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Sample records for rheumatoid hand pre

  1. The 'pre-erosive' radiologic signs of rheumatoid arthritis in soft tissue radiography of the hands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maekelae, P.; Virtama, P.

    1978-01-01

    Soft tissue radiography of the hands using the mammographic immersion technique was performed on 119 patients, having definite or classical rheumatoid arthritis, and on 123 controls of matching age, sex, and professional distribution. A total of 7744 finger joints and carpal borders were investigated for joint swelling, periarticular edema, pre-erosive and erosive bone changes, joint space narrowing, and osteoarthritic joint margin spurs. Slight joint swelling and pre-erosive bone changes were found in connection with osteoarthritic joint changes in elderly control patients. Periarticular edema and moderate to massive joint swelling were quite reliable signs for synovitis. The incidence of pre-erosive bone signs was significantly greater in the rheumatoid arthritis group than in the control group, especially in patients less than 60 years old. These signs can be regarded as suggestive of rheumatoid arthritis; probability diagnosis could be performed using these signs and the Bayesian approach. (orig.) [de

  2. 'pre-erosive' radiologic signs of rheumatoid arthritis in soft tissue radiography of the hands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maekelae, P; Virtama, P [Turku Univ. (Finland). Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology

    1978-01-01

    Soft tissue radiography of the hands using the mammographic immersion technique was performed on 119 patients, having definite or classical rheumatoid arthritis, and on 123 controls of matching age, sex, and professional distribution. A total of 7744 finger joints and carpal borders were investigated for joint swelling, periarticular edema, pre-erosive and erosive bone changes, joint space narrowing, and osteoarthritic joint margin spurs. Slight joint swelling and pre-erosive bone changes were found in connection with osteoarthritic joint changes in elderly control patients. Periarticular edema and moderate to massive joint swelling were quite reliable signs for synovitis. The incidence of pre-erosive bone signs was significantly greater in the rheumatoid arthritis group than in the control group, especially in patients less than 60 years old. These signs can be regarded as suggestive of rheumatoid arthritis; probability diagnosis could be performed using these signs and the Bayesian approach.

  3. Rheumatoid arthritis and hand surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peretz, Anne Sofie Rosenborg; Madsen, Ole Rintek; Brogren, Elisabeth

    2017-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis results in characteristic deformities of the hand. Medical treatment has undergone a remarkable development. However, not all patients achieve remission or tolerate the treatment. Patients who suffer from deformities and persistent synovitis may be candidates for hand surgery...

  4. Arthritis of the hand - Rheumatoid

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... All Topics A-Z Videos Infographics Symptom Picker Anatomy Bones Joints Muscles Nerves Vessels Tendons About Hand Surgery What is a Hand Surgeon? What is a Hand Therapist? Media Find a Hand Surgeon Home Anatomy Rheumatoid Arthritis Email to a friend * required fields ...

  5. Rheumatoid arthritis in the hand. Chapter 9

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weston, W.J.

    1979-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is primarily a disease of the synovial membrane. To demonstrate synovial changes it is necessary to show adequate detail of the soft tissue. This is best obtained by using industrial film and by hand-processing. The anatomy of the hand and the radiological appearance of rheumatoid arthritis are described. (author)

  6. ORIGINAL ARTICLES A radiological study of the rheumatoid hand in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nicky

    There are only a few publications on rheumatoid involvement in black South Africans.1-3 These publications do not address wrist and hand involvement specifically in black patients. However, when treating black patients one gets the impression that the wrist is more severely affected than the rest of the hand. In his thesis ...

  7. The prevalence of tenosynovitis of the interosseous tendons of the hand in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    OpenAIRE

    Rowbotham, EL; Freeston, JE; Emery, P; Grainger, AJ

    2015-01-01

    AIM: The aim of this study was to establish the prevalence of tenosynovitis affecting the interosseous tendons of the hand in a rheumatoid arthritis (RA) population and to assess for association with metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joint synovitis, flexor tendon tenosynovitis or ulnar drift. METHODS: Forty-four patients with RA underwent hand MRI along with 20 normal controls. Coronal 3D T1 VIBE sequences pre- and post-contrast were performed and reconstructed. The presence of interosseous tendon t...

  8. Hand assessment with the E-Cone in rheumatoid arthritis and hand osteoarthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Merendonk, N.; van Alebeek, V.; Spreeuwers, Lieuwe Jan; Spreeuwers, D.; Kroon, P.J.; Roorda, L.; Dekker, J.; Hoeksma, A.F.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic inflammatory, progressive disease resulting in deformities of the hand. Besides synovitis, tenosynovitis of the extrinsic flexor tendons is one of the initial features of RA, leading to friction and consequently to an imbalanced coordination of the

  9. The effects of compression gloves on hand symptoms and hand function in rheumatoid arthritis and hand osteoarthritis: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, Alison; Jones, Vivienne; Prior, Yeliz

    2016-03-01

    to evaluate the effects of compression gloves in adults with rheumatoid arthritis and hand osteoarthritis. Systematic review of randomized controlled trials identified from MEDLINE, CINAHL, AMED, PEDro, OT Seeker, The Cochrane Library, ISI Web of Knowledge, Science Direct and PubMed from their inceptions to January 2015. Methodological quality of identified trials was evaluated using the PEDro scale by three independent assessors. Effects were summarized descriptively. Four trials (n=8-24; total n=74), comparing night wear of full-length finger compression gloves with placebo gloves, were assessed. Three were of moderate (PEDro score 4-5) and one low (score 3) methodological quality. Effect sizes or standardized mean differences could not be calculated to compare trials due to poor data reporting. In rheumatoid arthritis, finger joint swelling was significantly reduced, but results for pain and stiffness were inconclusive and no differences in grip strength and dexterity were identified. One study reported similar effects in pain, stiffness and finger joint swelling from both compression and thermal placebo gloves. Only one study evaluated gloves in hand osteoarthritis (n=5) with no differences. All the trials identified were small with a high risk of Type I and II errors. Evidence for the effectiveness of compression gloves worn at night is inconclusive in rheumatoid arthritis and hand osteoarthritis. © The Author(s) 2015.

  10. Predictors of Stenosing Tenosynovitis in the Hand and Hand-Related Activity Limitations in Patients With Rheumatoid Arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ursum, J.; Horsten, N.C.; Hoeksma, A.F.; Dijkmans, B.A.C.; Knol, D.L.; van Schaardenburg, D.; Dekker, J.; Roorda, L.D.

    2011-01-01

    Ursum J, Horsten NC, Hoeksma AF, Dijkmans BA, Knol DL, van Schaardenburg D, Dekker J, Roorda LD. Predictors of stenosing tenosynovitis in the hand and hand-related activity limitations in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Objectives To identify early predictors of stenosing tenosynovitis in the

  11. Predictors of stenosing tenosynovitis in the hand and hand-related activity limitations in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ursum, J.; Horsten, N.C.; Hoeksma, A.F.; Dijkmans, B.A.; Knol, D.L.; Schaardenburg, D. van; Dekker, J.; Roorda, L.D.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: To identify early predictors of stenosing tenosynovitis in the hand and hand-related activity limitations in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Design: A longitudinal study of an inception cohort. Setting: A large outpatient clinic. Participants: Consecutive patients who attended

  12. The prevalence of tenosynovitis of the interosseous tendons of the hand in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rowbotham, Emma L. [Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, Musculoskeletal Radiology Department, Leeds (United Kingdom); Freeston, Jane E. [Department of Rheumatology, Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, Leeds (United Kingdom); Emery, Paul [University of Leeds, Arthritis Research UK, Leeds Musculoskeletal Biomedical Research Unit, LTHT Leeds Institute of Rheumatic Musculoskeletal Medicine, Leeds (United Kingdom); Grainger, Andrew J. [Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, Musculoskeletal Radiology Department, Leeds (United Kingdom); Chapel Allerton Hospital, NIHR Leeds Musculoskeletal Biomedical Research Unit, Leeds (United Kingdom)

    2016-02-15

    The aim of this study was to establish the prevalence of tenosynovitis affecting the interosseous tendons of the hand in a rheumatoid arthritis (RA) population and to assess for association with metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joint synovitis, flexor tendon tenosynovitis or ulnar drift. Forty-four patients with RA underwent hand MRI along with 20 normal controls. Coronal 3D T1 VIBE sequences pre- and post-contrast were performed and reconstructed. The presence of interosseous tendon tenosynovitis was recorded alongside MCP joint synovitis, flexor tendon tenosynovitis and ulnar drift. Twenty-one (47.7 %) patients with RA showed interosseous tendon tenosynovitis. Fifty-two (14.8 %) interosseous tendons showed tenosynovitis amongst the RA patients. Interosseous tendon tenosynovitis was more commonly seen in association with adjacent MCP joint synovitis (p < 0.001), but nine MCP joints (5.1 %) showed adjacent interosseous tenosynovitis in the absence of joint synovitis. Interosseous tendon tenosynovitis was more frequently seen in fingers which also showed flexor tendon tenosynovitis (p < 0.001) and in patients with ulnar drift of the fingers (p = 0.01). Tenosynovitis of the hand interosseous tendons was found in 47.7 % of patients with RA. In the majority of cases this was adjacent to MCP joint synovitis; however, interosseous tendon tenosynovitis was also seen in isolation. (orig.)

  13. The prevalence of tenosynovitis of the interosseous tendons of the hand in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rowbotham, Emma L.; Freeston, Jane E.; Emery, Paul; Grainger, Andrew J.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to establish the prevalence of tenosynovitis affecting the interosseous tendons of the hand in a rheumatoid arthritis (RA) population and to assess for association with metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joint synovitis, flexor tendon tenosynovitis or ulnar drift. Forty-four patients with RA underwent hand MRI along with 20 normal controls. Coronal 3D T1 VIBE sequences pre- and post-contrast were performed and reconstructed. The presence of interosseous tendon tenosynovitis was recorded alongside MCP joint synovitis, flexor tendon tenosynovitis and ulnar drift. Twenty-one (47.7 %) patients with RA showed interosseous tendon tenosynovitis. Fifty-two (14.8 %) interosseous tendons showed tenosynovitis amongst the RA patients. Interosseous tendon tenosynovitis was more commonly seen in association with adjacent MCP joint synovitis (p < 0.001), but nine MCP joints (5.1 %) showed adjacent interosseous tenosynovitis in the absence of joint synovitis. Interosseous tendon tenosynovitis was more frequently seen in fingers which also showed flexor tendon tenosynovitis (p < 0.001) and in patients with ulnar drift of the fingers (p = 0.01). Tenosynovitis of the hand interosseous tendons was found in 47.7 % of patients with RA. In the majority of cases this was adjacent to MCP joint synovitis; however, interosseous tendon tenosynovitis was also seen in isolation. (orig.)

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging of the hand in rheumatoid arthritis. New scientific insights and practical application; Magnetresonanztomographie der Hand bei rheumatoider Arthritis. Wissenschaftliche Ergebnisse und praktische Anwendung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hermann, K.G.A. [Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Institut fuer Radiologie am Campus Mitte, Berlin (Germany)

    2006-05-15

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a sensitive diagnostic modality for the detection of inflammatory changes in peripheral joints. Nevertheless, the widespread clinical use of MRI in assessing patients with early rheumatoid arthritis is still hampered by the technical complexity and higher cost of MRI compared with conventional radiography. This overview summarizes the results of recent research and gives practical tips on how to perform MRI of the hands. The authors present an MR protocol for hand imaging, discuss the pros and cons of low-field MR scanners, and outline pitfalls and artifacts. The MRI changes associated with rheumatoid arthritis such as synovitis, tenosynovitis, erosions, and bone marrow edema are described including their prognostic significance. The proven facts on the validation and grading of MR changes in rheumatoid arthritis are summarized. Finally, the role of MRI in the differential diagnosis of arthritis is critically discussed. (orig.) [German] Die Magnetresonanztomographie (MRT) ist ein sensitives Verfahren zur Detektion entzuendlicher Veraenderungen der peripheren Gelenke. Den breiten Einsatz der MRT im Fruehstadium der rheumatoiden Arthritis behindern derzeit jedoch der im Vergleich zur konventionellen Roentgendiagnostik hoehere technische Aufwand und vermehrte Kosten. Diese Uebersichtsarbeit fasst wichtige Studienergebnisse zusammen und gibt praktische Hinweise fuer Hand-MRTs. Ein geeignetes Sequenzprotokoll wird vorgestellt, Vor- und Nachteile von Niederfeld-MRTs werden beruecksichtigt, moegliche Fehlerquellen und Artefakte diskutiert. Magnetresonanztomographische Befunde bei rheumatoider Arthritis wie Synovitis, Tenosynovitis, Erosionen und Knochenmarkoedeme werden beschrieben und deren prognostische Bedeutung dargestellt. Gesicherte Fakten zur Validierung und Moeglichkeiten der Graduierung MR-tomographischer Veraenderungen bei rheumatoider Arthritis werden zusammengefasst. Der Nutzen der MRT zur differenzialdiagnostischen

  15. Patterns of radiographic changes in hands and feet of rheumatoid arthritis in Saudi Arabia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Arfaj, Abdurhman S.; Al-Boukai, Ahmad A.

    2005-01-01

    The aim of the study was to characterize the pattern of radiographic changes in the hands and feet of rheumatoid arthritis in Saudi patients. The radiographs of hands and feet of rheumatoid arthritis patients attending rheumatology outpatient clinics of King Khalid University Hospital in Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, over the period extending from March to June 2001, were examined and reported for the presence of osteopenia, joint space narrowing, and erosions. Fifty-six rheumatoid arthritis patients were studied. Their mean age was 50 + 1.9 years, and mean disease duration was 9.07 + 0.84 years. Generalized osteopenia was seen in 16/56 (29%) and periarticular osteopenia in 38/56 (68%). Joint space narrowing was present in 9/56 (16%) of feet and 35/56 (63%) of hand x-rays. Erosions were seen in 3/56 (6%) of feet and in 22/56 (39%) of hand x-rays. Significant correlation was seen between joints space narrowing, joint erosions, and disease duration. Radiographic changes in hands and feet of Saudi rheumatoid arthritis patients are less severe than those reported from the West, and the pattern is also different with less affection of the feet. (author)

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging of the hand in rheumatoid arthritis. New scientific insights and practical application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hermann, K.G.A.

    2006-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a sensitive diagnostic modality for the detection of inflammatory changes in peripheral joints. Nevertheless, the widespread clinical use of MRI in assessing patients with early rheumatoid arthritis is still hampered by the technical complexity and higher cost of MRI compared with conventional radiography. This overview summarizes the results of recent research and gives practical tips on how to perform MRI of the hands. The authors present an MR protocol for hand imaging, discuss the pros and cons of low-field MR scanners, and outline pitfalls and artifacts. The MRI changes associated with rheumatoid arthritis such as synovitis, tenosynovitis, erosions, and bone marrow edema are described including their prognostic significance. The proven facts on the validation and grading of MR changes in rheumatoid arthritis are summarized. Finally, the role of MRI in the differential diagnosis of arthritis is critically discussed. (orig.) [de

  17. Automated measurement of joint space width in early rheumatoid arthritis hand radiographs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huo, YH

    2017-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory disease, affecting predominantly small joints of hands and feet. The current gold standard for assessment of radiographic progression in RA is the Sharp/van der Heijde scoring method (SvdH), scoring both bone erosions and joint space narrowing

  18. The beneficial effects of rehabilitation on hand function in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krystyna Księżopolska-Orłowska

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The hand is one of the main elements of the rehabilitation of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA due to deformities, which occur in approximately 90% of patients. It is a serious problem, both in the psychological and functional aspect, connected with muscle strength reduction, a limited range of motion and non-acceptance of the changes in the shape of the limb. The study aimed to assess the effect of rehabilitation on the function of the hand in rheumatoid arthritis. Material and methods: The study group consisted of 40 women with RA. The patients had been previously treated at the Rehabilitation Department of the National Institute of Geriatrics, Rheumatology and Rehabilitation in Warsaw. The study group underwent 3 weeks of rehabilitation involving individual therapy, exercises with equipment, patient education and physical therapy. The control group included women without a diagnosis of RA, hands pain-free and fully mobile. In both groups the hand was assessed for grip value, grip quality and manipulative ability. In the study group the basis of pain intensity was noted. The measurements were performed twice – prior to the rehabilitation and after 3 weeks of rehabilitation in women with RA and once in women without hand problems. Results : The results obtained revealed marked limitation of hand function in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. The treatment resulted in an improvement of all assessed parameters except cylindrical grip, in which only a part of the findings was statistically significant. Conclusions : The analysis of the study material showed that appropriately adjusted and conducted hand physiotherapy in women with rheumatoid arthritis contributed to the improvement of its function by pain reduction, improved value and quality of grip, and also increased manipulative ability.

  19. Relationship between patient-reported and objective measurements of hand function in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.M. Günay

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA often results in impairments in upper extremities, especially in the small joints of hand. Involvement of hand brings limitations in activities of daily living. However, it is commonly observed that patient-reported functional status of hand does not always corresponds to their actual physical performance in the clinical setting. The aim of this pilot study is to investigate the relationship between patient self-reported and objectively measured hand functions in patients with RA. Twenty-six patients (51±13 years with RA diagnosis participated in the study. Hand grip and pinch (lateral, bipod, tripod strengths were measured and Jebsen Hand Function Test (JHFT was performed for objective functional performance. Duruöz Hand Index and Beck Depression Inventory - Turkish version were completed by patients. Grip and all three-pinch strength results significantly correlated with Duruöz Hand Index scores (p<0.05. JHFT results except the sentence writing also correlated with the Duruöz scores (p<0.05. Our results showed that self-reported outcome scales might be used for determining functional level of hand in patients with RA in rheumatology practice. Objective quantitative functional tests are the best methods in evaluating functional level of hand, but require valid and reliable equipment with accurate calibration. Therefore, in case of unavailability of objective assessment tools, patient-reported scales may also reflect the real status of hand functions.

  20. Soft tissue changes in the metacarpal region of the hand in rheumatoid arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, E.

    1984-11-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis causes changes in the soft tissues in the metacarpal portion of the hand which can be demonstrated by low Kv exposures. Indirect signs of inflammation consist of oedema extending from the synovial compartments to the skin, the subcutaneous tissues, the intermuscular fat septa and the peritendinous tissue. Increased blood flow leads to dilatation of veins. Direct signs of inflammation consists of tenosynovitis and synovitis of the joints, with enlargement of the corresponding compartments. Limited mobility of the hand over a long period, or improvement in motility are paralleled by changes in muscle mass.

  1. Soft tissue changes in the metacarpal region of the hand in rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, E.

    1984-01-01

    Rheumatoid arhtritis causes changes in the soft tissues in the metacarpal portion of the hand which can be demonstrated by low Kv exposures. Indirect signs of inflammation consist of oedema extending from the synovial compartments to the skin, the subcutaneous tissues, the intermuscular fat septa and the peritendinous tissue. Increased blood flow leads to dilatation of veins. Direct signs of inflammation consists of tenosynovitis and synovitis of the joints, with enlargement of the corresponding compartments. Limited mobility of the hand over a long period, or improvement in motility are paralleled by changes in muscle mass. (orig.) [de

  2. The severity of the articular deformities of the hands depending on the seropositivity in rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oprea Doiniţa

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Background. Rheumatoid arthritis (RA, met in the literature also as chronic evolving polyarthritis, is a chronic inflammatory disease, which typically involves the small and medium joints, with a symmetric distribution. Clinical studies shown that a proportion of patients with RA, without measurable rheumatoid factors are a distinct entity from those patients with seropositive RA. Around one third of patients with RA are seronegative for those two serological markers, the rheumatoid factors (RF and anti-citrullinated peptide antibodies (Anti-CCP. Hands are the most frequently affected in both seropositive and seronegative RA and the first joints involved in the inflammatory process are the metacarpo-phalangeal joints, IFP joints and the radiocarpian joint. The big joints become later symptomatic, after the small joints are affected. Materials and methods: 66 patients files and the personal records of the patients consecutively admitted in the Rheumatology Department of the Clinical Emergency County Hospital Constanta. Patients from county Constanta were included in the study, with diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis (diagnosis confirmed at least 2 years ago, including both forms (seropositive and seronegative of the disease. The complete clinical exam was done for the patients included in the study, following the identification of the active joint disease. The mechanical status of the joint was observed by a single evaluator for each of those 66 patients with RA, with special focus on the presence of the deformities / ankyloses of the hands joints. Therefore, there were evaluated: the mobility (the number of the joints with limited movements, deformities, ankyloses (the number of the joints without mobility. The joint mobility was assessed by counting the hand joints with limited movements and the worsening of the prehension function. The presence of the following hand deformities was followed: fingers in “swan neck”, “fusiform fingers

  3. Film-screen vs. digital radiography in rheumatoid arthritis of the hand. An ROC analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jonsson, A.; Borg, A.; Hannesson, P.; Herrlin, K.; Jonsson, K.; Sloth, M.; Pettersson, H.

    1994-01-01

    In a prospective investigation the diagnostic accuracy of filmscreen and digital radiography in rheumatoid arthritis of hands was compared. Seventy hands of 36 patients with established rheumatoid arthritis were included in the study. Each of 11 joints in every hand was evaluated regarding the following radiologic parameters: soft tissue swelling, joint space narrowing, erosions and periarticular osteopenia. The digital images were obtained with storage phosphor image plates and evaluated in 2 forms; as digital hard-copy on film and on a monitor of an interactive workstation. The digital images had a resolution of either 3.33 or 5.0 lp/mm. ROC curves were constructed and comparing the area under the curves no significant difference was found between the 3 different imaging forms in either resolution group for soft tissue swelling, joint space narrowing and erosions. The film-screen image evaluation of periarticular osteopenia was significantly better than the digital hard-copy one in the 3.33 lp/mm resolution group, but no significant difference was found in the 5.0 lp/mm group. These results support the view that currently available digital systems are capable of adequate diagnostic performance. (orig.)

  4. Occupational Safety. Hand Tools. Pre-Apprenticeship Phase 1 Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane Community Coll., Eugene, OR.

    This self-paced student training module on safety when using hand tools is one of a number of modules developed for Pre-apprenticeship Phase 1 Training. Purpose of the module is to teach students the correct safety techniques for operating common hand- and arm-powered tools, including selection, maintenance, technique, and uses. The module may…

  5. The effectiveness of home hand exercise programmes in rheumatoid arthritis: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, Alison; Prior, Yeliz

    2016-09-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) commonly reduces hand function. We systematically reviewed trials to investigate effects of home hand exercise programmes on hand symptoms and function in RA. We searched: Medline (1946-), AMED, CINAHL, Physiotherapy Evidence Database, OT Seeker, the Cochrane Library, ISI Web of Science from inception to January 2016. Nineteen trials were evaluated. Only three were randomized controlled trials with a low risk of bias (n = 665). Significant short-term improvements occurred in hand function, pain and grip strength, with long-term improvements in hand and upper limb function and pinch strength. Heterogeneity of outcome measures meant meta-analysis was not possible. Evaluation of low and moderate risk of bias trials indicated high-intensity home hand exercise programmes led to better short-term outcomes than low-intensity programmes. Such programmes are cost-effective. Further research is required to evaluate methods of helping people with RA maintain long-term home hand exercise. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Task-oriented training with computer gaming in people with rheumatoid arthritisor osteoarthritis of the hand: study protocol of a randomized controlled pilot trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srikesavan, Cynthia Swarnalatha; Shay, Barbara; Robinson, David B; Szturm, Tony

    2013-03-09

    Significant restriction in the ability to participate in home, work and community life results from pain, fatigue, joint damage, stiffness and reduced joint range of motion and muscle strength in people with rheumatoid arthritis or osteoarthritis of the hand. With modest evidence on the therapeutic effectiveness of conventional hand exercises, a task-oriented training program via real life object manipulations has been developed for people with arthritis. An innovative, computer-based gaming platform that allows a broad range of common objects to be seamlessly transformed into therapeutic input devices through instrumentation with a motion-sense mouse has also been designed. Personalized objects are selected to target specific training goals such as graded finger mobility, strength, endurance or fine/gross dexterous functions. The movements and object manipulation tasks that replicate common situations in everyday living will then be used to control and play any computer game, making practice challenging and engaging. The ongoing study is a 6-week, single-center, parallel-group, equally allocated and assessor-blinded pilot randomized controlled trial. Thirty people with rheumatoid arthritis or osteoarthritis affecting the hand will be randomized to receive either conventional hand exercises or the task-oriented training. The purpose is to determine a preliminary estimation of therapeutic effectiveness and feasibility of the task-oriented training program. Performance based and self-reported hand function, and exercise compliance are the study outcomes. Changes in outcomes (pre to post intervention) within each group will be assessed by paired Student t test or Wilcoxon signed-rank test and between groups (control versus experimental) post intervention using unpaired Student t test or Mann-Whitney U test. The study findings will inform decisions on the feasibility, safety and completion rate and will also provide preliminary data on the treatment effects of the task

  7. Relevance of the new pre-cachexia and cachexia definitions for patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Bokhorst-de van der Schueren, M.A.E.; Konijn, N.P.C.; Bultink, I.E.M.; Lems, W.F.; Earthman, C.P.; van Tuyl, H.D.

    2012-01-01

    Background & aims: The recently proposed definitions of 'pre-cachexia' and 'cachexia' might offer new possibilities for the detection of malnutrition in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods: The prevalence of different components of nutritional status and the compiled definitions of

  8. The initial ultrasonographic examination of hands and feet joints in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Ponikowska

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives : The aim was to assess of the morphology, intensity, and activity of changes in the first ultrasonographic (US examination of hands and feet in patients with early arthritis (lasting up to 12 months who were ultimately diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis (RA. An attempt was made to demonstrate a correlation between the intensity of lesions in US and selected laboratory parameters. Material and methods : Ultrasonographic examination was performed using a LOGIC GE 500 device on a group of 60 patients with arthritis (46 women, 14 men aged 18–80, previously untreated. In total, 3120 hand and feet joints were examined. The assessment focused on the presence of joint effusion, synovial proliferation and power Doppler signals (assessed on a semi-quantitative scale. Each patient underwent laboratory tests, necessary for making a diagnosis. In order to analyze the correlations between changes in US and laboratory parameters, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR, reactive protein test (CRP, rheumatoid factor (RF, and anti-citrullinated protein antibodies (ACPAs were used. Results : In the study group, the average duration of arthritis symptoms until the first US examination was 5.6 months. Among the 3120 examined hand and foot joints, deviations from the norm appeared in 1093 joints, synovial hypertrophy was found in 471 joints (grade 1 synovial hypertrophy was reported most frequently, while presence of signal in Power Doppler was revealed in 261 joints (grade 1 was observed most frequently. A statistically significant correlation was found between the intensity of changes in Power Doppler and CRP concentration. Conclusions : In patients with increased concentrations of CRP, we may expect arthritis of higher intensity, therefore, in order to prevent the progression of destructive changes, it is necessary to quickly implement effective disease-modifying antirheumatic treatment. The conducted research showed that the activity of joint

  9. Bone scan and joint scan of hands and feet in rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carpentier, N.; Verbeke, S.; Perdrisot, R.; Grilo, R.M.; Quenesson, E.; Bonnet, C.; Vergne, P.; Treves, R.; Bertin, P.; Boutros-Toni, F.

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the ability of joint scan and bone scan of hands and feet, in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, to localize the altered joints. The sensitivity, the specificity, the positive predictive value (PPV) and the negative predictive value (NPV) of joint scan were determined in comparison with clinical joint assessment. Fifteen patients (780 joints) were clinically examined (pain and synovitis); during the same day, a bone scan and a joint scan were realized by oxidronate 99m Tc intravenous injection. Patients were scanned 5 minutes (tissual time, T t ) and 3 hours 1/4 (bone time, T 0 ) after the administration. The uptake of the bi-phosphonate was evaluated with a qualitative method using a grey scale. The uptake of 99m Tc oxidronate was quantitated using an extra-articular region of interest. The sensitivity, specificity, PPV and NPV of the scan at Tt were 46%, 96%, 85% et 78%. The same parameters were 75%, 66%, 53% and 84% for the scan realized at T 0 . The joint scan has showed 22% of false positive. These false positives could be a consequence of an earlier detection of joint alterations by scan. The joint scan should forecast the evolution of joints in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. (author)

  10. Arthroplasty of the rheumatoid hand. Pre- and postoperative imaging with special consideration of biomechanical and pathobiomechanical aspects and its radiological evaluation; Arthroplastik der rheumatischen Hand. Prae- und postoperative Bildgebung mit besonderer Beruecksichtigung der Biomechanik und Pathobiomechanik und ihrer Evaluation am Roentgenbild

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sommer, O.J. [Krankenhaus Hietzing mit Neurologischem Zentrum Rosenhuegel, Zentralroentgeninstitut mit Schnittbildzentrum, Wien (Austria); Sekyra, K. [Medizinische Universitaet Innsbruck/Oesterreich, Klinik fuer Orthopaedie (Austria)

    2006-09-15

    Radiology plays a key role when the indications for arthroplasties of the hand and finger joints are determined and for the postoperative follow-up. On the one hand, the degree of inflammatory changes in all affected compartments is to be evaluated and graded; on the other hand, conventional radiograms allow for a first assessment of possible joint instability and impaired biomechanics. Both aspects influence the choice of the proper surgical therapeutic strategy. Osteolysis, deformity, fracture, prosthesis loosening or failure, heterotopic ossification, and foreign body-associated formation of granulation tissue are complications which can be detected on follow-up radiographs early on. (orig.) [German] Bei der Indikationsstellung und Verlaufskontrolle von Arthroplastien der Hand kommt der Radiologie eine wesentliche Rolle zu. Einerseits ist das Ausmass der entzuendlichen Veraenderungen in allen Kompartimenten umfassend zu beurteilen und graduieren, andererseits lassen sich bereits im konventionellen Roentgenbild Rueckschluesse auf etwaige Instabilitaet oder gestoerte Biomechanik ziehen. Beide Aussagen wirken sich auf die operative Therapieentscheidung massgeblich aus. Osteolyse, Deformitaet, Fraktur, Implantatlockerung oder -versagen, heterotope Knochenneubildung und fremdkoerperassoziierte Granulationsgewebebildung sind Komplikationen, die in den postoperativen Verlaufskontrollen fruehzeitig erfasst werden koennen. (orig.)

  11. Structural joint damage and hand bone loss in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lykke, Midtbøll Ørnbjerg

    2018-03-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic autoimmune disease characterized by pain, swelling and progressive destruction of the joints leading to loss of function and invalidity. The bone destruction in RA is characterised by two distinct features: structural joint damage and hand bone loss, and their prevention is an important treatment goal. Inhibitors of tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-inhibitors) have markedly improved the treatment options in RA patients who fail treatment with conventional synthetic Disease Modifying Anti Rheumatic Drugs (sDMARDS), but their effectiveness with regards to structural joint damage and hand bone loss, predictors thereof and the association with disease activity during treatment have mainly been investigated in randomized controlled trials (RCTs) with limited generalizability due to strict in- and exclusion criteria.
 The main aim of the PhD thesis was to assess and predict structural joint damage and hand bone loss in patients with early and established RA treated with sDMARDs and TNF-inhibitors. This was investigated in two cohorts: A) The "DANBIO X-ray study": an observational, nationwide, longitudinal cohort study of established RA patients treated in clinical practice who initiated TNF-inhibitor treatment after failure of sDMARDs and B) The "OPERA study": a randomized controlled trial of sDMARD-naïve patients with early RA treated with methotrexate (MTX) and intraarticular glucocorticoid injections in combination with adalimumab or placebo-adalimumab. Structural joint damage progression was assessed with the Sharp/van der Heijde radiographic method and hand bone loss was assessed with Digital X-ray Radiogrammetry. 
From the studies presented in the PhD thesis the following was concluded:
 Structural joint damage progression and hand bone loss were significantly lower during two years of TNF-inhibitor treatment compared to the previous two years of sDMARD-treatment in the DANBIO X-ray Study. The majority of patients had

  12. Frequency of abnormal hand and wrist radiographs at time of diagnosis of polyarticular juvenile rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Tom; Reed, Ann M; Nelson, Audrey M; Thomas, Kristen B; Patton, Alice; Hoffman, Alan D; Achenbach, Sara; O'Fallon, William M

    2002-10-01

    To determine the frequency of radiographic abnormalities in hand/wrist radiographs of children with newly diagnosed polyarticular juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (polyJRA) because radiographs of small joints are an important tool in assessing outcomes in RA and there are clinical similarities between RA and polyJRA. A medical record review was performed to identify cases of polyJRA seen at Mayo Clinic from January 1, 1994, to December 31, 2001. Hand/wrist radiographs, obtained at the time of diagnosis, were reviewed by 3 radiologists with attention to periarticular osteopenia, joint space narrowing (JSN), or erosion. At least 2 radiologists had to independently identify abnormal findings on the same radiograph. The relative carpal length (RCL), judged by Poznanski's method, was also determined. From the review of 159 medical records, 60 cases of newly diagnosed polyJRA were identified. Twenty-five of these had hand/wrist radiographs at diagnosis; 18 sets were available for this study. Of those, 2/3 were female, 6% (1/18) had subcutaneous nodules, 7% (1/14) had elevated levels of serum rheumatoid factor, and 44% (7/16) had elevated serum levels of antinuclear antibodies. Median age at diagnosis was 10.2 years, median duration of hand/wrist symptoms at diagnosis was 10 months, and median number of joints with either swelling, pain on range of motion (ROM), or limited ROM was 14.5. Sixty-one percent of radiographs taken at the time of diagnosis of polyJRA were abnormal. While 44% had periarticular osteopenia, 28% had either erosions or JSN. Six (33%) had RCL > 2 SD below the mean for age. Five (83%) of those with RCL, > 2 SD below the mean for age, had periarticular osteopenia, JSN, or erosion. We conclude the frequency of abnormal hand/wrist radiographs is very high very early in the course of polyJRA. More studies are needed to determine to what extent these radiographic abnormalities correlate with clinical outcomes.

  13. Tomosynthesis of the wrist and hand in patients with rheumatoid arthritis: comparison with radiography and MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, Takatoshi; Fujii, Masami; Yamashita, Yoshiko; Takahashi, Hiroyuki; Oki, Hodaka; Hayashida, Yoshiko; Saito, Kazuyoshi; Tanaka, Yoshiya; Korogi, Yukunori

    2014-02-01

    The purpose of this article is to compare tomosynthesis with radiography and MRI of the wrist and hand for evaluating bone erosion in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Twenty consecutive patients with an established diagnosis of RA and five control patients were included in this study. They underwent radiography, tomosynthesis, and MRI of the bilateral hand and wrist within a week. The mean total dose of radiography and tomosynthesis was 0.13 and 0.25 mGy, respectively. MRI evaluation was performed according to the Outcome Measures in Rheumatology Clinical Trials recommendations. Bone erosion on images from the three modalities was independently reviewed by two certificated radiologists with a 4-point scale (0, normal; 1, discrete erosion; 2, tomosynthesis, and MRI were 26.5%, 36.1%, and 36.7%, respectively. Significantly more bone erosions were revealed with tomosynthesis and MRI than with radiography (p tomosynthesis. Interobserver agreement (kappa value) for bone erosion was good to excellent on tomosynthesis and MRI for all joints (0.65-1.00 and 0.68-1.00, respectively), whereas it was slight to fair on radiography for some carpal bones and bases of metacarpal bones (0.22-0.56). Tomosynthesis is superior to radiography and almost comparable to MRI for the detection of bone erosion in patients with RA.

  14. Establishment of age- and sex-adjusted reference data for hand bone mass and investigation of hand bone loss in patients with rheumatoid arthritis treated in clinical practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørnbjerg, Lykke Midtbøll; Østergaard, Mikkel; Jensen, Trine

    2016-01-01

    remission (0.0032 vs. 0.0058 g/cm(2)/year; p clinical practice, and only......BACKGROUND: Rheumatoid arthritis is characterised by progressive joint destruction and loss of periarticular bone mass. Hand bone loss (HBL) has therefore been proposed as an outcome measure for treatment efficacy. A definition of increased HBL adjusted for age- and sex-related bone loss is lacking....... In this study, we aimed to: 1) establish reference values for normal hand bone mass (bone mineral density measured by digital x-ray radiogrammetry (DXR-BMD)); and 2) examine whether HBL is normalised in rheumatoid arthritis patients during treatment with tumour necrosis factor alpha inhibitors (TNFI). METHODS...

  15. Strengthening and stretching for rheumatoid arthritis of the hand (SARAH: design of a randomised controlled trial of a hand and upper limb exercise intervention - ISRCTN89936343

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adams Jo

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA commonly affects the hands and wrists with inflammation, deformity, pain, weakness and restricted mobility leading to reduced function. The effectiveness of exercise for RA hands is uncertain, although evidence from small scale studies is promising. The Strengthening And Stretching for Rheumatoid Arthritis of the Hand (SARAH trial is a pragmatic, multi-centre randomised controlled trial evaluating the clinical and cost effectiveness of adding an optimised exercise programme for hands and upper limbs to best practice usual care for patients with RA. Methods/design 480 participants with problematic RA hands will be recruited through 17 NHS trusts. Treatments will be provided by physiotherapists and occupational therapists. Participants will be individually randomised to receive either best practice usual care (joint protection advice, general exercise advice, functional splinting and assistive devices or best practice usual care supplemented with an individualised exercise programme of strengthening and stretching exercises. The study assessors will be blinded to treatment allocation and will follow participants up at four and 12 months. The primary outcome measure is the Hand function subscale of the Michigan Hand Outcome Questionnaire, and secondary outcomes include hand and wrist impairment measures, quality of life, and resource use. Economic and qualitative studies will also be carried out in parallel. Discussion This paper describes the design and development of a trial protocol of a complex intervention study based in therapy out-patient departments. The findings will provide evidence to support or refute the use of an optimised exercise programme for RA of the hand in addition to best practice usual care. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN89936343

  16. Task-Oriented Training with Computer Games for People with Rheumatoid Arthritis or Hand Osteoarthritis: A Feasibility Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srikesavan, Cynthia Swarnalatha; Shay, Barbara; Szturm, Tony

    2016-09-13

    To examine the feasibility of a clinical trial on a novel, home-based task-oriented training with conventional hand exercises in people with rheumatoid arthritis or hand osteoarthritis. To explore the experiences of participants who completed their respective home exercise programmes. Thirty volunteer participants aged between 30 and 60 years and diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis or hand osteoarthritis were proposed for a single-center, assessor-blinded, randomized controlled trial ( ClinicalTrials.gov : NCT01635582). Participants received task-oriented training with interactive computer games and objects of daily life or finger mobility and strengthening exercises. Both programmes were home based and were done four sessions per week with 20 minutes each session for 6 weeks. Major feasibility outcomes were number of volunteers screened, randomized, and retained; completion of blinded assessments, exercise training, and home exercise sessions; equipment and data management; and clinical outcomes of hand function. Reaching the recruitment target in 18 months and achieving exercise compliance >80% were set as success criteria. Concurrent with the trial, focus group interviews explored experiences of those participants who completed their respective programmes. After trial initiation, revisions in inclusion criteria were required to promote recruitment. A total of 17 participants were randomized and 15 were retained. Completion of assessments, exercise training, and home exercise sessions; equipment and data collection and management demonstrated excellent feasibility. Both groups improved in hand function outcomes and exercise compliance was above 85%. Participants perceived both programmes as appropriate and acceptable. Participants who completed task-oriented training also agreed that playing different computer games was enjoyable, engaging, and motivating. Findings demonstrate initial evidence on recruitment, feasibility of trial procedures, and acceptability of

  17. Validation of automatic joint space width measurements in hand radiographs in rheumatoid arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schenk, Olga; Huo, Yinghe; Vincken, Koen L; van de Laar, Mart A; Kuper, Ina H H; Slump, Kees C H; Lafeber, Floris P J G; Bernelot Moens, Hein J

    2016-01-01

    Computerized methods promise quick, objective, and sensitive tools to quantify progression of radiological damage in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Measurement of joint space width (JSW) in finger and wrist joints with these systems performed comparable to the Sharp-van der Heijde score (SHS). A next

  18. Validation of automatic joint space width measurements in hand radiographs in rheumatoid arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schenk, Olga; Huo, Yinghe; Vincken, Koen L.; van de Laar, Mart A F J; Kuper, Ina H.H.; Slump, Cornelis H.; Lafeber, Floris P.J.G.; Bernelot Moens, Hein J.

    2016-01-01

    Computerized methods promise quick, objective, and sensitive tools to quantify progression of radiological damage in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Measurement of joint space width (JSW) in finger and wrist joints with these systems performed comparable to the Sharp–van der Heijde score (SHS). A next

  19. Osteoporosis in the rheumatoid hand the effects of treatment with D ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Osteoporosis is a common and important feature of rheumatoid disease which can be further influenced by the treatment admiflistered. o-penicillamine. a lathyritic agent. can also theoretically hasten the osteoporotic process through its effect on collagen metabolism. In the present study the effects of the long-term ...

  20. Analysis of the effects of hospitalization on fine hand functions compared to gross grip in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeynep Tuna

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Hospitalization process causes a variety of physical problems. The decrease of hand use in daily life during hospitalization brings hand dysfunction to mind in inpatients. The aim of this study is to compare the hand functions of hospitalized patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA to outpatients in detail. Methods: Grip and pinch strengths of both hospitalized patients in rheumatology service and outpatients on the routine control day were measured. In addition, 9-Hole Peg Test was performed and the disability level was determined by the Turkish version of Michigan Hand Outcomes Questionnaire (MHOQ. Results: While grip strength and MHOQ scores were similar (p>0.05 in both groups, all three pinch strengths (lateral, bipod, tripod and 9HPT scores were lower (p<0.05 in hospitalized patients. Conclusion: Consequently, besides disease activity, hospitalization process also impairs fine hand functions in rheumatological patients. Evaluation of fine hand functions and appropriate rehabilitative interventions may prevent further disability in hospitalized patients. J Clin Exp Invest 2015; 6 (3: 228-232

  1. Ultrasound of the hand is sufficient to detect subclinical inflammation in rheumatoid arthritis remission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hammer, Hilde Berner; Kvien, Tore K; Terslev, Lene

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Ultrasound (US) is a sensitive method for detecting joint/tendon inflammation in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Subclinical inflammation is often found in patients with RA in composite score remission. The purpose of the present study was to explore whether US of only......-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (bDMARDs) and after 6 months (184 patients) and 12 months (152 patients) of follow-up. They were assessed by US (greyscale [GS] and power Doppler [PD] of 36 joints and 4 tendons, scored 0-3) as well as clinical and laboratory examinations, and different disease activity composite...

  2. Choices of Pre-Service Science Teachers Laboratory Environments: Hands-on or Hands-off?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapici, Hasan Ozgur; Akcay, Hakan

    2018-01-01

    Learning in laboratories for students is not only crucial for conceptual understanding, but also contributes to gaining scientific reasoning skills. Following fast developments in technology, online laboratory environments have been improved considerably and nowadays form an attractive alternative for hands-on laboratories. The study was done in…

  3. Evaluation of the diagnostic accuracy of hand and foot MRI for early Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieuwenhuis, Wouter P; van Steenbergen, Hanna W; Mangnus, Lukas; Newsum, Elize C; Bloem, Johan L; Huizinga, Tom W J; le Cessie, Saskia; Reijnierse, Monique; van der Helm-van Mil, Annette H M

    2017-08-01

    To assess the diagnostic value of MRI for early RA. In some RA patients, a classifiable diagnosis cannot be made at first presentation; these patients present with unclassified arthritis (UA). The use of MRI for early diagnosis of RA is recommended, yet the evidence for its reliability is limited. MRI of hand and foot was performed in 589 early arthritis patients included in the Leiden Early Arthritis Clinic (229 presented with RA, 159 with other arthritides and 201 with UA). Symptom-free controls provided a reference for defining an abnormal MRI. In preliminary investigations, MRI of patients who presented with RA was compared with MRI of symptom-free controls and of patients with other arthritides. Thereafter, the value of MRI in early RA diagnosis was determined in UA patients using the 1-year follow-up on fulfilling the 1987 RA criteria and start of disease-modifying drugs as outcomes. Preliminary investigations were promising. Of the UA patients, 14% developed RA and 37% started disease-modifying treatment. MRI-detected tenosynovitis was associated with RA development independent of other types of MRI-detected inflammation [odds ratio (OR) = 7.5, 95% CI: 2.4, 23] and also independent of age and other inflammatory measures (swollen joints, CRP) (OR = 4.2, 95% CI: 1.4, 12.9). Within UA patients, the negative predictive value of abnormal tenosynovitis was 95% (95% CI: 89%, 98%) and the positive predictive value 25% (95% CI: 17%, 35%). The performance was best in the subgroup of UA patients presenting with oligoarthritis (18% developed RA): the positive predictive value was 36% (95% CI: 23%, 52%), the negative predictive value was 98% (95% CI: 88%, 100%), the sensitivity was 93% (95% CI: 70%, 99%) and the specificity was 63% (95% CI: 51%, 74%). MRI contributes to the identification of UA patients who will develop RA, mostly in UA patients presenting with oligoarthritis. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for

  4. A comparison of magnetic resonance imaging, sonography, and radiography of the hand in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoving, Jan Lucas; Buchbinder, Rachelle; Hall, Stephen; Lawler, Gary; Coombs, Peter; McNealy, Stephen; Bird, Paul; Connell, David

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: As therapy for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) becomes more effective, more sensitive imaging methods are required to assess disease activity and joint damage. We compared magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), sonography, and radiography for assessment of disease activity for the detection of bony

  5. Follow-up of volar plate interposition arthroplasty (Tupper) of the metacarpophalangeal joints in rheumatoid hands: preliminary findings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gøtze, J P; Jensen, Claus Hjorth

    2000-01-01

    We present the results of a three-year follow-up study of 59 interposition volar plate arthroplasties (Tupper) on metacarpophalangeal joints in 13 patients with erosive rheumatoid arthritis. The median age at the time of operation was 60 years (range 45-77). All patients reported lasting pain...

  6. Distinctive radiological features of small hand joints in rheumatoid arthritis and seronegative spondyloarthritis demonstrated by contrast-enhanced (Gd-DTPA) magnetic resnance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jevtic, V. [Inst. of Radiology, Univ. Medical Centre, Ljubljana (Slovenia); Watt, I. [Dept. of Clinical Radiology, Bristol Royal Infirmary (United Kingdom); Rozman, B. [Dept. of Rheumatology, Univ. Medical Centre, Ljubljana (Slovenia); Kos-Golja, M. [Dept. of Rheumatology, Univ. Medical Centre, Ljubljana (Slovenia); Demsar, F. [Inst. Jozef Stefan, Ljubljana (Slovenia); Jarh, O. [Inst. Jozef Stefan, Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    1995-07-01

    A series of patients with clinically early inflammatory joint disease due to rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis and Reiter`s syndrome were examined by plain film radiography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The spin echo T1-weighted precontrast, T2-weighted, and, especially, T1-weighted postcontrast images demonstrated distinct differences in the distribution of inflamatory changes, both within and adjacent to involved small hand joints. Two major subtypes of inflammatory arthritis were shown, thus providing a specific differential diagnosis between rheumatoid arthritis and some patients with seronegative spondyloarthritis. In particular, all the patients with Reiter`s syndrome who were studied, and half of those with psoriatic arthritis, had a distinctive pattern of extra-articular desease involvement. The need for a new classification of clinical subsets in psoriatic arthritis has been recently suggested. The present findings suggest that magnetic resonance imaging could be useful in such a reclassification of seronegative spondyloarthritis, as well as offering considerable potential for a reappraisal of pathogenesis and therapy. In this series, it was also noted that juxta-articular osteoporosis on plain film did not correlate with bone marrow oedema on MRI. Hence the aetiology of this common radiographic finding also merits further consideration. (orig.)

  7. Distinctive radiological features of small hand joints in rheumatoid arthritis and seronegative spondyloarthritis demonstrated by contrast-enhanced (Gd-DTPA) magnetic resnance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jevtic, V.; Watt, I.; Rozman, B.; Kos-Golja, M.; Demsar, F.; Jarh, O.

    1995-01-01

    A series of patients with clinically early inflammatory joint disease due to rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis and Reiter's syndrome were examined by plain film radiography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The spin echo T1-weighted precontrast, T2-weighted, and, especially, T1-weighted postcontrast images demonstrated distinct differences in the distribution of inflamatory changes, both within and adjacent to involved small hand joints. Two major subtypes of inflammatory arthritis were shown, thus providing a specific differential diagnosis between rheumatoid arthritis and some patients with seronegative spondyloarthritis. In particular, all the patients with Reiter's syndrome who were studied, and half of those with psoriatic arthritis, had a distinctive pattern of extra-articular desease involvement. The need for a new classification of clinical subsets in psoriatic arthritis has been recently suggested. The present findings suggest that magnetic resonance imaging could be useful in such a reclassification of seronegative spondyloarthritis, as well as offering considerable potential for a reappraisal of pathogenesis and therapy. In this series, it was also noted that juxta-articular osteoporosis on plain film did not correlate with bone marrow oedema on MRI. Hence the aetiology of this common radiographic finding also merits further consideration. (orig.)

  8. Diagnostic performance of three-dimensional MR maximum intensity projection for the assessment of synovitis of the hand and wrist in rheumatoid arthritis: A pilot study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Xubin, E-mail: lixb@bjmu.edu.cn [Department of Radiology, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital, National Clinical Reseaech Center for Cancer, Tianjin, Key Laboratory of Cancer Prevention and Therapy, Tianjin 300060 (China); Liu, Xia; Du, Xiangke [Department of Radiology, Peking University People' s Hospital, Beijing 100044 (China); Ye, Zhaoxiang [Department of Radiology, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital, National Clinical Reseaech Center for Cancer, Tianjin, Key Laboratory of Cancer Prevention and Therapy, Tianjin 300060 (China)

    2014-05-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the diagnostic performance of three-dimensional (3D) MR maximum intensity projection (MIP) in the assessment of synovitis of the hand and wrist in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) compared to 3D contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (CE-MRI). Materials and methods: Twenty-five patients with RA underwent MR examinations. 3D MR MIP images were derived from the enhanced images. MR images were reviewed by two radiologists for the presence and location of synovitis of the hand and wrist. The diagnostic sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of 3D MIP were, respectively, calculated with the reference standard 3D CE-MRI. Results: In all subjects, 3D MIP images yielded directly and clearly the presence and location of synovitis with just one image. Synovitis demonstrated high signal intensity on MIP images. The k-values for the detection of articular synovitis indicated excellent interobserver agreements using 3D MIP images (k = 0.87) and CE-MR images (k = 0.91), respectively. 3D MIP demonstrated a sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of 91.07%, 98.57% and 96.0%, respectively, for the detection of synonitis. Conclusion: 3D MIP can provide a whole overview of lesion locations and a reliable diagnostic performance in the assessment of articular synovitis of the hand and wrist in patients with RA, which has potential value of clinical practice.

  9. ACR/EULAR Definitions of Remission Are Associated with Lower Residual Inflammatory Activity Compared with DAS28 Remission on Hand MRI in Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisbona, Maria Pilar; Solano, Albert; Ares, Jesús; Almirall, Miriam; Salman-Monte, Tarek Carlos; Maymó, Joan

    2016-09-01

    To determine the level of residual inflammation [synovitis, bone marrow edema (BME), tenosynovitis, and total inflammation] quantified by hand magnetic resonance imaging (h-MRI) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in remission according to 3 different definitions of clinical remission, and to compare these remission definitions. A cross-sectional study. To assess the level of residual MRI inflammation in remission, cutoff levels associated to remission and median scores of MRI residual inflammatory lesions were calculated. Data from an MRI register of patients with RA who have various levels of disease activity were used. These were used for the analyses: synovitis, BME according to the Rheumatoid Arthritis Magnetic Resonance Imaging Scoring system, tenosynovitis, total inflammation, and disease activity composite measures recorded at the time of MRI. Receiver-operating characteristic analysis was used to identify the best cutoffs associated with remission for each inflammatory lesion on h-MRI. Median values of each inflammatory lesion for each definition of remission were also calculated. A total of 388 h-MRI sets of patients with RA with different levels of disease activity, 130 in remission, were included. Cutoff values associated with remission according to the Simplified Disease Activity Index (SDAI) ≤ 3.3 and the Boolean American College of Rheumatology/European League Against Rheumatism (ACR/EULAR) definitions for BME and tenosynovitis (1 and 3, respectively) were lower than BME and tenosynovitis (2 and 5, respectively) for the Disease Activity Score on 28 joints (DAS28) ≤ 2.6. Median scores for synovitis, BME, and total inflammation were also lower for the SDAI and Boolean ACR/EULAR remission criteria compared with DAS28. Patients with RA in remission according to the SDAI and Boolean ACR/EULAR definitions showed lower levels of MRI-detected residual inflammation compared with DAS28.

  10. Association of bone edema with the progression of bone erosions quantified by hand magnetic resonance imaging in patients with rheumatoid arthritis in remission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisbona, Maria Pilar; Pàmies, Anna; Ares, Jesús; Almirall, Miriam; Navallas, Maria; Solano, Albert; Maymó, Joan

    2014-08-01

    To evaluate the association of synovitis, bone marrow edema (BME), and tenosynovitis in the progression of erosions quantified by hand magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at 1 year in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in remission. A total of 56 of 196 patients with early RA in remission at 1 year and with available MRI data at baseline and at 12 months were included. MRI images were assessed according to the Rheumatoid Arthritis Magnetic Resonance Imaging Scoring (RAMRIS) system. Persistent remission was defined as 28-joint Disease Activity Score-erythrocyte sedimentation rate ≤ 2.6 and/or Simplified Disease Activity Index ≤ 3.3 and/or the new boolean American College of Rheumatology/European League Against Rheumatism remission criteria for a continuous period of at least 6 months. Progression of bone erosions was defined as an increase of 1 or more units in annual RAMRIS score for erosions compared to baseline. At 1 year, the majority of patients with RA in sustained remission showed some inflammatory activity on MRI (94.6% synovitis, 46.4% BME, and 58.9% tenosynovitis) and 19 of the 56 patients (33.9%) showed MRI progression of bone erosions. A significant difference was observed in MRI BME at 1 year, with higher mean score in patients with progression compared to nonprogression of erosions (4.8 ± 5.6 and 1.4 ± 2.6, p = 0.03). Subclinical inflammation was identified by MRI in 96.4% of patients with RA in sustained clinical remission. Significantly higher scores of BME after sustained remission were observed in patients with progression of erosions compared to patients with no progression. The persistence of higher scores of BME may explain the progression of bone erosions in patients with persistent clinical remission.

  11. Rheumatoid arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Firestein's Textbook of Rheumatology . 10th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2017:chap 70. Garneau E. Rheumatoid arthritis. In: ... FF, ed. Ferri's Clinical Advisor 2018 . Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2017:1125-1128. June RR, Moreland LW. Rheumatoid ...

  12. THE RHEUMATOID HAND (Part I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuri Aleksandrovich Olyunin

    2009-01-01

    Progression of RA leads to articular cartilage and bone destruction and ligament and tendon damage over time. Incompetence of the ligamentous apparatus may cause dorsal subluxation of the radius. In late RA, bone erosions are detectable in practically all patients. This is the most characteristic X-ray symptom of polyarthritis. Extensive and multiple destructive changes in the joints are accompanied by the development of their multiple subluxations, dislocations, and contractures. In addition to destructive changes in the joints, most deformities are associated with their tendinous and liga-mentous looseness and ruptures and with the rearrangement of normal muscle tension around one joint or more. Articular ankylosis occurs in late RA

  13. Pre-Service Physics Teachers’ Perception toward Hands-on Lab Activity and 21st Century Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putri, D. H.; Risdianto, E.; Sutarno, S.

    2017-09-01

    This study aimed to describe the hands-on lab activities and 21st century skills of pre-service physics teachers at a university in Bengkulu. The respondents of this study were 113 students who have been finished and were following the laboratory course. The research instrument was questionnaire. The explored aspects of laboratory activities were motivation, the importance of laboratory activities, equipment, laboratory activities process, suitability of curriculum, assessment, laboratory design, and the 21st century skills training. The 21st century skills explored consist of learning and innovation skills, life and careers skills, and media, information and technology skills. The data obtained will be analyzed descriptively. Based on the results of data analysis was obtained that they have a good perception toward the aspect of motivation, the importance of hands-on lab activities, and laboratory activities process; and the perception was fair for other aspects. The lowest perception score was obtained in the aspects of the 21st century skills training. This result was in accordance with the 21st century skills of pre-service physics teachers which were still in moderate category. So it is necessary to develop a model of laboratory activities design that can training and enhancing the 21st century skills for pre-service physics teachers.

  14. Hands-on science methods class for pre-service elementary teachers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manner, B.M. [Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    1994-12-31

    If elementary teachers are to be comfortable teaching science, they must have positive pre-service experiences. A science methods class that is activity-based and student-centered, rather than lecture-based and teacher-centered, peaks their interest in science and alleviates their fears. Activities conducted by the students illustrate science concepts or integrate science with children`s literature books such as The Grouchy Ladybug. These activities are conducted by each student with the rest of the class and the professor acting as an elementary class. Each activity is then evaluated as to the science concept, what was done well, and how it could be improved. The students also relate how the activity would be integrated with other subjects such as social studies, art, math, and language arts. Student feedback indicates this method is enjoyable, educational, and valuable in preparing them to teach science. The {open_quotes}oohs{close_quotes} and {open_quotes}I didn`t know that!{close_quotes} during activities are positives, but students have also learned some science, lost most of their science anxiety, and will teach science with the confidence and enthusiasm that was lacking at the beginning of the course.

  15. Performance Comparison of Several Pre-Processing Methods in a Hand Gesture Recognition System based on Nearest Neighbor for Different Background Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iwan Setyawan

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a performance analysis and comparison of several pre-processing methods used in a hand gesture recognition system. The pre-processing methods are based on the combinations of several image processing operations, namely edge detection, low pass filtering, histogram equalization, thresholding and desaturation. The hand gesture recognition system is designed to classify an input image into one of six possible classes. The input images are taken with various background conditions. Our experiments showed that the best result is achieved when the pre-processing method consists of only a desaturation operation, achieving a classification accuracy of up to 83.15%.

  16. Pre-analytical and biological variability in circulating interleukin 6 in healthy subjects and patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Lene S; Christensen, Ib J; Lottenburger, Tine

    2008-01-01

    in serum IL-6 over a 3-year period (14%, p=0.33). Exercise (cycling) increased serum IL-6 in healthy subjects but not in RA patients. In conclusion, circulating IL-6 is stable regarding sample handling and shows little variation over time. Changes in IL-6 concentrations >60% (2 times the biological...... variation) are likely to reflect changes in disease activity and not only pre-analytical or normal biological variability....

  17. Hand bone loss in early rheumatoid arthritis during a methotrexate-based treat-to-target strategy with or without adalimumab-a substudy of the optimized treatment algorithm in early RA (OPERA) trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørnbjerg, L M; Østergaard, M; Jensen, T

    2017-01-01

    This study aims to investigate 1-year hand bone loss (HBL1-year) in early rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients treated with a methotrexate (MTX) and intra-articular triamcinolone treat-to-target strategy +/- adalimumab and to determine if HBL6months is associated with radiographic progression after 2...... associated with ∆TSS after 2 years (β = -0.086 (95% confidence interval = -0.15; -0.025) TSS unit/mg/cm(2) increase, p = 0.006) but not with presence of radiographic progression (∆TSS >0) (OR 0.96 (0.92-1.0), p = 0.10). In early RA patients treated with a methotrexate-based treat-to-target strategy...

  18. Rheumatoid Vasculitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in any rheumatoid arthritis patient who develops new constitutional symptoms, skin ulcerations, decreased blood flow to the ... The differential diagnosis of RV includes: Cholesterol embolization syndromes, in which a piece of cholesterol breaks off ...

  19. Rheumatoid arthritis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mahmood Ally

    being implicated as possible triggers.3 Smoking has recently received much ... rheumatoid synovium and interaction with these antibodies may not only ..... with psycho-social matters and the cessation of smoking should be incorporated in the ...

  20. Cartilage quality in rheumatoid arthritis: comparison of T2* mapping, native T1 mapping, dGEMRIC, ΔR1 and value of pre-contrast imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchbender, Christian; Scherer, Axel; Kroepil, Patric; Quentin, Michael; Reichelt, Dorothea C.; Lanzman, Rotem S.; Mathys, Christian; Blondin, Dirk; Wittsack, Hans-Joerg; Antoch, Gerald; Miese, Falk; Koerbl, Birthe; Bittersohl, Bernd; Zilkens, Christoph; Hofer, Matthias; Schneider, Matthias; Ostendorf, Benedikt

    2012-01-01

    To prospectively evaluate four non-invasive markers of cartilage quality - T2* mapping, native T1 mapping, dGEMRIC and ΔR1 - in healthy volunteers and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients. Cartilage of metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joints II were imaged in 28 consecutive subjects: 12 healthy volunteers [9 women, mean (SD) age 52.67 (9.75) years, range 30-66] and 16 RA patients with MCP II involvement [12 women, mean (SD) age 58.06 (12.88) years, range 35-76]. Sagittal T2* mapping was performed with a multi-echo gradient-echo on a 3 T MRI scanner. For T1 mapping the dual flip angle method was applied prior to native T1 mapping and 40 min after gadolinium application (delayed gadolinium-enhanced MRI of cartilage, dGEMRIC, T1 Gd ). The difference in the longitudinal relaxation rate induced by gadolinium (ΔR1) was calculated. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AROC) was used to test for differentiation of RA patients from healthy volunteers. dGEMRIC (AUC 0.81) and ΔR1 (AUC 0.75) significantly differentiated RA patients from controls. T2* mapping (AUC 0.66) and native T1 mapping (AUC 0.66) were not significantly different in RA patients compared to controls. The data support the use of dGEMRIC for the assessment of MCP joint cartilage quality in RA. T2* and native T1 mapping are of low diagnostic value. Pre-contrast T1 mapping for the calculation of ΔR1 does not increase the diagnostic value of dGEMRIC. (orig.)

  1. Cartilage quality in rheumatoid arthritis: comparison of T2* mapping, native T1 mapping, dGEMRIC, {delta}R1 and value of pre-contrast imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchbender, Christian; Scherer, Axel; Kroepil, Patric; Quentin, Michael; Reichelt, Dorothea C.; Lanzman, Rotem S.; Mathys, Christian; Blondin, Dirk; Wittsack, Hans-Joerg; Antoch, Gerald; Miese, Falk [University Duesseldorf, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Medical Faculty, Duesseldorf (Germany); Koerbl, Birthe [Heinrich-Heine-University, Department of Endocrinology, Diabetology and Rheumatology, Medical Faculty, Duesseldorf (Germany); Heinrich-Heine-University, Leibniz Centre for Diabetes Research, Institute of Biometrics and Epidemiology, German Diabetes Centre, Duesseldorf (Germany); Bittersohl, Bernd; Zilkens, Christoph [Heinrich-Heine-University, Department of Orthopaedics, Medical Faculty, Duesseldorf (Germany); Hofer, Matthias [Heinrich-Heine-University, Medical Education Group, Medical School, Duesseldorf (Germany); Schneider, Matthias; Ostendorf, Benedikt [Heinrich-Heine-University, Department of Endocrinology, Diabetology and Rheumatology, Medical Faculty, Duesseldorf (Germany)

    2012-06-15

    To prospectively evaluate four non-invasive markers of cartilage quality - T2* mapping, native T1 mapping, dGEMRIC and {delta}R1 - in healthy volunteers and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients. Cartilage of metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joints II were imaged in 28 consecutive subjects: 12 healthy volunteers [9 women, mean (SD) age 52.67 (9.75) years, range 30-66] and 16 RA patients with MCP II involvement [12 women, mean (SD) age 58.06 (12.88) years, range 35-76]. Sagittal T2* mapping was performed with a multi-echo gradient-echo on a 3 T MRI scanner. For T1 mapping the dual flip angle method was applied prior to native T1 mapping and 40 min after gadolinium application (delayed gadolinium-enhanced MRI of cartilage, dGEMRIC, T1{sub Gd}). The difference in the longitudinal relaxation rate induced by gadolinium ({delta}R1) was calculated. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AROC) was used to test for differentiation of RA patients from healthy volunteers. dGEMRIC (AUC 0.81) and {delta}R1 (AUC 0.75) significantly differentiated RA patients from controls. T2* mapping (AUC 0.66) and native T1 mapping (AUC 0.66) were not significantly different in RA patients compared to controls. The data support the use of dGEMRIC for the assessment of MCP joint cartilage quality in RA. T2* and native T1 mapping are of low diagnostic value. Pre-contrast T1 mapping for the calculation of {delta}R1 does not increase the diagnostic value of dGEMRIC. (orig.)

  2. Pre-silencing of genes involved in the electron transport chain (ETC) pathway is associated with responsiveness to abatacept in rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derambure, C; Dzangue-Tchoupou, G; Berard, C; Vergne, N; Hiron, M; D'Agostino, M A; Musette, P; Vittecoq, O; Lequerré, T

    2017-05-25

    In the current context of personalized medicine, one of the major challenges in the management of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is to identify biomarkers that predict drug responsiveness. From the European APPRAISE trial, our main objective was to identify a gene expression profile associated with responsiveness to abatacept (ABA) + methotrexate (MTX) and to understand the involvement of this signature in the pathophysiology of RA. Whole human genome microarrays (4 × 44 K) were performed from a first subset of 36 patients with RA. Data validation by quantitative reverse-transcription (qRT)-PCR was performed from a second independent subset of 32 patients with RA. Gene Ontology and WikiPathways database allowed us to highlight the specific biological mechanisms involved in predicting response to ABA/MTX. From the first subset of 36 patients with RA, a combination including 87 transcripts allowed almost perfect separation between responders and non-responders to ABA/MTX. Next, the second subset of patients 32 with RA allowed validation by qRT-PCR of a minimal signature with only four genes. This latter signature categorized 81% of patients with RA with 75% sensitivity, 85% specificity and 85% negative predictive value. This combination showed a significant enrichment of genes involved in electron transport chain (ETC) pathways. Seven transcripts from ETC pathways (NDUFA6, NDUFA4, UQCRQ, ATP5J, COX7A2, COX7B, COX6A1) were significantly downregulated in responders versus non-responders to ABA/MTX. Moreover, dysregulation of these genes was independent of inflammation and was specific to ABA response. Pre-silencing of ETC genes is associated with future response to ABA/MTX and might be a crucial key to susceptibility to ABA response.

  3. Radiological aspects of rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schacherl, M.

    1985-01-01

    An introductory summary of the imaging-diagnosis will be given. The necessity of acquiring a catalogue of application to particular imaging methods is emphasized. Discussion of step by step diagnosis regarding rheumatologic questions is given on example of the hand. Technically insufficient radiographs and bad habits during diagnostic analysis are pointed out. Radiologic problems in differentiating arthritis/osteoarthrosis will be mentioned. The discussion of these points is followed by outlining the radiology of rheumatoid arthritis and the complexity of this disease. Introduction of a new stage classification. Finally twelve basic radiologic types of rheumatoid arthritis will be presented. (orig.) [de

  4. National cohort study of reproductive risk factors for rheumatoid arthritis in Denmark: a role for hyperemesis, gestational hypertension and pre-eclampsia?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, K T; Pedersen, B V; Jacobsen, S

    2010-01-01

    While reproductive factors might plausibly be involved in the aetiology of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), the female predominance remains unexplained. A study was undertaken to address the possible impact of live births, pregnancy losses and pregnancy complications on the subsequent risk of RA...

  5. The effects of arthritis gloves on people with Rheumatoid Arthritis or Inflammatory Arthritis with hand pain: a study protocol for a multi-centre randomised controlled trial (the A-GLOVES trial).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prior, Yeliz; Sutton, Chris; Cotterill, Sarah; Adams, Jo; Camacho, Elizabeth; Arafin, Nazina; Firth, Jill; O'Neill, Terence; Hough, Yvonne; Jones, Wendy; Hammond, Alison

    2017-05-30

    Arthritis gloves are regularly provided as part of the management of people with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and undifferentiated (early) inflammatory arthritis (IA). Usually made of nylon and elastane (i.e. Lycra®), these arthritis gloves apply pressure with the aims of relieving hand pain, stiffness and improving hand function. However, a systematic review identified little evidence supporting their use. We therefore designed a trial to compare the effectiveness of the commonest type of arthritis glove provided in the United Kingdom (Isotoner gloves) (intervention) with placebo (control) gloves (i.e. larger arthritis gloves providing similar warmth to the intervention gloves but minimal pressure only) in people with these conditions. Participants aged 18 years and over with RA or IA and persistent hand pain will be recruited from National Health Service Trusts in the United Kingdom. Following consent, participants will complete a questionnaire booklet, then be randomly allocated to receive intervention or placebo arthritis gloves. Within three weeks, they will be fitted with the allocated gloves by clinical specialist rheumatology occupational therapists. Twelve weeks (i.e. the primary endpoint) after completing the baseline questionnaire, participants will complete a second questionnaire, including the same measures plus additional questions to explore adherence, benefits and problems with glove-wear. A sub-sample of participants from each group will be interviewed at the end of their participation to explore their views of the gloves received. The clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of the intervention, compared to placebo gloves, will be evaluated over 12 weeks. The primary outcome measure is hand pain during activity. Qualitative interviews will be thematically analysed. This study will evaluate the commonest type of arthritis glove (Isotoner) provided in the NHS (i.e. the intervention) compared to a placebo glove. The results will help

  6. MR imaging of the early rheumatoid arthritis: usefulness of contrast enhanced fat suppressed SPGR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sun Mi; Joo, Kyung Bin; Kim, Seong Tae; Hahm, Chang Kok

    1995-01-01

    To evaluate value of post-contrast 3-Dimensional fat suppressed Spoiled GRASS (FS SPGR) in detecting subtle bony erosion and tenosynovitis of hands and wrists due to early rheumatoid arthritis. Fourteen MR imagings of the hands and wrists were performed in 7 early rheumatoid arthritis without any abnormalities in plain radiography and in 7 healthy volunteers. All subjects underwent MR sequence of coronal 3D FS SPGR with and without contrast enhancement in 1.5T MR unit. We evaluated the number of the bony erosion and tenosynovitis respectively in pre-and post-contrast FS SPGR images. The abnormal enhancing areas were not demonstrated in 7 healthy volunteers. Seven patients had 25 bony erosions in pre-contrast FS SPGR and 52 bony erosions with tenosynovitis (n = 10) in post-contrast FS SPGR. Enhancing joint spaces were shown in 8 cases. Post-contrast FS SPGR was better than pre-contrast FS SPGR in the evaluation of early rheumatoid arthritis and is valuable as a baseline study

  7. MR imaging of the early rheumatoid arthritis: usefulness of contrast enhanced fat suppressed SPGR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sun Mi; Joo, Kyung Bin; Kim, Seong Tae; Hahm, Chang Kok [College of Medicine, Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-06-15

    To evaluate value of post-contrast 3-Dimensional fat suppressed Spoiled GRASS (FS SPGR) in detecting subtle bony erosion and tenosynovitis of hands and wrists due to early rheumatoid arthritis. Fourteen MR imagings of the hands and wrists were performed in 7 early rheumatoid arthritis without any abnormalities in plain radiography and in 7 healthy volunteers. All subjects underwent MR sequence of coronal 3D FS SPGR with and without contrast enhancement in 1.5T MR unit. We evaluated the number of the bony erosion and tenosynovitis respectively in pre-and post-contrast FS SPGR images. The abnormal enhancing areas were not demonstrated in 7 healthy volunteers. Seven patients had 25 bony erosions in pre-contrast FS SPGR and 52 bony erosions with tenosynovitis (n = 10) in post-contrast FS SPGR. Enhancing joint spaces were shown in 8 cases. Post-contrast FS SPGR was better than pre-contrast FS SPGR in the evaluation of early rheumatoid arthritis and is valuable as a baseline study.

  8. A Web-Based Training Resource for Therapists to Deliver an Evidence-Based Exercise Program for Rheumatoid Arthritis of the Hand (iSARAH): Design, Development, and Usability Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srikesavan, Cynthia Swarnalatha; Williamson, Esther; Eldridge, Lucy; Heine, Peter; Adams, Jo; Cranston, Tim; Lamb, Sarah E

    2017-12-13

    The Strengthening and Stretching for Rheumatoid Arthritis of the Hand (SARAH) is a tailored, progressive exercise program for people having difficulties with wrist and hand function due to rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The program was evaluated in a large-scale clinical trial and was found to improve hand function, was safe to deliver, and was cost-effective. These findings led to the SARAH program being recommended in the UK National Institute for Health and Care Excellence guidelines for the management of adults with RA. To facilitate the uptake of this evidence-based program by clinicians, we proposed a Web-based training program for SARAH (iSARAH) to educate and train physiotherapists and occupational therapists on delivering the SARAH program in their practice. The overall iSARAH implementation project was guided by the 5 phases of the analysis, design, development, implementation, and evaluation (ADDIE) system design model. The objective of our study was to conduct the first 3 phases of the model in the development of the iSARAH project. Following publication of the trial, the SARAH program materials were made available to therapists to download from the trial website for use in clinical practice. A total of 35 therapists who downloaded these materials completed an online survey to provide feedback on practice trends in prescribing hand exercises for people with RA, perceived barriers and facilitators to using the SARAH program in clinical practice, and their preferences for the content and Web features of iSARAH. The development and design of iSARAH were further guided by a team of multidisciplinary health professionals (n=17) who took part in a half-day development meeting. We developed the preliminary version of iSARAH and tested it among therapists (n=10) to identify and rectify usability issues and to produce the final version. The major recommendations made by therapists and the multidisciplinary team were having a simple Web design and layout, clear

  9. Earlier and greater hand pre-shaping in the elderly: a study based on kinematic analysis of reaching movements to grasp objects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamaru, Yoshiki; Naito, Yasuo; Nishikawa, Takashi

    2017-11-01

    Elderly people are less able to manipulate objects skilfully than young adults. Although previous studies have examined age-related deterioration of hand movements with a focus on the phase after grasping objects, the changes in the reaching phase have not been studied thus far. We aimed to examine whether changes in hand shape patterns during the reaching phase of grasping movements differ between young adults and the elderly. Ten healthy elderly adults and 10 healthy young adults were examined using the Simple Test for Evaluating Hand Functions and kinetic analysis of hand pre-shaping reach-to-grasp tasks. The results were then compared between the two groups. For kinetic analysis, we measured the time of peak tangential velocity of the wrist and the inter-fingertip distance (the distance between the tips of the thumb and index finger) at different time points. The results showed that the elderly group's performance on the Simple Test for Evaluating Hand Functions was significantly lower than that of the young adult group, irrespective of whether the dominant or non-dominant hand was used, indicating deterioration of hand movement in the elderly. The peak tangential velocity of the wrist in either hand appeared significantly earlier in the elderly group than in the young adult group. The elderly group also showed larger inter-fingertip distances with arch-like fingertip trajectories compared to the young adult group for all object sizes. To perform accurate prehension, elderly people have an earlier peak tangential velocity point than young adults. This allows for a longer adjustment time for reaching and grasping movements and for reducing errors in object prehension by opening the hand and fingers wider. Elderly individuals gradually modify their strategy based on previous successes and failures during daily living to compensate for their decline in dexterity and operational capabilities. © 2017 Japanese Psychogeriatric Society.

  10. Unique Role of Occupational Therapy in Rehabilitation of the Hand

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... tendonitis, rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis, and carpal tunnel syndrome also are treated by occupational therapy practitioners specializing in hand rehabilitation. Practitioners who treat ...

  11. Performance Comparison of Several Pre-Processing Methods in a Hand Gesture Recognition System based on Nearest Neighbor for Different Background Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regina Lionnie

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a performance analysis and comparison of several pre-processing  methods  used  in  a  hand  gesture  recognition  system.  The  preprocessing methods are based on the combinations ofseveral image processing operations,  namely  edge  detection,  low  pass  filtering,  histogram  equalization, thresholding and desaturation. The hand gesture recognition system is designed to classify an input image into one of six possibleclasses. The input images are taken with various background conditions. Our experiments showed that the best result is achieved when the pre-processing method consists of only a desaturation operation, achieving a classification accuracy of up to 83.15%.

  12. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Rheumatoid Arthritis: Additional Conditions Rheumatoid Arthritis: The Immune System Don’t have ... and Health-related Quality of Life Rehabilitation Management for Rheumatoid ...

  13. Elevated rheumatoid factor and long term risk of rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Sune F; Bojesen, Stig E; Schnohr, Peter

    2012-01-01

    To test whether elevated concentration of rheumatoid factor is associated with long term development of rheumatoid arthritis.......To test whether elevated concentration of rheumatoid factor is associated with long term development of rheumatoid arthritis....

  14. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... is Happening to the Joints? Rheumatoid Arthritis: Gaining Control – Working with your Rheumatologist Rheumatoid Arthritis: Additional Conditions ... Arthritis Nutrition & Rheumatoid Arthritis Arthritis and Health-related Quality of Life Rehabilitation Management for Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients ...

  15. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Play Rheumatoid Arthritis: Symptoms and Diagnosis Rheumatoid Arthritis: What is Happening to the Joints? Rheumatoid Arthritis: Gaining Control – Working with your Rheumatologist Rheumatoid Arthritis: Additional Conditions ...

  16. The association between insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1), IGF-binding proteins (IGFBPs), and the carboxyterminal propeptide of type I procollagen (PICP) in pre- and postmenopausal women with rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szeremeta, A; Jura-Półtorak, A; Komosińska-Vassev, K; Zoń-Giebel, A; Kapołka, D; Olczyk, K

    2017-05-01

    To assess the association between plasma levels of the insulin-like growth factor (IGF) system including IGF-1, IGF-binding proteins (IGFBPs) including IGFBP-1, total (t-)IGFBP-3 and functional (f-)IGFBP-3, and the carboxyterminal propeptide of type I procollagen (PICP) in pre- and postmenopausal women with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Plasma concentrations of IGF-1, IGFBP-1, t-IGFBP-3, f-IGFBP-3, and PICP were measured by immunoassay. No significant difference was observed in plasma IGF-1 levels between pre- and postmenopausal subjects. Plasma levels of IGFBP-1 were elevated in RA. PICP and f-IGFBP-3 were greatly affected by menopausal status. Of the three IGFBPs tested, only f-IGFBP-3 plasma levels in RA women correlated negatively with age and disease duration. A positive correlation was demonstrated between PICP and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) in RA. Moreover, there was no correlation between PICP and IGF-1 and any of the IGFBPs in RA women. Considerable disruption of the IGF system in RA was found to be related to disease activity and duration. Changes in the IGF-IGFBP axis and PICP levels were different in pre- and postmenopausal women with RA. Elevated plasma PICP concentrations may indicate an increased rate of bone formation in postmenopausal RA women. Additionally, the observed changes in the IGF/IGFBP system did not affect bone formation during RA.

  17. Work ability of Dutch employees with rheumatoid arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Croon, E. M.; Sluiter, J. K.; Nijssen, T. F.; Kammeijer, M.; Dijkmans, B. A. C.; Lankhorst, G. J.; Frings-Dresen, M. H. W.

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: To ( i) examine the association between fatigue, psychosocial work characteristics ( job control, support, participation in decision making, psychological job demands), and physical work requirements on the one hand and work ability of employees with rheumatoid arthritis ( RA) on the

  18. Thermotherapy for treating rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, V; Brosseau, L; Casimiro, L; Judd, M; Shea, B; Wells, G; Tugwell, P

    2002-01-01

    Thermotherapy is often used as adjunct in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) by rehabilitation specialists. To evaluate the effectiveness of different thermotherapy applications on objective and subjective measures of disease activity in patients with RA. We searched Medline, EMBASE, Pedro, Current Contents, Sports Discus and CINAHL up to and including September 2001. The Cochrane Field of Rehabilitation and related therapies and the Cochrane Musculoskeletal Review Group were also contacted for a search of their specialized registers. Hand searching was conducted on all retrieved articles for additional articles. Comparative controlled studies, such as randomized controlled trials, controlled clinical trials, cohort studies or case/control studies, of thermotherapy compared to control or active interventions in patients with RA were eligible. No language restrictions were applied. Abstracts were accepted. Two independent reviewers identified potential articles from the literature search (VR, LB). These reviewers extracted data using pre-defined extraction forms. Consensus was reached on all data extraction. Quality was assessed by two reviewers using a 5 point scale that measured the quality of randomization, double-blinding and description of withdrawals. Seven studies (n=328 subjects) met the inclusion criteria. The results of this systematic review of thermotherapy for RA found that there was no significant effect of hot and ice packs applications (Ivey 1994), cryotherapy (Rembe 1970) and faradic baths (Hawkes 1986) on objective measures of disease activity including joint swelling, pain, medication intake, range of motion (ROM), grip strength, hand function compared to a control (no treatment) or active therapy. There is no significant difference between wax and therapeutic ultrasound as well as between wax and faradic bath combined to ultrasound for all the outcomes measured after 1, 2 or 3 week(s) of treatment (Hawkes 1986). There was no difference in

  19. Rheumatoid arthritis (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rheumatoid arthritis is an autoimmune disease in which the body's immune system attacks itself. The pattern of joints ... other joints and is worse in the morning. Rheumatoid arthritis is also a systemic disease, involving other body ...

  20. Juvenile rheumatoid arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... joints. This form of JIA may turn into rheumatoid arthritis. It may involve 5 or more large and ... no known prevention for JIA. Alternative Names Juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA); Juvenile chronic polyarthritis; Still disease; Juvenile spondyloarthritis ...

  1. Second-hand smoke exposure and the factors associated with avoidance behavior among the mothers of pre-school children: a school-based cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Wei-Ting

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Second-hand Smoke (SHS exposure is a significant public health problem that may be responsible for serious health hazards for child. This study aimed to examine the exposure status of SHS and the factors associated with SHS avoidance behavior among the mothers of pre-school children. Methods A cross-sectional study was used to obtain a sample of the mothers of pre-school children (n = 1,020 in 30 registered kindergartens in eastern Taiwan. Overall, 919 (a response rate of 90% completed the questionnaires. Regression models were used to identify factors with respect to the avoidance behavior of SHS. Results The prevalence of exposure to SHS was 70% and 50% for the mothers and their children, respectively. After adjusting for other variables, mothers who were current smokers (β = -0.260, p Conclusions The high prevalence rate of exposure to SHS for mothers and their children suggests that a well-designed future intervention program should be implemented in regard to pre-school children's mothers in order to prevent these mothers and their children from SHS exposure hazards, more particularly, to strengthen the knowledge base, to enhance self-efficacy and to foster a more positive attitude toward the avoidance of SHS in the mothers.

  2. Integrative analysis reveals CD38 as a therapeutic target for plasma cell-rich pre-disease and established rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Suzanne; Walsh, Alice; Yin, Xuefeng; Wechalekar, Mihir D; Smith, Malcolm D; Proudman, Susanna M; Veale, Douglas J; Fearon, Ursula; Pitzalis, Costantino; Humby, Frances; Bombardieri, Michele; Axel, Amy; Adams, Homer; Chiu, Christopher; Sharp, Michael; Alvarez, John; Anderson, Ian; Madakamutil, Loui; Nagpal, Sunil; Guo, Yanxia

    2018-05-02

    Plasmablasts and plasma cells play a key role in many autoimmune diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). This study was undertaken to evaluate the potential of targeting CD38 as a plasma cell/plasmablast depletion mechanism by daratumumab in the treatment of patients with RA and SLE. RNA-sequencing analysis of synovial biopsies from various stages of RA disease progression, flow cytometry analysis of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from patients with RA or SLE and healthy donors, immunohistochemistry assessment (IHC) of synovial biopsies from patients with early RA, and ex vivo immune cell depletion assays using daratumumab (an anti-CD38 monoclonal antibody) were used to assess CD38 as a therapeutic target. We demonstrated that the plasma cell/plasmablast-related genes CD38, XBP1, IRF4, PRDM1, IGJ and TNFSF13B are significantly up-regulated in synovial biopsies from patients with arthralgia, undifferentiated arthritis (UA), early RA and established RA as compared to healthy controls and control patients with osteoarthritis. In addition, the highest CD38 expression was observed on plasma cells and plasmablasts compared to natural killer (NK) cells, classical dendritic cells (DCs), plasmacytoid DCs (pDCs) and T cells, in blood from healthy controls and patients with SLE and RA. Furthermore, IHC showed CD38 staining in the same region as CD3 and CD138 staining in synovial tissue biopsies from patients with early RA. Most importantly, our data show for the first time that daratumumab effectively depletes plasma cells/plasmablasts in PBMC from patients with SLE and RA in a dose-dependent manner ex vivo. These results indicate that CD38 may be a potential target for RA disease interception and daratumumab should be evaluated clinically for the treatment of both RA and SLE.

  3. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Corner / Patient Webcasts / Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series This series of five videos ... Your Arthritis Managing Chronic Pain and Depression in Arthritis Nutrition & Rheumatoid Arthritis Arthritis and Health-related Quality of Life ...

  4. Genetics Home Reference: rheumatoid arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Share: Email Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions Rheumatoid arthritis Rheumatoid arthritis Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable ... in my area? Other Names for This Condition arthritis, rheumatoid RA Related Information How are genetic conditions and ...

  5. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA). You will learn how the diagnosis of RA is made, what happens to your ... Link Below To Play Rheumatoid Arthritis: Symptoms and Diagnosis Rheumatoid Arthritis: What is Happening to the Joints? ...

  6. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Happening to the Joints? Rheumatoid Arthritis: Gaining Control – Working with your Rheumatologist Rheumatoid Arthritis: Additional Conditions Rheumatoid Arthritis: The Immune System Don’t have ...

  7. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Appointments • Support Our Research Arthritis Information Disease Information Rheumatoid Arthritis Psoriatic Arthritis Ankylosing Spondylitis Osteoarthritis Gout Lyme Disease Osteoporosis News Rheumatoid Arthritis News ...

  8. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Arthritis Nutrition & Rheumatoid Arthritis Arthritis and Health-related Quality of Life Rehabilitation Management for Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients Rehabilitation of Older Adult ...

  9. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Depression in Arthritis Nutrition & Rheumatoid Arthritis Arthritis and Health-related Quality of Life Rehabilitation Management for Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients Rehabilitation of Older Adult ...

  10. Comparing the Pre- and Posttest Scores in Relations to the Emporium and the Hands-on Instructional Approaches of Teaching Science in Prekindergarten

    Science.gov (United States)

    Headen, Patricia Ann

    This quantitative, quasi-experimental research investigated if two instructional approaches, the Emporium Computer-Based (Group 2) versus the hands-on approach (Group 1), resulted any difference in student achievement in science for four-year-old prekindergarten students at a private childcare facility in North Carolina. Three research questions hypothesized these relationships: (a) Group 2 versus Group 1 assessed student achievement as theoretically based on Piaget and Vygotsky's perspectives of child development, (b) the instructional approaches related to gender, and (c) the instructional approaches interrelated to ethnicity. Using a two-factor ANOVA and ANCOVA techniques, involved a convenience sample of 126 four-year-old prekindergarten students of which a convenience sample of 126 participated. The Assessment of Measurements for Pre-K (AMP-K), pretest and posttest scores of each group of 63 students measured student achievement. The t tests determined if a significant difference in student achievement existed (dependent variable) with the Emporium Computer-Based versus hands-on instructional approaches (independent variables). The posttest scores of Group 2 (p = 0.00), indicated a significant difference in student achievement. However, gender and ethnicity variables had no effect on student achievement, male (M = 36.14, SD = 19.61) and female (M = 42.91, SD = 18.99) with (p = 0.49), and ethnicity resulted, F (1,125) = 1.65, (p = 0.20). These results suggested that further research on the Emporium Computer-Based instructional approach could improve students' intellectual abilities through more innovative practices.

  11. COMORBIDITY IN RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. A. Panafidina

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The peak onset of rheumatoid arthritis (RA is at 30-55 years of age. At this age, the patients have also other concomi- tant diseases (comorbidities that affect the course and prognosis of RA, the choice of its treatment policy, quality of life of the patients. Objective: to identify the most important and common comorbidities in patients with RA. Subjects and methods. Two hundred patients (median age 55 [46; 61] years were enrolled; there was a preponderance of women (82.5% with median disease duration 5 [1; 10] years, seropositive for IgM rheumatoid factor (83.0% and anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies (81.6% with moderate and high disease activity (median DAS28 value 3.9 [3.1; 4.9]. Varying degrees of destructive changes in hand and foot joints were radiologically detected in 71.2% of the patients; 64.5% of the patients had Functional Class II. Methotrexate was given to 69.5% of the patients; therapy with biological agents was used in 21.0% of the cases. 15.5% of the patients did not receive DMARD or biologics. 43.0% of the patients with RA received glucocorticoids. Results. Comorbidities were present in 72.0% of the patients with RA. The most common diseases were hypertension (60.0%, dyslipidemia (45.0%, fractures at various sites (29.5%, and coronary heart disease (21.0%. Myocardial infarction and stroke were observed in 1.5 and 1.0% of cases, respectively. There was diabetes mellitus (DM in 7.5% of the cases and osteoporosis in 15.5% of the patients. 81.7% of the patients with RA and hypertension and 80.0% of those with RA and DM received antihypertensive and sugar-lowering therapy, respectively. At the same time the RA patients with dyslipidemia and osteoporosis received specific drugs far less frequently (30.0 and 29.0%, respectively. Conclusion. Comorbidities are frequently encountered in RA. By taking into account the fact that cardiovascular dis- eases are a main cause of death in RA; it is necessary to adequately and timely

  12. Rheumatoid Arthritis: Can It Affect the Lungs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rheumatoid arthritis: Can it affect the lungs? Can rheumatoid arthritis affect your lungs? Answers from April Chang-Miller, ... know. Arthritis Foundation. http://www.arthritis.org/about-arthritis/types/rheumatoid-arthritis/articles/lung-disease-rheumatoid-arthritis.php. Accessed ...

  13. Rheumatoid factor (RF)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003548.htm Rheumatoid factor (RF) To use the sharing features on this ... M. is also a founding member of Hi-Ethics and subscribes to the principles of the Health ...

  14. Radiological manifestations of rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kapp, H.J.

    1997-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis preferrably becomes manifest at the synovial joints of the limbs, especially at the small joints of the hands and feet, at bursae and synovial sheathes. The pathologic lesions are less frequently found at cartilaginous joints or entheses. The lesions very often are symmetrically distributed and are characterized by the following: 1. A periarticular, spindle-shaped opacity with a density similar to soft-tissue, induced by an inflammatory hypertrophy of the synovia, a serosynovitis, or an edematous impregnation of the periarticular tissue. 2. A juxta-articular osteoporosis, most probably caused by a neighbouring synovialitis accompanied by hyperemia. 3. A diffuse joint cavity narrowing due to a destruction of the articular cartilage by the pannus, a fibrovascular resorptive tissue. 4. Central as well as marginal erosions, caused by destruction of ossous material by the pannus. 5. Subchondral signal cysts, likewise unduced by the pannus. (Orig./AJ) [de

  15. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

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    Full Text Available ... is Happening to the Joints? Rheumatoid Arthritis: Gaining Control – Working with your Rheumatologist Rheumatoid Arthritis: Additional Conditions ... for Patients Arthritis Drug Information Sheets Benefits and Risks of Opioids in Arthritis Management How to Give ...

  16. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

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    Full Text Available ... are available, what is happening in the immune system and what other conditions are associated with RA. ... Rheumatoid Arthritis: Additional Conditions Rheumatoid Arthritis: The Immune System Don’t have SilverLight? Get it here. Updated: ...

  17. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

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    Full Text Available ... Patient Webcasts / Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series This series of five videos ... member of our patient care team. Managing Your Arthritis Managing Your Arthritis Managing Chronic Pain and Depression ...

  18. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

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    Full Text Available ... Managing Your Arthritis Managing Your Arthritis Managing Chronic Pain and Depression in Arthritis Nutrition & Rheumatoid Arthritis Arthritis and Health-related Quality of Life Rehabilitation Management for Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients Rehabilitation of Older Adult ...

  19. Quantitative comparisons on hand motor functional areas determined by resting state and task BOLD fMRI and anatomical MRI for pre-surgical planning of patients with brain tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bob L. Hou

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available For pre-surgical planning we present quantitative comparison of the location of the hand motor functional area determined by right hand finger tapping BOLD fMRI, resting state BOLD fMRI, and anatomically using high resolution T1 weighted images. Data were obtained on 10 healthy subjects and 25 patients with left sided brain tumors. Our results show that there are important differences in the locations (i.e., >20 mm of the determined hand motor voxels by these three MR imaging methods. This can have significant effect on the pre-surgical planning of these patients depending on the modality used. In 13 of the 25 cases (i.e., 52% the distances between the task-determined and the rs-fMRI determined hand areas were more than 20 mm; in 13 of 25 cases (i.e., 52% the distances between the task-determined and anatomically determined hand areas were >20 mm; and in 16 of 25 cases (i.e., 64% the distances between the rs-fMRI determined and anatomically determined hand areas were more than 20 mm. In just three cases, the distances determined by all three modalities were within 20 mm of each other. The differences in the location or fingerprint of the hand motor areas, as determined by these three MR methods result from the different underlying mechanisms of these three modalities and possibly the effects of tumors on these modalities.

  20. Stiff Hands

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... All Topics A-Z Videos Infographics Symptom Picker Anatomy Bones Joints Muscles Nerves Vessels Tendons About Hand Surgery What is a Hand Surgeon? What is a Hand Therapist? Media Find a Hand Surgeon Home Anatomy Stiff Hands Email to a friend * required fields ...

  1. Hand Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... All Topics A-Z Videos Infographics Symptom Picker Anatomy Bones Joints Muscles Nerves Vessels Tendons About Hand Surgery What is a Hand Surgeon? What is a Hand Therapist? Media Find a Hand Surgeon Home Anatomy Hand Infections Email to a friend * required fields ...

  2. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Corner / Patient Webcasts / Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series This series of five videos ... Your Arthritis Managing Chronic Pain and Depression in Arthritis Nutrition & Rheumatoid Arthritis Arthritis and Health-related Quality of Life ...

  3. Thoracic complications of rheumatoid disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Massey, H.; Darby, M.; Edey, A.

    2013-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a relatively common multisystem disease associated with significant mortality and morbidity. Thoracic disease, both pleural and pulmonary, is a frequent extra-articular manifestation of rheumatoid arthritis and responsible for approximately 20% of rheumatoid-associated mortality. Rheumatoid disease and its associated therapies can affect all compartments of the lung inciting a range of stereotyped pathological responses and it is not infrequent for multiple disease entities to co-exist. In some instances, development of pulmonary complications may precede typical rheumatological presentation of the disease and be the first indication of an underlying connective tissue disease. The spectrum of thoracic disease related to rheumatoid arthritis is reviewed

  4. Work ability of Dutch employees with rheumatoid arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Croon, E.M.; Sluiter, J.K.; Nijssen, TF; Kammeijer, M.; Dijkmans, B.A.C.; Lankhorst, G.J.; Frings-Dresen, M.H.W.

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: To (i) examine the association between fatigue, psychosocial work characteristics (job control, support, participation in decision making, psychological job demands), and physical work requirements on the one hand and work ability of employees with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) on the other,

  5. Work ability of Dutch employees with rheumatoid arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Croon, de E.M.; Sluiter, J.K.; Nijssen, TF; Kammeijer, M.; Dijkmans, B.A.C.; Lankhorst, G.J.; Frings-Dresen, M.H.W.

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To (i) examine the association between fatigue, psychosocial work characteristics (job control, support, participation in decision making, psychological job demands), and physical work requirements on the one hand and work ability of employees with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) on the other,

  6. Hand Fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... All Topics A-Z Videos Infographics Symptom Picker Anatomy Bones Joints Muscles Nerves Vessels Tendons About Hand Surgery What is ... Hand Therapist? Media Find a Hand Surgeon Home Anatomy ... DESCRIPTION The bones of the hand serve as a framework. This framework supports the muscles that make the wrist and fingers move. When ...

  7. Rheumatoid Arthritis: "You Are Not Alone."

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Understanding Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) Rheumatoid Arthritis: "You Are Not Alone." Past Issues / Summer 2014 ... Alternative Medicine http://nccam.nih.gov NIHSeniorHealth.gov—Rheumatoid Arthritis ... ...

  8. Rheumatoid Arthritis: Can It Affect the Eyes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rheumatoid arthritis: Can it affect the eyes? Can rheumatoid arthritis affect the eyes? Answers from April Chang-Miller, M.D. Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic inflammatory disease that primarily affects the ...

  9. Alteration In Bones Metabolism In Active Rheumatoid Arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salem, E.S.

    2013-01-01

    The strength and integrity of the human skeleton depends on a delicate equilibrium between bone resorption and bone formation. Osteocalcin (OC) is synthesized by osteoblasts and is considered to be a marker of bone formation and helps in corporating calcium into bone tissue. Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune inflammatory joint disease characterized by bone complication including bone pain, erosion and osteoporosis. The aim of the present study is to evaluate some factors responsible in bone metabolism termed OC, vitamin D (vit. D), oncostatin M (OSM), ionized calcium and alkaline phosphatase. Fifty pre-menopausal female patients with active RA and twenty healthy controls of the same age were included in the present study. Radioimmunoassay (RIA) was used to estimate serum OC and active vitamin D. The quantitative determination of ionized calcium and alkaline phosphatase were carried out colorimetrically. OSM was measured by ELISA and serum levels of OC and active vitamin D were significantly decreased in RA patients as compared to those of the control group. On the other hand, the levels of serum OSM, ionized calcium and alkaline phosphatase were significantly increased in the RA patients as compared to their healthy control subjects. The results of this study indicated that early investigation and therapy of disturbances of bone metabolism in active RA are necessary for better prognosis and exhibited the importance of OC as a diagnostic tool of alterations of bone metabolism in RA patients.

  10. Hand Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... from conditions such as carpal tunnel syndrome and tennis elbow , as well as from chronic problems such as ... Tools Advice from a Certified Hand Therapist on Tennis Elbow Advice from a Certified Hand Therapist: Living with( ...

  11. Hand Anatomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... All Topics A-Z Videos Infographics Symptom Picker Anatomy Bones Joints Muscles Nerves Vessels Tendons About Hand Surgery What is ... Hand Therapist? Media Find a Hand Surgeon Home Anatomy Bones Joints Muscles Nerves Vessels Tendons Anatomy The upper extremity is ...

  12. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Arthritis and Health-related Quality of Life Rehabilitation Management for Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients Rehabilitation of Older Adult Patients with Arthritis Complementary ...

  13. [Hand osteoarthritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šenolt, Ladislav

    Hand osteoarthritis (OA) is a common chronic disorder causing pain and limitation of mobility of affected joints. The prevalence of hand OA increases with age and more often affects females. Clinical signs obviously do not correlate with radiographic findings - symptomatic hand OA affects approximately 26 % of adult subjects, but radiographic changes can be found in up to two thirds of females and half of males older than 55 years.Disease course differ among individual patients. Hand OA is a heterogeneous disease. Nodal hand OA is the most common subtype affecting interphalangeal joints, thumb base OA affects first carpometacarpal joint. Erosive OA represents a specific subtype of hand OA, which is associated with joint inflammation, more pain, functional limitation and erosive findings on radiographs.Treatment of OA is limited. Analgesics and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are the only agents reducing symptoms. New insights into the pathogenesis of disease should contribute to the development of novel effective treatment of hand OA.

  14. Prevention of hand eczema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fisker, Maja H; Ebbehøj, Niels E; Vejlstrup, Søren Grove

    2018-01-01

    Objective Occupational hand eczema has adverse health and socioeconomic impacts for the afflicted individuals and society. Prevention and treatment strategies are needed. This study aimed to assess the effectiveness of an educational intervention on sickness absence, quality of life and severity...... of hand eczema. Methods PREVEX (PreVention of EXema) is an individually randomized, parallel-group superiority trial investigating the pros and cons of one-time, 2-hour, group-based education in skin-protective behavior versus treatment as usual among patients with newly notified occupational hand eczema...

  15. Effectiveness of resistance training in combination with botulinum toxin-A on hand and arm use in children with cerebral palsy: a pre-post intervention study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elvrum Ann-Kristin G

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of this pilot study was to examine the effects of additional resistance training after use of Botulinum Toxin-A (BoNT-A on the upper limbs in children with cerebral palsy (CP. Methods Ten children with CP (9–17 years with unilaterally affected upper limbs according to Manual Ability Classification System II were assigned to two intervention groups. One group received BoNT-A treatment (group B, the other BoNT-A plus eight weeks resistance training (group BT. Hand and arm use were evaluated by means of the Melbourne assessment of unilateral upper limb function (Melbourne and Assisting Hand Assessment (AHA. Measures of muscle strength, muscle tone, and active range of motion were used to assess neuromuscular body function. Measurements were performed before and two and five months after intervention start. Change scores and differences between the groups in such scores were subjected to Mann–Whitney U and Wilcoxon Signed Rank tests, respectively. Results Both groups had very small improvements in AHA and Melbourne two months after BoNT-A injections, without differences between groups. There were significant, or close to significant, short-term treatment effects in favour of group BT for muscle strength in injected muscles (elbow flexion strength, p = .08 and non-injected muscles (elbow extension and supination strength, both p = .05, without concomitant increases in muscle tone. Active supination range improved in both groups, but more so in group BT (p = .09. There were no differences between the groups five months after intervention start. Conclusions Resistance training strengthens non-injected muscles temporarily and may reduce short-term strength loss that results from BoNT-A injections without increasing muscle tone. Moreover, additional resistance training may increase active range of motion to a greater extent than BoNT-A alone. None of the improvements in neuromuscular impairments further

  16. Tracheobronchomegaly and rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rua Marin, Catalina; Diaz Betancur, James Samir; Cardona, Alejandro; Ramirez Gomez, Luis Alberto

    2008-01-01

    Tracheobronchomegaly is a rare condition of unknown etiology that has been described in association with connective tissue diseases. We present a case of tracheomegaly in a patient with a long evolution rheumatoid arthritis. This is the second case reported in the medical literature until now. Association between these pathologies is uncertain and we can not establish a clear pathophysiological link due to the rarity of its occurrence and the late onset of symptoms

  17. X-ray evaluation of bone tissue density in rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotlubej, O.V.; Kamenets'kij, M.S.; Tkachenko, G.D.; Momot, N.V.

    1998-01-01

    Densitometry of hand and foot films of 111 patients with rheumatoid arthritis was performed. Twelve patients underwent CT of lumbar vertebra with tomodensitometry followed by analysis of the obtained graphic histograms. Photo densitometry of plain x-ray films and histographic analysis of CT scans allows to perform quantitative evaluation of the bone tissue density in rheumatoid arthritis and to reveal osteoporosis at early stages when x-ray features of the disease are absent

  18. Hands-On Calculus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland, Melissa

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we discuss manipulatives and hands-on investigations for Calculus involving volume, arc length, and surface area to motivate and develop formulae which can then be verified using techniques of integration. Pre-service teachers in calculus courses using these activities experience a classroom in which active learning is encouraged and…

  19. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... treatments are available, what is happening in the immune system and what other conditions are associated with RA. ... Rheumatologist Rheumatoid Arthritis: Additional Conditions Rheumatoid Arthritis: The Immune System Don’t have SilverLight? Get it here. Updated: ...

  20. Crescentic glomerular nephritis associated with rheumatoid arthritis: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balendran, K; Senarathne, L D S U; Lanerolle, R D

    2017-07-21

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a systemic disorder where clinically significant renal involvement is relatively common. However, crescentic glomerular nephritis is a rarely described entity among the rheumatoid nephropathies. We report a case of a patient with rheumatoid arthritis presenting with antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-negative crescentic glomerular nephritis. A 54-year-old Sri Lankan woman who had recently been diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis was being treated with methotrexate 10 mg weekly and infrequent nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. She presented to our hospital with worsening generalized body swelling and oliguria of 1 month's duration. Her physical examination revealed that she had bilateral pitting leg edema and periorbital edema. She was not pale or icteric. She had evidence of mild synovitis of the small joints of the hand bilaterally with no deformities. No evidence of systemic vasculitis was seen. Her blood pressure was 170/100 mmHg, and her jugular venous pressure was elevated to 7 cm with an undisplaced cardiac apex. Her urine full report revealed 2+ proteinuria with active sediment (dysmorphic red blood cells [17%] and granular casts). Her 24-hour urinary protein excretion was 2 g. Her serum creatinine level was 388 μmol/L. Abdominal ultrasound revealed normal-sized kidneys with acute parenchymal changes and mild ascites. Her renal biopsy showed renal parenchyma containing 20 glomeruli showing diffuse proliferative glomerular nephritis, with 14 of 20 glomeruli showing cellular crescents, and the result of Congo red staining was negative. Her rheumatoid factor was positive with a high titer (120 IU/ml), but results for antinuclear antibody, double-stranded deoxyribonucleic acid, and antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (perinuclear and cytoplasmic) were negative. Antistreptolysin O titer rheumatoid arthritis, awareness of which would facilitate early appropriate investigations and treatment.

  1. Robotic Hand

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    The Omni-Hand was developed by Ross-Hime Designs, Inc. for Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) under a Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contract. The multiple digit hand has an opposable thumb and a flexible wrist. Electric muscles called Minnacs power wrist joints and the interchangeable digits. Two hands have been delivered to NASA for evaluation for potential use on space missions and the unit is commercially available for applications like hazardous materials handling and manufacturing automation. Previous SBIR contracts resulted in the Omni-Wrist and Omni-Wrist II robotic systems, which are commercially available for spray painting, sealing, ultrasonic testing, as well as other uses.

  2. Computer-assisted radiological quantification of rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peloschek, P.L.

    2000-03-01

    Specific objective was to develop the layout and structure of a platform for effective quantification of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). A fully operative Java stand-alone application software (RheumaCoach) was developed to support the efficacy of the scoring process in RA (Web address: http://www.univie.ac.at/radio/radio.htm). Addressed as potential users of such a program are physicians enrolled in clinical trials to evaluate the course of RA and its modulation with drug therapies and scientists developing new scoring modalities. The software 'RheumaCoach' consists of three major modules: The Tutorial starts with 'Rheumatoid Arthritis', to teach the basic pathology of the disease. Afterwards the section 'Imaging Standards' explains how to produce proper radiographs. 'Principles - How to use the 'Larsen Score', 'Radiographic Findings' and 'Quantification by Scoring' explain the requirements for unbiased scoring of RA. At the Data Input Sheet care was taken to follow the radiologist's approach in analysing films as published previously. At the compute sheet the calculated Larsen-Score may be compared with former scores and the further possibilities (calculate, export, print, send) are easily accessible. In a first pre-clinical study the system was tested in an unstructured. Two structured evaluations (30 fully documented and blinded cases of RA, four radiologists scored hands and feet with or without the RheumaCoach) followed. Between the evaluations we permanently improved the software. For all readers the usage of the RheumaCoach fastened the procedure, all together the scoring without computer-assistance needed about 20 % percent more time. Availability of the programme via the internet provides common access for potential quality control in multi-center studies. Documentation of results in a specifically designed printout improves communication between radiologists and rheumatologists. The possibilities of direct export to other programmes and electronic

  3. Shoulder arthography in rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reinbold, W.D.; Hehne, H.J.; Rau, W.S.; Freiburg Univ.

    1983-01-01

    Shoulder arthrography in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis is performed to differentiate between a rheumatoid flare and limitation of motion secondary to tear in the rotator cuff. Accurate diagnosis is important because of the therapeutic implications. The arthrographic findings characteristic of rheumatoid involvement of the shoulder joint are nodular filling defects of the joint, the subacromial and subdeltoideal bursa in case of rotator cuff tear, irregular capsular attachment, contracted joint space and visualized lymphatic drainage. A dilatation of the biceps tendon sheath has not been shown. (orig.) [de

  4. Cervical Myelopathy in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Mukerji

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Involvement of the cervical spine is common in rheumatoid arthritis. Clinical presentation can be variable, and symptoms may be due to neck pain or compressive myeloradiculopathy. We discuss the pathology, grading systems, clinical presentation, indications for surgery and surgical management of cervical myelopathy related to rheumatoid arthritis in this paper. We describe our surgical technique and results. We recommend early consultation for surgical management when involvement of the cervical spine is suspected in rheumatoid arthritis. Even patients with advanced cervical myelopathy should be discussed for surgical treatment, since in our experience improvement in function after surgery is common.

  5. JUVENILE RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I N Sartika

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA is the most common rheumatic condition in children. JRA is defined as persistent arthritis in 1 or more joints for at least 6 weeks, with the onset before age 16 years. The etiology of JRA is unknown. Antigen activated CD4+ T cell stimulate monocytes, macrophages, and synovial fibroblasts to produce the cytokines Interleukin-1 (IL-1, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor ? (TNF-? and to secrete matrix metalloproteinases, which lead to chronic inflammation due to infiltration of inflammatory cell, angiogenesis, destruction of cartilage and bone with pannus formation. The 3 major subtypes of JRA are based on the symptoms at disease onset and are designated systemic onset, pauciarticular onset, and polyarticular onset. For all patients, the goals of therapy are to decrease chronic joint pain and suppress the inflammatory process. Poor prognostic have been observed in patients with polyarticular onset, rheumatoid factor, persistent morning stiffness, tenosynovitis, involvement of the small joints, rapid appearance of erosions, active late onset childhood, subcutaneous nodules, or antinuclear antibody.

  6. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

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    Full Text Available ... Arthritis and Health-related Quality of Life Rehabilitation Management for Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients Rehabilitation of Older Adult ... Sheets Benefits and Risks of Opioids in Arthritis Management How to Give a Subcutaneous Injection Connect With ...

  7. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

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    Full Text Available ... and what other conditions are associated with RA. Learning more about your condition will allow you to ... Older Adult Patients with Arthritis Complementary and Alternative Medicine for Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis Yoga for Arthritis ...

  8. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

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    Full Text Available ... Arthritis Managing Your Arthritis Managing Chronic Pain and Depression in Arthritis Nutrition & Rheumatoid Arthritis Arthritis and Health- ... on this website. Copyright Johns Hopkins Arthritis Center © 2018 Patient Privacy Johns Hopkins Rheumatology

  9. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

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    Full Text Available ... you learn more about Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA). You will learn how the diagnosis of RA is made, ... associated with RA. Learning more about your condition will allow you to take a more active role ...

  10. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

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    Full Text Available ... Management for Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients Rehabilitation of Older Adult Patients with Arthritis Complementary and Alternative Medicine for ... Patient Update Transitioning the JRA Patient to an Adult Rheumatologist Drug Information for Patients Arthritis Drug Information ...

  11. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

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    Full Text Available ... Arthritis Managing Chronic Pain and Depression in Arthritis Nutrition & Rheumatoid Arthritis Arthritis and Health-related Quality of ... Hopkins Rheumatology Arthritis Center Lupus Center Lyme Disease Clinical Research Center Myositis Center Scleroderma Center Sjogren’s Syndrome ...

  12. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

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    Full Text Available ... She is a critical member of our patient care team. Managing Your Arthritis Managing Your Arthritis Managing Chronic Pain and Depression in Arthritis Nutrition & Rheumatoid Arthritis Arthritis and Health- ...

  13. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

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    Full Text Available ... of Body Weight in Osteoarthritis Educational Videos for Patients Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series Psoriatic Arthritis 101 ... Patient to an Adult Rheumatologist Drug Information for Patients Arthritis Drug Information Sheets Benefits and Risks of ...

  14. Fetal Programming in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F.D.O. de Steenwinkel (Florentien)

    2013-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic, systemic, inflammatory, autoimmune disease mainly affecting synovial tissues, which can lead to severe morbidity and progressive joint destruction resulting in deformations and disability. Other important outcomes include

  15. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Arthritis and Health-related Quality of Life Rehabilitation Management for Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients Rehabilitation of Older Adult ... Sheets Benefits and Risks of Opioids in Arthritis Management How to Give a Subcutaneous Injection Rheumatology Course ...

  16. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

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    Full Text Available ... a more active role in your care. The information in these videos should not take the place of any advice you ... Management for Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients Rehabilitation of Older Adult ...

  17. Physiotherapy in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavuncu, Vural; Evcik, Deniz

    2004-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic and painful clinical condition that leads to progressive joint damage, disability, deterioration in quality of life, and shortened life expectancy. Even mild inflammation may result in irreversible damage and permanent disability. The clinical course according to symptoms may be either intermittent or progressive in patients with RA. In most patients, the clinical course is progressive, and structural damage develops in the first 2 years. The aim of RA management is to achieve pain relief and prevent joint damage and functional loss. Physiotherapy and rehabilitation applications significantly augment medical therapy by improving the management of RA and reducing handicaps in daily living for patients with RA. In this review, the application of physiotherapy modalities is examined, including the use of cold/heat applications, electrical stimulation, and hydrotherapy. Rehabilitation treatment techniques for patients with RA such as joint protection strategies, massage, exercise, and patient education are also presented. PMID:15266230

  18. Smoking and Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathleen Chang

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is a chronic inflammatory disease caused by both genetic and environmental factors. Smoking has been implicated as one of the most important extrinsic risk factors for its development and severity. Recent developments have shed light on the pathophysiology of RA in smokers, including oxidative stress, inflammation, autoantibody formation and epigenetic changes. The association of smoking and the development of RA have been demonstrated through epidemiologic studies, as well as through in vivo and animal models of RA. With increased use of biological agents in addition to standard disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs, there has been interest in how smoking affects drug response in RA treatment. Recent evidence suggests the response and drug survival in people treated with anti-tumour necrosis factor (anti-TNF therapy is poorer in heavy smokers, and possible immunological mechanisms for this effect are presented in the current paper.

  19. Hand eczema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibler, K.S.; Jemec, G.B.E.; Flyvholm, M.-A.

    2012-01-01

    Background. Healthcare workers are at increased risk of developing hand eczema. Objectives. To investigate the prevalence and severity of self-reported hand eczema, and to relate the findings to demographic data, occupation, medical speciality, wards, shifts, and working hours. Patients/materials......Background. Healthcare workers are at increased risk of developing hand eczema. Objectives. To investigate the prevalence and severity of self-reported hand eczema, and to relate the findings to demographic data, occupation, medical speciality, wards, shifts, and working hours. Patients...... dermatitis, younger age, male sex (male doctors), and working hours. Eighty nine per cent of subjects reported mild/moderate lesions. Atopic dermatitis was the only factor significantly related to severity. Sick leave was reported by 8% of subjects, and notification to the authorities by 12%. Conclusions...... or severity, but cultural differences between professions with respect to coping with the eczema were significant. Atopic dermatitis was related to increased prevalence and severity, and preventive efforts should be made for healthcare workers with atopic dermatitis....

  20. Hand Osteoblastoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Farzan

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Osteoblastoma is one of the rarest primary bone tumors. Although, small bones of the hands and feet are the third most common location for this tumor, the hand involvement is very rare and few case observations were published in the English-language literature. Materials and Methods: In this study, we report five cases of benign osteoblastoma of the hand, 3 in metacarpals and two in phalanxes. The clinical feature is not specific. The severe nocturnal, salicylate-responsive pain is not present in patients with osteoblastoma. The pain is dull, persistent and less localized. The clinical course is usually long and there is often symptoms for months before medical attention are sought. Swelling is a more persistent finding in osteoblastoma of the hand that we found in all of our patients. The radiologic findings are indistinctive, so preoperative diagnosis based on X-ray appearance is difficult. In all of our 5 cases, we fail to consider osteoblastoma as primary diagnosis. Pathologically, osteoblastoma consisting of a well-vascularized connective tissue stroma in which there is active production of osteoid and primitive woven bone. Treatment depends on the stage and localization of the tumor. Curettage and bone grafting is sufficient in stage 1 or stage 2, but in stage 3 wide resection is necessary for prevention of recurrence. Osteosarcoma is the most important differential diagnosis that may lead to inappropriate operation.

  1. Juvenile rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naz, S.; Mushtaq, A.; Bari, A.; Maqsud, A.; Khan, M. Z.; Ahmad, T. M.; Saira Rehman

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To determine the spectrum of clinical presentation, laboratory parameters and drug therapy in patients with Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis (JRA). Study Design: Case series. Place and Duration of Study: The Children's Hospital and The Institute of Child Health, Lahore, from October 2008 to October 2011. Methodology: All patients who fulfilled the American College of Rheumatology criteria for JRA were enrolled. Their clinical features, investigations done and treatment received for JRA were noted. Statistical analysis of data was done on SPSS version 16.0 for obtaining descriptive statistics. Results: Out of 185 patients, 50.3% (n = 93) were females; 54% (n = 100) were between 10 - 15 years of age. Polyarthritis was found in 71.9% (n = 133) followed by oligoarthritis (22.7%, n = 42) and systemic onset disease (5.4%, n = 10). Morning stiffness (78%) and fever (68%) were the most common clinical presentations. All patients with systemic onset disease had fever (n = 10) followed by skin rash, hepatosplenomegaly and lymphadenopathy. Uveitis was found in 2 patients, and both belonged to the oligoarticular group. Rheumatoid factor was found in 10.27% (n = 19) of all patients. All patients were given non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Disease modifying agents (methotrexate) were given to 43.8% (n = 81). Steroids were used in 61% (n = 113) of patients either with NSAIDs alone or NSAIDs plus methotrexate. Conclusion: Disease profile of JRA at the study centre showed that polyarthritis is the commonest type. Recognition of subtypes will help in planning the management of these patients. (author)

  2. Understanding Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA): Treatment and Causes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Understanding Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) Treatment and Causes Past Issues / Summer 2014 Table of Contents How Is Rheumatoid Arthritis Treated? Doctors have many ways to treat this ...

  3. Case report patients diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Váňová, Tereza

    2012-01-01

    Title of bachelors thesis: Case report patients diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis Summary: The work is focused on diseases rheumatoid arthritis and its physiotherapy care. It consists of two parts. Part of the general anatomy of the joint contains a general, deals with the disease rheumatoid arthritis, its diagnosis, treatment and comprehensive rehabilitation treatment. Part has its own special case report physiotherapy sessions on this topic. Key words: rheumatoid arthritis, comprehensive ...

  4. Simplified approach to MR image quantification of the rheumatoid wrist: a pilot study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamishima, Tamotsu; Terae, Satoshi; Shirato, Hiroki; Tanimura, Kazuhide; Aoki, Yuko; Shimizu, Masato; Matsuhashi, Megumi; Fukae, Jun; Kosaka, Naoki; Kon, Yujiro

    2011-01-01

    To determine an optimal threshold in a simplified 3D-based volumetry of abnormal signals in rheumatoid wrists utilizing contrast and non-contrast MR data, and investigate the feasibility and reliability of this method. MR images of bilateral hands of 15 active rheumatoid patients were assessed before and 5 months after the initiation of tocilizumab infusion protocol. The volumes of abnormal signals were measured on STIR and post-contrast fat-suppressed T1-weighted images. Three-dimensional volume rendering of the images was used for segmentation of the wrist by an MR technologist and a radiologist. Volumetric data were obtained with variable thresholding (1, 1.25, 1.5, 1.75, and 2 times the muscle signal), and were compared to clinical data and semiquantitative MR scoring (RAMRIS) of the wrist. Intra- and interobserver variability and time needed for volumetry measurements were assessed. The volumetric data correlated favorably with clinical parameters almost throughout the pre-determined thresholds. Interval differences in volumetric data correlated favorably with those of RAMRIS when the threshold was set at more than 1.5 times the muscle signal. The repeatability index was lower than the average of the interval differences in volumetric data when the threshold was set at 1.5-1.75 for STIR data. Intra- and interobserver variability for volumetry was 0.79-0.84. The time required for volumetry was shorter than that for RAMRIS. These results suggest that a simplified MR volumetric data acquisition may provide gross estimates of disease activity when the threshold is set properly. Such estimation can be achieved quickly by non-imaging specialists and without contrast administration. (orig.)

  5. Simplified approach to MR image quantification of the rheumatoid wrist: a pilot study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamishima, Tamotsu; Terae, Satoshi; Shirato, Hiroki [Hokkaido University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Sapporo City (Japan); Tanimura, Kazuhide; Aoki, Yuko; Shimizu, Masato; Matsuhashi, Megumi; Fukae, Jun [Hokkaido Medical Center for Rheumatic Diseases, Sapporo City, Hokkaido (Japan); Kosaka, Naoki [Tokeidai Memorial Hospital, Sapporo City, Hokkaido (Japan); Kon, Yujiro [St. Thomas' Hospital, Lupus Research Unit, The Rayne Institute, London (United Kingdom)

    2011-01-15

    To determine an optimal threshold in a simplified 3D-based volumetry of abnormal signals in rheumatoid wrists utilizing contrast and non-contrast MR data, and investigate the feasibility and reliability of this method. MR images of bilateral hands of 15 active rheumatoid patients were assessed before and 5 months after the initiation of tocilizumab infusion protocol. The volumes of abnormal signals were measured on STIR and post-contrast fat-suppressed T1-weighted images. Three-dimensional volume rendering of the images was used for segmentation of the wrist by an MR technologist and a radiologist. Volumetric data were obtained with variable thresholding (1, 1.25, 1.5, 1.75, and 2 times the muscle signal), and were compared to clinical data and semiquantitative MR scoring (RAMRIS) of the wrist. Intra- and interobserver variability and time needed for volumetry measurements were assessed. The volumetric data correlated favorably with clinical parameters almost throughout the pre-determined thresholds. Interval differences in volumetric data correlated favorably with those of RAMRIS when the threshold was set at more than 1.5 times the muscle signal. The repeatability index was lower than the average of the interval differences in volumetric data when the threshold was set at 1.5-1.75 for STIR data. Intra- and interobserver variability for volumetry was 0.79-0.84. The time required for volumetry was shorter than that for RAMRIS. These results suggest that a simplified MR volumetric data acquisition may provide gross estimates of disease activity when the threshold is set properly. Such estimation can be achieved quickly by non-imaging specialists and without contrast administration. (orig.)

  6. Radiographic estimation in seropositive and seronegative rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahatçiu-Meka, Vjollca; Rexhepi, Sylejman; Manxhuka-Kërliu, Suzana; Rexhepi, Mjellma

    2011-08-01

    Long since it have been suggested that a subpopulation of patients with rheumatoid arthritis, diagnosed with negative rheumatoid factor tests, represents a clinical entity quite distinct from that of seropositive rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Our aim was to establish a scientific comparative analysis between seronegative and seropositive rheumatoid arthritis, regarding some radiological and clinical parameters, applied for the first time on patients from Kosovo. Two hundred fifty patients with rheumatoid arthritis according to the American College of Rheumatology criteria were retrospectively studied by analysis the radiographic damage and clinical parameters of the disease, using a data base. All examinees were between 25-60 years of age (Xb=49.96, SD=10.37) with disease duration between 1-27 years (Xb = 6.41, SD=6.47). All patients underwent a standardised evaluation radiographs. Baseline standardised poster anterior radiographs of hands and feet and radiographs of other joints, depending on indications, were assessed. Erythrocyte sedimentation rate values correlated with the radiological damages and statistical difference was found for seronegative subset (r=0.24, p<0.01). Longer duration of the disease resulted in the increase of radiological changes in both subsets (r=0.66, p<0.01) seronegative, (r=0.49, p<0.01) seropositive. Anatomic changes of IInd and IIIrd level were nearly equally distributed in both subsets, 76 (60.8%) seronegative, 75 (60%) seropositive. Radiological damages are nearly equal in both subsets, elevate in relation to the duration of the disease and correlate with ESR values. Regarding the sero-status, differences within sex, with some exceptions, are not relevant. Although there are some definite quantitative and qualitative differences regarding sero-status, obviously there is a great deal of overlap between the two groups.

  7. Radiographic estimation in seropositive and seronegative rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vjollca Sahatçiu-Meka

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Long since it have been suggested that a subpopulation of patients with rheumatoid arthritis, diagnosed with negative rheumatoid factor tests, represents a clinical entity quite distinct from that of seropositive rheumatoid arthritis (RA. Our aim was to establish a scientific comparative analysis between seronegative and seropositive rheumatoid arthritis, regarding some radiological and clinical parameters, applied for the first time on patients from Kosovo. Two hundred fifty patients with rheumatoid arthritis according to the American College of Rheumatology criteria were retrospectively studied by analysis the radiographic damage and clinical parameters of the disease, using a data base. All examinees were between 25-60 years of age (Xb=49.96, SD=10.37 with disease duration between 1-27 years (Xb = 6.41, SD=6.47. All patients underwent a standardised evaluation radiographs. Baseline standardised poster anterior radiographs of hands and feet and radiographs of other joints, depending on indications, were assessed. Erythrocyte sedimentation rate values correlated with the radiological damages and statistical difference was found for seronegative subset (r=0.24, p<0.01. Longer duration of the disease resulted in the increase of radiological changes in both subsets (r=0.66, p<0.01 seronegative, (r=0.49, p<0.01 seropositive. Anatomic changes of IInd and IIIrd level were nearly equally distributed in both subsets, 76 (60.8% seronegative, 75 (60% seropositive. Radiological damages are nearly equal in both subsets, elevate in relation to the duration of the disease and correlate with ESR values. Regarding the sero-status, differences within sex, with some exceptions, are not relevant. Although there are some definite quantitative and qualitative differences regarding sero-status, obviously there is a great deal of overlap between the two groups.

  8. Lower limb joint replacement in rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clement Nicholas D

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction There is limited literature regarding the peri-operative and surgical management of patients with rheumatoid disease undergoing lower limb arthroplasty. This review article summarises factors involved in the peri-operative management of major lower limb arthroplasty surgery for patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Methods We performed a search of the medical literature, using the PubMed search engine (http://www.pubmed.gov. We used the following terms: ‘rheumatoid’ ‘replacement’ ‘arthroplasty’ and ‘outcome’. Findings The patient should be optimised pre-operatively using a multidisciplinary approach. The continued use of methotrexate does not increase infection risk, and aids recovery. Biologic agents should be stopped pre-operatively due the increased infection rate. Patients should be made aware of the increased risk of infection and periprosthetic fracture rates associated with their disease. The surgical sequence is commonly hip, knee and then ankle. Cemented total hip replacement (THR and total knee replacement (TKR have superior survival rates over uncemented components. The evidence is not clear regarding a cruciate sacrificing versus retaining in TKR, but a cruciate sacrificing component limits the risk early instability and potential revision. Patella resurfacing as part of a TKR is associated with improved outcomes. The results of total ankle replacement remain inferior to THR and TKR. RA patients achieve equivalent pain relief, but their rehabilitation is slower and their functional outcome is not as good. However, the key to managing these complicated patients is to work as part of a multidisciplinary team to optimise their outcome.

  9. Gene therapy works in animal models of rheumatoid arthritis...so what!

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loo, F.A.J. van de; Geurts, J.; Berg, W.B. van den

    2006-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic disease with polyarticular manifestation of chronic inflammation in the knees and small joints of hand and feet. The current systemic anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha therapies with biologics ameliorate disease in 60% to 70% of RA patients. However,

  10. Gadolinium-DTPA enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of bone cysts in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gubler, F. M.; Algra, P. R.; Maas, M.; Dijkstra, P. F.; Falke, T. H.

    1993-01-01

    To examine the contents of intraosseous cysts in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) through the signal intensity characteristics on gadolinium-DTPA (Gd-DTPA) enhanced magnetic resonance imaging. The hand or foot joints of nine patients with the cystic form of RA (where the initial radiological

  11. RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS AND PREGNANCY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. M. Kosheleva

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA generally starts at the age when many women have already become mothers; however, it may occur in childhood or adolescence. Furthermore, there has been recently a women’s tendency to plan pregnacy for a more mature age, which necessitates a discussion about gestation in this disease. Investigation of mechanisms pregnancy can influence the development of RA both in the gestation and long-term periods is of important theoretical and practical value. The results of these investigations may be used to develop new treatments for RA and management tactics for patients during pregnancy and lactation. The  aper gives the data available in the literature on fertility in RA, impact of pregnancy on its activity and that of RA on the course and outcomes of gestation, as well as current ideas on lactation and use of oral contraceptives in RA. Particular attention is given to drug therapy in pregnant and breastfeeding women with RA: groups of anti-rheumatic drugs are considered in detail in relation to the safety of or a potential risk from their use. A therapeutic algorithm and recommendations for pregnancy planning and a follow-up of patients with RA during gestation are proposed.

  12. Prostaglandins and Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Javad Fattahi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is a chronic, autoimmune, and complex inflammatory disease leading to bone and cartilage destruction, whose cause remains obscure. Accumulation of genetic susceptibility, environmental factors, and dysregulated immune responses are necessary for mounting this self-reacting disease. Inflamed joints are infiltrated by a heterogeneous population of cellular and soluble mediators of the immune system, such as T cells, B cells, macrophages, cytokines, and prostaglandins (PGs. Prostaglandins are lipid inflammatory mediators derived from the arachidonic acid by multienzymatic reactions. They both sustain homeostatic mechanisms and mediate pathogenic processes, including the inflammatory reaction. They play both beneficial and harmful roles during inflammation, according to their site of action and the etiology of the inflammatory response. With respect to the role of PGs in inflammation, they can be effective mediators in the pathophysiology of RA. Thus the use of agonists or antagonists of PG receptors may be considered as a new therapeutic protocol in RA. In this paper, we try to elucidate the role of PGs in the immunopathology of RA.

  13. Leishmaniasis in rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Cutolo

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Leishmaniasis represents a complex of diseases with an important clinical and epidemiological diversity. Visceral leishmaniasis is of higher priority than cutaneous leishmaniasis as it is a fatal disease in the absence of treatment. The clinical spectrum of leishmaniasis and control of the infection are influenced by the parasite-host relationship. The role of cellular immune responses of the Th1 type in the protection against disease in experimental and human leishmaniasis is well established. TNF-α has been implicated in cytokine-induced macrophage activation and tissue granuloma formation, two activities linked to control of intracellular visceral infection caused by Leishmania donovani. Anti- tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α strategies have had a marked and substantial impact in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, however the clinical use of TNF-α antagonists has been accompanied by increased reporting of infections. Here we report the first case of visceral leishmaniasis in a patient treated for a long period of time with human anti TNF-α monoclonal antibody, adalimumab. Due to the low incidence rate of Mediterranean visceral leishmaniasis, a systematic screening for leishmaniasis in all patients treated with biologics may be not recommended. However, for those patients living at high risk of leishmaniasis exposure, a periodical serological monitoring should be performed during therapy with anti-TNF monoclonal antibodies.

  14. Serodiagnosis and immune profile in rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, P; Bhattacharya, S; Chakraborty, M; Pal, B

    1997-11-01

    One hundred and seventy-five cases of clinically diagnosed rheumatoid arthritis, 82 non-rheumatoid cases suffering from various other diseases and 40 healthy normal controls were investigated for detection of rheumatoid factor, quantitation of serum immunoglobulin, demonstration of antinuclear antibody (ANA) and LE cell phenomenon. Microlatex agglutination test of serum for rheumatoid factor (RF) showed 64% positivity in rheumatoid group and 1.2% positivity in non-rheumatoid group. All three immunoglobulins (IgG, IgM, IgA) were found to be raised in serum of patients with rheumatoid arthritis, whereas only IgA level was elevated in serum of patients with non-rheumatoid diseases. ANA and LE cell phenomenon were observed in 3.4% and 2.8% cases respectively in cases of clinically diagnosed rheumatoid arthritis who had been suffering from severe active rheumatoid arthritis. In non-rheumatoid group RF was positive in significant titre in only one case of leprosy. Synovial fluid and synovium were found to be heavily infiltrated by plasma cells and lymphocytes. RF appears first in synovial fluid and then in serum. Hence RF titre in blood may not attain significant level for the first several months.

  15. Serology and immunoglobulin profile in rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhya, S; Chakraborty, G; Hajra, B; Bhattacharya, S; Sikdar, P K; Sinha, S; Banerjee, P P; Ghosh, E; Chakraborty, P

    1998-01-01

    One hundred and twenty cases of clinically diagnosed rheumatoid arthritis, 80 non-rheumatoid cases suffering from various other diseases and 40 healthy individuals were investigated for the presence of rheumatoid factor, quantitation of serum immunoglobulin, demonstration of ANA and LE cell phenomenon. Microlatex agglutination test of serum for rheumatoid factor showed 56.6% positivity in rheumatoid group and 3.7% positivity in non-rheumatoid group. All three serum immunoglobulins (IgG, IgM, IgA) were raised in serum in significant titre in cases of rheumatoid arthritis, whereas only IgA lever was elevated in the group of non-rheumatoid diseases. ANA and LE cell phenomenon were observed in 11.7% and 4.4% cases of rheumatoid arthritis who had severe underlying disease. In non-rheumatoid group, only one of 6 cases of systemic lupus erythematosus showed rheumatoid factor and that too in an insignificant titre (less than 1:20). Synovium and synovial fluid contained plenty of plasma cells and lymphocytes. It has been observed that RF appears first in synovial fluid and it may take several months to a year to attain detectable level in serum.

  16. Dietetic recommendations in rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Rosa Alhambra-Expósito

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is a chronic autoimmune disease that has a significant effect on patients’ physical, emotional, and social functioning. For decades, patients have used different diets to try to improve the symptoms of RA. The possible benefits of dietary therapy for rheumatoid arthritis are reviewed in this article. Nutritional objectives for RA, are to halt the loss of bone mass, promote healing of bone fractures and improving bone-associated inflammatory disorders and joints. In general, diets low in saturated fat, rich in polyunsaturated fats: omega 3 and omega 6, rich in complex carbohydrates and fiber are recommended.

  17. Anticardiolipin antibodies in rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keane, A; Woods, R; Dowding, V; Roden, D; Barry, C

    1987-10-01

    Anticardiolipin antibody (ACA) was present in the sera of 49% of 90 consecutive patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The ACA was absent in 30 control patients with osteoarthritis. C-reactive protein levels equal to or exceeding 7 mg/dl were found in 10 patients all of whom were ACA positive. ACA was present in a larger proportion of rheumatoid factor (RF) positive than of RF negative patients. Male sex and extra-articular manifestations of RA were both more common in ACA positive than ACA negative patients. In the ACA positive group the lupus anticoagulant and VDRL tests were negative. However, a small number of patients had evidence of vascular events.

  18. Hand osteoarthritis: diagnosis, pathogenesis, treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. M. Balabanova

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to the development of synovitis, early-stage hand osteoarthritis (HOA mimics hand joint injury in rheumatoid arthritis (RA. However, the topography of synovitis is diverse in these diseases:  distal interphalangeal and thumb joints are involved in the process in HOA. In the latter, tests are negative for immunological markers  (anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies, which is typical of RA.  The differences between HOA and RA are prominent, as evidenced  by hand X-rays and magnetic resonance imaging. Investigations  suggest that cytokine profile imbalance is implicated in the  pathogenesis of osteoarthritis, which brings it closer to RA. However, therapy for HOA has not been practically developed; there are only a few works on the use of disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs and  biological agents in these patients. It is necessary to work out Russian guidelines for the treatment of HOA.

  19. Periarticular and generalised bone loss in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, T W; Hansen, M S; Hørslev-Petersen, Kim

    2013-01-01

    )). PATIENTS AND METHODS: A hundred and sixty patients with early, active rheumatoid arthritis (RA) received methotrexate, intra-articular betamethasone and ciclosporin /placebo-ciclosporin. Patients with Z-score ≤0 also started alendronate 10 mg/day. BMD of the hand (digital x-ray radiogrammetry (DXR...... in hand, lumbar spine and femoral neck was negatively associated with the dose of intra-articular betamethasone (p...

  20. [Management of rheumatoid arthritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiehn, C; Krüger, K

    2016-11-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is the most common inflammatory rheumatic disease. Due to the destruction of joints in the course of the disease it leads to significant morbidity in affected patients. The quality of life and even life expectancy can be severely impaired. Early diagnosis and early initiation of treatment is a decisive step towards a more benign course of the disease. New classification criteria have been published in order to help in early diagnosis. Methods of imaging, such as ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging help in the detection of synovitis, which is the major pathomorphological manifestation of arthritis and should be identified without any doubt. Treatment follows the rule of treat to target with the aim of achieving remission or if this is not realistic, at least the lowest possible level of disease activity. The first and perhaps most important step in therapy is the initiation of methotrexate or if contraindications are present, another disease-modifying antirheumatic drug (DMARD) as soon as the diagnosis is made. Initial addition of glucocorticoids is recommended, which should be reduced in dose and terminated as soon as possible. Furthermore, either the combination of different DMARDs or the start of biologic DMARDs, such as tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) inhibitors or second generation biologic DMARDs is possible as a treatment option. The treatment follows the rule of shared decision-making and is the standard to treat comorbidities, the use an interdisciplinary approach and to treat functional deficits by rehabilitation measures, such as physiotherapy.

  1. Detection of rheumatoid arthritis using infrared imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frize, Monique; Adéa, Cynthia; Payeur, Pierre; Di Primio, Gina; Karsh, Jacob; Ogungbemile, Abiola

    2011-03-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an inflammatory disease causing pain, swelling, stiffness, and loss of function in joints; it is difficult to diagnose in early stages. An early diagnosis and treatment can delay the onset of severe disability. Infrared (IR) imaging offers a potential approach to detect changes in degree of inflammation. In 18 normal subjects and 13 patients diagnosed with Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA), thermal images were collected from joints of hands, wrists, palms, and knees. Regions of interest (ROIs) were manually selected from all subjects and all parts imaged. For each subject, values were calculated from the temperature measurements: Mode/Max, Median/Max, Min/Max, Variance, Max-Min, (Mode-Mean), and Mean/Min. The data sets did not have a normal distribution, therefore non parametric tests (Kruskal-Wallis and Ranksum) were applied to assess if the data from the control group and the patient group were significantly different. Results indicate that: (i) thermal images can be detected on patients with the disease; (ii) the best joints to image are the metacarpophalangeal joints of the 2nd and 3rd fingers and the knees; the difference between the two groups was significant at the 0.05 level; (iii) the best calculations to differentiate between normal subjects and patients with RA are the Mode/Max, Variance, and Max-Min. We concluded that it is possible to reliably detect RA in patients using IR imaging. Future work will include a prospective study of normal subjects and patients that will compare IR results with Magnetic Resonance (MR) analysis.

  2. Pregnancy-induced gene expression changes in vivo among women with rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goin, Dana E; Smed, Mette Kiel; Pachter, Lior

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Little is known about gene expression changes induced by pregnancy in women with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and healthy women because the few studies previously conducted did not have pre-pregnancy samples available as baseline. We have established a cohort of women with RA and healthy...

  3. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Patients from Johns Hopkins Stategies to Increase your Level of Physical Activity Role of Body Weight in Osteoarthritis Educational Videos for Patients Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series Psoriatic Arthritis 101 2010 E.S.C.A.P.E. Study Patient Update Transitioning the JRA ...

  4. Radiographic progession of rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siozos, C.D.

    1981-01-01

    The radiographic progression of rheumatoid arthritis can be graded on a 0-IV scala. For this purpose five objective criteria are used: a) destruction, b) osteoporosis, c) narrowing of joint space, d) luxation and e) ankylosis. The grading of the radiographic progression is defined by the extent and the number of the measured alterations. The radiographic progression can be registered yearly. (orig.) [de

  5. Treating rheumatoid arthritis to target

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smolen, Josef S; Breedveld, Ferdinand C; Burmester, Gerd R

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Reaching the therapeutic target of remission or low-disease activity has improved outcomes in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) significantly. The treat-to-target recommendations, formulated in 2010, have provided a basis for implementation of a strategic approach towards this t...

  6. Glucocorticoids in early rheumatoid arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Everdingen, Amalia A. van

    2002-01-01

    For 50 years, glucocorticoids (GC) are used for symptomatic treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). In the last decade, results from clinical studies of treatment with GC as additional therapy to long-acting antirheumatic drugs in patients with early RA suggested also disease-modifying properties of

  7. Diagnostic Delay in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mølbaek, Karen; Hørslev-Petersen, Kim; Primdahl, Jette

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To prevent joint damage among patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), there is a need to minimize delays from the onset of symptoms until the initiation of appropriate therapy. The present study explored the factors that have an impact on the time it takes for Danish patients with RA...

  8. Glucocorticoid Sensitivity in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.A.M. Quax

    2013-01-01

    textabstractAccumulating observations of women with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) who ‘spontaneously’ experienced less active disease during pregnancy led to the growing belief by Philip Hench that a hormonal substance had to be involved in the improving clinical conditions of pregnant patients with RA.

  9. What People with Rheumatoid Arthritis Need to Know about Osteoporosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Need to Know About Osteoporosis What Is Rheumatoid Arthritis? Rheumatoid arthritis is an autoimmune disease, a disorder in ... new habits for healthy bones. The Link Between Rheumatoid Arthritis and Osteoporosis Studies have found an increased risk ...

  10. Radiographic changes in the os calcis in rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lakits, A.

    1994-01-01

    Plain films of the calcanea of 768 patients with confirmed rheumatoid arthritis were examined retrospectively with reference to inflammatory rheumatic changes. 42 patients (5.5%) showed an erosion of the posterior upper calcaneal margin related to an Achilles bursitis. In three patients there were additional plantar erosions. The Achilles bursitis was bilateral in 50% of cases, particularly in patients in stages 2 and 3 according to Steinbrocker. In the majority of bilateral cases (62%) the size or shape of the lesions was asymmetrical. Our observations indicate that involvement of the os calcis is not uncommon in rheumatoid arthritis; routine examination of this bone would appear to be indicated even in patients without symptoms. Since the defect is unilateral in half the patients, unilateral occurrence of an erosive lesion cannot be regarded as a criterion for a bacterial-inflammatory bursitis. Contrary to the symmetrical involvement of joints in the hands in rheumatoid arthritis, defects in the calcanea are often unilateral or asymmetrical. (orig.) [de

  11. Rheumatoid disease without arthritis; clinical case of pulmonary fibrosis, rheumatoid nodulosis and positive rheumatoid factor without arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ochoa Franco, Julian Andres; Canas Davila, Carlos Alberto

    2003-01-01

    We reported a case of a patient suffering pulmonary fibrosis rapidly progressive and a positive rheumatoid factor test with the presence of HLA DR11 y HLADR17, without arthritis, We discuss how rare is this clinical appearance, and remark the concept that rheumatoid arthritis is a systemic disease, with a wide clinical presentation, that some authors with a right criteria have called rheumatoid disease

  12. Rheumatoid arthritis following ciguatera poisoning: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohta, Ryuichi; Shimabukuro, Akira; Kinjo, Mitsuyo

    2017-05-01

    Objective: To report the first case of ciguatera-associated rheumatoid arthritis in Japan. Patient: A 53-year-old man presented to our clinic with morning stiffness and pain in the fingers and wrists. Results: For six months, he had suffered from chronic pain in both hands and shoulders caused by ciguatera poisoning. He was referred to a local general hospital and diagnosed with RA. Conclusion: When synovitis becomes evident in chronic ciguatera poisoning, reevaluation is necessary, including investigation of chronic arthritis, which might be associated with the onset of RA.

  13. Laser acupuncture versus reflexology therapy in elderly with rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adly, Afnan Sedky; Adly, Aya Sedky; Adly, Mahmoud Sedky; Serry, Zahra M H

    2017-07-01

    The purposes of this study are to determine and compare efficacy of laser acupuncture versus reflexology in elderly with rheumatoid arthritis. Thirty elderly patients with rheumatoid arthritis aged between 60 and 70 years were classified into two groups, 15 patients each. Group A received laser acupuncture therapy (904 nm, beam area of 1cm 2 , power 100 mW, power density 100 mW/cm 2 , energy dosage 4 J, energy density 4 J/cm 2 , irradiation time 40 s, and frequency 100,000 Hz). The acupuncture points that were exposed to laser radiation are LR3, ST25, ST36, SI3, SI4, LI4, LI11, SP6, SP9, GB25, GB34, and HT7. While group B received reflexology therapy, both offered 12 sessions over 4 weeks. The changes in RAQoL, HAQ, IL-6, MDA, ATP, and ROM at wrist and ankle joints were measured at the beginning and end of treatment. There was significant decrease in RAQoL, HAQ, IL-6, and MDA pre/posttreatment for both groups (p rheumatoid arthritis.

  14. Arthroscopic Synovectomy of Wrist in Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Jae Woo; Park, Min Jong

    2017-11-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic inflammatory disorder affecting multiple joints. Wrist involvement is common. Patients with persistent symptoms despite medical management are candidates for surgery. Synovectomy can provide pain relief and functional improvement for rheumatoid wrist. Arthroscopic synovectomy is a safe and reliable method, with minimal postoperative morbidity. This article reviews the role, technique, and results of arthroscopic synovectomy in the rheumatoid wrist. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Atypical Localized Rheumatoid Nodule: Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KORHAN BARIS BAYRAM

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid nodules can be seen in about 30% of patiens with rheumatoid arthritis. They are occasionally localized subcutaneous, but they can rarely seen in visceral organs. Their appearance can be confused with many clinical conditions when they have atypical localizations. To exclude the presence of a malignancy, these lesions should always be investigated. We aimed to discuss a patient with rheumatoid nodule localized in close neighborhood of hyoid bone, presumed as malignancy.

  16. The impact of dietary habits on the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rambod, Masoume; Nazarinia, Mohammadali; Raieskarimian, Farahnaz

    2018-05-22

    It has not been clear what kinds and how much nutrients could be harmful, preventive, or healthful for development of rheumatoid arthritis. This study aimed to determine the impact of dietary habits on the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis. This case-control study was conducted on a total of 500 rheumatoid arthritis patients and 500 healthy controls refereed to three clinics of Shiraz University of Medical Sciences in 2015-2016. Convenience sampling was used for data collection in both case and control groups. An approved valid and reliable questionnaire including information about the intake of different kinds of beverages, and nutritious and non-nutritious diet was used. Data were analyzed by SPSS, version 20, using t test, chi-square and Multiple Logistic Regression model. The associations between rheumatoid arthritis development and variables including drinking 1-7 cups of coffee (OR = .44, CI .25-.76), ≥ 8 cups of coffee (OR = .50, CI .28-.90), full-fat milk (OR = 1.01, CI 1.003-1.03) per month, and intake of green tea (OR = .65, CI .45-.93) and solid oils (OR = 2.29, CI:1.57-3.34) were significant. Based on the findings, coffee consumption more than one cup per month and green tea might have preventive effects on developing rheumatoid arthritis. On the other hand, patients who consumed more full-fat milk per month and solid oil might be at risk of development of rheumatoid arthritis. Therefore, modification of diet based on these findings is suggested. Performing a cohort study to determine the causality effect of dietary habits and development and prevention of rheumatoid arthritis is recommended.

  17. Rheumatoid arthritis as psychic problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiří Kaas

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the issue of psychic problems of rheumatoid arthritis patients. Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic, inflammatory motor system disease with comprehensive impact on the patient's life. The disease is often considered an exclusively physical disease. But such approach is insufficient because the disease is accompanied by motor limitations of different intensities, by pain and by fatigue that cause considerable exhaustion to the patient. The patients often must give up their hobbies and in some cases even their jobs. In most serious cases, even common daily activities including self–servicing actions become an obstacle to the patient. It is therefore logical that the psyche of a patient with such disease is considerably strained. One of the partial goals of the study consisted in mapping the subjectively perceived quality of life of rheumatoid arthritis patients in facet 8, "negative feelings", and in ascertaining whether there is statistically significant relation to facets 1, "pain and discomfort", and 2, "energy and fatigue". Another goal consisted in comparing the subjectively perceived quality of life between men and women with rheumatoid arthritis, as well as between population of rheumatoid arthritis patients and control healthy population. The study was implemented within the research project of the Grant Agency of the University of South Bohemia in České Budějovice number 120/2012/S, „Reflection of quality of life in nursing", under use of two standardized questionnaires, WHOQOL–100 and HAQ. This article presents exclusively the data acquired based on the WHOQOL–100 questionnaire. The research set consisted of patients suffering from rheumatoid arthritis from all over the Czech Republic. The size of the set was determined by a statistician at 200 individuals suffering from the disease, in a ratio of 150 women and 50 men. The selection set was derived from the basic set of rheumatoid arthritis patients and

  18. Rheumatoid arthritis as psychic problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiří Kaas

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the issue of psychic problems of rheumatoid arthritis patients. Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic, inflammatory motor system disease with comprehensive impact on the patient's life. The disease is often considered an exclusively physical disease. But such approach is insufficient because the disease is accompanied by motor limitations of different intensities, by pain and by fatigue that cause considerable exhaustion to the patient. The patients often must give up their hobbies and in some cases even their jobs. In most serious cases, even common daily activities including self-servicing actions become an obstacle to the patient. It is therefore logical that the psyche of a patient with such disease is considerably strained. One of the partial goals of the study consisted in mapping the subjectively perceived quality of life of rheumatoid arthritis patients in facet 8, "negative feelings", and in ascertaining whether there is statistically significant relation to facets 1, "pain and discomfort", and 2, "energy and fatigue". Another goal consisted in comparing the subjectively perceived quality of life between men and women with rheumatoid arthritis, as well as between population of rheumatoid arthritis patients and control healthy population. The study was implemented within the research project of the Grant Agency of the University of South Bohemia in České Budějovice number 120/2012/S, "Reflection of quality of life in nursing", under use of two standardized questionnaires, WHOQOL-100 and HAQ. This article presents exclusively the data acquired based on the WHOQOL-100 questionnaire. The research set consisted of patients suffering from rheumatoid arthritis from all over the Czech Republic. The size of the set was determined by a statistician at 200 individuals suffering from the disease, in a ratio of 150 women and 50 men. The selection set was derived from the basic set of rheumatoid arthritis patients and can

  19. Cystic form of rheumatoid arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dijkstra, P.F.; Gubler, F.M.; Maas, A.

    1988-10-01

    A nonerosive form of rheumatoid arthritis (R.A.) was found in 62 patients out of 660 patients with R.A.. These 62 patients exhibit slowly progressive cystic changes in about the same joints in which usually erosions develop in classic R.A.. The E.S.R. is often low, half of the patients remained seronegative and there are 35 males and 27 females in the group. A smaller group of 15 out of these patients could be followed from a stage wherein the radiographs were normal to a stage of extensive cystic changes, over a period of at least 6 years. An attempt is made to delineate this group within the rheumatoid arthritis disease entity.

  20. Tyrosine kinases in rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kobayashi Akiko

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is an inflammatory, polyarticular joint disease. A number of cellular responses are involved in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis, including activation of inflammatory cells and cytokine expression. The cellular responses involved in each of these processes depends on the specific signaling pathways that are activated; many of which include protein tyrosine kinases. These pathways include the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway, Janus kinases/signal transducers and activators transcription pathway, spleen tyrosine kinase signaling, and the nuclear factor κ-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells pathway. Many drugs are in development to target tyrosine kinases for the treatment of RA. Based on the number of recently published studies, this manuscript reviews the role of tyrosine kinases in the pathogenesis of RA and the potential role of kinase inhibitors as new therapeutic strategies of RA.

  1. Unilateral vs one stage bilateral total knee replacement in rheumatoid and osteoarthritis - A comparative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiran E

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : A controversy exists regarding simultaneous or staged bilateral total knee replacement. Methods: Fifty patients undergoing simultaneous bilateral and 50 undergoing unilateral total knee arthroplasty were evaluated prospectively to compare the clinical, radiological results and complication rates. Eighty-four patients belonged to ASA category II or III preoperatively. The study included a high proportion of rheumatoid patients and osteoarthritis patients with severe deformities. Results: Bilateral group had greater blood loss and required more blood transfusion, but there was no difference in requirement of postoperative intensive care and the complication rates. Rheumatoid knees had lower pre and postoperative knee score and functional score as compared to osteoarthritic knees. Morbidity and mortality of one stage bilateral knee replacement was no greater than unilateral operation. Conclusion: Simultaneous bilateral knee replacement in younger patients with advanced rheumatoid arthritis is safe and effective

  2. Emerging immunotherapies for rheumatoid arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Gary; Cooles, Faye AH; Isaacs, John D; Hilkens, Catharien MU

    2014-01-01

    Novel treatments in development for rheumatoid arthritis target 3 broad areas: cytokines, cells, and signaling pathways. Therapies from each domain share common advantages (for example previously demonstrated efficacy, potential long-term immunomodulation, and oral administration respectively) that have stimulated research in each area but also common obstacles to their development. In this review recent progress in each area will be discussed alongside the factors that have impeded their path to clinical use. PMID:24535556

  3. [Bone structure in rheumatoid arthritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ono, Kumiko; Ohashi, Satoru; Tanaka, Sakae; Matsumoto, Takuya

    2013-07-01

    In rheumatoid arthritis (RA) , the osteoclast pathway is activated by abnormal immune conditions accompanied by chronic inflammation, resulting in periarticular osteoporosis and local bone destruction around joints. In addition, multiple factors, including reduced physical activity and pharmacotherapies such as steroids, lead to systemic osteoporosis. These conditions cause decreasing bone mineral density and deterioration of bone quality, and expose patients to increased risk of fracture. Understanding the bone structures of RA and evaluating fracture risk are central to the treatment of RA.

  4. Clean Hands Count

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... has been rented. This feature is not available right now. Please try again later. Published on May ... 34 How The Clean Hands - Safe Hands System Works - Duration: 3:38. Clean Hands-Safe Hands 5, ...

  5. Two cases of rheumatoid meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magaki, Shino; Chang, Edward; Hammond, Robert R; Yang, Isaac; Mackenzie, Ian R A; Chou, Benedict T; Choi, Soo I; Jen, Joanna C; Pope, Whitney B; Bell, David A; Vinters, Harry V

    2016-02-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) involvement by rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in the form of rheumatoid meningitis (RM) is rare and most commonly occurs in the setting of longstanding severe RA. Due to a wide range of clinical presentations and nonspecific laboratory findings, it presents a diagnostic challenge often requiring brain biopsy. Only a few histopathologically confirmed cases have been described in the literature. Our aim is to describe two cases of RM and review the literature. The first case is of a previously healthy 37-year-old man who presented with severe headaches and focal neurologic deficits. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated abnormal leptomeningeal enhancement in the left frontal and parietal sulci. The second case is of a 62-year-old woman with a history of mild chronic joint pain who presented with confusion, personality changes and seizures. Both patients ultimately underwent brain biopsy which demonstrated RM on pathologic examination. Administration of corticosteroids resulted in significant clinical improvement in both cases. To our knowledge, our unusual case of RM in the young man is the fifth reported case of rheumatoid meningitis in a patient with no prior history of RA. Such an atypical presentation makes diagnosis even more difficult and highlights the need for awareness of this entity in the diagnostic consideration of a patient presenting with unexplained neurologic symptoms. Our literature review underscores the clinical and pathologic heterogeneity of CNS involvement in RA. © 2015 Japanese Society of Neuropathology.

  6. Rheumatoid arthritis and bacterial infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N L Prokopjeva

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available To study features of bacterial infections course in pts with rheumatoid arthritis (RA and changes of laboratory measures after focus of infection sanation. Material and methods. 46 pts with definite rheumatoid arthritis were examined at the time of comorbid infection (Cl detection and after infection focus sanation. Bacteriological test with evaluation of flora sensitivity to antibiotics by disco-diffusion method was performed at baseline and after the course of antibacterial therapy to assess its efficacy. Hemogram, serum fibrinogen, rheumatoid factor, circulating immune complexes (CIC, C-reactive protein levels were assessed. Serum interleukin (IL 1(3, IL6 and neopterin concentrations were examined by immune-enzyme assay in a part of pts. Typical clinical features of Cl were present in only 28 (60,9% pts. 13 (28,3% pts had fever, 12 (26,0% — leukocytosis, 15 (32,6% — changes of leucocyte populations. Some laboratory measures (thrombocytes, fibrinogen, CIC, neopterin levels significantly decreased (p<0,05 after infection focus sanation without correction of disease modifying therapy. Cl quite often develop as asymptomatic processes most often in pts with high activity and can induce disturbances promoting appearance of endothelial dysfunction, atherothrombosis and reduction of life duration. So timely detection and proper sanation of infection focuses should be performed in pts with RA

  7. The method for objective evaluation of the intensity of radial bone lesions in rheumatoid arthritis using digital image analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zielinski, K.W.; Krekora, K.

    2004-01-01

    The semiquantitative methods used in everyday diagnostic practice for scoring the intensity of bone lesions in rheumatoid arthritis are susceptible to a subjective error. The paper describes the original algorithm for an image analysis as a method for quantitative and objective evaluation of the intensity of radiological lesions in rheumatoid arthritis. 75 plain radiograms of the hand of patients diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis, in various stages of bone pathology, were evaluated. The analysis focused on the signs of pathological rebuilding of the affected bone, especially in the distal epiphysis of the radial bone. The plain radiograms of the hand were digitally analysed based on the modified method, formerly used for quantitative assessment of bone trabeculation. The method allowed us to objectively verify various scoring systems of radiograms widely used in rheumatological diagnosis. (author)

  8. Health-related quality of life for patients with rheumatoid arthritis foot involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickman, Amy M; Pinzur, Michael S; Kadanoff, Ruth; Juknelis, Dainius

    2004-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a common disabling form of arthritis that frequently affects the hands and feet. With time, the majority of affected individuals will become disabled. Sixty-nine consecutively selected mild to moderately affected individuals with rheumatoid arthritis provided demographic data and agreed to complete the Short Musculoskeletal Function Assessment (SFMA) instrument. Focus group subjects selectively used minimally adaptive nonprescription footwear. Control subjects had similar disease expression, but did not alter their choice of footwear due to their disease. Adult patients with rheumatoid arthritis demonstrate a significant negative impact on their quality of life with mild or moderate disease expression, as evidenced by poor scores in all six domains of the SFMA. Subjects who used even mildly adaptive nonprescription footwear demonstrated a statistically significant negative impact in mobility (p expression. Focus subjects also demonstrated a trend to less favorable scores in the arm and hand domain. Mean scores of the daily activity, emotional status, and bother index domains fared worse than population norms, but there was no statistical difference between subjects using, or not using, adaptive footwear. Individuals affected with mild to moderate rheumatoid arthritis are disabled as compared with the general population. There is a severe negative impact on mobility and functional capacity when the disease process begins to affect their feet.

  9. Diagnostic imaging of the hand. 3. rev. and enl. ed.; Bildgebende Diagnostik der Hand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmitt, Rainer [Herz und Gefaessklinik GmbH, Bad Neustadt (Germany). Klinik fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie; Lanz, Ulrich

    2015-07-01

    The book on diagnostic imaging of the hand covers the following issues: projection radiography, cinematography, MRT and CR arthrography, arthroscopy, arteriography, skeleton scintiscanning, sonography, computerized tomography, magnetic resonance tomography, anatomy of forearm and carpus, anatomy of metacarpus and fingers, carpal function and morphometry, postoperative X-ray diagnostic, growing hand skeleton, normative variants, malformations and deformities, trauma of the distal forearm, lesions of the ulnocarpal complex (TFCC), scaphoid fractures, scaphoid arthrosis, fractures of other carpus bones, carpal luxations and luxation fractures, carpal instabilities, fractures of the metacarpalla, finger fractures, arthrosis deformans, enthesiopathies, sport induced soft tissue lesions, osteonecrosis, impingement syndromes, osteopenic skeletal diseases, metabolis diseases, crystal-induced osteoarthropaties, rheumatoid arthritis, spondyloarthritis, rheumatic fever, collagenoses, infective arthritis, osteomyelitis, soft tissue infections, cystoids bone lesions, skeletal tumors, soft tissue tumors, carpal tunnel syndrome, nerve compression syndrome, arterial perfusion disturbances, differential diagnostic tables on hand lesions.

  10. "It Is Like Putting Fire in the Children's Hands": A Comparative Case Study of Pre-Service Teachers' Knowledge of and Beliefs about Education for Democracy in an Established and Emerging Post-Conflict Democracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanahan, Brian K.; Phillips, Michele S.

    2014-01-01

    This report documents and compares two cases of pre-service elementary teachers' beliefs about democracy and education for democracy in the USA and Bosnia and Herzegovina along with contextual factors influencing the similarities and differences among these beliefs. Findings suggest that US pre-service elementary teachers have a self-proclaimed…

  11. Socioeconomic status and risk of rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Line Merete Blak; Jacobsen, Søren; Klarlund, Mette

    2006-01-01

    To examine whether markers of socioeconomic status (SES) are associated with risk of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and if so, whether selected lifestyle-related factors could explain this association.......To examine whether markers of socioeconomic status (SES) are associated with risk of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and if so, whether selected lifestyle-related factors could explain this association....

  12. Targeted treatment in early rheumatoid arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klarenbeek, Naomi Bertine

    2013-01-01

    With the implementation of new treatment options, including biologicals and the early, agressive start of target-steered treatment the outlook for rheumatoid arthritis patients improved considerably the past decades. This thesis describes several aspects of modern rheumatoid arthritis treatment from

  13. Improved wrist pannus volume measurement from contrast-enhanced MRI in rheumatoid arthritis using shuffle transform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xanthopoulos, Emily; Hutchinson, Charles E; Adams, Judith E; Bruce, Ian N; Nash, Anthony F P; Holmes, Andrew P; Taylor, Christopher J; Waterton, John C

    2007-01-01

    Contrast-enhanced MRI is of value in assessing rheumatoid pannus in the hand, but the images are not always easy to quantitate. To develop and evaluate an improved measurement of volume of enhancing pannus (VEP) in the hand in human rheumatoid arthritis (RA). MR images of the hand and wrist were obtained for 14 patients with RA at 0, 1 and 13 weeks. Volume of enhancing pannus was measured on images created by subtracting precontrast T1-weighted images from contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images using a shuffle transformation technique. Maximum intensity projection (MIP) and 3D volume rendering of the images were used as a guide to identify the pannus and any contrast-enhanced veins. Visualisation of pannus was much improved following the shuffle transform. Between 0 weeks and 1 week, the mean value of the within-subject coefficient of variation (CoV) was 0.13 and the estimated total CoV was 0.15. There was no evidence of significant increased variability within the 13-week interval for the complete sample of patients. Volume of enhancing pannus can be measured reproducibly in the rheumatoid hand using 3D contrast-enhanced MRI and shuffle transform.

  14. Hearing status in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadzadeh, A; Daraei, M; Jalessi, M; Peyvandi, A A; Amini, E; Ranjbar, L A; Daneshi, A

    2017-10-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is thought to induce conductive hearing loss and/or sensorineural hearing loss. This study evaluated the function of the middle ear and cochlea, and the related factors. Pure tone audiometry, speech reception thresholds, speech discrimination scores, tympanometry, acoustic reflexes, and distortion product otoacoustic emissions were assessed in rheumatoid arthritis patients and healthy volunteers. Pure tone audiometry results revealed a higher bone conduction threshold in the rheumatoid arthritis group, but there was no significant difference when evaluated according to the sensorineural hearing loss definition. Distortion product otoacoustic emissions related prevalence of conductive or mixed hearing loss, tympanometry values, acoustic reflexes, and speech discrimination scores were not significantly different between the two groups. Sensorineural hearing loss was significantly more prevalent in patients who used azathioprine, cyclosporine and etanercept. Higher bone conduction thresholds in some frequencies were detected in rheumatoid arthritis patients that were not clinically significant. Sensorineural hearing loss is significantly more prevalent in refractory rheumatoid arthritis patients.

  15. Development and validation of rheumatoid arthritis magnetic resonance imaging inflammation thresholds associated with lack of damage progression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baker, Joshua F.; Østergaard, Mikkel; Emery, Paul

    2017-01-01

    Objective To determine thresholds for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) magnetic resonance imaging scores (RAMRIS) associated with a low risk of structural damage progression. Methods MRI of the dominant hand was performed and RAMRIS scores determined at weeks 0, 24, and 52. X-rays were performed and van...

  16. Hand Surgery: Anesthesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... All Topics A-Z Videos Infographics Symptom Picker Anatomy Bones Joints Muscles Nerves Vessels Tendons About Hand Surgery What is a Hand Surgeon? What is a Hand Therapist? Media Find a Hand Surgeon Home Anatomy Hand Surgery Anesthesia Email to a friend * required ...

  17. Identifying flares in rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bykerk, Vivian P; Bingham, Clifton O; Choy, Ernest H

    2016-01-01

    to flare, with escalation planned in 61%. CONCLUSIONS: Flares are common in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and are often preceded by treatment reductions. Patient/MD/DAS agreement of flare status is highest in patients worsening from R/LDA. OMERACT RA flare questions can discriminate between patients with...... Set. METHODS: Candidate flare questions and legacy measures were administered at consecutive visits to Canadian Early Arthritis Cohort (CATCH) patients between November 2011 and November 2014. The American College of Rheumatology (ACR) core set indicators were recorded. Concordance to identify flares...

  18. Treating rheumatoid arthritis to target

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smolen, Josef S; Aletaha, Daniel; Bijlsma, Johannes W J

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Aiming at therapeutic targets has reduced the risk of organ failure in many diseases such as diabetes or hypertension. Such targets have not been defined for rheumatoid arthritis (RA). OBJECTIVE: /st> To develop recommendations for achieving optimal therapeutic outcomes in RA. METHODS....... Levels of evidence, strength of recommendations and levels of agreement were derived. RESULTS: The treat-to-target activity resulted in 10 recommendations. The treatment aim was defined as remission with low disease activity being an alternative goal in patients with long-standing disease. Regular follow...

  19. Clinical registry for rheumatoid arthritis; a preliminary analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fakhr, A.; Hakim, F.; Zaidi, S.K.; Sharif, A.

    2017-01-01

    To establish a clinical registry for Rheumatoid Arthritis and delineate the most common symptoms that rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients experience in our set up. Study Design: Cross sectional study. Place and Duration of Study: Study was carried out at Military Hospital (MH) Rawalpindi at Rheumatology Department during the period of Jan 2013 to Jun 2015. Material and Methods: A clinical registry for Rheumatoid Arthritis was developed as per criteria jointly developed by American College of Rheumatology (ACR) along with European League against Rheumatism (EULAR) (2010). Fifty-eight patients were registered after their informed consent and approval by Military Hospital (MH) Rawalpindi ethical committee. Age, gender and relevant clinical parameters of RA patients were recorded on case report forms and stored for analysis in the RA registry in Excel 2010. The figures were reported in frequencies and percentages. Results: Multiple joint pains (48.28%), fever (24.14%), morning stiffness of joints (22.41%) were the most common symptoms in RA patients. Other clinical manifestations included painful bilateral swollen joints (13.79%), pain in different parts of the body (10.34%), Raynaud's phenomenon (10.34%), malaise (8.62%), swollen body parts (8.62%), ulcers (8.62%), fatigue (6.90%), nodules on skin/elbow/interphalangeal joints (6.90%), deformities of fingers/ hand (3.45%), redness of eyes (3.45%), body rash (3.45%), inability to walk (3.45%), cervical lymphadenopathy (1.72%), stiffness of spine (1.72%) and myalgias (1.72%). Conclusion: It is concluded that multiple joint pains, fever and morning stiffness of joints are the most common symptoms of RA patients. (author)

  20. Significance of bone marrow edema in pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sudoł-Szopińska, Iwona; Kontny, Ewa; Maśliński, Włodzimierz; Prochorec-Sobieszek, Monika; Warczyńska, Agnieszka; Kwiatkowska, Brygida

    2013-01-01

    Assessing the pathology of the synovium, its thickening and increased vascularity through ultrasound and magnetic resonance examinations (more often an ultrasound study alone) is still considered a sensitive parameter in the diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis and in monitoring of treatment efficacy. Magnetic resonance studies showed that, aside from the joint pannus, the subchondral bone tissue constitutes an essential element in the development of rheumatoid arthritis. Bone marrow edema correlates with inflammation severity, joint destruction, clinical signs and symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis, and thus is considered a predictor of rapid radiological progression of the disease. The newest studies reveal that bone marrow edema may be a more sensitive indicator of the response to therapy than appearance of the synovium. Bone marrow edema presents with increased signal in T2-weighted images, being most visible in fat saturation or IR sequences (STIR, TIRM). On the other hand, it is hypointense and less evident in T1-weighted images. It becomes enhanced (hyperintense) after contrast administration. Histopathological studies confirmed that it is a result of bone inflammation (osteitis/osteomyelitis), i.e. replacememt of bone marrow fat by inflammatory infiltrates containing macrophages, T lymphocytes, B lymphocytes, plasma cells and osteoclasts. Bone marrow edema appears after a few weeks from occurrence of symptoms and therefore is considered an early marker of inflammation. It correlates with clinical assessment of disease activity and elevated markers of acute inflammatory phase, i.e. ESR and CRP. It is a reversible phenomenon and may become attenuated due to biological treatment. It is considered a “herald” of erosions, as the risk of their formation is 6-fold higher in sites where BME was previously noted

  1. Newer Nutritional basis in the management of Rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharat Agarwal

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is a chronic inflammatory autoimmune disorder culminating in joint destruction with functional impairment & deformities. This disease is associated with poor nutritional status in relation to various nutrients due to not only because of increased requirements & reduction in their absorption but also due to disease modifying anti-rheumatoid drugs (DMARD’s, Non-steroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs (NSAID’s & corticosteroids prescribed to alleviate symptoms of this disease. This results in associated side effects like gastrointestinal bleeding & bone loss (osteoporosis. Supplementation with long chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA has constantly demonstrated an improvement in symptoms & reduction in dosages of NSAID’s. Such a supplementation can be provided with the use of fish oils which have an anti-inflammatory potential. Vitamin C (ascorbic acid use has been found to augment the anti-oxidant defenses, so also the use of Vitamin E (tocopherol which has got antiinflammatory action. Beneficial effects of Vitamin B6 (pyridoxal 5-phosphate used in conjunction with folate & Vitamin B12 have been documented in those group of RA patients with high homocysteine metabolism, there by reducing the cardiovascular risk in these patients. In addition role of Selenium, Iron, Zinc, Calcium, and Vitamin D has been discussed in this review article. Besides adding certain nutrients in food, elimination of certain foods like red meat, dairy products, cereals & wheat gluten have shown improvement in progression of this disease. This article emphasizes the need for dietary supervision in the hands of expert dietician, of the Rheumatoid arthritis patients.

  2. Total shoulder replacement in rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sneppen, O; Fruensgaard, S; Johannsen, Hans Viggo

    1996-01-01

    A prospective study of 62 Neer mark II total shoulder arthroplasties performed during the period from 1981 to 1990 on 51 patients with rheumatoid arthritis was undertaken to evaluate factors associated with component loosening and proximal humeral migration. Thirty-two (51%) showed proximal......, range of movement, abduction force, or function. The risk of clinical asymptomatic loosening is a relatively late complication that is eventually followed by pronounced bone destruction related to the loose component. Long-term radiographic control of total shoulders with rheumatoid arthritis...... is recommended. Hemiarthroplasty with a cemented humeral prosthesis may be a better treatment in the end stage of rheumatoid arthritis of the shoulder....

  3. Indirect costs of rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filip Raciborski

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available It is estimated that in Poland about 400,000 persons in general suffer from inflammatory joint diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis (RA. Epidemiological surveys documenting the frequency and disturbance of musculoskeletal disorders in the Polish population are few in number. Most of the estimations are based on epidemiological data from other countries (prevalence of 0.5–1%. According to the data of the National Health Fund in Poland 135,000–157,000 persons in total are treated because of rheumatoid arthritis per year [ICD10 (International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems: M05, M06]. In the case of this group of diseases indirect costs significantly outweigh the direct costs. Indirect costs increase together with activity level of the disease. The cost analysis of productivity loss of RA patients indicates that sickness absenteeism and informal care are the most burdensome. At the national level it amounts in total from 1.2 billion to 2.8 billion PLN per year, depending on the method of analysis. These costs could be significantly reduced through early diagnosis and introduction of effective treatment.

  4. MINERAL WATERS IN RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BORGES, TIAGO

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is an autoimmune disorder affecting nearly 1% of adult population. First-line therapies include disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs, but creno-balneotherapyis often prescribed in rheumatic disorders and RA is no exception. Objectives: To know the efficacy of creno-balneotherapy in RA. Methods: A Medline based search was made using MeSH terms “balneology” and “rheumatoid arthritis”. Articles concerning the use of mineral waters in RA treatment were included. Results: In RA, two traditional ways of employing mineral waters are commonly used: immersion and peliotherapy. Each owns their benefits to non-specific or hydrotherapeutic effects and specific or crenotherapeutic effects. Mineral waters must be regarded as an adjuvant therapy in quiescent, stable or non-progressive RA. Significant benefits have been accomplished with radonenriched and sulphurous waters. Isothermal or hyperthermal waters should be preferred. Conclusions: Although there is a global lack of evidence, mineral waters are a safe and effective therapy to be considered in RA.

  5. Hand Specific Representations in Language Comprehension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire eMoody-Triantis

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Theories of embodied cognition argue that language comprehension involves sensory-motor re-enactments of the actions described. However, the degree of specificity of these re-enactments as well as the relationship between action and language remains a matter of debate. Here we investigate these issues by examining how hand-specific information (left or right hand is recruited in language comprehension and action execution. An fMRI study tested right-handed participants in two separate tasks that were designed to be as similar as possible to increase sensitivity of the comparison across task: an action execution go/no-go task where participants performed right or left hand actions, and a language task where participants read sentences describing the same left or right handed actions as in the execution task. We found that language-induced activity did not match the hand-specific patterns of activity found for action execution in primary somatosensory and motor cortex, but it overlapped with pre-motor and parietal regions associated with action planning. Within these pre-motor regions, both right hand actions and sentences elicited stronger activity than left hand actions and sentences - a dominant hand effect -. Importantly, both dorsal and ventral sections of the left pre-central gyrus were recruited by both tasks, suggesting different action features being recruited. These results suggest that (a language comprehension elicits motor representations that are hand-specific and akin to multimodal action plans, rather than full action re-enactments; and (b language comprehension and action execution share schematic hand-specific representations that are richer for the dominant hand, and thus linked to previous motor experience.

  6. Hand specific representations in language comprehension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moody-Triantis, Claire; Humphreys, Gina F; Gennari, Silvia P

    2014-01-01

    Theories of embodied cognition argue that language comprehension involves sensory-motor re-enactments of the actions described. However, the degree of specificity of these re-enactments as well as the relationship between action and language remains a matter of debate. Here we investigate these issues by examining how hand-specific information (left or right hand) is recruited in language comprehension and action execution. An fMRI study tested self-reported right-handed participants in two separate tasks that were designed to be as similar as possible to increase sensitivity of the comparison across task: an action execution go/no-go task where participants performed right or left hand actions, and a language task where participants read sentences describing the same left or right handed actions as in the execution task. We found that language-induced activity did not match the hand-specific patterns of activity found for action execution in primary somatosensory and motor cortex, but it overlapped with pre-motor and parietal regions associated with action planning. Within these pre-motor regions, both right hand actions and sentences elicited stronger activity than left hand actions and sentences-a dominant hand effect. Importantly, both dorsal and ventral sections of the left pre-central gyrus were recruited by both tasks, suggesting different action features being recruited. These results suggest that (a) language comprehension elicits motor representations that are hand-specific and akin to multimodal action plans, rather than full action re-enactments; and (b) language comprehension and action execution share schematic hand-specific representations that are richer for the dominant hand, and thus linked to previous motor experience.

  7. Nailfold capillaroscopy in 430 patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajaei, Alireza; Dehghan, Pooneh; Amiri, Ali

    2017-01-01

    Microvascular changes are one of the first obvious steps in numerous inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Nailfold video capillaroscopy (NFC) is an easy, reliable and safe method for evaluating peripheral microangiopathy. The objective of this study was to examine nailfold microcirculation in RA patients, assess morphological and structural changes quantitatively and qualitatively, and recognize useful changes. A total of 430 patients diagnosed with RA were examined in a period of 4 years. NFC was performed on all fingers of both hands in each patient. Different parameters indicating microvascular changes were detected and analyzed; such as microvascular architecture, capillary distribution disturbances, capillary morphology, capillary density, efferent/afferent limb ratio, subpapillary venular plexus and morphological abnormalities. The obtained results were categorized into normal pattern, nonspecific morphological abnormality and scleroderma pattern. The mean age of participants was 51.03±14.54 (19-87 years) that consisted of 359 females and 71 males. Based on the findings, angiogenesis (74.7%) was the most pathological condition observed after tortuosity (99.5%). 7.2% and 20.9% of patients were categorized into normal and scleroderma pattern group, respectively. Among morphological abnormalities, angiogenesis, isolated enlarged loop, irregular enlarged loop and architectural derangement were significantly more frequent in scleroderma than normal pattern (p<0.001). NFC may play an important role in monitoring RA disease and patients' follow-up. Therefore, in our opinion it could be considered in the course and follow-up of rheumatoid arthritis.

  8. Calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate and hydroxyapatite crystals in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis: Acase report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shereen R Kamel

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The association between rheumatoid arthritis (RA and calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate (CPPD crystal deposits can now be easily identified by MSUS, which is a noninvasive technique that can be applied to patients with painful joints and enthesis that are unexplained by rheumatoid activity. In this paper, we report an Egyptian case of a 51-year-old man who had rheumatoid arthritis since 7 years and developed bilateral knee and heel pain of 1.5 months’ duration with gradual onset and progressive course. Radiography revealed features of RA in both hands, as well as features of severe osteoarthritis in both knees with no signs of chondrocalcinosis. Ultrasonography of the joints, Achilles tendon, and plantar fascia detected knee, Achilles tendon, and plantar fascia calcifications, which are characteristic of CPPD, and supraspinatus calcification, which is characteristic of hydroxyapatite (HA deposition. Further investigations revealed no evidence of metabolic disorders. CPPD and HA crystals were identified in his synovial fluid. Subclinical affection with CPPD and HA crystals in RA can be easily detected by ultrasonography, which allows early management to prevent future attacks in RA patients that could lead to exacerbation of joint symptoms that may be missed as rheumatoid disease activity. Diet control and colchicine treatment may be more effective if started early before exacerbation.

  9. Rheumatoid Arthritis and Complementary Medicine: In Depth

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... unproven. Many factors—including differences in tai chi styles, number of movements, length of the practice, and ... JY, Kim YJ, et al. Acupuncture for symptom management of rheumatoid arthritis: a pilot study. Clinical Rheumatology. ...

  10. Balneotherapy (or spa therapy) for rheumatoid arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhagen, A.P.; Bierma-Zeinstra, S.M.A.; Boers, M.; Cardoso, J.R.; Lambeck, J.; de Bie, R.; de Vet, H.C.W.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: No cure for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is known at present, so treatment often focuses on management of symptoms such as pain, stiffness and mobility. Treatment options include pharmacological interventions, physical therapy treatments and balneotherapy. Balneotherapy is defined as

  11. Tracheomegaly in association with rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Celenk, C.; Selcuk, M.B.; Oezyazici, B.; Celenk, P.; Kuru, Oe.

    2000-01-01

    Herein we present a case of tracheomegaly seen in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis. To the authors' knowledge, and from a review of the literature, this combination has not been previously described. (orig.)

  12. Rheumatoid Arthritis | Ally | South African Family Practice

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Immune-mediated inflammatory disorders include a clinically diverse group of conditions sharing similar pathogenic mechanisms. Conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, spondyloarthropathy, inflammatory bowel disease and connective tissue diseases are characterised by immune dysregulation and chronic ...

  13. Osteoarthritis of the Hand

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... All Topics A-Z Videos Infographics Symptom Picker Anatomy Bones Joints Muscles Nerves Vessels Tendons About Hand Surgery What is a Hand Surgeon? What is a Hand Therapist? Media Find a Hand Surgeon Home Anatomy Osteoarthritis Email to a friend * required fields From * ...

  14. Hands in Systemic Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... All Topics A-Z Videos Infographics Symptom Picker Anatomy Bones Joints Muscles Nerves Vessels Tendons About Hand Surgery What is ... Hand Therapist? Media Find a Hand Surgeon Home Anatomy ... hands, being composed of many types of tissue, including blood vessels, nerves, skin and skin-related tissues, bones, and muscles/tendons/ligaments, may show changes that reflect a ...

  15. The development of a preliminary ultrasonographic scoring system for features of hand osteoarthritis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Keen, H I

    2008-05-01

    Painful osteoarthritis (OA) of the hand is common and a validated ultrasound (US) scoring system would be valuable for epidemiological and therapeutic outcome studies. US is increasingly used to assess peripheral joints, though most of the US focus in rheumatic diseases has been on rheumatoid arthritis. We aimed to develop a preliminary US hand OA scoring system, initially focusing on relevant pathological features with potentially high reliability.

  16. Denmark: HAND in HAND Policy Questionnaire

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Hilmar Dyrborg; Nielsen, Birgitte Lund

    2018-01-01

    Som del af det internationale EU finansierede projekt Hand in Hand, der fokuserer på de såkaldte SEI-kompetencer (Social, Emotional, Intercultural), er dansk policy i relation til elevernes sociale, emotionelle og interkulturelle læring kortlagt i denne rapport. Der refereres bl.a. til "elevernes...

  17. Link between rheumatoid arthritis and chronic periodontitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz Kaczyński

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Chronic periodontitis is an infectious disease associated with the progressive destruction of periodontal tissues. In recent years, more and more data indicate an existing relationship between periodontal disease and rheumatoid arthritis. The link between both diseases has been confirmed in multiple studies. Despite the fact that this association might be based on shared environmental and genetic risk factors, a possible causal relation was advocated by experimental, epidemiological and interventional studies, with the leading role of Porphyromonas gingivalis. Individuals with chronic periodontitis are at an increased risk of developing rheumatoid arthritis, as well as rheumatoid arthritis patients are at an increased risk of chronic periodontitis and more severe forms of periodontitis. Furthermore, there is a correlation between the activity in both diseases – patients with more severe periodontitis suffer from more active rheumatoid arthritis. Intervention attempts were also performed, which demonstrated that eliminating periodontal infection and inflammation can affect the severity of rheumatoid arthritis. In this paper, we review the current knowledge about the link between both diseases, focusing on its clinical implications. Will periodontal treatment become a part of standard therapy for rheumatoid arthritis?

  18. Application physiotherapy in rehabilitation rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Nogas

    2017-02-01

    National University of Water and Environmental Engineering   Abstract Background: Rheumatoid arthritis is one of the most common forms of inflammatory diseases of the joints. The disease leads to deformation, then to destruction of the diseased joint and to disability. Physiotherapy is used for the treatment and rehabilitation of rheumatoid arthritis. It is assumed that physiotherapy treatments that promote remission of the disease, improve the quality of patients’ life, create the necessary conditions for comprehensive rehabilitation programs. Objective: Systematic’s review conducting of studies that assess the effect of physiotherapy in the rehabilitation of patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Methods: Theoretical analysis of scientific and methodical literature, methods of analysis, synthesis, generalization. Results: To reduce inflammation in the joints is performed UV of affected joints weak or medium erythermal or middle erythermal doses used UHF therapy. UHF-therapy prescribed to the area of joint in I or II dose, duration 10 min., the course – 5-8 treatments. For patients with minimal activity is added electrophoresis NSAIDs. Electrophoresis aspirin is applied on the affected joints (every day, the course – 10-12 procedures, which favorably affect the course of rheumatoid arthritis. Conclusions: Physical therapy can reduce pain and stiffness in the joints, prevent deformity and restore function, improve independence and quality of life. State of the art is a major incentive to develop new activities in the treatment and rehabilitation of patients with rheumatoid arthritis to improve joint functional activity and their physical health.   Keywords: rheumatoid arthritis, physiotherapy, rehabilitation, hydrotherapy.

  19. Rheumatoid arthritis affecting temporomandibular joint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amandeep Sodhi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is a chronic, systemic, autoimmune inflammatory disorder that is characterized by joint inflammation, erosive properties and symmetric multiple joint involvement. Temporomandibular joint (TMJ is very rare to be affected in the early phase of the disease, thus posing diagnostic challenges for the dentist. Conventional radiographs fail to show the early lesions due to its limitations. More recently cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT has been found to diagnose the early degenerative changes of TMJ and hence aid in the diagnosis of the lesions more accurately. Our case highlights the involvement of TMJ in RA and the role of advanced imaging (CBCT in diagnosing the bony changes in the early phase of the disease.

  20. [New therapies for rheumatoid arthritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salgado, Eva; Maneiro, José Ramón

    2014-11-18

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic systemic inflammatory disease characterized by inflammation of the synovial membrane and progressive destruction of the articular cartilage and bone. Advances in the knowledge of disease pathogenesis allowed the identification of novel therapeutic targets such as tumor necrosis factor (TNF), interleukin (IL)-1, IL-6 or the system JAK/STAT phosphorylation. At present there are 5 TNF antagonists approved for RA. Tocilizumab blocks the pathway of IL-6 and is the only biological with proven efficacy in monotherapy. Rituximab modulates B cell response in RA. Abatacept provided new data on T cell involvement in the pathogenesis of RA. Tofacitinib is the first kinase inhibitor approved for this disease. Biologic drugs have proven efficacy, almost always in combination with methotrexate, and even halt radiographic progression. Monitoring infection is the main precaution in handling these patients. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  1. Pharmacotherapy Options in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pradeep Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Drugs form the mainstay of therapy in rheumatoid arthritis (RA. Five main classes of drugs are currently used: analgesics, non-steroidal anti-inflammatories (NSAIDs, glucocorticoids, nonbiologic and biologic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs. Current clinical practice guidelines recommend that clinicians start biologic agents if patients have suboptimal response or intolerant to one or two traditional disease modifying agents (DMARDs. Methotrexate, sulfasalazine, leflunomide and hydroxychloroquine are the commonly used DMARDs. Currently, anti-TNF is the commonly used first line biologic worldwide followed by abatacept and it is usually combined with MTX. There is some evidence that tocilizumab is the most effective biologic as a monotherapy agent. Rituximab is generally not used as a first line biologic therapy due to safety issues but still as effective as anti-TNF. The long term data for the newer oral small molecule biologics such as tofacitinib is not available and hence used only as a last resort.

  2. Rheumatoid arthritis in Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almoallim, Hani M.; Alharbi, Laila A.

    2014-01-01

    The status of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in Saudi Arabia (SA) was examined from various perspectives based on a systematic literature review and the authors’ personal experiences. In this regard, database and journal search were conducted to identify studies on RA in SA, yielding a total of 43 articles. Although efforts have been made to promote RA research in SA, current studies mostly represent only a few centers and may not accurately portray the national status of RA care. Notably, biological therapies were introduced early for almost all practicing rheumatologists in SA (government and private). However, no national guidelines regarding the management of RA have been developed based on local needs and regulations. Also, while efforts were made to establish RA data registries, they have not been successful. Taken together, this analysis can contribute to the planning of future guidelines and directives for RA care in SA. PMID:25491208

  3. Kidney involvement in rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Lazzarini

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA is a widespread disease and its renal involvement, relatively common, is clinically significant because worsens course and mortality of the primary disease. There is still no agreement on the prevalence of renal disorders in RA: data analysis originates from different sources, as death certificates, autopsies, clinical and laboratory findings and kidney biopsies, each with its limitations. Histoimmunological studies on bioptical specimens of patients with RA and kidney damage, led to clarify prevalent pathologies. In order of frequency: glomerulonephritis and amyloidosis (60-65% and 20-30% respectively, followed by acute or chronic interstitial nephritis. Kidney injury during RA includes secondary renal amyloidosis, nephrotoxic effects of antirheumatic drugs and nephropathies as extra-articular manifestations (rheumatoid nephropathy. Amyloidosis affects survival, increases morbidity and is the main cause of end stage renal disease in patients with RA and nephropathy. Strong association between RA activity and amyloidosis needs the use of immunosuppressive and combined therapies, to prevent this complication and reduce risk of dialysis. Long-lasting and combined RA pharmacotherapy involves various renal side effects. In this review we describe NSAIDs and DMARDs (Disease-Modifying Antirheumatic Drugs nephrotoxicity, particularly by gold compounds, D-penicillamine, cyclosporine A and methotrexate. Rare cases of IgA glomerulonephritis during immunomodulating therapy with leflunomide and TNF blocking receptor (etanercept are reported; real clinical significance of this drug-related nephropathy will be established by development of RA treatment. In RA nephropathies, mesangial glomerulonephritis is the most frequent histological lesion (35-60 % out of biopsies from patients with urinary abnormalities and/or kidney impairment, followed by minimal change glomerulopathy (3-14% and p-ANCA positive necrotizing crescentic

  4. Risk of atrial fibrillation and stroke in rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindhardsen, Jesper; Ahlehoff, Ole; Gislason, Gunnar Hilmar

    2012-01-01

    To determine if patients with rheumatoid arthritis have increased risk of atrial fibrillation and stroke.......To determine if patients with rheumatoid arthritis have increased risk of atrial fibrillation and stroke....

  5. Robotic hand project

    OpenAIRE

    Karaçizmeli, Cengiz; Çakır, Gökçe; Tükel, Dilek

    2014-01-01

    In this work, the mechatronic based robotic hand is controlled by the position data taken from the glove which has flex sensors mounted to capture finger bending of the human hand. The angular movement of human hand’s fingers are perceived and processed by a microcontroller, and the robotic hand is controlled by actuating servo motors. It has seen that robotic hand can simulate the movement of the human hand that put on the glove, during tests have done. This robotic hand can be used not only...

  6. Case of physiotherapy care for patient with rheumatoid arthritis diagnosed

    OpenAIRE

    Koukalová, Martina

    2014-01-01

    Title of bachelor's thesis: Case of physiotherapy care for patient with rheumatoid arthritis diagnosed Objectives: The aim of this thesis is to show using of physiotherapeutistic methods on patient with rheumatoid arthritis. One part of this thesis is casuistry of patient with rheumatoid arthritis. The summary: The thesis is divided into two parts, the theoretical part and the special part. The theoretical part is focused on issue of rheumatoid arthritis, its characteristic, division, diagnos...

  7. Case of physiotherapy care for patient diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Šedková, Štěpánka

    2013-01-01

    Title of bachelor's thesis: Case of physiotherapy care for patient diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis Objectives: The aim is to emphasize the use of physiotherapy as a part of comprehensive treatment of a patient with rheumatoid arthritis. The thesis includes a detailed casuistry of a patient with rheumatoid arthritis. Methods: The thesis is divided into a general part and a special part. The general part is focused on description of rheumatoid arthritis. It discusses characteristics of the ...

  8. Corelations between radiological score with clinical and laboratory parameters in rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihaela Chicu

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Staging in rheumatoid arthritis (RA and evaluating the effectiveness of drug treatment involves the determination of radiological scores (for narrowing and erosions, this being the most specific changes and most commonly found in RA.Matherials and methods: Our study was condacted over a period of 12 months in Medical Rehabilitation Clinic of „Sf. Spiridon” Iasi Hospital, on a group of 40 women patients with RA in various stages of evolution. X-ray examination was done on hands and feet at the beginning and the end of the study period. There were computed radiographic Sharp scores for narrowing and erosions and the total score. Erosions were examined for 16 joints in each hand. For narrowing five joints were evaluated. For accuracy, radiological examination was done on mammography film. Rezults:After calculating Sharp scores - Van der Heide version - I compared them with the levels of clinical (HAQ, NAT, NAD, DAS28, bone densitometry and laboratory (ESR, CRP, rheumatoid factor, IL-1β parameters.Conclusions: The values of radiological scores for narrowing and erosions are directly correlate with DAS28, HAQ, rheumatoid factors levels and IgG values, and indirectly correlated with IL-1β levels.

  9. Cervical Spine Involvement as Initial Manifestation of Rheumatoid Arthritis: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filipe Araújo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis’ synovitis affects mostly small hand and feet joints, although it may compromise any joint with a synovial lining. Cervical involvement occurs usually in longstanding disease in over half of these patients. We report the case of a 35-year old male patient who was referred to our outpatient clinic for a 2-year severe and disabling inflammatory neck pain, with incomplete response to intramuscular non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and unremarkable cervical imaging studies. He also mentioned self-limited episodes of symmetric polyarthralgia involving hands, wrists, elbows, knees and feet, which started after his cervical complaints. On laboratorial workup, positive rheumatoid factor and anti-citrullinated peptide antibody and negative HLA-B27 were found. Cervical spine magnetic resonance imaging revealed atlantoaxial subluxation and odontoid process inflammatory pannus and erosions. Rheumatoid arthritis with cervical spine involvement as initial manifestation of disease was the definite diagnosis. The patient was started on methotrexate and prednisone and he was referred to neurosurgery outpatient clinic for cervical spine fixation.

  10. Inter- relationship between rheumatoid arthritis and periodontitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajkarnikar, J; Thomas, B S; Rao, S K

    2013-01-01

    Periodontal medicine defines a rapidly emerging branch of Periodontology focusing on establishing a strong relationship between periodontal health and systemic health. It is speculated that the major common dysregulation which links Periodontitis with Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is being played by the mediators of immune inflammatory response. To determine whether there is any relationship between periodontal disease and Rheumatoid arthritis. A total of 100 patients were included for the present study which was divided into two groups: one group (cases) included 50 patients attending the Department of Orthopedics, Kasturba Medical College, Manipal who were diagnosed of Rheumatoid arthritis. Another subject population included 50 patients as controls attending the Department of Oral Medicine, Manipal College of Dental Sciences, Manipal with age and gender matched with those of rheumatoid arthritis group. Specific measures for periodontitis included plaque index, gingival index, number of missing teeth, and radiographic alveolar bone loss scores. Measures of rheumatoid arthritis included health assessment questionaires, levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR). Various periodontal parameters were compared between the cases and controls. The average alveolar bone loss was statistically more severe in Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) group than in the controls although there were similar plaque index in both the groups. The gingival index was statistically higher in the RA group. The Erythrocyte Sedimentation Rate (ESR) and C- Reactive Protein (CRP) levels of RA patients were also significantly associated with the severity of periodontal disease. There was a significant association between Rheumatoid arthritis and Periodontitis which may be due to a common underlying deregulation of the inflammatory response in these individuals.

  11. Clean Hands Count

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to promote or encourage adherence to CDC hand hygiene recommendations. It is a component of the Clean ... aims to address myths and misperceptions about hand hygiene and empower patients to play a role in ...

  12. Clean Hands Count

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... intended to promote or encourage adherence to CDC hand hygiene recommendations. It is a component of the Clean ... also aims to address myths and misperceptions about hand hygiene and empower patients to play a role in ...

  13. Clean Hands Count

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... intended to promote or encourage adherence to CDC hand hygiene recommendations. It is a component of the Clean ... also aims to address myths and misperceptions about hand hygiene and empower patients to play a role in ...

  14. Wash Your Hands

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hand sanitizers might not remove harmful chemicals like pesticides and heavy metals from hands. Be cautious when ... Health Promotion Materials Fact Sheets Podcasts Posters Stickers Videos Web Features Training & Education Our Partners Publications, Data & ...

  15. Pleural and pulmonary alterations caused by rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bankier, A.A.; Fleischmann, D.; Kiener, H.P.; Wiesmayr, M.N.; Herold, C.J.

    1996-01-01

    Pulmonary complications caused by rheumatoid arthritis are a clinically relevant aspect of this chronic arthropathy. This article reviews pulmonary abnormalities induced by rheumatoid arthritis and their clinical and radiological findings. In addition, the role of different imaging modalities in the diagnostic work-up of pulmonary complications caused by rheumatoid arthritis is discussed. (orig./MG) [de

  16. Rheumatoid Arthritis Diet: Can Certain Foods Reduce Symptoms?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Can diet affect symptoms? Can certain diets affect rheumatoid arthritis symptoms? Answers from April Chang-Miller, M.D. ... article: http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/rheumatoid-arthritis/expert-answers/rheumatoid-arthritis/FAQ-20058041 . Mayo Clinic Footer Legal Conditions ...

  17. Cardio-pulmonary manifestations of rheumatoid arthritis among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic systemic inflammatory disease, characterized by polyarthritis and extraarticular manifestations. The cardiopulmonary manifestations of rheumatoid arthritis were studied retrospectively in a cohort of rheumatoid arthritis patients. Methods: This was a retrospective study of all ...

  18. Establishing a core domain set to measure rheumatoid arthritis flares

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bykerk, Vivian P; Lie, Elisabeth; Bartlett, Susan J

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The OMERACT Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) Flare Group (FG) is developing a data-driven, patient-inclusive, consensus-based RA flare definition for use in clinical trials, longterm observational studies, and clinical practice. At OMERACT 11, we sought endorsement of a proposed core domain set...... to measure RA flare. METHODS: Patient and healthcare professional (HCP) qualitative studies, focus groups, and literature review, followed by patient and HCP Delphi exercises including combined Delphi consensus at Outcome Measures in Rheumatology 10 (OMERACT 10), identified potential domains to measure flare...... Filter 2.0 methodology. RESULTS: A pre-meeting combined Delphi exercise for defining flare identified 9 domains as important (>70% consensus from patients or HCP). Four new patient-reported domains beyond those included in the RA disease activity core set were proposed for inclusion (fatigue...

  19. Hand hygiene strategies

    OpenAIRE

    Yazaji, Eskandar Alex

    2011-01-01

    Hand hygiene is one of the major players in preventing healthcare associated infections. However, healthcare workers compliance with hand hygiene continues to be a challenge. This article will address strategies to help improving hand hygiene compliance. Keywords: hand hygiene; healthcare associated infections; multidisciplinary program; system change; accountability; education; feedback(Published: 18 July 2011)Citation: Journal of Community Hospital Internal Medicine Perspectives 2011, 1: 72...

  20. About Hand Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Find a hand surgeon near you. © 2009 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Definition developed by ASSH Council. Other Links CME Mission Statement and Disclaimer Policies and Technical Requirements Exhibits and Partners ASSH 822 W. Washington Blvd. ... 2018 by American Society for Surgery of the Hand × Search Tips Tip ...

  1. Guideline Implementation: Hand Hygiene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Judith L

    2017-02-01

    Performing proper hand hygiene and surgical hand antisepsis is essential to reducing the rates of health care-associated infections, including surgical site infections. The updated AORN "Guideline for hand hygiene" provides guidance on hand hygiene and surgical hand antisepsis, the wearing of fingernail polish and artificial nails, proper skin care to prevent dermatitis, the wearing of jewelry, hand hygiene product selection, and quality assurance and performance improvement considerations. This article focuses on key points of the guideline to help perioperative personnel make informed decisions about hand hygiene and surgical hand antisepsis. The key points address the necessity of keeping fingernails and skin healthy, not wearing jewelry on the hands or wrists in the perioperative area, properly performing hand hygiene and surgical hand antisepsis, and involving patients and visitors in hand hygiene initiatives. Perioperative RNs should review the complete guideline for additional information and for guidance when writing and updating policies and procedures. Copyright © 2017 AORN, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Robotic hand and fingers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salisbury, Curt Michael; Dullea, Kevin J.

    2017-06-06

    Technologies pertaining to a robotic hand are described herein. The robotic hand includes one or more fingers releasably attached to a robotic hand frame. The fingers can abduct and adduct as well as flex and tense. The fingers are releasably attached to the frame by magnets that allow for the fingers to detach from the frame when excess force is applied to the fingers.

  3. Diagnostic imaging of the hand. 3. rev. and enl. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmitt, Rainer; Lanz, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    The book on diagnostic imaging of the hand covers the following issues: projection radiography, cinematography, MRT and CR arthrography, arthroscopy, arteriography, skeleton scintiscanning, sonography, computerized tomography, magnetic resonance tomography, anatomy of forearm and carpus, anatomy of metacarpus and fingers, carpal function and morphometry, postoperative X-ray diagnostic, growing hand skeleton, normative variants, malformations and deformities, trauma of the distal forearm, lesions of the ulnocarpal complex (TFCC), scaphoid fractures, scaphoid arthrosis, fractures of other carpus bones, carpal luxations and luxation fractures, carpal instabilities, fractures of the metacarpalla, finger fractures, arthrosis deformans, enthesiopathies, sport induced soft tissue lesions, osteonecrosis, impingement syndromes, osteopenic skeletal diseases, metabolis diseases, crystal-induced osteoarthropaties, rheumatoid arthritis, spondyloarthritis, rheumatic fever, collagenoses, infective arthritis, osteomyelitis, soft tissue infections, cystoids bone lesions, skeletal tumors, soft tissue tumors, carpal tunnel syndrome, nerve compression syndrome, arterial perfusion disturbances, differential diagnostic tables on hand lesions.

  4. Bone loss in rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gotfredsen, A.; Als, O.S.; Hassager, C.; Christiansen, C.

    1986-01-01

    The authors studied 159 patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) treated with a variety of drugs. Stratification of the patients was done according to treatment, sex, menopausal state, duration of the disease, and functional impairment. Forearm bone mineral content (BMC) and total body bone mineral (TBBM) were measured by single and dual photon absorptiometry. Bone turnover was estimated by biochemical markers. All patients had significantly decreased BMC and TBBM compared to normals. Comparing glucocorticoid and penicillamine treatment in premenopausal patients, they found significantly lower BMC and TBBM values in the glucocorticoid treated group. However, no differences in BMC and TBBM values were found in the corresponding postmenopausal groups. In the premenopausal glucocorticoid group with the duration of treatment and cumulated dose correlated with BMC, whereas no such correlations were found in the postmenopausal women. In the patients who did not receive glucocorticoids they found significant relationships between BMC and functional impairment as well as duration of the disease. Indices of bone turnover rose with increasing functional, impairment, particularly those of bone resorption

  5. Rheumatoid arthritis of the shoulder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dijkstra, J.; Dijkstra, P.F.; Klundert, W. v. d.

    1985-02-01

    The course of rheumatoid arthritis in the shoulder is evaluated in 143 patients. In a period of 29 years, 630 X-rays were taken of 286 shoulders. In this series 2 or more X-rays per shoulder were taken of 89 patients (29 male, 60 female). The various changes in the glenohumeral and acromioclavicular joints were described. Gross destruction appears to be rare, compared to the more frequently seen minor cystic changes. The progress of the disease is often slow or halting. One or both of the shoulders in some of the patients (15 male and 29 female) did not have any detectable X-rays changes, although some of them were followed up for more than 20 years. During our follow-up it became apparent that the acromioclavicular and glenohumeral joints do not follow the same course neither in time nor in severity of joint destruction. Therefore, we divided the shoulder joint into the acromioclavicular and glenohumeral joint. One normal stage and 5 stages of pathology are recognised to fit into previously published schemes of the other joints. Stage 5 appears to be a new phenomenon of neojoint formation, under the previous humeral head with the inferior glenoid rim. Joint disease in the acromioclavicular joint could be divided only into 3 stages.

  6. Rheumatoid arthritis of the shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dijkstra, J.; Dijkstra, P.F.; Jan van Breemen Inst., Amsterdam; Klundert, W. v. d.

    1985-01-01

    The course of rheumatoid arthritis in the shoulder is evaluated in 143 patients. In a period of 29 years, 630 X-rays were taken of 286 shoulders. In this series 2 or more X-rays per shoulder were taken of 89 patients (29 male, 60 female). The various changes in the glenohumeral and acromioclavicular joints were described. Gross destruction appears to be rare, compared to the more frequently seen minor cystic changes. The progress of the disease is often slow or halting. One or both of the shoulders in some of the patients (15 male and 29 female) did not have any detectable X-rays changes, although some of them were followed up for more than 20 years. During our follow-up it became apparent that the acromioclavicular and glenohumeral joints do not follow the same course neither in time nor in severity of joint destruction. Therefore, we divided the shoulder joint into the acromioclavicular and glenohumeral joint. One normal stage and 5 stages of pathology are recognised to fit into previously published schemes of the other joints. Stage 5 appears to be a new phenomenon of neojoint formation, under the previous humeral head with the inferior glenoid rim. Joint disease in the acromioclavicular joint could be divided only into 3 stages. (orig.) [de

  7. Rheumatoid arthritis and sleep quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goes, Ana Claudia Janiszewski; Reis, Larissa Aparecida Busatto; Silva, Marilia Barreto G; Kahlow, Barbara Stadler; Skare, Thelma L

    Sleep disturbances are common in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients and contribute to loss of life quality. To study associations of sleep quality with pain, depression and disease activity in RA. This is a transversal observational study of 112 RA patients submitted to measurement of DAS-28, Epworth scale for daily sleepiness, index of sleep quality by Pittsburg index, risk of sleep apnea by the Berlin questionnaire and degree of depression by the CES-D (Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression scale) questionnaire. We also collected epidemiological, clinical, serological and treatment data. Only 18.5% of RA patients had sleep of good quality. In univariate analysis a bad sleep measured by Pittsburg index was associated with daily doses of prednisone (p=0.03), DAS-28 (p=0.01), CES-D (p=0.0005) and showed a tendency to be associated with Berlin sleep apnea questionnaire (p=0.06). In multivariate analysis only depression (p=0.008) and Berlin sleep apnea questionnaire (p=0.004) kept this association. Most of RA patients do not have a good sleep quality. Depression and risk of sleep apnea are independently associated with sleep impairment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  8. Biologic interventions for fatigue in rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Almeida, Celia; Choy, Ernest H S; Hewlett, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Fatigue is a common and potentially distressing symptom for patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), with no accepted evidence-based management guidelines. Evidence suggests that biologic interventions improve symptoms and signs in RA as well as reducing joint damage. OBJECTIVES......: To evaluate the effect of biologic interventions on fatigue in rheumatoid arthritis. SEARCH METHODS: We searched the following electronic databases up to 1 April 2014: Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, Current Controlled Trials...... and contacted key authors. SELECTION CRITERIA: We included randomised controlled trials if they evaluated a biologic intervention in people with rheumatoid arthritis and had self reported fatigue as an outcome measure. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Two reviewers selected relevant trials, assessed methodological...

  9. Gender Peculiarities of Rheumatoid Arthritis Course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.A. Gonchar

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis in women differs by more clinical course of pathologic process, and injury of certain joints depends on patient’s gender (changes of sacroiliac joints, development of tendovaginitis, intraarticular Hoffa bodies are more often being detected in men, whereas in women — proximal interphalangeal joints of fingers and toes, supramaxillary and knee joints. There is sexual dimorphism of the integral extraarticular (systemic manifestations of rheumatoid arthritis, is this case more frequent damage of lungs and peripheral nervous system is attributable to men, and Sjogren syndrome and changes in central nervous system are observed only in women’s group. Indicators of bone metabolism change in blood serum of patients with rheumatoid arthritis, besides patients with osteoporosis have the commonality and gender differences in concentrations of osteoassociated hormones and chemical elements.

  10. Radiology of the hand in progressive systemic sclerosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scutellari, P N; Orzincolo, C; Delli Gatti, I. and others

    1986-01-01

    Radiographs and xerographs of the hands of 35 patients with progressive systematic sclerosis (PSS), as defined by the ARA, were reviewed. Patients with ''overlap'' syndromes (i.e., mixed connective tissue disease, systemic lupus erythematosus or rheumatoid arthritis) have been excluded. Soft tissue changes included atrophy (hidebound skin), and dystrophic calcifications, particularly in CREST patients (calcinosis, Raynaud phenomenon, esophageal dysmobility, sclerodactily and telangectasia). The most common bony change is resorption of distal phalanges; diffuse osteoporosis is also frequent; the distal interphalangeal and first carpometacarpal joints involvement appear as a distinctive feature of this e....

  11. Connective tissue markers of rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, H J

    1998-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a common systemic autoimmune disorder of unknown aetiology. The most common outcome of RA is a progressive development of joint destruction and deformity. Early introduction of disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs seems important for prevention of the long term...... of rheumatoid factor contributes to the classification of arthritis as RA, and acute phase reactants are useful for quantifying and comparing the level of inflammatory activity in the course of a given patient. There is, however, a lack of sensitive and specific biochemical markers for RA, and frontline...

  12. Therapy of rheumatoid arthritis by radiosynovectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mruck, S.; Feistel, H.; Kat, S.; Kuwert, T.

    2001-01-01

    Radiosynovectomy is a therapeutic modality for local treatment of inflammatory point diseases. It is performed by intraarticular instillation of beta-emitting radionuclides. Its effectiveness is based upon the anti-inflammatory action of beta-radiation. Accordingly, the indication of radiosynovectomy is based upon the evidence of the inflammatory etiology of disease. The principle of its therapeutic action makes radiosynovectomy a valuable device for successful treatment of florid rheumatoid arthritis. It can be performed as an alternative to surgical synovectomy or in combination with it. The following article describes the therapeutic management of rheumatoid arthritis by radiosynovectomy including patient preparation, performance, and follow-up. (orig.) [de

  13. A randomised trial of differentiated prednisolone treatment in active rheumatoid arthritis. Clinical benefits and skeletal side effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, M; Podenphant, J; Florescu, A

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To study benefits and skeletal side effects of carefully monitored prednisolone treatment in patients with active rheumatoid arthritis. METHODS: One hundred and two patients with active rheumatoid arthritis were randomly allocated to treatment with disease modifying anti......-inflammatory drug (DMARD) alone or DMARD and prednisolone in a one year follow up study. Prednisolone was given in a dose regimen adapted to the disease activity of the individual patient. The mean dose was 6 mg and the mean cumulated dose was 2160 mg. Patients were followed up with disease activity parameters......, radiograph of the hands (Larsen score), and bone mineral density (BMD) of the lumbar spine, distal forearm and hand. At one year 26 patients had withdrawn from the investigation leaving 76 patients for evaluation. RESULTS: The results showed that disease activity in the prednisolone treated group was reduced...

  14. Rheumatoid cachexia revisited: a metabolic co-morbidity in rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kayo eMasuko

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is a chronic inflammatory disease in which pro-inflammatory cytokines, including tumor necrosis factor (TNF-alpha, play a crucial role. The chronic inflammation, combined with reduced physical activity, leads to muscle wasting whereas fat mass would be maintained; the resulting abnormal metabolic state is described as rheumatoid cachexia. Since the loss of muscle volume would be compensated by the increased fat mass, body mass index (BMI is reported not to reflect the nutritional status in RA patients. The implication of rheumatoid cachexia for cardiovascular risk and clinical prognosis is not clearly understood, however, adequate control of disease activity in combination with appropriate physical exercise could be the most important strategy to control rheumatoid cachexia and related metabolic problems.

  15. The Avocado Hand

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Rahmani, G

    2017-11-01

    Accidental self-inflicted knife injuries to digits are a common cause of tendon and nerve injury requiring hand surgery. There has been an apparent increase in avocado related hand injuries. Classically, the patients hold the avocado in their non-dominant hand while using a knife to cut\\/peel the fruit with their dominant hand. The mechanism of injury is usually a stabbing injury to the non-dominant hand as the knife slips past the stone, through the soft avocado fruit. Despite their apparent increased incidence, we could not find any cases in the literature which describe the “avocado hand”. We present a case of a 32-year-old woman who sustained a significant hand injury while preparing an avocado. She required exploration and repair of a digital nerve under regional anaesthesia and has since made a full recovery.

  16. Hand eczema classification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diepgen, T L; Andersen, Klaus Ejner; Brandao, F M

    2008-01-01

    of the disease is rarely evidence based, and a classification system for different subdiagnoses of hand eczema is not agreed upon. Randomized controlled trials investigating the treatment of hand eczema are called for. For this, as well as for clinical purposes, a generally accepted classification system...... A classification system for hand eczema is proposed. Conclusions It is suggested that this classification be used in clinical work and in clinical trials....

  17. Coordination of hand shape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesyna, Colin; Pundi, Krishna; Flanders, Martha

    2011-03-09

    The neural control of hand movement involves coordination of the sensory, motor, and memory systems. Recent studies have documented the motor coordinates for hand shape, but less is known about the corresponding patterns of somatosensory activity. To initiate this line of investigation, the present study characterized the sense of hand shape by evaluating the influence of differences in the amount of grasping or twisting force, and differences in forearm orientation. Human subjects were asked to use the left hand to report the perceived shape of the right hand. In the first experiment, six commonly grasped items were arranged on the table in front of the subject: bottle, doorknob, egg, notebook, carton, and pan. With eyes closed, subjects used the right hand to lightly touch, forcefully support, or imagine holding each object, while 15 joint angles were measured in each hand with a pair of wired gloves. The forces introduced by supporting or twisting did not influence the perceptual report of hand shape, but for most objects, the report was distorted in a consistent manner by differences in forearm orientation. Subjects appeared to adjust the intrinsic joint angles of the left hand, as well as the left wrist posture, so as to maintain the imagined object in its proper spatial orientation. In a second experiment, this result was largely replicated with unfamiliar objects. Thus, somatosensory and motor information appear to be coordinated in an object-based, spatial-coordinate system, sensitive to orientation relative to gravitational forces, but invariant to grasp forcefulness.

  18. The hands of the projectionist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartwright, Lisa

    2011-09-01

    This essay considers the work of projection and the hand of the projectionist as important components of the social space of the cinema as it comes into being in the nineteenth century and the early decades of the twentieth. I bring the concept ofMaurice Merleau-Ponty on the place of the body as an entity that applies itself to the world "like a hand to an instrument" into a discussion of the pre-cinematic projector as an instrument that we can interpret as evidence of the experience of the work of the projectionist in the spirit of film theory and media archaeology, moving work on instrumentation in a different direction from the analysis of the work of the black box in laboratory studies. Projection is described as a psychological as well as a mechanical process. It is suggested that we interpret the projector not simply in its activity as it projects films, but in its movement from site to site and in the workings of the hand of its operator behind the scenes. This account suggests a different perspective on the cinematic turn of the nineteenth century, a concept typically approached through the study of the image, the look, the camera, and the screen.

  19. SECONDARY OSTEOARTHRITIS IN RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Starodubtseva

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers the problems of comorbidities in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA. Two or more RA-related conditions were diagnosed according to the results of the QUEST-RA program implemented in 34 countries. Osteoarthritis along with hypertension, hyperlipidemia, and osteoporosis was detected among the most commonly diseases. Owing to expanded diagnostic capabilities, the recognition and treatment of the comorbidities have recently received much attention, as embodied in the draft Association of Rheumatologists of Russia Guidelines for RA management (2014; Part 1. The concept and major characteristics of secondary osteoarthritis in RA are analyzed. It is precisely the inflammatory process and underlying disease-related risk factors, including treatment, that have impact on the development of secondary osteoarthritis and patients’ quality of life as a whole. All this allows an inference about the mechanisms closely intertwined with the underlying disease for the development of secondary osteoarthritis, which initiates cartilage damage and further remodeling. Primary and secondary osteoarthritis was comparatively analyzed. Particular emphasis is placed on current cartilage biomarkers, their diagnostic value and role in monitoring the efficiency of treatment in clinical trials. The paper provides a comparative analysis of detectable serum and urine biomarkers according to the results of the complex analysis made by the National Institutes of Health. Particular attention is given to cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP. Foreign authors’ investigations suggest that there is a relationship between serum COMP levels and disease severity and joint X-ray changes. There is evidence for the efficacy of hyaluronic acid used in the treatment of secondary osteoarthritis in patients with RA. 

  20. Scoring ultrasound synovitis in rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Terslev, Lene; Naredo, Esperanza; Aegerter, Philippe

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To test the reliability of new ultrasound (US) definitions and quantification of synovial hypertrophy (SH) and power Doppler (PD) signal, separately and in combination, in a range of joints in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) using the European League Against Rheumatisms...

  1. THE CYSTIC FORM OF RHEUMATOID-ARTHRITIS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, P. F.; Gubler, F. M.; Maas, M.

    1988-01-01

    A non-erosive form of rheumatoid arthritis (R.A.) was found in 62 patients out of 660 patients with R.A. These 62 patients exhibit slowly progressive cystic changes in about the same joints in which usually erosions develop in classic R.A. The E.S.R. is often low, half of the patients remained

  2. Penicillamin-induced neuropathy in rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, P B; Hogenhaven, H

    1990-01-01

    A case of penicillamin-induced severe polyradiculopathy in rheumatoid arthritis is presented. The neuropathy was of demyelinating type, purely motor, proximal and clinically fully reversible when the drug ceased. In case of a progressive neuropathy, during penicillamin treatment, this adverse eff...... effect should be born in mind, and discontinuation of the drug considered....

  3. Mitochondrial haplogroups in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duhn, Pernille Hurup; Sode, Jacob; Hagen, Christian Munch

    2017-01-01

    Objective To describe the distribution of specific mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) haplogroups (hgs) in a cohort of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods Two-hundred nineteen consecutive patients with RA had mtDNA isolated from their blood, sequenced and haplotyped. Patients were diagnosed...

  4. Scoring ultrasound synovitis in rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    D'Agostino, Maria-Antonietta; Terslev, Lene; Aegerter, Philippe

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To develop a consensus-based ultrasound (US) definition and quantification system for synovitis in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). METHODS: A multistep, iterative approach was used to: (1) evaluate the baseline agreement on defining and scoring synovitis according to the usual practice...

  5. Proteome Analysis of Rheumatoid Arthritis Gut Mucosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bennike, Tue Bjerg; Ellingsen, Torkell; Glerup, Henning

    2017-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an inflammatory joint disease leading to cartilage damage and ultimately impaired joint function. To gain new insight into the systemic immune manifestations of RA, we characterized the colon mucosa proteome from 11 RA-patients and 10 healthy controls. The biopsies were...

  6. Established rheumatoid arthritis - new imaging modalities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McQueen, Fiona M; Østergaard, Mikkel

    2007-01-01

    New imaging modalities are assuming an increasingly important role in the investigation and management of rheumatoid arthritis. It is now possible to obtain information about all tissues within the joint in three dimensions using tomographic techniques such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI...

  7. Adherence to methotrexate in rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bliddal, Henning; Eriksen, Stine A; Christensen, Robin

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. To study adherence to methotrexate (MTX) and factors of importance thereof in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods. Patients with a hospital diagnosis of RA (ICD10 codes M05.X or M06.X) after January 1, 1997, and aged ≥18 years at the date of first diagnosis...

  8. Penicillamin-induced neuropathy in rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, P B; Hogenhaven, H

    1990-01-01

    A case of penicillamin-induced severe polyradiculopathy in rheumatoid arthritis is presented. The neuropathy was of demyelinating type, purely motor, proximal and clinically fully reversible when the drug ceased. In case of a progressive neuropathy, during penicillamin treatment, this adverse...

  9. Role of ultrasound in managing rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hammer, Hilde Berner; Terslev, Lene

    2012-01-01

    Ultrasound (US) is a valid and reliable imaging tool for evaluation of joint and tendon inflammation as well as cartilage and erosions in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Synovitis is usually scored semiquantitatively for both gray scale synovitis and power Doppler activity, and use...

  10. Rheumatoid arthritis in the United Arab Emirates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Badsha, Humeira; Kong, Kok Ooi; Tak, Paul P.

    2008-01-01

    Studies have shown that patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in the Middle East have delayed diagnosis and low disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drug (DMARD) utilization. We describe the characteristics and treatments of consecutive RA patients presenting to a new musculoskeletal clinic in Dubai,

  11. Rheumatoid Arthritis, infiltrated pulmonary, and sharp dyspnoea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giraldo Estrada, Horacio

    2002-01-01

    A study of a patient (50 year-old) feminine sex, is made with antecedents of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) the last 10 years in treatment with steroids, hypothyroidism and arterial hypertension who consults for square of dyspnoea of small efforts, dry cough and fever. An evolution of the illness is made and the topic is analyzed

  12. Management of osteoporosis in rheumatoid arthritis patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoes, J.N.; Bultink, I.E.; Lems, W.F.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: In rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients, the risk of both vertebral and non-vertebral fractures is roughly doubled, which is for an important part caused by inflammation-mediated amplification of bone loss and by immobilization. New treatments have become available in the last two

  13. On the origin of rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Anders J; Kyvik, Kirsten O; Houen, Gunnar

    2013-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disease with a complex origin. Previous studies have reported heritability estimates on RA at about 60%. Only 16% of the genetic background of the disease has been disclosed so far. The purpose of the present investigation was to provide an optimized...

  14. Clean Hands Count

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... 585 views 3:10 Wash 'Em - Hand Hygiene Music Video - Duration: 5:46. Jefferson Health 413,097 ... 089,212 views 4:50 Hand hygiene FULL music video - Duration: 2:33. AlfredHealthTV 26,032 views ...

  15. Mind the hand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davidsen, Jacob; Christiansen, Ellen Tove

    2014-01-01

    Apart from touching the screen, what is the role of the hands for children collaborating around touchscreens? Based on embodied and multimodal interaction analysis of 8- and 9-year old pairs collaborating around touchscreens, we conclude that children use their hands to constrain and control acce...

  16. Clean Hands Count

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... 024 views 2:58 Wash 'Em - Hand Hygiene Music Video - Duration: 5:46. Jefferson Health 412,404 ... 2,805 views 3:13 Hand hygiene FULL music video - Duration: 2:33. AlfredHealthTV 25,574 views ...

  17. HAND INJURIES IN VOLLEYBALL

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BHAIRO, NH; NIJSTEN, MWN; VANDALEN, KC; TENDUIS, HJ

    We studied the long-term sequelae of hand injuries as a result of playing volleyball. In a retrospective study, 226 patients with injuries of the hand who were seen over a 5-year period at our Trauma Department, were investigated. Females accounted for 66 % of all injuries. The mean age was 26

  18. Clean Hands Count

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... 585 views 3:10 Wash 'Em - Hand Hygiene Music Video - Duration: 5:46. Jefferson Health 412,760 ... 536,963 views 1:46 Hand hygiene FULL music video - Duration: 2:33. AlfredHealthTV 25,574 views ...

  19. Clean Hands Count

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... today; no cure tomorrow - Duration: 3:10. World Health Organization 74,478 views 3:10 Wash 'Em - Hand Hygiene Music Video - Duration: 5:46. Jefferson Health 411,292 views 5:46 Hand Washing Technique - ...

  20. Clean Hands Count

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... 029 views 3:10 Wash 'Em - Hand Hygiene Music Video - Duration: 5:46. Jefferson Health 412,404 ... 081,511 views 4:50 Hand hygiene FULL music video - Duration: 2:33. AlfredHealthTV 25,194 views ...

  1. Clean Hands Count

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... today; no cure tomorrow - Duration: 3:10. World Health Organization 75,362 views 3:10 Wash 'Em - Hand Hygiene Music Video - Duration: 5:46. Jefferson Health 412,404 views 5:46 Hand Washing Technique - ...

  2. Clean Hands Count

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... 585 views 3:10 Wash 'Em - Hand Hygiene Music Video - Duration: 5:46. Jefferson Health 413,097 ... 086,746 views 4:50 Hand hygiene FULL music video - Duration: 2:33. AlfredHealthTV 25,802 views ...

  3. Clean Hands Count

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... 453 views 3:10 Wash 'Em - Hand Hygiene Music Video - Duration: 5:46. Jefferson Health 413,702 ... 28,656 views 3:40 Hand hygiene FULL music video - Duration: 2:33. AlfredHealthTV 26,480 views ...

  4. Clean Hands Count

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... 362 views 3:10 Wash 'Em - Hand Hygiene Music Video - Duration: 5:46. Jefferson Health 412,404 ... 219,427 views 1:27 Hand hygiene FULL music video - Duration: 2:33. AlfredHealthTV 25,194 views ...

  5. Clean Hands Count

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... 03. R Mayer 371,490 views 4:03 The psychological trick behind getting people to say yes - Duration: 8:06. PBS NewsHour 606,671 views 8:06 Should You Really Wash Your Hands? - Duration: 4:51. Gross Science 57,828 views 4:51 Healthcare Worker Hand ...

  6. Clean Hands Count

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... 585 views 3:10 Wash 'Em - Hand Hygiene Music Video - Duration: 5:46. Jefferson Health 413,097 ... 28,656 views 3:40 Hand hygiene FULL music video - Duration: 2:33. AlfredHealthTV 26,032 views ...

  7. Clean Hands Count

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... 5 Moments of Hand Hygiene - Duration: 1:53. Salem Health 13,972 views 1:53 Hand Hygiene ... Mode: Off History Help Loading... Loading... Loading... About Press Copyright Creators Advertise Developers +YouTube Terms Privacy Policy & ...

  8. "Puffy hand syndrome".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chouk, Mickaël; Vidon, Claire; Deveza, Elise; Verhoeven, Frank; Pelletier, Fabien; Prati, Clément; Wendling, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    Intravenous drug addiction is responsible for many complications, especially cutaneous and infectious. There is a syndrome, rarely observed in rheumatology, resulting in "puffy hands": the puffy hand syndrome. We report two cases of this condition from our rheumatologic consultation. Our two patients had intravenous drug addiction. They presented with an edema of the hands, bilateral, painless, no pitting, occurring in one of our patient during heroin intoxication, and in the other 2 years after stopping injections. In our two patients, additional investigations (biological, radiological, ultrasound) were unremarkable, which helped us, in the context, to put the diagnosis of puffy hand syndrome. The pathophysiology, still unclear, is based in part on a lymphatic toxicity of drugs and their excipients. There is no etiological treatment but elastic compression by night has improved edema of the hands in one of our patients. Copyright © 2016 Société française de rhumatologie. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Sensory nerve action potentials and sensory perception in women with arthritis of the hand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calder, Kristina M; Martin, Alison; Lydiate, Jessica; MacDermid, Joy C; Galea, Victoria; MacIntyre, Norma J

    2012-05-10

    Arthritis of the hand can limit a person's ability to perform daily activities. Whether or not sensory deficits contribute to the disability in this population remains unknown. The primary purpose of this study was to determine if women with osteoarthritis (OA) or rheumatoid arthritis (RA) of the hand have sensory impairments. Sensory function in the dominant hand of women with hand OA or RA and healthy women was evaluated by measuring sensory nerve action potentials (SNAPs) from the median, ulnar and radial nerves, sensory mapping (SM), and vibratory and current perception thresholds (VPT and CPT, respectively) of the second and fifth digits. All SNAP amplitudes were significantly lower for the hand OA and hand RA groups compared with the healthy group (p sensory fibers in the median, ulnar and radial nerves. Less apparent were losses in conduction speed or sensory perception.

  10. Cancer risk among patients with finger and hand joint and temporo-mandibular joint prostheses in Denmark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fryzek, J P; Mellemkjaer, L; McLaughlin, J K; Blot, W J; Olsen, J H

    1999-05-31

    The use of artificial joint implants has risen greatly over the past years. However, few investigations of the cancer risk associated with implants have been performed. We investigated cancer risk in patients with finger and hand joint and temporo-mandibular (TMJ) joint implants. A nationwide cohort in Denmark of patients with finger and hand joint prostheses (n = 858) or TMJ implants (n = 389) was followed from January 1, 1977, to December 31, 1995, to evaluate any potential cancer risks subsequent to receiving these implants. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) for all cancers were 1.0 (95% CI = 0.8-1.2) for the finger and hand joint cohort and 1.1 (95% CI = 0.8-1.7) for the TMJ cohort. A significant risk for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma was found in the finger and hand joint cohort (SIR = 3.8, 95% CI = 1.5-7.8). When the finger and hand joint cohort was stratified by diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis, the excess risk was seen only in the group with rheumatoid arthritis. This is consistent with past studies, which have found an association between rheumatoid arthritis and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Our results provide evidence that the cancer risk for patients with finger and hand joint prostheses and TMJ implants is similar to that for the general population.

  11. Predictive value of specific radiographic findings of disability in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaye, J.J.; Nance, E.P. Jr.; Callahan, L.F.; Pincus, T.

    1986-01-01

    This study was carried out to determine whether and to what extend radiographic erosion, joint space narrowing, and malalignment are predictive of clinical disability in patients with rheumatoid arthristis (RA). Radiographs of the hands and wrists of 224 patients with RA were scored for these radiographic parameters. To determine which of these findings best explained variation in clinical measures of disability, a series of regression analyses was performed. Malalignment scores were the best predictor of joint deformity and limitation of motion. Erosion scores were most predictive of variation in functional tests. The author concludes that specific radiographic findings of malalignment and erosion are significantly predictive of disability in patients with RA

  12. (In)Visible Hand(s)

    OpenAIRE

    Predrag Zima

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, the author discusses the regulatory role of the state and legal norms, in market economy, especially in so-called transition countries. Legal policy, and other questions of the state and free market economy are here closely connected, because the state must ensure with legal norms that economic processes are not interrupted: only the state can establish the legal basis for a market economy. The free market’s invisible hand is acting in questions such as: what is to be produced,...

  13. Clinical and radiological features of rheumatoid arthritis in British black Africans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravindran, Vinod; Seah, May-Ai; Elias, David A; Choy, Ernest H; Scott, David L; Gordon, Patrick A

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether radiographic damage is different in British black African patients with rheumatoid arthritis compared to Caucasian patients. Data on demographics, disease- and disability-related variables were obtained from all black African patients and their age-, gender- and disease-duration-matched Caucasian controls. After all features identifying the patients were concealed, X-rays of hands and feet were scored by using the Sharp/van der Heijde method. Data were analysed using Mann-Whitney U test, t test and chi (2) test. Sixty-four patients (32 in each ethnic group) were studied. The median age was 52 years and median disease duration 6 years. Seventy-two percent of patients were female. Black Africans and Caucasians did not differ significantly in rheumatoid factor positivity, disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs and biological treatment use. British black African patients had significantly more tender joints and disability. Joint space narrowing was significantly greater in Caucasian patients [48 (27-85) vs 56 (34-107), p = 0.01]. Caucasian patients had more number of erosions (172 vs 220) and higher erosion score; however, the difference in the erosion scores was not statistically significant [2 (0-48) vs 4.5 (0-46), p = 0.17]. Radiographic damage was less severe in black African patients with rheumatoid arthritis compared to their age-, gender- and disease-duration-matched Caucasian controls. A large prospective study is required to confirm the findings of this study and to establish the factors which might be accountable for any differences in the expression of rheumatoid arthritis in this ethnic group.

  14. Direct magnification radiography of the hand for the study of erosions in reumathoid arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orzincolo, C; Corcione, S; Campanati, A; Scutellari, P N; Bonari, L R

    1986-01-01

    Plain films and direct magnification radiographs of the hands were performed in 34 patients affected by rheumatoid arthritis, using mammographic x-ray tube, achieved with 0.1 mm microfocus, and 1.85 x magnification factor. Direct magnification radiography has provided essential or useful diagnostic data in 44% of cases, particularly in recognizing early skeletal erosions. Nevertheless direct magnification radiography must be used only in those cases in which traditional mammographic techniques do not supply sactisfactory results.

  15. Rheumatoid arthritis associated interstitial lung disease: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah Assayag

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis is a common inflammatory disease affecting about 1% of the population. Interstitial lung disease is a serious and frequent complication of rheumatoid arthritis. Rheumatoid arthritis associated interstitial lung disease (RA-ILD is characterized by several histopathologic subtypes. This article reviews the proposed pathogenesis and risk factors for RA-ILD. We also outline the important steps involved in the work-up of RA-ILD and review the evidence for treatment and prognosis.

  16. Clean Hands Count

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    Full Text Available ... myths and misperceptions about hand hygiene and empower patients to play a role in their care by ... Copyright Creators Advertise Developers +YouTube Terms Privacy Policy & Safety Send feedback Test new features Loading... Working... Sign ...

  17. Clean Hands Count

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  19. Tropical Diabetic Hand Syndrome

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015 Annals of Medical and Health Sciences Research | Published by Wolters Kluwer - Medknow. 473. Introduction ... diabetes.[2,3] Tropical diabetic hand syndrome is a terminology .... the importance of seeking medical attention immediately.

  20. Clean Hands Count

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    Full Text Available ... now. Please try again later. Published on May 5, 2017 This video for healthcare providers is intended ... 36 Wash 'Em - Hand Hygiene Music Video - Duration: 5:46. Jefferson Health 413,702 views 5:46 ...

  1. Clean Hands Count

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    Full Text Available ... reminding healthcare providers to clean their hands. See: https://www.cdc.gov/handhygiene/campa... . Comments on this ... are allowed in accordance with our comment policy: http://www.cdc.gov/SocialMedia/Tools/... This video can ...

  2. Clean Hands Count

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    Full Text Available ... empower patients to play a role in their care by asking or reminding healthcare providers to clean ... It's in your hands - prevent sepsis in health care' A 5 May 2018 advocacy message from WHO - ...

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    Full Text Available ... has been rented. This feature is not available right now. Please try again later. Published on May ... Wash your Hands - it just makes sense. - Duration: 1:36. Seema Marwaha 404,414 views 1:36 ...

  5. Clean Hands Count

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    Full Text Available ... Washing Video from CDC called "Put Your Hands Together" - Duration: 3:40. Patrick Boshell 27,834 views ... Policy & Safety Send feedback Test new features Loading... Working... Sign in to add this to Watch Later ...

  6. Clean Hands Count

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    Full Text Available ... Published on May 5, 2017 This video for healthcare providers is intended to promote or encourage adherence ... role in their care by asking or reminding healthcare providers to clean their hands. See: https://www. ...

  7. Balneotherapy in rheumatoid arthritis—a systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Isabel; Cantista, Pedro; Vasconcelos, Carlos

    2016-08-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic systemic autoimmune disease characterized by persistent inflammation of synovial joints with pain, often leading to joint destruction and disability, and despite intensive research, the cause of RA remains unknown. Balneotherapy—also called mineral baths or spa therapy—uses different types of mineral water compositions like sulphur, radon, carbon dioxin, etc. The role of balneotherapy is on debate; Sukenik wrote that the sulphur mineral water has special proprieties to rheumatologic diseases, including in the course of active inflammatory phases in RA. The aim of this review is to summarize the available evidence on the effects of balneotherapy on patients with rheumatoid arthritis. We have made a systematic search of the articles published from 1980 to 2014 on this topic in PubMed, Scopus, CRD, PEDro, Web of Science and Embase databases. We have followed the method set by the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic reviews and Meta-Analysis (PRISMA). These that have compared balneotherapy with other therapeutic modalities or with no intervention were considered. The inclusion criteria of these papers were randomized control trial (RCT); languages: English, French, Spanish, Italian and Portuguese; evaluation of efficacy (analysis of outcomes); use of natural mineral water baths; and participants with RA. A total of eight articles documenting RCTs were found and included for full review and critical appraisal involving a total of 496 patients. The studies selected highlighted an important improvement and statistically significant in several clinical parameters, in spite of their heterogeneity between the various studies. One study emphasized an important improvement on functional capacity up to 6 months of follow-up (FU). Some of the studies (std.) reveal an improvement on morning stiffness (5 std.), number of active joints (3 std.), Ritchie index (2 std.) and activities of daily living (2 std.) up to 3 months of FU. Three

  8. Radiosynoviorthese in the treatment of patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drozdovskij, B.Ya.; Ikonnikov, A.I.; Krylov, V.V.

    1991-01-01

    Radiosynoviorthese, a new method for the treatment of patients with rheumatoid arthritis, was developed. Altogether 260 patients with rheumatoid arthritis were treated. The therapeutic activity of radioactive colloid Au was administered intraarticularly to all the patients. Indications and contraindications for radiation therapy of rheumatoid arthritis were developed. Good short- and long-term results were noted in most of the patients after radiation therapy. Radiosynoviorthese as a method of local active therapy of affected joints with colloid Au in the multiple modality treatment of rheumatoid arthritis is effective; its prolonged stable therapeutic effect in patients is observed

  9. Hands of early primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyer, Doug M; Yapuncich, Gabriel S; Chester, Stephen G B; Bloch, Jonathan I; Godinot, Marc

    2013-12-01

    Questions surrounding the origin and early evolution of primates continue to be the subject of debate. Though anatomy of the skull and inferred dietary shifts are often the focus, detailed studies of postcrania and inferred locomotor capabilities can also provide crucial data that advance understanding of transitions in early primate evolution. In particular, the hand skeleton includes characteristics thought to reflect foraging, locomotion, and posture. Here we review what is known about the early evolution of primate hands from a comparative perspective that incorporates data from the fossil record. Additionally, we provide new comparative data and documentation of skeletal morphology for Paleogene plesiadapiforms, notharctines, cercamoniines, adapines, and omomyiforms. Finally, we discuss implications of these data for understanding locomotor transitions during the origin and early evolutionary history of primates. Known plesiadapiform species cannot be differentiated from extant primates based on either intrinsic hand proportions or hand-to-body size proportions. Nonetheless, the presence of claws and a different metacarpophalangeal [corrected] joint form in plesiadapiforms indicate different grasping mechanics. Notharctines and cercamoniines have intrinsic hand proportions with extremely elongated proximal phalanges and digit rays relative to metacarpals, resembling tarsiers and galagos. But their hand-to-body size proportions are typical of many extant primates (unlike those of tarsiers, and possibly Teilhardina, which have extremely large hands). Non-adapine adapiforms and omomyids exhibit additional carpal features suggesting more limited dorsiflexion, greater ulnar deviation, and a more habitually divergent pollex than observed plesiadapiforms. Together, features differentiating adapiforms and omomyiforms from plesiadapiforms indicate increased reliance on vertical prehensile-clinging and grasp-leaping, possibly in combination with predatory behaviors in

  10. The cystic form of rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dijkstra, P.F.; Gubler, F.M.; Maas, A.

    1988-01-01

    A nonerosive form of rheumatoid arthritis (R.A.) was found in 62 patients out of 660 patients with R.A.. These 62 patients exhibit slowly progressive cystic changes in about the same joints in which usually erosions develop in classic R.A.. The E.S.R. is often low, half of the patients remained seronegative and there are 35 males and 27 females in the group. A smaller group of 15 out of these patients could be followed from a stage wherein the radiographs were normal to a stage of extensive cystic changes, over a period of at least 6 years. An attempt is made to delineate this group within the rheumatoid arthritis disease entity. (orig.) [de

  11. Autoantibodies to Posttranslational Modifications in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burska, Agata N.; Hunt, Laura; Strollo, Rocky; Ryan, Brent J.; Vital, Ed; Nissim, Ahuva; Winyard, Paul G.; Emery, Paul; Ponchel, Frederique

    2014-01-01

    Autoantibodies have been associated with human pathologies for a long time, particularly with autoimmune diseases (AIDs). Rheumatoid factor (RF) is known since the late 1930s to be associated with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The discovery of anticitrullinated protein antibodies in the last century has changed this and other posttranslational modifications (PTM) relevant to RA have since been described. Such PTM introduce neoepitopes in proteins that can generate novel autoantibody specificities. The recent recognition of these novel specificities in RA provides a unique opportunity to understand human B-cell development in vivo. In this paper, we will review the three of the main classes of PTMs already associated with RA: citrullination, carbamylation, and oxidation. With the advancement of research methodologies it should be expected that other autoantibodies against PTM proteins could be discovered in patients with autoimmune diseases. Many of such autoantibodies may provide significant biomarker potential. PMID:24782594

  12. Nanomedicine delivers promising treatments for rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Leena Kumari; O'Mary, Hannah; Cui, Zhengrong

    2015-01-01

    An increased understanding in the pathophysiology of chronic inflammatory diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis, reveals that the diseased tissue and the increased presence of macrophages and other overexpressed molecules within the tissue can be exploited to enhance the delivery of nanomedicine. Nanomedicine can passively accumulate into chronic inflammatory tissues via the enhanced permeability and retention phenomenon, or be surface conjugated with a ligand to actively bind to receptors overexpressed by cells within chronic inflammatory tissues, leading to increased efficacy and reduced systemic side-effects. This review highlights the research conducted over the past decade on using nanomedicine for potential treatment of rheumatoid arthritis and summarizes some of the major findings and promising opportunities on using nanomedicine to treat this prevalent and chronic disease.

  13. Intestinal Dysbiosis and Rheumatoid Arthritis: A Link between Gut Microbiota and the Pathogenesis of Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Horta-Baas

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Characterization and understanding of gut microbiota has recently increased representing a wide research field, especially in autoimmune diseases. Gut microbiota is the major source of microbes which might exert beneficial as well as pathogenic effects on human health. Intestinal microbiome’s role as mediator of inflammation has only recently emerged. Microbiota has been observed to differ in subjects with early rheumatoid arthritis compared to controls, and this finding has commanded this study as a possible autoimmune process. Studies with intestinal microbiota have shown that rheumatoid arthritis is characterized by an expansion and/or decrease of bacterial groups as compared to controls. In this review, we present evidence linking intestinal dysbiosis with the autoimmune mechanisms involved in the development of rheumatoid arthritis.

  14. Understanding emerging treatment paradigms in rheumatoid arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Breedveld, Ferdinand C; Combe, Bernard

    2011-01-01

    Treatment strategies for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) will continue to evolve as new drugs are developed, as new data become available, and as our potential to achieve greater and more consistent outcomes becomes more routine. Many patients will find both symptom relief and modest control of their disease with disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs), yet this course of therapy is clearly not effective in all patients. In fact, despite strong evidence that intensive treatment in the early ...

  15. Hand eczema: An update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chembolli Lakshmi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Eczema, the commonest disorders afflicting the hands, is also the commonest occupational skin disease (OSD. In the dermatology outpatient departments, only the severe cases are diagnosed since patients rarely report with early hand dermatitis. Mild forms are picked up only during occupational screening. Hand eczema (HE can evolve into a chronic condition with persistent disease even after avoiding contact with the incriminated allergen / irritant. The important risk factors for hand eczema are atopy (especially the presence of dermatitis, wet work, and contact allergy. The higher prevalence in women as compared to men in most studies is related to environmental factors and is mainly applicable to younger women in their twenties. Preventive measures play a very important role in therapy as they enable the affected individuals to retain their employment and livelihood. This article reviews established preventive and therapeutic options and newer drugs like alitretinoin in hand eczema with a mention on the etiology and morphology. Identifying the etiological factors is of paramount importance as avoiding or minimizing these factors play an important role in treatment.

  16. Hand Washing Practices Among Emergency Medical Services Providers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua Bucher

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Hand hygiene is an important component of infection control efforts. Our primary and secondary goals were to determine the reported rates of hand washing and stethoscope cleaning in emergency medical services (EMS workers, respectively. Methods: We designed a survey about hand hygiene practices. The survey was distributed to various national EMS organizations through e-mail. Descriptive statistics were calculated for survey items (responses on a Likert scale and subpopulations of survey respondents to identify relationships between variables. We used analysis of variance to test differences in means between the subgroups. Results: There were 1,494 responses. Overall, reported hand hygiene practices were poor among pre-hospital providers in all clinical situations. Women reported that they washed their hands more frequently than men overall, although the differences were unlikely to be clinically significant. Hygiene after invasive procedures was reported to be poor. The presence of available hand sanitizer in the ambulance did not improve reported hygiene rates but improved reported rates of cleaning the stethoscope (absolute difference 0.4, p=0.0003. Providers who brought their own sanitizer were more likely to clean their hands. Conclusion: Reported hand hygiene is poor amongst pre-hospital providers. There is a need for future intervention to improve reported performance in pre-hospital provider hand washing.

  17. Hand Washing Practices Among Emergency Medical Services Providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucher, Joshua; Donovan, Colleen; Ohman-Strickland, Pamela; McCoy, Jonathan

    2015-09-01

    Hand hygiene is an important component of infection control efforts. Our primary and secondary goals were to determine the reported rates of hand washing and stethoscope cleaning in emergency medical services (EMS) workers, respectively. We designed a survey about hand hygiene practices. The survey was distributed to various national EMS organizations through e-mail. Descriptive statistics were calculated for survey items (responses on a Likert scale) and subpopulations of survey respondents to identify relationships between variables. We used analysis of variance to test differences in means between the subgroups. There were 1,494 responses. Overall, reported hand hygiene practices were poor among pre-hospital providers in all clinical situations. Women reported that they washed their hands more frequently than men overall, although the differences were unlikely to be clinically significant. Hygiene after invasive procedures was reported to be poor. The presence of available hand sanitizer in the ambulance did not improve reported hygiene rates but improved reported rates of cleaning the stethoscope (absolute difference 0.4, p=0.0003). Providers who brought their own sanitizer were more likely to clean their hands. Reported hand hygiene is poor amongst pre-hospital providers. There is a need for future intervention to improve reported performance in pre-hospital provider hand washing.

  18. Body Image and Self-Esteem in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurt, Emine; Özdilli, Kürşat; Yorulmaz, Hatice

    2013-09-01

    The study was conducted in order to investigate the effect of disease-related variables such as socio-demographic characteristics, disease complaints and use of necrosis factor (anti-TNF) on the body image and self-esteem in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. The data was collected by an Introductory Information Form, Body Image Scale (PfP) BIS and the Coopersmith Self-Esteem Inventory (SEI) in 120 patients with rheumatoid arthritis and in 120 healthy controls. One-way analysis of variance, Tukey HDS analysis, t-test, Kruskal-Wallis test, the Mann-Whitney U test, and Pearson's and Spearman's correlation coefficients were used to compare the data. 60% of the control group were in the 20-44 year-age group, 75% were women and 30.8% had a bachelor's degree or above, while 60% of patient group were in the 20-44 year-age group, 71.7% were women and 36.7% had a bachelor's degree or higher education level. We observed that the body satisfaction and self-esteem levels were higher in the 20-44 age group, in those with a bachelor's degree or higher education and in the patients who had no additional disease and who did not use anti-TNF. The body satisfaction and self-esteem levels were lower in those who had been receiving treatment for longer than 5 years, who had changes in hands and body, who had gait disturbance and who had changes in family and working life. The assessment of the psychosocial needs with a holistic approach and training programs for body image and self-esteem would be advisable for patients with rheumatoid arthritis who are aged 45-59 years, who have low self-esteem, who have additional diseases, who use anti-TNF, who have changes in hands and body and who have primary-school education.

  19. Rheumatoid arthritis: Clinical, SPECT and MRI investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ascoli, G.; Cinti, P.; Nonni, M.; Rossi, B.

    2002-01-01

    Aim: To demonstrate psychometric test and neuroimaging technic capacity in subclinical conditions of cerebral affection in patients with rheumatoid arthritis; to demonstrate agreement between topographic cerebral site and morphological signs in neuroimaging study; to evaluate agreement between cognitive deficits and rheumatoid severity. Material and Method: We have enrolled 20 patients, 17 pts. (85%) showed low score evocative for executive function limitation; 6 pts. (33%) showed attention anomaly, movement organization and verbal fluency. SPECT acquisition shows frontal lobe uptake in 95% (19/20 pts.) extended to parietal lobs in 42% (8/19pts.); 1 pt. Shows normal uptake and very high score. RMN study shows a specific sign of leukoencephalopaty in 35% (7/20pts.) and liquoral spaces increased in 25% (5/20 pts.). Conclusions: Frequent cognitive functions alteration during rheumatoid arthritis; very high topographic agreement between cognitive deficits and cerebral perfusion uptake showed by SPECT study; significant correlation between severity index and disease activity and cognitive deterioration; necessity of further longitudinal study for greater number of patient; pathogenetic disconnect mechanism cortical-subcortical by vasculitic reason or deafferentation jointed to negative interaction between motor limit and cognitive deficit

  20. Fibromyalgia Complicating Disease Management in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abbasi, L.; Haidri, F. R.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate frequency of fibromyalgia in rheumatoid arthritis and its effect on disease activity score. Study Design: Cross-sectional study. Place and Duration of Study: The Indus Hospital, Karachi, from December 2010 to May 2011. Methodology: All adult patients of either gender diagnosed as rheumatoid arthritis on the basis of clinical, laboratory and X-ray criteria were included in the study. The sample data was separated into two groups depending on presence or absence of fibromyalgia and 28 joint disease activity score (DAS-28) value was evaluated. Results: There were 31 (25.83%) patients with rheumatoid arthritis and fibromyalgia (RAFM) out of the total 120. The median (IQR) age of patients was 40 (32 - 51) years. All were females. The overall female frequency was 79 (88.8%). The median (IQR) DAS-28 score in RA group was 4.9 (3.66 - 5.71), while the median (IQR) DAS-28 score in RAFM was 7.04 (6.62 - 7.64) [p < 0.0001]. The number of patient getting combination therapy of DMARD in RAFM group was 61.3% while in RA group was 42.7%. Conclusion: DAS-28 was found to be significantly higher in RAFM patients probably because of higher perception of pain. (author)

  1. Asymptomatic atlantoaxial subluxation in rheumatoid arthritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammadali Nazarinia

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This cross-sectional study is conducted to determine the prevalence of asymptomatic cervical spine subluxation in rheumatoid arthritis patients by plain radiographs and its relation to demographic and clinical characteristics, disease activity measures and medications. 100 rheumatoid arthritis patients (18 male and 82 female were selected randomly, according to the American college of Rheumatology Criteria, who were under follow up in the rheumatology clinic. A complete history was taken, and physical examination has been done with focus on the cervical spine to determine their demographic data, disease duration, age of disease onset, drug history, swollen and tender joint counts, and ESR, Hb, CRP, RF levels. The disease activity of patients with rheumatoid arthritis was measured using the disease activity score 28. Radiographs of the cervical spine included lateral views taken in flexion, extension, neutral position of the neck and anterioposterior and odontoid projection view. Asymptomatic cervical spine subluxation was found in 17 of the 100 patients (17%. The prevalence of, anterior atlantoaxial subluxation, atlantoaxial impaction and subaxial subluxation was 10(10%, 5(5% and 6(6%, respectively. Posterior subluxation was not detected. The only characteristic that showed meaningful relationship with cervical spine subluxation was CRP (P=0.036. Our results showed that patients with RA, who have cervical spine subluxation cannot be distinguished on the basis of symptoms. Cervical spine involvement is common and may be asymptomatic, indicating routine cervical spine imaging is needed in patients with RA.

  2. Determination of IgE rheumatoid factor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herrmann, D.; Schlenvoigt, G.; Jaeger, L.

    1987-01-01

    A solid-phase radioimmunoassay and an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay have been developed for the identification of IgE rheumatoid factor (IgE RF). For both, human IgG was used as antigen. Bound IgE RF was detected by means of commercially available rabbit anti-human IgE antiserum and 125 I-labelled sheep anti-rabbit IgG as well as monoclonal anti-human-ε-chain antibody and horse-radish peroxidase-labelled sheep anti-mouse IgG. The presence of IgM RF did not cause false positive results. Correlation in the results of both assays were significant, the reproducibility was very good. In 50.6% of 79 sera from patients with rheumatoid arthritis IgE RF has been detected with both or one of the methods. Only in 1 out of 12 seronegative rheumatoid arthritis sera IgE RF was identified. (author)

  3. Blood cell gene expression profiling in rheumatoid arthritis. Discriminative genes and effect of rheumatoid factor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bovin, Lone Frier; Rieneck, Klaus; Workman, Christopher

    2004-01-01

    To study the pathogenic importance of the rheumatoid factor (RF) in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and to identify genes differentially expressed in patients and healthy individuals, total RNA was isolated from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from eight RF-positive and six RF-negative RA...... patients, and seven healthy controls. Gene expression of about 10,000 genes were examined using oligonucleotide-based DNA chip microarrays. The analyses showed no significant differences in PBMC expression patterns from RF-positive and RF-negative patients. However, comparisons of gene expression patterns...

  4. Hand Hygiene: When and How

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hand Hygiene When and How August 2009 How to handrub? How to handwash? RUB HANDS FOR HAND HYGIENE! WASH HANDS WHEN VISIBLY SOILED Duration of the ... its use. When? YOUR 5 MOMENTS FOR HAND HYGIENE 1 BEFORETOUCHINGA PATIENT 2 B P ECFLOER R ...

  5. Pre-Calculus For Dummies

    CERN Document Server

    Kuang, Yang

    2012-01-01

    The fun and easy way to learn pre-calculus Getting ready for calculus but still feel a bit confused? Have no fear. Pre-Calculus For Dummies is an un-intimidating, hands-on guide that walks you through all the essential topics, from absolute value and quadratic equations to logarithms and exponential functions to trig identities and matrix operations. With this guide's help you'll quickly and painlessly get a handle on all of the concepts - not just the number crunching - and understand how to perform all pre-calc tasks, from graphing to tackling proofs. You'll also get a new appreciation for

  6. Work ability of Dutch employees with rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Croon, E M; Sluiter, J K; Nijssen, T F; Kammeijer, M; Dijkmans, B A C; Lankhorst, G J; Frings-Dresen, M H W

    2005-01-01

    To (i) examine the association between fatigue, psychosocial work characteristics (job control, support, participation in decision making, psychological job demands), and physical work requirements on the one hand and work ability of employees with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) on the other, and (ii) determine the advice that health care professionals give to employees with RA on how to maintain their work ability. Data were gathered from 78 employees with early RA (response = 99%) by telephone interviews and self-report questionnaires. Fatigue, lack of autonomy, low coworker/supervisor support, low participation in decision making, and high physical work requirements (i.e. using manual force) predicted low work ability. High psychological job demands, however, did not predict low work ability. The rheumatologist, occupational physician, occupational therapist, physiotherapist, and psychologist gave advice on how to cope with RA at work to 36, 30, 27, 26, and 17% of the employees, respectively. Advice was directed mainly at factors intrinsic to the employee. Employees expressed a positive attitude towards this advice. Fatigue, lack of support, lack of autonomy, lack of participation in decision making, and using manual force at work (e.g. pushing and pulling) threaten the work ability of employees with RA. According to the employees with RA, involvement of health care professionals from different disciplines and the implementation of organizational and technical interventions would help them to tackle these threats.

  7. Ayurvedic medicine for rheumatoid arthritis: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jongbae; Ernst, Edzard

    2005-04-01

    To systematically review all randomized controlled trials (RCTs) on the effectiveness of Ayurvedic medicine for rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Computerized literature searches for all RCTs of Ayurvedic medicine for RA in the following databases: Medline (March 1969 to March 2003), Embase (February 1985 to February 2003), AMED (March 1980 to March 2003), Cochrane Controlled Trial Register (October 1997 to March 2003), and the abstract service of Central Council for Research in Ayurveda and Siddha (CCRAS; 1976 to March 2003). Hand searches were performed in 1 Sri Lankan and 3 Indian journals and the authors' personal files. Key data of included studies were extracted and reviewed. The methodological quality of all studies was evaluated with the Jadad scale. Seven studies met our inclusion criteria. Trials tested either Ayurvedic medicine against placebo or other Ayurvedic medicines. In general, patient and physician global assessments on the severity of pain, and morning stiffness were used as endpoints. Of 3 placebo-controlled RCTs, 1 high-quality trial did not show benefit of the active treatment against placebo, while another incompletely reported study indicated beneficial effects of an Ayurvedic medicine. A further incompletely reported study showed no significant difference. The remaining 4 trials were difficult to interpret because they tested an Ayurvedic medicine against other Ayurvedic medicines whose effects were not proven. There is a paucity of RCTs of Ayurvedic medicines for RA. The existing RCTs fail to show convincingly that such treatments are effective therapeutic options for RA.

  8. Personal hand gel for improved hand hygiene compliance on the regional anesthesia team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parks, Colby L; Schroeder, Kristopher M; Galgon, Richard E

    2015-12-01

    Hand hygiene reduces healthcare-associated infections, and several recent publications have examined hand hygiene in the perioperative period. Our institution's policy is to perform hand hygiene before and after patient contact. However, observation suggests poor compliance. This is a retrospective review of a quality improvement database showing the effect of personal gel dispensers on perioperative hand hygiene compliance on a regional anesthesia team. Healthcare providers assigned to the Acute Pain Service were observed for compliance with hand hygiene policy during a quality improvement initiative. Provider type and compliance were prospectively recorded in a database. Team members were then given a personal gel dispensing device and again observed for compliance. We have retrospectively reviewed this database to determine the effects of this intervention. Of the 307 encounters observed, 146 were prior to implementing personal gel dispensers. Compliance was 34%. Pre- and post-patient contact compliances were 23 and 43%, respectively. For 161 encounters after individual gel dispensers were provided, compliance was 63%. Pre- and post-patient contact compliances were 53 and 72%, respectively. Improvement in overall compliance from 34 to 63% was significant. On the Acute Pain Service, compliance with hand hygiene policy improves when individual sanitation gel dispensing devices are worn on the person.

  9. The lungs in rheumatoid arthritis - a clinical, radiographic and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The lungs in rheumatoid arthritis - a clinical, radiographic and pulmonary function study. Stephen C. Morrison, Girish M. Mody, Sally R. Benatar, Orlando L Meyers. Abstract. Objective. To detennine the prevalence and spectrum of pulmonary abnormalities in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in a developing country.

  10. Anti-IL-1alpha autoantibodies in early rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forslind, K; Svensson, Birte; Svenson, M

    2001-01-01

    To investigate the potential predictive value of autoantibodies against IL1-alpha (anti-IL-1alpha) in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (RA).......To investigate the potential predictive value of autoantibodies against IL1-alpha (anti-IL-1alpha) in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (RA)....

  11. Painful Joints? Early Treatment for Rheumatoid Arthritis Is Key

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Print this issue Painful Joints? Early Treatment for Rheumatoid Arthritis Is Key En español Send us your comments ... type of arthritis. It’s far more common than rheumatoid arthritis. Osteoarthritis is caused by wear and tear on ...

  12. Neuroradiologic picture of cerebral vasculitis in rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paci, R.; Giuffrida, C.M.; Marangolo, M.; Ventura, F.; Di Paola, F.

    1983-01-01

    The central nervous system is rarely involved in rheumatoid arthritis. In this paper the authors report a case of a 50-year-old woman who had rheumatoid arthritis for about 6 years. A month before admission she presented a symptomatology resembling an expansive intracranial process. Angiography revealed cerebral arteritis and CT showed areas of hypodensity with marked contrast enhancement. (orig.)

  13. Pulmonary manifestations of rheumatoid arthritis: a review | Biomdo ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Rheumatoid arthritis can aff ect the lung parenchyma, airways and pleura. Pulmonary complications are directly responsible for 10-20% of all mortality in RA patients. Objective: To highlight the common and important manifestations of rheumatoid lung disease and discuss the recent studies on each.Data source: Articles on ...

  14. Biologics for rheumatoid arthritis: an overview of Cochrane reviews

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singh, Jasvinder A; Christensen, Robin; Wells, George A

    2010-01-01

    the biologic disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs) are very effective in treating rheumatoid arthritis (RA), however there is a lack of head-to-head comparison studies.......the biologic disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs) are very effective in treating rheumatoid arthritis (RA), however there is a lack of head-to-head comparison studies....

  15. Indomethacin and naproxen suppositories in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, H; Swinson, D; Jones, J; Hamilton, E B

    1978-01-01

    A double-blind cross-over study of 35 out-patients with rheumatoid arthritis showed that Naproxen and Indomethacin suppositories were both effective forms of treatment in rheumatoid arthritis, both being significantly superior to placebo in terms of relief of morning stiffness. PMID:356764

  16. Clinical utility of autoantibodies and biologic markers in rheumatoid ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To review the current and emerging auto-antibodies and biologic markers in rheumatoid arthritis. Data source: Published original research work and reviews were searched in English related to pathophysiology, diagnosis and auto antibodies in rheumatoid arthritis. Study design: Only articles that emphasis on ...

  17. Clean Hands Count

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... CDC) 97,825 views 5:12 CDC Flu Education Video - Duration: 10:26. Nicole Shelton 213 views ... Infection Control Video - Duration: 20:55. Paramedical Services Education Page 4,735 views 20:55 Hand Washing ...

  18. Hand Eczema: Treatment options

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Tamara Theresia; Agner, Tove

    2017-01-01

    Hand eczema is a common disease, it affects young people, is often work-related, and the burden of the disease is significant for the individual as well as for society. Factors to be considered when choosing a treatment strategy are, among others, whether the eczema is acute or chronic, the sever...

  19. Clean Hands Count

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Queue __count__/__total__ It’s YouTube. Uninterrupted. Loading... Want music and videos with zero ads? Get YouTube Red. ... 824 views 1:36 Wash 'Em - Hand Hygiene Music Video - Duration: 5:46. Jefferson Health 409,492 ...

  20. Clean Hands Count

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    Full Text Available ... Queue __count__/__total__ It’s YouTube. Uninterrupted. Loading... Want music and videos with zero ads? Get YouTube Red. ... 786 views 1:36 Wash 'Em - Hand Hygiene Music Video - Duration: 5:46. Jefferson Health 413,702 ...

  1. Clean Hands Count

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    Full Text Available ... Queue __count__/__total__ It’s YouTube. Uninterrupted. Loading... Want music and videos with zero ads? Get YouTube Red. ... 414 views 3:10 Wash 'Em - Hand Hygiene Music Video - Duration: 5:46. Thomas Jefferson University & Jefferson ...

  2. Clean Hands Count

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    Full Text Available ... Queue __count__/__total__ It’s YouTube. Uninterrupted. Loading... Want music and videos with zero ads? Get YouTube Red. ... 869 views 1:36 Wash 'Em - Hand Hygiene Music Video - Duration: 5:46. Jefferson Health 410,052 ...

  3. Wash Your Hands

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2010-03-08

    This video shows kids how to properly wash their hands, one of the most important steps we can take to avoid getting sick and spreading germs to others.  Created: 3/8/2010 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 3/8/2010.

  4. Clean Hands Count

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... no cure tomorrow - Duration: 3:10. World Health Organization 75,585 views 3:10 Wash 'Em - Hand ... soap and water - Duration: 1:27. World Health Organization 224,180 views 1:27 The five moments ...

  5. Clean Hands Count

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    Full Text Available ... Queue __count__/__total__ It’s YouTube. Uninterrupted. Loading... Want music and videos with zero ads? Get YouTube Red. ... 460 views 3:10 Wash 'Em - Hand Hygiene Music Video - Duration: 5:46. Thomas Jefferson University & Jefferson ...

  6. Clean Hands Count

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    Full Text Available ... action today; no cure tomorrow - Duration: 3:10. World Health Organization 75,362 views 3:10 Wash ' ... handwash? With soap and water - Duration: 1:27. World Health Organization 219,427 views 1:27 Hand ...

  7. Clean Hands Count

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    Full Text Available ... action today; no cure tomorrow - Duration: 3:10. World Health Organization 74,478 views 3:10 Wash your Hands - ... handwash? With soap and water - Duration: 1:27. World Health Organization 215,487 views 1:27 Infection Control Video - ...

  8. Clean Hands Count

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    Full Text Available ... Queue __count__/__total__ It’s YouTube. Uninterrupted. Loading... Want music and videos with zero ads? Get YouTube Red. ... 741 views 3:10 Wash 'Em - Hand Hygiene Music Video - Duration: 5:46. Jefferson Health 410,052 ...

  9. Matching hand radiographs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kauffman, J.A.; Slump, Cornelis H.; Bernelot Moens, H.J.

    2005-01-01

    Biometric verification and identification methods of medical images can be used to find possible inconsistencies in patient records. Such methods may also be useful for forensic research. In this work we present a method for identifying patients by their hand radiographs. We use active appearance

  10. Clean Hands Count

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... today; no cure tomorrow - Duration: 3:10. World Health Organization 72,885 views 3:10 Wash 'Em - Hand Hygiene Music Video - Duration: 5:46. Jefferson Health 410,052 views 5:46 'It's in your ...

  11. Clean Hands Count

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    Full Text Available ... Queue __count__/__total__ It’s YouTube. Uninterrupted. Loading... Want music and videos with zero ads? Get YouTube Red. ... 029 views 3:10 Wash 'Em - Hand Hygiene Music Video - Duration: 5:46. Jefferson Health 411,974 ...

  12. Clean Hands Count

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    Full Text Available ... no cure tomorrow - Duration: 3:10. World Health Organization 78,256 views 3:10 Wash 'Em - Hand ... message from WHO - Duration: 10:07. World Health Organization 9,045 views 10:07 A very serious ...

  13. Clean Hands Count

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... action today; no cure tomorrow - Duration: 3:10. World Health Organization 78,256 views 3:10 Wash ... handwash? With soap and water - Duration: 1:27. World Health Organization 230,361 views 1:27 Hand ...

  14. Hands-on Humidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pankiewicz, Philip R.

    1992-01-01

    Presents five hands-on activities that allow students to detect, measure, reduce, and eliminate moisture. Students make a humidity detector and a hygrometer, examine the effects of moisture on different substances, calculate the percent of water in a given food, and examine the absorption potential of different desiccants. (MDH)

  15. Clean Hands Count

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    Full Text Available ... Queue __count__/__total__ It’s YouTube. Uninterrupted. Loading... Want music and videos with zero ads? Get YouTube Red. ... 396 views 3:10 Wash 'Em - Hand Hygiene Music Video - Duration: 5:46. Thomas Jefferson University & Jefferson ...

  16. Clean Hands Count

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    Full Text Available ... Queue __count__/__total__ It’s YouTube. Uninterrupted. Loading... Want music and videos with zero ads? Get YouTube Red. ... 094 views 1:19 Wash 'Em - Hand Hygiene Music Video - Duration: 5:46. Jefferson Health 411,974 ...

  17. Clean Hands Count

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    Full Text Available ... starting stop Loading... Watch Queue Queue __count__/__total__ It’s YouTube. Uninterrupted. Loading... Want music and videos with ... ads? Get YouTube Red. Working... Not now Try it free Find out why Close Clean Hands Count ...

  18. Clean Hands Count

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    Full Text Available ... today; no cure tomorrow - Duration: 3:10. World Health Organization 69,414 views 3:10 Hand Washing ... Video - Duration: 5:46. Thomas Jefferson University & Jefferson Health 408,436 views 5:46 83 videos Play ...

  19. Clean Hands Count

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    Full Text Available ... Queue __count__/__total__ It’s YouTube. Uninterrupted. Loading... Want music and videos with zero ads? Get YouTube Red. ... 319 views 3:10 Wash 'Em - Hand Hygiene Music Video - Duration: 5:46. Jefferson Health 410,052 ...

  20. Clean Hands Count

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    Full Text Available ... Queue __count__/__total__ It’s YouTube. Uninterrupted. Loading... Want music and videos with zero ads? Get YouTube Red. ... 585 views 3:10 Wash 'Em - Hand Hygiene Music Video - Duration: 5:46. Jefferson Health 413,097 ...

  1. Clean Hands Count

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    Full Text Available ... 14. Lake Health 14,415 views 3:14 Safety Demo: The Importance of Hand Washing - Duration: 2: ... Copyright Creators Advertise Developers +YouTube Terms Privacy Policy & Safety Send feedback Test new features Loading... Working... Sign ...

  2. Clean Hands Count

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    Full Text Available ... action today; no cure tomorrow - Duration: 3:10. World Health Organization 72,319 views 3:10 Wash 'Em - Hand ... handwash? With soap and water - Duration: 1:27. World Health Organization 205,878 views 1:27 Germ Smart - Wash ...

  3. Hands On Earth Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisgarber, Sherry L.; Van Doren, Lisa; Hackathorn, Merrianne; Hannibal, Joseph T.; Hansgen, Richard

    This publication is a collection of 13 hands-on activities that focus on earth science-related activities and involve students in learning about growing crystals, tectonics, fossils, rock and minerals, modeling Ohio geology, geologic time, determining true north, and constructing scale-models of the Earth-moon system. Each activity contains…

  4. Clean Hands Count

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    Full Text Available ... Queue __count__/__total__ It’s YouTube. Uninterrupted. Loading... Want music and videos with zero ads? Get YouTube Red. ... 384 views 1:19 Wash 'Em - Hand Hygiene Music Video - Duration: 5:46. Thomas Jefferson University & Jefferson ...

  5. Clean Hands Count

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    Full Text Available ... Queue __count__/__total__ It’s YouTube. Uninterrupted. Loading... Want music and videos with zero ads? Get YouTube Red. ... 285 views 1:36 Wash 'Em - Hand Hygiene Music Video - Duration: 5:46. Jefferson Health 410,052 ...

  6. Clean Hands Count

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    Full Text Available ... Gorin 243,451 views 2:57 Hand Hygiene Dance - Duration: 3:15. mohd hafiz 34,146 views ... Language: English Location: United States Restricted Mode: Off History Help Loading... Loading... Loading... About Press Copyright Creators ...

  7. Clean Hands Count

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    Full Text Available ... YouTube. Uninterrupted. Loading... Want music and videos with zero ads? Get YouTube Red. Working... Not now Try ... Wash your Hands - it just makes sense. - Duration: 1:36. Seema Marwaha 400,493 views 1:36 ...

  8. Clean Hands Count

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Queue __count__/__total__ It’s YouTube. Uninterrupted. Loading... Want music and videos with zero ads? Get YouTube Red. ... 033 views 1:36 Wash 'Em - Hand Hygiene Music Video - Duration: 5:46. Jefferson Health 410,052 ...

  9. Clean Hands Count

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    Full Text Available ... Em - Hand Hygiene Music Video - Duration: 5:46. Thomas Jefferson University & Jefferson Health 408,436 views 5: ... Prevention (CDC) 97,277 views 5:12 Loading more suggestions... Show more Language: English Location: United States ...

  10. Hands-On Hydrology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathews, Catherine E.; Monroe, Louise Nelson

    2004-01-01

    A professional school and university collaboration enables elementary students and their teachers to explore hydrology concepts and realize the beneficial functions of wetlands. Hands-on experiences involve young students in determining water quality at field sites after laying the groundwork with activities related to the hydrologic cycle,…

  11. Clean Hands Count

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Queue __count__/__total__ It’s YouTube. Uninterrupted. Loading... Want music and videos with zero ads? Get YouTube Red. ... 043 views 1:36 Wash 'Em - Hand Hygiene Music Video - Duration: 5:46. Jefferson Health 411,292 ...

  12. Clean Hands Count

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    Full Text Available ... News 581,131 views 18:49 Just Good Music 24/7 ● Classic Live Radio classics. 1,406 ... 611,013 views 1:46 Hand hygiene FULL music video - Duration: 2:33. AlfredHealthTV 26,798 views ...

  13. Clean Hands Count

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    Full Text Available ... 52 Hand Sanitizers and Soaps Put to the Test - Duration: 2:26. ABC News 42,006 views ... Developers +YouTube Terms Privacy Policy & Safety Send feedback Test new features Loading... Working... Sign in to add ...

  14. Posterior alien hand syndrome: case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rohde, S.; Weidauer, S.; Lanfermann, H.; Zanella, F.

    2002-01-01

    The alien hand syndrome (AHS) is involuntary uncontrolled movement of an arm with a sense of estrangement from the limb itself. AHS was initially used to describe interhemispheric disconnection phenomena in patients with lesions in the anterior corpus callosum, but it has been found in patients with posterior cerebral lesions without involvement of the corpus callosum, for example parietal infarcts or corticobasal degeneration. The posterior alien hand syndrome is less frequent and presents with nonpurposive behaviour like lifting the arm or writhing fingers. We report an 80-year-old woman with a posterior AHS of the dominant right hand. MRI showed atrophy of the pre- and postcentral gyri without involvement of the corpus callosum. We discuss the aetiology of the posterior AHS and the differences from the anterior varieties. (orig.)

  15. The roles of MR imaging in monitoring therapeutic effectiveness in rheumatoid arthritis: preliminary result

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yun, Mi Jin; Suh, Jin Suck; Lee, Soo Kon; Lee, Ji Soo; Cho, Jae Hyun

    1996-01-01

    It is difficult to determine objectively therapeutic response in rheumatoid arthritis. This study was carried out in order to assess the feasibility of MR imaging to determine disease status following antirheumatoid medication. Eight patients with rheumatoid arthritis underwent MR studies before treatment and approximately one year after the beginning of antirheumatoid medication. Coronal images were obtained, using a T1- and T2-weighted spin echo(n=8), contrast-enhanced T1-weighted image(n=8) and dynamic contrast-enhanced image(n=4). Bone erosions, synovial hypertrophy and bone marrow enhancement in pre-and post-medication studies were compared. On dynamic study, enhancement ratio(E) of pannus was measured(E=SNR at 30sec/ SNR at precontrast). Changes of MRI findings and enhancement ratio between pre- and post-medication were compared with disease status as assessed by clinical index. In three patients, improvement of bone marrow edema and synovial hypertrophy was noted, and in addition, there was no evidence of newly developed bone erosion. In two of these patients, complete remission was noted on the basis of the ARA criteria. In another three patients, despite improvement of bone marrow edema and synovial hypertrophy and improved clinical parameters including morning stiffness and ESR, discrete and newly developed bone erosions were noted. In one patient with a poor response to antirheumatoid medication, aggravation of bone marrow edema and synovial hypertrophy was seen, but no definite change in bone erosions was noted. In the remaining one patient, no remarkable changes were seen in bone marrow edema, synovial hypertrophy or bone erosion. Clinically this patient showed no morning stiffness or elevated ESR. The enhancement ratio of pannus decreased in all 4 cases, especially where there were complete remission. Synovial extent, bone marrow enhancement, bone erosions and enhancement ratio of pannus may be good parameters for monitoring disease activity in the

  16. The roles of MR imaging in monitoring therapeutic effectiveness in rheumatoid arthritis: preliminary result

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yun, Mi Jin; Suh, Jin Suck; Lee, Soo Kon; Lee, Ji Soo [Yonsei Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Jae Hyun [Ajou Univ. College of Medicine, Asan (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-07-01

    It is difficult to determine objectively therapeutic response in rheumatoid arthritis. This study was carried out in order to assess the feasibility of MR imaging to determine disease status following antirheumatoid medication. Eight patients with rheumatoid arthritis underwent MR studies before treatment and approximately one year after the beginning of antirheumatoid medication. Coronal images were obtained, using a T1- and T2-weighted spin echo(n=8), contrast-enhanced T1-weighted image(n=8) and dynamic contrast-enhanced image(n=4). Bone erosions, synovial hypertrophy and bone marrow enhancement in pre-and post-medication studies were compared. On dynamic study, enhancement ratio(E) of pannus was measured(E=SNR at 30sec/ SNR at precontrast). Changes of MRI findings and enhancement ratio between pre- and post-medication were compared with disease status as assessed by clinical index. In three patients, improvement of bone marrow edema and synovial hypertrophy was noted, and in addition, there was no evidence of newly developed bone erosion. In two of these patients, complete remission was noted on the basis of the ARA criteria. In another three patients, despite improvement of bone marrow edema and synovial hypertrophy and improved clinical parameters including morning stiffness and ESR, discrete and newly developed bone erosions were noted. In one patient with a poor response to antirheumatoid medication, aggravation of bone marrow edema and synovial hypertrophy was seen, but no definite change in bone erosions was noted. In the remaining one patient, no remarkable changes were seen in bone marrow edema, synovial hypertrophy or bone erosion. Clinically this patient showed no morning stiffness or elevated ESR. The enhancement ratio of pannus decreased in all 4 cases, especially where there were complete remission. Synovial extent, bone marrow enhancement, bone erosions and enhancement ratio of pannus may be good parameters for monitoring disease activity in the

  17. Is early rheumatoid arthritis the same disease process as late rheumatoid arthritis?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tak, P. P.

    2001-01-01

    Thoughts on treatment for the early control of synovitis have stimulated research on pathobiological events at the site of inflammation in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis. Several studies have thus been conducted to examine synovial biopsy samples at various stages of the disease. The most

  18. Validity of ultrasonography and measures of adult shoulder function and reliability of ultrasonography in detecting shoulder synovitis in patients with rheumatoid arthritis using magnetic resonance imaging as a gold standard.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Bruyn, G A W

    2010-08-01

    To assess the intra- and interobserver reproducibility of musculoskeletal ultrasonography (US) in detecting inflammatory shoulder changes in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, and to determine the agreement between US and the Shoulder Pain and Disability Index (SPADI) and the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand (DASH) questionnaire, using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as a gold standard.

  19. Tocilizumab in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis and beyond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shetty A

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Anjali Shetty,1 Rebekah Hanson,1 Peter Korsten,2 Munir Shawagfeh,3 Shiva Arami,1 Suncica Volkov,1 Olga Vila1 William Swedler,1 Abdel Naser Shunaigat,4 Sameer Smadi,4 Ray Sawaqed,5 David Perkins,1 Shiva Shahrara,1 Nadera J Sweiss11Department of Rheumatology, Pharmacy, Transplant, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA; 2Department of Nephrology and Rheumatology, University Medicine Göttingen, Göttingen, Germany; 3Anesthesia and Pain Management, King Hussein Cancer Center, Amman, Jordan; 4Liver Transplant, Kidney Transplant Royal Medical Services, Jordan; 5Cardiac Surgery Methodist Hospitals, Merrillville, IN, USAAbstract: Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is a systemic inflammatory disease characterized by joint pain, swelling, stiffness, and progressive destruction of the small joints of the hands and feet. Treatment of RA has improved over the past decade. With multiple cytokines well-known now to play a role in the pathogenesis of RA, including tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin (IL-1β, and IL-6, many targeted biological treatments against these cytokines have emerged, changing the treatment of this disease. Tocilizumab (TCZ is a recombinant humanized monoclonal antibody against the IL-6 receptor and has been approved in many countries, including the United States, for the treatment of moderate to severe RA in patients who have not adequately responded to one or more disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs or cannot tolerate other approved drug classes for RA. The aim of this review is to discuss the role of IL-6 in RA, and to provide an overview of the mode of action, pharmacokinetics, and safety of TCZ. Furthermore, efficacy studies of TCZ as both monotherapy and combination therapy will be evaluated. There have been several important clinical trials evaluating the efficacy and safety of TCZ in RA patients; this review summarizes this data from 14 key trials with emphasis on Phase III trials. Review of these trials

  20. Experience with tofacitinib in the treatment of resistant rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. R. Babaeva

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The Russian Federation has not got sufficient experience with tofacitinib (TOFA in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA so far; in this connection, all follow-ups using this drug in real clinical practice are of particular interest.Objective: to evaluate the efficancy and safety of TOFA in an open-label noncomparative trial of RA patients who have failed to achieve low disease activity or remission in compliance with the EULAR criteria after standard disease-modifying therapy and who have been previously untreated with drugs from a group of biological agents.Subjects and methods. Five patients (4 women and 1 men, whose age was 45 to 58 years (mean age 53 years with a valid diagnosis of RA were followed up. All the patients had an advanced clinical stage of RA with erosive arthritis (X-ray Stage III, predominantly involving the minor hand joints. Seropositive and seronegative (for rheumatoid factor (RF RA was diagnosed in 4 and 1 patients, respectively. At the inclusion into the study, the patients received disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs. Due to the remaining disease activity, all the patients were given TOFA in a dose of 5 mg twice daily (10 mg/day; moreover, 4 patients received its monotherapy (1 because of intolerability and 3 because of noncompliance; 1 female patient took a combination of TOFA and methotrexate (MT in a dose of 10 mg/week. Two patients continued to use methylprednisolone 4 mg/day (that had been long taken in combination with TOFA. The duration of TOFA therapy was 3 months.Results. TOFA 10 mg/day showed high therapeutic efficacy and good tolerability. Three-month disease-modifying therapy with TOFA(4 patients and its combination with MT (1 patient resulted in a considerable reduction in DAS28 scores and a significant clinical improvement in ACR 20/50/70 responses. Positive clinical changes were associated with a reduction in the blood level of immune markers (C-reactive protein and RF up to the

  1. Compact Dexterous Robotic Hand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovchik, Christopher Scott (Inventor); Diftler, Myron A. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A compact robotic hand includes a palm housing, a wrist section, and a forearm section. The palm housing supports a plurality of fingers and one or more movable palm members that cooperate with the fingers to grasp and/or release an object. Each flexible finger comprises a plurality of hingedly connected segments, including a proximal segment pivotally connected to the palm housing. The proximal finger segment includes at least one groove defining first and second cam surfaces for engagement with a cable. A plurality of lead screw assemblies each carried by the palm housing are supplied with power from a flexible shaft rotated by an actuator and output linear motion to a cable move a finger. The cable is secured within a respective groove and enables each finger to move between an opened and closed position. A decoupling assembly pivotally connected to a proximal finger segment enables a cable connected thereto to control movement of an intermediate and distal finger segment independent of movement of the proximal finger segment. The dexterous robotic hand closely resembles the function of a human hand yet is light weight and capable of grasping both heavy and light objects with a high degree of precision.

  2. RAACFDb: Rheumatoid arthritis ayurvedic classical formulations database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed Thoufic Ali, A M; Agrawal, Aakash; Sajitha Lulu, S; Mohana Priya, A; Vino, S

    2017-02-02

    In the past years, the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) has undergone remarkable changes in all therapeutic modes. The present newfangled care in clinical research is to determine and to pick a new track for better treatment options for RA. Recent ethnopharmacological investigations revealed that traditional herbal remedies are the most preferred modality of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). However, several ayurvedic modes of treatments and formulations for RA are not much studied and documented from Indian traditional system of medicine. Therefore, this directed us to develop an integrated database, RAACFDb (acronym: Rheumatoid Arthritis Ayurvedic Classical Formulations Database) by consolidating data from the repository of Vedic Samhita - The Ayurveda to retrieve the available formulations information easily. Literature data was gathered using several search engines and from ayurvedic practitioners for loading information in the database. In order to represent the collected information about classical ayurvedic formulations, an integrated database is constructed and implemented on a MySQL and PHP back-end. The database is supported by describing all the ayurvedic classical formulations for the treatment rheumatoid arthritis. It includes composition, usage, plant parts used, active ingredients present in the composition and their structures. The prime objective is to locate ayurvedic formulations proven to be quite successful and highly effective among the patients with reduced side effects. The database (freely available at www.beta.vit.ac.in/raacfdb/index.html) hopefully enables easy access for clinical researchers and students to discover novel leads with reduced side effects. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Contrast-enhanced power Doppler ultrasonography of the metacarpophalangeal joints in rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Szkudlarek, Marcin; Court-Payen, Michel; Strandberg, Charlotte

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine, with dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI as the reference, if contrast-enhanced power Doppler ultrasonography (CE PDUS) of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joints provides additional information for evaluation of synovial inflammation compared...... with PDUS. One MCP joint in each of 15 RA patients and 3 healthy control persons were examined with PDUS before and after intravenous bolus Levovist contrast injection. Corresponding rates of early synovial enhancement (RESE), previously shown to be closely related to histopathological synovitis, were...... calculated from dynamic contrast-enhanced MR images obtained the same day. Prior to ultrasonography, the joint was evaluated clinically. Levovist increased the flow signal in 7 of 9 joints with pre-contrast flow-signal and in 0 of 9 without pre-contrast signal. No healthy controls showed CE PDUS signal...

  4. Metabolism features in the active rheumatoid disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cossermelli, W; Carvalho, N; Papaleo Netto, M [Sao Paulo Univ. (Brazil). Centro de Medicina Nuclear

    1974-02-01

    The /sup 131/I-labelled albumin metabolism was studied in fourteen female patients with rheumatoid arthritis. The half-life of distribution was increased while the turnover half-life and turnover rate was within normal limits. These results led to assume that synthesis and catabolism may not change this disease, not being the responsible mechanism of hypoalbuminemia. Hypoalbuminemia would appear as compensatory mechanism in view of other protein alterations, as hypergammaglobulinemia, without changes of stabilizing and metabolic properties of albumin, perhaps due to albumin molecular alterations.

  5. Linkage Between Periodontal Disease and Rheumatoid Arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmstrup, Palle; Nielsen, Claus Henrik

    2016-01-01

    The past decades have significantly widened the perspectives of the chronic oral infectious disease known as periodontitis. The disease is regarded as a bacterial infection resulting in low-grade inflammation of the periodontal tissues, and both the associated release of pro-inflammatory mediators...... and the presence of bacteria in the periodontal pockets, which, as the result of daily procedures, may spread after penetration of the vasculature, are possible mediators of systemic consequences. The present chapter deals with the possible association of periodontitis with rheumatoid arthritis, which may possess...

  6. Sedentary behaviour in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Tanja; Beyer, Nina; Aadahl, Mette

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Despite increasing interest in investigating sedentary behaviour (SB) in the general population and in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), there is little documentation of the subjective experiences of SB in patients with RA. This study aimed to examine how patients with RA...... modification of physical activity level causing increase in SB, especially during periods of disease flare. Prioritizing and planning of SB also functioned as part of self-management strategies. 3) It has nothing to do with my arthritis; for some patients, SB was not related to RA, but simply reflected a way...

  7. Rheumatoid Arthritis: Early diagnosis and treatment outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidari, Behzad

    2011-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an inflammatory progressive disease which in the absence of appropriate treatment can lead to joint destruction and disability. Prognosis of RA may be predicted based on the presence of some clinical and laboratory evidences. New criteria for classification of RA provide opportunity for earlier treatment. Initiation of treatment particularly by combination of DMARDs concurrent with short duration of corticosteroid is expected to prevent progressive course and even change the natural course of RA. At present any patients with clinical synovitis in at least one joint may have definite RA, requiring agressive treatment.

  8. Metabolism features in the active rheumatoid disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cossermelli, W.; Carvalho, N.; Papaleo Netto, M.

    1974-01-01

    It was studied the 131 I-labelled albumin metabolism in fourteen female patients with rheumatoid arthritis. The half-life of distribution was increased while the turnover half-life and turnover rate was within normal limits. These results led to assume that synthesis and catabolism may not change this disease, not being the responsible mechanism of hypoalbuminemia. Hypoalbuminemia would appear as compensatory mechanism in view of other protein alterations, as hypergammaglobulinemia, without changes of stabilizing and metabolic properties of albumin, perhaps due to albumin molecular alterations [pt

  9. Performance Comparison Between FEDERICA Hand and LARM Hand

    OpenAIRE

    Carbone, Giuseppe; Rossi, Cesare; Savino, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes two robotic hands that have been\\ud developed at University Federico II of Naples and at the\\ud University of Cassino. FEDERICA Hand and LARM Hand\\ud are described in terms of design and operational features.\\ud In particular, careful attention is paid to the differences\\ud between the above-mentioned hands in terms of transmission\\ud systems. FEDERICA Hand uses tendons and pulleys\\ud to drive phalanxes, while LARM Hand uses cross four-bar\\ud linkages. Results of experime...

  10. Second-hand signals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergenholtz, Carsten

    2014-01-01

    Studies of signaling theory have traditionally focused on the dyadic link between the sender and receiver of the signal. Within a science‐based perspective this framing has led scholars to investigate how patents and publications of firms function as signals. I explore another important type...... used by various agents in their search for and assessment of products and firms. I conclude by arguing how this second‐hand nature of signals goes beyond a simple dyadic focus on senders and receivers of signals, and thus elucidates the more complex interrelations of the various types of agents...

  11. Hand grip strength

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, Henrik; Gaist, David; Petersen, Hans Christian

    2002-01-01

    in life is a major problem in terms of prevalence, morbidity, functional limitations, and quality of life. It is therefore of interest to find a phenotype reflecting physical functioning which has a relatively high heritability and which can be measured in large samples. Hand grip strength is known......-55%). A powerful design to detect genes associated with a phenotype is obtained using the extreme discordant and concordant sib pairs, of whom 28 and 77 dizygotic twin pairs, respectively, were found in this study. Hence grip strength is a suitable phenotype for identifying genetic variants of importance to mid...

  12. The hand and wrist

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood, M.B.; Berquist, T.H.

    1985-01-01

    Trauma is the most common etiologic factor leading to disability in the hand and wrist. Judicious radiographic evaluation is required for accurate assessment in practically all but the most minor of such injuries. Frequently serial radiographic evaluation is essential for directing the course of treatment and for following the healing process. A meaningful radiographic evaluation requires a comprehensive knowledge of the normal radiographic anatomy, an overview of the spectrum of pathology, and an awareness of the usual mechanisms of injury, appropriate treatment options, and relevant array of complications

  13. IMPACT OF MORNING STIFFNESS, EDUCATION, AND AGE ON THE FUNCTIONAL STATUS OF PATIENTS WITH RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahatçiu-Meka, Vjollca; Rexhepi, Sylejman; Manxhuka-Kerliu, Suzana; Pallaska, Kelmend; Murtezani, Ardiana; Osmani-Vllasolli, Teuta; Rexhepi, Mjellma; Rexhepi, Blerta

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship between disability status and duration of morning stiffness in hands with regard to age, level of education, and gender in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Also, the authors wanted to investigate this relationship with regard to the presence of rheumatoid factor, i.e., the serological status. A retrospective study was conducted in 250 patients with the classic form of RA (186 females, s64 males, mean age Xb = 49.96 y ears, range 25-60 years, disease duration 1-27 years, Xb = 6.41) previously diagnosed with RA according to the ACR (American College of Rheumatology 1987 criteria). All patients were in Steinbrocker functional classes II and III. The probability level was expressed by p 0.05) seronegative, (r = 0.12, y = 0.00x + 2.30, p > 0.05) seropositive]. High positive values were obtained for the linear correlation coefficient between duration of the disease and functional class (p < 0.01). Also, high values were obtained regarding the coefficient of correlation between age and functional class [(r = 0.29, p < 0.01) seronegative, (r = 0.47, p < 0.01) seropositive]. Uneducated patients were significantly more represented in functional class III [ 23 (50%) seronegative, 19 (42.2%) seropositive] than in functional class II [16 (20.3%) seronegative, 22 (27.5%) seropositive]. In conclusion, in this study of patients with rheumatoid arthritis, increased duration of morning stiffness was associated with functional disability. Functional disability increased with the duration of the disease, depended on age and educational level, and was more pronounced in older age, regardless of RA serological status. With regard to serological status and sex, the differences were non-significant.

  14. Characteristics of patients with rheumatoid arthritis in Qatar: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutf, Abdo; Poil, Abdul R; Hammoudeh, Mohammed

    2014-01-01

    To describe the clinical characteristics, serologic, radiological and clinical disease activity, and modality of therapy in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) at tertiary outpatient care in Qatar. The study design was cross-sectional where 100 consecutive cases who met 1987 American College of Rheumatology criteria for diagnosis of RA were enrolled in this study. Demographic data (sex, nationality and age) numbers of swollen and tender joints, X-rays and current medications were collected during outpatients visits to Hamad General Hospital. Disease Activity Score of 28 joints (DAS28) and Health Assessment Questionnaires (HAQ) scores were calculated. All patients with RA who were seen as rheumatology outpatients were invited to participate in the study. One hundred patients were seen and examined during their follow-up at the outpatient clinic; data were collected and analyzed. Females represented 67% of all patients, 6% had more than six swollen joints, 9% had more than six tender joints. DAS28 and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (DAS28) calculation revealed 49% of patients were in remission (DAS28  3.2.Mean HAQ score was 1.02. Rheumatoid factor (RF) was positive in 63%, while anti-cyclic citrullinated protein antibody (anti-CCP) was positive in 71%, and 49% were positive for both. Radiography of hands and feet during the previous year was done in 65% of patients: 11% of them had erosions. Sixty-six percent were on one synthetic disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drug (DMARD) and 27% where on more than one synthetic DMARD and 7% where on no DMRD. Glucocorticoids were used in 51% and 29% were on biologics. Sixty-four percent of rheumatoid arthritis patients in Qatar were in remission or had low disease activity while the remaining 36% had active disease and among these patients 29% were on biologics. © 2013 Asia Pacific League of Associations for Rheumatology and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  15. Pamidronate infusion improved two cases of intractable seronegative rheumatoid arthritise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansour Salesi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Pamidronate is a bisphosphonate derivative that can inhibit bone resorption by actions on osteoclasts and increase bone density in spite of treatment with steroids. This drug has the anti-inflammatory effect by increase apoptosis of monocytes. 5-10 percent of rheumatoid arthritis patients is seronegative and may be resistant to conventional disease modifying anti rheumatic drugs (DMARDs. Intravenous (IV pamidronate can be effective in disease control in seronegative rheumatoid arthritis. We report two cases of seronegative and drug resistant rheumatoid arthritis that favorably responds to pamidronate.

  16. Trace element analysis in rheumatoid arthritis under chrysotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lecomte, R.; Paradis, P.; Monaro, S.; Barrette, M.; Lamoureux, G.; Menard, H.A.

    1981-01-01

    Proton induced X-ray emission (PIXE) analysis is used to measure trace element concentrations in blood serum from patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Initially trace element contaminations in blood-collecting and storing devices are determined. Then mean values and nyctemeral cycles are measured both in normal subjects and patients with rheumatoid arthritis and other similar pathologies. Abnormal concentrations of Cu and Zn and anomalies in the nyctemeral cycle are found in the patients. In the second phase of the project, the special case of chrysotherapeutically treated (gold salt treatment) rheumatoid arthritis patients is studied for extended periods of time (up to 53 weeks). (orig.)

  17. Sacroiliac joint involvement in classical or definite rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carvalho, A. de; Graudal, H.

    1980-01-01

    In 188 patients with rheumatoid arthritis 564 radiologic examinations of the sacroiliac joints were performed. Severe blurring of the joint space or ankylosis were uncommon. The involvement was related to an age > 40 years at the onset, high values of the ESR and involvement of most joint groups in the limbs and cervical spine. Sex, presence or high titres of the rheumatoid factor and antinuclear antibodies were unrelated to lesions of the sacroiliac joints. A relation to the severity of rheumatoid arthritis rather than to the immunologic condition is suggested. (Auth.)

  18. Early rheumatoid arthritis and its differentiation from other joint abnormalities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boutry, Nathalie; Carmo, Clarissa Canella Moraes do; Flipo, Rene-Marc; Cotten, Anne

    2009-01-01

    The introduction of disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs has created new demands on imaging to early identify patients with rheumatoid arthritis and opened new prospects in therapeutic management of patients with aggressive disease. Therefore, new imaging modalities such as magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound have developed during the past few years in this field. In some cases, both magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound may be also useful in making the distinction between early rheumatoid arthritis and other joints abnormalities, including early psoriatic arthritis. This article will review key aspects of important advances in imaging in rheumatoid arthritis, particularly focusing on magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound.

  19. Liver enlargement demonstrated by scintigraphy in rheumatoid arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiger, L.H.; Gordon, M.H.; Ehrlich, G.E.; Shapiro, B.

    1976-03-01

    Scintigraphic scanning employing technetium-99m sulfur colloid was used to assess the size of the liver and spleen in 32 consecutive patients with rheumatoid arthritis. The data were correlated with clinical and laboratory assessment. Seven patients had enlarged livers, three enlarged spleens. An expected correlation of liver enlargement with Sjogren's syndrome did not materialize. Splenic enlargement and liver enlargement were discordant. Liver enlargement correlation best with elevations of rheumatoid factor as measured by latex fixation. As liver enlargement is not an appreciated feature of rheumatoid arthritis, these findings suggest that hepatomegaly need not necessarily imply adverse treatment results or the development of lymphoproliferative disorders.

  20. Express-diagnostics of rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoltan M. Sigal

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Diseases of bones and joints have the third greatest impact on the health of the world population. Rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis are uppermost inflammatory diseases of the joints. The aim of the study is the assessment of the ultrasonography and transillumination pulsooptometry of the knee joint as the diagnostic tools for rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthrosis. Materials and Methods: 2 266 people (29 % – rheumatoid arthritis, 62 % – osteoarthritis, 9 % – healthy, aged 19–75 years took part in the study. The ultrasonography and transillumination pulsooptometry were conducted. Measurements of hemodynamics and optical density were performed using the device and method of Z. M. Sigal (2007. Results. Various indicators were established, for example, the volume of synovial fluid in the suprapatellar bag for rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis. Optical density for rheumatoid arthritis is three times less than for osteoarthritis. There are significant differences in the amplitude of pulse oscillations in rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis. Results: Various indicators were established, for example, the volume of synovial fluid in the suprapatellar bag for rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis. Optical density for rheumatoid arthritis is three times less than for osteoarthritis. There are significant differences in the amplitude of pulse oscillations in rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis. Discussion and Conclusions: The volume of synovial fluid in the suprapatellar bag of the knee joint with rheumatoid arthritis is higher than in osteoarthritis and normal: 55.8 cm3 and above and 3,29 cm3, 1,85 cm3 and below, respectively. With osteoarthritis and normal amount of synovial fluid did not differ significantly. The optical density in the suprapatellar bag of the knee joint for rheumatoid arthritis was 0.56 ± 0.2, the amplitude of pulse oscillations was 13.45 ± 3.62 mm. In osteoarthritis, these values were 1

  1. Total lymphoid irradiation of intractable rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herbst, M.; Fritz, H.; Sauer, R.

    1986-01-01

    Eleven patients with intractable rheumatoid arthritis were treated with fractionated total lymphoid irradiation, (total dose 20 Gy). Lasting improvement in clinical symptoms was found in four patients during treatment and the remaining patients experienced similar benefit within 2 months of irradiation. There was marked reduction in exacerbations and number of joints involved. Morning stiffness, joint swelling and tenderness decreased. Complications included severe fatigue during treatment and acute bacterial arthritis in multiple joints in one patient. Four patients have since died, one of renal failure, another of cardiogenic shock following surgery 3 and 24 months after total lymphoid irradiation. Both had generalised amyloidosis. The third patient developed joint empyema and died of toxic cardiac failure. The fourth died 3 months after resection of a Kaposi's sarcoma complicated by wound infection which responded to treatment. Immunologically, total lymphoid irradiation resulted in suppression of the absolute lymphocyte count and reduction in T-helper cells, the number of T-suppressor cells remaining unchanged. These data provide evidence of T-cell involvement in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis. Total lymphoid irradiation can induce sustained improvement in clinical disease activity, but severe, possibly fatal, side-effects cannot be ignored. (author)

  2. Interstitial lung involvement in rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Vladimirovich Bestaev

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is a systemic autoimmune rheumatic disease of unknown etiology, characterized by chronic erosive arthritis and extraarticular manifestations. Pulmonary involvement is one of the common extraarticular manifestations of RA and may show itself as bronchial tree lesions, rheumatoid nodules, Caplan's syndrome, and lesions in the pleura or pulmonary interstitium (interstitial lung involvement (ILI. High-resolution computed tomography allows the diagnosis of ILI in RA in nearly 70% of cases although the incidence of ILI may be lower (4 to 30% depending on diagnostic methods and patient selection criteria. There are several histopathological types of ILI, the differential diagnosis of which can be troublesome. Usual interstitial pneumonia (UIP and nonspecific interstitial pneumonia are major types of RA-associated ILI. UIP-pattern ILI has a more severe course than ILI with other histological patterns. The clinical presentation of ILI may be complicated by the likely toxic effect of a number of disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs used to treat RA, such as methotrexate and leflunomide, and biological agents (BAs, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α inhibitors. The pathogenesis of pulmonary involvement in RA and the role of synthetic DMARDs and BAs in the development of ILI call for further investigations.An extraarticular manifestation, such as ILI, affects the choice of treatment policy in patients with RA.The relevance of a study of ILI is beyond question. The paper discusses the state-of-the-art of investigations in this area.

  3. Total lymphoid irradiation of intractable rheumatoid arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herbst, M.; Fritz, H.; Sauer, R.

    1986-12-01

    Eleven patients with intractable rheumatoid arthritis were treated with fractionated total lymphoid irradiation, (total dose 20 Gy). Lasting improvement in clinical symptoms was found in four patients during treatment and the remaining patients experienced similar benefit within 2 months of irradiation. There was marked reduction in exacerbations and number of joints involved. Morning stiffness, joint swelling and tenderness decreased. Complications included severe fatigue during treatment and acute bacterial arthritis in multiple joints in one patient. Four patients have since died, one of renal failure, another of cardiogenic shock following surgery 3 and 24 months after total lymphoid irradiation. Both had generalised amyloidosis. The third patient developed joint empyema and died of toxic cardiac failure. The fourth died 3 months after resection of a Kaposi's sarcoma complicated by wound infection which responded to treatment. Immunologically, total lymphoid irradiation resulted in suppression of the absolute lymphocyte count and reduction in T-helper cells, the number of T-suppressor cells remaining unchanged. These data provide evidence of T-cell involvement in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis. Total lymphoid irradiation can induce sustained improvement in clinical disease activity, but severe, possibly fatal, side-effects cannot be ignored.

  4. Coexistence of bronchiectasis and rheumatoid arthritis: revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilczynska, Maria M; Condliffe, Alison M; McKeon, Damian J

    2013-04-01

    The presence of bronchiectasis (BR) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) has been recognized for many decades; nevertheless, little research has been undertaken in this area. It is important to recognize that BR coexistent with RA differs from the other types of BR. The purpose of this descriptive review was to delineate the epidemiology, etiology, risk factors, pulmonary function testing, imaging, prognosis and management of concomitant BR and RA. To inform our study we searched the PubMed, EMBASE, CINAHL, and MEDLINE databases, using combinations of the following key words: computed tomography, lung function tests, rheumatoid arthritis, bronchiectasis, biological agents, and interstitial lung disease. The number of published papers covering this topic is limited, but several relevant conclusions can be drawn. Patients with concomitant RA and BR have worse obstructive airways disease, increased susceptibility to recurrent pulmonary infections, faster lung function decline, and higher mortality, compared with subjects with either RA or BR alone. The use of disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (both biological and non-biological) for RA in RA-BR patients imparts a further challenge in managing these patients. Although there are not any published guidelines on the management of coexisting RA-BR, we have attempted to provide such recommendations, based on the literature review and our experience.

  5. Back to basics: hand hygiene and surgical hand antisepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spruce, Lisa

    2013-11-01

    Health care-associated infections (HAIs) are a significant issue in the United States and throughout the world, but following proper hand hygiene practices is the most effective and least expensive way to prevent HAIs. Hand hygiene is inexpensive and protects patients and health care personnel alike. The four general types of hand hygiene that should be performed in the perioperative environment are washing hands that are visibly soiled, hand hygiene using alcohol-based products, surgical hand scrubs, and surgical hand scrubs using an alcohol-based surgical hand rub product. Barriers to proper hand hygiene may include not thinking about it, forgetting, skin irritation, a lack of role models, or a lack of a safety culture. One strategy for improving hand hygiene practices is monitoring hand hygiene as part of a quality improvement project, but the most important aspect for perioperative team members is to set an example for other team members by following proper hand hygiene practices and reminding each other to perform hand hygiene. Copyright © 2013 AORN, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Hand hygiene in the nursery during diaper changing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phang, Koh Ni; Maznin, Nur Liyanna; Yip, Wai Kin

    2012-12-01

    This project aimed to improve hand hygiene practice during diaper changing among nurses working in the nursery. This project was conducted in one of the nurseries in a 935-bed acute care hospital with a sample of 15 nurses. A pre- and post-intervention audit was conducted utilising the Joanna Briggs Institute Practical Application of Clinical Evidence System and Getting Research into Practice module. A revised written workflow, which specified the occasions and process for hand hygiene during diaper changing, was introduced. Modifications to the baby bassinets and nursery were made after barriers to good hand hygiene were identified. The project was carried out over 4 months, from March to June 2011. The post-intervention audit results show an improvement in performing hand washing after changing diapers (20%) and performing the correct steps of hand rubbing (25%). However, the compliance rates decreased for the other criteria that measured whether hand rubbing or hand washing was performed prior to contacting the infant and after wrapping the infant, and whether hand washing was performed correctly. The improvement in compliance with hand washing--the main focus of the new workflow--after changing diapers was especially significant. The results indicated that having a workflow on the occasions and process for hand hygiene during diaper changing was useful in standardising practice. Pre- and post-implementation audits were effective methods for evaluating the effect of translating evidence into practice. However, this project had limited success in improving compliance with hand hygiene. This suggested that more effort is needed to reinforce the importance of hand hygiene and compliance to the proposed workflow. In addition, this project showed that for change to take place successfully, environmental modifications, increased awareness and adequate communication to every staff member are essential. © 2012 The Authors. International Journal of Evidence

  7. A method of simultaneous no-screen X-ray film taking with direct twofold magnification of hands and feet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zajgner, J.; Szymanska-Prach, H.

    1978-01-01

    The authors propose an original method of X-ray examination of hands and feet which makes possible simultaneous radiography without screen and direct twofold magnified film taking. The method is not connected with the necessity of exposing the patient to an additional dose of X-rays. It has been tried in 20 patients with suspected rheumatoid arthritis. It requires an X-ray tube with 0.3 x 0.3 mm microfocus. (author)

  8. Can we see enough? A comparative study of film-screen vs digital radiographs in small lesions in rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jagt, E.J. van der; Hofman, S.; Kraft, B.M.; Leeuwen, M.A. van

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the performance of digital radiography in the detection of early very small erosions and joint space narrowing in the hands and feet in rheumatoid arthritis. Fifty-three sets of film-screen and digital radiographs of the same hands and feet with very small and sometimes questionable lesions (possible erosions and cysts) were scored independently two times by four investigators. The percentage of lesions found in exactly the same position for each investigator was calculated. Intra-observer agreement between first and second reading in film-screen radiography was 64-76 % (mean 67 %), and in digital radiographs 60-71 % (mean 64 %). Agreement between film-screen and digital radiographs ranged from 54 to 64 % (mean 58 %) in the first reading and from 56 to 66 % (mean 62 %) in the second reading. Overall agreement between both techniques between first and second reading ranged between 62 and 73 % (mean 65 %). Digital radiography of the hands and feet can be used in patients suspected of rheumatoid arthritis and in follow-up of those patients, because small and early erosions can be seen equally well with the digital technique as compared with the conventional film-screen technique. (orig.)

  9. Hand Matters: Left-Hand Gestures Enhance Metaphor Explanation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argyriou, Paraskevi; Mohr, Christine; Kita, Sotaro

    2017-01-01

    Research suggests that speech-accompanying gestures influence cognitive processes, but it is not clear whether the gestural benefit is specific to the gesturing hand. Two experiments tested the "(right/left) hand-specificity" hypothesis for self-oriented functions of gestures: gestures with a particular hand enhance cognitive processes…

  10. Balneotherapy in rheumatoid arthritis-a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Isabel; Cantista, Pedro; Vasconcelos, Carlos

    2016-08-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic systemic autoimmune disease characterized by persistent inflammation of synovial joints with pain, often leading to joint destruction and disability, and despite intensive research, the cause of RA remains unknown. Balneotherapy-also called mineral baths or spa therapy-uses different types of mineral water compositions like sulphur, radon, carbon dioxin, etc. The role of balneotherapy is on debate; Sukenik wrote that the sulphur mineral water has special proprieties to rheumatologic diseases, including in the course of active inflammatory phases in RA. The aim of this review is to summarize the available evidence on the effects of balneotherapy on patients with rheumatoid arthritis. We have made a systematic search of the articles published from 1980 to 2014 on this topic in PubMed, Scopus, CRD, PEDro, Web of Science and Embase databases. We have followed the method set by the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic reviews and Meta-Analysis (PRISMA). These that have compared balneotherapy with other therapeutic modalities or with no intervention were considered. The inclusion criteria of these papers were randomized control trial (RCT); languages: English, French, Spanish, Italian and Portuguese; evaluation of efficacy (analysis of outcomes); use of natural mineral water baths; and participants with RA. A total of eight articles documenting RCTs were found and included for full review and critical appraisal involving a total of 496 patients. The studies selected highlighted an important improvement and statistically significant in several clinical parameters, in spite of their heterogeneity between the various studies. One study emphasized an important improvement on functional capacity up to 6 months of follow-up (FU). Some of the studies (std.) reveal an improvement on morning stiffness (5 std.), number of active joints (3 std.), Ritchie index (2 std.) and activities of daily living (2 std.) up to 3 months of FU. Three

  11. Development and validation of the OMERACT rheumatoid arthritis magnetic resonance tenosynovitis scoring system in a multireader exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glinatsi, Daniel; Bird, Paul; Gandjbakhch, Frédérique

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To develop and validate a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) tenosynovitis (TS) score for tendons at the wrist and metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joint levels in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods: Axial T1-weighted precontrast and postcontrast fat-saturated MR image sets...... of the hands of 43 patients with RA initiating rituximab therapy were obtained at baseline and after 14, 26, 38, or 52 weeks. The MR images were scored twice by 4 readers. Nine tendon compartments of the wrist and 4 flexor tendon compartments at the MCP joints were assessed. Tenosynovitis was scored as follows...

  12. Standardisation of the MRI image evaluation in the diagnostics of rheumatoid arthritis within the wrist and metacarpophalangeal joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kapuscinska, K.; Urbanik, A.; Wojciechowski, W.

    2009-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic systemic autoimmune disease of the connective tissue, which results in disability and earlier death. Thus it is very important to recognise this pathologic condition as early as possible, to lessen and delay its consequences. Currently, magnetic resonance imaging is the best imaging modality, depicting every stage of this disease and allowing for monitoring of the treatment response. The process of standardisation is needed in assessing MR pictures. The aim of this article was to present the MR protocols of hand and wrist MR examinations for rheumatologic demand and standards of results, according to worldwide OMERACT RAMRIS 2002 and supplemented by tenosynovitis system. (authors)

  13. Features of systemic sclerosis-rheumatoid arthritis overlap syndrome (SS-RA overlap syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. V. Desinova

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To reveal clinico-laboratory, immunologic and immunogenetic features of systemic sclerosis-rheumatoid arthritis overlap syndrome (SS-RA.Material and methods. 32 pts with SS-RA (1 male, 31 female aged 22 to 74 years with disease onset at 18 to 69 years and disease duration from 1 to 35 years were included. Complex laboratory and instrumental examination was performed including nailfold capillaroscopy. A part of pts was also evaluated with magnetic resonance imaging of hands. Serum level of rheumatoid factor, antinuclear factor, circulating immune complexes, C-reactive protein, antibodies to cyclic citrullinated peptide (ACCP was evaluated. Genotyping of DRB1 alleles was performed.Results. Characteristic features of SS-RA were prevalence of limited skin damage, less prominent peripheral and visceral symptoms of SS, presence of anti-topoisomerase antibodies and erosive arthritis, high laboratory and immunological activity, more frequent association with DRB1*01.Conclusion. SS-RA possesses its own clinical features and can be considered as a distinct subtype of SS.

  14. Radiological differential diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis; Radiologische Differenzialdiagnose der rheumatoiden Arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wick, M.C.; Klauser, A.S. [Medizinische Universitaet Innsbruck, Department Radiologie, Innsbruck (Austria)

    2012-02-15

    Establishing an early and reliable diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is of major importance but can be a great clinical challenge leading to direct therapeutic consequences. No single epidemiological, genetic, clinical, serological or radiological test exists which can exclusively diagnose RA. In general diagnosis of RA includes a case history, clinical signs, laboratory abnormalities and radiological examinations, viz. conventional radiography of the joints of the hands and feet. This review summarizes the most important radiological features of RA and the radiological findings of its closest differential diagnoses. (orig.) [German] Eine fruehe Diagnosestellung bei rheumatoider Arthritis (RA) stellt eine grosse klinische Herausforderung dar, da sich daraus unmittelbare therapeutische Konsequenzen ableiten. Es gibt keinen epidemiologischen, genetischen, klinischen, serologischen oder radiologischen Test, mit dessen alleiniger Anwendung die Diagnose der RA definitiv gestellt werden kann. Die Diagnose der RA erfolgt durch die Kombination von Patientenanamnese, klinischen Zeichen und serologischen Biomarkern in Zusammenschau mit der radiologischen Diagnostik, allen voran der Anwendung konventioneller Roentgenbilder der Haende und Fuesse. In diesem Uebersichtsartikel werden die wichtigsten radiologischen Merkmale zur Diagnose der RA und der diagnostisch haeufigsten Differenzialerkrankungen dargestellt. (orig.)

  15. Tissue factor expression in rheumatoid synovium: a potential role in pannus invasion of rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lujun; Lu, Yahua; Chu, Yang; Xie, Jun; Ding, Wen'ge; Wang, Fengming

    2013-09-01

    Angiogenesis, as well as pannus formation within the joint, plays an important role in the erosion of articular cartilage and bone in the pathological process of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Tissue factor (TF), an essential initiator of the extrinsic pathway of blood coagulation, is also involved in the angiogenesis and the pannus formation of RA progression. In the present study, we used immunofluorescence and confocal scanning methods to characterize TF immunolocalization in RA synovium. We showed that positive staining of TF could be immunolocalized in synoviocytes, CD19(+) B cells and CD68(+) macrophages, whereas weak or negative staining of tissue factor could be found in CD34(+) endothelial cells of neo-vessels, CD3(+) T cells and CD14(+) monocytes in RA synovium tissues. Our study demonstrates a detailed local expression of TF in the rheumatoid synovium, and supports the notion that TF, expressed not only by the synoviocytes themselves, but also the infiltrating CD19(+) B cells and CD68(+) macrophages, is involved in the pannus invasion in the progression of rheumatoid arthritis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  16. EVALUATION OF IL1-α AND TNF-α SERUM LEVELS IN RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS PATIONTS WITH ACTIVE AND INACTIVE, WITH OR WITHOUT BONE EROSION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AR. Rostamian

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis is the most common inflammatory joint disease with 1 percent prevalence in community which presents with symmetrical polyarthritis of hands with inflammatory behavior. Several studies in recent years were conducted for evaluation of inflammatory cytokines such as IL1-α (Interlukin 1α and TNF- α (Tumor necrosis factor in rheumatologic disorders including rheumatoid arthritis to find new treatment methods base to pathogenesis. In this study different serum levels of IL1-α and TNF- α in 160 rheumatoid arthritis patients with active and inactive disease and also disease with or without bone erosion are assessed. 4% of our patients had rheumatoid nodule and 70% of all patients had positive RF, IL1-α, and TNF- α levels. Active with bone erosion patients had IL1-α and TNF- α serum levels higher than active without bone erosion patients; it was not significant in T-test but it was significant in Mann-Whitney Test. The results was the same as expected; IL1-α, and TNF- α serum levels were higher in active with bone erosion in comparison with inactive without bone erosion patients.

  17. Mycobacterial antigens stimulate rheumatoid mononuclear cells to cartilage proteoglycan depletion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilbrink, B.; Bijlsma, J. W.; Huber-Bruning, O.; van Roy, J. L.; den Otter, W.; van Eden, W.

    1990-01-01

    In a coculture with porcine articular cartilage explants unstimulated blood mononuclear cells (BMC) from patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), but not from healthy controls, induced proteoglycan depletion of dead cartilage. Specific stimulation of the RA BMC with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MT),

  18. Physical activity maintenance in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loeppenthin, K; Esbensen, Bente Appel; Østergaard, Mikkel

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe the experience of physical activity maintenance in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. DESIGN: A qualitative salutogenic-oriented interview study. SETTING: A rheumatology outpatient clinic. SUBJECTS: A purposive sample of 16 physically active patients (mean age 50, range 37...... with non-arthritis populations. CONCLUSION: This study demonstrates that physical activity in patients with rheumatoid arthritis may be understood as a resource to resist disability and to feel and stay healthy while creating and sustaining meaningfulness in life.......-67) diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis on average 21 years previously (range 4-46 years). METHODS: In-depth interviews were conducted using a semi-structured interview guide to illuminate how the phenomenon 'physical activity maintenance' was experienced by patients with rheumatoid arthritis. The interviews...

  19. Methods to score vertebral deformities in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lems, W. F.; Jahangier, Z. N.; Raymakers, J. A.; Jacobs, J. W.; Bijlsma, J. W.

    1997-01-01

    The objective was to compare four different scoring methods for vertebral deformities: the semiquantitative Kleerekoper score and three quantitative scores (according to Minne, Melton and Raymakers) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Lateral radiographs of the thoracic and lumbar vertebral

  20. Sleep Disturbances in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis | Abbasi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sleep Disturbances in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis. ... that insomnia, pain and disease intensity were the most important factors that ... that sleep disturbances are frequent in patients with RA and may contribute to disease severity.

  1. Clinical evaluation of joint scintigraphy in rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimabukuro, Kunisada; Sakata, Hiromichi; Shirono, Kazuo; Nakajo, Masataka; Shinohara, Shinji

    1983-01-01

    Pertechnetate (sup(99m)TcO 4 - ) joint scintigraphy was performed on 45 patients with rheumatoid arthritis, 3 with nonspecific arthritis and 6 normal subjects. 1) The sites of radioisotopic accumulation were generally in agreement with those of clinical involvement in rheumatoid arthritis. 2) By analysis of build-up curves in the wrist joint, tracer was found to be concentrated more rapidly in rheumatoid arthritis (T 1/2 = 0.67 min.) than in nonspecific arthritis (T 1/2 = 2.66 min.) 3) The degree of radioisotopic accumulation correlated well with the value of CRP and erythrocyte sedimentation rate. It could be cosidered that pertechnetate joint scintigraphy is useful for clinical evaluation of rheumatoid arthritis. (author)

  2. Juggling identities of rheumatoid arthritis, motherhood and paid work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feddersen, Helle; Mechlenborg Kristiansen, Tine; Andersen, Pernille Tanggaard

    2018-01-01

    professionals have an important role to play in investigating possible ways for the individual to maintain employment or return to work. Living with rheumatoid arthritis and being a paid worker challenge women's role performance and thereby their identification as mothers. Therefore, rehabilitation......PURPOSE: To explore how women with rheumatoid arthritis manage their illness, motherhood, and work life. METHODS: A constructivist, grounded theory approach based on individual interviews and participant observations with 20 women with rheumatoid arthritis who participated in work life and had......-sided act; (3) Living with rheumatoid arthritis as an identity? Paid work, motherhood, and illness are linked to the women's social identities. The women construct and change their identities in interactions with children, partners, other parents, colleagues, and employers. CONCLUSION: The women attribute...

  3. Rheumatoid Arthritis Pain: Tips for Protecting Your Joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... so you can get out and stretch. On airplanes choose aisle seats, so you can shift your ... Education and Research; 2010. March 08, 2018 Original article: http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/rheumatoid-arthritis/ ...

  4. Classification of hand eczema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agner, T; Aalto-Korte, K; Andersen, K E

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Classification of hand eczema (HE) is mandatory in epidemiological and clinical studies, and also important in clinical work. OBJECTIVES: The aim was to test a recently proposed classification system of HE in clinical practice in a prospective multicentre study. METHODS: Patients were...... recruited from nine different tertiary referral centres. All patients underwent examination by specialists in dermatology and were checked using relevant allergy testing. Patients were classified into one of the six diagnostic subgroups of HE: allergic contact dermatitis, irritant contact dermatitis, atopic...... system investigated in the present study was useful, being able to give an appropriate main diagnosis for 89% of HE patients, and for another 7% when using two main diagnoses. The fact that more than half of the patients had one or more additional diagnoses illustrates that HE is a multifactorial disease....

  5. Oro-facial evaluation of women with rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyuela, C P S; Furtado, R N V; Chiari, A; Natour, J

    2015-05-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an aggressive articular autoimmune disease that causes deformities and disability. The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) might be affected by this disease. Few controlled studies have evaluated bite force (BF) and oro-facial manifestations of this disease. To characterise oro-facial alterations in patients with RA, correlate these results with clinical and disease activity parameters and correlate BF with hand strength (HS). A cross-sectional study of 150 women was performed, (75 RA patients (RA group) and 75 healthy individuals (control group). The presence of articular sounds, pain on palpation of masseter, temporal and TMJ lateral pole, changes in occlusion, range of mandibular motion, measurement of BF in the incisor and molar regions and assessment of HS were evaluated. In relation to oro-facial evaluation there were statistical differences between the groups. There was correlation between BF and HS, in the RA group, this correlation was consistent in patients with natural teeth. Patients with RA had lower scores (P < 0·05) in the HAQ, DASH and OHIP-14 questionnaires than the control group. Inverse correlations were found between BF and HAQ, but not between BF and DAS-28, DASH and OHIP-14 questionnaires in the RA group. The women with RA presented more signs and symptoms in the oro-facial region and had a lower BF than the women in the control group. BF was inversely correlated with the overall function (evaluated by the HAQ) in the patients with RA, and there were correlations between BF and HS in the RA patients and in the control group. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Wide Awake Hand Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lied, Line; Borchgrevink, Grethe E; Finsen, Vilhjalmur

    2017-09-01

    "Wide awake hand surgery", where surgery is performed in local anaesthesia with adrenaline, without sedation or a tourniquet, has become widespread in some countries. It has a number of potential advantages and we wished to evaluate it among our patients. All 122 patients treated by this method during one year were evaluated by the surgeons and the patients on a numerical scale from 0 (best/least) to 10 (worst/most). Theatre time was compared to that recorded for a year when regional or general anaesthesia had been used. The patients' mean score for the general care they had received was 0.1 (SD 0.6), for pain during lidocaine injection 2.4 (SD 2.2), for pain during surgery 0.9 (SD 1.5), and for other discomfort during surgery 0.5 (SD 1.4). Eight reported that they would want general anaesthesia if they were to be operated again. The surgeons' mean evaluation of bleeding during surgery was 1.6 (SD 1.8), oedema during surgery 0.4 (SD 1.1), general disadvantages with the method 1.0 (SD 1.6) and general advantages 6.5 (SD 4.3). The estimation of advantages was 9.9 (DS 0.5) for tendon suture. 28 patients needed intra-operative additional anaesthesia. The proportion was lower among trained hand surgeons and fell significantly during the study period. Non-surgical theatre time was 46 (SD 15) minutes during the study period and 55 (SD 22) minutes during the regional/general period (p theatre.

  7. Experiences of mobility for people living with rheumatoid arthritis who are receiving biologic drug therapy: implications for podiatry services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Lucy; Donovan-Hall, Margaret; Borthwick, Alan; Bowen, Catherine J

    2017-01-01

    Despite significant advancements in new treatment modalities for rheumatoid arthritis with biological therapies, foot complications remain a disabling and common feature of the disease . In this study the aim was to explore and describe the personal experiences of people with rheumatoid arthritis in receipt of biologic treatments in a bid to understand the impact of this form of medication on their mobility. An interpretative phenomenological analysis (IPA) was undertaken to explore in depth the individual experience of rheumatoid disease through personal accounts of the patient journey spanning both 'before' and 'after' the instigation of biologic therapy. A purposive sampling strategy was adopted and in-depth semi structured interviews used to facilitate rich, detailed interview data exploring the lived experiences of individuals undertaking biological therapy and the changes to mobility experienced as a result. Thematic analysis was employed with an IPA framework to identify key meanings, and report patterns within the data. Five people with rheumatoid arthritis participated in the study. The mean disease duration was 20.2 years (range: 6 -32) and all were being treated with biologic therapies. Four key themes emerged from the data: 1) Life before biologic treatment, depicted in accounts as a negative experience characterised by painful and disabling symptoms and feelings of hopelessness. 2) Life with biologic treatment, often experienced as a life changing transition, restoring function and mobility and offering renewed hope. 3) Sense of self, in which the impact of rheumatoid disease and the subsequent changes arising from biologic therapy reveal a profound impact on feelings of personal identity both pre and post biologic therapy; an effect of footwear on self-image emerges as a dominant sub theme; 4) Unmet footcare needs were evident in the patient narrative, where the unrelenting if diminished impact of foot pain on mobility was viewed in the context of

  8. Radionuclide study of the joints in rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikonnikov, A.I.; Drozdovskij, B.Ya.; Ivanov, Yu.N.; Romagin, V.K.

    1985-01-01

    Diagnostic opportunities of scintigraphy with sup(113m)In- eluate in 49 rheumatoid arthritis patients with prevalent knee joint affections at the exudative-proliferative period of the disease have been studied. Selective accumulation of radionuclide in the inflammatory tissue forms the basis of the method. It is shown that the scintigraphic study (scintiscanning) with sup(113m)In allows to differentiate between the exudative ad exudative-proliferative stages of rheumatoid arthritis and to assess the results of medicamentary treatment

  9. Living with persistent rheumatoid arthritis: a BARFOT study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bala, Sidona-Valentina; Samuelson, Karin; Hagell, Peter; Fridlund, Bengt; Forslind, Kristina; Svensson, Björn; Thomé, Bibbi

    2017-09-01

    To describe and understand the meaning of living with persistent rheumatoid arthritis. A considerable number of patients with rheumatoid arthritis live with an ongoing active and symptomatic illness despite access to potent antirheumatic treatment. There is, however, a lack of knowledge about the meaning of living with this severe long-term illness, defined as persistent rheumatoid arthritis. A descriptive design based on a hermeneutic phenomenological method was used. Ten adults with persistent rheumatoid arthritis and at least five years disease duration were interviewed. The interviews were analysed according to van Manen's method. Living with persistent rheumatoid arthritis revealed four overall themes: an existence dominated by painful symptoms and treatment, radical changes and limitations in one's life, a continual struggle to cope with one's life and to master the illness, and a dependency on those who are close by and the world around. The lifeworld was affected to a varying extent and in various ways by the illness but also by the dependence on its treatment and care that was not experienced as sufficiently meeting needs in terms of security, access to and coordination of care as well as team and rehabilitation services. Persistent rheumatoid arthritis and its treatment entail a radical effect on the person's life and quality of life. Current ordinary rheumatology care does not seem to meet the individual needs of the person with persistent rheumatoid arthritis in an optimal way. A greater knowledge about and understanding of the person who lives with persistent rheumatoid arthritis is important for facilitating the development of care and the relief of suffering. A holistic alternative to conventional clinical practice, such as person-centred care, could be tested as an innovative model of care. Our findings might serve as material for educational and counselling purposes for healthcare professionals. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Efficacy of Fish Oil in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Heidari

    1998-04-01

    Full Text Available Ingestion of fish oil fatty acids (omega - 3 fatty acids inhibits the formation of arachidonic acid - derived cytokines and leads to production of compounds with diminished biological activity. Beneficial effects of dietary supplementation with fish oil in rheumatoid arthritis have been shown in many controlled trials."nMethods : 43 patients with active rheumatoid arthritis entered in a prospective, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial to recieve either lOgr fish oil daily (treatment group or corn oil (placebo group. Baseline drugs and usual diet were continued without any changes. Disease variables were evaluated at baseline and after completion of study period."nThe changes in disease variables were compared by paired t-tesl in each group. Comparison of the two groups was done by t-test. Functional capacity was compared by Wilcoxon ranks test."nResults : 19 patients in treatment group and 20 patients in placebo group completed the study which lasted eight weeks . In the treatment group, joint pain index decreased from 30±11 at baseline, to 18±11 at the end of study period (P < 0.01. Joint swelling index decreased from 8 ± 4 to 2 ± 4, (P< 0.01, morning stiffness from 87 ± 41 to 24±16 minutes (P < 0.01. In the placebo group the above variable changes were from 19±14 to 25±14 ; 8±8 to 7±6 and 80±71 to 76±75 minutes respectively, which were not significant . The differences between the treatment and placebo groups were significant in joint swelling index (P < 0.05, morning stiffness (P<0.01 and functioal capacity (p< 0.005, the differences in joint pain index and grip strenght did not quite achieve statstical significance. During study period there were no adverese effects with fish oil consumption."nConclusion : Fish oil supplemention has anti-inflamatory effects in rheumatoid arthritis. Further studies are needed to recommend its long - term usage concomittant with other drugs in all patients

  11. Blood flow in the forearm in patients with Rheumatoid arthritis and healthy subjects under local thermotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Mucha

    2002-02-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Muscle blood flow in the forearm of patients with rheuma-toid arthritis and healthy volunteers following treatment with temperature increasingarm baths, mudpacks and short- or decimeter-wave diathermy was studied in thisinvestigation. The aim of the study was to find out the difference of reactive hyperemia between the different temperature methods as well as the influence on theconsensual reaction. Subjects: Eighty patients with rheumatoid arthritis, stage 3 according toSteinbrocker, as well as 80 healthy human subjects had been assigned numerically in the four therapy- and controlgroups. Patients with diseases influencing the peripheral blood flow were excluded. Design: Blood flow was measured by venous occlusion plethysmography in both forearms with the subjects lyingsupine. The application of the local heat therapies had been excluded on the left forearm. The forearm blood flow wasmonitored before heat therapy, directly after as well as in two further 10 minutes intervals. An analysis of variancewas used to determine the influence on blood flow of the response to the heat therapies in patients with rheumatoidarthritis and healthy subjects.Results: Under homogeneous starting conditions and a statistically uniformed high blood flow in rest the reactive values of blood flow on the left-hand side of application and the right consensual side showed high significant differencesbetween all methods of therapy. Differences between the patients and the healthy subjects only showed tendencies withpartially lower reactions, concerning the patients with rheumatoid arthritis. All methods of heat therapy caused a statistically provable consensual reaction that turned out smaller after diathermic methods. Here the post therapeuticreaction of the blood flow on the side of application was also lower or rather shorter. Conclusion: Greater differences of the blood flow in rest between the patients with rheumatoid arthritis and healthysubjects

  12. Management of Atopic Hand Dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halling-Overgaard, Anne-Sofie; Zachariae, Claus; Thyssen, Jacob P

    2017-01-01

    This article provides an overview of clinical aspects of hand eczema in patients with atopic dermatitis. Hand eczema can be a part of atopic dermatitis itself or a comorbidity, for example, as irritant or allergic contact dermatitis. When managing hand eczema, it is important to first categorize...

  13. Hand Washing: Do's and Dont's

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hands frequently can help limit the transfer of bacteria, viruses and other microbes. Always wash your hands before: Preparing food or eating Treating wounds or caring for a sick person Inserting or removing contact lenses Always wash your hands after: Preparing food Using ...

  14. Hand aperture patterns in prehension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bongers, Raoul M; Zaal, Frank T J M; Jeannerod, Marc

    2012-06-01

    Although variations in the standard prehensile pattern can be found in the literature, these alternative patterns have never been studied systematically. This was the goal of the current paper. Ten participants picked up objects with a pincer grip. Objects (3, 5, or 7cm in diameter) were placed at 30, 60, 90, or 120cm from the hands' starting location. Usually the hand was opened gradually to a maximum immediately followed by hand closing, called the standard hand opening pattern. In the alternative opening patterns the hand opening was bumpy, or the hand aperture stayed at a plateau before closing started. Two participants in particular delayed the start of grasping with respect to start of reaching, with the delay time increasing with object distance. For larger object distances and smaller object sizes, the bumpy and plateau hand opening patterns were used more often. We tentatively concluded that the alternative hand opening patterns extended the hand opening phase, to arrive at the appropriate hand aperture at the appropriate time to close the hand for grasping the object. Variations in hand opening patterns deserve attention because this might lead to new insights into the coordination of reaching and grasping. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Rheumatoid arthritis: Radiological changes in the cervical spine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Boukai, Ahmad A.; Al-Arfaj, Abdurahman S.

    2003-01-01

    Objective was to describe the radiographic cervical spine changes in rheumatoid arthritis patients.Forty-nine patients (37 females and 12 males ) diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis at King Khalid University Hospital, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia between June 1998 and December 2000, were studied for their radiographic cervical spine changes . Their mean age at disease onset was 41.4 + 13.4 years (range of 18-73)and mean duration of disease was 9.1+-6.28 years (range of 2-34). Their demographic data including rheumatoid factor status was obtained. Standard conventional radiographs cervical spine were obtained to study the cervical spine changes. Cervical radiographic changes were found in 34 patients (27 females and 7 males) 10 had subluxation (7 with atlanto-axial subluxation,2 with sub-axial subluxation,and one with lateral subluxation ). No vertical impaction was seen. Erosion of odontoid process was seen in one patient .All were rheumatoid seropositive Cervical spine changes in patients with rheumatoid arthritis are common, in particular subluxation in the upper cervical spine. Our study showed somewhat lesser prevalence of these changes. These were clinically correlated with disease duration, female sex, and rheumatoid factor, but were not clinically significant. (author)

  16. Regression of an atlantoaxial rheumatoid pannus following posterior instrumented fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bydon, Mohamad; Macki, Mohamed; Qadi, Mohamud; De la Garza-Ramos, Rafael; Kosztowski, Thomas A; Sciubba, Daniel M; Wolinsky, Jean-Paul; Witham, Timothy F; Gokaslan, Ziya L; Bydon, Ali

    2015-10-01

    Rheumatoid patients may develop a retrodental lesion (atlantoaxial rheumatoid pannus) that may cause cervical instability and/or neurological compromise. The objective is to characterize clinical and radiographic outcomes after posterior instrumented fusion for atlantoaxial rheumatoid pannus. We retrospectively reviewed all patients who underwent posterior fusions for an atlantoaxial rheumatoid pannus at a single institution. Both preoperative and postoperative imaging was available for all patients. Anterior or circumferential operations, non-atlantoaxial panni, or prior C1-C2 operations were excluded. Primary outcome measures included Nurick score, Ranawat score (neurologic status in patients with rheumatoid arthritis), pannus regression, and reoperation. Pannus volume was determined with axial and sagittal views on both preoperative and postoperative radiological images. Thirty patients surgically managed for an atlantoaxial rheumatoid pannus were followed for a mean of 24.43 months. Nine patients underwent posterior instrumented fusion alone, while 21 patients underwent posterior decompression and instrumented fusion. Following a posterior instrumented fusion in all 30 patients, the pannus statistically significantly regressed by 44.44%, from a mean volume of 1.26cm(3) to 0.70cm(3) (ppannus radiographically regressed by 44.44% over a mean of 8.02 months, and patients clinically improved per the Nurick score. The Ranawat score did not improve, and 20% of patients required reoperation over a mean of 13.18 months. The annualized reoperation rate was approximately 13.62%. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. DNA Methylome Signature in Synoviocytes From Patients With Early Rheumatoid Arthritis Compared to Synoviocytes From Patients With Longstanding Rheumatoid Arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ai, Rizi; Whitaker, John W.; Boyle, David L.; Tak, Paul Peter; Gerlag, Danielle M.; Wang, Wei; Firestein, Gary S.

    2015-01-01

    Epigenetics can contribute to pathogenic mechanisms in autoimmunity. We recently identified an imprinted DNA methylation pattern in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS) involving multiple genes in pathways implicated in cell migration, matrix regulation and immune

  18. Diagnosis of initial changes in patients suffering from rheumatoid arthritis. A comparison between low-field magnetic resonance imaging, 3-phase bone scintigraphy and conventional X-ray

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoepfner, S.; Dresel, S.; Weiss, M.; Hahn, K.; Treitl, M.; Krolak, C.; Becker-Gaab, C.; Schattenkirchner, M.

    2002-01-01

    Besides conventional X-rays, in the diagnostic work up of initial changes in patients suffering from rheumatoid arthritis (RA), 3-phase bone scintigraphy (3P-Sz) is as well established as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The aim of this study was to compare the diagnostic value of the newly developed low field MRI with the proven methods X-rays and 3P-Sz. Methods: 65 patients (47f, 18m; 20-86 yrs) were studied on a one day protocol with 3P-Sz (550 MBq Tc-99m DPD), MRI and X-rays of the hands. Images were visually analysed by two blinded nuclear medicine physicians and radiologists and classified as a) RA-typical, b) inflammatory, non-RA-typical and c) non inflammatory changes. All methods were compared to 3P-Sz as golden standard. Results: In comparison to 3P-Sz, low field MRI presents with almost equal sensitivity and specificity in rheumatoid-typical and inflammatory changes. Conventional X-rays revealed in arthritis-typical changes as well as in inflammatory changes a significantly lower sensitivity and also a lower negative predictive value while specificity equals the one of MRI. Quantitative analysis of 3P-Sz using ROI-technique unveiled significantly higher values in patients with rheumatoid arthritis than in those with no inflammatory changes. Conclusion: MRI represents an equally sensitive method in the initial diagnosis of rheumatoid-typical and inflammatory changes in the region of the hands as compared to the 3P-Sz. Besides the basic diagnosis with conventional X-rays, 3P-Sz is still the recommended method of choice to evaluate the whole body when RA is suspected. Additionally, quantitative analysis of the 3P-Sz using the ROI technique in the region of the hands reveals statistically significant results and should therefore be taken into account in the assessment of inflammatory changes. (orig.) [de

  19. Hands, screws, triangles and absolute space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filipović Nenad

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Hands and other incongruent counterparts are enough argument against relationist, at least Kant thought so, since some of his pre-critical writings. Arguments with incongruent counterparts are elegant and effective and they are quite attracted great attention of numerous authors who have criticized or defended the arguments in different ways. In a meanwhile discussions have gone too far from Kant's original argument, and from the spirit of that time, and received characteristics of modern philosophy and geometry. This text should show that Kant, as well as those who later defended him, did not achieve their goal - no conclusive argument against relationist have been brought by them.

  20. Unimanual SNARC Effect: Hand Matters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riello, Marianna; Rusconi, Elena

    2011-01-01

    A structural representation of the hand embedding information about the identity and relative position of fingers is necessary to counting routines. It may also support associations between numbers and allocentric spatial codes that predictably interact with other known numerical spatial representations, such as the mental number line (MNL). In this study, 48 Western participants whose typical counting routine proceeded from thumb-to-little on both hands performed magnitude and parity binary judgments. Response keys were pressed either with the right index and middle fingers or with the left index and middle fingers in separate blocks. 24 participants responded with either hands in prone posture (i.e., palm down) and 24 participants responded with either hands in supine (i.e., palm up) posture. When hands were in prone posture, the counting direction of the left hand conflicted with the direction of the left-right MNL, whereas the counting direction of the right hand was consistent with it. When hands were in supine posture, the opposite was true. If systematic associations existed between relative number magnitude and an allocentric spatial representation of the finger series within each hand, as predicted on the basis of counting habits, interactions would be expected between hand posture and a unimanual version of the spatial-numerical association of response codes (SNARC) effect. Data revealed that with hands in prone posture a unimanual SNARC effect was present for the right hand, and with hands in supine posture a unimanual SNARC effect was present for the left hand. We propose that a posture-invariant body structural representation of the finger series provides a relevant frame of reference, a within-hand directional vector, that is associated to simple number processing. Such frame of reference can significantly interact with stimulus-response correspondence effects, like the SNARC, that have been typically attributed to the mapping of numbers on a left

  1. Unimanual SNARC Effect: Hand Matters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianna eRiello

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available A structural representation of the hand embedding information about the identity and relative position of fingers is necessary to counting routines. It may also support associations between numbers and allocentric spatial codes that predictably interact with other known numerical spatial representations, such as the mental number line. In this study, 48 Western participants whose typical counting routine proceeded from thumb-to-little on both hands performed magnitude and parity binary judgments. Response keys were pressed either with the right index and middle fingers or with the left index and middle fingers in separate blocks. 24 participants responded with either hands in prone posture (i.e. palm down and 24 participants responded with either hands in supine (i.e. palm up posture. When hands were in prone posture, the counting direction of the left hand conflicted with the direction of the left-right mental number line, whereas the counting direction of the right hand was consistent with it. When hands were in supine posture, the opposite was true. If systematic associations existed between relative number magnitude and an allocentric spatial representation of the finger series within each hand, as predicted on the basis of counting habits, interactions would be expected between hand posture and a unimanual version of the Spatial-Numerical Association of Response Codes (SNARC effect. Data revealed that with hands in prone posture a unimanual SNARC effect was present for the right hand, and with hands in supine posture a unimanual SNARC effect was present for the left hand. We propose that a posture-invariant body structural representation of the finger series provides a relevant frame of reference, a within-hand directional vector, that is associated to simple number processing. Such frame of reference can significantly interact with stimulus-response correspondence effects that have been attributed to the mapping of numbers on a mental

  2. Cardiovascular disease in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naranjo, Antonio; Sokka, Tuulikki; Descalzo, Miguel

    2008-01-01

    ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: We analyzed the prevalence of cardiovascular (CV) disease in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and its association with traditional CV risk factors, clinical features of RA, and the use of disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) in a multinational cross...... by patients. The clinical assessment included a review of clinical features of RA and exposure to DMARDs over the course of RA. Comorbidities were recorded; CV morbidity included myocardial infarction, angina, coronary disease, coronary bypass surgery, and stroke. Traditional risk factors recorded were...... any CV event and age and male gender and between extra-articular disease and myocardial infarction. Prolonged exposure to methotrexate (HR 0.85; 95% CI 0.81 to 0.89), leflunomide (HR 0.59; 95% CI 0.43 to 0.79), sulfasalazine (HR 0.92; 95% CI 0.87 to 0.98), glucocorticoids (HR 0.95; 95% CI 0.92 to 0...

  3. Parental rheumatoid arthritis and childhood epilepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rom, Ane Lilleøre; Wu, Chunsen; Olsen, Jørn

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the influence of parental rheumatoid arthritis (RA) on risk of epilepsy. METHODS: We performed a nationwide cohort study including all singletons born in Denmark from 1977 to 2008 (n = 1,917,723) through individual linkage to nationwide Danish registries. The children were...... followed for an average of 16 years. Main outcome measures were adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) for epilepsy with onset in early childhood (29 days-4 years), late childhood (5-15 years), adolescence/adulthood (≥15 years), and at any age until the end of follow-up (December 31, 2010). RESULTS: Compared...... to unexposed children, children exposed to maternal RA had an increased risk of early and late childhood epilepsy (adjusted HRs 1.34 [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.13-1.60] and 1.26 [95% CI 1.13-1.41]), while children exposed to maternal RA had no increased risk of epilepsy in adolescence/adulthood (HR 1...

  4. Oral Metagenomic Biomarkers in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-01

    individuals with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The goal is to test the  hypothesis that oral microbiome and metagenomic analyses will allow  us  to identify new...biomarkers  that are  useful  for the diagnosis of early RA and/or biomarkers that help to predict the efficacy of  specific therapeutic interventions... RNA  microbiome analysis as well as whole genome shotgun sequencing.  Upon completion of these aims, any identified bacterial biomarkers may be

  5. CYCLOSPORINE A IN RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS: CURRENT DATA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Lvovna Luchikhina

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite the advent of the new class of medications, such as gene engineering biologicals, the use of traditional essential anti-inflammatory drugs (EAID remains the most important method of pathogenetic therapy for rheumatoid arthritis (RA. Apart from methotrexate (MT that is the gold standard of treatment for RA, there are a number of other effective EAIDs, including cyclosporine A (CsA, Sandimmun. The review deals with the practical aspects of using CsA in RA. Particular emphasis is laid on the capacities of combined basic therapy with CsA and MT in early RA and on the use of CsA in patients with concomitant chronic viral diseases (including viral hepatitis C.

  6. Think Rheumatoid Arthritis: Causes, Consequences, and Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josef Smolen

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Prof Josef Smolen opened the symposium and briefly described the aims of the meeting. Co-host Prof Constantino Pitzalis first discussed the pathophysiology of rheumatoid arthritis (RA, identifying the pro-inflammatory cytokines involved and explaining why specific drugs only work in certain conditions. Prof Simon Jones followed with a discussion on comorbidities and adverse events associated with interleukin (IL-6 intervention in rheumatic disease. Dr Frank McKenna presented on the psychological impact of RA, including mood changes and development of depressive disorders, and Prof Smolen described the upcoming therapeutic approaches for the condition while also comparing and contrasting existing treatment options. The symposium concluded with a question and answer session.

  7. Is Hearing Impairment Associated with Rheumatoid Arthritis?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Emamifar, Amir; Bjoerndal, Kristine; Jensen Hansen, Inger Marie

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic, inflammatory disease that affects 1% of the population. The auditory system may be involved during the course of disease; however the association of RA and hearing impairment has not been clearly defined. OBJECTIVE: The objective of this review...... is to evaluate published clinical reports related to hearing impairment in patients with RA. Furthermore, we discuss possible pathologies and associated factors as well as new treatment modalities. METHOD: A thorough literature search was performed using available databases including Pubmed, Embase, Cochrane...... and ComDisDome to cover all relative reports. The following keywords were used: hearing loss, hearing difficulties, hearing disorders, hearing impairment, sensorineural hearing loss, conductive hearing loss, mixed hearing loss, autoimmune hearing loss, drug ototoxicity, drug-induced hearing loss, hearing...

  8. Part II. Therapy for rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Viktorovna Demidova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available On 23–25 May 2013, the Karolinska Institute (Stockholm, Sweden with the support of MSD company held a meeting on a Clinical Observational Program for rheumatologists, which was attended by the well-known rheumatologists and leading specialists of the Institute Prof. R. van Vollenhoven, Prof. L. Klareskog, Dr. E. af Klint, and Dr. C. Carlens. The reports and interactive sessions discussed the problems of rheumatoid arthritis (RA, including early RA (pathology, pathogenesis, and treatment, registers of with rheumatic diseases; ultrasound diagnosis of inflammatory locomotor diseases; biological therapy for rheumatic diseases; organization of work in the research immunological laboratory, outpatient/day hospital units of a rheumatology clinic. The Program was also attended by physicians from different European countries (Sweden, Germany, Russia, Spain, Greece, etc.. Below is given an overview of the proceedings of the Clinical Observational Program.

  9. Balneotherapy (or spa therapy) for rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhagen, Arianne P; Bierma-Zeinstra, Sita M A; Boers, Maarten; Cardoso, Jefferson R; Lambeck, Johan; de Bie, Rob; de Vet, Henrica C W

    2015-04-11

    No cure for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is known at present, so treatment often focuses on management of symptoms such as pain, stiffness and mobility. Treatment options include pharmacological interventions, physical therapy treatments and balneotherapy. Balneotherapy is defined as bathing in natural mineral or thermal waters (e.g. mineral baths, sulphur baths, Dead Sea baths), using mudpacks or doing both. Despite its popularity, reported scientific evidence for the effectiveness or efficacy of balneotherapy is sparse. This review, which evaluates the effects of balneotherapy in patients with RA, is an update of a Cochrane review first published in 2003 and updated in 2008. To perform a systematic review on the benefits and harms of balneotherapy in patients with RA in terms of pain, improvement, disability, tender joints, swollen joints and adverse events. We searched the Cochrane 'Rehabilitation and Related Therapies' Field Register (to December 2014), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (2014, Issue 1), MEDLIINE (1950 to December 2014), EMBASE (1988 to December 2014), the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL) (1982 to December 2014), the Allied and Complementary Medicine Database (AMED) (1985 to December 2014), PsycINFO (1806 to December 2014) and the Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro). We applied no language restrictions; however, studies not reported in English, Dutch, Danish, Swedish, Norwegian, German or French are awaiting assessment. We also searched the World Health Organization (WHO) International Clinical Trials Registry Platform for ongoing and recently completed trials. Studies were eligible if they were randomised controlled trials (RCTs) consisting of participants with definitive or classical RA as defined by the American Rheumatism Association (ARA) criteria of 1958, the ARA/American College of Rheumatology (ACR) criteria of 1988 or the ACR/European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) criteria of 2010

  10. The use of D-penicillamine in patients with rheumatoid arthritis undergoing hemodialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthey, F; Perrett, D; Greenwood, R N; Baker, L R

    1986-05-01

    D-penicillamine and its major metabolites cysteine-penicillamine disulphide (CP) and penicillamine disulphide (P2) concentrations were measured in plasma from a hemodialysis patient with rheumatoid arthritis. CP and P2 alone were measured in plasma and a plasma ultrafiltrate from a second patient. On penicillamine 250 mg thrice weekly taken after dialysis pre-dialysis penicillamine concentrations were in the range 5.9-9.9 mumol/l. CP and P2 concentrations remained stable (range 139-197 mumol/l and 10-20 mumol/l) over 5 weeks and were of the same order as previously found in patients with normal renal function on higher doses of the drug. On penicillamine 250 mg daily concentrations of metabolites CP and P2 reach 193 mumol/l and 59.2 mumol/l after 2 and 3 weeks respectively. Concentration of metabolites fell by about half and of penicillamine by about a third after dialysis. Concentration of metabolites in ultrafiltrate were on average 75% lower than in plasma. Penicillamine 250 mg thrice weekly given after dialysis appears to be an appropriate dose for hemodialysis patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

  11. Late onset rheumatoid arthritis an observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rexhepi, Sylejman; Rexhepi, Mjellma; Sahatçiu-Meka, Vjollca; Rexhepi, Blerta; Bahtiri, Elton; Mahmutaj, Vigan

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) may have an onset at older age. The onset of the disease at the age of 60 and over is called late-onset rheumatoid arthritis (LORA). The aim of this study was to analyze the clinical, laboratory, radiological, and treatment characteristics of patients with LORA compared to those with early-onset RA (EaORA), provided that all the patients had an approximately equal duration of the disease. This is an observational single-center study, which involved 120 patients with an established diagnosis of RA, of which 60 patients had LORA, and 60 patients EaORA. The disease activity, measured by the Disease Activity Score 28 (DAS28-ESR), was significantly higher in the LORA group compared to the EaORA group (p0.05), while the number of patients positive for anti-citrullinated protein antibody (ACPA) was signifi cantly greater in the EaORA group (p<0.05). The values of C-reactive protein (CRP) and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) were significantly higher in the LORA than in the EaORA group. Hemoglobin levels were lower in the LORA group (11.96±1.64 g/dL) than in the EaORA group (12.18±1.56 g/dL). The most used disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) were methotrexate and sulfasalazine, while biological drugs were not used. In conclusion, based on the results of our study, LORA has some features that distinguish it from EaORA, such as higher disease activity, more frequent involvement of large joints, and more pronounced structural damage. This should be taken in account in clinical practice, especially regarding treatment choices.

  12. Rheumatoid arthritis in the United Arab Emirates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badsha, Humeira; Kong, Kok Ooi; Tak, Paul P

    2008-06-01

    Studies have shown that patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in the Middle East have delayed diagnosis and low disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drug (DMARD) utilization. We describe the characteristics and treatments of consecutive RA patients presenting to a new musculoskeletal clinic in Dubai, United Arab Emirates (UAE). Demographic and clinical data were collected over a 10-month period at the first visit to our clinic for patients meeting the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) criteria for RA. A total of 100 patients were seen: (average +/- SD) age 42.2 +/- 12.3 years; female 87%; Arabs 38%, Indian 36%, Caucasian and others 26%; 73% rheumatoid-factor positive; years since diagnosis: 3.9 +/- 5.7; lag time between symptom onset to diagnosis 1.2 +/- 1.3 years and lag time to first DMARD was 1.6 +/- 2.0 years. Mean tender joint count was 8.9 +/- 7.9, mean swollen joint count 9.0 +/- 7.6, mean patient's global assessment of disease activity 57.4 +/- 25.0 mm, mean ESR 33 +/- 25 mm/h, mean DAS28 5.2 +/- 1.6, physician global assessment 55.0 +/- 23.8. Only 43% were on DMARDs (25% MTX, 5% TNF blockers). Among the patients who were not on DMARD, only 28.1% had disease duration less than 1 year (p = <0.01). Erosions were present in 55.2% of patients with available X-rays, and deformities in 26% of patients. There were no racial differences in disease characteristics. The UAE has a unique population with many races residing in the country. Among the first 100 consecutive patients seen at our clinic, there were no significant differences in disease characteristics with the majority of the patients having very active disease, delayed diagnosis, and not being treated with DMARDs.

  13. Ghrelin gene polymorphisms in rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozgen, Metin; Koca, Suleyman Serdar; Etem, Ebru Onalan; Yuce, Huseyin; Aydin, Suleyman; Isik, Ahmet

    2011-07-01

    Ghrelin, an endogenous orexigenic peptide, has anti-inflammatory effects, down-regulates pro-inflammatory cytokines, and its altered levels are reported in various inflammatory diseases. The human preproghrelin (ghrelin/obestatin) gene shows several single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) including Arg51Gln, Leu72Met, Gln90Leu, and A-501C. The aim of this study was to investigate the frequency, and clinical significance, of these four SNPs in a small cohort of Turkish patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The study included 103 patients with RA and 103 healthy controls. In the RA group, disease activity and disease-related damage were assessed using the Disease Activity Score-28 (DAS-28), and the modified Larsen scoring (MLS) methods. In all the participants, genomic DNA was isolated and genotyped by polymerase chain reaction and restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis. The frequencies of ghrelin gene SNPs were 82.5 and 79.6% in the RA and control groups, respectively, and there were no significant differences in terms of genotype distributions and allele frequencies for these four SNPs between the groups. However, the A-501C SNP was found to be associated with early disease onset, and Gln90Leu SNP with less frequent rheumatoid factor positivity, in the RA group. A-501C SNP is associated with earlier onset of RA suggesting that genetic variations in the ghrelin gene may have an impact on RA. Copyright © 2010 Société française de rhumatologie. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Iodine-131 uptake in a patient with thyroid cancer and rheumatoid arthritis during acupuncture treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otsuka, N.; Fukunaga, M.; Morita, K.; Ono, S.; Nagai, K.; Katagiri, M.; Harada, T.; Morita, R.

    1990-01-01

    A patient with thyroid carcinoma had abnormal accumulation of I-131 in the areas of both feet and hands on whole body scan. The sites of abnormal accumulation of I-131 were similar to those on bone scintigraphy. The radiographic examination of the lesions showed characteristic findings of rheumatoid arthritis, and the presence of small gold needles for acupuncture treatment was demonstrated. There were no findings of bone metastases. Although the mechanism of accumulation of I-131 in this patient is unknown, interpreters of I-131 whole body scintigraphs should keep this case in mind when acupuncture treatment has been done. The authors can only speculate on a common blood flow mechanism for enhanced HMDP and I-131 uptake in this arthritic patient who had been treated by acupuncture

  15. Iodine-131 uptake in a patient with thyroid cancer and rheumatoid arthritis during acupuncture treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Otsuka, N.; Fukunaga, M.; Morita, K.; Ono, S.; Nagai, K.; Katagiri, M.; Harada, T.; Morita, R. (Kawasaki Medical School, Okayama (Japan))

    1990-01-01

    A patient with thyroid carcinoma had abnormal accumulation of I-131 in the areas of both feet and hands on whole body scan. The sites of abnormal accumulation of I-131 were similar to those on bone scintigraphy. The radiographic examination of the lesions showed characteristic findings of rheumatoid arthritis, and the presence of small gold needles for acupuncture treatment was demonstrated. There were no findings of bone metastases. Although the mechanism of accumulation of I-131 in this patient is unknown, interpreters of I-131 whole body scintigraphs should keep this case in mind when acupuncture treatment has been done. The authors can only speculate on a common blood flow mechanism for enhanced HMDP and I-131 uptake in this arthritic patient who had been treated by acupuncture.

  16. In pursuit of our ancestors' hand laterality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bargalló, Amèlia; Mosquera, Marina; Lozano, Sergi

    2017-10-01

    The aim of this paper is to apply a previously published method (Bargalló and Mosquera, 2014) to the archaeological record, allowing us to identify the hand laterality of our ancestors and determine when and how this feature, which is exhibited most strongly in humans, appeared in our evolutionary history. The method focuses on identifying handedness by looking at the technical features of the flakes produced by a single knapper, and discovering how many flakes are required to ascertain their hand preference. This method can potentially be applied to the majority of archaeological sites, since flakes are the most abundant stone tools, and stone tools are the most widespread and widely-preserved remains from prehistory. For our study, we selected two Spanish sites: Gran Dolina-TD10.1 (Atapuerca) and Abric Romaní (Barcelona), which were occupied by pre-Neanderthal and Neanderthal populations, respectively. Our analyses indicate that a minimum number of eight flakes produced by the same knapper is required to ascertain their hand preference. Even though this figure is relatively low, it is quite difficult to obtain from many archaeological sites. In addition, there is no single technical feature that provides information about handedness, instead there is a combination of eight technical features, localised on the striking platforms and ventral surfaces. The raw material is not relevant where good quality rocks are used, in this case quartzite and flint, since most of them retain the technical features required for the analysis. Expertise is not an issue either, since the technical features analysed here only correlate with handedness (Bargalló and Mosquera, 2014). Our results allow us to tentatively identify one right-handed knapper among the pre-Neanderthals of level TD10.1 at Gran Dolina (Atapuerca), while four of the five Neanderthals analysed from Abric Romaní were right-handed. The hand preference of the fifth knapper from that location (AR5) remains unclear

  17. Robotically enhanced rubber hand illusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arata, Jumpei; Hattori, Masashi; Ichikawa, Shohei; Sakaguchi, Masamichi

    2014-01-01

    The rubber hand illusion is a well-known multisensory illusion. In brief, watching a rubber hand being stroked by a paintbrush while one's own unseen hand is synchronously stroked causes the rubber hand to be attributed to one's own body and to "feel like it's my hand." The rubber hand illusion is thought to be triggered by the synchronized tactile stimulation of both the subject's hand and the fake hand. To extend the conventional rubber hand illusion, we introduce robotic technology in the form of a master-slave telemanipulator. The developed one degree-of-freedom master-slave system consists of an exoskeleton master equipped with an optical encoder that is worn on the subject's index finger and a motor-actuated index finger on the rubber hand, which allows the subject to perform unilateral telemanipulation. The moving rubber hand illusion has been studied by several researchers in the past with mechanically connected rigs between the subject's body and the fake limb. The robotic instruments let us investigate the moving rubber hand illusion with less constraints, thus behaving closer to the classic rubber hand illusion. In addition, the temporal delay between the body and the fake limb can be precisely manipulated. The experimental results revealed that the robotic instruments significantly enhance the rubber hand illusion. The time delay is significantly correlated with the effect of the multisensory illusion, and the effect significantly decreased at time delays over 100 ms. These findings can potentially contribute to the investigations of neural mechanisms in the field of neuroscience and of master-slave systems in the field of robotics.

  18. B lymphocyte autoimmunity in rheumatoid synovitis is independent of ectopic lymphoid neogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cantaert, Tineke; Kolln, Johanna; Timmer, Trieneke; van der Pouw Kraan, Tineke C.; Vandooren, Bernard; Thurlings, Rogier M.; Cañete, Juan D.; Catrina, Anca I.; Out, Theo; Verweij, Cor L.; Zhang, Yiping; Tak, Paul P.; Baeten, Dominique

    2008-01-01

    B lymphocyte autoimmunity plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis. The local production of autoantibodies and the presence of ectopic lymphoid neogenesis in the rheumatoid synovium suggest that these dedicated microenvironments resembling canonical lymphoid follicles may

  19. Hypoxia-Inducible Factor-1 as Regulator of Angiogenesis in Rheumatoid Arthritis - Therapeutic Implications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westra, J.; Molema, G.; Kallenberg, C. G. M.

    Angiogenesis plays an important role in the pathogenesis of inflammatory diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis ( RA). The site and extent of inflammation and subsequent joint destruction in the rheumatoid synovium is dependent on the development of new vasculature. Inhibition of angiogenesis,

  20. Hand-related physical function in rheumatic hand conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klokker, Louise; Terwee, Caroline; Wæhrens, Eva Elisabet Ejlersen

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: There is no consensus about what constitutes the most appropriate patient-reported outcome measurement (PROM) instrument for measuring physical function in patients with rheumatic hand conditions. Existing instruments lack psychometric testing and vary in feasibility...... and their psychometric qualities. We aim to develop a PROM instrument to assess hand-related physical function in rheumatic hand conditions. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: We will perform a systematic search to identify existing PROMs to rheumatic hand conditions, and select items relevant for hand-related physical function...... as well as those items from the Patient Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) Physical Function (PF) item bank that are relevant to patients with rheumatic hand conditions. Selection will be based on consensus among reviewers. Content validity of selected items will be established...

  1. Hand-related physical function in rheumatic hand conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klokker, Louise; Terwee, Caroline B; Wæhrens, Eva Ejlersen

    2016-01-01

    as well as those items from the Patient Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) Physical Function (PF) item bank that are relevant to patients with rheumatic hand conditions. Selection will be based on consensus among reviewers. Content validity of selected items will be established......INTRODUCTION: There is no consensus about what constitutes the most appropriate patient-reported outcome measurement (PROM) instrument for measuring physical function in patients with rheumatic hand conditions. Existing instruments lack psychometric testing and vary in feasibility...... and their psychometric qualities. We aim to develop a PROM instrument to assess hand-related physical function in rheumatic hand conditions. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: We will perform a systematic search to identify existing PROMs to rheumatic hand conditions, and select items relevant for hand-related physical function...

  2. A multifaceted hospital-wide intervention increases hand hygiene compliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, B; Engelbrecht, H; McDonald, H; Morris, V; Smythe, W

    2016-03-07

    Hand hygiene is an important and basic practice that should be used by all healthcare staff to protect both themselves and their patients against infection. Unfortunately hand hygiene compliance remains poor. To show an improvement in hand hygiene compliance using a multifaceted approach. This was a quasiexperimental pre-post intervention study design with a number of standardised interventions to promote hand hygiene. The World Health Organization hand hygiene multimodal (five-step) intervention approach was used. The study ran from June 2015 to August 2015 in 11 selected wards of a 975-bed tertiary and quaternary care public hospital (Groote Schuur Hospital, Cape Town, South Africa). The outcome was to assess improvement in hand hygiene compliance monthly over the 3 months, compared with non-intervention wards and compared with the wards' own performance measured in 2014. The study included both descriptive and analytical components. Post intervention, hand hygiene compliance showed a statistically significant improvement for before patient contact from 34% in 2014 to 76% in 2015 (p<0.05) and for after patient contact from 47% in 2014 to 82% in 2015 (p<0.05). The intervention improved hand hygiene compliance and can easily be replicated in other wards, resulting in sustaining a culture of hand hygiene improvement and behavioural change throughout the hospital.

  3. HENRY'S "HAND OF GOD"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Željko Kaluđerović

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the author discusses the views and statements of the French football player Thierry Henry he gave after his illegal play during the playoff match between France and the Republic of Ireland to claim one of the final spots in the World Cup 2010 in South Africa. First, by controlling the ball with his hand before passing it on for the goal Henry has shown disregard for the constitutive rules of football. Then, by stating that he is "not a referee" he demonstrated that for some players rules are not inherent to football and that they can be relativized, given that for them winning is the goal of the highest ontological status. Furthermore, he has rejected the rules of sportsmanship, thus expressing his opinion that the opponents are just obstacles which have to be removed in order to achieve your goals. Henry's action has disrupted major moral values, such as justice, honesty, responsibility and beneficence. The rules of fair play have totally been ignored both in Henry's action and in the Football Association of France's unwillingness to comment on whether a replay should take place. They have ignored one of the basic principles stated in the "Declaration of the International Fair Play Committee", according to which, fair play is much more than playing to the rules of the game; it's about the attitude of the sportsperson. It's about respecting your opponent and preserving his or her physical and psychological integrity. Finally, the author believes that the rules, moral values and fair play in football are required for this game to become actually possible to play

  4. HENRY'S "HAND OF GOD"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Željko Kaluđerović

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the author discusses the views and statements of the French football player Thierry Henry he gave after his illegal play during the playoff match between France and the Republic of Ireland to claim one of the final spots in the World Cup 2010 in South Africa. First, by controlling the ball with his hand before passing it on for the goal Henry has shown disregard for the constitutive rules of football. Then, by stating that he is "not a referee" he demonstrated that for some players rules are not inherent to football and that they can be relativized, given that for them winning is the goal of the highest ontological status. Furthermore, he has rejected the rules of sportsmanship, thus expressing his opinion that the opponents are just obstacles which have to be removed in order to achieve your goals. Henry's action has disrupted major moral values, such as justice, honesty, responsibility and beneficence. The rules of fair play have totally been ignored both in Henry's action and in the Football Association of France's unwillingness to comment on whether a replay should take place. They have ignored one of the basic principles stated in the "Declaration of the International Fair Play Committee", according to which, fair play is much more than playing to the rules of the game; it's about the attitude of the sportsperson. It's about respecting your opponent and preserving his or her physical and psychological integrity. Finally, the author believes that the rules, moral values and fair play in football are required for this game to become actually possible to play.

  5. Pattern of Young and Old Onset Rheumatoid Arthritis  (YORA and EORA Among a Group of Egyptian Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdou S. El-Labban

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Rheumatoid arthritis (RA differs depending on the age of disease onset. The differences between EORA and YORA are important because they have clinical and therapeutic implications. Method: 1185 patients were ranked after classification according to age at onset of the disease into YORA I (16–40 years, YORA II (41–60 years and EORA .60 years. All patients groups were compared, based on disease duration, disease activity, severity parameters and drug history. Results: YORA I included 298 patients, 28.85% were males, with mean age of 29.4 ± 6 years and disease duration 4 ± 3.3 y, YORA II included 539 patients, 33.77% males, age 49.7 ± 6.1 y and disease duration 6.5 ± 5.6 y. EORA included 348 RA patients 40.5% males, age 67.1 ± 6.6 y, disease duration 9.95 ± 7.2 y. Activity was increased in EORA compared to YORA I and YORA II, while severity decreased in EORA. ESR, CRP and degree of anemia were higher in EORA. RF titer was higher in YORA. Small joints of the hands and feet were more involved in YORA, while, large joints in EORA. Rheumatoid nodules were increased in YORA I than EORA P = 0.04. Polymyalgia rheumatica was exclusively present in EORA group 25 patients 7.2%. Methotrexate was used in both YORA and EORA, with a higher mean of dosage in YORA than EORA. Multiple DMARDs in EORA was 57.9%, and biologics in 0.8% was which was significantly lower compared with YORA I, 86.3% and 1.7%, with P = 0.001. Conclusion: EORA has more active and less disabling and affects more males than YORA. The use of biologic therapy and combination DMARD therapy was less in EORA.

  6. The role of anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies in predicting rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rexhepi, Sylejman; Rexhepi, Mjellma; Sahatçiu-Meka, Vjollca; Tafaj, Argjend; Izairi, Remzi; Rexhepi, Blerta

    2011-01-01

    The study presents the results of predicting role of anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies in rheumatoid arthritis, compared to rheumatoid factor. 32 patients with rheumatoid arthritis were identified from a retrospective chart review. The results of our study show that presence of the rheumatoid factor has less diagnostic and prognostic significance than the anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide, and suggests its superiority in predicting an erosive disease course.

  7. Negative interference by rheumatoid factor in alpha-fetoprotein chemiluminescent microparticle immunoassay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui; Bi, Xiaohui; Xu, Lei; Li, Yirong

    2017-01-01

    Background Rheumatoid factor causes positive interference in multiple immunoassays. Recently, negative interference has also been found in immunoassays in the presence of rheumatoid factor. The chemiluminescent microparticle immunoassay is widely used to determine serum alpha-fetoprotein. However, it is not clear whether the presence of rheumatoid factor in the serum causes interference in the chemiluminescent microparticle immunoassay of alpha-fetoprotein. Methods Serum alpha-fetoprotein was determined using the ARCHITECT alpha-fetoprotein assay. The estimation of alpha-fetoprotein recovery was carried out in samples prepared by diluting high-concentration alpha-fetoprotein serum with rheumatoid factor-positive or rheumatoid factor-negative serum. Paramagnetic microparticles coated with hepatitis B surface antigen-anti-HBs complexes were used to remove rheumatoid factor from the serum. Results The average recovery of alpha-fetoprotein was 88.4% and 93.8% in the rheumatoid factor-positive and rheumatoid factor-negative serum samples, respectively. The recovery of alpha-fetoprotein was significantly lower in the rheumatoid factor-positive serum samples than in the rheumatoid factor-negative serum samples. In two of five rheumatoid factor-positive samples, a large difference was found (9.8%) between the average alpha-fetoprotein recoveries in the serially diluted and initial recoveries. Fourteen rheumatoid factor-positive serum samples were pretreated with hepatitis B surface antigen-anti-HBs complex-coated paramagnetic microparticles. The alpha-fetoprotein concentrations measured in the pretreated samples increased significantly. Conclusions It was concluded that the alpha-fetoprotein chemiluminescent microparticle immunoassay is susceptible to interference by rheumatoid factor, leading to significantly lower results. Eliminating the incidence of negative interference from rheumatoid factor should be an important goal for immunoassay providers. In the meantime

  8. 99m-Tc HMDP bone scintigraphic findings of gouty arthropathy of both hands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shih, Wei-Jen; Domstad, P.A.; Purcell, M.; DeLand, F.H.

    1988-01-01

    The 99m Tc hydroxy methylene diphosphonate scintigraphic findings of both hands are correlated to the radiographic findings in a patient with a 30-year history of gouty arthropathy. Scintigraphic differentiation of the type of arthritis on the basis of uptake pattern is difficult. However, the findings of rheumatoid arthritis are confined to the joints and usually the involvement is symmetrical. With gout there is a tendency toward asymmetrical, bilateral, multifocal joint involvement with areas of intense abnormal uptake; because of the associated soft tissue swelling, the intense uptake usually extends beyond the involved joints. (author)

  9. Measurement of hand bone mineral content using single-photon absorptiometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicoll, J.J.; Smith, M.A.; Law, E.; Tothill, P.; Reid, D.; Brown, N.; Nuki, G.

    1987-01-01

    A single photon absorption imaging technique has been developed to assess the bone mass of the hand, especially in patients with rheumatoid arthritis or bronchial asthma. A modified rectilinear scanner images the hand by transmission scanning in a water bath with a 7.4 GBq 125 I source. A microcomputer is used to calculate the bone mineral distribution, and the total bone mineral content (BMC) of the hand is determined from that distribution. The precision (coefficient of variation) of the measurement is 1.9%. A control population of 20 men and 58 women has been studied to determine normal variations in hand bone mineral content with age, sex, body size, hand volume and years since menopause. The normal men are found to have an average hand BMC of 25.1 g with a coefficient of variation (CV) of 22%, which is reduced to 12% by normalising for body size using span. The normal women had an average hand BMC of 18.0 g +- 15%. The CV is reduced to 13% by normalising for span and years post-menopause. (author)

  10. The visualization of pannus in rheumatoid arthritis using NMR imaging. Pannusdarstellung bei rheumatoider Arthritis mittels Kernspintomographie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schnarkowski, P. (Abt. fuer Roentgendiagnostik, Klinikum der Univ. Ulm (Germany)); Bader, C. (Abt. fuer Roentgendiagnostik, Klinikum der Univ. Ulm (Germany)); Goldmann, A. (Abt. fuer Roentgendiagnostik, Klinikum der Univ. Ulm (Germany)); Friedrich, J.M. (Abt. fuer Roentgendiagnostik, Klinikum der Univ. Ulm (Germany))

    1992-12-01

    The knee joints of 15 patients afflicted with rheumatoid arthritis were investigated using the method of nmr imaging. Parameters of investigation were the spin-echo and fast-field-echo sequences as well as the MR signal behaviour of proliferative synovial changes following intravenous administration of gadolinium dtpa. Pannus having formed on the articular surfaces or beneath the articular cartilages was distinguishable from other changes on the basis of the increased signal intensities to be observed after gadolinium dtpa had been given. (orig./GD)

  11. Prediking aan die hand van die metafoor van fiksieskryf

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    p1243322

    HTS 64(3) 2008 siening van die self en waarheid. In die pre-moderne paradigma kan die dominante metafoor verstaan word aan die hand van 'n spieël wat die lig uit 'n transendente oorsprong weerkaats, terwyl die moderne paradigma uitgedruk word met die metafoor van 'n lamp wat 'n eie, oorspronklike lig binne die self.

  12. Multi-fingered robotic hand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruoff, Carl F. (Inventor); Salisbury, Kenneth, Jr. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A robotic hand is presented having a plurality of fingers, each having a plurality of joints pivotally connected one to the other. Actuators are connected at one end to an actuating and control mechanism mounted remotely from the hand and at the other end to the joints of the fingers for manipulating the fingers and passing externally of the robot manipulating arm in between the hand and the actuating and control mechanism. The fingers include pulleys to route the actuators within the fingers. Cable tension sensing structure mounted on a portion of the hand are disclosed, as is covering of the tip of each finger with a resilient and pliable friction enhancing surface.

  13. EULAR recommendations for terminology and research in individuals at risk of rheumatoid arthritis: report from the Study Group for Risk Factors for Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerlag, Danielle M; Raza, Karim; van Baarsen, Lisa G M; Brouwer, Elisabeth; Buckley, Christopher D; Burmester, Gerd R; Gabay, Cem; Catrina, Anca I; Cope, Andrew P; Cornelis, François; Dahlqvist, Solbritt Rantapää; Emery, Paul; Eyre, Stephen; Finckh, Axel; Gay, Steffen; Hazes, Johanna M; van der Helm-van Mil, Annette; Huizinga, Tom W J; Klareskog, Lars; Kvien, Tore K; Lewis, Cathryn; Machold, Klaus P; Rönnelid, Johan; van Schaardenburg, Dirkjan; Schett, Georg; Smolen, Josef S; Thomas, Sue; Worthington, Jane; Tak, Paul P

    2012-01-01

    The Study Group for Risk Factors for Rheumatoid Arthritis was established by the EULAR Standing Committee on Investigative Rheumatology to facilitate research into the preclinical and earliest clinically apparent phases of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). This report describes the recommendation for terminology to be used to define specific subgroups during different phases of disease, and defines the priorities for research in this area. Terminology was discussed by way of a three-stage structured process: A provisional list of descriptors for each of the possible phases preceding the diagnosis of RA were circulated to members of the study group for review and feedback. Anonymised comments from the members on this list were fed back to participants before a 2-day meeting. 18 participants met to discuss these data, agree terminologies and prioritise important research questions. The study group recommended that, in prospective studies, individuals without RA are described as having: genetic risk factors for RA; environmental risk factors for RA; systemic autoimmunity associated with RA; symptoms without clinical arthritis; unclassified arthritis; which may be used in a combinatorial manner. It was recommended that the prefix ‘pre-RA with:’ could be used before any/any combination of the five points above but only to describe retrospectively a phase that an individual had progressed through once it was known that they have developed RA. An approach to dating disease onset was recommended. In addition, important areas for research were proposed, including research of other tissues in which an adaptive immune response may be initiated, and the identification of additional risk factors and biomarkers for the development of RA, its progression and the development of extra-articular features. These recommendations provide guidance on approaches to describe phases before the development of RA that will facilitate communication between researchers and comparisons between

  14. Total knee replacement with tibial tubercle osteotomy in rheumatoid patients with stiff knee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eid, Ahmed Salem; Nassar, Wael Ahmed Mohamed; Fayyad, Tamer Abdelmeguid Mohamed

    2016-11-01

    Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is a well-proven modality that can provide pain relief and restore mobility for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients with advanced joint destruction. Patellar ligament avulsion, especially in presence of poor bone quality and knee stiffness, is one of the special considerations that must be addressed in this unique population of patients. This study aimed to determine the functional results in a series of rheumatoid patients with stiff knee and end-stage joint destruction who underwent tibial tubercle osteotomy during TKA. Twenty-three knees in 20 patients (16 women; four men) at a mean age of 54 years with end-stage arthritis and knee stiffness due to RA were operated upon for TKA using tibial tubercle osteotomy as a step during the operation. Patients were reviewed clinically and radiographically with a minimum follow-up of two years. Complications were noted. Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS) score was recorded pre-operatively and at six and 12 months postoperatively. Union occurred at the osteotomy site in 21 of 23 cases. One case had deep venous thrombosis (DVT). There was no infection or periprosthetic fracture, and at last follow-up, no patient required revision. HSS score improved from 46 (15-60) pre-operatively to 85 (71-96) post-operatively. Tibial tubercle osteotomy during TKA in patients with RA and stiff knee is technically demanding yet proved to be effective in improving post-operative range of movement and minimising the complication of patellar ligament avulsion.

  15. The human hand as an inspiration for robot hand development

    CERN Document Server

    Santos, Veronica

    2014-01-01

    “The Human Hand as an Inspiration for Robot Hand Development” presents an edited collection of authoritative contributions in the area of robot hands. The results described in the volume are expected to lead to more robust, dependable, and inexpensive distributed systems such as those endowed with complex and advanced sensing, actuation, computation, and communication capabilities. The twenty-four chapters discuss the field of robotic grasping and manipulation viewed in light of the human hand’s capabilities and push the state-of-the-art in robot hand design and control. Topics discussed include human hand biomechanics, neural control, sensory feedback and perception, and robotic grasp and manipulation. This book will be useful for researchers from diverse areas such as robotics, biomechanics, neuroscience, and anthropologists.

  16. Roentgenographic study of the temporomandibular joint in rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yun, Ho Jung; You, Dong Soo

    1984-01-01

    For the study of the temporomandibular joint in rheumatoid arthritis 30 patients were selected who were diagnosis as rheumatoid arthritis through the clinical, radiographic examination and laboratory finding. Temporoman dibular joint involvement was evaluated through the clinical, radiographic examination. The results were as follows; 1. TMJ was involved in 15 patients of 30 patients with rheumatoid arthritis. (50% involvement). 2. Duration of rheumatoid arthritis was more longer in patients with TMJ involvement than in patients without TMJ involvement. 3. Osseous changes in TMJ were in order of frequency erosion, flattening, osteophyte, sclerosis, deformity, and most common involved site was mandibular condyle. 4. Most common positional change of condyle was forward position in centric occlusion, and restricted movement of condyle in 1 inch mouth opening. 5. TMJ involvement of rheumatoid arthritis was almost bilateral. 6. Main symptoms of TMJ were pain, stiffness, tenderness, limitation of mouth opening, crepitation. 7. There was not the case of ankylosis. 8. There was statistically insignificant correlation between mandibular deviation and TMJ involvement, but some cases showed severe deviation on mouth opening.

  17. Digital tomosynthesis of hand joints for arthritis assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duryea, J.; Dobbins, J.T. III; Lynch, J.A.

    2003-01-01

    The two principal forms of hand arthritis, rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and osteoarthritis (OA) have large clinical and economic costs. Radiography has been shown to be a useful tool to assess the condition of the disease. A hand radiograph, however, is a two-dimensional projection of a three-dimensional object. In this report we present the results of a study that applied digital tomosynthesis to hand radiography in order to extract three-dimensional outcome measures that should be more sensitive to arthritis progression. The study was performed using simulated projection radiographs created using micro computed tomography (μCT) and a set of five dry-bone hand skeletons. These simulated projection images were then reconstructed into tomographic slices using the matrix inversion tomosynthesis (MITS) algorithm. The accuracy of the tomosynthesis reconstruction was evaluated by comparing the reconstructed images to a gold standard created using the μCT data. A parameter from image registration science, normalized mutual information, provided a quantifiable figure of merit. This study examined the effects of source displacement, number of reconstructed planes, number of acquisitions, noise added to the gray scale images, and errors in the location of a fiducial marker. We also optimized the reconstruction as a function of two variables k and α, that controlled the mixing of MITS with conventional shift-and-add tomosynthesis. A study using hand delineated joint margins demonstrated that MITS images provided a better measurement of average joint space width. We found good agreement between the MITS slices and the true planes. Both joint margins and trabecular structure were visible and the reconstructed slices showed additional structures not visible with the standard projection image. Using hand-delineated joint margins we compared the average joint space width of the gold standard slices to the MITS and projection images. A root-mean square deviation (RMSD), calculated

  18. Giant lipomas of the hand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gokce Yildiran

    2015-04-01

    Conclusion: Giant lipomas of the hand are very rare and may cause compressions and other complications. Thus, they require a careful preoperative evaluation in order to make a proper differential diagnosis. [Hand Microsurg 2015; 4(1.000: 8-11

  19. Canadian hand dermatitis management guidelines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lynde, Charles; Guenther, Lyn; Diepgen, Thomas L

    2010-01-01

    Hand dermatitis (HD) is one of the most common skin conditions; however, it is not a homogeneous disease entity. The severity of HD may range from very mild cases to severe chronic forms, which may result in prolonged disability and, occasionally, refractory HD. Chronic hand dermatitis (CHD...

  20. Hand, Foot, and Mouth Disease

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    Hand, foot, and mouth disease is a contagious illness that mainly affects children under five. In this podcast, Dr. Eileen Schneider talks about the symptoms of hand, foot, and mouth disease, how it spreads, and ways to help protect yourself and your children from getting infected with the virus.

  1. Lymphoid irradiation in intractable rheumatoid arthritis: effects on the production of immunoglobulins and rheumatoid factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanly, J.G.; Bresnihan, B.; Hassan, J.; Whelan, A.; Feighery, C.; Moriarty, M.

    1985-01-01

    Changes in the production of immunoglobulins and rheumatoid factors (RF's) were studied in 20 patients with intractable rheumatoid arthritis (RA) following total doses of 750 rad or 2,000 rad lymphoid irradiation. Over a 12 month follow up period there was no consistent change in absolute serum or synovial fluid levels, or in synovial membrane production of either total IgG, IgA or IgM, or the corresponding RF fractions. The in-vitro production of immunoglobulins and IgM RF by peripheral blood mononuclear cells was also unaltered, except for one patient who had a dramatic rise in IgM RF production. Over the same period there was a significant overall reduction in disease activity following both doses of radiotherapy. It is concluded that the clinical response which occurs following lymphoid irradiation is not due to a reduction in RF production. Furthermore, the production of RF's appears to be unaffected by the changes in T cell immunity which occur following lymphoid irradiation. (author)

  2. Effect of hand sanitizer location on hand hygiene compliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cure, Laila; Van Enk, Richard

    2015-09-01

    Hand hygiene is the most important intervention to prevent infection in hospitals. Health care workers should clean their hands at least before and after contact with patients. Hand sanitizer dispensers are important to support hand hygiene because they can be made available throughout hospital units. The aim of this study was to determine whether the usability of sanitizer dispensers correlates with compliance of staff in using the sanitizer in a hospital. This study took place in a Midwest, 404-bed, private, nonprofit community hospital with 15 inpatient care units in addition to several ambulatory units. The usability and standardization of sanitizers in 12 participating inpatient units were evaluated. The hospital measured compliance of staff with hand hygiene as part of their quality improvement program. Data from 2010-2012 were analyzed to measure the relationship between compliance and usability using mixed-effects logistic regression models. The total usability score (P = .0046), visibility (P = .003), and accessibility of the sanitizer on entrance to the patient room (P = .00055) were statistically associated with higher observed compliance rates. Standardization alone showed no significant impact on observed compliance (P = .37). Hand hygiene compliance can be influenced by visibility and accessibility of dispensers. The sanitizer location should be part of multifaceted interventions to improve hand hygiene. Copyright © 2015 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Rheumatoid nodule of the foot: MRI appearances mimicking an indeterminate soft tissue mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanders, T.G.; Linares, R.; Su, A.

    1998-01-01

    Subcutaneous rheumatoid nodules occur commonly in advanced cases of rheumatoid arthritis, but only rarely appear in the feet. We present a case of a subcutaneous rheumatoid nodule arising in the heel pad of a 68-year-old man with a long history of rheumatoid arthritis, along with a review of the literature. The appearance of the mass on MRI is illustrated and correlated with the histologic findings. The MRI appearance of a subcutaneous rheumatoid nodule is that of a nonspecific ill-defined mass with long T1- and long T2-relaxation times. A differential diagnosis for similar appearing masses is offered. (orig.)

  4. Epstein-Barr virus and rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balandraud, Nathalie; Roudier, Jean

    2018-03-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is one of the most common autoimmune diseases, with a 0.5% worldwide prevalence. The cause of RA remains unknown, however both genetic and environmental factors may contribute to its development. Among these is the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). Here, we discuss several aspects of the close relationship between EBV and RA. Patients with RA have impaired control of EBV infection. Indeed, they have high titres of antibodies against EBV antigens. Their peripheral blood T lymphocytes are less efficient at controlling the outgrowth of EBV-infected B cells. RA patients have more EBV-infected B cells than normal controls, leading to a 10-fold systemic EBV overload. Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLPD) is a polyclonal EBV-positive B lymphocyte proliferation, which can evolve into an EBV-positive B cell lymphoma. RA patients also have an increased risk of developing EBV-associated lymphoproliferative disorder (LPD). Hence the need to monitor EBV load when treating RA patients with immunosuppressors. EBV, a widespread virus, highly recognized by antibodies but never eliminated, is an ideal candidate to trigger chronic immune complex disease. Anti-EBV antibody responses should be considered as one of the chronic autoantibody responses linked to the development of RA, in the same way as anti-citrullinated protein antibodies. Copyright © 2017 Société française de rhumatologie. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. [Rheumatoid arthritis as a connective tissue disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Targońska-Stępniak, Bożena

    2018-01-01

    The available data indicate that seropositive rheumatoid arthritis (RA) develops as a result of systemic, autoimmune reaction directed against a range of "self" peptides/proteins that have undergone specific forms of post-translational modification. The development and progress of autoimmunity may be triggered by non-specific, local inflammatory processes outside the joints, for example in the oral or respiratory mucous membrane. The disease occurs in genetically susceptible individuals under the influence of environmental risk factors that promote autoimmunity and consequently the inflammatory process. Smoking is particularly linked with RA pathogenesis. Synovitis of multiple, symmetrical, peripheral joints is the most typical feature of RA which results in irreversible damage to joints structure and as a consequence in disability of patients. However, the inflammatory process in the course of RA has a systemic, constitutional nature. Therefore, extra-articular symptoms with internal organ involvement may occur additionally to synovitis, what is an unfavorable prognostic factor. Extra-articular manifestations of RA are associated with the high disease activity both inflammatory and immunological. They occur in patients with severe form of the disease and contribute to a significant lifespan reduction. This is usually associated with progressive atherosclerosis and cardiovascular complications. The systemic inhibition of an abnormal immune system activity is the mainstay of the effective RA treatment. The currently used disease modifying antirheumatic drugs affect the activity and function of different constituents of the immune system, including B and T lymphocytes and the main pro-inflammatory cytokines, and contribute to autoimmune and inflammatory processes.

  6. Abatacept in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posadas, Augusto; Lisse, Jeffrey; Sarkar, Sujata

    2009-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory arthritis affecting 1% of the population. The immunologic dysfunction underlying this immune disorder is complex and intricate with the involvement of various immune cells as well as cytokines and surface molecules. While inhibition of TNF-alpha has changed the outlook of patients with this disorder, it regulates only one aspect of the inflammatory cascade associated with RA. This is corroborated by experience in the clinic, where a significant proportion of the patients do not have clinical benefit with such therapies. Furthermore, a number of patients experience blunting of the initial therapeutic benefits of TNF-alpha-targeted therapies. Thus, a different approach to regulate the immune dysfunction associated with RA is necessary. T cells are considered important in the pathogenesis of RA and abatacept, a fusion protein, was developed to abolish the activation of the T cell by blocking its interaction with the antigen-presenting cell. Abatacept has demonstrated promising clinical improvements in patients with RA. Although clinical experience with this new drug is limited and its mechanism of action remains to be understood, the data on the safety profile are reassuring.

  7. Genetics and epigenetics of rheumatoid arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viatte, Sebastien; Plant, Darren; Raychaudhuri, Soumya

    2013-01-01

    Investigators have made key advances in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) genetics in the past 10 years. Although genetic studies have had limited influence on clinical practice and drug discovery, they are currently generating testable hypotheses to explain disease pathogenesis. Firstly, we review here the major advances in identifying RA genetic susceptibility markers both within and outside of the MHC. Understanding how genetic variants translate into pathogenic mechanisms and ultimately into phenotypes remains a mystery for most of the polymorphisms that confer susceptibility to RA, but functional data are emerging. Interplay between environmental and genetic factors is poorly understood and in need of further investigation. Secondly, we review current knowledge of the role of epigenetics in RA susceptibility. Differences in the epigenome could represent one of the ways in which environmental exposures translate into phenotypic outcomes. The best understood epigenetic phenomena include post-translational histone modifications and DNA methylation events, both of which have critical roles in gene regulation. Epigenetic studies in RA represent a new area of research with the potential to answer unsolved questions. PMID:23381558

  8. PERIOPERATIVE MANAGEMENT OF PATIENTS WITH RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. N. Amirdzhanova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers the joint management of rheumatoid arthritis patients needing endoprosthetic replacement of the large joints of the lower extremities by rheumatologists and orthopedic traumatologists.Due to the fact that there are no conventional standards or guidelines for the perioperative management of patients with rheumatic diseases, adopted by international rheumatology associations, the authors generalize their experience in managing the patients in terms of international approaches and guidelines from different countries. The medical assessment and reduction of cardiovascular risks, the prevention of infectious complications, hemorrhages, and lower extremity deep vein thrombosis, and the specific features of management of patients with osteoporosis are under consideration. The authors' experience in managing the patients receiving antirheumatic therapy with nonsteroidal antiinflammatory and disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs, such as methotrexate, leflunomide, sulfasalazine, and hydroxychloroquine, is detailed. Recommendations for managing patients taking glucocorticoids and biologic agents (tumor necrosis factor-α inhibitors, anti-B-cell therapy, and interleukin-6 receptor inhibitors in the preoperative andpostoperative periods are given.

  9. New agents for scintigraphy in rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bois, M.H.W. de; Pauwels, E.K.J.; Breedveld, F.C.

    1995-01-01

    Radiopharmaceuticals have been used as investigative tools for the detection and treatment of arthritis activity in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) since the 1950s. Against the background of the pathophysiology of RA, the current status of joint scintigraphy and possible future developments are reviewed. Both non-specific (radiolabelled leucocytes and technetium-99m labelled human immunoglobulin) and specific targeting radiopharmaceuticals (including radiolabelled antibodies) are considered. The use of radiopharmaceuticals in the detection of arthritis activity has the advantages of allowing direct imaging of joints by means of whole-body scintigraphy and of joints that are difficult to assess clinically or radiographically. Promising results have been obtained with radiolabelled anti-CD4 and anti-E-selectin antibodies and with somatostatin receptor imaging, but more data are available regarding 99m Tc-IgG scintigraphy, which differentiates between the various degrees of arthritis activity and thus facilitates the choice of antirheumatic drug. Newer promising approaches to the imaging of RA include the use of radiolabelled J001 and cytokines, though studies on these are limited at present. (orig.)

  10. The Rheumatoid Arthritis-Associated Citrullinome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilvawala, Ronak; Nguyen, Son Hong; Maurais, Aaron J; Nemmara, Venkatesh V; Nagar, Mitesh; Salinger, Ari J; Nagpal, Sunil; Weerapana, Eranthie; Thompson, Paul R

    2018-03-21

    Increased protein citrullination is linked to various diseases including rheumatoid arthritis (RA), lupus, and cancer. Citrullinated autoantigens, a hallmark of RA, are recognized by anti-citrullinated protein antibodies (ACPAs) which are used to diagnose RA. ACPA-recognizing citrullinated enolase, vimentin, keratin, and filaggrin are also pathogenic. Here, we used a chemoproteomic approach to define the RA-associated citrullinome. The identified proteins include numerous serine protease inhibitors (Serpins), proteases and metabolic enzymes. We demonstrate that citrullination of antiplasmin, antithrombin, t-PAI, and C1 inhibitor (P1-Arg-containing Serpins) abolishes their ability to inhibit their cognate proteases. Citrullination of nicotinamide N-methyl transferase (NNMT) also abolished its methyltransferase activity. Overall, these data advance our understanding of the roles of citrullination in RA and suggest that extracellular protein arginine deiminase (PAD) activity can modulate protease activity with consequent effects on Serpin-regulated pathways. Moreover, our data suggest that inhibition of extracellular PAD activity will be therapeutically relevant. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Ghrelin and obestatin levels in rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koca, Suleyman Serdar; Ozgen, Metin; Aydin, Suleyman; Dag, Sait; Evren, Bahri; Isik, Ahmet

    2008-10-01

    Ghrelin is a powerful, endogenous orexigenic peptide. In addition, ghrelin has anti-inflammatory effects, and it has been reported that ghrelin down-regulates pro-inflammatory cytokines, including interleukin (IL)-1beta and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha. Obestatin appears to decrease food intake and appetite, and its potential role in inflammation is not yet clear. The aims of this study were to assess total and acylated (active) ghrelin and obestatin serum levels and their relations with inflammatory status in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients. Fasting blood samples were obtained from 37 patients with RA, 29 patients with Behçet's disease (BD) and 28 healthy controls (HC). Total ghrelin and obestatin levels were measured by radioimmunoassay and acylated ghrelin was quantified by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Patients with RA had lower total ghrelin, but higher obestatin levels than patients with BD (pghrelin. Total ghrelin level was not correlated with any study parameters in the all groups. Obestatin level correlated with erythrocyte sedimentation rate and DAS-28 in the RA group, the level of IL-6 in the BD group, and with the level of TNF-alpha in the HC group (r=0.400, pghrelin and clinical or laboratory markers of disease activity in RA. Surprisingly, obestatin correlated with some inflammatory markers. So, obestatin seems to be more valuable than ghrelin in the pathogenesis of RA.

  12. A systems approach to rheumatoid arthritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sungyong You

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is a chronic autoimmune disease that primarily attacks synovial joints. Despite the advances in diagnosis and treatment of RA, novel molecular targets are still needed to improve the accuracy of diagnosis and the therapeutic outcomes. Here, we present a systems approach that can effectively 1 identify core RA-associated genes (RAGs, 2 reconstruct RA-perturbed networks, and 3 select potential targets for diagnosis and treatments of RA. By integrating multiple gene expression datasets previously reported, we first identified 983 core RAGs that show RA dominant differential expression, compared to osteoarthritis (OA, in the multiple datasets. Using the core RAGs, we then reconstructed RA-perturbed networks that delineate key RA associated cellular processes and transcriptional regulation. The networks revealed that synovial fibroblasts play major roles in defining RA-perturbed processes, anti-TNF-α therapy restored many RA-perturbed processes, and 19 transcription factors (TFs have major contribution to deregulation of the core RAGs in the RA-perturbed networks. Finally, we selected a list of potential molecular targets that can act as metrics or modulators of the RA-perturbed networks. Therefore, these network models identify a panel of potential targets that will serve as an important resource for the discovery of therapeutic targets and diagnostic markers, as well as providing novel insights into RA pathogenesis.

  13. Understanding emerging treatment paradigms in rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breedveld, Ferdinand C; Combe, Bernard

    2011-05-25

    Treatment strategies for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) will continue to evolve as new drugs are developed, as new data become available, and as our potential to achieve greater and more consistent outcomes becomes more routine. Many patients will find both symptom relief and modest control of their disease with disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs), yet this course of therapy is clearly not effective in all patients. In fact, despite strong evidence that intensive treatment in the early stages of RA can slow or stop disease progression and may prevent disability, many patients continue to be managed in a stepwise manner and are treated with an ongoing monotherapy regimen with DMARDs. There is now a large body of evidence demonstrating the success of treating RA patients with anti-TNF therapy, usually in combination with methotrexate. As a result of the increased use of anti-TNF therapy, treatment paradigms have changed - and our practice is beginning to reflect this change. In the present review, we summarize the salient points of several recently proposed and emerging treatment paradigms with an emphasis on how these strategies may impact future practice.

  14. Current treatment paradigms in rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fries, J F

    2000-06-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) has traditionally been treated using the pyramid approach, in which non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are the first-line treatment and disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs) are introduced relatively late in the disease. This approach is no longer valid. Previously regarded as a benign disease, RA is now recognized as causing substantial morbidity and mortality, as do the NSAIDs used in treatment. DMARDs are more effective in controlling the pain and disability of RA than NSAIDs, and are often no more toxic. The current treatment paradigm emphasizes early, consistent use of DMARDs. A 'sawtooth' strategy of DMARD use has been proposed, in which a rising but low level of disability triggers a change in therapy. Determining the most clinically useful DMARD combinations and the optimal sequence of DMARD use requires effectiveness studies, Bayesian approaches and analyses of long-term outcomes. Such approaches will allow optimization of multiple drug therapies in RA, and should substantially improve the long-term outcome for many patients.

  15. Sex and Management of Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favalli, Ennio Giulio; Biggioggero, Martina; Crotti, Chiara; Becciolini, Andrea; Raimondo, Maria Gabriella; Meroni, Pier Luigi

    2018-01-26

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic and progressive autoimmune disease more common in women than men (3:1). Although sex-based differences may play a complex role in promoting an autoimmune dysfunction, to date the comprehensive knowledge of the link between sex and RA is still partially lacking. Furthermore, males and females have been demonstrated to differently deal with their chronic pathologies, modifying the perceived sex-based burden of disease. Gender medicine is a newly approach focusing on the impact of gender differences on human physiology, pathophysiology, and clinical features of diseases, analyzing the complex interrelation and integration of sex and psychological and cultural behavior. A better comprehension of possible factors influencing sexual dimorphism in RA susceptibility, pattern of presentation, disease activity, and outcome could contribute to a tailored approach, in order to limit the morbidity of the disease. RA disease activity seems to be higher in women, whereas the response rate to synthetic and biologic disease-modifying therapies appears to be better in males. Moreover, the common strategies for RA management may be affected by concomitant pregnancy or childbearing desire, with particular regard to treatments with potential teratogenic effects or impact on fertility. Finally, comorbidities, such as fibromyalgia, major depression, and osteoporosis, are more frequent in females, while the impact of sex on cardiovascular risk is still controversial. Moving from the role of sex in influencing RA pathogenesis, epidemiology, and disease characteristics, this review explores the evidence on how sex can have an impact on strategies for managing patients with RA.

  16. Evaluating the consequences of rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sossong, Björn; Felder, Stefan; Wolff, Malte; Krüger, Klaus

    2017-07-01

    Patients and non-patients tend to attach different utility values to the state of suffering from specific illnesses. This observation naturally leads to the question whose utility values should be used as the basis in cost-effectiveness analysis (CEA). Intuitively, one would presume that patients are better informed about the consequences of their illness, and public authorities should, therefore, use the patients' utility values in CEA. Contrary to this presumption, it has been argued that society at large should determine which values are to be used and not the patients because, in the end, it is societal resources that are to be allocated. Against this background, we use data from a discrete choice experiment (DCE) that was completed by patients of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and non-patients to explore the discrepancies between the two groups' utility estimates for typical consequences of RA. Our results indicate that both groups attach remarkably similar part-worth utilities to the symptoms pain, fatigue, and functional limitations. However, non-patients significantly undervalue the ability to work when compared to patients.

  17. Degloving injuries of the hand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Krishnamoorthy

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Avulsion of skin from the hand or fingers is an injury that has a dramatic presentation. The entire musculo-skeletal unit of the finger is intact, and the patient can often move the parts of his naked hand quite normally. The challenge for the reconstructive surgeon lies in resurfacing the hand or finger with a good quality pliable sensate skin cover while preserving the movements and function of the hand. Traditionally, skin grafting has been the standard method of reconstruction in such injuries. However, skin grafting does have many disadvantages, too. This article deals with the features of such injuries, management protocols and other reconstructive options available in the armamentarium of the hand surgeon.

  18. 3D Printed Robotic Hand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizarro, Yaritzmar Rosario; Schuler, Jason M.; Lippitt, Thomas C.

    2013-01-01

    Dexterous robotic hands are changing the way robots and humans interact and use common tools. Unfortunately, the complexity of the joints and actuations drive up the manufacturing cost. Some cutting edge and commercially available rapid prototyping machines now have the ability to print multiple materials and even combine these materials in the same job. A 3D model of a robotic hand was designed using Creo Parametric 2.0. Combining "hard" and "soft" materials, the model was printed on the Object Connex350 3D printer with the purpose of resembling as much as possible the human appearance and mobility of a real hand while needing no assembly. After printing the prototype, strings where installed as actuators to test mobility. Based on printing materials, the manufacturing cost of the hand was $167, significantly lower than other robotic hands without the actuators since they have more complex assembly processes.

  19. The hand of Homo naledi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kivell, Tracy L.; Deane, Andrew S.; Tocheri, Matthew W.; Orr, Caley M.; Schmid, Peter; Hawks, John; Berger, Lee R.; Churchill, Steven E.

    2015-01-01

    A nearly complete right hand of an adult hominin was recovered from the Rising Star cave system, South Africa. Based on associated hominin material, the bones of this hand are attributed to Homo naledi. This hand reveals a long, robust thumb and derived wrist morphology that is shared with Neandertals and modern humans, and considered adaptive for intensified manual manipulation. However, the finger bones are longer and more curved than in most australopiths, indicating frequent use of the hand during life for strong grasping during locomotor climbing and suspension. These markedly curved digits in combination with an otherwise human-like wrist and palm indicate a significant degree of climbing, despite the derived nature of many aspects of the hand and other regions of the postcranial skeleton in H. naledi. PMID:26441219

  20. Incidence of rheumatoid arthritis from 1995 to 2001

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jens; Kjær, Niels; Svendsen, Anders

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the mean incidence rate of rheumatoid arthritis over a 7-year period from 1995 to 2001 in a population in the southern part of Denmark, using the data from several sources. Cases fulfilling the 1987 American College of Rheumatology criteria for rheumatoid...... from general practice and referral centres, the estimated incidence was 35/100,000 person-years (95% confidence interval 32-38). We suggest that the estimated rate should be viewed as a plausible upper limit for the incidence of rheumatoid arthritis in the southern part of Denmark....... arthritis were identified at hospitals and private practising rheumatologists (referral centres), and in general practice. The observed incidence was 32/100,000 person-years (95% confidence interval 29-35). Using the ratio between the number of cases known only from general practice and the number known...