WorldWideScience

Sample records for rheumatic diseases validity

  1. HIV and Rheumatic Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... A Patient / Caregiver Diseases & Conditions HIV & Rheumatic Diseases HIV and Rheumatic Disease Fast Facts Rheumatic diseases related ... knows he or she has HIV. What are HIV-associated rheumatic diseases? Some diseases of the joints ...

  2. HIV and Rheumatic Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... A Patient / Caregiver Diseases & Conditions HIV & Rheumatic Diseases HIV and Rheumatic Disease Fast Facts Rheumatic diseases related ... knows he or she has HIV. What are HIV-associated rheumatic diseases? Some diseases of the joints ...

  3. Genetics and Rheumatic Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Well with Rheumatic Disease Genetics and Rheumatic Disease Genetics and Rheumatic Disease Fast Facts Studying twins has ... 70%, and for non-identical pairs, even lower. Genetics and ankylosing spondylitis Each rheumatic disease has its ...

  4. Genetics and Rheumatic Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Well with Rheumatic Disease Genetics and Rheumatic Disease Genetics and Rheumatic Disease Fast Facts Studying twins has ... 70%, and for non-identical pairs, even lower. Genetics and ankylosing spondylitis Each rheumatic disease has its ...

  5. Rheumatic diseases during pregnancy

    OpenAIRE

    Rahman YAVUZ

    2013-01-01

    Pregnancy induces immunologic changes that may differentially impact rheumatic disorders. The effects of pregnancy on rheumatic diseases vary by condition. The systemic rheumatic illnesses commonly complicating pregnancy are systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), antiphospholipid syndrome (APS), rheumatoid arthritis (RA), scleroderma.

  6. [Rheumatic diseases in pregnancy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Märker-Hermann, E; Bauer, H; Gromnica-Ihle, E

    2008-11-01

    Rheumatic diseases can influence the reproduction, the course of pregnancy and the development of the fetus. The inflammatory rheumatic disease itself can be modulated in its activity in terms of amelioration or exacerbation of the rheumatic symptoms. The associations between rheumatic diseases and pregnancy will be illustrated with rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, psoriatic arthritis, and systemic lupus erythematosus as examples. Antirheumatic drug therapy during pregnancy and the breast feeding period has to be adapted critically.

  7. Serum calprotectin: review of its usefulness and validity in paediatric rheumatic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariani, Anthea; Marsili, Manuela; Nozzi, Manuela; Faricelli, Raffaella; Chiarelli, Francesco; Breda, Luciana

    2015-01-01

    In most childhood rheumatic diseases, specific diagnostic markers are not yet available. Therefore, a major emphasis in medical research today is directed to the discovery of new inflammation molecules, like calprotectin. Calprotectin (MRP8/MRP14) is a complex of calcium- and zinc-binding proteins that belong to the S100 protein family. This protein is directly released by leukocytes during the interaction with inflammatory activated endothelium at the site of inflammation. Increased plasma calprotectin levels have been found in inflammatory chronic diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA), juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), multiple sclerosis, cystic fibrosis and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). In these diseases, serum calprotectin has been shown to correlate with disease activity and laboratory variables of inflammation such as C-reactive protein (CRP) and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR). This review outlines the validity and the possible applications of calprotectin as a new inflammation marker in paediatric rheumatic diseases.

  8. [Rheumatic diseases during pregnancy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer-Betz, R

    2012-09-01

    The treatment of inflammatory rheumatic diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis, spondylitis ankylosans and systemic lupus erythematosus, is improving continuously. This has lead to an increasing number of young patients with a wish to have children. Greater insight into the course of rheumatic diseases during pregnancy and post partum has enabled optimized support for women with rheumatic diseases wishing to have children. To ensure a favorable outcome, pregnancy should be started during a period of disease stability and should be monitored closely. A careful assessment of possible risks and the justified use of antirheumatic drugs before, during and after pregnancy are key issues for success.

  9. Culture-sensitive adaptation and validation of the community-oriented program for the control of rheumatic diseases methodology for rheumatic disease in Latin American indigenous populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peláez-Ballestas, Ingris; Granados, Ysabel; Silvestre, Adriana; Alvarez-Nemegyei, José; Valls, Evart; Quintana, Rosana; Figuera, Yemina; Santiago, Flor Julian; Goñi, Mario; González, Rosa; Santana, Natalia; Nieto, Romina; Brito, Irais; García, Imelda; Barrios, Maria Cecilia; Marcano, Manuel; Loyola-Sánchez, Adalberto; Stekman, Ivan; Jorfen, Marisa; Goycochea-Robles, Maria Victoria; Midauar, Fadua; Chacón, Rosa; Martin, Maria Celeste; Pons-Estel, Bernardo A

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of the study is to validate a culturally sensitive adaptation of the community-oriented program for the control of rheumatic diseases (COPCORD) methodology in several Latin American indigenous populations. The COPCORD Spanish questionnaire was translated and back-translated into seven indigenous languages: Warao, Kariña and Chaima (Venezuela), Mixteco, Maya-Yucateco and Raramuri (Mexico) and Qom (Argentina). The questionnaire was administered to almost 100 subjects in each community with the assistance of bilingual translators. Individuals with pain, stiffness or swelling in any part of the body in the previous 7 days and/or at any point in life were evaluated by physicians to confirm a diagnosis according to criteria for rheumatic diseases. Overall, individuals did not understand the use of a 0-10 visual analog scale for pain intensity and severity grading and preferred a Likert scale comprising four items for pain intensity (no pain, minimal pain, strong pain, and intense pain). They were unable to discriminate between pain intensity and pain severity, so only pain intensity was included. For validation, 702 subjects (286 male, 416 female, mean age 42.7 ± 18.3 years) were interviewed in their own language. In the last 7 days, 198 (28.2 %) subjects reported having musculoskeletal pain, and 90 (45.4 %) of these had intense pain. Compared with the physician-confirmed diagnosis, the COPCORD questionnaire had 73.8 % sensitivity, 72.9 % specificity, a positive likelihood ratio of 2.7 and area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.73. The COPCORD questionnaire is a valid screening tool for rheumatic diseases in indigenous Latin American populations.

  10. Pregnancy and rheumatic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gayed, M; Gordon, C

    2007-11-01

    Pregnancy is an issue that should be discussed with all patients with rheumatic diseases who are in the reproductive age group. Infertility is rarely due to the disease but can be associated with cyclophosphamide therapy. Most rheumatic diseases that are well controlled prior to pregnancy do not deteriorate in pregnancy, providing that the patient continues with appropriate disease-modifying therapy. Some patients with inflammatory arthritis go in to remission during pregnancy. Patients with renal involvement may be at increased risk of disease flare. This needs to be distinguished from pre-eclampsia. Intrauterine growth restriction is more likely in patients with active systemic disease, hypertension, a history of thrombosis and renal involvement. Premature delivery may need to be planned to reduce the risks of stillbirth and can be associated with a variety of neonatal complications. Post-partum flare is common in all the rheumatic diseases.

  11. Oncohematologic diseases and rheumatic disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson Hamerschlak

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Mielodysplasia, leukemia, lynfoma and multiple myeloma are themain oncohematologic diseases related to rheumatic manifestations.In multiple myeloma the pain manifestation is caused by fracturefrom bone lesions as a direct consequence of the disease, not beingan associateda true rheumatic manifestation. An interesting aspectof this subject is that many rheumatic manifestations occur beforehematologic diseases as, for example, lymphomas. Therefore we cansay that some rheumatic diseases are associated to a greater riskof oncohematologic diseases. On the other hand, oncohematologicdiseases can present rheumatic manifestations in articulations,muscles and vessels. Theses cases are usually interpreted as paraneoplasics.This chapter is divided in three parts: oncohematologicdiseases with rheumatic manifestations; rheumatic diseases thatpresent greater risk of oncohematologic pathologies; and the mainrheumatic manifestations of oncohematologic diseases.

  12. Osteoporosis and rheumatic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Maruotti

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Numerous rheumatic diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, juvenile idiopathic arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, systemic lupus erythematosus, systemic sclerosis, dermatomyositis/polymyositis and vasculitis are characterized by osteoporosis and fragility fractures. Inflammatory cytokines, glucocorticoid treatment, immobilization and reduced physical activity due to painful joints and muscle weakness are considered the main risk factors that cause low body mass density values in these diseases. Emerging evidence highlights the role of inflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α, interleukin (IL-1, IL-6, IL-7 and IL-17, in the regulation of the bone homeostasis. In fact, chronic inflammation is often characterized by an imbalance between bone formation and bone resorption with a net prevalence of osteoclastogenesis, which is an important determinant of bone loss in rheumatic diseases.

  13. Acute rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carapetis, Jonathan R; Beaton, Andrea; Cunningham, Madeleine W; Guilherme, Luiza; Karthikeyan, Ganesan; Mayosi, Bongani M; Sable, Craig; Steer, Andrew; Wilson, Nigel; Wyber, Rosemary; Zühlke, Liesl

    2016-01-14

    Acute rheumatic fever (ARF) is the result of an autoimmune response to pharyngitis caused by infection with group A Streptococcus. The long-term damage to cardiac valves caused by ARF, which can result from a single severe episode or from multiple recurrent episodes of the illness, is known as rheumatic heart disease (RHD) and is a notable cause of morbidity and mortality in resource-poor settings around the world. Although our understanding of disease pathogenesis has advanced in recent years, this has not led to dramatic improvements in diagnostic approaches, which are still reliant on clinical features using the Jones Criteria, or treatment practices. Indeed, penicillin has been the mainstay of treatment for decades and there is no other treatment that has been proven to alter the likelihood or the severity of RHD after an episode of ARF. Recent advances - including the use of echocardiographic diagnosis in those with ARF and in screening for early detection of RHD, progress in developing group A streptococcal vaccines and an increased focus on the lived experience of those with RHD and the need to improve quality of life - give cause for optimism that progress will be made in coming years against this neglected disease that affects populations around the world, but is a particular issue for those living in poverty.

  14. Acute rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease in indigenous populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steer, Andrew C; Carapetis, Jonathan R

    2009-12-01

    Acute rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease are diseases of socioeconomic disadvantage. These diseases are common in developing countries and in Indigenous populations in industrialized countries. Clinicians who work with Indigenous populations need to maintain a high index of suspicion for the potential diagnosis of acute rheumatic fever, particularly in patients presenting with joint pain. Inexpensive medicines, such as aspirin, are the mainstay of symptomatic treatment of rheumatic fever; however, antiinflammatory treatment has no effect on the long-term rate of progression or severity of chronic valvular disease. The current focus of global efforts at prevention of rheumatic heart disease is on secondary prevention (regular administration of penicillin to prevent recurrent rheumatic fever), although primary prevention (timely treatment of streptococcal pharyngitis to prevent rheumatic fever) is also important in populations in which it is feasible.

  15. [Skin changes in rheumatic diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobrić, Ivan

    2005-01-01

    The Intruduction includes those eflorescences that might be useful for diagnostics in rheumatology. Further in the text we have described four groups of rheumatic disorders. The first group: rheumatic diseases (lupus erythematosus, dermatomyositis, systemic scleroderma, the mixed connective tissue disease, allergic vasculitis, polyarteritis) which are the most common from the dermatological point of view. The second group: rheumatic diseases (Wegener's granulomatosis, rheumatoid arthritis, Sjögren, Reiter and Behçet syndrome and Kawasaki's disease) which are rarely of interest to our dermatologists. In this group there is also psoriatic arthritis, which is not rare in dermatology but its diagnostics and treatment belong to rheumatologists' field of expertise. The third group: infections (rheumatic fever, diseminated gonococcal infection, subacute bacterial endocarditis, Lyme disesease). The fourth group: metabolic disorders (gout). The diseases of the first group are described completely. In the second, third and fourth group of the diseases we have included only skin changes.

  16. Validation of the educational needs assessment tool as a generic instrument for rheumatic diseases in seven European countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndosi, Mwidimi; Bremander, Ann; Hamnes, Bente; Horton, Mike; Kukkurainen, Marja Leena; Machado, Pedro; Marques, Andrea; Meesters, Jorit; Stamm, Tanja A; Tennant, Alan; de la Torre-Aboki, Jenny; Vliet Vlieland, Theodora P M; Zangi, Heidi A; Hill, Jackie

    2014-12-01

    To validate the educational needs assessment tool (ENAT) as a generic tool for assessing the educational needs of patients with rheumatic diseases in European Countries. A convenience sample of patients from seven European countries was included comprising the following diagnostic groups: ankylosing spondylitis, psoriatic arthritis, systemic sclerosis, systemic lupus erythematosus, osteoarthritis (OA) and fibromyalgia syndrome. Translated versions of the ENAT were completed through surveys in each country. Rasch analysis was used to assess the construct validity of the adapted ENATs including differential item functioning by culture (cross-cultural DIF). Initially, the data from each country and diagnostic group were fitted to the Rasch model separately, and then the pooled data from each diagnostic group. The sample comprised 3015 patients; the majority, 1996 (66.2%), were women. Patient characteristics (stratified by diagnostic group) were comparable across countries except the educational background, which was variable. In most occasions, the 39-item ENAT deviated significantly from the Rasch model expectations (item-trait interaction χ(2) p0.18) in all pooled disease group datasets except OA (χ(2)=99.91; p=0.002). The internal consistency in each group was high (Person Separation Index above 0.90). There was no significant DIF by person characteristics. Cross-cultural DIF was found in some items, which required adjustments. Subsequently, interval-level scales were calibrated to enable transformation of ENAT scores when required. The adapted ENAT is a valid tool with high internal consistency providing accurate estimation of the educational needs of people with rheumatic diseases. Cross-cultural comparison of educational needs is now possible. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  17. The macrophages in rheumatic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laria A

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Antonella Laria, Alfredomaria Lurati , Mariagrazia Marrazza , Daniela Mazzocchi, Katia Angela Re, Magda Scarpellini Rheumatology Unit, Fornaroli Hospital, Magenta, Italy Abstract: Macrophages belong to the innate immune system giving us protection against pathogens. However it is known that they are also involved in rheumatic diseases. Activated macrophages have two different phenotypes related to different stimuli: M1 (classically activated and M2 (alternatively activated. M1 macrophages release high levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines, reactive nitrogen and oxygen intermediates killing microorganisms and tumor cells; while M2 macrophages are involved in resolution of inflammation through phagocytosis of apoptotic neutrophils, reduced production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, and increased synthesis of mediators important in tissue remodeling, angiogenesis, and wound repair. The role of macrophages in the different rheumatic diseases is different according to their M1/M2 macrophages phenotype. Keywords: macrophage, rheumatic diseases

  18. Methotrexato in Rheumatic Disease Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Sandoval, David; Centro de Enfermedades Articulares y Musculoesqueléticas The University of Alabama at Bimingham Bimingham, Estados Unidos; Alarcón, Graciela; Centro de Enfermedades Articulares y Musculoesqueléticas The University of Alabama at Bimingham Bimingham, Estados Unidos

    2014-01-01

    The authors review methotrexate use in Rheumatic Diseases, specially in Rheumatoid arthritis. Pharmacokinetics, efficacy, toxicity, and treatment monitoring of methotrexate are presented. Los autores revisan el uso del Metrotexate en el tratamiento de las enfermedades reumáticas, con especial énfasis en los recientes conceptos desarrollados como droga de segunda línea en el tratamiento de la artritis reumatoidea. Se presenta una revisión de los aspectos farmacocinóticos, eficacia, toxicida...

  19. Pregnancy and Rheumatic Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... diseases vary by condition. Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) , systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) typically are modified by pregnancy. For example, RA symptoms often improve in pregnant ...

  20. Rheumatic diseases and pregnancy

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    without renal disease, including spontaneous abortion, premature abortion, premature delivery, intrauterine growth restriction and pre- eclampsia.[2] SLE .... Sjögren's syndrome is a chronic autoimmune inflammatory disease affecting primarily .... interleukin 10 (IL-10), and the effects of hormonal changes.[2,6,18] In addition ...

  1. Validity and reliability of the EQ-5D self-report questionnaire in English-speaking Asian patients with rheumatic diseases in Singapore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, N; Chew, L H; Fong, K Y; Koh, D R; Ng, S C; Yoon, K H; Vasoo, S; Li, S C; Thumboo, J

    2003-02-01

    Validity and reliability of a Singaporean English EQ-5D self-report questionnaire (EQ-5D) were evaluated among consecutive outpatients with rheumatic diseases attending a tertiary referral hospital in Singapore (a multi-ethnic, urban Asian country). Subjects were interviewed twice within a 2-week period using a standardized questionnaire containing the EQ-5D, Short Form 36 Health Survey (SF-36) and assessing demographic and psychosocial characteristics. To assess validity of the EQ-5D, 13 hypotheses relating responses to EQ-5D dimension/Visual Analogue Scale (EQ-VAS) to SF-36 scores or other variables were examined using the Mann-Whitney test, Kruskal-Wallis test, or Spearman's correlation coefficient. Test-retest reliability was assessed using Cohen's kappa. Sixty-six subjects were studied (osteoarthritis: 9, rheumatoid arthritis: 26, systemic lupus erythematosus: 23, spondyloarthropathy: 8; female: 72.7%; mean age: 44.3 years). Ten of 13 a-priori hypotheses relating EQ-5D responses to external variables were fulfilled, supporting the validity of the EQ-SD. Cohen's kappa for test-retest reliability (n = 52) ranged from 0.29 to 0.61. The Singaporean English EQ-5D appears to be valid in measuring quality of life in Singaporeans with rheumatic diseases; however, its reliability requires further investigation. These data provide a basis for further studies assessing the validity of the EQ-5D in Singapore.

  2. Social implications of rheumatic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kłak, Anna; Raciborski, Filip; Samel-Kowalik, Piotr

    2016-01-01

    Social consequences of a disease constitute limitations in performing roles relating to working life as well as family and social life caused by the disease, mainly chronic. The aim of the study was to analyze the social consequences of rheumatic diseases in the aspect of disability pensions with respect to incapacity for work and quality of life. The occurrence of rheumatic diseases is related not only to increased risk of different types of organic changes, but above all disability. In Europe almost 50% of persons suffering from diseases of the musculoskeletal system who are currently unemployed were breadwinners. Nearly 60% of them received legal disability status. The loss of work ability is, among other things, the consequence of progressive disability. In Europe 40% of persons suffering from rheumatoid arthritis (RA) had to stop working due to the disease. Most of the persons diagnosed with RA were of working age. It results in the decrease in the quality of life as well as economic difficulties (decreased incomes and increased disease-related costs). In Poland the results of the analysis of the Social Insurance Institution (ZUS) of first-time disability recognition issued for the purpose of disability pensions in 2014 showed that the incapacity for work was caused by diseases relating to general health condition (65.5%). Diseases of the musculoskeletal system were the cause of partial inability to work of 21.6% of persons who received a disability pension for the first time (as many as 5,349 certificates were issued). Early diagnosis and implementation of effective treatment are the necessary conditions for a patient to sustain activity, both professional and social, which is of crucial importance to reduce the negative effects of the disease.

  3. [Rheumatic diseases in colonial Mexico].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aceves-Avila, F J; Fraga, A

    1997-01-01

    The medical texts published in New Spain between the XVI and XVIII century have not been searched until now for evidence of the existence of rheumatoid arthritis and other rheumatic diseases before the descriptions made by Sydenham. We surveyed most of the medical books written and published in New Spain from the arrival of the Spaniards to the XVIII century, and we divided the diseases with articular manifestations into four groups, according to their main clinical characteristics: pain without swelling in anatomical region; pain without swelling in several joints; pain and swelling in joints, and joint complaints associated with contagious diseases. We found that a difference was established between gout and rheumatoid arthritis one hundred years before Sydenham, according to the different evolutions of both diseases, and we present one of the oldest descriptions of reactive arthritis.

  4. Rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease in Bangladesh: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, A K M Monwarul; Majumder, A A S

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatic fever (RF) and rheumatic heart disease (RHD) are the most-common cardiovascular disease in young people aged <25 years, globally. They are important contributors to cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in Bangladesh. Classical risk factors, i.e. poverty, overcrowding, ignorance, and insufficient health care services were responsible for the high incidence and prevalence of these diseases over the last century. In concert with the progresses in socioeconomic indicators, advances in health sectors, improved public awareness, and antibiotic prophylaxis, acute RF came into control. However, chronic RHD continues to be prevalent, and the actual disease burden may be much higher. RHD predominantly affects the young adults, seriously incapacitates them, follows a protracted course, gets complicated because of delayed diagnosis and is sometimes maltreated. The treatment is often palliative and expensive. Large-scale epidemiological and clinical researches are needed to formulate evidence-based national policy to tackle this important public health issue in future.

  5. Rheumatic Diseases: from Theory to Reality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Ángel Serra Valdés

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatic diseases are a significant health problem worldwide because of their morbidity, their resulting disabilities and their economic impact due the high costs they entail for health institutions and patients. They should be included in the non-communicable chronic diseases when considering the following aspects for its definition: risk factors, chronic course, impact on quality of life, incidence and prevalence in the general population, mortality, etc.; aspects that coexists in rheumatic diseases.

  6. OPPORTUNISTIC MICROORGANISMS IN RHEUMATIC DISEASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Yu. Gulneva

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper gives the data available in the literature on the role of opportunistic microorganisms (OMs in rheumatic diseases (RDs. OMs are anticipated to be involved as triggers initiating the development of chronic inflammation. Along with this, OMs in autoimmune diseases may play a defensive role through the interaction with Toll-like receptors and the activation of T cells that have suppressor activity. The possible involvement of OMs in the pathogenesis of RDs provides support not only the isolation of microorganisms, but also the detection of antibacterial antibodies of different classes. Of great importance are OMs in the etiology of comorbid infections, the risk of which is due to both the presence of autoimmune RDs and the necessity of using the drugs having immunosuppressive activity. The active clinical introduction of biological agents is followed by a rise in the rate and severity of different infections, including those caused by OMs. Having a marked biological and environmental plasticity, OMs are able to persist long when there are changes in the immune defense of patients with RDs. There is evidence for the higher adhesive properties and persistent potential of the microorganisms that colonize the body of patients with RDs. In the latter, OMs that are distinguished by pronounced antibiotic polyresistance are isolated, making the treatment and prevention of opportunistic infections more difficult in rheumatology. The results of the papers analyzed in the review suggest that the study of OMs in RDs is of practical importance.

  7. 10.8.Rheumatic heart disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1992-01-01

    920083 A preliminary study of cell immunefunction in rheumatic heart disease.YANG Qi(杨奇),et al.Res Lab Cardiovasc Dis,Luzhou MedColl Hosp,Sichuan.Chin Cir J 1991; 6 (5): 392-394.Cell immune function of forty one patients withrheumatic heart disease (RHD),forty four withRHD and rheumatic fever (RF) and fifty normal

  8. Neurologic Manifestations of Childhood Rheumatic Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza SHIARI

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Children with rheumatic disorders may have a wide variety of clinical features ranging from fever or a simple arthritis to complex multisystem autoimmune diseases. Information about the prevalence of neurological manifestations in children with rheumatologic disorders is limited. This review describes the neurologic complications of childhood Rheumatic disease either solely or combined with symptoms of other organs involvement, as a primary manifestation or as a part of other symptoms, additionally.

  9. Persisting eicosanoid pathways in rheumatic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korotkova, Marina; Jakobsson, Per-Johan

    2014-04-01

    An unmet clinical need exists for early treatment of rheumatic diseases and improved treatment strategies that can better maintain remission with reduced ongoing subclinical inflammation and bone destruction. Eicosanoids form one of the most complex networks in the body controlling many physiological and pathophysiological processes, including inflammation, autoimmunity and cancer. Persisting eicosanoid pathways are thought to be involved in the development of rheumatic diseases, and targeting this pathway might enable improved treatment strategies. Several enzymes of the arachidonic acid cascade as well as eicosanoid receptors (all part of the eicosanoid pathway) are today well-recognized targets for anti-inflammatory drugs that can reduce symptoms of inflammation in rheumatic diseases. In this Review, we outline the evidence supporting pivotal roles of eicosanoid signalling in the pathogenesis of rheumatic diseases and discuss findings from studies in animals and humans. We focus first on rheumatoid arthritis and discuss the upregulation of the cyclooxygenase and lipoxygenase pathways as most data are available in this condition. Research into the roles of eicosanoids in other rheumatic diseases (osteoarthritis, idiopathic inflammatory myopathies, systemic lupus erythematosus and gout) is also progressing rapidly and is discussed. Finally, we summarize the prospects of targeting eicosanoid pathways as anti-inflammatory treatment strategies for patients with rheumatic diseases.

  10. Prevalence of Rheumatic Fever and Rheumatic Heart Disease in School Children in Malwa Region of MP

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease continue to affect millions of people around the world. Children and adolescents of the developing countries are especially susceptible to this disease. To asses the prevalence of Rheumatic Fever /Rheumatic heart disease in an urban area, we do survey of children aged between 5 to 16 years studying in various government schools in Indore district which were selected randomly. Out of 9879 students enrolled in the study 9526 were examined, the percent...

  11. Acute rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease among children--American Samoa, 2011-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaudoin, Amanda; Edison, Laura; Introcaso, Camille E; Goh, Lucy; Marrone, James; Mejia, Amelita; Van Beneden, Chris

    2015-05-29

    Acute rheumatic fever is a nonsuppurative, immune-mediated consequence of group A streptococcal pharyngitis (strep throat). Recurrent or severe acute rheumatic fever can cause permanent cardiac valve damage and rheumatic heart disease, which increases the risk for cardiac conditions (e.g., infective endocarditis, stroke, and congestive heart failure). Antibiotics can prevent acute rheumatic fever if administered no more than 9 days after symptom onset. Long-term benzathine penicillin G (BPG) injections are effective in preventing recurrent acute rheumatic fever attacks and are recommended to be administered every 3-4 weeks for 10 years or until age 21 years to children who receive a diagnosis of acute rheumatic fever. During August 2013, in response to anecdotal reports of increasing rates of acute rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease, CDC collaborated with the American Samoa Department of Health and the Lyndon B. Johnson Tropical Medical Center (the only hospital in American Samoa) to quantify the number of cases of pediatric acute rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease in American Samoa and to assess the potential roles of missed pharyngitis diagnosis, lack of timely prophylaxis prescription, and compliance with prescribed BPG prophylaxis. Using data from medical records, acute rheumatic fever incidence was calculated as 1.1 and 1.5 cases per 1,000 children aged ≤18 years in 2011 and 2012, respectively; 49% of those with acute rheumatic fever subsequently received a diagnosis of rheumatic heart disease. Noncompliance with recommended prophylaxis with BPG after physician-diagnosed acute rheumatic fever was noted for 22 (34%) of 65 patients. Rheumatic heart disease point prevalence was 3.2 cases per 1,000 children in August 2013. Establishment of a coordinated acute rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease control program in American Samoa, likely would improve diagnosis, treatment, and patient compliance with BPG prophylaxis.

  12. Prevalence of Rheumatic Fever and Rheumatic Heart Disease in School Children in Malwa Region of MP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Yadav, P Joshi, J Gupta, D Joseph, P Sakhi

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease continue to affect millions of people around the world. Children and adolescents of the developing countries are especially susceptible to this disease. To asses the prevalence of Rheumatic Fever /Rheumatic heart disease in an urban area, we do survey of children aged between 5 to 16 years studying in various government schools in Indore district which were selected randomly. Out of 9879 students enrolled in the study 9526 were examined, the percentage of absentees being ten. Revised Jones criterion (1992 was used for the diagnosis of rheumatic fever. Doppler echocardiography is used to confirm the diagnosis of rheumatic heart disease. A total of seven cases of definite rheumatic heart disease (out of 13 suspected cases were identified giving overall prevalence rate of 0.73 per 1000. Fifty percent rheumatic heart disease cases gave a history suggestive of rheumatic fever. No case of active rheumatic fever could be identified. The study gave lower result than that reported in earlier studies from developing countries but it is similar to that reported from Indore district in 2009. It is concluded that there is some downward trend in rheumatic fever / rheumatic heart disease prevalence but the low prevalence is also due to the use of Doppler echocardiography which has prevented over diagnosis in the present study.

  13. Interaction of pregnancy and autoimmune rheumatic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Østensen, Monika; Villiger, Peter M; Förger, Frauke

    2012-05-01

    During pregnancy, the fetus represents a natural allograft that is not normally rejected. While the maternal immune system retains the ability to respond to foreign antigens, tolerance mechanisms are up-regulated to protect the fetus from immunologic attacks by the mother. The profound immunologic adaptations during and after pregnancy do influence maternal autoimmune rheumatic diseases in several ways. One is triggering the onset of a rheumatic disease in the post partum period, the other influencing disease activity of established rheumatic disease. The review will discuss the mechanisms of increased susceptibility of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in the first year post partum with a specific emphasis on the role of fetal cells or antigens persisting in the maternal circulation (so called microchimerism). Furthermore, the different influences of pregnancy on established rheumatic diseases will be highlighted. A marked beneficial effect of pregnancy is observed on RA whereas several other rheumatic diseases as ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) show either no particular effect or an aggravation of symptoms during pregnancy. Differences emerging in regard to modulation of disease symptoms during pregnancy seem related to response to hormones, the type of cytokine profile and immune response prevailing as well as further downstream interactions of molecular pathways that are important in disease pathogenesis.

  14. [The temporomandibular joint and inflammatory rheumatic diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marotte, H

    2016-09-01

    Some inflammatory rheumatic diseases can involve the temporomandibular joint, such as rheumatoid arthritis and spondylarthritis. The aim of our work was to evaluate the current prevalence of these inflammatory TMJ diseases, to indicate the new therapeutics and to describe the collaboration between rheumatologist and maxillofacial surgeon in these pathologies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Rheumatic fever & rheumatic heart disease: the last 50 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, R Krishna; Tandon, R

    2013-04-01

    Rheumatic fever (RF) and rheumatic heart disease (RHD) continue to be a major health hazard in most developing countries as well as sporadically in developed economies. Despite reservations about the utility, echocardiographic and Doppler (E&D) studies have identified a massive burden of RHD suggesting the inadequacy of the Jones' criteria updated by the American Heart Association in 1992. Subclinical carditis has been recognized by E&D in patients with acute RF without clinical carditis as well as by follow up of RHD patients presenting as isolated chorea or those without clinical evidence of carditis. Over the years, the medical management of RF has not changed. Paediatric and juvenile mitral stenosis (MS), upto the age of 12 and 20 yr respectively, severe enough to require operative treatement was documented. These negate the belief that patients of RHD become symptomatic ≥20 years after RF as well as the fact that congestive cardiac failure in childhood indicates active carditis and RF. Non-surgical balloon mitral valvotomy for MS has been initiated. Mitral and/or aortic valve replacement during active RF in patients not responding to medical treatment has been found to be life saving as well as confirming that congestive heart failure in acute RF is due to an acute haemodynamic overload. Pathogenesis as well as susceptibility to RF continue to be elusive. Prevention of RF morbidity depends on secondary prophylaxis which cannot reduce the burden of diseases. Primary prophylaxis is not feasible in the absence of a suitable vaccine. Attempts to design an antistreptococcal vaccine utilizing the M-protein has not succeeded in the last 40 years. Besides pathogenesis many other questions remain unanswered.

  16. [Periodontal disease in pediatric rheumatic diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabri, Gisele M C; Savioli, Cynthia; Siqueira, José T; Campos, Lucia M; Bonfá, Eloisa; Silva, Clovis A

    2014-01-01

    Gingivitis and periodontitis are immunoinflammatory periodontal diseases characterized by chronic localized infections usually associated with insidious inflammation This narrative review discusses periodontal diseases and mechanisms influencing the immune response and autoimmunity in pediatric rheumatic diseases (PRD), particularly juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus (C-SLE) and juvenile dermatomyositis (JDM). Gingivitis was more frequently observed in these diseases compared to health controls, whereas periodontitis was a rare finding. In JIA patients, gingivitis and periodontitis were related to mechanical factors, chronic arthritis with functional disability, dysregulation of the immunoinflammatory response, diet and drugs, mainly corticosteroids and cyclosporine. In C-SLE, gingivitis was associated with longer disease period, high doses of corticosteroids, B-cell hyperactivation and immunoglobulin G elevation. There are scarce data on periodontal diseases in JDM population, and a unique gingival pattern, characterized by gingival erythema, capillary dilation and bush-loop formation, was observed in active patients. In conclusion, gingivitis was the most common periodontal disease in PRD. The observed association with disease activity reinforces the need for future studies to determine if resolution of this complication will influence disease course or severity.

  17. Tai chi and rheumatic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chenchen

    2011-02-01

    Tai chi is a complex multicomponent mind-body exercise. Many studies have provided evidence that tai chi benefits patients with a variety of chronic disorders. This form of mind-body exercise enhances cardiovascular fitness, muscular strength, balance, and physical function and seems to be associated with reduced stress, anxiety, and depression and improved quality of life. Thus, despite certain limitations in the evidence, tai chi can be recommended to patients with osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, and fibromyalgia as a complementary and alternative medical approach. This article overviews the current knowledge about tai chi to better inform clinical decision making for rheumatic patients. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Role of diet in rheumatic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Sophia; Micheletti, Robert

    2011-02-01

    Millions of people suffer from rheumatic diseases such as gout, fibromyalgia, osteoarthritis, and rheumatoid arthritis. These can be incapacitating and detrimental to quality of life. Diet, nutrition, and weight loss have shown promise in alleviating some of this disease burden. These lifestyle changes may give patients a feeling of control and ownership over their disease as well as a nonpharmacologic means of treatment. This article reviews the available research on the effects of diet and nutrition on rheumatoid disease.

  19. Rheumatic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khaled A. Sorour

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatic fever (RF and rheumatic heart disease (RHD have decreased in prevalence in the advanced industrialized nation. In the developing world, RF and RHD although less prevalent than they were 30 to 50 years ago, are still a major health problem. Poor socio-economic standards and difficulty of reaching proper primary health care facilities are the main causes of the still relatively high prevalence. This article will discuss in brief the epidemiology of group A beta hemolytic streptococci (GAS and RF/RHD as well as their global burden. The gloomy past of RF/RHD will hopefully give way to the promising future we all strive to achieve through better social standards, sanitation and hygiene, and availability of better health care for all.

  20. Rheumatic manifestations associated with lung diseases

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    Marco Aurelio Scarpinella Bueno

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatic manifestations in the more prevalent lung diseasessuch as asthma, chronic pulmonary disease or pneumonia are notfrequent. Exceptions to this rule are represented by lung cancerand sarcoidosis, where the appearance of the digital clubbing,hypertrophic osteoarthropathy, and arthtritis can correspond to thefi rst symptoms of the illness.

  1. Perspectives for uveitis treatment in rheumatic diseases

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    Alla Aleksandrovna Godzenko

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes current approaches to treating uveitis in rheumatic diseases and theoretical backgrounds for using tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α inhibitors. The data available in the literature suggest that anti-TNF-α therapy is highly effective in relieving and preventing uveitis attacks.

  2. Adipokines, Metabolic Syndrome and Rheumatic Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Vanessa Abella; Morena Scotece; Javier Conde; Verónica López; Verónica Lazzaro; Jesús Pino; Gómez-Reino, Juan J; Oreste Gualillo

    2014-01-01

    The metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a cluster of cardiometabolic disorders that result from the increasing prevalence of obesity. The major components of MetS include insulin resistance, central obesity, dyslipidemia, and hypertension. MetS identifies the central obesity with increased risk for cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) and type-2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Patients with rheumatic diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, and ankylosing spondylitis...

  3. Acute rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease in resource-limited settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Gabriella; Jallow, Bintou; Le Doare, Kirsty; Pushparajah, Kuberan; Anderson, Suzanne T

    2015-04-01

    Poststreptococcal complications, such as acute rheumatic fever (ARF) and rheumatic heart disease (RHD), are common in resource-limited settings, with RHD recognised as the most common cause of paediatric heart disease worldwide. Managing these conditions in resource-limited settings can be challenging. We review the investigation and treatment options for ARF and RHD and, most importantly, prevention methods in an African setting.

  4. Adipokines, metabolic syndrome and rheumatic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abella, Vanessa; Scotece, Morena; Conde, Javier; López, Verónica; Lazzaro, Verónica; Pino, Jesús; Gómez-Reino, Juan J; Gualillo, Oreste

    2014-01-01

    The metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a cluster of cardiometabolic disorders that result from the increasing prevalence of obesity. The major components of MetS include insulin resistance, central obesity, dyslipidemia, and hypertension. MetS identifies the central obesity with increased risk for cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) and type-2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Patients with rheumatic diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, and ankylosing spondylitis, have increased prevalence of CVDs. Moreover, CVD risk is increased when obesity is present in these patients. However, traditional cardiovascular risk factors do not completely explain the enhanced cardiovascular risk in this population. Thus, MetS and the altered secretion patterns of proinflammatory adipokines present in obesity could be the link between CVDs and rheumatic diseases. Furthermore, adipokines have been linked to the pathogenesis of MetS and its comorbidities through their effects on vascular function and inflammation. In the present paper, we review recent evidence of the role played by adipokines in the modulation of MetS in the general population, and in patients with rheumatic diseases.

  5. Adipokines, Metabolic Syndrome and Rheumatic Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Abella

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The metabolic syndrome (MetS is a cluster of cardiometabolic disorders that result from the increasing prevalence of obesity. The major components of MetS include insulin resistance, central obesity, dyslipidemia, and hypertension. MetS identifies the central obesity with increased risk for cardiovascular diseases (CVDs and type-2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM. Patients with rheumatic diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, and ankylosing spondylitis, have increased prevalence of CVDs. Moreover, CVD risk is increased when obesity is present in these patients. However, traditional cardiovascular risk factors do not completely explain the enhanced cardiovascular risk in this population. Thus, MetS and the altered secretion patterns of proinflammatory adipokines present in obesity could be the link between CVDs and rheumatic diseases. Furthermore, adipokines have been linked to the pathogenesis of MetS and its comorbidities through their effects on vascular function and inflammation. In the present paper, we review recent evidence of the role played by adipokines in the modulation of MetS in the general population, and in patients with rheumatic diseases.

  6. The management of rheumatic diseases in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, K; Kaul, M; Clowse, Megan E B

    2010-03-01

    Pregnancy can create a challenge for physicians caring for women with rheumatic diseases. For many women with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), pregnancy can provide a reprieve from long-term joint pain and inflammation, but others will not experience remission and will continue to need medication. Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) may remain quiet in some women, but in others may become more aggressive during pregnancy, putting both mother and foetus at risk. Women with limited scleroderma can do remarkably well, but scleroderma renal crises can be difficult to manage. A third of pregnancies in women with antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) may be refractory to our best therapy. In general, active inflammation from rheumatic diseases poses a stronger threat to the well-being of both mother and foetus than many immunosuppressant medications. Therefore, continued immunosuppression with the least risky medications will allow for the most optimal pregnancy outcomes.

  7. Autoimmune neuropathies associated to rheumatic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Alberto R M; Faber, Ingrid; Nucci, Anamarli; Appenzeller, Simone; França, Marcondes C

    2017-04-01

    Systemic manifestations are frequent in autoimmune rheumatic diseases and include peripheral nervous system damage. Neuron cell body, axons and myelin sheath may all be affected in this context. This involvement results in severe and sometimes disabling symptoms. Sensory, motor and autonomic features may be present in different patterns that emerge as peculiar clinical pictures. Prompt recognition of these neuropathies is pivotal to guide treatment and reduce the risks of long term disability. In this review, we aim to describe the main immune-mediated neuropathies associated to rheumatic diseases: sensory neuronopathies, multiple mononeuropathies and chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy, with an emphasis on clinical features and therapeutic options. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Ultrasound of enthesopathy in rheumatic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falsetti, Paolo; Acciai, Caterina; Lenzi, Lucia; Frediani, Bruno

    2009-01-01

    Enthesopathy is the pathologic change of the insertion of tendons, ligaments and joint capsules on the bone. It is a cardinal feature of spondyloarthropathies (SpA), but it can occur in other rheumatic disease. Recent studies using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and ultrasonography (US) have demonstrated that enthesopathy can often be asymptomatic, in both the axial and peripheral skeleton. Therefore, a systematic US study of peripheral entheses could be useful in the diagnostic process of patients with rheumatic diseases, in particular SpA. Recently, power Doppler US (PDUS) has been proved to be useful for differentiating mechanical/degenerative and inflammatory enthesopathy and for monitoring the efficacy of therapy. This article reviews the main histopathologic aspects of enthesopathy and describes the normal US features of enthesis and the basic US features of enthesopathy, in its various stages. The usefulness of US and PDUS in the diagnosis and assessment of enthesopathy is discussed on the basis of the literature and our experience.

  9. Rheumatic heart disease in Tennessee: An overlooked diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahana A Choudhury

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatic heart disease, already a major burden in low- and middle-income countries, is becoming an emerging problem in high-income countries. Although acute rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease have almost been eradicated in areas with established economies, the emergence of this problem may be attributable to the migration from low-income to high-income settings. Between 2010 and 2012, we diagnosed a cluster of rheumatic heart disease cases in children from the Middle Tennessee area. The goal of this report is to increase awareness among clinicians as the incidence and prevalence of acute rheumatic fever remain relatively significant in large US metropolitan areas. Although acute rheumatic fever is seasonal, a high suspicion index may lead to the early diagnosis and prevention of its cardiac complications. Furthermore, screening procedures may be recommended for populations at risk for rheumatic heart disease in endemic areas, and active surveillance with echocardiography-based screening might become very important.

  10. The management of rheumatic diseases in pregnancy

    OpenAIRE

    Mitchell, K; Kaul, M; Clowse, MEB

    2010-01-01

    Pregnancy can create a challenge for physicians caring for women with rheumatic diseases. For many women with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), pregnancy can provide a reprieve from long-term joint pain and inflammation, but others will not experience remission and will continue to need medication. Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) may remain quiet in some women, but in others may become more aggressive during pregnancy, putting both mother and foetus at risk. Women with limited scleroderma can do ...

  11. Pulmonary hypertension in autoimmune rheumatic diseases

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    L. Massironi

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Pulmonary hypertension is a severe and rapidly progressive disease, particularly frequent in patients with rheumatic diseases. The aims of this study were the following: to determine the prevalence of pulmonary hypertension in Italian patients with autoimmune rheumatic diseases, and to evaluate if the presence of a rheumatic disease in general, or of a specific autoimmune rheumatic disease, is a risk factor for the development of pulmonary hypertension. Patients and Methods. One hundred and thirteen Italian patients with connective tissue diseases (105 females, 8 males, aged 19 to 83 yrs, entered the study. Fifty-one had systemic sclerosis (SSc: 49 were females, 2 males, aged 34 to 83 yrs; 41 had limited cutaneous SSc, 8 diffuse cutaneous SSc, and 2 SSc sine scleroderma. Thirty-three patients had systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE: all but one were females, their age ranged from 19 to 82 yrs. Twenty-five had rheumatoid arthritis (RA: 21 females, 4 males, aged 26 to 45 yrs. Three females and one male, 51-77 yrs, had mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD. Systolic pulmonary arterial pressure (SPAP was assessed by Doppler echocardiography. Results. Twenty three patients had pulmonary hypertension, which was more frequent in MCTD than in SLE (75% vs 6.1%, p=0.0002 or in AR (20%, p=0.0313. Pulmonary hypertension was more frequent in SSc than in SLE (25.5% vs 6.1%, p=0.0028 and in limited than in diffuse SSc(21.6% vs 3.9%. SPAP was significanly related to age (R=0.35, P=0.0275, with patients with pulmonary hypertension older than patients with normal SPAP (66±13 vs 52±16 yrs, p=0.0003. Conclusions. These data show a significant association between pulmonary hypertension and autoimmune rheumatic diseases. Therefore pulmonary hypertension assessment seems mandatory, at least in MCTD and SSc. However, more studies are needed to clarify the relationship between age and pulmonary hypertension and to verify whether the low prevalence of

  12. Management of rheumatic diseases during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Amy B; Chakravarty, Eliza F

    2010-05-01

    Systemic rheumatic diseases commonly affect women during the childbearing years. Many women with these diseases may be contemplating pregnancy or discover an inadvertent pregnancy, leading to concerns regarding medication use, changes in disease activity during pregnancy, safety of lactation, and future ability to care for a child given the presence of chronic illnesses. There are outstanding reviews that summarize the safety and use of immunosuppressive medications during pregnancy. However, in addition to medication use, providers need to be aware of the available data regarding fertility, pregnancy outcomes, delivery, and lactation issues that may be specific to individual diseases. Optimally, women should plan pregnancies to occur around times of disease quiescence, several months after potentially teratogenic medications have been discontinued. The course of the underlying rheumatic disease during pregnancy is variable, and there are no specific clinical or laboratory variables that consistently predict disease improvement or worsening during pregnancy. Recent data suggest that increased disease activity in women with most autoimmune diseases during pregnancy may lead to increased risk of premature delivery, low-birth-weight infants, and other adverse pregnancy outcomes. Arthritis involving the cervical spine and hips may impact delivery and must be considered by both obstetricians and obstetric anesthesiologists. Data are mixed regarding the impact of breastfeeding on underlying autoimmune diseases; the choice to continue breastfeeding is a personal decision.

  13. KONSUPREN IN THETHERAPY OF RHEUMATIC DISEASES

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    Z S Alekberova

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Summary Aim: to assess the efficacy and tolerability of Consupren (Galena, Chekia in some rheumatic diseases. Material and methods. Three months’ therapy by Consupren was studied in 12 patients: 4 with SLE, 4 with Behcet’s disease, 2 with rheumatoid arthritis with systemic manifestations, 2 with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis. Sandimmune therapy was changed for Consupren in 9 patients. All patients were controlled for the level of serum creatinine and AD and had consultations with ophtalmologist. Results. 3 SLE patients treated by Consupren demonstrated decreasing of proteinuria, disease activity by SLAM and SLEDA1, the fourth patient demonstrated fading of diskoid rash and normalizing of temperature. Patients with Behcet’s disease had no episodes of ulcerous stomatitis and uveitis exacerbation, in one patient stable nodular erythema disappeared. Patients with JRA improved articular syndrome, normalized temperature, reduced acute phase indices. Both patients continue taking Consupren, RA patients had long term of onset of the disease and 111-IV radiological stage , thus the effect on the articular syndrome was not so demonstrative but the activity of the disease reduced. Conclusion: consupren is effective and well tolerable drug for patients with systemic manifestations of rheumatic diseases. No side effects were noticed.

  14. Challenges to developing effective streptococcal vaccines to prevent rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma A

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Abhinay Sharma, D Patric Nitsche-SchmitzDepartment of Medical Microbiology, Helmholtz Center for Infection Research, Braunschweig, GermanyAbstract: Acute rheumatic fever is a sequela of Streptococcus pyogenes and potentially of Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis infections. Acute rheumatic fever is caused by destructive autoimmunity and inflammation in the extracellular matrix and can lead to rheumatic heart disease, which is the most frequent cardiologic disease that is acquired in youth. Although effective treatments are available, acute rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease remain serious threats to human health, which affect millions and cause high economic losses. This has motivated the search for a vaccine that prevents the causative streptococcal infections. A variety of potential vaccine candidates have been identified and investigated in the past. Today, new approaches are applied to find alternative candidates. Nevertheless, several obstacles lie in the way of an approved S. pyogenes vaccine for use in humans. Herein, a subjective selection of promising vaccine candidates with respect to the prevention of acute rheumatic fever/rheumatic heart disease and safety regarding immunological side effects is discussed.Keywords: autoimmune disease, side effects, M protein vaccine, molecular mimicry, coiled-coil, collagen binding, PARF

  15. [Alternative treatment methods in rheumatic diseases; a literature review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, J W; Rasker, J J; Van Riel, P L; Gribnau, F W; van de Putte, L B

    1991-02-23

    To evaluate the effectiveness of several types of complementary medicine in patients with rheumatic diseases, a literature search was performed. Clinical trials, blind or open, comparing the effectiveness of forms of complementary medicine with that of placebo or another control therapy in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis, soft tissue rheumatism and the fibromyalgia syndrome were selected until half of 1989, using electronic databases. Abstracts and summaries were excluded. The investigation was performed at the department of rheumatology of the Medisch Spectrum Twente hospital at Enschede in cooperation with the department of internal diseases of the Sint Radboud hospital at Nijmegen. For each type of complementary treatment, the results of all the clinical trials were summarized. Furthermore, the placebo-controlled trials were graded according to convincing trials or trials that seemed to be less valid and/or difficult to interpret. Data concerning acupuncture, balneotherapy, dietary measures, enzymic therapy, Seatone, homeopathy, manual therapy and fever few were found. Of these types of complementary medicine in rheumatic diseases, we found no convincing prove that they are more effective than the control or placebo treatment. A considerable number of the studies however can be criticized. It is necessary to perform further studies on the effect of frequently used types of complementary medicine in patients with rheumatic diseases, by or in cooperation with the physicians or paramedics who prescribe or perform these kinds of treatment. This is nearly always possible; directives are given to realize further studies of this kind. If a particular treatment proves to be no more effective than placebo treatment, its use should be discouraged.

  16. Calprotectin in rheumatic diseases: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopeć-Mędrek, Magdalena; Widuchowska, Małgorzata; Kucharz, Eugeniusz J

    2016-01-01

    Calprotectin also known as MRP8/14 or S100A8/A9 is a heterodimeric complex of two S100 calcium-binding proteins: myeloid-related protein 8 (MRP-8 or S100A8) and MRP-14 (or S100A9). At present, according to many authors, it is considered that calprotectin MRP8/14 is a potentially more sensitive biomarker of disease activity in rheumatoid disease than conventional inflammatory indices such as the erythrocyte sedimentation rate, C-reactive protein and others. A review of the literature on concentration of calprotectin in patients with some rheumatic diseases (rheumatoid arthritis, juvenile idiopathic arthritis, adult-onset Still's disease, systemic vasculitis, polymyalgia rheumatica, ankylosis spondylitis, systemic lupus erythematosus, and primary Sjögren's syndrome) is presented.

  17. Rheumatic manifestations of inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tatiana Sofía Rodríguez-Reyna; Cynthia Martínez-Reyes; Jesús Kazúo Yamamoto-Furusho

    2009-01-01

    This article reviews the literature concerning rheumatic manifestations of inflammatory bowel disease(IBD), including common immune-mediated pathways,frequency, clinical course and therapy. Musculoskeletal complications are frequent and well-recognized manifestations in IBD, and affect up to 33% of patients with IBD. The strong link between the bowel and the osteo-articular system is suggested by many clinical and experimental observations, notably in HLA-B27 transgenic rats. The autoimmune pathogenic mechanisms shared by IBD and spondyloarthropathies include genetic susceptibility to abnormal antigen presentation,aberrant recognition of self, the presence of autoantibodies against specific antigens shared by the colon and other extra-colonic tissues, and increased intestinal permeability. The response against microorganisms may have an important role through molecular mimicry and other mechanisms. Rheumatic manifestations of IBD have been divided into peripheral arthritis, and axial involvement, including sacroiliitis,with or without spondylitis, similar to idiopathic ankylosing spondylitis. Other periarticular features can occur,including enthesopathy, tendonitis, clubbing, periostitis,and granulomatous lesions of joints and bones.Osteoporosis and osteomalacia secondary to IBD and iatrogenic complications can also occur. The management of the rheumatic manifestations of IBD consists of physical therapy in combination with local injection of corticosteroids and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs; caution is in order however, because of their possible harmful effects on intestinal integrity, permeability,and even on gut inflammation. Sulfasalazine,methotrexate, azathioprine, cyclosporine and leflunomide should be used for selected indications. In some cases, tumor necrosis factor-α blocking agents should be considered as first-line therapy.

  18. Macrophage Activation Syndrome in Paediatric Rheumatic Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, M I; Talukder, M K; Islam, M M; Laila, K; Rahman, S A

    2017-04-01

    Macrophage activation syndrome (MAS) is a potentially fatal complication of rheumatic disorders, which commonly occurs in systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis (sJIA).This study was carried out with the aims of describing the clinical features, laboratory findings and outcomes of MAS associated with paediatric rheumatic diseases in the Department of Paediatrics, Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University (BSMMU) and compare these results with previous studies on MAS. This retrospective study was conducted in the paediatric rheumatology wing of the Department of Paediatrics, Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University (BSMMU), Dhaka, Bangladesh. Clinical and laboratory profile of all the diagnosed cases of MAS were analyzed from the medical records from January 2010 to July 2015. Among 10 MAS patients, 6 were female and 4 were male. Seven patients of systemic JIA, two patients of SLE and one patient with Kawasaki Disease developed MAS in their course of primary disease. Mean duration of primary disease prior to development of MAS was 2.9 years and mean age of onset was 9.1 years. High continued fever and new onset hepatosplenomegaly were the hallmark of the clinical presentation. White blood cell count and platelet count came down from the mean of 16.2 to 10.2×10⁹/L and 254 to 90×10⁹/L. Mean erythrocyte sedimentation rate was dropped from 56 to 29 mm/hr. Six patients had abnormal liver enzyme level (ALT) and 5 had evidence of coagulopathy (prolonged prothrombin time and APTT) at the onset of disease. Hyperferritinnemia were found in all the patients. Bone marrow study was done in 5 patients but features of hamophagocytosis were found only in 2 patients. All patients received intravenous steroid and 3 patients who did not respond to steroid received additional cyclosporine. Mortality rate was 30% in this series. Macrophage activation syndrome is a fatal complication of paediatric rheumatic diseases among which s-JIA was predominant. Early diagnosis and

  19. Weather conditions can influence rheumatic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergés, Josep; Montell, Eulàlia; Tomàs, Elena; Cumelles, Gemma; Castañeda, Guido; Marti, Núria; Möller, Ingrid

    2004-01-01

    In daily clinical practice, many patients attribute joint pain to weather conditions. There is little information published on this subject and most of it is contradictory. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of climatic conditions in rheumatic patients. The present work was carried out with patients attending the Instituto Poal de Reumatologia of Barcelona and the data were analyzed by Bioibérica Farma (Spain). It was a prospective, double-blind study including 92 patients with rheumatic disorders (80 with osteoarthritis, 12 with rheumatoid arthritis) compared to a control group of 42 subjects. The evaluation of pain (Huskisson VAS) and functional capacity (Health Assessment Questionnaire, HAQ) were determined daily during one month. The climatic variables studied were temperature, humidity and barometric pressure. The results obtained have been subject to binary regression analysis. Our data demonstrate that osteoarthritic patients experience increased joint pain in response to a decrease in pressure, indicating that low atmospheric pressure conditions exacerbate joint pain in these patients. Our work also suggests that some meteorological variables affect the occurrence of pain in rheumatoid arthritis, since we have found that low temperature increases the risk of joint pain. Therefore, these data suggest that in the future it may be possible to modulate pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatments for some osteoarthritic patients depending on the predictable weather conditions in order to avoid, as much as possible, the disease-associated joint pain and functional incapacity, thus improving patients' quality of life.

  20. Metabolic syndrome in inflammatory rheumatic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. La Montagna

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Toward the end of the last century a better knowledge of cardiovascular (CV risk factors and their associations led investigators to propose the existence of a unique pathophysiological condition called “metabolic” or “insulin resistance syndrome”. Among all, insulin-resistance and compensatory hyperinsulinemia are considered its most important treatment targets. Different definitions have been provided by World Health Organization (WHO and by The Third Report of The National Cholesterol Education Program’s Adult Treatment Panel (NCEP-ATP III. In particular, abdominal obesity, hypertension, low HDL cholesterol and hyperglicemia are the most common items used for its definition. The presence of MetS is effective in predicting the future risk of diabetes and coronaropathies. The evidence of a higher CV risk rate among different rheumatic inflammatory diseases has recently been associated with high prevalence of MetS in some cases. Rheumatoid or psoriatic arthritis have the large series among arthritis, whereas systemic lupus erythematosus among connective tissue disorders. This review analyses all most important studies about the evidence of MetS in rheumatic patients and the main clinical and prognostic significance of this relation.

  1. [Metabolic syndrome in inflammatory rheumatic diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malesci, D; Valentini, G; La Montagna, G

    2006-01-01

    Toward the end of the last century a better knowledge of cardiovascular (CV) risk factors and their associations led investigators to propose the existence of a unique pathophysiological condition called "metabolic" or "insulin resistance syndrome". Among all, insulin-resistance and compensatory hyperinsulinemia are considered its most important treatment targets. Different definitions have been provided by World Health Organization (WHO) and by The Third Report of The National Cholesterol Education Program's Adult Treatment Panel (NCEP-ATP III). In particular, abdominal obesity, hypertension, low HDL cholesterol and hyperglicemia are the most common items used for its definition. The presence of MetS is effective in predicting the future risk of diabetes and coronaropathies. The evidence of a higher CV risk rate among different rheumatic inflammatory diseases has recently been associated with high prevalence of MetS in some cases. Rheumatoid or psoriatic arthritis have the large series among arthritis, whereas systemic lupus erythematosus among connective tissue disorders. This review analyses all most important studies about the evidence of MetS in rheumatic patients and the main clinical and prognostic significance of this relation.

  2. Acupuncture in the treatment of rheumatic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amezaga Urruela, Matxalen; Suarez-Almazor, Maria E

    2012-12-01

    Acupuncture has been used for millennia in traditional Chinese medicine as a technique believed to restore the balance of energy in the body caused by disease through the use of needles inserted into specific points or energy channels. This energy is called the de qi. The use of acupuncture for the treatment of pain in musculoskeletal disorders is increasing. Some patients seek alternative therapies because of lack of improvement with conventional treatments. The potential physiological effects of acupuncture on pain relief have been attributed to biochemical processes, such as the release of endorphins into the limbic structures, subcortical areas and brain stem, mechanisms that are also present in placebo-induced analgesia. In addition, pain relief with acupuncture is also associated with patient expectations, beliefs, and interactions with their acupuncturists. In this review, we summarize the latest evidence on the treatment of musculoskeletal conditions including rheumatoid arthritis, fibromyalgia, neck pain, shoulder pain, low back pain, and knee pain with traditional Chinese acupuncture (TCA), electroacupuncture (EA), and the use of moxibustion. Acupuncture is relatively safe, but there are still reports of serious and fatal side effects that must be taken into account when recommending this therapy. Many of the latest trials assessing the benefits of acupuncture in rheumatic diseases found that acupuncture was not better than sham acupuncture, implying that the analgesic effects observed are related to a strong placebo response. While the literature on this topic is extensive, many of the studies lack methodological rigor, and additional large, well-controlled, high quality trials are still needed to determine if acupuncture might be useful in the treatment of chronic rheumatic diseases.

  3. Nutrition and pediatric rheumatic diseases. Hypothesis: cytokines modulate nutritional abnormalities in rheumatic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostrov, B E

    1992-04-01

    Growth abnormalities are common in pediatric rheumatic diseases. Studies suggest that effects of inflammation such as anorexia, and adipose and muscle tissue breakdown contribute to the nutritional and growth aberrations. The effects of the various cytokines produced during inflammation create a vicious cycle of anorexia and increased catabolism, and may be responsible for the nutritional deficits seen. In future, specific treatment with anticytokine monoclonal antibodies may block these effects, minimizing the nutritional consequences of inflammation.

  4. [Neuroendocrine immune interactions in rheumatic diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straub, R H; Fassold, A

    2010-06-01

    Clinical observations in chronic inflammatory diseases have demonstrated the significant influence of neuroendocrine mechanisms on the immune system: (1) Amelioration of rheumatoid arthritis during pregnancy; (2) preponderance of women versus men with respect to autoimmune diseases; (3) negative effects of ovulation-inducing therapy, oral contraceptives, and hormone replacement therapy; (4) protective effect of hemiplegia; (5) influence of psychological stress on inflammation; and (6) influence of circadian rhythms on inflammatory symptoms.The effects of different hormones and neurotransmitters on the immune system are influenced by: (1) the immune stimulus (foreign antigens or autoantigens) and subsequent antigen-specific immune responses, (2) the cell types involved during different phases of the disease, (3) the target organ with its specific microenvironment, (4) the timing of hormone or neurotransmitter increase in relation to the disease course, (5) the concentration of hormones and neurotransmitters, (6) the variability in expression of receptors depending on the microenvironment and the cell type, and (7) the intra- and extracellular peripheral metabolism of hormones and neurotransmitters leading to important biologically active metabolites with quite different anti- and proinflammatory functions.The circadian rhythm of disease-related symptoms with a peak in the early morning hours confirms that the neuroendocrine system has a strong influence on these chronic immune/inflammatory diseases. The influence is transmitted by the circadian fluctuation in the activity of hormonal and neuronal pathways linking the brain to immune cell activation.These considerations could lead to novel therapeutic strategies for rheumatic diseases in the future.

  5. MicroRNAs in autoimmune rheumatic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.D. Sebastiani

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The etiology of autoimmune diseases remains largely unknown. In recent years, besides genetic factors, several studies proposed that the epigenome may hold the key to a better understanding of autoimmunity initiation and perpetuation. More specifically epigenetic regulatory mechanisms comprise DNA methylation, a variety of histone modifications, and microRNA (miRNA activity, all of which act upon gene and protein expression levels. In particular it is well known that epigenetic mechanisms are important for controlling the pattern of gene expression during development, the cell cycle, and the response to biological or environmental changes. In the present review a description of the most frequent epigenetic deregulations, in particular the role of miRNA, in rheumatic autoimmune disorders will be analyzed.

  6. [Systemic inflammatory rheumatic diseases competence network].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rufenach, C; Burmester, G-R; Zeidler, H; Radbruch, A

    2004-04-01

    The foundation of the competence network for rheumatology, which is funded by the "Bundesministerium für Bildung und Forschung" (BMBF) since 1999, succeeded to create a unique research structure in Germany: medical doctors and scientists from six university rheumatology centres (Berlin, Düsseldorf, Erlangen, Freiburg, Hannover und Lübeck/Bad Bramstedt) work closely together with scientists doing basic research at the Deutsches Rheuma-Forschungszentrum (DRFZ), with rheumatological hospitals, reha-clinics, and rheumatologists. Jointly they are searching for causes of systemic inflammatory rheumatic diseases and try to improve therapies-nationwide and with an interdisciplinary approach. The primary objective of this collaboration is to transfer new scientific insights more rapidly in order to improve methods for diagnosis and patients treatment.

  7. Noxa in rheumatic diseases: present understanding and future impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cottier, Karissa E; Fogle, Elise M; Fox, David A; Ahmed, Salahuddin

    2014-09-01

    Impaired programmed cell death is an important contributing mechanism in the development of chronic inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. Overexpression of Bcl-2 family proteins in such diseases has led to the concept of targeted suppression of these proteins as a primary therapeutic strategy. However, limited success with this approach has prompted pharmacologists to look at the other side of the coin, with the aim of reactivating jeopardized pro-apoptotic proteins that may neutralize Bcl-2 or other anti-apoptotic molecules. In this effort, BH3-only proteins have gained recent attention as endogenous molecules for the sensitization of resistant cells to undergo apoptosis. Among the BH3-only family, Noxa stands out as exceptional for its specificity to bind Mcl-1 and Bcl-2 and blunt their biological properties. Noxa is now being tested as a promising therapeutic target in cancer biology. Nonetheless, its role and clinical application still lack validation in autoimmune diseases, including rheumatic conditions. This is partly attributed to the significant gap in our understanding of its regulatory role and how either overexpression of Noxa or delivery of BH3 mimetics could be therapeutically exploited. In this review we highlight some recent studies in RA, OA, SLE and SS suggesting that Noxa may be used as a potential therapeutic target to circumvent invasive and tissue destructive processes in these rheumatic diseases.

  8. Role of bone scan in rheumatic disease

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    Choi, Yun Young [Hanyang University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-06-01

    Rheumatic diseases can be categorized by pathology into several specific types of musculoskeletal problems, including synovitis (e.g. rheumatoid arthritis), enthesopathy (e.g. ankylosing spondylitis) and cartilage degeneration (e.g. osteoarthritis). Skeletal radiographs have contributed to the diagnosis of these articular diseases, and some disease entities need typical radiographic changes as a factor of the diagnostic criteria. However, they sometimes show normal radiographic findings in the early stage of disease, when there is demineralization of less than 30-50%. Bone scans have also been used in arthritis, but not widely because the findings are nonspecific and it is thought that bone scans do not add significant information to routine radiography. Bone scans do however play a different role than simple radiography, and it is a complementary imaging method in the course of management of arthritis. The image quality of bone scans can be improved by obtaining regional views and images under al pin-hole collimator, and through a variety of scintigraphic techniques including the three phase bone scan and bone SPECT. Therefore, bone scans could improve the diagnostic value, and answer multiple clinical questions, based on the pathophysiology of various forms of arthritis.

  9. Diets, dietary supplements, and nutritional therapies in rheumatic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, C J; Panush, R S

    1999-11-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis and many other systemic rheumatic diseases remain illnesses of unknown cause for which current therapy is often inadequate. This leads patients to seek questionable remedies, prominent among which are dietary manipulations. Is there a role for dietary modifications in the routine therapy for patients with rheumatic diseases? This article discusses the relationships between diets, fasting, elemental nutrition, vitamins, minerals, and foods for rheumatic diseases. Known scientific-based evidence for the use, safety, and efficacy of diets and dietary-related practices subscribed by patients with rheumatic diseases are presented. Studies that link diet with arthritis offer the possibility of identifying new therapeutic approaches for selected patients and of developing new insights to disease pathogenesis. Dietary therapy for arthritis, however, is still being investigated.

  10. Nutrition and chronic inflammatory rheumatic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semerano, Luca; Julia, Chantal; Aitisha, Ouidade; Boissier, Marie-Christophe

    2016-11-30

    Nutrition is a major environmental influence on human health. Epidemiological and interventional studies suggest a pathophysiological or therapeutic role, respectively, for nutrition in inflammatory rheumatic diseases (IRDs). Nevertheless, the associations between nutrition and IRDs are often weak and inconsistent, and the available clinical trials on nutrition are methodologically flawed. Experimental evidence is accumulating that micronutrients in the diet may influence intestinal and systemic immune responses via complex interactions involving the gut microbiota. Micronutrients may, therefore, contribute to the pathogenesis of inflammatory diseases. No interventions targeting these interactions for diagnostic, prophylactic, or therapeutic purposes have been developed to date. Moreover, the relevance to human disease of experimental results obtained in animals or in vitro is unclear. Novel high-throughput technologies (-omics) may prove useful for a systems biology approach to these results that takes the complexity of the interactions into account. Concomitant cohort studies combining clinical and laboratory data collected over time may provide new impetus to research into the connections between nutrition and IRDs.

  11. EULAR recommendations for vaccination in paediatric patients with rheumatic diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijstek, M. W.; de Bruin, L. M. Ott; Bijl, M.; Borrow, R.; van der Klis, F.; Kone-Paut, I.; Fasth, A.; Minden, K.; Ravelli, A.; Abinun, M.; Pileggi, G. S.; Borte, M.; Wulffraat, N. M.

    2011-01-01

    Evidence-based recommendations for vaccination of paediatric patients with rheumatic diseases (PaedRD) were developed by following the EULAR standardised procedures for guideline development. The EULAR task force consisted of (paediatric) rheumatologists/immunologists, one expert in vaccine

  12. [Non steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and rheumatic diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cossermelli, W; Pastor, E H

    1995-01-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) comprise an important class of medicaments that reduced the symptoms of inflamation in rheumatic disease. This article emphasizes similarities and class characteristics of the NSAID, mechanisms of action, and drug-interactions.

  13. The management of chronic pain in rheumatic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pasquale De Negri

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatic diseases are a group of pathologies that usually affect the joints or adjacent anatomical structures or functionally related such as bones, muscles, tendons, bursa, fascia, ligaments, and whose main symptom is the pain. Optimal pain control is a prerequisite for successful therapy of many rheumatic diseases. Many patients may present many diffi culties in terms of pain relief and therefore must be addressed at an appropriate pain treatment center.

  14. Pulmonary Involvement in Rheumatic Diseases: HRCT Findings

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    Serhat Avcu

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Systemic rheumatic disease (SRD may affect all the components of the pulmonary system. This study was designed to investigate the frequency and pattern of pulmonary involvement of systemic collagen tissue diseases. Material and Methods: A total of 128 patients -44 with rheumatoid arthritis (RA, 8 with giant cell arteritis, 14 with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE, 8 with juvenile chronic arthritis, 24 with ankylosing spondylitis (AS, 6 with scleroderma, 12 with Behcet’s disease, 4 with mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD, 4 with polymyositis and 4 with dermatomyositis- who had presented to the Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation/Rheumatology between January 2007 and December 2008 were included in the study. All the ptients were informed about the study in detail and all gave written consent before enrollment. HRCT was performed in all patients. Results: Pulmonary involvement was detected in 21 patients with RA (48%, in 8 patients withcSLE (57%, in 16 patients with AS (67%, in 4 patients with scleroderma (67%, and in 4 patients with MCTD (50%. No pulmonary involvement was observed in patients with Behçet’s disease, polymyositis and dermatomyositis. Conclusions: Our results suggest that patients with SRD may present with pulmonary involvement in varying degrees. Pulmonary symptoms may be underdiagnosed due to limited capacity of exercise secondary to musculoskeletal involvement. Therefore, a routine pulmonary X-ray should be performed in the process of the diagnosis and prior to treatment, even in the lack of complaints suggesting pulmonary involvement. Further investigations including HRCT should be performed if needed. 

  15. Cytokines and pregnancy in rheumatic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Østensen, Monika; Förger, Frauke; Villiger, Peter M

    2006-06-01

    Cytokines are important mediators involved in the successful outcome of pregnancy. The concept of pregnancy as biased toward a Th2 immune response states that Th1 type cytokines are associated with pregnancy failure and that Th2 cytokines are protective and counteract pregnancy-related disorders. Studies at the level of the maternal-fetal interface, in the maternal circulation and in cells of peripheral blood have shown that the Th2 concept of pregnancy is an oversimplification. Both Th1 and Th2 type cytokines play a role at different stages of pregnancy and are adapted to the localization and function of cells and tissues. The changes of local and systemic cytokine patterns during pregnancy correspond to neuroendocrine changes with hormones as powerful modulators of cytokine expression. Several autoimmune disorders show a modulation of disease activity during and after pregnancy. In rheumatic diseases with a predominance of a Th1 immune response, a shift to a Th2 type immune response during pregnancy has been regarded as beneficial. Studies of pregnant patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) have shown a cytokine expression similar to that found in healthy pregnant women. Significant differences were present only for a few cytokines and seemed related to the activity of the underlying disease. Interestingly, a gestational increase of cytokine inhibitors interleukin 1 receptor antagonist (IL-1ra) and soluble tumor necrosis factor receptor (sTNFR) in the circulation corresponded to low disease activity in RA. The influence of hormones and cytokines on autoimmune disease is an issue for further study.

  16. An epidemiological survey of rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease in Sahafa Town, Sudan.

    OpenAIRE

    1992-01-01

    STUDY OBJECTIVE--The aim was to determine the prevalence of rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease and to initiate a programme of secondary prophylaxis in Sahafa Town, Sudan. DESIGN--The study was a prospective case finding survey, carried out by a specially trained team headed by a cardiologist. SETTING--The study involved high risk school children (5-15 years of age) from Sahafa Town in the period 1986-1989. SUBJECTS--A total of 13,332 children on the school registers (7892 boys and 54...

  17. Is primary prevention of rheumatic fever the missing link in the control of rheumatic heart disease in Africa?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karthikeyan, Ganesan; Mayosi, Bongani M

    2009-08-25

    Rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease continue to be major public health problems in the developing world, particularly in the countries of sub-Saharan Africa. Because of its cost effectiveness, secondary prophylaxis is advocated as the principal means of disease prevention and control. However, in developing countries, valvular damage, due to earlier, unrecognized episodes of rheumatic fever, has already occurred by the time secondary prophylaxis is instituted. Secondary prophylaxis cannot reduce the incidence of new cases of rheumatic fever and has not been shown to alter the natural history of rheumatic valvular disease. Experience from several regions of the world suggests that incorporation of a strategy of primary antibiotic prophylaxis into a comprehensive program for disease control can reduce the incidence of rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease. In this article, we argue that a strategy of primary antibiotic prophylaxis, with appropriate modifications, can be successfully implemented in resource-poor settings across the world and should be a key component of any rheumatic heart disease control program. This, we believe, is essential for reducing the global burden of rheumatic heart disease.

  18. Aquatic therapy for patients with rheumatic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeal, R L

    1990-11-01

    Aquatic therapy is justifiably a rapidly expanding, beneficial form of patient treatment. The goals established at the initial and subsequent evaluations usually are met as quickly and as sensibly as possible. Understanding the theory of water techniques is essential in implementing an aquatic therapy program. The success of the program, however, will always depend on the pleasure and benefits achieved by the patients. Remember, rheumatic patients most likely will need to modify their previous daily functioning. Patients need to be aware of the long-term ramifications of the disease process and understand how treatment and care may be altered during various stages of exacerbation and remission. Patient education is critical in ensuring individual responsibility for the changes that must be made when not supervised by a professional. Aquatic therapy is a step in molding a positive lifestyle change for the patient. The patient can be encouraged to be fitness oriented and, at the same time, exercise in a manner that is safe, effective, and biomechanically and physiologically sound. The environment, hopefully, also will be conductive to family and social interaction that ultimately encourages the compliance of long-term exercise programs.

  19. Neurohumoral relationship in patients with rheumatic diseases

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    I. V. Dryazenkova

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To assess neurohumoral relationship state in pts with systemic vasculitis (SV and systemic connective tissue diseases. Material and Methods. 54 pts with rheumatic diseases (RS were included: 18 with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE, 16 with systemic sclerosis, 20 with systemic vasculitis (SV. Mean age was 49,3 5,4 years. Disease duration varied from 5 to 10 years. Control group consisted of 20 healthy persons. 24- hours ECG monitoring, heart rate variability (HRV spectral analysis, functional (clinoorthostatic sign and exercise ECG testing (isometric exercise, dynamic load, veloergometry were performed. Plasma histamine level, histaminase activity, plasma serotonin, tryptophan-5-hydrolase, oxytriptophandecar- boxylase, MAO levels were examined to assess vasoactive amine system state. Vasoactive amine system slate was assessed on histamine/serotonin ratio. Histamine/histaminase, serotonin/MAO, histaminase/MAO ratios were used to judge inhibitory activity. Results. Compared with control pts with RS showed marked and significant decrease of ergotropic mediators (noradrenaline, adrenaline and their metabolites concentration which correlated with HRV. Increase of histaminase that processes appropriate biogenic amine excess quantity was found in all forms of RS. More intensive than in healthy persons monoamine metabolism accompanied by their degradation acceleration resulted in enhanced MAO activity (significant in polyarteritis. LF/HF index reflecting summated activity of autonomic influences on heart rate showed significant prevalence of sympathetic effect in SV (3,46 0,31, p<0,05, CRV analysis showed adequate autonomic supply only in 11,7% of pts with RS. Conclusion. Exercise testing in dynamic analysis of quantitative HRV indices should be performed to determine autonomic reactivity ю assess homeostatic possibilities and adaptation reserve in pts with RS.

  20. "SURVEY OF PREVALENCE RATE OF RHEUMATIC FEVER AND RHEUMATIC HEART DISEASE AMONG SCHOOL CHILDREN IN TEHRAN"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Nadimi.

    1973-06-01

    Full Text Available A study was undertaken to find out the prevalence rate or rheumatic fever (R.F. and rheumatic heart disease (R.H.D. among pupils in selected schools of Tehran, and to evaluate the rate of socio-economical factors on prevalence rate of this disease. During period of 5 months, 6, 183 children and adolescents aged 5-17 were studied. Out of 6,183 pupils, 3, 680 were boys (59.5 and 2,503 were girls (40.5%. 1,425(23% were in high, 1,381 (22% in mid, and (55% in low socio- economic classes. Out of these, 32 (5.2/per 1000 had history of R.F. in the past and 17 (2.7/per 1000 had R.H.D. with an all together prevalence rate of 7.9/per 1000. There was no significant difference in the prevalence rate of rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease between the children in high and low socioeconomic group.

  1. A Review of Acute Rheumatic Fever and Rheumatic Heart Disease Research in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, L C; Nadia, R

    2016-06-01

    A total of 39 titles related to rheumatic fever or rheumatic heart disease in Malaysia were found with online literature search dating back to their inceptions and through 2014. Additional publications from conference journals were included. Nine papers were selected based on clinical relevance and future research implications. There were no population-based studies on the incidence or prevalence of ARF or RHD. In the 1980s, the incidence of admission due to ARF ranged from 2 to 21.1 per 100 000 paediatric admission per year. The burden of disease was significant in the adult population; 74.5% of patients with RHD were female, of which 77.1% were in the reproductive age group of 15-45 years old. Rheumatic mitral valve disease constituted almost half (46.7%) of all mitral valve repairs, ranging from 44.8 - 55.8 patients per year from 1997 - 2003. From 2010-2012, mitral valve interventions increased to 184 per year, of which 85.7% were mitral valve repair. In children with ARF, 25.4% - 41.7% had past history of rheumatic fever or RHD. In patients with rheumatic mitral valve disease undergoing surgical or medical interventions, only 6% reported history of ARF, none had history of GABHS pharyngitis or antibiotic prophylaxis. Only 44.7% of patients with RHD on follow-up were on intramuscular benzathine penicillin prophylaxis. Overall, there is scarcity of publications on ARF and RHD in Malaysia. Priority areas for research include determination of the incidence and prevalence of ARF and RHD, identification of high-risk populations, evaluation on the implementation and adherence of secondary preventive measures, identification of subclinical RHD especially amongst the high-risk population, and a surveillance system to monitor and evaluate preventive measures, disease progression and outcomes.

  2. Protecting Bone Health in Pediatric Rheumatic Diseases: Pharmacological Considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yujuan; Milojevic, Diana

    2017-06-01

    Bone health in children with rheumatic conditions may be compromised due to several factors related to the inflammatory disease state, delayed puberty, altered life style, including decreased physical activities, sun avoidance, suboptimal calcium and vitamin D intake, and medical treatments, mainly glucocorticoids and possibly some disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs. Low bone density or even fragility fractures could be asymptomatic; therefore, children with diseases of high inflammatory load, such as systemic onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis, juvenile dermatomyositis, systemic lupus erythematosus, and those requiring chronic glucocorticoids may benefit from routine screening of bone health. Most commonly used assessment tools are laboratory testing including serum 25-OH-vitamin D measurement and bone mineral density measurement by a variety of methods, dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry as the most widely used. Early disease control, use of steroid-sparing medications such as disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs and biologics, supplemental vitamin D and calcium, and promotion of weight-bearing physical activities can help optimize bone health. Additional treatment options for osteoporosis such as bisphosphonates are still controversial in children with chronic rheumatic diseases, especially those with decreased bone density without fragility fractures. This article reviews common risk factors leading to compromised bone health in children with chronic rheumatic diseases and discusses the general approach to prevention and treatment of bone fragility.

  3. Newer Diagnostic And Therapeutic Modalities For Autoimmune Rheumatic Diseases

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    Jog Antony

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available There is refinement of classification criteria for various rheumatic diseases like Rheumatoid arthritis (RA Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE, vasculitis, Sjogren's syndrome etc. in the last few years which help the clinician in establishing early diagnosis and therapy. In case of uncertainties in the diagnosis, clinicians need to carefully interpret the result of autoantibody tests in the background of the clinical context. A growing number of autoantibodies have specificity for particular clinical phenotypes. They can also offer prognostic information and sometimes diagnostic certainty. Early use of Disease Modifying Anti Rheumatic drugs (DMARDs and biological agents to attain no or low disease activity measured by primary complex indices markedly changed the outcome in most of the autoimmune rheumatic diseases.

  4. Acute Rheumatic Fever: Global Persistence of a Preventable Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bono-Neri, Francine

    2016-10-21

    The persistence of acute rheumatic fever continues to be seen globally. Once thought to be eradicated in various parts of the world, the disease came back with a vengeance secondary to a lack of diligence on the part of providers. Today, the global burden of group A streptococcal infection, the culprit of the numerous sequelae manifested in acute rheumatic fever, is considerable. Although a completely preventable disease, rheumatic fever continues to exist. It is a devastating disease that involves long-term, multisystem treatment and monitoring for patients who were unsuccessful at eradicating the precipitating group A streptococcal infection. Prevention is the key to resolving the dilemma of the disease's global burden, yet the method to yield its prevention still remains unknown. Thus, meticulous attention to implementing proper treatment is the mainstay and remains a top priority.

  5. Neurologic Manifestations of Childhood Rheumatic Diseases

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    Reza SHIARI

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available How to Cite this Article: Shiari R. Neurologic Manifestations of Childhood Rheumatic Diseases.  Iran J Child Neurol Autumn 2012; 6(4: 1-7.Children with rheumatic disorders may have a wide variety of clinical features ranging from fever or a simple arthritis to complex multisystem autoimmune diseases. Information about the prevalence of neurological manifestations in children with rheumatologic disorders is limited. This review describes the neurologic complications of childhood Rheumatic disease either solely or combined with symptoms of other organs involvement, as a primary manifestation or as a part of other symptoms, additionally. References1. Benseler S, Schneider R. Central nervous system vasculitisin children. Curr Opin Rheumatol. 2004 Jan;16(1:43-50. 2. Benseler SM. Central nervous system vasculitis in children. Curr Rheumatol Rep. 2006 Dec;8(6:442-9. 3. Mc Carthy HJ, Tizard EJ. Clinical practice: Diagnosis and management of Henoch-Schönlein purpura. Eur J Pediatr.2010 Jun;169(6:643-50. Epub 2009 Dec 12. 4. Robson WL, Leung AK. Henoch-Schönlein purpura. AdvPediatr. 1994;41:163-94. 5. Ostergaard JR, Storm K, Neurologic manifestations of Schönlein-Henoch purpura. Acta Paediatr Scand. 1991Mar;80(3:339-42. 6. Bakkaloğlu SA, Ekim M, Tümer N, Deda G, ErdenI, Erdem T. Cerebral vasculitis in Henoch-Schönlein purpura. Nephrol. Dial Transplant. 2000 Feb;15(2:246-8. 7. Mattoo TK, al-Mutair A, al-Khatib Y, Ali A, al-SohaibaniMO. Group A beta-haemolytic streptococcal infection and Henoch-Schonlein purpura with cardiac, renal and neurological complications. Ann Trop Pediatr. 1997Dec;17(4:381-6. 8. Ha TS, Cha SH. Cerebral vasculitis in Henoch-Schönlein purpura: a case with sequential magnetic resonance imaging. Pediatr Nephrol. 1996;10:634-6. 9. Saket S, Mojtahedzadeh S, Karimi A, Shiari R, ShirvaniF. Relationship between electrolyte abnormalities, ESR,CRP and platelet count with severity of Kawasaki disease.Yafteh. 2009;11(3:5-14. 10

  6. Value of contrast-enhanced ultrasound in rheumatic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klauser, Andrea Sabine

    2005-12-01

    Ultrasound (US) is a useful tool in the assessment of rheumatic disease. It permits assessment of early erosive changes and vascularity detection in synovial proliferation, caused by inflammatory activity by using colour/power Doppler US (CDUS/PDUS). In the detection of slow flow and flow in small vessels, the CDUS/PDUS technique is limited. Contrast enhanced US can improve the detection of inflammatory vascularity but is not yet included in routine diagnosis of this condition. However, contrast enhanced US shows promising results in diagnosis, assessment of disease activity and follow up of inflammatory rheumatic diseases.

  7. Vaccination in adult patients with auto-immune inflammatory rheumatic diseases : A systematic literature review for the European League Against Rheumatism evidence-based recommendations for vaccination in adult patients with auto-immune inflammatory rheumatic diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Assen, S.; Elkayam, O.; Agmon-Levin, N.; Cervera, R.; Doran, M. F.; Dougados, M.; Emery, P.; Geborek, P.; Ioannidis, J. P. A.; Jayne, D. R. W.; Kallenberg, C. G. M.; Mueller-Ladner, U.; Shoenfeld, Y.; Stojanovich, L.; Valesini, G.; Wulffraat, N. M.; Bijl, M.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: To present the systematic literature review (SLR), which formed the basis for the European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) evidence-based recommendations for vaccination in adult patients with autoimmune inflammatory rheumatic diseases (AIIRD). Methods: AIIRD, vaccines and immunomodula

  8. Evaluation of an automated connective tissue disease screening assay in Korean patients with systemic rheumatic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Seri; Yang, Heeyoung; Hwang, Hyunyong

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the diagnostic utilities of the automated connective tissues disease screening assay, CTD screen, in patients with systemic rheumatic diseases. A total of 1093 serum samples were assayed using CTD screen and indirect immunofluorescent (IIF) methods. Among them, 162 were diagnosed with systemic rheumatic disease, including rheumatoid arthritis (RA), systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), and mixed connective tissue disease (MCT). The remaining 931 with non-systemic rheumatic disease were assigned to the control group. The median ratios of CTD screen tests were significantly higher in the systemic rheumatic disease group than in the control group. The positive likelihood ratios of the CTD screen were higher than those of IIF in patients with total rheumatic diseases (4.1 vs. 1.6), including SLE (24.3 vs. 10.7). The areas under the receiver operating characteristic curves (ROC-AUCs) of the CTD screen for discriminating total rheumatic diseases, RA, SLE, and MCT from controls were 0.68, 0.56, 0.92 and 0.80, respectively. The ROC-AUCs of the combinations with IIF were significantly higher in patients with total rheumatic diseases (0.72) and MCT (0.85) than in those of the CTD screen alone. Multivariate analysis indicated that both the CTD screen and IIF were independent variables for predicting systemic rheumatic disease. CTD screen alone and in combination with IIF were a valuable diagnostic tool for predicting systemic rheumatic diseases, particularly for SLE.

  9. Outcomes in mothers with rheumatic diseases and their offspring workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neville, Autumn; Bernatsky, Sasha; Kuriya, Bindee; Bujold, Emmanuel; Chakravarty, Eliza; Platt, Robert W; Bérard, Anick; Vinet, Évelyne

    2017-01-01

    This conference report describes six presentations that were given during a Canadian Institutes for Health Research-funded workshop. The goal of the workshop was to discuss key knowledge gaps in the study of outcomes in mothers with rheumatic diseases and their offspring. Presentations focused on epidemiological and methodological issues associated with the reproductive and perinatal health of women with rheumatic diseases. Discussions of relevant recent research allowed for discovery of potential data sources that could facilitate interdisciplinary research and created the opportunity for future collaborations.

  10. The ying and yang of fever in rheumatic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galloway, James; Cope, Andrew P

    2015-06-01

    Fevers are relatively common in rheumatic disease, largely due to the fact that the inflammatory process is driven by inflammatory mediators that function as endogenous pyrogens. Since the immune system's sensors cannot accurately distinguish between endogenous and exogenous (pathogen-derived) pyrogens a major challenge for physicians and rheumatologists has been to decipher patterns of clinical signs and symptoms to inform clinical decision making. Here we describe some of the common pitfalls and clinical challenges, and highlight the importance of a systematic approach to investigating the rheumatic disease patient presenting with fever.

  11. Microsomal prostaglandin E synthase-1 in rheumatic diseases

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    Marina eKorotkova

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Microsomal prostaglandin E synthase-1 (mPGES-1 is a well recognized target for the development of novel anti-inflammatory drugs that can reduce symptoms of inflammation in rheumatic diseases and other inflammatory conditions. In this review, we focus on mPGES-1 in rheumatic diseases with the aim to cover the most recent advances in the understanding of mPGES-1 in rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis and inflammatory myopathies. Novel findings regarding regulation of mPGES1 cell expression as well as enzyme inhibitors are also summarized.

  12. Pulmonary hypertension in rheumatic diseases: epidemiology and pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahane, Anupama

    2013-07-01

    The focus of this review is to increase awareness of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) in patients with rheumatic diseases. Epidemiology and pathogenesis of PAH in rheumatic diseases is reviewed, with recommendations for early screening and diagnosis and suggestion of possible role of immunosuppressive therapy in treatment for PAH in rheumatic diseases. A MEDLINE search for articles published between January 1970 and June 2012 was conducted using the following keywords: pulmonary hypertension, scleroderma, systemic sclerosis, pulmonary arterial hypertension, connective tissues disease, systemic lupus erythematosus, mixed connective tissue disease, rheumatoid arthritis, Sjogren's syndrome, vasculitis, sarcoidosis, inflammatory myopathies, dermatomyositis, ankylosing spondylitis, spondyloarthropathies, diagnosis and treatment. Pathogenesis and disease burden of PAH in rheumatic diseases was highlighted, with emphasis on early consideration and workup of PAH. Screening recommendations and treatment were touched upon. PAH is most commonly seen in systemic sclerosis and may be seen in isolation or in association with interstitial lung disease. Several pathophysiologic processes have been identified including an obliterative vasculopathy, veno-occlusive disease, formation of microthrombi and pulmonary fibrosis. PAH in systemic lupus erythematosus is associated with higher prevalence of antiphospholipid and anticardiolipin antibodies and the presence of Raynaud's phenomenon. Endothelial proliferation with vascular remodeling, abnormal coagulation with thrombus formation and immune-mediated vasculopathy are the postulated mechanisms. Improvement with immunosuppressive medications has been reported. Pulmonary fibrosis, extrinsic compression of pulmonary arteries and granulomatous vasculitis have been reported in patients with sarcoidosis. Intimal and medial hyperplasia with luminal narrowing has been observed in Sjogren's syndrome, mixed connective tissue disease and

  13. Hypoadrenalism in patients with fatigue and rheumatic disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitra Methiniti

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Many patients with rheumatic disease complain of fatigue. Clinicians may interpret this as part of the disease process in the absence of anaemia or hypothyroidism, and sometimes respond with the empiric addition of steroids to therapy. The possibility of true hypoadrenalism is only occasionally considered, and little data exists on the frequency with which it coexists with rheumatic disease. Random serum cortisol may be requested by clinicians to help exclude hypoadrenalism as a factor in fatigue. We undertook a survey to assess how frequently this test was of clinical relevance, what was done in patients with low results, and which patients were most likely to have true adrenal failure. All random cortisol assays requested by the members of a rheumatological team over one year were identified and the notes examined retrospectively. The indication for the request, the result, the ultimate clinical diagnosis and all prior diagnoses were recorded. Where further investigations were undertaken, these too were noted. The results were compared to those in an age and gender matched population of patients with general medical conditions (excluding endocrine disorders for whom cortisol assays had also been requested. Random cortisol was requested by a team of four consultants in 74 patients with a variety of rheumatic disorders over 12 months, usually because of unexplained fatigue. Among the control group of 75 medical patients, the commonest reasons for requesting cortisol assay were fatigue, low sodium and unexplained anaemia. Mean cortisol levels were significantly higher in medical patients (512 nmol/L than those with rheumatic disease (351 nmol/L [P=0.04]. The results were low (<200 nmol/L in 14 rheumatic patients and 7 medical patients. Among these 21 individuals, synacthen tests were performed in 16 and were indicative of hypoadrenalism in 6 cases. Further investigations revealed primary hypoadrenalism in 3 patients, with tertiary adrenal

  14. The control of rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease: a call to raise the awareness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kheir, Sirageldin M; Ali, Sulafa Khalid M

    2014-01-01

    Although the incidence of rheumatic fever (RF) and rheumatic heart disease (RHD) has declined in the developed world and many developing countries, yet it is still high in many countries including Sudan. The decline of frequency of RF in these countries is largely due to improved medical services leading to wide use of antibiotics to treat bacterial pharyngitis. In many developing countries, the incidence is decreased due to development of integrated control programs. Depending on secondary prophylaxis alone was shown to be ineffective, therefore, many countries, including Sudan initiated control programs that utilize both primary and secondary prevention together with increasing awareness and surveillance. The new program started in 2012 in Sudan in order to achieve its goal of reducing mortality of RHD by 25% in individual less than 25 years of age by year 2025. This article throws light on RF and RHD and its control program in Sudan.

  15. Severe fatigue is highly prevalent in ALL rheumatic diseases : an international study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geenen, R.; Overman, C.L.; Da Silva, J.A.P.; Kool, M.B.

    2014-01-01

    Background Fatigue is a common, disabling, and difficult to manage problem in rheumatic diseases. Prevalence estimates of fatigue within various rheumatic disease groups vary considerably. Data on the relative prevalence of severe fatigue across multiple rheumatic diseases using a similar instrument

  16. Severe fatigue is highly prevalent in ALL rheumatic diseases : an international study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geenen, R.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/087017571; Overman, C.L.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/328198838; Da Silva, J.A.P.; Kool, M.B.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304828335

    Background Fatigue is a common, disabling, and difficult to manage problem in rheumatic diseases. Prevalence estimates of fatigue within various rheumatic disease groups vary considerably. Data on the relative prevalence of severe fatigue across multiple rheumatic diseases using a similar instrument

  17. The prevalence of severe fatigue in rheumatic diseases: an international study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Overman, C.L.; Da Silva, J.A.P.; Kool, M.B.; Geenen, R.

    2016-01-01

    Fatigue is a common, disabling, and difficult-tomanage problem in rheumatic diseases. Prevalence estimates of fatigue within rheumatic diseases vary considerably. Data on the prevalence of severe fatigue across multiple rheumatic diseases using a similar instrument is missing. Our aim was to provide

  18. [Morphological points of departure for the therapy of rheumatic diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fassbender, H G

    1975-01-01

    Pathogenic mechanisms of several rheumatic diseases are reported. Besides signs of nonspecific inflammation there are characteristic features in some rheumatic disorders: in rheumatoid arthritis one can find mesenchymoid proliferation and - in seropositive cases only - necrosis ot tissue. In ankylosing spondylitis osseous metaplasia of the intervertebral discs, in psoriatic arthritis, osteoclastic and in osteoblastic changes without inflammation. In fibrositis syndrome, however, there was no evidence of inflammation, but one may detect local muscular lesions and proliferation of fibroblasts. Pain in osteoarthritis is always caused by secondary inflammation. Due to this data, the possibilities of treatment are discussed, especially those of nonsteroidal drugs.

  19. Frequency of rheumatic diseases in Portugal: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monjardino, Teresa; Lucas, Raquel; Barros, Henrique

    2011-01-01

    To describe the frequency of rheuma­tic diseases in Portugal through a systematic review of published literature, critically appraising available information and identifying data collection gaps. We systematically reviewed the literature to retrieve data on the occurrence of rheumatic diseases in Portugal through MEDLINE and Índex das Revistas Médicas Portuguesas searches, PhD theses, and national health surveys reports. Original articles in English or Portuguese published between 1 January 2000 and 31 December 2010 were included. We retrieved information for the prevalence of rheumatic diseases, osteoarthritis, back pain, work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WRMDs), osteoporosis, fibromyalgia, rheumatoid arthritis, spondyloarthritis and other systemic rheumatic diseases and for the incidence of back pain, osteoporotic fracture and other systemic rheumatic diseases. The prevalence of rheumatic diseases ranged from 16.0% to 24.0% and the prevalence of osteoarthritis was 11.1% (95% confidence intervals (95%CI): 9.4-13.1) in the knee and 5.5% (95%CI: 4.3-7.0) in the hip. Regarding back pain, period prevalence ranged from 8.0% (95%CI: 6.1-10.1) to 29.5% (95%CI: 23.4-36.2) in children and from 12.3% (95%CI: 10.5-14.3) to 51.3% (95%CI: 48.6-53.9) in adults. The prevalence of WRMDs ranged from 5.9% to 84.2% (95%CI: 80.8-87.3). The yearly incidence of osteoporotic fracture (per 100 000) ranged from 93.3 to 481 (95%CI: 407-564) in women and from 31.9 to 154 (95%CI: 106-218) in men. The prevalence of osteoporosis in women ranged from 11.0% to 15.4% (95%CI: 13.4-17.6) and in men from 1.1% to 16.8% (95%CI: 12.2-22.3). The prevalence of fibromyalgia ranged from 3.6% (95%CI: 2.0-5.2) to 3.7% (95%CI: 2.0-5.4). The prevalence estimates of ankylosing spondylitis and of spondyloarthritis were 0.6% and 1.6% (95%CI: 0.8-2.7), respectively. The prevalence of systemic lupus erythematosus was estimated in 0.2% (95%CI: 0.1-0.8). There is a broad spectrum of information available

  20. [Treatment of peptic ulcer related to rheumatic diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imaeda, Hiroyuki; Ishii, Hiromasa; Goto, Makoto

    2002-08-01

    Rheumatic diseases often have gastrointestinal(GI) manifestations, and may present as GI bleeding and perforation due to peptic ulcer associated with high mortality. Major causes of peptic ulcer related to rheumatic diseases are drugs such as nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug(NSAID) and corticosteroid, and vasculitis. The analgesic effects of NSAID often mask abdominal pain until they cause GI bleeding and perforation. Therefore, it is important to make early diagnosis of peptic ulcer with upper gastrointestinal endoscope. Fundamental treatment of NSAID induced peptic ulcer is to quit it, however it is difficult because of activity of rheumatic diseases. Also, most NSAID induced peptic ulcers heal by administration of proton pump inhibitor or misoprostol. Corticosteroid pulse therapy or administration of immunosuppressant agents is effective for vasculitis induced peptic ulcer, however it is difficult to make diagnosis of it. Development of NSAID with less side effects such as cyclooxygenase-2 selective inhibitors and establishment of diagnosis and treatment of peptic ulcer related to rheumatic diseases are expected.

  1. Vaccination of patients with autoimmune inflammatory rheumatic diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westra, Johanna; Rondaan, Christien; van Assen, Sander; Bijl, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Patients with autoimmune inflammatory rheumatic diseases (AIRDs) are at increased risk of infections. This risk has been further increased by the introduction of biologic agents over the past two decades. One of the most effective strategies to prevent infection is vaccination. However, patients wit

  2. EULAR recommendations for vaccination in paediatric patients with rheumatic diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijstek, M. W.; de Bruin, L. M. Ott; Bijl, M.; Borrow, R.; van der Klis, F.; Kone-Paut, I.; Fasth, A.; Minden, K.; Ravelli, A.; Abinun, M.; Pileggi, G. S.; Borte, M.; Wulffraat, N. M.

    2011-01-01

    Evidence-based recommendations for vaccination of paediatric patients with rheumatic diseases (PaedRD) were developed by following the EULAR standardised procedures for guideline development. The EULAR task force consisted of (paediatric) rheumatologists/immunologists, one expert in vaccine evaluati

  3. For bitter or worse. Embitterment in rheumatic diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blom, D.

    2014-01-01

    In clinical practice and in the context of work and disability pension examinations, clinical and vocational professionals regularly encounter patients with a rheumatic disease who are embittered. These patients view themselves as victims of external factors, experience a sense of resentment and inj

  4. For bitter or worse. Embitterment in rheumatic diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blom, D.

    2014-01-01

    In clinical practice and in the context of work and disability pension examinations, clinical and vocational professionals regularly encounter patients with a rheumatic disease who are embittered. These patients view themselves as victims of external factors, experience a sense of resentment and inj

  5. New insights into the epigenetics of inflammatory rheumatic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballestar, Esteban; Li, Tianlu

    2017-10-01

    Over the past decade, awareness of the importance of epigenetic alterations in the pathogenesis of rheumatic diseases has grown in parallel with a general recognition of the fundamental role of epigenetics in the regulation of gene expression. Large-scale efforts to generate genome-wide maps of epigenetic modifications in different cell types, as well as in physiological and pathological contexts, illustrate the increasing recognition of the relevance of epigenetics. To date, although several reports have demonstrated the occurrence of epigenetic alterations in a wide range of inflammatory rheumatic conditions, epigenomic information is rarely used in a clinical setting. By contrast, several epigenetic biomarkers and treatments are currently in use for personalized therapies in patients with cancer. This Review highlights advances from the past 5 years in the field of epigenetics and their application to inflammatory rheumatic diseases, delineating the future lines of development for a rational use of epigenetic information in clinical settings and in personalized medicine. These advances include the identification of epipolymorphisms associated with clinical outcomes, DNA methylation as a contributor to disease susceptibility in rheumatic conditions, the discovery of novel epigenetic mechanisms that modulate disease susceptibility and the development of new epigenetic therapies.

  6. Understanding lack of understanding: Invalidation in rheumatic diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kool, M.B.

    2012-01-01

    The quality of life of patients with chronic rheumatic diseases is negatively influenced by symptoms such as pain, fatigue, and stiffness, and secondary symptoms such as physical limitations and depressive mood. On top of this burden, some patients experience negative responses from others, such as

  7. The role of Doppler ultrasound in rheumatic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porta, Francesco; Radunovic, Goran; Vlad, Violeta; Micu, Mihaela C; Nestorova, Rodina; Petranova, Tzvetanka; Iagnocco, Annamaria

    2012-06-01

    The use of Doppler techniques, including power, colour and spectral Doppler, has greatly increased in rheumatology in recent years. This is due to the ability of Doppler US (DUS) to detect pathological vascularization within joints and periarticular soft tissues, thereby demonstrating the presence of active inflammation, which has been reported to be correlated with the local neo-angiogenesis. In synovitis, DUS showed a high correlation with histological and MRI findings, thus it is considered a valid tool to detect pathological synovial vascularization. Moreover, it is more sensitive than clinical examination in detecting active joint inflammation and in the evaluation of response to treatment. In addition, DUS may be considered as a reference imaging modality in the assessment of enthesitis, MRI being not sensitive and histology not feasible. Moreover, it has been demonstrated to be able to detect changes in asymptomatic enthesis. In conclusion, DUS is a useful and sensitive tool in the evaluation and monitoring of active inflammation. Its widespread use in clinical rheumatological practice is recommended. The aim of this article is to review the current literature about the role of DUS in rheumatic diseases, analysing its validity, reliability and feasibility.

  8. Immunization of patients with autoimmune inflammatory rheumatic diseases (the EULAR recommendations)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Assen, S.; Bijl, M.

    The European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) recommendations for vaccination in adult patients with autoimmune inflammatory rheumatic diseases (AIIRD) have been recently published. These evidence-based recommendations were based on existing literature in combination with expert opinion. Although

  9. EULAR recommendations for vaccination in adult patients with autoimmune inflammatory rheumatic diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Assen, S.; Agmon-Levin, N.; Elkayam, O.; Cervera, R.; Doran, M. F.; Dougados, M.; Emery, P.; Geborek, P.; Ioannidis, J. P. A.; Jayne, D. R. W.; Kallenberg, C. G. M.; Mueller-Ladner, U.; Shoenfeld, Y.; Stojanovich, L.; Valesini, G.; Wulffraat, N. M.; Bijl, M.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To develop evidence-based European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) recommendations for vaccination in patients with autoimmune inflammatory rheumatic diseases (AIIRD). Methods A EULAR task force was composed of experts representing 11 European countries, consisting of eight rheumatologi

  10. Vaccination of paediatric patients with rheumatic diseases. Navigating through turbulent waters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijstek, M.W.

    2014-01-01

    In this thesis we focus on the safety and efficacy of vaccinations in paediatric patients with rheumatic diseases. With the European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR), we constructed recommendations for vaccination of paediatric patients with rheumatic diseases based on available evidence. Evidence

  11. The human microbiome in rheumatic autoimmune diseases: A comprehensive review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coit, Patrick; Sawalha, Amr H

    2016-09-01

    The human microbiome consists of the total diversity of microbiota and their genes. High-throughput sequencing has allowed for inexpensive and rapid evaluation of taxonomic representation and functional capability of the microbiomes of human body sites. Autoimmune and inflammatory rheumatic diseases are characterized by dysbiosis of the microbiome. Microbiome dysbiosis can be influenced by host genetics and environmental factors. Dysbiosis is also associated with shifts in certain functional pathways. The goal of this article is to provide a current and comprehensive review of the unique characteristics of the microbiome of patients with autoimmune and inflammatory rheumatic diseases, measured using high-throughput sequencing. We also highlight the need for broader studies utilizing a longitudinal approach to better understand how the human microbiome contributes to disease susceptibility, and to characterize the role of the interaction between host genetics and microbial diversity in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases, disease manifestations, and progression.

  12. Vaccination in paediatric patients with auto-immune rheumatic diseases : A systemic literature review for the European League against Rheumatism evidence-based recommendations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijstek, M. W.; de Bruin, L. M. Ott; Borrow, R.; van der Klis, F.; Kone-Paut, I.; Fasth, A.; Minden, K.; Ravelli, A.; Abinun, M.; Pileggi, G.; Borte, M.; Bijl, M.; Wulffraat, N. M.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: To analyze available evidence on vaccinations in paediatric patients with rheumatic and auto-inflammatory diseases. This evidence formed the basis of the recently constructed European League against Rheumatism (EULAR) recommendations for vaccination of these patients. Methods: A systemat

  13. [Use of intravenous humana immunoglobulin in rheumatic diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mussano, Eduardo D; Onetti, Laura B; Cadile, Isaac I; Onetti, Carlos M

    2012-01-01

    Preparations of intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) are used as treatment in different diseases such primary and secondary immunodeficiencies, autoimmune diseases, systemic inflammatory diseases, infectious diseases and allergic diseases among others. to present 13 of our cases with the use of IVIG in different rheumatic diseases. we retrospectively studied 13 patients (10 women and 3 men), mean age 29 years with different rheumatic diseases, that underwent conventional treatments without positive response. They received IVIG pulses, trying to improve or induce remission of their previous clinical situation. 6/13 patients met criteria for systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), 2/13 had primary antiphospholipid syndrome (APL)one had polydermatomyositis (PDM), 1 juvenile arthritis, 1 panarteritis nodosa (cutaneous PAN), one Evans syndrome, and one with autoimmune uveitis. 7 of them had a positive response to therapy with IGEV evaluated by clinical and biochemical parameters. They remained with conventional treatments. One patient received a new IG EV pulse after 24 months, because of panniculitis reactivation. Clinical and biochemical response was poor in 4 of them, and 2 patients died. IVIg may be usefull in autoimmune rheumatic diseases when conventional therapies have failed. The therapeutic success is also limited. Only the 55 percent of our patients had a positive clinical response.

  14. Immune checkpoint receptors in regulating immune reactivity in rheumatic disease

    OpenAIRE

    Ceeraz, Sabrina; Nowak, Elizabeth C.; Burns, Christopher M.; Noelle, Randolph J.

    2014-01-01

    Immune checkpoint regulators are critical modulators of the immune system, allowing the initiation of a productive immune response and preventing the onset of autoimmunity. Co-inhibitory and co-stimulatory immune checkpoint receptors are required for full T-cell activation and effector functions such as the production of cytokines. In autoimmune rheumatic diseases, impaired tolerance leads to the development of diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, and Sjogren’s...

  15. Th22 Cells Contribution in Immunopathogenesis of Rheumatic Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gholamreza Azizi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Newly  identified  T  helper  cell  22  (Th22  is  a  subset  of  CD4+T  cells  with  specific properties apart from other known CD4+ T cell subsets with distinguished gene expression and function. Th22 cells are characterized by production of a distinct profile of effector cytokines, including interleukin (IL-22, IL-13, and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α. The levels of Th22 and related cytokine IL-22 are increased in various autoimmune diseases and positively associated with some rheumatic diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, behcet's disease, ankylosing spondylitis and psoriatic arthritis. In summary, IL-22 and Th22 cells play a significant and complicated role in inflammatory and autoimmune  rheumatic  diseases,  therefore,  targeting  IL-22  or  Th22  have  unique  and attractive advantages due to the fact that Th22 subset is recently identified and its associated research is extremely limited. This review discusses the role of Th22 and its cytokine IL-22 in the immunopathogenesis of rheumatic disease.

  16. [Immune system and rheumatic diseases in the elderly].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schirmer, Michael

    2016-06-01

    Impairments of the immune system play an important role in all immun-mediated rheumatic diseases. Recently, the following news were reported: · Early aging of the immune system with thymus insufficiency has now been reported for both patients with rheumatoid arthritis and axial spondyloarthritis, without prethymic lack of progenitors at least in rheumatoid arthritis.. · For giant cell arteritis, the most frequent vasculitis in the elderly, an increased expression of IL-17A in temporal artery biopsies coincides with good prognosis and reponse to glucocorticoids.. · Concerning immunosenescence in systemic lupus erythematosus, BAFF appears to have an important role for relapses after B-cell depletion.. For the future it can be anticipated that the use of unified classification criteria for rheumatic diseases (as with the new 2012 EULAR / ACR classification criteria for polymyalgia rheumatica) will ensure better comparability of immunological studies also in the elderly.

  17. ECHOCARDIOGRAPHIC PROFILE OF VALVULAR LESIONS IN CHILDREN WITH ACUTE RHEUMATIC FEVER / RHEUMATIC HEART DISEASE IN A TERTIARY CARE HOSPITAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramu

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT (B ACKGROUND: Rheumatic Heart disease is still a leading cause of valvular disease in developing countries like India and constitutes 10 to 50% of the cardiac patients in Indian hospitals. Echocardiography is a very sensitive investigation for the diagnosis of Rheumatic Carditis and its sequalae like Mitral, Aortic and Tricuspid valve disease as well as sub clinical Carditis. AIMS & OBJECTIVES: To study the profile, severity and gender based differences of valvular lesions on the Trans Thoracic Echocardiographic records of children diagnosed as Acute Rheumatic fever/ Rheumatic Heart disease. MATERIALS & METHODS: This study was conducted during D ecember’2014 by reviewing the records of trans thoracic Echocardiographic reports of our 36 cases (childhood Acute Rheumatic fever/ Rheumatic Heart disease cases for type and degree of valvular involvement according to AHA guidelines. RESULTS: Mitral valv e was involved most often (23 cases – 63.89%. Severe Mitral regurgitation is the common type of valvular lesions both in Boys and Girls (19.44% and 25% respectively. Isolated Aortic valve/ Tricuspid valve involvement was not found in our study. Mixed les ions were seen most often than pure isolated valvular lesions. CONCLUSION: Mitral valve was most commonly affected, while Regurgitant lesions were more common than Stenotic lesions and most severe in children less than 15 years age group. Aortic Regurgitat ion (AR was found more commonly in Girls than Boys in our study. But all these cases of AR had some other valvular involvement as Mixed lesions. Therefore Echocardiography should be done routinely for patients with Rheumatic Heart Disease, focusing on you nger population to facilitate diagnosis and definitive treatment before complications set in.

  18. A vaccine against Streptococcus pyogenes: the potential to prevent rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilherme, Luiza; Ferreira, Frederico Moraes; Köhler, Karen Francine; Postol, Edilberto; Kalil, Jorge

    2013-02-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes causes severe, invasive infections such as the sequelae associated with acute rheumatic fever, rheumatic heart disease, acute glomerulonephritis, uncomplicated pharyngitis, and pyoderma. Efforts to produce a vaccine against S. pyogenes began several decades ago, and different models have been proposed. We have developed a vaccine candidate peptide, StreptInCor, comprising 55 amino acid residues of the C-terminal portion of the M protein and encompassing both the T- and B-cell protective epitopes. The present article summarizes data from the previous 5 years during which we tested the immunogenicity and safety of StreptInCor in different animal models. We showed that StreptInCor overlapping peptides induced cellular and humoral immune responses of individuals bearing different HLA class II molecules. These results are consistent with peptides that have a universal vaccine epitope. The tridimensional molecular structure of StreptInCor was elucidated by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, which showed that its structure is composed of two microdomains linked by an 18-residue α-helix. Additionally, we comprehensively evaluated the structural stability of the StreptInCor peptide in different physicochemical conditions using circular dichroism. Additional experiments were performed with inbred, outbred, and HLA class II transgenic mice. Analysis of several organs of these mice showed neither deleterious nor autoimmune reactions even after a long period of vaccination, indicating that the StreptInCor candidate peptide could be considered as an immunogenic and safe vaccine.

  19. Association of MASP2 polymorphisms and protein levels with rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catarino, Sandra Jeremias dos Santos; Boldt, Angelica Beate Winter; Beltrame, Marcia Holsbach; Nisihara, Renato Mitsunori; Schafranski, Marcelo Derbli; de Messias-Reason, Iara Jose

    2014-12-01

    MASP-2 is a key protein of the lectin pathway of complement system. Several MASP2 polymorphisms were associated with MASP-2 serum levels or functional activity. Here we investigated a possible association between MASP2 polymorphisms and MASP-2 serum levels with the susceptibility to rheumatic fever (RF) and rheumatic heart disease (RHD). We haplotyped 11 MASP2 polymorphisms with multiplex sequence-specific PCR in 145 patients with history of RF from south Brazil (103 with RHD and 42 without cardiac lesion [RFo]) and 342 healthy controls. MASP-2 levels were determined by ELISA. The low MASP-2 producing p.377A and p.439H variants were negatively associated with RF (P=0.02, OR=0.36) and RHD (P=0.01, OR=0.25). In contrast, haplotypes that share the intron 9 - exon 12 g.1961795C, p.371D, p.377V and p.439R polymorphisms increased the susceptibility to RHD (P=0.02, OR=4.9). MASP-2 levels were associated with MASP2 haplotypes and were lower in patients (P<0.0001), which may reflect protein consumption due to complement activation. MASP2 gene polymorphisms and protein levels seem to play an important role in the development of RF and establishment of RHD.

  20. Pregnancy in patients with rheumatic diseases: obstetric management and monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branch, D W

    2004-01-01

    The obstetric management of the pregnant rheumatic patient is largely dictated by the specific disease and the degree to which it is associated with recognizable and treatable adverse obstetric outcomes, maternal or fetal. This review will cover the obstetric management of women with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), antiphospholipid syndrome (APS), rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and systemic sclerosis (SSc). Most experts agree that a co-ordinated management effort on the part of obstetricians and rheumatologists will likely yield the optimal achievable results.

  1. Vaccination recommendations for adult patients with autoimmune inflammatory rheumatic diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Bühler, Silja; Eperon, Gilles; Ribi, Camillo; Kyburz, Diego; van Gompel, Fons; Visser, Leo G.; Siegrist, Claire-Anne; Hatz, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND The number of individuals with autoimmune inflammatory rheumatic diseases (AIIRDs) treated with immunosuppressive drugs is increasing steadily. The variety of immunosuppressive drugs and, in particular, biological therapies is also rising. The immunosuppressants, as well as the AIIRD itself, increase the risk of infection in this population. Thus, preventing infections by means of vaccination is of utmost importance. New Swiss vaccination recommendations for AIIRD patients were in...

  2. Place of cyclosporin A in the therapy of rheumatic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zemfira Sadullaevna Alekberova

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers the major effects of cyclosporin A (CsA in rheumatic diseases (RD. CsA is noted to be effective for a number of RDs and all types of rheumatoid arthritis (RA, including in early RA in adults and juvenile RA; uveitis associated with Behcet's disease (BD (as the drug of choice; in combination with other disease-modifying drugs; in RD with concomitant viral hepatitis C. The diagnostic criteria for (BD and the efficacy of CsA for this disease are given according to different authors.

  3. Male fertility potential alteration in rheumatic diseases: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Camargo Tiseo

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Background Improved targeted therapies for rheumatic diseases were developed recently resulting in a better prognosis for affected patients. Nowadays, patients are living longer and with improved quality of life, including fertility potential. These patients are affected by impaired reproductive function and the causes are often multifactorial related to particularities of each disease. This review highlights how rheumatic diseases and their management affect testicular function and male fertility. Materials and Methods A systematic review of literature of all published data after 1970 was conducted. Data was collected about fertility abnormalities in male patients with systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, dermatomyositis, ankylosing spondylitis, Behçet disease and gout. Two independent researchers carried out the search in online databases. Results A total of 19 articles were included addressing the following diseases: 7 systemic lupus erythematosus, 6 Behçet disease, 4 ankylosing spondylitis, 2 rheumatoid arthritis, 2 dermatomyositis and one gout. Systemic lupus erythematosus clearly affects gonadal function impairing spermatogenesis mainly due to antisperm antibodies and cyclophosphamide therapy. Behçet disease, gout and ankylosing spondylitis patients, including those under anti-TNF therapy in the latter disease, do not seem to have reduced fertility whereas in dermatomyositis, the fertility potential is hampered by disease activity and by alkylating agents. Data regarding rheumatoid arthritis is scarce, gonadal dysfunction observed as consequence of disease activity and antisperm antibodies. Conclusions Reduced fertility potential is not uncommon. Its frequency and severity vary among the different rheumatic diseases. Permanent infertility is rare and often associated with alkylating agent therapy.

  4. Male fertility potential alteration in rheumatic diseases: a systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiseo, Bruno Camargo; Cocuzza, Marcello; Bonfá, Eloisa; Srougi, Miguel; Clovis, A

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background Improved targeted therapies for rheumatic diseases were developed recently resulting in a better prognosis for affected patients. Nowadays, patients are living longer and with improved quality of life, including fertility potential. These patients are affected by impaired reproductive function and the causes are often multifactorial related to particularities of each disease. This review highlights how rheumatic diseases and their management affect testicular function and male fertility. Materials and Methods A systematic review of literature of all published data after 1970 was conducted. Data was collected about fertility abnormalities in male patients with systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, dermatomyositis, ankylosing spondylitis, Behçet disease and gout. Two independent researchers carried out the search in online databases. Results A total of 19 articles were included addressing the following diseases: 7 systemic lupus erythematosus, 6 Behçet disease, 4 ankylosing spondylitis, 2 rheumatoid arthritis, 2 dermatomyositis and one gout. Systemic lupus erythematosus clearly affects gonadal function impairing spermatogenesis mainly due to antisperm antibodies and cyclophosphamide therapy. Behçet disease, gout and ankylosing spondylitis patients, including those under anti-TNF therapy in the latter disease, do not seem to have reduced fertility whereas in dermatomyositis, the fertility potential is hampered by disease activity and by alkylating agents. Data regarding rheumatoid arthritis is scarce, gonadal dysfunction observed as consequence of disease activity and antisperm antibodies. Conclusions Reduced fertility potential is not uncommon. Its frequency and severity vary among the different rheumatic diseases. Permanent infertility is rare and often associated with alkylating agent therapy. PMID:27120778

  5. The emerging role of epigenetics in rheumatic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gay, Steffen; Wilson, Anthony G

    2014-03-01

    Epigenetics is a key mechanism regulating the expression of genes. There are three main and interrelated mechanisms: DNA methylation, post-translational modification of histone proteins and non-coding RNA. Gene activation is generally associated with lower levels of DNA methylation in promoters and with distinct histone marks such as acetylation of amino acids in histones. Unlike the genetic code, the epigenome is altered by endogenous (e.g. hormonal) and environmental (e.g. diet, exercise) factors and changes with age. Recent evidence implicates epigenetic mechanisms in the pathogenesis of common rheumatic disease, including RA, OA, SLE and scleroderma. Epigenetic drift has been implicated in age-related changes in the immune system that result in the development of a pro-inflammatory status termed inflammageing, potentially increasing the risk of age-related conditions such as polymyalgia rheumatica. Therapeutic targeting of the epigenome has shown promise in animal models of rheumatic diseases. Rapid advances in computational biology and DNA sequencing technology will lead to a more comprehensive understanding of the roles of epigenetics in the pathogenesis of common rheumatic diseases.

  6. A STUDY OF PROFILE AND PATTERNS OF “JOINT INVOLVEMENT” IN UNDER 15 YEARS AGE GROUP CHILDREN WITH ACUTE RHEUMATIC FEVER AND RHEUMATIC HEART DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhavani Shankar

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT (BACKGROUND: Acute Rheumatic fever / Rheumatic Heart disease is the most common acquired childhood heart disease diagnosis made in India. Poly Arthritis is one of the common manifestations of the disease and making it one among many differential diagnoses for sub - acute arthritis. AIMS & OBJECTIVES: To study the profile and patterns of joint involvement in children with Acute Rheumatic fever / Rheumatic Heart dise ase. MATERIALS & METHODS: The Study was conducted in a tertiary care hospital for 2 years period on less than 15 years children diagnosed as Acute Rheumatic fever / Rheumatic Heart disease as per Jones criteria (U pdated 1992. RESULTS: Joint involvement is one of the common manifestations of Acute Rheumatic fever / Rheumatic Heart disease. In our study Joint involvement is found in 50% cases (18 out of 36 cases i.e., 87.5% (7 out of 8cases of first attack cases and 39.28 %( 11 out 28 cases of reactivation cases. Further we found Polyarthritis is the predominant pattern of joint involvement. CONCLUSION: Basing on the results of our study we conclude that Joint involvement was observed in majority of cases, more so in first attack cases of Acute Rheumatic fever. Further Polyarthritis is the predominant pattern in our study. We found Knee Joint involvement as most common joint to be involved in children with Acute Rheumatic fever / Rheumatic Heart disease.

  7. [Systemic autoimmune rheumatic diseases in 2013: problems of laboratory diagnosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasonov, E L; Aleksandrova, E N; Novikov, A A

    2014-01-01

    Progress in the laboratory diagnosis of systemic autoimmune rheumatic diseases (SRAD) is caused by the ever increasing clinical introduction of new highly productive methods for immune analysis using computer-aided systems and multiplex proteomic technologies. The urgent problem in the laboratory diagnosis of SRAD is the standardization of current methods for the detection of autoantibodies (autoAb), including the preparation of international reference materials for the calibration and external quality assessment of immunological assay. New autoAb technologies have a higher analytical validity than the previously used classical techniques immunodiffusion, agglutination, and immunofluorescence; however, their diagnostic sensitivity and specificity for SRAD have been poorly studied. Particular emphasis is laid on the standardization of the methods for examining antinuclear antibodies (ANAb), the major serologic marker of SRAD. According to the EULAR/ACR guidelines, indirect immunofluorescence reaction (IIFR) using human HEp-2 cells as substrate is the gold standard and a primary screening ANAb method. New methods for solid-phase analysis (enzyme immunoassay, multiplex test systems, etc.) cannot substitute the primary screening of ANAb using IIFR-HEp-2 as they identify antibodies to the limited number of antigens, increasing the number of false- negative results. The computer-aided systems for interpreting cell fluorescence tests contribute to the standardization and enhancement of the efficiency of detection of ANAb and other autoAb by IIFR. The use of complex diagnostic indices based on the multiparametric analysis of laboratory biomarkers in the serum makes it possible to most fully and objectively assess complex molecular mechanisms for the pathogenesis of SRAD, thus radically improving the early diagnosis, the estimation of the activity and severity of disease, the prediction of the outcomes of a pathological process and the response to treatment.

  8. Opioid Use and Tobacco Smoking in Patients With Rheumatic Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shakibi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Rheumatic diseases are chronic diseases, which may be associated with severe and debilitating pain. Objectives The purpose of this study was to examine the prevalence of tobacco and opioid use among rheumatic patients. Patients and Methods In this cross-sectional study, 1042 patients referred to a major rheumatology clinic of Kerman city, in south east of Iran, were interviewed. Patients were divided into seven groups of disease, including rheumatoid arthritis (330 persons osteoarthritis (313 persons, systemic lupus erythematosus (149 persons, back pain (146 persons, spondyloarthropathies (62 persons, Behcet’s disease (25 persons, and scleroderma (17 persons. The questionnaire consisted of demographic variables, disease-related variables (e.g. duration of disease, the severity of pain on the VAS scale and use of opioids and tobacco based on self-reporting. Results The mean age of the patients was 49.3 ± 15.0 years and mean disease duration in the whole sample was 7.1 ± 5.1 years. Opium consumption was reported by 104 persons (9.9%, codeine, by 185 persons (17.7%, cigarette smoking by 49 persons (4.7% and waterpipe smoking by 34 persons (3.3%. Conclusions In this study, codeine consumption is the most frequently used substance. The consumption of opium is not much different from the general population. Also, the rate of cigarette and waterpipe smoking was less than that in the general population. The prevalence of opium use and tobacco smoking was higher in men than in women. There was no significant relationship between type of rheumatic diseases, disease-related variables, and substance use.

  9. Treatment of rheumatic diseases in children: special considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milojevic, Diana S; Ilowite, Norman T

    2002-08-01

    The goals of treatment of rheumatic diseases in children are to control the disease process while ensuring normal nutrition, growth, and development. The choice of antirheumatic drugs is similar in children and adults, but the doses, treatment schedules, and susceptibility to toxicity can differ considerably. In addition to differences between adult and pediatric diseases themselves, it is important for the rheumatologist who treats children to be cognizant of the impact of nutritional, developmental, and growth issues and differential susceptibility to toxicity of various treatments.

  10. Benzathine Penicillin Prophylaxis in Children with Rheumatic Fever (RF/ Rheumatic Heart Disease (RHD: A Study of Compliance

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    Radha G. Ghildiyal

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Aims and Objectives: To study the compliance of patients of Rheumatic fever (RF/ Rheumatic heart disease (RHD regarding secondary prophylaxis with injection benzathine penicillin. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted in the Pediatric Rheumatology Outpatients’ Department (OPD of a tertiary care teaching university affiliated hospital. Patients below 18 years of age diagnosed as Rheumatic fever/ Rheumatic heart disease following up in Pediatric Rheumatology OPD for at least 1 year for benzathine pencillin prophylaxis were included in the study. The patients diagnosed to have RF/ RHD were advised injection benzathine penicillin prophylaxis every 3 weeks. A proforma was devised for recording the clinical details of the patient- including demographic information, clinical details regarding RF/ RHD and rheumatic fever recurrences. The details of the benzathine penicillin prophylaxis taken by the patient were also recorded in the proforma. The reasons for non-compliance were noted and enlisted as per their frequency. Results: The study included 10 patients following up at the specialty clinic for rheumatic heart disease patients. We had 7 males and 3 females in the study. The average age was 9.7 yrs (6 years to 12 years. The average number of months of follow up for assessing the compliance was 20.7 months (12.6 months to 44 months. The average compliance (% of the 10 patients was 89.60% (63.69% to 100%. Out of the 10 subjects, four had a recurrence of rheumatic fever manifesting in the form of congestive cardiac failure & carditis. Though most of the times the patients were not able to recall the reason for missing the dose, trip to one’s native place was an important reason for missed doses besides forgetting the dates of the prophylaxis and doubts about need for the prophylaxis. Conclusions: Compliance of secondary prophylaxis with benzathine penicillin was about 90% in the present study. Frequent travel by patients to their native

  11. Role of Adipokines in Atherosclerosis: Interferences with Cardiovascular Complications in Rheumatic Diseases

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    Morena Scotece

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with rheumatic diseases have an increased risk of mortality by cardiovascular events. In fact, several rheumatic diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, and ankylosing spondylitis are associated with a higher prevalence of cardiovascular diseases (CVDs. Although traditional cardiovascular risk factors have been involved in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases in rheumatic patients, these alterations do not completely explain the enhanced cardiovascular risk in this population. Obesity and its pathologic alteration of fat mass and dysfunction, due to an altered pattern of secretion of proinflammatory adipokines, could be one of the links between cardiovascular and rheumatic diseases. Indeed, the incidence of CVDs is augmented in obese individuals with rheumatic disorders. Thus, in this paper we explore in detail the relationships among adipokines, rheumatic diseases, and cardiovascular complications by giving to the reader a holistic vision and several suggestions for future perspectives and potential clinical implications.

  12. Glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis in rheumatic diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijs, Ronny Nicolaas Johannes Theodorus Lambertus de

    2005-01-01

    Glucocorticoids (GCs) are widely used in medicine for their immunosuppressive and anti-inflammatory effects. They are prescribed to patients with systemic inflammatory diseases and are frequently used in the fields of internal medicine (rheumatology, hematology, pulmonology, gastroenterology, etc),

  13. [Pathogenesis of parodontitis in rheumatic diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Detert, J; Pischon, N; Burmester, G-R; Buttgereit, F

    2010-03-01

    Inflammatory periodontal disease (PD) is a common disease worldwide that has a primarily bacterial aetiology and is characterized by dysregulation of the host inflammatory response. The degree of inflammation varies among individuals with PD independently of the degree of bacterial infection, suggesting that alteration of the immune function may substantially contribute to its extent. Factors such as smoking, education, and body mass index (BMI) are discussed as potential risk factors for PD. Most PD patients respond to bacterial invaders by mobilizing their defensive cells and releasing cytokines such as interleukin (IL)-1beta, tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha, and IL-6, which ultimately causes tissue destruction by stimulating the production of collagenolytic enzymes, such matrix metalloproteinases. Recently, there has been growing evidence suggesting an association between PD and the increased risk of systemic diseases, such ateriosclerosis, diabetes mellitus, stroke, and rheumatoid arthritis (RA). PD and rheumatologic diseases such as RA share many pathological aspects and immunological findings.

  14. Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor: A Multifunctional Cytokine in Rheumatic Diseases

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    Tsuyoshi Kasama

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF was originally identified in the culture medium of activated T lymphocytes as a soluble factor that inhibited the random migration of macrophages. MIF is now recognized to be a multipotent cytokine involved in the regulation of immune and inflammatory responses. Moreover, the pivotal nature of its involvement highlights the importance of MIF to the pathogenesis of various inflammatory disorders and suggests that blocking MIF may be a useful therapeutic strategy for treating these diseases. This paper discusses the function and expressional regulation of MIF in several rheumatic diseases and related conditions.

  15. The place of intravenous immunoglobulin in rheumatic diseases

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    N. V. Seredavkina

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Therapy with intravenous human immunoglobulin (IVIG was and continues to remain essential for a number of diseases. At the same time the evidence base for IVIG use is extremely small in rheumatology. Clinical experience shows that IVIG is effective in treating thrombocytopenic purpura, Guillain–Barre syndrome, and chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy, which develop in the presence of rheumatic diseases, such as systemic lupus erythematosus, inflammatory myopathies, and antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitides. The review considers indications for the use of IVIG, its dosage regimen, benefits, and adverse reactions and analyzes the Russian and foreign literature on this issue.

  16. Genetic diseases with rheumatic manifestations in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prahalad, S; Colbert, R A

    1998-09-01

    Many nonrheumatic diseases of childhood present with musculoskeletal abnormalities. A significant proportion of these disorders have a genetic basis, many involving defects in structural proteins of the connective tissue. Chief among these are collagen mutations resulting in spondyloepiphyseal dysplasias and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, as well as fibrillin defects associated with Marfan's syndrome. A variety of other chromosomal anomalies are associated with musculoskeletal abnormalities, and may result from as yet unidentified connective tissue defects. In addition, metabolic diseases may result in findings of hyper- or hypomobility, or carpal tunnel syndrome. Helpful clinical clues to identify nonrheumatologic musculoskeletal disease, as well as recent advances in our understanding of the genetic basis of several of these disorders, are reviewed here.

  17. Sulfasalazine efficacy and tolerability in rheumatic diseases

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    V. V. Badokin

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Sulfasalazine is one of the main disease modifying drugs for the treatment of chronic inflammatory joint and spine diseases. The article describes mechanism of action of sulfasalazine and its main metabolites. Detailed information about anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive action of the drug is presented. Results of many studies of sulfasalazine efficacy in rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, psoriatic arthritis and reactive arthritis are discussed from the evidence based medicine point of view. Data on sulfasalazine tolerability and safety are presented with separate discussion of hypersensitivity and dose-dependent adverse reactions so as their treatment and prophylaxis.

  18. State of the art: Reproduction and pregnancy in rheumatic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Østensen, Monika; Andreoli, Laura; Brucato, Antonio; Cetin, Irene; Chambers, Christina; Clowse, Megan E B; Costedoat-Chalumeau, Nathalie; Cutolo, Maurizio; Dolhain, Radboud; Fenstad, M H; Förger, Frauke; Wahren-Herlenius, Marie; Ruiz-Irastorza, Guillermo; Koksvik, Hege; Nelson-Piercy, Catherine; Shoenfeld, Yehuda; Tincani, Angela; Villiger, Peter M; Wallenius, Marianne; von Wolff, Michael

    2015-05-01

    Throughout the last decade, increasing awareness has been raised on issues related to reproduction in rheumatic diseases including basic research to clarify the important role of estrogens in the etiology and pathophysiology of immune/inflammatory diseases. Sub- or infertility is a heterogeneous condition that can be related to immunological mechanisms, to pregnancy loss, to disease burden, to therapy, and to choices in regard to family size. Progress in reproductive medicine has made it possible for more patients with rheumatic disease to have children. Active disease in women with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) affects their children's birth weight and may have long-term effects on their future health status. Pregnancy complications as preeclampsia and intrauterine growth restriction are still increased in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and antiphospholipid syndrome (APS), however, biomarkers can monitor adverse events, and several new therapies may improve outcomes. Pregnancies in women with APS remain a challenge, and better therapies for the obstetric APS are needed. New prospective studies indicate improved outcomes for pregnancies in women with rare diseases like systemic sclerosis and vasculitis. TNF inhibitors hold promise for maintaining remission in rheumatological patients and may be continued at least in the first half of pregnancy. Pre-conceptional counseling and interdisciplinary management of pregnancies are essential for ensuring optimal pregnancy outcomes.

  19. Rheumatic Heart Disease in the Twenty-First Century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woldu, Bethel; Bloomfield, Gerald S

    2016-10-01

    Rheumatic heart disease (RHD) is a chronic valvular disease resulting after severe or repetitive episodes of acute rheumatic fever (ARF), an autoimmune response to group A Streptococcus infection. RHD has been almost eliminated with improved social and health infrastructure in affluent countries while it remains a neglected disease with major cause of morbidity and mortality in many low- and middle-income countries, and resource-limited regions of high-income countries. Despite our evolving understanding of the pathogenesis of RHD, there have not been any significant advances to prevent or halt progression of disease in recent history. Long-term penicillin-based treatment and surgery remain the backbone of a RHD control program in the absence of an effective vaccine. The advent of echocardiographic screening algorithms has improved the accuracy of diagnosing RHD and has shed light on the enormous burden of disease. Encouragingly, this has led to a rekindled commitment from researchers in the most affected countries to advocate and take bold actions to end this disease of social inequality.

  20. Rheumatic diseases in the Corpus Hippocraticum

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    G. Squillace

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Medecine of V and IV centuries B.C. attested in the Corpus Hippocraticum ascribes all diseases to the rheuma, i.e. the flux of humours into the body. This flux produces not only the rise of cold, hoarsness, cough, reddenings, dropsy, but also arthritis, sciatica, gout.

  1. [Biological treatment of rare inflammatory rheumatic diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baslund, B.

    2008-01-01

    The current status of the use of biological medicine in the treatment of adult onset morbus still, Wegeners granulomatosis and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is reviewed. The need for controlled trials is emphasized. Anti-CD20 treatment for SLE patients with kidney involvement and patients wi...... with Wegeners granulomatosis seems promising. Anti-TNF and IL1 receptor antagonist can control disease activity in most patients with adult morbus still Udgivelsesdato: 2008/6/9...

  2. Rheumatic diseases of the spine: imaging diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narváez, J A; Hernández-Gañán, J; Isern, J; Sánchez-Fernández, J J

    2016-04-01

    Spinal involvement is common both in the spondyloarthritides and in rheumatoid arthritis, in which the cervical segment is selectively affected. Rheumatoid involvement of the cervical spine has characteristic radiologic manifestations, fundamentally different patterns of atlantoaxial instability. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the technique of choice for evaluating the possible repercussions of atlantoaxial instability on the spinal cord and/or nerve roots in patients with rheumatoid arthritis as well as for evaluating parameters indicative of active inflammation, such as bone edema and synovitis. Axial involvement is characteristic in the spondyloarthritides and has distinctive manifestations on plain-film X-rays, which reflect destructive and reparative phenomena. The use of MRI has changed the conception of spondyloarthritis because it is able to directly detect the inflammatory changes that form part of the disease, making it possible to establish the diagnosis early in the disease process, when plain-film X-ray findings are normal (non-radiographic axial spondyloarthritis), to assess the prognosis of the disease, and to contribute to treatment planning.

  3. [Tuberculous rheumatism "Poncet's disease". Case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lugo-Zamudio, Gustavo Esteban; Barbosa-Cobos, Rosa Elda; González-Ramírez, Laura Virginia; Delgado-Ochoa, Dolores

    2016-01-01

    Deaths due to tuberculosis have reached 2.5 million cases per year worldwide. Poncet's disease is an infrequent form of tuberculosis characterised by a clinical picture of polyarthritis. A 24-year-old male presented with morning stiffness, arthralgias, bilateral symmetric arthritis of the proximal interphalangeal joints, wrists, knees, ankles, and shoulders, and adenomegalies at the cervical, submandibular, left supraclavicular, axillary and inguinal levels, without fever. Laboratory results were as follows: ESR 44mm/h, C-reactive protein 4.35, normal levels of complement C3 and C4, negative rheumatoid factor and anticyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies, positive antinuclear antibodies with fine speckled pattern (1:320) and cytoplasm (1:160) pattern and negative anti-Smith, -double-stranded DNA, Sjogren's syndrome-antigen A and Sjogren's syndrome-antigen B. Histological report of cervical node tissue revealed granulomatous lesions compatible with tuberculosis. Rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus were ruled out. Anti-tuberculosis agents were initiated that resolved the clinical picture. Diagnosis of Poncet's disease was confirmed. The differential diagnosis between tuberculosis and autoimmune inflammatory joint diseases is a clinical challenge. Copyright © 2015 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  4. Air pollution in autoimmune rheumatic diseases: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farhat, Sylvia C L; Silva, Clovis A; Orione, Maria Angelica M; Campos, Lucia M A; Sallum, Adriana M E; Braga, Alfésio L F

    2011-11-01

    Air pollution consists of a heterogeneous mixture of gasses and particles that include carbon monoxide, nitrates, sulfur dioxide, ozone, lead, toxic by-product of tobacco smoke and particulate matter. Oxidative stress and inflammation induced by inhaled pollutants may result in acute and chronic disorders in the respiratory system, as well as contribute to a state of systemic inflammation and autoimmunity. This paper reviews the mechanisms of air contaminants influencing the immune response and autoimmunity, and it focuses on studies of inhaled pollutants triggering and/or exacerbating rheumatic diseases in cities around the world. Remarkably, environmental factors contribute to the onset of autoimmune diseases, especially smoking and occupational exposure to silica in rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus. Other diseases such as scleroderma may be triggered by the inhalation of chemical solvents, herbicides and silica. Likewise, primary vasculitis associated with anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA) may be triggered by silica exposure. Only few studies showed that air pollutants could trigger or exacerbate juvenile idiopathic arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus. In contrast, no studies of tropospheric pollution triggering inflammatory myopathies and spondyloarthropathies were carried out. In conclusion, air pollution is one of the environmental factors involved in systemic inflammation and autoimmunity. Further studies are needed in order to evaluate air pollutants and their potentially serious effects on autoimmune rheumatic diseases and the mechanisms involved in the onset and the exacerbation of these diseases.

  5. Portuguese recommendations for the use of methotrexate in rheumatic diseases - 2016 update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte, Ana Catarina; Santos-Faria, Daniela; Gonçalves, Maria João; Sepriano, Alexandre; Mourão, Ana Filipa; Duarte, Cátia; Neves, Joana Sousa; Águeda, Ana Filipa; Ribeiro, Pedro Avila; Daniel, Alexandra; Neto, Adriano; Cordeiro, Ana; Rodrigues, Ana; Barcelos, Anabela; Silva, Cândida; Ponte, Cristina; Vieira-Sousa, Elsa; Teixeira, Filipa; Oliveira-Ramos, Filipa; Araújo, Filipe; Barcelos, Filipe; Canhão, Helena; Santos, Helena; Ramos, João; Polido-Pereira, Joaquim; Tavares-Costa, José; Melo Gomes, José António; Cunha-Miranda, Luís; Costa, Lúcia; Cerqueira, Marcos; Cruz, Margarida; Santos, Maria José; Bernardes, Miguel; Oliveira, Paula; Abreu, Pedro; Figueira, Ricardo; Barros, Rita; Falcão, Sandra; Pinto, Patrícia; Pimenta, Sofia; Capela, Susana; Teixeira, Vitor; Fonseca, João Eurico

    2017-01-01

    Methotrexate (MTX) is the first-line drug in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and the most commonly prescribed disease modifying anti-rheumatic drug. Moreover, it is also used as an adjuvant drug in patients under biologic therapies, enhancing the efficacy of biologic agents. To review the literature and update the Portuguese recommendations for the use of MTX in rheumatic diseases first published in 2009. The first Portuguese guidelines for the use of MTX in rheumatic diseases were published in 2009 and were integrated in the multinational 3E Initiative (Evidence Expertise Exchange) project. The Portuguese rheumatologists based on literature evidence and consensus opinion formulated 13 recommendations. At a national meeting, the recommendations included in this document were further discussed and updated. The document resulting from this meeting circulated to all Portuguese rheumatologists, who anonymously voted online on the level of agreement with the updated recommendations. Results presented in this article are mainly in accordance with previous guidelines, with some new information regarding hepatitis B infection during MTX treatment, pulmonary toxicity monitoring, hepatotoxicity management, association with hematologic neoplasms, combination therapy and tuberculosis screening during treatment. The present recommendations combine scientific evidence with expert opinion and attained desirable agreement among Portuguese rheumatologists. The regular update of these recommendations is essential in order to keep them a valid and useful tool in daily practice.

  6. [Depression and inflammation in rheumatic diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buras, Aleksandra; Waszkiewicz, Napoleon; Szulc, Agata

    2016-03-04

    It is known that the prevalence of depression in rheumatologic patients is higher than in the general population. Socioeconomic factors are not a sufficient explanation of mood disorder in these patients. Symptoms reported by patients with chronic inflammatory diseases resemble changes defined as "sickness behavior". Mood disorders among somatic patients could be explained by disturbances of the immune system according to the monoaminergic theory of depression. Inflammatory factors such as IL-1 (interleukin-1), IL-2 (interleukin-2), IL-6 (interleukin-6), TNF-α (tumor necrosis factor α), and IFN-γ (interferon-γ) act within the CNS (central nervous system). They get through from peripheral tissues as well as being synthesized de novo by neurons. This cytokine activity correlates positively with depression intensity as well as with genetic polymorphism of the serotonin (5-HT) transporter. The theory of glucocorticoid resistance-mediated depression (limbic-hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal [LHPA] axis) is also connected with gained proinflammatory cytokines activity. It might assume the form of a vicious circle. Depressed mood is probably linked with depression in immune-mediated diseases. An elevated level of proinflammatory cytokines is able to activate IDO (indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase)--an enzyme catabolizing tryptophan (5-HT precursor). Those reactions probably play the main role at the biochemical level. IDO metabolites extensively disturb neurotransmission. 3-Hydroxykynurenine (3OH-KYN), quinolinic acid (Quin) and kynurenic acid (KYNA) are neurotoxic by releasing oxidative stress mediators. Moreover, they activate MAO (monoamine oxidase), which degrades neurotransmitters responsible for stable mood. Bidirectional communication between the neuroendocrine and immune systems is significant for depression treatment, as well as CNS protection against incremental neurodegeneration among seemingly diverse diseases.

  7. Depression and inflammation in rheumatic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra Buras

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available It is known that the prevalence of depression in rheumatologic patients is higher than in the general population. Socioeconomic factors are not a sufficient explanation of mood disorder in these patients. Symptoms reported by patients with chronic inflammatory diseases resemble changes defined as “sickness behavior”. Mood disorders among somatic patients could be explained by disturbances of the immune system according to the monoaminergic theory of depression. Inflammatory factors such as IL-1 (interleukin-1, IL-2 (interleukin-2, IL-6 (interleukin-6, TNF-α (tumor necrosis factor α, and IFN-γ (interferon-γ act within the CNS (central nervous system. They get through from peripheral tissues as well as being synthesized de novo by neurons. This cytokine activity correlates positively with depression intensity as well as with genetic polymorphism of the serotonin (5-HT transporter. The theory of glucocorticoid resistance-mediated depression (limbic-hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal [LHPA] axis is also connected with gained proinflammatory cytokines activity. It might assume the form of a vicious circle. Depressed mood is probably linked with depression in immune-mediated diseases. An elevated level of proinflammatory cytokines is able to activate IDO (indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase – an enzyme catabolizing tryptophan (5-HT precursor. Those reactions probably play the main role at the biochemical level. IDO metabolites extensively disturb neurotransmission. 3-Hydroxykynurenine (3OH-KYN, quinolinic acid (Quin and kynurenic acid (KYNA are neurotoxic by releasing oxidative stress mediators. Moreover, they activate MAO (monoamine oxidase, which degrades neurotransmitters responsible for stable mood. Bidirectional communication between the neuroendocrine and immune systems is significant for depression treatment, as well as CNS protection against incremental neurodegeneration among seemingly diverse diseases.

  8. STUDY OF RISK FACTORS AND LABORATORY PROFILE IN UNDER 15 YEARS AGE GROUP CHILDREN WITH ACUTE RHEUMATIC FEVER AND RHEUMATIC HEART DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramu

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT : BACKGROUND : Acute Rheumatic fever / Rheumatic Heart disease is the most common acquired child hood heart disease diagnosis made in India and is consistently associated with poverty and overcrowding. There is no single symptom , sign or laboratory test that is diagnostic of Acute Rheumatic fever and carditis . Revised , edited and updated Jones criteria are guidelines to assist practitioners and are not a substitute for clinical judgment . The main concern in liberalizing these criteria in developed countries may be over diagnosis of Acute Rheumatic fever. AIMS & OBJECTIVES: To study the risk factors and laboratory profile in children with Acute Rheumatic fever / Rheumatic Heart d isease. MATERIALS & METHODS: The Study was conducted for 2 years period in a tertiary care hospital on less than 15 years children diagnosed as Acute Rheumatic fever / Rheumatic Heart disease. RESULTS: In our study all the cases (100% , 36 cases belongs to Lower socio economic status. Overcrowding is noted in all 36 cases (100% and we noticed rural predilection in 91.7% (33 cases cases. CONCLUSION: Basing on the results of our study we conclude that lower socio economic status , overcrowding (100% cases a nd rural predilection (91.7% are frequent associate risk factors of Acute Rheumatic fever / Rheumatic Heart disease. Further we found Anemia (88.89% , positive C.R.P (86.11% , and A.S.O titer more than 400 I.U/ml in (69.44% as common laboratory abnormali ties.

  9. Assessement of rheumatic diseases with computational radiology: current status and future potential

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peloschek, Philipp; Boesen, Mikael; Donner, Rene;

    2009-01-01

    In recent years, several computational image analysis methods to assess disease progression in rheumatic diseases were presented. This review article explains the basics of these methods as well as their potential application in rheumatic disease monitoring, it covers radiography, sonography...... as well as magnetic resonance imaging in quantitative analysis frameworks....

  10. Cardiac strain findings in children with latent rheumatic heart disease detected by echocardiographic screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaton, Andrea; Richards, Hedda; Ploutz, Michelle; Gaur, Lasya; Aliku, Twalib; Lwabi, Peter; Ensing, Greg; Sable, Craig

    2017-08-01

    Identification of patients with latent rheumatic heart disease by echocardiography presents a unique opportunity to prevent disease progression. Myocardial strain is a more sensitive indicator of cardiac performance than traditional measures of systolic function. The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that abnormalities in myocardial strain may be present in children with latent rheumatic heart disease. Standard echocardiography images with electrocardiogram gating were obtained from Ugandan children found to have latent rheumatic heart disease as well as control subjects. Traditional echocardiography measures of systolic function were obtained, and offline global longitudinal strain analysis was performed. Comparison between groups was performed using strain as a continuous (Mann-Whitney U-test) and categorical (cut-off 5th percentile for age) variable. Our study included 14 subjects with definite rheumatic heart disease, 13 with borderline rheumatic heart disease, and 112 control subjects. None of the subjects had abnormal left ventricular size or ejection fraction. Global longitudinal strain was lower than the 5th percentile in 44% of the subjects with any rheumatic heart disease (p=0.002 versus controls) and 57% of the subjects with definite rheumatic heart disease (p=0.03). The mean absolute strain values were significantly lower when comparing subjects with any rheumatic heart disease with controls (20.4±3.95 versus 22.4±4.35, p=0.025) and subjects with definite rheumatic heart disease with controls (19.9±4.25 versus 22.4±4.35, p=0.033). Global longitudinal strain is decreased in subjects with rheumatic heart disease in the absence of abnormal systolic function. Larger studies with longer-term follow-up are required to determine whether there is a role for strain to help better understand the pathophysiology of latent rheumatic heart disease.

  11. [Febrile responses in patients with pediatric rheumatic diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokota, Shumpei; Kikuchi, Masako; Nozawa, Tomo; Kizawa, Toshitaka; Kanetaka, Taichi; Kadota, Keisuke; Miyamae, Takako; Mori, Masaaki

    2012-01-01

    Fever is one of the critical symptoms of patients in pediatrics field. It indicates inflammatory focus somewhere in the body, and the major causes of fever are infectious diseases. Recent progresses of our knowledge about autoinflammatory syndrome promoted the investigation of the mechanism of fever, and suggested that the pro-inflammatory cytokines are the direct causative agents of fever. The basic science revealed that cooperation of IL-6 and IL-1β induces febrile response. Fever of unknown origin (FUO) remains a challenging problem. Rheumatic diseases, rare infectious diseases, and benign tumors and malignancies are diagnoses to be differentiated. FDG-PET is recently proved a valuable tool for the identification of the etiology in patients with FUO. Since the introduction of biological response modifiers into the treatment of patients with pediatric rheumatic diseases has shifted the therapeutic paradigm, a new concept that the blockade of a unique pro-inflammatory cytokine brings cessation of whole inflammatory responses affected tremendously the clinical medicine. A more investigation of inflammation and its pathophisiology will be needed in pediatric rheumatology.

  12. Incidence of acute rheumatic fever and chronic rheumatic heart disease, trends in deaths in the Tula region (1991—2011

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    Valentina Nikolayevna Sorotskaya

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper analyzes the incidence of acute rheumatic fever (ARF and chronic rheumatic heart disease (CRHD and theirs outcomes in the Tula Region in 1991 to 2011. In this period, the incidence of ARF decreased to 0.002, which was much lower than Russia's rates. That of CRHD in 2011 accounted for 1.6 per 1,000 adult population, which was comparable to the values in Russia. CRHD mortality rates showed a 2.5-fold decrease. The main causes of fatal outcomes were cardiovascular disorders.

  13. Case Report: Giant Right Atrium in Rheumatic Mitral Disease

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    Deniz Demir

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Dilation and hypertrophy of the atria occur in patients with valvular heart disease especially in mitral regurgitation, mitral stenosis or tricuspid abnormalities. Dilatation of the atriums which occurs slowly in time, becomes evident with ritim disturbances and embolic events. We report a case of an unusual giant right atrium in context of rheumatic mitral stenosis, mitral regurgitation, pulmonar hypertansion and severe tricuspid regurgitation in a 40-year-old man who underwent succesfull operations as mitral valve replacement, Maze-IV radiofrequency ablation, right atrium atrioplasty and De Vega anuloplasty. [J Contemp Med 2014; 4(2.000: 98-102

  14. Outcomes in Children Born to Women with Rheumatic Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinet, Évelyne; Bernatsky, Sasha

    2017-05-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are the most prevalent autoimmune rheumatic diseases, predominantly occurring in women during childbearing years. Research has focused on assessing the risk of immediate complications during SLE and RA pregnancies, with studies documenting a higher risk of adverse obstetric outcomes, such as preterm births and infants small for gestational age. Until recently, little was known regarding the long-term health of children born to affected women. We present a review of the current evidence regarding the risk of adverse health outcomes in SLE and RA offspring, and potential mechanisms involved in their pathogenesis.

  15. Commentary – ordering lab tests for suspected rheumatic disease

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    Jarvis James N

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract One of the least-appreciated advances in pediatric rheumatology over the past 25 years has been the delineation of the many ways in which children with rheumatic disease differ from adults with the same illnesses. Furthermore, we are now learning that paradigms that are useful in evaluating adults with musculoskeletal complaints have limited utility in children. Nowhere is that more true than in the use of commonly used laboratory tests, particularly antinuclear antibody (ANA and rheumatoid factor (RF assays. This short review will provide the practitioner with the evidence base that supports a more limited use of ANA and RF testing in children.

  16. A STUDY OF PROFILE AND PATTERNS OF “JOINT INVOLVEMENT” IN UNDER 15 YEARS AGE GROUP CHILDREN WITH ACUTE RHEUMATIC FEVER AND RHEUMATIC HEART DISEASE

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    CONTEXT (BACKGROUND): Acute Rheumatic fever / Rheumatic Heart disease is the most common acquired childhood heart disease diagnosis made in India. Poly Arthritis is one of the common manifestations of the disease and making it one among many differential diagnoses for sub - acute arthritis. AIMS & OBJECTIVES: To study the profile and patterns ...

  17. The impact of rheumatic diseases on sexual function.

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    Tristano, Antonio G

    2009-06-01

    Sexuality is a complex aspect of the human being's life and is more than of only the sexual act. Normal sexual functioning consists of sexual activity with transition through the phases from arousal to relaxation with no problems, and with a feeling of pleasure, fulfillment and satisfaction. Rheumatic diseases may affect all aspects of life including sexual functioning. The reasons for disturbing sexual functioning are multifactorial and comprise disease-related factors as well as therapy. In rheumatoid arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis patients, pain and depression could be the principal factors contributing to sexual dysfunction. On the other hand, in women with Sjögren's syndrome, systemic lupus erythematosus and systemic sclerosis sexual dysfunction is apparently most associated to vaginal discomfort or pain during intercourse. Finally, sexual dysfunction in patients with fibromyalgia could be principally associated with depression, but the characteristic symptoms of fibromyalgia (generalized pain, stiffness, fatigue and poor sleep) may contribute to the occurrence of sexual dysfunction. The treatment of sexual dysfunction will depend on the specific patient's symptoms, however, there are some general recommendations including: exploring different positions, using analgesics drug, heat and muscle relaxants before sexual activity and exploring alternative methods of sexual expression. This is a systemic review about the impact of several rheumatic diseases on sexual functioning. There are no previous overviews about this topic so far.

  18. What rheumatologists should know about orofacial manifestations of autoimmune rheumatic diseases

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    Aline Lauria Pires Abrão

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Orofacial manifestations occur frequently in rheumatic diseases and usually represent early signs of disease or of its activity that are still neglected in clinical practice. Among the autoimmune rheumatic diseases with potential for oral manifestations, rheumatoid arthritis (RA, inflammatory myopathies (IM, systemic sclerosis (SSc, systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE, relapsing polychondritis (RP and Sjögren's syndrome (SS can be cited. Signs and symptoms such as oral hyposalivation, xerostomia, temporomandibular joint disorders, lesions of the oral mucosa, periodontal disease, dysphagia, and dysphonia may be the first expression of these rheumatic diseases. This article reviews the main orofacial manifestations of rheumatic diseases that may be of interest to the rheumatologist for diagnosis and monitoring of autoimmune rheumatic diseases.

  19. Role of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids in diet of patients with rheumatic diseases

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    P. Spinella

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The beneficial effects of ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids have been widely described in the literature in particular those on cardiovascular system. In the last decade there has been an increased interest in the role of these nutrients in the reduction of articular inflammation as well as in the improvement of clinical symptoms in subjects affected by rheumatic diseases, in particular rheumatoid arthritis (RA. Nutritional supplementation with ω-3 may represent an additional therapy to the traditional pharmacological treatment due to the anti-inflammatory properties which characterize this class of lipids: production of alternative eicosanoids, reduction of inflammatory cytochines, reduction of T-lymphocytes activation, reduction of catabolic enzymes activity. The encouraging results of dietetic therapy based on ω- 3 in RA are leading researchers to test their effectiveness on patients with other rheumatic conditions such as systemic lupus erythematosus and ankylosing spondylitis. Nutritional therapy based on food rich in ω-3 or on supplementation with fish oil capsules, proved to be a valid support to he treatment of chronic inflammatory rheumatic diseases.

  20. The inflammatory role of phagocyte apoptotic pathways in rheumatic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuda, Carla M; Pope, Richard M; Perlman, Harris

    2016-08-23

    Rheumatoid arthritis affects nearly 1% of the world's population and is a debilitating autoimmune condition that can result in joint destruction. During the past decade, inflammatory functions have been described for signalling molecules classically involved in apoptotic and non-apoptotic death pathways, including, but not limited to, Toll-like receptor signalling, inflammasome activation, cytokine production, macrophage polarization and antigen citrullination. In light of these remarkable advances in the understanding of inflammatory mechanisms of the death machinery, this Review provides a snapshot of the available evidence implicating death pathways, especially within the phagocyte populations of the innate immune system, in the perpetuation of rheumatoid arthritis and other rheumatic diseases. Elevated levels of signalling mediators of both extrinsic and intrinsic apoptosis, as well as the autophagy, are observed in the joints of patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Furthermore, risk polymorphisms are present in signalling molecules of the extrinsic apoptotic and autophagy death pathways. Although research into the mechanisms underlying these pathways has made considerable progress, this Review highlights areas where further investigation is particularly needed. This exploration is critical, as new discoveries in this field could lead to the development of novel therapies for rheumatoid arthritis and other rheumatic diseases.

  1. [Trends in rehabilitation of patients with rheumatic diseases in Germany].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mau, W; Beyer, W; Ehlebracht-König, I; Engel, J-M; Genth, E; Jäckel, W H; Lange, U; Thiele, K

    2014-03-01

    Recent Deutsche Gesellschaft für Rheumatologie (DGRh, German Society of Rheumatology) guidelines emphasized the significance of coordinated multidisciplinary care and rehabilitation of patients with inflammatory rheumatic diseases. Nationwide data from the German pension insurance funds showed that inpatient rehabilitation due to rheumatoid arthritis (RA) varied by a factor of 2.6 between the different German states. From 2000 to 2012 rehabilitation measures were reduced by one third, most significantly in men with ankylosing spondylitis (AS). Rehabilitation measures because of RA or AS were provided up to 14 times more frequently by the German statutory pension insurance scheme compared with a large compulsory health insurance which is responsible for rehabilitation measures after retirement. In rehabilitation centers with high numbers of patients with inflammatory rheumatic diseases, higher structural and process quality were demonstrated. In 2011 a total of 40 % of RA patients in the national database of the collaborative arthritis centers showed medium or severe functional limitations. Among these disabled RA patients inpatient rehabilitation was reduced by about 50 % between 1995 and 2011. Out of all RA patients from outpatient rheumatology care with severe functional limitations 38 % had no functional restoration therapy within the previous 12 months with a high variation between rheumatologists. Experiences from other European countries may inspire German rheumatologists and other involved health professionals to initiate a wider range of rehabilitative interventions in the future.

  2. Oxidative stress parameters in different systemic rheumatic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firuzi, Omidreza; Fuksa, Leos; Spadaro, Chiara; Bousová, Iva; Riccieri, Valeria; Spadaro, Antonio; Petrucci, Rita; Marrosu, Giancarlo; Saso, Luciano

    2006-07-01

    The involvement of oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of rheumatic disorders, such as systemic sclerosis (SSc) and chronic polyarthritides, has been suggested yet not thoroughly verified experimentally. We analysed 4 plasmatic parameters of oxidative stress in patients with SSc (n = 17), psoriatic arthritis (PsA) (n = 10) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) (n = 9) compared with healthy subjects (n = 22). The biomarkers were: total antioxidant capacity (TAC) measured by ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) method, hydroperoxides determined by ferrous ion oxidation in presence of xylenol orange (FOX) method and sulfhydryl and carbonyl groups assessed by spectrophotometric assays. The results showed significantly increased hydroperoxides in SSc, PsA and RA (3.97 +/- 2.25, 4.87 +/- 2.18 and 5.13 +/- 2.36 micromol L(-1), respectively) compared with the control group (2.31 +/- 1.40 micromol L(-1); P diseases showed no difference in comparison with controls. Carbonyls were significantly higher in RA than in the control group (32.1 +/- 42 vs 2.21 +/- 1.0 nmol (mg protein)(-1); P rheumatic diseases and suggest a role for the use of antioxidants in prevention and treatment of these pathologies.

  3. Muscle function in rheumatic disease patients treated with corticosteroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothstein, J M; Delitto, A; Sinacore, D R; Rose, S J

    1983-02-01

    Clinical and experimental data indicate that long-term corticosteroid use leads to atrophy of the type 2 muscle fibers. The purpose of this study was to characterize and quantify the nature of muscle function in rheumatic disease patients who have been on long-term corticosteroid therapy. Quadriceps function (i.e., peak torque and power) in 19 patients (11 with rheumatoid arthritis, five with systemic lupus erythematosis, and 3 other) and 11 age- and activity-matched normal controls was measured with an isokinetic dynamometer (Cybex II), during four constant velocity movements. Power was significantly lower for the patients at all speeds. At the higher speeds the patients' deficit in power production increased as indicated by a difference in the slopes of power-velocity regression lines. Measures of peak torque could not be consistently used to differentiate the groups. Patients with rheumatic diseases receiving corticosteroids have a decreased ability to generate muscle power. The method described allows for quantification of these deficits in a clinical setting.

  4. Molecular mechanisms in normal pregnancy and rheumatic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez-Del Mercado, M; Martín-Márquez, B T; Petri, M H; Martínez-García, E A; Muñoz-Valle, J F

    2006-01-01

    Pregnancy is a phenomenon that is not totally understood, based on the complex molecular interactions between the mother and the embrio. Once the fecundation is completed the fetus starts to fight for survival. The first challenge is the implantation process and the second one is the interaction with the maternal immune system. This review discusses how the fetus avoids the immune system rejection, and the mechanisms that the maternal immune system adapts in order to be fit for a successful pregnancy. Also, we focus in this paper on the effects of pregnancy in rheumatic diseases, because the myriad clinical outcomes of the disease itself and the obstetric complications dependent of the disease implicated, as for example in rheumatoid arthritis (RA), systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), spondyloarthropaties and antiphospholipid syndrome (APS).

  5. COMPLICATED CASE OF RHEUMATIC HEART DISEASE; UNEXPLORED FOR YEARS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Arif Khan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatic heart disease is a one of the very common heart problem commonly prevalent among the children of developing countries, may occur in adults in their fourties also, if undiagnosed in early ages, similar in symptoms to ‘rheumatism’ but quite difficult to diagnose or are often misdiagnosed. The main objective of this article is to make acquainted about the disease and its further consequences, since initially it appears to be just a simple general fever but may prove deadly if undiagnosed or misdiagnosed leading to severe heart valve damage and consequent complications. The methods involved in the case include bilateral Femoral Embolectomy (BFE, Fasciotomy and Balloon Mitral Valvotomy (BMV. Through this case study an attempt has been made by the authors to make the people especially from the medical and related field, well acquainted about this deadly, silent, heart disease and its consequent complications.

  6. Evaluation of physicians' knowledge about prevention of rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease before and after a teaching session.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osman, Gehan M; Abdelrahman, Sirageldin M K; Ali, Sulafa K M

    2015-01-01

    Rheumatic fever (RF) and rheumatic heart disease RHD remain as one of the major cardiovascular problems in Sudanese children. The cornerstones for control of RF and RHD are primary and secondary preventions as adopted by Sudan's programme. This study aimed to describe and raise the paediatric doctors' awareness about prevention of RF and RHD using lectures. It was a prospective, cross-sectional, hospital based study, conducted in Khartoum. The study populations were paediatric doctors including house officers, medical officers and registrars. Data were collected through self-administered questionnaire, which was constructed to assess the doctor's awareness about RF and RHD prevention before and after attending lectures. Eighty seven doctors participated in the study. The results showed that the overall doctors' awareness about prevention of rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease was at average level. It was raised by intervention through lectures to good level. It is recommended to introduce training programs for physicians in order to improve doctors' awareness about prevention of RF and RHD. Such activities need to be conducted at regular intervals.

  7. Lyme disease: a unique human model for an infectious etiology of rheumatic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malawista, S. E.; Steere, A. C.; Hardin, J. A.

    1984-01-01

    Lyme disease is a complex immune-mediated multi-system disorder that is infectious in origin and inflammatory or "rheumatic" in expression. Through its epidemiologic characteristics, large numbers of a seasonally synchronized patient population are readily available for prospective study. Lyme disease has a known clinical onset ("zero time"), marked by the characteristic expanding skin lesion, erythema chronicum migrans, and a clearly defined pre-articular phase. At least some manifestations of the disorder are responsive to antibiotics, and the causative agent--a spirochete--is now known. These advantages make Lyme disease unique as a human model for an infectious etiology of rheumatic disease. PMID:6516449

  8. Rheumatic diseases presenting as sports-related injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennings, Fabio; Lambert, Elaine; Fredericson, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Most individuals seeking consultation at sports medicine clinics are young, healthy athletes with injuries related to a specific activity. However, these athletes may have other systemic pathologies, such as rheumatic diseases, that may initially mimic sports-related injuries. As rheumatic diseases often affect the musculoskeletal system, they may masquerade as traumatic or mechanical conditions. A systematic review of the literature found numerous case reports of athletes who presented with apparent mechanical low back pain, sciatica pain, hip pain, meniscal tear, ankle sprain, rotator cuff syndrome and stress fractures and who, on further investigation, were found to have manifestations of rheumatic diseases. Common systemic, inflammatory causes of these musculoskeletal complaints include ankylosing spondylitis (AS), gout, chondrocalcinosis, psoriatic enthesopathy and early rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Low back pain is often mechanical among athletes, but cases have been described where spondyloarthritis, especially AS, has been diagnosed. Neck pain, another common mechanical symptom in athletes, can be an atypical presentation of AS or early RA. Hip or groin pain is frequently related to injuries in the hip joint and its surrounding structures. However, differential diagnosis should be made with AS, RA, gout, psudeogout, and less often with haemochromatosis and synovial chondochromatosis. In athletes presenting with peripheral arthropathy, it is mandatory to investigate autoimmune arthritis (AS, RA, juvenile idiopathic arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus), crystal-induced arthritis, Lyme disease and pigmented villonodular synovitis. Musculoskeletal soft tissue disorders (bursitis, tendinopathies, enthesitis and carpal tunnel syndrome) are a frequent cause of pain and disability in both competitive and recreational athletes, and are related to acute injuries or overuse. However, these disorders may occasionally be a manifestation of RA, spondyloarthritis

  9. [Acute rheumatic fever].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maier, Alexander; Kommer, Vera

    2016-03-01

    We report on a young women with acute rheumatic fever. Acute rheumatic fever has become a rare disease in Germany, especially in adults. This carries the risk that it can be missed in the differential diagnostic considerations of acute rheumatic disorders and febrile status. If rheumatic fever is not diagnosed and treated correctly, there is a considerable risk for rheumatic valvular heart disease. In this article diagnosis, differential diagnosis and therapy of rheumatic fever are discussed extensively.

  10. Oxidative stress and nutritional prevention in autoimmune rheumatic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukkar, Samir G; Rossi, Edoardo

    2004-03-01

    The hypothesis that oxidative stress favours flogistic and immune processes inducing autoimmune rheumatic diseases (ARDs) and their complications is still under discussion. In this review we take into consideration both the aetiopathological role of the diet in such diseases and the possible efficacy of dietary supports as adjuvants for the usual specific therapies. Moreover, we shall examine the hypothetical pathophysiological role of oxidative stress on ARDs and their complications, the methods for its evaluation and the possibility of intervening on oxidative pathways by means of nutritional modulation. It is possible that in the future we will be able to control connective pathology by associating an immuno-modulating therapy ('re-educating') with natural products having an anti-oxidant activity to current immunosuppressive treatment (which has potentially toxic effects).

  11. Animal models to investigate the pathogenesis of rheumatic heart disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine M Rush

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatic fever (RF and rheumatic heart disease (RHD are sequelae of group A streptococcal (GAS infection. Although an autoimmune process has long been considered to be responsible for the initiation of RF/RHD, it is only in the last few decades that the mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of the inflammatory condition have been unravelled partly due to experimentation on animal models.RF/RHD is a uniquely human condition and modelling this disease in animals is challenging. Antibody and T cell responses to recombinant GAS M protein (rM and the subsequent interactions with cardiac tissue have been predominantly investigated using a rat autoimmune valvulitis model. In Lewis rats immunized with rM, the development of hallmark histological features akin to RF/RHD, both in the myocardial and in valvular tissue have been reported, with the generation of heart tissue cross reactive antibodies and T cells. However, studies of cardiac function are more challenging in such a model. Recently a Lewis rat model of Sydenham’s chorea (SC and related neuropsychiatric disorders has also been described. Rodent models are very useful for assessing disease mechanisms due to the availability of reagents to precisely determine sequential events following infection with GAS or post-challenge with specific proteins and or carbohydrate preparations from GAS. However, studies of cardiac function are more problematic in such models. In this review an historical overview of animal models previously used and those that are currently available will be discussed in terms of their usefulness in modelling different aspects of the disease process. Ultimately, cardiologists, microbiologists, immunologists and physiologists may have to resort to diverse models to investigate different aspects of RF/RHD.

  12. Follow-up of patients with rheumatic heart diseases in the outpatient setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B S Belov

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The major tasks of a follow-up of patients with rheumatic cardiac defects (RCD are formulated on the basis of the recommendations of international and national scientific associations. At the same time, a clinicianXs experience and judgments play an important role in supervising patients with chronic rheumatic heart disease and RCD.

  13. Radonexposure with the treatment of rheumatic diseases - randomized controlled trials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Falkenbach, A. [Krankenanstalt Gasteiner Heilstollen, Bad Gastein-Boeckstein (Austria)]|[Forschungsinstitut Gastein, Bad Gastein (Austria); Kovac, J.; Brandmaier, P. [Krankenanstalt Gasteiner Heilstollen, Bad Gastein-Boeckstein (Austria); Soto, J. [Dept. of Medical Physics, Univ. of Cantabria (Spain)

    2001-07-01

    The objective was to investigate whether there is evidence for the effectiveness of radon therapy in the treatment of rheumatic diseases. Method: Medline and MedKur databases were searched for randomised controlled clinical trials. Radon therapy centres and experts in the field were contacted, proceedings were hand-searched and bibliographies were checked for references of potential impact. Four clinical trials evaluating the effect of radon in patients suffering from rheumatic diseases with no or only a small number of drop-outs met the inclusion criteria. In patients with degenerative disease of the spine and large joints, two trials [1,2] reported less pain on pressure of painful paraspinal muscle points after a series of radon baths at a concentration of 0.8 kBq/L and 3 kBq/L, respectively. The alleviation of pain was most pronounced in the weeks following the treatment period. [3]. At six months follow-up serial immersion in combined radon and CO{sub 2} baths reduced pain and functional restrictions in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (n=60) more effectively than bathing in CO{sub 2} only. [4] In 130 patients with ankylosing spondylitis a complex rehabilitation program at a health resort (group 1 and 2) showed greater and longer-lasting differences to a control group staying at home (group 3), if speleotherapeutic radon exposure (group 1) was added (as compared to an added sauna treatment, group 2). Conclusion: The four trials meeting the inclusion criteria showed beneficial effects of radon therapy compared to interventions without radon exposure. Up to nine months after the treatment period significantly better results were observed, if radon therapy is added. (orig.)

  14. [Ocular manifestations of rheumatic diseases. Cooperation between internist/ophthalmologist].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyndall, A; Steiger, U

    1993-05-01

    A red or painful eye may be the clue to a systemic condition, many of which are of a rheumatological or immunological nature. Conjunctivitis may occur in Sjögren's Syndrome, Reiter's Syndrome (and other sero negative spondyloarthropathies) and with infections such as chlamydia and viruses. 70% of cases of episcleritis are idiopathic, the other 30% being associated with rheumatoid arthritis or other connective tissue diseases or herpes zoster infection. Scleritis may be seen with connective tissue diseases or auto immune conditions (rheumatoid arthritis, Wegener granulomatosis, polyarteritis nodosa, relapsing polychondritis, SLE), infections (herpes, tuberculosis, syphilis, aspergillosis) or metabolic (gout, porphyria, cystinosis). Retinal vasculitis is seen in SLE, Behçet's Disease, sarcoidosis, polyarteritis nodosa, Whipple's disease and Crohn's disease among others. However, uveitis presents perhaps the greatest diagnostic challenge and interface between ophthalmology and rheumatology. Some syndromes are purely ophthalmological (eg: Fuch's heterochromic cyclitis) but others may lead to the diagnosis of a rheumatic disorder (eg: recurrent unilateral acute anterior uveitis and ankylosing spondylitis). Systemic syndromes most likely to be associated with uveitis are Reiter's disease, ankylosing spondylitis, sarcoidosis, juvenile arthritis, interstitial nephritis, inflammatory bowel disease, syphilis. The patterns are different, eg: acute painful unilateral anterior uveitis with ankylosing spondylitis and chronic asymptomatic bilateral uveitis in juvenile arthritis (ANA positive, pauci-articular) or bilateral symptomatic uveitis in sarcoidosis. An illustrative case will be presented and an algorithm for the evaluation of uveitis discussed.

  15. Traditional medicine and food supplements in rheumatic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, S K; Yeap, S S; Goh, E M L; Veerapen, K; Lim, K K T

    2002-09-01

    This was a prospective survey using a standard questionnaire to determine the prevalence of use of oral traditional medicine and food supplements among patients with rheumatic diseases. Among the 141 patients surveyed, we found that 69% of the patients were consuming food supplements, 35% were using traditional medicine and 45% had used traditional medicine at some time or other. Females were more likely to use food supplements (P traditional medicines. The Chinese were more likely than others to be using traditional medicine (p traditional medicine from non-medical personnel. More than half of them used 2 or more types of traditional medicine for more than two months. Spending on traditional medicine was noted to be modest with 73% spending less than one hundred ringgit a month for their traditional treatment. Doctors need to be aware of the possible interactions between these 'self-medications' and the conventionally prescribed medication.

  16. Postpartum Acute Pulmonary Oedema with Sub clinical Rheumatic Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    R, Padmaja; Gande, Sri Krishna Padma Challa Rao

    2015-02-01

    Acute dyspnea with pulmonary oedema in postpartum is uncommon but life-threatening event. Contributing factors for pulmonary oedema include, administration of tocolytics, underlying cardiac disease, iatrogenic fluid overload and preeclampsia acounting 0.08% of pregnancies. Pulmonary embolism, amniotic fluid embolism, pneumonia, aspiration and pulmonary oedema are some of the potentially devastating conditions that should be considered by the attending physician. Here, we report a case of postpartum acute pulmonary oedema referred to causality after an emergency caesarean section in a private hospital. No matter what the underlying pathology, prompt administration and appropriate resuscitation is always the first priority. Only after the patient has been stabilized attention must be turned to diagnosis and specific treatment. A diagnosis of severe Mitral Stenosis, probably of rheumatic origin was made after stabilizing the patient.

  17. Stem cell therapy in autoimmune rheumatic diseases: a comprehensive review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bin; Shu, ShangAn; Kenny, Thomas P; Chang, Christopher; Leung, Patrick S C

    2014-10-01

    The clinical management of autoimmune rheumatic diseases (ARD) has undergone significant changes in the last few decades, leading to remarkable improvements in clinical outcomes of many patients with mild to moderate ARD. On the other hand, severe refractory ARD patients often have high morbidity and mortality. Extensive basic research and clinical evidence has opened the door to new encouraging perspectives, such as the establishment of a role of stem cell transplantation (SCT) in the strategic management of ARD. Given the great heterogeneity of ARD, it is difficult to assign an optimal SCT regimen to all ARD patients. SCT remains a challenging mode of therapy in ARD patients from the standpoints of both efficacy and safety. As the clinical data of SCT in ARD increases and as we improve our understanding of stem cell biology and the downstream effects on the immune system, the future is promising for the development of optimal personalized SCT regimens in ARD.

  18. Rheumatic diseases induced by drugs and environmental factors: the state-of-the-art - part one.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niklas, Karolina; Niklas, Arkadiusz A; Majewski, Dominik; Puszczewicz, Mariusz

    2016-01-01

    The majority of rheumatic diseases belong to the group of autoimmune diseases and are associated with autoantibody production. Their etiology is not fully understood. Certain medications and environmental factors may have an influence on the occurrence of rheumatic diseases. Establishing a cause-effect relationship between a certain factor and disease induction is not always simple. It is important to administer the drug continuously or monitor exposure to a given factor in the period preceding the onset of symptoms. The lack of previously diagnosed autoimmune disease, or finally the lack of symptoms within a few weeks/months after discontinuation of the drug/cessation of exposure, is also important. The most frequently mentioned rheumatic diseases caused by drugs and environmental factors include systemic lupus erythematosus, scleroderma, systemic vasculitis, polymyositis, dermatomyositis, and Sjögren's syndrome. The objective of this study is to summarize current knowledge on rheumatic diseases induced by drugs and environmental factors.

  19. Rheumatic diseases induced by drugs and environmental factors: the state-of-the-art - part two.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niklas, Karolina; Niklas, Arkadiusz A; Majewski, Dominik; Puszczewicz, Mariusz J

    2016-01-01

    The majority of rheumatic diseases belong to the group of autoimmune diseases and are associated with autoantibody production. Their etiology is not fully understood. Certain medications and environmental factors may have an influence on the occurrence of rheumatic diseases. Establishing a cause-effect relationship between a certain factor and disease induction is not always simple. It is important to administer the drug continuously or monitor exposure to a given factor in the period preceding the onset of symptoms. The lack of early diagnosed autoimmune disease, or finally the lack of symptoms within a few weeks/months after discontinuation of the drug/cessation of exposure, is also important. The most frequently mentioned rheumatic diseases caused by drugs and environmental factors include systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), scleroderma, systemic vasculitis, polymyositis, dermatomyositis, and Sjögren's syndrome. The objective of this study is to summarize current knowledge on rheumatic diseases induced by drugs and environmental factors.

  20. Impact of smoking and obesity on rheumatic disease in persons of productive age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lusianawaty Tana

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Arthritis is a disease of the joints that causes pain and musculoskeletal stiffness, and may cause limitation of joint movement. Age, obesity, smoking behavior, and occupation are risk factors for rheumatic diseases. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the role of body mass index (BMI, smoking behavior, and occupation on rheumatic disease among persons of productive age in Indonesia. A cross-sectional study was conducted using National Basic Health Research data. The inclusion criterion was age 15-64 years. Rheumatic disease diagnosis was based on interview results and was defined as the presence of a history of rheumatic disease diagnosed by health professionals and/or rheumatic symptoms in the past 12 months. The study sample consisted of 609.097 persons who fulfilled the inclusion criterion. Compared to persons with normal BMI, rheumatic disease was more prevalent in the overweight (OR 1.25; 95%CI 1.21—1.29 and the obese (OR 1.52; 95%CI 1.47—1.56, but less prevalent in the underweight (OR 0.91; 95%CI 0.88—0.93. Compared to non-smokers, rheumatic disease was more prevalent in every day smokers (OR 1.65; 95%CI 1.60—1.70, occasional smokers (OR 1.41; 95%CI 1.35—1.47, and ex-smokers (OR 1.85; 95%CI 1.76—1.95. Measures for prevention of rheumatic disease are needed, e.g. through education to increase knowledge about the impact of smoking and obesity on rheumatic disease.

  1. Factors affecting school performance in children with rheumatic heart disease

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    Arief Hermanu S.

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the association between school performance and age, sex, duration of illness, educational achievement prior to illness, socioeconomic status of family, parent’s educational level, number of children in the family and severity of the disease of patients with rheumatic heart disease (RHD. Subjects were patients with RHD treated at the Division of Cardiology, Department of Child Health, Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital Jakarta. The parameters of school performance were educational achievement, absent of school and dropout. All data were processed by using Epi-Info program to find out bivariate analysis and Statistic Program for Social Sciences (SPSS for multivariate analysis. We obtained 80 patients with RHD; most of them were of mild severity (64 of 80% and the remainder 16 (20% with severe disease. There were 44 (55% males and 36 (45% females. Most parents (42 or 53% had junior high school educational level, most of them, 23 (29% had elementary school education, and 3 (4% illiterate. Bivariate and multivariate analyses showed that severity of disease and parental educational level were associated withschool performance of patients with RHD, but age, sex, duration of disease, premorbid educational achievement, socio-economic level of the family and number of children in family were not.

  2. A cost-effective strategy for primary prevention of acute rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease in children with pharyngitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irlam, James H; Mayosi, Bongani M; Engel, Mark E; Gaziano, Thomas A

    2013-09-03

    Primary prevention of acute rheumatic fever (ARF) and rheumatic heart disease (RHD) in children depends on prompt and effective diagnosis and treatment of pharyngitis at the primary level of care. Cost-effectiveness modeling shows that the most cost-effective strategy for primary prevention in South Africa (SA) is to use a simple symptomatic clinical decision rule (CDR) to diagnose pharyngitis in children presenting at the primary level of care and then to treat them with a single dose of intramuscular penicillin. Treat All and CDR2+ strategies are affordable and simple and miss few cases of streptococcal pharyngitis at the primary level of care. The CDR2+ strategy is the most cost-effective for primary prevention of ARF and RHD in urban SA and should complement primordial and secondary prevention efforts.

  3. Experiences of health-promoting self-care in people living with rheumatic diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Arvidsson, Susann Helen; Bergman, Stefan; Arvidsson, Barbro S; Fridlund, Bengt; Bengtsson-Tops, Anita

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Aim This paper is a report of a study which explores and describes the meaning of the phenomenon health-promoting self-care as experienced by people living with rheumatic diseases. Background People with rheumatic diseases estimate health status as low and health belief and health status influence the self-care behaviours. Several self-care behaviours are used in the efforts to mitigate the diseases. Method The study had a descriptive phenomenological ...

  4. Prevalence of Rheumatic Heart Disease in a Public School of Belo Horizonte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miranda, Lavinia Pimentel, E-mail: lavinia.pimentel@globo.com; Camargos, Paulo Augusto Moreira; Torres, Rosália Morais; Meira, Zilda Maria Alves [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2014-08-15

    Previous studies indicate that compared with physical examination, Doppler echocardiography identifies a larger number of cases of rheumatic heart disease in apparently healthy individuals. To determine the prevalence of rheumatic heart disease among students in a public school of Belo Horizonte by clinical evaluation and Doppler echocardiography. This was a cross-sectional study conducted with 267 randomly selected school students aged between 6 and 16 years. students underwent anamnesis and physical examination with the purpose of establishing criteria for the diagnosis of rheumatic fever. They were all subjected to Doppler echocardiography using a portable machine. Those who exhibited nonphysiological mitral regurgitation (MR) and/or aortic regurgitation (AR) were referred to the Doppler echocardiography laboratory of the Hospital das Clínicas of the Universidade Federal of Minas Gerais (HC-UFMG) to undergo a second Doppler echocardiography examination. According to the findings, the cases of rheumatic heart disease were classified as definitive, probable, or possible. Of the 267 students, 1 (0.37%) had a clinical history compatible with the diagnosis of acute rheumatic fever (ARF) and portable Doppler echocardiography indicated nonphysiological MR and/or AR in 25 (9.4%). Of these, 16 (6%) underwent Doppler echocardiography at HC-UFMG. The results showed definitive rheumatic heart disease in 1 student, probable rheumatic heart disease in 3 students, and possible rheumatic heart disease in 1 student. In the population under study, the prevalence of cases compatible with rheumatic involvement was 5 times higher on Doppler echocardiography (18.7/1000; 95% CI 6.9/1000-41.0/1000) than on clinical evaluation (3.7/1000-95% CI)

  5. Prevalence of Rheumatic Heart Disease in a Public School of Belo Horizonte

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lavinia Pimentel Miranda

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Previous studies indicate that compared with physical examination, Doppler echocardiography identifies a larger number of cases of rheumatic heart disease in apparently healthy individuals. Objectives: To determine the prevalence of rheumatic heart disease among students in a public school of Belo Horizonte by clinical evaluation and Doppler echocardiography. Methods: This was a cross-sectional study conducted with 267 randomly selected school students aged between 6 and 16 years. students underwent anamnesis and physical examination with the purpose of establishing criteria for the diagnosis of rheumatic fever. They were all subjected to Doppler echocardiography using a portable machine. Those who exhibited nonphysiological mitral regurgitation (MR and/or aortic regurgitation (AR were referred to the Doppler echocardiography laboratory of the Hospital das Clínicas of the Universidade Federal of Minas Gerais (HC-UFMG to undergo a second Doppler echocardiography examination. According to the findings, the cases of rheumatic heart disease were classified as definitive, probable, or possible. Results: Of the 267 students, 1 (0.37% had a clinical history compatible with the diagnosis of acute rheumatic fever (ARF and portable Doppler echocardiography indicated nonphysiological MR and/or AR in 25 (9.4%. Of these, 16 (6% underwent Doppler echocardiography at HC-UFMG. The results showed definitive rheumatic heart disease in 1 student, probable rheumatic heart disease in 3 students, and possible rheumatic heart disease in 1 student. Conclusion: In the population under study, the prevalence of cases compatible with rheumatic involvement was 5 times higher on Doppler echocardiography (18.7/1000; 95% CI 6.9/1000-41.0/1000 than on clinical evaluation (3.7/1000-95% CI.

  6. [Rheumatic diseases need more attention in case of the desire to have children and during pregnancy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Man, Yaël A; Dolhain, Radboud J E M; Steegers, Eric A P; Hazes, Johanna M W

    2011-01-01

    Treatment of rheumatic diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus and Bechterew's disease is still improving and the number of fertile patients with a wish to conceive will probably increase. New knowledge regarding the course of rheumatic diseases during pregnancy and post partum herald a change in the support of women with rheumatic diseases who desire to have children. Justified use of antirheumatic drugs before, during and after pregnancy is a key issue for a successful pregnancy. The newer agents such as tumour necrosis factor (TNF) alpha blocking agents can also be of use. Specific preconception care should be offered to women with rheumatic diseases to optimize and increase chances of a successful pregnancy.

  7. Rheumatic fever reappraised

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ulrik Baandrup

    2005-01-01

    @@ Rheumatic fever is a complication following an episode of group A streptococcal pharyngitis. It is an acute immunologically mediated, multisystem inflammatory disorder. Acute rheumatic heart disease during the active phase of rheumatic fever sometimes progresses to chronic rheumatic heart disease. Despite its declining importance in industrialised countries rheumatic fever remains the leading cause of death from heart disease in children and young adults in less developed regions. Fifteen to twenty million new cases emerge every year in developing countries.1

  8. Mixing omics: combining genetics and metabolomics to study rheumatic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menni, Cristina; Zierer, Jonas; Valdes, Ana M; Spector, Tim D

    2017-03-01

    Metabolomics is an exciting field in systems biology that provides a direct readout of the biochemical activities taking place within an individual at a particular point in time. Metabolite levels are influenced by many factors, including disease status, environment, medications, diet and, importantly, genetics. Thanks to their dynamic nature, metabolites are useful for diagnosis and prognosis, as well as for predicting and monitoring the efficacy of treatments. At the same time, the strong links between an individual's metabolic and genetic profiles enable the investigation of pathways that underlie changes in metabolite levels. Thus, for the field of metabolomics to yield its full potential, researchers need to take into account the genetic factors underlying the production of metabolites, and the potential role of these metabolites in disease processes. In this Review, the methodological aspects related to metabolomic profiling and any potential links between metabolomics and the genetics of some of the most common rheumatic diseases are described. Links between metabolomics, genetics and emerging fields such as the gut microbiome and proteomics are also discussed.

  9. Changes in the Prevalence of Rheumatic Diseases in Shantou, China, in the Past Three Decades: A COPCORD Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shao-Ying Zeng

    Full Text Available This study aimed to clarify changes in the prevalence of rheumatic diseases in Shantou, China, in the past 3 decades and validate whether stair-climbing is a risk factor for knee pain and knee osteoarthritis (KOA. The World Health Organization-International League Against Rheumatism Community Oriented Program for Control of Rheumatic Diseases (COPCORD protocol was implemented. In all, 2337 adults living in buildings without elevators and 1719 adults living in buildings with elevators were surveyed. The prevalence of rheumatic pain at any site and in the knee was 15.7% and 10.2%, respectively; both types of pain had a significantly higher incidence in residents of buildings without elevators than was reported by people who lived in buildings with elevators (14.9% vs. 10.6% and 11.32% vs. 8.82%, respectively (both P 85 years, 7.64% vs. 6.26%, P = 0.162. The prevalence of RA and AS remained stable, whereas that of KOA, gout, and fibromyalgia has increased significantly in Shantou, China, during the past 3 decades. Stair-climbing might be an important risk factor for knee pain and KOA.

  10. Ethnic differences in cardiovascular risk in rheumatic disease: focus on Asians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yiu, Kai-Hang; Tse, Hung-Fat; Mok, Mo-Yin; Lau, Chak-Sing

    2011-09-13

    Rheumatic diseases are associated with high cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Considerable differences exist in the frequency of cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors and events among people of different ethnic origins, but little is known of the ethnic variations in the relative distribution of CVD risk factors and the degree of atherosclerosis in patients with rheumatic diseases. Understanding this variation will provide insight into the underlying pathogenesis of CVD in patients with rheumatic diseases, and aid in future studies of the detection and management of this complication. In general, although Asian patients seem to have fewer background CVD risk factors and are less affected by metabolic syndrome (MetS) than their non-Asian counterparts, those with rheumatic disease are equally as susceptible to CVD. Furthermore, it seems that systemic inflammation and mechanisms that do not involve conventional CVD risk factors and MetS have an important role in the development of atherosclerosis in patients with rheumatic diseases. Here we examine the frequency of conventional CVD risk factors and the prevalence of MetS in both Asian and non-Asian patients with selected rheumatic diseases. We also discuss the burden of CVD, as evaluated using various surrogate markers in these patients, and their overall CVD mortality rate.

  11. Cryotherapy in inflammatory rheumatic diseases: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillot, Xavier; Tordi, Nicolas; Mourot, Laurent; Demougeot, Céline; Dugué, Benoît; Prati, Clément; Wendling, Daniel

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this article was to review current evidence about cryotherapy in inflammatory rheumatic diseases (therapeutic and biological effects). For therapeutic effects, we performed a systematic review (PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, LILACS databases, unpublished data) and selected studies including non-operated and non-infected arthritic patients treated with local cryotherapy or whole-body cryotherapy. By pooling 6 studies including 257 rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients, we showed a significant decrease in pain visual analogic scale (mm) and 28-joint disease activity score after chronic cryotherapy in RA patients. For molecular pathways, local cryotherapy induces an intrajoint temperature decrease, which might downregulate several mediators involved in joint inflammation and destruction (cytokines, cartilage-degrading enzymes, proangiogenic factors), but studies in RA are rare. Cryotherapy should be included in RA therapeutic strategies as an adjunct therapy, with potential corticosteroid and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug dose-sparing effects. However, techniques and protocols should be more precisely defined in randomized controlled trials with stronger methodology.

  12. EULAR recommendations for vaccination in paediatric patients with rheumatic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heijstek, M W; Ott de Bruin, L M; Bijl, M; Borrow, R; van der Klis, F; Koné-Paut, I; Fasth, A; Minden, K; Ravelli, A; Abinun, M; Pileggi, G S; Borte, M; Wulffraat, N M

    2011-10-01

    Evidence-based recommendations for vaccination of paediatric patients with rheumatic diseases (PaedRD) were developed by following the EULAR standardised procedures for guideline development. The EULAR task force consisted of (paediatric) rheumatologists/immunologists, one expert in vaccine evaluation, one expert in public health and infectious disease control, and one epidemiologist. A systematic literature review was conducted in MEDLINE, EMBASE, and abstracts of the EULAR and American College of Rheumatology meetings of 2008/9. The level of evidence and strength of recommendation were based on customary scoring systems. Delphi voting was applied to assess the level of agreement between task force members. 107 papers and eight abstracts were used. The majority of papers considered seasonal influenza (41) or pneumococcal (23) vaccination. 26 studies were performed specifically in paediatric patients, and the majority in adult rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus patients. Fifteen recommendations were developed with an overall agreement of 91.7%. More research is needed on the safety and immunogenicity of (live-attenuated) vaccination in PaedRD, particularly in those using biologicals, and the effect of vaccination on prevention of infections.

  13. Cyclophosphamide administration routine in autoimmune rheumatic diseases: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teles, Kaian Amorim; Medeiros-Souza, Patrícia; Lima, Francisco Aires Correa; Araújo, Bruno Gedeon de; Lima, Rodrigo Aires Correa

    2016-09-17

    Cyclophosphamide (CPM) is an alkylating agent widely used for the treatment of malignant neoplasia and which can be used in the treatment of multiple rheumatic diseases. Medication administration errors may lead to its reduced efficacy or increased drug toxicity. Many errors occur in the administration of injectable drugs. The present study aimed at structuring a routine for cyclophosphamide use, as well as creating a document with pharmacotherapeutic guidelines for the patient. The routine is schematized in three phases: pre-chemotherapy (pre-ChT), administration of cyclophosphamide, and post-chemotherapy (post-ChT), taking into account the drugs to be administered before and after cyclophosphamide in order to prevent adverse effects, including nausea and hemorrhagic cystitis. Adverse reactions can alter laboratory tests; thus, this routine included clinical management for changes in white blood cells, platelets, neutrophils, and sodium, including cyclophosphamide dose adjustment in the case of kidney disease. Cyclophosphamide is responsible for other rare-but serious-side effects, for instance, hepatotoxicity, severe hyponatremia and heart failure. Other adverse reactions include hair loss, amenorrhea and menopause. In this routine, we also entered guidelines to post-chemotherapy patients. The compatibility of injectable drugs with the vehicle used has been described, as well as stability and infusion times. The routine aimed at the rational use of cyclophosphamide, with prevention of adverse events and relapse episodes, factors that may burden the health care system.

  14. [Diabetes and rheumatism: is diabetes mellitus also an inflammatory disease?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graf, S; Schumm-Draeger, P-M

    2011-11-01

    New studies have demonstrated similarities in the complex pathomechanisms of diabetes mellitus type 1 (T₁D) and rheumatic diseases and in particular rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Common HLA gene complex characteristics and polymorphisms of inflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin-1 (IL-1), interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) play a special role in both disorders. The metabolic syndrome, associated with insulin resistance and diabetes mellitus type 2 (T₂D), often shows criteria of a subclinical chronic inflammation. New forms of therapy with monoclonal antibodies against TNF-α, IL-1 and IL-6 have improved the management of patients with RA. Cytokine-induced inflammation also seems to be important in the pathogenesis and progression of T₁D and T₂D. Whether a therapy with the same monoclonal antibodies established in RA could also be successful in diabetes still has to be investigated in further studies. Both RA and T₁D are autoimmune disorders and show a cumulative incidence with further autoimmune diseases.

  15. The microbiota in pediatric rheumatic disease: epiphenomenon or therapeutic target?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoll, Matthew L; Cron, Randy Q

    2016-09-01

    There has been increasing interest in the contents and function of the microbiota, as it relates to pediatric inflammatory diseases. Here, we discuss the factors underlying the development of the microbiota, its role in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) and prospects for therapeutic interventions in the microbiota. The human microbiota undergoes a succession of changes, until it reaches a mature form. A variety of early-life exposures, including mode of delivery and form of feeding, can affect the contents of the microbiota and possibly impact upon long-term risk of developing autoimmune diseases. The microbiota is altered in children with JIA, including elevated Bacteroides genus in JIA as a whole and decreased Faecalibacterium prausnitzii in pediatric spondyloarthritis. Although there are limited data so far indicating that microbiota-based therapies can result in therapeutic improvement of arthritis, most of the data are on adults and thus may not be applicable to children. Perturbations of the microbiota during childhood may result in the development of a microbiota associated with increased risk of pediatric rheumatic illness. Whether the microbiota can be targeted is a focus of ongoing research.

  16. Vitamin D endocrine system involvement in autoimmune rheumatic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutolo, Maurizio; Pizzorni, Carmen; Sulli, Alberto

    2011-12-01

    Vitamin D is synthesized from cholesterol in the skin (80-90%) under the sunlight and then metabolized into an active D hormone in liver, kidney and peripheral immune/inflammatory cells. These endocrine-immune effects include also the coordinated activities of the vitamin D-activating enzyme, 1alpha-hydroxylase (CYP27B1), and the vitamin D receptor (VDR) on cells of the immune system in mediating intracrine and paracrine actions. Vitamin D is implicated in prevention and protection from chronic infections (i.e. tubercolosis), cancer (i.e. breast cancer) and autoimmune rheumatic diseases since regulates both innate and adaptive immunity potentiating the innate response (monocytes/macrophages with antimicrobial activity and antigen presentation), but suppressing the adaptive immunity (T and B lymphocyte functions). Vitamin D has modulatory effects on B lymphocytes and Ig production and recent reports have demonstrated that 1,25(OH)2D3 does indeed exert direct effects on B cell homeostasis. A circannual rhythm of trough vitamin D levels in winter and peaks in summer time showed negative correlation with clinical status at least in rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus. Recently, the onset of symptoms of early arthritis during winter or spring have been associated with greater radiographic evidence of disease progression at 12 months possibly are also related to seasonal lower vitamin D serum levels.

  17. Hemodynamic performance and tolerance to physical activity in women with rheumatic heart diseases

    OpenAIRE

    ZAKIROVA FERUZA AKILDJANOVNA; BEKBULATOVA INDIRA RENATOVNA; ELISEYEVA MARIETTA RAFAELEVNA

    2016-01-01

    We have studied the parameters of central hemodynamics in relation to the physical activity tolerance in women with rheumatic heart disease. The increase of the depth and severity of the valve apparatus lesions is associated with an increase of functional class of heart failure. In pregnant women with rheumatic heart diseases, the heart failure signs develop on the background of minimal changes of linear and volumetric parameters of the myocardium, which does not exceed the normal limits.

  18. Power Doppler ultrasonographic assessment of the ankle in patients with inflammatory rheumatic diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Suzuki, Takeshi

    2014-01-01

    Ankle involvement is frequent in patients with inflammatory rheumatic diseases, but accurate evaluation by physical examination is often difficult because of the complex anatomical structures of the ankle. Over the last decade, ultrasound (US) has become a practical imaging tool for the assessment of articular and periarticular pathologies, including joint synovitis, tenosynovitis, and enthesitis in rheumatic diseases. Progress in power Doppler (PD) technology has enabled evaluation of the st...

  19. Vitamin D in autoimmune rheumatic diseases: A view inside gender differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasile, Massimiliano; Corinaldesi, Clarissa; Antinozzi, Cristina; Crescioli, Clara

    2017-03-01

    A large body of evidence highlights the role for vitamin D deficiency/insufficiency in rheumatic diseases, a group of different pathologies mostly of autoimmune origin. Vitamin D and vitamin D receptor agonists exquisitely modulate the immune system against over-reactivity towards tolerance; on this basis, vitamin D could be a good therapeutic candidate to control autoimmune processes in rheumatic diseases. Similarly, to other autoimmune pathologies, rheumatic diseases show a significant female bias. This sexual dimorphism seems, in part, to rely on the different sex hormone-induced regulation on male and female immune systems. Females, in fact, retain greater immune reactivity and competence likely due to estrogens, which, at variance with androgens, are associated with a greater resilience to infections but also to a higher risk for autoimmunity. In this scenario, there is growing interest on vitamin D supplementation for prevention or therapy in rheumatic diseases in relation to gender and sexual hormones. The purpose of the review is to overview vitamin D status in rheumatic diseases, related to gender and sex hormones. In particular, the main vitamin D immunoregulatory properties are summarized with some sex hormone-driven immune activities, in females and males immune systems. Topics onto vitamin D receptor agonists as potential therapeutic agents in rheumatic disease are addressed, especially in view of the role of vitamin D inadequacy in the pathogenesis of rheumatic diseases. So far, further clinical and basic studies should be encouraged to confirm the high potential power of vitamin D receptor agonists as novel pharmacological tools in rheumatic diseases particularly in light of personalized gender-related therapeutic strategies.

  20. Alendronate prevents glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis in patients with rheumatic diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Kan, Shun-Li; Yuan, Zhi-Fang; Li, Yan; Ai, Jie; Xu, Hong; Sun, Jing-Cheng; Feng, Shi-Qing

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis (GIOP) is a serious problem for patients with rheumatic diseases requiring long-term glucocorticoid treatment. Alendronate, a bisphosphonate, has been recommended in the prevention of GIOP. However, the efficacy and safety of alendronate in preventing GIOP remains controversial. We performed a meta-analysis to investigate the efficacy and safety of alendronate in preventing GIOP in patients with rheumatic diseases. We retrieved randomized controlle...

  1. Doppler US in rheumatic diseases with special emphasis on rheumatoid arthritis and spondyloarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toprak, Hüseyin; Kılıç, Erkan; Serter, Aslı; Kocakoç, Ercan; Özgöçmen, Salih

    2014-01-01

    Developments in digital ultrasonography (US) technology and the use of high-frequency broadband transducers have increased the quality of US imaging, particularly of superficial tissues. Thus, US, particularly color US or power Doppler US, in which high-resolution transducers are used, has become an important imaging modality in the assessment of rheumatic diseases. Furthermore, therapeutic interventions and biopsies can be performed under US guidance during the assessment of lesions. In this era of effective treatments, such as biologics, improvements in synovial inflammation in rheumatoid arthritis as well as changes in enthesitis in spondyloarthropathies, including ankylosing spondylitis and psoriatic arthritis, can be monitored effectively using gray-scale and/or power Doppler US. US is also a good imaging modality for crystal arthropathies, including gout and pseudogout, in which synovitis, erosions, tophi, and crystal deposition within or around the joint can be visualized readily. Vascular and tenosynovial structures, as well as the salivary glands, can be assessed with US in vasculitis and connective tissue disorders, including systemic lupus erythematosus and Sjögren's syndrome. Current research is focused on improving the sensitivity, specificity, validity, and reproducibility of US findings. In this review, we summarized the role of US, particularly power Doppler US, in rheumatic diseases and inflammation in superficial tissues.

  2. Parvovirus B19 infections serological diagnostics in rheumatic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L P Ananjeva

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To study contamination with parvovirus B19 of a group of patients with rheumatic diseases (RD. Methods. 77 pts with RD (mean age 42,5 years, 79% female admitted to Institute of Rheumatology of RAMS were examined. 34 of them had rheumatoid arthritis (RA, 11 - systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE and Sjogren's disease (SD, 15 with osteoarthritis (OA and seronegative spondyloarthritides (SS and 17 with early (before a year undifferentiated arthritis (EUA. Quantitative determination of IgM and IgG serum antibodies to parvovirus BI9 was performed by I FA with IBL kits (Hamburg, Germany. Results. Anti-B19 IgG antibodies were found in 52% of pts, IgM antibodies - only in one case. Mean antibodies values in pts with RD of disease duration less then 6 months were significantly higher then in pts with longer disease duration (21,5+36 U/ml and 8,4+14.7 U/ml respectively, p<0,05. Anti-B 19 antibodies were present in 62% of pts with RA, 53% of pts with EUA, 45% of pts with SD, 33% of pts with OA and SS. High levels of antibodies (4-10 times higher positivity threshold were revealed in 13 pts with different RD with short duration of joint syndrome (6,3±7,6 months and fever at presentation. A case of B19 parvovirus infection in a boy of 3 years age accompanied by symptoms of Still's disease is described.

  3. Power Doppler ultrasonographic assessment of the ankle in patients with inflammatory rheumatic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Takeshi

    2014-11-18

    Ankle involvement is frequent in patients with inflammatory rheumatic diseases, but accurate evaluation by physical examination is often difficult because of the complex anatomical structures of the ankle. Over the last decade, ultrasound (US) has become a practical imaging tool for the assessment of articular and periarticular pathologies, including joint synovitis, tenosynovitis, and enthesitis in rheumatic diseases. Progress in power Doppler (PD) technology has enabled evaluation of the strength of ongoing inflammation. PDUS is very useful for identifying the location and kind of pathologies in rheumatic ankles as well as for distinguishing between inflammatory processes and degenerative changes or between active inflammation and residual damage. The aim of this paper is to illustrate the US assessment of ankle lesions in patients with inflammatory rheumatic diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, spondyloarthritis, and systemic lupus erythematosus, focusing on the utility of PDUS.

  4. Metabolic abnormalities in patients with inflammatory rheumatic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dessein, Patrick H; Solomon, Ahmed; Hollan, Ivana

    2016-10-01

    Patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) experience an increased cardiometabolic risk factor burden that is substantially driven by systemic inflammation. This occurs less consistently in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS). Psoriatic arthritis most strongly associates with excess adiposity and metabolic risk. RA patients also often have systemic inflammation-induced proinflammatory high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol particles and lean/muscle mass loss in association with increased adiposity, a condition termed rheumatoid cachexia, which further enhances cardiovascular risk. The presence of proinflammatory HDL and lean mass loss was also reported in patients with AS. Individualized aerobic and resistance exercise programs can improve body composition and metabolic risk factor profiles in RA and AS. Future studies should assess how long-term lifestyle changes can be effectuated and if these can influence cardiovascular events in inflammatory rheumatic diseases. Herein, we review the current evidence on metabolic abnormalities in inflammatory arthritis. We propose management strategies and a research agenda. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Infections and treatment of patients with rheumatic diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Atzeni, F; Bendtzen, K; Bobbio-Pallavicini, F;

    2008-01-01

    Glucocorticoids (GCs) have many complex quantitative and qualitative immunosuppressive effects which induce cellular immunodeficiency and increase host susceptibility to various viral, bacterial, fungal and parasitic infections. As cortisol secretion is inadequate in chronic immune/inflammatory c...... lupus erythematosus (SLE) or RA. These vaccinations are generally immunogenic (i.e., capable of inducing a protective level of specific antibodies) but may not induce an adequate response in a substantial proportion of patients......., and for the shortest possible time should therefore greatly reduce the risk of infections. Infection is a major co-morbidity in rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and conventional disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs) can increase the risk of their occurrence, including tuberculosis. TNF-alpha plays a key role...... in the pathogenesis of RA, and the data concerning infections in RA patients treated with anti-TNF agents are controversial. Patients and physicians should vigilantly monitor for signs of infection when using anti-TNF agents. Recombinant gene technologies now make it possible to produce protein drugs that are almost...

  6. Prediction of iron deficiency in chronic inflammatory rheumatic disease anaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann Kurer, S; Seifert, B; Michel, B; Ruegg, R; Fehr, J

    1995-12-01

    We prospectively studied 45 anaemic patients (37 women, 8 men) with chronic inflammatory rheumatic diseases. The combination of serum ferritin and CRP (as well as ESR) in its predictive capacity for bone marrow iron stores was examined. The relationship between other iron-related measurements (transferrin, transferrin saturation, soluble transferrin receptor, erythrocyte porphyrins and percentage of hypochromic/microcytic erythrocytes) and bone marrow iron stores was also investigated. Stainable bone marrow iron was taken as the most suitable standard to separate iron-deficient from iron-replete patients. 14 patients (31%) were lacking bone marrow iron. Regression analysis showed a good correlation between ferritin and bone marrow iron (adjusted R2 = 0.721, P power for bone marrow iron (adjusted R2 = 0.715) in this cohort of patients with low systemic inflammatory activity. With respect to the bone marrow iron content the best predictive cut-off value of ferritin was 30 micrograms/l (86% sensitivity, 90% specificity). The other iron-related parameters both individually and when combined were less powerful in predicting bone marrow iron than ferritin alone. Only zinc bound erythrocyte protoporphyrin in combination with ferritin slightly improved prediction (adjusted R2 = 0.731). A cut-off point of 11% hypochromic erythrocytes reached a high specificity (90%), but was less sensitive (77%).

  7. Association between Autoimmune Rheumatic Diseases and the Risk of Dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kang Lu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. Autoimmune rheumatic diseases (ARD are characterized by systemic inflammation and may affect multiple organs and cause vascular events such as ischemic stroke and acute myocardial infarction. However, the association between ARD and increased risk of dementia is uncertain. This is a retrospective cohort study to investigate and compare the risk of dementia between patients clinically diagnosed with ARD and non-ARD patients during a 5-year follow-up period. Methods. Data were obtained from the Longitudinal Health Insurance Database 2000 (LHID2000. We included 1221 patients receiving ambulatory or hospitalization care and 6105 non-ARD patients; patients were matched by sex, age, and the year of index use of health care. Each patient was studied for 5 years to identify the subsequent manifestation of dementia. The data obtained were analyzed by Cox proportional hazard regression. Results. During the 5-year follow-up period, 30 ARD (2.48% and 141 non-ARD patients (2.31% developed dementia. During the 5-year follow-up period, there were no significant differences in the risks of any type of dementia (adjusted hazard ratio (HR, 1.18; 95% CI, 0.79–1.76 in the ARD group after adjusting for demographics and comorbidities. Conclusions. Within the 5-year period, patients with and without ARD were found to have similar risks of developing dementia.

  8. CLINICAL PROFILE OF RHEUMATIC FEVER AND RHEUMATIC HEART DISEASE IN CHILDREN UNDER 15 YEARS AGE GROUP AND ITS CORRELATION WITH ECHOCARDIOGRAPHY

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    Ramu

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Context ( Back ground Acute Rheumatic fever and Rheumatic heart disease are the most common acquired childhood heart disease in India. It is well established that 2 D Echo cardiography is more sensitive in picking up minor degrees of valvular regurgitation than clinical examination . AIMS & OBJECTIVES: To study the clinical profile of “Rheumatic Fever and Rheumatic heart disease“ & correlate it with Echocardiographic fin dings in Children under 15 years age group presenting to a tertiary care hospital. MATERIALS AND METHODS OF STUDY: Thirty six cases of Acute Rheumatic fever, which includes eight cases of first attack and twenty eight cases of reactivation of Rheumatic fev er were studied over a period of two years in paediatric medical wards, King George Hospital, Visakhapatnam. The revised (1992 modified Jones criteria with the 1988 WHO modification was taken as a criterion to diagnose Acute Rheumatic fever . RESULTS : Peak age of Acute Rheumatic fever and Chronic Rheumatic heart disease is between 5 - 10 years (55.8%. No sex variation has been observed. Fever and joint involvement are the most common clinical manifestations (87.5%each in first attack cases. Active cardi tis (75% the second most common manifestation , followed by arthralgia (25% and sore throat (25% , chorea , chest pain , abdominal pain were infrequent manifestations found to be 12.5% each. None of the cases had Erythema marginatum. CONCLUSION : In the pres ent study the clinical findings were correlated with that of previous studies and Echocardiographic findings were correlated well as far as moderate to severe lesions. Further Echocardiography was proved to be more sensitive in detecting even trivial or mi ld aortic regurgitation and mitral or aortic stenosis.

  9. Differential diagnosis of rheumatic diseases; Differenzialdiagnose rheumatischer Erkrankungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lingg, G.; Schorn, C. [Sana-Rheumazentrum, Zentrales Roentgeninstitut, Bad Kreuznach (Germany)

    2006-05-15

    Which imaging modalities are appropriate for the Differential diagnosis of Rheumatic diseases. MRI has far most the highest sensitivity and is unequaled in its brilliant presentation of Anatomy and Pathology. But it is sometimes forgotten, that this is at least in part the result of carefully selected sequences, dedicated to the expected result. In a method totally independent of any result, this should not be the case. In contrary this method should be highly standardised and regardless what will be the findings. This is true for Plain X-ray. It will be shown, that already the outer silhouette of the soft parts with different features of swelling, and differences in density and even more - defects or appositions of the bony silhouette in the majority of cases at least will allow to classify the patient for a group of diseases and in many cases will lead to a definite diagnosis. Differential diagnoses like Rheumatoid Arthritis versus Psoriatic Arthritis or simply but not always simple - inflammatory Arthritis versus degenerative disease - are allowed to be answered definitely, not always so in MRI. The condition of the subchondral bone can give hints, how advanced and how active the disease is at present. Plain X-ray offers high specifity in the differential diagnoses of Rheumatic diseases, it is well standardised and it is a device, to use independent from any suspected findings. So it is the method of choice for questions of differential diagnosis. This is even more true, thinking of the possibility, to investigate all clinically involved regions with not to much extended efforts, whereas MRI and CT are used normally for only one region. (orig.) [German] Mit welcher oder welchen bildgebenden Methoden und in welchem Stadium lassen sich rheumatische Erkrankungen bildgebend voneinander unterscheiden. Die MRT ist in ihrer sehr hohen Sensitivitaet sowie in ihrer brillanten morphologischen Darstellung von Anatomie und Pathologie unerreicht. Diese erreicht sie

  10. The incidence of acute rheumatic fever and chronic rheumatic heart disease in the Russian population (2011–2012

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    Rimma Mikhailovna Balabanova

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The problems of acute rheumatic fever (ARF and chronic rheumatic heart disease (CRHD are discussed. Carditis, polyarthritis, erythema annulare, subcutaneous nodules, and chorea minor are the main clinical manifestations of ARF caused by β-hemolytic streptococcus A. Cardiac failures emerge in 60–65% of patients after the first ARF episode. Repeated ARF attacks promote CRHD. The aim of the study is to evaluate the prevalence of rheumatic heart disease in different age groups in the regions of Russian Federation in 2011–2012. Materials and Methods. Analysis of the Ministry of Healthcare of the Russian Federation reports on population morbidity in 2011–2012 (Form N12.Results. The highest ARF prevalence was observed in 15–17-year-old teenagers, while the lowest, in adults over 18-year-old. The lowest CRHD figures were registered in juniors, while the highest ones, in adults. No ARF cases in 0–14-year-old children were registered in 31 entities of the Russian Federation; single cases, in 17 entities; no ARF cases in 15–17-year-old teenagers was registered in 37 entities, and 1–2 ARF cases were registered in 23 entities. Only in 10 entities, no ARF cases were registered in adults, and single cases were registered in 22 entities. Extremely unfavorable situations were found in the Chechen Republic (140 ARF cases in 0–14-year-old children and in the Dagestan Republic (140 cases. High morbidity among 15–17-year-old teenagers was registered in tje Kaliningrad region (83 cases and the Chechen Republic (100. ARF cases in adults were most frequent in St. Petersburg (124 cases, the Chechen Republic (154, and the Moscow region (161.The article lists the ARF and CRHD preventive measures.

  11. The incidence of acute rheumatic fever and chronic rheumatic heart disease in the Russian population (2011–2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rimma Mikhailovna Balabanova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The problems of acute rheumatic fever (ARF and chronic rheumatic heart disease (CRHD are discussed. Carditis, polyarthritis, erythema annulare, subcutaneous nodules, and chorea minor are the main clinical manifestations of ARF caused by β-hemolytic streptococcus A. Cardiac failures emerge in 60–65% of patients after the first ARF episode. Repeated ARF attacks promote CRHD. The aim of the study is to evaluate the prevalence of rheumatic heart disease in different age groups in the regions of Russian Federation in 2011–2012. Materials and Methods. Analysis of the Ministry of Healthcare of the Russian Federation reports on population morbidity in 2011–2012 (Form N12.Results. The highest ARF prevalence was observed in 15–17-year-old teenagers, while the lowest, in adults over 18-year-old. The lowest CRHD figures were registered in juniors, while the highest ones, in adults. No ARF cases in 0–14-year-old children were registered in 31 entities of the Russian Federation; single cases, in 17 entities; no ARF cases in 15–17-year-old teenagers was registered in 37 entities, and 1–2 ARF cases were registered in 23 entities. Only in 10 entities, no ARF cases were registered in adults, and single cases were registered in 22 entities. Extremely unfavorable situations were found in the Chechen Republic (140 ARF cases in 0–14-year-old children and in the Dagestan Republic (140 cases. High morbidity among 15–17-year-old teenagers was registered in tje Kaliningrad region (83 cases and the Chechen Republic (100. ARF cases in adults were most frequent in St. Petersburg (124 cases, the Chechen Republic (154, and the Moscow region (161.The article lists the ARF and CRHD preventive measures.

  12. Integrated Analyses of Gene Expression Profiles Digs out Common Markers for Rheumatic Diseases.

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    Lan Wang

    Full Text Available Rheumatic diseases have some common symptoms. Extensive gene expression studies, accumulated thus far, have successfully identified signature molecules for each rheumatic disease, individually. However, whether there exist shared factors across rheumatic diseases has yet to be tested.We collected and utilized 6 public microarray datasets covering 4 types of representative rheumatic diseases including rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, ankylosing spondylitis, and osteoarthritis. Then we detected overlaps of differentially expressed genes across datasets and performed a meta-analysis aiming at identifying common differentially expressed genes that discriminate between pathological cases and normal controls. To further gain insights into the functions of the identified common differentially expressed genes, we conducted gene ontology enrichment analysis and protein-protein interaction analysis.We identified a total of eight differentially expressed genes (TNFSF10, CX3CR1, LY96, TLR5, TXN, TIA1, PRKCH, PRF1, each associated with at least 3 of the 4 studied rheumatic diseases. Meta-analysis warranted the significance of the eight genes and highlighted the general significance of four genes (CX3CR1, LY96, TLR5, and PRF1. Protein-protein interaction and gene ontology enrichment analyses indicated that the eight genes interact with each other to exert functions related to immune response and immune regulation.The findings support that there exist common factors underlying rheumatic diseases. For rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, ankylosing spondylitis and osteoarthritis diseases, those common factors include TNFSF10, CX3CR1, LY96, TLR5, TXN, TIA1, PRKCH, and PRF1. In-depth studies on these common factors may provide keys to understanding the pathogenesis and developing intervention strategies for rheumatic diseases.

  13. Rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease at the Department of Child Health, School of Medicine, University of North Sumatera/Dr. Pirngadi Hospital, Medan (1983-1985).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naim, M; Tjipta, G D; Siregar, A A; Halim, S

    1989-01-01

    A retrospective study on rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease in children was conducted at the Department of Child Health, Dr. Pirngadi Hospital Medan, during 1983-1985. The patients consisted of 43 females and 30 males. Most of the patients were over 12 years of age. Of the 73 patients there were 60 patients (82.19%) accompanied by valvular disorders. The most frequent major criteria of Jones found in this study were carditis and polyarthritis. Thirty one patients (42.46%) had functional status (NYHA) of grade II-IV, and 43 patients (58.90%) had cardiomegaly. The major ECG findings were enlargement of the atria or ventricles and first degree AV block. Compliance was only achieved in 25 (34.24%) cases. Rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease still remain a challenge for the medical professionals to cope with in the region.

  14. Disturbance of intracardiac hemodynamics in children with chronic rheumatic cardiac disease

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    Kondratiev V.A.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available By means of Doppler echocardiography there have been studied disturbances of intracardiac hemodynamics in 44 children aged 8-17 years with chronic rheumatic cardiac disease and developed mitral aortal and combined heart defects, as well as in chronic rheumatic cardiac disease without developed valvar defect. Differential approach has been defined to administration of inhibitors of angiotensin-converting factor in rheumatic heart defects: developed insufficiency of mitral and/or aortal valves II-III stage leads to remodeling of the left heart portions with developing chronic insufficiency of blood circulation, being an index for prolonged, not less than a year usage of the angiotensin-converting factor. In the presence of isolated mitral regurgitation, I stage in children with chronic rheumatic cardiac disease usage of the angiotensin-converting factor may be cancelled due to insignificant disturbances of valvar hemodynamics and a small risk of developing blood circulation insufficiency. Timely sanation of chronic infection foci in nasopharynx (conservative and surgical treatment of chronic tonsillitis, adenoid vegetations, therapy of hemolytic streptococcus presence decreases risk of developing rheumatic heart defect in children suffered acute rheumatic fever.

  15. Coping mediates the influence of personality on life satisfaction in patients with rheumatic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vollmann, Manja; Pukrop, Jörg; Salewski, Christel

    2016-04-01

    A rheumatic disease can severely impair a person's quality of life. The degree of impairment, however, is not closely related to objective indicators of disease severity. This study investigated the influence and the interplay of core psychological factors, i.e., personality and coping, on life satisfaction in patients with rheumatic diseases. Particularly, it was tested whether coping mediates the effects of personality on life satisfaction. In a cross-sectional design, 158 patients diagnosed with a rheumatic disease completed questionnaires assessing the Big 5 personality traits (BFI-10), several disease-related coping strategies (EFK) and life satisfaction (HSWBS). Data were analyzed using a complex multiple mediation analysis with the Big 5 personality traits as predictors, coping strategies as mediators and life satisfaction as outcome. All personality traits and seven of the nine coping strategies were associated with life satisfaction (rs > |0.16|, ps ≤ 0.05). The mediation analysis revealed that personality traits had no direct, but rather indirect effects on life satisfaction through coping. Neuroticism had a negative indirect effect on life satisfaction through less active problem solving and more depressive coping (indirect effects > -0.03, ps satisfaction through more active problem solving, less depressive coping and/or a more active search for social support (indirect effects > 0.06, ps < 0.05). Personality and coping play a role in adjustment to rheumatic diseases. The interplay of these variables should be considered in psychological interventions for patients with rheumatic diseases.

  16. Prevalence of rheumatic diseases in Raramuri people in Chihuahua, Mexico: a community-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Río Nájera, Danyella; Santana, Natalia; Peláez-Ballestas, Ingris; González-Chávez, Susana A; Quiñonez-Flores, Celia M; Pacheco-Tena, César

    2016-07-01

    This study aimed to determine the prevalence of musculoskeletal (MSK) pain and rheumatic diseases in the Raramuri population (also known as Tarahumaras) who are an indigenous group in the northern state of Chihuahua in Mexico. We used the Community-Oriented Program for Control of Rheumatic Diseases (COPCORD) methodology. An analytical cross-sectional study was conducted including indigenous Raramuri aged ≥18 years from communities settled in Chihuahua City. Subjects with positive MSK pain were evaluated by primary care physicians and rheumatologists. Demographic and occupational factors such as gender and job type associated with rheumatic disease were investigated. A total of 380 indigenous Raramuri (mean age 33.6 ± 13.1 years; 37.9 % male) were interviewed. Seventy-six individuals (20 %) reported MSK pain in the last 7 days. Pain intensity was reported as "severe" and "the most severe" in 30 % of the cases. Fifty-six individuals (14.7 %) reported pain in the past and 86 (22.6 %) had either past or current pain. The prevalence of rheumatic diseases was 10.5 %. Diagnosed diseases were osteoarthritis (6.6 %), low back pain (1.6 %), spondyloarthritis (0.8 %), rheumatoid arthritis (0.5 %), non-specific arthritis (0.5 %), rheumatic regional pain syndromes (0.3 %), and fibromyalgia (0.3 %). Rheumatic disease was associated with the following variables: age (odds ratio (OR) 1.04, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.02-1.08; p = 0.006), family history of rheumatic symptoms (OR 6.9; 95 % CI 2.6-18.7; p Mexico.

  17. Preoperative CT scanning of 70 cases of rheumatic valvular disease

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    Take, Akira; Matuzaki, Shigeru; Oki, Shinichi (Jichi Medical School, Minamikawachi, Tochigi (Japan)) (and others)

    1992-05-01

    Seventy patients with rheumatic valvular disease were evaluated with preoperative CT scanning. The correlation of the obtained CT images to the operative findings were examined. Left atrial thrombi were found in 24 cases at the operation. CT scan had detected thrombi in 19 cases (79.2%) and echocardiography in 15 (62.5%). CT failed to find them in 5 cases in which the left atrial thrombi were less than 3 g. Echocardiogram, however, failed to detect thrombi in 9 cases, the largest being 14 g. There were 15 cases with left atrial calcification, in which 10 cases had left atrial thrombi. Nine cases out of these 10 cases had rough left atrial surface after thrombectomy. Early postoperative CT of 10 with left atrial calcification showed recurrent left atrial thrombi in 4 (40%) cases. Mitral valve calcification was found in 42 cases during operation. CT scan was able to detect it in 40 (95.2%), while echocardiogram detected in 34 cases (81.0%) (p<0.05). All mitral valves with calcification required replacement. Out of 30 cases with non calcified mitral valves, 9 underwent OMC, and the other 21 underwent mitral valve replacement. Aortic valve calcification was found in 9 out of 11 cases of aortic stenosis. All has been diagnosed by CT scan. In conclusion, 1. in detecting the left atrial thrombi, CT scan was superior to echo-cardiography, and provided useful information for planning the operative procedure including atrial approach and valvular manipulation, 2. CT scan could detect calcification of left atrial wall which had high incidence of thrombus formation and rough left atrial surface, 3. CT scan could detect calcification of both mitral and aortic valve, and showed the severity of valvular structural changes. (author).

  18. Digestive comorbidity in patients with rheumatic diseases: Not only NSAID-induced gastropathy

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    A. E. Karateev

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Digestive comorbidity is a serious problem that significantly aggravates the course of rheumatic diseases. Diseases of the gastrointestinal tract (GIT, liver, and pancreatobiliary system may present a threat to life and substantially worsen its quality. The incidence of many digestive diseases, such as gastric ulcer (including its complicated forms, cholelithiasis, and acute pancreatitis, in patients with rheumatic diseases (at least in those with rheumatoid arthritis is considerably higher than in the population. The presence of this comorbidity poses substantial challenges during active anti-rheumatic therapy. Rheumatologists are very familiar with issues in the prevention of GIT complications due to the use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. However, new time presents new challenges. The widespread use of immunosuppressive agents and biologic agents requires careful monitoring of complications associated with liver and bowel diseases. This review considers a relationship of rheumatic diseases and anti-rheumatic therapy to comorbidities, such as cholelithiasis, acute pancreatitis, viral hepatitis B and C, and intestinal diverticula. 

  19. Loneliness in patients with rheumatic diseases: the significance of invalidation and lack of social support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kool, Marianne B; Geenen, Rinie

    2012-01-01

    Rheumatic diseases affect about 20% of the population, leading to common symptoms such as joint problems, pain, fatigue, and stiffness. Loneliness is prevalent in individuals with rheumatic diseases. This could be due to not receiving social support and being stigmatized and invalidated, which might be most common in fibromyalgia, a rheumatic disease that lacks medical evidence. The aim of this study was to compare loneliness in distinct rheumatic diseases and to examine the association of loneliness with social support and invalidation. Participants were 927 patients with ankylosing spondylitis (n = 152), fibromyalgia (n = 341), osteoarthritis (n = 150), rheumatoid arthritis (n = 171), or systemic diseases (n = 113). They completed online questionnaires including an 11-point Likert scale assessing loneliness, the Illness Invalidation Inventory (3*1; Kool et al., 2010), and the Social Support Survey (SSS; De Boer, Wijker, Speelman, & De Haes, 1996; Sherbourne & Stewart, 1991). Patients with fibromyalgia experienced significantly more loneliness than patients with ankylosing spondylitis and patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Besides being younger, having lower education, and not working, in multiple regression analyses both lack of social support and invalidation were independently correlated with loneliness. This suggests that to decrease loneliness, therapeutic attention should be given to both increasing social support as well as decreasing invalidation in patients with rheumatic diseases, especially in patients with fibromyalgia.

  20. Towards safer use of glucocorticoids. Studies in patients with rheumatic diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Goes, M.C.

    2013-01-01

    Glucocorticoids are highly effective in many inflammatory rheumatic diseases because of their ability to inhibit the disease process at the local and systemic level. Thereby, they are capable of relieving symptoms and inhibiting the progression of the disease and –in early rheumatoid arthritis– also

  1. Prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders and rheumatic diseases in Cuenca, Ecuador: a WHO-ILAR COPCORD study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guevara-Pacheco, Sergio; Feicán-Alvarado, Astrid; Sanín, Luz Helena; Vintimilla-Ugalde, Jaime; Vintimilla-Moscoso, Fernando; Delgado-Pauta, Jorge; Lliguisaca-Segarra, Angelita; Dután-Erráez, Holger; Guevara-Mosquera, Daniel; Ochoa-Robles, Verónica; Cardiel, Mario H; Peláez-Ballestas, Ingris

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of musculoskeletal pain and rheumatic diseases in subjects over 18 years of age from the canton of Cuenca, Ecuador. Cross-sectional analytical community-based study was conducted in subjects over 18 years of age using the validated Community-Oriented Program for the Control of Rheumatic Diseases (COPCORD) questionnaire. Random sampling was used. The questionnaire was administered by standardized health workers. Subjects were visited house by house. Subjects positive for musculoskeletal (MSK) pain in the last 7 days and at some point in life were assessed by rheumatologists to confirm the diagnosis. A total of 4877 subjects participated, with an average age of 42.8 (SD 18.8) years of age; 59.7 % were women; 69.7 % lived in urban areas. 32.5 % reported MSK pain in the last 7 days and 45.7 % at some point in life. The prevalence of knee osteoarthritis was 7.4 %, hand osteoarthritis 5.3 %, low back pain 9.3 %, rheumatoid arthritis 0.8 %, fibromyalgia 2 %, gout 0.4 %, and lupus 0.06 %. Subjects from rural areas reported experiencing more MSK pain in the last 7 days and at some point in life, lower income, poorer health-care coverage, and increased physical activity involving repetitive tasks such as lifting weights or cooking with firewood. MSK pain prevalence was high. Osteoarthritis and low back pain were the most common diseases. Age, sex, physical activity, repetitive tasks, living in a rural area, and lack of health-care coverage were found to be associated with MSK pain.

  2. Health related quality of life measure in systemic pediatric rheumatic diseases and its translation to different languages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moorthy, Lakshmi Nandini; Roy, Elizabeth; Kurra, Vamsi

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Rheumatic diseases in children are associated with significant morbidity and poor health-related quality of life (HRQOL). There is no health-related quality of life (HRQOL) scale available specifically for children with less common rheumatic diseases. These diseases share several feat...

  3. The association between vibration and vascular injury in rheumatic diseases: a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu-Jie; Huang, Xiao-Lei; Yan, Jun-Wei; Wan, Ya-Nan; Wang, Bing-Xiang; Tao, Jin-Hui; Chen, Bing; Li, Bao-Zhu; Yang, Guo-Jun; Wang, Jing

    2015-02-01

    Vascular manifestations can be seen early in the pathogenesis of inflammatory rheumatic diseases. Animal experiments, laboratory and clinical findings indicated that acute or long-term vibration exposure can induce vascular abnormalities. Recent years, in addition to Raynaud's phenomenon (RP), vibration as a risk factor for other rheumatic diseases has also received corresponding considered. This review is concentrated upon the role of vibration in the disease of systemic sclerosis (SSc). In this review, we are going to discuss the main mechanisms which are thought to be important in pathophysiology of vascular injury under the three broad headings of "vascular", "neural" and "intravascular". Aspects on the vibration and vascular inflammation are briefly discussed. And the epidemiological studies related to vibration studies in SSc and other rheumatic diseases are taken into account.

  4. Correlation of different bone markers with bone density in patients with rheumatic diseases on glucocorticoid therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loddenkemper, Konstanze; Bohl, Nicole; Perka, Carsten; Burmester, Gerd-Rüdiger; Buttgereit, Frank

    2006-02-01

    Osteoporosis is a common concomitant disease in patients with rheumatic diseases on glucocorticoid (GC) therapy. Bone status is usually evaluated by determination of bone density in combination with clinical examinations and laboratory tests. However, the strength of individual biochemical bone makers in GC-induced osteoporosis has yet to be fully clarified. For this reason, different bone markers were investigated in correlation with bone density in patients with rheumatic diseases. Approximately 238 patients (212 women, 26 men) with a rheumatic disease and under GC therapy were examined consecutively for the first time with regard to bone density (BMD) and bone markers [osteocalcin, bone-specific alkaline phosphatase (precipitation method/tandem-MP ostase), crosslinks [pyridinoline (PYD), deoxypyridinoline (DPX), N-terminal telopeptide (NTX)

  5. Anti CD20 (Rituximab therapy in refractory pediatric rheumatic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel Reis

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: We aim to report the efficacy and safety of rituximab (RTX in patients diagnosed with juvenile systemic lupus erythematosus (JSLE or juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA refractory to conventional treatment. Methods: A retrospective review was made of all medical records of patients with JSLE or JIA treated with RTX between January 2009 and January 2015 in the Pediatric Rheumatology Unit of a central hospital. Results: Five patients, 4 with JSLE and 1 with extended oligoarticular JIA, received 10 cycles of RTX (23 infusions. The scheme of RTX frequently used was 750 mg/m2 two weeks apart. The median follow-up time after receiving the first cycle of RTX was 24 months (12 – 70. The four patients with JSLE were female (three caucasian and one black. The patient with JIA was a caucasian male. The median age at diagnosis was 10 years (16 months – 17years. The median evolution time until receiving RTX was 6 years (5 months – 15 years. Refractory class IV lupus nephritis was the most common indication for receiving RTX. Previous treatment to RTX included nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs, immunosuppressive drugs and corticosteroids in all patients and anti-TNFα (etanercept in the patient with JIA. It was possible to reduce the mean oral corticosteroid dose after RTX, ranging from 23 mg/day (20-25mg/day before RTX to 11 mg/day (0–20 mg/day at the last evaluation. Disease activity before RTX and at last evaluation also improved. The SLEDAI score, for JSLE, decreased from a median of 15, 5 (11 – 18 to 3 (0 – 6, and the JADAS-27 score, for JIA, also diminished from 40.4 to 3.5. Adverse events occurred in 2 patients, including delayed second dose after the diagnosis of cryptococcosis and respiratory tract infection with concomitant hypogammaglobulinemia needing of immunoglobulin replacement and antibiotic therapy. Conclusions: Rituximab might have a role in the treatment of JSLE and JIA

  6. Beyond Fat Mass: Exploring the Role of Adipokines in Rheumatic Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morena Scotece

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The cloning of leptin in 1994 by Zhang et al. introduced a novel concept about white adipose tissue (WAT as a very dynamic organ that releases a plethora of immune and inflammatory mediators, such as adipokines and cytokines, which are involved in multiple diseases. Actually, adipokines exert potent modulatory actions on target tissues involved in rheumatic diseases including cartilage, synovial, bone and immune cells. The goal of this paper is to elucidate the recent findings concerning the involvement of adipokines in rheumatic diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA, osteoarthritis (OA, and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE.

  7. Foot tendinopathies in rheumatic diseases: etiopathogenesis, clinical manifestations and therapeutic options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frizziero, A; Bonsangue, V; Trevisan, M; Ames, P R J; Masiero, S

    2013-05-01

    Damage to the mutual and delicate articular relationships of the foot may lead to functional failure. A painful foot can be the heralding sign of inflammatory, metabolic or degenerative rheumatic disease that may cause severe disability if left untreated. Healthy tendons are brilliant white in colour, are fibroelastic in texture and can withstand huge mechanical loads. Pathological tendons are characterised by changes in cellular function, rupture of collagen bundles, increased production of the proteoglycan-water matrix and neurovascular proliferation. According to the underlying disease, tendinopathies may present with pain of variable duration and intensity and with functional impairment, or they may be an asymptomatic finding on imaging techniques. Pain is the most common presenting symptom in the inflammatory rheumatic diseases of the ankle and the foot and usually precedes ultrasound or radiographic changes; pain results from inflammatory changes of the synovia and soft tissue structures including bursae, tendons, fascias and peripheral nerves. The management of tendinopathies in inflammatory and non-inflammatory rheumatic patients includes "articular economy," pharmacological treatment, foot orthotics, cryotherapy, instrumental physiotherapy, rehabilitation and physical. This review highlights the differences between tendinopathies occurring in non-inflammatory rheumatic disorders compared to those appearing in the course of inflammatory rheumatic disorders and defines a conservative management framework that non-rheumatologists (orthopaedic surgeons) and rheumatologists could adhere for the management of foot tendinopathies.

  8. Endocrine origins of rheumatic disease. Diagnostic clues to interrelated syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockshin, Michael D

    2002-04-01

    Heightened awareness of endocrine abnormalities is important in evaluation of patients presenting with musculoskeletal symptoms. Endocrine disorders such as diabetes, hyperthyroidism, hypothyroidism, hyperparathyroidism, hypoparathyroidism, hyperadrenocorticism, and acromegaly cause a unique array of rheumatic manifestations. Such conditions include Dupuytren's contracture, carpal tunnel syndrome, chondrocalcinosis, pseudogout, scleredema, and osteoporosis. Characteristic changes on radiologic evaluation and serum enzyme testing are additional clues to these atypical presentations. Consideration of a possible endocrine cause early in the evaluation may improve management in patients with such an underlying disorder.

  9. Coping mediates the influence of personality on life satisfaction in patients with rheumatic diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vollmann, M.; Pukrop, Jörg; Salewski, Christel

    2016-01-01

    A rheumatic disease can severely impair a person’s quality of life. The degree of impairment, however, is not closely related to objective indicators of disease severity. This study investigated the influence and the interplay of core psychological factors, i.e., personality and coping, on life sati

  10. Points to consider for reporting, screening for and preventing selected comorbidities in chronic inflammatory rheumatic diseases in daily practice : a EULAR initiative

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baillet, Athan; Gossec, Laure; Carmona, Loreto; de Wit, Maarten; van Eijk-Hustings, Yvonne; Bertheussen, Heidi; Alison, Kent; Toft, Mette; Kouloumas, Marios; Ferreira, Ricardo J. O.; Oliver, Susan; Rubbert-Roth, Andrea; van Assen, Sander; Dixon, William G.; Finckh, Axel; Zink, Angela; Kremer, Joel; Kvien, Tore K.; Nurmohamed, Michael; van der Heijde, Desiree; Dougados, Maxime

    2016-01-01

    In chronic inflammatory rheumatic diseases, comorbidities such as cardiovascular diseases and infections are suboptimally prevented, screened for and managed. The objective of this European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) initiative was to propose points to consider to collect comorbidities in pat

  11. Decreased levels of serum platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase in patients with rheumatic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Vergne

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available PAF is a potent inflammatory compound known to stimulate the release of various cytokines involved in rheumatic diseases. Elevated blood PAF levels are reported in these patients. We report that serum PAF acetylhydrolase activity (AHA levels are decreased in patients with rheumatoid arthritis or osteoarthritis as compared to healthy controls. Serum and synovial fluid AHA levels were correlated in these patients. The present study suggests the potential role of AHA in controling systemic and/or local PAF levels in patients with rheumatic diseases.

  12. Epigenetic Modulation as a Therapeutic Prospect for Treatment of Autoimmune Rheumatic Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marzena Ciechomska

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Systemic inflammatory rheumatic diseases are considered as autoimmune diseases, meaning that the balance between recognition of pathogens and avoidance of self-attack is impaired and the immune system attacks and destroys its own healthy tissue. Treatment with conventional Disease Modifying Antirheumatic Drugs (DMARDs and/or Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDs is often associated with various adverse reactions due to unspecific and toxic properties of those drugs. Although biologic drugs have largely improved the outcome in many patients, such drugs still pose significant problems and fail to provide a solution to all patients. Therefore, development of more effective treatments and improvements in early diagnosis of rheumatic diseases are badly needed in order to increase patient’s functioning and quality of life. The reversible nature of epigenetic mechanisms offers a new class of drugs that modulate the immune system and inflammation. In fact, epigenetic drugs are already in use in some types of cancer or cardiovascular diseases. Therefore, epigenetic-based therapeutics that control autoimmunity and chronic inflammatory process have broad implications for the pathogenesis, diagnosis, and management of rheumatic diseases. This review summarises the latest information about potential therapeutic application of epigenetic modification in targeting immune abnormalities and inflammation of rheumatic diseases.

  13. Epigenetic Modulation as a Therapeutic Prospect for Treatment of Autoimmune Rheumatic Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciechomska, Marzena; O'Reilly, Steven

    2016-01-01

    Systemic inflammatory rheumatic diseases are considered as autoimmune diseases, meaning that the balance between recognition of pathogens and avoidance of self-attack is impaired and the immune system attacks and destroys its own healthy tissue. Treatment with conventional Disease Modifying Antirheumatic Drugs (DMARDs) and/or Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDs) is often associated with various adverse reactions due to unspecific and toxic properties of those drugs. Although biologic drugs have largely improved the outcome in many patients, such drugs still pose significant problems and fail to provide a solution to all patients. Therefore, development of more effective treatments and improvements in early diagnosis of rheumatic diseases are badly needed in order to increase patient's functioning and quality of life. The reversible nature of epigenetic mechanisms offers a new class of drugs that modulate the immune system and inflammation. In fact, epigenetic drugs are already in use in some types of cancer or cardiovascular diseases. Therefore, epigenetic-based therapeutics that control autoimmunity and chronic inflammatory process have broad implications for the pathogenesis, diagnosis, and management of rheumatic diseases. This review summarises the latest information about potential therapeutic application of epigenetic modification in targeting immune abnormalities and inflammation of rheumatic diseases.

  14. Autoantibodies in patients with chronic hepatitis C virus infection: pitfalls for the diagnosis of rheumatic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palazzi, Carlo; Buskila, Dan; D'Angelo, Salvatore; D'Amico, Emilio; Olivieri, Ignazio

    2012-07-01

    Hepatitis C virus infection (HCV) is one of the best mimes in medicine. About 40-70% of patients suffering from this disorder develop at least one extra-hepatic disorder that can have a rheumatic nature (arthralgias, arthritis, vasculitis and sicca syndrome) and must be differentiated from the primitive rheumatic diseases. In addition, HCV infection can also alter the laboratory tests. Several alterations of first line laboratory tests can be usually found in both chronic HCV infection and chronic inflammatory rheumatic disorders. In the present review we analyze the interference of HCV in tests more specifically used in rheumatology: rheumatoid factor and other autoantibodies (ANA, anti-ENA, ANCA, anti-DNA, antiphospholipid, anti-CCP). In patients suffering from HCV infection, the diagnosis of connective tissue diseases (CTD) or rheumatoid arthritis (RA) should be made only when the detected symptoms or laboratory data are not inducible by HCV, otherwise only a diagnosis of "possible CTD" or "possible RA" should be considered.

  15. Mitral valve replacement in children and adolescents with rheumatic heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, J; Munsi, S; Sukumar, I P; Cherian, G

    1976-09-01

    To our knowledge, no documented hemodynamic studies in larger series of young patients undergoing valve replacement for rheumatic valvular disease have been reported previously. It seems to us that the natural history of rheumatic heart disease in India often follows a rapid and fulminant course which makes an aggressive surgical approach mandatory. An operative mortality of 22 % was seen in this series. Pronounced cardiac disability together with the poor general condition and the low nutritional status contributed in no small measure to this figure. Patients have been followed for periods ranging from 6 months to 6 years following corrective surgery. A remarkable absence of thrombo-embolic phenomena was a striking feature in the follow-up. There has been no evidence of rheumatic reactivation in any of these patients. This communication reinforces the beneficial results of valve replacement even at this young age when severe mitral incompetence exists refractory to medical treatment.

  16. Pregnancy and rheumatic disease: "by the book" or "by the doc".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeling, Stephanie O; Oswald, Anna E

    2009-01-01

    Pregnancy is an important condition that can affect and be affected by rheumatic disease. Overall, pregnancy is viewed as a Th2-predominant state, but several Th1-related cytokines are vital to early pregnancy. In rheumatoid arthritis for example, the majority of women improve by the beginning of the second trimester, but the majority (90%) will flare in the first 3 to 4 months postpartum. In contrast, systemic lupus erythematosus has an unpredictable course in pregnancy, leaving most rheumatologists to recommend a disease-quiescent state prior to conception. Other diseases such as scleroderma are less clear because the disease less commonly presents in the childbearing period. Many immunosuppressive medications for the rheumatic diseases are contraindicated in pregnancy because of their mechanisms of action leaving only a select few "safe" medications. Significant heterogeneity between the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) category for a medication and what a rheumatologist does in clinic leads to confusion on how a patient should be treated for active rheumatic disease both peripartum and postpartum, particularly if the patient is breastfeeding. We review the general state of pregnancy and how it is affected by prototypical rheumatic diseases including rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus. In addition, we present the most commonly used disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs and immunosuppressants and explain the difference between the FDA category and clinical practice among rheumatologists. Finally, we provide some general recommendations on how to manage a rheumatic disease during pregnancy including: (a) preconception planning to ensure no teratogenic medications on board, (b) early disclosure of pregnancy to all caregivers including the rheumatologist, family physician, obstetrician, and maternal-fetal medicine specialist, and (c) planning of safe medication use for acute flare-ups and disease suppression peripartum and postpartum.

  17. Central nervous system involvement in pediatric rheumatic diseases: current concepts in treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duzova, Ali; Bakkaloglu, Aysin

    2008-01-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) manifestations are not rare in pediatric rheumatic diseases. They may be a relatively common feature of the disease, as in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and Behçet's disease. Direct CNS involvement of a systemic rheumatic disease, primary CNS vasculitis, indirect involvement secondary to hypertension, hypoxia and metabolic changes, and drug associated adverse events may all result in CNS involvement. We have reviewed the CNS manifestations of SLE, Behçet's disease, Henoch-Schönlein purpura, polyarteritis nodosa, juvenile idiopathic arthritis, juvenile ankylosing spondylitis, familial Mediterranean fever, scleroderma, sarcoidosis, Wegener's granulomatosis, Takayasu's arteritis, CINCA syndrome, Kawasaki disease, and primary CNS vasculitis; and adverse CNS effects of anti-rheumatic drugs in pediatric patients. The manifestations are diverse; ranging from headache, seizures, chorea, changes in personality, depression, memory and concentration problems, cognitive impairment, cerebrovascular accidents to coma, and death. The value of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) examination (pleocytosis, high level of protein), auto-antibodies in serum and CSF, electroencephalography, neuroimaging with computerized tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, SPECT, PET, and angiography depends on the disease. Brain biopsy is gold standard for the diagnosis of CNS vasculitis, however it may be inconclusive in 25% of cases. A thorough knowledge of the rheumatic diseases and therapy-related adverse events is mandatory for the management of a patient with rheumatic disease and CNS involvement. Severe CNS involvement is associated with poor prognosis, and high mortality rate. High dose steroid and cyclophosphamide (oral or intravenous) are first choice drugs in the treatment; plasmapheresis, IVIG, thalidomide, and intratechal treatment may be valuable in treatment-resistant, and serious cases.

  18. Exercise as an anti-inflammatory therapy for rheumatic diseases-myokine regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benatti, Fabiana B; Pedersen, Bente K

    2015-02-01

    Persistent systemic inflammation, a typical feature of inflammatory rheumatic diseases, is associated with a high cardiovascular risk and predisposes to metabolic disorders and muscle wasting. These disorders can lead to disability and decreased physical activity, exacerbating inflammation and the development of a network of chronic diseases, thus establishing a 'vicious cycle' of chronic inflammation. During the past two decades, advances in research have shed light on the role of exercise as a therapy for rheumatic diseases. One of the most important of these advances is the discovery that skeletal muscle communicates with other organs by secreting proteins called myokines. Some myokines are thought to induce anti-inflammatory responses with each bout of exercise and mediate long-term exercise-induced improvements in cardiovascular risk factors, having an indirect anti-inflammatory effect. Therefore, contrary to fears that physical activity might aggravate inflammatory pathways, exercise is now believed to be a potential treatment for patients with rheumatic diseases. In this Review, we discuss how exercise disrupts the vicious cycle of chronic inflammation directly, after each bout of exercise, and indirectly, by improving comorbidities and cardiovascular risk factors. We also discuss the mechanisms by which some myokines have anti-inflammatory functions in inflammatory rheumatic diseases.

  19. [RheumaCheck: development and evaluation of a German language screening instrument for rheumatic diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Jutta G; Wessel, Ewa; Klimt, Ralf; Willers, Reinhardt; Schneider, Matthias

    2008-01-01

    Early diagnosis of inflammatory rheumatic diseases is important for patients' prognosis and outcome. The mean time delay of 1 to 5 years in Germany between the initial symptoms and the first rheumatologist contact should be reduced. Efficiency of patient questionnaires for the identification of inflammatory rheumatic diseases has been demonstrated in other countries. The aim of our study was to develop a patient questionnaire in German identifying inflammatory rheumatic diseases with a high sensitivity and specificity as well as a high positive predictive value. The RheumaCheck questionnaire was developed by adoption of the FDA-approved Connective Tissue Disease Screening Questionnaire. 1448 patients (195 controls, 437 patients suspicious for and 816 patients with known inflammatory rheumatic diseases) recruited by rheumatologists and general practitioners answered the questionnaire that additionally assessed comorbidities and sociodemographic data. A predictive algorithm was calculated. Mean age of the complete group (73.1% female) was 52.5 +/- 15.1 years. 53.1% had no comorbidity. Application of the algorithm yields a high sensitivity (77.6%) and specificity (79.9%). The area under the ROC curve was 0.85 (p < 0.0001). Being aware of a possible high rate of false true results RheumaCheck is a simple, efficient instrument easily filled out by patients. It can identify the group of patients that needs further investigation, care and assessment by a rheumatologist leading to earlier diagnosis and therapy. A web version of RheumaCheck is provided on www.rheuma-check.de .

  20. RHEUMATIC FEVER AS NONVANISHING DISEASE: A PROBLEM STATE AND CLINICAL CASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. A. Shostak

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Early diagnostics and treatment of patients with acute rheumatic fever (RF remains actual problem because rheumatic heart disease is still one of the main causes of acquired valvular lesions. Two cases of acute RF occurred in City Clinical Hospital №1 named after N.I. Pirogov in 2009 are presented. Different outcomes were observed during 6 and 10 months of clinical monitoring. The main approaches to diagnostics and treatment of RF are also described taking into consideration national and international guidelines.

  1. Low-energy laser treatment of rheumatic diseases: a long-term study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antipa, Ciprian; Moldoveanu, Vladimir; Rusca, Nicolae; Bruckner, Ion I.; Podoleanu, Adrian Gh.; Stanciulescu, Viorica

    1995-05-01

    We tried to establish the efficiency of low energy (power) lasers (LEL), in various inflammatory and noninflammatory rheumatic diseases during five years. We treated 514 patients with osteoarthrosis, 326 patients with nonarticular rheumatism and 82 patients with inflammatory rheumatism, in four different ways: only with Galium-Aluminum-Arsenide (GaAs) infrared lasers; both GaAs lasers and Helium neon (HeNe) lasers; with placebo laser; with classical anti-inflammatory therapy. The results were analyzed using local objective improvements and the score obtained from a pain scale before and after the treatments. We also note some preliminary results obtained by the computer analysis of the evocated potentials after laser irradiation. We conclude that LEL (especially HeNe with GaAs) is obviously more efficient than placebo laser therapy and also had better or at least similar results, in most of the cases, than classical anti-inflammatory therapy.

  2. Application of the health assessment questionnaire disability index to various rheumatic diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groen, van Maaike M.; Klooster, ten Peter M.; Taal, Erik; Laar, van de Mart A.F.J.; Glas, Cees A.W.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To investigate whether the Stanford Health Assessment Questionnaire Disability Index (HAQ-DI) can serve as a generic instrument for measuring disability across different rheumatic diseases and to propose a scoring method based on item response theory (IRT) modeling to support this goal. Me

  3. The metabolic role of the gut microbiota in health and rheumatic disease: mechanisms and interventions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abdollahi-Roodsaz, S.; Abramson, S.B.; Scher, J.U.

    2016-01-01

    The role of the gut microbiome in animal models of inflammatory and autoimmune disease is now well established. The human gut microbiome is currently being studied as a potential modulator of the immune response in rheumatic disorders. However, the vastness and complexity of this host-microorganism

  4. Application of the health assessment questionnaire disability index to various rheumatic diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Groen, M.M.; van Groen, Maaike M.; ten Klooster, Peter M.; Taal, Erik; van de Laar, Mart A F J; Glas, Cornelis A.W.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To investigate whether the Stanford Health Assessment Questionnaire Disability Index (HAQ-DI) can serve as a generic instrument for measuring disability across different rheumatic diseases and to propose a scoring method based on item response theory (IRT) modeling to support this goal.

  5. EULAR evidence-based recommendations on the management of systemic glucocorticoid therapy in rheumatic diseases

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hoes, J N; Jacobs, J W G; Boers, M; Boumpas, D; Buttgereit, F; Caeyers, N; Choy, E H; Cutolo, M; Da Silva, J A P; Esselens, G; Guillevin, L; Hafstrom, I; Kirwan, J R; Rovensky, J; Russell, A; Saag, K G; Svensson, B; Westhovens, R; Zeidler, H; Bijlsma, J W J

    2007-01-01

    ... on proper use of GCs. Hence, a EULAR task force on GCs, including a patient, was formed to develop evidence-based recommendations, to provide a tool for the better use and management of GC-therapy in rheumatic diseases. METHODS Endorsed by EULAR-ESCISIT, a multidisciplinary guideline development committee on GCs was formed, consisting of 20 experts in...

  6. Experience of aging in patients with rheumatic disease: A comparison with the general population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bode, C.; Taal, E.; Westerhof, G.J.; Gessel, van L.; Laar, van de M.A.F.J.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: Self-perceptions of aging have been shown to predict mental and physical health and even longevity. This study examined the aging perceptions of patients with rheumatic disease and compared them with the general Dutch population. Methods: Consecutive patients visiting a rheumatology cl

  7. Growth hormone treatment in children with rheumatic disease, corticosteroid induced growth retardation, and osteopenia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grote, FK; van Suijlekom-Smit, LWA; Mul, D; Hop, WCJ; ten Cate, R; Oostdijk, W; Van Luijk, W; Jansen-van Wijngaarden, CJA; Keizer-Schrama, SMPFD

    2006-01-01

    Background: In children with severe rheumatic disease (RD), treatment with corticosteroids (CS) is frequently needed and growth retardation and osteopenia may develop. A beneficial effect of human growth hormone (hGH) has been reported but mostly in trials without a control group. Aims: To study the

  8. Gastro-intestinal complications as one of causes of death in patients with rheumatic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V N Sorotskaya

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To assess frequency of gastro-intestinal (Gl bleeding and ulcer perforation as direct cause of death in pts with rheumatic diseases. Material and methods. Statistical analysis of Tula region patient care institutions documentation was performed to assess frequency and character of severe GI complications leading to death of pts. 300 cases of death which took place during 5 years (1996-2000 in 3 rheumatologic (105 cases and 10 therapeutic (195 cases departments of Tula region patient care institutions were studied. Results. Gl bleeding and ulcer perforation were the direct causes of death in 15 pts with rheumatic diseases i.e. in 5% from the whole number of died. GI complications caused death in 4 pts with chronic rheumatic heart disease (HRHD (1,7%, in 7 (15,2%with rheumatoid arthritis -, in 2 with ankylosing spondylitis and systemic lupus erythematosus (8,0 and 22,2% respectively. Pts with systemic sclerosis did not die because of GI damage. GI changes most frequently localized in duodenum (8 pts. 4 pts had complications connected with gastric ulcer and in 2 diffuse erosive damage of Gl mucosa was the source of bleeding. Conclusion. Severe Gl complications quite often lead to death of pts with rheumatic diseases in Tula region.

  9. MicroRNA in 2012: Biotherapeutic potential of microRNAs in rheumatic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pers, Yves-Marie; Jorgensen, Christian

    2013-02-01

    A number of microRNAs have been implicated in the pathogenesis of various rheumatic diseases, and evidence in support of the therapeutic potential of microRNA-based strategies for these conditions is growing, as demonstrated by several new findings published in 2012.

  10. Thought barriers to understanding rheumatic diseases--Halstead R. Holman revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazici, Hasan

    2010-01-01

    Halsted R. Holman, in a 1994 Arthritis & Rheumatism editorial, discusses how "thought barriers" can make our understanding of rheumatic diseases more difficult. The medical teaching-practice has traditionally been centered on acute disease; however, most rheumatic diseases are chronic. There is also the prevailing notion of a single lesion for each disease, a concept stemming from infectious diseases. Related to this is an investigative strategy of reductionism. We commonly overlook interactive biological pathways, which make up many of our diseases. In this regard, Holman advises us that 1. abnormalities are not necessarily harmful; 2. in rheumatological diseases, not only are multivariate causes-pathways operative, but the same pathways can be influenced by separate influences; 3. in chronic disease, "the task of the physician is to manage the course of disease over time," a scheme where the patient is at the center of achieving and monitoring progress; and 4. our current medical care system is mainly based on acute care, and needs to be adopted more to the needs of chronic care. In the current manuscript, three additional "thought barriers" are proposed: 1. our urge to lump diseases is too simplistic and hinders progress; 2. the same is true for our resistance in not including diseased control groups in genetic association studies; and 3. misuse of the controlled clinical trial. The popular inductive reasoning with the propensity to prove rather than to falsify one's self might be the common denominator in many of the barriers discussed.

  11. Failure of oral penicillin as secondary prophylaxis for rheumatic heart disease: a lesson from a low-prevalence rheumatic fever region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGlacken-Byrne, S M; Parry, H M; Currie, P F; Wilson, N J

    2015-11-03

    Our patient is an 18-year-old Caucasian woman from the UK who developed severe mitral stenosis on a history of childhood acute rheumatic fever (ARF) and rheumatic heart disease (RHD). She had been reporting of her oral penicillin secondary prophylaxis regimen since diagnosis. At the age of 15 years, a new murmur was discovered during routine cardiac follow-up. An echocardiogram confirmed moderate-severe mitral stenosis. One year later, her exercise tolerance significantly deteriorated and she subsequently underwent balloon valvuloplasty of her mitral valve to good effect. Our case emphasises the evidence base supporting the use of monthly intramuscular penicillin injection to prevent ARF recurrence and RHD progression; it also emphasises the reduced efficacy of oral penicillin prophylaxis in this context. It particularly resonates with regions of low rheumatic fever endemicity. The long-term cardiac sequelae of ARF can be devastating; prescribing the most effective secondary prophylaxis regimen is essential.

  12. Metabolomics and its potential in diagnosis, prognosis and treatment of rheumatic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smoleńska, Żaneta; Zdrojewski, Zbigniew

    2015-01-01

    The main aim of metabolomics is to make a comprehensive study of metabolites, the intermediates of biochemical processes in living organisms. Any pathophysiological mechanism caused by disease will inevitably lead to related changes in the concentrations of specific metabolites. In line with this, metabolomics offers a promising laboratory tool for the analysis of potential diagnostic biomarkers that may be used to assess susceptibility to a disease and to evaluate the prognosis and therapeutic response to treatment. Recent data have shown that metabolomics analysis in rheumatoid arthritis has made possible more efficient diagnosis, discrimination between patients with regard to disease activity, prediction of the response to a particular treatment approach, differentiation between rheumatic disease subtypes and greater understanding of the pathophysiology of this disease. Here we characterize metabolomics as a comprehensive laboratory tool and review its potential in the diagnosis, prognosis and treatment of rheumatic diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis.

  13. Epigenetic Modulation as a Therapeutic Prospect for Treatment of Autoimmune Rheumatic Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Ciechomska, Marzena; O'Reilly, Steven

    2016-01-01

    Systemic inflammatory rheumatic diseases are considered as autoimmune diseases, meaning that the balance between recognition of pathogens and avoidance of self-attack is impaired and the immune system attacks and destroys its own healthy tissue. Treatment with conventional Disease Modifying Antirheumatic Drugs (DMARDs) and/or Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDs) is often associated with various adverse reactions due to unspecific and toxic properties of those drugs. Although biologic...

  14. Rheumatic diseases induced by drugs and environmental factors: the state-of-the-art – part two

    OpenAIRE

    Niklas, Karolina; Niklas, Arkadiusz A.; Majewski, Dominik; Puszczewicz, Mariusz J.

    2016-01-01

    The majority of rheumatic diseases belong to the group of autoimmune diseases and are associated with autoantibody production. Their etiology is not fully understood. Certain medications and environmental factors may have an influence on the occurrence of rheumatic diseases. Establishing a cause-effect relationship between a certain factor and disease induction is not always simple. It is important to administer the drug continuously or monitor exposure to a given factor in the period precedi...

  15. Rheumatic diseases induced by drugs and environmental factors: the state-of-the-art – part one

    OpenAIRE

    Niklas, Karolina; Niklas, Arkadiusz A.; Majewski, Dominik; Puszczewicz, Mariusz

    2016-01-01

    The majority of rheumatic diseases belong to the group of autoimmune diseases and are associated with autoantibody production. Their etiology is not fully understood. Certain medications and environmental factors may have an influence on the occurrence of rheumatic diseases. Establishing a cause-effect relationship between a certain factor and disease induction is not always simple. It is important to administer the drug continuously or monitor exposure to a given factor in the period precedi...

  16. Th2 immune deviation induced by pregnancy: the two faces of autoimmune rheumatic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doria, Andrea; Iaccarino, Luca; Arienti, Silvia; Ghirardello, Anna; Zampieri, Sandra; Rampudda, Maria Elisa; Cutolo, Maurizio; Tincani, Angela; Todesco, Silvano

    2006-08-01

    One of the most important immunological modifications during pregnancy is the Th1/Th2 shift, due to the progressive increase of progesterone and estrogens during pregnancy, which reach their peak-level in the third trimester of gestation. At high levels, estrogens seem mainly to suppress Th1 cytokines and stimulate Th2-mediated immunological responses as well as antibody production. For this reason Th1-mediated diseases, like rheumatoid arthritis (RA), tend to improve and Th2-mediated disease, like systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), tend to worsen during pregnancy. SLE is the autoimmune rheumatic disease in which pregnancy most frequently occurs because it predominantly affects young females in their childbearing age. Other autoimmune rheumatic diseases, including RA, are less frequently observed during pregnancy due to their low female-to-male ratio and peak onset after the age of 40. This review is focused on the disease course, gestational outcome and management of patients with SLE and RA during pregnancy.

  17. Rheumatic diseases induced by drugs and environmental factors: the state-of-the-art – part one

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niklas, Arkadiusz A.; Majewski, Dominik; Puszczewicz, Mariusz

    2016-01-01

    The majority of rheumatic diseases belong to the group of autoimmune diseases and are associated with autoantibody production. Their etiology is not fully understood. Certain medications and environmental factors may have an influence on the occurrence of rheumatic diseases. Establishing a cause-effect relationship between a certain factor and disease induction is not always simple. It is important to administer the drug continuously or monitor exposure to a given factor in the period preceding the onset of symptoms. The lack of previously diagnosed autoimmune disease, or finally the lack of symptoms within a few weeks/months after discontinuation of the drug/cessation of exposure, is also important. The most frequently mentioned rheumatic diseases caused by drugs and environmental factors include systemic lupus erythematosus, scleroderma, systemic vasculitis, polymyositis, dermatomyositis, and Sjögren's syndrome. The objective of this study is to summarize current knowledge on rheumatic diseases induced by drugs and environmental factors. PMID:27504022

  18. Rheumatic diseases induced by drugs and environmental factors: the state-of-the-art – part two

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niklas, Arkadiusz A.; Majewski, Dominik; Puszczewicz, Mariusz J.

    2016-01-01

    The majority of rheumatic diseases belong to the group of autoimmune diseases and are associated with autoantibody production. Their etiology is not fully understood. Certain medications and environmental factors may have an influence on the occurrence of rheumatic diseases. Establishing a cause-effect relationship between a certain factor and disease induction is not always simple. It is important to administer the drug continuously or monitor exposure to a given factor in the period preceding the onset of symptoms. The lack of early diagnosed autoimmune disease, or finally the lack of symptoms within a few weeks/months after discontinuation of the drug/cessation of exposure, is also important. The most frequently mentioned rheumatic diseases caused by drugs and environmental factors include systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), scleroderma, systemic vasculitis, polymyositis, dermatomyositis, and Sjögren’s syndrome. The objective of this study is to summarize current knowledge on rheumatic diseases induced by drugs and environmental factors. PMID:27826170

  19. Stress and resilience in rheumatic diseases: a review and glimpse into the future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evers, Andrea W M; Zautra, Alex; Thieme, Kati

    2011-06-21

    Stress resilience factors, and interventions to ease stress and enhance resilience, are gaining increasing attention for the treatment of rheumatic conditions. This Review presents a digest of empirical work on the factors that determine the risk of adapting poorly to a rheumatic condition, and on the resilience factors that counteract such risks. We consider the types of stress-management and resilience treatments that are most effective in promoting the physical and psychological functioning of patients at risk of long-term adjustment problems. Prospective research shows that cognitive-behavioral and social risk and resilience factors predict the long-term physical and psychological functioning of patients with rheumatic conditions. Furthermore, validated screening instruments are becoming increasingly useful in clinical practice to identify and select patients at risk. Stress-management and resilience interventions offer promising ways to improve the long-term functioning of patients. These treatment methods might be especially useful when they are tailored to the specific risk and resilience factors of patients, and when they incorporate innovative approaches to the delivery of services, including internet applications such as eHealth, to increase efficiency and availability of treatments, and to optimize patient empowerment in rheumatic conditions.

  20. Medical therapy for rheumatic heart disease: is it time to be proactive rather than reactive?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajamannan, Nalini M; Antonini-Canterin, Francesco; Moura, Luis; Zamorano, Jose L; Rosenhek, Raphael A; Best, Patricia Jm; Lloyd, Margaret A; Rocha-Goncalves, F; Chandra, Sarat; Alfieri, Ottavio; Lancellotti, Patrizio; Tornos, Pilar; Baliga, Ragavendra R; Wang, Andrew; Bashore, Thomas; Ramakrishnan, S; Spargias, Konstantinos; Shuvy, Mony; Beeri, Ronen; Lotan, Chaim; Suwaidi, Jassim Al; Bahl, Vinay; Pierard, Luc A; Maurer, Gerald; Nicolosi, Gian Luigi; Rahimtoola, Shahbudin H; Chopra, K; Pandian, Natesa G

    2009-01-01

    Rheumatic Heart Disease (RHD) is well known to be an active inflammatory process which develops progressive calcification and leaflet thickening over time. The potential for statin therapy in slowing the progression of valvular heart disease is still controversial. Retrospective studies have shown that medical therapy is beneficial for patients with calcific aortic stenosis and recently for rheumatic valve disease. However, the prospective randomized clinical trials have been negative to date. This article discusses the epidemiologic risk factors, basic science, retrospective and prospective studies in valvular heart disease and a future clinical trial to target RHD with statin therapy to slow the progression of this disease. Recent epidemiological studies have revealed the risk factors associated with valvular disease include male gender, smoking, hypertension and elevated serum cholesterol and are similar to the risk factors for vascular atherosclerosis. An increasing number of models of experimental hypercholesterolemia demonstrate features of atherosclerosis in the aortic valve (AV), which are similar to the early stages of vascular atherosclerotic lesions. Calcification, the end stage process of the disease, must be understood as a prognostic indicator in the modification of this cellular process before it is too late. This is important in calcific aortic stenosis as well as in rheumatic valve disease. There are a growing number of studies that describe similar pathophysiologic molecular markers in the development of rheumatic valve disease as in calcific aortic stenosis. In summary, these findings suggest that medical therapies may have a potential role in patients in the early stages of this disease process to slow the progression of RHD affecting the valves. This review will summarize the potential for statin therapy for this patient population.

  1. Congenital heart disease and rheumatic heart disease in Africa: recent advances and current priorities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zühlke, Liesl; Mirabel, Mariana; Marijon, Eloi

    2013-11-01

    Africa has one of the highest prevalence of heart diseases in children and young adults, including congenital heart disease (CHD) and rheumatic heart disease (RHD). We present here an extensive review of recent data from the African continent highlighting key studies and information regarding progress in CHD and RHD since 2005. Main findings include evidence that the CHD burden is underestimated mainly due to the poor outcome of African children with CHD. The interest in primary prevention for RHD has been recently re-emphasised, and new data are available regarding echocardiographic screening for subclinical RHD and initiation of secondary prevention. There is an urgent need for comprehensive service frameworks to improve access and level of care and services for patients, educational programmes to reinforce the importance of prevention and early diagnosis and a relevant research agenda focusing on the African context.

  2. Readability and suitability assessment of patient education materials in rheumatic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhee, Rennie L; Von Feldt, Joan M; Schumacher, H Ralph; Merkel, Peter A

    2013-10-01

    Web-based patient education materials and printed pamphlets are frequently used by providers to inform patients about their rheumatic disease. Little attention has been given to the readability and appropriateness of patient materials. The objective of this study was to examine the readability and suitability of commonly used patient education materials for osteoarthritis (OA), rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, and vasculitis. Five or 6 popular patient resources for each disease were chosen for evaluation. Readability was measured using the Flesch-Kincaid reading grade level and suitability was determined by the Suitability Assessment of Materials (SAM), a score that considers characteristics such as content, graphics, layout/topography, and cultural appropriateness. Three different reviewers rated the SAM score and means were used in the analysis. Twenty-three resources written on the 4 diseases were evaluated. The education material for all 4 diseases studied had readability above the eighth-grade level and readability did not differ among the diseases. Only 5 of the 23 resources received superior suitability scores, and 3 of these 5 resources were written for OA. All 4 diseases received adequate suitability scores, with OA having the highest mean suitability score. Most patient education materials for rheumatic diseases are written at readability levels above the recommended sixth-grade reading level and have only adequate suitability. Developing more appropriate educational resources for patients with rheumatic diseases may improve patient comprehension. Copyright © 2013 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  3. Autoimmunity in Rheumatic Diseases Is Induced by Microbial Infections via Crossreactivity or Molecular Mimicry

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    Taha Rashid

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A general consensus supports fundamental roles for both genetic and environmental, mainly microbial, factors in the development of autoimmune diseases. One form of autoimmune rheumatic diseases is confined to a group of nonpyogenic conditions which are usually preceded by or associated with either explicit or occult infections. A previous history of clinical pharyngitis, gastroenteritis/urethritis, or tick-borne skin manifestation can be obtained from patients with rheumatic fever, reactive arthritis, or Lyme disease, respectively, whilst, other rheumatic diseases like rheumatoid arthritis (RA, ankylosing spondylitis (AS, and Crohn’s disease (CD are usually lacking such an association with a noticeable microbial infection. A great amount of data supports the notion that RA is most likely caused by Proteus asymptomatic urinary tract infections, whilst AS and CD are caused by subclinical bowel infections with Klebsiella microbes. Molecular mimicry is the main pathogenetic mechanism that can explain these forms of microbe-disease associations, where the causative microbes can initiate the disease with consequent productions of antibacterial and crossreactive autoantibodies which have a great impact in the propagation and the development of these diseases.

  4. Blood serum apolipoproteins B and A-I in females suffering from rheumatic heart valve disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stakisaitis, Donatas; Maksvytis, Arūnas; Salcius, Kestutis; Benetis, Rimantas

    2004-01-01

    With the aim to check whether the atherogenic factors are involved in the mechanisms of valve fibrosis, we have studied the blood serum concentrations of apolipoproteins (apo) A-I and B concentration in patients suffering from rheumatic heart valve fibrosis. The quantities of apoA-I and apoB in the blood serum were tested by the ELISA method. Concentration of apoA-I and B in the blood serum was determined in rheumatic females with replacement of the damaged valves: after aortic valve operation (n=11; mean age 43.3+/-3.6 years) and after mitral valve operation (n=29; 41.3+/-4.1). The results obtained for rheumatic patients were compared with the data on age-matched healthy females (n=43; 39.5+/-5.2 years). Significantly lower apoA-I level in the blood serum of all patients suffering from rheumatic heart valve disease was determined as compared with controls: in the pooled group of patients (1.02+/-0.22 vs 1.23+/-0.23 g/l, Pvalve replacement (0.98+/-0.21 vs. 1.23+/-0.23 g/l, Pvalve surgery (1.03+/-0.23 g/l vs 1.23+/-0.23 g/l, Pheart valve disease did not differ from that of controls. The apoB/apoA-I ratio for patients with valve fibrotic damage was significantly higher as compared to controls in all groups (Pvalve fibrosis was caused by lower apoA-I levels in blood serum. The obtained results indicate that decreased apoA-I levels in blood serum can be indicative of valve fibrosis in rheumatic heart valve disease patients.

  5. Association between rheumatic diseases and cancer: results from a clinical practice cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellan, Mattia; Boggio, Enrico; Sola, Daniele; Gibbin, Antonello; Gualerzi, Alessandro; Favretto, Serena; Guaschino, Giulia; Bonometti, Ramona; Pedrazzoli, Roberta; Pirisi, Mario; Sainaghi, Pier Paolo

    2017-02-08

    The association between cancer and immune-mediated rheumatic conditions is controversial, especially as far as polymyalgia rheumatica (PMR) is concerned. Furthermore, no clinical feature has been shown to be suggestive of a paraneoplastic rheumatic syndrome. With the present study, we aim to address both these issues. The study population comprised N = 1750 patients, including N = 100 with PMR, who attended our tertiary immuno-rheumatology clinic between January 1, 2005 and November 30, 2012. A rheumatic disease was deemed paraneoplastic if cancer had been diagnosed in the 2 years preceding or following its onset. The probability of a significant association between a specific rheumatic disease and cancer was evaluated by computing the odds ratio (OR): N = 702 patients with osteoarthritis serving as controls. Furthermore, clinical features distinguishing paraneoplastic rheumatic diseases were searched for by univariate and multivariate analysis. Sjogren's syndrome (SS) [OR 3.6 (CI 95% 1.7-7.5)], PMR (OR 5.1 CI 95% 2.9-8.9), dermatomyositis/polymyositis [OR 12.09 (CI 95% 2.6-55.8)] and vasculitis [OR 3.70 (CI 95% 1.81-7.52)] are associated with cancer. At multivariate analysis, older age is associated with cancer among SS patients (p = 0.03), while in the PMR group, older age, male gender, and ≥6 tender joints are independent predictors of paraneoplastic PMR (p PMR. Older age, male gender and a more extensive joint involvement should be considered red flags for paraneoplastic PMR.

  6. [Deficits of routine occupational therapy services in rheumatic diseases: results of the RheumaDat study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thieme, H; Löffler, K; Borgetto, B

    2010-07-01

    The purpose of the present study is to describe the frequency and potential determinants of occupational therapy routine services in patients with rheumatic diseases. The study is based on a secondary analysis of the RheumaDat database. The results of the survey on 907 patients were analyzed regarding frequency of occupational therapy routine services and related sociodemographic and disease-specific variables. Approximately 8% of the study population received occupational therapy, patients with rheumatoid arthritis representing the largest proportion of these at 13%. Only patients with osteoarthritis showed a clear treatment pattern. Patients from this group receiving occupational therapy were older, had a longer duration of disease and were more affected. No clear appraisal of the therapy status in the rheumatoid arthritis or fibromyalgia group could be made. The results indicate shortages and the lack of a clear system in occupational therapy routine services in patients with different rheumatic diseases.

  7. Rheumatic diseases in children and adolescents in the Russian Federation (2009—2010

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    Rimma Mikhailovna Balabanova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In pediatrics, rheumatic diseases (RD are characterized by particularly severe social consequences. This investigation was undertaken to clarify the prevalence of RD from the 2009—2010 statistical data of the Ministry of Health and Social Development of the Russian Federation. Analysis of these data has led to the conclusion that the acute rheumatic fever situation is relatively favorable in Russia. As for musculoskeletal system diseases, patients with inflammatory RD are a small percentage among those with this pathology; however, they are critically ill and become disabled early and frequently despite the fact that the majority of novel highly effective drugs have not approved for use in children, which makes their timely use difficult. Most children with locomotor diseases suffer from non-inflammatory diseases. This shows the importance of measures for the prevention, early detection, and correction of acquired or inherited pathology of the joints and vertebral column.

  8. Features of local immunity of an oral cavity at children with rheumatic diseases

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    Kozlitina Y.A. Chugaeva U.Y. Admakin O.I.

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available It is revealed that level decrease slgA at children rheumatic diseases is risk factor of development of plural caries of teeth, and also developments of inflammatory diseases of periodont and an oral cavity mucous membrane. Insufficiency IgAs of a saliva can causes mutual relation infringement between oral cavity microflora, especially its is conditional-pathogenic forms, and an organism of the child

  9. The impact of unrecognized autoimmune rheumatic diseases on the incidence of preeclampsia and fetal growth restriction: a longitudinal cohort study

    OpenAIRE

    Spinillo, Arsenio; Beneventi, Fausta; Locatelli, Elena; Ramoni, Vèronique; Caporali, Roberto; Alpini, Claudia; Albonico, Giulia; Cavagnoli, Chiara; Montecucco, Carlomaurizio

    2016-01-01

    Background The burden of pregnancy complications associated with well defined, already established systemic rheumatic diseases preexisting pregnancy such as rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus or scleroderma is well known. Systemic rheumatic diseases are characterized by a long natural history with few symptoms, an undifferentiated picture or a remitting course making difficult a timely diagnosis. It has been suggested that screening measures for these diseases could be useful ...

  10. Obesity as a risk and severity factor in rheumatic diseases (Autoimmune Chronic inflammatory diseases-ACIDs

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    Elisa eGremese

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The growing body of evidence recognizing the adipose tissue as an active endocrine organ secreting bioactive mediators involved in metabolic and inflammatory disorders, together with the global epidemic of overweight and obesity, rise obesity as a hot topic of current research. The chronic state of low grade inflammation present in the obese condition and the multiple pleiotropic effects of adipokines on the immune system has been implicated in the pathogenesis of several inflammatory conditions including rheumatic autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. We will discuss the main relevant evidences on the role of the adipose tissue on immune and inflammatory networks and the more recent evidences regarding the effects of obesity on the incidence and outcomes of the major autoimmune chronic inflammatory diseases.

  11. Antinuclear antibodies in rheumatic disease: a proposal for a function-based classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisetsky, D S

    2012-09-01

    Antinuclear antibodies (ANAs) are a diverse group of autoantibodies that bind macromolecular components of the cell nucleus. While some ANAs occur in normal individuals, others are expressed almost exclusively in patients with rheumatic disease and serve as markers for diagnosis and prognosis. Despite the clinical associations of ANAs, the relationship of these antibodies to specific disease manifestations is often unknown because the target antigens are intracellular molecules that are ubiquitously expressed. In systemic lupus erythematosus, the role of ANAs in disease manifestations is better understood, especially for antibodies to DNA and related nucleosomal antigens. These antibodies can promote nephritis by the formation of immune complexes that are deposited in the kidney. In addition, anti-DNA, along with antibodies to RNA-binding proteins such as anti-Sm, can induce non-specific immune abnormalities based on the induction of type interferon 1 by plasmacytoid dendritic cells. Despite ANA expression in rheumatic disease, studies in animal models of inflammation and tissue injury indicate that antibodies to certain nuclear molecules such as HMGB1 have protective effects. Together, these considerations suggest a function-based classification of ANAs based on their expression in normal and autoimmune individuals as well as their capacity to induce or attenuate immunological disturbances. This classification provides a framework to elucidate the serological features of rheumatic disease and the often uncertain relationship between ANA expression and disease manifestations.

  12. IL-10 and ET-1 as biomarkers of rheumatic valve disease

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    Sydney Correia Leão

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the immunological profile and gene expression of endothelin-1 (ET-1 in mitral valves of patients with rheumatic fever originated from a reference service in cardiovascular surgery. Methods: This was a quantitative, observational and cross-sectional study. Thirty-five subjects (divided into four groups participated in the study, 25 patients with chronic rheumatic heart disease and ten control subjects. The mean age of the sample studied was 34.5 years. Seventeen of them (48.58% were male and 18 (51.42% were female. Inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-4 and IL-10 were measured and ten mitral valves of patients who underwent first valve replacement were collected for determination of gene expression of endothelin-1 by real time PCR. Results: Among the groups studied (patients vs. controls, there was a statistically significant difference in IL-10 levels (P=0.002, and no differences in other cytokines. Expression of endothelin-1 was observed in 70% of samples. Quantitatively, average of ET-1 expression was 62.85±25.63%. Conclusion: Inflammatory cytokine IL-10 participates in the maintenance of chronicity of rheumatic fever in patients who underwent valve replacement and those who are undergoing medical treatment. The expression of endothelin-1 in heart valve lesions in patients undergoing mitral valve replacement confirms its association with inflammatory activity in rheumatic fever.

  13. Risk Factors for Infection in Patients with Remitted Rheumatic Diseases Treated with Glucocorticoids

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    Matsumoto,Yoshinori

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available It is well known that infection is one of the major causes of morbidity and mortality in rheumatic disease patients treated with high-dose glucocorticoids, especially in the early phase after achievement of disease remission. The aim of this study was to identify the risk factors for infection, with a focus on the dose of glucocorticoids administered, following the achievement of disease remission in rheumatic diseases patients. We retrospectively analyzed the medical records of rheumatic disease patients who had been treated with glucocorticoids. The primary endpoint was the incidence rate of infection during a period from 1 to 2 months after the commencement of treatment. From April 2006 to March 2010, 19 of 92 patients suffered from infection during the observation period. Age≧65 yrs, presence of interstitial pneumonia, diagnosis of systemic vasculitis and serum creatinine level≧2.0mg/dl were found to be univariate predictors for infection. However, only the presence of interstitial pneumonia was an independent risk factor for infection (HR=4.50, 95%CI=1.65 to 14.44 by the Cox proportional hazard model. Even after achievement of clinical remission, careful observation is needed for patients with interstitial pneumonia, more so than for those receiving high-dose glucocorticoids.

  14. Epidemiology of rheumatic diseases in Mixtec and Chontal indigenous communities in Mexico: a cross-sectional community-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julián-Santiago, Flor; García-García, Conrado; García-Olivera, Imelda; Goycochea-Robles, María Victoria; Pelaez-Ballestas, Ingris

    2016-07-01

    This study aimed to estimate the prevalence of musculoskeletal (MSK) disorders and rheumatic diseases in the Chontal and Mixtec indigenous communities in the state of Oaxaca, Mexico, using the Community-Oriented Program for the Control of Rheumatic Diseases (COPCORD) methodology. After cross-culturally validating the COPCORD questionnaire for these communities, we conducted a cross-sectional, analytical, community-based census study using a house-to-house method. Positive cases of MSK disorders were assessed by primary care physicians and rheumatologists. The study population included participants aged ≥18 years from the indigenous communities of San Antonio Huitepec and San Carlos Yautepec. A total of 1061 persons participated in the study. Mean age was 46.9 years (standard deviation 19.9; age range 18-97 years); 642 (60.5 %) were women; 483 participants (45.5; 42.4-48.5 %) had MSK pain in the previous 7 days. Diagnoses were back pain 170 (16.0 %; 95 % confidence interval [CI] 13.8-18.3); osteoarthritis 157 (14.7 %; 95 % CI 12.7-17.0); rheumatic regional pain syndrome 53 (4.9 %; 95 % CI 3.7-6.4); rheumatoid arthritis 4 (0.3 %; 95 % CI 0.1-0.9); dermatomyositis 1 (0.09 %; 95 % CI 0.0-0.5); ankylosing spondylitis 1 (0.09 %; 95 % CI 0.0-0.5); systemic lupus erythematosus 1 (0.09 %; 95 % CI 0.02-0.5); and gout 1 (0.09 %; 95 % CI 0.0-0.5). 53.2 % had not received medical treatment for their disease. The prevalence of MSK disorders in indigenous communities in the Mixtec and Chontal regions is very high. The most common rheumatic diseases found were back pain and osteoarthritis. A high percentage of participants had not received medical care.

  15. Psychological effects of calisthenic exercises on neuroinflammatory and rheumatic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taspinar, O; Aydın, T; Celebi, A; Keskin, Y; Yavuz, S; Guneser, M; Camli, A; Tosun, M; Canbaz, N; Gok, M

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of calisthenic exercises on psychological status in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and multiple sclerosis (MS). This study comprised 40 patients diagnosed with AS randomized into two exercise groups (group 1 = hospital-based, group 2 = home-based) and 40 patients diagnosed with MS randomized into two exercise groups (group 1 = hospital-based, group 2 = home-based). The exercise programme was completed by 73 participants (hospital-based = 34, home-based = 39). Mean age was 33.75 ± 5.77 years. After the 8-week exercise programme in the AS group, the home-based exercise group showed significant improvements in erythrocyte sedimentation rates (ESR). The hospital-based exercise group showed significant improvements in terms of the Bath AS Metrology Index (BASMI) and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale-Anxiety (HADS-A) scores. After the 8-week exercise programme in the MS group, the home-based and hospital-based exercise groups showed significant improvements in terms of the 10-m walking test, Berg Balance Scale (BBS), HADS-A, and MS international Quality of Life (MusiQoL) scores. There was a significant improvement in the hospital-based and a significant deterioration in the home-based MS patients according to HADS-Depression (HADS-D) score. The positive effects of exercises on neurologic and rheumatic chronic inflammatory processes associated with disability should not be underestimated.

  16. The Lectin Pathway of Complement and Rheumatic Heart Disease

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    Marcia Holsbach Beltrame

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The innate immune system is the first line of host defense against infection and is comprised of humoral and cellular mechanisms that recognize potential pathogens within minutes or hours of entry. The effector components of innate immunity include epithelial barriers, phagocytes and natural killer cells, as well as cytokines and the complement system. Complement plays an important role in the immediate response against microorganisms, including Streptococcus sp. The lectin pathway is one of three pathways by which the complement system can be activated. This pathway is initiated by the binding of mannose-binding lectin (MBL, collectin K-1 (CL-K1 and ficolins (Ficolin-1, Ficolin-2 and Ficolin-3 to microbial surface oligosaccharides and acetylated residues, respectively. Upon binding to target molecules, MBL, CL-K1 and ficolins form complexes with MBL-associated serine proteases 1 and 2 (MASP-1 and MASP-2, which cleave C4 and C2 forming the C3 convertase (C4b2a. Subsequent activation of complement cascade leads to opsonization, phagocytosis and lysis of target microorganisms through the formation of the membrane attack complex. In addition, activation of complement may induce several inflammatory effects, such as expression of adhesion molecules, chemotaxis and activation of leukocytes, release of reactive oxygen species and secretion of cytokines and chemokines. In this chapter, we review the general aspects of the structure, function and genetic polymorphism of lectin pathway components and discuss most recent understanding on the role of the lectin pathway in the predisposition and clinical progression of Rheumatic Fever (RF.

  17. Valves replacement operation in treatment of electrical storm induced by rheumatic valves disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhenqiang Chen; Hui Zhang; Yang Zhao; Haiji Yang; Sheng'ai Ye; Liang Cheng; Ying Zhang

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To present a case of electrical storm (ES) in a female patient with rheumatic valve disease. Methods: A female patient with severe rheumatic valve disease suffered an unexpected ES. She received more than 50 electrical shocks for repeated cardiac arrests due to ES over 16 hours. Then she received beta-blocking agent treatment and had an operation of double valves replacement. Results: ES was suppressed by sympathetic blockade with beta-receptor blocker and finally disappeared after the double pathological valves had been replaced. Conclusion: Increased sympathetic activity plays an important role in the genesis of electrical storm and sympathetic blockade may effectively suppress ES. However, the most important thing in the treatment of ES is to identify and eliminate the underlying cause of ES.

  18. Th9 lymphocytes: A recent history from IL-9 to its potential role in rheumatic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas-Zuleta, Wilmer Gerardo; Vásquez, Gloria

    2016-07-01

    Various subtypes of effector T cells have been described up to date, and each one has its specific immunological function and a defined cytokine secretion profile. Th9 lymphocytes, recently described, are characterized by a high IL-9 expression. Their differentiation requires the integration of IL-4 and TGF-β signaling pathways and the coordinated participation of multiple transcription factors. Their role has been mainly found in immunity against parasites and in allergic inflammatory processes. Nevertheless, they have been implicated in processes as autoimmunity, cancer and recently in rheumatic diseases. The objective of this review is to describe the discovery of this cellular subtype, its differentiation, expression regulation and its potential role in rheumatic diseases.

  19. TARDY IDEAS ON THE USE OF BIOLOGICAL AGENTS IN RHEUMATIC DISEASES

    OpenAIRE

    Yu. V. Muravyev; L. A. Muravyeva

    2016-01-01

    The past two decades have been marked by the design of a great variety of innovative biological agents, the clinical introduction of which could substantially improve the results of treatment for rheumatic diseases. At the same time, there are a larger number of reports on their administration-associated adverse events, often paradoxical ones (these drugs indicated in many autoimmune processes may induce similar autoimmune processes).

  20. [Experience gained with the use of local administration of medicinal remedies in rheumatic diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taran, A I; Puzanova, O G; Lapenko, O Ie; Sol's'kyĭ, V I; Samoĭlova, S M

    2001-01-01

    In the article, errors that are frequently encountered in dealing with rheumatic diseases are analysed together with the experience gained by the authors themselves with the management of 380 patients using local injections of corticosteroids (diprospan) and chondroprotectors (alflutop). The employment of local injection therapy has been shown to shorten considerably the patient's hospital stay, to improve the quality of life of the patients, with them being practically free from ill effects and complications.

  1. Combined uphill and downhill varices as a consequence of rheumatic heart disease: a unique presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harwani, Yogesh P; Kumar, Ajit; Chaudhary, Akash; Kumar, Manoj; Choudeswari, Padmavathi R; Kankanala, Vishnu V; Joshi, Nayana; Kansagra, Chintan; Shah, Sandip; Tripathi, Abhisheka

    2014-03-01

    Hemorrhage from downhill varices is a rare manifestation. The etiology of downhill varices is due to superior vena cava obstruction while uphill varices are secondary to portal hypertension. We report a rare case of 55-year-old female with bleeding downhill varices not associated with obstruction or compression of superior vena cava, but was due to severe pulmonary artery hypertension secondary to chronic rheumatic heart disease.

  2. High prevalence of hypovitaminosis D of patients with autoimmune rheumatic diseases in China

    OpenAIRE

    Zheng, Zhao-hui; Gao, Cong-Cong; Wu, Zhen-Zhen; Liu, Sheng-Yun; Li, Tian-Fang; Gao, Guan-Min; Liu, Zhang-Suo

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to determine the prevalence of hypovitaminosis D in patients with autoimmune rheumatic diseases (ARDs) in China and its association with demographic characteristics of the patients. We recruited 384 patients in this cross-sectional study including 121 cases of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), 131 rheumatoid arthritis (RA), 102 spondyloarthritis (SpA) and 30 other ARDs. For each patient, demographic information was collected and serum concentration of 25OHD3 was measured by electro...

  3. Myositis complicating benzathine penicillin-G injection in a case of rheumatic heart disease

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    Joshua R. Francis

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A 7-year old boy developed myositis secondary to intramuscular injection of benzathine penicillin-G in the context of secondary prophylaxis for rheumatic heart disease. Side effects of intramuscular delivery of benzathine penicillin-G are well described and include injection site pain and inflammation, but myositis, as depicted on magnetic resonance imaging in this case, has not previously been described.

  4. Screening of Natural Antioxidants from Traditional Chinese Medicinal Plants Associated with Treatment of Rheumatic Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Hua-Bin Li; Feng-Lin Song; En-Qin Xia; Yuan Zhang; Xiang-Rong Xu; Lei Kuang; Ren-You Gan

    2010-01-01

    In order to find new sources of natural antioxidants, the antioxidant capacities of 50 medicinal plants associated with treatment of rheumatic diseases were systemically evaluated using the ferric-reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) and Trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity (TEAC) assays, and their total phenolic contents were measured by the Folin–Ciocalteu method. Their antioxidant activities of some of these plants were analyzed for the first time. The FRAP and TEAC assay results suggested ...

  5. Doppler US in rheumatic diseases with special emphasis on rheumatoid arthritis and spondyloarthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Toprak, Hüseyin; Kılıç, Erkan; Serter, Aslı; Kocakoç, Ercan; ÖZGÖÇMEN, Salih

    2013-01-01

    Developments in digital ultrasonography (US) technology and the use of high-frequency broadband transducers have increased the quality of US imaging, particularly of superficial tissues. Thus, US, particularly color US or power Doppler US, in which high-resolution transducers are used, has become an important imaging modality in the assessment of rheumatic diseases. Furthermore, therapeutic interventions and biopsies can be performed under US guidance during the assessment of lesions. In this...

  6. Current nutritional status of patients with rheumatic diseases in the population of Poland

    OpenAIRE

    Kłak, Anna; Borowicz, Jacek; Mańczak, Małgorzata; Grygielska, Jolanta; Samel-Kowalik, Piotr; Raciborski, Filip

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study The aim of the study was to evaluate the current state of nutrition of patients with rheumatic diseases in the Polish population. Material and methods An anonymous questionnaire study was carried out among the patients of the Institute of Rheumatology in Warsaw in the fourth quarter of 2012. Five hundred questionnaires were distributed, and 397 questionnaires were collected and accepted for further analysis (response rate = 79%). Results Overweight or obesity was present ...

  7. Management of rheumatic and autoimmune blistering disease in pregnancy and postpartum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Joy; Imadojemu, Sotonye; Werth, Victoria P

    2016-01-01

    The treatment of rheumatic and autoimmune skin disease in women who are pregnant or of childbearing potential can present challenges to the dermatologist. We discuss the current approaches to treating lupus erythematosus, antiphospholipid antibody syndrome, dermatomyositis, morphea and systemic sclerosis, mixed connective tissue disease, rheumatoid arthritis, and autoimmune blistering disease in such patients. In the appropriate setting, topical and systemic corticosteroids, hydroxychloroquine, dapsone, azathioprine, and ultraviolet B phototherapy may be safely and cautiously used during pregnancy. Considerations about contraception, planned conception, therapeutic options, and disease control are paramount in optimizing pregnancy outcomes and minimizing risks to both mother and fetus.

  8. Clinical significance of markers of collagen metabolism in rheumatic mitral valve disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanima Banerjee

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Rheumatic Heart Disease (RHD, a chronic acquired heart disorder results from Acute Rheumatic Fever. It is a major public health concern in developing countries. In RHD, mostly the valves get affected. The present study investigated whether extracellular matrix remodelling in rheumatic valve leads to altered levels of collagen metabolism markers and if such markers can be clinically used to diagnose or monitor disease progression. METHODOLOGY: This is a case control study comprising 118 subjects. It included 77 cases and 41 healthy controls. Cases were classified into two groups- Mitral Stenosis (MS and Mitral Regurgitation (MR. Carboxy-terminal propeptide of type I procollagen (PICP, amino-terminal propeptide of type III procollagen (PIIINP, total Matrix Metalloproteinase-1(MMP-1 and Tissue Inhibitor of Metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1 were assessed. Histopathology studies were performed on excised mitral valve leaflets. A p value 459 ng/mL for PICP provided 91% sensitivity, 90% specificity and a likelihood ratio of 9 in diagnosing RHD. Histopathology analysis revealed inflammation, scarring, neovascularisation and extensive leaflet fibrosis in diseased mitral valve. CONCLUSIONS: Levels of collagen metabolism markers correlated with echocardiographic parameters for RHD diagnosis.

  9. [Bad memories: understanding and removal of pathogenic consequences of immunological memory in inflammatory rheumatic diseases. The IMPAM consortium].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamradt, T; Radbruch, A; Chang, H-D

    2012-08-01

    The Research Consortium IMPAM (IMprinting of the PAthogenic Memory for rheumatic inflammation) has recently been funded by the Federal Ministry of Education and Research in Germany. Within this consortium ten different research groups, coordinated by the German Rheumatism Research Center (DRFZ) and the University Hospital Jena, will examine the molecular dialogue between immune system memory cells and mesenchymal cells in chronic rheumatic diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis or ankylosing spondylitis. The consortium's aim is to understand and modulate these interactions therapeutically, such that the pathogenic imprinting of proinflammatory memory cells can be extinguished and the anti-inflammatory capacity of the patients' regulatory cells can be restored.

  10. Rheumatic heart disease: 15 years of clinical and immunological follow-up

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    Roney O Sampaio

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Roney O Sampaio, Kellen C Fae, Lea MF Demarchi, Pablo MA Pomerantzeff, Vera D Aiello, Guilherme S Spina, Ana C Tanaka, Sandra E Oshiro, Max Grinberg, Jorge Kalil, Luiza GuilhermeHeart Institute (InCor, University of São Paulo, BrazilAbstract: Rheumatic fever (RF is a sequel of group A streptococcal throat infection and occurs in untreated susceptible children. Rheumatic heart disease (RHD, the major sequel of RF, occurs in 30%–45% of RF patients. RF is still considered endemic in some regions of Brazil and is responsible for approximately 90% of early childhood valvular surgery in the country. In this study, we present a 15-year clinical follow-up of 25 children who underwent surgical valvular repair. Histopathological and immunological features of heart tissue lesions of RHD patients were also evaluated. The patients presented severe forms of RHD with congestive symptoms at a very young age. Many of them had surgery at the acute phase of RF. Histological analysis showed the presence of dense valvular inflammatory infiltrates and Aschoff nodules in the myocardium of 21% of acute RHD patients. Infiltrating T-cells were mainly CD4+ in heart tissue biopsies of patients with rheumatic activity. In addition, CD4+ and CD8+ infiltrating T-cell clones recognized streptococcal M peptides and cardiac tissue proteins. These findings may open the possibilities of new ways of immunotherapy. In addition, we demonstrated that the surgical procedure during acute phase of the disease improved the quality of life of young RHD patients.Keywords: rheumatic heart disease, Streptococcus pyogenes, heart failure, inflammatory infiltrate, T lymphocytes, molecular mimicry

  11. Immune System and Its Link to Rheumatic Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is essential. Only a physician experienced with these drugs and diseases should monitor the therapies. The physician will review a combination of medical history including that of any family members with autoimmune disease, a physical exam and the results of ...

  12. The Corrona US registry of rheumatic and autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremer, Joel M

    2016-01-01

    The Corrona US national registry collects data concerning patient status from both the rheumatologist and patient at routine clinical encounters. Corrona has functioning disease registries in rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, spondyloarthropathies, psoriasis and inflammatory bowel disease. Corrona merges data concerning long-term effectiveness and safety, as well as comparative and cost effectiveness of agents to treat these autoimmune diseases.

  13. Overexpression of transforming growth factor-beta 1 in the valvular fibrosis of chronic rheumatic heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Lucia; Kim, Do Kyun; Yang, Woo Ick; Shin, Dong Hwan; Jung, Ick Mo; Park, Han Ki; Chang, Byung Chul

    2008-02-01

    For the purpose of determining the pathogenic role of transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-beta 1) in the mechanism of chronic rheumatic heart disease, we evaluated the expression of TGF-beta 1, proliferation of myofibroblasts, and changes in extracellular matrix components including collagen and proteoglycan in 30 rheumatic mitral valves and in 15 control valves. High TGF-beta 1 expression was identified in 21 cases (70%) of rheumatic mitral valves, whereas only 3 cases (20%) of the control group showed high TGF-beta 1 expression (pvalves. High TGF-beta1 expression positively correlated with the proliferation of myofibroblasts (p=0.004), valvular fibrosis (pvalves (p=0.040). In conclusion, an ongoing inflammatory process, the expression of TGF-beta 1, and proliferation of myofibroblasts within the valves have a potential role in the valvular fibrosis, calcification, and changes in the extracellular matrix that lead to the scarring sequelae of rheumatic heart disease.

  14. Non-celiac gluten sensitivity and rheumatic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isasi, Carlos; Tejerina, Eva; Morán, Luz M

    2016-01-01

    Celiac disease is an autoimmune systemic disease having among its clinical manifestations frequent symptoms common to rheumatologic diseases such as musculoskeletal pain, asthenia, and cognitive fatigue. It is associated with other autoimmune diseases like Sjögren disease. It is a well-characterized disease with specific diagnostic tests. Non-celiac gluten sensitivity is an emerging entity with symptoms similar to celiac disease, but without specific diagnostic tests. The concept of non-celiac gluten sensitivity and its diagnostic problems are reviewed, and the hypothesis of its association with fibromyalgia, spondyloarthritis, and autoimmune conditions is proposed. Clinical observations supporting the hypothesis are described, highlighting the benefit of treating non-celiac gluten sensitivity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Reumatología y Colegio Mexicano de Reumatología. All rights reserved.

  15. Urinary free light chains may help to identify infection in patients with elevated systemic inflammation due to rheumatic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bramlage, Carsten P; Froelich, Britta; Wallbach, Manuel; Minguet, Joan; Grupp, Clemens; Deutsch, Cornelia; Bramlage, Peter; Müller, Gerhard A; Koziolek, Michael

    2017-04-01

    The risk of infection in patients with rheumatic diseases is elevated, but a clear marker to differentiate the cause of the systemic inflammation is missing. We assessed the ability urinary immunoglobulin free light chains (FLCs) to indicate the presence of infection in patients with rheumatic disease. We performed a retrospective analysis of patients with rheumatic disease attending the Georg-August University Hospital in Goettingen, Germany, from January 2011 to December 2013. Subjects were included if they had urine levels of κ and λ FLCs available. A reference group of patients without autoimmune disease, but with documented infection, was constructed. A total of 1500 patients had their urinary FLCs quantified during the study period. Of the 382 patients with rheumatic disease, 172 (45%) displayed no systemic inflammation, 162 (42%) had inflammation due to the underlying disease activity, and 48 (13%) had inflammation due to a confirmed infection. Urinary FLC concentrations were much higher in patients with rheumatic diseases and infection (κ 68.8 ± 81.8 mg/L, λ 31.4 ± 53.5 mg/L) compared to those with inflammation due to rheumatic disease activity (κ 22.7 ± 26.3 mg/L, λ 8.1 ± 9.1 mg/L, κ p inflammation due to rheumatic disease activity from that due to the additional presence of infection. The ability to quantify these proteins in urine provides a simple alternative to the use of blood.

  16. Genomics and epigenomics in rheumatic diseases: what do they provide in terms of diagnosis and disease management?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro-Santos, Patricia; Díaz-Peña, Roberto

    2017-07-20

    Most rheumatic diseases are complex or multifactorial entities with pathogeneses that interact with both multiple genetic factors and a high number of diverse environmental factors. Knowledge of the human genome sequence and its diversity among populations has provided a crucial step forward in our understanding of genetic diseases, identifying many genetic loci or genes associated with diverse phenotypes. In general, susceptibility to autoimmunity is associated with multiple risk factors, but the mechanism of the environmental component influence is poorly understood. Studies in twins have demonstrated that genetics do not explain the totality of the pathogenesis of rheumatic diseases. One method of modulating gene expression through environmental effects is via epigenetic modifications. These techniques open a new field for identifying useful new biomarkers and therapeutic targets. In this context, the development of "-omics" techniques is an opportunity to progress in our knowledge of complex diseases, impacting the discovery of new potential biomarkers suitable for their introduction into clinical practice. In this review, we focus on the recent advances in the fields of genomics and epigenomics in rheumatic diseases and their potential to be useful for the diagnosis, follow-up, and treatment of these diseases. The ultimate aim of genomic studies in any human disease is to understand its pathogenesis, thereby enabling the prediction of the evolution of the disease to establish new treatments and address the development of personalized therapies.

  17. Undifferentiated vasculitis or an evolving systemic autoimmune rheumatic disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatimah, Nafeesah; Ussaid, Ahmad; Rasheed, Aflak

    2016-01-01

    Undifferentiated connective tissue diseases usually present with arthralgias, sicca symptoms, Raynaud's phenomenon and leucopenia. This case presents the atypical presentation of an undifferentiated connective tissue disease with extensive cutaneous involvement of fingers and toes leading to gangrene with absence of typical rheumatological symptoms. The autoimmune profile showed positive ANA and anti-Ro/SS-A. Thromboembolism was ruled out on the basis of transthoracic and transesophageal echo. She was treated with I/V corticosteroids and cyclophosphamide that halted the disease progression. PMID:27574560

  18. New areas of the pharmacotherapy of rheumatic diseases are inhibition of interleukin-6 and interleukin-17

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evgeny Lvovich Nasonov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Significant progress related particular to the use of interleukin (IL-6 and IL17 inhibitors has been made in the pharmacotherapy of rheumatic diseases. IL-6 is a cytokine that has a wide range of biological activity and affects different types of cells. There is evidence for the important role of IL-6 hyperproduction not only in rheumatoid arthritis (RA, but also in other immune inflammatory rheumatic diseases (systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE, scleroderma systematica, idiopathic inflammatory myopathies, giant cell arteritis, etc.. IL-6 inhibition primarily with humanized monoclonal antibodies against IL-6 receptors (tocilizumab – TCZ is considered as one of the promising areas of pharmacotherapy for these diseases. The successful results of TCZ use have created pre requisites for the design of other medicaments that can form a novel class of IL-6 inhibitors, genetically engineered biological agents, in the future. There is another new area in the treatment of immune inflammatory rheumatic diseases, which is the inhibition of the cytokine IL17A that provides interaction between innate and acquired immunity and is synthesized by a wide range of immunocompetent cells, the socalled Th17 ones in particular. IL-17A is implicated in the immunopathogenesis of a broad spectrum of immune inflammatory diseases, including RA, psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis, inflammatory bowel diseases, SLE, allergic diseases, transplantation immunity, obesity, carcinogenesis, etc. Elevated IL-17A concentrations correlate with the activity and severity of a pathological process. The pathogenetic effects of IL-17 in RA may be associated with its involvement in the development of synovial inflammation and joint destruction. The therapeutic efficiency of inhibition of Th17 cells and IL-17A synthesis in autoimmune diseases was first indirectly demonstrated in psoriasis. This providedthe basis for the elaboration of therapeutic approaches associated with the direct

  19. The new face of rheumatic heart disease in South West Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akinwusi PO

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Patience Olayinka Akinwusi,1,2 Johnson Olarewaju Peter,2 Adebayo Tolulope Oyedeji,2 Abiona Oluwadamilola Odeyemi21Department of Medicine, College of Health Sciences, Osun State University, 2Department of Medicine, LAUTECH Teaching Hospital, Osogbo, Osun State, NigeriaPurpose: To determine the current prevalence of rheumatic heart disease (RHD, clinical features, types of valvular lesions, complications and mortality, at Ladoke Akintola University of Technology (LAUTECH Teaching Hospital, Osogbo, South West Nigeria.Methods: We conducted a retrospective, descriptive study of all the cases of RHD seen in the medical outpatient clinics and wards of LAUTECH for 9 years, from January 2003 to December 2011. Statistical analysis of data obtained was done using SPSS 16. Results: The total number of attendees of all the medical outpatient clinics during the 9-year period was 67,378, with a subset of 9423 attending the cardiology clinic. There were 11 cases of RHD, which translates to a prevalence of 0.16/1000 and 1.2/1000 for medical outpatient clinics and the cardiology clinic respectively. The mean age of the patients was 25.64 ± 9.65 years, age range 14–40 years and male to female ratio of 1:1.2. The most common valve affected was mitral (90.9%, followed by the aortic (36.4%, and the tricuspid (18.2%. Mitral and aortic lesions coexisted in 18.2% of the patients, and late presentation was common in all RHD cases. Heart failure was the most common complication (90.9%. Other complications were secondary pulmonary hypertension (36.4%, infective endocarditis (27.3%, atrial fibrillation (27.3%, cardioembolic cerebrovascular disease (18.2%, and atrial flutter (9.1%. Mortality was 9.1%, while only one patient (9.1% had definitive surgery. Financial constraints precluded others from having definitive surgery.Conclusion: The prevalence of RHD has declined considerably as a result of improvements in the primary health care delivery system, with widespread use

  20. Pattern of rheumatic diseases in two outpatient clinics in Iran: Similarities with some different features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Owlia Mohammad Bagher

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Rheumatic diseases are among the most prevalent diseases recognized in the world. Musculoskeletal disorders are one of the main causes of disability around the world and expend a large amount of health care and social resources and have a substantial impact on the quality of life of those affected. To identify preventable risk factors and to gain insights into the burden of the diseases, it is important to know the prevalence and demographics of them. Herein we are to describe the pattern of different rheumatic disorders and characteristics of the patients attending in rheumatology clinics in Yazd, Iran, with addressing some different points of views in this regards. Materials and Methods:In this retrospective study, medical records of all patients referred to two main referral rheumatology clinics in Yazd from March 2009 to February 2010 were reviewed. A questionnaire including sex, age, chief complaint, diagnoses, and co-morbid diseases was used for gathering the data. Results:All medical records were reviewed, of whom 5187 patients had specific diagnoses. The mean age of the patients was 38.57 year ± 19.4 SD. 70.81% were females and 29.19% were males. The most common diagnoses were: degenerative joint disease (58.33%, autoimmune disorders (17.88%, and soft tissue rheumatism (12.47%. The most frequent complaints were knee pain (32%. 55.6% of the patients were overweight (BMI >29 and 923 (17.8 % of the patients had diabetes mellitus. Conclusion: Our findings were similar to other studies from Iran and the other countries in most features. The prevalence of autoimmune disorders was rather higher than the other studies; this is perhaps due to our belief that some of periarthritis conditions were part of systemic autoimmune diseases by careful history taking and using pertinent laboratory investigations.

  1. Metabolic syndrome in rheumatic diseases: epidemiology, pathophysiology, and clinical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidiropoulos, Prodromos I; Karvounaris, Stylianos A; Boumpas, Dimitrios T

    2008-01-01

    Subjects with metabolic syndrome--a constellation of cardiovascular risk factors of which central obesity and insulin resistance are the most characteristic--are at increased risk for developing diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease. In these subjects, abdominal adipose tissue is a source of inflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha, known to promote insulin resistance. The presence of inflammatory cytokines together with the well-documented increased risk for cardiovascular diseases in patients with inflammatory arthritides and systemic lupus erythematosus has prompted studies to examine the prevalence of the metabolic syndrome in an effort to identify subjects at risk in addition to that conferred by traditional cardiovascular risk factors. These studies have documented a high prevalence of metabolic syndrome which correlates with disease activity and markers of atherosclerosis. The correlation of inflammatory disease activity with metabolic syndrome provides additional evidence for a link between inflammation and metabolic disturbances/vascular morbidity.

  2. Chikungunya fever. Rheumatic manifestations of an emerging disease in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horcada, M Loreto; Díaz-Calderón, Carlos; Garrido, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Chikungunya fever is a viral disease caused by an alphavirus belonging to the Togaviridae family, transmitted by several species of Aedes mosquitoes: Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus (A. albopictus). It is endemic in Africa and Asia with recurrent outbreaks. It is an emerging disease and cases in Europe transmitted by A. albopictus have been established in Mediterranean areas. The first autochthonous cases detected on the Caribbean islands suppose a serious threat of spreading disease to America, which so far has been disease free. Clinical symptoms begin abruptly with fever, skin rash and polyarthritis. Although mortality is low, a high percentage of patients develop a chronic phase defined by persistent arthritis for months or even years. A severe immune response is responsible for joint inflammation. The absence of specific treatment and lack of vaccine requires detailed studies about its immunopathogenesis in order to determine the most appropriate target. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  3. Some peculiarities of hemodynamic indices in pregnant women with rheumatic heart disease during childbirth

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    Tashpulat Abdukarimov

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available During childbirth some pronounced hemodynamic displacements take place increasing together with the aggravation of uterine contractions, in such a way leading to the increased heart loading. We carried out the comparative investigation of hemodynamic indices in women with rheumatic heart disease depending on their bodies’ posture during labor. The obtained results testify the facts of decreasing of venous blood relapse during every birth pang in women in childbirth with heart valvular disease in supine posture during labor, and that impedes the providing of necessary extension of cardiac output and, correspondingly, adequate blood supply of uterus and oxygenation of foetus.

  4. Atrial fibrillation and rheumatic valvular heart disease: usefulness of very-low-dose amiodarone

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tsuyoshi Shiga

    2006-01-01

    @@ Atrial fibrillation (AF) is frequently associated with rheumatic valvular heart disease (RVHD). AF leads to systemic thromboembolic complications,reduced quality of life (QOL), impaired ventricular function and also increased mortality. Multivariate analysis of results from a population-based study has shown that valvular heart disease is one of risk factors for development of AF.1 The frequency of RVHD has decreased in developed countries in recent years, but RVHD now constitutes a significant population for the cardiology services in developing countries.2

  5. Modulation of autoimmune rheumatic diseases by oestrogen and progesterone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Grant C; Choubey, Divaker

    2014-12-01

    Sexual dimorphism is evident in the risk and expression of several human autoimmune diseases. Differences in disease manifestations observed between sexes are likely to involve immunomodulation by sex steroids, nonhormonal factors encoded by genes on the X and Y chromosomes, and immunological phenomena unique to pregnancy. In systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), and perhaps other autoantibody-mediated diseases, oestrogen seems to increase the risk of disease in genetically predisposed women by targeting key immune pathways, including the type 1 interferon (IFN) response, differentiation of CD4(+) T helper cells and survival of autoreactive B cells. By contrast, progesterone seems to reduce the risk of SLE by counteracting the effects of oestrogen on some of these same pathways, which suggests that the balance between oestrogen and progesterone can determine disease expression. In this Review we focus on the roles of the sex steroid hormones oestrogen and progesterone in modulating the risk and expression of SLE and rheumatoid arthritis. Intensive research in this area promises to identify novel therapeutic strategies and improve understanding of the immunological requirements and complications of pregnancy, and is expected to define the mechanisms behind sexual dimorphism in autoimmunity, immunity and other aspects of human health--a newly announced directive of the NIH.

  6. The mediterranean diet model in inflammatory rheumatic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Spinella

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The Mediterranean diet is based on a pattern of eating that’s closely tied to the Mediterranean region, which includes Greece and southern Italy. Essentially, the traditional diet emphasizes foods from plant sources, limited meat consumption, small amounts of wine and olive oil as the main fat source. The beneficial effects of the Mediterranean diet has been proven not only to cardiovascular diseases but also for diabetes, obesity, arthritis and cancer. Its anti-inflammatory and protective properties are linked to the large presence of ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, vitamins, but especially to the constituents of extra virgin olive oil: oleic acid, phenolic compounds olecanthal, a new recently discovered molecule, with natural anti-inflammatory properties. It has been shown that the Mediterranean diet can reduce disease activity, pain and stiffness in patients with inflammatory arthritis and may thus constitute a valuable support for patients suffering from these diseases.

  7. Postpartum Acute Pulmonary Oedema with Sub clinical Rheumatic Heart Disease

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Acute dyspnea with pulmonary oedema in postpartum is uncommon but life-threatening event. Contributing factors for pulmonary oedema include, administration of tocolytics, underlying cardiac disease, iatrogenic fluid overload and preeclampsia acounting 0.08% of pregnancies. Pulmonary embolism, amniotic fluid embolism, pneumonia, aspiration and pulmonary oedema are some of the potentially devastating conditions that should be considered by the attending physician.

  8. Coexistence of endocrinopathies in children with rheumatic diseases

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    Doha Alhomaidah

    2016-09-01

    Conclusion: Our findings demonstrated that coexistence of endocrinopathies is not uncommon in children diagnosed with JIA and SLE. Abnormal thyroid function occurs frequently and at a similar rate in children diagnosed with SLE and JIA. Thus, screening for endocrinopathies, namely thyroid disease, during the assessment of childhood SLE and JIA is worth consideration.

  9. Magnetic resonance imaging of peripheral joints in rheumatic diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mikkel; Duer, Anne; Møller, Uffe;

    2004-01-01

    The need for better methods than the conventional clinical, biochemical and radiographical examinations in the management of inflammatory joint diseases is evident, since these methods are not sensitive or specific to early pathologies and subtle changes. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) offers...

  10. Self-management skills in adolescents with chronic rheumatic disease: A cross-sectional survey

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    Lawson Erica F

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background For adolescents with a diagnosis of lifelong chronic illness, mastery of self-management skills is a critical component of the transition to adult care. This study aims to examine self-reported medication adherence and self-care skills among adolescents with chronic rheumatic disease. Methods Cross-sectional survey of 52 adolescent patients in the Pediatric Rheumatology Clinic at UCSF. Outcome measures were self-reported medication adherence, medication regimen knowledge and independence in health care tasks. Predictors of self-management included age, disease perception, self-care agency, demographics and self-reported health status. Bivariate associations were assessed using the Student's t-test, Wilcoxon rank sum test and Fisher exact test as appropriate. Independence in self-management tasks were compared between subjects age 13-16 and 17-20 using the chi-squared test. Results Subjects were age 13-20 years (mean 15.9; 79% were female. Diagnoses included juvenile idiopathic arthritis (44%, lupus (35%, and other rheumatic conditions (21%. Mean disease duration was 5.3 years (SD 4.0. Fifty four percent reported perfect adherence to medications, 40% reported 1-2 missed doses per week, and 6% reported missing 3 or more doses. The most common reason for missing medications was forgetfulness. Among health care tasks, there was an age-related increase in ability to fill prescriptions, schedule appointments, arrange transportation, ask questions of doctors, manage insurance, and recognize symptoms of illness. Ability to take medications as directed, keep a calendar of appointments, and maintain a personal medical file did not improve with age. Conclusions This study suggests that adolescents with chronic rheumatic disease may need additional support to achieve independence in self-management.

  11. Body-self unity and self-esteem in patients with rheumatic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bode, Christina; van der Heij, Anouk; Taal, Erik; van de Laar, Mart A F J

    2010-12-01

    Perceptions and evaluations of the own body are important sources of self-esteem. Having a rheumatic disease challenges maintenance of positive self-esteem due to consequences of the disease such as unfavorable sensations as pain and limited (physical) functioning. We expect that a positive experience of the own body in spite of a rheumatic disease (body-self harmony) will be associated with higher levels of self-esteem and that experiencing the body as unworthy part of the own person or as disabler for own strivings (body-self alienation) will result in lower levels of self-esteem. For this explorative study, the body experience questionnaire (BEQ) measuring body-self unity was developed and piloted. One hundred sixty-eight patients visiting the outpatient rheumatology clinic of the Medisch Spectrum Twente, Enschede, The Netherlands, completed a questionnaire on touchscreen computers to measure body-self unity (BEQ), illness cognitions (illness cognition questionnaire), pain intensity, functional limitations (health assessment questionnaire disability index), self-esteem (Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale) and demographics. To analyze predictors of self-esteem, hierarchical regression analyses were employed. The BEQ revealed a two-factor structure with good reliability (subscale harmony, four items, Cronbach's α = 0.76; subscale alienation, six items, Cronbach's α = 0.84). The final model of the hierarchical regression analyses showed that self-esteem can be predicted by the illness cognitions helplessness and acceptance, by harmony and most strongly by alienation from the body. R(2) of the final model was 0.50. The relationship between functional limitations and self-esteem was totally mediated by the psychological constructs body-self unity and illness cognitions. This explorative study showed the importance of the unity of body and self for self-esteem in patients with a rheumatic disease.

  12. Free fatty acids: potential proinflammatory mediators in rheumatic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frommer, Klaus W; Schäffler, Andreas; Rehart, Stefan; Lehr, Angela; Müller-Ladner, Ulf; Neumann, Elena

    2015-01-01

    Due to their role in inflammatory metabolic diseases, we hypothesised that free fatty acids (FFA) are also involved in inflammatory joint diseases. To test this hypothesis, we analysed the effect of FFA on synovial fibroblasts (SF), human chondrocytes and endothelial cells. We also investigated whether the toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), which can contribute to driving arthritis, is involved in FFA signalling. Rheumatoid arthritis SF, osteoarthritis SF, psoriatic arthritis SF, human chondrocytes and endothelial cells were stimulated in vitro with different FFA. Immunoassays were used to quantify FFA-induced protein secretion. TLR4 signalling was inhibited extracellularly and intracellularly. Fatty acid translocase (CD36), responsible for transporting long-chain FFA into the cell, was also inhibited. In rheumatoid arthritis synovial fibroblasts (RASF), FFA dose-dependently enhanced the secretion of the proinflammatory cytokine IL-6, the chemokines IL-8 and MCP-1, as well as the matrix-degrading enzymes pro-MMP1 and MMP3. The intensity of the response was mainly dependent on the patient rather than on the type of disease. Both saturated and unsaturated FFA showed similar effects on RASF, while responses to the different FFA varied for human chondrocytes and endothelial cells. Extracellular and intracellular TLR4 inhibition as well as fatty acid transport inhibition blocked the palmitic acid-induced IL-6 secretion of RASF. The data show that FFA are not only metabolic substrates but may also directly contribute to articular inflammation and degradation in inflammatory joint diseases. Moreover, the data suggest that, in RASF, FFA exert their effects via TLR4 and require extracellular and intracellular access to the TLR4 receptor complex. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  13. Interleukin-1 function and role in rheumatic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schett, Georg; Dayer, Jean-Michel; Manger, Bernhard

    2016-01-01

    Interleukin (IL)-1, first described ∼35 years ago as a secreted product of monocytes and neutrophils, refers to IL-1α and IL-1β, two key cytokines in the activation of innate immunity. These cytokines were among the first proteins identified as orchestrators of leukocyte communication, creating the class of secreted products now known as interleukins. The IL-1 family comprises a total of 11 members, including the two activating cytokines IL-1α and IL-1β as well as an inhibitory mediator, the IL-1 receptor antagonist. IL-1 is processed and activated by a caspase-1 dependent mechanism in conjunction with inflammasome assembly, as well as by caspase-1 independent processes that involve neutrophil proteases. Once activated, IL-1α and IL-1β act as potent proinflammatory cytokines at the local level, triggering vasodilatation and attracting monocytes and neutrophils to sites of tissue damage and stress. Importantly, these cytokines are crucial for the induction of matrix enzymes and serve as potent mediators of tissue damage by altering cartilage and bone homeostasis. Systemically, IL-1 cytokines foster the hypothalamic fever response and promote hyperalgesia. Uncontrolled IL-1 activation is a central component of some inflammatory diseases, including rare hereditary syndromes with mutations in inflammasome-associated genes or more frequent diseases such as gout, characterized by neutrophil infiltration and IL-1 activation. Apart from these connections to inflammatory diseases, an important role for IL-1 in inflammatory atherogenesis is also predicted. To date, four potent inhibitors of IL-1 are available for clinical use or in late-stage clinical development, which not only constitute efficacious therapies, but also helped improve our understanding of the role of IL-1 in human disease.

  14. Metabolic syndrome in rheumatic diseases: epidemiology, pathophysiology, and clinical implications

    OpenAIRE

    Sidiropoulos, Prodromos I; Karvounaris, Stylianos A; Boumpas, Dimitrios T.

    2008-01-01

    Subjects with metabolic syndrome–a constellation of cardiovascular risk factors of which central obesity and insulin resistance are the most characteristic–are at increased risk for developing diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease. In these subjects, abdominal adipose tissue is a source of inflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha, known to promote insulin resistance. The presence of inflammatory cytokines together with the well-documented increased risk for cardiovasc...

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging of peripheral joints in rheumatic diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mikkel; Duer, Anne; Møller, Uffe;

    2004-01-01

    The need for better methods than the conventional clinical, biochemical and radiographical examinations in the management of inflammatory joint diseases is evident, since these methods are not sensitive or specific to early pathologies and subtle changes. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) offers...... of radiographical outcome in RA. Similarly, there is solid evidence for MRI synovitis representing true synovial inflammation and being of considerable practical, clinical and radiological significance in RA. Describing the encouraging current knowledge regarding MRI for diagnosis, monitoring and prognosis...

  16. LEFT ATRIUM THROMBOSIS IN PATIENTS WITH RHEUMATIC MITRAL VALVULAR DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. D. Kaverin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Systemic thromboembolism — fairly common complication of mitral valvular disease, often leading to disability or fatal consequences for the patient. The source of emboli in most cases, are blood clots localized in the left atrium. The survey reflected basic views on the pathogenesis, diagnosis, treatment and prevention of intraatrial thrombosis according to new scientific advances. Articles (reviews, meta-analyzes and original researchs from Pub Med database, as well as domestic literature were used.

  17. LEFT ATRIUM THROMBOSIS IN PATIENTS WITH RHEUMATIC MITRAL VALVULAR DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. D. Kaverin

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Systemic thromboembolism — fairly common complication of mitral valvular disease, often leading to disability or fatal consequences for the patient. The source of emboli in most cases, are blood clots localized in the left atrium. The survey reflected basic views on the pathogenesis, diagnosis, treatment and prevention of intraatrial thrombosis according to new scientific advances. Articles (reviews, meta-analyzes and original researchs from Pub Med database, as well as domestic literature were used.

  18. Why are women predisposed to autoimmune rheumatic diseases?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Jacqueline E; Silman, Alan J

    2009-01-01

    The majority of autoimmune diseases predominate in females. In searching for an explanation for this female excess, most attention has focused on hormonal changes--both exogenous changes (for example, oral contraceptive pill) and fluctuations in endogenous hormone levels particularly related to menstruation and pregnancy history. Other reasons include genetic differences, both direct (influence of genes on sex chromosomes) and indirect (such as microchimerism), as well as gender differences in lifestyle factors. These will all be reviewed, focusing on the major autoimmune connective tissue disorders: rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus and scleroderma.

  19. Usefulness of anti -CCP antibodies in rheumatic diseases in Indian patients

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    Gupta Rajiva

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: The usefulness of anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies (anti-CCP antibodies to identify rheumatic arthritis (RA from other rheumatic diseases presenting with joint pain is not well studied. Aims: We aimed to determine the sensitivity and specificity of anti-CCP antibodies in Indian RA patients with respect to non-RA rheumatic diseases and to study the relationship of anti-CCP antibodies and IgG, IgM and IgA rheumatoid factor in RA. Settings and Design: Case-control cross-sectional study carried out in the rheumatology division of All India Institute of Medical Sciences.Materials and Methods: Sixty-three patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA and 51 patients with non-RA rheumatic diseases having joint pain were included in the study. Sera were tested for anti-CCP antibodies (IgG and IgA, IgM, IgG rheumatoid factor, using a commercially available enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Statistical Analysis: Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS statistical software version 11.5. Results: Fifty-four of 63 RA patients (85.71% were positive for anti-CCP antibodies. In the non-RA group, anti-CCP antibody was positive in only 5 of 51 patients (9.8%. Our study found a sensitivity of 85% and a specificity of 90.19% with regard to the use of anti-CCP antibodies assay in patients with joint pain to correctly identify RA. Anti-CCP antibodies positive patients did not have more erosive disease. IgM-RF-positive patients had more erosion when compared to the IgM-RF-negative group. Thirty-two of 57 (56.1% IgM-RF-positive patients had erosions, while no patient (0/6 patients had erosions in the IgM-RF-negative group (P = 0.01 Conclusion: Anti-CCP antibodies have high sensitivity and specificity for diagnosis of RA, in Indian patients. Anti-CCP antibodies positive patients did not have more erosive disease in our study.

  20. Mechanisms of action of spa therapies in rheumatic diseases: what scientific evidence is there?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fioravanti, Antonella; Cantarini, Luca; Guidelli, Giacomo Maria; Galeazzi, Mauro

    2011-01-01

    Spa therapy represents a popular treatment for many rheumatic diseases. The mechanisms by which immersion in mineral or thermal water or the application of mud alleviates suffering in rheumatic diseases are not fully understood. The net benefit is probably the result of a combination of factors, with mechanical, thermal and chemical effects among the most prominent ones. Buoyancy, immersion, resistance and temperature all play important roles. According to the gate theory, pain relief may be due to the pressure and temperature of the water on skin; hot stimuli may influence muscle tone and pain intensity, helping to reduce muscle spasm and to increase the pain threshold. Mud-bath therapy increases plasma β-endorphin levels and secretion of corticotrophin, cortisol, growth hormone and prolactin. It has recently been demonstrated that thermal mud-pack therapy induces a reduction in the circulating levels of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), leukotriene B4 (LTB4), interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), important mediators of inflammation and pain. Spa therapy has been found to cause an increase in insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF1), which stimulates cartilage metabolism, and transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β). There is also evidence of the positive action of mud-packs and thermal baths on the oxidant/antioxidant system, with a reduction in the release of reactive oxygen (ROS) and nitrogen (RNS) species. Overall, thermal stress has an immunosuppressive effect. Many other non-specific factors may also contribute to the beneficial effects observed after spa therapy in some rheumatic diseases, including effects on cardiovascular risk factors, and changes in the environment, pleasant surroundings and the absence of work duties.

  1. Clinical significance of markers of collagen metabolism in rheumatic mitral valve disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Tanima; Mukherjee, Somaditya; Ghosh, Sudip; Biswas, Monodeep; Dutta, Santanu; Pattari, Sanjib; Chatterjee, Shelly; Bandyopadhyay, Arun

    2014-01-01

    Rheumatic Heart Disease (RHD), a chronic acquired heart disorder results from Acute Rheumatic Fever. It is a major public health concern in developing countries. In RHD, mostly the valves get affected. The present study investigated whether extracellular matrix remodelling in rheumatic valve leads to altered levels of collagen metabolism markers and if such markers can be clinically used to diagnose or monitor disease progression. This is a case control study comprising 118 subjects. It included 77 cases and 41 healthy controls. Cases were classified into two groups- Mitral Stenosis (MS) and Mitral Regurgitation (MR). Carboxy-terminal propeptide of type I procollagen (PICP), amino-terminal propeptide of type III procollagen (PIIINP), total Matrix Metalloproteinase-1(MMP-1) and Tissue Inhibitor of Metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1) were assessed. Histopathology studies were performed on excised mitral valve leaflets. A p value valve replacement (pvalve area (r = -0.40; r = 0.49 respectively) and pulmonary artery systolic pressure (r = 0.49; r = -0.49 respectively); while in MR they correlated with left ventricular internal diastolic (r = 0.68; r = -0.48 respectively) and systolic diameters (r = 0.65; r = -0.55 respectively). Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis established PICP as a better marker (AUC = 0.95; 95% CI = 0.91-0.99; p459 ng/mL for PICP provided 91% sensitivity, 90% specificity and a likelihood ratio of 9 in diagnosing RHD. Histopathology analysis revealed inflammation, scarring, neovascularisation and extensive leaflet fibrosis in diseased mitral valve. Levels of collagen metabolism markers correlated with echocardiographic parameters for RHD diagnosis.

  2. Modeling systemic autoimmune rheumatic disease in rats under the adverse weather conditions

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    Yegudina Ye.D.

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Changes in the lungs, heart and kidneys are found in all animals with experimental systemic autoimmune rheumatic disease and respectively in 47%, 47% and 40% of cases of intact rats in a hostile environment with xenobiotics air pollution (ammonia + benzene + formalin, herewith in every third or fourth individual lesions of visceral vessels developed. The negative environmental situation increases the frequency of morphological signs of the disease, such as proliferation of endothelial vessels of the heart by 68% and renal arterioles by 52%, in addition, there are direct correlations of angiopathy degree in individual organs; this depends on the nature of pathological process modeling and demonstrates air pollution as a risk factor of disease in humans. The impact of pulmonary vessels sclerosis on the development of bronhosclerosis, perivascular infiltration of the heart muscle on the lymphocyte-macrophage infiltration of the stroma of the myocardium and sclerosis of renal arterioles on the degree of nephroslerosis of stroma is directly associated, with the model of systemic autoimmune rheumatic diseases whereas air pollution by xenobiotics determines dependences of the degree of cellular infiltration of alveolar septa from perivascular pulmonary infiltration, the development of cardiomyocytes hypertrophy from proliferation of the heart endothelial vessels, increase of kidney mesangial matrix from the proliferation of endothelial glomerular capillaries.

  3. The Clinical Application of Anti-CCP in Rheumatoid Arthritis and Other Rheumatic Diseases

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    CT Chou

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is a common rheumatic disease in Caucasians and in other ethnic groups. Diagnosis is mainly based on clinical features. Before 1998, the only serological laboratory test that could contribute to the diagnosis was that for rheumatoid factor (RF. The disease activity markers for the evaluation of clinical symptoms or treatment outcome were the erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR and C-reactive protein (CRP. As a matter of fact, the diagnosis of early RA is quite impossible, as the clinical criteria are insuffi cient at the beginning stage of the disease. In 1998, Schelleken reported that a high percentage of RA patients had a specifi c antibody that could interact with a synthetic peptide which contained the amino acid citrulline. The high specifi city (98% for RA of this new serological marker, anti-cyclic citrullinated antibody (anti-CCP antibody, can be detected early in RA, before the typical clinical features appear. The presence or absence of this antibody can easily distinguish other rheumatic diseases from RA. Additionally, the titer of anti-CCP can be used to predict the prognosis and treatment outcome after DMARDs or biological therapy. Therefore, with improvement of sensitivity, the anti-CCP antibody will be widely used as a routine laboratory test in the clinical practice for RA.

  4. SPONTANEOUS IMMUNOGLOBULIN-SYNTHESIZING ACTIVITY OF B LYMPHOCYTES IN INFLAMMATORY RHEUMATIC DISEASES

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    A.T. T. Mamasaidov

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. The aim of present work was to evaluate clinical significance of B-lymphocytes spontaneous antibody-synthesizing activity by B-lymphocytes (LASA in patients with rheumatic inflammatory diseases (RD, i.e., reactive arthritis (ReA, ankylosing spondylitis (AS, rheumatoid arthritis (RA, and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE. Significantly higher LASA levels were revealed in the patients with ReA, AS, RA, and SLE, as compared with healthy persons and patients with osteoarthrosis. Clinical significance of LASA indexes and their changes may reflect manifestation and degree of immunological activities in ReA, AS, RA, and SLE.

  5. [Modern ultrasonographic techniques for the study of the synovial membrane in rheumatic diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeka, Sławomir; Sokólska, Elzbieta; Ignaczak, Piotr; Dura, Marta

    2010-01-01

    In recent years ultrasonography has become one of basic imaging techniques used by radiologists, orthopedists, and rheumatologists for the study of the musculoskeletal system, particularly in patients with rheumatic diseases. This position of ultrasonography is the result of rapid technical advances. Contemporary ultrasound scanners have little in common with those used when ultrasonography was introduced into medicine. Modern ultrasound scanners offer additional options like tissue harmonic imaging, power color Doppler, volumetric ultrasonography (3D/4D imaging), and contrast-enhanced ultrasonography. Moreover, image resolution during examination has significantly been improved thanks to high-resolution transducers and software for image analysis. This article discusses modern ultrasonographic techniques and their use.

  6. Impact of Fatigue in Rheumatic Diseases in the Work Environment: A Qualitative Study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Connolly, Deirdre

    2015-10-28

    Fatigue is a symptom of arthritis that causes difficulty at work. An improved understanding of this symptom could assist its management in the work environment. The aim of this study was to explore people with rheumatic diseases\\' experiences of fatigue in work. A qualitative descriptive design was used with semi-structured interviews and a constant comparative method of data analysis. There were 18 participants, the majority of them female with Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) and working full-time. Three themes were identified: "Impact of fatigue on work performance" with cognition, mood and physical abilities being the main difficulties reported. In the second theme "Disclosure at Work" participants discussed disclosing their disease to employers but reported a lack of understanding of fatigue from colleagues. The final theme "work-based fatigue management strategies" included cognitive strategies and energy management techniques, which were mainly self-taught. In this study, fatigue was reported to impact on many areas of work performance with limited understanding from colleagues and employers. Interventions from health professionals to assist with development of work-related self-management skills are required to assist with symptom management in the work place. Such interventions should include education to employers and colleagues on the nature of fatigue in Rheumatic diseases.

  7. Incidence of neoplasms in the most prevalent autoimmune rheumatic diseases: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Roberta Ismael Lacerda; Braz, Alessandra de Sousa; Freire, Eutilia Andrade Medeiros

    2014-01-01

    This article is a systematic review of the literature about the coexistence of cancer and autoimmune rheumatic diseases, their main associations, cancers and possible risk factors associated, with emphasis on existing population-based studies, besides checking the relation of this occur with the use of the drugs used in the treatment of autoimmune diseases. A search was conducted of scientific articles indexed in the Cochrane / BVS, Pubmed / Medline and Scielo / Lilacs in the period from 2002 to 2012. Also consulted was the IB-ICT (Brazilian digital library of theses and Masters), with descriptors in Portuguese and English for "Systemic sclerosis", "Rheumatoid Arthritis", " Systemic Lupus Erythematosus" and "Sjögren's syndrome", correlating each one with the descriptor AND "neoplasms". The results showed that in the database IBICT a thesis and a dissertation for the descriptor SLE met the inclusion criteria, none met RA one thesis to SS. Lilacs in the database/Scielo found two articles on "Rheumatoid Arthritis" AND "neoplasms". In Pubmed/Medline the inicial search resulted in 118 articles, and 41 were selected. The review noted the relationship between cancer and autoimmune rheumatic diseases, as well as a risk factor for protection, although the pathophysiological mechanisms are not known.

  8. CURRENT APPROACHES TO THE LABORATORY DIAGNOSIS OF RHEUMATIC DISEASES: ROLE OF MOLECULAR AND CELLULAR BIOMARKERS

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    E. N. Aleksandrova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Laboratory medicine in the early 21st century has achieved advances due to the development and prompt practical introduction of innovative molecular cell technologies, which have assisted in increasing the diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of laboratory tests and in substantially expanding the spectrum of study biomarkers in rheumatology. High-technology automated analytical systems using both classical uniplex methods for immunochemical analysis (indirect immunofluorescence test, enzyme immunoassay, immunoblotting, immunodot assay, immunonephelometry, chemiluminescence immunoassay, and radioimmunoassay and multiplex diagnostic platforms based on DNA, RNA, protein and cellular microchips, polymerase chain reaction, flow cytometry, and mass spectrometry have been used in the past decade to determine biomarkers of rheumatic diseases (RD in blood, synovial fluid, urine, biopsy specimens of the synovial membrane, kidney, and other affected tissues.Present-day generation of molecular and cellular biomarkers (autoantibodies, acute-phase inflammatory proteins, cytokines, chemokines, vascular endothelial activation markers, immunoglobulins, complement components, lymphocyte subpopulations, osseous and cartilaginous tissue metabolic products, intracellular signaling molecules, proteases, and genetic, epigenetic, and transcriptomic markers is an important tool for prevention, early diagnosis, assessment of disease activity, progression rate, clinical laboratory subtypes of RD, prediction of the efficiency of therapy and the risk of adverse events during treatment. Deciphering of the key pathogenetic mechanisms of RD could identify the molecular and cellular biomarkers that might be used as therapeutic targets. Biologicals (monoclonal antibodies and hybrid protein molecules that selectively inhibit proinflammatory cytokines and membrane molecules mediating the pathological activation of immunocompetent cells are successfully used to treat RD today

  9. Factors promoting health-related quality of life in people with rheumatic diseases: a 12 month longitudinal study

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    Arvidsson Barbro

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rheumatic diseases have a significant adverse impact on the individual from physical, mental and social aspects, resulting in a low health-related quality of life (HRQL. There is a lack of longitudinal studies on HRQL in people with rheumatic diseases that focus on factors promoting HRQL instead of risk factors. The aim of this study was to investigate the associations between suggested health promoting factors at baseline and outcome in HRQL at a 12 month follow-up in people with rheumatic diseases. Methods A longitudinal cohort study was conducted in 185 individuals with rheumatic diseases with questionnaires one week and 12 months after rehabilitation in a Swedish rheumatology clinic. HRQL was assessed by SF-36 together with suggested health factors. The associations between SF-36 subscales and the health factors were analysed by multivariable logistic regressions. Results Factors predicting better outcome in HRQL in one or several SF-36 subscales were being younger or middle-aged, feeling painless, having good sleep structure, feeling rested after sleep, performing low effort of exercise more than twice per week, having strong sense of coherence (SOC, emotional support and practical assistance, higher educational level and work capacity. The most important factors were having strong SOC, feeling rested after sleep, having work capacity, being younger or middle-aged, and having good sleep structure. Conclusions This study identified several factors that promoted a good outcome in HRQL to people with rheumatic diseases. These health factors could be important to address in clinical work with rheumatic diseases in order to optimise treatment strategies.

  10. Impact of Fatigue in Rheumatic Diseases in the Work Environment: A Qualitative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deirdre Connolly

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Fatigue is a symptom of arthritis that causes difficulty at work. An improved understanding of this symptom could assist its management in the work environment. The aim of this study was to explore people with rheumatic diseases’ experiences of fatigue in work. A qualitative descriptive design was used with semi-structured interviews and a constant comparative method of data analysis. There were 18 participants, the majority of them female with Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA and working full-time. Three themes were identified: “Impact of fatigue on work performance” with cognition, mood and physical abilities being the main difficulties reported. In the second theme “Disclosure at Work” participants discussed disclosing their disease to employers but reported a lack of understanding of fatigue from colleagues. The final theme “work-based fatigue management strategies” included cognitive strategies and energy management techniques, which were mainly self-taught. In this study, fatigue was reported to impact on many areas of work performance with limited understanding from colleagues and employers. Interventions from health professionals to assist with development of work-related self-management skills are required to assist with symptom management in the work place. Such interventions should include education to employers and colleagues on the nature of fatigue in Rheumatic diseases.

  11. TNF inhibitors increase fat mass in inflammatory rheumatic disease: a systematic review with meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marouen, Sarah; Barnetche, Thomas; Combe, Bernard; Morel, Jacques; Daïen, Claire I

    2017-01-01

    To assess body composition of patients with inflammatory rheumatic disease and the effect of TNF inhibitors on it. This was systematic review with meta-analysis of studies consulted on PubMed, Cochrane Library and EMBASE and assessing body composition in patients with rheumatoid arthritis or spondyloarthritis. We compared i) patients with healthy controls and ii) body components before and after TNF inhibitors. Among the 703 articles reviewed, 19 met the inclusion criteria. In patients with rheumatoid arthritis, a significant increase in fat mass (+1.85 kg, p=0.02), adiposity (+3.53%, pincrease in fat mass (+0.69 kg, p=0.03) and a significant decrease in lean mass (-3.74 kg, p=0.03) were observed. Nine studies assessed impact of TNF inhibitors on body composition, with an increase of fat mass in the short and long term in all studies. Data on lean mass were controversial. Two studies found an increase in visceral or android mass under TNF inhibitors. Patients with inflammatory rheumatic disease have a significant decrease in lean mass and increase in fat mass. The use of TNF inhibitors is associated with a further increase in fat mass including android fat, which could potentially have cardiovascular consequences.

  12. A practical approach to vaccination of patients with autoimmune inflammatory rheumatic diseases in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Peter Kk; Bagga, Hanish; Barrett, Claire; Hanrahan, Paddy; Johnson, Doug; Katrib, Amel; Leder, Karin; Marabani, Mona; Pentony, Peta; Riordan, John; White, Ray; Young, Laurel

    2017-01-19

    Autoimmune inflammatory rheumatic diseases (AIIRD) such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA), psoriatic arthritis (PsA) and ankylosing spondylitis (AS) are often complicated by infection, which results in significant morbidity and mortality. The increased risk of infection is probably due to a combination of immunosuppressive effects of the AIIRD, comorbidities, and the use of immunosuppressive conventional synthetic disease modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDS) and more recently, targeted synthetic DMARDS and biologic DMARDS which block specific pro-inflammatory enzymes, cytokines or cell types. The use of these various DMARDS has revolutionized the treatment of AIIRD. This has led to a marked improvement in quality of life for AIIRD patients, who often now travel for prolonged periods. Many infections are preventable with vaccination. However, as protective immune responses induced by vaccination may be impaired by immunosuppression, where possible, vaccination may need to be performed prior to initiation of immunosuppression. Vaccination status should also be reviewed when planning overseas travel. Limited data regarding vaccine efficacy in patients with AIIRD makes prescriptive guidelines difficult. However, a vaccination history should be part of the initial work-up in all AIIRD patients. Those caring for AIIRD patients should regularly consider vaccination to prevent infection within the practicalities of routine clinical practice.

  13. Alendronate prevents glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis in patients with rheumatic diseases: A meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kan, Shun-Li; Yuan, Zhi-Fang; Li, Yan; Ai, Jie; Xu, Hong; Sun, Jing-Cheng; Feng, Shi-Qing

    2016-06-01

    Glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis (GIOP) is a serious problem for patients with rheumatic diseases requiring long-term glucocorticoid treatment. Alendronate, a bisphosphonate, has been recommended in the prevention of GIOP. However, the efficacy and safety of alendronate in preventing GIOP remains controversial. We performed a meta-analysis to investigate the efficacy and safety of alendronate in preventing GIOP in patients with rheumatic diseases.We retrieved randomized controlled trials from PubMed, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library. Two reviewers extracted the data and evaluated the risk of bias and quality of the evidence. We calculated the risk ratio (RR) with a 95% confidence interval (CI) for dichotomous outcomes, and the mean difference (MD) with a 95% CI for continuous outcomes using Review Manager, version 5.3.A total of 339 studies were found, and 9 studies (1134 patients) were included. Alendronate was not able to reduce the incidence of vertebral fractures (RR = 0.63, 95% CI: 0.10-4.04, P = 0.62) and nonvertebral fractures (RR = 0.40, 95% CI: 0.15-1.12, P = 0.08). Alendronate significantly increased the percent change in bone mineral density (BMD) at the lumbar spine (MD = 3.66, 95% CI: 2.58-4.74, P power.

  14. Comparative assessment of vascular function in autoimmune rheumatic diseases: considerations of prevention and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soltész, Pál; Kerekes, György; Dér, Henriett; Szücs, Gabriella; Szántó, Sándor; Kiss, Emese; Bodolay, Edit; Zeher, Margit; Timár, Orsolya; Szodoray, Péter; Szegedi, Gyula; Szekanecz, Zoltán

    2011-05-01

    Numerous autoimmune-inflammatory rheumatic diseases have been associated with accelerated atherosclerosis or other types of vasculopathy leading to increased cardio- and cerebrovascular disease risk. Traditional risk factors, as well as the role of systemic inflammation including cytokines, chemokines, proteases, autoantibodies, adhesion receptors and others have been implicated in the development of these vascular pathologies. The characteristics of vasculopathies may significantly differ depending on the underlying disease. While classical accelerated atherosclerosis has been associated with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) or spondyloarthropathies (SpA), obliterative vasculopathy may rather be characteristic for systemic sclerosis (SSc) or mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD). Antiphospholipid antibodies have been implicated in vasculopathies underlying SLE, antiphospholipid syndrome (APS), RA and MCTD. There is also heterogeneity with respect to inflammatory risk factors. Cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) or interleukin 6 (IL-6) and immune complexes are primarily involved in arthritides, such as RA, SpA, as well as in SLE. On the other hand, autoantibodies including anti-oxLDL anti-cardiolipin and anti-β2GPI are rather involved in SLE- and APS-associated vasculopathies. Regarding the non-invasive assessment of vascular function, endothelial dysfunction, overt atherosclerosis and vascular stiffness may be indicated by brachial artery flow-mediated vasodilation (FMD), common carotid intima-media thickness (ccIMT) and aortic pulse-wave velocity (PWV), respectively. These abnormalities have been described in most inflammatory rheumatic diseases. While ccIMT and stiffness are relatively stable, FMD may be influenced by many confounding factors. In addition to traditional vasculoprotection, immunosuppressive agents including corticosteroids, traditional and biologic DMARDs may have significant vascular and metabolic

  15. Vaccination of patients with auto-immune inflammatory rheumatic diseases requires careful benefit-risk assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bijl, M; Agmon-Levin, N; Dayer, J-M; Israeli, E; Gatto, M; Shoenfeld, Y

    2012-06-01

    Will vaccination raise the incidence of autoimmune diseases, what is the impact of increasingly crowded vaccination schedules, the vaccination in age groups and the risk of coincidental temporal association? All these issues are still under debate. However, for the time being, to avoid confusion in the medical community and the media, we have to adhere to guidelines established consensually by experts while ensuring a strict surveillance and reporting possible side effects. Recommendation for vaccination in patients with autoimmune inflammatory rheumatic diseases (AIIRD) based on the currently available evidence and expert opinion were recently formulated by an EULAR task force. Major recommendations for AIIRD include: i) vaccination should ideally be administered during stable disease; ii) influenza vaccination and pneumococcal vaccination should be strongly considered; iii) vaccination can be administered during the use of DMARDs and TNF-inhibitors, but before starting rituximab; iv) live attenuated vaccines should be avoided whenever possible in immunosuppressed patients; v) BCG vaccination is not recommended.

  16. [Biologicals for children and adolescents in the treatment of rheumatic diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huppertz, H-I

    2012-09-01

    Following pharmacolegal measures several biologic agents have been tested in children and adolescents with rheumatic diseases, mainly juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), in controlled trials and have been introduced into treatment algorithms. This was achieved by international research cooperation and after introduction of well-defined criteria for disease entities, disease activity, improvement and deterioration. Etanercept, adalimumab, abatacept, tocilizumab and canakinumab have obtained limited licenses. Etanercept is the longest available biologic agent. Etanercept or adalimumab are the treatment of choice when methotrexate is not sufficient or toxic in children with polyarthritis. Tocilizumab is given to patients with systemic JIA when glucocorticoids fail or become toxic. These and other biologic agents including anakinra and rituximab are effectively applied also off label; however, there is a lack of long-term studies. These drugs should be prescribed only by pediatric rheumatologists.

  17. The pharmacological mechanisms and therapeutic activities of hydroxychloroquine in rheumatic and related diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Changfeng; Lu, Lu; Wan, Jie-Ping; Wen, Chengping

    2017-03-16

    Hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) is known as one of the most fascinating synthetic antimalarial drugs during the last 50 years. It is currently among the most commonly employed medicines for the clinical treatment of rheumatic diseases, especially systemic lupus erythematosus and rheumatoid arthritis. In related mechanism studies, it has been found that HCQ possesses various immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory activities. In addition, the effects of HCQ on anti-platelet, metabolic pathways, and antineoplasticity have also been disclosed in more recent studies. These significant findings on HCQ suggest the potential therapeutic applications of HCQ for treatment of many diseases, such as cancers, skin disease, antiphospholipid syndrome, etc. This review focuses on recent in vitro and clinical trials on its pharmacological mechanisms, therapeutic activities, and potential adverse effects.

  18. Vitamin D endocrine system and the immune response in rheumatic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutolo, Maurizio; Plebani, M; Shoenfeld, Yehuda; Adorini, Luciano; Tincani, Angela

    2011-01-01

    Epidemiological evidence indicates a significant association between vitamin D deficiency and an increased incidence of autoimmune diseases. The presence of vitamin D receptors (VDRs) in the cells of the immune system and the fact that several of these cells produce the vitamin D hormone suggested that vitamin D could have immunoregulatory properties, and now potent immunomodulatory activities on dendritic cells, Th1 and Th17 cells, as well as B cells have been confirmed. Serum levels of vitamin D have been found to be significantly lower in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus, undifferentiated connective tissue disease, and type-1 diabetes mellitus than in the healthy population. In addition, it was also found that lower levels of vitamin D were associated with higher disease activity in rheumatoid arthritis. Promising clinical results together with evidence for the regulation of multiple immunomodulatory mechanisms by VDR agonists represent a sound basis for further exploration of their potential in the treatment of rheumatic autoimmune disorders.

  19. Prevalence and clinical significance of nonorgan specific antibodies in patients with autoimmune thyroiditis as predictor markers for rheumatic diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elnady, Basant M.; Kamal, Naglaa M.; Shaker, Raneyah H.M.; Soliman, Amal F.; Hasan, Waleed A.; Alghamdi, Hamed A.; Algethami, Mohammed M.; Jajah, Mohamed Bilal

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Autoimmune diseases are considered the 3rd leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the industrialized countries. Autoimmune thyroid diseases (ATDs) are associated with high prevalence of nonorgan-specific autoantibodies, such as antinuclear antibodies (ANA), antidouble-stranded deoxyribonucleic acid (anti-dsDNA), antiextractable-nuclear antigens (anti-ENAs), rheumatoid factor (RF), and anticyclic-citrullinated peptides (anti-CCP) whose clinical significance is unknown. We aimed to assess the prevalence of various nonorgan-specific autoantibodies in patients with ATD, and to investigate the possible association between these autoantibodies and occurrence of rheumatic diseases and, if these autoantibodies could be considered as predictor markers for autoimmune rheumatic diseases in the future. This study had 2 phases: phase 1; in which 61 ATD patients free from rheumatic manifestations were assessed for the presence of these nonorgan-specific autoantibodies against healthy 61 control group, followed by 2nd phase longitudinal clinical follow-up in which cases are monitored systematically to establish occurrence and progression of any rheumatic disease in association to these autoantibodies with its influences and prognosis. Regarding ATD patients, ANA, anti-dsDNA, Anti-ENA, and RF were present in a percentage of (50.8%), (18%), (21.3%), and (34.4%), respectively, with statistically significance difference (P < 0.5) rather than controls. Nearly one third of the studied group (32.8%) developed the rheumatic diseases, over 2 years follow-up. It was obvious that those with positive anti-dsDNA had higher risk (2.45 times) to develop rheumatic diseases than those without. There was a statistically significant positive linear relationship between occurrence of disease in months and (age, anti-dsDNA, anti-CCP, RF, and duration of thyroiditis). Anti-dsDNA and RF are the most significant predictors (P < 0.0001). ATD is more associated with rheumatic

  20. Adherence to secondary prophylaxis and disease recurrence in 536 Brazilian children with rheumatic fever

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Oliveira Sheila KF

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background More than 15 million people worldwide have rheumatic fever (RF and rheumatic heart disease due to RF. Secondary prophylaxis is a critical cost-effective intervention for preventing morbidity and mortality related to RF. Ensuring adequate adherence to secondary prophylaxis for RF is a challenging task. This study aimed to describe the rates of recurrent episodes of RF, quantify adherence to secondary prophylaxis, and examine the effects of medication adherence to the rates of RF in a cohort of Brazilian children and adolescents with RF. Methods This retrospective study took place in the Pediatric Rheumatology outpatient clinic at a tertiary care hospital (Instituto de Puericultura e Pediatria Martagão Gesteira in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, and included patients with a diagnosis of RF from 1985 to 2005. Results 536 patients with RF comprised the study sample. Recurrent episodes of RF occurred in 88 of 536 patients (16.5%. Patients with a recurrent episode of RF were younger (p Conclusions We recommend implementation of a registry, and a system of active search of missing patients in every service responsible for the follow-up of RF patients. Measures to increase adherence to secondary prophylaxis need to be implemented formally, once non-adherence to secondary prophylaxis is the main cause of RF recurrence. Detection of irregularity in secondary prophylaxis or in appointments should be an alert about the possibility of loss of follow-up and closer observation should be instituted.

  1. Clinical and echocardiographic features of children with rheumatic heart disease and their serum cytokine profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Sulafa Khalid Mohamed; Eldaim, Inaam Noor; Osman, Samia Hassan; Bakhite, Sahar Mohamed

    2012-01-01

    Acute rheumatic fever (ARF) and rheumatic heart disease (RHD) constitute important public health problems in developing countries. Children with ARF and RHD seen at Children's Hospital-Sudan from May 2008-2009 were examined clinically and by echocardiography. Blood cytokines (interleukin 10 (IL10), Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF- alpha) and interferon gamma (IFN-gamma) were done. Thirty six children were enrolled; 63% had established RHD, and 37% ARF. Mitral regurgitation (MR) was the most common lesion (94%).Ninety five percent of the valve lesions were severe. The serum interleukin IL10 level ranged between 3-6 pg/ml. TNF alpha levels were 9- 100 pg/ml in 12 patients (40%), 101-1000 pg/ml in 10 patients (33%), more than 1000 in 8 patients (26%). The level of IFN gamma ranged between 2-7 pg/m in all patients except 2 (84 and 135 pg/ml). RHD is manifested with severe valvular lesions and a high TNF alpha indicating and ongoing inflammation.

  2. Endoplasmic reticulum-associated amino-peptidase 1 and rheumatic disease: genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ombrello, Michael J; Kastner, Daniel L; Remmers, Elaine F

    2015-07-01

    This article will review the genetic evidence implicating ERAP1, which encodes the endoplasmic reticulum-associated amino-peptidase 1, in susceptibility to rheumatic disease. Genetic variants and haplotypes of ERAP1 are associated with AS, psoriasis, and Behçet's disease in people of varying ancestries. In each of these diseases, disease-associated variants of ERAP1 have been shown to interact with disease-associated class I human leukocyte antigen alleles to influence disease risk. Functionally, disease-associated missense variants of ERAP1 concertedly alter ERAP1 enzymatic function, both quantitatively and qualitatively, whereas other disease-associated variants influence ERAP1 expression. Therefore, ERAP1 haplotypes (or allotypes) should be examined as functional units. Biologically, this amounts to an examination of the gene regulation and function of the protein encoded by each allotype. Genetically, the relationship between disease risk and ERAP1 allotypes should be examined to determine whether allotypes or individual variants produce the most parsimonious risk models. Future investigations of ERAP1 should focus on comprehensively characterizing naturally occurring ERAP1 allotypes, examining the enzymatic function and gene expression of each allotype, and identifying specific allotypes that influence disease susceptibility.

  3. Drug use during pregnancy; asking questions and finding answers for women with a rheumatic disease : Drug use during pregnancy; asking questions and finding answers for women with a rheumatic disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vroom, Fokaline; Van De Laar, Mart A. F. J.; Van Roon, Eric N.; De Walle, Hermien E. K.; De Jong-van Den Berg, Lolkje T. W.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Evidence about drug use in pregnancy is scarce and often inconsistent. This study explored what questions women with rheumatic diseases have concerning drug use during pregnancy and their satisfaction with the answers they obtained. Design and methods: Through the website of the Dutch

  4. Post-epidemic Chikungunya disease on Reunion Island: course of rheumatic manifestations and associated factors over a 15-month period.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daouda Sissoko

    Full Text Available Although the acute manifestations of Chikungunya virus (CHIKV illness are well-documented, few data exist about the long-term rheumatic outcomes of CHIKV-infected patients. We undertook between June and September 2006 a retrospective cohort study aimed at assessing the course of late rheumatic manifestations and investigating potential risk factors associated with the persistence of these rheumatic manifestations over 15 months. 147 participants (>16 yrs with laboratory-confirmed CHIKV disease diagnosed between March 1 and June 30, 2005, were identified through a surveillance database and interviewed by telephone. At the 15-month-period evaluation after diagnosis, 84 of 147 participants (57% self-reported rheumatic symptoms. Of these 84 patients, 53 (63% reported permanent trouble while 31 (37% had recurrent symptoms. Age > or=45 years (OR = 3.9, 95% CI 1.7-9.7, severe initial joint pain (OR = 4.8, 95% CI 1.9-12.1, and presence of underlying osteoarthritis comorbidity (OR = 2.9, 95% CI 1.1-7.4 were predictors of nonrecovery. Our findings suggest that long-term CHIKV rheumatic manifestations seem to be a frequent underlying post-epidemic condition. Three independent risk factors that may aid in early recognition of patients with the highest risk of presenting prolonged CHIKV illness were identified. Such findings may be particularly useful in the development of future prevention and care strategies for this emerging virus infection.

  5. Treatment of rheumatic diseases in patients with HCV and HIV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galeazzi, Mauro; Giannitti, Chiara; Manganelli, Stefania; Benucci, Maurizio; Scarpato, Salvatore; Bazzani, Chiara; Caporali, Roberto; Sebastiani, Gian Domenico

    2008-12-01

    A wide variety of rheumatic diseases has been documented in the presence of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection and in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. In this conditions, physicians are refrained from using corticosteroids and/or immunosuppressants agents because of the risk of favouring viral replication and the progression of the underlying viral disease. In the present review we have focused our attention on the possible role of cyclosporine A (CsA), anti-Tumour Necrosis Factor (TNF) alpha agents in the treatment of HIV or HCV infected autoimmune patients. The results drown from the literature and from our personal experience confirm the safety of CsA and anti-TNF alpha agents, in terms of viral load and liver toxicity. A limited experience also suggest that both therapies can be given in combination in rheumatoid arthritis patients without increasing the risk of adverse events.

  6. STUDIES OF THE POSSIBILITY OF OBTAINING ECOLOGICALLY BASED CREAM CAPSAICIN IN THE TREATMENT OF RHEUMATIC DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olimpia PANDIA

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Since herbal medicine makes strides to improve or cure of diseases or serious diseases to human, wherepreparations obtained by chemical are replaced successfully with herbal preparations obtained herbs, aromatic orthose of spontaneous. Thus, in this paper, several attempts are made to prepare a capsaicin based creams antrheumatic. This product is an environmentally friendly product, 100% vegetable produced in the laboratory as abase flossing a chilli extract obtained from private household, beeswax, distilled water, alcohol and peppermint oil.By obtaining this cream was intended to improve or cure people suffering from rheumatism, to relieve pain causedby arthritis, you know, is a readily available even at home, easy to manage, with immediate good results withoutside effects.

  7. Pattern recognition receptors as potential therapeutic targets in inflammatory rheumatic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullen, Lisa M; Chamberlain, Giselle; Sacre, Sandra

    2015-05-15

    The pattern recognition receptors of the innate immune system are part of the first line of defence against pathogens. However, they also have the ability to respond to danger signals that are frequently elevated during tissue damage and at sites of inflammation. Inadvertent activation of pattern recognition receptors has been proposed to contribute to the pathogenesis of many conditions including inflammatory rheumatic diseases. Prolonged inflammation most often results in pain and damage to tissues. In particular, the Toll-like receptors and nucleotide-binding oligomerisation domain-like receptors that form inflammasomes have been postulated as key contributors to the inflammation observed in rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis, gout and systemic lupus erythematosus. As such, there is increasing interest in targeting these receptors for therapeutic treatment in the clinic. Here the role of pattern recognition receptors in the pathogenesis of these diseases is discussed, with an update on the development of interventions to modulate the activity of these potential therapeutic targets.

  8. Comparison of qualitative and quantitative analysis of capillaroscopic findings in patients with rheumatic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambova, Sevdalina Nikolova; Hermann, Walter; Müller-Ladner, Ulf

    2012-12-01

    No guidelines for the application of qualitative and quantitative analysis of the capillaroscopic examination in the rheumatologic practice exist. The aims of the study were to compare qualitative and quantitative analysis of key capillaroscopic parameters in patients with common rheumatic diseases and to assess the reproducibility of the qualitative evaluation of the capillaroscopic parameters, performed by two different investigators. Two hundred capillaroscopic images from 93 patients with different rheumatic diseases were analysed quantitatively and qualitatively by two different investigators. The distribution of the images according to the diagnosis and the microvascular abnormalities was as follows-group 1: 73 images from systemic sclerosis patients ("scleroderma" type pattern), group 2: 10 images from dermatomyositis ("scleroderma-like" pattern), group 3: 25 images from undifferentiated connective tissue disease and different forms of overlap (24 "scleroderma-like"), group 4: 26 images from systemic lupus erythematosus patients, group 5: 46 images from rheumatoid arthritis and group 6: 20 images from primary Raynaud's phenomenon patients. All the images were mixed and blindly presented to both investigators. For comparison of the quantitative and qualitative method, investigator 1 assessed presence of dilated, giant capillaries and avascular areas quantitatively by the available software programme and his estimates were compared with the results of investigator 2, who assessed the parameters qualitatively. In addition, the capillaroscopic images were evaluated qualitatively by the investigator 1 and 2 for presence of dilated, giant capillaries, avascular areas and haemorrhages. The comparison of the quantitative and qualitative assessment of the two investigators demonstrated statistically significant difference between the two methods for the detection of dilated and giant capillaries (P 0.05). As we further analysed the results for the capillaroscopic

  9. Prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders and rheumatic disease in the Warao, Kari'ña, and Chaima indigenous populations of Monagas State, Venezuela.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granados, Ysabel; Rosillo, Celenia; Cedeño, Ligia; Martínez, Yanira; Sánchez, Gloris; López, Geovalis; Pérez, Fernando; Martínez, Damarys; Maestre, Gabriela; Berbin, Sol; Chacón, Rosa; Stekman, Iván; Valls, Evart; Peláez-Ballestas, Ingris

    2016-07-01

    This study aimed to estimate the prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders and rheumatic diseases in the Warao, Kari'ña, and Chaima indigenous populations of Monagas State, Venezuela. A cross-sectional, analytical, community-based study was conducted in 1537 indigenous subjects ≥18 years old (38.6 % male, mean age 41.4 ± 17.5 years). The cross-culturally validated Community Oriented Program for the Control of Rheumatic Diseases (COPCORD) diagnostic questionnaire was applied. Subjects with a positive COPCORD diagnosis (either historic or current pain) were evaluated by primary care physicians and rheumatologists. A descriptive analysis was performed and comparisons made using analysis of variance and the chi-square test. Pain in the last 7 days was reported by 32.9 %, with pain intensity, according to a Likert-type scale [no pain, 195 (38.5 %); minimal pain, 231 (45.6 %); strong pain, 68 (13.4 %); intense pain, 5 (0.9 %)], 38.0 % reported historical pain, and 641 (41.7 %) had either historic or current pain. Of the COPCORD-positive subjects, pain most frequently occurred in the knee, back, and hands. Musculoskeletal and rheumatic diseases included osteoarthritis (14.1 %), back pain (12.4 %), rheumatic regional pain syndromes (RRPS) (9.7 %), undifferentiated arthritis (1.5 %), rheumatoid arthritis (1.1 %), and fibromyalgia (0.5 %). Chaima (18.3 %) and Kari'ña (15.6 %) subjects had a high prevalence of osteoarthritis, and Warao subjects had a high prevalence of low back pain (13.8 %). The prevalence of RRPS was high in all three ethnic groups. The Chaima group had the highest prevalence of rheumatic diseases, with 2.0 % having rheumatoid arthritis. This study provides useful information for health care policy-making in indigenous communities.

  10. EU Registries Forum Meeting is a new step in the development of international cooperation in rheumatic diseases registries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. E. Karateev

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available EU Registries Forum Meeting took place 2–3 March 2015 in Chantilly, France. Leading experts in the field participated in the forum. Registersnot only of Western Europe but also of Russia, USA, Canada and Japan were presented at the meeting. The most important directions of development of modern registers of patients with rheumatic diseases are the inclusion of comprehensive data on the process of care in practice, the integration of the data of registers in different countries, the active collection of information on the application of the new anti-rheumatic drugs

  11. Value of serum IgG4 in the diagnosis of IgG4-related disease and in differentiation from rheumatic diseases and other diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Motohisa; Tabeya, Tetsuya; Naishiro, Yasuyoshi; Yajima, Hidetaka; Ishigami, Keisuke; Shimizu, Yui; Obara, Mikiko; Suzuki, Chisako; Yamashita, Kentaro; Yamamoto, Hiroyuki; Hayashi, Toshiaki; Sasaki, Shigeru; Sugaya, Toshiaki; Ishida, Tadao; Takano, Ken-Ichi; Himi, Tetsuo; Suzuki, Yasuo; Nishimoto, Norihiro; Honda, Saho; Takahashi, Hiroki; Imai, Kohzoh; Shinomura, Yasuhisa

    2012-06-01

    IgG4-related disease (IgG4-RD) is a novel disease entity that includes Mikulicz's disease, autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP), and many other conditions. It is characterized by elevated serum IgG4 levels and abundant IgG4-bearing plasmacyte infiltration of involved organs. We postulated that high levels of serum IgG4 would comprise a useful diagnostic tool, but little information is available about IgG4 in conditions other than IgG4-RD, including rheumatic diseases. Several reports have described cutoff values for serum IgG4 when diagnosing IgG4-RD, but these studies mostly used 135 mg/dL in AIP to differentiate from pancreatic cancer instead of rheumatic and other common diseases. There is no evidence for a cutoff serum IgG4 level of 135 mg/dL for rheumatic diseases and common diseases that are often complicated with rheumatic diseases. The aim of this work was to re-evaluate the usual cutoff serum IgG4 value in AIP (135 mg/dL) that is used to diagnose whole IgG4-RD in the setting of a rheumatic clinic by measuring serum IgG4 levels in IgG4-RD and various disorders. We therefore constructed ROC curves of serum IgG4 levels in 418 patients who attended Sapporo Medical University Hospital due to IgG4-RD and various rheumatic and common disorders. The optimal cut-off value of serum IgG4 for a diagnosis of IgG4-RD was 144 mg/dL, and the sensitivity and specificity were 95.10 and 90.76%, respectively. Levels of serum IgG4 were elevated in IgG4-RD, Churg-Strauss syndrome, multicentric Castleman's disease, eosinophilic disorders, and in some patients with rheumatoid arthritis, systemic sclerosis, chronic hepatitis, and liver cirrhosis. The usual cut-off value of 135 mg/dL in AIP is useful for diagnosing whole IgG4-RD, but high levels of serum IgG4 are sometimes observed in not only IgG4-RD but also other rheumatic and common diseases.

  12. THE INCIDENCE AND PREVALENCE OF RHEUMATIC DISEASES IN RUSSIA IN 2012–2013

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    R. M. Balabanova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of major rheumatic diseases was analyzed inRussia's adult population  in 2012–2013 on the basis of the statistical reports of the Ministry of Health ofRussia(Form No. 12.Among the adult population  ofRussia, the overall incidence of acute rheumatic fever (ARF decreased by 11.6% (from 1666 to 1474 cases. No case of ARF was registered in 11 of the 83 subjects of the Federation in 2013. The inci- dence rates per 100,000 adult population  compared toRussia's ones were higher in theRepublicofIngushetia(21.0%, theChechen Republic(13.2%, and the Chukotka Autonomous District (26.2%. All cases of ARF were first notified. The overall incidence rates of chronic rheumatic heart diseases amongRussia's adult population  tend to reduce slightly [by 5.3% (from 182,286 to 172,687 cases].In the period in question, the total number of patients with musculoskeletal diseases (MSD  slightly rose. The bulk of rheumatic  patients from the MSD group are more than 4 million patients with osteoarthritis  (OA, half of them (2,454,563 being those who are older than able-bodied  age. The incidence of OA tends to increase in all Federal Districts (FD.  The most common  joint inflammatory diseases are rheumatoid  arthritis (RA (286,000 cases, spondylopathies  (90,000 cases, and osteoporosis (152,000 cases. The incidence rates of MSD per 100,000 adult population  are higher in the North-Western (19,397.7, Volga (16,552.6, and Siberian (16,133.4 FD thanRussia's mean rate (14,205.5. There were somewhat higher incidence rates of RA per 100,000 population  in 2013 than in 2012 (241.4 and 245.6, respectively. The rates in the North-Western, Ural, Far Eastern, and Volga FDs are higher than the mean Russian ones.In 2011, the rubric of «Ankylosing spondylitis» (AS was replaced by that of «Spondylopathies» that, besides AS (ICD-10 M45, encompasses other inflammatory spondylopathies  (M46, including infectious one, which does not allow single out the

  13. Acute rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease--priorities in prevention, diagnosis and management. A report of the CSANZ Indigenous Cardiovascular Health Conference, Alice Springs 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rémond, M G W; Wheaton, G R; Walsh, W F; Prior, D L; Maguire, G P

    2012-10-01

    Three priority areas in the prevention, diagnosis and management of acute rheumatic fever (ARF) and rheumatic heart disease (RHD) were identified and discussed in detail: 1. Echocardiography and screening/diagnosis of RHD – Given the existing uncertainty it remains premature to advocate for or to incorporate echocardiographic screening for RHD into Australian clinical practice. Further research is currently being undertaken to evaluate the potential for echocardiography screening. 2. Secondary prophylaxis – Secondary prophylaxis (long acting benzathine penicillin injections) must be seen as a priority. Systems-based approaches are necessary with a focus on the development and evaluation of primary health care-based or led strategies incorporating effective health information management systems. Better/novel systems of delivery of prophylactic medications should be investigated. 3. Management of advanced RHD – National centres of excellence for the diagnosis, assessment and surgical management of RHD are required. Early referral for surgical input is necessary with multidisciplinary care and team-based decision making that includes patient, family, and local health providers. There is a need for a national RHD surgical register and research strategy for the assessment, intervention and long-term outcome of surgery and other interventions for RHD.

  14. Recommendations of the ESSR Arthritis Subcommittee for the Use of Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Musculoskeletal Rheumatic Diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sudoł-Szopińska, Iwona; Jurik, Anne Grethe; Eshed, Iris

    2015-01-01

    This article presents the recommendations of the European Society of Musculoskeletal Radiology Arthritis Subcommittee regarding the standards of the use of MRI in the diagnosis of musculoskeletal rheumatic diseases. The recommendations discuss (1) the role of MRI in current classification criteri...

  15. Patients' considerations in the decision-making process of initiating disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nota, Ingrid; Drossaert, Constance H.C.; Taal, Erik; Laar, van de Mart A.F.J.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To explore what considerations patients have when deciding about disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs) and what information patients need to participate in the decision-making process. Methods In-depth face-to-face interviews were conducted with 32 inflammatory arthritis patien

  16. Preferences and needs of patients with a rheumatic disease regarding the structure and content of online self-management support

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ammerlaan, J.W.; van Os-Medendorp, H.; de Boer-Nijhof, N.C.; Maat, B.; Scholtus, L.; Kruize, A.A.; Bijlsma, J.W.J.; Geenen, R.

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Aim of this study was to investigate preferences and needs regarding the structure and content of a person-centered online self-management support intervention for patients with a rheumatic disease. METHODS: A four step procedure, consisting of online focus group interviews, consensus

  17. Rheumatic Fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visvanathan; Manjarez; Zabriskie

    1999-10-01

    There have been numerous reports stating that treatment of acute rheumatic fever with either aspirin or corticosteroids does not alter the long-term outcome of rheumatic heart disease. Yet, it should be emphasized that most of these studies were carried out with the first generic corticosteroids before the advent of the more active and more potent corticosteroid agents. In spite of this caveat, there is no question that all the clinical and laboratory parameters of inflammation (erythrocyte sedimentation rate, C-reactive protein) return to normal much more rapidly with corticosteroids than with aspirin alone. It is therefore our belief that steroids should be used when clinical and laboratory evidence of carditis exists, and aspirin should be reserved for cases of acute rheumatic arthritis with no evidence of carditis. The incidence of long-term valvular disease in active carditis may be decreased with steroid therapy. For example, the number of valve replacements differs markedly in centers that do use steroids and in those that do not. In Capetown, South Africa, where steroids are routinely used for carditis, valve replacement is quite rare. In contrast, in Johannesburg, where steroids are rarely used, the rate of valve replacement is quite high. The racial backgrounds of both groups of patients are similar, thus eliminating the question of racial differences. Concerning secondary prophylaxis, there is also controversy concerning the best second-line therapy. It is now well known that monthly intramuscular injections of benzathine penicillin are really effective for only 20 days. Thus, there is a window in which penicillin coverage is not adequate. To circumvent this problem, some investigators give benzathine penicillin every 3 weeks. These injections are quite painful, however, and it has been our "rule" that compliance with this treatment is inversely proportional to the ratio of the size of the child to the mother. In our own experience over 30 years with the

  18. High prevalence of hypovitaminosis D of patients with autoimmune rheumatic diseases in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Zhao-Hui; Gao, Cong-Cong; Wu, Zhen-Zhen; Liu, Sheng-Yun; Li, Tian-Fang; Gao, Guan-Min; Liu, Zhang-Suo

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to determine the prevalence of hypovitaminosis D in patients with autoimmune rheumatic diseases (ARDs) in China and its association with demographic characteristics of the patients. We recruited 384 patients in this cross-sectional study including 121 cases of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), 131 rheumatoid arthritis (RA), 102 spondyloarthritis (SpA) and 30 other ARDs. For each patient, demographic information was collected and serum concentration of 25OHD3 was measured by electrochemiluminescence immunoassay (ECLIA). The multivariate logistic regression model was used to investigate the association between vitamin D deficiency and patient characteristics. The mean serum vitamin D level of the 384 patients was 18.91 (8.12) ng/mL, and the median age was 37.33 (12.01) yrs. Among these patients, 222 (57.81%) and 127 (33.07%) were found to be vitamin D deficiency and insufficiency, respectively. From the disease perspective, the percentages of insufficiency and deficiency were as follow: 97.52% and 84.30% in SLE, 87.02% and 48.85% in RA, 88.24% and 40.20% in SpA, 90.89% and 57.81% in other ARDs patients. The causative factors for vitamin D deficiency included SLE per se (OR 12.54, P Hypovitaminosis D is highly prevalent among autoimmune rheumatic diseases population in China. The SLE per se and the obesity are the risk factors for vitamin D deficiency. Clinicians are advised to supplement vitamin D in these patients.

  19. Rhythminotropic Reactions of Human Myocardium in Ischemic and Rheumatic Heart Diseases against the Background of Amiodarone

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    Boris N. Kozlov, PhD, ScD

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available In human heart failure, Ca2+ homeostasis gets disturbed due to a decrease in the function of the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR. We studied the differences in the SR function in patients with rheumatic and coronary heart disease, against the background of amiodarone. Cardiac preparations from the atrium of 21 patients with coronary artery disease (CAD and 14 patients with rheumatic heart disease (RHD were used in this study. Myocardial strips perfused with oxygenated Krebs-Henzelait solution without and with amiodarone (1 mM/l at 37°C. The steady state stimulation rate of the muscle strips was 0.5 Hz. The single extraordinary impulse was given as 0.2-1.5 sec after the steady state beat. Then, the first beat after a 4- to 60-sec rest period was evaluated. The extrasystoles of the myocardium in both groups, after long intervals, were decreased after amiodarone treatment. The amplitude of post extrasystoles of amiodarone-treated myocardium showed differences only after long intervals in both groups. Two types of inotropic responses of a failing myocardium after rest periods were observed. Type I post-rest contractions maintained the steady state amplitude after all rests. However, type II was characterized by a reduction in the amplitude of the contractions. Amiodarone treatment of the myocardium showing type I reactions led to an increase in the potentiation after rests, but showed no effect on the reaction of the muscle with the type II response. The results suggested that SR dysfunction was different in CAD and RHD. The realization of the therapeutic effect of amiodarone was found to be dependent on the functional activity of the SR.

  20. Social support: a key variable for health promotion and chronic disease management in Hispanic patients with rheumatic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Alyssa T; Andrade, Regina E; Middleton, Kimberly R; Wallen, Gwenyth R

    2014-01-01

    Chronic diseases, including rheumatic diseases, can cause immense physical and psychosocial burden for patients. Many Hispanics suffering with arthritis face activity limitations. Social support, or the functional content of relationships, may be important to consider when examining treatment and outcomes for Hispanic individuals. Participants were recruited from an urban community health center (CHC) as part of a larger health behavior study. A cross-sectional, descriptive, mixed methods analysis was conducted to explore the role of social support in the sample. Only Hispanic/Latino patients (n = 46) were included in this analysis. Interviews were conducted in both English and Spanish. The majority of the sample (87%) perceived some presence of social support in their lives. The two most commonly cited types of social support were emotional and instrumental. The two most common sources of social support were family members other than spouses (52.2%) and spouses (32.6%). Body mass index (BMI) was significantly correlated with the number of perceived sources of support. The presence or absence and the role of social support in supporting optimal health outcomes should be considered for Hispanics with chronic rheumatic diseases. Involving family members and spouses in the plan of care for this population could facilitate health promotion and chronic disease management.

  1. Major histocompatibility complex: its role in the pathogenesis of autoimmune rheumatic diseases - doi:10.5020/18061230.2006.p155

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crésio Alves

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to allow early diagnosis and more efficient treatments, many studies have been trying to define genetic markers of rheumatic diseases. Amongst them, antigens and alleles of the HLA (Human Leukocyte Antigens system are distinguished. Located in the short arm of chromosome 6, the HLA system exerts genetic influence on the susceptibility and severity of these diseases. The discovery of new molecular methods to typify HLA alleles and the recent nomenclature updates have been contributing to a better understanding of this system. Unfortunately, this information has not been adequately published in the clinical literature. The present work aimed at presenting the function, nomenclature and methods of detection of the HLA polymorphism; and to review its associations with rheumatic fever, systemic erythematosus lupus, rheumatoid arthritis, juvenile idiopathic arthritis and spondyloarthropathies. Articles that were published between 1980 and 2005 were searched in the MEDLINE and LILACS data basis. This review demonstrated that although the HLA association is well established for some rheumatic diseases (e.g., HLA-B27 and spondyloarthropathies, HLA DR-3 and HLA-DR4 with rheumatoid arthritis, HLA-DR4 and lupus others vary in different ethnic-racial group and illnesses, due to its polymorphism. It is necessary to study populations from different ethnic backgrounds to identify new associations or to strengthen associations with the ones already identified. This knowledge will contribute to future prophylactic or therapeutic interventions in patients with rheumatic disorders or at risk to develop them.

  2. [Treatment with immunosuppressive and biologic drugs of pregnant women with systemic rheumatic or autoimmune disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alijotas-Reig, Jaume; Esteve-Valverde, Enrique; Ferrer-Oliveras, Raquel

    2016-10-21

    Rheumatic and systemic autoimmune diseases occur in women and, to a lesser degree, men of reproductive age. These disorders have to be clinically nonactive before conception, which is usually only possible after anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive treatment. We must be alert since 50% of pregnancies are unplanned. Physicians should know the embryo-foetal toxicity of these drugs during pregnancy and lactation. This January 2016-updated review allows us to conclude that the majority of immunosuppressives available -anti-TNF inhibitors included- can be used before and during pregnancy, with the exception of cyclophosphamide, methotrexate, mycophenolate and leflunomide. Lactation is permitted with all drugs except methotrexate, leflunomide, mycophenolate and cyclophosphamide. Although data on abatacept, belimumab, rituximab, tocilizumab and anakinra are scant, preliminary reports agree on their safety during pregnancy and, probably, lactation. Cyclophosphamide and sulfasalazine apart, no negative effects on sperm quality, or embryo-foetal anomalies in men treated with immunosuppressives have been described.

  3. Pathohistological Evidence of Smoldering Inflammation in Rheumatic Heart Disease with Massive Left Atrial Calcification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiba, Mikio; Sugano, Yasuo; Ikeda, Yoshihiko; Ishibashi-Ueda, Hatsue; Ohara, Takahiro; Hasegawa, Takuya; Kanzaki, Hideaki; Anzai, Toshihisa

    2016-01-01

    A 74-year-old man, who had a history of a mitral valve replacement for rheumatic heart disease (RHD) 30 years previously, was admitted with progressive heart failure. Massive calcification was observed around the left atrium on multidetector CT, in addition to a late gadolinium enhancement (LGE)-positive layer adjacently outside of the calcification on MRI. He underwent a second mitral valve replacement for the prosthetic valve failure. Pathohistological analyses of a tissue section of the left atrial wall from a surgical specimen revealed lymphocyte and macrophage infiltration that coincided with the LGE-positive layer on MRI, suggesting the existence of sustained active inflammation even after the long period of RHD.

  4. The role of vitamin D supplementation in patients with rheumatic diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abrahamsen, Bo; Harvey, Nicholas C

    2013-01-01

    the function of the immune, cardiovascular and endocrine systems. Vitamin D deficiency, due to insufficient sunlight exposure, dietary uptake and/or abnormalities in its metabolism, has been associated with rheumatic diseases, and both the classical and nonclassical effects of vitamin D might be of relevance......Vitamin D is a dietary vitamin that can also be synthesized in adequate amounts from cholesterol in most mammals exposed to sunlight. Vitamin D has classical roles in calcium and phosphate metabolism, and thus the skeleton; however, this molecule also has nonclassical effects that might influence......, harmful or beneficial, are observational in nature, linking clinical events to vitamin D exposure or serum levels of vitamin D metabolites. Evidence from high quality, prospective, double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized trials should be obtained before vitamin D supplementation is recommended...

  5. [Relationship between atrial fibroblast proliferation/fibrosis and atrial fibrillation in patients with rheumatic heart disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ya-Zhou; Cai, Jin-Ming; Chen, Lin; Yang, Zhi-Ping; Zhang, Jian-Cheng; Wu, Wei; Ke, Dan; Xu, Chun-Xuan

    2009-09-01

    To investigate the association between gene expressions of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), smooth muscle alpha-actin (alpha-SMA) and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and atrial fibrosis in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF). The right atrial tissue samples were taken from 75 patients with rheumatic heart disease underwent heart valve replacement surgery (34 patients with sinus rhythm, 11 patients with paroxysmal AF and 30 patients with persistent AF) and stained with picrosirius red for quantitative analysis of collagen accumulation. The mRNA and protein levels of bFGF, alpha-SMA and PCNA were detected by semi-quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and immunohistochemical technique, respectively. The percent volume fraction of collagen (CVF) was the highest in persistent AF group and the lowest in the sinus rhythm group (all P fibrosis by promoting fibroblast proliferation in AF patients.

  6. Prospects for using meloxicam in old-age group patients with rheumatic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O N Egorova

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs are commonly used in complex therapy for pain syndrome in rheumatology. The paper describes the pathophysiological mechanisms responsible for the development of chronic and acute pain. It details the action of cyclooxygenase types 1 and 2 (COG 1 and COG 2, shows the key role of COG 2 in pain induction and transmission. The data of clinical trials of meloxicam that inhibits mainly COG 2 are given. The drug is highly effective in treating rheumatic diseases, particularly in old-age group patients with osteoporosis. The combined use of different meloxicam formulations makes it possible to choose adequate, maximally individualized treatment and to relieve the pain syndrome in the shortest possible time. Among NSAIDs, meloxicam shows an optimum efficacy-safety ratio.

  7. Future perspectives of Smartphone applications for rheumatic diseases self-management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azevedo, Ana Rita Pereira; de Sousa, Hugo Manuel Lopes; Monteiro, Joaquim António Faria; Lima, Aurea Rosa Nunes Pereira

    2015-03-01

    Rheumatic diseases (RD) self-management interventions are designed to improve health-related quality of life, health care utilization, and perceived self-efficacy. Despite these demonstrated good results, there are several issues that hinder or render less appealing these interventions. One economically and socially viable solution is exploiting the potential of Smartphone technology. This potential comes from Smartphones pervasive presence in actual society, combined with the advantages of being personal, intuitive, and computationally powerful, with capability to support applications and assist its user throughout different activities of daily living and environments persistently. With their global acceptance increasing quickly, there is a great opportunity for mobile health in using Smartphone applications for RD self-management. Besides the potential of such applications, research on the development and evaluation of such applications is in the early stages. Therefore, it is important to foresee its future applicability in order to meet the needs of the twenty-first century.

  8. Interrelation specific autoimmune pathologies of a thyroid gland with inorganic autoimmune rheumatic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O V Paramonova

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The problem of a pathology of a thyroid gland at rheumatic diseases, in particular at rheumatoid arthritis, remains actual and to this day. The work purpose was studying antitelogenesis to thyroid hormones at patients with mixt autoimmune pathology. In whey of blood of patients with RA and autothyroid pathology are found out antibodies (AB to Т3 and Т4, their concentration correlates with activity of pathological process. It is shown, that level AB to Т3 and Т4 authentically differs from the maintenance of the given antibodies in whey of blood of healthy faces. Level of antibodies to thyroid hormones can be considered as the criterion predicting development of pathology of a thyroid gland at patients with RA.

  9. Screening of natural antioxidants from traditional Chinese medicinal plants associated with treatment of rheumatic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Ren-You; Kuang, Lei; Xu, Xiang-Rong; Zhang, Yuan; Xia, En-Qin; Song, Feng-Lin; Li, Hua-Bin

    2010-08-30

    In order to find new sources of natural antioxidants, the antioxidant capacities of 50 medicinal plants associated with treatment of rheumatic diseases were systemically evaluated using the ferric-reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) and Trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity (TEAC) assays, and their total phenolic contents were measured by the Folin-Ciocalteu method. Their antioxidant activities of some of these plants were analyzed for the first time. The FRAP and TEAC assay results suggested that the antioxidant compounds in these plants possessed free radicals scavenging activity and oxidant reducing power. A positive linear correlation between antioxidant capacities and total phenolic contents implied that phenolic compounds in these plants could be the main components contributing to the observed activities. The results showed that Geranium wilfordii, Loranthus parasiticus, Polygonum aviculare, Pyrrosia sheaeri, Sinomenium acutum and Tripterygium wilfordii possessed the highest antioxidant capacities and total phenolic content among 50 plants tested, and could be rich potential sources of natural antioxidants.

  10. Screening of Natural Antioxidants from Traditional Chinese Medicinal Plants Associated with Treatment of Rheumatic Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua-Bin Li

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available In order to find new sources of natural antioxidants, the antioxidant capacities of 50 medicinal plants associated with treatment of rheumatic diseases were systemically evaluated using the ferric-reducing antioxidant power (FRAP and Trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity (TEAC assays, and their total phenolic contents were measured by the Folin–Ciocalteu method. Their antioxidant activities of some of these plants were analyzed for the first time. The FRAP and TEAC assay results suggested that the antioxidant compounds in these plants possessed free radicals scavenging activity and oxidant reducing power. A positive linear correlation between antioxidant capacities and total phenolic contents implied that phenolic compounds in these plants could be the main components contributing to the observed activities. The results showed that Geranium wilfordii, Loranthus parasiticus, Polygonum aviculare, Pyrrosia sheaeri, Sinomenium acutum and Tripterygium wilfordii possessed the highest antioxidant capacities and total phenolic content among 50 plants tested, and could be rich potential sources of natural antioxidants.

  11. Prevalence of rheumatic diseases in adult population in Spain (EPISER 2016 study): Aims and methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seoane-Mato, Daniel; Sánchez-Piedra, Carlos; Silva-Fernández, Lucía; Sivera, Francisca; Blanco, Francisco J; Pérez Ruiz, Fernando; Juan-Mas, Antonio; Pego-Reigosa, José M; Narváez, Javier; Quilis Martí, Neus; Cortés Verdú, Raúl; Antón-Pagés, Fred; Quevedo Vila, Víctor; Garrido Courel, Laura; Del Amo, Natividad Del Val; Paniagua Zudaire, Inmaculada; Añez Sturchio, Gustavo; Medina Varo, Fermín; Ruiz Tudela, María Del Mar; Romero Pérez, Antonio; Ballina, Javier; Brandy García, Anahy; Fábregas Canales, Dolores; Font Gayá, Teresa; Bordoy Ferrer, Carolina; González Álvarez, Beatriz; Casas Hernández, Laura; Álvarez Reyes, Fátima; Delgado Sánchez, Mónica; Martínez Dubois, Cristina; Sánchez-Fernández, Simón Ángel; Rojas Vargas, Luisa Marena; García Morales, Paula Virginia; Olivé, Alejandro; Rubio Muñoz, Paula; Larrosa, Marta; Navarro Ricos, Noemí; Graell Martín, Eduard; Chamizo, Eugenio; Chaves Chaparro, Lara; Rojas Herrera, Sara; Pons Dolset, Jordi; Polo Ostariz, Miguel Ángel; Ruiz-Alejos Garrido, Susana; Macía Villa, Cristina; Cruz Valenciano, Ana; González Gómez, María Luisa; Morcillo Valle, Mercedes; Palma Sánchez, Deseada; Moreno Martínez, María José; Mayor González, Marta; Atxotegi Sáenz de Buruaga, Joana; Urionagüena Onaindia, Irati; Blanco Cáceres, Boris Anthony; Díaz-González, Federico; Bustabad, Sagrario

    2017-07-31

    To describe the methodology of the EPISER 2016 (study of the prevalence of rheumatic diseases in adult population in Spain), as well its strengths and limitations. The aim of this study is to estimate the prevalence of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), psoriatic arthritis (PsA), ankylosing spondylitis (AS), systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), Sjögren's syndrome (SS), osteoarthritis (knee, hip, hands, and cervical and lumbar spine), fibromyalgia, gout and clinical osteoporotic fracture. Population-based, multicenter, cross-sectional study, with the participation of 45 municipalities in the 17 Spanish autonomous communities. The reference population will consist of adults aged 20 years and over residing in Spain. A computer-assisted telephone interview (CATI) system will be used for data collection. Diagnostic suspicions and diagnoses received by the participants will be studied by rheumatologists in the referral hospitals in the selected municipalities. the prevalence of the rheumatic diseases will be calculated using estimators and their 95% confidence intervals. Weights will be calculated in each of the sampling stages in accordance with the probability of selection. The distribution of the population in Spain will be obtained from the Spanish Statistics Institute. Sociodemographic and lifestyle changes over the last 16 years justify EPISER 2016. This study will provide current data about the prevalences of RA, AS, PsA, SLE, SS, osteoarthritis, fibromyalgia, gout and clinical osteoporotic fracture. The results will allow comparisons with studies from other countries and EPISER 2000. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Reumatología y Colegio Mexicano de Reumatología. All rights reserved.

  12. An immunological perspective on rheumatic heart disease pathogenesis: more questions than answers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bright, Philip David; Mayosi, Bongani M; Martin, William John

    2016-10-01

    Acute rheumatic fever (ARF) and the related rheumatic heart disease (RHD) are autoimmune diseases thought to be triggered by group A streptococcal (GAS) pharyngitis. RHD is a leading cause of mortality in the developing world. The strong epidemiological association between GAS throat infection and ARF is highly suggestive of causation, but does not exclude other infections as contributory. There is good evidence of both humoral and cellular autoreactivity and GAS/self cross-reactivity in established RHD. RHD pathogenesis could feasibly be triggered and driven by humoral and/or cellular molecular cross-reactivity between GAS and host cardiac tissues (molecular mimicry). However, good evidence of humoral pathogenicity is lacking and the specific triggering event for RHD remains unknown. It is likely that the critical immunological events leading to ARF/RHD occur at the point of contact between GAS and the immune system in the throat, strongly implicating the mucosal immune system in RHD pathogenesis. Additionally, there is circumstantial evidence that continued live GAS may play a role in ARF/RHD pathogenesis. We suggest that future avenues for study should include the exclusion of GAS components directly contributing to RHD pathogenesis; large genome-wide association studies of patients with RHD looking for candidate genes involved in RHD pathogenesis; genome-wide association studies of GAS from patients with ARF taken at diagnosis to look for characteristics of rheumatogenic strains; and performing case/control studies of GAS pharyngitis/ARF/patients with RHD, and controls to identify microbiological, immunological and environmental differences to elucidate RHD pathogenesis. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  13. [Rheumatic fever].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherkashin, D V; Kumchin, A N; Shchulenin, S N; Svistov, A S

    2013-01-01

    This lecture-style paper highlights all major problems pertinent to rheumatic fever Definition of acute RF and chronic rheumatic heart disease is proposed and desirability of the use of these terms in clinical practice is explained. Present-day epidemiology of RF is described with reference to marked differences in its prevalence in developed and developing countries. Modern classification of acute RF is described as adopted by the Russian Association of Rheumatologists and recommended for the use in Russian medical facilities. Discussion of etiological issues is focused on such virulence factors as beta-hemolytic streptococcus A and genetic predisposition confirming hereditary nature of RE Its clinical features are described along with laboratory and instrumental methods applied for its diagnostics. Large and small diagnostic criteria of RF are considered. Special attention is given to the treatment of RF and its complications (antibiotic, pathogenetic, and drug therapy). Its primary and secondary prophylaxis is discussed in detail, preparations for the purpose are listed (with doses and duration of application). In conclusion, criteria for the efficacy of therapy are presented along with indications for hospitalization and emergency treatment.

  14. A Cost-Effectiveness Tool to Guide the Prioritization of Interventions for Rheumatic Fever and Rheumatic Heart Disease Control in African Nations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubinga, Solomon J.; Mayosi, Bongani; Babigumira, Joseph B.

    2016-01-01

    Background Rheumatic heart disease (RHD) prevalence and mortality rates remain especially high in many parts of Africa. While effective prevention and treatment exist, coverage rates of the various interventions are low. Little is known about the comparative cost-effectiveness of different RHD interventions in limited resource settings. We developed an economic evaluation tool to assist ministries of health in allocating resources and planning RHD control programs. Methodology/Principal Findings We constructed a Markov model of the natural history of acute rheumatic fever (ARF) and RHD, taking transition probabilities and intervention effectiveness data from previously published studies and expert opinion. Our model estimates the incremental cost-effectiveness of scaling up coverage of primary prevention (PP), secondary prevention (SP) and heart valve surgery (VS) interventions for RHD. We take a healthcare system perspective on costs and measure outcomes as disability-adjusted life-years (DALYs), discounting both at 3%. Univariate and probabilistic sensitivity analyses are also built into the modeling tool. We illustrate the use of this model in a hypothetical low-income African country, drawing on available disease burden and cost data. We found that, in our hypothetical country, PP would be cost saving and SP would be very cost-effective. International referral for VS (e.g., to a country like India that has existing surgical capacity) would be cost-effective, but building in-country VS services would not be cost-effective at typical low-income country thresholds. Conclusions/Significance Our cost-effectiveness analysis tool is designed to inform priorities for ARF/RHD control programs in Africa at the national or subnational level. In contrast to previous literature, our preliminary findings suggest PP could be the most efficient and cheapest approach in poor countries. We provide our model for public use in the form of a Supplementary File. Our research has

  15. Echo-based screening of rheumatic heart disease in children: a cost-effectiveness Markov model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zachariah, Justin P; Samnaliev, Mihail

    2015-06-01

    To project the cost-effectiveness of population-based echo screening to prevent rheumatic heart disease (RHD) consequences. RHD is a leading cause of cardiovascular mortality and morbidity during adolescence and young adulthood in low- and middle-per capita income settings. Echocardiography-based screening approaches can dramatically expand the number of children identified at risk of progressive RHD. Cost-effectiveness analysis can inform public health agencies and payers about the net economic benefit of such large-scale population-based screening. A Markov model was constructed comparing a no-screen to echo screen approach. The echo screen program was modeled as a 2-staged screen of a cohort of 11-year-old children with initial short screening performed by dedicated technicians and follow-up complete echo by cardiologists. Penicillin RHD prophylaxis was modeled to only reduce rheumatic fever recurrence-related exacerbation. Quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) and societal costs (in 2010 Australian dollars) associated with each approach were estimated. One-way, two-way and probabilistic sensitivity analyses were performed on RHD prevalence and transition probabilities; echocardiography test characteristics; and societal level costs including supplies, transportation, and labor. The incremental costs and QALYs of the screen compared to no screen strategy were -$432 (95% CI = -$1357 to $575) and 0.007 (95% CI = -0.0101 to 0.0237), respectively. The joint probability that the screen was both less costly and more effective exceeded 80%. Sensitivity analyses suggested screen strategy dominance depends mostly on the probability of transitioning out of sub-clinical RHD. Two-stage echo RHD screening and secondary prophylaxis may achieve modestly improved outcomes at lower cost compared to clinical detection and deserves closer attention from health policy stakeholders.

  16. Validation of the 28-joint Disease Activity Score (DAS28) and European League Against Rheumatism response criteria based on C-reactive protein against disease progression in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, and comparison with the DAS28 based on erythrocyte sedimentation rate.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wells, G.; Becker, J.C.; Teng, J.; Dougados, M.; Schiff, M.; Smolen, J.; Aletaha, D.; Riel, P.L.C.M. van

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To validate and compare the definition of the Disease Activity Score 28 based on C-reactive protein (DAS28 (CRP)) to the definition based on erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR). METHODS: Data were analysed from two randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials of abatacept of

  17. Validation of the 28-joint Disease Activity Score (DAS28) and European League Against Rheumatism response criteria based on C-reactive protein against disease progression in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, and comparison with the DAS28 based on erythrocyte sedimentation rate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wells, G.; Becker, J-C; Teng, J.; Dougados, M.; Schiff, M.; Smolen, J.; Aletaha, D.; van Riel, P. L. C. M.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To validate and compare the definition of the Disease Activity Score 28 based on C-reactive protein (DAS28 (CRP)) to the definition based on erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR). Methods: Data were analysed from two randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials of abatacept of 6-mon

  18. Validation of the 28-joint Disease Activity Score (DAS28) and European League Against Rheumatism response criteria based on C-reactive protein against disease progression in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, and comparison with the DAS28 based on erythrocyte sedimentation rate.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wells, G.; Becker, J.C.; Teng, J.; Dougados, M.; Schiff, M.; Smolen, J.; Aletaha, D.; Riel, P.L.C.M. van

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To validate and compare the definition of the Disease Activity Score 28 based on C-reactive protein (DAS28 (CRP)) to the definition based on erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR). METHODS: Data were analysed from two randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials of abatacept of 6-mon

  19. The danger model approach to the pathogenesis of the rheumatic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacheco-Tena, César; González-Chávez, Susana Aideé

    2015-01-01

    The danger model was proposed by Polly Matzinger as complement to the traditional self-non-self- (SNS-) model to explain the immunoreactivity. The danger model proposes a central role of the tissular cells' discomfort as an element to prime the immune response processes in opposition to the traditional SNS-model where foreignness is a prerequisite. However recent insights in the proteomics of diverse tissular cells have revealed that under stressful conditions they have a significant potential to initiate, coordinate, and perpetuate autoimmune processes, in many cases, ruling over the adaptive immune response cells; this ruling potential can also be confirmed by observations in several genetically manipulated animal models. Here, we review the pathogenesis of rheumatic diseases such as systemic lupus erythematous, rheumatoid arthritis, spondyloarthritis including ankylosing spondylitis, psoriasis, and Crohn's disease and provide realistic approaches based on the logic of the danger model. We assume that tissular dysfunction is a prerequisite for chronic autoimmunity and propose two genetically conferred hypothetical roles for the tissular cells causing the disease: (A) the Impaired cell and (B) the paranoid cell. Both roles are not mutually exclusive. Some examples in human disease and in animal models are provided based on current evidence.

  20. Pregnancy in autoimmune rheumatic diseases: the importance of counselling for old and new challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreoli, Laura; Bazzani, Chiara; Taraborelli, Mara; Reggia, Rossella; Lojacono, Andrea; Brucato, Antonio; Meroni, Pier Luigi; Tincani, Angela

    2010-11-01

    Rheumatic diseases can affect women during their childbearing age. Therefore, physicians should introduce a discussion with the patients about pregnancy and its problems. Lupus pregnancies can be successful, even in patients with renal disease, when planned in remission state; the use of low dose aspirin was shown to be an independent predictor of good outcome, so it can be suggested as a preventive measure. Pregnancies in women with Antiphospholipid Syndrome can fail even if properly treated, especially when associated with a systemic autoimmune disease, a history of both thrombosis and pregnancy morbidity, and a triple positivity of antiphospholipid antibody assays. Women with systemic sclerosis have generally a good obstetric outcome, except for an increase rate of preterm deliveries. Severe disease complications were sometimes reported, but their relationship with gestation is not clear yet. Although data on human pregnancy are still preliminary, anti-TNF agents are classified as non teratogens in contrast to methotrexate and leflunomide. So women affected by aggressive chronic arthritis may be treated with anti-TNF in the pre-conceptional period, discontinuing the drug as soon as pregnancy starts. In order to increase maternal compliance and cope with difficult cases, a multidisciplinary team (rheumatologists/internists, obstetricians and neonatologists) should take care of patients during pregnancy.

  1. The Danger Model Approach to the Pathogenesis of the Rheumatic Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    César Pacheco-Tena

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The danger model was proposed by Polly Matzinger as complement to the traditional self-non-self- (SNS- model to explain the immunoreactivity. The danger model proposes a central role of the tissular cells’ discomfort as an element to prime the immune response processes in opposition to the traditional SNS-model where foreignness is a prerequisite. However recent insights in the proteomics of diverse tissular cells have revealed that under stressful conditions they have a significant potential to initiate, coordinate, and perpetuate autoimmune processes, in many cases, ruling over the adaptive immune response cells; this ruling potential can also be confirmed by observations in several genetically manipulated animal models. Here, we review the pathogenesis of rheumatic diseases such as systemic lupus erythematous, rheumatoid arthritis, spondyloarthritis including ankylosing spondylitis, psoriasis, and Crohn’s disease and provide realistic approaches based on the logic of the danger model. We assume that tissular dysfunction is a prerequisite for chronic autoimmunity and propose two genetically conferred hypothetical roles for the tissular cells causing the disease: (A the Impaired cell and (B the paranoid cell. Both roles are not mutually exclusive. Some examples in human disease and in animal models are provided based on current evidence.

  2. The ACR20 and defining a threshold for response in rheumatic diseases: too much of a good thing

    OpenAIRE

    Felson, David T.; LaValley, Michael P

    2014-01-01

    In the past 20 years great progress has been made in the development of multidimensional outcome measures (such as the Disease Activity Score and ACR20) to evaluate treatments in rheumatoid arthritis, a process disseminated throughout rheumatic diseases. These outcome measures have standardized the assessment of outcomes in trials, making it possible to evaluate and compare the efficacy of treatments. The methodologic advances have included the selection of pre-existing outcome measures that ...

  3. Role of laboratory biomarkers in monitoring and prediction of the effectiveness of treatment of rheumatic diseases using genetically engineered drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Nikolayevna Aleksandrova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Significant progress in treating immunoinflammatory rheumatic diseases (RD is related to the design of a novel family of drugs, genetically engineered (GE drugs. Molecular and cellular biomarkers (antibodies, indicators of acute inflammation, cytokines, chemokines, growth factors, endothelial activation markers, immunoglobulins, cryoglobulins, T- and B-cell subpopulations, products of bone and cartilage metabolism, genetic and metabolic markers that allow one to conduct immunological monitoring and prediction of the effectiveness of RD therapy using tumor necrosis factor α inhibitors (infliximab, adalimumab, golimumab, etanercept, anti-B-cell drugs (rituximab, belimumab, interleukin-6 receptor antagonist (tocilizumab, and T-cell costimulation blocker (abatacept have been detected in blood, synovial fluid, urine, and bioptates of the affected tissues. In addition to the conventional uniplex immunodiagnostics techniques, multiplex analysis of marker, which is based on genetic, transcriptomic and proteomic technologies using DNA and protein microarrays, polymerase chain reaction, and flow cytometry, is becoming increasingly widespread. The search for and validation of immunological predictors of the effective response to GE drug therapy make it possible to optimize and reduce the cost of therapy using these drugs in future.

  4. Role of laboratory biomarkers in monitoring and prediction of the effectiveness of treatment of rheumatic diseases using genetically engineered drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Nikolayevna Aleksandrova

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Significant progress in treating immunoinflammatory rheumatic diseases (RD is related to the design of a novel family of drugs, genetically engineered (GE drugs. Molecular and cellular biomarkers (antibodies, indicators of acute inflammation, cytokines, chemokines, growth factors, endothelial activation markers, immunoglobulins, cryoglobulins, T- and B-cell subpopulations, products of bone and cartilage metabolism, genetic and metabolic markers that allow one to conduct immunological monitoring and prediction of the effectiveness of RD therapy using tumor necrosis factor α inhibitors (infliximab, adalimumab, golimumab, etanercept, anti-B-cell drugs (rituximab, belimumab, interleukin-6 receptor antagonist (tocilizumab, and T-cell costimulation blocker (abatacept have been detected in blood, synovial fluid, urine, and bioptates of the affected tissues. In addition to the conventional uniplex immunodiagnostics techniques, multiplex analysis of marker, which is based on genetic, transcriptomic and proteomic technologies using DNA and protein microarrays, polymerase chain reaction, and flow cytometry, is becoming increasingly widespread. The search for and validation of immunological predictors of the effective response to GE drug therapy make it possible to optimize and reduce the cost of therapy using these drugs in future.

  5. Doenças reumáticas e infertilidade masculina Rheumatic diseases and male infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eutília Andrade Medeiros Freire

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available As doenças reumáticas podem causar distúrbios sexuais e reprodutivos. As razões destes distúrbios são multifatoriais. Manifestações e sintomas das doenças podem reduzir a libido e interferir no sucesso da reprodução, como ocorre na artrite reumatóide (AR, lúpus eritematoso sistêmico (LES, espondilite anquilosante (EA e esclerose sistêmica (ES. A atividade da doença pode levar a uma alteração do eixo hipotálamo-hipófise, acarretando períodos de disfunção gonadal. Os auto-anticorpos e os distúrbios de hormônios sexuais, que podem estar presentes em muitas doenças reumáticas, podem influenciar negativamente na fertilidade. Além disso, algumas drogas usadas no tratamento de doenças reumatológicas por vezes representam um risco para a reprodução masculina, devido aos efeitos adversos que podem causar, como defeitos cromos-sômicos e gonadotoxicidade, prejudicando a espermatogênese e a motilidade dos espermatozóides. Conseqüentemente, há falência gonadal transitória ou permanente. Este trabalho faz uma revisão de um assunto pouco abordado na literatura brasileira.Rheumatic diseases affect all aspects of life, including sexuality and reproduction. The reasons for disturbing sexual functioning and reproduction are multifactorial. Manifestations and symptoms of disease can reduce libido and interfere with successful reproduction, for example, in rheumatoid arthritis (AR, systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE, ankylosing spondylitis (AS and systemic sclerosis (SSc. Active disease disturbs the hypothalamic-pituitary-axis, giving rise to periods of gonadal dysfunction. Autoantibodies, which are present in most of the rheumatic diseases, and disturbances of sex hormone status can negatively influence the fertilization. Furthermore, some antirheumatic drugs carry a risk for male reproduction, because can present adverse effects, which includes chromosomal defects and gonadotoxicity, damaging the spermatogenesis and sperm

  6. Autoimmune rheumatic diseases and Klinefelter syndrome Autoimunitné reumatické choroby a Klinefelterov syndróm

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    Lazúrová I.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The article summarizes data on the association of Klinefelter syndrome (KS with autoimmune rheumatic diseases, that is rheumatoid arthritis (RA, systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE, polymyositis/dermatomyositis, systemic sclerosis (SSc, mixed connective tissue diseases (MCTD, Sjogren’s syndrome and antiphospholipid syndrome (APS. Recently, a higher risk for RA, SLE and Sjogren’s syndrome in patients with KS has been clearly demonstrated. However, the association of other autoimmune rheumatic disorders such as dermatomyositis/polymyositis, SSc, MCTD and APS is reported only casually. Based on the hormonal changes in KS, there are suggestions that low androgen and higher estrogen levels might be a predisposing factor for the development of autoimmune diseases, but evidence for the association is poor. Epidemiologic studies on larger cohorts of patients are required.

  7. Limits and perspectives of ultrasound in the diagnosis and management of rheumatic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delle Sedie, Andrea; Riente, Lucrezia; Bombardieri, Stefano

    2008-01-01

    Musculoskeletal sonography (MSUS) has played a growing role in the diagnosis and management of rheumatic diseases, enabling the imaging of synovitis, bone erosion, and cartilage damage in the early phase of arthritis. "Dynamic" evaluation of tendons and help in guiding needle positioning in interventional manoeuvres are some of the other reasons for its success. MSUS, particularly when coupled with power Doppler (PD) examination, has recently been shown to be an efficient tool for monitoring disease activity and progression in rheumatoid arthritis, spondyloarthritis, crystal-related arthropathy, and osteoarthritis, with general consensus on its interesting results. More specifically, the PD signal has proved to be a simple and promising tool for short-term monitoring of synovial vascularity changes induced by steroids or biological agents in RA patients. MSUS has some limits, because of the physical properties of US and the quality of the equipment; it is, moreover, an operator-related imaging technique, with few standardized protocols. Future goals should be standardization of the examining approach in grey scale and Doppler ultrasound (US), including use of new equipment (3D US), extensive use in other fields (i.e. connective tissue diseases and vasculitis), and possible new applications (e.g. thoracic US).

  8. Accurate Detection of Changes in Disease Activity in Primary Sjogren's Syndrome by the European League Against Rheumatism Sjogren's Syndrome Disease Activity Index

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seror, Raphaele; Mariette, Xavier; Bowman, Simon; Baron, Gabriel; Gottenberg, Jacques Eric; Boostma, Hendrika; Theander, Elke; Tzioufas, Athanasios; Vitali, Claudio; Ravaud, Philippe

    Objective. To assess and compare the sensitivity to change of the European League Against Rheumatism Sjogren's Syndrome Disease Activity Index (ESSDAI) with that of other primary Sjogren's syndrome (SS) disease activity indexes. Methods. We abstracted 96 patient profiles, including data on 3

  9. Zinc distribution in blood components, inflammatory status, and clinical indexes of disease activity during zinc supplementation in inflammatory rheumatic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peretz, A; Nève, J; Jeghers, O; Pelen, F

    1993-05-01

    The effects of zinc supplementation on zinc status and on clinical and biological indicators of inflammation were investigated in 18 patients with chronic inflammatory rheumatic diseases and in 9 healthy control subjects. Patients with mild and recent onset disease were assigned to a 60-d trial to receive either 45 mg Zn (as gluconate)/d or a placebo, while control subjects received the zinc supplement. Baseline mean plasma zinc of the patients was low whereas mononuclear cell zinc content was elevated, suggesting a redistribution of the element related to the inflammatory process rather than to a zinc-deficient state. Zinc supplementation increased plasma zinc to a similar extent in patients and in control subjects, which suggested no impairment of zinc intestinal absorption as a result of the inflammatory process. On the contrary, erythrocyte and leukocyte zinc concentrations were not modified in the two groups examined. No beneficial effect of zinc treatment could be demonstrated on either clinical or inflammation indexes.

  10. Double Valve Replacement (Mitral and Aortic for Rheumatic Heart Disease: A 20-year experience with 300 patients.

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    Prashant Mishra

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Rheumatic heart disease still remains one of the leading causes of congestive heart failure and death owing to valvular pathologies, in developing countries. Valve replacement still remains the treatment of choice in such patients.The aim of this study wasto analyze the postoperative outcome of  double valve replacement (Mitral and Aortic in patients of rheumatic heart disease. Materials and Methods: Between 1988 and 2008, 300 patients of rheumatic heart disease underwent double (Mitral and Aortic valve replacement with Starr Edwards valve or St Jude mechanical valve prosthesis were implanted. These patients were studied retrospectively for preoperative data and postoperative outcome including causes of early and late deaths and the data was analyzed statistically. Results: The 30-day hospital death rate was 11.3% andlate death occurred in 11.6%. Anticoagulant regimen was followed to maintain the target pro-thrombin time at 1.5 times the control value. The actuarial survival (exclusive of hospital mortality was 92.4%, 84.6%, and 84.4%, per year at 5, 10, and 20 years, respectively Conclusions: In view of the acknowledged advantageof superior durability, increased thromboresistance in our patient population, and its cost effectiveness the Starr-Edwards ball valve or St. Jude valve is the mechanical prosthesis of choice for advanced combined valvular disease. The low-intensity anticoagulant regimen has offered suffcient protection against thromboembolism as well as hemorrhage.

  11. Possible contribution of chronic inflammation in the induction of cancer in rheumatic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutolo, Maurizio; Paolino, Sabrina; Pizzorni, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    Several chronic inflammatory conditions and autoimmune diseases involving different organs and tissues have been found at risk of progression to cancer. A wide array of proinflammatory cytokines, prostaglandins, nitric oxide products, and matricellular proteins are closely involved in premalignant and malignant transition of cells almost always in a background of chronic inflammation. Interestingly, epigenetic perturbations (i.e. miRNA aberrations, altered DNA methylation) together with important steroid hormone metabolic changes (i.e. oestrogens), or the altered vitamin D concentrations that may unbalance the immune / inflammatory response, have been found linked to the risk and severity in several chronic inflammatory conditions, as well as in cancer. In particular, it is evident, that not only the parent oestrogen but also oestrogen metabolites should be taken into account when this process is evaluated, specially the formation of catecholoestrogen metabolites, that are capable of forming either stable or depurinating DNA adducts, which can cause extensive DNA damage. It is interesting that today the successful treatment of several chronic immune/inflammatory rheumatic diseases is obtained also by using medications initially developed for their use in oncology. The circadian increase of growth factors, specially during the late night, in both chronic inflammation and in cancer patients, as well as the presence of oestrogen-regulated circadian mechanisms, suggests further important links.

  12. A cost-effectiveness analysis of a program to control rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease in Pinar del Rio, Cuba.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David A Watkins

    Full Text Available Acute rheumatic fever (ARF and rheumatic heart disease (RHD persist in many low- and middle-income countries. To date, the cost-effectiveness of population-based, combined primary and secondary prevention strategies has not been assessed. In the Pinar del Rio province of Cuba, a comprehensive ARF/RHD control program was undertaken over 1986-1996. The present study analyzes the cost-effectiveness of this Cuban program.We developed a decision tree model based on the natural history of ARF/RHD, comparing the costs and effectiveness of the 10-year Cuban program to a "do nothing" approach. Our population of interest was the cohort of children aged 5-24 years resident in Pinar del Rio in 1986. We assessed costs and health outcomes over a lifetime horizon, and we took the healthcare system perspective on costs but did not apply a discount rate. We used epidemiologic, clinical, and direct medical cost inputs that were previously collected for publications on the Cuban program. We estimated health gains as disability-adjusted life years (DALYs averted using standard approaches developed for the Global Burden of Disease studies. Cost-effectiveness acceptability thresholds were defined by one and three times per capita gross domestic product per DALY averted. We also conducted an uncertainty analysis using Monte Carlo simulations and several scenario analyses exploring the impact of alternative assumptions about the program's effects and costs. We found that, compared to doing nothing, the Cuban program averted 5051 DALYs (1844 per 100,000 school-aged children and saved $7,848,590 (2010 USD despite a total program cost of $202,890 over 10 years. In the scenario analyses, the program remained cost saving when a lower level of effectiveness and a reduction in averted years of life lost were assumed. In a worst-case scenario including 20-fold higher costs, the program still had a 100% of being cost-effective and an 85% chance of being cost saving.A 10-year

  13. A cost-effectiveness analysis of a program to control rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease in Pinar del Rio, Cuba.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, David A; Mvundura, Mercy; Nordet, Porfirio; Mayosi, Bongani M

    2015-01-01

    Acute rheumatic fever (ARF) and rheumatic heart disease (RHD) persist in many low- and middle-income countries. To date, the cost-effectiveness of population-based, combined primary and secondary prevention strategies has not been assessed. In the Pinar del Rio province of Cuba, a comprehensive ARF/RHD control program was undertaken over 1986-1996. The present study analyzes the cost-effectiveness of this Cuban program. We developed a decision tree model based on the natural history of ARF/RHD, comparing the costs and effectiveness of the 10-year Cuban program to a "do nothing" approach. Our population of interest was the cohort of children aged 5-24 years resident in Pinar del Rio in 1986. We assessed costs and health outcomes over a lifetime horizon, and we took the healthcare system perspective on costs but did not apply a discount rate. We used epidemiologic, clinical, and direct medical cost inputs that were previously collected for publications on the Cuban program. We estimated health gains as disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) averted using standard approaches developed for the Global Burden of Disease studies. Cost-effectiveness acceptability thresholds were defined by one and three times per capita gross domestic product per DALY averted. We also conducted an uncertainty analysis using Monte Carlo simulations and several scenario analyses exploring the impact of alternative assumptions about the program's effects and costs. We found that, compared to doing nothing, the Cuban program averted 5051 DALYs (1844 per 100,000 school-aged children) and saved $7,848,590 (2010 USD) despite a total program cost of $202,890 over 10 years. In the scenario analyses, the program remained cost saving when a lower level of effectiveness and a reduction in averted years of life lost were assumed. In a worst-case scenario including 20-fold higher costs, the program still had a 100% of being cost-effective and an 85% chance of being cost saving. A 10-year program to

  14. Minor rheumatology: Nonsystemic rheumatic disease of juxta-articular soft tissues of the upper extremity. Part 1

    OpenAIRE

    A E Karateev; D. E. Karateev; E. S. Orlova; Yu. A. Ermakova

    2015-01-01

    Rheumatic diseases of juxta-articular soft tissues (RDJAST) (tendinitis, tenosynovitis, bursitis, etc.) are one of the most common causes of disability and one the most common reasons for seeking medical advice. To manage patients with RDJAST is an important part of practising rheumatologists’ work. But unfortunately, the issues of diagnosis and therapy of this pathology have been relatively rarely discussed on the pages of Russian medical journals and at the scientific congresses and confere...

  15. Person-focused care for young people with rheumatic and musculoskeletal diseases: young rheumatologists' and EULAR Young PARE perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alunno, Alessia; Studenic, Paul; Nikiphorou, Elena; Balážová, Petra; van Nieuwkoop, Linda; Ramiro, Sofia; Carubbi, Francesco; Richez, Christophe; Caeyers, Nele; Gossec, Laure; Kouloumas, Marios

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, the evolution of healthcare challenged the management of people with rheumatic and musculoskeletal diseases (RMDs). From disease-centred care to person-focused care, a holistic approach along with patient empowerment about their disease, improved the physician-patient relationship and allowed to achieve better outcomes with lower healthcare costs. Nevertheless, RMDs may occur from childhood to the old age and to date very few studies have addressed the needs and priorities of young people with RMDs. However, the image of RMDs is still associated with the elderly population. In this regard, the group of young people with arthritis and rheumatism in Europe (PARE) was recently developed within European League Against Rheumatism to represent the voice of the young affected and to carry out projects aiming for a better understanding of these specific aspects. This viewpoint discusses the needs and priorities of young people compared with adult people with RMDs, based on the available literature and on the results of the PARE Youth research project, aiming to identify the next steps of actions that need to be taken to improve the current situation.

  16. Preferences and needs of patients with a rheumatic disease regarding the structure and content of online self-management support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammerlaan, Judy W; van Os-Medendorp, Harmieke; de Boer-Nijhof, Nienke; Maat, Bertha; Scholtus, Lieske; Kruize, Aike A; Bijlsma, Johannes W J; Geenen, Rinie

    2017-03-01

    Aim of this study was to investigate preferences and needs regarding the structure and content of a person-centered online self-management support intervention for patients with a rheumatic disease. A four step procedure, consisting of online focus group interviews, consensus meetings with patient representatives, card sorting task and hierarchical cluster analysis was used to identify the preferences and needs. Preferences concerning the structure involved 1) suitability to individual needs and questions, 2) fit to the life stage 3) creating the opportunity to share experiences, be in contact with others, 4) have an expert patient as trainer, 5) allow for doing the training at one's own pace and 6) offer a brief intervention. Hierarchical cluster analysis of 55 content needs comprised eleven clusters: 1) treatment knowledge, 2) societal procedures, 3) physical activity, 4) psychological distress, 5) self-efficacy, 6) provider, 7) fluctuations, 8) dealing with rheumatic disease, 9) communication, 10) intimate relationship, and 11) having children. A comprehensive assessment of preferences and needs in patients with a rheumatic disease is expected to contribute to motivation, adherence to and outcome of self-management-support programs. The overview of preferences and needs can be used to build an online-line self-management intervention. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Application of Percutaneous Balloon Mitral Valvuloplasty in Patients of Rheumatic Heart Disease Mitral Stenosis Combined with Tricuspid Regurgitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang-Qiang Chen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Tricuspid regurgitation (TR is frequently associated with severe mitral stenosis (MS, the importance of significant TR was often neglected. However, TR influences the outcome of patients. The aim of this study was to investigate the efficacy and safety of percutaneous balloon mitral valvuloplasty (PBMV procedure in rheumatic heart disease patients with mitral valve (MV stenosis and tricuspid valve regurgitation. Methods: Two hundred and twenty patients were enrolled in this study due to rheumatic heart disease with MS combined with TR. Mitral balloon catheter made in China was used to expand MV. The following parameters were measured before and after PBMV: MV area (MVA, TR area (TRA, atrial pressure and diameter, and pulmonary artery pressure (PAP. The patients were followed for 6 months to 9 years. Results: After PBMV, the MVAs increased significantly (1.7 ± 0.3 cm 2 vs. 0.9 ± 0.3 cm 2 , P 0.05. The PAP and left ventricular ejection fraction appeared no statistical difference compared with the postoperative (P > 0.05, the remaining patients without serious complications. Conclusions: PBMV is a safe and effective procedure for MS combined with TR in patients of rheumatic heart disease. It can alleviate the symptoms and reduce the size of TR. It can also improve the quality-of-life and prognosis. Its recent and mid-term efficacy is certain. While its long-term efficacy remains to be observed.

  18. Epidemiology of rheumatic diseases in rural and urban populations in Indonesia: a World Health Organisation International League Against Rheumatism COPCORD study, stage I, phase 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darmawan, J; Valkenburg, H A; Muirden, K D; Wigley, R D

    1992-04-01

    To determine the incidence of musculoskeletal pain, disabilities, and help seeking behaviour, a questionnaire was administered to a rural population of 2184 men and 2499 women and an urban population of 481 men and 590 women aged over 15 years by house to house interviews with completion rates of 95.2% (rural) and 97.1% (urban). The incidences of pain in the joints, back, or neck were 23.6% (rural) and 31.3% (urban). The incidence of disability due to an inability to walk, lift, carry, and dress was 2.8% (rural) and 0.9% (urban). The percentage of the population with pain who had to stop work owing to disability was 75% (rural) and 78% (urban). Official health care facilities were used by 62% (rural) and 71% (urban) of the population. Traditional health care was used by 87% (rural) and 89% (urban). The high percentage of subjects unable to work was due to a predominance of manual labour occupations (rural, 90%, urban, 80%). The age and sex specific incidence of rheumatic diseases in these populations were similar to other developing and developed countries. The primary rheumatology service was inadequate due to the low priority given by the health service to non-communicable diseases and inadequate rheumatology teaching of the primary health care doctors during undergraduate training. Musculoskeletal pain is a major public health problem in Indonesia and is still not fully appreciated.

  19. Air pollution in early life and adult mortality from chronic rheumatic heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, David I W; Osmond, Clive; Williams, Martin L; Jones, Alexander

    2017-08-01

    Chronic rheumatic heart disease (RHD) remains a globally important cause of heart disease. The reasons for the continuing high prevalence of this disease are obscure, but it may have its origins in the poor social and economic conditions with which the disease has been consistently and strongly linked. Mortality studies from the UK have suggested the importance of adverse environmental factors in early life; these studies demonstrated specific geographical associations between high rates of chest infection during infancy and subsequent RHD. They raised the possibility that early air pollution, which is known to be strongly linked with chest infection during infancy, may predispose to RHD. We related estimates of air pollution and social conditions developed by Daly in 1951-52 for 78 urban areas in England and Wales to their subsequent RHD mortality rates at ages 35-74 in men and women during 1993-2012. There were strong relationships between domestic air pollution and RHD [relative risk per standard deviation (SD) increase in pollution 1.168, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.128 to 1.210, P pollution association was independent of these; only overcrowding was separately linked with RHD. We present the first evidence of an association between air pollution in early life and RHD. Although there are several limitations to this study, the strength and consistency of the results, together with their biological plausibility, suggest a causal link. This deserves attention because it may have important consequences for the control of RHD in resource-poor countries where widespread use of biomass fuels and domestic pollution remain a problem.

  20. Persistent atrial fibrillation is associated with inability to recover atrial contractility after MAZE IV surgery in rheumatic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinetti, Matias; Costello, Ramiro; Cardenas, Cesar; Piazza, Antonio; Iglesias, Ricardo; Baranchuk, Adrian

    2012-08-01

    MAZE IV surgery is effective in restoring sinus rhythm (SR) and atrial contraction (AC) in patients with nonrheumatic persistent atrial fibrillation (AF). However, there is less information on its effectiveness to restore AC in patients with rheumatic disease. To assess the effectiveness of the MAZE IV surgery in restoring AC in patients with rheumatic disease and long persistent AF. Prospective, consecutive study in patients who underwent cardiovascular surgery and had long persistent AF in whom MAZE IV surgery was performed. The presence of AC was assessed by lateral mitral annulus tissue Doppler. A total of 75 patients were included. Mean age 60 years (±11.7); 27 men (36%). AF duration was 63 months (±34.1). Primary indication for surgery: rheumatic mitral stenosis 67 patients and mitral insufficiency eight patients. Mean left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) was 51.8% (±12.1) and mean left atrial area was 37 cm(2) (±10.3). After a mean follow-up of 28 months (±9.3), 69 patients remained alive and 59 were in SR. AC was detected in 37.3% (Group A) and absent in 62.7% (Group B). The mean difference between groups was the high prevalence of AF longer than 5 years in group B (P = 0.000001). There were no differences related to left atrial size, LVEF, and age. In patients with rheumatic disease, the absence of correlation between SR recovery and AC recovery post MAZE IV surgery is significant. A history of long persistent AF lasting more than 5 years was a strong predictor for the absence of AC. ©2012, The Authors. Journal compilation ©2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. EULAR evidence‐based recommendations on the management of systemic glucocorticoid therapy in rheumatic diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoes, J N; Jacobs, J W G; Boers, M; Boumpas, D; Buttgereit, F; Caeyers, N; Choy, E H; Cutolo, M; Da Silva, J A P; Esselens, G; Guillevin, L; Hafstrom, I; Kirwan, J R; Rovensky, J; Russell, A; Saag, K G; Svensson, B; Westhovens, R; Zeidler, H; Bijlsma, J W J

    2007-01-01

    Objective To develop evidence‐based recommendations for the management of systemic glucocorticoid (GC) therapy in rheumatic diseases. Methods The multidisciplinary guideline development group from 11 European countries, Canada and the USA consisted of 15 rheumatologists, 1 internist, 1 rheumatologist–epidemiologist, 1 health professional, 1 patient and 1 research fellow. The Delphi method was used to agree on 10 key propositions related to the safe use of GCs. A systematic literature search of PUBMED, EMBASE, CINAHL, and Cochrane Library was then used to identify the best available research evidence to support each of the 10 propositions. The strength of recommendation was given according to research evidence, clinical expertise and perceived patient preference. Results The 10 propositions were generated through three Delphi rounds and included patient education, risk factors, adverse effects, concomitant therapy (ie, non‐steroidal anti‐inflammatory drugs, gastroprotection and cyclo‐oxygenase‐2 selective inhibitors, calcium and vitamin D, bisphosphonates) and special safety advice (ie, adrenal insufficiency, pregnancy, growth impairment). Conclusion Ten key recommendations for the management of systemic GC‐therapy were formulated using a combination of systematically retrieved research evidence and expert consensus. There are areas of importance that have little evidence (ie, dosing and tapering strategies, timing, risk factors and monitoring for adverse effects, perioperative GC‐replacement) and need further research; therefore also a research agenda was composed. PMID:17660219

  2. Early diagnosis of rheumatic diseases: an evaluation of the present situation and proposed changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwiatkowska, Brygida; Raciborski, Filip; Kłak, Anna; Maślińska, Maria; Gryglewicz, Jerzy

    2015-01-01

    Musculoskeletal pain is a very common complaint, affecting 30-40% of the European population. It is estimated that approximately 400,000 Poles suffer from inflammatory rheumatic diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis and psoriatic arthritis, and a vast majority of those affected are working-age individuals. Patients with suspected arthritis require prompt diagnosis and treatment, as any delays may result in irreversible joint destruction and disability. Currently in Poland, the lag time between the onset of symptoms and diagnosis is, on average, as much as 35 weeks. In this paper, we review the current state of specialist rheumatology care in Poland and propose a reorganised care model that includes early diagnosis of inflammatory arthritis. The main goal we wish to achieve with our reorganised model is to enhance access to outpatient specialist rheumatology care for patients with suspected arthritis. We believe that our model should make it possible to considerably reduce the lag time between GP referral and the diagnosis and treatment by a rheumatologist to as little as 3 to 4 weeks. This article provides a proposal of changes that would achieve this goal and is a summary of the report published by the Institute of Rheumatology in September 2014.

  3. Potential of specialized pro-resolving lipid mediators against rheumatic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Kosaku

    2016-01-01

      While arachidonic acid (AA), which is classified into n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA), has been mainly recognized as a substrate of pro-inflammatory mediators, eicosapentaenoic acid or docosahexaenoic acid, which are classified into n-3 PUFA, is currently identified as substrates of mediators inducing resolution of inflammation, namely pro-resolving mediators (SPM). As with any other pathological conditions, it is gradually elucidated that SPMs contributes a certain effect on joint inflammation. In osteoarthritis (OA), Lipid fractions extracted from adipocytes, especially in infrapatellar fat pad rather than subcutaneous tissue induce T cell skewing for producing IFN-γ or decrease the production of IL-12p40 from macrophages. In synovial tissues form OA, there are some of known receptors for SPM. In the synovial fluid from rheumatoid arthritis (RA), it could be identified and quantified a certain kind of SPMs such as maresin 1, lipoxin A4 and resolvin D5. In murine models of arthritis, some of SPMs are found to have some functions to reduce tissue damage. Correctively, SPMs might have some potential to a novel therapeutic target for arthritis or any other rheumatic diseases.

  4. [Glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis and rheumatic diseases. Pathogenesis, prevention and treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Munno, Ombretta; Delle Sedie, Andrea

    2006-01-01

    Glucocorticoids (GC) are diffusely used to treat a wide variety of inflammatory and autoimmune disorders, including rheumatic diseases. GC-induced osteoporosis (GIO) is the most common and serious side-effect for patients receiving GC. Loss of bone mineral density (BMD) is greatest in the first few months of GC use; fracture (Fx) risk is significantly increased at the spine and hip on doses even as low as 2.5 mg of prednisolone daily; Fx risk increases rapidly from the onset of therapy and, for a given BMD, is higher in GIO than in postmenopausal OP. General measures to reduce bone loss include use of the lowest effective dose; consideration of alternative routes of administration; adequate calcium and vitamin D supplementation. Today, results from large randomised controlled clinical trials provide evidence that bone loss and Fx may be prevented through the use of bone sparing agents (hormone therapy, bisphosphonates, PTH 1-34). Bisphosphonates (alendronate, risedronate) are first-choice therapy for the prevention and treatment of GIO; patients at high risk for Fx, for example those in post-menopausal status or aged > or =65 years and those with a prior fragility Fx, should be advised to start bone-protective therapy at the time of starting GC. Due to the prevalence of GC use, it is imperative that there be a greater awareness of GIO and of therapies that may be offered to patients both for prevention and treatment.

  5. Glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis and rheumatic diseases. Pathogenesis, prevention and treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Delle Sedie

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Glucocorticoids (GC are diffusely used to treat a wide variety of inflammatory and autoimmune disorders, including rheumatic diseases. GC-induced osteoporosis (GIO is the most common and serious side-effect for patients receiving GC. Loss of bone mineral density (BMD is greatest in the first few months of GC use; fracture (Fx risk is significantly increased at the spine and hip on doses even as low as 2.5 mg of prednisolone daily; Fx risk increases rapidly from the onset of therapy and, for a given BMD, is higher in GIO than in postmenopausal OP. General measures to reduce bone loss include use of the lowest effective dose; consideration of alternative routes of administration; adequate calcium and vitamin D supplementation. Today, results from large randomised controlled clinical trials provide evidence that bone loss and Fx may be prevented through the use of bone sparing agents (hormone therapy, bisphosphonates, PTH 1-34. Bisphosphonates (alendronate, risedronate are first-choice therapy for the prevention and treatment of GIO; patients at high risk for Fx, for example those in post-menopausal status or aged ³65 years and those with a prior fragility Fx, should be advised to start bone-protective therapy at the time of starting GC. Due to the prevalence of GC use, it is imperative that there be a greater awareness of GIO and of therapies that may be offered to patients both for prevention and treatment

  6. Features of acute ischemic stroke with rheumatic heart disease in a hospitalized Chinese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Deren; Liu, Ming; Hao, Zilong; Tao, Wendan; Lin, Sen; Zhang, Shihong; Wu, Bo; Ma, Zhenxing; Dong, Wei

    2012-11-01

    Rheumatic heart disease (RHD) is an important risk factor for ischemic stroke in developing countries. Observational data on its characteristics and influence on outcome or recurrence of ischemic stroke are scarce. We aimed to investigate proportions, characteristics, functional outcome, and recurrence of acute ischemic stroke patients with RHD in a hospitalized Chinese population. We prospectively enrolled consecutive patients with acute ischemic stroke who were admitted within 1 month of stroke onset from January 2003 to February 2007, into the analysis. Clinical characteristics such as age, gender, risk factors, and National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale on admission were investigated. Basic characteristics, functional outcomes, and recurrence were compared between RHD group and nonRHD group. Of the 1638 cases included, RHD was present in 130 patients (7.9%). RHD patients, compared with those without RHD, were younger, more frequently female, and more often had experienced atrial fibrillation and higher National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score on admission (all PStroke Scale on admission, the death risk in patients with RHD was 2.0-fold higher at 3 months, 6 months, and 1 year compared with patients without RHD (all PStroke attributable to RHD is still common in the Chinese population. RHD was associated with 2-fold increased risk of death and 1-fold increased risk of recurrence in stroke patients.

  7. [Preliminary study of the expression of connective tissue growth factor in papillary muscles of the patients with rheumatic heart disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y N; Li, T; Gu, J R; Yu, B Y

    2016-04-19

    To investigate the expression and the effect of connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) on rheumatic myocardial fibrosis of rheumatic heart disease (RHD). The papillary muscles samples were obtained from patients with RHD during mitral valve replacement.The expression of TGF-β1, CTGF mRNA and CTGF protein were detected with semiquantitative RT-PCR technique and immunohistochemistry technologyin the papillary muscles cell from 41RHD patients and 20 normal papillary muscles samples.The area of myocardial fibrosis was measured by imaging analysis system. SPSS package was used to analyze the relationship between the expression of CTGF and the area of myocardial fibrosis. Compared with normal controls (PU 2.4±0.9), the mean level of CTGF protein expression in the papillary muscles samples of the RHD patients (PU 44.7±6.0) was significantly increased(Pfibrosis (r=0.856, Pfibrosis of RHD.

  8. Adherence to secondary antibiotic prophylaxis for patients with rheumatic heart disease diagnosed through screening in Fiji.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelman, Daniel; Mataika, Reapi L; Kado, Joseph H; Ah Kee, Maureen; Donath, Susan; Parks, Tom; Steer, Andrew C

    2016-12-01

    Echocardiographic screening for rheumatic heart disease (RHD) can detect subclinical cases; however, adequate adherence to secondary antibiotic prophylaxis (SAP) is required to alter disease outcomes. We aimed to investigate the adherence to SAP among young people with RHD diagnosed through echocardiographic screening in Fiji and to investigate factors associated with adherence. Patients diagnosed with RHD through echocardiographic screening in Fiji from 2006 to 2014 were included. Dates of benzathine penicillin G injections were collected from 76 health clinics nationally from December 2011 to December 2014. Adherence was measured using the proportion of days covered (PDC). Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to identify characteristics associated with any adherence (≥1 injection received) and adequate adherence (PDC ≥0.80). Of 494 patients, 268 (54%) were female and the median age was 14 years. Overall, 203 (41%) had no injections recorded and just 33 (7%) had adequate adherence. Multivariate logistic regression showed increasing age (OR 0.93 per year, 95% CI 0.87-0.99) and time since diagnosis ≥1.5 years (OR 0.53, 95% CI 0.37-0.79) to be inversely associated with any adherence. Non-iTaukei ethnicity (OR 2.58, 95%CI 1.04-6.33) and urban residence (OR 3.36, 95% CI 1.54-7.36) were associated with adequate adherence, whereas time since diagnosis ≥1.5 years (OR 0.38, 95%CI 0.17-0.83) was inversely associated with adequate adherence. Adherence to SAP after screening in Fiji is currently inadequate for individual patient protection or population disease control. Secondary prevention should be strengthened before further screening can be justified. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Human papillomavirus infection and cervical lesions in rheumatic diseases: a systematic review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Raposo

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available An association between immune-mediated diseases and cervical pre-malignant and malignant lesions is described, having the human papillomavirus (HPV infection a causal role. Related studies have been generally focused on systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE patients, but relatively to other diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA, Sjögren's syndrome (SS and systemic sclerosis (SSc, data has not been systematically evaluated. We conducted a systematic review analysis of the literature in PubMed, including articles published until March of 2015, in patients with RA, SS, SLE and SSc, to evaluate the frequency of HPV infection, cervical dysplasia and cervical cancer, and associated factors, with particular interest on the role of glucocorticoids and immunosuppressive treatment. Moreover, safety and efficacy of HPV vaccines in these patients was investigated. Of 476 articles identified, 27 were finally included. The studies showed an increased prevalence of cervical dysplasia and cancer, with the HPV infection being an important associated factor, in particular in SLE patients. The data relatively to other rheumatic diseases was very scarse, but an increased prevalence of smear abnormalities was also found in RA. Patients exposed to glucocorticoids and to long-term immunosuppression, particularly cyclophosphamide, have increased risk of presenting more pre-malignant lesions than the general population. The available vaccines seem to be generally safe and immunogenic in the short- period evaluation, but long-term follow-up is required to evaluate the impact of the vaccine in the protection against HPV infection and occurrence of high-grade cervical lesions.

  10. Structure of rheumatic diseases among adult population of Russia according to data of an epidemiological study (preliminary results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E A Galushko

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Preliminary results of interregional program “Social and economic consequences of rheumatic diseases” diagnostic stage are presented.Objective. Clinical examination of persons with joint pathology revealed during screening to determine the diagnosis.Material and methods. A group of persons, who had joint complaints at the examination or during the previous year, was randomly formed according to the results of screening. Thorough uniform clinical examination with participation of a qualified rheumatologist aimed to precise determination of rheumatic pathology character was performed in all cases. During screening 1755 from 2723 persons examined at diagnostic stage positively answered question about presence of joint swelling and 968 complained of pain in knee and hip joints.Results. In 1971 from 2723 persons (72,4% different rheumatic diseases were diagnosed. Nonrheumatic pathology was revealed in 371 (13,6%, low back pain – in 218 (8% persons. In 163 (6% persons no disease was determined. Osteoarthritis (49% and rheumatoid arthritis (3% were the most frequent causes of joint complaints. Other RD were revealed in 20%.Conclusion. Preliminary results of program diagnostic stage demonstrated significance of joint pathology problem and allowed to get the first data about structure of RD among adult inhabitants of Russia.

  11. Improvement in rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease management and prevention using a health centre-based continuous quality improvement approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ralph, Anna P; Fittock, Marea; Schultz, Rosalie; Thompson, Dale; Dowden, Michelle; Clemens, Tom; Parnaby, Matthew G; Clark, Michele; McDonald, Malcolm I; Edwards, Keith N; Carapetis, Jonathan R; Bailie, Ross S

    2013-12-18

    Rheumatic heart disease (RHD) remains a major health concern for Aboriginal Australians. A key component of RHD control is prevention of recurrent acute rheumatic fever (ARF) using long-term secondary prophylaxis with intramuscular benzathine penicillin (BPG). This is the most important and cost-effective step in RHD control. However, there are significant challenges to effective implementation of secondary prophylaxis programs. This project aimed to increase understanding and improve quality of RHD care through development and implementation of a continuous quality improvement (CQI) strategy. We used a CQI strategy to promote implementation of national best-practice ARF/RHD management guidelines at primary health care level in Indigenous communities of the Northern Territory (NT), Australia, 2008-2010. Participatory action research methods were employed to identify system barriers to delivery of high quality care. This entailed facilitated discussion with primary care staff aided by a system assessment tool (SAT). Participants were encouraged to develop and implement strategies to overcome identified barriers, including better record-keeping, triage systems and strategies for patient follow-up. To assess performance, clinical records were audited at baseline, then annually for two years. Key performance indicators included proportion of people receiving adequate secondary prophylaxis (≥80% of scheduled 4-weekly penicillin injections) and quality of documentation. Six health centres participated, servicing approximately 154 people with ARF/RHD. Improvements occurred in indicators of service delivery including proportion of people receiving ≥40% of their scheduled BPG (increasing from 81/116 [70%] at baseline to 84/103 [82%] in year three, p = 0.04), proportion of people reviewed by a doctor within the past two years (112/154 [73%] and 134/156 [86%], p = 0.003), and proportion of people who received influenza vaccination (57/154 [37%] to 86/156 [55%], p

  12. Clinical significance of fibromyalgia syndrome in different rheumatic diseases: Relation to disease activity and quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Rabbat M, Sarah; Mahmoud, Nermeen K; Gheita, Tamer A

    2017-04-11

    To describe the frequencies of fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) in various rheumatic diseases; rheumatoid arthritis (RA), systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), systemic sclerosis (SSc) and Behçets disease (BD) patients and to study the relation to clinical manifestations and quality of life (QoL). 160 patients (50 RA, 50 SLE, 30 SSc and 30 BD) and matched corresponding healthy controls were included. Disease activity was assessed using disease activity score in 28 joints (DAS28) for RA, SLE Disease Activity index (SLEDAI), modified Rodnan skin score for SSc and BD Current Activity Form (BDCAF). The QoL was also recorded. Severity in FMS cases was estimated using the revised Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire score. In the RA, SLE, SSc and BD patients, FMS was found in 14%, 18%, 6.67% and 3.33% respectively compared to 2.1%, 3%, 3.3% and 0% in their corresponding controls. In RA patients, DAS28 was significantly higher in those with FMS (p=0.009) and significantly correlated with both Widespread Pain Index (WPI) (p=0.011) and Symptom Severity (SS) scale (p=0.012). The QoL scale in those with FMS was significantly worse (62.3±7.9) compared to those without (71.7±14.4) (p=0.023). In SLE patients, The WPI and SS both significantly correlated with the presence of thrombosis (r=0.28, p=0.049 and r=0.43, p=0.002 respectively). The SS scale tended to correlate with the SLEDAI (r=0.28, p=0.05). In BD patients, BDCAF and WPI significantly correlated (p=0.03). Fibromyalgia syndrome is more frequent in rheumatic diseases, could be related to the disease activity in RA and BD patients and to thrombosis in SLE and affected the QoL in RA. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Reumatología y Colegio Mexicano de Reumatología. All rights reserved.

  13. [Management of heart diseases in pregnancy: rheumatic and congenital heart disease, myocardial infarction and post partum cardiomyopathy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westhoff-Bleck, M; Hilfiker-Kleiner, D; Günter, H H; Schieffer, E; Drexler, H

    2008-07-01

    Heart disease is present in 0.5-1% of all pregnancies. It is the leading non-obstetric cause of maternal mortality accounting for about 10-15% of all maternal death. Over the last decades the underlying cardiac disease has changed. Also new therapeutic options have been developed. In western industrial countries the incidence of acquired rheumatic heart disease has declined. In contrast, as a result of neonatal corrective or palliative surgery, congenital heart disease has become an increasing and challenging problem. Maternal older age and the increase in women's smoking habits amplify the likelihood of coronary artery disease. Multiple therapeutic options including percutaneous interventions are available and novel therapeutic concepts are emerging i.e. for peripartum cardiomyopathy. Management of pregnancy, labor and delivery requires accurate diagnosis of the underlying cardiac disorder. Hemodynamic changes physiologically occurring during pregnancy have a different impact depending on the type and severity of cardiac anomalies. Management of these patients requires teamwork of obstetricians, neonatologists, cardiologists, anesthetists and sometimes cardiac surgeons.

  14. Angiotensin converting enzyme DD genotype is associated with development of rheumatic heart disease in Egyptian children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morsy, Mohamed-Mofeed Fawaz; Abdelaziz, Nada Abdelmohsen Mohamed; Boghdady, Ahmed Mohamed; Ahmed, Hydi; Abu Elfadl, Essam Mohamed; Ismail, Mohamed Ali

    2011-01-01

    Angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) gene polymorphism was previously studied in some cardiovascular diseases. There are only few studies which investigated this polymorphism in patients with rheumatic heart disease (RHD). The results of these investigations are inconsistent. Furthermore, gene polymorphism distribution is different in various ethnic populations. We conducted this study to demonstrate this gene polymorphism in Egyptian children with RHD. Leukocytes DNA was extracted from 139 patients with RHD and 79 healthy control children. After amplification by the PCR, the products were separated by electrophoresis in 6% polyacrylamide gel and visualized after ethidium bromide staining with UV light. The PCR product is a 190-bp fragment in the absence of the insertion (D allele) and a 490-bp fragment in the presence of the insertion (I allele). Gene polymorphism was as follows: DD gene when lane contains only 190-bp fragment, II gene when lane contains only 490-bp fragment and ID gene when lane contains both fragments. We found that gene polymorphism in both control and patients groups followed the following order of distribution from highest to lowest: ID, II, DD gene. The frequency in control group was 49.4, 36.7, and 13.9%, respectively. In patients groups, the gene frequency was 42.5, 30.9, and 26.6%, respectively. DD gene frequency differs significantly between the two groups. We concluded that patients with RHD have a higher ACE-DD genotype than normal control. ACE-DD genotype may be a risk factor for RHD in Egyptian children.

  15. Value of immunogenicity in the TNF-α inhibitor treatment of rheumatic diseases

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    N. V. Chichasova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Immunogenicity, the characteristic property of proteins affecting an immune response, shows up in the formation of anti-drug antibodies (ADA and/or immune complexes. The paper discusses whether immunogenicity has an impact on the efficacy and safety of TNF-α inhibitors (TNF-αI in different rheumatic diseases. It provides evidence that immunogenicity has an impact and no impact on the pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics of the drugs. It also demonstrates the detection rate of ADA when using different biological agents (BAs in rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, psoriatic arthritis, psoriasis, and Crohn's disease. The impact of TNF-αI change, concurrent methotrexate (MT therapy, and treatment intervals on immunogenicity is characterized. A combination of TNF-αI and MT versus BA monotherapy is shown to diminish immunogenicity; moreover, the use of therapeutic doses of MT as compared to its low weekly doses (2.5–5 mg could reduce to a greater degree the rate of anti-TNF-αI antibody formation. Randomized controlled trials have demonstrated that the presence or absence of ADA affects the rate of adverse reactions (ARs (due to infusion or injectable therapy than the change in TNF-αI efficacy. This is confirmed by the data of real clinical practice (BA registers from different countries, which show that there is no significant difference in the duration of treatment with different TNF-αI; therapy with the latter in the presence of ADA was shorter mainly because of ARs rather than its inefficiency. ADA detecting methods and the complexity of their interpretation are depicted.

  16. Adult-onset acute rheumatic fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakashima, Dainari; Ueda, Kohei; Tsukuda, Kyozo; Utsu, Noriaki; Kohki, Shimazu; Fushimi, Hiroaki; Miyakoshi, Kazuho

    2012-01-01

    A 62-year-old man was hospitalized for acute rheumatic fever. He had previously suffered from rheumatic fever at 15 years of age. The rheumatic fever was complicated by carditis, which caused valve disease that required surgical treatment. The incidence of rheumatic fever has decreased in most developed countries with improvements in sanitary conditions. The low incidence of this disease makes a timely and accurate diagnosis difficult. Due to the fact that both the first occurrence and recurrence of acute rheumatic fever can occur in the elderly and adults, this potential disease should not be overlooked when making a differential diagnosis.

  17. Systemic and localized infection by Candida species in patients with rheumatic diseases receiving anti-TNF therapy

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    Nadia E. Aikawa

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: To evaluate the prevalence of systemic and localized infection by Candida species and its possible association with demographic, clinical and laboratory manifestations and therapy in patients with rheumatic diseases taking TNF blockers. Methods: Consecutive patients with rheumatic diseases receiving anti-TNF agents were included. The following risk factors up to four weeks prior to the study were analyzed: use of antibiotics, immunosuppressant drugs, hospitalization and invasive procedures. All subjects were evaluated for clinical complaints; specific blood cultures were obtained for fungi and blood samples were collected for Candida spp. detection by polymerase chain reaction. Results: 194 patients [67 with rheumatoid arthritis (RA, 47 with ankylosing spondylitis (AS, 36 with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA, 28 with psoriatic arthritis and 16 with other conditions] were included. The average age of patients was 42 ± 16 years, with 68 (35% male and mean disease duration of 15 ± 10 years. Sixty-four (33% patients were receiving adalimumab, 59 (30% etanercept and 71 (36% infliximab. Eighty-one percent of patients were concomitantly taking immunosuppressant drugs. At the time of the study, only one (0.5% patient had localized fungal infection (vaginal candidiasis. None of the patients included had systemic candidiasis with positive blood cultures for fungi or PCR positive for Candida spp. in peripheral blood sample. Conclusions: This was the first study to assess the prevalence of invasive and localized fungal disease by Candida in a significant number of patients with rheumatic diseases on anti-TNF therapy, and demonstrated low risk of candidiasis, despite the high prevalence of immunosuppressive drug use.

  18. Rheumatic Heart Disease and Myxomatous Degeneration: Differences and Similarities of Valve Damage Resulting from Autoimmune Reactions and Matrix Disorganization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Carlo de Oliveira; Demarchi, Lea; Ferreira, Frederico Moraes; Pomerantzeff, Pablo Maria Alberto; Brandao, Carlos; Sampaio, Roney Orismar; Spina, Guilherme Sobreira; Kalil, Jorge; Cunha-Neto, Edecio

    2017-01-01

    Autoimmune inflammatory reactions leading to rheumatic fever (RF) and rheumatic heart disease (RHD) result from untreated Streptococcus pyogenes throat infections in individuals who exhibit genetic susceptibility. Immune effector mechanisms have been described that lead to heart tissue damage culminating in mitral and aortic valve dysfunctions. In myxomatous valve degeneration (MXD), the mitral valve is also damaged due to non-inflammatory mechanisms. Both diseases are characterized by structural valve disarray and a previous proteomic analysis of them has disclosed a distinct profile of matrix/structural proteins differentially expressed. Given their relevance in organizing valve tissue, we quantitatively evaluated the expression of vimentin, collagen VI, lumican, and vitronectin as well as performed immunohistochemical analysis of their distribution in valve tissue lesions of patients in both diseases. We identified abundant expression of two isoforms of vimentin (45 kDa, 42 kDa) with reduced expression of the full-size protein (54 kDa) in RHD valves. We also found increased vitronectin expression, reduced collagen VI expression and similar lumican expression between RHD and MXD valves. Immunohistochemical analysis indicated disrupted patterns of these proteins in myxomatous degeneration valves and disorganized distribution in rheumatic heart disease valves that correlated with clinical manifestations such as valve regurgitation or stenosis. Confocal microscopy analysis revealed a diverse pattern of distribution of collagen VI and lumican into RHD and MXD valves. Altogether, these results demonstrated distinct patterns of altered valve expression and tissue distribution/organization of structural/matrix proteins that play important pathophysiological roles in both valve diseases. PMID:28121998

  19. A timely reminder--rheumatic fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lilic, Nikola; Kumar, Priyanka

    2013-04-19

    Rheumatic fever is a disease diagnosed using the Jones criteria. The Jones criteria were designed using data from areas with a low prevalence of rheumatic fever. In New Zealand there is a high prevalence of rheumatic fever amongst Maori and Pacific peoples. A case is presented where a child of Samoan ethnicity is diagnosed and treated for rheumatic fever without fulfilling the Jones criteria. Evidence supporting the broadening of the diagnostic criteria in high prevalence areas is highlighted.

  20. Pathological study on right atrium myocardium in rheumatic heart disease patients with atrial fibrillation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DUAN Xiang-ying; ZHANG Bao-ren; LI Li

    2002-01-01

    Objective:To study the pathological basis of right atrial fibrillation in rheumatic heart disease (RHD) patients with atrial fibrillation (AF). Methods: Twenty-nine patients with mitral valve replacement of RHD were divided into AF group (n= 13) and sinus rhythm group (SN group) (n= 16). There was no significant statistical difference in clinical factors between the 2 groups. During the operation of valve replacement, the samples of right atrial appendages were taken and the qualitative and quantitative study were made by light microscopy and electron microscopy. Results: (1) Light microscope: The interstitial fibrosis and the arrangement of myocardium was more disordered in AF group than that in SN group. However, no statistic difference was found in interstitial fibrosis and cellar hypertrophy degree between the 2 groups. (2) Electron microscope: Mitochondrial crosta broke and dissolved obviously in AF group. The mitochondrial volume in AF group was smaller than that in SN group. Volume density, average area and average perimeter in AF group were less than that in SN group; specific surface in AF group was bigger than that in SN group. There was significant difference of above factors between the 2 groups; but there was no significant difference of surface density and numerical density on area in the 2 groups. Volume density of myofibril in AF group and SN group were less than that in SN group. (3)Split of Intercalated disc(ID) gap was found in AF group, and there was marrowing and floccular substance in ID gap. Conclusion: There were significant differences in the pathological changes of right atrial myocardium between AF and SN with RHD, these changes may be the important pathological basis for RA fibrillation of AF patients with RHD.

  1. Role of pediatric and internist rheumatologists in treating children with rheumatic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Michelle L; Sandborg, Christy I; Mellins, Elizabeth D

    2004-03-01

    To quantify and describe the role of internist and pediatric rheumatologists in the care of children with rheumatic diseases and identify factors associated with internist rheumatologists' willingness to treat children. We surveyed physician members of the American College of Rheumatology who currently practice in California (n = 589). Bivariate and logit analyses were used to examine the effects of training, provider, practice, and distance to the nearest pediatric rheumatologist on the likelihood that an internist rheumatologist treated children. Our effective response rate was 51%. More than one third of internist rheumatologists who practice in California reported treating pediatric patients. On average, internist rheumatologists who treated children saw 3.1 patients younger than 18 years weekly; half of these patients were 16 and 17 years of age. In logistic regression analysis, internist rheumatologists who treat pediatric patients were significantly more likely to practice in a multispecialty clinic (adjusted odds ratio: 3.5; 95% confidence interval: 1.9-9.7) and to live >50 miles from a pediatric rheumatologists (adjusted odds ratio: 6.8; 95% confidence interval: 2.1-22.7). In aggregate, we estimate that pediatric rheumatologists and internist rheumatologists provide care to 550 and 419 patients younger than 18 years per week, respectively. A substantial number of California internist rheumatologists are involved in the care of children, especially adolescents. The heavy involvement of internist rheumatologists in the care of children suggests that additional pediatric rheumatologists may be needed in select areas. Our findings have important implications for the size and distribution of the pediatric rheumatology workforce, the content of fellowship training for internist rheumatologists, and future studies of the relative quality of pediatric rheumatology care offered by internist rheumatologists. Furthermore, the role of internist subspecialists in

  2. Lactulose administration for correction of stool disturbances in patients with rheumatic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A E Karateev

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To study efficacy and tolerability of Normase® (lactulose, Doctor Reddy’s laboratories for correction of stool disturbances in pts with rheumatic diseases (RD. Material and methods. 50 pts with RD (female with mean age 64,2+19,6 years suffering from constipation (stool frequency less than 3 times a week at least for 3 months were included. Lactulose 30 ml was administered once a day in the evening. In the absence of effect dose was increased to 60 ml, in case of prominent effect — decreased to 15 ml. Duration of treatment was 2 weeks. Dejection frequency from 8 lh to 14 ,h day and changes of general health connected with bowels function (on VAS were used as outcome measures. Results. Results of treatment were assessed in 48 pts. Two pts were lost to follow up, in two the drug was withdrawn due to adverse events (haemorrhoidal bleeding increase in one and prominent wind in another. Stool normalization was achieved in 12, significant improvement (increase of dejection frequency at least by 50% — in 19 (39,6%, insignificant improvement (increase of dejection frequency less than by 50% — in 9 (18,7% pts. In 6 pts (12,5% effect was absent. Mean dejection frequency significantly increased from 1,8+0,4 to 4,1 ±1,7 times a week (p<0,001 Conclusion. Lactulose is effective and relatively safe drug for treatment of chronic constipation in pts with RD and can be recommended for wide administration in rheumatological practice.

  3. Asymptomatic bacteriuria in women with autoimmune rheumatic disease: prevalence, risk factors, and clinical significance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiadou, Sarah P; Gamaletsou, Maria N; Mpanaka, Ioanna; Vlachou, Aggeliki; Goules, Andreas V; Ziogas, Dimitrios C; Syriou, Vassiliki; Tektonidou, Maria G; Kaltsas, Gregory; Manoussakis, Menelaos N; Sipsas, Nikolaos V

    2015-03-15

    Data regarding the prevalence and clinical significance of asymptomatic bacteriuria (AB) in women with autoimmune rheumatic disease (ARD) are scarce. In this prospective, case-control study, consecutive female outpatients with ARD were screened for AB. For each patient, demographics, type, duration, and treatment of underlying ARD, and risk factors for urinary tract infection (UTI), were recorded. Age-matched women with endocrine disease, without any autoimmune disease, not receiving immunosuppressive agents were used as controls. Subjects were followed up for 1 year for the development of symptomatic UTI. Two hundred sixty patients with ARD (mean age, 52.4 [standard deviation {SD}, 14.6] years) and 238 controls (mean age, 51.2 [SD, 16.5] years) were enrolled. The majority of patients with ARD (93.5%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 89.7%-95.9%) were receiving immunosuppressive agents. AB was detected in 24 patients with ARD (9.2%; 95% CI, 6.2%-13.4%) and in 22 controls (9.2%; 95% CI, 5.5%-12.9%) (P = 1.000). The most prevalent pathogen was Escherichia coli (16/24 [66%]). Independent predictors for AB among patients were diabetes (odds ratio [OR], 6.6; P = .008) and a longer ARD duration (>84 months; OR, 4.3; P = .018). During the 1-year follow-up, 9 patients with baseline AB remained persistently bacteriuric, whereas 11 were intermittently bacteriuric. Symptomatic UTI developed in 4 of 24 patients (16.7%; 95% CI, 6.1%-36.5%) with baseline AB vs 29 of 236 (12.3%; 95% CI, 8.6%-17.1%) without AB (P = .522). In our study, the prevalence of AB among women with ARD was not higher than that of controls, and AB was not associated with higher risk for symptomatic UTI. Risk factors for AB were longer duration of ARD and diabetes. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Critical review of the current recommendations for the treatment of systemic inflammatory rheumatic diseases during pregnancy and lactation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Roger A; de Jesús, Guilherme R; de Jesús, Nilson R; Klumb, Evandro M

    2016-10-01

    The crucial issue for a better pregnancy outcome in women with autoimmune rheumatic diseases is appropriate planning, with counseling of the ideal timing and treatment adaptation. Drugs used to treat rheumatic diseases may interfere with fertility or increase the risk of miscarriages and congenital abnormalities. MTX use post-conception is clearly linked to abortions as well as major birth defects, so it should be stopped 3months before conception. Leflunomide causes abnormalities in animals even in low doses. Although in humans, it does not seem to be as harmful as MTX, when pregnancy is detected in a patient on leflunomide, cholestyramine is given for washout. Sulfasalazine can be used safely and is an option for those patients who were on MTX or leflunomide. Azathioprine is generally the immunosuppressive of choice in many high-risk pregnancy centers because of the safety profile and its steroid-sparing property. Cyclosporine and tacrolimus can also be used as steroid-sparing agents, but experience is smaller. Although prednisone and prednisolone are inactivated in the placenta, we try to limit the dose to the minimal effective one, to prevent side effects. Antimalarials have been broadly studied and are safe during pregnancy and breastfeeding. Among biologic disease modifying anti-rheumatic agents (bDMARD), the anti-TNFs that have been used for longer are the ones with greater experience. The large monoclonal antibodies do not cross the placenta in the first trimester, and after conception, the decision to continue medication should be taken individually. The experience is larger in women with inflammatory bowel diseases, where anti-TNF is generally maintained at least until 30weeks to reduce fetal exposure. Live vaccines should not be administrated to the infant in the first 6months of life. Pregnancy data for rituximab, abatacept, anakinra, tocilizumab, ustekinumab, belimumab, and tofacitinib are limited and their use in pregnancy cannot currently be

  5. Fibroblast growth factor-21 is positively associated with atrial fibrosis in atrial fibrillation patients with rheumatic heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rui; Yi, Xin; Li, Xiaoyan; Jiang, Xuejun

    2015-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor-21 (FGF-21) has been discovered as a strong hormone, plays an important role in lipid metabolism, glucose metabolism, associated with several diseases such as obesity, metabolic syndrome, diabetes mellitus, and cardiovascular events; however, no evidence is available concerning the relationship of FGF-21 and atrial fibrosis in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) and rheumatic heart disease (RHD). Twenty-four rheumatic heart disease patients were divided into two groups, 12 cases with AF and 12 cases with sinus rhythm (SR). Clinical characteristics and blood samples were collected before surgery; right atrial appendage samples were taken in the surgery of valve replacement. HE staining was performed to determine cross-sectional area of atrial myocytes; Masson stained sections and mRNA levels of cardiac fibrosis biomarkers were used to evaluate the degree of cardiac fibrosis; the level of FGF-21 was evaluated via enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), immunohistochemistry, and real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Compared with SR group, cross-sectional area of atrial myocytes and collagen volume fraction were significantly increased in the atrial tissue of AF group. The distribution of FGF-21 in the AF group was remarkably higher than SR group. In addition, plasma and mRNA levels of FGF-21 in atrial tissue of AF showed the same trend as the result of immunohistochemistry. Using linear correlation analysis, the expression level of FGF-21 was found to be positively related to the degree of atrial fibrosis. FGF-21 might involve in the development and maintenance of atrial fibrosis in atrial fibrillation with rheumatic heart disease, and FGF-21 could be used as a novel biomarker to evaluate myocardial fibrosis in the future.

  6. Aiming for a healthier life: a qualitative content analysis of rehabilitation goals in patients with rheumatic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berdal, Gunnhild; Sand-Svartrud, Anne-Lene; Bø, Ingvild; Dager, Turid N; Dingsør, Anne; Eppeland, Siv G; Hagfors, Jon; Hamnes, Bente; Nielsen, Merete; Slungaard, Bente; Wigers, Sigrid H; Hagen, Kåre Birger; Dagfinrud, Hanne S; Kjeken, Ingvild

    2017-01-13

    To explore and describe rehabilitation goals of patients with rheumatic diseases during rehabilitation stays, and examine whether goal content changed from admission to discharge. Fifty-two participants were recruited from six rehabilitation centers in Norway. Goals were formulated by the participants during semi-structured goal-setting conversations with health professionals trained in motivational interviewing. An inductive qualitative content analysis was conducted to classify and quantify the expressed goals. Changes in goal content from admission to discharge were calculated as percentage differences. Goal content was explored across demographic and contextual characteristics. A total of 779 rehabilitation goals were classified into 35 categories, within nine overarching dimensions. These goals varied and covered a wide range of topics. Most common at admission were goals concerning healthy lifestyle, followed by goals concerning symptoms, managing everyday life, adaptation, disease management, social life, and knowledge. At discharge, goals about knowledge and symptoms decreased considerably, and goals about healthy lifestyle and adaptation increased. The health profession involved and patient gender influenced goal content. The rehabilitation goals of the patients with rheumatic diseases were found to be wide-ranging, with healthy lifestyle as the most prominent focus. Goal content changed between admission to, and discharge from, rehabilitation stays. Implications for rehabilitation Rehabilitation goals set by patients with rheumatic diseases most frequently concern healthy lifestyle changes, yet span a wide range of topics. Patient goals vary by gender and are influenced by the profession of the health care worker involved in the goal-setting process. To meet the diversity of patient needs, health professionals need to be aware of their potential influence on the actual goal-setting task, which may limit the range of topics patients present when they are

  7. Plasma complement and vascular complement deposition in patients with coronary artery disease with and without inflammatory rheumatic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shields, Kelly J; Mollnes, Tom Eirik; Eidet, Jon Roger; Mikkelsen, Knut; Almdahl, Sven M; Bottazzi, Barbara; Lyberg, Torstein; Manzi, Susan; Ahearn, Joseph M; Hollan, Ivana

    2017-01-01

    Inflammatory rheumatic diseases (IRD) are associated with accelerated coronary artery disease (CAD), which may result from both systemic and vascular wall inflammation. There are indications that complement may be involved in the pathogenesis of CAD in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) and Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA). This study aimed to evaluate the associations between circulating complement and complement activation products with mononuclear cell infiltrates (MCI, surrogate marker of vascular inflammation) in the aortic media and adventitia in IRDCAD and non-IRDCAD patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). Furthermore, we compared complement activation product deposition patterns in rare aorta adventitial and medial biopsies from SLE, RA and non-IRD patients. We examined plasma C3 (p-C3) and terminal complement complexes (p-TCC) in 28 IRDCAD (SLE = 3; RA = 25), 52 non-IRDCAD patients, and 32 IRDNo CAD (RA = 32) from the Feiring Heart Biopsy Study. Aortic biopsies taken from the CAD only patients during CABG were previously evaluated for adventitial MCIs. The rare aortic biopsies from 3 SLE, 3 RA and 3 non-IRDCAD were assessed for the presence of C3 and C3d using immunohistochemistry. IRDCAD patients had higher p-TCC than non-IRDCAD or IRDNo CAD patients (p<0.0001), but a similar p-C3 level (p = 0.42). Circulating C3 was associated with IRD duration (ρ, p-value: 0.46, 0.03). In multiple logistic regression analysis, IRD remained significantly related to the presence and size of MCI (p<0.05). C3 was present in all tissue samples. C3d was detected in the media of all patients and only in the adventitia of IRD patients (diffuse in all SLE and focal in one RA). The independent association of IRD status with MCI and the observed C3d deposition supports the unique relationship between rheumatic disease, and, in particular, SLE with the complement system. Exaggerated systemic and vascular complement activation may accelerate CVD, serve as a CVD

  8. Factors Associated with Myelosuppression Related to Low-Dose Methotrexate Therapy for Inflammatory Rheumatic Diseases.

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    Shunsuke Mori

    Full Text Available Severe myelosuppression is a serious concern in the management of rheumatic disease patients receiving methotrexate (MTX therapy. This study was intended to explore factors associated with the development of MTX-related myelosuppression and its disease severity.We retrospectively examined a total of 40 cases of MTX-related myelosuppression that had been filed in the registries of participating rheumatology and hematology divisions. Data before onset were compared with those of 120 controls matched for age and sex. Cytopenia was graded according to the National Cancer Institute criteria for adverse events. Data before and at onset were compared between the severe and non-severe groups.Non-use of folic acid supplements, concurrent medications, and low renal function were significantly associated with the development of myelosuppression (p < 0.001, p < 0.001, and p = 0.002, respectively. In addition, significantly lower MTX dosages, higher blood cell counts, and lower hemoglobin levels were seen in the myelosuppression group (p < 0.001. No patients exhibited leukocytopenia, neutropenia, or thrombocytopenia in routine blood monitoring taken within the past month. One-fourth developed myelosuppression within the first two months (an early-onset period. Myelosuppression was severe in approximately 40% of patients. Hypoalbuminemia and non-use of folic acid supplements were significantly associated with the severity of pancytopenia (p = 0.001 and 0.008, respectively. Besides these two factors, early onset and the use of lower doses of MTX were significantly associated with the severity of neutropenia (p = 0.003, 0.007, 0.003, and 0.002, respectively.Myelosuppression can occur abruptly at any time during low-dose MTX therapy, but severe neutropenia is more likely to occur in the early-onset period of this therapy. Contrary to our expectations, disease severity was not dependent on MTX doses. Serum albumin levels and folic acid supplementation are the

  9. Metabolic syndrome, inflammation and atherosclerosis - the role of adipokines in health and in systemic inflammatory rheumatic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Maria José; Fonseca, João Eurico

    2009-01-01

    Cardiovascular (CV) events are among the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in patients with inflammatory rheumatic diseases. It has been hypothesized that, in addition to the traditional CV risk factors, inflammation is a major contributor to atherogenesis. Metabolic syndrome (MetS) stands for a cluster of risk factors associated with insulin resistance and increased abdominal fat. Inflammation and MetS are intimately linked. Inflammatory biomarkers are frequently elevated in people with MetS and, conversely, the prevalence of MetS is higher in patients with chronic inflammatory rheumatic diseases, such as Rheumatoid Arthritis and Systemic Lupus Erythematosus. Inflammatory cytokines impair insulin sensitivity and can induce an adverse lipoprotein profile as seen in MetS. Furthermore, the presence of MetS correlates with increased subclinical atherosclerosis, major adverse CV events and death, making an important contribution to the CV burden in inflammatory diseases. Adipose tissue has recently emerged as an active organ that produces and secretes numerous mediators - adipokines - particularly relevant in energy homeostasis, inflammation, immune regulation and angiogenesis. These mediators arise as a potential link between MetS, inflammation and atherogenesis. Understanding the complex regulation and function of adipokines in health and disease is a priority since it may lead to new preventive and therapeutic interventions aiming to decrease CV risk.

  10. ANTI-B-CELL THERAPY AT IMMUNE INFLAMMATORY RHEUMATIC DISEASES: EFFICACY AND TOLERABILITY IN 229 PATIENTS

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    L. P. Ananieva

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to assess the efficacy and tolerability of Rituximab treatment in patients with serious immune inflammatory rheumatic diseases (IRD like systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE, systemic sclerosis (SS, systemic vasculitis (SV, Sjogren syndrome (SjS, dermatomyositis/polymyositis (DM/PM.Subjects and methods. The clinical efficacy has been analyzed in 229 patients with IRD: SLE (n=97, SV (n=50, SS (n=40, SjS (n=23 and DM/PM (n=19. Rituximab treatment was accompanied by administration of glucocorticoids and/or immunosuppressive drugs. Most patients demonstrated resistance to or low tolerability of standard therapy. Efficacy of treatment was analyzed in each group with the criteria relevant for each disease. To compare clinical response to the treatment between the groups we used gradations accepted by international registries: complete (good response, partial response, no response. Average duration of monitoring comprised 72 (1–288 weeks after the first introduction of Rituximab. Average Rituximab dose administered to patients over the period of monitoring was low and varied from 1.6±0.84 in DM/PM to 3.1±1.75 in SV. About 80% of patients received one or two courses of Rituximab except for patients with SS (half of them received three and more courses.Results. «Complete response» was observed in 50.6%, «partial response» – in 35% of patients. Rituximab courses provided positive dynamics in clinical scores and allowed to reduce supportive dose of glucocorticoids and to lower the dose or withdraw of immune-stimulating drugs. Multiple Rituximab courses provided stable and longlasting effect. Recurrences were observed less frequently, whereas efficacy of the therapy increased during a year and longer. Occurrence of adverse events and mortality rate were comparable to data of other national Rituximab registries.Conclusion. The results of the study may prove administration of Rituximab in patients with resistance to standard

  11. Autoimmune rheumatic disease and pulmonary arterial hypertension%免疫风湿病与肺动脉高压

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何岚

    2009-01-01

    @@ 肺动脉高压(pulmonary arterial hypertension.PAH)是一种进展迅速、预后极差的疾病.如果不治疗,40%~60%的患者在诊断后2年内死亡.PAH除原因不清的特发性PAH和家族性PAH外,多种临床疾病状态与PAH的发生有关.免疫风湿病(autoimmune rheumatic disease,AIRD)是一组与PAH发生多个环节相关的疾病[1-2].

  12. Prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders and rheumatic diseases in an urban community in Monagas State, Venezuela: a COPCORD study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granados, Ysabel; Cedeño, Ligia; Rosillo, Celenia; Berbin, Sol; Azocar, Miriam; Molina, María Elena; Lara, Onelia; Sanchez, Gloris; Peláez-Ballestas, Ingris

    2015-05-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders and rheumatic diseases in an urban community in Venezuela. We conducted a cross-sectional, community-based study using the COPCORD (Community Oriented Program for Control of Rheumatic Diseases) methodology in subjects older than 18 years. Positive cases were evaluated by rheumatologists. We surveyed 3,973 individuals (1,606 males and 2,367 females), with a mean age of 43.7 years (standard deviation (SD) 17.6). Mean duration of education was 8.9 years (SD 3.7), 79.2 % had a monthly income of < US$569, and 46.4 % were working. Excluding trauma, the prevalence of pain in the 7 days prior to interview was 19.9 % (95 % confidence interval (CI) 18.7-21.2 %). Mean pain intensity on a visual analog scale was 6.3 (SD 2.2), and 30.1 % (95 % CI 28.7-31.6 %) had a history of pain. Respondents reported pain in the knees, back, hands, shoulders, and ankles in the last 7 days; 4.7 % described current functional limitation, with 16.5 % reporting limitations in the past. Regarding treatment, 23.9 % received medication, 6.4 % received physical therapy, and 2.6 % received alternative treatment. The main diagnoses were osteoarthritis in 15.0 % (95 % CI 13.9-16.1 %), rheumatic regional pain syndromes in 6.3 % (95 % CI 5.5-7.1 %), back pain in 2.8 % (95 % CI 2.3-3.4 %), rheumatoid arthritis in 0.4 % (95 % CI 0.2-0.6 %), crystal arthropathy in 0.3 % (95 % CI 0.1-0.5 %), fibromyalgia in 0.2 % (95 % CI 0.1-0.4 %), and systemic lupus erythematosus in 0.07 % (95 % CI 0.01-0.2 %). The prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders was 22.4 %, and the most prevalent disease was osteoarthritis. Pain, in which a patient is receiving treatment for musculoskeletal disorders, and physical disability were associated with the presence of a rheumatic disease.

  13. Juvenile idiopathic arthritis in adulthood: fulfilment of classification criteria for adult rheumatic diseases, long-term outcomes and predictors of inactive disease, functional status and damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira-Ramos, Filipa; Eusébio, Mónica; M Martins, Fernando; Mourão, Ana Filipa; Furtado, Carolina; Campanilho-Marques, Raquel; Cordeiro, Inês; Ferreira, Joana; Cerqueira, Marcos; Figueira, Ricardo; Brito, Iva; Santos, Maria José; Melo-Gomes, José A; Fonseca, João Eurico

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To determine how adult juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) patients fulfil classification criteria for adult rheumatic diseases, evaluate their outcomes and determine clinical predictors of inactive disease, functional status and damage. Methods Patients with JIA registered on the Rheumatic Diseases Portuguese Register (Reuma.pt) older than 18 years and with more than 5 years of disease duration were included. Data regarding sociodemographic features, fulfilment of adult classification criteria, Health Assessment Questionnaire, Juvenile Arthritis Damage Index—articular (JADI-A) and Juvenile Arthritis Damage Index—extra-articular (JADI-E) damage index and disease activity were analysed. Results 426 patients were included. Most of patients with systemic JIA fulfilled criteria for Adult Still's disease. 95.6% of the patients with rheumatoid factor (RF)-positive polyarthritis and 57.1% of the patients with RF-negative polyarthritis matched criteria for rheumatoid arthritis (RA). 38.9% of the patients with extended oligoarthritis were classified as RA while 34.8% of the patients with persistent oligoarthritis were classified as spondyloarthritis. Patients with enthesitis-related arthritis fulfilled criteria for spondyloarthritis in 94.7%. Patients with psoriatic arthritis maintained this classification. Patients with inactive disease had lower disease duration, lower diagnosis delay and corticosteroids exposure. Longer disease duration was associated with higher HAQ, JADI-A and JADI-E. Higher JADI-A was also associated with biological treatment and retirement due to JIA disability and higher JADI-E with corticosteroids exposure. Younger age at disease onset was predictive of higher HAQ, JADI-A and JADI-E and decreased the chance of inactive disease. Conclusions Most of the included patients fulfilled classification criteria for adult rheumatic diseases, maintain active disease and have functional impairment. Younger age at disease onset was predictive

  14. Association between Coagulation Function and Cerebral Microbleeds in Ischemic Stroke Patients with Atrial Fibrillation and/or Rheumatic Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Junfeng; Wang, Deren; Xiong, Yao; Liu, Bian; Lin, Jing; Zhang, Shihong; Wu, Bo; Wei, Chenchen; Liu, Ming

    2017-04-01

    Cerebral microbleeds (CMBs), which indicate hemorrhage-prone disease, may associate with hemostatic abnormalities, but the association between CMBs and coagulation function is uncertain. We aimed to examine this possible association. The following coagulation function indicators were evaluated in 85 consecutive ischemic stroke patients diagnosed with atrial fibrillation and/or rheumatic heart disease: prothrombintime (PT), activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT), and levels of D-dimer and fibrinogen. Indicators were assessed within 24 h after admission. CMBs were identified based on published criteria by two experienced stroke neurologists working independently. PT, APPT, and levels of D-dimer and fibrinogen were compared between patients with and without CMBs using univariate and multivariate analysis. CMBs were detected in 48 patients (56.5%), and fibrinogen levels in these patients were independently and significantly higher than in patients without CMBs after adjustment (OR 2.16, 95% CI 1.20-3.90, P=0.01), whereas the two types of patients did not differ significantly in PT, APPT, or D-dimer levels. The presence of CMBs in ischemic stroke patients with atrial fibrillation and/or rheumatic heart disease is associated with elevated levels of fibrinogen. Larger prospective studies are needed to verify this association and explore the mechanisms involved.

  15. Treatment of rheumatic disease by Chinese drugs fumigation and steaming%中药薰蒸治疗风湿性疾病84例

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    沈鹰; 康贤通; 毛婷丽

    2003-01-01

    AIM:To observe therapeutic effect of fumigation and steaming with Chinese drugs in the rheumatic diseases.METHODS:Drugs removing rheumatic disease,warming channels and dispersing cold,activating blood circulation were used for fumigation and steaming treatment in 84 cases with rheumatic diseases,once a day,20 min each time,10 times as a treatment course. Among them,4 cases received treatment for 2 and 3 course of treatment respectively.RESULTS:18 cases were corrected completely,64 were improved,2 showed no improvement,and total effective rate was 98% . CONCLUSION:Through hot and therapeutic effect of drugs,lesions can be managed directly in fumigation and steaming treatment.

  16. Absence of high-affinity calreticulin autoantibodies in patients with systemic rheumatic diseases and coeliac disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, C S; Hansen, K B; Jacobsen, Søren

    2005-01-01

    Calreticulin has been reported to be an autoantigen in various autoimmune connective tissue diseases and in coeliac disease. Previous studies have used incubation buffers with low salt and low detergent concentrations (low stringency conditions) with serum albumin or other proteins as a blocking...

  17. Prevalence and factors associated with musculoskeletal disorders and rheumatic diseases in indigenous Maya-Yucateco people: a cross-sectional community-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peláez-Ballestas, I; Alvarez-Nemegyei, J; Loyola-Sánchez, A; Escudero, M L

    2016-07-01

    This study aimed to estimate the prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders and rheumatic diseases in indigenous Maya-Yucateco communities using Community-Oriented Program for Control of Rheumatic Diseases (COPCORD) methodology. The study population comprised subjects aged ≥18 years from 11 communities in the municipality of Chankom, Yucatan. An analytical cross-sectional study was performed, and a census was used. Subjects positive for musculoskeletal (MSK) pain were examined by trained physicians. A total of 1523 community members were interviewed. The mean age was 45.2 years (standard deviation (SD) 17.9), and 917 (60.2 %) were women. Overall, 592 individuals (38.8 %; 95 % CI 36.3-41.3 %) had experienced MSK pain in the last 7 days. The pain intensity was reported as "strong" to "severe" in 43.4 %. The diagnoses were rheumatic regional pain syndromes in 165 (10.8 %; 95 % CI 9.4-12.5), low back pain in 153 (10.0 %; 95 % CI 8.5-11.6), osteoarthritis in 144 (9.4 %; 95 % CI 8.0-11.0), fibromyalgia in 35 (2.2 %; 95 % CI 1.6-3.1), rheumatoid arthritis in 17 (1.1 %; 95 % CI 0.6-1.7), undifferentiated arthritis in 8 (0.5 %; 95 % CI 0.2-0.8), and gout in 1 (0.06 %; 95 % CI 0.001-0.3). Older age, being female, disability, and physically demanding work were associated with a greater likelihood of having a rheumatic disease. In conclusion, MSK pain and rheumatic diseases were highly prevalent. The high impact of rheumatic diseases on daily activities in this indigenous population suggests the need to organize culturally-sensitive community interventions for the prevention of disabilities caused by MSK disorders and diseases.

  18. US-guided interventional joint procedures in patients with rheumatic diseases-When and how we do it?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goncalves, B., E-mail: belarmino.goncalves@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Hospitais da Universidade de Coimbra - HUC, Coimbra (Portugal); Ambrosio, C.; Serra, S. [Department of Rheumatology, Hospitais da Universidade de Coimbra - HUC, Coimbra (Portugal); Alves, F.; Gil-Agostinho, A.; Caseiro-Alves, F. [Department of Radiology, Hospitais da Universidade de Coimbra - HUC, Coimbra (Portugal)

    2011-09-15

    Objective: To describe the main indications and the technical steps to perform ultrasound guided procedures in patients with rheumatic diseases. To access procedures accuracy, safety and effectiveness. Materials and methods: 27 patients with pain related to articular complications of rheumatic diseases and according to previous radiographic or US exam were submitted to several US-guided procedures. 42% of patients (n = 11) had rheumatoid arthritis, 11% (n = 3) spondyloarthropathies, 18% (n = 5) psoriatic arthritis, 15% (n = 4) undifferentiated arthritis, 3% (n = 1) Sjoegren syndrome and 11% (n = 3) had gout. Described procedures are synovial biopsies, intra-articular injections of corticosteroids, radiation synovectomy and synovial cysts drainage procedures. When a therapeutical procedure was made, patients were evaluated by 2 rheumatologists. Corticosteroids used were Prednisolone and Triamcinolone. Yttrium-90 was used for synovectomy. Results: In all cases success was achieved with correct needle placement inside the joint. After injection/aspiration symptoms successfully solved with all patients improving their health status. No complications were recorded during follow-up period. Conclusions: US-guidance is very reliable to afford a safety procedure always checking the injection, biopsy or aspiration. Guided-biopsy has high success rates obtaining several samples. Thus is also possible to use more powerful/long acting therapeutic drugs aggressive to extra-articular structures avoiding complications.

  19. The ACR20 and defining a threshold for response in rheumatic diseases: too much of a good thing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felson, David T; LaValley, Michael P

    2014-01-03

    In the past 20 years great progress has been made in the development of multidimensional outcome measures (such as the Disease Activity Score and ACR20) to evaluate treatments in rheumatoid arthritis, a process disseminated throughout rheumatic diseases. These outcome measures have standardized the assessment of outcomes in trials, making it possible to evaluate and compare the efficacy of treatments. The methodologic advances have included the selection of pre-existing outcome measures that detected change in a sensitive fashion (in rheumatoid arthritis, this was the Core Set Measures). These measures were then combined into a single multidimensional outcome measure and such outcome measures have been widely adopted in trials and endorsed by the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) and the European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) and regulatory agencies. The secular improvement in treatment for patients with rheumatoid arthritis has been facilitated in part by these major methodologic advancements. The one element of this effort that has not optimized measurement of outcomes nor made it easier to detect the effect of treatments is the dichotomization of continuous measures of response, creating responders and non-responder definitions (for example, ACR20 responders; EULAR good responders). Dichotomizing response sacrifices statistical power and eliminates variability in response. Future methodologic work will need to focus on improving multidimensional outcome measurement without arbitrarily characterizing some patients as responders while labeling others as non-responders.

  20. Understanding rheumatic fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azevedo, Pedro Ming; Pereira, Rosa Rodrigues; Guilherme, Luiza

    2012-05-01

    Through a comprehensive review of the recent findings on rheumatic fever, we intend to propose a new physiopathologic model for this disease. A Medline search was performed for all articles containing the terms rheumatic fever or rheumatic heart disease in title or abstract from 1970 to 2011. Best evidence qualitative technique was used to select the most relevant. The scientific interest on rheumatic fever has notably diminished throughout the twentieth century as evidenced by the comparison of the proportion of articles in which RF was a subject in 1950 (0.26%) and today (0.03%) [Pubmed]. However, RF remains a major medical and social problem in the developing world and in the so-called hotspots, where it still causes around 500.000 deaths each year, not too different from the pre-antibiotic era. The role of genetic factors in RF susceptibility is discussed. Familiar aggregation, similarity of disease patterns between siblings, identical twin, and HLA correlation studies are evidence for a genetic influence on RF susceptibility. The suspect-involved genes fall mainly into those capable of immunologic mediation. Molecular mimicry explains the triggering of RF, but an intense and sustained inflammation is needed to cause sequels. Also, RF patients vary greatly in terms of symptoms. It is likely that a genetic background directing immune response towards a predominantly Th1 or Th2 pattern contributes to these features. The recent findings on rheumatic fever provide important insight on its physiopathology that helps understanding this prototype post-infectious autoimmune disease giving insights on other autoimmune conditions.

  1. Analysis of employment rate and social status in young adults with childhood-onset rheumatic disease in Catalonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Mendoza, Ana Carolina; Modesto Caballero, Consuelo; Navarro-Cendejas, José

    2015-07-11

    Rheumatic diseases of childhood, in particular juvenile idiopathic arthritis, are chronic conditions associated with considerable morbidity and mortality that can have repercussions on aspects of adult life. The aim of this study was to determine the employment rate and social status of patients with childhood-onset rheumatic disease attending a pediatric rheumatology transition unit. A census was taken of patients seen in the Pediatric Rheumatology Transition Unit of Hospital Vall d'Hebron (Barcelona, Spain). We collected demographic and clinical variables and determined the patients' functional capacity. All patients seen during the period of September to December 2013 underwent a survey containing items related to their social situation, maximum academic level achieved, and working life. Correlations were sought between clinical variables associated with a poor prognosis and the patients' job performance. The data were analyzed and compared with those of an age-matched cohort from the general population of Catalonia. Of 130 patients included in the census, 96 responded to the survey. Steinbrocker grade III and IV disability (poorer functional capacity) (p = 0.0025) and longer disease duration (p = 0.017) were significantly related to greater difficulty getting a job. Patients with grade III and IV disability and those with more severe disease showed trends to having more problems carrying out work-related tasks. Our cohort included a higher percentage of students than the age-matched comparison population (50 % vs 24 %, respectively) (p = 0.0001); 82 % of patients had completed studies beyond the compulsory education level. The employment rate was lower in our patient cohort than in the comparison cohort (38.3 % vs 59.9 %) (p = 0.0001), whereas the percentage of unemployed was similar. Patients with milder disease had a higher probability of living with their parents up to a later age (OR = 3.2, 95 % CI 0.38-6.15; p = 0

  2. Systematic review of rheumatic disease phenotypes and outcomes in the Indigenous populations of Canada, the USA, Australia and New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurd, Kelle; Barnabe, Cheryl

    2017-04-01

    We performed a systematic review designed to characterize clinical phenotypes and outcomes in Indigenous populations with rheumatic disease to enhance the understanding of how rheumatic disease presents in Indigenous populations and allow for better projection of the healthcare needs of the communities affected. A systematic search was performed in medical (Medline, EMBASE, CINAHL), Indigenous and conference abstract databases (to June 2015). Search terms for Indigenous populations were combined with terms for inflammatory arthritis conditions, connective tissue disorders, crystal arthritis and osteoarthritis. Studies were included if they reported on disease features, disease activity measures, or patient-reported outcomes in Canadian, American, Australian or New Zealand Indigenous populations. Data were extracted in duplicate, and a narrative summary was prepared. A total of 5269 titles and abstracts were reviewed, of which 504 underwent full-text review and 85 met inclusion criteria. Nearly all the studies described outcomes in the North American populations (n = 77), with only four studies from Australia and four studies from New Zealand. The majority of studies were in rheumatoid arthritis (n = 31) and systemic lupus erythematosus (n = 19). Indigenous patients with rheumatoid arthritis had higher disease activity and reported more significant impact on patient-reported outcomes and quality of life than non-Indigenous patients. Spondyloarthropathy features were described in North American populations, with most patients having advanced manifestations. In systemic lupus erythematosus, nephritis was more frequent in Indigenous populations. Gout and osteoarthritis were more severe in New Zealand Maori populations. The existing literature supports differences in disease phenotype and severity in Indigenous populations of Canada, America, Australia and New Zealand. We encourage investigators in this area of research to undertake contemporary studies that

  3. Real-life effectiveness of spa therapy in rheumatic and musculoskeletal diseases: a retrospective study of 819 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karagülle, Mine; Kardeş, Sinan; Karagülle, Müfit Zeki

    2017-05-30

    The objective of this study is to determine the use and efficacy of spa therapy in patients with a wide spectrum of rheumatic and musculoskeletal diseases under real-life clinical practice circumstances. In this retrospective observational study at the Medical Ecology and Hydroclimatology Department of Istanbul Faculty of Medicine, the records of all adult patients with rheumatic and musculoskeletal diseases who were prescribed a spa therapy in various health resorts in Turkey between 2002 and 2012 were analyzed. Patients sojourned to and stayed at a health resort and followed a usual 2-week course of spa therapy. The patients were examined within a week before and after the spa therapy at the department by the physicians and outcome measures were pain intensity (visual analog scale, VAS), patient's general evaluation (VAS), physician's general evaluation (VAS), Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ), Lequesne's Functional Index (LFI), Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Index (WOMAC), Waddell Index (WI), Neck Pain and Disability Scale (NPDS), Shoulder Disability Questionnaire (SDQ), Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ), and Beck's Depression Inventory (BDI). In total, 819 patients were included in the analysis. The diagnoses were 536 osteoarthritis; 115 fibromyalgia; 50 lumbar disc herniation; 34 cervical disc herniation; 23 nonspecific low back pain; 22 ankylosing spondylitis; 16 rheumatoid arthritis; 9 rotator cuff tendinitis; and 14 other conditions/diseases including scoliosis, stenosing flexor tenosynovitis, congenital hip dislocation in adult, Behçet's disease, de Quervain tendinopathy, psoriatic arthritis, osteoporosis, fracture rehabilitation, and diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis. Statistically significant decrease in pain scores was found in all patients except hip osteoarthritis (p = 0.063) and rheumatoid arthritis (p = 0.134) subgroups; and statistically significant improvement in function in all patients except hip osteoarthritis

  4. Rheumatic Diseases and Obesity: Adipocytokines as Potential Comorbidity Biomarkers for Cardiovascular Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rossana Scrivo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation has been recognized as a common trait in the pathogenesis of multifactorial diseases including obesity, where a low-grade inflammation has been established and may be responsible for the cardiovascular risk related to the disease. Obesity has also been associated with the increased incidence and a worse outcome of rheumatoid arthritis (RA and osteoarthritis (OA. RA is characterized by systemic inflammation, which is thought to play a key role in accelerated atherosclerosis and in the increased incidence of cardiovascular disease, an important comorbidity in patients with RA. The inflammatory process underlying the cardiovascular risk both in obesity and RA may be mediated by adipocytokines, a heterogeneous group of soluble proteins mainly secreted by the adipocytes. Many adipocytokines are mainly produced by white adipose tissue. Adipocytokines may also be involved in the pathogenesis of OA since a positive association with obesity has been found for weight-bearing and nonweight-bearing joints, suggesting that, in addition to local overload, systemic factors may contribute to joint damage. In this review we summarize the current knowledge on experimental models and clinical studies in which adipocytokines were examined in obesity, RA, and OA and discuss the potential of adipocytokines as comorbidity biomarkers for cardiovascular risk.

  5. The relevance of performing exercise test before starting supervised physical exercise in asymptomatic cardiovascular patients with rheumatic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klemz, Bárbara Nascimento de Carvalho; Reis-Neto, Edgard Torres Dos; Jennings, Fábio; Siqueira, Usmary Sardinha; Klemz, Fábio Kadratz; Pinheiro, Helder Henrique Costa; Sato, Emília Inoue; Natour, Jamil; Szejnfeld, Vera Lúcia; Pinheiro, Marcelo de Medeiros

    2016-11-01

    To evaluate the impact and risk factors associated with an abnormal exercise test (ET) in systemic inflammatory rheumatic disease (SIRD) patients before commencing supervised physical exercise. A total of 235 SIRD patients were enrolled in three controlled clinical trials, including 103 RA, 42 SLE and 57 AS patients. The control group consisted of 231 healthy, sedentary subjects matched for age, gender and BMI. All performed an ET, according to Bruce's or Ellestad's protocol. Cardiovascular disease risk factors, medications, comorbidities and details of each SIRD were assessed. SIRD patients had a higher percentage of abnormal ETs compared with the control group, especially exercise hypertensive behaviour, higher oxygen consumption, higher resting heart rate and heart rate at the first minute of recovery, and chronotropic incompetence (C-Inc) (P exercise. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Rheumatology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. PERIPROSTHETIC JOINT INFECTION IN PATIENTS WITH RHEUMATIC DISEASES: THE PROBLEMS OF DIAGNOSIS, PREVENTION, AND TREATMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. E. Khramov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the most menacing complications of large joint total endoprosthesis (TE in patients with rheumatic diseases (RD is the development of periprosthetic infection (PI, progression of which may give rise not only to limb loss, but also death. At the same time, early diagnosis and adequate surgical care make it possible not only to arrest the infectious process, but also to preserve an implanted joint.Objective: to define criteria for the diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of PI after hip and knee joint (HJ and KJ TE in patients with RD.Subjects and methods. In 2009 to 2013, 654 KJ and 549 HJ TE was performed in the V.A. Nasonova Research Instituteof Rheumatology performed KJ (n = 654 and HJ (n = 549 joint ERs.Results and discussion. PI developed in 12 (3.63% and 8 (2.95% patients after KJ and HJ ER, respectively. Early, delayed, and late PI was seen in 11, 6, and 3 patients, respectively. Eleven patients with early PI underwent joint revision/ debridement with preservation of an endoprosthesis and replacement of HJ endoprosthetic inserts and heads. The operations were completed with the collagen hemobiotics being left in the wound and its drainage. Systemic antibiotic therapy was used for 4–6 weeks. No recurrent infection was observed in 9 cases. Two patients underwentresurgery, by setting suction-irrigation systems. Nine patients with delayed or late PI had the following operations: A single-stage revision operation (the endoprosthesis was removed and a new one was implanted was performed in two cases of stable endoprosthetic components and accurately verified low-virulent microorganisms susceptible to certain antibiotics. It was imperative to use cement with an antibiotic, collagen hemobiotics, and systemic antibiotic therapy for 6 weeks. The other 7 patients with unstable endoprosthetic components underwent two-stage revision: Stage 1, endoprosthetic removal and antibiotic-loaded spacer implantation; 6-12 weeks after

  7. Expert opinion of Spanish rheumatologists about the role of physical exercise in ankging spondylitis and other rheumatic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarco, Pedro; Florez, Mariano; Almodóvar, Raquel

    2016-01-01

    To analyze the perceptions of Spanish rheumatologists, experts in spondyloarthropathies (SpA), on the role of exercise in these and in other rheumatic diseases A survey to 106 rheumatologists belonging to an SpA working group of the Spanish Society of Rheumatology, GRESSER, was collected. The questions were related with general aspects of professional exercise (clinical practice and generic knowledge), use of fitness in SpA (benefits, indications, contraindications, compliance, facilitators), sociodemographic characteristics and professional experience with the respondents' exercise regimen. A descriptive analysis was performed. the survey was sent to 106 rheumatologists, 44 of them answered (51% female, over 20 years of experience). Over 86% believe that their patients need exercise, but the prescription is moderate. 42% believe they do not have training to prescribe specific exercises. The physical activity education materials available consisted essentially of brochures (90%), websites (52%) and videos (23%). The therapeutic importance of exercise depends on the type of underlying disease. Most agree in decreasing the intensity of exercise during disease flares. For most cases of Spa, exercise is not a trigger of flares (66%), and may be used at any stage of the disease, depending on the type and the phase of the Spa. Rheumatologists consider exercise as a fundamental part of the treatment of rheumatic patients, but greater knowledge and development of specific strategies in its prescription is required. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Reumatología y Colegio Mexicano de Reumatología. All rights reserved.

  8. Gout: will the "King of Diseases" be the first rheumatic disease to be cured?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Jasvinder A

    2016-11-11

    Gout is the most common inflammatory arthritis in adults in the Western world. Characterized by hyperuricemia and the effects of acute and chronic inflammation in joints and bursa, gout leads to an agonizing, chronically painful arthritis. Arthritis can also be accompanied by urate nephropathy and subcutaneous urate deposits (tophi). Exciting new developments in the last decade have brought back the focus on this interesting, crystal-induced chronic inflammatory condition. New insights include the role of NALP3 inflammasome-induced inflammation in acute gout, the characterization of diagnostic signs on ultrasound and dual-energy computed tomography imaging modalities, the recognition of target serum urate less than 6 mg/day as the goal for urate-lowering therapies, and evidence-based treatment guidelines. A better understanding of disease mechanisms has enabled drug discovery - three new urate-lowering drugs have been approved in the last decade, with several more in the pipeline. We now recognize the important role that environment and genetics play in the causation of gout. A focus on the cardiac, renal, and metabolic comorbidities of gout will help translational research and discovery over the next decade.

  9. Effect of Ligustrazine hydrochloride on coagulation reaction and inflammation reaction in single valve replacement patients with rheumatic heart disease undergoing cardiopulmonary bypass

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈益君

    2014-01-01

    Objective To observe the protection effect of Ligustrazine Hydrochloride(LH)on coagulation reaction and inflammation reaction in single valve replacement patients with rheumatic heart disease undergoing cardiopulmonary bypass(CPB).Methods Totally 40 patients undergoing single valve replacement were recruited in the study and randomly assigned to the two groups,the treatment group

  10. Historical aspects of rheumatic fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steer, Andrew C

    2015-01-01

    Few diseases have experienced such a remarkable change in their epidemiology over the past century, without the influence of a vaccine, than rheumatic fever. Rheumatic fever has all but disappeared from industrialised countries after being a frequent problem in the 1940s and 1950s. That the disease still occurs at high incidence in resource limited settings and in Indigenous populations in industrialised countries, particularly in Australia and New Zealand, is an indication of the profound effect of socio-economic factors on the disease. Although there have been major changes in the epidemiology of rheumatic fever, diagnosis remains reliant on careful clinical judgement and management is remarkably similar to that 50 years ago. Over the past decade, increasing attention has been given to rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease as public health issues, including in Australia and particularly in New Zealand, as well as in selected low and middle income countries. Perhaps the greatest hope for public health control of rheumatic fever is the development of a vaccine against Streptococcus pyogenes, and there are encouraging initiatives in this area. However, an effective vaccine is some time away and in the meantime public health efforts need to focus on effective translation of the known evidence around primary and secondary prophylaxis into policy and practice.

  11. Clinical practice guidelines for the management of pregnancy in women with autoimmune rheumatic diseases of the Mexican College of Rheumatology. Part I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saavedra Salinas, Miguel Ángel; Barrera Cruz, Antonio; Cabral Castañeda, Antonio Rafael; Jara Quezada, Luis Javier; Arce-Salinas, C Alejandro; Álvarez Nemegyei, José; Fraga Mouret, Antonio; Orozco Alcalá, Javier; Salazar Páramo, Mario; Cruz Reyes, Claudia Verónica; Andrade Ortega, Lilia; Vera Lastra, Olga Lidia; Mendoza Pinto, Claudia; Sánchez González, Antonio; Cruz Cruz, Polita Del Rocío; Morales Hernández, Sara; Portela Hernández, Margarita; Pérez Cristóbal, Mario; Medina García, Gabriela; Hernández Romero, Noé; Velarde Ochoa, María Del Carmen; Navarro Zarza, José Eduardo; Portillo Díaz, Verónica; Vargas Guerrero, Angélica; Goycochea Robles, María Victoria; García Figueroa, José Luis; Barreira Mercado, Eduardo; Amigo Castañeda, Mary Carmen

    2015-01-01

    Pregnancy in women with autoimmune rheumatic diseases is associated with several maternal and fetal complications. The development of clinical practice guidelines with the best available scientific evidence may help standardize the care of these patients. To provide recommendations regarding prenatal care, treatment, and a more effective monitoring of pregnancy in women with lupus erythematosus (SLE), rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and antiphospholipid antibody syndrome (APS). Nominal panels were formed for consensus, systematic search of information, development of clinical questions, processing and grading of recommendations, internal validation by peers, and external validation of the final document. The quality criteria of the AGREE II instrument were followed. The various panels answered the 37 questions related to maternal and fetal care in SLE, RA, and APS, as well as to the use of antirheumatic drugs during pregnancy and lactation. The recommendations were discussed and integrated into a final manuscript. Finally, the corresponding algorithms were developed. We present the recommendations for pregnant women with SLE in this first part. We believe that the Mexican clinical practice guidelines for the management of pregnancy in women with SLE integrate the best available evidence for the treatment and follow-up of patients with these conditions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  12. Clinical practice guidelines for the management of pregnancy in women with autoimmune rheumatic diseases of the Mexican College of Rheumatology. Part II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saavedra Salinas, Miguel Ángel; Barrera Cruz, Antonio; Cabral Castañeda, Antonio Rafael; Jara Quezada, Luis Javier; Arce-Salinas, C Alejandro; Álvarez Nemegyei, José; Fraga Mouret, Antonio; Orozco Alcalá, Javier; Salazar Páramo, Mario; Cruz Reyes, Claudia Verónica; Andrade Ortega, Lilia; Vera Lastra, Olga Lidia; Mendoza Pinto, Claudia; Sánchez González, Antonio; Cruz Cruz, Polita Del Rocío; Morales Hernández, Sara; Portela Hernández, Margarita; Pérez Cristóbal, Mario; Medina García, Gabriela; Hernández Romero, Noé; Velarde Ochoa, María Del Carmen; Navarro Zarza, José Eduardo; Portillo Díaz, Verónica; Vargas Guerrero, Angélica; Goycochea Robles, María Victoria; García Figueroa, José Luis; Barreira Mercado, Eduardo; Amigo Castañeda, Mary Carmen

    2015-01-01

    Pregnancy in women with autoimmune rheumatic diseases is associated with several maternal and fetal complications. The development of clinical practice guidelines with the best available scientific evidence may help standardize the care of these patients. To provide recommendations regarding prenatal care, treatment, and a more effective monitoring of pregnancy in women with lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and antiphospholipid syndrome (APS). Nominal panels were formed for consensus, systematic search of information, development of clinical questions, processing and staging of recommendations, internal validation by peers and external validation of the final document. The quality criteria of the AGREE II instrument were followed. The panels answered 37 questions related to maternal and fetal care in lupus erythematosus, RA and APS, as well as for use of antirheumatic drugs during pregnancy and lactation. The recommendations were discussed and integrated into a final manuscript. Finally, the corresponding algorithms were developed. In this second part, the recommendations for pregnant women with RA, APS and the use of antirheumatic drugs during pregnancy and lactation are presented. We believe that the Mexican clinical practice guidelines for the management of pregnancy in women with RA and APS integrate the best available evidence for the treatment and follow-up of patients with these conditions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  13. Comparative study on cerebral injury after open heart surgery in patients with congenital and rheumatic heart disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Yong; XIAO Ying-bin; CHEN Lin; ZHONG Qian-jin; WANG Xue-feng

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To comparatively study the different effects of open heart surgery on brain tissues of patients with congenital and rheumatic heart disease. Methods: Forty patients with congenital heart disease (CHD, CHD group, n=20) or rheumatic heart disease (RHD, RHD group, n=20) underwent on-pump (cardiopulmonary bypass, CPB) heart-beating open heart surgery. Blood samples before CPB, and 20 minutes, 1 hour, 24 hours and 7 days after CPB were collected, and the levels of neuron-specific enolase (NSE) and protein S-100b in the plasma were determined with enzyme-linked immunoadsorbent assay (ELISA), respectively. All the patients were examined with electroencephalogram (EEG) before and 1 week after operation. The changes of NSE, S-100b and EEG compared to verify the difference of postoperative cerebral injury between CHD cases and RHD cases. Results: The plasma level of S-100b increased significantly 20 minutes after CPB and was still higher than the preoperative level at 24 hours after operation in both groups (P<0.01). The plasma level of NSE increased more significantly in the CHD group than in the RHD group 20 minutes after CPB and it returned to the normal level 24 hours after CPB in the CHD group but remained at a high level in the RHD group (P<0.01). The levels of NSE and S-100b returned to the normal levels on the 7th day after CPB. Abnormal EEG was found in 75% of the patients in the CHD group and 60% in the RHD group. Conclusions: On-pump heart-beating open heart surgery can cause certain cerebral injury in the patients with CHD or RHD. The injury was more severe and recovered more quickly in the CHD group than in the RHD group.

  14. Evaluation of proinflammatory cytokines and brain natriuretic peptide in patients with rheumatic heart diseases and coronary heart disease complicated by chronic heart insufficiency

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    Objective. To study proinflammatory cytokines and brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) in patients with rheumatic heart diseases (RHD) and coronary heart disease (CHD) complicated by chronic heart insufficiency (CHI). Material and methods. 54 pts with CHI (among them 16 with RHD and 38 with CHD with signs of CHI ofll-IV functional class according to NYHA that correspond to 11A-III stage according to N.D. Strazesko-V.H. \\frsilenko classification) and 30 healthy persons of control group were examine...

  15. The WHF Roadmap for Reducing CV Morbidity and Mortality Through Prevention and Control of Rheumatic Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palafox, Benjamin; Mocumbi, Ana Olga; Kumar, R Krishna; Ali, Sulafa K M; Kennedy, Elizabeth; Haileamlak, Abraham; Watkins, David; Petricca, Kadia; Wyber, Rosemary; Timeon, Patrick; Mwangi, Jeremiah

    2017-03-20

    Rheumatic heart disease (RHD) is a preventable non-communicable condition that disproportionately affects the world's poorest and most vulnerable. The World Heart Federation Roadmap for improved RHD control is a resource designed to help a variety of stakeholders raise the profile of RHD nationally and globally, and provide a framework to guide and support the strengthening of national, regional and global RHD control efforts. The Roadmap identifies the barriers that limit access to and uptake of proven interventions for the prevention and control of RHD. It also highlights a variety of established and promising solutions that may be used to overcome these barriers. As a general guide, the Roadmap is meant to serve as the foundation for the development of tailored plans of action to improve RHD control in specific contexts.

  16. CLINICAL APPLICATION OF 99mTc MAA PULMONARY SCINTISCAN IN DEEP VEIN THROMBOSIS AND RHEUMATIC HEART DISEASE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈万春; 曾昭瑞; 金立仁; 包玉倩

    1992-01-01

    We studied 21 cases of pulmonary thromboembolism (PTE) in 67 consecutive cases of deep vein thrombosis (DVT) of the lower limbs and 4 cases in 9 selective cases of rheumatic heart disease (RHD). The incidence of PTE in DVT could be inferred as being 31.3%. PTE were diagnosed by 99mTc MAA lung scintiscans. In the DVT cases, lung scintiscan were done right after venography of the legs. Six cases underwent pulmonary angiography, ⅠDSA. As PTE in the DVT cases were all subclinical, only oligemia andvascular "pruning" were noted. Injection of urokinase into the pulmonary artery concerned through a catheter after which intravenous infusion was continued for 10-14 days, only 3 PTE resolved, probably representing early cases.

  17. Minor rheumatology: Nonsystemic rheumatic disease of juxta-articular soft tissues of the upper extremity. Part 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. E. Karateev

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatic diseases of juxta-articular soft tissues (RDJAST (tendinitis, tenosynovitis, bursitis, etc. are one of the most common causes of disability and one the most common reasons for seeking medical advice. To manage patients with RDJAST is an important part of practising rheumatologists’ work. But unfortunately, the issues of diagnosis and therapy of this pathology have been relatively rarely discussed on the pages of Russian medical journals and at the scientific congresses and conferences of rheumatologists in recent years. This review is to refresh physicians’interest in this problem. Part 1 of this review briefly considers the general issues relating to the epidemiology, pathogenesis, and diagnosis of RDJAST of the upper extremity, such as rotator cuff tendinitis, lateral and medial epicondylitis, stenosing flexor tenosynovitis, de Quervain’s syndrome, and carpal tunnel syndrome.

  18. Clinical effectiveness of low-power laser radiation and functioning of hemosalivatory barrier in patients with rheumatic diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gladkova, Natalia D.; Karachistov, Alexander B.; Komarova, Lia G.; Alekseeva, Olga P.; Grunina, Elena A.

    1996-11-01

    We have estimated the clinical effectiveness of several regimes and ways of low power laser therapy (LT) on the basis of a double 'blind', placebo-controlling randomizing comparative test in 454 patients with rheumatic diseases (RD). LT for RD has a well-expressed placebo effect. The level of clinical effect of LT for RD is not so high. We couldn't achieve 'a considerable improvement' in any cases, 'an improvement' was secured in only 18 percent. LT should be viewed as a symptomatic means, with a primary anesthetic and feebly expressed anti-inflammatory effect, which can not influence the course of the rheumatoid process. Only in 15 percent of patients with RD, a sufficient functioning of hemo-salivary barrier was observed, the latter providing a reserve for adaption mechanism, which leads under the influence of stressor agents of medium strength not only to anesthetic, but also to moderately expressed anti- inflammatory effect.

  19. Gene Expression of Atrial Calcium-Handling Proteins in Patients with Rheumatic Heart Disease and Atrial Fibrillation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    伍伟锋; 黄从新; 刘唐威; 朱树雄

    2003-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the gene expression of calcium-handling proteins inpatients with rheumatic heart disease (RHD) and atrialfibrillation (AF) . Methods A total of 50 patientswith rheumatic mitral valve disease were included.According to cardiac rhythm and duration of episode ofAF, patients were divided into four groups: sinusrhythm group, paroxysmal AF group, persistent AF forless than 6 months group and persistent AF for morethan 6 months group. Atrial tissue was obtained fromthe right atrial appendage, the right atrial free wall andthe left atrial appendage respectively during open heartsurgery. Total RNA was isolated and reversly tran-scribed into cDNA. In a semi -quantitative polymerasechain reaction the cDNA of interest and of glyceralde-hyde3 -phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) were am-plified and separated by ethidium bromide - stained gelelectrophoresis. Multiple liner regress was used forcorrelation between the mRNA amount and age, sex,right atrial diameter (RAd) and left atrial diameter(LAd) Results The mRNA of L- type calciumchannelα1c subunit, of Ca2 + - ATPase and of ryanodinereceptor in patients with persistent AF for more than 6months were significantly decreased ( P all < 0. 01 ). But no alterations of the mRNA levels for SR phos-pholamban and calsequestrin were observed in patientswith persistent AF for more than 6 months comparedwith patients with sinus rhythm, paroxysmal AF andpersistent AF for less than 6 months( P all > 0.05) .There was no difference of the gene expression amongthe three atrial tissue sampling sites(P all > 0.05). Age, gender, RAd and LAd had no significant effectson the gene expression of calcium- handling proteins( P all> 0. 05). Conclusions The mRNA expressionof calcium -handling proteins is down -regulated onlyin patients with RHD and long- term persistent AF.Such abnormalities may be related to the initiationand/or perpetuation of AF in the patients with RHD.

  20. Physical activity in the elderly who underwent joint replacement surgery in the course of rheumatic diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komorowski, Arkadiusz; Przepióra, Wiktor; Księżopolska-Orłowska, Krystyna

    2016-01-01

    According to the forecasts of the Central Statistical Office of Poland, in 2030 people at the age of 65 and older will account for 23.8%, i.e. their number will amount to approx. 8.5 m people. Geriatric rheumatic patients more often decide to undergo surgical joint replacement. According to the National Health Fund, the number of joint replacement services provided in 2014 increased by 93%, as compared to 2005. Improving the physical performance of this constantly expanding group of patients requires taking into account many factors to raise their functional status, reduce the risk of falling, teach rules of proper functioning with an artificial joint and encourage unassisted physical activity. Restoring fitness and independence is a difficult but necessary task due to an increasing number of seniors with replaced joint. PMID:27504021

  1. Rheumatic manifestations of primary and metastatic bone tumors and paraneoplastic bone disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waimann, Christian A; Lu, Huifang; Suarez Almazor, Maria E

    2011-11-01

    Bone tumors can show a wide range of nonspecific rheumatic manifestations. The presence of unexplained or atypical chronic bone pain, an enlarging bone mass, neurovascular compression syndromes, or pathologic fractures should alert us to the possibility of a bone tumor causing these symptoms. These patients must undergo a complete physical examination; adequate imaging; and, if needed, a biopsy to confirm their diagnosis and offer them an opportune treatment. In addition, bone tumors and other malignancies can present remote clinical manifestations and unusual laboratory findings (eg, HOA, hypophosphatemia, hyperphosphaturia, and hypercalcemia) that may be the first and early manifestation of an occult cancer. These findings should motivate a cancer screening according to age, sex, and personal history. Cancer therapies also have a big impact on bone health, increasing the risk of osteoporosis, osteomalacia, and/or osteonecrosis. Rheumatologists should be aware of possible long-term adverse events of cancer treatment to avoid future complications.

  2. Physical activity in the elderly who underwent joint replacement surgery in the course of rheumatic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prusinowska, Agnieszka; Komorowski, Arkadiusz; Przepióra, Wiktor; Księżopolska-Orłowska, Krystyna

    2016-01-01

    According to the forecasts of the Central Statistical Office of Poland, in 2030 people at the age of 65 and older will account for 23.8%, i.e. their number will amount to approx. 8.5 m people. Geriatric rheumatic patients more often decide to undergo surgical joint replacement. According to the National Health Fund, the number of joint replacement services provided in 2014 increased by 93%, as compared to 2005. Improving the physical performance of this constantly expanding group of patients requires taking into account many factors to raise their functional status, reduce the risk of falling, teach rules of proper functioning with an artificial joint and encourage unassisted physical activity. Restoring fitness and independence is a difficult but necessary task due to an increasing number of seniors with replaced joint.

  3. Rheumatic Fever Programme in Samoa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viali, Satupaitea; Saena, Puleiala; Futi, Vailogoua

    2011-02-11

    Rheumatic fever is very common in Samoa. The following paper describes the Rheumatic Fever Programme in Samoa and looks at the incidence of acute rheumatic fever (ARF) and rheumatic heart disease (RHD). The incidence of ARF has decreased to 30 per 100,000 in 2005, 12.8 per 100,000 in 2007, 7.3 per 100,000 in 2008, and 9.5 per 100,000 in 2009. The incidence of RHD has decreased to 40.2 per 100,000 in 2007, 34 per 100,000 in 2008, and 31.8 per 100,000 in 2009. Cardiac surgery in New Zealand is expensive, but is cheaper to perform in Samoa. RHD screening with echocardiogram at schools may be the best way to reduce the burden and suffering from RHD.

  4. Advanced heart block in acute rheumatic fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubail, Zakariya; Ebrahim, Ishaq M

    2016-04-01

    First degree heart block is considered a minor criterion for the diagnosis of this condition. The cases presented here demonstrate that higher degrees of heart block do occur in rheumatic fever. Children presenting with acquired heart block should be worked-up for rheumatic fever. Likewise, it is imperative to serially follow the electrocardiogram in patients already diagnosed with acute rheumatic fever, as the conduction abnormalities can change during the course of the disease.

  5. Advanced heart block in acute rheumatic fever

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    First degree heart block is considered a minor criterion for the diagnosis of this condition. The cases presented here demonstrate that higher degrees of heart block do occur in rheumatic fever. Children presenting with acquired heart block should be worked-up for rheumatic fever. Likewise, it is imperative to serially follow the electrocardiogram in patients already diagnosed with acute rheumatic fever, as the conduction abnormalities can change during the course of the disease.

  6. 链球菌感染后风湿热和风湿性心脏病%Poststreptococcus rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高路; 袁越

    2006-01-01

    风湿热(rheumatic fever)是儿童上呼吸道或皮肤等感染A族链球菌(group A streptococcus,GAS)后引起的一种自身免疫性疾病。在结缔组织有多发的非化脓性病变,主要累及心脏和关节,脑、皮肤、粘膜、血管、肺、肾等亦可受累,而心脏为本病唯一留有后遗症的器官,可导致永久性瓣膜损害、心力衰竭,甚至死亡。

  7. Barriers to effective patient management with chronic rheumatic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PAF User

    influencing the treatment seeking behavior of rheumatic fever/rheumatic ... and to develop a conceptual tool to improve health service utilization of rural patients. .... Improved family education on understanding the impacts of the disease on.

  8. Efficacy of genetically engineered biological agents in the treatment of uveitis associated with rheumatic diseases in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V V Neroyev

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The efficiency of incorporating genetically engineered biological agents (GEBAs into a combination treatment regimen for rheumatic diseases (RD (juvenile idiopathic arthritis, Behcet's disease in relation to associated uveitis of varying severity was studied in 92 children aged 2 to 17 years. The follow-up lasted 1.5 to 49 months. Twenty-three patients took consecutively 2 to 5 GEBAs. When infliximab was used, remission of uveitis occurred in 21% of 38 children and the disease activity and/or recurrence rates reduced in an additional 21%. These were in 45 and 38.6% of 44 patients on adalimumab (ADA and in 27.8 and 27.8% of 18 patients on abatacept, respectively. There was an association of the efficiency of therapy with the severity of uveitis at the start of treatment. The use of ADA induced a steady remission of panuveitis resistant to therapy with glucocorticoids and cyclosporine in both patients with Behcet's disease. One of 4 rituximab-treated patients achieved a steady remission. Tocilizumab therapy caused an exacerbation of uveitis in 1 patient. The postoperative period showed no inflammatory complications in most cases (37 operations, 26 eyes, 20 patients. No local adverse reactions were seen; systemic reactions occurred in 14% of the patients, this caused GEBAs to be discontinued in 7%. There is evidence for a need for further investigations into the efficacy of GEBAs in RD-associated uveitis in children in order to define success criteria, differentiated indications, and therapy regimens.

  9. Vitamin D regulates the production of vascular endothelial growth factor: A triggering cause in the pathogenesis of rheumatic heart disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Subendu; Chopra, Seema; Rohit, Manoj Kumar; Banerjee, Dibyajyoti; Chakraborti, Anuradha

    2016-10-01

    Rheumatic heart disease (RHD) remains a major cause of cardiac related mortality and morbidity in the developing countries due to poor diagnosis and lack of proper therapeutics. The definite reason of heart valve injury during RHD is poorly understood. Valvular endothelial cells play an important role in pathogenesis of different cardiovascular diseases. Besides, the regulation of vitamin D (calciferol) and VEGF (vascular endothelial growth factor) results in the functional changes in endothelial cells. However, the crosstalk between vitamin D and VEGF in the pathogenesis of RHD is not yet unfurled. Evidences in the concerned fields are documented by searching through Google Scholar and Pubmed. Literature based survey has revealed that vascular endothelium, especially endothelial cells play important roles in valvular remodelling during cardiovascular diseases. Endothelial cell dysfunction leads to heart valve remodelling, which furthermore initiates the pathogenesis of valvular heart disease. Vitamin D has the potential to maintain the concentration of VEGF in the circulation and induce the function of endothelial cells. Hence, we hypothesize that vitamin D and VEGF homeostasis can alter the function of endothelial cells, which may subsequently trigger the valvular remodelling or even damage of heart valves during the progression of RHD pathogenesis. Our hypothesis shed light on the evidence based knowledge translation of plausible cellular phenomena due to vitamin D/VEGF homeostasis during valvular vandalism in RHD. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Prevalence of systemic autoimmune rheumatic diseases and clinical significance of ANA profile: data from a tertiary hospital in Shanghai, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zaixing; Ren, Yingpeng; Liu, Donghong; Lin, Feng; Liang, Yan

    2016-09-01

    It is necessary and useful to explore prevalence of various systemic autoimmune rheumatic diseases (SARDs) in patients with suspicion of having SARDs and to characterize antinuclear antibodies (ANA) profile for identifying different populations (SARDs and non-SARDs). A total of 5024 consecutive patients with available medical records were investigated, whose sera had been tested for ANA profile, including ANA, anti-dsDNA and anti-extractable nuclear antigen (ENA) antibodies, between 31 January 2012 and 26 March 2014. Only 594 (11.8%) patients were diagnosed with SARDs of those suspected with SARDs. The prevalence of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) was highest (3.2%), followed by rheumatoid arthritis (RA) (2.5%), primary Sjögren's syndrome (pSS) (1.7%), ankylosing spondylitis (AS) (1.5%), etc. Of females, SLE also showed the highest prevalence (6%), while of males, AS showed the highest prevalence (1.9%). The prevalence of most SARDs was closely associated with age, except mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD), and the variation characteristics among different age groups were different among various SARDs. The prevalence of ANA was significantly increased in most SARD patients [especially in SLE, systemic sclerosis (SSc) and MCTD]. For anti-ENA antibodies, in contrast to some autoantibodies associated with multiple SARDs (e.g. anti-SSA, SSB, nRNP), others were relatively specific for certain diseases, such as anti-dsDNA, Sm, histone, nucleosome and Rib-P for SLE, anti-SCL-70 for SSc and anti-Jo-1 for polymyositis/dermatomyositis (PM/DM). Of note, ANA profile appeared to be of little significance for AS, ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV), polymyalgia rheumatic (PMR), adult-onset Still's disease (ASD) and Behcet's disease (BD). The younger were more likely to have the presence of anti-dsDNA, Sm, histone or Rib-P for SLE, and anti-SSA for RA or MCTD. No significant differences for frequencies of ANA and anti-ENA autoantibodies were found between sexes in most SARDs

  11. Rheumatic fever in New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Rachel; Wilson, Nigel

    2013-03-01

    Acute rheumatic fever and its sequel rheumatic heart disease remain major unsolved problems in New Zealand, causing significant morbidity and premature death. The disease burden affects predominantly indigenous Māori and Pacific Island children and young adults. In the past decade these ethnic disparities are even widening. Secondary prophylaxis using 28-day intramuscular penicillin has been the mainstay of disease control. In the greater Auckland region, audit shows community nurse-led penicillin delivery rates of 95% and recurrence rates of less than 5%. The true penicillin failure rate of 0.07 per 100 patient years supports 4 weekly penicillin rather than more frequent dose regimens. Landmark primary prevention research has been undertaken supporting sore throat primary prevention programmes in regions with very high rheumatic fever rates. Echocardiographic screening found 2.4% previously undiagnosed rheumatic heart disease in socially disadvantaged children. Combined with secondary prevention, echocardiography screening has the potential to reduce the prevalence of severe rheumatic heart disease.

  12. Points to consider for reporting, screening for and preventing selected comorbidities in chronic inflammatory rheumatic diseases in daily practice: a EULAR initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baillet, Athan; Gossec, Laure; Carmona, Loreto; Wit, Maarten de; van Eijk-Hustings, Yvonne; Bertheussen, Heidi; Alison, Kent; Toft, Mette; Kouloumas, Marios; Ferreira, Ricardo J O; Oliver, Susan; Rubbert-Roth, Andrea; van Assen, Sander; Dixon, William G; Finckh, Axel; Zink, Angela; Kremer, Joel; Kvien, Tore K; Nurmohamed, Michael; van der Heijde, Desirée; Dougados, Maxime

    2016-06-01

    In chronic inflammatory rheumatic diseases, comorbidities such as cardiovascular diseases and infections are suboptimally prevented, screened for and managed. The objective of this European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) initiative was to propose points to consider to collect comorbidities in patients with chronic inflammatory rheumatic diseases. We also aimed to develop a pragmatic reporting form to foster the implementation of the points to consider. In accordance with the EULAR Standardised Operating Procedures, the process comprised (1) a systematic literature review of existing recommendations on reporting, screening for or preventing six selected comorbidities: ischaemic cardiovascular diseases, malignancies, infections, gastrointestinal diseases, osteoporosis and depression and (2) a consensus process involving 21 experts (ie, rheumatologists, patients, health professionals). Recommendations on how to treat the comorbidities were not included in the document as they vary across countries. The literature review retrieved 42 articles, most of which were recommendations for reporting or screening for comorbidities in the general population. The consensus process led to three overarching principles and 15 points to consider, related to the six comorbidities, with three sections: (1) reporting (ie, occurrence of the comorbidity and current treatments); (2) screening for disease (eg, mammography) or for risk factors (eg, smoking) and (3) prevention (eg, vaccination). A reporting form (93 questions) corresponding to a practical application of the points to consider was developed. Using an evidence-based approach followed by expert consensus, this EULAR initiative aims to improve the reporting and prevention of comorbidities in chronic inflammatory rheumatic diseases. Next steps include dissemination and implementation. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  13. Systematic review of 2008-2012 literature and update of recommendations for the use of methotrexate in rheumatic diseases, with a focus on rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Todoerti

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this review is to update the recommendations of the 2010 Italian Consensus on the use of methotrexate (MTX in rheumatoid arthritis (RA and other rheumatic diseases. The literature published between 2008 and 2012 was systematically reviewed and updated recommendations on MTX use in rheumatic diseases, particularly RA, were formulated. These recommendations were approved by a panel of expert Italian Rheumatologists. A total of 10,238 references were identified, among which 70 studies were selected for critical evaluation. Sufficient evidence had accumulated to warrant changes to several of the recommendations in the new version. A new recommendation for patients with RA who are in MTX-induced clinical remission was also proposed and approved by the panel. Updated recommendations for the use of MTX in patients with RA or other rheumatologic disease are proposed.

  14. 44岁女性风湿性心脏病伴发冠心病1例%Rheumatic heart disease and coronary heart disease in a 44-vears old female case

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王文广; 任琳; 杨红梅; 张晶; 张双月; 刘晓媛; 王庆胜

    2013-01-01

    The female patient of 44-years old suffered from rheumatic heart disease for 22 years, and had valve replacementbefore one year. She was on admission for chest pain, with cTnT 1 236 pg/ml. Coronary angiog-raphy showed 95% of stenosis in the left main artery. She was diagnosed with acute myocardial infarction. With the improvement of living standards, coronary heart disease was in younger trend. So we recommended that conventional coronary angiography was performed for women over 35-year before valve replacement in rheumatic heart disease.

  15. Ocorrência de doenças autoimunes tireoidianas em pacientes com doenças reumáticas Autoimmune thyroid disease in patients with rheumatic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa Cristina Martins Vicente Robazzi

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Anormalidades na função tireoidiana e presença de autoanticorpos da tireoide têm sido frequentemente descritas em pacientes com doenças reumatológicas autoimunes, como síndrome de Sjögren, artrite reumatoide, lúpus eritematoso sistêmico e esclerodermia. São limitados os dados sobre prevalência e características clínicas de tireoidite autoimune em outras doenças reumatológicas, tais como febre reumática e lúpus eritematoso sistêmico juvenil. Os autores revisaram as associações de doenças autoimunes endócrinas e reumáticas, avaliando as diversas faixas etárias e condições clínicas. O levantamento bibliográfico foi realizado por meio de busca por artigos científicos indexados em bancos de dados de ciências da saúde em geral, como Literatura Latino-Americana e do Caribe em Ciências da Saúde (LILACS, Medline/PubMed e Scientific Eletronic Library Online (SciELO. Utilizaram-se os seguintes descritores: "rheumatic autoimmune diseases and autoimmune thyroid diseases", "thyroid disorders and rheumatic diseases", "thyroiditis and rheumatic diseases", "autoimmune diseases and thyroid", e "pediatric rheumatic diseases and autoimmune thyroid diseases". Este estudo mostrou que, apesar de resultados contraditórios na literatura, há maior prevalência da associação entre doenças autoimunes da tireoide e doenças reumáticas, destacando-se a possibilidade de mecanismos patogênicos comuns entre as doenças.Thyroid function abnormalities and thyroid autoantibodies have been frequently described in patients with rheumatologic autoimmune diseases, such as Sjögren's syndrome, rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus and scleroderma. Limited data are available regarding the prevalence and clinical characteristics of autoimmune thyroiditis in other rheumatologic disorders, such as rheumatic fever and juvenile systemic lupus erythematosus. The authors review the association of endocrine autoimmune and rheumatic

  16. Growth differentiation factor-15 (GDF-15), novel biomarker for assessing atrial fibrosis in patients with atrial fibrillation and rheumatic heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yong-Ming; Li, Ming-Jiang; Zhou, Yan-Li; Ma, Le-Le; Yi, Xin

    2015-01-01

    Growth differentiation factor-15 (GDF-15) has been identified as a strong biomarker of cardiovascular diseases; however, no evidence are available concerning the relationship of GDF-15 and atrial fibrosis in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) and rheumatic heart disease (RHD). Twenty patients with rheumatic heart disease were divided into two groups, 10 cases with AF and 10 cases with sinus rhythm (SR). Clinical data and blood samples were collected; left atrial appendage was taken by the surgeon in the process of valve replacement. Masson stained sections and mRNA levels of cardiac fibrosis biomarkers were used to determine the level of cardiac fibrosis, the expression level of GDF-15 was evaluated via immunohistochemistry, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Compared with SR group, more collagen deposited in the atrial tissue of AF group. The distribution of GDF-15 in the AF group was significantly higher than SR group (Pfibrosis. GDF-15 might involve in the development and maintenance of atrial fibrosis in patients with atrial fibrillation and rheumatic heart disease, and GDF-15 could be used as a novel biomarker to evaluate myocardial fibrosis in the future.

  17. Parent Perceptions of Illness Uncertainty and Child Depressive Symptoms in Juvenile Rheumatic Diseases: Examining Caregiver Demand and Parent Distress as Mediators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaney, John M; Gamwell, Kaitlyn L; Baraldi, Amanda N; Ramsey, Rachelle R; Cushing, Christopher C; Mullins, Alexandria J; Gillaspy, Stephen R; Jarvis, James N; Mullins, Larry L

    2016-10-01

    Examine caregiver demand and general parent distress as mediators in the parent illness uncertainty-child depressive symptom association in youth with juvenile rheumatic diseases.   Children and adolescents completed the Child Depression Inventory; caregivers completed the Parent Perceptions of Uncertainty Scale, the Care for My Child with Rheumatic Disease Scale, and the Brief Symptom Inventory. The pediatric rheumatologist provided ratings of clinical disease status.   Analyses revealed significant direct associations between illness uncertainty and caregiver demand, and between caregiver demand and both parent distress and child depressive symptoms. Results also revealed significant parent uncertainty → caregiver demand → parent distress and parent uncertainty → caregiver demand → child depressive symptom indirect paths.   Results highlight the role of illness appraisals in adjustment to juvenile rheumatic diseases, and provide preliminary evidence that parent appraisals of illness uncertainty impact parent distress and child depressive symptoms indirectly through increased perceptions of caregiver demand. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Pediatric Psychology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Angiotensin Converting Enzyme Gene I/D Polymorphism in Pakistani Rheumatic Heart Disease Patients and Healthy Controls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadia Rehman

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Valve scarring and collagen deposition are crucial in pathogenesis of Rheumatic Heart Disease (RHD, an autoimmune disorder of the heart. Angiotensin I-Converting Enzyme (ACE plays a major role in fibrous tissue formation. Objectives: The present research work aimed to assess the role of ACE Insertion/Deletion (I/D polymorphism in progress of RHD. Patients and Methods: DNA was pre pared from blood samples from 156 RHD patients (156 and 204 healthy ethnically-matched controls. Then, it was screened using sequence-specific Primers. Polymerase chain reaction and Agarose gel electrophoresis. The data were analyzed using Vassar stats (http://faculty.vassar.edu/lowry/VassarStats.html. Results: I allele (P = 0.024, OR = 1.42 and II genotype (P = 0.001, OR = 3.07 were significantly higher in Pakistani RHD patients compared to the healthy controls. Also, a significant difference was found between the female, but not male, patients and the controls regarding I allele and II genotype. Conclusions: The study results provided information about involvement of ACE I/D polymorphism in molecular mechanism of RHD. Thus, it can become one of the useful tools in risk assessment and help with designing strategies to combat the disease.

  19. Cardiovascular system involvement in rheumatic diseases in children%常见儿童风湿性疾病的心血管损害

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    卢慧玲

    2015-01-01

    儿童常见的风湿性疾病有风湿热、幼年特发性关节炎、系统性红斑狼疮(包括新生儿红斑狼疮)、幼年皮肌炎、川崎病、过敏性紫癜等.风湿性疾病作为一组病因不明的自身免疫性疾病,可累及不同脏器的结缔组织和胶原纤维,均具有系统性炎症的特点,往往造成多器官脏器受损.近十几年越来越多的研究证实,该类风湿性疾病患者远期的心血管损害远高于健康人群,其特征性的系统性炎性反应的病理过程作为动脉粥样硬化的独立危险因素已引起广泛的重视.现就儿童常见自身免疫性疾病合并的心血管损害进行阐述.%The common rheumatic diseases in children including rheumatic fever,juvenile idiopathic arthritis,systemic lupus erythematosus (including neonatal lupus),juvenile dermatomyositis,Kawasaki disease,anaphylactoid purpura.Rheumatic diseases as a group of unknown etiology autoimmune diseases,connective tissue and collagen fibers of different organs can be affected.Systemic inflammatory is the common prominent characteristics of this kind of disease,often resulting in multiple organ damage.Over recent decades,there has been considerable interest in the long-term outcomes of individuals with chronical inflammatory disease and an area of particular concern has been the increased prevalence of cardiovascular disease.Since sustained systemic inflammation is known to accelerate atherosclerosis,doctor should pay attention to rheumatic diseases associated cardiovascular involvements during daily clinical work.The cardiovascular involvement of common rheumatic diseases in children is summarized in this paper.

  20. FREQUENCY DISTRIBUTION OF INTRONIC POLYMORPHISMS OF IL1-raVNTR AND IL-4VNTR IN RHEUMATIC MITRAL VALVE DISEASE IN CAUCASIAN POPULATION OF SIBERIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Ponasenko

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A search for associations between allelic variations of immune response genes, and mitral stenosis associated with rheumatic heart disease, represents an important task when studying the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disorders among inhabitants of large industrial regions in Western Siberia. Among multiple polymorphisms of interleukin-encoding genes, a particular attention should be paid to association studies of some intronic polymorphisms with variable numbers of tandem repeats (VNTR. In this respect, genotyping of interleukin 1 receptor antagonist genes (IL-1ra86bp VNTR and interleukin 4 (IL-470bp VNTR has shown positive associations between the intron 2 IL-1ra*3R/3R microsatellite polymorphism, intron 3 IL-4*2R/2R variant, and the risk of mitral stenosis development in patients with rheumatic heart disease (OR = 12.71; p = 0.0001.  

  1. Valvoplastia mitral em pacientes jovens com cardiopatia reumática Mitral valvuloplasty in young patients with rheumatic heart disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Antônio Fantini

    1992-06-01

    Full Text Available No período, de setembro de 1988 a janeiro de 1992, 56 pacientes com até 20 anos de idade (4 a 20 anos, média de 12,7 com insuficiência mitral pura ou predominante de etiologia reumática foram submetidos a valvoplastia mitral. Noventa e quatro por cento dos pacientes estavam em classe funcional III ou IV da NYHA. A técnica cirúrgica básica usada em todos os pacientes foi a anuloplastia assimétrica preconizada por Reed et alii 31, associada em 69,7% dos casos a outros procedimentos sobre as cúspides e aparelho subvalvar mitral. Dois pacientes foram submetidos, concomitantemente, a plastia da valva tricúspide e 4 a troca da valva aórtica. Estudo ecodopplercardiográfico per-operatório foi utilizado após a correção em todos os casos e mostrou ausência de lesões residuais em 76% dos pacientes e insuficiência mitral discreta nos demais. Náo houve mortalidade hospitalar. Ecopplercardiograma realizado antes da alta hospitalar mostrou boa correlação com o estudo per-operatório. Foi possível colher informações do seguimento tardio de 53 pacientes. Ocorreu 1 óbito tardio três meses após a cirurgia, por morte súbita. Quatro pacientes foram reoperados e submetidos a troca valvar: uma paciente no 4º mês de pós-operatório (PO, por falha primária do procedimento, e outros três no 6º, 34º e 38º meses de PO, por comprovada recidiva da cardite reumática. Os demais encontram-se em classe funcional I e II (NYHA. Concluímos, baseados nos resultados apresentados, que a anuloplastia mitral assimétrica é um excelente procedimento para pacientes jovens com valvopatia reumática, constituindo-se numa boa alternativa à troca de valva ou implante de anéis, sendo, no entanto, extremamente importante o controle de recidivas da doença reumática.From September 1988 to July 1990, 56 patients under 20 years of age (mean 12.7 ± 5.12 years with pure or predominant mitral valve regurgitation secondary to rheumatic valve disease

  2. Cutaneous adverse events during treatment of chronic inflammatory rheumatic conditions with tumor necrosis factor antagonists: study using the Spanish registry of adverse events of biological therapies in rheumatic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, M Victoria; Sanmartí, Raimon; Cañete, Juan D; Descalzo, Miguel A; Alsina, Mercè; Carmona, Loreto; Gomez-Reino, Juan J

    2013-12-01

    To analyze the incidence rate (IR) and risk factors of cutaneous adverse events (CAE) in patients with chronic inflammatory rheumatic diseases treated with tumor necrosis factor (TNF) antagonists. We analyzed all patients from the BIOBADASER (Base de Datos de Productos Biológicos de la Sociedad Española de Reumatología) registry treated with a TNF antagonist (infliximab, etanercept, or adalimumab). Data collected included age, sex, diagnosis and duration of rheumatic disease, type of TNF antagonist, and concomitant treatment. Type of CAE was classified as local or systemic cutaneous manifestation related to treatment administration (infusion reaction), infection, malignancy, or autoimmune skin disease. Time of onset of CAE and outcome were also recorded. The IRs of CAE per 1,000 patient-years of exposure with 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) were estimated. Multivariable analysis was performed to identify potential risk factors for CAE. A total of 5,437 patients were included, representing 17,330 patient-years of exposure. A total of 920 CAE were reported; the IRs per 1,000 patient-years were 53 (95% CI 50-57) for CAE, 28 (95% CI 25-30) for infection, 15 (95% CI 13-17) for infusion reactions, 5 (95% CI 4-6) for autoimmune skin diseases, and 3 (95% CI 2-4) for skin malignancy. The mean time between starting TNF antagonist treatment and CAE was 1.78 years. In 32% of patients, CAE required TNF antagonist withdrawal. The main risk factors for CAE were female sex and treatment with infliximab, leflunomide, and glucocorticoids. The IR of CAE in patients treated with TNF antagonists is significant and should be addressed carefully, and withdrawal of therapy is required in some cases. Copyright © 2013 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  3. "HLA-G 3'UTR gene polymorphisms and rheumatic heart disease: a familial study among South Indian population".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poomarimuthu, Maheshkumar; Elango, Sivakumar; Soundrapandian, Sambath; Mariakuttikan, Jayalakshmi

    2017-02-01

    Rheumatic heart disease (RHD) is an autoimmune disease where cross reactive CD4(+) T cells are involved in the pathogenesis of valvular damage. Human Leukocyte Antigen-G (HLA-G), an immunosuppressive molecule playing a crucial role in the inhibition of T cell response is associated with the pathogenesis of various autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. Genetic polymorphisms within the 3'untranslated region (UTR) of HLA-G influences its expression and thus disease pathogenesis. Hence, the present study aims to unravel the association of 14 bp Ins/Del (rs66554220) and +3142 C/G (rs1063320) polymorphisms in 3' UTR of HLA-G with RHD. This familial study consists of 99 RHD families (99 RHD patients, 140 parents and 126 healthy siblings). The 14 bp Ins/Del and +3142 C/G polymorphisms were evaluated by PCR using sequence specific primers and its transmission disequilibrium (TD) was tested by TD test in 70 trio families. The frequency of +3142 C/C genotype was high in patients with combined valvular lesions (CVL) (OR = 5.88; pc = 0.012) and pooled RHD patients (P: OR = 2.76; p = 0.043; pc = 0.076) when compared to healthy siblings. Under the additive (OR = 5.50; pc = 0.026) and recessive genetic model (OR = 5.88; pc = 0.012), the +3142 C/C genotype was significantly associated with CVL in patients. The results suggest that the +3142 C/C genotype may be associated with minor risk for the development of RHD and is more likely to influence the severity of the disease.

  4. Minor rheumatology: Nonsystemic rheumatic disease of juxta-articular soft tissues of the upper extremity. Part 2. Drug and non-drug treatments

    OpenAIRE

    Andrei Evgenyevich Karateev; D. E. Karateev; Yu. A. Ermakova

    2015-01-01

    The treatment of rheumatic diseases of juxta-articular soft tissues (RDJAST) of the upper extremity (rotator cuff tendinitis, epicondylitis, de Quervain’s syndrome, trigger finger, carpal tunnel syndrome) entails a combination of drug and nondrug therapies. The basic agents that have been proven to be efficacious in this pathology are nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and glucocorticosteroids (GCs). The paper considers the largest and known studies that are an evidence base for th...

  5. Major clinical progress of rheumatic disease in 2015%2015年风湿免疫病主要进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高丽霞; 郭惠芳

    2016-01-01

    The clinical progress of rheumatic disease mainly concentrated in the change of management guidelines and treatment strategies in rheumatoid arthritis,rheumatic polymyalgia,IgG4 related disease and psoriasis arthritis during 201 5.At the same time,the diagnostic criteria of primary Sjogren syndrome and gout were updated. The guidelines of systemic lupus erythematous (SLE)-associated pulmonary arterial hypertension were made,and our domestic rheumatologists made management suggestions for SLE patients during pregnancy and the puerperium.Both rheumatism itself and comorbidity attracted attention to in 201 5,especially rheumatic diseases complicated with cardiovascular disease,and patient educations were more emphasized.%2015年风湿病的临床进展主要集中在针对类风湿关节炎、风湿性多肌痛、IgG4相关性疾病和银屑病关节炎管理指南和治疗策略的改变,同时更新了原发性干燥综合征和痛风的诊断标准。国内则针对系统性红斑狼疮相关肺动脉高压给出了相应的指南,并对妊娠围产期的系统性红斑狼疮患者给出了我国的围产期管理建议。2015年不仅关注风湿病本身,同时关注了风湿病的共患病,尤其心血管疾病等并发症,并且更加强调患者教育。

  6. Two to five repeated measurements per patient reduced the required sample size considerably in a randomized clinical trial for patients with inflammatory rheumatic diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Smedslund Geir; Zangi Heidi Andersen; Mowinckel Petter; Hagen Kåre Birger

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background Patient reported outcomes are accepted as important outcome measures in rheumatology. The fluctuating symptoms in patients with rheumatic diseases have serious implications for sample size in clinical trials. We estimated the effects of measuring the outcome 1-5 times on the sample size required in a two-armed trial. Findings In a randomized controlled trial that evaluated the effects of a mindfulness-based group intervention for patients with inflammatory arthritis (n=71)...

  7. Depression, anxiety, and quality of life in a large cohort of patients with rheumatic diseases: common, yet undertreated.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anyfanti, Panagiota; Gavriilaki, Eleni; Pyrpasopoulou, Athina; Triantafyllou, George; Triantafyllou, Areti; Chatzimichailidou, Sofia; Gkaliagkousi, Eugenia; Aslanidis, Spyros; Douma, Stella

    2016-03-01

    A growing amount of literature has explored mainly the role of depression (and/or anxiety) in patients with rheumatic disorders. We aimed at determining the prevalence of depression, anxiety, and their association with quality of life among patients attending a rheumatology clinic, focusing on data regarding concomitant psychiatric treatment. Depression, anxiety, and quality of life were assessed using the Zung Self-Rating Depression Scale, the Hamilton Anxiety Scale, and the Health Assessment Questionnaire, respectively. Overall, 514 rheumatologic patients were studied. Depression and anxiety were documented in 21.8 and 30.8 % of the population, respectively, and correlated significantly with quality of life. Only 13.4 % of patients with depressive symptoms and 12.1 % of patients with anxiety symptoms were receiving antidepressant or antianxiety medication. Given the wide therapeutic armamentarium available nowadays for the management of depression and anxiety, an increased awareness among physicians dealing with rheumatologic patients is warranted in order to integrate detection and effective treatment of anxiety and depression into the routine clinical practice. Special attention should be paid to female patients, patients with longer disease duration, and/or those with established disability.

  8. Single-walled carbon nanotubes based chemiresistive genosensor for label-free detection of human rheumatic heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Swati; Kumar, Ashok; Khare, Shashi; Mulchandani, Ashok; Rajesh

    2014-11-01

    A specific and ultrasensitive, label free single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) based chemiresistive genosensor was fabricated for the early detection of Streptococcus pyogenes infection in human causing rheumatic heart disease. The mga gene of S. pyogenes specific 24 mer ssDNA probe was covalently immobilized on SWNT through a molecular bilinker, 1-pyrenemethylamine, using carbodiimide coupling reaction. The sensor was characterized by the current-voltage (I-V) characteristic curve and scanning electron microscopy. The sensing performance of the sensor was studied with respect to changes in conductance in SWNT channel based on hybridization of the target S. pyogenes single stranded genomic DNA (ssG-DNA) to its complementary 24 mer ssDNA probe. The sensor shows negligible response to non-complementary Staphylococcus aureus ssG-DNA, confirming the specificity of the sensor only with S. pyogenes. The genosensor exhibited a linear response to S. pyogenes G-DNA from 1 to1000 ng ml-1 with a limit of detection of 0.16 ng ml-1.

  9. Outcomes and organ dysfunctions of critically ill patients with systemic lupus erythematosus and other systemic rheumatic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.T. Ranzani

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Our objective was to compare the pattern of organ dysfunctions and outcomes of critically ill patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE with patients with other systemic rheumatic diseases (SRD. We studied 116 critically ill SRD patients, 59 SLE and 57 other-SRD patients. The SLE group was younger and included more women. Respiratory failure (61% and shock (39% were the most common causes of ICU admission for other-SRD and SLE groups, respectively. ICU length-of-stay was similar for the two groups. The 60-day survival adjusted for the groups’ baseline imbalances was not different (P = 0.792. Total SOFA scores were equal for the two groups at admission and during ICU stay, although respiratory function was worse in the other-SRD group at admission and renal and hematological functions were worse in the SLE group at admission. The incidence of severe respiratory dysfunction (respiratory SOFA >2 at admission was higher in the other-SRD group, whereas severe hematological dysfunction (hematological SOFA >2 during ICU stay was higher in the SLE group. SLE patients were younger and displayed a decreased incidence of respiratory failure compared to patients with other-SRDs. However, the incidences of renal and hematological failure and the presence of shock at admission were higher in the SLE group. The 60-day survival rates were similar.

  10. Single-walled carbon nanotubes based chemiresistive genosensor for label-free detection of human rheumatic heart disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Swati; Kumar, Ashok, E-mail: rajesh-csir@yahoo.com, E-mail: ashokigib@rediffmail.com [CSIR-Institute of Genomics and Integrative Biology, Mall Road, Delhi 110007 (India); Academy of Scientific and Innovative Research (AcSIR), New Delhi (India); Khare, Shashi [National Centre for Disease Control, Sham Nath Marg, Delhi 110054 (India); Mulchandani, Ashok [Department of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, University of California, Riverside, California 92521 (United States); Rajesh, E-mail: rajesh-csir@yahoo.com, E-mail: ashokigib@rediffmail.com [CSIR-National Physical Laboratory, Dr. K. S. Krishnan Road, New Delhi 110012 (India)

    2014-11-24

    A specific and ultrasensitive, label free single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) based chemiresistive genosensor was fabricated for the early detection of Streptococcus pyogenes infection in human causing rheumatic heart disease. The mga gene of S. pyogenes specific 24 mer ssDNA probe was covalently immobilized on SWNT through a molecular bilinker, 1-pyrenemethylamine, using carbodiimide coupling reaction. The sensor was characterized by the current-voltage (I-V) characteristic curve and scanning electron microscopy. The sensing performance of the sensor was studied with respect to changes in conductance in SWNT channel based on hybridization of the target S. pyogenes single stranded genomic DNA (ssG-DNA) to its complementary 24 mer ssDNA probe. The sensor shows negligible response to non-complementary Staphylococcus aureus ssG-DNA, confirming the specificity of the sensor only with S. pyogenes. The genosensor exhibited a linear response to S. pyogenes G-DNA from 1 to1000 ng ml{sup −1} with a limit of detection of 0.16 ng ml{sup −1}.

  11. [Significance and Expressions of MMP-1, TIMP-1 and TGF-β1 in Valve Tissue of Rheumatic Heart Disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yi; Li, Zeng-Qi; Chen, Kun; Zhan, Ping; Liao, Jian; Ruan, Qin-Yun

    2017-01-01

    To explore expressions of matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1), tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1 (TIMP-1) and transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) in valve tissue of rheumatic heart disease (RHD), and to analyzed their roles in RHD. The expressions of MMP-1, TIMP-1 and TGF-β1 proteins and mRNAs were tested by Western blot and RT-PCR methods in valve tissues in participants with (experimental group, n=30) and without RHD (control group, n=15). Collagen fibers were detected by Masson staining, and collagen volume fraction (CVF) was caculated. The correlations of CVF and the expressions of MMP-1, TIMP-1 and TGF-β1 were analyzed. The collagen fibers, CVF, and the protein and mRNA expressions of MMP-1 and TGF-β1 in experimental group were higher than those in control group, while the protein and mRNA expressions of TIMP-1 in experimental group were lower than those in control group. The expression of TIMP-1 was negatively correlated with TGF-β1 and CVF in valve tissues, while MMP-1 was positively correlated with them. The expression of TGF-β1 was positively correlated with CVF in valve tissues. MMP-1, TIMP-1 and TGF-β1 contribute to the progression of fibrosis in RHD.

  12. TGF-beta1 expression and atrial myocardium fibrosis increase in atrial fibrillation secondary to rheumatic heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Hua; Lei, Han; Qin, Shu; Ma, Kanghua; Wang, Xi

    2010-03-01

    Atrial fibrosis was considered a structural basis for the development and sustaining of atrial fibrillation (AF). Transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-beta1) was one of the main factors for accelerating collagen production. The contribution of TGF-beta1 in the pathogenesis of AF needs further investigation. The altered expression and distribution of TGF-beta1 will be associated with the changes in atrial fibrosis in different types of AF patients with rheumatic heart disease (RHD). Right atrial specimens obtained from 38 RHD patients undergoing mitral valve replacement surgery were divided into 3 groups: the sinus rhythm group (n = 8), the paroxysmal AF group (pAF; n = 10), and the chronic AF group (cAF; AF lasting >/= 6 mo; n = 20). The degree of atrial fibrosis, collagen content, serum levels, messenger RNA (mRNA), and protein expression of TGF-beta1 were detected. The collagen content, serum level, TGF-beta1 mRNA, and protein expression of the atrial tissue increased gradually in sinus rhythm, for both pAF and cAF groups, respectively. A positive correlation between TGF-beta1 and the degree of atrial fibrosis was also demonstrated (P fibrosis in AF and was associated with the type of AF, which suggests that TGF-beta1 is possibly involved in the pathogenesis of AF in RHD patients. Copyright (c) 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Changes in the expression of Th17 cell-associated cytokines in the development of rheumatic heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Yun; Zeng, Zhiyu; Gui, Chun; Li, Lang; Li, Wenting

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmunity plays a critical role in the development of rheumatic heart disease (RHD). Recent studies have linked Th17 cells to the autoimmune mechanism associated with RHD. This study aimed to investigate changes in Th17 cell-related cytokine expression in acute and chronic RHD. We established a Lewis rat model of experimental RHD, which was induced by inactivated Group A streptococci and complete Freund's adjuvant. After 7- and 24-week intervention treatments, we measured serum levels of interleukin-17 (IL-17) and IL-6, key cytokines associated with Th17 cells, using a Luminex liquichip method, and levels of IL-17 and IL-6 in heart tissues using immunohistochemical assays. Moreover, expression levels of IL-17, IL-21, IL-6, and IL-23 in mitral valve tissues of human RHD patients were also measured using immunohistochemistry. Compared with the normal control group, serum IL-17 and IL-6 concentrations were significantly increased, and the expression levels of IL-17 and IL-6 in the mitral valve were also significantly increased in 7- or 24-week RHD rats (P<.017). Compared with the control group, expression of IL-17, IL-21, IL-6, and IL-23 in mitral valve tissues was significantly increased in RHD patients (P<.05). Our study suggested that the increased expression of Th17 cell-associated cytokines might play an important role in the pathogenesis and development of RHD. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Compound glycyrrhizin in the treatment of refractory rheumatic diseases%复方甘草酸苷用于治疗难治性风湿性疾病

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡乃文; 李凤; 曹金; 李璐; 于成成; 张源潮

    2011-01-01

    Compound glycyrrhizin is of the effect on anti-inflammation, immuno-regulation and anti-allergy. This review focuses on the clinical application of compound glycyrrhizin in the treatment of refractory rheumatic diseases, such as rheumatic fever, rheumatoid arthritis (RA), systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and primary sjǒgren syndrome.%复方甘草酸苷具有抗炎、免疫调节和抗变态反应等作用.本文综述其在多种难治性风湿性疾病如风湿热、类风湿关节炎(RA)、系统性红斑狼疮(SLE)和原发性干燥综合征等临床治疗中的应用.

  15. Role of Natural Autoantibodies in Ugandans With Rheumatic Heart Disease and HIV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel M. Huck

    2016-03-01

    Interpretation: We found that HIV and RHD are associated with alterations in natural autoantibody responses previously linked to an increased risk for atherosclerosis and autoimmune inflammatory disease.

  16. Comparing the prevalence of rheumatic diseases in China with the rest of the world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felson, David T

    2008-01-01

    Geographic or ethnic differences in the occurrence of disease often provide insights into causes of disease and possible opportunities for disease prevention. Persons in China appear to have a consistently lower prevalence of rheumatoid arthritis and fibromyalgia than persons in the United States and Europe; reasons for these prevalence differences might include genetic differences, differences in environmental exposures or a combination of both. With increasing obesity, gout is becoming endemic in China. Finally, symptomatic knee osteoarthritis is extremely common in China and constitutes a major public health problem there.

  17. Movement and Other Neurodegenerative Syndromes in Patients with Systemic Rheumatic Diseases: A Case Series of 8 Patients and Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menezes, Rikitha; Pantelyat, Alexander; Izbudak, Izlem; Birnbaum, Julius

    2015-08-01

    Patients with rheumatic diseases can present with movement and other neurodegenerative disorders. It may be underappreciated that movement and other neurodegenerative disorders can encompass a wide variety of disease entities. Such disorders are strikingly heterogeneous and lead to a wider spectrum of clinical injury than seen in Parkinson's disease. Therefore, we sought to stringently phenotype movement and other neurodegenerative disorders presenting in a case series of rheumatic disease patients. We integrated our findings with a review of the literature to understand mechanisms which may account for such a ubiquitous pattern of clinical injury.Seven rheumatic disease patients (5 Sjögren's syndrome patients, 2 undifferentiated connective tissue disease patients) were referred and could be misdiagnosed as having Parkinson's disease. However, all of these patients were ultimately diagnosed as having other movement or neurodegenerative disorders. Findings inconsistent with and more expansive than Parkinson's disease included cerebellar degeneration, dystonia with an alien-limb phenomenon, and nonfluent aphasias.A notable finding was that individual patients could be affected by cooccurring movement and other neurodegenerative disorders, each of which could be exceptionally rare (ie, prevalence of ∼1:1000), and therefore with the collective probability that such disorders were merely coincidental and causally unrelated being as low as ∼1-per-billion. Whereas our review of the literature revealed that ubiquitous patterns of clinical injury were frequently associated with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings suggestive of a widespread vasculopathy, our patients did not have such neuroimaging findings. Instead, our patients could have syndromes which phenotypically resembled paraneoplastic and other inflammatory disorders which are known to be associated with antin