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Sample records for rhabdomyosarcomas

  1. Rhabdomyosarcoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donaldson, S.S.

    1987-01-01

    A planned combination of surgery, radiation therapy, and multiagent chemotherapy is the current standard of management for childhood rhabdomyosarcoma. As results of current treatment protocols evolve, further refinements in therapy will be necessary. All children should be treated aggressively, with curative intent, in a major medical center where surgeons, radiation therapists, and oncologists with expertise in pediatrics may collaborate in a multidisciplinary approach to the management of childhood cancer. Appropriate therapy also requires accurate diagnosis, as well as expeditious and exhaustive workup to determine the extent of disease. For those purposes, the assistance of surgical pathologists and diagnostic radiologists familiar with appropriate techniques and procedures is invaluable. Aggressive combined modality therapy cures approximately 50% to 66% of children with rhabdomyosarcoma. Long-term follow-up is necessary in evaluating results. Survival and relapse-free survival are related to initial stage and extent of disease. Site of the primary tumor is a prognostic factor, with more favorable survival rates being reported for the orbit, other head and neck sites, and genitourinary sites than for primary tumors of the extremity, trunk, or retroperitoneum. Histologic subtype also is a prognostic factor; embryonal and botryoides subtypes have better prognoses than alveolar or unfavorable subtypes. Treatment must be individualized according to the site and extent of disease, with scheduling of the various modalities in a sequence that minimizes overlapping toxicities while maintaining an uninterrupted course of aggressive therapy. Optimal results require either complete surgical excision with chemotherapy or subtotal excision with postoperative radiation therapy and chemotherapy

  2. Childhood rhabdomyosarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Córdoba Rovira, S M; Inarejos Clemente, E J

    Rhabdomyosarcoma is the most common soft-tissue sarcoma in children; it can appear in any part of the body. Its biological behavior varies widely, and despite the absence of specific clinical or radiological characteristics, rhabdomyosarcoma should be taken into account in the differential diagnosis of solid tumors in children. This review focuses primarily on the imaging findings and anatomical distribution of the histological subtypes of childhood rhabdomyosarcoma and secondarily on the differential findings in histological studies. Copyright © 2016 SERAM. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  3. Rhabdomyosarcoma of the kidney

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alaa Samkari

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Rhabdomyosarcoma is considered the most common soft tissue sarcoma arising in patients younger than 15 years old, accounting for 5%–10% of childhood solid tumors. Sarcoma of the kidney represents 1% of all primary renal malignancies. Primary renal rhabdomyosarcoma is a very rare entity with limited number of cases reported in the literature. In this paper we present two cases of primary renal rhabdomyosarcoma in pediatric patients. The two tumors involved the renal parenchyma and occurred in 2-year-old girl and 6-year-old boy, respectively. Histopathology examination and immunohistochemistry studies confirm the diagnosis of embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma with pleomorphic component, and pleomorphic rhabdomyosarcoma, respectively. Both cases are treated with chemotherapy and show a good response with no evidence of recurrence or metastasis. The aim of this paper is to expand the differential diagnosis of primary mesenchymal kidney tumors in pediatric age group. Keywords: Rhabdomyosarcoma, Renal neoplasm, Pediatric, Oncology

  4. Drugs Approved for Rhabdomyosarcoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for rhabdomyosarcoma. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries. There may be drugs used in rhabdomyosarcoma that are not listed here.

  5. Intracardiac Metastatic Rhabdomyosarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tae Ho Kim

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A 70-year-old man who visited Samsung Medical Center reported experiencing palpitation for 2 weeks. He had undergone excision of a mass in the right buttock due to rhabdomyosarcoma 7 years prior to this visit. Transesophageal echocardiography showed a pedunculated mass in the left ventricle, which was thought to be a vegetation of infective endocarditis, metastasis of the primary tumor, or thrombus. He underwent removal of the cardiac tumor, and the pathologic report was metastatic rhabdomyosarcoma. Thus, here, we report a rare case of metastatic rhabdomyosarcoma in the left ventricle.

  6. Primary Meningeal Rhabdomyosarcoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palta, Manisha; Riedel, Richard F.; Vredenburgh, James J.; Cummings, Thomas J.; Green, Scott; Chang, Zheng; Kirkpatrick, John P.

    2011-01-01

    Primary meningeal rhabdomyosarcoma is a rare primary brain malignancy, with scant case reports. While most reports of primary intracranial rhabdomyosarcoma occur in pediatric patients, a handful of cases in adult patients have been reported in the medical literature. We report the case of a 44-year-old male who developed primary meningeal rhabdomyosarcoma. After developing episodes of right lower extremity weakness, word finding difficulty, and headaches, a brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demonstrated a vertex lesion with radiographic appearance of a meningeal-derived tumor. Subtotal surgical resection was performed due to sagittal sinus invasion and initial pathology was interpreted as an anaplastic meningioma. Re-review of pathology demonstrated rhabdomyosarcoma negative for alveolar translocation t(2;13). Staging studies revealed no evidence of disseminated disease. He was treated with stereotactic radiotherapy with concurrent temozolamide to be followed by vincristine, actinomycin-D, and cyclophosphamide (VAC) systemic therapy. PMID:21772793

  7. Primary Meningeal Rhabdomyosarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manisha Palta

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary meningeal rhabdomyosarcoma is a rare primary brain malignancy, with scant case reports. While most reports of primary intracranial rhabdomyosarcoma occur in pediatric patients, a handful of cases in adult patients have been reported in the medical literature. We report the case of a 44-year-old male who developed primary meningeal rhabdomyosarcoma. After developing episodes of right lower extremity weakness, word finding difficulty, and headaches, a brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI demonstrated a vertex lesion with radiographic appearance of a meningeal-derived tumor. Subtotal surgical resection was performed due to sagittal sinus invasion and initial pathology was interpreted as an anaplastic meningioma. Re-review of pathology demonstrated rhabdomyosarcoma negative for alveolar translocation t(2;13. Staging studies revealed no evidence of disseminated disease. He was treated with stereotactic radiotherapy with concurrent temozolamide to be followed by vincristine, actinomycin-D, and cyclophosphamide (VAC systemic therapy.

  8. Primary meningeal rhabdomyosarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palta, Manisha; Riedel, Richard F; Vredenburgh, James J; Cummings, Thomas J; Green, Scott; Chang, Zheng; Kirkpatrick, John P

    2011-01-01

    Primary meningeal rhabdomyosarcoma is a rare primary brain malignancy, with scant case reports. While most reports of primary intracranial rhabdomyosarcoma occur in pediatric patients, a handful of cases in adult patients have been reported in the medical literature. We report the case of a 44-year-old male who developed primary meningeal rhabdomyosarcoma. After developing episodes of right lower extremity weakness, word finding difficulty, and headaches, a brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demonstrated a vertex lesion with radiographic appearance of a meningeal-derived tumor. Subtotal surgical resection was performed due to sagittal sinus invasion and initial pathology was interpreted as an anaplastic meningioma. Re-review of pathology demonstrated rhabdomyosarcoma negative for alveolar translocation t(2;13). Staging studies revealed no evidence of disseminated disease. He was treated with stereotactic radiotherapy with concurrent temozolamide to be followed by vincristine, actinomycin-D, and cyclophosphamide (VAC) systemic therapy.

  9. Rhabdomyosarcoma in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bukhny, A.F.; Belkina, B.M.; Blinov, V.M.

    1990-01-01

    Issues in diagnosis and complex treatment of pediatric rhabdomyosarcoma were studied in 198 patients with morphologically verified disease. Tumors most often developed in the genitourinary organs (36.6 %), head and neck (37 %) and -less frequently - on the trunk and extremities (26.4 %). The diagnostic workup included instrumental methods, ultrasonography and computed tomography. All modern modalities of cancer treatment, viz. surgery, drug and radiotherapy were used in those patients. As a rule, treatment was either combined or complex. Two-year-osurvival rate ranged from 83 % for rhabdomyosarcoma of the orbit to 50 % for those of the trunk and extremities and 47 % for head and neck neoplasms. Two-year survival for patients with rhabdomyosarcoma of non-genitourinary sites was 54 %

  10. Rhabdomyosarcoma of the extremity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao, Bhaskar N

    1997-01-01

    Rhabdomyosarcoma is the most common soft tissue sarcoma accounting for almost 55%. These tumors arise from unsegmented mesoderm or primitive mesenchyma, which have the capacity to differentiate into muscle. Less than 5% occur in the first year of life. Extremity rhabdomyosarcoma are mainly seen in the adolescent years. The most common histologic subtype is the alveolar variant. Other characteristics of extremity rhabdomyosarcoma include a predilection for lymph node metastasis, a high local failure, and a relatively low survival rate. They often present as slow painless masses; however, lesions in the hand and foot often present as painful masses and imaging studies may show invasion of the bone. Initial diagnostic approaches include needle biopsy or incisional biopsy for larger lesions. Excisional biopsy is indicated preferably for lesions less than 2.5 cm. following this in most instances therapy is initiated with multi agent chemotherapy depending upon response, the next modality may be either surgery with intent to cure or radiation therapy. Amputation of an extremity for local control is not considered in most instances. Prognostic factors that have been determined over the years to be of significance by multi variant analysis have included age, tumor size, invasiveness, presence of either nodal or distant metastasis, and complete excision whenever feasible, with supplemental radiation therapy for local control

  11. Rhabdomyosarcoma in childhood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gadner, H.

    1984-01-01

    In spite of an excellent improvement of treatment strategies many questions about the best therapeutic approach in rhabdomyosarcoma remain open. The rare incidence (4,5 per million children and year), the biological heterogeneity, the different localisations and stages of disease still remain a challenge for the interdisciplinary cooperation in paediatric oncology. The optimum treatment consists of a qualified combination of chemo- and radiotherapy as well as surgical intervention. The importance of each modality is to be defined in every individual case. Only with such an approach severe mutilations can be avoided and a better chance of survival offered. A national study for rhabdomyosarcoma of the Austrian Paediatric Oncology Group is presented, which has been established in close collaboration with the paediatric onologists of West-Germany. The study protocol since January 1982 is still in use. Therapeutic strategies of the Intergroup Rhabdomyosarcoma Study Group were taken into consideration. The chemotherapy essentially consists of a modified T9- and T11-protocol (Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York) including newer drugs like cisplatin and VP 16 -213. The surgical intervention is recommended as primary resection only when multilations can be avoided (otherwise a biopsy is proposed). The secondary and definitive resection or biopsy is provided for the time period after completion of 16 weeks of chemotherapy. The addition of radiotherapy after the second look operation promises the maximum of curative effect. The following chemotherapy is planned for further 16 or 36 weeks according to the stage of disease. Because of the rather small number of patients and because of the necessity of a close collaboration between surgeons, urologists, radiotherapists and paediatricians it is recommended to transfer the patient to a center of paediatric oncology. (Author)

  12. Rhabdomyosarcoma of masticator space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Wan; Lee, Chang Jin; Song, Young Han; Lee, Byeong Do

    2001-01-01

    A 16-year-old female was admitted to Wonkwang dental hospital with a chief complaint of painful ulceration on right buccal mucosa around mandibular 3rd molar area. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging showed relative large soft tissue mass on the infratemporal fossa and masseter muscle region. By the feature of T1-weighted and T2-weighted of MR imaging, we suspected this mass as a kind of myogenic sarcoma. Histopathological and immunohistochemical studies established a definitive diagnosis of embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma. A review of the literature was also presented

  13. Rhabdomyosarcoma presenting as acute leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morandi, S; Manna, A; Sabattini, E; Porcellini, A

    1996-08-01

    We describe a case of a very unusual presentation of rhabdomyosarcoma. An 18-year-old woman presented with symptoms and signs compatible with acute leukemia. The bone marrow picture showed diffuse involvement sustained by undifferentiated blasts that turned out to be of striated muscle origin by immunochemistry. While it is well known that rhabdomyosarcoma may metastasize to the bone marrow, extensive marrow involvement with leukemic spread as a unique clinical manifestation is extremely rare. Our observation further confirms the need to consider rhabdomyosarcoma among the possible differential diagnoses in patients who present with a leukemic picture and atypical blasts lacking all hematopoietic markers.

  14. Rhabdomyosarcoma of the pulmonary artery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barth, J.; Lehmann, H.; Thermann, M.; Horny, H.P.; Stein, H.; Kiel Univ.; Kiel Univ.; Kiel Univ.

    1982-01-01

    A case of a 55-year-old man with the histological diagnosis rhabdomyosarcoma of the left pulmonary artery has been seen. Lung scanning and pulmonary arteriography are the clues for the diagnostical procedure. 55 cases from the literature are reviewed and clinical findings of the early and late stages of the diseases are discussed. Surgical treatment is the therapy of choice if ever possible; aggressive chemotherapy might be an acceptable alternative. (orig.) [de

  15. Rhabdomyosarcoma of the uterus in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendonca, L.K. de; Matsumoto, M.H.

    1989-01-01

    One case of rhabdomyosarcoma of the uterus (type III) is reported. The patient was a seven-year-old with abnormal vaginal bleeding. Ultrasound has been shown to be valuable in the diagnosis, for defining the initial extend of disease and follow-up after chemotherapy which is important with the advent of more conservative forms of therapy for rhabdomyosarcoma. (author) [pt

  16. Testicular Embryonic Rhabdomyosarcoma, Case report with brief ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Testicular Embryonic Rhabdomyosarcoma, Case report with brief literature review. AM Adam, MMAM Ibnouf, IAF Allah. Abstract. Background: Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) is a malignant solid tumour arising from mesenchymal tissues which normally differentiate to form striated muscle. It can occur in a wide variety of sites.

  17. Rhabdomyosarcoma of the orbit in the newborn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellenbogen, E; Lasky, M A

    1975-12-01

    A full-term black boy had a 2- to 3-cm, round, bluish mass on his right lower eye-lid at birth, later diagnosed as rhabdomyosarcoma. It was cystic in nature and extended into the nasal cavity. The tumor was initially classified as neuroblastoma. The child died eitht months later and necropsy report confirmed an original ophthalmologic pathology diagnosis of embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma.

  18. Rhabdomyosarcoma of Cervix: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, Maryam Sadat; Ashrafganjoei, Tahereh; Sourati, Ainaz; Tabatabeifar, Morteza; Mohamadianamiri, Mahdiss

    2016-06-01

    Rhabdomyosarcoma has known as a highly malignant soft tissue sarcoma. It has been the most common soft tissue sarcoma in childhood, accounting for about 3 to 4 % of all cases of childhood cancer. Rhabdomyosarcoma was rare in adults, accounting for 3% of all soft-tissue sarcomas. embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma of female genital tract including uterine cervix in an adult was rare. This study has reported a 33-year-old woman presented with abnormal vaginal discharge. Gynecologic examination revealed a cervical mass with grape- like feature protruding into vagina with posterior- superior vaginal wall involvement. Biopsy has performed and pathologic examination was consistent with embryonal botryoid type rhabdomyosarcoma. She has undergone the staging work up measurements including thoracic computed tomography (CT) scan, abdominopelvic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), bone scan and bone marrow examination. In exception of abdominopelvic MRI, with 2 suspicious pelvic lymph nodes in addition of cervical mass, all others were normal. Radical hysterectomy with lymph node debulking and ovarian preservation has performed. Final results have shown embryonal botryoid type rhabdomyosarcoma of cervix. ovaries, endometrium, parametrium, and follopian tubes were unremarkable. Pelvic lymph nodes pathology and intraabdominal fluid cytology were negative for malignancy. Lymphovascular invasion was identified. She has advised for adjuvant chemotherapy. This case has reminded that embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma could occur in uncommon site and older female. Longer follow up of these cases has required due to lack of survival data for embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma of this site and age group.

  19. Brachytherapy in childhood rhabdomyosarcoma treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novaes, Paulo Eduardo Ribeiro dos Santos

    1995-01-01

    A retrospective study of 21 children with rhabdomyosarcoma treated by brachytherapy to the primary site of the tumor at the Radiotherapy Department of the A.C.Camargo Hospital between january/1980 to june/1993 was undertaken. The main objectives were to comprove the utility of brachytherapy in childhood rhabdomyosarcoma, to evaluate the local control and survival, in association with chemotherapy, to analyze the late effects of the treatment and to determinate the preferential technique to each clinical situation. All patients received brachytherapy to the tumor site. The radioactive isotopes employed were Gold 198 , Cesium 137 and Iridium 192 . The brachytherapy techniques depended on the tumor site, period of treatment, availability of the radioactive material and stage of the disease. Patients treated exclusively by brachytherapy received 40 Gy to 60 Gy. When brachytherapy was associated with external radiotherapy the dose ranged from 20 Gy to 40 Gy. Local control was achieved in 18 of 20 patients (90%). The global survival and local control survival rates were 61.9% (13/21 patients) and 72,2% (13/18 patients) respectively. (author)

  20. Clinical significance of anaplasia in childhood rhabdomyosarcoma

    OpenAIRE

    Sidhom, Iman; El Nadi, Enas; Taha, Hala; Elkinaai, Naglaa; Zaghloul, Mohamed S.; Younes, Alaa; Labib, Rania; Sabry, Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    Background: The presence of anaplastic features has been known to correlate with poor clinical outcome in various pediatric malignancies, including Wilms tumor and medulloblastoma but not in rhabdomyosarcoma. Aim: Aim was to study the frequency of anaplasia at presentation in childhood rhabdomyosarcoma and its relationship to clinical and pathological characteristics as well as to outcome. Patients and Methods: Anaplasia was retrospectively assessed in 105 consecutive pediatric rhabdomy...

  1. Childhood Rhabdomyosarcoma Treatment (PDQ®)—Patient Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treatment of children with rhabdomyosarcoma often includes chemotherapy, radiation therapy, and surgery. Learn about the signs, tests to diagnose, survival, treatment, and clinical trials for children with rhabdomyosarcoma in this expert-reviewed summary.

  2. Childhood Rhabdomyosarcoma Treatment (PDQ®)—Health Professional Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhabdomyosarcoma (cancer of striated muscle) in children is treated with chemotherapy, radiation therapy, and surgery. For pediatric embryonal, alveolar, and anaplastic rhabdomyosarcoma, learn about the disease presentation, diagnosis, prognosis, treatment regimens, and clinical trials in this expert-reviewed summary.

  3. Human rhabdomyosarcoma cell lines for rhabdomyosarcoma research: Utility and pitfalls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashley R.P. Hinson

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS is the most common soft tissue sarcoma of childhood and adolescence. Despite intergroup clinical trials conducted in Europe and North America, outcomes for high risk patients with this disease have not significantly improved in the last several decades, and survival of metastatic or relapsed disease remains extremely poor. Accrual into new clinical trials is slow and difficult, so in vitro cell line research and in vivo xenograft models present an attractive alternative for preclinical research for this cancer type. Currently, 30 commonly used human RMS cell lines exist, with differing origins, karyotypes, histologies, and methods of validation. Selecting an appropriate cell line for RMS research has important implications for outcomes. There are also potential pitfalls in using certain cell lines including contamination with murine stromal cells, cross-contamination between cell lines, discordance between the cell line and its associated original tumor, imposter cell lines, and nomenclature errors that result in the circulation of two or more presumed unique cell lines that are actually from the same origin. These pitfalls can be avoided by testing for species-specific isoenzymes, microarray analysis, assays for subtype-specific fusion products, and short tandem repeat analysis.

  4. Human Rhabdomyosarcoma Cell Lines for Rhabdomyosarcoma Research: Utility and Pitfalls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinson, Ashley R. P.; Jones, Rosanne; Crose, Lisa E. S.; Belyea, Brian C.; Barr, Frederic G.; Linardic, Corinne M.

    2013-01-01

    Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) is the most common soft tissue sarcoma of childhood and adolescence. Despite intergroup clinical trials conducted in Europe and North America, outcomes for high risk patients with this disease have not significantly improved in the last several decades, and survival of metastatic or relapsed disease remains extremely poor. Accrual into new clinical trials is slow and difficult, so in vitro cell-line research and in vivo xenograft models present an attractive alternative for preclinical research for this cancer type. Currently, 30 commonly used human RMS cell lines exist, with differing origins, karyotypes, histologies, and methods of validation. Selecting an appropriate cell line for RMS research has important implications for outcomes. There are also potential pitfalls in using certain cell lines including contamination with murine stromal cells, cross-contamination between cell lines, discordance between the cell line and its associated original tumor, imposter cell lines, and nomenclature errors that result in the circulation of two or more presumed unique cell lines that are actually from the same origin. These pitfalls can be avoided by testing for species-specific isoenzymes, microarray analysis, assays for subtype-specific fusion products, and short tandem repeat analysis. PMID:23882450

  5. Transurethral resection for botryoid bladder rhabdomyosarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitsuyuki Nakata

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The outcome of multimodal therapy for localized bladder rhabdomyosarcoma is quite good in terms of morbidity, and conservative surgery is generally recommended. However, in cases originating in the bladder neck, tumorectomy or partial cystectomy has adverse effects on bladder function. A 2-year-old girl underwent transurethral resection of a bladder tumor (TUR-BT, chemotherapy consisting of vincristine, actinomycin-D, and cyclophosphamide, and radiotherapy. She was in remission for 3 years when frequent urination became evident. Her bladder capacity and compliance were low; however, her urinary symptom was controlled using anticholinergic medication. Accordingly, TUR-BT could be an optional approach for bladder rhabdomyosarcoma. Keywords: Rhabdomyosarcoma, Transurethral resection, Conservative surgery

  6. Integrated diagnostic imaging of primary thoracic rhabdomyosarcoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almberger, M.; Iannicelli, E.; Matrunola, M.; Schiavetti, A.; Capocaccia, P.

    2001-01-01

    We report a rare case of primary thoracic rhabdomyosarcoma in a girl who was referred with acute chest pain, hacking cough, and wheezing. A chest X-ray revealed a complete opacity of the right hemithorax. Ultrasound revealed a right-sided pleural effusion and a solid mass above the liver dome, suggesting a neoplastic disease, which quickly led to further specific examination. Use of CT and MRI together with bone scintigraphy completed the investigation. The biopsy specimen showed a pattern of alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma. This case was reported to emphasize the role of US in the evaluation of a child with hemithorax opacity. (orig.)

  7. Integrated diagnostic imaging of primary thoracic rhabdomyosarcoma

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    Almberger, M.; Iannicelli, E. [Dept. of Radiology, University ' ' La Sapienza' ' , Rome (Italy); Matrunola, M.; Schiavetti, A.; Capocaccia, P. [Dept. of Pediatric Radiology, University ' ' La Sapienza' ' , Rome (Italy)

    2001-03-01

    We report a rare case of primary thoracic rhabdomyosarcoma in a girl who was referred with acute chest pain, hacking cough, and wheezing. A chest X-ray revealed a complete opacity of the right hemithorax. Ultrasound revealed a right-sided pleural effusion and a solid mass above the liver dome, suggesting a neoplastic disease, which quickly led to further specific examination. Use of CT and MRI together with bone scintigraphy completed the investigation. The biopsy specimen showed a pattern of alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma. This case was reported to emphasize the role of US in the evaluation of a child with hemithorax opacity. (orig.)

  8. [Primary testicular rhabdomyosarcoma: A case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mejía-Salas, Jesús Alberto; Sánchez-Corona, Hugo; Priego-Niño, Alejandro; Cárdenas-Rodríguez, Edgar; Sánchez-Galindo, José Antonio

    Rhabdomyosarcoma is the most common sarcoma of soft tissues in childhood and adolescence, with an annual incidence of 4-7 cases per million children aged 15. Embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma is common in adults younger than 30 years, and are usually presented as a large painless, palpable mass (> 5cm). Survival in the case of paratesticular sarcoma in men is approximately 50%. Male 27 years of age with no history of importance, was seen in a clinic with an increased, painless, left testicular volume 3 years onset. Intrascrotal left testicle increased volume, with dimensions of 20×12×8cm, a stone and left inguinal node in induratum measuring 2×2cm. Microscopically, it showed a pattern of an embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma with left inguinal node metastases. Early diagnosis of testicular tumours, and especially of primary intratesticular rhabdomyosarcomas, and aggressive surgical treatment in combination with chemotherapy reduces the incidence of local recurrence and may improve the rate of disease-free survival and overall survival in adult patients with metastases. Copyright © 2015 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  9. Clinical significance of anaplasia in childhood rhabdomyosarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidhom, Iman; El Nadi, Enas; Taha, Hala; Elkinaai, Naglaa; Zaghloul, Mohamed S; Younes, Alaa; Labib, Rania; Sabry, Mohamed

    2015-06-01

    The presence of anaplastic features has been known to correlate with poor clinical outcome in various pediatric malignancies, including Wilms tumor and medulloblastoma but not in rhabdomyosarcoma. Aim was to study the frequency of anaplasia at presentation in childhood rhabdomyosarcoma and its relationship to clinical and pathological characteristics as well as to outcome. Anaplasia was retrospectively assessed in 105 consecutive pediatric rhabdomyosarcoma patients who were registered at the Children's Cancer Hospital in Egypt (CCHE) during the period from July 2007 till the end of May 2010. Anaplasia was diagnosed in 18 patients (17.1%), focal in 10 (9.5%) and diffuse in 8 (7.6%). The distribution of anaplasia was found to be more common in older patients having age⩾10 years. Also it was more likely to occur in the high risk group and in tumors with unfavorable histology (alveolar subtype), and stage IV. The 3-year failure free survival rates for patients with and without anaplasia were 27.8±10.6% and 53.4±5.8%, respectively (p=0.014) and the 3-year overall survival rates were 35.3±11.6% and 61±6%, respectively (p=0.019). The frequency of anaplasia in pediatric patients with rhabdomyosarcoma in our study was 17.1%. The presence of anaplasia had statistically significant worse clinical outcome. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Clinical significance of anaplasia in childhood rhabdomyosarcoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sidhom, I.; El Nadi, E.; Taha, H.; Elkinaai, N.; Zaghloul, M.S.; Younes, A.; Labib, R.; Sabry, M.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The presence of anaplastic features has been known to correlate with poor clinical outcome in various pediatric malignancies, including Wilms tumor and medulloblastoma but not in rhabdomyosarcoma. Aim: Aim was to study the frequency of anaplasia at presentation in childhood rhabdomyosarcoma and its relationship to clinical and pathological characteristics as well as to outcome. Patients and Methods: Anaplasia was retrospectively assessed in 105 consecutive pediatric rhabdomyosarcoma patients who were registered at the Children’s Cancer Hospital in Egypt (CCHE) during the period from July 2007 till the end of May 2010. Results: Anaplasia was diagnosed in 18 patients (17.1%), focal in 10 (9.5%) and diffuse in 8 (7.6%). The distribution of anaplasia was found to be more common in older patients having age P 10 years. Also it was more likely to occur in the high risk group and in tumors with unfavorable histology (alveolar subtype), and stage IV. The 3-year failure free survival rates for patients with and without anaplasia were 27.8 ± 10.6% and 53.4 ± 5.8%, respectively (p = 0.014) and the 3-year overall survival rates were 35.3 ± 11.6% and 61 ± 6%, respectively (p = 0.019). Conclusions: The frequency of anaplasia in pediatric patients with rhabdomyosarcoma in our study was 17.1%. The presence of anaplasia had statistically significant worse clinical outcome

  11. Embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma of the cervix | Ocheke | African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma (sarcoma botyroides) of the cervix, which is rare, is described in a 16-yearold. The combined use of chemotherapy, radiotherapy and surgery has markedly improved survival in those with this condition. However, our patient did not benefit from this treatment modality due to late presentation ...

  12. Parameningeal Rhabdomyosarcoma: Outcomes and Opportunities

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    Yang, Joanna C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Wexler, Leonard H.; Meyers, Paul A. [Department of Pediatrics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Wolden, Suzanne L., E-mail: woldens@mskcc.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To examine patterns of failure in patients with parameningeal rhabdomyosarcoma (PM-RMS) treated with intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Methods and Materials: Forty-seven patients with PM-RMS received chemotherapy and IMRT for definitive treatment. The median age was 9 years (range, 0.5-35 years). The high-risk features were as follows: 40% alveolar histology, 72% group III and 26% group IV disease, 57% either intracranial extension (ICE) (n=25) or cranial neuropathy (n=21). The median time to RT from the start of chemotherapy was 15 weeks (range, 2-54 weeks). Patients received 50.4 Gy in 1.8-Gy fractions to the primary tumor by use of IMRT. Thirteen patients aged {>=}14 years with alveolar histology received 36 Gy prophylactic nodal irradiation (PNI) to bilateral cervical nodes. Events were defined as local, regional (nodal), central nervous system (CNS), or distant failures. Results: With a median follow-up time of 3.3 years (range, 0.5-12.8 years), 18 patients experienced failure: 5 local, 2 regional, 6 distant, and 7 CNS. The 5-year local failure-free survival was 86%. Age, histology, and time to RT did not influence the risk of local failure. The 5-year regional failure-free survival was 92%: 100% for embryonal and 74% for alveolar (P=.03). However, there were no lymph node failures in patients with alveolar histology who were given PNI. The 5-year CNS failure-free survival was 83%: 100% without and 70% with ICE (P=.01); 95% without and 69% with cranial neuropathy (P=.02). The estimated 5-year event-free survival and overall survival were 61% for group III and 58% for group IV patients. Conclusions: Distant failure was the most common type of failure among group IV patients. Patients with alveolar histology seem to benefit from PNI. The presence of ICE or cranial neuropathy portends a high risk of CNS failure, the most common pattern of failure among non-group IV patients. These patients may benefit from the addition of novel CNS

  13. Pediatric rhabdomyosarcomas and nonrhabdomyosarcoma soft tissue sarcoma

    OpenAIRE

    Agarwala Sandeep

    2006-01-01

    Tumors arising from the soft tissues are uncommon in children, accounting for about 6% of all childhood malignancies. More than half (53%) of these originate from the striated muscles and are called rhabdomyosarcomas (RMS) the remaining are nonrhabdomyosarcoma soft tissue sarcomas (NRSTS). Almost two-thirds of RMS cases are diagnosed in children < 6 years of age. They can arise at varied locations like the head and neck region, genitourinary tract, extremities, trunk and retrope...

  14. Imaging findings in craniofacial childhood rhabdomyosarcoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freling, Nicole J.M.; Rijn, Rick R. van; Merks, Johannes H.M.; Saeed, Peerooz; Balm, Alfons J.M.; Bras, Johannes; Pieters, Bradley R.; Adam, Judit A.

    2010-01-01

    Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) is the commonest paediatric soft-tissue sarcoma constituting 3-5% of all malignancies in childhood. RMS has a predilection for the head and neck area and tumours in this location account for 40% of all childhood RMS cases. In this review we address the clinical and imaging presentations of craniofacial RMS, discuss the most appropriate imaging techniques, present characteristic imaging features and offer an overview of differential diagnostic considerations. Post-treatment changes will be briefly addressed. (orig.)

  15. Biologic and Clinical Aspects of Rhabdomyosarcoma

    OpenAIRE

    Arya Emami; Zahra Sepehri; Joseph W. Gordon; Saeid Ghavami

    2017-01-01

    Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) is a muscle-derived tumor and is the most common pediatric soft tissue sarcoma representing 5% of all childhood cancers. Statistically, soft tissue sarcomas account for approximately 10% of all cancers in children, of which more than half of these tumors are RMS. Thus, RMS is a major clinical problem in pediatric oncology. RMS is caused by a disruption in the pathway of primitive mesenchymal stem cells directed towards myogenesis. In most cases of patients diagnosed wit...

  16. Rhabdomyosarcomas in aging A/J mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger B Sher

    Full Text Available Rhabdomyosarcomas (RSCs are skeletal muscle neoplasms found in humans and domestic mammals. The A/J inbred strain developed a high frequency (between 70-80% of adult pleomorphic type (APT RSC at >20 months of age while BALB/cByJ also develop RSC but less frequently. These neoplasms invaded skeletal muscle surrounding either the axial or proximal appendicular skeleton and were characterized by pleomorphic cells with abundant eosinophilic cytoplasm, multiple nuclei, and cross striations. The diagnosis was confirmed by detection of alpha-sarcomeric actin and myogenin in the neoplastic cells using immunocytochemistry. The A/J strain, but not the related BALB/c substrains, is also characterised by a progressive muscular dystrophy homologous to limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2B. The association between the development of RSC in similar muscle groups to those most severely affected by the progressive muscular dystrophy suggested that these neoplasms developed from abnormal regeneration of the skeletal muscle exacerbated by the dysferlin mutation. Transcriptome analyses of RSCs revealed marked downregulation of genes in muscular development and function signaling networks. Non-synonymous coding SNPs were found in Myl1, Abra, Sgca, Ttn, and Kcnj12 suggesting these may be important in the pathogenesis of RSC. These studies suggest that A strains of mice can be useful models for dissecting the molecular genetic basis for development, progression, and ultimately for testing novel anticancer therapeutic agents dealing with rhabdomyosarcoma.

  17. An unusual presentation of an intra- abdominal rhabdomyosarcoma

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) is a common neoplasm, representing 5 - 10% of malignant ... Departments of Diagnostic Radiology and Anatomical Pathology, University of the ... There were no features of ascites or metastases to the liver, lung.

  18. Vaginal rhabdomyosarcoma in a patient with Noonan syndrome.

    OpenAIRE

    Khan, S; McDowell, H; Upadhyaya, M; Fryer, A

    1995-01-01

    This is the first report of a Noonan syndrome patient who has had a vaginal rhabdomyosarcoma. Recent reports of Noonan syndrome patients with leukaemia have prompted speculation that there may be a slightly increased malignancy risk associated with this syndrome.

  19. Rhabdomyosarcoma in an elderly patient. A case report

    OpenAIRE

    Leopoldo Garduño-Vieyra; Sergio E. Hernandez-Da Mota; Claudia Ruth Gonzalez; Roberto Gamez-Carrillo

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To describe a case of rhabdomyosarcoma in an elderly patient. Methods: An exenteration surgery was performed of the right orbit with desperiostization and temporal muscle-skin flap rotation to cover the defect in a 96 year old patient with a history of right eye exotropia. Results: The pathology report showed a malignant striate muscle neoplasm with pleomorphic neuclei of variable size with discromic and disperse cromatine that was consistent with pleomorphic rhabdomyosarcoma. ...

  20. Molecular diagnostics in the management of rhabdomyosarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Michael A; Barr, Fredric G

    2017-02-01

    A classification of rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) with prognostic relevance has primarily relied on clinical features and histologic classification as either embryonal or alveolar RMS. The PAX3-FOXO1 and PAX7-FOXO1 gene fusions occur in 80% of cases with the alveolar subtype and are more predictive of outcome than histologic classification. Identifying additional molecular hallmarks that further subclassify RMS is an active area of research. Areas Covered: The authors review the current state of the PAX3-FOXO1 and PAX7-FOXO1 fusions as prognostic biomarkers. Emerging biomarkers, including mRNA expression profiling, MYOD1 mutations, RAS pathway mutations and gene fusions involving NCOA2 or VGLL2 are also reviewed. Expert commentary: Strategies for modifying RMS risk stratification based on molecular biomarkers are emerging with the potential to transform the clinical management of RMS, ultimately improving patient outcomes by tailoring therapy to predicted patient risk and identifying targets for novel therapies.

  1. Parameningeal rhabdomyosarcoma: results of an International workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benk, V.; Rodary, C.; Donaldson, S. S.; Flamant, F.; Maurer, H.; Treuner, I.; Carli, M.; Gehan, E.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: A retrospective analysis was performed on children with nonmetastatic rhabdomyosarcomas (RMS) involving a parameningeal site treated by one of the four major cooperative groups: Intergroup Rhabdomyosarcoma Study (IRS), International Society of Pediatric Oncology (SIOP), German Cooperative Group (CWS), and Italian Cooperative Group (ICS) to analyse survival and prognostic factors. Methods and Materials: Between 1979 and 1989, 230 children (median age 6 years) were treated in the IRS III, SIOP 84, CWS 81, and ICS 79 studies. All patients received chemotherapy, and 203 were irradiated. Radiotherapy doses were similar in the four studies, although treatment volumes were not similar. The SIOP patients had smaller volumes treated. In addition, the SIOP patients with a low risk of meningeal involvement and children under 5 years of age were not irradiated if they had a complete response (CR) to chemotherapy. Time to initiation of irradiation was earlier in the IRS and Italian studies. Results: Median follow-up was 62 months (range 22-140). The 5-year survival and 5-year event-free survival were better for the IRS study (74% and 71%) than for the other study groups (55% and 36% for SIOP, 47% and 47% for CWS, and 39% and 39% for ICS). The low-risk (LR) patients in the IRS study had improved survival. However, patients with high risk of meningeal involvement had similar survival in all four studies. The most significant prognostic factor was the size of tumor (>5 cm). Conclusion: The improved results from the IRS group, especially among the LR patients, could be related to the IRS treatment employed, particularly the systematic use of radiation, to the inclusion of patients with smaller tumors, and to the routine use of quality control of radiation

  2. Pediatric rhabdomyosarcomas and nonrhabdomyosarcoma soft tissue sarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agarwala Sandeep

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Tumors arising from the soft tissues are uncommon in children, accounting for about 6% of all childhood malignancies. More than half (53% of these originate from the striated muscles and are called rhabdomyosarcomas (RMS the remaining are nonrhabdomyosarcoma soft tissue sarcomas (NRSTS. Almost two-thirds of RMS cases are diagnosed in children < 6 years of age. They can arise at varied locations like the head and neck region, genitourinary tract, extremities, trunk and retroperitoneum. Pathologically RMS is now classified as superior, intermediate and poor outcome histologies. For stratification of treatment and also comparison of results the RMS are now staged both by the clinical grouping and the TNM staging systems. The ultimate outcome depends on the site, extent of disease and histology. Currently, approximately 70% of the patients survive for 5 years or more and are probably cured. This is credited to the use of multi-modal, risk-adapted therapy, refinements in tumor grouping and better supportive care which has emerged out of cooperative studies like Intergroup Rhabdomyosarcoma Study (IRS and the International Society of Pediatric Oncology studies (SIOP. The treatment involves chemotherapy, radiotherapy and organ/function preserving surgery. The gold standard chemotherapy is still vincristine, actinomycin D and cyclophosphamide (VAC regime with high doses of intensity bone marrow rescue with colony stimulating factors. The NRSTS are rare and of heterogenous histologies and so it has been difficult to arrive at a treatment strategy for these. What is definitely understood is that these are usually immature and poorly differentiated tumors that respond poorly to chemotherapy and so surgical resection forms the mainstay of treatment with adjuvant radiotherapy and chemotherapy to prevent local recurrences. In all likelihood, the molecular analysis of RMS will further refine current classification schemes and knowledge of genetic features of

  3. Clonality and evolutionary history of rhabdomyosarcoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Chen

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available To infer the subclonality of rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS and predict the temporal order of genetic events for the tumorigenic process, and to identify novel drivers, we applied a systematic method that takes into account germline and somatic alterations in 44 tumor-normal RMS pairs using deep whole-genome sequencing. Intriguingly, we find that loss of heterozygosity of 11p15.5 and mutations in RAS pathway genes occur early in the evolutionary history of the PAX-fusion-negative-RMS (PFN-RMS subtype. We discover several early mutations in non-RAS mutated samples and predict them to be drivers in PFN-RMS including recurrent mutation of PKN1. In contrast, we find that PAX-fusion-positive (PFP subtype tumors have undergone whole-genome duplication in the late stage of cancer evolutionary history and have acquired fewer mutations and subclones than PFN-RMS. Moreover we predict that the PAX3-FOXO1 fusion event occurs earlier than the whole genome duplication. Our findings provide information critical to the understanding of tumorigenesis of RMS.

  4. Biologic and Clinical Aspects of Rhabdomyosarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arya Emami

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS is a muscle-derived tumor and is the most common pediatric soft tissue sarcoma representing 5% of all childhood cancers. Statistically, soft tissue sarcomas account for approximately 10% of all cancers in children, of which more than half of these tumors are RMS. Thus, RMS is a major clinical problem in pediatric oncology. RMS is caused by a disruption in the pathway of primitive mesenchymal stem cells directed towards myogenesis. In most cases of patients diagnosed with RMS there is a genetic or chromosomal alteration involved. In past few years there have been discoveries of more therapeutic approaches that has improved the quality of life in RMS patients and has resulted in a better survival rate in this population from 25% to 60%. However, Additional researches and clinical trials are needed in order to minimize the devastating consequences of the pediatric cancer including RMS. In the current mini review we will briefly discuss current knowledge in RMS focusing on most common biological and clinical aspects of the disease.

  5. Endothelin-3 production by human rhabdomyosarcoma: a possible new marker with a paracrine role.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palladini, Arianna; Astolfi, Annalisa; Croci, Stefania; De Giovanni, Carla; Nicoletti, Giordano; Rosolen, Angelo; Sartori, Francesca; Lollini, Pier-Luigi; Landuzzi, Lorena; Nanni, Patrizia

    2006-03-01

    Several autocrine and paracrine growth factor circuits have been found in human rhabdomyosarcoma cells. In this study we show that endothelin-3 (ET-3), a vasoactive peptide, is produced by human rhabdomyosarcoma cell lines, whereas it is not expressed by human sarcoma cell lines of non-muscle origin. We did not find evidence of a significant autocrine loop; nevertheless ET-3 produced by rhabdomyosarcoma cells can act as a paracrine factor, since it promotes migration of endothelial cells. Moreover ET-3 is present in plasma of mice bearing xenografts of human rhabdomyosarcoma cells, and may be potential new marker of the human rhabdomyosarcoma to be studied further.

  6. Embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma of the biliary tree: a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Jong Young; Nam, Kyung Jin; Choi, Jong Chul; Park, Byung Ho; Lee, Ki Nam; Chung, Duck Hwan

    1995-01-01

    Rhabdomyosarcoma are reportedly the most common soft tissue sarcoma occurring in childhood, but the biliary tree is a rare site of origin for this tumor. Recently we experienced a case of embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma of the biliary tree in a 30-month-old child. Ultrasonography showed hypoechoic mass filling the dilated left intrahepatic and extrahepatic bile ducts, and CT showed hypodense mass with heterogeneous enhancement after contrast infusion. Intraoperative cholangiography showed filling defects within the dilated left intrahepatic and extrahepatic bile ducts. Postoperative MRI showed residual mass within the left intrahepatic duct which was hypointense on T1WI and hyperintense on T2WI

  7. Cranial nerve palsies in childhood parameningeal rhabdomyosarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorzi, Alexandra P; Grant, Ronald; Gupta, Abha A; Hodgson, David C; Nathan, Paul C

    2012-12-15

    Children with parameningeal rhabdomyosarcoma (PM RMS) and cranial nerve palsy (CNP) are at risk for permanent neurologic dysfunction. Clinicians often consider the use of emergent therapies such as expedited radiation and/or corticosteroids; however, there is a paucity of information describing the natural history of CNP in PM RMS. We sought to describe the clinical features of patients with PM RMS plus associated CNP and to evaluate the patient, disease, and treatment-related factors that impacted neurologic recovery. We conducted a retrospective review of PM RMS cases treated at the Hospital for Sick Children between 1985 and 2010. Thirty-five children were treated for PM RMS, 19 (54%) of whom presented with CNP. Children with CNP were nine times more likely to have other high-risk features (cranial base bony erosion and/or intracranial extension) at the time of presentation than children without CNP (OR 9.6, 95% CI 1.69, 54.79, P = 0.013). In addition to commencing chemotherapy, 13 patients (68%) received expedited RT and corticosteroids, four (21%) corticosteroids alone, and two (11%) received only standard chemotherapy and RT. At last follow up of the 11 survivors, neurologic recovery was complete in five (45%), partial in five (45%), and absent in one (9%). In our cohort, recovery of PM RMS associated CNP was often incomplete despite multi-modal therapy. A larger cohort of patients is required to determine the utility of emergent initiation of radiation or corticosteroids. This study will facilitate the counseling of future families on the long-term neurologic recovery CNP in PM RMS. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Nonparameningeal head and neck rhabdomyosarcoma in children and adolescents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Orbach, Daniel; Mosseri, Veronique; Gallego, Soledad

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: This article reports risk factors and long-term outcome in localized nonparameningeal head and neck rhabdomyosarcomas in children and adolescents from a combined dataset from 3 consecutive international trials. METHODS: Data from 140 children (9.3% of total) prospectively enrolled in ...

  9. Congenitally absent thoracic pedicle in a child with rhabdomyosarcoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaufman, R A; Poznanski, A K; Hensinger, R N

    1980-04-01

    A case of congenital absence of a thoracic pedicle is reported in a 9 year old boy with embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma of the eyelid. In this clinical setting a surgical exploration was necessary in order to differentiate a developmental anomaly from an acquired metastatic deposit.

  10. Early life factors and risk of childhood rhabdomyosarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anshu eShrestha

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Although little is known about etiology of childhood rhabdomyosarcoma, early life factors are suspected in the etiology. We explored this hypothesis using linked data from the California Cancer Registry and the California birth rolls. Incident cases were 359 children < 6 year old (218 embryonal, 81 alveolar, 60 others diagnosed in 1988-2008. Controls (205,173, frequency matched on birth year (1986-2007, were randomly selected from the birth rolls. We examined association of birth characteristics such as birth weight, size for gestational age, and timing of prenatal care with all-type rhabdomyosarcoma, embryonal and alveolar subtypes. Crude and adjusted odds ratios (ORs and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs were estimated using logistic regression. In contrast to a previous study, we observed statistically non-significant association for embryonal subtype among high birth weight (4000-5250 grams children for term births [OR (95%CI: 1.28 (0.85, 1.92] and all births adjusted for gestational age [OR (95%CI: 1.21 (0.81, 1.81]. On the other hand, statistically significant 1.7-fold increased risk of alveolar subtype (95%CI: 1.02, 2.87 was observed among children with late or no prenatal care and a 1.3-fold increased risk of all rhabdomyosarcoma subtypes among children of fathers ≥ 35 years old at child birth (95%CI: 1.00, 1.75, independent of all covariates. Our finding positive association on male sex for all rhabdomyosarcoma types is consistent with previous studies. While we did not find a convincingly positive association between high birth weight and RMS, our findings on paternal age at childbirth and prenatal care supports the hypothesis that prenatal environment modifies risk for childhood rhabdomyosarcoma.

  11. X-radiation-induced differentiation of xenotransplanted human undifferentiated rhabdomyosarcoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takizawa, T.; Matsui, T.; Maeda, Y.

    1989-01-01

    A serially xenotransplantable strain of undifferentiated embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma originating from the nasal cavity of a 42-year-old woman has been established in our laboratory. After radiotherapy for the tumor donor, distinct rhabdomyoblastic differentiation of the undifferentiated sarcoma cells appeared in the primary lesion, and it is a reasonable assumption that X-irradiation has a certain potentiality to induce morphologic differentiation of tumor cells. To study this possibility, tissue fragments of undifferentiated embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma that had grown to more than 10 mm after being transplanted to nude mice were selectively irradiated in situ. The degree of rhabdomyoblastic differentiation according to radiation dose was evaluated by light and electron microscopy and by immunostainability for myoglobin, creatine phosphokinase-MM, and desmin. Distinct morphologic differentiation of undifferentiated sarcoma cells could be induced by repeated X-irradiations at several-week intervals

  12. Embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma in an immature Baird's tapir (Tapirus bairdii).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonar, Christopher J; Lewandowski, Albert H; Skowronek, Anthony J

    2007-03-01

    An immature Baird's tapir (Tapirus bairdii) with a history of seizure-like episodes developed signs of respiratory disease. The initial clinical diagnosis was pneumonia, and antibiotic therapy was started. The animal failed to improve after 14 days of therapy and developed unilateral, bloody nasal discharge. Endoscopic examination and radiography revealed a soft tissue mass in the nasopharynx depressing the soft palate. The tapir died 32 days after initial presentation. Histologic examination of the mass demonstrated a mesenchymal tumor composed of spindle cells with elongate nuclei forming densely packed fascicles. The neoplastic spindle cells showed prominent cross-striations. Immunohistochemistry revealed the cells to be positive for desmin and myoglobin, but negative for smooth muscle actin, confirming diagnosis of rhabdomyosarcoma. Embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma is the most common nasopharyngeal soft tissue tumor of humans, and it has been reported infrequently in dogs, horses, and pigs. Neoplasia should be a differential diagnosis in cases of unilateral nasal discharge and inspiratory stridor, even in young animals.

  13. Indium111 antimyosin for the detection of leiomyosarcoma and rhabdomyosarcoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cox, P.H.; Pillay, M.; Schonfeld, D.; Verweij, J.; Stoter, G.

    1988-01-01

    111 In-antimyosin monoclonal antibody complex passes through damaged myocardial cell membranes and binds to the intracellular myosin. Normal myocardial and other muscle cells show no uptake. Rhabdomyosarcoma and Leiomyosarcoma cells also contain intracellular myosin and the cell membrane permeability is greater than normal. Significant uptake of 111 In-antimyosin was observed in patients with Leiomyosarcoma and Rhabdomyosarcoma suggesting that the reagent has a potential for the in vivo detection of these tumour types. Tumour to background ratios of 10:1 were measured in one case and in view of the fact that the site of accumulation is intracellular, antimyosin may have a potential as a carrier for therapeutic agents. (orig.)

  14. Synchronous Occurance of Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Rhabdomyosarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayasudha, A V; Nair, Rekha A; Renu, S; Binitha, R; Reghu, K S; Kusumakumary, P

    2015-09-01

    Metachronous primary distinct tumors are frequently and increasingly encountered in oncology clinical practice of recent times, but synchronous tumours are still a rarity. We report an unusual case of a 2 year old male child who had synchronous occurrence of rhabdomyosarcoma of pelvis and acute myeloid leukemia.Our search of literature suggests that this may be the first reported case of simultaneous occurrence of these two malignancies.

  15. Rb1 loss modifies but does not initiate alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma (aRMS) is a myogenic childhood sarcoma frequently associated with a translocation-mediated fusion gene, Pax3:Foxo1a. Methods We investigated the complementary role of Rb1 loss in aRMS tumor initiation and progression using conditional mouse models. Results Rb1 loss was not a necessary and sufficient mutational event for rhabdomyosarcomagenesis, nor a strong cooperative initiating mutation. Instead, Rb1 loss was a modifier of progression and increased anaplasia and pleomorphism. Whereas Pax3:Foxo1a expression was unaltered, biomarkers of aRMS versus embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma were both increased, questioning whether these diagnostic markers are reliable in the context of Rb1 loss. Genome-wide gene expression in Pax3:Foxo1a,Rb1 tumors more closely approximated aRMS than embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma. Intrinsic loss of pRb function in aRMS was evidenced by insensitivity to a Cdk4/6 inhibitor regardless of whether Rb1 was intact or null. This loss of function could be attributed to low baseline Rb1, pRb and phospho-pRb expression in aRMS tumors for which the Rb1 locus was intact. Pax3:Foxo1a RNA interference did not increase pRb or improve Cdk inhibitor sensitivity. Human aRMS shared the feature of low and/or heterogeneous tumor cell pRb expression. Conclusions Rb1 loss from an already low pRb baseline is a significant disease modifier, raising the possibility that some cases of pleomorphic rhabdomyosarcoma may in fact be Pax3:Foxo1a-expressing aRMS with Rb1 or pRb loss of function. PMID:24274149

  16. Advanced Orofacial Rhabdomyosarcoma: A Retrospective Study of 31 Cases

    OpenAIRE

    Otmani, Naima; Khattab, Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) is the most common soft tissue sarcoma encountered in childhood and adolescence. Early diagnosis of pediatric cases is critical to improving outcomes, especially when socioeconomic status and geographical access to specialist services can reduce opportunities for early cancer detection and treatment. Objective The objective of this study is to determine factors that can delay referral and treatment in specialist pediatric oncology center upon o...

  17. Collecting and Storing Tissue, Blood, and Bone Marrow Samples From Patients With Rhabdomyosarcoma or Other Soft Tissue Sarcoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-11

    Adult Rhabdomyosarcoma; Childhood Desmoplastic Small Round Cell Tumor; Chordoma; Desmoid Tumor; Metastatic Childhood Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Nonmetastatic Childhood Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Previously Treated Childhood Rhabdomyosarcoma; Previously Untreated Childhood Rhabdomyosarcoma; Recurrent Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Recurrent Childhood Rhabdomyosarcoma; Recurrent Childhood Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage I Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage II Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage III Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage IV Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma

  18. Rhabdomyosarcoma in patients with constitutional mismatch-repair-deficiency syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kratz, C P; Holter, S; Etzler, J; Lauten, M; Pollett, A; Niemeyer, C M; Gallinger, S; Wimmer, K

    2009-06-01

    Biallelic germline mutations in the mismatch repair genes MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 or PMS2 cause a recessive childhood cancer syndrome characterised by early-onset malignancies and signs reminiscent of neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1). Alluding to the underlying genetic defect, we refer to this syndrome as constitutional mismatch repair-deficiency (CMMR-D) syndrome. The tumour spectrum of CMMR-D syndrome includes haematological neoplasias, brain tumours and Lynch syndrome-associated tumours. Other tumours, such as neuroblastoma, Wilm tumour, ovarian neuroectodermal tumour or infantile myofibromatosis, have so far been found only in individual cases. We analysed two consanguineous families that had members with suspected CMMR-D syndrome who developed rhabdomyosarcoma among other neoplasias. In the first family, we identified a pathogenic PMS2 mutation for which the affected patient was homozygous. In family 2, immunohistochemistry analysis showed isolated loss of PMS2 expression in all tumours in the affected patients, including rhabdomyosarcoma itself and the surrounding normal tissue. Together with the family history and microsatellite instability observed in one tumour this strongly suggests an underlying PMS2 alteration in family 2 also. Together, these two new cases show that rhabdomyosarcoma and possibly other embryonic tumours, such as neuroblastoma and Wilm tumour, belong to the tumour spectrum of CMMR-D syndrome. Given the clinical overlap of CMMR-D syndrome with NF1, we suggest careful examination of the family history in patients with embryonic tumours and signs of NF1 as well as analysis of the tumours for loss of one of the mismatch repair genes and microsatellite instability. Subsequent mutation analysis will lead to a definitive diagnosis of the underlying disorder.

  19. Embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma of the uterine cervix in adult woman

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubio C, Patricia; Lanzon L, Alberto; Vicente A, Sandra; Ruiz C, Miguel Angel

    2012-01-01

    Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) of the lower genital tract is a common childhood malignancy but a rare tumor in female adults. It accounting for around 2-4% of soft-tissue sarcomas. It is a malignant neoplasm originating from myogenic progenitors cells that shows variable stages of skeletal muscle differentiation. In many cases, the tumor appears as a benign endocervical polyp and this delays the correct diagnosis. Optimal management of adult genital tract RMS is uncertain. Aggressive primary therapy with local excition, polichemotherapy and radiotherapy in selected patients may result in prolonged survival and cure in early stages

  20. Patterns of Failure in Pediatric Rhabdomyosarcoma After Proton Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vern-Gross, Tamara Z.; Indelicato, Daniel J., E-mail: dindelicato@floridaproton.org; Bradley, Julie A.; Rotondo, Ronny L.

    2016-12-01

    Purpose: To report on the patterns of failure in children with rhabdomyosarcoma treated with proton therapy. Patients and Methods: Between February 2007 and November 2013, 66 children with a median age of 4.1 years (range, 0.6-15.3 years) diagnosed with nonmetastatic rhabdomyosarcoma were treated with proton therapy. Clinical target volume 1 was defined as the prechemotherapy tumor plus a 1-cm anatomically constrained margin. Clinical target volume 2 was defined as the postchemotherapy tumor (or tumor bed) plus a 0.5-cm anatomically constrained margin, further expanded to encompass potential pathways of spread, including soft tissue infiltrated with tumor at diagnosis. Results: Of the 66 children, 11 developed locally progressive disease at a median of 16 months (range, 14-32 months), for an actuarial 2-year local control rate of 88%. Among the children who progressed, median age and tumor size at diagnosis were 6.7 years (range, 0.6-16 years) and 6 cm (range, 2-8 cm), respectively. Of the recurrences, 64% and 36% were embryonal and alveolar, respectively. Disease progression was observed in 7 (64%) parameningeal, 2 (18%) head and neck (other), and 2 (18%) bladder/prostate subsites. At diagnosis, 8 of 11 patients who developed a recurrence were Intergroup Rhabdomyosarcoma Study stage 3, and all 11 were group III. Of the relapses, 100% (11 of 11) were confirmed as in-field within the composite 95% isodose line. One of the 11 patients (9%) developed a new simultaneous regional nodal recurrence outside of the previously treated radiation field. Conclusion: Early data suggest that the sharp dosimetric gradient associated with proton therapy is not associated with an increased risk of marginal failure. Routine use of a 0.5- to 1-cm clinical target volume 1/2 margin with highly conformal proton therapy does not compromise local control in children diagnosed with rhabdomyosarcoma with unfavorable risk features.

  1. Alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma: origin and prognostic implications of molecular findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eguía-Aguilar, Pilar; López-Martínez, Briceida; Retana-Contreras, Carmen; Perezpeña-Diazconti, Mario

    We present the case of a 2-year-old male patient with a facial tumor partially treated with chemotherapy before his admission to our institution. The tumor involved from the frontal region to the maxillary floor, the orbit, and the maxillary and sphenoid sinuses. The histopathological diagnosis revealed a stage IV alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma with infiltration to bone marrow and cerebrospinal fluid. He was managed with four cycles of adriamycin, actinomycin, cyclophosphamide and vincristine; cisplatin and irinotecan were added to the last cycle. The tumor had a 50% size reduction, but the patient died after a neutropenia and fever episode. The aggressive behavior of alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma has been associated with the expression of oncogenic fusion proteins resulting from chromosomal translocations, particularly t(2;13) (q35;q14) PAX3/FOXO1, and t(1;13) (p36;q14) PAX7/FOXO1 which were present in this patient. Copyright © 2016 Hospital Infantil de México Federico Gómez. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  2. Localized paediatric orbital rhabdomyosarcoma: Influence of imaging on treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burns, B.J.; McHugh, K.; McDowell, H.P.; Anslow, P.; Mitchell, C.

    2001-01-01

    AIM: Orbital rhabdomyosarcoma is the most common primary malignant orbital tumour in children and has a good prognosis. The purpose of this paper was to review the imaging and consequent treatment of patients with localized orbital rhabdomyosarcoma from around the U.K. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Patients were identified through the U.K. Chilren's Cancer Study Group (UKCCSG) database. Investigations and therapy were dictated by the Malignant Mesenchymal Tumour '89 (MMT89) protocol. Imaging and radiological reports of 16 patients from 12 centres were reviewed. The number of patients receiving radiotherapy, timing of radiotherapy, and adherence to treatment protocols were assessed. RESULTS: Local radiologists' reports and imaging techniques varied between sequential examinations and centres. The imaging was adequate for management. No reports quoted measurements of the tumours. Treatment protocols were not always followed rigidly with regard to a residual mass at day 80 post-diagnosis. However, the protocol was not explicit for all outcomes. Fifteen out of 16 patients eventually received radiotherapy. CONCLUSION: There is no standardization of imaging between centres. The presence or absence of a post-therapeutic residue should be stated in the radiology report. Further investigation is needed to differentiate between fibrosis and recurrent tumour. Radiotherapy for residual mass at day 80 is probably more important than standardizing radiological technique. Burns B.J. et al. (2001)

  3. HES6 enhances the motility of alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wickramasinghe, Caroline M [MRC Cancer Cell Unit, Hutchison-MRC Research centre, Addenbrooke' s Hospital Cambridge, CB2 0XZ (United Kingdom); MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology, Addenbrooke' s Hospital Cambridge, CB2 0QH (United Kingdom); Domaschenz, Renae [MRC Cancer Cell Unit, Hutchison-MRC Research centre, Addenbrooke' s Hospital Cambridge, CB2 0XZ (United Kingdom); Gene Regulation and Chromatin Group, MRC Clinical Sciences Centre, Faculty of Medicine, Imperial College, Hammersmith Campus, Du Cane Road, London W12 ONN (United Kingdom); Amagase, Yoko [MRC Cancer Cell Unit, Hutchison-MRC Research centre, Addenbrooke' s Hospital Cambridge, CB2 0XZ (United Kingdom); Department of Pathophysiology, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Doshisha Women' s College of Liberal Arts, Kodo, Kyotanabe, Kyoto 610-0395 (Japan); Williamson, Daniel [Molecular Cytogenetics, The Institute of Cancer Research, Sutton SM2 5NG (United Kingdom); Northern Institute for Cancer Research, Paul O' Gorman Building, Medical School, Newcastle University, Framlington Place, Newcastle upon Tyne, NE2 4HH (United Kingdom); Missiaglia, Edoardo; Shipley, Janet [Molecular Cytogenetics, The Institute of Cancer Research, Sutton SM2 5NG (United Kingdom); Murai, Kasumi [MRC Cancer Cell Unit, Hutchison-MRC Research centre, Addenbrooke' s Hospital Cambridge, CB2 0XZ (United Kingdom); Jones, Philip H, E-mail: phj20@cam.ac.uk [MRC Cancer Cell Unit, Hutchison-MRC Research centre, Addenbrooke' s Hospital Cambridge, CB2 0XZ (United Kingdom)

    2013-01-01

    Absract: HES6, a member of the hairy-enhancer-of-split family of transcription factors, plays multiple roles in myogenesis. It is a direct target of the myogenic transcription factor MyoD and has been shown to regulate the formation of the myotome in development, myoblast cell cycle exit and the organization of the actin cytoskeleton during terminal differentiation. Here we investigate the expression and function of HES6 in rhabdomyosarcoma, a soft tissue tumor which expresses myogenic genes but fails to differentiate into muscle. We show that HES6 is expressed at high levels in the subset of alveolar rhabdomyosarcomas expressing PAX/FOXO1 fusion genes (ARMSp). Knockdown of HES6 mRNA in the ARMSp cell line RH30 reduces proliferation and cell motility. This phenotype is rescued by expression of mouse Hes6 which is insensitive to HES6 siRNA. Furthermore, expression microarray analysis indicates that the HES6 knockdown is associated with a decrease in the levels of Transgelin, (TAGLN), a regulator of the actin cytoskeleton. Knockdown of TAGLN decreases cell motility, whilst TAGLN overexpression rescues the motility defect resulting from HES6 knockdown. These findings indicate HES6 contributes to the pathogenesis of ARMSp by enhancing both proliferation and cell motility.

  4. Paediatric nasopharyngeal rhabdomyosarcoma: a case series and literature review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Healy, J.N.; Borg, M.F.

    2010-01-01

    Full text: Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) is the most common soft tissue tumour in children, with the head and neck region accounting for 35-40% of cases. Nasopharyngeal RMSs tend to grow rapidly and invade adjacent structures. Both the intergroup Rhabdomyosarcoma studies and the European Studies have established that the ideal management of this disease is multimodal, using a combination of surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy. This case series examines the role of radiotherapy in the management of paediatric nasopharyngeal RMSs, with particular reference to long-term morbidity and disease-free survival. The cases of five children with nasopharyngeal RMS were reviewed and a systematic review of the literature contained in the PubMed databases was conducted to establish 24 individually detailed cases. Management in all patients was multimodal, using a combination of chemotherapy, radiotherapy as well as surgery. External beam radiotherapy is an integral component of treatment for nasopharyngeal RMSs. With more patients surviving for longer periods, more long-term sequelae of radiotherapy have been reported. Complications include sensorineural deafness, endocrine manifestations following radiation of the pituitary gland, cranial nerve palsies, second malignancies within the radiation field, cataract formation, retinopathy and growth disturbance. Morbidity from radiotherapy may be considerable and depends on the field and dose of radiation. Current advances in radiotherapy are aimed at improving the rate of tumour control and reducing such complications. Recent improvements in imaging and conformal techniques have the potential to reduce the morbidity associated with radiotherapy in this cohort.

  5. Three dimensional conformal radiation therapy in pediatric parameningeal rhabdomyosarcomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michalski, Jeff M.; Harms, William B.; Purdy, James A.; Sur, Ranjan K.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: We evaluated the utility of three dimensional (3D) treatment planning in the management of children with parameningeal head and neck rhabdomyosarcomas. Methods and Materials: Five children with parameningeal rhabdomyosarcoma were referred for treatment at our radiation oncology center from May 1990 through January 1993. Each patient was evaluated, staged, and treated according to the Intergroup Rhabdomyosarcoma Study. Patients were immobilized and underwent a computed tomography scan with contrast in the treatment position. Tumor and normal tissues were identified with assistance from a diagnostic radiologist and defined in each slice. The patients were then planned and treated with the assistance of a 3D treatment planning system. A second plan was then devised by another physician without the benefit of the 3D volumetric display. The target volumes designed with the 3D system and the two-dimensional (2D) method were then compared. The dosimetric coverage to tumor, tumor plus margin, and normal tissues was also compared with the two methods of treatment planning. Results: The apparent size of the gross tumor volume was underestimated with the conventional 2D planning method relative to the 3D method. When margin was added around the gross tumor to account for microscopic extension of disease in the 2D method, the expected area of coverage improved relative to the 3D method. In each circumstance, the minimum dose that covered the gross tumor was substantially less with the 2D method than with the 3D method. The inadequate dosimetric coverage was especially pronounced when the necessary margin to account for subclinical disease was added. In each case, the 2D plans would have delivered substantial dose to adjacent normal tissues and organs, resulting in a higher incidence of significant complications. Conclusions: 3D conformal radiation therapy has a demonstrated advantage in the treatment of sarcomas of the head and neck. The improved dosimetric coverage

  6. Alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma originating between the fourth and fifth metatarsal--case report and literature review.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Bolger, J C

    2010-09-01

    We report a case of alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma arising between the fourth and fifth metatarsal. A 13-year-old boy presented to outpatients with a history of pain and swelling in the lateral aspect of his left forefoot. Plain radiographs and MRI showed a soft tissue mass displacing the fourth metatarsal. Percutaneous biopsy revealed an alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma. Staging scans showed advanced metastatic disease. The patient was treated with chemotherapy. This highly malignant lesion remains challenging to diagnose, and difficult to treat successfully.

  7. Does negative retroperitoneal CT in adolescents with paratesticular rhabdomyosarcoma preclude the need of retroperitoneal lymph node dissection?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Damazio, Eulalio; Caran, Eliana; Ortiz, Valdemar; Macedo Junior, Antonio

    2011-01-01

    We report on a 16-year-old male with paratesticular rhabdomyosarcoma who underwent retroperitoneal lymph node dissection due to a stage I tumor (normal retroperitoneal computed tomography). The surgical finding was three enlarged nodes, positive for metastatic disease. Patient was referred to adjuvant chemotherapy. This case suggests that the Intergroup Rhabdomyosarcoma Study Group IV protocol is subject to questions regarding adolescents with paratesticular rhabdomyosarcoma, and that negative retroperitoneal CT does not preclude the need of lymph node dissection. (author)

  8. Rhabdomyosarcoma of the Vagina in an Adolescent Girl.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, Geetha; Rajan, Varun; Soman, Lali V

    2017-12-01

    Gynecologic neoplasms are rare in children and represent only less than 5% of all childhood tumors. Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) of the female genital tract of children accounts for only 3.5% of the cases. A 16-year-old adolescent presented with a proliferating growth and foul smelling discharge from her vagina, which, on biopsy was diagnosed as RMS. She received chemotherapy and radiation to the primary site. She is alive in remission at 8 years, and with normal menstrual function. RMS of the vagina is a rare, but highly curable tumor in adolescent girls. Any abnormal vaginal bleeding in girls should be promptly investigated using pelvic examination and appropriate imaging. An organ-preserving approach should be considered in these patients. Copyright © 2017 North American Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Radiosensitivity and thermoresistance of rat RA-2 rhabdomyosarcoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fedorova, E.V.; Trusova, V.D.; Vakhtin, Yu.B.

    1990-01-01

    The data obtained show that clonogenic RA-2T cells are 2-3 times more thermoresistant than clonogenic cells of the original thermosensitive RA-2T strain as estimated by D 0 value upon heating up to 43-45 deg C. After X-irradiation of rat rhabdomyosarcoma, a decrease in the capacity of forming pulmonary colonies is more pronounced in cells of the thermosensitive RA-2 strain cells than in those of the thermoresistant strain RA-2T (D 0 =1.6 Gy and D 0 =2.4 Gy, respectively). In all appearance, within one and the same tumor cell population, the hereditarily thermoresistant cells are more radioresistant than the thermosensitive ones

  10. Tumor oxygenation in a transplanted rat rhabdomyosarcoma during fractionated irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zywietz, Friedrich; Reeker, Wolfram; Kochs, Eberhard

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: To quantify the changes in tumor oxygenation in the course of a fractionated radiation treatment extending over 4 weeks. Methods and Materials: Rhabdomyosarcomas R1H of the rat were irradiated with 60 Co-γ-rays with a total dose of 60 Gy, given in 20 fractions over 4 weeks. Oxygen partial pressure (pO 2 ) in tumors was measured at weekly intervals using polarographic needle probes in combination with a microprocessor-controlled device (pO 2 -Histograph/KIMOC). The pO 2 measurements were carried out in anesthetized animals under mechanical ventilation and in respiratory and hemodynamic steady state. Tumor pO 2 values were correlated to the arterial oxygen pressure p a O 2 , arterial pCO 2 , and pH determined with a blood gas analyzer. Results: Tumor oxygenation did not change significantly during the 3 weeks of irradiation (up to 45 Gy), from a median pO 2 of 23 ± 2 mmHg in untreated controls to 19 ± 4 mmHg after the third week. The decrease of the number of pO 2 values between 0 and 5 mmHg indicated that an improved oxygenation in the tumors occurred. However, with increasing radiation dose (fourth week, 60 Gy) a significant decrease in tumor oxygenation to a median pO 2 of 8 ± 2 mmHg and a rapid increase in the frequency of pO 2 values (35 ± 4%) between 0 and 5 mmHg was found. Conclusion: Improved oxygenation in rhabdomyosarcomas R1H was only present in the early phase of the fractionated irradiation. Radiation doses above 45 Gy led to a considerable decrease of tumor oxygenation in the later phase of irradiation

  11. Surgical Interventions for Advanced Parameningeal Rhabdomyosarcoma of Children and Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Paul J; Iwanaga, Joe; Tubbs, R Shane; Yilmaz, Emre

    2018-01-09

    Owing to its rarity, rhabdomyosarcoma of the head and neck (HNRMS) has seldom been discussed in the literature. As most of the data is based only on the retrospective experiences of tertiary healthcare centers, there are difficulties in formulating a standard treatment protocol. Moreover, the disease is poorly understood at its pathological, genetic, and molecular levels. For instance, 20% of all histological assessment is inaccurate; even an experienced pathologist can confuse rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) with neuroblastoma, Ewing's sarcoma, and lymphoma. RMS can occur sporadically or in association with genetic syndromes associated with predisposition to other cancers such as Li-Fraumeni syndrome and neurofibromatosis type 1 (von Recklinghausen disease). Such associations have a potential role in future gene therapies but are yet to be fully confirmed. Currently, chemotherapies are ineffective in advanced or metastatic disease and there is lack of targeted chemotherapy or biological therapy against RMS. Also, reported uses of chemotherapy for RMS have not produced reasonable responses in all cases. Despite numerous molecular and biological studies during the past three decades, the chemotherapeutic regimen remains unchanged. This vincristine, actinomycin, cyclophosphamide (VAC) regime, described in Kilman, et al. (1973) and Koop, et al. (1963), has achieved limited success in controlling the progression of RMS. Thus, the pathogenesis of RMS remains poorly understood despite extensive modern trials and more than 30 years of studies exploring the chemotherapeutic options. This suggests a need to explore surgical options for managing the disease. Surgery is the single most critical therapy for pediatric HNRMS. However, very few studies have explored the surgical management of pediatric HNRMS and there is no standard surgical protocol. The aim of this review is to explore and address such issues in the hope of maximizing the number of options available for young patients

  12. Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy With Dose Painting to Treat Rhabdomyosarcoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Joanna C.; Dharmarajan, Kavita V.; Wexler, Leonard H.; La Quaglia, Michael P.; Happersett, Laura; Wolden, Suzanne L.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To examine local control and patterns of failure in rhabdomyosarcoma patients treated with intensity modulated radiation therapy (RT) with dose painting (DP-IMRT). Patients and Methods: A total of 41 patients underwent DP-IMRT with chemotherapy for definitive treatment. Nineteen also underwent surgery with or without intraoperative RT. Fifty-six percent had alveolar histologic features. The median interval from beginning chemotherapy to RT was 17 weeks (range, 4-25). Very young children who underwent second-look procedures with or without intraoperative RT received reduced doses of 24-36 Gy in 1.4-1.8-Gy fractions. Young adults received 50.4 Gy to the primary tumor and lower doses of 36 Gy in 1.8-Gy fractions to at-risk lymph node chains. Results: With 22 months of median follow-up, the actuarial local control rate was 90%. Patients aged ≤7 years who received reduced overall and fractional doses had 100% local control, and young adults had 79% (P=.07) local control. Three local failures were identified in young adults whose primary target volumes had received 50.4 Gy in 1.8-Gy fractions. Conclusions: DP-IMRT with lower fractional and cumulative doses is feasible for very young children after second-look procedures with or without intraoperative RT. DP-IMRT is also feasible in adolescents and young adults with aggressive disease who would benefit from prophylactic RT to high-risk lymph node chains, although dose escalation might be warranted for improved local control. With limited follow-up, it appears that DP-IMRT produces local control rates comparable to those of sequential IMRT in patients with rhabdomyosarcoma.

  13. A Case Report of Cervical Rhabdomyosarcoma with the Complaint of a Mass Protrusion from Vagina with Bleeding and Vaginal Discharge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Arab

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Botyroide sarcoma is one of the rhabdomyosarcoma which is usually seen in infant's vagina. However, it rarely originates from uterine cervix. Rhabdomyosarcoma is a heterogenic tumor and it is usually diagnosed in second decade of life.Case Report: The patient was a 17 years old virgin girl with the complaint of a mass protrusion from vagina with bleeding and vaginal discharge. Biopsy samples and immunohistochemistry assessments showed embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma. Surgery combined with chemotherapy, significantly increased the survival of patients with uterine cervical rhabdomyosarcoma. Conclusion: The patient underwent radical hysterectomy with restored ovaries and then combined chemotherapy. In the 9 months follow up recurrence has not been observed yet.

  14. Diagnostic power and pitfalls of intraoperative consultation (frozen section) in rhabdomyosarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurtulan, Olcay; Kösemehmetoğlu, Kemal

    2015-01-01

    Intraoperative consultation plays an important role in the management of soft tissue sarcomas, such as rhabdomyosarcoma. In this study, we aimed to draw attention to the important points during frozen section interpretation, and analyse the accuracy of frozen diagnosis in rhabdomyosarcoma patients. The cases, both diagnosed as rhabdomyosarcoma or followed with a history of rhabdomyosarcoma, and interpreted with intraoperative consultation (frozen section) between 2000 and 2013 were culled from pathology archives. The diagnoses were confirmed by desmin and myogenin, immunohistochemically. The frozen and final diagnoses were noted of 21 biopsy specimens of 19 patients. Sensitivity and specificity of intraoperative consultation were calculated regarding to the major diagnostic discrepancies leading to a change in surgical management of the patient, after exclusion of the cases deferred to paraffin section. Of the evaluated 21 biopsy material, 3 (14%) were misdiagnosed: Of the 2 false negative embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma cases, sample was not representative of the tumor, and there was chemo/radiotherapy induced changes in the other case. In the only false positively diagnosed case with a known history of rhabdomyosarcoma, inflammatory cells were misinterpreted as small round cell neoplasm. In 5 (29%) of 21 biopsies, a frozen diagnosis could not be given, and the diagnosis was deferred. Six cases (29%) were evaluated with cytological squash or imprint preparation; none of the misdiagnosed cases was evaluated with adjunct cytological preparation. Six of 8 misdiagnosed or deferred biopsies showed morphological changes secondary to radiotherapy and/or chemotherapy. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value were calculated as 85%, 67%, 92% and 50%, respectively. Intraoperative consultation for rhabdomyosarcoma is a reliable tool with high sensitivity and fair specificity. Cases with treatment effect may lead to diagnostic difficulties

  15. Rhabdomyosarcoma of children in the head and neck : CT and MR finding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Byung Kwan; Kim, In One; Kim, Woo Sun; Han, Sang Wook; Kim, Hyun Beom; Yeon, Myung Mo

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate radiologic findings of rhabdomyosarcoma of children in the head and neck concerning the origin, morphologic characteristics, extent, and the route of intracranial extension on CT and MR. Twenty cases of pathologically proven rhabdomyosarcoma were analyzed. Fifteen CT scans (postcontrast CT (n=13), precontrast CT (n=2)) and eleven MR scans were obtained. Postcontrast MR scans were performed in the ten cases. Six cases had CT and MR scans. Nine cases had only CT scan and five had only MR scans. We retrospectively analyzed the origin, morphologic characteristics (attenuation, signal intensity, margin), extent,intracranial extension, route and clinical staging of rhabdomyosarcoma on CT and MR scans. Rhabdomyosarcoma of children in the head and neck tends to show relatively severe bony destruction of skull base and various intracranial extension routes can be helpful radiologic findings on the CT or MR scan although its CT density or signal intensity of MR was not specific. And it is peculiar that infratempral fossa was the most common site of origin of rhabdomyosarcoma. (author). 28 refs., 2 tabs., 5 figs

  16. Alveolar Rhabdomyosarcoma of the foot metastasizing to the Iris: report of a rare case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fabian, Ido Didi; Hildebrand, G. Darius; Wilson, Shaun; Foord, Tina; Sagoo, Mandeep S.

    2016-01-01

    Intraocular iris rhabdomyosarcoma is extremely rare, and in the 3 cases reported to date occurred as the primary site of tumour growth. We report a case of rhabdomyosarcoma of the foot metastasizing to the iris. An 18-year-old white female was referred to the London Ocular Oncology Service for management of a metastatic rhabdomyosarcomatous deposit in the iris, a metastasis from alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma of the foot. She was diagnosed nearly 2 years earlier with the primary sarcoma with extensive systemic spread and treated by resection of the foot lesion and chemotherapy, and achieved a partial remission. The left iris deposit was noted while she was receiving systemic chemotherapy, heralding a relapse. However, anterior uveitis and raised intraocular pressure developed and she was referred to our service for further management. A left iris secondary rhabdomyosarcoma deposit was noticed and in addition a lacrimal gland mass, as indicated by ultrasound B scan of the eye and orbit. The patient was treated with external beam radiotherapy to the globe and orbit, but died 2 months after treatment completion. Rhabdomyosarcoma of the iris is very rare and was previously documented only as a primary malignancy in this location. We report that secondary spread to the iris can also occur, in this case as the first sign of widely disseminated systemic relapse

  17. Adult Rhabdomyosarcoma Survival Improved With Treatment on Multimodality Protocols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerber, Naamit Kurshan; Wexler, Leonard H.; Singer, Samuel; Alektiar, Kaled M.; Keohan, Mary Louise; Shi, Weiji; Zhang, Zhigang; Wolden, Suzanne

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) is a pediatric sarcoma rarely occurring in adults. For unknown reasons, adults with RMS have worse outcomes than do children. Methods and Materials: We analyzed data from all patients who presented to Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center between 1990 and 2011 with RMS diagnosed at age 16 or older. One hundred forty-eight patients met the study criteria. Ten were excluded for lack of adequate data. Results: The median age was 28 years. The histologic diagnoses were as follows: embryonal 54%, alveolar 33%, pleomorphic 12%, and not otherwise specified 2%. The tumor site was unfavorable in 67% of patients. Thirty-three patients (24%) were at low risk, 61 (44%) at intermediate risk, and 44 (32%) at high risk. Forty-six percent were treated on or according to a prospective RMS protocol. The 5-year rate of overall survival (OS) was 45% for patients with nonmetastatic disease. The failure rates at 5 years for patients with nonmetastatic disease were 34% for local failure and 42% for distant failure. Among patients with nonmetastatic disease (n=94), significant factors associated with OS were histologic diagnosis, site, risk group, age, and protocol treatment. On multivariate analysis, risk group and protocol treatment were significant after adjustment for age. The 5-year OS was 54% for protocol patients versus 36% for nonprotocol patients. Conclusions: Survival in adult patients with nonmetastatic disease was significantly improved for those treated on RMS protocols, most of which are now open to adults

  18. Adult Rhabdomyosarcoma Survival Improved With Treatment on Multimodality Protocols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerber, Naamit Kurshan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Wexler, Leonard H. [Department of Pediatrics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Singer, Samuel [Department of Surgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Alektiar, Kaled M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Keohan, Mary Louise [Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Shi, Weiji; Zhang, Zhigang [Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Wolden, Suzanne, E-mail: woldens@mskcc.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)

    2013-05-01

    Purpose: Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) is a pediatric sarcoma rarely occurring in adults. For unknown reasons, adults with RMS have worse outcomes than do children. Methods and Materials: We analyzed data from all patients who presented to Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center between 1990 and 2011 with RMS diagnosed at age 16 or older. One hundred forty-eight patients met the study criteria. Ten were excluded for lack of adequate data. Results: The median age was 28 years. The histologic diagnoses were as follows: embryonal 54%, alveolar 33%, pleomorphic 12%, and not otherwise specified 2%. The tumor site was unfavorable in 67% of patients. Thirty-three patients (24%) were at low risk, 61 (44%) at intermediate risk, and 44 (32%) at high risk. Forty-six percent were treated on or according to a prospective RMS protocol. The 5-year rate of overall survival (OS) was 45% for patients with nonmetastatic disease. The failure rates at 5 years for patients with nonmetastatic disease were 34% for local failure and 42% for distant failure. Among patients with nonmetastatic disease (n=94), significant factors associated with OS were histologic diagnosis, site, risk group, age, and protocol treatment. On multivariate analysis, risk group and protocol treatment were significant after adjustment for age. The 5-year OS was 54% for protocol patients versus 36% for nonprotocol patients. Conclusions: Survival in adult patients with nonmetastatic disease was significantly improved for those treated on RMS protocols, most of which are now open to adults.

  19. Advanced Orofacial Rhabdomyosarcoma: A Retrospective Study of 31 Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Otmani, Naima

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS is the most common soft tissue sarcoma encountered in childhood and adolescence. Early diagnosis of pediatric cases is critical to improving outcomes, especially when socioeconomic status and geographical access to specialist services can reduce opportunities for early cancer detection and treatment. Objective The objective of this study is to determine factors that can delay referral and treatment in specialist pediatric oncology center upon our population specificities. Methods This retrospective study involved 31 children between 2003 and 2013. Children affected by histologically confirmed RMS occurring as a primary lesion in the orofacial area were included. Results The median age was 8 ± 4.22 years (range: 3 months – 15 years. The male to female ratio was 1.8:1. Most of the patients had advanced stage disease at presentation (81.7% group had 3–4 pretreatment staging with parameningeal involvement in 80.6% of the cases. The 2-year event-free survival rate was 17.7 ± 7.8% for all the patients. Delay of admission to our unit and abandonment of treatment seem to be important factors for the dismal prognosis. Conclusion Patient's location, socioeconomic status and health care coverage have had an impact on longer delays in seeking care and on follow-up. More studies are needed for implementation of a better management practices and a better supportive care upon specificities of our population.

  20. Advanced Orofacial Rhabdomyosarcoma: A Retrospective Study of 31 Cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otmani, Naima; Khattab, Mohamed

    2016-07-01

    Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) is the most common soft tissue sarcoma encountered in childhood and adolescence. Early diagnosis of pediatric cases is critical to improving outcomes, especially when socioeconomic status and geographical access to specialist services can reduce opportunities for early cancer detection and treatment. The objective of this study is to determine factors that can delay referral and treatment in specialist pediatric oncology center upon our population specificities. This retrospective study involved 31 children between 2003 and 2013. Children affected by histologically confirmed RMS occurring as a primary lesion in the orofacial area were included. The median age was 8 ± 4.22 years (range: 3 months - 15 years). The male to female ratio was 1.8:1. Most of the patients had advanced stage disease at presentation (81.7% group had 3-4 pretreatment staging) with parameningeal involvement in 80.6% of the cases. The 2-year event-free survival rate was 17.7 ± 7.8% for all the patients. Delay of admission to our unit and abandonment of treatment seem to be important factors for the dismal prognosis. Patient's location, socioeconomic status and health care coverage have had an impact on longer delays in seeking care and on follow-up. More studies are needed for implementation of a better management practices and a better supportive care upon specificities of our population.

  1. The impact of radiotherapy on clinical outcomes in parameningeal rhabdomyosarcoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Yun Seon; Lim, Do Hoon [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    Radiotherapy (RT) is considered a mainstay of treatment in parameningeal rhabdomyosarcoma (PM-RMS). We aim to determine the treatment outcomes and prognostic factors for PM-RMS patients who treated with RT. In addition, we tried to evaluate the adequate dose and timing of RT. Twenty-two patients with PM-RMS from 1995 to 2013 were evaluated. Seven patients had intracranial extension (ICE) and 17 patients had skull base bony erosion (SBBE). Five patients showed distant metastases at the time of diagnosis. All patients underwent chemotherapy and RT. The median radiation dose was 50.4 Gy (range, 40.0 to 56.0 Gy). The median follow-up was 28.7 months. Twelve patients (54.5%) experienced failure after treatment; 4 local, 2 regional, and 6 distant failures. The 5-year local control (LC) and overall survival (OS) were 77.7% and 38.5%, respectively. The 5-year OS rate was 50.8% for patients without distant metastases and 0% for patients with metastases (p < 0.001). Radiation dose (<50 Gy vs. ≥50 Gy) did not compromise the LC (p = 0.645). However, LC was affected by ICE (p = 0.031). Delayed administration (>22 weeks) of RT was related to a higher rate of local failure (40.0%). RT resulted in a higher rate of local control in PM-RMS. However, it was not extended to survival outcome. A more effective treatment for PM-RMS is warranted.

  2. [Orbital alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma masked by ethmoid sinusitis in a 25-year-old].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanz-Marco, E; España, E; Alamar, A; Pérez-Rojas, J; López-Prats, M J; Díaz-Llopis, M

    2014-05-01

    A 25-year-old woman with right subacute sinusitis, complained about discomfort in her right eye. Clinical manifestations and computed tomography were suggestive of sub-periosteal orbital ethmoid wall abscess, for which the patient underwent urgent drainage. A solid tumor was found, with a positive biopsy for alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma. Complete remission and resolution of orbital symptoms were achieved with chemotherapy and radiation therapy. Alveolar orbital rhabdomyosarcoma in adults is uncommon. Rhabdomyosarcoma has a high risk of spreading. It can simulate a sinusitis, as in our patient, early diagnosis and early treatment being especially important in these patients. Copyright © 2010 Sociedad Española de Oftalmología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  3. Rhabdomyosarcoma of the trachea: first reported case treated with proton beam therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exley, R; Bernstein, J M; Brennan, B; Rothera, M P

    2012-09-01

    We report a case of rhabdomyosarcoma of the trachea in a 14-month-old child, and we present the first reported use of proton beam therapy for this tumour. A 14-month-old girl presented acutely with a seven-day history of biphasic stridor. Emergency endoscopic debulking of a posterior tracheal mass was undertaken. Histological examination revealed an embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma with anaplasia. Multimodality therapy with surgery and chemotherapy was administered in the UK, and proton beam therapy in the USA. Only three cases of rhabdomyosarcoma of the trachea have previously been reported in the world literature. This is the first reported case of treatment of this tumour with proton beam therapy. Compared with conventional radiotherapy, proton beam therapy may confer improved long-term outcome in children, with benefits including reduced irradiation of the spinal cord.

  4. Systemic rhabdomyosarcoma presenting as leukemia: case report with ultrastructural study and reviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huntrakoon, M; Callaway, L A; Vergara, G G

    1987-08-01

    A 20-year-old white male was initially suspected clinically and pathologically of having an acute lymphoblastic leukemic process because of fatigue, severe anemia, thrombocytopenia, a leuko-erythroblastic peripheral blood picture, and a diffusely infiltrated bone marrow. Subsequent review of the bone marrow material indicated cytologic features consistent with either an embryonal, undifferentiated small cell mesenchymal malignancy or reticulo-endothelial malignancy. Ultimately, the electron microscopic (EM) study of the tumor proved to be diagnostic of rhabdomyosarcoma. An extensive search for a primary site of rhabdomyosarcoma did not show any lesion, although the genitourinary region was clinically suspected. The clinical course was a rapidly downhill one with extensive bone and CNS involvement. The patient died 5 months later. An autopsy permit was not obtained. This case emphasizes the occasional tendency of rhabdomyosarcoma to masquerade as a hematopoietic malignancy at the time of presentation and the usefulness of EM study in confirming a diagnosis.

  5. Synchronous rhabdomyosarcoma of the testis and kidney: A case report and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babatunde M. Duduyemi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Rhabdomyosarcoma is the commonest soft tissue sarcoma in both children and adolescents representing 40% of such tumours in North America and more than 50% in Africa. The involvement of the paratesticular tissue, testis and the kidney are generally rare and more so when it is occurring synchronously. We present a case of 22 year old male with inguinoscrotal swelling, fever and abdominal distention who was diagnosed as having obstructed left inguinoscrotal hernia and a right renal mass. The patient had surgery, and a diagnosis of synchronous rhabdomyosarcoma of the left testis, paratesticular tissue and right kidney was made by histology and immunohistochemistry.

  6. Un caso inusual de rabdomiosarcoma An unusual case of rhabdomyosarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caridad Verdecia Cañizares

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Los sarcomas de partes blandas aparecen a cualquier edad, aunque son más frecuentes en la cuarta década de la vida. Se denominan así a aquellos tumores que se originan en las estructuras que soportan el cuerpo o envuelven los órganos y tejidos, y es el rabdomiosarcoma el tumor de partes blandas más frecuente en edad pediátrica. Es rara la condición de intratabilidad, mientras que son frecuentes las recaídas tempranas y tardías después del tratamiento. Presentamos un caso de una paciente diagnosticada en etapa de recién nacida con una mala respuesta al tratamiento, con progresión en el curso de este (algo no habitual, pues, generalmente, existe una buena respuesta inicial y después puede haber recaídas.The soft parts sarcomas appear in any age, although are more frequent in the fourth decade of life. Are called in this way, those tumors originating in structures supporting the body or surrounding the organs and tissues and it is the rhabdomyosarcoma the more frequent soft parts tumor present in children. It is uncommon the irritability whereas the early and late relapses are frequent. This is the case of a patient diagnosed in the newborn stage with a poor response to treatment and progression during its course (something unusual, since generally, there is a good initial response and afterwards may be relapses.

  7. Parameningeal rhabdomyosarcoma (including the orbit): results of orbital irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jereb, B.; Haik, B.G.; Ong, R.; Ghavimi, F.

    1985-01-01

    Twenty-three patients with parameningeal (including orbital rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS)) were treated at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC) between July 1971 and January 1983. Twenty were children with a mean age of 6 and 3 were adults. In 6 patients, the primary tumor was from the orbit, whereas the remaining 17 had other parameningeal primary sites. The tumors were in a very progressive local stage, with extensive destruction of the facial bones in 19 patients. Eight patients were treated with T2 chemotherapy protocol and 15 received T6. Seven patients received 5,000 to 7,200 rad delivered to the primary tumor in 11-16 weeks, 15 patients received between 4,500 to 5,000 rad in 4-7 weeks, and 1 patient received 3,000 rad in 3 weeks for residual microscopic disease following surgery. Two patients were treated with radiation to the whole brain; no patients received radiation of the whole central nervous axis (CNA). Fifteen of the 23 patients (65%) are alive and well with a medical follow-up time of 5 years. Two patients died of therapeutic complications and six died of tumor spread. In five patients, involvement of the central nervous system (CNS) was the cause of death. The prognosis of orbital RMS with parameningeal involvement is no better than in other tumors of parameningeal sites. In those patients who had impaired vision because of optic nerve damage prior to treatment, the vision did not improve following treatment. There was no impaired vision seen due to radiation damage of eye structures except in the lens

  8. Proton Radiotherapy for Parameningeal Rhabdomyosarcoma: Clinical Outcomes and Late Effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Childs, Stephanie K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Kozak, Kevin R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Wisconsin Cancer Center Johnson Creek, Madison, WI (United States); Friedmann, Alison M. [Department of Pediatric Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Yeap, Beow Y. [Department of Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Adams, Judith; MacDonald, Shannon M.; Liebsch, Norbert J.; Tarbell, Nancy J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Yock, Torunn I., E-mail: tyock@partners.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To report the clinical outcome and late side effect profile of proton radiotherapy in the treatment of children with parameningeal rhabdomyosarcoma (PM-RMS). Methods and Materials: Seventeen consecutive children with PM-RMS were treated with proton radiotherapy at Massachusetts General Hospital between 1996 and 2005. We reviewed the medical records of all patients and asked referring physicians to report specific side effects of interest. Results: Median patient age at diagnosis was 3.4 years (range, 0.4-17.6). Embryonal (n = 11), alveolar (n = 4), and undifferentiated (n = 2) histologies were represented. Ten patients (59%) had intracranial extension. Median prescribed dose was 50.4 cobalt gray equivalents (GyRBE) (range, 50.4-56.0 GyRBE) delivered in 1.8-2.0-GyRBE daily fractions. Median follow-up was 5.0 years for survivors. The 5-year failure-free survival estimate was 59% (95% confidence interval, 33-79%), and overall survival estimate was 64% (95% confidence interval, 37-82%). Among the 7 patients who failed, sites of first recurrence were local only (n = 2), regional only (n = 2), distant only (n = 2), and local and distant (n = 1). Late effects related to proton radiotherapy in the 10 recurrence-free patients (median follow-up, 5 years) include failure to maintain height velocity (n = 3), endocrinopathies (n = 2), mild facial hypoplasia (n = 7), failure of permanent tooth eruption (n = 3), dental caries (n = 5), and chronic nasal/sinus congestion (n = 2). Conclusions: Proton radiotherapy for patients with PM-RMS yields tumor control and survival comparable to that in historical controls with similar poor prognostic factors. Furthermore, rates of late effects from proton radiotherapy compare favorably to published reports of photon-treated cohorts.

  9. Building the bridge between rhabdomyosarcoma in children, adolescents and young adults : The road ahead

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Gaal, J. Carlijn; De Bont, Eveline S. J. M.; Kaal, Suzanne E. J.; Versleijen-Jonkers, Yvonne; van der Graaf, Winette T. A.

    Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) is a rare type of soft tissue sarcoma that mainly affects children, but also occurs in adolescents and (young) adults (AYA). Despite dramatic survival improvements reported by international study groups in children over the past decades, the awareness of a dismal outcome for

  10. Alveolar Rhabdomyosarcoma in a 69-Year-Old Woman Receiving Glucagon-Like Peptide-2 Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura E. Zyczynski

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A 69-year-old woman was diagnosed with alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma (ARMS of the nasopharynx. She has a history of catastrophic thromboembolic event in the abdomen that caused short-gut syndrome and dependence on total parenteral nutrition (TPN twelve hours per day. She was treated for short-gut syndrome with teduglutide, a glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2 analog, which led to reduction of TPN requirements. However, a few months later, she developed metastatic alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma. Though a causative relationship is unlikely between the peptide and ARMS due to the brief time course between teduglutide therapy and sarcoma diagnosis, neoplastic growth may have been accelerated by the GLP-2 analog, causing release of IGF-1. The transmembrane receptor for IGF-1 is frequently overexpressed in ARMS and is implicated in cell proliferation and metastatic behavior. This case describes a rare incidence of metastatic alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma in a sexagenarian and possibly the first case reported associated with the use of teduglutide. Teduglutide was discontinued due to a potential theoretical risk of acceleration of sarcoma growth, and the patient’s rhabdomyosarcoma is in remission following sarcoma chemotherapy.

  11. Oral rehabilitation with implant-based prostheses of two adult patients treated for childhood rhabdomyosarcoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korfage, Anke; Stellingsma, Kees; Jansma, Johan; Vissink, Arjan; Raghoebar, Gerry M.

    Background Rhabdomyosarcoma is the most common malignant tumor in the nasal and paranasal sinus area at childhood. Multimodal treatment for this disorder has severe side effects due to normal tissue damage. As a result of this treatment, facial growth retardation and oral abnormalities such as

  12. Laryngeal embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma in an adult - A case presentation in the eyes of geneticists and clinicians

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kukwa, Wojciech; Wojtowicz, Piotr; Jagielska, Beata; Sobczyk, Grzegorz; Kukwa, Andrzej; Czarnecka, Anna M

    2011-01-01

    Rhabdomyosarcoma is a solid tumor, resulting from dysregulation of the skeletal myogenesis program. For rhabdomyosarcomas (RMS) with a predilection for the head and neck, genitourinary tract, extremities, trunk, retroperitoneum, the larynx is still an unusual site. Till now only several cases of this laryngeal tumor have been described in world literature in the adult population. The entire spectrum of genetic factors underlying RMS development and progression is unclear until today. Multiple signaling pathways seem to be involved in ERMS development and progression. In this paper we report an interesting RMS case in which the disease was located within the glottic region. We report an embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma of the larynx in 33 year-old man. After unsuccessful chemotherapy hemilaryngectomy was performed. In follow up CT no signs of recurrence were found. Recently patient is recurrence free for 62 months. Considering the histological diagnosis and the highly aggressive nature of the lesion for optimal diagnosis positron electron tomography (PET) and computerized tomography (CT) of the neck and thorax should be performed. At this time surgical treatment with adjuvant radiotherapy seems to be the treatment of choice for this disease. Rhabdomyosarcoma of the larynx has a better prognosis than elsewhere in the body, probably because of its earlier recognition and accessibility to radical surgery

  13. CHROMOSOMAL SUBLOCALIZATION OF THE 2 13 TRANSLOCATION BREAKPOINT IN ALVEOLAR RHABDOMYOSARCOMA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SHAPIRO, DN; VALENTINE, MB; SUBLETT, JE; SINCLAIR, AE; TEREBA, AM; SCHEFFER, H; BUYS, CHCM; LOOK, AT

    A characteristic balanced reciprocal chromosomal translocation [t(2;13)(q35;q14)] has been identified in more than 50% of alveolar rhabdomyosarcomas. As the first step in characterization of the genes involved in this translocation, we constructed somatic cell hybrids that retained either the

  14. Evolving strategies in the treatment of childhood rhabdomyosarcoma. Slovenian experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pohar-Marinsek, Z.; Anzic, J.; Jereb, B.

    2001-01-01

    Background. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy (Cht) has changed the treatment of rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) in children. The purpose of our study was to review the children treated for RMS between 1974 and 1996. Patients and methods. Fifty-one children, 1-15 years old, were included. Primary sites of tumour were: head and neck 15, orbit 6, genitourinary 12, extremity 9, torso 5 and paratesticular 4. Twelve patients were in stage I, 10 in stage II, 26 in stage III and 3 in stage IV. Of 43 histologically confirmed RMS 25 were embryonal, 13 alveolar, 1 botryoid, 1 spindle cell and 3 sarcoma NOS. In 8 patients, only fine needle aspiration biopsy (FNAB) was available. All patients had Cht, 29 neoadjuvant, 20 had surgery first, 40 had irradiation (RT), 2 stage IV patients had bone marrow transplant (ABMT). Multidrug Cht varied: VCR, AMD, and cyclophosphamide (VAC) were used in the 1970s, with Adriablastine (T2), methotrexat (MTX) and/or other drugs (T6, T11) in the 1980s, and in the 1990s, cyclophosphamide was replaced by ifosfamide (VAIA). The treatment was started with Cht in orbital and head and neck tumours and in the majority of genitourinary tumours, but surgery was first in paratesticular and in the majority of extremity tumours. Results. The 3 patients with stage IV disease died. Of those with localised tumour, 34 (70%) were alive and well 5 years after treatment, 80% stage I, 75% stage II and 61% stage III. One patient died of heart failure, 3 of Cht toxicity and 1 of intercurrent disease. Conclusions. The survival of our patients has improved during the last 2 decades and increased from 57 % to 70 % for patients treated after 1985. It is now comparable to that in other centres. With the introduction of neoadjuvant Cht, surgery and RT have become more conservative and could sometimes even be abandoned, thereby reducing considerably the risk of late sequels. Orbital, genitourinary and paratesticular embryonal RMS of low stages have very good prognosis. Primary tumours of the

  15. Store-operated Ca{sup 2+} entry in rhabdomyosarcoma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmid, Evi, E-mail: Evi.Schmid@med.uni-tuebingen.de [Department of Pediatric Surgery & Pediatric Urology, Eberhard-Karls-University, Hoppe-Seyler Straße 3, 72076, Tuebingen (Germany); Stagno, Matias Julian [Department of Pediatric Surgery & Pediatric Urology, Eberhard-Karls-University, Hoppe-Seyler Straße 3, 72076, Tuebingen (Germany); Yan, Jing [Department of Cardiology & Vascular Medicine and Physiology, Eberhard-Karls-University, Gmelinstr.5/Otfried-Mueller-Str.10, 72076, Tuebingen (Germany); Stournaras, Christos [Department of Biochemistry, University of Crete Medical School, GR-71003, Heraklion, Crete (Greece); Lang, Florian [Department of Cardiology & Vascular Medicine and Physiology, Eberhard-Karls-University, Gmelinstr.5/Otfried-Mueller-Str.10, 72076, Tuebingen (Germany); Fuchs, Jörg [Department of Pediatric Surgery & Pediatric Urology, Eberhard-Karls-University, Hoppe-Seyler Straße 3, 72076, Tuebingen (Germany); Seitz, Guido [Department of Pediatric Surgery & Pediatric Urology, Eberhard-Karls-University, Hoppe-Seyler Straße 3, 72076, Tuebingen (Germany); Department of Pediatric Surgery, University Hospital Marburg, Marburg (Germany)

    2016-08-12

    Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS), the most common pediatric soft tissue sarcoma, has an intrinsic or early-acquisition of resistance to chemo- and radiation therapy. Molecular determinants pivotal for RMS migration, metastatic invasion, cell proliferation, and survival are incompletely identified. Migration and cell proliferation were shown to correlate with cytosolic Ca{sup 2+} activity ([Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}). Store-operated Ca{sup 2+}-entry (SOCE) that increases intracellular [Ca{sup 2+}] is accomplished by Orai1, a pore-forming ion channel unit, the expression of which is stimulated by the transcription factor NFκB. The present study explored the expression of Orai1 and its regulators STIM1 and NFκB in human rhabdomyosarcoma cell lines and analyzed their impact on cell proliferation and migration. For the study human rhabdomyosarcoma cell lines RD (embryonal) and RH30 (alveolar) were analyzed for Orai1, STIM1, and NFκB transcription by RT-PCR and their corresponding proteins in Western blot. [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} was detected via Fura-2 fluorescence and SOCE – resulting from [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} increase following store depletion with extracellular Ca{sup 2+} removal and inhibition of the sarcoendoplasmatic reticular Ca{sup 2+} ATPase – detected with thapsigargin. Cell migration was analyzed in transwell and mitotic cell death with the clonogenic assay. In summary, Orai1, STIM1, and NFκB are expressed in embryonal (RD) and alveolar (RH30) rhabdomyosarcoma. SOCE inhibitor BTP2, Orai1 inhibitor 2-APB, or NFκB inhibitor wogonin virtually abrogated (BTP2, 2-APB) or significantly reduced (wogonin) SOCE. Moreover, SOCE inhibitors 2-APB and BTP2 and wogonin significantly inhibited migration and proliferation of both, RD and RH30 cells. These results suggest that Orai1 signaling is involved in SOCE into rhabdomyosarcoma cells thus contributing to migration, invasion and proliferation. - Highlights: • Orai1, STIM1, and NFκB are expressed in RD and RH30 rhabdomyosarcoma

  16. Inhibition of connective tissue growth factor (CTGF/CCN2) expression decreases the survival and myogenic differentiation of human rhabdomyosarcoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croci, Stefania; Landuzzi, Lorena; Astolfi, Annalisa; Nicoletti, Giordano; Rosolen, Angelo; Sartori, Francesca; Follo, Matilde Y; Oliver, Noelynn; De Giovanni, Carla; Nanni, Patrizia; Lollini, Pier-Luigi

    2004-03-01

    Connective tissue growth factor (CTGF/CCN2), a cysteine-rich protein of the CCN (Cyr61, CTGF, Nov) family of genes, emerged from a microarray screen of genes expressed by human rhabdomyosarcoma cells. Rhabdomyosarcoma is a soft tissue sarcoma of childhood deriving from skeletal muscle cells. In this study, we investigated the role of CTGF in rhabdomyosarcoma. Human rhabdomyosarcoma cells of the embryonal (RD/12, RD/18, CCA) and the alveolar histotype (RMZ-RC2, SJ-RH4, SJ-RH30), rhabdomyosarcoma tumor specimens, and normal skeletal muscle cells expressed CTGF. To determine the function of CTGF, we treated rhabdomyosarcoma cells with a CTGF antisense oligonucleotide or with a CTGF small interfering RNA (siRNA). Both treatments inhibited rhabdomyosarcoma cell growth, suggesting the existence of a new autocrine loop based on CTGF. CTGF antisense oligonucleotide-mediated growth inhibition was specifically due to a significant increase in apoptosis, whereas cell proliferation was unchanged. CTGF antisense oligonucleotide induced a strong decrease in the level of myogenic differentiation of rhabdomyosarcoma cells, whereas the addition of recombinant CTGF significantly increased the proportion of myosin-positive cells. CTGF emerges as a survival and differentiation factor and could be a new therapeutic target in human rhabdomyosarcoma.

  17. Incidence of meningeal involvement by rhabdomyosarcoma of the head and neck in children. A report of the Intergroup Rhabdomyosarcoma Study (IRS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tefft, M.; Fernandez, C.; Donaldson, M.; Newton, W.; Moon, T.E.

    1978-01-01

    One hundred and forty-one patients with embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) of the head and neck are reviewed. 57/141 had lesions of para-meningeal sites. 20/57 (35%) developed evidence of direct meningeal extension. 18/20 (90%) died of this complication. Radiation portals and doses were limited in 42% and 32%, respectively. All patients had chemotherapy for 6 weeks prior to radiation. The significance of the adequacy of radiation factors and the timing of chemotherapy are reviewed. Recommendations for managing these patients include earlier use of radiation and increased coverage of adjacent meninges by radiation including total craniospinal axis radiation when brain meningeal involvement exists

  18. Rhabdomyosarcoma in a terrestrial tortoise (Geochelone nigra in Nigeria: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oghenemega D. Eyarefe

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available A skeletal muscle tumour (rhabdomysarcoma was diagnosed in a 4-year-old captive female terrestrial tortoise (Geochelone nigra weighing 7 kg presented at the Veterinary Teaching Hospital, University of Ibadan, Ibadan, Nigeria. The tumour was located at the anterior right portion of the body and ventral to the carapace. The location of the tumour prevented the tortoise from extending its head from the body. The tumour was a sessile, smooth white mass, with a soft myxomatous consistency. The histological features that were diagnostic of rhabdomyosarcoma included a sparse population of haphazardly arranged spindle-shaped cells within a homogenous matrix (anisocytosis, occasional tumour giant and binucleate cells, and some well differentiated myofibrils with cross striations within the cytoplasm. The paucity of information on tumours in the land tortoise was the reason for this report, which appears to be the first report of rhabdomyosarcoma in the tortoise.

  19. The ''botryoid sign'': a characteristic feature of rhabdomyosarcomas in the head and neck

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagiwara, A.; Inoue, Y.; Yamato, K.; Daikokuya, H.; Nakayama, K.; Yamada, R.; Nakayama, T.; Nemoto, Y.; Shakudo, M.

    2001-01-01

    We investigated nine patients with rhabomyosarcoma in the head and neck (6-53 years of age), using CT and MRI. The tumours originated in the paranasal sinuses (3), cheek (2), soft palate (1), orbit (1), sternocostoclavicular muscle (1) and parapharyngeal space (1). The histological subtype was embryonal in five, alveolar in three and pleomorphic in one case. The tumours enhanced markedly and heterogeneous on CT and MRI. The masses were isointense or gave slightly higher signal than surrounding muscles on T1- and heterogeneously high signal on T2-weighted images. In four tumours, multiple ring enhancement resembling bunches of grapes. This appears to be characteristic of rhabdomyosarcoma and probably reflects a component of botryoid-type rhabdomyosarcoma in which mucoid-rich stroma is covered with a thin layer of tumour cells. We have named this imaging feature the ''botryoid sign''. (orig.)

  20. The Expression of c-Myb Correlates with the Levels of Rhabdomyosarcoma-specific Marker Myogenin

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kašpar, Petr; Zíková, Martina; Bartůněk, Petr; Štěrba, J.; Strnad, Hynek; Křen, L.; Sedláček, Radislav

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 5, Oct 14 (2015) ISSN 2045-2322 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP305/10/2133; GA ČR GAP301/12/1478; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : c-Myb * Rhabdomyosarcomas * C2C12 myoblast cell line * myogenin Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 5.228, year: 2015

  1. Urothelial carcinoma of urinary bladder with exclusive heterologous component of epithelioid rhabdomyosarcoma at metastatic site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Poojan; Pasricha, Sunil; Gupta, Gurudutt; Sharma, Anila; Mehta, Anurag

    2018-01-01

    Urothelial carcinoma of urinary bladder with divergent differentiation into rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) is an extremely uncommon aggressive phenomenon. We present a case of a 74-year-old male with bladder carcinoma which metastasized to the abdominal wall as epithelioid RMS. To the best knowledge of our literature searches, an oligometastasis of exclusive heterologous component has not been described before. The clinical, radiological, and immunohistochemistry profile of the patient supported the monoclonal nature of the tumor.

  2. High ALK mRNA expression has a negative prognostic significance in rhabdomyosarcoma

    OpenAIRE

    Bonvini, P; Zin, A; Alaggio, R; Pawel, B; Bisogno, G; Rosolen, A

    2013-01-01

    Background: Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) is a receptor tyrosine kinase aberrantly expressed in cancer, but its clinical and functional importance remain controversial. Mutation or amplification of ALK, as well as its expression levels assessed by conventional immunohistochemistry methods, has been linked to prognosis in cancer, although with potential bias because of the semi-quantitative approaches. Herein, we measured ALK mRNA expression in rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) and determined its clin...

  3. Hazards of combined chemotherapy and radiotherapy in rhabdomyosarcoma of the mediastinum. A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Moor, N G; Levy, J I; Katz, G [University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg (South Africa)

    1977-02-05

    A total tumour irradiation dose of 2900 rad and a dose of 2500 rad to a metastasis, as well as the administration of 330mg/m/sup 2/ adriamycin, successfully eradicated all traces of malignant disease after partial surgical excision in a 12-year-old Black boy with a rhabdomyosarcoma of the mediastinum. The treatment, however, damaged the heart and caused the death of the patient.

  4. The hazards of combined chemotherapy and radiotherapy in rhabdomyosarcoma of the mediastinum: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Moor, N G; Levy, J I; Katz, G

    1977-02-05

    A total tumour irradiation dose of 2900 rad and a dose of 2500 rad to a metastasis, as well as the administration of 330 mg/m2 adriamycin, successfully eradicated all traces of malignant disease after partial surgical excision in a 12-year-old Black boy with a rhabdomyosarcoma of the mediastinum. The treatment, however, damaged the heart and caused the death of the patient.

  5. The hazards of combined chemotherapy and radiotherapy in rhabdomyosarcoma of the mediastinum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Moor, N.G.; Levy, J.I.; Katz, G.

    1977-01-01

    A total tumour irradiation dose of 2900 rad and a dose of 2500 rad to a metastasis, as well as the administration of 330mg/m 2 adriamycin, successfully eradicated all traces of malignant disease after partial surgical excision in a 12-year-old Black boy with a rhabdomyosarcoma of the mediastinum. The treatment, however, damaged the heart and caused the death of the patient

  6. Rhabdomyosarcoma associated with the lead wire of a pacemaker generator implant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thieman Mankin, Kelley M; Dunbar, Mark D; Toplon, David; Ginn, Pamela; Maisenbacher, Herbert W; Risselada, Marije

    2014-06-01

    An 11-year-old female spayed Labrador Retriever was presented for a draining, painful subcutaneous mass palpated over a previously implanted pacemaker generator. Infection was suspected and the mass was removed surgically. On cut surface, the mass was friable and mottled tan to brown with firm pale tan nodules, surrounding the pacemaker lead wire adjacent to the pacemaker generator. Cytologic interpretation of impression smears was consistent with a sarcoma, and suggestive of a rhabdomyosarcoma due to the presence of strap-like cells. On histopathologic examination, a highly invasive nodular mass surrounded the pacemaker lead, composed of pleomorphic round, spindle and strap cells, and multinucleated giant cells. The population exhibited microscopic invasion into the deep portion of the fibrous capsule surrounding the pacemaker generator. There were tumor emboli within small to medium subcutaneous veins adjacent to the mass. Immunohistochemically, the neoplastic cells stained positive for α-sarcomeric actin and vimentin, and negative for α-smooth muscle actin, consistent with a rhabdomyosarcoma arising at the site of the pacemaker generator. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a rhabdomyosarcoma associated with the lead wire of a pacemaker generator in a dog. © 2014 American Society for Veterinary Clinical Pathology and European Society for Veterinary Clinical Pathology.

  7. FDG PET/CT in initial staging and early response to chemotherapy assessment of paediatric rhabdomyosarcomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eugene, T.; Ansquer, C.; Oudoux, A.; Carlier, T.; Kraeber-Bodere, T.; Bodet-Milin, C.; Corradini, N.; Thomas, C.; Dupas, B.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The objective of this study was to retrospectively evaluate the impact of positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) using fluorine-18-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG), in comparison with conventional imaging modalities (CIM), for initial staging and early therapy assessment in paediatric rhabdomyosarcoma. Patients and methods: Prior to treatment, 18 patients (age range, 9 months to 18 years) with histologically proven rhabdomyosarcoma underwent FDG PET/CT in addition to CIM (magnetic resonance imaging of primary site, whole body CT and bone scintigraphy). After three courses of chemotherapy, 12 patients underwent FDG PET/CT in addition to CIM. RECIST criteria and visual analysis of FDG uptake were used for assessment of response. The standard of reference was determined by an interdisciplinary tumor board based on imaging material, histopathology and follow-up data (median = 5 years). Results: PET/CT sensitivity was superior to CIM's concerning lymph node involvement (100% versus 83%, respectively) and metastases detection (100% versus 50%, respectively). PET/CT results changed therapeutic management in 11% of cases. After three courses of chemotherapy, the rate of complete response was 66% with PET/CT versus 8% with CIM. Five percent of patients relapsed during follow-up (median = 5 years). Conclusion: This study confirms that PET/CT depicts important additional information in initial staging of paediatric rhabdomyosarcomas and suggests a superior prognostic value of PET/CT in early response to chemotherapy assessment. (authors)

  8. MDM2 Amplification and PI3KCA Mutation in a Case of Sclerosing Rhabdomyosarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ken Kikuchi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A rare sclerosing variant of rhabdomyosarcoma characterized by prominent hyalinization and pseudovascular pattern has recently been described as a subtype biologically distinct from embryonal, alveolar, and pleomorphic forms. We present cytogenetic and molecular findings as well as experimental studies of an unusual case of sclerosing rhabdomyosarcoma. The primary lesion arose within the plantar subcutaneous tissue of the left foot of an otherwise healthy 23-year-old male who eventually developed pulmonary nodules despite systemic chemotherapy. Two genetic abnormalities identified in surgical and/or autopsy samples of the tumor were introduced into 10T1/2 murine fibroblasts to determine whether these genetic changes cooperatively facilitated transformation and growth. Cytogenetic analysis revealed a complex abnormal hyperdiploid clone, and MDM2 gene amplification was confirmed by fluorescence in situ hybridization. Cancer gene mutation screening using a combination of multiplexed PCR and mass spectroscopy revealed a PIK3CA exon 20 H1047R mutation in the primary tumor, lung metastasis, and liver metastasis. However, this mutation was not cooperative with MDM2 overexpression in experimental assays for transformation or growth. Nevertheless, MDM2 and PIK3CA are genes worthy of further investigation in patients with sclerosing rhabdomyosarcoma and might be considered in the enrollment of these patients into clinical trials of targeted therapeutics.

  9. Expression of neural cell adhesion molecules and neurofilament protein isoforms in Ewing's sarcoma of bone and soft tissue sarcomas of other than rhabdomyosarcoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Molenaar, W.M.; Muntinghe, F.L.H.

    1999-01-01

    In a previous study, it was shown that rhabdomyosarcomas widely express "neural" markers, such as neural cell adhesion molecules (N-CAM) and neurofilament protein isoforms, In the current study, a series of Ewing's sarcomas of bone and soft tissue sarcomas other than rhabdomyosarcoma was probed for

  10. Genomic gains and losses are similar in genetic and histologic subsets of rhabdomyosarcoma, whereas amplification predominates in embryonal with anaplasia and alveolar subtypes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bridge, J.A.; Liu, J.; Qualman, S.J.; Suijkerbuijk, R.F.; Wenger, G.; Zhang, J.; Wan, X.; Baker, K.S.; Sorensen, P.; Barr, F.G.

    2002-01-01

    In this investigation, we selected PAX3/FKHR and PAX7/FKHR fusion transcript-positive and -negative alveolar rhabdomyosarcomas (ARMSs) and embryonal rhabdomyosarcomas (ERMSs) with and without anaplastic features, to ascertain genomic imbalance differences and/or similarities within these

  11. Costello Syndrome and Umbilical Ligament Rhabdomyosarcoma in Two Pediatric Patients: Case Reports and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Sánchez-Montenegro

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Costello syndrome is caused by heterozygous de novo missense mutations in the protooncogene HRAS with tumor predisposition, especially rhabdomyosarcoma. We here report two pediatric patients with Costello syndrome and umbilical ligament rhabdomyosarcoma. A review of the literature published in English in MEDLINE from January 1971 to June 2016 using the search terms “Costello syndrome” and “rhabdomyosarcoma” was performed, including two new cases that we describe. Twenty-six patients with Costello syndrome and rhabdomyosarcoma were recorded with mean age of diagnosis of 2 years and 8 months. The most common tumor location was the abdomen/pelvis, including four out of ten of those in the umbilical ligament. The most common histological subtype was embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma. Overall survival was 43%. A total of 17 rhabdomyosarcomas in pediatric patients arising in the umbilical ligament were recorded with mean age of diagnosis of 3 years and 4 months. Overall survival was 69%. Costello syndrome is a poorly known disorder in pediatric oncology but their predisposition to malignancies implies the need for a new perspective on early diagnosis and aggressive medical and surgical treatment.

  12. Sorafenib inhibits tumor growth and vascularization of rhabdomyosarcoma cells by blocking IGF-1R-mediated signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wessen Maruwge

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Wessen Maruwge1, Pádraig D’Arcy1, Annika Folin1,2, Slavica Brnjic1, Johan Wejde1, Anthony Davis1, Fredrik Erlandsson3, Jonas Bergh1,2, Bertha Brodin11Department of Oncology and Pathology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; 2Radiumhemmet, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden; 3Bayer Pharmaceutical Corporation, SwedenAbstract: The growth of many soft tissue sarcomas is dependent on aberrant growth factor signaling, which promotes their proliferation and motility. With this in mind, we evaluated the effect of sorafenib, a receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor, on cell growth and apoptosis in sarcoma cell lines of various histological subtypes. We found that sorafenib effectively inhibited cell proliferation in rhabdomyosarcoma, synovial sarcoma and Ewing’s sarcoma with IC50 values <5 µM. Sorafenib effectively induced growth arrest in rhabdomyosarcoma cells, which was concurrent with inhibition of Akt and Erk signaling. Studies of ligand-induced phosphorylation of Erk and Akt in rhabdomyosarcoma cells showed that insulin-like growth factor-1 is a potent activator, which can be blocked by treatment with sorafenib. In vivo sorafenib treatment of rhabdomyosarcoma xenografts had a significant inhibitory effect on tumor growth, which was associated with inhibited vascularization and enhanced necrosis in the adjacent tumor stroma. Our results demonstrate that in vitro and in vivo growth of rhabdomyosarcoma can be suppressed by treatment with sorafenib, and suggests the possibilities of using sorafenib as a potential adjuvant therapy for the treatment of rhabdomyosarcoma.Keywords: soft tissue sarcoma, kinase inhibitors, targeted therapy, vascularization

  13. Positron Emission Tomography (PET) Evaluation After Initial Chemotherapy and Radiation Therapy Predicts Local Control in Rhabdomyosarcoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dharmarajan, Kavita V., E-mail: dharmark@mskcc.org [Departments of Radiation Oncology, Pediatric Oncology, and Nuclear Medicine, Memorial Sloan-Kettering, New York, New York (United States); Wexler, Leonard H.; Gavane, Somali; Fox, Josef J.; Schoder, Heiko; Tom, Ashlyn K.; Price, Alison N.; Meyers, Paul A.; Wolden, Suzanne L. [Departments of Radiation Oncology, Pediatric Oncology, and Nuclear Medicine, Memorial Sloan-Kettering, New York, New York (United States)

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: 18-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (PET) is already an integral part of staging in rhabdomyosarcoma. We investigated whether primary-site treatment response characterized by serial PET imaging at specific time points can be correlated with local control. Patients and Methods: We retrospectively examined 94 patients with rhabdomyosarcoma who received initial chemotherapy 15 weeks (median) before radiotherapy and underwent baseline, preradiation, and postradiation PET. Baseline PET standardized uptake values (SUVmax) and the presence or absence of abnormal uptake (termed PET-positive or PET-negative) both before and after radiation were examined for the primary site. Local relapse-free survival (LRFS) was calculated according to baseline SUVmax, PET-positive status, and PET-negative status by the Kaplan-Meier method, and comparisons were tested with the log-rank test. Results: The median patient age was 11 years. With 3-year median follow-up, LRFS was improved among postradiation PET-negative vs PET-positive patients: 94% vs 75%, P=.02. By contrast, on baseline PET, LRFS was not significantly different for primary-site SUVmax {<=}7 vs >7 (median), although the findings suggested a trend toward improved LRFS: 96% for SUVmax {<=}7 vs 79% for SUVmax >7, P=.08. Preradiation PET also suggested a statistically insignificant trend toward improved LRFS for PET-negative (97%) vs PET-positive (81%) patients (P=.06). Conclusion: Negative postradiation PET predicted improved LRFS. Notably, 77% of patients with persistent postradiation uptake did not experience local failure, suggesting that these patients could be closely followed up rather than immediately referred for intervention. Negative baseline and preradiation PET findings suggested statistically insignificant trends toward improved LRFS. Additional study may further understanding of relationships between PET findings at these time points and outcome in rhabdomyosarcoma.

  14. Orbital rhabdomyosarcoma of the child: the role of PDR brachytherapy in eye preservation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovacs, G.; Rochels, R.; Mehdorn, H.M.; Werner, J.; Wilhelm, R.; Kohr, P.; Kimmig, B. N.

    1996-01-01

    Material and Methods: There were four children (8-7-5 years and(15(12)) months old) with recurrent/primary embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma treated with curative intention by peroperative PDR boost brachytherapy in combination with radio-chemotherapy and/or surgery. PDR brachytherapy according to the Kiel protocol: daily five pulses, two hours each, with 1 Gy on the reference isodose which is usually 2-3 mm close to the applicator surface. CT simulation based conformal treatment planning was carried out in each case. The implant was done intraoperatively using the free-hand plastic tube method, after a macroscopically complete excision of the tumor. Due to treatment planning individual target volume, eye with N, opticus and bone structures, as well as the applicators and other regions of interest were visualized. Manual volume optimisation was practiced and natural volumen-dose histograms were analysed in 'classic' graphic mode as well as in a special colour coded three-dimensional visualization in cine mode on the screen. One child received, three months before the recurrence was operated, 50 Gy hyperfractionated external beam radiation (2 Gy fractions) and was irradiated with 20 Gy brachytherapy in four days. The second patient received ten days after 20 Gy brachytherapy 32 Gy hyperfractionated external beam radiation. The third child (external beam treatment outside of our clinic), received conventional fractionated irradiation with 1.6 Gy fraction dose instead of a prescribed hyperfractionated external beam therapy and her brachytherapy dose was 25 Gy. At the (15(12)) months old child with primary embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma we applied 20 Gy brachytherapy and 24 Gy hyperfractionated external beam irradiation. All patients received multidrug chemotherapy according to the German Study Protocol (CWS-91). Results: Follow-up is 34, 28, 22, and 6 months for recurrent embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma patients (stand February 96). We observed at 9 months one rhabdomyosarcoma

  15. Total laryngectomy and permanent tracheostomy for treatment of laryngeal rhabdomyosarcoma in a dog

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Block, G.; Clarke, K.; Salisbury, S.K.; DeNicola, D.B.

    1995-01-01

    An extensive, laryngeal tumor was identified in a nine-year-old, spayed female, mixed-breed dog. Clinical staging of the tumor included computed tomography. Six days prior to surgery, a percutaneous gastrostomy tube was placed under endoscopic guidance. Surgical treatment included total laryngectomy and permanent tracheostomy. The histologic diagnosis of the tumor was rhabdomyosarcoma. There were no major postoperative complications, and there have been no signs of local recurrence, metastatic disease, or long-term complications associated with the surgical procedure during an 18-month follow-up period

  16. Rhabdomyosarcoma of the tongue base, its recurrence, and multiple lymph node metastases with imaging evidence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Young Ho; Choi, Bo Ram; Huh, Kyung Hoe; Yi, Won Jin; Lee, Sam Sun [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, School of Dentistry, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-12-15

    Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) is an aggressive and fast-growing malignant tumor. RMS predominantly arises in the head and neck of infancy and children. Metastasis is usually via the blood vessel. We report a case of a recurred RMS of the tongue base with the metastasis to multiple lymph nodes in a 37-year-old female. On the follow-up examination using advanced imaging modalities after surgical treatment of RMS, the lymph nodes should be carefully evaluated like in other malignancies, such as a carcinoma, showing frequent lymph node metastasis.

  17. Place of the brachytherapy in the therapeutic strategy of rhabdomyosarcomas of the nasogenian groove of children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breton-Callu, C.; Haie-Meder, C.; Oberlin, O.; Delapierre, M.; Gerbaulet, A.

    2000-01-01

    The brachytherapy in the treatment of rhabdomyosarcomas of the nasogenian groove has to be discussed when it exists a residual tumor after an initial chemotherapy and leads to good results, in term of local control. An advantage of the brachytherapy in comparison with external irradiation, in the treatment of children tumors, is the small size of the treated volume, that allows to decrease the aftereffects incidence. The brachytherapy comes in the frame of a therapeutic needing a multidisciplinary approach and a cooperation between surgeons, brachy-therapists and onco-pediatricians. (N.C.)

  18. Long-term effects in children treated with radiotherapy for head and neck rhabdomyosarcoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paulino, Arnold C.; Simon, James H.; Zhen Weining; Wen, B.-C.

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the long-term effects of treatment in children receiving radiotherapy for head and neck rhabdomyosarcoma. Methods: From 1967 to 1994, a total of 30 children with head and neck rhabdomyosarcoma received megavoltage radiotherapy at one institution. Seventeen patients (57%) have survived and have at least a 5-year follow-up. There were 11 males and 6 females, with a median age of 5.7 years (range 2.2-11.6) at the time of radiotherapy. Tumor location was orbit in 6 patients, infratemporal fossa in 4, paranasal sinuses in 2, and supraglottic larynx in 2; the nasopharynx, pterygopalatine fossa, and parotid gland were sites for the remaining children. All but 2 patients had tumors of embryonal histology. The Intergroup Rhabdomyosarcoma Study (IRS) Group was I in 2, II in 3, and III in 11 children; 1 patient had a recurrent tumor after surgery alone. Radiotherapy volume was the primary tumor or tumor bed in 13, tumor and whole brain in 3, and tumor and craniospinal axis in 1. Median radiotherapy dose to the primary site was 5,040 cGy (range 4,140-6,500) and to the whole brain was 3,000 cGy. All but 1 were treated with 150-200-cGy fractions; 1 patient received 250-cGy fractions for a tumor in the larynx. Chemotherapy was vincristine (V), actinomycin-D (A), and cyclophosphamide (C) in 10 patients, VAC + adriamycin in 2, VA in 1, VA + ifosfamide in 1, VC + adriamycin in 1, and none in 2. One patient had salvage chemotherapy consisting of cisplatin and etoposide. Median follow-up time was 20 years (range 7.5-33). Results: Late effects of treatment were seen in all patients and included facial growth retardation in 11, neuroendocrine dysfunction in 9, visual/orbital problems in 9, dental abnormalities in 7, hearing loss in 6, and hypothyroidism in 3. Intellectual and academic delays were documented in 3 patients who had received whole brain radiotherapy. While neuroendocrine, thyroid, dental, and cognitive sequelae were primarily attributed to radiotherapy

  19. Spinal Cord Glioblastoma Induced by Radiation Therapy of Nasopharyngeal Rhabdomyosarcoma with MRI Findings: Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, Se Jin; Kim, In One [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-09-15

    Radiation-induced spinal cord gliomas are extremely rare. Since the first case was reported in 1980, only six additional cases have been reported.; The radiation-induced gliomas were related to the treatment of Hodgkin's lymphoma, thyroid cancer, and medullomyoblastoma, and to multiple chest fluoroscopic examinations in pulmonary tuberculosis patient. We report a case of radiation-induced spinal cord glioblastoma developed in a 17-year-old girl after a 13-year latency period following radiotherapy for nasopharyngeal rhabdomyosarcoma. MRI findings of our case are described.

  20. Severe Hepatic Sinusoidal Obstruction Syndrome in a Child Receiving Vincristine, Actinomycin-D, and Cyclophosphamide for Rhabdomyosarcoma: Successful Treatment with Defibrotide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Aery; Kang, Young Kyung; Lim, Sewon; Kim, Dong Ho; Lim, Jung Sub; Lee, Jun Ah

    2016-10-01

    Hepatic sinusoidal obstruction syndrome (SOS) is a life-threatening syndrome that generally occurs as a complication after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation or, less commonly, after conventional chemotherapy. Regarding SOS in rhabdomyosarcoma patients who received conventional chemotherapy, the doses of chemotherapeutic agents are associated with the development of SOS. Several cases of SOS in rhabdomyosarcoma patients after receiving chemotherapy with escalated doses of cyclophosphamide have been reported. Here, we report on a 9-year-old female with rhabdomyosarcoma who developed severe SOS after receiving chemotherapy consisting of vincristine, actinomycin-D, and a moderate dose of cyclophosphamide. She was treated successfully with defibrotide without sequelae to the liver.

  1. Brachytherapy in childhood rhabdomyosarcoma treatment; Braquiterapia no tratamento do rabdomiossarcoma da infancia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novaes, Paulo Eduardo Ribeiro dos Santos

    1995-07-01

    A retrospective study of 21 children with rhabdomyosarcoma treated by brachytherapy to the primary site of the tumor at the Radiotherapy Department of the A.C.Camargo Hospital between january/1980 to june/1993 was undertaken. The main objectives were to comprove the utility of brachytherapy in childhood rhabdomyosarcoma, to evaluate the local control and survival, in association with chemotherapy, to analyze the late effects of the treatment and to determinate the preferential technique to each clinical situation. All patients received brachytherapy to the tumor site. The radioactive isotopes employed were Gold{sup 198}, Cesium{sup 137} and Iridium{sup 192}. The brachytherapy techniques depended on the tumor site, period of treatment, availability of the radioactive material and stage of the disease. Patients treated exclusively by brachytherapy received 40 Gy to 60 Gy. When brachytherapy was associated with external radiotherapy the dose ranged from 20 Gy to 40 Gy. Local control was achieved in 18 of 20 patients (90%). The global survival and local control survival rates were 61.9% (13/21 patients) and 72,2% (13/18 patients) respectively. (author)

  2. Disruption of myoblast alignment by highly motile rhabdomyosarcoma cell in tissue structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Menglu; Nagamori, Eiji; Kino-Oka, Masahiro

    2017-02-01

    Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) is a highly malignant tumor type of skeletal muscle origin, hallmarked by local invasion. Interaction between invasive tumor cells and normal cells plays a major role in tumor invasion and metastasis. Culturing tumor cells in a three-dimensional (3D) model can translate tumor malignancy relevant cell-cell interaction. To mimic tumor heterogeneity in vitro, a co-culture system consisting of a malignant embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma (ERMS) cell line RD and a normal human skeletal muscle myoblast (HSMM) cell line was established by cell sheet technology. Various ratios of RDs to HSMMs were employed to understand the quantitative effect on intercellular interactions. Disruption of sheet structure was observed in heterogeneous cell sheets having a low ratio of RDs to HSMMs, whereas homogeneous HSMM or RD sheets maintained intact structure. Deeper exploration of dynamic tumor cell behavior inside HSMM sheets revealed that HSMM cell alignment was disrupted by highly motile RDs. This study demonstrated that RMS cells are capable of compromising their surrounding environment through induced decay of HSMMs alignment in a cell-based 3D system. This suggests that muscle disruption might be a major consequence of RMS cell invasion into muscles, which could be a promising target to preventing tumor invasion. Copyright © 2016 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Leiomyosarcoma, embrionary rhabdomyosarcoma and malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor: report of three cases of atypical retroperitoneal sarcomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Catalan, Julian; Justino Junior, Reinaldo Ottero; Tjioe Tjia Min; Lima, Ana Carolina Mori; Fonte, Alexandre Calabria da; Goncalves, Carlos Marcelo

    2005-01-01

    We report three cases of atypical retroperitoneal sarcomas: leiomyosarcoma, embrionary rhabdomyosarcoma and malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (previously known as neuro sarcoma and neuro fibrosarcoma). These lesions, which are characterized by large and heterogeneous retroperitoneal masses, are uncommon and usually diagnosed late. Intravenous contrast enhanced computerized tomography is a useful method for the evaluation of these tumors and their relationship with adjacent structures. (author)

  4. Prevalence and clinical impact of anaplasia in childhood rhabdomyosarcoma : a report from the Soft Tissue Sarcoma Committee of the Children's Oncology Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qualman, Stephen; Lynch, James; Bridge, Julia; Parham, David; Teot, Lisa; Meyer, William; Pappo, Alberto

    2008-12-01

    Anapalsia is rare in childhood rhabdomyosarcoma and has not been included in the International Classification of Rhabdomyosarcoma (ICR). A recent review of cases from the Soft Tissue Sarcoma Committee of the Children's Oncology Group (COG) suggests that anaplasia might be more common than previously reported and may impact clinical outcome. The prevalence of anaplasia (focal or diffuse) was prospectively assessed in 546 eligible cases who were registered in an Intergroup Rhabdomyosarcoma Study Group (IRSG) or COG therapeutic trial from 1995 through 1998. The incidence of anaplasia in tumor samples and its impact in predicting clinical outcome was assessed. Overall, 71 (13%) of all samples analyzed had anaplasia. Anaplasia was more common in patients with tumors in favorable sites and was less commonly observed in younger patients and in those with stage II, III, or clinical group III disease. Regardless of its distribution (focal or diffuse), on univariate analysis the presence of anaplasia negatively influenced the failure-free survival rate (63% vs 77% at 5 years) and overall survival (68% vs 82% at 5 years) rates in patients with embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma. This effect was most pronounced in children with intermediate-risk tumors. Anaplasia did not affect outcome in patients with alveolar tumors. The incidence of anaplasia in patients with rhabdomyosarcoma is higher than previously described and may be of prognostic significance in children with intermediate-risk embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma. (c) 2008 American Cancer Society

  5. Does negative retroperitoneal CT in adolescents with paratesticular rhabdomyosarcoma preclude the need of retroperitoneal lymph node dissection?; A tomografia de retroperitoneo normal em adolescentes com rabdomiossarcoma paratesticular afasta necessidade de linfadenectomia?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Damazio, Eulalio [Hospital Lucano, Teresina (PI) (Brazil); Caran, Eliana [Instituto de Oncologia Pediatrica, Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo - UNIFESP, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Ortiz, Valdemar; Macedo Junior, Antonio, E-mail: macedo.dcir@epm.br [Departamento de Urologia, Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo - UNIFESP, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    We report on a 16-year-old male with paratesticular rhabdomyosarcoma who underwent retroperitoneal lymph node dissection due to a stage I tumor (normal retroperitoneal computed tomography). The surgical finding was three enlarged nodes, positive for metastatic disease. Patient was referred to adjuvant chemotherapy. This case suggests that the Intergroup Rhabdomyosarcoma Study Group IV protocol is subject to questions regarding adolescents with paratesticular rhabdomyosarcoma, and that negative retroperitoneal CT does not preclude the need of lymph node dissection. (author)

  6. Rhabdomyosarcoma-associated renal cell carcinoma: a link with constitutional Tp53 mutation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Curry, Sarah

    2012-02-01

    The 2004 World Health Organization classification includes the new entity "neuroblastoma-associated renal cell carcinoma." The pathogenetic link between these entities is unknown as yet. The patient reported herein developed renal cell carcinoma after anaplastic embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma, a previously unknown association. The 2nd malignancy developed very soon after the 1st one, prompting concern for inherent cancer predisposition rather than a therapy-induced 2nd malignancy. A variety of features raised suspicion for Tp53 mutation, and indeed a pathogenic germline Tp53 mutation was identified in this child, despite a negative family history for Li-Fraumeni syndrome. Consideration of underlying predisposition is advocated in the context of rapid evolution of 2nd childhood malignancy.

  7. Allergies, atopy, immune-related factors and childhood rhabdomyosarcoma: a report from the Children's Oncology Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupo, Philip J; Zhou, Renke; Skapek, Stephen X; Hawkins, Douglas S; Spector, Logan G; Scheurer, Michael E; Fatih Okcu, M; Melin, Beatrice; Papworth, Karin; Erhardt, Erik B; Grufferman, Seymour

    2014-01-15

    Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) is a highly malignant tumor of developing muscle that can occur anywhere in the body. Due to its rarity, relatively little is known about the epidemiology of RMS. Atopic disease is hypothesized to be protective against several malignancies; however, to our knowledge, there have been no assessments of atopy and childhood RMS. Therefore, we explored this association in a case-control study of 322 childhood RMS cases and 322 pair-matched controls. Cases were enrolled in a trial run by the Intergroup Rhabdomyosarcoma Study Group. Controls were matched to cases on race, sex and age. The following atopic conditions were assessed: allergies, asthma, eczema and hives; in addition, we examined other immune-related factors: birth order, day-care attendance and breastfeeding. Conditional logistic-regression models were used to calculate an odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) for each exposure, adjusted for age, race, sex, household income and parental education. As the two most common histologic types of RMS are embryonal (n=215) and alveolar (n=66), we evaluated effect heterogeneity of these exposures. Allergies (OR=0.60, 95% CI: 0.41-0.87), hives (OR = 0.61, 95% CI: 0.38-0.97), day-care attendance (OR=0.48, 95% CI: 0.32-0.71) and breastfeeding for ≥ 12 months (OR=0.36, 95% CI: 0.18-0.70) were inversely associated with childhood RMS. These exposures did not display significant effect heterogeneity between histologic types (p>0.52 for all exposures). This is the first study indicating that atopic exposures may be protective against childhood RMS, suggesting additional studies are needed to evaluate the immune system's role in the development of this tumor. © 2013 UICC.

  8. Cell-cycle dependent expression of a translocation-mediated fusion oncogene mediates checkpoint adaptation in rhabdomyosarcoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ken Kikuchi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Rhabdomyosarcoma is the most commonly occurring soft-tissue sarcoma in childhood. Most rhabdomyosarcoma falls into one of two biologically distinct subgroups represented by alveolar or embryonal histology. The alveolar subtype harbors a translocation-mediated PAX3:FOXO1A fusion gene and has an extremely poor prognosis. However, tumor cells have heterogeneous expression for the fusion gene. Using a conditional genetic mouse model as well as human tumor cell lines, we show that that Pax3:Foxo1a expression is enriched in G2 and triggers a transcriptional program conducive to checkpoint adaptation under stress conditions such as irradiation in vitro and in vivo. Pax3:Foxo1a also tolerizes tumor cells to clinically-established chemotherapy agents and emerging molecularly-targeted agents. Thus, the surprisingly dynamic regulation of the Pax3:Foxo1a locus is a paradigm that has important implications for the way in which oncogenes are modeled in cancer cells.

  9. Radiographic and computed tomographic demonstration of pseudotumor cerebri due to rapid weight gain in a child with pelvic rhabdomyosarcoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berdon, W.E.; Barker, D.H.; Barash, F.S.

    1982-06-01

    Rapid weight gain in a malnourished child can be associated with suture diastasis in the pattern of pseudotumor cerebri; this has been previously reported in deprivational dwarfism and cystic fibrosis. In a child with pelvic rhabdomyosarcoma, skull radiographs and cranial computed tomographic (CT) scans were available prior to a period of rapid weight gain induced by hyperalimentation. Suture diastasis developed and repeat CT scans showed this to be accompanied by smaller ventricles.

  10. Radiographic and computed tomographic demonstration of pseudotumor cerebri due to rapid weight gain in a child with pelvic rhabdomyosarcoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berdon, W.E.; Barker, D.H.; Barash, F.S.

    1982-01-01

    Rapid weight gain in a malnourished child can be associated with suture diastasis in the pattern of pseudotumor cerebri; this has been previously reported in deprivational dwarfism and cystic fibrosis. In a child with pelvic rhabdomyosarcoma, skull radiographs and cranial computed tomographic (CT) scans were available prior to a period of rapid weight gain induced by hyperalimentation. Suture diastasis developed and repeat CT scans showed this to be accompanied by smaller ventricles

  11. Optic pathway glioma associated with orbital rhabdomyosarcoma and bilateral optic nerve sheath dural ectasia in a child with neurofibromatosis-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikas, Ioannis; Theofanopoulou, Maria; Lampropoulou, Penelope; Hadjigeorgi, Christiana; Pourtsidis, Apostolos; Kosmidis, Helen

    2006-01-01

    Neurofibromatosis-1 (NF-1) is a multisystem disorder presenting with a variety of clinical and imaging manifestations. Neural and non-neural tumours, and unusual benign miscellaneous conditions, separately or combined, are encountered in variable locations. We present a 21/2-year-old boy with NF-1 who demonstrated coexisting optic pathway glioma with involvement of the chiasm and optic nerve, orbital alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma and bilateral optic nerve sheath dural ectasia. (orig.)

  12. High ALK mRNA expression has a negative prognostic significance in rhabdomyosarcoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonvini, P; Zin, A; Alaggio, R; Pawel, B; Bisogno, G; Rosolen, A

    2013-01-01

    Background: Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) is a receptor tyrosine kinase aberrantly expressed in cancer, but its clinical and functional importance remain controversial. Mutation or amplification of ALK, as well as its expression levels assessed by conventional immunohistochemistry methods, has been linked to prognosis in cancer, although with potential bias because of the semi-quantitative approaches. Herein, we measured ALK mRNA expression in rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) and determined its clinical impact on patients' stratification and outcome. Methods: Specimens were obtained from RMS patients and cell lines, and ALK expression was analysed by quantitative RT–PCR, western blotting, IHC, and copy number analysis. Results: High ALK mRNA expression was detected in the vast majority of PAX3/7-FOXO1-positive tumours, whereas PAX3/7-FOXO1-negative RMS displayed considerably lower amounts of both mRNA and protein. Notably, ALK mRNA distinguished unfavourable PAX3/7-FOXO1-positive tumours from PAX3/7-FOXO1-negative RMS (Ptumour size (PALK mRNA levels were of prognostic relevance by Cox univariate regression analysis and correlated with increased risk of relapse (P=0.001) and survival (P=0.01), whereas by multivariate analysis elevated ALK mRNA expression resulted a negative prognostic marker when clinical stage was not included. Conclusion: Quantitative assessment of ALK mRNA expression helps to improve risk stratification of RMS patients and identifies tumours with adverse biological characteristics and aggressive behaviour. PMID:24149177

  13. Radiomodifying effect of resveratrol in human rhabdomyosarcoma (RD) cell culture applying the comet assay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magalhaes, Vanessa D.; Rogero, Sizue O.; Vieira, Daniel P.; Okazaki, Kayo; Rogero, Jose R., E-mail: van.biologa@gmail.com [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Cruz, Aurea S., E-mail: aurcruz@ial.sp.gov.br [Instituto Adolfo Lutz (IAL-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    Cancer is considered a worldwide public health problem. Resveratrol is a defense polyphenol, synthesized naturally by a wide variety of plants according to response of ultraviolet radiation (UV) exposition or according to mechanical stress resulting of pathogens or chemical and physical agents. In vines this substance is found in elevated concentration. Thus, resveratrol is present in grape juice and wines, especially red wine. Red wines are the best dietary source of resveratrol.The protective effects performed by resveratrol during the process of cell damage, produced by oxidative effects of free radicals, are anti-inflammatory, anti-platelet and anti-carcinogenic activity, prevent or inhibit degenerative diseases, decrease incidence of cardiovascular diseases. Moreover, resveratrol is considered as a cell radioprotector. On the other hand, in some elevated concentrations resveratrol is considered as a radiosensitizing compound. The aim of this work was study in vitro the radiomodifying effect of resveratrol in human rhabdomyosarcoma (RD) cells applying the comet assay to evaluate the cellular damage and its repair capacity. In this study RD cells culture was irradiated by gamma radiation at 50 Gy and 100 Gy doses and the used resveratrol concentrations was from 15 μM to 60 μM. The protective and radioprotective effects were observed at 15 μM and 30 μM resveratrol concentrations. The resveratrol concentration of 60 μM showed cytotoxic effect to RD tumor cells and with gamma radiation presence this concentration showed no statistically significant radiosensitizing effects. (author)

  14. A Patient-Derived Xenograft Model of Parameningeal Embryonal Rhabdomyosarcoma for Preclinical Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jody E. Hooper

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma (eRMS is one of the most common soft tissue sarcomas in children and adolescents. Parameningeal eRMS is a variant that is often more difficult to treat than eRMS occurring at other sites. A 14-year-old female with persistent headaches and rapid weight loss was diagnosed with parameningeal eRMS. She progressed and died despite chemotherapy with vincristine, actinomycin-D, and cyclophosphamide plus 50.4 Gy radiation therapy to the primary tumor site. Tumor specimens were acquired by rapid autopsy and tumor tissue was transplanted into immunodeficient mice to create a patient-derived xenograft (PDX animal model. As autopsy specimens had an ALK R1181C mutation, PDX tumor bearing animals were treated with the pan-kinase inhibitor lestaurtinib but demonstrated no decrease in tumor growth, suggesting that single agent kinase inhibitor therapy may be insufficient in similar cases. This unique parameningeal eRMS PDX model is publicly available for preclinical study.

  15. Rhabdomyosarcoma treatment and outcome at a multidisciplinary pediatric cancer center in Lebanon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salman, Maysaa; Tamim, Hani; Medlej, Fouad; El-Ariss, Tarek; Saad, Fatima; Boulos, Fouad; Eid, Toufic; Muwakkit, Samar; Khoury, Nabil; Abboud, Miguel; Saab, Raya

    2012-05-01

    Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) is the most common soft tissue sarcoma in children. Outcome of patients treated on standard protocols, in a multidisciplinary cancer center setting outside of clinical trials, is not well reported. We reviewed characteristics and outcome of 23 pediatric patients treated at a single, multidisciplinary cancer center in Lebanon, between April 2002 and December 2010. Median follow-up was 41 months. The most commonly affected primary site was the head and neck (48%, n = 11). Nineteen tumors (82.6%) were of embryonal histology. Tumor size was ≥5 cm in eight (34.8%) patients. Sixteen patients (69.6%) had localized disease, and one (4.4%) had metastatic disease. Fifteen (65.2%) had Group III tumors. All patients received chemotherapy, for a duration ranging 21-51 weeks. Upfront surgical resection was performed in 10 patients (43.5%). Eighteen patients (78.3%) received radiation therapy. The 5-year overall and disease-free survival rates were 83% and 64%, respectively. Relapse correlated with absence of surgery. Treatment of childhood RMS in a multidisciplinary cancer center in Lebanon results in similar survival to that in developed countries when similar protocols are applied. There was a higher incidence of local relapse, but those were salvageable with further therapy and surgical local control.

  16. Free microvascular rotationplasty with nerve repair for rhabdomyosarcoma in a 18-month-old patient.

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    Pérez-García, Alberto; Salom, Marta; Villaverde-Doménech, María Eloísa; Baixauli, Francisco; Simón-Sanz, Eduardo

    2017-05-01

    Rotationplasty is a limb-sparing surgical option in lower limb malignancies. Sciatic or tibial nerve encasement has been considered an absolute contraindication to this procedure. We report a case of an 18-month-old girl with a rhabdomyosarcoma that affected the leg and popliteal fossa, with neurovascular involvement. Knee and proximal leg intercalary resection was performed followed by reconstruction with free microvascular rotationplasty and neurorraphy from tibial division of sciatic nerve to sural and tibial nerves, and from saphenous nerve to superficial peroneal nerve. Postoperative course was uneventful and ambulation with a provisional prosthesis was restarted during the sixth week after surgery. Bone consolidation was observed after two months. Eighteen months later, the patient had a good gait pattern with a below-knee prosthesis and had recovered sensation in the whole foot and ankle area. This case shows that rotationplasty with nerve repair may provide a sensate stump, which is vital for successful prosthetic adaptation. We believe it may be considered as an alternative to above-knee amputation in tumors with sciatic involvement. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Primary rhabdomyosarcoma of the sacrum: a case report and review of the literature

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    Hakozaki, Michiyuki [Fukushima Medical University School of Medicine, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Fukushima (Japan); Fukushima Medical University School of Medicine, First Department of Pathology, Fukushima (Japan); Hojo, Hiroshi; Kuze, Tetsuo; Abe, Masafumi [Fukushima Medical University School of Medicine, First Department of Pathology, Fukushima (Japan); Tajino, Takahiro; Yamada, Hitoshi; Kikuchi, Shinichi [Fukushima Medical University School of Medicine, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Fukushima (Japan); Kikuta, Atsushi [Fukushima Medical University School of Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Fukushima (Japan); Qualman, Stephen J. [Ohio Children' s Hospital and Ohio State University School of Medicine, Department of Laboratory Medicine and IRSG Pathology Center, Columbus, OH (United States)

    2008-07-15

    We describe herein a rare case of primary rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) occurring in the sacrum. A 16-year-old woman presented with a 2-month history of pain in bilateral buttocks and posterior thighs. Computed tomography showed a primary tumor with bone destruction in the 2nd sacral vertebra and invasion to the 1st to 3rd vertebrae and retroperitoneal space. Histological examination of the tumor showed proliferation of spindle-shaped cells intermingled with rhabdomyoblasts in a fascicular and storiform growth pattern. Tumor cells showed immunoreactivity for vimentin, desmin, muscle-specific actin, sarcomeric actin, {alpha}-smooth muscle actin and CD99, and partial immunoreactivity for myoD1, myf-4, myogenin and myoglobin. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction demonstrated expression of myoD1. On the basis of the aforementioned findings, a poorly differentiated spindle cell variant of embryonal RMS was diagnosed. The patient underwent combined therapy with chemotherapy and radiotherapy, but died 17 months after incisional biopsy. The present case is instructive in differential diagnosis of primary bone tumors, and the possibility of skeletal RMS needs to be considered. (orig.)

  18. Low Prevalence of TP53 Mutations and MDM2 Amplifications in Pediatric Rhabdomyosarcoma

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    Simona Ognjanovic

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The tumor suppressor gene TP53 is the most commonly mutated gene in human cancer. The reported prevalence of mutations in rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS varies widely, with recent larger studies suggesting that TP53 mutations in pediatric RMS may be extremely rare. Overexpression of MDM2 also attenuates p53 function. We have performed TP53 mutation/MDM2 amplification analyses in the largest series analyzed thus far, including DNA isolated from 37 alveolar and 38 embryonal RMS tumor samples obtained from the Cooperative Human Tissue Network (CHTN. Available samples were frozen tumor tissues (N=48 and histopathology slides. TP53 mutations in exons 4–9 were analyzed by direct sequencing in all samples, and MDM2 amplification analysis was performed by differential PCR on a subset of 22 samples. We found only one sample (1/75, 1.3% carrying a TP53 mutation at codon 259 (p.D259Y and no MDM2 amplification. Two SNPs in the TP53 pathway, associated with accelerated tumor onset in germline TP53 mutation carriers, (TP53 SNP72 (rs no. 1042522 and MDM2 SNP309 (rs no. 2279744, were not found to confer earlier tumor onset. In conclusion, we confirm the extremely low prevalence of TP53 mutations/MDM2 amplifications in pediatric RMS (1.33% and 0%, respectively. The possible inactivation of p53 function by other mechanisms thus remains to be elucidated.

  19. Radiomodifying effect of resveratrol in human rhabdomyosarcoma (RD) cell culture applying the comet assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magalhaes, Vanessa D.; Rogero, Sizue O.; Vieira, Daniel P.; Okazaki, Kayo; Rogero, Jose R.; Cruz, Aurea S.

    2013-01-01

    Cancer is considered a worldwide public health problem. Resveratrol is a defense polyphenol, synthesized naturally by a wide variety of plants according to response of ultraviolet radiation (UV) exposition or according to mechanical stress resulting of pathogens or chemical and physical agents. In vines this substance is found in elevated concentration. Thus, resveratrol is present in grape juice and wines, especially red wine. Red wines are the best dietary source of resveratrol.The protective effects performed by resveratrol during the process of cell damage, produced by oxidative effects of free radicals, are anti-inflammatory, anti-platelet and anti-carcinogenic activity, prevent or inhibit degenerative diseases, decrease incidence of cardiovascular diseases. Moreover, resveratrol is considered as a cell radioprotector. On the other hand, in some elevated concentrations resveratrol is considered as a radiosensitizing compound. The aim of this work was study in vitro the radiomodifying effect of resveratrol in human rhabdomyosarcoma (RD) cells applying the comet assay to evaluate the cellular damage and its repair capacity. In this study RD cells culture was irradiated by gamma radiation at 50 Gy and 100 Gy doses and the used resveratrol concentrations was from 15 μM to 60 μM. The protective and radioprotective effects were observed at 15 μM and 30 μM resveratrol concentrations. The resveratrol concentration of 60 μM showed cytotoxic effect to RD tumor cells and with gamma radiation presence this concentration showed no statistically significant radiosensitizing effects. (author)

  20. Uremic Toxins Enhance Statin-Induced Cytotoxicity in Differentiated Human Rhabdomyosarcoma Cells

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    Hitoshi Uchiyama

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The risk of myopathy and rhabdomyolysis is considerably increased in statin users with end-stage renal failure (ESRF. Uremic toxins, which accumulate in patients with ESRF, exert cytotoxic effects that are mediated by various mechanisms. Therefore, accumulation of uremic toxins might increase statin-induced cytotoxicity. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of four uremic toxins—hippuric acid, 3-carboxy-4-methyl-5-propyl-2-furanpropionate, indole-3-acetic acid, and 3-indoxyl sulfate—on statin-induced myopathy. Differentiated rhabdomyosarcoma cells were pre-treated with the uremic toxins for seven days, and then the cells were treated with pravastatin or simvastatin. Cell viability and apoptosis were assessed by viability assays and flow cytometry. Pre-treatment with uremic toxins increased statin- but not cisplatin-induced cytotoxicity (p < 0.05 vs. untreated. In addition, the pre-treatment increased statin-induced apoptosis, which is one of the cytotoxic factors (p < 0.05 vs. untreated. However, mevalonate, farnesol, and geranylgeraniol reversed the effects of uremic toxins and lowered statin-induced cytotoxicity (p < 0.05 vs. untreated. These results demonstrate that uremic toxins enhance statin-induced apoptosis and cytotoxicity. The mechanism underlying this effect might be associated with small G-protein geranylgeranylation. In conclusion, the increased severity of statin-induced rhabdomyolysis in patients with ESRF is likely due to the accumulation of uremic toxins.

  1. Ovarian embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma is a rare manifestation of the DICER1 syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Kock, Leanne; Druker, Harriet; Weber, Evan; Hamel, Nancy; Traubici, Jeffrey; Malkin, David; Arseneau, Jocelyne; Stewart, Colin J R; Bouron-Dal Soglio, Dorothée; Priest, John R; Foulkes, William D

    2015-06-01

    Embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma (ERMS), a soft tissue sarcoma, is one of the most common pediatric cancers. Certain ERMSs are associated with the DICER1 syndrome, a tumor predisposition syndrome caused by germ-line DICER1 mutations. Characteristic somatic mutations have also been identified in DICER1-associated tumor types. These "hotspot" mutations affect the catalytic activity of the DICER1 ribonuclease IIIb domain. Primary ovarian ERMS (oERMS) is extremely rare. We present a case of a 6-year-old girl with an oERMS harboring 2 DICER1 mutations. The girl also exhibited other DICER1 phenotypes: cystic nephroma (CN) and multinodular goiter. Somatic investigations of the CN identified a hotspot DICER1 mutation different from that in the oERMS. Significantly, the CN presented at 12 years of age, which is much older than the previously reported age range of susceptibility. This report documents the occurrence of DICER1 mutations in a case of oERMS, expanding the spectrum of DICER1-associated tumors. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors Antagonize Distinct Pathways to Suppress Tumorigenesis of Embryonal Rhabdomyosarcoma.

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    Terra Vleeshouwer-Neumann

    Full Text Available Embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma (ERMS is the most common soft tissue cancer in children. The prognosis of patients with relapsed or metastatic disease remains poor. ERMS genomes show few recurrent mutations, suggesting that other molecular mechanisms such as epigenetic regulation might play a major role in driving ERMS tumor biology. In this study, we have demonstrated the diverse roles of histone deacetylases (HDACs in the pathogenesis of ERMS by characterizing effects of HDAC inhibitors, trichostatin A (TSA and suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA; also known as vorinostat in vitro and in vivo. TSA and SAHA suppress ERMS tumor growth and progression by inducing myogenic differentiation as well as reducing the self-renewal and migratory capacity of ERMS cells. Differential expression profiling and pathway analysis revealed downregulation of key oncogenic pathways upon HDAC inhibitor treatment. By gain-of-function, loss-of-function, and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP studies, we show that Notch1- and EphrinB1-mediated pathways are regulated by HDACs to inhibit differentiation and enhance migratory capacity of ERMS cells, respectively. Our study demonstrates that aberrant HDAC activity plays a major role in ERMS pathogenesis. Druggable targets in the molecular pathways affected by HDAC inhibitors represent novel therapeutic options for ERMS patients.

  3. Intraoperative Electron-Beam Radiation Therapy for Pediatric Ewing Sarcomas and Rhabdomyosarcomas: Long-Term Outcomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sole, Claudio V.; Calvo, Felipe A.; Polo, Alfredo; Cambeiro, Mauricio; Gonzalez, Carmen; Desco, Manuel; Martinez-Monge, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To assess long-term outcomes and toxicity of intraoperative electron-beam radiation therapy (IOERT) in the management of pediatric patients with Ewing sarcomas (EWS) and rhabdomyosarcomas (RMS). Methods and Materials: Seventy-one sarcoma (EWS n=37, 52%; RMS n=34, 48%) patients underwent IOERT for primary (n=46, 65%) or locally recurrent sarcomas (n=25, 35%) from May 1983 to November 2012. Local control (LC), overall survival (OS), and disease-free survival were estimated using Kaplan-Meier methods. For survival outcomes, potential associations were assessed in univariate and multivariate analyses using the Cox proportional hazards model. Results: After a median follow-up of 72 months (range, 4-310 months), 10-year LC, disease-free survival, and OS was 74%, 57%, and 68%, respectively. In multivariate analysis after adjustment for other covariates, disease status (P=.04 and P=.05) and R1 margin status (P<.01 and P=.04) remained significantly associated with LC and OS. Nine patients (13%) reported severe chronic toxicity events (all grade 3). Conclusions: A multimodal IOERT-containing approach is a well-tolerated component of treatment for pediatric EWS and RMS patients, allowing reduction or substitution of external beam radiation exposure while maintaining high local control rates

  4. Prevalence and Clinical Impact of Anaplasia in Childhood Rhabdomyosarcoma: A Report from the Soft Tissue Sarcoma Committee for the Children’s Oncology Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qualman, Stephen; Lynch, James; Bridge, Julia; Parham, David; Teot, Lisa; Meyer, William; Pappo, Alberto

    2009-01-01

    Background Anapalsia is rare in childhood rhabdomyosarcoma and has not been included in the International Classification of Rhabdomyosarcoma (ICR). A recent review of cases from the Soft Tissue Sarcoma Committee of the Children’s Oncology Group (COG) suggests that anaplasia might be more common than previously reported and may impact clinical outcome. Materials and Methods The prevalence of anaplasia (focal or diffuse) was prospectively assessed in 546 eligible cases who were registered in an Intergroup Rhabdomyosarcoma Study Group (IRSG) or COG therapeutic trial from 1995–1998. The incidence of anaplasia in tumor samples and its impact in predicting clinical outcome was assessed. Results Overall 71 (13%) of all samples analyzed had anaplasia. Anaplasia was more common in patients with tumors in favorable sites and was less commonly seen in younger patients and in those with stage 2, 3 or clinical Group III disease. Regardless of its distribution (focal or diffuse), on univariate analysis the presence of anaplasia had a significant negative impact for both failure-free survival (FFS: 63% vs 77% at 5 years) and survival (S: 68% vs 82% at 5 years) in patients with embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma. This effect was most pronounced in children with intermediate risk disease. Using multivariate analysis, the hazard ratio was 1.6 for FFS (p=0.085) and 1.7 for overall survival (p=0.081). Anaplasia did not affect outcome in patients with alveolar tumors. Conclusion The incidence of anaplasia in rhabdomyosarcoma is higher than previously described and may be of prognostic significance in children with intermediate risk embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma. PMID:18985676

  5. Therapeutic Effect of Supercritical CO2 Extracts of Curcuma Species with Cancer Drugs in Rhabdomyosarcoma Cell Lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandran, Cheppail; Quirin, Karl-W; Escalon, Enrique A; Lollett, Ivonne V; Melnick, Steven J

    2015-08-01

    Synergistic effect of supercritical CO2 extracts of Curcuma species with conventional chemotherapeutic drugs was investigated in human alveolar (SJRH30) and embryonal (RD) rhabdomyosarcoma cell lines. The Curcuma amada (mango ginger) (CA) extract showed the highest levels of cytotoxicity with inhibitory concentration IC50 values of 7.133 µg/ml and 7.501 µg/ml for SJRH30 and RD cell lines, respectively, as compared with Curcuma longa (turmeric) and Curcuma xanthorrhiza (Javanese turmeric) extracts. CA showed synergistic cytotoxic effects with vinblastine (VBL) and cyclophosphamide (CP) as indicated by the combination index values of <1 for VBL + CA, CP + CA, and VBL + CP + CA combinations in both embryonal and alveolar rhabdomyosarcomas. When lower doses of CA (0.1-0.2 µg/ml) were combined with cancer drugs like CP and VBL, caspase-3 activity increased significantly compared with individual agents and correlated with the percentage of apoptotic cells. CA in combination with VBL and CP induced a higher percentage of apoptosis than single agents in both cell lines. CA also modulated the expression of genes associated with intrinsic pathway of apoptosis (Bcl-2, Bax, Bak, and p53) and also inhibited the expression of genes associated with inflammation such as COX-2 and NF-κB. Xenograft studies with SJRH30 tumors in nude mice showed that CA treatment inhibited tumor growth rate with and without VBL and increased the survival rate significantly. These results suggest that CA can be evaluated further as an adjuvant with cancer drugs for the treatment of rhabdomyosarcoma patients. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Rhabdomyosarcoma Arising in a Previously Irradiated Field: An Analysis of 43 Patients

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    Dang, Nguyen D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas (United States); Teh, Bin S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The Methodist Hospital and Methodist Hospital Research Institute, Houston, Texas (United States); Paulino, Arnold C., E-mail: apaulino@tmhs.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, The Methodist Hospital and Methodist Hospital Research Institute, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2013-03-01

    Patients with soft tissue sarcomas that arise from previously irradiated fields have traditionally been reported to have a poor prognosis. In this report, we examined the characteristics and outcomes of patients who developed a rhabdomyosarcoma in a previously irradiated field (RMS-RIF); we hypothesize that these patients should have a better outcome compared to other postradiation soft tissue sarcomas as these tumors are chemosensitive and radiosensitive. A PubMed search of the literature from 1961-2010 yielded 33 studies with data for patients with RMS-RIF. The study included 43 patients with a median age of 6.5 years at the time of radiation therapy (RT) for the initial tumor. The median RT dose was 48 Gy. The median latency period, the time from RT to development of RMS-RIF, was 8 years. The 3-year overall survival for RMS-RIF was 42%. The 3-year overall survival was 66% for patients receiving chemotherapy and local treatment (surgery and/or RT) compared to 29% for those who had systemic treatment only or local treatment only (P=.049). Other factors associated with increased 3-year overall survival included retinoblastoma initial diagnosis (P<.001), age ≤18 years at diagnosis of RMS-RIF (P=.003), favorable site (P=.008), and stage 1 disease (P=.002). Age at time of RMS-RIF, retinoblastoma initial tumor, favorable site, stage 1 disease, and use of both systemic and local treatment were found to be favorable prognostic factors for 3-year overall survival.

  7. Intracellular trafficking as a determinant of AS-DACA cytotoxicity in rhabdomyosarcoma cells

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    Stewart Bernard W

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS is a malignant soft tissue sarcoma derived from skeletal muscle precursor cells, which accounts for 5-8% of all childhood malignancies. Disseminated RMS represents a major clinical obstacle, and the need for better treatment strategies for the clinically aggressive alveolar RMS subtype is particularly apparent. Previously, we have shown that the acridine-4-carboxamide derivative AS-DACA, a known topoisomerase II poison, is potently cytotoxic in the alveolar RMS cell line RH30, but is 190-fold less active in the embryonal RMS cell line RD. Here, we investigate the basis for this selectivity, and demonstrate in these RMS lines, and in an AS-DACA- resistant subclone of RH30, that AS-DACA-induced cytotoxicity correlates with the induction of DNA double strand breaks. Results We show that inhibition of the multidrug-resistance associated protein (MRP1 has no effect on AS-DACA sensitivity. By exploiting the pH-dependent fluorescence properties of AS-DACA, we have characterized its intracellular distribution, and show that it concentrates in the cell nucleus, as well as in acidic vesicles of the membrane trafficking system. We show that fluorescence microscopy can be used to determine the localization of AS-DACA to the nuclear and cytoplasmic compartments of RMS cells grown as spheroids, penetrance being much greater in RH30 than RD spheroids, and that the vesicular signal leads the way into the spheroid mass. EEA1 and Rab5 proteins, molecular markers expressed on early-endosomal vesicles, are reduced by > 50% in the sensitive cell lines. Conclusion Taking the evidence as a whole, suggests that endosomal vesicle trafficking influences the toxicity of AS-DACA in RMS cells.

  8. Predicting Outcome in Patients with Rhabdomyosarcoma: Role of [18F]Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casey, Dana L.; Wexler, Leonard H.; Fox, Josef J.; Dharmarajan, Kavita V.; Schoder, Heiko; Price, Alison N.; Wolden, Suzanne L.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate whether [ 18 F]fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) response of the primary tumor after induction chemotherapy predicts outcomes in rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS). Methods and Materials: After excluding those with initial tumor resection, 107 patients who underwent FDG-PET after induction chemotherapy at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center from 2002 to 2013 were reviewed. Local control (LC), progression-free survival (PFS), and overall survival (OS) were calculated according to FDG-PET response and maximum standardized uptake value (SUV) at baseline (PET1/SUV1), after induction chemotherapy (PET2/SUV2), and after local therapy (PET3/SUV3). Receiver operator characteristic curves were used to determine the optimal cutoff for dichotomization of SUV1 and SUV2 values. Results: The SUV1 (<9.5 vs ≥9.5) was predictive of PFS (P=.02) and OS (P=.02), but not LC. After 12 weeks (median) of induction chemotherapy, 45 patients had negative PET2 scans and 62 had positive scans: 3-year PFS was 72% versus 44%, respectively (P=.01). The SUV2 (<1.5 vs ≥1.5) was similarly predictive of PFS (P=.005) and was associated with LC (P=.02) and OS (P=.03). A positive PET3 scan was predictive of worse PFS (P=.0009), LC (P=.05), and OS (P=.03). Conclusions: [ 18 F]fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography is an early indicator of outcomes in patients with RMS. Future prospective trials may incorporate FDG-PET response data for risk-adapted therapy and early assessment of new treatment regimens

  9. A Novel Notch-YAP Circuit Drives Stemness and Tumorigenesis in Embryonal Rhabdomyosarcoma.

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    Slemmons, Katherine K; Crose, Lisa E S; Riedel, Stefan; Sushnitha, Manuela; Belyea, Brian; Linardic, Corinne M

    2017-12-01

    Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS), a cancer characterized by skeletal muscle features, is the most common soft-tissue sarcoma of childhood. While low- and intermediate-risk groups have seen improved outcomes, high-risk patients still face a 5-year survival rate of statistic that has not changed in over 40 years. Understanding the biologic underpinnings of RMS is critical. The developmental pathways of Notch and YAP have been identified as potent but independent oncogenic signals that support the embryonal variant of RMS (eRMS). Here, the cross-talk between these pathways and the impact on eRMS tumorigenesis is reported. Using human eRMS cells grown as three-dimensional (3D) rhabdospheres, which enriches in stem cells, it was found that Notch signaling transcriptionally upregulates YAP1 gene expression and YAP activity. Reciprocally, YAP transcriptionally upregulates the Notch ligand genes JAG1 and DLL1 and the core Notch transcription factor RBPJ This bidirectional circuit boosts expression of key stem cell genes, including SOX2 , which is functionally required for eRMS spheres. Silencing this circuit for therapeutic purposes may be challenging, because the inhibition of one node (e.g., pharmacologic Notch blockade) can be rescued by upregulation of another (constitutive YAP expression). Instead, dual inhibition of Notch and YAP is necessary. Finally, supporting the existence of this circuit beyond a model system, nuclear Notch and YAP protein expression are correlated in human eRMS tumors, and YAP suppression in vivo decreases Notch signaling and SOX2 expression. Implications: This study identifies a novel oncogenic signaling circuit driving eRMS stemness and tumorigenesis, and provides evidence and rationale for combination therapies co-targeting Notch and YAP. Mol Cancer Res; 15(12); 1777-91. ©2017 AACR . ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  10. Local Failure in Parameningeal Rhabdomyosarcoma Correlates With Poor Response to Induction Chemotherapy

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    Ladra, Matthew M. [Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Mandeville, Henry C. [The Royal Marsden Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Niemierko, Andrzej; Padera, Timothy P.; Friedmann, Alison M.; MacDonald, Shannon M.; Ebb, David; Chen, Yen-Lin; Tarbell, Nancy J. [Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Yock, Torunn I., E-mail: tyock@partners.org [Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2015-06-01

    Background: Local control remains a challenge in pediatric parameningeal rhabdomyosarcoma (PM-RMS), and survival after local failure (LF) is poor. Identifying patients with a high risk of LF is of great interest to clinicians. In this study, we examined whether tumor response to induction chemotherapy (CT) could predict LF in embryonal PM-RMS. Methods: We identified 24 patients with embryonal PM-RMS, age 2 to 18 years, with complete magnetic resonance imaging and gross residual disease after surgical resection. All patients received proton radiation therapy (RT), median dose 50.4 Gy{sub RBE} (50.4-55.8 Gy{sub RBE}). Tumor size was measured before initial CT and before RT. Results: With a median follow-up time of 4.1 years for survivors, LF was seen in 9 patients (37.5%). The median time from the initiation of CT to the start of RT was 4.8 weeks. Patients with LF had a similar initial (pre-CT) tumor volume compared with patients with local controlled (LC) (54 cm{sup 3} vs 43 cm{sup 3}, P=.9) but a greater median volume before RT (pre-RT) (40 cm{sup 3} vs 7 cm{sup 3}, P=.009) and a smaller median relative percent volume reduction (RPVR) in tumor size (0.4% vs 78%, P<.001). Older age (P=.05), larger pre-RT tumor volume (P=.03), and smaller RPVR (P=.003) were significantly associated with actuarial LF on univariate Cox analysis. Conclusions: Poor response to induction CT appears to be associated with an increased risk of LF in pediatric embryonal PM-RMS.

  11. Genito-urinary Rhabdomyosarcoma: Overview on SIOP committee trials and results

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    Martelli, Helene

    1997-01-01

    Since 1975, 4 rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) studies have been undertaken by the SIOP (RMS 75, MMT 84, MMT 89 and presently MMT 95) (FLAMANT 1985 -1997). The main goal of theses protocols was to improve the survival of children with RMS while reducing late effects from therapy by restricting the indications for local treatment (surgery and/or radiotherapy) after good response to initial chemotherapy (CT). All theses studies are based on the proven efficacy of initial CT (Vincristine, Dactinomycin, Cyclophosphamide replaced by Ifosfamide) followed by local treatment of residual disease. In case of complete clinical and radiological remission after initial CT, a Mm study (Godzinski 1994) concluded that positive biopsies were rare (5%) and that the local relapse rate remained high even when biopsies apparently confirmed complete remission. subsequently, MMT studies have not placed such emphasis on the value of second look surgery to confirm clinical and radiological evidence of remission. surgery is therefore indicated in case of residual mass after initial CT and should, as a rule, be conservative, anticipating local radiotherapy for residual disease. Genito-urinary RMS account for 24% of all RMS in MMT 84 study and 28% in MMT 89 study. They are classified into two groups, according to slop workshop (RODARY 1989): genito-urinary bladder prostate (GUBP) and genito-urinary non-bladder prostate (GU non BP) including paratesticular RMS in boys and uterine and/or vulvo-vaginal RMS in girls. According to MMT 84 study, tumor site is an important prognostic factor in multivariate analysis as well as T status (according to SIOP UICC- TNM classification) and histology (alveolar versus non alveolar). GU non-BP represents the most favourable site with orbit followed in order by GUBP, head and neck, limbs and other sites

  12. Hyper-activation of Notch3 amplifies the proliferative potential of rhabdomyosarcoma cells.

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    Maria De Salvo

    Full Text Available Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS is a pediatric myogenic-derived soft tissue sarcoma that includes two major histopathological subtypes: embryonal and alveolar. The majority of alveolar RMS expresses PAX3-FOXO1 fusion oncoprotein, associated with the worst prognosis. RMS cells show myogenic markers expression but are unable to terminally differentiate. The Notch signaling pathway is a master player during myogenesis, with Notch1 activation sustaining myoblast expansion and Notch3 activation inhibiting myoblast fusion and differentiation. Accordingly, Notch1 signaling is up-regulated and activated in embryonal RMS samples and supports the proliferation of tumor cells. However, it is unable to control their differentiation properties. We previously reported that Notch3 is activated in RMS cell lines, of both alveolar and embryonal subtype, and acts by inhibiting differentiation. Moreover, Notch3 depletion reduces PAX3-FOXO1 alveolar RMS tumor growth in vivo. However, whether Notch3 activation also sustains the proliferation of RMS cells remained unclear. To address this question, we forced the expression of the activated form of Notch3, Notch3IC, in the RH30 and RH41 PAX3-FOXO1-positive alveolar and in the RD embryonal RMS cell lines and studied the proliferation of these cells. We show that, in all three cell lines tested, Notch3IC over-expression stimulates in vitro cell proliferation and prevents the effects of pharmacological Notch inhibition. Furthermore, Notch3IC further increases RH30 cell growth in vivo. Interestingly, knockdown of Notch canonical ligands JAG1 or DLL1 in RMS cell lines decreases Notch3 activity and reduces cell proliferation. Finally, the expression of Notch3IC and its target gene HES1 correlates with that of the proliferative marker Ki67 in a small cohort of primary PAX-FOXO1 alveolar RMS samples. These results strongly suggest that high levels of Notch3 activation increase the proliferative potential of RMS cells.

  13. Delta-like 1 homolog (dlk1: a marker for rhabdomyosarcomas implicated in skeletal muscle regeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louise H Jørgensen

    Full Text Available Dlk1, a member of the Epidermal Growth Factor family, is expressed in multiple tissues during development, and has been detected in carcinomas and neuroendocrine tumors. Dlk1 is paternally expressed and belongs to a group of imprinted genes associated with rhabdomyosarcomas but not with other primitive childhood tumors to date. Here, we investigate the possible roles of Dlk1 in skeletal muscle tumor formation. We analyzed tumors of different mesenchymal origin for expression of Dlk1 and various myogenic markers and found that Dlk1 was present consistently in myogenic tumors. The coincident observation of Dlk1 with a highly proliferative state in myogenic tumors led us to subsequently investigate the involvement of Dlk1 in the control of the adult myogenic programme. We performed an injury study in Dlk1 transgenic mice, ectopically expressing ovine Dlk1 (membrane bound C2 variant under control of the myosin light chain promotor, and detected an early, enhanced formation of myotubes in Dlk1 transgenic mice. We then stably transfected the mouse myoblast cell line, C2C12, with full-length Dlk1 (soluble A variant and detected an inhibition of myotube formation, which could be reversed by adding Dlk1 antibody to the culture supernatant. These results suggest that Dlk1 is involved in controlling the myogenic programme and that the various splice forms may exert different effects. Interestingly, both in the Dlk1 transgenic mice and the DLK1-C2C12 cells, we detected reduced myostatin expression, suggesting that the effect of Dlk1 on the myogenic programme might involve the myostatin signaling pathway. In support of a relationship between Dlk1 and myostatin we detected reciprocal expression of these two transcripts during different cell cycle stages of human myoblasts. Together our results suggest that Dlk1 is a candidate marker for skeletal muscle tumors and might be involved directly in skeletal muscle tumor formation through a modulatory effect on the

  14. Rhabdomyosarcoma of the lower female genital tract: an analysis of 144 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasioudis, Dimitrios; Alevizakos, Michail; Chapman-Davis, Eloise; Witkin, Steven S; Holcomb, Kevin

    2017-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to elucidate the clinico-pathological characteristics of female patients with lower genital tract rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) stratified by age group and investigate their prognosis, using a multi-institutional database. The National Cancer Institute's Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database was accessed (1973-2013) and a cohort of females diagnosed with RMS of the lower genital tract (vulva, vagina, cervix) was drawn. Five-year overall survival (OS) rate was estimated following generation of Kaplan-Meier curves and compared with the log-rank test. A total of 144 eligible cases were identified; 51.4 and 48.6% originated from the vagina/vulva and the cervix, respectively. Median patient age was 16 years and distant metastases were rare (ten cases). The majority of tumors were of embryonal histology (75.7%). Non-embryonal RMS was more prevalent in the older patient groups. Tumors originating from the cervix were more common among adolescents and premenopausal women. Rate of LN involvement was 52.9 and 20% for vulvovaginal and cervical tumors (p = 0.02). Five-year OS rate was 68.4%; factors associated with better OS were younger age, absence of distant metastasis, embryonal histology, negative LNs, and performance of surgery. For prepubertal girls and adolescents, radical surgery did not confer a survival benefit compared to local tumor excision. RMS of the lower genital tract primarily affects prepubertal girls and adolescents, who have excellent survival rates; however, outcomes for adults remain poor.

  15. The challenging role of radiation therapy for very young children with rhabdomyosarcoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puri, Dev R.; Wexler, Leonard H.; Meyers, Paul A.; La Quaglia, Michael P.; Healey, John H.; Wolden, Suzanne L.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate local control and toxicity for very young children treated with multimodality therapy for rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS). Methods and Materials: From 1990 to 2004, 20 patients ≤36 months at diagnosis were treated at our institution. Nineteen underwent chemotherapy (CMT), surgery and/or intraoperative high-dose-rate brachytherapy (IOHDR), and external-beam radiation (EBRT). Median age was 17 months. Sites included extremity (7), trunk (5), parameningeal (4), orbit (1), head/neck (1), bladder/prostate (1). Histologies consisted of 10 embryonal (53%) and 9 alveolar/undifferentiated (47%). Ten had delayed gross total resection (GTR) at median time of 17 weeks after the start of CMT, and 8 of these underwent IOHDR. Median interval between start of CMT and EBRT was 18 weeks. Median EBRT dose was 36 Gy. EBRT technique was either intensity-modulated (11), three-dimensional (3), or two-dimensional (5). Functional outcome was assessed for patients alive ≥1 year after diagnosis (15) in terms of mild, moderate, or severe deficits. Results: Median follow-up was 33 months for survivors and 23 months for all patients. Two-year actuarial local control, event-free survival, disease-specific survival, and overall survival were 84%, 52%, 74%, and 62%, respectively. All patients who began EBRT ≤18 weeks after the start of CMT had their disease controlled locally. Five have mild deficits and 10 have no deficits. Conclusions: A reduced dose of 36-Gy EBRT after delayed GTR may maximize local control while minimizing long-term sequelae for very young children with RMS, but unresectable tumors (e.g., parameningeal) require higher doses. Normal-tissue-sparing techniques such as intensity-modulated radiation therapy and IOHDR are encouraged. Local control may be maximized when EBRT begins ≤18 weeks after initiation of CMT, but further study is warranted. Longer follow-up is required to determine the full extent of late effects

  16. Local Control After Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Head-and-Neck Rhabdomyosarcoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curtis, Amarinthia E.; Okcu, M. Fatih; Chintagumpala, Murali; Teh, Bin S.; Paulino, Arnold C.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the patterns of failure in patients treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for head-and-neck rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS). Methods and Materials: Between 1998 and 2005, 19 patients with a diagnosis of head-and-neck RMS received IMRT at The Methodist Hospital. There were 11 male and 8 female patients, with a median age of 6 years at time of irradiation. Tumor location was parameningeal in 7, orbital in 6, and other head-and-neck RMS in 6. Chemotherapy was given to all patients, with vincristine, actinomycin D, and cyclophosphamide being the most common regimen (n = 18). The median prescribed dose was 5040 cGy. The clinical target volume included the gross tumor volume with a 1.5-cm margin. The median duration of follow-up for surviving patients was 56 months. Results: The 4-year overall survival and local control rates were 76% and 92.9%, respectively. One patient developed a local failure in the high-dose region of the radiation field; there were no marginal failures. Distant metastasis was seen in 4 patients. Overall survival was 42.9% for parameningeal sites and 100% for other sites (p < 0.01). Late toxicities were seen in 7 patients. Two secondary malignancies occurred in 1 child with embryonal RMS of the face and a p53 mutation. Conclusions: Local control was excellent in patients receiving IMRT for head-and-neck RMS. Patterns of local failure reveal no marginal failures in this group of patients

  17. A single amino acid substitution controls DAF-dependent phenotype of echovirus 11 in rhabdomyosarcoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novoselov, Alexey V; Rezaykin, Alexey V; Sergeev, Alexander G; Fadeyev, Fedor A; Grigoryeva, Julia V; Sokolova, Zoya I

    2012-06-01

    Decay accelerating factor (DAF, CD55) is used by DAF-dependent (Daf+) variants of echovirus 11 (EV11) as a primary cellular receptor. The interaction of EV11 with DAF is completely reversible, therefore DAF-dependent variants require an unidentified coreceptor to initiate uncoating. Daf- variants of EV11, which do not interact with DAF, use an alternative primary cellular receptor. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis whether the coreceptor, which is necessary for the uncoating of DAF-dependent variants, may act as an alternative primary receptor for the Daf- variants of EV11. By using the model of the two closely related daf+ and daf- clones of EV11 in rhabdomyosarcoma (RD) cell line, it was shown that a single amino acid substitution in the capsid protein VP2 could control the expression of the DAF-dependent phenotype. Anti-DAF monoclonal antibody has blocked the infection of RD cells by the DAF-dependent daf+ clone, but not by the daf- clone of EV11. Since the structural proteins of the two clones differed only in the receptor binding site for DAF, the unidentified non-DAF primary receptor for the daf- clone might have the same conformation as the uncoating coreceptor required for the daf+ clone. Despite the difference in primary receptors, both daf+ and daf- clones were equally inhibited by a monoclonal antibody to beta2-microglobulin. The monoclonal antibody B9.12.1 to class I human leukocyte antigen molecules showed no inhibitory effect in regards to either clone. The hypothesis of convergent intracellular traffic of Daf+ and Daf- variants of EV11 is discussed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. The evaluation of results and complications of radiotherapy in children treated for orbital rhabdomyosarcoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skowronska-Gardas, A.; Pedziwiatr, K.; Chojnacka, M.

    2002-01-01

    To analyse treatment results and late complications of radiotherapy in children treated for orbital rhabdomyosarcoma. Between the years 1980 and 2000 34 children (median age 7 yrs. range: 1-15) with orbital RMS, were treated in the 1st Department of the MCCMCC in Warsaw. All but two of the patients received induction chemotherapy; 3 children were treated after ablative surgery (exenteration); 6 children were irradiated due to recurrence after chemotherapy. All the children were treated with megavoltage radiotherapy from a Co-60 unit or linear accelerator. We applied individual lens and lacrimal apparatus shielding in 16 patients. Five children, treated between 1996-2000, received conformal radiotherapy, with CT and 3-D treatment planning system.To obtain information about late side effects, we developed a questionnaire, including questions about the status of the affected eye, appearance of the orbit and facial structures.Thirty one patients (91%) are still living (between 24 and 264 months - median 138 mos) after completion of radiotherapy and 28 (82%) with no recurrence. In six patients treated due to recurrent tumour OS and DFS was 80% and 60%, respectively. Late complications were evaluated in 24 patients. We observed lacrimal duct stenosis in 33%, cataract in 29%, enophtalmos in 20% of patients. Retinopathy developed in 2 children, glaucoma in 2 pts, and facial asymmetry in 3 pts. In one case enucleation of blind eye was performed. Thirteen children have preserved adequate vision in the treated eye. In children treated with conformal radiotherapy we did not observe any late complications. Radiotherapy in orbital RMS allows to obtain good local control and excellent survival rate. Late complications could be limited with the application of individual treatment planning and conformal radiotherapy. (author)

  19. Genomic Imbalances in Rhabdomyosarcoma Cell Lines Affect Expression of Genes Frequently Altered in Primary Tumors: An Approach to Identify Candidate Genes Involved in Tumor Development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Missiaglia, Edoardo; Selfe, Joanna; Hamdi, Mohamed; Williamson, Daniel; Schaaf, Gerben; Fang, Cheng; Koster, Jan; Summersgill, Brenda; Messahel, Boo; Versteeg, Rogier; Pritchard-Jones, Kathy; Kool, Marcel; Shipley, Janet

    2009-01-01

    Rhabdomyosarcomas (RMS) are the most common pediatric soft tissue sarcomas. They resemble developing skeletal muscle and are histologically divided into two main subtypes; alveolar and embryonal RMS. Characteristic genomic aberrations, including the PAX3- and PAX7-FOXO1 fusion genes in alveolar

  20. Genomic gains and losses are similar in genetic and histologic subsets of rhabdomyosarcoma, whereas amplification predominates in embryonal with anaplasia and alveolar subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridge, Julia A; Liu, Jian; Qualman, Stephen J; Suijkerbuijk, Ron; Wenger, Gail; Zhang, Ji; Wan, Xiaoying; Baker, K Scott; Sorensen, Poul; Barr, Frederic G

    2002-03-01

    In this investigation, we selected PAX3/FKHR and PAX7/FKHR fusion transcript-positive and -negative alveolar rhabdomyosarcomas (ARMSs) and embryonal rhabdomyosarcomas (ERMSs) with and without anaplastic features, to ascertain genomic imbalance differences and/or similarities within these histopathologic and genetic rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) variants. Comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) studies were performed on 45 rhabdomyosarcoma specimens consisting of 23 ARMSs and 22 ERMSs (12 ERMS cases were included from an earlier study). The anaplastic variant of RMS has not previously been subjected to CGH analysis. Overall, the most prominent imbalances were gain of chromosomes or chromosomal regions 2/2q (40%), 7/7q (31%), 8/8p (53%), 11/11q (31%), 12q13-15 (49%), 13q14 (22%), and 20/20p (31%), and loss of 1p36 (27%), 3p14-21 (22%), 9q21-22 (33%), 10q22-qter (18%), 16q (27%), 17p (22%), and 22 (22%). These gains and losses were distributed equally between ARMS and ERMS histologic subtypes (excluding 7/7q and 11/11q gain that were observed chiefly in ERMS), demonstrating that these entities are similar with respect to recurrent genomic imbalances. Moreover, genomic imbalances were also evenly distributed among the ARMS fusion transcript subtypes, providing evidence for a genetic kinship despite the absence of a fusion transcript in some cases. Genomic amplification was detected in 26% and 23% of the ARMS and ERMS cases, respectively (with nearly all of the latter subset exhibiting anaplastic features). One amplicon, involving 15q25-26, corresponds to the locus of the insulin-like growth factor type I receptor (IGF1R) gene. Amplification of IGF1R was confirmed molecularly in the cases exhibiting a 15q25-26 amplicon. In summary, these results indicate that genomic gains and losses involve alike chromosomes with similar frequencies within the histopathologic and genetic subtypes of rhabdomyosarcoma, that genomic amplification is

  1. Rabdomiosarcoma de vejiga: Presentación de un caso Urinary bladder rhabdomyosarcoma: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilio Simón Barroso de la Cruz

    2004-12-01

    checked. Normal uterus, ovaries, colon, intestine and liver were found. In the histological study, it was proved that the tumor was a pleomorphic rhabdomyosarcoma. Its evolution was followed and interconsultations were made with the oncology service for further treatment

  2. Patterns of Failure for Rhabdomyosarcoma of the Perineal and Perianal Region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casey, Dana L.; Wexler, Leonard H.; LaQuaglia, Michael P.; Meyers, Paul A.; Wolden, Suzanne L.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To analyze prognostic factors and patterns of failure for rhabdomyosarcoma of the perineal and perianal region (PRMS), with an emphasis on radiation therapy for locoregional control. Methods and Materials: Detailed records of all 14 patients treated for PRMS at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center between 1998 and 2012 were reviewed. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to assess the event-free survival (EFS) and overall survival (OS), and a competing-risks analysis was used to assess the cumulative incidence of local, regional, and distant failures. Results: Median age was 15.8 years (range, 1.1-31.9 years). High-risk features were identified: 9 of 14 patients (64%) had group 3 disease and 3 of 14 (21%) had group 4; 11 of 14 tumors (78%) were alveolar; 12 of 14 tumors (86%) were ≥5 cm; and 9 of 14 patients (64%) had involved lymph nodes (N1). Of those aged ≥10 years at diagnosis, 9 of 10 (90%) had alveolar histology, all had tumors ≥5 cm, and 8 of 10 (80%) presented with N1 disease. The rates of local, regional, and distant failure at 5 years were 17%, 31%, and 52%, respectively. Although 3 of the 4 patients with regional failure received nodal irradiation, only one of the nodal failures occurred in the radiation therapy field. The 5-year EFS was 33%, and OS was 39%. Age ≥10 years was associated with poor outcomes: EFS was 13% in patients aged ≥10 years, compared with 75% in those aged <10 years (P=.04); the OS was 13% in patients aged ≥10 years, compared with 100% in those aged <10 years (P=.04). Conclusions: Patients with PRMS, especially those aged ≥10 years, present with poor prognostic features and continue to have poor outcomes. Given the high incidence of regional node recurrence, we recommend prophylactic ilioinguinal lymph node irradiation for all patients aged ≥10 years. For children aged <10 years, nodal evaluation is essential to determine the role for lymph node irradiation

  3. Differential gene expressions of the MAPK signaling pathway in enterovirus 71-infected rhabdomyosarcoma cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weifeng Shi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK signaling pathway plays an important role in response to viral infection. The aim of this study was to explore the function and mechanism of MAPK signaling pathway in enterovirus 71 (EV71 infection of human rhabdomyosarcoma (RD cells. METHODS: Apoptosis of RD cells was observed using annexin V-FITC/PI binding assay under a fluorescence microscope. Cellular RNA was extracted and transcribed to cDNA. The expressions of 56 genes of MAPK signaling pathway in EV71-infected RD cells at 8 h and 20 h after infection were analyzed by PCR array. The levels of IL-2, IL-4, IL-10, and TNF-α in the supernatant of RD cells infected with EV71 at different time points were measured by ELISA. RESULTS: The viability of RD cells decreased obviously within 48 h after EV71 infection. Compared with the control group, EV71 infection resulted in the significantly enhanced releases of IL-2, IL-4, IL-10 and TNF-α from infected RD cells (p < 0.05. At 8 h after infection, the expressions of c-Jun, c-Fos, IFN-i, MEKK1, MLK3 and NIK genes in EV71-infected RD cells were up-regulated by 2.08-6.12-fold, whereas other 19 genes (e.g. AKT1, AKT2, E2F1, IKK and NF-κB1 exhibited down-regulation. However, at 20 h after infection, those MAPK signaling molecules including MEKK1, ASK1, MLK2, MLK3, NIK, MEK1, MEK2, MEK4, MEK7, ERK1, JNK1 and JNK2 were up-regulated. In addition, the expressions of AKT2, ELK1, c-Jun, c-Fos, NF-κB p65, PI3K and STAT1 were also increased. CONCLUSION: EV71 infection induces the differential gene expressions of MAPK signaling pathway such as ERK, JNK and PI3K/AKT in RD cells, which may be associated with the secretions of inflammatory cytokines and host cell apoptosis.

  4. Embryonal Rhabdomyosarcoma of the Adult Urinary Bladder: A Rare Case Report of Misclassification as Inflammatory Myofibroblastic Tumor

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    Kelven Weijing Chen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma (ERMS of the adult urinary bladder is a rare malignant tumour. Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumour (IMT of the bladder is a benign genitourinary tumour that may appear variable histologically but usually lacks unequivocal malignant traits. Techniques like flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry may be used to differentiate these two tumours. Our patient, a 46-year-old male, had rapidly recurring lower urinary tract symptoms after two transurethral resections of the prostate. He subsequently underwent a transvesical prostatectomy which showed IMT on histology. However, his symptoms did not resolve and an open resection done at our institution revealed a 6 cm tumour arising from the right bladder neck. This time, histology was ERMS with diffuse anaplasia of the bladder. Rapid recurrence of urinary symptoms with prostate regrowth after surgery is unusual. Differential diagnoses of uncommon bladder malignancies should be considered if there is an inconsistent clinical course as treatment approaches are different.

  5. Embryonal Rhabdomyosarcoma of the Adult Urinary Bladder: A Rare Case Report of Misclassification as Inflammatory Myofibroblastic Tumor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kelven Weijing; Wu, Fiona Mei Wen; Lee, Victor Kwan Min; Esuvaranathan, Kesavan

    2015-01-01

    Embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma (ERMS) of the adult urinary bladder is a rare malignant tumour. Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumour (IMT) of the bladder is a benign genitourinary tumour that may appear variable histologically but usually lacks unequivocal malignant traits. Techniques like flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry may be used to differentiate these two tumours. Our patient, a 46-year-old male, had rapidly recurring lower urinary tract symptoms after two transurethral resections of the prostate. He subsequently underwent a transvesical prostatectomy which showed IMT on histology. However, his symptoms did not resolve and an open resection done at our institution revealed a 6 cm tumour arising from the right bladder neck. This time, histology was ERMS with diffuse anaplasia of the bladder. Rapid recurrence of urinary symptoms with prostate regrowth after surgery is unusual. Differential diagnoses of uncommon bladder malignancies should be considered if there is an inconsistent clinical course as treatment approaches are different. PMID:25737794

  6. Knock-down of ELMO1 in Paediatric Rhabdomyosarcoma Cells by Nanoparticle Mediated siRNA Delivery

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    Xinyue Huang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS is the most common soft tissue sarcoma that is found in children and has a poor outcome for those with metastatic disease. Two histological groups have been distinguished - embryonal (ERMS and alveolar (ARMS forms. The ARMS subtype has higher rates of metastasis, as well as higher levels of ELMO1, which is thought to be involved in cell migration. Therefore, the knock-down of ELMO1 by targeted siRNA could provide a mechanism to prevent the metastatic behaviour of ARMS cells. However, challenges still lie in the delivery of nucleotides to a tumour site. Herein, we have described the use of a variety of mesoporous silica nanoparticles as a delivery system for siRNA that is specific for ELMO1 and shown the effective reduction in cell invasive behaviour in these cells.

  7. Urinary bladder botryoid rhabdomyosarcoma with widespread metastases in an 8-month-old Labrador cross dog : clinical communication

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    K. Gerber

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available An 8-month-old crossbred Labrador retriever was presented with a history and clinical signs suggestive of lower urinary tract obstruction. Laboratory results revealed azotaemia and hyperphosphataemia. Ultrasonographic evaluation of the urinary tract showed a mass at the bladder trigone, hydronephrosis, hyrodureter, and suspected metastases to lymph nodes and the liver. Pulmonary metastasis was identified on thoracic radiographs. A post mortem confirmed metastases to the liver, lungs and regional lymph nodes, as well as to the mesenteric lymph nodes, mediastinum, heart, subcutaneous tissue and several muscle groups. A histopathological diagnosis of metastatic botryoid rhabdomyosarcoma (sarcoma botryoides was made. A review of the literature shows that, although the bladder trigone is a well documented location for this tumour, this case was unique with its widespread metastases to previously undocumented organs. The incidence, embryology, ultrasonographic appearance and treatment of this tumour are discussed.

  8. Rabdomiosarcoma de oído en el niño Rhabdomyosarcoma of the ear in a child

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    Esther Villavicencio Cordobés

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Los sarcomas de partes blandas son un grupo heterogéneo de tumores que se denominan así porque se originan en las estructuras que soportan el cuerpo o envuelven los órganos y tejidos. Dentro de los sarcomas de tejidos blandos, se encuentra el rabdomiosarcoma, que es la variedad más frecuente en Pediatría. A pesar de ser tumores raros, representan aproximadamente el 3 % de los tumores malignos pediátricos. Cuando se presentan, se localizan, en su mayoría, en la cabeza y el cuello, la vejiga, las vías biliares y la vagina. La localización en el oído medio es muy infrecuente. El objetivo de nuestro trabajo es presentar el caso de una paciente con esta localización del tumor, su evolución, y realizar una revisión del tema.Soft tissue sarcomas are a heterogeneous group of tumors that are so called because they occur in the structures supporting the body or lining the organs and tissues. Within this group, one may find the rhabdomyosarcoma that is the most frequent type in pediatrics. In spite of being rare tumors, they account for 3 % of pediatric malignant tumors. Most of them are located in the neck and the head, in the bladder, in the biliary ducts and in the vagina. Rhabdomyosarcoma of the middle ear is very uncommon. This paper was aimed at presenting a female patient with this type of tumor, her progression, and also a literature review on this topic.

  9. Brachytherapy Combined With Surgery for Conservative Treatment of Children With Bladder Neck and/or Prostate Rhabdomyosarcoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chargari, Cyrus, E-mail: cyrus.chargari@gustaveroussy.fr [Brachytherapy Unit, Department of Radiotherapy, Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France); Institut de Recherche Biomédicale des Armées, Bretigny-sur-Orge (France); French Military Health Service Academy, Ecole du Val-de-Grâce, Paris (France); Haie-Meder, Christine [Brachytherapy Unit, Department of Radiotherapy, Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France); Guérin, Florent [Department of Pediatric Surgery, Bicêtre Hospital, Hôpitaux Universitaires Paris Sud, Assistance Publique des Hôpitaux de Paris, Le Kremlin-Bicêtre (France); Minard-Colin, Véronique [Department of Pediatric and Adolescent Oncology, Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France); Lambert, Guénolée de [Department of Pediatric Surgery, Bicêtre Hospital, Hôpitaux Universitaires Paris Sud, Assistance Publique des Hôpitaux de Paris, Le Kremlin-Bicêtre (France); Mazeron, Renaud; Escande, Alexandre; Marsolat, Fanny; Dumas, Isabelle [Brachytherapy Unit, Department of Radiotherapy, Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France); Deutsch, Eric [Brachytherapy Unit, Department of Radiotherapy, Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France); Faculté de Médecine Paris Sud, Université Paris Sud, Université Paris Saclay, Paris (France); Valteau-Couanet, Dominique [Department of Pediatric and Adolescent Oncology, Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France); and others

    2017-06-01

    Purpose: To report the results of a conservative strategy based on partial surgery combined with brachytherapy in a prospective cohort of children with bladder–prostate rhabdomyosarcoma (BP RMS). Methods and Materials: We prospectively documented the outcome of children treated in our department between 1991 and 2015 for BP RMS and undergoing a multimodal approach combining conservative surgery (partial cystectomy and/or partial prostatectomy) and perioperative interstitial low-dose-rate or pulse-dose-rate brachytherapy. Before brachytherapy, children had received chemotherapy with modalities depending on their risk group of treatment. Results: A total of 100 patients were identified, with a median age of 28 months (range, 5.6 months-14 years). According to the Intergroup Rhabdomyosarcoma Study (IRS) group, 84 were IRS-III, and 12 were IRS-IV tumors. Four patients were treated at relapse. The median number of chemotherapy cycles before local therapy was 6 (range, 4-13). After surgery, 63 patients had a macroscopic tumor residuum. Five patients underwent a brachytherapy boost before pelvic external beam radiation therapy because of nodal involvement, and 95 had exclusive brachytherapy. Median follow-up was 64 months (range, 6 months-24.5 years). Five-year disease-free and overall survival rates were 84% (95% confidence interval 80%-88%) and 91% (95% confidence interval 87%-95%), respectively. At last follow-up most survivors presented with only mild to moderate genitourinary sequelae and a normal diurnal urinary continence. Five patients required a secondary total cystectomy: 3 for a nonfunctional bladder and 2 for relapse. Conclusion: Brachytherapy is effective as part of a conservative strategy for BP RMS, with a relatively low delayed toxicity as compared with previously published studies using external beam radiation therapy. Longer follow-up is required to ensure that the functional results are maintained over time.

  10. Brachytherapy Combined With Surgery for Conservative Treatment of Children With Bladder Neck and/or Prostate Rhabdomyosarcoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chargari, Cyrus; Haie-Meder, Christine; Guérin, Florent; Minard-Colin, Véronique; Lambert, Guénolée de; Mazeron, Renaud; Escande, Alexandre; Marsolat, Fanny; Dumas, Isabelle; Deutsch, Eric; Valteau-Couanet, Dominique

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To report the results of a conservative strategy based on partial surgery combined with brachytherapy in a prospective cohort of children with bladder–prostate rhabdomyosarcoma (BP RMS). Methods and Materials: We prospectively documented the outcome of children treated in our department between 1991 and 2015 for BP RMS and undergoing a multimodal approach combining conservative surgery (partial cystectomy and/or partial prostatectomy) and perioperative interstitial low-dose-rate or pulse-dose-rate brachytherapy. Before brachytherapy, children had received chemotherapy with modalities depending on their risk group of treatment. Results: A total of 100 patients were identified, with a median age of 28 months (range, 5.6 months-14 years). According to the Intergroup Rhabdomyosarcoma Study (IRS) group, 84 were IRS-III, and 12 were IRS-IV tumors. Four patients were treated at relapse. The median number of chemotherapy cycles before local therapy was 6 (range, 4-13). After surgery, 63 patients had a macroscopic tumor residuum. Five patients underwent a brachytherapy boost before pelvic external beam radiation therapy because of nodal involvement, and 95 had exclusive brachytherapy. Median follow-up was 64 months (range, 6 months-24.5 years). Five-year disease-free and overall survival rates were 84% (95% confidence interval 80%-88%) and 91% (95% confidence interval 87%-95%), respectively. At last follow-up most survivors presented with only mild to moderate genitourinary sequelae and a normal diurnal urinary continence. Five patients required a secondary total cystectomy: 3 for a nonfunctional bladder and 2 for relapse. Conclusion: Brachytherapy is effective as part of a conservative strategy for BP RMS, with a relatively low delayed toxicity as compared with previously published studies using external beam radiation therapy. Longer follow-up is required to ensure that the functional results are maintained over time.

  11. The Role of Childhood Infections and Immunizations on Childhood Rhabdomyosarcoma: A Report From the Children's Oncology Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankaran, Hari; Danysh, Heather E; Scheurer, Michael E; Okcu, M Fatih; Skapek, Stephen X; Hawkins, Douglas S; Spector, Logan G; Erhardt, Erik B; Grufferman, Seymour; Lupo, Philip J

    2016-09-01

    Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) is a rare, highly malignant tumor arising from primitive mesenchymal cells that differentiate into skeletal muscle. Relatively little is known about RMS susceptibility. Based on growing evidence regarding the role of early immunologic challenges on RMS development, we evaluated the role of infections and immunizations on this clinically significant pediatric malignancy. RMS cases (n = 322) were enrolled from the third trial coordinated by the Intergroup Rhabdomyosarcoma Study Group. Population-based controls (n = 322) were pair matched to cases on race, sex, and age. The following immunizations were assessed: diphtheria, pertussis, and tetanus (DPT); measles, mumps, and rubella; and oral polio vaccine. We also evaluated if immunizations were complete versus incomplete. We examined selected infections including chickenpox, mumps, pneumonia, scarlet fever, rubella, rubeola, pertussis, mononucleosis, and lung infections. Conditional logistic regression models were used to calculate an odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) for each exposure, adjusted for maternal education and total annual income. Incomplete immunization schedules (OR = 5.30, 95% CI: 2.47-11.33) and incomplete DPT immunization (OR = 1.56, 95% CI: 1.06-2.29) were positively associated with childhood RMS. However, infections did not appear to be associated with childhood RMS. This is the largest study of RMS to date demonstrating a possible protective effect of immunizations against the development of childhood RMS. Further studies are needed to validate our findings. Our findings add to the growing body of literature, suggesting a protective role of routine vaccinations in childhood cancer and specifically in childhood RMS. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Fractionated, three-dimensional, planning-assisted proton-radiation therapy for orbital rhabdomyosarcoma: a novel technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hug, Eugen B.; Adams, Judy; Fitzek, Markus; Vries, Alexander de; Munzenrider, John E.

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: Most children with orbital rhabdomyosarcoma will survive their disease. However, conventional photon-radiation treatment, as part of multimodality therapy, results in varying degrees of long-term functional and cosmetic side effects. This report introduces external beam proton radiation therapy (PRT) as a conformal, three-dimensional planned radiation technique for this disease, analyzes normal tissue dosimetry, and describes the technique's application in the first 2 patients. Material and Methods: Between January 1995 and February 1996, 2 patients underwent PRT following biopsy and chemotherapy for orbital rhabdomyosarcoma. Fifty and 55 Cobalt Gray Equivalent (CGE) were delivered to the gross tumor volume and 40 CGE to clinical target volumes in both patients. A relative biologic effectiveness (RBE) of 1.1 was utilized to correlate proton dose calculations with CGE. To achieve dose conformity, a ''patch technique'' was utilized, where target regions were divided into segments, each treated by a separate proton field. Dose-volume histograms were obtained for target and nontarget regions, including lens, bony orbit, pituitary gland, optic chiasm, optic nerves, lacrimal gland, and ipsilateral frontal and temporal lobes. Results: At 3.4 and 2.5 years after PRT, both patients are clinically and radiographically free of disease. Visual acuity remains excellent, without signs of cataract formation; pituitary function is normal; cosmetically, only mild enophthalmos is noticeable. Doses to 90%, 50%, and 5% of lens volume were kept at less than 1%, less than 2%, and less than 8%, respectively. Fifty percent of lacrimal gland volume received less than 36% of the prescribed dose and 50% of the volume of the optic chiasm, pituitary gland, and hypothalamus were restricted to less than 2%. Proton conformity to orbital contents resulted in between 9% and 36% of the prescribed dose reaching the ipsilateral temporal and frontal lobes immediately adjacent to bony orbit (5

  13. Evaluation of Trace Elements in Augmentation of Statin-Induced Cytotoxicity in Uremic Serum-Exposed Human Rhabdomyosarcoma Cells

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    Hitoshi Uchiyama

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with end-stage kidney disease (ESKD are at higher risk for rhabdomyolysis induced by statin than patients with normal kidney function. Previously, we showed that this increase in the severity of statin-induced rhabdomyolysis was partly due to uremic toxins. However, changes in the quantity of various trace elements in ESKD patients likely contribute as well. The purpose of this study is to determine the effect of trace elements on statin-induced toxicity in rhabdomyosarcoma cells exposed to uremic serum (US cells for a long time. Cell viability, apoptosis, mRNA expression, and intracellular trace elements were assessed by viability assays, flow cytometry, real-time RT-PCR, and ICP-MS, respectively. US cells exhibited greater simvastatin-induced cytotoxicity than cells long-time exposed with normal serum (NS cells (non-overlapping 95% confidence intervals. Intracellular levels of Mg, Mn, Cu, and Zn were significantly less in US cells compared to that in NS cells (p < 0.05 or 0.01. Pre-treatment with TPEN increased simvastatin-induced cytotoxicity and eliminated the distinction between both cells of simvastatin-induced cytotoxicity. These results suggest that Zn deficiencies may be involved in the increased risk for muscle complaints in ESKD patients. In conclusion, the increased severity of statin-induced rhabdomyolysis in ESKD patients may be partly due to trace elements deficiencies.

  14. Influence of the timing of a concomitant boost during fractionated irradiation of rat rhabdomyosarcoma R1H

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubben, H.H.; Beck-Bornholdt, H.P.

    1993-01-01

    Rhabdomyosarcomas R1H of the rat (WAG/Rij) were treated using fractionation schedules including a boost. The total dose was 60 Gy. Overall treatment time was 6 weeks. Four different boost schedules were applied: A single dose boost (12.15 Gy) at the last day of treatment, a single dose boost (12.15 Gy) at the first day of treatment, a schedule including the boost in 7 fractions during the first week, and a schedule including the boost in 10 fractions during the first week of treatment. A standard schedule with 30 fractions of 2 Gy without a boost was used for comparison. Initially accelerated schedules, i.e. those with a boost at start of treatment, revealed higher effect on tumour parenchyma as monitored by local control rate and net growth delay. This could be due to a decrease of radio-sensitivity, that is, an increase of the hypoxic fraction of clonogenic tumour cells during fractionated irradiation. (orig.)

  15. Combined application of arsenic trioxide and lithium chloride augments viability reduction and apoptosis induction in human rhabdomyosarcoma cell lines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabine B Schleicher

    Full Text Available Rhabdomyosarcomas (RMS are the most prevalent soft tissue sarcomas affecting children and adolescents. Despite intensive treatment consisting of multimodal chemotherapy and surgery RMS patients diagnosed with metastatic disease expect long term survival rates of only 20%. Often multidrug resistance arises upon initial response emphasizing the need for new therapeutic drugs to improve treatment efficiency. Previously, we demonstrated the efficacy of the FDA approved drug arsenic trioxide (ATO specifically inhibiting viability and clonal growth as well as inducing cell death in human RMS cell lines of different subtypes. In this study, we combined low dose ATO with lithium chloride (LiCl, which is approved as mood stabilizer for the treatment of bipolar disorder, but also inhibits growth and survival of different cancer cell types in pre-clinical research. Indeed, we could show additive effects of LiCl and ATO on viability reduction, decrease of colony formation as well as cell death induction. In the course of this, LiCl induced inhibitory glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β serine 9 phosphorylation, whereas glioma associated oncogene family 1 (GLI1 protein expression was particularly reduced by combined ATO and LiCl treatment in RD and RH-30 cell lines, showing high rates of apoptotic cell death. These results imply that combination of ATO with LiCl or another drug targeting GSK-3 is a promising strategy to enforce the treatment efficiency in resistant and recurrent RMS.

  16. Preliminary studies on factors controlling the rate of regrowth of heavily x-irradiated rat rhabdomyosarcoma tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tenforde, T.S.; Curtis, S.B.; Woodruff, H.K.; Parks, D.L.; Daniels, S.J.; Crabtree, K.E.; Schilling, W.A.; DeGuzman, R.J.

    1977-12-01

    Following large single doses of x rays, rat rhabdomyosarcoma tumors exhibit a volume response which characteristically has a swelling phase, a regression phase, a rapid ''initial'' regrowth phase and a slow ''late'' regrowth phase. The preliminary experiments reported here were designed to examine three mechanisms that may underlie the reduction in growth rate occurring in the late regrowth phase; heritable non-lethal cellular damage, host immunity, delayed post-irradiation tissue and vascular damage. Based on retransplantation experiments and studies with immunosuppressed rats, neither heritable non-lethal damage nor host immune factors appear to influence the regrowth rate of tumors receiving radiation doses well below the cure level. After an x-ray dose approaching the cure level, regrowing tumors were observed to have a greatly reduced growth rate, possibly reflecting the presence of heritable non-lethal damage and/or an increased antigenicity of the heavily irradiated tumor cells. Morphometric analysis of histological sections did not reveal statistically significant abnormalities at the cellular level during the late regrowth phase, except for an increase in the percentage of necrotic tissue relative to non-irradiated tumors. The morphological resolution of small blood vessels was not adequate to evaluate delayed vascular damage in regrowing irradiated tumors

  17. Investigation of PAX3/7-FKHR fusion genes and IGF2 gene expression in rhabdomyosarcoma tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, Robson Ramos; Oliveira, Indhira Dias; Caran, Eliana Maria Monteiro; Alves, Maria Teresa de Seixas; Abib, Simone; Toledo, Silvia Regina Caminada

    2012-12-01

    The purpose of our study was to investigate the prevalence of the PAX3/7-FKHR fusion genes and quantify the IGF2 gene expression in rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) samples. Soft tissue sarcomas account 5% of childhood cancers and 50% of them are RMS. Morphological evaluation of pediatric RMS has defined two histological subtypes, embryonal (ERMS) and alveolar (ARMS). Chromosomal analyses have demonstrated two translocations associated with ARMS, resulting in the PAX3/7-FKHR rearrangements. Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) is extremely useful in the diagnosis of ARMS positive for these rearrangements. Additionally, several studies have shown a significant involvement of IGF pathway in the pathogenesis of RMS. The presence of PAX3/7-FKHR gene fusions was studied in 25 RMS samples from patients attending the IOP-GRAACC/UNIFESP and three RMS cell lines by RT-PCR. IGF2 gene expression was quantified by qPCR and related with clinic pathological parameters. Of the 25 samples, nine (36%) were ARMS and 16 (64%) were ERMS. PAX3/7-FKHR gene fusions expression was detected in 56% of ARMS tumor samples. IGF2 overexpression was observed in 80% of samples and could indicate an important role of this pathway in RMS biology. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. NF-κB–YY1–miR-29 Regulatory Circuitry in Skeletal Myogenesis and Rhabdomyosarcoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huating; Garzon, Ramiro; Sun, Hao; Ladner, Katherine J.; Singh, Ravi; Dahlman, Jason; Cheng, Alfred; Hall, Brett M.; Qualman, Stephen J.; Chandler, Dawn S.; Croce, Carlo M.; Guttridge, Denis C.

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY Studies support the importance of microRNAs in physiological and pathological processes. Here we describe the regulation and function of miR-29 in myogenesis and Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS). Results demonstrate that in myoblasts miR-29 is repressed by NF-κB acting through YY1 and the Polycomb. During myogenesis, NF-κB and YY1 downregulation causes derepression of miR-29, which in turn accelerates differentiation by targeting its repressor YY1. However, in RMS cells and primary tumors that possess impaired differentiation, miR-29 is epigenetically silenced by an activated NF-κB-YY1 pathway. Reconstitution of miR-29 in RMS in mice inhibits tumor growth and stimulates differentiation, suggesting that miR-29 acts as a tumor suppressor through its pro-myogenic function. Together, results identify a NF-κB–YY1–miR-29 regulatory circuit whose disruption may contribute to RMS. SIGNIFICANCE MicroRNAs regulate skeletal myogenesis, but their impact in muscle diseases is not well understood. Here we describe miR-29 as an enhancer of myogenic differentiation and a suppressor of RMS. We find that miR-29 exists in a regulatory circuit involving NF-κB and YY1. In myoblasts NF-B acts through YY1 to epigenetically suppress miR-29, while during differentiation miR-29 is induced to facilitate myogenesis by a negative feedback on YY1. Significantly, RMS tumors lose miR-29 due to an elevation in NF-B and YY1, and readjustment of miR-29 levels in RMS stimulates differentiation. Thus, myogenesis is dependent on NF-κB–YY1–miR-29 circuitry whose dysfunction may contribute to RMS pathogenesis. Such findings offer potential avenues for the diagnosis and treatment of muscle relevant cancers. PMID:18977326

  19. Effects of hyperbaric oxygen and normobaric carbogen on the radiation response of the rat rhabdomyosarcoma R1H

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartmann, K. Axel; Kleij, Ad J. van der; Carl, Ulrich M.; Hulshof, Maarten C.C.M.; Willers, Reinhart; Sminia, Peter

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: Hypoxic tumor cells are an important factor of radioresistance. Hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) and normobaric carbogen (95% oxygen, 5% carbon dioxide) increase the oxygen delivery to tumors. This study was performed to explore changes of tumor oxygenation during a course of fractionated irradiation and to determine the effectiveness of normobaric carbogen and HBO during the final phase of the radiation treatment. Methods and Materials: Experiments were performed on the rhabdomyosarcoma R1H growing on WAG/Rij rats. After 20 X-ray fractions of 2 Gy within 4 weeks, oxygen partial pressure (pO 2 ) was measured using the Eppendorf oxygen electrode under ambient conditions, with normobaric carbogen or HBO at a pressure of 240 kPa. Following the 4-week radiation course, a top-up dose of 10-50 Gy was applied in 2-10 fractions of 5 Gy with or without hyperoxygenation. Results: HBO but not carbogen significantly increased the median pO 2 in irradiated tumors. The radiation doses to control 50% of tumors were 38.0 Gy, 29.5 Gy, and 25.0 Gy for air, carbogen, and HBO, respectively. Both high oxygen content gas inspirations led to significantly improved tumor responses with oxygen enhancement ratios (OERs) of 1.3 for normobaric carbogen and 1.5 for HBO (air vs. carbogen: p=0.044; air vs. HBO: p=0.02; carbogen vs. HBO: p=0.048). Conclusion: Both normobaric carbogen and HBO significantly improved the radiation response of R1H tumors. HBO appeared to be more effective than normobaric carbogen, both with regard to tumor oxygenation and response to irradiation

  20. Pediatric Anaplastic Embryonal Rhabdomyosarcoma: Targeted Therapy Guided by Genetic Analysis and a Patient-Derived Xenograft Study

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    Stuart L. Cramer

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Therapy for rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS has generally been limited to combinations of conventional cytotoxic agents similar to regimens originally developed in the late 1960s. Recently, identification of molecular alterations through next-generation sequencing of individual tumor specimens has facilitated the use of more targeted therapeutic approaches for various malignancies. Such targeted therapies have revolutionized treatment for some cancer types. However, malignancies common in children, thus far, have been less amenable to such targeted therapies. This report describes the clinical course of an 8-year-old female with embryonal RMS having anaplastic features. This patient experienced multiple relapses after receiving various established and experimental therapies. Genomic testing of this RMS subtype revealed mutations in BCOR, ARID1A, and SETD2 genes, each of which contributes to epigenetic regulation and interacts with or modifies the activity of histone deacetylases (HDAC. Based on these findings, the patient was treated with the HDAC inhibitor vorinostat as a single agent. The tumor responded transiently followed by subsequent disease progression. We also examined the efficacy of vorinostat in a patient-derived xenograft (PDX model developed using tumor tissue obtained from the patient’s most recent tumor resection. The antitumor activity of vorinostat observed with the PDX model reflected clinical observations in that obvious areas of tumor necrosis were evident following exposure to vorinostat. Histologic sections of tumors harvested from PDX tumor-bearing mice treated with vorinostat demonstrated induction of necrosis by this agent. We propose that the evaluation of clinical efficacy in this type of preclinical model merits further evaluation to determine if PDX models predict tumor sensitivity to specific agents and/or combination therapies.

  1. PAX-FOXO1 fusion status drives unfavorable outcome for children with rhabdomyosarcoma: a children's oncology group report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skapek, Stephen X; Anderson, James; Barr, Frederic G; Bridge, Julia A; Gastier-Foster, Julie M; Parham, David M; Rudzinski, Erin R; Triche, Timothy; Hawkins, Douglas S

    2013-09-01

    Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) is divided into two major histological subtypes: alveolar (ARMS) and embryonal (ERMS), with most ARMS expressing one of two oncogenic genes fusing PAX3 or PAX7 with FOXO1 (P3F and P7F, respectively). The Children's Oncology Group (COG) carried out a multi-institutional clinical trial to evaluate the prognostic value of PAX-FOXO1 fusion status. Study participants were treated on COG protocol D9803 for intermediate risk ARMS or ERMS using multi-agent chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and surgery. Central diagnostic pathology review and molecular testing for fusion genes were carried out on prospectively collected specimens. Event-free (EFS) and overall survival (OS) at 5 years were correlated with histological subtype and PAX-FOXO1 status. Of 616 eligible D9803 enrollees, 434 cases had adequate clinical, molecular, and pathology data for definitive classification as ERMS, ARMS P3F+ or P7F+, or ARMSn (without detectable fusion). EFS was worse for those with ARMS P3F+ (54%) and P7F+ (65%) than those with ERMS (77%; P < 0.001). EFS for ARMSn and ERMS were not statistically different (90% vs. 77%, P = 0.15). ARMS P3F+ had poorer OS (64%) than ARMS P7F+ (87%), ARMSn (89%), and ERMS (82%; P = 0.006). ARMSn has an outcome similar to ERMS and superior EFS compared to ARMS with either P3F or P7F, when given therapy designed for children with intermediate risk RMS. This prospective analysis supports incorporation of PAX-FOXO1 fusion status into risk stratification and treatment allocation. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. PAX-FOXO1 Fusion Status Drives Unfavorable Outcome for Children With Rhabdomyosarcoma: A Children’s Oncology Group Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skapek, Stephen X.; Anderson, James; Barr, Frederic G.; Bridge, Julia A.; Gastier-Foster, Julie M.; Parham, David M.; Rudzinski, Erin R.; Triche, Timothy; Hawkins, Douglas S.

    2015-01-01

    Background Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) is divided into two major histological subtypes: alveolar (ARMS) and embryonal (ERMS), with most ARMS expressing one of two oncogenic genes fusing PAX3 or PAX7 with FOXO1 (P3F and P7F, respectively). The Children’s Oncology Group (COG) carried out a multi-institutional clinical trial to evaluate the prognostic value of PAX-FOXO1 fusion status. Methods Study participants were treated on COG protocol D9803 for intermediate risk ARMS or ERMS using multi-agent chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and surgery. Central diagnostic pathology review and molecular testing for fusion genes were carried out on prospectively collected specimens. Event-free (EFS) and overall survival (OS) at 5 years were correlated with histological subtype and PAX-FOXO1 status. Results Of 616 eligible D9803 enrollees, 434 cases had adequate clinical, molecular, and pathology data for definitive classification as ERMS, ARMS P3F+ or P7F+, or ARMSn (without detectable fusion). EFS was worse for those with ARMS P3F+ (54%) and P7F+ (65%) than those with ERMS (77%; P < 0.001). EFS for ARMSn and ERMS were not statistically different (90% vs. 77%, P = 0.15). ARMS P3F+had poorer OS (64%) than ARMS P7F+ (87%), ARMSn (89%), and ERMS (82%; P = 0.006). Conclusions ARMSn has an outcome similar to ERMS and superior EFS compared to ARMS with either P3F or P7F, when given therapy designed for children with intermediate risk RMS. This prospective analysis supports incorporation of PAX-FOXO1 fusion status into risk stratification and treatment allocation. PMID:23526739

  3. Topical topic: value of fine needle aspiration biopsy in childhood rhabdomyosarcoma: twenty-six years of experience in Slovenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohar-Marinsek, Ziva; Anzic, Jozica; Jereb, Berta

    2002-06-01

    Chemotherapy (Cht) for rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) given before local treatment can prevent mutilating surgery and high-dose irradiation (RT). Fine needle aspiration biopsy (FNAB) can confirm the diagnosis and neoadjuvant treatment can start without delay. The purpose of our study was to assess the role of FNAB in the management of childhood RMS in Slovenia. A total of 78 children and young adults were included. FNAB provided the pre-treatment diagnosis in 37 and surgical biopsy in 41 patients. In 61 cases recurrent/metastatic disease was aspirated. Cytological diagnoses were compared to the original histological diagnoses. All case histories, cytological and histological material were reviewed and immunocytochemical staining performed when necessary. FNAB provided a correct diagnosis of malignancy in all 37 primary tumours, a specific diagnosis of RMS was given in 29 (78%). With the use of immunocytochemistry during the last 15 years, the accuracy has risen to 87%. FNAB provided the diagnosis of recurrence/metastasis in 57/61 cases. No complications of FNAB were noted. Review of histology reclassified five original diagnoses of RMS into one malignant rhabdoid tumour and four sarcomas NOS. In review of cytology we were able to sub classify 80% of RMS. FNAB is a safe method, which enables us to establish the pre-treatment diagnosis of RMS, and to some extent even its type, without delay. In our study, FNAB successfully replaced surgical biopsy in 87% of RMS patients during the last 15 years. Neoadjuvant Cht was started immediately, surgery was delayed and more conservative. Consequently, the risk for treatment sequelae was considerably reduced. Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  4. Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy With Use of Cone-Down Boost for Pediatric Head-and-Neck Rhabdomyosarcoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonald, Mark W.; Esiashvili, Natia; George, Bradley A.; Katzenstein, Howard M.; Olson, Thomas A.; Rapkin, Louis B.; Marcus, Robert B.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To report our initial experience using intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) with a cone-down boost for pediatric head-and-neck rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS). Methods and Materials: A review of institutional treatment records identified children treated with IMRT for head-and-neck RMS between January 2000 and February 2007. All patients had undergone chemotherapy according to cooperative group RMS protocols. The initial planning target volume (PTV) covered the prechemotherapy tumor extent with variable margins, generally 1-2 cm. The boost PTV covered the postchemotherapy tumor volume, usually with a margin of 0.5-1 cm. Results: A total of 20 patients were treated with IMRT for head-and-neck RMS. Of these 20 patients, 4 had Group II, 15 Group III, and 1 Group IV disease. The site was parameningeal in 12, nonparameningeal in 6, and orbit primary in 2. Of the 20 patients, 14 were treated with a cone-down boost after a median dose of 36 Gy (range, 30-45.6). The mean initial PTV was 213.5 cm 3 , and the mean boost PTV was 76.9 cm 3 . Patients received a median total dose of 50.4 Gy. The median follow-up time was 29 months. The 3-year Kaplan-Meier local control rate was 100%, although 1 patient developed an in-field recurrence 50 months after IMRT. The 3-year event-free survival rate, overall survival rate, and risk of central nervous system failure was 74%, 76%, and 7%, respectively. Conclusions: Our preliminary follow-up of pediatric head-and-neck RMS patients treated with IMRT revealed excellent local control. The initial targeting of the prechemotherapy tumor volume with 1-2-cm margin to 30.6 or 36 Gy followed by a cone-down boost to the postchemotherapy tumor volume with a 0.5-1-cm margin allowed for significant sparing of normal tissues and provided good local control

  5. Overexpression of GEFT, a Rho family guanine nucleotide exchange factor, predicts poor prognosis in patients with rhabdomyosarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Chao; Liu, Chunxia; Li, Shugang; Li, Hongan; Wang, Yuanyuan; Xie, Yuwen; Li, Bingcheng; Cui, Xiaobin; Chen, Yunzhao; Zhang, Wenjie; Li, Feng

    2014-01-01

    Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) is one of the most common soft-tissue sarcomas in children and adolescents with poor prognosis. Yet, there is lack of effective prognostic biomarkers for RMS. The present study, therefore, aimed to explore potential biomarkers for RMS based on our previous findings using array comparative genomic hybridization. We investigated guanine nucleotide exchange factor, GEFT, at expression level in 45 RMS patients and 36 normal striated muscle controls using immunohistochemistry using tissue microarrays. The expression rate of GEFT in RMS samples (42/45, 93.33%) was significantly higher (Prate of GEFT in RMS (31/45, 68.89%) was also significantly higher (P<0.05) than that in normal controls (0/36, 0.00%). Increased expression of GEFT correlated significantly with advanced disease stages (stages III/IV) (P=0.001), lymph node metastasis (P=0.019), and distant metastasis (P=0.004), respectively, in RMS patients. In addition, RMS patients having overexpressed GEFT experienced worse overall survival (OS) than those having low levels of GEFT (P=0.001). GEFT overexpression was determined to be an independent prognostic factor for poor OS in RMS patients (hazard ratio: 3.491, 95% confidence interval: 1.121-10.871, P=0.004). In conclusion, these observations provide the first evidence of GEFT overexpression in RMS and its correlations with disease aggressiveness and metastasis. These findings suggest that GEFT may serve as a promising biomarker predicting poor prognosis in RMS patients, thus implying its potential as a therapeutic target.

  6. High-dose chemotherapy followed by autologous stem cell transplantation for metastatic rhabdomyosarcoma--a systematic review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Peinemann

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Patients with metastatic rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS have a poor prognosis. The aim of this systematic review is to investigate whether high-dose chemotherapy (HDCT followed by autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT in patients with metastatic RMS has additional benefit or harm compared to standard chemotherapy. METHODS: Systematic literature searches were performed in MEDLINE, EMBASE, and The Cochrane Library. All databases were searched from inception to February 2010. PubMed was searched in June 2010 for a last update. In addition to randomized and non-randomized controlled trials, case series and case reports were included to complement results from scant data. The primary outcome was overall survival. A meta-analysis was performed using the hazard ratio as primary effect measure, which was estimated from Cox proportional hazard models or from summary statistics of Kaplan Meier product-limit estimations. RESULTS: A total of 40 studies with 287 transplant patients with metastatic RMS (age range 0 to 32 years were included in the assessment. We identified 3 non-randomized controlled trials. The 3-year overall survival ranged from 22% to 53% in the transplant groups vs. 18% to 55% in the control groups. Meta-analysis on overall survival in controlled trials showed no difference between treatments. Result of meta-analysis of pooled individual survival data of case series and case reports, and results from uncontrolled studies with aggregate data were in the range of those from controlled data. The risk of bias was high in all studies due to methodological flaws. CONCLUSIONS: HDCT followed by autologous HSCT in patients with RMS remains an experimental treatment. At present, it does not appear justifiable to use this treatment except in appropriately designed controlled trials.

  7. Nonparameningeal head and neck rhabdomyosarcoma in children and adolescents: Lessons from the consecutive International Society of Pediatric Oncology Malignant Mesenchymal Tumor studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orbach, Daniel; Mosseri, Veronique; Gallego, Soledad; Kelsey, Anna; Devalck, Christine; Brenann, Bernadette; van Noesel, Max M; Bergeron, Christophe; Merks, Johannes H M; Rechnitzer, Catherine; Jenney, Meriel; Minard-Colin, Veronique; Stevens, Michael

    2017-01-01

    This article reports risk factors and long-term outcome in localized nonparameningeal head and neck rhabdomyosarcomas in children and adolescents from a combined dataset from 3 consecutive international trials. Data from 140 children (9.3% of total) prospectively enrolled in the International Society of Pediatric Oncology Malignant Mesenchymal Tumor (SIOP-MMT)-84/89/95 studies were analyzed. Primary site was: superficial face in 46%; oral cavity (21%); neck (19%); and salivary glands (14%). Local control was achieved in 96%, but 49% relapsed (locoregionally 91%). At median follow-up of 10 years, 5-year overall survival (OS) was 74.7% (67.4% to 81.9%) and event-free survival 48.9% (40.6% to 57.2%), although this improved with successive studies. Radiotherapy (RT) as first-line treatment was independently prognostic for event-free survival (relative risk [RR] = 0.4 [range, 0.2-0.7]; p < .01) even if it did not impact OS (RR = 1 [range, 0.5-2]). High rates of locoregional relapse were seen in head and neck rhabdomyosarcoma that should be prevented by more frequent use of RT in this primary. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Head Neck 39: 24-31, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Pleomorphic rhabdomyosarcoma arising in the anterior mediastinum: A case report with cytological features of imprint and liquid-based cytology specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishijima, Yoshimi; Hirato, Junko; Fukuda, Toshio

    2017-04-01

    We herein report the cytological features of a very rare case of pleomorphic rhabdomyosarcoma arising in the anterior mediastinum on imprint and liquid-based cytology (LBC) specimens. A 58-year-old man had an approximately 10-cm tumor in the anterior mediastinum as shown on computed tomography. Thymectomy with complete resection of the left lung was performed. The fresh cut surface of the tumor was used to prepare imprint and LBC specimens. The imprint specimens showed four types of tumor cells dispersed on a background of hemorrhage, necrosis, and mucus. On the other hand, only two types of tumor cells (spindle-shaped and spiderweb cells) were scattered or present in clusters in the LBC specimens. Immunocytologically, both of these cell types were positive for desmin and myoglobin, negative for pan-keratin and epithelial membrane antigen. Cytological and immunocytological features are useful for the correct diagnosis of pleomorphic rhabdomyosarcoma, and LBC specimens show clearer results than do imprint specimens. Diagn. Cytopathol. 2017;45:333-338. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Cholinesterase response in the rhabdomyosarcoma tumor and small intestine of the BALB/c mice and the radioprotective actions of exogenous ATP after lethal dose of neutron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szeinfeld, D.; De Villiers, N.

    1993-01-01

    The rhabdomyosarcoma tumors were subjected to different doses of 2.0, 3.8 and 7.0 Gy from a neutron beam facility p(66 MeV)/Be. Elevated levels of cholinesterase activity are observed in which there is a correlation between the different doses of neutron radiation and the augmentation response of this enzyme. The increase of cholinesterase activity after 7 Gy neutron irradiation as a feature of involvement in the homeostatic mechanism maintaining the proper choline/acetylcholine ratio in the cell is also observed at 1 and 24 h in both tissues, rhabdomyosarcoma and small intestine. The activity of the enzyme after neutron irradiation with prior administration of ATP showed smaller increases when compared with increase observed after neutron irradiation alone. Moreover in the present work the protective mechanism of ATP in the response of cholinesterase activity is marked differential between both, normal and tumoral tissue and correlated inversely with the administered of the following concentrations of exogenous ATP (8, 25, 80, 250, and 700 mg/kg body weight) prior to exposure to 7 Gy neutron radiation. These results reflect the radioprotective ability of exogenous ATP to exert a number of metabolic adaptations as a defense mechanism in which the cell exposed to neutron radiation could remain viable because the injury is potentially repairable. (orig.) [de

  10. Role of radiotherapy in the treatment of head and neck rhabdomyosarcomas in children; Role de la radiotherapie dans le traitement des rhabdomyosarcomes de la tete et du cou chez l'enfant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nouni, K.; Kebdani, T.; Hassouni, K.; Benjaafer, N.; Elgueddari, B. [Institut national d' oncologie, Rabat (Morocco)

    2010-10-15

    The authors report the assessment of clinic results obtained for the radiotherapy of head and neck rhabdomyosarcomas in children. The study is based on a sample of 22 children. The authors report epidemiologic, clinic, and above all therapeutic and evolutional aspects: age, symptoms, radiological examination (scanography, MRI), tumour location, histological characterization, chemotherapeutic and radiotherapeutic treatment, local relapses, pulmonary and hepatic metastases, survival. Short communication

  11. Detection of alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma in pleural fluid with immunocytochemistry on cell block and determination of PAX/FKHR fusion mRNA by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawangpanich, Ruchchadol; Larbcharoensub, Noppadol; Jinawath, Artit; Pongtippan, Atcharaporn; Anurathapan, Usanarat; Hongeng, Suradej

    2011-11-01

    Alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma is a primitive malignant round cell neoplasm, which shows skeletal muscle differentiation. Although their histopathologic and immunohistochemical findings are well known, the cytology, immunocytochemistry and molecular study on pleural effusion have not been well documented. To apply molecular method in the diagnosis and monitoring of alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma. The case of a 14-year-old Thai male, who presented with dyspnea and left pleural effusion. Computed tomography of the chest and abdomen showed a huge heterogeneous enhancing mass at the left retroperitoneum. Pleural fluid cytology showed malignant small round blue cells. Immunocytochemical stains on cell block material showed positive reactivity to vimentin, sarcomeric actin, desmin, MyoD1, myogenin, and CD56 in round cell tumor Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) demonstrated PAX/FKHR fusion transcript. The patient received chemotherapeutic regimen for advanced-stage rhabdomyosarcoma. Finally, he succumbed to the disease, thirteen months after the diagnosis. Immunocytochemistry on cell block in conjunction with determination of PAX/FKHR fusion mRNA by RT-PCR is a molecular method in the diagnosis and monitoring of alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma inpleural fluid.

  12. Rapamycin targeting mTOR and hedgehog signaling pathways blocks human rhabdomyosarcoma growth in xenograft murine model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaylani, Samer Z. [Division of Hematology and Oncology, Department of Pediatrics, University of Alabama at Birmingham, 1600 7th Avenue South, ACC 414, Birmingham, AL 35233 (United States); Xu, Jianmin; Srivastava, Ritesh K. [Department of Dermatology and Skin Diseases Research Center, University of Alabama at Birmingham, 1530 3rd Avenue South, VH 509, Birmingham, AL 35294-0019 (United States); Kopelovich, Levy [Division of Cancer Prevention, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda (United States); Pressey, Joseph G. [Division of Hematology and Oncology, Department of Pediatrics, University of Alabama at Birmingham, 1600 7th Avenue South, ACC 414, Birmingham, AL 35233 (United States); Athar, Mohammad, E-mail: mathar@uab.edu [Department of Dermatology and Skin Diseases Research Center, University of Alabama at Birmingham, 1530 3rd Avenue South, VH 509, Birmingham, AL 35294-0019 (United States)

    2013-06-14

    Graphical abstract: Intervention of poorly differentiated RMS by rapamycin: In poorly differentiated RMS, rapamycin blocks mTOR and Hh signaling pathways concomitantly. This leads to dampening in cell cycle regulation and induction of apoptosis. This study provides a rationale for the therapeutic intervention of poorly differentiated RMS by treating patients with rapamycin alone or in combination with other chemotherapeutic agents. -- Highlights: •Rapamycin abrogates RMS tumor growth by modulating proliferation and apoptosis. •Co-targeting mTOR/Hh pathways underlie the molecular basis of effectiveness. •Reduction in mTOR/Hh pathways diminish EMT leading to reduced invasiveness. -- Abstract: Rhabdomyosarcomas (RMS) represent the most common childhood soft-tissue sarcoma. Over the past few decades outcomes for low and intermediate risk RMS patients have slowly improved while patients with metastatic or relapsed RMS still face a grim prognosis. New chemotherapeutic agents or combinations of chemotherapies have largely failed to improve the outcome. Based on the identification of novel molecular targets, potential therapeutic approaches in RMS may offer a decreased reliance on conventional chemotherapy. Thus, identification of effective therapeutic agents that specifically target relevant pathways may be particularly beneficial for patients with metastatic and refractory RMS. The PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway has been found to be a potentially attractive target in RMS therapy. In this study, we provide evidence that rapamycin (sirolimus) abrogates growth of RMS development in a RMS xenograft mouse model. As compared to a vehicle-treated control group, more than 95% inhibition in tumor growth was observed in mice receiving parenteral administration of rapamycin. The residual tumors in rapamycin-treated group showed significant reduction in the expression of biomarkers indicative of proliferation and tumor invasiveness. These tumors also showed enhanced apoptosis

  13. Gonad doses in radiotherapy. Phantom measurement in mammary carcinomas, Morbus Hodgkin, seminomas, hypernephromas, and rhabdomyosarcomas of the thigh

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liebstueckel, L.

    1979-01-01

    The gonad doses in the therapy of malignant diseases were determined under defined conditions with the aid of a 60 Co and a 137 Cs irradiation appliance using an Alderson and paraffin phantom each. The measurements were carried out with a condiometer by Physikalisch-Technische Werkstaetten, Freiburg. Two different types of condensator chambers with a measuring range 15 mR to 8 R were used. In the irradiation of mammary carcinoma using the Alderson phantom with two tangential stationary fields the ovarian dose was 0.49 to 1.05 per mille, the testicular dose 0.3 to 0.47 per mille of the maximum irradiated dose. If mammary carcinomas are irradiated using a Caesa-Gammatron, the ovarian dose varies from 0.04 to 0.78 per mille within the five fields, the testicular dose from 0.01 to 0.13 per mille. For these measurements the paraffin phantom was used. If the radiation technique was somewhat modified, the ovaries (testes) of the Alderson phantom irradiated for Hodgkin's disease received 7 (4.7) per mille from irradiation of the thoracal field and 4.6 (3.2) per mille from irradiation of the mediastinal field. Irradiation of the abdominal field produced doses for the female and male gonads of 520 resp. 47.2 per mille. On irradiation of the para-aortic field, the ovaries and testes received doses of 8 resp. 4.6 per mille. Irradiation of the Alderson phantom for seminoma involved testicular doses between 29.1 and 3.1 per mille, depending on the size of the field and its distance from the gonads. Hypernephroma irradiation was carried out on the Alderson phantom with two pendular fields. The ovaries received between 3.7 and 14 per mille and the testes between 2.3 and 3.3 per mille of the focal dose. In irradiation for rhabdomyosarcoma, simulated with the paraffin phantom, the ovarian doses ranged between 5.5 and 11.9 per mille. The male gonad dose rose to values between 36.5 and 458 per mille of the focal dose. (orig./MG) [de

  14. Non-Rhabdomyosarcoma Soft Tissue Sarcomas in Children: A Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Analysis Validating COG Risk Stratifications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waxweiler, Timothy V., E-mail: timothy.waxweiler@ucdenver.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado (United States); Rusthoven, Chad G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado (United States); Proper, Michelle S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Billings Clinic, Billings, Montana (United States); Cost, Carrye R. [Division of Hematology and Oncology, Department of Pediatrics, University of Colorado Denver School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado (United States); Cost, Nicholas G. [Division of Urology, Department of Surgery, University of Colorado Denver School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado (United States); Donaldson, Nathan [Department of Orthopedics, University of Colorado Denver School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado (United States); Garrington, Timothy; Greffe, Brian S. [Division of Hematology and Oncology, Department of Pediatrics, University of Colorado Denver School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado (United States); Heare, Travis [Department of Orthopedics, University of Colorado Denver School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado (United States); Macy, Margaret E. [Division of Hematology and Oncology, Department of Pediatrics, University of Colorado Denver School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado (United States); Liu, Arthur K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado (United States)

    2015-06-01

    Purpose: Non-rhabdomyosarcoma soft tissue sarcomas (NRSTS) are a heterogeneous group of sarcomas that encompass over 35 histologies. With an incidence of ∼500 cases per year in the United States in those <20 years of age, NRSTS are rare and therefore difficult to study in pediatric populations. We used the large Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database to validate the prognostic ability of the Children's Oncology Group (COG) risk classification system and to define patient, tumor, and treatment characteristics. Methods and Materials: From SEER data from 1988 to 2007, we identified patients ≤18 years of age with NRSTS. Data for age, sex, year of diagnosis, race, registry, histology, grade, primary size, primary site, stage, radiation therapy, and survival outcomes were analyzed. Patients with nonmetastatic grossly resected low-grade tumors of any size or high-grade tumors ≤5 cm were considered low risk. Cases of nonmetastatic tumors that were high grade, >5 cm, or unresectable were considered intermediate risk. Patients with nodal or distant metastases were considered high risk. Results: A total of 941 patients met the review criteria. On univariate analysis, black race, malignant peripheral nerve sheath (MPNST) histology, tumors >5 cm, nonextremity primary, lymph node involvement, radiation therapy, and higher risk group were associated with significantly worse overall survival (OS) and cancer-specific survival (CSS). On multivariate analysis, MPNST histology, chemotherapy-resistant histology, and higher risk group were significantly poor prognostic factors for OS and CSS. Compared to low-risk patients, intermediate patients showed poorer OS (hazard ratio [HR]: 6.08, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 3.53-10.47, P<.001) and CSS (HR: 6.27; 95% CI: 3.44-11.43, P<.001), and high-risk patients had the worst OS (HR: 13.35, 95% CI: 8.18-21.76, P<.001) and CSS (HR: 14.65, 95% CI: 8.49-25.28, P<.001). Conclusions: The current COG risk group

  15. Rhabdomyosarcoma: The Experience of the Pediatric Unit of Kasr El-Aini Center of Radiation Oncology and Nuclear Medicine (NEMROCK) (from January 1992 to January 2001)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdel Aal, H.H.; Habib, E.E.; Mishrif, M.M.

    2006-01-01

    Our present study is a retrospective analysis of the treatment results of new rhabdomyosarcoma pediatric patients who had attended the pediatric unit clinic of Kasr El-Aini Center of Radiation Oncology and Nuclear Medicine (NEMROCK) from January 1992 to January 200 I). Patients and Methods: Fifty-five new cases of pediatric rhabdomyosarcoma attended the pediatric unit outpatient clinic of (NEMROCK) from the period of January 1992 until January 200 I. Patients were divided into 4 stages and classified into low-risk patients and high-risk patients according to the extent of resection. Stage I, II orbital and stage I para-testicular embryonal rhabdomyosarcomas received 32 weeks of vincristine and actinomycin-D (vincristine 1.5 mg/m 2 weekly, actinomycin-D 0.015 mg/ Kg/day day 1 to day 5). Other pathologies, sites and stages received 52 weeks of chemotherapy. Chemotherapy regimens included VAC (vincristine 1.5 mg/m 2 weekly, actinomycin-D 0.015 mg/Kg/day day 1 to day 5 and endoxan 2.2 gm/m 2 LV with mesna every 21 days), VAl (vincristine, actinomycin-D and ifosfamide 1.8 gm/m2 l.V day 1 to day 5 with mesna) or VIE (vincristine, ifosfamide and vepesid 100 mg/m 2 1. V day 1 to day 5) [11,12]. Stages I and II received conventional fractionation radiotherapy 4140 c Gy on week 13, stages Ill and IV received conventional fractionation radiation therapy 5040 c Gy also, on week 13. The radiation volume included the tumor bed with a 2 cm safety margin at least. Relapsing cases received palliative radiation therapy and chemotherapy (cisplatinum LV 100 mg/m 2 divided over 2 days and vepesid 100 mg/m2 l.V day 1 to day 3 to be recycled every 21 days). Patients were followed-up for 5 years, with a median follow-up of 36 months. Overall survival, disease free survival, treatment response, and complications of treatment were assessed and statistically analyzed. Results: Fifty-five new cases of pediatric rhabdomy-osarcoma attended the pediatric unit outpatient clinic of (NEMROCK) and

  16. Cell cycle kinetics and in vivo micronuclei induction in rat rhabdomyosarcoma tumors using a monoclonal antibody to BrdUrd and cell sorting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuesse, M.; Afzal, S.M.J.; Carr, B.C.; Kavanau, K.S.; Tenforde, T.S.; Curtis, S.B.

    1986-01-01

    The aim of the experiments reported here was to investigate the applicability of the BrdUrd/DNA technique to a rat rhabdomyosarcoma tumor system growing in vivo and to study radiation-induced changes in the progression of cells through the cell cycle. Details of this technique are described elsewhere. In addition, the induction of micronuclei in tumor cells irradiated in vivo with x-rays or peak neon ions was studied. Micronuclei found in interphase cells after irradiation represent genetic material that is lost from the genome of the cells during mitosis. The formation of micronuclei that can mainly be ascribed to acentric chromosome or chromatid fragments occurs only after cells go through one or more cell divisions. Cycling cells in the tumors were, therefore, continuously labeled with BrdUrd, and micronuclei induction was measured only in tetraploid cycling tumor cells using the flow cytometric cell sorting technique

  17. A disseminated alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma in a 9-year-old boy disclosed by chromosomal translocation (2;13) (q35;q14)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brichard, B; Ninane, J; Gosseye, S; Verellen-Dumoulin, C; Vermylen, C; Rodhain, J; Cornu, G

    1991-01-01

    A 9-year-old boy presented with a small subcutaneous tumor of the trunk and diffuse bone marrow involvement. The first histological diagnosis given was undifferentiated malignancy possibly of neural crest origin and chemotherapy was started immediately using vincristine, cyclophosphamide, cisplatin, and teniposide (OPEC). Complete response was achieved after four courses of chemotherapy. Histological slides were then reviewed and the final diagnosis of alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) was retained. Moreover, chromosome analysis of malignant cells in the bone marrow revealed a translocation involving chromosomes 2 and 13:t(2;13) (q35;q14). This specific karyotype finding has been recently reported in a few cases and could be specific for alveolar RMS. The patient had a relapse 7 months after diagnosis and died 4 months later.

  18. The Effect of Radiation Timing on Patients With High-Risk Features of Parameningeal Rhabdomyosarcoma: An Analysis of IRS-IV and D9803

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spalding, Aaron C., E-mail: Aaron.Spalding@nortonhealthcare.org [Kosair Children' s Hospital and Brain Tumor Center, Louisville, Kentucky (United States); Hawkins, Douglas S. [Division of Hematology/Oncology, Seattle Children' s Hospital, and Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington (United States); Donaldson, Sarah S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, California (United States); Anderson, James R.; Lyden, Elizabeth [University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, Nebraska (United States); Laurie, Fran [Quality Assurance Review Center, Providence, Rhode Island and Seattle, Washington (United States); Wolden, Suzanne L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Arndt, Carola A.S. [Department of Pediatric and Adolescent Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Michalski, Jeff M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States)

    2013-11-01

    Purpose: Radiation therapy remains an essential treatment for patients with parameningeal rhabdomyosarcoma (PMRMS), and early radiation therapy may improve local control for patients with intracranial extension (ICE). Methods and Materials: To address the role of radiation therapy timing in PMRMS in the current era, we reviewed the outcome from 2 recent clinical trials for intermediate-risk RMS: Intergroup Rhabdomyosarcoma Study (IRS)-IV and Children's Oncology Group (COG) D9803. The PMRMS patients on IRS-IV with any high-risk features (cranial nerve palsy [CNP], cranial base bony erosion [CBBE], or ICE) were treated immediately at day 0, and PMRMS patients without any of these 3 features received week 6-9 radiation therapy. The D9803 PMRMS patients with ICE received day 0 X-Ray Therapy (XRT) as well; however, those with either CNP or CBBE had XRT at week 12. Results: Compared with the 198 PMRMS patients from IRS-IV, the 192 PMRMS patients from D9803 had no difference (P<.05) in 5-year local failure (19% vs 19%), failure-free-survival (70% vs 67%), or overall survival (75% vs 73%) in aggregate. The 5-year local failure rates by subset did not differ when patients were classified as having no risk features (None, 15% vs 19%, P=.25), cranial nerve palsy/cranial base of skull erosion (CNP/CBBE, 15% vs 28%, P=.22), or intracranial extension (ICE, 21% vs 15%, P=.27). The D9083 patients were more likely to have received initial staging by magnetic resonance imaging (71% vs 53%). Conclusions: These data support that a delay in radiation therapy for high-risk PMRMS features of CNP/CBBE does not compromise clinical outcomes.

  19. Stages of Childhood Rhabdomyosarcoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... marrow are removed for examination under a microscope. Lumbar puncture : A procedure used to collect cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from the spinal column . This is done by placing a needle between ...

  20. Acid phosphates response in murine rhabdomyosarcoma for various tumour volumes and after different doses of neutron irradiation, alone or combined with exogenous ATP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szeinfeld, D.; De Villiers, N.

    1991-01-01

    Acid phosphatase activity measured in a methylocholanthrene-induced murine rhabdomyosarcoma showed a monotonically increasing relation between enzyme activity and tumour volume. This could be related to the lytic activity of the enzyme in large tumours which become more hypoxic and necrotic, and hence enhance degradation and turnover of damaged tumour cells. The tumours were also subjected to irradiation using doses of 2.0, 3.8 and 6.0 Gy from a neutron therapy facility p(66 MeV)/Be. The correlation between different doses and response of acid phosphatase activity could reflect the relation of magnitude of damage from metabolic disturbances, with dose. Furthermore exogenous ATP was shown to provide radioprotective action against neutron irradiation in two different experiments. The ATP reduced the activity of this lytic enzyme in irradiated tumours and also decreased tumour growth delay. This radioprotective role of exogenous ATP in a murine tumour could be related to physiological regulatory processes during defence mechanisms to maintain self-organisation in response to the radiation damage. (orig.) [de

  1. Experimental radiotherapy of the R1H rhabdomyosarcoma of the rat: combined use of interstitial iodine-125-brachytherapy and fractionated X-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doll, D.

    1995-01-01

    The study described here investigated into the therapeutic effects that split-dose x-radiation combined with interstitial iodine-125 brachytherapy would have on two different lines of the R1H rhabdomyosarcoma of the rat. The following parameters were examined: local tumour control rate; growth delay; net growth delay; position, movement and loss of seeds; tumour shape. The following results were obtained: The local tumour control rate for tumours externally treated with two seeds was by 42 Gy higher than that determined for the group treated with external irradiation alone. A procedure was developed to calculate the most appropriate distance for the seeds on the basis of tumour axes and volumes. The relationship between growth delay and mean maximum distance of the seed from the tumour margin could be ascertained on a quantitative basis. The influence of the tumour shape on the result of treatment was confirmed. Although the seeds were still active at the time of recidivation and treatment was not yet terminated, it was possible to show that the tumour bed effect, which tends to distort the growth delay calculations and may even occur in externally treated seed animals, could largely be avoided in the evaluation of this study. (orig./MG) [de

  2. Embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma in a patient with a heterozygous frameshift variant in the DICER1 gene and additional manifestations of the DICER1 syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fremerey, Julia; Balzer, Stefan; Brozou, Triantafyllia; Schaper, Joerg; Borkhardt, Arndt; Kuhlen, Michaela

    2017-07-01

    Germline mutations in the DICER1 gene are associated with an inherited cancer predisposition syndrome also known as the DICER1-syndrome, which is implicated in a broad range of tumors including pleuropulmonary blastoma, ovarian Sertoli-Leydig cell tumors, ciliary body medulloepithelioma (CBME), pituitary blastoma, embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma (eRMS), anaplastic renal sarcoma as well as ocular, sinonasal tumors ovarian sex-cord tumors, thyroid neoplasia and cystic nephroma. This study describes a novel, heterozygous frameshift DICER1 mutation in a patient, who is affected by different tumors of the DICER1-syndrome, including eRMS, CBME and suspected pleuropulmonary blastoma type I. By whole-exome sequencing of germline material using peripheral blood-derived DNA, we identified a single base pair duplication within the DICER1 gene (c.3405 dupA) that leads to a frameshift and results in a premature stop in exon 21 (p.Gly1136Arg). The metachronous occurrence of two unrelated tumor entities (eRMS and CBME) in a very young child within a short timeframe should have raised the suspicion of an underlying cancer susceptibility syndrome and should be prompt tested for DICER1.

  3. MURC/cavin-4 Is Co-Expressed with Caveolin-3 in Rhabdomyosarcoma Tumors and Its Silencing Prevents Myogenic Differentiation in the Human Embryonal RD Cell Line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faggi, Fiorella; Codenotti, Silvia; Poliani, Pietro Luigi; Cominelli, Manuela; Chiarelli, Nicola; Colombi, Marina; Vezzoli, Marika; Monti, Eugenio; Bono, Federica; Tulipano, Giovanni; Fiorentini, Chiara; Zanola, Alessandra; Lo, Harriet P; Parton, Robert G; Keller, Charles; Fanzani, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether MURC/cavin-4, a plasma membrane and Z-line associated protein exhibiting an overlapping distribution with Caveolin-3 (Cav-3) in heart and muscle tissues, may be expressed and play a role in rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS), an aggressive myogenic tumor affecting childhood. We found MURC/cavin-4 to be expressed, often concurrently with Cav-3, in mouse and human RMS, as demonstrated through in silico analysis of gene datasets and immunohistochemical analysis of tumor samples. In vitro expression studies carried out using human cell lines and primary mouse tumor cultures showed that expression levels of both MURC/cavin-4 and Cav-3, while being low or undetectable during cell proliferation, became robustly increased during myogenic differentiation, as detected via semi-quantitative RT-PCR and immunoblotting analysis. Furthermore, confocal microscopy analysis performed on human RD and RH30 cell lines confirmed that MURC/cavin-4 mostly marks differentiated cell elements, colocalizing at the cell surface with Cav-3 and labeling myosin heavy chain (MHC) expressing cells. Finally, MURC/cavin-4 silencing prevented the differentiation in the RD cell line, leading to morphological cell impairment characterized by depletion of myogenin, Cav-3 and MHC protein levels. Overall, our data suggest that MURC/cavin-4, especially in combination with Cav-3, may play a consistent role in the differentiation process of RMS.

  4. MURC/cavin-4 Is Co-Expressed with Caveolin-3 in Rhabdomyosarcoma Tumors and Its Silencing Prevents Myogenic Differentiation in the Human Embryonal RD Cell Line.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fiorella Faggi

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate whether MURC/cavin-4, a plasma membrane and Z-line associated protein exhibiting an overlapping distribution with Caveolin-3 (Cav-3 in heart and muscle tissues, may be expressed and play a role in rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS, an aggressive myogenic tumor affecting childhood. We found MURC/cavin-4 to be expressed, often concurrently with Cav-3, in mouse and human RMS, as demonstrated through in silico analysis of gene datasets and immunohistochemical analysis of tumor samples. In vitro expression studies carried out using human cell lines and primary mouse tumor cultures showed that expression levels of both MURC/cavin-4 and Cav-3, while being low or undetectable during cell proliferation, became robustly increased during myogenic differentiation, as detected via semi-quantitative RT-PCR and immunoblotting analysis. Furthermore, confocal microscopy analysis performed on human RD and RH30 cell lines confirmed that MURC/cavin-4 mostly marks differentiated cell elements, colocalizing at the cell surface with Cav-3 and labeling myosin heavy chain (MHC expressing cells. Finally, MURC/cavin-4 silencing prevented the differentiation in the RD cell line, leading to morphological cell impairment characterized by depletion of myogenin, Cav-3 and MHC protein levels. Overall, our data suggest that MURC/cavin-4, especially in combination with Cav-3, may play a consistent role in the differentiation process of RMS.

  5. O6-alkylguanine-DNA alkyltransferase activity correlates with the therapeutic response of human rhabdomyosarcoma xenografts to 1-(2-chloroethyl)-3-(trans-4-methylcyclohexyl)-1-nitrosourea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brent, T.P.; Houghton, P.J.; Houghton, J.A.

    1985-01-01

    Immune-deprived female CBA/CaJ mice bearing xenografts of six different human rhabdomyosarcoma lines were treated with 1-(2-chloroethyl)-3-(trans-4-methylcyclohexyl)-1-nitrosourea (MeCCNU). Tumor responses were compared with levels of O 6 -methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase activity because of evidence indicating that repair of DNA interstrand cross-link precursors, mediated by the transferase, may be an important determinant of MeCCNU cytotoxicity. Levels of methyltransferase in tumor extracts were measured by determining the loss of O 6 -methylguanine from 3 H-labeled methylated DNA. Five of the six tumor lines examined showed either no response to MeCCNU or regrowth after an incomplete response. In each instance, the extent of tumor regression correlated with the level of O 6 -methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase activity in tumor extracts. These results suggest that O 6 -methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase levels in human tumor cells may be a clinically useful predictor of sensitivity to the chloroethylnitrosoureas

  6. Biosynthesis of 10 kDa and 7.5 kDa insulin-like growth factor II in a human rhabdomyosarcoma cell line

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, F C; Haselbacher, G; Christiansen, Jan

    1993-01-01

    In the present study we have analysed the expression of insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II) in the human rhabdomyosarcoma cell line IN157.IN157 cells express high levels of three IGF-II mRNAs of 6.0 kb, 4.8 kb and 4.2 kb. In contrast, normal skeletal muscle expresses a negligible amount of IGF......-II mRNA. Two forms of IGF-II with molecular masses of 7.5 kDa and 10 kDa, corresponding to the mature IGF-II and IGF-II with a C-terminal extension of 21 amino acids (IGF-IIE21), were secreted into the culture medium at amounts of 17 ng/ml (2.3 nM) and 15 ng/ml (1.5 nM), respectively. IN157 cells also......-II and IGF-IIE21 with Kd values of 0.5 nM and 2 nM, respectively, and IGF-I with about 500 times lower affinity. IGF-II and IGF-IIE21 stimulated DNA synthesis via the IGF-I receptor, whereas the IGF-II/Man 6-P receptor mediated their rapid internalization and inactivation. During culture of IN157 cells about...

  7. Results from the IRS-IV randomized trial of hyperfractionated radiotherapy in children with rhabdomyosarcoma--a report from the IRSG

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donaldson, Sarah S.; Meza, Jane; Breneman, John C.; Crist, William M.; Laurie, Fran; Qualman, Stephen J.; Wharam, Moody

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the outcome and toxicity of hyperfractionated radiotherapy (HFRT) vs. conventionally fractionated radiotherapy (CFRT) in children with Group III rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS). Methods and Materials: Five hundred fifty-nine children were enrolled into the Intergroup Rhabdomyosarcoma Study IV with Group III RMS. Sixty-nine were ineligible for the analysis because of incorrect group or pathologic findings. Of the 490 remaining, 239 were randomized to HFRT (59.4 Gy in 54 1.1-Gy twice daily fractions) and 251 to CFRT (50.4 Gy in 28 1.8-Gy daily fractions). The age range was <1-21 years. All patients received chemotherapy. RT began at Week 9 after induction chemotherapy for all but those with high-risk parameningeal tumors who received RT during induction chemotherapy. The patient groups were equally balanced. The median follow-up was 3.9 years. Results: Analysis by randomized treatment assignment (intent to treat) revealed an estimated 5-year failure-free survival (FFS) rate of 70% and overall survival (OS) of 75%. In the univariate analysis, the factors associated with the best outcome were age 1-9 years at diagnosis; noninvasive tumors; tumor size <5 cm; uninvolved lymph nodes; Stage 1 or 2 disease; primary site in the orbit or head and neck; and embryonal histologic features (p=0.001 for all factors). No differences in the FFS or OS between the two RT treatment methods and no differences in the FFS or OS between HFRT and CFRT were found when analyzed by age, gender, tumor size, tumor invasiveness, nodal status, histologic features, stage, or primary site. Treatment compliance differed by age. Of the children <5 years, 57% assigned to HFRT received HFRT and 77% assigned to CFRT received CFRT. Of the children ≥5 years, 88% assigned to both HFRT and CFRT received their assigned treatment. The reasons for not receiving the appropriate randomized treatment were progressive disease, early death, parent or physician refusal, young age, or surgery. The

  8. Conservative approach in localised rhabdomyosarcoma of the bladder and prostate: results from International Society of Paediatric Oncology (SIOP) studies: malignant mesenchymal tumour (MMT) 84, 89 and 95.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenney, Meriel; Oberlin, Odile; Audry, Georges; Stevens, Michael C G; Rey, Annie; Merks, Johannes H M; Kelsey, Anna; Gallego, Soledad; Haie-Meder, Christine; Martelli, Hélène

    2014-02-01

    The three sequential SIOP MMT studies provide the largest dataset available to date, to define the patient and tumour characteristics, treatment modalities and event-free and overall survival for children with non metastatic rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) of the bladder and/or prostate (BP). The combined dataset of 172 patients with BP RMS treated on the SIOP MMT 84, 89 and 95 studies was reviewed to determine tumour characteristics, details of treatment and outcome. Median age at diagnosis was 2.5 years (range 2 months-17.8 years) and 138 (79%) were males. Median follow-up was 11.4 years (range 3 months-22 years). The 5-year overall survival of the combined cohort was 77% (CI 70-83%). The 5-year event-free survival was 63% and included 7 patients (4%) who did not achieve complete remission (CR), and 57 (33%) who relapsed. Age ≥ 10 years (RR 3.7) and alveolar pathology (RR 3.3) were identified as independent prognostic factors on multivariate analysis. Fifty-nine (50%) of the 119 survivors were cured without significant local therapy, improving from 31% in MMT84 study to 61% in MMT95 study. The clinical strategy of the MMT studies aims to minimise the burden of therapy whilst maintaining survival rates. Overall survival is comparable to that of other international groups, despite the lower use of radiotherapy and or radical surgery, although number of events experienced is higher. Further assessment of the late effects of therapy is required to confirm whether this approach results in lower morbidity in the long-term. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Surgical treatment of primary cardiac rhabdomyosarcoma Tratamento cirúrgico de rabdomiosarcoma primário do coração

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo de Carvalho Lima

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The authors report a case of a 16-year-old man who presented progressive dyspnea. At that time the diagnosis of rheumatic fever with mitral valve involvement was performed. The bidimensional echocardiogram showed presence of mobile mass inside the left atrium. The tumor presented lobules, projecting into the left ventricle during the diastole and provoking turbulence. The patient underwent surgical resection with postoperative course needing re-operation for mitral valve replacement. Histopathology has proven that such tumor was a primary cardiac rhabdomyosarcoma and the early clinical diagnosis of rheumatic mitral valve disease was very difficult.Os autores reportam caso de jovem de 16 anos, o qual apresentou dispnéia progressiva. No momento do atendimento foi feito diagnóstico de febre reumática com comprometimento da valva mitral. Ecocardiograma bidimensional demonstrou a presença de massa móvel dentro do átrio esquerdo. O tumor apresentava lobos, se projetando para o interior do ventrículo esquerdo durante a diástole, provocando turbulência. O paciente foi submetido a ressecção cirúrgica, complicada com reoperação e troca valvar mitral. A histopatologia demonstrou tratar-se de rabdomiosarcoma primário e o diagnóstico clínico diferencial com febre reumática e doença valvar mitral foi muito difícil desde o seu início.

  10. Structural and functional studies of FKHR-PAX3, a reciprocal fusion gene of the t(2;13 chromosomal translocation in alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma.

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    Qiande Hu

    Full Text Available Alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma (ARMS is an aggressive pediatric cancer of skeletal muscle. More than 70% of ARMS tumors carry balanced t(2;13 chromosomal translocation that leads to the production of two novel fusion genes, PAX3-FKHR and FKHR-PAX3. While the PAX3-FKHR gene has been intensely studied, the reciprocal FKHR-PAX3 gene has rarely been described. We report here the cloning and functional characterization of the FKHR-PAX3 gene as the first step towards a better understanding of its potential impact on ARMS biology. From RH30 ARMS cells, we detected and isolated three versions of FKHR-PAX3 cDNAs whose C-terminal sequences corresponded to PAX3c, PAX3d, and PAX3e isoforms. Unlike the nuclear-specific localization of PAX3-FKHR, the reciprocal FKHR-PAX3 proteins stayed predominantly in the cytoplasm. FKHR-PAX3 potently inhibited myogenesis in both non-transformed myoblast cells and ARMS cells. We showed that FKHR-PAX3 was not a classic oncogene but could act as a facilitator in oncogenic pathways by stabilizing PAX3-FKHR expression, enhancing cell proliferation, clonogenicity, anchorage-independent growth, and matrix adhesion in vitro, and accelerating the onset of tumor formation in xenograft mouse model in vivo. In addition to these pro-oncogenic behaviors, FKHR-PAX3 also negatively affected cell migration and invasion in vitro and lung metastasis in vivo. Taken together, these functional characteristics suggested that FKHR-PAX3 might have a critical role in the early stage of ARMS development.

  11. The AMORE Protocol for Advanced-Stage and Recurrent Nonorbital Rhabdomyosarcoma in the Head-and-Neck Region of Children: A Radiation Oncology View

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blank, Leo E.C.M.; Koedooder, Kees; Pieters, Bradley R.; Grient, Hans N.B. van der; Kar, Marlou van de; Buwalda, Joeri; Balm, Alfons J.M.; Merks, Johannes H.M.; Strackee, Simon D.; Freling, Nicole J.; Koning, Caro C.E.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: A multidisciplinary approach, consisting of consecutive Ablative Surgery, MOld technique with afterloading brachytherapy and immediate surgical REconstruction (AMORE) applied after chemotherapy, was designed for children with rhabdomyosarcoma in the head-and-neck region. Analysis of the first 42 patients was performed. Methods and Materials: After macroscopically radical tumor resection, molds were constructed for each individual to fit into the surgical defect. The molds, made of 5-mm-thick layers of thermoplastic rubber, consisted of different parts. Flexible catheters were positioned between layers. After brachytherapy, the molds were removed. Surgical reconstruction was performed during the same procedure. Results: Dose to the clinical target volume varied from 40 to 50 Gy for the primary treatment (31 patients) and salvage treatment groups (11 patients). There were 18 females and 24 males treated from 1993 until 2007. Twenty-nine tumors were located in the parameningeal region, and 13 were located in the nonparameningeal region. Patient age at the time of AMORE was 1.2-16.9 years (average, 6.5 years). Follow-up was 0.2-14.5 years (average, >5.5 years). Eleven patients died, 3 with local recurrence only, 6 with local and distant disease, 1 died of distant metastases only, and 1 patient died of a second primary tumor. Overall 5-year survival rates were 70% for the primary treatment group and 82% for the salvage group. Treatment was well tolerated, and acute and late toxicity were mild. Conclusions: The AMORE protocol yields good local control and overall survival rates, and side effects are acceptable.

  12. Target specificity, in vivo pharmacokinetics, and efficacy of the putative STAT3 inhibitor LY5 in osteosarcoma, Ewing's sarcoma, and rhabdomyosarcoma.

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    Peter Y Yu

    Full Text Available STAT3 is a transcription factor involved in cytokine and receptor kinase signal transduction that is aberrantly activated in a variety of sarcomas, promoting metastasis and chemotherapy resistance. The purpose of this work was to develop and test a novel putative STAT3 inhibitor, LY5.An in silico fragment-based drug design strategy was used to create LY5, a small molecule inhibitor that blocks the STAT3 SH2 domain phosphotyrosine binding site, inhibiting homodimerization. LY5 was evaluated in vitro demonstrating good biologic activity against rhabdomyosarcoma, osteosarcoma and Ewing's sarcoma cell lines at high nanomolar/low micromolar concentrations, as well as specific inhibition of STAT3 phosphorylation without effects on other STAT3 family members. LY5 exhibited excellent oral bioavailability in both mice and healthy dogs, and drug absorption was enhanced in the fasted state with tolerable dosing in mice at 40 mg/kg BID. However, RNAi-mediated knockdown of STAT3 did not phenocopy the biologic effects of LY5 in sarcoma cell lines. Moreover, concentrations needed to inhibit ex vivo metastasis growth using the PuMA assay were significantly higher than those needed to inhibit STAT3 phosphorylation in vitro. Lastly, LY5 treatment did not inhibit the growth of sarcoma xenografts or prevent pulmonary metastasis in mice.LY5 is a novel small molecule inhibitor that effectively inhibits STAT3 phosphorylation and cell proliferation at nanomolar concentrations. LY5 demonstrates good oral bioavailability in mice and dogs. However LY5 did not decrease tumor growth in xenograft mouse models and STAT3 knockdown did not induce concordant biologic effects. These data suggest that the anti-cancer effects of LY5 identified in vitro were not mediated through STAT3 inhibition.

  13. Target specificity, in vivo pharmacokinetics, and efficacy of the putative STAT3 inhibitor LY5 in osteosarcoma, Ewing's sarcoma, and rhabdomyosarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Peter Y; Gardner, Heather L; Roberts, Ryan; Cam, Hakan; Hariharan, Seethalakshmi; Ren, Ling; LeBlanc, Amy K; Xiao, Hui; Lin, Jiayuh; Guttridge, Denis C; Mo, Xiaokui; Bennett, Chad E; Coss, Christopher C; Ling, Yonghua; Phelps, Mitch A; Houghton, Peter; London, Cheryl A

    2017-01-01

    STAT3 is a transcription factor involved in cytokine and receptor kinase signal transduction that is aberrantly activated in a variety of sarcomas, promoting metastasis and chemotherapy resistance. The purpose of this work was to develop and test a novel putative STAT3 inhibitor, LY5. An in silico fragment-based drug design strategy was used to create LY5, a small molecule inhibitor that blocks the STAT3 SH2 domain phosphotyrosine binding site, inhibiting homodimerization. LY5 was evaluated in vitro demonstrating good biologic activity against rhabdomyosarcoma, osteosarcoma and Ewing's sarcoma cell lines at high nanomolar/low micromolar concentrations, as well as specific inhibition of STAT3 phosphorylation without effects on other STAT3 family members. LY5 exhibited excellent oral bioavailability in both mice and healthy dogs, and drug absorption was enhanced in the fasted state with tolerable dosing in mice at 40 mg/kg BID. However, RNAi-mediated knockdown of STAT3 did not phenocopy the biologic effects of LY5 in sarcoma cell lines. Moreover, concentrations needed to inhibit ex vivo metastasis growth using the PuMA assay were significantly higher than those needed to inhibit STAT3 phosphorylation in vitro. Lastly, LY5 treatment did not inhibit the growth of sarcoma xenografts or prevent pulmonary metastasis in mice. LY5 is a novel small molecule inhibitor that effectively inhibits STAT3 phosphorylation and cell proliferation at nanomolar concentrations. LY5 demonstrates good oral bioavailability in mice and dogs. However LY5 did not decrease tumor growth in xenograft mouse models and STAT3 knockdown did not induce concordant biologic effects. These data suggest that the anti-cancer effects of LY5 identified in vitro were not mediated through STAT3 inhibition.

  14. Rhabdomyosarcoma of the urinary bladder in adults: predilection for alveolar morphology with anaplasia and significant morphologic overlap with small cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paner, Gladell P; McKenney, Jesse K; Epstein, Jonathan I; Amin, Mahul B

    2008-07-01

    Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) represents the most common malignant soft tissue tumor in children and adolescents with the urinary bladder representing a frequent site. Most of these urinary bladder tumors are embryonal RMS, predominantly the botryoid subtype. RMSs of the urinary bladder in adults are distinctively rare and the subject of only case reports. We report the clinicopathologic features of 5 bladder neoplasms with rhabdomyosarcomatous differentiation in adults and emphasize the differential diagnosis in the adult setting. The patients, 4 men and 1 woman, ranged in age from 23 to 85 years (mean 65.4 y). Gross hematuria was the most common initial symptom, although 2 patients had metastatic disease at presentation. Four cases were pure primary RMSs of the bladder and 1 case was a sarcomatoid urothelial carcinoma with RMS representing the extensive heterologous component. All 5 cases demonstrated a diffuse growth pattern (ie, non-nested), of which 4 cases had nuclear anaplasia (Wilms criteria without the atypical mitotic figure requirement); only 1 case (the sarcomatoid carcinoma) showed obvious rhabdomyoblastic differentiation (ie, strap cells). Three cases were of the alveolar subtype (1 admixed with embryonal histology) and 2 were RMS, not further classified. Microscopically, all tumors had a primitive undifferentiated morphology with cells containing scant cytoplasm, varying round to fusiform nuclei with even chromatin distribution, and frequent mitoses. The degree of morphologic overlap with small cell carcinoma of the bladder, a relatively more common round cell tumor in adults, was striking. The epithelial component of the sarcomatoid carcinoma was high-grade invasive urothelial carcinoma with glandular differentiation. No other case had previous history of bladder cancer or concurrent carcinoma in situ or invasive urothelial carcinoma. All tumors showed immunohistochemical expression for desmin, myogenin, and/or MyoD1. Synaptophysin was performed in 4 cases

  15. Carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1A (CPT1A): a transcriptional target of PAX3-FKHR and mediates PAX3-FKHR–dependent motility in alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Lingling; Wang, Yong-Dong; Wu, Jing; Cui, Jimmy; Chen, Taosheng

    2012-01-01

    Alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma (ARMS) has a high propensity to metastasize, leading to its aggressiveness and a poor survival rate among those with the disease. More than 80% of aggressive ARMSs harbor a PAX3-FKHR fusion transcription factor, which regulates cell migration and promotes metastasis, most likely by regulating the fusion protein’s transcriptional targets. Therefore, identifying druggable transcription targets of PAX3-FKHR that are also downstream effectors of PAX3-FKHR–mediated cell migration and metastasis may lead to novel therapeutic approaches for treating ARMS. To identify genes whose expression is directly affected by the level of PAX3-FKHR in an ARMS cellular-context, we first developed an ARMS cell line in which PAX3-FKHR is stably down-regulated, and showed that stably downregulating PAX3-FKHR in ARMS cells significantly decreased the cells’ motility. We used microarray analysis to identify genes whose expression level decreased when PAX3-FKHR was downregulated. We used mutational analysis, promoter reporter assays, and electrophoretic mobility shift assays to determine whether PAX3-FKHR binds to the promoter region of the target gene. We used siRNA and pharmacologic inhibitor to downregulate the target gene of PAX3-FKHR and investigated the effect of such downregulation on cell motility. We found that when PAX3-FKHR was downregulated, the expression of carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1A (CPT1A) decreased. We showed that PAX3-FKHR binds to a paired-domain binding-site in the CPT1A promoter region, indicating that CPT1A is a novel transcriptional target of PAX3-FKHR. Furthermore, downregulating CPT1A decreased cell motility in ARMS cells, indicating that CPT1A is a downstream effector of PAX3-FKHR–mediated cell migration and metastasis. Taken together, we have identified CPT1A as a novel transcriptional target of PAX3-FKHR and revealed the novel function of CPT1A in promoting cell motility. CPT1A may represent a novel therapeutic target for

  16. Pharmacological targeting of the ephrin receptor kinase signalling by GLPG1790 in vitro and in vivo reverts oncophenotype, induces myogenic differentiation and radiosensitizes embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma cells

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    Francesca Megiorni

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background EPH (erythropoietin-producing hepatocellular receptors are clinically relevant targets in several malignancies. This report describes the effects of GLPG1790, a new potent pan-EPH inhibitor, in human embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma (ERMS cell lines. Methods EPH-A2 and Ephrin-A1 mRNA expression was quantified by real-time PCR in 14 ERMS tumour samples and in normal skeletal muscle (NSM. GLPG1790 effects were tested in RD and TE671 cell lines, two in vitro models of ERMS, by performing flow cytometry analysis, Western blotting and immunofluorescence experiments. RNA interfering experiments were performed to assess the role of specific EPH receptors. Radiations were delivered using an x-6 MV photon linear accelerator. GLPG1790 (30 mg/kg in vivo activity alone or in combination with irradiation (2 Gy was determined in murine xenografts. Results Our study showed, for the first time, a significant upregulation of EPH-A2 receptor and Ephrin-A1 ligand in ERMS primary biopsies in comparison to NSM. GLPG1790 in vitro induced G1-growth arrest as demonstrated by Rb, Cyclin A and Cyclin B1 decrease, as well as by p21 and p27 increment. GLPG1790 reduced migratory capacity and clonogenic potential of ERMS cells, prevented rhabdosphere formation and downregulated CD133, CXCR4 and Nanog stem cell markers. Drug treatment committed ERMS cells towards skeletal muscle differentiation by inducing a myogenic-like phenotype and increasing MYOD1, Myogenin and MyHC levels. Furthermore, GLPG1790 significantly radiosensitized ERMS cells by impairing the DNA double-strand break repair pathway. Silencing of both EPH-A2 and EPH-B2, two receptors preferentially targeted by GLPG1790, closely matched the effects of the EPH pharmacological inhibition. GLPG1790 and radiation combined treatments reduced tumour mass by 83% in mouse TE671 xenografts. Conclusions Taken together, our data suggest that altered EPH signalling plays a key role in ERMS development and that

  17. In vitro cytotoxic activity of medicinal plants from Nigeria ethnomedicine on Rhabdomyosarcoma cancer cell line and HPLC analysis of active extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogbole, Omonike O; Segun, Peter A; Adeniji, Adekunle J

    2017-11-22

    Cancer is a leading cause of death world-wide, with approximately 17.5 million new cases and 8.7 million cancer related deaths in 2015. The problems of poor selectivity and severe side effects of the available anticancer drugs, have demanded the need for the development of safer and more effective chemotherapeutic agents. The present study was aimed at determining the cytotoxicities of 31 medicinal plants extracts, used in Nigerian ethnomedicine for the treatment of cancer. The plant extracts were screened for cytotoxicity, using the brine shrimp lethality assay (BSLA) and MTT cytotoxicity assay. Rhabdomyosarcoma (RD) cell line, normal Vero cell line and the normal prostate (PNT2) cell line were used for the MTT assay, while Artemia salina nauplii was used for the BSLA. The phytochemical composition of the active plant extracts was determined by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis. The extract of Eluesine indica (L.) Gaertn (Poaceae), with a LC 50 value of 76.3 μg/mL, had the highest cytotoxicity on the brine shrimp larvae compared to cyclophosphamide (LC 50  = 101.3 μg/mL). Two plants extracts, Macaranga barteri Mull. Arg. (Euphorbiaceae) and Calliandra portoricensis (Jacq.) Benth (Leguminosae) exhibited significant cytotoxic activity against the RD cell line and had comparable lethal activity on the brine shrimps. Further cytotoxic investigation showed that the dichloromethane fraction of Macaranga barteri (DMB) and the ethyl acetate fraction of Calliandra portoricensis (ECP), exhibited approximately 6-fold and 4-fold activity, respectively, compared to cyclophosphamide on RD cell line. Determination of selective index (SI) using Vero and PNT2 cell line indicated that DMB and ECP displayed a high degree of selectivity against the cancer cell under investigation. HPLC analysis showed that 3,5dicaffeoylquinic acid, acteoside, kampferol-7-O-glucoside and bastadin 11 were the major components of DMB while the major components of ECP were

  18. Cytotoxic capacity of IL-15-stimulated cytokine-induced killer cells against human acute myeloid leukemia and rhabdomyosarcoma in humanized preclinical mouse models

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    Eva eRettinger

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT has become an important treatment modality for patients with high risk acute myeloid leukemia (AML and is also under investigation for soft tissue sarcomas. The therapeutic success is still limited by minimal residual disease (MRD status ultimately leading to patients’ relapse. Adoptive donor lymphocyte infusions (DLI based on MRD status using IL-15-expanded cytokine-induced killer (CIK cells may prevent relapse without causing graft-versus-host-disease (GvHD. To generate preclinical data we developed mouse models to study anti-leukemic- and anti-tumor-potential of CIK cells in vivo. Immunodeficient mice (NOD/SCID/IL2Rγc-, NSG were injected intravenously with human leukemic cell lines THP-1, SH-2 and with human rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS cell lines RH41 and RH30 at minimal doses required for leukemia or tumor engraftment. Mice transplanted with THP-1 or RH41 cells were randomly assigned for analysis of CIK cell treatment. Organs of mice were analyzed by flow cytometry as well as quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR for engraftment of malignant cells and CIK cells. Potential of CIK cells to induce GvHD was determined by histological analysis. Tissues of the highest degree of THP-1 cell expansion included bone marrow (BM followed by liver, lung, spleen, peripheral blood (PB, and brain. RH30 and RH41 engraftment mainly took place in liver and lung, but was also detectable in spleen and PB. In spite of delayed CIK cell expansion compared with malignant cells, CIK cells injected at an effector to target cell (E:T ratio of 1:1 were sufficient for significant reduction of RH41 cells, whereas against fast-expanding THP-1 cells an E:T ratio of 250:1 was needed to achieve comparable results. Our preclinical in vivo mouse models showed a reliably 100% engraftment of malignant cells which is essential for analysis of anti-cancer therapy. Furthermore our data demonstrated that IL-15-activated CIK cells

  19. Cytotoxic Capacity of IL-15-Stimulated Cytokine-Induced Killer Cells Against Human Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Rhabdomyosarcoma in Humanized Preclinical Mouse Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rettinger, Eva; Meyer, Vida; Kreyenberg, Hermann [Department of Pediatric Hematology, Oncology and Hemostaseology, University Children’s Hospital of Frankfurt/Main, Goethe-University Frankfurt/Main, Frankfurt/Main (Germany); Volk, Andreas [Chemotherapeutisches Forschungsinstitut, Georg-Speyer-Haus, Frankfurt/Main (Germany); Kuçi, Selim; Willasch, Andre [Department of Pediatric Hematology, Oncology and Hemostaseology, University Children’s Hospital of Frankfurt/Main, Goethe-University Frankfurt/Main, Frankfurt/Main (Germany); Koscielniak, Ewa [Department of Pediatric Oncology and Hematology, Olgahospital Stuttgart, Stuttgart (Germany); Fulda, Simone [Institute for Experimental Cancer Research in Pediatrics, Goethe-University Frankfurt/Main, Frankfurt/Main (Germany); Wels, Winfried S. [Chemotherapeutisches Forschungsinstitut, Georg-Speyer-Haus, Frankfurt/Main (Germany); Boenig, Halvard [Institute for Transfusion Medicine and Immunohematology, Goethe-University Frankfurt/Main, Division for Cell Processing, German Red Cross Blood Donor Service Baden-Württemberg-Hessen, Frankfurt/Main (Germany); Klingebiel, Thomas; Bader, Peter, E-mail: eva.rettinger@kgu.de, E-mail: peter.bader@kgu.de [Department of Pediatric Hematology, Oncology and Hemostaseology, University Children’s Hospital of Frankfurt/Main, Goethe-University Frankfurt/Main, Frankfurt/Main (Germany)

    2012-04-09

    Allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT) has become an important treatment modality for patients with high-risk acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and is also under investigation for soft tissue sarcomas. The therapeutic success is still limited by minimal residual disease (MRD) status ultimately leading to patients’ relapse. Adoptive donor lymphocyte infusions based on MRD status using IL-15-expanded cytokine-induced killer (CIK) cells may prevent relapse without causing graft-versus-host-disease (GvHD). To generate preclinical data we developed mouse models to study anti-leukemic- and anti-tumor-potential of CIK cells in vivo. Immunodeficient mice (NOD/SCID/IL-2Rγc{sup −}, NSG) were injected intravenously with human leukemic cell lines THP-1, SH-2 and with human rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) cell lines RH41 and RH30 at minimal doses required for leukemia or tumor engraftment. Mice transplanted with THP-1 or RH41 cells were randomly assigned for analysis of CIK cell treatment. Organs of mice were analyzed by flow cytometry as well as quantitative polymerase chain reaction for engraftment of malignant cells and CIK cells. Potential of CIK cells to induce GvHD was determined by histological analysis. Tissues of the highest degree of THP-1 cell expansion included bone marrow followed by liver, lung, spleen, peripheral blood (PB), and brain. RH30 and RH41 engraftment mainly took place in liver and lung, but was also detectable in spleen and PB. In spite of delayed CIK cell expansion compared with malignant cells, CIK cells injected at equal amounts were sufficient for significant reduction of RH41 cells, whereas against fast-expanding THP-1 cells 250 times more CIK than THP-1 cells were needed to achieve comparable results. Our preclinical in vivo mouse models showed a reliable 100% engraftment of malignant cells which is essential for analysis of anti-cancer therapy. Furthermore our data demonstrated that IL-15-activated CIK cells have potent cytotoxic capacity

  20. Treatment Option Overview (Childhood Rhabdomyosarcoma)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... factors affect prognosis (chance of recovery) and treatment options. The prognosis (chance of recovery ) and treatment options ... or in other parts of the body. Treatment Option Overview Key Points There are different types of ...

  1. Treatment Options for Childhood Rhabdomyosarcoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... factors affect prognosis (chance of recovery) and treatment options. The prognosis (chance of recovery ) and treatment options ... or in other parts of the body. Treatment Option Overview Key Points There are different types of ...

  2. Rabdomiosarcoma de cabeça e pescoço na infância Head and neck rhabdomyosarcoma in childhood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatrice Mª J. Neves

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Rabdomiosarcoma é uma neoplasia maligna originária de células mesenquimais primitivas, podendo ocorrer em qualquer lugar do corpo. É o sarcoma de partes moles mais comum na infância, e localiza-se mais freqüentemente na cabeça e pescoço. OBJETIVO: Estudar a ocorrência de RMS na cabeça e pescoço na infância, correlacionando aspectos clínicos e histopatológicos. FORMA DE ESTUDO: Clínico retrospectivo. MÉTODO: Oitenta e dois pacientes com diagnóstico de sarcomas de partes moles, atendidos no Instituto de Oncopediatria da UNIFESP-EPM de 1988 a 2002 foram incluídos neste estudo. Foram estudados os seguintes parâmetros: incidência de RMS na infância e na cabeça e pescoço, distribuição segundo sexo, faixa etária, tipo histológico, localização primária, óbito X localização, causa mortis. RESULTADOS: Neste estudo 65% dos casos de sarcomas de partes moles corresponderam à RMS; 33% dos casos de RMS localizavam-se na cabeça e pescoço; 77% dos casos de sarcoma de partes moles de cabeça e pescoço corresponderam ao RMS. A média de idade no diagnóstico foi de 7,62 anos, predominando na faixa etária dos 5 aos 9 anos (41%. Em relação ao sexo, encontramos 47% do sexo feminino e 53% do sexo masculino. Quanto ao tipo histológico, o mais comum foi o RMS embrionário correspondendo a 64,6% do total. O sítio primário mais comum foi o orbital (52,8%. Cem por cento, 50% e 33,3% dos pacientes com RMS parameníngeo, não parameníngeo e orbital, respectivamente, evoluíram para óbito. CONCLUSÃO: O RMS é o sarcoma de partes moles mais comum na infância, localizando-se preferencialmente na cabeça e pescoço. Houve predominância do sexo masculino neste estudo; idade média de 7,62 anos predominando a faixa etária dos 5 aos 9 anos. O tipo histológico predominante foi o embrionário e a localização orbital foi mais freqüente. O maior índice de óbito pertenceu aos RMS parameníngeo e o menor ao orbital.Rhabdomyosarcoma

  3. Early monitoring of external radiation therapy by [18F]-fluoromethylcholine positron emission tomography and 3-T proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy: an experimental study in a rodent rhabdomyosarcoma model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rommel, Denis; Abarca-Quinones, Jorge; Bol, Anne; Peeters, Frank; Lhommel, Renaud; Lonneux, Max; Labar, Daniel; Gregoire, Vincent; Duprez, Thierry

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To assess early radiation therapy (RT)-induced variations in total choline (tCho) concentration measured by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (H-MRS) and in 18 F-labelled fluoromethylcholine (FCH) uptake measured by PET in a rodent tumour model. Methods: Nine rats bearing syngenic rhabdomyosarcoma grafts in both thighs were irradiated (13 Gy, one fraction). H-MRS data and FCH-PET were acquired in the same imaging session prior to and 3, 9 and 16 days after external RT. Total choline concentration was expressed in arbitrary units as the area under the curve of the 3.2-ppm peak on H-MR spectra. FCH uptake was expressed as maximum standardized uptake value (SUV max ) and as the % of injected dose per gram (%ID/g) after precise tumour delineation on hybrid PET-MR images. Pre- and post-RT data were compared using the Student's paired t test, and results were expressed as mean±S.D. Results: Seventeen tumours were available for analysis. A mean drop in choline concentration of 45% was observed 3 days after irradiation (P max of 41% was observed (P=.006). Choline concentration reincreased on later time points. Conclusions: Opposite trend between increased FCH uptake and decreased tCho peak was observed at 3 days. Later (9 and 16 days), uptake remained stable and tCho peak reincreased.

  4. Local Control for Intermediate-Risk Rhabdomyosarcoma: Results From D9803 According to Histology, Group, Site, and Size: A Report From the Children's Oncology Group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolden, Suzanne L., E-mail: woldens@mskcc.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Lyden, Elizabeth R. [Department of Preventive and Societal Medicine, Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, Nebraska (United States); Arndt, Carola A. [Department of Pediatric and Adolescent Medicine, Mayo Clinic and Foundation, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Hawkins, Douglas S. [Division of Hematology/Oncology, Seattle Children' s Hospital, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington (United States); Anderson, James R. [Frontier Science and Technology Research Foundation, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); Rodeberg, David A. [Department of Surgery, East Carolina University, Greenville, North Carolina (United States); Morris, Carol D. [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Donaldson, Sarah S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Purpose: To determine local control according to clinical variables for patients with intermediate-risk rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) treated on Children's Oncology Group protocol D9803. Patients and Methods: Of 702 patients enrolled, we analyzed 423 patients with central pathology–confirmed group III embryonal (n=280) or alveolar (group III, n=102; group I-II, n=41) RMS. Median age was 5 years. Patients received 42 weeks of VAC (vincristine, dactinomycin, cyclophosphamide) or VAC alternating with VTC (T = topotecan). Local therapy with 50.4 Gy radiation therapy with or without delayed primary excision began at week 12 for group III patients. Patients with group I/II alveolar RMS received 36-41.4 Gy. Local failure (LF) was defined as local progression as a first event with or without concurrent regional or distant failure. Results: At a median follow-up of 6.6 years, patients with clinical group I/II alveolar RMS had a 5-year event-free survival rate of 69% and LF of 10%. Among patients with group III RMS, 5-year event-free survival and LF rates were 70% and 19%, respectively. Local failure rates did not differ by histology, nodal status, or primary site, though there was a trend for increased LF for retroperitoneal (RP) tumors (P=.12). Tumors ≥5 cm were more likely to fail locally than tumors <5 cm (25% vs 10%, P=.0004). Almost all (98%) RP tumors were ≥5 cm, with no difference in LF by site when the analysis was restricted to tumors ≥5 cm (P=.86). Conclusion: Local control was excellent for clinical group I/II alveolar RMS. Local failure constituted 63% of initial events in clinical group III patients and did not vary by histology or nodal status. The trend for higher LF in RP tumors was related to tumor size. There has been no clear change in local control over RMS studies, including IRS-III and IRS-IV. Novel approaches are warranted for larger tumors (≥5 cm).

  5. Comparison of the uptake of [123/125I]-2-iodo-D-tyrosine and [123/125I]-2-iodo-L-tyrosine in R1M rhabdomyosarcoma cells in vitro and in R1M tumor-bearing Wag/Rij rats in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauwens, Matthias; Lahoutte, Tony; Kersemans, Ken; Gallez, Carol; Bossuyt, Axel; Mertens, John

    2006-01-01

    Introduction: Recently, promising results concerning uptake in vivo in tumors of D-amino acids have been published. Therefore, we decided to evaluate the tumor uptake of the D-analogue of [ 123 I]-2-iodo-L-tyrosine, a tracer recently introduced by our group into clinical trials. The uptake of 2-amino-3-(4-hydroxy-2-[ 123/125 I]iodophenyl)-D-propanoic acid (2-iodo-D-tyrosine) was studied in vitro in LAT1-expressing R1M rat rhabdomyosarcoma cells and in vivo in R1M tumor-bearing Wag/Rij rats. Methods: The uptake of [ 125 I]-2-iodo-L-tyrosine and [ 125 I]-2-iodo-D-tyrosine into R1M cells was determined in appropriate buffers, allowing the study of the involved transport systems. In vivo, the biodistribution in R1M-bearing rats of [ 123 I]-2-iodo-L-tyrosine and [ 123 I]-2-iodo-D-tyrosine was performed by both dynamic and static planar imaging with a gamma camera. Results: In in vitro conditions, the uptake of both [ 125 I]-2-iodo-L-tyrosine and [ 125 I]-2-iodo-D-tyrosine in the HEPES buffer was 25% higher in the presence of Na + ions. In the absence of Na + ions, [ 125 I]-2-iodo-D-tyrosine was taken up reversibly in the R1M cells, with an apparent accumulation, probably for the larger part by the LAT1 system. Dynamic planar imaging showed that the uptake in the tumors of [ 123 I]-2-iodo-D-tyrosine was somewhat lower than that of [ 123 I]-2-iodo-L-tyrosine. At 30 min postinjection, the mean differential uptake ratio values of the L- and D-enantiomers are 2.5±0.7 and 1.7±0.6, respectively. Although the uptake of the D-isomer is lower, probably due to a faster clearance from the blood, the tumor-background ratio is the same as that of the L-analogue. Conclusion: A large part (75%) of [ 125 I]-2-iodo-D-tyrosine in vitro and [ 123 I]-2-iodo-D-tyrosine in vivo is reversibly highly taken up in R1M tumor cells by Na + -independent LAT transport systems, more likely by the LAT1. The clearance from the blood of [ 123 I]-2-iodo-D-tyrosine in the rats is faster than that of the

  6. [Rhabdomyosarcoma of soft palate. A case on purpose].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arias Marzán, F; De Bonis Redondo, M; Redondo Ventura, F; Betancor Martínez, L; Sanginés Yzzo, M; Arias Marzán, J; De Bonis Braun, C; Zurita Expósito, V; Reig Ripoll, F; De Lucas Carmona, G

    2006-01-01

    The rabdomiosarcoma (RMS) are infrequent tumors. They are principally described in infancy and located in 35% of the cases in head and neck. The nasopharynx localisation is relatively rare, being in these cases the tongue, palate and oral mucosa the preferent places of establishment. Classically the patient presented very low standard healing with surgery and radiotherapy. The introduction in the middle 70 of systematic chimiotherapy as complementary treatment, improved the survival rate in large scale. In this article the case of an adolescent patient, who presented a RMS at the level of the soft palate, the diagnostic procedure and the therapeutic decision adopted, after revision of the last studies at this respect, are described.

  7. Synchronous rhabdomyosarcoma of the testis and kidney: A case ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Babatunde M. Duduyemi

    2015-04-15

    Apr 15, 2015 ... option for soft tissue evaluation.7 Our patient was evaluated with ultrasonography as he could not afford CT or MRI for financial and logistic considerations. Treatment of RMS consists of complete surgical excision and adjuvant chemotherapy with or without radiotherapy and is dependent on the stage and ...

  8. A Single Coxsackievirus B2 Capsid Residue Controls Cytolysis and Apoptosis in Rhabdomyosarcoma Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gullberg, M.; Tolf, C.; Jonsson, N.

    2010-01-01

    Coxsackievirus B2 (CVB2), one of six human pathogens of the group B coxsackieviruses within the enterovirus genus of Picornaviridae, causes a wide spectrum of human diseases ranging from mild upper respiratory illnesses to myocarditis and meningitis. The CVB2 prototype strain Ohio-1 (CVB2O...

  9. Doxorubicin potentiates TRAIL cytotoxicity and apoptosis and can overcome TRAIL-resistance in rhabdomyosarcoma cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Komdeur, R; Meijer, C; Van Zweeden, M; De Jong, S; Wesseling, J; Hoekstra, HJ; van der Graaf, WTA

    Doxorubicin (DOX) and ifosfamide (IFO) are the most active single agents in soft tissue sarcomas (STS). Tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) is used for STS in the setting of isolated limb perfusions. Like TNF-alpha, TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) induces apoptosis. In contrast to

  10. Metastatic spreading and growth of rhabdomyosarcoma in exposure to hyperglycemia, hyperthermia and ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ul'yanenko, S.E.; Salamatina, N.A.; Dedenkov, A.N.

    1985-01-01

    Under the effect of local UHF-hyperthermia, short-term hyperglycemia and ionizing radiation on metastasing strain of rhabdomysarcoma an increase in metastatic spreading or stimulated growth of primary tumor are not noticed. Otherwise, it is stated that hyperglycemia and hyperthermia thrice-used prevent from metastatic spreading of the tumor. Ionizing radiation decelerates both tumor growth and to a least extent its metastatic spreading

  11. Rabdomiosarcoma de vejiga: Presentación de un caso Urinary bladder rhabdomyosarcoma: A case report

    OpenAIRE

    Emilio Simón Barroso de la Cruz; Ramón Duany Freyre; Ernesto Pérez Moreno; Alberto Ruiz Roche; Ramón Portales Pérez; Juan Langaney Rizo

    2004-01-01

    Se presenta el caso de una paciente de 52 años de edad que acudió a la consulta de Ginecología por un aumento de volumen en el abdomen. Se le indicó ingreso, se estudió y se diagnosticó un tumor gigante de víscera ginecológica. Se decide tratamiento quirúrgico mediante laparatomía. Durante el acto quirúrgico se demuestra que la tumoración corresponde a la vejiga, por lo que se solicita la presencia de un urólogo. Continuamos la intervención y encontramos una tumoración grande, de base ancha, ...

  12. Rhabdomyosarcoma cells show an energy producing anabolic metabolic phenotype compared with primary myocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Higashi Richard M

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The functional status of a cell is expressed in its metabolic activity. We have applied stable isotope tracing methods to determine the differences in metabolic pathways in proliferating Rhabdomysarcoma cells (Rh30 and human primary myocytes in culture. Uniformly 13C-labeled glucose was used as a source molecule to follow the incorporation of 13C into more than 40 marker metabolites using NMR and GC-MS. These include metabolites that report on the activity of glycolysis, Krebs' cycle, pentose phosphate pathway and pyrimidine biosynthesis. Results The Rh30 cells proliferated faster than the myocytes. Major differences in flux through glycolysis were evident from incorporation of label into secreted lactate, which accounts for a substantial fraction of the glucose carbon utilized by the cells. Krebs' cycle activity as determined by 13C isotopomer distributions in glutamate, aspartate, malate and pyrimidine rings was considerably higher in the cancer cells than in the primary myocytes. Large differences were also evident in de novo biosynthesis of riboses in the free nucleotide pools, as well as entry of glucose carbon into the pyrimidine rings in the free nucleotide pool. Specific labeling patterns in these metabolites show the increased importance of anaplerotic reactions in the cancer cells to maintain the high demand for anabolic and energy metabolism compared with the slower growing primary myocytes. Serum-stimulated Rh30 cells showed higher degrees of labeling than serum starved cells, but they retained their characteristic anabolic metabolism profile. The myocytes showed evidence of de novo synthesis of glycogen, which was absent in the Rh30 cells. Conclusion The specific 13C isotopomer patterns showed that the major difference between the transformed and the primary cells is the shift from energy and maintenance metabolism in the myocytes toward increased energy and anabolic metabolism for proliferation in the Rh30 cells. The data further show that the mitochondria remain functional in Krebs' cycle activity and respiratory electron transfer that enables continued accelerated glycolysis. This may be a common adaptive strategy in cancer cells.

  13. Differential Expression of Cytochrome P450 Enzymes in Normal and Tumor Tissues from Childhood Rhabdomyosarcoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina-Ortiz, Dora; Camacho-Carranza, Rafael; González-Zamora, José Francisco; Shalkow-Kalincovstein, Jaime; Cárdenas-Cardós, Rocío; Ností-Palacios, Rosario; Vences-Mejía, Araceli

    2014-01-01

    Intratumoral expression of genes encoding Cytochrome P450 enzymes (CYP) might play a critical role not only in cancer development but also in the metabolism of anticancer drugs. The purpose of this study was to compare the mRNA expression patterns of seven representative CYPs in paired tumor and normal tissue of child patients with rabdomyosarcoma (RMS). Using real time quantitative RT-PCR, the gene expression pattern of CYP1A1, CYP1A2, CYP1B1, CYP2E1, CYP2W1, CYP3A4, and CYP3A5 were analyzed in tumor and adjacent non-tumor tissues from 13 child RMS patients. Protein concentration of CYPs was determined using Western blot. The expression levels were tested for correlation with the clinical and pathological data of the patients. Our data showed that the expression levels of CYP1A1 and CYP1A2 were negligible. Elevated expression of CYP1B1 mRNA and protein was detected in most RMS tumors and adjacent normal tissues. Most cancerous samples exhibit higher levels of both CYP3A4 and CYP3A5 compared with normal tissue samples. Expression of CYP2E1 mRNA was found to be significantly higher in tumor tissue, however no relation was found with protein levels. CYP2W1 mRNA and/or protein are mainly expressed in tumors. In conclusion, we defined the CYP gene expression profile in tumor and paired normal tissue of child patients with RMS. The overexpression of CYP2W1, CYP3A4 and CYP3A5 in tumor tissues suggests that they may be involved in RMS chemoresistance; furthermore, they may be exploited for the localized activation of anticancer prodrugs. PMID:24699256

  14. Sonographic and computed tomographic features of embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma of the biliary tract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedburg, H.; Kauffmann, G.W.; Boehm, N.; Fiedler, L.; Jobke, A.

    1984-01-01

    3-year-old child presented with vague abdominal pain, fever, leucocytosis and elevation of alkaline phosphatase. Ultrasonography revealed a space occupying process within the extrahepatic bile ducts surrounded by fluid. Various densities (between 15-25 Hounsfield units) were measured in this intrabiliary tumor by computed tomography. (orig.)

  15. Cytologic diagnosis of rhabdomyosarcoma in a child with a pleural effusion. A case report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Theunissen, Paul; Cremers, Martin; van der Meer, Syb; Bot, Freek; Bras, Johannes

    2004-01-01

    A pleural effusion in children is usually caused by infectious diseases; malignant effusion is very uncommon. In a case of a malignant effusion in a child, a pleura-based metastasis of a neoplasm with a typically high prevalence in childhood has to be considered. Examples are neuroblastoma,

  16. Delta-like 1 homolog (dlk1): a marker for rhabdomyosarcomas implicated in skeletal muscle regeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Louise Helskov; Sellathurai, Jeeva; Davis, Erica E

    2013-01-01

    of the myosin light chain promotor, and detected an early, enhanced formation of myotubes in Dlk1 transgenic mice. We then stably transfected the mouse myoblast cell line, C2C12, with full-length Dlk1 (soluble A variant) and detected an inhibition of myotube formation, which could be reversed by adding Dlk1...... antibody to the culture supernatant. These results suggest that Dlk1 is involved in controlling the myogenic programme and that the various splice forms may exert different effects. Interestingly, both in the Dlk1 transgenic mice and the DLK1-C2C12 cells, we detected reduced myostatin expression......, suggesting that the effect of Dlk1 on the myogenic programme might involve the myostatin signaling pathway. In support of a relationship between Dlk1 and myostatin we detected reciprocal expression of these two transcripts during different cell cycle stages of human myoblasts. Together our results suggest...

  17. [The reentrant binomial model of nuclear anomalies growth in rhabdomyosarcoma RA-23 cell populations under increasing doze of rare ionizing radiation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alekseeva, N P; Alekseev, A O; Vakhtin, Iu B; Kravtsov, V Iu; Kuzovatov, S N; Skorikova, T I

    2008-01-01

    Distributions of nuclear morphology anomalies in transplantable rabdomiosarcoma RA-23 cell populations were investigated under effect of ionizing radiation from 0 to 45 Gy. Internuclear bridges, nuclear protrusions and dumbbell-shaped nuclei were accepted for morphological anomalies. Empirical distributions of the number of anomalies per 100 nuclei were used. The adequate model of reentrant binomial distribution has been found. The sum of binomial random variables with binomial number of summands has such distribution. Averages of these random variables were named, accordingly, internal and external average reentrant components. Their maximum likelihood estimations were received. Statistical properties of these estimations were investigated by means of statistical modeling. It has been received that at equally significant correlation between the radiation dose and the average of nuclear anomalies in cell populations after two-three cellular cycles from the moment of irradiation in vivo the irradiation doze significantly correlates with internal average reentrant component, and in remote descendants of cell transplants irradiated in vitro - with external one.

  18. Primary Renal Sarcomas in the Intergroup Rhabdomyosarcoma Study Group (IRSG) Experience, 1972–2005: A Report from the Children’s Oncology Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raney, Beverly; Anderson, James; Arndt, Carola; Crist, Willam; Maurer, Harold; Qualman, Stephen; Wharam, Moody; Meyer, William

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To describe clinical and pathologic characteristics and outcome of patients with renal sarcomas. Patients/Methods The IRSG database includes newly diagnosed patients Anaplasia was present in six (60%) of the tumors. Patients’ ages ranged from 2.6–17.8 years. Tumor diameters ranged from 7–15 cm (median, 12 cm). At diagnosis, seven patients had localized disease: four underwent complete removal of tumor (Group I), two had microscopic residual (Group II), and one had gross residual tumor (Group III). Three patients had distant metastases (Group IV) in lungs and bone. Nine patients received vincristine, actinomycin D and cyclophosphamide (VAC). Two Group I patients received no radiation therapy (XRT); others received XRT to the primary tumor and to some metastatic sites. Nine patients achieved complete disappearance of tumor, six due to the initial operation. Tumors recurred in lung (N=2) or brain (N=1) in Group IV patients; each died within 16 months. The Group III patient died of Aspergillus pneumonia. The six Group I and II patients survive, continuously disease-free, at 2.7 to 17.3 years (median, 4.7 years). Conclusions Patients with renal sarcomas often present with large tumors, many of them containing anaplastic features. Removing all gross disease at diagnosis, if feasible, is a critical component of treatment to curing patients with renal sarcoma. PMID:18523987

  19. Molecular-Guided Therapy for Childhood Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-07

    Neuroblastoma; Medulloblastoma; Glioma; Ependymoma; Choroid Plexus Neoplasms; Craniopharyngioma; Dysembryoplastic Neuroepithelial Tumor; Meningioma; Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumors (PNETs); Germ Cell Tumors; Rhabdomyosarcoma; Non-rhabdomyosarcoma; Ewings Sarcoma; Osteosarcoma; Wilms Tumor; Renal Cell Carcinoma; Malignant Rhabdoid Tumor; Clear Cell Sarcoma; Liver Tumors

  20. Pulmonary nodules secondary to total parenteral alimentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landry, B.A.; Melhem, R.E.

    1989-01-01

    A seven-year-old male, who had a retroperitoneal alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma and was on total parenteral alimentation (TPN) developed muliple pulmonary nodules, indistinguishable from metastases. These proved to be multiple lipid emboli on open biopsy. (orig.)

  1. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 301 - 350 of 623 ... ... periventricular leukomalacia in Nigerian infants of very low birth weight ... Vol 25, No 1 (2006), Juvenile rhabdomyosarcomas in Port Harcourt, ... in a Nigerian child: Case report and a review of Literature, Abstract PDF.

  2. To Find a Safe Dose and Show Early Clinical Activity of Weekly Nab-paclitaxel in Pediatric Patients With Recurrent/ Refractory Solid Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-04-23

    Neuroblastoma; Rhabdomyosarcoma; Ewing's Sarcoma; Ewing's Tumor; Sarcoma, Ewing's; Sarcomas, Epitheliod; Sarcoma, Soft Tissue; Sarcoma, Spindle Cell; Melanoma; Malignant Melanoma; Clinical Oncology; Oncology, Medical; Pediatrics, Osteosarcoma; Osteogenic Sarcoma; Osteosarcoma Tumor; Sarcoma, Osteogenic; Tumors; Cancer; Neoplasia; Neoplasm; Histiocytoma; Fibrosarcoma; Dermatofibrosarcoma

  3. Complications following radiation therapy to the head

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helpin, M.L.; Krejmas, N.L.; Krolls, S.O.

    1986-01-01

    A case is presented in which a child who received therapeutic radiation as part of his treatment regimen for rhabdomyosarcoma of the infratemporal and parapharyngeal region demonstrated undesirable sequelae in the dentition and the mandible

  4. TFG-MET fusion in an infantile spindle cell sarcoma with neural features

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Flucke, U.E.; Noesel, M.M. van; Wijnen, M.; Zhang, L.; Chen, C.L.; Sung, Y.S.; Antonescu, C.R.

    2017-01-01

    An increasing number of congenital and infantile sarcomas displaying a primitive, monomorphic spindle cell phenotype have been characterized to harbor recurrent gene fusions, including infantile fibrosarcoma and congenital spindle cell rhabdomyosarcoma. Here, we report an unusual spindle cell

  5. Aflac ST0901 CHOANOME - Sirolimus in Solid Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-05-15

    Ewing's Sarcoma; Osteosarcoma; Astrocytoma; Atypical Teratoid/Rhabdoid Tumor; Ependymoma; Germ Cell Tumor; Glioma; Medulloblastoma; Rhabdoid Tumor; Retinoblastoma; Clear Cell Sarcoma; Renal Cell Carcinoma; Wilms Tumor; Hepatoblastoma; Neuroblastoma; Rhabdomyosarcoma

  6. Study of Genistein in Pediatric Oncology Patients (UVA-Gen001)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-20

    Lymphoma; Childhood Lymphoma; Solid Tumor; Childhood Solid Tumor; Neuroblastoma; Ewing Sarcoma; Hodgkin Lymphoma; Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Rhabdomyosarcoma; Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Medulloblastoma; Germ Cell Tumor; Wilms Tumor; Brain Neoplasms; Medulloblastoma, Childhood; Neuroectodermal Tumors, Primitive

  7. Palbociclib in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Rb Positive Advanced Solid Tumors, Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma, or Histiocytic Disorders With Activating Alterations in Cell Cycle Genes (A Pediatric MATCH Treatment Trial)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-05-15

    Advanced Malignant Solid Neoplasm; RB1 Positive; Recurrent Childhood Ependymoma; Recurrent Ewing Sarcoma; Recurrent Glioma; Recurrent Hepatoblastoma; Recurrent Kidney Wilms Tumor; Recurrent Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis; Recurrent Malignant Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Malignant Glioma; Recurrent Medulloblastoma; Recurrent Neuroblastoma; Recurrent Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Osteosarcoma; Recurrent Peripheral Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor; Recurrent Rhabdoid Tumor; Recurrent Rhabdomyosarcoma; Recurrent Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Refractory Ependymoma; Refractory Ewing Sarcoma; Refractory Glioma; Refractory Hepatoblastoma; Refractory Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis; Refractory Malignant Germ Cell Tumor; Refractory Malignant Glioma; Refractory Medulloblastoma; Refractory Neuroblastoma; Refractory Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Osteosarcoma; Refractory Peripheral Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor; Refractory Rhabdoid Tumor; Refractory Rhabdomyosarcoma; Refractory Soft Tissue Sarcoma

  8. Mesenchymal Chondrosarcoma of Posterior Maxilla: Report of a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Histologically, the lesion must be differentiated from similar other lesions like hemangiopericytoma, Ewing sarcoma, leukemia/lymphoma, rhabdomyosarcoma, malignant melanoma and small cell osteosarcoma.[8]. The detection of type II collagen in the matrix component of MC was a sensitive marker for the identification of.

  9. Paraspinal primitive neuroectodermal tumour (PNET) of the chest ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    neural crest cells1-5 and may occur in the central or peripheral nervous system.4 PNET must be distinguished from other small round cell tumours like Ewing's sarcoma (ES), extraosseous Ewing's sarcoma, neuroblastoma, lymphoma, rhabdomyosarcoma and small-cell carcinoma. 3,4,6,7 Although it can occur at any age, ...

  10. Liposarcoma of the thigh with mixed calcification and ossification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy R. Child, MD

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Liposarcoma is one of the most common soft-tissue sarcomas. Calcification and ossification can occur in liposarcoma; however, the presence of both ossification and calcification is a very rare entity. We present a case of a partially calcified and ossified dedifferentiated liposarcoma of the thigh in a 76-year-old woman, which contained heterologous elements of chondrosarcoma and rhabdomyosarcoma.

  11. Comparison of radiation sensitivity for three cell lines as measured by the cloning assay and the micro-nucleus test

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stap, J.; Aten, J. A.

    1990-01-01

    The correlation between cell killing and the induction of micro-nuclei was studied for three cell lines after treatment with gamma radiation to investigate whether the frequency of micro-nucleated cells can be used to determine the radiation sensitivity of a cell type. R1 rat rhabdomyosarcoma cells

  12. Tumor hypoxia - A confounding or exploitable factor in interstitial brachytherapy? Effects of tissue trauma in an experimental rat tumor model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, AP; van Geel, CAJF; van Hooije, CMC; van der Kleij, AJ; Visser, AG

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the potential effects of tumor hypoxia induced by afterloading catheter implantation on the effectiveness of brachytherapy in a rat tumor model. Methods and Materials: Afterloading catheters (4) Here implanted in subcutaneously growing R1M rhabdomyosarcoma in female Wag/Rij

  13. Acute renal failure in high dose carboplatin chemotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frenkel, J.; Kool, G.; de Kraker, J.

    1995-01-01

    Carboplatin has been reported to cause acute renal failure when administered in high doses to adult patients. We report a 4 1/2-year-old girl who was treated with high-dose carboplatin for metastatic parameningeal embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma. Acute renal failure developed followed by a slow partial

  14. Childhood Laryngeal Tumors Treatment (PDQ®)—Health Professional Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laryngeal tumors in children are rare and can be benign (papillomatosis) or malignant. Rhabdomyosarcoma is the most common cancer of the larynx in children. Get comprehensive information about childhood laryngeal tumors, including histology, presentation, and treatment in this summary for clinicians.

  15. Past Medical and Dental Experiences as a Predictpr of Behaviour of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PAUL

    most commonly fractured bone (20 patients or 19.6%) and limb injuries were the most commonly ... falls, sport related injuries and gunshot injuries7,8. Severe ... Fights. 2. 1.9. Gunshot injury. 7. 6.6. Epileptic convulsion. 2. 1.9. Acute Erythema Multiforme. 1. 0.9. Rhabdomyosarcoma. 1. 0.9. Industrial Accident. 1. 0.9. TOTAL.

  16. Salivary gland anlage tumour

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    developmental midline nasal lesions such as a meningo-encephalocele or glioma. Neoplastic lesions are usually benign, and include dermoids, hamartomas, teratomas and haemangiomas. Malignant lesions such as neuroblastoma, rhabdomyosarcoma or lymphoma may be seen, but are extremely rare, and metastatic ...

  17. Head And Neck Rhabdomyosacroma In Childhood: An ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Rhabdomyosarcoma may be histologically indistinguishable from other undifferentiated childhood tumours occurring in the head and neck region on routine heamatoxylin and eosin staining. Aim: aimed at assessing the usefulness of employing immunohistochemistry, as an adjunct to routine H&E staining, ...

  18. Genetics of Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome-associated tumors: common genetic pathways

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steenman, M.; Westerveld, A.; Mannens, M.

    2000-01-01

    A specific subset of solid childhood tumors-Wilms' tumor, adrenocortical carcinoma, rhabdomyosarcoma, and hepatoblastoma-is characterized by its association with Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome. Genetic abnormalities found in these tumors affect the same chromosome region (11p15), which has been

  19. Measurement of antiacetylcholine receptor auto-antibodies in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Two different acetylcholine receptor (AChR) preparations derived from amputated human muscle (AChRAMP) and from the human rhabdomyosarcoma cell line TE671 (AChRTE67,) were compared in radio-immunoprecipitation assays for the detection of AChR auto-antibodies in serum specimens from 20 patients with ...

  20. Adaptation of cancer cells from different entities to the MDM2 inhibitor nutlin-3 results in the emergence of p53-mutated multi-drug-resistant cancer cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Michaelis, M.; Rothweiler, F.; Barth, S.; Cinatl, J.; van Rikxoort, M.; Loeschmann, N.; Voges, Y.; Breitling, R.; von Deimling, A.; Roedel, F.; Weber, K.; Fehse, B.; Mack, E.; Stiewe, T.; Doerr, H. W.; Speidel, D.; Cinatl, J.; Cinatl jr., J.; Stephanou, A.

    2011-01-01

    Six p53 wild-type cancer cell lines from infrequently p53-mutated entities (neuroblastoma, rhabdomyosarcoma, and melanoma) were continuously exposed to increasing concentrations of the murine double minute 2 inhibitor nutlin-3, resulting in the emergence of nutlin-3-resistant, p53-mutated sublines

  1. Signification of modern radiology in ophthalmooncology of child age

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerinec, A.; Moczova, J.

    1997-01-01

    Authors in their work analyse importance of modern radiological methods in ophthalmooncology of child age. Computer tomography and magnetic resonance imaging are now very important methods for diagnostic, differential diagnostic and controlling therapeutic effects in retinoblastoma, rhabdomyosarcoma and hemangioma of the orbit and optic nerve glioma. (authors)

  2. Clinical characteristics and outcome of surgical treatment of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There were 12 patients with alveolar disease while six had embryonal type of rhabdomyosarcoma. Treatment was by combination chemotherapy, and surgical excision which was done primarily in 11, after chemotherapy in four, and after radiotherapy in one. Two had biopsy only. Five patients are alive, two of them without ...

  3. Pattern Of Paediatric Malignancies Seen At The Radiotherapy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    23 tumour types were seen with retinoblastoma accounting for about 45% of all the patients reviewed. Burkitt\\'s lymphoma accounted for only about 2.5%. Conclusion: Retinoblastoma, nephroblastoma, intracranial malignancies and rhabdomyosarcoma are the tumours most commonly seen at the Radiotherapy Department ...

  4. Immature ovarian teratoma in a postmenopausal woman

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ornvold, K; Detlefsen, G U; Horn, T

    1987-01-01

    We report the first case of immature ovarian teratoma occurring after menopause in a 57-year-old, 3 years postmenopausal woman. Within one year after resection of the teratoma she developed peritoneal botryoid rhabdomyosarcoma, which probably originated from initially unrecognized rhabdomyoblasts...

  5. Cytotoxicity evaluation of sixteen Nigerian medicinal plant extracts ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    As part of our evaluation of plants from the Nigerian ethnobotany,sixteen extracts from fourteen medicinal plants were evaluated for toxicity and inhibition of tumour cell growth using human rhabdomyosarcoma(RD) cell line. The plant samples were extracted by maceration in methanol at room temperature and were ...

  6. PAX3-FOXO1: Zooming in on an "undruggable" target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wachtel, Marco; Schäfer, Beat W

    2018-06-01

    Driver oncogenes are prime targets for therapy in tumors many of which, including leukemias and sarcomas, express recurrent fusion transcription factors. One specific example for such a cancer type is alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma, which is associated in the majority of cases with the fusion protein PAX3-FOXO1. Since fusion transcription factors are challenging targets for development of small molecule inhibitors, indirect inhibitory strategies for this type of oncogenes represent a more promising approach. One can envision strategies at different molecular levels including upstream modifiers and activators, epigenetic and transcriptional co-regulators, and downstream effector targets. In this review, we will discuss the current knowledge regarding potential therapeutic targets that might contribute to indirect interference with PAX3-FOXO1 activity in alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma at the different molecular levels and extrapolate these findings to fusion transcription factors in general. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  7. RBE of neutrons for induction of cell reproductive death and chromosome aberrations in three cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zoetelief, J.; Kuijpers, W.C.; Baten-Wittwer, A.; Barendsen, G.W.

    1983-01-01

    The authors have compared the RBE values for induction of dicentrics and centric rings with those for cell inactivation and with the mean or effective quality factors (Q) recommended for radiation protection. The induction of cell reproductive death and chromosome aberrations has been investigated in plateau phase cultures of established lines of a rat rhabdomyosarcoma, a rat ureter carcinoma and Chinese hamster cells for single doses of 300 kV X-rays and 0.5, 4.2 and 15 MeV neutrons. The different cell lines show considerable variations in sensitivity and the RBE values obtained are presented in tabular form. The mean RBE values for the rat rhabdomyosarcoma cells are lower than those for the other two relatively resistant cell lines. Those for the Chinese hamster cells extrapolated to levels according to low doses of X-rays are in good agreement with the quoted Q values. (Auth./C.F.)

  8. Hepatic Sinusoidal Obstruction Syndrome During Chemotherapy for Childhood Medulloblastoma: Report of a Case and Review of the Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckland, Amy; Phillips, Marianne B.; Cole, Catherine H.; Gottardo, Nicholas G.

    2014-01-01

    Hepatic sinusoidal obstruction syndrome (HSOS), also known as veno-occlusive disease, is a well-recognized toxic complication after autologous and allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant, during treatment of Wilms tumor and rhabdomyosarcoma associated with actinomycin-D, and during acute lymphoblastic leukemia therapy due to oral 6-thioguanine. However, its occurrence in the context of chemotherapy regimens for other childhood malignancies is rare. We report a 5-year-old girl with high-risk anaplastic medulloblastoma, who developed severe HSOS during her second cycle of maintenance chemotherapy, consisting of vincristine, cisplatin, and cyclophosphamide. She was treated with defibrotide with complete resolution of the HSOS. These findings and a review of the literature, highlight the occurrence of HSOS in children outside the established settings of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, Wilms tumor, rhabdomyosarcoma, and acute lymphoblastic leukemia. PMID:24276042

  9. Search for virus-related genetic information in human tumors DNA by the transfection method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knyazev, P G; Perevozchikov, A P; Korobitsyn, L P; Zhudina, A I; Kuznetsov, O K; Savost' yanov, G A; Dyad' kova, A M; Sejts, I F [Nauchno-Issledovatel' skij Inst. Onkologii, Leningrad (USSR)

    1979-01-01

    DNA preparations from the blood cells of a patient suffering from acute myeloid leukemia, from tissues of polymorphous cell rhabdomyosarcoma, synovial sarcoma and neurinoma were studied. The production of virus-like RNA-containing particles (according to radioisotope analysis and the content of reverse transcriptase in these particles) was observed in cultures of embryonic human cells treated with DNA from the cells of leukemia patient.

  10. Painful orgasm in an adolescent after seminal-sparing cystoprostatectomy: a puzzling symptom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelini, Lorenzo; Castagnetti, Marco; Rigamonti, Waifro

    2015-01-01

    An 18-year-old boy, followed up after seminal-sparing cystectomy for bladder rhabdomyosarcoma, presented complaining of recurrent episodes of left scrotal/inguinal pain arising after orgasms. Full work-up ruled out disease recurrence, but showed enlarged seminal vesicles. Ligation of the vas deferens was unsuccessful. The patient was started on α-blockers to reduce vas contractions with improvement of symptoms. The possible pathophysiology and treatments of this symptom are discussed. 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel

  11. Bone-metastasizing primary renal tumors in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamego, C.M.B.; Zerbini, M.C.N.

    1984-01-01

    Seven cases of childhood renal tumor with extensive bone involvement are reported. These neoplasms had been classified originally as wills tumors with atypical clinical and pathologic features. Subsequent to a retrospective histologic analysis, the lesions were reclassified as follows: three cases as bone-metastasizing renal tumors of childhood, one as rhabdomyosarcoma, two as indifferentiated Sarcomas and one case as indifferentiated malignant neoplasm. (Author) [pt

  12. MFH Mimic in Breast: A High-Grade Malignant Phyllodes Tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. L. Hemalatha

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Malignant phyllodes tumor is usually diagnosed by the presence of benign duct-like epithelium and malignant mesenchymal tissue. In addition to the usual fibrosarcomatous features, the mesenchymal component may show areas resembling osteogenic sarcoma, chondrosarcoma, liposarcoma, leiomyosarcoma, rhabdomyosarcoma, malignant mesenchymoma, and, very rarely, malignant fibrous histiocytoma. We present one such rare case of malignant phyllodes tumor with malignant fibrous histiocytoma-like stromal differentiation.

  13. Mesenchymal neoplasia and congenital pulmonary cysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weinberg, A.G.; Currarino, G.; Moore, G.C.; Votteler, T.P.

    1980-01-01

    A malignant mesenchymoma exibiting a varied spectrum of differentation developed within a congenital pulmonary cyst 6 1/2 years after the cyst was first recognized. Related tumors with a similar gross appearance have been previously described and have included rhabdomyosarcomas and so-called pulmonary blastomas. There is a low but distinct risk for the developement of mesenchymal sarcomas within congenital peripheral pulmonary cysts. (orig.) [de

  14. Clinical applications of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newman, R.J.

    1984-01-01

    The advantages and present limitations of the clinical applications of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy are reviewed in outline, with passing references to skeletal muscular studies, in particular a group of children with advanced Duchenne dystrophy, and the applications to the study of cerebral metabolism of neonates, excised kidneys, biopsy studies of breast and axillary lymph node samples, and NMR spectroscopy performed during chemotherapy of a secondary rhabdomyosarcoma in the skin. (U.K.)

  15. Clinical applications of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy: a review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newman, R.J. (Glasgow Western Infirmary (UK))

    1984-09-01

    The advantages and present limitations of the clinical applications of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy are reviewed in outline, with passing references to skeletal muscular studies, in particular a group of children with advanced Duchenne dystrophy, and the applications to the study of cerebral metabolism of neonates, excised kidneys, biopsy studies of breast and axillary lymph node samples, and NMR spectroscopy performed during chemotherapy of a secondary rhabdomyosarcoma in the skin.

  16. Modulators of Response to Tumor Necrosis-related Apoptosis Inducing Ligand (TRAIL) Therapy in Ovarian Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-01

    several human cancers including breast, ovarian, uterine cervical , rhabdomyosarcoma, and hepatocellular carcinoma(9, 18-21). When Six1 is expressed...during HPV-mediated carcinogenesis: a comparison between an in vitro cell model and cervical cancer. Int J Cancer 2008; 123:32-40. 22. Reichenberger KJ...to have recurrent carcinoma in the hernia sac during hernia repair. Of the 9 patients who were first diagnosed with recurrence based on positive

  17. Annual Research Progress Report. Fiscal Year 1989. Volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-10-01

    Microsurgery - A Training Protocol. (T) 359 T-7-86 Mouse Inoculation Test (MI) - Rabies Diagnosis. (0) 360 xxvii Project Page Number T-8-86 Production of...Page Number POG 8552 A Case-Control Study of Childhood Rhabdomyosarcoma. (0) 511 PO 8561 Phase II Study of 6- Mercaptopurine Administered as an Intra...T-8-86 Status: Ongoing Title: Production of Positive and Negative Controls for Rabies FA Test Start Date 4 Apr 86 Est Comp Date: Principal

  18. Carcinogenicity and Immunotoxicity of Embedded Depleted Uranium and Heavy-Metal Tungsten Alloy in Rodents

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-10-01

    collected and passed through a column packed with Amberlite XAD-8 resin. Resins were purified by Soxhlet -extraction before use. Use of these columns...complete culture medium. To assay for NK function, serial dilutions of the splenocyte suspension were done to yield splenocyte/target cell ratios of 200:1...and Maenza 1976; Sunderman et al. 1977). Tumors (rhabdomyosarcoma and fibrosar- coma) were found in many cases at the injec- tion site, with tumor yield

  19. WE-E-17A-06: Assessing the Scale of Tumor Heterogeneity by Complete Hierarchical Segmentation On MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gensheimer, M; Trister, A; Ermoian, R; Hawkins, D

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: In many cancers, intratumoral heterogeneity exists in vascular and genetic structure. We developed an algorithm which uses clinical imaging to interrogate different scales of heterogeneity. We hypothesize that heterogeneity of perfusion at large distance scales may correlate with propensity for disease recurrence. We applied the algorithm to initial diagnosis MRI of rhabdomyosarcoma patients to predict recurrence. Methods: The Spatial Heterogeneity Analysis by Recursive Partitioning (SHARP) algorithm recursively segments the tumor image. The tumor is repeatedly subdivided, with each dividing line chosen to maximize signal intensity difference between the two subregions. This process continues to the voxel level, producing segments at multiple scales. Heterogeneity is measured by comparing signal intensity histograms between each segmented region and the adjacent region. We measured the scales of contrast enhancement heterogeneity of the primary tumor in 18 rhabdomyosarcoma patients. Using Cox proportional hazards regression, we explored the influence of heterogeneity parameters on relapse-free survival (RFS). To compare with existing methods, fractal and Haralick texture features were also calculated. Results: The complete segmentation produced by SHARP allows extraction of diverse features, including the amount of heterogeneity at various distance scales, the area of the tumor with the most heterogeneity at each scale, and for a given point in the tumor, the heterogeneity at different scales. 10/18 rhabdomyosarcoma patients suffered disease recurrence. On contrast-enhanced MRI, larger scale of maximum signal intensity heterogeneity, relative to tumor diameter, predicted for shorter RFS (p=0.05). Fractal dimension, fractal fit, and three Haralick features did not predict RFS (p=0.09-0.90). Conclusion: SHARP produces an automatic segmentation of tumor regions and reports the amount of heterogeneity at various distance scales. In rhabdomyosarcoma, RFS was

  20. Radionuclide and thermographic diagnosis of head and neck tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bogdasarov, Yu.B.; Lenskaya, O.P.; Polyakov, B.I.; Belkina, B.M. (Akademiya Meditsinskikh Nauk SSSR, Moscow. Onkologicheskij Nauchnyj Tsentr)

    1983-10-01

    Radionuclide and thermographic studies using /sup 67/Ga-citrate and /sup 111/In-bleomycin were performed in 129 patients with laryngeal cancer, chemodectoma of the neck, retinoblastoma, rhabdomyosarcoma of the orbital and facial soft tissues and cancer of the tongue. Elevated amounts of the radiopharmaceuticals were found in patients with tumors. In thermographic studies higher temperature activity corresponding to the tumor was noted. Radio-nuclide thermographic studies extend diagnostic opportunities for head and neck tumors.

  1. Radionuclide and thermographic diagnosis of head and neck tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogdasarov, Yu.B.; Lenskaya, O.P.; Polyakov, B.I.; Belkina, B.M.

    1983-01-01

    Radionuclide and thermographic studies using 67 Ga-citrate and 111 In-bleomycin were performed in 129 patients with laryngeal cancer, chemodectoma of the neck, retinoblastoma, rhabdomyosarcoma of the orbital and facial soft tissues and cancer of the tongue. Elevated amounts of the radiopharmaceuticals were found in patients with tumors. In thermographic studies higher temperature activity corresponding to the tumor was noted. Radio-nuclide thermographic studies extend diagnostic opportunities for head and neck tumors

  2. Utility of Phox2b immunohistochemical stain in neural crest tumours and non-neural crest tumours in paediatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Mikako; Matsuno, Ryosuke; Tran, Henry; Shimada, Hiroyuki

    2018-03-01

    This study evaluated the utility of Phox2b in paediatric tumours. Previously, tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) was the most widely utilised sympathoadrenal marker specific for neural crest tumours with neuronal/neuroendocrine differentiation. However, its sensitivity is insufficient. Recently Phox2b has emerged as another specific marker for this entity. Phox2b immunohistochemistry (IHC) was performed on 159 paediatric tumours, including (group 1) 65 neural crest tumours with neuronal differentiation [peripheral neuroblastic tumours (pNT)]: 15 neuroblastoma undifferentiated (NB-UD), 10 NB poorly differentiated (NB-PD), 10 NB differentiating (NB-D), 10 ganglioneuroblastoma intermixed (GNBi), 10 GNB nodular (GNBn) and 10 ganglioneuroma (GN); (group 2) 23 neural crest tumours with neuroendocrine differentiation [pheochromocytoma/paraganglioma (PCC/PG)]; (group 3) 27 other neural crest tumours including one composite rhabdomyosarcoma/neuroblastoma; and (group 4) 44 non-neural crest tumours. TH IHC was performed on groups 1, 2 and 3. Phox2b was expressed diffusely in pNT (n = 65 of 65), strongly in NB-UD and NB-PD and with less intensity in NB-D, GNB and GN. Diffuse TH was seen in all NB-PD, NB-D, GNB and GN, but nine of 15 NB-UD and a nodule in GNBn did not express TH (n = 55 of 65). PCC/PG expressed diffuse Phox2b (n = 23 of 23) and diffuse TH, except for one tumour (n = 22 of 23). In composite rhabdomyosarcoma, TH was expressed only in neuroblastic cells and Phox2b was diffusely positive in neuroblastic cells and focally in rhabdomyosarcoma. All other tumours were negative for Phox2b (n = none of 44). Phox2b was a specific and sensitive marker for pNT and PCC/PG, especially useful for identifying NB-UD often lacking TH. Our study also presented a composite rhabdomyosarcoma/neuroblastoma of neural crest origin. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Clinicopathological correlates of pediatric head and neck cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sengupta Subhabrata

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : The spectrum of head and neck tumors in children continues to be the cause of diverse, diagnostically challenging issues. Aims : To demonstrate and compare the unique clinicopathological features in our study population and their correlations with the final histopathological diagnosis. Methods : Fifty-three children with head and neck cancer were examined thoroughly at the Otorhinolaryngology department in a tertiary care teaching hospital followed by histopathological studies. Results : Lymphomas were the most common malignant lesions seen followed by rhabdomyosarcomas, nasopharyngeal carcinomas, and others like thyroid carcinomas and eosinophilic granulomas. In the neck, the commonest cause of primary malignant disease was lymphoma; however, the most frequent lesion was reactive lymphadenitis. In the sinonasal region, the commonest malignancy was rhabdomyosarcoma, which often had extension to the orbit and the face. Recurrent epistaxis was found universally in the malignant cases of this region. In the facial region, disfiguring swelling with proptosis was mainly caused by rhabdomyosarcoma. The only case of tonsillar malignancy was due to non-Hodgkin lymphoma. The duration of disease was less than 1 year. Conclusion : The most common manifestation of the malignant lesions in the pediatric age group was with a history of an enlarging, painless neck swelling. Still, an insignificant lump in the neck or recurrent bleeding from nose may be the manifestation of an underlying cancer.

  4. V-ATPase as an effective therapeutic target for sarcomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perut, Francesca, E-mail: francesca.perut@ior.it [Laboratory for Orthopaedic Pathophysiology and Regenerative Medicine, Istituto Ortopedico Rizzoli, Bologna (Italy); Avnet, Sofia; Fotia, Caterina; Baglìo, Serena Rubina; Salerno, Manuela [Laboratory for Orthopaedic Pathophysiology and Regenerative Medicine, Istituto Ortopedico Rizzoli, Bologna (Italy); Hosogi, Shigekuni [Laboratory for Orthopaedic Pathophysiology and Regenerative Medicine, Istituto Ortopedico Rizzoli, Bologna (Italy); Department of Molecular Cell Physiology, Graduate School of Medical Science, Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine, Kyoto (Japan); Kusuzaki, Katsuyuki [Department of Molecular Cell Physiology, Graduate School of Medical Science, Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine, Kyoto (Japan); Baldini, Nicola [Laboratory for Orthopaedic Pathophysiology and Regenerative Medicine, Istituto Ortopedico Rizzoli, Bologna (Italy); Department of Biomedical and Neuromotor Sciences, University of Bologna, Bologna (Italy)

    2014-01-01

    Malignant tumors show intense glycolysis and, as a consequence, high lactate production and proton efflux activity. We investigated proton dynamics in osteosarcoma, rhabdomyosarcoma, and chondrosarcoma, and evaluated the effects of esomeprazole as a therapeutic agent interfering with tumor acidic microenvironment. All sarcomas were able to survive in an acidic microenvironment (up to 5.9–6.0 pH) and abundant acidic lysosomes were found in all sarcoma subtypes. V-ATPase, a proton pump that acidifies intracellular compartments and transports protons across the plasma membrane, was detected in all cell types with a histotype-specific expression pattern. Esomeprazole administration interfered with proton compartmentalization in acidic organelles and induced a significant dose-dependent toxicity. Among the different histotypes, rhabdomyosarcoma, expressing the highest levels of V-ATPase and whose lysosomes are most acidic, was mostly susceptible to ESOM treatment. - Highlights: • Osteosarcoma, rhabdomyosarcoma, and chondrosarcoma survive in acidic microenvironment. • At acidic extracellular pH, sarcoma survival is dependent on V-ATPase expression. • Esomeprazole administration induce a significant dose-dependent toxicity.

  5. Ovarian germ cell tumors with rhabdomyosarcomatous components and later development of growing teratoma syndrome: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Jumaily Usama

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Development of a sarcomatous component in a germ cell tumor is an uncommon phenomenon. Most cases reported have a grim prognosis. Growing teratoma syndrome is also an uncommon phenomenon and occurs in approximately 2% to 7% of non seminomatous germ cell tumors and should be treated surgically. Case presentation We report the case of a 12-year-old Asian girl with an ovarian mixed germ cell tumor containing a rhabdomyosarcomatous component. She was treated with a germ cell tumor chemotherapy regimen and rhabdomyosarcoma-specific chemotherapy. Towards the end of her treatment, she developed a retroperitoneal mass that was increasing in size. It was completely resected, revealing a mature teratoma, consistent with growing teratoma syndrome. She is still in complete remission approximately three years after presentation. Conclusion The presence of rhabdomyosarcoma in a germ cell tumor should be treated by a combined chemotherapy regimen (for germ cell tumor and rhabdomyosarcoma. In addition, development of a mass during or after therapy with normal serum markers should raise the possibility of growing teratoma syndrome that should be treated surgically.

  6. Targeting Glutathione-S Transferase Enzymes in Musculoskeletal Sarcomas: A Promising Therapeutic Strategy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michela Pasello

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies have indicated that targeting glutathione-S-transferase (GST isoenzymes may be a promising novel strategy to improve the efficacy of conventional chemotherapy in the three most common musculoskeletal tumours: osteosarcoma, Ewing's sarcoma, and rhabdomyosarcoma. By using a panel of 15 drug-sensitive and drug-resistant human osteosarcoma, Ewing's sarcoma, and rhabdomyosarcoma cell lines, the efficay of the GST-targeting agent 6-(7-nitro-2,1,3-benzoxadiazol-4-ylthiohexanol (NBDHEX has been assessed and related to GST isoenzymes expression (namely GSTP1, GSTA1, GSTM1, and MGST. NBDHEX showed a relevant in vitro activity on all cell lines, including the drug-resistant ones and those with higher GSTs levels. The in vitro activity of NBDHEX was mostly related to cytostatic effects, with a less evident apoptotic induction. NBDHEX positively interacted with doxorubicin, vincristine, cisplatin but showed antagonistic effects with methotrexate. In vivo studies confirmed the cytostatic efficay of NBDHEX and its positive interaction with vincristine in Ewing's sarcoma cells, and also indicated a positive effect against the metastatisation of osteosarcoma cells. The whole body of evidence found in this study indicated that targeting GSTs in osteosarcoma, Ewing's sarcoma and rhabdomyosarcoma may be an interesting new therapeutic option, which can be considered for patients who are scarcely responsive to conventional regimens.

  7. Outcome for children with metastatic solid tumors over the last four decades.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie M Perkins

    Full Text Available Outcomes for pediatric solid tumors have significantly improved over the last 30 years. However, much of this improvement is due to improved outcome for patients with localized disease. Here we evaluate overall survival (OS for pediatric patients with metastatic disease over the last 40 years.The United States Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER database was used to conduct this study. Patients diagnosed between 0 and 18 years of age with metastatic Ewings sarcoma, neuroblastoma, osteosarcoma, rhabdomyosarcoma or Wilms tumor were included in the analysis.3,009 patients diagnosed between 1973-2010 met inclusion criteria for analysis. OS at 10 years for patients diagnosed between 1973-1979, 1980-1989, 1990-1999 and 2000-2010 was 28.3%, 37.2%, 44.7% and 49.3%, respectively (p<0.001. For patients diagnosed between 2000-2010, 10-year OS for patients with Ewing sarcoma, neuroblastoma, osteosarcoma, rhabdomyosarcoma and Wilms tumor was 30.6%, 54.4%, 29.3%, 27.5%, and 76.6%, respectively, as compared to 13.8%, 25.1%, 13.6%, 17.9% and 57.1%, respectively, for patients diagnosed between 1973-1979. OS for neuroblastoma significantly increased with each decade. For patients with osteosarcoma and Ewing sarcoma, there was no improvement in OS over the last two decades. There was no improvement in outcome for patients with rhabdomyosarcoma or Wilms tumor over the last 30 years.OS for pediatric patients with metastatic solid tumors has significantly improved since the 1970s. However, outcome has changed little for some malignancies in the last 20-30 years. These data underscore the importance of continued collaboration and studies to improve outcome for these patients.

  8. TH-302 in Combination with Radiotherapy Enhances the Therapeutic Outcome and Is Associated with Pretreatment [18F]HX4 Hypoxia PET Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peeters, Sarah G J A; Zegers, Catharina M L; Biemans, Rianne; Lieuwes, Natasja G; van Stiphout, Ruud G P M; Yaromina, Ala; Sun, Jessica D; Hart, Charles P; Windhorst, Albert D; van Elmpt, Wouter; Dubois, Ludwig J; Lambin, Philippe

    2015-07-01

    Conventional anticancer treatments are often impaired by the presence of hypoxia. TH-302 selectively targets hypoxic tumor regions, where it is converted into a cytotoxic agent. This study assessed the efficacy of the combination treatment of TH-302 and radiotherapy in two preclinical tumor models. The effect of oxygen modification on the combination treatment was evaluated and the effect of TH-302 on the hypoxic fraction (HF) was monitored using [(18)F]HX4-PET imaging and pimonidazole IHC stainings. Rhabdomyosarcoma R1 and H460 NSCLC tumor-bearing animals were treated with TH-302 and radiotherapy (8 Gy, single dose). The tumor oxygenation status was altered by exposing animals to carbogen (95% oxygen) and nicotinamide, 21% or 7% oxygen breathing during the course of the treatment. Tumor growth and treatment toxicity were monitored until the tumor reached four times its start volume (T4×SV). Both tumor models showed a growth delay after TH-302 treatment, which further increased when combined with radiotherapy (enhancement ratio rhabdomyosarcoma 1.23; H460 1.49). TH-302 decreases the HF in both models, consistent with its hypoxia-targeting mechanism of action. Treatment efficacy was dependent on tumor oxygenation; increasing the tumor oxygen status abolished the effect of TH-302, whereas enhancing the HF enlarged TH-302's therapeutic effect. An association was observed in rhabdomyosarcoma tumors between the pretreatment HF as measured by [(18)F]HX4-PET imaging and the T4×SV. The combination of TH-302 and radiotherapy is promising and warrants clinical testing, preferably guided by the companion biomarker [(18)F]HX4 hypoxia PET imaging for patient selection. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  9. Analysis of three variable number terminal repeat loci is sufficient to characterize the deoxyribonucleic acid fingerprints of a panel of human tumor cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anding, Allyson L; Reiss, Tanika; Germain, Glen S

    2003-01-01

    Using primers for the MCT118, YNZ22, and COL2A1 loci in polymerase chain reaction analysis we could distinguish among the approximately 20 cell lines routinely maintained in our laboratory. We also demonstrated that the cell line NB-1691 (a neuroblastoma) and its xenograft had an identical number of repeats at two loci. Rh30 (a rhabdomyosarcoma) made resistant to rapamycin was identical to its parent line and to a subline that had reverted to sensitivity after it was cultured without rapamycin in the medium.

  10. Insulin-like growth factor II: complexity of biosynthesis and receptor binding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gammeltoft, S; Christiansen, Jan; Nielsen, F C

    1991-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II) belongs to the insulin family of peptides and acts as a growth factor in many fetal tissues and tumors. The gene expression of IGF-II is initiated at three different promoters which gives rise to multiple transcripts. In a human rhabdomyosarcoma cell line......, Man-6-P induces cellular responses. We have studied rat brain neuronal precursor cells where Man-6-P acted as a mitogen suggesting that phosphomannosylated proteins may act as growth factors via the Man-6-P/IGF-II receptor. In conclusion, the gene expression and mechanism of action of IGF-II is very...

  11. Computed tomography scans of metastatic hepatic tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takemoto, Kazumasa; Fukuda, Haruyuki; Nemoto, Yutaka [Osaka City Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine

    1984-01-01

    Computed tomography scans of 114 metastatic hepatic tumors were reviewed. Central low density was found in 82 cases (71.9%) and seems to be characteristic to metastatic hepatic tumors. Dynamic CT was performed on 34 cases, and 21 (61.8%) of these had ring enhancement at the arterial phase. Most of metastatic hepatic tumors could be differentiated from hepatocellular carcinoma. However, metastatic hepatic tumors from renal cell carcinoma, renal rhabdomyosarcoma, malignant melanoma and leiomyosarcoma could not be differentiated from hepatocellular carcinoma, even with use of dynamic study.

  12. MR imaging of uncommon soft tissue tumors in the foot: a pictorial essay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Youn Joo; Chun, Kyung Ah; Kim, Jee Young; Sung, Mi Sook; Kim, Ki Tae [The Catholic University of Korea, Uijeongbu (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-06-15

    The large variety of masses occur in the foot. The foot is a comparatively rare site of soft tissue neoplasms. MRI has greatly improved the ability to detect and delineate soft tissue lesions and is now considered the gold-standard imaging technique in their investigation. Recently, we have encountered rare soft tissue tumors of the foot. The presented cases include benign masses such as granuloma annulare, angiomyoma, neural fibrolipoma, and giant cell tumor of tendon sheath, as well as malignant tumors such as melanoma, synovial sarcoma, rhabdomyosarcoma and extraskeletal myxoid chondrosarcoma. We wish to illustrate the MR findings of these uncommon soft tissue mors to aid in their diagnosis.

  13. Monitoring Tumor Response to Carbogen Breathing by Oxygen-Sensitive Magnetic Resonance Parameters to Predict the Outcome of Radiation Therapy: A Preclinical Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao-Pham, Thanh-Trang; Tran, Ly-Binh-An; Colliez, Florence; Joudiou, Nicolas [Université Catholique de Louvain, Louvain Drug Research Institute, Biomedical Magnetic Resonance Research Group, Brussels (Belgium); El Bachiri, Sabrina [Université Catholique de Louvain, IMMAQ Technological Platform, Methodology and Statistical Support, Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Grégoire, Vincent [Université Catholique de Louvain, Institute of Experimental and Clinical Research, Center for Molecular Imaging, Radiotherapy and Oncology, Brussels (Belgium); Levêque, Philippe; Gallez, Bernard [Université Catholique de Louvain, Louvain Drug Research Institute, Biomedical Magnetic Resonance Research Group, Brussels (Belgium); Jordan, Bénédicte F., E-mail: benedicte.jordan@uclouvain.be [Université Catholique de Louvain, Louvain Drug Research Institute, Biomedical Magnetic Resonance Research Group, Brussels (Belgium)

    2016-09-01

    Purpose: In an effort to develop noninvasive in vivo methods for mapping tumor oxygenation, magnetic resonance (MR)-derived parameters are being considered, including global R{sub 1}, water R{sub 1}, lipids R{sub 1}, and R{sub 2}*. R{sub 1} is sensitive to dissolved molecular oxygen, whereas R{sub 2}* is sensitive to blood oxygenation, detecting changes in dHb. This work compares global R{sub 1}, water R{sub 1}, lipids R{sub 1}, and R{sub 2}* with pO{sub 2} assessed by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) oximetry, as potential markers of the outcome of radiation therapy (RT). Methods and Materials: R{sub 1}, R{sub 2}*, and EPR were performed on rhabdomyosarcoma and 9L-glioma tumor models, under air and carbogen breathing conditions (95% O{sub 2}, 5% CO{sub 2}). Because the models demonstrated different radiosensitivity properties toward carbogen, a growth delay (GD) assay was performed on the rhabdomyosarcoma model and a tumor control dose 50% (TCD50) was performed on the 9L-glioma model. Results: Magnetic resonance imaging oxygen-sensitive parameters detected the positive changes in oxygenation induced by carbogen within tumors. No consistent correlation was seen throughout the study between MR parameters and pO{sub 2}. Global and lipids R{sub 1} were found to be correlated to pO{sub 2} in the rhabdomyosarcoma model, whereas R{sub 2}* was found to be inversely correlated to pO{sub 2} in the 9L-glioma model (P=.05 and .03). Carbogen increased the TCD50 of 9L-glioma but did not increase the GD of rhabdomyosarcoma. Only R{sub 2}* was predictive (P<.05) for the curability of 9L-glioma at 40 Gy, a dose that showed a difference in response to RT between carbogen and air-breathing groups. {sup 18}F-FAZA positron emission tomography imaging has been shown to be a predictive marker under the same conditions. Conclusion: This work illustrates the sensitivity of oxygen-sensitive R{sub 1} and R{sub 2}* parameters to changes in tumor oxygenation. However, R{sub 1

  14. Monitoring Tumor Response to Carbogen Breathing by Oxygen-Sensitive Magnetic Resonance Parameters to Predict the Outcome of Radiation Therapy: A Preclinical Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao-Pham, Thanh-Trang; Tran, Ly-Binh-An; Colliez, Florence; Joudiou, Nicolas; El Bachiri, Sabrina; Grégoire, Vincent; Levêque, Philippe; Gallez, Bernard; Jordan, Bénédicte F.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: In an effort to develop noninvasive in vivo methods for mapping tumor oxygenation, magnetic resonance (MR)-derived parameters are being considered, including global R_1, water R_1, lipids R_1, and R_2*. R_1 is sensitive to dissolved molecular oxygen, whereas R_2* is sensitive to blood oxygenation, detecting changes in dHb. This work compares global R_1, water R_1, lipids R_1, and R_2* with pO_2 assessed by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) oximetry, as potential markers of the outcome of radiation therapy (RT). Methods and Materials: R_1, R_2*, and EPR were performed on rhabdomyosarcoma and 9L-glioma tumor models, under air and carbogen breathing conditions (95% O_2, 5% CO_2). Because the models demonstrated different radiosensitivity properties toward carbogen, a growth delay (GD) assay was performed on the rhabdomyosarcoma model and a tumor control dose 50% (TCD50) was performed on the 9L-glioma model. Results: Magnetic resonance imaging oxygen-sensitive parameters detected the positive changes in oxygenation induced by carbogen within tumors. No consistent correlation was seen throughout the study between MR parameters and pO_2. Global and lipids R_1 were found to be correlated to pO_2 in the rhabdomyosarcoma model, whereas R_2* was found to be inversely correlated to pO_2 in the 9L-glioma model (P=.05 and .03). Carbogen increased the TCD50 of 9L-glioma but did not increase the GD of rhabdomyosarcoma. Only R_2* was predictive (P<.05) for the curability of 9L-glioma at 40 Gy, a dose that showed a difference in response to RT between carbogen and air-breathing groups. "1"8F-FAZA positron emission tomography imaging has been shown to be a predictive marker under the same conditions. Conclusion: This work illustrates the sensitivity of oxygen-sensitive R_1 and R_2* parameters to changes in tumor oxygenation. However, R_1 parameters showed limitations in terms of predicting the outcome of RT in the tumor models studied, whereas R_2* was found to be

  15. Principles of radiation therapy in the treatment of vaginal tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nori, D.

    1987-01-01

    Vaginal tumors constitute about 1-1.5% of all gynecological cancers. However, there is a great variety of histological types of vaginal cancers that affect females of all ages. Characteristically embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma (sarcoma botryoides) occurs in infants; diethylstilbestrol-induced clear cell adenocarcinomas in teenage girls; and squamous cell carcinoma, melanoma, sarcoma, and adenocarcinoma in adult women. Because of the rarity of these tumors, few clinicians gain wide experience in their treatment. Treatment of these three clinical entities in three different age groups is presented in this chapter

  16. Targeting Common but Complex Proteoglycans on Breast Cancer Cells and Stem Cells Using Evolutionary Refined Malaria Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-01

    T24 Bladder transitional cell carcinoma ++ UM-UC-6 Bladder transitional cell carcinoma +++ Cancer of mesenchymal lineage CW9019 Rhabdomyosarcoma...Expression (median) nd Bladder cancer (n=32) -3 -2 321-1 0 BCAN CA9 CCR10 CD44 THBD GPC3 GPC5 CSPG5 PODXL2 PTPRG S100A9 SDC1 SDC4 TGFBR3 TMEFF1 TMEFF2...in various other tumours including breast cancers . CCR10 Chemokine receptor 10 Not known Chemokine receptor . Overexpressed in lymphoma

  17. Responses of rat R-1 cells to low dose rate gamma radiation and multiple daily dose fractions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kal, H.B.; Bijman, J.Th.

    1981-01-01

    Multifraction irradiation may offer the same therapeutic gain as continuous irradiation. Therefore, a comparison of the efficacy of low dose rate irradiation and multifraction irradiation was the main objective of the experiments to be described. Both regimens were tested on rat rhabdomyosarcoma (R-1) cells in vitro and in vivo. Exponentially growing R-1 cells were treated in vitro by a multifraction irradiation procedure with dose fractions of 2 Gy gamma radiation and time intervals of 1 to 3 h. The dose rate was 1.3 Gy.min -1 . The results indicate that multifractionation of the total dose is more effective with respect to cell inactivation than continuous irradiation. (Auth.)

  18. Kirurgisk behandling af levertumorer hos børn

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Allan; Kvist, Nina; Kirkegaard, Preben

    2008-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: In this paper we review the results of surgical treatment of children with hepatic tumours. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The study comprises 33 children who have undergone lever resection or liver transplantation since 1990. 26 patients had hepatoblastoma, 3 had hepatocellular carcinoma, 2...... had rhabdomyosarcoma, 1 had a mesenchymal tumour, and 1 had a giant haemangioma. RESULTS: Because of the number of patients, we only analyzed the results of the treatment in the hepatoblastoma group. The survival was the same after resection (77.3%) and liver transplantation (75...

  19. Pleuropulmonary blastoma--case report of a patient presenting in a moribund state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauke, Risenga Frank; Muthuphei, M Nelson

    2003-11-01

    A 4-year-old girl presented with an intrathoracic tumour that was pleural in origin, invading the right lower lobe. The patient underwent urgent right thoracotomy and surgical excision of the tumour and right lower lobectomy as the tumour was invading that lobe. The histological report initially reported it as a rhabdomyosarcoma, embryonal type, but after consultation it was changed to type III pleuropulmonary blastoma. The patient was treated with chemotherapy but succumbed to the disease 12 months after the diagnosis. Relevant literature on pleuropulmonary blastoma is reviewed.

  20. T-lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemia and parvovirus infection in a child with neurofibromastosis-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pallavi Agarwal

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurofibromatosis (NF-1 patients have an increased risk of developing malignancies most commonly rhabdomyosarcomas, optic gliomas, brain tumors and non-lymphocytic leukemias. Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL has been infrequently reported in association with NF-1. We describe a rare association of NF-1, T-lineage ALL and parvovirus infection in a 12-year-old child. In addition, it is also to emphasize that a high index of suspicion should be kept for parvovirus B19 infection as a cause of bicytopenia/pancytopenia in ALL patients following induction chemotherapy.

  1. Epithelioid malignant mesothelioma of tunica vaginalis with deciduoid features: An unusual malignancy clinically masquerading an inguinal hernia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharique Ahmed

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Paratesticular/scrotal and inguinal canal mass lesions in elderly patients may pose a diagnostic challenge to both the surgeon as well as the pathologist. In most cases, these represent hernial sacs with their contents, and true neoplasms like lipomas, rhabdomyosarcomas, and fibrous pseudotumors are infrequent. Malignant mesotheliomas arising from the tunica layers are rare cause of inguinal and paratesticular tumors. Herein, we report a case of an elderly patient who presented with an inguinal hernia which pathologically had features of deciduoid malignant mesothelioma.

  2. Rhabdomysarcoma of the penis in a boy. Report of a case

    OpenAIRE

    Palacios Acosta José Martín; Venzor Pérez Isaura Georgina; Hernández Arrazola Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) is the most common pediatric soft tissue malignant tumor. It is more likely to occur in children under 5 years of age and it is most often found in the head and neck. The presentation in the penis is extremely rare. The embryonic variety is the most common histologic subtype. The RMS of the penis is usually a painless mass. In some cases dysuria and priapism can also be present. Treatment is based on surgical resection, che- motherapy and radiation therapy. We describe ...

  3. Ether à go-go potassium channel expression in soft tissue sarcoma patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stühmer Walter

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The expression of the human Eag1 potassium channel (Kv10.1 is normally restricted to the adult brain, but it has been detected in both tumour cell lines and primary tumours. Our purpose was to determine the frequency of expression of Eag1 in soft tissue sarcoma and its potential clinical implications. Results We used specific monoclonal antibodies to determine the expression levels of Eag1 in soft tissue sarcomas from 210 patients by immunohistochemistry. Eag1 was expressed in 71% of all tumours, with frequencies ranging from 56% (liposarcoma to 82% (rhabdomyosarcoma. We detected differences in expression levels depending on the histological type, but no association was seen between expression of this protein and sex, age, grade or tumour size. Four cell lines derived from relevant sarcoma histological types (fibrosarcoma and rhabdomyosarcoma were tested for Eag1 expression by real-time RT-PCR. We found all four lines to be positive for Eag1. In these cell lines, blockage of Eag1 by RNA interference led to a decrease in proliferation. Conclusion Eag1 is aberrantly expressed in over 70% sarcomas. In sarcoma cell lines, inhibition of Eag1 expression and/or function leads to reduced proliferation. The high frequency of expression of Eag1 in primary tumours and the restriction of normal expression of the channel to the brain, suggests the application of this protein for diagnostic or therapeutic purposes.

  4. Iodine-125 orbital brachytherapy with a prosthetic implant in situ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stannard, Clare [Groote Schuur Hospital and Cape Town Univ. (South Africa). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Maree, Gert; Munro, Roger [Groote Schuur Hospital and Cape Town Univ. (South Africa). Dept. of Medical Physics; Lecuona, Karin [Groote Schuur Hospital and Cape Town Univ. (South Africa). Dept. of Ophthalmology; Sauerwein, Wolfgang [Universitaetsklinikum Essen (Germany). Strahlenklinik, NCTeam

    2011-05-15

    Purpose: Brachytherapy is one method of irradiating the orbit after enucleation of an eye with a malignant tumor that has a potential to recur. It consists of 6 trains of I-125 seeds placed around the periphery of the orbit, a shorter central train, and a metal disc, loaded with seeds, placed beneath the eyelids. The presence of a prosthetic orbital implant requires omission of the central train and adjustment of the activity of the seeds in the anterior orbit around the prosthesis. Patients and Methods: This is a retrospective review of the technical modifications and outcome of 12 patients treated in this manner: 6 with retinoblastoma, 5 with malignant melanoma, and 1 with an intraocular rhabdomyosarcoma. The median dose was 35.5 Gy in 73 hours for retinoblastoma and 56 Gy in 141 hours for malignant melanoma. Patients with retinoblastoma and rhabdomyosarcoma also received chemotherapy. Results: The tubes can be placed satisfactorily around the prosthesis. The increased activity in the anterior half of the tubes produced comparable dose distributions. There have been no orbital recurrences, no extrusion of the prosthesis, and cosmesis is good. Conclusion: Insertion of a prosthetic implant at the time of enucleation greatly enhances the subsequent cosmetic appearance. This should be encouraged unless there is frank tumor in the orbit. Orbital brachytherapy without the central train continues to give excellent local control. The short treatment time and good cosmesis are added advantages. The patient is spared the expense and inconvenience of removing and replacing the prosthetic implant. (orig.)

  5. Incorporation of ophiobolin a into novel chemoembolization particles for cancer cell treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Rachel; Gardiner, Chris; Evidente, Antonio; Kiss, Robert; Townley, Helen

    2014-10-01

    To design and synthesize chemoembolization particles for the delivery of Ophiobolin A (OphA), a promising fungal-derived chemotherapeutic, directly at the tumour location. To investigate cell death mechanism of OphA on a Rhabdomyosarcoma cancer (RD) cell line. Rhabdomyosarcoma is the most common soft tissue sarcoma in children; with a 5-year survival rate of between 30 and 65%. Multimodal chemoembolization particles were prepared by sintering mesoporous silica nanoparticles, prepared by the sol-gel method, onto the surface of polystyrene microspheres, prepared by suspension copolymerisation. The chemoembolization particles were subsequently loaded with OphA. The effects of OphA in vitro were characterised by flow cytometry and nanoparticle tracking analysis (NanoSight). High loading of OphA onto the chemoembolization particles was achieved. The subsequent release of OphA onto RD cells in culture showed a 70% reduction in cell viability. OphA caused RD cells to round up and their membrane to bleb and caused cell death via apoptosis. OphA caused both an increase in the number of microvesicles produced and an increase in DNA content within these microvesicles. The prepared chemoembolization particles showed good efficacy against RD cells in culture.

  6. Anterior sagittal transanorectal approach to the posterior urethra in the pediatric age group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, F; De Castro, R; Ceccarelli, P L; Dòmini, R

    1998-09-01

    Surgical access to the posterior urethra is often difficult and several surgical solutions have been proposed. We suggest an anterior sagittal transanorectal approach based on splitting the anterior rectal wall only. This alternative technique provides excellent exposure to the retrourethral region, permitting simple and safe surgery. Between 1994 and 1996 we performed surgery via the anterior sagittal transanorectal approach in 8 patients with a mean age of 9.06 years. Patients included 1 girl with a posttraumatic urethrovaginal fistula, 3 with intersex disorders (2 with mixed gonadal dysgenesis raised as boys and 1 with male dysgenetic pseudohermaphroditism with an enlarged urtricle) and 4 boys (1 with penile agenesis raised as girl, 2 with urethral duplication and 1 with prostatic rhabdomyosarcoma). The patient was placed in a knee-chest position. A midline sagittal incision was made through the anterior anorectal wall only and deepened through the perineal body to expose the posterior urethra and retrovesical space. After the pathological condition was corrected the anterior rectal wall and perineal body were reconstructed. The operation was completed with protective colostomy. In our final patient with prostatic rhabdomyosarcoma the anterior sagittal transanorectal approach was used without colostomy. Anorectal manometry was done 6 months postoperatively. All patients were completely continent of stool and urine. Convalescence was unremarkable in all cases. Postoperative manometry in 7 patients revealed no differences from preoperative measurements. This procedure should be considered a useful alternative to other techniques for various congenital and acquired pelvic disorders.

  7. Nutlin-3 down-regulates retinoblastoma protein expression and inhibits muscle cell differentiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walsh, Erica M. [Department of Biochemistry, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA 02118 (United States); Niu, MengMeng; Bergholz, Johann [Center of Growth, Metabolism and Aging, College of Life Sciences, Sichuan University, Chengdu, 610014 China (China); Jim Xiao, Zhi-Xiong, E-mail: jxiao@bu.edu [Department of Biochemistry, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA 02118 (United States); Center of Growth, Metabolism and Aging, College of Life Sciences, Sichuan University, Chengdu, 610014 China (China)

    2015-05-29

    The p53 tumor suppressor gene plays a critical role in regulation of proliferation, cell death and differentiation. The MDM2 oncoprotein is a major negative regulator for p53 by binding to and targeting p53 for proteasome-mediated degradation. The small molecule inhibitor, nutlin-3, disrupts MDM2-p53 interaction resulting in stabilization and activation of p53 protein. We have previously shown that nutlin-3 activates p53, leading to MDM2 accumulation as concomitant of reduced retinoblastoma (Rb) protein stability. It is well known that Rb is important in muscle development and myoblast differentiation and that rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS), or cancer of the skeletal muscle, typically harbors MDM2 amplification. In this study, we show that nutlin-3 inhibited myoblast proliferation and effectively prevented myoblast differentiation, as evidenced by lack of expression of muscle differentiation markers including myogenin and myosin heavy chain (MyHC), as well as a failure to form multinucleated myotubes, which were associated with dramatic increases in MDM2 expression and decrease in Rb protein levels. These results indicate that nutlin-3 can effectively inhibit muscle cell differentiation. - Highlights: • Nutlin-3 inhibits myoblast proliferation and prevents differentiation into myotubes. • Nutlin-3 increases MDM2 expression and down-regulates Rb protein levels. • This study has implication in nutlin-3 treatment of rhabdomyosarcomas.

  8. Undifferentiated (embryonal) liver sarcoma: synchronous and metachronous occurrence with neoplasms other than mesenchymal liver hamartoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasljevic, Gorana; Lamovec, Janez; Jancar, Janez

    2011-08-01

    Undifferentiated (embryonal) liver sarcoma (UELS) is a rare tumor that typically occurs in children. The association of UELS with neoplasm other than mesenchymal liver hamartoma is exceedingly rare. The aim of the study was to report 3 cases of UELS, 2 of them being interesting because of their association with another neoplasm, vaginal embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma in a teenage girl and B-acute lymphoblastic leukemia in a middle-aged woman. Besides, one of our cases of UELS, in a 58-year-old woman, is an extremely rare presentation of such a tumor in a middle-aged adult. The patient's clinical features, therapy, and pathologic results were reviewed; immunohistochemical analysis and, in 2 cases, electron microscopy were performed. In this study, all 3 patients were females aged 13, 13, and 58 years. Histopathologic evaluation of resected liver tumors confirmed the diagnosis of UELS in all of them. In 2 of the cases, metachronous occurrence of UELS with vaginal embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma in a teenage girl and B-acute lymphoblastic leukemia in a middle-aged woman is described. Careful clinical analysis, histologic studies, and immunohistochemistry are mandatory to distinguish UELS from other hepatic malignancies with similar or overlapping features and to exclude the possibility of other tumors that may be considered in the differential diagnosis. The association of UELS with another neoplasm is exceedingly rare. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Cyclin D1 and Ewing's sarcoma/PNET: A microarray analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagone, Paolo; Nicoletti, Ferdinando; Salvatorelli, Lucia; Musumeci, Giuseppe; Magro, Gaetano

    2015-10-01

    Recent immunohistochemical analyses have showed that cyclin D1 is expressed in soft tissue Ewing's sarcoma/peripheral neuroectodermal tumor (PNET) of childhood and adolescents, while it is undetectable in both embryonal and alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma. In the present paper, microarray analysis provided evidence of a significant upregulation of cyclin D1 in Ewing's sarcoma as compared to normal tissues. In addition, we confirmed our previous findings of a significant over-expression of cyclin D1 in Ewing sarcoma as compared to rhabdomyosarcoma. Bioinformatic analysis also allowed to identify some other genes, strongly correlated to cyclin D1, which, although not previously studied in pediatric tumors, could represent novel markers for the diagnosis and prognosis of Ewing's sarcoma/PNET. The data herein provided support not only the use of cyclin D1 as a diagnostic marker of Ewing sarcoma/PNET but also the possibility of using drugs targeting cyclin D1 as potential therapeutic strategies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  10. Live attenuated measles virus vaccine therapy for locally established malignant glioblastoma tumor cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Shammari AM

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Ahmed M Al-Shammari,1 Farah E Ismaeel,2 Shahlaa M Salih,2 Nahi Y Yaseen11Experimental Therapy Department, Iraqi Center for Cancer and Medical Genetic Researches, Mustansiriya University, 2Departments of Biotechnology, College of Science, Al-Nahrain University, Baghdad, IraqAbstract: Glioblastoma multiforme is the most aggressive malignant primary brain tumor in humans, with poor prognosis. A new glioblastoma cell line (ANGM5 was established from a cerebral glioblastoma multiforme in a 72-year-old Iraqi man who underwent surgery for an intracranial tumor. This study was carried out to evaluate the antitumor effect of live attenuated measles virus (MV Schwarz vaccine strain on glioblastoma multiforme tumor cell lines in vitro. Live attenuated MV Schwarz strain was propagated on Vero, human rhabdomyosarcoma, and human glioblastoma-multiform (ANGM5 cell lines. The infected confluent monolayer appeared to be covered with syncytia with granulation and vacuolation, as well as cell rounding, shrinkage, and large empty space with cell debris as a result of cell lysis and death. Cell lines infected with virus have the ability for hemadsorption to human red blood cells after 72 hours of infection, whereas no hemadsorption of uninfected cells is seen. Detection of MV hemagglutinin protein by monoclonal antibodies in infected cells of all cell lines by immunocytochemistry assay gave positive results (brown color in the cytoplasm of infected cells. Cell viability was measured after 72 hours of infection by 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay. Results showed a significant cytotoxic effect for MV (P≤0.05 on growth of ANGM5 and rhabdomyosarcoma cell lines after 72 hours of infection. Induction of apoptosis by MV was assessed by measuring mitochondrial membrane potentials in tumor cells after 48, 72, and 120 hours of infection. Apoptotic cells were counted, and the mean percentage of dead cells was significantly higher after 48, 72

  11. MR imaging of diffuse bone marrow replacement in pediatric patients with solid malignancies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruzal-Shapiro, C.; Berdon, W.E.; Cohen, M.D.; Abramson, S.J.

    1990-01-01

    This paper demonstrates that the MR imaging finding of dark T1/bright T2, associated with diffuse bone marrow tumor infiltration in leukemia, also occurs in solid tumors. The clinical course and results on plain radiographs, bone scans, and marrow aspiration were reviewed in two patients with solid tumors and two with leukemia whose MR studies showed a pattern of diffuse bone marrow T2 hypointensity and T2 hyperintensity. One case was followed serially through treatment. There were two cases of ALL, one neuroblastoma, and one rhabdomyosarcoma. Plain radiographs and bone scans showed metaphyseal changes with normal epiphyses and diaphyses. On MR images, flip-flop or reversal of the expected signal characteristics of fatty marrow was seen diffusely in the metaphyses, epiphyses, and diaphyses. All patients had positive bone marrow aspirates

  12. Long-term prognosis of maxillary sinus malignant tumor patients treated by fast neutron radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kishi, Hirohisa; Numata, Tsutomu; Yuza, Jun; Suzuki, Haruhiko; Konno, Akiyoshi [Chiba Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine; Miyamoto, Tadaaki

    1995-03-01

    From 1976 through 1990, 19 patients with maxillary sinus malignant tumor were treated with combination therapy consisting of maxillectomy and radiation of fast neutron. Fast neutron radiotherapy was performed at National Institute of Radiological Sciences. Eight patients had adenoid cystic carcinomas, three patients squamous cell carcinomas, one patient a carcinoma in pleomorphic adenoma, four patients fibrosarcomas, one patient osteosarcoma, one patient chondrosarcoma and one patient rhabdomyosarcoma. Fast neutron therapy after/before surgery was effective in fresh cases with T2-3N0M0 adenoid cystic carcinomas and sarcomas (except for fibrosarcoma). Nine patients were alive more than three years after treatment. And serious complications of fast neutron radiation therapy appeared in six of these nine patients. Visual impairment of opposite side occurred in four patients. Bone necrosis occured in one patient and brain dysfunction in one patient. (author).

  13. Long-term prognosis of maxillary sinus malignant tumor patients treated by fast neutron radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kishi, Hirohisa; Numata, Tsutomu; Yuza, Jun; Suzuki, Haruhiko; Konno, Akiyoshi; Miyamoto, Tadaaki.

    1995-01-01

    From 1976 through 1990, 19 patients with maxillary sinus malignant tumor were treated with combination therapy consisting of maxillectomy and radiation of fast neutron. Fast neutron radiotherapy was performed at National Institute of Radiological Sciences. Eight patients had adenoid cystic carcinomas, three patients squamous cell carcinomas, one patient a carcinoma in pleomorphic adenoma, four patients fibrosarcomas, one patient osteosarcoma, one patient chondrosarcoma and one patient rhabdomyosarcoma. Fast neutron therapy after/before surgery was effective in fresh cases with T2-3N0M0 adenoid cystic carcinomas and sarcomas (except for fibrosarcoma). Nine patients were alive more than three years after treatment. And serious complications of fast neutron radiation therapy appeared in six of these nine patients. Visual impairment of opposite side occurred in four patients. Bone necrosis occured in one patient and brain dysfunction in one patient. (author)

  14. [Rabdomiosarcoma primario de corazón como causa de síncope recurrente en el adulto].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Pérez, Julio Alexander; Gómez-Arbeláez, Diego; Hurtado-Gomez, Gabriel Alexander

    2011-01-01

    Primary or secondary neoplasms can affect the heart. Secondary are more common. However, primary neoplasms are relevant because is a group with diverse genesis, behavior, treatment and clinical manifestations. We present a case of a 45 year-old woman, with recurrent syncope started 1 year before her first consult. She had palpitations and chest pain. Echocardiography identified a left atrium mass of 2.1x1.8 cm. Endomyocardial biopsy document a primary rhabdomyosarcoma of the heart. The patient dies after a overall-survival of 22 months. This case presented had a good study of its symptoms with an accurate diagnosis and early treatment, which provided prolonged survival of this rare and aggressive neoplasm.

  15. Modulation of the toxicity of photons by non-conventional drugs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bohm, L.; Theron, T.; Serafin, A.; Verheye, F.

    1997-01-01

    The 3 drugs under investigation Pentoxifylline, Ouabain and Thalidomide are non-conventional in the sense that they have a low toxicity and do not damage DNA. Pentoxifylline reduces blood viscosity ad enhances peripheral blood flow. When combined with irradiation in a mouse rhabdomyosarcoma model we found markedly enhanced tumour growth delay and in cultured cells dose modifying factors for SF2 and alpha in the region of 1.2-1.7 (Strahlentherapie 1995;170:595-01). The drug also alters cell regulation by inhibiting the radiation induced G2/M block and suppressing control of DNA synthesis (Theron and Boehm, unpubl.). When Thalidomide was added in the absence of irradiation to the myelo-blastic cell line K-562 we found characteristic changes of cell morphology and cell surface markers suggesting differentiation and expression of a megacaryocytic lineage (Leukemia Research 1991;15:129-136). A summary of the current state of research is given. (authors)

  16. Soft Tissue Sarcoma, Version 2.2018, NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Mehren, Margaret; Randall, R Lor; Benjamin, Robert S; Boles, Sarah; Bui, Marilyn M; Ganjoo, Kristen N; George, Suzanne; Gonzalez, Ricardo J; Heslin, Martin J; Kane, John M; Keedy, Vicki; Kim, Edward; Koon, Henry; Mayerson, Joel; McCarter, Martin; McGarry, Sean V; Meyer, Christian; Morris, Zachary S; O'Donnell, Richard J; Pappo, Alberto S; Paz, I Benjamin; Petersen, Ivy A; Pfeifer, John D; Riedel, Richard F; Ruo, Bernice; Schuetze, Scott; Tap, William D; Wayne, Jeffrey D; Bergman, Mary Anne; Scavone, Jillian L

    2018-05-01

    Soft tissue sarcomas (STS) are rare solid tumors of mesenchymal cell origin that display a heterogenous mix of clinical and pathologic characteristics. STS can develop from fat, muscle, nerves, blood vessels, and other connective tissues. The evaluation and treatment of patients with STS requires a multidisciplinary team with demonstrated expertise in the management of these tumors. The complete NCCN Guidelines for STS provide recommendations for the diagnosis, evaluation, and treatment of extremity/superficial trunk/head and neck STS, as well as intra-abdominal/retroperitoneal STS, gastrointestinal stromal tumors, desmoid tumors, and rhabdomyosarcoma. This portion of the NCCN Guidelines discusses general principles for the diagnosis, staging, and treatment of STS of the extremities, superficial trunk, or head and neck; outlines treatment recommendations by disease stage; and reviews the evidence to support the guidelines recommendations. Copyright © 2018 by the National Comprehensive Cancer Network.

  17. Soft Tissue Sarcoma, Version 2.2016, NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Mehren, Margaret; Randall, R Lor; Benjamin, Robert S; Boles, Sarah; Bui, Marilyn M; Conrad, Ernest U; Ganjoo, Kristen N; George, Suzanne; Gonzalez, Ricardo J; Heslin, Martin J; Kane, John M; Koon, Henry; Mayerson, Joel; McCarter, Martin; McGarry, Sean V; Meyer, Christian; O'Donnell, Richard J; Pappo, Alberto S; Paz, I Benjamin; Petersen, Ivy A; Pfeifer, John D; Riedel, Richard F; Schuetze, Scott; Schupak, Karen D; Schwartz, Herbert S; Tap, William D; Wayne, Jeffrey D; Bergman, Mary Anne; Scavone, Jillian

    2016-06-01

    Soft tissue sarcomas (STS) are rare solid tumors of mesenchymal cell origin that display a heterogenous mix of clinical and pathologic characteristics. STS can develop from fat, muscle, nerves, blood vessels, and other connective tissues. The evaluation and treatment of patients with STS requires a multidisciplinary team with demonstrated expertise in the management of these tumors. The complete NCCN Guidelines for Soft Tissue Sarcoma (available at NCCN.org) provide recommendations for the diagnosis, evaluation, and treatment of extremity/superficial trunk/head and neck STS, as well as intra-abdominal/retroperitoneal STS, gastrointestinal stromal tumor, desmoid tumors, and rhabdomyosarcoma. This manuscript discusses guiding principles for the diagnosis and staging of STS and evidence for treatment modalities that include surgery, radiation, chemoradiation, chemotherapy, and targeted therapy. Copyright © 2016 by the National Comprehensive Cancer Network.

  18. Changing clinical scenario in Chandipura virus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A B Sudeep

    2016-01-01

    Phlebotomine sandflies are implicated as vectors due to their predominance in endemic areas, repeated virus isolations and their ability to transmit the virus by transovarial and venereal routes. Significant contributions have been made in the development of diagnostics and prophylactics, vaccines and antivirals. Two candidate vaccines, viz. a recombinant vaccine and a killed vaccine and siRNAs targeting P and M proteins have been developed and are awaiting clinical trials. Rhabdomyosarcoma and Phlebotomus papatasi cell lines as well as embryonated chicken eggs have been found useful in virus isolation and propagation. Despite these advancements, CHPV has been a major concern in Central India and warrants immediate attention from virologists, neurologists, paediatricians and the government for containing the virus.

  19. Long-term effects of external radiation on the pituitary and thyroid glands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuks, Z.; Glatstein, E.; Marsa, G.W.; Bagshaw, M.A.; Kaplan, H.S.

    1976-01-01

    Chronic damage following external irradiation of the normal pituitary and thyroid glands, delivered incidentally during radiotherapy of neoplasms of the head and neck may be more common than has been appreciated in the past. A case of a child who developed pituitary dwarfism 5 1 / 2 years after radiation therapy had been delivered for an embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma of the nasopharynx is described. A review of similar cases from the literature is presented. Likewise, external irradiation of the normal thyroid gland produces a spectrum of radiation-induced syndromes. Clinical damage to the pituitary and thyroid glands is usually manifested months to years after treatment and is preceded by a long subclinical phase. A careful exclusion of these glands from radiation treatment fields is recommended whenever possible. An early detection of endocrine function abnormalities in patients receiving radiation to these glands is desirable, since appropriate treatment may prevent the late deleterious effects of external irradiation of the pituitary and thyroid glands

  20. Familial Investigations of Childhood Cancer Predisposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-03

    Acute Leukemia; Adenomatous Polyposis; Adrenocortical Carcinoma; AML; BAP1 Tumor Predisposition Syndrome; Carney Complex; Choroid Plexus Carcinoma; Constitutional Mismatch Repair Deficiency Syndrome; Diamond-Blackfan Anemia; DICER1 Syndrome; Dyskeratosis Congenita; Emberger Syndrome; Familial Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Familial Adenomatous Polyposis; Fanconi Anemia; Familial Cancer; Familial Wilms Tumor; Familial Neuroblastoma; GIST; Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer; Hereditary Paraganglioma-Pheochromocytoma Syndrome; Hodgkin Lymphoma; Juvenile Polyposis; Li-Fraumeni Syndrome; Lynch Syndrome; MDS; Melanoma Syndrome; Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 1; Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 2; Neuroblastoma; Neurofibromatosis Type 1; Neurofibromatosis Type II; Nevoid Basal Cell Carcinoma Syndrome; Non Hodgkin Lymphoma; Noonan Syndrome and Other Rasopathy; Overgrowth Syndromes; Pancreatic Cancer; Peutz-Jeghers Syndrome; Pheochromocytoma/Paraganglioma; PTEN Hamartoma Tumor Syndrome; Retinoblastoma; Rhabdoid Tumor Predisposition Syndrome; Rhabdomyosarcoma; Rothmund-Thomson Syndrome; Tuberous Sclerosis; Von Hippel-Lindau Disease

  1. Nuclear magnetic resonance evaluation of fifty children with cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, M.D.; Klatte, E.C.; Smith, J.A.; Carr, B.E.; Martin-Simmerman, P.

    1985-01-01

    Fifty children with cancer have been studied by MR. The patients studied include ten with lymphoma, nine with neuroblastoma, five with rhabdomyosarcoma, six with leukemia, five with Ewings sarcoma, four with Wilms tumor and several with other miscellaneous tumors. The results of scanning show that MR is well tolerated by children. Primary tumor has been identified in every case. Metastases have been identified in many patients. MR has proved helpful in identifying the organ of origin of a tumor. Because of excellent vessel visualization it is helpful in planning surgical resection of a tumor. In addition, in a number of patients MR has proved helpful in monitoring the response of tumor to nonsurgical therapy. With continued improvement in image quality it is believed that MR has a major role to play in pediatric tumor imaging [fr

  2. YAP and the Hippo pathway in pediatric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Atif A; Mohamed, Abdalla D; Gener, Melissa; Li, Weijie; Taboada, Eugenio

    2017-01-01

    The Hippo pathway is an important signaling pathway that controls cell proliferation and apoptosis. It is evolutionarily conserved in mammals and is stimulated by cell-cell contact, inhibiting cell proliferation in response to increased cell density. During early embryonic development, the Hippo signaling pathway regulates organ development and size, and its functions result in the coordinated balance between proliferation, apoptosis, and differentiation. Its principal effectors, YAP and TAZ, regulate signaling by the embryonic stem cells and determine cell fate and histogenesis. Dysfunction of this pathway contributes to cancer development in adults and children. Emerging studies have shed light on the upregulation of Hippo pathway members in several pediatric cancers and may offer prognostic information on rhabdomyosarcoma, osteosarcoma, Wilms tumor, neuroblastoma, medulloblastoma, and other brain gliomas. We review the results of such published studies and highlight the potential clinical application of this pathway in pediatric oncologic and pathologic studies. These studies support targeting this pathway as a novel treatment strategy.

  3. Pediatric hepatic rhabdoid tumor: A rare cause of abdominal mass in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole Kapral, MD

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Pediatric hepatic rhabdoid tumors are rare tumors of the liver, with few cases reported in the literature. These aggressive tumors can be difficult to differentiate from hepatoblastomas on imaging alone, and surgical biopsy combined with special immunohistochemical stains can assist in differentiating these 2 tumor types. We present a case of hepatic rhabdoid tumor in a 7-month-old female infant, which was originally thought to be a hepatoblastoma; however, using BAF47 staining for INI-1 we were able to diagnose a rhabdoid tumor and affect the patient's medical oncologic therapy. Earlier detection and a better understanding of the imaging features of hepatic rhabdoid tumor may aid in improved patient management and treatment planning. Keywords: Rhabdoid tumor, INI-1, Hepatoblastoma, Pediatric, Rhabdomyosarcoma

  4. Radiation biophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1979-01-01

    Summaries of research projects conducted during 1978 and 1979 are presented. The overall thrust of the research is aimed at understanding the effects of radiation on organisms. Specific subject areas include: the effects of heavy-particle beam nuclear interactions in tissue on dosimetry; tracer studies with radioactive fragments of heavy-ion beams; the effects of heavy/ions on human kidney cells and Chinese hamster cells; the response of a rhabdomyosarcoma tumor system in rats to heavy-ion beams; the use of heavy charged particles in radiotherapy of human cancer; heavy-ion radiography; the biological effects of high magnetic fields; central nervous system neurotoxicity; and biophysical studies on cell membranes

  5. Second Malignanat Solid Neoplasms in Children Treated with Radiotherapy-Report of Two Cases and Review of Literature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Eun Ji; Suh, Chang Ok; Kim, Gwi Eon; Lyu, Chuhl Joo; Kim, Byung Soo

    1995-01-01

    Radiotherapy and chemotherapy can effectively control cancer but can also cause new second cancers to develop as long-term complications especially in childhood cancer. We experienced two patients with second malignant solid neoplasm who had been treated with radiation and chemotherapy for childhood cancers. One female patients with rhabdomyosarcoma of the right popliteal fossa was treated with radiotherapy at total dose of 54 Gy. Three years and seven months later, osteosarcoma developed in the field of radiation therapy. The other male patient with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma of the small bowel was treated with radiotherapy and leiomyosarcoma developed in the field of radiotherapy 18 years later. We reviewed the literature of the second malignant neoplasm in children in respect of risk factors. The risk for a second primary cancer following radiotherapy or chemotherapy emphasizes the need for life long follow-up of patients receiving such treatments. Particularly patients treated for childhood cancers

  6. Radiation therapy in the management of childhood cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kun, L.E.

    1987-01-01

    Over the past two decades, multimodality treatment regimens have produced significant improvement in survival rates for most types of childhood cancer. The role of radiation therapy has been critically evaluated in prospective clinical trials that established the importance of irradiation in assuring local and regional control of disease central to ultimate survival. Indications for cranial and craniospinal irradiation in acute lymphoblastic leukemia are reviewed, as is difficult technical factors important for successful management. The role of radiation therapy in neuroblastoma and Wilms tumor is reviewed in the context of tumor biology and increasing data from multi-institutional trials. Interactions of irradiation with surgery and chemotherapy are stressed in childhood rhabdomyosarcoma and Ewing sarcoma. Current results in the more common central nervous tumors of childhood are presented, including the central role of radiation therapy in medulloblastoma, astrocytoma, and craniopharyngioma. Concerns regarding late effects of radiation therapy are balanced with the importance of achieving disease control

  7. Periocular Myxoma in a Child

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dolores Ríos y Valles-Valles

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Myxomas are locally invasive, benign mesenchymal neoplasms with odontogenic, osteogenic, or soft tissue origin. Facial myxomas probably account for less than 0.5% of all paranasal sinus and nasal tumors. We report a case of a left painless periocular mass in a 11-month-old girl. The lesion was resected with a clinical diagnosis of lacrimal sac tumor. Histopathology and immunohistochemistry proved the tumor to be a myxoma. There has been no recurrence after 4 years of followup. Midfacial myxomas should be differentiated from other benign and malignant tumors such as dermoid, hamartoma, neurofibroma, nasolacrimal duct cyst, and sarcomas in particular embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma. Because of the infiltrative nature of these tumors, a wide surgery is required to achieve clear resection margins and avoid recurrence.

  8. High-grade primary pulmonary leiomyosarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Afonso da Silva Sardenberg

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Primary sarcomas of the lung are rare and account for 0.5% of all primary lung tumors. There were approximately 300 cases described in the literature as of 2006. All histologic types of sarcoma were described, and the most common intrathoracic types reported were angiosarcoma, leiomyosarcoma, fibrosarcoma, hemangiopericytoma, and rhabdomyosarcoma. The biological behavior of these tumors is not well-known due to their low frequency. Leiomyosarcomas represent one of the most common subtypes encountered in the lungs, and usually occur during the sixth decade, with male predominance. Although the frequency of metastatic disease is not related to tumor size, prognosis was reported to be poorer in high-grade tumors. In comparison with other sarcomas, survival after complete resection of pulmonary leiomyosarcoma was reported as longer. We report on a patient with primary leiomyosarcoma originating from the bronchus with complete resection and long-term follow-up.

  9. The effect of anaesthesia on the radiosensitivity of rat intestine, foot skin and R-1 tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kal, H.B.; Gaiser, J.F.

    1980-01-01

    A comparison has been made of the effects of Nembutal (sodium pentobarbital) and Ethrane (2-chloro-1,1,2-trifluoroethyldifluoromethyl ether) anaesthesia on the radiation responses of rat intestine, foot skin and R-1 rhabdomyosarcoma. Single-dose experiments under Nembutal or short-lasting Ethrane anaesthesia resulted in equivalent radiosensitivities for the R-1 sarcoma and foot skin, whereas Ethrane induced radiosensitization in the intestine. In the Ethrane anaesthesia lasting 3 hours, and in the split-dose experiments, Ethrane inhibited repair of radiation-induced damage in the R-1 sarcoma and in the foot skin. It is therefore recommended that the use of Ethrane as an anaesthetic should be avoided in experiments designed to investigate repair of damage in fractionated studies or during protracted irradiation treatments. (UK)

  10. Developmental orofacial deficits associated with multimodal cancer therapy: Case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berkowitz, R.J.; Neuman, P.; Spalding, P.; Novak, L.; Strandjord, S.; Coccia, P.F.

    1989-01-01

    Multimodal cancer therapy for pediatric head and neck tumors may be associated with significant developmental orofacial morbidity. This report details these effects in a child (C.I.) diagnosed at 2.5 years of age with a rhabdomyosarcoma, primary to the left buccinator. This case is of interest as C.I. has an unaffected identical twin (D.I.) for comparative study. Both were assessed by comparing panoramic radiographs and lateral and frontal tracings of cephalometric radiographs obtained at 8.25 years of age. C.I. had multiple dental anomalies which included agenesis, ectopia, crown malformation, and root malformation. Root malformation, ectopia, and agenesis were restricted to the left dentition, whereas crown malformation was noted bilaterally. C.I. had a generalized craniofacial skeletal hypoplasia relative to D.I. in all three planes, growth defects were greater on the side of the tumor, and the mandible was affected more than the nasomaxillary complex

  11. The contribution of radiation therapy to the cancer in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watari, Tsutomu

    1981-01-01

    Majority of patients with tumors generally are sensitive and very useful of radiotherapy. Major cases in pediatric cancer are leukemia, brain tumor, neuroblastoma, malignant lymphoma, Wilms tumor, retinoblastoma, rhabdomyo-sarcoma, osteosarcoma, testicular tumors et al. Others are hemangioma including Kasabach-Merritt Syndrome. Radiation therapy is indicated to all cases of malignant tumor in children. Recently the treatment results improving with the help of well organized chemotherapy. Cancer in children is almost a speciality on its own. Since the total number of patients in any region is not large, treatment is best concentrated at special oncology centers. Long-term results in the majority of cases are disappointing, and the nursing problems after formidable. Surgery, Radiation and Chemotherapy and all valuable, especially in combination - Multidisciplinary therapy and Multidisciplinary team. (author)

  12. Effects of radiation on the developing dentition and supporting bone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carl, W.; Wood, R.

    1980-01-01

    Underdevelopment of teeth after exposure to radiation has been observed since the early experiments with x rays. Two patients had been irradiated at young ages for embryonal rhabdomyosarcomas. For the patient treated with radiation at age 4 for a lesion in the submandibular area, root development of the mandibular teeth stopped, but the teeth nevertheless erupted. In the patient treated with radiation at age 9 for a tumor in the left cheek, bone apposition in the left side of the mandible failed to continue at the same rate as on the right side. Although new megavoltage radiation machines have reduced the chances of bone complications in adults, developing bone and structures are still significantly affected by radiation

  13. Children’s Oncology Group’s 2013 Blueprint for Research: Soft Tissue Sarcomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, Douglas S.; Spunt, Sheri L.; Skapek, Stephen X.

    2013-01-01

    In the US, approximately 850-900 children are diagnosed each year with soft tissue sarcomas (STS). Key findings from recent clinical trials include safe reduction in therapy for low risk rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS), validation of FOXO1 fusion as a prognostic factor, a modest improvement in outcome for high-risk RMS, and a biologically-designed non-cytotoxic therapy for pediatric desmoid tumor. Planned Phase 2 trials include targeted agents for VEGF/PDGF, mTOR, and IGF-1R for children with RMS and VEGF for children with non-RMS STS (NRSTS). For RMS, COG Phase 3 trials potentially will explore VEGF/mTOR inhibition or chemotherapy interval compression. For NRSTS, a COG Phase 3 trial will explore VEGF inhibition. PMID:23255356

  14. A novel algorithm for simplification of complex gene classifiers in cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Raphael A.; Teng, Ling; Bachmeyer, Karen M.; Bissonnette, Mei Lin Z.; Husain, Aliya N.; Parham, David M.; Triche, Timothy J.; Wing, Michele R.; Gastier-Foster, Julie M.; Barr, Frederic G.; Hawkins, Douglas S.; Anderson, James R.; Skapek, Stephen X.; Volchenboum, Samuel L.

    2013-01-01

    The clinical application of complex molecular classifiers as diagnostic or prognostic tools has been limited by the time and cost needed to apply them to patients. Using an existing fifty-gene expression signature known to separate two molecular subtypes of the pediatric cancer rhabdomyosarcoma, we show that an exhaustive iterative search algorithm can distill this complex classifier down to two or three features with equal discrimination. We validated the two-gene signatures using three separate and distinct data sets, including one that uses degraded RNA extracted from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded material. Finally, to demonstrate the generalizability of our algorithm, we applied it to a lung cancer data set to find minimal gene signatures that can distinguish survival. Our approach can easily be generalized and coupled to existing technical platforms to facilitate the discovery of simplified signatures that are ready for routine clinical use. PMID:23913937

  15. Tumor radiobiology studies with heavy charged-particle beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curtis, S.B.; Tenforde, T.S.; Tenforde, S.D.; Parr, S.S.; Flynn, M.J.

    1981-01-01

    The response of tumor-cell systems to irradiation with carbon, neon, and argon beams at various positions in the plateau and extended peak regions of the Bragg ionization (dose versus depth) curve is being evaluated from experiments conducted both in vivo and in vitro. The radiobiological end points being studied include: tumor volume response, cellular survival after tumor irradiation in situ, cell-kinetic parameters measured by flow cytofluorometry and time-lapse cinematography, and survival of oxic and hypoxic cells irradiated in suspension. One focus of the research effort during the past year has been on the combined effect of radiosensitizing drugs and charged-particle irradiation. In this article, the results are presented of studies on combined drug and radiation treatment of a rat rhabdomyosarcoma tumor and a human melanoma tumor growing in athymic (thymus-less) nude mice

  16. Lycorine reduces mortality of human enterovirus 71-infected mice by inhibiting virus replication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qin Chuan

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Human enterovirus 71 (EV71 infection causes hand, foot and mouth disease in children under 6 years old and this infection occasionally induces severe neurological complications. No vaccines or drugs are clinical available to control EV71 epidemics. In present study, we show that treatment with lycorine reduced the viral cytopathic effect (CPE on rhabdomyosarcoma (RD cells by inhibiting virus replication. Analysis of this inhibitory effect of lycorine on viral proteins synthesis suggests that lycorine blocks the elongation of the viral polyprotein during translation. Lycorine treatment of mice challenged with a lethal dose of EV71 resulted in reduction of mortality, clinical scores and pathological changes in the muscles of mice, which were achieved through inhibition of viral replication. When mice were infected with a moderate dose of EV71, lycorine treatment was able to protect them from paralysis. Lycorine may be a potential drug candidate for the clinical treatment of EV71-infected patients.

  17. Proliferative activity (MIB-1 index) is an independent prognostic parameter in patients with high-grade soft tissue sarcomas of subtypes other than malignant fibrous histiocytomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, V; Sørensen, Flemming Brandt; Bentzen, S M

    1998-01-01

    . The proliferative activity was assessed by use of the monoclonal antibody MIB-1 and evaluated in multiple, random systematic sampled fields of vision. The percentage of proliferating cells (the MIB-1 index) ranged between 1% and 85% (median 12%). A significant increase in mean MIB-1 index was seen with increasing...... histological malignancy grade. Variation in the incidence of p53 accumulation and bcl-2 positivity among different histological subtypes was observed. p53 accumulation was frequent in synovial sarcomas and leiomyo- and rhabdomyosarcomas, whereas bcl-2 preferentially was expressed in synovial sarcomas....... Univariate analysis identified patient age, tumour size, histological grade of malignancy, MIB-1 index and p53 accumulation as significant prognostic parameters. Multivariate Cox analysis, including tests for interaction terms between histological subtypes and MIB-1 index, showed independent prognostic...

  18. The effect of dose loading and of double labelling with 57Co and 125I on the tissue distribution in animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vos, C.M.; Westera, G.; Jagt, P.J. van der; Zanten, B. van; Vrije Universiteit, Amsterdam

    1979-01-01

    Dose loading effects upon the performance of 57 Co-bleomycin as a tumor localizing agent have been investigated in Rhabdomyosarcoma bearing Wag/Ry rats. The addition of non-radioactively labelled Co-bleomycin increased the relative uptake of 57 Co-bleomycin in rapid growing tumors, but the addition of non-chelated bleomycin had no influence at all. In our experimental system, iodinated bleomycin generally labelled by reaction with ICl, was found to be an unsatisfactory tumor localizing agent. In order to combine the useful localizing properties of Co-bleomycin with the qualified detection properties of some iodine isotopes, we attempted to prepare bleomycin doubly labelled with Co and I. However, we were unable to prepare 57 Co- 125 I-bleomycin by general labelling with ICl. This result indicates that both labels need the imidazole ring for the formation of a stable, labelled bleomycin. (orig.) [de

  19. Region of the eye. Strategy for the management of malignant tumours of the orbit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freeman, J.E.

    1984-01-01

    The strategy for the management of the various malignant tumours of the orbit was tabulated and also illustrated in diagrams. Table 1. Strategy for retinoblastoma; Table 2. Strategy for malignant melanoma: (a) intra-ocular, (b) epibulbar; Table 3. Strategy for squamous cell carcinoma: (a) conjunctival, (b) palpebral; Table 4. Strategy for basal cell carcinoma: (a) palpebral, (b) intra-orbital; Table 5. Strategy for rhabdomyosarcoma (and embryoma) of the orbit; Table 6. Strategy for lymphosarcoma of the orbit; Table 7. Strategy for other tumours of the orbit or adnexa: (A) hystiocytosis X, (B) adenocarcinoma of the lachrymal gland, (C) optic nerve glioma, (D) para-nasal sinus tumours involving orbit; Table 8. Strategy for systemic or metastatic disease involving the orbit or contents: (a) intra-ocular [(i) leukaemia, (ii) carcinoma of the breast or of the bronchus], (b) orbital or peri-orbital [(i) leukaemia, (ii) neuroblastoma, (iii) histiocytosis X, (iv) lymphoma

  20. Common and Uncommon Conditions of Breast Disease in Children and Adolescents: A Pictorial Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Hyoun; Kim, Kyu Soon; Kim, Da Mi [Dept. of f Radiology, Eulji University Hospital, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, You Me [Dept. of Radiology, Dankook University Hospital, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hak Hee [Dept. of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-02-15

    The purpose of this study is to review various breast diseases in children and adolescents and to illustrate the sonographic findings. We reviewed the cases at our institution in order to identify breast disease in children and adolescent patients who underwent sonography and mammography. Breast disease in children and adolescents included developmental disturbance, infection, benign tumors and inherent defects. In contrast to adults, the radiologic findings of malignant breast conditions in pediatric populations have rarely been reported; however, we show ductal carcinoma in situ with juvenile fibroadenoma and rhabdomyosarcoma. During childhood and adolescence, the recognition and correct identification of physiologic breast development and specific lesions in breast entities on radiologic findings is most helpful in identifying and characterizing abnormalities and in guiding further investigation.

  1. The sonographic findings of the scrotal pathology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Hyen Sook; Han, Chun Hee; Lee, Jung Hee; Chung, Kyu Byung; Suh, Won Hyuck

    1988-01-01

    Clinical differentiation of the various pathological conditions affecting scrotal contents can be difficult. The superficial location of scrotum is suited for sonographic examination. March, 1984 to december, 1987 authors experienced 23 cases of the inflammatory and tumorous condition, which were confirmed by operation and clinical follow up. The results are as follows : 1. Sonographic examination is safe, noninvasive, and useful in screening test of scrotum. 2. Sonography is useful for the confirmation of complicated epididymitis. 3. In palpable mass cases, sonography can differentiate intratesticular and extratesticular lesions. 4. Sonography is useful for detection of primary tumor in clinically uncertain conditions. 5. In epididymitis, sonography shows enlargement and decreased echogenecity of epididymis, reactive hydrocele, and thickening of scrotal wall. 6. In testicular tumor : Seminoma shows hypoechoic solid mass lesion with enlargement. Embryonal cell carcinoma shows ill defined hypoechoic testicular enlargement. Rhabdomyosarcoma shows ill defined hypoechoic mass with central necrosis. Metastatic testicular tumor shows bilaterallity and ill defined abnormal echogenecity, more older age distribution

  2. Importance of protocol target definition on the ability to spare normal tissue: An IMRT and 3D-CRT planning comparison for intraorbital tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hein, Patrick A.; Gladstone, David J.; Bellerive, Marc R.; Hug, Eugen B.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: We selected five intraorbital tumor sites that are frequently found in clinical practice in children diagnosed with orbital rhabdomyosarcoma and performed three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) and intensity-modulated photon radiotherapy (IMRT) planning. Results of target coverage and doses to critical structures were compared. The goal of this study was to evaluate and to document realistic expectations as to organ-sparing capabilities of modern radiation therapy planning technologies with a focus on lens-sparing irradiation. Furthermore, we investigated potential added benefits of IMRT compared with 3D-CRT and the influence of protocol volume criteria definitions on the ability to obtain normal tissue dose sparing using the orbit as an example of a complex anatomic site. Methods and Materials: The five intraorbital tumor sites were placed retrobulbar, temporal, nasal, in the upper inner and upper outer quadrant, the latter two more complex in shape. Gross tumor volume (GTV), clinical target volume (CTV), and planning target volume (PTV) were defined in image-fused computed tomography and magnetic resonance data sets. 3D-CRT and IMRT photon plans, using equal beam angles and collimation for direct comparison, were designed to 45 Gy prescription dose according to Intergroup Rhabdomyosarcoma Study Group-D9602 (IRSG-D9602) protocol (Intergroup Rhabdomyosarcoma Study V [IRS-V] protocol) for Stage I, Clinical Group 3 orbital rhabdomyosarcoma. To compare the impact of changed target definitions in IMRT planning, additional IMRT plans were generated using modified volume and dose coverage criteria. The minimum dose constraint (95%) of the PTV was substituted by a required minimum volume coverage (95%) with the prescribed dose. Dose-volume histograms (DVHs) were obtained, including target volumes, lens, optic nerves, optic chiasm, lacrimal gland, bony orbit, pituitary gland, frontal and temporal lobes. Results: Protocol target volume coverage criteria

  3. Ionizing radiation induced malignancies in man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dutrillaux, B.

    1997-01-01

    Using data on gene and chromosome alterations in human cancers, it is proposed that most radiation induced cancers are a consequence of recessive mutations of tumor suppressor genes. This explains the long delay between radiation exposure and the cancer onset. As a consequence, radiation induced cancers belong to groups of tumors where no specific translocations (forming or activating oncogenes) but multiple unbalanced chromosome rearrangements (deletions unmasking recessive mutations) exist. This explains why osteosarcomas, malignant fibrous histiocytoma, chondrosarcomas are frequently induced, but not liposarcoma, Ewing sarcomas and rhabdomyosarcomas, among others. A single exception confirms this rule: papillary thyroid cancer, frequently induced in exposed children, in which structural rearrangements frequently form a RET/PTC3 fusion gene. This fusion gene is the results of the inversion of a short segment of chromosome 10, and it is assumed that such rearrangement (small para-centric inversion) can easily occur after exposure to radiations, at contrast with translocations between to genes belonging to different chromosomes. (author)

  4. Rare Cause of Stricture Esophagus—Sarcoma: A Case Report and Review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Patricia

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma account for the vast majority of oesophageal malignancies. Other malignancies known to occur in the oesophagus include melanoma, sarcoma, and lymphoma. Among the sarcomas, carcinosarcoma is the commonest with both carcinomatous and sarcomatous elements followed by leiomyosarcoma of mesenchymal origin. Other sarcomas reported in the literature are liposarcoma, synovial sarcoma, myxofibrosarcoma, Ewing's sarcoma, granulocytic sarcoma, histiocytic sarcoma, schwannoma rhabdomyosarcoma, and epithelioid sarcoma. We report a case of malignant spindle cell tumour of oesophagus. Sarcomas of esophagus present as a polypoid exophytic soft tissue mass. Our patient presented with a stricture which is a rare presentation. Locally aggressive treatment with surgery is beneficial, and local palliative treatment including radiotherapy is worthwhile.

  5. Implications of the Incidental Finding of a MYCN Amplified Adrenal Tumor: A Case Report and Update of a Pediatric Disease Diagnosed in Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Koumarianou

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available MYCN is a well-known oncogene overexpressed in different human malignancies including neuroblastoma, rhabdomyosarcoma, medulloblastoma, astrocytoma, Wilms’ tumor, and small cell lung cancer. While neuroblastoma is one of the most common childhood malignancies, in adults it is extremely rare and its treatment is based on pediatric protocols that take into consideration stage and genotypic features, such as MYCN amplification. Although neuroblastoma therapy has evolved, identification of early stage patients who need chemotherapy continues to pose a therapeutic challenge. The emerging prognostic role of MYCN phenotype of this disease is currently under investigation as it may redefine MYCN amplified subgroups. We describe an unusual case of adult neuroblastoma with MYCN amplification diagnosed incidentally and discuss possible therapeutic dilemmas.

  6. Radiation Treatment for Malignant Small Cell Tumor of the Thoracopulmonary Region Primitive Pluripotent Histogenesis and Differential Diagnosis-A Case Report and Review of Literatures-

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Won Young; Yang, Jin Yeong; Whang, In Soon

    1991-01-01

    Malignant small round cell tumor (SRCT) of the thoracopulmonary region appears to originate in the soft tissues of the chest wall or the peripheral lung. A differential diagnosis of poorly differentiated small round cell tumors which include Ewing's sarcoma of bone and soft tissue, embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma, Askin tumor, neuroblastoma, peripheral neuroectodermal tumor, small cell osteogenic sarcoma and lymphoma are after difficult by light microscopy alone. In recent, by the extensive studies electron microscopic examination, histochemical study, immunochemical study, cytogenetics and gene analysis, these tumors may be derived from the primitive and pluripotential cells, differentiating into mesenchymal, epithelial and neural features in variable proportions. Treatment for SRCT of thoracopulmonary regin is not determined because of massive involvement of the lung, pleura or soft tissues of the chest wall resulted in a dismal outcome despite aggressive surgery, irradiation and chemotherapy

  7. The Antiviral Effect of Baicalin on Enterovirus 71 In Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang Li

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Baicalin is a flavonoid compound extracted from Scutellaria roots that has been reported to possess antibacterial, anti-inflammatory, and antiviral activities. However, the antiviral effect of baicalin on enterovirus 71 (EV71 is still unknown. In this study, we found that baicalin showed inhibitory activity on EV71 infection and was independent of direct virucidal or prophylactic effect and inhibitory viral absorption. The expressions of EV71/3D mRNA and polymerase were significantly blocked by baicalin treatment at early stages of EV71 infection. In addition, baicalin could decrease the expressions of FasL and caspase-3, as well as inhibit the apoptosis of EV71-infected human embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma (RD cells. Altogether, these results indicate that baicalin exhibits potent antiviral effect on EV71 infection, probably through inhibiting EV71/3D polymerase expression and Fas/FasL signaling pathways.

  8. Overexpression screens identify conserved dosage chromosome instability genes in yeast and human cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffy, Supipi; Fam, Hok Khim; Wang, Yi Kan; Styles, Erin B.; Kim, Jung-Hyun; Ang, J. Sidney; Singh, Tejomayee; Larionov, Vladimir; Shah, Sohrab P.; Andrews, Brenda; Boerkoel, Cornelius F.; Hieter, Philip

    2016-01-01

    Somatic copy number amplification and gene overexpression are common features of many cancers. To determine the role of gene overexpression on chromosome instability (CIN), we performed genome-wide screens in the budding yeast for yeast genes that cause CIN when overexpressed, a phenotype we refer to as dosage CIN (dCIN), and identified 245 dCIN genes. This catalog of genes reveals human orthologs known to be recurrently overexpressed and/or amplified in tumors. We show that two genes, TDP1, a tyrosyl-DNA-phosphdiesterase, and TAF12, an RNA polymerase II TATA-box binding factor, cause CIN when overexpressed in human cells. Rhabdomyosarcoma lines with elevated human Tdp1 levels also exhibit CIN that can be partially rescued by siRNA-mediated knockdown of TDP1. Overexpression of dCIN genes represents a genetic vulnerability that could be leveraged for selective killing of cancer cells through targeting of an unlinked synthetic dosage lethal (SDL) partner. Using SDL screens in yeast, we identified a set of genes that when deleted specifically kill cells with high levels of Tdp1. One gene was the histone deacetylase RPD3, for which there are known inhibitors. Both HT1080 cells overexpressing hTDP1 and rhabdomyosarcoma cells with elevated levels of hTdp1 were more sensitive to histone deacetylase inhibitors valproic acid (VPA) and trichostatin A (TSA), recapitulating the SDL interaction in human cells and suggesting VPA and TSA as potential therapeutic agents for tumors with elevated levels of hTdp1. The catalog of dCIN genes presented here provides a candidate list to identify genes that cause CIN when overexpressed in cancer, which can then be leveraged through SDL to selectively target tumors. PMID:27551064

  9. Sci—Thur AM: YIS - 07: Design and production of 3D printed bolus for electron radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su, Shiqin [Department of Physics and Atmospheric Science, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia (Canada); Moran, Kathryn [Queen Elizabeth II Health Sciences Centre, Nova Scotia Cancer Centre, Halifax, Nova Scotia (Canada); Robar, James L. [Department of Physics and Atmospheric Science, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia (Canada)

    2014-08-15

    This is a proof-of-concept study demonstrating the capacity for modulated electron radiation therapy (MERT) using 3D printed bolus. Previous reports have involved bolus design using an electron pencil beam model and fabrication using a milling machine. In this study, an in-house algorithm is presented that optimizes the dose distribution with regard to dose coverage, conformity and homogeneity within planning target volume (PTV). The algorithm uses calculated result of a commercial electron Monte Carlo dose calculation as input. Distances along ray lines from distal side of 90% isodose to distal surface of PTV are used to estimate the bolus thickness. Inhomogeneities within the calculation volume are accounted for using coefficient of equivalent thickness method. Several regional modulation operators are applied to improve dose coverage and uniformity. The process is iterated (usually twice) until an acceptable MERT plan is realized, and the final bolus is printed using solid polylactic acid. The method is evaluated with regular geometric phantoms, anthropomorphic phantoms and a clinical rhabdomyosarcoma pediatric case. In all cases the dose conformity is improved compared to that with uniform bolus. The printed boluses conform well to the surface of complex anthropomorphic phantoms. For the rhabdomyosarcoma patient, the MERT plan yields a reduction of mean dose by 38.2% in left kidney relative to uniform bolus. MERT using 3D printed bolus appears to be a practical, low cost approach to generating optimized bolus for electron therapy. The method is effective in improving conformity of prescription isodose surface and in sparing immediately adjacent normal tissues.

  10. Sci—Thur AM: YIS - 07: Design and production of 3D printed bolus for electron radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su, Shiqin; Moran, Kathryn; Robar, James L.

    2014-01-01

    This is a proof-of-concept study demonstrating the capacity for modulated electron radiation therapy (MERT) using 3D printed bolus. Previous reports have involved bolus design using an electron pencil beam model and fabrication using a milling machine. In this study, an in-house algorithm is presented that optimizes the dose distribution with regard to dose coverage, conformity and homogeneity within planning target volume (PTV). The algorithm uses calculated result of a commercial electron Monte Carlo dose calculation as input. Distances along ray lines from distal side of 90% isodose to distal surface of PTV are used to estimate the bolus thickness. Inhomogeneities within the calculation volume are accounted for using coefficient of equivalent thickness method. Several regional modulation operators are applied to improve dose coverage and uniformity. The process is iterated (usually twice) until an acceptable MERT plan is realized, and the final bolus is printed using solid polylactic acid. The method is evaluated with regular geometric phantoms, anthropomorphic phantoms and a clinical rhabdomyosarcoma pediatric case. In all cases the dose conformity is improved compared to that with uniform bolus. The printed boluses conform well to the surface of complex anthropomorphic phantoms. For the rhabdomyosarcoma patient, the MERT plan yields a reduction of mean dose by 38.2% in left kidney relative to uniform bolus. MERT using 3D printed bolus appears to be a practical, low cost approach to generating optimized bolus for electron therapy. The method is effective in improving conformity of prescription isodose surface and in sparing immediately adjacent normal tissues

  11. Histopathological pattern of soft tissues tumors and tumour like lesions in the pathology department of lady reading hospital peshawar, pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sajjad, M.; Ahmad, F.

    2016-01-01

    Soft tissues tumours are tumours of mesenchymal origin excluding epithelial, skeletal tissue, reticuloendothelial system, brain coverings and solid viscera of the body. The objective of this study was to know the histopathological pattern of soft tissues tumours in the Pathology Department of Lady Reading Hospital Peshawar Khyber Pakhtunkhwa Pakistan. Methods: This descriptive study was conducted on retrospective data from January 2009 to December 2013. All the soft tissues biopsy specimens were received in 10% formalin, labelled, gross performed, sections processed in alcohol, xylene, wax, block prepared, frozen, microtome sections taken and processed for H and E staining, mounted and reported by a Histopathologist. The inclusion criteria was any sufficient soft tissue tumour biopsy specimen of any age, sex, location in body whereas the exclusion criteria was autolysed biopsy specimen. A minimum of four and maximum of eight sections and 5 micron thick were taken from each specimen. Results: A total of 267 soft tissues tumours biopsy specimens were received in the pathology laboratory with age range of 01 to 75 years, with mean age of 30.68+-17.71 years. Male to female ratio was 1.13:1. Amongst the total, benign tumours were 176 (65.91%). Haemangioma, 73 (27.3%) was the commonest tumours followed by lipomas 41 (15.4%) cases. Amongst the total malignant tumours, i.e., 91 (34.08%), rhabdomyosarcoma, 35 (13.1%) was the commonest tumour followed by angiosarcoma 14 (5.2%) cases. Conclusion: Haemangioma is the commonest benign tumour and rhabdomyosarcoma is the commonest malignant tumour in this study. (author)

  12. Pediatric imaging in DICER1 syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bueno, Marta Tijerin; Martinez-Rios, Claudia; Ahyad, Rayan A.; Greer, Mary-Louise C.; Puente Gregorio, Alejandro de la; Villani, Anita; Malkin, David; Druker, Harriet; Van Engelen, Kalene; Gallinger, Bailey; Aronoff, Laura; Grant, Ronald

    2017-01-01

    DICER1 syndrome, arising from a mutation in the DICER1 gene mapped to chromosome 14q32, is associated with an increased risk of a range of benign and malignant neoplasms. To determine the spectrum of abnormalities and imaging characteristics in patients with DICER1 syndrome at a tertiary pediatric hospital. This retrospective analysis evaluated imaging in patients ≤18 years with DICER1 germline variants between January 2004 and July 2016. An imaging database search including keywords pleuropulmonary blastoma, cystic nephroma, pineoblastoma, embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma, ovarian sex cord-stromal tumor, ovarian Sertoli-Leydig cell tumor and DICER1 syndrome, was cross-referenced against the institutional Cancer Genetics Program database, excluding patients with negative/unknown DICER1 gene testing. Sixteen patients were included (12 females; mean age at presentation: 4.2 years, range: 14 days to 17 years), with surveillance imaging encompassing the following modalities: chest X-ray and CT; abdominal, pelvic and neck US; and brain and whole-body MRI. Malignant lesions (68.8% of patients) included pleuropulmonary blastoma (5), pineoblastoma (3), ovarian Sertoli-Leydig cell tumor (1), embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma (1) and renal sarcoma (1); benign lesions (37.5% of patients) included thyroid cysts (2), thyroid nodules (2), cystic nephroma (2), renal cysts (1) and pineal cyst (1). A common lesional appearance observed across modalities and organs was defined as the ''cracked windshield'' sign. The spectrum of DICER1-related tumors and the young age at presentation suggest early surveillance of at-risk patients is critical, while minimizing exposure to ionizing radiation. (orig.)

  13. Chest Wall tumor: combined management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao Bhaskar, N.

    1997-01-01

    Cancer is relatively rare disease among children and adolescents. The incidence of solid tumors other than CNS is less than 2/100,000. Tumors of the chest wall can arise either from the somatic tissue or ribs. These are rare, so either institutional reviews or multi institutional studies should determine optimal therapeutic management. Of the bony chest wall, Ewing's sarcoma or the family of tumor (peripheral neuro epithelioma, Askin tumor), are the most common. These lesions are lytic and have associated large extra pleural component. This large extra pleural component often necessitates major chest wall resection (3 or more ribs), and when lower ribs are involved, this entails resection of portion of diaphragm. Despite this resection, survival in the early 1970 was 10-20%. Since 1970 multi agent chemotherapy has increased survival rates. of importance, however, is these regimens have caused significant reduction of these extra pleural components so that major chest wall resections have become a rarity. With improved survival and decreased morbidity preoperative chemotherapy followed by surgery is now the accepted modality of treatment. Another major advantage of this regimen is that potential radiation therapy may be obviated. The most common chest wall lesion is rhabdomyosarcoma. In the IRS study of 1620 RMS patients, in 141 (9%) the primary lesion was in the chest wall. these are primarily alveolar histology. when lesions were superficial, wide local excision with supplemental radiation therapy was associated with low morbidity and good overall survival. however, a majority have significant intra- thoracic components. in these circumstances the resectability rate is less than 30% and the survival poor. Other lesions include non rhabdomyosarcomas, eosinophilic granuloma, chondrosarcoma, and osteomyelitis. The management of these lesions varies according to extent, histology, and patient characteristics

  14. Improved delivery of the anticancer agent citral using BSA nanoparticles and polymeric wafers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    White B

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Benjamin White,1 Anna Evison,1 Eszter Dombi,1 Helen E Townley1,2 1Nuffield Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Women’s Centre, John Radcliffe Hospital, 2Department of Engineering Science, Oxford University, Oxford, UK Abstract: Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS is the most common soft tissue sarcoma in children, with a 5-year survival rate of between 30 and 65%. Standard treatment involves surgery, radiation treatment, and chemotherapy. However, there is a high recurrence rate, particularly from locoregional spread. We investigated the use of the natural compound citral (3,7-dimethyl-2,6-octadienal, which can be found in a number of plants, but is particularly abundant in lemon grass (Cymbopogon citratus oil, for activity against immortalized RMS cells. Significant cancer cell death was seen at concentrations above 150 μM citral, and mitochondrial morphological changes were seen after incubation with 10 μM citral. However, since citral is a highly volatile molecule, we prepared albumin particles by a desolvation method to encapsulate citral, as a means of stabilization. We then further incorporated the loaded nanoparticles into a biodegradable polyanhydride wafer to generate a slow release system. The wafers were shown to degrade by 50% over the course of 25 days and to release the active compound. We therefore propose the use of the citral-nanoparticle-polymer wafers for implantation into the tumor bed after surgical removal of a sarcoma as a means to control locoregional spread due to any remaining cancerous cells. Keywords: citral, nanoparticle, wafer, biodegradable, mitochondria, toroidal, cancer, rhabdomyosarcoma, Cymbopogon citratus

  15. Optimizing the interval between G-CSF therapy and F-18 FDG PET imaging in children and young adults receiving chemotherapy for sarcoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trout, Andrew T.; Sharp, Susan E.; Gelfand, Michael J.; Turpin, Brian K.; Zhang, Bin

    2015-01-01

    Granulocyte colony-stimulating factors (G-CSF) speed recovery from chemotherapy-induced myelosuppression but the marrow stimulation they cause can interfere with interpretation of F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (F-18 FDG PET) exams. To assess the frequency of interfering G-CSF-induced bone marrow activity on FDG PET imaging in children and young adults with Ewing sarcoma and rhabdomyosarcoma and to define an interval between G-CSF administration and FDG PET imaging that limits marrow interference. Blinded, retrospective review of FDG PET exams performed in patients treated with long-acting G-CSF as part of their chemotherapeutic regimen. Exams were subjectively scored by two reviewers (R1 and R2) who assessed the level of marrow uptake of FDG and measured standardized uptake values in the marrow, liver, spleen and blood pool. FDG PET findings were correlated with time since G-CSF administration and with blood cell counts. Thirty-eight FDG PET exams performed in 17 patients were reviewed with 47.4% (18/38) of exams having marrow uptake of FDG sufficient to interfere with image interpretation. Primary predictors of marrow uptake of FDG were patient age (P = 0.0037) and time since G-CSF exposure (P = 0.0028 for subjective marrow uptake of FDG, P = 0.008 [R1] and P = 0.004 [R2] for measured maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax)). The median interval between G-CSF administration and PET imaging in cases with marrow activity considered normal or not likely to interfere was 19.5 days (range: 7-55 days). In pediatric and young adult patients with Ewing sarcoma and rhabdomyosarcoma, an interval of 20 days between administration of the long-acting form of G-CSF and FDG PET imaging should limit interference by stimulated marrow. (orig.)

  16. No effect of the hemoglobin solution HBOC-201 on the response of the rat R1H tumor to fractionated irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raabe, A.

    2005-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Tumor hypoxia is regarded as one important underlying feature of radioresistance. The authors report on an experimental approach to improve tumor response to radiation by combining fractionated irradiation with HBOC-201, an ultrapurified polymerized hemoglobin solution, which is currently used in clinical phase II/III trials as alternative oxygen carrier and proved to be highly effective in tissue oxygenation (tpO 2 ). Material and Methods: Subcutaneously growing rhabdomyosarcoma R1H tumors of the rat were treated with either 40 Gy (2 Gy/fraction, 20 fractions in 2 weeks, ambient) followed by grade top-up doses (clamped) alone, or in combination with HBOC-201, or with HBOC-201 plus carbogen (95% O 2 +5% CO 2 ). Local tumor control (TCD50%) and growth delay were used as endpoints. In addition, the effect of HBOC-201 alone or in combination with carbogen on the tpO 2 of tumor and muscle was determined using a flexible stationary probe (Licox, GMS). Results: TCD50% values of 119 Gy (95% confidence interval 103; 135), 111 Gy (84; 138), and 102 Gy (83; 120) were determined for tumors irradiated alone, in combination with HBOC-201, and with HBOC-201 plus carbogen, respectively. Although the dose-response curves showed a slight shift to lower doses when HBOC-201 or HBOC-201 plus carbogen was added, the differences in TCD50% were not statistically significant. No effect was seen on the growth delay of recurrent tumors. HBOC-201 alone did not effect tumor or muscle tpO 2 . In combination with carbogen the mean tpO 2 muscle raised from 23.9 mmHg to 59.3 mmHg (p 2 by carbogen alone. Conclusion: Low-dose application of HBOC-201 does not improve the response of the rhabdomyosarcoma R1H of the rat to fractionated irradiation. (orig.)

  17. Pediatric imaging in DICER1 syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bueno, Marta Tijerin; Martinez-Rios, Claudia; Ahyad, Rayan A.; Greer, Mary-Louise C. [The Hospital for Sick Children, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); University of Toronto, Department of Medical Imaging, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Puente Gregorio, Alejandro de la [Hospital Son Espases, Radiotherapy Department, Palma de Mallorca (Spain); Villani, Anita; Malkin, David [University of Toronto, Department of Pediatrics, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); The Hospital for Sick Children, Division of Hematology/Oncology, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); The Hospital for Sick Children, Genetics and Genomic Biology Program, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Druker, Harriet [The Hospital for Sick Children, Division of Hematology/Oncology, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); The Hospital for Sick Children, Department of Genetic Counselling, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); The Hospital for Sick Children, Department of Molecular Genetics, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Van Engelen, Kalene [The Hospital for Sick Children, Genetics and Genomic Biology Program, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Gallinger, Bailey [The Hospital for Sick Children, Genetics and Genomic Biology Program, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); The Hospital for Sick Children, Department of Genetic Counselling, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); The Hospital for Sick Children, Department of Molecular Genetics, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Aronoff, Laura [The Hospital for Sick Children, Division of Hematology/Oncology, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Grant, Ronald [University of Toronto, Department of Pediatrics, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); The Hospital for Sick Children, Division of Hematology/Oncology, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2017-09-15

    DICER1 syndrome, arising from a mutation in the DICER1 gene mapped to chromosome 14q32, is associated with an increased risk of a range of benign and malignant neoplasms. To determine the spectrum of abnormalities and imaging characteristics in patients with DICER1 syndrome at a tertiary pediatric hospital. This retrospective analysis evaluated imaging in patients ≤18 years with DICER1 germline variants between January 2004 and July 2016. An imaging database search including keywords pleuropulmonary blastoma, cystic nephroma, pineoblastoma, embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma, ovarian sex cord-stromal tumor, ovarian Sertoli-Leydig cell tumor and DICER1 syndrome, was cross-referenced against the institutional Cancer Genetics Program database, excluding patients with negative/unknown DICER1 gene testing. Sixteen patients were included (12 females; mean age at presentation: 4.2 years, range: 14 days to 17 years), with surveillance imaging encompassing the following modalities: chest X-ray and CT; abdominal, pelvic and neck US; and brain and whole-body MRI. Malignant lesions (68.8% of patients) included pleuropulmonary blastoma (5), pineoblastoma (3), ovarian Sertoli-Leydig cell tumor (1), embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma (1) and renal sarcoma (1); benign lesions (37.5% of patients) included thyroid cysts (2), thyroid nodules (2), cystic nephroma (2), renal cysts (1) and pineal cyst (1). A common lesional appearance observed across modalities and organs was defined as the ''cracked windshield'' sign. The spectrum of DICER1-related tumors and the young age at presentation suggest early surveillance of at-risk patients is critical, while minimizing exposure to ionizing radiation. (orig.)

  18. PHOX2B reliably distinguishes neuroblastoma among small round blue cell tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Yin P; Lee, John P; Bellizzi, Andrew M; Hornick, Jason L

    2017-11-01

    Neuroblastoma shows considerable histological overlap with other small round blue cell tumours. PHOX2B, a transcription factor that is essential for autonomic nervous system development, has been reported as an immunohistochemical marker for neuroblastoma. The aim of this study was to validate the specificity and diagnostic utility of PHOX2B for peripheral neuroblastic tumours. We evaluated 240 cases (133 in whole-tissue sections; 107 in tissue microarrays), including 76 peripheral neuroblastic tumours (median age 2 years; including four adults) and 164 other tumours: 44 Wilms tumours; 20 Ewing sarcomas; 10 each of CIC-rearranged round cell sarcomas, poorly differentiated synovial sarcomas, lymphoblastic lymphomas, alveolar rhabdomyosarcomas, embryonal rhabdomyosarcomas, mesenchymal chondrosarcomas, Merkel cell carcinomas, olfactory neuroblastomas, and melanomas; and five each of NUT midline carcinomas and desmoplastic small round cell tumours. Immunohistochemistry for PHOX2B was performed with a rabbit monoclonal antibody. PHOX2B positivity was defined as the presence of nuclear immunoreactivity in ≥5% of cells. PHOX2B was positive in 70 (92%) peripheral neuroblastic tumours, including 68 of 72 (94%) paediatric and two of four (50%) adult cases. Furthermore, PHOX2B was consistently negative in all non-peripheral neuroblastic tumours, with staining being absent in 160 cases and limited in four cases. PHOX2B is a highly sensitive and specific immunohistochemical marker for peripheral neuroblastic tumours, including neuroblastoma. PHOX2B reliably distinguishes neuroblastoma from histological mimics such as Wilms tumour, Ewing sarcoma, and CIC-rearranged round cell sarcoma. PHOX2B negativity in two of four adult neuroblastoma cases raises the possibility that some adult neuroblastomas are of a different lineage than paediatric cases. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Epidemiology and therapies for metastatic sarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amankwah EK

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Ernest K Amankwah,1 Anthony P Conley,2 Damon R Reed2 1Department of Cancer Epidemiology, H Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, FL, USA; 2Sarcoma Department, H Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, FL, USA Abstract: Sarcomas are cancers arising from the mesenchymal layer that affect children, adolescents, young adults, and adults. Although most sarcomas are localized, many display a remarkable predilection for metastasis to the lungs, liver, bones, subcutaneous tissue, and lymph nodes. Additionally, many sarcoma patients presenting initially with localized disease may relapse at metastatic sites. While localized sarcomas can often be cured through surgery and often radiation, controversies exist over optimal management of patients with metastatic sarcoma. Combinations of chemotherapy are the most effective in many settings, and many promising new agents are under active investigation or are being explored in preclinical models. Metastatic sarcomas are excellent candidates for novel approaches with additional agents as they have demonstrated chemosensitivity and affect a portion of the population that is motivated toward curative therapy. In this paper, we provide an overview on the common sarcomas of childhood (rhabdomyosarcoma, adolescence, and young adults (osteosarcoma, Ewing sarcoma, synovial sarcoma, and malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor and older adults (leiomyosarcoma, liposarcoma, and undifferentiated high grade sarcoma in terms of the epidemiology, current therapy, promising therapeutic directions and outcome with a focus on metastatic disease. Potential advances in terms of promising therapy and biologic insights may lead to more effective and safer therapies; however, more clinical trials and research are needed for patients with metastatic sarcoma. Keywords: chemotherapy, pediatric sarcoma, rhabdomyosarcoma, osteosarcoma, Ewing sarcoma, synovial sarcoma

  20. Treatment of pediatric patients and young adults with particle therapy at the Heidelberg Ion Therapy Center (HIT: establishment of workflow and initial clinical data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Combs Stephanie E

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To report on establishment of workflow and clinical results of particle therapy at the Heidelberg Ion Therapy Center. Materials and methods We treated 36 pediatric patients (aged 21 or younger with particle therapy at HIT. Median age was 12 years (range 2-21 years, five patients (14% were younger than 5 years of age. Indications included pilocytic astrocytoma, parameningeal and orbital rhabdomyosarcoma, skull base and cervical chordoma, osteosarcoma and adenoid-cystic carcinoma (ACC, as well as one patient with an angiofibroma of the nasopharynx. For the treatment of small children, an anesthesia unit at HIT was established in cooperation with the Department of Anesthesiology. Results Treatment concepts depended on tumor type, staging, age of the patient, as well as availability of specific study protocols. In all patients, particle radiotherapy was well tolerated and no interruptions due to toxicity had to be undertaken. During follow-up, only mild toxicites were observed. Only one patient died of tumor progression: Carbon ion radiotherapy was performed as an individual treatment approach in a child with a skull base recurrence of the previously irradiated rhabdomyosarcoma. Besides this patient, tumor recurrence was observed in two additional patients. Conclusion Clinical protocols have been generated to evaluate the real potential of particle therapy, also with respect to carbon ions in distinct pediatric patient populations. The strong cooperation between the pediatric department and the department of radiation oncology enable an interdisciplinary treatment and stream-lined workflow and acceptance of the treatment for the patients and their parents.

  1. Spot-scanning proton therapy for malignant soft tissue tumors in childhood: First experiences at the Paul Scherrer Institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Timmermann, Beate; Schuck, Andreas; Niggli, Felix; Weiss, Markus; Lomax, Antony Jonathan; Pedroni, Eros; Coray, Adolf; Jermann, Martin; Rutz, Hans Peter; Goitein, Gudrun

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: Radiotherapy plays a major role in the treatment strategy of childhood sarcomas. Consequences of treatment are likely to affect the survivor's quality of life significantly. We investigated the feasibility of spot-scanning proton therapy (PT) for soft tissue tumors in childhood. Methods and Materials: Sixteen children with soft tissue sarcomas were included. Median age at PT was 3.3 years. In 10 children the tumor histology was embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma. All tumors were located in the head or neck, parameningeal, or paraspinal, or pelvic region. In the majority of children, the tumor was initially unresectable (Intergroup Rhabdomyosarcoma Study [IRS] Group III in 75%). In 50% of children the tumors exceeded 5 cm. Fourteen children had chemotherapy before and during PT. Median total dose of radiotherapy was 50 cobalt Gray equivalent (CGE). All 16 children were treated with spot-scanning proton therapy at the Paul Scherrer Institute, and in 3 children the PT was intensity-modulated (IMPT). Results: After median follow-up of 1.5 years, local control was achieved in 12 children. Four children failed locally, 1 at the border of the radiation field and 3 within the field. All 4 children died of tumor recurrence. All 4 showed unfavorable characteristic either of site or histopathology of the tumor. Acute toxicity was low, with Grade 3 or 4 side effects according to Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (RTOG/EORTC) criteria occurring in the bone marrow only. Conclusions: Proton therapy was feasible and well tolerated. Early local control rates are comparable to those being achieved after conventional radiotherapy. For investigations on late effect, longer follow-up is needed

  2. Optimizing the interval between G-CSF therapy and F-18 FDG PET imaging in children and young adults receiving chemotherapy for sarcoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trout, Andrew T.; Sharp, Susan E.; Gelfand, Michael J. [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Turpin, Brian K. [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Cancer and Blood Diseases Institute, Division of Oncology, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Zhang, Bin [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Division of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    2015-07-15

    Granulocyte colony-stimulating factors (G-CSF) speed recovery from chemotherapy-induced myelosuppression but the marrow stimulation they cause can interfere with interpretation of F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (F-18 FDG PET) exams. To assess the frequency of interfering G-CSF-induced bone marrow activity on FDG PET imaging in children and young adults with Ewing sarcoma and rhabdomyosarcoma and to define an interval between G-CSF administration and FDG PET imaging that limits marrow interference. Blinded, retrospective review of FDG PET exams performed in patients treated with long-acting G-CSF as part of their chemotherapeutic regimen. Exams were subjectively scored by two reviewers (R1 and R2) who assessed the level of marrow uptake of FDG and measured standardized uptake values in the marrow, liver, spleen and blood pool. FDG PET findings were correlated with time since G-CSF administration and with blood cell counts. Thirty-eight FDG PET exams performed in 17 patients were reviewed with 47.4% (18/38) of exams having marrow uptake of FDG sufficient to interfere with image interpretation. Primary predictors of marrow uptake of FDG were patient age (P = 0.0037) and time since G-CSF exposure (P = 0.0028 for subjective marrow uptake of FDG, P = 0.008 [R1] and P = 0.004 [R2] for measured maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax)). The median interval between G-CSF administration and PET imaging in cases with marrow activity considered normal or not likely to interfere was 19.5 days (range: 7-55 days). In pediatric and young adult patients with Ewing sarcoma and rhabdomyosarcoma, an interval of 20 days between administration of the long-acting form of G-CSF and FDG PET imaging should limit interference by stimulated marrow. (orig.)

  3. Nuclear medicine in childhood tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoefnagel, C.A.

    2004-01-01

    together with thyroglobulin assays has become a reliable alternative to the use of 131 l-iodide In the follow-up of differentiated thyroid carcinoma; procedure and radiation dose to the child compare favourably with that of 131 l. 131 l maintains its role in radionuclide therapy of thyroid carcinoma. When children become involved in the family screening of MEN 2 syndromes, a variety of tracers can be used to demonstrate medullary thyroid carcinoma. Neuroblastoma. Because of its high sensitivity and specificity, scintigraphy using 123 l- or 131 l-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) has established its role in the diagnosis, staging and follow-up of neuroblastoma. 131 l-MIBG is used for the treatment of this condition. Alternatively, specific targeting may be achieved using radiolabelled peptides (e.g. 111 ln-pentetreotide) or monoclonal antibodies (e.g. 3F8, UJ13A, BW575/9, ch14.18 and chCE7). PET using 18 F-deoxyglucose (FDG) and 11 C-hydroxyephedrin (HEO) is used to image neuroblastoma and 124 l-MIBG and -3F8 antibodies for dosimetry prior to therapy. Rhabdomyosarcoma. Aspecific tracers. e.g. 67 Ga-citrate, 201 TI-chloride and 18 F-deoxyglucose, can be used to image rhabdomyosarcoma. An example of specific targeting of rhabdomyosarcoma is radioimmunoscintigraphy using 111 In antimyosin Fab fragments. but these are no longer commercially available. (author)

  4. In vivo corrosion, tumor outcome, and microarray gene expression for two types of muscle-implanted tungsten alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuster, B.E.; Roszell, L.E.; Murr, L.E.; Ramirez, D.A.; Demaree, J.D.; Klotz, B.R.; Rosencrance, A.B.; Dennis, W.E.; Bao, W.; Perkins, E.J.; Dillman, J.F.; Bannon, D.I.

    2012-01-01

    Tungsten alloys are composed of tungsten microparticles embedded in a solid matrix of transition metals such as nickel, cobalt, or iron. To understand the toxicology of these alloys, male F344 rats were intramuscularly implanted with pellets of tungsten/nickel/cobalt, tungsten/nickel/iron, or pure tungsten, with tantalum pellets as a negative control. Between 6 and 12 months, aggressive rhabdomyosarcomas formed around tungsten/nickel/cobalt pellets, while those of tungsten/nickel/iron or pure tungsten did not cause cancers. Electron microscopy showed a progressive corrosion of the matrix phase of tungsten/nickel/cobalt pellets over 6 months, accompanied by high urinary concentrations of nickel and cobalt. In contrast, non-carcinogenic tungsten/nickel/iron pellets were minimally corroded and urinary metals were low; these pellets having developed a surface oxide layer in vivo that may have restricted the mobilization of carcinogenic nickel. Microarray analysis of tumors revealed large changes in gene expression compared with normal muscle, with biological processes involving the cell cycle significantly up‐regulated and those involved with muscle development and differentiation significantly down‐regulated. Top KEGG pathways disrupted were adherens junction, p53 signaling, and the cell cycle. Chromosomal enrichment analysis of genes showed a highly significant impact at cytoband 7q22 (chromosome 7) which included mouse double minute (MDM2) and cyclin‐dependant kinase (CDK4) as well as other genes associated with human sarcomas. In conclusion, the tumorigenic potential of implanted tungsten alloys is related to mobilization of carcinogenic metals nickel and cobalt from corroding pellets, while gene expression changes in the consequent tumors are similar to radiation induced animal sarcomas as well as sporadic human sarcomas. -- Highlights: ► Tungsten/nickel/cobalt, tungsten/nickel/iron, and pure tungsten were studied. ► Male Fischer rats implanted with

  5. Differential effects of insulin-like growth factor binding protein-6 (IGFBP-6 on migration of two ovarian cancer cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiyong eYang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available IGFBP-6 inhibits angiogenesis as well as proliferation and survival of rhabdomyosarcoma cells. However, it promotes migration of these cells in an IGF-independent manner. The IGF system is implicated in ovarian cancer, so we studied the effects of IGFBP-6 in ovarian cancer cells.Methods: The effects of wild type (wt and a non-IGF-binding mutant (m of IGFBP-6 on migration of HEY and SKOV-3 ovarian cancer cells, which respectively represent aggressive and transitional cancers, were studied. ERK and JNK phosphorylation were measured by Western blotting.Results: IGF-II, wt- and mIGFBP-6 each promoted SKOV3 cell migration by 77-98% (p<0.01. In contrast, IGF-II also increased HEY cell migration to 155 ± 13% of control (p<0.001, but wtIGFBP-6 and mIGFBP-6 decreased migration to 62 ± 5% and 66 ± 3% respectively (p<0.001. In these cells, coincubation of IGF-II with wt but not mIGFBP-6 increased migration. MAP kinase pathways are involved in IGFBP-6-induced rhabdomyosarcoma cell migration, so activation of these pathways in HEY and SKOV3 cells was studied. wt and mIGFBP-6 increased ERK phosphorylation by 62-99% in both cell lines (p<0.05. wtIGFBP-6 also increased JNK phosphorylation by 139-153% in both cell lines (p<0.05, but the effect of mIGFBP-6 was less clear. ERK and JNK inhibitors partially inhibited the migratory effects of wt and mIGFBP-6 in SKOV3 cells, whereas the ERK inhibitor partially restored wt and mIGFBP-6-induced inhibition of HEY cell migration. The JNK inhibitor had a lesser effect on the actions of wtIGFBP-6 and no effect on the actions of mIGFBP-6 in HEY cells.Conclusions: IGFBP-6 has opposing effects on migration of HEY and SKOV3 ovarian cancer cells, but activates MAP kinase pathways in both. Delineating the pathways underlying the differential effects on migration will increase our understanding of ovarian cancer metastasis and shed new light on the IGF-independent effects of IGFBP-6.

  6. Automated brightfield dual-color in situ hybridization for detection of mouse double minute 2 gene amplification in sarcomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wenjun; McElhinny, Abigail; Nielsen, Alma; Wang, Maria; Miller, Melanie; Singh, Shalini; Rueger, Ruediger; Rubin, Brian P; Wang, Zhen; Tubbs, Raymond R; Nagle, Raymond B; Roche, Pat; Wu, Ping; Pestic-Dragovich, Lidija

    2011-01-01

    The human homolog of the mouse double minute 2 (MDM2) oncogene is amplified in about 20% of sarcomas. The measurement of the MDM2 amplification can aid in classification and may provide a predictive value for recently formulated therapies targeting MDM2. We have developed and validated an automated bright field dual-color in situ hybridization application to detect MDM2 gene amplification. A repeat-depleted MDM2 probe was constructed to target the MDM2 gene region at 12q15. A chromosome 12-specific probe (CHR12) was generated from a pα12H8 plasmid. The in situ hybridization assay was developed by using a dinitrophenyl-labeled MDM2 probe and a digoxigenin-labeled CHR12 probe on the Ventana Medical Systems' automated slide-staining platforms. The specificity of the MDM2 and CHR12 probes was shown on metaphase spreads and further validated against controls, including normal human tonsil and known MDM2-amplified samples. The assay performance was evaluated on a cohort of 100 formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded specimens by using a conventional bright field microscope. Simultaneous hybridization and signal detection for MDM2 and CHR12 showed that both DNA targets were present in the same cells. One hundred soft tissue specimens were stained for MDM2 and CHR12. Although 26 of 29 lipomas were nonamplified and eusomic, MDM2 amplification was noted in 78% of atypical lipomatous tumors or well-differentiated liposarcomas. Five of 6 dedifferentiated liposarcoma cases were amplified for MDM2. MDM2 amplification was observed in 1 of 8 osteosarcomas; 3 showed CHR12 aneusomy. MDM2 amplification was present in 1 of 4 chondrosarcomas. Nine of 10 synovial sarcomas displayed no evidence of MDM2 amplification in most tumor cells. In pleomorphic sarcoma, not otherwise specified (pleomorphic malignant fibrous histiocytoma), MDM2 was amplified in 38% of cases, whereas 92% were aneusomic for CHR12. One alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma and 2 embryonal rhabdomyosarcomas displayed low-level aneusomy

  7. In vivo corrosion, tumor outcome, and microarray gene expression for two types of muscle-implanted tungsten alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuster, B.E. [U.S. Army Research Laboratory, Weapons and Materials Research Directorate, B434 Mulberry Road, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD 21005-5609 (United States); Roszell, L.E. [U.S. Army Institute of Public Health, 5158 Blackhawk Road, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD 21010‐5403 (United States); Murr, L.E.; Ramirez, D.A. [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, University of Texas, El Paso, TX 79968 (United States); Demaree, J.D. [U.S. Army Research Laboratory, Weapons and Materials Research Directorate, B434 Mulberry Road, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD 21005-5609 (United States); Klotz, B.R. [Dynamic Science Inc., Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD 21005‐5609 (United States); Rosencrance, A.B.; Dennis, W.E. [U.S. Army Center for Environmental Health Research, Department of Chemistry, Ft. Detrick, MD 21702‐5010 (United States); Bao, W. [SAS Institute, Inc. SAS Campus Drive, Cary, NC 27513 (United States); Perkins, E.J. [U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center, 3909 Hall Ferry Road, Vicksburg MS 39180 (United States); Dillman, J.F. [U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Chemical Defense, 3100 Ricketts Point Road, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD 21010‐5400 (United States); Bannon, D.I., E-mail: desmond.bannon@us.army.mil [U.S. Army Institute of Public Health, 5158 Blackhawk Road, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD 21010‐5403 (United States)

    2012-11-15

    Tungsten alloys are composed of tungsten microparticles embedded in a solid matrix of transition metals such as nickel, cobalt, or iron. To understand the toxicology of these alloys, male F344 rats were intramuscularly implanted with pellets of tungsten/nickel/cobalt, tungsten/nickel/iron, or pure tungsten, with tantalum pellets as a negative control. Between 6 and 12 months, aggressive rhabdomyosarcomas formed around tungsten/nickel/cobalt pellets, while those of tungsten/nickel/iron or pure tungsten did not cause cancers. Electron microscopy showed a progressive corrosion of the matrix phase of tungsten/nickel/cobalt pellets over 6 months, accompanied by high urinary concentrations of nickel and cobalt. In contrast, non-carcinogenic tungsten/nickel/iron pellets were minimally corroded and urinary metals were low; these pellets having developed a surface oxide layer in vivo that may have restricted the mobilization of carcinogenic nickel. Microarray analysis of tumors revealed large changes in gene expression compared with normal muscle, with biological processes involving the cell cycle significantly up‐regulated and those involved with muscle development and differentiation significantly down‐regulated. Top KEGG pathways disrupted were adherens junction, p53 signaling, and the cell cycle. Chromosomal enrichment analysis of genes showed a highly significant impact at cytoband 7q22 (chromosome 7) which included mouse double minute (MDM2) and cyclin‐dependant kinase (CDK4) as well as other genes associated with human sarcomas. In conclusion, the tumorigenic potential of implanted tungsten alloys is related to mobilization of carcinogenic metals nickel and cobalt from corroding pellets, while gene expression changes in the consequent tumors are similar to radiation induced animal sarcomas as well as sporadic human sarcomas. -- Highlights: ► Tungsten/nickel/cobalt, tungsten/nickel/iron, and pure tungsten were studied. ► Male Fischer rats implanted with

  8. Phase I results of a phase I/II study of weekly nab-paclitaxel in paediatric patients with recurrent/refractory solid tumours: A collaboration with innovative therapies for children with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Lucas; Casanova, Michela; Chisholm, Julia C; Berlanga, Pablo; Chastagner, Pascal B; Baruchel, Sylvain; Amoroso, Loredana; Melcón, Soledad Gallego; Gerber, Nicolas U; Bisogno, Gianni; Fagioli, Franca; Geoerger, Birgit; Glade Bender, Julia L; Aerts, Isabelle; Bergeron, Christophe; Hingorani, Pooja; Elias, Ileana; Simcock, Mathew; Ferrara, Stefano; Le Bruchec, Yvan; Slepetis, Ruta; Chen, Nianhang; Vassal, Gilles

    2018-06-21

    nab-Paclitaxel has demonstrated efficacy in adults with solid tumours and preclinical activity in paediatric solid tumour models. Results from phase I of a phase I/II study in paediatric patients with recurrent/refractory solid tumours treated with nab-paclitaxel are reported. Patients with recurrent/refractory extracranial solid tumours received nab-paclitaxel on days 1, 8 and 15 every 4 weeks at 120, 150, 180, 210, 240, or 270 mg/m 2 (rolling-6 dose-escalation) to establish the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) and recommended phase II dose (RP2D). Sixty-four patients were treated. Dose-limiting toxicities were grade 3 dizziness at 120 mg/m 2 and grade 4 neutropenia >7 days at 270 mg/m 2 . The most frequent grade 3/4 adverse events were haematologic, including neutropenia (36%), leukopenia (36%) and lymphopenia (25%). Although the MTD was not reached, 270 mg/m 2 was declared non-tolerable due to grade 3/4 toxicities during cycles 1-2 (neutropenia, n = 5/7; skin toxicity, n = 2/7; peripheral neuropathy, n = 1/7). Of 58 efficacy-evaluable patients, complete response occurred in one patient (2%; Ewing sarcoma) and partial responses in four patients (7%; rhabdomyosarcoma, Ewing sarcoma, renal tumour with pulmonary metastases [high-grade, malignant] and sarcoma not otherwise specified); all responses occurred at ≥210 mg/m 2 . Thirteen patients (22%) had stable disease (5 lasting ≥16 weeks) per RECIST. nab-Paclitaxel 240 mg/m 2 qw3/4 (nearly double the adult recommended monotherapy dose for this schedule in metastatic breast cancer) was selected as the RP2D based on the tolerability profile, pharmacokinetics and antitumour activity. Phase II is currently enrolling patients with recurrent/refractory neuroblastoma, rhabdomyosarcoma and Ewing sarcoma. CLINICALTRIALS.GOV: NCT01962103. 2013-000144-26. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Robustness against serum neutralization of a poliovirus type 1 from a lethal epidemic of poliomyelitis in the Republic of Congo in 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drexler, Jan Felix; Grard, Gilda; Lukashev, Alexander N; Kozlovskaya, Liubov I; Böttcher, Sindy; Uslu, Gökhan; Reimerink, Johan; Gmyl, Anatoly P; Taty-Taty, Raphaël; Lekana-Douki, Sonia Etenna; Nkoghe, Dieudonné; Eis-Hübinger, Anna M; Diedrich, Sabine; Koopmans, Marion; Leroy, Eric M; Drosten, Christian

    2014-09-02

    In 2010, a large outbreak of poliomyelitis with unusual 47% lethality occurred in Pointe Noire, Republic of Congo. Vaccine-mediated immunity against the outbreak virus was never investigated. A wild poliovirus 1 (WPV1) isolated from a fatal case (termed PV1-RC2010) showed a previously unknown combination of amino acid exchanges in critical antigenic site 2 (AgS2, VP1 capsid protein positions 221SAAL → 221PADL). These exchanges were also detected in an additional 11 WPV1 strains from fatal cases. PV1-RC2010 escaped neutralization by three different mAbs relevant for AgS2. Virus neutralization was tested in sera from fatal cases, who died before supplementary immunization (n = 24), Gabonese recipients of recent oral polio vaccination (n = 12), routinely vaccinated German medical students (n = 34), and German outpatients tested for antipoliovirus immunity (n = 17) on Vero, human rhabdomyosarcoma, and human epidermoid carcinoma 2 cells. Fatal poliomyelitis cases gave laboratory evidence of previous trivalent vaccination. Neutralizing antibody titers against PV1-RC2010 were significantly lower than those against the vaccine strain Sabin-1, two genetically distinct WPV1s isolated in 1965 and 2010 and two genetically distinct vaccine-derived PV strains. Of German vaccinees tested according to World Health Organization protocols, 15-29% were unprotected according to their neutralization titers (poliomyelitis eradication in populations with predominantly vaccine-derived immunity. Sustained vaccination coverage and clinical and environmental surveillance will be necessary.

  10. Genotoxic Changes to Rodent Cells Exposed in Vitro to Tungsten, Nickel, Cobalt and Iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie Bardack

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Tungsten-based materials have been proposed as replacements for depleted uranium in armor-penetrating munitions and for lead in small-arms ammunition. A recent report demonstrated that a military-grade composition of tungsten, nickel, and cobalt induced a highly-aggressive, metastatic rhabdomyosarcoma when implanted into the leg muscle of laboratory rats to simulate a shrapnel wound. The early genetic changes occurring in response to embedded metal fragments are not known. In this study, we utilized two cultured rodent myoblast cell lines, exposed to soluble tungsten alloys and the individual metals comprising the alloys, to study the genotoxic effects. By profiling cell transcriptomes using microarray, we found slight, yet distinct and unique, gene expression changes in rat myoblast cells after 24 h metal exposure, and several genes were identified that correlate with impending adverse consequences of ongoing exposure to weapons-grade tungsten alloy. These changes were not as apparent in the mouse myoblast cell line. This indicates a potential species difference in the cellular response to tungsten alloy, a hypothesis supported by current findings with in vivo model systems. Studies examining genotoxic-associated gene expression changes in cells from longer exposure times are warranted.

  11. The Role of the Component Metals in the Toxicity of Military-Grade Tungsten Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christy A. Emond

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Tungsten-based composites have been recommended as a suitable replacement for depleted uranium. Unfortunately, one of these mixtures composed of tungsten (W, nickel (Ni and cobalt (Co induced rhabdomyosarcomas when implanted into the leg muscle of laboratory rats and mice to simulate a shrapnel wound. The question arose as to whether the neoplastic effect of the mixture could be solely attributed to one or more of the metal components. To investigate this possibility, pellets with one or two of the component metals replaced with an identical amount of the biologically-inert metal tantalum (Ta were manufactured and implanted into the quadriceps of B6C3F1 mice. The mice were followed for two years to assess potential adverse health effects. Implantation with WTa, CoTa or WNiTa resulted in decreased survival, but not to the level reported for WNiCo. Sarcomas in the implanted muscle were found in 20% of the CoTa-implanted mice and 5% of the WTa- and WCoTa-implanted rats and mice, far below the 80% reported for WNiCo-implanted mice. The data obtained from this study suggested that no single metal is solely responsible for the neoplastic effects of WNiCo and that a synergistic effect of the three metals in tumor development was likely.

  12. Dental and maxillofacial abnormalities in long-term survivors of childhood cancer: effects of treatment with chemotherapy and radiation to the head and neck

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaffe, N.; Toth, B.B.; Hoar, R.E.; Ried, H.L.; Sullivan, M.P.; McNeese, M.D.

    1984-01-01

    Sixty-eight long-term survivors of childhood cancer were evaluated for dental and maxillofacial abnormalities. Forty-five patients had received maxillofacial radiation for lymphoma, leukemia, rhabdomyosarcoma, and miscellaneous tumors. Forty-three of the 45 patients and the remaining 23 who had not received maxillofacial radiation also received chemotherapy. Dental and maxillofacial abnormalities were detected in 37 of the 45 (82%) radiated patients. Dental abnormalities comprised foreshortening and blunting of roots, incomplete calcification, premature closure of apices, delayed or arrested tooth development, and caries. Maxillofacial abnormalities comprised trismus, abnormal occlusal relationships, and facial deformities. The abnormalities were more severe in those patients who received radiation at an earlier age and at higher dosages. Possible chemotherapeutic effects in five of 23 patients who received treatment for tumors located outside the head and neck region comprised acquired amelogenesis imperfecta, microdontia of bicuspid teeth, and a tendency toward thinning of roots with an enlarged pulp chamber. Dental and maxillofacial abnormalities should be recognized as a major consequence of maxillofacial radiation in long-term survivors of childhood cancer, and attempts to minimize or eliminate such sequelae should involve an effective interaction between radiation therapists, and medical and dental oncologists

  13. Evidence that muscle cells do not express the histidine-rich glycoprotein associated with AMP deaminase but can internalise the plasma protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.R.M. Sabbatini

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Histidine-rich glycoprotein (HRG is synthesized by liver and is present at relatively high concentration in the plasma of vertebrates. We have previously described the association of a HRG-like molecule to purified rabbit skeletal muscle AMP deaminase (AMPD. We also provided the first evidence for the presence of a HRG-like protein in human skeletal muscle where a positive correlation between HRG content and total determined AMPD activity has been shown. In the present paper we investigate the origin of skeletal muscle HRG. The screening of a human skeletal muscle cDNA expression library using an anti-HRG antibody failed to reveal any positive clone. The RT-PCR analysis, performed on human skeletal muscle RNA as well as on RNA from the rhabdomyosarcoma (RD cell line, failed to show any mRNA specific for the plasma HRG or for the putative muscle variant. When the RD cells were incubated with human plasma HRG, a time-dependent increase of the HRG immunoreactivity was detected both at the plasma membrane level and intracellularly. The internalisation of HRG was inhibited by the addition of heparin. The above data strongly suggest that skeletal muscle cells do not synthesize the muscle variant of HRG but instead can actively internalise it from plasma.

  14. Postobstructive pulmonary edema after biopsy of a nasopharyngeal mass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Keyur Kamlesh; Ahmad, Sabina Qureshi; Shah, Vikas; Lee, Haesoon

    2015-01-01

    We describe a case of 17 year-old male with a nasopharyngeal rhabdomyosarcoma who developed postobstructive pulmonary edema (POPE) after removing the endotracheal tube following biopsy. He developed muffled voice, rhinorrhea, dysphagia, odynophagia, and difficulty breathing through nose and weight loss of 20 pounds in the preceding 2 months. A nasopharyngoscopy revealed a fleshy nasopharyngeal mass compressing the soft and hard palate. Head and neck MRI revealed a large mass in the nasopharynx extending into the bilateral choana and oropharynx. Biopsy of the mass was taken under general anesthesia with endotracheal intubation. Immediately after extubation he developed oxygen desaturation, which did not improve with bag mask ventilation with 100% of oxygen, but improved after a dose of succinylcholine. He was re-intubated and pink, frothy fluid was suctioned from the endotracheal tube. Chest radiograph (CXR) was suggestive of an acute pulmonary edema. He improved with mechanical ventilation and intravenous furosemide. His pulmonary edema resolved over the next 24 h. POPE is a rare but serious complication associated with upper airway obstruction. The pathophysiology of POPE involves hemodynamic changes occurring in the lung and the heart during forceful inspiration against a closed airway due to an acute or chronic airway obstruction. This case illustrates the importance of considering the development of POPE with general anesthesia, laryngospasm and removal of endotracheal tube to make prompt diagnosis and to initiate appropriate management.

  15. Childhood cancer and occupational radiation exposure in parents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hicks, N.; Zack, M.; Caldwell, G.G.; Fernbach, D.J.; Falletta, J.M.

    1984-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that a parent's job exposure to radiation affeOR). its his or her child's risk of cancer, the authors compared this exposure during the year before the child's birth for parents of children with and without cancer. Parents of children with cancer were no more likely to have worked in occupations, industries, or combined occupations and industries with potential ionizing radiation exposure. Bone cancer and Wilms' tumor occurred more frequently among children of fathers in all industries with moderate potential ionizing radiation exposure. Children with cancer more often had fathers who were aircraft mechanics (odds ratio (OR)) . infinity, one-sided 95% lower limit . 1.5; P . 0.04). Although four of these six were military aircraft mechanics, only children whose fathers had military jobs with potential ionizing radiation exposure had an increased cancer risk (OR . 2.73; P . 0.01). Four cancer types occurred more often among children of fathers in specific radiation-related occupations: rhabdomyosarcoma among children whose fathers were petroleum industry foremen; retinoblastoma among children whose fathers were radio and television repairmen; central nervous system cancers and other lymphatic cancers among children of Air Force fathers. Because numbers of case fathers are small and confidence limits are broad, the associations identified by this study need to be confirmed in other studies. Better identification and gradation of occupational exposure to radiation would increase the sensitivity to detect associations

  16. Brain Metastasis in Bone and Soft Tissue Cancers: A Review of Incidence, Interventions, and Outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faris Shweikeh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Bone and soft tissue malignancies account for a small portion of brain metastases. In this review, we characterize their incidence, treatments, and prognosis. Most of the data in the literature is based on case reports and small case series. Less than 5% of brain metastases are from bone and soft tissue sarcomas, occurring most commonly in Ewing’s sarcoma, malignant fibrous tumors, and osteosarcoma. Mean interval from initial cancer diagnosis to brain metastasis is in the range of 20–30 months, with most being detected before 24 months (osteosarcoma, Ewing sarcoma, chordoma, angiosarcoma, and rhabdomyosarcoma, some at 24–36 months (malignant fibrous tumors, malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors, and alveolar soft part sarcoma, and a few after 36 months (chondrosarcoma and liposarcoma. Overall mean survival ranges between 7 and 16 months, with the majority surviving < 12 months (Ewing’s sarcoma, liposarcoma, malignant fibrous tumors, malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors, angiosarcoma and chordomas. Management is heterogeneous involving surgery, radiosurgery, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy. While a survival advantage may exist for those given aggressive treatment involving surgical resection, such patients tended to have a favorable preoperative performance status and minimal systemic disease.

  17. Determination of gamma radiation lethal dose (LD{sub 50}) and resveratrol cytotoxicity level in tumor cells line

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magalhaes, Vanessa D.; Rogero, Sizue O.; Rogero, Jose R. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Cruz, Aurea S. [Instituto Adolfo Lutz (IAL-SP) Secao de Culturas Celulares, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Cancer is a disease with high incidence and it is considered a worldwide public health problem. Resveratrol is a polyphenol occurring naturally in a wide variety of plants according to response of ultraviolet radiation (UV) exposition or according to mechanical stress resulting of pathogens or chemical and physical agents. This polyphenol possesses a pharmacological activity of carcinogenesis inhibition in multiple levels. It also protects cells by scavenging the free radicals which are considered toxic products. These free radicals are formed of natural process of cell aging and also by incidence of ionizing radiation in the organism. Thus, resveratrol is considered as a cell radioprotector. On the other hand, in some elevated concentrations resveratrol may be considered as a radiosensitizing. The aim of this work was the determination of radiation lethal dose (LD{sub 50}) and also verifies the cytotoxicity level of resveratrol in tumor cells line: muco epidermoid pulmonary carcinoma cells (NCI-H292) and rhabdomyosarcoma cells (RD). The cytotoxicity test was performed by neutral red uptake assay. The results of resveratrol IC{sub 50%} in NCI-H292 cells was 192{mu}M and in RD cells was 128{mu}M; and RD cells gamma radiation LD{sub 50} was 435Gy. (author)

  18. Research Institute for Medical Biophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wynchank, S.

    1989-01-01

    The effects of ionising and non-ionising radiation on rodent tumours and normal tissue were studied in terms of cellular repair and the relevant biochemical and biophysical changes following radiation. Rodent tumours investigated in vivo were the CaNT adenocarcinoma and a chemically induced transplantable rhabdomyosarcoma. Radiations used were 100KVp of X-Rays, neutron beams, various magnetic fields, and microwave radiation of 2450MHz. The biochemical parameters measured were, inter alia, levels of adenosine-5'-triphoshate (ATP) and the specific activity of hexokinase (HK). Metabolic changes in ATP levels and the activity of HK were observed in tumour and normal tissues following ionising and non-ionising radiation in normoxia and hypoxia. The observation that the effect of radiation and chemotherapeutic treatment of some tumours may be size dependent can possibly now be explained by the variation of ATP content with tumour size. The enhanced tumour HK specific activity implies increased metabolism, possibly a consequence of cellular requirements to maintain homeostasis during repair processes. Other research projects of the Research Institute for Medical Biophysics involved, inter alia, gastroesophageal scintigraphies to evaluate the results of new forms of therapy. 1 ill

  19. Usefulness of [18F]FDG-PET in diagnosis of bone and soft tissue tumors. Study with multi-center survey by questionnaire

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Katsuhiko; Hosono, Makoto; Okada, Masahiro; Komeya, Yoshihiro; Im, Sung-Woon; Tsuchiya, Norio; Ito, Kengo; Torizuka, Kanji

    2008-01-01

    In the aspect of future additional approval of [ 18 F]fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) diagnosis of the title tumors in the health insurance, its usefulness was studied by questionnaire to 18 facilities, where PET had been conducted for those tumors in the period July, 2005-February, 2006. Major questions concerned the purpose and finding of PET, findings by other imaging and by tumor markers, and judgment of PET effectiveness compared with other imaging (more useful, equally or less, and its reason). Subjects were 75 cases (42 males, 33 females; 3-82 years old) in 20 diseases, which involved 21 cases of osteosarcoma, 7 of leiomyosarcoma, 8 of Ewing sarcoma, 6 of liposarcoma, 5 of hemangiosarcoma, 4 of synovial sarcoma, each 3 of rhabdomyosarcoma, giant cell tumor, Schwannoma, malignant fibrous histiocytoma, each 2 of chondrosarcoma, alveolar soft part sarcoma, each one of epithelioid sarcoma, endometrial storomal sarcoma, hibernoma, fibrosarcoma, multiple osteochondroma, sacral chondroma, Langerhans cell histiocytosis and neurofibromatosis. Obtained were the judgments of highly useful in 5 diseases, fairly useful in 4, useful in 3, and useful/inconclusive due to the only one case in 8. FDG-PET was thus found useful in all diseases examined. (R.T.)

  20. Hormone-dependent nuclear export of estradiol receptor and DNA synthesis in breast cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardi, Maria; Castoria, Gabriella; Migliaccio, Antimo; Barone, Maria Vittoria; Di Stasio, Rosina; Ciociola, Alessandra; Bottero, Daniela; Yamaguchi, Hiroshi; Appella, Ettore; Auricchio, Ferdinando

    2008-01-01

    In breast cancer cells, cytoplasmic localization of the estradiol receptor α (ERα) regulates estradiol-dependent S phase entry. We identified a nuclear export sequence (NES) in ERα and show that its export is dependent on both estradiol-mediated phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT activation and chromosome region maintenance 1 (CRM1). A Tat peptide containing the ERα NES disrupts ERα–CRM1 interaction and prevents nuclear export of ERα- and estradiol-induced DNA synthesis. NES-ERα mutants do not exit the nucleus and inhibit estradiol-induced S phase entry; ERα-dependent transcription is normal. ERα is associated with Forkhead proteins in the nucleus, and estradiol stimulates nuclear exit of both proteins. ERα knockdown or ERα NES mutations prevent ERα and Forkhead nuclear export. A mutant of forkhead in rhabdomyosarcoma (FKHR), which cannot be phosphorylated by estradiol-activated AKT, does not associate with ERα and is trapped in the nucleus, blocking S phase entry. In conclusion, estradiol-induced AKT-dependent phosphorylation of FKHR drives its association with ERα, thereby triggering complex export from the nucleus necessary for initiation of DNA synthesis and S phase entry. PMID:18644889

  1. Connections between constitutional mismatch repair deficiency syndrome and neurofibromatosis type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wimmer, K; Rosenbaum, T; Messiaen, L

    2017-04-01

    Constitutional mismatch repair (MMR) deficiency (CMMRD) is a rare childhood cancer susceptibility syndrome resulting from biallelic germline loss-of-function mutations in one of the MMR genes. Individuals with CMMRD have high risk to develop a broad spectrum of malignancies and frequently display features reminiscent of neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1). Evaluation of the clinical findings of genetically proven CMMRD patients shows that not only multiple café-au-lait macules but also any of the diagnostic features of NF1 may be present in a CMMRD patient. This phenotypic overlap may lead to misdiagnosis of CMMRD patients as having NF1, which impedes adequate management of the patients and their families. The spectrum of CMMRD-associated childhood malignancies includes high-grade glioma, acute myeloid leukaemia or rhabdomyosarcoma, also reported as associated with NF1. Reported associations between NF1 and these malignancies are to a large extent based on studies that neither proved the presence of an NF1 germline mutation nor ruled-out CMMRD in the affected. Hence, these associations are challenged by our current knowledge of the phenotypic overlap between NF1 and CMMRD and should be re-evaluated in future studies. Recent advances in the diagnostics of CMMRD should render it possible to definitely state or refute this diagnosis in these individuals. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Tumor-specific loss of 11p15.5 alleles in del11p13 Wilms tumor and in familial adrenocortical carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henry, I.; Grandjouan, S.; Couillin, P.

    1989-01-01

    The authors have compared constitutional and tumor genotypes in nine cases of hereditary Wilms tumor (WT) and in three unrelated cases of familial adrenocortical carcinoma (ADCC). Since susceptibility to these tumors can be observed in malformation syndromes associated with a constitutional deletion of band 11p13 (WT) and with a constitutional duplication of band 11p15.5 (WT, ADCC), they investigated these two candidate regions by using 11p polymorphic markers. As expected, somatic chromosomal events, resulting in a loss of heterozygosity limited to region 11p15.5, were observed in the tumor of two familial cases of adrenocortical carcinoma. Surprisingly, however, analysis of the WT of two patients with a constitutional deletion of band 11p13, associated with aniridia, genitourinary abnormalities, and mental retardation (WAGR syndrome), revealed a loss of heterozygosity limited to region 11p15.5. These data therefore suggest that observation of a specific loss of heterozygosity may not necessarily point to the site of the initial germinal mutation. Together with previous similar observations of a loss of heterozygosity limited to 11p15.5 in breast cancer and in rhabdomyosarcoma, the data suggest that region 11p15.5 may carry a non-tissue-specific gene that could be involved in genetic predisposition, in tumor progression, or in both

  3. CT and MRI evaluation of orbital tumors: our experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cabrini, Marcelo; Docampo, Jorge; Martinez, Manuel; Bruno, Claudio; Morales, Carlos

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To show our experience in the evaluation of orbital masses on computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). To describe their most important findings and epidemiological features found on literature review, related to their differential diagnosis. Materials and methods: During a 48-months period of time, 26 patients (13 male, 13 female; age range, 3 to 75 years) with orbital tumors were evaluated. Seventeen patients underwent MR scans, 8 underwent CT scans, and one underwent both imaging methods. It was employed 0,5 and 1 Tesla MR scanners, and axial-helical CT scanners. Results: Benign lesions were found on 7 patients (cavernous hemangioma [n=2], meningioma [n=1], epidermoid cyst [n=1], dermoid cyst [n=1], lipoma [n=1], orbital vein deformity [n=1]). It was found lesions with undetermined behavior (optical nerve glioma [n=2]), and malignant ones were found on 17 patients (metastatic lesions [n=5], non- Hodgkin's lymphoma [n=3], hemangiopericytoma [n=2], retinoblastoma [n=2], rhabdomyosarcoma [n=2], melanoma [n=1], and lacrimal adenocarcinoma [n=1]). Conclusion: In our experience, 65.4% was malignant tumors (orbital metastasis was the most common; 19.2%). More than one-quarter was benign tumor, where cavernous hemangioma was the most frequent. (author) [es

  4. Nonangiogenic and nonlymphomatous sarcomas of the canine spleen: 57 cases (1975-1987)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weinstein, M.J.; Carpenter, J.L.; Mehlhaff Schunk, C.J.

    1989-01-01

    The case records of and histopathologic findings in 57 dogs with nonangiogenic and nonlymphomatous splenic sarcomas were reviewed. Splenic neoplasms in these dogs included leiomyosarcoma, fibrosarcoma, undifferentiated sarcoma, liposarcoma, osteosarcoma, chondrosarcoma, myxosarcoma, rhabdomyosarcoma, and fibrous histiocytoma. The clinical signs associated with splenic sarcoma included anorexia or decreased appetite, abdominal distention, polydipsia, lethargy, vomiting, weight loss, and weakness. An abdominal mass was detected in 86% of the dogs by use of abdominal palpation (63%), and/or abdominal radiography (74%). The diagnosis was based on histopathologic findings in the spleen. Abdominal exploratory surgery was performed on 43 of the 57 dogs. Twenty-seven dogs were treated by splenectomy, and 16 were euthanatized at the time of surgery because of widespread metastatic lesions. Of the 14 dogs on which surgery was not performed, 11 were euthanatized on the basis of results of preoperative diagnostic tests, and the remaining 3 dogs had splenic neoplasms that were incidental findings at necropsy. Of the 27 surgically treated dogs, 5 died in the immediate postoperative period, 12 died or were euthanatized within 1 year after splenectomy, and only 5 dogs survived greater than or equal to 1 year. Three dogs were lost to follow-up evaluation, and 2 were still alive 6 and 7 months after surgery. The median survival time of the 22 dogs for which survival was known was 2.5 months. The median survival time for 11 dogs with no obvious metastasis at the time of splenectomy was 9 months

  5. Intensive combined modality therapy of small round cell and undifferentiated sarcomas in children and young adults

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bader, J.L.; Dewan, R.; Watkins, E.; Kinsella, T.J.; Glatstein, E.; STeinberg, S.M.

    1989-01-01

    Seventy-five patients (ages 4-35 years) with the following small round cell tumors and undifferentiated sarcoma were treated at the National Cancer Institute: Ewing's sarcome (n=32), peripheral neuroepithelioma (n=14), rhabdomyosarcoma (n=24), undifferentiated sarcoma (n=5). Most patients had poor prognostic features including 36 (48%) with metastatic disease, and 42 (56%) with central (truncal) tumors (22 in the pelvis). Treatment included 5 cycles of intensive induction chemotherapy with vincristine, cyclophosphamide and adriamycin, plus aggressive local radiation therapy using simulation and computerized treatment planning for all patients. Thereafter, complete clinical responses were consolidated with intensive chemotherapy, total body irradiation and autologous bone marrow transplantation. There were three local only failures, 10 local plus distant failures, 36 distant only failures, 3 treatment-related deaths, and one intercurrent death. Overall actuarial survival and event-free survival at 4 years are 49 and 29%, respectively. Actuarial freedom from local progression was seen in 74% of patients at 4 years, quite remarkable considering the bulk and location of most of these tumors. Without aggressive surgery, many of these high risk patients had satisfactory outcomes, but better systemic treatments are still needed.(author). 44 refs.; 8 figs.; 6 tabs

  6. Adolescent Neuroblastoma of Lower Limb

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    Rajeshwari K

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Neuroblastoma is an embryonic tumour of neural crest origin, commonly seen in children with upper abdomen involvement. Rarely neuroblastomas present in adolescents and adults involving lower limb. Histopathologically neuroblastoma of lower limb can be confused with other small round cell tumour especially with Ewing's sarcoma and rhabdomyosarcoma. A 16 year old male presented with 15x11cm swelling, pain and multiple discharging sinuses of right leg since 4 months. Routine haematological and biochemical analysis were within normal limits. Radiology of right leg showed large soft tissue swelling encompassing the pathological fracture of tibia and bowing of fibula. Fine needle aspiration of the swelling revealed malignant small round cell tumour. Histopathology revealed poorly differentiated neuroblastoma of lower limb. The immunohistochemistry of Synaptophysin and Chromogranin were positive and CD 99 was negative. Neuroblastoma diagnosed at unusual site with uncommon age has poor prognosis. Hence, one must keep in mind the differential diagnosis of neuroblastoma as one of the differential diagnosis in evaluating the soft tissue tumours of lower limb.

  7. Cytomorphology and immunohistochemistry of extrarenal rhabdoid tumor: A case report with review of literature

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    Manjula Jain

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Extrarenal rhabdoid tumor (ERRT is a rare, aggressive tumor with extremely poor prognosis. We report a case of ERRT with intraspinal extension in a 1.5-year-old child diagnosed by fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC and immunohistochemistry. The child presented with a right lumbar region lump of two months duration. Ultrasound guided FNAC was performed and cell block was prepared. Smears were highly cellular and showed a dispersed population of large round cells having abundant pale eosinophillic cytoplasm, centrally to eccentrically placed nucleus with large prominent nucleoli. Immunohistochemistry was carried out on cell block which was positive for epithelial membrane antigen EMA and Vimentin. It was negative for leucocyte common antigen [LCA], wilms tumor 1, WT1, desmin and neuron specific enolaseNSE, thus ruling out other tumors like lymphoma, Wilms tumor, rhabdomyosarcoma, and neuroblastoma. A final diagnosis of ERRT was given. ERRT is an extremely rare tumor of retroperitoneal area; it should be included in the differential diagnosis of malignant round cell tumor in children. Cell block in this case is mandatory for putting up the panel of immunohistochemistry which can clinch the diagnosis of rhabdoid tumor and treatment can be started as early as possible.

  8. Long-term effects of radiotherapy in childhood and adolescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larson, D.L.; Kroll, S.; Jaffe, N.; Serure, A.; Goepfert, H.

    1990-01-01

    The records of 50 selected pediatric patients who were treated and followed at M. D. Anderson Cancer Center were reviewed to study the late effects of nonsurgical treatment of cancer in children. There were 26 girls and 24 boys ranging in age between 2 months and 16 years. Patients with head and neck cancer received chemotherapy and radiotherapy for rhabdomyosarcoma (n = 27), retinoblastoma (n = 8), or nasopharynx cancer (n = 2). Median follow-up was 13 years. The most severe side effects were noted in the fields of radiation and included hypoplasia of the jaw, orbit, or hemi-face with varying degrees of atrophy of the overlying soft tissues. A wide range of endocrine, dental, and psychologic abnormalities was also documented. Since 1 in every 1,000 adults older than 20 years today is likely to be a survivor of childhood cancer, recommendations are made for this new class of patients whom the head and neck surgeon will be seeing in the future

  9. Sequence-specific capture of protein-DNA complexes for mass spectrometric protein identification.

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    Cheng-Hsien Wu

    Full Text Available The regulation of gene transcription is fundamental to the existence of complex multicellular organisms such as humans. Although it is widely recognized that much of gene regulation is controlled by gene-specific protein-DNA interactions, there presently exists little in the way of tools to identify proteins that interact with the genome at locations of interest. We have developed a novel strategy to address this problem, which we refer to as GENECAPP, for Global ExoNuclease-based Enrichment of Chromatin-Associated Proteins for Proteomics. In this approach, formaldehyde cross-linking is employed to covalently link DNA to its associated proteins; subsequent fragmentation of the DNA, followed by exonuclease digestion, produces a single-stranded region of the DNA that enables sequence-specific hybridization capture of the protein-DNA complex on a solid support. Mass spectrometric (MS analysis of the captured proteins is then used for their identification and/or quantification. We show here the development and optimization of GENECAPP for an in vitro model system, comprised of the murine insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 1 (IGFBP1 promoter region and FoxO1, a member of the forkhead rhabdomyosarcoma (FoxO subfamily of transcription factors, which binds specifically to the IGFBP1 promoter. This novel strategy provides a powerful tool for studies of protein-DNA and protein-protein interactions.

  10. Skeletal sequelae of radiation therapy for malignant childhood tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butler, M.S.; Robertson, W.W. Jr.; Rate, W.; D'Angio, G.J.; Drummond, D.S.

    1990-01-01

    One hundred forty-three patients who received radiation therapy for childhood tumors, and survived to the age of skeletal maturity, were studied by retrospective review of oncology records and roentgenograms. Diagnoses for the patients were the following: Hodgkin's lymphoma (44), Wilms's tumor (30), acute lymphocytic leukemia (26), non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (18), Ewing's sarcoma (nine), rhabdomyosarcoma (six), neuroblastoma (six), and others (four). Age at the follow-up examination averaged 18 years (range, 14-28 years). Average length of follow-up study was 9.9 years (range, two to 18 years). Asymmetry of the chest and ribs was seen in 51 (36%) of these children. Fifty (35%) had scoliosis; 14 had kyphosis. In two children, the scoliosis was treated with a brace, while one developed significant kyphosing scoliosis after laminectomy and had spinal fusion. Twenty-three (16%) patients complained of significant pain at the radiation sites. Twelve of the patients developed leg-length inequality; eight of those were symptomatic. Three patients developed second primary tumors. Currently, the incidence of significant skeletal sequelae is lower and the manifestations are less severe than reported in the years from 1940 to 1970. The reduction in skeletal complications may be attributed to shielding of growth centers, symmetric field selection, decreased total radiation doses, and sequence changes in chemotherapy

  11. Pattern of childhood malignancies at combined military hospital, rawalpindi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saleem, M.Z.; Haq, M.Z.U.; Badsha, S.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To document distribution of childhood malignancies among Paediatric Oncology patients. Study design: Descriptive study Place and duration of study: Department of Paediatric Oncology, Combined Military Hospital, Rawalpindi from June 2006 to May 2007. Methodology: We collected data of 141 consecutive newly diagnosed paediatric oncology patients. Demographics (age and gender) and types of malignancy (diagnosed on histopathology) were collected in all cases. Results: Of the total patients 90 were male, 51 female with a male to female ratio of 1.76. Childhood malignancies found were leukaemia (60.3%) lymphomas (11.3%), bone tumours (4.3%), brain tumours (2.8%), germ cell tumours (3.5%), retinoblastoma (7.1%), neuroblastoma (3.5%), Wilms tumour (2.8%), rhabdomyosarcoma (2.1%), hepatoblastoma (1.4%) and synovial sarcoma(0.7%).Mean age at diagnosis was 5.4 +- 3.05 years. 24 (17%) patients were from Punjab, 9 (6.4%) from Sindh, 82 (58.2%) from Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, 5 (3.5%) from Baluchistan and 21 (14.9%) from Azad Jammu and Kashmir (AJK). Conclusion: This study showed that distribution varies according to gender, age and geography. Leukemia is the commonest childhood malignancy. Our research findings are useful for prioritizing future childhood cancer research needs. (author)

  12. Use of a perfluorochemical emulsion in combination with high pressure oxygen to alter the radiation response to a rat sarcoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, D.F.; Porter, E.; Fischer, J.J.

    1985-01-01

    The ability of perfluorochemical emulsion to enhance the radiation response of solid tumors is being tested. It is postulated that the exceptional O/sub 2/-carrying capacity of the perfluorochemicals, combined with the small size of the micelles, and changes in blood viscosity resulting from dilution with the emulsion, may allow the micelles to reach areas inaccessible to red cells and to deliver O/sub 2/ to regions of the tumor which are not served by a functioning vasulature. Rats bearing BA1112 rhabdomyosarcomas were i.v. injected with Fluosol-DA 20% and held in 100% O/sub 2/ at 3 atmospheres pressure (HPO/sub 2/) for 15 min prior to and during irradiation. Cell survival was assayed in vitro immediately following treatment. HPO/sub 2/ alone increased radiation cell kill 2-3 fold relative to air at 1 atmosphere. Fluosol combined with HPO/sub 2/ produced a 10-fold increase in cell kill relative to HPO/sub 2/ alone. The authors have previously shown that Fluosol alone does not alter survival levels. The slopes of the radiation survival curves were not different, suggesting that HPO/sub 2/ alone or in combination with Fluosol did not alter the intrinsic radiosensitivity of the tumor cells, but rather decreased the fraction of cells where were hypoxic

  13. Effect of novel dietary supplement on metabolism in vitro and in vivo

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    Roger A. Vaughan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is an increasingly prevalent and preventable morbidity with multiple behavioral, surgical and pharmacological interventions currently available. Commercial dietary supplements are often advertised to stimulate metabolism and cause rapid weight and/or fat loss, although few well-controlled studies have demonstrated such effects. We describe a commercially available dietary supplement (purportedly containing caffeine, catechins, and other metabolic stimulators on resting metabolic rate in humans, and on metabolism, mitochondrial content, and related gene expression in vitro. Human males ingested either a placebo or commercially available supplement (RF in a randomized double-blind placebo-controlled cross-over fashion. Metabolic rate, respiratory exchange ratio, and blood pressure were measured hourly for 3 h post-ingestion. To investigate molecular effects, human rhabdomyosarcoma cells (RD and mouse myocytes (C2C12 were treated with various doses of RF for various durations. RF enhanced energy expenditure and systolic blood pressure in human males without altering substrate utilization. In myocytes, RF enhanced metabolism, metabolic gene expression, and mitochondrial content suggesting RF may target common energetic pathways which control mitochondrial biogenesis. RF appears to increase metabolism immediately following ingestion, although it is unclear if RF provides benefits beyond those provided by caffeine alone. Additional research is needed to examine safety and efficacy for human weight loss.

  14. Malignant phyllodes tumor of the breast with heterologous high-grade angiosarcoma

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    Ghassan Tranesh

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Phyllodes tumors (PTs account for <3% of fibroepithelial breast lesions and for 0.3% to 1.0% of primary breast tumors. They occur predominantly in middle-aged women (mean age range, 40–50 years. PTs can be categorized into benign, borderline, and malignant; the first 2 categories are distinguished only by degree of cellular atypia and mitotic activity. Malignant PTs are more frequent among persons of Hispanic ethnicity, especially those born in Central America or South America. Heterologous sarcomatous elements may be present in malignant PTs, predominantly liposarcoma and rarely fibrosarcoma, rhabdomyosarcoma, leiomyosarcoma, osteosarcoma, and chondrosarcoma. Breast angiosarcoma (BA is a rare heterologous, sarcomatous element that may arise secondary to malignant PT. We report a 47-year-old woman with no history of previous surgery or radiation therapy who presented to the emergency department with a painful right breast mass. She admittedly noticed the right breast mass for many years; however, recently it increased in size. Mammography and ultrasonography identified a partially cystic mass. Core needle biopsy showed dense hyalinized fibrous tissue with old blood clots, suggestive of infarcted fibroadenoma. The patient received antibiotics and analgesics; however, she reported intractable pain and a worsening skin rash of her right breast. Chest computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging showed a doubling in mass size, with pectoralis major muscle involvement. Incisional biopsy showed malignant PT with heterologous high-grade angiosarcoma. The diagnosis of angiosarcoma was confirmed through immunoreactivity for CD31, FLI1, and ERG immunostains.

  15. Determination of gamma radiation lethal dose (LD50) and resveratrol cytotoxicity level in tumor cells line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magalhaes, Vanessa D.; Rogero, Sizue O.; Rogero, Jose R.; Cruz, Aurea S.

    2011-01-01

    Cancer is a disease with high incidence and it is considered a worldwide public health problem. Resveratrol is a polyphenol occurring naturally in a wide variety of plants according to response of ultraviolet radiation (UV) exposition or according to mechanical stress resulting of pathogens or chemical and physical agents. This polyphenol possesses a pharmacological activity of carcinogenesis inhibition in multiple levels. It also protects cells by scavenging the free radicals which are considered toxic products. These free radicals are formed of natural process of cell aging and also by incidence of ionizing radiation in the organism. Thus, resveratrol is considered as a cell radioprotector. On the other hand, in some elevated concentrations resveratrol may be considered as a radiosensitizing. The aim of this work was the determination of radiation lethal dose (LD 50 ) and also verifies the cytotoxicity level of resveratrol in tumor cells line: muco epidermoid pulmonary carcinoma cells (NCI-H292) and rhabdomyosarcoma cells (RD). The cytotoxicity test was performed by neutral red uptake assay. The results of resveratrol IC 50% in NCI-H292 cells was 192μM and in RD cells was 128μM; and RD cells gamma radiation LD 50 was 435Gy. (author)

  16. SINONASAL AND ORBITAL MALIGNANT NEOPLASMS IN PEDIATRIC POPULATION: A STUDY FROM A TERTIARY CARE CENTRE IN INDIA

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    Koyela Mondal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available NTRODUCTION : Paranasal and extra - ocular orbital malignant tumors are comparatively rare in pediatric patients and difficult to diagnose early. Malignant lesions in this region tend to be locally aggressive, often presenting at an advanced stage. Non osseous, extra ocular orbital tumors represent a different histologic spectrum in children than in adults. AIMS: To study the spectrum of malignant lesions of paranasal sinuses and orbital area in patients under 18 years of age. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A retrospective and prospective study was done from July 2004 to June 2014. Malignant paranasal and orbital neoplasms were recorded including clinico - radiological and cytological data. Review of histopathological slides along with immunohistochemistry (IHC of selected cases were done. RESULTS: Total 69 cases were recorded over the ten year period as per our inclusion criteria. Out of these, 46 (67% patients presented with malignant paranasal neoplasm and 23 (33% with orbital mass. Most cases were found in the age group of 7 - 12 years, where females were preponderant. Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS was the commonest tumor arising in paranasal as well as in orbital area (33%. IHC aided the confirmation of our diagnoses. CONCLUSION: Paranasal malignancy in the pediatric population often presents with non - specific symptoms, and high index of suspicion along with better diagnostic tools like computed tomography (CT scan is necessary for a timely diagnosis . IHC should be done in all malignant neoplasms of pediatric population to arrive at a proper diagnosis, to facilitate proper management to these patients

  17. Fine-needle aspiration cytology of postirradiation sarcomas, including angiosarcoma, with immunocytochemical confirmation

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    Silverman, J.F.; Lannin, D.L.; Larkin, E.W.; Feldman, P.; Frable, W.J. (East Carolina Univ. School of Medicine, Greenville, NC (USA))

    1989-01-01

    Postirradiation sarcomas are an unusual but well-recognized late effect of cancer therapy. In this article, a fine-needle aspiration (FNA) series of four cases is presented. There were three female patients and one male patient, with an age range of 28-55 yr (mean, 41). Two of the patients were irradiated for uterine cervical carcinoma while the other two received irradiation for malignant lymphoma. The time interval to the development of the postirradiation sarcoma ranged from 10 to greater than 20 yr. There were a postirradiation synovial sarcoma of the buttock region, malignant fibrous histiocytoma of the bone (femur), and rhabdomyosarcoma and angiosarcoma of the retroperitoneum. A spectrum of cytologic findings was encountered, reflecting the specific types of sarcomas. Immunocytochemical studies performed on the aspirated material from the angiosarcoma demonstrated the utility of immunoperoxidase stains for ULEX europaeus agglutinin-1 (UEA-1) and, to a lesser degree, factor VIII-related antigen antibody, confirming the vascular nature of this malignancy. The FNA findings from all four cases demonstrated cytologic features that allowed recognition of this unusual complication of irradiation treatment. This article confirms the utility of FNA cytology in following patients with previous malignancies and differentiating a postirradiation sarcoma from recurrent carcinoma.

  18. Fine-needle aspiration cytology of postirradiation sarcomas, including angiosarcoma, with immunocytochemical confirmation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silverman, J.F.; Lannin, D.L.; Larkin, E.W.; Feldman, P.; Frable, W.J.

    1989-01-01

    Postirradiation sarcomas are an unusual but well-recognized late effect of cancer therapy. In this article, a fine-needle aspiration (FNA) series of four cases is presented. There were three female patients and one male patient, with an age range of 28-55 yr (mean, 41). Two of the patients were irradiated for uterine cervical carcinoma while the other two received irradiation for malignant lymphoma. The time interval to the development of the postirradiation sarcoma ranged from 10 to greater than 20 yr. There were a postirradiation synovial sarcoma of the buttock region, malignant fibrous histiocytoma of the bone (femur), and rhabdomyosarcoma and angiosarcoma of the retroperitoneum. A spectrum of cytologic findings was encountered, reflecting the specific types of sarcomas. Immunocytochemical studies performed on the aspirated material from the angiosarcoma demonstrated the utility of immunoperoxidase stains for ULEX europaeus agglutinin-1 (UEA-1) and, to a lesser degree, factor VIII-related antigen antibody, confirming the vascular nature of this malignancy. The FNA findings from all four cases demonstrated cytologic features that allowed recognition of this unusual complication of irradiation treatment. This article confirms the utility of FNA cytology in following patients with previous malignancies and differentiating a postirradiation sarcoma from recurrent carcinoma

  19. Adult prostate sarcoma: the M. D. Anderson Cancer Center Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sexton, W J; Lance, R E; Reyes, A O; Pisters, P W; Tu, S M; Pisters, L L

    2001-08-01

    Sarcoma of prostate origin is rare. Historically, long-term survival rates for adult patients with prostate sarcoma are poor. We analyzed the experience of 1 institution with prostate sarcoma during the last 3 decades. The records of 21 patients with prostate sarcoma were reviewed to identify symptoms at presentation, diagnostic procedures, presence and development of metastases, staging evaluation, histological subtype, grade and size of the primary tumor, and treatment sequence, including surgery, and preoperative and postoperative therapies. Several clinicopathological variables were assessed for prognostic importance. Most patients presented with urinary obstruction. The diagnosis of prostate sarcoma was usually established with ultrasound guided biopsy or transurethral resection. Histological subtypes were leiomyosarcoma in 12, rhabdomyosarcoma in 4, malignant fibrous histiocytoma in 1 and unclassified sarcoma in 4 patients. At last followup, 8 patients had no evidence of disease after a median of 81.5 months (range 10 to 197). The remaining 13 patients died of sarcoma (median survival 18 months, range 3 to 94). The 1, 3 and 5-year actuarial survival rates for all 21 patients were 81%, 43% and 38%, respectively. Factors predictive of long-term survival were negative surgical margins (p = 0.0005) and absence of metastatic disease at presentation (p = 0.0004). Tumor size and grade, and the histological subtype of prostate sarcoma had no significant influence on actuarial survival. The long-term disease specific survival rate for adults with prostate sarcoma is poor. Early diagnosis and complete surgical resection offer patients the best chance for cure.

  20. The role of radiology in head and neck tumours in children

    Science.gov (United States)

    McHugh, Kieran

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Head and neck malignancy is rare in children. However, distinguishing malignant tumours from the more common and numerous benign causes of neck masses in childhood is crucial as many malignant conditions have an excellent prognosis with appropriate oncological management. Ultrasound, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging all have crucial roles in the diagnosis of head and neck malignancy in children and there is an emerging role for positron emission tomography, particularly in the management and follow-up of lymphoma. We describe the imaging appearances of the common malignant tumours arising in the extracranial head and neck in children, focusing on lymphoma, rhabdomyosarcoma and nasopharyngeal carcinoma. The clinical presentation and radiological appearances of benign tumours in the head and neck in children may overlap with those seen in malignant disease. We describe the imaging appearances of juvenile angiofibroma, vascular abnormalities involving the extracranial head and neck and cervical teratomas. Advances in both imaging techniques and cancer staging systems, many of the latter aimed at avoiding over-treatment and treatment-related complications, will lead to an increasingly central role for imaging in childhood head and neck cancer. PMID:20199940

  1. Magnetic Resonance Imaging versus Computed Tomography and Different Imaging Modalities in Evaluation of Sinonasal Neoplasms Diagnosed by Histopathology

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    Mohammed A. Gomaa

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective The study purpose was to detect the value of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI compared to computed tomography (CT and different imaging modalities as conventional radiology in evaluation of sinonasal neoplasms diagnosed by Histopathology. Methods Thirty patients (16 males and 14 females were complaining of symptoms related to sinonasal tract. After thorough clinical and local examination, the patients were subjected to the following: conventional radiography, CT, MRI, and histopathological examination. Results The nasal cavity was the most commonly involved site with sinonasal malignancies followed by the maxillary sinuses. The least commonly affected site was the frontal sinuses. Benign sinonasal tumors were present in 14 cases. The most common benign lesion was juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma (6 cases, followed by inverted papilloma (3 cases. While malignant sinonasal tumors were present in 16 cases, squamous cell carcinoma was present in 5 cases, and undifferentiated carcinoma, in 3 cases. Lymphoepithelioma and non-Hodgkin lymphomas were present in 2 cases each, while adenocarcinoma, chondrosarcoma, adenoid cystic carcinoma, and rhabdomyosarcoma were present in 1 case each. Conclusion MRI with its superior soft tissue contrast and multiplanar capability is superior to CT in pretreatment evaluation of primary malignant tumors of sinonasal cavity.

  2. [Virtual Planning of Prosthetic Treatment of the Orbit].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veit, Johannes A; Thierauf, Julia; Egner, Kornelius; Wiggenhauser, Paul Severin; Friedrich, Daniel; Greve, Jens; Schuler, Patrick J; Hoffmann, Thomas K; Schramm, Alexander

    2017-06-01

    Optimal positioning of bone-anchored implants in the treatment of patients with orbital prosthesis is challenging. The definition of implant axis as well as the positioning of the implants is important to prevent failures in prosthetic rehabilitation in these patients. We performed virtual planning of enossal implants at a base of a standard fan beam CT scan using the software CoDiagnostiX™ (DentalWings, Montréal, Canada). By 3D-printing a surgical guide for drilling and implant insertion was manufactured (Med-610™, Stratasys, Rehovot, Israel). An orbital exenteration was performed in a patient after shrinkage of the eyelids 20 years after enucleation and radiation of the orbit due to rhabdomyosarcoma. 4 Vistafix-3 implants (Cochlear™, Cochlea, Centennial, USA) were primarily inserted after resection with the help of the 3D-surgical guide. Prosthetic rehabilitation could be achieved as preplanned to a predictable result. The individual prosthesis of the orbit showed good functional and esthetic outcome. The virtual 3D-planning of endosseous implants for prosthetic orbital and periorbital reconstruction is easy to use and facilitates optimal placement of implants especially in posttherapeutically altered anatomic situations. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  3. Radiosensitivity of soft tissue sarcomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirano, Toru; Iwasaki, Katsuro; Suzuki, Ryohei; Monzen, Yoshio; Hombo, Zenichiro

    1989-01-01

    The correlation between the effectiveness of radiation therapy and the histology of soft tissue sarcomas was investigated. Of 31 cases with a soft tissue sarcoma of an extremity treated by conservative surgery and postoperative radiation of 3,000-6,000 cGy, local recurrence occurred in 12; 5 out of 7 synovial sarcomas, 4 of 9 MFH, one of 8 liposarcomas, none of 4 rhabdomyosarcomas and 2 of 3 others. As for the histological subtyping, the 31 soft tissue sarcomas were divided into spindle cell, pleomorphic cell, myxoid and round cell type, and recurrence rates were 75%, 33.3%, 16.7% and 0%, respectively. From the remarkable difference in recurrent rate, it was suggested that round cell and myxoid type of soft tissue sarcomas showed a high radiosensitivity compared to the spindle cell type with low sensitivity. Clarifying the degree of radiosensitivity is helpful in deciding on the management of limb salvage in soft tissue sarcomas of an extremity. (author)

  4. Clinical and MRI features of prostate sarcoma: comparison with prostate adenocarcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding Jianping; Wang Xiaoying; Wang Zhenzhong; Zhou Liangping; Jiang Xuexiang

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To summarize the clinical and imaging features of prostate sarcoma, and to compare the features with those of prostate adenocarcinoma (PCa). Method: Six cases of prostate sarcoma proved pathologically were enrolled in this study. The clinical material and imaging features were compared with those of the PCa. Results: (1) Pathological result: Among the 6 prostate sarcomas, 3 were rhabdomyosarcoma, 1 was leiomyosarcoma, and 2 were sarcoma originated from interstitial tissue that could not be classified. (2) Clinical result: The 6 patients of sarcoma were younger (median age 36.5, 15-71 years) than the patients of PCa (median age 72, 50-78 years) (P -3 ng/L] was normal and lower than that of the PCa patients [median 27.80, (1.55-352.00) x 10 -3 ng/ L] (P 3 ) was larger than that of PCa (median 41.57, 17.16-179.44 cm 3 ) (P 2 -weighted images, with grossly normal structure of the prostate. Excapsular extension was more common in the sarcomas than in the PCa (83.3% vs 66.7%). Conclusion: The clinical and imaging features of prostate sarcoma are different from those of prostate adenocarcinoma

  5. Epidemiology and therapies for metastatic sarcoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amankwah, Ernest K; Conley, Anthony P; Reed, Damon R

    2013-01-01

    Sarcomas are cancers arising from the mesenchymal layer that affect children, adolescents, young adults, and adults. Although most sarcomas are localized, many display a remarkable predilection for metastasis to the lungs, liver, bones, subcutaneous tissue, and lymph nodes. Additionally, many sarcoma patients presenting initially with localized disease may relapse at metastatic sites. While localized sarcomas can often be cured through surgery and often radiation, controversies exist over optimal management of patients with metastatic sarcoma. Combinations of chemotherapy are the most effective in many settings, and many promising new agents are under active investigation or are being explored in preclinical models. Metastatic sarcomas are excellent candidates for novel approaches with additional agents as they have demonstrated chemosensitivity and affect a portion of the population that is motivated toward curative therapy. In this paper, we provide an overview on the common sarcomas of childhood (rhabdomyosarcoma), adolescence, and young adults (osteosarcoma, Ewing sarcoma, synovial sarcoma, and malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor) and older adults (leiomyosarcoma, liposarcoma, and undifferentiated high grade sarcoma) in terms of the epidemiology, current therapy, promising therapeutic directions and outcome with a focus on metastatic disease. Potential advances in terms of promising therapy and biologic insights may lead to more effective and safer therapies; however, more clinical trials and research are needed for patients with metastatic sarcoma. PMID:23700373

  6. Conjugated linoleic acid or omega 3 fatty acids increase mitochondrial biosynthesis and metabolism in skeletal muscle cells

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    Vaughan Roger A

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Polyunsaturated fatty acids are popular dietary supplements advertised to contribute to weight loss by increasing fat metabolism in liver, but the effects on overall muscle metabolism are less established. We evaluated the effects of conjugated linoleic acid (CLA or combination omega 3 on metabolic characteristics in muscle cells. Methods Human rhabdomyosarcoma cells were treated with either DMSO control, or CLA or combination omega 3 for 24 or 48 hours. RNA was determined using quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR. Mitochondrial content was determined using flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry. Metabolism was quantified by measuring extracellular acidification and oxygen consumption rates. Results Omega 3 significantly induced metabolic genes as well as oxidative metabolism (oxygen consumption, glycolytic capacity (extracellular acidification, and metabolic rate compared with control. Both treatments significantly increased mitochondrial content. Conclusion Omega 3 fatty acids appear to enhance glycolytic, oxidative, and total metabolism. Moreover, both omega 3 and CLA treatment significantly increase mitochondrial content compared with control.

  7. Two cases of radiation retinopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shoda, Miho; Yuzawa, Mitsuko; Matsui, Mizuo; Kaneko, Akihiro.

    1992-01-01

    Radiation retinopathy is characterized by retinal micovascular abnormalities after radiation therapy of the eye and its surrounding structures. The authors performed focal laser photocoagulation in two cases of radiation retinopathy. Case 1 was a 16 year old woman with radiation retinopathy who had been treated for retioblastoma in her right eye using cobalt 60-applicator 16 years prior to the first visit. Her corrected visual acuity of the right eye was 0.4. Ophthalmoscopy revealed large macular deposits, soft exudates, and retinal hemorrhage. Fluorescein angiography showed hyperpermeability of capillaries in the vicinity of the lower temporal retinal vessels. The visual acuity improved to 1.2 after the photocoagulation. Case 2 was a 16 year old man who had received 50 gray of external beam for a primary rhabdo-myosarcoma in the temporal region. Retinal avascular areas in the posterior pole of his both eyes were observed and the area showed increased retinal vessel permeability in the right eye was photocoagulated. The visual acuity in his right eye increased from 0.08 to 1.0 following the treatment. (author)

  8. Neoplasia of captive yellow sea horses (Hippocampus kuda) and weedy sea dragons (Phyllopteryx taeniolatus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    LePage, Véronique; Dutton, Christopher J; Kummrow, Maya; McLelland, David J; Young, Karrie; Lumsden, John S

    2012-03-01

    Syngnathidae is the family of fish that includes sea horses, pipefish, and sea dragons. To date, only a single publication has described neoplasia in syngnathids, a fibrosarcoma of the brood pouch in an aquarium-reared lined sea horse (Hippocampus erectus). From 1998 until 2010, the Toronto Zoo submitted 172 syngnathids for postmortem; species included the spotted or yellow sea horse (Hippocampus kuda), the pot-bellied sea horse (Hippocampus abdominalis) and the weedy sea dragon (Phyllopteryx taeniolatus). Seven neoplasms and two neoplastic-like lesions were identified from these cases. Under light microscopy, the neoplasms had morphological characteristics of a cardiac rhabdomyosarcoma, renal adenocarcinoma, renal adenoma, renal round cell tumors, which were likely lymphomas, exocrine pancreatic carcinoma, and intestinal carcinoma. Of these neoplasms, four had clear evidence of metastasis: the pancreatic and intestinal carcinomas and both round cell tumors. As syngnathids are highly fastidious animals, they can be difficult to maintain in captivity. In order to improve their husbandry, preventative and palliative care, as well as treatment, it is important to investigate and document the types of diseases affecting syngnathids.

  9. CT characteristics of primary retroperitoneal neoplasms in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Yufeng; Wang Jichen; Peng Yun; Zeng Jinjin

    2010-01-01

    Primary retroperitoneal neoplasms are uncommon in children. Retroperitoneal neoplasms are either mesodermal, neurogenic, germ cell ectodermal or lymphatic in origin. In general, primary retroperitoneal neoplasms in children have different spectrum and prevalence compared to those in adults. Neuroblastoma, rhabdomyosarcoma, benign teratoma and lymphoma are the common retroperitoneal neoplasms. In this review, the clinical and CT futures of common retroperitoneal neoplasms in children are described. Coarse, amorphous, and mottled calcification are very common in neuroblastoma. Paraganglioma tends to show marked and early enhancement and may present with clinical symptoms associated with the excess catecholamine. Sarcomas are often very large and have heterogeneous appearance. Imaging cannot be reliably used to identify the type of retroperitoneal sarcomas due to overlapped radiographic features. In children, lipoblastoma is the most common lipomatous tumor in the retroperitoneum. The percentage of visible fat in tumor varies depending on the cellular composition of the lesion. The CT characteristics of teratoma are quite variable, which may be cystic, solid, on a combination of both. Typically teratoma appears as a large complex mass containing fluid, fat, fat-fluid level, and calcifications. Lymphoma is often homogeneous on both enhanced and unenhanced CT scans. Necrosis and calcification are rare on CT. In conclusion, making a final histological diagnosis of retroperitoneal tumor base on CT features is not often possible; however, CT can help to develop a differential diagnosis and determine the size and extent of the retroperitoneal neoplasms.

  10. Boron neutron capture therapy for children with malignant brain tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakagawa, Yoshinobu; Komatsu, Hisao; Kageji, Teruyoshi; Tsuji, Fumio; Matsumoto, Keizo; Kitamura, Katsuji; Hatanaka, Hiroshi; Minobe, Takashi.

    1993-01-01

    Among the 131 cases with brain tumors treated by boron-neutron capture therapy (BNCT), seventeen were children. Eight supratentorial tumors included five astrocytomas(grade 2-4), two primitive neuroectodermal tumors (PNET) and one rhabdomyosarcoma. Seven pontine tumors included one astrocytoma, one PNET and 5 unverified gliomas. Two cerebellar tumors (PNET and astrocytoma) were also treated. All pontine tumors showed remarkable decrease in size after BNCT. However, most of them showed regrowth of the tumors because the neutrons were insufficient due to the depth. Four cases with cerebral tumor died of remote cell dissemination, although they all responded to BNCT. One of them survived 7 years after repeated BNCTs. An 11 years old girl with a large astrocytoma in the right frontal lobe has lived more than 11 years and is now a draftswoman at a civil engineering company after graduating from a technical college. An 8 years old girl with an astrocytoma in the left occipital lobe has no recurrence of the tumor for 2 years and attends on elementary school without mental and physical problems. Two children (one year old girl and four years old boy) with cerebellar tumors have shown showed an excellent growth after BNCT and had no neurological deficits. Mental and physical development in patients treated by BNCT is usually better than that in patients treated by conventional radiotherapy. (author)

  11. Assessing the scale of tumor heterogeneity by complete hierarchical segmentation of MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gensheimer, Michael F; Ermoian, Ralph P; Hawkins, Douglas S; Trister, Andrew D

    2015-01-01

    In many cancers, intratumoral heterogeneity has been found in histology, genetic variation and vascular structure. We developed an algorithm to interrogate different scales of heterogeneity using clinical imaging. We hypothesize that heterogeneity of perfusion at coarse scale may correlate with treatment resistance and propensity for disease recurrence. The algorithm recursively segments the tumor image into increasingly smaller regions. Each dividing line is chosen so as to maximize signal intensity difference between the two regions. This process continues until the tumor has been divided into single voxels, resulting in segments at multiple scales. For each scale, heterogeneity is measured by comparing each segmented region to the adjacent region and calculating the difference in signal intensity histograms. Using digital phantom images, we showed that the algorithm is robust to image artifacts and various tumor shapes. We then measured the primary tumor scales of contrast enhancement heterogeneity in MRI of 18 rhabdomyosarcoma patients. Using Cox proportional hazards regression, we explored the influence of heterogeneity parameters on relapse-free survival. Coarser scale of maximum signal intensity heterogeneity was prognostic of shorter survival (p = 0.05). By contrast, two fractal parameters and three Haralick texture features were not prognostic. In summary, our algorithm produces a biologically motivated segmentation of tumor regions and reports the amount of heterogeneity at various distance scales. If validated on a larger dataset, this prognostic imaging biomarker could be useful to identify patients at higher risk for recurrence and candidates for alternative treatment. (paper)

  12. Assessing the scale of tumor heterogeneity by complete hierarchical segmentation of MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gensheimer, Michael F; Hawkins, Douglas S; Ermoian, Ralph P; Trister, Andrew D

    2015-02-07

    In many cancers, intratumoral heterogeneity has been found in histology, genetic variation and vascular structure. We developed an algorithm to interrogate different scales of heterogeneity using clinical imaging. We hypothesize that heterogeneity of perfusion at coarse scale may correlate with treatment resistance and propensity for disease recurrence. The algorithm recursively segments the tumor image into increasingly smaller regions. Each dividing line is chosen so as to maximize signal intensity difference between the two regions. This process continues until the tumor has been divided into single voxels, resulting in segments at multiple scales. For each scale, heterogeneity is measured by comparing each segmented region to the adjacent region and calculating the difference in signal intensity histograms. Using digital phantom images, we showed that the algorithm is robust to image artifacts and various tumor shapes. We then measured the primary tumor scales of contrast enhancement heterogeneity in MRI of 18 rhabdomyosarcoma patients. Using Cox proportional hazards regression, we explored the influence of heterogeneity parameters on relapse-free survival. Coarser scale of maximum signal intensity heterogeneity was prognostic of shorter survival (p = 0.05). By contrast, two fractal parameters and three Haralick texture features were not prognostic. In summary, our algorithm produces a biologically motivated segmentation of tumor regions and reports the amount of heterogeneity at various distance scales. If validated on a larger dataset, this prognostic imaging biomarker could be useful to identify patients at higher risk for recurrence and candidates for alternative treatment.

  13. Lobular carcinoma in situ and invasive lobular breast cancer are characterized by enhanced expression of transcription factor AP-2β.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raap, Mieke; Gronewold, Malte; Christgen, Henriette; Glage, Silke; Bentires-Alj, Mohammad; Koren, Shany; Derksen, Patrick W; Boelens, Mirjam; Jonkers, Jos; Lehmann, Ulrich; Feuerhake, Friedrich; Kuehnle, Elna; Gluz, Oleg; Kates, Ronald; Nitz, Ulrike; Harbeck, Nadia; Kreipe, Hans H; Christgen, Matthias

    2018-01-01

    Transcription factor AP-2β (TFAP2B) regulates embryonic organ development and is overexpressed in alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma, a rare childhood malignancy. Gene expression profiling has implicated AP-2β in breast cancer (BC). This study characterizes AP-2β expression in the mammary gland and in BC. AP-2β protein expression was assessed in the normal mammary gland epithelium, in various reactive, metaplastic and pre-invasive neoplastic lesions and in two clinical BC cohorts comprising >2000 patients. BCs from various genetically engineered mouse (GEM) models were also evaluated. Human BC cell lines served as functional models to study siRNA-mediated inhibition of AP-2β. The normal mammary gland epithelium showed scattered AP-2β-positive cells in the luminal cell layer. Various reactive and pre-invasive neoplastic lesions, including apocrine metaplasia, usual ductal hyperplasia and lobular carcinoma in situ (LCIS) showed enhanced AP-2β expression. Cases of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) were more often AP-2β-negative (Pinvasive BC cohorts, AP-2β-positivity was associated with the lobular BC subtype (Plobular BC cell lines in vitro. In summary, AP-2β is a new mammary epithelial differentiation marker. Its expression is preferentially retained and enhanced in LCIS and invasive lobular BC and has prognostic implications. Our findings indicate that AP-2β controls tumor cell proliferation in this slow-growing BC subtype.

  14. Strategy of diagnosis and treatment for pediatric solid tumor patients using FDG-PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosono, Ako; Watanabe, Atsuko; Tsuji, Naoko; Kawamoto, Hiroshi; Makimoto, Atsushi; Tateishi, Ukihide; Terauthi, Takashi

    2006-01-01

    Usefulness of FDG-PET (18F-deoxyglucose PET) was investigated in diagnosis and therapeutic planning of childhood and adolescence malignant solid tumors. Evidence was based on 46 patients (25 males) of ages 5-30 y, involving those with rhabdomyosarcoma (17 cases), Ewing's sarcoma (13), osteosarcoma (5), neuroblastoma (4), Wilms' tumor (2), germinoma (2), and each 1 case of ganglioblastoma, retinoblastoma and hepatoblastoma. In total, they underwent 104 FDG-PET examinations for diagnosis before and during treatment in authors' hospital in the period from January 2005 to February 2006. Evaluations were done with the standard uptake value (SUV, 1 x 1 cm ROI of abnormally high distribution area of radioactivity in the lesion/FDG dose/kg body wt.), by recurrence, by early detection of exacerbation and by follow up of residual tumors, of which typical image findings were herein presented. From the aspects of the present purposes, it was concluded that FDG-PET had advantages of high resolution, short imaging time, quantitative diagnosis (SUV) as well as the tumor detection, and had defects of difficulty of detection of tumors of <1 cm size, of distribution to normal or benign tissues and of difficulty of central nervous system (CNS) imaging. (T.I.)

  15. TFG-MET fusion in an infantile spindle cell sarcoma with neural features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flucke, Uta; van Noesel, Max M; Wijnen, Marc; Zhang, Lei; Chen, Chun-Liang; Sung, Yun-Shao; Antonescu, Cristina R

    2017-09-01

    An increasing number of congenital and infantile sarcomas displaying a primitive, monomorphic spindle cell phenotype have been characterized to harbor recurrent gene fusions, including infantile fibrosarcoma and congenital spindle cell rhabdomyosarcoma. Here, we report an unusual spindle cell sarcoma presenting as a large and infiltrative pelvic soft tissue mass in a 4-month-old girl, which revealed a novel TFG-MET gene fusion by whole transcriptome RNA sequencing. The tumor resembled the morphology of an infantile fibrosarcoma with both fascicular and patternless growth, however, it expressed strong S100 protein immunoreactivity, while lacking SOX10 staining and retaining H3K27me3 expression. Although this immunoprofile suggested partial neural/neuroectodermal differentiation, overall features were unusual and did not fit into any known tumor types (cellular schwannoma, MPNST), raising the possibility of a novel pathologic entity. The TFG-MET gene fusion expands the genetic spectrum implicated in the pathogenesis of congenital spindle cell sarcomas, with yet another example of kinase oncogenic activation through chromosomal translocation. The discovery of this new fusion is significant since the resulting MET activation can potentially be inhibited by targeted therapy, as MET inhibitors are presently available in clinical trials. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Second cancers in children treated with modern radiotherapy techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, Uwe; Lomax, Antony; Timmermann, Beate

    2008-01-01

    Background and Purpose: The scattered radiation from the treatment volume might be more significant for children than for adults and, as a consequence, modern radiotherapy treatment techniques such as IMRT and passive proton therapy could potentially increase the number of secondary cancers. In this report, secondary cancer risk resulting from new treatment technologies was estimated for an adult prostate patient and a child. Material and methods: The organ equivalent dose (OED) concept with a linear-exponential, a plateau and a linear dose-response curve was applied to dose distributions of an adult prostate patient and a child with a rhabdomyosarcoma of the prostate. Conformal radiotherapy, IMRT with 6 MV photons and proton therapy were planned. OED (cancer risk) was estimated for the whole body, the rectum and the bladder. In addition, relative cumulative risk was calculated. Results: Secondary cancer risk in the adult is not more than 15% it increased when IMRT or passive proton therapy was compared to conventional treatment planning. In the child, risk remains practically constant or was even reduced for proton therapy. The cumulative risk in the child relative to that in the adult can be as large as 10-15. Conclusions: By a comparison between an adult patient and a child treated for a disease of the prostate, it was shown that modern radiotherapy techniques such as IMRT and proton therapy (active and passive) do not increase the risk for secondary cancers

  17. Radiotherapy for ocular lesions by electron beam therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyaishi, Kazuo

    1981-01-01

    Radiotherapy can be very significant as the treatment for ocular lesions, eyes need to be preserved as properly as possible on their functions and cosmetics. The appliance of conventional X ray therapy has been gradually abandaned as conventional X ray therapy ceased to be accepted as the general treatment for malignant tumors. Consequently the necessity of electron beam therapy has been rising even as the substituted method for conventional X ray therapy. The department of radiology of Gunma University was obliged to establish a new therapy for ocular lesions, and has been trying electron beam therapy since 1973; It is concluded that electron beam therapy is not at all inferior to conventional X ray therapy as reported above. Basic therapeutic methods for ocular lesions are the following: 1) For epidermoid carcinoma, 600 rads at a time, 3600 - 4200 rads in total is applied by 8 MeV electron twice a week method. 2) For malignant melanoma, 1000 rads at a time, 4000 - 5000 rads in total is applied by 8 MeV electron twice a week method. 3) For orbitar lymphoid neoplasm, Cobalt-60 γ ray or Linac X ray is applied together with electron beam. 4) For embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma, adenoid cystic cancer etc., the therapy for whole body is necessary. 5) For benign tumors, a small dose at a time is applied for a long time. (author)

  18. Enhancement of Radiation Response in Osteosarcoma and Rhabomyosarcoma Cell Lines by Histone Deacetylase Inhibition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blattmann, Claudia; Oertel, Susanne; Ehemann, Volker

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACIs) can enhance the sensitivity of cells to photon radiation treatment (XRT) by altering numerous molecular pathways. We investigated the effect of pan-HDACIs such as suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) on radiation response in two osteosarcoma (OS) and two rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) cell lines. Methods and Materials: Clonogenic survival, cell cycle analysis, and apoptosis were examined in OS (KHOS-24OS, SAOS2) and RMS (A-204, RD) cell lines treated with HDACI and HDACI plus XRT, respectively. Protein expression was investigated via immunoblot analysis, and cell cycle analysis and measurement of apoptosis were performed using flow cytometry. Results: SAHA induced an inhibition of cell proliferation and clonogenic survival in OS and RMS cell lines and led to a significant radiosensitization of all tumor cell lines. Other HDACI such as M344 and valproate showed similar effects as investigated in one OS cell line. Furthermore, SAHA significantly increased radiation-induced apoptosis in the OS cell lines, whereas in the RMS cell lines radiation-induced apoptosis was insignificant with and without SAHA. In all investigated sarcoma cell lines, SAHA attenuated radiation-induced DNA repair protein expression (Rad51, Ku80). Conclusion: Our results show that HDACIs enhance radiation action in OS and RMS cell lines. Inhibition of DNA repair, as well as increased apoptosis induction after exposure to HDACIs, can be mechanisms of radiosensitization by HDACIs.

  19. Postobstructive pulmonary edema after biopsy of a nasopharyngeal mass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keyur Kamlesh Mehta

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe a case of 17 year-old male with a nasopharyngeal rhabdomyosarcoma who developed postobstructive pulmonary edema (POPE after removing the endotracheal tube following biopsy. He developed muffled voice, rhinorrhea, dysphagia, odynophagia, and difficulty breathing through nose and weight loss of 20 pounds in the preceding 2 months. A nasopharyngoscopy revealed a fleshy nasopharyngeal mass compressing the soft and hard palate. Head and neck MRI revealed a large mass in the nasopharynx extending into the bilateral choana and oropharynx. Biopsy of the mass was taken under general anesthesia with endotracheal intubation. Immediately after extubation he developed oxygen desaturation, which did not improve with bag mask ventilation with 100% of oxygen, but improved after a dose of succinylcholine. He was re-intubated and pink, frothy fluid was suctioned from the endotracheal tube. Chest radiograph (CXR was suggestive of an acute pulmonary edema. He improved with mechanical ventilation and intravenous furosemide. His pulmonary edema resolved over the next 24 h. POPE is a rare but serious complication associated with upper airway obstruction. The pathophysiology of POPE involves hemodynamic changes occurring in the lung and the heart during forceful inspiration against a closed airway due to an acute or chronic airway obstruction. This case illustrates the importance of considering the development of POPE with general anesthesia, laryngospasm and removal of endotracheal tube to make prompt diagnosis and to initiate appropriate management.

  20. Cytotoxic effects of new synthesis heterocyclic derivatives of Amoxicillin on some cancer cell lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Rawi, M. S.; Hussei, D. F.; Al-Taie, A. F.; Al-Halbosiy, M. M.; Hameed, B. A.

    2018-05-01

    A new Schiff base [I] was prepared by refluxing Amoxicillin trihydrate and 4-Hydroxy- 3,5-dimethoxybenzaldehyde in aqueous methanol solution using glacial acetic acid as a catalyst. The new 1,3-oxazepine derivative [II] was obtained by Diels- Alder reaction of Schiff base [I] with phthalic anhydride in dry benzene. The reaction of Schiff base [I] with thioglycolic acid in dry benzene led to the formation of thiazolidin-4-one derivative [III]. While the imidazolidin-4-one [IV] derivative was produced by reacting the mentioned Schiff base [I] with glycine and triethylamine in ethanol for 9 hrs. Tetrazole derivative [V] was synthesized by refluxing Schiff base [I] with sodium azide in dimethylformamid DMF. The structure of synthesized compounds[I-V] was characterized by their melting points, elemental analysis CHN-S and by their spectral data; FTIR and 1H NMR spectroscopy. Two cancer cell lines include: (RD) human pelvic rhabdomyosarcoma and (L20B) the mice intestines carcinoma cell line (which expresses the genes for human cellular receptor for Polio viruses) were used in this study. The cytotoxic effect of different concentrations of all the synthesized compounds for 48 hrs was examined. All compounds except [IV] and [V] showed less than 50% inhibition for (L20B), while these compounds exhibit inhibition more than 50% inhibition for (RD).

  1. Incidence of eye cancer in Taiwan: an 18-year review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, C-Y; Hsu, W-M

    2004-02-01

    To describe the incidence and histologic patterns of eye cancers in Chinese in Taiwan. Beginning in 1979, cases of cancer in Taiwan were reported to the Taiwan National Cancer Registry. Information on all Chinese patients diagnosed with eye malignancies under the International Classification of Disease, Ninth Revision, site 190, was retrieved for analysis from the data bank of the Taiwan National Cancer Registry. In all, 733 cases with primary eye cancers were identified from 1979 to 1996, an 18-year period. The average annual age-standardized incidence of eye cancers was 2.46 per million population (2.57 for male and 2.33 for female). For cases less than 15 years of age, the most common eye malignancy was retinoblastoma (86.0%), followed by rhabdomyosarcoma (3.9%) and lymphoma (2.8%). For cases 15 years of age or older, the most common eye malignancy was melanoma (28.6%), followed by squamous cell sarcoma (21.0%) and lymphoma (20.8%). The time trends of the incidence of eye cancers were relatively stable over the 18-year period in Taiwan. Retinobalstoma, melanoma, and lymphoma were the three most common eye cancers in this Chinese population.

  2. Birth order and risk of childhood cancer: a pooled analysis from five US States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Von Behren, Julie; Spector, Logan G; Mueller, Beth A; Carozza, Susan E; Chow, Eric J; Fox, Erin E; Horel, Scott; Johnson, Kimberly J; McLaughlin, Colleen; Puumala, Susan E; Ross, Julie A; Reynolds, Peggy

    2011-06-01

    The causes of childhood cancers are largely unknown. Birth order has been used as a proxy for prenatal and postnatal exposures, such as frequency of infections and in utero hormone exposures. We investigated the association between birth order and childhood cancers in a pooled case-control dataset. The subjects were drawn from population-based registries of cancers and births in California, Minnesota, New York, Texas and Washington. We included 17,672 cases confidence intervals using logistic regression, adjusted for sex, birth year, maternal race, maternal age, multiple birth, gestational age and birth weight. Overall, we found an inverse relationship between childhood cancer risk and birth order. For children in the fourth or higher birth order category compared to first-born children, the adjusted OR was 0.87 (95% CI: 0.81, 0.93) for all cancers combined. When we examined risks by cancer type, a decreasing risk with increasing birth order was seen in the central nervous system tumors, neuroblastoma, bilateral retinoblastoma, Wilms tumor and rhabdomyosarcoma. We observed increased risks with increasing birth order for acute myeloid leukemia but a slight decrease in risk for acute lymphoid leukemia. These risk estimates were based on a very large sample size, which allowed us to examine rare cancer types with greater statistical power than in most previous studies, however the biologic mechanisms remain to be elucidated. Copyright © 2010 UICC.

  3. Noonan syndrome-like disorder with loose anagen hair: a second case with neuroblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garavelli, Livia; Cordeddu, Viviana; Errico, Stefania; Bertolini, Patrizia; Street, Maria Elisabeth; Rosato, Simonetta; Pollazzon, Marzia; Wischmeijer, Anita; Ivanovski, Ivan; Daniele, Paola; Bacchini, Ermanno; Lombardi, Alfonsa Anna; Izzi, Giancarlo; Biasucci, Giacomo; Del Rossi, Carmine; Corradi, Domenico; Cazzaniga, Giovanni; Dominici, Carlo; Rossi, Cesare; De Luca, Alessandro; Bernasconi, Sergio; Riccardi, Riccardo; Legius, Eric; Tartaglia, Marco

    2015-08-01

    Noonan-like syndrome with loose anagen hair (NSLH), also known as Mazzanti syndrome, is a RASopathy characterized by craniofacial features resembling Noonan syndrome, cardiac defects, cognitive deficits and behavioral issues, reduced growth generally associated with GH deficit, darkly pigmented skin, and an unique combination of ectodermal anomalies. Virtually all cases of NSLH are caused by an invariant and functionally unique mutation in SHOC2 (c.4A>G, p.Ser2Gly). Here, we report on a child with molecularly confirmed NSLH who developed a neuroblastoma, first suspected at the age 3 months by abdominal ultrasound examination. Based on this finding, scanning of the SHOC2 coding sequence encompassing the c.4A>G change was performed on selected pediatric cohorts of malignancies documented to occur in RASopathies (i.e., neuroblastoma, brain tumors, rhabdomyosarcoma, acute lymphoblastic, and myeloid leukemia), but failed to identify a functionally relevant cancer-associated variant. While these results do not support a major role of somatic SHOC2 mutations in these pediatric cancers, this second instance of neuroblastoma in NSLAH suggests a possible predisposition to this malignancy in subjects heterozygous for the c.4A>G SHOC2 mutation. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Trabectedin Followed by Irinotecan Can Stabilize Disease in Advanced Translocation-Positive Sarcomas with Acceptable Toxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Herzog

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Preclinical data indicate that trabectedin followed by irinotecan has strong synergistic effects on Ewing sarcoma. This is presumably due to hypersensitization of the tumor cells to the camptothecin as an effect of trabectedin in addition to synergistic suppression of EWS-FLI1 downstream targets. A strong effect was also reported in a human rhabdomyosarcoma xenograft. Procedure. Twelve patients with end-stage refractory translocation-positive sarcomas were treated with trabectedin followed by irinotecan within a compassionate use program. Eight patients had Ewing sarcoma and four patients had other translocation-positive sarcomas. Results. Three-month survival rate was 0.75 after the start of this therapy. One patient achieved a partial response according to RECIST criteria, five had stable disease, and the remaining six progressed through therapy. The majority of patients experienced significant hematological toxicity (grades 3 and 4. Reversible liver toxicity and diarrhea also occurred. Conclusions. Our experience with the combination of trabectedin followed with irinotecan in patients with advanced sarcomas showed promising results in controlling refractory solid tumors. While the hematological toxicity was significant, it was reversible. Quality of life during therapy was maintained. These observations encourage a larger clinical trial.

  5. MR Histoanatomical Distribution of 290 Soft-tissue Tumors

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    Moon, Tae Yong; Lee, In Sook; Lee, Gee Won; Kim, Jeung Il; Choi, Kyung Un; Kim, Won Taek [Pusan National University Hospital, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-12-15

    This study was designed too identify the MR histoanatomical distribution of soft-tissue tumors. A total of 290 soft-tissue tumors of 281 patients were analyzed by the use of MR imaging and were pathologically confirmed after surgical resection or a biopsy. There were 120 malignant soft-tissue tumors including tumors of an intermediate malignancy and 170 benign tumors. The histoanatomical locations were divided into three types: 'type I' with superficial layer tumors that involved the cutaneous and subcutaneous tissue, 'type II' with deep layer tumors that involved the muscle or tendon and 'type III' with soft tissue tumors that involved both the superficial and deep layers. Soft-tissue tumors with more than three cases with a frequency of more than 75% included dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans, glomus tumor, angiolipoma, leiomyosarcoma and lymphoma as 'type I' tumors. 'Type II' tumors with more than three cases with a frequency of more than 75% included liposarcoma, fibromatosis, papillary endothelial hyperplasia and rhabdomyosarcoma. 'Type III' tumors with more than three cases with a frequency of more than 50% included neurofibromatosis. The MR histoanatomical distributions of soft tissue tumors are useful in the differential pathological diagnosis when a soft-tissue tumor has a nonspecific MR appearance.

  6. PET measurements of hyperthermia-induced suppression of protein synthesis in tumors in relation to effects on tumor growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daemen, B.J.; Elsinga, P.H.; Mooibroek, J.; Paans, A.M.; Wieringa, A.R.; Konings, A.W.; Vaalburg, W.

    1991-01-01

    Hyperthermia-induced metabolic changes in tumor tissue have been monitored by PET. Uptake of L-[1-11C]tyrosine in rhabdomyosarcoma tissue of Wag/Rij rats was dose-dependently reduced after local hyperthermia treatment at 42, 45, or 47 degrees C. Tumor blood flow, as measured by PET with 13NH3, appeared to be unchanged. The L-[1-11C]tyrosine uptake data were compared to uptake data of L-[1-14C]tyrosine and with data on the incorporation of L-[1-14C]tyrosine into tumor proteins. After intravenous injection, the 14C data were obtained from dissected tumor tissue. Heat-induced inhibition of the incorporation of L-[1-14C]tyrosine into tumor proteins tallied with the L-[1-11C]tyrosine uptake data. Heat-induced inhibition of amino acid uptake in the tumor correlated well with regression of tumor growth. It is concluded that PET using L-[1-11C]tyrosine is eligible for monitoring the effect of hyperthermia on tumor growth

  7. Intracellular distribution of 57Bleomycin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konings, A.W.T.; Rasker, J.J.; Posthuma, G.A.

    1978-01-01

    Since the first promising results of Nouel et al. 1972, additional positive experience has been obtained with 57 Co-Bleomycin ( 57 Co-BLM) as a tumour-localizing agent. In this preclinical study, mice with transplanted osteosarcoma and lymphosarcoma were used and rats with transplanted rhabdomyosarcoma. 57 CoCl 2 served as a control substance. 57 Co-BLM had concentrated in the tumours with a factor 2 to 10 as compared to the (normal) liver of the animals. No preferential concentration in the tumours was found when 57 CoCl 2 was used. The highest specific activity of 57 Co-BLM (cpm/mg protein) was found in a fraction containing mitochondria and lysosomes. Evidence for a lysosomal localization of this diagnostic compound was obtained from experiments in which the mitochondrial-lysosomal fraction was treated with hypertonic media of different osmolarities. Conditions could be found in which many lysosomes burst while almost all mitochondria were intact. From these experiments it appeared that the radioactivity in the particles obtained from animals injected with 57 Co-BLM was released very rapidly. (Auth.)

  8. Morphological, functional and metabolic imaging biomarkers: assessment of vascular-disrupting effect on rodent liver tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Huaijun; Li, Junjie; Keyzer, Frederik De; Yu, Jie; Feng, Yuanbo; Marchal, Guy; Ni, Yicheng; Chen, Feng; Nuyts, Johan

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate effects of a vascular-disrupting agent on rodent tumour models. Twenty rats with liver rhabdomyosarcomas received ZD6126 intravenously at 20 mg/kg, and 10 vehicle-treated rats were used as controls. Multiple sequences, including diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) with the microvascular permeability constant (K), were acquired at baseline, 1 h, 24 h and 48 h post-treatment by using 1.5-T MRI. [ 18 F]fluorodeoxyglucose micro-positron emission tomography ( 18 F-FDG μPET) was acquired pre- and post-treatment. The imaging biomarkers including tumour volume, enhancement ratio, necrosis ratio, apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) and K from MRI, and maximal standardised uptake value (SUV max ) from FDG μPET were quantified and correlated with postmortem microangiography and histopathology. In the ZD6126-treated group, tumours grew slower with higher necrosis ratio at 48 h (P max dropped at 24 h (P < 0.01). Relative K of tumour versus liver at 48 h correlated with relative vascular density on microangiography (r = 0.93, P < 0.05). The imaging biomarkers allowed morphological, functional and metabolic quantifications of vascular shutdown, necrosis formation and tumour relapse shortly after treatment. A single dose of ZD6126 significantly diminished tumour blood supply and growth until 48 h post-treatment. (orig.)

  9. Parenteral nutrition in patients with inborn errors of metabolism - a therapeutic problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaluzny, L; Szczepanik, M; Siwinska-Mrozek, Z; Borkowska-Klos, M; Cichy, W; Walkowiak, J

    2014-06-01

    Parenteral nutrition is now a standard part of supportive treatment in pediatric departments. We describe four cases in which parenteral nutrition was extremely difficult due to coincidence with inborn errors of metabolism. The first two cases was fatty acid beta-oxidation disorders associated with necrotizing enterocolitis and congenital heart disease. Thus, limitations of intravenous lipid intake made it difficult to maintain a good nutritional status. The third case was phenylketonuria associated with a facial region tumour (rhabdomyosarcoma), in which parenteral nutrition was complicated because of a high phenylalanine content in the amino acid formulas for parenteral nutrition. The fourth patient was a child with late-diagnosed tyrosinemia type 1, complicated with encephalopathy - during intensive care treatment the patient needed nutritional support, including parenteral nutrition - we observed amino acid formula problems similar to those in the phenylketonuria patient. Parenteral nutrition in children with inborn errors of metabolism is a rare, but very important therapeutic problem. Total parenteral nutrition formulas are not prepared for this group of diseases.

  10. The crystal structure of a coxsackievirus B3-RD variant and a refined 9-angstrom cryo-electron microscopy reconstruction of the virus complexed with decay-accelerating factor (DAF) provide a new footprint of DAF on the virus surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoder, Joshua D; Cifuente, Javier O; Pan, Jieyan; Bergelson, Jeffrey M; Hafenstein, Susan

    2012-12-01

    The coxsackievirus-adenovirus receptor (CAR) and decay-accelerating factor (DAF) have been identified as cellular receptors for coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3). The first described DAF-binding isolate was obtained during passage of the prototype strain, Nancy, on rhabdomyosarcoma (RD) cells, which express DAF but very little CAR. Here, the structure of the resulting variant, CVB3-RD, has been solved by X-ray crystallography to 2.74 Å, and a cryo-electron microscopy reconstruction of CVB3-RD complexed with DAF has been refined to 9.0 Å. This new high-resolution structure permits us to correct an error in our previous view of DAF-virus interactions, providing a new footprint of DAF that bridges two adjacent protomers. The contact sites between the virus and DAF clearly encompass CVB3-RD residues recently shown to be required for binding to DAF; these residues interact with DAF short consensus repeat 2 (SCR2), which is known to be essential for virus binding. Based on the new structure, the mode of the DAF interaction with CVB3 differs significantly from the mode reported previously for DAF binding to echoviruses.

  11. Enzastaurin inhibits ABCB1-mediated drug efflux independently of effects on protein kinase C signalling and the cellular p53 status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaelis, Martin; Rothweiler, Florian; Löschmann, Nadine; Sharifi, Mohsen; Ghafourian, Taravat; Cinatl, Jindrich

    2015-07-10

    The PKCβ inhibitor enzastaurin was tested in parental neuroblastoma and rhabdomyosarcoma cell lines, their vincristine-resistant sub-lines, primary neuroblastoma cells, ABCB1-transduced, ABCG2-transduced, and p53-depleted cells. Enzastaurin IC50s ranged from 3.3 to 9.5 μM in cell lines and primary cells independently of the ABCB1, ABCG2, or p53 status. Enzastaurin 0.3125 μM interfered with ABCB1-mediated drug transport. PKCα and PKCβ may phosphorylate and activate ABCB1 under the control of p53. However, enzastaurin exerted similar effects on ABCB1 in the presence or absence of functional p53. Also, enzastaurin inhibited PKC signalling only in concentrations ≥ 1.25 μM. The investigated cell lines did not express PKCβ. PKCα depletion reduced PKC signalling but did not affect ABCB1 activity. Intracellular levels of the fluorescent ABCB1 substrate rhodamine 123 rapidly decreased after wash-out of extracellular enzastaurin, and enzastaurin induced ABCB1 ATPase activity resembling the ABCB1 substrate verapamil. Computational docking experiments detected a direct interaction of enzastaurin and ABCB1. These data suggest that enzastaurin directly interferes with ABCB1 function. Enzastaurin further inhibited ABCG2-mediated drug transport but by a different mechanism since it reduced ABCG2 ATPase activity. These findings are important for the further development of therapies combining enzastaurin with ABC transporter substrates.

  12. Contamination of infectious RD-114 virus in vaccines produced using non-feline cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshikawa, Rokusuke; Sato, Eiji; Miyazawa, Takayuki

    2011-01-01

    All domestic cats have a replication-competent endogenous retrovirus, termed RD-114 virus, in their genome and several feline cell lines produce RD-114 viruses. Recently, we found that a portion of live attenuated feline and canine vaccines produced using feline cell lines was contaminated with infectious RD-114 viruses. In this study, we expanded our survey and examined canine vaccines produced using 'non-feline' cell lines. Consequently, we found two vaccines containing RD-114 viral RNA by reverse transcriptase (RT)-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and real-time RT-PCR. We also confirmed the presence of infectious RD-114 virus in the vaccines by the LacZ marker rescue assay and PCR to detect proviral DNA in TE671 cells (human rhabdomyosarcoma cells) inoculated with the vaccines. It is impossible to investigate the definitive cause of contamination with RD-114 virus; however, we suspect that a seed canine parvovirus type 2 was contaminated with RD-114 virus, because many canine parvoviruses have been isolated and attenuated using feline cell lines. To exclude RD-114 virus from live attenuated vaccines, we must pay attention to the contamination of seed viruses with RD-114 virus in addition to avoiding feline cell lines producing RD-114 virus when manufacturing vaccines. Copyright © 2010 The International Association for Biologicals. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Visual Analytics of Complex Genomics Data to Guide Effective Treatment Decisions

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    Quang Vinh Nguyen

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In cancer biology, genomics represents a big data problem that needs accurate visual data processing and analytics. The human genome is very complex with thousands of genes that contain the information about the individual patients and the biological mechanisms of their disease. Therefore, when building a framework for personalised treatment, the complexity of the genome must be captured in meaningful and actionable ways. This paper presents a novel visual analytics framework that enables effective analysis of large and complex genomics data. By providing interactive visualisations from the overview of the entire patient cohort to the detail view of individual genes, our work potentially guides effective treatment decisions for childhood cancer patients. The framework consists of multiple components enabling the complete analytics supporting personalised medicines, including similarity space construction, automated analysis, visualisation, gene-to-gene comparison and user-centric interaction and exploration based on feature selection. In addition to the traditional way to visualise data, we utilise the Unity3D platform for developing a smooth and interactive visual presentation of the information. This aims to provide better rendering, image quality, ergonomics and user experience to non-specialists or young users who are familiar with 3D gaming environments and interfaces. We illustrate the effectiveness of our approach through case studies with datasets from childhood cancers, B-cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukaemia (ALL and Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS patients, on how to guide the effective treatment decision in the cohort.

  14. A review of soft-tissue sarcomas: translation of biological advances into treatment measures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoang NT

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Ngoc T Hoang,* Luis A Acevedo,* Michael J Mann, Bhairavi Tolani Thoracic Oncology Program, Department of Surgery, Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California, San Francisco, CA, USA *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Soft-tissue sarcomas are rare malignant tumors arising from connective tissues and have an overall incidence of about five per 100,000 per year. While this diverse family of malignancies comprises over 100 histological subtypes and many molecular aberrations are prevalent within specific sarcomas, very few are therapeutically targeted. Instead of utilizing molecular signatures, first-line sarcoma treatment options are still limited to traditional surgery and chemotherapy, and many of the latter remain largely ineffective and are plagued by disease resistance. Currently, the mechanism of sarcoma oncogenesis remains largely unknown, thus necessitating a better understanding of pathogenesis. Although substantial progress has not occurred with molecularly targeted therapies over the past 30 years, increased knowledge about sarcoma biology could lead to new and more effective treatment strategies to move the field forward. Here, we discuss biological advances in the core molecular determinants in some of the most common soft-tissue sarcomas – liposarcoma, angiosarcoma, leiomyosarcoma, rhabdomyosarcoma, Ewing’s sarcoma, and synovial sarcoma – with an emphasis on emerging genomic and molecular pathway targets and immunotherapeutic treatment strategies to combat this confounding disease. Keywords: sarcoma, molecular pathways, immunotherapy, genomics

  15. The prognosis of osteosarcoma occurring as second malignancy of childhood cancers may be favorable: experience of two cancer centers in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yonemoto, Tsukasa; Hosono, Ako; Iwata, Shintaro; Kamoda, Hiroto; Hagiwara, Yoko; Fujiwara, Tomohiro; Kawai, Akira; Ishii, Takeshi

    2015-06-01

    Osteosarcoma as second malignancy of childhood cancers rarely occurs, and its clinical characteristics are unclear. Patients with osteosarcoma occurring as second malignancy of childhood cancers were retrospectively surveyed. Of 323 patients with osteosarcoma registered in the database, 10 (3.1%) had a past history of childhood cancers. The mean age at the onset of the first childhood cancer was 2.7 years, and the diagnosis of the first childhood cancer was adrenocortical carcinoma, malignant teratoma, ovarian carcinoma, Ewing's sarcoma, and rhabdomyosarcoma in 1 patient each, and retinoblastoma in 5 patients. Osteosarcoma as second malignancy occurred 14.6 years after the first childhood cancer on average. Seven patients were alive and 3 died. In 1 patient, the cause of death was related to a complication of treatment for the first childhood cancer. Except for this patient, 7 (77.8%) of 9 patients survived with no disease (mean follow-up period: 10.9 years). Attention should be paid to complications of treatment for the first childhood cancer in the treatment for osteosarcoma occurring as second malignancy. The prognosis of osteosarcoma as second malignancy of childhood cancers may be more favorable than that of conventional osteosarcoma.

  16. PIRATE: pediatric imaging response assessment and targeting environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenn, Russell; Zhang, Yong; Krasin, Matthew; Hua, Chiaho

    2010-02-01

    By combining the strengths of various imaging modalities, the multimodality imaging approach has potential to improve tumor staging, delineation of tumor boundaries, chemo-radiotherapy regime design, and treatment response assessment in cancer management. To address the urgent needs for efficient tools to analyze large-scale clinical trial data, we have developed an integrated multimodality, functional and anatomical imaging analysis software package for target definition and therapy response assessment in pediatric radiotherapy (RT) patients. Our software provides quantitative tools for automated image segmentation, region-of-interest (ROI) histogram analysis, spatial volume-of-interest (VOI) analysis, and voxel-wise correlation across modalities. To demonstrate the clinical applicability of this software, histogram analyses were performed on baseline and follow-up 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) PET images of nine patients with rhabdomyosarcoma enrolled in an institutional clinical trial at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital. In addition, we combined 18F-FDG PET, dynamic-contrast-enhanced (DCE) MR, and anatomical MR data to visualize the heterogeneity in tumor pathophysiology with the ultimate goal of adaptive targeting of regions with high tumor burden. Our software is able to simultaneously analyze multimodality images across multiple time points, which could greatly speed up the analysis of large-scale clinical trial data and validation of potential imaging biomarkers.

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging after radiofrequency ablation in a rodent model of liver tumor: tissue characterization using a novel necrosis-avid contrast agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ni, Yicheng; Yu, Jie; Marchal, Guy; Chen, Feng; Mulier, Stefaan; Sun, Xihe; Landuyt, Willy; Verbruggen, Alfons

    2006-01-01

    We exploited a necrosis-avid contrast agent ECIV-7 for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in rodent liver tumors after radiofrequency ablation (RFA). Rats bearing liver rhabdomyosarcoma (R1) were randomly allocated to three groups: group I, complete RFA, group II, incomplete RFA, and group III, sham ablation. Within 24 h after RFA, T1-weighted (T1-w) MRI was performed before and after injection of ECIV-7 at 0.05 mmol/kg and followed up from 6-24 h. Signal intensities (SIs) were measured with relative enhancement (RE) and contrast ratio (CR) calculated. The MRI findings were verified histomorphologically. On plain T1-w MRI the contrasts between normal liver, RFA lesion, residual and/or intact tumor were vague. Early after administration of ECIV-7, the liver SI was strongly enhanced (RE=40-50%), leaving the RFA lesion as a hypointense region in groups I and II. At delayed phase, two striking peri-ablational enhancement patterns appeared (RE=90% and CR=1.89%), i.e., ''O'' type of hyperintense rim in group I and ''C'' type of incomplete rim in group II. These MRI manifestations could be proven histologically. In this study, tissue components after RFA could be characterized with discernable contrasts by necrosis-avid contrast agent (NACA)-enhanced MRI, especially at delayed phase. This approach may prove useful for defining the ablated area and identifying residual tumor after RFA. (orig.)

  18. Artificial neural network inference (ANNI: a study on gene-gene interaction for biomarkers in childhood sarcomas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Ling Tong

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To model the potential interaction between previously identified biomarkers in children sarcomas using artificial neural network inference (ANNI. METHOD: To concisely demonstrate the biological interactions between correlated genes in an interaction network map, only 2 types of sarcomas in the children small round blue cell tumors (SRBCTs dataset are discussed in this paper. A backpropagation neural network was used to model the potential interaction between genes. The prediction weights and signal directions were used to model the strengths of the interaction signals and the direction of the interaction link between genes. The ANN model was validated using Monte Carlo cross-validation to minimize the risk of over-fitting and to optimize generalization ability of the model. RESULTS: Strong connection links on certain genes (TNNT1 and FNDC5 in rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS; FCGRT and OLFM1 in Ewing's sarcoma (EWS suggested their potency as central hubs in the interconnection of genes with different functionalities. The results showed that the RMS patients in this dataset are likely to be congenital and at low risk of cardiomyopathy development. The EWS patients are likely to be complicated by EWS-FLI fusion and deficiency in various signaling pathways, including Wnt, Fas/Rho and intracellular oxygen. CONCLUSIONS: The ANN network inference approach and the examination of identified genes in the published literature within the context of the disease highlights the substantial influence of certain genes in sarcomas.

  19. Toxicology and metabolism of nickel compounds. Progress report, December 1, 1978-November 30, 1979. [Hamsters and rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sunderman, F.W. Jr.

    1979-08-15

    The toxicology and metabolism of nickel compounds were investigated in rats and hamsters. The new knowledge includes; demonstration that nickel carbonyl is teratogenic for hamsters; elucidation of physiological factors which influence ..cap alpha..Ni/sub 3/S/sub 2/-induced erythrocytosis in rats; development of a sensitive assay for heme oxygenase activity in renal microsomes for use in studies of renal effects of nickel compounds; demonstration that administration of Ni(CO)/sub 4/ to rats inhibits incorporation of /sup 3/H-thymidine into DNA during hepatic regeneration; demonstration that clones of Syrian hamster fetal cells which have been transformed by in vitro exposure to ..cap alpha..Ni/sub 3/S/sub 2/ consistently cause sarcomas following sc injection into nude mice; demonstration that nickel carbonyl-cyclopentadiene dimer induces rhabdomyosarcomas following im injection in rats; observation of differences in carcinogenic activities of several insoluble nickel compounds; discovery that intraocular injection of ..cap alpha..Ni/sub 3/S/sub 2/ induces amelanotic melanomas in rats; and refinement of analytical methods for nickel in biological materials.

  20. The Ezrin Metastatic Phenotype Is Associated with the Initiation of Protein Translation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph W. Briggs

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available We previously associated the cytoskeleton linker protein, Ezrin, with the metastatic phenotype of pediatric sarcomas, including osteosarcoma and rhabdomyosarcoma. These studies have suggested that Ezrin contributes to the survival of cancer cells after their arrival at secondary metastatic locations. To better understand this role in metastasis, we undertook two noncandidate analyses of Ezrin function including a microarray subtraction of high-and low-Ezrin-expressing cells and a proteomic approach to identify proteins that bound the N-terminus of Ezrin in tumor lysates. Functional analyses of these data led to a novel and unifying hypothesis that Ezrin contributes to the efficiency of metastasis through regulation of protein translation. In support of this hypothesis, we found Ezrin to be part of the ribonucleoprotein complex to facilitate the expression of complex messenger RNA in cells and to bind with poly A binding protein 1 (PABP1; PABPC1. The relevance of these findings was supported by our identification of Ezrin and components of the translational machinery in pseudopodia of highly metastatic cells during the process of cell invasion. Finally, two small molecule inhibitors recently shown to inhibit the Ezrin metastatic phenotype disrupted the Ezrin/PABP1 association. Taken together, these results provide a novel mechanistic basis by which Ezrin may contribute to metastasis.

  1. A novel minicircle vector based system for inhibting the replication and gene expression of enterovirus 71 and coxsackievirus A16.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhuo; Li, Guodong; Zhang, Yingqiu; Liu, Xiaoman; Tien, Po

    2012-11-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV 71) and Coxsackievirus A16 (CA 16) are two major causative agents of hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD). They have been associated with severe neurological and cardiological complications worldwide, and have caused significant mortalities during large-scale outbreaks in China. Currently, there are no effective treatments against EV 71 and CA 16 infections. We now describe the development of a novel minicircle vector based RNA interference (RNAi) system as a therapeutic approach to inhibiting EV 71 and CA 16 replication. Small interfering RNA (siRNA) molecules targeting the conserved regions of the 3C(pro) and 3D(pol) function gene of the EV 71 and CA 16 China strains were designed based on their nucleotide sequences available in GenBank. This RNAi system was found to effectively block the replication and gene expression of these viruses in rhabdomyosarcoma (RD) cells and virus-infected mice model. The inhibitory effects were confirmed by a corresponding decrease in viral RNA, viral protein, and progeny virus production. In addition, no significant adverse off-target silencing or cytotoxic effects were observed. These results demonstrated the potential and feasibility of this novel minicircle vector based RNAi system for antiviral therapy against EV 71 and CA 16 infection. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. The mouse as a model for understanding chronic diseases of aging: the histopathologic basis of aging in inbred mice

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    David Harrison

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Inbred mice provide a unique tool to study aging populations because of the genetic homogeneity within an inbred strain, their short life span, and the tools for analysis which are available. A large-scale longitudinal and cross-sectional aging study was conducted on 30 inbred strains to determine, using histopathology, the type and diversity of diseases mice develop as they age. These data provide tools that when linked with modern in silico genetic mapping tools, can begin to unravel the complex genetics of many of the common chronic diseases associated with aging in humans and other mammals. In addition, novel disease models were discovered in some strains, such as rhabdomyosarcoma in old A/J mice, to diseases affecting many but not all strains including pseudoxanthoma elasticum, pulmonary adenoma, alopecia areata, and many others. This extensive data set is now available online and provides a useful tool to help better understand strain-specific background diseases that can complicate interpretation of genetically engineered mice and other manipulatable mouse studies that utilize these strains.

  3. Rhabdomysarcoma of the penis in a boy. Report of a case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palacios Acosta José Martín

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS is the most common pediatric soft tissue malignant tumor. It is more likely to occur in children under 5 years of age and it is most often found in the head and neck. The presentation in the penis is extremely rare. The embryonic variety is the most common histologic subtype. The RMS of the penis is usually a painless mass. In some cases dysuria and priapism can also be present. Treatment is based on surgical resection, che- motherapy and radiation therapy. We describe a 3 year old boy with a 6 month history of a painless enlargement of the penis due to the presence of a mass. On its dorsal aspect measuring 3 x 3 cm with necrotic and ulcerated areas; it did not affect the urethral meatus. On the CT scan a tumor on the left lateral side of the penile shaft was found, with a diameter of 2.8 x 2.5 x 3.3 cm and a 12 cc volume. Surgical resection of the mass was performed. The histopathologic study reported an embryonal type RMS. The patient was treated with chemotherapeutic agents including ifosfamide and doxorubicin, with a favorable outcome.

  4. FDG small animal PET permits early detection of malignant cells in a xenograft murine model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanni, Cristina; Spinelli, Antonello; Trespidi, Silvia; Ambrosini, Valentina; Castellucci, Paolo; Farsad, Mohsen; Franchi, Roberto; Fanti, Stefano; Leo, Korinne di; Tonelli, Roberto; Pession, Andrea; Pettinato, Cinzia; Rubello, Domenico

    2007-01-01

    The administration of new anticancer drugs in animal models is the first step from in vitro to in vivo pre-clinical protocols. At this stage it is crucial to ensure that cells are in the logarithmic phase of growth and to avoid vascular impairment, which can cause inhomogeneous distribution of the drug within the tumour and thus lead to bias in the final analysis of efficacy. In subcutaneous xenograft murine models, positivity for cancer is visually recognisable 2-3 weeks after inoculation, when a certain amount of necrosis is usually already present. The aim of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of FDG small animal PET for the early detection of malignant masses in a xenograft murine model of human rhabdomyosarcoma. A second goal was to analyse the metabolic behaviour of this xenograft tumour over time. We studied 23 nude mice, in which 7 x 10 6 rhabdomyosarcoma cells (RH-30 cell line) were injected in the dorsal subcutaneous tissues. Each animal underwent four FDG PET scans (GE, eXplore Vista DR) under gas anaesthesia. The animals were studied 2, 5, 14 and 20 days after inoculation. We administered 20 MBq of FDG via the tail vein. Uptake time was 60 min, and acquisition time, 20 min. Images were reconstructed with OSEM 2D iterative reconstruction and the target to background ratio (TBR) was calculated for each tumour. Normal subcutaneous tissue had a TBR of 0.3. Necrosis was diagnosed when one or more cold areas were present within the mass. All the animals were sacrificed and histology was available to verify PET results. PET results were concordant with the findings of necropsy and histology in all cases. The incidence of the tumour was 69.6% (16/23 animals); seven animals did not develop a malignant mass. Ten of the 23 animals had a positive PET scan 2 days after inoculation. Nine of these ten animals developed a tumour; the remaining animal became negative, at the third scan. The positive predictive value of the early PET scan was 90% (9/10 animals

  5. Effects of all-trans retinoic acid on tumor recurrence and metastasis Efecto del ácido trans-retinoico sobre la recidiva tumoral y el desarrollo metastásico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. García-Alonso

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: all-trans-retinoic acid (ATRA promotes cell differentiation. We have studied its effect on the local recurrence and metastatic spreading of an experimental rhabdomyosarcoma in rats. Design: syngenic rhabdomyosarcoma cells (S4MH were inoculated s.c. in male WAG/RijCrl rats. After 25 days tumors were excised and a 40% hepatectomy was performed for all animals. Ten days later the rats were sacrificed and a thorough necropsy was performed. The animals were randomly allocated to receive daily doses of ATRA (5 mg/kg, i.p. or its solvent (Clinoleic®/ethanol 90/10, starting three days before surgery until the end of the experiment. Results: ATRA reduced the incidence of local recurrence from 70 to 33% (p Objetivo: el ácido trans-retinoico (ATRA, "all-trans retinoic acid" es un agente inductor de la diferenciación celular. Se estudia su efecto sobre la recidiva local y la diseminación metastásica de los tumores sólidos. Diseño experimental: mediante inoculación subcutánea de células de rabdomiosarcoma (S4MH se ha inducido un tumor en ratas WAG/RijCrl. Tras 25 días, se practicó una tumorectomía y simultáneamente hepatectomía del 40%. Los animales se sacrificaron el día 35, y fueron sometidos a estudio necrópsico. La mitad de los animales fueron tratados con ATRA (5 mg/kg, i.p. desde el día 22 al 35, mientras que los controles recibieron el excipiente (Clinoleico®/etanol 90/10. Resultados: el tratamiento redujo la tasa de recidiva local del 70 al 33% (p < 0,05, aunque no afectó a su tamaño (1,8 vs. 2,0 cc. El volumen medio de las metástasis inguinales se redujo a la sexta parte (0,2 vs. 1,2 cc; p < 0,05, si bien su frecuencia aumentó con el ATRA (86 vs. 29%; p < 0,05. La extensión retroperitoneal del rabdomisoarcoma también se redujo (0,7 vs. 5,1 cc; p < 0,05, aunque no hubo variación en la incidencia (71 vs. 67%. La incidencia de afectación pulmonar (100% en controles se redujo hasta el 33% (p < 0,05, a la vez que el

  6. Proton radiotherapy in management of pediatric base of skull tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hug, Eugen B.; Sweeney, Reinhart A.; Nurre, Pamela M.; Holloway, Kitty C.; Slater, Jerry D.; Munzenrider, John E.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: Primary skull base tumors of the developing child are rare and present a formidable challenge to both surgeons and radiation oncologists. Gross total resection with negative margins is rarely achieved, and the risks of functional, structural, and cosmetic deficits limit the radiation dose using conventional radiation techniques. Twenty-nine children and adolescents treated with conformal proton radiotherapy (proton RT) were analyzed to assess treatment efficacy and safety. Methods and Materials: Between July 1992 and April 1999, 29 patients with mesenchymal tumors underwent fractionated proton (13 patients) or fractionated combined proton and photon (16 patients) irradiation. The age at treatment ranged from 1 to 19 years (median 12); 14 patients were male and 15 female. Tumors were grouped as malignant or benign. Twenty patients had malignant histologic findings, including chordoma (n=10), chondrosarcoma (n=3), rhabdomyosarcoma (n=4), and other sarcomas (n=3). Target doses ranged between 50.4 and 78.6 Gy/cobalt Gray equivalent (CGE), delivered at doses of 1.8-2.0 Gy/CGE per fraction. The benign histologic findings included giant cell tumors (n=6), angiofibromas (n=2), and chondroblastoma (n=1). RT doses for this group ranged from 45.0 to 71.8 Gy/CGE. Despite maximal surgical resection, 28 (97%) of 29 patients had gross disease at the time of proton RT. Follow-up after proton RT ranged from 13 to 92 months (mean 40). Results: Of the 20 patients with malignant tumors, 5 (25%) had local failure; 1 patient had failure in the surgical access route and 3 patients developed distant metastases. Seven patients had died of progressive disease at the time of analysis. Local tumor control was maintained in 6 (60%) of 10 patients with chordoma, 3 (100%) of 3 with chondrosarcoma, 4 (100%) of 4 with rhabdomyosarcoma, and 2 (66%) of 3 with other sarcomas. The actuarial 5-year local control and overall survival rate was 72% and 56%, respectively, and the overall survival

  7. High-level expression of podoplanin in benign and malignant soft tissue tumors: immunohistochemical and quantitative real-time RT-PCR analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yongjun; Ogose, Akira; Kawashima, Hiroyuki; Hotta, Tetsuo; Ariizumi, Takashi; Li, Guidong; Umezu, Hajime; Endo, Naoto

    2011-03-01

    Podoplanin is a 38 kDa mucin-type transmembrane glycoprotein that was first identified in rat glomerular epithelial cells (podocytes). It is expressed in normal lymphatic endothelium, but is absent from vascular endothelial cells. D2-40 is a commercially available mouse monoclonal antibody which binds to an epitope on human podoplanin. D2-40 immunoreactivity is therefore highly sensitive and specific for lymphatic endothelium. Recent investigations have shown widespread applications of immunohistochemical staining with D2-40 in evaluating podoplanin expression as an immunohistochemical marker for diagnosis and prognosis in various tumors. To determine whether the podoplanin (D2-40) antibody may be useful for the diagnosis of soft tissue tumors, 125 cases, including 4 kinds of benign tumors, 15 kinds of malignant tumors and 3 kinds of tumor-like lesions were immunostained using the D2-40 antibody. Total RNA was extracted from frozen tumor tissue obtained from 41 corresponding soft tissue tumor patients and 12 kinds of soft tissue tumor cell lines. Quantitative real-time PCR reactions were performed. Immunohistochemical and quantitative real-time RT-PCR analyses demonstrated the expression of the podoplanin protein and mRNA in the majority of benign and malignant soft tissue tumors and tumor-like lesions examined, with the exception of alveolar soft part sarcoma, embryonal and alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma, extraskeletal Ewing's sarcoma/peripheral primitive neuro-ectodermal tumor and lipoma, which were completely negative for podoplanin. Since it is widely and highly expressed in nearly all kinds of soft tissue tumors, especially in spindle cell sarcoma, myxoid type soft tissue tumors and soft tissue tumors of the nervous system, podoplanin is considered to have little value in the differential diagnosis of soft tissue tumors.

  8. Tumor induction following intraoperative radiotherapy: Late results of the National Cancer Institute canine trials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnes, M.; Duray, P.; DeLuca, A.; Anderson, W.; Sindelar, W.; Kinsella, T.

    1990-01-01

    Intraoperative radiotherapy has been employed in human cancer research for over a decade. Since 1979, trials to assess the acute and late toxicity of IORT have been carried out at the National Cancer Institute in an adult dog model in an attempt to establish dose tolerance guidelines for a variety of organs. Of the 170 animals entered on 12 studies with a minimum follow-up of 2 years, 148 dogs received IORT; 22 control animals received only surgery. Animals were sacrificed at designated intervals following IORT, usually at 1, 6, 12, 24, and 60 month intervals. 102 of 148 irradiated dogs were sacrificed less than 24 months; 46 dogs were followed greater than or equal to 24 months after IORT. To date, 34 of the 46 animals have been sacrificed; the 12 remaining animals are to be followed to 5 years. These 12 animals have minimum follow-up of 30 months. In the irradiated group followed for greater than or equal to 24 months, 10 tumors have arisen in 9 animals. One animal developed an incidental spontaneous breast carcinoma outside the IORT port, discovered only at scheduled post-mortem exam. The remaining nine tumors arose within IORT ports. Two tumors were benign neural tumors--a neuroma and a neurofibroma. One animal had a collision tumor comprised of grade I chondrosarcoma adjacent to grade III osteosarcoma arising in lumbar vertebrae. Two other grade III osteosarcomas, one grade III fibrosarcoma, and one grade III malignant fibrous histiocytoma arose in retroperitoneal/paravertebral sites. An embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma (sarcoma botryoides) arose within the irradiated urinary bladder of one animal. No sham irradiated controls nor IORT animals sacrificed less than 24 months have developed any spontaneous or radiation-induced tumors. The time range of diagnoses of tumors was 24-58 months. The IORT dose range associated with tumor development was 20-35 Gy

  9. PET/CT versus bone marrow biopsy in the initial evaluation of bone marrow infiltration in various pediatric malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapata, Claudia P; Cuglievan, Branko; Zapata, Catalina M; Olavarrieta, Raquel; Raskin, Scott; Desai, Kavita; De Angulo, Guillermo

    2018-02-01

    Accurate staging is essential in the prognosis and management of pediatric malignancies. Current protocols require screening for marrow infiltration with bone marrow biopsy (BMB) as the gold standard. Positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) is commonly used to complete the staging process and can also be used to evaluate marrow infiltration. To compare PET-CT and BMB in the initial evaluation of bone marrow infiltration in pediatric cancers. We retrospectively reviewed new cases of EWS, rhabdomyosarcoma, neuroblastoma, and lymphoma diagnosed between January 2009 and October 2014. Each case had undergone both PET-CT and BMB within 4 weeks without treatment in the interval between screening modalities. We reviewed 69 cases. Bone marrow infiltration was demonstrated in 34 cases by PET-CT and in 18 cases by BMB. The sensitivity and negative predictive value of PET-CT were both 100%. Interestingly, the cases in which infiltration was not detected on BMB had an abnormal marrow signal on PET-CT focal or distant to iliac crest. PET-CT has a high sensitivity when assessing marrow infiltration in pediatric malignancies. Advances in radiologic modalities may obviate the use of invasive, painful, and costly procedures like BMB. Furthermore, biopsy results are limited by insufficient tissue or the degree of marrow infiltration (diffuse vs. focal disease). PET-CT can improve the precision of biopsy when used as a guiding tool. This study proposes the use of PET-CT as first-line screening for bone marrow infiltration to improve the accuracy of staging in new diagnoses. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. SU-F-BRD-12: When Does Pencil Beam Scanning Become Superior to Passive Scattered Proton Therapy for Pediatric Head and Neck Cancers?

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    Moteabbed, M; Depauw, N; Kooy, H; Yock, T; Paganetti, H [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the dosimetric benefits of pencil beam scanning (PBS) compared with passive scattered (PS) proton therapy for treatment of pediatric head&neck patients as a function of the PBS spot size and explore the advantages of using apertures in PBS. Methods: Ten pediatric patients with head&neck cancers treated by PS proton therapy at our institution were retrospectively selected. The histologies included rhabdomyosarcoma, ependymoma, astrocytoma, craniopharyngioma and germinoma. The prescribed dose ranged from 36 to 54 Gy(RBE). Five PBS plans were created for each patient using variable spot size (average sigma at isocenter) and choice of beam specific apertures: (1) 10mm spots, (2) 10mm spots with apertures, (3) 6mm spots, (4) 6mm spots with apertures, and (5) 3mm spots. The plans were optimized for intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) with no single beam uniformity constraints. Dose volume indices as well as equivalent uniform dose (EUD) were compared between PS and PBS plans. Results: Although target coverage was clinically adequate for all cases, the plans with largest (10mm) spots provide inferior quality compared with PS in terms of dose to organs-at-risk (OAR). However, adding apertures to these plans ensured lower OAR dose than PS. The average EUD difference between PBS and PS plans over all patients and organs at risk were (1) 2.5%, (2) −5.1%, (3) -5%, (4) −7.8%, and (5) −9.5%. As the spot size decreased, more conformal plans were achieved that offered similar target coverage but lower dose to the neighboring healthy organs, while alleviating the need for using apertures. Conclusion: The application of PBS does not always translate to better plan qualities compared to PS depending on the available beam spot size. We recommend that institutions with spot size larger than ∼6mm at isocenter consider using apertures to guarantee clinically comparable or superior dosimetric efficacy to PS treatments.

  11. Non-germ cell tumours arising in germ cell tumours (teratoma with malignant transformation) in men: CT and MR findings

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    Athanasiou, A. [Department of Radiology, Institut Gustave-Roussy, Villejuif (France); Department of Radiology, Institut Curie, Paris (France)], E-mail: alexandra.athanasiou@curie.net; Vanel, D. [Department of Radiology, Institut Gustave-Roussy, Villejuif (France); Department of Radiology, Istituti Ortopedici Rizzoli, Bologna (Italy); El Mesbahi, O. [Department of Medicine, Institut Gustave-Roussy, Villejuif (France); Theodore, C. [Department of Medicine, Institut Gustave-Roussy, Villejuif (France); Department of Oncology, Hopital Foch, Suresnes (France); Fizazi, K. [Department of Medicine, Institut Gustave-Roussy, Villejuif (France)

    2009-02-15

    Purpose: To describe the imaging findings of germ cell tumours (GCT) containing non-germ cell malignant components (also designated teratoma with malignant transformation or TMT). Patients and methods: The records of 14 male patients with GCT and a non-germ cell histological component TMT were retrospectively reviewed. All patients had computed tomography (CT) and/or magnetic resonance (MR) studies before and after initial surgery and chemotherapy, as well as during follow-up. Imaging findings were correlated with the response to treatment and with overall survival. Pathological evaluation, immunohistochemistry, serum alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) and human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG) were also taken into consideration. Sarcoma was identified in 10 out of 14 patients, with rhabdomyosarcoma ranking first (n = 4), followed by osteosarcoma (n = 2), fusiform cell sarcoma (n = 1), undifferentiated sarcoma (n = 1), neurosarcoma (n = 1) and myxoid sarcoma (n = 1). Other histological types of malignant transformation included adenocarcinoma (n = 3) and bronchoalveolar carcinoma (n = 1). Overall, 9 patients relapsed at a median time of 84 months (range 60-168). Results: Non-GCT malignant transformation was identified in the retroperitoneum (5), testis (3), mediastinum (3), peritoneum (2) and lungs (1). The CT and MR imaging findings before treatment and after relapse were evaluated with emphasis on imaging features that could possibly imply the presence of malignant transformation (heterogeneously enhancing soft-tissue masses, ossified masses with calcified lymph nodes, diffuse epiploic thickening associated with ascites and peritoneal nodules, pulmonary alveolar infiltration with septal thickening). All but 1 patient with TMT presented with nodal and distant metastases. The prognosis was poor: within a median follow-up of 59 months (range 3-180), 4 out of 14 patients were alive. Conclusion: TMT is rare and associated with poorer survival compared to GCT. Imaging can be useful

  12. Tumors of the liver; a ten year study in Children Medical Center

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    Farahmand F

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of this study was to review the frequency, histopathology and outcome in children with tumors of the liver. Methods: Included in this retrospective/descriptive study were 30 children treated for liver tumors from 1375-1384 (ca. 1996-2005, at Children’s Hospital Medical Center, Tehran, Iran. We included the clinical, radiologic, and pathologic data of our patients, focusing on the frequency, etiology and outcome. Results: Patient ages ranged from three months to 12 years (median 3.8 years, with 18 males (60% and 12 females (40%. Of these, 17 patients had hepatoblastoma (55.66%, including 13 males and four females, with an age range of six months to five years. Four cases (13.33% had neuroblastoma. Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC was found in three cases (10%, all of whom were carriers of hepatitis B. Two cases (6.66% were diagnosed with mesenchymal hamartoma, two cases (6.66% with hemangioendothelioma and two cases (6.66% with rhabdomyosarcoma and leiomyosarcoma of the biliary tract. Abdominal swelling and hepatomegaly were seen in all of patients. Jaundice was observed in two cases. Serum alpha-fetoprotein levels greater than 500 ng/ml were seen in 17 cases (56.66%. All patients were receiving specific treatment. The three-year survival rate was 65% for hepatoblastoma and 2% for HCC Conclusion: With the introduction of specific treatment, the survival rate for children with tumors of the liver has significantly increased. Further improvement can be achieved using diagnostic biopsy for hepatoblastoma, although it may result in complications, and preoperative chemotherapy followed by complete surgical excision (per International Society of Pediatric Oncology guidelines, yielding an outstanding survival rate of 80%.

  13. Inhibition of enterovirus 71 (EV-71 infections by a novel antiviral peptide derived from EV-71 capsid protein VP1.

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    Chee Wah Tan

    Full Text Available Enterovirus 71 (EV-71 is the main causative agent of hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD. In recent years, EV-71 infections were reported to cause high fatalities and severe neurological complications in Asia. Currently, no effective antiviral or vaccine is available to treat or prevent EV-71 infection. In this study, we have discovered a synthetic peptide which could be developed as a potential antiviral for inhibition of EV-71. Ninety five synthetic peptides (15-mers overlapping the entire EV-71 capsid protein, VP1, were chemically synthesized and tested for antiviral properties against EV-71 in human Rhabdomyosarcoma (RD cells. One peptide, SP40, was found to significantly reduce cytopathic effects of all representative EV-71 strains from genotypes A, B and C tested, with IC(50 values ranging from 6-9.3 µM in RD cells. The in vitro inhibitory effect of SP40 exhibited a dose dependent concentration corresponding to a decrease in infectious viral particles, total viral RNA and the levels of VP1 protein. The antiviral activity of SP40 peptide was not restricted to a specific cell line as inhibition of EV-71 was observed in RD, HeLa, HT-29 and Vero cells. Besides inhibition of EV-71, it also had antiviral activities against CV-A16 and poliovirus type 1 in cell culture. Mechanism of action studies suggested that the SP40 peptide was not virucidal but was able to block viral attachment to the RD cells. Substitutions of arginine and lysine residues with alanine in the SP40 peptide at positions R3A, R4A, K5A and R13A were found to significantly decrease antiviral activities, implying the importance of positively charged amino acids for the antiviral activities. The data demonstrated the potential and feasibility of SP40 as a broad spectrum antiviral agent against EV-71.

  14. Prevalence of Malignant Soft Tissue Tumors inExtremities: An Epidemiological Study in Syria

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    Habib Reshadi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background:   Although the majority of soft tissue masses are benign, it is important to consider malignancy in differential diagnoses. Because most soft tissue sarcomas present as a painless mass, clinicians must watch for signs suggestive of malignancy, including large size, rapid growth, and site deep into the deep fascia.The purpose of this study was to determine the relative prevalence according to sex and age, site of tumor, skeletal distribution, and treatment (surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy before and after surgery, and ascertain the relative frequency of these tumors in specific anatomic sites and age groups based on pathological studies. Methods: A total of 308 patients, with a musculoskeletal tumor were evaluated retrospectively. All of the patients enrolled into this study were referred to the Beirouni Hospital of Damascus University with a proven diagnosis of alignant soft tissue tumors from the beginning of January 2008 until the end of 2010. The prevalence of the malignant soft tissue tumors in these patients was analyzed. For purposes of analysis, all lesions were placed in 1 of 9 categories: hand and wrist, forearm, humorous (arm, proximal limb girdle (axilla and shoulder, foot and ankle, thigh, hip and buttocks region, trunk, and other lesions. Age and sex also were recorded. Results: Malignant tumors consisted of seven diagnostic categories: malignant fibrous histiocytoma (23%, liposarcoma (22%, rhabdomyosarcoma (9%, leiomyosarcoma (8%, malignant schwannoma (5%, dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans (5%, synovial sarcoma (10%, fibrosarcoma (13%, extraskeletal chondrosarcoma (1%, and extraskeletal Ewing sarcoma (4%. Conclusions: Despite the multitude of pathologic possibilities, most malignant soft-tissue tumors are classified into a small number of diagnoses. These may be further defined when the site of the lesion and the age of the patient are considered. Knowledge of tumor prevalence will assist radiologists in

  15. Prevalence of Malignant Soft Tissue Tumors inExtremities: An Epidemiological Study in Syria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Habib Reshadi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background:   Although the majority of soft tissue masses are benign, it is important to consider malignancy in differential diagnoses. Because most soft tissue sarcomas present as a painless mass, clinicians must watch for signs suggestive of malignancy, including large size, rapid growth, and site deep into the deep fascia.The purpose of this study was to determine the relative prevalence according to sex and age, site of tumor, skeletal distribution, and treatment (surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy before and after surgery, and ascertain the relative frequency of these tumors in specific anatomic sites and age groups based on pathological studies. Methods: A total of 308 patients, with a musculoskeletal tumor were evaluated retrospectively. All of the patients enrolled into this study were referred to the Beirouni Hospital of Damascus University with a proven diagnosis of alignant soft tissue tumors from the beginning of January 2008 until the end of 2010. The prevalence of the malignant soft tissue tumors in these patients was analyzed. For purposes of analysis, all lesions were placed in 1 of 9 categories: hand and wrist, forearm, humorous (arm, proximal limb girdle (axilla and shoulder, foot and ankle, thigh, hip and buttocks region, trunk, and other lesions. Age and sex also were recorded. Results: Malignant tumors consisted of seven diagnostic categories: malignant fibrous histiocytoma (23%, liposarcoma (22%, rhabdomyosarcoma (9%, leiomyosarcoma (8%, malignant schwannoma (5%, dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans (5%, synovial sarcoma (10%, fibrosarcoma (13%, extraskeletal chondrosarcoma (1%, and extraskeletal Ewing sarcoma (4%. Conclusions: Despite the multitude of pathologic possibilities, most malignant soft-tissue tumors are classified into a small number of diagnoses. These may be further defined when the site of the lesion and the age of the patient are considered. Knowledge of tumor prevalence will assist radiologists in

  16. Proton Therapy in Children: A Systematic Review of Clinical Effectiveness in 15 Pediatric Cancers

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    Leroy, Roos, E-mail: Roos.leroy@kce.fgov.be [Belgian Healthcare Knowledge Centre (KCE), Brussels (Belgium); Benahmed, Nadia; Hulstaert, Frank [Belgian Healthcare Knowledge Centre (KCE), Brussels (Belgium); Van Damme, Nancy [Belgian Cancer Registry, Brussels (Belgium); De Ruysscher, Dirk [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Leuven, Leuven (Belgium)

    2016-05-01

    Because it spares many normal tissues and reduces the integral dose, proton therapy (PT) is the preferred tumor irradiation technique for treating childhood cancer. However, to the best of our knowledge, no systematic review of the clinical effectiveness of PT in children has been reported in the scientific literature. A systematic search for clinical outcome studies on PT published between 2007 and 2015 was performed in Medline (through OVID), EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library. Twenty-three primary studies were identified, including approximately 650 patients overall. The median/mean follow-up times were limited (range, 19-91 months). None of the studies were randomized, 2 were comparative, and 20 were retrospective. Most suffered from serious methodologic limitations, yielding a very low level of clinical evidence for the outcomes in all indications. For example, for retinoblastoma, very low-level evidence was found that PT might decrease the incidence of second malignancies. For chondrosarcoma, chordoma, craniopharyngioma, ependymoma, esthesioneuroblastoma, Ewing sarcoma, central nervous system germinoma, glioma, medulloblastoma, osteosarcoma, and rhabdomyosarcoma, there was insufficient evidence to either support or refute PT in children. For pelvic sarcoma (ie, nonrhabdomyosarcoma and non-Ewing sarcoma), pineal parenchymal tumor, primitive neuroectodermal tumor, and “adult-type” soft tissue sarcoma, no studies were identified that fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Although there is no doubt that PT reduces the radiation dose to normal tissues and organs, to date the critical clinical data on the long-term effectiveness and harm associated with the use of PT in the 15 pediatric cancers under investigation are lacking. High-quality clinical research in this area is needed.

  17. Human lactoferricin derived di-peptides deploying loop structures induce apoptosis specifically in cancer cells through targeting membranous phosphatidylserine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedl, Sabrina; Leber, Regina; Rinner, Beate; Schaider, Helmut; Lohner, Karl; Zweytick, Dagmar

    2015-11-01

    Host defense-derived peptides have emerged as a novel strategy for the development of alternative anticancer therapies. In this study we report on characteristic features of human lactoferricin (hLFcin) derivatives which facilitate specific killing of cancer cells of melanoma, glioblastoma and rhabdomyosarcoma compared with non-specific derivatives and the synthetic peptide RW-AH. Changes in amino acid sequence of hLFcin providing 9-11 amino acids stretched derivatives LF11-316, -318 and -322 only yielded low antitumor activity. However, the addition of the repeat (di-peptide) and the retro-repeat (di-retro-peptide) sequences highly improved cancer cell toxicity up to 100% at 20 μM peptide concentration. Compared to the complete parent sequence hLFcin the derivatives showed toxicity on the melanoma cell line A375 increased by 10-fold and on the glioblastoma cell line U-87mg by 2-3-fold. Reduced killing velocity, apoptotic blebbing, activation of caspase 3/7 and formation of apoptotic DNA fragments proved that the active and cancer selective peptides, e.g. R-DIM-P-LF11-322, trigger apoptosis, whereas highly active, though non-selective peptides, such as DIM-LF11-318 and RW-AH seem to kill rapidly via necrosis inducing membrane lyses. Structural studies revealed specific toxicity on cancer cells by peptide derivatives with loop structures, whereas non-specific peptides comprised α-helical structures without loop. Model studies with the cancer membrane mimic phosphatidylserine (PS) gave strong evidence that PS only exposed by cancer cells is an important target for specific hLFcin derivatives. Other negatively charged membrane exposed molecules as sialic acid, heparan and chondroitin sulfate were shown to have minor impact on peptide activity. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Inhibition of EV71 by curcumin in intestinal epithelial cells.

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    Huang, Hsing-I; Chio, Chi-Chong; Lin, Jhao-Yin

    2018-01-01

    EV71 is a positive-sense single-stranded RNA virus that belongs to the Picornaviridae family. EV71 infection may cause various symptoms ranging from hand-foot-and-mouth disease to neurological pathological conditions such as aseptic meningitis, ataxia, and acute transverse myelitis. There is currently no effective treatment or vaccine available. Various compounds have been examined for their ability to restrict EV71 replication. However, most experiments have been performed in rhabdomyosarcoma or Vero cells. Since the gastrointestinal tract is the entry site for this pathogen, we anticipated that orally ingested agents may exert beneficial effects by decreasing virus replication in intestinal epithelial cells. In this study, curcumin (diferuloylmethane, C21H20O6), an active ingredient of turmeric (Curcuma longa Linn) with anti-cancer properties, was investigated for its anti-enterovirus activity. We demonstrate that curcumin treatment inhibits viral translation and increases host cell viability. Curcumin does not exert its anti-EV71 effects by modulating virus attachment or virus internal ribosome entry site (IRES) activity. Furthermore, curcumin-mediated regulation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways is not involved. We found that protein kinase C delta (PKCδ) plays a role in virus translation in EV71-infected intestinal epithelial cells and that curcumin treatment decreases the phosphorylation of this enzyme. In addition, we show evidence that curcumin also limits viral translation in differentiated human intestinal epithelial cells. In summary, our data demonstrate the anti-EV71 properties of curcumin, suggesting that ingestion of this phytochemical may protect against enteroviral infections.

  19. Inhibition of EV71 by curcumin in intestinal epithelial cells.

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    Hsing-I Huang

    Full Text Available EV71 is a positive-sense single-stranded RNA virus that belongs to the Picornaviridae family. EV71 infection may cause various symptoms ranging from hand-foot-and-mouth disease to neurological pathological conditions such as aseptic meningitis, ataxia, and acute transverse myelitis. There is currently no effective treatment or vaccine available. Various compounds have been examined for their ability to restrict EV71 replication. However, most experiments have been performed in rhabdomyosarcoma or Vero cells. Since the gastrointestinal tract is the entry site for this pathogen, we anticipated that orally ingested agents may exert beneficial effects by decreasing virus replication in intestinal epithelial cells. In this study, curcumin (diferuloylmethane, C21H20O6, an active ingredient of turmeric (Curcuma longa Linn with anti-cancer properties, was investigated for its anti-enterovirus activity. We demonstrate that curcumin treatment inhibits viral translation and increases host cell viability. Curcumin does not exert its anti-EV71 effects by modulating virus attachment or virus internal ribosome entry site (IRES activity. Furthermore, curcumin-mediated regulation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK signaling pathways is not involved. We found that protein kinase C delta (PKCδ plays a role in virus translation in EV71-infected intestinal epithelial cells and that curcumin treatment decreases the phosphorylation of this enzyme. In addition, we show evidence that curcumin also limits viral translation in differentiated human intestinal epithelial cells. In summary, our data demonstrate the anti-EV71 properties of curcumin, suggesting that ingestion of this phytochemical may protect against enteroviral infections.

  20. The highly conserved 5' untranslated region as an effective target towards the inhibition of Enterovirus 71 replication by unmodified and appropriate 2'-modified siRNAs

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    Deng Jun-Xia

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Enterovirus 71 (EV71 is a highly infectious agent that plays an etiological role in hand, foot, and mouth disease. It is associated with severe neurological complications and has caused significant mortalities in recent large-scale outbreaks. Currently, no effective vaccine or specific clinical therapy is available against EV71. Methods Unmodified 21 nucleotide small interfering RNAs (siRNAs and classic 2′-modified (2′-O-methylation or 2′-fluoro modification siRNAs were designed to target highly conserved 5′ untranslated region (UTR of the EV71 genome and employed as anti-EV71 agents. Real-time TaqMan RT-PCR, western blot analysis and plaque assays were carried out to evaluate specific viral inhibition by the siRNAs. Results Transfection of rhabdomyosarcoma (RD cells with siRNAs targeting the EV71 genomic 5′ UTR significantly delayed and alleviated the cytopathic effects of EV71 infection, increased cell viability in EV71-infected RD cells. The inhibitory effect on EV71 replication was sequence-specific and dosage-dependent, with significant corresponding decreases in viral RNA, VP1 protein and viral titer. Appropriate 2′-modified siRNAs exhibited similar RNA interference (RNAi activity with dramatically increased serum stability in comparison with unmodified counterparts. Conclusion Sequences were identified within the highly conserved 5′ UTR that can be targeted to effectively inhibit EV71 replication through RNAi strategies. Appropriate 2′-modified siRNAs provide a promising approach to optimizing siRNAs to overcome barriers on RNAi-based antiviral therapies for broader administration.

  1. Antiviral activity of shikonin ester derivative PMM-034 against enterovirus 71 in vitro

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    Y. Zhang

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Human enterovirus 71 (EV71 is the major causative agent of hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD, particularly in infants and children below 4 years of age. Shikonin is a bioactive compound with anti-inflammatory, antiviral, and antibacterial activities derived from the roots of the Chinese medicinal herb Lithospermum erythrorhizon. This study aimed to examine the antiviral activity of PMM-034, a shikonin ester derivative, against EV71 in rhabdomyosarcoma (RD cells. Cytotoxicity of PMM-034 on RD cells was determined using WST-1 assay. Dose- and time-dependent effects of PMM-034 on EV71 replication in RD cells were determined using plaque reduction assay. mRNA expression levels of EV71/VP1 and pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, and TNF-α were determined by real-time RT-PCR, and EV71/VP1 and phospho-p65 protein expressions were determined by western blot analysis. PMM-034 exhibited only weak cytotoxicity against RD cells. However, PMM-034 exhibited significant antiviral activity against EV71 in RD cells with 50% inhibitory concentration of 2.31 μg/mL. The VP1 mRNA and protein levels were significantly reduced in cells treated with PMM-034. Furthermore, relative mRNA expression levels of IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, and TNF-α significantly decreased in the cells treated with PMM-034, while the phospho-p65 protein expression was also significantly lower in the treated cells. These results indicated that PMM-034 suppressed the expressions of pro-inflammatory cytokines in RD cells, exhibiting antiviral activity against EV71, as evidenced by the reduced VP1 mRNA and protein levels in PMM-034-treated cells. Thus, PMM-034 is a promising candidate for further development as an EV71 inhibitor.

  2. Galectin-3 and Its Genetic Variation rs4644 Modulate Enterovirus 71 Infection.

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    Wen-Chan Huang

    Full Text Available Galectin-3, a chimeric type β-galactoside-binding protein, is known to modulate viral infection; however, its role in enterovirus 71 (EV71 infection has not been investigated. We generated galectin-3 null rhabdomyosarcoma (RD cells and evaluated whether EV71 infection would be affected. In galectin-3 null cells, the released and intracellular EV71 viral loads were suppressed after 24 h of infection, and cell death rates were significantly lower, while cell proliferation remained unaltered. In addition, RD cells expressing a nonsynonymous genetic variant of galectin-3, rs4644 (LGALS3 +191C/A, P64H, produced lower virus titers than those with wild-type galectin-3 (C allele. To clarify whether the in vitro viral load reduction correlates with clinical severity, we enrolled children with laboratory-confirmed EV71 infection. Since hyperglycemia is an indicator of severe EV71 infection in children, 152 of 401 enrolled children had glucose examinations at admission, and 59 subjects had serum glucose levels ≥ 150 mg/dL. In comparison to the rs4644 AA genotype (2.2 ± 0.06 log10 mg/dL, serum glucose levels during EV71 infection were higher in patients with CC (2.4 ± 0.17 log10 mg/dL, p = 0.03 and CA (2.4 ± 0.15 log10 mg/dL, p = 0.02 genotypes, respectively. These findings suggest that the rs4644 AA genotype of galectin-3 might exert a protective effect. In summary, galectin-3 affects EV71 replication in our cellular model and its variant, rs4644, is associated with hyperglycemia in the clinical setting. The underlying mechanism and its potential therapeutic application warrant further investigation.

  3. Myeloid- and lymphoid-specific breakpoint cluster regions in chromosome band 13q14 in acute leukemia.

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    Coignet, L J; Lima, C S; Min, T; Streubel, B; Swansbury, J; Telford, N; Swanton, S; Bowen, A; Nagai, M; Catovsky, D; Fonatsch, C; Dyer, M J

    1999-07-01

    Abnormalities of chromosome band 13q14 occur in hematologic malignancies of all lineages and at all stages of differentiation. Unlike other chromosomal translocations, which are usually specific for a given lineage, the chromosomal translocation t(12;13)(p12;q14) has been observed in both B-cell and T-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (BCP-, TCP-ALL), in differentiated and undifferentiated acute myeloblastic leukemia (AML), and in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) at progression to blast crisis. The nature of these translocations and their pathologic consequences remain unknown. To begin to define the gene(s) involved on chromosome 13, we have performed fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using a panel of YACs from the region, on a series of 10 cases of acute leukemia with t(12;13)(p12;q14) and 1 case each with "variant" translocations including t(12;13)(q21;q14), t(10;13)(q24;q14) and t(9;13)(p21;q14). In 8/13 cases/cell lines, the 13q14 break fell within a single 1.4 Mb CEPH MegaYAC. This YAC fell immediately telomeric of the forkhead (FKHR) gene, which is disrupted in the t(2;13)(q35;q14) seen in pediatric alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma. Seven of the 8 cases with breaks in this YAC were AML. In 4/13 cases, the 13q14 break fell within a 1.7-Mb YAC located about 3 Mb telomeric of the retinoblastoma (RB1) gene: all 4 cases were ALL. One case of myelodysplastic syndrome exhibited a break within 13q12, adjacent to the BRCA2 gene. These data indicate the presence of myeloid- and lymphoid-specific breakpoint cluster regions within chromosome band 13q14 in acute leukemia.

  4. Alveolar soft-part sarcoma of the orbit: a clinicopathologic analysis of seventeen cases and a review of the literature.

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    Font, R L; Jurco, S; Zimmerman, L E

    1982-06-01

    This is a clinicopathologic study of 17 cases of alveolar soft-part sarcoma of the orbit. The mean age of patients was 23 and the median was 18 (range, 11 months to 69 years); 13 patients (76.5 per cent) were women and four were men (ratio, 3.25:1). The right and left orbits were equally involved (eight patients each), and in one the laterality was not specified. Histologically, the tumors had a distinctive organoid pattern outlined by thin-walled capillaries and were composed of nests of large polyhedral cells with abundant, finely granular, acidophilic cytoplasm. Approximately two thirds of the tumors had diagnostic PAS-positive diastase-resistant crystalline structures. Histologically, the differential diagnosis included nonchromaffin paraganglioma, granular cell tumor, metastatic renal cell carcinoma, vascular tumor, alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma, and amelanotic malignant melanoma. Electron microscopic studies of one tumor disclosed mitochondria with abnormal cristae, increased amounts of glycogen, and cytoplasmic crystalline structures with a periodicity of 8 to 10 nm. Smaller membrane-bound electron-dense granules appeared to be precursors of the crystals. Follow-up studies showed that eight patients were alive and well (median follow-up period, 11.4 years). Six of the eight patients at the time of diagnosis were 20 years of age or younger. A ninth patient was alive and well 13 years after excision of the orbital mass and four years after bilateral thoracotomy with resection of nine pulmonary nodules. Two patients died as a result of metastatic disease, one 14 years and the other 21 years after initial orbital surgery. Two patients died of other causes, one of whom had pulmonary metastases at autopsy. The follow-up period on two recent cases was less than three years, and two patients were lost to follow-up. The disease pursued an indolent clinical course. Surgery offers the best chance to control the disease.

  5. Extrarenal rhabdoid tumours outside the central nervous system in infancy

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    Garces-Inigo, Enrique F. [Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children, Department of Radiology, London (United Kingdom); Complejo Hospitalario Universitario de Albacete, Radiology Department, Hermanos Falco, Albacete (Spain); Leung, Rebecca; McHugh, Kieran [Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children, Department of Radiology, London (United Kingdom); Sebire, Neil J. [Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children, Department of Histopathology, London (United Kingdom)

    2009-08-15

    Malignant rhabdoid tumours (RT) are increasingly recognized in young children, probably as a consequence of advances in accurate histological diagnosis rather than a true increase in frequency. Although typically presenting as renal tumours in infancy, extrarenal tumours outside the central nervous system (CNS) in children less than 12 months of age are now well recognized, but previous literature on their imaging features is very limited. To demonstrate the imaging features of extrarenal RTs outside the CNS. A retrospective database review was made from 1989 to 2007 of patients diagnosed with extrarenal RT in infancy, i.e. below 12 months of age. There were nine patients (six boys and three girls). The age at presentation varied from 1 to 11 months (average 6 months). Tumours were located in the thorax/mediastinum (n=3), liver (n=3), neck (n=1), shoulder (n=1) and axilla (n=1). The imaging modalities used included US (n=8), CT (n=7) and MRI (n=6). Bone scan was positive in one patient, while metastases at the time of diagnosis occurred in four patients. On MRI the tumours tended to show nonspecific hypointensity on T1-W images and heterogeneous hyperintensity on T2-W images, with heterogeneous enhancement. This is the largest radiological series of extrarenal RTs outside the CNS in infancy. In our series no imaging features were found specific to the diagnosis. A tendency towards large size and mediastinal/paravertebral location were noted. A hypodense solid component on CT and a heterogeneous hyperintensity on T2-W MR images suggest that this tumour should be considered in the routine differential diagnosis of soft-tissue tumours in infancy, in addition to rhabdomyosarcoma. (orig.)

  6. Cytotoxicity and antiviral activity of electrochemical - synthesized silver nanoparticles against poliovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huy, Tran Quang; Hien Thanh, Nguyen Thi; Thuy, Nguyen Thanh; Chung, Pham Van; Hung, Pham Ngoc; Le, Anh-Tuan; Hong Hanh, Nguyen Thi

    2017-03-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) have been proven to have noticeable cytotoxicity in vitro and antiviral activity against some types of enveloped viruses. This paper presents the cytotoxicity and antiviral activity of pure AgNPs synthesized by the electrochemical method, towards cell culture and poliovirus (a non-enveloped virus). Prepared AgNPs were characterized by ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Before incubation with poliovirus, different concentrations of AgNPs were added to human rhabdomyosarcoma (RD) cell monolayers seeded in 96 well plates for testing their cytotoxicity. The in vitro cytotoxicity and anti-poliovirus activity of AgNPs were daily assessed for cytopathic effect (CPE) through inverted light microscopy. CPE in the tested wells was determined in comparison with those in wells of negative and positive control. Structure analysis showed that AgNPs were formed with a quasi-spherical shape with mean size about 7.1nm and high purity. No CPE of RD cells was seen in wells at the time point of 48h post-incubation with AgNPs at concentration up to 100ppm. The anti-poliovirus activity of AgNPs was determined at 3.13ppm corresponding to the viral concentration of 1TCID 50 (Tissue Culture Infective Dose) after 30min, and 10TCID 50 after 60min, the cell viability was found up to 98% at 48h post-infection, with no CPE found. Whereas, a strong CPE of RD cells was found at 48h post-infection with the mixture of AgNPs and poliovirus at concentration of 100TCID 50 , and in wells of positive controls. With mentioned advantages, electrochemical-synthesized AgNPs are promising candidate for advanced biomedical and disinfection applications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Birth order and Risk of Childhood Cancer: A Pooled Analysis from Five U.S. States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Von Behren, Julie; Spector, Logan G.; Mueller, Beth A.; Carozza, Susan E.; Chow, Eric J.; Fox, Erin E.; Horel, Scott; Johnson, Kimberly J.; McLaughlin, Colleen; Puumala, Susan E.; Ross, Julie A.; Reynolds, Peggy

    2010-01-01

    The causes of childhood cancers are largely unknown. Birth order has been used as a proxy for prenatal and postnatal exposures, such as frequency of infections and in utero hormone exposures. We investigated the association between birth order and childhood cancers in a pooled case-control dataset. The subjects were drawn from population-based registries of cancers and births in California, Minnesota, New York, Texas, and Washington. We included 17,672 cases less than 15 years of age who were diagnosed from1980-2004 and 57,966 randomly selected controls born 1970-2004, excluding children with Down syndrome. We calculated odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals using logistic regression, adjusted for sex, birth year, maternal race, maternal age, multiple birth, gestational age, and birth weight. Overall, we found an inverse relationship between childhood cancer risk and birth order. For children in the fourth or higher birth order category compared to first-born children, the adjusted OR was 0.87 (95% CI: 0.81, 0.93) for all cancers combined. When we examined risks by cancer type, a decreasing risk with increasing birth order was seen in the central nervous system (CNS) tumors, neuroblastoma, bilateral retinoblastoma, Wilms tumor, and rhabdomyosarcoma. We observed increased risks with increasing birth order for acute myeloid leukemia but a slight decrease in risk for acute lymphoid leukemia. These risk estimates were based on a very large sample size which allowed us to examine rare cancer types with greater statistical power than in most previous studies, however the biologic mechanisms remain to be elucidated. PMID:20715170

  8. 2BC Non-Structural Protein of Enterovirus A71 Interacts with SNARE Proteins to Trigger Autolysosome Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Jeffrey K F; Sam, I-Ching; Verlhac, Pauline; Baguet, Joël; Eskelinen, Eeva-Liisa; Faure, Mathias; Chan, Yoke Fun

    2017-07-04

    Viruses have evolved unique strategies to evade or subvert autophagy machinery. Enterovirus A71 (EV-A71) induces autophagy during infection in vitro and in vivo. In this study, we report that EV-A71 triggers autolysosome formation during infection in human rhabdomyosarcoma (RD) cells to facilitate its replication. Blocking autophagosome-lysosome fusion with chloroquine inhibited virus RNA replication, resulting in lower viral titres, viral RNA copies and viral proteins. Overexpression of the non-structural protein 2BC of EV-A71 induced autolysosome formation. Yeast 2-hybrid and co-affinity purification assays showed that 2BC physically and specifically interacted with a N -ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment receptor (SNARE) protein, syntaxin-17 (STX17). Co-immunoprecipitation assay further showed that 2BC binds to SNARE proteins, STX17 and synaptosome associated protein 29 (SNAP29). Transient knockdown of STX17, SNAP29, and microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3B (LC3B), crucial proteins in the fusion between autophagosomes and lysosomes) as well as the lysosomal-associated membrane protein 1 (LAMP1) impaired production of infectious EV-A71 in RD cells. Collectively, these results demonstrate that the generation of autolysosomes triggered by the 2BC non-structural protein is important for EV-A71 replication, revealing a potential molecular pathway targeted by the virus to exploit autophagy. This study opens the possibility for the development of novel antivirals that specifically target 2BC to inhibit formation of autolysosomes during EV-A71 infection.

  9. HRAS mutations in Costello syndrome: detection of constitutional activating mutations in codon 12 and 13 and loss of wild-type allele in malignancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estep, Anne L; Tidyman, William E; Teitell, Michael A; Cotter, Philip D; Rauen, Katherine A

    2006-01-01

    Costello syndrome (CS) is a complex developmental disorder involving characteristic craniofacial features, failure to thrive, developmental delay, cardiac and skeletal anomalies, and a predisposition to develop neoplasia. Based on similarities with other cancer syndromes, we previously hypothesized that CS is likely due to activation of signal transduction through the Ras/MAPK pathway [Tartaglia et al., 2003]. In this study, the HRAS coding region was sequenced for mutations in a large, well-characterized cohort of 36 CS patients. Heterogeneous missense point mutations predicting an amino acid substitution were identified in 33/36 (92%) patients. The majority (91%) had a 34G --> A transition in codon 12. Less frequent mutations included 35G --> C (codon 12) and 37G --> T (codon 13). Parental samples did not have an HRAS mutation supporting the hypothesis of de novo heterogeneous mutations. There is phenotypic variability among patients with a 34G --> A transition. The most consistent features included characteristic facies and skin, failure to thrive, developmental delay, musculoskeletal abnormalities, visual impairment, cardiac abnormalities, and generalized hyperpigmentation. The two patients with 35G --> C had cardiac arrhythmias whereas one patient with a 37G --> T transversion had an enlarged aortic root. Of the patients with a clinical diagnosis of CS, neoplasia was the most consistent phenotypic feature for predicating an HRAS mutation. To gain an understanding of the relationship between constitutional HRAS mutations and malignancy, HRAS was sequenced in an advanced biphasic rhabdomyosarcoma/fibrosarcoma from an individual with a 34G --> A mutation. Loss of the wild-type HRAS allele was observed, suggesting tumorigenesis in CS patients is accompanied by additional somatic changes affecting HRAS. Finally, due to phenotypic overlap between CS and cardio-facio-cutaneous (CFC) syndromes, the HRAS coding region was sequenced in a well-characterized CFC cohort

  10. Exploration of the anti-enterovirus activity of a series of pleconaril/pirodavir-like compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, Angela; Lacroix, Céline; Cabiddu, Maria G; Neyts, Johan; Leyssen, Pieter; Pompei, Raffaello

    2015-04-01

    The Enterovirus genus of the Picornaviridae is represented by several viral pathogens that are associated with human disease, namely Poliovirus 1, Enterovirus 71 and Rhinoviruses. Enterovirus 71 has been associated with encephalitis, while Rhinoviruses are a major cause of asthma exacerbations and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Based on the structure of both pleconaril and pirodavir, we previously synthesized some original compounds as potential inhibitors of Rhinovirus replication. These compounds were explored for in vitro antiviral potential on other human pathogenic Enteroviruses, namely Enterovirus 71 on rhabdo-myosarcoma cells, Coxsackievirus B3 on Vero cells, Poliovirus 1 and Echovirus 11 on BGM cells. Activity was confirmed for compound against Rhinovirus 14. Furthermore, few compounds showed a cell-protective effect on Enterovirus 71, presented a marked improvement as compared to the reference drug pleconaril for inhibitory activity on both Enterovirus 71 and Poliovirus 1. The most striking observation was the clear cell protective effect for the set of analogues in a virus-cell-based assay for Echovirus 11 with an effective concentration (EC50) as low as 0.3 µM (Selectivity index or SI = 483), and selectivity indexes greater than 857 (EC50 = 0.6 µM) and 1524 (EC50 = 0.33 µM). Some of the evaluated compounds showed potent and selective antiviral activity against several enterovirus species, such as Enterovirus 71 (EV-A), Echovirus 11 (EV-B), and Poliovirus 1 (EV-C). This could be used as a starting point for the development of other pleconaril/pirodavir-like enterovirus inhibitors with broad-spectrum activity and improved effects as compared to the reference drugs. © The Author(s) 2015.

  11. IGF1R- and ROR1-Specific CAR T Cells as a Potential Therapy for High Risk Sarcomas.

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    Xin Huang

    Full Text Available Patients with metastatic or recurrent and refractory sarcomas have a dismal prognosis. Therefore, new targeted therapies are urgently needed. This study was designed to evaluate chimeric antigen receptor (CAR T cells targeting the type I insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGF1R or tyrosine kinase-like orphan receptor 1 (ROR1 molecules for their therapeutic potential against sarcomas. Here, we report that IGF1R (15/15 and ROR1 (11/15 were highly expressed in sarcoma cell lines including Ewing sarcoma, osteosarcoma, alveolar or embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma, and fibrosarcoma. IGF1R and ROR1 CAR T cells derived from eight healthy donors using the Sleeping Beauty (SB transposon system were cytotoxic against sarcoma cells and produced high levels of IFN-γ, TNF-α and IL-13 in an antigen-specific manner. IGF1R and ROR1 CAR T cells generated from three sarcoma patients released significant amounts of IFN-γ in response to sarcoma stimulation. The adoptive transfer of IGF1R and ROR1 CAR T cells derived from a sarcoma patient significantly reduced tumor growth in pre-established, systemically disseminated and localized osteosarcoma xenograft models in NSG mice. Infusion of IGF1R and ROR1 CAR T cells also prolonged animal survival in a localized sarcoma model using NOD/scid mice. Our data indicate that both IGF1R and ROR1 can be effectively targeted by SB modified CAR T cells and that such CAR T cells may be useful in the treatment of high risk sarcoma patients.

  12. Inhibition of EV71 by curcumin in intestinal epithelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chio, Chi-Chong; Lin, Jhao-Yin

    2018-01-01

    EV71 is a positive-sense single-stranded RNA virus that belongs to the Picornaviridae family. EV71 infection may cause various symptoms ranging from hand-foot-and-mouth disease to neurological pathological conditions such as aseptic meningitis, ataxia, and acute transverse myelitis. There is currently no effective treatment or vaccine available. Various compounds have been examined for their ability to restrict EV71 replication. However, most experiments have been performed in rhabdomyosarcoma or Vero cells. Since the gastrointestinal tract is the entry site for this pathogen, we anticipated that orally ingested agents may exert beneficial effects by decreasing virus replication in intestinal epithelial cells. In this study, curcumin (diferuloylmethane, C21H20O6), an active ingredient of turmeric (Curcuma longa Linn) with anti-cancer properties, was investigated for its anti-enterovirus activity. We demonstrate that curcumin treatment inhibits viral translation and increases host cell viability. Curcumin does not exert its anti-EV71 effects by modulating virus attachment or virus internal ribosome entry site (IRES) activity. Furthermore, curcumin-mediated regulation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways is not involved. We found that protein kinase C delta (PKCδ) plays a role in virus translation in EV71-infected intestinal epithelial cells and that curcumin treatment decreases the phosphorylation of this enzyme. In addition, we show evidence that curcumin also limits viral translation in differentiated human intestinal epithelial cells. In summary, our data demonstrate the anti-EV71 properties of curcumin, suggesting that ingestion of this phytochemical may protect against enteroviral infections. PMID:29370243

  13. Outcomes of the treatment of head and neck sarcomas in a tertiary referral center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew eLindford

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Head and neck sarcomas are a rare and heterogeneous group of tumors that pose management challenges. We report our experience with these tumors. Forty consecutive patients treated for 44 head and neck sarcomas between 1997 and 2014 were culled from our prospectively maintained head and neck database. Five patients were excluded. The adult cohort consisted 29 (83% patients of a mean age of 57.7 years, with 33 sarcomas. The most common diagnoses were undifferentiated pleomorphic sarcoma (27% and chondroblastic osteosarcoma (21%. Clear surgical margins were achieved in 24/33 (73% lesions. Twenty-two patients received radiotherapy and/or chemotherapy. Fourteen patients developed local (n=6, regional (n=1 and distant (n=7 recurrence. The overall 5-year survival was 66% with a mean survival interval of 66.5 months. Recurrent sarcoma, close (<1mm or involved surgical margins and advanced age were associated with statistically significantly reduced survival. The pediatric cohort consisted 6 (17% patients, with a mean age of nine years. Five patients had primary embryonal rhabdomyosarcomas and one had chondroblastic osteosarcoma. Clear surgical margins were achieved in 5 (83% patients. All patients received adjuvant radiotherapy and/or chemotherapy. Mean survival interval was 102 months. Three patients developed local (n=1 or distant (n=2 recurrence. Twenty-three free and 8 pedicled flaps were performed in 25 patients. 11/39 (28% lesions in 11 patients developed a complication. In conclusion, head and neck sarcomas are best managed by a multidisciplinary team at a tertiary head and neck referral centre and resection with clear margins is vital for disease control.

  14. The use of Osseointegration and Orbital Implants in the Management of Orbital Exenteration or Severe Contracted Sockets

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    Emine Esra Karaca

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To evaluate the results of bony integrated implants used in the management of exenterated or contracted sockets. Materials and Methods: Ten eyes of 10 cases underwent bony integrated implants for the management of exenterated (7 eyes or contracted (3 eyes sockets. The procedure was performed in two steps in a two-month period. The first step included placement of screws by preparing the osteotomy site, whereas the second step included implantation of magnetic implants over these screws that will adhere to the orbital implant. The patients were retrospectively evaluated for age, gender, etiology, surgical timing, history of radiotherapy, and time of application of epithesis. The presence of infection at the surgical site, implant loss, functional or cosmetic problems at the perisurgical area, the usage of epithesis during the social life were evaluated. Results: There were 7 female and 3 male patients. The mean age was 34 (5-75 years. The indications for enucleation or exenteration were: retinoblastoma (4 cases, malignant melanoma (2 cases, basal cell carcinoma (1 case, squamous cell carcinoma (1 case, rhabdomyosarcoma (1 case and sinoorbital mucormycosis (1 case. The epitheses were applied 3 to 156 months (mean 51 months following the intervention. All of the implantations were performed successfully. During follow-up, one case had lost the implant and one case had local infection that responded to antibiotic treatment. Three cases were reoperated and the implants were replaced after a 2-year follow-up time due to the deterioration of the magnetic effect of the implants. Conclusion: Bony integrated orbital implants have an important role in solution of esthetic problems encountered in the exenterated orbit and severe contracted socket. (Turk J Ophthalmol 2014; 44: 127-31

  15. Carbon ion radiotherapy for localized primary sarcoma of the extremities: Results of a phase I/II trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugahara, Shinji; Kamada, Tadashi; Imai, Reiko; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Kameda, Noriaki; Okada, Tohru; Tsujii, Hirohiko; Tatezaki, Shinichirou

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the effectiveness of carbon ion radiotherapy (CIRT) for localized primary sarcomas of the extremities in a prospective study. Patients and materials: From April 2000 to May 2010, 17 (male/female: 12/5) patients with localized primary sarcoma of the extremities received CIRT. The median age was 53 years (range: 14–87 years). Nine patients had primary diseases and eight had recurrent diseases. Of the 17 patients, eight refused amputation, and the remaining nine refused surgical resection. Tumors were located in the upper limbs in four patients and lower limbs in 13. Histological diagnosis was osteosarcoma in three patients, liposarcoma in two, synovial sarcoma in two, rhabdomyosarcoma in two, pleomorphic sarcoma in two, and miscellaneous in six. The CIRT dose to the limb was 52.8 GyE for one patient, 64 GyE for three, 70.4 GyE for 13 in 16 fixed fractions over 4 weeks. Records were reviewed and outcomes including radiologic response, local control (progression-free), and survival were analyzed. Results: The median follow-up was 37 months (range: 11–97 months). Radiological response rate was 65% (PR in 11, SD in 5, and PD in 1). The local control rate at 5 years was 76%. The overall survival rate at 5 years was 56%. Of the 17 patients, 10 survived without disease progression. Four patients had local recurrences, one was salvaged by repeated CIRT and the other three died due to systemic diseases. Distant failure was observed in six patients. One patient suffered from femoral fracture (grade 3) and received surgical fixation 27 months after CIRT. No other severe reactions (grade 3) were observed. Conclusions: CIRT is suggested to be an effective and safe treatment for patients who refuse surgery for localized primary sarcomas of the extremities.

  16. Paediatric parotid neoplasms: a 10 year retrospective imaging and pathology review of these rare tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mamlouk, M.D.; Rosbe, K.W.; Glastonbury, C.M.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To determine the relative incidence of benign and malignant paediatric parotid gland tumours and whether particular presenting symptoms or imaging characteristics were more likely to predict malignancy. Materials and methods: Hospital records were reviewed for all patients <18 years with histopathology-proven parotid neoplasms over the 10 year period from 2003–2013. Infantile haemangiomas and patients with neurofibromatosis type I were excluded. The presenting clinical symptoms for each patient were recorded. All available CT and MRI examinations for these patients were evaluated for tumour imaging characteristics. Results: Seventeen patients (nine boys, eight girls; age range 2–17 years) were identified with neoplastic parotid masses; 11 tumours were malignant (65%) and six were benign (35%). The malignant tumours consisted of three acinic cell carcinomas, two mucoepidermoid carcinomas, one alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma, one poorly differentiated carcinoma, one low-grade adenocarcinoma, and three metastases (two melanoma, one orbital medulloepithelioma). The benign tumours consisted of five pleomorphic adenomas and one schwannoma. Presenting clinical symptoms were similar between benign and malignant tumours. Twelve MRI and six CT examinations were available for review with five patients undergoing both techniques. MRI features commonly identified with malignant tumours included: hypointense T2 signal, restricted diffusion, ill-defined borders, and focal necrosis. Only four of the six tumours imaged at CT were visualized, and of those, the margins were indeterminate in three patients. Conclusion: Paediatric parotid masses are more likely to be malignant than benign. Presenting clinical symptoms and CT are not helpful for distinguishing benign and malignant disease. MRI features such as T2 hypointensity, restricted diffusion, ill-defined borders, and focal necrosis, although not specific, should raise concern for malignancy. - Highlights: • Pediatric parotid

  17. Classical NF-κB Metabolically Reprograms Sarcoma Cells Through Regulation of Hexokinase 2

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    Priya Londhe

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundMetabolic reprogramming has emerged as a cancer hallmark, and one of the well-known cancer-associated metabolic alterations is the increase in the rate of glycolysis. Recent reports have shown that both the classical and alternative signaling pathways of nuclear factor κB (NF-κB play important roles in controlling the metabolic profiles of normal cells and cancer cells. However, how these signaling pathways affect the metabolism of sarcomas, specifically rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS and osteosarcoma (OS, has not been characterized.MethodsClassical NF-κB activity was inhibited through overexpression of the IκBα super repressor of NF-κB in RMS and OS cells. Global gene expression analysis was performed using Affymetrix GeneChip Human Transcriptome Array 2.0, and data were interpreted using gene set enrichment analysis. Seahorse Bioscience XFe24 was used to analyze oxygen consumption rate as a measure of aerobic respiration.ResultsInhibition of classical NF-κB activity in sarcoma cell lines restored alternative signaling as well as an increased oxidative respiratory metabolic phenotype in vitro. In addition, microarray analysis indicated that inhibition of NF-κB in sarcoma cells reduced glycolysis. We showed that a glycolytic gene, hexokinase (HK 2, is a direct NF-κB transcriptional target. Knockdown of HK2 shifted the metabolic profile in sarcoma cells away from aerobic glycolysis, and re-expression of HK2 rescued the metabolic shift induced by inhibition of NF-κB activity in OS cells.ConclusionThese findings suggest that classical signaling of NF-κB plays a crucial role in the metabolic profile of pediatric sarcomas potentially through the regulation of HK2.

  18. Human muscle cells express a B7-related molecule, B7-H1, with strong negative immune regulatory potential: a novel mechanism of counterbalancing the immune attack in idiopathic inflammatory myopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiendl, Heinz; Mitsdoerffer, Meike; Schneider, Dagmar; Chen, Lieping; Lochmüller, Hanns; Melms, Arthur; Weller, Michael

    2003-10-01

    B7-H1 is a novel B7 family protein attributed to costimulatory and immune regulatory functions. Here we report that human myoblasts cultured from control subjects and patients with inflammatory myopathies as well as TE671 muscle rhabdomyosarcoma cells express high levels of B7-H1 after stimulation with the inflammatory cytokine IFN-gamma. Coculture experiments of MHC class I/II-positive myoblasts with CD4 and CD8 T cells in the presence of antigen demonstrated the functional consequences of muscle-related B7-H1 expression: production of inflammatory cytokines, IFN-gamma and IL-2, by CD4 as well CD8 T cells was markedly enhanced in the presence of a neutralizing anti-B7-H1 antibody. This observation was paralleled by an augmented expression of the T cell activation markers CD25, ICOS, and CD69, thus showing B7-H1-mediated inhibition of T cell activation. Further, we investigated 23 muscle biopsy specimens from patients with polymyositis (PM), inclusion body myositis (IBM), dermatomyositis (DM), and nonmyopathic controls for B7-H1 expression by immunohistochemistry: B7-H1 was expressed in PM, IBM, and DM specimens but not in noninflammatory and nonmyopathic controls. Staining was predominantly localized to areas of strong inflammation and to muscle cells as well as mononuclear cells. These data highlight the immune regulatory properties of muscle cells and suggest that B7-H1 expression represents an inhibitory mechanism induced upon inflammatory stimuli and aimed at protecting muscle fibers from immune aggression.

  19. Activity of MM-398, nanoliposomal irinotecan (nal-IRI), in Ewing's family tumor xenografts is associated with high exposure of tumor to drug and high SLFN11 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Min H; Wang, Jing; Makena, Monish R; Lee, Joo-Sang; Paz, Nancy; Hall, Connor P; Song, Michael M; Calderon, Ruben I; Cruz, Riza E; Hindle, Ashly; Ko, Winford; Fitzgerald, Jonathan B; Drummond, Daryl C; Triche, Timothy J; Reynolds, C Patrick

    2015-03-01

    To determine the pharmacokinetics and the antitumor activity in pediatric cancer models of MM-398, a nanoliposomal irinotecan (nal-IRI). Mouse plasma and tissue pharmacokinetics of nal-IRI and the current clinical formulation of irinotecan were characterized. In vivo activity of irinotecan and nal-IRI was compared in xenograft models (3 each in nu/nu mice) of Ewing's sarcoma family of tumors (EFT), neuroblastoma (NB), and rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS). SLFN11 expression was assessed by Affymetrix HuEx arrays, Taqman RT-PCR, and immunoblotting. Plasma and tumor concentrations of irinotecan and SN-38 (active metabolite) were approximately 10-fold higher for nal-IRI than for irinotecan. Two doses of NAL-IRI (10 mg/kg/dose) achieved complete responses maintained for >100 days in 24 of 27 EFT-xenografted mice. Event-free survival for mice with RMS and NB was significantly shorter than for EFT. High SLFN11 expression has been reported to correlate with sensitivity to DNA damaging agents; median SLFN11 mRNA expression was >100-fold greater in both EFT cell lines and primary tumors compared with NB or RMS cell lines or primary tumors. Cytotoxicity of SN-38 inversely correlated with SLFN11 mRNA expression in 20 EFT cell lines. In pediatric solid tumor xenografts, nal-IRI demonstrated higher systemic and tumor exposures to SN-38 and improved antitumor activity compared with the current clinical formulation of irinotecan. Clinical studies of nal-IRI in pediatric solid tumors (especially EFT) and correlative studies to determine if SLFN11 expression can serve as a biomarker to predict nal-IRI clinical activity are warranted. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  20. Colon pouch (Mainz III) for continent urinary diversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolzenburg, Jens-Uwe; Schwalenberg, Thilo; Liatsikos, Evangelos N; Sakelaropoulos, George; Rödder, Kilian; Hohenfellner, Rudolph; Fisch, Margit

    2007-06-01

    To evaluate the use of a continent cutaneous pouch made exclusively of colon (Mainz pouch III), as excellent results with the Mainz pouch III in irradiated patients suggested that the indication for this type of urinary diversion could be extended. The outcome of 24 patients with continent cutaneous urinary diversions using colon segments (Mainz pouch III) was investigated retrospectively. Overall, 22 of the patients had a malignant disease and two a benign disease; 16 had a hysterectomy and pelvic exenteration for gynaecological tumours; two men with a rhabdomyosarcoma of the prostate had a radical cystoprostatectomy; one woman had pelvic exenteration for bladder cancer; one man had a simultaneous rectum resection due to infiltrating rectal cancer, and another a left nephrectomy with cystectomy for concomitant kidney and bladder tumour. Benign indications were hyper-reflexive bladder after polytrauma and two cases of neurogenic bladder dysfunction. Eighteen patients had radiotherapy (32-48 Gy) before the urinary diversion. The mean (range) follow-up was 35 (12-65) months. The mean pouch capacity was 293.8 mL. Three patients died during the follow-up (two from disease progression and one suicide); 20 patients were fully continent, four with reduced pouch capacity (<300 mL) had slight incontinence and are wearing a protective pad (band-aid at the umbilicus). All patients use intermittent self-catheterization (mean catheterization frequency 6.8/day, range 6-12). Complications related to the pouch were one outlet stenosis that required revision. Postoperative pouchograms showed asymptomatic reflux in four patients. None of the patients developed metabolic acidosis or diarrhoea. The Mainz pouch III is an alternative to other types of continent urinary diversion.

  1. SARC009: Phase 2 study of dasatinib in patients with previously treated, high-grade, advanced sarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuetze, Scott M; Wathen, J Kyle; Lucas, David R; Choy, Edwin; Samuels, Brian L; Staddon, Arthur P; Ganjoo, Kristen N; von Mehren, Margaret; Chow, Warren A; Loeb, David M; Tawbi, Hussein A; Rushing, Daniel A; Patel, Shreyaskumar R; Thomas, Dafydd G; Chugh, Rashmi; Reinke, Denise K; Baker, Laurence H

    2016-03-15

    Dasatinib exhibited activity in preclinical models of sarcoma. The Sarcoma Alliance for Research through Collaboration (SARC) conducted a multicenter, phase 2 trial of dasatinib in patients with advanced sarcoma. Patients received dasatinib twice daily. The primary objective was to estimate the clinical benefit rate (CBR) (complete response or partial response within 6 months or stable disease duration of ≥6 months) with a target of ≥25%. Patients were enrolled into 1 of 7 different cohorts and assessed by imaging every 8 weeks using Choi criteria tumor response and a Bayesian hierarchical design. For each subtype, enrollment was stopped after a minimum of 9 patients were treated if there was a sarcoma (UPS) cohorts fully accrued and 6 of 47 and 8 of 42 evaluable patients, respectively, exhibited clinical benefit. The probability that the CBR was ≥25% in the LMS and UPS cohorts was 0.008 and 0.10, respectively. The median progression-free survival ranged from 0.9 months in patients with rhabdomyosarcoma to 2.2 months in patients with LMS. The median overall survival was 8.6 months. The most frequent adverse events were constitutional, gastrointestinal, and respiratory, and 36% of patients required dose reduction for toxicity. Serious adverse events attributed to therapy occurred in 11% of patients. Dasatinib may have activity in patients with UPS but is inactive as a single agent in the other sarcoma subtypes included herein. The Bayesian design allowed for the early termination of accrual in 5 subtypes because of lack of drug activity. © 2015 American Cancer Society.

  2. Preclinical activity of selinexor, an inhibitor of XPO1, in sarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, Robert; Zhang, Yi-Xiang; Czaplinski, Jeffrey T; Anatone, Alex J; Sicinska, Ewa T; Fletcher, Jonathan A; Demetri, George D; Wagner, Andrew J

    2016-03-29

    Selinexor is an orally bioavailable selective inhibitor of nuclear export that has been demonstrated to have preclinical activity in various cancer types and that is currently in Phase I and II clinical trials for advanced cancers. In this study, we evaluated the effects of selinexor in several preclinical models of various sarcoma subtypes. The efficacy of selinexor was investigated in vitro and in vivo using 17 cell lines and 9 sarcoma xenograft models including gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST), liposarcoma (LPS), leiomyosarcoma, rhabdomyosarcoma, undifferentiated sarcomas, and alveolar soft part sarcoma (ASPS). Most sarcoma cell lines were sensitive to selinexor with IC50s ranging from 28.8 nM to 218.2 nM (median: 66.1 nM). Selinexor suppressed sarcoma tumor xenograft growth, including models of ASPS that were resistant in vitro. In GIST cells with KIT mutations, selinexor induced G1- arrest without attenuation of phosphorylation of KIT, AKT, or MAPK, in contrast to imatinib. In LPS cell lines with MDM2 and CDK4 amplification, selinexor induced G1-arrest and apoptosis irrespective of p53 expression or mutation and irrespective of RB expression. Selinexor increased p53 and p21 expression at the protein but not RNA level, indicating a post-transcriptional effect. These results indicate that selinexor has potent in vitro and in vivo activity against a wide variety of sarcoma models by inducing G1-arrest independent of known molecular mechanisms in GIST and LPS. These studies further justify the exploration of selinexor in clinical trials targeting various sarcoma subtypes.

  3. Sarcomatoid carcinoma associated with small cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder: a series of 28 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urrea, Yuly Ramirez; Epstein, Jonathan I

    2017-09-01

    The association of sarcomatoid carcinoma (SC) with small cell carcinoma (SCC) has not been systematically studied. We identified 39 consult cases between 2001 and 2016 with available slides for review in 28 cases. There were 19 men and 9 women (mean age: 78 years [51-89]). In 26 (92.8%) cases, the sarcomatoid component had nonspecific malignant spindle cells, 4 (14%) chondrosarcoma, 2 (7%) myxoid sarcomatous, 1 (3.5%) osteosarcoma, and 1 (3.5%) rhabdomyosarcoma. The predominant component was SCC in 11 (39%) cases, urothelial carcinoma in 6 (21%), sarcomatoid in 3 (10%), and equal sarcomatoid and SCC in 8 (29%). There were 3 morphological groups: group 1 (18/28 [64%]) showed a gradual transition from SCC to other components; group 2 (5/28 [18%]) had an abrupt transition from SCC to other components; and in group 3 (5/28 [18%]), the SCC was separate from other components. In group 1, 12 (66%) cases of SCC showed a gradual transition to sarcomatoid areas; 3 (17%) to urothelial carcinoma; and 3 (17%) to multiple components including squamous cell carcinoma, urothelial carcinoma, and sarcomatoid. Mortality did not differ based on pathological groups. The 36-month actuarial risk of death was 64.3%. The multitude of different components in these tumors is further evidence of the remarkable ability of carcinoma of the bladder to show divergent differentiation with, in some cases, gradual transition between SCC and other elements including sarcomatoid. Greater recognition of this entity with chemotherapy targeted to the various histological elements may have important therapeutic implications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Virological investigation of hand, foot, and mouth disease in a tertiary care center in South India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavithra M Vijayaraghavan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD remains a common problem in India, yet its etiology is largely unknown as diagnosis is based on clinical characteristics. There are very few laboratory-based molecular studies on HFMD outbreaks. Aim: The aim of this study was to characterize HFMD-related isolates by molecular techniques. Settings and Design: Between 2005 and 2008, during two documented HFMD outbreaks, 30 suspected HFMD cases presented at the Outpatient Unit of the Department of Dermatology, Christian Medical College (CMC, Vellore. Seventy-eight clinical specimens (swabs from throat, mouth, rectum, anus, buttocks, tongue, forearm, sole, and foot were received from these patients at the Department of Clinical Virology, CMC, for routine diagnosis of hand, foot, and mouth disease. Materials and Methods: Samples from these patients were cultured in Vero and rhabdomyosarcoma (RD cell lines. Isolates producing enterovirus-like cytopathogenic effect (CPE in cell culture were identified by a nested reverse transcription-based polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR and sequenced. The nucleotide sequences were analyzed using the BioEdit sequence program. Homology searches were performed using the Basic Local Alignment Search Tool (BLAST algorithm. Statistical Analysis used: The statistical analysis was performed using Epi Info version 6.04b and Microsoft Excel 2002 (Microsoft Office XP. Results: Of the 30 suspected HFMD cases, only 17 (57% were laboratory confirmed and Coxsackievirus A16 (CVA16 was identified as the etiological agent in all these cases. Conclusions: Coxsackievirus A16 (CVA16 was identified as the virus that caused the HFMD outbreaks in Vellore between 2005 and 2008. Early confirmation of HFMD helps to initiate control measures to interrupt virus transmission. In the laboratory, classical diagnostic methods, culture and serological tests are being replaced by molecular techniques. Routine surveillance systems will help understand the

  5. Site of childhood cancer care in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reedijk, A M J; van der Heiden-van der Loo, M; Visser, O; Karim-Kos, H E; Lieverst, J A; de Ridder-Sluiter, J G; Coebergh, J W W; Kremer, L C; Pieters, R

    2017-12-01

    Due to the complexity of diagnosis and treatment, care for children and young adolescents with cancer preferably occurs in specialised paediatric oncology centres with potentially better cure rates and minimal late effects. This study assessed where children with cancer in the Netherlands were treated since 2004. All patients aged under 18 diagnosed with cancer between 2004 and 2013 were selected from the Netherlands Cancer Registry (NCR) and linked with the Dutch Childhood Oncology Group (DCOG) database. Associations between patient and tumour characteristics and site of care were tested statistically with logistic regression analyses. This population-based study of 6021 children diagnosed with cancer showed that 82% of them were treated in a paediatric oncology centre. Ninety-four percent of the patients under 10 years of age, 85% of the patients aged 10-14 and 48% of the patients aged 15-17 were treated in a paediatric oncology centre. All International Classification of Childhood Cancers (ICCC), 3rd edition, ICCC-3 categories, except embryonal tumours, were associated with a higher risk of treatment outside a paediatric oncology centre compared to leukaemia. Multivariable analyses by ICCC-3 category revealed that specific tumour types such as chronic myelogenous leukaemia (CML), embryonal carcinomas, bone tumours other type than osteosarcoma, non-rhabdomyosarcomas, thyroid carcinomas, melanomas and skin carcinomas as well as lower-staged tumours were associated with treatment outside a paediatric oncology centre. The site of childhood cancer care in the Netherlands depends on the age of the cancer patient, type of tumour and stage at diagnosis. Collaboration between paediatric oncology centre(s), other academic units is needed to ensure most up-to-date paediatric cancer care for childhood cancer patients at the short and long term. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Tumor induction following intraoperative radiotherapy: Late results of the National Cancer Institute canine trials

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    Barnes, M.; Duray, P.; DeLuca, A.; Anderson, W.; Sindelar, W.; Kinsella, T. (Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (USA))

    1990-09-01

    Intraoperative radiotherapy has been employed in human cancer research for over a decade. Since 1979, trials to assess the acute and late toxicity of IORT have been carried out at the National Cancer Institute in an adult dog model in an attempt to establish dose tolerance guidelines for a variety of organs. Of the 170 animals entered on 12 studies with a minimum follow-up of 2 years, 148 dogs received IORT; 22 control animals received only surgery. Animals were sacrificed at designated intervals following IORT, usually at 1, 6, 12, 24, and 60 month intervals. 102 of 148 irradiated dogs were sacrificed less than 24 months; 46 dogs were followed greater than or equal to 24 months after IORT. To date, 34 of the 46 animals have been sacrificed; the 12 remaining animals are to be followed to 5 years. These 12 animals have minimum follow-up of 30 months. In the irradiated group followed for greater than or equal to 24 months, 10 tumors have arisen in 9 animals. One animal developed an incidental spontaneous breast carcinoma outside the IORT port, discovered only at scheduled post-mortem exam. The remaining nine tumors arose within IORT ports. Two tumors were benign neural tumors--a neuroma and a neurofibroma. One animal had a collision tumor comprised of grade I chondrosarcoma adjacent to grade III osteosarcoma arising in lumbar vertebrae. Two other grade III osteosarcomas, one grade III fibrosarcoma, and one grade III malignant fibrous histiocytoma arose in retroperitoneal/paravertebral sites. An embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma (sarcoma botryoides) arose within the irradiated urinary bladder of one animal. No sham irradiated controls nor IORT animals sacrificed less than 24 months have developed any spontaneous or radiation-induced tumors. The time range of diagnoses of tumors was 24-58 months. The IORT dose range associated with tumor development was 20-35 Gy.

  7. [Serotype distribution of enteroviruses isolated from paediatric cases prediagnosed as aseptic meningitis between 2001-2004 period].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozkaya, Etem; Uysal, Gülnar; Atak, Tunca; Alkan, Mehmet

    2005-01-01

    Enteroviruses have major clinical and public health importance and are one of the leading causes of aseptic meningitis. There are many diseases with similar clinical symptoms and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) findings of aseptic meningitis, thus virus isolation and identification is crucial for definitive diagnosis. Virological diagnosis is nonetheless important to distinguish between induced meningitis and other treatable causes of disease with a similar clinical picture. A total of 249 samples obtained from 246 cases (age range: 0-15 years), prediagnosed as aseptic meningitis, were sent to Virology Laboratory of Refik Saydam Hygiene Center. The patients were followed at Department of Pediatric Infectious Diseases in the Social Security Hospital, Ankara, Turkey, between 2001 and 2004. Stool (n: 180), CSF (n: 54) and throat swab (n: 15) samples have been inoculated to RD (rhabdomyosarcoma), Hep-2 (human epithelioma) and L20B (transgenic mice) cell lines, and followed up for the presence of cytopathic effects. A total of 95 enterovirus strains were isolated from 85 (34.6%) cases, and serotyped by using RIVM (National Institute of Public and the Environment, Nederlands) antisera with microneutralization method. As a result, the most frequently isolated types were found as echovirus type 30 (n: 24) and coxsackievirus type B (n: 19), which were most frequently isolated between July to October. This is the first report from Turkey for aseptic meningitis cases due to echovirus type 25 (n:3), 18 (n:2), 14 (n:1), 13 (n:4), 11 (n:6), 9 (n:1), 6 (n:9), 5 (n:1), 4 (n:1) and coxsackievirus type A9 (n:1).

  8. A novel concept for tumour targeting with radiation: Inverse dose-painting or targeting the "Low Drug Uptake Volume".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaromina, Ala; Granzier, Marlies; Biemans, Rianne; Lieuwes, Natasja; van Elmpt, Wouter; Shakirin, Georgy; Dubois, Ludwig; Lambin, Philippe

    2017-09-01

    We tested a novel treatment approach combining (1) targeting radioresistant hypoxic tumour cells with the hypoxia-activated prodrug TH-302 and (2) inverse radiation dose-painting to boost selectively non-hypoxic tumour sub-volumes having no/low drug uptake. 18 F-HX4 hypoxia tracer uptake measured with a clinical PET/CT scanner was used as a surrogate of TH-302 activity in rhabdomyosarcomas growing in immunocompetent rats. Low or high drug uptake volume (LDUV/HDUV) was defined as 40% of the GTV with the lowest or highest 18 F-HX4 uptake, respectively. Two hours post TH-302/saline administration, animals received either single dose radiotherapy (RT) uniformly (15 or 18.5Gy) or a dose-painted non-uniform radiation (15Gy) with 50% higher dose to LDUV or HDUV (18.5Gy). Treatment plans were created using Eclipse treatment planning system and radiation was delivered using VMAT. Tumour response was quantified as time to reach 3 times starting tumour volume. Non-uniform RT boosting tumour sub-volume with low TH-302 uptake (LDUV) was superior to the same dose escalation to HDUV (pvolume with no/low activity of hypoxia-activated prodrugs. This strategy applies on average a lower radiation dose and is as effective as uniform dose escalation to the entire tumour. It could be applied to other type of drugs provided that their distribution can be imaged. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Nonviral gene-delivery by highly fluorinated gemini bispyridinium surfactant-based DNA nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisicaro, Emilia; Compari, Carlotta; Bacciottini, Franco; Contardi, Laura; Pongiluppi, Erika; Barbero, Nadia; Viscardi, Guido; Quagliotto, Pierluigi; Donofrio, Gaetano; Krafft, Marie Pierre

    2017-02-01

    Biological and thermodynamic properties of a new homologous series of highly fluorinated bispyridinium cationic gemini surfactants, differing in the length of the spacer bridging the pyridinium polar heads in 1,1' position, are reported for the first time. Interestingly, gene delivery ability is closely associated with the spacer length due to a structural change of the molecule in solution. This conformation change is allowed when the spacer reaches the right length, and it is suggested by the trends of the apparent and partial molar enthalpies vs molality. To assess the compounds' biological activity, they were tested with an agarose gel electrophoresis mobility shift assay (EMSA), MTT proliferation assay and Transient Transfection assays on a human rhabdomyosarcoma cell line. Data from atomic force microscopy (AFM) allow for morphological characterization of DNA nanoparticles. Dilution enthalpies, measured at 298K, enabled the determination of apparent and partial molar enthalpies vs molality. All tested compounds (except that with the longest spacer), at different levels, can deliver the plasmid when co-formulated with 1,2-dioleyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine (DOPE). The compound with a spacer formed by eight carbon atoms gives rise to a gene delivery ability that is comparable to that of the commercial reagent. The compound with the longest spacer compacts DNA in loosely condensed structures by forming bows, which are not suitable for transfection. Regarding the compounds' hydrogenated counterparts, the tight relationship between the solution thermodynamics data and their biological performance is amazing, making "old" methods the foundation to deeply understanding "new" applications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Integrated imaging using MRI and 123I metaiodobenzylguanidine scintigraphy to improve sensitivity and specificity in the diagnosis of pediatric neuroblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfluger, Thomas; Schmied, Christoph; Porn, Ute; Leinsinger, Gerda; Vollmar, Christian; Dresel, Stefan; Schmid, Irene; Hahn, Klaus

    2003-10-01

    The objectives of this study were to compare MRI and iodine-123 ((123)I) metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) scintigraphy in the detection of neuroblastoma lesions in pediatric patients and to assess the additional value of combined imaging. Fifty MRI and 50 (123)I MIBG examinations (mean interval, 6.4 days) were analyzed retrospectively with regard to suspected or proven neuroblastoma lesions (n = 193) in 28 patients. MRI and MIBG scans were reviewed by two independent observers each. Separate and combined analyses of MRI and MIBG scintigraphy were compared with clinical and histologic findings. With regard to the diagnosis of neuroblastoma lesion, MIBG scintigraphy, MRI, and combined analysis showed a sensitivity of 69%, 86%, and 99% and a specificity of 85%, 77%, and 95%, respectively. On MRI, 15 false-positive findings were recorded: posttherapeutic reactive changes (n = 10), benign adrenal tumors (n = 3), and enlarged lymph nodes (n = 2). On MIBG scintigraphy, 10 false-positive findings occurred: ganglioneuromas (n = 2), benign liver tumors (n = 2), and physiologic uptake (n = 6). Thirteen neuroblastoma metastases and two residual masses under treatment with chemotherapy were judged to be false-negative findings on MRI. Two primary or residual neuroblastomas and one orbital metastasis were misinterpreted as Wilms' tumor, reactive changes after surgery, and rhabdomyosarcoma on MRI. Thirty-two bone metastases, six other neuroblastoma metastases, and one adrenal neuroblastoma showed no MIBG uptake. On combined imaging, one false-negative (bone metastasis) and three false-positive (two ganglioneuromas and one pheochromocytoma) findings remained. In the assessment of neuroblastoma lesions in pediatric patients, MRI showed a higher sensitivity and MIBG scintigraphy a higher specificity. However, integrated imaging showed an increase in both sensitivity and specificity.

  11. CCR9-CCL25 interactions promote cisplatin resistance in breast cancer cell through Akt activation in a PI3K-dependent and FAK-independent fashion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lillard James W

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chemotherapy heavily relies on apoptosis to kill breast cancer (BrCa cells. Many breast tumors respond to chemotherapy, but cells that survive this initial response gain resistance to subsequent treatments. This leads to aggressive cell variants with an enhanced ability to migrate, invade and survive at secondary sites. Metastasis and chemoresistance are responsible for most cancer-related deaths; hence, therapies designed to minimize both are greatly needed. We have recently shown that CCR9-CCL25 interactions promote BrCa cell migration and invasion, while others have shown that this axis play important role in T cell survival. In this study we have shown potential role of CCR9-CCL25 axis in breast cancer cell survival and therapeutic efficacy of cisplatin. Methods Bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU incorporation, Vybrant apoptosis and TUNEL assays were performed to ascertain the role of CCR9-CCL25 axis in cisplatin-induced apoptosis of BrCa cells. Fast Activated Cell-based ELISA (FACE assay was used to quantify In situ activation of PI3Kp85, AktSer473, GSK-3βSer9 and FKHRThr24 in breast cancer cells with or without cisplatin treatment in presence or absence of CCL25. Results CCR9-CCL25 axis provides survival advantage to BrCa cells and inhibits cisplatin-induced apoptosis in a PI3K-dependent and focal adhesion kinase (FAK-independent fashion. Furthermore, CCR9-CCL25 axis activates cell-survival signals through Akt and subsequent glycogen synthase kinase-3 beta (GSK-3β and forkhead in human rhabdomyosarcoma (FKHR inactivation. These results show that CCR9-CCL25 axis play important role in BrCa cell survival and low chemotherapeutic efficacy of cisplatin primarily through PI3K/Akt dependent fashion.

  12. SU-E-T-751: Three-Component Kinetic Model of Tumor Growth and Radiation Response for Stereotactic Radiosurgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, Y; Dahlman, E; Leder, K; Hui, S [University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To develop and study a kinetic model of tumor growth and its response to stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) by assuming that the cells in irradiated tumor volume were made of three types. Methods: A set of ordinary differential equations (ODEs) were derived for three types of cells and a tumor growth rate. It is assumed that the cells were composed of actively proliferating cells, lethally damaged-dividing cells, and non-dividing cells. We modeled the tumor volume growth with a time-dependent growth rate to simulate the saturation of growth. After SRS, the proliferating cells were permanently damaged and converted to the lethally damaged cells. The amount of damaged cells were estimated by the LQ-model. The damaged cells gradually stopped dividing/proliferating and died with a constant rate. The dead cells were cleared from their original location with a constant rate. The total tumor volume was the sum of the three components. The ODEs were numerically solved with appropriate initial conditions for a given dosage. The proposed model was used to model an animal experiment, for which the temporal change of a rhabdomyosarcoma tumor volume grown in a rat was measured with time resolution sufficient to test the model. Results: To fit the model to the experimental data, the following characteristics were needed with the model parameters. The α-value in the LQ-model was smaller than the commonly used value; furthermore, it decreased with increasing dose. At the same time, the tumor growth rate after SRS had to increase. Conclusions: The new 3-component model of tumor could simulate the experimental data very well. The current study suggested that the radiation sensitivity and the growth rate of the proliferating tumor cells may change after irradiation and it depended on the dosage used for SRS. These preliminary observations must be confirmed by future animal experiments.

  13. Imaging of urinary bladder tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hadjidekov, G.

    2015-01-01

    Full text: Primary bladder neoplasms account for 2%-6% of all tumors, with urinary bladder cancer ranked as the fourth most common cancer in males. Transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) is the most common subtype of urothelial tumour accounting for approximately 90% of all urothelial cancers. It is typically observed in men aged 50-70 years with history of smoking or occupational exposure to carcinogens. Most urothelial neoplasms are low-grade papillary tumors, with high incidence of recurrence, requires rigorous follow-up but have a relatively good prognosis. Other bladder neoplasm include squamous cell carcinoma accounts for 2%-15% mainly according to geographic location; adenocarcinoma - less than 2% /both occurring in the context of chronic bladder infection and irritation/; mesenchymal tumors in 5%, with the most common examples being rhabdomyosarcoma in children and leiomyosarcoma in adults. More rare mesenchymal tumors include paraganglioma, lymphoma, leiomyoma and solitary fibrous tumor which have no specific typical imaging findings to be differentiated. Multidetector computed tomography urography is an efficient tool for diagnosis and follow-up in patients with transitional cell carcinoma and it can be considered the primary radiologic method for detection, staging and assessment of the entire urothelium regarding the multicentric nature of TCC. MRI is rapidly expanding modality of choice especially in locally staging the tumor and in controversies. Accurate TNM staging is primordial in choosing treatment and prognosis for patients with bladder carcinoma. Correct interpretation and classification of the tumour is helpful for the urologists to determine further management in these cases. The learning objectives of the presentation are: to illustrate the spectrum of CT and MRI findings and to assess their clinical value in patients with transitional cell carcinoma and some other bladder neoplasm; to discuss the TNM staging based on the imaging findings; to be

  14. Paraganglioma of the urinary bladder: a clinicopathologic spectrum of a series of 14 cases emphasizing diagnostic dilemmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menon, Santosh; Goyal, Pankaj; Suryawanshi, Pallavi; Tongaonkar, Hemant; Joshi, Amit; Bakshi, Ganesh; Desai, Sangeeta

    2014-01-01

    Paraganglioma (PG) of the urinary bladder is a rare neuroendocrine neoplasm, accounting for bladder tumours. Distinction from urothelial carcinoma is imperative as management and prognosis vary markedly. In this report, we describe our experience with the histopathology of paragangliomas of the urinary bladder with emphasis on the histologic features that have led to their being misdiagnosed as conventional urothelial cancer and, most importantly, those that will help pathologists recognize this rare tumor of the bladder. All cases of PG of urinary bladder diagnosed at our institute from 2002-2012 were retrieved and diagnosis confirmed in accordance with WHO classification. Clinical and treatment details were obtained from hospital medical records. Fourteen cases of PG of urinary bladder including 5 consult cases were analysed. These included 11 transurethral resections ± partial cystectomies, 2 partial cystectomies and 1 radical cystectomy. Two out of the 5 consult cases had been submitted with a diagnosis of urothelial carcinoma and 1 with that of a rhabdomyosarcoma. Age ranged from 15-84 years (median, 43 years) with a male to female ratio of 1:2.5. Presenting symptoms were haematuria, dysuria and flank pain; only 1 case had antecedent hypertension. Histologically, typical 'zellballen' (72%), diffuse (21%) and ribbon-like (7%) growth patterns amidst a richly vascularised stroma were seen. Muscularis propria invasion and necrosis was present in 72% and 21%, respectively. Substantial cautery artifacts led to misdiagnosis in the 3 erroneous cases. Tumour cells were positive for chromogranin, synaptophysin; sustentacular cells were S-100 positive. Follow up was available in 6 patients; median follow-up was 29 months (8-120 months). One patient developed distant metastasis in cervical lymph node 10 years after diagnosis; remaining were alive without evidence of disease. Paraganglioma of the urinary bladder is a rare tumor and may be misdiagnosed as urothelial cancer

  15. Two children with chronic progressive radiation myelopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohta, Hideaki; Takai, Kenji; Hosoi, Gaku; Okamura, Takayuki; Osugi, Yuko; Ishihara, Shigehiko; Hara, Junichi; Tawa, Akio; Okada, Shintaro

    1995-01-01

    We report two patients who developed chronic progressive radiation myelopathy (CPRM). Patient 1 was a 16-year-old boy with group IV rhabdomyosarcoma of cervical soft tissue. He underwent partial excision of the tumor and received systemic and intrathecal chemotherapy and 44 Gy of local radiotherapy (C4 through Th3). These therapies were followed by high-dose chemotherapy including thio-TEPA and busulfan with autologous bone marrow rescue. One year after the completion of the therapies, he developed CPRM. Patient 2 was a 15-year-old girl with acute lymphoblastic leukemia on the 3rd complete remission. She received 18 Gy of irradiation to whole brain during the 1st remission and another 18 Gy to whole brain and 9 Gy to spinal cord after her 1st CNS relapse. After successful reinduction therapy for the 2nd relapse in CNS and bone marrow, she underwent an allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT). The preconditioning regimen consisted of 12 Gy total body irradiation, thio-TEPA and cyclophosphamide. Seven months after BMT, she developed CPRM at C0-C1 level, which was included in the area of whole-brain irradiation. In both patients, MR images showed a swelling of the cervical cord and ring-like images by gadolinium enhancement. Their neurological disability transiently responded to the administration of corticosteroid, but they developed progressive quadriplegia. Although it is reported that a dose of 45-50 Gy may be safe, these cases suggest that administration of high-dose chemotherapy combined with intrathecal chemotherapy and radiotherapy to the cord might increase the rink of developing CPRM. (author)

  16. Two children with chronic progressive radiation myelopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohta, Hideaki; Takai, Kenji; Hosoi, Gaku; Okamura, Takayuki; Osugi, Yuko; Ishihara, Shigehiko; Hara, Junichi; Tawa, Akio; Okada, Shintaro [Osaka Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine

    1995-06-01

    We report two patients who developed chronic progressive radiation myelopathy (CPRM). Patient 1 was a 16-year-old boy with group IV rhabdomyosarcoma of cervical soft tissue. He underwent partial excision of the tumor and received systemic and intrathecal chemotherapy and 44 Gy of local radiotherapy (C4 through Th3). These therapies were followed by high-dose chemotherapy including thio-TEPA and busulfan with autologous bone marrow rescue. One year after the completion of the therapies, he developed CPRM. Patient 2 was a 15-year-old girl with acute lymphoblastic leukemia on the 3rd complete remission. She received 18 Gy of irradiation to whole brain during the 1st remission and another 18 Gy to whole brain and 9 Gy to spinal cord after her 1st CNS relapse. After successful reinduction therapy for the 2nd relapse in CNS and bone marrow, she underwent an allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT). The preconditioning regimen consisted of 12 Gy total body irradiation, thio-TEPA and cyclophosphamide. Seven months after BMT, she developed CPRM at C0-C1 level, which was included in the area of whole-brain irradiation. In both patients, MR images showed a swelling of the cervical cord and ring-like images by gadolinium enhancement. Their neurological disability transiently responded to the administration of corticosteroid, but they developed progressive quadriplegia. Although it is reported that a dose of 45-50 Gy may be safe, these cases suggest that administration of high-dose chemotherapy combined with intrathecal chemotherapy and radiotherapy to the cord might increase the rink of developing CPRM. (author).

  17. MYCN: From Oncoprotein To Tumor-Associated Antigen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vito ePistoia

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available MYCN is a well known oncogene overexpressed in different human malignancies including neuroblastoma, rhabdomyosarcoma, medulloblastoma, astrocytoma, Wilms’ tumor and small cell lung cancer. In the case of neuroblastoma (NB, MYCN amplification is an established biomarker of poor prognosis. MYCN belongs to a family of transcription factors (the most important of which is CMYC that show a high degree of homology. Downregulation of MYC protein expression leads to tumor regression in animal models, indicating that MYC proteins represent interesting therapeutic targets.Pre-requisites for a candidate tumor-associated antigen (TAA to be targeted by immunotherapeutic approaches are the following, i expression should be tumor-restricted, ii the putative TAA should be up-regulated in cancer cells and iii protein should be processed into immunogenic peptides capable of associating to MHC molecules with high affinity. Indeed, the MYCN protein is not expressed in human adult tissues and upregulated variably in NB cells, and MYCN peptides capable of associating to HLA-A1 or –A2 molecules with high affinity have been identified. Thus the MYCN protein qualifies as putative TAA in NB.Additional issues that determine the feasibility of targeting a putative TAA with cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL and will be here discussed are the following, i the inadequacy of tumor cells per se to act as antigen-presenting cells witnessed, in the case of NB cells, by the low to absent expression of HLA- class I molecules, the lack of costimulatory molecules and multiple defects in the HLA class I related antigen processing machinery, and ii the immune evasion mechanisms operated by cancer cells to fool the host immune system, such as up-regulation of soluble immunosuppressive molecules (e.g. soluble MICA and HLA-G in the case of NB or generation of immunosuppressive cells in the tumor microenvironment. A final issue that deserves consideration is the strategy used to generate