along the underlying scale, and reliability. Less frequently used IRT applications were the evaluation of local independence, the threshold ordering of items, and the measurement precision along the scale. IRT applications have markedly increased within rheumatology over the past decades. To date, IRT has primarily been applied to patient-reported outcomes, however, applications to clinical measures are gaining interest. Useful IRT applications not yet widely used within rheumatology include the cross-calibration of instrument scores and the development of computerized adaptive tests which may reduce the measurement burden for both the patient

  20. [The G-DRG System 2009--relevant changes for rheumatology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiori, W; Liedtke-Dyong, A; Lakomek, H-J; Buscham, K; Lehmann, H; Liman, W; Fuchs, A-K; Bessler, F; Roeder, N

    2010-05-01

    The following article presents the major general and specific changes in the G-DRG system, in the classification systems for diagnoses and procedures as well as for the billing process for 2010. Since the G-DRG system is primarily a tool for the redistribution of resources, every hospital needs to analyze the economic effects of the changes by applying the G-DRG transition-grouper to its own cases. Depending on their clinical focus, rheumatological departments may experience positive or negative consequences from the adjustments. In addition, relevant current case law is considered.

  1. Value of 3-dimensional (3D) imaging in rheumatology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fredy, D.

    1990-01-01

    The whole body scanner (Exel 2.400) of the Centre Hospitalier Sainte-Anne enables the three-dimensional reconstruction, with visualization, of the object in its real volume in less than 10 minutes after taking 20 to 40 radiological sections. The exploration can be complete at all levels. Bone lesions can be perfectly shown, the study of osteoarticular or intraspinal abnormalities is facilitated, all solution of continuity can be detected. A soft parts program as well as a colour program enable a clear and rapid visualization of organic lesions. Three-dimensional imaging can be of great value in rheumatology [fr

  2. Rheumatologic complications in a cohort of 227 patients with common variable immunodeficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azizi, G; Kiaee, F; Hedayat, E; Yazdani, R; Dolatshahi, E; Alinia, T; Sharifi, L; Mohammadi, H; Kavosi, H; Jadidi-Niaragh, F; Ziaee, V; Abolhassani, H; Aghamohammadi, A

    2018-05-01

    Common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) is the most prevalent symptomatic type of human primary immunodeficiency diseases (PID). Clinically, CVID is characterized by increased susceptibility to infections and a wide variety of autoimmune and rheumatologic disorders. All patients with CVID registered in Iranian PID Registry (IPIDR) were enrolled in this retrospective cohort study. We investigated the frequency of rheumatologic diseases and its association with immunological and clinical phenotypes in patients with CVID. A total of 227 patients with CVID were enrolled in this study. The prevalence of rheumatologic disorders was 10.1% with a higher frequency in women than men. Most common rheumatologic manifestations were juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) and adult rheumatoid arthritis (RA) followed by juvenile spondyloarthritis (JSpA) and undifferentiated inflammatory arthritis (UIA). Septic arthritis in patients with CVID with a history of RA and JIA was higher than patients without rheumatologic complication. Patients with CVID with a history of autoimmunity (both rheumatologic and non-rheumatologic autoimmunity) had lower regulatory T cells counts in comparison with patients without autoimmune disorders. There was an association between defect in specific antibody responses and negative serologic test results in patients with rheumatologic manifestations. JIA, RA, JSpA and UIA are the most frequent rheumatologic disorders in patients with CVID. Due to antibody deficiency, serologic tests may be negative in these patients. Therefore, these conditions pose significant diagnostic and therapeutic challenges for immunologists and rheumatologists in charge of the care for these patients. © 2018 The Foundation for the Scandinavian Journal of Immunology.

  3. Improved training of house officers in a rheumatology consult service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzuca, S A; Brandt, K D; Katz, B P

    1993-06-01

    This study examined whether the clinical environment could be used to increase internal medicine house officers' adoption of care recommendations taught in a didactic conference. Subjects were 11 internal medicine house officers who served 6-week rheumatology elective rotations. At the start of each of four rotation periods, house officers attended a 1-hour conference in which periarticular rheumatic disorders associated with knee pain (anserine bursitis, pseudothrombophlebitis) and shoulder pain (bicipital tendinitis) were discussed. All house officers also practiced physical examination techniques on anatomic models simulating the disorders. During alternate rotation periods, reminder sheets were appended to the records of arthritis patients with histories of chronic knee or shoulder pain. The frequency with which house officers followed conference recommendations was documented by direct observation (6 house officers in 17 encounters with reminders, 5 house officers in 30 encounters without reminders). Specific questioning about a recent history of knee or shoulder pain and the performance of four of five recommended physical examination maneuvers were increased significantly by reminder sheets in patients' charts (P < 0.05 for all). Although rheumatology faculty often have limited options available to increase the number of house officer trainees or to intensify clinical activity, qualitative improvements within existing logistic parameters are feasible by assuring that the clinical environment (e.g., patient records) contains salient cues that will prompt desired actions.

  4. Leprae reaction resembling rheumatologic disease as presenting feature of leprosy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baharuddin, Hazlyna; Taib, Tarita; Zain, Mollyza Mohd; Ch'ng, Shereen

    2016-10-01

    Leprosy is a chronic granulomatous infection caused by Mycobacterium leprae with predominant involvement of skin and nerves. We present a 70-year-old man with leprosy whose initial presentation resembled rheumatologic disease, due to leprae reaction. He presented with an 8-week history of worsening neuropathic pain in the right forearm, associated with necrotic skin lesions on his fingers that had ulcerated. Physical examination revealed two tender necrotic ulcers at the tip of the right middle finger and the dorsal aspect of the left middle finger. The patient had right wrist tenosynovitis and right elbow bursitis. Apart from raised inflammatory markers, the investigations for infection, connective tissue disease, vasculitis, thromboembolic disease and malignancy were negative. During the fourth week of hospitalization, we noticed a 2-cm hypoesthetic indurated plaque on the right inner arm. Further examination revealed thickened bilateral ulnar, radial and popliteal nerves. A slit skin smear was negative. Two skin biopsies and a biopsy of the olecranon bursa revealed granulomatous inflammation. He was diagnosed with paucibacillary leprosy with neuritis. He responded well to multidrug therapy and prednisolone; his symptoms resolved over a few weeks. This case illustrates the challenges in diagnosing a case of leprosy with atypical presentation in a non-endemic country. © 2016 Asia Pacific League of Associations for Rheumatology and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  5. [Changes for rheumatology in the G-DRG system 2005].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiori, W; Roeder, N; Lakomek, H-J; Liman, W; Köneke, N; Hülsemann, J L; Lehmann, H; Wenke, A

    2005-02-01

    The German prospective payment system G-DRG has been recently adapted and recalculated. Apart from the adjustments of the G-DRG classification system itself changes in the legal framework like the extension of the "convergence period" or the limitation of budget loss due to DRG introduction have to be considered. Especially the introduction of new procedure codes (OPS) describing the specialized and complex rheumatologic treatment of inpatients might be of significant importance. Even though these procedures will not yet develop influence on the grouping process in 2005, it will enable a more accurate description of the efforts of acute-rheumatologic treatment which can be used for further adaptations of the DRG algorithm. Numerous newly introduced additive payment components (ZE) result in a more adequate description of the "DRG-products". Although not increasing the individual hospital budget, these additive payments contribute to more transparency of high cost services and can be addressed separately from the DRG-budget. Furthermore a lot of other relevant changes to the G-DRG catalogue, the classification systems ICD-10-GM and OPS-301 and the German Coding Standards (DKR) are presented.

  6. Antibody Response against Parvovirus in Patients with Inflammatory Rheumatological Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SH Raeisi

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Some viral infections have been suggested to trigger or cause autoimmune diseases. One of these viruses is parvovirus B19 which can have various rheumatologic manifestations. In this study we investigated the association between parvovirus and rheumatoid arthritis (RA, systemic lupus erythematosis(SLE, systemic sclerosis(SSc and undifferentiated arthritis at the Rheumatological Clinic, Imam Khomeini hospital. Methods: In this sectional case-control study, IgM and IgG antibodies against parvovirus B19 were measured with ELISA in 41 patients with RA, 28 patients with SLE, 13 patients with SSc, 8 patients with undifferentiated arthritis as well as 90 healthy controls. The ELISA kit (DRG, Germany was semi-quantitative and qualititative. Results: Parvovirus B19 IgM was detected in one patient with RA, one with SSc and four in the control group. IgG anti- B19-specific antibody was detected in 58.5% of RA patients, 67.9% of SLE patients, 69. 2% of SSc patients, 87.5% of undifferentiated arthritis patients as compared to 53.3% of controls. The results were compared between the patient and control groups(p>0.05. Conclusion: According to the results, there was no significant correlation for the antibody titer against parvovirus B19 in the patient and control group. The highly positive response of IgG against parvovirus in undifferentiated arthritis implies the need for more research.

  7. Rheumatology in the community of Madrid: current availability of rheumatologists and future needs using a predictive model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lázaro y De Mercado, Pablo; Blasco Bravo, Antonio Javier; Lázaro y De Mercado, Ignacio; Castañeda, Santos; López Robledillo, Juan Carlos

    2013-01-01

    To: 1) describe the distribution of the public sector rheumatologists; 2) identify variables on which the workload in Rheumatology depends; and 3) build a predictive model on the need of rheumatologists for the next 10 years, in the Community of Madrid (CM). The information was obtained through structured questionnaires sent to all services/units of Rheumatology of public hospitals in the CM. The population figures, current and forecasted, were obtained from the National Statistics Institute. A predictive model was built based on information about the current and foreseeable supply, current and foreseeable demand, and the assumptions and criteria used to match supply with demand. The underlying uncertainty in the model was assessed by sensitivity analysis. In the CM in 2011 there were 150 staff rheumatologists and 49 residents in 27 centers, which is equivalent to one rheumatologist for every 33,280 inhabitants in the general population, and one for every 4,996 inhabitants over 65 years. To keep the level of assistance of 2011 in 2021 in the general population, it would be necessary to train more residents or hire more rheumatologists in scenarios of demand higher than 15%. However, to keep the level of assistance in the population over 65 years of age it would be necessary to train more residents or hire more specialists even without increased demand. The model developed may be very useful for planning, with the CM policy makers, the needs of human resources in Rheumatology in the coming years. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  8. Digital health: a new dimension in rheumatology patient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kataria, Suchitra; Ravindran, Vinod

    2018-04-30

    The new digital health innovations have opened up several opportunities to help the clinicians, patients and other caregivers of rheumatology healthcare system in maximizing efficiencies resulting in better patient outcomes. In the global context, digital health technology has the potential to bridge the distance gap between all the key stakeholders involved in rheumatology health care. In this review, we update on the recent advances in the field of digital health and highlight unique features of these technologies which would help in routine care. Application of technology in any form to enable, facilitate or enhance the quality of care is the foundation of digitised care. The components could be smartphone apps, sensors, video, social media platforms or messenger platforms, wearables or a combination of these enabling healthcare delivery and overcoming the constraints of distance, location and time. Digital therapeutics have started evolving and an important step in this direction is the involvement of FDA in the approval process. Speciality specific apps, personalised patient education as per disease status, remote specialist consultations or virtual health coach to guide on lifestyle modifications are some of the developments which have been facilitated by increased digitization in all walks of life. Assisted care with the help of robots rendering care in the hospitals or an intelligent robot guiding a patient by voice and visual sense at home are already at the threshold of entering the mainstream of patient care. Wearable devices equipped with powerful sensors are coming handy in keeping a watch on patient symptoms all the time and providing useful insights on disease progression, clinical response or complications. In chronic care such as rheumatology the implications, possibilities and benefits seem unprecedented. Real time data analytics and artificial intelligence are helping the clinicians, healthcare systems and policy makers optimise the resources and

  9. Readability of patient information and consent documents in rheumatological studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hamnes, Bente; van Eijk-Hustings, Yvonne; Primdahl, Jette

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Before participation in medical research an informed consent must be obtained. This study investigates whether the readability of patient information and consent documents (PICDs) corresponds to the average educational level of participants in rheumatological studies in the Netherlands......, Denmark, and Norway. METHODS: 24 PICDs from studies were collected and readability was assessed independently using the Gunning's Fog Index (FOG) and Simple Measure of Gobbledygook (SMOG) grading. RESULTS: The mean score for the FOG and SMOG grades were 14.2 (9.0-19.0) and 14.2 (12-17) respectively....... The mean FOG and SMOG grades were 12.7 and 13.3 in the Dutch studies, 15.0 and 14.9 in the Danish studies, and 14.6 and 14.3 in the Norwegian studies, respectively. Out of the 2865 participants, more than 57 % had a lower educational level than the highest readability score calculated in the individual...

  10. Rheumatoid cachexia and other nutritional alterations in rheumatologic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurtado-Torres, Gilberto Fabián; González-Baranda, Lourdes Larisa; Abud-Mendoza, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of nutritional alterations in rheumatologic diseases ranges from 4 to 95%, depending on the detection method used. Formerly described as the single term rheumatoid cachexia, nutritional alterations can currently be grouped and subdivided based on the physiopathological mechanisms involved: chronic disease-related inflammatory conditions (cachexia), malnutrition associated to acute malnutrition inflammatory conditions (protein-caloric malnutrition) and starvation-related malnutrition. Clinical manifestations of malnutrition associated to rheumatic diseases vary from the patient with low weight or overweight and obesity; with lean body mass depletion as well as functional repercussions, and impact of quality of life as a common denominator. Additionally, the associated increase in body fat mass increases the risk for cardiovascular morbidity. A multidisciplinary approach towards rheumatic diseases should include aspects oriented towards prevention, early identification, diagnosis and correction of nutritional alterations. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. Enhancing the reporting and transparency of rheumatology research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Robin; Bliddal, Henning; Henriksen, Marius

    2013-01-01

    Manuscripts and abstracts from biomedical journals frequently do not contain proper information for meeting required standards and serving the multiple needs of their end users. Reporting guidelines and checklists help researchers to meet those standards by providing rules or principles......, to present a structured overview of reporting guidelines that rheumatology journals could apply, and to encourage their use by journal authors, editors, and reviewers, including those of Arthritis Research & Therapy. Internationally recognized reporting guidelines exist for a diversity of research areas. We...... encourage colleagues to consult the 'Enhancing the QUAlity and Transparency Of health Research' (EQUATOR) network when writing scientific papers. EQUATOR is an international initiative that seeks to improve the reliability and value of biomedical research literature by promoting transparent and accurate...

  12. Fit for work? Evaluation of a workshop for rheumatology teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, D; Khan, S; Marfell, N

    2016-06-01

    People with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) may rapidly cease work prematurely due to ill-health. A recent survey noted that a quarter of respondents with RA experienced job loss within a year of diagnosis and 50% stopped work within 6 years. To develop and pilot workshops to increase the knowledge, skills and confidence of rheumatology team members to support work-related issues in outpatient clinics. A 3-h interactive workshop, informed by rheumatology experts and the Royal College of General Practitioners (RCGP) National Education Programme (NEP) about work and health, was developed to address both knowledge and skills in the management of health and work consultations in an outpatient setting. Questionnaires were developed for use pre- and immediately post-workshop, with questions that focused on the confidence of delegates in managing these discussions and the importance they placed upon them. Ninety-nine participants attended five workshops throughout the UK between 2013 and 2104. Seventy-three per cent (72) completed the post-workshop questionnaire. Eighty-nine per cent found the workshop useful or very useful, 88% found it relevant or very relevant and 79% responded that it had an impact or a considerable impact on their practice. Wilcoxon matched pairs signed rank tests were carried out that showed an overall increase in confidence after training. The results suggest that the workshop was both relevant and useful to participants and had an impact on their practice. This was true for all specialities. The workshops also highlighted participants' desire to understand how to use the 'fit note' to enhance their patient management. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Occupational Medicine. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. The Videofluorographic Swallowing Study in Rheumatologic Diseases: A Comprehensive Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Piazza, Ambra; Costanzo, Massimo; Scopelliti, Laura; Salvaggi, Francesco; Cupido, Francesco; Salerno, Sergio; Lo Casto, Antonio; Midiri, Massimo; Lo Re, Giuseppe; Lagalla, Roberto

    2017-01-01

    Autoimmune connective tissue diseases are a heterogeneous group of pathologies that affect about 10% of world population with chronic evolution in 20%–80%. Inflammation in autoimmune diseases may lead to serious damage to other organs including the gastrointestinal tract. Gastrointestinal tract involvement in these patients may also due to both a direct action of antibodies against organs and pharmacological therapies. Dysphagia is one of the most important symptom, and it is caused by failure of the swallowing function and may lead to aspiration pneumonia, malnutrition, dehydration, weight loss, and airway obstruction. The videofluorographic swallowing study is a key diagnostic tool in the detection of swallowing disorders, allowing to make an early diagnosis and to reduce the risk of gastrointestinal and pulmonary complications. This technique helps to identify both functional and structural anomalies of the anatomic chain involved in swallowing function. The aim of this review is to systematically analyze the basis of the pathological involvement of the swallowing function for each rheumatological disease and to show the main features of the videofluorographic study that may be encountered in these patients. PMID:28706536

  14. Mass spectrometry imaging: a novel technology in rheumatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, Beatriz; Ruiz-Romero, Cristina; Blanco, Francisco J

    2017-01-01

    Mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) is used to determine the relative abundance and spatial distribution of biomolecules such as peptides, proteins, lipids and other organic compounds in tissue sections by their molecular masses. This technique provides a sensitive and label-free approach for high-resolution imaging, and is currently used in an increasing number of biomedical applications such as biomarker discovery, tissue classification and drug monitoring. Owing to technological advances in the past 5 years in diverse MSI strategies, this technology is expected to become a standard tool in clinical practice and provides information complementary to that obtained using existing methods. Given that MSI is able to extract mass-spectral signatures from pathological tissue samples, this technique provides a novel platform to study joint-related tissues affected by rheumatic diseases. In rheumatology, MSI has been performed on articular cartilage, synovium and bone to increase the understanding of articular destruction and to characterize diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers for osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis and osteoporosis. In this Review, we provide an overview of MSI technology and of the studies in which joint tissues have been analysed by use of this methodology. This approach might increase knowledge of rheumatic pathologies and ultimately prompt the development of targeted strategies for their management.

  15. Readability of patient information and consent documents in rheumatological studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamnes, Bente; van Eijk-Hustings, Yvonne; Primdahl, Jette

    2016-07-16

    Before participation in medical research an informed consent must be obtained. This study investigates whether the readability of patient information and consent documents (PICDs) corresponds to the average educational level of participants in rheumatological studies in the Netherlands, Denmark, and Norway. 24 PICDs from studies were collected and readability was assessed independently using the Gunning's Fog Index (FOG) and Simple Measure of Gobbledygook (SMOG) grading. The mean score for the FOG and SMOG grades were 14.2 (9.0-19.0) and 14.2 (12-17) respectively. The mean FOG and SMOG grades were 12.7 and 13.3 in the Dutch studies, 15.0 and 14.9 in the Danish studies, and 14.6 and 14.3 in the Norwegian studies, respectively. Out of the 2865 participants, more than 57 % had a lower educational level than the highest readability score calculated in the individual study. As the readability level of the PICDs did not match the participants' educational level, consent may not have been valid, as the participants may have had a limited understanding of what they agreed to participate in. There should be more focus on the readability of PICDs. National guidelines for how to write clear and unambiguous PICDs in simple and easily understandable language could increase the focus on the readability of PICD.

  16. Art and rheumatology: the artist and the rheumatologist's perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinojosa-Azaola, Andrea; Alcocer-Varela, Jorge

    2014-10-01

    The reflection of medicine in the universal arts has motivated several rheumatologists to discover features of rheumatic diseases depicted by the artist's eyes long before they were defined as specific pathologic entities. The result has been the identification of several pieces of art dating from the Middle Ages, the Renaissance, the Baroque and Post-Impressionist periods that depict clear features of several rheumatic diseases such as RA, OA, camptodactyly and temporal arteritis, among others. On the other hand, great artists such as Pierre-Auguste Renoir, Antoni Gaudí, Raoul Dufy, Paul Klee, Frida Kahlo and Niki de Saint Phalle are good examples of how rheumatic diseases such as RA, scleroderma and chronic pain can influence the artist's perspective, the technique used and the content of their work. Art can serve as a powerful resource to understand the natural course of diseases. By learning through the artist's eyes the way illnesses behave and evolve in time, rheumatologists can trace the history of several conditions. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Rheumatology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Flipped Learning: Can Rheumatology Lead the Shift in Medical Education?

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Miedany, Yasser; El Gaafary, Maha; El Aroussy, Nadia; Youssef, Sally

    2018-04-16

    To: 1. implement flipped classroom rheumatology teaching for undergraduate education. 2. Evaluate outcomes of teaching using OSCE assessment and student perceived effectiveness and satisfaction survey. The flipped classroom education was conducted in 3 phases. Phase 1: carried out in the students' own time. Web links were emailed to assist exposure of the instructional part of the lesson online. Phase 2: interactive in-class activity to share personal reflection and reinforce the key aspects. Phase 3: a simulated OSCE assessment. A cohort of 56-students, who were taught in the last educational year on the same topics according to standard teaching protocols, were included as control group. The clinical Outcomes were assessed using the scores of the OSCE examination model. Academic outcomes included the engagement measure as well as the students' answers to perceived effectiveness and satisfaction survey. There was no significant difference regarding demographics between the 2 students' groups. There was significant improvement (plearning, in contrast to the control group, in terms of clinical (OSCE score) as well as communication skills. Student perceived effectiveness and satisfaction was significantly higher among the flipped learning (plearning cohort showed a state of engagement significantly higher than the control group (plearning implementation musculoskeletal learning successfully demonstrated a promising platform for using technology to make better use of the students' time, and for increasing their satisfaction. Active learning increases student engagement and can lead to improved retention of knowledge. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  18. Italian Society of Rheumatology (SIR recommendations for performing arthrocentesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Spadaro

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Joint fluid aspiration, or arthrocentesis, is one of the most useful and commonly performed procedures for the diagnosis and treatment of rheumatic diseases, but to date no definite guidelines have been published. For this reason, a group of experts of the Italian Society of Rheumatology (SIR produced evidence based recommendations for performing arthrocentesis. Among them, the most relevant are: a arthrocentesis is necessary when synovial effusion of unknown origin is present, especially if septic or crystal arthritis is suspected; b the patient should be clearly informed of the benefits and risks of the procedure in order to give an informed consent; c ultrasonography should be used to facilitate arthrocentesis in difficult joints; d fluid evacuation often has a therapeutic effect and facilitates the success of the following intraarticular injection; e careful skin disinfection and the use of sterile, disposable material is mandatory for avoiding septic complications. Disposable, non sterile gloves should always be used by the operator, mainly for his own protection; f contraindications are the presence of skin lesions or infections in the area of the puncture; g the patient’s anticoagulant treatment is not a contraindication, providing the therapeutic range is not exceeded; h joint rest after arthrocentesis is not indicated. Several of these recommendations were based on experts’ opinion rather than on published evidence which is scanty.

  19. Gout Classification Criteria: Update and Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas-Santos, Ana Beatriz; Taylor, William J.

    2016-01-01

    Gout is the most common inflammatory arthritis, with a rising prevalence and incidence worldwide. There has been a resurgence in gout research, fueled, in part, by a number of advances in pharmacologic therapy for gout. The conduct of clinical trials and other observational research in gout requires a standardized and validated means of assembling well-defined groups of patients with gout for such research purposes. Recently, an international collaborative effort that involved a data-driven process with state-of-the art methodology supported by the American College of Rheumatology and the European League Against Rheumatism led to publication of new gout classification criteria. PMID:27342957

  20. Current provision of rheumatology education for undergraduate nursing, occupational therapy and physiotherapy students in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, C; Clarke, B; O'Brien, A; Hammond, A; Ryan, S; Kay, L; Hewlett, S

    2006-07-01

    Rheumatological conditions are common and all health professionals (HPs) therefore need sufficient knowledge and skills to manage patients safely and effectively. The aim of this study was to examine current undergraduate education in rheumatology for HPs in the UK. A questionnaire was sent to curriculum organizers and clinical placement officers for all undergraduate courses in adult nursing, occupational therapy (OT) and physiotherapy (PT) in the UK to ascertain the nature and amount of rheumatology theory and clinical exposure provided. Of the 47 adult nursing, 26 OT and 30 PT undergraduate courses surveyed, 85-90% responded. Overall, rheumatology teaching is 5-10 h over 3 yr. Nursing students receive moderate/in-depth teaching on rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in only 52% of courses (OT 91%, PT 96%) and on osteoarthritis (OA) in 63% (OT 91%, PT 92%). Clinical experience of RA is probably/definitely available in only 56% of nursing courses (OT 72%, PT 88%), with similar results in OA. Overall, nursing students receive the least rheumatology exposure, particularly in psychosocial issues and symptom management, while PT students receive the most. OT students have limited opportunities for clinical exposure to psychosocial and joint protection issues. Use of local rheumatology clinical HP experts is variable (18-93%) and cross-disciplinary exposure is limited (0-36%). Many educators consider their rheumatology training to be insufficient (nursing 50%, PT 42%, OT 24%). Rheumatology training for undergraduate HPs is limited in key areas and often fails to take advantage of local clinical expertise, with nursing students particularly restricted. Clinical HP experts should consider novel methods of addressing these shortfalls within the limited curriculum time available.

  1. Immunology for rheumatology residents: working toward a Canadian national curriculum consensus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Shirley L; Herman-Kideckel, Sari; Mahendira, Dharini; McDonald-Blumer, Heather

    2015-01-01

    Immunologic mechanisms play an integral role in understanding the pathogenesis and management of rheumatic conditions. Currently, there is limited access to formal instruction in immunology for rheumatology trainees across Canada. The aims of this study were (1) to describe current immunology curricula among adult rheumatology training programs across Canada and (2) to compare the perceived learning needs of rheumatology trainees from the perspective of program directors and trainees to help develop a focused nationwide immunology curriculum. Rheumatology trainees and program directors from adult rheumatology programs across Canada completed an online questionnaire and were asked to rank a comprehensive list of immunology topics. A modified Delphi approach was implemented to obtain consensus on immunology topics. Only 42% of program directors and 31% of trainees felt the current method of teaching immunology was effective. Results illustrate concordance between program directors and trainees for the highest-ranked immunology topics including innate immunity, adaptive immunity, and cells and tissues of the immune system. However, there was discordance among other topics, such as diagnostic laboratory immunology and therapeutics. There is a need to improve immunology teaching in rheumatology training programs. Results show high concordance between the basic immunology topics. This study provides the groundwork for development of future immunology curricula.

  2. Mental health care for youth with rheumatologic diseases - bridging the gap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Alaina M; Rubinstein, Tamar B; Rodriguez, Martha; Knight, Andrea M

    2017-12-28

    Youth with rheumatologic diseases have a high prevalence of comorbid mental health disorders. Individuals with comorbid mental health disorders are at increased risk for adverse outcomes related to mental health as well as their underlying rheumatologic disease. Early identification and treatment of mental health disorders has been shown to improve outcomes, but current systems of care fall short in providing adequate mental health services to those in need. Pediatric rheumatologists are uniquely positioned to provide mental health screening and intervention for youth with rheumatologic diseases due to the frequency of patient encounters and ongoing therapeutic relationship with patients and families. However, additional training is likely required for pediatric rheumatologists to provide effective mental health care, and focusing efforts on providing trainees with mental health education is key to building competency. Potential opportunities for improved mental health education include development of clinical guidelines regarding mental health screening and management within pediatric rheumatology settings and incorporation of mental health didactics, workshops, and interdisciplinary clinic experiences into pediatric rheumatology fellowship curricula. Additional steps include mental health education for patients and families and focus on system change, targeting integration of medical and mental health care. Research is needed to better define the scope of the problem, determine effective strategies for equipping pediatric rheumatologists with skills in mental health intervention, and develop and implement sustainable systems for delivery of optimal mental health care to youth with rheumatologic diseases.

  3. Quality of life in rheumatological patients: The impact of personality disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uguz, Faruk; Kucuk, Adem; Cicek, Erdinc; Kayhan, Fatih; Salli, Ali; Guncu, Hatice; Çilli, Ali Savas

    2015-01-01

    Rheumatological diseases are associated with lower quality of life (QoL) levels. Psychiatric disturbances are frequently observed in these patients. This study examined the impact of personality disorders on the QoL of patients with rheumatological diseases. The study sample consisted of 142 participants including patients suffering from rheumatological disease with a personality disorder (n = 30), without any personality disorder (n = 112), and healthy control participants without physical or psychiatric disorders (n = 60). The Structured Clinical Interview for Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition (SCID-I) and the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM, Revised Third Edition Personality Disorders (SCID-II) were used to determine Axis I and Axis II psychiatric disorders, respectively. QoL levels were assessed by means of the World Health Organization QoL Assessment-Brief. The subscale scores of physical health, psychological health, and social relationships were significantly lower in patients with rheumatological disease regardless of the existence of personality disorder compared with the control participants. Rheumatological patients with a personality disorder had significantly lower subscale scores of psychological health (p = 0.003) and social relationships (p personality disorder. Personality disorders seem to be a relevant factor that maybe associated with QoL in patients suffering from rheumatological disease. © The Author(s) 2015 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  4. Current educational status of paediatric rheumatology in Europe: the results of PReS survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirkaya, E; Ozen, S; Türker, T; Kuis, W; Saurenmann, R K

    2009-01-01

    To understand the status of education and problems in paediatric rheumatology practice in Europe, through a survey. A 26-item questionnaire was conducted during the 14th Congress of the Paediatric Rheumatology European Society in Istanbul, 2007. Physicians who were practicing or studying within the field of paediatric rheumatology for at least one year were included in the survey. One hundred and twenty eight physicians, 79 paediatric rheumatologists (including 5 paediatric immunologists and 10 paediatric nephrologists), 34 paediatric rheumatology fellows and 15 adult rheumatologists completed the survey. The physicians were from: Europe 95 (81.9%), South America 12 (10.4%), Middle East 5 (4.3%), Asia 2 (1.7%), Africa 2 (1.7%). The duration of training for paediatric rheumatology ranged between 1-5 years (mean: 3.12+/-1.11). Sixty physicians scored their education as unsatisfactory and among those, 48 physicians were from Europe. Physicians reported good skills in the following items; intraarticular injections (83.3%); soft tissue injections (47.6%); evaluation of radiographs (67.5%); whereas competence in the evaluation of computed tomography/magnetic resonance imaging (30.5%); and musculoskeletal sonography (16.7%) was much lower. A need for improved basic science and rotations among relevant fields were specifically expressed. Being a relatively new speciality in the realm of paediatrics, paediatric rheumatology education at the European level needs to be further discussed, revised and uniformed.

  5. Sjögren SER: National registry of the Spanish Society of Rheumatology of patients with primary Sjögren syndrome: Objectives and methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández Castro, Mónica; Andreu, Jose Luis; Sánchez-Piedra, Carlos; Martínez Taboada, Víctor; Olivé, Alejandro; Rosas, José; Sánchez-Alonso, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    To describe the objectives and methods of the Spanish Society of Rheumatology primary Sjögren syndrome (pSS) registry (SJOGREN-SER) METHODS: This is a multicenter descriptive transversal study of a cohort of pSS patients fulfilling European/American consensus criteria collected from Rheumatology clinics all over Spain. Patients were included by randomisation from an anonymised list provided by every department. Data were collected by reviewing clinical records and an interviewing the patients. Two hundred and ninety eight variables were investigated: epidemiological, clinical, serological characteristics, treatments and complications. Informed consent was obtained and local ethics committees approved the study. Variables were analysed by descriptive statistical methods, using means, medians, and rates, with their deviations and interquartile ranges (p25-p75). A total of 3 rheumatology departments participated in the registry. A total of 437 patients were included. And 95% of them were women, with a median age of 58. Median age at pSS 's diagnosis was 50 years. Dryness symptoms (95%) were the most frequent complaint and anti-Ro/SS-A were present in 94% of the cases. Only 27% of the patients fulfilled the new 2012 SICCA-ACR classification criteria. SJOGREN-SER has been designed in order to characterize a representative pSS Spanish cohort, in clinical daily practice, to analyze the magnitude and distribution of its manifestations, activity, accumulated damage and therapeutic management of the disease. This will allow broadening the knowledge of this disease and plan strategies of action in pSS. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Reumatología y Colegio Mexicano de Reumatología. All rights reserved.

  6. Criteria CSR

    OpenAIRE

    Vovk, V.; Zateyshikova, O.

    2014-01-01

    In the article the theoretical aspects regarding criteria for assessing CSR proposed by A. Carroll, including: economic, legal, ethical, philanthropic. Based on this, it is proposed to characterize these criteria with respect to the interested parties (stakeholders), including: investors, shareholders suppliers, customers, employees, society and the state. This will make a qualitative assessment of the presence and depth using social responsibility in the company, as well as determine the ext...

  7. Secukinumab for rheumatology: development and its potential place in therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koenders MI

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Marije I Koenders, Wim B van den Berg Experimental Rheumatology, Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen, the Netherlands Abstract: Rheumatic disease is not a single disorder, but a group of more than 100 diseases that affect joints, connective tissues, and/or internal organs. Although rheumatic diseases like rheumatoid arthritis (RA, psoriatic arthritis, and ankylosing spondylitis (AS differ in their pathogenesis and clinical presentation, the treatment of these inflammatory disorders overlaps. Non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs are used to reduce pain and inflammation. Additional disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs are prescribed to slowdown disease progression, and is in RA more frequently and effectively applied than in AS. Biologicals are a relatively new class of treatments that specifically target cytokines or cells of the immune system, like tumor necrosis factor alpha inhibitors or B-cell blockers. A new kid on the block is the interleukin-17 (IL-17 inhibitor secukinumab, which has been recently approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for moderate-to-severe plaque psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis, and AS. IL-17 is a proinflammatory cytokine that has an important role in host defense, but its proinflammatory and destructive effects have also been linked to pathogenic processes in autoimmune diseases like RA and psoriasis. Animal models have greatly contributed to further insights in the potential of IL-17 blockade in autoimmune and autoinflammatory diseases, and have resulted in the development of various potential drugs targeting the IL-17 pathway. Secukinumab (AIN457 is a fully human monoclonal antibody that selectively binds to IL-17A and recently entered the market under the brand name Cosentyx®. By binding to IL-17A, secukinumab prevents it from binding to its receptor and inhibits its ability to trigger inflammatory responses that play a role in the development of various autoimmune diseases. With secukinumab being

  8. Rheumatology telephone advice line - experience of a Portuguese department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, R; Marques, A; Mendes, A; da Silva, J A

    2015-01-01

    Telephone helplines for patients are tool for information and advice. They can contribute to patient's satisfaction with care and to the effectiveness and safety of treatments. In order to achieve this, they need to be adequately adapted to the target populations, as to incorporate their abilities and expectations. a) Evaluate the adherence of patients to a telephone helpline managed by nurses in a Portuguese Rheumatology Department, b) Analyse the profile of users and their major needs, c) Analyse the management of calls by the nurses. The target population of this phone service are the patients treated at Day Care Hospital and Early Arthritis Clinic of our department. Nurses answered phone calls immediately between 8am and 4pm of working days. In the remaining hours messages were recorded on voice mail and answered as soon as possible. Details of the calls were registered in a dedicated sheet and patients were requested permission to use data to improve the service, with respect for their rights of confidentiality, anonymity and freedom of decision. In 18 months 173 calls were made by 79 patients, with a mean age of 47.9 years (sd=9.13). Considering the proportions of men and women in the target population, it was found that men called more frequently (M= 32.7% vs F= 20.4%, p=.016). The reasons for these calls can be divided into three categories: instrumental help, such as the request for results of complementary tests or rescheduling appointments (43.9% of calls); counselling on side effects or worsening of the disease/pain (31.2 %); counselling on therapy management (24.9%). Neither sex nor patient age were significantly related to these reasons for calling. Nurses resolved autonomously half (50.3%) of the calls and in 79.8% of the cases there was no need for patient referral to other health services. About a quarter of patients adhered to the telephone helpline.. Patients called to obtain support in the management of disease and therapy or to report side

  9. Why do we choose rheumatology? Implications for future recruitment--results of the 2006 UK Trainee Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunkley, L; Filer, A; Speden, D; Bax, D; Crisp, A

    2008-06-01

    Against changes to junior doctor career structure under MMC (Modernizing Medical Careers), and uncertainty about the future place of rheumatology, we explored critical factors in choice of rheumatology as a speciality, and asked what factors might govern choices of prospective trainees. Using these data, we developed suggestions to enhance future recruitment. A postal survey was sent to rheumatology specialist registrars (SpRs) on the Joint Committee for Higher Medical Training (JCHMT) database between December 2005 and January 2006, and concurrently by e-mail to the Rheumatologists at Training e-mail list. Seventy-three percent (165/227) of trainees responded. Of them, 89.1% had previous senior house officer (SHO) experience in rheumatology and 81.8% made a career decision in favour of rheumatology during their SHO post. The top four ranked factors influencing choice of rheumatology were SHO experience, subject matter, inspirational consultants and lifestyle aspects; 89.1% would still choose rheumatology now. Factors felt to be negatively influencing future trainees came under three key themes: poor student or postgraduate exposure, employment and service delivery issues (including concern over the future place of rheumatology in primary vs secondary care), and perceived poor profile of rheumatology. Factors positively influencing future candidates were subject matter, work/life balance and prior exposure to the speciality. Early postgraduate experience is key to choice of speciality. An overwhelming majority of trainees decide speciality during SHO experience. With ongoing changes in career structure, it is critical that rheumatology is incorporated into foundation and speciality training programmes and essential that continued measures are taken to improve the image of rheumatology.

  10. New Myositis Classification Criteria-What We Have Learned Since Bohan and Peter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leclair, Valérie; Lundberg, Ingrid E

    2018-03-17

    Idiopathic inflammatory myopathy (IIM) classification criteria have been a subject of debate for many decades. Despite several limitations, the Bohan and Peter criteria are still widely used. The aim of this review is to discuss the evolution of IIM classification criteria. New IIM classification criteria are periodically proposed. The discovery of myositis-specific and myositis-associated autoantibodies led to the development of clinico-serological criteria, while in-depth description of IIM morphological features improved histopathology-based criteria. The long-awaited European League Against Rheumatism and American College of Rheumatology (EULAR/ACR) IIM classification criteria were recently published. The Bohan and Peter criteria are outdated and validated classification criteria are necessary to improve research in IIM. The new EULAR/ACR IIM classification criteria are thus a definite improvement and an important step forward in the field.

  11. Proceedings from The 8th Annual International Society for Musculoskeletal Imaging in Rheumatology (ISEMIR) Conference

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Troum, Orrin M; Pimienta, Olga L; Olech, Ewa

    2016-01-01

    The International Society for Musculoskeletal Imaging in Rheumatology (ISEMIR) was founded in 2005 with the goal of discussing matters related to imaging in rheumatology, particularly, validation, education, and use in both clinical practice and research. The field of musculoskeletal (MSK) imaging...... is continuously evolving; therefore, education for healthcare providers in this field is of paramount importance. ISEMIR's international faculty and world-renowned experts presented the newest information as it relates to the use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and ultrasound (US) at the 8th annual ISEMIR...

  12. "Big Data" in Rheumatology: Intelligent Data Modeling Improves the Quality of Imaging Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landewé, Robert B M; van der Heijde, Désirée

    2018-05-01

    Analysis of imaging data in rheumatology is a challenge. Reliability of scores is an issue for several reasons. Signal-to-noise ratio of most imaging techniques is rather unfavorable (too little signal in relation to too much noise). Optimal use of all available data may help to increase credibility of imaging data, but knowledge of complicated statistical methodology and the help of skilled statisticians are required. Clinicians should appreciate the merits of sophisticated data modeling and liaise with statisticians to increase the quality of imaging results, as proper imaging studies in rheumatology imply more than a supersensitive imaging technique alone. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Nursing, occupational therapy, and physical therapy preparation in rheumatology in the United States and Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jette, A M; Becker, M C

    1980-11-01

    Directors of undergraduate programs in nursing, physical therapy, and occupational therapy in the United States and Canada were surveyed to determine the amount and perceived adequacy of the current degree of classroom and clinical exposure to the rheumatic diseases. One hundred ninety-one (73%) of the 262 mailed questionnaires were returned. Results indicate that regardless of the actual degree of rheumatologic classroom exposure, directors in all three disciplines view current amounts as adequate. A larger proportion views levels of clinical exposure as inadequate. In general, the Canadian programs had a greater emphasis on rheumatology than their United States counterparts.

  14. Impact of Antiinflammatory Treatment on the Onset of Uveitis in Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis: Longitudinal Analysis From a Nationwide Pediatric Rheumatology Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tappeiner, Christoph; Schenck, Sandra; Niewerth, Martina; Heiligenhaus, Arnd; Minden, Kirsten; Klotsche, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Based on a nationwide database, this study analyzed the influence of methotrexate (MTX), tumor necrosis factor (TNF) inhibitors, and a combination of the 2 medications on uveitis occurrence in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) patients. Data from the National Paediatric Rheumatological Database in Germany were used in this study. Between 2002 and 2013, data from JIA patients were annually documented at the participating pediatric rheumatologic sites. Patients with a JIA disease duration of treatment on the occurrence of uveitis was evaluated by discrete-time survival analysis. A total of 3,512 JIA patients (mean ± SD age 8.3 ± 4.8 years, 65.7% female, 53.2% antinuclear antibody positive, and mean ± SD age at arthritis onset 7.8 ± 4.8 years) fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Mean ± SD total followup time was 3.6 ± 2.4 years. Uveitis developed in a total of 180 patients (5.1%) within 1 year after arthritis onset. Uveitis onset after the first year was observed in another 251 patients (7.1%). Disease-modifying antirheumatic drug (DMARD) treatment in the year before uveitis onset significantly reduced the risk for uveitis as follows: MTX: hazard ratio (HR) 0.63, P = 0.022; TNF inhibitors: HR 0.56, P uveitis risk (HR 0.29, P uveitis onset. Early MTX use within the first year of disease and the combination of MTX with a TNF inhibitor had the highest protective effect. © 2016 The Authors. Arthritis Care & Research published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American College of Rheumatology.

  15. Mentoring of young professionals in the field of rheumatology in Europe: results from an EMerging EUlar NETwork (EMEUNET) survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frank-Bertoncelj, Mojca; Hatemi, Gulen; Ospelt, Caroline; Ramiro, Sofia; Machado, Pedro; Mandl, Peter; Gossec, Laure; Buch, Maya H.

    2014-01-01

    To explore perceptions of, participation in and satisfaction with mentoring programmes among young clinicians and researchers in rheumatology in Europe. To identify mentoring needs and expectations focusing on gender-specific differences. A survey on mentoring in rheumatology was distributed to

  16. Most Trial Eligibility Criteria and Patient Baseline Characteristics Do Not Modify Treatment Effect in Trials Using Targeted Therapies for Rheumatoid Arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Anton Wulf; Tarp, Simon; Furst, Daniel E

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine if variations in trial eligibility criteria and patient baseline characteristics could be considered effect modifiers of the treatment response when testing targeted therapies (biological agents and targeted synthetic disease modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs....... Odds ratios (ORs) were calculated from the response rates and compared among the trial eligibility criteria/patient baseline characteristics of interest. Comparisons are presented as the Ratio of Odds Ratios (ROR). RESULTS: Sixty-two trials (19,923 RA patients) were included in the primary analyses...... using ACR20 response. Overall, targeted therapies constituted an effective treatment (OR 3.96 95% confidence interval (CI) 3.41 to 4.60). The majority of the trial eligibility criteria and patient baseline characteristics did not modify treatment effect. The added benefit of targeted therapies was lower...

  17. Including health equity considerations in development of instruments for rheumatology research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O'Neill, Jennifer; Rader, Tamara; Guillemin, Francis

    2014-01-01

    The Outcome Measures in Rheumatology (OMERACT) Equity Special Interest Group (SIG) was established in 2008 to create a preliminary core set of outcome measures for clinical trials that can assess equity gaps in healthcare and the effectiveness of interventions to close or narrow gaps between...

  18. Advanced practice physiotherapy-led triage in Irish orthopaedic and rheumatology services: national data audit.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Fennelly, Orna

    2018-06-01

    Many people with musculoskeletal (MSK) disorders wait several months or years for Consultant Doctor appointments, despite often not requiring medical or surgical interventions. To allow earlier patient access to orthopaedic and rheumatology services in Ireland, Advanced Practice Physiotherapists (APPs) were introduced at 16 major acute hospitals. This study performed the first national evaluation of APP triage services.

  19. Characterizing the concept of activity pacing as a non-pharmacological intervention in rheumatology care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cuperus, N; Vliet Vlieland, Tpm; Brodin, N

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To develop a consensual list of the most important aspects of activity pacing (AP) as an intervention within the context of non-pharmacological rheumatology care. METHOD: An international, multidisciplinary expert panel comprising 60 clinicians and/or healthcare providers experienced i...

  20. The impact factor of rheumatology journals : an analysis of 2008 and the recent 10 years

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, Min; Zhao, Ming-Hui; Kallenberg, Cees G. M.

    2011-01-01

    Despite various weaknesses, the impact factor (IF) is still used as an important indictor for scientific quality in specific subject categories. In the current study, the IFs of rheumatology journals over the past 10 years were serially analyzed and compared with that from other fields. For the past

  1. Impact of healthcare design on patients' perception of a rheumatology outpatient infusion room

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bukh, Gunhild; Tommerup, Anne Marie Munk; Madsen, Ole Rintek

    2015-01-01

    Evidence-based healthcare design is a concept aimed at reducing stress factors in the physical environment for the benefit of patients and the medical staff. The objective of this study was to examine the impact of room modifications on patients' perception of an outpatient infusion room used...... the potential to improve patients' perception of outpatient infusion rooms used for treating rheumatologic diseases....

  2. Advanced practice physiotherapy-led triage in Irish orthopaedic and rheumatology services: national data audit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fennelly, Orna; Blake, Catherine; FitzGerald, Oliver; Breen, Roisin; Ashton, Jennifer; Brennan, Aisling; Caffrey, Aoife; Desmeules, François; Cunningham, Caitriona

    2018-06-01

    Many people with musculoskeletal (MSK) disorders wait several months or years for Consultant Doctor appointments, despite often not requiring medical or surgical interventions. To allow earlier patient access to orthopaedic and rheumatology services in Ireland, Advanced Practice Physiotherapists (APPs) were introduced at 16 major acute hospitals. This study performed the first national evaluation of APP triage services. Throughout 2014, APPs (n = 22) entered clinical data on a national database. Analysis of these data using descriptive statistics determined patient wait times, Consultant Doctor involvement in clinical decisions, and patient clinical outcomes. Chi square tests were used to compare patient clinical outcomes across orthopaedic and rheumatology clinics. A pilot study at one site identified re-referral rates to orthopaedic/rheumatology services of patients managed by the APPs. In one year, 13,981 new patients accessed specialist orthopaedic and rheumatology consultations via the APP. Median wait time for an appointment was 5.6 months. Patients most commonly presented with knee (23%), lower back (22%) and shoulder (15%) disorders. APPs made autonomous clinical decisions regarding patient management at 77% of appointments, and managed patient care pathways without onward referral to Consultant Doctors in more than 80% of cases. Other onward clinical pathways recommended by APPs were: physiotherapy referrals (42%); clinical investigations (29%); injections administered (4%); and surgical listing (2%). Of those managed by the APP, the pilot study identified that only 6.5% of patients were re-referred within one year. This national evaluation of APP services demonstrated that the majority of patients assessed by an APP did not require onward referral for a Consultant Doctor appointment. Therefore, patients gained earlier access to orthopaedic and rheumatology consultations in secondary care, with most patients conservatively managed.

  3. EULAR definition of erosive disease in light of the 2010 ACR/EULAR rheumatoid arthritis classification criteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Heijde, Désirée; van der Helm-van Mil, Annette H. M.; Aletaha, Daniel; Bingham, Clifton O.; Burmester, Gerd R.; Dougados, Maxime; Emery, Paul; Felson, David; Knevel, Rachel; Kvien, Tore K.; Landewé, Robert B. M.; Lukas, Cédric; McInnes, Iain; Silman, Alan J.; Smolen, Josef S.; Stanislawska-Biernat, Ewa; Zink, Angela; Combe, Bernard

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this report was to propose a definition for erosive disease in the context of inflammatory arthritis in light of the 2010 American College of Rheumatology (ACR)/European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) rheumatoid arthritis (RA) criteria for use in clinical practice and studies. A EULAR

  4. Max Hirsch (1875-1941): His forgotten fate and his contributions to the founding of modern rheumatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keitel, Wolfgang; Olsson, Leif; Matteson, Eric L

    2016-09-01

    To elucidate the connections between balneology and rheumatology in the founding period of the discipline of rheumatology, and describe the contributions of Max Hirsch, MD in the formation of professional rheumatology societies. Historical documents from the medical history collection of Vogelsang-Gommern, Germany, and original personal documents of the Hirsch family and information from the medical and historical period literature were used in developing this report. The first efforts at organizing rheumatology as a recognized clinical and academic discipline took place in the 1920s. Many of the first proponents were balneologists who cared for patients with chronic arthritic conditions without the benefit of effective medications. Max Hirsch, MD was a major figure in the development of modern rheumatology as it emerged from the provenance of balneology and orthopedics as a recognized organized medical discipline, contributing to the founding of the German Society for Rheumatology and the International League Against Rheumatism. Max Hirsch made significant contributions to scientific and organized rheumatology in the early days of the discipline. His contributions to the field and his fate as a Jewish physician have only recently come to light.

  5. Paediatric rheumatology practice in the UK benchmarked against the British Society for Paediatric and Adolescent Rheumatology/Arthritis and Musculoskeletal Alliance Standards of Care for juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavirayani, Akhila; Foster, Helen E

    2013-12-01

    To describe current clinical practice against the BSPAR/ARMA Standards of Care (SOCs) for children and young people (CYP) with incident JIA. Ten UK paediatric rheumatology centres (including all current centres nationally accredited for paediatric rheumatology higher specialist training) participated in a retrospective case notes review using a pretested pro forma based on the SOC. Data collected per centre included clinical service configuration and the initial clinical care for a minimum of 30 consecutive new patients seen within the previous 2 years and followed up for at least 6 months. A total of 428 CYP with JIA (median age 11 years, range 1-21 years) were included, with complete data available for 73% (311/428). Against the key SOCs, 41% (175/428) were assessed ≤10 weeks from symptom onset, 60% (186/311) ≤4 weeks from referral, 26% (81/311) had eye screening at ≤6 weeks, 83% (282/341) had joint injections at ≤6 weeks, 59% (184/311) were assessed by a nurse specialist at ≤4 weeks and 45% (141/311) were assessed by a physiotherapist at ≤8 weeks. A median of 6% of patients per centre participated in clinical trials. All centres had access to eye screening and prescribed biologic therapies. All had access to a nurse specialist and physiotherapist. Most had access to an occupational therapist (8/10), psychologist (8/10), joint injection lists (general anaesthesia/inhaled analgesia) (9/10) and designated transitional care clinics (7/10). This first description of UK clinical practice in paediatric rheumatology benchmarked against the BSPAR/ARMA SOCs demonstrates variable clinical service delivery. Considerable delay in access to specialist care is evident and this needs to be addressed in order to improve clinical outcomes.

  6. Rheumatologic care of nursing home residents with rheumatoid arthritis: a comparison of the year before and after nursing home admission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luque Ramos, Andres; Albrecht, Katinka; Zink, Angela; Hoffmann, Falk

    2017-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate health care for patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) before and after admission to nursing homes. Data of a German health insurance fund from persons with diagnostic codes of RA, aged ≥65 years, admitted to a nursing home between 2010 and 2014 and continuously insured 1 year before and after admission were used. The proportion of patients with ≥1 rheumatologist visit and ≥1 prescription of biologic or conventional synthetic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (bDMARDs or csDMARDs), glucocorticoids and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in the year before and after admission were calculated. Predictors of rheumatologic care after admission were analyzed by multivariable logistic regression. Of 75,697 nursing home residents, 2485 (3.3%) had RA (90.5% female, mean age 83.8). Treatment by rheumatologists and prescription of antirheumatic drugs decreased significantly in the year after admission (rheumatologic visits: 17.6 to 9.1%, bDMARDs: 2.1 to 1.5%, csDMARDs: 22.5 to 16.5%, glucocorticoids: 46.5 to 43.1%, NSAIDs: 47.4 to 38.5%). 60.2% of patients in rheumatologic care received csDMARDs compared with 14.5% without rheumatologic care. Rheumatologic care before admission to a nursing home strongly predicted rheumatologic care thereafter (OR 33.8, 95%-CI 23.2-49.2). Younger age and lower care level (reflecting need of help) were also associated with a higher chance of rheumatologic care. Rheumatologic care is already infrequent in old patients with RA and further decreases after admission to a nursing home. Patients without rheumatologic care are at high risk of insufficient treatment for their RA. Admission to a nursing home further increases this risk.

  7. Policy challenges for the pediatric rheumatology workforce: Part I. Education and economics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrickson Michael

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract For children with rheumatic conditions, the available pediatric rheumatology workforce mitigates their access to care. While the subspecialty experiences steady growth, a critical workforce shortage constrains access. This three-part review proposes both national and international interim policy solutions for the multiple causes of the existing unacceptable shortfall. Part I explores the impact of current educational deficits and economic obstacles which constrain appropriate access to care. Proposed policy solutions follow each identified barrier. Challenges consequent to obsolete, limited or unavailable exposure to pediatric rheumatology include: absent or inadequate recognition or awareness of rheumatic disease; referral patterns that commonly foster delays in timely diagnosis; and primary care providers' inappropriate or outdated perception of outcomes. Varying models of pediatric rheumatology care delivery consequent to market competition, inadequate reimbursement and uneven institutional support serve as additional barriers to care. A large proportion of pediatrics residency programs offer pediatric rheumatology rotations. However, a minority of pediatrics residents participate. The current generalist pediatrician workforce has relatively poor musculoskeletal physical examination skills, lacking basic competency in musculoskeletal medicine. To compensate, many primary care providers rely on blood tests, generating referrals that divert scarce resources away from patients who merit accelerated access to care for rheumatic disease. Pediatric rheumatology exposure could be enhanced during residency by providing a mandatory musculoskeletal medicine rotation that includes related musculoskeletal subspecialties. An important step is the progressive improvement of many providers' fixed referral and laboratory testing patterns in lieu of sound physical examination skills. Changing demographics and persistent reimbursement disparities will

  8. A report from the American college of rheumatology/association of rheumatology health professionals (ACR/ARHP) - 2012 annual meeting (November 9-14, 2012 - Washington, D.C., USA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croasdell, G

    2013-02-01

    The annual meeting of the American College of Rheumatology (ACR), jointly held with the Association of Rheumatology Health Professionals (ARHP), brought together attendees focused on all aspects of rheumatology, including researchers looking into treatment options and various services around the care of rheumatologic conditions. As well as networking opportunities at the meeting, there were a wide range of symposia and posters available covering various conditions and levels of research. There were also educational and meet-the-professor sessions. This report will cover a selection of interesting talks from poster and oral sessions on the latest preclinical and clinical research. Copyright 2013 Prous Science, S.A.U. or its licensors. All rights reserved.

  9. Framework for Advancing the Reporting of Patient Engagement in Rheumatology Research Projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Clayon B; Leese, Jenny C; Hoens, Alison M; Li, Linda C

    2017-07-01

    The term "patient engagement in research" refers to patients and their surrogates undertaking roles in the research process beyond those of study participants. This paper proposes a new framework for describing patient engagement in research, based on analysis of 30 publications related to patient engagement. Over the past 15 years, patients' perspectives have been instrumental in broadening the scope of rheumatology research and outcome measurement, such as evaluating fatigue in rheumatoid arthritis. Recent reviews, however, highlight low-quality reporting of patient engagement in research. Until we have more detailed information about patient engagement in rheumatology research, our understanding of how patients' perspectives are being integrated into research projects remains limited. When authors follow our guidance on the important components for describing patients' roles and function as "research partners," researchers and other knowledge users will better understand how patients' perspectives were integrated in their research projects.

  10. Achieving serum urate targets in gout: an audit in a gout-oriented rheumatology practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbett, Elizabeth J M; Pentony, Peta; McGill, Neil W

    2017-07-01

    To assess the proportion of patients with gout who achieve target serum urate levels, the drug regime required and the reasons for failing to do so. We reviewed the files of all patients with gout who presented to a gout-oriented rheumatology practice between January 2010 and September 2014. Two hundred and thirty patients agreed to commence urate lowering therapy (ULT); 73% achieved their urate target, including 74% with non-tophaceous gout (target ≤ 0.36 mmol/L) and 71% with tophi (target ≤ 0.30 mmol/L). Of the 62 who failed to reach target, in 61 it was due to non-adherence and in one due to inefficacy. Adherence remains the major challenge to successful long-term gout management. © 2017 Asia Pacific League of Associations for Rheumatology and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  11. Biosimilars in rheumatology: recommendations for regulation and use in Middle Eastern countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Zorkany, Bassel; Al Ani, Nizar; Al Emadi, Samar; Al Saleh, Jamal; Uthman, Imad; El Dershaby, Yasser; Mounir, Mohamed; Al Moallim, Hani

    2018-05-01

    The increasing availability of biosimilar medicines in Middle Eastern regions may provide an opportunity to increase the number of rheumatology patients who have access to traditionally more expensive biologic medicines. However, as well as a lack of real-world data on the use of biosimilar medicines in practice, the availability of intended copies in the region may undermine physician confidence in prescribing legitimate biosimilar medicines. There is a need for regional recommendations for healthcare professionals to ensure that biosimilar drugs can be used safely. Therefore, a literature search was performed with the aim of providing important recommendations for the regulation and use of biosimilar medicines in the Middle East from key opinion leaders in rheumatology from the region. These recommendations focus on improving the availability of relevant real-world data, ensuring that physicians are aware of the difference between intended copies and true biosimilars and ensuring that physicians are responsible for making any prescribing and switching decisions.

  12. Developing an OMERACT Core Outcome Set for Assessing Safety Components in Rheumatology Trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klokker, Louise; Tugwell, Peter; Furst, Daniel E

    2016-01-01

    in such COS. The Outcome Measures in Rheumatology (OMERACT) Filter 2.0 emphasizes the importance of measuring harms. The Safety Working Group was reestablished at the OMERACT 2016 with the objective to develop a COS for assessing safety components in trials across rheumatologic conditions. METHODS: The safety......OBJECTIVE: Failure to report harmful outcomes in clinical research can introduce bias favoring a potentially harmful intervention. While core outcome sets (COS) are available for benefits in randomized controlled trials in many rheumatic conditions, less attention has been paid to safety...... that patients consider relevant so that they will be able to make informed decisions. CONCLUSION: The OMERACT Safety Working Group will advance the work previously done within OMERACT using a new patient-driven approach....

  13. The uptake of influenza and pneumococcal vaccination among immunocompromised patients attending rheumatology outpatient clinics.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Haroon, Muhammad

    2011-07-01

    PURPOSE AND OBJECTIVES: The patients using immunosuppressive agents are considered at high risk for acquiring different infections. Accordingly, international guidelines recommend vaccinating such patients against influenza and pneumococcal organisms. The aims of this study were two-fold: (1) to assess the influenza and pneumococcal vaccination uptake among our rheumatology outpatients who are immunosuppressed; (2) to identify the factors influencing immunisation uptake among our sample of patients.

  14. Management of gout by UK rheumatologists: a British Society for Rheumatology national audit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roddy, Edward; Packham, Jon; Obrenovic, Karen; Rivett, Ali; Ledingham, Joanna M

    2018-05-01

    To assess the concordance of gout management by UK rheumatologists with evidence-based best-practice recommendations. Data were collected on patients newly referred to UK rheumatology out-patient departments over an 8-week period. Baseline data included demographics, method of diagnosis, clinical features, comorbidities, urate-lowering therapy (ULT), prophylaxis and blood tests. Twelve months later, the most recent serum uric acid level was collected. Management was compared with audit standards derived from the 2006 EULAR recommendations, 2007 British Society for Rheumatology/British Health Professionals in Rheumatology guideline and the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence febuxostat technology appraisal. Data were collected for 434 patients from 91 rheumatology departments (mean age 59.8 years, 82% male). Diagnosis was crystal-proven in 13%. Of 106 taking a diuretic, this was reduced/stopped in 29%. ULT was continued/initiated in 76% of those with one or more indication for ULT. One hundred and fifty-eight patients started allopurinol: the starting dose was most commonly 100 mg daily (82%); in those with estimated glomerular filtration rate <60 ml/min the highest starting dose was 100 mg daily. Of 199 who started ULT, prophylaxis was co-prescribed for 94%. Fifty patients started a uricosuric or febuxostat: 84% had taken allopurinol previously. Of 44 commenced on febuxostat, 18% had a history of heart disease. By 12 months, serum uric acid levels ⩽360 and <300 μmol/l were achieved by 45 and 25%, respectively. Gout management by UK rheumatologists concords well with guidelines for most audit standards. However, fewer than half of patients achieved a target serum uric level over 12 months. Rheumatologists should help ensure that ULT is optimized to achieve target serum uric acid levels to benefit patients.

  15. [Structural quality of rheumatology clinics for children and adolescents. Paper by a task force of the "Society of Pediatric and Adolescent Rheumatology" and of the "Association of Rheumatology Clinics in Germany"].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michels, H; Ganser, G; Dannecker, G; Forster, J; Häfner, R; Horneff, G; Küster, R M; Lakomek, H-J; Lehmann, H; Minden, K; Rogalski, B; Schöntube, M

    2006-07-01

    Rheumatic diseases in childhood and adolescence differ from those of adulthood according to type, manifestation, treatment and course. A specialized therapy, starting as early as possible, improves the prognosis, can prevent long-term damage and saves the costs of long-term care. Only a specialized pediatric care system can guarantee optimum quality of the processes involved and the results for rheumatology in childhood and adolescence within a global financial system. This requires adequate structural quality of the specialized clinics and departments for pediatric rheumatology. The management of rheumatic diseases in childhood and adolescence is comprehensive and requires a multidisciplinary, specialized and engaged team which can cover the whole spectrum of rheumatic diseases with their various age-dependent aspects. In order to guarantee an adequate, cost-efficient routine, a specialized center which concentrates on inpatient care should treat at least 300 patients with pediatric rheumatic diseases per year. The diagnoses should be divided among the various disease categories with at least 70% of them involving inflammatory rheumatic diseases. For the inpatient care of small children, an accompanying person (parent) is necessary, requiring adequate structures and services. Patient rooms as well as diagnostic (radiography, sonography, etc.) and therapeutic services (physiotherapy, occupational therapy, pool, etc.) must be adequate for small children and school children as well as adolescents. Suitable mother-child units must also be provided and a school for patients is required within the clinic. A pediatric rheumatologist must be available 24 h a day, and it must be possible to reach other specialists within a short time. For painful therapeutic procedures, age-appropriate pain management is obligatory. A continuous adjustment of these recommendations to changing conditions in health politics is intended.

  16. Position paper from the Spanish Society of Rheumatology on biosimilar drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abad Hernández, Miguel Ángel; Andreu, José Luis; Caracuel Ruiz, Miguel Ángel; Belmonte Serrano, Miguel Ángel; Díaz-González, Federico; Moreno Muelas, José Vicente

    2015-01-01

    A biosimilar (BS) is a biological drug that contains a version of the active substance of an already authorized original biological product. The BSs are marketed after patent period of the original drug has ended and once it has been demonstrated that the differences regarding the innovative medicine have no relevant effect on its safety or clinical efficacy. The Spanish Society of Rheumatology, in line with the European Medicines Agency, considers that because of its nature and complexity of production, a BS cannot be considered to be the same as a generic drug. The Spanish Society of Rheumatology expresses an unequivocal commitment to the sustainability of the health system in our country and our steadfast alignment with all measures designed to ensure continuity, without reducing the quality of care. Therefore, we believe that the advent of BSs will likely facilitate access of patients with rheumatic diseases to the biological drugs. This article reviews the European Medicines Agency requirements for authorization, the Spanish legal framework and controversies on BS and presents the position paper of the Spanish Society of Rheumatology on these drugs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  17. Viewpoints of dentists on the use of bisphosphonates in rheumatology patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daron, Coline; Deschaumes, Christophe; Soubrier, Martin; Mathieu, Sylvain

    2018-02-15

    Alhough typically prescribed in oncology, bisphosphonates (BPs) are also employed in rheumatology, particularly for the treatment of osteoporosis, sometimes resulting in complications, such as osteonecrosis of the jaw. Because of different opinions between rheumatologists and dentists on BP use, this study aimed to assess the views of dentists regarding administration of BPs in rheumatology. A questionnaire was sent to 880 dentists from the Auvergne region of France to determine their views on BP treatment. We obtained 382 (43.4%) responses and analysed 376 (58.7% men). In total, 156 (41.5%) of the responders analysed had attended an in-service training course (ISTC) on the topic. A total of 237 (63.0%) systematically inquired as to whether their patients were undergoing BP treatment; this proportion was higher among those who had been practicing for fewer than 10 years (P ISTC (62.6% vs. 50.7%; P < 0.03). Dentists feel ill at ease providing dental surgery to patients receiving BPs. Closer collaboration and better information-sharing between rheumatologists and dentists is necessary to facilitate the administration of BPs in rheumatology. © 2018 FDI World Dental Federation.

  18. Assessment of email communication skills of rheumatology fellows: a pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhuper, Sonal; Siva, Chokkalingam; Fresen, John L; Petruc, Marius; Velázquez, Celso R

    2010-01-01

    Physician–patient email communication is gaining popularity. However, a formal assessment of physicians' email communication skills has not been described. We hypothesized that the email communication skills of rheumatology fellows can be measured in an objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) setting using a novel email content analysis instrument which has 18 items. During an OSCE, we asked 50 rheumatology fellows to respond to a simulated patient email. The content of the responses was assessed using our instrument. The majority of rheumatology fellows wrote appropriate responses scoring a mean (±SD) of 10.6 (±2.6) points (maximum score 18), with high inter-rater reliability (0.86). Most fellows were concise (74%) and courteous (68%) but not formal (22%). Ninety-two percent of fellows acknowledged that the patient's condition required urgent medical attention, but only 30% took active measures to contact the patient. No one encrypted their messages. The objective assessment of email communication skills is possible using simulated emails in an OSCE setting. The variable email communication scores and incidental patient safety gaps identified, suggest a need for further training and defined proficiency standards for physicians' email communication skills. PMID:20962134

  19. Rheumatology education for undergraduate nursing, physiotherapy and occupational therapy students in the UK: standards, challenges and solutions

    OpenAIRE

    Hewlett, S.; Clarke, B.; O?Brien, A.; Hammond, A.; Ryan, S.; Kay, L.; Richards, P.; Almeida, C.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives. Rheumatological conditions are common, thus nurses (Ns) occupational therapists (OTs) and physiotherapists (PTs) require at least basic rheumatology knowledge upon qualifying. The aim of this study was to develop a core set of teaching topics and potential ways of delivering them. Methods. A modified Delphi technique was used for clinicians to develop preliminary core sets of teaching topics for each profession. Telephone interviews with educationalists explored their views on the...

  20. Self-management model in the scheduling of successive appointments in rheumatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro Corredor, David; Cuadra Díaz, José Luis; Mateos Rodríguez, Javier José; Anino Fernández, Joaquín; Mínguez Sánchez, María Dolores; de Lara Simón, Isabel María; Tébar, María Ángeles; Añó, Encarnación; Sanz, María Dolores; Ballester, María Nieves

    2018-01-08

    The rheumatology service of Ciudad Real Hospital, located in an autonomous community of that same name that is nearly in the center of Spain, implemented a self-management model of successive appointments more than 10 years ago. Since then, the physicians of the department schedule follow-up visits for their patients depending on the disease, its course and ancillary tests. The purpose of this study is to evaluate and compare the self-management model for successive appointments in the rheumatology service of Ciudad Real Hospital versus the model of external appointment management implemented in 8 of the hospital's 15 medical services. A comparative and multivariate analysis was performed to identify variables with statistically significant differences, in terms of activity and/or performance indicators and quality perceived by users. The comparison involved the self-management model for successive appointments employed in the rheumatology service of Ciudad Real Hospital and the model for external appointment management used in 8 hospital medical services between January 1 and May 31, 2016. In a database with more than 100,000 records of appointments involving the set of services included in the study, the mean waiting time and the numbers of non-appearances and rescheduling of follow-up visits in the rheumatology department were significantly lower than in the other services. The number of individuals treated in outpatient rheumatology services was 7,768, and a total of 280 patients were surveyed (response rate 63.21%). They showed great overall satisfaction, and the incidence rate of claims was low. Our results show that the self-management model of scheduling appointments has better results in terms of activity indicators and in quality perceived by users, despite the intense activity. Thus, this study could be fundamental for decision making in the management of health care organizations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de

  1. The United States rheumatology workforce: supply and demand, 2005-2025.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deal, Chad L; Hooker, Roderick; Harrington, Timothy; Birnbaum, Neal; Hogan, Paul; Bouchery, Ellen; Klein-Gitelman, Marisa; Barr, Walter

    2007-03-01

    To develop and apply a model that allows prediction of current and future supply and demand for rheumatology services in the US. A supply model was developed using the age and sex distribution of current physicians, retirement and mortality rates, the number of fellowship slots and fill rates, and practice patterns of rheumatologists. A Markov projection model was used to project needs in 5-year increments from 2005 to 2025. The number of rheumatologists for adult patients in the US in 2005 is 4,946. Male and female rheumatologists are equally distributed up to age 44; above age 44, men predominate. The percent of women in adult rheumatology is projected to increase from 30.2% in 2005 to 43.6% in 2025. The mean number of visits per rheumatologist per year is 3,758 for male rheumatologists and 2,800 for female rheumatologists. Assuming rheumatology supply and demand are in equilibrium in 2005, the demand for rheumatologists in 2025 is projected to exceed supply by 2,576 adult and 33 pediatric rheumatologists. The primary factors in the excess demand are an aging population which will increase the number of people with rheumatic disorders, growth in the Gross Domestic Product, and flat rheumatology supply due to fixed numbers entering the workforce and to retirements. The productivity of younger rheumatologists and women, who will make up a greater percentage of the future workforce, may also have important effects on supply. Unknown effects that could influence these projections include technology advances, more efficient practice methods, changes in insurance reimbursements, and shifting lifestyles. Current data suggest that the pediatric rheumatology workforce is experiencing a substantial excess of demand versus supply. Based on assessment of supply and demand under current scenarios, the demand for rheumatologists is expected to exceed supply in the coming decades. Strategies for the profession to adapt to this changing health care landscape include increasing

  2. Profile of rheumatology patients willing to report adverse drug reactions: bias from selective reporting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Protić D

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Dragana Protić,1 Nada Vujasinović-Stupar,2 Zoran Bukumirić,3 Slavica Pavlov-Dolijanović,4 Snežana Baltić,5 Slavica Mutavdžin,6 Ljiljana Markovic-Denić,7 Marija Zdravković,8 Zoran Todorović1 1Department of Pharmacology, Clinical Pharmacology and Toxicology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Belgrade, Belgrade, Serbia; 2Department 2, Institute of Rheumatology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Belgrade, Belgrade, Serbia; 3Institute for Medical Statistics and Informatics, Faculty of Medicine, University of Belgrade, Belgrade, Serbia; 4Department 5, Institute of Rheumatology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Belgrade, Belgrade, Serbia; 5Department 5, Institute of Rheumatology, Belgrade, Serbia; 6Institute of Physiology “Rihard Burjan”, Faculty of Medicine, University of Belgrade, Belgrade, Serbia; 7Institute of Epidemiology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Belgrade, Belgrade, Serbia; 8Department of Cardiology, Medical Center “Bežanijska kosa”, Faculty of Medicine, University of Belgrade, Belgrade, Serbia Background: Adverse drug reactions (ADRs have a significant impact on human health and health care costs. The aims of our study were to determine the profile of rheumatology patients willing to report ADRs and to identify bias in such a reporting system. Methods: Semi-intensive ADRs reporting system was used in our study. Patients willing to participate (N=261 completed the questionnaire designed for the purpose of the study at the hospital admission. They were subsequently classified into two groups according to their ability to identify whether they had experienced ADRs during the previous month. Group 1 included 214 out of 261 patients who were able to identify ADRs, and group 2 consisted of 43 out of 261 patients who were not able to identify ADRs in their recent medical history. Results: Group 1 patients were more significantly aware of their diagnosis than the patients from group 2. Marginal significance was found

  3. A Composite Indicator to Assess the Quality of Care in the Management of Patients With Rheumatoid Arthritis in Outpatient Rheumatology Clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Martínez, María Auxiliadora; Andreu-Sanchez, Jose Luis; Sanchez-Alonso, Fernando; Corominas, Hector; Perez-Venegas, Jose Javier; Roman-Ivorra, Jose Andres; Alperi, Mercedes; Blanco-Alonso, Ricardo; Caliz, Rafael; Chamizo-Carmona, Eugenio; Graña-Gil, Jenaro; Hernández, Blanca; Marras, Carlos; Mazzucchelli, Ramon; Medina Luezas, Julio Antonio; Naranjo-Hernández, Antonio; Ortiz, Ana; Roselló, Rosa; Sanchez-Nievas, Ginés; Sanmartí, Raimon; Vela-Casasempere, Paloma

    2017-08-05

    The current guidelines in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) include the early diagnosis and early use of disease modifying drugs to achieve remission or low disease activity level, known as "Treat to Target" (T2T). The objective of this study is to develop a composite indicator (CI) to evaluate the quality of care in the management of patients with RA, according to the T2T strategy and other general recommendations concerning the management of these patients. The phases of the construction of the CI were: 1) selection of quality criteria through expert judgment; 2) prioritization of the criteria, according to relevance and feasibility, applying the Delphi methodology (two rounds) involving 20 experts; 3) design of quality indicators; and 4) calculation of the weighted CI, using the mean value in relevance and feasibility granted by the experts. The source of information for the calculation of the CI are the medical records of patients with RA. Twelve criteria out of 37 required a second Delphi round. Thirty-one criteria were prioritized. These criteria presented a median in relevance and feasibility greater than or equal to 7.5, with an interquartile range of less than 3.5, and a level of agreement (score greater than or equal to 8) greater than or equal to 80%. The constructed CI allows us to evaluate the quality of care of patients with RA following the T2T strategy in the rheumatology units of Spanish hospitals, offering a valid and easily interpretable summary measure. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Reumatología y Colegio Mexicano de Reumatología. All rights reserved.

  4. Examining Changes in Central and Peripheral Pain as Mediates of Fatigue Improvement: Results From the British Society for Rheumatology Biologics Register for Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Druce, Katie L; Jones, Gareth T; Macfarlane, Gary J; Basu, Neil

    2016-07-01

    Following anti-tumor necrosis factor (anti-TNF) therapy, improvements in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) fatigue are driven by reductions in pain. However, therapies may modify both central and peripheral pain. This study sought to examine the hypothesis that reductions in fatigue after anti-TNF therapy reflect changes in central, not peripheral, pain mechanisms. Data came from patients with severe baseline fatigue (Short Form 36 health survey [SF-36] vitality scale ≤12.5; n = 2,652), recruited to the British Society for Rheumatology Biologics Register for RA for commencing anti-TNF therapies between October 2000 and November 2008. Data of interest comprised change over 6 months in fatigue, pain (SF-36 bodily pain scale), and disease activity constituents (Disease Activity Score in 28 joints, erythrocyte sedimentation rate [ESR], global health, swollen joints, and tender joints). Principal components factor analysis with varimax rotation determined latent variables of symptom change; variables were accepted provided they had eigenvalues ≥1. Six factors were identified, of which 2 met acceptance criteria (eigenvalues of 2.39 and 1.14, respectively). Following rotation, loadings indicated that factor 1 comprised markers of peripheral inflammation: change in ESR, swollen joints, tender joints, and global health. This distinct loading led to factor 1 being labeled peripheral inflammation. Conversely, factor 2 comprised change in pain, fatigue, and global health and an absence of peripheral inflammation markers and was therefore labeled central inflammation. Following anti-TNF therapies, reductions in fatigue and pain appear to reflect improvements in central, rather than peripheral, inflammation. Therefore, for those seeking to treat fatigue via pain mechanisms, improvements may be maximized by the application of treatment modalities that effectively target central mechanisms. © 2016, American College of Rheumatology.

  5. Association between periodontal disease temporomandibular disorders and rheumatoid arthritis among patients visiting rheumatology centers in Bengaluru City: A cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijay Kumar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Association between rheumatoid arthritis (RA, periodontitis and temporomandibular disorder (TMD can be an outcome of the existing inflammatory conditions or involvement of joints at a different level of severity. Aim: This study aims to find an association between periodontal disease and TMDs and RA among patients visiting various Rheumatology centers in Bengaluru city. Materials and Methods: A total of 100 RA patients and age- and gender-matched comparison group were recruited from various Rheumatology centers in Bengaluru city. Periodontal status and loss of attachment (LOA were measured from the World Health Organization (2013 criteria and TMDs and severity were assessed using Helkimo index (1987. Data were analyzed and comparisons were done using Chi-square test and independent t-test (P < 0.05. Correlation and association are measured through spearman's correlation and logistic regression analysis. Results: There was a significant difference regarding shallow and deep periodontal pocket depth among RA (4.62 ± 2.33, 1.48 ± 1.7 and comparison (3.48 ± 2.53, 0.83 ± 1.05 groups (P = 0.01. Impaired mobility (P = 0.012, altered function (P = 0.032, painful function (P = 0.023, muscle pain (P = 0.028, and temporomandibular joint pain (P = 0.048 differed significantly between RA group and comparison group. RA patients were more likely to suffer from TMD (OR = 4.88 and LOA (OR = 2.16 than the comparison group. Conclusion: Periodontitis and TMD are found to be associated with RA. A dental check-up for patients suffering from RA should be part of the routine RA assessment.

  6. DOE ZERH Case Study: Greenhill Contracting, Green Acres #20, #26, #28, New Paltz, NY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2015-09-01

    Case study of three DOE 2015 Housing Innovation Award winning custom homes in the cold climate that got a HERS of 26, 28, and 26 without PV or -3, -1, and -3.5 with PV; with R-22 ICFs, 10” ocsf plus 2.7” c ccsf in attic; ICF basements with 4.3” ccsf under slab; tri;e-pane windows; ERVs, ground source heat pumps (COP 5.7).

  7. The prevalence of medical nomadism of the followed patients in rheumatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudali, Aziza; Bahiri, Rachid; Hmamouchi, Ihssane; Abouqal, Redouane; Abouqual, Redouane; Hajjaj Hassouni, Najia

    2012-06-01

    The nomads are defined as patients related to multiple practicians of the same speciality or different specialities for the same symptomatology during a certain period. The objectives of this investigation were to evaluate the prevalence of medical nomadism of the followed patients in rheumatology and compare their profile with those patients followed in neurology and gastroenterology. A multicentric transverse study (September 2009-March 2010) was conducted in three departments of CHU Ibn Sina Rabat-Salé, Morocco; rheumatology, gastroenterology and neurology. Only patients seen in external consultations were included. Patients' socio-economic and demographic background (familial status, instruction level, monthly revenue, social assistance) were recorded, as well as the clinical parameters related to the pathology (pathology, duration of the illness, diagnosis final time). A questionnaire containing variables on the patients' state concerning diagnosis, satisfaction degree of the patients and other variables evaluated the notion of taking medication and the practice of alternative medicine. Medical nomadism has been defined by the consultation for the same symptomatology of three different practicians, either of the same speciality or of different specialities during the study period of 6 months. There were 250 patients included in this study (150 patients in rheumatology, 50 in gastroenterology and 50 in neurology), the mean age was 46 ± 13 years and females dominated (65.6%). The average duration of the evolution was 7 ± 5 years, 35% of the patients were illiterate, 30% had a primary school education, 22% had a secondary school education and 13% had a university-level education. Sixty-two percent of the patients were jobless, 27% were workers, 9% were the functionary and 2% were the based liberal. Fifty-six percent had no social assistance. Rheumatoid arthritis and degenerative pathology were the most frequent diagnoses in rheumatology, being 20% and

  8. PERICARDIAL FEATURES OF IN-HOSPITAL RHEUMATOLOGY PATIENTS: AN OBSERVATIONAL STUDY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakalli, Aurora; Rexhepi, Mjellma; Rexhepi, Blerta; Koçinaj, Dardan

    Rheumatic disorders can be associated with pericarditis, but severe forms of pericarditis are rare. The aim of this observational study was to evaluate pericardial features in patients with different rheumatic diseases. Thirty-five patients hospitalized at the Clinic of Rheumatology, University Clinical Center of Kosovo, from October 1 to October 21, 2014 were included in the study. Demographic data, history, laboratory, ECG, and echocardiography data, with special emphasis on the analysis of the pericardium, were obtained from each patient. Echocardiography was especially focused on the amount of pericardial fluid and pericardial thickness in the posterior wall of the heart. Mean patient age was 51.5 ± 13.8 years. 65.7% of the patients were women. Out of the patients that we analyzed, 88.6% had an inflammatory rheumatologic disease. 11.3% of the patients had mild symptoms, in 68.7% the symptoms were moderate, and in 20% severe. In all patients, pericardial hyperechogenicity was marked, with a mean pericardial thickness of 4.68 ± 1.66 mm. Pericardial effusion in a small amount was present in 57.1% of patients, with a mean pericardial fluid amount of 3.3 ± 1.9 mm. The severity of rheumatic disease had a positive and significant correlation with the presence of pericardial effusion (r= 0.29, p=0.04) and its amount (r= 0.28, p=0.05). The patients had not been aware of the pericardial involvement and did not have any clinical symptoms. In conclusion, in this short-term small observational study pericardial changes were a frequent finding in the rheumatology patients. In general, the pericarditis was subclinical and with small amounts of effusion. The disease activity of rheumatic disorders can be associated with pericarditis. Further studies with larger samples of patients and of longer duration are needed to further explore this issue.

  9. Continuing Professional Development Evaluation: Two Rapid Review Courses inNephrology and Rheumatology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah Shehab

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Continuing professional development (CPD is anovel approach to increase professional knowledge and skills. The aim of this study is to explore participants’ characteristics and to understand participants’ views on two rapid review courses (RRCs as part of CPD program, and to assess healthcare providers’ views about the use of internet for accessing medical information.Methods: Data were collected from 150 participants who attended an RRC in Nephrology and Rheumatology as part of an ongoing CME program.Results: Participants’ response rate was 92% and 84.4% in Nephrology and Rheumatology RRCs, respectively. Participants’ Mean Age±SD were 39±2.1 and 41±2.1 years in the Nephrology and Rheumatology courses, respectively. Demographic variables, i.e., age, gender, and specialization showed a significant (p<0.01 impact on the learning objectives of the program. Further, participants reported that the course material had a significant (p<0.02 impacton their knowledge. Finding new medical information was the primary motive to search the internet among all participants. About half of the subjects reported knowledge of their preferred medical education sites and had access at their clinical setup. Barriers to internet use included lack of specific information, difficulty to download contents, and excessive material. Professional association websites, online journals, and CME programs were the most frequently searched sources of information. Most of the subjects reported significant (p<0.02 barriers to find medical resources on the internet and to adequately utilize the currently available medical search engines available in the healthcare system.Conclusion: A discipline specific and integrated CPD programmay have provided dual benefit such as accredited CME hours and a significant change in the participants’ knowledge. There is a need to increase Internet accessibility and capacity in the current healthcare facilities. Future CPD

  10. Patients' Perspectives on Information and Communication About Sexual and Relational Issues in Rheumatology Health Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helland, Ylva; Dagfinrud, Hanne; Haugen, Mona-Iren; Kjeken, Ingvild; Zangi, Heidi

    2017-06-01

    Men and women with rheumatic diseases report a significantly negative impact on multiple areas of life, including sexuality. Research indicates that patients want to discuss sexual issues with health professionals (HPs) in rheumatology care but these issues are rarely addressed in consultations. The objective of the present study was to explore patients' experiences of communication with HPs about disease-related sexual issues, their perceptions of the relevance of these issues in rheumatology care and their preferences for how these topics should be handled. A qualitative design was used and 18 semi-structured interviews were performed, including eight women and ten men with inflammatory rheumatic joint diseases, aged 29-62 years. The interviews were recorded and transcribed verbatim. Data were analysed thematically. Four main themes were derived from the interviews: (i) relevance of sexual issues; (ii) vital conditions for communication; (iii) individual preferences in mode and timing of information and communication; and (iv) benefits of information and communication. The participants expressed that, although sexual issues are relevant, necessary conditions for good communication are largely lacking. HPs' knowledge, experience and personal skills, as well as having sufficient time were essential. HPs lack of initiating sexual topics contributed to uncertainty about whether their sexual challenges were disease related and whether it was a legitimate topic to discuss in rheumatology care. Patients wanted HPs to possess knowledge about possible disease-related challenges in sexual life and intimate relationships, and to facilitate communication about these aspects. There is a need to develop practice guidelines to enable HPs to integrate sexual issues as an aspect of healthcare delivery in a patient-friendly manner. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Canadian Rheumatology Association Meeting, The Westin Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada, February 8-11, 2017.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverman, Earl D

    2017-05-01

    The 72nd Annual Meeting of The Canadian Rheumatology Association (CRA) was held at The Westin Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada, February 8-11, 2017. The program consisted of presentations covering original research, symposia, awards, and lectures. Highlights of the meeting include the following 2017 award winners: Dr. Vinod Chandran, Young Investigator; Dr. Jacques P. Brown, Distinguished Investigator; Dr. David Robinson, Teacher-Educator; Dr. Michel Zummer, Distinguished Rheumatologist; Ms. Rebecca Gole, Best Abstract on SLE Research by a Trainee - Ian Watson Award; Ms. Bailey Russell, Best Abstract on Clinical or Epidemiology Research by a Trainee - Phil Rosen Award; Dr. Sahil Koppikar and Dr. Henry Averns, Practice Reflection Award; Dr. Shirine Usmani, Best Abstract on Basic Science Research by a Trainee; Ms. Carol Dou, Best Abstract for Research by an Undergraduate Student; Dr. Dania Basodan, Best Abstract on Research by a Rheumatology Resident; Dr. Claire Barber, Best Abstract on Adult Research by Young Faculty; Ms. Audrea Chen, Best Abstract by a Medical Student; Dr. Kun Huang, Best Abstract by a Post-Graduate Resident; and Dr. Ryan Lewinson, Best Abstract by a Post-Graduate Research Trainee. Lectures and other events included a Keynote Lecture by Jonathon Fowles: Exercise is Medicine: Is Exercise a Good or Bad Thing for People with Arthritis?; State of the Art Lecture by Matthew Warman: Insights into Bone Biology and Therapeutics Gleaned from the Sustained Investigation of Rare Diseases; Dunlop-Dottridge Lecture by Allen Steere: Lyme Disease: A New Problem for Rheumatologists in Canada; and the Great Debate: Be it Resolved that the Least Expensive Treatment Should be Chosen. Switch, Switch, Switch! Arguing for: Jonathan Chan and Antonio Avina, and against: Marinka Twilt and Glen Hazlewood. Topics such as rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, systemic sclerosis, Sjögren syndrome, psoriatic arthritis, spondyloarthritis, vasculitis, osteoarthritis

  12. Association between antinuclear antibody titers and connective tissue diseases in a Rheumatology Department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menor Almagro, Raúl; Rodríguez Gutiérrez, Juan Francisco; Martín-Martínez, María Auxiliadora; Rodríguez Valls, María José; Aranda Valera, Concepción; de la Iglesia Salgado, José Luís

    To determine the dilution titles at antinuclear antibodies (ANA) by indirect immunofluorescence observed in cell substrate HEp-2 and its association with the diagnosis of systemic connective tissue disease in ANA test requested by a Rheumatology Unit. Samples of patients attended for the first time in the rheumatology unit, without prior ANA test, between January 2010 and December 2012 were selected. The dilution titers, immunofluorescence patterns and antigen specificity were recorded. In January 2015 the diagnosis of the patients were evaluated and classified in systemic disease connective tissue (systemic lupus erythematosus, Sjögren's syndrome, systemic sclerosis, undifferentiated connective, antiphospholipid syndrome, mixed connective tissue and inflammatory myophaty) or not systemic disease connective tissue. A total of 1282 ANA tests requested by the Rheumatology Unit in subjects without previous study, 293 were positive, predominance of women (81.9%). Patients with systemic connective tissue disease were recorded 105, and 188 without systemic connective tissue disease. For 1/640 dilutions the positive predictive value in the connective was 73.3% compared to 26.6% of non-connective, and for values ≥1/1,280 85% versus 15% respectively. When performing the multivariate analysis we observed a positive association between 1/320 dilution OR 3.069 (95% CI: 1.237-7.614; P=.016), 1/640 OR 12.570 (95% CI: 3.659-43.187; P=.000) and ≥1/1,280 OR 42.136 (95% CI: 8.604-206.345; P=.000). These results show association titles dilution ≥1/320 in ANA's first test requested by a Rheumatology Unit with patients with systemic connective tissue disease. The VPP in these patients was higher than previous studies requested by other medical specialties. This may indicate the importance of application of the test in a targeted way. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Reumatología y Colegio Mexicano de Reumatología. All rights reserved.

  13. Rheumatology in the Italian literary fiction: “La Longobarda” by Giorgio Conconi (1999

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Marson

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available In the literary fiction “La Longobarda” by Giorgio Conconi (1999 the protagonist Linda narrates her life, when about fifty she falls ill because of arthritis, thus looking prematurely older and suffering from severe disturbances of body image. This fiction represents an uncommon case of contemporary literature dealing with rheumatological topics. In the present note, it has shown how literature can contribute in several ways to achievement in the human dimension of medicine, by teaching physician concrete and powerful lessons about the lives of sick people.

  14. The concept of incomplete fibromyalgia syndrome: comparison of incomplete fibromyalgia syndrome with fibromyalgia syndrome by 1990 ACR classification criteria and its implications for newer criteria and clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yunus, Muhammad B; Aldag, Jean C

    2012-03-01

    The 1990 American College of Rheumatology (ACR) classification criteria for fibromyalgia/fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) has 2 components: (a) widespread pain (WSP) and (b) presence of 11 or more tender points (TP) among possible 18 sites. Some clinic patients fulfill 1 component but not the other. We have considered these patients to have incomplete FMS (IFMS). The purpose of this study was to examine the clinical and psychological differences between IFMS and FMS (by 1990 ACR criteria) because such comparison may be helpful to diagnose patients in the clinic. Six hundred consecutive patients referred to our rheumatology clinic with a diagnosis of FMS were examined by a standard protocol to determine whether they fulfilled the 1990 criteria for FMS. Both IFMS and FMS groups were compared in demographic, clinical, and psychological variables using appropriate statistical methods. One hundred twelve (18.7%) patients did not satisfy the 1990 ACR criteria and were classified as IFMS. Symptoms in IFMS and FMS were similar, generally with less frequent and less severe symptoms in the IFMS group. In IFMS, no significant difference was found among the WSP and TP component subgroups. Both TP and WSP were correlated with important features of FMS. Fulfillment of the ACR 1990 criteria is not necessary for a diagnosis of FMS in the clinic. For diagnosis and management of FMS in the clinical setting, IFMS patients, along with consideration of the total clinical picture, may be considered to have FMS, albeit generally mild.

  15. Patient's Knowledge and Perception Towards the use of Non-steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs in Rheumatology Clinic Northern Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulaiman, Wahinuddin; Seung, Ong Ping; Ismail, Rosli

    2012-11-01

    In Rheumatology, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) has been widely prescribed and used. However, despite their clinical benefits in the management of inflammatory and degenerative joint disease, NSAIDs have considerable side effects, mostly affecting the upper gastrointestinal system, which therefore, limit their use. This study was conducted to determine the patients' knowledge and perception regarding the used of NSAIDS. A total of 120 patients who attended the rheumatology clinic Hospital, Raja Permaisuri Bainun, Malaysia, and received NSAIDs more than 3 months were interviewed irrespective of their rheumatological conditions. Patient's knowledge and perception on the side effects of NSAIDs were recorded. Fifty-four percent of the patients obtained information regarding the side effect of NSAIDs either from the rheumatologist, rheumatology staff nurse or other medical staffs (75.4%). The remaining 45.8% were naive of such knowledge. Fifteen percent obtained the information by surfing the internet and 9.2% from printed media. Twenty-four (24.2%) patients, experienced indigestion and/or stomach discomfort attributed to NSAIDs used. Two patients (1.7%) had hematemesis and malena once. This study shows that half of the patients who attended the rheumatology clinic were unaware of the side effect of NSAIDs. Available data showed that most of the knowledgeable patients are more conscience and self-educated. This study also reveals the important roles of clinicians, trained staff nurses as well as the pharmacist in providing the guidance and knowledge of any medication taken by patients.

  16. Indicadores del estrés oxidativo en pacientes afectados por VIH/sida con manifestaciones reumatológicas Oxidative stress indicators for HIV/AIDS patients with rheumatologic manifestations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Pomier Suárez

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Introducción: el estrés oxidativo se ha reconocido como cofactor en la progresión de la infección por el virus de la inmunodeficiencia humana (VIH y en las manifestaciones reumatológicas. Objetivo: valorar los indicadores del estrés oxidativo en los pacientes afectados por VIH con manifestaciones reumatológicas. Métodos: se estudiaron 31 pacientes VIH con manifestaciones reumatológicas y se compararon los índices evaluados con un grupo control, 31 individuos aparentemente sanos. Los pacientes fueron clasificados según los siguientes criterios de actividad: escala de actividad de la enfermedad para manifestaciones reumatológicas, e índice de actividad de enfermedad y la escala visual analógica de dolor nocturno para manifestaciones reumatológicas. Las concentraciones plasmáticas de los indicadores de estrés oxidativo fueron cuantificadas mediante técnicas espectrofotométricas y el análisis estadístico realizado, mediante el programa estadístico SPSS 13. Resultados: los pacientes VIH evaluados presentaron un estrés oxidativo de moderado a severo, caracterizado por aumento significativo de los parámetros indicadores de daño oxidativo y disminución de los sistemas antioxidantes (pIntroduction: the oxidative stress has been recognized as a cofactor in the progression of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infection and in the rheumatologic manifestations. Objective: to assess the oxidative stress indicators in those HIV patients with rheumatologic manifestations. Methods: thirty one HIV patients with rheumatologic manifestations were studied and the evaluated indexes were compared to those of a control group made up of 31 apparently healthy individuals. The patients were classified according to the following activity criteria: scale of the disease activity for the rheumatologic manifestations, and index of disease activity and the analogical visual scale of pain at night in terms of the rheumatologic manifestations. The

  17. Monitoring of Urate-Lowering Therapy Among US Veterans Following the 2012 American College of Rheumatology Guidelines for Management of Gout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Jonathan C; Wallace, Jessica L; Bryant, Candace L; Salvig, Brent E; Fourakre, T Neal; Stone, William J

    2017-04-01

    With the prevalence of and hospitalizations for gout increasing, optimizing care for patients with gout is imperative. The 2012 American College of Rheumatology gout guidelines emphasize that timely monitoring is key to achieving serum urate (SUA) goals. Few studies have examined this metric following the 2012 update, and to our knowledge, none have examined a veteran population. To evaluate adherence to urate-lowering therapy (ULT) monitoring guidelines in a veteran population. This is a single-center, multisite, retrospective chart review of US veterans receiving ULT for gout within the VA (Veterans Affairs) Tennessee Valley Healthcare System from January 1, 2013, to June 30, 2015. The primary end point was percentage of patients with a SUA within 6 months of initial xanthine oxidase inhibitor prescription. Secondary end points included percentage of patients with SUA <6 mg/dL and percentage of patients with uptitration following SUA above goal. A total of 601 patients met inclusion criteria for the study; after application of exclusion criteria, 505 were analyzed. Of these, 295 patients (58%) did not have a SUA drawn within 6 months, and 162 patients (32%) reached the end of the study period without SUA measured. Of 226 patients with SUA above goal on initial check, 64 (28%) had timely dose adjustment, whereas 143 patients (63%) had no adjustment. A total of 161 patients (32%) had a SUA at goal within the study period. Rates of ULT monitoring at a major VA medical center were suboptimal, and improved adherence to guideline recommendations is needed.

  18. Increased occurrence of cardiovascular events and comorbidities in a general rheumatology cohort.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Mohammad, A

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: To identify cardiovascular and other comorbidities in a general rheumatology cohort. METHODS: Interviews\\/retrospective chart audits were conducted on 1,000 patients attending rheumatology outpatient clinics of a university teaching hospital. Comorbidities were classified using the Charlson comorbidity index (Ambrose et al. in Ir J Med Sci 178(1):53-55, 2009). RESULTS: Mean age 58 +\\/- 15.3 years, mean BMI 26. Of the patients, 400 (40%) were diagnosed with dyslipidemia and hypertension (p = 0.002), 160 (16%) with obesity and 80 (8%) with hypothyroidism. Overall 160 (16%) patients were diagnosed with coronary heart disease (CHD). Of these, 120 (75%) had RA (p = 0.001), 100 (63%) were male, mean age 60 +\\/- 15.8 years, 120 (75%) had dyslipidemia and BMI > 30 (p = 0.002), 112 (70%) were smokers (p = 0.002), 40 (25%) were diagnosed with diabetes mellitus and 20 (12%) with hypothyroidism. CONCLUSIONS: The increased prevalence of these comorbidities may serve as a reminder to the rheumatologists that many of their patients will have coexistent disease of which they need to be aware to properly plan their management.

  19. Infections in an inpatient rheumatology unit: how big is the problem?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romana Vieira

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Patients with rheumatic diseases are at high risk of infections. As quantification and characterization of infections in daily practice is a crucial exercise to delineate strategies to overcome this problem, we aimed to describe the prevalence of infections in an inpatient rheumatology unit. A cross-sectional analysis of all patients admitted at the São João Hospital Centre Rheumatology Unit between January 1st 2012 and December 31st 2013 was performed. We found a 31.7% (n=79 period prevalence of infection and a total number of infections of 97 (1.23 infections per patient. They were the admission reason in 17.6% (n=44 and hospital acquired in 19.0% (n=15 of the cases. The urinary tract was the most commonly affected (32.0%; n=31 and Escherichia coli (17.5%; n=17 the most frequently identified infectious agent. Infection prolonged the hospital length of stay in 34.2% (n=27 of the cases but any death occurred as a direct consequence of it. Patients with infection were older, had longer rheumatic disease duration and longer hospital length of stay than those without infection. We conclude that the prevalence of infection in our inpatient population is high but most cases were non complicated, easily treated with common antibiotics and, importantly, not associated with higher lethality.

  20. Lifestyle and dietary habits of patients with gout followed in rheumatology settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manara, M; Carrara, G; Scirè, C A; Cimmino, M A; Govoni, M; Montecucco, C; Matucci-Cerinic, M; Minisola, G; Study Group, The King

    2015-12-23

    Diet and lifestyles modification are core aspects of the non-pharmacological management of gout, but a poor consistency with suggested guidelines is reported. This study aimed to investigate dietary and lifestyle habits of patients with gout followed in rheumatology settings. Data were retrieved from the baseline dataset of the KING study, a multicentre cohort study of patients with gout followed in rheumatology settings. Dietary habits were assessed with the Italian National Institute of Statistics (ISTAT) food-frequency questionnaire and compared with reported data about general population. The relative increase of exposure was estimated by standardized prevalence ratios adjusted for gender, age and geographical distribution. The study population included 446 patients, with a mean age of 63.9 years and a M/F ratio of 9:1. Compared to the Italian population, gouty patients showed a higher prevalence of obesity [1.82 (1.52-2.18)] and a higher consumption of wine [1.85 (1.48-2.32)] and beer [2.21 (1.68-2.90)], but a lower prevalence of smoking and a lower intake of liquor. They showed a lower intake of red meat [0.80 (0.71-0.91)], but a similar intake of other tested dietary factors. Gouty patients' lifestyle is still partially different from the recommended.

  1. Survey of herbal cannabis (marijuana) use in rheumatology clinic attenders with a rheumatologist confirmed diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ste-Marie, Peter A; Shir, Yoram; Rampakakis, Emmanouil; Sampalis, John S; Karellis, Angela; Cohen, Martin; Starr, Michael; Ware, Mark A; Fitzcharles, Mary-Ann

    2016-12-01

    Cannabinoids may hold potential for the management of rheumatic pain. Arthritis, often self-reported, is commonly cited as the reason for the use of medicinal herbal cannabis (marijuana). We have examined the prevalence of marijuana use among 1000 consecutive rheumatology patients with a rheumatologist-confirmed diagnosis and compared in an exploratory manner the clinical characteristics of medicinal users and nonusers. Current marijuana use, medicinal or recreational, was reported by 38 patients (3.8%; 95% CI: 2.8-5.2). Ever use of marijuana for medical purposes was reported by 4.3% (95% CI: 3.2-5.7), with 28 (2.8%; 95% CI: 1.9-4.0) reporting current medicinal use. Current medicinal users had a spectrum of rheumatic conditions, with over half diagnosed with osteoarthritis. Medicinal users were younger, more likely unemployed or disabled, and reported poorer global health. Pain report and opioid use was greater for users, but they had similar physician global assessment of disease status compared with nonusers. Medicinal users were more likely previous recreational users, with approximately 40% reporting concurrent recreational use. Therefore, less than 3% of rheumatology patients reported current use of medicinal marijuana. This low rate of use in patients with a rheumatologist-confirmed diagnosis is in stark contrast to the high rates of severe arthritis frequently reported by medicinal marijuana users, especially in Canada. Familiarity with marijuana as a recreational product may explain use for some as disease status was similar for both groups.

  2. Patient involvement in rheumatology outpatient service design and delivery: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, Savia; Galloway, James; Simpson, Carol; Chura, Radka; Dobson, Joanne; Gullick, Nicola J; Steer, Sophia; Lempp, Heidi

    2017-06-01

    Patient involvement is increasingly recognized as important within the UK National Health Service to ensure that services delivered are relevant to users' needs. Organizations are encouraged to work with service users to achieve excellence in care. Patient education can improve health outcomes and reduce health-care costs. Mobile technologies could play a vital role in this. Patient-centred development of innovative strategies to improve the experience of rheumatology outpatients. The Group Rheumatology Initiative Involving Patients (GRIIP) project was set up in 2013 as a joint venture between patients, clinicians, academics and management at a London hospital. The project saw (i) the formation of an independent patient group which provided suggestions for service improvement - outcomes included clearer signs in the outpatient waiting area, extended phlebotomy opening hours and better access to podiatry; (ii) a rolling patient educational evening programme initiated in 2014 with topics chosen by patient experts - feedback has been positive and attendance continues to grow; and (iii) a mobile application (app) co-designed with patients launched in 2015 which provides relevant information for outpatient clinic attendees and data capture for clinicians - downloads have steadily increased as users adopt this new technology. Patients can effectively contribute to service improvement provided they are supported, respected as equals, and the organization is willing to undergo a cultural change. © 2016 The Authors. Health Expectations Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. EVALUATION OF ULTRASOUND REMISSION CRITERIA IN PATIENTS WITH RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS DURING TOCILIZUMAB THERAPY

    OpenAIRE

    Rita Aleksandrovna Osipyants; D E Karateev; E Yu Panasyuk; G V Lukina; A V Smirnov; S I Glukhova; E N Aleksandrova; A V Volkov; E L Nasonov

    2013-01-01

    Objective: to study the association of ultrasound (US) remission criteria with the clinical and laboratory indicators of inflammatory activity, functional status, and X-ray changes in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) during tocilizumab (TCZ) therapy.Subjects and methods. The trial included 36 patients with RA (meeting the 1987 American College of Rheumatology (ACR) criteria) who had received TCZ for 6 months. The authors made a clinical and laboratory assessment of RA activity (DAS28-C...

  4. Comparing new diagnostic criteria of 2010 ACR/EULAR with 1987 ACR criteria in rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Shirani

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA is a chronic inflammatory disease presenting with inflammation, tenderness and destruction of the synovial joints, resulting in severe disability and early death due to complication of disease. Previous diagnostic criteria are not useful for identifying patients who need early treatment. Thus, new diagnostic criteria for faster diagnosis of disease are introduced in 2010. The aim of this study was to compared 1987 ACR (American College of Rheumatology criteria and 2010 ACR/EULAR (European League Against Rheumatism classification criteria for diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis. Methods: In this Cohort prospective study, patients with early arthritis were evaluated   according to the old and new diagnostic criteria and followed-up every two monthly for one year (2012-2013 in Hazrat-e Rasool University Hospital, Tehran. Inclusion criteria of this study were age more than 18 year and indefinite diagnosis of arthritis. For all of patients physical examination by expert rheumatologist was done and lab data include erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR, C-reactive protein (CRP, anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide (Anti-CCP and rheumatoid factor was requested. The sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values were then determined for each diagnostic criteria. Results: In this study 104 patients including 28 males (26.9% and 76 females (73.1% with the mean age of 44.2±13.7 years were included. At the end of one year follow-up, 82 were diagnosed to have RA while other 22 patients were not categorized as RA. Sensitivity for ESR, CRP, Anti-CCP and rheumatoid factor in 2010 ACR/EULAR criteria was 52%, 19%, 48%, 28% and specificity for them was 45%, 71%, 27%, 79% respectively. Number of small and large joint arthritis were more in patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA rather than other arthritis (P=0.0001. Sensitivity and specificity for small joints involvement was 87% and 54% and for large joints

  5. Analysis of information on rheumatology from a selected Internet forum in the context of the need for telemedicine solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafał Szpakowski

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of this study was to determine how often patients and undiagnosed people who complain of musculoskeletal system and rheumatic diseases look for knowledge contained on an Internet forum. Content analysis was used to identify the level of Internet users’ activity in the rheumatology section, compared to other areas of medicine. Material and methods : Material included information posted on the Internet forum established at http://medyczka.pl/. The method employed was a quantitative and qualitative analysis of the content. The method was based on qualitative assessment of the first post in each thread presented on the rheumatologic subforum, by assigning keywords, subjectively determined by the researcher, to such a post. For each keyword a specific definition was established, determining a situation in which a given keyword was used. Results: The quantitative analysis qualified rheumatology in the last place in terms of Internet users’ activity compared to other branches of medicine. The qualitative assessment of the rheumatologic forum indicated that the three most common keywords were joint pain (32, joints swelling (13, and schoolage (13. The three most common intentional keywords (arranged in order of their decreasing number were diagnosis based on symptoms (29, interpretation of the laboratory test results (9, and how to deal with symptoms (8. Conclusions : The analysis leads to the conclusion that the rheumatologic subforum, along with other subforums listed above, presents a critically low level of discussion. There is a large disproportion between the number of active and passive forum users, suggesting that numerous individuals search the forum for presented information. Based on the qualitative analysis of the information stocks of the rheumatologic subforum, it was established that most of the questions posted concerned young individuals, who complained of joint pain and swelling, and asked for a possible

  6. Rheumatology education for undergraduate nursing, physiotherapy and occupational therapy students in the UK: standards, challenges and solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewlett, S; Clarke, B; O'Brien, A; Hammond, A; Ryan, S; Kay, L; Richards, P; Almeida, C

    2008-07-01

    Rheumatological conditions are common, thus nurses (Ns) occupational therapists (OTs) and physiotherapists (PTs) require at least basic rheumatology knowledge upon qualifying. The aim of this study was to develop a core set of teaching topics and potential ways of delivering them. A modified Delphi technique was used for clinicians to develop preliminary core sets of teaching topics for each profession. Telephone interviews with educationalists explored their views on these, and challenges and solutions for delivering them. Inter-professional workshops enabled clinicians and educationalists to finalize the core set together, and generate methods for delivery. Thirty-nine rheumatology clinicians (12N, 14OT, 13PT) completed the Delphi consensus, proposing three preliminary core sets (N71 items, OT29, PT26). Nineteen educationalists (6N, 7OT, 6PT) participated in telephone interviews, raising concerns about disease-specific vs generic teaching and proposing many methods for delivery. Three inter-professional workshops involved 34 participants (clinicians: N12, OT9, PT5; educationalists: N2, OT3, PT2; Patient 1) who reached consensus on a single core set comprising six teaching units: Anatomy and Physiology; Assessment; Management and Intervention; Psychosocial Issues; Patient Education; and the Multi-disciplinary Team, recommending some topics within the units receive greater depth for some professions. An innovative range of delivery options was generated plus two brief interventions: a Rheumatology Chat Show and a Rheumatology Road Show. Working together, clinicians and educationalists proposed a realistic core set of rheumatology topics for undergraduate health professionals. They proposed innovative delivery methods, with collaboration between educationalists, clinicians and patients strongly recommended. These potential interventions need testing.

  7. Analysis of information on rheumatology from a selected Internet forum in the context of the need for telemedicine solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szpakowski, Rafał; Maślińska, Maria; Dykowska, Grażyna; Zając, Patrycja

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine how often patients and undiagnosed people who complain of musculoskeletal system and rheumatic diseases look for knowledge contained on an Internet forum. Content analysis was used to identify the level of Internet users' activity in the rheumatology section, compared to other areas of medicine. Material included information posted on the Internet forum established at http://medyczka.pl/. The method employed was a quantitative and qualitative analysis of the content. The method was based on qualitative assessment of the first post in each thread presented on the rheumatologic subforum, by assigning keywords, subjectively determined by the researcher, to such a post. For each keyword a specific definition was established, determining a situation in which a given keyword was used. The quantitative analysis qualified rheumatology in the last place in terms of Internet users' activity compared to other branches of medicine. The qualitative assessment of the rheumatologic forum indicated that the three most common keywords were joint pain (32), joints swelling (13), and schoolage (13). The three most common intentional keywords (arranged in order of their decreasing number) were diagnosis based on symptoms (29), interpretation of the laboratory test results (9), and how to deal with symptoms (8). The analysis leads to the conclusion that the rheumatologic subforum, along with other subforums listed above, presents a critically low level of discussion. There is a large disproportion between the number of active and passive forum users, suggesting that numerous individuals search the forum for presented information. Based on the qualitative analysis of the information stocks of the rheumatologic subforum, it was established that most of the questions posted concerned young individuals, who complained of joint pain and swelling, and asked for a possible diagnosis based on the presented symptomatology, interpretation of the laboratory

  8. Clinical Nononcologic Applications of PET/CT and PET/MRI in Musculoskeletal, Orthopedic, and Rheumatologic Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gholamrezanezhad, Ali; Basques, Kyle; Batouli, Ali; Matcuk, George; Alavi, Abass; Jadvar, Hossein

    2018-06-01

    With improvements in PET/CT and PET/MRI over the last decade, as well as increased understanding of the pathophysiology of musculoskeletal diseases, there is an emerging potential for PET as a primary or complementary modality in the management of rheumatologic and orthopedic conditions. We discuss the role of PET/CT and PET/MRI in nononcologic musculoskeletal disorders, including inflammatory and infectious conditions and postoperative complications. There is great potential for an increased role for PET to serve as a primary or complementary modality in the management of orthopedic and rheumatologic disorders.

  9. An indirect comparison and cost per responder analysis of adalimumab, methotrexate and apremilast in the treatment of methotrexate-naïve patients with psoriatic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betts, Keith A; Griffith, Jenny; Friedman, Alan; Zhou, Zheng-Yi; Signorovitch, James E; Ganguli, Arijit

    2016-01-01

    Apremilast was recently approved for the treatment of active psoriatic arthritis (PsA). However, no studies compare apremilast with methotrexate or biologic therapies, so its relative comparative efficacy remains unknown. This study compared the response rates and incremental costs per responder associated with methotrexate, apremilast, and biologics for the treatment of active PsA. A systematic literature review was performed to identify phase 3 randomized controlled clinical trials of approved biologics, methotrexate, and apremilast in the methotrexate-naïve PsA population. Using Bayesian methods, a network meta-analysis was conducted to indirectly compare rates of achieving a ≥20% improvement in American College of Rheumatology component scores (ACR20). The number needed to treat (NNT) and the incremental costs per ACR20 responder (2014 US$) relative to placebo were estimated for each of the therapies. Three trials (MIPA for methotrexate, PALACE-4 for apremilast, and ADEPT for adalimumab) met all inclusion criteria. The NNTs relative to placebo were 2.63 for adalimumab, 6.69 for apremilast, and 8.31 for methotrexate. Among methotrexate-naïve PsA patients, the 16 week incremental costs per ACR20 responder were $3622 for methotrexate, $26,316 for adalimumab, and $45,808 for apremilast. The incremental costs per ACR20 responder were $222,488 for apremilast vs. methotrexate. Among methotrexate-naive PsA patients, adalimumab was found to have the lowest NNT for one additional ACR20 response and methotrexate was found to have the lowest incremental costs per ACR20 responder. There was no statistical evidence of greater efficacy for apremilast vs. methotrexate. A head-to-head trial between apremilast and methotrexate is recommended to confirm this finding.

  10. Canadian physiotherapists' views on certification, specialisation, extended role practice, and entry-level training in rheumatology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sutton Evelyn

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Since the last decade there has been a gradual change of boundaries of health professions in providing arthritis care. In Canada, some facilities have begun to adopt new arthritis care models, some of which involve physiotherapists (PT working in extended roles. However, little is known about PTs' interests in these new roles. The primary objective of this survey was to determine the interests among orthopaedic physiotherapists (PTs in being a certified arthritis therapist, a PT specialized in arthritis, or an extended scope practitioner in rheumatology, and to explore the associated factors, including the coverage of arthritis content in the entry-level physiotherapy training. Methods Six hundred PTs practicing in orthopaedics in Canada were randomly selected to receive a postal survey. The questionnaire covered areas related to clinical practice, perceptions of rheumatology training received, and attitudes toward PT roles in arthritis care. Logistic regression models were developed to explore the associations between PTs' interests in pursuing each of the three extended scope practice designations and the personal/professional/attitudinal variables. Results We received 286 questionnaires (response rate = 47.7%; 258 contained usable data. The average length of time in practice was 15.4 years (SD = 10.4. About 1 in 4 PTs agreed that they were interested in assuming advanced practice roles (being a certified arthritis therapist = 28.9%, being a PT specialized in rheumatology = 23.3%, being a PT practitioner = 20.9%. Having a caseload of ≥ 40% in arthritis, having a positive attitude toward advanced practice roles in arthritis care and toward the formal credentialing process, and recognizing the difference between certification and specialisation were associated with an interest in pursing advanced practice roles. Conclusion Orthopaedic PTs in Canada indicated a fair level of interest in pursuing certification, specialisation

  11. Policy challenges for the pediatric rheumatology workforce: Part II. Health care system delivery and workforce supply.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henrickson, Michael

    2011-01-01

    The United States pediatric population with chronic health conditions is expanding. Currently, this demographic comprises 12-18% of the American child and youth population. Affected children often receive fragmented, uncoordinated care. Overall, the American health care delivery system produces modest outcomes for this population. Poor, uninsured and minority children may be at increased risk for inferior coordination of services. Further, the United States health care delivery system is primarily organized for the diagnosis and treatment of acute conditions. For pediatric patients with chronic health conditions, the typical acute problem-oriented visit actually serves as a barrier to care. The biomedical model of patient education prevails, characterized by unilateral transfer of medical information. However, the evidence basis for improvement in disease outcomes supports the use of the chronic care model, initially proposed by Dr. Edward Wagner. Six inter-related elements distinguish the success of the chronic care model, which include self-management support and care coordination by a prepared, proactive team. United States health care lacks a coherent policy direction for the management of high cost chronic conditions, including rheumatic diseases. A fundamental restructure of United States health care delivery must urgently occur which places the patient at the center of care. For the pediatric rheumatology workforce, reimbursement policies and the actions of health plans and insurers are consistent barriers to chronic disease improvement. United States reimbursement policy and overall fragmentation of health care services pose specific challenges for widespread implementation of the chronic care model. Team-based multidisciplinary care, care coordination and self-management are integral to improve outcomes. Pediatric rheumatology demand in the United States far exceeds available workforce supply. This article reviews the career choice decision-making process

  12. Policy challenges for the pediatric rheumatology workforce: Part II. Health care system delivery and workforce supply

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrickson Michael

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The United States pediatric population with chronic health conditions is expanding. Currently, this demographic comprises 12-18% of the American child and youth population. Affected children often receive fragmented, uncoordinated care. Overall, the American health care delivery system produces modest outcomes for this population. Poor, uninsured and minority children may be at increased risk for inferior coordination of services. Further, the United States health care delivery system is primarily organized for the diagnosis and treatment of acute conditions. For pediatric patients with chronic health conditions, the typical acute problem-oriented visit actually serves as a barrier to care. The biomedical model of patient education prevails, characterized by unilateral transfer of medical information. However, the evidence basis for improvement in disease outcomes supports the use of the chronic care model, initially proposed by Dr. Edward Wagner. Six inter-related elements distinguish the success of the chronic care model, which include self-management support and care coordination by a prepared, proactive team. United States health care lacks a coherent policy direction for the management of high cost chronic conditions, including rheumatic diseases. A fundamental restructure of United States health care delivery must urgently occur which places the patient at the center of care. For the pediatric rheumatology workforce, reimbursement policies and the actions of health plans and insurers are consistent barriers to chronic disease improvement. United States reimbursement policy and overall fragmentation of health care services pose specific challenges for widespread implementation of the chronic care model. Team-based multidisciplinary care, care coordination and self-management are integral to improve outcomes. Pediatric rheumatology demand in the United States far exceeds available workforce supply. This article reviews the career

  13. Incentives in Rheumatology: the Potential Contribution of Physician Responses to Financial Incentives, Public Reporting, and Treatment Guidelines to Health Care Sustainability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Mark; Milbers, Katherine; Mihic, Tamara; Anis, Aslam H

    2016-07-01

    Concerns about the sustainability of current health care expenditure are focusing attention on the cost, quality and value of health care provision. Financial incentives, for example pay-for-performance (P4P), seek to reward quality and value in health care provision. There has long been an expectation that P4P schemes are coming to rheumatology. We review the available evidence about the use of incentives in this setting and provide two emerging examples of P4P schemes which may shape the future of service provision in rheumatology. Currently, there is limited and equivocal evidence in rheumatology about the impact of incentive schemes. However, reporting variation in the quality and provision of rheumatology services has highlighted examples of inefficiencies in the delivery of care. If financial incentives can improve the delivery of timely and appropriate care for rheumatology patients, then they may have an important role to play in the sustainability of health care provision.

  14. Barriers and Facilitators of Mentoring for Trainees and Early Career Investigators in Rheumatology Research: Current State, Identification of Needs, and Road Map to an Inter-Institutional Adult Rheumatology Mentoring Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogdie, Alexis; Sparks, Jeffrey A; Angeles-Han, Sheila T; Bush, Kathleen; Castelino, Flavia V; Golding, Amit; Jiang, Yihui; Kahlenberg, J Michelle; Kim, Alfred H J; Lee, Yvonne C; Machireddy, Kirthi; Ombrello, Michael J; Shah, Ami A; Wallace, Zachary S; Nigrovic, Peter A; Makris, Una E

    2018-03-01

    To determine perceived barriers and facilitators to effective mentoring for early career rheumatology investigators and to develop a framework for an inter-institutional mentoring program. Focus groups or interviews with rheumatology fellows, junior faculty, and mentors were conducted, audiorecorded, and transcribed. Content analysis was performed using NVivo software. Themes were grouped into categories (e.g., mentor-mentee relationship, barriers, and facilitators of a productive relationship). Rheumatology fellows and early career investigators were also surveyed nationwide to identify specific needs to be addressed through an inter-institutional mentoring program. Twenty-five individuals participated in focus groups or interviews. Attributes of the ideal mentee-mentor relationship included communication, accessibility, regular meetings, shared interests, aligned goals, and mutual respect. The mentee should be proactive, efficient, engaged, committed, focused, accountable, and respectful of the mentor's time. The mentor should support/promote the mentee, shape the mentee's goals and career plan, address day-to-day questions, provide critical feedback, be available, and have team leadership skills. Barriers included difficulty with career path navigation, gaining independence, internal competition, authorship, time demands, funding, and work-life balance. Facilitators of a successful relationship included having a diverse network of mentors filling different roles, mentor-mentee relationship management, and confidence. Among 187 survey respondents, the primary uses of an inter-institutional mentoring program were career development planning and oversight, goal-setting, and networking. In this mixed-methods study, tangible factors for optimizing the mentor-mentee relationship were identified and will inform the development of an adult rheumatology inter-institutional mentoring program. © 2017, American College of Rheumatology.

  15. Leprosy Mimicking Common Rheumatologic Entities: A Trial for the Clinician in the Era of Biologics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepak Rath

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis and seronegative spondyloarthritis, which make up the lion’s share of cases attending a rheumatology clinic, are relatively easy to diagnose. However, when an entity of infective aetiology like leprosy known to be a great mimic of different autoimmune conditions presents with features similar to these, the possibility of it being diagnosed at the outset is very slim indeed. The ease with which the diagnosis of leprosy can be missed assumes sinister proportions as the use of disease modifying agents can have deleterious effects in these patients. In the era of increasing availability and use of biologic disease modifying agents, it is imperative not only to actively rule out the presence of leprosy but also to make it a part of the prebiologic screening of patients in whom biologics are being planned to be administered, especially in leprosy endemic areas.

  16. State of the art on nailfold capillaroscopy: a reliable diagnostic tool and putative biomarker in rheumatology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutolo, Maurizio; Smith, Vanessa

    2013-11-01

    Capillaroscopy is a non-invasive and safe tool to morphologically study the microcirculation. In rheumatology it has a dual use. First, it has a role in differential diagnosis of patients with RP. Second, it may have a role in the prediction of clinical complications in CTDs. In SSc, pilot studies have shown predictive associations with peripheral vascular and lung involvement hinting at a role of capillaroscopy as putative biomarker. Also and logically, in SSc, microangiopathy, as assessed by capillaroscopy, has been associated with markers of the disease such as angiogenic/static factors and SSc-specific antibodies. Moreover, morphological assessments of the microcirculation (capillaroscopy) seem to correlate with functional assessments (such as laser Doppler). Because of its clinical and research role, eyes are geared in Europe to expand the knowledge of this tool. Both the European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) and the ACR are stepping forward to this need.

  17. Recommendations of the Brazilian Society of Rheumatology for the induction therapy of ANCA-associated vasculitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Wagner Silva de Souza

    Full Text Available Abstract The purpose of these recommendations is to guide the appropriate induction treatment of antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis (AAV patients with active disease. The recommendations proposed by the Vasculopathies Committee of the Brazilian Society Rheumatology for induction therapy of AAV, including granulomatosis with polyangiitis, microscopic polyangiitis and renal-limited vasculitis, were based on systematic literature review and expert opinion. Literature review was performed using Medline (PubMed, EMBASE and Cochrane database to retrieve articles until October 2016. PRISMA guidelines were used for the systematic review and articles were assessed according to the Oxford levels of evidence. Sixteen recommendations were made regarding different aspects of induction therapy for AAV. The purpose of these recommendations is to serve as a guide for therapeutic decisions by health care professionals in the management of AAV patients presenting active disease.

  18. [Tubulointerstitial nephritis with uveitis (TINU) syndrome. A relatively rare rheumatological differential diagnosis with unexplained uveitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Häusler, U; Guminski, B; Helmchen, U; Kisters, K; Heinz, C; Braun, J

    2013-05-01

    The tubulo-interstitial nephritis and uveitis (TINU) syndrome, first described in 1975, is a rare disease most probably of autoimmune origin that is characterized by unilateral or bilateral uveitis and tubulointerstitial nephritis. Most patients are adolescents and it is sometimes associated with other autoimmune diseases, such as spondyloarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis and hyperthyroidosis. This article reports the case of a 43-year-old female patient who presented with refractory recurrent bilateral uveitis despite therapy with high doses of corticosteroids in combination with cyclosporin. When the patient was referred to this hospital for rheumatological examination after almost 1 year of therapy, mild renal insufficiency and proteinuria were found. The kidney biopsy revealed interstitial nephritis, partly crescent-shaped and partly chronic. A diagnosis of TINU syndrome was made and treatment with adalimumab in combination with methotrexate was started. The favorable clinical outcome indicated that tumor necrosis factor (TNF) alpha may play an important role in the pathogenesis of TINU syndrome.

  19. Current trends in medical English education and the Japan College of Rheumatology International School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jego, Eric Hajime; Amengual, Olga

    2017-11-01

    In light of the present revolution happening in medical education in Japan as medical schools implement new curricula to conform to global standards, there is a growing demand for more internationalization and higher quality practical medical English education. In response, many institutions including governmental organizations, universities and academic associations are moving ahead with new initiatives to adapt to these changing demands. This paper reviews the current trends and innovations in medical English education in Japan. This paper also describes one initiative by the Japan College of Rheumatology (JCR) known as the JCR International School held yearly in Karuizawa. By examining recent trends and innovations in medical English education in Japan, the most relevant and applicable can be elucidated to illuminate a path forward for improved medical English education within the JCR.

  20. Current state of biosimilars in Mexico: The position of the Mexican College of Rheumatology, 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xibille, Daniel; Carrillo, Sandra; Huerta-Sil, Gabriela; Hernández, Ramiro; Limón, Leonardo; Olvera-Soto, Guadalupe; Jara-Quezada, Luis Javier; Esquivel, Abdieel; Pérez-Rodríguez, Marcela

    The present document is a position statement of the Mexican College of Rheumatology on the use of biosimilars in rheumatic diseases. This position considers that biosimilars should be considered as interchangeable, that automatic substitution without previous notice in stable patients during follow-up is not ethical, that the approval of a biosimilar should only be given after exhaustive review of preclinical and clinical data marked by Mexican regulations, that it should be clearly stated in the nomenclature of biologic drugs which is the innovator and which is the biosimilar, that it is not correct to choose a biosimilar as treatment based only on economic reasons or extrapolate indications based only on the approval of the innovator and in the absence of safety and efficacy data for the biosimilar. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Reumatología y Colegio Mexicano de Reumatología. All rights reserved.

  1. Giving rheumatology patients online home access to their electronic medical record (EMR): advantages, drawbacks and preconditions according to care providers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Vaart, R.; Drossaert, Constance H.C.; Taal, Erik; van de Laar, Mart A F J

    2013-01-01

    Technology enables patients home access to their electronic medical record (EMR), via a patient portal. This study aims to analyse (dis)advantages, preconditions and suitable content for this service, according to rheumatology health professionals. A two-phase policy Delphi study was conducted.

  2. Adaptation of the 2015 American College of Rheumatology treatment guideline for rheumatoid arthritis for the Eastern Mediterranean Region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Darzi, Andrea; Harfouche, Manale; Arayssi, Thurayya

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It has been hypothesized that adaptation of health practice guidelines to the local setting is expected to improve their uptake and implementation while cutting on required resources. We recently adapted the published American College of Rheumatology (ACR) Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) tr...

  3. A Brief History of IL-1 and IL-1 Ra in Rheumatology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Michel Dayer

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The history of what, in 1979, was called interleukin-1 (IL-1, orchestrator of leukocyte inter-communication, began many years before then, initially by the observation of fever induction via the endogenous pyrogen (EP (1974 and then in rheumatology on the role in tissue destruction in rheumatoid diseases via the induction of collagenase and PGE2 in human synovial cells by a mononuclear cell factor (MCF (1977. Since then, the family has exploded to presently 11 members as well as many membrane-bound and soluble receptor forms. The discovery of a natural Interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra in human biological fluids has highlighted the importance of IL-1 and IL-1Ra in human diseases. Evidence delineating its role in autoinflammatory syndromes and the elucidation of the macromolecular complex referred to as “inflammasome” have been instrumental to our understanding of the link with IL-1. At present, the IL-1blockade as therapeutic approach is crucial for many hereditary autoinflammatory diseases, as well as for adult-onset Still’s disease, crystal-induced arthropathies, certain skin diseases including neutrophil-triggered skin diseases, Behçet’s disease and deficiency of IL-1Ra and other rare fever syndromes. Its role is only marginally important in rheumatoid arthritis and is still under debate with regard to osteoarthritis, type 2 diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular diseases and cancer. This brief historical review focuses on some aspects of IL-1, mainly IL-1β and IL-Ra, in rheumatology. There are many excellent reviews focusing on the IL-1 family in general or with regard to specific diseases or biological discoveries.

  4. [Arthur Vick Prize 2017 of the German Society of Orthopaedic Rheumatology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bause, L; Niemeier, A; Krenn, V

    2018-03-01

    The German Society of Orthopaedic Rheumatology (DGORh) honored Prof. Dr. med. Veit Krenn (MVZ-ZHZMD-Trier) with the Arthur Vick Prize 2017. With this award, scientific results with high impact on the diagnosis, therapy and pathogenetic understanding of rheumatic diseases are honored. In cooperation with pathologists and colleagues from various clinical disciplines Prof. Dr. med. Veit Krenn developed several histopathologic scoring systems which contribute to the diagnosis and pathogenetic understanding of degenerative and rheumatic diseases. These scores include the synovitis score, the meniscal degeneration score, the classification of periprosthetic tissues (SLIM classification), the arthrofibrosis score, the particle score and the CD15 focus score. Of highest relevance for orthopedic rheumatology is the synovitis score which is a semiquantitative score for evaluating immunological and inflammatory changes of synovitis in a graded manner. Based on this score, it is possible to divide results into low-grade synovitis and high-grade synovitis: a synovitis score of 1-4 is called low-grade synovitis and occurs for example in association with osteoarthritis (OA), post-trauma, with meniscal lesions and hemochromatosis. A synovitis score of 5-9 is called high-grade synovitis, e.g. rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, Lyme arthritis, postinfection and reactive arthritis as well as peripheral arthritis with Bechterew's disease (sensitivity 61.7%, specificity 96.1%). The first publication (2002) and an associated subsequent publication (2006) of the synovitis score has led to national and international acceptance of this score as the standard for histopathological assessment of synovitis. The synovitis score provides a diagnostic, standardized and reproducible histopathological evaluation method for joint diseases, particularly when this score is applied in the context with the joint pathology algorithm.

  5. Impact of the 2012 London Olympic and Paralympic Games on physical activity of rheumatology patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müther, Michael; Williamson, Marie; Williamson, Lyn

    2014-10-01

    Lack of physical activity in the general population is one of the biggest health challenges we face. For rheumatology patients, and other patients with chronic disease, exercise is an essential part of disease management. However, very few patients exercise effectively.One of the aspirations of the London 2012 Olympic/Paralympic Games was to catalyze people into long-term physical activity. We surveyed our rheumatology patients at 3 high-profile times in the year after the Olympics. Two hundred fifty-three patients were enrolled within the study; the largest diagnosis subgroup being rheumatoid arthritis (36%). Ninety-five percent of our patients regard exercise as beneficial; 36% still think it does harm. Most common barriers to exercise were pain (53%), tiredness (44%), and lack of time (36%). Forty-five percent exercise daily, mostly just walking. Twnety-seven patients (16%) were motivated by the 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games toward physical activity. They were mostly motivated by athletics' individual stories (67%), taking part in a big sports festival (11%) and demonstration of top sporting levels (4%). Eighteen patients in total (7%) increased their amount of exercise in response to the London 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games. There was no difference between patient diagnostic groups. Only a small minority of patients increased their amount of exercise in response to the 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games. The message about the importance of physical exercise to health needs to be clear, unambiguous, and consistent, because a significant number of patients still think that physical activity does harm. Big sporting events such as the London 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games can be used as an opportunity to remind patients that physical activity does good and is not harmful. Athletes' individual stories could be used in future as part of a strategy to encourage exercise for all patients.

  6. Evaluation of a novel 7-joint ultrasound score in daily rheumatologic practice: a pilot project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backhaus, M; Ohrndorf, S; Kellner, H; Strunk, J; Backhaus, T M; Hartung, W; Sattler, H; Albrecht, K; Kaufmann, J; Becker, K; Sörensen, H; Meier, L; Burmester, G R; Schmidt, W A

    2009-09-15

    To introduce a new standardized ultrasound score based on 7 joints of the clinically dominant hand and foot (German US7 score) implemented in daily rheumatologic practice. The ultrasound score included the following joints of the clinically dominant hand and foot: wrist, second and third metacarpophalangeal and proximal interphalangeal, and second and fifth metatarsophalangeal joints. Synovitis and synovial/tenosynovial vascularity were scored semiquantitatively (grade 0-3) by gray-scale (GS) and power Doppler (PD) ultrasound. Tenosynovitis and erosions were scored for presence. The scoring range was 0-27 for GS synovitis, 0-39 for PD synovitis, 0-7 for GS tenosynovitis, 0-21 for PD tenosynovitis, and 0-14 for erosions. Patients with arthritis were examined at baseline and after the start or change of disease-modifying antirheumatic drug (DMARD) and/or tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha) inhibitor therapy 3 and 6 months later. C-reactive protein level, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, rheumatoid factor, anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide, Disease Activity Score in 28 joints (DAS28), and radiographs of the hands and feet were performed. One hundred twenty patients (76% women) with rheumatoid arthritis (91%) and psoriatic arthritis (9%) were enrolled. In 52 cases (43%), erosions were seen in radiography at baseline. Patients received DMARDs (41%), DMARDs plus TNFalpha inhibitors (41%), or TNFalpha inhibitor monotherapy (18%). At baseline, the mean DAS28 was 5.0 and the synovitis scores were 8.1 in GS ultrasound and 3.3 in PD ultrasound. After 6 months of therapy, the DAS28 significantly decreased to 3.6 (Delta = 1.4), and the GS and PD ultrasound scores significantly decreased to 5.5 (-32%) and 2.0 (-39%), respectively. The German US7 score is a viable tool for examining patients with arthritis in daily rheumatologic practice because it significantly reflects therapeutic response.

  7. Performance of classification criteria for gout in early and established disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taylor, William J; Fransen, Jaap; Dalbeth, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To compare the sensitivity and specificity of different classification criteria for gout in early and established disease. METHODS: This was a cross-sectional study of consecutive rheumatology clinic patients with joint swelling in which gout was defined by presence or absence...... of monosodium urate crystals as observed by a certified examiner at presentation. Early disease was defined as patient-reported onset of symptoms of 2 years or less. RESULTS: Data from 983 patients were collected and gout was present in 509 (52%). Early disease was present in 144 gout cases and 228 non.......3%/84.4% and 86.4%/63.6%. Criteria not requiring synovial fluid analysis had sensitivity and specificity of less than 80% in early and established disease. CONCLUSIONS: Existing classification criteria for gout have sensitivity of over 80% in early and established disease but currently available criteria that do...

  8. Restless Legs Syndrome with Current Diagnostic Criteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meral Bilgilisoy Filiz

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Restless legs syndrome (RLS, also known as Willis-Ekbom disease, is a chronic movement disorder, characterized by an urge to move legs usually accompanied by uncomfortable sensations and sleep disorders. The prevalence of the syndrome ranges from 1% to 15% in the general population, and about 2% during childhood. RLS is the most common movement disorder in pregnancy. However RLS still remains underdiagnosed probably due to lack of accurate information about the disease. Family history is positive in 50-70% of the primary RLS patients. The secondary form of the syndrome is associated with iron deficiency, renal failure, pregnancy, diabetes mellitus and many rheumatologic disorders. Secondary forms generally manifest at older ages and have a rapid progression with a poorer prognosis. The pathophysiology of RLS is focused on the dopaminergic system, reduced central nervous system iron levels and genetic linkages. Diagnosis is based on clinical features and the diagnostic criteria suggested by International RLS Study Group. Secondary causes must be carefully investigated before the treatment. In mild forms of the disease non-pharmacologic therapies might be useful, while in moderate or severe forms of the disease generally pharmacologic therapies such as dopamine agonists, anticonvulsants, opioids and benzodiazepines are required. (Turkish Journal of Osteoporosis 2015;21: 87-95

  9. Risk of Serious Infection in Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis Patients Associated With Tumor Necrosis Factor Inhibitors and Disease Activity in the German Biologics in Pediatric Rheumatology Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Ingrid; Horneff, Gerd

    2017-04-01

    To examine the effects of tumor necrosis factor inhibitors on the risk for serious infections and other influencing factors in a registry. Patients exposed for the first time to etanercept, adalimumab, or methotrexate and serious infections were identified in the German Biologic Registry for Pediatric Rheumatology (BIKER) registry. Serious infection rates per 1,000 observation-years and relative risks were calculated. Cox regression identified risk factors and provided hazard ratios (HRs) for occurrence of infections. A total of 3,350 patients with 5,919 observation-years fulfilled the inclusion criteria for the study. The first biologic agents were etanercept (1,720 cases) and adalimumab (177 cases). A total of 1,453 patients were treated with methotrexate and no biologic agent. In total, 28 serious infections were reported in 26 patients (4.7 per 1,000 patient-years), 5 with methotrexate (1.6 per 1,000 patient-years), 21 with etanercept (8.1 per 1,000 patient-years), and 2 with adalimumab (9.7 per 1,000 patient-years). Significant univariate risk factors for infection were therapy with biologic agents, disease duration before therapy start, corticosteroid medication, nonbiologic premedications, higher clinical Juvenile Arthritis Disease Activity Score including maximal 10 joints (cJADAS10) at therapy start, and higher mean cJADAS10 during therapy. In multivariate Cox regression, only biologic therapy and cJADAS10 at therapy start remained significant. Risk for infection was increased by etanercept (univariate HR 6.0 [95% confidence interval (95% CI) 2.0-17.5]) or adalimumab (HR 7.3 [95% CI 1.3-40.0]) compared to methotrexate as well as by an elevated cJADAS10 at therapy start (HR 1.1 [95% CI 1.0-1.2] per unit increase). The total rate of serious infections reported in the BIKER registry seems low. Treatment with etanercept or adalimumab increases the risk for serious infection slightly, compared to methotrexate. Disease activity expressed by cJADAS10 appears to

  10. Septic arthritis: a 12 years retrospective study in a rheumatological university clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Riato

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Septic arthritis is a disabling and potentially life-threatening condition that requires prompt diagnosis and treatment. The most important risk factors are joint prosthesis, pre-existing joint disease and immunosuppressive drugs. The aim of our study therefore was to revaluate all septic arthritis cases discharged from our Rheumatologic Unit in the last 12 years, to assess the risk factors, the clinical and laboratory characteristics, the causative microorganisms and its possible increase in frequency. Methods: The medical records of 42 consecutive patients with septic arthritis discharged from our Rheumatology Unit between January 1995 and December 2006 were reviewed. The patients ranged in age from 23 to 90 and there isn’t gender predominance. Septic arthritis was diagnosed based on the finding of purulent material in the joint space and/or the isolation of a bacterial pathogen from joint fluid. Demographic data, risk factors, co-morbidity, clinical manifestations, time interval between symptoms onset and diagnosis, treatment and laboratory data including serum white blood cell count, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR, C reactive protein (CRP, synovial white blood cells and culture results were analysed. We considered these parameters in the whole population and in two different age groups (≤60, >60 and tried to determine if there was a change of microorganisms involved in septic arthritis during the years. Results: Of 42 patients, 47% were aged 60 and younger. Only 10 patients were admitted to our unit before 2001. A predisposing factor was recorded in 90,5% of cases: 15 patients had rheumatoid arthritis, 8 were diabetic, 6 had seronegative arthritis, 4 had a connective tissue disease, 8 patients had a prosthetic infection and 3 were subjected recently to arthrocentesis. We found that patients aged 60 and younger were more frequently affected by joint disease and had a synovial white blood cell count lower than patients

  11. Toward the Development of a Core Set of Outcome Domains to Assess Shared Decision-making Interventions in Rheumatology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toupin-April, Karine; Barton, Jennifer; Fraenkel, Liana

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this Outcome Measures in Rheumatology (OMERACT) Working Group was to determine the core set of outcome domains and subdomains for measuring the effectiveness of shared decision-making (SDM) interventions in rheumatology clinical trials. METHODS: Following the OMERACT Filter 2.......0, and based on a previous literature review of SDM outcome domains and a nominal group process at OMERACT 2014, (1) an online Delphi survey was conducted to gather feedback on the draft core set and refine its domains and subdomains, and (2) a workshop was held at the OMERACT 2016 meeting to gain consensus...... ranged from 83% to 100% of respondents). At OMERACT 2016, only 8% of the 96 attendees were patients/caregivers. Despite initial votes of support in breakout groups, there was insufficient comfort about the conceptualization of these 7 domains and 17 subdomains for these to be endorsed at OMERACT 2016...

  12. Effectiveness of computer-assisted interactive videodisc instruction in teaching rheumatology to physical and occupational therapy students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanford, M K; Hazelwood, S E; Bridges, A J; Cutts, J H; Mitchell, J A; Reid, J C; Sharp, G

    1996-01-01

    A computer-assisted interactive videodisc instructional program, HP-RHEUM was designed to teach clinical findings in arthritis to occupational and physical therapy students. Using the Rheumatology Image Library videodisc produced by the National Library of Medicine, HP-RHEUM consists of instructional modules which employ advance organizers, examples/nonexamples, summaries, and immediate feedback. To see if HP-RHEUM would be as effective as traditional classroom instruction, control data were collected in 1991 from 52 OT and PT students. Treatment data were collected from 61 students in 1992 when HP-RHEUM entirely replaced lectures. Identical pre- and post-tests consisted of 70 multiple choice questions, with 24 matched to slides. On the slide questions the HP-RHEUM group had significantly higher scores. Otherwise, there was no significant difference in performance between groups. HP-RHEUM provided an independent learning method and enhanced visual comprehension of rheumatologic disease concepts.

  13. Demyelinizing neurological disease after treatment with tumor necrosis factor alpha-inhibiting agents in a rheumatological outpatient clinic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Theibich, Ali; Dreyer, Lene; Magyari, Melinda

    2014-01-01

    Biological treatment with inhibitors of the pro-inflammatory cytokine TNF-alpha has dramatically improved the disease course of several chronic rheumatologic conditions. Adverse events (AEs) are primarily infections and hypersensitivity reactions. Demyelinizing neurological symptoms resembling...... multiple sclerosis (MS) have been described as a rare AE. During about 10-year use of anti TNF-alpha, the Danish Medicines Agency has recorded eight cases of MS like AEs. The objective of this study was to estimate the incidence of demyelinizing AEs both in the central and peripheral nervous system after...... treatment with anti TNF-alpha in a cohort of patients from a large rheumatologic outpatient clinic in Copenhagen. In a 4-year period from January 2008 to December 2011, approximately 550 patients annually were undergoing treatment with anti TNF-alpha inhibitors in our department. We collected data on all...

  14. Cost of common low back pain and lumbar radiculopathy in rheumatologic consultation in Lomé.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fianyo, Eyram; Oniankitan, Owonayo; Tagbor Komi, C; Kakpovi, Kodjo; Houzou, Prénam; Koffi-Tessio Viwalé, E S; Mijiyawa, Moustafa

    2017-03-01

    The cost of low back pain was the subject of few studies in black Africa. To assess the cost of common low back pain and lumbar radiculopathy in Lomé. A six months study was realised in the rheumatologic department of CHU Sylvanus Olympio. 103 consecutive patients suffering from a common low back pain or lumbar radiculopathy were included. To assess direct, indirect and non-financial costs they were questioned about their expense during the year. Financial cost of common low back pain and lumbar radiculopathy amounted to 107.2 $ US (extremes: 5.8 and 726.1 $ US). This amount, quadruple of guaranteed minimum wage, felled under two headings: direct cost (56.3 $ US; 53% of total sum), indirect cost (50.3 $ US; 47% of total sum). Non-financial cost were: disruption in daily activities (94%), impact in emotional and sexual life (59%), impact on the family's budget (69%), abandon of family's projects (58%) or of leisure (42%). In black Africa top priority is given to the fight against infectious diseases those cause an important mortality. But common low back pain and lumbar radiculopathy, those have social and economic impact, should be given more attention.

  15. THE EUROPEAN CONGRESS OF RHEUMATOLOGY (PARIS, 11–14 JUNE 2014: PROBLEMS OF RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Avdeeva

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The 15th annual European Congress of Rheumatology took place in Paris in June 2014. Its program was extremely diverse and included a discussion of new data pertinent to the diagnosis and treatment of the most common rheumatic diseases and problems of their etiology and pathogenesis, personified therapy, and many others. The Congress focused on the problems of early rheumatoid arthritis (RA. A number of papers concerned the efficiency and safety of different therapy regimens for RA at its onset, the discontinuation of biological therapy after achievement of remission, and the maintenance of drug-free RA remission. The Congress discussed new results of the tREACH trial comparing three treatment regimens for early inflammatory arthritis: combined therapy with methotrexate (MT, sulfasalazine, and hydroxychloroquine in conjunction with intramuscular glucocorticoids (GC; combined therapy with these drugs in conjunction with oral GC; and MT monotherapy with oral GC. A large number of reports dealt with the use of tumor necrosis factor-α inhibitors, the evaluation of their immunogenicity, and theanalysis of reasons for therapy discontinuation and adverse reactions. Some aspects of therapy with disease-difying antirheumatic drugs were discussed. A number of reports concerned the application of novel laboratory biomarkers for RA.Thus, sufficiently many new data that will be able to optimize therapy for common rheumatic disease, such as RA, were presented at the Congress.

  16. Italian Society for Rheumatology recommendations for the management of hand osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Manara

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Hand osteoarthritis (OA is a common and potentially disabling disease, with different features from hip and knee OA so that a specific therapeutic approach is required. Evidence based recommendations for the management of hand OA were developed by the European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR in 2006. The Italian Society for Rheumatology (SIR aimed to update, adapt to national contest and disseminate the EULAR recommendations for the management of hand OA. The multidisciplinary group of experts included specialists involved in the management of patients with hand OA. In order to maintain consistency with EULAR recommendations, a similar methodology was utilized by the Italian group. The original propositions were reformulated in terms of a search query and for every recommendation a systematic search was conducted updating EULAR recommendations’ review. The propositions were translated in Italian and reformulated basing on collected evidences and expert opinion. The strength of recommendation was measured for each proposition with the EULAR ordinal and visual analogue scales. The original 11 propositions of EULAR recommendations were translated and adapted to Italian context. Further evidences were collected about non-pharmacological therapies, local treatments, intra-articular injection with SYSADOA and corticosteroids, and surgery. The SIR has developed updated recommendations for the management of hand OA adapted to the Italian healthcare system. Their implementation in clinical practice is expected to improve the management of patients with hand OA.

  17. Redesign of the Attention Process of Patients with Rheumatologic Diseases: Assessing the Performance with Analytic Hierarchy Process

    OpenAIRE

    Gorbanev, Iouri; Cortes, Ariel; Agudelo-Londoño, Sandra

    2017-01-01

    Objective. To compare the Business process management and the analytic hierarchy process as the tools of process performance assessment. Instruments and Methods. Case study of the attention process of rheumatology patients. Business process management and analytic hierarchy process were applied to assess the redesign of the attention process. The two methods were compared. The data were obtained through personal observations, an interview with a Colombian health insurer’s senior executive, an...

  18. A survey of anatomical items relevant to the practice of rheumatology: upper extremity, head, neck, spine, and general concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villaseñor-Ovies, Pablo; Navarro-Zarza, José Eduardo; Saavedra, Miguel Ángel; Hernández-Díaz, Cristina; Canoso, Juan J; Biundo, Joseph J; Kalish, Robert A; de Toro Santos, Francisco Javier; McGonagle, Dennis; Carette, Simon; Alvarez-Nemegyei, José

    2016-12-01

    This study aimed to identify the anatomical items of the upper extremity and spine that are potentially relevant to the practice of rheumatology. Ten rheumatologists interested in clinical anatomy who published, taught, and/or participated as active members of Clinical Anatomy Interest groups (six seniors, four juniors), participated in a one-round relevance Delphi exercise. An initial, 560-item list that included 45 (8.0 %) general concepts items; 138 (24.8 %) hand items; 100 (17.8 %) forearm and elbow items; 147 (26.2 %) shoulder items; and 130 (23.2 %) head, neck, and spine items was compiled by 5 of the participants. Each item was graded for importance with a Likert scale from 1 (not important) to 5 (very important). Thus, scores could range from 10 (1 × 10) to 50 (5 × 10). An item score of ≥40 was considered most relevant to competent practice as a rheumatologist. Mean item Likert scores ranged from 2.2 ± 0.5 to 4.6 ± 0.7. A total of 115 (20.5 %) of the 560 initial items reached relevance. Broken down by categories, this final relevant item list was composed by 7 (6.1 %) general concepts items; 32 (27.8 %) hand items; 20 (17.4 %) forearm and elbow items; 33 (28.7 %) shoulder items; and 23 (17.6 %) head, neck, and spine items. In this Delphi exercise, a group of practicing academic rheumatologists with an interest in clinical anatomy compiled a list of anatomical items that were deemed important to the practice of rheumatology. We suggest these items be considered curricular priorities when training rheumatology fellows in clinical anatomy skills and in programs of continuing rheumatology education.

  19. Person-centred care in nurse-led outpatient rheumatology clinics: Conceptualization and initial development of a measurement instrument.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bala, Sidona-Valentina; Forslind, Kristina; Fridlund, Bengt; Samuelson, Karin; Svensson, Björn; Hagell, Peter

    2018-06-01

    Person-centred care (PCC) is considered a key component of effective illness management and high-quality care. However, the PCC concept is underdeveloped in outpatient care. In rheumatology, PCC is considered an unmet need and its further development and evaluation is of high priority. The aim of the present study was to conceptualize and operationalize PCC, in order to develop an instrument for measuring patient-perceived PCC in nurse-led outpatient rheumatology clinics. A conceptual outpatient PCC framework was developed, based on the experiences of people with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), person-centredness principles and existing PCC frameworks. The resulting framework was operationalized into the PCC instrument for outpatient care in rheumatology (PCCoc/rheum), which was tested for acceptability and content validity among 50 individuals with RA attending a nurse-led outpatient clinic. The conceptual framework focuses on the meeting between the person with RA and the nurse, and comprises five interrelated domains: social environment, personalization, shared decision-making, empowerment and communication. Operationalization of the domains into a pool of items generated a preliminary PCCoc/rheum version, which was completed in a mean (standard deviation) of 5.3 (2.5) min. Respondents found items easy to understand (77%) and relevant (93%). The Content Validity Index of the PCCoc/rheum was 0.94 (item level range, 0.87-1.0). About 80% of respondents considered some items redundant. Based on these results, the PCCoc/rheum was revised into a 24-item questionnaire. A conceptual outpatient PCC framework and a 24-item questionnaire intended to measure PCC in nurse-led outpatient rheumatology clinics were developed. The extent to which the questionnaire represents a measurement instrument remains to be tested. Copyright © 2018 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Biological Water Quality Criteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page contains links to Technical Documents pertaining to Biological Water Quality Criteria, including, technical assistance documents for states, tribes and territories, program overviews, and case studies.

  1. Improving the peer review skills of young rheumatologists and researchers in rheumatology: the EMEUNET Peer Review Mentoring Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Carrio, Javier; Putrik, Polina; Sepriano, Alexandre; Moltó, Anna; Nikiphorou, Elena; Gossec, Laure; Kvien, Tore K; Ramiro, Sofia

    2018-01-01

    Although peer review plays a central role in the maintenance of high standards in scientific research, training of reviewing skills is not included in the common education programmes. The Emerging EULAR (European League Against Rheumatism) Network (EMEUNET) developed a programme to address this unmet need. The EMEUNET Peer Review Mentoring Program for Rheumatology Journals promotes a systematic training of reviewing skills by engaging mentees in a 'real world' peer review experience supervised by experienced mentors with support from rheumatology journals. This viewpoint provides an overview of this initiative and its outcomes, and discusses its potential limitations. Over 4 years, 18 mentors and 86 mentees have participated. Among the 33 participants who have completed the programme, 13 (39.3%) have become independent reviewers for Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases after the training. This programme has been recently evaluated by a survey and qualitative interviews, revealing a high interest in this initiative. The main strengths (involvement of a top journal and learning opportunities) and weaknesses of the programme (limited number of places and insufficient dissemination) were identified. Overall, this programme represents an innovative and successful approach to peer review training. Continuous evaluation and improvement are key to its functioning. The EMEUNET Peer Review Mentoring Program may be used as a reference for peer review training in areas outside rheumatology.

  2. Developing an OMERACT Core Outcome Set for Assessing Safety Components in Rheumatology Trials: The OMERACT Safety Working Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klokker, Louise; Tugwell, Peter; Furst, Daniel E; Devoe, Dan; Williamson, Paula; Terwee, Caroline B; Suarez-Almazor, Maria E; Strand, Vibeke; Woodworth, Thasia; Leong, Amye L; Goel, Niti; Boers, Maarten; Brooks, Peter M; Simon, Lee S; Christensen, Robin

    2017-12-01

    Failure to report harmful outcomes in clinical research can introduce bias favoring a potentially harmful intervention. While core outcome sets (COS) are available for benefits in randomized controlled trials in many rheumatic conditions, less attention has been paid to safety in such COS. The Outcome Measures in Rheumatology (OMERACT) Filter 2.0 emphasizes the importance of measuring harms. The Safety Working Group was reestablished at the OMERACT 2016 with the objective to develop a COS for assessing safety components in trials across rheumatologic conditions. The safety issue has previously been discussed at OMERACT, but without a consistent approach to ensure harms were included in COS. Our methods include (1) identifying harmful outcomes in trials of interventions studied in patients with rheumatic diseases by a systematic literature review, (2) identifying components of safety that should be measured in such trials by use of a patient-driven approach including qualitative data collection and statistical organization of data, and (3) developing a COS through consensus processes including everyone involved. Members of OMERACT including patients, clinicians, researchers, methodologists, and industry representatives reached consensus on the need to continue the efforts on developing a COS for safety in rheumatology trials. There was a general agreement about the need to identify safety-related outcomes that are meaningful to patients, framed in terms that patients consider relevant so that they will be able to make informed decisions. The OMERACT Safety Working Group will advance the work previously done within OMERACT using a new patient-driven approach.

  3. Repository operational criteria analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hageman, J.P.; Chowdhury, A.H.

    1992-08-01

    The objective of the ''Repository Operational Criteria (ROC) Feasibility Studies'' (or ROC task) was to conduct comprehensive and integrated analyses of repository design, construction, and operations criteria in 10 CFR Part 60 regulations, considering the interfaces and impacts of any potential changes to those regulations. The study addresses regulatory criteria related to the preclosure aspects of the geologic repository. The study task developed regulatory concepts or potential repository operational criteria (PROC) based on analysis of a repository's safety functions and other regulations for similar facilities. These regulatory concepts or PROC were used as a basis to assess the sufficiency and adequacy of the current criteria in 10 CFR Part 60. Where the regulatory concepts were same as current operational criteria, these criteria were referenced. The operations criteria referenced or the PROC developed are given in this report. Detailed analyses used to develop the regulatory concepts and any necessary PROC for those regulations that may require a minor change are also presented. The results of the ROC task showed a need for further analysis and possible major rule change related to the design bases of a geologic repository operations area, siting, and radiological emergency planning

  4. CCS site characterisation criteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bachu, S.; Hawkes, C.; Lawton, D.; Pooladi-Darvish, M.; Perkins, E.

    2009-12-15

    IEA GHG recently commissioned the Alberta Research Counil in Canada to conduct a review of storage site selection criteria and site characterisation methods in order to produce a synthesis report. This report reviews the literature on the subject on the site seleciton and characterisation since the publication of the IPCC Special Report on CCS, and provides a synthesis and classification of criteria. 161 refs.

  5. Green Supplier Selection Criteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Izabela Ewa; Banaeian, Narges; Golinska, Paulina

    2014-01-01

    Green supplier selection (GSS) criteria arise from an organization inclination to respond to any existing trends in environmental issues related to business management and processes, so GSS is integrating environmental thinking into conventional supplier selection. This research is designed...... to determine prevalent general and environmental supplier selection criteria and develop a framework which can help decision makers to determine and prioritize suitable green supplier selection criteria (general and environmental). In this research we considered several parameters (evaluation objectives......) to establish suitable criteria for GSS such as their production type, requirements, policy and objectives instead of applying common criteria. At first a comprehensive and deep review on prevalent and green supplier selection literatures performed. Then several evaluation objectives defined to assess the green...

  6. Plutonium storage criteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, D. [Scientech, Inc., Germantown, MD (United States); Ascanio, X. [Dept. of Energy, Germantown, MD (United States)

    1996-05-01

    The Department of Energy has issued a technical standard for long-term (>50 years) storage and will soon issue a criteria document for interim (<20 years) storage of plutonium materials. The long-term technical standard, {open_quotes}Criteria for Safe Storage of Plutonium Metals and Oxides,{close_quotes} addresses the requirements for storing metals and oxides with greater than 50 wt % plutonium. It calls for a standardized package that meets both off-site transportation requirements, as well as remote handling requirements from future storage facilities. The interim criteria document, {open_quotes}Criteria for Interim Safe Storage of Plutonium-Bearing Solid Materials{close_quotes}, addresses requirements for storing materials with less than 50 wt% plutonium. The interim criteria document assumes the materials will be stored on existing sites, and existing facilities and equipment will be used for repackaging to improve the margin of safety.

  7. Medication use in juvenile uveitis patients enrolled in the Childhood Arthritis and Rheumatology Research Alliance Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Lauren A; Zurakowski, David; Angeles-Han, Sheila T; Lasky, Andrew; Rabinovich, C Egla; Lo, Mindy S

    2016-02-16

    There is not yet a commonly accepted, standardized approach in the treatment of juvenile idiopathic uveitis when initial steroid therapy is insufficient. We sought to assess current practice patterns within a large cohort of children with juvenile uveitis. This is a cross-sectional cohort study of patients with uveitis enrolled in the Childhood Arthritis and Rheumatology Research Alliance (CARRAnet) registry. Clinical information including, demographic information, presenting features, disease complications, and medications were collected. Chi-square and Fisher's exact tests were used to assess for associations between medications and clinical characteristics. Ninety-two children with idiopathic and 656 with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA)-associated uveitis were identified. Indication (arthritis or uveitis) for medication use was not available for JIA patients; therefore, detailed analysis was limited to children with idiopathic uveitis. In this group, 94 % had received systemic steroids. Methotrexate (MTX) was used in 76 % of patients, with oral and subcutaneous forms given at similar rates. In multivariable analysis, non-Caucasians were more likely to be treated initially with subcutaneous MTX (P = 0.003). Of the 53 % of patients treated with a biologic DMARD, all received a tumor necrosis factor (TNF) inhibitor. TNF inhibitor use was associated with a higher frequency of cataracts (52 % vs 21 %; P = 0.001) and antinuclear antibody positivity (49 % vs 29 %; P = 0.04), although overall complication rates were not higher in these patients. Among idiopathic uveitis patients enrolled in the CARRAnet registry, MTX was the most commonly used DMARD, with subcutaneous and oral forms equally favored. Patients who received a TNF inhibitor were more likely to be ANA positive and have cataracts.

  8. Policy challenges for the pediatric rheumatology workforce: Part III. the international situation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrickson Michael

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Survival dominates current pediatric global health priorities. Diseases of poverty largely contribute to overall mortality in children under 5 years of age. Infectious diseases and injuries account for 75% of cause-specific mortality among children ages 5-14 years. Twenty percent of the world's population lives in extreme poverty (income below US $1.25/day. Within this population, essential services and basic needs are not met, including clean water, sanitation, adequate nutrition, shelter, access to health care, medicines and education. In this context, musculoskeletal disease comprises 0.1% of all-cause mortality in children ages 5-14 years. Worldwide morbidity from musculoskeletal disease remains generally unknown in the pediatric age group. This epidemiologic data is not routinely surveyed by international agencies, including the World Health Organization. The prevalence of pediatric rheumatic diseases based on data from developed nations is in the range of 2,500 - 3,000 cases per million children. Developing countries' needs for musculoskeletal morbidity are undergoing an epidemiologic shift to chronic conditions, as leading causes of pediatric mortality are slowly quelled. A global crisis of health care providers and human resources stems from insufficient workforce production, inability to retain workers in areas of greatest need, distribution disparity and poor management of both health care systems and health workforce. Internationally, the pediatric rheumatology workforce will also be in very short supply for the foreseeable future relative to projected demand. Physician extenders are an essential resource to meet this demand in underserved regions. They can be trained in common aspects of musculoskeletal medicine and rheumatic conditions. Innovative strategies have been introduced in the United Kingdom to address musculoskeletal medicine educational deficiencies. Telemedicine offers an important capacity to improve access to

  9. Update of the Mexican College of Rheumatology guidelines for the pharmacologic treatment of rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardiel, Mario H; Díaz-Borjón, Alejandro; Vázquez del Mercado Espinosa, Mónica; Gámez-Nava, Jorge Iván; Barile Fabris, Leonor A; Pacheco Tena, César; Silveira Torre, Luis H; Pascual Ramos, Virginia; Goycochea Robles, María Victoria; Aguilar Arreola, Jorge Enrique; González Díaz, Verónica; Alvarez Nemegyei, José; González-López, Laura del Carmen; Salazar Páramo, Mario; Portela Hernández, Margarita; Castro Colín, Zully; Xibillé Friedman, Daniel Xavier; Alvarez Hernández, Everardo; Casasola Vargas, Julio; Cortés Hernández, Miguel; Flores-Alvarado, Diana E; Martínez Martínez, Laura A; Vega-Morales, David; Flores-Suárez, Luis Felipe; Medrano Ramírez, Gabriel; Barrera Cruz, Antonio; García González, Adolfo; López López, Susana Marisela; Rosete Reyes, Alejandra; Espinosa Morales, Rolando

    2014-01-01

    The pharmacologic management of rheumatoid arthritis has progressed substantially over the past years. It is therefore desirable that existing information be periodically updated. There are several published international guidelines for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis that hardly adapt to the Mexican health system because of its limited healthcare resources. Hence, it is imperative to unify the existing recommendations and to incorporate them to a set of clinical, updated recommendations; the Mexican College of Rheumatology developed these recommendations in order to offer an integral management approach of rheumatoid arthritis according to the resources of the Mexican health system. To review, update and improve the available evidence within clinical practice guidelines on the pharmacological management of rheumatoid arthritis and produce a set of recommendations adapted to the Mexican health system, according to evidence available through December 2012. The working group was composed of 30 trained and experienced rheumatologists with a high quality of clinical knowledge and judgment. Recommendations were based on the highest quality evidence from the previously established treatment guidelines, meta-analysis and controlled clinical trials for the adult population with rheumatoid arthritis. During the conformation of this document, each working group settled the existing evidence from the different topics according to their experience. Finally, all the evidence and decisions were unified into a single document, treatment algorithm and drug standardization tables. This update of the Mexican Guidelines for the Pharmacologic Treatment of Rheumatoid Arthritis provides the highest quality information available at the time the working group undertook this review and contextualizes its use for the complex Mexican health system. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  10. 2012 Brazilian Society of Rheumatology Consensus for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Mota, Licia Maria Henrique; Cruz, Boris Afonso; Brenol, Claiton Viegas; Pereira, Ivanio Alves; Rezende-Fronza, Lucila Stange; Bertolo, Manoel Barros; de Freitas, Max Victor Carioca; da Silva, Nilzio Antonio; Louzada-Júnior, Paulo; Giorgi, Rina Dalva Neubarth; Lima, Rodrigo Aires Corrêa; da Rocha Castelar Pinheiro, Geraldo

    2012-01-01

    To elaborate recommendations for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis in Brazil. Literature review with articles' selection based on evidence and the expert opinion of the Rheumatoid Arthritis Committee of the Brazilian Society of Rheumatology. 1) The therapeutic decision should be shared with the patient; 2) immediately after the diagnosis, a disease-modifying antirheumatic drug (DMARD) should be prescribed, and the treatment adjusted to achieve remission; 3) treatment should be conducted by a rheumatologist; 4) the initial treatment includes synthetic DMARDs; 5) methotrexate is the drug of choice; 6) patients who fail to respond after two schedules of synthetic DMARDs should be assessed for the use of biologic DMARDs; 7) exceptionally, biologic DMARDs can be considered earlier; 8) anti-TNF agents are preferentially recommended as the initial biologic therapy; 9) after therapeutic failure of a first biologic DMARD, other biologics can be used; 10) cyclophosphamide and azathioprine can be used in severe extra-articular manifestations; 11) oral corticoid is recommended at low doses and for short periods of time; 12) non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs should always be prescribed in association with a DMARD; 13) clinical assessments should be performed on a monthly basis at the beginning of treatment; 14) physical therapy, rehabilitation, and occupational therapy are indicated; 15) surgical treatment is recommended to correct sequelae; 16) alternative therapy does not replace traditional therapy; 17) family planning is recommended; 18) the active search and management of comorbidities are recommended; 19) the patient's vaccination status should be recorded and updated; 20) endemic-epidemic transmissible diseases should be investigated and treated.

  11. A system of networks and continuing education for physical therapists in rheumatology: a feasibility study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Verhoef

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of regional physical therapy networks including continuing education in rheumatology. The aim of these networks was to improve care provided by primary care physical therapists by improving specific knowledge, technical and communicative skills and the collaboration with rheumatologists. Methods: In two regions in The Netherlands continuing education (CE programmes, consisting of a 5-day postgraduate training course followed by bimonthly workshops and teaching practices, were organised simultaneously. Network activities included consultations, newsletters and the development of a communication guideline. Endpoint measures included the participation rate, compliance, quality of the CE programme, teaching practices, knowledge, network activities, communication, number of patients treated and patient satisfaction. Results: Sixty-three physical therapists out of 193 practices (33% participated in the project. They all completed the education programmes and were formally registered. All evaluations of the education programmes showed positive scores. Knowledge scores increased significantly directly after the training course and at 18 months. A draft guideline on communication between physical therapists and rheumatologists was developed, and 4 newsletters were distributed. A substantial proportion of physical therapists and rheumatologists reported improved communication at 18 months. The mean number of patients treated by physical therapists participating in the networks increased significantly. Patients' satisfaction scores within the networks were significantly higher than those from outside the networks at 18 months. Conclusions: Setting up a system of networks for continuing education for physical therapists regarding the treatment of patients with rheumatic diseases is feasible. Further research will focus on the effectiveness of the system and its implementation on a larger scale.

  12. Manifestaciones reumatológicas de la enfermedad inflamatoria intestinal Rheumatologic manifestations of inflammatory bowel disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Octavio Germán Muñoz Maya

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available La enfermedad inflamatoria intestinal (EII se caracteriza por la activación inapropiada del sistema inmune de la mucosa intestinal y sus dos formas de presentación son: la colitis ulcerativa y la enfermedad de Crohn. Las manifestaciones extraintestinales se presentan hasta en el 36% de los pacientes y pueden comprometer cualquier órgano o sistema. La disfunción inmune se caracteriza por el desequilibrio entre los mediadores proinflamatorios y los antinflamatorios y se expresa como una enfermedad sistémica. Las manifestaciones reumatológicas asociadas a la EII son de tres tipos: la artritis periférica, la espondiloartropatía y una tercera categoría que incluye lesiones dérmicas, oftálmicas y del metabolismo óseo, entre otras. El manejo de estas manifestaciones se basa en la terapia sistémica para el control de la actividad inflamatoria local utilizando esteroides, derivados de la 5-ASA, inmunomoduladores y, en los últimos años, terapia anti-TNF. The main feature of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD is the continuous activation of the mucosa-associated immune system; the disease has two major forms of presentation: ulcerative colitis and Crohn´s disease. The extraintestinal manifestations are present in 36% of patients, and any organ can be affected. There is an imbalance between proinflammatory and antinflammatory cytokines leading to a systemic disease. The rheumatologic manifestations of the IBD are: Peripheral arthritis, spondyloarthropathy and a third category that includes dermic and ocular lesions as well as metabolic bone disease. Control of the extraintestinal manifestations is based on systemic therapy with steroids, 5-ASA derivatives and biological anti-TNF therapy.

  13. Multimodal freight investment criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    Literature was reviewed on multi-modal investment criteria for freight projects, examining measures and techniques for quantifying project benefits and costs, as well as ways to describe the economic importance of freight transportation. : A limited ...

  14. Water Quality Criteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA develops water quality criteria based on the latest scientific knowledge to protect human health and aquatic life. This information serves as guidance to states and tribes in adopting water quality standards.

  15. Aquatic Life Criteria - Ammonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Documents related to EPA's final 2013 Aquatic Life Ambient Water Quality Criteria for Ammonia (Freshwater). These documents pertain to the safe levels of Ammonia in water that should protect to the majority of species.

  16. Aquatic Life Criteria - Copper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Documents pertain to Aquatic Life Ambient Water Quality criteria for Copper (2007 Freshwater, 2016 Estuarine/marine). These documents contain the safe levels of Copper in water that should protect to the majority of species.

  17. Integrated Criteria Document Chromium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slooff W; Cleven RFMJ; Janus JA; van der Poel P; van Beelen P; Boumans LJM; Canton JH; Eerens HC; Krajnc EI; de Leeuw FAAM; Matthijsen AJCM; van de Meent D; van der Meulen A; Mohn GR; Wijland GC; de Bruijn PJ; van Keulen A; Verburgh JJ; van der Woerd KF

    1990-01-01

    Betreft de engelse versie van rapport 758701001
    Bij dit rapport behoort een appendix onder hetzelfde nummer getiteld: "Integrated Criteria Document Chromium: Effects" Auteurs: Janus JA; Krajnc EI
    (appendix: see 710401002A)

  18. Dual Criteria Decisions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Steffen; Harrison, Glenn W.; Lau, Morten Igel

    2014-01-01

    The most popular models of decision making use a single criterion to evaluate projects or lotteries. However, decision makers may actually consider multiple criteria when evaluating projects. We consider a dual criteria model from psychology. This model integrates the familiar tradeoffs between...... to the clear role that income thresholds play in such decision making, but does not rule out a role for tradeoffs between risk and utility or probability weighting....

  19. Rating of environmental criteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glueck, K; Krasser, G

    1980-01-01

    After a general theoretical discussion on the question of rating within a framework of cost-benefit studies, first trials as to the quantification and standardisation of twelve selected environmental criteria by means of an indicator system are worked out and compiled. The selection includes the criteria exhaust gas, dust, micro climate, water pollution, water regime, land requirement, vibrations, traffic noise, landscape scene, urban scene, effect of separation and safety risks. An insight is given of the rating practice using an evaluation of the available literature, of a household interview and of an interview of experts. The interviewing of 156 experts as to their rating conception of ten criteria in the second round has provided contributions to the general problem of the evaluation estimate based on multi criteria analysis as well as differentiation of the twelve or ten environmental criteria. The following criteria ratings given by the experts and which are averaged and smoothed are: traffic noise 20,0% +- 8,5; air pollution 15,0% +- 7,0; safety risk 13,0% +- 7,0; soil and water pollution 8,5% +- 5,0; landscape scene 8,0% +- 4,5; urban scene 8,0% +- 4,5; water regime 6,5% +- 3,5 and vibrations 4,5% +- 2,5.

  20. The prevalence of vitamin D deficiency in consecutive new patients seen over a 6-month period in general rheumatology clinics.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Haroon, Muhammad

    2012-02-01

    The objectives of this study are to assess: (a) the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency among new patients attending rheumatology outpatient departments, (b) the age profile of these low vitamin D patients and (c) whether any diagnostic category had a particularly high number of vitamin D-deficient patients. All new patients seen consecutively in general rheumatology clinics between January to June 2007 inclusive were eligible to partake in this study, and 231 out of 264 consented to do so. Parathyroid hormone, 25-hydroxyvitamin D, creatinine, calcium, phosphate, albumin and alkaline phosphatase levels were measured. We defined vitamin D deficiency as <\\/=53 nmol\\/l and severe deficiency as <\\/=25 nmol\\/l. Overall, 70% of 231 patients had vitamin D deficiency, and 26% had severe deficiency. Sixty-five percent of patients aged >\\/=65 and 78% of patients aged <\\/=30 years had low vitamin D levels. Vitamin D deficiency in each diagnostic category was as follows: (a) inflammatory joint diseases\\/connective tissue diseases (IJD\\/CTD), 69%; (b) soft tissue rheumatism, 77%; (c) osteoarthritis, 62%; (d) non-specific musculoskeletal back pain, 75% and (e) osteoporosis, 71%. Seasonal variation of vitamin D levels was noted in all diagnostic groups apart from IJD\\/CTD group, where the degree of vitamin D deficiency persisted from late winter to peak summer. Very high prevalence of vitamin D deficiency was noted in all diagnostic categories (p = 0.006), and it was independent of age (p = 0.297). The results suggest vitamin D deficiency as a possible modifiable risk factor in different rheumatologic conditions, and its role in IJD\\/CTD warrants further attention.

  1. The effect of new biosimilars in rheumatology and gastroenterology specialities on UK healthcare budgets: Results of a budget impact analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aladul, Mohammed I; Fitzpatrick, Raymond W; Chapman, Stephen R

    2018-05-15

    The approval of new biosimilars of infliximab, etanercept and adalimumab by the European Medicines Agency is expected to produce further cost savings to the healthcare system budget. This study aimed to estimate the budget impact of the introduction of new biosimilars Flixabi ® , Erelzi ® , Solymbic ® , Amgevita ® and Imraldi ® in rheumatology and gastroenterology specialities in the UK. A published budget impact model was adapted to estimate the expected cost savings following the entry of new biosimilars Flixabi ® , Erelzi ® , Solymbic ® , Amgevita ® and Imraldi ® in the UK over three-year time horizon. This model was based on retrospective market shares of biologics used in rheumatology and gastroenterology which were derived from DEFINE Software and healthcare professional perspectives. The model predicted that infliximab and etanercept biosimilars would replace their corresponding reference agents by 2020. Adalimumab biosimilars were predicted to achieve 19% of the rheumatology and gastroenterology market by 2020. Without the introduction of further biosimilars, the model predicted a reduction in expenditure of £44 million on biologics over the next three years. With the entry of Flixabi ® , Erelzi ® , Solymbic ® , Amgevita ® and Imraldi ® the model estimates cumulative savings of £285 million by 2020. The introduction of new infliximab, etanercept and adalimumab biosimilars will be associated with considerable cost savings and have a substantial favourable impact on the UK NHS budget. The number of biosimilars and time of entry of is critical to create competition which will result in maximum cost savings. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. A multi-centre study of interactional style in nurse specialist- and physician-led Rheumatology clinics in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinall-Collier, Karen; Madill, Anna; Firth, Jill

    2016-07-01

    Nurse-led care is well established in Rheumatology in the UK and provides follow-up care to people with inflammatory arthritis including treatment, monitoring, patient education and psychosocial support. The aim of this study is to compare and contrast interactional style with patients in physician-led and nurse-led Rheumatology clinics. A multi-centre mixed methods approach was adopted. Nine UK Rheumatology out-patient clinics were observed and audio-recorded May 2009-April 2010. Eighteen practitioners agreed to participate in clinic audio-recordings, researcher observations, and note-taking. Of 9 nurse specialists, 8 were female and 5 of 9 physicians were female. Eight practitioners in each group took part in audio-recorded post-clinic interviews. All patients on the clinic list for those practitioners were invited to participate and 107 were consented and observed. In the nurse specialist cohort 46% were female; 71% had a diagnosis of Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA). The physician cohort comprised 31% female; 40% with RA and 16% unconfirmed diagnosis. Nineteen (18%) of the patients observed were approached for an audio-recorded telephone interview and 15 participated (4 male, 11 female). Forty-four nurse specialist and 63 physician consultations with patients were recorded. Roter's Interactional Analysis System (RIAS) was used to code this data. Thirty-one semi-structured interviews were conducted (16 practitioner, 15 patients) within 24h of observed consultations and were analyzed using thematic analysis. RIAS results illuminated differences between practitioners that can be classified as 'socio-emotional' versus 'task-focussed'. Specifically, nurse specialists and their patients engaged significantly more in the socio-emotional activity of 'building a relationship'. Across practitioners, the greatest proportion of 'patient initiations' were in 'giving medical information' and reflected what patients wanted the practitioner to know rather than giving insight into

  3. EULAR task force recommendations on annual cardiovascular risk assessment for patients with rheumatoid arthritis: an audit of the success of implementation in a rheumatology outpatient clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikdahl, Eirik; Rollefstad, Silvia; Olsen, Inge C; Kvien, Tore K; Hansen, Inger Johanne Widding; Soldal, Dag Magnar; Haugeberg, Glenn; Semb, Anne Grete

    2015-01-01

    EULAR recommendations for cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk management include annual CVD risk assessments for patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). We evaluated the recording of CVD risk factors (CVD-RF) in a rheumatology outpatient clinic, where EULAR recommendations had been implemented. Further, we compared CVD-RF recordings between a regular rheumatology outpatient clinic (RegROC) and a structured arthritis clinic (AC). In 2012, 1142 RA patients visited the rheumatology outpatient clinic: 612 attended RegROC and 530 attended AC. We conducted a search in the patient journals to ascertain the rate of CVD-RF recording. The overall CVD-RF recording rate was 40.1% in the rheumatology outpatient clinic, reflecting a recording rate of 59.1% in the AC and 23.6% in the RegROC. The odds ratios for having CVD-RFs recorded for patients attending AC compared to RegROC were as follows: blood pressure: 12.4, lipids: 5.0-6.0, glucose: 9.1, HbA1c: 6.1, smoking: 1.4, and for having all the CVD-RFs needed to calculate the CVD risk by the systematic coronary risk evaluation (SCORE): 21.0. The CVD-RF recording rate was low in a rheumatology outpatient clinic. However, a systematic team-based model was superior compared to a RegROC. Further measures are warranted to improve CVD-RF recording in RA patients.

  4. EULAR Task Force Recommendations on Annual Cardiovascular Risk Assessment for Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis: An Audit of the Success of Implementation in a Rheumatology Outpatient Clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eirik Ikdahl

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. EULAR recommendations for cardiovascular disease (CVD risk management include annual CVD risk assessments for patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA. We evaluated the recording of CVD risk factors (CVD-RF in a rheumatology outpatient clinic, where EULAR recommendations had been implemented. Further, we compared CVD-RF recordings between a regular rheumatology outpatient clinic (RegROC and a structured arthritis clinic (AC. Methods. In 2012, 1142 RA patients visited the rheumatology outpatient clinic: 612 attended RegROC and 530 attended AC. We conducted a search in the patient journals to ascertain the rate of CVD-RF recording. Results. The overall CVD-RF recording rate was 40.1% in the rheumatology outpatient clinic, reflecting a recording rate of 59.1% in the AC and 23.6% in the RegROC. The odds ratios for having CVD-RFs recorded for patients attending AC compared to RegROC were as follows: blood pressure: 12.4, lipids: 5.0-6.0, glucose: 9.1, HbA1c: 6.1, smoking: 1.4, and for having all the CVD-RFs needed to calculate the CVD risk by the systematic coronary risk evaluation (SCORE: 21.0. Conclusion. The CVD-RF recording rate was low in a rheumatology outpatient clinic. However, a systematic team-based model was superior compared to a RegROC. Further measures are warranted to improve CVD-RF recording in RA patients.

  5. Getting back to the dissecting room: An evaluation of an innovative course in musculoskeletal anatomy for UK-based rheumatology training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, Tim; Marais, Debbi; Hassell, Andrew B; Stevenson, Kay; Paskins, Zoe

    2017-12-01

    The rheumatologist relies heavily on clinical skills to diagnose diverse conditions, something that is correlated with one's knowledge of clinical anatomy. More recently, rheumatology has offered further career flexibility with opportunities to develop skills such as joint injection and musculoskeletal (MSK) ultrasound, both of which require a sound understanding of anatomy. Currently, there are no formal strategies to support competency-based anatomy learning in rheumatology in the UK. This study aimed to evaluate an innovative applied anatomy course utilizing cadaveric material, targeted at clinicians practising in rheumatology and MSK medicine. A new course was developed for rheumatologists, rheumatology trainees and allied health professionals practising rheumatology and MSK medicine, with the principal focus being on applied MSK anatomy. A questionnaire was given to course attendees and a mixed methods approach of evaluation used. Descriptive statistical data analysis was performed. The course received overall positive feedback and statistically significant improvements in levels of confidence in anatomy (mean 52.35-83.53, p attendees also favoured a peer-assisted and multidisciplinary learning approach. This study lends support for the use of cadaveric material in the teaching of postgraduate anatomy to rheumatologists. It has demonstrated a continual need for hands-on and interactive anatomy training in an ever-advancing digital world. To be successful, cadaveric learning should not be viewed in a purely 'pre-clinical' setting, but instead integrated with postgraduate learning. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Summarized water quality criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kempster, P.L.; Hattingh, W.H.J.; Van Vliet, H.R.

    1980-08-01

    The available world literature from 27 sources on existing water quality criteria are summarized for the 15 main uses of water. The minimum, median and maximum specified values for 96 different determinands are included. Under each water use the criteria are grouped according to the functional significance of the determinands e.g. aesthetic/physical effects, high toxic potential, low toxic potential etc. A synopsis is included summarizing salient facts for each determinand such as the conditions under which it is toxic and its relationship to other determinands. The significance of the criteria is briefly discussed and the importance of considering functional interactions between determinands emphasized in evaluating the potential for toxic or beneficial effects. From the source literature it appears that the toxic potential, in addition to being determined by concentration, is also affected by the origin of the substance concerned, i.e. whether from natural sources or from anthropogenic pollution

  7. Teaching musculoskeletal examination skills to UK medical students: a comparative survey of Rheumatology and Orthopaedic education practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, Tim

    2014-03-28

    Specialists in Rheumatology and Orthopaedics are frequently involved in undergraduate teaching of musculoskeletal (MSK) examination skills. Students often report that specialty-led teaching is inconsistent, confusing and bears little resemblance to the curricula. The Gait, Arms, Legs and Spine (GALS) is a MSK screening tool that provides a standardised approach to examination despite it being fraught with disapproval and low uptake. Recent studies would appear to support innovative instructional methods of engaging learners such as patient educators and interactive small group teaching. This comparative cross-sectional survey evaluates the current state of undergraduate teaching in Rheumatology and Orthopaedics, including preferred teaching methods, attitudes towards GALS, and barriers to effective teaching. An electronic questionnaire was sent to specialist trainees and Consultants in the East and West Midlands region, representing 5 UK medical schools. Descriptive statistical data analysis was performed. There were 76 respondents representing 5 medical schools. There was a request for newer teaching methodologies to be used: multi-media computer-assisted learning (35.5%), audio-visual aids (31.6%), role-playing (19.7%), and social media (3.9%). It is evident that GALS is under-utilised with 50% of clinicians not using GALS in their teaching. There is a genuine desire for clinical educators to improve their teaching ability, collaborate more with curriculum planners, and feel valued by institutions. There remains a call for implementing a standardised approach to MSK clinical teaching to supersede GALS.

  8. A concise evaluation and management curriculum for physicians in training improved billing at an outpatient academic rheumatology clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirsh, Joel M; Collier, David H; Boyle, Dennis J; Gardner, Edward M

    2010-04-01

    To study whether providing house staff with a brief lecture and handout about proper documentation could improve billing at an academic rheumatology clinic. The authors created an educational sheet about documentation and billing after a review of the common documentation omissions responsible for down coding (Appendix, Supplemental Digital Content 1, available at: http://links.lww.com/RHU/A8). Beginning in November of 2006, the house staff were provided with this sheet and a brief lecture regarding how outpatient evaluation and management levels of service are coded. The results of clinic billing from January 1, 2006 to October 31, 2006 and November 1, 2006 to August 31, 2007 were obtained from the physician billing office. The authors compared the average level of service, by appointment type, in the prepost comparison periods using the student t test. There was a significant improvement in the level of service billed for new visits (P < 0.001), consults (P < 0.001), and return visits (P < 0.001) after November 1, 2006. The percentage of patients evaluated for the first time who were billed as consults improved from 15% to 78% (P < 0.001 by chi2). These changes resulted in $34,342 of additional billing during the postintervention period. A simple strategy for educating the house staff about proper documentation of the history, physical examination, and clinical decision making resulted in a significant improvement in an academic rheumatology division's outpatient billing.

  9. Radiological design criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selby, J.M.; Andersen, B.V.; Carter, L.A.; Waite, D.A.

    1977-01-01

    Many new nuclear facilities are unsatisfactory from a radiation protection point of view, particularly when striving to maintain occupational exposure as low as practicable 'ALAP'. Radiation protection is achieved through physical protective features supplemented by administrative controls. Adequate physical protective feature should be achieved during construction so that supplemental administrative controls may be kept simple and workable. Many nuclear facilities fall short of adequate physical protective features, thus, remedial and sometimes awkward administrative procedures are required to safely conduct work. In reviewing the various handbooks, reports and regulations which deal with radiation protection, it may be noted that there is minimal radiological design guidance for application to nuclear facilities. A set of criteria or codes covering functional areas rather than specific nuclear facility types is badly needed. The following are suggested as functional areas to be considered: characterization of the Facility; siting and access; design exposure limits; layout (people and materials flow); ventilation and effluent control; radiation protection facilities and systems. The application of such radiological design criteria early in the design process would provide some assurance that nuclear facilities will be safe, flexible, and efficient with a minimum of costly retrofitting or administrative restrictions. Criteria which we have found helpful in these functional areas is discussed together with justification for adoption of such criteria and identification of problems which still require solution

  10. Comments on confinement criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurak, V.; Schroer, B.; Swieca, J.A.

    1977-01-01

    For a QED 2 model with SU(n) flavour, the nature of the physical states space is more subtle than one expects on the basis of the loop criterion for confinement. One may have colour confinement without confinement of the fundamental flavour representation. Attempts to formulate confinement criteria in which the quark fields play a more fundamental role are discussed [pt

  11. EULAR definition of erosive disease in light of the 2010 ACR/EULAR rheumatoid arthritis classification criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Heijde, Désirée; van der Helm-van Mil, Annette H M; Aletaha, Daniel; Bingham, Clifton O; Burmester, Gerd R; Dougados, Maxime; Emery, Paul; Felson, David; Knevel, Rachel; Kvien, Tore K; Landewé, Robert B M; Lukas, Cédric; McInnes, Iain; Silman, Alan J; Smolen, Josef S; Stanislawska-Biernat, Ewa; Zink, Angela; Combe, Bernard

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this report was to propose a definition for erosive disease in the context of inflammatory arthritis in light of the 2010 American College of Rheumatology (ACR)/European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) rheumatoid arthritis (RA) criteria for use in clinical practice and studies. A EULAR task force was formed including 16 rheumatologists and one rheumatology fellow. The process was both evidence based and consensus based, and included, between March 2010 and April 2012, analyses of data from two cohorts, two face-to-face meetings, one online voting and one teleconference. The Leiden Early Arthritis Cohort and the French ESPOIR cohort were used for the evidence-based part. The outcome measures, which were initiation of methotrexate therapy, or any disease-modifying antirheumatic drug therapy within the first year of disease and arthritis persistency over 5 years, were studied with the aim to give the best definition of erosive disease. A decision was made to select a definition with a high specificity and focus on patients who did not otherwise fulfil the 2010 ACR/EULAR RA criteria (definition was selected: erosive disease for use in the 2010 ACR/EULAR RA classification criteria is defined when an erosion (defined as a cortical break) is seen in at least three separate joints at any of the following sites: the proximal interphalangeal, the metacarpophalangeal, the wrist (counted as one joint) and the metatarsophalangeal joints on radiographs of both hands and feet. A highly specific definition for erosive disease has thus been formulated.

  12. Human Systems Design Criteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Jens

    1982-01-01

    This paper deals with the problem of designing more humanised computer systems. This problem can be formally described as the need for defining human design criteria, which — if used in the design process - will secure that the systems designed get the relevant qualities. That is not only...... the necessary functional qualities but also the needed human qualities. The author's main argument is, that the design process should be a dialectical synthesis of the two points of view: Man as a System Component, and System as Man's Environment. Based on a man's presentation of the state of the art a set...... of design criteria is suggested and their relevance discussed. The point is to focus on the operator rather than on the computer. The crucial question is not to program the computer to work on its own conditions, but to “program” the operator to function on human conditions....

  13. Intelligent intefrace design criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sicard, Y.; Siebert, S.; Thebault, M.H.

    1990-01-01

    Optimum adequation between control means and the capacities of the teams of operators is sought for to achieve computerization of control and monitoring interfaces. Observation of the diagnosis activity of populations of operators in incident situations on a simulator enables design criteria well-suited to the characteristics of the detection, interpretation of symptoms and incident location tasks to be defined. A software tool based on a qualitative approach enables the design process to be systematized

  14. Efficacy and safety of tofacitinib as monotherapy in Japanese patients with active rheumatoid arthritis: a 12-week, randomized, phase 2 study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Yoshiya; Takeuchi, Tsutomu; Yamanaka, Hisashi; Nakamura, Hiroyuki; Toyoizumi, Shigeyuki; Zwillich, Samuel

    2015-07-01

    To evaluate oral tofacitinib versus placebo for treatment of active rheumatoid arthritis in Japanese patients with inadequate response to disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs. In this double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized, parallel-group, 12-week, phase 2 study (clinicaltrials.gov NCT00687193), 317 patients received tofacitinib: 1, 3, 5, 10, or 15 mg as monotherapy or placebo twice daily (BID). response rate by American College of Rheumatology (ACR) ≥ 20% improvement criteria (ACR20) at week 12. ACR20 response rates: 37.7% (20/53), 67.9% (36/53), 73.1% (38/52), 84.9% (45/53), and 90.7% (49/54) with tofacitinib: 1, 3, 5, 10, and 15 mg BID, respectively, versus 15.4% (8/52) with placebo (p tofacitinib versus placebo occurred from week 2 onward (p tofacitinib versus placebo from week 4 (p tofacitinib patients experienced treatment-related serious adverse events (AEs). Most common treatment-emergent AEs: nasopharyngitis (10% vs 12%) and hyperlipidemia (5% vs 0%). Serum creatinine, hemoglobin, and total-, low-, and high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol levels increased with tofacitinib. Tofacitinib produced dose-dependent ACR20 responses and reduced disease activity. The safety profile was consistent with that reported from global monotherapy trials.

  15. Evaluation of the ACR and SLICC classification criteria in juvenile-onset systemic lupus erythematosus: a longitudinal analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lythgoe, H; Morgan, T; Heaf, E; Lloyd, O; Al-Abadi, E; Armon, K; Bailey, K; Davidson, J; Friswell, M; Gardner-Medwin, J; Haslam, K; Ioannou, Y; Leahy, A; Leone, V; Pilkington, C; Rangaraj, S; Riley, P; Tizard, E J; Wilkinson, N; Beresford, M W

    2017-10-01

    Objectives The Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics (SLICC) group proposed revised classification criteria for systemic lupus erythematosus (SLICC-2012 criteria). This study aimed to compare these criteria with the well-established American College of Rheumatology classification criteria (ACR-1997 criteria) in a national cohort of juvenile-onset systemic lupus erythematosus (JSLE) patients and evaluate how patients' classification criteria evolved over time. Methods Data from patients in the UK JSLE Cohort Study with a senior clinician diagnosis of probable evolving, or definite JSLE, were analyzed. Patients were assessed using both classification criteria within 1 year of diagnosis and at latest follow up (following a minimum 12-month follow-up period). Results A total of 226 patients were included. The SLICC-2012 was more sensitive than ACR-1997 at diagnosis (92.9% versus 84.1% p < 0.001) and after follow up (100% versus 92.0% p < 0.001). Most patients meeting the SLICC-2012 criteria and not the ACR-1997 met more than one additional criterion on the SLICC-2012. Conclusions The SLICC-2012 was better able to classify patients with JSLE than the ACR-1997 and did so at an earlier stage in their disease course. SLICC-2012 should be considered for classification of JSLE patients in observational studies and clinical trial eligibility.

  16. [The National Database of the Regional Collaborative Rheumatic Centers as a tool for clinical epidemiology and quality assessment in rheumatology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zink, Angela; Huscher, Dörte; Listing, Joachim

    2003-01-01

    The national database of the German Collaborative Arthritis Centres is a well-established tool for the observation and assessment of health care delivery to patients with rheumatic diseases in Germany. The discussion of variations in treatment practices contributes to the internal quality assessment in the participating arthritis centres. This documentation has shown deficits in primary health care including late referral to a rheumatologist, undertreatment with disease-modifying drugs and complementary therapies. In rheumatology, there is a trend towards early, intensive medical treatment including combination therapy. The frequency and length of inpatient hospital and rehabilitation treatments is decreasing, while active physiotherapy in outpatient care has been increased. Specific deficits have been identified concerning the provision of occupational therapy services and patient education.

  17. Specialized rheumatology nurse substitutes for rheumatologists in the diagnostic process of fibromyalgia: a cost-consequence analysis and a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kroese, Mariëlle E.; Severens, Johan L.; Schulpen, Guy J.; Bessems, Monique C.; Nijhuis, Frans J.; Landewé, Robert B.

    2011-01-01

    To perform a cost-consequence analysis of the substitution of specialized rheumatology nurses (SRN) for rheumatologists (RMT) in the diagnostic process of fibromyalgia (FM), using both a healthcare and societal perspective and a 9-month period. Alongside a randomized controlled trial, we measured

  18. Criteria for software modularization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Card, David N.; Page, Gerald T.; Mcgarry, Frank E.

    1985-01-01

    A central issue in programming practice involves determining the appropriate size and information content of a software module. This study attempted to determine the effectiveness of two widely used criteria for software modularization, strength and size, in reducing fault rate and development cost. Data from 453 FORTRAN modules developed by professional programmers were analyzed. The results indicated that module strength is a good criterion with respect to fault rate, whereas arbitrary module size limitations inhibit programmer productivity. This analysis is a first step toward defining empirically based standards for software modularization.

  19. The Place of Nailfold Capillaroscopy Among Instrumental Methods for Assessment of Some Peripheral Ischaemic Syndromes in Rheumatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambova, Sevdalina N

    2016-01-01

    Micro- and macrovascular pathology is a frequent finding in a number of common rheumatic diseases. Secondary Raynaud's phenomenon (RP) is among the most common symptoms in systemic sclerosis and several other systemic autoimmune diseases including a broad differential diagnosis. It should be also differential from other peripheral vascular syndromes such as embolism, thrombosis, etc., some of which lead to clinical manifestation of the blue toe syndrome. The current review discusses the instrumental methods for vascular assessments. Nailfold capillaroscopy is the only method among the imaging techniques that can be used for morphological assessment of the nutritive capillaries in the nailfold area. Laser-Doppler flowmetry and laser-Doppler imaging are methods for functional assessment of microcirculation, while thermography and plethysmography reflect both blood flow in peripheral arteries and microcirculation. Doppler ultrasound and angiography visualize peripheral arteries. The choice of the appropriate instrumental method is guided by the clinical presentation. The main role of capillaroscopy is to provide differential diagnosis between primary and secondary RP. In rheumatology, capillaroscopic changes in systemic sclerosis have been recently defined as diagnostic. The appearance of abnormal capillaroscopic pattern inherits high positive predictive value for the development of a connective tissue disease that is higher than the predictive value of antinuclear antibodies. In cases of abrupt onset of peripheral ischaemia, clinical signs of critical ischaemia, unilateral or lower limb involvement, Doppler ultrasound and angiography are indicated. The most common causes for such clinical picture that may be referred to rheumatologic consultation are the antiphospholipid syndrome, mimickers of vasculitides such as atherosclerosis with cholesterol emboli, and neoplasms.

  20. Conversion rates of abstracts presented at the Canadian Rheumatology Association Annual Meetings into full-text journal articles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yacyshyn, Elaine A; Soong, Laura C

    2017-06-01

    Dissemination of research studies is important for research ideas to be transformed from initial abstracts to full publications. Analyses of the scientific impact and publication record of the Canadian Rheumatology Association (CRA) Annual meeting have not been previously described. This study determines the publication rate of abstracts presented at the CRA Annual Meetings 2005-2013 to full-text journal articles and the factors associated with publication. Program records of previous CRA meetings from 2005 to 2013 were obtained. Abstracts were searched for corresponding full-text publication in Google Scholar and PubMed using a search algorithm. Abstracts and subsequent published articles were evaluated for type of abstract, time to publication, study type, publishing journal, and journal impact factor. A total of 1401 abstracts were included in the study, 567 of which were converted to full publications. The average time to publication was 19.7 months, with 89% of abstracts published within 3 years of being presented. Eighty-three percent of abstracts were clinical in nature, and 58% of published studies were observational in design. Articles were published in a wide range of journals, with the top publisher being the Journal of Rheumatology (31%). Average time to publication was 19.7 months. Eighty-six percent of articles had a Journal Impact Factor > 2. Overall, 40.5% of abstracts presented at the CRA Annual Meetings 2005-2013 were published. Further research is needed to determine barriers and reasons for abstracts not being published as full-text articles.

  1. Safety and reliability criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Neil, R.

    1978-01-01

    Nuclear power plants and, in particular, reactor pressure boundary components have unique reliability requirements, in that usually no significant redundancy is possible, and a single failure can give rise to possible widespread core damage and fission product release. Reliability may be required for availability or safety reasons, but in the case of the pressure boundary and certain other systems safety may dominate. Possible Safety and Reliability (S and R) criteria are proposed which would produce acceptable reactor design. Without some S and R requirement the designer has no way of knowing how far he must go in analysing his system or component, or whether his proposed solution is likely to gain acceptance. The paper shows how reliability targets for given components and systems can be individually considered against the derived S and R criteria at the design and construction stage. Since in the case of nuclear pressure boundary components there is often very little direct experience on which to base reliability studies, relevant non-nuclear experience is examined. (author)

  2. Combining the IADPSG criteria with the WHO diagnostic criteria for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Macrosomia or at least one adverse outcome were more likely in GDM patients who met the diagnostic criteria by both the IADPSG and WHO criteria (P = 0.001). Conclusion: A diagnosis of GDM that meets both the WHO and IADPSG criteria provides stronger prediction for adverse pregnancy outcome than a diagnosis that ...

  3. Development and Preliminary Face and Content Validation of the "Which Health Approaches and Treatments Are You Using?" (WHAT) Questionnaires Assessing Complementary and Alternative Medicine Use in Pediatric Rheumatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toupin April, Karine; Stinson, Jennifer; Boon, Heather; Duffy, Ciarán M; Huber, Adam M; Gibbon, Michele; Descarreaux, Martin; Spiegel, Lynn; Vohra, Sunita; Tugwell, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is commonly used by children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), yet no validated questionnaires assess that use. The objective of this study was to develop child self- and parent proxy-report questionnaires assessing CAM use and to determine the face and content validity of the "Which Health Approaches and Treatments are you using?" (WHAT) questionnaires in pediatric rheumatology. A sequential phased mixed methods approach was used to develop the questionnaires. A Delphi Survey of 126 experts followed by an interdisciplinary consensus conference of 14 stakeholders in CAM, general pediatrics and pediatric rheumatology was held to develop consensus on the content of the questionnaires using a nominal group technique. To determine face and content validity of the questionnaires, two groups, including (a) a purposive sample of 22 children with JIA 8 to 18 years and their parents from the Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario and the Hospital for Sick Children, and (b) 21 Canadian pediatric rheumatology experts, participated in interviews. Participants were independently asked about the goal, understandability and comprehensiveness of the WHAT questionnaires, as well as the relevance of items. Consensus was reached on 17 items of the WHAT questionnaires. The domains found to be relevant were child's CAM use, factors associated with CAM use, perceived impact of CAM use, and communication about CAM. A total of 15 items in the parent proxy-report questionnaire and 13 items in the child report questionnaire showed adequate content validity. Consensus was reached by experts on the content of a pediatric CAM questionnaire. Face and content validity testing and modifications made to the WHAT questionnaires have helped ensure adequate preliminary validity for use in pediatric rheumatology. This constitutes the basis for further testing of these questionnaires in pediatric rheumatology and for adaptation to other chronic

  4. Development and Preliminary Face and Content Validation of the "Which Health Approaches and Treatments Are You Using?" (WHAT Questionnaires Assessing Complementary and Alternative Medicine Use in Pediatric Rheumatology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karine Toupin April

    Full Text Available Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM is commonly used by children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA, yet no validated questionnaires assess that use. The objective of this study was to develop child self- and parent proxy-report questionnaires assessing CAM use and to determine the face and content validity of the "Which Health Approaches and Treatments are you using?" (WHAT questionnaires in pediatric rheumatology.A sequential phased mixed methods approach was used to develop the questionnaires. A Delphi Survey of 126 experts followed by an interdisciplinary consensus conference of 14 stakeholders in CAM, general pediatrics and pediatric rheumatology was held to develop consensus on the content of the questionnaires using a nominal group technique. To determine face and content validity of the questionnaires, two groups, including (a a purposive sample of 22 children with JIA 8 to 18 years and their parents from the Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario and the Hospital for Sick Children, and (b 21 Canadian pediatric rheumatology experts, participated in interviews. Participants were independently asked about the goal, understandability and comprehensiveness of the WHAT questionnaires, as well as the relevance of items.Consensus was reached on 17 items of the WHAT questionnaires. The domains found to be relevant were child's CAM use, factors associated with CAM use, perceived impact of CAM use, and communication about CAM. A total of 15 items in the parent proxy-report questionnaire and 13 items in the child report questionnaire showed adequate content validity.Consensus was reached by experts on the content of a pediatric CAM questionnaire. Face and content validity testing and modifications made to the WHAT questionnaires have helped ensure adequate preliminary validity for use in pediatric rheumatology. This constitutes the basis for further testing of these questionnaires in pediatric rheumatology and for adaptation to other

  5. Patient’s Knowledge and Perception Towards the use of Non-steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs in Rheumatology Clinic Northern Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulaiman, Wahinuddin; Seung, Ong Ping; Ismail, Rosli

    2012-01-01

    Objective In Rheumatology, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) has been widely prescribed and used. However, despite their clinical benefits in the management of inflammatory and degenerative joint disease, NSAIDs have considerable side effects, mostly affecting the upper gastrointestinal system, which therefore, limit their use. This study was conducted to determine the patients’ knowledge and perception regarding the used of NSAIDS. Methods A total of 120 patients who attended the rheumatology clinic Hospital, Raja Permaisuri Bainun, Malaysia, and received NSAIDs more than 3 months were interviewed irrespective of their rheumatological conditions. Patient’s knowledge and perception on the side effects of NSAIDs were recorded. Result Fifty-four percent of the patients obtained information regarding the side effect of NSAIDs either from the rheumatologist, rheumatology staff nurse or other medical staffs (75.4%). The remaining 45.8% were naive of such knowledge. Fifteen percent obtained the information by surfing the internet and 9.2% from printed media. Twenty-four (24.2%) patients, experienced indigestion and/or stomach discomfort attributed to NSAIDs used. Two patients (1.7%) had hematemesis and malena once. Conclusion This study shows that half of the patients who attended the rheumatology clinic were unaware of the side effect of NSAIDs. Available data showed that most of the knowledgeable patients are more conscience and self-educated. This study also reveals the important roles of clinicians, trained staff nurses as well as the pharmacist in providing the guidance and knowledge of any medication taken by patients. PMID:23226825

  6. Laser Safety Inspection Criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barat, K

    2005-01-01

    A responsibility of the Laser Safety Officer (LSO) is to perform laser safety audits. The American National Standard Z136.1 Safe use of Lasers references this requirement in several sections: (1) Section 1.3.2 LSO Specific Responsibilities states under Hazard Evaluation, ''The LSO shall be responsible for hazards evaluation of laser work areas''; (2) Section 1.3.2.8, Safety Features Audits, ''The LSO shall ensure that the safety features of the laser installation facilities and laser equipment are audited periodically to assure proper operation''; and (3) Appendix D, under Survey and Inspections, it states, ''the LSO will survey by inspection, as considered necessary, all areas where laser equipment is used''. Therefore, for facilities using Class 3B and or Class 4 lasers, audits for laser safety compliance are expected to be conducted. The composition, frequency and rigueur of that inspection/audit rests in the hands of the LSO. A common practice for institutions is to develop laser audit checklists or survey forms. In many institutions, a sole Laser Safety Officer (LSO) or a number of Deputy LSO's perform these audits. For that matter, there are institutions that request users to perform a self-assessment audit. Many items on the common audit list and the associated findings are subjective because they are based on the experience and interest of the LSO or auditor in particular items on the checklist. Beam block usage is an example; to one set of eyes a particular arrangement might be completely adequate, while to another the installation may be inadequate. In order to provide more consistency, the National Ignition Facility Directorate at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (NIF-LLNL) has established criteria for a number of items found on the typical laser safety audit form. These criteria are distributed to laser users, and they serve two broad purposes: first, it gives the user an expectation of what will be reviewed by an auditor, and second, it is an

  7. National Recommended Water Quality Criteria

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The National Recommended Water Quality Criteria is a compilation of national recommended water quality criteria for the protection of aquatic life and human health...

  8. Laser Safety Inspection Criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barat, K.

    2005-01-01

    A responsibility of the Laser Safety Officer (LSO) is to perform laser audits. The American National Standard Z136.1 Safe Use of Lasers references this requirement through several sections. One such reference is Section 1.3.2.8, Safety Features Audits, ''The LSO shall ensure that the safety features of the laser installation facilities and laser equipment are audited periodically to assure proper operation''. The composition, frequency and rigor of that inspection/audit rests in the hands of the LSO. A common practice for institutions is to develop laser audit checklists or survey forms It is common for audit findings from one inspector or inspection to the next to vary even when reviewing the same material. How often has one heard a comment, ''well this area has been inspected several times over the years and no one ever said this or that was a problem before''. A great number of audit items, and therefore findings, are subjective because they are based on the experience and interest of the auditor to particular items on the checklist. Beam block usage, to one set of eyes might be completely adequate, while to another, inadequate. In order to provide consistency, the Laser Safety Office of the National Ignition Facility Directorate has established criteria for a number of items found on the typical laser safety audit form. The criteria are distributed to laser users. It serves two broad purposes; first, it gives the user an expectation of what will be reviewed by an auditor. Second, it is an opportunity to explain audit items to the laser user and thus the reasons for some of these items, such as labelling of beam blocks

  9. Diagnostic Criteria for Pediatric MS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Investigators at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine and Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children’s Hospital of Chicago review the diagnostic criteria for pediatric multiple sclerosis, the differential diagnosis, the 2010 McDonald criteria, and Callen criteria.

  10. Decision criteria in PSA applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holmberg, J.E.; Pulkkinen, U.; Rosqvist, T.; Simola, K.

    2001-11-01

    Along with the adoption of risk informed decision making principles, the need for formal probabilistic decision rule or criteria has been risen. However, there are many practical and theoretical problems in the application of probabilistic criteria. One has to think what is the proper way to apply probabilistic rules together with deterministic ones and how the criteria are weighted with respect to each other. In this report, we approach the above questions from the decision theoretic point of view. We give a short review of the most well known probabilistic criteria, and discuss examples of their use. We present a decision analytic framework for evaluating the criteria, and we analyse how the different criteria behave under incompleteness or uncertainty of the PSA model. As the conclusion of our analysis we give recommendations on the application of the criteria in different decision situations. (au)

  11. Efficacy and safety of belimumab in patients with rheumatoid arthritis: a phase II, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, dose-ranging Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stohl, William; Merrill, Joan T; McKay, James D; Lisse, Jeffrey R; Zhong, Z John; Freimuth, William W; Genovese, Mark C

    2013-05-01

    To evaluate the efficacy/safety of belimumab in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Patients fulfilling American College of Rheumatology (ACR) criteria for RA for ≥ 1 year who had at least moderate disease activity while receiving stable disease-modifying antirheumatic drug (DMARD) therapy and failed ≥ 1 DMARD were randomly assigned to placebo or belimumab 1, 4, or 10 mg/kg, administered intravenously on Days 1, 14, and 28, and then every 4 weeks for 24 weeks (n = 283). This was followed by an optional 24-week extension (n = 237) in which all patients received belimumab. Primary efficacy endpoint was the Week 24 ACR20 response. Week 24 ACR20 responses with placebo and belimumab 1, 4, and 10 mg/kg were 15.9%, 34.7% (p = 0.010), 25.4% (p = 0.168), and 28.2% (p = 0.080), respectively. Patients taking any belimumab dose who continued with belimumab in the open-label extension had an ACR20 response of 41% at 48 weeks. A similar ACR20 response (42%) at 48 weeks was seen in patients taking placebo who switched in the extension to belimumab 10 mg/kg. Greater response rates were observed in patients who at baseline were rheumatoid factor-positive, anticitrullinated protein antibody-positive, or tumor necrosis factor inhibitor-naive, or had elevated C-reactive protein levels, Disease Activity Score 28 > 5.1, or low B lymphocyte stimulator levels (< 0.858 ng/ml). Adverse event rates were similar across treatment groups. In this phase II trial, belimumab demonstrated efficacy and was generally well tolerated in patients with RA who had failed previous therapies. [ClinicalTrials.gov identifier NCT00071812].

  12. ACR appropriateness criteria jaundice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalani, Tasneem; Couto, Corey A; Rosen, Max P; Baker, Mark E; Blake, Michael A; Cash, Brooks D; Fidler, Jeff L; Greene, Frederick L; Hindman, Nicole M; Katz, Douglas S; Kaur, Harmeet; Miller, Frank H; Qayyum, Aliya; Small, William C; Sudakoff, Gary S; Yaghmai, Vahid; Yarmish, Gail M; Yee, Judy

    2013-06-01

    A fundamental consideration in the workup of a jaundiced patient is the pretest probability of mechanical obstruction. Ultrasound is the first-line modality to exclude biliary tract obstruction. When mechanical obstruction is present, additional imaging with CT or MRI can clarify etiology, define level of obstruction, stage disease, and guide intervention. When mechanical obstruction is absent, additional imaging can evaluate liver parenchyma for fat and iron deposition and help direct biopsy in cases where underlying parenchymal disease or mass is found. Imaging techniques are reviewed for the following clinical scenarios: (1) the patient with painful jaundice, (2) the patient with painless jaundice, and (3) the patient with a nonmechanical cause for jaundice. The ACR Appropriateness Criteria are evidence-based guidelines for specific clinical conditions that are reviewed every 2 years by a multidisciplinary expert panel. The guideline development and review include an extensive analysis of current medical literature from peer-reviewed journals and the application of a well-established consensus methodology (modified Delphi) to rate the appropriateness of imaging and treatment procedures by the panel. In those instances where evidence is lacking or not definitive, expert opinion may be used to recommend imaging or treatment. Copyright © 2013 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Criteria of site assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibbs, P.; Fuchs, H.

    1975-01-01

    The criteria which lead to the choice of a particular site for a nuclear power station are in general very similar to those which would apply to any other type of power station. The principal differences derive from the simpler transport problems for the fuel compared with, say, solid fuel and the special safety considerations which attach to nuclear reactors. The search for a suitable site obviously starts by considering where the power is needed, i.e. where the load centers are and also the existing transmission network which may help to bring the power from a more remote site to the load centers. This economic incentive to put the plant close to loads conflicts directly with the nuclear safety argument which favours more remote siting, and part of the problem of site selection is to reconcile these two matters. In addition, there are many other important matters which will be considered later concerning the adequacy of cooling water supplies, foundation conditions, etc., all of which must be examined in considerable detail. (orig./TK) [de

  14. Criteria for decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ricci, P.F.

    1988-01-01

    In this paper the authors describe three risk acceptability criteria as parts of a strategy to clean up decommissioned facilities, related to both the status quo and to a variety of alternative technical clean-up options. The acceptability of risk is a consideration that must enter into any decision to establish when a site is properly decommissioned. To do so, both the corporate and public aspects of the acceptability issue must be considered. The reasons for discussion the acceptability of risk are to: Legitimize the process for making cleanup decisions; Determine who is at risk, who benefits, and who bears the costs of site cleanup, for each specific cleanup option, including the do nothing option; Establish those factors that, taken as a whole, determine measures of acceptability; Determine chemical-specific aggregate and individual risk levels; and Establish levels for cleanup. The choice of these reasons is pragmatic. The method consistent with these factors is risk-risk-effectiveness: the level of cleanup must be consistent with the foreseeable use of the site and budget constraints. Natural background contamination is the level below which further cleanup is generally inefficient. Case-by-case departures from natural background are to be considered depending on demonstrated risk. For example, a hot spot is obviously a prima facie exception, but should be rebuttable. Rebuttability means that, through consensus, the ''hot spot'' is shown not to be associated with exposure

  15. Criteria for performance evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David J. Weiss

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Using a cognitive task (mental calculation and a perceptual-motor task (stylized golf putting, we examined differential proficiency using the CWS index and several other quantitative measures of performance. The CWS index (Weiss and Shanteau, 2003 is a coherence criterion that looks only at internal properties of the data without incorporating an external standard. In Experiment 1, college students (n = 20 carried out 2- and 3-digit addition and multiplication problems under time pressure. In Experiment 2, experienced golfers (n = 12, also college students, putted toward a target from nine different locations. Within each experiment, we analyzed the same responses using different methods. For the arithmetic tasks, accuracy information (mean absolute deviation from the correct answer, MAD using a coherence criterion was available; for golf, accuracy information using a correspondence criterion (mean deviation from the target, also MAD was available. We ranked the performances of the participants according to each measure, then compared the orders using Spearman's rextsubscript{s}. For mental calculation, the CWS order correlated moderately (rextsubscript{s} =.46 with that of MAD. However, a different coherence criterion, degree of model fit, did not correlate with either CWS or accuracy. For putting, the ranking generated by CWS correlated .68 with that generated by MAD. Consensual answers were also available for both experiments, and the rankings they generated correlated highly with those of MAD. The coherence vs. correspondence distinction did not map well onto criteria for performance evaluation.

  16. FHR Generic Design Criteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flanagan, George F [ORNL; Holcomb, David Eugene [ORNL; Cetiner, Sacit M [ORNL

    2012-06-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide an initial, focused reference to the safety characteristics of and a licensing approach for Fluoride-Salt-Cooled High-Temperature Reactors (FHRs). The document does not contain details of particular reactor designs nor does it attempt to identify or classify either design basis or beyond design basis accidents. Further, this document is an initial attempt by a small set of subject matter experts to document the safety and licensing characteristics of FHRs for a larger audience. The document is intended to help in setting the safety and licensing research, development, and demonstration path forward. Input from a wider audience, further technical developments, and additional study will be required to develop a consensus position on the safety and licensing characteristics of FHRs. This document begins with a brief overview of the attributes of FHRs and then a general description of their anticipated safety performance. Following this, an overview of the US nuclear power plant approval process is provided that includes both test and power reactors, as well as the role of safety standards in the approval process. The document next describes a General Design Criteria (GDC) - based approach to licensing an FHR and provides an initial draft set of FHR GDCs. The document concludes with a description of a path forward toward developing an FHR safety standard that can support both a test and power reactor licensing process.

  17. Human brucellosis mimicking axial spondyloarthritis: a challenge for rheumatologists when applying the 2009 ASAS criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Cong; Shen, Gui-Fen; Li, Shou-Xin; Dong, Ling-Li; Yu, Yi-Kai; Tu, Wei; Zhu, Ying-Zi; Hu, Shao-Xian

    2016-06-01

    Although the development of the 2009 SpA classification criteria by Assessment of SpondyloArthritis international Society (ASAS) represents an important step towards a better definition of the early disease stage particularly in axial spondyloarthritis (axSpA), the specificity of the criteria has been criticized these days. As the commonest zoonotic infection worldwide, human brucellosis can mimic a large number of diseases, including SpA. This study was performed to determine the frequency of rheumatologic manifestations in patients with brucellosis and the chance of misdiagnosing them as having axSpA in central China. The results showed that clinical manifestations of axSpA could be observed in brucellosis. Over half of patients had back pain, and one fifth of the patients with back pain were less than 45 years old at onset and had the symptom for more than 3 months. Two young males were falsely classified as suffering from axSpA according to the ASAS criteria, and one with MRI proved sacroiliitis was once given Etanercept for treatment. Therefore, differential diagnosis including human brucellosis should always be kept in mind when applying the ASAS criteria, even in traditionally non-endemic areas.

  18. Uveitis Events During Adalimumab, Etanercept, and Methotrexate Therapy in Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis: Data From the Biologics in Pediatric Rheumatology Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foeldvari, Ivan; Becker, Ingrid; Horneff, Gerd

    2015-11-01

    Uveitis is a major extraarticular quality of life-restricting manifestation of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). The aim of the study is to describe the occurrence of uveitis in JIA patients receiving tumor necrosis factor inhibitors or methotrexate (MTX). Patients' characteristics, treatment, and the reported first occurrence of uveitis as an adverse event were searched in the Biologics in Pediatric Rheumatology Registry. The rates per exposed patients, exposure time, and time until event were calculated. Uveitis was reported as an adverse event in 75 of 3,467 patients; 51 of 2,844 patients were receiving MTX, 37 of 1,700 patients were receiving etanercept, and 13 of 364 patients were receiving adalimumab. Patients with uveitis were younger (mean ± SD age 4.6 ± 4.2 versus 7.4 ± 4.5 years; P uveitis diagnosis before starting treatment more often had a uveitis event (n = 28, 8.4%; OR 8.5, P uveitis event occurred: 11 while taking MTX (3.2 per 1,000 patient-years), 2 while taking etanercept monotherapy (1.9 per 1,000 patient-years), and 3 while taking etanercept and MTX combination (0.9 per 1,000 patient-years). A new uveitis event occurred early in the disease course after a median disease duration of 1.5 years (interquartile range [IQR] 1.3-3.8) while taking etanercept and 1.8 years (IQR 1.8-2.1) for the MTX cohort. A recurrent uveitis event was reported after a disease duration of 7.6 years (IQR 4.3-10.0) in the etanercept cohort and 4.8 years (IQR 1.0-5.8) in the MTX cohort. Univariate analysis showed that MTX, but not etanercept or adalimumab, led to a lower rate of uveitis. Patients with a history of uveitis had higher risks for uveitis events while taking both etanercept and adalimumab. Methotrexate turned out to be protective. Few patients developed a first uveitis event while taking etanercept, while the rate is comparable to that with MTX. Uveitis may not be attributed to be an adverse drug reaction to etanercept. © 2015, American

  19. American College of Rheumatology/European League against Rheumatism Preliminary Definition of Remission in Rheumatoid Arthritis for Clinical Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felson, David T.; Smolen, Josef S.; Wells, George; Zhang, Bin; van Tuyl, Lilian H. D.; Funovits, Julia; Aletaha, Daniel; Allaart, Renée; Bathon, Joan; Bombardieri, Stefano; Brooks, Peter; Brown, Andrew; Matucci-Cerinic, Marco; Choi, Hyon; Combe, Bernard; de Wit, Maarten; Dougados, Maxime; Emery, Paul; Furst, Dan; Gomez-Reino, Juan; Hawker , Gillian; Keystone, Edward; Khanna, Dinesh; Kirwan, John; Kvien, Tore; Landewé, Robert; Listing, Joachim; Michaud, Kaleb; Mola, Emilio Martin; Montie, Pam; Pincus, Ted; Richards, Pam; Siegel, Jeff; Simon, Lee; Sokka, Tuulikki; Strand, Vibeke; Tugwell, Peter; Tyndall, Alan; van der Heijde, Desirée; Verstappen, Suzan; White, Barbara; Wolfe, Fred; Zink, Angela; Boers, Maarten

    2010-01-01

    Background With remission in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) an increasingly attainable goal, there is no widely used definition of remission that is stringent but achievable and could be applied uniformly as an outcome in clinical trials. Methods A committee consisting of members of the American College of Rheumatology, the European League Against Rheumatism and the Outcome Measures in Rheumatology Initiative (OMERACT) met to guide the process and review prespecified analyses from clinical trials of patients with RA. The committee requested a stringent definition (little, if any, active disease) and decided to use core set measures to define remission including at least joint counts and an acute phase reactant. Members were surveyed to select the level of each core set measure consistent with remission. Candidate definitions of remission were tested including those that constituted a number of individual measures in remission (Boolean approach) as well as definitions using disease activity indexes. To select a definition of remission, trial data were analyzed to examine the added contribution of patient reported outcomes and the ability of candidate measures to predict later good x-ray and functional outcomes. Results Survey results for the definition of remission pointed to indexes at published thresholds and to a count of core set measures with each measure scored as 1 or less (e.g. tender and swollen joint counts, CRP and global assessments on 0-10 scale). Analyses suggested the need to include a patient reported measure. Examination of 2 year follow-up data suggested that many candidate definitions performed comparably in terms of predicting later good x-ray and functional outcomes, although DAS28 based measures of remission did not predict good radiographic outcomes as well as did the other candidate definitions. Given these and other considerations, we propose that a patient be defined as in remission based on one of two definitions : 1: When their scores on the

  20. Comparative efficacy and safety of tocilizumab, rituximab, abatacept and tofacitinib in patients with active rheumatoid arthritis that inadequately responds to tumor necrosis factor inhibitors: a Bayesian network meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Young Ho; Bae, Sang-Cheol

    2016-11-01

    This study aimed to assess the relative efficacy and safety of biologics and tofacitinib in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) showing an inadequate response to tumor necrosis factor (TNF) inhibitors. We performed a Bayesian network meta-analysis to combine the direct and indirect evidence from randomized controlled trials (RCTs) examining the efficacy and safety of tocilizumab, rituximab, abatacept and tofacitinib in patients with RA that inadequately responds to TNF inhibitors. Four RCTs including 1796 patients met the inclusion criteria. The tocilizumab 8 mg group showed a significantly higher American College of Rheumatology 20% (ACR20) response rate than the abatacept and tofacitinib groups. Ranking probability based on surface under the cumulative ranking curve (SUCRA) indicated that tocilizumab 8 mg had the highest probability of being the best treatment for achieving the ACR20 response rate (SUCRA = 0.9863), followed by rituximab (SUCRA = 0.6623), abatacept (SUCRA = 0.5428), tocilizumab 4 mg (SUCRA = 0.4956), tofacitinib 10 mg (SUCRA = 0.4715), tofacitinib 5 mg (SUCRA = 0.3415) and placebo (SUCRA = 0). In contrast, the safety based on the number of withdrawals due to adverse events did not differ significantly among the treatment options. Tocilizumab 8 mg was the second-line non-TNF biologic with the highest performance regarding an early good response based on ACR20 response rate and acceptable safety profile, followed by rituximab, abatacept and tofacitinib in patients with RA and an inadequate response to anti-TNF therapy, and none of these treatments were associated with a significant risk of withdrawal due to adverse events. © 2015 Asia Pacific League of Associations for Rheumatology and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  1. Water quality criteria for lead

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagpal, N.K.

    1987-01-01

    This report is one in a series that establishes water quality criteria for British Columbia. The report sets criteria for lead to protect a number of water uses, including drinking water, freshwater and marine aquatic life, wildlife, livestock, irrigation, and recreation. The criteria are set as either maximum concentrations of total lead that should not be exceeded at any time, or average concentrations that should not be exceeded over a 30-day period. Actual values are summarized.

  2. Criteria for Authorship in Bioethics

    OpenAIRE

    Resnik, David B.; Master, Zubin

    2011-01-01

    Multiple authorship is becoming increasingly common in bioethics research. There are well-established criteria for authorship in empirical bioethics research but not for conceptual research. It is important to develop criteria for authorship in conceptual publications to prevent undeserved authorship and uphold standards of fairness and accountability. This article explores the issue of multiple authorship in bioethics and develops criteria for determining who should be an author on a concept...

  3. Recommendations of the Brazilian Society of Rheumatology for the diagnosis and treatment of chikungunya fever. Part 2 - Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Diniz Lopes Marques

    Full Text Available Abstract Chikungunya fever has become an important public health problem in countries where epidemics occur because half of the cases progress to chronic, persistent and debilitating arthritis. Literature data on specific therapies at the various phases of arthropathy caused by chikungunya virus (CHIKV infection are limited, lacking quality randomized trials assessing the efficacies of different therapies. There are a few studies on the treatment of musculoskeletal manifestations of chikungunya fever, but these studies have important methodological limitations. The data currently available preclude conclusions favorable or contrary to specific therapies, or an adequate comparison between the different drugs used. The objective of this study was to develop recommendations for the treatment of chikungunya fever in Brazil. A literature review was performed via evidence-based selection of articles in the databases Medline, SciELO, PubMed and Embase and conference proceedings abstracts, in addition to expert opinions to support decision-making in defining recommendations. The Delphi method was used to define the degrees of agreement in 2 face-to-face meetings and several online voting rounds. This study is part 2 of the Recommendations of the Brazilian Society of Rheumatology (Sociedade Brasileira de Reumatologia - SBR for the Diagnosis and Treatment of chikungunya fever and specifically addresses treatment.

  4. Systemic lupus erythematosus in Spanish males: a study of the Spanish Rheumatology Society Lupus Registry (RELESSER) cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riveros Frutos, A; Casas, I; Rúa-Figueroa, I; López-Longo, F J; Calvo-Alén, J; Galindo, M; Fernández-Nebro, A; Pego-Reigosa, J M; Olivé Marqués, A

    2017-06-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to describe the demographic, clinical, and immunological manifestations of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) in male patients. Methods A cross-sectional, multicenter study was carried out of 3651 patients (353 men, 9.7%, and 3298 women, 90.2%) diagnosed with SLE, included in the Spanish Rheumatology Society SLE Registry (RELESSER). Results Mean ages (18-92 years) of symptom onset were 37 (SD 17) years (men) and 32 (SD 14) years (women). Male/female ratio was 1/9. Age of onset of symptoms and age at diagnosis were higher in men than in women ( p lupus nephritis was more common in men, being present in 155 (44.8%) of males versus 933 (29%) of females ( p  50 years had a higher mortality (odds ratios 3.6 and 2.1, respectively). Furthermore, SLE patients who developed pulmonary hemorrhage, pulmonary hypertension, psychiatric involvement, complement deficiency, and hemophagocytic syndrome also had higher mortality, regardless of gender. Conclusion Patients with SLE over the age of 50 years have an increased risk of mortality. In Caucasians, age at diagnosis and symptom onset is higher in men than in women. The diagnostic delay is shorter in men. Male SLE patients present more cardiovascular comorbidities, and also more serositis, adenopathies, splenomegaly, renal involvement, convulsion, thrombosis, and lupus anticoagulant positivity than women.

  5. Ankylosing Spondylitis Patients Commencing Biologic Therapy Have High Baseline Levels of Comorbidity: A Report from the Australian Rheumatology Association Database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Oldroyd

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims. To compare the baseline characteristics of a population-based cohort of patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS commencing biological therapy to the reported characteristics of bDMARD randomised controlled trials (RCTs participants. Methods. Descriptive analysis of AS participants in the Australian Rheumatology Association Database (ARAD who were commencing bDMARD therapy. Results. Up to December 2008, 389 patients with AS were enrolled in ARAD. 354 (91.0% had taken bDMARDs at some time, and 198 (55.9% completed their entry questionnaire prior to or within 6 months of commencing bDMARDs. 131 (66.1% had at least one comorbid condition, and 24 (6.8% had a previous malignancy (15 nonmelanoma skin, 4 melanoma, 2 prostate, 1 breast, cervix, and bowel. Compared with RCT participants, ARAD participants were older, had longer disease duration and higher baseline disease activity. Conclusions. AS patients commencing bDMARDs in routine care are significantly different to RCT participants and have significant baseline comorbidities.

  6. Wait times to rheumatology care for patients with rheumatic diseases: a data linkage study of primary care electronic medical records and administrative data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widdifield, Jessica; Bernatsky, Sasha; Thorne, J Carter; Bombardier, Claire; Jaakkimainen, R Liisa; Wing, Laura; Paterson, J Michael; Ivers, Noah; Butt, Debra; Lyddiatt, Anne; Hofstetter, Catherine; Ahluwalia, Vandana; Tu, Karen

    2016-01-01

    The Wait Time Alliance recently established wait time benchmarks for rheumatology consultations in Canada. Our aim was to quantify wait times to primary and rheumatology care for patients with rheumatic diseases. We identified patients from primary care practices in the Electronic Medical Record Administrative data Linked Database who had referrals to Ontario rheumatologists over the period 2000-2013. To assess the full care pathway, we identified dates of symptom onset, presentation in primary care and referral from electronic medical records. Dates of rheumatologist consultations were obtained by linking with physician service claims. We determined the duration of each phase of the care pathway (symptom onset to primary care encounter, primary care encounter to referral, and referral to rheumatologist consultation) and compared them with established benchmarks. Among 2430 referrals from 168 family physicians, 2015 patients (82.9%) were seen by 146 rheumatologists within 1 year of referral. Of the 2430 referrals, 2417 (99.5%) occurred between 2005 and 2013. The main reasons for referral were osteoarthritis (32.4%) and systemic inflammatory rheumatic diseases (30.6%). Wait times varied by diagnosis and geographic region. Overall, the median wait time from referral to rheumatologist consultation was 74 (interquartile range 27-101) days; it was 66 (interquartile range 18-84) days for systemic inflammatory rheumatic diseases. Wait time benchmarks were not achieved, even for the most urgent types of referral. For systemic inflammatory rheumatic diseases, most of the delays occurred before referral. Rheumatology wait times exceeded established benchmarks. Targeted efforts are needed to promote more timely access to both primary and rheumatology care. Routine linkage of electronic medical records with administrative data may help fill important gaps in knowledge about waits to primary and specialty care.

  7. Patient’s Knowledge and Perception Towards the use of Non-steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs in Rheumatology Clinic Northern Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wahinuddin Sulaiman

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: In Rheumatology, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs has been widely prescribed and used. However, despite their clinical benefits in the management of inflammatory and degenerative joint disease, NSAIDs have considerable side effects, mostly affecting the upper gastrointestinal system, which therefore, limit their use. This study was conducted to determine the patients’ knowledge and perception regarding the used of NSAIDS.Methods: A total of 120 patients who attended the rheumatology clinic Hospital, Raja Permaisuri Bainun, Malaysia, and received NSAIDs more than 3 months were interviewed irrespective of the irrheumatological conditions. Patient’s knowledge and perception on the side effects of NSAIDs were recorded.Result: Fifty-four percent of the patients obtained information regarding the side effect of NSAIDs either from the rheumatologist, rheumatology staff nurse or other medical staffs (75.4%. The remaining 45.8% were naive of such knowledge. Fifteen percent obtained the information by surfing the internet and 9.2% from printed media. Twenty-four (24.2% patients, experiencedin digestion and/or stomach discomfort attributed to NSAIDsused. Two patients (1.7% had hematemesis and malena once.Conclusion: This study shows that half of the patients who attended the rheumatology clinic were unaware of the side effect of NSAIDs. Available data showed that most of the knowledgeable patients are more conscience and self-educated. This study also reveals the important roles of clinicians, trained staff nurses as well as the pharmacist in providing the guidance and knowledge of any medication taken by patients.

  8. Combining the IADPSG criteria with the WHO diagnostic criteria for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The International Association of Diabetes in Pregnancy Study Group (IADPSG) and World Health ... Macrosomia or at least one adverse outcome were more likely in GDM patients who ... criteria for GDM in the ADA's more recent position statement.[18] .... at risk for postpartum type 2 DM;[27] the IADPSG criteria on the other ...

  9. Principles and Criteria for Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beghin, D.; Cervetto, D.; Hansen, Peter Friis

    1997-01-01

    The mandate of ISSC Committee IV.1 on principles and Criteria for Design is to report on the following:The ongoing concern for quantification of general economic and safety criteria for marine structures and for the development of appropriate principles for rational life cycle design using...

  10. Diagnostic criteria for vascular dementia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheltens, P.; Hijdra, A. H.

    1998-01-01

    The term vascular dementia implies the presence of a clinical syndrome (dementia) caused by, or at least assumed to be caused by, a specific disorder (cerebrovascular disease). In this review, the various sets of criteria used to define vascular dementia are outlined. The various sets of criteria

  11. Criteria for controlled atmosphere chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, J.N.

    1980-03-01

    The criteria for design, construction, and operation of controlled atmosphere chambers intended for service at ORNL are presented. Classification of chambers, materials for construction, design criteria, design, controlled atmosphere chamber systems, and operating procedures are presented. ORNL Safety Manual Procedure 2.1; ORNL Health Physics Procedure Manual Appendix A-7; and Design of Viewing Windows are included in 3 appendices

  12. Joint involvement in patients with early polymyalgia rheumatica using high-resolution ultrasound and its contribution to the EULAR/ACR 2012 classification criteria for polymyalgia rheumatica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weigand, Sandra; Ehrenstein, Boris; Fleck, Martin; Hartung, Wolfgang

    2014-04-01

    To assess joint involvement and the contribution of musculoskeletal ultrasound (MSUS) to the novel European League Against Rheumatism/American College of Rheumatology (EULAR/ACR) 2012 classification criteria in patients with polymyalgia rheumatic (PMR). MSUS was performed in 54 consecutive patients with recent-onset PMR. Biceps tenosynovitis of at least 1 shoulder has been observed in 70.4% of patients, and 64.8% had a bilateral biceps tenosynovitis. Subdeltoid bursitis (27.8% unilateral, 5.6% bilateral), glenohumeral synovitis (22.2% unilateral, 9.3% bilateral), and hip involvement (22.2% unilateral, 16.7% bilateral) were observed less frequently. The sensitivities of the classification criteria were 85.2% for EULAR/ACR without MSUS and 81.5% for EULAR/ACR with MSUS. The most common MSUS pathology was a biceps tenosynovitis. However, US findings had no effect on the sensitivity of the novel EULAR/ACR criteria for PMR.

  13. Failure Criteria for Reinforced Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rathkjen, Arne

    Failure of materials is often characterized as ductile yielding, brittle fracture, creep rupture, etc., and different criteria given in terms of different parameters have been used to describe different types of failure. Only criteria expressing failure in terms of stress are considered in what...... place until the matrix, the continuous component of the composite, fails. When an isotropic matrix is reinforced as described above, the result is an anisotropic composite material. Even if the material is anisotropic, it usually exhibits a rather high degree of symmetry and such symmetries place...... certain restrictions on the form of the failure criteria for anisotropic materials. In section 2, some failure criteria for homogenous materials are reviewed. Both isotropic and anisotropic materials are described, and in particular the constraints imposed on the criteria from the symmetries orthotropy...

  14. Telemedicine and other care models in pediatric rheumatology: an exploratory study of parents' perceptions of barriers to care and care preferences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullock, Danielle R; Vehe, Richard K; Zhang, Lei; Correll, Colleen K

    2017-07-11

    The United States pediatric rheumatology workforce is committed to a mission of providing children access to pediatric rheumatology care. With a limited number and distribution of pediatric rheumatologists, telemedicine has been proposed as one way to meet this mission, yet the adoption of this modality has been slower than expected. The purpose of this study was to explore the parent perspective on barriers to accessing pediatric rheumatology care and to explore the acceptability of telemedicine and other alternative care models. Over a period of six weeks, all new and return English-speaking parents/guardians of patients visiting a single center were offered an opportunity to complete a survey which assessed barriers to care and interest in alternative models of care. Responses were analyzed using descriptive statistics. Survey response rate was 72% (159/221). Twenty-eight percent (45/159) traveled more than three hours to the pediatric rheumatology clinic, and 43% (65/152) reported travel as inconvenient. An overwhelming majority of respondents (95%, 144/152) reported a preference for in-person visits over the option of telemedicine. This preference was similar regardless of whether respondents reported travel to the clinic as inconvenient vs convenient (inconvenient 92%, 60/65; convenient 97%, 84/87; p = 0.2881) and despite those reporting travel as inconvenient also reporting greater difficulty with several barriers to care. Those familiar with telemedicine were more likely to report a preference for telemedicine over in-person visits (27%, 3/11 vs 3%, 4/140; p = 0.0087). The option of an outreach clinic was acceptable to a majority (63%, 97/154); however, adult rheumatology and shared-care options were less acceptable (22%, 35/156 and 34%, 53/156 respectively). Among survey respondents, in-person visits were preferred over the option of telemedicine, even when travel was noted to be inconvenient. Telemedicine familiarity increased its acceptability

  15. ASSESSMENT OF THE SENSITIVITY OF NEW CRITERIA FOR SYSTEMIC SCLEROSIS IN RUSSIAN PATIENT POPULATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. A. Koneva

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Systemic sclerosis (SS is a progressive connective tissue disease, the prognosis of which largely depends on the time of adequate therapy initiation. Low sensitivity of the 1980 American College of Rheumatology (ACR SS classification criteria for identifying patients with early stage of the disease, and with its limited form in particular, has necessitated revision of existing SS diagnostic standards and elaboration of more sensitive criteria that allow to establish the diagnosis when the first sign of the disease appear.Objective: to compare the sensitivity of the novel SS criteria of ACR and European League against Rheumatism (ACR/EULAR 2013 and the 1980 ACR criteria in different stages of the disease.Subjects and methods. The investigation enrolled 302 patients who had been diagnosed by experts as having SS and followed up at the V.A. Nasonova Research Institute of Rheumatology in 2007–2013. The patients’ mean age was 49±13 years (18 to 80 years; male to female ratio – 1:9 (31 and 271, that of patients with diffuse and limited SS – 1:2 (105 and 197; mean duration of the disease from the first non-Raynaud’s syndrome was 8.2±7.0 years (6 months to 36 years. Physical examination, nailfold capillaroscopy, chest radiography or computed tomography, echocardiography for the determination of pulmonary artery systolic pressure and SS-specific antibodies evaluation were performed.Results. 273 (90% patients fulfilled the novel ACR/EULAR 2013 SS criteria. 76 (25% patients had skin thickening above the metacarpophalangeal (MPC joints in both hands; 263 (87% – finger skin thickening [70 (23% – finger swelling, 192 (64% – thickening of all fingers distal to the MPC joints], 141 (47% – digital ischemia [79 (26% – digital pitting scars, 20 (7% – digital ulcers, 42 (14% – digital pitting scars and ulcers], 134 (44% – telangiectasias, 276 (91% – capillaroscopic changes, 225 (78% – pulmonary hypertension (PH or

  16. Childhood Arthritis and Rheumatology Research Alliance consensus treatment plans for juvenile idiopathic arthritis-associated and idiopathic chronic anterior uveitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angeles-Han, Sheila T; Lo, Mindy S; Henderson, Lauren A; Lerman, Melissa A; Abramson, Leslie; Cooper, Ashley M; Parsa, Miriam F; Zemel, Lawrence S; Ronis, Tova; Beukelman, Timothy; Cox, Erika; Sen, H Nida; Holland, Gary N; Brunner, Hermine I; Lasky, Andrew; Rabinovich, C Egla

    2018-05-28

    Systemic immunosuppressive treatment of pediatric chronic anterior uveitis (CAU), both juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA)-associated and idiopathic varies, making it difficult to identify best treatments. The Childhood Arthritis and Rheumatology Research Alliance (CARRA) developed consensus treatment plans (CTPs) for CAU for the purpose of reducing practice variability and allowing future comparison of treatments by comparative effectiveness analysis techniques. A core group of pediatric rheumatologists, ophthalmologists with uveitis expertise, and a lay advisor comprised the CARRA uveitis workgroup who performed literature review on pharmacologic treatments, held teleconferences, and developed a case-based survey administered to the CARRA membership to delineate treatment practices. We utilized 3 face-to-face consensus meetings using nominal group technique to develop CTPs. The survey identified areas of treatment practice variability. We developed 2 CTPs for the treatment of CAU, case definitions, and monitoring parameters. The first CTP is directed at children naïve to steroid-sparing medication, and the second at children initiating biologic therapy with options for methotrexate, adalimumab and infliximab. We defined a core dataset and outcome measures with data collection at 3 and 6 months after therapy initiation. The CARRA membership voted acceptance of the CTPs with a >95% (N = 233) approval. Using consensus methodology, two standardized CTPs were developed for systemic immunosuppressive treatment of CAU. These CTPs are not meant as treatment guidelines, but are designed for further pragmatic research within the CARRA research network. Use of these CTPs in a prospective comparison effectiveness study should improve outcomes by identifying best practice options. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  17. Adherence to the 2012 American College of Rheumatology (ACR) Guidelines for Management of Gout: A Survey of Brazilian Rheumatologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coutinho, Evandro Silva Freire; Schumacher, H. Ralph; Singh, Jasvinder A.; Schlesinger, Naomi

    2015-01-01

    Objective To describe the current pharmacological approach to gout treatment reported by rheumatologists in Brazil. Methods We performed a cross-sectional survey study using an online questionnaire e-mailed to 395 rheumatologists, randomly selected, from among the members of the Brazilian Society of Rheumatology. Results Three hundred and nine rheumatologists (78.2%) responded to the survey. For acute gout attacks, combination therapy (NSAIDs or steroid + colchicine) was often used, even in monoarticular involvement, and colchicine was commonly started as monotherapy after 36 hours or more from onset of attack. During an acute attack, urate-lowering therapy (ULT) was withdrawn by approximately a third of rheumatologists. Anti-inflammatory prophylaxis (98% colchicine) was initiated when ULT was started in most cases (92.4%), but its duration was varied. Most (70%) respondents considered the target serum uric acid level to be less than 6 mg/dl. Approximately 50% of rheumatologists reported starting allopurinol at doses of 100 mg daily or less and 42% reported the initial dose to be 300 mg daily in patients with normal renal function. ULT was maintained indefinitely in 76% of gout patients with tophi whereas in gout patients without tophi its use was kept indefinitely in 39.6%. Conclusion This is the first study evaluating gout treatment in a representative, random sample of Brazilian rheumatologists describing common treatment practices among these specialists. We identified several gaps in reported gout management, mainly concerning the use of colchicine and ULT and the duration of anti-inflammatory prophylaxis and ULT. Since rheumatologists are considered as opinion leaders in this disease, a program for improving quality of care for gout patients should focus on increasing their knowledge in this common disease. PMID:26274585

  18. Analysing and Comparing Encodability Criteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirstin Peters

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Encodings or the proof of their absence are the main way to compare process calculi. To analyse the quality of encodings and to rule out trivial or meaningless encodings, they are augmented with quality criteria. There exists a bunch of different criteria and different variants of criteria in order to reason in different settings. This leads to incomparable results. Moreover it is not always clear whether the criteria used to obtain a result in a particular setting do indeed fit to this setting. We show how to formally reason about and compare encodability criteria by mapping them on requirements on a relation between source and target terms that is induced by the encoding function. In particular we analyse the common criteria full abstraction, operational correspondence, divergence reflection, success sensitiveness, and respect of barbs; e.g. we analyse the exact nature of the simulation relation (coupled simulation versus bisimulation that is induced by different variants of operational correspondence. This way we reduce the problem of analysing or comparing encodability criteria to the better understood problem of comparing relations on processes.

  19. Aquatic Life Criteria - Tributyltin (TBT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Documents pertaining to 2004 Final Acute and Chronic Ambient Aquatic Life Water Quality Criteria for Tributyltin (TBT) for freshwater and saltwater. These documents include the safe levels of TBT that should protect the majority of species.

  20. Floorball game skills (evaluation criteria)

    OpenAIRE

    Chlumský, Marek

    2013-01-01

    Title: Playing skills in floorball (evaluation criteria). Target: To create a list of playing skills which an ideal player should demonstrate. Find and verify the evaluation criteria of these skills and inspire trainers to develop these skills in the best way. Methods: Informal interviews, individually structured interviews, analysis and verification of data, pilot testing. Results: Defined playing skills in floorball, developed scale of values of floorball playing skills, creation of exercis...

  1. Reliability criteria for voltage stability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, Carson W; Silverstein, Brian L [Bonneville Power Administration, Portland, OR (United States)

    1994-12-31

    In face of costs pressures, there is need to allocate scare resources more effectively in order to achieve voltage stability. This naturally leads to development of probabilistic criteria and notions of rick management. In this paper it is presented a discussion about criteria for long term voltage stability limited to the case in which the time frames are topically several minutes. (author) 14 refs., 1 fig.

  2. Toxic chemical risk acceptance criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Craig, D.K.; Davis, J.; Lee, L.; Lein, P.; Omberg, S.

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents recommendations of a subcommittee of the Westinghouse M ampersand 0 Nuclear Facility Safety Committee concerning toxic chemical risk acceptance criteria. Two sets of criteria have been developed, one for use in the hazard classification of facilities, and the second for use in comparing risks in DOE non-reactor nuclear facility Safety Analysis Reports. The Emergency Response Planning Guideline (ERPG) values are intended to provide estimates of concentration ranges for specific chemicals above which exposure would be expected to lead to adverse heath effects of increasing severity for ERPG-1, -2, and -3s. The subcommittee recommends that criteria for hazard class or risk range be based on ERPGs for all chemicals. Probability-based Incremental Cancer Risk (ICR) criteria are recommended for additional analyses of risks from all known or suspected human carcinogens. Criteria are given for both on-site and off-site exposure. The subcommittee also recommends that the 5-minute peak concentration be compared with the relevant criterion with no adjustment for exposure time. Since ERPGs are available for only a limited number of chemicals, the subcommittee has developed a proposed hierarchy of concentration limit parameters for the different criteria

  3. Social Advertising Quality: Assessment Criteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. B. Kalmykov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: the The purpose of the publication is development of existing criterial assessment in social advertising sphere. The next objectives are provided for its achievement: to establish research methodology, to develop the author’s version of necessary notional apparatus and conceptual generalization, to determine the elements of social advertising quality, to establish the factors of its quality, to conduct the systematization of existing criteria and measuring instruments of quality assessment, to form new criteria of social advertising quality, to apply received results for development of criterial assessment to determine the further research perspectives. Methods: the methodology of research of management of social advertising interaction with target audience, which has dynamic procedural character with use of sociological knowledge multivariate paradigmatic status, has been proposed. Results: the primary received results: the multivariate paradigmatic research basis with use of works of famous domestic and foreign scientists in sociology, qualimetry and management spheres; the definitions of social advertising, its quality, sociological quality provision system, target audience behavior model during social advertising interaction are offered; the quality factors with three groups by level of effect on consumer are established; the systematization of existing quality and its measure instruments assessment criteria by detected social advertising quality elements are conducted; the two new criteria and its management quality assessment measuring instruments in social advertising sphere are developed; the one of the common groups of production quality criteria – adaptability with considering of new management quality criteria and conducted systematization of existing social advertising creative quality assessment criteria development; the perspective of further perfection of quality criterial assessment based on social advertising

  4. A review of the literature analyzing benefits and concerns of infliximab biosimilar CT-P13 for the treatment of rheumatologic diseases: focus on interchangeability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Becciolini A

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Andrea Becciolini,1 Maria Gabriella Raimondo,2 Chiara Crotti,2 Elena Agape,2 Martina Biggioggero,2 Ennio Giulio Favalli1 1Department of Rheumatology, 2Department of Clinical Sciences and Health Community, University of Milan, Division of Rheumatology, Gaetano Pini Institute, Milan, Italy Abstract: The introduction of biological agents drastically changed the treatment paradigm of inflammatory arthritides, ameliorating the natural history of the diseases but concomitantly increasing the drug costs due to the manufacturing process. On this concern, biosimilar drugs may represent a valid option for reducing this elevated cost and increasing the availability of these highly effective treatments. Recently, CT-P13, the first biosimilar of infliximab, has been approved with the same indications established for the reference product (RP, and its daily use is progressively increasing. However, the experience with biosimilar drugs in the field of rheumatology is still limited, raising potential doubts and concerns on their correct management in real-life settings. Comparability analysis between CT-P13 and its RP was evaluated in equivalence randomized controlled trials (RCTs – PLANETRA and PLANETAS – performed on patients with rheumatoid arthritis and axial spondylitis, respectively. CT-P13 and RP showed similar profile in terms of quality, biological activity, safety, immunogenicity, and efficacy. However, the interchangeability between infliximab RP and its biosimilar still represents the most challenging issue because of a lack of a long-lasting experience. To date, reassuring preliminary data on this topic were reported in open-label extensions of PLANETRA and PLANETAS RCTs and in ongoing real-life observational studies. These findings, taken all together, significantly affect the landscape of biosimilar regulatory pathways and strongly support CT-P13 introduction as a great opportunity for expanding the accessibility to these very effective and

  5. Opportunities in Rheumatology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Stisi

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Nel precedente numero di questa rubrica riconoscevo la presenza di tre grossi limiti nella creazione dell’offerta di lavoro nel settore in Italia: • L’ignoranza da parte delle amministrazioni sanitarie delle dimensioni sociali, delle invalidità e dei costi derivanti dalle malattie reumatiche; • la mancanza di una vera concorrenza all’interno del “mercato” con un “monopolio di fatto” del SSN e, di conseguenza, • la mancanza d’imprenditorialità dei reumatologi. Dell’esistenza della prima mancanza ho avuto conferma alcune settimane fa mentre ero a colloquio con un Direttore Generale di quelli “illuminati e fattivi”...

  6. Bone scan in rheumatology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morales G, R.; Cano P, R.; Mendoza P, R.

    1993-01-01

    In this chapter a revision is made concerning different uses of bone scan in rheumatic diseases. These include reflex sympathetic dystrophy, osteomyelitis, spondyloarthropaties, metabolic bone diseases, avascular bone necrosis and bone injuries due to sports. There is as well some comments concerning pediatric pathology and orthopedics. (authors). 19 refs., 9 figs

  7. Radionuclide examination in rheumatology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Streda, A.; Kolar, J.; Valesova, M.

    1984-01-01

    On the basis of twenty years of experience with the use of radionuclides in bone and articular rheumatic diseases indications for such examinations are summed up. The main advantage of the use of radionuclide methods is that they bring forward early diagnosis of tissue reconstruction which can thus be detected at the stage of microstructural changes. They also provide earlier and more reliable detection of the degree of the pathological process than is provided by X-ray examination. In some cases scintiscan may also be found useful as a method for following up the results of treatment of rheumatic diseases. (author)

  8. The Difficult Rheumatology Diagnosis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2018-01-01

    Jan 1, 2018 ... care clinic with history of intermittent chest discomfort and dyspnoea on exertion for three months associated with fatigue, anorexia, fever, intermittent bilateral leg swelling, occasional neck, shoulder, lower back and hipjoint pain. ... anaemia with haemoglobin of 10.5 g/dL, normal fasting glucose, renal ...

  9. Role of erosions typical of rheumatoid arthritis in the 2010 ACR/EULAR rheumatoid arthritis classification criteria: results from a very early arthritis cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkmann, Gina Hetland; Norli, Ellen S; Bøyesen, Pernille; van der Heijde, Désirée; Grøvle, Lars; Haugen, Anne J; Nygaard, Halvor; Bjørneboe, Olav; Thunem, Cathrine; Kvien, Tore K; Mjaavatten, Maria D; Lie, Elisabeth

    2017-11-01

    To determine how the European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) definition of erosive disease (erosion criterion) contributes to the number of patients classified as rheumatoid arthritis (RA) according to the 2010 American College of Rheumatology/EULAR RA classification criteria (2010 RA criteria) in an early arthritis cohort. Patients from the observational study Norwegian Very Early Arthritis Clinic with joint swelling ≤16 weeks, a clinical diagnosis of RA or undifferentiated arthritis, and radiographs of hands and feet were included. Erosive disease was defined according to the EULAR definition accompanying the 2010 RA criteria. We calculated the additional number of patients being classified as RA based on the erosion criteria at baseline and during follow-up. Of the 289 included patients, 120 (41.5%) fulfilled the 2010 RA criteria, whereas 15 (5.2%) fulfilled only the erosion criterion at baseline. 118 patients had radiographic follow-up at 2 years, of whom 6.8% fulfilled the 2010 RA criteria and only one patient fulfilled solely the erosion criterion during follow-up. Few patients with early arthritis were classified as RA based on solely the erosion criteria, and of those who did almost all did so at baseline. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  10. Attitudes and Self-Care Behaviors of Patients with Knee Osteoarthritis Referred to Rheumatology Clinical Centers in Yazd

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MA Morowatisharifabad

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: Knee Osteoarthritis is the most common age-related causes of knee pain which can induce disability, disablement and reduced quality of life. Therefore, the present study aimed to determine attitudes and self-care behaviors of knee osteoarthritis patients referred to three Rheumatology Clinical Centers in Yazd. Methods: This descriptive-analytical study was carried out on 235 patients referred to Health Care Centers of Yazd who were selected randomly. In order to glean the study data, a researcher-designed questionnaire was utilized probing into demographic variables as well as patients' attitudes and self-care behaviors. The reliability and validity of the questionnaire were approved, as well. The study data were analyzed applying SPSS software (ver. 18 via T-Test, ANOVA, Pearson correlation coefficient at 0.05 of the significant level. Results: The participants' mean age and Mean BMI were reported 54.90±9.15 and 28.8±4.61, respectively. Mean score of patients' attitude toward self-care was 47.4±3.95 out of 55 and the mean score of their self-care behaviors was 43.11±5.75 out of 60, which the both scores were at a moderate level. Furthermore, a positive significant correlation was detected between attitude and self-care behaviors (p=0.01. Within different self-care behaviors, participants' attitude towards the positive effect of using crutches while walking was at the lowest level. Meanwhile, according to the patients' attitude, using crutches was demonstrated to have the least performance within the self-care behaviors. Conclusion: Based on the findings of the present study, the attitude level can cause an increase in the patients' self-care behaviors. Moreover, since the participants' attitude towards such behaviors as using crutches, using pool and weight loss were at a low level, interventional programs are recommended to emphasize the mentioned issues. Keywords: Attitude; Knee osteoarthritis; Performance; Self

  11. Criteria for saturated magnetization loop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harres, A.; Mikhov, M.; Skumryev, V.; Andrade, A.M.H. de; Schmidt, J.E.; Geshev, J.

    2016-01-01

    Proper estimation of magnetization curve parameters is vital in studying magnetic systems. In the present article, criteria for discrimination non-saturated (minor) from saturated (major) hysteresis loops are proposed. These employ the analysis of (i) derivatives of both ascending and descending branches of the loop, (ii) remanent magnetization curves, and (iii) thermomagnetic curves. Computational simulations are used in order to demonstrate their validity. Examples illustrating the applicability of these criteria to well-known real systems, namely Fe_3O_4 and Ni fine particles, are provided. We demonstrate that the anisotropy-field value estimated from a visual examination of an only apparently major hysteresis loop could be more than two times lower than the real one. - Highlights: • Proper estimation of hysteresis-loop parameters is vital in magnetic studies. • We propose criteria for discrimination minor from major hysteresis loops. • The criteria analyze magnetization, remanence and ZFC/FC curves and/or their derivatives. • Examples of their application on real nanoparticles systems are given. • Using the criteria could avoid twofold or bigger saturation-field underestimation errors.

  12. Criteria for saturated magnetization loop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harres, A. [Departamento de Física, UFSM, Santa Maria, 97105-900 Rio Grande do Sul (Brazil); Mikhov, M. [Faculty of Physics, University of Sofia, 1164 Sofia (Bulgaria); Skumryev, V. [Institució Catalana de Recerca i Estudis Avançats, 08010 Barcelona (Spain); Departament de Física, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, 08193 Barcelona (Spain); Andrade, A.M.H. de; Schmidt, J.E. [Instituto de Física, UFRGS, Porto Alegre, 91501-970 Rio Grande do Sul (Brazil); Geshev, J., E-mail: julian@if.ufrgs.br [Departament de Física, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, 08193 Barcelona (Spain); Instituto de Física, UFRGS, Porto Alegre, 91501-970 Rio Grande do Sul (Brazil)

    2016-03-15

    Proper estimation of magnetization curve parameters is vital in studying magnetic systems. In the present article, criteria for discrimination non-saturated (minor) from saturated (major) hysteresis loops are proposed. These employ the analysis of (i) derivatives of both ascending and descending branches of the loop, (ii) remanent magnetization curves, and (iii) thermomagnetic curves. Computational simulations are used in order to demonstrate their validity. Examples illustrating the applicability of these criteria to well-known real systems, namely Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} and Ni fine particles, are provided. We demonstrate that the anisotropy-field value estimated from a visual examination of an only apparently major hysteresis loop could be more than two times lower than the real one. - Highlights: • Proper estimation of hysteresis-loop parameters is vital in magnetic studies. • We propose criteria for discrimination minor from major hysteresis loops. • The criteria analyze magnetization, remanence and ZFC/FC curves and/or their derivatives. • Examples of their application on real nanoparticles systems are given. • Using the criteria could avoid twofold or bigger saturation-field underestimation errors.

  13. Study for Updated Gout Classification Criteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taylor, William J; Fransen, Jaap; Jansen, Tim L

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine which clinical, laboratory, and imaging features most accurately distinguished gout from non-gout. METHODS: We performed a cross-sectional study of consecutive rheumatology clinic patients with ≥1 swollen joint or subcutaneous tophus. Gout was defined by synovial fluid...... (MTP1) joint ever involved (multivariate OR 2.30), location of currently tender joints in other foot/ankle (multivariate OR 2.28) or MTP1 joint (multivariate OR 2.82), serum urate level >6 mg/dl (0.36 mmoles/liter; multivariate OR 3.35), ultrasound double contour sign (multivariate OR 7...

  14. Brief Report: Remission Rates With Tofacitinib Treatment in Rheumatoid Arthritis: A Comparison of Various Remission Criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolen, Josef S; Aletaha, Daniel; Gruben, David; Zwillich, Samuel H; Krishnaswami, Sriram; Mebus, Charles

    2017-04-01

    the DAS28-4(CRP) was used. The presence or absence and type of acute-phase reactants in remission criteria were significant contributors to remission rates across treatment groups. This finding has important consequences for trial design and clinical practice. © 2016, The Authors. Arthritis & Rheumatology published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American College of Rheumatology.

  15. User perspectives on relevance criteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maglaughlin, Kelly L.; Sonnenwald, Diane H.

    2002-01-01

    , partially relevant, or not relevant to their information need; and explained their decisions in an interview. Analysis revealed 29 criteria, discussed positively and negatively, that were used by the participants when selecting passages that contributed or detracted from a document's relevance......This study investigates the use of criteria to assess relevant, partially relevant, and not-relevant documents. Study participants identified passages within 20 document representations that they used to make relevance judgments; judged each document representation as a whole to be relevant...... matter, thought catalyst), full text (e.g., audience, novelty, type, possible content, utility), journal/publisher (e.g., novelty, main focus, perceived quality), and personal (e.g., competition, time requirements). Results further indicate that multiple criteria are used when making relevant, partially...

  16. Criteria for authorship in bioethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resnik, David B; Master, Zubin

    2011-10-01

    Multiple authorship is becoming increasingly common in bioethics research. There are well-established criteria for authorship in empirical bioethics research but not for conceptual research. It is important to develop criteria for authorship in conceptual publications to prevent undeserved authorship and uphold standards of fairness and accountability. This article explores the issue of multiple authorship in bioethics and develops criteria for determining who should be an author on a conceptual publication in bioethics. Authorship in conceptual research should be based on contributing substantially to: (1) identifying a topic, problem, or issue to study; (2) reviewing and interpreting the relevant literature; (3) formulating, analyzing, and evaluating arguments that support one or more theses; (4) responding to objections and counterarguments; and (5) drafting the manuscript. Authors of conceptual publications should participate substantially in at least two of areas (1)-(5) and also approve the final version. [corrected].

  17. Design criteria for advanced reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dennielou, Y.

    1991-01-01

    Design criteria for advanced reactors are discussed, including safety aspects, site selection, problems related to maintenance and possibility of repairing or replacing structures or components of a nuclear power plant, the human factor considerations. Bearing in mind that some of these criteria are the subject of consensus at international level, the author suggests to establish a table of different operator requirements, to prepare a dossier on the comparison of input data for probabilistic risk analysis, to take into consideration the means to control a severe accident from the very start of the design

  18. OSCILLATION CRITERIA FOR FORCED SUPERLINEAR DIFFERENCE EQUATIONS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Using Riccati transformation techniques,some oscillation criteria for the forced second-order superlinear difference equations are established.These criteria are dis- crete analogues of the criteria for differential equations proposed by Yan.

  19. Complications encountered in patients bearers with crest syndrome in rheumatological service of the Hospital San Juan de Dios until September 2009

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendez Rodriguez, Alexis

    2010-01-01

    Systematic sclerosis is a disease that has caused much morbidity and dependence in patients. Despite not being the disease most prevalent in rheumatological practice, it has been perhaps one that has generated more interest in the complex pathophysiology; but, also a great sense of frustration with the great therapeutic limitations especially when is diagnosed in advanced stages. The research was conducted in order to motivate early clinical search of the major complications found in patients CREST syndrome, in rheumatological service of the Hospital San Juan de Dios until September 2009 the total of cases with a diagnosis of CREST were reviewed in outpatient records, the study population have been of 41 patients. The different clinical manifestations of the patient were taken into account, among other aspects: immunological studies, established treatments and diagnosis methods as conventional radiology, endoscopic studies, echocardiogram, capillaroscopy. This job has determined among other things, that the majority of patients with CREST come from Desamparados and the Southern Zone, representing 31.7 and 29.2%, respectively, 98% are women and 76% of patients engaged in domestic chores and no mortality case was found in relation to CREST [es

  20. Content comparison of occupation-based instruments in adult rheumatology and musculoskeletal rehabilitation based on the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamm, Tanja A; Cieza, Alarcos; Machold, Klaus P; Smolen, Josef S; Stucki, Gerold

    2004-12-15

    To compare the content of clinical, occupation-based instruments that are used in adult rheumatology and musculoskeletal rehabilitation in occupational therapy based on the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF). Clinical instruments of occupational performance and occupation in adult rehabilitation and rheumatology were identified in a literature search. All items of these instruments were linked to the ICF categories according to 10 linking rules. On the basis of the linking, the content of these instruments was compared and the relationship between the capacity and performance component explored. The following 7 instruments were identified: the Canadian Occupational Performance Measure, the Assessment of Motor and Process Skills, the Sequential Occupational Dexterity Assessment, the Jebson Taylor Hand Function Test, the Moberg Picking Up Test, the Button Test, and the Functional Dexterity Test. The items of the 7 instruments were linked to 53 different ICF categories. Five items could not be linked to the ICF. The areas covered by the 7 occupation-based instruments differ importantly: The main focus of all 7 instruments is on the ICF component activities and participation. Body functions are covered by 2 instruments. Two instruments were linked to 1 single ICF category only. Clinicians and researchers who need to select an occupation-based instrument must be aware of the areas that are covered by this instrument and the potential areas that are not covered at all.

  1. Accident analysis and DOE criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graf, J.M.; Elder, J.C.

    1982-01-01

    In analyzing the radiological consequences of major accidents at DOE facilities one finds that many facilities fall so far below the limits of DOE Order 6430 that compliance is easily demonstrated by simple analysis. For those cases where the amount of radioactive material and the dispersive energy available are enough for accident consequences to approach the limits, the models and assumptions used become critical. In some cases the models themselves are the difference between meeting the criteria or not meeting them. Further, in one case, we found that not only did the selection of models determine compliance but the selection of applicable criteria from different chapters of Order 6430 also made the difference. DOE has recognized the problem of different criteria in different chapters applying to one facility, and has proceeded to make changes for the sake of consistency. We have proposed to outline the specific steps needed in an accident analysis and suggest appropriate models, parameters, and assumptions. As a result we feed DOE siting and design criteria will be more fairly and consistently applied

  2. Aversive Stimulation -- Criteria for Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donnell, Patrick A.; Ohlson, Glenn A.

    Criteria for applying aversive stimulation with severely handicapped children are examined, and practical and ethical issues are considered. Factors seen to influence punishment outcomes include timing, intensity, and schedule of reinforcement. Suggested is the need for further research on the comparative effectiveness of positive and negative…

  3. Risk based seismic design criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennedy, R.P.

    1999-01-01

    In order to develop a risk based seismic design criteria the following four issues must be addressed: (1) What target annual probability of seismic induced unacceptable performance is acceptable? (2) What minimum seismic margin is acceptable? (3) Given the decisions made under Issues 1 and 2, at what annual frequency of exceedance should the safe-shutdown-earthquake (SSE) ground motion be defined? (4) What seismic design criteria should be established to reasonably achieve the seismic margin defined under Issue 2? The first issue is purely a policy decision and is not addressed in this paper. Each of the other three issues are addressed. Issues 2 and 3 are integrally tied together so that a very large number of possible combinations of responses to these two issues can be used to achieve the target goal defined under Issue 1. Section 2 lays out a combined approach to these two issues and presents three potentially attractive combined resolutions of these two issues which reasonably achieves the target goal. The remainder of the paper discusses an approach which can be used to develop seismic design criteria aimed at achieving the desired seismic margin defined in resolution of Issue 2. Suggestions for revising existing seismic design criteria to more consistently achieve the desired seismic margin are presented. (orig.)

  4. Evaluating Dependence Criteria for Caffeine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Striley, Catherine L W; Griffiths, Roland R; Cottler, Linda B

    2011-12-01

    Background: Although caffeine is the most widely used mood-altering drug in the world, few studies have operationalized and characterized Diagnostic and Statistical Manual IV (DSM-IV) substance dependence criteria applied to caffeine. Methods: As a part of a nosological study of substance use disorders funded by the National Institute on Drug Abuse, we assessed caffeine use and dependence symptoms among high school and college students, drug treatment patients, and pain clinic patients who reported caffeine use in the last 7 days and also reported use of alcohol, nicotine, or illicit drugs within the past year ( n =167). Results: Thirty-five percent met the criteria for dependence when all seven of the adopted DSM dependence criteria were used. Rates of endorsement of several of the most applicable diagnostic criteria were as follows: 26% withdrawal, 23% desire to cut down or control use, and 44% continued use despite harm. In addition, 34% endorsed craving, 26% said they needed caffeine to function, and 10% indicated that they talked to a physician or counselor about problems experienced with caffeine. There was a trend towards increased caffeine dependence among those dependent on nicotine or alcohol. Within a subgroup that had used caffeine, alcohol, and nicotine in the past year, 28% fulfilled criteria for caffeine dependence compared to 50% for alcohol and 80% for nicotine. Conclusion: The present study adds to a growing literature suggesting the reliability, validity, and clinical utility of the caffeine dependence diagnosis. Recognition of caffeine dependence in the DSM-V may be clinically useful.

  5. Reflexive criteria of sociological research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R T Ubaydullaeva

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to the sociological criteria of explaining the way of thinking and actions of subjects, their spiritual and moral positions and intellectual forces that form the laws of social life. The author seeks to adapt such categories as ‘meaning of life’, ‘human dignity’, ‘rationality’ etc. for the purposes of sociological analysis by methodological construction of some real life dichotomies such as ‘subjective meaning and social function’, ‘the real and the ideal’, ‘the demanded and the excluded’. Thus, the author studies economic, political and technical processes in terms of both positivity and negativity of social interaction and states that given the increasing differentiation of the society and the contradictory trends of social development the reflexive criteria that take into account the socio-cultural nature of the man help to find one’s own model of development.

  6. New facility shield design criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howell, W.P.

    1981-07-01

    The purpose of the criteria presented here is to provide standard guidance for the design of nuclear radiation shields thoughout new facilities. These criteria are required to assure a consistent and integrated design that can be operated safely and economically within the DOE standards. The scope of this report is confined to the consideration of radiation shielding for contained sources. The whole body dose limit established by the DOE applies to all doses which are generally distributed throughout the trunk of the body. Therefore, where the whole body is the critical organ for an internally deposited radionuclide, the whole body dose limit applies to the sum of doses received must assure control of the concentration of radionuclides in the building atmosphere and thereby limit the dose from internal sources

  7. NSSS supplier's response to differing safety criteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cremades, J; Filkin, R; Franke, T [Westinghouse Electric Nuclear Energy Systems Europe (WENESE), Brussels (Belgium)

    1980-11-01

    The limited progress achieved to date in harmonizing national criteria has led to the development of designs which include the most common national requirements. Progress towards harmonization of safety criteria can be accelerated by expanding the IAEA leadership and co-ordination activities, and implementing an integrated approach to criteria development. National and International safety criteria are examined.

  8. Evaluating Dependence Criteria for Caffeine

    OpenAIRE

    Striley, Catherine L.W.; Griffiths, Roland R.; Cottler, Linda B.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Although caffeine is the most widely used mood-altering drug in the world, few studies have operationalized and characterized Diagnostic and Statistical Manual IV (DSM-IV) substance dependence criteria applied to caffeine. Methods: As a part of a nosological study of substance use disorders funded by the National Institute on Drug Abuse, we assessed caffeine use and dependence symptoms among high school and college students, drug treatment patients, and pain clinic patients who re...

  9. Radiological criteria in nuclear emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carrillo, D.; Diaz de la Cruz, F.

    1985-01-01

    It is pretended to enlighten the way to adopt the recommendations, from supranational organizations or the practices followed in other countries, to the peculiarities existing in Spain for the specific case of Nuclear Emergency Response Planning. The adaptation has been focalized in the criteria given by the Spanish Nuclear Safety Council and has taken into account the radiological protection levels, which have been considered adequate for Spanish population in case of nuclear accidents. (author)

  10. Sampling criteria in multicollection searching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilio, A.; Scozzafava, R.; Marchetti, P. G.

    In the first stage of the document retrieval process, no information concerning relevance of a particular document is available. On the other hand, computer implementation requires that the analysis be made only for a sample of retrieved documents. This paper addresses the significance and suitability of two different sampling criteria for a multicollection online search facility. The inevitability of resorting to a logarithmic criterion in order to achieve a "spread of representativeness" from the multicollection is demonstrated.

  11. Position paper: Seismic design criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farnworth, S.K.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to document the seismic design criteria to be used on the Title 11 design of the underground double-shell waste storage tanks and appurtenant facilities of the Multi-Function Waste Tank Facility (MWTF) project, and to provide the history and methodologies for determining the recommended Design Basis Earthquake (DBE) Peak Ground Acceleration (PGA) anchors for site-specific seismic response spectra curves. Response spectra curves for use in design are provided in Appendix A

  12. Repository operational criteria comparative analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hageman, J.P.; Chowdhury, A.H.

    1994-06-01

    The objective of the ''Repository Operational Criteria (ROC) Feasibility Studies'' (or ROC task) was to conduct comprehensive and integrated analyses of repository design, construction, and operations criteria in 10 CFR Part 60 regulations considering the interfaces among the components of the regulations and impacts of any potential changes to those regulations. The ROC task addresses regulatory criteria and uncertainties related to the preclosure aspects of the geologic repository. Those parts of 10 CFR Part 60 that require routine guidance or minor changes to the rule were addressed in Hageman and Chowdhury, 1992. The ROC task shows a possible need for further regulatory clarity, by major changes to the rule, related to the design bases and siting of a geologic repository operations area and radiological emergency planning in order to assure defense-in-depth. The analyses, presented in this report, resulted in the development and refinement of regulatory concepts and their supporting rationale for recommendations for potential major changes to 10 CFR Pan 0 regulations

  13. How Turkey Meets MPOWER Criteria?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazmi Bilir

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available In 2003 World Health Assembly adopted an international treaty on tobacco control; FCTC, Framework Convention on Tobacco Control. Five year later World Health Organization (WHO declared the six effective approach for tobacco control, under the name of MPOWER. In the following years, WHO evaluated the level of implementation of MPOWER criteria in the countries. In this article, how Turkey implemented these six criteria will be discussed. Monitor tobacco use and prevention policies: Monitoring of tobacco use prevalence has been successfully monitored in Turkey through Global Adult Tobacco Survey, Global Youth Tobacco Survey and Health Professionals Tobacco Use Survey. Nevertheless, monitoring of tobacco industry activities was not successfully implemented. Protect people from tobacco smoke: Smoking was banned in most of the indoor public places in Turkey since 1996, and Turkey became a complete smoke-free country by the exposion of smoke-free places including the hospitality workplaces in 2008. Offer help to quit tobacco use: Although smoking cessation services has been a bit late in Turkey, availability of smoking cessation drugs and the establishment of free quitline services made Turkey successful in this regard. Warn about the dangers of tobacco: Since 1996, all TV channels have a duty of broadcasting programs on harms of tobacco use, not less than 90 minutes in a month and it has been implemented successfully. Additionally written messages indicating harms of tobacco has been printed on the packs since 1988 and pictures was added in 2010. But since the average surface area covered by the messages in less than 50% of the total surface of the pack, Turkey was not regarded as to meet the requirement. Enforce bans on tobacco advertising, promotion and sponsorship: All kinds of tobacco advertisement and promotion was banned by the Law in 1996. But the tobacco products was not in closed boxes at the sales points. Turkey was not found as successful

  14. Study of the functional state of peripheral vessels in fingers of rheumatological patients by means of laser Doppler flowmetry and cutaneous thermometry measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zherebtsova, Angelina I.; Zherebtsov, Evgeny A.; Dunaev, Andrey V.; Podmasteryev, Konstantin V.; Pilipenko, Olga V.; Krupatkin, Alexander I.; Khakhicheva, Lyudmila S.; Muradyan, Vadim F.

    2016-04-01

    Vasospastic disorders are a common class of rheumatic disease. These include syndromes such as vegetative dystonia, Raynaud's syndrome, vibration disease and rheumatoid arthritis among others. The aim of this work is to develop an original method of diagnosing the functional state of peripheral vessels of the fingers, based on the simultaneous recording of LDF- and thermograms during the occlusion test, for determining vascular disorders of rheumatological patients. A diagnostic method was developed for assessing the functional state of the peripheral vessels of fingers, based on carrying out occlusion test in a thermally stabilized environment, with simultaneous recording of signals of laser Doppler flowmetry and skin thermometry. To verify the diagnostic value of the proposed method, a series of experiments were carried out on 41 rheumatological patients: 5 male and 36 females (average age 56.0+/-12.2 years). The most common diagnoses in the patient group were rheumatoid arthritis, arthrosis, gout and systemic lupus erythematosus. The laser analyser of blood microcirculation "LAKK-02" (SPE "LAZMA" Ltd, Russia) and a custom developed multi-channel thermometry device for low inertia thermometry were used for experimental measurements. The measurements of cutaneous temperature and the index of microcirculation were performed on the distal phalanx of the third finger of the right hand. Occlusion tests were performed with water baths at 25 and 42 °C and a tonometer cuff with a pressure of 200-220 mmHg for 3 min on the upper arm. The results of experimental studies are presented and interpreted. These data indicate a violation of the blood supply regulation in the form of a pronounced tendency towards microvascular vasoconstriction in the fingers. Thus, the response displaying a tendency toward angiospasm among patients in the rheumatological diseases profile group was observed mainly in the most severe cases (49 % of this group). The prospects of the developed

  15. Agreements and Discrepancies between FDA Reports and Journal Papers on Biologic Agents Approved for Rheumatoid Arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amarilyo, Gil; Furst, Daniel E; Woo, Jennifer M P

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Sponsors that seek to commercialize new drugs apply to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) which independently analyzes the raw data and reports the results on its website. OBJECTIVES: This study sought to determine if there are differences between the FDA assessments and journal...... reports on biologic agents developed for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. METHODS: Available data on FDA-approved drugs were extracted from the website, and a systematic literature search was conducted to identify matching studies in peer-reviewed medical journals. Outcome measures were the American...... College of Rheumatology response criteria ACR20 (efficacy) and withdrawal due to adverse events (safety). As effect size odds ratios were estimated for each active trial arm vs. control arm (i.e. for both sources: FDA and journal report), followed by calculation of the ratios of the FDA and journal report...

  16. EVALUATION OF ULTRASOUND REMISSION CRITERIA IN PATIENTS WITH RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS DURING TOCILIZUMAB THERAPY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita Aleksandrovna Osipyants

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to study the association of ultrasound (US remission criteria with the clinical and laboratory indicators of inflammatory activity, functional status, and X-ray changes in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA during tocilizumab (TCZ therapy.Subjects and methods. The trial included 36 patients with RA (meeting the 1987 American College of Rheumatology (ACR criteria who had received TCZ for 6 months. The authors made a clinical and laboratory assessment of RA activity (DAS28-CRP, and SDAI, functional impairments (HAQ index and US verification of wrist joint synovitis (a Voluson-i device, GE, 4-13-MHz linear transducer at baseline and 6 months after therapy. No signs of grey-scale (B-mode and power Doppler (PD synovitis (B = 0; PD = 0 or minimal B-mode synovitis, and not more one PD hypervascular signal (В ≤1; PD ≤1 were arbitrarily taken as US remission criteria. Destruction changes were evaluated by hand and foot X-ray using the Sharp method modified by van der Heijde (SHS.Results. After 6 months of therapy, about 80% of the patients in clinical remission retained moderate or significant synovitis, as evidenced by US studies. There were no clinical differences in clinical activity indices and functional impairments between the patients who were and were not in US remission (p > 0.05. The 12-month follow-up SHS score was significantly higher with the preservation of 6-month therapy signs of B-mode synovitis and PD hypervascularization (of not more than one signal than that in US remission (p < 0.05. There was no relationship of X-ray progression to the clinical and functional statuses (p > 0.05.Conclusion. Subclinical synovitis is observed even in clinical remission of RA. Destruction progression is significantlyrelated to synovitis persistence, as shown by ultrasonography.

  17. Appropriate Use Criteria for Hyaluronic Acid in the Treatment of Knee Osteoarthritis in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhadra, Arup K.; Altman, Roy; Dasa, Vinod; Myrick, Karen; Rosen, Jeffrey; Vad, Vijay; Vitanzo, Peter; Bruno, Michelle; Kleiner, Hillary; Just, Caryn

    2016-01-01

    Objective: A workgroup of clinical experts has developed an Appropriate Use Criteria (AUC) for the use of hyaluronic acid (HA) in the treatment of osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee. The increasingly broad and varied use of HA injections, lack of published clinical guidance, and limited coverage for their use has created the imperative to establish appropriateness criteria. Methods: The experts of this workgroup represent rheumatology, orthopedic surgery, physiatry, sports medicine, and nursing clinicians with substantive knowledge of intra-articular HA therapy. This workgroup utilized the results of a systematic review of evidence, expert clinical opinion, and current evidence-based clinical practice guidelines to develop appropriateness criteria for the use of intra-articular HA for knee OA in 17 real-world clinical scenarios. Results: The workgroup scored the appropriateness of treatment of each patient scenario using a 9-point scale to designate a treatment as appropriate (7-9), uncertain (4-6), or inappropriate (1-3). Six scenarios were scored as appropriate, 10 scenarios were scored as uncertain, and 1 scenario was scored as inappropriate. Conclusion: This article can assist clinicians in shared decision-making by providing best practices in considering HA injections for knee OA treatment. Moreover, this AUC article can aid payers and policy makers in determining reimbursement and preauthorization policies and more appropriately managing health care resources. It is clear that further research is still necessary—particularly in patient populations differentiated by OA severity—that may benefit the greatest from the use of HA injections for the treatment of knee OA. PMID:28618868

  18. The ratio of nurse consultation and physician efficiency index of senior rheumatologists is significantly higher than junior physicians in rheumatology residency training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Emamifar, Amir; van Bui Hansen, Morten Hai; Jensen Hansen, Inger Marie

    2017-01-01

    To elucidate the difference between ratios of nurse consultation sought by senior rheumatologists and junior physicians in rheumatology residency training, and also to evaluate physician efficiency index respecting patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Data regarding outpatient visits for RA...... patients between November 2013 and 2015 were extracted. The mean interval (day) between consultations, the nurse/physician visits ratio, and physician efficiency index (nurse/physician visits ratio × mean interval) for each senior and junior physicians were calculated. Disease Activity Score in 28 joints....../physician visits ratio (P = .01) and mean efficiency index (P = .04) of senior rheumatologists were significantly higher than that of junior physicians. Regression analysis showed a positive correlation between physician postgraduate experience and physician efficiency index adjusted for DAS28 at baseline...

  19. DISPOSABLE CANISTER WASTE ACCEPTANCE CRITERIA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R.J. Garrett

    2001-07-30

    The purpose of this calculation is to provide the bases for defining the preclosure limits on radioactive material releases from radioactive waste forms to be received in disposable canisters at the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) at Yucca Mountain. Specifically, this calculation will provide the basis for criteria to be included in a forthcoming revision of the Waste Acceptance System Requirements Document (WASRD) that limits releases in terms of non-isotope-specific canister release dose-equivalent source terms. These criteria will be developed for the Department of Energy spent nuclear fuel (DSNF) standard canister, the Multicanister Overpack (MCO), the naval spent fuel canister, the High-Level Waste (HLW) canister, the plutonium can-in-canister, and the large Multipurpose Canister (MPC). The shippers of such canisters will be required to demonstrate that they meet these criteria before the canisters are accepted at the MGR. The Quality Assurance program is applicable to this calculation. The work reported in this document is part of the analysis of DSNF and is performed using procedure AP-3.124, Calculations. The work done for this analysis was evaluated according to procedure QAP-2-0, Control of Activities, which has been superseded by AP-2.21Q, Quality Determinations and Planning for Scientific, Engineering, and Regulatory Compliance Activities. This evaluation determined that such activities are subject to the requirements of DOE/RW/0333P, Quality Assurance Requirements and Description (DOE 2000). This work is also prepared in accordance with the development plan titled Design Basis Event Analyses on DOE SNF and Plutonium Can-In-Canister Waste Forms (CRWMS M&O 1999a) and Technical Work Plan For: Department of Energy Spent Nuclear Fuel Work Packages (CRWMS M&O 2000d). This calculation contains no electronic data applicable to any electronic data management system.

  20. STUDIES DEVOTED TO ANTIPHOSPHOLIPID SYNDROME AT THE V.A. NASONOVA RESEARCH INSTITUTE OF RHEUMATOLOGY: MAIN ACHIEVEMENTS (ON THE OCCASION OF THE 40th ANNIVERSARY OF THE DISSERTATION BOARD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. M. Reshetnyak

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents achievements associated with the study of antiphospholipid syndrome from its description to the present time, i.e. over the last 30 years, worldwide and at the V.A. Nasonova Research Institute of Rheumatology.

  1. Group for Research and Assessment of Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis/Outcome Measures in Rheumatology Consensus-Based Recommendations and Research Agenda for Use of Composite Measures and Treatment Targets in Psoriatic Arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coates, Laura C; FitzGerald, Oliver; Merola, Joseph F

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: A meeting was convened by the Group for Research and Assessment of Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis (GRAPPA) and Outcome Measures in Rheumatology (OMERACT) to further the development of consensus among physicians and patients regarding composite disease activity measures and targets i...

  2. Productive Regions: Criteria and Classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vlasyuk L. I.

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available An official statistical dataset for 80 territorial subjects of the Russian Federation for 2000, 2007 and 2009 has proved the hypothesis that, under the neoclassical concept, the resources move to regions with the highest marginal productivity of the factors of production, which leads to the accumulation of investment resources, while providing financial and social efficiency. Based on cluster analysis by three performance criteria, productive regions are identified, which are dominated by regions productive in the extraction of minerals. It is shown that the stability of the factors’ distribution in space determines the current and future specialization of regional economies

  3. Training review criteria and procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    This document provides direction to NRC personnel for reviewing training programs at nuclear power plants to verify compliance with the requirements of 10 CFR 50. 120 and 10 CFR 55 as applicable. It describes the process for evaluating the effectiveness of training programs, provides aids for collection of information during interviews and observations, and provides criteria for evaluating the implementation of a systems approach to training. This document is not intended to have the effect of a regulation, it establishes no binding requirements or interpretations of NRC regulations. It is intended as guidance only

  4. Quality criteria for landscape visualisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waldi, H.-P.; Witt, U. de

    1996-01-01

    The rapid expansion of wind energy utilisation in Western Europe can strain the limits of social acceptance with citizens living in wind development areas. One of the problems wind farm engineers and local authorities face is the visual impact of wind turbines. To determine the influence on the landscape visualisations of wind farms photorealistic compositions are used. In many cases it is part of the planning procedure. The quality of this visualization can strongly influence the success of the permission procedure. We will give criteria which can give help to reduce the possibility of unwanted manipulations. (author)

  5. Most patients who reach disease remission following anti-TNF therapy continue to report fatigue: results from the British Society for Rheumatology Biologics Register for Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Druce, Katie L; Bhattacharya, Yagnaseni; Jones, Gareth T; Macfarlane, Gary J; Basu, Neil

    2016-10-01

    RA-related fatigue is common and debilitating, but does not always respond to immunotherapy. In the context of anti-TNF therapy, we aimed to examine whether patients achieving disease remission experienced remission of fatigue. Data from the British Society for Rheumatology Biologics Register for RA were used. In participants with severe baseline fatigue [36-item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36) vitality score ⩽12.5], we identified those in disease remission [28-joint DAS (DAS28) 12.5) and complete remission (SF-36 vitality score >50) at follow-up. Demographic (e.g. sex, age), clinical (e.g. inflammation, joint erosion and co-morbidities) and psychosocial (e.g. SF-36 domains and HAQ) characteristics were compared between responder and non-responder groups. Severe baseline fatigue was reported by 2652 participants, of whom 271 (10%) achieved a DAS28 <2.6 by 6 months. In total, 225 participants (83%) reported partial remission and were distinguished from those who did not by better health status on all psychosocial domains. Far fewer [n = 101 (37.3%)] reported full fatigue remission. In addition to reporting clinically poorer health status, they were distinguished on the basis of a history of hypertension, depression and stroke as well as baseline treatment use of steroids and antidepressants. Despite achieving clinical remission, many RA patients do not achieve complete remission of their fatigue. Therefore, despite being important in overall disease control, reductions in disease activity are not always sufficient to ameliorate fatigue, so other symptom-specific management approaches must be considered for those for whom fatigue does not resolve. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Rheumatology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Comparison of Anti-Saccharomyces Cerevisiae Antibodies (ASCA in Behcet’s Disease Patients with Three Groups of Oral Aphthosis, other Rheumatologic Diseases and Healthy Volunteers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed Kerdari

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Behcet’s Disease (BD is a general and progressive vasculitis and involves various organs. Its main etiology is not yet understood; however, immunologic and infectious causes and genetic predisposition have been proposed. Saccharomyces Cerevisiae is a type of yeast which is used in the bread and wine industries. Antibodies against this yeast have a well-proven role in inflammatory bowel diseases. The aim of the present study was to assess the frequency of Anti-Saccharomyces Cerevisiae Antibody (ASCA and its relation to clinical symptoms and disease activity index in patients afflicted by BD. Materials and Methods: Serum ASCA levels, determined by ELISA, were Studied in Behcet’s disease along with oral aphthosis, other rheumatologic diseases and healthy volunteers (n=30 in each group. In the BD group the disease activity index and different clinical symptoms were recorded during the study course. Results:Serum level of ASCA in the four studied groups of BD, oral aphthosis, other rheumatologic disease and healthy volunteers was 9.18±9.69, 10.90±10.40, 11.29±17.96 and 8.86±5.31IU/ml, respectively;  indicating no meaningful difference (p=0.811. The ASCA titer was not related to Behcet’s disease severity (p=0.399. Serum level of ASCA in BD patients with oral aphthosis or with gastrointestinal symptoms was significantly higher than the other Behcet’s Disease patients (p=0.012, p=0.014. Conclusion: ASCS is not a valuable test for distinguishing BD from recurrent oral aphthosis or other connective tissue disorders. It also cannot be used for determining disease severity. However, it has a higher level in BD patients with oral aphthous ulcers and gastrointestinal symptoms.

  7. VIRAL HEPATITIS B AND C AS COMORBIDITY IN RHEUMATIC DISEASES: ANALYSIS OF THE DATA OF THE V.A. NASONOVA RESEARCH INSTITUTE OF RHEUMATOLOGY CLINIC OVER 4 YEARS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. E. Karateev

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis B virus (HBV and hepatitis C virus (HCV infection is a serious problem that substantially hinders the treatment of patients with rheumatic diseases (RD particular when there is a need for using cytotoxic and biological agents (BAs.Objective: to estimate the rate of HBV and HCV infection in RD patients followed up at the V.A. Nasonova Research Institute of Rheumatology Clinic in 2011 to 2014.Subjects and methods. All case histories of the RD patients hospitalized in the given period were analyzed. Infection with HBV and HCV was assessed from the presence of HBsAg and anti-HCV, respectively.Results and discussion. There were a total of 16,553 admissions to the V.A. Nasonova Research Institute of Rheumatology Clinic over 4 years. HBV and HCV were detected in 0.33 and 0.74%, respectively; their combination was found in 0.03% (a total of 1.1% of the patients. About half of the patients took cytotoxic agents and glucocorticoids; 29.8% received BAs, mainly rituximab. Moderate and high chronic hepatitis activity was noted in 4.9% of the patients; liver cirrhosis was observed in 2.7%. Over the follow-up period, alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase levels were not elevated in the vast majority of patients.Conclusion. HBV and HCV infection is often detected in patients with RD. The infected patients and persons with chronic viral hepatitis require careful follow-up and the decision whether to perform prophylactic antiviral therapy when using cytotoxic agents and BAs.

  8. [The impact of the annual scientific meetings of the Israel Society of Rheumatology as measured by publication rates of the abstracts in peer-reviewed journals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Shira; Hashkes, Philip J; Uziel, Yosef

    2004-04-01

    We aimed to examine the impact and quality of the research presented in the Israel Society of Rheumatology (ISR) annual scientific meetings by measuring publication rates of the abstracts in peer-reviewed journals and investigating the factors that influenced publication. We examined the outcome of all 79 abstracts submitted to the ISR for the 1998-2000 annual meetings. A MEDLINE search of all abstracts, by authors, topics and keywords was performed. Senior authors of abstracts not found to be published in this search were interviewed regarding publication and factors influencing submission. We described the effect of variable factors on the rate of publication. As of September 2002, 63 (80%) abstracts were published in peer-reviewed journals or are currently in-press. Most abstracts were published in prominent journals (with a high impact factor). The majority of the abstracts (61%) were published in rheumatologic journals, 65% of the studies originated from tertiary centers and 19% of the studies were multicenter. The most common diseases studied were antiphospholipid syndrome (20%), systemic lupus erythematosus (19%) and inflammatory arthritis (18%). Most of the studies were of disease pathogenesis (35%) and clinical manifestations (33%). The most common study designs were basic science (34%). An overall 57% of the studies reported "positive" results and 9% reported "negative" results. None of the factors studied were associated with publication or non-publication. The main cause cited by authors for not publishing their abstract was lack of time to prepare a full paper or a desire to further expand the study. Within this group of 16 authors of abstracts, 11 authors still plan to submit a paper. The ISR annual meetings have an important clinical scientific impact as measured by the high rate of abstracts published as full length articles in leading peer-reviewed journals.

  9. Evaluation of rheumatoid factor and anti-citrullinated peptide antibodies in relation to rheumatological manifestations in patients with leprosy from Southern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dionello, Carla Fontoura; Rosa Utiyama, Shirley Ramos; Radominski, Sebastião Cézar; Stahlke, Ewalda; Stinghen, Servio Tulio; de Messias-Reason, Iara Jose

    2016-10-01

    Leprosy patients may present several osteoarticular complaints, which require further evaluation of inflammatory diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Therefore, an adequate clinical assessment in addition to testing for rheumatoid factors (RF) and anticyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies (anti-CCP), can be useful in order to establish the correct diagnosis. In this study, the relation of RF and anti-CCP with rheumatological manifestations was evaluated in 97 leprosy patients from Southern Brazil. The results were compared to RA patients and healthy controls from the same geographical area and ethnic background. Neuropathy was observed in 71.1% and arthritis in 35.1% of the leprosy patients. A high frequency of RF positivity was observed among the leprosy patients (41.2%, 40/97), with RF immunoglobulin A (IgA) significantly associated with arthritis (OR = 7.9, 95% CI = 1.5-40.6 P = 0.008). Anti-CCP was observed in 9.3% (9/97) of the patients, with anti-CCP2 being the most frequent subtype. Only 4.1% (4/97) of the patients were RF and anti-CCP concomitantly positive. RF IgM showed a significant association with leprosy when compared to healthy controls (P leprosy in patients from the same geographical area and ethnic background (anti-CCP2 OR = 38.6; 95% CI = 16.49-90.26; P leprosy with other inflammatory diseases, such as RA, clinical and laboratorial evaluation of affected patients must be carefully assessed in order to achieve proper diagnosis and treatment. © 2015 Asia Pacific League of Associations for Rheumatology and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  10. Ventilation criteria for IDMS facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambert, D.P.

    1996-01-01

    Both Facility Evaluation Board (FEB) reviews of the Integrated DWPF Melter System (IDMS) have identified the inconsistency of the current IDMS Process Hazards Review (PHR) versus actual IDMS practice as regards the criteria to contain air borne pollutants that may be present in the Process Room (e.g. benzene and mercury). The PHR states that a 1.0 in. wc pressure differential be maintained between the IDMS Process Room and Building 672-T. In addition, the PHR further specifies that the linear velocity through openings into the Process Room (e.g. open doors) be equal to or greater than 150 fpm. Finally, the PHR recommended that mercury vapor and benzene monitors be installed in the Process Room ventilation exhaust to alert personnel to the presence of vapors of benzene and/or mercury before entering the Process Room. This report summarizes the results of reassessment of these criteria and the specific recommendation for permanent installation of mercury and benzene vapor monitors in the vapor exhaust of the Process Room

  11. Donor selection criteria and procurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agcaoili, N.R.

    1999-01-01

    Donor selection is one of the most important aspects of tissue banking practice. Without a good donor selection criteria, the results of any effort of trying to preserve tissues will have disastrous outcome for the recipient of these tissues. While with a very good and strict donor selection the Tissue Bank can guarantee safe and effective tissue allografts. There are significant aspects in the history and physical examination of the donor that must be emphasized. A donor exclusion criteria has also been formulated together with a list of all the needed laboratory examinations to eliminate possible diseases that may be transferred from the donor. The methods of procurement of tissue allografts from living and cadaver donors will be described. The limitations and advantages of each will be taken.There are also special restrictions that are important in the practice of removing the tissues from the donors. All the necessary equipment should be ready and the potential risk on the personnel should be known to all doing Tissue Banking

  12. Nuclear reactor philosophy and criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atchison, R.J.

    1979-07-01

    Nuclear power plant safety criteria and principles developed in Canada are directed towards minimizing the chance of failure of the fuel and preventing or reducing to an acceptably low level the escape of fission products should fuel failure occur. Safety criteria and practices are set forth in the Reactor Siting Guide, which is based upon the concept of defence in depth. The Guide specifies that design and construction shall follow the best applicable code, standard or practice; the total of all serious process system failures shall not exceed one in three years; special safety systems are to be physically and functionally separate from process systems and each other; and safety systems shall be testable, with unavailability less than 10 - 3 . Doses to the most exposed member of the public due to normal operation, serious process failures, and dual failures are specified. Licensees are also required to consider the effects of extreme conditions due to airplane crashes, explosions, turbine disintegration, pipe burst, and natural disasters. Safety requirements are changing as nuclear power plant designs evolve and in response to social and economic pressures

  13. Multi-criteria decision making with overlapping criteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Shahid Abdulla

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The evidential reasoning (ER algorithm for multi-criteria decision making (MCDM performs aggregation of the assessments of multiple experts, one each for every attribute (or subsystem or criterion of a given system. Two variants of ER are proposed, that handle a scenario where more than one expert assesses an attribute. The first algorithm handles the case of multiple experts who assess an attribute of a larger system. Experiments compare a modification of ER for this scenario which results in poorer detection. The second algorithm is used when experts have overlapping areas of expertise among the subsystems. A comparison is made with a variant of ER in the literature. Both algorithms are examples of novel ‘exclusive’ and ‘inclusive’ ER.

  14. Development and Preliminary Face and Content Validation of the “Which Health Approaches and Treatments Are You Using?” (WHAT) Questionnaires Assessing Complementary and Alternative Medicine Use in Pediatric Rheumatology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toupin April, Karine; Stinson, Jennifer; Boon, Heather; Duffy, Ciarán M.; Huber, Adam M.; Gibbon, Michele; Descarreaux, Martin; Spiegel, Lynn; Vohra, Sunita; Tugwell, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Objective Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is commonly used by children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), yet no validated questionnaires assess that use. The objective of this study was to develop child self- and parent proxy-report questionnaires assessing CAM use and to determine the face and content validity of the “Which Health Approaches and Treatments are you using?” (WHAT) questionnaires in pediatric rheumatology. Methods A sequential phased mixed methods approach was used to develop the questionnaires. A Delphi Survey of 126 experts followed by an interdisciplinary consensus conference of 14 stakeholders in CAM, general pediatrics and pediatric rheumatology was held to develop consensus on the content of the questionnaires using a nominal group technique. To determine face and content validity of the questionnaires, two groups, including (a) a purposive sample of 22 children with JIA 8 to 18 years and their parents from the Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario and the Hospital for Sick Children, and (b) 21 Canadian pediatric rheumatology experts, participated in interviews. Participants were independently asked about the goal, understandability and comprehensiveness of the WHAT questionnaires, as well as the relevance of items. Results Consensus was reached on 17 items of the WHAT questionnaires. The domains found to be relevant were child’s CAM use, factors associated with CAM use, perceived impact of CAM use, and communication about CAM. A total of 15 items in the parent proxy-report questionnaire and 13 items in the child report questionnaire showed adequate content validity. Conclusions Consensus was reached by experts on the content of a pediatric CAM questionnaire. Face and content validity testing and modifications made to the WHAT questionnaires have helped ensure adequate preliminary validity for use in pediatric rheumatology. This constitutes the basis for further testing of these questionnaires in pediatric

  15. A Phase III, Randomized, Controlled Trial of Apremilast in Patients with Psoriatic Arthritis: Results of the PALACE 2 Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutolo, Maurizio; Myerson, Gary E; Fleischmann, Roy M; Lioté, Frédéric; Díaz-González, Federico; Van den Bosch, Filip; Marzo-Ortega, Helena; Feist, Eugen; Shah, Kamal; Hu, ChiaChi; Stevens, Randall M; Poder, Airi

    2016-09-01

    Apremilast, an oral phosphodiesterase 4 inhibitor, downregulates intracellular inflammatory mediator synthesis by elevating cyclic adenosine monophosphate levels. The PALACE 2 trial evaluated apremilast efficacy and safety in patients with active psoriatic arthritis (PsA) despite prior conventional disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs and/or biologic therapy. Eligible patients were randomized (1:1:1) to placebo, apremilast 20 mg BID, or apremilast 30 mg BID. At Week 16, patients with swollen and tender joint count improvement 20% improvement in American College of Rheumatology response criteria (ACR20) at Week 16. In the intent-to-treat population (N = 484), ACR20 at Week 16 was achieved by more patients receiving apremilast 20 mg BID [37.4% (p = 0.0002)] and 30 mg BID [32.1% (p = 0.0060)] versus placebo (18.9%). Clinically meaningful improvements in signs and symptoms of PsA, physical function, and psoriasis were observed with apremilast through Week 52. The most common adverse events were diarrhea, nausea, headache, and upper respiratory tract infection. Diarrhea and nausea generally occurred early and usually resolved spontaneously with continued treatment. Laboratory abnormalities were infrequent and transient. Apremilast demonstrated clinical improvements in PsA for up to 52 weeks, including signs and symptoms, physical function, and psoriasis. No new safety signals were observed. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01212757.

  16. Proposed Diagnostic Criteria for Smartphone Addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yu-Hsuan; Chiang, Chih-Lin; Lin, Po-Hsien; Chang, Li-Ren; Ko, Chih-Hung; Lee, Yang-Han; Lin, Sheng-Hsuan

    2016-01-01

    Global smartphone penetration has led to unprecedented addictive behaviors. The aims of this study are to develop diagnostic criteria of smartphone addiction and to examine the discriminative ability and the validity of the diagnostic criteria. We developed twelve candidate criteria for characteristic symptoms of smartphone addiction and four criteria for functional impairment caused by excessive smartphone use. The participants consisted of 281 college students. Each participant was systematically assessed for smartphone-using behaviors by psychiatrist's structured diagnostic interview. The sensitivity, specificity, and diagnostic accuracy of the candidate symptom criteria were analyzed with reference to the psychiatrists' clinical global impression. The optimal model selection with its cutoff point of the diagnostic criteria differentiating the smartphone addicted subjects from non-addicted subjects was then determined by the best diagnostic accuracy. Six symptom criteria model with optimal cutoff point were determined based on the maximal diagnostic accuracy. The proposed smartphone addiction diagnostic criteria consisted of (1) six symptom criteria, (2) four functional impairment criteria and (3) exclusion criteria. Setting three symptom criteria as the cutoff point resulted in the highest diagnostic accuracy (84.3%), while the sensitivity and specificity were 79.4% and 87.5%, respectively. We suggested determining the functional impairment by two or more of the four domains considering the high accessibility and penetration of smartphone use. The diagnostic criteria of smartphone addiction demonstrated the core symptoms "impaired control" paralleled with substance related and addictive disorders. The functional impairment involved multiple domains provide a strict standard for clinical assessment.

  17. 45 CFR 1176.3 - Criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... ENDOWMENT FOR THE HUMANITIES PART-TIME CAREER EMPLOYMENT § 1176.3 Criteria. Positions becoming vacant... to part-time. Among the criteria which may be used when conducting this review are: (a) Mission...

  18. 40 CFR 258.24 - Air criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... SOLID WASTE LANDFILLS Operating Criteria § 258.24 Air criteria. (a) Owners or operators of all MSWLFs... wastes, silvicultural wastes, landclearing debris, diseased trees, or debris from emergency cleanup...

  19. Qualitative vs. quantitative atopic dermatitis criteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, R M; Thyssen, J P; Maibach, H I

    2016-01-01

    This review summarizes historical aspects, clinical expression and pathophysiology leading to coining of the terms atopy and atopic dermatitis, current diagnostic criteria and further explore the possibility of developing quantitative diagnostic criteria of atopic dermatitis (AD) based on the imp...

  20. Separability criteria for genuine multiparticle entanglement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guhne, O.; Seevinck, M.P.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304847399

    2010-01-01

    We present a method to derive separability criteria for different classes of multiparticle entanglement, especially genuine multiparticle entanglement. The resulting criteria are necessary and sufficient for certain families of states. This, for example, completely solves the problem of classifying

  1. Separability Criteria for Genuine Multiparticle Entanglement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guehne, O.; Seevinck, M.P.

    2010-01-01

    We present a method to derive separability criteria for different classes of multiparticle entanglement, especially genuine multiparticle entanglement. The resulting criteria are necessary and sufficient for certain families of states. This, for example, completely solves the problem of classifying

  2. Criteria for onsite transfers of radioactive material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Opperman, E.K.; Jackson, E.J.; Eggers, A.G.

    1992-01-01

    A general description of the requirements for making onsite transfers of radioactive material is provided in Chapter 2, along with the required sequencey of activities. Various criteria for package use are identified in Chapters 3-13. These criteria provide protection against undue radiation exposure. Package shielding, containment, and surface contamination requirements are established. Criteria for providing criticality safety are enumerated in Chapter 6. Criteria for providing hazards information are established in Chapter 13. A glossary is provided

  3. Design criteria for plutonium gloveboxes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1981-01-01

    The standard defines criteria for the design of glovebox systems to be used for the handling of plutonium in any form or isotopic composition or when mixed with other elements or compounds. The glovebox system is a series of physical barriers provided with glove ports and gloves, through which process and maintenance operations may be performed, together with an operating ventilation system. The system minimizes the potential for release of radioactive material to the environment, protects operators from contamination, and mitigates the consequences of abnormal condiations. The standard covers confinement, construction, materials, windows, glove ports, gloves, equipment insertion and removal, lighting, ventilation, fire protection, criticality prevention, services and utilities, radiation shielding, waste systems, monitoring and alarm systems, safeguards, quality assurance, and decommissioning

  4. Enhanced seismic criteria for piping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Touboul, F. . E-mail francoise.touboul@cea.fr; Blay, N.; Sollogoub, P.; Chapuliot, S.

    2006-01-01

    In situ or laboratory experiments have shown that piping systems exhibit satisfactory seismic behavior. Seismic motion is not severe enough to significantly damage piping systems unless large differential motions of anchorage are imposed. Nevertheless, present design criteria for piping are very severe and require a large number of supports, which creates overly rigid piping systems. CEA, in collaboration with EDF, FRAMATOME and IRSN, has launched a large R and D program on enhanced design methods which will be less severe, but still conservative, and compatible with defect justification during operation. This paper presents the background of the R and D work on this matter, and CEA proposed equations. Our approach is based on the difference between the real behavior (or the best estimated computed one) with the one supposed by codified methods. Codified criteria are applied on an elastically calculated behavior that can be significantly different from the real one: the effect of plasticity may be very meaningful, even with low incursion in the plastic domain. Moreover, and particularly in piping systems, the elastic follow-up effect affects stress distribution for both seismic and thermal loads. For seismic load, we have proposed to modify the elastic moment limitation, based on the interpretation of experimental results on piping systems. The methods have been validated on more industrial cases, and some of the consequences of the changes have been studied: modification of the drawings and of the number of supports, global displacements, forces in the supports, stability of potential defects, etc. The basic aim of the studies undertaken is to make a decision on the stress classification problem, one that is not limited to seismic induced stresses, and to propose simplified methods for its solution

  5. 10 CFR 905.36 - Marketing criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Marketing criteria. 905.36 Section 905.36 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY PLANNING AND MANAGEMENT PROGRAM Power Marketing Initiative § 905.36 Marketing criteria. Western shall retain applicable provisions of existing marketing criteria for projects where...

  6. 46 CFR 385.51 - Criteria: Projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... results; (iii) The extent of the problems treated and whether the objectives sought by the undertaking are... MARITIME ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION MISCELLANEOUS RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT GRANT AND COOPERATIVE AGREEMENTS REGULATIONS Criteria for Award § 385.51 Criteria: Projects. The criteria to be used by...

  7. Analysis of Published Criteria for Clinically Inactive Disease in a Large Juvenile Dermatomyositis Cohort Shows That Skin Disease Is Underestimated

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Beverley; Campanilho‐Marques, Raquel; Arnold, Katie; Pilkington, Clarissa A.; Wedderburn, Lucy R.; Armon, Kate; Briggs, Vanja; Ellis‐Gage, Joe; Roper, Holly; Watts, Joanna; Baildam, Eileen; Hanna, Louise; Lloyd, Olivia; McCann, Liza; Roberts, Ian; McGovern, Ann; Riley, Phil; Al‐Abadi, Eslam; Ryder, Clive; Scott, Janis; Southwood, Taunton; Thomas, Beverley; Amin, Tania; Burton, Deborah; Jackson, Gillian; Van Rooyen, Vanessa; Wood, Mark; Wyatt, Sue; Browne, Michael; Davidson, Joyce; Ferguson, Sue; Gardner‐Medwin, Janet; Martin, Neil; Waxman, Liz; Foster, Helen; Friswell, Mark; Jandial, Sharmila; Qiao, Lisa; Sen, Ethan; Smith, Eve; Stevenson, Vicky; Swift, Alison; Wade, Debbie; Watson, Stuart; Crate, Lindsay; Frost, Anna; Jordan, Mary; Mosley, Ellen; Satyapal, Rangaraj; Stretton, Elizabeth; Venning, Helen; Warrier, Kishore; Almeida, Beverley; Arnold, Katie; Beard, Laura; Brown, Virginia; Campanilho‐Marques, Raquel; Enayat, Elli; Glackin, Yvonne; Halkon, Elizabeth; Hasson, Nathan; Juggins, Audrey; Kassoumeri, Laura; Lunt, Sian; Maillard, Sue; Nistala, Kiran; Pilkington, Clarissa; Simou, Stephanie; Smith, Sally; Varsani, Hemlata; Wedderburn, Lucy; Murray, Kevin; Ioannou, John; Suffield, Linda; Al‐Obaidi, Muthana; Leach, Sam; Lee, Helen; Smith, Helen; Inness, Emma; Kendall, Eunice; Mayers, David; Wilkinson, Nick; Clinch, Jacqui; Pluess‐Hall, Helen

    2015-01-01

    Objective The Pediatric Rheumatology International Trials Organisation (PRINTO) recently published criteria for classification of patients with juvenile dermatomyositis (DM) as having clinically inactive disease. The criteria require that at least 3 of 4 conditions be met, i.e., creatine kinase level ≤150 units/liter, Childhood Myositis Assessment Scale score ≥48, Manual Muscle Testing in 8 muscles score ≥78, and physician's global assessment of overall disease activity (PGA) ≤0.2. The present study was undertaken to test these criteria in a UK cohort of patients with juvenile DM. Methods We assessed 1,114 patient visits for the 4 items in the PRINTO criteria for clinically inactive disease. Each visit was analyzed to determine whether skin disease was present. The Disease Activity Score (DAS) for juvenile DM was determined in 59 patients. Results At 307 of the 1,114 visits, clinically inactive disease was achieved based on the 3 muscle criteria (but with a PGA of >0.2); rash was present at 65.8% of these visits and nailfold capillary abnormalities at 35.2%. When PGA ≤0.2 was one of the 3 criteria that were met, the frequency of skin signs was significantly lower (rash in 23.1% and nailfold capillary abnormalities in 8.7%). If PGA was considered an essential criterion for clinically inactive disease (P‐CID), patients with active skin disease were less likely to be categorized as having clinically inactive disease (a median DAS skin score of 0 [of a possible maximum of 9] in visits where the PGA was ≤0.2, versus a median DAS skin score of 4 in patients meeting the 3 muscle criteria [with a PGA of >0.2]; P < 0.001). Use of the P‐CID led to improvements in the positive predictive value and the positive likelihood ratio (85.4% and 11.0, respectively, compared to 72.9% and 5.1 with the current criteria). Conclusion There was a high frequency of skin disease among patients with juvenile DM who did not meet the PGA criterion for inactive disease but met

  8. Selection criteria for dental radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    The Faculty of General Dental Practitioners (UK) has a declared commitment to 'improving the standards of patient care'. By the provision of standards and guidelines it aims to help the profession to achieve this goal. Standards and guidelines are simply tools a dentist may use to improve treatment planning and care outcomes. The Self-Assessment Manual and Standards, SAMS, first published in 1991, is now well known to the profession and has become a frequently quoted source in clinical audit and quality assurance initiatives. Since its publication the scientific methodology of systematic reviews of the literature has progressed dramatically and this book is based on these developments. Evidence-based care is well established in medicine and dentistry and these selection criteria and guidelines follow these established protocols by basing advice on the available scientific evidence wherever possible. This book's purpose is a practical one, it is not intended to be limiting or restrictive but to be useful in the decision-making process. This is the first in a series of standards documents from the FGDP(UK) which are based on reviews of the scientific literature and employ the Scottish Intercollegiate Guideline Network (SIGN) methodology for guideline production. They are not constraints but an aid to effective treatment planning and patient care

  9. Criteria for exact qudit universality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brennen, Gavin K.; O'Leary, Dianne P.; Bullock, Stephen S.

    2005-01-01

    We describe criteria for implementation of quantum computation in qudits. A qudit is a d-dimensional system whose Hilbert space is spanned by states vertical bar 0>, vertical bar 1>, ..., vertical bar d-1>. An important earlier work [A. Muthukrishnan and C.R. Stroud, Jr., Phys. Rev. A 62, 052309 (2000)] describes how to exactly simulate an arbitrary unitary on multiple qudits using a 2d-1 parameter family of single qudit and two qudit gates. That technique is based on the spectral decomposition of unitaries. Here we generalize this argument to show that exact universality follows given a discrete set of single qudit Hamiltonians and one two-qudit Hamiltonian. The technique is related to the QR-matrix decomposition of numerical linear algebra. We consider a generic physical system in which the single qudit Hamiltonians are a small collection of H jk x =(ℎ/2π)Ω(vertical bar k> jk y =(ℎ/2π)Ω(i vertical bar k> jk x,y are allowed Hamiltonians. One qudit exact universality follows iff this graph is connected, and complete universality results if the two-qudit Hamiltonian H=(ℎ/2π)Ω vertical bar d-1,d-1> 87 Rb and construct an optimal gate sequence using Raman laser pulses

  10. Complete family of separability criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doherty, Andrew C.; Spedalieri, Federico M.; Parrilo, Pablo A.

    2004-01-01

    We introduce a family of separability criteria that are based on the existence of extensions of a bipartite quantum state ρ to a larger number of parties satisfying certain symmetry properties. It can be easily shown that all separable states have the required extensions, so the nonexistence of such an extension for a particular state implies that the state is entangled. One of the main advantages of this approach is that searching for the extension can be cast as a convex optimization problem known as a semidefinite program. Whenever an extension does not exist, the dual optimization constructs an explicit entanglement witness for the particular state. These separability tests can be ordered in a hierarchical structure whose first step corresponds to the well-known positive partial transpose (Peres-Horodecki) criterion, and each test in the hierarchy is at least as powerful as the preceding one. This hierarchy is complete, in the sense that any entangled state is guaranteed to fail a test at some finite point in the hierarchy, thus showing it is entangled. The entanglement witnesses corresponding to each step of the hierarchy have well-defined and very interesting algebraic properties that, in turn, allow for a characterization of the interior of the set of positive maps. Coupled with some recent results on the computational complexity of the separability problem, which has been shown to be NP hard, this hierarchy of tests gives a complete and also computationally and theoretically appealing characterization of mixed bipartite entangled states

  11. Criteria for onset of firestorms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carrier, G.F.; Fendell, F.E.; Feldman, P.S.

    1983-01-01

    Quantitative criteria are evolved for onset of firestorms, severe stationary (nonpropagating) holocausts arising via merger of fires from multiple simultaneous ignitions in a heavily fuel-laden urban environment. Within an hour, surface-level radial inflow from all directions sustains a large-diameter convective column that eventually reaches altitude of about 10 km (e.g., Hamburg, Dresden, Hiroshima). As the firestorm achieves peak intensity (2 to 3 hours after the ignitions), inflow speeds are inferred to attain 25 to 50 m/s; typically 12 km 2 are reduced to ashes, before winds relax to ambient levels in six-to-nine hours. Here the firestorm is interpreted to be a mesocyclone (rotating severe local storm). Even with exceedingly large heat release sustained over a concentrated area, in the presence of a very nearly autoconvectively unstable atmospheric stratification, onset of vigorous swirling on the scale of two hours requires more than concentration of circulation associated with the rotation of the earth; rather, a preexisting, if weak, circulation appears necessary for firestorm cyclogenesis

  12. Diversification criteria for power systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kharbach, Mohammed

    2016-01-01

    Growing power demand, fuel availability and prices, technology changes, the environmental impacts of energy consumption, the changing regulatory environments and the uncertainties around such elements make the planning for optimal power mix a challenging task. The diversity approach is advocated as a most appropriate planning methodology for the optimal energy mix (Hickey et al., 2010). Shannon Wiener Index (SWI), which is the most cited diversity metric has been used to assess power systems diversity mainly from an energy perspective. To our best knowledge, there is no rigorous justification why energy has been the main variable used in diversification exercises rather than other variables such as capacity. We use a stylized power generation framework to show that diversity based on energy or capacity could lead to different outcomes in terms of vulnerability to fuel exposure, among others. We also introduce a Shannon Wiener Index ratio (SWIR) that we believe captures better the diversity of a power system compared to the standard SWI. - Highlights: • Ranking power systems, from a diversity perspective, based on one criteria has many shortcomings. • Diversity based on energy or capacity could lead to different outcomes in terms of vulnerability to fuel exposure, among others. • A Shannon Wiener Index ratio (SWIR) captures better the diversity of a power system compared to the standard SWI.

  13. Panel 1: Safety design criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yllera, Javier

    2013-01-01

    There is general consensus in the nuclear community, and more after the Fukushima accident, that the deployment of nuclear energy has to be done at the highest levels of nuclear safety and that safety cannot be compromised by other factors. It is well understood that reactors that are being licensed and the new generations of reactors that will be constructed in the future will need to reach higher safety levels than the existing ones. Several countries and international organizations or international groups are launching initiatives to harmonise safety goals, safety requirements, safety objectives, regulations, criteria or safety reference levels. There are differences in the meanings of these terms and the working approaches, but the overall purpose is the same: to specify how new plants can be safer. In this context, the IAEA has an statutory function for developing international nuclear safety standards. The IAEA safety standards are per se not mandatory for IAEA Member States. Regulating safety is a national responsibility, and many States have decided to adopt the IAEA’s standards for use in their national regulations in different ways. The IAEA Safety Standards represent international consensus on what must constitute a high level of safety for nuclear installations. In the area of NPP design, IAEA safety standards that are published are intended to apply primarily to new plants. It might not be practicable to apply all the requirements to plants that are already in operation. In addition, the focus is primarily on plants with water cooled reactors

  14. Investigation of Sustainable Housing Criteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    roshanfekr Somayeh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, much attention has been paid to sustainable development in cities. The quality of human life is directly related to environmental quality. Because many people live in cities as a place of social, economic and cultural relationships, certain issues such as environmental crises, energy, air and noise pollution and traffic jams are some of the factors that can alter the quality of human life. Therefore, in order to improve the quality of human life, attention to sustainable development (or sustainability in cities is proposed. Sustainable building has a comprehensive significance that begins with the conception of negative and positive impacts on the environment. Several descriptions of sustainable or green buildings have been created; however, they all pursue one goal, which is to create sustainable urban developments and protection of the environment. The quality of indoor environments, materials, and energy consumption, water usage, the impact of building construction processes and building maintenance are some of the factors that affect the environment and sustainability. Sustainable building is an attempt to relieve the minus impacts on the environment that occur during a building’s lifetime. This research investigates the important factors that have relevance to green buildings and introduces several criteria of sustainable housing.

  15. Diagnostic criteria in MR neurography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baeumer, P.

    2017-01-01

    Peripheral neuropathies are frequent and can mostly be correctly diagnosed by clinical examination and electrophysiology; however, diagnostically difficult cases are sometimes encountered especially with respect to precise localization of nerve lesions. Imaging of the peripheral nervous system has been shown to provide additional useful diagnostic information. In addition to the more widely available nerve sonography, magnetic resonance neurography (MRN) is the method of choice in diagnostically complex cases. The most important pulse sequence is a T2-weighted fat-saturated pulse sequence with high in-plane resolution and detects increased T2-weighted signals of nerve fascicles as a highly sensitive sign for nerve lesions. Further established diagnostic criteria are nerve caliber and, less commonly used, contrast agent uptake. The spatial pattern of nerve lesions aids in the diagnostic classification of neuropathies. Functional imaging techniques, such as diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and nerve perfusion are currently under examination with respect to the clinical potential. If all other diagnostic methods, including clinical examination, electrophysiology and nerve sonography do not arrive at an unambiguous diagnosis of a peripheral neuropathy, MRN should be used. The special value of MRN is demonstrated particularly in complex nerve lesions, such as traumatic plexopathies and in partial fascicular neuropathies and many other indications. (orig.) [de

  16. Admission Criteria for MBA Programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvana Dakduk

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports a review of studies on admission criteria for MBA programs. The method consisted in a literary review based on a systematic search in international databases (Emerald, ABI/INFORM Global, ProQuest Education Journals, ProQuest European Business, ProQuest Science Journal, ProQuest Research Library, ProQuest Psychology Journals, ProQuest Social Science Journals and Business Source Complete of studies published from January 1990 to December 2013, which explore the academic performance of students or graduates of MBA programs. A quantitative review was performed. Results show that most researchers studied relations between GMAT (Graduate Management Admission Test and UGPA (Undergraduate Grade Point Average as predictors of GGPA (Graduate Grade Point Average. On the other hand, work experience and personal traits (such as personality, motivation, learning strategies, self-efficacy beliefs and achievement expectations and their relation with GGPA had been less studied, and results are not consistent enough to consider them valid predictors of student performance at this time.

  17. Bioethics and conflicting ethical criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Michael

    2002-01-01

    Some of the major problematic issues in contemporary ethical discourse are highlighted in the field of bioethics. The need to incorporate new understandings and foundational shifts in essential criteria because of technological advances in the areas of medicine and human sciences increasingly challenges traditional and accepted notions of ethics. As the possibilities of technical progress increase, more and more pressure is put on traditional understandings of the human person, identity, and value. In the face of ethical relativism and emotivism, which are already widespread in social and political discourse, the immediacy of bioethics as a response to technology and its impact on human lives reinforces the need for ethics to become interdisciplinary, while attempting to provide some coherence to both the questions and the responses that contemporary life generates. In this paper, the author intends to sketch the outlines of some of these problems, and suggest one approach which might allow a certain methodical intelligibility to emerge which takes into account shifts in consciousness and the dependence on historically grounded perspective.

  18. Determining Pathways to Improvements in Fatigue in Rheumatoid Arthritis: Results From the British Society for Rheumatology Biologics Register for Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Druce, Katie L; Jones, Gareth T; Macfarlane, Gary J; Basu, Neil

    2015-09-01

    There is debate as to the role of inflammatory disease activity in the etiology of rheumatoid arthritis (RA)-related fatigue. We undertook this study to determine the relationship of fatigue to disease activity by examining pathways associated with change in fatigue in subjects starting anti-tumor necrosis factor (anti-TNF) therapy for the first time. Participants who had been recruited to the British Society for Rheumatology Biologics Register for RA provided information on fatigue (Short Form 36 [SF-36] vitality scale) and other health status variables at the start of anti-TNF therapy and 6 months later. The Disease Activity Score in 28 joints (DAS28) and inflammation (erythrocyte sedimentation rate [ESR]/C-reactive protein [CRP] level) were also reported. A path analysis model comprising changes in fatigue, pain, disease activity, disability, and mental health, along with effects of sex and a history of depression, was used to examine those with high levels of fatigue at baseline (score of ≤12.5 units on the SF-36 vitality scale). The DAS28 was substituted for ESR/CRP to delineate the specific role of inflammation. With a total of 2,652 participants, we identified a well-fitting model (χ2  = 0.18, P = 0.98) accounting for 40% of the variance in fatigue change. There was no direct pathway from change in inflammation to change in fatigue; instead, significant pathways to change in fatigue were observed from changes in disease activity, pain, mental health, and disability, along with effects of sex and a history of depression. A total of 82% of the effect of change in disease activity was indirect, of which ∼50% was mediated through a change in pain. Improvements in fatigue do not appear to be driven by inflammatory disease activity; instead, they appear to result indirectly from improvements in pain. Additional significant pathways through disability and mental health suggest potentially modifiable factors that could be targeted to improve clinically

  19. Patients receiving anti-TNF therapies experience clinically important improvements in RA-related fatigue: results from the British Society for Rheumatology Biologics Register for Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Druce, Katie L; Jones, Gareth T; Macfarlane, Gary J; Basu, Neil

    2015-06-01

    Pro-inflammatory cytokines such as TNF-α are important in the pathogenesis of fatigue in conditions such as RA. This study aimed to determine whether fatigue improved in a cohort of RA patients with clinically relevant fatigue commencing anti-TNF-α therapy and, if so, to identify predictors of improvement. Participants recruited to a long-term observational cohort study (the British Society for Rheumatology Biologics Register for RA) provided information on fatigue using the 36-item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36) vitality subscale. The prevalence of severe baseline fatigue (SF-36 vitality ≤12.5) was calculated and improvements, considered as (i) absolute values and (ii) improvement from severe to non-severe fatigue (SF-36 vitality >12.5), were examined 6 months subsequently. A comprehensive set of putative predictors of fatigue improvement were evaluated using multivariable logistic regression. In 6835 participants the prevalence of severe baseline fatigue was 38.8%. Of those with severe fatigue, 70% reported clinically relevant improvement and 66% moved to the non-severe fatigue category (i.e. improvers). The mean change for improvers was three times the minimum clinically important difference for improvement (33.0 U). Independent baseline predictors of improvement were female sex [odds ratio (OR) 1.3 (95% CI 1.1, 1.7)], not being unemployed due to ill health [OR 1.5 (95% CI 1.2, 1.7)], low disability [OR 1.2 (95% CI 1.001, 1.5)], seropositivity [OR 1.2 (95% CI 0.98, 1.4)], not using steroids [OR 1.2 (95% CI 1.03, 1.5)], no history of hypertension [OR 1.4 (95% CI 1.1, 1.6)] or depression [OR 1.3 (95% CI 1.1, 1.5)] and good mental health [SF-36 mental health subscale >35; OR 1.4 (95% CI 1.2, 1.7)]. Fatigued RA patients reported substantial improvement in their fatigue after commencing anti-TNF-α therapy. Further, a number of clinical and psychosocial baseline factors identified those most likely to improve, supporting future stratified approaches to RA

  20. The Japanese version of the modified ACR preliminary diagnostic criteria for fibromyalgia and the fibromyalgia symptom scale: reliability and validity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usui, Chie; Hatta, Kotaro; Aratani, Satoko; Yagishita, Naoko; Nishioka, Kenya; Kanazawa, Teruhisa; Itoh, Kenji; Yamano, Yoshihisa; Nakamura, Hiroyuki; Nakajima, Toshihiro; Nishioka, Kusuki

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the reliability and validity of the Japanese version of the modified American College of Rheumatology (ACR) Preliminary Diagnostic Criteria for Fibromyalgia (mACR 2010-J) and the Fibromyalgia Symptom Scale (mFS-J). According to the ACR 1990 classification criteria, patients with chronic pain were divided into the fibromyalgia group and nonfibromyalgia group (rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis). Patients in both groups were assessed using mACR 2010-J and mFS-J. 294 of 462 (64 %) patients in the fibromyalgia group met mACR 2010-J, whereas 4 % (9/231) of the nonfibromyalgia group did, with sensitivity of 64 %, specificity of 96 %, positive predictive value of 97 %, negative predictive value of 56 %, and positive likelihood ratio of 16.3. Mean total scores on mFS-J significantly differentiated the fibromyalgia from the nonfibromyalgia group. According to the value of the Youden index, the best cutoff score for the mFS-J was 9/10. Our findings indicate that mACR 2010-J as a positive test and mFS-J as a quantification scale might be suitable for assessing fibromyalgia among Japanese chronic pain populations.

  1. Proposed Diagnostic Criteria for Smartphone Addiction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Hsuan Lin

    Full Text Available Global smartphone penetration has led to unprecedented addictive behaviors. The aims of this study are to develop diagnostic criteria of smartphone addiction and to examine the discriminative ability and the validity of the diagnostic criteria.We developed twelve candidate criteria for characteristic symptoms of smartphone addiction and four criteria for functional impairment caused by excessive smartphone use. The participants consisted of 281 college students. Each participant was systematically assessed for smartphone-using behaviors by psychiatrist's structured diagnostic interview. The sensitivity, specificity, and diagnostic accuracy of the candidate symptom criteria were analyzed with reference to the psychiatrists' clinical global impression. The optimal model selection with its cutoff point of the diagnostic criteria differentiating the smartphone addicted subjects from non-addicted subjects was then determined by the best diagnostic accuracy.Six symptom criteria model with optimal cutoff point were determined based on the maximal diagnostic accuracy. The proposed smartphone addiction diagnostic criteria consisted of (1 six symptom criteria, (2 four functional impairment criteria and (3 exclusion criteria. Setting three symptom criteria as the cutoff point resulted in the highest diagnostic accuracy (84.3%, while the sensitivity and specificity were 79.4% and 87.5%, respectively. We suggested determining the functional impairment by two or more of the four domains considering the high accessibility and penetration of smartphone use.The diagnostic criteria of smartphone addiction demonstrated the core symptoms "impaired control" paralleled with substance related and addictive disorders. The functional impairment involved multiple domains provide a strict standard for clinical assessment.

  2. Radiological protection criteria for waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, M.D.; Webb, G.A.M.

    1985-01-01

    In this paper the progress being made by international organisations towards the development of a consensus on the radiological protection criteria to be applied to waste management, and in particular waste disposal, is reviewed. Against this background, work on the development of criteria for use in the UK is described. It is concluded that an international consensus is emerging and that the criteria being recommended for use in the UK are consistent with current international views. (author)

  3. Radiological protection criteria for waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, M.D.; Webb, G.A.M.

    1985-01-01

    In this Paper the progress being made by international organizations towards the development of a consensus on the radiological protection criteria to be applied to waste management, and in particular waste disposal, is reviewed. Against this background, work on the development of criteria for use in the UK is described. It is concluded that an international consensus is emerging and that the criteria being recommended for use in the UK are consistent with current international views. (author)

  4. Discordant American College of Physicians and international rheumatology guidelines for gout management: consensus statement of the Gout, Hyperuricemia and Crystal-Associated Disease Network (G-CAN).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalbeth, Nicola; Bardin, Thomas; Doherty, Michael; Lioté, Frédéric; Richette, Pascal; Saag, Kenneth G; So, Alexander K; Stamp, Lisa K; Choi, Hyon K; Terkeltaub, Robert

    2017-09-01

    In November 2016, the American College of Physicians (ACP) published a clinical practice guideline on the management of acute and recurrent gout. This guideline differs substantially from the latest guidelines generated by the American College of Rheumatology (ACR), European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) and 3e (Evidence, Expertise, Exchange) Initiative, despite reviewing largely the same body of evidence. The Gout, Hyperuricemia and Crystal-Associated Disease Network (G-CAN) convened an expert panel to review the methodology and conclusions of these four sets of guidelines and examine possible reasons for discordance between them. The G-CAN position, presented here, is that the fundamental pathophysiological knowledge underlying gout care, and evidence from clinical experience and clinical trials, supports a treat-to-target approach for gout aimed at lowering serum urate levels to below the saturation threshold at which monosodium urate crystals form. This practice, which is truly evidence-based and promotes the steady reduction in tissue urate crystal deposits, is promoted by the ACR, EULAR and 3e Initiative recommendations. By contrast, the ACP does not provide a clear recommendation for urate-lowering therapy (ULT) for patients with frequent, recurrent flares or those with tophi, nor does it recommend monitoring serum urate levels of patients prescribed ULT. Results from emerging clinical trials that have gout symptoms as the primary end point are expected to resolve this debate for all clinicians in the near term future.

  5. 2014 update of the Consensus Statement of the Spanish Society of Rheumatology on the use of biological therapies in rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanmartí, Raimon; García-Rodríguez, Susana; Álvaro-Gracia, José María; Andreu, José Luis; Balsa, Alejandro; Cáliz, Rafael; Fernández-Nebro, Antonio; Ferraz-Amaro, Iván; Gómez-Reino, Juan Jesús; González-Álvaro, Isidoro; Martín-Mola, Emilio; Martínez-Taboada, Víctor Manuel; Ortiz, Ana M; Tornero, Jesús; Marsal, Sara; Moreno-Muelas, José Vicente

    2015-01-01

    To establish recommendations for the management of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) to serve as a reference for all health professionals involved in the care of these patients, and focusing on the role of available synthetic and biologic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs). Consensual recommendations were agreed on by a panel of 14 experts selected by the Spanish Society of Rheumatology (SER). The available scientific evidence was collected by updating three systematic reviews (SR) used for the EULAR 2013 recommendations. A new SR was added to answer an additional question. The literature review of the scientific evidence was made by the SER reviewer's group. The level of evidence and the degree of recommendation was classified according to the Oxford Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine system. A Delphi panel was used to evaluate the level of agreement between panellists (strength of recommendation). Thirteen recommendations for the management of adult RA were emitted. The therapeutic objective should be to treat patients in the early phases of the disease with the aim of achieving clinical remission, with methotrexate playing a central role in the therapeutic strategy of RA as the reference synthetic DMARD. Indications for biologic DMARDs were updated and the concept of the optimization of biologicals was introduced. We present the fifth update of the SER recommendations for the management of RA with synthetic and biologic DMARDs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  6. Paediatric rheumatology: clinical practice review. Physiotherapy and occupational therapy for juvenile chronic arthritis: custom and practice in five centres in the UK, USA and Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackett; Johnson; Parkin; Southwood

    1996-07-01

    Physiotherapy and occupational therapy are widely accepted as being of central importance for the treatment of juvenile chronic arthritis (JCA). However, these approaches have rarely been subject to critical scrutiny. The aims of this report are to highlight some of the inter-centre similarities and differences observed in the implementation of physical and occupational therapy for JCA, and to emphasize the need for scientifically controlled research in this area. During a series of visits to several paediatric rheumatology units in the UK, USA and Canada, three aspects of the service were noted: treatment philosophy, physical interventions used for the treatment of JCA and quality-of life and independence training activities. There was general consensus with the philosophy that early physical intervention was a vital part of the treatment plan for JCA, although all therapists were concerned that compliance with treatment modalities was poor. Differences between units in the approach to acute arthritis, the use of foot othoses and wrist splints, the treatment of joint contractures and the use of general quality-of-life training activities were noted. Although it was widely recognized that controlled research into the efficacy of physical intervention was needed, no centre had a co-ordinated plan for such investigations. Keywords: Juvenile chronic arthritis, Physiotherapy, Occupational therapy

  7. A review of the literature analyzing benefits and concerns of infliximab biosimilar CT-P13 for the treatment of rheumatologic diseases: focus on interchangeability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becciolini, Andrea; Raimondo, Maria Gabriella; Crotti, Chiara; Agape, Elena; Biggioggero, Martina; Favalli, Ennio Giulio

    2017-01-01

    The introduction of biological agents drastically changed the treatment paradigm of inflammatory arthritides, ameliorating the natural history of the diseases but concomitantly increasing the drug costs due to the manufacturing process. On this concern, biosimilar drugs may represent a valid option for reducing this elevated cost and increasing the availability of these highly effective treatments. Recently, CT-P13, the first biosimilar of infliximab, has been approved with the same indications established for the reference product (RP), and its daily use is progressively increasing. However, the experience with biosimilar drugs in the field of rheumatology is still limited, raising potential doubts and concerns on their correct management in real-life settings. Comparability analysis between CT-P13 and its RP was evaluated in equivalence randomized controlled trials (RCTs) - PLANETRA and PLANETAS - performed on patients with rheumatoid arthritis and axial spondylitis, respectively. CT-P13 and RP showed similar profile in terms of quality, biological activity, safety, immunogenicity, and efficacy. However, the interchangeability between infliximab RP and its biosimilar still represents the most challenging issue because of a lack of a long-lasting experience. To date, reassuring preliminary data on this topic were reported in open-label extensions of PLANETRA and PLANETAS RCTs and in ongoing real-life observational studies. These findings, taken all together, significantly affect the landscape of biosimilar regulatory pathways and strongly support CT-P13 introduction as a great opportunity for expanding the accessibility to these very effective and high-cost therapies.

  8. Criteria for Evaluating Oral History Interviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonsino, Frank J.

    1980-01-01

    Discusses the rationale for establishing criteria for evaluating oral history interviews. Presents seven evaluation categories relating to oral history tapes and three categories relating to typescripts. (CK)

  9. Criteria for operator review of workplace changes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davey, E.

    2000-01-01

    A set of criteria for reviewing workplace changes has been developed for use by plant Operations staff. The criteria were developed to provide Operations staff with a practical framework for structuring assessments and subsequent review comments with regard to control room modifications and innovations that impact their work environment. The criteria were assembled from design, operations and human factors engineering principles, and system review experiences with plant Operations staff over the past ten years. Operations staff at several CANDU stations helped shape the emphasis for initial criteria definition and have assisted with criteria refinement through trial applications. Use of the criteria is expected to lead to more effective and task relevant equipment evaluations by Operations staff, and ultimately lead to system modifications and innovations that better serve plant operation needs. The paper begins with a discussion of the rationale for criteria development and the attributes of 'good' design. The balance of the paper outlines the project objectives, describes the approach applied in assembling, structuring, and refining the review criteria, and illustrates the application of the criteria in the review of a proposed control room innovation. (author)

  10. NWTS program criteria for mined geologic disposal of nuclear wasite: site performance criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-02-01

    This report states ten criteria governing the suitability of sites for mined geologic disposal of high-level radioactive waste. The Department of Energy will use these criteria in its search for sites and will reevaluate their use when the Nuclear Regulatory Commission issues radioactive waste repository rules. These criteria encompass site geometry, geohydrology, geochemistry, geologic characteristics, tectonic environment, human intrusion, surface characteristics, environment, and potential socioeconomic impacts. The contents of this document include background discussion, site performance criteria, and appendices. The background section describes the waste disposal system, the application of the site criteria, and applicable criteria from NWTS-33(1) - Program Objectives, Functional Requirements and System Performance Criteria. Appendix A, entitled Comparison with Other Siting Criteria compares the NWTS criteria with those recommended by other agencies. Appendix B contains DOE responses to public comments received on the January 1980 draft of this document. Appendix C is a glossary

  11. 16 CFR 1031.15 - Communication criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... nature and a report of each oral communication of a substantive nature between a Commission official or... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Communication criteria. 1031.15 Section 1031... Communication criteria. (a) Commission officials and employees, who are not in the positions listed in § 1031.12...

  12. Who and Racist criteria on CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Servente, L.

    2012-01-01

    This presentation is about Who and Recist criteria on CT.These are rules to the evaluation of the solid tumors treatment response as well as different concepts of measurability criteria of blastic changes, target /non target lesions, adenopathies, lytic, cystic , non-measurable disease and progressive lesions

  13. [Primary childhood vasculitis new classification criteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herlin, T.; Nielsen, Susan

    2008-01-01

    Primary vasculitis is seen in both adults and children, but some of the diseases like Kawasaki disease occur primarily in children. The Chapel Hill Classification Criteria for primary vasculitis refers to the size of vessels but has not been validated in children. Recently, new criteria...

  14. 2012 provisional classification criteria for polymyalgia rheumatica

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dasgupta, Bhaskar; Cimmino, Marco A; Maradit-Kremers, Hilal

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to develop EULAR/ACR classification criteria for polymyalgia rheumatica (PMR). Candidate criteria were evaluated in a 6-month prospective cohort study of 125 patients with new onset PMR and 169 non-PMR comparison subjects with conditions mimicking PMR. A scoring al...

  15. [Criteria of scientific validity in research].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelletier, Céline; Pagé, Ginette

    2002-03-01

    The purpose of this article is to present the evaluative criteria of qualitative and quantitative research. Philosophical foundations of positivism, postpositivism and constructivism are explored. Triangulation and crystallization expose the controversies about them. Finally, Lincoln and Guba criteria are retained for the evaluation of qualitative and quantitative research.

  16. CT diagnostic criteria of branchial cysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jend, H.H.; Jend-Rossmann, I.; Techentin, E.C.

    1984-01-01

    Although well known, the morphology of branchial cysts has not been sufficiently presented in CT literature. In the present case report, diagnostic criteria are given, such as typical site of occurrence, ductal extension towards the supratonsillar fossa, and cystic, but occasionally soft tissue density. Differential diagnosis is given for cases which cannot be classified according to these criteria. (orig.) [de

  17. CT diagnostic criteria of branchial cysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jend, H.H.; Jend-Rossmann, I.; Techentin, E.C.

    1984-09-01

    Although well known, the morphology of branchial cysts has not been sufficiently presented in CT literature. In the present case report, diagnostic criteria are given, such as typical site of occurrence, ductal extension towards the supratonsillar fossa, and cystic, but occasionally soft tissue density. Differential diagnosis is given for cases which cannot be classified according to these criteria.

  18. Hybrid multiple criteria decision-making methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zavadskas, Edmundas Kazimieras; Govindan, K.; Antucheviciene, Jurgita

    2016-01-01

    Formal decision-making methods can be used to help improve the overall sustainability of industries and organisations. Recently, there has been a great proliferation of works aggregating sustainability criteria by using diverse multiple criteria decision-making (MCDM) techniques. A number of revi...

  19. Proposed diagnostic criteria for internet addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Ran; Huang, Xiuqin; Wang, Jinan; Zhang, Huimin; Zhang, Ying; Li, Mengchen

    2010-03-01

    The objective of this study was to develop diagnostic criteria for internet addiction disorder (IAD) and to evaluate the validity of our proposed diagnostic criteria for discriminating non-dependent from dependent internet use in the general population. This study was conducted in three stages: the developmental stage (110 subjects in the survey group; 408 subjects in the training group), where items of the proposed diagnostic criteria were developed and tested; the validation stage (n = 405), where the proposed criteria were evaluated for criterion-related validity; and the clinical stage (n = 150), where the criteria and the global clinical impression of IAD were evaluated by more than one psychiatrist to determine inter-rater reliability. The proposed internet addiction diagnostic criteria consisted of symptom criterion (seven clinical symptoms of IAD), clinically significant impairment criterion (functional and psychosocial impairments), course criterion (duration of addiction lasting at least 3 months, with at least 6 hours of non-essential internet usage per day) and exclusion criterion (exclusion of dependency attributed to psychotic disorders). A diagnostic score of 2 + 1, where the first two symptoms (preoccupation and withdrawal symptoms) and at least one of the five other symptoms (tolerance, lack of control, continued excessive use despite knowledge of negative effects/affects, loss of interests excluding internet, and use of the internet to escape or relieve a dysphoric mood) was established. Inter-rater reliability was 98%. Our findings suggest that the proposed diagnostic criteria may be useful for the standardization of diagnostic criteria for IAD.

  20. Education Criteria for Performance Excellence, 2002.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Inst. of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD.

    The education criteria presented in this guide are designed to help organizations use an integrated approach to organizational performance management that results in delivery of ever-improving value to students and stakeholders. Implementation of the criteria will contribute to improvement of education quality, improvement of overall…

  1. 42 CFR 456.5 - Evaluation criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ...) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS UTILIZATION CONTROL General Provisions § 456.5 Evaluation criteria. The agency must establish and use written criteria for evaluating the appropriateness and quality of Medicaid services. This section does not apply to services in hospitals and mental hospitals. For these facilities...

  2. Multiple criteria facility location probems : a survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Farahani, R.Z.; Steadie Seifi, M.; Asgari, N.

    2010-01-01

    This paper provides a review on recent efforts and development in multi-criteria location problems in three categories including bi-objective, multi-objective and multi-attribute problems and their solution methods. Also, it provides an overview on various criteria used. While there are a few

  3. Aspirational Model Teaching Criteria for Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richmond, Aaron S.; Boysen, Guy A.; Gurung, Regan A. R.; Tazeau, Yvette N.; Meyers, Steven A.; Sciutto, Mark J.

    2014-01-01

    In 2011, the Society for the Teaching of Psychology commissioned a presidential task force to document teaching criteria for model psychology teachers in undergraduate education. The resulting list of criteria reflects activities related to face-to-face course interaction and online teaching, training, and education; course design; implementation…

  4. Diagnostic criteria for DCD : Past and future

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits-Engelsman, Bouwien; Schoemaker, Marina; Delabastita, Tijs; Hoskens, Jasmine; Geuze, Reint

    The aim of this review was to gather information on how well authors comply to DSM criteria in their description and selection of children with DCD. We investigated which selection criteria were used in experimental and intervention studies published in the last 5 years (2010-2014). Results on 176

  5. 29 CFR 1904.4 - Recording criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... criteria. (Needlestick and sharps injury cases, tuberculosis cases, hearing loss cases, medical removal... Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR RECORDING AND REPORTING OCCUPATIONAL INJURIES AND ILLNESSES Recordkeeping Forms and Recording Criteria § 1904.4...

  6. Models and criteria for waste repository performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, C.F.; Cohen, J.J.

    1981-03-01

    A primary objective of the Waste Management Program is to assure that public health is protected. Predictive modeling, to some extent, will play a role in assuring that this objective is met. This paper considers the requirements and limitations of predictive modeling in providing useful inputs to waste management decision making. Criteria development needs and the relation between criteria and models are also discussed

  7. Learners' Epistemic Criteria for Good Scientific Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pluta, William J.; Chinn, Clark A.; Duncan, Ravit Golan

    2011-01-01

    Epistemic criteria are the standards used to evaluate scientific products (e.g., models, evidence, arguments). In this study, we analyzed epistemic criteria for good models generated by 324 middle-school students. After evaluating a range of scientific models, but before extensive instruction or experience with model-based reasoning practices,…

  8. Quality criteria for cardiac images: An update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernardi, G.; Bar, O.; Jezewski, T.; Vano, E.; Maccia, C.; Trianni, A.; Padovani, R.

    2008-01-01

    The DIMOND II and III Cardiology Groups have agreed on quality criteria for cardiac images and developed a scoring system, to provide a tool to test quality of coronary angiograms, which was demonstrated to be of value in clinical practice. In the last years, digital flat panel technology has been introduced in cardiac angiographic systems and the radiological technique may have been influenced by the better performance of these new detectors. This advance in digital imaging, together with the lesson learned from previous studies, warranted the revision of the quality criteria for cardiac angiographic images as formerly defined. DIMOND criteria were reassessed to allow a simpler evaluation of angiograms. Clinical criteria were simplified and separated from technical criteria. Furthermore, the characteristics of an optimised angiographic technique have been outlined. (authors)

  9. An objective approach to determining criteria weights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milić R. Milićević

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an objective approach to determining criteria weights that can be successfully used in multiple criteria models. The methods of entropy, CRITIC and FANMA are presented in this paper as well as a possible combination of the methods of objective and subjective approaches. Although based on different theoretical settings, and therefore with different algorithms of realization, all methods have a decision matrix as a starting point. An objective approach to determining the weight of criteria eliminates the negative impacts of a decision maker on criteria weights as well as on the final solution of multicriteria problems. The main aim of this paper is to systematize description procedures as a kind of help when encountering a problem of determining the criteria weights for solving multicriteria tasks. A possibility of the method application is shown in a numerical example.

  10. Validity and reliability problems with patient global as a component of the ACR/EULAR remission criteria as used in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masri, Karim R; Shaver, Timothy S; Shahouri, Shadi H; Wang, Shirley; Anderson, James D; Busch, Ruth E; Michaud, Kaleb; Mikuls, Ted R; Caplan, Liron; Wolfe, Frederick

    2012-06-01

    To investigate what factors influence patient global health assessment (PtGlobal), and how those factors and the reliability of PtGlobal affect the rate, reliability, and validity of recently published American College of Rheumatology/European League Against Rheumatism (ACR/EULAR) rheumatoid arthritis (RA) remission criteria when used in clinical practice. We examined consecutive patients with RA in clinical practice and identified 77 who met ACR/EULAR joint criteria for remission (≤ 1 swollen joint and ≤ 1 tender joint). We evaluated factors associated with a PtGlobal > 1, because a PtGlobal ≤ 1 defined ACR/EULAR remission in this group of patients who had already met ACR/EULAR joint criteria. Of the 77 patients examined, only 17 (22.1%) had PtGlobal ≤ 1 and thus fully satisfied ACR/EULAR criteria. A large proportion of patients not in remission by ACR/EULAR criteria had high PtGlobal related to noninflammatory issues, including low back pain, fatigue, and functional limitations, and a number of patients clustered in the range of PtGlobal > 1 and ≤ 2. However, the minimal detectable difference for PtGlobal was 2.3. In addition, compared with a PtGlobal severity score, a PtGlobal activity score was 3.3% less likely to be abnormal (> 1). Noninflammatory factors contribute to the level of PtGlobal and result in the exclusion of many patients who would otherwise be in "true" remission according to the ACR/EULAR definition. Reliability problems associated with PtGlobal can also result in misclassification, and may explain the observation of low longterm remission rates in RA. As currently constituted, the use of the ACR/EULAR remission criteria in clinical practice appears to be problematic.

  11. Criteria voor het beoordelen van tentamenuitwerkingen in het vak Programmeren [Assessment Criteria in Computer Programming Courses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, Klaas; van Diepen, N.M.; van Dijk, H.W.; Koppelman, Hermannus; Moerkerke, G.; Roossink, H.J.

    Bij het beoordelen is het belangrijk te weten welke criteria gehanteerd moeten worden. Met behulp van een vragenlijstonderzoek onder de docenten is een beperkt aantal criteria geselecteerd die gehanteerd moeten worden bij de cursus Inleiding in het Programmeren.

  12. Termo de consentimento livre e esclarecido na prática reumatológica Informed consent in rheumatology care practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Marques Filho

    2011-04-01

    represents patients' autonomy or self-determination regarding their relationship with their physicians, took a while to be included in medical care practice and medical deontology codes. The convenience of using the informed consent in medical practice is widely discussed today, especially in rheumatology. Our opinion is that the obligation of a signed informed consent provided by the patient for every medical procedure is neither reasonable nor practical. It should be used for more invasive or risky therapeutic procedures. We understand that the informed consent does not guarantee that the patient has been fully informed, which is an essential condition for the current rheumatological practice. Its adoption in routine medical care practice would make medical intervention bureaucratic, and, thus, quite different from the Hippocratic view, which considered the trustful physician-patient relationship fundamental for an adequate medical care practice.

  13. Redefining design criteria for Pu-238 gloveboxes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acosta, S.V.

    1998-01-01

    Enclosures for confinement of special nuclear materials (SNM) have evolved into the design of gloveboxes. During the early stages of glovebox technology, established practices and process operation requirements defined design criteria. Proven boxes that performed and met or exceeded process requirements in one group or area, often could not be duplicated in other areas or processes, and till achieve the same success. Changes in materials, fabrication and installation methods often only met immediate design criteria. Standardization of design criteria took a big step during creation of ''Special-Nuclear Materials R and D Laboratory Project, Glovebox standards''. The standards defined design criteria for every type of process equipment in its most general form. Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) then and now has had great success with Pu-238 processing. However with ever changing Environment Safety and Health (ES and H) requirements and Ta-55 Facility Configuration Management, current design criteria are forced to explore alternative methods of glovebox design fabrication and installation. Pu-238 fuel processing operations in the Power Source Technologies Group have pushed the limitations of current design criteria. More than half of Pu-238 gloveboxes are being retrofitted or replaced to perform the specific fuel process operations. Pu-238 glovebox design criteria are headed toward process designed single use glovebox and supporting line gloveboxes. Gloveboxes that will house equipment and processes will support TA-55 Pu-238 fuel processing needs into the next century and extend glovebox expected design life

  14. Dynamic criteria for partitioning and transmutation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, A.H.

    1991-11-01

    This paper addresses dynamic criteria intended to optimize partitioning and transmutation (P-T) concept development supporting improved nuclear waste management. Six criteria are proposed initially and the rationale for each is briefly explained. Each criterion is used as a measure (or dimension) on which the developed concepts can be evaluated. The criteria allow the P-T concepts to be evaluated in an integral system including long-term energy needs, fuel cycle, and waste management. New criteria will be identified along with the P-T concept development, and each criterion will be realistically weighted so that it is comparable in an overall criteria evaluation. The weights are subject to change as a result of technical advancements and public perception on various issues. Incomplete criteria will result in a poor choice because important factors may not be considered when the decision is made. A successful decision on the optimal P-T system depends on the completeness of criteria (dimensions) as well as realistic weights assigned to each criterion

  15. Identification of patients at risk of non-adherence to oral antirheumatic drugs in rheumatoid arthritis using the Compliance Questionnaire in Rheumatology: an ARCO sub-study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marras, Carlos; Monteagudo, Indalecio; Salvador, Georgina; de Toro, Francisco J; Escudero, Alejandro; Alegre-Sancho, Juan J; Raya, Enrique; Ortiz, Ana; Carmona, Loreto; Mestre, Yvonne; Cea-Calvo, Luis; Calvo-Alén, Jaime

    2017-07-01

    The ARCO study (Study on Adherence of Rheumatoid Arthritis patients to SubCutaneous and Oral Drugs), a multicenter, non-interventional retrospective study, was primarily designed to assess the percentage of patients [aged ≥18 years with an established rheumatoid arthritis (RA) diagnosis] with non-adherence to prescribed subcutaneous biologicals. This paper reports data for the secondary objective from a subset of patients, namely to evaluate non-adherence to prescribed oral antirheumatic drugs in RA patients in Spain using the validated Compliance Questionnaire Rheumatology (CQR). Patients also completed the Morisky-Green Medication Adherence Questionnaire, Beliefs about Medicines Questionnaire, and a questionnaire (developed and validated in Spain) on patient satisfaction with RA treatment and preferences. A total of 271 patients (76.7% females; mean age 55.6 years) were being treated with oral drugs for RA, of which 234 completed the CQR questionnaire. Non-adherence was reported in 49/234 (20.9%) patients. The proportion of non-adherence in younger patients (aged ≤48 years; 37.5%) was double that recorded in patients aged >48 years (p = 0.006). Patients with a perception of lower efficacy also had a higher risk of non-adherence (p = 0.012). Multivariable analysis showed that younger age and male gender were independently associated with risk of non-adherence. There was only slight agreement between the CQR and Morisky-Green assessment tools (kappa coefficient = 0.186), possibly reflecting the fact that both questionnaires measure slightly different aspects of medication adherence. In conclusion, one out of five RA patients was identified as at risk for non-adherence with the CQR, and this was more frequent in younger patients and in males.

  16. Treatment adherence and disease burden of individuals with rheumatic diseases admitted as outpatients to a large rheumatology center in Shanghai, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Le; Lu, Guo Hong; Ye, Shuang; Wu, Bin; Shen, Yi; Li, Ting

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine treatment adherence and disease burden, analyze detailed medication problems experienced by patients, and identify factors associated with adherence in patients with rheumatic diseases in China. Patients with confirmed diagnoses of ankylosing spondylitis (AS), rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) were recruited, regardless of demographics, disease severity, and treatment characteristics. Adherence was assessed using the Compliance Questionnaire for Rheumatology and interview-based self-reports. A backwards-stepwise multivariate regression analysis was used to identify factors associated with adherence. We collected data on 252 patients who had a rheumatic disease and visited our outpatient clinic in January or February of 2017. There were 121 patients with SLE, 70 with RA, and 61 with AS. The overall adherence rate was 41.7%, with 48.7% for SLE patients, 38.6% for RA patients, and 31.1% for AS patients. The overall EuroQol (EQ)-index was 0.761; AS patients had the best EQ-index (0.792), followed by those with SLE (0.780) and RA (0.700). SLE patients also had greater annual direct costs (US$5,103.58) than RA or AS patients. Overall, 41.7% of our rheumatic disease patients were adherent to treatment, lower than in many other parts of the world. This indicates that it is important to identify methods that improve adherence in this population. It is particularly important to improve the health status and reduce the disease burden of patients with SLE, the most common of the three rheumatic diseases we analyzed. Our results suggest that reminder tools may improve adherence. Further prospective research is needed to confirm whether reminder tools and other measures can improve patient compliance.

  17. Sleep and physical activity: a survey of people with inflammatory arthritis and their engagement by health professionals in rheumatology in Ireland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenna, Sean; Donnelly, Alan; Fraser, Alexander; Kennedy, Norelee

    2017-06-02

    Sleep is important in maintaining the body's circadian rhythm and in maintaining health. Aim was to investigate sleep and physical activity among people who have inflammatory arthritis and their engagement with Health Professionals. Members from a national charitable organisation for patients with arthritis and a national rheumatology health professionals society were invited to participate in separate cross-sectional surveys hosted on SurveyMonkey (R)TM . Ninety people responded and report an average of 5.7 (SD 1.46) hours sleep per night. A majority (61%) report their sleep quality as bad, with 31% taking medications at least once a week to help sleep. There was a statistically significant association between longer years with symptoms, taking medication at least once a week and limited in their activities, when rating their sleep quality as bad. Twenty eight (65%) health professional's responded with 53% discussing sleep with their patients. People with inflammatory arthritis report low sleep with those having symptoms longer, taking medications regularly and having limitations with their activities, reporting poorer sleep quality. Only half of health professionals discuss sleep. More research is needed in investigating poor sleep quality, disturbances, and physical activity in order to promote health and well-being in this population. Implications for Rehabilitation People with inflammatory arthritis fall far below the National Sleep Foundations' "sleep needs spectrum", which is concerning as those who have reduced levels of sleep have been associated with decreased quality of life and physical function. Due to the importance of receiving sufficient sleep, there is a need to develop education and training for health professionals in the importance of engaging their patients in their sleep quality and disturbances. The effects of physical activity interventions on poor sleep need to be examined to show if it is a positive non-pharmacological treatment approach

  18. The new Childhood Arthritis and Rheumatology Research Alliance (CARRA) registry: design, rationale, and characteristics of patients enrolled in the first 12 months.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beukelman, Timothy; Kimura, Yukiko; Ilowite, Norman T; Mieszkalski, Kelly; Natter, Marc D; Burrell, Grendel; Best, Brian; Jones, Jason; Schanberg, Laura E

    2017-04-17

    Herein we describe the history, design, and rationale of the new Childhood Arthritis and Rheumatology Research Alliance (CARRA) Registry and present the characteristics of patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) enrolled in the first 12 months of operation. The CARRA Registry began prospectively collecting data in the United States and Canada in July 2015 to evaluate the safety of therapeutic agents in persons with childhood-onset rheumatic disease, initially restricted to JIA. Secondary objectives include the evaluation of disease outcomes and their associations with medication use and other factors. Data are collected every 6 months and include clinical assessments, detailed medication use, patient-reported outcomes, and safety events. Follow-up is planned for at least 10 years for each participant and is facilitated by a telephone call center. As of July 2016, 1192 patients with JIA were enrolled in the CARRA Registry at 49 clinical sites. At enrollment, their median age was 12.4 years old and median disease duration was 2.6 years. Owing to preferential enrollment, patients with systemic JIA (13%) and with a polyarticular course (75%) were over-represented compared to patients in typical clinical practice. Approximately 49% were currently using biologic agents and ever use of oral glucocorticoids was common (47%). The CARRA Registry provides safety surveillance data to pharmaceutical companies to satisfy their regulatory requirements, and several independently-funded sub-studies that use the Registry infrastructure are underway. The new CARRA Registry successfully enrolled nearly 1200 participants with JIA in the first 12 months of its operation. Sustainable funding has been secured from multiple sources. The CARRA Registry may serve as a model for the study of other uncommon diseases.

  19. Simplified Stability Criteria for Delayed Neutral Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinghua Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available For a class of linear time-invariant neutral systems with neutral and discrete constant delays, several existing asymptotic stability criteria in the form of linear matrix inequalities (LMIs are simplified by using matrix analysis techniques. Compared with the original stability criteria, the simplified ones include fewer LMI variables, which can obviously reduce computational complexity. Simultaneously, it is theoretically shown that the simplified stability criteria and original ones are equivalent; that is, they have the same conservativeness. Finally, a numerical example is employed to verify the theoretic results investigated in this paper.

  20. Modern dimensioning criteria for pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roche, Roland.

    1975-01-01

    Some ideas on modern dimensioning criteria are given and their advantages with regard to both safety and economy are shown. In general these criteria result from considerations on possible damage to the apparatus in service and the modes of breakdown liable to follow. They are general enough to allow for a variety of dimensioning methods both experimental and theoretical, with special reference to modern computerized digital analysis techniques. As a practical example however some notions are given on the simplest means of computing dimensions in accordance with these criteria [fr

  1. Validation of proposed diagnostic criteria (the "Budapest Criteria") for Complex Regional Pain Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harden, R Norman; Bruehl, Stephen; Perez, Roberto S G M; Birklein, Frank; Marinus, Johan; Maihofner, Christian; Lubenow, Timothy; Buvanendran, Asokumar; Mackey, Sean; Graciosa, Joseph; Mogilevski, Mila; Ramsden, Christopher; Chont, Melissa; Vatine, Jean-Jacques

    2010-08-01

    Current IASP diagnostic criteria for CRPS have low specificity, potentially leading to overdiagnosis. This validation study compared current IASP diagnostic criteria for CRPS to proposed new diagnostic criteria (the "Budapest Criteria") regarding diagnostic accuracy. Structured evaluations of CRPS-related signs and symptoms were conducted in 113 CRPS-I and 47 non-CRPS neuropathic pain patients. Discriminating between diagnostic groups based on presence of signs or symptoms meeting IASP criteria showed high diagnostic sensitivity (1.00), but poor specificity (0.41), replicating prior work. In comparison, the Budapest clinical criteria retained the exceptional sensitivity of the IASP criteria (0.99), but greatly improved upon the specificity (0.68). As designed, the Budapest research criteria resulted in the highest specificity (0.79), again replicating prior work. Analyses indicated that inclusion of four distinct CRPS components in the Budapest Criteria contributed to enhanced specificity. Overall, results corroborate the validity of the Budapest Criteria and suggest they improve upon existing IASP diagnostic criteria for CRPS. Copyright (c) 2010 International Association for the Study of Pain. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Containment penetration design criteria and implementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perry, R.F.; Rigamonti, G.; Dainora, J.

    1975-01-01

    A rational design criteria is presented which serves as a basis for the design and analysis of containment piping penetrations. The criteria includes the effect of temperature as well as mechanical loads for the full range of plant conditions. With this criteria various penetration flued head designs have been compared and optimization achieved. Sleeve wall dimensions and containment loads have been determined without reference to piping configuration. An interaction theory which allows the implementation of the criteria for the determination of design loads and minimum sleeve wall thickness. The interaction theory developed applies to elastic-perfectly plastic cylinders (pipes and sleeves) and accounts for the simultaneous load resultants of transverse shear force, bending moment, torsional moment, and axial force in addition to internal pipe pressure. Application of the theory developed to the determination of sleeve thickness and containment design loads is presented in detail. (Auth.)

  3. Infill sampling criteria to locate extremes

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Watson, AG

    1995-07-01

    Full Text Available Three problem-dependent meanings for engineering ''extremes'' are motivated, established, and translated into formal geostatistical (model-based) criteria for designing infill sample networks. (I) Locate an area within the domain of interest where a...

  4. Safety criteria of uranium enrichment plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nardocci, A.C.; Oliveira Neto, J.M. de

    1994-01-01

    The applicability of nuclear reactor safety criteria applied to uranium enrichment plants is discussed, and a new criterion based on the soluble uranium compounds and hexafluoride chemical toxicities is presented. (L.C.J.A.). 21 refs, 4 tabs

  5. SEISMIC DESIGN CRITERIA FOR NUCLEAR POWER REACTORS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williamson, R. A.

    1963-10-15

    The nature of nuclear power reactors demands an exceptionally high degree of seismic integrity. Considerations involved in defining earthquake resistance requirements are discussed. Examples of seismic design criteria and applications of the spectrum technique are described. (auth)

  6. 45 CFR 1801.21 - Evaluation criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... HARRY S. TRUMAN SCHOLARSHIP PROGRAM The Competition § 1801.21 Evaluation criteria. (a) The Foundation...: (1) Extent and quality of community service and government involvement; (2) Leadership record; (3...

  7. Ebook Evaluation Criteria: A Proposed Checklist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Ghaebi

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available E-books embody diverse features, each of which could contribute towards increasing their user-agreeability and attracting more users. In order to select an Ebook best suited to their needs, both users and librarians consider a set of criteria. The present study aims at providing the evaluation criteria from the standpoint of both the users and librarys by employing two approaches, i.e. through considering the characteristics of the electronic environment, and also maintaining the desired features of the printed media in E-books. By reviewing the resources published in the field of E-books, 15 criteria along with 101 components have been collectively discussed for evaluation of the suitable E-book for users and libraries. Four criteria with 24 components have been solely devised for libraries and librarians.

  8. ACR Appropriateness Criteria on Resectable Rectal Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suh, W. Warren; Blackstock, A. William; Herman, Joseph; Konski, Andre A.; Mohiuddin, Mohammed; Poggi, Matthew M.; Regine, William F.; Cosman, Bard C.; Saltz, Leonard; Johnstone, Peter A.S.

    2008-01-01

    The American College of Radiology (ACR) Appropriateness Criteria on Resectable Rectal Cancer was updated by the Expert Panel on Radiation Oncology-Rectal/Anal Cancer, based on a literature review completed in 2007

  9. Retinopathy of prematurity screening criteria and workload ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Larger infants require screening to include a few outliers, but they ... Making local screening criteria narrower on the basis of a limited evidence base may be dangerous. Risk factors for CSROP in larger infants need to be researched.

  10. Retinopathy of prematurity screening criteria and workload ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Larger infants require screening to include a few outliers, but they require ... Making local screening criteria narrower on the basis of a limited evidence base may be dangerous. Risk factors for CSROP in larger infants need to be researched.

  11. Sgarbossa criteria and acute myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alang, Neha; Bathina, Jaya; Kranis, Mark; Angelis, Dimitrios

    2010-01-01

    Diagnosis of acute ST-elevation myocardial infarction in the presence of left bundle branch block is difficult. present a case of acute myocardial infarction with LBBB diagnosed and treated using the Sgarbossa criteria.

  12. 16 CFR 1031.12 - Membership criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION GENERAL COMMISSION PARTICIPATION AND COMMISSION EMPLOYEE INVOLVEMENT IN VOLUNTARY STANDARDS ACTIVITIES Employee Involvement § 1031.12 Membership criteria. (a) The Commissioners, their special assistants, and Commission officials and employees holding the...

  13. 16 CFR 1031.14 - Observation criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ....14 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION GENERAL COMMISSION PARTICIPATION AND COMMISSION EMPLOYEE INVOLVEMENT IN VOLUNTARY STANDARDS ACTIVITIES Employee Involvement § 1031.14 Observation criteria. A Commission official or employee may, on occasion, attend voluntary standards meetings for the...

  14. Design criteria monograph for pressurized metal cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    1972-01-01

    Organiation and presentation of data pertaining to design of solid propellant rocket engine cases are discussed. Design criteria are presented in form of monograph based on accumulated experience and knowledge. Improvements in reliability, cost effectiveness, and engine efficiency are stressed.

  15. Generalized Lawson Criteria for Inertial Confinement Fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tipton, Robert E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-08-27

    The Lawson Criterion was proposed by John D. Lawson in 1955 as a general measure of the conditions necessary for a magnetic fusion device to reach thermonuclear ignition. Over the years, similar ignition criteria have been proposed which would be suitable for Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) designs. This paper will compare and contrast several ICF ignition criteria based on Lawson’s original ideas. Both analytical and numerical results will be presented which will demonstrate that although the various criteria differ in some details, they are closely related and perform similarly as ignition criteria. A simple approximation will also be presented which allows the inference of each ignition parameter directly from the measured data taken on most shots fired at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) with a minimum reliance on computer simulations. Evidence will be presented which indicates that the experimentally inferred ignition parameters on the best NIF shots are very close to the ignition threshold.

  16. Three-Quarters of Persons in the US Population Reporting a Clinical Diagnosis of Fibromyalgia Do Not Satisfy Fibromyalgia Criteria: The 2012 National Health Interview Survey.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Walitt

    Full Text Available Although fibromyalgia criteria have been in effect for decades, little is known about how the fibromyalgia diagnosis is applied and understood by clinicians and patients. We used the National Health Interview Survey (NHIS to determine the prevalence of self-reported clinician diagnosed fibromyalgia and then compared demographics, symptoms, disability and medical utilization measures of persons with a clinical diagnosis of fibromyalgia that did not meet diagnostic criteria (false-positive or prior [F/P] fibromyalgia to persons with and without criteria-positive fibromyalgia.The National Health Interview Survey (NHIS collected information about both clinical diagnosis and symptoms of fibromyalgia that was appropriately weighted to represent 225,726,257 US adults. Surrogate NHIS diagnostic criteria for fibromyalgia were developed based on the level of polysymptomatic distress (PSD as characterized in the 2011 modified American College of Rheumatology criteria (ACR for fibromyalgia. Persons with F/P fibromyalgia were compared with persons who do not have fibromyalgia and those meeting surrogate NHIS fibromyalgia criteria.Of the 1.78% of persons reporting a clinical diagnosis, 73.5% did not meet NHIS fibromyalgia criteria. The prevalence of F/P fibromyalgia is 1.3%. F/P fibromyalgia is associated with a mild degree of polysymptomatic distress (NHIS PSD score 6.2 and characterized by frequent but not widespread pain and insomnia. Measures of work disability and medical utilization in F/P fibromyalgia were equal to that seen with NHIS criteria positive fibromyalgia and were 6-7x greater in F/P fibromyalgia than in non-fibromyalgia persons. F/P fibromyalgia was best predicted by being female (Odds Ratio [OR] 8.81, married (OR 3.27, and white (OR 1.96. In contrast, being a white, married woman was only modestly predictive of NHIS (criteria positive fibromyalgia (OR 2.1.The majority of clinically diagnosed fibromyalgia cases in the US do not reach levels

  17. Models and criteria for LLW disposal performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, C.F.; Cohen, J.J.

    1980-12-01

    A primary objective of the Low Level Waste (LLW) Management Program is to assure that public health is protected. Predictive modeling, to some extent, will play a role in meeting this objective. This paper considers the requirements and limitations of predictive modeling in providing useful inputs to waste mangement decision making. In addition, criteria development needs and the relation between criteria and models are discussed

  18. Application of trial risk acceptance criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, D.H.; Kastenberg, W.E.; Okrent, D.

    1982-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to investigate some of the implications inherent in the application of various proposed sets of risk acceptance criteria. A power-law model of risk aversion is utilized to estimate the equivalent number of individual deaths and is treated parametrically. The implications of ALARA requirements for cost-effective improvements are also illustrated. The risks assessed for various technological endeavors, as well as some estimated natural background risks, are compared to the trial criteria

  19. Strain limit criteria to predict failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flanders, H.E.

    1995-01-01

    In recent years extensive effort has been expended to qualify existing structures for conditions that are beyond the original design basis. Determination of the component failure load is useful for this type of evaluation. This paper presents criteria based upon strain limits to predict the load at failure. The failure modes addressed are excessive plastic deformations, localized plastic strains, and structural instability. The effects of analytical method sophistication, as built configurations, material properties degradation, and stress state are addressed by the criteria

  20. Extended BRS algebra and color confinement criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shintani, Meiun.

    1983-09-01

    We examine the color-confinement criteria proposed by Kugo and Ojima. With the use of the extended BRS symmetry and the Nakanishi's theorem, we look for the representations of the BRS algebra compatible with the first condition of their criteria (the K-O condition) and then ask whether or not they are physically acceptable. As a result, the quartet mechanism does not work, and the K-O condition is not regarded as a confinement condition. (author)

  1. TAPS safety evaluation criteria for reload fueling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahendra Nath; Veeraraghavan, N.

    1976-01-01

    To improve operating performance of Tarapur reactors, several proposals are under consideration such as core expansion, change-over to an improved fuel design with lower heat rating, extension of fuel cycle lengths etc., which have a bearing on overall plant operating characteristics and reactor safety. For evaluating safety implications of the various proposals, it is necessary to formulate safety evaluation criteria for reload fuelling. Salient features of these criteria are discussed. (author)

  2. Choice Criteria of Cosmetics among Chinese Consumers

    OpenAIRE

    LI, ZHU

    2014-01-01

    Becoming familiar with consumers’ choice criteria towards a certain kind of product can help marketers tailor more efficient market strategies. Cosmetics play a very important part in the lives of women. Plautus asserted, “A woman without paint is like food without salt”. In recent years, the Chinese cosmetic market has flourished. The aim of this dissertation is to understand the choice criteria of cosmetics in the context of the Chinese market. Country-of-origin, brand image and quality are...

  3. Models and criteria for LLW disposal performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, C.F.; Cohen, J.J.

    1980-01-01

    A primary objective of the Low Level Waste (LLW) Management Program is to assure that public health is protected. Predictive modeling, to some extent, will play a role in meeting this objective. This paper considers the requirements and limitations of predictive modeling in providing useful inputs to waste management decision making. In addition, criteria development needs and the relation between criteria and models are discussed

  4. Risk assessment of soil contamination criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, C.M.; Marter, W.L.; Montaque, D.F.; Holton, G.A.

    1987-06-01

    Criteria have been developed to select radioactive and nonradioactive contaminants at waste sites detailed analysis and risk assessment. These criteria were based on soil and water quality guidelines developed by various government agencies to determine if the criteria were appropriate. We performed a risk assessment of a hypothetical site which contained radioactive and nonradioactive contaminants at levels equal to the criteria values. Risks to the public from atmospheric, surface water, and groundwater exposure pathways were examined. Health risks to the public from atmospheric releases of radioactive and nonradioactive materials from a waste at soil criteria contamination levels are low. Health risks to the maximally exposed individual to chemical carcinogens are considerably below traditional EPA action levels. And health risks to the maximally exposed individual to atmospherically released radioactive contaminants is 1.88 x 10 -7 , more than a factor of 5 less than 10 -6 . Based on our atmospheric exposure pathways analysis and risk assessment, the applied soil criteria are appropriate for screening out unimportant risk contributors to human health from atmospheric exposure pathways. 13 refs., 3 figs., 7 tabs

  5. African Journal of Rheumatology: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Original research work, reviews, case reports and other relevant scientific work will be published in the journal on the understanding that the work submitted will not be under consideration in any other journal. This must be stated by the authors when submitting papers. All submitted papers will be acknowledged and are ...

  6. Frequency of vitamin D inadequacy among Saudi males visiting a Rheumatology Outpatient Clinic of a tertiary hospital in Al-Qassim region: Effect of vitamin D supplementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hala Lotfy Fayed

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Vitamin D inadequacy (deficiency and insufficiency has become an epidemic with the assumption that women in Arab countries are at a higher risk due to their clothing style of wearing dark colored suits or a veil. Aim of the work: To determine the frequency of vitamin D inadequacy among young adult and early middle-aged males in Al-Qassim region and to study the effect of vitamin D supplementation. Patients and methods: Sixty Saudi males visiting Rheumatology Outpatient Clinic of a tertiary hospital in Al-Qassim region were enrolled and evaluated for musculoskeletal state including assessment of chronic diffuse musculoskeletal pains using Numeric Rating Pain Scale (NRPS and functional evaluation of lower limb proximal muscle power using chair–rise performance test. Serum 25(OHD was evaluated. Vitamin D supplementation was provided for symptomatic subjects. Follow-up clinical evaluation as well as serum 25(OHD measurement after 12 weeks vitamin D3 supplementation was performed. Results: The mean age of the patients was 43.2 ± 6.4 years. 54 (90% had vitamin D inadequacy; 42 (70% deficiency and 12 (20% had insufficiency. Significant increase in baseline serum 25(OHD (13.92 ± 5.67 ng/ml after 12 weeks of supplementation (35.94 ± 4.11 ng/ml with significant decrease in NPRS (7.42 ± 2.12 vs 2.06 ± 2.04 (p < 0.001, as well as significant improvement of functional status scores of chair–rise performance test (93.95 ± 23.56 vs 203.1 ± 58.6 (p < 0.001. Conclusion: Vitamin D inadequacy is a major health problem not only in elderly people or women with in-door residency and dark-colored clothes, but also in Saudi male young adults in Al-Qassim region.

  7. Are joint and soft tissue injections painful? Results of a national French cross-sectional study of procedural pain in rheumatological practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poncet Coralie

    2010-01-01

    -articular injections, synovial fluid aspirations and spine injections suffer from procedural pain. Most patients experience usually mild procedural pain and procedural pain management is uncommonly provided by physicians. Specific research and guidelines for the management of procedural pain related to rheumatologic care should be established to improve the quality of care provided by physicians.

  8. Usability and Workflow Evaluation of "RhEumAtic Disease activitY" (READY). A Mobile Application for Rheumatology Patients and Providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yen, Po-Yin; Lara, Barbara; Lopetegui, Marcelo; Bharat, Aseem; Ardoin, Stacy; Johnson, Bernadette; Mathur, Puneet; Embi, Peter J; Curtis, Jeffrey R

    2016-11-02

    RhEumAtic Disease activitY (READY) is a mobile health (mHealth) application that aims to create a shared platform integrating data from both patients and physicians, with a particular emphasis on arthritis disease activity. We made READY available on an iPad and pilot implemented it at a rheumatology outpatient clinic. We conducted 1) a usability evaluation study to explore patients' and physicians' interactions with READY, and 2) a time motion study (TMS) to observe the clinical workflow before and after the implementation. A total of 33 patients and 15 physicians participated in the usability evaluation. We found usability problems in navigation, data entry, pain assessment, documentation, and instructions along with error messages. Despite these issues, 25 (75,76%) patients reported they liked READY. Physicians provided mixed feedback because they were concerned about the impact of READY on clinical workflow. Six physicians participated in the TMS. We observed 47 patient visits (44.72 hours) in the pre-implementation phase, and 42 patient visits (37.82 hours) in the post-implementation phase. We found that patients spent more time on READY than paper (4.39mins vs. 2.26mins), but overall, READY did not delay the workflow (pre = 52.08 mins vs. post = 45.46 mins). This time difference may be compensated with READY eliminating a workflow step for the staff. Patients preferred READY to paper documents. Many found it easier to input information because of the larger font size and the ease of 'tapping' rather than writing-out or circling answers. Even though patients spent more time on READY than using paper documents, the longer usage of READY was mainly due to when troubleshooting was needed. Most patients did not have problems after receiving initial support from the staff. This study not only enabled improvements to the software but also serves as good reference for other researchers or institutional decision makers who are interested in implementing such a

  9. Disease course and long-term outcome of juvenile localized scleroderma: Experience from a single pediatric rheumatology Centre and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martini, Giorgia; Fadanelli, Gloria; Agazzi, Anna; Vittadello, Fabio; Meneghel, Alessandra; Zulian, Francesco

    2018-05-03

    Juvenile Localized Scleroderma (JLS) is a rare disorder that may cause severe aesthetic sequelae and functional disability. To date, data on natural history and long-term outcome are discordant and difficult to compare due to the heterogeneity of clinical subtypes, treatments and methods to evaluate activity and outcome in previous studies. A retrospective and cross-sectional study including 133 patients followed between January 1991 and December 2016 was conducted at our Pediatric Rheumatology Centre. Disease course was drawn by retrospective analysis of patients' clinical features, treatment, disease course and outcome at the last evaluation. Disease activity and severity of tissue damage were assessed by using parameters derived from the Localized Scleroderma Cutaneous Assessment Tool (LoSCAT) and thermography. Most patients achieved complete remission, as only 12.5%, all with the linear subtype, had still active disease after over 10 years of follow-up. At least one disease relapse occurred in 22.2% of patients and first flare was observed 20 months after first treatment discontinuation. Mild tissue damage was observed in more than half of patients, in 25.4% was moderate and in 23.0% severe; 19.8% presented a functional limitation. The entity of skin and subcutaneous fat loss established at the early stages of the disease as 27.8% of patients with shorter disease duration had severe damage and the rates remained constant in patients with longer follow-up. The delay in start of systemic treatment was associated with longer disease activity and higher relapse rate. Patients with linear scleroderma (LS), pansclerotic morphea (PM) and mixed subtype (MS) presented more severe aesthetic and functional damage but did not differ from other subtypes as for rate of complete remission. JLS in some patients can be a very aggressive disease with persistent activity after >10 years and/or several disease relapses. As tissue damage establishes early in disease course a

  10. Photovoltaic system criteria documents. Volume 3: Environmental issues and evaluation criteria for photovoltaic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig, John C.; Billitti, Joseph W.; Tallon, John M.

    1979-01-01

    The environmental issues and evaluation criteria relating to the suitability of sites proposed for photovoltaic (PV) system deployment are identified. The important issues are defined, briefly discussed and then developed into evaluation criteria. System designers are provided with information on the environmental sensitivity of PV systems in realistic applications, background material which indicates the applicability of the siting issues identified, and evaluation criteria are defined to facilitate the selection of sites that maximize PV system operation.

  11. The Criteria for Determining the Business Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luminiţa TULEAŞCĂ

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The business failure represents a current problem in any economic and social context and, for this reason, the legislator has been concerned with the regulation of the criteria based on which to accurately determine the failure of a business man when the case. The liquidity test and the balance sheet test, or the insolvency and insolvability are the criteria for determining the business failure usually materialized by undergoing the bankruptcy procedure. The legislator’s option for one or another of these criteria represents a structural option depending on the legal culture of each state however, considering the economic causes and effects of the insolvability and insolvency, that tends to remove the unilateral, exclusivist options. This paper illustrates significant option differences between the criteria for determining the business failure in the member states of the European Union which is the most used criterion and, if these criteria can be equally used in the banking and insurance sector. Last but not least, the paper illustrates the meanings of insolvency and insolvability in different matters and different laws and the need to eliminate the reserve that the Romanian doctrine manifests towards the insolvability concept as a cause for bankruptcy.

  12. Rationales for the Lightning Launch Commit Criteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willett, John C. (Editor); Merceret, Francis J. (Editor); Krider, E. Philip; O'Brien, T. Paul; Dye, James E.; Walterscheid, Richard L.; Stolzenburg, Maribeth; Cummins, Kenneth; Christian, Hugh J.; Madura, John T.

    2016-01-01

    Since natural and triggered lightning are demonstrated hazards to launch vehicles, payloads, and spacecraft, NASA and the Department of Defense (DoD) follow the Lightning Launch Commit Criteria (LLCC) for launches from Federal Ranges. The LLCC were developed to prevent future instances of a rocket intercepting natural lightning or triggering a lightning flash during launch from a Federal Range. NASA and DoD utilize the Lightning Advisory Panel (LAP) to establish and develop robust rationale from which the criteria originate. The rationale document also contains appendices that provide additional scientific background, including detailed descriptions of the theory and observations behind the rationales. The LLCC in whole or part are used across the globe due to the rigor of the documented criteria and associated rationale. The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) adopted the LLCC in 2006 for commercial space transportation and the criteria were codified in the FAA's Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) for Safety of an Expendable Launch Vehicle (Appendix G to 14 CFR Part 417, (G417)) and renamed Lightning Flight Commit Criteria in G417.

  13. DOE Standard: Fire protection design criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-07-01

    The development of this Standard reflects the fact that national consensus standards and other design criteria do not comprehensively or, in some cases, adequately address fire protection issues at DOE facilities. This Standard provides supplemental fire protection guidance applicable to the design and construction of DOE facilities and site features (such as water distribution systems) that are also provided for fire protection. It is intended to be used in conjunction with the applicable building code, National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) Codes and Standards, and any other applicable DOE construction criteria. This Standard replaces certain mandatory fire protection requirements that were formerly in DOE 5480.7A, ''Fire Protection'', and DOE 6430.1A, ''General Design Criteria''. It also contains the fire protection guidelines from two (now canceled) draft standards: ''Glove Box Fire Protection'' and ''Filter Plenum Fire Protection''. (Note: This Standard does not supersede the requirements of DOE 5480.7A and DOE 6430.1A where these DOE Orders are currently applicable under existing contracts.) This Standard, along with the criteria delineated in Section 3, constitutes the basic criteria for satisfying DOE fire and life safety objectives for the design and construction or renovation of DOE facilities

  14. On melting criteria for complex plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klumov, Boris A

    2011-01-01

    The present paper considers melting criteria for a plasma crystal discovered in dust plasma in 1994. Separate discussions are devoted to three-dimensional (3D) and two-dimensional (2D) systems. In the 3D case, melting criteria are derived based on the properties of local order in a system of microparticles. The order parameters are constructed from the cumulative distributions of the microparticle probability distributions as functions of various rotational invariants. The melting criteria proposed are constructed using static information on microparticle positions: a few snapshots of the system that allow for the determination of particle coordinates are enough to determine the phase state of the system. It is shown that criteria obtained in this way describe well the melting and premelting of 3D complex plasmas. In 2D systems, a system of microparticles interacting via a screened Coulomb (i.e., Debye-Hueckel or Yukawa) potential is considered as an example, using molecular dynamics simulations. A number of new order parameters characterizing the melting of 2D complex plasmas are proposed. The order parameters and melting criteria proposed for 2D and 3D complex plasmas can be applied to other systems as well. (methodological notes)

  15. Clinical features of children with enthesitis-related juvenile idiopathic arthritis / juvenile spondyloarthritis followed in a French tertiary care pediatric rheumatology centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goirand, Maxime; Breton, Sylvain; Chevallier, Frédéric; Duong, Ngoc-Phoi; Uettwiller, Florence; Melki, Isabelle; Mouy, Richard; Wouters, Carine; Bader-Meunier, Brigitte; Job-Deslandre, Chantal; Quartier, Pierre

    2018-04-02

    Childhood-onset spondyloarthropathies usually start with enthesitis and peripheral arthritis. However, axial disease may develop afterward. Patients are most often classified, following revised (Edmonton 2011) ILAR criteria, as enthesitis-related arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, or unclassified juvenile idiopathic arthritis, particularly in cases of psoriasis in the patient or a first-degree relative. In adults, peripheral spondyloarthritis is classified by ASAS criteria. We retrospectively studied patients with childhood-onset spondyloarthropathies followed for more than one year in our referral centre. We did not exclude patients with a personal or familial history of psoriasis. We included 114 patients followed between January 2008 and December 2015 for a median of 2.5 years (IQR = 2.3). Sixty-nine per-cent of patients fulfilled the revised ILAR classification criteria for enthesitis-related arthritis, and 92% the ASAS criteria for peripheral spondyolarthritis (p <  0.001). Axial disease and sacroiliitis were rare at disease onset. However, they appeared during follow-up in 63% and 47% of cases respectively, after a median disease duration of 2.6 (IC 95% [2.2-4.4]) and 5.3 years (IC 95% [4.1-7.7]), respectively. Multivariable analysis showed that familial history of spondyloarthritis was associated with the presence of sacroiliitis and active disease at the latest follow-up (OR = 3.61 [1.5-8.7], p <  0.01 and 2.98 [1.2-7.3], p = 0.02, respectively). Axial involvement developed in most patients within five years. Revised Edmonton criteria were less sensitive than ASAS criteria to classify patients as having childhood-onset spondyloarthropathies. The main risk factor for both sacroiliitis and persistent active disease was a familial history of spondyloarthritis.

  16. Statistical criteria for characterizing irradiance time series.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stein, Joshua S.; Ellis, Abraham; Hansen, Clifford W.

    2010-10-01

    We propose and examine several statistical criteria for characterizing time series of solar irradiance. Time series of irradiance are used in analyses that seek to quantify the performance of photovoltaic (PV) power systems over time. Time series of irradiance are either measured or are simulated using models. Simulations of irradiance are often calibrated to or generated from statistics for observed irradiance and simulations are validated by comparing the simulation output to the observed irradiance. Criteria used in this comparison should derive from the context of the analyses in which the simulated irradiance is to be used. We examine three statistics that characterize time series and their use as criteria for comparing time series. We demonstrate these statistics using observed irradiance data recorded in August 2007 in Las Vegas, Nevada, and in June 2009 in Albuquerque, New Mexico.

  17. Plugging criteria for WWER SG tubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papp, L.; Wilam, M. [Vitkovice NPP Services (Switzerland); Herman, M. [Vuje, Trnava (Slovakia)

    1997-12-31

    At operated Czech and Slovak nuclear power plants the 80 % criteria for crack or other bulk defect depth is used for steam generator heat exchanging tubes plugging. This criteria was accepted as the recommendation of designer of WWER steam generators. Verification of this criteria was the objective of experimental program performed by Vitkovice, J.S.C., UJV Rez, J.S.C. and Vuje Trnava, J.S.C .. Within this program the following factors were studied: (1) Influence of secondary water chemistry on defects initiation and propagation, (2) Statistical evaluation of corrosion defects progression at operated SG, and (3) Determination of critical pressure for tube rupture as a function of eddy current indications. In this presentation items (2) and (3) are considered.

  18. Nonreactor nuclear facilities: standards and criteria guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brynda, W.J.; Junker, L.; Karol, R.C.; Lobner, P.R.; Goldman, L.A.

    1981-09-01

    This guide is a source document that identifies standards, codes, and guides that address the nuclear safety considerations pertinent to nuclear facilities as defined in DOE Order 5480.1, Chapter V, Safety of Nuclear Facilities. The guidance and criteria provided are directed toward areas of safety usually addressed in a Safety Analysis Report. The areas of safety include, but are not limited to, siting, principal design criteria and safety system design guidelines, radiation protection, accident analysis, and quality assurance. The guide is divided into two sections: general guidelines and appendices. Those guidelines that are broadly applicable to most nuclear facilities are presented in the general guidelines. These general guidelines may have limited applicability to subsurface facilities such as waste repositories. Guidelines specific to the various types or categories of nuclear facilities are presented in the appendices. These facility-specific appendices provide guidelines and identify standards and criteria that should be considered in addition to, or in lieu of, the general guidelines

  19. Nonreactor nuclear facilities: Standards and criteria guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brynda, W.J.; Scarlett, C.H.; Tanguay, G.E.; Lobner, P.R.

    1986-09-01

    This guide is a source document that identifies standards, codes, and guides that address the nuclear safety considerations pertinent to nuclear facilities as defined in DOE 5480.1A, Chapter V, ''Safety of Nuclear Facilities.'' The guidance and criteria provided is directed toward areas of safety usually addressed in a Safety Analysis Report. The areas of safety include, but are not limited to, siting, principal design criteria and safety system design guidelines, radiation protection, accident analysis, conduct of operations, and quality assurance. The guide is divided into two sections: general guidelines and appendices. Those guidelines that are broadly applicable to most nuclear facilities are presented in the general guidelines. Guidelines specific to the various types or categories of nuclear facilities are presented in the appendices. These facility-specific appendices provide guidelines and identify standards and criteria that should be considered in addition to, or in lieu of, the general guidelines. 25 figs., 62 tabs

  20. Squale: evaluation criteria of functioning safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deswarte, Y.; Kaaniche, M.; Benoit, P.

    1998-05-01

    The SQUALE (security, safety and quality evaluation for dependable systems) project is part of the ACTS (advanced communications, technologies and services) European program. Its aim is to develop confidence evaluation criteria to test the functioning safety of systems. All industrial sectors that use critical applications (nuclear, railway, aerospace..) are concerned. SQUALE evaluation criteria differ from the classical evaluation methods: they are independent of the application domains and industrial sectors, they take into account the overall functioning safety attributes, and they can progressively change according to the level of severity required. In order to validate the approach and to refine the criteria, a first experiment is in progress with the METEOR automatic underground railway and another will be carried out on a telecommunication system developed by Bouygues company. (J.S.)

  1. Plugging criteria for WWER SG tubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papp, L; Wilam, M [Vitkovice NPP Services (Switzerland); Herman, M [Vuje, Trnava (Slovakia)

    1998-12-31

    At operated Czech and Slovak nuclear power plants the 80 % criteria for crack or other bulk defect depth is used for steam generator heat exchanging tubes plugging. This criteria was accepted as the recommendation of designer of WWER steam generators. Verification of this criteria was the objective of experimental program performed by Vitkovice, J.S.C., UJV Rez, J.S.C. and Vuje Trnava, J.S.C .. Within this program the following factors were studied: (1) Influence of secondary water chemistry on defects initiation and propagation, (2) Statistical evaluation of corrosion defects progression at operated SG, and (3) Determination of critical pressure for tube rupture as a function of eddy current indications. In this presentation items (2) and (3) are considered.

  2. Maintenance evaluation using risk based criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torres Valle, A.

    1996-01-01

    The maintenance evaluation is currently performed by using economic and, in some case, technical equipment failure criteria, however this is done to a specific equipment level. In general, when statistics are used the analysis for maintenance optimization are made isolated and whit a post mortem character; The integration provided by mean of Probabilistic Safety assessment (PSA) together with the possibilities of its applications, allow for evaluation of maintenance on the basis of broader scope criteria in regard to those traditionally used. The evaluate maintenance using risk based criteria, is necessary to follow a dynamic and systematic approach, in studying the maintenance strategy, to allow for updating the initial probabilistic models, for including operational changes that often take place during operation of complex facilities. This paper proposes a dynamic evaluation system of maintenance task. The system is illustrated by means of a practical example

  3. Developing criteria to establish Trusted Digital Repositories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faundeen, John L.

    2017-01-01

    This paper details the drivers, methods, and outcomes of the U.S. Geological Survey’s quest to establish criteria by which to judge its own digital preservation resources as Trusted Digital Repositories. Drivers included recent U.S. legislation focused on data and asset management conducted by federal agencies spending $100M USD or more annually on research activities. The methods entailed seeking existing evaluation criteria from national and international organizations such as International Standards Organization (ISO), U.S. Library of Congress, and Data Seal of Approval upon which to model USGS repository evaluations. Certification, complexity, cost, and usability of existing evaluation models were key considerations. The selected evaluation method was derived to allow the repository evaluation process to be transparent, understandable, and defensible; factors that are critical for judging competing, internal units. Implementing the chosen evaluation criteria involved establishing a cross-agency, multi-disciplinary team that interfaced across the organization. 

  4. Hanford Site solid waste acceptance criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellefson, M.D.

    1998-01-01

    Order 5820.2A requires that each treatment, storage, and/or disposal facility (referred to in this document as TSD unit) that manages low-level or transuranic waste (including mixed waste and TSCA PCB waste) maintain waste acceptance criteria. These criteria must address the various requirements to operate the TSD unit in compliance with applicable safety and environmental requirements. This document sets forth the baseline criteria for acceptance of radioactive waste at TSD units operated by WMH. The criteria for each TSD unit have been established to ensure that waste accepted can be managed in a manner that is within the operating requirements of the unit, including environmental regulations, DOE Orders, permits, technical safety requirements, waste analysis plans, performance assessments, and other applicable requirements. Acceptance criteria apply to the following TSD units: the Low-Level Burial Grounds (LLBG) including both the nonregulated portions of the LLBG and trenches 31 and 34 of the 218-W-5 Burial Ground for mixed waste disposal; Central Waste Complex (CWC); Waste Receiving and Processing Facility (WRAP); and T Plant Complex. Waste from all generators, both from the Hanford Site and from offsite facilities, must comply with these criteria. Exceptions can be granted as provided in Section 1.6. Specific waste streams could have additional requirements based on the 1901 identified TSD pathway. These requirements are communicated in the Waste Specification Records (WSRds). The Hanford Site manages nonradioactive waste through direct shipments to offsite contractors. The waste acceptance requirements of the offsite TSD facility must be met for these nonradioactive wastes. This document does not address the acceptance requirements of these offsite facilities

  5. Clinical Criteria for Physician Aid in Dying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orentlicher, David; Pope, Thaddeus Mason; Rich, Ben A

    2016-03-01

    More than 20 years ago, even before voters in Oregon had enacted the first aid in dying (AID) statute in the United States, Timothy Quill and colleagues proposed clinical criteria AID. Their proposal was carefully considered and temperate, but there were little data on the practice of AID at the time. (With AID, a physician writes a prescription for life-ending medication for a terminally ill, mentally capacitated adult.) With the passage of time, a substantial body of data on AID has developed from the states of Oregon and Washington. For more than 17 years, physicians in Oregon have been authorized to provide a prescription for AID. Accordingly, we have updated the clinical criteria of Quill, et al., based on the many years of experience with AID. With more jurisdictions authorizing AID, it is critical that physicians can turn to reliable clinical criteria. As with any medical practice, AID must be provided in a safe and effective manner. Physicians need to know (1) how to respond to a patient's inquiry about AID, (2) how to assess patient decision making capacity, and (3) how to address a range of other issues that may arise. To ensure that physicians have the guidance they need, Compassion & Choices convened the Physician Aid-in-Dying Clinical Criteria Committee, in July 2012, to create clinical criteria for physicians who are willing to provide AID to patients who request it. The committee includes experts in medicine, law, bioethics, hospice, nursing, social work, and pharmacy. Using an iterative consensus process, the Committee drafted the criteria over a one-year period.

  6. Criteria for the PNE seismic network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pruvost, N.L.

    1978-01-01

    A 1976 treaty between the United States and the Soviet Union permits a local seismic network to be deployed at the site of a peaceful nuclear explosion to monitor the event. Criteria for the design and selection of the data-acquisition equipment for such a network are provided. Constraints imposed by the protocol of the treaty, the environment, and the expected properties of seismic signals (based on experiences at the Nevada Test Site) are discussed. Conclusions are drawn about the desired operating mode. Criteria for a general seismic instrumentation system are described

  7. History and Evolution of the Johnson Criteria.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sjaardema, Tracy A. [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Smith, Collin S. [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Birch, Gabriel Carisle [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-07-01

    The Johnson Criteria metric calculates probability of detection of an object imaged by an optical system, and was created in 1958 by John Johnson. As understanding of target detection has improved, detection models have evolved to better model additional factors such as weather, scene content, and object placement. The initial Johnson Criteria, while sufficient for technology and understanding at the time, does not accurately reflect current research into target acquisition and technology. Even though current research shows a dependence on human factors, there appears to be a lack of testing and modeling of human variability.

  8. Hanford Site Solid Waste Acceptance Criteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-11-17

    This manual defines the Hanford Site radioactive, hazardous, and sanitary solid waste acceptance criteria. Criteria in the manual represent a guide for meeting state and federal regulations; DOE Orders; Hanford Site requirements; and other rules, regulations, guidelines, and standards as they apply to acceptance of radioactive and hazardous solid waste at the Hanford Site. It is not the intent of this manual to be all inclusive of the regulations; rather, it is intended that the manual provide the waste generator with only the requirements that waste must meet in order to be accepted at Hanford Site TSD facilities.

  9. Packaging design criteria for the MCO cask

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clements, M.D.

    1996-01-01

    Approximately 2,100 metric tons of unprocessed, irradiated nuclear fuel elements are presently stored in the K Basins. To permit cleanup of the K Basins and fuel conditioning, the fuel will be transported from the K Basins to a Canister Storage Building in the 200 East Area. The purpose of this packaging design criteria is to provide criteria for the design, fabrication, and use of a packaging system to transport the large quantities of irradiated nuclear fuel elements positioned within Multiple Canister Overpacks

  10. Design criteria for prestressed concrete pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schimmelpfennig, K.

    1989-01-01

    The work concerned with the PCRVs has been focussed on topics which are not sufficiently covered by the usual codes with respect to the special structure of PCRVs and the special demands on it, and different investigations yielding a basis for such specific design criteria have been carried out. Only a couple of subjects being in the fore under the aspect of defining quality enlarging design criteria for PCRVs are outlined. The materials for the concrete to be used for the PCRVs are carefully selected. (DG)

  11. Criteria for safety-related operator actions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gray, L.H.; Haas, P.M.

    1983-01-01

    The Safety-Related Operator Actions (SROA) Program was designed to provide information and data for use by NRC in assessing the performance of nuclear power plant (NPP) control room operators in responding to abnormal/emergency events. The primary effort involved collection and assessment of data from simulator training exercises and from historical records of abnormal/emergency events that have occurred in operating plants (field data). These data can be used to develop criteria for acceptability of the use of manual operator action for safety-related functions. Development of criteria for safety-related operator actions are considered

  12. Proliferation resistance criteria for fissile material disposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Close, D.A.; Fearey, B.L.; Markin, J.T.; Rutherford, D.A.; Duggan, R.A.; Jaeger, C.D.; Mangan, D.L.; Moya, R.W.; Moore, L.R.; Strait, R.S.

    1995-04-01

    The 1994 National Academy of Sciences study open-quotes Management and Disposition of Excess Weapons Plutoniumclose quotes defined options for reducing the national and international proliferation risks of materials declared excess to the nuclear weapons program. This report proposes criteria for assessing the proliferation resistance of these options. The criteria are general, encompassing all stages of the disposition process from storage through intermediate processing to final disposition including the facilities, processing technologies and materials, the level of safeguards for these materials, and the national/subnational threat to the materials

  13. NRC licensing criteria for portable radwaste systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayes, J.J. Jr.

    1983-01-01

    The shortcomings of various components of the liquid and solid radwaste systems at nuclear power reactors has resulted in the contracting of the functions performed by these systems to various contractors who utilize portable equipment. In addition, some streams, for which treatment was not originally anticipated, have been processed by portable equipment. The NRC criteria applicable to portable liquid and solid radwaste systems is presented along with discussion on what is required to provide an adequate 10 CFR Part 50.59 review for those situations where changes are made to an existing system. The criteria the NRC is considering for facilities which may intend to utilize portable incinerators is also presented

  14. Snell Envelope with Small Probability Criteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Del Moral, Pierre, E-mail: Pierre.Del-Moral@inria.fr; Hu, Peng, E-mail: Peng.Hu@inria.fr [Universite de Bordeaux I, Centre INRIA Bordeaux et Sud-Ouest and Institut de Mathematiques de Bordeaux (France); Oudjane, Nadia, E-mail: Nadia.Oudjane@edf.fr [EDF R and D Clamart (France)

    2012-12-15

    We present a new algorithm to compute the Snell envelope in the specific case where the criteria to optimize is associated with a small probability or a rare event. This new approach combines the Stochastic Mesh approach of Broadie and Glasserman with a particle approximation scheme based on a specific change of measure designed to concentrate the computational effort in regions pointed out by the criteria. The theoretical analysis of this new algorithm provides non asymptotic convergence estimates. Finally, the numerical tests confirm the practical interest of this approach.

  15. Hanford Site Solid Waste Acceptance Criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    This manual defines the Hanford Site radioactive, hazardous, and sanitary solid waste acceptance criteria. Criteria in the manual represent a guide for meeting state and federal regulations; DOE Orders; Hanford Site requirements; and other rules, regulations, guidelines, and standards as they apply to acceptance of radioactive and hazardous solid waste at the Hanford Site. It is not the intent of this manual to be all inclusive of the regulations; rather, it is intended that the manual provide the waste generator with only the requirements that waste must meet in order to be accepted at Hanford Site TSD facilities

  16. NEVADA TEST SITE WASTE ACCEPTANCE CRITERIA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, NATIONAL NUCLEAR SECURITY ADMINISTRATION, NEVADA SITE OFFICE

    2005-01-01

    This document establishes the U. S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) waste acceptance criteria (WAC). The WAC provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada Test Site will accept low-level radioactive and mixed waste for disposal. Mixed waste generated within the State of Nevada by NNSA/NSO activities is accepted for disposal. It includes requirements for the generator waste certification program, characterization, traceability, waste form, packaging, and transfer. The criteria apply to radioactive waste received at the Nevada Test Site Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site for storage or disposal

  17. Nevada Test Site Waste Acceptance Criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    U. S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office

    2005-01-01

    This document establishes the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) waste acceptance criteria (WAC). The WAC provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada Test Site (NTS) will accept low-level radioactive (LLW) and mixed waste (MW) for disposal. It includes requirements for the generator waste certification program, characterization, traceability, waste form, packaging, and transfer. The criteria apply to radioactive waste received at the NTS Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) for storage or disposal

  18. A Meta-Analysis of the Relations among Training Criteria

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Alliger, George

    1998-01-01

    .... Meta-analysis results among criteria using this framework include the finding of substantial reliabilities across training criteria and reasonable convergence among subdivisions of criteria within a larger level...

  19. Defining criteria related to wastes for use in multi-criteria decision tool for nuclear accidents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Diogo N.G.; Guimaraes, Jean R.D., E-mail: dneves@biof.ufrj.br, E-mail: jeanrdg@biof.ufrj.br [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Instituto de Biofisica Carlos Chagas Filho; Rochedo, Elaine R.R.; De Luca, Christiano, E-mail: elainerochedo@gmail.com, E-mail: christiano_luca@hotmail.com [Instituto Militar de Engenharia (IME), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Programa de Engenharia Nuclear; Rochedo, Pedro R.R., E-mail: rochedopedro@gmail.com [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Instituto Alberto Luiz Coimbra de Pos-Graduacao e Pesquisa de Engenharia

    2013-07-01

    The selection of protective measures and strategies for remediation of contaminated areas after a nuclear accident must be based on previously established criteria in order to prevent stress of the population and the unnecessary exposure of workers. After a nuclear accident resulting in environmental contamination, decisions on remediation of areas is complex due to the large numbers of factors involved in decontamination processes. This work is part of a project which aims to develop a multi-criteria tool to support a decision-making process in cases of a radiological or a nuclear accident in Brazil. First, a database of remediation strategies for contaminated areas was created. In this process, the most relevant aspects for the implementation of these strategies were considered, including technical criteria regarding aspects related to the generation of wastes in a reference urban area, which are discussed in this paper. The specific objective of this study is to define criteria for the aspects of radioactive wastes, resulted by the implementation of some urban measures, in order to be incorporated in a multi-criteria decision tool. Main aspects considered were the type, the amount and the type of treatment necessary for each procedure. The decontamination procedures are then classified according to the selected criteria in order to feed the multi-criteria decision tool. This paper describes the steps for the establishment of these criteria and evaluates the potential for future applications in order to improve predictions and to support the decisions to be made. (author)

  20. Defining criteria related to wastes for use in multi-criteria decision tool for nuclear accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Diogo N.G.; Guimaraes, Jean R.D.; Rochedo, Elaine R.R.; De Luca, Christiano; Rochedo, Pedro R.R.

    2013-01-01

    The selection of protective measures and strategies for remediation of contaminated areas after a nuclear accident must be based on previously established criteria in order to prevent stress of the population and the unnecessary exposure of workers. After a nuclear accident resulting in environmental contamination, decisions on remediation of areas is complex due to the large numbers of factors involved in decontamination processes. This work is part of a project which aims to develop a multi-criteria tool to support a decision-making process in cases of a radiological or a nuclear accident in Brazil. First, a database of remediation strategies for contaminated areas was created. In this process, the most relevant aspects for the implementation of these strategies were considered, including technical criteria regarding aspects related to the generation of wastes in a reference urban area, which are discussed in this paper. The specific objective of this study is to define criteria for the aspects of radioactive wastes, resulted by the implementation of some urban measures, in order to be incorporated in a multi-criteria decision tool. Main aspects considered were the type, the amount and the type of treatment necessary for each procedure. The decontamination procedures are then classified according to the selected criteria in order to feed the multi-criteria decision tool. This paper describes the steps for the establishment of these criteria and evaluates the potential for future applications in order to improve predictions and to support the decisions to be made. (author)

  1. Arrhythmogenic Right Ventricular Dysplasia/Cardiomyopathy Diagnostic Task Force Criteria Impact of New Task Force Criteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cox, Moniek G. P. J.; van der Smagt, Jasper J.; Noorman, Maartje; Wiesfeld, Ans C.; Volders, Paul G. A.; van Langen, Irene M.; Atsma, Douwe E.; Dooijes, Dennis; Houweling, Arjan C.; Loh, Peter; Jordaens, Luc; Arens, Yvonne; Cramer, Maarten J.; Doevendans, Pieter A.; van Tintelen, Peter; Wilde, Arthur A. M.; Hauer, Richard N. W.

    Background-Arrhythmogenic Right Ventricular Dysplasia/Cardiomyopathy (ARVD/C) Diagnostic Task Force Criteria (TFC) proposed in 1994 are highly specific but lack sensitivity. A new international task force modified criteria to improve diagnostic yield. A comparison of diagnosis by 1994 TFC versus

  2. A randomized, double-blind, multicenter, controlled clinical trial of chicken type II collagen in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ling-Ling; Wei, Wei; Xiao, Feng; Xu, Jian-Hua; Bao, Chun-De; Ni, Li-Qing; Li, Xing-Fu

    2008-07-15

    To assess the efficacy and safety of chicken type II collagen (CCII) in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) compared with methotrexate (MTX). We conducted a prospective, 24-week, followup, multicenter, double-blind, controlled study of CCII (0.1 mg/day) versus MTX (10 mg/week) in patients with active RA. Clinical assessments were performed at screening and at 12, 18, and 24 weeks of treatment. A total of 236 RA patients were included; 211 patients (89.4%) completed the 24-week followup. In both groups there was a decrease in pain, morning stiffness, tender joint count, swollen joint count, Health Assessment Questionnaire score, and investigator and patient assessment of function; all differences were statistically significant. In the MTX group, erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein level decreased. Rheumatoid factor did not change in either group. At 24 weeks, 68.57% of patients in the CCII group and 83.02% in the MTX group met the American College of Rheumatology 20% improvement criteria (ACR20), and 40.95% and 57.54%, respectively, met the ACR50 criteria. The ACR20 and ACR50 response rates in the CCII group were lower than those in the MTX group, and this difference was statistically significant (P < 0.05). Gastrointestinal symptoms were common in both groups. There were fewer and milder side effects in the CCII group than the MTX group. The difference in incidence of adverse events between the 2 groups was statistically significant (P < 0.05). CCII is effective in the treatment of RA. CCII is well tolerated, and the incidence of adverse events of CCII is lower than that of MTX.

  3. Rett syndrome diagnostic criteria: lessons from the Natural History Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Percy, Alan K; Neul, Jeffrey L; Glaze, Daniel G; Motil, Kathleen J; Skinner, Steven A; Khwaja, Omar; Lee, Hye-Seung; Lane, Jane B; Barrish, Judy O; Annese, Fran; McNair, Lauren; Graham, Joy; Barnes, Katherine

    2010-12-01

    Analysis of 819 participants enrolled in the Rett syndrome (RTT) Natural History Study validates recently revised diagnostic criteria. 765 females fulfilled 2002 consensus criteria for classic (653/85.4%) or variant (112/14.6%) RTT. All participants classified as classic RTT fulfilled each revised main criterion; supportive criteria were not uniformly present. All variant RTT participants met at least 3 of 6 main criteria in the 2002, 2 of 4 main criteria in the current format, and 5 of 11 supportive criteria in both. This analysis underscores the critical role of main criteria for classic RTT; variant RTT requires both main and supportive criteria.

  4. Relationship between damage clustering and mortality in systemic lupus erythematosus in early and late stages of the disease: cluster analyses in a large cohort from the Spanish Society of Rheumatology Lupus Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pego-Reigosa, José María; Lois-Iglesias, Ana; Rúa-Figueroa, Íñigo; Galindo, María; Calvo-Alén, Jaime; de Uña-Álvarez, Jacobo; Balboa-Barreiro, Vanessa; Ibáñez Ruan, Jesús; Olivé, Alejandro; Rodríguez-Gómez, Manuel; Fernández Nebro, Antonio; Andrés, Mariano; Erausquin, Celia; Tomero, Eva; Horcada Rubio, Loreto; Uriarte Isacelaya, Esther; Freire, Mercedes; Montilla, Carlos; Sánchez-Atrio, Ana I; Santos-Soler, Gregorio; Zea, Antonio; Díez, Elvira; Narváez, Javier; Blanco-Alonso, Ricardo; Silva-Fernández, Lucía; Ruiz-Lucea, María Esther; Fernández-Castro, Mónica; Hernández-Beriain, José Ángel; Gantes-Mora, Marian; Hernández-Cruz, Blanca; Pérez-Venegas, José; Pecondón-Español, Ángela; Marras Fernández-Cid, Carlos; Ibáñez-Barcelo, Mónica; Bonilla, Gema; Torrente-Segarra, Vicenç; Castellví, Iván; Alegre, Juan José; Calvet, Joan; Marenco de la Fuente, José Luis; Raya, Enrique; Vázquez-Rodríguez, Tomás Ramón; Quevedo-Vila, Víctor; Muñoz-Fernández, Santiago; Otón, Teresa; Rahman, Anisur; López-Longo, Francisco Javier

    2016-07-01

    To identify patterns (clusters) of damage manifestations within a large cohort of SLE patients and evaluate the potential association of these clusters with a higher risk of mortality. This is a multicentre, descriptive, cross-sectional study of a cohort of 3656 SLE patients from the Spanish Society of Rheumatology Lupus Registry. Organ damage was ascertained using the Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics Damage Index. Using cluster analysis, groups of patients with similar patterns of damage manifestations were identified. Then, overall clusters were compared as well as the subgroup of patients within every cluster with disease duration shorter than 5 years. Three damage clusters were identified. Cluster 1 (80.6% of patients) presented a lower amount of individuals with damage (23.2 vs 100% in clusters 2 and 3, P Cluster 2 (11.4% of patients) was characterized by musculoskeletal damage in all patients. Cluster 3 (8.0% of patients) was the only group with cardiovascular damage, and this was present in all patients. The overall mortality rate of patients in clusters 2 and 3 was higher than that in cluster 1 (P clusters. Both in early and late stages of the disease, there was a significant association of these clusters with an increased risk of mortality. Physicians should pay special attention to the early prevention of damage in these two systems. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Rheumatology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. 2014 Update of the Canadian Rheumatology Association/spondyloarthritis research consortium of Canada treatment recommendations for the management of spondyloarthritis. Part I: principles of the management of spondyloarthritis in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohekar, Sherry; Chan, Jon; Tse, Shirley M L; Haroon, Nigil; Chandran, Vinod; Bessette, Louis; Mosher, Dianne; Flanagan, Cathy; Keen, Kevin J; Adams, Karen; Mallinson, Michael; Thorne, Carter; Rahman, Proton; Gladman, Dafna D; Inman, Robert D

    2015-04-01

    The Canadian Rheumatology Association (CRA) and the Spondyloarthritis Research Consortium of Canada (SPARCC) have collaborated to update the recommendations for the management of spondyloarthritis (SpA). A working group was assembled and consisted of the SPARCC executive committee, rheumatologist leaders from SPARCC collaborating sites, Canadian rheumatologists from across the country with an interest in SpA (both academic and community), a rheumatology trainee with an interest in SpA, an epidemiologist/health services researcher, a member of the CRA executive, a member of the CRA therapeutics committee, and a patient representative from the Canadian Spondylitis Association. An extensive review was conducted of literature published from 2007 to 2014 involving the management of SpA. The working group created draft recommendations using multiple rounds of Web-based surveys and an in-person conference. A survey was sent to the membership of the CRA to obtain an extended review that was used to finalize the recommendations. Guidelines for the management of SpA were created. Part I focuses on the principles of management of SpA in Canada and includes 6 general management principles, 5 ethical considerations, target groups for treatment recommendations, 2 wait time recommendations, and recommendations for disease monitoring. Also included are 6 modifications for application to juvenile SpA. These recommendations were developed based on current literature and applied to a Canadian healthcare context. It is hoped that the implementation of these recommendations will promote best practices in the treatment of SpA.

  6. Nevada Test Site Waste Acceptance Criteria (NTSWAC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NNSA/NSO Waste Management Project

    2008-06-01

    This document establishes the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, Nevada Test Site Waste Acceptance Criteria (NTSWAC). The NTSWAC provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada Test Site will accept low-level radioactive (LLW) and LLW Mixed Waste (MW) for disposal.

  7. System identification with information theoretic criteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.A. Stoorvogel; J.H. van Schuppen (Jan)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractAttention is focused in this paper on the approximation problem of system identification with information theoretic criteria. For a class of problems it is shown that the criterion of mutual information rate is identical to the criterion of exponential-of-quadratic cost and to

  8. 7 CFR 3430.908 - Review criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Review criteria. 3430.908 Section 3430.908 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) COOPERATIVE STATE RESEARCH, EDUCATION, AND EXTENSION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE COMPETITIVE AND NONCOMPETITIVE NON-FORMULA FEDERAL...

  9. Brain Death,Concept and Criteria

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    The concept of brain death originated in France. In 1959, the French scholars P. Mollaret and M. Goulon proposed the concept of "coma de- passe" or "brain death" for the first time and reported 23 cases with such symptoms. The first guidelines (the Harvard criteria) for diagnosing brain death was established in 1968, defining brain death

  10. 5 CFR 430.404 - Certification criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... MANAGEMENT Performance Appraisal Certification for Pay Purposes § 430.404 Certification criteria. (a) To be... system(s) must provide for the following: (1) Alignment, so that the performance expectations for... that the performance expectations for senior employees meet the requirements of 5 CFR part 430...

  11. Criteria for the selection of ERP software

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The implementation of an ERP software package is an important investment for an organization, which is characterized also by a high degree of risk. Selecting the most appropriate software is a necessary condition for a successful implementation. This paper is describing the major aspects of software selection in general and the relevant criteria in the case of ERP software.

  12. Reliability criteria selection for integrated resource planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruiu, D.; Ye, C.; Billinton, R.; Lakhanpal, D.

    1993-01-01

    A study was conducted on the selection of a generating system reliability criterion that ensures a reasonable continuity of supply while minimizing the total costs to utility customers. The study was conducted using the Institute for Electronic and Electrical Engineers (IEEE) reliability test system as the study system. The study inputs and results for conditions and load forecast data, new supply resources data, demand-side management resource data, resource planning criterion, criterion value selection, supply side development, integrated resource development, and best criterion values, are tabulated and discussed. Preliminary conclusions are drawn as follows. In the case of integrated resource planning, the selection of the best value for a given type of reliability criterion can be done using methods similar to those used for supply side planning. The reliability criteria values previously used for supply side planning may not be economically justified when integrated resource planning is used. Utilities may have to revise and adopt new, and perhaps lower supply reliability criteria for integrated resource planning. More complex reliability criteria, such as energy related indices, which take into account the magnitude, frequency and duration of the expected interruptions are better adapted than the simpler capacity-based reliability criteria such as loss of load expectation. 7 refs., 5 figs., 10 tabs

  13. Acceptance criteria for radioactive waste deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rzyski, B.M.

    1989-01-01

    The disposal of low-and intermediate level radioactive waste in either shallow ground or rock cavities must be subjected to special guidelines which are used by national authorities and implementing bodies when establishing and regulating respositories. These informations are given by the acceptance criteria and will depend on specific site conditions and optmized procedures. (author) [pt

  14. Multiple cost criteria for occupational dose reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    James, J.Z.

    1983-01-01

    This paper describes a simple, feasible procedure for deciding if a proposed dose reduction measure is justified under ALARA, based on engineering economic principles of project feasibility analysis. Particular attention is given to the fixing of cost criteria: the importance of melding disparate objectives into a single parameter, and the distinction between a cost criterion and a cost consideration. (author)

  15. Certification Criteria for Linked Learning Pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    ConnectEd: The California Center for College and Career, 2010

    2010-01-01

    Pathways offer a promising strategy for transforming high schools and improving student outcomes. However, to achieve these desired results, pathways must be of high quality. To guide sites in planning and implementing such pathways, a design team of experts developed the criteria outlined in this document. Sites can choose to go through a…

  16. CORAL REEF BIOLOGICAL CRITERIA: USING THE CLEAN ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coral reefs are declining at unprecedented rates worldwide due to multiple interactive stressors including climate change and land-based sources of pollution. The Clean Water Act (CWA) can be a powerful legal instrument for protecting water resources, including the biological inhabitants of coral reefs. The objective of the CWA is to restore and maintain the chemical, physical and biological integrity of water resources. Coral reef protection and restoration under the Clean Water Act begins with water quality standards - provisions of state or Federal law that consist of a designated use(s) for the waters of the United States and water quality criteria sufficient to protect the uses. Aquatic life use is the designated use that is measured by biological criteria (biocriteria). Biocriteria are expectations set by a jurisdiction for the quality and quantity of living aquatic resources in a defined waterbody. Biocriteria are an important addition to existing management tools for coral reef ecosystems. The Technical Support Document “Coral Reef Biological Criteria: Using the Clean Water Act to Protect a National Treasure” will provide a framework to aid States and Territories in their development, adoption, and implementation of coral reef biocriteria in their respective water quality standards. The Technical Support Document “Coral Reef Biological Criteria: Using the Clean Water Act to Protect a National Treasure” will provide a framework for coral re

  17. Air Quality Criteria for Particulate Matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Air Pollution Control Administration (DHEW), Washington, DC.

    To assist states in developing air quality standards, this book offers a review of literature related to atmospheric particulates and the development of criteria for air quality. It not only summarizes the current scientific knowledge of particulate air pollution, but points up the major deficiencies in that knowledge and the need for further…

  18. Design Criteria Based on Aesthetic Considerations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Bente Dahl

    2009-01-01

    Aesthetic criteria for designs are often debated in a very subjective manner which makes it difficult to reach consensus. In order to have a more rational and transparent process, in particular in industrial design, we propose a procedure based on Baumgarten's aesthetic considerations and Thommesen......'s dividing of a form into form elements. The procedure has been tested in student projects....

  19. Surgical criteria for femoroacetabular impingement syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peters, Scott; Laing, Alisha; Emerson, Courtney

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The purpose of this review was to analyse and report criteria used for open and arthroscopic surgical treatment of femoroacetabular impingement syndrome (FAIS). METHODS: A librarian-assisted computer search of Medline, CINAHL and Embase for studies related to criterion for FAIS surgery...

  20. VDTT removal system functional design criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Legare, D.E.

    1996-01-01

    Two Velocity Density Temperature Trees (H-2-815016) are to be removed from risers 14A and 1B of tank 241-SY-101. This document provides functional design criteria for the removal system. The removal system consists of a Liquid Removal Tool, Flexible Receiver (H-2-79216), Burial Container, Transport Trailers, and associated equipment