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Sample records for rheumatic disorders including

  1. Rheumatic disorders in Sub-saharan Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGill, P E; Oyoo, G O

    2002-04-01

    To review prevalence of rheumatic disorders in Sub-saharan Africa and in the context of current medical practice in the region assess the need for service and educational provision. Medline, (English, French). Pre-Medline literature review from the 1950's (Current contents). Various conference reports including attendance at all three AFLAR (African League Against Rheumatism) congresses in the 1990's. Author's personal database. All cited references read in full. The evidence shows rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus to be increasing in frequency in the indigenous populations of East, Central and South Africa but remaining rare in West Africans. Gout is now more prevalent than ever throughout the subcontinent. HIV has spawned a variety of previously rare spondyloarthropathies (reactive arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, enthesopathy) and changed the epidemiology of pyomyositis and osteomyelitis. Osteoarthritis is a universal problem. Juvenile chronic arthritis is not rare and rheumatic fever is common. Acute and chronic locomotor problems associated with diverse entities such as leprosy, brucellosis, meningococcus, alpha viruses, parasites, fluorosis, rickets and haemoglobinopathies enhance diagnostic diversity and therapeutic and educational requirements. Suggestions made to address the challenge posed by the burden of rheumatic disorders.

  2. Refractory Rheumatic Disorder: Atypical Postpregnancy Osteoporosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cindy Mourgues

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This is a case report on a young patient with severe osteoporosis that was initially revealed when she presented with polyarthralgia during her second pregnancy. Postpartum, the pain increased and her X-ray did not show any abnormalities. A bone scintigraphy was performed. It indicated an inflammatory rheumatic disorder. Six months after partum, an investigation of right coxalgia revealed a spontaneous basicervical fracture. Given the persistent polyarthralgia, the patient underwent a new scintigraphy, which revealed areas of what looked to be old rib and L1 fractures. A subsequent full body magnetic resonance imaging (MRI scan revealed signal abnormalities that could indicate multiple lower limb bone fractures. Despite exhaustive biological, radiological, and histological testing, no secondary cause for the osteoporosis was found. The patient was started on teriparatide. We finally concluded that, despite the atypical presentation, the patient was suffering from postpregnancy osteoporosis. It is possible that the frequency of occurrence of this still poorly understood disease is underestimated.

  3. Risk of malignancy in patients with rheumatic disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wong Victor Tak-lung

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Patients with autoimmune rheumatic diseases including rheumatoid arthritis (RA, systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE, Sjogren’s syndrome (SS, and inflammatory myositis are at increased risk of developing malignancies. Treatment of these conditions, including disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs and biologic therapies, are also associated with increased risk of malignancies.Cancer adds to the disease burden in these patients, affecting their quality of life and life expectancy. The decision in choosing immunosuppressive agents in these rheumatic diseases should take into account the disease severity, expectation for disease control, comorbidities, as well asthe side effects including risks of cancer.

  4. Imaging of the hip in patients with rheumatic disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boutry, Nathalie; Khalil, Chadi; Jaspart, Matthieu; Marie-Helene, Vieillard; Demondion, Xavier; Cotten, Anne

    2007-01-01

    Hip joint abnormalities are commonly encountered in patients with rheumatic disorders. Although conventional radiography remains the mainstay for diagnosis of joint damage and subsequent follow-up, magnetic resonance imaging and, to a lesser extent, ultrasound have afforded the ability to detect early signs of articular involvement (i.e., synovitis and bone erosions), and to assess disease activity in treated patients. In more advanced stages of rheumatic disorders, magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound are both useful in assessing paraarticular involvement (i.e., bursitis and synovial cysts)

  5. Imaging of the hip in patients with rheumatic disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boutry, Nathalie [Department of Musculoskeletal Radiology, Roger Salengro Hospital, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Lille (France)]. E-mail: nboutry@chru-lille.fr; Khalil, Chadi [Department of Musculoskeletal Radiology, Roger Salengro Hospital, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Lille (France); Jaspart, Matthieu [Department of Musculoskeletal Radiology, Roger Salengro Hospital, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Lille (France); Department of Anatomy, Faculty of Medicine, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Lille (France); Marie-Helene, Vieillard [Department of Rheumatology, Roger Salengro Hospital, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Lille (France); Demondion, Xavier [Department of Musculoskeletal Radiology, Roger Salengro Hospital, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Lille (France); Department of Anatomy, Faculty of Medicine, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Lille (France); Cotten, Anne [Department of Musculoskeletal Radiology, Roger Salengro Hospital, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Lille (France)

    2007-07-15

    Hip joint abnormalities are commonly encountered in patients with rheumatic disorders. Although conventional radiography remains the mainstay for diagnosis of joint damage and subsequent follow-up, magnetic resonance imaging and, to a lesser extent, ultrasound have afforded the ability to detect early signs of articular involvement (i.e., synovitis and bone erosions), and to assess disease activity in treated patients. In more advanced stages of rheumatic disorders, magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound are both useful in assessing paraarticular involvement (i.e., bursitis and synovial cysts)

  6. Systemic Aspects of Soft Tissue Rheumatic Disorders (STRDs)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Owlia, M. B.; Mehrpoor, G.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine the markers of systemic inflammation in soft tissue rheumatic disorders (STRDs). Study Design: Case series. Place and Duration of Study: Rheumatology Clinic, Yazd, Iran, from November 2010 to December 2011. Methodology: Patients aged 20 years or above with known diagnosis of STRD according to clinical criteria and/ or paraclinical investigations for at least 3 weeks duration were longitudinally followed. Patients with diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis, hypothyroidism, or any other known systemic conditions (other than diabetes mellitus) were excluded. After careful and detailed history taking, laboratory tests indicating systemic inflammation including erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), C-reactive protein (CRP), and routine screening rheumatologic tests were assessed. Results: Of the 90 patients, 75% were female and 25% were male and 28 (31.1%) of patients had diabetes mellitus. Fifty six (62%) and 49 (54%) of all studies cases had some degrees of morning stiffness and remarkable fatigue respectively. Twenty two (24%) had elevated CRP and 5 (5.5%) had abnormal ESR. Rheumatoid factor (RF) and anti-CCP was positive in 5 (5.5%) and 12 (13.3%) of patients accordingly. Three (3.3%) patients suffered from anemia of chronic disease. Mean ESR was 48 A +- 7.34 (hl) and mean CRP was 10.06 A +- 1.96 mg/dl. Mean RF was 10.8 A +- 1.64 U/ml and mean anti- CCP was 18.5 A +- 2.71 U/ml. Mean hemoglobin was between 10.4 A +- 1.01 g/dl. Conclusion: Features of subtle systemic inflammation are positive in some cases of soft tissue rheumatism. (author)

  7. Evidence-based recommendations for treatment with methotrexate in rheumatic disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Ole Rintek; Faurschou, Mikkel; Loft, Anne Gitte

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop 3E (Evidence, Expertise, Exchange) recommendations (RCs) on the use of methotrexate in rheumatic disorders and to assess the agreement among Danish rheumatologists.......The aim of this study was to develop 3E (Evidence, Expertise, Exchange) recommendations (RCs) on the use of methotrexate in rheumatic disorders and to assess the agreement among Danish rheumatologists....

  8. Prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders and rheumatic diseases in the indigenous Qom population of Rosario, Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintana, Rosana; Silvestre, Adriana M R; Goñi, Mario; García, Vanina; Mathern, Nora; Jorfen, Marisa; Miljevic, Julio; Dhair, Daniel; Laithe, Matias; Conti, Silvana; Midauar, Fadua; Martin, Maria Celeste; Barrios, Maria Cecilia; Nieto, Romina; Prigione, Cristina; Sanabria, Alvaro; Gervasoni, Viviana; Grabbe, Emilio; Gontero, Romina; Peláez-Ballestas, Ingris; Pons-Estel, Bernardo A

    2016-07-01

    This study aimed to estimate the prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders and rheumatic diseases among the indigenous Qom (Toba) population in the city of Rosario, Santa Fe, Argentina. An analytical cross-sectional study using methodology of the Community Oriented Program for the Control of Rheumatic Diseases (COPCORD) was performed. Subjects ≥18 years of age were interviewed by advanced students of medicine and nursing, bilingual translator-facilitators, and coordinators. Individuals with musculoskeletal pain (positive cases) were evaluated sequentially for 7 days by internists and rheumatologists for diagnosis and treatment. The study included 1656 individuals (77 % of the census population). Of these, 1020 (61.5 %) were female, with mean age of 35.3 (SD 13.9) years, and 1028 (62.0 %) were bilingual. The public health care system covers 87.1 % of the population. Musculoskeletal pain in the previous 7 days and/or at some time during their life was present in 890 subjects (53.7 %). Of those with pain in the last 7 days, 302 (64.1 %) subjects had an Health Assessment Questionnaire Disability Index (HAQ-DI) score ≥0.8. The most frequent pain sites were lumbar spine (19.3 %), knees (13.0 %), and hands (12.0 %). The prevalence of rheumatic diseases was as follows: mechanical back pain (20.1 %), rheumatic regional pain syndrome (2.9 %), osteoarthritis (4.0 %) rheumatoid arthritis (2.4 %), inflammatory back pain (0.2 %), systemic sclerosis (0.1 %), Sjögren syndrome (0.1 %), fibromyalgia (0.1 %), mixed connective tissue disease (0.06 %), and systemic lupus erythematosus (0.06 %). The prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders was 53.7 % and rheumatic diseases 29.6 %. Rheumatoid arthritis prevalence was 2.4 % using COPCORD methodology, one of the highest reported at present.

  9. Increased risk of comorbid rheumatic disorders in vitiligo patients: A nationwide population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Chong Won; Eun, Sung Hye; Choi, Kwang Hyun; Bae, Jung Min

    2017-08-01

    Vitiligo is a common acquired depigmentation disorder. Previous studies have shown that vitiligo is associated with a variety of autoimmune disorders. However, a large-scale epidemiological study focused on comorbid rheumatic disorders has not been undertaken. To clarify the associations between vitiligo and various rheumatic disorders, we performed a cross-sectional study using data from the Korean National Health Insurance claims database. Between 2009 and 2013, totals of 86 210 patients with vitiligo and 172 420 age- and sex-matched controls without vitiligo were enrolled in this study. Vitiligo patients were found to be at increased risk of systemic lupus erythematosus, systemic sclerosis, Sjögren's syndrome and rheumatoid arthritis, but no significant association was found between vitiligo and dermatomyositis/polymyositis, Behçet's disease or ankylosing spondylitis. Subgroup analysis showed an increased risk of dermatomyositis/polymyositis in male and ankylosing spondylitis in female vitiligo patients. The risks of dermatomyositis/polymyositis or ankylosing spondylitis were higher in young vitiligo patients. Our study confirms a significant association between vitiligo and rheumatic disorders. Differences in comorbid rheumatic disorders by age group and sex suggest the need for patient-specific approaches. Careful consideration of rheumatic disorders is required for the proper management of comorbidities in vitiligo patients. © 2017 Japanese Dermatological Association.

  10. Do the Drugs Used to Treat Rheumatic Disorders Induce Bone Fragility? A Review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Súsanna við Streym; Vestergaard, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Rheumatic disorders are linked to immuno-logical processes in the body; therefore, drugs used to treat these disorders may interfere with the immune system. The immune system shares several signaling mechanisms with bone cells, both directly via cytokines and prostaglandins, and indirectly via...... vitamin D, which is also an active immunological substance. As a result, drugs used to modulate the immune response may interfere with bone mineral density (BMD), bone biomechanical competence, and the risk of fractures [1–3]....

  11. Cryotherapy in rheumatic disorders; Kryotherapie bei rheumatischen Erkrankungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soerensen, H. [Rheumaklinik Immanuel-Krankenhaus, Berlin (Germany). Innere Rheumatologische Abt.

    1994-12-31

    When applied locally, cold therapy (cryotherapy) has the effect of inhibiting inflammation, occluding blood vessels, and stopping bleeding. Active rheumatic inflammation, activated arthrosis, and swelling after injury can be alleviated by local cold application, while heat application would worsen the situation. In whole-body cryotherapy the whole patient, wearing only a bathing suit, is exposed to a temperature of -100 C. The present paper descrcribes the cold room of the Immanuel Hospital in Berlin-Wannsee. (BWI) [Deutsch] Kaeltetherapie (Kryotherapie) wirkt lokal angewendet entzuendungshemmend, blutgefaessabdichtend und blutstillend. Eine aktive rheumatische Entzuendung, aktivierte Arthrose und Schwellungsreaktionen bei Verletzungen werden durch lokale Kaelteanwendungen gedaempft, wogegen Waerme den akuten Zustand verschlimmern wuerde. In der Ganzkoerperkaeltetherapie wird der ganze Mensch in Badebekleidung einer realen Temperatur von -100 C ausgesetzt. Der vorliegende Beitrag beschreibt die Kaeltekammer des Immanuel Krankenhauses in Berlin Wannsee. (BWI)

  12. Prevalence and factors related to rheumatic musculoskeletal disorders in rural south India: WHO-ILAR-COPCORD-BJD India Calicut study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Binoy J; Rahim, Asma A; Bina, Thomas; Thekkekara, Romy J

    2013-08-01

    To assess the prevalence and factors related to rheumatic musculoskeletal disorders (RMSD) in a rural population of south India. The cross-sectional study included all individuals, 15 years and above, in a rural unit of Calicut District in North Kerala. Data were collected using the validated World Health Organization - International League of Associations for Rheumatology - Community Oriented Program for the Control of Rheumatic Diseases - Bhigwan model questionnaire by trained volunteers. In Phase 1 details of demographic characteristics, major co-morbidities and perceived musculoskeletal aches and pains were elicited. Phases 2 and 3 further evaluated and diagnosed the subjects. Predictors for RMSD were assessed using binary logistic regression analysis. There were 4999 individuals in the study. The prevalence of RMSD was 24.9% (95% CI 23.73; 26.12%). Females constituted 50.7% of the population; 5.1% of the respondents were illiterate; 80.9% belonged to low-income groups. Diabetes mellitus and hypertension affected 4.1% and 5.4% of the subjects respectively. The predictors for RMSD in the population were female sex, age, illiteracy, married status, low-income group, vegetarian diet, current alcohol consumption, current tobacco use, history of injury or accidents, diabetes and hypertension. Symptom-related ill-defined rheumatism (10.39%) followed by osteoarthritis (3.85%) were the most prevalent in the Phase 3 rheumatological evaluation. There is an urgent need to introduce lifestyle modifications in high-risk groups and start rehabilitation for those affected. Community rheumatology in primary health care settings in rural areas needs to be strengthened by introducing national programs addressing RMSD at the grassroots level. © 2013 Asia Pacific League of Associations for Rheumatology and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  13. Lost productivity in four European countries among patients with rheumatic disorders: are absenteeism and presenteeism transferable?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knies, Saskia; Candel, Math J J M; Boonen, Annelies; Evers, Silvia M A A; Ament, Andre J H A; Severens, Johan L

    2012-09-01

    When national pharmacoeconomic guidelines are compared, different recommendations are identified on how to identify, measure and value lost productivity, leading to difficulties when comparing lost productivity estimates across countries. From a transferability point of view, the question arises of whether differences between countries regarding lost productivity are the result of using different calculation methods (methodological differences) or of other between-country differences. When lost productivity data differ significantly across countries, the transferability of lost productivity data across countries is hindered. The objective of this study was to investigate whether country of residence has a significant influence on the quantity of lost productivity among patients with rheumatic disorders. Confounding factors that might differ between countries were corrected for, while the methodology used to identify and measure lost productivity was kept the same. This question was investigated by means of an online questionnaire filled out by 200 respondents with a rheumatic disorder per country in four European countries, namely the Netherlands, the UK, Germany and France. In addition to those regarding lost productivity, the questionnaire contained questions about patient characteristics, disability insurance, disease characteristics, quality of life and job characteristics as these variables are expected to influence lost productivity in terms of absenteeism and presenteeism. The data were analysed by regression analyses, in which different components - being absent in last 3 months, number of days absent and presenteeism - of lost productivity were the main outcome measures and other variables, such as gender, impact of disease, shift work, job control, partial disability and overall general health, were corrected for. The results showed that country sometimes has a significant influence on lost productivity and that other variables such as, for example, age

  14. Calprotectin in rheumatic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ometto, Francesca; Friso, Lara; Astorri, Davide; Botsios, Costantino; Raffeiner, Bernd; Punzi, Leonardo; Doria, Andrea

    2017-04-01

    Calprotectin is a heterodimer formed by two proteins, S100A8 and S100A9, which are mainly produced by activated monocytes and neutrophils in the circulation and in inflamed tissues. The implication of calprotectin in the inflammatory process has already been demonstrated, but its role in the pathogenesis, diagnosis, and monitoring of rheumatic diseases has gained great attention in recent years. Calprotectin, being stable at room temperature, is a candidate biomarker for the follow-up of disease activity in many autoimmune disorders, where it can predict response to treatment or disease relapse. There is evidence that a number of immunomodulators, including TNF-α inhibitors, may reduce calprotectin expression. S100A8 and S100A9 have a potential role as a target of treatment in murine models of autoimmune disorders, since the direct or indirect blockade of these proteins results in amelioration of the disease process. In this review, we will go over the biologic functions of calprotectin which might be involved in the etiology of rheumatic disorders. We will also report evidence of its potential use as a disease biomarker. Impact statement Calprotectin is an acute-phase protein produced by monocytes and neutrophils in the circulation and inflamed tissues. Calprotectin seems to be more sensitive than CRP, being able to detect minimal residual inflammation and is a candidate biomarker in inflammatory diseases. High serum levels are associated with some severe manifestations of rheumatic diseases, such as glomerulonephritis and lung fibrosis. Calprotectin levels in other fluids, such as saliva and synovial fluid, might be helpful in the diagnosis of rheumatic diseases. Of interest is also the potential role of calprotectin as a target of treatment.

  15. Clinical utility of therapeutic drug monitoring in biological disease modifying anti-rheumatic drug treatment of rheumatic disorders: a systematic narrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Herwaarden, Noortje; Van Den Bemt, Bart J F; Wientjes, Maike H M; Kramers, Cornelis; Den Broeder, Alfons A

    2017-08-01

    Biological Disease Modifying Anti-Rheumatic Drugs (bDMARDs) have improved the treatment outcomes of inflammatory rheumatic diseases including Rheumatoid Arthritis and spondyloarthropathies. Inter-individual variation exists in (maintenance of) response to bDMARDs. Therapeutic Drug Monitoring (TDM) of bDMARDs could potentially help in optimizing treatment for the individual patient. Areas covered: Evidence of clinical utility of TDM in bDMARD treatment is reviewed. Different clinical scenarios will be discussed, including: prediction of response after start of treatment, prediction of response to a next bDMARD in case of treatment failure of the first, prediction of successful dose reduction or discontinuation in case of low disease activity, prediction of response to dose-escalation in case of active disease and prediction of response to bDMARD in case of flare in disease activity. Expert opinion: The limited available evidence does often not report important outcomes for diagnostic studies, such as sensitivity and specificity. In most clinical relevant scenarios, predictive value of serum (anti-) drug levels is absent, therefore the use of TDM of bDMARDs cannot be advocated. Well-designed prospective studies should be done to further investigate the promising scenarios to determine the place of TDM in clinical practice.

  16. The epidemiology of rheumatic disorders in a rural area of the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    prevalence of 3.8%), soft tissue rheumatism in 78 patients (5.2%), rheumatoid arthritis in 21 patients (1.4%), juvenile arthritis in 19 patients (1.26%), infectious arthritis in 11 patients (0.73%), rheumatic fever in 9 patients (0.6%) and gout in 1 patient ...

  17. Prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders and rheumatic disease in the Warao, Kari'ña, and Chaima indigenous populations of Monagas State, Venezuela.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granados, Ysabel; Rosillo, Celenia; Cedeño, Ligia; Martínez, Yanira; Sánchez, Gloris; López, Geovalis; Pérez, Fernando; Martínez, Damarys; Maestre, Gabriela; Berbin, Sol; Chacón, Rosa; Stekman, Iván; Valls, Evart; Peláez-Ballestas, Ingris

    2016-07-01

    This study aimed to estimate the prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders and rheumatic diseases in the Warao, Kari'ña, and Chaima indigenous populations of Monagas State, Venezuela. A cross-sectional, analytical, community-based study was conducted in 1537 indigenous subjects ≥18 years old (38.6 % male, mean age 41.4 ± 17.5 years). The cross-culturally validated Community Oriented Program for the Control of Rheumatic Diseases (COPCORD) diagnostic questionnaire was applied. Subjects with a positive COPCORD diagnosis (either historic or current pain) were evaluated by primary care physicians and rheumatologists. A descriptive analysis was performed and comparisons made using analysis of variance and the chi-square test. Pain in the last 7 days was reported by 32.9 %, with pain intensity, according to a Likert-type scale [no pain, 195 (38.5 %); minimal pain, 231 (45.6 %); strong pain, 68 (13.4 %); intense pain, 5 (0.9 %)], 38.0 % reported historical pain, and 641 (41.7 %) had either historic or current pain. Of the COPCORD-positive subjects, pain most frequently occurred in the knee, back, and hands. Musculoskeletal and rheumatic diseases included osteoarthritis (14.1 %), back pain (12.4 %), rheumatic regional pain syndromes (RRPS) (9.7 %), undifferentiated arthritis (1.5 %), rheumatoid arthritis (1.1 %), and fibromyalgia (0.5 %). Chaima (18.3 %) and Kari'ña (15.6 %) subjects had a high prevalence of osteoarthritis, and Warao subjects had a high prevalence of low back pain (13.8 %). The prevalence of RRPS was high in all three ethnic groups. The Chaima group had the highest prevalence of rheumatic diseases, with 2.0 % having rheumatoid arthritis. This study provides useful information for health care policy-making in indigenous communities.

  18. Outcome measures in inflammatory rheumatic diseases.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fransen, J.; Riel, P.L.C.M. van

    2009-01-01

    Inflammatory rheumatic diseases are generally multifaceted disorders and, therefore, measurement of multiple outcomes is relevant to most of these diseases. Developments in outcome measures in the rheumatic diseases are promoted by the development of successful treatments. Outcome measurement will

  19. Prevalence and risk factors of sleep disordered breathing in patients with rheumatic valvular heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Ning; Ni, Bu-Qing; Zhang, Xi-Long; Huang, Han-Peng; Su, Mei; Zhang, Shi-Jiang; Wang, Hong

    2013-08-15

    Sleep disordered breathing (SDB) is common in patients with chronic heart failure secondary to non-valvular heart disease; however, the prevalence and characteristics of SDB in patients with rheumatic valvular heart disease (RVHD) are unclear. This study was designed to determine the prevalence, characteristics, and risk factors for SDB in RVHD patients. A cross-sectional study was conducted in 260 RVHD patients. The following data were recorded: types of heart valve lesions, electrocardiographic, echocardiographic, arterial blood gas analysis findings, baseline medication, 6-minute walk test (6MWT) distance, and sleep parameters. Compared to patients with single leftsided valve lesions, patients with left- and rightsided valve lesions had a higher prevalence of SDB (46.2% vs. 31.2%, p = 0.013); the increased prevalence of SDB only involved central sleep apnea (CSA) (31.1% vs. 14.1%, p = 0.001). Patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) or CSA were older and had a shorter 6MWT distance, lower left ventricle ejection fraction and PaO₂, a longer lung-to-finger circulation time, and a higher prevalence of atrial fibrillation (AF) and hypertension (all p < 0.05) as compared with patients without SDB. Multinomial logistic regression analysis showed that PaO2 ≤ 85 mm Hg was the only risk factor for OSA. Male gender, AF, 6MWT distance ≤ 300 m, PaO₂ ≤ 85 mmHg, and PaCO₂ ≤ 40 mm Hg were risk factors for CSA. Patients with RVHD had a high prevalence of SDB (predominantly CSA). RVHD patients with SDB, particularly those who had CSA, manifested more severe symptoms and greater impairment of cardiac function. Assessments of clinical manifestations of cardiac dysfunction may be important for predicting the risk factors for SDB.

  20. Changing clinical profile of acute rheumatic fever and rheumatic recurrence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheikh, A.M.; Sadiq, M.; Rehman, A.U.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Clinical profile of acute rheumatic fever and rheumatic recurrence seems to have changed in countries where rheumatic fever is still endemic. The objectives of this study were to compare clinical profile and outcome of patients suffering initial and recurrent episodes of acute rheumatic fever in children. Methods: This prospective study was conducted in two tertiary care hospitals from January to June 2011. The diagnosis was based on the modified Jones criteria. Sixty children were included in the study, 15 having first episode of rheumatic fever and 45 with rheumatic recurrence. The severity of carditis was assessed by Clinical and echocardiography means. Results: Carditis was the commonest presentation in both first (80 percentage) and recurrent attacks (100 percentage). Arthritis was seen in 60 percentage of children with first episode and in 26.7 percentage with recurrence. The frequency of subcutaneous nodules, invariably associated with carditis, was very high (33.3 percentage in the first and 48.3 percentage in recurrent episodes). Carditis was generally mild during first episode (53.3 percentage) and severe with rheumatic recurrence (55.6 percentage). There was no death in either group. One patient with severe mitral regurgitation and rheumatic recurrence underwent mitral valve repair for intractable heart failure. Conclusion: Clinical profile of rheumatic recurrence and acute rheumatic fever has changed. Rheumatic recurrence is associated with severe carditis. Carditis is more common than arthritis even in the first attack. Sub-cutaneous nodules are a frequent finding invariably associated with carditis. (author)

  1. Pregnancy and Rheumatic Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... with Rheumatic Disease Pregnancy & Rheumatic Disease Pregnancy and Rheumatic Disease Fast Facts Diseases with the potential to affect ... control. What are the effects of pregnancy on rheumatic disease? The effects of pregnancy on rheumatic diseases vary ...

  2. Elevated D8/17 expression on B lymphocytes, a marker of rheumatic fever, measured with flow cytometry in tic disorder patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekstra, PJ; Bijzet, J; Limburg, PC; Steenhuis, MP; Troost, PW; Oosterhoff, MD; Korf, J; Kallenberg, CGM; Minderaa, RB

    Objective: Elevated D8/17 expression on B lymphocytes is a known susceptibility marker of rheumatic fever. Previous studies have reported higher than usual D8/ 17 expression on B lymphocytes of patients with tic disorders. The purpose of this study was to assess D8/17 expression on B lymphocytes of

  3. Interventions for treating patients with chikungunya virus infection-related rheumatic and musculoskeletal disorders: A systematic review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arturo Martí-Carvajal

    Full Text Available Chikungunya virus infection (CHIKV is caused by a mosquito-borne alphavirus. CHIKV causes high fever and painful rheumatic disorders that may persist for years. Because little is known about interventions for treating CHIKV-related illness, we conducted a systematic review.We used Cochrane methods. We searched PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, LILACS and other sources from the earliest records to March 2016. We had no language restrictions. We included randomized controlled trials assessing any intervention for treating acute or chronic CHIKV-related illness. Our primary outcomes were pain relief, global health status (GHS or health related quality of life (HRQL, and serious adverse events (SAEs. We assessed bias risk with the Cochrane tool and used GRADE to assess evidence quality.We screened 2,229 records and found five small trials with a total of 402 participants. Patients receiving chloroquine (CHQ had better chronic pain relief than those receiving placebo (relative risk [RR] 2.67, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.23 to 5.77, N = 54, but acute pain relief was marginally not different between groups (mean difference [MD] 1.46, 95% CI 0.00 to 2.92, N = 54. SAEs were similar (RR = 15.00, 95% CI 0.90 to 250.24, N = 54. Comparing CHQ with paracetamol (PCM, CHQ patients had better pain relief (RR = 1.52, 95% CI 1.20 to 1.93, N = 86. Compared with hydroxychloroquine (HCHQ, disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs reduced pain (MD = -14.80, 95% CI -19.12 to -10.48, N = 72. DMARDs patients had less disability (MD = -0.74, 95% CI -0.92 to -0.56, N = 72 and less disease activity (MD = -1.35; 95% CI -1.70 to -1.00; N = 72. SAEs were similar between DMARDs and HCHQ groups (RR = 2.84, 95% CI 0.12 to 67.53, N = 72. Comparing meloxicam (MXM with CHQ, there was no difference in pain relief (MD = 0.24, 95% CI = -0.81 to 1.29; p = 0.65, N = 70, GHS or HRQL (MD = -0.31, 95% CI -2.06 to 1.44, N = 70 or SAEs (RR = 0.85, 95% CI 0.30 to 2.42, N = 70. Finally

  4. Prevalence and factors associated with musculoskeletal disorders and rheumatic diseases in indigenous Maya-Yucateco people: a cross-sectional community-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peláez-Ballestas, I; Alvarez-Nemegyei, J; Loyola-Sánchez, A; Escudero, M L

    2016-07-01

    This study aimed to estimate the prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders and rheumatic diseases in indigenous Maya-Yucateco communities using Community-Oriented Program for Control of Rheumatic Diseases (COPCORD) methodology. The study population comprised subjects aged ≥18 years from 11 communities in the municipality of Chankom, Yucatan. An analytical cross-sectional study was performed, and a census was used. Subjects positive for musculoskeletal (MSK) pain were examined by trained physicians. A total of 1523 community members were interviewed. The mean age was 45.2 years (standard deviation (SD) 17.9), and 917 (60.2 %) were women. Overall, 592 individuals (38.8 %; 95 % CI 36.3-41.3 %) had experienced MSK pain in the last 7 days. The pain intensity was reported as "strong" to "severe" in 43.4 %. The diagnoses were rheumatic regional pain syndromes in 165 (10.8 %; 95 % CI 9.4-12.5), low back pain in 153 (10.0 %; 95 % CI 8.5-11.6), osteoarthritis in 144 (9.4 %; 95 % CI 8.0-11.0), fibromyalgia in 35 (2.2 %; 95 % CI 1.6-3.1), rheumatoid arthritis in 17 (1.1 %; 95 % CI 0.6-1.7), undifferentiated arthritis in 8 (0.5 %; 95 % CI 0.2-0.8), and gout in 1 (0.06 %; 95 % CI 0.001-0.3). Older age, being female, disability, and physically demanding work were associated with a greater likelihood of having a rheumatic disease. In conclusion, MSK pain and rheumatic diseases were highly prevalent. The high impact of rheumatic diseases on daily activities in this indigenous population suggests the need to organize culturally-sensitive community interventions for the prevention of disabilities caused by MSK disorders and diseases.

  5. Genetics and Rheumatic Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Well with Rheumatic Disease Genetics and Rheumatic Disease Genetics and Rheumatic Disease Fast Facts Studying twins has ... 70%, and for non-identical pairs, even lower. Genetics and ankylosing spondylitis Each rheumatic disease has its ...

  6. Attitudes of Israeli Rheumatologists to the Use of Medical Cannabis as Therapy for Rheumatic Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob N. Ablin

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background While medical cannabis has been used for thousands of years in the treatment of pain and other symptoms, evidence-based use is limited and practitioners face multiple areas of uncertainty regarding the rational use of these compounds. Nonetheless, an increasing public interest and advocacy in favor of medical cannabis is causing the issue to be encountered ever more frequently by physicians in different fields of medicine and particularly in rheumatology. In view of this situation, we have surveyed the attitudes of Israeli rheumatologists to the use of medical cannabis. Objectives As rheumatologists are specialized in caring for patients presenting with musculoskeletal complaints, the confidence of rheumatologists’ knowledge of cannabinoids was surveyed. Methods All members of the Israeli Society of Rheumatology were surveyed by e-mail for their confidence and knowledge of cannabinoids and their perceived competence to prescribe herbal cannabis. Results A total of 23 out of 119 (19.3% Israeli rheumatologists approached returned the questionnaire. Three-quarters of responders were not confident about their knowledge of cannabinoid molecules or ability to write a prescription for herbal cannabis, and 78% were not confident to write a prescription for herbal cannabis; 74% of responders held the opinion that there was some role for cannabinoids in the management of rheumatic disease. Conclusion Israeli rheumatologists lack confidence in their knowledge of cannabinoids in general, yet are open to the possibility of introducing this treatment. Additional data and guidance are necessary in order to allow rational utilization of cannabinoids for management of rheumatic pain.

  7. Fibroblastic rheumatism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyoti Ranjan Parida

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Fibroblastic rheumatism (FR is a rare dermoarthopathy reported from different parts of the world since 1980. Although the exact cause is unknown, few reports implicate infection may be a triggering event. Patients usually present with multiple skin nodules and polyarthropathy with progressive skin contractures. Laboratory parameters including acute phase reactants are usually normal. The confirmatory diagnosis is based on histopathologic study of skin nodules, which demonstrate fibroblastic proliferation, thickened collagen fibers, dermal fibrosis, and decreased number of elastic fibers. Immunoreactivity for b-catenin, smooth muscle actin, and the monoclonal antibody HHF35 show myofibroblastic differentiation. Treatments with oral prednisolone and other disease-modifying drugs such as methotrexate, infliximab, and interferon have been tried with variable success. In general, skin lesions respond more aptly than joint symptoms indicating that skin fibroblast is more amenable to treatment than synovial fibroblasts. Awareness regarding this orphan disease among clinicians and pathologists will help in more reporting of such cases and finding out optimal treatment regimen.

  8. Osteoporosis in rheumatic diseases | Basma | African Journal of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Inflammatory joint disease such as rheumatoid arthritis, as well as other rheumatic conditions, such as Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) and ankylosing spondylitis comprise a heterogeneous group of joint disorders that are all associated with extra-articular manifestations, including bone loss and fractures ...

  9. Arthritis and Rheumatic Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health Topics Arthritis and Rheumatic Diseases Arthritis and Rheumatic Diseases Arthritis is often used to refer to any ... primary immunodeficiency syndrome March 11, 2013 Arthritis and Rheumatic Disease News Research Brief | January 9, 2017 Tofacitinib Shows ...

  10. Somatoform disorders and rheumatic diseases: from DSM-IV to DSM-V.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alciati, A; Atzeni, F; Sgiarovello, P; Sarzi-Puttini, P

    2014-06-06

    Medically unexplained symptoms are considered 'somatoform disorders' in the fourth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV). The introduction of this nosographic category has been helpful in drawing attention to a previously neglected area, but has not been successful in promoting an understanding of the disorders' biological basis and treatment implications, probably because of a series of diagnostic shortcomings. The newly proposed DSM-V diagnostic criteria try to overcome the limitations of the DSM-IV definition, which was organised centrally around the concept of medically unexplained symptoms, by emphasising the extent to which a patient's thoughts, feelings and behaviours concerning their somatic symptoms are disproportionate or excessive. This change is supported by a growing body of evidence showing that psychological and behavioural features play a major role in causing patient disability and maintaining high level of health care use. Pain disorders is the sub-category of DSM-IV somatoform disorders that most closely resembles fibromyalgia. Regardless of the diagnostic changes recently brought about by DSM-V, neuroimaging studies have identified important components of the mental processes associated with a DSM- IV diagnosis of pain disorder.

  11. Specific management of post-chikungunya rheumatic disorders: a retrospective study of 159 cases in Reunion Island from 2006-2012.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilie Javelle

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Since 2003, the tropical arthritogenic chikungunya (CHIK virus has become an increasingly medical and economic burden in affected areas as it can often result in long-term disabilities. The clinical spectrum of post-CHIK (pCHIK rheumatic disorders is wide. Evidence-based recommendations are needed to help physicians manage the treatment of afflicted patients. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We conducted a 6-year case series retrospective study in Reunion Island of patients referred to a rheumatologist due to continuous rheumatic or musculoskeletal pains that persisted following CHIK infection. These various disorders were documented in terms of their clinical and therapeutic courses. Post-CHIK de novo chronic inflammatory rheumatisms (CIRs were identified according to validated criteria. RESULTS: We reviewed 159 patient medical files. Ninety-four patients (59% who were free of any articular disorder prior to CHIK met the CIR criteria: rheumatoid arthritis (n=40, spondyloarthritis (n=33, undifferentiated polyarthritis (n=21. Bone lesions detectable by radiography occurred in half of the patients (median time: 3.5 years pCHIK. A positive therapeutic response was achieved in 54 out of the 72 patients (75% who were treated with methotrexate (MTX. Twelve out of the 92 patients (13% received immunomodulatory biologic agents due to failure of contra-indication of MTX treatment. Other patients mainly presented with mechanical shoulder or knee disorders, bilateral distal polyarthralgia that was frequently associated with oedema at the extremities and tunnel syndromes. These pCHIK musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs were managed with pain-killers, local and/or general anti-inflammatory drugs, and physiotherapy. CONCLUSION: Rheumatologists in Reunion Island managed CHIK rheumatic disorders in a pragmatic manner following the outbreak in 2006. This retrospective study describes the common mechanical and inflammatory pCHIK disorders. We provide a diagnostic

  12. Factors associated with regional rheumatic pain disorders in a population of Puerto Ricans with diabetes mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Font, Yvonne M.; Castro-Santana, Lesliane E.; Nieves-Plaza, Mariely; Maldonado, Mirna; Mayor, Ángel M.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the prevalence and factors associated with bursitis/tendonitis disorders in Puerto Ricans with diabetes mellitus (DM). A cross-sectional study was performed in 202 adult Puerto Ricans (100 DM patients and 102 non-diabetic subjects). For each participant, a complete medical history and a musculoskeletal exam were systematically performed. Socio-demographic parameters, health-related behaviors, comorbidities, and pharmacotherapy were determined for all subjects. For DM patients, disease duration, glycemic control, and DM long-term complications were also examined. Multivariate logistic regression analyses were used to determine the factors associated with bursitis/tendonitis disorders. The mean (SD) age for DM patients and non-diabetic controls were 53.3 (12.9) and 50.0 (13.1) years; 64.0 and 64.7 % of DM patients and controls were females, respectively. Overall, the prevalence of bursitis/tendonitis was higher in DM patients than among non-diabetics (59.0 % vs. 29.4 %, pdiabetics. Specifically, DM patients had a higher frequency of flexor tenosynovitis, De Quervain’s tenosynovitis, lateral epicondylitis, medial epicondylitis, trochanteric bursitis, and anserine bursitis than non-diabetic subjects (p<0.05). Among DM patients, multivariate analyses showed that those with bursitis/tendonitis were more likely to be female [OR (95 % CI) 4.55 (1.42, 14.55)] and have peripheral vascular disease [OR (95 % CI) 8.48 (1.71, 41.93)]. In conclusion, bursitis/tendonitis disorders were common in this population of Hispanics with DM. Among DM patients, bursitis/tendonitis disorders were more frequent in women and those with long-term complications such as peripheral vascular disease. PMID:24522480

  13. Factors associated with regional rheumatic pain disorders in a population of Puerto Ricans with diabetes mellitus

    OpenAIRE

    Font, Yvonne M.; Castro-Santana, Lesliane E.; Nieves-Plaza, Mariely; Maldonado, Mirna; Mayor, Ángel M.; Vilá, Luis M.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the prevalence and factors associated with bursitis/tendonitis disorders in Puerto Ricans with diabetes mellitus (DM). A cross-sectional study was performed in 202 adult Puerto Ricans (100 DM patients and 102 non-diabetic subjects). For each participant, a complete medical history and a musculoskeletal exam were systematically performed. Socio-demographic parameters, health-related behaviors, comorbidities, and pharmacotherapy were determined for all subj...

  14. Role of inflammasomes in inflammatory autoimmune rheumatic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Young-Su

    2018-01-01

    Inflammasomes are intracellular multiprotein complexes that coordinate anti-pathogenic host defense during inflammatory responses in myeloid cells, especially macrophages. Inflammasome activation leads to activation of caspase-1, resulting in the induction of pyroptosis and the secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines including interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-18. Although the inflammatory response is an innate host defense mechanism, chronic inflammation is the main cause of rheumatic diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA), systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), ankylosing spondylitis (AS), and Sjögren's syndrome (SS). Since rheumatic diseases are inflammatory/autoimmune disorders, it is reasonable to hypothesize that inflammasomes activated during the inflammatory response play a pivotal role in development and progression of these diseases. Indeed, previous studies have provided important observations that inflammasomes are actively involved in the pathogenesis of inflammatory/autoimmune rheumatic diseases. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge on several types of inflammasomes during macrophage-mediated inflammatory responses and discuss recent research regarding the role of inflammasomes in the pathogenesis of inflammatory/autoimmune rheumatic diseases. This avenue of research could provide new insights for the development of promising therapeutics to treat inflammatory/autoimmune rheumatic diseases.

  15. Radiologic atlas of rheumatic diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dihlmann, W.

    1986-01-01

    This book is an ''atlas of rheumatic joint disease'' selected from 20 years of personal experience by the author. The author sets a goal of demonstrating the value of soft-tissue imaging in the diagnosis of early joint disease. This goal is achieved with high quality reproductions, many of which are presented in duplicate to illustrate bone and soft-tissue changes. The contents include an introductory overview of the ''Mosaic of Arthritis'' followed by sections on adult rheumatoid arthritis, seronegative spondyloarthropathies, classic collagen disease, enthesiopathies, and lastly a section on gout and psuedogout. The subject index is specific and indexes figures with boldface type. Each section is introduced by a brief outline or overview of the radiographic spectrum of the joint disorder to be illustrated

  16. Clinical manifestations in uveitis patients with and without rheumatic disease in a Chinese population in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Shi-Ting; Yao, Tsung-Chieh; Huang, Jing-Long; Yeh, Kuo-Wei; Hwang, Yih-Shiou

    2017-12-01

    Uveitis can be a local eye disease or a manifestation of systemic rheumatologic disorders. However, the differences of clinical manifestations between uveitis patients with or without systemic rheumatologic disease have been seldom described in literature. We investigated the clinical features and complications of rheumatic disease-related uveitis, and compared the characteristics in patients with and without rheumatic disease in a Chinese population in Taiwan. A retrospective review was performed for all patients who had been diagnosed with uveitis between January 2009 and June 2014 at the Department of Ophthalmology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taoyuan, Taiwan. A total of 823 uveitis patients were enrolled in the study, including 123 patients with rheumatic diseases. The most frequent rheumatic diseases included ankylosing spondylitis (5.8%), followed by Behçet's disease (2.8%), sarcoidosis (1.4%), psoriasis (1.1%), and juvenile idiopathic arthritis (1.1%). Compared with patients without rheumatic disease, those with rheumatic disease-related uveitis had a lower mean age at onset (35.1 ± 15.8 years vs. 44.0 ± 17.5 years), a longer follow-up period (27.1 ± 25.3 months vs. 22.2 ± 23.0 months), a higher incidence of anterior uveitis (69.0% vs. 46.3%), less frequent posterior uveitis (4.9% vs. 21.4%), a higher incidence of recurrence (26.8% vs. 14.1%), more frequent bilateral involvement (53.7% vs. 38.8%), and more frequent posterior synechiae (17.2% vs. 9.4%). The disease course and clinical manifestations of rheumatic disease-related uveitis were different from those unrelated. Patients with rheumatic disease-related uveitis had a higher recurrent rate and more frequent posterior synechiae than patients without rheumatic diseases. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. Rudolf Virchow's medical school dissertation on rheumatism and the cornea: overlooked tribute to the cornea in biomedical research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margo, Curtis E; Harman, Lynn E

    2015-02-01

    To critique Rudolf Virchow's medical school dissertation on rheumatism and the cornea and to determine whether it might have anticipated his remarkable career in medicine. Review of the English translation of Rudolf Virchow's de Rheumate Praesertim Corneae written in 1843. The dissertation was more than 7000 words long. Virchow considered rheumatism as an irritant disorder not induced by acid as traditionally thought but by albumin. He concluded that inflammation was secondary to a primary irritant and that the "seat" of rheumatism was "gelatinous" (connective) tissues, which included the cornea. He divided kerato-rheumatism into different varieties. The prognosis of keratitis was variable, and would eventually lapse into "scrofulosis, syphilis, or arthritis of the cornea." Virchow's dissertation characterizes rheumatism in terms of chemical and tissue interactions that make little sense in the context of today's knowledge of rheumatic disease and keratitis. Ironically, many of these concepts were made obsolete by the cellular model of disease that Virchow championed. Virchow decided to pursue the study of rheumatism through the cornea because he thought that the cornea was an ideal tissue to study disease. This discernment was passed on to his students whose seminal contributions to general pathology were based on research with the cornea. It is debatable whether Virchow's insight into the importance of the cornea in biomedical research at such an early stage of his career could have predicted his monumental contributions to medicine.

  18. Acute rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carapetis, Jonathan R.; Beaton, Andrea; Cunningham, Madeleine W.; Guilherme, Luiza; Karthikeyan, Ganesan; Mayosi, Bongani M.; Sable, Craig; Steer, Andrew; Wilson, Nigel; Wyber, Rosemary; Zühlke, Liesl

    2018-01-01

    Acute rheumatic fever (ARF) is the result of an autoimmune response to pharyngitis caused by infection with group A Streptococcus. The long-term damage to cardiac valves caused by ARF, which can result from a single severe episode or from multiple recurrent episodes of the illness, is known as rheumatic heart disease (RHD) and is a notable cause of morbidity and mortality in resource-poor settings around the world. Although our understanding of disease pathogenesis has advanced in recent years, this has not led to dramatic improvements in diagnostic approaches, which are still reliant on clinical features using the Jones Criteria, or treatment practices. Indeed, penicillin has been the mainstay of treatment for decades and there is no other treatment that has been proven to alter the likelihood or the severity of RHD after an episode of ARF. Recent advances — including the use of echocardiographic diagnosis in those with ARF and in screening for early detection of RHD, progress in developing group A streptococcal vaccines and an increased focus on the lived experience of those with RHD and the need to improve quality of life — give cause for optimism that progress will be made in coming years against this neglected disease that affects populations around the world, but is a particular issue for those living in poverty. PMID:27188830

  19. Monoclonal gammopathy in rheumatic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yue; Chen, Long; Jia, Yuan; Liu, Yang; Wen, Lei; Liang, Yaoxian; An, Yuan; Chen, Shi; Su, Yin; Li, Zhanguo

    2018-07-01

    switch, 1 progressed to multiple myeloma (MM), and another 2 experienced renal injuries attributed by monoclonal or polyclonal plasma cell interstitial infiltration. Seven (17.1%) of the 41 MG patients presented hematological neoplasias, 4 with MM, 2 with smoldering multiple myeloma, and 1 with B cell lymphoma of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) type. The presence of light-chain MG was associated with the development of MM [OR 17.5 (95%CI 1.551-197.435), P = 0.041], but not with an increased risk of lymphoma or SMM. MG was observed in patients with various rheumatic disorders, with SS being the most common type. The presence of MG might be associated with higher disease activity. The development of hematological neoplasias including MM and lymphoma was seen in this setting. Therefore, we recommend the screening for MG and close monitoring for potential malignant transformation in patients with rheumatic diseases as needed.

  20. Rheumatic Diseases in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Qing Yu; Chen, Ren; Darmawan, John; Xiao, Zheng Yu; Chen, Su Biao; Wigley, Richard; Le Chen, Shun; Zhang, Nai Zheng

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Epidemiological studies of rheumatic diseases have been conducted during the past 20 years in China. The aim of this study was to clarify prevalence rates of common rheumatic diseases in China. Methods Relevant reports of population-based surveys conducted from 1980 to 2006 were retrieved. Studies using the World Health Organization-International League of Associations for Rheumatology COPCORD (Community Oriented Program for Control of Rheumatic Diseases) protocol and those that did not employ this protocol but were published in recognized journals were identified and analyzed. Results Thirty-eight surveys including 241,169 adults from 25 provinces/cities were pooled for analysis. The prevalence of rheumatic complaints ranged from 11.6% to 46.4%, varying by locality, study protocol and age of the people surveyed. Prevalence of symptomatic osteoarthritis (OA) varied from 5.1% to 20.8%, with common sites of involvement being the lumbar spine, knee joint and cervical spine. Compared with rates of radiographic and symptomatic knee OA in the USA, elderly men in Beijing exhibited similar prevalence rates and elderly women exhibited a higher prevalence. The prevalence of hip OA and hand OA was much lower in Chinese than in Caucasian populations, but both kinds of OA were more common in coal miners. The prevalence of ankylosing spondylitis ranged from 0.2% to 0.54% among Han ethnic Chinese and were lower among mixed ethnic populations. The prevalence of psoriatic arthritis ranged from 0.01% to 0.1%, and that of reactive arthritis was 0.02%; undifferentiated spondyloarthropathy was identified in 0.64% to 1.2% of the individuals included in the surveys. The prevalence of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) ranged from 0.2% to 0.93%, with the highest rate being reported from a Taiwan urban area. In mainland China there were no significant differences in prevalence of RA between the northern and southern parts of China, or between different ethnic groups. The prevalence of

  1. ABO blood groups and rheumatic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çildağ, Songül; Kara, Yasemin; Şentürk, Taşkın

    2017-12-01

    Various genetic and environmental risk factors have been shown to be associated with the incidence of rheumatic diseases. However, the pathogenesis of rheumatic diseases poorly understood. Several studies have shown associations of ABO blood groups with various diseases. Our study aimed to determine whether there is an association between the types of rheumatic diseases and ABO and Rh blood groups. The study included the patients, followed up at the Immunology-Rheumatology clinic between January 2016 and December 2016 for diagnosis of rheumatic disease, who had an ABO Rh blood data. Age, gender, type of rheumatic disease, ABO Rh blood groups were recorded. When 823 patients were assessed for blood types, 42.5% patients had A type, 33.2% had O type, 15.4% had B type, and 8.9% had AB type. There was significant difference in the distribution of blood types in rheumatic diseases. While SpA, vasculitis, UCTD, Behçet's and RA were more common in the patients with A blood type; FMF, SLE, SSc and SjS were more common in the patients with O blood type. In addition, the blood type where all the diseases are observed the least commonly was AB. There was significant difference in the distribution of Rh factor in rheumatic diseases. 92.2% patients were Rh positive and 7.8% patients were Rh negative. In our study, we thought that the higher incidence of different rheumatic diseases in different blood types was associated with different genetic predisposition.

  2. Prevention of Acute Rheumatic Fever and Rheumatic Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Patient Page Prevention of Acute Rheumatic Fever and Rheumatic Heart Disease Mariana Mirabel , Kumar Narayanan , Xavier Jouven , Eloi Marijon ... regurgitant ) valves. Over time, there is progressive damage (rheumatic heart disease, RHD) that may lead to heart failure, stroke, ...

  3. Menopause and Rheumatic Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talsania, Mitali; Scofield, Robert Hal

    2017-05-01

    Menopause occurs naturally in women at about 50 years of age. There is a wealth of data concerning the relationship of menopause to systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, and osteoarthritis; there are limited data concerning other rheumatic diseases. Age at menopause may affect the risk and course of rheumatic diseases. Osteoporosis, an integral part of inflammatory rheumatic diseases, is made worse by menopause. Hormone replacement therapy has been studied; its effects vary depending on the disease and even different manifestations within the same disease. Cyclophosphamide can induce early menopause, but there is underlying decreased ovarian reserve in rheumatic diseases. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Frequency of rheumatic diseases in Portugal: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monjardino, Teresa; Lucas, Raquel; Barros, Henrique

    2011-01-01

    To describe the frequency of rheuma­tic diseases in Portugal through a systematic review of published literature, critically appraising available information and identifying data collection gaps. We systematically reviewed the literature to retrieve data on the occurrence of rheumatic diseases in Portugal through MEDLINE and Índex das Revistas Médicas Portuguesas searches, PhD theses, and national health surveys reports. Original articles in English or Portuguese published between 1 January 2000 and 31 December 2010 were included. We retrieved information for the prevalence of rheumatic diseases, osteoarthritis, back pain, work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WRMDs), osteoporosis, fibromyalgia, rheumatoid arthritis, spondyloarthritis and other systemic rheumatic diseases and for the incidence of back pain, osteoporotic fracture and other systemic rheumatic diseases. The prevalence of rheumatic diseases ranged from 16.0% to 24.0% and the prevalence of osteoarthritis was 11.1% (95% confidence intervals (95%CI): 9.4-13.1) in the knee and 5.5% (95%CI: 4.3-7.0) in the hip. Regarding back pain, period prevalence ranged from 8.0% (95%CI: 6.1-10.1) to 29.5% (95%CI: 23.4-36.2) in children and from 12.3% (95%CI: 10.5-14.3) to 51.3% (95%CI: 48.6-53.9) in adults. The prevalence of WRMDs ranged from 5.9% to 84.2% (95%CI: 80.8-87.3). The yearly incidence of osteoporotic fracture (per 100 000) ranged from 93.3 to 481 (95%CI: 407-564) in women and from 31.9 to 154 (95%CI: 106-218) in men. The prevalence of osteoporosis in women ranged from 11.0% to 15.4% (95%CI: 13.4-17.6) and in men from 1.1% to 16.8% (95%CI: 12.2-22.3). The prevalence of fibromyalgia ranged from 3.6% (95%CI: 2.0-5.2) to 3.7% (95%CI: 2.0-5.4). The prevalence estimates of ankylosing spondylitis and of spondyloarthritis were 0.6% and 1.6% (95%CI: 0.8-2.7), respectively. The prevalence of systemic lupus erythematosus was estimated in 0.2% (95%CI: 0.1-0.8). There is a broad spectrum of information available

  5. X-ray atlas of rheumatic diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dihlmann, W.

    1986-01-01

    This atlas comprises instructive X-rays of the various inflammatory rheumatic joint diseases in all stages at the extremities and the spinal column. In addition, the complex pattern of the wide range of arthroses, also known as degenerative rheumatic disease is included. Besides the instructive pointers to X-ray diagnosis, the book is also a guide to differential diagnosis. Hence, this book is actually an X-ray atlas of joint diseases in general. Selected Contents: Introduction: What Does ''Rheumatism'' Actually Mean?/Radiographic Methodology in Rheumatic Diseases of the Locomotor System/The Mosaic of Arthritis/Adult Rheumatoid Arthritis/Seronegative Spondylarthritis/Classic Collagen Diseases/Enthesiopathies/Gout-Pseudogout

  6. Immunomodulatory interplay of the microbiome and therapy of rheumatic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostrov, Barbara E; Amsterdam, Daniel

    2017-11-01

    Modulation of the immune system by microbes, especially from the gastrointestinal tract, is increasingly considered a key factor in the onset, course and outcome of rheumatic diseases. The interplay of the microbiome, along with genetic predisposition and environmental exposure, is thought to be an important trigger for rheumatic diseases. Improved identification of the relationship of disease-specific genetic alterations and rheumatic diseases has potential diagnostic and therapeutic applications. Treatment of rheumatic disorders is influenced by microbial actions but this interplay can be challenging due to variable and unpredictable responses to therapies. Expanded knowledge of the microbiome now allows clinicians to more precisely select ideal medication regimens and to predict response to and toxicity from drugs. Rheumatic diseases and associated therapies were among the earliest microbiome interactions investigated, yet it is notable that current research is focused on clinical and immunological associations but, in comparison, a limited number of studies regarding the microbiome's impact on treatment for rheumatic diseases have been published. In the coming years, further knowledge of immunomodulating interactions between the microbiome and the immune system will aid our understanding of autoimmunity and will be increasingly important in selection of therapeutic agents for patients with autoimmune and rheumatic diseases. In this review, recent literature regarding the bidirectional immunomodulatory effects of the microbiome with rheumatic diseases and current understanding and gaps regarding the drug-microbiome interface in the management of these disorders is presented.

  7. Early, Incomplete, or Preclinical Autoimmune Systemic Rheumatic Diseases and Pregnancy Outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinillo, Arsenio; Beneventi, Fausta; Locatelli, Elena; Ramoni, Vèronique; Caporali, Roberto; Alpini, Claudia; Albonico, Giulia; Cavagnoli, Chiara; Montecucco, Carlomaurizio

    2016-10-01

    To evaluate the impact of preclinical systemic autoimmune rheumatic disorders on pregnancy outcome. In this longitudinal cohort study, patients were enrolled during the first trimester of pregnancy if they reported having had connective tissue disorder symptoms, were found to be positive for circulating autoantibodies, and on clinical evaluation were judged to have a preclinical or incomplete rheumatic disorder. The incidence of fetal growth restriction (FGR), preeclampsia, and adverse pregnancy outcomes in patients with preclinical rheumatic disorders was compared with that in selected controls, after adjustment for confounders by penalized logistic regression. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) were calculated. Of 5,232 women screened, 150 (2.9%) were initially diagnosed as having a suspected rheumatic disorder. After a mean ± SD postpartum follow-up of 16.7 ± 5.5 months, 64 of these women (42.7%) had no clinically apparent rheumatic disease and 86 (57.3%) had persistent symptoms and positive autoantibody results, including 10 (6.7%) who developed a definitive rheumatic disease. The incidences of preeclampsia/FGR and of small for gestational age (SGA) infants were 5.1% (23 of 450) and 9.3% (42 of 450), respectively, among controls, 12.5% (8 of 640) (OR 2.7 [95% CI 1.1-6.4]) and 18.8% (12 of 64) (OR 2.2 [95% CI 1.1-4.5]), respectively, among women with no clinically apparent disease, and 16.3% (14 of 86) (OR 3.8 [95% CI 1.9-7.7]) and 18.6% (16 of 86) (OR 2.3 [95% CI 1.2-4.3]), respectively, among those with persisting symptoms at follow-up. Mean ± SD umbilical artery Doppler pulsatility indices were higher among women with no clinically apparent disease (0.95 ± 0.2) and those with persisting symptoms (0.96 ± 0.21) than in controls (0.89 ± 0.12) (P = 0.01 and P rheumatic disorders were associated with an increased risk of FGR/preeclampsia and SGA. The impact of these findings and their utility in screening

  8. Tai chi and rheumatic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chenchen

    2011-02-01

    Tai chi is a complex multicomponent mind-body exercise. Many studies have provided evidence that tai chi benefits patients with a variety of chronic disorders. This form of mind-body exercise enhances cardiovascular fitness, muscular strength, balance, and physical function and seems to be associated with reduced stress, anxiety, and depression and improved quality of life. Thus, despite certain limitations in the evidence, tai chi can be recommended to patients with osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, and fibromyalgia as a complementary and alternative medical approach. This article overviews the current knowledge about tai chi to better inform clinical decision making for rheumatic patients. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Fasting and rheumatic diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammad Hassan Jokar

    2015-01-01

    Fasting is one of the important religious practices of Muslims, in which the individuals abstain from eating and drinking from dawn to sunset. Fasting is not obligatory or even not allowed, in case it causes health problems to the fasting individual. Rheumatic diseases are a major group of chronic diseases which can bring about numerous problems while fasting. The aim of this article is to review the impact of Islamic fasting on rheumatic patients, based on the scientific evidences.

  10. Hearing loss in fibromyalgia? Somatic sensory and non-sensory symptoms in patients with fibromyalgia and other rheumatic disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolfe, Frederick; Rasker, Johannes J.; Häuser, W.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: It has been proposed that fibromyalgia can be understood as a disorder of central sensitisation and dysregulation (CD) and that characteristic somatic symptoms are the result of `central augmentation`. We examined this hypothesis by analysing sensory and non-sensory variables in the

  11. Rheumatic Fever and Rheumatic Heart Disease: Collaboration Patterns and Research Core Topics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salinas, Alejandro; González, Gregorio; Manuel Ramos, Jose

    2016-09-01

    Rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease (RHD) are important health problems in developing countries. The study aim was to provide a review and content analysis of the scientific literature on rheumatic fever and RHD over a 70-year period. Medline was employed via the online PubMed service of the US National Library of Medicine, to search for all documents containing the MeSH terms 'rheumatic fever' or 'rheumatic heart disease' between January 1945 and December 2013. A total of 18,552 references was retrieved. Between 1945 and 1970 the number of annual publications containing the search terms increased, but decreased between 1971 and 2013. Between 1990 and 2013, national collaboration (co-authorship) was greatly increased, from 8.7% to 41.7% of the total reports. International collaboration also increased, from 2.5% to 14.8% (p = 0.001). The United States was the main collaborating country, sharing ties mainly with India, South Africa and Brazil. A content analysis led to the identification of three prominent core research topics, chief among which were heart diseases (rheumatic fever diseases, mitral valve diseases and endocarditis). Other areas of note included streptococcal infections and rheumatic diseases (which, in addition to rheumatic fever, also highlighted arthritis and juvenile arthritis). Publications on rheumatic fever and RHD had a major impact during the 1960s, but research groups interest has since declined overall, in line with a decreasing interest in these diseases in developed countries. In contrast, national and international collaboration has increased, a phenomenon that should be encouraged for research into these and other diseases that affect developing countries.

  12. Pregnancy and rheumatic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gayed, M; Gordon, C

    2007-11-01

    Pregnancy is an issue that should be discussed with all patients with rheumatic diseases who are in the reproductive age group. Infertility is rarely due to the disease but can be associated with cyclophosphamide therapy. Most rheumatic diseases that are well controlled prior to pregnancy do not deteriorate in pregnancy, providing that the patient continues with appropriate disease-modifying therapy. Some patients with inflammatory arthritis go in to remission during pregnancy. Patients with renal involvement may be at increased risk of disease flare. This needs to be distinguished from pre-eclampsia. Intrauterine growth restriction is more likely in patients with active systemic disease, hypertension, a history of thrombosis and renal involvement. Premature delivery may need to be planned to reduce the risks of stillbirth and can be associated with a variety of neonatal complications. Post-partum flare is common in all the rheumatic diseases.

  13. Abnormal Uterine Bleeding including coagulopathies and other menstrual disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deligeoroglou, Efthimios; Karountzos, Vasileios

    2018-04-01

    Abnormal Uterine Bleeding (AUB) is a frequent cause of visits to the emergency department and a major reason for concern among adolescents and their families. The most common cause of AUB, in otherwise healthy adolescents, is ovulatory dysfunction, although 5-36% of adolescents who present with heavy menstrual bleeding, have an underlying bleeding disorder (BD). The most common form of BDs is von Willebrand Disease, reflecting 13% of adolescents with AUB. Management of AUB depends on the underlying etiology, the bleeding severity, as well as the need for hospitalization. Treatment of adolescents with an underlying coagulopathy depends on the severity of the BD, while therapeutic interventions are summarized in supportive measures, hormonal treatments (e.g. Combined Oral Contraceptives), non-hormonal treatments (e.g. tranexamic acid and desmopressin), surgical options (e.g. dilatation & curettage) and treatment options in specific conditions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Contraception for adolescents with chronic rheumatic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benito Lourenço

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Contraception is an important issue and should be a matter of concern in every medical visit of adolescent and young patients with chronic rheumatic diseases. This narrative review discusses contraception methods in adolescents with juvenile systemic lupus erythematosus (JSLE, antiphospholipid syndrome (APS, juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA and juvenile dermatomyositis (JDM. Barrier methods are safe and their use should be encouraged for all adolescents with chronic rheumatic diseases. Combined oral contraceptives (COC are strictly prohibited for JSLE and APS patients with positive antiphospholipid antibodies. Reversible long-acting contraception can be encouraged and offered routinely to the JSLE adolescent patient and other rheumatic diseases. Progestin-only pills are safe in the majority of rheumatic diseases, although the main concern related to its use by adolescents is poor adherence due to menstrual irregularity. Depot medroxyprogesterone acetate injections every three months is a highly effective contraception strategy, although its long-term use is associated with decreased bone mineral density. COC or other combined hormonal contraceptive may be options for JIA and JDM patients. Oral levonorgestrel should be considered as an emergency contraception method for all adolescents with chronic rheumatic diseases, including patients with contraindication to COC.

  15. Anti-B cell antibody therapies for inflammatory rheumatic diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faurschou, Mikkel; Jayne, David R W

    2014-01-01

    Several monoclonal antibodies targeting B cells have been tested as therapeutics for inflammatory rheumatic diseases. We review important observations from randomized clinical trials regarding the efficacy and safety of anti-B cell antibody-based therapies for rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus...... and functions in rheumatic disorders. Future studies should also evaluate how to maintain disease control by means of conventional and/or biologic immunosuppressants after remission-induction with anti-B cell antibodies....

  16. Rheumatic diseases and pregnancy

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    women with rheumatic diseases constitute a high-risk population, with potential adverse fetal ... who are not actively planning a pregnancy, or are taking drugs that are ... disease.[9] Fetal loss (miscarriage or stillbirth) occurs in about 20% of ..... trimester,[3] with up to 70% of patients needing NSAIDs. .... No. Use low dose.

  17. Radiological imaging in pediatric rheumatic diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matuszewska, Genowefa; Zaniewicz-Kaniewska, Katarzyna; Włodkowska-Korytkowska, Monika; Smorawińska, Patrycja; Saied, Fadhil; Kunisz, Wojciech; Sudoł-Szopińska, Iwona

    2014-01-01

    Radiological imaging plays a fundamental role in the diagnosis and monitoring of rheumatic diseases. The basic method of imaging is a classic X-ray picture, which for many years has been used as a single method for the recognition and evaluation of the effects of disease management. In today’s modern day treatment of rheumatic diseases, ultrasonography and magnetic resonance are more commonly performed for early detection of inflammatory changes in the region of soft tissue, subchondral bone and bone marrow. In spite of their usefulness and fundamental role in the diagnosis, X-ray still remains an essential tool in the diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis in children and is complementary to today’s methods of imaging diagnostics. In clinical practice, X-ray imaging is still an important examination performed not only to recognize the disorders, but also to provide a differential diagnosis. It helps estimate disease progression and is used to monitor the effects of treatment and the development of possible complications. Differential diagnosis of rheumatic diseases is performed on the basis of localization and type of radiographic changes. The surrounding periarticular soft tissues, bone structures, joint space, with special attention to articular bone surfaces and epiphyses, are analyzed. The aim of this work is to describe characteristic inflammatory changes present on X-ray imaging typical for the most commonly diagnosed rheumatic diseases in children, such as juvenile idiopathic arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, systemic scleroderma, mixed connective tissue disease, juvenile dermatomyositis, juvenile spondyloarthropathy and systemic vascular disease

  18. Global research priorities in rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carapetis, Jonathan R; Zühlke, Liesl J

    2011-01-01

    We now stand at a critical juncture for rheumatic fever (RF) and rheumatic heart disease (RHD) control. In recent years, we have seen a surge of interest in these diseases in regions of the world where RF/RHD mostly occur. This brings real opportunities to make dramatic progress in the next few years, but also real risks if we miss these opportunities. Most public health and clinical approaches in RF/RHD arose directly from programmes of research. Many unanswered questions remain, including those around how to implement what we know will work, so research will continue to be essential in our efforts to bring a global solution to this disease. Here we outline our proposed research priorities in RF/RHD for the coming decade, grouped under the following four challenges: Translating what we know already into practical RHD control; How to identify people with RHD earlier, so that preventive measures have a higher chance of success; Better understanding of disease pathogenesis, with a view to improved diagnosis and treatment of ARF and RHD; and Finding an effective approach to primary prevention. We propose a mixture of basic, applied, and implementation science. With concerted efforts, strong links to clinical and public health infrastructure, and advocacy and funding support from the international community, there are good prospects for controlling these RF and RHD over the next decade

  19. Role of Adipokines in Atherosclerosis: Interferences with Cardiovascular Complications in Rheumatic Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scotece, Morena; Conde, Javier; Gómez, Rodolfo; López, Verónica; Pino, Jesús; González, Antonio; Lago, Francisca; Gómez-Reino, Juan J.; Gualillo, Oreste

    2012-01-01

    Patients with rheumatic diseases have an increased risk of mortality by cardiovascular events. In fact, several rheumatic diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, and ankylosing spondylitis are associated with a higher prevalence of cardiovascular diseases (CVDs). Although traditional cardiovascular risk factors have been involved in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases in rheumatic patients, these alterations do not completely explain the enhanced cardiovascular risk in this population. Obesity and its pathologic alteration of fat mass and dysfunction, due to an altered pattern of secretion of proinflammatory adipokines, could be one of the links between cardiovascular and rheumatic diseases. Indeed, the incidence of CVDs is augmented in obese individuals with rheumatic disorders. Thus, in this paper we explore in detail the relationships among adipokines, rheumatic diseases, and cardiovascular complications by giving to the reader a holistic vision and several suggestions for future perspectives and potential clinical implications. PMID:22910888

  20. Osteoporosis in Rheumatic Diseases: Anti-rheumatic Drugs and the Skeleton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubrovsky, Alanna M; Lim, Mie Jin; Lane, Nancy E

    2018-05-01

    Osteoporosis in rheumatic diseases is a very well-known complication. Systemic inflammation results in both generalized and localized bone loss and erosions. Recently, increased knowledge of inflammatory process in rheumatic diseases has resulted in the development of potent inhibitors of the cytokines, the biologic DMARDs. These treatments reduce systemic inflammation and have some effect on the generalized and localized bone loss. Progression of bone erosion was slowed by TNF, IL-6 and IL-1 inhibitors, a JAK inhibitor, a CTLA4 agonist, and rituximab. Effects on bone mineral density varied between the biological DMARDs. Medications that are approved for the treatment of osteoporosis have been evaluated to prevent bone loss in rheumatic disease patients, including denosumab, cathepsin K, bisphosphonates, anti-sclerostin antibodies and parathyroid hormone (hPTH 1-34), and have some efficacy in both the prevention of systemic bone loss and reducing localized bone erosions. This article reviews the effects of biologic DMARDs on bone mass and erosions in patients with rheumatic diseases and trials of anti-osteoporotic medications in animal models and patients with rheumatic diseases.

  1. Rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease in Africa

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Acute rheumatic fever (ARF), with its varied and potentially devas tating cardiac complication of rheumatic heart disease (RHD), has largely been eradicated from developing countries, but continues to be a scourge mainly in poorly resourced areas of the world and also among the indigenous populations of some wealthy ...

  2. Immunoadsorption for collagen and rheumatic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaji, Ken

    2017-10-01

    The field of therapeutics has seen remarkable progress in the recent years, which has made mainstream drug treatment possible for collagen and rheumatic diseases. However, treatment of intractable cases where drug effectiveness is poor is a challenge. Furthermore, organ damage, concurrent illnesses or allergic reactions make adequate drug therapy impossible. For such cases, therapeutic apheresis is very significant, and it is important how this should be valued related to drug therapies. Therapeutic apheresis for collagen and rheumatic diseases involves the removal of factors that cause and exacerbate the disease; the aim of immunoadsorption, in particular, is to improve the clinical condition of patients with autoimmune disease by selectively removing pathogenic immune complexes and autoantibodies from their plasma. Immunoadsorption, in particular, unlike plasma exchange and DFPP, utilizes a high-affinity column that selectively removes autoantibodies and immune complexes, leaving other plasma components intact. There is no need to replenish fresh frozen plasma or blood products such as albumin and gamma globulin preparations. Immunoadsorption is thus superior in terms of safety, as the risk of infection or allergic reaction relating to these preparations can be avoided. We anticipate future investigations of application of synchronized therapy using drugs and therapeutic apheresis, most notably immunoadsorption, in combination to treat intractable clinical conditions such as collagen and rheumatic diseases. In this paper, our discussion includes the indications for immunoadsorption such as collagen and rheumatic diseases, the relevant conditions and types, as well as the latest understanding related to methods and clinical efficacy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Psychological Factors Including Demographic Features, Mental Illnesses, and Personality Disorders as Predictors in Internet Addiction Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malihe Farahani

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Problematic internet use is an important social problem among adolescents and has become a global health issue. This study identified predictors and patterns of problematic internet use among adult students.Method: In this study, 400 students were recruited using stratified sampling technique. Participants were selected among students from 4 universities in Tehran and Karaj, Iran, during 2016 and 2017. Internet Addiction Test (IAT, Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory - Third Edition (MCMI-III, Structured Clinical Interview for DSM (SCID-I, and semi-structured interview were used to diagnose internet addiction. Then, the association between main psychiatric disorders and internet addiction was surveyed. Data were analyzed using SPSS18 software by performing descriptive statistics and multiple logistic regression analysis methods. P- Values less than 0.05 were considered statistically significant.Results: After controlling the demographic variables, it was found that narcissistic personality disorder, obsessive- compulsive personality disorder, anxiety, bipolar disorders, depression, and phobia could increase the odds ratio (OR of internet addiction by 2.1, 1.1, 2.6, 1.1, 2.2 and 2.5-folds, respectively (p-value<0.05, however, other psychiatric or personality disorders did not have a significant effect on the equation.Conclusion: The findings of this study revealed that some mental disorders affect internet addiction. Considering the sensitivity and importance of the cyberspace, it is necessary to evaluate mental disorders that correlate with internet addiction.

  4. The metabolic role of the gut microbiota in health and rheumatic disease: mechanisms and interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdollahi-Roodsaz, Shahla; Abramson, Steven B; Scher, Jose U

    2016-08-01

    The role of the gut microbiome in animal models of inflammatory and autoimmune disease is now well established. The human gut microbiome is currently being studied as a potential modulator of the immune response in rheumatic disorders. However, the vastness and complexity of this host-microorganism interaction is likely to go well beyond taxonomic, correlative observations. In fact, most advances in the field relate to the functional and metabolic capabilities of these microorganisms and their influence on mucosal immunity and systemic inflammation. An intricate relationship between the microbiome and the diet of the host is now fully recognized, with the microbiota having an important role in the degradation of polysaccharides into active metabolites. This Review summarizes the current knowledge on the metabolic role of the microbiota in health and rheumatic disease, including the advances in pharmacomicrobiomics and its potential use in diagnostics, therapeutics and personalized medicine.

  5. Rheumatic Disease Autoantibodies in Patients with Autoimmune Thyroid Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nisihara, Renato; Pigosso, Yasmine; Prado, Nathalia; Utiyama, Shirley R R; Carvalho, Gisah; Skare, Thelma

    2018-06-04

    Patients with autoimmune thyroid diseases (ATD) such as Graves' disease (GD) and Hashimoto thyroiditis (HT) may have non-organ specific autoantibodies such as ANA (antinuclear antibodies) and RF (rheumatoid factor). To study the prevalence of rheumatic autoantibodies in a group of ATD patients without known rheumatic diseases and to evaluate its association with the patients' epidemiological and treatment profile. To follow positive non-organ specific autoantibody-positive ATD individuals to investigate whether they will develop a rheumatic disorder. A sample of 154 ATD patients (70 HT and 84 GD; mean age 45.3 ± 14.2) had determination of ANA by immunofluorescence, using hep-2 cells as substrate, extractable nuclear antigen (ENA) profile by ELISA kits and RF by latex agglutination. Epidemiological and treatment profile were obtained through chart review. These patients were followed for the mean period of five years, between 2010 to 2015. Positive ANA was found in 17.5% (27/154) of the patients: anti-Ro/SS-A in 4/154 (2.5%); anti-RNP in 4/154 (2.5%) and anti-La/SS-B in 3/154 (1.9%). None had anti-Sm antibodies. RF was detected in 12/154 (7.7%) of ATD patients and was more common in older individuals (p = 0.007). There was a positive association between the presence of RF and ANA (p = 0.03; OR = 3.89; 95% CI = 1.1-13.3). None of the patients with positive autoantibodies developed clinical rheumatic diseases during the period of observation. We found rheumatic autoantibodies in 17.5% of ATD patients without rheumatic diseases. None of them were associated with the appearance of clinical rheumatic disorder during the period of five years. ©2018The Author(s). Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  6. A Descriptive Study on the Neonatal Morbidity Profile of Autism Spectrum Disorders, Including a Comparison with Other Neurodevelopmental Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atladóttir, H. Ó.; Schendel, D. E.; Parner, E. T.; Henriksen, T. B.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the profile of specific neonatal morbidities in children later diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), and to compare this profile with the profile of children with hyperkinetic disorder, cerebral palsy, epilepsy or intellectual disability. This is a Danish population based cohort study, including all…

  7. Male fertility potential alteration in rheumatic diseases: a systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Bruno Camargo Tiseo; Marcello Cocuzza; Eloisa Bonfá; Miguel Srougi; A Clovis

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background Improved targeted therapies for rheumatic diseases were developed recently resulting in a better prognosis for affected patients. Nowadays, patients are living longer and with improved quality of life, including fertility potential. These patients are affected by impaired reproductive function and the causes are often multifactorial related to particularities of each disease. This review highlights how rheumatic diseases and their management affect testicular function an...

  8. Rheumatic fever associated with antiphospholipid syndrome: systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Felipe; de Carvalho, Jozélio

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the clinical associations between rheumatic fever and antiphospholipid syndrome and the impact of coexistence of these two diseases in an individual. Systematic review in electronics databases, regarding the period from 1983 to 2012. The keywords: "Rheumatic Fever," "Antiphospholipid Syndrome," and "Antiphospholipid Antibody Syndrome" are used. were identified 11 cases described in the literature about the association of rheumatic fever and antiphospholipid syndrome. Clinical presentation of rheumatic fever was characterized by the predominance of carditis (11/11) and chorea (7/11). Regarding the manifestations of APS, the stroke was observed in 7/11 (63.6%), with one of them having probable embolic origin. The present study brings the information that the association between APS and RF is quite rare, however, is of great clinical importance. Doctors who deal with the RF should include in their differential diagnosis the APS, especially in the presence of stroke in patients with RF and whose echocardiogram does not show intracavitary thrombi.

  9. Osseous temporomandibular joint abnormalities in rheumatic disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larheim, T.A.; Kolbenstvedt, A.; Rikshospitalet, Oslo

    1990-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) was compared with hypocycloidal tomography in 30 joints of 15 adults with rheumatic disease. CT included 1.5 mm thick axial scans (at 1.0 mm intervals) with reformatted oblique sagittal and oblique coronal sections. Multisection (at 2.0 mm intervals) tomography included oblique sagittal and occasionally, oblique coronal sections. CT demonstrated bone abnormalities in 21 and tomography in 20 joints, indicating high agreement between the imaging modalities regarding number of abnormal TMJs. Bone structures were, however, better visualized by multiplanar CT due to superior contrast and spatial resolution particularly in the most lateral and medial parts of the joint, indicating superiority of CT for depicting subtle bony TMJ abnormalities in patients with rheumatic disease. (orig.)

  10. Sexual and reproductive health in rheumatic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Østensen, Monika

    2017-08-01

    Family size is reduced among patients with rheumatic diseases. The causes for the low number of children are multifactorial and include impaired sexual function, decreased gonadal function, pregnancy loss, therapy and personal choices. Sexuality contributes to quality of life in patients with rheumatic disease, but is often ignored by health professionals. Both disease-related factors and psychological responses to chronic disease can impair sexual functioning. Toxic effects of anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive drugs can induce transient or permanent gonadal failure in women and men. Furthermore, permanent infertility can be a consequence of treatment with cyclophosphamide, whereas transient infertility can be caused by NSAIDs in women and sulfasalazine in men. These adverse effects must be communicated to the patients, and measures to preserve fertility should be initiated before the start of gonadotoxic therapy. Management of patients of both genders should include regular family planning, effective treatment of high disease activity, sexual counselling, and, if necessary, infertility treatment.

  11. The role of gut microbiota in the pathogenesis of rheumatic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Danli; Wu, Chanyuan; Zeng, Xiaofeng; Wang, Qian

    2018-01-01

    Rheumatic diseases refer to many diseases with a loss of immune self-tolerance, leading to a chronic inflammation, degeneration, or metabolic derangement in multiple organs or tissues. The cause of rheumatic diseases remains to be elucidated, though both environmental and genetic factors are required for the development of rheumatic diseases. Over the past decades, emerging studies suggested that alteration of intestinal microbiota, known as gut dysbiosis, contributed to the occurrence or development of a range of rheumatic diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, ankylosing spondylitis, systemic sclerosis, and Sjogren's syndrome, through profoundly affecting the balance between pro- and anti-inflammatory immune responses. In this article, we discussed the role of gut microbiota in the pathogenesis of rheumatic diseases based on a large number of experimental and clinical materials, thereby providing a new insight for microbiota-targeted therapies to prevent or cure rheumatic diseases.

  12. A Review of Acute Rheumatic Fever and Rheumatic Heart Disease Research in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, L C; Nadia, R

    2016-06-01

    A total of 39 titles related to rheumatic fever or rheumatic heart disease in Malaysia were found with online literature search dating back to their inceptions and through 2014. Additional publications from conference journals were included. Nine papers were selected based on clinical relevance and future research implications. There were no population-based studies on the incidence or prevalence of ARF or RHD. In the 1980s, the incidence of admission due to ARF ranged from 2 to 21.1 per 100 000 paediatric admission per year. The burden of disease was significant in the adult population; 74.5% of patients with RHD were female, of which 77.1% were in the reproductive age group of 15-45 years old. Rheumatic mitral valve disease constituted almost half (46.7%) of all mitral valve repairs, ranging from 44.8 - 55.8 patients per year from 1997 - 2003. From 2010-2012, mitral valve interventions increased to 184 per year, of which 85.7% were mitral valve repair. In children with ARF, 25.4% - 41.7% had past history of rheumatic fever or RHD. In patients with rheumatic mitral valve disease undergoing surgical or medical interventions, only 6% reported history of ARF, none had history of GABHS pharyngitis or antibiotic prophylaxis. Only 44.7% of patients with RHD on follow-up were on intramuscular benzathine penicillin prophylaxis. Overall, there is scarcity of publications on ARF and RHD in Malaysia. Priority areas for research include determination of the incidence and prevalence of ARF and RHD, identification of high-risk populations, evaluation on the implementation and adherence of secondary preventive measures, identification of subclinical RHD especially amongst the high-risk population, and a surveillance system to monitor and evaluate preventive measures, disease progression and outcomes.

  13. What rheumatologists should know about orofacial manifestations of autoimmune rheumatic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrão, Aline Lauria Pires; Santana, Caroline Menezes; Bezerra, Ana Cristina Barreto; Amorim, Rivadávio Fernandes Batista de; Silva, Mariana Branco da; Mota, Licia Maria Henrique da; Falcão, Denise Pinheiro

    2016-02-11

    Orofacial manifestations occur frequently in rheumatic diseases and usually represent early signs of disease or of its activity that are still neglected in clinical practice. Among the autoimmune rheumatic diseases with potential for oral manifestations, rheumatoid arthritis (RA), inflammatory myopathies (IM), systemic sclerosis (SSc), systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), relapsing polychondritis (RP) and Sjögren's syndrome (SS) can be cited. Signs and symptoms such as oral hyposalivation, xerostomia, temporomandibular joint disorders, lesions of the oral mucosa, periodontal disease, dysphagia, and dysphonia may be the first expression of these rheumatic diseases. This article reviews the main orofacial manifestations of rheumatic diseases that may be of interest to the rheumatologist for diagnosis and monitoring of autoimmune rheumatic diseases. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  14. Evaluation of an automated connective tissue disease screening assay in Korean patients with systemic rheumatic diseases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seri Jeong

    Full Text Available This study aimed to evaluate the diagnostic utilities of the automated connective tissues disease screening assay, CTD screen, in patients with systemic rheumatic diseases. A total of 1093 serum samples were assayed using CTD screen and indirect immunofluorescent (IIF methods. Among them, 162 were diagnosed with systemic rheumatic disease, including rheumatoid arthritis (RA, systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE, and mixed connective tissue disease (MCT. The remaining 931 with non-systemic rheumatic disease were assigned to the control group. The median ratios of CTD screen tests were significantly higher in the systemic rheumatic disease group than in the control group. The positive likelihood ratios of the CTD screen were higher than those of IIF in patients with total rheumatic diseases (4.1 vs. 1.6, including SLE (24.3 vs. 10.7. The areas under the receiver operating characteristic curves (ROC-AUCs of the CTD screen for discriminating total rheumatic diseases, RA, SLE, and MCT from controls were 0.68, 0.56, 0.92 and 0.80, respectively. The ROC-AUCs of the combinations with IIF were significantly higher in patients with total rheumatic diseases (0.72 and MCT (0.85 than in those of the CTD screen alone. Multivariate analysis indicated that both the CTD screen and IIF were independent variables for predicting systemic rheumatic disease. CTD screen alone and in combination with IIF were a valuable diagnostic tool for predicting systemic rheumatic diseases, particularly for SLE.

  15. Evaluation of an automated connective tissue disease screening assay in Korean patients with systemic rheumatic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Seri; Yang, Heeyoung; Hwang, Hyunyong

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the diagnostic utilities of the automated connective tissues disease screening assay, CTD screen, in patients with systemic rheumatic diseases. A total of 1093 serum samples were assayed using CTD screen and indirect immunofluorescent (IIF) methods. Among them, 162 were diagnosed with systemic rheumatic disease, including rheumatoid arthritis (RA), systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), and mixed connective tissue disease (MCT). The remaining 931 with non-systemic rheumatic disease were assigned to the control group. The median ratios of CTD screen tests were significantly higher in the systemic rheumatic disease group than in the control group. The positive likelihood ratios of the CTD screen were higher than those of IIF in patients with total rheumatic diseases (4.1 vs. 1.6), including SLE (24.3 vs. 10.7). The areas under the receiver operating characteristic curves (ROC-AUCs) of the CTD screen for discriminating total rheumatic diseases, RA, SLE, and MCT from controls were 0.68, 0.56, 0.92 and 0.80, respectively. The ROC-AUCs of the combinations with IIF were significantly higher in patients with total rheumatic diseases (0.72) and MCT (0.85) than in those of the CTD screen alone. Multivariate analysis indicated that both the CTD screen and IIF were independent variables for predicting systemic rheumatic disease. CTD screen alone and in combination with IIF were a valuable diagnostic tool for predicting systemic rheumatic diseases, particularly for SLE.

  16. Should an obsessive-compulsive spectrum grouping of disorders be included in DSM-V?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Katharine A; Stein, Dan J; Rauch, Scott L; Hollander, Eric; Fallon, Brian A; Barsky, Arthur; Fineberg, Naomi; Mataix-Cols, David; Ferrão, Ygor Arzeno; Saxena, Sanjaya; Wilhelm, Sabine; Kelly, Megan M; Clark, Lee Anna; Pinto, Anthony; Bienvenu, O Joseph; Farrow, Joanne; Leckman, James

    2010-06-01

    The obsessive-compulsive (OC) spectrum has been discussed in the literature for two decades. Proponents of this concept propose that certain disorders characterized by repetitive thoughts and/or behaviors are related to obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), and suggest that such disorders be grouped together in the same category (i.e. grouping, or "chapter") in DSM. This article addresses this topic and presents options and preliminary recommendations to be considered for DSM-V. The article builds upon and extends prior reviews of this topic that were prepared for and discussed at a DSM-V Research Planning Conference on Obsessive-Compulsive Spectrum Disorders held in 2006. Our preliminary recommendation is that an OC-spectrum grouping of disorders be included in DSM-V. Furthermore, we preliminarily recommend that consideration be given to including this group of disorders within a larger supraordinate category of "Anxiety and Obsessive-Compulsive Spectrum Disorders." These preliminary recommendations must be evaluated in light of recommendations for, and constraints upon, the overall structure of DSM-V. (c) 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  17. Resilience in women with autoimmune rheumatic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas, Manuel; Rodriguez, Yhojan; Pacheco, Yovana; Zapata, Elizabeth; Monsalve, Diana M; Mantilla, Rubén D; Rodríguez-Jimenez, Monica; Ramírez-Santana, Carolina; Molano-González, Nicolás; Anaya, Juan-Manuel

    2017-12-28

    To evaluate the relationship between resilience and clinical outcomes in patients with autoimmune rheumatic diseases. Focus groups, individual interviews, and chart reviews were done to collect data on 188 women with autoimmune rheumatic diseases, namely rheumatoid arthritis (n=51), systemic lupus erythematosus (n=70), systemic sclerosis (n=35), and Sjögren's syndrome (n=32). Demographic, clinical, and laboratory variables were assessed including disease activity by patient reported outcomes. Resilience was evaluated by using the Brief Resilience Scale. Bivariate, multiple linear regression, and classification and regression trees were used to analyse data. Resilience was influenced by age, duration of disease, and socioeconomic status. Lower resilience scores were observed in younger patients (50years) had higher resilience scores regardless of socioeconomic status. There was no influence of disease activity on resilience. A particular behaviour was observed in systemic sclerosis in which patients with high socioeconomic status and regular physical activity had higher resilience scores. Resilience in patients with autoimmune rheumatic diseases is a continuum process influenced by age and socioeconomic status. The ways in which these variables along with exercise influence resilience deserve further investigation. Copyright © 2017 Société française de rhumatologie. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Value of serum IgG4 in the diagnosis of IgG4-related disease and in differentiation from rheumatic diseases and other diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Motohisa; Tabeya, Tetsuya; Naishiro, Yasuyoshi; Yajima, Hidetaka; Ishigami, Keisuke; Shimizu, Yui; Obara, Mikiko; Suzuki, Chisako; Yamashita, Kentaro; Yamamoto, Hiroyuki; Hayashi, Toshiaki; Sasaki, Shigeru; Sugaya, Toshiaki; Ishida, Tadao; Takano, Ken-Ichi; Himi, Tetsuo; Suzuki, Yasuo; Nishimoto, Norihiro; Honda, Saho; Takahashi, Hiroki; Imai, Kohzoh; Shinomura, Yasuhisa

    2012-06-01

    IgG4-related disease (IgG4-RD) is a novel disease entity that includes Mikulicz's disease, autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP), and many other conditions. It is characterized by elevated serum IgG4 levels and abundant IgG4-bearing plasmacyte infiltration of involved organs. We postulated that high levels of serum IgG4 would comprise a useful diagnostic tool, but little information is available about IgG4 in conditions other than IgG4-RD, including rheumatic diseases. Several reports have described cutoff values for serum IgG4 when diagnosing IgG4-RD, but these studies mostly used 135 mg/dL in AIP to differentiate from pancreatic cancer instead of rheumatic and other common diseases. There is no evidence for a cutoff serum IgG4 level of 135 mg/dL for rheumatic diseases and common diseases that are often complicated with rheumatic diseases. The aim of this work was to re-evaluate the usual cutoff serum IgG4 value in AIP (135 mg/dL) that is used to diagnose whole IgG4-RD in the setting of a rheumatic clinic by measuring serum IgG4 levels in IgG4-RD and various disorders. We therefore constructed ROC curves of serum IgG4 levels in 418 patients who attended Sapporo Medical University Hospital due to IgG4-RD and various rheumatic and common disorders. The optimal cut-off value of serum IgG4 for a diagnosis of IgG4-RD was 144 mg/dL, and the sensitivity and specificity were 95.10 and 90.76%, respectively. Levels of serum IgG4 were elevated in IgG4-RD, Churg-Strauss syndrome, multicentric Castleman's disease, eosinophilic disorders, and in some patients with rheumatoid arthritis, systemic sclerosis, chronic hepatitis, and liver cirrhosis. The usual cut-off value of 135 mg/dL in AIP is useful for diagnosing whole IgG4-RD, but high levels of serum IgG4 are sometimes observed in not only IgG4-RD but also other rheumatic and common diseases.

  19. The role of user representation and Arthritis and Rheumatism International.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnstone, Robert

    2003-08-01

    Arthritis and Rheumatism International (ARi), founded in 1988, is an association of national lay organizations comprising mainly people whose lives are affected by arthritis and rheumatism. ARi's charter defines the organization's aims, including to raise awareness of the needs of people with arthritis/rheumatism, to improve the quality of their lives through education and self-management programs, and to support research into causes, management, prevention, and cure of arthritis. With the aid of a grant from the Pfizer Foundation in 2002, ARi has been able to further develop into a strong organization throughout the world, with a membership of 22 countries. Successful intitiatives include the People with Arthritis and Rheumatism in Europe Manifesto, which has served as a very effective focus for developing action plans, opening dialogues, building partnerships with other organizations, lobbying governments, and gaining media attention throughout Europe. The manifesto (website: www.PAREmanifesto.org) was developed by ARi working in conjunction with The International Organisation of Youth with Rheumatism and the EULAR Social League. These are examples of initiatives that ARi aims to promote on a global scale in the next few years.

  20. Protecting Bone Health in Pediatric Rheumatic Diseases: Pharmacological Considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yujuan; Milojevic, Diana

    2017-06-01

    Bone health in children with rheumatic conditions may be compromised due to several factors related to the inflammatory disease state, delayed puberty, altered life style, including decreased physical activities, sun avoidance, suboptimal calcium and vitamin D intake, and medical treatments, mainly glucocorticoids and possibly some disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs. Low bone density or even fragility fractures could be asymptomatic; therefore, children with diseases of high inflammatory load, such as systemic onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis, juvenile dermatomyositis, systemic lupus erythematosus, and those requiring chronic glucocorticoids may benefit from routine screening of bone health. Most commonly used assessment tools are laboratory testing including serum 25-OH-vitamin D measurement and bone mineral density measurement by a variety of methods, dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry as the most widely used. Early disease control, use of steroid-sparing medications such as disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs and biologics, supplemental vitamin D and calcium, and promotion of weight-bearing physical activities can help optimize bone health. Additional treatment options for osteoporosis such as bisphosphonates are still controversial in children with chronic rheumatic diseases, especially those with decreased bone density without fragility fractures. This article reviews common risk factors leading to compromised bone health in children with chronic rheumatic diseases and discusses the general approach to prevention and treatment of bone fragility.

  1. Including Pupils with Autistic Spectrum Disorders in the Classroom: The Role of Teaching Assistants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Symes, Wendy; Humphrey, Neil

    2012-01-01

    The aims of the current study were (i) to explore the extent to which pupils with Autistic Spectrum Disorders (ASD) were effectively included in lessons, compared with pupils with dyslexia (DYS) or no Special Educational Needs (CON) and (ii) to understand how the presence of a teaching assistant (TA) influences the inclusion/exclusion process. One…

  2. Cardiac strain findings in children with latent rheumatic heart disease detected by echocardiographic screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaton, Andrea; Richards, Hedda; Ploutz, Michelle; Gaur, Lasya; Aliku, Twalib; Lwabi, Peter; Ensing, Greg; Sable, Craig

    2017-08-01

    Identification of patients with latent rheumatic heart disease by echocardiography presents a unique opportunity to prevent disease progression. Myocardial strain is a more sensitive indicator of cardiac performance than traditional measures of systolic function. The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that abnormalities in myocardial strain may be present in children with latent rheumatic heart disease. Standard echocardiography images with electrocardiogram gating were obtained from Ugandan children found to have latent rheumatic heart disease as well as control subjects. Traditional echocardiography measures of systolic function were obtained, and offline global longitudinal strain analysis was performed. Comparison between groups was performed using strain as a continuous (Mann-Whitney U-test) and categorical (cut-off 5th percentile for age) variable. Our study included 14 subjects with definite rheumatic heart disease, 13 with borderline rheumatic heart disease, and 112 control subjects. None of the subjects had abnormal left ventricular size or ejection fraction. Global longitudinal strain was lower than the 5th percentile in 44% of the subjects with any rheumatic heart disease (p=0.002 versus controls) and 57% of the subjects with definite rheumatic heart disease (p=0.03). The mean absolute strain values were significantly lower when comparing subjects with any rheumatic heart disease with controls (20.4±3.95 versus 22.4±4.35, p=0.025) and subjects with definite rheumatic heart disease with controls (19.9±4.25 versus 22.4±4.35, p=0.033). Global longitudinal strain is decreased in subjects with rheumatic heart disease in the absence of abnormal systolic function. Larger studies with longer-term follow-up are required to determine whether there is a role for strain to help better understand the pathophysiology of latent rheumatic heart disease.

  3. Metabolic syndrome in inflammatory rheumatic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. La Montagna

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Toward the end of the last century a better knowledge of cardiovascular (CV risk factors and their associations led investigators to propose the existence of a unique pathophysiological condition called “metabolic” or “insulin resistance syndrome”. Among all, insulin-resistance and compensatory hyperinsulinemia are considered its most important treatment targets. Different definitions have been provided by World Health Organization (WHO and by The Third Report of The National Cholesterol Education Program’s Adult Treatment Panel (NCEP-ATP III. In particular, abdominal obesity, hypertension, low HDL cholesterol and hyperglicemia are the most common items used for its definition. The presence of MetS is effective in predicting the future risk of diabetes and coronaropathies. The evidence of a higher CV risk rate among different rheumatic inflammatory diseases has recently been associated with high prevalence of MetS in some cases. Rheumatoid or psoriatic arthritis have the large series among arthritis, whereas systemic lupus erythematosus among connective tissue disorders. This review analyses all most important studies about the evidence of MetS in rheumatic patients and the main clinical and prognostic significance of this relation.

  4. Acupuncture for neurological disorders in the Cochrane reviews:Characteristics of included reviews and studies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Deren Wang; Weimin Yang; Ming Liu

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To summarize Cochrane reviews of acupuncture for neurological disorders, and characteristics of included reviews and studies.DATA SOURCES: A computer-based online search of the Cochrane Library (Issue 7 of 12, July 2010) was performed with the key word "acupuncture" and systematic evaluations for acupuncture for neurological disorders were screened.STUDY SELECTION: Systematic reviews on acupuncture in the treatment of neurological disorders were included, and the characteristics of these reviews were analyzed based on methods recommended by the Cochrane collaboration.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Basic characteristics, methodological quality, main reasons for excluding trials, results and conclusions of Cochrane reviews were assessed.RESULTS: A total of 18 Cochrane systematic reviews were included, including 13 completed reviews and five research protocols. The 13 completed reviews involved 111 randomized controlled trials, including 43 trials (38.7%) conducted in China, 47 trials (42.3%) using sham-acupuncture or placebo as control, 15 trials (13.5%) with relatively high quality, 91 trials (81.9%) reporting data on follow-up. Primary outcomes used in the Cochrane reviews were reported by 65 trials (58.6%), and adverse events were reported in 11 trials (9.9%). Two hundred and eighty three trials were excluded. Two reviews on headache suggested that acupuncture is a valuable non-drug treatment for patients with chronic or recurrent headache, and has better curative effects on migraine compared with preventative drug treatment. CONCLUSION: Of the Cochrane reviews on acupuncture in the treatment of neurological disorders, two reviews evaluating the efficacy of acupuncture in treating headaches drew positive conculsions, while other reviews did not obtain positive conclusions due to a small sample size or low methodological quality. The methodological quality of acupuncture trials needs further improvement.

  5. Case report 511: Fibroblastic rheumatism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernandez, R.J.; Martel, W.; Headington, J.T.; Kaufman, R.A.; Cincinnati Univ., OH

    1989-01-01

    We report a ten-year-old child with the newly described entity of fibroblastic rheumatism. This child developed rapid, progressive, symmetrical polyarthritis, similar to the radiographic appearance of juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, except for the rapidity of progression. The polyarthritis was preceded by the development of skin nodules with characteristic histological changes. (orig./GDG)

  6. [Gynecological and obstetrical management of rheumatic diseases in reproductive age].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pepe, Franco; Stracquadanio, Mariagrazia; Privitera, Agata; Ciotta, Lilliana; DE Luca, Francesco

    2018-04-01

    The gynecologist's role in the management of rheumatic patients is complex: it includes the prevention of damage caused by drugs, the counseling about contraception to avoid pregnancy while taking teratogen drugs, the scheduling of pregnancy during the quiescent phase of the specific disease, the replacement of teratogen drugs and a competent management of the pregnancy. The task is carried out as part of a multidisciplinary team with a focus on the differential diagnosis between specific complications of pregnancy and the complications of the rheumatic disease. This is the right way to allow a conscious reproduction, with reduced risks and acceptable maternal-fetal outcomes, to this kind of patients considered at high risk.

  7. Population Genetics and Natural Selection in Rheumatic Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Paula S

    2017-08-01

    Human genetic diversity is the result of population genetic forces. This genetic variation influences disease risk and contributes to health disparities. Natural selection is an important influence on human genetic variation. Because immune and inflammatory function genes are enriched for signals of positive selection, the prevalence of rheumatic disease-risk alleles seen in different populations is partially the result of differing selective pressures (eg, due to pathogens). This review summarizes the genetic regions associated with susceptibility to different rheumatic diseases and concomitant evidence for natural selection, including known agents of selection exerting selective pressure in these regions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease in Bangladesh: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, A.K.M. Monwarul; Majumder, A.A.S.

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatic fever (RF) and rheumatic heart disease (RHD) are the most-common cardiovascular disease in young people aged diseases over the last century. In concert with the progresses in socioeconomic indicators, advances in health sectors, improved public awareness, and antibiotic prophylaxis, acute RF came into control. However, chronic RHD continues to be prevalent, and the actual disease burden may be much higher. RHD predominantly affects the young adults, seriously incapacitates them, follows a protracted course, gets complicated because of delayed diagnosis and is sometimes maltreated. The treatment is often palliative and expensive. Large-scale epidemiological and clinical researches are needed to formulate evidence-based national policy to tackle this important public health issue in future. PMID:26896274

  9. Global, Regional, and National Burden of Rheumatic Heart Disease, 1990-2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, David A; Johnson, Catherine O; Colquhoun, Samantha M; Karthikeyan, Ganesan; Beaton, Andrea; Bukhman, Gene; Forouzanfar, Mohammed H; Longenecker, Christopher T; Mayosi, Bongani M; Mensah, George A; Nascimento, Bruno R; Ribeiro, Antonio L P; Sable, Craig A; Steer, Andrew C; Naghavi, Mohsen; Mokdad, Ali H; Murray, Christopher J L; Vos, Theo; Carapetis, Jonathan R; Roth, Gregory A

    2017-08-24

    Rheumatic heart disease remains an important preventable cause of cardiovascular death and disability, particularly in low-income and middle-income countries. We estimated global, regional, and national trends in the prevalence of and mortality due to rheumatic heart disease as part of the 2015 Global Burden of Disease study. We systematically reviewed data on fatal and nonfatal rheumatic heart disease for the period from 1990 through 2015. Two Global Burden of Disease analytic tools, the Cause of Death Ensemble model and DisMod-MR 2.1, were used to produce estimates of mortality and prevalence, including estimates of uncertainty. We estimated that there were 319,400 (95% uncertainty interval, 297,300 to 337,300) deaths due to rheumatic heart disease in 2015. Global age-standardized mortality due to rheumatic heart disease decreased by 47.8% (95% uncertainty interval, 44.7 to 50.9) from 1990 to 2015, but large differences were observed across regions. In 2015, the highest age-standardized mortality due to and prevalence of rheumatic heart disease were observed in Oceania, South Asia, and central sub-Saharan Africa. We estimated that in 2015 there were 33.4 million (95% uncertainty interval, 29.7 million to 43.1 million) cases of rheumatic heart disease and 10.5 million (95% uncertainty interval, 9.6 million to 11.5 million) disability-adjusted life-years due to rheumatic heart disease globally. We estimated the global disease prevalence of and mortality due to rheumatic heart disease over a 25-year period. The health-related burden of rheumatic heart disease has declined worldwide, but high rates of disease persist in some of the poorest regions in the world. (Funded by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation and the Medtronic Foundation.).

  10. Infections and treatment of patients with rheumatic diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Atzeni, F; Bendtzen, K; Bobbio-Pallavicini, F

    2008-01-01

    , and for the shortest possible time should therefore greatly reduce the risk of infections. Infection is a major co-morbidity in rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and conventional disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs) can increase the risk of their occurrence, including tuberculosis. TNF-alpha plays a key role...

  11. Rheumatic diseases and pregnancy | Gcelu | South African Medical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this article is to discuss the optimal management of pregnant women with SLE and other rheumatic diseases, including antiphospholipid antibody syndrome, Sjögren's syndrome, systemic sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis. The effects of pregnancy on underlying diseases ...

  12. Tai Chi and Rheumatic Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Chenchen

    2010-01-01

    Many patients with chronic rheumatic diseases such as osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis and fibromyalgia experience high levels of pain, psychological distress and negative emotions and have limited therapeutic options. Tai Chi is a complex multi-component mind-body exercise that increasing numbers of Americans are practicing, particularly those with musculoskeletal conditions. Clinical trials and observational studies have provided encouraging evidence that Tai Chi, both short and long-te...

  13. Balneotherapy in rheumatic diseases--an overview of novel and known aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, U; Müller-Ladner, U; Schmidt, K L

    2006-04-01

    Balneotherapeutic applications to treat rheumatic diseases have a long-term tradition and are based on established scientific principles, and the majority of rheumatic diseases most frequently include balneotherapy. However, as other therapeutic strategies, balneological interventions require scientific proof of their effect and efficacy. Notably, recent studies providing evidence of the thermic and chemical effects on the immune system and cytokine milieu have enforced the revival of the traditional balneological interventions. This review provides an overview of the known as well as the novel aspects of balneotherapy and their clinical relevance in the treatment of rheumatic diseases.

  14. New insights into the epigenetics of inflammatory rheumatic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballestar, Esteban; Li, Tianlu

    2017-10-01

    Over the past decade, awareness of the importance of epigenetic alterations in the pathogenesis of rheumatic diseases has grown in parallel with a general recognition of the fundamental role of epigenetics in the regulation of gene expression. Large-scale efforts to generate genome-wide maps of epigenetic modifications in different cell types, as well as in physiological and pathological contexts, illustrate the increasing recognition of the relevance of epigenetics. To date, although several reports have demonstrated the occurrence of epigenetic alterations in a wide range of inflammatory rheumatic conditions, epigenomic information is rarely used in a clinical setting. By contrast, several epigenetic biomarkers and treatments are currently in use for personalized therapies in patients with cancer. This Review highlights advances from the past 5 years in the field of epigenetics and their application to inflammatory rheumatic diseases, delineating the future lines of development for a rational use of epigenetic information in clinical settings and in personalized medicine. These advances include the identification of epipolymorphisms associated with clinical outcomes, DNA methylation as a contributor to disease susceptibility in rheumatic conditions, the discovery of novel epigenetic mechanisms that modulate disease susceptibility and the development of new epigenetic therapies.

  15. [Rheumatic cardiopathy in children younger than 6 years of age].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez-Antona, C; Calderón-Colmenero, J; Attié, F; Zabal, C; Buendía-Hernández, A; Díaz-Medina, L H; Bialkowski, J; García Arenal, F

    1991-01-01

    Most of the published papers on Rheumatic Fever (RF) have not included the younger population. We selected 211 cases of children with RF younger than 6 years of age from 9,471 clinical files from 1944 to 1982. These were followed retrospectively to identify the presence of rheumatic activity, subsequent attacks and penicillin profilaxis. From de 211 cases, 209 had carditis; 57% of them were girls and 43% boys. There were no previous infections of the upper respiratory tract in 36% of the patients. The number of cases with RF increased abruptly after 3 years of age and continued increasing until 5 years of age when 70.5% of the population had there first clinically recognized attack. Lesions were present in the mitral valve in 80% of the cases, in the aortic valve in 12%, in the tricuspid in 5% and in the pulmonary valve in 3%. The death rate during the first attack was 20% being refractory heart failure the main cause of death. Thirteen cases suffered rheumatic pneumonia, 9 of whom died (69.2%). 1) The incidence of acute rheumatic fever in children under 6 years of age has decreased with time. 2) The death rate as well as the valvular damage decreased with the parents cooperation with the treatment. 3) The changes in the clinical picture and the severity of valve sequelea may be due to penicillin profilaxis and the better understanding of the disease.

  16. Rheumatic Fever Associated with Antiphospholipid Syndrome: Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe da Silva

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To evaluate the clinical associations between rheumatic fever and antiphospholipid syndrome and the impact of coexistence of these two diseases in an individual. Methods. Systematic review in electronics databases, regarding the period from 1983 to 2012. The keywords: “Rheumatic Fever,” “Antiphospholipid Syndrome,” and “Antiphospholipid Antibody Syndrome” are used. Results. were identified 11 cases described in the literature about the association of rheumatic fever and antiphospholipid syndrome. Clinical presentation of rheumatic fever was characterized by the predominance of carditis (11/11 and chorea (7/11. Regarding the manifestations of APS, the stroke was observed in 7/11 (63.6%, with one of them having probable embolic origin. Conclusion. The present study brings the information that the association between APS and RF is quite rare, however, is of great clinical importance. Doctors who deal with the RF should include in their differential diagnosis the APS, especially in the presence of stroke in patients with RF and whose echocardiogram does not show intracavitary thrombi.

  17. Pharmacotherapy in the Management of Voiding and Storage Disorders, Including Enuresis and Encopresis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiner, William G.

    2008-01-01

    Enuresis and encopresis are disorders of the bladder and rectum, and this article helps in understanding the neurobiology of lower urinary tract and anorectal function to help in the treatment of these disorders. Treatment for children with these disorders emphasizes either a psychological or pharmacological approach.

  18. Movement and Other Neurodegenerative Syndromes in Patients with Systemic Rheumatic Diseases: A Case Series of 8 Patients and Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menezes, Rikitha; Pantelyat, Alexander; Izbudak, Izlem; Birnbaum, Julius

    2015-08-01

    Patients with rheumatic diseases can present with movement and other neurodegenerative disorders. It may be underappreciated that movement and other neurodegenerative disorders can encompass a wide variety of disease entities. Such disorders are strikingly heterogeneous and lead to a wider spectrum of clinical injury than seen in Parkinson's disease. Therefore, we sought to stringently phenotype movement and other neurodegenerative disorders presenting in a case series of rheumatic disease patients. We integrated our findings with a review of the literature to understand mechanisms which may account for such a ubiquitous pattern of clinical injury.Seven rheumatic disease patients (5 Sjögren's syndrome patients, 2 undifferentiated connective tissue disease patients) were referred and could be misdiagnosed as having Parkinson's disease. However, all of these patients were ultimately diagnosed as having other movement or neurodegenerative disorders. Findings inconsistent with and more expansive than Parkinson's disease included cerebellar degeneration, dystonia with an alien-limb phenomenon, and nonfluent aphasias.A notable finding was that individual patients could be affected by cooccurring movement and other neurodegenerative disorders, each of which could be exceptionally rare (ie, prevalence of ∼1:1000), and therefore with the collective probability that such disorders were merely coincidental and causally unrelated being as low as ∼1-per-billion. Whereas our review of the literature revealed that ubiquitous patterns of clinical injury were frequently associated with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings suggestive of a widespread vasculopathy, our patients did not have such neuroimaging findings. Instead, our patients could have syndromes which phenotypically resembled paraneoplastic and other inflammatory disorders which are known to be associated with antineuronal antibodies. We similarly identified immune-mediated and inflammatory markers of injury

  19. NON-RHEUMATIC MYOCARDITIDES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. A. Shostak

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Myocarditis is an inflammatory disease of the myocardium, which is caused by different factors, such as infectious, immune, chemical, physical, and allergic ones. The main cause of the disease is viral agents. In 1837, the term “myocarditis” was introduced in medical prac­ tice by J.F. Sobernheim who considered the presence of an infectious agent and inflammatory and vascular disorders in the myocardium to be the major signs of the disease. The specific symptoms of myocarditis cannot be identified therefore it is rather hard to determine the prevalence of the disease in the population. However, the association with a definite etiological factor (such as with prior infection and use of some drugs and the presence of the symptoms of myocardial lesion (chest pain, dyspnea, rhythm and conduction disturbances may sug­ gest an idea on the possible development of myocarditis. Laboratory studies show an elevation of cardiospecific enzymes and the signs of an inflammatory response. Endomyocardial biopsy (EMB is the gold standard for the diagnosis of myocarditis to the present day. The diag­ nostic value of the method is limited by technical feasibilities, the skills of medical staff, and the development of possible complications. Gadolinium magnetic resonance imaging that can visualize myocardial inflammatory foci may be used as an alternative to EMB. The de­ veloped criteria are of definite diagnostic value; however, the problems in making diagnosis and differential diagnosis remain unsolved. There are no specific myocarditis treatment methods and regimens. Symptomatic therapy is most commonly used depending on the existing manifestations of myocarditis. The intake of nonsteroidal anti­inflammatory drugs and glucocorticosteroids is now a point open to question. It is necessary to remember about the prevention of infectious myocarditis and the sanitization of existing foci of infection in the body. 

  20. Clinical aspects of rheumatic diseases in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saenger, L.

    1978-01-01

    Rheumatic fever is no longer the most problematic of rheumatic diseases as it poses some diagnostic, but no radiological problems. The most problematic are chronic inflammatory processes of the joints. Here, the fate in life of the child patients does indeed depend upon an exact diagnosis. (orig./AJ) [de

  1. Comparing the results of DAADD and ABC of children included in autism spectrum disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, Milene Rossi Pereira; Fernandes, Fernanda Dreux Miranda

    2014-01-01

    To verify if there are characteristic behaviors of the different diagnosis included in the autism spectrum according to the Differential Assessment of Autism and Other Developmental Disorders (DAADD) and to the Autism Behavior Checklist (ABC). Participants were 45 individuals and their respective speech-language therapists. All therapists are graduate students working with the children for at least 1 year. This time was considered sufficient to the therapists to have the information required by the DAADD questionnaire. It is comprised by 3 protocols specifically designed to children with 2 to 4 years, 4 to 6 years and 6 to 8 years, the same criteria used to separate the research groups, G1, G2 and G3, respectively. Data referring to the ABC were retrieved from the subject's files at the Laboratório de Investigação Fonoaudiológica nos Distúrbios do Espectro do Autismo (Research Laboratory on Language Disorders in the Autism Spectrum) of the School of Medicine, Universidade de São Paulo, where it is routinely applied during the annual assessment. Answers to the different areas of DAADD are similar to the different areas of ABC. These data show data the diagnosis by DAADD is easier in older children. Although there is no significant difference, the large occurrence of Rett's syndrome diagnosis according to the DAADD was associated to higher risk for autism according to the ABC in G1. With increasing age this tendency decreases and either in G2 and G3 Autism is the most frequent diagnosis. Although the results of both questionnaires tend to agree more with increasing age, the DAADD is more sensitive in the different ages while the ABC if more specific only to older children.

  2. [Hypersexual disorder will not be included in the DSM V : a contextual analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toussaint, I; Pitchot, W

    2013-01-01

    Hypersexuality disorder has not been added to the list of psychiatric disorders for the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) V, to be published in May 2013. The evolution of the concept of hypersexuality disorder and its series of different models call into question the controversial context within which its inclusion is considered for the DSM V. A brief contextual analysis makes clear that the creation of this concept follows moral norms and psychosocial values. The construction of hypersexuality disorder in terms of a diagnostic entity rests on the clash of social forces at play in the development process. This article lays the foundation to contemplate the manner in which entities for psychiatric disorders are constructed.

  3. Should DSM-V include dimensional diagnostic criteria for alcohol use disorders?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helzer, John E; Bucholz, Kathleen K; Bierut, Laura Jean; Regier, Darrel A; Schuckit, Marc A; Guth, Sarah E

    2006-02-01

    This program calls attention to the upcoming timetable for the revision of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM)-IV and the publication of DSM-V. It is vitally important for Research Society of Alcoholism members to be aware of the current discussions of the important scientific questions related to the next DSM revision and to use the opportunity for input. The title of the symposium highlights 1 key question, i.e., whether the DSM definitions should remain strictly categorical as in the past or whether a dimensional component should be included in this revision. Two substantive and 1 conceptual paper are included in this portion of the symposium. The fourth and final presentation detailing the revision timetable and the opportunities for input is by Dr. Darrel Regier. Dr. Regier is the director of American Psychiatric Institute for Research and Education the research and education branch of the American Psychiatric Association and the organization within the APA that will oversee the DSM revision. The discussion is by Marc Schuckit, who was chair of the Substance Use disorders (SUD) Committee for DSM-IV and cochair of the international group of experts reviewing the SUD definitions for DSM-V.

  4. Binge eating disorder should be included in DSM-IV: a reply to Fairburn et al.'s "the classification of recurrent overeating: the binge eating disorder proposal".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spitzer, R L; Stunkard, A; Yanovski, S; Marcus, M D; Wadden, T; Wing, R; Mitchell, J; Hasin, D

    1993-03-01

    Extensive recent research supports a proposal that a new eating disorder, binge eating disorder (BED), be included in DSM-IV. BED criteria define a relatively pure group of individuals who are distressed by recurrent binge eating who do not exhibit the compensatory features of bulimia nervosa. This large number of patients currently can only be diagnosed as eating disorder not otherwise specified (EDNOS). Recognizing this new disorder will help stimulate research and clinical programs for these patients. Fairburn et al.'s critique of BED fails to acknowledge the large body of knowledge that indicates that BED represents a distinct and definable subgroup of eating disordered patients and that the diagnosis provides useful information about psychopathology, prognosis, and outcome (Fairburn, Welch, & Hay [in press]. The classification of recurrent overeating: The "binge eating disorder" proposal. International Journal of Eating Disorders.) Against any reasonable standard for adding a new diagnosis to DSM-IV, BED meets the test.

  5. Exercise as an anti-inflammatory therapy for rheumatic diseases—myokine regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benatti, Fabiana B; Pedersen, Bente K

    2015-01-01

    Persistent systemic inflammation, a typical feature of inflammatory rheumatic diseases, is associated with a high cardiovascular risk and predisposes to metabolic disorders and muscle wasting. These disorders can lead to disability and decreased physical activity, exacerbating inflammation...... and the development of a network of chronic diseases, thus establishing a 'vicious cycle' of chronic inflammation. During the past two decades, advances in research have shed light on the role of exercise as a therapy for rheumatic diseases. One of the most important of these advances is the discovery that skeletal....... Therefore, contrary to fears that physical activity might aggravate inflammatory pathways, exercise is now believed to be a potential treatment for patients with rheumatic diseases. In this Review, we discuss how exercise disrupts the vicious cycle of chronic inflammation directly, after each bout...

  6. Kynurenic acid content in anti-rheumatic herbs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zgrajka, Wojciech; Turska, Monika; Rajtar, Grażyna; Majdan, Maria; Parada-Turska, Jolanta

    2013-01-01

    The use of herbal medicines is common among people living in rural areas and increasingly popular in urbanized countries. Kynurenic acid (KYNA) is a metabolite of kynurenine possessing anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidative and pain reliving properties. Previous data indicated that the content of KYNA in the synovial fluid of patients with rheumatoid arthritis is lower than in patients with osteoarthritis. Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic, systemic inflammatory disorder affecting about 1% of the world's population. The aim of the presented study was to investigate the content of KYNA in 11 herbal preparations used in rheumatic diseases. The following herbs were studied: bean pericarp, birch leaf, dandelion root, elder flower, horsetail herb, nettle leaf, peppermint leaf and willow bark. An anti-rheumatic mixture of the herbs Reumatefix and Reumaflos tea were also investigated. The herbs were prepared according to producers' directions. In addition, the herbal supplement Devil's Claw containing root of Harpagophytum was used. KYNA content was measured using the high-performance liquid chromatography method, and KYNA was detected fluorometrically. KYNA was found in all studied herbal preparations. The highest content of KYNA was found in peppermint, nettle, birch leaf and the horsetail herb. The lowest content of KYNA was found in willow bark, dandelion root and in the extract from the root of Harpagophytum. These findings indicate that the use of herbal preparations containing a high level of KYNA can be considered as a supplementary measure in rheumatoid arthritis therapy, as well as in rheumatic diseases prevention.

  7. The Effects of Including a Callous-Unemotional Specifier for the Diagnosis of Conduct Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahn, Rachel E.; Frick, Paul J.; Youngstrom, Eric; Findling, Robert L.; Youngstrom, Jennifer Kogos

    2012-01-01

    Background: "With Significant Callous-Unemotional Traits" has been proposed as a specifier for conduct disorder (CD) in the upcoming revision of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-V). The impact of this specifier on children diagnosed with CD should be considered. Methods: A multi-site cross-sectional design with…

  8. Antioxidants in vegan diet and rheumatic disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hänninen; Kaartinen, K; Rauma, A L; Nenonen, M; Törrönen, R; Häkkinen, A S; Adlercreutz, H; Laakso, J

    2000-11-30

    Plants are rich natural sources of antioxidants in addition to other nutrients. Interventions and cross sectional studies on subjects consuming uncooked vegan diet called living food (LF) have been carried out. We have clarified the efficacy of LF in rheumatoid diseases as an example of a health problem where inflammation is one of the main concerns. LF is an uncooked vegan diet and consists of berries, fruits, vegetables and roots, nuts, germinated seeds and sprouts, i.e. rich sources of carotenoids, vitamins C and E. The subjects eating LF showed highly increased levels of beta and alfa carotenes, lycopen and lutein in their sera. Also the increases of vitamin C and vitamin E (adjusted to cholesterol) were statistically significant. As the berry intake was 3-fold compared to controls the intake of polyphenolic compounds like quercetin, myricetin and kaempherol was much higher than in the omnivorous controls. The LF diet is rich in fibre, substrate of lignan production, and the urinary excretion of polyphenols like enterodiol and enterolactone as well as secoisolaricirecinol were much increased in subjects eating LF. The shift of fibromyalgic subjects to LF resulted in a decrease of their joint stiffness and pain as well as an improvement of their self-experienced health. The rheumatoid arthritis patients eating the LF diet also reported similar positive responses and the objective measures supported this finding. The improvement of rheumatoid arthritis was significantly correlated with the day-to-day fluctuation of subjective symptoms. In conclusion the rheumatoid patients subjectively benefited from the vegan diet rich in antioxidants, lactobacilli and fibre, and this was also seen in objective measures.

  9. Burden and health-related quality of life of eating disorders, including Avoidant/Restrictive Food Intake Disorder (ARFID), in the Australian population

    OpenAIRE

    Hay, Phillipa; Mitchison, Deborah; Collado, Abraham Ernesto Lopez; Gonz?lez-Chica, David Alejandro; Stocks, Nigel; Touyz, Stephen

    2017-01-01

    Background Little is known about the epidemiology and health related quality of life (HRQoL) of the new DSM-5 diagnoses, Binge Eating Disorder (BED) and Avoidant/Restrictive Food Intake Disorder (ARFID) in the Australian population. We aimed to investigate the prevalance and burden of these disorders. Methods We conducted two sequential population-based surveys including individuals aged over 15?years who were interviewed in 2014 (n?=?2732) and 2015 (n =3005). Demographic information and diag...

  10. Radiosynovectomy in rheumatic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jarosław B. Ćwikła

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Radiosynovectomy is a safe and repeatable treatment method of chronic synovitis with synovial overgrowth and refractory chronic or acute inflammatory joint effusion. It consist in the intraarticular administration of a radioactive isotope in the form of a colloid causing the extinguishing of active synovitis. The radiocolloid causes permanent irradiation of the synovium with beta ray electron beams, which ultimately leads to its fibrosis and extinguishes the inflammatory process destroying the joint. The main indications for radiosynovectomy include chronic and acute arthritis in the course of systemic diseases, intraarticular bleeding in hemorrhagic diatheses (hemophilia, selected cases of osteoarthritis, recurrent effusions following surgery, e.g. arthroplasty, or other iatrogenic post-surgery complications causing arthritis. Radiosynovectomy is also performed in pigmented villonodular synovitis and crystal synovitis. The most common method used to determine the eligibility for radiosynovectomy is an ultrasound, which shows the location and activity of the thickened synovium. The administration of a radiocolloid into the joint, sheath or bursa should also be performed under the control of the ultrasound image, as this ensures a precise location of the puncture needle and full control of the isotope administration process. Clinical efficacy of radiosynovectomy depends on the proper qualification of patients for the procedure. The success rate of radiosynovectomy in common indications is 65–80%. It is confirmed by the visualization of avascular (fibrotic synovium in follow-up ultrasound tests. The aim of this article is to present techniques and indications for the radiosynovectomy treatment.

  11. Should borderline personality disorder be included in the fourth edition of the Chinese classification of mental disorders?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHONG Jie; LEUNG Freedom

    2007-01-01

    @@ Borderline personality disorder (BPD) is a serious Bpersonality disorder characterized by a pervasive pattern of disturbances in mood regulation, impulse control, self-image and interpersonal relationships.1 In the United States, the prevalence of BPD has been estimated at 1%-2% of the general population, 10% of psychiatric outpatients, and 20% of inpatients.2,3 According to the 4th text revision of diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders (DSM-Ⅳ-TR),1 about 75% of BPD patients are women. The BPD diagnosis has been associated with heightened risk (8.5% to 10.0% among BPD patients) for completed suicide, a rate almost 50times higher than in the general population.4

  12. Rheumatic fever & rheumatic heart disease: The last 50 years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, R. Krishna; Tandon, R.

    2013-01-01

    Rheumatic fever (RF) and rheumatic heart disease (RHD) continue to be a major health hazard in most developing countries as well as sporadically in developed economies. Despite reservations about the utility, echocardiographic and Doppler (E&D) studies have identified a massive burden of RHD suggesting the inadequacy of the Jones’ criteria updated by the American Heart Association in 1992. Subclinical carditis has been recognized by E&D in patients with acute RF without clinical carditis as well as by follow up of RHD patients presenting as isolated chorea or those without clinical evidence of carditis. Over the years, the medical management of RF has not changed. Paediatric and juvenile mitral stenosis (MS), upto the age of 12 and 20 yr respectively, severe enough to require operative treatement was documented. These negate the belief that patients of RHD become symptomatic ≥20 years after RF as well as the fact that congestive cardiac failure in childhood indicates active carditis and RF. Non-surgical balloon mitral valvotomy for MS has been initiated. Mitral and/or aortic valve replacement during active RF in patients not responding to medical treatment has been found to be life saving as well as confirming that congestive heart failure in acute RF is due to an acute haemodynamic overload. Pathogenesis as well as susceptibility to RF continue to be elusive. Prevention of RF morbidity depends on secondary prophylaxis which cannot reduce the burden of diseases. Primary prophylaxis is not feasible in the absence of a suitable vaccine. Attempts to design an antistreptococcal vaccine utilizing the M-protein has not succeeded in the last 40 years. Besides pathogenesis many other questions remain unanswered. PMID:23703332

  13. Telehealth solutions to enable global collaboration in rheumatic heart disease screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Eduardo Lv; Beaton, Andrea Z; Nascimento, Bruno R; Tompsett, Alison; Dos Santos, Julia Pa; Perlman, Lindsay; Diamantino, Adriana C; Oliveira, Kaciane Kb; Oliveira, Cassio M; Nunes, Maria do Carmo P; Bonisson, Leonardo; Ribeiro, Antônio Lp; Sable, Craig

    2018-02-01

    Background The global burden of rheumatic heart disease is nearly 33 million people. Telemedicine, using cloud-server technology, provides an ideal solution for sharing images performed by non-physicians with cardiologists who are experts in rheumatic heart disease. Objective We describe our experience in using telemedicine to support a large rheumatic heart disease outreach screening programme in the Brazilian state of Minas Gerais. Methods The Programa de Rastreamento da Valvopatia Reumática (PROVAR) is a prospective cross-sectional study aimed at gathering epidemiological data on the burden of rheumatic heart disease in Minas Gerais and testing of a non-expert, telemedicine-supported model of outreach rheumatic heart disease screening. The primary goal is to enable expert support of remote rheumatic heart disease outreach through cloud-based sharing of echocardiographic images between Minas Gerais and Washington. Secondary goals include (a) developing and sharing online training modules for non-physicians in echocardiography performance and interpretation and (b) utilising a secure web-based system to share clinical and research data. Results PROVAR included 4615 studies that were performed by non-experts at 21 schools and shared via cloud-telemedicine technology. Latent rheumatic heart disease was found in 251 subjects (4.2% of subjects: 3.7% borderline and 0.5% definite disease). Of the studies, 50% were preformed on full functional echocardiography machines and transmitted via Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) and 50% were performed on handheld echocardiography machines and transferred via a secure Dropbox connection. The average time between study performance date and interpretation was 10 days. There was 100% success in initial image transfer. Less than 1% of studies performed by non-experts could not be interpreted. Discussion A sustainable, low-cost telehealth model, using task-shifting with non-medical personal in low and middle

  14. Disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drug use in pregnant women with rheumatic diseases: a systematic review of the risk of congenital malformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Corisande; Avina-Zubieta, Antonio; Rai, Sharan K; Carruthers, Erin; De Vera, Mary A

    2016-01-01

    Despite the high incidence of rheumatic diseases during the reproductive years, little is known about the impact of disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drug (DMARD) use during pregnancy. Our objective was to systematically review and appraise evidence in women with rheumatic disease on the use of traditional and biologic DMARDs during pregnancy and the risk of congenital malformation outcomes. We conducted a systematic search of MEDLINE, EMBASE, and INTERNATIONAL PHARMACEUTICAL ABSTRACTS databases. Inclusion criteria were: 1) study sample including women with rheumatic disease; 2) use of traditional and/or biologic DMARDs during pregnancy; and 3) congenital malformation outcome(s) reported. We extracted information on study design, data source, number of exposed pregnancies, type of DMARD, number of live births, and number of congenital malformations. Altogether, we included 79 studies; the majority were based on designs that did not involve a comparison group, including 26 case reports, 17 case series, 20 cross-sectional studies, and 4 surveys. Studies that had a comparator group included 1 case control, 10 cohort studies, and 1 controlled trial. Hydroxychloroquine and azathioprine represent the most studied traditional DMARD exposures and, among biologics, most of the reports were on infliximab and etanercept. This is the first systematic review on the use of both traditional and biologic DMARDs during pregnancy among women with rheumatic diseases and congenital malformation outcomes, with a focus on study design and quality. Findings confirm the limited number of studies, as well as the need to improve study designs.

  15. Periodontal disease in pregnant patients with rheumatic valvular disease: clinical and microbiological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avila, Walkiria Samuel; Timerman, Lilia; Romito, Giuseppe Alexandre; Marcelino, Sílvia Linard; Neves, Itamara Lúcia Itagiba; Zugaib, Marcelo; Grinberg, Max

    2011-04-01

    The periodontal disease during pregnancy of women with rheumatic valve disease imply infective endocarditis risks and higher rate of preterm birth and low birth weight. To study the periodontal disease rate of women with rheumatic valve disease during pregnancy. We studied 140 pregnant women who included 70 patients with rheumatic valve disease and 70 healthy women. The periodontal examination included: 1) periodontal clinical exam regard the follow variables: a) probing depth; b) gingival margin; c) clinical attachment level; d) bleeding on probing; e) plaque index and f) gingival index; and 2) microbiological test was performed in samples serum and gingival crevicular fluid and considered positive controls to Porphyromonas gingivalis, Tannerella forsithia e Aggregobacter actinomycetemcomitans. Age and parity were similar between groups; as single or combined the mitral valve disease was prevalent among the rheumatic valve lesion in 45 (32.1%) e 20 (28.5%) cases, respectively. Among the periodontal variables gingival margin (p=0.01) and plaque index (p=0.04) were different between groups. The periodontal disease was identified in 20 (14,3%) pregnant women, seven (10%) of them were patients with valve rheumatic disease and the remain 13 (18,6%) were healthy women, its percentual was not different between groups (p=0,147). Microbiological analyses of oral samples showed higher percentual of P. gingivalis in healthy pregnant women (p=0.004). The clinical and microbiological study during pregnancy showed comparable incidence of periodontal disease between women with rheumatic valve disease and healthy women.

  16. Epidemiology of rheumatic diseases in Mixtec and Chontal indigenous communities in Mexico: a cross-sectional community-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julián-Santiago, Flor; García-García, Conrado; García-Olivera, Imelda; Goycochea-Robles, María Victoria; Pelaez-Ballestas, Ingris

    2016-07-01

    This study aimed to estimate the prevalence of musculoskeletal (MSK) disorders and rheumatic diseases in the Chontal and Mixtec indigenous communities in the state of Oaxaca, Mexico, using the Community-Oriented Program for the Control of Rheumatic Diseases (COPCORD) methodology. After cross-culturally validating the COPCORD questionnaire for these communities, we conducted a cross-sectional, analytical, community-based census study using a house-to-house method. Positive cases of MSK disorders were assessed by primary care physicians and rheumatologists. The study population included participants aged ≥18 years from the indigenous communities of San Antonio Huitepec and San Carlos Yautepec. A total of 1061 persons participated in the study. Mean age was 46.9 years (standard deviation 19.9; age range 18-97 years); 642 (60.5 %) were women; 483 participants (45.5; 42.4-48.5 %) had MSK pain in the previous 7 days. Diagnoses were back pain 170 (16.0 %; 95 % confidence interval [CI] 13.8-18.3); osteoarthritis 157 (14.7 %; 95 % CI 12.7-17.0); rheumatic regional pain syndrome 53 (4.9 %; 95 % CI 3.7-6.4); rheumatoid arthritis 4 (0.3 %; 95 % CI 0.1-0.9); dermatomyositis 1 (0.09 %; 95 % CI 0.0-0.5); ankylosing spondylitis 1 (0.09 %; 95 % CI 0.0-0.5); systemic lupus erythematosus 1 (0.09 %; 95 % CI 0.02-0.5); and gout 1 (0.09 %; 95 % CI 0.0-0.5). 53.2 % had not received medical treatment for their disease. The prevalence of MSK disorders in indigenous communities in the Mixtec and Chontal regions is very high. The most common rheumatic diseases found were back pain and osteoarthritis. A high percentage of participants had not received medical care.

  17. Rheumatic masks of plasma cell dyscrasias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Ivanovich Vasilyev

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to consider clinical practice problems in the differential diagnosis of different types of plasma cell dyscrasias (PCD. Subjects and methods. Fourteen patients (8 men and 6 women aged 52±12 years, in whom rheumatic diseases (RD were ruled out and who were diagnosed as having primary PCD: different types of myeloma in 7 patients, myeloma + AL-amyloidosis in 2, AL-amyloidosis in 3, and Waldenstrom’s macroglobulinemia in 2, were examined. Results and discussion. The most common maldiagnosed RDs in patients with PCD were seronegative rheumatoid arthritis (RA, systemic lupus erythematosus, Sjogren’s disease, and different forms of vasculitis. The most frequent masks of RD were kidney (78% and osteoarticular system (64% lesions, vascular disorders (36%, peripheral polyneuropathies (36%, and enlarged salivary glands with xerostomia (28.5%. Serum and urine immunochemical study should be performed in all patients who have clinical manifestations of seropositive RA, spondyloarthritis, intensive bone pain syndrome, ulceronecrotic vasculitis, enlarged submandibular salivary glands with macroglossia in the absence of markers of autoimmune disease for the timely diagnosis of PCD and the exclusion of RD. The paper estimates the sensitivity and specificity of main methods used to diagnose different types of PCD.

  18. Thymic stromal lymphopoietin as a novel mediator amplifying immunopathology in rheumatic disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hillen, Maarten R.; Radstake, Timothy R. D. J.; Hack, Cornelis E.; van Roon, Joel A. G.

    2015-01-01

    Thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) is an IL-7-related cytokine that has been studied extensively in atopic diseases and more recently in various rheumatic disorders. It is involved in T cell development in the thymus and promotes homeostatic T cell expansion by classical dendritic cells. However,

  19. The metabolic role of the gut microbiota in health and rheumatic disease: mechanisms and interventions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abdollahi-Roodsaz, S.; Abramson, S.B.; Scher, J.U.

    2016-01-01

    The role of the gut microbiome in animal models of inflammatory and autoimmune disease is now well established. The human gut microbiome is currently being studied as a potential modulator of the immune response in rheumatic disorders. However, the vastness and complexity of this host-microorganism

  20. Orthopaedic surgeries in rheumatic patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moises Cohen

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis is the most common rheumatic disease thatneeds surgical intervention. The most affected joints are the wrists,metacarpophalangeal, interphalangeal, metatarsophalangeal, andknees. The others joints are affected in the development of thedisease. During its progression, the infl ammatory process extendsto the periarticular structures of the connective tissue as tendonsand ligaments. These involvements of soft tissue with osteoarticularinvolvement lead to instability and deformities. Open or arthroscopicsynovectomies lead to pain relief, while tenotomies and tendonstransfer aim to correct deformities, as well as regain function of thejoint. Arthroplasty is an excellent choice in order to have a goodrange of motion, functional and not a painful joint. Arthrodesis ischosen, when there is an intense articular involvement and there isno indication for arthroplasty. Although, it limits the range of motionit can achieve pain relief and function, when performed in the rightangle of fl exion and extension.

  1. Prevalence of rheumatic diseases in Raramuri people in Chihuahua, Mexico: a community-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Río Nájera, Danyella; Santana, Natalia; Peláez-Ballestas, Ingris; González-Chávez, Susana A; Quiñonez-Flores, Celia M; Pacheco-Tena, César

    2016-07-01

    This study aimed to determine the prevalence of musculoskeletal (MSK) pain and rheumatic diseases in the Raramuri population (also known as Tarahumaras) who are an indigenous group in the northern state of Chihuahua in Mexico. We used the Community-Oriented Program for Control of Rheumatic Diseases (COPCORD) methodology. An analytical cross-sectional study was conducted including indigenous Raramuri aged ≥18 years from communities settled in Chihuahua City. Subjects with positive MSK pain were evaluated by primary care physicians and rheumatologists. Demographic and occupational factors such as gender and job type associated with rheumatic disease were investigated. A total of 380 indigenous Raramuri (mean age 33.6 ± 13.1 years; 37.9 % male) were interviewed. Seventy-six individuals (20 %) reported MSK pain in the last 7 days. Pain intensity was reported as "severe" and "the most severe" in 30 % of the cases. Fifty-six individuals (14.7 %) reported pain in the past and 86 (22.6 %) had either past or current pain. The prevalence of rheumatic diseases was 10.5 %. Diagnosed diseases were osteoarthritis (6.6 %), low back pain (1.6 %), spondyloarthritis (0.8 %), rheumatoid arthritis (0.5 %), non-specific arthritis (0.5 %), rheumatic regional pain syndromes (0.3 %), and fibromyalgia (0.3 %). Rheumatic disease was associated with the following variables: age (odds ratio (OR) 1.04, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.02-1.08; p = 0.006), family history of rheumatic symptoms (OR 6.9; 95 % CI 2.6-18.7; p rheumatic disease prevention program in the Raramuri people in Chihuahua, Mexico.

  2. Association between TYK2 polymorphisms and susceptibility to autoimmune rheumatic diseases: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Y H; Bae, S-C

    2016-10-01

    This study aimed to explore whether TYK2 polymorphisms are associated with susceptibility to autoimmune rheumatic diseases. We conducted a meta-analysis on the association between TYK2 polymorphisms and autoimmune rheumatic diseases. Twelve studies with a total of 16,335 patients and 30,065 controls were included in the meta-analysis. Meta-analysis revealed an association between rheumatic diseases and the 2 allele of the TYK2 rs2304256 (OR = 0.885, 95% CI = 0.802-0.978, p = 0.016). Furthermore, stratification by ethnicity identified a significant association between this polymorphism and rheumatic diseases in Caucasians (OR = 0.822, 95% CI = 0.706-0.889, p = 9.5 × 10(-7)), but not in Asians (OR = 1.127, 95% CI = 0.835-1.522, p = 0.434). Meta-analysis by rheumatic disease type revealed a significant association between the 2 allele of the TYK2 rs2304256 and SLE in Caucasians (OR = 0.737, 95% CI = 0.673-0.808, p rheumatic diseases in Caucasians (OR = 0.812, 95% CI = 0.661-0.997, p = 0.046) but not in Asians. Interestingly, the rs280519 polymorphism was significantly associated with susceptibility to SLE both in Caucasians and Asians. However, no associations were found between the rs12720270, rs280500, rs280523 and rs8108236 polymorphisms and susceptibility to rheumatic diseases. This meta-analysis demonstrates that the TYK2 rs2304256 and rs12720356 polymorphisms are associated with susceptibility to rheumatic diseases, rs2304256 polymorphism is associated with SLE in Caucasians, and rs280519 polymorphism is associated with SLE in Caucasians and Asians. © The Author(s) 2016.

  3. Differential diagnosis of rheumatic diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lingg, G.; Schorn, C.

    2006-01-01

    Which imaging modalities are appropriate for the Differential diagnosis of Rheumatic diseases. MRI has far most the highest sensitivity and is unequaled in its brilliant presentation of Anatomy and Pathology. But it is sometimes forgotten, that this is at least in part the result of carefully selected sequences, dedicated to the expected result. In a method totally independent of any result, this should not be the case. In contrary this method should be highly standardised and regardless what will be the findings. This is true for Plain X-ray. It will be shown, that already the outer silhouette of the soft parts with different features of swelling, and differences in density and even more - defects or appositions of the bony silhouette in the majority of cases at least will allow to classify the patient for a group of diseases and in many cases will lead to a definite diagnosis. Differential diagnoses like Rheumatoid Arthritis versus Psoriatic Arthritis or simply but not always simple - inflammatory Arthritis versus degenerative disease - are allowed to be answered definitely, not always so in MRI. The condition of the subchondral bone can give hints, how advanced and how active the disease is at present. Plain X-ray offers high specifity in the differential diagnoses of Rheumatic diseases, it is well standardised and it is a device, to use independent from any suspected findings. So it is the method of choice for questions of differential diagnosis. This is even more true, thinking of the possibility, to investigate all clinically involved regions with not to much extended efforts, whereas MRI and CT are used normally for only one region. (orig.) [de

  4. Male fertility potential alteration in rheumatic diseases: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiseo, Bruno Camargo; Cocuzza, Marcello; Bonfa, Eloisa; Srougi, Miguel; Silva, Clovis A

    2016-01-01

    Improved targeted therapies for rheumatic diseases were developed recently resulting in a better prognosis for affected patients. Nowadays, patients are living longer and with improved quality of life, including fertility potential. These patients are affected by impaired reproductive function and the causes are often multifactorial related to particularities of each disease. This review highlights how rheumatic diseases and their management affect testicular function and male fertility. A systematic review of literature of all published data after 1970 was conducted. Data was collected about fertility abnormalities in male patients with systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, dermatomyositis, ankylosing spondylitis, Behçet disease and gout. Two independent researchers carried out the search in online databases. A total of 19 articles were included addressing the following diseases: 7 systemic lupus erythematosus, 6 Behçet disease, 4 ankylosing spondylitis, 2 rheumatoid arthritis, 2 dermatomyositis and one gout. Systemic lupus erythematosus clearly affects gonadal function impairing spermatogenesis mainly due to antisperm antibodies and cyclophosphamide therapy. Behçet disease, gout and ankylosing spondylitis patients, including those under anti-TNF therapy in the latter disease, do not seem to have reduced fertility whereas in dermatomyositis, the fertility potential is hampered by disease activity and by alkylating agents. Data regarding rheumatoid arthritis is scarce, gonadal dysfunction observed as consequence of disease activity and antisperm antibodies. Reduced fertility potential is not uncommon. Its frequency and severity vary among the different rheumatic diseases. Permanent infertility is rare and often associated with alkylating agent therapy.

  5. The changing spectrum of rheumatic mitral regurgitation in Soweto, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meel, Ruchika; Peters, Ferande; Libhaber, Elena; Essop, Mohammed Rafique

    To determine the clinical and echocardiographic characteristics of contemporary patients with rheumatic mitral regurgitation (MR) at Chris Hani Baragwanath Academic Hospital. This prospective, cross-sectional study included 84 patients with isolated moderate or severe rheumatic MR who underwent clinical and echocardiographic assessment. Mean age of the patients was 44 ± 15.3 years (84% females). Acute rheumatic fever was rare. Hypertension and HIV were present in 52 and 26%, respectively. Echocardiography showed leaflet thickening and calcification, restricted motion and subvalvular disease in 41, 25 and 34%, respectively. Carpentier IIIa leaflet dysfunction occurred in 80% of patients and leaflet prolapse was seen in only 20%. These findings contrast with the previous literature, where patients were younger, they had rheumatic carditis and there were no co-morbidities. Leaflets were pliable, isolated leaflet prolapse was common and commissural fusion was absent. Contemporary patients with rheumatic MR were older, fewer had rheumatic fever and there were more co-morbidities. Echocardiographic features had evolved to greater leaflet thickening, calcification and reduced motion with minimal prolapse. These findings may have important implications for surgical management of this disease.

  6. Rheumatic manifestations of hepatitis C virus chronic infection: Indications for a correct diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palazzi, Carlo; D'Amico, Emilio; D'Angelo, Salvatore; Gilio, Michele; Olivieri, Ignazio

    2016-01-28

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a hepato- and lymphotropic agent that is able to induce several autoimmune rheumatic disorders: vasculitis, sicca syndrome, arthralgias/arthritis and fibromyalgia. The severity of clinical manifestations is variable and sometimes life-threatening. HCV infection can mimic many primitive rheumatic diseases, therefore, it is mandatory to distinguish HCV-related manifestations from primitive ones because the prognosis and therapeutic strategies can be fairly dissimilar. The new direct-acting antivirals drugs can help to avoid the well-known risks of worsening or new onset of autoimmune diseases during the traditional interferon-based therapies.

  7. Adapting Knowledge Translation Strategies for Rare Rheumatic Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cellucci, Tania; Lee, Shirley; Webster, Fiona

    2016-08-01

    Rare rheumatic diseases present unique challenges to knowledge translation (KT) researchers. There is often an urgent need to transfer knowledge from research findings into clinical practice to facilitate earlier diagnosis and better outcomes. However, existing KT frameworks have not addressed the specific considerations surrounding rare diseases for which gold standard evidence is not available. Several widely adopted models provide guidance for processes and problems associated with KT. However, they do not address issues surrounding creation or synthesis of knowledge for rare diseases. Additional problems relate to lack of awareness or experience in intended knowledge users, low motivation, and potential barriers to changing practice or policy. Strategies to address the challenges of KT for rare rheumatic diseases include considering different levels of evidence available, linking knowledge creation and transfer directly, incorporating patient and physician advocacy efforts to generate awareness of conditions, and selecting strategies to address barriers to practice or policy change.

  8. Risk of falls in the rheumatic patient at geriatric age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prusinowska, Agnieszka; Komorowski, Arkadiusz; Sadura-Sieklucka, Teresa; Księżopolska-Orłowska, Krystyna

    2017-01-01

    Evaluating the risk of falling of a geriatric rheumatic patient plays an essential role not only in planning and carrying out the physiotherapeutic process. The consequences of falls may be different and, although they do not always result in serious repercussions such as fractures or injuries, it is sufficient that they generate the fear of falling and cause a significant reduction in physical activity. Assessing functional capacity to define the risk of falling is of utmost importance in the case of patients after joint arthroplasty surgeries. The specificity of rheumatic patient's falls is determined by numerous factors. It is not always possible to avoid them. However, it becomes vital to include fall prevention in the rehabilitation process as well as to prepare the house for the needs of an elderly person so that they are safe and as self-dependent as possible.

  9. Genes, autoimmunity and pathogenesis of rheumatic heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guilherme, L; Köhler, K F; Postol, E; Kalil, J

    2011-01-01

    Pathogenesis of rheumatic heart disease (RHD) remains incompletely understood. Several genes associated with RHD have been described; most of these are involved with immune responses. Single nucleotide polymorphisms in a number of genes affect patients with RHD compared to controls. Molecular mimicry between streptococcal antigens and human proteins, including cardiac myosin epitopes, vimentin and other intracellular proteins is central to the pathogenesis of RHD. Autoreactive T cells migrate from the peripheral blood to the heart and proliferate in the valves in response to stimulation with specific cytokines. The types of cells involved in the inflammation as well as different cytokine profiles in these patients are being investigated. High TNF alpha, interferon gamma, and low IL4 are found in the rheumatic valve suggesting an imbalance between Th1 and Th2 cytokines and probably contributing to the progressive and permanent valve damage. Animal model of ARF in the Lewis rat may further contribute towards understanding the ARF

  10. Risk of falls in the rheumatic patient at geriatric age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Prusinowska

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Evaluating the risk of falling of a geriatric rheumatic patient plays an essential role not only in planning and carrying out the physiotherapeutic process. The consequences of falls may be different and, although they do not always result in serious repercussions such as fractures or injuries, it is sufficient that they generate the fear of falling and cause a significant reduction in physical activity. Assessing functional capacity to define the risk of falling is of utmost importance in the case of patients after joint arthroplasty surgeries. The specificity of rheumatic patient’s falls is determined by numerous factors. It is not always possible to avoid them. However, it becomes vital to include fall prevention in the rehabilitation process as well as to prepare the house for the needs of an elderly person so that they are safe and as self-dependent as possible.

  11. Managing rheumatic and musculoskeletal diseases - past, present and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burmester, Gerd R; Bijlsma, Johannes W J; Cutolo, Maurizio; McInnes, Iain B

    2017-07-01

    Progress in rheumatology has been remarkable in the past 70 years, favourably affecting quality of life for people with rheumatic and musculoskeletal diseases. Therapeutics have advanced considerably in this period, from early developments such as the introduction of glucocorticoid therapy to the general use of methotrexate and other disease-modifying agents, followed by the advent of biologic DMARDs and, most recently, small-molecule signalling inhibitors. Novel strategies for the use of such agents have also transformed outcomes, as have multidisciplinary nonpharmacological approaches to the management of rheumatic musculoskeletal disease including surgery, physical therapy and occupational therapy. Breakthroughs in our understanding of disease pathogenesis, diagnostics and the use of 'big data' continue to drive the field forward. Critically, the patient is now at the centre of management strategies as well as the future research agenda.

  12. Developmental trauma disorder: pros and cons of including formal criteria in the psychiatric diagnostic systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schmid Marc

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This article reviews the current debate on developmental trauma disorder (DTD with respect to formalizing its diagnostic criteria. Victims of abuse, neglect, and maltreatment in childhood often develop a wide range of age-dependent psychopathologies with various mental comorbidities. The supporters of a formal DTD diagnosis argue that post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD does not cover all consequences of severe and complex traumatization in childhood. Discussion Traumatized individuals are difficult to treat, but clinical experience has shown that they tend to benefit from specific trauma therapy. A main argument against inclusion of formal DTD criteria into existing diagnostic systems is that emphasis on the etiology of the disorder might force current diagnostic systems to deviate from their purely descriptive nature. Furthermore, comorbidities and biological aspects of the disorder may be underdiagnosed using the DTD criteria. Summary Here, we discuss arguments for and against the proposal of DTD criteria and address implications and consequences for the clinical practice.

  13. The radiologic examination in rheumatic diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houli, J.

    1985-01-01

    The importance of the radiologic examination in rheumatic diseases is discussed. The value of correct execution (incidence and appropriate method) and posterior interpretation in the radiographic proceeding is broached aiming at a clinic-radiologic association. The necessity of an analitic radiographic examination is emphasized and basic principles of its interpretation are described. The expressives aspects of main rheumatic diseases are presented (M.A.C.) [pt

  14. Aortic valve replacement during acute rheumatic fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, A; Chi, S; Gonzalez-Lavin, L

    1978-07-01

    Emergency aortic valve replacement was performed during an attack of acute rheumatic fever in a 12-year-old black boy. He had an uneventful recovery and has remained asymptomatic 27 months after operation. In the light of this experience and that of others, one might conclude that the decision to operate on these patients should be based on the severity of the haemodynamic derangement rather than on the state of activity in the rheumatic process.

  15. Muscle layer histopathology and manometry pattern of primary esophageal motility disorders including achalasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, N; Sato, H; Takahashi, K; Hasegawa, G; Mizuno, K; Hashimoto, S; Sato, Y; Terai, S

    2017-03-01

    Histopathology of muscularis externa in primary esophageal motility disorders has been characterized previously. We aimed to correlate the results of high-resolution manometry with those of histopathology. During peroral endoscopic myotomy, peroral esophageal muscle biopsy was performed in patients with primary esophageal motility disorders. Immunohistochemical staining for c-kit was performed to assess the interstitial cells of Cajal (ICCs). Hematoxylin Eosin and Azan-Mallory staining were used to detect muscle atrophy, inflammation, and fibrosis, respectively. Slides from 30 patients with the following motility disorders were analyzed: achalasia (type I: 14, type II: 5, type III: 3), one diffuse esophageal spasm (DES), two outflow obstruction (OO), four jackhammer esophagus (JE), and one nutcracker esophagus (NE). ICCs were preserved in high numbers in type III achalasia (n=9.4±1.2 cells/high power field [HPF]), compared to types I (n=3.7±0.3 cells/HPF) and II (n=3.5±1.0 cells/HPF). Moreover, severe fibrosis was only observed in type I achalasia and not in other types of achalasia, OO, or DES. Four of five patients with JE and NE had severe inflammation with eosinophilic infiltration of the esophageal muscle layer (73.8±50.3 eosinophils/HPF) with no epithelial eosinophils. One patient with JE showed a visceral myopathy pattern. Compared to types I and II, type III achalasia showed preserved ICCs, with variable data regarding DES and OO. In disorders considered as primary esophageal motility disorders, a disease category exists, which shows eosinophilic infiltration in the esophageal muscle layer with no eosinophils in the epithelium. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. A scientific update on biosimilar infliximab (CT-P13) in rheumatic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The development of biologic drugs has undoubtedly enhanced the spectrum of treatments available for immune-mediated inflammatory rheumatic diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis. However, despite their clear clinical benifits, use of biologics is often hindered by their high costs. The manufacture and subsequent approval of more cost-effective 'biosimilar' versions of these drugs may address this issue and improve patient access. CT-P13 (Remsima(®), Inflectra(®)), a biosimilar of infliximab (Remicade(®)), has shown comparable efficacy, safety and pharmacokinetics to its originator drug in clinical studies. The articles in this supplement present a scientific update on the development and use of biosimilars in rheumatic disorders, with specific focus on CT-P13. The information discussed highlights the predicted positive clinical and economic impact of biosimilars on the management of rheumatic diseases.

  17. The worldwide epidemiology of acute rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seckeler, Michael D; Hoke, Tracey R

    2011-01-01

    Acute rheumatic fever (ARF) and rheumatic heart disease (RHD) are significant public health concerns around the world. Despite decreasing incidence, there is still a significant disease burden, especially in developing nations. This review provides background on the history of ARF, its pathology and treatment, and the current reported worldwide incidence of ARF and prevalence of RHD. PMID:21386976

  18. The Microbiome: a Revolution in Treatment for Rheumatic Diseases?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenbaum, James T; Asquith, Mark J

    2016-10-01

    The microbiome is the term that describes the microbial ecosystem that cohabits an organism such as humans. The microbiome has been implicated in a long list of immune-mediated diseases which include rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, and even gout. The mechanisms to account for this effect are multiple. The clinical implications from observations on the microbiome and disease are broad. A growing number of microbiota constituents such as Prevotella copri, Porphyromonas gingivalis, and Collinsella have been correlated or causally related to rheumatic disease. The microbiome has a marked effect on the immune system. Our understanding of immune pathways modulated by the microbiota such as the induction of T helper 17 (Th17) cells and secretory immunoglobulin A (IgA) responses to segmented filamentous bacteria continues to expand. In addition to the gut microbiome, bacterial communities of other sites such as the mouth, lung, and skin have also been associated with the pathogenesis of rheumatic diseases. Strategies to alter the microbiome or to alter the immune activation from the microbiome might play a role in the future therapy for rheumatic diseases.

  19. Reuma.pt - the rheumatic diseases portuguese register.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canhão, H; Faustino, A; Martins, F; Fonseca, J E

    2011-01-01

    Since June 2008, Portuguese rheumatologists have been collecting on a routine basis, data into the nationwide Reuma.pt, the Rheumatic Diseases Portuguese Register from the Portuguese Society of Rheumatology (SPR), which includes rheumatic patients (rheumatoid arthritis - RA, ankylosing spondylitis - AS, psoriatic arthritis - PsA and juvenile idiopathic arthritis - JIA) receiving biological therapies or patients receiving synthetic disease modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs). The aim of this publication is to describe the structure of Reuma.pt and the population registered since June 2008. Demographic and anthropometric data, life style habits, work status, co-morbidities, disease activity and functional assessment scores, previous and current therapies, adverse events codified by the Medical Dictionary for Regulatory Activities (MedDRA), reasons for discontinuation and laboratory measurements are registered at each visit. The platform is based on a structured electronic medical record linked to a SQL Server database. All Rheumatology Departments assigned to the Portuguese National Health Service (n=21), 2 Military Hospitals (Lisboa and Porto), 1 public-private Institution and 6 private centers adhered to the Register. Until now, 18 centers have entered data into Reuma.pt. By January 2011, 3438 patients and 16130 visits had been registered. 2162 (63%) were RA patients, 700 of them treated with biological agents and 1462 with synthetic DMARDs. From the 515 (15%) AS patients, 297 were medicated with biological and 218 with non-biological therapies. 293 (8%) were PsA patients, 151 treated with biological drugs and 142 with other treatment strategies. 368 (11%) had the diagnosis of JIA, 68 were under biological treatment and 300 were managed with other treatment options. The register also includes 100 (3%) patients with other rheumatic diseases, submitted to treatments that required hospital day care infusions including 18 exposed to biological therapies. Registers

  20. Pattern of mri brain abnormalities in rheumatic patients with neurological involvement: a tertiary care teaching hospital experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parvez, K.; Arfaj, A.; Naseeb, F.; Daif, A.K.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To explore the pattern of abnormalities seen on MRI in rheumatic patients with neurological manifestations and to interpret the findings in relation to clinical picture. Study Design: Descriptive study. Place and Duration of Study: Rheumatology unit, King Khalid University Hospital, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia from January 2013 to February 2014. Patients and Methods: We prospectively included rheumatic patients with neurological symptoms and signs. The clinical data were correlated with MRI findings by a team comprising of a rheumatologist, neurologist and neuro-radiologist. Data was analyzed using simple statistical analysis. Results: Fifty patients were recruited with a mean age of 36.4 ± 10.76 years (range 17-62). Among SLE patients with seizures, focal deficit and headache white matter hyperintensities were found in 9 (64.28%), 4 (50%), 4 (80%) patients respectively. Out of seven SLE patients with global dysfunction, 3 (42.85%) had brain atrophy and 2 (28.57%) normal MRI. In Behcet disease with focal deficit, 3 (75%) patients had white matter hyperintensities and 1 (25%) had brainstem involvement. In Behcet disease with headache, 2 (50%) had normal MRI, 1 (25%) brainstem hyper-intensities and 1 (25%) had subacute infarct. Two (66%) of three Primary APS patients had white matter hyperintensities while third (33%) had old infarct. Both patients of polyarteritisnodosa, had white matter hyperintensities. Out of two Wegener granulomatosis one had white matter hyperintensities and other had ischemic changes in optic nerves. The only one scleroderma patient had white matter hyperintensities. Conclusion: We found that white matter hyperintensities was the most common MRI abnormality in our study group which in most of the cases had poor clinical correlation. No distinct pattern of CNS involvement on MRI was observed in various rheumatic disorders. (author)

  1. Integrated Analyses of Gene Expression Profiles Digs out Common Markers for Rheumatic Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lan; Wu, Long-Fei; Lu, Xin; Mo, Xing-Bo; Tang, Zai-Xiang; Lei, Shu-Feng; Deng, Fei-Yan

    2015-01-01

    Objective Rheumatic diseases have some common symptoms. Extensive gene expression studies, accumulated thus far, have successfully identified signature molecules for each rheumatic disease, individually. However, whether there exist shared factors across rheumatic diseases has yet to be tested. Methods We collected and utilized 6 public microarray datasets covering 4 types of representative rheumatic diseases including rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, ankylosing spondylitis, and osteoarthritis. Then we detected overlaps of differentially expressed genes across datasets and performed a meta-analysis aiming at identifying common differentially expressed genes that discriminate between pathological cases and normal controls. To further gain insights into the functions of the identified common differentially expressed genes, we conducted gene ontology enrichment analysis and protein-protein interaction analysis. Results We identified a total of eight differentially expressed genes (TNFSF10, CX3CR1, LY96, TLR5, TXN, TIA1, PRKCH, PRF1), each associated with at least 3 of the 4 studied rheumatic diseases. Meta-analysis warranted the significance of the eight genes and highlighted the general significance of four genes (CX3CR1, LY96, TLR5, and PRF1). Protein-protein interaction and gene ontology enrichment analyses indicated that the eight genes interact with each other to exert functions related to immune response and immune regulation. Conclusion The findings support that there exist common factors underlying rheumatic diseases. For rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, ankylosing spondylitis and osteoarthritis diseases, those common factors include TNFSF10, CX3CR1, LY96, TLR5, TXN, TIA1, PRKCH, and PRF1. In-depth studies on these common factors may provide keys to understanding the pathogenesis and developing intervention strategies for rheumatic diseases. PMID:26352601

  2. Role of bone scan in rheumatic disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Yun Young

    2003-01-01

    Rheumatic diseases can be categorized by pathology into several specific types of musculoskeletal problems, including synovitis (e.g. rheumatoid arthritis), enthesopathy (e.g. ankylosing spondylitis) and cartilage degeneration (e.g. osteoarthritis). Skeletal radiographs have contributed to the diagnosis of these articular diseases, and some disease entities need typical radiographic changes as a factor of the diagnostic criteria. However, they sometimes show normal radiographic findings in the early stage of disease, when there is demineralization of less than 30-50%. Bone scans have also been used in arthritis, but not widely because the findings are nonspecific and it is thought that bone scans do not add significant information to routine radiography. Bone scans do however play a different role than simple radiography, and it is a complementary imaging method in the course of management of arthritis. The image quality of bone scans can be improved by obtaining regional views and images under al pin-hole collimator, and through a variety of scintigraphic techniques including the three phase bone scan and bone SPECT. Therefore, bone scans could improve the diagnostic value, and answer multiple clinical questions, based on the pathophysiology of various forms of arthritis

  3. Ontology-based systematic representation and analysis of traditional Chinese drugs against rheumatism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qingping; Wang, Jiahao; Zhu, Yan; He, Yongqun

    2017-12-21

    Rheumatism represents any disease condition marked with inflammation and pain in the joints, muscles, or connective tissues. Many traditional Chinese drugs have been used for a long time to treat rheumatism. However, a comprehensive information source for these drugs is still missing, and their anti-rheumatism mechanisms remain unclear. An ontology for anti-rheumatism traditional Chinese drugs would strongly support the representation, analysis, and understanding of these drugs. In this study, we first systematically collected reported information about 26 traditional Chinese decoction pieces drugs, including their chemical ingredients and adverse events (AEs). By mostly reusing terms from existing ontologies (e.g., TCMDPO for traditional Chinese medicines, NCBITaxon for taxonomy, ChEBI for chemical elements, and OAE for adverse events) and making semantic axioms linking different entities, we developed the Ontology of Chinese Medicine for Rheumatism (OCMR) that includes over 3000 class terms. Our OCMR analysis found that these 26 traditional Chinese decoction pieces are made from anatomic entities (e.g., root and stem) from 3 Bilateria animals and 23 Mesangiospermae plants. Anti-inflammatory and antineoplastic roles are important for anti-rheumatism drugs. Using the total of 555 unique ChEBI chemical entities identified from these drugs, our ChEBI-based classification analysis identified 18 anti-inflammatory, 33 antineoplastic chemicals, and 9 chemicals (including 3 diterpenoids and 3 triterpenoids) having both anti-inflammatory and antineoplastic roles. Furthermore, our study detected 22 diterpenoids and 23 triterpenoids, including 16 pentacyclic triterpenoids that are likely bioactive against rheumatism. Six drugs were found to be associated with 184 unique AEs, including three AEs (i.e., dizziness, nausea and vomiting, and anorexia) each associated with 5 drugs. Several chemical entities are classified as neurotoxins (e.g., diethyl phthalate) and allergens (e

  4. Experiences of Students with Specific Learning Disorder (Including ADHD) in Online College Degree Programs: A Phenomenological Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunch, Seleta LeAnn

    2016-01-01

    Enrollment in online degree programs is rapidly expanding due to the convenience and affordability offered to students and improvements in technology. The purpose of this hermeneutical phenomenological study was to understand the shared experiences of students with documented specific learning disorders (including Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity…

  5. Perioperative Management of Patients with Rheumatic Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bissar, Lina; Almoallim, Hani; Albazli, Khaled; Alotaibi, Manal; Alwafi, Samar

    2013-01-01

    This paper aims to explore the assessment of patients with rheumatologic diseases, especially rheumatoid arthritis (RA), before undergoing orthopedic surgery. Perioperative assessment ensures an early diagnosis of the patient's medical condition, overall health, medical co-morbidities, and the assessment of the risk factors associated with the proposed procedures. Perioperative assessment allows for proper postoperative management of complications and of the management of drugs such as disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARD) and anti-platelets, and corticosteroids. The assessment also supports follow up plans, and patient education. Perioperative assessment enables the discussion of the proposed treatment plans and the factors associated with them in each case among the different specialists involved to facilitate an appropriate early decision-making about the assessment and treatment of patients with rheumatologic diseases. It also enables the discussion of both condition and procedure with the patient to ensure a good postoperative care. The article identifies the components of perioperative medical evaluation, discusses perioperative management of co-morbidities and the management of specific clinical problems related to RA, systemic lupus erythematosus, the management of DMARDs, like methotrexate (MTX) and biologic therapies, prophylactic antibiotics, and postoperative follow up, including patient education and rehabilitation PMID:24062860

  6. Challenges to developing effective streptococcal vaccines to prevent rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma A

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Abhinay Sharma, D Patric Nitsche-SchmitzDepartment of Medical Microbiology, Helmholtz Center for Infection Research, Braunschweig, GermanyAbstract: Acute rheumatic fever is a sequela of Streptococcus pyogenes and potentially of Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis infections. Acute rheumatic fever is caused by destructive autoimmunity and inflammation in the extracellular matrix and can lead to rheumatic heart disease, which is the most frequent cardiologic disease that is acquired in youth. Although effective treatments are available, acute rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease remain serious threats to human health, which affect millions and cause high economic losses. This has motivated the search for a vaccine that prevents the causative streptococcal infections. A variety of potential vaccine candidates have been identified and investigated in the past. Today, new approaches are applied to find alternative candidates. Nevertheless, several obstacles lie in the way of an approved S. pyogenes vaccine for use in humans. Herein, a subjective selection of promising vaccine candidates with respect to the prevention of acute rheumatic fever/rheumatic heart disease and safety regarding immunological side effects is discussed.Keywords: autoimmune disease, side effects, M protein vaccine, molecular mimicry, coiled-coil, collagen binding, PARF

  7. Proposed criteria to differentiate heterogeneous eosinophilic gastrointestinal disorders of the esophagus, including eosinophilic esophageal myositis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Hiroki; Nakajima, Nao; Takahashi, Kazuya; Hasegawa, Go; Mizuno, Ken-ichi; Hashimoto, Satoru; Ikarashi, Satoshi; Hayashi, Kazunao; Honda, Yutaka; Yokoyama, Junji; Sato, Yuichi; Terai, Shuji

    2017-01-01

    AIM To define clinical criteria to differentiate eosinophilic gastrointestinal disorder (EoGD) in the esophagus. METHODS Our criteria were defined based on the analyses of the clinical presentation of eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE), subepithelial eosinophilic esophagitis (sEoE) and eosinophilic esophageal myositis (EoEM), identified by endoscopy, manometry and serum immunoglobulin E levels (s-IgE), in combination with histological and polymerase chain reaction analyses on esophageal tissue samples. RESULTS In five patients with EoE, endoscopy revealed longitudinal furrows and white plaques in all, and fixed rings in two. In one patient with sEoE and four with EoEM, endoscopy showed luminal compression only. Using manometry, failed peristalsis was observed in patients with EoE and sEoE with some variation, while EoEM was associated with hypercontractile or hypertensive peristalsis, with elevated s-IgE. Histology revealed the following eosinophils per high-power field values. EoE = 41.4 ± 7.9 in the epithelium and 2.3 ± 1.5 in the subepithelium; sEoE = 3 in the epithelium and 35 in the subepithelium (conventional biopsy); EoEM = none in the epithelium, 10.7 ± 11.7 in the subepithelium (conventional biopsy or endoscopic mucosal resection) and 46.8 ± 16.5 in the muscularis propria (peroral esophageal muscle biopsy). Presence of dilated epithelial intercellular space and downward papillae elongation were specific to EoE. Eotaxin-3, IL-5 and IL-13 were overexpressed in EoE. CONCLUSION Based on clinical and histological data, we identified criteria, which differentiated between EoE, sEoE and EoEM, and reflected a different pathogenesis between these esophageal EoGDs. PMID:28428721

  8. Proposed criteria to differentiate heterogeneous eosinophilic gastrointestinal disorders of the esophagus, including eosinophilic esophageal myositis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Hiroki; Nakajima, Nao; Takahashi, Kazuya; Hasegawa, Go; Mizuno, Ken-Ichi; Hashimoto, Satoru; Ikarashi, Satoshi; Hayashi, Kazunao; Honda, Yutaka; Yokoyama, Junji; Sato, Yuichi; Terai, Shuji

    2017-04-07

    To define clinical criteria to differentiate eosinophilic gastrointestinal disorder (EoGD) in the esophagus. Our criteria were defined based on the analyses of the clinical presentation of eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE), subepithelial eosinophilic esophagitis (sEoE) and eosinophilic esophageal myositis (EoEM), identified by endoscopy, manometry and serum immunoglobulin E levels (s-IgE), in combination with histological and polymerase chain reaction analyses on esophageal tissue samples. In five patients with EoE, endoscopy revealed longitudinal furrows and white plaques in all, and fixed rings in two. In one patient with sEoE and four with EoEM, endoscopy showed luminal compression only. Using manometry, failed peristalsis was observed in patients with EoE and sEoE with some variation, while EoEM was associated with hypercontractile or hypertensive peristalsis, with elevated s-IgE. Histology revealed the following eosinophils per high-power field values. EoE = 41.4 ± 7.9 in the epithelium and 2.3 ± 1.5 in the subepithelium; sEoE = 3 in the epithelium and 35 in the subepithelium (conventional biopsy); EoEM = none in the epithelium, 10.7 ± 11.7 in the subepithelium (conventional biopsy or endoscopic mucosal resection) and 46.8 ± 16.5 in the muscularis propria (peroral esophageal muscle biopsy). Presence of dilated epithelial intercellular space and downward papillae elongation were specific to EoE. Eotaxin-3, IL-5 and IL-13 were overexpressed in EoE. Based on clinical and histological data, we identified criteria, which differentiated between EoE, sEoE and EoEM, and reflected a different pathogenesis between these esophageal EoGDs.

  9. Burden and health-related quality of life of eating disorders, including Avoidant/Restrictive Food Intake Disorder (ARFID), in the Australian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hay, Phillipa; Mitchison, Deborah; Collado, Abraham Ernesto Lopez; González-Chica, David Alejandro; Stocks, Nigel; Touyz, Stephen

    2017-01-01

    Little is known about the epidemiology and health related quality of life (HRQoL) of the new DSM-5 diagnoses, Binge Eating Disorder (BED) and Avoidant/Restrictive Food Intake Disorder (ARFID) in the Australian population. We aimed to investigate the prevalance and burden of these disorders. We conducted two sequential population-based surveys including individuals aged over 15 years who were interviewed in 2014 ( n  = 2732) and 2015 ( n =3005). Demographic information and diagnostic features of DSM-5 eating disorders were asked including the occurrence of regular (at least weekly over the past 3 months) objective binge eating with levels of distress, extreme dietary restriction/fasting for weight/shape control, purging behaviors, overvaluation of shape and/or weight, and the presence of an avoidant/restrictive food intake without overvaluation of shape and/or weight. In 2014 functional impact or role performance was measured with the 'days out of role' question and in 2015, Health Related Quality of Life (HRQoL) was assessed with the Short Form -12 item questionnaire (SF-12v1). The 2014 and 2015 3-month prevalence of eating disorders were: anorexia nervosa-broad 0.4% (95% CI 0.2-0.7) and 0.5% (0.3-0.9); bulimia nervosa 1.1% (0.7-1.5) and 1.2% (0.9-1.7); ARFID 0.3% (0.1-0.5) and 0.3% (0.2-0.6). The 2015 3-month prevalence rates were: BED-broad 1.5% (1.1-2.0); Other Specified Feeding or Eating Disorder (OSFED) 3.2 (2.6-3.9); and Unspecified Feeding or Eating Disorder (UFED) 10.4% (0.9-11.5). Most people with OSFED had atypical anorexia nervosa and majority with UFED were characterised by having recurrent binge eating without marked distress. Eating disorders were represented throughout sociodemographic groups and those with bulimia nervosa and BED-broad had mean weight (BMI, kg/m 2 ) in the obese range. Mental HRQoL was poor in all eating disorder groups but particularly poor for those with BED-broad and ARFID. Individuals with bulimia nervosa, BED

  10. Anti-inflammatory treatment for carditis in acute rheumatic fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cilliers, Antoinette; Adler, Alma J; Saloojee, Haroon

    2015-05-28

    Rheumatic heart disease remains an important cause of acquired heart disease in developing countries. Although prevention of rheumatic fever and management of recurrences have been well established, optimal management of active rheumatic carditis remains unclear. This is an update of a review published in 2003, and previously updated in 2009 and 2012. To assess the effects, both harmful and beneficial, of anti-inflammatory agents such as aspirin, corticosteroids and other drugs in preventing or reducing further valvular damage in patients with acute rheumatic fever. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (2013, Issue 9 of 12), MEDLINE (Ovid, 1948 to 2013 October Week 1), EMBASE (Ovid, 1980 to 2013 Week 41) and Latin American Caribbean Health Sciences Literature (LILACS) (1982 to 17 October 2013). We last searched Index Medicus (1950 to April 2001) in 2001. We checked reference lists of identified studies and applied no language restrictions. Randomised controlled trials comparing anti-inflammatory agents (e.g. aspirin, steroids, immunoglobulins, pentoxifylline) versus placebo or controls, or comparing any of the anti-inflammatory agents versus one another, in adults and children with acute rheumatic fever diagnosed according to Jones, or modified Jones, criteria. The presence of cardiac disease one year after treatment was the major outcome criterion selected. Two review authors extracted data and assessed risk of bias using the methodology outlined in the Cochrane Handbook of Systematic Reviews of Interventions. Standard methodological procedures as expected by The Cochrane Collaboration were used. No new studies were included in this update. Eight randomised controlled trials involving 996 people were selected for inclusion in the review. Researchers compared several steroidal agents such as corticotrophin, cortisone, hydrocortisone, dexamethasone, prednisone and intravenous immunoglobulin versus aspirin, placebo or no treatment. Six

  11. MR imaging of the knee in patients with rheumatic diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weissman, B.N.; Winalski, C.S.; Aliabadi, P.; Kikinis, R.; Shortkroff, S.; Sledge, C.B.

    1990-01-01

    This paper evaluates the MR appearances of the knees in patients with rheumatic diseases, including the grading of changes, quantification of changes, and the role of intravenous gadolinium. MR imaging of the knee was performed in 19 patients with arthritis, including rheumatoid arthritis (n = 11), juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (n = 2), Reiter syndrome (n = 2), Crohn arthritis (n = 1), and psoriatic arthritis (n = 3). Spin-echo images (T1, T2, and proton density weighted) were obtained in sagittal, coronal, and axial planes. T1-weighted axial images were obtained before and after intravenous injection of Gd-DTPA

  12. Therapeutic Drug Monitoring in Rheumatic Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NG Hoi-Yan Alexandra

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The ultimate goal of treating rheumatic disease is to achieve rapid suppression of inflammation, while at the same time minimizing the toxicities from rheumatic drugs. Different patients have different individual pharmacokinetics that can affect the drug level. Moreover, different factors, such as renal function, age or even different underlying diseases, can affect the drug level. Therefore, giving the same dosage of drugs to different patients may result in different drug levels. This article will review the usefulness of therapeutic drug monitoring in maximizing drug efficacy, while reducing the risk of toxicities in Hydroxychloroquine, Mycophenolate Mofetil, Tacrolimus and Tumor Necrosis Factor inhibitors (TNF Inhibitors.

  13. The impact of unrecognized autoimmune rheumatic diseases on the incidence of preeclampsia and fetal growth restriction: a longitudinal cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinillo, Arsenio; Beneventi, Fausta; Locatelli, Elena; Ramoni, Vèronique; Caporali, Roberto; Alpini, Claudia; Albonico, Giulia; Cavagnoli, Chiara; Montecucco, Carlomaurizio

    2016-10-18

    The burden of pregnancy complications associated with well defined, already established systemic rheumatic diseases preexisting pregnancy such as rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus or scleroderma is well known. Systemic rheumatic diseases are characterized by a long natural history with few symptoms, an undifferentiated picture or a remitting course making difficult a timely diagnosis. It has been suggested that screening measures for these diseases could be useful but the impact of unrecognized systemic rheumatic disorders on pregnancy outcome is unknown. The objective of the study was to evaluate the impact of previously unrecognized systemic autoimmune rheumatic on the incidence of preeclampsia and fetal growth restriction (FGR). A longitudinal cohort-study with enrolment during the first trimester of pregnancy of women attending routine antenatal care using a two-step approach with a self-reported questionnaire, autoantibody detection and clinical evaluation of antibody-positive subjects. The incidence of FGR and preeclampsia in subjects with newly diagnosed rheumatic diseases was compared to that of selected negative controls adjusting for potential confounders by logistic regression analysis. The prevalence of previously unrecognized systemic rheumatic diseases was 0.4 % for rheumatoid arthritis (19/5232), 0.25 % (13/5232) for systemic lupus erythematosus, 0.31 % (16/5232) for Sjögren's syndrome, 0.3 % for primary antiphospholipid syndrome (14/5232) and 0.11 % (6/5232) for other miscellaneous diseases. Undifferentiated connective tissue disease was diagnosed in an additional 131 subjects (2.5 %). The incidence of either FGR or preeclampsia was 6.1 % (36/594) among controls and 25.3 % (50/198) in subjects with unrecognized rheumatic diseases (excess incidence = 3.9 % (95 % CI = 2.6-9.6) or 34 % (95 % CI = 22-44) of all cases of FGR/preeclampsia). The incidence of small for gestational age infant (SGA) was higher among

  14. Plasma and tissue oxidative stress index in patients with rheumatic and degenerative heart valve disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabus, Murat; Demirbağ, Recep; Sezen, Yusuf; Konukoğlu, Oğuz; Yildiz, Ali; Erel, Ozcan; Zeybek, Rahmi; Yakut, Cevat

    2008-12-01

    We investigated whether patients with rheumatic and degenerative heart valve disease (HVD) differed with regard to plasma and tissue oxidative stress index (OSI). The study included 56 patients who underwent valve replacement due to rheumatic (n=32; 15 males; mean age 47+/-10 years) and degenerative (n=24; 13 males; mean age 55+/-12 years) HVD. Plasma and tissue total oxidative status (TOS) and total antioxidative capacity (TAC) levels were measured and OSI was calculated. Patients with degenerative HVD had significantly higher age, increased interventricular septum thickness, and higher frequency of aortic stenosis, whereas the incidence of mitral stenosis was higher in patients with rheumatic HVD (p0.05). Tissue TAC was significantly lower in patients with rheumatic HVD (p=0.027), whereas tissue TOS and OSI were similar between the two HVD groups (p>0.05). In bivariate analysis, plasma OSI did not show any correlation with clinical, laboratory, and echocardiographic variables (p>0.05). Our data show that plasma and tissue OSI levels are similar in patients with rheumatic and degenerative HVD.

  15. The Role of Monocyte Percentage in Osteoporosis in Male Rheumatic Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Yu-Jih; Chen, Chao Tung; Tsai, Nai-Wen; Huang, Chih-Cheng; Wang, Hung-Chen; Kung, Chia-Te; Lin, Wei-Che; Cheng, Ben-Chung; Su, Chih-Min; Hsiao, Sheng-Yuan; Lu, Cheng-Hsien

    2017-11-01

    Osteoporosis is easily overlooked in male patients, especially in the field of rheumatic diseases mostly prevalent with female patients, and its link to pathogenesis is still lacking. Attenuated monocyte apoptosis from a transcriptome-wide expression study illustrates the role of monocytes in osteoporosis. This study tested the hypothesis that the monocyte percentage among leukocytes could be a biomarker of osteoporosis in rheumatic diseases. Eighty-seven males with rheumatic diseases were evaluated in rheumatology outpatient clinics for bone mineral density (BMD) and surrogate markers, such as routine peripheral blood parameters and autoantibodies. From the total number of 87 patients included in this study, only 15 met the criteria for diagnosis of osteoporosis. Both age and monocyte percentage remained independently associated with the presence of osteoporosis. Steroid dose (equivalent prednisolone dose) was negatively associated with BMD of the hip area and platelet counts were negatively associated with BMD and T score of the spine area. Besides age, monocyte percentage meets the major requirements for osteoporosis in male rheumatic diseases. A higher monocyte percentage in male rheumatic disease patients, aged over 50 years in this study, and BMD study should be considered in order to reduce the risk of osteoporosis-related fractures.

  16. Digestive comorbidity in patients with rheumatic diseases: Not only NSAID-induced gastropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. E. Karateev

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Digestive comorbidity is a serious problem that significantly aggravates the course of rheumatic diseases. Diseases of the gastrointestinal tract (GIT, liver, and pancreatobiliary system may present a threat to life and substantially worsen its quality. The incidence of many digestive diseases, such as gastric ulcer (including its complicated forms, cholelithiasis, and acute pancreatitis, in patients with rheumatic diseases (at least in those with rheumatoid arthritis is considerably higher than in the population. The presence of this comorbidity poses substantial challenges during active anti-rheumatic therapy. Rheumatologists are very familiar with issues in the prevention of GIT complications due to the use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. However, new time presents new challenges. The widespread use of immunosuppressive agents and biologic agents requires careful monitoring of complications associated with liver and bowel diseases. This review considers a relationship of rheumatic diseases and anti-rheumatic therapy to comorbidities, such as cholelithiasis, acute pancreatitis, viral hepatitis B and C, and intestinal diverticula. 

  17. Computer tomography of inflammatory rheumatic degenerative and reparative affections and transformation processes in the region of the sacroiliac joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heller, M.; Guertler, K.F.; Dihlmann, W.; Allgemeines Krankenhaus Barmbek, Hamburg

    1980-01-01

    Inflammatory rheumatic, degenerative and reparative affections and transformation processes in the region of the sacroiliac joints can be demonstrated via computer tomography and/or conventinal roentgenology. It is found that computer tomography is superior to plain roentgenography diagnosis, including tomography, in respect of malpositioning of the articulating bones and reparative phenomena. On the other hand, early diagnosis of inflammatory rheumatic changes does not yield any additional information via computer tomography. (orig.) [de

  18. Recommendations of the ESSR Arthritis Subcommittee for the Use of Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Musculoskeletal Rheumatic Diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sudoł-Szopińska, Iwona; Jurik, Anne Grethe; Eshed, Iris

    2015-01-01

    This article presents the recommendations of the European Society of Musculoskeletal Radiology Arthritis Subcommittee regarding the standards of the use of MRI in the diagnosis of musculoskeletal rheumatic diseases. The recommendations discuss (1) the role of MRI in current classification criteria...... of musculoskeletal rheumatic diseases (including early diagnosis of inflammation, disease follow-up, and identification of disease complications); (2) the impact of MRI on the diagnosis of axial and peripheral spondyloarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, and juvenile spondyloarthritis; (3) MRI protocols for the axial...

  19. Male fertility potential alteration in rheumatic diseases: a systematic review

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    Bruno Camargo Tiseo

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Background Improved targeted therapies for rheumatic diseases were developed recently resulting in a better prognosis for affected patients. Nowadays, patients are living longer and with improved quality of life, including fertility potential. These patients are affected by impaired reproductive function and the causes are often multifactorial related to particularities of each disease. This review highlights how rheumatic diseases and their management affect testicular function and male fertility. Materials and Methods A systematic review of literature of all published data after 1970 was conducted. Data was collected about fertility abnormalities in male patients with systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, dermatomyositis, ankylosing spondylitis, Behçet disease and gout. Two independent researchers carried out the search in online databases. Results A total of 19 articles were included addressing the following diseases: 7 systemic lupus erythematosus, 6 Behçet disease, 4 ankylosing spondylitis, 2 rheumatoid arthritis, 2 dermatomyositis and one gout. Systemic lupus erythematosus clearly affects gonadal function impairing spermatogenesis mainly due to antisperm antibodies and cyclophosphamide therapy. Behçet disease, gout and ankylosing spondylitis patients, including those under anti-TNF therapy in the latter disease, do not seem to have reduced fertility whereas in dermatomyositis, the fertility potential is hampered by disease activity and by alkylating agents. Data regarding rheumatoid arthritis is scarce, gonadal dysfunction observed as consequence of disease activity and antisperm antibodies. Conclusions Reduced fertility potential is not uncommon. Its frequency and severity vary among the different rheumatic diseases. Permanent infertility is rare and often associated with alkylating agent therapy.

  20. Occurrence and features of uveitis in patients with rheumatic diseases: current peculiarities of clinical examination and patient management.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dzhalavyan Y.V.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of the study are to establish the occurrence of uveitis in patients with rheumatic diseases, to assess the features of the uveitis in rheumatic disease in children and adults, and to analyze the effectiveness of theirtreatment. Materials and Methods. The study included 670 people with RH (stage I and 35 patients who had uveitis and / or rheumatic fever who agreed to undergo additional ophthalmologic bleeding (stage II, including a standard ophthalmological examination including visiometry, biomicroscopy of the anterior segment, ophthalmoscopy of the posterior segment of the eye, refractometry, optical coherence tomography in angiomode(tomograph-angiograph CIRRUS HD-OCT MODEL 5000 (Carl Zeiss, Germany, dopplerography of the vessels of the eye. Results. The prevalence of uveitis in rheumatic diseases was established in 21%, which is higher than that in the general population. Uveitis in rheumatic diseases is recurrent and well-treated condition with frequent and complete improvement of visual acuity, and angiographycal features of uveitis, p <0,05 for all parameters. Conclusions. The high incidence of uveitis and relapsing their course in rheumatic diseases lead to necessity of an ophthalmologist's examination every 6 months. It is desirable to perform a comprehensive angiographic examination of uvea for the timely detection of erased and subclinical forms of uveitis.

  1. Perspectives for uveitis treatment in rheumatic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alla Aleksandrovna Godzenko

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes current approaches to treating uveitis in rheumatic diseases and theoretical backgrounds for using tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α inhibitors. The data available in the literature suggest that anti-TNF-α therapy is highly effective in relieving and preventing uveitis attacks.

  2. Lung Manifestations in the Rheumatic Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, Tracy J; Dellaripa, Paul F

    2017-12-01

    Lung ailments in rheumatic diseases present unique challenges for diagnosis and management and are a source of significant morbidity and mortality for patients. Unlike the idiopathic interstitial pneumonias, patients with rheumatic diseases experience lung disease in the context of a systemic disease that may make it more difficult to recognize and that may present greater risks with treatment. Despite recent advances in our awareness of these diseases, there is still a significant lack of understanding of natural history to elucidate which patients will have disease that is progressive and thus warrants treatment. What we do know is that a subset of patients with rheumatic disease experience parenchymal lung disease that can prognostically resemble idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, such as in rheumatoid arthritis, and that others can have aggressive inflammatory lung disease in the context of autoimmune myositis, systemic sclerosis, or an undifferentiated autoimmune process. As we enter into a paradigm shift where we view lung health as a cornerstone of our care of patients with rheumatic diseases, we hopefully will improve our ability to identify those patients at highest risk for pulmonary disease and progression, and offer emerging treatments which will result in better outcomes and a better quality of life. Copyright © 2017 American College of Chest Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Diagnostic radiology in the rheumatic diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, A.; Martin, W.

    1986-01-01

    In the radiological investigation of joint disease there are several signs which are helpful in making a diagnosis, Individually these signs will often suggest the presence of joint disease but may not be specific. However when present in combination or when considering the anatomic distribution, a definitive diagnosis is possible. Several of the signs of rheumatic disease can occur in other nonrheumatic conditions

  4. Epidemiological studies in incidence, prevalence, mortality, and comorbidity of the rheumatic diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabriel, Sherine E; Michaud, Kaleb

    2009-01-01

    Epidemiology is the study of the distribution and determinants of disease in human populations. Over the past decade there has been considerable progress in our understanding of the fundamental descriptive epidemiology (levels of disease frequency: incidence and prevalence, comorbidity, mortality, trends over time, geographic distributions, and clinical characteristics) of the rheumatic diseases. This progress is reviewed for the following major rheumatic diseases: rheumatoid arthritis (RA), juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, osteoarthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, giant cell arteritis, polymyalgia rheumatica, gout, Sjögren's syndrome, and ankylosing spondylitis. These findings demonstrate the dynamic nature of the incidence and prevalence of these conditions – a reflection of the impact of genetic and environmental factors. The past decade has also brought new insights regarding the comorbidity associated with rheumatic diseases. Strong evidence now shows that persons with RA are at a high risk for developing several comorbid disorders, that these conditions may have atypical features and thus may be difficult to diagnose, and that persons with RA experience poorer outcomes after comorbidity compared with the general population. Taken together, these findings underscore the complexity of the rheumatic diseases and highlight the key role of epidemiological research in understanding these intriguing conditions. PMID:19519924

  5. Beyond Fat Mass: Exploring the Role of Adipokines in Rheumatic Diseases

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    Morena Scotece

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The cloning of leptin in 1994 by Zhang et al. introduced a novel concept about white adipose tissue (WAT as a very dynamic organ that releases a plethora of immune and inflammatory mediators, such as adipokines and cytokines, which are involved in multiple diseases. Actually, adipokines exert potent modulatory actions on target tissues involved in rheumatic diseases including cartilage, synovial, bone and immune cells. The goal of this paper is to elucidate the recent findings concerning the involvement of adipokines in rheumatic diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA, osteoarthritis (OA, and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE.

  6. Association between rheumatic diseases and cancer: results from a clinical practice cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellan, Mattia; Boggio, Enrico; Sola, Daniele; Gibbin, Antonello; Gualerzi, Alessandro; Favretto, Serena; Guaschino, Giulia; Bonometti, Ramona; Pedrazzoli, Roberta; Pirisi, Mario; Sainaghi, Pier Paolo

    2017-08-01

    The association between cancer and immune-mediated rheumatic conditions is controversial, especially as far as polymyalgia rheumatica (PMR) is concerned. Furthermore, no clinical feature has been shown to be suggestive of a paraneoplastic rheumatic syndrome. With the present study, we aim to address both these issues. The study population comprised N = 1750 patients, including N = 100 with PMR, who attended our tertiary immuno-rheumatology clinic between January 1, 2005 and November 30, 2012. A rheumatic disease was deemed paraneoplastic if cancer had been diagnosed in the 2 years preceding or following its onset. The probability of a significant association between a specific rheumatic disease and cancer was evaluated by computing the odds ratio (OR): N = 702 patients with osteoarthritis serving as controls. Furthermore, clinical features distinguishing paraneoplastic rheumatic diseases were searched for by univariate and multivariate analysis. Sjogren's syndrome (SS) [OR 3.6 (CI 95% 1.7-7.5)], PMR (OR 5.1 CI 95% 2.9-8.9), dermatomyositis/polymyositis [OR 12.09 (CI 95% 2.6-55.8)] and vasculitis [OR 3.70 (CI 95% 1.81-7.52)] are associated with cancer. At multivariate analysis, older age is associated with cancer among SS patients (p = 0.03), while in the PMR group, older age, male gender, and ≥6 tender joints are independent predictors of paraneoplastic PMR (p rheumatic manifestations, including PMR. Older age, male gender and a more extensive joint involvement should be considered red flags for paraneoplastic PMR.

  7. The significance and predictive value of free light chains in the urine of patients with chronic inflammatory rheumatic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bramlage, Carsten Paul; Froelich, Britta; Wallbach, Manuel; Minguet, Joan; Grupp, Clemens; Deutsch, Cornelia; Bramlage, Peter; Koziolek, Michael; Müller, Gerhard Anton

    2016-12-01

    In patients with rheumatic diseases, reliable markers for determining disease activity are scarce. One potential parameter is the level of immunoglobulin free light chains (FLCs), which is known to be elevated in the blood of patients with certain rheumatic diseases. Few studies have quantified FLCs in urine, a convenient source of test sample, in patients with different rheumatic diseases. We carried out a retrospective analysis of patients with rheumatic disease attending the University hospital of Goettingen, Germany. Subjects were included if they had urine levels of both κ and λ FLCs available and did not have myeloma. Data regarding systemic inflammation and kidney function were recorded, and FLC levels were correlated with inflammatory markers. Of the 382 patients with rheumatic disease, 40.1 % had chronic polyarthritis, 21.2 % connective tissue disease, 18.6 % spondyloarthritis and 15.7 % vasculitis. Elevated levels of κ FLCs were found for 84 % of patients and elevated λ for 52.7 %. For the patients with rheumatoid arthritis, FLCs correlated with C-reactive protein (κ, r = 0.368, p rheumatic disease, but not in κ/λ ratio. The correlation between FLCs and inflammatory markers in patients with rheumatoid arthritis demonstrates their potential for predicting disease activity.

  8. Prognosis of patients with rheumatic diseases admitted to intensive care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beil, M; Sviri, S; de la Guardia, V; Stav, I; Ben-Chetrit, E; van Heerden, P V

    2017-01-01

    Variable mortality rates have been reported for patients with rheumatic diseases admitted to an intensive care unit (ICU). Due to the absence of appropriate control groups in previous studies, it is not known whether the presence of a rheumatic disease constitutes a risk factor. Moreover, the accuracy of the Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II) score for predicting outcome in this group of patients has been questioned. The primary goal of this study was to compare outcome of patients with rheumatic diseases admitted to a medical ICU to those of controls. The records of all patients admitted between 1 April 2003 and 30 June 2014 (n=4020) were screened for the presence of a rheumatic disease during admission (n=138). The diagnosis of a rheumatic disease was by standard criteria for these conditions. An age- and gender-matched control group of patients without a rheumatic disease was extracted from the patient population in the database during the same period (n=831). Mortality in ICU, in hospital and after 180 days did not differ significantly between patients with and without rheumatic diseases. There was no difference in the performance of the APACHE II score for predicting outcome in patients with rheumatic diseases and controls. This score, as well as a requirement for the use of inotropes or vasopressors, accurately predicted hospital mortality in the group of patients with rheumatic diseases. In conclusion, patients with a rheumatic condition admitted to intensive care do not do significantly worse than patients without such a disease.

  9. Management of rheumatic chorea: an observational study

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    Araújo Alexandra Prufer de Queiroz Campos

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Rheumatic chorea (RC has recently been linked to an antibody-mediated immune mechanism. OBJECTIVE/METHOD: To verify if this knowledge reflected in management changes we conceived a descriptive study. RESULTS: The medical charts of 20 children (13 females aged 6 to 12 years (mean 8 years, diagnosed as RC from June 1996 to June 1999, were reviewed. All patients received some medical treatment. Haloperidol was the most prescribed medication (15 patients - 75 %. Sulpiride, diazepam and valproate were also used as symptomatic treatment. Imune-modulating therapy with prednisone was prescribed for seven children. The shortest course of chorea (16 days occurred in a patient treated with prednisone. CONCLUSION: Prednisone has been prescribed for rheumatic chorea besides the traditional symptomatic approach. A great variety of antichoreic drugs are being employed.

  10. Mortality from Musculoskeletal Disorders Including Rheumatoid Arthritis in Southern Sweden: A Multiple-cause-of-death Analysis, 1998-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiadaliri, Aliasghar A; Turkiewicz, Aleksandra; Englund, Martin

    2017-05-01

    To assess mortality related to musculoskeletal (MSK) disorders and rheumatoid arthritis (RA), specifically, among adults (aged ≥ 20 yrs) in southern Sweden using the multiple-cause-of-death approach. All death certificates (DC; n = 201,488) from 1998 to 2014 for adults in the region of Skåne were analyzed when mortality from MSK disorders and RA was listed as the underlying and nonunderlying cause of death (UCD/NUCD). Trends in age-standardized mortality rates (ASMR) were evaluated using joinpoint regression, and associated causes were identified by age- and sex-adjusted observed/expected ratios. MSK (RA) was mentioned on 2.8% (0.8%) of all DC and selected as UCD in 0.6% (0.2%), with higher values among women. Proportion of MSK disorder deaths from all deaths increased from 2.7% in 1998 to 3.1% in 2014, and declined from 0.9% to 0.5% for RA. The mean age at death was higher in DC with mention of MSK/RA than in DC without. The mean ASMR for MSK (RA) was 15.5 (4.3) per 100,000 person-years and declined by 1.1% (3.8%) per year during 1998-2014. When MSK/RA were UCD, pneumonia and heart failure were the main NUCD. When MSK/RA were NUCD, the leading UCD were ischemic heart disease and neoplasms. The greatest observed/expected ratios were seen for infectious diseases (including sepsis) and blood diseases. We observed significant reduction in MSK and RA mortality rates and increase in the mean age at death. Further analyses are required to investigate determinants of these improvements in MSK/RA survival and their potential effect on the Swedish healthcare systems.

  11. Ergonomic intervention for employed persons with rheumatic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allaire, Saralynn J; Backman, Catherine L; Alheresh, Rawan; Baker, Nancy A

    2013-01-01

    Prior articles in this series on employment and arthritis have documented the major impact arthritis and other rheumatic conditions have on employment. As expected, physically demanding job tasks, including hand use, are substantial risk factors for work limitation. Computer use has been increasing. People with arthritis may choose occupations involving extensive computer use to avoid occupations with other physical demands. But studies show many people with arthritis conditions have difficulty using computers.Ergonomic assessment and implementation helps relieve the physical and other demands of jobs. The Ergonomic Assessment Tool for Arthritis (EATA) is specifically for people with arthritis conditions. Since the EATA can be conducted off worksite, it is feasible to use with workers not wishing to disclose their condition to their employer. Available research supports the effectiveness of ergonomic intervention as a viable method to reduce work limitation for persons with arthritis. Some workers will need additional vocational intervention to remain employed long term. However, ergonomic intervention is a useful first step, as it promotes awareness of arthritis effects on work activities. Assisting workers with arthritis or other rheumatic conditions to use ergonomics to enhance their ability to work well should be an important aspect of managing these conditions.

  12. State of the art: Reproduction and pregnancy in rheumatic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Østensen, Monika; Andreoli, Laura; Brucato, Antonio; Cetin, Irene; Chambers, Christina; Clowse, Megan E B; Costedoat-Chalumeau, Nathalie; Cutolo, Maurizio; Dolhain, Radboud; Fenstad, M H; Förger, Frauke; Wahren-Herlenius, Marie; Ruiz-Irastorza, Guillermo; Koksvik, Hege; Nelson-Piercy, Catherine; Shoenfeld, Yehuda; Tincani, Angela; Villiger, Peter M; Wallenius, Marianne; von Wolff, Michael

    2015-05-01

    Throughout the last decade, increasing awareness has been raised on issues related to reproduction in rheumatic diseases including basic research to clarify the important role of estrogens in the etiology and pathophysiology of immune/inflammatory diseases. Sub- or infertility is a heterogeneous condition that can be related to immunological mechanisms, to pregnancy loss, to disease burden, to therapy, and to choices in regard to family size. Progress in reproductive medicine has made it possible for more patients with rheumatic disease to have children. Active disease in women with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) affects their children's birth weight and may have long-term effects on their future health status. Pregnancy complications as preeclampsia and intrauterine growth restriction are still increased in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and antiphospholipid syndrome (APS), however, biomarkers can monitor adverse events, and several new therapies may improve outcomes. Pregnancies in women with APS remain a challenge, and better therapies for the obstetric APS are needed. New prospective studies indicate improved outcomes for pregnancies in women with rare diseases like systemic sclerosis and vasculitis. TNF inhibitors hold promise for maintaining remission in rheumatological patients and may be continued at least in the first half of pregnancy. Pre-conceptional counseling and interdisciplinary management of pregnancies are essential for ensuring optimal pregnancy outcomes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Development of a versatile enrichment analysis tool reveals associations between the maternal brain and mental health disorders, including autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background A recent study of lateral septum (LS) suggested a large number of autism-related genes with altered expression in the postpartum state. However, formally testing the findings for enrichment of autism-associated genes proved to be problematic with existing software. Many gene-disease association databases have been curated which are not currently incorporated in popular, full-featured enrichment tools, and the use of custom gene lists in these programs can be difficult to perform and interpret. As a simple alternative, we have developed the Modular Single-set Enrichment Test (MSET), a minimal tool that enables one to easily evaluate expression data for enrichment of any conceivable gene list of interest. Results The MSET approach was validated by testing several publicly available expression data sets for expected enrichment in areas of autism, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), and arthritis. Using nine independent, unique autism gene lists extracted from association databases and two recent publications, a striking consensus of enrichment was detected within gene expression changes in LS of postpartum mice. A network of 160 autism-related genes was identified, representing developmental processes such as synaptic plasticity, neuronal morphogenesis, and differentiation. Additionally, maternal LS displayed enrichment for genes associated with bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, ADHD, and depression. Conclusions The transition to motherhood includes the most fundamental social bonding event in mammals and features naturally occurring changes in sociability. Some individuals with autism, schizophrenia, or other mental health disorders exhibit impaired social traits. Genes involved in these deficits may also contribute to elevated sociability in the maternal brain. To date, this is the first study to show a significant, quantitative link between the maternal brain and mental health disorders using large scale gene expression data. Thus, the

  14. Aortic, carotid intima-media thickness and flow- mediated dilation as markers of early atherosclerosis in a cohort of pediatric patients with rheumatic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Giudice, Emanuela; Dilillo, Anna; Tromba, Luciana; La Torre, Giuseppe; Blasi, Sara; Conti, Fabrizio; Viola, Franca; Cucchiara, Salvatore; Duse, Marzia

    2018-06-01

    The aims of this study were to identify the presence of endothelial dysfunction as a marker of early atherosclerosis by measuring aortic and carotid intimal-medial thickness (aIMT and cIMT) and flow-mediated dilation (FMD) and their correlation with traditional and no traditional risk factors for atherosclerosis in children with rheumatic diseases. Thirty-nine patients (mean age 15.3 ± 5.7 years), 23 juvenile idiopathic arthritis, 9 juvenile spondyloarthropathies, 7 connective tissue diseases (mean disease duration and onset respectively 5 ± 3.6 and 10 ± 5 years), and 52 healthy children matched for sex and age were enrolled. Demographic data (age, sex, familiarity for cardiovascular disease), traditional risk factors for atherosclerosis (BMI, active and passive smoking, dyslipidemia), activity disease indexes (reactive count protein, erythrocyte sedimentation rate) autoantibodies, and complement tests were collected. aIMT, cIMT, and FMD were assessed following a standardized protocol by high-resolution ultrasonography. Patients resulted significantly more exposed to passive smoking and had a lower BMI and higher homocysteine level than controls. cIMT and aIMT were significantly higher in patients than controls (p disease duration. FMD % was significantly reduced in patients compared to controls (p rheumatic diseases, mainly in early onset forms, and aIMT is an earlier marker of preclinical atherosclerosis. Premature endothelial dysfunction could be included in the follow-up of children with rheumatic disorders to plan prevention strategies of cardiovascular disease already in pediatrics.

  15. Parents' Adoption of Social Communication Intervention Strategies: Families Including Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder Who are Minimally Verbal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shire, Stephanie Y; Goods, Kelly; Shih, Wendy; Distefano, Charlotte; Kaiser, Ann; Wright, Courtney; Mathy, Pamela; Landa, Rebecca; Kasari, Connie

    2015-06-01

    Notably absent from the intervention literature are parent training programs targeting school-aged children with autism who have limited communication skills (Tager-Flusberg and Kasari in Autism Res 6:468-478, 2013). Sixty-one children with autism age 5-8 with minimal spontaneous communication received a 6-month social communication intervention including parent training. Parent-child play interactions were coded for parents' strategy implementation and children's time jointly engaged (Adamson et al. in J Autism Dev Disord 39:84-96, 2009). Parents mastered an average of 70% of the strategies. Further analyses indicated some gains in implementation occurred from mere observation of sessions, while the greatest gains occurred in the first month of active coaching and workshops. Children's joint engagement was associated with parents' implementation success across time demonstrating parents' implementation was relevant to children's social engagement.

  16. Shift, Interrupted: Strategies for Managing Difficult Patients Including Those with Personality Disorders and Somatic Symptoms in the Emergency Department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moukaddam, Nidal; AufderHeide, Erin; Flores, Araceli; Tucci, Veronica

    2015-11-01

    Difficult patients are often those who present with a mix of physical and psychiatric symptoms, and seem refractory to usual treatments or reassurance. such patients can include those with personality disorders, those with somatization symptoms; they can come across as entitled, drug-seeking, manipulative, or simply draining to the provider. Such patients are often frequent visitors to Emergency Departments. Other reasons for difficult encounters could be rooted in provider bias or countertransference, rather than sole patient factors. Emergency providers need to have high awareness of these possibilities, and be prepared to manage such situations, otherwise workup can be sub-standard and dangerous medical mistakes can be made. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Invited review: sex ratio and rheumatic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockshin, M D

    2001-11-01

    Human illnesses affect men and women differently. In some cases (diseases of sex organs, diseases resulting from X or Y chromosome mutations), reasons for sex discrepancy are obvious, but in other cases no reason is apparent. Explanations for sex discrepancy of illness occur at different biological levels: molecular (e.g., imprinting, X-inactivation), cellular (sex-specific receptor activity), organ (endocrine influences), whole organism (size, age), and environmental-behavioral, including intrauterine influences. Autoimmunity represents a prototypical class of illness that has high female-to-male (F/M) ratios. Although the F/M ratios in autoimmune diseases are usually attributed to the influence of estrogenic hormones, evidence demonstrates that the attributed ratios are imprecise and that definitions and classifications of autoimmune diseases vary, rendering at least part of the counting imprecise. In addition, many studies on sex discrepancy of human disease fail to distinguish between disease incidence and disease severity. In April 2001, the Institute of Medicine of the National Academy of Sciences published Exploring the Biological Contributions to Human Health: Does Sex Matter? (Wizemann T and Pardue M-L, editors). This minireview summarizes the section of that report that concerns autoimmune and infectious disease. Some thyroid, rheumatic, and hepatic autoimmune diseases have high F/M ratios, whereas others have low. Those that have high ratios occur primarily in young adulthood. Gonadal hormones, if they play a role, likely do so through a threshold or permissive mechanism. Examples of sex differences that could be caused by environmental exposure, X inactivation, imprinting, X or Y chromosome genetic modulators, and intrauterine influences are presented as alternate, theoretical, and largely unexplored explanations for sex differences of incidence. The epidemiology of autoimmune diseases (young, female) suggests that an explanation for sex discrepancy of

  18. Cardiovascular disease in autoimmune rheumatic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollan, Ivana; Meroni, Pier Luigi; Ahearn, Joseph M; Cohen Tervaert, J W; Curran, Sam; Goodyear, Carl S; Hestad, Knut A; Kahaleh, Bashar; Riggio, Marcello; Shields, Kelly; Wasko, Mary C

    2013-08-01

    Various autoimmune rheumatic diseases (ARDs), including rheumatoid arthritis, spondyloarthritis, vasculitis and systemic lupus erythematosus, are associated with premature atherosclerosis. However, premature atherosclerosis has not been uniformly observed in systemic sclerosis. Furthermore, although experimental models of atherosclerosis support the role of antiphospholipid antibodies in atherosclerosis, there is no clear evidence of premature atherosclerosis in antiphospholipid syndrome (APA). Ischemic events in APA are more likely to be caused by pro-thrombotic state than by enhanced atherosclerosis. Cardiovascular disease (CVD) in ARDs is caused by traditional and non-traditional risk factors. Besides other factors, inflammation and immunologic abnormalities, the quantity and quality of lipoproteins, hypertension, insulin resistance/hyperglycemia, obesity and underweight, presence of platelets bearing complement protein C4d, reduced number and function of endothelial progenitor cells, apoptosis of endothelial cells, epigenetic mechanisms, renal disease, periodontal disease, depression, hyperuricemia, hypothyroidism, sleep apnea and vitamin D deficiency may contribute to the premature CVD. Although most research has focused on systemic inflammation, vascular inflammation may play a crucial role in the premature CVD in ARDs. It may be involved in the development and destabilization of both atherosclerotic lesions and of aortic aneurysms (a known complication of ARDs). Inflammation in subintimal vascular and perivascular layers appears to frequently occur in CVD, with a higher frequency in ARD than in non-ARD patients. It is possible that this inflammation is caused by infections and/or autoimmunity, which might have consequences for treatment. Importantly, drugs targeting immunologic factors participating in the subintimal inflammation (e.g., T- and B-cells) might have a protective effect on CVD. Interestingly, vasa vasorum and cardiovascular adipose tissue may

  19. The DSM-5 Dimensional Anxiety Scales in a Dutch non-clinical sample: psychometric properties including the adult separation anxiety disorder scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Möller, Eline L; Bögels, Susan M

    2016-09-01

    With DSM-5, the American Psychiatric Association encourages complementing categorical diagnoses with dimensional severity ratings. We therefore examined the psychometric properties of the DSM-5 Dimensional Anxiety Scales, a set of brief dimensional scales that are consistent in content and structure and assess DSM-5-based core features of anxiety disorders. Participants (285 males, 255 females) completed the DSM-5 Dimensional Anxiety Scales for social anxiety disorder, generalized anxiety disorder, specific phobia, agoraphobia, and panic disorder that were included in previous studies on the scales, and also for separation anxiety disorder, which is included in the DSM-5 chapter on anxiety disorders. Moreover, they completed the Screen for Child Anxiety Related Emotional Disorders Adult version (SCARED-A). The DSM-5 Dimensional Anxiety Scales demonstrated high internal consistency, and the scales correlated significantly and substantially with corresponding SCARED-A subscales, supporting convergent validity. Separation anxiety appeared present among adults, supporting the DSM-5 recognition of separation anxiety as an anxiety disorder across the life span. To conclude, the DSM-5 Dimensional Anxiety Scales are a valuable tool to screen for specific adult anxiety disorders, including separation anxiety. Research in more diverse and clinical samples with anxiety disorders is needed. © 2016 The Authors International Journal of Methods in Psychiatric Research Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. © 2016 The Authors International Journal of Methods in Psychiatric Research Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. HBV reactivation in rheumatic diseases patients under therapy: A meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghoofei, Mohsen; Mostafaei, Shayan; Ashraf-Ganjouei, Amir; Kavosi, Hoda; Mahmoudi, Mahdi

    2018-01-01

    Hepatitis B is one of the most common infectious diseases worldwide. In patients undergoing immunosuppressive therapy such as rheumatic diseases, reactivation of hepatitis B virus (HBV) is considered clinically important. This systematic review and meta-analysis were performed to determine the prevalence rate of HBV reactivation in rheumatic patients from different parts of the world. The authors performed a systematic literature review from several reliable databases including Scopus, ISI Web of Science and PubMed. Furthermore, the keywords of this research were "Hepatitis B virus", "Rheumatic diseases", "HBV reactivation", "Anti-TNF", "DMARDs" and "Biologic agents". The authors selected 30 studies out of 983 for the present review. The overall estimation of the prevalence of HBV reactivation was 1.4 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.3-1.6). Also, the heterogeneity in estimating the pooled prevalence among the studies was shown; Cochran Q test, P HBV were in Italy and France respectively. Rheumatic disease patients with resolved hepatitis B should be tightly monitored for possible HBV reactivation by elevation of liver enzymes and HBV DNA levels. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Determination of specificity and pattern of antinuclear antibodies (ana) in systemic rheumatic disease patients positive for ana testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nawaz, H.; Bashir, M.M.; Iqbal, W.

    2018-01-01

    To determine probability of finding antinuclear antibodies (ANA) and anti extractable nuclear antigens (ENA) positive samples and associating ANA patterns with anti-ENA reactivities among a consecutive cohort of samples of systemic rheumatic disease patients referred for ANA testing. Study Design:Prospective cohort study. Place and Duration of Study:Immunology Department, Armed Forces Institute of Pathology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan, from January to June 2016. Methodology:All the samples referred for ANA testing with clinical suspicion of systemic rheumatic disease were included. After screening, ANA positive samples were subjected to anti-ENA antibodies testing (including anti-SSA, anti-SSB, anti-Sm, anti-RNP, anti-SCL-70 and anti-Jo-1 antibodies) and ANA pattern and titer determination. Results:Of 4,347 samples received, 397 were positive for ANA (9%). Of 397, 96 (24%) samples positive on ENA screen were tested for anti-ENA reactivity. Anti-SSA antibodies were found in 59 samples. Commonest ANA patterns were coarse and fine speckled (43 and 22 samples of 81 tested), while majority of samples carried ANA in titers of 1:40 and 1:80 (22 and 18 samples of 81 tested). No specific ANA pattern was associated with any particular anti-ENA reactivity. Conclusion:Among samples/patients referred for investigations of autoimmune disorders, probability of finding positive ANA is approximately 9%. Of these 9%, about 24% also show reactivity against ENA. Commonest ANA pattern is coarse speckled and majority of such patients carry ANA in titers ranging from 1:40 to 1:80. Commonest ENA reactivity was against SSA. (author)

  2. Rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease among children ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Of the 22 with RHD, 14 (63.6%) presented de novo and 1 had bacterial endocarditis. Among the outpatients, 15 had cardiac failure while echocardiographic findings included mitral regurgitation (18/19) and aortic regurgitation (5/19). At presentation, 18/26 known cases were on oral penicillin prophylaxis and 7 on injectable ...

  3. Urinary free light chains may help to identify infection in patients with elevated systemic inflammation due to rheumatic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bramlage, Carsten P; Froelich, Britta; Wallbach, Manuel; Minguet, Joan; Grupp, Clemens; Deutsch, Cornelia; Bramlage, Peter; Müller, Gerhard A; Koziolek, Michael

    2017-04-01

    The risk of infection in patients with rheumatic diseases is elevated, but a clear marker to differentiate the cause of the systemic inflammation is missing. We assessed the ability urinary immunoglobulin free light chains (FLCs) to indicate the presence of infection in patients with rheumatic disease. We performed a retrospective analysis of patients with rheumatic disease attending the Georg-August University Hospital in Goettingen, Germany, from January 2011 to December 2013. Subjects were included if they had urine levels of κ and λ FLCs available. A reference group of patients without autoimmune disease, but with documented infection, was constructed. A total of 1500 patients had their urinary FLCs quantified during the study period. Of the 382 patients with rheumatic disease, 172 (45%) displayed no systemic inflammation, 162 (42%) had inflammation due to the underlying disease activity, and 48 (13%) had inflammation due to a confirmed infection. Urinary FLC concentrations were much higher in patients with rheumatic diseases and infection (κ 68.8 ± 81.8 mg/L, λ 31.4 ± 53.5 mg/L) compared to those with inflammation due to rheumatic disease activity (κ 22.7 ± 26.3 mg/L, λ 8.1 ± 9.1 mg/L, κ p rheumatic disease activity from that due to the additional presence of infection. The ability to quantify these proteins in urine provides a simple alternative to the use of blood.

  4. [Treatment with immunosuppressive and biologic drugs of pregnant women with systemic rheumatic or autoimmune disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alijotas-Reig, Jaume; Esteve-Valverde, Enrique; Ferrer-Oliveras, Raquel

    2016-10-21

    Rheumatic and systemic autoimmune diseases occur in women and, to a lesser degree, men of reproductive age. These disorders have to be clinically nonactive before conception, which is usually only possible after anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive treatment. We must be alert since 50% of pregnancies are unplanned. Physicians should know the embryo-foetal toxicity of these drugs during pregnancy and lactation. This January 2016-updated review allows us to conclude that the majority of immunosuppressives available -anti-TNF inhibitors included- can be used before and during pregnancy, with the exception of cyclophosphamide, methotrexate, mycophenolate and leflunomide. Lactation is permitted with all drugs except methotrexate, leflunomide, mycophenolate and cyclophosphamide. Although data on abatacept, belimumab, rituximab, tocilizumab and anakinra are scant, preliminary reports agree on their safety during pregnancy and, probably, lactation. Cyclophosphamide and sulfasalazine apart, no negative effects on sperm quality, or embryo-foetal anomalies in men treated with immunosuppressives have been described. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  5. Moving towards a molecular taxonomy of autoimmune rheumatic diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barturen, Guillermo; Beretta, Lorenzo; Cervera, Ricard; van Vollenhoven, Ronald; Alarcón-Riquelme, Marta E.

    2018-01-01

    Autoimmune rheumatic diseases pose many problems that have, in general, already been solved in the field of cancer. The heterogeneity of each disease, the clinical similarities and differences between different autoimmune rheumatic diseases and the large number of patients that remain without a

  6. Notification of rheumatic fever in South Africa - evidence for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Information on the incidence of rheumatic fever (RF) and the prevalence of rheumatic heart disease (RHD) is required for the prevention of valvular heart disease in developing countries. In South Africa, RF was made a notifiable condition in 1989. It has recently been suggested that the reporting of RF cases ...

  7. Mechanisms and active rheumatic management carditis of heart failure

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1990-08-18

    Aug 18, 1990 ... rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease has declined drastically. The fact .... 1. Analysis 0(339 patients who had mitral valve surgery at. Baragwanath .... young age (mean 13 years) of the patients studied.il The maximal ...

  8. Rheumatic Disease Autoantibodies in Autoimmune Liver Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utiyama, Shirley R R; Zenatti, Katiane B; Nóbrega, Heloisa A J; Soares, Juliana Z C; Skare, Thelma L; Matsubara, Caroline; Muzzilo, Dominique A; Nisihara, Renato M

    2016-08-01

    Autoimmune liver diseases (ALDs) are known to be associated with systemic autoimmune rheumatic diseases (SARDs) and their autoantibodies. We aimed to study the prevalence of SARDs and related autoantibodies, as well as their prognostic implications in a group of patients with ALDs. This was a cross-sectional study. Sixty patients with ALDs (38.3% with autoimmune hepatitis; 11.7% with primary biliary cirrhosis; 25% with primary sclerosing cholangitis and 25% with overlap syndrome) were studied for the presence of SARDs and their autoantibodies. There was autoimmune rheumatic disease in 20% of the studied sample. Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) were the commonest (11.6% and 5%, respectively). Antinuclear antibodies (ANAs) were present in 35% of the patients, followed by anti-Ro (20.0%); anti-nucleosome (18.3%); rheumatoid factor (10%) anti-CCP (8.3%); anti-RNP (8.3%); anti-ds-DNA (6.6%); anti-La (3.3%); anti-Sm (3.3%), anti-ribosomal P (3.3%). Anti-Ro (p = 0.0004), anti-La (p = 0.03), anti-RNP (p = 0.04) and anti-Sm (p = 0.03) were commonly found in patients with SARD, but not anti-DNA, anti-nucleosome and anti-ribosomal P. No differences were found in liver function tests regarding to the presence of autoantibodies. There was a high prevalence of SARD and their autoantibodies in ALD patients. Anti-Ro, anti-La, anti-RNP and anti-Sm positivity points to an association with systemic autoimmune rheumatic diseases. The presence of autoantibodies was not related to liver function tests.

  9. Deletions in 16p13 including GRIN2A in patients with intellectual disability, various dysmorphic features, and seizure disorders of the rolandic region.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reutlinger, C.; Helbig, I.; Gawelczyk, B.; Subero, J.I.; Tonnies, H.; Muhle, H.; Finsterwalder, K.; Vermeer, S.; Pfundt, R.; Sperner, J.; Stefanova, I.; Gillessen-Kaesbach, G.; Spiczak, S. von; Baalen, A. van; Boor, R.; Siebert, R.; Stephani, U.; Caliebe, A.

    2010-01-01

    Seizure disorders of the rolandic region comprise a spectrum of different epilepsy syndromes ranging from benign rolandic epilepsy to more severe seizure disorders including atypical benign partial epilepsy/pseudo-Lennox syndrome,electrical status epilepticus during sleep, and Landau-Kleffner

  10. Complementary and alternative medicine for rheumatic diseases: A systematic review of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phang, Jie Kie; Kwan, Yu Heng; Goh, Hendra; Tan, Victoria Ie Ching; Thumboo, Julian; Østbye, Truls; Fong, Warren

    2018-04-01

    To summarize all good quality randomized controlled trials (RCTs) using complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) interventions in patients with rheumatic diseases. A systematic literature review guided by the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic review and Meta-Analysis (PRISMA) was performed. We excluded non-English language articles and abstract-only publications. Due to the large number of RCTs identified, we only include "good quality" RCTs with Jadad score of five. We identified 60 good quality RCTs using CAM as intervention for patients with rheumatic diseases: acupuncture (9), Ayurvedic treatment (3), homeopathic treatment (3), electricity (2), natural products (31), megavitamin therapies (8), chiropractic or osteopathic manipulation (3), and energy healing therapy (1). The studies do not seem to suggest a particular type of CAM is effective for all types for rheumatic diseases. However, some CAM interventions appear to be more effective for certain types of rheumatic diseases. Acupuncture appears to be beneficial for osteoarthritis but not rheumatoid arthritis. For the other therapeutic modalities, the evidence base either contains too few trials or contains trials with contradictory findings which preclude any definitive summary. There were only minor adverse reactions observed for CAM interventions presented. We identified 60 good quality RCTs which were heterogenous in terms of interventions, disease, measures used to assess outcomes, and efficacy of CAM interventions. Evidence indicates that some CAM therapies may be useful for rheumatic diseases, such as acupuncture for osteoarthritis. Further research with larger sample size is required for more conclusive evidence regarding efficacy of CAM interventions. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Lung Infections in Systemic Rheumatic Disease: Focus on Opportunistic Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Franco, Manuela; Lucchino, Bruno; Spaziante, Martina; Iannuccelli, Cristina; Valesini, Guido; Iaiani, Giancarlo

    2017-01-29

    Systemic rheumatic diseases have significant morbidity and mortality, due in large part to concurrent infections. The lung has been reported among the most frequent sites of infection in patients with rheumatic disease, who are susceptible to developing pneumonia sustained both by common pathogens and by opportunistic microorganisms. Patients with rheumatic disease show a peculiar vulnerability to infectious complications. This is due in part to intrinsic disease-related immune dysregulation and in part to the immunosuppressive treatments. Several therapeutic agents have been associated to a wide spectrum of infections, complicating the management of rheumatic diseases. This review discusses the most frequent pulmonary infections encountered in rheumatic diseases, focusing on opportunistic agents, consequent diagnostic challenges and appropriate therapeutic strategies.

  12. Choice of approaches for surgical correction of tricuspid pathology in patients with rheumatic multi-valvular heart disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamidullah A. Abdumadzhidov

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To analyze the results of surgical correction of patients with tricuspid pathology in rheumatic multi-valvular heart disease. Methods: We retrospectively analyzed outcomes of surgical correction of tricuspid valve disease in 292 patients with rheumatic multi-valvular heart defects, who underwent surgery in our clinic. Results: The age of our patients ranged from 12 to 74 years (mean age 36.7 (9.4 years, among them 197 (67.4% women and 95 (32.6% - men. According to the degree of circulatory disorders, 21 (7.2% patients were in NYHA class III and 271 (92.8% patients - class IV. Of them 235 (80.5% patients were operated by the method of De Vega using plastic fibrous ring. After tricuspid valve (TV and fibrous ring repair in 26.9% - tricuspid regurgitation disappeared, in 62.8% - regurgitation decreased to the 1st degree, and the remaining 10.3% of patients had 2nd (moderate degree tricuspid regurgitation. In 7 (2.38% cases of infective endocarditis, the "open heart surgery" correction – replacement of TV with biological prosthesis was made. Creation of the bicuspid tricuspid valve techniques was used in 13.4% of cases. Conclusion: Our study demonstrated that correction of tricuspid valve disease in our cohort of patients, including valve repair and replacement and reconstructive surgery of fibrous ring alone or in combination with mitral or aortic valve replacement/ repair is accompanied by reduction of tricuspid regurgitation and reduction of cardiac chamber size and right ventricular pressure. No complications intrinsic to operative technique of tricuspid valve reconstructive surgery as advanced atrioventricular block or myocardial ischemia and infarction were recorded.

  13. Multisystem Disease, Including Eosinophilia and Progressive Hyper-Creatine-Kinase-emia over 10 Years, Suggests Mitochondrial Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josef Finsterer

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Eosinophilia has not been reported as a manifestation of a mitochondrial disorder (MID. Here, we report a patient with clinical features suggesting a MID and permanent eosinophilia, multisystem disease, and progressive hyper-creatine-kinase (CK-emia for at least 10 years. Materials and Methods: Methods applied included a clinical exam, blood chemical investigations, electrophysiological investigations, imaging, and invasive cardiological investigations. The patient was repeatedly followed up over several years. He required replacement cardiac surgery. Results: In a 57-year-old male, eosinophilia was first detected at the age of 44 years and has remained almost constantly present until today. In addition to eosinophilia, he developed progressive hyper-CK-emia at the age of 47 years. His history was further positive for hepatopathy, hyperlipidemia, hypothyroidism, renal insufficiency, spontaneous Achilles tendon rupture, double vision, exercise intolerance, muscle aching, mild hypoacusis, sensory neuropathy, seizures, and mitral insufficiency/stenosis requiring valve replacement therapy, oral anticoagulation, and pacemaker implantation. Based on the multisystem nature of his abnormalities and permanent hyper-CK-emia, a MID was suspected. Conclusion: Eosinophilia can be associated with a MID with myopathy, possibly as a reaction to myofiber necrosis. If eosinophilia is associated with progressive hyper-CK-emia and multisystem disease, a MID should be suspected.

  14. A short history of anti-rheumatic therapy - V. Analgesics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Marson

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The pharmacological treatment of pain has very ancient origins, when plant-derived products were used, including mandrake extracts and opium, a dried latex obtained from Papaver somniferum. In the XVI and XVII centuries opium came into the preparation of two compounds widely used for pain relief: laudanum and Dover’s powder. The analgesic properties of extracts of willow bark were then recognized and later, in the second half of the XIX century, experimental studies on chemically synthesized analgesics were planned, thus promoting the marketing of some derivatives of para-amino-phenol and pyrazole, the predecessors of paracetamol and metamizol. In the XX century, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs were synthesized, such as phenylbutazone, which was initially considered primarily a pain medication. The introduction on the market of centrally acting analgesics, such as tramadol, sometimes used in the treatment of rheumatic pain. is quite recent.

  15. Klotho: a humeral mediator in CSF and plasma that influences longevity and susceptibility to multiple complex disorders, including depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlatou, M G; Remaley, A T; Gold, P W

    2016-08-30

    Klotho is a hormone secreted into human cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), plasma and urine that promotes longevity and influences the onset of several premature senescent phenotypes in mice and humans, including atherosclerosis, cardiovascular disease, stroke and osteoporosis. Preliminary studies also suggest that Klotho possesses tumor suppressor properties. Klotho's roles in these phenomena were first suggested by studies demonstrating that a defect in the Klotho gene in mice results in a significant decrease in lifespan. The Klotho-deficient mouse dies prematurely at 8-9 weeks of age. At 4-5 weeks of age, a syndrome resembling human ageing emerges consisting of atherosclerosis, osteoporosis, cognitive disturbances and alterations of hippocampal architecture. Several deficits in Klotho-deficient mice are likely to contribute to these phenomena. These include an inability to defend against oxidative stress in the central nervous system and periphery, decreased capacity to generate nitric oxide to sustain normal endothelial reactivity, defective Klotho-related mediation of glycosylation and ion channel regulation, increased insulin/insulin-like growth factor signaling and a disturbed calcium and phosphate homeostasis accompanied by altered vitamin D levels and ectopic calcification. Identifying the mechanisms by which Klotho influences multiple important pathways is an emerging field in human biology that will contribute significantly to understanding basic physiologic processes and targets for the treatment of complex diseases. Because many of the phenomena seen in Klotho-deficient mice occur in depressive illness, major depression and bipolar disorder represent illnesses potentially associated with Klotho dysregulation. Klotho's presence in CSF, blood and urine should facilitate its study in clinical populations.

  16. Construct validity and parent-child agreement of the six new or modified disorders included in the Spanish version of the Kiddie Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia present and Lifetime Version DSM-5 (K-SADS-PL-5).

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Peña, Francisco R; Rosetti, Marcos F; Rodríguez-Delgado, Andrés; Villavicencio, Lino R; Palacio, Juan D; Montiel, Cecilia; Mayer, Pablo A; Félix, Fernando J; Larraguibel, Marcela; Viola, Laura; Ortiz, Silvia; Fernández, Sofía; Jaímes, Aurora; Feria, Miriam; Sosa, Liz; Palacios-Cruz, Lino; Ulloa, Rosa E

    2018-06-01

    Changes to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders fifth edition (DSM-5) incorporate the inclusion or modification of six disorders: Autism Spectrum Disorder, Social Anxiety Disorder, Intermittent Explosive Disorder, Disruptive Mood Dysregulation Disorder, Avoidant/Restrictive Food Intake Disorder and Binge Eating Disorder. The objectives of this study were to assess the construct validity and parent-child agreement of these six disorders in the Spanish language Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia for School Age Children Present and Lifetime Version (K-SADS-PL-5) in a clinical population of children and adolescents from Latin America. The Spanish version of the K-SADS-PL was modified to integrate changes made to the DSM-5. Clinicians received training in the K-SADS-PL-5 and 90% agreement between raters was obtained. A total of 80 patients were recruited in four different countries in Latin America. All items from each of the six disorders were included in a factor analysis. Parent-child agreement was calculated for every item of the six disorders, including the effect of sex and age. The factor analysis revealed 6 factors separately grouping the items defining each of the new or modified disorders, with Eigenvalues greater than 2. Very good parent-child agreements (r>0.8) were found for the large majority of the items (93%), even when considering the sex or age of the patient. This independent grouping of disorders suggests that the manner in which the disorders were included into the K-SADS-PL-5 reflects robustly the DSM-5 constructs and displayed a significant inter-informant reliability. These findings support the use of K-SADS-PL-5 as a clinical and research tool to evaluate these new or modified diagnoses. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  17. Association of rheumatic diseases with early exit from paid employment in Portugal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laires, Pedro A; Gouveia, Miguel

    2014-04-01

    To examine the association between rheumatic diseases (RD) and other chronic morbidity with early exit from paid employment in the Portuguese population. The study population consisted of all people between 50 and 64 years of age (3,762 men and 4,241 women) who participated in the Portuguese National Health Survey, conducted in 2005/2006. Data were collected on demographics, ill-health, lifestyle, and socioeconomic factors. Logistic regression was used to estimate the isolated effect of rheumatic diseases and other chronic diseases on the likelihood of exit from paid employment. At the time of the survey, 45.1 % of the Portuguese population with ages between 50 and 64 years old were not employed. In the nonemployed population, 31.6 % self-reported "poor" to "very poor" health, whereas 16.4 % did so in the employed population. A larger average number of major chronic diseases per capita were also found in those not employed (1.9 vs. 1.4, p paid employment. In particular, rheumatic diseases were more prevalent (43.4 vs. 32.1 %) and associated with early exit from work (OR 1.31; CI 1.12-1.52, p = 0.001). This study suggests an association between RD and other major chronic diseases with early exit from paid employment in Portugal. Thus, health and social protection policies should target these chronic disorders in order to better address sustainability issues and social protection effectiveness.

  18. KONSUPREN IN THETHERAPY OF RHEUMATIC DISEASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z S Alekberova

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Summary Aim: to assess the efficacy and tolerability of Consupren (Galena, Chekia in some rheumatic diseases. Material and methods. Three months’ therapy by Consupren was studied in 12 patients: 4 with SLE, 4 with Behcet’s disease, 2 with rheumatoid arthritis with systemic manifestations, 2 with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis. Sandimmune therapy was changed for Consupren in 9 patients. All patients were controlled for the level of serum creatinine and AD and had consultations with ophtalmologist. Results. 3 SLE patients treated by Consupren demonstrated decreasing of proteinuria, disease activity by SLAM and SLEDA1, the fourth patient demonstrated fading of diskoid rash and normalizing of temperature. Patients with Behcet’s disease had no episodes of ulcerous stomatitis and uveitis exacerbation, in one patient stable nodular erythema disappeared. Patients with JRA improved articular syndrome, normalized temperature, reduced acute phase indices. Both patients continue taking Consupren, RA patients had long term of onset of the disease and 111-IV radiological stage , thus the effect on the articular syndrome was not so demonstrative but the activity of the disease reduced. Conclusion: consupren is effective and well tolerable drug for patients with systemic manifestations of rheumatic diseases. No side effects were noticed.

  19. Influence of interface-included disorder on classical quantum conductivity of CdTe:In epitaxial layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lusakowski, J.; Karpierz, K.; Grynberg, M.; Karczewski, G.; Wojtowicz, T.; Contreras, S.; Callen, O.

    1997-01-01

    An influence of disorder originated from the substrate/layer interface on electrical properties of CdTe:In layers was investigated by means of the Hall effect and magnetoresistance measurements at low temperatures. An estimation of a scattering rate due to interface induced disorder is given. Characteristic features of a magnetic field dependence of magnetoresistance are explained by an influence of quantum interference of scattered electron waves both in the hopping and the free electron conductivity regimes. (author)

  20. Autoimmune vitiligo in rheumatic disease in the mestizo Mexican population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avalos-Díaz, Esperanza; Pérez-Pérez, Elena; Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Mayra; Pacheco-Tovar, María-Guadalupe; Herrera-Esparza, Rafael

    2016-08-01

    Vitiligo is a chronic disease characterized by the dysfunction or destruction of melanocytes with secondary depigmentation. The aim of the present study was to determine the prevalence of vitiligo associated with autoimmune rheumatic diseases. The clinical records from a 10-year database of patients with rheumatic diseases and associated vitiligo was analysed, with one group of patients having autoimmune rheumatic disease and another non-autoimmune rheumatic disease. Available serum samples were used to assess the anti-melanocyte antibodies. A total of 5,251 individual clinical files were archived in the last 10 years, and these patients underwent multiple rheumatology consultations, with 0.3% of the group presenting with vitiligo. The prevalence of vitiligo in the autoimmune rheumatic disease group was 0.672%, which was mainly associated with lupus and arthritis. However, patients with more than one autoimmune disease had an increased relative risk to develop vitiligo, and anti-melanocyte antibodies were positive in 92% of these patients. By contrast, the prevalence was 0.082% in the group that lacked autoimmune rheumatic disease and had negative autoantibodies. In conclusion, the association between vitiligo and autoimmune rheumatic diseases was relatively low. However, the relative risk increased when there were other autoimmune comorbidities, such as thyroiditis or celiac disease. Therefore, the presence of multiple autoimmune syndromes should be suspected.

  1. Evaluation of Frequency and Risk Factors of Soft Tissue Rheumatism of Upper Limbs in Diabetic Patients in Kerman in 2001

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.R. Shakibi

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disorder that affect different systems in human. Wide range of musculoskeletal syndromes have been described in association with diabetes. To determine the prevalence of upper limb soft tissue rheumatism in diabetes patients. In a cross sectional study 300 diabetic patients was examined by COPCORD questionnaire. The examination was performed by internist and rheumatologist . Data was analyzed by logistic regression. 73.3% of patients were female. Average age of cases was 51.2±13.7 years and mean of duration of disease was 7±6.4 years. 152 cases (50.7% had soft tissue rheumatism in upper limbs. 66 cases had carpal tannel syndrome, 23 cases with Dupuytren’s disease, 23 cases with Flexortenosynovitis, 91 cases with shoulder periarthritis, 4 cases had limited joint mobility and 12 had Elbow Epicandititis. Logestic regression analysis showed that type 2 diabetes, weak control of blood sugur and duration of disease>5years were risk factors for incidence of soft tissue rheumatism in upper limbs. Results have showed the high prevalence of soft tissue rheumatism in diabetic patients.

  2. Major histocompatibility complex: its role in the pathogenesis of autoimmune rheumatic diseases - doi:10.5020/18061230.2006.p155

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crésio Alves

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to allow early diagnosis and more efficient treatments, many studies have been trying to define genetic markers of rheumatic diseases. Amongst them, antigens and alleles of the HLA (Human Leukocyte Antigens system are distinguished. Located in the short arm of chromosome 6, the HLA system exerts genetic influence on the susceptibility and severity of these diseases. The discovery of new molecular methods to typify HLA alleles and the recent nomenclature updates have been contributing to a better understanding of this system. Unfortunately, this information has not been adequately published in the clinical literature. The present work aimed at presenting the function, nomenclature and methods of detection of the HLA polymorphism; and to review its associations with rheumatic fever, systemic erythematosus lupus, rheumatoid arthritis, juvenile idiopathic arthritis and spondyloarthropathies. Articles that were published between 1980 and 2005 were searched in the MEDLINE and LILACS data basis. This review demonstrated that although the HLA association is well established for some rheumatic diseases (e.g., HLA-B27 and spondyloarthropathies, HLA DR-3 and HLA-DR4 with rheumatoid arthritis, HLA-DR4 and lupus others vary in different ethnic-racial group and illnesses, due to its polymorphism. It is necessary to study populations from different ethnic backgrounds to identify new associations or to strengthen associations with the ones already identified. This knowledge will contribute to future prophylactic or therapeutic interventions in patients with rheumatic disorders or at risk to develop them.

  3. Selected principles of proper education of women with rheumatic diseases in respect of pregnancy planning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariola Kosowicz

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available One of the more important problems resulting from the specificity of a chronic disease, its treatment and associated adverse effects is a permanent inability or limited ability to initiate and realize the requirements relevant to a given developmental stage of the patient. For women at reproductive age this includes family planning and giving birth to babies. The problem of pregnancy in women with the diagnosis of rheumatic disease is associated not only with physical but also psychological factors. A significant percentage of women with rheumatic diseases make no attempts to conceive. It is caused among other things by lacking knowledge on the possibilities of realization of the motherhood plans and the influence of social stereotypes concerning limitations resulting from disability. Therefore, an important element of influencing the patients’ attitudes is solid education providing information and instrumental support including practical training in precise ways of management of a given situation.

  4. Streptococcal pharyngitis and rheumatic heart disease: the superantigen hypothesis revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurst, Jacklyn R; Kasper, Katherine J; Sule, Akshay N; McCormick, John K

    2018-07-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes is a human-specific and globally prominent bacterial pathogen that despite causing numerous human infections, this bacterium is normally found in an asymptomatic carrier state. This review provides an overview of both bacterial and human factors that likely play an important role in nasopharyngeal colonization and pharyngitis, as well as the development of acute rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease. Here we highlight a recently described role for bacterial superantigens in promoting acute nasopharyngeal infection, and discuss how these immune system activating toxins could be crucial to initiate the autoimmune process in rheumatic heart disease. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Designing and recruiting to UK autism spectrum disorder research databases: do they include representative children with valid ASD diagnoses?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warnell, F; George, B; McConachie, H; Johnson, M; Hardy, R; Parr, J R

    2015-09-04

    (1) Describe how the Autism Spectrum Database-UK (ASD-UK) was established; (2) investigate the representativeness of the first 1000 children and families who participated, compared to those who chose not to; (3) investigate the reliability of the parent-reported Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) diagnoses, and present evidence about the validity of diagnoses, that is, whether children recruited actually have an ASD; (4) present evidence about the representativeness of the ASD-UK children and families, by comparing their characteristics with the first 1000 children and families from the regional Database of children with ASD living in the North East (Dasl(n)e), and children and families identified from epidemiological studies. Recruitment through a network of 50 UK child health teams and self-referral. Parents/carers with a child with ASD, aged 2-16 years, completed questionnaires about ASD and some gave professionals' reports about their children. 1000 families registered with ASD-UK in 30 months. Children of families who participated, and of the 208 who chose not to, were found to be very similar on: gender ratio, year of birth, ASD diagnosis and social deprivation score. The reliability of parent-reported ASD diagnoses of children was very high when compared with clinical reports (over 96%); no database child without ASD was identified. A comparison of gender, ASD diagnosis, age at diagnosis, school placement, learning disability, and deprivation score of children and families from ASD-UK with 1084 children and families from Dasl(n)e, and families from population studies, showed that ASD-UK families are representative of families of children with ASD overall. ASD-UK includes families providing parent-reported data about their child and family, who appear to be broadly representative of UK children with ASD. Families continue to join the databases and more than 3000 families can now be contacted by researchers about UK autism research. Published by the BMJ

  6. Myositis complicating benzathine penicillin-G injection in a case of rheumatic heart disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua R. Francis

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A 7-year old boy developed myositis secondary to intramuscular injection of benzathine penicillin-G in the context of secondary prophylaxis for rheumatic heart disease. Side effects of intramuscular delivery of benzathine penicillin-G are well described and include injection site pain and inflammation, but myositis, as depicted on magnetic resonance imaging in this case, has not previously been described.

  7. Vaccination in paediatric patients with auto-immune rheumatic diseases : A systemic literature review for the European League against Rheumatism evidence-based recommendations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijstek, M. W.; de Bruin, L. M. Ott; Borrow, R.; van der Klis, F.; Kone-Paut, I.; Fasth, A.; Minden, K.; Ravelli, A.; Abinun, M.; Pileggi, G.; Borte, M.; Bijl, M.; Wulffraat, N. M.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: To analyze available evidence on vaccinations in paediatric patients with rheumatic and auto-inflammatory diseases. This evidence formed the basis of the recently constructed European League against Rheumatism (EULAR) recommendations for vaccination of these patients. Methods: A

  8. Real efficiency of ambulatory laser treatment at the patients with different rheumatic diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidenco, Elena-Luminita; Ristache, Sanda; Belu, Luminita

    2001-06-01

    We consulted 189 patients, with different locomotory diseases: degenerative, posttraumatic and chronic inflammatory rheumatic diseases. We followed the main clinical parameters: pain, limitation of mobility, affected function, inflammation and disorders of sensitivity. We applied an infrared LASER source of 100 mW (BTL), daily, for 5 days. The tolerance of the patients at the LASER treatment was excellent (100%). The evolution of the clinical parameters was variated, but inflammation, limitation of mobility and the affected function significantly improved (30-50%). We found a significant diminution of pain (27- 39%). We believe the LASER treatment in ambulatory conditions is essential for the function of the patients with different locomotory diseases.

  9. Mental Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mental disorders include a wide range of problems, including Anxiety disorders, including panic disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder, ... disorders, including schizophrenia There are many causes of mental disorders. Your genes and family history may play ...

  10. Effect of secondary penicillin prophylaxis on valvular changes in patients with rheumatic heart disease in Far North Queensland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haran, Shankar; Crane, Natalie; Kazi, Saniya; Axford-Haines, Louise; White, Andrew

    2018-04-01

    To determine the effect of secondary penicillin prophylaxis on echocardiographic diagnosed valvular changes in patients with rheumatic heart disease or history of acute rheumatic fever in the Townsville Health district. Patients with known were identified from the North Queensland register, serial echocardiogram results and number of secondary penicillin prophylaxis doses received in 2014 were collated. Descriptive statistics were utilised. Townsville Hospital and outreach clinics within the Townsville Health catchment zone. All patients diagnosed with acute rheumatic fever or rheumatic heart disease between 2010 and October 2013 who had serial echocardiograms prior to and post commencement of secondary penicillin prophylaxis were included. All patients were of Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander descent. Progression of echocardiographic valvular changes and association with secondary penicillin prophylaxis compliance. Compliance with secondary penicillin prophylaxis among the study population was a secondary outcome measure. Twenty-three patients were recruited. Only those patients who were compliant with secondary penicillin prophylaxis had any improvement in valvular changes on echocardiogram. Four of six patients without any baseline valvular involvement developed new valvular changes. Seventy percent of patients received >75% of secondary penicillin prophylaxis doses. This small study of patients in Townsville suggests that with good secondary penicillin prophylaxis compliance there is regression of some cardiac lesions over time in people with rheumatic heart disease. Furthermore the natural history of acute rheumatic fever in the Indigenous population is progressive requiring strict adherence to secondary penicillin prophylaxis. Prospective studies or use of data from the nationwide RHD register and standardised reporting of cardiac echocardiograms will provide more robust evidence. © 2017 National Rural Health Alliance Inc.

  11. Efficacy and Safety of Vaccination in Pediatric Patients with Systemic Inflammatory Rheumatic Diseases: a systematic review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Sousa

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Children and adolescents with systemic rheumatic diseases have an increased risk of infections. Although some infections are vaccine-preventable, immunization among patients with juvenile rheumatic diseases is suboptimal, partly due to some doubts that still persist regarding its efficacy and safety in this patient population. Objectives: To review the available evidence regarding the immunological response and the safety of vaccination in children and adolescents with systemic inflammatory rheumatic diseases (SIRD. Methods: A systematic review of the current literature until December 2014 using MEDLINE, EMBASE and abstracts from the American College of Rheumatology and European League Against Rheumatism congresses (2011-2014, complemented by hand search was performed. Eligible studies were identified and efficacy (seroprotection and/or seroconversion and safety (reactions to vaccine and relapse of rheumatic disease outcomes were extracted and summarized according to the type of vaccine. Results: Twenty-eight articles concerning vaccination in pediatric patients with SIRDs were found, that included almost 2100 children and adolescents, comprising nearly all standard vaccinations of the recommended immunization schedule. Children with SIRDs generally achieved seroprotection and seroconversion; nevertheless, the antibody levels were often lower when compared with healthy children. Glucocorticoids and conventional disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs do not seem to significantly hamper the immune responses, whereas TNF inhibitors may reduce antibody production, particularly in response to pneumococcal conjugate, influenza, meningococcal C and hepatitis A vaccine. There were no serious adverse events, nor evidence of a relevant worsening of the underlying rheumatic disease. Concerning live attenuated vaccines, the evidence is scarce, but no episodes of overt disease were reported, even in patients under biological therapy

  12. Efficacy and Safety of Vaccination in Pediatric Patients with Systemic Inflammatory Rheumatic Diseases: a systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, Sandra; Duarte, Ana Catarina; Cordeiro, Inês; Ferreira, Joana; Gonçalves, Maria João; Meirinhos, Tiago; Rocha, Teresa Martins; Romão, Vasco C; Santos, Maria José

    2017-01-01

    Children and adolescents with systemic rheumatic diseases have an increased risk of infections. Although some infections are vaccine-preventable, immunization among patients with juvenile rheumatic diseases is suboptimal, partly due to some doubts that still persist regarding its efficacy and safety in this patient population. To review the available evidence regarding the immunological response and the safety of vaccination in children and adolescents with systemic inflammatory rheumatic diseases (SIRD). A systematic review of the current literature until December 2014 using MEDLINE, EMBASE and abstracts from the American College of Rheumatology and European League Against Rheumatism congresses (2011-2014), complemented by hand search was performed. Eligible studies were identified and efficacy (seroprotection and/or seroconversion) and safety (reactions to vaccine and relapse of rheumatic disease) outcomes were extracted and summarized according to the type of vaccine. Twenty-eight articles concerning vaccination in pediatric patients with SIRDs were found, that included almost 2100 children and adolescents, comprising nearly all standard vaccinations of the recommended immunization schedule. Children with SIRDs generally achieved seroprotection and seroconversion; nevertheless, the antibody levels were often lower when compared with healthy children. Glucocorticoids and conventional disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs do not seem to significantly hamper the immune responses, whereas TNF inhibitors may reduce antibody production, particularly in response to pneumococcal conjugate, influenza, meningococcal C and hepatitis A vaccine. There were no serious adverse events, nor evidence of a relevant worsening of the underlying rheumatic disease. Concerning live attenuated vaccines, the evidence is scarce, but no episodes of overt disease were reported, even in patients under biological therapy. Existing literature demonstrates that vaccines are generally well

  13. Hand-related physical function in rheumatic hand conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klokker, Louise; Terwee, Caroline; Wæhrens, Eva Elisabet Ejlersen

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: There is no consensus about what constitutes the most appropriate patient-reported outcome measurement (PROM) instrument for measuring physical function in patients with rheumatic hand conditions. Existing instruments lack psychometric testing and vary in feasibility...... and their psychometric qualities. We aim to develop a PROM instrument to assess hand-related physical function in rheumatic hand conditions. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: We will perform a systematic search to identify existing PROMs to rheumatic hand conditions, and select items relevant for hand-related physical function...... as well as those items from the Patient Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) Physical Function (PF) item bank that are relevant to patients with rheumatic hand conditions. Selection will be based on consensus among reviewers. Content validity of selected items will be established...

  14. Hand-related physical function in rheumatic hand conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klokker, Louise; Terwee, Caroline B; Wæhrens, Eva Ejlersen

    2016-01-01

    as well as those items from the Patient Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) Physical Function (PF) item bank that are relevant to patients with rheumatic hand conditions. Selection will be based on consensus among reviewers. Content validity of selected items will be established......INTRODUCTION: There is no consensus about what constitutes the most appropriate patient-reported outcome measurement (PROM) instrument for measuring physical function in patients with rheumatic hand conditions. Existing instruments lack psychometric testing and vary in feasibility...... and their psychometric qualities. We aim to develop a PROM instrument to assess hand-related physical function in rheumatic hand conditions. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: We will perform a systematic search to identify existing PROMs to rheumatic hand conditions, and select items relevant for hand-related physical function...

  15. Impact of Chronic Rheumatic Valve Diseases on Large Vessels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altunbas, Gokhan; Yuce, Murat; Ozer, Hasan O; Davutoglu, Vedat; Ercan, Suleyman; Kizilkan, Nese; Bilici, Muhammet

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIM OF STUDY: Rheumatic valvular heart disease, which remains a common health problem in developing countries, has numerous consequences on the heart chambers and circulation. The study aim was to investigate the effects of chronic rheumatic valve disease on the diameters of the descending aorta (DA) and inferior vena cava (IVC). METHODS: A total of 88 patients with echocardiographically documented rheumatic valvular heart disease and 112 healthy controls were enrolled into the study. All patients underwent detailed echocardiographic examinations, while their height and body weight were recorded and adjusted to their body surface area. RESULTS: The most common involvement was mitral valve disease, followed by aortic valve disease and tricuspid valve disease. The mean diameter of the DA (indexed to BSA) was 1.79 ± 0.49 cm for patients and 1.53 ± 0.41 for controls (p Rheumatic valve disease, especially mitral stenosis, was closely related to remodeling of the great vessels.

  16. [Non steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and rheumatic diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cossermelli, W; Pastor, E H

    1995-01-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) comprise an important class of medicaments that reduced the symptoms of inflamation in rheumatic disease. This article emphasizes similarities and class characteristics of the NSAID, mechanisms of action, and drug-interactions.

  17. Frequency of different valvular lesions of rheumatic heart disease presenting to a tertiary care hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehman, J.U.; Shah, I.

    2015-01-01

    Rheumatic Hearth Disease (RHD) is still prevalent in our country and a great source of morbidity. This study was done with an objective to determine relative frequency of different valvular lesions of RHD presenting in a tertiary care hospital. Methods: This cross sectional study was conducted at the Cardiology Department of Hayatabad Medical Complex, Peshawar. A total of 171 cases of RHD were included through consecutive sampling technique. Results: There were 64.33% females. Mean age was 25.6 ± 6.95 years ranging from 15 to 40 years. The different percentage of valvular lesions in RHD were MR (59.06%), MS (46.78%), AR (43.85%) and mixed lesions (38.59%). Conclusion: Rheumatic heart disease is a very common disease in our community and mitral regurgitation is a predominant lesion at presentation. Females are usually affected more than males. (author)

  18. High burden of rheumatic diseases in Lebanon: a COPCORD study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaaya, Monique; Slim, Zeinab N; Habib, Rima R; Arayssi, Thurayya; Dana, Rouwayda; Hamdan, Omar; Assi, Maher; Issa, Zeinab; Uthman, Imad

    2012-04-01

    To estimate the prevalence of rheumatic diseases in Lebanon and to explore their distribution by geographic location, age, and gender.   Using the Community Oriented Program for the Control of Rheumatic Diseases (COPCORD) methodology, a random sample of 3530 individuals aged 15 and above was interviewed from the six Lebanese governorates. Positive respondents were evaluated by rheumatologists using the internationally accepted classification criterion of the American College of Rheumatology for the diagnosis of rheumatic diseases. Prevalence rates of current and past musculoskeletal problems were 24.4% and 8.4%, respectively. Shoulder (14.3%), knee (14.2%) and back (13.6%) were the most common pain sites. Point prevalence of rheumatic diseases was 15.0%. The most frequent types of rheumatic diseases were of mechanical origin, namely soft tissue rheumatism (5.8%) and osteoarthritis (4.0%). Rheumatoid arthritis (1.0%) and spondylathropathies (0.3%) constituted the most common inflammatory diseases. Coastal areas had the lowest prevalence of all diseases except for fibromyalgia. All diseases showed an increasing prevalence pattern with age and a higher prevalence among women than men. This is the first study to give population-based estimates of rheumatic diseases in Lebanon. The high burden calls for public health attention for early detection, control and prevention of these conditions. Point prevalence of individual diseases was within the range of results from other COPCORD surveys with some variations that can be attributed to differences in methodology and geo-ethnic factors. © 2011 The Authors. International Journal of Rheumatic Diseases © 2011 Asia Pacific League of Associations for Rheumatology and Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  19. MRI of the temporomandibular joint in patients with rheumatic disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okochi, Kiyoshi; Ida, Mizue; Ohbayashi, Naoto

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the MRI findings of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) in patients with rheumatic disease. The characteristic MRI findings of the TMJs in rheumatic patients were considered the obscurity of temporal posterior attachment (TPA) visualization and the presence of osseous changes of the condyle. As for the osseous changes, nearly 50% of the condyles had erosive changes and 20% showed severe bone destruction. (author)

  20. Anti-Rheumatic Potential of Pakistani Medicinal Plants: A Review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamal, M.; Adnan, M.; Murad, W.; Tariq, A.; Bibi, H.; Rahman, H.; Shinwari, Z. K.

    2016-01-01

    Present review aimed to provide a comprehensive documentation of plants used as anti-rheumatic ethnomedicines in Pakistan and to suggest future recommendations. Data on anti-rheumatic plants was collected from published scientific papers, reports and thesis using online searching engines such as Google Scholar PubMed and Science Direct. Five distinct zones in the country were classified on the basis of geography, humidity and rainfall. We used Sorenson similarity index for plants and their parts used between different zones. A total of 137 anti-rheumatic plant species representing 55 families and 104 genera are used in Pakistan. Herbs (87 plants) were the primary source of anti-rheumatic medicinal plants, while leaves (22 % plant species) were the most frequently used part in the preparation of ethnomedicinal recipes. Highest number of 52 medicinal plant species were found in Zone A having high mountains and cold climate where the prevalence of rheumatism was more common. Solanum surattense was found with highest conservation concerns as it was using in 13 different areas against rheumatism. Results of Sorenson index revealed that there is a similarity of plants and its parts uses between different zones. In conclusions, geography and climate have an important role in causing rheumatic disease. Pakistan has a number of anti-rheumatic plants that are used by the local populations through their traditional knowledge. Moreover, inter zonal similarities among plants and its part uses indicate higher pharmacological potency of these medicinal plants. Further, the review will also provide an insight regarding the conservation status of reported plants. (author)

  1. Cytomegalovirus infection in pediatric rheumatic diseases: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolf Dana G

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV is familiar to pediatric rheumatologists mainly as a cause of opportunistic disease in pharmacologically immune suppressed patients. However, HCMV also has a variety of immuno-modulatory effects, through which it may influence the course of rheumatic conditions. In this article we discuss the interplay between HCMV and the immune system, and review the clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and treatment of HCMV infection in children with rheumatic disease.

  2. Macro Ergonomics Interventions and their Impact on Productivity and Reduction of Musculoskeletal disorders: Including a Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Sadra Abarqhouei

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available   Background and aims : The present studies show that the theoretical discussions and the applications of ergonomics have not been seriously handled in our country, Iran. So, the aim of the current study was to present an appropriate method which could help in increasing the productivity and decreasing the risk factors of ergonomics in socio-technical systems.   Methods: During the present study, a theoretical model was developed to guide the “ergonomic intervention processes” and its evaluation and application was carried out for an educational organization (EO. The faculty members were selected as the subjects of statistical survey and simple random sampling was performed. The level of musculoskeletal disorders was evaluated in control and treatment groups. Comparative analysis of the obtained data was carried out using fuzzy numbers and their level of confinement.   Results: According to the results of present study with the help of ergonomic interventions, an increase in the activity of staff members, increased revenue, expansion of work with the least number of manpower and a decrease in the overall expenses was seen as compared to the base year. In addition, the analysis of questionnaires with fuzzy approach has shown that the level of musculoskeletal disorders in the experimental group was less as compared to that of control group.   Conclusion: The results obtained by the use of macro and micro ergonomic interventions (Total ergonomics have proved that these methods were successful by increasing the innovation and motivation of the staff members to solve the organizational problems as compared to the base year. The decrease of musculoskeletal disorders among the members resulted to an increase of performance in different units of the educational organization.  

  3. Cyclophosphamide administration routine in autoimmune rheumatic diseases: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaian Amorim Teles

    Full Text Available Abstract Cyclophosphamide is an alkylating agent widely used for the treatment of malignant neoplasia and which can be used in the treatment of multiple rheumatic diseases. Medication administration errors may lead to its reduced efficacy or increased drug toxicity. Many errors occur in the administration of injectable drugs. The present study aimed at structuring a routine for cyclophosphamide use, as well as creating a document with pharmacotherapeutic guidelines for the patient. The routine is schematized in three phases: pre-chemotherapy, administration of cyclophosphamide, and post-chemotherapy, taking into account the drugs to be administered before and after cyclophosphamide in order to prevent adverse effects, including nausea and hemorrhagic cystitis. Adverse reactions can alter laboratory tests; thus, this routine included clinical management for changes in white blood cells, platelets, neutrophils, and sodium, including cyclophosphamide dose adjustment in the case of kidney disease. Cyclophosphamide is responsible for other rare - but serious - side effects, for instance, hepatotoxicity, severe hyponatremia and heart failure. Other adverse reactions include hair loss, amenorrhea and menopause. In this routine, we also entered guidelines to post-chemotherapy patients. The compatibility of injectable drugs with the vehicle used has been described, as well as stability and infusion times. The routine aimed at the rational use of cyclophosphamide, with prevention of adverse events and relapse episodes, factors that may burden the health care system.

  4. Pregnancy outcome in 162 women with rheumatic diseases: experience of a university hospital in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davutoğlu, Ebru Alici; Ozel, Aysegul; Yılmaz, Nevin; Madazli, Riza

    2017-12-01

    To evaluate the distribution and the obstetric outcomes of pregnancies with different types of rheumatic diseases managed in our unit. Pregnancies of 162 women with rheumatic diseases, seen for their antenatal care at our department for the period between 2013 and 2017 were included in this retrospective clinical study. Obstetric and perinatal outcomes were main outcome measures. The most encountered rheumatic diseases were SLE (37.7%) followed by Behcet's disease (20.4%) and rheumatoid arthritis (17.3%) in our series. The mean maternal age was 30.6 ± 5.3 and the rate of nulliparity was 38.3% in the overall group. Disease activation occurred in 14.1% of patients. Mean gestational age at delivery was 37.4 ± 3.1 and mean birth weight was 3004 ± 762 g. Stillbirth, neonatal death, fetal growth restriction, preeclampsia and preterm delivery rates were 1.2, 2.4, 17.3, 7.4 and 17.9%, respectively. Antiphospholipid syndrome had the highest incidences for fetal growth restriction (42.9%), preeclampsia (28.6%) and delivery ≤ 34 gestational weeks (42.9%). Pathologic uterine artery Doppler velocimetry was identified in 15 cases (15/162, 9.3%) in which 10 (66.7%) developed preeclampsia and/or fetal growth restriction during follow-up. A majority of women with rheumatic diseases have successful pregnancies and deliver healthy babies, with the close and appropriate rheumatological, obstetric and neonatal monitoring.

  5. Biologic agents therapy for Saudi children with rheumatic diseases: indications and safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Mayouf, Sulaiman M; Alenazi, Abdullatif; AlJasser, Hind

    2016-06-01

    To report the indications and safety of biologic agents in childhood rheumatic diseases at a tertiary hospital. Children with rheumatic diseases treated with biologic agents at King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Center, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, from January 2001 to December 2011 were included. All patients were reviewed for: demographic characteristics, diagnosis, concomitant treatment and indications of using biologic agents, age at start of therapy and side effects during the treatment period. In all, 134 children (89 female) with various rheumatic diseases were treated with biologic agents. Mean age at starting biologic treatment was 9.3 (4.25-14) years and mean therapy duration was 14.7 (3-88) months. Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) was the most frequent diagnosis (70.1%) followed by systemic lupus erythematosus (12.7%) and vasculitis (4.5%). All patients received concomitant therapy (corticosteroids and disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs). In total, 273 treatments with biologic agents were used, (95 etanercept, 52 rituximab, 47 adalimumab, 37 infliximab, 23 anakinra, 10 tocilizumab and nine abatacept). Therapy was switched to another agent in 57 (42.5%) patients, mainly because of inefficacy (89.4%) or adverse event (10.6%). A total of 95 (34.8%) adverse events were notified; of these, the most frequent were infusion-related reactions (33.7%) followed by infections (24.2%) and autoantibody positivity (10.6%). One patient developed macrophage activation syndrome. Biologic agents were used in children with a range of rheumatic diseases. Of these, the most frequent was JIA. Off-label use of biologic agents in our cohort is common. These agents seem safe. However, they may associated with various adverse events. Sequential therapy seems well tolerated. However, this should be carefully balanced and considered on an individual basis. © 2014 Asia Pacific League of Associations for Rheumatology and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  6. Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia in systemic autoimmune rheumatic disease: A case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadros, Susan; Teichtahl, Andrew J; Ciciriello, Sabina; Wicks, Ian P

    2017-06-01

    Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia (PJP) is an opportunistic fungal infection that affects the immunocompromised. Patients with systemic autoimmune rheumatic disease are increasingly recognised as an at-risk clinical population with a high mortality. This case-control study examined differences in the characteristics and peripheral blood parameters between patients with systemic autoimmune rheumatic disease who developed PJP and gender, age and disease-matched controls. Historical data collected between 2002 and 2013 at the Royal Melbourne Hospital, Australia were reviewed. Cases were defined by having a systemic autoimmune rheumatic disease and a diagnosis of PJP (either a positive toluidine blue O stain or P. jirovecii PCR, with a concurrent respiratory illness that was clinically consistent with PJP). Controls were matched for age, gender and disease in a 4:1 ratio. Peripheral blood results were retrieved from an in-house pathology database. Clinical information including glucocorticoid exposure, PJP prophylaxis, comorbidities and month of admission were retrieved from medical notes. After adjustment for corticosteroid exposure and C-reactive protein, lymphocyte count on admission (0.4 vs. 1.3; p = 0.04) and at nadir (0.2 vs. 0.8 × 10 9 /L; p = 0.05) was significantly lower in cases than in controls. Cases (n = 11) were more frequently Caucasian rather than non-Caucasian (81.8% vs. 65.9%; p = 0.04). In addition, cases more commonly presented in autumn (March to May) than in other seasons (OR = 7.3; 95% CI: 1.4-38.7; p = 0.02). These data demonstrate that patients with systemic autoimmune rheumatic disease who develop PJP have significantly greater lymphopenia than age, gender and disease-matched controls, independent of corticosteroid exposure, as well as a potential ethnicity and seasonal predilection to PJP. This may help to inform prophylactic guidelines for PJP in these patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Cardiovascular involvement in systemic rheumatic diseases: An integrated view for the treating physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kwang Seob; Kronbichler, Andreas; Eisenhut, Michael; Lee, Keum Hwa; Shin, Jae Il

    2018-03-01

    Systemic autoimmune diseases can affect various kinds of organs including the kidney, the skin, soft tissue and the bone. Among others, cardiovascular involvement in rheumatic diseases has been shown to affect myocardium, pericardium, cardiac vessels, conduction system and valves, eventually leading to increased mortality. In general, underlying chronic inflammation leads to premature atherosclerosis, but also other manifestations such as arrhythmia and heart failure may have a 'silent' progress. Traditional cardiovascular risk factors play a secondary role, while disease-specific factors (i.e. disease duration, severity, antibody positivity, persistent disease activity) can directly influence the cardiovascular system. Therefore, early diagnosis is critical to optimize management and to control inflammatory activity and recent data suggest that risk factors (i.e. hypercholesterolemia and hypertension) need intensive treatment as well. With the advent of immunosuppressive agents, most rheumatic diseases are well controlled on treatment, but information related to their cardioprotective efficacy is not well-defined. In this review, we focus on cardiovascular involvement in rheumatic diseases and highlight current evidence which should be of help for the treating physicians. Moreover, cardiotoxicity of immunosuppressive drugs is a rare issue and such potential adverse events will be briefly discussed. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Portuguese recommendations for the use of methotrexate in rheumatic diseases - 2016 update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte, Ana Catarina; Santos-Faria, Daniela; Gonçalves, Maria João; Sepriano, Alexandre; Mourão, Ana Filipa; Duarte, Cátia; Neves, Joana Sousa; Águeda, Ana Filipa; Ribeiro, Pedro Avila; Daniel, Alexandra; Neto, Adriano; Cordeiro, Ana; Rodrigues, Ana; Barcelos, Anabela; Silva, Cândida; Ponte, Cristina; Vieira-Sousa, Elsa; Teixeira, Filipa; Oliveira-Ramos, Filipa; Araújo, Filipe; Barcelos, Filipe; Canhão, Helena; Santos, Helena; Ramos, João; Polido-Pereira, Joaquim; Tavares-Costa, José; Melo Gomes, José António; Cunha-Miranda, Luís; Costa, Lúcia; Cerqueira, Marcos; Cruz, Margarida; Santos, Maria José; Bernardes, Miguel; Oliveira, Paula; Abreu, Pedro; Figueira, Ricardo; Barros, Rita; Falcão, Sandra; Pinto, Patrícia; Pimenta, Sofia; Capela, Susana; Teixeira, Vitor; Fonseca, João Eurico

    2017-01-01

    Methotrexate (MTX) is the first-line drug in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and the most commonly prescribed disease modifying anti-rheumatic drug. Moreover, it is also used as an adjuvant drug in patients under biologic therapies, enhancing the efficacy of biologic agents. To review the literature and update the Portuguese recommendations for the use of MTX in rheumatic diseases first published in 2009. The first Portuguese guidelines for the use of MTX in rheumatic diseases were published in 2009 and were integrated in the multinational 3E Initiative (Evidence Expertise Exchange) project. The Portuguese rheumatologists based on literature evidence and consensus opinion formulated 13 recommendations. At a national meeting, the recommendations included in this document were further discussed and updated. The document resulting from this meeting circulated to all Portuguese rheumatologists, who anonymously voted online on the level of agreement with the updated recommendations. Results presented in this article are mainly in accordance with previous guidelines, with some new information regarding hepatitis B infection during MTX treatment, pulmonary toxicity monitoring, hepatotoxicity management, association with hematologic neoplasms, combination therapy and tuberculosis screening during treatment. The present recommendations combine scientific evidence with expert opinion and attained desirable agreement among Portuguese rheumatologists. The regular update of these recommendations is essential in order to keep them a valid and useful tool in daily practice.

  9. Mitral valve repair in a rheumatic population: an experience at AFIC/NIHD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, M.; Janjuja, A.M.; Iqbal, M.A.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the outcome of mitral valve repair in rheumatic heart disease. Study Design: Retrospective analytical. Place and Duration of Study: Armed forces institute of cardiology/National institute of heart diseases Rawalpindi from Jan 2011 to June 2013. Material and Methods: In this retrospective study of 28 patients (15 females). The mean age was 20.2 +- 11.2 years (range, 11 to 55 years). The cause of mitral regurgitation was rheumatic in all patients, with no congenital myxomatous, infective or ischemic cases. About 68 percent patients were in New York Heart Association (NYHA) functional class III or IV. In all the cases posterior ring annuloplasty was done with flexible C- Shape rings with size ranging from 20 to 26 mm. Repairs included anterior leaflet repair with cusp shortening and resuspension (n=17), posterior leaflet repair with quardranguloplasty and transpositioning (n=6), commissuroplasty (n=2) and mixed anterior posterior leaflet repair (n=3). Results: There was no operative mortality. Follow-up was carried out for 10 months. The trivial mitral regurgitation was found in 3 cases (10.7 percent). Four (14.2 percent) patients required mitral valve replacement due to valve dysfunction. Conclusion: Mitral valve repair in rheumatic patients, with current techniques, can effectively correct functional and hemodynamic abnormalities with satisfactory results. (author)

  10. Cryotherapy in inflammatory rheumatic diseases: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillot, Xavier; Tordi, Nicolas; Mourot, Laurent; Demougeot, Céline; Dugué, Benoît; Prati, Clément; Wendling, Daniel

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this article was to review current evidence about cryotherapy in inflammatory rheumatic diseases (therapeutic and biological effects). For therapeutic effects, we performed a systematic review (PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, LILACS databases, unpublished data) and selected studies including non-operated and non-infected arthritic patients treated with local cryotherapy or whole-body cryotherapy. By pooling 6 studies including 257 rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients, we showed a significant decrease in pain visual analogic scale (mm) and 28-joint disease activity score after chronic cryotherapy in RA patients. For molecular pathways, local cryotherapy induces an intrajoint temperature decrease, which might downregulate several mediators involved in joint inflammation and destruction (cytokines, cartilage-degrading enzymes, proangiogenic factors), but studies in RA are rare. Cryotherapy should be included in RA therapeutic strategies as an adjunct therapy, with potential corticosteroid and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug dose-sparing effects. However, techniques and protocols should be more precisely defined in randomized controlled trials with stronger methodology.

  11. Meta-analysis of the relationship between single nucleotide polymorphism of IL-10-1082G/A and rheumatic heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Weiran; Ye, Ziliang; Lu, Haili; Su, Qiang; Li, Hui; Li, Lang

    2018-02-23

    The results showed that there was a certain correlation between the single nucleotide polymorphism of IL-10-1082G/A and rheumatic heart disease, but there was no systematic study to verify this conclusion. Systematic review of the association between single nucleotide polymorphism of IL-10-1082G/A locus and rheumatic heart disease. Computer retrieval PubMed, EMbase, Cochrane Library, CBM, CNKI, VIP and Data WanFang, the retrieval time limit from inception to June 2017. A case control study of single nucleotide polymorphisms and rheumatic heart disease in patients with rheumatic heart disease in the IL-10-1082G/A was collected. Two researchers independently screened the literature, extracted data and evaluated the risk of bias in the study, and using RevMan5.3 software for data analysis. A total of 3 case control studies were included, including 318 patients with rheumatic heart disease and 502 controls. Meta-analysis showed that there was no correlation between IL-10-1082G/A gene polymorphism and rheumatic heart disease [AA+AG VS GG: OR = 0.62, 95% CI (0.28, 1.39), P = 0.25; AA VS AG+GG: OR = 0.73, 95% CI (0.54, 1.00), P = 0.05; AA VS GG: OR = 0.70, 95% CI(0.47, 1.05), P = 0.08; AG VS GG: OR = 0.65, 95% CI (0.22, 1.92), P = 0.43; A VS G: OR = 0.87, 95% CI (0.71, 1.06), P = 0.17]. When AA is a recessive gene, the single nucleotide polymorphism of IL-10-1082G/A is associated with the presence of rheumatic heart disease. Due to the limitations of the quantity and quality of the included literatures, the further research results were still needed.

  12. Study on the effectiveness of the kinetic method in patients with rheumatic diseases and temporomandibular joint dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havriş, Maria Daniela; Ancuţa, Codrina; Iordache, Cristina; Chirieac, Rodica Marieta

    2012-01-01

    Selecting the appropriate treatment decision is essential for achieving optimal results in the management of algo-dysfunctional syndrome of the temporo-mandibular joint (TMJD). The study aims to decide on the most effective (symptomatic control, preserved motility) kinetic program in patients with TMJ involvement. prospective observational study on 83 consecutive patients with rheumatic diseases and TMJ dysfunction. Clinical assessment (pain, noises, muscle spasm, range of motion, ROM) was performed at baseline and after 3 months of specific kinetic rehabilitation program. Change in clinical parameters and TM3 index was reported, pposture (head, neck and trunk), normal mastication, swallowing and respiration, as well as correction of neuromuscular imbalances in patients with TMJD secondary to rheumatic disorders.

  13. The Incidence of Atypical Femoral Fractures in Patients with Rheumatic Disease: Yamagata Prefectural Committee of Atypical Femoral Fractures (YamaCAFe) Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takakubo, Yuya; Ohta, Daichi; Ishi, Masaji; Ito, Juji; Oki, Hiroharu; Naganuma, Yasushi; Uno, Tomohiro; Sasaki, Akiko; Akabane, Takeru; Dairaku, Katsuyuki; Goto, Shinichi; Goto, Yasuo; Kanauchi, Yumiko; Kobayashi, Shinji; Nakajima, Taku; Masuda, Keiji; Matsuda, Michiharu; Mura, Nariyuki; Takenouchi, Kenji; Tsuchida, Hiroyuki; Onuma, Yasushi; Shibuya, Junichirou; Seino, Mitsuyoshi; Yamaguchi, Osamu; Hiragami, Ken; Urayama, Yasuhiro; Furukawa, Takashi; Okuda, Shouta; Ogura, Ken; Nakamura, Takeshi; Sasaki, Kan; Konta, Tsuneo; Takagi, Michiaki

    2017-08-01

    Atypical femoral fractures (AFFs) have been reported to occur with minimal or spontaneous subtrochanteric and femoral shaft fractures with a characteristic transverse pattern, compared with typical femoral fractures in young patients with high-energy trauma. AFFs are related to long-term use of bisphosphonates (BPs), glucocorticoids and rheumatic diseases. We have estimated a blind analysis of AFFs in rheumatic patients receiving BPs and glucocorticoids ordinary over a long time in all Yamagata prefectural area through radiographic examination. The 123 AFFs including suspected cases over six years were collected and reviewed by two independent orthopedic surgeons. We found 86 patients with a total of 99 AFFs between 2009 and 2014 (1.43 cases/100,000 person/year). Of these 99 AFFs, 11 were in 8 rheumatic patients including three patients with bilateral AFFs. The incidence of AFFs in rheumatic patients had trend to increase from 2012. The mean age of all 8 patients was 54.9 years. All 8 patients received BPs and 7/8 received prednisolone (PSL). The mean dose of PSL was 14 mg/day. Compared to patients with unilateral AFFs, those with bilateral AFFs in rheumatic patients were on a higher dose of PSL (20 mg/day vs. 7 mg/day) and had less femoral neck-shaft angle (129° vs. 136°, p rheumatic patients showed a trend to increase from 2012 to 2014 in Yamagata prefecture. Careful management of AFFs is of particular importance in rheumatic patients who have taken high doses of PSL and have small femoral neck-shaft angle.

  14. [Periodontal disease in pediatric rheumatic diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabri, Gisele M C; Savioli, Cynthia; Siqueira, José T; Campos, Lucia M; Bonfá, Eloisa; Silva, Clovis A

    2014-01-01

    Gingivitis and periodontitis are immunoinflammatory periodontal diseases characterized by chronic localized infections usually associated with insidious inflammation This narrative review discusses periodontal diseases and mechanisms influencing the immune response and autoimmunity in pediatric rheumatic diseases (PRD), particularly juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus (C-SLE) and juvenile dermatomyositis (JDM). Gingivitis was more frequently observed in these diseases compared to health controls, whereas periodontitis was a rare finding. In JIA patients, gingivitis and periodontitis were related to mechanical factors, chronic arthritis with functional disability, dysregulation of the immunoinflammatory response, diet and drugs, mainly corticosteroids and cyclosporine. In C-SLE, gingivitis was associated with longer disease period, high doses of corticosteroids, B-cell hyperactivation and immunoglobulin G elevation. There are scarce data on periodontal diseases in JDM population, and a unique gingival pattern, characterized by gingival erythema, capillary dilation and bush-loop formation, was observed in active patients. In conclusion, gingivitis was the most common periodontal disease in PRD. The observed association with disease activity reinforces the need for future studies to determine if resolution of this complication will influence disease course or severity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  15. Risk of Childhood Rheumatic and Non-Rheumatic Autoimmune Diseases in Children Born to Women with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couture, Julie; Bernatsky, Sasha; Scott, Susan; Pineau, Christian A; Vinet, Evelyne

    2018-05-23

    Several autoimmune diseases have familial aggregation and possibly, common genetic predispositions. In a large population-based study, we evaluated if children born to mothers with SLE have an increased risk of rheumatic and non-rheumatic autoimmune diseases, versus children born to mothers without SLE. Using the "Offspring of SLE mothers Registry (OSLER)", we identified children born live to SLE mothers and their matched controls, and ascertained autoimmune diseases based on ≥1 hospitalization or ≥2 physician visits with a relevant diagnostic code. We adjusted for maternal age, education, race/ethnicity, obstetrical complications, calendar birth year, and sex of child. 509 women with SLE had 719 children, while 5824 matched controls had 8493 children. Mean follow-up was 9.1 (SD 5.8) years. Children born to mothers with SLE had similar frequency of rheumatic autoimmune diagnoses (0.14%, 95% CI 0.01, 0.90) versus controls (0.19%, 95% CI 0.11, 0.32). There was a trend towards more non-rheumatic autoimmune diseases in SLE offspring (1.11%, 95% CI 0.52, 2.27) versus controls (0.48%, 95% CI 0.35, 0.66). In multivariate analyses, we did not see a clear increase in rheumatic autoimmune disease (OR 0.71, 95% CI 0.11-4.82) but children born to mothers with SLE had a substantially increased risk of non-rheumatic autoimmune disease versus controls (OR 2.30, 95% CI 1.06-5.03). Although the vast majority of offspring have no autoimmune disease, children born to women with SLE may have an increased risk of non-rheumatic autoimmune diseases, versus controls. Additional studies assessing offspring through to adulthood would be additionally enlightening. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  16. Assessement of rheumatic diseases with computational radiology: current status and future potential

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peloschek, Philipp; Boesen, Mikael; Donner, Rene

    2009-01-01

    In recent years, several computational image analysis methods to assess disease progression in rheumatic diseases were presented. This review article explains the basics of these methods as well as their potential application in rheumatic disease monitoring, it covers radiography, sonography...

  17. Whole-body MR imaging for patients with rheumatism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weckbach, Sabine [Department of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Unversity Hospital Mannheim, Medical Faculty Mannheim, University of Heidelberg, Theodor-Kutzer-Ufer 1-3, 68167 Mannheim (Germany)], E-mail: sabine.weckbach@umm.de

    2009-06-15

    WB-MRI in rheumatic diseases is still an emerging imaging tool. So far, WB-MRI in rheumatism is mainly used in seronegative spondyloarthropathies. In these diseases it has the ability to visualize the majority of involved joints and soft tissue structures (both active inflammatory changes and chronic structural abnormalities) in one examination, making it suitable for imaging of different forms of spondylopathies, allowing different types of joint involvement to be recognized and assessing both the acute symptoms of disease and the longer-term consequences. Its role in daily practice is not yet clear. WB-MRI is not recommended as a first line investigation in every patient suffering from a form of spondyloarthropathy, but may add important information in difficult cases. Moreover, WB-MRI might obtain a stronger role in the early diagnosis of spondyloarthritides and in the assessment of treatment response. Other rheumatic diseases where WB-MRI may play a role in the future are polymyositis/dermatomyositis, CRMO and certain forms of systemic vasculitis. WB-MRI in rheumatism is a promising tool with great potential, however further systematic evaluation of its abilities and limitations in different forms of rheumatic diseases is awaited.

  18. Whole-body MR imaging for patients with rheumatism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weckbach, Sabine

    2009-01-01

    WB-MRI in rheumatic diseases is still an emerging imaging tool. So far, WB-MRI in rheumatism is mainly used in seronegative spondyloarthropathies. In these diseases it has the ability to visualize the majority of involved joints and soft tissue structures (both active inflammatory changes and chronic structural abnormalities) in one examination, making it suitable for imaging of different forms of spondylopathies, allowing different types of joint involvement to be recognized and assessing both the acute symptoms of disease and the longer-term consequences. Its role in daily practice is not yet clear. WB-MRI is not recommended as a first line investigation in every patient suffering from a form of spondyloarthropathy, but may add important information in difficult cases. Moreover, WB-MRI might obtain a stronger role in the early diagnosis of spondyloarthritides and in the assessment of treatment response. Other rheumatic diseases where WB-MRI may play a role in the future are polymyositis/dermatomyositis, CRMO and certain forms of systemic vasculitis. WB-MRI in rheumatism is a promising tool with great potential, however further systematic evaluation of its abilities and limitations in different forms of rheumatic diseases is awaited.

  19. Culture-sensitive adaptation and validation of the community-oriented program for the control of rheumatic diseases methodology for rheumatic disease in Latin American indigenous populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peláez-Ballestas, Ingris; Granados, Ysabel; Silvestre, Adriana; Alvarez-Nemegyei, José; Valls, Evart; Quintana, Rosana; Figuera, Yemina; Santiago, Flor Julian; Goñi, Mario; González, Rosa; Santana, Natalia; Nieto, Romina; Brito, Irais; García, Imelda; Barrios, Maria Cecilia; Marcano, Manuel; Loyola-Sánchez, Adalberto; Stekman, Ivan; Jorfen, Marisa; Goycochea-Robles, Maria Victoria; Midauar, Fadua; Chacón, Rosa; Martin, Maria Celeste; Pons-Estel, Bernardo A

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of the study is to validate a culturally sensitive adaptation of the community-oriented program for the control of rheumatic diseases (COPCORD) methodology in several Latin American indigenous populations. The COPCORD Spanish questionnaire was translated and back-translated into seven indigenous languages: Warao, Kariña and Chaima (Venezuela), Mixteco, Maya-Yucateco and Raramuri (Mexico) and Qom (Argentina). The questionnaire was administered to almost 100 subjects in each community with the assistance of bilingual translators. Individuals with pain, stiffness or swelling in any part of the body in the previous 7 days and/or at any point in life were evaluated by physicians to confirm a diagnosis according to criteria for rheumatic diseases. Overall, individuals did not understand the use of a 0-10 visual analog scale for pain intensity and severity grading and preferred a Likert scale comprising four items for pain intensity (no pain, minimal pain, strong pain, and intense pain). They were unable to discriminate between pain intensity and pain severity, so only pain intensity was included. For validation, 702 subjects (286 male, 416 female, mean age 42.7 ± 18.3 years) were interviewed in their own language. In the last 7 days, 198 (28.2 %) subjects reported having musculoskeletal pain, and 90 (45.4 %) of these had intense pain. Compared with the physician-confirmed diagnosis, the COPCORD questionnaire had 73.8 % sensitivity, 72.9 % specificity, a positive likelihood ratio of 2.7 and area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.73. The COPCORD questionnaire is a valid screening tool for rheumatic diseases in indigenous Latin American populations.

  20. Modeling quality of life in patients with rheumatic diseases: the role of pain catastrophizing, fear-avoidance beliefs, physical disability, and depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Eun-Jung; Hahm, Bong-Jin; Go, Dong Jin; Lee, Kwang-Min; Noh, Hae Lim; Park, Seung-Hee; Song, Yeong Wook

    2018-06-01

    physical and psychological quality of life, the assessment and treatment of the former should be included in the rehabilitation of patients with rheumatic diseases. Interventions targeting physical function and depression are likely to be effective in terms of improving physical and psychological quality of life in patients with rheumatic diseases.

  1. High frequency of association of rheumatic/autoimmune diseases and untreated male hypogonadism with severe testicular dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez-Balderas, F Javier; Tapia-Serrano, Rosario; Fonseca, M Eugenia; Arellano, Jorge; Beltran, Arturo; Yañez, Patricia; Camargo-Coronel, Adolfo; Fraga, Antonio

    2001-01-01

    Our goal in the present work was to determine whether male patients with untreated hypogonadism have an increased risk of developing rheumatic/autoimmune disease (RAD), and, if so, whether there is a relation to the type of hypogonadism. We carried out neuroendocrine, genetic, and rheumatologic investigations in 13 such patients and 10 healthy male 46,XY normogonadic control subjects. Age and body mass index were similar in the two groups. Nine of the 13 patients had hypergonadotropic hypogonadism (five of whom had Klinefelter's syndrome [karyotype 47,XXY]) and 4 of the 13 had hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (46,XY). Of these last four, two had Kallmann's syndrome and two had idiopathic cryptorchidism. Eight (61%) of the 13 patients studied had RADs unrelated to the etiology of their hypogonadism. Of these, four had ankylosing spondylitis and histocompatibility B27 antigen, two had systemic lupus erythematosus (in one case associated with antiphospholipids), one had juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, and one had juvenile dermatomyositis. In comparison with the low frequencies of RADs in the general population (about 0.83%, including systemic lupus erythematosus, 0.03%; dermatomyositis, 0.04%; juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, 0.03%; ankylosing spondylitis, 0.01%; rheumatoid arthritis, 0.62%; and other RAD, 0.1%), there were surprisingly high frequencies of such disorders in this small group of patients with untreated hypogonadism (P hypogonadism and was associated with marked gonadal failure with very low testosterone levels. PMID:11714390

  2. Heart Lesion After the First Attack of the Rheumatic Fever 22 Years Experience in Single Centre

    OpenAIRE

    Bejiqi, Ramush A.; Retkoceri, Ragip; Zeka, Naim; Bejiqi, Hana; Retkoceri, Arber

    2015-01-01

    Background: Acute rheumatic fever and its sequels, rheumatic heart diseases, remain major unsolved preventable health problems in Kosovo population, particularly among the disadvantages indigenous Albanian and Egyptians people. In Kosovo, despite of performing secondary prophylaxis with benzathine penicillin, acute rheumatic fever hospitalization rates have remained essentially unchanged for the last 20 years. The role of echocardiography in the diagnosis of acute rheumatic carditis was estab...

  3. Vitamin D endocrine system involvement in autoimmune rheumatic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutolo, Maurizio; Pizzorni, Carmen; Sulli, Alberto

    2011-12-01

    Vitamin D is synthesized from cholesterol in the skin (80-90%) under the sunlight and then metabolized into an active D hormone in liver, kidney and peripheral immune/inflammatory cells. These endocrine-immune effects include also the coordinated activities of the vitamin D-activating enzyme, 1alpha-hydroxylase (CYP27B1), and the vitamin D receptor (VDR) on cells of the immune system in mediating intracrine and paracrine actions. Vitamin D is implicated in prevention and protection from chronic infections (i.e. tubercolosis), cancer (i.e. breast cancer) and autoimmune rheumatic diseases since regulates both innate and adaptive immunity potentiating the innate response (monocytes/macrophages with antimicrobial activity and antigen presentation), but suppressing the adaptive immunity (T and B lymphocyte functions). Vitamin D has modulatory effects on B lymphocytes and Ig production and recent reports have demonstrated that 1,25(OH)2D3 does indeed exert direct effects on B cell homeostasis. A circannual rhythm of trough vitamin D levels in winter and peaks in summer time showed negative correlation with clinical status at least in rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus. Recently, the onset of symptoms of early arthritis during winter or spring have been associated with greater radiographic evidence of disease progression at 12 months possibly are also related to seasonal lower vitamin D serum levels. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. A short history of anti-rheumatic therapy. II. Aspirin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Marson

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The discovery of aspirin, an antipyretic, anti-inflammatory and analgesic drug, undoubtedly represents a milestone in the history of medical therapy. Since ancient times the derivatives of willow (Salix alba were used to treat a variety of fevers and pain syndromes, although the first report dates back to 1763 when the English Reverend Edward Stone described the effect of an extract of the bark willow in treating malaria. In the XIX century many apothecaries and chemists, including the Italian Raffaele Piria and Cesare Bertagnini, developed the biological processes of extraction and chemical synthesis of salicylates, and then analyzed their therapeutic properties and pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic characteristics. In 1899 the Bayer Company, where Felix Hoffmann, Heinrich Dreser and Arthur Eichengrün worked, recorded acetyl-salicylic acid under the name “Aspirin”. In the XX century, besides the definition of the correct applications of aspirin in the anti-rheumatic therapy being defined, Lawrence L. Crawen identified the property of this drug as an anti-platelet agent, thus opening the way for more widespread uses in cardiovascular diseases.

  5. Arthritis, Rheumatism and Aging Medical Information System Post-Marketing Surveillance Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, G

    2001-05-01

    The Arthritis, Rheumatism, and Aging Post-Marketing Surveillance Program (ARAMIS-PMS) is a collection of multicenter, prospective, noninterventional, observational longitudinal studies of patients with rheumatic diseases. The ARAMIS-PMS program aims to study patients in normal clinical setting to evaluate the real-life effectiveness, toxicity, and cost effectiveness of various medications used to treat rheumatic diseases.

  6. Severe fatigue is highly prevalent in ALL rheumatic diseases : an international study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geenen, R.; Overman, C.L.; Da Silva, J.A.P.; Kool, M.B.

    Background Fatigue is a common, disabling, and difficult to manage problem in rheumatic diseases. Prevalence estimates of fatigue within various rheumatic disease groups vary considerably. Data on the relative prevalence of severe fatigue across multiple rheumatic diseases using a similar instrument

  7. [The social medicine significance of rheumatic diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mertz, D P

    1989-01-01

    There is no doubt that the various rheumatoid diseases constitute a socio-medical and socio-economic problem of first order. Surely the importance of this problem will even grow till around the turn of the millenium because the share of older people in the total population of the German Federal Republic is continuing to increase. Concerning frequency and duration the rheumatoid diseases figure at the top of all the insurance benefits. The following measures are essentials to a successful combat of this popular disease: Purposive information, prevention, early diagnosis, adequate treatment and a fitting the patient back into the productive process. Among the rheumatoid diseases the degenerative changes are ranking foremost in the range of frequency, unchallenged and at a considerable distance from the primarily inflammatory diseases. Arthroses and spondyloses are by no means a simple "articular detrition" but a disease in which the time factor is not always of decisive importance. There are ascertainable degenerative articular changes to be found in every person virtually by the age of fifty-five although not everybody has physical complaints. As to the increase in frequency observed in the past few years regarding fillings of applications for therapies because of so-called rheumatic complaints, changes of the conditions at someone's workplace alone cannot be blamed for it at all, rather bad posture and unsound stresses in one's leisure time as well as a new kind of consciousness of being sick supervene. A prophylactic healthful conduct depends strongly upon a person's social status and upon socio-cultural conditions.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  8. A rapid echocardiographic screening protocol for rheumatic heart disease in Samoa: a high prevalence of advanced disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Marvin; Allen, John; Naseri, Take; Gardner, Rebecca; Tolley, Dennis; Allen, Lori

    2017-10-01

    Echocardiography has been proposed as a method to screen children for rheumatic heart disease. The World Heart Federation has established guidelines for echocardiographic screening. In this study, we describe a rapid echocardiogram screening protocol according to the World Heart Federation guidelines in Samoa, endemic for rheumatic heart disease. We performed echocardiogram screening in schoolchildren in Samoa between 2013 and 2015. A brief screening echocardiogram was performed on all students. Children with predefined criteria suspicious for rheumatic hear diseases were referred for a more comprehensive echocardiogram. Complete echocardiograms were classified according to the World Heart Federation guidelines and severity of valve disease. Echocardiographic screening was performed on 11,434 children, with a mean age of 10.2 years; 51% of them were females. A total of 558 (4.8%) children underwent comprehensive echocardiography, including 49 students who were randomly selected as controls. Definite rheumatic heart disease was observed in 115 students (10.0 per 1000): 92 students were classified as borderline (8.0 per 1000) and 23 with CHD. Advanced disease was identified in 50 students (4.4 per 1000): 15 with severe mitral regurgitation, five with severe aortic regurgitation, 11 with mitral stenoses, and 19 with mitral and aortic valve disease. We successfully applied a rapid echocardiographic screening protocol to a large number of students over a short time period - 28 days of screening over a 3-year time period - to identify a high prevalence of rheumatic heart disease. We also reported a significantly higher rate of advanced disease compared with previously published echocardiographic screening programmes.

  9. Cost-effectiveness of collaborative care including PST and an antidepressant treatment algorithm for the treatment of major depressive disorder in primary care; a randomised clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beekman Aartjan TF

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Depressive disorder is currently one of the most burdensome disorders worldwide. Evidence-based treatments for depressive disorder are already available, but these are used insufficiently, and with less positive results than possible. Earlier research in the USA has shown good results in the treatment of depressive disorder based on a collaborative care approach with Problem Solving Treatment and an antidepressant treatment algorithm, and research in the UK has also shown good results with Problem Solving Treatment. These treatment strategies may also work very well in the Netherlands too, even though health care systems differ between countries. Methods/design This study is a two-armed randomised clinical trial, with randomization on patient-level. The aim of the trial is to evaluate the treatment of depressive disorder in primary care in the Netherlands by means of an adapted collaborative care framework, including contracting and adherence-improving strategies, combined with Problem Solving Treatment and antidepressant medication according to a treatment algorithm. Forty general practices will be randomised to either the intervention group or the control group. Included will be patients who are diagnosed with moderate to severe depression, based on DSM-IV criteria, and stratified according to comorbid chronic physical illness. Patients in the intervention group will receive treatment based on the collaborative care approach, and patients in the control group will receive care as usual. Baseline measurements and follow up measures (3, 6, 9 and 12 months are assessed using questionnaires and an interview. The primary outcome measure is severity of depressive symptoms, according to the PHQ9. Secondary outcome measures are remission as measured with the PHQ9 and the IDS-SR, and cost-effectiveness measured with the TiC-P, the EQ-5D and the SF-36. Discussion In this study, an American model to enhance care for patients with a

  10. Microsomal prostaglandin E synthase-1 in rheumatic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina eKorotkova

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Microsomal prostaglandin E synthase-1 (mPGES-1 is a well recognized target for the development of novel anti-inflammatory drugs that can reduce symptoms of inflammation in rheumatic diseases and other inflammatory conditions. In this review, we focus on mPGES-1 in rheumatic diseases with the aim to cover the most recent advances in the understanding of mPGES-1 in rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis and inflammatory myopathies. Novel findings regarding regulation of mPGES1 cell expression as well as enzyme inhibitors are also summarized.

  11. Influence of atmospheric factors on the rheumatic diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Latman, N S

    1987-01-01

    This paper reviews the influence of atmospheric factors on rheumatic diseases - rheumatoid arthritis, unspecified arthritis, gout, and systemic lupus erythematosis (SLE). The authors state that there appears to be ample evidence to conclude that various atmospheric factors do exert a significant impact on some people with various rheumatic diseases. The data are, however, crude relative to the authors general understanding. They recommend as a logical progression of research the determination of the effects of the meteorological/atmospheric factors of concern on the specific intrinsic mediators of inflammation.

  12. Heart Lesion After the First Attack of the Rheumatic Fever 22 Years Experience in Single Centre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bejiqi, Ramush A.; Retkoceri, Ragip; Zeka, Naim; Bejiqi, Hana; Retkoceri, Arber

    2015-01-01

    Background: Acute rheumatic fever and its sequels, rheumatic heart diseases, remain major unsolved preventable health problems in Kosovo population, particularly among the disadvantages indigenous Albanian and Egyptians people. In Kosovo, despite of performing secondary prophylaxis with benzathine penicillin, acute rheumatic fever hospitalization rates have remained essentially unchanged for the last 20 years. The role of echocardiography in the diagnosis of acute rheumatic carditis was established over the last 20 years. Aims: In this study we aimed to determine the prevalence of rheumatic heart disease in children from Kosovo population with first attack of acute rheumatic fever. Also, we presented that echocardiography examination detects a greater prevalence of rheumatic heart disease than other diagnostic procedures. We aimed to compare the sensitivity and specificity of cardiac auscultation, ECG record, lab analysis to echocardiography and to determine the feasibility of specific age in this setting. Methods: To optimize accurate diagnosis of rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease, we utilized two group models. In the first group of 388 children, hospitalized and treated before 1999, diagnosis of rheumatic fever was decided basing on the clinical and laboratory findings whereas in second group (221 children treated from1999 to 2010) clinical and lab diagnosis were amplified also on the detection by echocardiography. Conclusion: In second group, using echocardiography as a method of diagnosis and assessment children with rheumatic fever, we found high rates of undetected rheumatic heart disease in this high-risk group population. Echocardiographic examination of children with rheumatic fever for rheumatic heart disease may over diagnose rheumatic heart disease unless congenital mitral valve anomalies and physiological regurgitation are excluded. PMID:25870479

  13. Is a rheumatic fever register the best surveillance tool to evaluate rheumatic fever control in the Auckland region?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moxon, Te Aro; Reed, Peter; Jelleyman, Timothy; Anderson, Philippa; Leversha, Alison; Jackson, Catherine; Lennon, Diana

    2017-08-11

    To determine the most accurate data source for acute rheumatic fever (ARF) epidemiology in the Auckland region. To assess coverage of the Auckland Regional Rheumatic Fever Register (ARRFR), (1998-2010) for children Auckland at the time of illness, register, hospitalisation and notification data were compared. A consistent definition was applied to determine definite and probable cases of ARF using clinical records. (www.heartfoundation.org.nz) RESULTS: Of 559 confirmed (definite and probable) RF cases Auckland. This was significantly more accurate than medical officer of health notification and hospitalisation data.

  14. Acute rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease--priorities in prevention, diagnosis and management. A report of the CSANZ Indigenous Cardiovascular Health Conference, Alice Springs 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rémond, M G W; Wheaton, G R; Walsh, W F; Prior, D L; Maguire, G P

    2012-10-01

    Three priority areas in the prevention, diagnosis and management of acute rheumatic fever (ARF) and rheumatic heart disease (RHD) were identified and discussed in detail: 1. Echocardiography and screening/diagnosis of RHD – Given the existing uncertainty it remains premature to advocate for or to incorporate echocardiographic screening for RHD into Australian clinical practice. Further research is currently being undertaken to evaluate the potential for echocardiography screening. 2. Secondary prophylaxis – Secondary prophylaxis (long acting benzathine penicillin injections) must be seen as a priority. Systems-based approaches are necessary with a focus on the development and evaluation of primary health care-based or led strategies incorporating effective health information management systems. Better/novel systems of delivery of prophylactic medications should be investigated. 3. Management of advanced RHD – National centres of excellence for the diagnosis, assessment and surgical management of RHD are required. Early referral for surgical input is necessary with multidisciplinary care and team-based decision making that includes patient, family, and local health providers. There is a need for a national RHD surgical register and research strategy for the assessment, intervention and long-term outcome of surgery and other interventions for RHD. Copyright © 2012 Australian and New Zealand Society of Cardiac and Thoracic Surgeons (ANZSCTS) and the Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand (CSANZ). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Interventions aiming to reduce early retirement due to rheumatic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Almeida Laires

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Aging of the population and early retirement translates into productivity losses to society. Persistence of working life is crucial to counteract this sustainability issue faced by western countries. Musculoskeletal and rheumatic diseases (RD may cause work disability and early exit from work, including early retirement. The objective of this article is to review the current knowledge about interventions aiming to reduce early retirement due to RD. Methods: We searched PubMed and The Cochrane Library for studies either in English or Portuguese between January 2000 and June 2016 that evaluated the impact of interventions targeting early retirement in RD patients still at work. We also searched for grey literature from Portuguese institutional repositories. Results: We identified several published studies testing pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic vocational rehabilitation interventions. None was specifically identified for Portugal. The general low quality of the literature and its inconsistency makes it unfeasible to draw definitive conclusions. However, some broad recommendations might be outlined. An effective intervention must: 1 act upon different levels (e.g. RD patient, workplace, involving several stakeholders (e.g. rheumatologists, occupational physicians, employers; 2 prioritize the right patients (e.g. more disabling RD; and 3 consider the patients’ role, for instance by including an element of patient education and support. Despite the lack of good quality evidence on this field, there seems to be a growing interest in the international scientific community with several ongoing studies promoting such interventions. This promising data will be very useful to set up effective policies. Conclusions: This article summarizes the current knowledge about the impact of interventions to avoid or mitigate early retirement in RD patients. It highlights the demand for further research and it also contributes to aware decision

  16. Understanding lack of understanding : Invalidation in rheumatic diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kool, M.B.

    2012-01-01

    The quality of life of patients with chronic rheumatic diseases is negatively influenced by symptoms such as pain, fatigue, and stiffness, and secondary symptoms such as physical limitations and depressive mood. On top of this burden, some patients experience negative responses from others, such as

  17. Rheumatic heart disease and the asap programme: fresh insights ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    rheumatic heart disease (RHD), which could potentially result in 1.4 million deaths per year from the disease and its complications.2 These individuals are predominantly children, adolescents and young adults who live in poor and under-resourced areas of the world. Current epidemiology. The prevalence of RHD has ...

  18. Rheumatic manifestations among HIV positive adults attending the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Rheumatic manifestations among HIV positive adults attending the Infectious ... diseases seen depend on a number of factors such as, the CD4 count, HLA status ... population were commonest finding followed by HIV associated arthritis at 4.3%. ... affected with the knees (28.8%) and ankles (26.9%) contributing the highest.

  19. Determinants of cardiovascular risk in current rheumatic practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meek, I.L.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this thesis was to study cardiovascular risk in arthritis: Firstly, how do different rheumatic diseases compare in the patients’ traditional cardiovascular (CV) risk factor profiles, and does this justify the general focus on rheumatoid arthritis regarding cardiovascular complications in

  20. Early identification of iflammantory rheumatic bone disease via mammography technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singer, F.; Jakic, L.

    1981-01-01

    A decisive improvement of early X-ray diagnosis of inflammatory rheumatic osseus changes becomes possible by means of an appropriate combination of film and foil of the type which has been in use in mammography for a long time. (orig.) [de

  1. Proportion of patients in the Uganda rheumatic heart disease ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Proportion of patients in the Uganda rheumatic heart disease registry with advanced ... of Cardiology guidelines on the management of valvular heart disease. ... disease that require surgical treatment yet they cannot access this therapy due to ... By Country · List All Titles · Free To Read Titles This Journal is Open Access.

  2. Mechanisms and management of heart failure in active rheumatic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fulminating active rheumatic carditis has been observed for over three decades in this environment with no recent alteration in either the incidence or the pattern of presentation. Heart failure (in this context defined as 'an inadequate circulation at rest together with a raised pulmonary venous pressure, with or without an ...

  3. Overlapping humoral autoimmunity links rheumatic fever and the antiphospholipid syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blank, M; Krause, I; Magrini, L

    2006-01-01

    Rheumatic fever (RF) and the antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) are autoimmune diseases that share similar cardiac and neurological pathologies. We assessed the presence of shared epitopes between M protein, N-acetyl-beta-D-glucosamine (GlcNAc) and beta2 glycoprotein-I (beta2GPI), the pathogenic...

  4. Fatigue and functioning in rheumatic diseases: a biopsychological perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Overman, C.L.

    2015-01-01

    Rheumatic diseases are characterized by inflammation, damage and pain, mostly of the joints and connective tissues. They can have a profound negative impact on almost every aspect of a patient’s life as well as on the direct environment and society as a whole. Patients are hampered in their daily

  5. For bitter or worse. Embitterment in rheumatic diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blom, D.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/337987734

    2014-01-01

    In clinical practice and in the context of work and disability pension examinations, clinical and vocational professionals regularly encounter patients with a rheumatic disease who are embittered. These patients view themselves as victims of external factors, experience a sense of resentment and

  6. Poncet\\'s Disease (Tuberculous Rheumatism) in a Nigerian Boy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Poncet's disease or tuberculous rheumatism is an immunological reaction to mycobacteria tubercle with resultant reactive polyarthritis. Prompt distinction between Poncet's disease and tuberculous arthritis should be made because of the poor prognostic significance of tuberculous arthritis. In this paper, we report the case ...

  7. Gastroduodenal safety of Nimesulid (Nimesil, Berlin Chemie in rheumatic patients with history of ulcer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. E. Karateyev

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To assess safety of nimesulid in rheumatic pts with history of ulcer or multiple erosions (ME of stomach and/or duodenal mucosa. Methods. 42 pts with rheumatic diseases aged 22-73 years were included. AH had gastric or duodenal ulcers or ME (n>10 connected with NSAID treatment and confirmed by endoscopy no more than 6 months before the beginning of the study. Pts were included after healing of ulcers and erosions. The pts were randomized to receive Nimesulid 200 mg/day (group 1 or Diclofenac suppositoria 100 mg/day + ranitidine 150 mg/day (group 2. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy was performed before and 12 weeks after the beginning of treatment. Results. Relapse of stomach ulcer was observed in I pts of group 1 (5,6%. Relapse of NSAID-induced ulcers and ME was noted in 6 pts of group 2 (33,3%: in 4 cases stomach ulcers, in 1 case stomach ME, in 1 case duodenal ulcer (p=0,0424. Presence of gastralgias and dyspepsia was noted in 36,8% pts of group 1 and in 20% pts of group 2 (p=0,0539. In 1 pts of group 2 gastralgias were the reason for premature endoscopy. Conclusion. Nimesil (Nimesulid can be considered as a more safe drug than classical NSAIDs with smaller risk of serious gastroduodenal complications development in rheumatic pts with ulcer history. The results of the study allow to recommend Nimesulid as a drug of choice for treatment of pts with history of NSAID-induced gastropathy.

  8. Heart Transplant in Patients with Predominantly Rheumatic Valvular Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa, Vitor E E; Lopes, Antonio S S A; Accorsi, Tarso A D; Fernandes, Joao Ricardo C; Spina, Guilherme S; Sampaio, Roney O; Bacal, Fernando; Tarasoutchi, Flavio

    2015-09-01

    International records indicate that only 2.6% of patients with heart transplants have valvular heart disease. The study aim was to evaluate the epidemiological and clinical profile of patients with valvular heart disease undergoing heart transplantation. Between 1985 and 2013, a total of 569 heart transplants was performed at the authors' institution. Twenty patients (13 men, seven women; mean age 39.5 +/- 15.2 years) underwent heart transplant due to structural (primary) valvular disease. Analyses were made of the patients' clinical profile, laboratory data, echocardiographic and histopathological data, and mortality and rejection. Of the patients, 18 (90%) had a rheumatic etiology, with 85% having undergone previous valve surgery (45% had one or more operations), and 95% with a normal functioning valve prosthesis at the time of transplantation. Atrial fibrillation was present in seven patients (35%), while nine (45%) were in NYHA functional class IV and eight (40%) in class III. The indication for cardiac transplantation was refractory heart failure in seven patients (35%) and persistent NYHA class III/IV in ten (50%). The mean left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) was 26.6 +/- 7.9%. The one-year mortality was 20%. Histological examination of the recipients' hearts showed five (27.7%) to have reactivated rheumatic myocarditis without prior diagnosis at the time of transplantation. Univariate analysis showed that age, gender, LVEF, rheumatic activity and rejection were not associated with mortality at one year. Among the present patient cohort, rheumatic heart disease was the leading cause of heart transplantation, and a significant proportion of these patients had reactivated myocarditis diagnosed in the histological analyses. Thus, it appears valid to investigate the existence of rheumatic activity, especially in valvular cardiomyopathy with severe systolic dysfunction before transplantation.

  9. Models of disordered media: some new results, including some new connections between composite-media, fluid-state, and random-flight theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stell, G.

    1983-01-01

    Some new theoretical results on the microstructure of models of two-phase disordered media are given, as well as the new quantitative bounds on the thermal conductivity that follows for one such model (randomly centered spherical inclusions). A second set of results is then given for random flights, including random flights with hit expectancy prescribed in a unit hall around the flight origin. Finally, some interesting correspondences are demonstrated, via the Ornstein-Zernike equation, between random-flight results, liquid-state results and percolation-theory results. 27 references, 6 figures, 4 tables

  10. Management of infections in rheumatic patients receiving biological therapies. The Portuguese Society of Rheumatology recommendations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teixeira L

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Infections are a major cause of morbi dity and mortality in systemic inflammatory rheumatic di - seases and the management of infectious complications in patients under biological therapies deserves parti - cular attention. Objective: Develop evidence-based recommendations for the management of infections in rheumatic patients receiving biological therapies. Methods: A search in PubMed (until 10 November 2014 and EMBASE (until 20 December 2014 databases was performed. Patients with systemic inflammatory rheumatic diseases treated with approved biologics in whom infections occurred were included. Search results were submitted to title and abstract selection, followed by detailed review of suitable studies. Information regarding presentation of the infectious complication, its diagnosis, treatment, and outcome, as well as maintenance or discontinuation of the biological agent was extracted and subsequently pooled according to the type of infection considered. Results of literature review were presented and critically reviewed in a dedi - cated meeting by a multidisciplinary panel. Recommendations were then formulated using the Delphi method. Finally, the level of agreement among rheumatologists was voted using an online survey. Results: Fifteen recommendations were issued. Nine general recommendations concerned the assessment of infectious risk before and while on biologics, the procedures in case of suspected infection and the mana - gement of biologics during infectious complications. Six specific recommendations were developed for respiratory, urinary, gastrointestinal, skin, osteoarticular and disseminated infections. Conclusion: These fifteen recommendations are intended to help rheumatologists in the management of infections in patients on biological therapy. They integrate an extensive literature review, expert opinion and inputs from Portuguese rheumatologists.

  11. Posterior leaflet preservation during mitral valve replacement for rheumatic mitral stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djukić, P L; Obrenović-Kirćanski, B B; Vranes, M R; Kocica, M J; Mikić, A Dj; Velinović, M M; Kacar, S M; Kovacević, N S; Parapid, B J

    2006-01-01

    Mitral valve replacement with posterior leaflet preservation was shown beneficial for postoperative left vetricular (LV) performance in patients with mitral regurgitation. Some authors find it beneficial even for the long term LV function. We investigated a long term effect of this technique in patients with rheumatic mitral stenosis. We studied 20 patents with mitral valve replacement due to rheumatic mitral stenosis, in the period from January 1988 to December 1989. In group A (10 patients) both leaflets and coresponding chordal excision was performed, while in group B (10 patients) the posterior leaflet was preserved. In all patients a Carbomedics valve was inserted. We compared clinical pre and postoperative status, as well as hemodynamic characteristics of the valve and left ventricle in both groups. Control echocardiographyc analysis included: maximal (PG) and mean (MG) gradients; effective valve area (AREA); telediastolic (TDV) and telesystolic (TSV) LV volume; stroke volume (SV); ejection fraction (EF); fractional shortening (FS) and segmental LV motion. The mean size of inserted valve was 26.6 in group A and 27.2 in group B. Hemodynamic data: PG (10.12 vs 11.1); MG (3.57 vs 3.87); AREA (2.35 vs 2.30); TDV 126.0 vs 114.5); TSV (42.2 vs 36.62); SV (83.7 vs 77.75); EF (63.66 vs 67.12); FS (32.66 vs 38.25). Diaphragmal segmental hypokinesis was evident in one patient from group A and in two patients from group B. In patients with rheumatic stenosis, posterior leaflet preservation did not have increased beneficial effect on left ventricular performance during long-term follow-up. An adequate posterior leaflet preservation does not change hemodynamic valvular characteristics even after long-term follow-up.

  12. X-ray picture of the heart turn in echocardiographic diagnosis of rheumatic heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grishkevich, A.M.; Goryanina, N.K.

    1986-01-01

    The paper is concerned with X-ray and echocardiographic investigation of the heart in 461 patients with mitral-tricuspidal disease. In 377 (82%) cases a turn of the heart along the longitudinal axis (counter clockwise) to the left and back was revealed. X-ray recognition of the heart turn made it possible to set an echocardiographic sensor to spot some of the cardiac cavities, interventricular septum and valvular apparatus. The correct setting of the echocardiographic sensor resulted in the determination of true sizes of each cardiac cavity, diagnosis of the nature of each valvular lesion and the recognition of such complications of rheumatic heart diseases as valvular calcinosis, left atrial thrombosis and disorder of myocardial contractility

  13. Insertional translocation leading to a 4q13 duplication including the EPHA5 gene in two siblings with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matoso, Eunice; Melo, Joana B; Ferreira, Susana I; Jardim, Ana; Castelo, Teresa M; Weise, Anja; Carreira, Isabel M

    2013-08-01

    An insertional translocation (IT) can result in pure segmental aneusomy for the inserted genomic segment allowing to define a more accurate clinical phenotype. Here, we report on two siblings sharing an unbalanced IT inherited from the mother with a history of learning difficulty. An 8-year-old girl with developmental delay, speech disability, and attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), showed by GTG banding analysis a subtle interstitial alteration in 21q21. Oligonucleotide array comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH) analysis showed a 4q13.1-q13.3 duplication spanning 8.6 Mb. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones confirmed the rearrangement, a der(21)ins(21;4)(q21;q13.1q13.3). The duplication described involves 50 RefSeq genes including the EPHA5 gene that encodes for the EphA5 receptor involved in embryonic development of the brain and also in synaptic remodeling and plasticity thought to underlie learning and memory. The same rearrangement was observed in a younger brother with behavioral problems and also exhibiting ADHD. ADHD is among the most heritable of neuropsychiatric disorders. There are few reports of patients with duplications involving the proximal region of 4q and a mild phenotype. To the best of our knowledge this is the first report of a duplication restricted to band 4q13. This abnormality could be easily missed in children who have nonspecific cognitive impairment. The presence of this behavioral disorder in the two siblings reinforces the hypothesis that the region involved could include genes involved in ADHD. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Combined percutaneous balloon mitral valvuloplasty and left atrial appendage occlusion device implantation for rheumatic mitral stenosis and atrial fibrillation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murdoch, Dale; McAulay, Laura; Walters, Darren L.

    2014-01-01

    Rheumatic heart disease is a common cause of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality worldwide, mostly in developing countries. Mitral stenosis and atrial fibrillation often coexist, related to both structural and inflammatory changes of the mitral valve and left atrium. Both predispose to left atrial thrombus formation, commonly involving the left atrial appendage. Thromboembolism can occur, with devastating consequences. We report the case of a 62 year old woman with rheumatic heart disease resulting in mitral stenosis and atrial fibrillation. Previous treatment with warfarin resulted in life-threatening gastrointestinal bleeding and she refused further anticoagulant therapy. A combined procedure was performed, including percutaneous balloon mitral valvuloplasty and left atrial appendage occlusion device implantation with the Atritech® Watchman® device. No thromboembolic or bleeding complications were encountered at one year follow-up. Long-term follow-up in a cohort of patients will be required to evaluate the safety and efficacy of this strategy

  15. Combined percutaneous balloon mitral valvuloplasty and left atrial appendage occlusion device implantation for rheumatic mitral stenosis and atrial fibrillation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murdoch, Dale, E-mail: dale_murdoch@health.qld.gov.au [The Prince Charles Hospital, Brisbane (Australia); The University of Queensland, Brisbane (Australia); McAulay, Laura [The Prince Charles Hospital, Brisbane (Australia); Walters, Darren L. [The Prince Charles Hospital, Brisbane (Australia); The University of Queensland, Brisbane (Australia)

    2014-11-15

    Rheumatic heart disease is a common cause of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality worldwide, mostly in developing countries. Mitral stenosis and atrial fibrillation often coexist, related to both structural and inflammatory changes of the mitral valve and left atrium. Both predispose to left atrial thrombus formation, commonly involving the left atrial appendage. Thromboembolism can occur, with devastating consequences. We report the case of a 62 year old woman with rheumatic heart disease resulting in mitral stenosis and atrial fibrillation. Previous treatment with warfarin resulted in life-threatening gastrointestinal bleeding and she refused further anticoagulant therapy. A combined procedure was performed, including percutaneous balloon mitral valvuloplasty and left atrial appendage occlusion device implantation with the Atritech® Watchman® device. No thromboembolic or bleeding complications were encountered at one year follow-up. Long-term follow-up in a cohort of patients will be required to evaluate the safety and efficacy of this strategy.

  16. DSP30 and interleukin-2 as a mitotic stimulant in B-cell disorders including those with a low disease burden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dun, Karen A; Riley, Louise A; Diano, Giuseppe; Adams, Leanne B; Chiu, Eleanor; Sharma, Archna

    2018-05-01

    Chromosome abnormalities detected during cytogenetic investigations for B-cell malignancy offer prognostic information that can have wide ranging clinical impacts on patients. These impacts may include monitoring frequency, treatment type, and disease staging level. The use of the synthetic oligonucleotide DSP30 combined with interleukin 2 (IL2) has been described as an effective mitotic stimulant in B-cell disorders, not only in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) but also in a range of other B-cell malignancies. Here, we describe the comparison of two B-cell mitogens, lipopolysaccharide (LPS), and DSP30 combined with IL2 as mitogens in a range of common B-cell disorders excluding CLL. The results showed that DSP30/IL2 was an effective mitogen in mature B-cell disorders, revealing abnormal cytogenetic results in a range of B-cell malignancies. The abnormality rate increased when compared to the use of LPS to 64% (DSP30/IL2) from 14% (LPS). In a number of cases the disease burden was proportionally very low, less than 10% of white cells. In 37% of these cases, the DSP30 culture revealed abnormal results. Importantly, we also obtained abnormal conventional cytogenetics results in 3 bone marrow cases in which immunophenotyping showed an absence of an abnormal B-cell clone. In these cases, the cytogenetics results correlated with the provisional diagnosis and altered their staging level. The use of DSP30 and IL2 is recommended for use in many B-cell malignancies as an effective mitogen and their use has been shown to enable successful culture of the malignant clone, even at very low levels of disease. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Impact of Fatigue in Rheumatic Diseases in the Work Environment: A Qualitative Study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Connolly, Deirdre

    2015-10-28

    Fatigue is a symptom of arthritis that causes difficulty at work. An improved understanding of this symptom could assist its management in the work environment. The aim of this study was to explore people with rheumatic diseases\\' experiences of fatigue in work. A qualitative descriptive design was used with semi-structured interviews and a constant comparative method of data analysis. There were 18 participants, the majority of them female with Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) and working full-time. Three themes were identified: "Impact of fatigue on work performance" with cognition, mood and physical abilities being the main difficulties reported. In the second theme "Disclosure at Work" participants discussed disclosing their disease to employers but reported a lack of understanding of fatigue from colleagues. The final theme "work-based fatigue management strategies" included cognitive strategies and energy management techniques, which were mainly self-taught. In this study, fatigue was reported to impact on many areas of work performance with limited understanding from colleagues and employers. Interventions from health professionals to assist with development of work-related self-management skills are required to assist with symptom management in the work place. Such interventions should include education to employers and colleagues on the nature of fatigue in Rheumatic diseases.

  18. Impact of Fatigue in Rheumatic Diseases in the Work Environment: A Qualitative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deirdre Connolly

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Fatigue is a symptom of arthritis that causes difficulty at work. An improved understanding of this symptom could assist its management in the work environment. The aim of this study was to explore people with rheumatic diseases’ experiences of fatigue in work. A qualitative descriptive design was used with semi-structured interviews and a constant comparative method of data analysis. There were 18 participants, the majority of them female with Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA and working full-time. Three themes were identified: “Impact of fatigue on work performance” with cognition, mood and physical abilities being the main difficulties reported. In the second theme “Disclosure at Work” participants discussed disclosing their disease to employers but reported a lack of understanding of fatigue from colleagues. The final theme “work-based fatigue management strategies” included cognitive strategies and energy management techniques, which were mainly self-taught. In this study, fatigue was reported to impact on many areas of work performance with limited understanding from colleagues and employers. Interventions from health professionals to assist with development of work-related self-management skills are required to assist with symptom management in the work place. Such interventions should include education to employers and colleagues on the nature of fatigue in Rheumatic diseases.

  19. CURRENT APPROACHES TO THE LABORATORY DIAGNOSIS OF RHEUMATIC DISEASES: ROLE OF MOLECULAR AND CELLULAR BIOMARKERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. N. Aleksandrova

    2016-01-01

    .The alternative therapies of RD include the use of low-molecular-weight chemically synthesized agents that suppress the activity of tyrosine kinases. The important area of this therapy is to restore immunological tolerance and to correct autoimmune disorders by means of autologous hematopoietic stem cells, mesenchymal stromal cells, autologous tolerogenic dendritic cells, regulatory T and B cells, gene therapy, and peptide antigens. The prospects for the laboratory diagnosis of RD are associated with the necessity of harmonizing and standardizing the current methods to determine autoantibodies and with the search for and clinical validation of novel proteomic, transcriptomic, and genomic biomarkers.

  20. Enteric bacterial metabolites propionic and butyric acid modulate gene expression, including CREB-dependent catecholaminergic neurotransmission, in PC12 cells--possible relevance to autism spectrum disorders.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bistra B Nankova

    Full Text Available Alterations in gut microbiome composition have an emerging role in health and disease including brain function and behavior. Short chain fatty acids (SCFA like propionic (PPA, and butyric acid (BA, which are present in diet and are fermentation products of many gastrointestinal bacteria, are showing increasing importance in host health, but also may be environmental contributors in neurodevelopmental disorders including autism spectrum disorders (ASD. Further to this we have shown SCFA administration to rodents over a variety of routes (intracerebroventricular, subcutaneous, intraperitoneal or developmental time periods can elicit behavioral, electrophysiological, neuropathological and biochemical effects consistent with findings in ASD patients. SCFA are capable of altering host gene expression, partly due to their histone deacetylase inhibitor activity. We have previously shown BA can regulate tyrosine hydroxylase (TH mRNA levels in a PC12 cell model. Since monoamine concentration is known to be elevated in the brain and blood of ASD patients and in many ASD animal models, we hypothesized that SCFA may directly influence brain monoaminergic pathways. When PC12 cells were transiently transfected with plasmids having a luciferase reporter gene under the control of the TH promoter, PPA was found to induce reporter gene activity over a wide concentration range. CREB transcription factor(s was necessary for the transcriptional activation of TH gene by PPA. At lower concentrations PPA also caused accumulation of TH mRNA and protein, indicative of increased cell capacity to produce catecholamines. PPA and BA induced broad alterations in gene expression including neurotransmitter systems, neuronal cell adhesion molecules, inflammation, oxidative stress, lipid metabolism and mitochondrial function, all of which have been implicated in ASD. In conclusion, our data are consistent with a molecular mechanism through which gut related environmental signals

  1. Burke-Fahn-Marsden dystonia severity, Gross Motor, Manual Ability, and Communication Function Classification scales in childhood hyperkinetic movement disorders including cerebral palsy: a 'Rosetta Stone' study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elze, Markus C; Gimeno, Hortensia; Tustin, Kylee; Baker, Lesley; Lumsden, Daniel E; Hutton, Jane L; Lin, Jean-Pierre S-M

    2016-02-01

    Hyperkinetic movement disorders (HMDs) can be assessed using impairment-based scales or functional classifications. The Burke-Fahn-Marsden Dystonia Rating Scale-movement (BFM-M) evaluates dystonia impairment, but may not reflect functional ability. The Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS), Manual Ability Classification System (MACS), and Communication Function Classification System (CFCS) are widely used in the literature on cerebral palsy to classify functional ability, but not in childhood movement disorders. We explore the concordance of these three functional scales in a large sample of paediatric HMDs and the impact of dystonia severity on these scales. Children with HMDs (n=161; median age 10y 3mo, range 2y 6mo-21y) were assessed using the BFM-M, GMFCS, MACS, and CFCS from 2007 to 2013. This cross-sectional study contrasts the information provided by these scales. All four scales were strongly associated (all Spearman's rank correlation coefficient rs >0.72, pdisorders including cerebral palsy can be effectively evaluated using these scales. © 2015 Mac Keith Press.

  2. [Biorheological contribution to the problem of rheumatic joint diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribitsch, V; Rainer, F; Ribitsch, G; Schurz, J; Klein, G

    1981-01-01

    The rheological properties of synovial fluids from patients with different rheumatic diseases are discussed. Viscosities of 73 samples were determined and are compared to a standard of "healthy" human synovial fluid p. m. and to bovine synovia. Typical differences between "healthy", degenerative and inflammatory synovial fluids could be discerned. These differences can be characterized with several rheological parameters. The mechanism of lubrication in joints and the role of synovial fluid as a lubricant are discussed. Rheological properties of polymere solutions which could serve as a substitute for sick synovial fluids are described and compared to the properties of healthy synovia. Several possibilities for molecular changes which could account for the deterioration of synovial fluids in patients with different rheumatic diseases are discussed.

  3. Treatment of rheumatic diseases with X-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dihlmann, W.

    1977-01-01

    Treatment of rheumatic diseases with X-rays today still has some certain indications such as activated arthrosis, inflammatory insertion tendopathies, so-called periarthritis, ankylosing spondilytis, and - with reserve - cervical and lumbar syndromes. For X-radiation of rheumatic diseases, the rules and methods of the so-called inflammation radiation in low dosages are valid. Despite contradictory statements in the relevant literature, it is not proved that irradiation of the spinal column of patients with ankylosing spondylitis involves the danger of radiogenic leukaemia. Certain irradiations of joints, however, (e.g. hip joint, sacro-iliac joints) lead to a gonadal exposure (esp. in the case of women of reproductive age) which cannot be tolerated by any physician. (orig.) [de

  4. Soft tissue manifestations of early rheumatic disease. Imaging with MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Treitl, M.; Panteleon, A.; Koerner, M.; Becker-Gaab, C.; Reiser, M.; Wirth, S.

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate typical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in early rheumatic diseases manifesting at the soft tissues of the hand using a retrospective analysis. A total of 186 MRI examinations of patients with clinical suspicion of a rheumatic disease were evaluated in a consensus reading by two experienced radiologists. All imaging patterns were assessed with respect to their type and localization. Under blinded and non-blinded conditions diagnoses were correlated with final clinical diagnosis. The most frequent diagnoses were rheumatoid arthritis (RA, 45.7%) and psoriatic arthritis (PsA, 15.6%). The mean correlation between clinical and MRI diagnosis (r) was 0.75 in blinded and 0.853 in non-blinded reading (p [de

  5. short history of anti-rheumatic therapy. IV. Corticosteroids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Marson

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available In 1948 a corticosteroid compound was administered for the first time to a patient affected by rheumatoid arthritis by Philip Showalter Hench, a rheumatologist at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota (USA. He was investigating since 1929 the role of adrenal gland-derived substances in rheumatoid arthritis. For the discovery of cortisone and its applications in anti-rheumatic therapy, Hench, along with Edward Calvin Kendall and Tadeusz Reichstein, won the 1950 Nobel Prize for Medicine. In this review we summarize the main stages that led to the identification of the so-called compound E, which was used by Hench. We also consider the subsequent development of steroid therapy in rheumatic diseases, through the introduction of new molecules with less mineralocorticoid effects, such as prednisone, and more recently, deflazacort.

  6. Evolution, evidence and effect of secondary prophylaxis against rheumatic fever

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosemary Wyber

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The association between group A streptococcal infection and rheumatic fever (RF was established in the early 20 th century. At the time, RF and subsequent rheumatic heart disease (RHD were an untreatable scourge of young people in developed and developing countries. Resultingly, research efforts to understand, treat and prevent the disease were widepread. The development of antibiotics in the 1930s offered therapeutic promise, although antibotic treatment of acute RF had little impact. Improved understanding of the post-infectious nature of RF prompted attempts to use antibiotics prophylactically. Regular doses of sulphonamide antibiotics following RF appeared to reduce disease progression to RHD. Development of penicillin and later, benzathine penicillin G, was a further thereputic advance in the 1950s. No new prophylactic options against RF have emerged in the intervening 60 years, and delivery of regularly scheduled BPG injections remains a world wide challenge.

  7. Reactive hemophagocytic syndromes in children with rheumatic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr Gietka

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Reactive haemophagocytic syndrome (RHPS, also calledmacrophage activation syndrome (MAS, is a serious complicationof viral, rheumatic and malignant diseases, thought to be causedby the excessive activation of T lymphocytes and macrophages.MAS is characterized by polyorgan involvement with typical features:non-remitting fever, hepatic enlargement, considerable loweringof blood cell count and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR,elevation of serum glutamic-oxaloacetic transaminase (SGOT,serum glutamic pyruvic transaminase (SGPT, lactate dehydrogenase(LDH and serum ferritin level, with hypofibrinogenemia. Themost characteristic feature is the presence of well differentiatedmacrophages, revealing an active haemophagocytosis in the bonemarrow aspirate. Because of rapid progression and fatal prognosisof the disease, prompt and immediate therapeutic intervention isvery important. Although there is no standardized treatment, commonlyapplied glucocorticoids (GCS, and cyclosporine A (CsA areused. The study was aimed to a general characteristics of pathogenicfactors, clinical picture, laboratory features and results oftreatment in 8 children with RHPS /MAS. Material and methods: The study included 8 children (5 girls and3 boys aged 3 to 16 years (mean age was 10 years and 3 monthshospitalized in the Clinic of Pediatrics at IPCZD and in the Departmentof Pediatric Rheumatology at the Institute of Rheumatology in Warsaw. The analysis covered potential etiological factors, consideringthe basic disease, clinical symptoms (Table II, results oflaboratory tests (Table III, including immunological tests, appliedtherapy. In 4 patients, systemic-onset juvenile idiopathic arthritiswas accompanied by MAS, and in 2 patients it was the first manifestationof sJIA. In one patient, EBV infection was confirmed bythe polymerase chain reaction (case 1. In patient 3, PCR evaluationrevealed Cytomegalovirus (CMV infection. Cytomegalovirus infectionwas also confirmed in case 4

  8. Risk of falls in the rheumatic patient at geriatric age

    OpenAIRE

    Prusinowska, Agnieszka; Komorowski, Arkadiusz; Sadura-Sieklucka, Teresa; Ksi??opolska-Or?owska, Krystyna

    2017-01-01

    Evaluating the risk of falling of a geriatric rheumatic patient plays an essential role not only in planning and carrying out the physiotherapeutic process. The consequences of falls may be different and, although they do not always result in serious repercussions such as fractures or injuries, it is sufficient that they generate the fear of falling and cause a significant reduction in physical activity. Assessing functional capacity to define the risk of falling is of utmost importance in th...

  9. Echoscanning of knee joints in norm and in rheumatic lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potsybina, V.V.; Sivachenko, T.P.; Fed'ko, A.A.; Zakharchenko, R.P.

    1991-01-01

    Methods were elaborated and clinical possibilities of echoscanning (sonography) of knee joints in comprehensive clinicoradiological examination of patients with rheumatic diseases of joints were studied. A total of 25 healthy persons and 52 patients with systemic diseases of connective tissue were investigated. All the patients were subjected to clinical, laboratory, functional and x-ray examinations, and so osteoscintigraphy with 99m Tc-phosphate complexes and ultrasonography. An advantage of ultrasonography in comparison with roentgenography was noted

  10. Acute Rheumatic Fever versus Post-Streptococcal Reactive Arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashry, K.M.

    2009-01-01

    Rheumatic fever is an inflammatory disease that may develop after a Group A streptococcal infection and can involve the heart, joints, skin, and brain. A migrating polyarthritis after throat infection with group A β-haemolytic streptococci is classically attributed to acute rheumatic fever (ARF). Sterile non-migratory arthritis may occur as a separate entity, the so called post streptococcal reactive arthritis (PSRA). This study aimed to identify clinical and serological differences of patients with reactive arthritis after infection with Lance field group Aβ-haemolytic streptococci, compared with acute rheumatic fever. Hundred and twenty patients were recruited for the study , they were classified into two groups according to the diagnosis of ARF and PSRA patients consecutively seen in the Rheumatology and the Pediatric wards. Clinical and laboratory data were assessed through a questionnaire. The diagnosis of rheumatic fever was made based on revised modified Jones' criteria, while the diagnosis of post streptococcal reactive arthritis was made based on Deighton criteria; these associated with laboratory data, electrocardiography, chest X-ray, and bi-dimensional echocardiography. Results revealed no significant differences between both groups as regard age where ρ>0.05, while there were a significant difference regarding the date of antecedent upper respiratory tract infection (ρ 0.05). Regarding the cardio logical changes P-R interval by ECG was prolonged in 19 patients (31.67%)and Echo study showed changes in 12 patient (20%) of cases of ARF patient only. On the basis of simple laboratory variables and management, it ws possible to differentiate ARF from PSRA patients. So it could be concluded that these two conditions are actually distinct identities

  11. The impact of rheumatic diseases on early retirement

    OpenAIRE

    Laires, Pedro Almeida, 1979-

    2017-01-01

    Tese de doutoramento, Ciências e Tecnologias da Saúde (Epidemiologia), Universidade de Lisboa, Faculdade de Medicina, 2017 BACKGROUND: Rheumatic Diseases (RD) are characterized by pain and reduction in the range of motion and function in one or more areas of the musculoskeletal system. RD are prominent causes of morbidity and disability throughout the world, giving rise to enormous healthcare expenditures. RD may also lead to early retirement, generating indirect costs to society, namely t...

  12. Biomarkers in rheumatic diseases: how can they facilitate diagnosis and assessment of disease activity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan, Chandra; Assassi, Shervin

    2015-11-26

    Serological and proteomic biomarkers can help clinicians diagnose rheumatic diseases earlier and assess disease activity more accurately. These markers have been incorporated into the recently revised classification criteria of several diseases to enable early diagnosis and timely initiation of treatment. Furthermore, they also facilitate more accurate subclassification and more focused monitoring for the detection of certain disease manifestations, such as lung and renal involvement. These biomarkers can also make the assessment of disease activity and treatment response more reliable. Simultaneously, several new serological and proteomic biomarkers have become available in the routine clinical setting--for example, a protein biomarker panel for rheumatoid arthritis and a myositis antibody panel for dermatomyositis and polymyositis. This review will focus on commercially available antibody and proteomic biomarkers in rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, systemic sclerosis (scleroderma), dermatomyositis and polymyositis, and axial spondyloarthritis (including ankylosing spondylitis). It will discuss how these markers can facilitate early diagnosis as well as more accurate subclassification and assessment of disease activity in the clinical setting. The ultimate goal of current and future biomarkers in rheumatic diseases is to enable early detection of these diseases and their clinical manifestations, and to provide effective monitoring and treatment regimens that are tailored to each patient's needs and prognosis. © BMJ Publishing Group Ltd 2015.

  13. Productivity Losses and Costs in the Less-Common Systemic Autoimmune Rheumatic Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormick, Natalie; Marra, Carlo A; Aviña-Zubieta, J Antonio

    2017-10-30

    We synthesised the literature on productivity losses and costs in the less-common systemic autoimmune rheumatic diseases: Sjogren's syndrome (SjS), systemic sclerosis (SSc), poly/dermatomyositis (PM/DM), and systemic vasculitides (SV). Of 29 studies located, 12 were published 2012 onwards (SSc = 6, SjS = 2, PM/DM = 2, SV = 2). In these, 25% of PM/DM, and 21-26% of SV, were work disabled, 22% of SSc stopped work within 3 years of diagnosis, and annual costs of absenteeism in SSc averaged $12,024 2017 USD. Very few studies reported on costs, presenteeism (working at reduced levels), or unpaid productivity loss. Across multiple systemic autoimmune rheumatic diseases (SARDs), major drivers of lost productivity were generalised items like pain, depression, and fatigue, rather than disease-specific factors. Evidence suggests that work disability is common in SSc and strikes quickly. However, in SSc and other SARDs, more comprehensive estimates are needed, which include absenteeism and presenteeism from paid and unpaid work, costs, and drivers of productivity loss.

  14. Factors associated with the development of atrial fibrillation in patients with rheumatic mitral stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozaydin, Mehmet; Turker, Yasin; Varol, Ercan; Alaca, Sule; Erdogan, Dogan; Yilmaz, Nigar; Dogan, Abdullah

    2010-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the factors associated with the development of atrial fibrillation (AF) in patients with rheumatic mitral stenosis (MS). A total of 146 consecutive patients with rheumatic MS were screened. They were accepted to be in AF group and sinus rhythm group according to their rhythm in the baseline ECG. After screening, 38 patients were excluded due to hyperthyroidism (n = 13), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (n = 22), malignancy (n = 2) and rheumatoid arthritis (n = 1). Therefore, remaining 108 patients, 74 of whom in sinus rhythm (MS-SR) and 34 of whom in AF (MS-AF) constituted study population. Fourty age- and gender-matched patients constituted control group. Factors associated with development of AF in multivariable analysis included High sensitivity C reactive protein (P = 0.005; odds ratio, 3.44; 95% confidence interval, 1.44-8.22), N-terminal of brain natriuretic peptide precursor (P brain natriuretic peptide precursor and left atrial diameter are associated with development AF in patients with MS.

  15. Emotion regulation in patients with rheumatic diseases: validity and responsiveness of the Emotional Approach Coping Scale (EAC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mowinckel Petter

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic rheumatic diseases are painful conditions which are not entirely controllable and can place high emotional demands on individuals. Increasing evidence has shown that emotion regulation in terms of actively processing and expressing disease-related emotions are likely to promote positive adjustment in patients with chronic diseases. The Emotional Approach Coping Scale (EAC measures active attempts to acknowledge, understand, and express emotions. Although tested in other clinical samples, the EAC has not been validated for patients with rheumatic diseases. This study evaluated the data quality, internal consistency reliability, validity and responsiveness of the Norwegian version of the EAC for this group of patients. Methods 220 patients with different rheumatic diseases were included in a cross-sectional study in which data quality and internal consistency were assessed. Construct validity was assessed through comparisons with the Brief Approach/Avoidance Coping Questionnaire (BACQ and the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-20. Responsiveness was tested in a longitudinal pretest-posttest study of two different coping interventions, the Vitality Training Program (VTP and a Self-Management Program (SMP. Results The EAC had low levels of missing data. Results from principal component analysis supported two subscales, Emotional Expression and Emotional Processing, which had high Cronbach's alphas of 0.90 and 0.92, respectively. The EAC had correlations with approach-oriented items in the BACQ in the range 0.17-0.50. The EAC Expression scale had a significant negative correlation with the GHQ-20 of -0.13. As hypothesized, participation in the VTP significantly improved EAC scores, indicating responsiveness to change. Conclusion The EAC is an acceptable and valid instrument for measuring emotional processing and expression in patients with rheumatic diseases. The EAC scales were responsive to change in an intervention

  16. [Perceived pain and weather changes in rheumatic patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, L Cunha; Parente, M; Silva, C; Clemente-Coelho, P; Santos, H; Cortes, S; Medeiros, D; Ribeiro, J Saraiva; Barcelos, F; Sousa, M; Miguel, C; Figueiredo, R; Mediavilla, M; Simões, E; Silva, M; Patto, J Vaz; Madeira, H; Ferreira, J; Micaelo, M; Leitão, R; Las, V; Faustino, A; Teixeira, A

    2007-01-01

    Rheumatic patients with chronic pain describe in a vivid way the influence of climate on pain and disease activity. Several studies seem to confirm this association. To evaluate and compare in a population of rheumatic patients the perceived influence of weather changes on pain and disease activity This is a retrospective cross-sectional study. For three weeks an assisted self-reported questionnaire with nine dimensions and a VAS pain scale was performed on consecutive out-patients in our clinic. 955 patients 787 female 168 male mean age 57.9 years with several rheumatologic diagnosis were evaluated. Overall 70 of the patients believed that the weather influenced their disease and 40 believed that the influence was high. Morning stiffness was influenced in 54 high influenced in 34 . Autumn and Winter were the most influential periods as well as humidity 67 and low temperatures 59 . In our study as well as in literature we found that a high percentage of patients 70 perceived that weather conditions influenced their pain and disease. Fibromyalgia patients seemed to be strongly influenced by weather changes. Our study confirms that patients perception on the influence of climate on pain and therefore their disease is an important clinical factor and it should be considered when evaluating rheumatic patients.

  17. Prevention of Rheumatic Diseases: Strategies, Caveats and Future Directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finckh, Axel

    2014-01-01

    Rheumatic diseases affect a significant portion of the population and lead to increased health care costs, disability and even premature mortality; as such, effective preventive measures for these diseases could lead to substantial improvements in public health. Importantly, established and emerging data from natural history studies show that for most rheumatic diseases there is a period of ‘preclinical’ disease development during which abnormal biomarkers or other processes can be detected. These changes are useful to understand mechanisms of disease pathogenesis; in addition, they may be applied to estimate a personal risk of future disease, while individuals are still relatively asymptomatic. Based on this, a hope is to implement effective screening and preventive approaches for some rheumatic diseases, perhaps in the near future. However, a key part of such approaches is a deep understanding of the mechanisms of disease development as well as evidence-based and effective screening and preventive interventions that incorporate disease biology as well as ethical and public health concerns. PMID:25437291

  18. [Special features of physical therapy for elderly rheumatic patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardt, R

    2012-07-01

    The demographic shift is leading to a rapid rise in the number of elderly citizens. Accordingly, the number of geriatric problems is also increasing within the population of rheumatic patients. Geriatric patients are characterized through the triad of high age, multimorbidity and functional deficits. Almost all will show signs of arthritis and other degenerative musculoskeletal illnesses. Inflammatory rheumatic diseases within the geriatric population are found to be mostly in the chronic stage or with defective conditions. Problems typical of this population, such as comorbidities especially in the cardiovascular sector, must be assessed prior to the application of therapeutic concepts. The focus is on activating therapies, such as physiotherapy and occupational therapy, where the functional usefulness is proven. The use of thermal therapy, especially applied in the form of heat, as well as electrotherapy and high frequency therapy are also useful when indicated. Balneotherapy and hydrotherapy, as well as massage therapy and lymphatic drainage, must be adapted to the cardiovascular function of geriatric patients; this applies especially to heart failure patients. Physical therapy concepts in elderly rheumatic patients should preferably be implemented and managed by a multidisciplinary geriatric team.

  19. Double Valve Replacement (Mitral and Aortic for Rheumatic Heart Disease: A 20-year experience with 300 patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prashant Mishra

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Rheumatic heart disease still remains one of the leading causes of congestive heart failure and death owing to valvular pathologies, in developing countries. Valve replacement still remains the treatment of choice in such patients.The aim of this study wasto analyze the postoperative outcome of  double valve replacement (Mitral and Aortic in patients of rheumatic heart disease. Materials and Methods: Between 1988 and 2008, 300 patients of rheumatic heart disease underwent double (Mitral and Aortic valve replacement with Starr Edwards valve or St Jude mechanical valve prosthesis were implanted. These patients were studied retrospectively for preoperative data and postoperative outcome including causes of early and late deaths and the data was analyzed statistically. Results: The 30-day hospital death rate was 11.3% andlate death occurred in 11.6%. Anticoagulant regimen was followed to maintain the target pro-thrombin time at 1.5 times the control value. The actuarial survival (exclusive of hospital mortality was 92.4%, 84.6%, and 84.4%, per year at 5, 10, and 20 years, respectively Conclusions: In view of the acknowledged advantageof superior durability, increased thromboresistance in our patient population, and its cost effectiveness the Starr-Edwards ball valve or St. Jude valve is the mechanical prosthesis of choice for advanced combined valvular disease. The low-intensity anticoagulant regimen has offered suffcient protection against thromboembolism as well as hemorrhage.

  20. Brain MR spectroscopy in children with a history of rheumatic fever with a special emphasis on neuropsychiatric complications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alkan, Alpay; Kutlu, Ramazan; Kocak, Gulendam; Sigirci, Ahmet; Emul, Murat; Dogan, Selda; Aslan, Mehmet; Sarac, Kaya; Yakinci, Cengiz

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate whether there are metabolite changes in basal ganglia of children with complete healing of rheumatic fever (RF), history of Syndenham chorea (SC) and obsessive compulsive-tic disorder (OCTD) developed after RF when compared with healthy controls and each other. Material and methods: A total of 49 children with history of RF and 31 healthy controls were included into the study. All patients and control group underwent a detailed neuropsychiatric evaluation. Children with the history of RF were classified into three groups as; group 1: with history of RF without neuropsychiatric complications (NCRF), group 2: only with history of SC (HSC), group 3: with HSC and OCTD (OCTD). After MR imaging, single voxel MR spectroscopy was performed in all subjects. Voxels (15x15x15 mm) were placed in basal ganglia. N-acetyl aspartate (NAA)/creatin (Cr), and choline (Cho)/Cr ratios were calculated. Results: OCTD were detected in 13 children with HSC. NAA/Cr ratio was found to be decreased in these children when compared with NCRF (n:29), HSC without OCTD (n:7) and control groups (n:31). No significant difference was found in metabolite ratios of children with HSC without OCTD when compared with NCRF and control groups. There were no significant differences in Cho/Cr ratio between patient and control groups. Conclusion: Although MR imaging findings was normal, MR spectroscopy findings (decreased NAA/Cr ratio) in our study support the neuronal loss in basal ganglia of children with OCTD and could indicate the development of permanent damage

  1. A Systematic Review of Combination Therapy with Stimulants and Atomoxetine for Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder, Including Patient Characteristics, Treatment Strategies, Effectiveness, and Tolerability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gau, Susan Shur-Fen; Méndez, Luis; Montgomery, William; Monk, Julie A.; Altin, Murat; Wu, Shenghu; Lin, Chaucer C.H.; Dueñas, Héctor J.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Objective The purpose of this article was to systematically review the literature on stimulant and atomoxetine combination therapy, in particular: 1) Characteristics of patients with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) given combination therapy, 2) treatment strategies used, 3) efficacy and effectiveness, and 4) safety and tolerability. Methods Literature databases (MEDLINE®, EMBASE, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Science Citation Index Expanded, and SciVerse Scopus) were systematically searched using prespecified criteria. Publications describing stimulant and atomoxetine combination therapy in patients with ADHD or healthy volunteers were selected for review. Exclusion criteria were comorbid psychosis, bipolar disorder, epilepsy, or other psychiatric/neurologic diseases that could confound ADHD symptom assessment, or other concomitant medication(s) to treat ADHD symptoms. Results Of the 16 publications included for review, 14 reported findings from 3 prospective studies (4 publications), 7 retrospective studies, and 3 narrative reviews/medication algorithms of patients with ADHD. The other two publications reported findings from two prospective studies of healthy volunteers. The main reason for prescribing combination therapy was inadequate response to previous treatment. In the studies of patients with ADHD, if reported, 1) most patients were children/adolescents and male, and had a combined ADHD subtype; 2) methylphenidate was most often used in combination with atomoxetine for treatment augmentation or switch; 3) ADHD symptom control was improved in some, but not all, patients; and 4) there were no serious adverse events. Conclusions Published evidence of the off-label use of stimulant and atomoxetine combination therapy is limited because of the small number of publications, heterogeneous study designs (there was only one prospective, randomized controlled trial), small sample sizes, and geographic bias. Existing

  2. Can cardiovascular magnetic resonance prompt early cardiovascular/rheumatic treatment in autoimmune rheumatic diseases? Current practice and future perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavrogeni, Sophie I; Sfikakis, Petros P; Dimitroulas, Theodoros; Koutsogeorgopoulou, Loukia; Katsifis, Gikas; Markousis-Mavrogenis, George; Kolovou, Genovefa; Kitas, George D

    2018-06-01

    Life expectancy in autoimmune rheumatic diseases (ARDs) remains lower compared to the general population, due to various comoborbidities. Cardiovascular disease (CVD) represents the main contributor to premature mortality. Conventional and biologic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) have considerably improved long-term outcomes in ARDs not only by suppressing systemic inflammation but also by lowering CVD burden. Regarding atherosclerotic disease prevention, EULAR has recommended tight disease control accompanied by regular assessment of traditional CVD risk factors and lifestyle changes. However, this approach, although rational and evidence-based, does not account for important issues such as myocardial inflammation and the long asymptomatic period that usually proceeds clinical manifestations of CVD disease in ARDs before or after the diagnosis of systemic disease. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) can offer reliable, reproducible and operator independent information regarding myocardial inflammation, ischemia and fibrosis. Some studies suggest a role for CMR in the risk stratification of ARDs and demonstrate that oedema/fibrosis visualisation with CMR may have the potential to inform cardiac and rheumatic treatment modification in ARDs with or without abnormal routine cardiac evaluation. In this review, we discuss how CMR findings could influence anti-rheumatic treatment decisions targeting optimal control of both systemic and myocardial inflammation irrespective of clinical manifestations of cardiac disease. CMR can provide a different approach that is very promising for risk stratification and treatment modification; however, further studies are needed before the inclusion of CMR in the routine evaluation and treatment of patients with ARDs.

  3. A short history of anti-rheumatic therapy - VI. Rheumatoid arthritis drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Pasero

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The treatment of rheumatoid arthritis traditionally includes symptomatic drugs, showing a prompt action on pain and infl ammation, but without any infl uence on disease progression, and other drugs that could modify the disease course and occasionally induce clinical remission (DMARDs or disease modifying anti-rheumatic drugs. This review describes the historical steps that led to the use of the main DMARDs in rheumatoid arthritis, such as gold salts, sulphasalazine, chloroquine and hydroxychloroquine, D-penicillamine, and other immunoactive drugs, including methotrexate, azathioprine, cyclosporin and lefl unomide. The historical evolution of use of these drugs is then discussed, including the strategy of progressive (“therapeutic pyramid” or of more aggressive treatment, through the simultaneous use of two or more DMARDs (“combination therapy”.

  4. Depression and inflammation in rheumatic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra Buras

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available It is known that the prevalence of depression in rheumatologic patients is higher than in the general population. Socioeconomic factors are not a sufficient explanation of mood disorder in these patients. Symptoms reported by patients with chronic inflammatory diseases resemble changes defined as “sickness behavior”. Mood disorders among somatic patients could be explained by disturbances of the immune system according to the monoaminergic theory of depression. Inflammatory factors such as IL-1 (interleukin-1, IL-2 (interleukin-2, IL-6 (interleukin-6, TNF-α (tumor necrosis factor α, and IFN-γ (interferon-γ act within the CNS (central nervous system. They get through from peripheral tissues as well as being synthesized de novo by neurons. This cytokine activity correlates positively with depression intensity as well as with genetic polymorphism of the serotonin (5-HT transporter. The theory of glucocorticoid resistance-mediated depression (limbic-hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal [LHPA] axis is also connected with gained proinflammatory cytokines activity. It might assume the form of a vicious circle. Depressed mood is probably linked with depression in immune-mediated diseases. An elevated level of proinflammatory cytokines is able to activate IDO (indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase – an enzyme catabolizing tryptophan (5-HT precursor. Those reactions probably play the main role at the biochemical level. IDO metabolites extensively disturb neurotransmission. 3-Hydroxykynurenine (3OH-KYN, quinolinic acid (Quin and kynurenic acid (KYNA are neurotoxic by releasing oxidative stress mediators. Moreover, they activate MAO (monoamine oxidase, which degrades neurotransmitters responsible for stable mood. Bidirectional communication between the neuroendocrine and immune systems is significant for depression treatment, as well as CNS protection against incremental neurodegeneration among seemingly diverse diseases.

  5. Depression and inflammation in rheumatic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra Buras

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available It is known that the prevalence of depression in rheumatologic patients is higher than in the general population. Socioeconomic factors are not a sufficient explanation of mood disorder in these patients. Symptoms reported by patients with chronic inflammatory diseases resemble changes defined as “sickness behavior”. Mood disorders among somatic patients could be explained by disturbances of the immune system according to the monoaminergic theory of depression. Inflammatory factors such as IL-1 (interleukin-1, IL-2 (interleukin-2, IL-6 (interleukin-6, TNF-α (tumor necrosis factor α, and IFN-γ (interferon-γ act within the CNS (central nervous system. They get through from peripheral tissues as well as being synthesized de novo by neurons. This cytokine activity correlates positively with depression intensity as well as with genetic polymorphism of the serotonin (5-HT transporter. The theory of glucocorticoid resistance-mediated depression (limbic-hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal [LHPA] axis is also connected with gained proinflammatory cytokines activity. It might assume the form of a vicious circle. Depressed mood is probably linked with depression in immune-mediated diseases. An elevated level of proinflammatory cytokines is able to activate IDO (indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase – an enzyme catabolizing tryptophan (5-HT precursor. Those reactions probably play the main role at the biochemical level. IDO metabolites extensively disturb neurotransmission. 3-Hydroxykynurenine (3OH-KYN, quinolinic acid (Quin and kynurenic acid (KYNA are neurotoxic by releasing oxidative stress mediators. Moreover, they activate MAO (monoamine oxidase, which degrades neurotransmitters responsible for stable mood. Bidirectional communication between the neuroendocrine and immune systems is significant for depression treatment, as well as CNS protection against incremental neurodegenerationamong seemingly diverse diseases.

  6. Use of IFN-γ and IP-10 detection in the diagnosis of latent tuberculosis infection in patients with inflammatory rheumatic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villar-Hernández, Raquel; Latorre, Irene; Mínguez, Sonia; Díaz, Jéssica; García-García, Esther; Muriel-Moreno, Beatriz; Lacoma, Alicia; Prat, Cristina; Olivé, Alex; Ruhwald, Morten; Mateo, Lourdes; Domínguez, José

    2017-10-01

    Biologic agents are used against rheumatic diseases, however, they increase the risk of developing severe infections and diseases such as tuberculosis. We aimed to determine the benefits of IP-10 detection to diagnose latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) in patients with inflammatory rheumatic diseases on different immunosuppressive drug regimens, and compare these results with IFN-γ detection. We included 64 patients with inflammatory rheumatic diseases. We used QuantiFERON Gold In-Tube (QFN-G-IT) and T-SPOT.TB to detect IFN-γ production, and an in-house ELISA for IP-10 detection from the previous QFN-G-IT stimulated samples. We assessed the combined use of IFN-γ release assays (IGRAs) and IP-10 test, and analyzed the influence of immunotherapy on the tests performance. We obtained 34.9% positive results by T-SPOT.TB, 25.0% by QFN-G-IT and 31.3% by IP-10 test. The combined use of IGRAs and IP-10 detection increased significantly the amount of positive results (p  0.05). IP-10 and IFN-γ detection is comparable and their combined use could increase the number of positive results in the diagnosis of LTBI in rheumatic patients. The tested assays were not influenced by rheumatoid immunosuppressive therapy. Thus, IP-10 could be of use in the development of new and improved LTBI diagnostic tools. Copyright © 2017 The British Infection Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Impact of body weight on the achievement of minimal disease activity in patients with rheumatic diseases: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupoli, Roberta; Pizzicato, Paolo; Scalera, Antonella; Ambrosino, Pasquale; Amato, Manuela; Peluso, Rosario; Di Minno, Matteo Nicola Dario

    2016-12-13

    In this study, we evaluated the impact of obesity and/or overweight on the achievement of minimal disease activity (MDA) in patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA) and patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) receiving an anti-rheumatic treatment. Obesity can be considered a low-grade, chronic systemic inflammatory disease and some studies suggested that obese patients with rheumatic diseases exhibit a lower rate of low disease activity achievement during treatment with anti-rheumatic drugs. A systematic search was performed in major electronic databases (PubMed, Web of Science, Scopus, Embase) to identify studies reporting MDA achievement in obese and/or overweight patients with RA or PsA and in normal-weight RA or PsA control subjects. Results were expressed as Odds Ratios (ORs) with pertinent 95% Confidence Intervals (95%CIs). We included 17 studies (10 on RA and 7 on PsA) comprising a total of 6693 patients (1562 with PsA and 5131 with RA) in the analysis. The MDA achievement rate was significantly lower in obese patients than in normal-weight subjects (OR 0.447, 95% CI 0.346-0.577, p rheumatic diseases receiving treatment with traditional or biologic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs.

  8. Congenital heart disease and rheumatic heart disease in Africa: recent advances and current priorities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zühlke, Liesl; Mirabel, Mariana; Marijon, Eloi

    2013-11-01

    Africa has one of the highest prevalence of heart diseases in children and young adults, including congenital heart disease (CHD) and rheumatic heart disease (RHD). We present here an extensive review of recent data from the African continent highlighting key studies and information regarding progress in CHD and RHD since 2005. Main findings include evidence that the CHD burden is underestimated mainly due to the poor outcome of African children with CHD. The interest in primary prevention for RHD has been recently re-emphasised, and new data are available regarding echocardiographic screening for subclinical RHD and initiation of secondary prevention. There is an urgent need for comprehensive service frameworks to improve access and level of care and services for patients, educational programmes to reinforce the importance of prevention and early diagnosis and a relevant research agenda focusing on the African context.

  9. [Therapeutic effects of venlafaxine extended release for patients with depressive and anxiety disorders in the German outpatient setting - results of 2 observational studies including 8500 patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anghelescu, I-G; Dierkes, W; Volz, H-P; Loeschmann, P-A; Schmitt, A B

    2009-11-01

    The therapeutic effects of venlafaxine extended release have been investigated by two prospective observational studies including 8506 patients in the outpatient setting of office based general practitioners and specialists. The efficacy has been documented by the Clinical Global Impression (CGI) scale and by the Hamilton depression (HAMD-21) scale. The tolerability has been assessed by the documentation of adverse events. About (2/3) of the patients were treated because of depression and about (1/3) mainly because of anxiety disorder. The patients of specialists did receive higher dosages and were more severely affected. The response rate on the CGI scale was 87.4 for the patients of general practitioners and 74.2 % for the patients of specialists. The results of the HAMD-21 scale, which has been used by specialists, showed a response rate of 71.8 and a remission rate of 56.3 %. These positive effects could be demonstrated even for the more severely and chronically affected patients. The incidence of adverse events was low in both studies and comparable to the tolerability profile of randomized studies. Importantly, the good tolerability profile was similar even for patients with concomitant cardiovascular disease. In conclusion, these results confirm the efficacy and good tolerability of venlafaxine extended release in the outpatient setting in Germany. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart, New York.

  10. Temporomandibular joint dysfunction in various rheumatic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F.J. Aceves-Avila

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Temporomandibular disorder (TMD is an inclusive term in which those conditions disturbing the masticatory function are embraced. It has been estimated that 33% of the population have signs of TMD, but less than 5% of the population will require treatment. The objective of this study was to measure the frequency of TMD in rheumatoid arthritis (RA, osteoarthrosis (OA, ankylosing spondylitis (AS and systemic lupus erythematosus, and to define the limitations in everyday’s life that patients perceive when present. A six-month survey of consecutive outpatients in a rheumatology clinic in a teaching hospital in Mexico was carried out. We defined TMD as: 1 the presence of pain; 2 difficulty on mouth opening, chewing or speaking; 3 the presence of non-harmonic movements of the temporomaxilar joints. All three characteristics had to be present. Z test was used to define differences between proportions. We present the results of 171 patients. Overall, 50 patients had TMD according to our operational definition (29.24%. Up to 76% of the sample had symptoms associated with the condition. TMD is more frequent in OA and in AS (29.24% vs 38% OA, P=0.009; 39% AS; P=0.005. We found no association between the severity of TMD and the request for specific attention for the discomfort produced by the condition. Only 8 of 50 (16% patients with TMD had requested medical help for their symptoms, and they were not the most severe cases. TMD is more frequent in RA and OA. Although it may produce severe impairment, patients seem to adapt easily.

  11. Rheumatic conditions in the northern part of Central Java : an epidemiological survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Darmawan

    1988-01-01

    textabstractThis thesis deals with a population study on rheumatic diseases in the subdistrict Bandungan, Central Java, Indonesia. It is part of a series of epidemiological surveys executed according to the World Health Organisation - International League Against Rheumatism (WHO-ILAR) initiative

  12. The prevalence of H-pylori is still substantial in rheumatic patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Leest, HTJI; Steen, KSS; Lems, WF; van der Laar, MAFJ; Dijkmans, BAC

    2002-01-01

    The separate contribution of NSAIDs and H. pylori in the pathogenesis of peptic ulcer disease has not been fully elucidated. The aim of this study was to investigate the seroprevalence of H. pylori in patients with rheumatic diseases and chronic NSAID treatment. Patients with a rheumatic disease,

  13. Follow-up of patients with rheumatic heart diseases in the outpatient setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B S Belov

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The major tasks of a follow-up of patients with rheumatic cardiac defects (RCD are formulated on the basis of the recommendations of international and national scientific associations. At the same time, a clinicianXs experience and judgments play an important role in supervising patients with chronic rheumatic heart disease and RCD.

  14. Assessement of rheumatic diseases with computational radiology: Current status and future potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peloschek, Philipp; Boesen, Mikael; Donner, Rene; Kubassova, Olga; Birngruber, Erich; Patsch, Janina; Mayerhoefer, Marius; Langs, Georg

    2009-01-01

    In recent years, several computational image analysis methods to assess disease progression in rheumatic diseases were presented. This review article explains the basics of these methods as well as their potential application in rheumatic disease monitoring, it covers radiography, sonography as well as magnetic resonance imaging in quantitative analysis frameworks.

  15. The prevalence of severe fatigue in rheumatic diseases: an international study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overman, Cécile L; Kool, Marianne B; Da Silva, José A P; Geenen, Rinie

    2016-02-01

    Fatigue is a common, disabling, and difficult-to-manage problem in rheumatic diseases. Prevalence estimates of fatigue within rheumatic diseases vary considerably. Data on the prevalence of severe fatigue across multiple rheumatic diseases using a similar instrument is missing. Our aim was to provide an overview of the prevalence of severe fatigue across a broad range of rheumatic diseases and to examine its association with clinical and demographic variables. Online questionnaires were filled out by an international sample of 6120 patients (88 % female, mean age 47) encompassing 30 different rheumatic diseases. Fatigue was measured with the RAND(SF)-36 Vitality scale. A score of ≤35 was taken as representing severe fatigue (90 % sensitivity and 81 % specificity for chronic fatigue syndrome). Severe fatigue was present in 41 to 57 % of patients with a single inflammatory rheumatic disease such as rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, ankylosing spondylitis, Sjögren's syndrome, psoriatic arthritis, and scleroderma. Severe fatigue was least prevalent in patients with osteoarthritis (35 %) and most prevalent in patients with fibromyalgia (82 %). In logistic regression analysis, severe fatigue was associated with having fibromyalgia, having multiple rheumatic diseases without fibromyalgia, younger age, lower education, and language (French: highest prevalence; Dutch: lowest prevalence). In conclusion, one out of every two patients with a rheumatic disease is severely fatigued. As severe fatigue is detrimental to the patient, the near environment, and society at large, unraveling the underlying mechanisms of fatigue and developing optimal treatment should be top priorities in rheumatologic research and practice.

  16. High prevalence of rheumatic heart disease detected by echocardiography in school children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhaya, Maneesha; Panwar, Sadik; Beniwal, Rajesh; Panwar, Raja Babu

    2010-04-01

    It is fairly easy to detect advanced valve lesions of established rheumatic heart disease by echocardiography in the clinically identified cases of rheumatic heart disease. However, to diagnose a subclinical case of rheumatic heart disease, no uniform set of echocardiographic criteria exist. Moderate thickening of valve leaflets is considered an indicator of established rheumatic heart disease. World Health Organization criteria for diagnosing probable rheumatic heart disease are more sensitive and are based on the detection of significant regurgitation of mitral and/or aortic valves by color Doppler. We attempted diagnosing RHD in school children in Bikaner city by cardiac ultrasound. The stratified cluster sampling technique was employed to identify 31 random clusters in the coeducational schools of Bikaner city. We selected 1059 school children aged 6-15 years from these schools. An experienced operator did careful cardiac auscultation and echocardiographic study. A second expert confirmed the echocardiographic findings. The prevalence of lesions suggestive of rheumatic heart disease by echocardiography was 51 per 1,000 (denominator = 1059; 95% CI: 38-64 per 1,000). We were able to clinically diagnose RHD in one child. None of these children or their parents having echocardiographic evidence of RHD could provide a positive history of acute rheumatic fever. By echocardiographic screening, we found a high prevalence of rheumatic heart disease in the surveyed population. Clinical auscultation had much lower diagnostic efficacy.

  17. Ocorrência de doenças autoimunes tireoidianas em pacientes com doenças reumáticas Autoimmune thyroid disease in patients with rheumatic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa Cristina Martins Vicente Robazzi

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Anormalidades na função tireoidiana e presença de autoanticorpos da tireoide têm sido frequentemente descritas em pacientes com doenças reumatológicas autoimunes, como síndrome de Sjögren, artrite reumatoide, lúpus eritematoso sistêmico e esclerodermia. São limitados os dados sobre prevalência e características clínicas de tireoidite autoimune em outras doenças reumatológicas, tais como febre reumática e lúpus eritematoso sistêmico juvenil. Os autores revisaram as associações de doenças autoimunes endócrinas e reumáticas, avaliando as diversas faixas etárias e condições clínicas. O levantamento bibliográfico foi realizado por meio de busca por artigos científicos indexados em bancos de dados de ciências da saúde em geral, como Literatura Latino-Americana e do Caribe em Ciências da Saúde (LILACS, Medline/PubMed e Scientific Eletronic Library Online (SciELO. Utilizaram-se os seguintes descritores: "rheumatic autoimmune diseases and autoimmune thyroid diseases", "thyroid disorders and rheumatic diseases", "thyroiditis and rheumatic diseases", "autoimmune diseases and thyroid", e "pediatric rheumatic diseases and autoimmune thyroid diseases". Este estudo mostrou que, apesar de resultados contraditórios na literatura, há maior prevalência da associação entre doenças autoimunes da tireoide e doenças reumáticas, destacando-se a possibilidade de mecanismos patogênicos comuns entre as doenças.Thyroid function abnormalities and thyroid autoantibodies have been frequently described in patients with rheumatologic autoimmune diseases, such as Sjögren's syndrome, rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus and scleroderma. Limited data are available regarding the prevalence and clinical characteristics of autoimmune thyroiditis in other rheumatologic disorders, such as rheumatic fever and juvenile systemic lupus erythematosus. The authors review the association of endocrine autoimmune and rheumatic

  18. Surveillance of systemic autoimmune rheumatic diseases using administrative data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernatsky, S; Lix, L; Hanly, J G; Hudson, M; Badley, E; Peschken, C; Pineau, C A; Clarke, A E; Fortin, P R; Smith, M; Bélisle, P; Lagace, C; Bergeron, L; Joseph, L

    2011-04-01

    There is growing interest in developing tools and methods for the surveillance of chronic rheumatic diseases, using existing resources such as administrative health databases. To illustrate how this might work, we used population-based administrative data to estimate and compare the prevalence of systemic autoimmune rheumatic diseases (SARDs) across three Canadian provinces, assessing for regional differences and the effects of demographic factors. Cases of SARDs (systemic lupus erythematosus, scleroderma, primary Sjogren's, polymyositis/dermatomyositis) were ascertained from provincial physician billing and hospitalization data. We combined information from three case definitions, using hierarchical Bayesian latent class regression models that account for the imperfect nature of each case definition. Using methods that account for the imperfect nature of both billing and hospitalization databases, we estimated the over-all prevalence of SARDs to be approximately 2-3 cases per 1,000 residents. Stratified prevalence estimates suggested similar demographic trends across provinces (i.e. greater prevalence in females-versus-males, and in persons of older age). The prevalence in older females approached or exceeded 1 in 100, which may reflect the high burden of primary Sjogren's syndrome in this group. Adjusting for demographics, there was a greater prevalence in urban-versus-rural settings. In our work, prevalence estimates had good face validity and provided useful information about potential regional and demographic variations. Our results suggest that surveillance of some rheumatic diseases using administrative data may indeed be feasible. Our work highlights the usefulness of using multiple data sources, adjusting for the error in each.

  19. Technetium-99m pyrophosphate myocardial scintigraphy in the diagnosis of acute rheumatic carditis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malhotra, A.; Radhakrishnan, S.; Reddy, K.S.; Gopinath, P.G.; Bhatia, M.L.

    1989-01-01

    Rheumatic fever (RF) and rheumatic heart disease (RHD) are major health problems in India. The most difficult decision to make in such a setting is whether a patient of acute rheumatic fever has acute rheumatic carditis or not. Physical signs such as a new cardiac murmur, cardiac enlargement, congestive cardiac failure although quoted as pointers to carditis are non-specific specially if the attack is superimposed on pre-existing RHD. Any investigation which will provide an answer to this problem would be very welcome. sup(99m)Tc pyrophosphate (Tc PYP) is a very sensitive indicator of myocardial necrosis in acute myocardial infarction. A study to determine the usefulness of this technique in diagnosis of rheumatic carditis in patients with unequivocal clinical evidence of myocarditis was undertaken. Results are reported. (author). 14 refs

  20. Case Report: Giant Right Atrium in Rheumatic Mitral Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deniz Demir

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Dilation and hypertrophy of the atria occur in patients with valvular heart disease especially in mitral regurgitation, mitral stenosis or tricuspid abnormalities. Dilatation of the atriums which occurs slowly in time, becomes evident with ritim disturbances and embolic events. We report a case of an unusual giant right atrium in context of rheumatic mitral stenosis, mitral regurgitation, pulmonar hypertansion and severe tricuspid regurgitation in a 40-year-old man who underwent succesfull operations as mitral valve replacement, Maze-IV radiofrequency ablation, right atrium atrioplasty and De Vega anuloplasty. [J Contemp Med 2014; 4(2.000: 98-102

  1. Fatigue and functioning in rheumatic diseases: a biopsychological perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Overman, C.L.

    2015-01-01

    Rheumatic diseases are characterized by inflammation, damage and pain, mostly of the joints and connective tissues. They can have a profound negative impact on almost every aspect of a patient’s life as well as on the direct environment and society as a whole. Patients are hampered in their daily activities by pain, physical disability,and fatigue,and also psychological distress is more prevalent than in the general population. A patient’s health is determined by a complex interplay between p...

  2. Introduction of the radio synoviorthesis in Cuba for the treatment of the rheumatic and haemophilic arthropathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia Rodriguez, Enrique; Sagarra Veranes, Marta; Fundora Sarraff, Teresa A

    2006-01-01

    It is offered a modernized revision of the topic that includes a brief historical review, the general and specific indications of the Radiosynoviorthesis in the rheumatic and haemophilic arthropathy, their advantages and disadvantages, secondary reactions and contraindications. The complementary studies are analyzed to carry out previous to the treatment and later to the same one. They are also exposed the characteristics of the procedure, the main used radionuclides, as well as the general handling of the patients before and after their realization. The advantages of the introduction of this treatment method in our country are exposed as well as the statistics of their use during 5 years in the Hospital Carl Gustav Carus, of the Technical University of Dresden, Germany. It is also carried out a presentation of the new Service of Nuclear Medicine of the Educational General Hospital Enrique Goatherd (Author)

  3. Prevention and control of rheumatic heart disease: Overcoming core challenges in resource-poor environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dougherty, Scott; Beaton, Andrea; Nascimento, Bruno R; Zühlke, Liesl J; Khorsandi, Maziar; Wilson, Nigel

    2018-01-01

    Rheumatic heart disease (RHD) has long receded as a significant threat to public health in high-income countries. In low-resource settings, however, the specter of RHD remains unabated, as exemplified by recent data from the Global Burden of Diseases Study. There are many complex reasons for this ongoing global disparity, including inadequate data on disease burden, challenges in effective advocacy, ongoing poverty and inequality, and weak health systems, most of which predominantly affect developing nations. In this review, we discuss how each of these acts as a core challenge in RHD prevention and control. We then examine key lessons learnt from successful control programs in the past and highlight resources that have been developed to help create strong national RHD control programs. PMID:29440834

  4. Conventional X-ray examination and computed tomography in inflammatory rheumatic diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lingg, G.

    1996-01-01

    Plain-film radiography is an important and basic element in the assessment of inflammatory rheumatic diseases. Its various uses include assessment of inflammatory osseous destruction and the activity of inflammatory changes. Furthermore, the inflammatory collateral phenomena can indicate an acute clinical phase, and the articular soft tissue swelling and tenosynovitis are shown directly and indirectly very clearly. On the other hand, high-resolution computed tomography is very capable of showing cortical structures of bone complementary to MR. In some special clinical questions and anatomical regions, especially the axial skeleton, it delivers information of high specifity, partly for definitive diagnosis and partly for planning surgical procedures. The assessment of changes in the sacroiliac joints, sternoclavicular joints and craniocervical junction are domains of computed tomography. (orig.) [de

  5. Rheumatic Disease: Protease-Activated Receptor-2 in Synovial Joint Pathobiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kendal McCulloch

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Protease-activated receptor-2 (PAR2 is one member of a small family of transmembrane, G-protein-coupled receptors. These receptors are activated via cleavage of their N terminus by serine proteases (e.g., tryptase, unveiling an N terminus tethered ligand which binds to the second extracellular loop of the receptor. Increasing evidence has emerged identifying key pathophysiological roles for PAR2 in both rheumatoid arthritis (RA and osteoarthritis (OA. Importantly, this includes both pro-inflammatory and destructive roles. For example, in murine models of RA, the associated synovitis, cartilage degradation, and subsequent bone erosion are all significantly reduced in the absence of PAR2. Similarly, in experimental models of OA, PAR2 disruption confers protection against cartilage degradation, subchondral bone osteosclerosis, and osteophyte formation. This review focuses on the role of PAR2 in rheumatic disease and its potential as an important therapeutic target for treating pain and joint degradation.

  6. [Anti-rheumatic therapy in patients with rheumatoid arthritis undergoing hemodialysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akiyama, Yuji

    2011-01-01

    Hemodialysis (HD) patients have been increasing recently. Some rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients need hemodialysis (HD), though the proportion is not high. At present, such patients are almost treated with corticosteroids and/or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs alone, even if they have a high disease activity that would require disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drug (DMARD) therapy, partly because the safety of DMARDs in RA patients with end-stage renal disease has not been confirmed. Their joint destruction would be inevitable and lead to impaired activities of daily living. As there are no guidelines for the use of DMARDs in HD patients, here I reviewed the previous reports about the treatment of DMARDs including biologics for patients with RA undergoing HD.

  7. The incidence of acute rheumatic fever and chronic rheumatic heart disease in the Russian population (2011–2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rimma Mikhailovna Balabanova

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The problems of acute rheumatic fever (ARF and chronic rheumatic heart disease (CRHD are discussed. Carditis, polyarthritis, erythema annulare, subcutaneous nodules, and chorea minor are the main clinical manifestations of ARF caused by β-hemolytic streptococcus A. Cardiac failures emerge in 60–65% of patients after the first ARF episode. Repeated ARF attacks promote CRHD. The aim of the study is to evaluate the prevalence of rheumatic heart disease in different age groups in the regions of Russian Federation in 2011–2012. Materials and Methods. Analysis of the Ministry of Healthcare of the Russian Federation reports on population morbidity in 2011–2012 (Form N12.Results. The highest ARF prevalence was observed in 15–17-year-old teenagers, while the lowest, in adults over 18-year-old. The lowest CRHD figures were registered in juniors, while the highest ones, in adults. No ARF cases in 0–14-year-old children were registered in 31 entities of the Russian Federation; single cases, in 17 entities; no ARF cases in 15–17-year-old teenagers was registered in 37 entities, and 1–2 ARF cases were registered in 23 entities. Only in 10 entities, no ARF cases were registered in adults, and single cases were registered in 22 entities. Extremely unfavorable situations were found in the Chechen Republic (140 ARF cases in 0–14-year-old children and in the Dagestan Republic (140 cases. High morbidity among 15–17-year-old teenagers was registered in tje Kaliningrad region (83 cases and the Chechen Republic (100. ARF cases in adults were most frequent in St. Petersburg (124 cases, the Chechen Republic (154, and the Moscow region (161.The article lists the ARF and CRHD preventive measures.

  8. The incidence of acute rheumatic fever and chronic rheumatic heart disease in the Russian population (2011–2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rimma Mikhailovna Balabanova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The problems of acute rheumatic fever (ARF and chronic rheumatic heart disease (CRHD are discussed. Carditis, polyarthritis, erythema annulare, subcutaneous nodules, and chorea minor are the main clinical manifestations of ARF caused by β-hemolytic streptococcus A. Cardiac failures emerge in 60–65% of patients after the first ARF episode. Repeated ARF attacks promote CRHD. The aim of the study is to evaluate the prevalence of rheumatic heart disease in different age groups in the regions of Russian Federation in 2011–2012. Materials and Methods. Analysis of the Ministry of Healthcare of the Russian Federation reports on population morbidity in 2011–2012 (Form N12.Results. The highest ARF prevalence was observed in 15–17-year-old teenagers, while the lowest, in adults over 18-year-old. The lowest CRHD figures were registered in juniors, while the highest ones, in adults. No ARF cases in 0–14-year-old children were registered in 31 entities of the Russian Federation; single cases, in 17 entities; no ARF cases in 15–17-year-old teenagers was registered in 37 entities, and 1–2 ARF cases were registered in 23 entities. Only in 10 entities, no ARF cases were registered in adults, and single cases were registered in 22 entities. Extremely unfavorable situations were found in the Chechen Republic (140 ARF cases in 0–14-year-old children and in the Dagestan Republic (140 cases. High morbidity among 15–17-year-old teenagers was registered in tje Kaliningrad region (83 cases and the Chechen Republic (100. ARF cases in adults were most frequent in St. Petersburg (124 cases, the Chechen Republic (154, and the Moscow region (161.The article lists the ARF and CRHD preventive measures.

  9. Fibromyalgia in patients with other rheumatic diseases: prevalence and relationship with disease activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haliloglu, Sema; Carlioglu, Ayse; Akdeniz, Derya; Karaaslan, Yasar; Kosar, Ali

    2014-09-01

    Fibromyalgia (FM) is a syndrome characterized by chronic widespread pain and the presence of specific tender points. The prevalence of FM has been estimated at 2-7 % of the general global population. The presence of FM in several rheumatic diseases with a structural pathology has been reported as 11-30 %. The objectives of this study were to determine the prevalence of FM and to evaluate the possible relationship between FM existence and disease activity among rheumatic diseases. The study group included 835 patients--197 rheumatoid arthritis (RA), 67 systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), 119 ankylosing spondylitis (AS), 238 osteoarthritis (OA), 14 familial Mediterranean fever (FMF), 53 Behçet's disease (BD), 71 gout, 25 Sjögren's syndrome (SS), 20 vasculitis, 29 polymyalgia rheumatica (PMR), and two polymyositis (PM)--with or without FM. Recorded information included age, gender, laboratory parameters, presence of fatigue, and disease activity indexes. The prevalence of FM in patients with rheumatologic diseases was found to be 6.6 % for RA, 13.4 % for SLE, 12.6 % for AS, 10.1 % for OA, 5.7 % for BD, 7.1 % for FMF, 12 % for SS, 25 % for vasculitis, 1.4 % for gout, and 6.9 % for PMR. One out of two patients with PM was diagnosed with FM. Some rheumatologic cases (AS, OA) with FM were observed mostly in female patients (p = 0.000). Also, there were significant correlations between disease activity indexes and Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire scores for most rheumatologic patients (RA, AS, OA, and BD) (p diseases, and its recognition is important for the optimal management of these diseases. Increased pain, physical limitations, and fatigue may be interpreted as increased activity of these diseases, and a common treatment option is the prescription of higher doses of biologic agents or corticosteroids. Considerations of the FM component in the management of rheumatologic diseases increase the likelihood of the success of the treatment.

  10. Nailfold capillaroscopy in children and adolescents with rheumatic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piotto, Daniela Gerent Petry; Len, Cláudio Arnaldo; Hilário, Maria Odete Esteves; Terreri, Maria Teresa Ramos Ascensão

    2012-10-01

    To assess nailfold capillaroscopy in children and adolescents with autoimmune rheumatic diseases (juvenile idiopathic arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, juvenile dermatomyositis, scleroderma and mixed connective tissue disease) and relate it to clinical and laboratory findings and disease activity. Cross-sectional study assessing 147 patients by use of nailfold capillaroscopy as follows: 60 with juvenile idiopathic arthritis; 30 with systemic lupus erythematosus; 30 with juvenile dermatomyositis; 20 with localized scleroderma; four with systemic sclerosis; and three with mixed connective tissue disease. Clinical and laboratory tests and nailfold capillaroscopy were performed in all patients. The nailfold capillaroscopy was performed with an optical microscope (at 10- and 16-time magnifications) by the same observer. Most patients (76.2%) had normal nailfold capillaroscopy. The major changes in nailfold capillaroscopy, characterizing the scleroderma pattern, were observed in patients with juvenile dermatomyositis, systemic scleroderma and mixed connective tissue disease. There was no association between nailfold capillaroscopy and disease activity in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus and localized scleroderma. Disease activity and capillaroscopy were associated in patients with juvenile dermatomyositis. Nailfold capillaroscopy is a useful method to diagnose autoimmune rheumatic diseases and monitor disease activity.

  11. Echocardiographic Screening of Rheumatic Heart Disease in American Samoa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jennifer H; Favazza, Michael; Legg, Arthur; Holmes, Kathryn W; Armsby, Laurie; Eliapo-Unutoa, Ipuniuesea; Pilgrim, Thomas; Madriago, Erin J

    2018-01-01

    While rheumatic heart disease (RHD) is a treatable disease nearly eradicated in the United States, it remains the most common form of acquired heart disease in the developing world. This study used echocardiographic screening to determine the prevalence of RHD in children in American Samoa. Screening took place at a subset of local schools. Private schools were recruited and public schools underwent cluster randomization based on population density. We collected survey information and performed a limited physical examination and echocardiogram using the World Heart Federation protocol for consented school children aged 5-18 years old. Of 2200 students from two private high schools and two public primary schools, 1058 subjects consented and were screened. Overall, 133 (12.9%) children were identified as having either definite (3.5%) or borderline (9.4%) RHD. Of the patients with definitive RHD, 28 subjects had abnormal mitral valves with pathologic regurgitation, three mitral stenosis, three abnormal aortic valves with pathologic regurgitation, and seven borderline mitral and aortic valve disease. Of the subjects with borderline disease, 77 had pathologic mitral regurgitation, 12 pathologic aortic regurgitation, and 7 at least two features of mitral valve disease without pathologic regurgitation or stenosis. Rheumatic heart disease remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. The prevalence of RHD in American Samoa (12.9%) is to date the highest reported in the world literature. Echocardiographic screening of school children is feasible, while reliance on murmur and Jones criteria is not helpful in identifying children with RHD.

  12. Rheumatic heart disease screening: Current concepts and challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dougherty, Scott; Khorsandi, Maziar; Herbst, Philip

    2017-01-01

    Rheumatic heart disease (RHD) is a disease of poverty, is almost entirely preventable, and is the most common cardiovascular disease worldwide in those under 25 years. RHD is caused by acute rheumatic fever (ARF) which typically results in cumulative valvular lesions that may present clinically after a number of years of subclinical disease. Therapeutic interventions, therefore, typically focus on preventing subsequent ARF episodes (with penicillin prophylaxis). However, not all patients with ARF develop symptoms and not all symptomatic cases present to a physician or are correctly diagnosed. Therefore, if we hope to control ARF and RHD at the population level, we need a more reliable discriminator of subclinical disease. Recent studies have examined the utility of echocardiographic screening, which is far superior to auscultation at detecting RHD. However, there are many concerns surrounding this approach. Despite the introduction of the World Heart Federation diagnostic criteria in 2012, we still do not really know what constitutes the most subtle changes of RHD by echocardiography. This poses serious problems regarding whom to treat and what to do with the rest, both important decisions with widespread implications for already stretched health-care systems. In addition, issues ranging from improving the uptake of penicillin prophylaxis in ARF/RHD-positive patients, improving portable echocardiographic equipment, understanding the natural history of subclinical RHD and how it might respond to penicillin, and developing simplified diagnostic criteria that can be applied by nonexperts, all need to be effectively tackled before routine widespread screening for RHD can be endorsed. PMID:28163427

  13. Rheumatic Heart Disease in the Twenty-First Century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woldu, Bethel; Bloomfield, Gerald S

    2016-10-01

    Rheumatic heart disease (RHD) is a chronic valvular disease resulting after severe or repetitive episodes of acute rheumatic fever (ARF), an autoimmune response to group A Streptococcus infection. RHD has been almost eliminated with improved social and health infrastructure in affluent countries while it remains a neglected disease with major cause of morbidity and mortality in many low- and middle-income countries, and resource-limited regions of high-income countries. Despite our evolving understanding of the pathogenesis of RHD, there have not been any significant advances to prevent or halt progression of disease in recent history. Long-term penicillin-based treatment and surgery remain the backbone of a RHD control program in the absence of an effective vaccine. The advent of echocardiographic screening algorithms has improved the accuracy of diagnosing RHD and has shed light on the enormous burden of disease. Encouragingly, this has led to a rekindled commitment from researchers in the most affected countries to advocate and take bold actions to end this disease of social inequality.

  14. Serum amyloid A protein in amyloidosis, rheumatic, and neoplastic diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benson, M.D.; Cohen, A.S.

    1979-01-01

    Serum levels of amyloid protein A (SAA) have been shown to be elevated in different types of amyloidosis and in rheumatic diseases by radioimmunoassay using 125 iodine labeled AA and anti-AA. SAA levels were elevated in both primary and secondary amyloidosis, but there were highly significant differences between these levels. In heredofamilial amyloid, SAA levels were within normal limits. While the mean SAA level was elevated in persons over 70 years, the fact that some persons in this age group had normal levels suggested that marked elevation after age 70 may be due to occult inflammatory or neoplastic disease. High SAA levels in patients with rheumatoid arthritis correlated, in most cases, with physician evaluation of disease activity and Westergren ESR. SAA levels in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus were lower than those in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, and most patients with degenerative joint disease had normal levels. Very high levels of SAA were found in patients with neoplastic diseases. Patients with carcinoma of the lung and bowel had much higher levels than patients with carcinoma of the breast. Determination of SAA levels may be of value in evaluating different forms of systemic amyloidosis, assessing the activity of rheumatic disease, and screening for occult inflammatory or neoplastic disease

  15. Improvement in rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease management and prevention using a health centre-based continuous quality improvement approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ralph, Anna P; Fittock, Marea; Schultz, Rosalie; Thompson, Dale; Dowden, Michelle; Clemens, Tom; Parnaby, Matthew G; Clark, Michele; McDonald, Malcolm I; Edwards, Keith N; Carapetis, Jonathan R; Bailie, Ross S

    2013-12-18

    Rheumatic heart disease (RHD) remains a major health concern for Aboriginal Australians. A key component of RHD control is prevention of recurrent acute rheumatic fever (ARF) using long-term secondary prophylaxis with intramuscular benzathine penicillin (BPG). This is the most important and cost-effective step in RHD control. However, there are significant challenges to effective implementation of secondary prophylaxis programs. This project aimed to increase understanding and improve quality of RHD care through development and implementation of a continuous quality improvement (CQI) strategy. We used a CQI strategy to promote implementation of national best-practice ARF/RHD management guidelines at primary health care level in Indigenous communities of the Northern Territory (NT), Australia, 2008-2010. Participatory action research methods were employed to identify system barriers to delivery of high quality care. This entailed facilitated discussion with primary care staff aided by a system assessment tool (SAT). Participants were encouraged to develop and implement strategies to overcome identified barriers, including better record-keeping, triage systems and strategies for patient follow-up. To assess performance, clinical records were audited at baseline, then annually for two years. Key performance indicators included proportion of people receiving adequate secondary prophylaxis (≥80% of scheduled 4-weekly penicillin injections) and quality of documentation. Six health centres participated, servicing approximately 154 people with ARF/RHD. Improvements occurred in indicators of service delivery including proportion of people receiving ≥40% of their scheduled BPG (increasing from 81/116 [70%] at baseline to 84/103 [82%] in year three, p = 0.04), proportion of people reviewed by a doctor within the past two years (112/154 [73%] and 134/156 [86%], p = 0.003), and proportion of people who received influenza vaccination (57/154 [37%] to 86/156 [55%], p

  16. Systemic and localized infection by Candida species in patients with rheumatic diseases receiving anti-TNF therapy

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    Nadia E. Aikawa

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: To evaluate the prevalence of systemic and localized infection by Candida species and its possible association with demographic, clinical and laboratory manifestations and therapy in patients with rheumatic diseases taking TNF blockers. Methods: Consecutive patients with rheumatic diseases receiving anti-TNF agents were included. The following risk factors up to four weeks prior to the study were analyzed: use of antibiotics, immunosuppressant drugs, hospitalization and invasive procedures. All subjects were evaluated for clinical complaints; specific blood cultures were obtained for fungi and blood samples were collected for Candida spp. detection by polymerase chain reaction. Results: 194 patients [67 with rheumatoid arthritis (RA, 47 with ankylosing spondylitis (AS, 36 with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA, 28 with psoriatic arthritis and 16 with other conditions] were included. The average age of patients was 42 ± 16 years, with 68 (35% male and mean disease duration of 15 ± 10 years. Sixty-four (33% patients were receiving adalimumab, 59 (30% etanercept and 71 (36% infliximab. Eighty-one percent of patients were concomitantly taking immunosuppressant drugs. At the time of the study, only one (0.5% patient had localized fungal infection (vaginal candidiasis. None of the patients included had systemic candidiasis with positive blood cultures for fungi or PCR positive for Candida spp. in peripheral blood sample. Conclusions: This was the first study to assess the prevalence of invasive and localized fungal disease by Candida in a significant number of patients with rheumatic diseases on anti-TNF therapy, and demonstrated low risk of candidiasis, despite the high prevalence of immunosuppressive drug use.

  17. Therapy of rheumatic polymyalgia: the pathophysiologic management

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    M.A. Cimino

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Polymyalgia rheumatica (PMR is an inflammatory syndrome affecting older people whose prevalence has increased in recent years. The suppression of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis (HPA and ageing may contribute to the pathogenesis of PMR. Chronic stress (i.e. interpersonal, chronic infections etc. in elderly people may represent a risk factor for the development of PMR. In fact, elderly represent per se a condition of endocrine senescence including adrenal hypofunction, in addition chronic stress represents a further harmful stimulus to seriously compromise endogenous glucocorticoid production. Synovitis and vasculitis characterize the majority of the patients. Serum cytokine and steroidal hormone patterns suggest that patients with PMR have an intensive inflammatory reaction. As a matter of fact, glucocorticoids represent the most useful temporary “replacement” treatment during the active phase of PMR. The use of modified-release glucocorticoids that might induce higher levels during the night (circadian rhythms as in physiological conditions, will represent another important approach to optimize PMR treatment and reduce the side effects. Combination therapy between glucocorticoids and inhibitors of pro-inflammatory cytokines should be tested in large studies and early cases of PMR.

  18. THE INCIDENCE AND PREVALENCE OF RHEUMATIC DISEASES IN RUSSIA IN 2012–2013

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    R. M. Balabanova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of major rheumatic diseases was analyzed inRussia's adult population  in 2012–2013 on the basis of the statistical reports of the Ministry of Health ofRussia(Form No. 12.Among the adult population  ofRussia, the overall incidence of acute rheumatic fever (ARF decreased by 11.6% (from 1666 to 1474 cases. No case of ARF was registered in 11 of the 83 subjects of the Federation in 2013. The inci- dence rates per 100,000 adult population  compared toRussia's ones were higher in theRepublicofIngushetia(21.0%, theChechen Republic(13.2%, and the Chukotka Autonomous District (26.2%. All cases of ARF were first notified. The overall incidence rates of chronic rheumatic heart diseases amongRussia's adult population  tend to reduce slightly [by 5.3% (from 182,286 to 172,687 cases].In the period in question, the total number of patients with musculoskeletal diseases (MSD  slightly rose. The bulk of rheumatic  patients from the MSD group are more than 4 million patients with osteoarthritis  (OA, half of them (2,454,563 being those who are older than able-bodied  age. The incidence of OA tends to increase in all Federal Districts (FD.  The most common  joint inflammatory diseases are rheumatoid  arthritis (RA (286,000 cases, spondylopathies  (90,000 cases, and osteoporosis (152,000 cases. The incidence rates of MSD per 100,000 adult population  are higher in the North-Western (19,397.7, Volga (16,552.6, and Siberian (16,133.4 FD thanRussia's mean rate (14,205.5. There were somewhat higher incidence rates of RA per 100,000 population  in 2013 than in 2012 (241.4 and 245.6, respectively. The rates in the North-Western, Ural, Far Eastern, and Volga FDs are higher than the mean Russian ones.In 2011, the rubric of «Ankylosing spondylitis» (AS was replaced by that of «Spondylopathies» that, besides AS (ICD-10 M45, encompasses other inflammatory spondylopathies  (M46, including infectious one, which does not allow single out the

  19. P-glycoprotein in autoimmune rheumatic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Carrasco, M; Mendoza-Pinto, C; Macias Díaz, S; Vera-Recabarren, M; Vázquez de Lara, L; Méndez Martínez, S; Soto-Santillán, P; González-Ramírez, R; Ruiz-Arguelles, A

    2015-07-01

    P-glycoprotein (Pgp) is a transmembrane protein of 170 kD encoded by the multidrug resistance 1 (MDR-1) gene, localized on chromosome 7. More than 50 polymorphisms of the MDR-1 gene have been described; a subset of these has been shown to play a pathophysiological role in the development of inflammatory bowel disease, femoral head osteonecrosis induced by steroids, lung cancer and renal epithelial tumors. Polymorphisms that have a protective effect on the development of conditions such as Parkinson disease have also been identified. P-glycoprotein belongs to the adenosine triphosphate binding cassette transporter superfamily and its structure comprises a chain of approximately 1280 aminoacid residues with an N-C terminal structure, arranged as 2 homologous halves, each of which has 6 transmembrane segments, with a total of 12 segments with 2 cytoplasmic nucleotide binding domains. Many cytokines like interleukin 2 and tumor necrosis factor alpha increase Pgp expression and activity. Pgp functions as an efflux pump for a variety of toxins in order to protect particular organs and tissues as the central nervous system. Pgp transports a variety of substrates including glucocorticoids while other drugs such as tacrolimus and cyclosporine A act as modulators of this protein. The most widely used method to measure Pgp activity is flow cytometry using naturally fluorescent substrates such as anthracyclines or rhodamine 123. The study of drug resistance and its association to Pgp began with the study of resistance to chemotherapy in the treatment of cancer and antiretroviral therapy for human immunodeficiency virus; however, the role of Pgp in the treatment of systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis and psoriatic arthritis has been a focus of study lately and has emerged as an important mechanism by which treatment failure occurs. The present review analyzes the role of Pgp in these autoimmune diseases. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Resveratrol, Potential Therapeutic Interest in Joint Disorders: A Critical Narrative Review

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    Christelle Nguyen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Trans-resveratrol (t-Res is a natural compound of a family of hydroxystilbenes found in a variety of spermatophyte plants. Because of its effects on lipids and arachidonic acid metabolisms, and its antioxidant activity, t-Res is considered as the major cardioprotective component of red wine, leading to the “French Paradox” health concept. In the past decade, research on the effects of resveratrol on human health has developed considerably in diverse fields such as cancer, neurodegenerative and cardiovascular diseases, and metabolic disorders. In the field of rheumatic disorders, in vitro evidence suggest anti-inflammatory, anti-catabolic, anti-apoptotic and anti-oxidative properties of t-Res in various articular cell types, including chondrocytes and synoviocytes, along with immunomodulation properties on T and B lymphocytes. In preclinical models of osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis, resveratrol has shown joint protective effects, mainly mediated by decreased production of pro-inflammatory and pro-degradative soluble factors, and modulation of cellular and humoral responses. Herein, we comprehensively reviewed evidence supporting a potential therapeutic interest of t-Res in treating symptoms related to rheumatic disorders.

  1. Association of Tricuspid Regurgitation and Severity of Mitral Stenosis in Patients with Rheumatic Heart Disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, R.; Kazmi, N.; Naz, F.; Malik, S.; Gillani, S.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Rheumatic heart disease is a common ailment in Pakistan and Mitral stenosis is its flag bearer Severity of mitral stenosis is the key factor in deciding for mitral valve surgery. Methods: This case series study was conducted at Ayub Teaching Hospital .Cases of Rheumatic heart disease with mitral stenosis were diagnosed clinically. 2D echocardiography was used to find severity of mitral stenosis. Data was entered into SPSS-17.0 and results were recorded and analysed. Pearsons two tailed correlation was used to find the correlation between presence of tricuspid regurgitation in patients with severe mitral stenosis, p was <0.05. Results: A total 35 patients with pure mitral stenosis were included in study, out of which 8 were male and 27 were females. Mean age in males was 34.5±15.85 years while in females it was 31±8 years. Twenty-two out of 35 (62.86 percent) patients had tricuspid regurgitation while 13 out 35 (37.14 percent) had no tricuspid regurgitation. Mean (MVA) mitral valve area in patients with tricuspid regurgitation was 0.84±0.3 cm/sup 2/ while mean (MVA) mitral valve area in patients without tricuspid regurgitation was 1.83±0.7 cm/sup 2/. Mean left atrial (L.A) size was 45.23±1.5mm/sup 2/ in patients with tricuspid regurgitation, while it was 44.13±6.14mm/sup 2/ in patients without tricuspid regurgitation. Mean RSVP was 57.5mmHg in patients with tricuspid regurgitation while RSVP could not be calculated in patients without tricuspid regurgitation. Conclusions: It was concluded that tricuspid regurgitation was strongly associated with severe mitral stenosis as almost all patients with severe mitral stenosis had tricuspid regurgitation and none of the patients with mild mitral stenosis had tricuspid regurgitation. (author)

  2. Seven key actions to eradicate rheumatic heart disease in Africa: the Addis Ababa communiqué.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, David; Zuhlke, Liesl; Engel, Mark; Daniels, Rezeen; Francis, Veronica; Shaboodien, Gasnat; Kango, Mabvuto; Abul-Fadl, Azza; Adeoye, Abiodun; Ali, Sulafa; Al-Kebsi, Mohammed; Bode-Thomas, Fidelia; Bukhman, Gene; Damasceno, Albertino; Goshu, Dejuma Yadeta; Elghamrawy, Alaa; Gitura, Bernard; Haileamlak, Abraham; Hailu, Abraha; Hugo-Hamman, Christopher; Justus, Steve; Karthikeyan, Ganesan; Kennedy, Neil; Lwabi, Peter; Mamo, Yoseph; Mntla, Pindile; Sutton, Chris; Mocumbi, Ana Olga; Mondo, Charles; Mtaja, Agnes; Musuku, John; Mucumbitsi, Joseph; Murango, Louis; Nel, George; Ogendo, Stephen; Ogola, Elijah; Ojji, Dike; Olunuga, Taiwo Olabisi; Redi, Mekia Mohammed; Rusingiza, Kamanzi Emmanuel; Sani, Mahmoud; Sheta, Sahar; Shongwe, Steven; van Dam, Joris; Gamra, Habib; Carapetis, Jonathan; Lennon, Diana; Mayosi, Bongani M

    Acute rheumatic fever (ARF) and rheumatic heart disease (RHD) remain major causes of heart failure, stroke and death among African women and children, despite being preventable and imminently treatable. From 21 to 22 February 2015, the Social Cluster of the Africa Union Commission (AUC) hosted a consultation with RHD experts convened by the Pan-African Society of Cardiology (PASCAR) in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, to develop a 'roadmap' of key actions that need to be taken by governments to eliminate ARF and eradicate RHD in Africa. Seven priority areas for action were adopted: (1) create prospective disease registers at sentinel sites in affected countries to measure disease burden and track progress towards the reduction of mortality by 25% by the year 2025, (2) ensure an adequate supply of high-quality benzathine penicillin for the primary and secondary prevention of ARF/RHD, (3) improve access to reproductive health services for women with RHD and other non-communicable diseases (NCD), (4) decentralise technical expertise and technology for diagnosing and managing ARF and RHD (including ultrasound of the heart), (5) establish national and regional centres of excellence for essential cardiac surgery for the treatment of affected patients and training of cardiovascular practitioners of the future, (6) initiate national multi-sectoral RHD programmes within NCD control programmes of affected countries, and (7) foster international partnerships with multinational organisations for resource mobilisation, monitoring and evaluation of the programme to end RHD in Africa. This Addis Ababa communiqué has since been endorsed by African Union heads of state, and plans are underway to implement the roadmap in order to end ARF and RHD in Africa in our lifetime.

  3. Newly diagnosed rheumatic heart disease among indigenous populations in the Pacific.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirabel, Mariana; Tafflet, Muriel; Noël, Baptiste; Parks, Tom; Axler, Olivier; Robert, Jacques; Nadra, Marie; Phelippeau, Gwendolyne; Descloux, Elodie; Cazorla, Cécile; Missotte, Isabelle; Gervolino, Shirley; Barguil, Yann; Rouchon, Bernard; Laumond, Sylvie; Jubeau, Thierry; Braunstein, Corinne; Empana, Jean-Philippe; Marijon, Eloi; Jouven, Xavier

    2015-12-01

    Rheumatic heart disease (RHD) remains the leading acquired heart disease in the young worldwide. We aimed at assessing outcomes and influencing factors in the contemporary era. Hospital-based cohort in a high-income island nation where RHD remains endemic and the population is captive. All patients admitted with newly diagnosed RHD according to World Heart Federation echocardiographic criteria were enrolled (2005-2013). The incidence of major cardiovascular events (MACEs) including heart failure, peripheral embolism, stroke, heart valve intervention and cardiovascular death was calculated, and their determinants identified. Of the 396 patients, 43.9% were male with median age 18 years (IQR 10-40)). 127 (32.1%) patients presented with mild, 131 (33.1%) with moderate and 138 (34.8%) with severe heart valve disease. 205 (51.8%) had features of acute rheumatic fever. 106 (26.8%) presented with at least one MACE. Among the remaining 290 patients, after a median follow-up period of 4.08 (95% CI 1.84 to 6.84) years, 7 patients (2.4%) died and 62 (21.4%) had a first MACE. The annual incidence of first MACE and of heart failure were 59.05‰ (95% CI 44.35 to 73.75) and 29.06‰ (95% CI 19.29 to 38.82), respectively. The severity of RHD at diagnosis (moderate vs mild HR 3.39 (0.95 to 12.12); severe vs mild RHD HR 10.81 (3.11 to 37.62), pdisease and no secondary prophylaxis. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  4. GLUT1 deficiency syndrome as a cause of encephalopathy that includes cognitive disability, treatment-resistant infantile epilepsy and a complex movement disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, John M

    2012-05-01

    Glucose transporter-1 (GLUT1) deficiency syndrome is caused by heterozygous mutations in the SLC2A1 gene, resulting in impaired glucose transport into the brain. It is characterized by a low glucose concentration in the cerebrospinal fluid (hypoglycorrhachia) in the absence of hypoglycemia, in combination with low to normal lactate in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). It often results in treatment-resistant infantile epilepsy with progressive developmental disabilities and a complex movement disorder. Recognizing GLUT1 deficiency syndrome is important, since initiation of a ketogenic diet can reduce the frequency of seizures and the severity of the movement disorder. There can be a considerable delay in diagnosing GLUT1 deficiency syndrome, and this point is illustrated by the natural history of this disorder in a 21-year-old woman with severe, progressive neurological disabilities. Her encephalopathy consisted of treatment-resistant seizures, a complex movement disorder, progressive intellectual disability, and deceleration of her head growth after late infancy. Focused evaluation at age 21 revealed GLUT1 deficiency caused by a novel heterozygous missence mutation in exon 7 (c.938C > A; p.Ser313Try) in SLC2A1 as the cause for her disabilities. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Brief Report: Cancer Immunotherapy in Patients With Preexisting Rheumatic Disease: The Mayo Clinic Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Michael D; Pinkston, Olga; Kottschade, Lisa A; Finnes, Heidi D; Markovic, Svetomir N; Thanarajasingam, Uma

    2018-03-01

    To determine the risk of rheumatic disease flare and adverse effects in patients with preexisting rheumatic disease who were receiving immune checkpoint inhibitor (ICI) therapy. A retrospective medical record review was performed to identify all patients who received ICI therapy at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota between 2011 and 2016 (~700 patients). Those with a preexisting rheumatic disease were identified using specific diagnostic codes. Sixteen patients were identified (81% female, median age 68.5 years). The most common rheumatic diseases were rheumatoid arthritis (n = 5), polymyalgia rheumatica (n = 5), Sjögren's syndrome (n = 2), and systemic lupus erythematosus (n = 2). Seven patients were receiving immunosuppressive therapy or glucocorticoids for their rheumatic disease at the time of initiation of the ICI. The primary malignancies were melanoma (n = 10), pulmonary (n = 4), or hematologic (n = 2). In most cases, ICIs were offered only after failure of several other therapies. Immune-related adverse effects (IRAEs) occurred in 6 patients, and all were treated successfully with glucocorticoids and discontinuation of the ICI therapy. There were no significant differences in time from cancer diagnosis to immunotherapy, duration of immunotherapy, age, or sex between the patients with and those without IRAEs. To our knowledge, this represents the largest single-center cohort of patients with rheumatic diseases who were exposed to modern cancer immunotherapy. Only a minority of these patients experienced a flare of their preexisting rheumatic disease or any other IRAE. © 2017, American College of Rheumatology.

  6. Co-existence of ischemic stroke in Rheumatic and non-rheumatic atrial Fibrillation in a tertiary care teaching hospital of Western Nepal

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    Ram Chandra Kafle

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background & Objectives: Stroke is a major public health burden worldwide leading to long-term morbidity and even mortality. Atrial fibrillation (AF is the most common sustained arrhythmia and is an independent factor to increase risk of ischemic stroke. The risk of stroke further enhanced in rheumatic atrial fibrillation and affects younger population of developing countries.  The study has aimed to find out frequency of co-existence of stroke in AF and secondarily to look for age distribution of stroke and risk factors of AF.Materials & Methods: A retrospective analysis of trans-thoracic echocardiographic records of patients from 1st June 2009 to 31st June 2016 was done. Data were collected in a pre-structured proforma and analyzed.Results: Among 15767 echocardiographies, 577 (3.65% cases were recorded to have atrial fibrillation. Mean age 65(±15 years ranging from 14 to 100 years. Rheumatic heart disease was the second most common cause of atrial fibrillation after hypertension. The co-existence of ischemic stroke was seen in 87(15.07% cases with male to female ratio of 1:1.3. The proportion of stroke in rheumatic Atrial fibrillation was 21(18.75% which was higher than in non-Rheumatic atrial fibrillation 66(14.2%.Conclusion: Rheumatic heart disease is contributing as second most common cause of atrial fibrillation after hypertension, nearly one fourth of total stroke and most common (93% cause of stroke below the age of 45 years. Preventive strategies aimed at health awareness about rheumatic fever, screening programs at community level, early detection and treatment for hypertension and Rheumatic heart disease can contribute in reduction of stroke burden. 

  7. Prevalence of Rheumatic Heart Disease in a Public School of Belo Horizonte

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    Miranda, Lavinia Pimentel, E-mail: lavinia.pimentel@globo.com; Camargos, Paulo Augusto Moreira; Torres, Rosália Morais; Meira, Zilda Maria Alves [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2014-08-15

    Previous studies indicate that compared with physical examination, Doppler echocardiography identifies a larger number of cases of rheumatic heart disease in apparently healthy individuals. To determine the prevalence of rheumatic heart disease among students in a public school of Belo Horizonte by clinical evaluation and Doppler echocardiography. This was a cross-sectional study conducted with 267 randomly selected school students aged between 6 and 16 years. students underwent anamnesis and physical examination with the purpose of establishing criteria for the diagnosis of rheumatic fever. They were all subjected to Doppler echocardiography using a portable machine. Those who exhibited nonphysiological mitral regurgitation (MR) and/or aortic regurgitation (AR) were referred to the Doppler echocardiography laboratory of the Hospital das Clínicas of the Universidade Federal of Minas Gerais (HC-UFMG) to undergo a second Doppler echocardiography examination. According to the findings, the cases of rheumatic heart disease were classified as definitive, probable, or possible. Of the 267 students, 1 (0.37%) had a clinical history compatible with the diagnosis of acute rheumatic fever (ARF) and portable Doppler echocardiography indicated nonphysiological MR and/or AR in 25 (9.4%). Of these, 16 (6%) underwent Doppler echocardiography at HC-UFMG. The results showed definitive rheumatic heart disease in 1 student, probable rheumatic heart disease in 3 students, and possible rheumatic heart disease in 1 student. In the population under study, the prevalence of cases compatible with rheumatic involvement was 5 times higher on Doppler echocardiography (18.7/1000; 95% CI 6.9/1000-41.0/1000) than on clinical evaluation (3.7/1000-95% CI)

  8. Prevalence of Rheumatic Heart Disease in a Public School of Belo Horizonte

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miranda, Lavinia Pimentel; Camargos, Paulo Augusto Moreira; Torres, Rosália Morais; Meira, Zilda Maria Alves

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies indicate that compared with physical examination, Doppler echocardiography identifies a larger number of cases of rheumatic heart disease in apparently healthy individuals. To determine the prevalence of rheumatic heart disease among students in a public school of Belo Horizonte by clinical evaluation and Doppler echocardiography. This was a cross-sectional study conducted with 267 randomly selected school students aged between 6 and 16 years. students underwent anamnesis and physical examination with the purpose of establishing criteria for the diagnosis of rheumatic fever. They were all subjected to Doppler echocardiography using a portable machine. Those who exhibited nonphysiological mitral regurgitation (MR) and/or aortic regurgitation (AR) were referred to the Doppler echocardiography laboratory of the Hospital das Clínicas of the Universidade Federal of Minas Gerais (HC-UFMG) to undergo a second Doppler echocardiography examination. According to the findings, the cases of rheumatic heart disease were classified as definitive, probable, or possible. Of the 267 students, 1 (0.37%) had a clinical history compatible with the diagnosis of acute rheumatic fever (ARF) and portable Doppler echocardiography indicated nonphysiological MR and/or AR in 25 (9.4%). Of these, 16 (6%) underwent Doppler echocardiography at HC-UFMG. The results showed definitive rheumatic heart disease in 1 student, probable rheumatic heart disease in 3 students, and possible rheumatic heart disease in 1 student. In the population under study, the prevalence of cases compatible with rheumatic involvement was 5 times higher on Doppler echocardiography (18.7/1000; 95% CI 6.9/1000-41.0/1000) than on clinical evaluation (3.7/1000-95% CI)

  9. Prevalence of Rheumatic Heart Disease in a Public School of Belo Horizonte

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lavinia Pimentel Miranda

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Previous studies indicate that compared with physical examination, Doppler echocardiography identifies a larger number of cases of rheumatic heart disease in apparently healthy individuals. Objectives: To determine the prevalence of rheumatic heart disease among students in a public school of Belo Horizonte by clinical evaluation and Doppler echocardiography. Methods: This was a cross-sectional study conducted with 267 randomly selected school students aged between 6 and 16 years. students underwent anamnesis and physical examination with the purpose of establishing criteria for the diagnosis of rheumatic fever. They were all subjected to Doppler echocardiography using a portable machine. Those who exhibited nonphysiological mitral regurgitation (MR and/or aortic regurgitation (AR were referred to the Doppler echocardiography laboratory of the Hospital das Clínicas of the Universidade Federal of Minas Gerais (HC-UFMG to undergo a second Doppler echocardiography examination. According to the findings, the cases of rheumatic heart disease were classified as definitive, probable, or possible. Results: Of the 267 students, 1 (0.37% had a clinical history compatible with the diagnosis of acute rheumatic fever (ARF and portable Doppler echocardiography indicated nonphysiological MR and/or AR in 25 (9.4%. Of these, 16 (6% underwent Doppler echocardiography at HC-UFMG. The results showed definitive rheumatic heart disease in 1 student, probable rheumatic heart disease in 3 students, and possible rheumatic heart disease in 1 student. Conclusion: In the population under study, the prevalence of cases compatible with rheumatic involvement was 5 times higher on Doppler echocardiography (18.7/1000; 95% CI 6.9/1000-41.0/1000 than on clinical evaluation (3.7/1000-95% CI.

  10. A cost-effectiveness analysis of a program to control rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease in Pinar del Rio, Cuba.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David A Watkins

    Full Text Available Acute rheumatic fever (ARF and rheumatic heart disease (RHD persist in many low- and middle-income countries. To date, the cost-effectiveness of population-based, combined primary and secondary prevention strategies has not been assessed. In the Pinar del Rio province of Cuba, a comprehensive ARF/RHD control program was undertaken over 1986-1996. The present study analyzes the cost-effectiveness of this Cuban program.We developed a decision tree model based on the natural history of ARF/RHD, comparing the costs and effectiveness of the 10-year Cuban program to a "do nothing" approach. Our population of interest was the cohort of children aged 5-24 years resident in Pinar del Rio in 1986. We assessed costs and health outcomes over a lifetime horizon, and we took the healthcare system perspective on costs but did not apply a discount rate. We used epidemiologic, clinical, and direct medical cost inputs that were previously collected for publications on the Cuban program. We estimated health gains as disability-adjusted life years (DALYs averted using standard approaches developed for the Global Burden of Disease studies. Cost-effectiveness acceptability thresholds were defined by one and three times per capita gross domestic product per DALY averted. We also conducted an uncertainty analysis using Monte Carlo simulations and several scenario analyses exploring the impact of alternative assumptions about the program's effects and costs. We found that, compared to doing nothing, the Cuban program averted 5051 DALYs (1844 per 100,000 school-aged children and saved $7,848,590 (2010 USD despite a total program cost of $202,890 over 10 years. In the scenario analyses, the program remained cost saving when a lower level of effectiveness and a reduction in averted years of life lost were assumed. In a worst-case scenario including 20-fold higher costs, the program still had a 100% of being cost-effective and an 85% chance of being cost saving.A 10-year

  11. A cost-effectiveness analysis of a program to control rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease in Pinar del Rio, Cuba.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, David A; Mvundura, Mercy; Nordet, Porfirio; Mayosi, Bongani M

    2015-01-01

    Acute rheumatic fever (ARF) and rheumatic heart disease (RHD) persist in many low- and middle-income countries. To date, the cost-effectiveness of population-based, combined primary and secondary prevention strategies has not been assessed. In the Pinar del Rio province of Cuba, a comprehensive ARF/RHD control program was undertaken over 1986-1996. The present study analyzes the cost-effectiveness of this Cuban program. We developed a decision tree model based on the natural history of ARF/RHD, comparing the costs and effectiveness of the 10-year Cuban program to a "do nothing" approach. Our population of interest was the cohort of children aged 5-24 years resident in Pinar del Rio in 1986. We assessed costs and health outcomes over a lifetime horizon, and we took the healthcare system perspective on costs but did not apply a discount rate. We used epidemiologic, clinical, and direct medical cost inputs that were previously collected for publications on the Cuban program. We estimated health gains as disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) averted using standard approaches developed for the Global Burden of Disease studies. Cost-effectiveness acceptability thresholds were defined by one and three times per capita gross domestic product per DALY averted. We also conducted an uncertainty analysis using Monte Carlo simulations and several scenario analyses exploring the impact of alternative assumptions about the program's effects and costs. We found that, compared to doing nothing, the Cuban program averted 5051 DALYs (1844 per 100,000 school-aged children) and saved $7,848,590 (2010 USD) despite a total program cost of $202,890 over 10 years. In the scenario analyses, the program remained cost saving when a lower level of effectiveness and a reduction in averted years of life lost were assumed. In a worst-case scenario including 20-fold higher costs, the program still had a 100% of being cost-effective and an 85% chance of being cost saving. A 10-year program to

  12. The effect of flexible cognitive-behavioural therapy and medical treatment, including antidepressants on post-traumatic stress disorder and depression in traumatised refugees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buhmann, Caecilie Böck; Nordentoft, Merete; Ekstrøm, Morten

    2016-01-01

    design (registered with Clinicaltrials.gov, NCT00917397, EUDRACT no. 2008-006714-15). Participants were refugees with war-related traumatic experiences, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and without psychotic disorder. Treatment was weekly sessions with a physician and/or psychologist over 6 months....... RESULTS: A total of 217 of 280 patients completed treatment (78%). There was no effect on PTSD symptoms, no effect of psychotherapy and no interaction between psychotherapy and medicine. A small but significant effect of treatment with antidepressants was found on depression. CONCLUSIONS: In a pragmatic...... clinical setting, there was no effect of flexible CBT and antidepressants on PTSD, and there was a small-to-moderate effect of antidepressants and psychoeducation on depression in traumatised refugees....

  13. Vitamin D endocrine system and the immune response in rheumatic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutolo, Maurizio; Plebani, M; Shoenfeld, Yehuda; Adorini, Luciano; Tincani, Angela

    2011-01-01

    Epidemiological evidence indicates a significant association between vitamin D deficiency and an increased incidence of autoimmune diseases. The presence of vitamin D receptors (VDRs) in the cells of the immune system and the fact that several of these cells produce the vitamin D hormone suggested that vitamin D could have immunoregulatory properties, and now potent immunomodulatory activities on dendritic cells, Th1 and Th17 cells, as well as B cells have been confirmed. Serum levels of vitamin D have been found to be significantly lower in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus, undifferentiated connective tissue disease, and type-1 diabetes mellitus than in the healthy population. In addition, it was also found that lower levels of vitamin D were associated with higher disease activity in rheumatoid arthritis. Promising clinical results together with evidence for the regulation of multiple immunomodulatory mechanisms by VDR agonists represent a sound basis for further exploration of their potential in the treatment of rheumatic autoimmune disorders. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Teaching focused echocardiography for rheumatic heart disease screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Engelman

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Screening for rheumatic heart disease (RHD requires workers skilled in echocardiography, which typically involves prolonged, specialized training. Task shifting echocardiographic screening to nonexpert health workers may be a solution in settings with limited human resources. An 8-week training program was designed to train health workers without any prior experience in focused echocardiography for RHD screening. Seven health workers participated. At the completion of training, the health workers performed unsupervised echocardiography on 16 volunteer children with known RHD status. A pediatric cardiologist assessed image quality. Participants provided qualitative feedback. The quality of echocardiograms were high at completion of training (55 of 56 were adequate for diagnosis and all cases of RHD were identified. Feedback was strongly positive. Training health workers to perform focused echocardiography for RHD screening is feasible. After systematic testing for accuracy, this training program could be adapted in other settings seeking to expand echocardiographic capabilities.

  15. Teaching focused echocardiography for rheumatic heart disease screening

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engelman, Daniel; Kado, Joseph H; Reményi, Bo; Colquhoun, Samantha M; Watson, Caroline; Rayasidamu, Sera C; Steer, Andrew C

    2005-01-01

    Screening for rheumatic heart disease (RHD) requires workers skilled in echocardiography, which typically involves prolonged, specialized training. Task shifting echocardiographic screening to nonexpert health workers may be a solution in settings with limited human resources. An 8-week training program was designed to train health workers without any prior experience in focused echocardiography for RHD screening. Seven health workers participated. At the completion of training, the health workers performed unsupervised echocardiography on 16 volunteer children with known RHD status. A pediatric cardiologist assessed image quality. Participants provided qualitative feedback. The quality of echocardiograms were high at completion of training (55 of 56 were adequate for diagnosis) and all cases of RHD were identified. Feedback was strongly positive. Training health workers to perform focused echocardiography for RHD screening is feasible. After systematic testing for accuracy, this training program could be adapted in other settings seeking to expand echocardiographic capabilities

  16. VALUE OF RHEUMATIC PATIENTS' AWARENESS OF HAVING INFECTIOUS COMORBIDITIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rimma Mikhailovna Balabanova

    2010-01-01

    Results. The patients with RD frequently reported to have nasopharyngeal infection. The latter was accompanied by an exacerbation of articular syndrome in more than half of the patients with RD. The rate of pneumonias experienced by patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE (10/55 engages our attention. Urogenital tract infections (mainly cystitis and pyelonephritis are more typical of patients with rheumatic arthritis (RA and those with osteoarthrosis (OA, respectively. The clinical manifestations of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1 recurred most frequently in patients with SLE and those with OA and less in patients with RA. The percentage of HSV-1 recurrences was high in the medical staff. Conclusion. The findings suggest that it is necessary to thoroughly collect medical history data especially in patients who need aggressive immunosuppressive therapy as activation of latent infection makes management of these patients difficult

  17. Update on the epidemiology of the rheumatic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabriel, S E

    1996-03-01

    Epidemiologic studies continue to enhance our understanding of the rheumatic diseases. Such studies now indicate that 26 million American women are at risk for osteoporotic fractures. Contrary to previous recommendations, the identification and treatment of patients at risk for osteoporosis may be valuable even among very elderly people. Other epidemiologic studies suggest that the incidence of rheumatoid arthritis is decreasing and that it is a more benign disease than previously recognized. Osteoarthritis remains a leading cause of physical and work disability in North America. The roles of occupational physical activity, obesity, and highly competitive (though not low-impact) exercise as risk factors for osteoarthritis continue to be explored. Pharmacoepidemiologic research has recently demonstrated that a policy of prior authorization for prescription of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs may be highly cost effective. Finally, controlled epidemiologic studies have not confirmed an association between silicone breast implants and connective tissue diseases, a conclusion recently endorsed by the American College of Rheumatology.

  18. Evaluation of foot static disturbances in patients with rheumatic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Kuryliszyn-Moskal

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Objectives : Rheumatic diseases such as osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis constitute the most frequent pathological states leading to the development of foot deformities, which reduce quality of life and cause disability. The aim of the present study was to compare the results of plantoconturographic examinations, obtained by means of a computer podoscope, in osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis patients. Special attention was paid to the differences in the values of each parameter determining the level of foot function. Material and methods : The study was performed in 94 female patients divided into two groups according to the type of disease. There were 54 patients with rheumatoid arthritis and 40 with osteoarthritis. The control group consisted of 34 healthy women. The plantographic assessment of static foot structure was carried out by means of a device for computer-aided foot examination. Results : A fallen transverse arch of the right foot was statistically much more frequent in the rheumatoid arthritis patients than in osteoarthritis patients or the control group (p < 0.005 and p < 0.05, respectively. Significant differences in the values of the Wejsflog index were observed in the case of left foot between rheumatoid arthritis patients and the control group (p < 0.05. Similarly, there were statistically significant differences in the values of the hallux valgus angle ( for the right foot between rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis patients or control group (in both cases p < 0.05. Conclusions : Rheumatic diseases predispose patients to disturbances of static foot function. The obtained results highlight the importance of diagnosing foot static disturbances in the prevention of destructive changes affecting the functioning of osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis patients.

  19. Gene polymorphisms of TNF-α and IL-10 related to rheumatic heart

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Rheumatic fever (RF) is inherited as a single recessive gene. Several genes are ..... phisms within this locus may contribute to the pathogenesis of ... toid factors in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Our results showed no statisti-.

  20. The role of vitamin D supplementation in patients with rheumatic diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abrahamsen, Bo; Harvey, Nicholas C

    2013-01-01

    the function of the immune, cardiovascular and endocrine systems. Vitamin D deficiency, due to insufficient sunlight exposure, dietary uptake and/or abnormalities in its metabolism, has been associated with rheumatic diseases, and both the classical and nonclassical effects of vitamin D might be of relevance...... to patients with rheumatic disease. However, conclusive data from intervention trials demonstrating the relationship between vitamin D levels and pathogenetic processes separate from classical effects of this molecule are lacking. Furthermore, the majority of studies linking vitamin D to health outcomes...... in the treatment of the many rheumatic conditions in which deficiency of this compound has been implicated. Herein, we review the evidence for vitamin D supplementation in the management of patients with rheumatic diseases....

  1. Analysis of skin blood microflow oscillations in patients with rheumatic diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizeva, Irina; Makovik, Irina; Dunaev, Andrey; Krupatkin, Alexander; Meglinski, Igor

    2017-07-01

    Laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF) has been applied for the assessment of variation in blood microflows in patients with rheumatic diseases and healthy volunteers. Oscillations of peripheral blood microcirculation observed by LDF have been analyzed utilizing a wavelet transform. A higher amplitude of blood microflow oscillations has been observed in a high frequency band (over 0.1 Hz) in patients with rheumatic diseases. Oscillations in the high frequency band decreased in healthy volunteers in response to the cold pressor test, whereas lower frequency pulsations prevailed in patients with rheumatic diseases. A higher perfusion rate at normal conditions was observed in patients, and a weaker response to cold stimulation was observed in healthy volunteers. Analysis of blood microflow oscillations has a high potential for evaluation of mechanisms of blood flow regulation and diagnosis of vascular abnormalities associated with rheumatic diseases.

  2. Recommendations for the content and conduct of European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) musculoskeletal ultrasound courses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Naredo, E.; Bijlsma, J. W. J.; Conaghan, P. G.; Acebes, C.; Balint, P.; Berner-Hammer, H.; Bruyn, G. A. W.; Collado, P.; D'Agostino, M. A.; de Agustin, J. J.; de Miguel, E.; Filippucci, E.; Grassi, W.; Iagnocco, A.; Kane, D.; Koski, J. M.; Manger, B.; Mayordomo, L.; Moeller, I.; Moragues, C.; Rejon, E.; Szkudlarek, M.; Terslev, L.; Uson, J.; Wakefield, R. J.; Schmidt, A.

    Objective: To develop education guidelines for the conduct of future European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) musculoskeletal ultrasound (MSUS) courses. Methods: We undertook a consensus-based, iterative process using two consecutive questionnaires sent to 29 senior ultrasonographer

  3. Modified radial v/s biatrial maze for atrial fibrillation in rheumatic valvular heart surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sajid A. Sayed

    2014-09-01

    Discussion: In patients with AF undergoing rheumatic valvular surgery, radiofrequency radial approach is as effective as modified Cox's maze III for conversion to NSR with better atrial transport function.

  4. Rheumatism as perceived by some quotations: as seen by the patient and physician.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagier, R

    1995-12-01

    The word "rheumatism", introduced in ancient times, is still used directly or indirectly, in parallel with the terms of the modern nosography. The reasons for this persistence can be sought in the history of the concept, which can be approached via quotations from texts written either by authors who describe popular beliefs or their own sufferings; or by physicians known to have played a prominent role in the individualization of rheumatology. The word "rheumatism" was first used mainly to designate a painful fluxion of the tissues located between the skin and the internal organs. It gradually lost ground to more descriptive terms suggestive of joints. Thus, the concept of "rheumatism" still bears the hallmark of its "popular" roots and is on a level parallel to but distinct from that of modern nosography. Awareness of its origins may improve communication between physicians and patients and also raises questions about the foundations of the concept of "rheumatic disease".

  5. Unusual Giant Right Atrium in Rheumatic Mitral Stenosis and Tricuspid Insufficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean Baptiste Anzouan-Kacou

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Dilation and hypertrophy of the atria occur in patients with valvular heart disease especially in mitral regurgitation, mitral stenosis or tricuspid abnormalities. In sub-saharan Africa, rheumatic fever is still the leading cause of valvular heart disease. We report a case of an unusual giant right atrium in context of rheumatic stenosis and severe tricuspid regurgitation in a 58-year-old woman.

  6. Prevalence of Rheumatic Heart Disease in a Public School of Belo Horizonte

    OpenAIRE

    Miranda, Lavinia Pimentel; Camargos, Paulo Augusto Moreira; Torres, Rosália Morais; Meira, Zilda Maria Alves

    2014-01-01

    Background: Previous studies indicate that compared with physical examination, Doppler echocardiography identifies a larger number of cases of rheumatic heart disease in apparently healthy individuals. Objectives: To determine the prevalence of rheumatic heart disease among students in a public school of Belo Horizonte by clinical evaluation and Doppler echocardiography. Methods: This was a cross-sectional study conducted with 267 randomly selected school students aged between 6 and ...

  7. Myocardial Infarction in a Young Female with Palindromic Rheumatism: A Consequence of Negative Remodeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy R. Larsen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Palindromic rheumatism is a rare disease associated with systemic inflammation. Negative or constrictive coronary artery remodeling is typically not seen until the 7th or 8th decade of life. We report a case of a young female with palindromic rheumatism who suffered a non-ST segment elevation myocardial infarction secondary to a flow-limiting lesion that demonstrated negative remodeling by intravascular ultrasound (IVUS.

  8. Vitamin D in autoimmune rheumatic diseases: A view inside gender differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasile, Massimiliano; Corinaldesi, Clarissa; Antinozzi, Cristina; Crescioli, Clara

    2017-03-01

    A large body of evidence highlights the role for vitamin D deficiency/insufficiency in rheumatic diseases, a group of different pathologies mostly of autoimmune origin. Vitamin D and vitamin D receptor agonists exquisitely modulate the immune system against over-reactivity towards tolerance; on this basis, vitamin D could be a good therapeutic candidate to control autoimmune processes in rheumatic diseases. Similarly, to other autoimmune pathologies, rheumatic diseases show a significant female bias. This sexual dimorphism seems, in part, to rely on the different sex hormone-induced regulation on male and female immune systems. Females, in fact, retain greater immune reactivity and competence likely due to estrogens, which, at variance with androgens, are associated with a greater resilience to infections but also to a higher risk for autoimmunity. In this scenario, there is growing interest on vitamin D supplementation for prevention or therapy in rheumatic diseases in relation to gender and sexual hormones. The purpose of the review is to overview vitamin D status in rheumatic diseases, related to gender and sex hormones. In particular, the main vitamin D immunoregulatory properties are summarized with some sex hormone-driven immune activities, in females and males immune systems. Topics onto vitamin D receptor agonists as potential therapeutic agents in rheumatic disease are addressed, especially in view of the role of vitamin D inadequacy in the pathogenesis of rheumatic diseases. So far, further clinical and basic studies should be encouraged to confirm the high potential power of vitamin D receptor agonists as novel pharmacological tools in rheumatic diseases particularly in light of personalized gender-related therapeutic strategies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Biphosphonate-induced radiographic changes in two pediatric patients with rheumatic diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandes, Joao L.; Rocha, Arthemizio L.; Viana, Sergio L.; Ribeiro, Maria C.; Castro, Luis C.

    2004-01-01

    Biphosphonates are now being used experimentally in children to increase bone mass, but their long-term effects remain an issue of concern. We report two cases of biphosphonate-induced radiographic changes in children with rheumatic diseases. Our experience supports the view that clinical improvement and radiographic findings after biphosphonate therapy are related to increased bone mineral density, without effects on the inflammatory process itself. Biphosphonates seem to act in rheumatic diseases by reducing bone turnover instead of improving disease activity. (orig.)

  10. Seven key actions to eradicate rheumatic heart disease in Africa: the Addis Ababa communiqu?

    OpenAIRE

    Watkins, David; Zuhlke, Liesl; Engel, Mark; Daniels, Rezeen; Francis, Veronica; Shaboodien, Gasnat; Mayosi, Bongani M; Kango, Mabvuto; Abul-Fadl, Azza; Adeoye, Abiodun; Ali, Sulafa; Al-Kebsi, Mohammed; Bode-Thomas, Fidelia; Bukhman, Gene; Damasceno, Albertino

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Acute rheumatic fever (ARF) and rheumatic heart disease (RHD) remain major causes of heart failure, stroke and death among African women and children, despite being preventable and imminently treatable. From 21 to 22 February 2015, the Social Cluster of the Africa Union Commission (AUC) hosted a consultation with RHD experts convened by the Pan-African Society of Cardiology (PASCAR) in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, to develop a ?roadmap? of key actions that need to be taken by governments t...

  11. Social Support: a Key Variable for Health Promotion and Chronic Disease Management in Hispanic Patients with Rheumatic Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alyssa T. Brooks

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic diseases, including rheumatic diseases, can cause immense physical and psychosocial burden for patients. Many Hispanics suffering with arthritis face activity limitations. Social support, or the functional content of relationships, may be important to consider when examining treatment and outcomes for Hispanic individuals. Participants were recruited from an urban community health center (CHC as part of a larger health behavior study. A cross-sectional, descriptive, mixed methods analysis was conducted to explore the role of social support in the sample. Only Hispanic/Latino patients (n = 46 were included in this analysis. Interviews were conducted in both English and Spanish. The majority of the sample (87% perceived some presence of social support in their lives. The two most commonly cited types of social support were emotional and instrumental. The two most common sources of social support were family members other than spouses (52.2% and spouses (32.6%. Body mass index (BMI was significantly correlated with the number of perceived sources of support. The presence or absence and the role of social support in supporting optimal health outcomes should be considered for Hispanics with chronic rheumatic diseases. Involving family members and spouses in the plan of care for this population could facilitate health promotion and chronic disease management.

  12. Bioboosters in the treatment of rheumatic diseases: a comprehensive review of currently available biologics in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis and psoriatic arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrizio Cantini

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Fabrizio Cantini, Carlotta Nannini, Laura NiccoliSecond Division of Medicine, Rheumatology Unit, Hospital of Prato, ItalyAbstract: Immunologic research has clarified many aspects of the pathogenesis of inflammatory rheumatic disorders. Biologic drugs acting on different steps of the immune response, including cytokines, B- and T-cell lymphocytes, have been marketed over the past 10 years for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA, ankylosing spondylitis (AS, and psoriatic arthritis (PsA. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs of anti-cytokine agents in RA (including the anti-tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα drugs infliximab, etanercept, adalimumab, golimumab, certolizumab, anti-interleukin (IL-1 anakinra, and anti-IL-6 tocilizumab demonstrated a significant efficacy compared to traditional therapies, if combined with methotrexate (MTX, as measured by ACR 20, 50 and 70 response criteria. The new therapies have also been demonstrated to be superior to MTX in slowing or halting articular damage. RCTs have shown the efficacy of anti-TNFα in AS patients through significant improvement of symptoms and function. Trials of anti-TNFα in PsA patients showed marked improvement of articular symptoms for psoriasis and radiological disease progression. More recent studies have demonstrated the efficacy of B-cell depletion with rituximab, and T-cell inactivation with abatacept. All these drugs have a satisfactory safety profile. This paper reviews the different aspects of efficacy and tolerability of biologics in the therapy of RA, AS, and PsA.Keywords: anti-TNF, anti-cytokine agents, rituximab, abatacept, rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis

  13. Vitamin D deficiency in patients with either rheumatic diseases or inflammatory bowel diseases on biologic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruzzese, Vincenzo; Zullo, Angelo; Picchianti Diamanti, Andrea; Ridola, Lorenzo; Lorenzetti, Roberto; Marrese, Cinzia; Scolieri, Palma; De Francesco, Vincenzo; Hassan, Cesare; Migliore, Alberto; Laganà, Bruno

    2016-09-01

    Vitamin D deficiency has been reported in patients with chronic inflammatory conditions, such as rheumatic and inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). We evaluated the role of biologic therapy on vitamin D, calcium and parathormone (PTH) levels. This cross-sectional study enrolled consecutive patients with either rheumatic diseases or IBD who underwent an ambulatory visit. Patients receiving vitamin D/calcium supplementation were excluded. Vitamin D deficiency or insufficiency was diagnosed when values were rheumatic disease (M/F 37/99; mean age 60.7 ± 12.9 years) and 64 with IBD (M/F 41/23; Mean age 49.6 ± 13.1 years) were enrolled. Vitamin D deficiency/insufficiency was detected in as many as 63.5 % patients, being 61.8 and 67.2 % in patients with either rheumatic diseases or IBD, respectively. The prevalence of vitamin D deficiency/insufficiency was higher in those receiving biologics than other therapies (78.3 vs 43.2 %; p rheumatic diseases (78.7 vs 41 %; p rheumatic diseases or IBD receiving a biologic therapy.

  14. Physical inactivity and sedentary behavior: Overlooked risk factors in autoimmune rheumatic diseases?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Ana Jéssica; Roschel, Hamilton; de Sá Pinto, Ana Lúcia; Lima, Fernanda Rodrigues; Pereira, Rosa Maria Rodrigues; Silva, Clovis Artur; Bonfá, Eloisa; Gualano, Bruno

    2017-07-01

    This review aims to (1) summarize the estimates of physical inactivity and sedentary behavior in autoimmune rheumatic diseases; (2) describe the relationship between physical (in)activity levels and disease-related outcomes; (3) contextualize the estimates and impact of physical inactivity and sedentary behavior in autoimmune diseases compared to other rheumatic diseases and chronic conditions; and (4) discuss scientific perspectives around this theme and potential clinical interventions to attenuate these preventable risk factors. We compiled evidence to show that estimates of physical inactivity and sedentary behavior in autoimmune rheumatic diseases are generally comparable to other rheumatic diseases as well as to other chronic conditions (e.g., type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, and obesity), in which a lack of physical activity and excess of sedentary behavior are well-known predictors of morbimortality. In addition, we also showed evidence that both physical inactivity and sedentary behavior may be associated with poor health-related outcomes (e.g., worse disease symptoms and low functionality) in autoimmune rheumatic diseases. Thus, putting into practice interventions to make the patients "sit less and move more", particularly light-intensity activities and/or breaking-up sedentary time, is a simple and prudent therapeutic approach to minimize physical inactivity and sedentary behavior, which are overlooked yet modifiable risk factors in the field of autoimmune rheumatic diseases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Kinetics of 3H-serotonin uptake by platelets in infantile autism and developmental language disorder (including five pairs of twins)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katsui, T.; Okuda, M.; Usuda, S.; Koizumi, T.

    1986-01-01

    The kinetics of 5-HT uptake by platelets was studied in cases of infantile autism and developmental language disorder (DLD) and normal subjects. Two patients of the autism group were twins, and the seven patients of the DLD group were members of four pairs of twins. The Vmax values (means +/- SD) for autism and DLD were 6.46 +/- .90 pmol 5-HT/10(7) cells/min and 4.85 +/- 1.50 pmol 5-HT/10(7) cells/min, respectively. These values were both significantly higher than that of 2.25 +/- .97 pmole 5-HT/10(7) cells/min for normal children. The Km values of the three groups were not significantly different. Data on the five pairs of twins examined suggested that the elevated Vmax of 5-HT uptake by platelets was determined genetically

  16. Kinetics of 3H-serotonin uptake by platelets in infantile autism and developmental language disorder (including five pairs of twins)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katsui, T.; Okuda, M.; Usuda, S.; Koizumi, T.

    1986-03-01

    The kinetics of 5-HT uptake by platelets was studied in cases of infantile autism and developmental language disorder (DLD) and normal subjects. Two patients of the autism group were twins, and the seven patients of the DLD group were members of four pairs of twins. The Vmax values (means +/- SD) for autism and DLD were 6.46 +/- .90 pmol 5-HT/10(7) cells/min and 4.85 +/- 1.50 pmol 5-HT/10(7) cells/min, respectively. These values were both significantly higher than that of 2.25 +/- .97 pmole 5-HT/10(7) cells/min for normal children. The Km values of the three groups were not significantly different. Data on the five pairs of twins examined suggested that the elevated Vmax of 5-HT uptake by platelets was determined genetically.

  17. Patients suffering from rheumatic disease describing own experiences from participating in Basic Body Awareness Group Therapy: A qualitative pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Aarid Liland; Skjaerven, Liv Helvik

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatic diseases have physical and psychological impact on patients' movement and function. Basic Body Awareness Therapy focuses on promoting more functional movement quality in daily life. The purpose of this study was to describe patient experiences from participating in Basic Body Awareness Group Therapy for inpatients with rheumatic disease. A phenomenological design included data collection in two focus group interviews with seven patients. Giorgi's four-step phenomenological method was used for data analysis. Four main themes emerged: (1) "Movement exploration-being guided in movement" described informants' exploration of bodily signals and movement habits; (2) "Movement awareness training in a relational perspective" informants described experiences from being in a group setting; (3) "Movement awareness-integration and insight" described informants' reflections on movement experiences; and (4) "Integrating and practicing new movement habits" informants described how they used their movement experiences in daily life. The study described perspectives in movement learning experienced by patients. The results support the view that contact with the body can help patients exploring and cultivating their own resources for a more functional movement quality. Descriptions of relational movement learning aspects can contribute to our understanding of physiotherapy group design.

  18. The shorter the better? A follow-up analysis of 10-session psychiatric treatment including the motive-oriented therapeutic relationship for borderline personality disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Ueli; Stulz, Niklaus; Berthoud, Laurent; Caspar, Franz; Marquet, Pierre; Kolly, Stéphane; De Roten, Yves; Despland, Jean-Nicolas

    2017-05-01

    There is little research on short-term treatments for borderline personality disorder (BPD). While the core changes may occur only in long-term treatments, short-term treatments may enable the study of early generic processes of engagement in therapy and thus inform about effective treatment components. It was shown that a 10-session version of a psychiatric treatment was effective in reducing borderline symptoms at the end of this treatment [Kramer, U., Kolly, S., Berthoud, L., Keller, S., Preisig, M., Caspar, F., … Despland, J.-N. (2014). Effects of motive-oriented therapeutic relationship in a ten-session general psychiatric treatment for borderline personality disorder: A randomized controlled trial. Psychotherapy and Psychosomatics, 83, 176-186.]. Also, it was demonstrated in a randomized design that adding the motive-oriented therapeutic relationship (MOTR), following an individualized case formulation based on Plan Analysis, further increased general outcome after session 10 and had a positive effect on the early changes in self-esteem and alliance. The present study focuses on the follow-up period after this initial treatment, examining treatment density and outcomes after 6 months and service utilization after 12 months. Outcome was measured using the OQ-45. Results on a sub-sample of N = 40 patients with available OQ-45 data at follow-up (n = 21 for MOTR-treatment, n = 19 for comparison treatment) showed maintenance of gains over the follow-up period, which did not differ between both conditions. It appeared for this sample that MOTR treatments, while using the same number of sessions, lasted more weeks (i.e., lower treatment density, defined as the number of sessions per week), when compared to the treatments without MOTR. Density marginally predicted symptom reduction at follow-up. Patients in MOTR treatments had a greater likelihood of entering structured psychotherapy after the initial sessions than patients in the comparison

  19. Sugar, dental caries and the incidence of acute rheumatic fever: a cohort study of Māori and Pacific children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornley, Simon; Marshall, Roger J; Bach, Katie; Koopu, Pauline; Reynolds, Gary; Sundborn, Gerhard; Ei, Win Le Shwe Sin

    2017-04-01

    To determine whether dental caries, as an indicator of cumulative exposure to sugar, is associated with the incidence of acute rheumatic fever and chronic rheumatic heart disease, in Māori and Pacific children aged 5 and 6 years at their first dental visit. A cohort study was undertaken which linked school dental service records of caries with national hospital discharge and mortality records. Cox models were used to investigate the strength of the association between dental caries and rheumatic fever incidence. A total of 20 333 children who were free of rheumatic heart disease at enrolment were available for analysis. During a mean follow-up time of 5 years, 96 children developed acute rheumatic fever or chronic rheumatic heart disease. After adjustment for potential confounders, children with five or more primary teeth affected by caries were 57% (95% CI: 20% to 106%) more likely to develop disease during follow-up, compared to children whose primary teeth were caries free. The population attributable to the risk for caries in this cohort was 22%. Dental caries is positively associated with the incidence of acute rheumatic fever and chronic rheumatic heart disease in Māori and Pacific children. Sugar intake, an important risk factor for dental caries, is also likely to influence the aetiology of rheumatic fever. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  20. Motivations of women in Uganda living with rheumatic heart disease: A mixed methods study of experiences in stigma, childbearing, anticoagulation, and contraception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Andrew Y; Nabbaale, Juliet; Nalubwama, Haddy; Okello, Emmy; Ssinabulya, Isaac; Longenecker, Christopher T; Webel, Allison R

    2018-01-01

    Rheumatic heart disease (RHD) is a leading cause of premature mortality in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). Women of reproductive age are a unique and vulnerable group of RHD patients, due to increased risk of cardiovascular complications and death during pregnancy. Yet, less than 5% of women of childbearing age with RHD in LMICs use contraceptives, and one in five pregnant women with RHD take warfarin despite known teratogenicity. It is unclear whether this suboptimal contraception and anticoagulant use during pregnancy is due to lack of health system resources, limited health literacy, or social pressure to bear children. We conducted a mixed methods study of 75 women living with RHD in Uganda. Questionnaires were administered to 50 patients. Transcripts from three focus groups with 25 participants were analyzed using qualitative description methodology. Several themes emerged from the focus groups, including pregnancy as a calculated risk; misconceptions about side-effects of contraceptives and anticoagulation; reproductive decision-making control by male partners, in-laws, or physicians; abandonment of patients by male partners; and considerable stigma against heart disease patients for both their reproductive and financial limitations (often worse than that directed against HIV patients). All questionnaire respondents were told by physicians that their hearts were not strong enough to support a pregnancy. Only 14% used contraception while taking warfarin. All participants felt that society would look poorly on a woman who cannot have children due to a heart condition. To our knowledge, this is the first qualitative study of female RHD patients and their attitudes toward cardiovascular disorders and reproduction. Our results suggest that health programs targeting heart disease in LMICs must pay special attention to the needs of women of childbearing age. There are opportunities for improved family/societal education programs and community engagement

  1. Doenças reumáticas e infertilidade masculina Rheumatic diseases and male infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eutília Andrade Medeiros Freire

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available As doenças reumáticas podem causar distúrbios sexuais e reprodutivos. As razões destes distúrbios são multifatoriais. Manifestações e sintomas das doenças podem reduzir a libido e interferir no sucesso da reprodução, como ocorre na artrite reumatóide (AR, lúpus eritematoso sistêmico (LES, espondilite anquilosante (EA e esclerose sistêmica (ES. A atividade da doença pode levar a uma alteração do eixo hipotálamo-hipófise, acarretando períodos de disfunção gonadal. Os auto-anticorpos e os distúrbios de hormônios sexuais, que podem estar presentes em muitas doenças reumáticas, podem influenciar negativamente na fertilidade. Além disso, algumas drogas usadas no tratamento de doenças reumatológicas por vezes representam um risco para a reprodução masculina, devido aos efeitos adversos que podem causar, como defeitos cromos-sômicos e gonadotoxicidade, prejudicando a espermatogênese e a motilidade dos espermatozóides. Conseqüentemente, há falência gonadal transitória ou permanente. Este trabalho faz uma revisão de um assunto pouco abordado na literatura brasileira.Rheumatic diseases affect all aspects of life, including sexuality and reproduction. The reasons for disturbing sexual functioning and reproduction are multifactorial. Manifestations and symptoms of disease can reduce libido and interfere with successful reproduction, for example, in rheumatoid arthritis (AR, systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE, ankylosing spondylitis (AS and systemic sclerosis (SSc. Active disease disturbs the hypothalamic-pituitary-axis, giving rise to periods of gonadal dysfunction. Autoantibodies, which are present in most of the rheumatic diseases, and disturbances of sex hormone status can negatively influence the fertilization. Furthermore, some antirheumatic drugs carry a risk for male reproduction, because can present adverse effects, which includes chromosomal defects and gonadotoxicity, damaging the spermatogenesis and sperm

  2. Serum C-reactive protein concentrations in Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retrievers with immune-mediated rheumatic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bremer, Hanna Dorotea; Hillström, Anna; Kånåhols, Malin; Hagman, Ragnvi; Hansson-Hamlin, Helene

    2017-04-17

    Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retrievers (NSDTRs) are a dog breed often affected by immune-mediated rheumatic disease (IMRD), a disorder characterised by chronic stiffness and joint pain. Most, but not all, dogs with IMRD, have antinuclear antibodies (ANA), which are also commonly present in the autoimmune disease systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). The clinical and diagnostic findings of IMRD indicate that it is an SLE-related disorder. C-reactive protein (CRP), an acute phase protein, is a quantitative marker of inflammation for many diseases and is used for diagnosing and monitoring systemic inflammation in both humans and dogs. However, in human SLE, CRP concentrations are often elevated but correlate poorly with disease activity; they can be low in individual patients with active disease. The aim of the study was to investigate CRP in a group of NSDTRs with the SLE-related disorder IMRD. The hypothesis was that CRP concentrations would be increased in dogs with IMRD compared to healthy dogs, but that the increase would be mild. Serum CRP concentrations were measured in 18 IMRD-affected NSDTRs and 19 healthy control NSDTRs using two different canine-specific CRP assays. Dogs with IMRD and ANA had higher CRP concentrations than the control dogs, but the concentrations were below the clinical decision limit for systemic inflammation for most of the IMRD dogs. These results indicate that CRP concentrations were increased in dogs with IMRD and ANA, but the increase was mild, similar to what has been observed in human SLE.

  3. Rheumatic Disease among Oklahoma Tribal Populations: A Cross-Sectional Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaddy, Jasmine R.; Vista, Evan S.; Robertson, Julie M.; Dedeke, Amy B.; Roberts, Virginia C.; Klein, Wendy S.; Levin, Jeremy H.; Mota, Fabio H.; Cooper, Tina M.; Grim, Gloria A.; Khan, Sohail; James, Judith A.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Rheumatic diseases cause significant morbidity within American Indian populations. Clinical disease presentations, as well as historically associated autoantibodies, are not always useful in making a rapid diagnosis or assessing prognosis. The purpose of this study is to identify autoantibody associations among Oklahoma tribal populations with rheumatic disease. Methods Oklahoma tribal members (110 rheumatic disease patients and 110 controls) were enrolled at tribal-based clinics. Rheumatic disease patients (suspected or confirmed diagnosis) were assessed by a rheumatologist for clinical features, disease criteria, and activity measures. Blood samples were collected and tested for common rheumatic disease autoantibodies (ANA, anti-CCP, anti-RF, anti-Ro, anti-La, anti-Sm, anti-nRNP, anti-Ribosomal P, anti-dsDNA, and anti-cardiolipins). Results In patients with suspected systemic rheumatic diseases, 72% satisfied ACR classification: 40 (36%) rheumatoid arthritis, 16 (15%) systemic lupus erythematosus, 8 (7%) scleroderma, 8 (7%) osteoarthritis, 4 (4%) fibromyalgia, 2 (2%) seronegative spondyloarthropathy, 1 Sjogrens syndrome, and 1 sarcoidosis. When compared to controls, RA patient sera were more likely to contain anti-CCP (55% vs 2%, pdisease activity scores (DAS28 5.6 vs 4.45, p=0.021) while anti-RF positivity did not (DAS28 5.36 vs 4.64, p=0.15). Anticardiolipin antibodies (25% or rheumatic disease paitents vs 10% of contros,; p=0.0022) and ANA (63% vs 21%, prheumatic disease patients. Conclusion Anti-CCP may serve as a better RA biomarker in AI patients, while the clinical significance of increased frequency of aCLs needs further evaluation. PMID:22896022

  4. Schizoaffective Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... variations in brain chemistry and structure. Risk factors Factors that increase the risk of developing schizoaffective disorder include: Having a close blood relative who has schizoaffective disorder, schizophrenia or bipolar disorder Stressful events that trigger symptoms ...

  5. Rheumatic heart disease: infectious disease origin, chronic care approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katzenellenbogen, Judith M; Ralph, Anna P; Wyber, Rosemary; Carapetis, Jonathan R

    2017-11-29

    Rheumatic heart disease (RHD) is a chronic cardiac condition with an infectious aetiology, causing high disease burden in low-income settings. Affected individuals are young and associated morbidity is high. However, RHD is relatively neglected due to the populations involved and its lower incidence relative to other heart diseases. In this narrative review, we describe how RHD care can be informed by and integrated with models of care developed for priority non-communicable diseases (coronary heart disease), and high-burden communicable diseases (tuberculosis). Examining the four-level prevention model (primordial through tertiary prevention) suggests primordial and primary prevention of RHD can leverage off existing tuberculosis control efforts, given shared risk factors. Successes in coronary heart disease control provide inspiration for similarly bold initiatives for RHD. Further, we illustrate how the Chronic Care Model (CCM), developed for use in non-communicable diseases, offers a relevant framework to approach RHD care. Systems strengthening through greater integration of services can improve RHD programs. Strengthening of systems through integration/linkages with other well-performing and resourced services in conjunction with policies to adopt the CCM framework for the secondary and tertiary prevention of RHD in settings with limited resources, has the potential to significantly reduce the burden of RHD globally. More research is required to provide evidence-based recommendations for policy and service design.

  6. Revised Jones Criteria For The Diagnosis of Acute Rheumatic Fever (AHA 2015 - An Indian Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KV Sahasranam

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Acute Rheumatic Fever (ARF is still a major problem in some developing and low middle income countries though the incidence and prevalence has remarkably reduced in North America and Europe. Ever since T. Duckett Jones in 1944 proposed the Jones criteria, it was modified and later revised by the American Heart Association (AHA in 1992. This was reconfirmed in and AHA sponsored Work shop in 2002. No modification or change was suggested after the introduction of Doppler Echocardiography (DE for the diagnosis of clinical and "subclinical carditis". When a clinical diagnosis by the clinician fails to show evidence of carditis, DE may pick up cases of "subclinical carditis". Moreover, previous recommendations did not include the Classification of Recommendations (Class I, II a, II b, and III and Levels of Evidence (Levels A, B and C. Recently, however, a scientific statement from the American Heart Association (AHA has published an update to the Jones criteria including the use of DE in the diagnosis of ARF.

  7. The clinical obesity maintenance model: an integration of psychological constructs including mood, emotional regulation, disordered overeating, habitual cluster behaviours, health literacy and cognitive function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raman, Jayanthi; Smith, Evelyn; Hay, Phillipa

    2013-01-01

    Psychological distress and deficits in executive functioning are likely to be important barriers to effective weight loss maintenance. The purpose of this paper is twofold. First, in the light of recent evidence in the fields of neuropsychology and obesity, particularly on the deficits in the executive function in overweight and obese individuals, a conceptual and theoretical framework of obesity maintenance is introduced by way of a clinical obesity maintenance model (COMM). It is argued that psychological variables, that of habitual cluster Behaviors, emotional dysregulation, mood, and health literacy, interact with executive functioning and impact on the overeating/binge eating behaviors of obese individuals. Second, cognizant of this model, it is argued that the focus of obesity management should be extended to include a broader range of maintaining mechanisms, including but not limited to cognitive deficits. Finally, a discussion on potential future directions in research and practice using the COMM is provided.

  8. The Clinical Obesity Maintenance Model: An Integration of Psychological Constructs including Mood, Emotional Regulation, Disordered Overeating, Habitual Cluster Behaviours, Health Literacy and Cognitive Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayanthi Raman

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Psychological distress and deficits in executive functioning are likely to be important barriers to effective weight loss maintenance. The purpose of this paper is twofold. First, in the light of recent evidence in the fields of neuropsychology and obesity, particularly on the deficits in the executive function in overweight and obese individuals, a conceptual and theoretical framework of obesity maintenance is introduced by way of a clinical obesity maintenance model (COMM. It is argued that psychological variables, that of habitual cluster Behaviors, emotional dysregulation, mood, and health literacy, interact with executive functioning and impact on the overeating/binge eating behaviors of obese individuals. Second, cognizant of this model, it is argued that the focus of obesity management should be extended to include a broader range of maintaining mechanisms, including but not limited to cognitive deficits. Finally, a discussion on potential future directions in research and practice using the COMM is provided.

  9. Plenum of the All-Union Committee on the Study of Rheumatism and Diseases of the Joints at the Presidium of the Academy of Medical Sciences USSR - USSR

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shcherbatenko, S

    1960-01-01

    .... The report on the prophylaxis of rheumatism was submitted by Active Member of the Acad. Med. Sci. USSR, Prof. A. I. Nesterov (Moscow). Experience shows that the streptococcus plays the principal role in the development of rheumatism...

  10. Soluble HLA-G in pregnancies complicated by autoimmune rheumatic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beneventi, Fausta; Badulli, Carla; Locatelli, Elena; Caporali, Roberto; Ramoni, Véronique; Cavagnoli, Chiara; Simonetta, Margherita; Garbin, Giulia; Tinelli, Carmine; Alpini, Claudia; Montecucco, CarloMaurizio; Martinetti, Miryam; Spinillo, Arsenio

    2015-08-01

    Autoimmune rheumatic diseases in pregnancies are associated with increased adverse obstetric outcomes. We compared maternal soluble human leucocyte antigen-G (sHLA-G) blood levels in subjects with a rheumatic disease preexisting pregnancy and unaffected controls. Third-trimester blood maternal sHLA-G concentrations were significantly higher in subjects with rheumatic diseases than in controls (mean 93.1ng/ml [SD 42.1] vs 58.1ng/ml [SD 96.3], p=0.003). Cord blood sHLA-G concentrations were significantly higher in rheumatic disease than in those born to control mothers (median 41.2ng/ml [IQR: 3.3-44.0] vs 17.9ng/ml [IQR: 17.2-88.1], p=0.007). A strict positive correlation (r=0.88, prheumatic disease DEL/DEL homozygous for a polymorphism of the 3' untranslated regulatory region of HLA-G (HLA-G 14bp) than in the corresponding healthy controls (mean values 141.5ng/ml [SD: 166] vs 54.2ng/ml [SD: 35], p=0.009). Increasing maternal and cord blood levels of s-HLA-G concentrations among pregnant subjects with rheumatic diseases compared with controls suggest that autoimmune diseases prompt a maternal and fetal immune response that favors pregnancy immune tolerance. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Perioperative Management of Patients with Inflammatory Rheumatic Diseases Undergoing Major Orthopaedic Surgery: A Practical Overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gualtierotti, Roberta; Parisi, Marco; Ingegnoli, Francesca

    2018-04-01

    Patients with inflammatory rheumatic diseases often need orthopaedic surgery due to joint involvement. Total hip replacement and total knee replacement are frequent surgical procedures in these patients. Due to the complexity of the inflammatory rheumatic diseases, the perioperative management of these patients must envisage a multidisciplinary approach. The frequent association with extraarticular comorbidities must be considered when evaluating perioperative risk of the patient and should guide the clinician in the decision-making process. However, guidelines of different medical societies may vary and are sometimes contradictory. Orthopaedics should collaborate with rheumatologists, anaesthesiologists and, when needed, cardiologists and haematologists with the common aim of minimising perioperative risk in patients with inflammatory rheumatic diseases. The aim of this review is to provide the reader with simple practical recommendations regarding perioperative management of drugs such as disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs, corticosteroids, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and tools for a risk stratification for cardiovascular and thromboembolic risk based on current evidence for patients with inflammatory rheumatic diseases.

  12. Coping mediates the influence of personality on life satisfaction in patients with rheumatic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vollmann, Manja; Pukrop, Jörg; Salewski, Christel

    2016-04-01

    A rheumatic disease can severely impair a person's quality of life. The degree of impairment, however, is not closely related to objective indicators of disease severity. This study investigated the influence and the interplay of core psychological factors, i.e., personality and coping, on life satisfaction in patients with rheumatic diseases. Particularly, it was tested whether coping mediates the effects of personality on life satisfaction. In a cross-sectional design, 158 patients diagnosed with a rheumatic disease completed questionnaires assessing the Big 5 personality traits (BFI-10), several disease-related coping strategies (EFK) and life satisfaction (HSWBS). Data were analyzed using a complex multiple mediation analysis with the Big 5 personality traits as predictors, coping strategies as mediators and life satisfaction as outcome. All personality traits and seven of the nine coping strategies were associated with life satisfaction (rs > |0.16|, ps ≤ 0.05). The mediation analysis revealed that personality traits had no direct, but rather indirect effects on life satisfaction through coping. Neuroticism had a negative indirect effect on life satisfaction through less active problem solving and more depressive coping (indirect effects > -0.03, ps  0.06, ps rheumatic diseases. The interplay of these variables should be considered in psychological interventions for patients with rheumatic diseases.

  13. Delayed Diagnosis of Acute Rheumatic Fever in a Patient with Multiple Emergency Department Visits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inna Kaminecki

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available While the incidence of acute rheumatic fever (ARF in the United States has declined over the past years, the disease remains one of the causes of severe cardiovascular morbidity in children. The index of suspicion for ARF in health care providers may be low due to decreasing incidence of the disease and clinical presentation that can mimic other conditions. We present the case of a 5-year-old boy with a history of intermittent fevers, fatigue, migratory joint pain, and weight loss following group A Streptococcus pharyngitis. The patient presented to the emergency department twice with the complaints described above. On his 3rd presentation, the workup for his symptoms revealed the diagnosis of acute rheumatic fever with severe mitral and aortic valve regurgitation. The patient was treated with penicillin G benzathine and was started on glucocorticoids for severe carditis. The patient was discharged with recommendations to continue secondary prophylaxis with penicillin G benzathine every 4 weeks for the next 10 years. This case illustrates importance of primary prevention of acute rheumatic fever with adequate antibiotic treatment of group A Streptococcus pharyngitis. Parents should also receive information and education that a child with a previous attack of ARF has higher risk for a recurrent attack of rheumatic fever. This can lead to development of severe rheumatic heart disease. Prevention of recurrent ARF requires continuous antimicrobial prophylaxis. Follow-up with a cardiologist every 1-2 years is essential to assess the heart for valve damage.

  14. [The National Database of the Regional Collaborative Rheumatic Centers as a tool for clinical epidemiology and quality assessment in rheumatology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zink, Angela; Huscher, Dörte; Listing, Joachim

    2003-01-01

    The national database of the German Collaborative Arthritis Centres is a well-established tool for the observation and assessment of health care delivery to patients with rheumatic diseases in Germany. The discussion of variations in treatment practices contributes to the internal quality assessment in the participating arthritis centres. This documentation has shown deficits in primary health care including late referral to a rheumatologist, undertreatment with disease-modifying drugs and complementary therapies. In rheumatology, there is a trend towards early, intensive medical treatment including combination therapy. The frequency and length of inpatient hospital and rehabilitation treatments is decreasing, while active physiotherapy in outpatient care has been increased. Specific deficits have been identified concerning the provision of occupational therapy services and patient education.

  15. Behavioral outcome including attention deficit hyperactivity disorder/hyperactivity disorder and minor neurological signs in perinatal high-risk newborns at 4-6 years of age with relation to risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Masuko; Aotani, Hirofumi; Hattori, Ritsuko; Funato, Masahisa

    2004-06-01

    Diagnostic problems with the criteria of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in the Diagnostic Statistical Manual, 4th edn, have been identified. The aim of this study was to clarify whether the minor neurological signs test (MNT) the authors had previously reported was a predictor for the criteria of ADHD or hyperactivity disorder (HD) in perinatal risk children at 4-6 years of age and what kind of risk factors related to MNT. A total of 136 children discharged from neonatal intensive care units were examined at the age of 4-6 years by a developmental neuropediatrician using both MNT and diagnostic criteria of DSM-IV ADHD/ICD-10 (International Classification of Diseases, 10th edn) HD. SPSS base and professional were used for statistical analysis. On comparison of diagnostic criteria between ADHD (11.0%) and HD (27.5%), the incidence in the same subjects showed significant difference. MNT scores showed significant correlation with criteria of ADHD (P Apgar 5 in the NLBW group and toxemia of pregnancy and small for gestational age (SGA) in VLBW group were highly correlated with behavioral outcome. Minor neurological signs test score was a significant predictor for criteria of ADHD and HD. High incidences of positive MNT were suspected in not only VLBW children but also NLBW children and Apgar 5 in NLBW children and toxemia of pregnancy and SGA in VLBW children influenced behavioral outcome.

  16. Systematic review with meta-analysis: online psychological interventions for mental and physical health outcomes in gastrointestinal disorders including irritable bowel syndrome and inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanlon, I; Hewitt, C; Bell, K; Phillips, A; Mikocka-Walus, A

    2018-06-14

    Online psychotherapy has been successfully used as supportive treatment in many chronic illnesses. However, there is a lack of evidence on its role in the management of gastrointestinal (GI) diseases. To examine whether online psychological interventions improve mental and physical outcomes in gastrointestinal diseases. We searched CINAHL Plus, MEDLINE, EMBASE, Health Management Information Consortium, PsycINFO, British Nursing Index, Cochrane Library, a specialised register of the IBD/FBD Cochrane Group, MEDLINE (PubMed) WHO International Clinical Trial Registry, ClinicalTrials.gov, and reference lists of all papers included in the review. The Cochrane Risk of Bias Tool was used to assess internal validity. Where possible, data were pooled using random-effects meta-analysis. We identified 11 publications (encompassing nine studies) meeting inclusion criteria. One study had a high risk of selection bias (allocation concealment), all studies had a high risk of performance and detection bias. Eight studies were included in the meta-analyses (6 on irritable bowel syndrome [IBS] and two on inflammatory bowel disease [IBD]). Online cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) was shown to significantly improve gastrointestinal symptom-specific anxiety (MD: -8.51, 95% CI -12.99 to -4.04, P = 0.0002) and lessen symptom-induced disability (MD: -2.78, 95% CI -5.43 to -0.12, P = 0.04) in IBS post intervention. There was no significant effect of online CBT on any other outcomes in IBS. No significant effect of online psychotherapy was demonstrated in IBD. There is insufficient evidence to demonstrate the effectiveness of online CBT to manage mental and physical outcomes in gastrointestinal diseases. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Novel insights into systemic autoimmune rheumatic diseases using shared molecular signatures and an integrative analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, Marie; Bernatsky, Sasha; Colmegna, Ines; Lora, Maximilien; Pastinen, Tomi; Klein Oros, Kathleen; Greenwood, Celia M T

    2017-06-03

    We undertook this study to identify DNA methylation signatures of three systemic autoimmune rheumatic diseases (SARDs), namely rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, and systemic sclerosis, compared to healthy controls. Using a careful design to minimize confounding, we restricted our study to subjects with incident disease and performed our analyses on purified CD4 + T cells, key effector cells in SARD. We identified differentially methylated (using the Illumina Infinium HumanMethylation450 BeadChip array) and expressed (using the Illumina TruSeq stranded RNA-seq protocol) sites between cases and controls, and investigated the biological significance of this SARD signature using gene annotation databases. We recruited 13 seropositive rheumatoid arthritis, 19 systemic sclerosis, 12 systemic lupus erythematosus subjects, and 8 healthy controls. We identified 33 genes that were both differentially methylated and expressed (26 over- and 7 under-expressed) in SARD cases versus controls. The most highly overexpressed gene was CD1C (log fold change in expression = 1.85, adjusted P value = 0.009). In functional analysis (Ingenuity Pathway Analysis), the top network identified was lipid metabolism, molecular transport, small molecule biochemistry. The top canonical pathways included the mitochondrial L-carnitine shuttle pathway (P = 5E-03) and PTEN signaling (P = 8E-03). The top upstream regulator was HNF4A (P = 3E-05). This novel SARD signature contributes to ongoing work to further our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying SARD and provides novel targets of interest.

  18. Frequency and severity of rheumatic heart disease in the catchment area of Gauteng hospitals, 1993-1995

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Clur, Sally-Ann

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Identification of frequency and severity of rheumatic fever/rheumatic heart disease (RF/RHD) in the catchment area of Gauteng hospitals. DESIGN: A retrospective descriptive analysis using hospital-based computer databases. SETTING: Helen Joseph, Chris Hani Baragwanath and Johannesburg

  19. Analysis of employment rate and social status in young adults with childhood-onset rheumatic disease in Catalonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Mendoza, Ana Carolina; Modesto Caballero, Consuelo; Navarro-Cendejas, José

    2015-07-11

    Rheumatic diseases of childhood, in particular juvenile idiopathic arthritis, are chronic conditions associated with considerable morbidity and mortality that can have repercussions on aspects of adult life. The aim of this study was to determine the employment rate and social status of patients with childhood-onset rheumatic disease attending a pediatric rheumatology transition unit. A census was taken of patients seen in the Pediatric Rheumatology Transition Unit of Hospital Vall d'Hebron (Barcelona, Spain). We collected demographic and clinical variables and determined the patients' functional capacity. All patients seen during the period of September to December 2013 underwent a survey containing items related to their social situation, maximum academic level achieved, and working life. Correlations were sought between clinical variables associated with a poor prognosis and the patients' job performance. The data were analyzed and compared with those of an age-matched cohort from the general population of Catalonia. Of 130 patients included in the census, 96 responded to the survey. Steinbrocker grade III and IV disability (poorer functional capacity) (p = 0.0025) and longer disease duration (p = 0.017) were significantly related to greater difficulty getting a job. Patients with grade III and IV disability and those with more severe disease showed trends to having more problems carrying out work-related tasks. Our cohort included a higher percentage of students than the age-matched comparison population (50 % vs 24 %, respectively) (p = 0.0001); 82 % of patients had completed studies beyond the compulsory education level. The employment rate was lower in our patient cohort than in the comparison cohort (38.3 % vs 59.9 %) (p = 0.0001), whereas the percentage of unemployed was similar. Patients with milder disease had a higher probability of living with their parents up to a later age (OR = 3.2, 95 % CI 0.38-6.15; p = 0

  20. Real-life effectiveness of spa therapy in rheumatic and musculoskeletal diseases: a retrospective study of 819 patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karagülle, Mine; Kardeş, Sinan; Karagülle, Müfit Zeki

    2017-11-01

    The objective of this study is to determine the use and efficacy of spa therapy in patients with a wide spectrum of rheumatic and musculoskeletal diseases under real-life clinical practice circumstances. In this retrospective observational study at the Medical Ecology and Hydroclimatology Department of Istanbul Faculty of Medicine, the records of all adult patients with rheumatic and musculoskeletal diseases who were prescribed a spa therapy in various health resorts in Turkey between 2002 and 2012 were analyzed. Patients sojourned to and stayed at a health resort and followed a usual 2-week course of spa therapy. The patients were examined within a week before and after the spa therapy at the department by the physicians and outcome measures were pain intensity (visual analog scale, VAS), patient's general evaluation (VAS), physician's general evaluation (VAS), Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ), Lequesne's Functional Index (LFI), Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Index (WOMAC), Waddell Index (WI), Neck Pain and Disability Scale (NPDS), Shoulder Disability Questionnaire (SDQ), Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ), and Beck's Depression Inventory (BDI). In total, 819 patients were included in the analysis. The diagnoses were 536 osteoarthritis; 115 fibromyalgia; 50 lumbar disc herniation; 34 cervical disc herniation; 23 nonspecific low back pain; 22 ankylosing spondylitis; 16 rheumatoid arthritis; 9 rotator cuff tendinitis; and 14 other conditions/diseases including scoliosis, stenosing flexor tenosynovitis, congenital hip dislocation in adult, Behçet's disease, de Quervain tendinopathy, psoriatic arthritis, osteoporosis, fracture rehabilitation, and diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis. Statistically significant decrease in pain scores was found in all patients except hip osteoarthritis ( p = 0.063) and rheumatoid arthritis ( p = 0.134) subgroups; and statistically significant improvement in function in all patients except hip osteoarthritis ( p

  1. Handheld echocardiography versus auscultation for detection of rheumatic heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godown, Justin; Lu, Jimmy C; Beaton, Andrea; Sable, Craig; Mirembe, Grace; Sanya, Richard; Aliku, Twalib; Yu, Sunkyung; Lwabi, Peter; Webb, Catherine L; Ensing, Gregory J

    2015-04-01

    Rheumatic heart disease (RHD) remains a major public health concern in developing countries, and routine screening has the potential to improve outcomes. Standard portable echocardiography (STAND) is far more sensitive than auscultation for the detection of RHD but remains cost-prohibitive in resource-limited settings. Handheld echocardiography (HAND) is a lower-cost alternative. The purpose of this study was to assess the incremental value of HAND over auscultation to identify RHD. RHD screening was completed for schoolchildren in Gulu, Uganda, by using STAND performed by experienced echocardiographers. Any child with mitral or aortic regurgitation or stenosis plus a randomly selected group of children with normal STAND findings underwent HAND and auscultation. STAND and HAND studies were interpreted by 6 experienced cardiologists using the 2012 World Heart Federation criteria. Sensitivity and specificity of HAND and auscultation for the detection of RHD and pathologic mitral or aortic regurgitation were calculated by using STAND as the gold standard. Of 4773 children who underwent screening with STAND, a subgroup of 1317 children underwent HAND and auscultation. Auscultation had uniformly poor sensitivity for the detection of RHD or valve disease. Sensitivity was significantly improved by using HAND compared with auscultation for the detection of definite RHD (97.8% vs 22.2%), borderline or definite RHD (78.4% vs 16.4%), and pathologic aortic insufficiency (81.8% vs 13.6%). Auscultation alone is a poor screening test for RHD. HAND significantly improves detection of RHD and may be a cost-effective screening strategy for RHD in resource-limited settings. Copyright © 2015 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  2. Parvovirus B19 infections serological diagnostics in rheumatic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L P Ananjeva

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To study contamination with parvovirus B19 of a group of patients with rheumatic diseases (RD. Methods. 77 pts with RD (mean age 42,5 years, 79% female admitted to Institute of Rheumatology of RAMS were examined. 34 of them had rheumatoid arthritis (RA, 11 - systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE and Sjogren's disease (SD, 15 with osteoarthritis (OA and seronegative spondyloarthritides (SS and 17 with early (before a year undifferentiated arthritis (EUA. Quantitative determination of IgM and IgG serum antibodies to parvovirus BI9 was performed by I FA with IBL kits (Hamburg, Germany. Results. Anti-B19 IgG antibodies were found in 52% of pts, IgM antibodies - only in one case. Mean antibodies values in pts with RD of disease duration less then 6 months were significantly higher then in pts with longer disease duration (21,5+36 U/ml and 8,4+14.7 U/ml respectively, p<0,05. Anti-B 19 antibodies were present in 62% of pts with RA, 53% of pts with EUA, 45% of pts with SD, 33% of pts with OA and SS. High levels of antibodies (4-10 times higher positivity threshold were revealed in 13 pts with different RD with short duration of joint syndrome (6,3±7,6 months and fever at presentation. A case of B19 parvovirus infection in a boy of 3 years age accompanied by symptoms of Still's disease is described.

  3. High frequency of parvovirus B19 DNA in bone marrow samples from rheumatic patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundqvist, Anders; Isa, Adiba; Tolfvenstam, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Human parvovirus B19 (B19) polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is now a routine analysis and serves as a diagnostic marker as well as a complement or alternative to B19 serology. The clinical significance of a positive B19 DNA finding is however dependent on the type of tissue or body fluid...... analysed and of the immune status of the patient. OBJECTIVES: To analyse the clinical significance of B19 DNA positivity in bone marrow samples from rheumatic patients. STUDY DESIGN: Parvovirus B19 DNA was analysed in paired bone marrow and serum samples by nested PCR technique. Serum was also analysed...... negative group. A high frequency of parvovirus B19 DNA was thus detected in bone marrow samples in rheumatic patients. The clinical data does not support a direct association between B19 PCR positivity and rheumatic disease manifestation. Therefore, the clinical significance of B19 DNA positivity in bone...

  4. Cutaneous adverse events during treatment of chronic inflammatory rheumatic conditions with tumor necrosis factor antagonists: study using the Spanish registry of adverse events of biological therapies in rheumatic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, M Victoria; Sanmartí, Raimon; Cañete, Juan D; Descalzo, Miguel A; Alsina, Mercè; Carmona, Loreto; Gomez-Reino, Juan J

    2013-12-01

    To analyze the incidence rate (IR) and risk factors of cutaneous adverse events (CAE) in patients with chronic inflammatory rheumatic diseases treated with tumor necrosis factor (TNF) antagonists. We analyzed all patients from the BIOBADASER (Base de Datos de Productos Biológicos de la Sociedad Española de Reumatología) registry treated with a TNF antagonist (infliximab, etanercept, or adalimumab). Data collected included age, sex, diagnosis and duration of rheumatic disease, type of TNF antagonist, and concomitant treatment. Type of CAE was classified as local or systemic cutaneous manifestation related to treatment administration (infusion reaction), infection, malignancy, or autoimmune skin disease. Time of onset of CAE and outcome were also recorded. The IRs of CAE per 1,000 patient-years of exposure with 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) were estimated. Multivariable analysis was performed to identify potential risk factors for CAE. A total of 5,437 patients were included, representing 17,330 patient-years of exposure. A total of 920 CAE were reported; the IRs per 1,000 patient-years were 53 (95% CI 50-57) for CAE, 28 (95% CI 25-30) for infection, 15 (95% CI 13-17) for infusion reactions, 5 (95% CI 4-6) for autoimmune skin diseases, and 3 (95% CI 2-4) for skin malignancy. The mean time between starting TNF antagonist treatment and CAE was 1.78 years. In 32% of patients, CAE required TNF antagonist withdrawal. The main risk factors for CAE were female sex and treatment with infliximab, leflunomide, and glucocorticoids. The IR of CAE in patients treated with TNF antagonists is significant and should be addressed carefully, and withdrawal of therapy is required in some cases. Copyright © 2013 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  5. Nailfold capillaroscopy in juvenile rheumatic diseases: known measures, patterns and indications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerhold, K; Becker, M O

    2014-01-01

    Nailfold capillaroscopy has become an established method in adults for the evaluation of structural abnormalities of the microcirculation associated with rheumatic disease. It is a cornerstone for the diagnostic work-up of patients with Raynaud's phenomenon and the early diagnosis of systemic sclerosis. However, this non-invasive examination may also be valuable in children and adolescents with rheumatic diseases. Based on the scarce data available, this review focuses on capillaroscopic findings in healthy children and adolescents as well as in children with juvenile systemic sclerosis, juvenile dermatomyositis, juvenile idiopathic arthritis, and Raynaud's phenomenon. In addition, it outlines the potential benefits and limitations of nailfold capillaroscopy for routine care in paediatric rheumatology.

  6. A short history of anti-rheumatic therapy - VII. Biological agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Gatto

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The introduction of biological agents has been a major turning-point in the treatment of rheumatic diseases, particularly in rheumatoid arthritis. This review describes the principle milestones that have led, through the knowledge of the structure and functions of nucleic acids, to the development of production techniques of the three major families of biological agents: proteins, monoclonal antibodies and fusion proteins. A brief history has also been traced of the cytokines most involved in the pathogenesis of inflammatory rheumatic diseases (IL-1 and TNF and the steps which have led to the use of the main biological drugs in rheumatology: anakinra, infliximab, adalimumab, etanercept and rituximab.

  7. Differential diagnosis of rheumatic illnesses. 4. compl. rev. and enl. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeidler, Henning; Michel, Beat

    2009-01-01

    The number of the possible differential diagnosis of rheumatic illnesses is extraordinarily high. This circumstance makes the diagnostics a difficult field with numerous pitfalls. The correct and complete diagnosis however is a condition for the correct therapy. This book facilitates this way from the symptom to the diagnosis for the reader: A detailed representation of the fundamentals (anamnesis, investigation findings, laboratory diagnostics and imaging) a detailed description of all important differential diagnosis follows. The meanwhile fourth edition of this standard work was completely revised and updated. An indispensable guide book for all persons which treat patients with rheumatic illnesses [de

  8. Efficacy and safety of combined spinal: Epidural versus epidural technique for labor analgesia in parturients with rheumatic valvular heart disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babita Ghai

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hemodynamic changes induced by labor pain and apprehension in addition to physiological changes may pose risk to parturients with rheumatic heart disease (RHD. Therefore, it is important to provide adequate pain relief during labor in these patients. We planned this study to compare the efficacy and safety of epidural (E versus combined spinal - epidural (CSE for labor analgesia in parturients with rheumatic valvular heart disease. Methods: Twenty-five parturients with RHD included in this study were randomized to one of the two groups - E group (n = 12, received 6 mL of 0.0625% bupivacaine with 25 μg fentanyl or CSE group (n = 13, received 25 μg of fentanyl with 1.25 mg bupivacaine diluted to 1 mL in subarachnoid space. Afterward, a continuous infusion of 0.1% bupivacaine with 2 μg/mL fentanyl was started at 6-8 mL/h. Primary outcome, analgesic efficacy, was assessed by visual analog scale (VAS for pain. VAS ≤ 3 was considered as effective analgesia. Rescue analgesia in the form of epidural bolus was given if VAS > 3. Results: Demographic characteristics of the patients were comparable. Mitral stenosis was the predominant valvular lesion. The VAS at which the parturients received analgesia was comparable. The mean time to achieve effective analgesia was significantly faster in CSE group (4.46 ± 0.87 min compared with group E (15.09 ± 5.7 min (P < 0.001. Significantly lower median pain scores were recorded until the initial 15 min in CSE group. Afterward, median VAS for pain was comparable between the groups. VAS for pain was significantly low at all time intervals than baseline in both the groups. Maternal satisfaction and incidence of cesarean rate and complication were comparable between the groups. Conclusion: Both epidural and CSE are equally effective and safe for labor analgesia in parturients with rheumatic valvular heart disease. However, CSE technique provides a faster onset of analgesia.

  9. Clinical course and therapeutic approach to varicella zoster virus infection in children with rheumatic autoimmune diseases under immunosuppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leuvenink, Raphael; Aeschlimann, Florence; Baer, Walter; Berthet, Gerald; Cannizzaro, Elvira; Hofer, Michael; Kaiser, Daniela; Schroeder, Silke; Heininger, Ulrich; Woerner, Andreas

    2016-06-02

    To analyze the clinical presentation and complications of varicella zoster virus (VZV) infection in children with rheumatic diseases treated with immunosuppressive medication such as biological disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (bDMARDs) and/or conventional disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (cDMARDs), and to analyze the therapeutic approach to VZV infections with respect to the concomitant immunosuppressive treatment. Retrospective multicenter study using the Swiss Pediatric Rheumatology registry. Children with rheumatic diseases followed in a Swiss center for pediatric rheumatology and treated with cDMARD and/or bDMARD with a clinical diagnosis of varicella or herpes zoster between January 2004 and December 2013 were included. Twenty-two patients were identified, of whom 20 were treated for juvenile idiopathic arthritis, 1 for a polyglandular autoimmune syndrome type III, and 1 for uveitis. Of these 22 patients, 16 had varicella and 6 had herpes zoster. Median age at VZV disease was 7.6 years (range 2 to 17 years), with 6.3 years (range 2 to 17 years) for those with varicella and 11.6 years (range 5 to 16 years) for those with herpes zoster. The median interval between start of immunosuppression and VZV disease was 14.1 months (range 1 to 63 months). Two patients had received varicella vaccine (1 dose each) prior to start of immunosuppression. Concomitant immunosuppressive therapy was methotrexate (MTX) monotherapy (n = 9) or bDMARD monotherapy (n = 2), or a combination of bDMARD with prednisone, MTX or Leflunomide (n = 11). Four patients experienced VZV related complications: cellulitis in 1 patient treated with MTX, and cellulitis, sepsis and cerebellitis in 3 patients treated with biological agents and MTX combination therapy. Six children were admitted to hospital (range of duration: 4 to 9 days) and 12 were treated with valaciclovir or aciclovir. The clinical course of varicella and herpes zoster in children under

  10. Validation of the educational needs assessment tool as a generic instrument for rheumatic diseases in seven European countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndosi, Mwidimi; Bremander, Ann; Hamnes, Bente; Horton, Mike; Kukkurainen, Marja Leena; Machado, Pedro; Marques, Andrea; Meesters, Jorit; Stamm, Tanja A; Tennant, Alan; de la Torre-Aboki, Jenny; Vliet Vlieland, Theodora P M; Zangi, Heidi A; Hill, Jackie

    2014-12-01

    To validate the educational needs assessment tool (ENAT) as a generic tool for assessing the educational needs of patients with rheumatic diseases in European Countries. A convenience sample of patients from seven European countries was included comprising the following diagnostic groups: ankylosing spondylitis, psoriatic arthritis, systemic sclerosis, systemic lupus erythematosus, osteoarthritis (OA) and fibromyalgia syndrome. Translated versions of the ENAT were completed through surveys in each country. Rasch analysis was used to assess the construct validity of the adapted ENATs including differential item functioning by culture (cross-cultural DIF). Initially, the data from each country and diagnostic group were fitted to the Rasch model separately, and then the pooled data from each diagnostic group. The sample comprised 3015 patients; the majority, 1996 (66.2%), were women. Patient characteristics (stratified by diagnostic group) were comparable across countries except the educational background, which was variable. In most occasions, the 39-item ENAT deviated significantly from the Rasch model expectations (item-trait interaction χ(2) pseven domains and analysing them as 'testlets'), fit to the model was satisfied (item-trait interaction χ(2) p>0.18) in all pooled disease group datasets except OA (χ(2)=99.91; p=0.002). The internal consistency in each group was high (Person Separation Index above 0.90). There was no significant DIF by person characteristics. Cross-cultural DIF was found in some items, which required adjustments. Subsequently, interval-level scales were calibrated to enable transformation of ENAT scores when required. The adapted ENAT is a valid tool with high internal consistency providing accurate estimation of the educational needs of people with rheumatic diseases. Cross-cultural comparison of educational needs is now possible. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a

  11. Improving the quality of care of patients with rheumatic disease using patient-centric electronic redesign software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Eric D; Lerch, Virginia; Billet, Jon; Berger, Andrea; Kirchner, H Lester

    2015-04-01

    Electronic health records (EHRs) are not optimized for chronic disease management. To improve the quality of care for patients with rheumatic disease, we developed electronic data capture, aggregation, display, and documentation software. The software integrated and reassembled information from the patient (via a touchscreen questionnaire), nurse, physician, and EHR into a series of actionable views. Core functions included trends over time, rheumatology-related demographics, and documentation for patient and provider. Quality measures collected included patient-reported outcomes, disease activity, and function. The software was tested and implemented in 3 rheumatology departments, and integrated into routine care delivery. Post-implementation evaluation measured adoption, efficiency, productivity, and patient perception. Over 2 years, 6,725 patients completed 19,786 touchscreen questionnaires. The software was adopted for use by 86% of patients and rheumatologists. Chart review and documentation time trended downward, and productivity increased by 26%. Patient satisfaction, activation, and adherence remained unchanged, although pre-implementation values were high. A strong correlation was seen between use of the software and disease control (weighted Pearson's correlation coefficient 0.5927, P = 0.0095), and a relative increase in patients with low disease activity of 3% per quarter was noted. We describe innovative software that aggregates, stores, and displays information vital to improving the quality of care for patients with chronic rheumatic disease. The software was well-adopted by patients and providers. Post-implementation, significant improvements in quality of care, efficiency of care, and productivity were demonstrated. Copyright © 2015 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  12. Juvenile idiopathic arthritis in adulthood: fulfilment of classification criteria for adult rheumatic diseases, long-term outcomes and predictors of inactive disease, functional status and damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira-Ramos, Filipa; Eusébio, Mónica; M Martins, Fernando; Mourão, Ana Filipa; Furtado, Carolina; Campanilho-Marques, Raquel; Cordeiro, Inês; Ferreira, Joana; Cerqueira, Marcos; Figueira, Ricardo; Brito, Iva; Canhão, Helena; Santos, Maria José; Melo-Gomes, José A; Fonseca, João Eurico

    2016-01-01

    To determine how adult juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) patients fulfil classification criteria for adult rheumatic diseases, evaluate their outcomes and determine clinical predictors of inactive disease, functional status and damage. Patients with JIA registered on the Rheumatic Diseases Portuguese Register (Reuma.pt) older than 18 years and with more than 5 years of disease duration were included. Data regarding sociodemographic features, fulfilment of adult classification criteria, Health Assessment Questionnaire, Juvenile Arthritis Damage Index-articular (JADI-A) and Juvenile Arthritis Damage Index-extra-articular (JADI-E) damage index and disease activity were analysed. 426 patients were included. Most of patients with systemic JIA fulfilled criteria for Adult Still's disease. 95.6% of the patients with rheumatoid factor (RF)-positive polyarthritis and 57.1% of the patients with RF-negative polyarthritis matched criteria for rheumatoid arthritis (RA). 38.9% of the patients with extended oligoarthritis were classified as RA while 34.8% of the patients with persistent oligoarthritis were classified as spondyloarthritis. Patients with enthesitis-related arthritis fulfilled criteria for spondyloarthritis in 94.7%. Patients with psoriatic arthritis maintained this classification. Patients with inactive disease had lower disease duration, lower diagnosis delay and corticosteroids exposure. Longer disease duration was associated with higher HAQ, JADI-A and JADI-E. Higher JADI-A was also associated with biological treatment and retirement due to JIA disability and higher JADI-E with corticosteroids exposure. Younger age at disease onset was predictive of higher HAQ, JADI-A and JADI-E and decreased the chance of inactive disease. Most of the included patients fulfilled classification criteria for adult rheumatic diseases, maintain active disease and have functional impairment. Younger age at disease onset was predictive of higher disability and decreased the

  13. Impact of a fatigue management in work programme on meeting work demands of individuals with rheumatic diseases: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormack, Róisín C; O'Shea, Finbar; Doran, Michele; Connolly, Deirdre

    2018-03-25

    Work disability and job loss are serious consequences of rheumatic diseases (RDs), and fatigue is a symptom of RDs commonly reported to have an impact on work performance. A FAtigue ManagEment in Work (FAME-W) programme was developed to facilitate the self-management of fatigue in work. The present pilot study explored if FAME-W could facilitate individuals with RDs to manage fatigue in work and improve their ability to meet work demands. Twenty-seven individuals with a variety of rheumatic diagnoses completed a 4-week, 2-h occupational therapy-led self-management programme. Each week focused on fatigue-related topics, including fatigue and activity management, pain management and joint protection, mental well-being, effective communication with employers and work colleagues, and employment legislation. Individual workplace ergonomic assessments were also offered. Study measures (work function, fatigue, pain, mood and self-efficacy) were completed prior to starting FAME-W, immediately post-intervention and 12 weeks post-intervention. Participants (56% male) had a mean age of 43 years. No significant improvements were observed immediately post-programme. However, at the 12-week follow-up, significant improvements were reported in meeting work demands (scheduling [p = 0.046], output [p = 0.002], physical [p = 0.003], mental [p = 0.016]), fatigue [p = 0.001], pain [p = 0.01], anxiety [p = 0.001], depression [p physical: p = 0.005; symptoms: p = 0.010; affect: p = 0.010; social: p = 0.001). Significant improvements were reported in participants' ability to meet various demands of their work 3 months post-FAME-W. These findings suggest that FAME-W has the potential to assist individuals with RDs to meet the demands of their work, although further research is required to test the effectiveness of this intervention. Copyright © 2018 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Spectrum of Magnetic Resonance Imaging Appearances of Juvenile Temporomandibular Joints (TMJ) in Non-Rheumatic Children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tzaribachev, N. (Dept. of Hematology, Oncology, and General Pediatrics, Univ. Children' s Hospital, Eberhard-Karls-Univ., Tuebingen (Germany)). e-mail. tzari@o2online.de; Fritz, J. (Russell H. Morgan Dept. of Radiology and Radiological Science, Johns Hopkins Univ. School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States)); Horger, M. (Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Eberhard-Karls-Univ., Tuebingen (Germany))

    2009-12-15

    Background: Temporomandibular joints (TMJ) are frequently involved in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), and gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the only modality for an early diagnosis. However, only very few data exist on the appearance of contrast-enhanced MRI of normal juvenile TMJ. Purpose: To define the spectrum of normal MRI findings of juvenile TMJ, and to assess a possible overlap with findings typical for active synovitis in JIA. Material and Methods: 96 children (192 TMJ), 51 boys and 45 girls with a median age of 7.8 years (range 3-13 years), underwent a head MRI. The presence of autoimmune disease, including JIA, was excluded via chart history, available laboratory findings, and the absence of known typical pathological MRI changes (degree of synovial enhancement, hyperintense signal on T2-weighted images in the synovia or bone marrow, and morphologic changes of the mandibular condyle) of the TMJ affected by JIA. Results: In 90 (94%) children, the TMJ showed no MRI abnormalities compatible with arthritis. In three children (3%), the only abnormal MRI finding was a small bilateral joint effusion. A further three children (3%) had a mild synovial enhancement seen on both axial and coronal MR planes in one child and only in the axial plane in the other two children. Signal hyperintensity on T2-weighted images and other corresponding characteristics of TMJ inflammation were lacking in all these six patients. Conclusion: The vast majority of juvenile TMJ in non-rheumatic children shows no MRI abnormalities. Exceptions, including a discrete enhancement of the synovial membrane (3%) or small joint effusions (3%), can occur in a minority of patients, but none of them are accompanied by other signs of inflammation or morphological changes of the TMJ

  15. Human papillomavirus infection and cervical lesions in rheumatic diseases: a systematic review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Raposo

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available An association between immune-mediated diseases and cervical pre-malignant and malignant lesions is described, having the human papillomavirus (HPV infection a causal role. Related studies have been generally focused on systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE patients, but relatively to other diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA, Sjögren's syndrome (SS and systemic sclerosis (SSc, data has not been systematically evaluated. We conducted a systematic review analysis of the literature in PubMed, including articles published until March of 2015, in patients with RA, SS, SLE and SSc, to evaluate the frequency of HPV infection, cervical dysplasia and cervical cancer, and associated factors, with particular interest on the role of glucocorticoids and immunosuppressive treatment. Moreover, safety and efficacy of HPV vaccines in these patients was investigated. Of 476 articles identified, 27 were finally included. The studies showed an increased prevalence of cervical dysplasia and cancer, with the HPV infection being an important associated factor, in particular in SLE patients. The data relatively to other rheumatic diseases was very scarse, but an increased prevalence of smear abnormalities was also found in RA. Patients exposed to glucocorticoids and to long-term immunosuppression, particularly cyclophosphamide, have increased risk of presenting more pre-malignant lesions than the general population. The available vaccines seem to be generally safe and immunogenic in the short- period evaluation, but long-term follow-up is required to evaluate the impact of the vaccine in the protection against HPV infection and occurrence of high-grade cervical lesions.

  16. Growth hormone treatment in children with rheumatic disease, corticosteroid induced growth retardation, and osteopenia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F.K. Grote (Floor); L.W.A. van Suijlekom-Smit (Lisette); D. Mul (Dick); W.C.J. Hop (Wim); R. ten Cate (Rebecca); W. Oostdijk (Wilma); W.H.J. van Luijk (Wilma); C.J.A. Jansen-Van Wijngaarden (C. J A); S.M.P.F. de Muinck Keizer-Schrama (Sabine)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractBackground: In children with severe rheumatic disease (RD), treatment with corticosteroids (CS) is frequently needed and growth retardation and osteopenia may develop. A beneficial effect of human growth hormone (hGH) has been reported but mostly in trials without a control group. Aims:

  17. Growth hormone treatment in children with rheumatic disease, corticosteroid induced growth retardation, and osteopenia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grote, FK; van Suijlekom-Smit, LWA; Mul, D; Hop, WCJ; ten Cate, R; Oostdijk, W; Van Luijk, W; Jansen-van Wijngaarden, CJA; Keizer-Schrama, SMPFD

    Background: In children with severe rheumatic disease (RD), treatment with corticosteroids (CS) is frequently needed and growth retardation and osteopenia may develop. A beneficial effect of human growth hormone (hGH) has been reported but mostly in trials without a control group. Aims: To study the

  18. Inflammatory status in patients with rheumatic mitral stenosis: Guilty before and after balloon mitral valvuloplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Ahmed Abdel Rahman

    2016-06-01

    Conclusion: Inflammatory pathogenesis of rheumatic fever, suggested by hsCRP, seems fixed both before, and after BMV. A basal increase in hsCRP before BMV is related to BMV success and an acute increase immediately after BMV seems related to trauma of balloon dilatations.

  19. Estimation of the symptoms for GERD by GerdQ in the patients with rheumatic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nozaki, Yuji; Kinoshita, Koji; Ri, Jinhai; Sakai, Kenji; Shiga, Toshihiko; Hino, Shoichi; Hirooka, Yasuaki; Sugiyama, Masahumi; Funauchi, Masanori; Matsumura, Itaru

    2016-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is one of the most common comorbidity in many diseases, but the frequency in rheumatic disease has not been well understood. We investigated the prevalence of GERD by GerdQ in 530 rheumatic patients [systematic lupus erythematosus (SLE; n = 120), rheumatoid arthritis (RA; n = 117), polymyalgia rheumatica (PMR; n = 40), dermatomyositis and polymyositis (PM/DM; n = 38), systemic scleroderma (SSc; n = 37), mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD; n = 18), Behçet disease (BD; n = 17), adult onset still disease (AOSD; n = 14), and other rheumatic diseases (n = 129)]. The mean GerdQ scores of patients was 6.2 ± 1.8, respectively, and no significant differences were observed between all patients. However, the GERD prevalence in SSc and BD was increased compared to that in SLE, RA, PMR, PM/DM, MCTD, and AOSD. In no medication of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs), a significant increase in the risk of GERD symptoms was 2.5 times compared with that in the medication of PPIs in all patients by multivariable regression analysis. On the other hand, there were no increased risks of GERD symptoms with corticosteroids. In rheumatic diseases, GerdQ would be the useful tool of diagnosis GERD, regardless whether the patients complain or not about gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms.

  20. Correction to: Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy in rituximab-treated rheumatic diseases: a rare event.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Joseph R; Malik, Vineeta; Lacey, Stuart; Brunetta, Paul; Lehane, Patricia B

    2018-04-10

    The article "Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy in rituximab-treated rheumatic diseases: a rare event," written by Joseph R. Berger, Vineeta Malik, Stuart Lacey, Paul Brunetta, and Patricia B. Lehane 3 , was originally published electronically on the publisher's internet portal (currently SpringerLink).

  1. Surgery for rheumatic mitral valve disease in sub-saharan African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    However, controversies exist on the choice between valve repair or prosthetic valve replacement. Although the advantages of mitral valve repair over prosthetic valve replacement in degenerative mitral disease are well established, this has not been the case for rheumatic lesions, where the use of prosthetic valves, ...

  2. Coping mediates the influence of personality on life satisfaction in patients with rheumatic diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vollmann, M.; Pukrop, Jörg; Salewski, Christel

    2016-01-01

    A rheumatic disease can severely impair a person’s quality of life. The degree of impairment, however, is not closely related to objective indicators of disease severity. This study investigated the influence and the interplay of core psychological factors, i.e., personality and coping, on life

  3. Sub-acute toxicity evaluation of ethanol extract of rheumatic tea ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sub-acute toxicity profile of Rheumatic Tea Formula (RTF), a polyherbal tea consisting of Salix alba, Eucalyptus globulus and Albizia chevalieri was investigated in wistar rats of both sexes. Wistar rats were orally administered three different doses of ethanol extract of RTF for 28 days after which the effect on body weight, ...

  4. Rheumatic fever prophylaxis in South Africa - is bicillin 1,2 million ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1993-09-30

    Sep 30, 1993 ... inducing loss of the organism's hyaluronic acid capsule and. M-proteins'6.21 Rheumatogenic strains of GABHS tend to· be highly virulent."·'6 It is therefore possible that serum penicillin concentrations below the MBCs for GABHS might be effective in secondary prophylaxis of rheumatic fever. Ginsburg et al.

  5. Treatment of muscular rheumatism with 99Tc-MDP (one case report)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Jincheng

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To observe the value of using Yun Ke ( 99 Tc-MDP) to cure muscular rheumatism. Methods: A 10 years old male patient was diagnosed with muscular rheumatism. His symptoms were wandering and muscular pain and tenderness at lumbosacral region, abdomen and double crus. He was given therapy with Yun Ke everyday, intravenous injection of 5 mg for 30 days. Results: After intravenous injection of Yun Ke within 8 to 72 hours, the pain in the left crus, the lumbosacral portion and the right crus was reduced in respective order. Finally, the pain disappeared, and only the abdominal pain remained. Between 6 and 30 days, the area of abdominal pain reduced little by little to the size of 1.0 x 1.0 cm 2 , which was beside the navel. On the 33 rd day after the initial treatment, we injected him in the previous mentioned area with prednisone and the pain disappeared. Conclusion: Yun Ke ( 99 Tc-MDP) is a new medicine for the treatment of rheumatism, and we believe muscular rheumatism is a new indication of Yun Ke

  6. CoReumaPt Protocol: the Portuguese Cohort of Rheumatic Diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laires, Pedro A.; Canhão, Helena; Araújo, Domingos; Fonseca, João Eurico; Machado, Pedro; Mourão, Ana Filipa; Ramiro, Sofia; Romeu, José Carlos; Santos, Maria José; Silva, Inês; Silva, José A.; Sousa, Elsa; Tavares, Viviana; Gouveia, Nélia; Branco, Jaime C.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Rheumatic diseases (RD) are conditions with a variety of clinical manifestations and prognosis influenced by several factors. Cohorts and registries have been already established in some countries and have contributed to important knowledge about the disease course and the long-term

  7. Rheumatic diseases in HIV-infected patients in the post-antiretroviral therapy era: a tertiary care center experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parperis, Konstantinos; Abdulqader, Yasir; Myers, Robert; Bhattarai, Bikash; Al-Ani, Muhsen

    2018-04-04

    The aim of the study was to calculate the proportion of rheumatic diseases in HIV patients who were receiving ART and to identify association of the HIV medications with the development of rheumatologic diseases. We conducted a retrospective chart review during the period of 2010 to 2016. We identified 2996 patients as having chronic HIV infection and on ART, and we collected data regarding patient's demographic characteristics, comorbidities, CD 4 count, HIV viral load, and ART. One hundred thirteen out of 2996 HIV patients (3.8%) were found to have a rheumatic condition (mean age of 48.6 years, 83% male). The most frequent musculoskeletal condition was avascular necrosis (AVN) in 39 (1.3%), and the most frequent autoimmune condition was psoriasis in 28 patients (1%). Compared with the 200 HIV patients without any diagnosis of rheumatic disease were the older patients with rheumatic conditions (mean age of 48.9 vs. 42.7 years; p rheumatic conditions were 1.7 times higher in males (relative to females). Those who received integrase inhibitors were more likely (63.3%) to develop rheumatologic manifestations relative to those who never received integrase inhibitors (21.6%; p rheumatic diseases in HIV patients appears to be comparable to the prevalence in the US population. Older age, longer duration of HIV infection, and the use of ART regimens containing integrase inhibitors, appear to increase the risk of developing a rheumatic condition.

  8. Reuma.pt contribution to the knowledge of immune-mediated systemic rheumatic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Maria José; Canhão, Helena; Mourão, Ana Filipa; Oliveira Ramos, Filipa; Ponte, Cristina; Duarte, Cátia; Barcelos, Anabela; Martins, Fernando; Melo Gomes, José António

    2017-01-01

    Patient registries are key instruments aimed at a better understanding of the natural history of diseases, at assessing the effectiveness of therapeutic interventions, as well as identifying rare events or outcomes that are not captured in clinical trials. However, the potential of registries goes far beyond these aspects. For example, registries promote the standardization of clinical practice, can also provide information on domains that are not routinely collected in clinical practice and can support decision-making. Being aware of the importance of registries, the Portuguese Society of Rheumatology developed the Rheumatic Diseases Portuguese Register- Reuma.pt - which proved to be an innovative instrument essential to a better understanding of systemic immune-mediated rheumatic diseases. To describe the contribution of Reuma.pt to the knowledge of systemic immune-mediated rheumatic diseases. Reuma.pt is widely implemented, with 77 centres actively contributing to the recruitment and follow-up of patients. Reuma.pt follows in a standardized way patients with the following systemic inflammatory rheumatic diseases: rheumatoid arthritis (n=6218), psoriatic arthritis (n=1498), spondyloarthritis (n=2529), juvenile idiopathic arthritis (n =1561), autoinflammatory syndromes (n=122), systemic lupus erythematosus (n =1718), systemic sclerosis (n=180) and vasculitis (n=221). This platform is intended for use as an electronic medical record, provides standardized assessment of patients and support to the clinical decision, thereby contributing to a better quality of care of rheumatic patients. The research based on Reuma.pt identified genetic determinants of susceptibility and response to therapy, characterized in detail systemic rheumatic diseases and their long-term impact, critically appraised the performance of instruments for monitoring the disease activity, established the effectiveness and safety of biologic therapies and identified predictors of response, and

  9. Resultados tardios da plastia mitral em pacientes reumáticos Late outcomes of mitral repair in rheumatic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elaine Soraya Barbosa de Oliveira Severino

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUÇÃO: Os resultados tardios da plastia mitral em pacientes reumáticos são controversos na literatura. OBJETIVO: Estudo observacional e prospectivo que avalia os resultados tardios e identifica os fatores associados à reoperação e à mortalidade em pacientes reumáticos submetidos à plastia da valva mitral. MÉTODOS: Incluídos somente os pacientes com valvopatia mitral reumática submetidos a plastia, com insuficiência tricúspide associada ou não. Excluídos os pacientes com outros procedimentos associados. Um total de 104 pacientes foi estudado. Sobrevida e reoperação foram avaliadas pela analise de Kaplan-Meier e regressão logística de Cox. RESULTADOS: O tempo de seguimento foi de 63 ± 39 meses (IC 95% 36 a 74 meses. A classe funcional III e IV estava presente em 65,4% dos pacientes no pré-operatório. Foram realizadas 33 plastias do anel posterior, 21 comissurotomias, 50 comissurotomias e plastias do anel posterior. Não houve mortalidade operatória e a tardia foi de três (2,8% pacientes. A reoperação tardia esteve associada à insuficiência mitral residual no pós-operatório (PINTRODUCTION AND AIMS: The long-term results after surgical repair of rheumatic mitral valve remain controversial in literature. Our aim was to determine the predictive factors which impact the long-term results after isolated rheumatic mitral valve repair and to evaluate the effect of those factors on reoperation and late mortality. METHODS: One hundred and four patients with rheumatic valve disease who had undergone mitral valve repair with or without tricuspid valve annuloplasty were included. All patients with associated procedures were excluded. The predictive variables for reoperation were assessed with Cox regression and Kaplan Meier survival curves. RESULTS: The mean follow-up time was 63 ± 39 months (CI 95% 36 to 74 months. The functional class III and IV was observed in 65.4% of all patients. The posterior ring annuloplasty was

  10. Cerebrovascular Disease in Rheumatic Diseases: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiseman, Stewart J; Ralston, Stuart H; Wardlaw, Joanna M

    2016-04-01

    Some rheumatic diseases are associated with stroke. Less is known about associations with stroke subtypes or stroke risk by age. We quantified the association between stroke, its subtypes, and rheumatic diseases and identified when stroke risk is greatest. Searches of EMBASE (from 1980) and MEDLINE (from inception) to end 2014 and manual search of reference lists for studies of stroke and stroke subtypes in rheumatic diseases as well as studies measuring cerebrovascular disease from magnetic resonance imaging. Prior published meta-analyses and new pooled analyses of any stroke in rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, ankylosing spondylitis, gout, and psoriasis show an excess risk of stroke over the general population with odds ratio (OR) ranging from 1.51 (95% confidence interval: 1.39-1.62) to 2.13 (1.53-2.98). New meta-analyses of stroke subtypes in rheumatoid arthritis [ischemic: OR, 1.64 (1.32-2.05); hemorrhagic: OR, 1.68 (1.11-2.53)] and systemic lupus erythematosus [ischemic: OR, 2.11 (1.66-2.67); hemorrhagic: OR, 1.82 (1.07-3.09)] show an excess risk of stroke over the general population. Stroke risk across rheumatic diseases is highest in those aged 65 years: OR, 1.14 (0.94-1.38); difference Pdiseases (OR, 1.3, 1.2-1.3). It was not possible to adjust ORs for risk factors or treatments. Risk of any stroke is higher in most rheumatic diseases than in the general population, particularly <50 years. Rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus increase ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke risk by 60% to 100% relative to the general population. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  11. Differences in selected medical care parameters in rheumatic disease ward patients of different ages of life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr Pobrotyn

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction : Rheumatic diseases are becoming more and more common in Poland with the ageing of the population. Nearly 18% of the total hospital admissions in Poland result from rheumatic diseases, which was equivalent to 350 thousand cases in the year 2008. These diseases tend to last for many decades, decreasing both the quality of life and income of the patients as well as increasing the medical institutions’ workload and society’s financial burden. The aim of the study was to determine whether the medical care parameters in a rheumatic disease hospital ward show any significant differences among different patient age groups – especially such that would support taking them into account as a basis for adjusting the financial coverage level of medical services. Material and methods : Data on hospitalizations at the Rheumatic Diseases Ward of Wroclaw University Hospital in Wroclaw in the years 2009–2015 were analyzed, taking into account the age groups, number of hospital admissions, their duration and causes. Relevant statistical data analysis was performed. Discussion: The study revealed that the number of old patients hospitalized at the rheumatic diseases ward increased over the last 6 years and that such statistically significant differences do exist: on average the old patients not only tend to stay much longer at the hospital, but also suffer from a different and more diverse spectrum of diseases in comparison to their younger counterparts. Conclusions : The detected differences in medical care parameters support the need for more individualized medical care and increased cost of the hospital stay in the case of older patients. Consequently, those factors justify the necessity to increase the value of medical services in the case of old patients, possibly also taking into account the variation between age subgroups.

  12. Telemedicine for patients with rheumatic diseases: Systematic review and proposal for research agenda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piga, Matteo; Cangemi, Ignazio; Mathieu, Alessandro; Cauli, Alberto

    2017-08-01

    To systematically review the scientific literature regarding tele-rheumatology and draw conclusions about feasibility, effectiveness, and patient satisfaction. PubMed, Scopus, and Cochrane database searches were performed (April 2016) using relevant MeSH and keyword terms for telemedicine and rheumatic diseases. Articles were selected if reporting outcomes for feasibility, effectiveness, and patient satisfaction and methodologically appraised using the Cochrane Collaboration's tool for assessing risk of bias and a modified version of CONSORT 2010 Statement. A total of 177 articles were screened, 23 were selected for the present review but only 9 were RCTs. Five studies reported on feasibility, 14 effectiveness, and 9 satisfaction rates for different tele-rheumatology interventions grouped in synchronous (remotely delivered consultation) and asynchronous (remote disease activity assessment; tele-monitoring of treatment strategies or rehabilitation; and remotely delivered self-management programs). Seven studies (30.4%) were on rheumatoid arthritis, 2 (8.7%) were on systemic sclerosis (1 including also rheumatoid arthritis patients), 5 (21.7%) on fibromyalgia, 2 (8.7%) on osteoarthritis, 3 (13.0%) on juvenile idiopathic arthritis and 4 (17.4%) on mixed disease cohorts. Interventions and outcomes heterogeneity prevented meta-analysis of results. Overall, feasibility and patient satisfaction rates were high or very high across intervention types. Effectiveness was equal or higher than standard face-to-face approach in controlled trials which, however, were affected by small sample size and lack of blinding participants according to appraisal tools. Telemedicine may provide a well-accepted way to remotely deliver consultation, treatment and monitoring disease activity in rheumatology. Higher quality RCTs demonstrating effectiveness of different tele-rheumatology interventions are needed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. 2015 Gout classification criteria: an American College of Rheumatology/European League Against Rheumatism collaborative initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neogi, Tuhina; Jansen, Tim L Th A; Dalbeth, Nicola; Fransen, Jaap; Schumacher, H Ralph; Berendsen, Dianne; Brown, Melanie; Choi, Hyon; Edwards, N Lawrence; Janssens, Hein J E M; Lioté, Frédéric; Naden, Raymond P; Nuki, George; Ogdie, Alexis; Perez-Ruiz, Fernando; Saag, Kenneth; Singh, Jasvinder A; Sundy, John S; Tausche, Anne-Kathrin; Vaquez-Mellado, Janitzia; Yarows, Steven A; Taylor, William J

    2015-01-01

    Objective Existing criteria for the classification of gout have suboptimal sensitivity and/or specificity, and were developed at a time when advanced imaging was not available. The current effort was undertaken to develop new classification criteria for gout. Methods An international group of investigators, supported by the American College of Rheumatology and the European League Against Rheumatism, conducted a systematic review of the literature on advanced imaging of gout, a diagnostic study in which the presence of monosodium urate monohydrate (MSU) crystals in synovial fluid or tophus was the gold standard, a ranking exercise of paper patient cases, and a multi-criterion decision analysis exercise. These data formed the basis for developing the classification criteria, which were tested in an independent data set. Results The entry criterion for the new classification criteria requires the occurrence of at least one episode of peripheral joint or bursal swelling, pain, or tenderness. The presence of MSU crystals in a symptomatic joint/bursa (ie, synovial fluid) or in a tophus is a sufficient criterion for classification of the subject as having gout, and does not require further scoring. The domains of the new classification criteria include clinical (pattern of joint/bursa involvement, characteristics and time course of symptomatic episodes), laboratory (serum urate, MSU-negative synovial fluid aspirate), and imaging (double-contour sign on ultrasound or urate on dual-energy CT, radiographic gout-related erosion). The sensitivity and specificity of the criteria are high (92% and 89%, respectively). Conclusions The new classification criteria, developed using a data-driven and decision-analytic approach, have excellent performance characteristics and incorporate current state-of-the-art evidence regarding gout. PMID:26359487

  14. Recommendations for the content and conduct of European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) musculoskeletal ultrasound courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naredo, E; Bijlsma, J W J; Conaghan, P G; Acebes, C; Balint, P; Berner-Hammer, H; Bruyn, G A W; Collado, P; D'Agostino, M A; de Agustin, J J; de Miguel, E; Filippucci, E; Grassi, W; Iagnocco, A; Kane, D; Koski, J M; Manger, B; Mayordomo, L; Möller, I; Moragues, C; Rejón, E; Szkudlarek, M; Terslev, L; Uson, J; Wakefield, R J; Schmidt, W A

    2008-07-01

    To develop education guidelines for the conduct of future European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) musculoskeletal ultrasound (MSUS) courses. We undertook a consensus-based, iterative process using two consecutive questionnaires sent to 29 senior ultrasonographer rheumatologists who comprised the faculty of the 14th EULAR ultrasound course (June 2007). The first questionnaire encompassed the following issues: type of MSUS educational model; course timing; course curriculum; course duration; number of participants per teacher in practical sessions; time spent on hands-on sessions; and the requirements and/or restrictions for attendance at the courses. The second questionnaire consisted of questions related to areas where consensus had not been achieved in the first questionnaire, and to the topics and pathologies to be assigned to different educational levels. The response rate was 82.7% from the first questionnaire and 87.5% from the second questionnaire. The respondents were from 11 European countries. The group consensus on guidelines and curriculum was for a three-level education model (basic, intermediate and advanced) with timing and location related to the annual EULAR Congresses. The topics and pathologies to be included in each course were agreed. The course duration will be 20 h. There will be a maximum of six participants per teacher and 50-60% of total time will be spent on practical sessions. There was also agreement on prerequisite experience before attending the intermediate and advanced courses. We have developed European agreed guidelines for the content and conduct of EULAR ultrasound courses, which may also be recommended to national and local MSUS training programmes.

  15. Adherence to secondary antibiotic prophylaxis for patients with rheumatic heart disease diagnosed through screening in Fiji.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelman, Daniel; Mataika, Reapi L; Kado, Joseph H; Ah Kee, Maureen; Donath, Susan; Parks, Tom; Steer, Andrew C

    2016-12-01

    Echocardiographic screening for rheumatic heart disease (RHD) can detect subclinical cases; however, adequate adherence to secondary antibiotic prophylaxis (SAP) is required to alter disease outcomes. We aimed to investigate the adherence to SAP among young people with RHD diagnosed through echocardiographic screening in Fiji and to investigate factors associated with adherence. Patients diagnosed with RHD through echocardiographic screening in Fiji from 2006 to 2014 were included. Dates of benzathine penicillin G injections were collected from 76 health clinics nationally from December 2011 to December 2014. Adherence was measured using the proportion of days covered (PDC). Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to identify characteristics associated with any adherence (≥1 injection received) and adequate adherence (PDC ≥0.80). Of 494 patients, 268 (54%) were female and the median age was 14 years. Overall, 203 (41%) had no injections recorded and just 33 (7%) had adequate adherence. Multivariate logistic regression showed increasing age (OR 0.93 per year, 95% CI 0.87-0.99) and time since diagnosis ≥1.5 years (OR 0.53, 95% CI 0.37-0.79) to be inversely associated with any adherence. Non-iTaukei ethnicity (OR 2.58, 95%CI 1.04-6.33) and urban residence (OR 3.36, 95% CI 1.54-7.36) were associated with adequate adherence, whereas time since diagnosis ≥1.5 years (OR 0.38, 95%CI 0.17-0.83) was inversely associated with adequate adherence. Adherence to SAP after screening in Fiji is currently inadequate for individual patient protection or population disease control. Secondary prevention should be strengthened before further screening can be justified. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Angiotensin Converting Enzyme Gene I/D Polymorphism in Pakistani Rheumatic Heart Disease Patients and Healthy Controls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadia Rehman

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Valve scarring and collagen deposition are crucial in pathogenesis of Rheumatic Heart Disease (RHD, an autoimmune disorder of the heart. Angiotensin I-Converting Enzyme (ACE plays a major role in fibrous tissue formation. Objectives: The present research work aimed to assess the role of ACE Insertion/Deletion (I/D polymorphism in progress of RHD. Patients and Methods: DNA was pre pared from blood samples from 156 RHD patients (156 and 204 healthy ethnically-matched controls. Then, it was screened using sequence-specific Primers. Polymerase chain reaction and Agarose gel electrophoresis. The data were analyzed using Vassar stats (http://faculty.vassar.edu/lowry/VassarStats.html. Results: I allele (P = 0.024, OR = 1.42 and II genotype (P = 0.001, OR = 3.07 were significantly higher in Pakistani RHD patients compared to the healthy controls. Also, a significant difference was found between the female, but not male, patients and the controls regarding I allele and II genotype. Conclusions: The study results provided information about involvement of ACE I/D polymorphism in molecular mechanism of RHD. Thus, it can become one of the useful tools in risk assessment and help with designing strategies to combat the disease.

  17. Primary headaches in pediatric patients with chronic rheumatic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uluduz, Derya; Tavsanli, Mustafa Emir; Uygunoğlu, Uğur; Saip, Sabahattin; Kasapcopur, Ozgur; Ozge, Aynur; Temel, Gulhan Orekici

    2014-11-01

    To assess the presence, prevalence and clinical characteristics of primary headaches in pediatric patients with chronic rheumatic diseases such as juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) and familial Mediterranean fever (FMF), and to analyze the common pathophysiological mechanisms. In this noncontrolled, cross-sectional study, a semi-structured 53 item headache questionnaire was administered to subjects with FMF and JIA, and interviewed a total sample size of 601 patients younger than16years of age. The questionnaires were then analyzed according to the International Headache Society's diagnostic criteria. Children with FMF (n=378) and JIA (n=223) were studied. Each group was then divided into two subgroups according to whether the subjects reported headache or not. 29.5% of subjects with FMF reported having migraine, 37.6% probable migraine and 32.9% tension type headache (TTH). In JIA group 28.2% were diagnosed with migraine; 41.2% with probable migraine and 30.6% with TTH. No significant difference was found between all subjects with (n=258) and without (n=343) headache for variables such as living in a crowded family (p=0.95), being the first child in the family (p=0.63), academic achievement of the child (p=0.63), high education level (higher than high school) of the mother (p=0.52) and father (p=0.46). The presence of systemic disease was reported not to be effecting the daily life at the time of evaluation by 90.2% of the children with headache and 91.0% of the children without headache (p=0.94). 81.4% of the children reported their headaches were not aggravating with the exacerbation periods of their systemic disease. Family history of hypertension was reported higher by the subjects with headache (13.5% with headache and 4.0% without headache p=0.001). Diabetes mellitus was also reported higher (5.8% with headache; 0.5% without headache; p=0.006). Family history of headache was reported in 28.2% of the patients with headache whereas it was 17.4% of the

  18. Nailfold capillaroscopy is useful for the diagnosis and follow-up of autoimmune rheumatic diseases. A future tool for the analysis of microvascular heart involvement?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutolo, M; Sulli, A; Secchi, M E; Paolino, S; Pizzorni, C

    2006-10-01

    Raynaud's phenomenon (RP) represents the most frequent clinical aspect of cardio/microvascular involvement and is a key feature of several autoimmune rheumatic diseases. Moreover, RP is associated in a statistically significant manner with many coronary diseases. In normal conditions or in primary RP (excluding during the cold-exposure test), the normal nailfold capillaroscopic pattern shows a regular disposition of the capillary loops along with the nailbed. On the contrary, in subjects suffering from secondary RP, one or more alterations of the capillaroscopic findings should alert the physician of the possibility of a connective tissue disease not yet detected. Nailfold capillaroscopy (NV) represents the best method to analyse microvascular abnormalities in autoimmune rheumatic diseases. Architectural disorganization, giant capillaries, haemorrhages, loss of capillaries, angiogenesis and avascular areas characterize >95% of patients with overt scleroderma (SSc). The term 'SSc pattern' includes, all together, these sequential capillaroscopic changes typical to the microvascular involvement in SSc. The capillaroscopic aspects observed in dermatomyositis and in the undifferentiated connective tissue disease are generally reported as 'SSc-like pattern'. Effectively, and early in the disease, the peripheral microangiopathy may be well recognized and studied by nailfold capillaroscopy, or better with nailfold video capillaroscopy (NVC). The early differential diagnosis between primary and secondary RP is the best advantage NVC may offer. In addition, interesting capillaroscopic changes have been observed in systemic lupus erythematosus, anti-phospholipid syndrome and Sjogren's syndrome. Further epidemiological and clinical studies are needed to better standardize the NCV patterns. In future, the evaluation of nailfold capillaroscopy in autoimmune rheumatic diseases might represent a tool for the prediction of microvascular heart involvement by considering the systemic

  19. Vitamin D supplementation and disease activity in patients with immune-mediated rheumatic diseases: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, André Silva; Freitas, Thiago Quadrante; Bernardo, Wanderley M; Pereira, Rosa Maria R

    2017-06-01

    Vitamin D serum levels and the presence and activity of rheumatic conditions have been associated. However, many studies are merely observational, and the existent randomized clinical trials were never systematically analyzed. Therefore, this study aims to provide a systematic review and meta-analysis of such a topic. MEDLINE, EMBASE, LILACS, COCHRANE, and CINAHL were explored to identify randomized trials that investigated clinical repercussions of vitamin D (or analogs) supplementation for at least 3 months in rheumatic diseases. Standardized clinical and/or laboratorial outcomes related to disease activity were analyzed according to each disease before and after supplementation. Database searches rendered 668 results; 9 were included-5 on rheumatoid arthritis, 3 on systemic lupus erythematosus, and 1 on systemic sclerosis. Seven of the studies were meta-analyzed. After vitamin D supplementation, rheumatoid arthritis recurrence decreased; however, not significantly (risk difference = -0.10, 95% CI = -0.21, 0.00, P = .05). No statistical significance was observed regarding visual analog scale (mean difference = 2.79, 95% CI = -1.87, 7.44, P = .24) and disease activity score28 (mean difference = -0.31, 95% CI = -0.86, 0.25, P = .28). Regarding systemic lupus erythematosus, anti-dsDNA positivity was significantly reduced (risk difference = -0.10, 95% CI = -0.18, -0.03; P = .005). Vitamin D supplementation reduced anti-dsDNA positivity on systemic lupus erythematosus and could possibly reduce rheumatoid arthritis recurrence, although novel randomized clinical trials are needed to confirm and extend the benefits of this hormone in immune-mediated rheumatic diseases.

  20. Comparative long-term results of mitral valve repair in adults with chronic rheumatic disease and degenerative disease: is repair for "burnt-out" rheumatic disease still inferior to repair for degenerative disease in the current era?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillon, Jeswant; Yakub, Mohd Azhari; Kong, Pau Kiew; Ramli, Mohd Faizal; Jaffar, Norfazlina; Gaffar, Intan Fariza

    2015-03-01

    Mitral valve repair is perceived to be of limited durability for advanced rheumatic disease in adults. We aim to examine the long-term outcomes of repair for rheumatic disease, identify predictors of durability, and compare with repair for degenerative disease. Rheumatic and degenerative mitral valve repairs in patients aged 40 years or more were prospectively analyzed. The primary outcomes investigated were mortality, freedom from reoperation, and valve failure. Logistic regression analysis was performed to define predictors of poor outcome. Between 1997 and 2011, 253 rheumatic and 148 degenerative mitral valves were repaired. The age of patients in both groups was similar, with a mean of 54.1 ± 8.4 years versus 55.6 ± 7.3 years (P = .49). Freedom from reoperation for rheumatic valves at 5 and 10 years was 98.4%, comparable to 95.3% (P = .12) for degenerative valves. Freedom from valve failure at 5 and 10 years was 91.4% and 81.5% for rheumatic repairs and 82.5% and 75.4% for degenerative repairs, respectively (P = .15). The presence of residual mitral regurgitation greater than 2+ before discharge was the only significant independent predictor of reoperation, whereas residual mitral regurgitation greater than 2+ and leaflet procedures were significant risk factors for valve failure. The durability of rheumatic mitral valve repair in the current era has improved and is comparable to the outstanding durability of repairs for degenerative disease, even in the adult rheumatic population. Modifications of standard repair techniques, adherence to the importance of good leaflet coaptation, and strict quality control with stringent use of intraoperative transesophageal echocardiography have all contributed to the improved long-term results. Copyright © 2015 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Zebrafish homologs of genes within 16p11.2, a genomic region associated with brain disorders, are active during brain development, and include two deletion dosage sensor genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alicia Blaker-Lee

    2012-11-01

    Deletion or duplication of one copy of the human 16p11.2 interval is tightly associated with impaired brain function, including autism spectrum disorders (ASDs, intellectual disability disorder (IDD and other phenotypes, indicating the importance of gene dosage in this copy number variant region (CNV. The core of this CNV includes 25 genes; however, the number of genes that contribute to these phenotypes is not known. Furthermore, genes whose functional levels change with deletion or duplication (termed ‘dosage sensors’, which can associate the CNV with pathologies, have not been identified in this region. Using the zebrafish as a tool, a set of 16p11.2 homologs was identified, primarily on chromosomes 3 and 12. Use of 11 phenotypic assays, spanning the first 5 days of development, demonstrated that this set of genes is highly active, such that 21 out of the 22 homologs tested showed loss-of-function phenotypes. Most genes in this region were required for nervous system development – impacting brain morphology, eye development, axonal density or organization, and motor response. In general, human genes were able to substitute for the fish homolog, demonstrating orthology and suggesting conserved molecular pathways. In a screen for 16p11.2 genes whose function is sensitive to hemizygosity, the aldolase a (aldoaa and kinesin family member 22 (kif22 genes were identified as giving clear phenotypes when RNA levels were reduced by ∼50%, suggesting that these genes are deletion dosage sensors. This study leads to two major findings. The first is that the 16p11.2 region comprises a highly active set of genes, which could present a large genetic target and might explain why multiple brain function, and other, phenotypes are associated with this interval. The second major finding is that there are (at least two genes with deletion dosage sensor properties among the 16p11.2 set, and these could link this CNV to brain disorders such as ASD and IDD.

  2. Autism and Related Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPartland, James; Volkmar, Fred R.

    2012-01-01

    The Pervasive Developmental Disorders are a group of neurodevelopmental disorders that include Autistic Disorder, Asperger’s Disorder, Pervasive Developmental Disorder - Not Otherwise Specified (PDD-NOS), Childhood Disintegrative Disorder (CDD), and Rett’s Disorder. All feature childhood onset with a constellation of symptoms spanning social interaction and communication and including atypical behavior patterns. The first three disorders (Autistic Disorder, Asperger’s Disorder, and PDD-NOS) are currently referred to as Autism Spectrum Disorders, reflecting divergent phenotypic and etiologic characteristics compared to Rett’s Disorder and CDD. This chapter reviews relevant research and clinical information relevant to appropriate medical diagnosis and treatment. PMID:22608634

  3. Identification of streptococcal proteins reacting with sera from Behçet's disease and rheumatic disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Sung Bin; Lee, Ju Hee; Ahn, Keun Jae; Cho, Suhyun; Park, Yong-Beom; Lee, Soo-Kon; Bang, Dongsik; Lee, Kwang Hoon

    2010-01-01

    We evaluated the reactivity of sera from Behçet's disease (BD), systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), dermatomyositis (DM), rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and Takayasu's arteritis (TA) patients against human α-enolase and streptococcal α-enolase, and identified additional streptococcal antigens. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and immunoblotting were performed using sera from patients with BD, SLE, DM, RA, and TA and healthy volunteers (control) against human α-enolase and streptococcal α-enolase. Immunoblot analysis and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionisation-time-of-flight mass spectrometry were used to identify and recombine other streptococcal antigens. Specific positive signals against recombinant human α-enolase were detected by IgM ELISA of serum samples from 50% of BD, 14.3% of SLE, 57.1% of DM, 42.9% of RA, and 57.1% of TA patients. Specific positive signals against streptococcal α-enolase were detected from 42.9% of BD, 14.3% of DM, and 14.3% of TA patients. No SLE and RA sera reacted against streptococcal α-enolase antigen. Streptococcal proteins reacting with sera were identified as hypothetical protein (HP) for SLE and DM patients, acid phosphatase (AP) for RA patients, and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) for TA patients. We observed that RA patients did not present serum reactivity against either HP or GAPDH though BD, SLE, DM, and TA patients did. Also, AP reacted with sera from BD, SLE, DM, RA, and TA patients.

  4. Rheumatic heart disease in pregnancy: How can health services adapt to the needs of Indigenous women? A qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belton, Suzanne; Kruske, Sue; Jackson Pulver, Lisa; Sherwood, Juanita; Tune, Kylie; Carapetis, Jonathan; Vaughan, Geraldine; Peek, Michael; McLintock, Claire; Sullivan, Elizabeth

    2017-11-06

    To study rheumatic heart disease health literacy and its impact on pregnancy, and to identify how health services could more effectively meet the needs of pregnant women with rheumatic heart disease. Researchers observed and interviewed a small number of Aboriginal women and their families during pregnancy, childbirth and postpartum as they interacted with the health system. An Aboriginal Yarning method of relationship building over time, participant observations and interviews with Aboriginal women were used in the study. The settings were urban, island and remote communities across the Northern Territory. Women were followed interstate if they were transferred during pregnancy. The participants were pregnant women and their families. We relied on participants' abilities to tell their own experiences so that researchers could interpret their understanding and perspective of rheumatic heart disease. Aboriginal women and their families rarely had rheumatic heart disease explained appropriately by health staff and therefore lacked understanding of the severity of their illness and its implications for childbearing. Health directives in written and spoken English with assumed biomedical knowledge were confusing and of limited use when delivered without interpreters or culturally appropriate health supports. Despite previous studies documenting poor communication and culturally inadequate care, health systems did not meet the needs of pregnant Aboriginal women with rheumatic heart disease. Language-appropriate health education that promotes a shared understanding should be relevant to the gender, life-stage and social context of women with rheumatic heart disease. © 2017 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists.

  5. Rheumatic polymyalgia like presentation of multiple myeloma and amyloidosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medina, Yimy F; Martinez, Jose Bernardo; Restrepo, Jose Felix; Rondon, Federico; Iglesias Gamarra, Antonio

    2005-01-01

    Polymyalgia rheumatica is a disorder with defined clinical characteristics and may be the initial expression or to be associated to other diseases. Although it is not associated to neoplastic diseases, may be their initial manifestation. We report a patient who presented the initial complaining of polymyalgia rheumatica as a manifestation of another illness, amyloidosis associated to multiple myeloma. We also discuss the clinical characteristics of these entities and revised the available literature with regard to this association

  6. Recommendations for the content and conduct of European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) musculoskeletal ultrasound courses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naredo, E.; Bijlsma, J.W.J.; Conaghan, P.G.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To develop education guidelines for the conduct of future European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) musculoskeletal ultrasound (MSUS) courses. Methods: We undertook a consensus-based, iterative process using two consecutive questionnaires sent to 29 senior ultrasonographer rheumatolog......Objective: To develop education guidelines for the conduct of future European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) musculoskeletal ultrasound (MSUS) courses. Methods: We undertook a consensus-based, iterative process using two consecutive questionnaires sent to 29 senior ultrasonographer...... attending the intermediate and advanced courses. Conclusion: We have developed European agreed guidelines for the content and conduct of EULAR ultrasound courses, which may also be recommended to national and local MSUS training programmes Udgivelsesdato: 2008/7...

  7. The Third Eye of the Rheumatologist: Applications of Musculoskeletal Ultrasound in Rheumatic Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsin-Hua Chen

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatologists manage patients with rheumatic diseases, which are of a wide range of musculoskeletal pathologies. Without clarification of the exact location of pathologies and the degree of inflammation, rheumatologists may have an incorrect assessment, leading to inappropriate management. In everyday practice, physical examination is limited by its sensitivity and power of assessment. Musculoskeletal ultrasonography (MSUS is inexpensive, readily available, and allows side-by-side image comparisons. Thus, during the past 10 years, MSUS has become the “third eye” of the rheumatologist, in that it allows more detailed examination of muscles, bones, and joints, just as the stethoscope provides further details about the respiratory and circulatory systems. We briefly introduce how rheumatologists in Taiwan use MSUS for the diagnosis and treatment for rheumatic diseases.

  8. Monazite: a new, natural, radioactive measurement for the treatment of rheumatic, dermatoses and other allergic diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aguiar Pupo, J. de

    1981-01-01

    Monazite: a new, natural, radioactive medication for the treatment of rheumatism, dermatosis and other allergic diseases. The cure of rheumatic and other diseases observed during the last 40 years by ordinary people at the beaches of monazitic sand in the town Guarapari, was confirmed by local physicians and visitors of the great radioaclimatic station. The effects of the medication, imputed to the local radioactivity by the great Brazilian doctor Silva Mello, were confirmed by two physicists of the Pontificia Universidade Catolica do Rio de Janeiro, the Jesuit priests Roser and Cullen, after careful physical determinations of the radioactivity resultant from thorium oxide, which is present at a rate of 6.4%. This new and inocuous medicament, unknown in the annals of medical biology, is divulged in the present paper, suggesting new and interesting medico-social studies to our young doctors. (author) [pt

  9. Oral sugar clearance and root caries prevalence in rheumatic patients with dry mouth symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risheim, H; Arneberg, P; Birkhed, D

    1992-01-01

    The relationship between root caries, oral sugar clearance, salivary flow rate, and salivary counts of mutans streptococci, lactobacilli and candida has been studied in a group of 22 rheumatic patients (age range 40-72 years). The study group comprised all subjects volunteering for a clinical trial on relief of dry mouth symptoms. The median salivary flow was 0.09 ml/min at rest and 0.9 ml/min during chewing stimulation. The median sugar clearance time was about 5 min in the sublingual area and 16 min in the lower buccal vestibule. For subjects with 0-2 root caries lesions the clearance time at both sites was shorter than for subjects with 3 or more lesions (p flow, and high salivary counts of mutans streptococci. It is concluded that root caries in rheumatic patients with low salivary flow is significantly related to oral sugar clearance time.

  10. Musculoskeletal disorders associated with HIV infection and AIDS. Part I: Infectious musculoskeletal conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tehranzadeh, Jamshid; Ter-Oganesyan, Ramon R.; Steinbach, Lynne S.

    2004-01-01

    The musculoskeletal system can be affected by a variety of abnormalities in association with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Although not as common as complications involving other organ systems, such as the pulmonary and the central nervous systems, HIV-associated musculoskeletal disorders are sometimes the initial presentation of the viral illness. Knowledge of the existence and the characteristic appearance of the conditions affecting bone, joint, and muscle in HIV-infected patients is valuable to radiologists for diagnosis and to clinicians for detection and appropriate treatment. We reviewed recent literature to provide a comprehensive assessment of the HIV-associated musculoskeletal disorders, and present radiologic examples from our own collection. This article is divided into two parts. In the first part we review the infectious musculoskeletal disorders associated with HIV illness and AIDS, including cellulitis, abscesses, pyomyositis, septic bursitis, septic arthritis, osteomyelitis, and bacillary angiomatosis. We also present a comprehensive spectrum of mycobacterial infections, consisting of tuberculous spondylitis and spondylodiskitis, arthritis, osteomyelitis, and tenosynovitis, as well as infections caused by atypical mycobacteria. Part II of this review will concentrate on non-infectious musculoskeletal conditions, including rheumatic disorders and neoplasms. (orig.)

  11. Musculoskeletal disorders associated with HIV infection and AIDS. Part I: Infectious musculoskeletal conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tehranzadeh, Jamshid [Department of Radiological Sciences, University of California, Irvine, Irvine, California (United States); Department of Radiological Sciences, Rt. 140, 101 The City Drive ZC 5005, CA 92868-3298, Orange (United States); Ter-Oganesyan, Ramon R. [College of Medicine, University of California, Irvine, Irvine, California (United States); Steinbach, Lynne S. [Department of Radiological Sciences, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California (United States)

    2004-05-01

    The musculoskeletal system can be affected by a variety of abnormalities in association with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Although not as common as complications involving other organ systems, such as the pulmonary and the central nervous systems, HIV-associated musculoskeletal disorders are sometimes the initial presentation of the viral illness. Knowledge of the existence and the characteristic appearance of the conditions affecting bone, joint, and muscle in HIV-infected patients is valuable to radiologists for diagnosis and to clinicians for detection and appropriate treatment. We reviewed recent literature to provide a comprehensive assessment of the HIV-associated musculoskeletal disorders, and present radiologic examples from our own collection. This article is divided into two parts. In the first part we review the infectious musculoskeletal disorders associated with HIV illness and AIDS, including cellulitis, abscesses, pyomyositis, septic bursitis, septic arthritis, osteomyelitis, and bacillary angiomatosis. We also present a comprehensive spectrum of mycobacterial infections, consisting of tuberculous spondylitis and spondylodiskitis, arthritis, osteomyelitis, and tenosynovitis, as well as infections caused by atypical mycobacteria. Part II of this review will concentrate on non-infectious musculoskeletal conditions, including rheumatic disorders and neoplasms. (orig.)

  12. [Balneotherapy and spa therapy of rheumatic diseases in Turkey: a systematic review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karagülle, M Z; Karagülle, M

    2004-02-01

    Turkey has a lot of thermal and mineral springs and is looking back on a still vivid tradition of spa therapy and balneotherapy, applied especially for the treatment of rheumatic diseases. This tradition is predominantly empiric and intuitive, however, it has assumed some important aspects of modern balneotherapeutic methods as well. This article is aimed at presenting the characteristics of traditional and modern balneological and spa therapy forms in Turkey. The studies which have been conducted between 1990 and 2000 in different spas in Turkey on the efficacy and effectiveness of spa therapy and balneotherapy for rheumatic diseases have been searched and analyzed independent of their design. A descriptive evaluation of the studies was carried out. A total of 15 published studies have been found and analyzed. The investigations have been carried out in 8 different spa resorts in Turkey. In these studies the effectiveness and efficacy of different balneological and spa therapies on a variety of rheumatic diseases (from osteoarthritis to fibromyalgia and from rheumatoid arthritis to low back pain) could be shown. Nearly all studied balneotherapeutic modalities were applied as bathing cures. Only in one study peloid therapy was applied. Balneotherapeutic therapy was applied in a modern and traditional way, and both open and stationary spa therapy forms were used at the same time. The review has shown the effectiveness of the investigated spa therapy and balneotherapy forms. It could be concluded that nearly all forms of spa therapy and balneotherapy used for the treatment of rheumatic diseases in Turkey are effective. A definitive conclusion, however, is not possible because of the heterogeneity of the study designs, methodological flaws, and the publication bias. In future good quality randomized controlled trials are needed. Copyright 2004 S. Karger GmbH, Freiburg

  13. The Third Eye of the Rheumatologist: Applications of Musculoskeletal Ultrasound in Rheumatic Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Hsin-Hua Chen

    2017-01-01

    Rheumatologists manage patients with rheumatic diseases, which are of a wide range of musculoskeletal pathologies. Without clarification of the exact location of pathologies and the degree of inflammation, rheumatologists may have an incorrect assessment, leading to inappropriate management. In everyday practice, physical examination is limited by its sensitivity and power of assessment. Musculoskeletal ultrasonography (MSUS) is inexpensive, readily available, and allows side-by-side image co...

  14. The Spanish biology/disease initiative within the human proteome project: Application to rheumatic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Romero, Cristina; Calamia, Valentina; Albar, Juan Pablo; Casal, José Ignacio; Corrales, Fernando J; Fernández-Puente, Patricia; Gil, Concha; Mateos, Jesús; Vivanco, Fernando; Blanco, Francisco J

    2015-09-08

    The Spanish Chromosome 16 consortium is integrated in the global initiative Human Proteome Project, which aims to develop an entire map of the proteins encoded following a gene-centric strategy (C-HPP) in order to make progress in the understanding of human biology in health and disease (B/D-HPP). Chromosome 16 contains many genes encoding proteins involved in the development of a broad range of diseases, which have a significant impact on the health care system. The Spanish HPP consortium has developed a B/D platform with five programs focused on selected medical areas: cancer, obesity, cardiovascular, infectious and rheumatic diseases. Each of these areas has a clinical leader associated to a proteomic investigator with the responsibility to get a comprehensive understanding of the proteins encoded by Chromosome 16 genes. Proteomics strategies have enabled great advances in the area of rheumatic diseases, particularly in osteoarthritis, with studies performed on joint cells, tissues and fluids. In this manuscript we describe how the Spanish HPP-16 consortium has developed a B/D platform with five programs focused on selected medical areas: cancer, obesity, cardiovascular, infectious and rheumatic diseases. Each of these areas has a clinical leader associated to a proteomic investigator with the responsibility to get a comprehensive understanding of the proteins encoded by Chromosome 16 genes. We show how the Proteomic strategy has enabled great advances in the area of rheumatic diseases, particularly in osteoarthritis, with studies performed on joint cells, tissues and fluids. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: HUPO 2014. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Biological therapy and development of neoplastic disease in patients with juvenile rheumatic disease: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Patricia L. Pereira

    Full Text Available Abstract Juvenile rheumatic diseases affect the musculoskeletal system and begin before the age of 18. These conditions have varied, identifiable or unknown etiologies, but those of an autoimmune inflammatory nature have been associated with an increased risk of development of cancer, regardless of treatment. This study aims to assess, through a systematic review of the literature according to Prisma (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses quality criteria, the risk of cancer in patients with juvenile rheumatic disease, and its association with biological agents. The criteria described by the Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology initiative were used in order to assess the methodological quality of those individual items selected in this study. We analyzed nine publications, from a total of 251 papers initially selected. There was an increase in cancer risk in the population with juvenile rheumatic disease versus the general population. Most specified cancers were of a lymphoproliferative nature. Seven studies did not specify the treatment or not defined an association between treatment and cancer risk. Only one study has suggested this association; in it, their authors observed high risk in patients diagnosed in the last 20 years, a period of the advent of new therapies. One study found an increased risk in a population not treated with biological agents, suggesting a disease in its natural course, and not an adverse effect of therapy. Studies have shown an increased risk of malignancy associated with juvenile rheumatic disease, and this may be related to disease activity and not specifically to the treatment with biological agents.

  16. Percutaneous transluminal mitral commissurotomy for rheumatic mitral stenosis in a 5-year-old child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullah, Maad; Sultan, Mehboob; Akbar, Hajira; Sadiq, Nadeem

    2012-06-01

    We report a 5-year-old boy weighing 11 kg, with severe mitral valve stenosis of rheumatic aetiology, who underwent successful percutaneous transluminal mitral commissurotomy (PTMC) with valvuloplasty balloon. Postprocedural mean pressure gradient across the mitral valve decreased to 6 mmHg from an initially recorded value of 22 mmHg. In addition to symptomatic improvement, the mitral valvular area increased from 0.4 to 0.8 cm(2) without significant change in mitral regurgitation. At 1- and 3-month follow up, transthoracic echocardiography revealed further improvement with an increase in mitral valve area to 1.0 cm(2), a decrease in pulmonary arterial pressure, and a mean mitral valve pressure gradient of 8 mmHg with trivial mitral regurgitation. To best of our knowledge, this is the first successful PTMC procedure performed in the youngest and smallest ever reported child with rheumatic mitral stenosis (MS). We conclude that PTMC with valvuloplasty balloon could be a logical alternative to surgery in young patients with rheumatic MS.

  17. Readability and suitability assessment of patient education materials in rheumatic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhee, Rennie L; Von Feldt, Joan M; Schumacher, H Ralph; Merkel, Peter A

    2013-10-01

    Web-based patient education materials and printed pamphlets are frequently used by providers to inform patients about their rheumatic disease. Little attention has been given to the readability and appropriateness of patient materials. The objective of this study was to examine the readability and suitability of commonly used patient education materials for osteoarthritis (OA), rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, and vasculitis. Five or 6 popular patient resources for each disease were chosen for evaluation. Readability was measured using the Flesch-Kincaid reading grade level and suitability was determined by the Suitability Assessment of Materials (SAM), a score that considers characteristics such as content, graphics, layout/topography, and cultural appropriateness. Three different reviewers rated the SAM score and means were used in the analysis. Twenty-three resources written on the 4 diseases were evaluated. The education material for all 4 diseases studied had readability above the eighth-grade level and readability did not differ among the diseases. Only 5 of the 23 resources received superior suitability scores, and 3 of these 5 resources were written for OA. All 4 diseases received adequate suitability scores, with OA having the highest mean suitability score. Most patient education materials for rheumatic diseases are written at readability levels above the recommended sixth-grade reading level and have only adequate suitability. Developing more appropriate educational resources for patients with rheumatic diseases may improve patient comprehension. Copyright © 2013 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  18. Cognitive-behavioural approaches to self-management in rheumatic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dures, Emma; Hewlett, Sarah

    2012-09-01

    Patients with rheumatic disease must adjust psychosocially and behaviourally in order to manage the impact of symptoms and treatment on their daily lives, and the emotional consequences of the disease. However, patients can improve their well-being by taking a proactive role in self-management, for example by using coping strategies. Support for patient self-management from clinical teams usually comprises information and advice on disease management; however, this largely didactic approach often focuses on the biomedical aspects of rheumatic disease, without addressing how these aspects interact with psychosocial factors to influence health behaviours and thus outcomes. A cognitive-behavioural approach based on the biopsychosocial model of rheumatic disease can facilitate the identification of effective self-management strategies through collaboration between patients and clinicians. Most patients do not require intense cognitive-behavioural therapy from a clinical psychologist; rather, basic cognitive-behavioural techniques and tools could be used by rheumatology clinical teams to expand and enhance the support already offered to patients.

  19. Autoimmunity in Rheumatic Diseases Is Induced by Microbial Infections via Crossreactivity or Molecular Mimicry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taha Rashid

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A general consensus supports fundamental roles for both genetic and environmental, mainly microbial, factors in the development of autoimmune diseases. One form of autoimmune rheumatic diseases is confined to a group of nonpyogenic conditions which are usually preceded by or associated with either explicit or occult infections. A previous history of clinical pharyngitis, gastroenteritis/urethritis, or tick-borne skin manifestation can be obtained from patients with rheumatic fever, reactive arthritis, or Lyme disease, respectively, whilst, other rheumatic diseases like rheumatoid arthritis (RA, ankylosing spondylitis (AS, and Crohn’s disease (CD are usually lacking such an association with a noticeable microbial infection. A great amount of data supports the notion that RA is most likely caused by Proteus asymptomatic urinary tract infections, whilst AS and CD are caused by subclinical bowel infections with Klebsiella microbes. Molecular mimicry is the main pathogenetic mechanism that can explain these forms of microbe-disease associations, where the causative microbes can initiate the disease with consequent productions of antibacterial and crossreactive autoantibodies which have a great impact in the propagation and the development of these diseases.

  20. Transitioning to employment with a rheumatic disease: the role of independence, overprotection, and social support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jetha, Arif; Badley, Elizabeth; Beaton, Dorcas; Fortin, Paul R; Shiff, Natalie J; Rosenberg, Alan M; Tucker, Lori B; Mosher, Dianne P; Gignac, Monique A M

    2014-12-01

    To examine perceived independence, overprotection, and support, and their association with the employment participation of young adults with rheumatic disease. One hundred and forty-three young adults, ages 18 to 30 years, with systemic lupus erythematosus (54.5%) and juvenile arthritis (45.5%) completed a 30-min online questionnaire of their work and education experiences. Information collected was demographic, health (e.g., pain, fatigue, disease activity), work context (e.g., career satisfaction, helpfulness of job accommodation/benefits, and workplace activity limitations), and psychosocial (e.g., independence, social support, and overprotection). Log-Poisson regression analysis examined factors associated with employment status. Over half of respondents were employed (59%) and 26% were enrolled in school. Respondents reported moderate to high perceptions of independence and social support. However, 27% reported that "quite a bit" to "a great deal" of overprotection characterized their relationships with those closest to them. At the bivariate level, employed participants and those indicating greater perceived independence reported greater social support and less overprotection. Multivariable analysis revealed that being employed was associated with older age, more job accommodations/benefits perceived as being helpful, and greater perceived independence. This is one of the first studies examining the employment of young adults with rheumatic diseases. Findings highlight the importance of psychosocial perceptions such as independence and overprotection, in addition to support related to working. Additional research is needed to better understand the role of those close to young adults with rheumatic diseases in supporting independence and encouraging employment.

  1. Endothelial microparticles: Pathogenic or passive players in endothelial dysfunction in autoimmune rheumatic diseases?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, E M; Wilkinson, F L; Parker, B; Alexander, M Y

    2016-11-01

    Autoimmune rheumatic diseases are characterised by systemic inflammation and complex immunopathology, with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease, initiated by endothelial dysfunction in a chronic inflammatory environment. Endothelial microparticles (EMPs) are released into the circulation from activated endothelial cells and may therefore, reflect disease severity, vascular and endothelial dysfunction, that could influence disease pathogenesis via autocrine/paracrine signalling. The exact function of EMPs in rheumatic disease remains unknown, and this has initiated research to elucidate EMP composition and function, which may be determined by the mode of endothelial activation and the micro environment. To date, EMPs are thought to play a role in angiogenesis, thrombosis and inflammation by transferring specific proteins and microRNAs (miRs) to target cells. Here, we review the mechanisms underlying the generation and composition of EMPs and the clinical and experimental studies describing the involvement of EMPs in rheumatic diseases, since we have previously shown endothelial dysfunction and an elevated risk of cardiovascular disease are characteristics in systemic lupus erythematosus. We will also discuss the potential of EMPs as future biomarkers of cardiovascular risk in these diseases. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. US Assessment of Hip Joint Synovitis in Rheumatic Diseases A comparison with MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soini, I.; Kotaniemi, A.; Kautiainen, H.; Kauppi, M.

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the significance of ultrasonography (US) in detecting hip joint synovitis in patients with rheumatic diseases. Material and Methods: Forty patients with rheumatic disease and suspected hip joint synovitis underwent MRI and US of the hip joint. In addition to the throughout MRI evaluation, the anterior collum-capsule distance (CCD) was determined by both MRI and US. Thirteen healthy volunteers were examined with MRI to establish the criteria for normal findings in MRI when classifying hip joints to those with synovitis and those without. MRI was used as a gold standard. Results: Synovitis was found using MRI in 31 hips of 22 patients (9 patients had bilateral synovitis). The intraclass correlation was 0.61 between MRI and US in measuring CCD. In classifying hip joint synovitis with US, the sensitivity of the method was 87% and specificity 42%, when the CCD criterion for synovitis was determined to be 7 mm. If the cut-off point was raised to 9 mm, the sensitivity decreased to 61% while specificity increased to 94%. A difference in CCD of 1 mm between the hips as an additional criterion for synovitis increased the number of false-positive findings. Conclusion: Measurement of CCD with US proved to be a rather inaccurate method to point out synovitis in rheumatic patients when using MRI as a reference. The main reason for this result was the thickened capsule, which US could not differentiate from a thickened synovium

  3. Role of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids in diet of patients with rheumatic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Spinella

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The beneficial effects of ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids have been widely described in the literature in particular those on cardiovascular system. In the last decade there has been an increased interest in the role of these nutrients in the reduction of articular inflammation as well as in the improvement of clinical symptoms in subjects affected by rheumatic diseases, in particular rheumatoid arthritis (RA. Nutritional supplementation with ω-3 may represent an additional therapy to the traditional pharmacological treatment due to the anti-inflammatory properties which characterize this class of lipids: production of alternative eicosanoids, reduction of inflammatory cytochines, reduction of T-lymphocytes activation, reduction of catabolic enzymes activity. The encouraging results of dietetic therapy based on ω- 3 in RA are leading researchers to test their effectiveness on patients with other rheumatic conditions such as systemic lupus erythematosus and ankylosing spondylitis. Nutritional therapy based on food rich in ω-3 or on supplementation with fish oil capsules, proved to be a valid support to he treatment of chronic inflammatory rheumatic diseases.

  4. Interstitial lung disease in systemic autoimmune rheumatic diseases: a comprehensive review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atzeni, Fabiola; Gerardi, Maria Chiara; Barilaro, Giuseppe; Masala, Ignazio Francesco; Benucci, Maurizio; Sarzi-Puttini, Piercarlo

    2018-01-01

    Interstitial lung diseases (ILDs) are among the most serious complications associated with systemic rheumatic diseases, and lead to significant morbidity and mortality; they may also be the first manifestation of connective tissue diseases (CTDs). The aim of this narrative review is to summarise the data concerning the pathogenesis of CTD/ILD and its distinguishing features in different rheumatic diseseas. Areas covered: The pathogenesis, clinical aspects and treatment of ILD associated with rheumatic systemic diseases and CTDs were reviewed by searching the PubMed, Medline, and Cochrane Library databases for papers published between 1995 and February 2017 using combinations of words or terms. Articles not written in English were excluded. Expert commentary: The management of CTD-ILD is challenging because of the lack of robust data regarding the treatments used, the heterogeneity of the diseases themselves, and the scarcity of well-defined outcome measures. Treatment decisions are often made clinically on the basis of functional, radiographic progression, and exacerbating factors such as age and the burden of comorbidities. Given the complexities of diagnosis and the paucity of treatment trials, the management of CTD patients with ILD requires multidisciplinary collaboration between rheumatologists and pulmonologists in CTD-ILD clinics.

  5. Rheumatic heart disease- a study of surgically excised cardiac valves and biopsies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khalil Ullah; Badsha, S.; Khan, A.; Kiani, M.R.; Ahmed, S.A.

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To examine the prevalence, age, sex and topographical distribution of the rheumatic heart diseases and its morphology. Design: A cross sectional descriptive study. Place and Duration of Study: Pathology Department, Army Medical College, Rawalpindi between 1981-1990. Patients and Methods: Five hundred and twenty six surgically excised cardiac valves and biopsies were studied in the laboratory in the light of clinical data. Results: Carditis constituted 87.4 % of the cardiac valvular disease with 23.5% active and 71% healed rheumatic lesions. About 5.5% had morphological appearances consistent with RHD. The lesions affected mitral valves (37.0%), aortic valve (22.1%), mitral and aortic valves together (21.0%) and atrial appendages (19.0%). Presentation was mostly as mitral stenosis either isolated (49.2% ) or combined (31.0%), aortic stenosis (11.7% ) and aortic incompetence with regurgitation (7.3%). Conclusion: Rheumatic carditis constitutes a significant proportion of cardiac valvular disease and affects comparatively younger age, with slight male preponderance and primarily affects mitral valve. (author)

  6. THE HYDROGEN ION CONCENTRATION OF JOINT EXUDATES IN RHEUMATIC FEVER AND OTHER FORMS OF ARTHRITIS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boots, R H; Cullen, G E

    1922-09-30

    1. The hydrogen ion concentration of joint exudates aspirated from patients ill with acute rheumatic fever, arthritis of undetermined origin, and bacterial arthritis was determined. The hydrogen ion concentrations of the joint exudates from patients with acute rheumatic fever approximated the normal reaction of blood, varying from pH 7.27 to 7.42. Exudates from patients with arthritis of undetermined origin varied in pH from 7.33 to 7.47. The pH of a joint effusion occurring in a patient with myocardial insufficiency was 7.34. Bacteriologically, all of these fluids were sterile by ordinary means of cultivation. An exudate aspirated from a knee infected with Staphylococcus aureus had a pH of 6.69, while that from a patient having an arthritis due to Streptococcus hoemolyticus was also acid, having a pH of 6.19. 2. Since a definitely acid medium is necessary for the liberation of free salicylic acid and since all of the joint fluids from patients with acute rheumatic fever were slightly alkaline, no free salicylic acid could possibly exist in such joint fluids following the administration of salicylates.

  7. Surgical Treatment of Atrial Fibrillation in Patients with Rheumatic Valve Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernesto Koehler Chavez

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: To assess heart rhythm and predictive factors associated with sinus rhythm after one year in patients with rheumatic valve disease undergoing concomitant surgical treatment of atrial fibrillation. Operative mortality, survival and occurrence of stroke after one year were also evaluated. Methods: Retrospective longitudinal observational study of 103 patients undergoing rheumatic mitral valve surgery and ablation of atrial fibrillation using uni- or bipolar radiofrequency between January 2013 and December 2014. Age, gender, functional class (NYHA, type of atrial fibrillation, EuroSCORE, duration of atrial fibrillation, stroke, left atrial size, left ventricular ejection fraction, cardiopulmonary bypass time, myocardial ischemia time and type of radiofrequency were investigated. Results: After one year, 66.3% of patients were in sinus rhythm. Sinus rhythm at hospital discharge, lower left atrial size in the preoperative period and bipolar radiofrequency were associated with a greater chance of sinus rhythm after one year. Operative mortality was 7.7%. Survival rate after one year was 92.3% and occurrence of stroke was 1%. Conclusion: Atrial fibrillation ablation surgery with surgical approach of rheumatic mitral valve resulted in 63.1% patients in sinus rhythm after one year. Discharge from hospital in sinus rhythm was a predictor of maintenance of this rhythm. Increased left atrium and use of unipolar radiofrequency were associated with lower chance of sinus rhythm. Operative mortality rate of 7.7% and survival and stroke-free survival contribute to excellent care results for this approach.

  8. The new face of rheumatic heart disease in South West Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akinwusi PO

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Patience Olayinka Akinwusi,1,2 Johnson Olarewaju Peter,2 Adebayo Tolulope Oyedeji,2 Abiona Oluwadamilola Odeyemi21Department of Medicine, College of Health Sciences, Osun State University, 2Department of Medicine, LAUTECH Teaching Hospital, Osogbo, Osun State, NigeriaPurpose: To determine the current prevalence of rheumatic heart disease (RHD, clinical features, types of valvular lesions, complications and mortality, at Ladoke Akintola University of Technology (LAUTECH Teaching Hospital, Osogbo, South West Nigeria.Methods: We conducted a retrospective, descriptive study of all the cases of RHD seen in the medical outpatient clinics and wards of LAUTECH for 9 years, from January 2003 to December 2011. Statistical analysis of data obtained was done using SPSS 16. Results: The total number of attendees of all the medical outpatient clinics during the 9-year period was 67,378, with a subset of 9423 attending the cardiology clinic. There were 11 cases of RHD, which translates to a prevalence of 0.16/1000 and 1.2/1000 for medical outpatient clinics and the cardiology clinic respectively. The mean age of the patients was 25.64 ± 9.65 years, age range 14–40 years and male to female ratio of 1:1.2. The most common valve affected was mitral (90.9%, followed by the aortic (36.4%, and the tricuspid (18.2%. Mitral and aortic lesions coexisted in 18.2% of the patients, and late presentation was common in all RHD cases. Heart failure was the most common complication (90.9%. Other complications were secondary pulmonary hypertension (36.4%, infective endocarditis (27.3%, atrial fibrillation (27.3%, cardioembolic cerebrovascular disease (18.2%, and atrial flutter (9.1%. Mortality was 9.1%, while only one patient (9.1% had definitive surgery. Financial constraints precluded others from having definitive surgery.Conclusion: The prevalence of RHD has declined considerably as a result of improvements in the primary health care delivery system, with widespread use

  9. ANP and BNP plasma levels in patients with rheumatic mitral stenosis after percutaneous balloon mitral valvuloplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Łukasz Mazurkiewicz

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Atrial (ANP and B-type (BNP natriuretic peptides are hormones secreted by the heart as a response to volume expansion and pressure overload. Aim: To assess the changes of ANP and BNP after percutaneous balloon mitral valvuloplasty (PBMV and to investigate factors associated with endpoints. Material and methods: The study included 96 patients (90.7% females, age 51.6 ±12.2 years with rheumatic mitral valve stenosis (mitral valve area (MVA 1.18 (1.01–1.33 cm2, mean mitral gradient (MMG 8.2 (7.1–9.2 mm Hg, NYHA 2.09 (1.9–2.5. Patients were followed up for 29.1 months for the search of endpoints. Results : The PBMV was successful in all cases. After the procedure MVA increased (1.18–1.78 cm2, p < 0.01 and pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (PCWP decreased (29.8–21.8 mm Hg, p < 0.01. Concentration of ANP significantly rose 30 min after the PBMV (79.2 vs. 134.2 pg/ml, p = 0.012 and dropped significantly after 24 h (134.2 vs. 70.4 pg/ml, p = 0.01. Furthermore, after 36 months concentration of ANP did not differ from the baseline value (p = NS. BNP concentration at day 1 was lower than at baseline (94.5 vs. 80.2 pg/ml, p = 0.032. Moreover, during the follow-up period BNP continued to fall at all time points. In univariate analysis parameters associated with endpoint occurrence were baseline PAP (p = 0.023, baseline PCWP (p = 0.022, baseline NYHA (p = 0.041 and increase in 6-minute walk test (6MWT (p = 0.043. In multivariate analysis the only factor associated with endpoint occurrence was baseline NYHA (HR = 1.52, 95% CI: –1.3–1.91, p = 0.022. Conclusions : Patients with MS had increased levels of both BNP and ANP. Baseline NYHA class was found to be associated with outcomes after the procedure.

  10. Clinical significance of fibromyalgia syndrome in different rheumatic diseases: Relation to disease activity and quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Rabbat M, Sarah; Mahmoud, Nermeen K; Gheita, Tamer A

    2017-04-11

    To describe the frequencies of fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) in various rheumatic diseases; rheumatoid arthritis (RA), systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), systemic sclerosis (SSc) and Behçets disease (BD) patients and to study the relation to clinical manifestations and quality of life (QoL). 160 patients (50 RA, 50 SLE, 30 SSc and 30 BD) and matched corresponding healthy controls were included. Disease activity was assessed using disease activity score in 28 joints (DAS28) for RA, SLE Disease Activity index (SLEDAI), modified Rodnan skin score for SSc and BD Current Activity Form (BDCAF). The QoL was also recorded. Severity in FMS cases was estimated using the revised Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire score. In the RA, SLE, SSc and BD patients, FMS was found in 14%, 18%, 6.67% and 3.33% respectively compared to 2.1%, 3%, 3.3% and 0% in their corresponding controls. In RA patients, DAS28 was significantly higher in those with FMS (p=0.009) and significantly correlated with both Widespread Pain Index (WPI) (p=0.011) and Symptom Severity (SS) scale (p=0.012). The QoL scale in those with FMS was significantly worse (62.3±7.9) compared to those without (71.7±14.4) (p=0.023). In SLE patients, The WPI and SS both significantly correlated with the presence of thrombosis (r=0.28, p=0.049 and r=0.43, p=0.002 respectively). The SS scale tended to correlate with the SLEDAI (r=0.28, p=0.05). In BD patients, BDCAF and WPI significantly correlated (p=0.03). Fibromyalgia syndrome is more frequent in rheumatic diseases, could be related to the disease activity in RA and BD patients and to thrombosis in SLE and affected the QoL in RA. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Reumatología y Colegio Mexicano de Reumatología. All rights reserved.

  11. Comprehensive microRNA profiling reveals potential augmentation of the IL1 pathway in rheumatic heart valve disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Qiyu; Sun, Yi; Duan, Yuyin; Li, Bin; Xia, Jianming; Yu, Songhua; Zhang, Guimin

    2018-03-16

    Valvular heart disease is a leading cause of cardiovascular mortality, especially in China. More than a half of valvular heart diseases are caused by acute rheumatic fever. microRNA is involved in many physiological and pathological processes. However, the miRNA profile of the rheumatic valvular heart disease is unknown. This research is to discuss microRNAs and their target gene pathways involved in rheumatic heart valve disease. Serum miRNA from one healthy individual and four rheumatic heart disease patients were sequenced. Specific differentially expressed miRNAs were quantified by Q-PCR in 40 patients, with 20 low-to-moderate rheumatic mitral valve stenosis patients and 20 severe mitral valve stenosis patients. The target relationship between certain miRNA and predicted target genes were analysis by Luciferase reporter assay. The IL-1β and IL1R1 expression levels were analyzed by immunohistochemistry and western blot in the mitral valve from surgery of mitral valve replacement. The results showed that 13 and 91 miRNAs were commonly upregulated or downregulated in all four patients. Nine miRNAs, 1 upregulated and 8 downregulated, that had a similar fold change in all 4 patients were selected for quantitative PCR verification. The results showed similar results from miRNA sequencing. Within these 9 tested miRNAs, hsa-miR-205-3p and hsa-miR-3909 showed a low degree of dispersion between the members of each group. Hsa miR-205-3p and hsa-miR-3909 were predicted to target the 3'UTR of IL-1β and IL1R1 respectively. This was verified by luciferase reporter assays. Immunohistochemistry and Western blot results showed that the mitral valve from rheumatic valve heart disease showed higher levels of IL- 1β and IL1R1 expression compared with congenital heart valve disease. This suggested a difference between rheumatic heart valve disease and other types of heart valve diseases, with more inflammatory responses in the former. In the present study, by next generation

  12. Detection of immune complexes in sera of dogs with rheumatic and neoplastic diseases by 125I-Clq binding test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terman, D.S.; Moore, D.; Collins, J.; Johnston, B.; Person, D.; Templeton, J.; Poser, R.; Quinby, F.

    1979-01-01

    Some canine rheumatic and neoplastic diseases bear a striking clinical and serological resemblance to their counterparts in man. In the present study, human 125 I-Clq was employed in a radioimmunoassay for detection of immune complexes in sera of normal dogs and those with rheumatic and neoplastic diseases. Human 125 I-Clq showed binding of 16.7 +- 5.73% in a group of normal dog sera with binding of 32.5 +- 17.3% and 43.0 +- 16.0% in sera of dogs with rheumatic and neoplastic diseases. respectively. Human 125 I-Clq bound similar quantities of heat-aggregated canine and human gamma-globulin over a broad range of concentrations and human 125 I-Clq binding in canine sera was effectively inhibited by similar quantities of heat aggregated canine and human gamma-globulin. Seven of 12 dogs with elevated levels of Clq binding had active clinical and serological rheumatic disease (SLE or rheumatoid arthritis), while none of 7 dogs with values within the normal range had active clinical disease. All 5 dogs with widespread osteogenic sarcoma and all 4 dogs with high grade adenocarcinoma of the mammary gland had elevated Clq binding values while 2 animals with low grade malignancies without evident metastases did not. Thus, it appears that human 125 I-Clq may be employed to assay immune complexes in canine sera and may be a valuable technique for the study of dogs with various rheumatic and neoplastic diseases. (author)

  13. Conventional X-ray examination and computed tomography in inflammatory rheumatic diseases; Roentgendiagnostik und Computertomographie bei entzuendlich-rheumatischen Erkrankungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lingg, G. [Rheumazentrum Bad Kreuznach (Germany). Zentrales Roentgeninstitut

    1996-08-01

    Plain-film radiography is an important and basic element in the assessment of inflammatory rheumatic diseases. Its various uses include assessment of inflammatory osseous destruction and the activity of inflammatory changes. Furthermore, the inflammatory collateral phenomena can indicate an acute clinical phase, and the articular soft tissue swelling and tenosynovitis are shown directly and indirectly very clearly. On the other hand, high-resolution computed tomography is very capable of showing cortical structures of bone complementary to MR. In some special clinical questions and anatomical regions, especially the axial skeleton, it delivers information of high specifity, partly for definitive diagnosis and partly for planning surgical procedures. The assessment of changes in the sacroiliac joints, sternoclavicular joints and craniocervical junction are domains of computed tomography. (orig.) [Deutsch] Das konventionelle Roentgenbild muss auch heute noch bei klinischer Frage nach entzuendlich-rheumatischer Erkrankung als Basisuntersuchung angesehen werden. Sein Informationspotential umfasst nicht nur knoecherne entzuendliche Destruktionen, sondern es laesst auch deren derzeitige Aktivitaet beurteilen. Weiterhin vermag das Roentgenbild ueber die Kollateralphaenomene auf eine klinische Schubsituation hinzuweisen und die entzuendliche Volumenvermehrung der Gelenke und Sehnenscheiden direkt und indirekt darzustellen. Darueber hinaus bietet die hochaufloesende Computertomographie, insbesondere durch die detaillierte Darstellung kortikaler knoecherner Strukturen - komplementaer zur MR -, bei einigen speziellen Fragestellungen, insbesondere am Stammskelett und an einzelnen grossen Gelenken, hochspezifische Informationen, teils zur definitiven Diagnosestellung, teils auch fuer die Operationsplanung. Dies gilt u.a. fuer die Kreuzdarmbeingelenke, die Sternoklavikulargelenke und die obere HWS. (orig.)

  14. Effectiveness of integrated care including therapeutic assertive community treatment in severe schizophrenia-spectrum and bipolar I disorders: Four-year follow-up of the ACCESS II study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schöttle, Daniel; Schimmelmann, Benno G; Ruppelt, Friederike; Bussopulos, Alexandra; Frieling, Marietta; Nika, Evangelia; Nawara, Luise Antonia; Golks, Dietmar; Kerstan, Andrea; Lange, Matthias; Schödlbauer, Michael; Daubmann, Anne; Wegscheider, Karl; Rohenkohl, Anja; Sarikaya, Gizem; Sengutta, Mary; Luedecke, Daniel; Wittmann, Linus; Ohm, Gunda; Meigel-Schleiff, Christina; Gallinat, Jürgen; Wiedemann, Klaus; Bock, Thomas; Karow, Anne; Lambert, Martin

    2018-01-01

    The ACCESS-model offers integrated care including assertive community treatment to patients with psychotic disorders. ACCESS proved more effective compared to standard care (ACCESS-I study) and was successfully implemented into clinical routine (ACCESS-II study). In this article, we report the 4-year outcomes of the ACCESS-II study. Between May 2007 and December 2013, 115 patients received continuous ACCESS-care. We hypothesized that the low 2-year disengagement and hospitalization rates and significant improvements in psychopathology, functioning, and quality of life could be sustained over 4 years. Over 4 years, only 10 patients disengaged from ACCESS. Another 23 left for practical reasons and were successfully transferred to other services. Hospitalization rates remained low (13.0% in year 3; 9.1% in year 4). Involuntary admissions decreased from 35% in the 2 years prior to ACCESS to 8% over 4 years in ACCESS. Outpatient contacts remained stably high at 2.0-2.4 per week. We detected significant improvements in psychopathology (effect size d = 0.79), illness severity (d = 1.29), level of functioning (d = 0.77), quality of life (d = 0.47) and stably high client satisfaction (d = 0.02) over 4 years. Most positive effects were observed within the first 2 years with the exception of illness severity, which further improved from year 2 to 4. Within continuous intensive 4-year ACCESS-care, sustained improvements in psychopathology, functioning, quality of life, low service disengagement and re-hospitalization rates, as well as low rates of involuntary treatment, were observed in contrast to other studies, which reported a decline in these parameters once a specific treatment model was stopped. Yet, stronger evidence to prove these results is required. Clinical Trial Registration Number: NCT01888627.

  15. Health related quality of life measure in systemic pediatric rheumatic diseases and its translation to different languages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moorthy, Lakshmi Nandini; Roy, Elizabeth; Kurra, Vamsi

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Rheumatic diseases in children are associated with significant morbidity and poor health-related quality of life (HRQOL). There is no health-related quality of life (HRQOL) scale available specifically for children with less common rheumatic diseases. These diseases share several......, Hungarian, Japanese, Romanian, Serbian and Xhosa. CONCLUSION: SMILY©-Illness is a brief, easy to administer and score HRQOL scale for children with systemic rheumatic diseases. It is suitable for use across different age groups and literacy levels. SMILY©-Illness with its available translations may be used...... features with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) such as their chronic episodic nature, multi-systemic involvement, and the need for immunosuppressive medications. HRQOL scale developed for pediatric SLE will likely be applicable to children with systemic inflammatory diseases. FINDINGS: We adapted Simple...

  16. The effects of clinical, epidemiological and economic aspects of changes in classification criteria of selected rheumatic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksander J. Owczarek

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the epidemiology and socio-economic aspects of the three most common rheumatic diseases: rheumatoid arthritis (RA, systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE and scleroderma. The incidence of rheumatic diseases in a population is estimated at 4–5%. Prevalence rate for RA in Poland is 0.45% of the adult population and is similar to the rate reported in the EU (0.49%. It is estimated that the average incidence of SLE is 40–55 per 100 thousand and that the annual incidence of systemic sclerosis is 19–35 cases per million (depending on the country. Nearly 18% of all hospital admissions in Poland are associated with rheumatic diseases. The introduction of new classification criteria for rheumatoid arthritis, allowing classification of the early forms of the disease and their use in clinical practice will probably change the assessment of incidence of this disease in the population.

  17. Body-self unity and self-esteem in patients with rheumatic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bode, Christina; van der Heij, Anouk; Taal, Erik; van de Laar, Mart A F J

    2010-12-01

    Perceptions and evaluations of the own body are important sources of self-esteem. Having a rheumatic disease challenges maintenance of positive self-esteem due to consequences of the disease such as unfavorable sensations as pain and limited (physical) functioning. We expect that a positive experience of the own body in spite of a rheumatic disease (body-self harmony) will be associated with higher levels of self-esteem and that experiencing the body as unworthy part of the own person or as disabler for own strivings (body-self alienation) will result in lower levels of self-esteem. For this explorative study, the body experience questionnaire (BEQ) measuring body-self unity was developed and piloted. One hundred sixty-eight patients visiting the outpatient rheumatology clinic of the Medisch Spectrum Twente, Enschede, The Netherlands, completed a questionnaire on touchscreen computers to measure body-self unity (BEQ), illness cognitions (illness cognition questionnaire), pain intensity, functional limitations (health assessment questionnaire disability index), self-esteem (Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale) and demographics. To analyze predictors of self-esteem, hierarchical regression analyses were employed. The BEQ revealed a two-factor structure with good reliability (subscale harmony, four items, Cronbach's α = 0.76; subscale alienation, six items, Cronbach's α = 0.84). The final model of the hierarchical regression analyses showed that self-esteem can be predicted by the illness cognitions helplessness and acceptance, by harmony and most strongly by alienation from the body. R(2) of the final model was 0.50. The relationship between functional limitations and self-esteem was totally mediated by the psychological constructs body-self unity and illness cognitions. This explorative study showed the importance of the unity of body and self for self-esteem in patients with a rheumatic disease.

  18. PCR analysis is superior to histology for diagnosis of Whipple's disease mimicking seronegative rheumatic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, P; Ehrenstein, B; Hartung, W; Dragonas, C; Reischl, U; Fleck, M

    2017-03-01

    The diagnosis of Whipple's disease (WD) is commonly confirmed by histology demonstrating Periodic Acid Schiff (PAS)-positive macrophages in the duodenal mucosa. Analysis of intestinal tissue or other specimens using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is a more sensitive method. However, the relevance of positive PCR findings is still controversial. Therefore, we evaluated the relevance of histology and PCR findings to establishing the diagnosis of WD in a series of WD patients initially presenting with suspected rheumatic diseases. Between 2006 and 2014, 20 patients with seronegative rheumatic diseases tested positive for Tropheryma whipplei (Tw) by PCR and/or histology and were enrolled in a retrospective analysis of the diagnostic value of both procedures. Seven of the 20 cases (35%) were diagnosed with 'classic' WD as indicated by PAS-positive macrophages. In the remaining 13 patients, the presence of Tw was detected by intestinal (n = 10) or synovial PCR analysis (n = 3). Two of the 20 patients (10%) with evidence of Tw did not respond to antibiotic therapy. They were not considered to suffer from WD. Therefore, relying only on histological findings of intestinal biopsies would have missed 11 (61%) of the 18 patients with WD in our cohort. In comparison, PCR of intestinal biopsies detected Tw-DNA in 14 (93%) of the 15 WD patients evaluated. Patients with a positive histology did not differ from PCR-positive patients with regard to sex, age, or duration of disease, but more often presented with gastrointestinal symptoms. A substantial number of WD patients present without typical intestinal histology findings. Additional PCR analysis of intestinal tissue or synovial fluid increased the sensitivity of the diagnostic evaluation and should be considered particularly in patients presenting with atypical seronegative rheumatic diseases and a high-risk profile for WD.

  19. Course control in rheumatic arthritis by means of X-ray and scintiscanning examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grebe, S.F.; Dreher, R.; Hanheide, H.; Virian, M.; Faengewisch, G.L.; Mueller, H.; Altaras, J.; Federlin, K.

    In contact to the X-ray examinations, the scintiscanning permits the recognition of the probable rheumatic arthritis. Furthermore, the quantitative scintiscanning values show the activity of a process and hence are a control of the therapy. This is not possible with X-rays. The latter merely show the advance of the degenerative process. The increase of the inflammation index in some cases does not always run parallel to the dose of both radiopharmaceuticals. These problems must be clarified in further investigations. (orig./AJ) [de

  20. Factors promoting health-related quality of life in people with rheumatic diseases: a 12 month longitudinal study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Rheumatic diseases have a significant adverse impact on the individual from physical, mental and social aspects, resulting in a low health-related quality of life (HRQL). There is a lack of longitudinal studies on HRQL in people with rheumatic diseases that focus on factors promoting HRQL instead of risk factors. The aim of this study was to investigate the associations between suggested health promoting factors at baseline and outcome in HRQL at a 12 month follow-up in people with rheumatic diseases. Methods A longitudinal cohort study was conducted in 185 individuals with rheumatic diseases with questionnaires one week and 12 months after rehabilitation in a Swedish rheumatology clinic. HRQL was assessed by SF-36 together with suggested health factors. The associations between SF-36 subscales and the health factors were analysed by multivariable logistic regressions. Results Factors predicting better outcome in HRQL in one or several SF-36 subscales were being younger or middle-aged, feeling painless, having good sleep structure, feeling rested after sleep, performing low effort of exercise more than twice per week, having strong sense of coherence (SOC), emotional support and practical assistance, higher educational level and work capacity. The most important factors were having strong SOC, feeling rested after sleep, having work capacity, being younger or middle-aged, and having good sleep structure. Conclusions This study identified several factors that promoted a good outcome in HRQL to people with rheumatic diseases. These health factors could be important to address in clinical work with rheumatic diseases in order to optimise treatment strategies. PMID:21599884

  1. Task shifting to clinical officer-led echocardiography screening for detecting rheumatic heart disease in Malawi, Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sims Sanyahumbi, Amy; Sable, Craig A; Karlsten, Melissa; Hosseinipour, Mina C; Kazembe, Peter N; Minard, Charles G; Penny, Daniel J

    2017-08-01

    Echocardiographic screening for rheumatic heart disease in asymptomatic children may result in early diagnosis and prevent progression. Physician-led screening is not feasible in Malawi. Task shifting to mid-level providers such as clinical officers may enable more widespread screening. Hypothesis With short-course training, clinical officers can accurately screen for rheumatic heart disease using focussed echocardiography. A total of eight clinical officers completed three half-days of didactics and 2 days of hands-on echocardiography training. Clinical officers were evaluated by performing screening echocardiograms on 20 children with known rheumatic heart disease status. They indicated whether children should be referred for follow-up. Referral was indicated if mitral regurgitation measured more than 1.5 cm or there was any measurable aortic regurgitation. The κ statistic was calculated to measure referral agreement with a paediatric cardiologist. Sensitivity and specificity were estimated using a generalised linear mixed model, and were calculated on the basis of World Heart Federation diagnostic criteria. The mean κ statistic comparing clinical officer referrals with the paediatric cardiologist was 0.72 (95% confidence interval: 0.62, 0.82). The κ value ranged from a minimum of 0.57 to a maximum of 0.90. For rheumatic heart disease diagnosis, sensitivity was 0.91 (95% confidence interval: 0.86, 0.95) and specificity was 0.65 (95% confidence interval: 0.57, 0.72). There was substantial agreement between clinical officers and paediatric cardiologists on whether to refer. Clinical officers had a high sensitivity in detecting rheumatic heart disease. With short-course training, clinical officer-led echo screening for rheumatic heart disease is a viable alternative to physician-led screening in resource-limited settings.

  2. Prevalence of Disability in Patients With Musculoskeletal Pain and Rheumatic Diseases in a Population From Cuenca, Ecuador.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guevara-Pacheco, Sergio Vicente; Feican-Alvarado, Astrid; Delgado-Pauta, Jorge; Lliguisaca-Segarra, Angelita; Pelaez-Ballestas, Ingris

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of disability in patients with musculoskeletal pain and rheumatic diseases in Cuenca, Ecuador. We performed a cross-sectional analytical study with randomized sampling in 4877 subjects, from urban and rural areas. COPCORD (Community Oriented Program for Control of Rheumatic Diseases)-validated questionnaire was administered house-to-house to identify subjects with nontraumatic musculoskeletal pain and rheumatic diseases. The subjects were assessed by rheumatologists for diagnostic accuracy, and the Health Assessment Questionnaire Disability Index was administered to assess functional capacity. A logistic regression analysis was conducted to determine the association of rheumatic diseases with functional disability. Functional disability was found in 221 subjects (73.1% women), with mean age 62 (SD, 18.2) years, residing in rural areas (201 [66.5%]), with education of 6.9 (SD, 5.3) years, and of low income (77 [47.2%]). The value of HAQ-DI was a mean of 0.2 (0-2.9). The real prevalence of physical disability was 9.5%. Moderate and severe disability predominated in activities such as kneeling (4.9% and 3.3%), squatting (4.8% and 2.7%), and leaning to pick up objects (3.7% and 0.9%), respectively. Rheumatic diseases associated with physical disabilities were knee osteoarthritis (95 [31.4%]) and hand osteoarthritis (69 [22.8%]), mechanical low-back pain (43 [14.2%]), fibromyalgia (27 [9.5%]), and rheumatoid arthritis (11 [3.6%]; P Rheumatic diseases associated with disability were hand and knee osteoarthritis, back pain, fibromyalgia, and rheumatoid arthritis.

  3. HBV Reactivation in Patients Treated with Antitumor Necrosis Factor-Alpha (TNF-α Agents for Rheumatic and Dermatologic Conditions: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrizio Cantini

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Antitumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α agents are widely used for treatment of rheumatic and dermatological diseases. We conducted the systematic review and meta-analysis to assess the prevalence of HBV reactivation among patients treated with anti-TNF-α. Methods and Findings. A comprehensive literature search of MEDLINE, Scopus, and ISI Web of Knowledge databases was conducted. From 21 studies included in the systematic review, 9 included patients with occult chronic HBV infection and 6 included patients with overt infection while 6 addressed both groups. Based on 10 studies eligible for meta-analysis we report pooled estimate of HBV reactivation of 4.2% (95% CI: 1.4–8.2%, I2: 74.7%. The pooled prevalence of reactivation was 3.0% (95% CI: 0.6–7.2, I2: 77.1% for patients with occult infection, and 15.4% (95% CI: 1.2–41.2%, I2: 79.9% for overt infection. The prevalence of reactivation was 3.9% (95% CI: 1.1–8.4%, I2: 51.1% for treatment with etanercept and 4.6% (95% CI: 0.5–12.5%, I2: 28.7% for adalimumab. For subgroup of patients without any antiviral prophylaxis the pooled reactivation was 4.0% (95% CI: 1.2–8.3%, I2: 75.6%. Conclusion. Although HBV reactivation rate is relatively low in patients treated with anti-TNF-α for rheumatic and dermatological conditions, the antiviral prophylaxis would be recommended in patients with overt chronic HBV infection.

  4. Health-Related Quality-of-Life in patients with chronic rheumatic disease after a multidisciplinary rehabilitation regimen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Couppé, C; Comins, J.; Beyer, N.

    2017-01-01

    -, and 12-month follow-ups. Multivariable linear regression models using generalized estimating equations to account for repeated measurement were employed. A weighting procedure to account for differential dropouts was applied. Results: Three hundred fifty-six women and 74 men with chronic rheumatic......Introduction: Multidisciplinary rehabilitation has beneficial effects on health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in patients with chronic rheumatic diseases. However, whether this intervention benefits different age groups in women or men is largely unknown. Purpose: To investigate HRQoL in patients...

  5. An Ineffective Differential Diagnosis of Infective Endocarditis and Rheumatic Heart Disease after Streptococcal Skin and Soft Tissue Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Tetsuya; Mawatari, Momoko; Iizuka, Toshihiko; Amano, Tatsuya; Kutsuna, Satoshi; Fujiya, Yoshihiro; Takeshita, Nozomi; Hayakawa, Kayoko; Ohmagari, Norio

    2017-09-01

    We herein report the case of a 68-year-old woman with a skin and soft tissue infection at her extremities. The blood culture results were positive for Streptococcus pyogenes, and we started treatment using ampicillin and clindamycin, although subsequent auscultation revealed a new-onset heart murmur. We therefore suspected rheumatic heart disease and infective endocarditis. The case met both the Jones criteria and the modified Duke criteria. Transesophageal echocardiography revealed vegetation on the aortic valve, although the pathological findings were also compatible with both rheumatic heart disease and infective endocarditis. The present findings suggest that these two diseases can coexist in some cases.

  6. The mediterranean diet model in inflammatory rheumatic diseases

    OpenAIRE

    P. Spinella; F. Oliviero; C. Sales

    2011-01-01

    The Mediterranean diet is based on a pattern of eating that’s closely tied to the Mediterranean region, which includes Greece and southern Italy. Essentially, the traditional diet emphasizes foods from plant sources, limited meat consumption, small amounts of wine and olive oil as the main fat source. The beneficial effects of the Mediterranean diet has been proven not only to cardiovascular diseases but also for diabetes, obesity, arthritis and cancer. Its anti-inflammatory and protective pr...

  7. Should We Expand the Toolbox of Psychiatric Treatment Methods to Include Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS)? A Meta-Analysis of the Efficacy of rTMS in Psychiatric Disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slotema, Christina W.; Blom, Jan Dirk; Hoek, Hans W.; Sommer, Iris E. C.

    Objective: Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is a safe treatment method with few side effects However, efficacy for various psychiatric disorders is currently not clear Data sources: A literature search was performed from 1966 through October 2008 using PubMed, Ovid Medline, Embase

  8. The mediterranean diet model in inflammatory rheumatic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Spinella

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The Mediterranean diet is based on a pattern of eating that’s closely tied to the Mediterranean region, which includes Greece and southern Italy. Essentially, the traditional diet emphasizes foods from plant sources, limited meat consumption, small amounts of wine and olive oil as the main fat source. The beneficial effects of the Mediterranean diet has been proven not only to cardiovascular diseases but also for diabetes, obesity, arthritis and cancer. Its anti-inflammatory and protective properties are linked to the large presence of ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, vitamins, but especially to the constituents of extra virgin olive oil: oleic acid, phenolic compounds olecanthal, a new recently discovered molecule, with natural anti-inflammatory properties. It has been shown that the Mediterranean diet can reduce disease activity, pain and stiffness in patients with inflammatory arthritis and may thus constitute a valuable support for patients suffering from these diseases.

  9. Confidence amongst Multidisciplinary Professionals in Managing Paediatric Rheumatic Disease in Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Cassidy

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Interprofessional collaboration is a crucial component of care for children with rheumatic disease. Interprofessional care, when delivered appropriately, prevents disability and improves long-term prognosis in this vulnerable group. Methods. The aim of this survey was to explore allied health professionals’ and nurses’ confidence in treating paediatric rheumatology patients. Results. Overall, 117 participants were recruited, 77.9% of participants reported being “not confident at all,” “not confident,” or “neutral” in treating children with rheumatic diseases (RD despite 65.1% of participants reporting having treated >1 paediatric rheumatology case in the past month. Furthermore, 67.2% of participants felt their undergraduate education in paediatric rheumatology was inadequate. “Journals” or “texts books” were used by 49.3% of participants as their primary source of continuing professional development (CPD and 39.3% of participants indicated that they did not undertake any CPD related to paediatric rheumatology. Small group and online education were perceived to be potentially of “great benefit” for CPD. Conclusion. This paper highlights allied health professionals’ and nurses’ perceived inadequacy of their undergraduate education in paediatric RD and their low confidence in recognising and treating RD. Undergraduate and postgraduate education opportunities focusing on interprofessional collaboration should be developed to address this workforce deficiency.

  10. Modeling systemic autoimmune rheumatic disease in rats under the adverse weather conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yegudina Ye.D.

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Changes in the lungs, heart and kidneys are found in all animals with experimental systemic autoimmune rheumatic disease and respectively in 47%, 47% and 40% of cases of intact rats in a hostile environment with xenobiotics air pollution (ammonia + benzene + formalin, herewith in every third or fourth individual lesions of visceral vessels developed. The negative environmental situation increases the frequency of morphological signs of the disease, such as proliferation of endothelial vessels of the heart by 68% and renal arterioles by 52%, in addition, there are direct correlations of angiopathy degree in individual organs; this depends on the nature of pathological process modeling and demonstrates air pollution as a risk factor of disease in humans. The impact of pulmonary vessels sclerosis on the development of bronhosclerosis, perivascular infiltration of the heart muscle on the lymphocyte-macrophage infiltration of the stroma of the myocardium and sclerosis of renal arterioles on the degree of nephroslerosis of stroma is directly associated, with the model of systemic autoimmune rheumatic diseases whereas air pollution by xenobiotics determines dependences of the degree of cellular infiltration of alveolar septa from perivascular pulmonary infiltration, the development of cardiomyocytes hypertrophy from proliferation of the heart endothelial vessels, increase of kidney mesangial matrix from the proliferation of endothelial glomerular capillaries.