WorldWideScience

Sample records for rfa-ca-07-004 small animal

  1. Small Animal Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livesey, Dennis W.; Fong, Stephen

    This small animal care course guide is designed for students who will be seeking employment in veterinary hospitals, kennels, grooming shops, pet shops, and small-animal laboratories. The guide begins with an introductory section that gives the educational philosophy of the course, job categories and opportunities, units of instruction required…

  2. Neurological examination in small animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viktor Paluš

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This clinical review about the neurological examination in small animals describes the basics about the first steps of investigation when dealing with neurological patients. The knowledge of how to perform the neurological examination is important however more important is how to correctly interpret these performed tests. A step-by-step approach is mandatory and examiners should master the order and the style of performing these tests. Neurological conditions can be sometimes very distressing for owners and for pets that might not be the most cooperating. The role of a veterinary surgeon, as a professional, is therefore to collect the most relevant history, to examine a patient in a professional manner and to give to owners an educated opinion about the further treatment and prognosis. However neurological examinations might look challenging for many. But it is only the clinical application of neuroanatomy and neurophysiology to an every-day situation for practicing veterinarians and it does not require any specific in-to-depth knowledge. This clinical review is aimed not only to provide the information on how to perform the neurological examination but it is also aimed to appeal on veterinarians to challenge their daily routine and to start practicing on neurologically normal patients. This is the best and only way to differentiate between the normal and abnormal in a real situation.

  3. A focus on small animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steward, Jeremy

    2016-07-16

    After qualifying 25 years ago, Jeremy Stewart worked at the RSPCA's Harmsworth Hospital during the years it featured in the BBC television programme Animal Hospital. Having moved to a large group practice, his involvement in the charity sector is now as a trustee of the Blue Cross.

  4. Exploring Small Animal Care. Teacher's Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livesey, Dennis W.

    This course guide in small animal care is designed to give students seeking employment in veterinary hospitals, kennels, or pet shops an opportunity to (1) develop basic skills in small animal handling, sanitation of housing, and nutrition, (2) acquire skills in dog and cat grooming, including shop operation, (3) develop attitudes which contribute…

  5. Endocrine hypertension in small animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reusch, Claudia E; Schellenberg, Stefan; Wenger, Monique

    2010-03-01

    Hypertension is classified as idiopathic or secondary. In animals with idiopathic hypertension, persistently elevated blood pressure is not caused by an identifiable underlying or predisposing disease. Until recently, more than 95% of cases of hypertension in humans were diagnosed as idiopathic. New studies have shown, however, a much higher prevalence of secondary causes, such as primary hyperaldosteronism. In dogs and cats, secondary hypertension is the most prevalent form and is subclassified into renal and endocrine hypertension. This review focuses on the most common causes of endocrine hypertension in dogs and cats.

  6. Small animal imaging. Basics and practical guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiessling, Fabian [Aachen Univ. (RWTH) (Germany). Chair of Experimental Molecular Imaging; Pichler, Bernd J. (eds.) [Tuebingen Univ. (Germany). Lab. for Preclinical Imaging and Imaging Technology of the Werner Siemens-Foundation

    2011-07-01

    Small animal imaging has been recognized as an important tool in preclinical research. Nevertheless, the results of non-invasive imaging are often disappointing owing to choice of a suboptimal imaging modality and/or shortcomings in study design, experimental setup, and data evaluation. This textbook is a practical guide to the use of non-invasive imaging in preclinical research. Each of the available imaging modalities is discussed in detail, with the assistance of numerous informative illustrations. In addition, many useful hints are provided on the installation of a small animal unit, study planning, animal handling, and the cost-effective performance of small animal imaging. Cross-calibration methods, data postprocessing, and special imaging applications are also considered in depth. This is the first book to cover all the practical basics in small animal imaging, and it will prove an invaluable aid for researchers, students, and technicians. (orig.)

  7. [Spirograph for small laboratory animals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniiarov, S B; Lanskiĭ, Iu M; Bebinov, E M

    1986-10-01

    A design of dry spirograph is described. It is characterized by greater precision, lack of inertia, high reliability, absence of respiration resistance, adequate form of recording, rapid resetting to any respiratory rate. The device consists of two similar injection syringes, photoelectric sensor for the identification of the initial moments of respiration stages, electromagnetic valves, two photoelectric converters of the air volume into the impulse signal, vacuum micro-pump, microcompressor and a system of air-driving tubes. In the initial position of pistons and valves the microcompressor pumps air into the inhalation cylinder and lifts the piston to the upper extreme position. With the signal marking the beginning of inspiration, the valves switch over and the piston lowers, pushing out the air, which moves into the animals' respiratory organs. Simultaneously, the signals of the inhaled air volume from the photoelectric transducer reach the recorder. During expiration the air pushes the piston down into the second cylinder and photoelectric transducer gives the information on the volume of the expired air.

  8. Antimicrobial stewardship in small animal veterinary practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guardabassi, Luca; Prescott, John F

    2015-01-01

    Despite the increasing recognition of the critical role for antimicrobial stewardship in preventing the spread of multidrug-resistant bacteria, examples of effective antimicrobial stewardship programs are rare in small animal veterinary practice. This article highlights the basic requirements...

  9. Small animal micro-CT colonography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durkee, Benjamin Y; Weichert, Jamey P; Halberg, Richard B

    2010-01-01

    Microcomputed tomography colonography (mCTC) is a new method for detecting colonic tumors in living animals and estimating their volume, which allows investigators to determine the spontaneous fate of individually annotated tumors as well as their response to chemotherapeutics. This imaging platform was developed using the Min mouse, but is applicable to any murine model of human colorectal cancer. MicroCT is capable of 20 micron resolution, however, 100 microns is sufficient for this application. Scan quality is primarily dependent on animal preparation with the most critical parameters being proper anesthesia, bowel cleansing, and sufficient insufflation. The detection of colonic tumors is possible by both 2D and 3D rendering of image data. Tumor volume is estimated using a semi-automated five-step process which is based on three algorithms within the Amira software package. The estimates are precise, accurate and reproducible enabling changes in volume as small as 16% to be readily observed. Confirmation of mCTC observations by gross examination and histology is sometimes useful in this otherwise non-invasive protocol. Finally, mCTC is compared to other newly developed small animal imaging platforms including microMRI and microoptical colonoscopy. A major advantage of these platforms is that investigators can be perform longitudinal studies, which often have much greater statistical power than traditional cross-sectional studies; consequently, fewer animals are required for testing.

  10. Management of fractures in small animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roush, James K

    2005-09-01

    Fracture repair in small animals has arrived at a crossroads because of advances in fracture repair and client demands. Research into bone healing and repair techniques, collective professional experience,economics, and client demands are obligating veterinarians to greater expertise in the actual act of repairing fractures. The influx of surgery specialists into burgeoning private practices has improved access to specialty service beyond what the limited number of academic practices could previously provide and has raised the local standard of practice for orthopedic surgery at the same time. The necessity to deal with the preoperative and postoperative management of traumatized small animals by the general practitioner has not changed, however. Treatment of the small animal patient with a fractured bone does involve accurate definition of the fracture, selection of an appropriate method of fracture fixation from the variety of devices available, and correct application of the fixation. Far more than these, however, it involves assessment and treatment of the traumatized patient as a whole,including preanesthetic evaluation of critical body systems, preoperative preparation of the patient and client, and postoperative management of the repaired fracture and patient.

  11. Advanced techniques in echocardiography in small animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chetboul, Valérie

    2010-07-01

    Transthoracic echocardiography has become a major imaging tool for the diagnosis and management of canine and feline cardiovascular diseases. During the last decade, more recent advances in ultrasound technology with the introduction of newer imaging modalities, such as tissue Doppler imaging, strain and strain rate imaging, and 2-dimensional speckle tracking echocardiography, have provided new parameters to assess myocardial performance, including regional myocardial velocities and deformation, ventricular twist, and mechanical synchrony. An outline of these 4 recent ultrasound techniques, their impact on the understanding of right and left ventricular function in small animals, and their application in research and clinical settings are given in this article.

  12. Noninvasive bioluminescence imaging in small animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinn, Kurt R; Chaudhuri, Tandra R; Szafran, April Adams; O'Quinn, Darrell; Weaver, Casey; Dugger, Kari; Lamar, Dale; Kesterson, Robert A; Wang, Xiangdong; Frank, Stuart J

    2008-01-01

    There has been a rapid growth of bioluminescence imaging applications in small animal models in recent years, propelled by the availability of instruments, analysis software, reagents, and creative approaches to apply the technology in molecular imaging. Advantages include the sensitivity of the technique as well as its efficiency, relatively low cost, and versatility. Bioluminescence imaging is accomplished by sensitive detection of light emitted following chemical reaction of the luciferase enzyme with its substrate. Most imaging systems provide 2-dimensional (2D) information in rodents, showing the locations and intensity of light emitted from the animal in pseudo-color scaling. A 3-dimensional (3D) capability for bioluminescence imaging is now available, but is more expensive and less efficient; other disadvantages include the requirement for genetically encoded luciferase, the injection of the substrate to enable light emission, and the dependence of light signal on tissue depth. All of these problems make it unlikely that the method will be extended to human studies. However, in small animal models, bioluminescence imaging is now routinely applied to serially detect the location and burden of xenografted tumors, or identify and measure the number of immune or stem cells after an adoptive transfer. Bioluminescence imaging also makes it possible to track the relative amounts and locations of bacteria, viruses, and other pathogens over time. Specialized applications of bioluminescence also follow tissue-specific luciferase expression in transgenic mice, and monitor biological processes such as signaling or protein interactions in real time. In summary, bioluminescence imaging has become an important component of biomedical research that will continue in the future.

  13. [New drugs for small animals in 2014].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmerich, I U

    2015-01-01

    In 2014, six active pharmaceutical ingredients were released on the German market for small animals. Those are the ektoparasiticide of the isoxazoline group afoxolaner (NexGard®) and fluralaner (Bravecto®) and the neonicotinoid dinotefuran (Vectra 3D, Vectra Felis), the antidiabetic protamine zinc insulin of human origin (ProZinc®), the antifungal agent ketoconazole (Fugazid®) as well as the cytostatic drug oclacitinib (Apoquel®). Two substances were authorized for an additional species. The antiparasiticide eprinomectin and the antibiotic clindamycin were also authorized for use in cats. In addition, two active pharmaceutical ingredients, which were approved 2014 for use in human medicine and are of potential interest to veterinary medicine, are discussed. These are the antihypertensive drug riociguat and the urological substance mirabegron.

  14. Blended learning in the small animal clinic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langebæk, Rikke

    2011-01-01

    At the Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, Basic Surgical Skills are taught in groups of 30-35 students in the first year of the master program (4th year students). The eight day course is an example of ‘blended learning’ in which students use our e-learning-material (Step 1) to prepare...... for the practical part of the course (Step 2, 3 and 4). From their home computers, students log on to the e-learning platform of Copenhagen University: https://absalon.ku.dk and go to the Basic Surgical Skills course, which consist of a line of chapters concerning a variety of surgical subjects. Each subject...... the implementation of these new teaching methods (e-learning and Skills Lab), teachers have ascertained a more satisfactory level of preparation, students that seem more focused and live-animal surgery that is conducted at a more ‘professional’ level than before. Finally, our research in this field shows...

  15. Enclosure for small animals during awake animal imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goddard, Jr., James S

    2013-11-26

    An enclosure or burrow restrains an awake animal during an imaging procedure. A tubular body, made from a radiolucent material that does not attenuate x-rays or gamma rays, accepts an awake animal. A proximal end of the body includes an attachment surface that corresponds to an attachment surface of an optically transparent and optically uniform window. An anti-reflective coating may be applied to an inner surface, an outer surface, or both surfaces of the window. Since the window is a separate element of the enclosure and it is not integrally formed as part of the body, it can be made with optically uniform thickness properties for improved motion tracking of markers on the animal with a camera during the imaging procedure. The motion tracking information is then used to compensate for animal movement in the image.

  16. Simulation, construction and application of focused pinhole small animal SPECT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vastenhouw, B.

    2008-01-01

    New developments in molecular imaging techniques like small animal SPECT systems are important tools to analyze mouse models of human diseases. The main subjects of this thesis are simulation, construction and image reconstruction algorithms needed for the development of a small-animal SPECT system

  17. A Very High Spatial Resolution Detector for Small Animal PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanai Shah, M.S.

    2007-03-06

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is an in vivo analog of autoradiography and has the potential to become a powerful new tool in imaging biological processes in small laboratory animals. PET imaging of small animals can provide unique information that can help in advancement of human disease models as well as drug development. Clinical PET scanners used for human imaging are bulky, expensive and do not have adequate spatial resolution for small animal studies. Hence, dedicated, low cost instruments are required for conducting small animal studies with higher spatial resolution than what is currently achieved with clinical as well as dedicated small animal PET scanners. The goal of the proposed project is to investigate a new all solid-state detector design for small animal PET imaging. Exceptionally high spatial resolution, good timing resolution, and excellent energy resolution are expected from the proposed detector design. The Phase I project was aimed at demonstrating the feasibility of producing high performance solid-state detectors that provide high sensitivity, spatial resolution, and timing characteristics. Energy resolution characteristics of the new detector were also investigated. The goal of the Phase II project is to advance the promising solid-state detector technology for small animal PET and determine its full potential. Detectors modules will be built and characterized and finally, a bench-top small animal PET system will be assembled and evaluated.

  18. Tri-modality small animal imaging system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kundu, B.K.; Stolin, A.V.; Pole, J.; Baumgart, L.; Fontaine, M.; Wojcik, R.; Kross, B.; Zorn, C.; Majewski, S.; Williams, M.B.

    2006-02-01

    Our group is developing a scanner that combines x-ray, single gamma, and optical imaging on the same rotating gantry. Two functional modalities (SPECT and optical) are included because they have different strengths and weaknesses in terms of spatial and temporal decay lengths in the context of in vivo imaging, and because of the recent advent of multiple reporter gene constructs. The effect of attenuation by biological tissue on the detected intensity of the emitted signal was measured for both gamma and optical imaging. Attenuation by biological tissue was quantified for both the bioluminescent emission of luciferace and for the emission light of the near infrared fluorophore cyanine 5.5, using a fixed excitation light intensity. Experiments were performed to test the feasibility of using either single gamma or x-ray imaging to make depth-dependent corrections to the measured optical signal. Our results suggest that significant improvements in quantitation of optical emission are possible using straightforward correction techniques based on information from other modalities. Development of an integrated scanner in which data from each modality are obtained with the animal in a common configuration will greatly simplify this process.

  19. Cortical inactivation by cooling in small animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben eCoomber

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Reversible inactivation of the cortex by surface cooling is a powerful method for studying the function of a particular area. Implanted cooling cryoloops have been used to study the role of individual cortical areas in auditory processing of awake-behaving cats. Cryoloops have also been used in rodents for reversible inactivation of the cortex, but recently there has been a concern that the cryoloop may also cool non-cortical structures either directly or via the perfusion of blood, cooled as it passed close to the cooling loop. In this study we have confirmed that the loop can inactivate most of the auditory cortex without causing a significant reduction in temperature of the auditory thalamus or other sub-cortical structures. We placed a cryoloop on the surface of the guinea pig cortex, cooled it to 2°C and measured thermal gradients across the neocortical surface. We found that the temperature dropped to 20-24°C among cells within a radius of about 2.5mm away from the loop. This temperature drop was sufficient to reduce activity of most cortical cells and led to the inactivation of almost the entire auditory region. When the temperature of thalamus, midbrain, and middle ear were measured directly during cortical cooling, there was a small drop in temperature (about 4°C but this was not sufficient to directly reduce neural activity. In an effort to visualise the extent of neural inactivation we measured the uptake of thallium ions following an intravenous injection. This confirmed that there was a large reduction of activity across much of the ipsilateral cortex and only a small reduction in subcortical structures.

  20. Method to Quantify Tail Vein Injection Technique in Small Animals

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Groman, Ernest V; Reinhardt, Christopher P

    2004-01-01

    .... In this report, we propose six criteria for a reagent designed to assess tail vein injection technique in small animals and suggest a reagent, colloidal gold labeled with the stable isotope 197Au...

  1. A small swivel joint for infusion of free moving animals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Strubbe, J.H.

    1974-01-01

    The construction and application of a small, light, inexpensive swivel joint suitable for infusions of small laboratory animals is described. Commercially available tubes and needles are used in the construction of the swivel thus making it easy to repare and essentially disposable. This swivel is e

  2. High-resolution SPECT for small-animal imaging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    This article presents a brief overview of the development of high-resolution SPECT for small-animal imaging. A pinhole collimator has been used for high-resolution animal SPECT to provide better spatial resolution and detection efficiency in comparison with a parallel-hole collimator. The theory of imaging characteristics of the pinhole collimator is presented and the designs of the pinhole aperture are discussed. The detector technologies used for the development of small-animal SPECT and the recent advances are presented. The evolving trend of small-animal SPECT is toward a multi-pinhole and a multi-detector system to obtain a high resolution and also a high detection efficiency.

  3. UTIs in small animal patients: part 1: etiology and pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smee, Nicole; Loyd, Kimberly; Grauer, Greg

    2013-01-01

    Understanding how urinary tract infections (UTIs) can occur and how to classify them can help the practitioner to make a plan for treatment. This review summarizes the etiology, pathogenesis, and host defense mechanisms associated with bacterial UTIs in dogs and cats. UTIs in Small Animal Patients: Part 2: Diagnosis, Treatment, and Complications will appear in the March/April 2013 issue of the Journal of the American Animal Hospital Association.

  4. The lack of analgesic use (oligoanalgesia) in small animal practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, B T; Scallan, E M; Carroll, G; Steagall, P V

    2017-08-01

    Oligoanalgesia is defined as failure to provide analgesia in patients with acute pain. Treatment of pain in emergencies, critical care and perioperatively may influence patient outcomes: the harmful practice of withholding analgesics occurs in teaching hospitals and private practices and results in severe physiological consequences. This article discusses the prevalence, primary causes, species and regional differences and ways to avoid oligoanalgesia in small animal practice. Oligoanalgesia may be addressed by improving education on pain management in the veterinary curriculum, providing continuing education to veterinarians and implementing pain scales. © 2017 British Small Animal Veterinary Association.

  5. On the surveillance for animal diseases in small herds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greiner, Matthias; Dekker, Aldo

    2005-01-01

    Small herds may present a problem in surveillance for infectious animal diseases because typical levels of a within-herd design prevalence are not directly applicable. We suggest a definition of small herds as those smaller than 2/(within-herd design prevalence) on the basis that such herds would...... be expected to have less than two (i.e. only one) infected animals. Consequently, the probability of detecting small herds cannot be improved by choosing a larger sample size within the herd. We derive necessary sample sizes of herds and the probability ("confidence") of detecting disease within a stratum...... of small herds, given the among-herd design prevalence and test diagnostic sensitivity. Both a binomial model and a Poisson model can be used to establish the confidence for a given sample size of herds (and vice versa). The results of a simulation study suggest that the Poisson model provides more...

  6. Small Animal Radionuclide Imaging With Focusing Gamma-Ray Optics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hill, R; Decker, T; Epstein, M; Ziock, K; Pivovaroff, M J; Craig, W W; Jernigan, J G; Barber, W B; Christensen, F E; Funk, T; Hailey, C J; Hasegawa, B H; Taylor, C

    2004-02-27

    Significant effort currently is being devoted to the development of noninvasive imaging systems that allow in vivo assessment of biological and biomolecular interactions in mice and other small animals. While physiological function in small animals can be localized and imaged using conventional radionuclide imaging techniques such as single-photon emission tomography (SPECT) and positron emission tomography (PET), these techniques inherently are limited to spatial resolutions of 1-2 mm. For this reason, we are developing a small animal radionuclide imaging system (SARIS) using grazing incidence optics to focus gamma-rays emitted by {sup 125}I and other radiopharmaceuticals. We have developed a prototype optic with sufficient accuracy and precision to focus the 27.5 keV photons from {sup 125}I onto a high-resolution imaging detector. Experimental measurements from the prototype have demonstrated that the optic can focus X-rays from a microfocus X-ray tube to a spot having physical dimensions (approximately 1500 microns half-power diameter) consistent with those predicted by theory. Our theoretical and numerical analysis also indicate that an optic can be designed and build that ultimately can achieve 100 {micro}m spatial resolution with sufficient efficiency to perform in vivo single photon emission imaging studies in small animal.

  7. Ultra-high-resolution small-animal SPECT imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Have, F. van der

    2007-01-01

    The main subject of this thesis is the development of the first two in a series of dedicated ultra-high resolution Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) systems (U-SPECT-I and II) for the imaging of distributions of radio-isotope labeled tracers in small laboratory animals such as mice

  8. Marketing small animal theriogenology services--one perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, J A

    2007-08-01

    Once a decision is made to add small animal theriogenology services to a practice, marketing strategies must be developed and implemented to attract clients to the new services. Marketing strategies for the niche market of theriogenology include start-up marketing methods, referral programs, internal marketing, and continued marketing. Marketing theriogenology services is a dynamic, ongoing process that never ends.

  9. Quantification in dynamic and small-animal positron emission tomography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Disselhorst, Johannes Antonius

    2011-01-01

    This thesis covers two aspects of positron emission tomography (PET) quantification. The first section addresses the characterization and optimization of a small-animal PET/CT scanner. The sensitivity and resolution as well as various parameters affecting image quality (reconstruction settings, type

  10. Importance of Attenuation Correction (AC) for Small Animal PET Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    El Ali, Henrik H.; Bodholdt, Rasmus Poul; Jørgensen, Jesper Tranekjær;

    2012-01-01

    was performed. Methods: Ten NMRI nude mice with subcutaneous implantation of human breast cancer cells (MCF-7) were scanned consecutively in small animal PET and CT scanners (MicroPETTM Focus 120 and ImTek’s MicroCATTM II). CT-based AC, PET-based AC and uniform AC methods were compared. Results: The activity...

  11. Monte Carlo simulations in small animal PET imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Branco, Susana [Universidade de Lisboa, Faculdade de Ciencias, Instituto de Biofisica e Engenharia Biomedica, Lisbon (Portugal)], E-mail: susana.silva@fc.ul.pt; Jan, Sebastien [Service Hospitalier Frederic Joliot, CEA/DSV/DRM, Orsay (France); Almeida, Pedro [Universidade de Lisboa, Faculdade de Ciencias, Instituto de Biofisica e Engenharia Biomedica, Lisbon (Portugal)

    2007-10-01

    This work is based on the use of an implemented Positron Emission Tomography (PET) simulation system dedicated for small animal PET imaging. Geant4 Application for Tomographic Emission (GATE), a Monte Carlo simulation platform based on the Geant4 libraries, is well suited for modeling the microPET FOCUS system and to implement realistic phantoms, such as the MOBY phantom, and data maps from real examinations. The use of a microPET FOCUS simulation model with GATE has been validated for spatial resolution, counting rates performances, imaging contrast recovery and quantitative analysis. Results from realistic studies of the mouse body using {sup -}F and [{sup 18}F]FDG imaging protocols are presented. These simulations include the injection of realistic doses into the animal and realistic time framing. The results have shown that it is possible to simulate small animal PET acquisitions under realistic conditions, and are expected to be useful to improve the quantitative analysis in PET mouse body studies.

  12. Robotic Delivery of Complex Radiation Volumes for Small Animal Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matinfar, Mohammad; Iordachita, Iulian; Wong, John; Kazanzides, Peter

    2010-07-15

    The Small Animal Radiation Research Platform (SARRP) is a novel and complete system capable of delivering multidirectional (focal), kilo-voltage radiation fields to targets in small animals under robotic control using cone-beam CT (CBCT) image guidance. The capability of the SARRP to deliver highly focused beams to multiple animal models provides new research opportunities that more realistically bridge laboratory research and clinical translation. This paper describes the design and operation of the SARRP for precise radiation delivery. Different delivery procedures are presented which enable the system to radiate through a series of points, representative of a complex shape. A particularly interesting case is shell dose irradiation, where the goal is to deliver a high dose of radiation to the shape surface, with minimal dose to the shape interior. The ability to deliver a dose shell allows mechanistic research of how a tumor interacts with its microenvironment to sustain its growth and lead to its resistance or recurrence.

  13. Non-Invasive in vivo Imaging in Small Animal Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Koo

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Non-invasive real time in vivo molecular imaging in small animal models has become the essential bridge between in vitro data and their translation into clinical applications. The tremendous development and technological progress, such as tumour modelling, monitoring of tumour growth and detection of metastasis, has facilitated translational drug development. This has added to our knowledge on carcinogenesis. The modalities that are commonly used include Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI, Computed Tomography (CT, Positron Emission Tomography (PET, bioluminescence imaging, fluorescence imaging and multi-modality imaging systems. The ability to obtain multiple images longitudinally provides reliable information whilst reducing animal numbers. As yet there is no one modality that is ideal for all experimental studies. This review outlines the instrumentation available together with corresponding applications reported in the literature with particular emphasis on cancer research. Advantages and limitations to current imaging technology are discussed and the issues concerning small animal care during imaging are highlighted.

  14. Applications of penetrating radiation for small animal imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Bruce H.; Wu, Max C.; Iwata, Koji; Hwang, Andrew B.; Wong, Kenneth H.; Barber, William C.; Dae, Michael W.; Sakdinawat, Anne E.

    2002-11-01

    Researchers long have relied on research involving small animals to unravel scientific mysteries in the biological sciences, and to develop new diagnostic and therapeutic techniques in the medical and health sciences. Within the past 2 decades, new techniques have been developed to manipulate the genome of the mouse, allowing the development of transgenic and knockout models of mammalian and human disease, development, and physiology. Traditionally, much biological research involving small animals has relied on the use of invasive methods such as organ harvesting, tissue sampling, and autoradiography during which the animal was sacrificed to perform a single measurement. More recently, imaging techniques have been developed that assess anatomy and physiology in the intact animal, in a way that allows the investigator to follow the progression of disease, or to monitor the response to therapeutic interventions. Imaging techniques that use penetrating radiation at millimeter or submillimeter levels to image small animals include x-ray computed tomography (microCT), single-photon emission computed tomography (microSPECT), and imaging positron emission computed tomography (microPET). MicroCT generates cross-sectional slices which reveal the structure of the object with spatial resolution in the range of 50 to 100 microns. MicroSPECT and microPET are radionuclide imaging techniques in which a radiopharmaceutical is injected into the animal that is accumulated to metabolism, blood flow, bone remodeling, tumor growth, or other biological processes. Both microSPECT and microPET offer spatial resolutions in the range of 1-2 millimeters. However, microPET records annihilation photons produced by a positron-emitting radiopharmaceutical using electronic coincidence, and has a sensitivity approximately two orders of magnitude better than microSPECT, while microSPECT is compatible with gamma-ray emitting radiopharmaceuticals that are less expensive and more readily available

  15. II International Congress on small animals and JDC-VEPA I National Meeting of Research in Animal Science

    OpenAIRE

    Autores Varios

    2013-01-01

    SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH INSTITUTE - INICIENFACULTY OF AGRICULTURAL SCIENCES II International Congress on small animals and JDC-VEPA I National Meeting of Animal science research RESEARCH GROUPS INPANTA-CEAS-GREBIAL-IRABI II International Congress on small animals and JDC-VEPA I National Meeting of Research in Animal Science

  16. Animals In Synchrotrons: Overcoming Challenges For High-Resolution, Live, Small-Animal Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnelley, Martin; Parsons, David; Morgan, Kaye; Siu, Karen

    2010-07-01

    Physiological studies in small animals can be complicated, but the complexity is increased dramatically when performing live-animal synchrotron X-ray imaging studies. Our group has extensive experience in high-resolution live-animal imaging at the Japanese SPring-8 synchrotron, primarily examining airways in two-dimensions. These experiments normally image an area of 1.8 mm×1.2 mm at a pixel resolution of 0.45 μm and are performed with live, intact, anaesthetized mice. There are unique challenges in this experimental setting. Importantly, experiments must be performed in an isolated imaging hutch not specifically designed for small-animal imaging. This requires equipment adapted to remotely monitor animals, maintain their anesthesia, and deliver test substances while collecting images. The horizontal synchrotron X-ray beam has a fixed location and orientation that limits experimental flexibility. The extremely high resolution makes locating anatomical regions-of-interest slow and can result in a high radiation dose, and at this level of magnification small animal movements produce motion-artifacts that can render acquired images unusable. Here we describe our experimental techniques and how we have overcome several challenges involved in performing live mouse synchrotron imaging. Experiments have tested different mouse strains, with hairless strains minimizing overlying skin and hair artifacts. Different anesthetics have also be trialed due to the limited choices available at SPring-8. Tracheal-intubation methods have been refined and controlled-ventilation is now possible using a specialized small-animal ventilator. With appropriate animal restraint and respiratory-gating, motion-artifacts have been minimized. The animal orientation (supine vs. head-high) also appears to affect animal physiology, and can alter image quality. Our techniques and image quality at SPring-8 have dramatically improved and in the near future we plan to translate this experience to the

  17. Molecular Imaging with Small Animal PET/CT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2011-01-01

    in this field of small animal molecular imaging with special emphasis on the targets for tissue characterization in tumor biology such as hypoxia, proliferation and cancer specific over-expression of receptors. The added value of applying CT imaging for anatomical localization and tumor volume measurements...... is also described. In addition, the non-invasive nature of molecular imaging and the targets of these promising new tracers are attractive for other research areas as well, although these fields are much less explored. We present an example of an interesting research field with the application of small...

  18. [Application of paramunity inducers in small animal practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proksch, A L; Hartmann, K

    2016-01-01

    Paramunity inducers have been used to treat small animals for decades. Paramunity inducers are based on attenuated and inactivated poxviruses (avipox virus and parapox virus). Their applications include both therapeutic and prophylactic use in various diseases. Despite their wide and variable use, only a very small number of placebo-controlled studies has been published. Positive effects in preventing kitten mortality and in treating feline stomatitis have been reported, however, no statistically significant effect of their therapeutic use in canine parvovirus infection, feline leukemia infection virus infection or canine papillomavirus infection could be demonstrated. For these infectious diseases, paramunity inducers do not appear to be effective.

  19. Micro-computed tomography for small animal imaging: Technological details

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hao Li; Hui Zhang; Zhiwei Tang; Guangshu Hu

    2008-01-01

    The high-resolution micro-computed tomography(micro-CT)system has now become an important tool for biological research.The micro-CT system enables a non-invasive inspection to screen anatomical changes in small animals.The promising advantages include high-spatial resolution,high sensitivity to bone and lung,short scan time and cost-effectiveness.The dose received by the small animal might be a critical concern in the research.In this article,the choice of the components,fundamental physical problems,the image reconstruction algorithm and the representative applications of micro-CT are summarized.Some results from our research group are also presented to show high-resolution images obtained by the micro-CT system.

  20. Microtomography with sandwich detectors for small-animal bone imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, S. H.; Kim, D. W.; Kim, D.; Youn, H.; Cho, S.; Kim, H. K.

    2016-10-01

    An x-ray radiographic system consisting of two detectors in tandem, or a sandwich detector, can produce dual-energy image from a single-shot exposure. Subtraction of two images obtained from the two detectors can produce a sharper image through an unsharp masking effect if the two images are formed at different spatial resolutions. This is indeed possible by incorporating different thicknesses of x-ray conversion layers in the detectors. In this study, we have developed a microtomography system with a sandwich detector in pursuit of high-resolution bone-enhanced small-animal imaging. The results show that the bone-enhanced images reconstructed from the dual-energy projection data provide higher visibility of bone details than the conventionally reconstructed images. The microtomography with the single-shot dual-energy sandwich detector will be useful for the high-resolution bone-enhanced small-animal imaging.

  1. Advances in endoscopic surgery for small animal reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katic, N; Dupré, G

    2016-09-01

    Although endoscopic surgery entered its "golden era" in the mid-1980s, it is still advancing at a tremendous pace. Novel surgical techniques and devices are continuously developed and applied, and new indications (and/or contraindications) for the use of endoscopic surgery are routinely reported in the literature and subjected to systematic assessments. Although endoscopic surgery (laparoscopy in particular) has already become established as the gold standard in human medicine, it has yet to be proven as a viable alternative to open surgery in the field of veterinary medicine. The advantages of minimally invasive surgery include better intra-operative visualization, reduced postoperative pain, reduced scar formation and increased postoperative mobility. Therefore, it is reasonable to expect that the application of this will continue to expand. Small animal reproduction, a field within the broad discipline of veterinary medicine, has already recognized and begun to reap the benefits of endoscopic surgery. Herein, we retrospectively review the most recent successful novel applications of endoscopic surgery in the small animal reproduction system to provide small animal reproductive surgeons with important knowledge to help improve their own veterinarian medical practice.

  2. Coded Aperture Nuclear Scintigraphy: A Novel Small Animal Imaging Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dawid Schellingerhout

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available We introduce and demonstrate the utility of coded aperture (CA nuclear scintigraphy for imaging small animals. CA imaging uses multiple pinholes in a carefully designed mask pattern, mounted on a conventional gamma camera. System performance was assessed using point sources and phantoms, while several animal experiments were performed to test the usefulness of the imaging system in vivo, with commonly used radiopharmaceuticals. The sensitivity of the CA system for 99mTc was 4.2 × 103 cps/Bq (9400 cpm/μCi, compared to 4.4 × 104 cps/Bq (990 cpm/μCi for a conventional collimator system. The system resolution was 1.7 mm, as compared to 4–6 mm for the conventional imaging system (using a high-sensitivity low-energy collimator. Animal imaging demonstrated artifact-free imaging with superior resolution and image quality compared to conventional collimator images in several mouse and rat models. We conclude that: (a CA imaging is a useful nuclear imaging technique for small animal imaging. The advantage in signal-to-noise can be traded to achieve higher resolution, decreased dose or reduced imaging time. (b CA imaging works best for images where activity is concentrated in small volumes; a low count outline may be better demonstrated using conventional collimator imaging. Thus, CA imaging should be viewed as a technique to complement rather than replace traditional nuclear imaging methods. (c CA hardware and software can be readily adapted to existing gamma cameras, making their implementation a relatively inexpensive retrofit to most systems.

  3. Computer-aided pulmonary image analysis in small animal models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Ziyue; Mansoor, Awais; Mollura, Daniel J. [Center for Infectious Disease Imaging (CIDI), Radiology and Imaging Sciences, National Institutes of Health (NIH), Bethesda, Maryland 32892 (United States); Bagci, Ulas, E-mail: ulasbagci@gmail.com [Center for Research in Computer Vision (CRCV), University of Central Florida (UCF), Orlando, Florida 32816 (United States); Kramer-Marek, Gabriela [The Institute of Cancer Research, London SW7 3RP (United Kingdom); Luna, Brian [Microfluidic Laboratory Automation, University of California-Irvine, Irvine, California 92697-2715 (United States); Kubler, Andre [Department of Medicine, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Dey, Bappaditya; Jain, Sanjay [Center for Tuberculosis Research, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21231 (United States); Foster, Brent [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of California-Davis, Davis, California 95817 (United States); Papadakis, Georgios Z. [Radiology and Imaging Sciences, National Institutes of Health (NIH), Bethesda, Maryland 32892 (United States); Camp, Jeremy V. [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Louisville, Louisville, Kentucky 40202 (United States); Jonsson, Colleen B. [National Institute for Mathematical and Biological Synthesis, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996 (United States); Bishai, William R. [Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Chevy Chase, Maryland 20815 and Center for Tuberculosis Research, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21231 (United States); Udupa, Jayaram K. [Medical Image Processing Group, Department of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States)

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: To develop an automated pulmonary image analysis framework for infectious lung diseases in small animal models. Methods: The authors describe a novel pathological lung and airway segmentation method for small animals. The proposed framework includes identification of abnormal imaging patterns pertaining to infectious lung diseases. First, the authors’ system estimates an expected lung volume by utilizing a regression function between total lung capacity and approximated rib cage volume. A significant difference between the expected lung volume and the initial lung segmentation indicates the presence of severe pathology, and invokes a machine learning based abnormal imaging pattern detection system next. The final stage of the proposed framework is the automatic extraction of airway tree for which new affinity relationships within the fuzzy connectedness image segmentation framework are proposed by combining Hessian and gray-scale morphological reconstruction filters. Results: 133 CT scans were collected from four different studies encompassing a wide spectrum of pulmonary abnormalities pertaining to two commonly used small animal models (ferret and rabbit). Sensitivity and specificity were greater than 90% for pathological lung segmentation (average dice similarity coefficient > 0.9). While qualitative visual assessments of airway tree extraction were performed by the participating expert radiologists, for quantitative evaluation the authors validated the proposed airway extraction method by using publicly available EXACT’09 data set. Conclusions: The authors developed a comprehensive computer-aided pulmonary image analysis framework for preclinical research applications. The proposed framework consists of automatic pathological lung segmentation and accurate airway tree extraction. The framework has high sensitivity and specificity; therefore, it can contribute advances in preclinical research in pulmonary diseases.

  4. Assessment of a new CT system for small animals

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    Proceeding of: 2006 IEEE Nuclear Science Symposium Conference Record, San Diego, CA, Oct. 29 - Nov. 1, 2006 We have developed an X-ray cone beam tomograph for in vivo small-animal imaging using a flat panel detector (CMOS technology with a columnar CsI scintillator plate) and a microfocus X-ray source in a geometric configuration with 1.6 magnification and 7.5 cm2 field of view. This work presents an initial characterization of this new system. We measured the detector modulation tra...

  5. Veterinarians' perceptions of behaviour support in small-animal practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roshier, A. L.; McBride, E. A.

    2013-01-01

    Veterinarians are professionals considered to be at the forefront of animal welfare, including behaviour medicine. However, concerns raised, both within the profession and without, highlight that the support offered is not optimal, due to deficiencies in veterinary training, which focuses on physical aspects and overlooks psychological aspects. This preliminary study explored the experiences and perceptions of six veterinarians (three male, three female, age range: 23–55 years) in two UK small-animal practices. Seventeen annual booster consultations were videoed and conversations thematically analysed for welfare topics discussed. Both veterinarians and clients completed questionnaires to gather demographic information and perspectives. All veterinarians recognised behaviour as a component of their caseload, and acknowledged that clients expected them to provide behaviour support. Veterinarians varied in their experiences of and confidence in providing behaviour support. Five felt unable to meet client expectations; four did not feel their training had prepared them sufficiently. Only one provided dedicated behaviour consultations, the others referred cases. All provided suggestions for behaviour skills needed for new veterinary graduates. The study has afforded an insight into the experiences of a small opportunistic sample of veterinarians. The data indicated important limitations regarding time available in general consultations to discuss behaviour concerns, and practitioner knowledge and skill in detection, anamnesis, assessment and provision of appropriate behaviour information. Suggestions for veterinary training in behaviour are provided. PMID:23475046

  6. Veterinarians' perceptions of behaviour support in small-animal practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roshier, A L; McBride, E A

    2013-03-09

    Veterinarians are professionals considered to be at the forefront of animal welfare, including behaviour medicine. However, concerns raised, both within the profession and without, highlight that the support offered is not optimal, due to deficiencies in veterinary training, which focuses on physical aspects and overlooks psychological aspects. This preliminary study explored the experiences and perceptions of six veterinarians (three male, three female, age range: 23-55 years) in two UK small-animal practices. Seventeen annual booster consultations were videoed and conversations thematically analysed for welfare topics discussed. Both veterinarians and clients completed questionnaires to gather demographic information and perspectives. All veterinarians recognised behaviour as a component of their caseload, and acknowledged that clients expected them to provide behaviour support. Veterinarians varied in their experiences of and confidence in providing behaviour support. Five felt unable to meet client expectations; four did not feel their training had prepared them sufficiently. Only one provided dedicated behaviour consultations, the others referred cases. All provided suggestions for behaviour skills needed for new veterinary graduates. The study has afforded an insight into the experiences of a small opportunistic sample of veterinarians. The data indicated important limitations regarding time available in general consultations to discuss behaviour concerns, and practitioner knowledge and skill in detection, anamnesis, assessment and provision of appropriate behaviour information. Suggestions for veterinary training in behaviour are provided.

  7. Preliminary study for small animal preclinical hadrontherapy facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, G.; Pisciotta, P.; Cirrone, G. A. P.; Romano, F.; Cammarata, F.; Marchese, V.; Forte, G. I.; Lamia, D.; Minafra, L.; Bravatá, V.; Acquaviva, R.; Gilardi, M. C.; Cuttone, G.

    2017-02-01

    Aim of this work is the study of the preliminary steps to perform a particle treatment of cancer cells inoculated in small animals and to realize a preclinical hadrontherapy facility. A well-defined dosimetric protocol was developed to explicate the steps needed in order to perform a precise proton irradiation in small animals and achieve a highly conformal dose into the target. A precise homemade positioning and holding system for small animals was designed and developed at INFN-LNS in Catania (Italy), where an accurate Monte Carlo simulation was developed, using Geant4 code to simulate the treatment in order to choose the best animal position and perform accurately all the necessary dosimetric evaluations. The Geant4 application can also be used to realize dosimetric studies and its peculiarity consists in the possibility to introduce the real target composition in the simulation using the DICOM micro-CT image. This application was fully validated comparing the results with the experimental measurements. The latter ones were performed at the CATANA (Centro di AdroTerapia e Applicazioni Nucleari Avanzate) facility at INFN-LNS by irradiating both PMMA and water solid phantom. Dosimetric measurements were performed using previously calibrated EBT3 Gafchromic films as a detector and the results were compared with the Geant4 simulation ones. In particular, two different types of dosimetric studies were performed: the first one involved irradiation of a phantom made up of water solid slabs where a layer of EBT3 was alternated with two different slabs in a sandwich configuration, in order to validate the dosimetric distribution. The second one involved irradiation of a PMMA phantom made up of a half hemisphere and some PMMA slabs in order to simulate a subcutaneous tumour configuration, normally used in preclinical studies. In order to evaluate the accordance between experimental and simulation results, two different statistical tests were made: Kolmogorov test and

  8. Prompt gamma-ray imaging for small animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Libai

    Small animal imaging is recognized as a powerful discovery tool for small animal modeling of human diseases, which is providing an important clue to complete understanding of disease mechanisms and is helping researchers develop and test new treatments. The current small animal imaging techniques include positron emission tomography (PET), single photon emission tomography (SPECT), computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and ultrasound (US). A new imaging modality called prompt gamma-ray imaging (PGI) has been identified and investigated primarily by Monte Carlo simulation. Currently it is suggested for use on small animals. This new technique could greatly enhance and extend the present capabilities of PET and SPECT imaging from ingested radioisotopes to the imaging of selected non-radioactive elements, such as Gd, Cd, Hg, and B, and has the great potential to be used in Neutron Cancer Therapy to monitor neutron distribution and neutron-capture agent distribution. This approach consists of irradiating small animals in the thermal neutron beam of a nuclear reactor to produce prompt gamma rays from the elements in the sample by the radiative capture (n, gamma) reaction. These prompt gamma rays are emitted in energies that are characteristic of each element and they are also produced in characteristic coincident chains. After measuring these prompt gamma rays by surrounding spectrometry array, the distribution of each element of interest in the sample is reconstructed from the mapping of each detected signature gamma ray by either electronic collimations or mechanical collimations. In addition, the transmitted neutrons from the beam can be simultaneously used for very sensitive anatomical imaging, which provides the registration for the elemental distributions obtained from PGI. The primary approach is to use Monte Carlo simulation methods either with the specific purpose code CEARCPG, developed at NC State University or with the general purpose

  9. Integration of optical imaging with a small animal irradiator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weersink, Robert A., E-mail: robert.weersink@rmp.uhn.on.ca [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, 610 University Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9, Canada and Techna Institute, University Health Network, 124-100 College Street, Toronto, Ontario M5G 1P5 (Canada); Ansell, Steve; Wang, An; Wilson, Graham [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, 610 University Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9 (Canada); Shah, Duoaud [Techna Institute, University Health Network, 124-100 College Street, Toronto, Ontario M5G 1P5 (Canada); Lindsay, Patricia E. [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, 610 University Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9, Canada and Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5S 1A1 (Canada); Jaffray, David A. [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, 610 University Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9 (Canada); Techna Institute, University Health Network, 124-100 College Street, Toronto, Ontario M5G 1P5 (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5S 1A1 (Canada); Ontario Cancer Institute, Princess Margaret Hospital, 610 University Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9 (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5S 1A1 (Canada)

    2014-10-15

    Purpose: The authors describe the integration of optical imaging with a targeted small animal irradiator device, focusing on design, instrumentation, 2D to 3D image registration, 2D targeting, and the accuracy of recovering and mapping the optical signal to a 3D surface generated from the cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) imaging. The integration of optical imaging will improve targeting of the radiation treatment and offer longitudinal tracking of tumor response of small animal models treated using the system. Methods: The existing image-guided small animal irradiator consists of a variable kilovolt (peak) x-ray tube mounted opposite an aSi flat panel detector, both mounted on a c-arm gantry. The tube is used for both CBCT imaging and targeted irradiation. The optical component employs a CCD camera perpendicular to the x-ray treatment/imaging axis with a computer controlled filter for spectral decomposition. Multiple optical images can be acquired at any angle as the gantry rotates. The optical to CBCT registration, which uses a standard pinhole camera model, was modeled and tested using phantoms with markers visible in both optical and CBCT images. Optically guided 2D targeting in the anterior/posterior direction was tested on an anthropomorphic mouse phantom with embedded light sources. The accuracy of the mapping of optical signal to the CBCT surface was tested using the same mouse phantom. A surface mesh of the phantom was generated based on the CBCT image and optical intensities projected onto the surface. The measured surface intensity was compared to calculated surface for a point source at the actual source position. The point-source position was also optimized to provide the closest match between measured and calculated intensities, and the distance between the optimized and actual source positions was then calculated. This process was repeated for multiple wavelengths and sources. Results: The optical to CBCT registration error was 0.8 mm. Two

  10. Shielding considerations for the small animal radiation research platform (SARRP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayler, Elaine; Dolney, Derek; Avery, Stephen; Koch, Cameron

    2013-05-01

    The Small Animal Radiation Research Platform (SARRP) is a commercially available platform designed to deliver conformal, image-guided radiation to small animals using a dual-anode kV x-ray source. At the University of Pennsylvania, a free-standing 2 m enclosure was designed to shield the SARRP according to federal code regulating cabinet x-ray systems. The initial design consisted of 4.0-mm-thick lead for all secondary barriers and proved wholly inadequate. Radiation levels outside the enclosure were 15 times higher than expected. Additionally, the leakage appeared to be distributed broadly within the enclosure, so concern arose that a subject might receive significant doses outside the intended treatment field. Thus, a detailed analysis was undertaken to identify and block all sources of leakage. Leakage sources were identified by Kodak X-OmatV (XV) film placed throughout the enclosure. Radiation inside the enclosure was quantified using Gafchromic film. Outside the enclosure, radiation was measured using a survey meter. Sources of leakage included (1) an unnecessarily broad beam exiting the tube, (2) failure of the secondary collimator to confine the primary beam entirely, (3) scatter from the secondary collimator, (4) lack of beam-stop below the treatment volume, and (5) incomplete shielding of the x-ray tube. The exit window was restricted, and a new collimator was designed to address problems (1-3). A beam-stop and additional tube shielding were installed. These modifications reduced internal scatter by more than 100-fold. Radiation outside the enclosure was reduced to levels compliant with federal regulations, provided the SARRP is operated using tube potentials of 175 kV or less. In addition, these simple and relatively inexpensive modifications eliminate the possibility of exposing a larger animal (such as a rat) to significant doses outside the treatment field.

  11. Multispectral Cerenkov luminescence tomography for small animal optical imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinelli, Antonello E; Kuo, Chaincy; Rice, Brad W; Calandrino, Riccardo; Marzola, Pasquina; Sbarbati, Andrea; Boschi, Federico

    2011-06-20

    Quite recently Cerenkov luminescence imaging (CLI) has been introduced as a novel pre-clinical imaging for the in vivo imaging of small animals such as mice. The CLI method is based on the detection of Cerenkov radiation (CR) generated by beta particles as they travel into the animal tissues with an energy such that Cerenkov emission condition is satisfied. This paper describes an image reconstruction method called multi spectral diffuse Cerenkov luminescence tomography (msCLT) in order to obtain 3D images from the detection of CR. The multispectral approach is based on a set of 2D planar images acquired using a number of narrow bandpass filters, and the distinctive information content at each wavelength is used in the 3D image reconstruction process. The proposed msCLT method was tested both in vitro and in vivo using 32P-ATP and all the images were acquired by using the IVIS 200 small animal optical imager (Caliper Life Sciences, Alameda USA). Source depth estimation and spatial resolution measurements were performed using a small capillary source placed between several slices of chicken breast. The theoretical Cerenkov emission spectrum and optical properties of chicken breast were used in the modelling of photon propagation. In vivo imaging was performed by injecting control nude mice with 10 MBq of 32P-ATP and the 3D tracer bio-distribution was reconstructed. Whole body MRI was acquired to provide an anatomical localization of the Cerenkov emission. The spatial resolution obtained from the msCLT reconstructed images of the capillary source showed that the FWHM is about 1.5 mm for a 6 mm depth. Co-registered MRI images showed that the Cerenkov emission regions matches fairly well with anatomical regions, such as the brain, heart and abdomen. Ex vivo imaging of the different organs such as intestine, brain, heart and ribs further confirms these findings. We conclude that in vivo 3D bio-distribution of a pure beta-minus emitting radiopharmaceutical such as 32P

  12. Acoustic method for levitation of small living animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, W. J.; Cao, C. D.; Lü, Y. J.; Hong, Z. Y.; Wei, B.

    2006-11-01

    Ultrasonic levitation of some small living animals such as ant, ladybug, and young fish has been achieved with a single-axis acoustic levitator. The vitality of ant and ladybug is not evidently influenced during the acoustic levitation, whereas that of the young fish is reduced because of the inadequacy of water supply. Numerical analysis shows that the sound pressures on the ladybug's surface almost reach the incident pressure amplitude p0 due to sound scattering. It is estimated that 99.98% of the acoustic energy is reflected away from the ladybug. The acoustic radiation pressure pa on the ladybug's surface is only 1%-3% of p0, which plays a compression role on the central region and a suction role on the peripheral region.

  13. Development of the optical biopsy system for small experimental animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Hidetoshi; Hattori, Yusuke; Oshima, Yusuke; Komachi, Yuichi; Katagiri, Takashi; Asakura, Toru; Shimosegawa, Toru; Matsuura, Yuji; Miyagi, Mitsunobu; Kanai, Gen'ichi; Ura, Nobuo; Masutani, Koji; Tashiro, Hideo

    2006-02-01

    Development of the optical biopsy system for experimental small animals is in progress. A prototype of the system which consists of a miniaturized gastro endoscope unit and Raman probes has been completed by now. The system is developed to study a gastric cancer rat model. The endoscope is 2.5 mm in diameter and is equipped an imaging bundle fiber, illumination fibers, a channel and a mechanism to angle the probe head. The head of the Raman probe comes out through the channel and it is possible to aim the probe to the target watching on the monitor. The endoscope was inserted into the anaesthetized healthy rat under the breathing support. It was successfully observed inside of the stomach of the living rat and measured Raman spectra. The spectrum of blood vessels contains the strong contribution from lipids. The present results demonstrate high potential of the system in the in vivo Raman study using the rat model.

  14. Photoacoustic tomography of small-animal and human peripheral joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xueding; Chamberland, David L.; Fowlkes, J. Brian; Carson, Paul L.; Jamadar, David A.

    2008-02-01

    As an emerging imaging technology that combines the merits of both light and ultrasound, photoacoustic tomography (PAT) holds promise for screening and diagnosis of inflammatory joint diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis. In this study, the feasibility of PAT in imaging small-animal joints and human peripheral joints in a noninvasive manner was explored. Ex vivo rat tail and fresh cadaveric human finger joints were imaged. Based on the intrinsic optical contrast, intra- and extra-articular tissue structures in the joints were visualized successfully. Using light in the near-infrared region, the imaging depth of PAT is sufficient for cross-sectional imaging of a human peripheral joint as a whole organ. PAT, as a novel imaging modality with unique advantages, may contribute significantly to the early diagnosis of inflammatory joint disorders and accurate monitoring of disease progression and response to therapy.

  15. The therapeutic lamp: treating small-animal phobias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrzesien, Maja; Alcañiz, Mariano; Botella, Cristina; Burkhardt, Jean-Marie; Bretón-López, Juana; Ortega, Mario; Brotons, Daniel Beneito

    2013-01-01

    We all have an irrational fear or two. Some of us get scared by an unexpected visit from a spider in our house; others get nervous when they look down from a high building. Fear is an evolutionary and adaptive function that can promote self-preservation and help us deal with the feared object or situation. However, when this state becomes excessive, it might develop into psychological disorders such as phobias, producing high anxiety and affecting everyday life. The Therapeutic Lamp is an interactive projection-based augmented-reality system for treating small-animal phobias. It aims to increase patient-therapist communication, promote more natural interaction, and improve the patient's engagement in the therapy.

  16. Optimising rigid motion compensation for small animal brain PET imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spangler-Bickell, Matthew G.; Zhou, Lin; Kyme, Andre Z.; De Laat, Bart; Fulton, Roger R.; Nuyts, Johan

    2016-10-01

    Motion compensation (MC) in PET brain imaging of awake small animals is attracting increased attention in preclinical studies since it avoids the confounding effects of anaesthesia and enables behavioural tests during the scan. A popular MC technique is to use multiple external cameras to track the motion of the animal’s head, which is assumed to be represented by the motion of a marker attached to its forehead. In this study we have explored several methods to improve the experimental setup and the reconstruction procedures of this method: optimising the camera-marker separation; improving the temporal synchronisation between the motion tracker measurements and the list-mode stream; post-acquisition smoothing and interpolation of the motion data; and list-mode reconstruction with appropriately selected subsets. These techniques have been tested and verified on measurements of a moving resolution phantom and brain scans of an awake rat. The proposed techniques improved the reconstructed spatial resolution of the phantom by 27% and of the rat brain by 14%. We suggest a set of optimal parameter values to use for awake animal PET studies and discuss the relative significance of each parameter choice.

  17. Laser surgery for selected small animal soft-tissue conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartels, Kenneth E.

    1991-05-01

    With the acquisition of a Nd:YAG and a CO2 laser in the College of Veterinary Medicine at Oklahoma State University in 1989, over 100 small animal clinical cases have been managed with these modern modalities for surgical excision and tissue vaporization. Most procedures have been for oncologic problems, but inflammatory, infectious, or congenital conditions including vaporization of acral lick 'granulomas,' excision/vaporization of foreign body induced, infected draining tracts, and resection of elongated soft palates have been successfully accomplished. Laser excision or vaporization of both benign and malignant neoplasms have effectively been performed and include feline nasal squamous cell carcinoma, mast cell tumors, and rectal/anal neoplasms. Results to date have been excellent with animals exhibiting little postoperative pain, swelling, and inflammation. Investigations involving application of laser energy for tissue welding of esophageal lacerations and hepatitic interstitial hyperthermia for metastatic colorectal cancer have also shown potential. A review of cases with an emphasis on survival time and postoperative morbidity suggests that carefully planned laser surgical procedures in clinical veterinary practice done with standardized protocols and techniques offer an acceptable means of treating conditions that were previously considered extremely difficult or virtually impossible to perform.

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging for precise radiotherapy of small laboratory animals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frenzel, Thorsten [Universitaetsklinikum Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany). Bereich Strahlentherapie; Universitaetsklinikum Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany). Inst. fuer Anatomie und Experimentelle Morphologie; Kaul, Michael Gerhard; Ernst, Thomas Michael; Salamon, Johannes [Universitaetsklinikum Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie; Jaeckel, Maria [Universitaetsklinikum Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Radioonkologie; Schumacher, Udo [Universitaetsklinikum Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany). Inst. fuer Anatomie und Experimentelle Morphologie; Kruell, Andreas [Universitaetsklinikum Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany). Bereich Strahlentherapie

    2017-05-01

    Radiotherapy of small laboratory animals (SLA) is often not as precisely applied as in humans. Here we describe the use of a dedicated SLA magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner for precise tumor volumetry, radiotherapy treatment planning, and diagnostic imaging in order to make the experiments more accurate. Different human cancer cells were injected at the lower trunk of pfp/rag2 and SCID mice to allow for local tumor growth. Data from cross sectional MRI scans were transferred to a clinical treatment planning system (TPS) for humans. Manual palpation of the tumor size was compared with calculated tumor size of the TPS and with tumor weight at necropsy. As a feasibility study MRI based treatment plans were calculated for a clinical 6 MV linear accelerator using a micro multileaf collimator (μMLC). In addition, diagnostic MRI scans were used to investigate animals which did clinical poorly during the study. MRI is superior in precise tumor volume definition whereas manual palpation underestimates their size. Cross sectional MRI allow for treatment planning so that conformal irradiation of mice with a clinical linear accelerator using a μMLC is in principle feasible. Several internal pathologies were detected during the experiment using the dedicated scanner. MRI is a key technology for precise radiotherapy of SLA. The scanning protocols provided are suited for tumor volumetry, treatment planning, and diagnostic imaging.

  19. Importance of Attenuation Correction (AC) for Small Animal PET Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    El Ali, Henrik H.; Bodholdt, Rasmus Poul; Jørgensen, Jesper Tranekjær

    2012-01-01

    was performed. Methods: Ten NMRI nude mice with subcutaneous implantation of human breast cancer cells (MCF-7) were scanned consecutively in small animal PET and CT scanners (MicroPETTM Focus 120 and ImTek’s MicroCATTM II). CT-based AC, PET-based AC and uniform AC methods were compared. Results: The activity...... concentration in the same organ with and without AC revealed an overall attenuation recovery of 9–21% for MAP reconstructed images, i.e., SUV without AC could underestimate the true activity at this level. For subcutaneous tumors, the attenuation was 13 ± 4% (9–17%), for kidneys 20 ± 1% (19......–21%), and for bladder 18 ± 3% (15–21%). The FBP reconstructed images showed almost the same attenuation levels as the MAP reconstructed images for all organs. Conclusions: The annihilation photons are suffering attenuation even in small subjects. Both PET-based and CT-based are adequate as AC methods. The amplitude...

  20. Common reversal agents/antidotes in small animal poisoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Safdar A

    2012-03-01

    Different antidotes counteract the effect of a toxicant in several different ways. Antidotes can reverse, decrease, or prevent action of a toxicant. They can also help in achieving stabilization of vital signs, directly or indirectly, and promote excretion of a toxicant. However, overreliance on an antidote can be unrealistic and dangerous. While expectations of rapid recovery from antidotes are usually high, in a real life situation, there are many impediments in achieving this goal. The timing of its use, availability, cost, and sometimes adverse effects from the antidote itself can influence the results and outcome of a case. The majority of toxicants do not have a specific antidote therapy indicated and patients in these cases equally benefit from supportive care. In this chapter, commonly used antidotes and reversal agents in small animals are listed in a table form. The table lists generic name along with brand name of an antidote/reversal agent whenever available, main indications for their use, and provides comments or cautions in their use as needed. After stabilizing the patient and establishing the etiology, the clinicians must review more detailed management of that particular toxicant discussed here or in other references.

  1. Cell and small animal models for phenotypic drug discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szabo M

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Mihaly Szabo,1 Sara Svensson Akusjärvi,1 Ankur Saxena,1 Jianping Liu,2 Gayathri Chandrasekar,1 Satish S Kitambi1 1Department of Microbiology Tumor, and Cell Biology, 2Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, Karolinska Institutet, Solna, Sweden Abstract: The phenotype-based drug discovery (PDD approach is re-emerging as an alternative platform for drug discovery. This review provides an overview of the various model systems and technical advances in imaging and image analyses that strengthen the PDD platform. In PDD screens, compounds of therapeutic value are identified based on the phenotypic perturbations produced irrespective of target(s or mechanism of action. In this article, examples of phenotypic changes that can be detected and quantified with relative ease in a cell-based setup are discussed. In addition, a higher order of PDD screening setup using small animal models is also explored. As PDD screens integrate physiology and multiple signaling mechanisms during the screening process, the identified hits have higher biomedical applicability. Taken together, this review highlights the advantages gained by adopting a PDD approach in drug discovery. Such a PDD platform can complement target-based systems that are currently in practice to accelerate drug discovery. Keywords: phenotype, screening, PDD, discovery, zebrafish, drug

  2. Multimode optical imaging of small animals: development and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, J. Y.; Moffatt-Blue, C.; Equils, O.; Fujita, M.; Jeong, J.; Khazenzon, N. M.; Lindsley, E.; Ljubimova, J.; Nowatzyk, A. G.; Farkas, D. L.; Wachsmann-Hogiu, S.

    2007-02-01

    We present an optical system for small animal imaging that can combine various in vivo imaging modalities, including fluorescence (intensity and lifetime), spectral, and trans-illumination imaging. This system consists of light-tight box with ultrafast pulsed or cw laser light excitation, motorized translational and rotational stages, a telecentric lens for detection, and a cooled CCD camera that can be coupled to an ultrafast time-gated intensifier. All components are modular, making possible laser excitation at various wavelengths and pulse lengths, and signal detection in a variety of ways (multimode). Results of drug nanoconjugate carrier delivery studies in mice are presented. Conventional and spectrally-resolved fluorescence images reveal details of in vivo drug nanoconjugate carrier accumulation within the tumor region and several organs in real time. By multi-spectral image analysis of ex vivo specimens from the same mice, we were able to evaluate the extent and topology of drug nanoconjugate carrier distribution into specific organs and the tumor itself.

  3. Fluence compensated photoacoustic tomography in small animals (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Altaf; Pool, Martin; Daoudi, Khalid; de Vries, Liesbeth G.; Steenbergen, Wiendelt

    2017-03-01

    Light fluence inside turbid media can be experimentally mapped by measuring ultrasonically modulated light (Acousto-optics). To demonstrate the feasibility of fluence corrected Photoacoustic (PA) imaging, we have realized a tri-modality (i.e. photoacoustic, acousto-optic and ultrasound) tomographic small animal imaging system. Wherein PA imaging provides high resolution map of absorbed optical energy density, Acousto-optics yields the fluence distribution map in the corresponding PA imaging plane and Ultrasound provides morphological information. Further, normalization of the PA image with the acousto-optically measured fluence map results in an image that directly represents the optical absorption. Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) is commonly found overexpressed in human cancers, among which breast cancers, resulting in a more aggressive tumor phenotype. Identification of HER2-expression is clinically relevant, because cancers overexpressing this marker are amenable to HER2-directed therapies, among which antibodies trastuzumab and pertuzumab. Here, we investigate the feasibility and advantage of acousto-optically assisted fluence compensated PA imaging over PA imaging alone in visualizing and quantifying HER2 expression. For this experiment, nude mice were xenografted with human breast cancer cell lines SKBR3 and BT474 (both HER2 overexpressing), as well as HER2-negative MDA-MB-231. To visualize HER2 expression in these mice, HER2 monoclonal antibody pertuzumab (Perjeta®, Roche), was conjugated to near-infrared dye IRDye 800CW (800CW, LICOR Biosciences) at a ratio of 1∶2 antibody to 800CW. When xenograft tumors measured ≥ 100 mm3, mice received 100 µg 800CW-pertuzumab intravenously. Three days post injection, mice were scanned for fluorescence signal with an IVIS scanner. After fluorescence scans, mice were euthanized and imaged in our PA tomographic imaging system.

  4. Acute spinal cord injury: tetraplegia and paraplegia in small animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granger, Nicolas; Carwardine, Darren

    2014-11-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a common problem in animals for which definitive treatment is lacking, and information gained from its study has benefit for both companion animals and humans in developing new therapeutic approaches. This review provides an overview of the main concepts that are useful for clinicians in assessing companion animals with severe acute SCI. Current available advanced ancillary tests and those in development are reviewed. In addition, the current standard of care for companion animals following SCI and recent advances in the development of new therapies are presented, and new predictors of recovery discussed.

  5. New approach to intracardiac hemodynamic measurements in small animals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eskesen, Kristian; Olsen, Niels T; Dimaano, Veronica L

    2012-01-01

    Invasive measurements of intracardiac hemodynamics in animal models have allowed important advances in the understanding of cardiac disease. Currently they are performed either through a carotid arteriotomy or via a thoracotomy and apical insertion. Both of these techniques have disadvantages...

  6. New approach to intracardiac hemodynamic measurements in small animals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eskesen, Kristian; Olsen, Niels T; Dimaano, Veronica L;

    2012-01-01

    Invasive measurements of intracardiac hemodynamics in animal models have allowed important advances in the understanding of cardiac disease. Currently they are performed either through a carotid arteriotomy or via a thoracotomy and apical insertion. Both of these techniques have disadvantages and...

  7. Dose evaluation of three-dimensional small animal phantom with film dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Su Chul [Div. of Medical Radiation Equipment, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Seung Woo [Radilogcial and Medico-Oncological Sciences, University of Sciences and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-03-15

    The weight of small animal dosimetry has been continuously increased in pre-clinical studies using radiation in small animals. In this study, three-dimensional(3D) small animal phantom was fabricated using 3D printer which has been continuously used and studied in the various fields. The absorbed dose of 3D animal phantom was evaluated by film dosimetry. Previously, the response of film was obtained from the materials used for production of 3D small animal phantom and compared with the bolus used as the tissue equivalent material in the radiotherapy. When irradiated with gamma rays from 0.5 Gy to 6 Gy, it was confirmed that there was a small difference of less than 1% except 0.5 Gy dose. And when small animal phantom was irradiated with 5 Gy, the difference between the irradiated dose and calculated dose from film was within 2%. Based on this study, it would be possible to increase the reliability of dose in pre-clinical studies using irradiation in small animals by evaluating dose of 3D small animal phantom.

  8. Construct validation of a small-animal thoracocentesis simulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Julie A

    2014-01-01

    Training students to perform emergency procedures is a critical but challenging component of veterinary education. Thoracocentesis is traditionally taught in the classroom, with students progressing to "see one, do one, teach one" during the clinical phase of their education. This method of teaching does not permit students to gain proficiency before performing thoracocentesis on a live animal in a high-stakes, high-stress environment and is dependent on the availability of animals requiring the procedure. A veterinary thoracocentesis simulator has been created to allow students an opportunity for repetitive practice in a low-stakes environment. This study evaluated the face, content, and construct validity of the thoracocentesis simulator. Face and content validation were confirmed by survey results, and construct validity was assessed through comparison of student and veterinarian performance on the simulator. Students' median checklist and global rating scores were significantly lower than those of the veterinarians, and students took significantly longer to perform the procedure, indicating that the simulator was able to differentiate the relative expertise of the user and establishing construct validity. This study supported the use of the thoracocentesis simulator for educators to demonstrate proper technique, for students to practice the steps needed to perform the procedure and experience an approximation of the tactile aspects of the task, and for formative assessment before performing the procedure on client-owned animals.

  9. Animals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skuterud, L.; Strand, P. [Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority (Norway); Howard, B.J. [Inst. of Terrestrial Ecology (United Kingdom)

    1997-10-01

    The radionuclides of most concern with respect to contamination of animals after a nuclear accident are radioiodine, radiocaesium and radiostrontium (ICRP 30, 1979). Of the other significant anthropogenic radionuclides likely to be released in most accidents, only small proportions of that ingested will be absorbed in an animals gut, and the main animal products, milk and meat, will not normally be contaminated to a significant extent. Animal products will mostly be contaminated as a result of ingestion of contaminated feed and possibly, but to a much lesser extent, from inhalation (for radioiodine only). Direct external contamination of animals is of little or no consequence in human food production. Radioiodine and radiostrontium are important with respect to contamination of milk; radiocaesium contaminates both milk and meat. The physical and chemical form of a radionuclide can influence its absorption in the animal gut. For example, following the Chernobyl accident radiocaesium incorporated into vegetation by root uptake was more readily absorbed than that associated with the original deposit. The transfer of radiocaesium and radiostrontium to animals will be presented both as transfer coefficients and aggregated transfer coefficients. For most animal meat products, only radiocaesium is important as other radionuclides do not significantly contaminate muscle. Farm animal products are the most important foodstuff determining radiocaesium intake by the average consumer in the Nordic countries. The major potential source of radioiodine and radiostrontium to humans is milk and milk products. Of the different species, the smaller animals have the highest transfer of radiocaesium from fodder to meat and milk. (EG). 68 refs.

  10. Theoretical considerations on maximum running speeds for large and small animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentes, Mauricio A

    2016-02-01

    Mechanical equations for fast running speeds are presented and analyzed. One of the equations and its associated model predict that animals tend to experience larger mechanical stresses in their limbs (muscles, tendons and bones) as a result of larger stride lengths, suggesting a structural restriction entailing the existence of an absolute maximum possible stride length. The consequence for big animals is that an increasingly larger body mass implies decreasing maximal speeds, given that the stride frequency generally decreases for increasingly larger animals. Another restriction, acting on small animals, is discussed only in preliminary terms, but it seems safe to assume from previous studies that for a given range of body masses of small animals, those which are bigger are faster. The difference between speed scaling trends for large and small animals implies the existence of a range of intermediate body masses corresponding to the fastest animals.

  11. High Sensitivity SPECT for Small Animals and Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell, Gregory S. [UC Davis

    2015-02-28

    Imaging systems using single gamma-ray emitting radioisotopes typically implement collimators in order to form the images. However, a tradeoff in sensitivity is inherent in the use of collimators, and modern preclinical single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) systems detect a very small fraction of emitted gamma-rays (<0.3%). We have built a collimator-less system, which can reach sensitivity of 40% for 99mTc imaging, while still producing images of sufficient spatial resolution for certain applications in thin objects such as mice, small plants, and well plates used for in vitro experiments.

  12. Pet food recalls and pet food contaminants in small animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bischoff, Karyn; Rumbeiha, Wilson K

    2012-03-01

    Most pet foods are safe, but incidents of chemical contamination occur and lead to illness and recalls. There were 11 major pet food recalls in the United States between 1996 and 2010 that were due to chemical contaminants or misformulations: 3 aflatoxin, 3 excess vitamin D3, 1 excess methionine, 3 inadequate thiamine, and 1 adulteration with melamine and related compounds and an additional 2 warnings concerning a Fanconilike renal syndrome in dogs after ingesting large amounts of chicken jerky treat products. This article describes clinical findings and treatment of animals exposed to the most common pet food contaminants.

  13. Pre-clinical research in small animals using radiotherapy technology. A bidirectional translational approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tillner, Falk; Buetof, Rebecca [Technische Univ. Dresden (Germany). OncoRay - National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology; Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Dresden (Germany); Technische Univ. Dresden (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Thute, Prasad [Technische Univ. Dresden (Germany). OncoRay - National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology; Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Dresden (Germany); Krause, Mechthild [Technische Univ. Dresden (Germany). OncoRay - National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology; Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Dresden (Germany); Technische Univ. Dresden (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; German Cancer Consortium (DKTK), Dresden (Germany); German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany); Enghardt, Wolfgang [Technische Univ. Dresden (Germany). OncoRay - National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology; Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Dresden (Germany); Technische Univ. Dresden (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Dresden (Germany). Inst. of Radiooncology

    2014-07-01

    For translational cancer research, pre-clinical in-vivo studies using small animals have become indispensable in bridging the gap between in-vitro cell experiments and clinical implementation. When setting up such small animal experiments, various biological, technical and methodical aspects have to be considered. In this work we present a comprehensive topical review based on relevant publications on irradiation techniques used for pre-clinical cancer research in mice and rats. Clinical radiotherapy treatment devices for the application of external beam radiotherapy and brachytherapy as well as dedicated research irradiation devices are feasible for small animal irradiation depending on the animal model and the experimental goals. In this work, appropriate solutions for the technological transfer of human radiation oncology to small animal radiation research are summarised. Additionally, important information concerning the experimental design is provided such that reliable and clinically relevant results can be attained.

  14. Cone Beam Micro-CT System for Small Animal Imaging and Performance Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shouping Zhu

    2009-01-01

    in this paper. Experimental results show that the system is suitable for small animal imaging and is adequate to provide high-resolution anatomic information for bioluminescence tomography to build a dual modality system.

  15. Antimicrobial stewardship in small animal veterinary practice: from theory to practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guardabassi, Luca; Prescott, John F

    2015-03-01

    Despite the increasing recognition of the critical role for antimicrobial stewardship in preventing the spread of multidrug-resistant bacteria, examples of effective antimicrobial stewardship programs are rare in small animal veterinary practice. This article highlights the basic requirements for establishing stewardship programs at the clinic level. The authors provide suggestions and approaches to overcome constraints and to move from theoretic concepts toward implementation of effective antimicrobial stewardship programs in small animal clinics.

  16. Capturing the complexity of first opinion small animal consultations using direct observation

    OpenAIRE

    Robinson, N. J.; Brennan, Marnie L.; Cobb, M.; Dean, R. S.

    2014-01-01

    Various different methods are currently being used to capture data from small animal consultations. The aim of this study was to develop a tool to record detailed data from consultations by direct observation. A second aim was to investigate the complexity of the consultation by examining the number of problems discussed per patient. A data collection tool was developed and used during direct observation of small animal consultations in eight practices. Data were recorded on consultation type...

  17. The motivations and methodology for high-throughput PET imaging of small animals in cancer research.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aide, N.; Visser, E.P.; Lheureux, S.; Heutte, N.; Szanda, I.; Hicks, R.J.

    2012-01-01

    Over the last decade, small-animal PET imaging has become a vital platform technology in cancer research. With the development of molecularly targeted therapies and drug combinations requiring evaluation of different schedules, the number of animals to be imaged within a PET experiment has

  18. Positron emission tomography (PET) methodology for small animals and its application in radiopharmaceutical preclinical investigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hume, Susan P.; Jones, Terry

    1998-11-01

    The use and usefulness of positron emission tomography (PET) to quantify the specific and selective in vivo binding of radioligands in small laboratory animals is briefly reviewed up to the end of 1996. Emphasis is placed on practical experience with a dedicated, small diameter, tomograph (built in collaboration with CTI, Knoxville, TN), implementing conventional PET methodology.

  19. An integrated multimodality image-guided robot system for small-animal imaging research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsu, Wen-Lin [Department of Radiology, Tzu-Chi University and Radiation Oncology, Buddhist Tzu-Chi General Hospital Hualien, Taiwan (China); Hsin Wu, Tung [Department of Biomedical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, National Yang Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Hsu, Shih-Ming [Department of Biomedical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Chen, Chia-Lin [Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Lee, Jason J.S., E-mail: jslee@ym.edu.tw [Department of Biomedical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, National Yang Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Huang, Yung-Hui, E-mail: yhhuang@isu.edu.tw [Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, I-Shou University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China)

    2011-10-01

    We design and construct an image-guided robot system for use in small-animal imaging research. This device allows the use of co-registered small-animal PET-MRI images to guide the movements of robotic controllers, which will accurately place a needle probe at any predetermined location inside, for example, a mouse tumor, for biological readouts without sacrificing the animal. This system is composed of three major components: an automated robot device, a CCD monitoring mechanism, and a multimodality registration implementation. Specifically, the CCD monitoring mechanism was used for correction and validation of the robot device. To demonstrate the value of the proposed system, we performed a tumor hypoxia study that involved FMISO small-animal PET imaging and the delivering of a pO{sub 2} probe into the mouse tumor using the image-guided robot system. During our evaluation, the needle positioning error was found to be within 0.153{+-}0.042 mm of desired placement; the phantom simulation errors were within 0.693{+-}0.128 mm. In small-animal studies, the pO{sub 2} probe measurements in the corresponding hypoxia areas showed good correlation with significant, low tissue oxygen tensions (less than 6 mmHg). We have confirmed the feasibility of the system and successfully applied it to small-animal investigations. The system could be easily adapted to extend to other biomedical investigations in the future.

  20. MRI compatible small animal monitoring and trigger system for whole body scanners

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrmann, Karl-Heinz; Krumbein, Ines; Reichenbach, Juergen R. [Jena University Hospital (Germany). Medical Physics Group; Pfeiffer, Norman [Jena University Hospital (Germany). Medical Physics Group; Ernst-Abbe-Fachhochschule Jena (Germany); Herrmann, Lutz [Ernst-Abbe-Fachhochschule Jena (Germany)

    2014-03-01

    Performing magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) experiments with small animals requires continuous monitoring of vital parameters, especially the respiration rate. Clinical whole-body MR scanners represent an attractive option for preclinical imaging as dedicated animal scanners are cost-intensive in both investment and maintenance, thus limiting their availability. Even though impressive image quality is achievable with clinical MR systems in combination with special coils, their built-in physiologic monitoring and triggering units are often not suited for small animal imaging. In this work, we present a simple, MRI compatible low cost solution to monitor the respiration and heart rate of small animals in a clinical whole-body MR scanner. The recording and processing of the biosignals as well as the optimisation of the respiratory trigger generation is described. Additionally rat and mouse in-vivo MRI experiments are presented to illustrate the effectiveness of the monitoring and respiratory trigger system in suppressing motion artifacts. (orig.)

  1. The motivations and methodology for high-throughput PET imaging of small animals in cancer research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aide, Nicolas [Francois Baclesse Cancer Centre, Nuclear Medicine Department, Caen Cedex (France); Caen University, BioTICLA team, EA 4656, IFR 146, Caen (France); Visser, Eric P. [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Center, Nuclear Medicine Department, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Lheureux, Stephanie [Caen University, BioTICLA team, EA 4656, IFR 146, Caen (France); Francois Baclesse Cancer Centre, Clinical Research Unit, Caen (France); Heutte, Natacha [Francois Baclesse Cancer Centre, Clinical Research Unit, Caen (France); Szanda, Istvan [King' s College London, Division of Imaging Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, London (United Kingdom); Hicks, Rodney J. [Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Centre for Molecular Imaging, East Melbourne (Australia)

    2012-09-15

    Over the last decade, small-animal PET imaging has become a vital platform technology in cancer research. With the development of molecularly targeted therapies and drug combinations requiring evaluation of different schedules, the number of animals to be imaged within a PET experiment has increased. This paper describes experimental design requirements to reach statistical significance, based on the expected change in tracer uptake in treated animals as compared to the control group, the number of groups that will be imaged, and the expected intra-animal variability for a given tracer. We also review how high-throughput studies can be performed in dedicated small-animal PET, high-resolution clinical PET systems and planar positron imaging systems by imaging more than one animal simultaneously. Customized beds designed to image more than one animal in large-bore small-animal PET scanners are described. Physics issues related to the presence of several rodents within the field of view (i.e. deterioration of spatial resolution and sensitivity as the radial and the axial offsets increase, respectively, as well as a larger effect of attenuation and the number of scatter events), which can be assessed by using the NEMA NU 4 image quality phantom, are detailed. (orig.)

  2. Dry coupling for whole-body small-animal photoacoustic computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Chenghung; Li, Lei; Zhu, Liren; Xia, Jun; Li, Chiye; Chen, Wanyi; Garcia-Uribe, Alejandro; Maslov, Konstantin I.; Wang, Lihong V.

    2017-04-01

    We have enhanced photoacoustic computed tomography with dry acoustic coupling that eliminates water immersion anxiety and wrinkling of the animal and facilitates incorporating complementary modalities and procedures. The dry acoustic coupler is made of a tubular elastic membrane enclosed by a closed transparent water tank. The tubular membrane ensures water-free contact with the animal, and the closed water tank allows pressurization for animal stabilization. The dry coupler was tested using a whole-body small-animal ring-shaped photoacoustic computed tomography system. Dry coupling was found to provide image quality comparable to that of conventional water coupling.

  3. Recommendations on vaccination for Asian small animal practitioners: a report of the WSAVA Vaccination Guidelines Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, M J; Karkare, U; Schultz, R D; Squires, R; Tsujimoto, H

    2015-02-01

    In 2012 and 2013, the World Small Animal Veterinary Association (WSAVA) Vaccination Guidelines Group (VGG) undertook fact-finding visits to several Asian countries, with a view to developing advice for small companion animal practitioners in Asia related to the administration of vaccines to dogs and cats. The VGG met with numerous first opinion practitioners, small animal association leaders, academic veterinarians, government regulators and industry representatives and gathered further information from a survey of almost 700 veterinarians in India, China, Japan and Thailand. Although there were substantial differences in the nature and magnitude of the challenges faced by veterinarians in each country, and also differences in the resources available to meet those challenges, overall, the VGG identified insufficient undergraduate and postgraduate training in small companion animal microbiology, immunology and vaccinology. In most of the countries, there has been little academic research into small animal infectious diseases. This, coupled with insufficient laboratory diagnostic support, has limited the growth of knowledge concerning the prevalence and circulating strains of key infectious agents in most of the countries visited. Asian practitioners continue to recognise clinical infections that are now considered uncommon or rare in western countries. In particular, canine rabies virus infection poses a continuing threat to animal and human health in this region. Both nationally manufactured and international dog and cat vaccines are variably available in the Asian countries, but the product ranges are small and dominated by multi-component vaccines with a licensed duration of immunity (DOI) of only 1 year, or no description of DOI. Asian practitioners are largely unaware of current global trends in small animal vaccinology or of the WSAVA vaccination guidelines. Consequently, most practitioners continue to deliver annual revaccination with both core and non

  4. Less charismatic animals are more likely to be “road killed”: human attitudes towards small animals in Brazilian roads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo C. M. D. Mesquita

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Roads are long and intermittent sources of wildlife loss due to their indirect effects, such as fragmentation of habitat, or their direct effects, such as constant mortality by run-over. Thus, some studies indicate that a portion of these run-over incidents may be intentional and could be avoided. We investigated whether various groups of small animals had different run-over rates and how “charisma” affects the survival chances of an animal on the roads. During our experiment, we quantified run-over rates for models of spiders, snakes, chicks, and tree leaves (control on three roads with different traffic volumes. We found out that snakes and spiders were consistently ran over with a higher frequency than chicks and leaves. We also observed that chicks were the only models rescued by human beings. We concluded that the survival chances of chicks are the highest among the models tested and this is due to the charismatic value attributed to them by human beings, when compared to snakes and spiders. We suggest the broadcasting of campaigns in the media to increase public awareness regarding wildlife conservation as a useful tool to solve the problem of intentional run over of small animals.

  5. Less charismatic animals are more likely to be “road killed”: human attitudes towards small animals in Brazilian roads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo C. M. D. Mesquita

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/2175-7925.2015v28n1p85 Roads are long and intermittent sources of wildlife loss due to their indirect effects, such as fragmentation of habitat, or their direct effects, such as constant mortality by run-over. Thus, some studies indicate that a portion of these run-over incidents may be intentional and could be avoided. We investigated whether various groups of small animals had different run-over rates and how “charisma” affects the survival chances of an animal on the roads. During our experiment, we quantified run-over rates for models of spiders, snakes, chicks, and tree leaves (control on three roads with different traffic volumes. We found out that snakes and spiders were consistently ran over with a higher frequency than chicks and leaves. We also observed that chicks were the only models rescued by human beings. We concluded that the survival chances of chicks are the highest among the models tested and this is due to the charismatic value attributed to them by human beings, when compared to snakes and spiders. We suggest the broadcasting of campaigns in the media to increase public awareness regarding wildlife conservation as a useful tool to solve the problem of intentional run over of small animals.

  6. Accuracy of measurement of acoustic rhinometry applied to small experimental animals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaise, Toshihiko; Ukai, Kotara; Pedersen, Ole Finn

    1999-01-01

    -sectional areas as a function of the distance from the nostril. We modified the equipment used on humans to assess dimensions of nasal airway geometry of small experimental animals. The purpose of this study was to investigate the accuracy of measurement of the modified acoustic rhinometry applied to small...... experimental animals using nasal cavity models and guinea pigs. Measurement of the nasal cavity models (made of cylindrical silicone tubes) showed that the acoustic rhinometry estimated 85.5% of actual area and 79.0% of actual volume. In guinea pigs, nasal cavity volume determined by the acoustic rhinometry...... the volume and nasal airway resistance in guinea pigs. Measurement of the nasal airway resistance is the method frequently used in the evaluation of the nasal obstruction in guinea pigs. These results suggest that acoustic rhinometry is useful in evaluating nasal obstruction in small experimental animals....

  7. A mask for delivery of inhalation gases to small laboratory animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, D E; Zwies, A; Duffy, T E

    1980-10-01

    A mask was developed for the administration of volatile anesthetics and other gases to small, spontaneously breathing laboratory animals. A vacuum-powered venting system surrounding the inspiratory gas supply prevented potentially hazardous gases from escaping into the environment. This system was used to deliver nitrous oxide, halothane, and methoxyflurane to rats, gerbils, and newborn dogs. It was used to vary the oxygen and carbon dioxide concentrations inspired by spontaneously breathing animals undergoing physiological experiments.

  8. SU-E-T-124: Anthropomorphic Phantoms for Confirmation of Linear Accelerator Based Small Animal Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perks, J; Benedict, S [UC Davis Cancer Center, Sacramento, CA (United States); Lucero, S [UC Davis, Davis, CA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To document the support of radiobiological small animal research by a modern radiation oncology facility. This study confirms that a standard, human use linear accelerator can cover the range of experiments called for by researchers performing animal irradiation. A number of representative, anthropomorphic murine phantoms were made. The phantoms confirmed the small field photon and electron beams dosimetry validated the use of the linear accelerator for rodents. Methods: Laser scanning a model, CAD design and 3D printing produced the phantoms. The phantoms were weighed and CT scanned to judge their compatibility to real animals. Phantoms were produced to specifically mimic lung, gut, brain, and othotopic lesion irradiations. Each phantom was irradiated with the same protocol as prescribed to the live animals. Delivered dose was measured with small field ion chambers, MOS/FETs or TLDs. Results: The density of the phantom material compared to density range across the real mice showed that the printed material would yield sufficiently accurate measurements when irradiated. The whole body, lung and gut irradiations were measured within 2% of prescribed doses with A1SL ion chamber. MOSFET measurements of electron irradiations for the orthotopic lesions allowed refinement of the measured small field output factor to better than 2% and validated the immunology experiment of irradiating one lesion and sparing another. Conclusion: Linacs are still useful tools in small animal bio-radiation research. This work demonstrated a strong role for the clinical accelerator in small animal research, facilitating standard whole body dosing as well as conformal treatments down to 1cm field. The accuracy of measured dose, was always within 5%. The electron irradiations of the phantom brain and flank tumors needed adjustment; the anthropomorphic phantoms allowed refinement of the initial output factor measurements for these fields which were made in a large block of solid water.

  9. Hand hygiene practices of veterinary support staff in small animal private practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, R K; Tompkins, E; Braasch, E L; Martinez, J G; Bianco, D

    2012-03-01

    To evaluate the hand hygiene (HH) practices among veterinary technicians (VT) and veterinary support staff (VSS) in small animal private practice. This was a prospective questionnaire-based study involving 182 VT and VSS from 18 small animal hospitals in the USA. Questions asked included gender, number of animals handled per work shift, frequency of hand washing, reason for not washing more frequently, most common available hand washing agent, education regarding the importance of HH and frequency of ring wearing. Less than half of the respondents [76 of 182 (41·7%)] reported washing their hands regularly between handling patients and 154 of 182 (85·6%) believed they should have washed more frequently. The most commonly employed HH agent was hand soap [154 of 182 (84·6%)] and the most common reason cited for not washing more frequently was being too busy [132 of 182 (72·5%)]. Only 96 of 182 (52·7%) respondents were educated by doctors at their hospital regarding the importance of HH. The HH practices among VT and VSS in small animal private practice is poor. Hand soap was the most commonly employed agent among respondents in this study. Education of VT and VSS regarding the importance of HH requires improvement. © 2012 British Small Animal Veterinary Association.

  10. Animation, Small Multiples, and the Effect of Mental Map Preservation in Dynamic Graphs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archambault, D; Purchase, H; Pinaud, B

    2011-04-01

    In this paper, we present the results of a human-computer interaction experiment that compared the performance of the animation of dynamic graphs to the presentation of small multiples and the effect that mental map preservation had on the two conditions. Questions used in the experiment were selected to test both local and global properties of graph evolution over time. The data sets used in this experiment were derived from standard benchmark data sets of the information visualization community. We found that small multiples gave significantly faster performance than animation overall and for each of our five graph comprehension tasks. In addition, small multiples had significantly more errors than animation for the tasks of determining sets of nodes or edges added to the graph during the same timeslice, although a positive time-error correlation coefficient suggests that, in this case, faster responses did not lead to more errors. This result suggests that, for these two tasks, animation is preferable if accuracy is more important than speed. Preserving the mental map under either the animation or the small multiples condition had little influence in terms of error rate and response time.

  11. Multimodality imaging combination in small animal via point-based registration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, C. C.; Wu, T. H.; Lin, M. H.; Huang, Y. H.; Guo, W. Y.; Chen, C. L.; Wang, T. C.; Yin, W. H.; Lee, J. S.

    2006-12-01

    We present a system of image co-registration in small animal study. Marker-based registration is chosen because of its considerable advantage that the fiducial feature is independent of imaging modality. We also experimented with different scanning protocols and different fiducial marker sizes to improve registration accuracy. Co-registration was conducted using rat phantom fixed by stereotactic frame. Overall, the co-registration accuracy was in sub-millimeter level and close to intrinsic system error. Therefore, we conclude that the system is an accurate co-registration method to be used in small animal studies.

  12. Volumetric Diffuse Optical Tomography for Small Animals Using a CCD-Camera-Based Imaging System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zi-Jing Lin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the feasibility of three-dimensional (3D volumetric diffuse optical tomography for small animal imaging by using a CCD-camera-based imaging system with a newly developed depth compensation algorithm (DCA. Our computer simulations and laboratory phantom studies have demonstrated that the combination of a CCD camera and DCA can significantly improve the accuracy in depth localization and lead to reconstruction of 3D volumetric images. This approach may present great interests for noninvasive 3D localization of an anomaly hidden in tissue, such as a tumor or a stroke lesion, for preclinical small animal models.

  13. Development of a SiPM-based PET imaging system for small animals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Yanye [Department of Biomedicine and Engineering, College of Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Yang, Kun, E-mail: yangkun9999@hotmail.com [Department of Control Technology and Instrumentation, College of Quality and Technical Supervision, Hebei University, Baoding, 071000 (China); Zhou, Kedi; Zhang, Qiushi; Pang, Bo [Department of Biomedicine and Engineering, College of Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Ren, Qiushi, E-mail: renqsh@coe.pku.edu.cn [Department of Biomedicine and Engineering, College of Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2014-04-11

    Advances in small animal positron emission tomography (PET) imaging have been accelerated by many new technologies such as the successful incorporation of silicon photomultiplier (SiPM). In this paper, we have developed a compact, lightweight PET imaging system that is based on SiPM detectors for small animals imaging, which could be integrated into a multi-modality imaging system. This PET imaging system consists of a stationary detector gantry, a motor-controlled animal bed module, electronics modules, and power supply modules. The PET detector, which was designed as a multi-slice circular ring geometry of 27 discrete block detectors, is composed of a cerium doped lutetium–yttrium oxyorthosilicate (LYSO) scintillation crystal and SiPM arrays. The system has a 60 mm transaxial field of view (FOV) and a 26 mm axial FOV. Performance tests (e.g. spatial resolution, energy resolution, and sensitivity) and phantom and animal imaging studies were performed to evaluate the imaging performance of the PET imaging system. The performance tests and animal imaging results demonstrate the feasibility of an animal PET system based on SiPM detectors and indicate that SiPM detectors can be promising photodetectors in animal PET instrumentation development.

  14. Evaluation of a cone beam computed tomography geometry for image guided small animal irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yidong; Armour, Michael; Wang, Ken Kang-Hsin; Gandhi, Nishant; Iordachita, Iulian; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey; Wong, John

    2015-07-01

    The conventional imaging geometry for small animal cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) is that a detector panel rotates around the head-to-tail axis of an imaged animal ('tubular' geometry). Another unusual but possible imaging geometry is that the detector panel rotates around the anterior-to-posterior axis of the animal ('pancake' geometry). The small animal radiation research platform developed at Johns Hopkins University employs the pancake geometry where a prone-positioned animal is rotated horizontally between an x-ray source and detector panel. This study is to assess the CBCT image quality in the pancake geometry and investigate potential methods for improvement. We compared CBCT images acquired in the pancake geometry with those acquired in the tubular geometry when the phantom/animal was placed upright simulating the conventional CBCT geometry. Results showed signal-to-noise and contrast-to-noise ratios in the pancake geometry were reduced in comparison to the tubular geometry at the same dose level. But the overall spatial resolution within the transverse plane of the imaged cylinder/animal was better in the pancake geometry. A modest exposure increase to two folds in the pancake geometry can improve image quality to a level close to the tubular geometry. Image quality can also be improved by inclining the animal, which reduces streak artifacts caused by bony structures. The major factor resulting in the inferior image quality in the pancake geometry is the elevated beam attenuation along the long axis of the phantom/animal and consequently increased scatter-to-primary ratio in that orientation. Not withstanding, the image quality in the pancake-geometry CBCT is adequate to support image guided animal positioning, while providing unique advantages of non-coplanar and multiple mice irradiation. This study also provides useful knowledge about the image quality in the two very different imaging geometries, i.e. pancake and tubular geometry, respectively.

  15. Development of computational small animal models and their applications in preclinical imaging and therapy research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Tianwu; Zaidi, Habib

    2016-01-01

    The development of multimodality preclinical imaging techniques and the rapid growth of realistic computer simulation tools have promoted the construction and application of computational laboratory animal models in preclinical research. Since the early 1990s, over 120 realistic computational animal models have been reported in the literature and used as surrogates to characterize the anatomy of actual animals for the simulation of preclinical studies involving the use of bioluminescence tomography, fluorescence molecular tomography, positron emission tomography, single-photon emission computed tomography, microcomputed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and optical imaging. Other applications include electromagnetic field simulation, ionizing and nonionizing radiation dosimetry, and the development and evaluation of new methodologies for multimodality image coregistration, segmentation, and reconstruction of small animal images. This paper provides a comprehensive review of the history and fundamental technologies used for the development of computational small animal models with a particular focus on their application in preclinical imaging as well as nonionizing and ionizing radiation dosimetry calculations. An overview of the overall process involved in the design of these models, including the fundamental elements used for the construction of different types of computational models, the identification of original anatomical data, the simulation tools used for solving various computational problems, and the applications of computational animal models in preclinical research. The authors also analyze the characteristics of categories of computational models (stylized, voxel-based, and boundary representation) and discuss the technical challenges faced at the present time as well as research needs in the future.

  16. Development of computational small animal models and their applications in preclinical imaging and therapy research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Tianwu [Division of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Geneva University Hospital, Geneva 4 CH-1211 (Switzerland); Zaidi, Habib, E-mail: habib.zaidi@hcuge.ch [Division of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Geneva University Hospital, Geneva 4 CH-1211 (Switzerland); Geneva Neuroscience Center, Geneva University, Geneva CH-1205 (Switzerland); Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen 9700 RB (Netherlands)

    2016-01-15

    The development of multimodality preclinical imaging techniques and the rapid growth of realistic computer simulation tools have promoted the construction and application of computational laboratory animal models in preclinical research. Since the early 1990s, over 120 realistic computational animal models have been reported in the literature and used as surrogates to characterize the anatomy of actual animals for the simulation of preclinical studies involving the use of bioluminescence tomography, fluorescence molecular tomography, positron emission tomography, single-photon emission computed tomography, microcomputed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and optical imaging. Other applications include electromagnetic field simulation, ionizing and nonionizing radiation dosimetry, and the development and evaluation of new methodologies for multimodality image coregistration, segmentation, and reconstruction of small animal images. This paper provides a comprehensive review of the history and fundamental technologies used for the development of computational small animal models with a particular focus on their application in preclinical imaging as well as nonionizing and ionizing radiation dosimetry calculations. An overview of the overall process involved in the design of these models, including the fundamental elements used for the construction of different types of computational models, the identification of original anatomical data, the simulation tools used for solving various computational problems, and the applications of computational animal models in preclinical research. The authors also analyze the characteristics of categories of computational models (stylized, voxel-based, and boundary representation) and discuss the technical challenges faced at the present time as well as research needs in the future.

  17. Performance evaluation of a mouse-sized camera for dynamic studies in small animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loudos, George; Majewski, Stan; Wojcik, Randy; Weisenberger, Andrew; Sakellios, Nicolas; Nikita, Konstantina; Uzunoglu, Nikolaos; Bouziotis, Penelope; Varvarigou, Alexandra

    2007-02-01

    A mouse sized camera has been built in terms of collaboration between the presenting institutions. The system is used for the performance of dynamic studies in small animals, in order to evaluate novel radiopharmaceuticals. The active area of the detector is approximately 48×96 mm allowing depiction of the entire mouse in a single view. The system is based on two flat-panel Hamamatsu H8500 position sensitive photomultiplier tubes (PSPMT), a pixellated NaI(Tl) scintillator and a copper-beryllium (CuBe) parallel-hole collimator. In this work, the evaluation results of the system are presented, using phantoms and small animals injected with conventional radiophrmaceuticals. Average resolution was ˜1.6 mm on the collimator surface and increased to ˜4.1 mm in 12 cm distance from the detector. The average energy resolution was measured and found to be ˜15.6% for Tc 99m. Results from imaging thin capillaries demonstrated system's high resolution and sensitivity in activity variations was shown. Initial dynamic studies have been carried out in small animals injected with Tc 99m-DTPA and Tc 99m-MDP. The results show system's ability to perform kinetic imaging in small animals.

  18. Precise image-guided irradiation of small animals: a flexible non-profit platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tillner, Falk; Thute, Prasad; Löck, Steffen; Dietrich, Antje; Fursov, Andriy; Haase, Robert; Lukas, Mathias; Rimarzig, Bernd; Sobiella, Manfred; Krause, Mechthild; Baumann, Michael; Bütof, Rebecca; Enghardt, Wolfgang

    2016-04-01

    Preclinical in vivo studies using small animals are essential to develop new therapeutic options in radiation oncology. Of particular interest are orthotopic tumour models, which better reflect the clinical situation in terms of growth patterns and microenvironmental parameters of the tumour as well as the interplay of tumours with the surrounding normal tissues. Such orthotopic models increase the technical demands and the complexity of preclinical studies as local irradiation with therapeutically relevant doses requires image-guided target localisation and accurate beam application. Moreover, advanced imaging techniques are needed for monitoring treatment outcome. We present a novel small animal image-guided radiation therapy (SAIGRT) system, which allows for precise and accurate, conformal irradiation and x-ray imaging of small animals. High accuracy is achieved by its robust construction, the precise movement of its components and a fast high-resolution flat-panel detector. Field forming and x-ray imaging is accomplished close to the animal resulting in a small penumbra and a high image quality. Feasibility for irradiating orthotopic models has been proven using lung tumour and glioblastoma models in mice. The SAIGRT system provides a flexible, non-profit academic research platform which can be adapted to specific experimental needs and therefore enables systematic preclinical trials in multicentre research networks.

  19. Small animal positron emission tomography imaging and in vivo studies of atherosclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hag, Anne Mette Fisker; Ripa, Rasmus Sejersten; Pedersen, Sune Folke

    2013-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a growing health challenge globally, and despite our knowledge of the disease has increased over the last couple of decades, many unanswered questions remain. As molecular imaging can be used to visualize, characterize and measure biological processes at the molecular and cellu...... knowledge obtained from in vivo positron emission tomography studies of atherosclerosis performed in small animals....

  20. Spatial resolution and sensitivity of the Inveon small-animal PET scanner.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, E.P.; Disselhorst, J.; Brom, M.; Laverman, P.; Gotthardt, M.; Oyen, W.J.G.; Boerman, O.C.

    2009-01-01

    The Inveon small-animal PET scanner is characterized by a large, 127-mm axial length and a 161-mm crystal ring diameter. The associated high sensitivity is obtained by using all lines of response (LORs) up to the maximum ring difference (MRD) of 79, for which the most oblique LORs form acceptance an

  1. Scatter Characterization and Correction for Simultaneous Multiple Small-Animal PET Imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prasad, Rameshwar; Zaidi, Habib

    2014-01-01

    The rapid growth and usage of small-animal positron emission tomography (PET) in molecular imaging research has led to increased demand on PET scanner's time. One potential solution to increase throughput is to scan multiple rodents simultaneously. However, this is achieved at the expense of deterio

  2. Quantitative multi-pinhole small-animal SPECT : uniform versus non-uniform Chang attenuation correction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wu, C.; de Jong, J. R.; van Andel, H. A. Gratama; van der Have, F.; Vastenhouw, B.; Laverman, P.; Boerman, O. C.; Dierckx, R. A. J. O.; Beekman, F. J.

    2011-01-01

    Attenuation of photon flux on trajectories between the source and pinhole apertures affects the quantitative accuracy of reconstructed single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) images. We propose a Chang-based non-uniform attenuation correction (NUA-CT) for small-animal SPECT/CT with focusi

  3. Quantitative multi-pinhole small-animal SPECT: uniform versus non-uniform Chang attenuation correction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wu, C.; Jong, J.R. de; Gratama van Andel, H.A.; Have, F. van der; Vastenhouw, B.; Laverman, P.; Boerman, O.C.; Dierckx, R.A.; Beekman, F.J.

    2011-01-01

    Attenuation of photon flux on trajectories between the source and pinhole apertures affects the quantitative accuracy of reconstructed single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) images. We propose a Chang-based non-uniform attenuation correction (NUA-CT) for small-animal SPECT/CT with focusi

  4. Spatial resolution and sensitivity of the Inveon small-animal PET scanner.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, E.P.; Disselhorst, J.; Brom, M.; Laverman, P.; Gotthardt, M.; Oyen, W.J.G.; Boerman, O.C.

    2009-01-01

    The Inveon small-animal PET scanner is characterized by a large, 127-mm axial length and a 161-mm crystal ring diameter. The associated high sensitivity is obtained by using all lines of response (LORs) up to the maximum ring difference (MRD) of 79, for which the most oblique LORs form acceptance

  5. Multi-modal small-animal imaging : image processing challenges and applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khmelinskii, Artem

    2013-01-01

    In pre-clinical research, whole-body small-animal imaging is widely used for in vivo visualization of functional and anatomical information to study cancer, neurological and cardiovascular diseases and help with a faster development of new drugs. Functional information is provided by imaging modalit

  6. Small-Animal Imaging Using Clinical Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography and Super-Resolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank P. DiFilippo

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Considering the high cost of dedicated small-animal positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT, an acceptable alternative in many situations might be clinical PET/CT. However, spatial resolution and image quality are of concern. The utility of clinical PET/CT for small-animal research and image quality improvements from super-resolution (spatial subsampling were investigated. National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA NU 4 phantom and mouse data were acquired with a clinical PET/CT scanner, as both conventional static and stepped scans. Static scans were reconstructed with and without point spread function (PSF modeling. Stepped images were postprocessed with iterative deconvolution to produce super-resolution images. Image quality was markedly improved using the super-resolution technique, avoiding certain artifacts produced by PSF modeling. The 2 mm rod of the NU 4 phantom was visualized with high contrast, and the major structures of the mouse were well resolved. Although not a perfect substitute for a state-of-the-art small-animal PET/CT scanner, a clinical PET/CT scanner with super-resolution produces acceptable small-animal image quality for many preclinical research studies.

  7. Development of a training model for small animal thoracocentesis and chest tube thoracostomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Julie A; Fio Rito, Robin M

    2014-06-01

    Training veterinary students to perform emergency procedures, such as thoracocentesis and chest tube thoracostomy, poses challenges in terms of providing adequate hands-on experience without compromising animal welfare. A small animal thoracocentesis and chest tube thoracostomy model has been developed, that allows repetitive practice in a safe, standardised environment. The model has been incorporated into a clinical skills laboratory, where students work through computerised case studies in small groups, performing thoracocentesis or chest tube thoracostomy where indicated during the case. Student feedback indicated a high degree of satisfaction with the model and the laboratory experience, high perceived value of the case studies in improving learning, and increased confidence to perform the procedures under supervision. This model can replace the use of live animals while students are practising these procedures, improving their technique, and learning the appropriate safeguards used to prevent injuries such as pulmonary trauma.

  8. A simple optogenetic system for behavioral analysis of freely moving small animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawazoe, Yuya; Yawo, Hiromu; Kimura, Koutarou D

    2013-01-01

    We present a new and simple optogenetic system for the behavioral analysis of small animals. This system includes a strong LED ring array, a high-resolution CCD camera, and the improved channelrhodopsin ChRGR. We used the system for behavioral analysis with the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans as a model, and we found that it can stimulate ChRGR expressed in the body wall muscles of the animals to modulate the behavior. Our results indicate that this system may be suitable for optogenetic behavioral analysis of freely moving small animals under various conditions to understand the principles underlying brain functions. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd and the Japan Neuroscience Society. All rights reserved.

  9. Current status and future perspectives of in vivo small animal imaging using radiolabeled nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loudos, George, E-mail: gloudos@teiath.gr [Department of Medical Instruments Technology, Technological Educational Institute of Athens, AG. Spyridonos 28, Egaleo 12210 (Greece); Kagadis, George C., E-mail: gkagad@gmail.com [Department of Medical Physics, School of Medicine, University of Patras, P.O. Box 13273, GR-265 04 Rion (Greece); Psimadas, Dimitris, E-mail: dpsimad@chem.uoa.gr [Department of Medical Instruments Technology, Technological Educational Institute of Athens, AG. Spyridonos 28, Egaleo 12210 (Greece); Institute of Radioisotopes and Radiodiagnostic Products, National Center of Scientific Research ' Demokritos' , P.O. 60228, 153 10 Agia Paraskevi, Athens (Greece)

    2011-05-15

    Small animal molecular imaging is a rapidly expanding efficient tool to study biological processes non-invasively. The use of radiolabeled tracers provides non-destructive, imaging information, allowing time related phenomena to be repeatedly studied in a single animal. In the last decade there has been an enormous progress in related technologies and a number of dedicated imaging systems overcome the limitations that the size of small animal possesses. On the other hand, nanoparticles (NPs) gain increased interest, due to their unique properties, which make them perfect candidates for biological applications. Over the past 5 years the two fields seem to cross more and more often; radiolabeled NPs have been assessed in numerous pre-clinical studies that range from oncology, till HIV treatment. In this article the current status in the tools, applications and trends of radiolabeled NPs reviewed.

  10. Design, construction and testing of a DC bioeffects test enclosure for small animals. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frazier, M J; Preache, M M

    1980-11-01

    This final report describes both the engineering development of a DC bioeffects test enclosure for small laboratory animals, and the biological protocol for the use of such enclosures in the testing of animals to determine possible biological effects of the environment associated with HVDC transmission lines. The test enclosure which has been designed is a modular unit, which will house up to eight rat-sized animals in individual compartments. Multiple test enclosures can be used to test larger numbers of animals. A prototype test enclosure has been fabricated and tested to characterize its electrical performance characteristics. The test enclosure provides a simulation of the dominant environment associated with HVDC transmission lines; namely, a static electric field and an ion current density. A biological experimental design has been developed for assessing the effects of the dominant components of the HVDC transmission line environment.

  11. Partial body irradiation of small laboratory animals with an industrial X-ray tube

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frenzel, Thorsten; Kruell, Andreas [Universitaetsklinikum Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany). Bereich Strahlentherapie; Grohmann, Carsten; Schumacher, Udo [Universitaetsklinikum Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany). Inst. fuer Anatomie und Experimentelle Morphologie

    2014-07-01

    Dedicated precise small laboratory animal irradiation sources are needed for basic cancer research and to meet this need expensive high precision radiation devices have been developed. To avoid such expenses a cost efficient way is presented to construct a device for partial body irradiation of small laboratory animals by adding specific components to an industrial X-ray tube. A custom made radiation field tube was added to an industrial 200 kV X-ray tube. A light field display as well as a monitor ionization chamber were implemented. The field size can rapidly be changed by individual inserts of MCP96 that are used for secondary collimation of the beam. Depth dose curves and cross sectional profiles were determined with the use of a custom made water phantom. More components like positioning lasers, a custom made treatment couch, and a commercial isoflurane anesthesia unit were added to complete the system. With the accessories described secondary small field sizes down to 10 by 10 mm{sup 2} (secondary collimator size) could be achieved. The dosimetry of the beam was constructed like those for conventional stereotactical clinical linear accelerators. The water phantom created showed an accuracy of 1 mm and was well suited for all measurements. With the anesthesia unit attached to the custom made treatment couch the system is ideal for the radiation treatment of small laboratory animals like mice. It was feasible to shrink the field size of an industrial X-ray tube from whole animal irradiation to precise partial body irradiation of small laboratory animals. Even smaller secondary collimator sizes than 10 by 10 mm{sup 2} are feasible with adequate secondary collimator inserts. Our custom made water phantom was well suited for the basic dosimetry of the X-ray tube.

  12. Partial body irradiation of small laboratory animals with an industrial X-ray tube.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frenzel, Thorsten; Grohmann, Carsten; Schumacher, Udo; Krüll, Andreas

    2014-12-01

    Dedicated precise small laboratory animal irradiation sources are needed for basic cancer research and to meet this need expensive high precision radiation devices have been developed. To avoid such expenses a cost efficient way is presented to construct a device for partial body irradiation of small laboratory animals by adding specific components to an industrial X-ray tube. A custom made radiation field tube was added to an industrial 200 kV X-ray tube. A light field display as well as a monitor ionization chamber were implemented. The field size can rapidly be changed by individual inserts of MCP96 that are used for secondary collimation of the beam. Depth dose curves and cross sectional profiles were determined with the use of a custom made water phantom. More components like positioning lasers, a custom made treatment couch, and a commercial isoflurane anesthesia unit were added to complete the system. With the accessories described secondary small field sizes down to 10 by 10 mm2 (secondary collimator size) could be achieved. The dosimetry of the beam was constructed like those for conventional stereotactical clinical linear accelerators. The water phantom created showed an accuracy of 1 mm and was well suited for all measurements. With the anesthesia unit attached to the custom made treatment couch the system is ideal for the radiation treatment of small laboratory animals like mice. It was feasible to shrink the field size of an industrial X-ray tube from whole animal irradiation to precise partial body irradiation of small laboratory animals. Even smaller secondary collimator sizes than 10 by 10 mm2 are feasible with adequate secondary collimator inserts. Our custom made water phantom was well suited for the basic dosimetry of the X-ray tube. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  13. Development of a combined microSPECT/CT system for small animal imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Mingshan

    Modern advances in the biomedical sciences have placed increased attention on small animals such as mice and rats as models of human biology and disease in biological research and pharmaceutical development. Their small size and fast breeding rate, their physiologic similarity to human, and, more importantly, the availability of sophisticated genetic manipulations, all have made mice and rats the laboratory mammals of choice in these experimental studies. However, the increased use of small animals in biomedical research also calls for new instruments that can measure the anatomic and metabolic information noninvasively with adequate spatial resolution and measurement sensitivity to facilitate these studies. This dissertation describes the engineering development of a combined single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and X-ray computed tomography (CT) system dedicated for small animals imaging. The system aims to obtain both the anatomic and metabolic images with submillimeter spatial resolution in a way that the data can be correlated to provide improved image quality and to offer more complete biological evaluation for biomedical studies involving small animals. The project requires development of complete microSPECT and microCT subsystems. Both subsystems are configured with a shared gantry and animal bed with integrated instrumentation for data acquisition and system control. The microCT employs a microfocus X-ray tube and a CCD-based detector for low noise, high resolution imaging. The microSPECT utilizes three semiconductor detectors coupled with pinhole collimators. A significant contribution of this dissertation project is the development of iterative algorithms with geometrical compensation that allows radionuclide images to be reconstructed at submillimeter spatial resolution, but with significantly higher detection efficiency than conventional methods. Both subsystems are capable of helical scans, offering lengthened field of view and improved

  14. Multiplane spectroscopic whole-body photoacoustic imaging of small animals in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Mansik; Kim, Jeesu; Kim, Chulhong

    2016-03-01

    We have successfully developed a multiscale acoustic-resolution photoacoustic tomography system in a single imaging platform. By switching between ultrasound transducers (center frequencies 5 and 40 MHz) and optical condensers, we have photoacoustically imaged microvasculatures of small animals in vivo at different scales. Further, we have extended the field of view of our imaging system to entire bodies of small animals. At different imaging planes, we have noninvasively imaged the major blood vessels (e.g., descending aorta, intercostal vessels, cephalic vessels, brachial vessels, femoral vessels, popliteal vessels, lateral marginal vessels, cranial mesenteric vessels, mammalian vessels, carotid artery, jugular vein, subclavian vessels, iliac vessels, and caudal vessels) as well as intact internal organs (e.g., spleen, liver, kidney, intestine, cecum, and spinal cord) of the animals in vivo. The spectroscopic whole-body photoacoustic imaging clearly reveals the spectral responses of the internal structures. Similar to other existing preclinical whole-body imaging systems, this whole-body photoacoustic tomography can be a useful tool for small-animal research.

  15. Assessment of a New High-Performance Small-Animal X-Ray Tomograph

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    We have developed a new X-ray cone-beam tomograph for in vivo small-animal imaging using a flat panel detector (CMOS technology with a microcolumnar CsI scintillator plate) and a microfocus X-ray source. The geometrical configuration was designed to achieve a spatial resolution of about 12 lpmm with a field of view appropriate for laboratory rodents. In order to achieve high performance with regard to per-animal screening time and cost, the acquisition software takes advantage of the highest ...

  16. Multi-institutional MicroCT image comparison of image-guided small animal irradiators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnstone, Chris D.; Lindsay, Patricia; E Graves, Edward; Wong, Eugene; Perez, Jessica R.; Poirier, Yannick; Ben-Bouchta, Youssef; Kanesalingam, Thilakshan; Chen, Haijian; E Rubinstein, Ashley; Sheng, Ke; Bazalova-Carter, Magdalena

    2017-07-01

    To recommend imaging protocols and establish tolerance levels for microCT image quality assurance (QA) performed on conformal image-guided small animal irradiators. A fully automated QA software SAPA (small animal phantom analyzer) for image analysis of the commercial Shelley micro-CT MCTP 610 phantom was developed, in which quantitative analyses of CT number linearity, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), uniformity and noise, geometric accuracy, spatial resolution by means of modulation transfer function (MTF), and CT contrast were performed. Phantom microCT scans from eleven institutions acquired with four image-guided small animal irradiator units (including the commercial PXi X-RAD SmART and Xstrahl SARRP systems) with varying parameters used for routine small animal imaging were analyzed. Multi-institutional data sets were compared using SAPA, based on which tolerance levels for each QA test were established and imaging protocols for QA were recommended. By analyzing microCT data from 11 institutions, we established image QA tolerance levels for all image quality tests. CT number linearity set to R 2  >  0.990 was acceptable in microCT data acquired at all but three institutions. Acceptable SNR  >  36 and noise levels  1.5 lp mm-1 for MTF  =  0.2) was obtained at all but four institutions due to their large image voxel size used (>0.275 mm). Ten of the eleven institutions passed the set QA tolerance for geometric accuracy (2000 HU for 30 mgI ml-1). We recommend performing imaging QA with 70 kVp, 1.5 mA, 120 s imaging time, 0.20 mm voxel size, and a frame rate of 5 fps for the PXi X-RAD SmART. For the Xstrahl SARRP, we recommend using 60 kVp, 1.0 mA, 240 s imaging time, 0.20 mm voxel size, and 6 fps. These imaging protocols should result in high quality images that pass the set tolerance levels on all systems. Average SAPA computation time for complete QA analysis for a 0.20 mm voxel, 400 slice Shelley phantom microCT data set

  17. Fully automated image-guided needle insertion: application to small animal biopsies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayadi, A; Bour, G; Aprahamian, M; Bayle, B; Graebling, P; Gangloff, J; Soler, L; Egly, J M; Marescaux, J

    2007-01-01

    The study of biological process evolution in small animals requires time-consuming and expansive analyses of a large population of animals. Serial analyses of the same animal is potentially a great alternative. However non-invasive procedures must be set up, to retrieve valuable tissue samples from precisely defined areas in living animals. Taking advantage of the high resolution level of in vivo molecular imaging, we defined a procedure to perform image-guided needle insertion and automated biopsy using a micro CT-scan, a robot and a vision system. Workspace limitations in the scanner require the animal to be removed and laid in front of the robot. A vision system composed of a grid projector and a camera is used to register the designed animal-bed with to respect to the robot and to calibrate automatically the needle position and orientation. Automated biopsy is then synchronised with respiration and performed with a pneumatic translation device, at high velocity, to minimize organ deformation. We have experimentally tested our biopsy system with different needles.

  18. Small animal deworming protocols, client education, and veterinarian perception of zoonotic parasites in western Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stull, Jason W.; Carr, Anthony P.; Chomel, Bruno B.; Berghaus, Roy D.; Hird, David W.

    2007-01-01

    Questionnaires were mailed to veterinarians in western Canada to determine dog and cat deworming protocols and the association between perceived zoonotic risk and perceived prevalence of endoparasites and deworming protocols. Of the responding veterinarians (545), 13% and 39% recommended deworming protocols consistent with established guidelines for puppies and kittens, respectively. Mixed animal practitioners and high-perceived prevalence of Toxocara cati were associated with increased appropriate kitten deworming (P veterinarians noted an established hospital deworming protocol, although only 78% followed the protocol. Forty-four percent of veterinarians stated they discussed with all clients the zoonotic risk of animal-derived endoparasites, whereas the remainder discussed it only under particular circumstances or not at all. Most small animal deworming protocols recommended in western Canada begin too late to inhibit endoparasite shedding. Increased educational efforts directed at veterinarians are warranted. PMID:17436903

  19. A 3D high-resolution gamma camera for radiopharmaceutical studies with small animals

    CERN Document Server

    Loudos, G K; Giokaris, N D; Styliaris, E; Archimandritis, S C; Varvarigou, A D; Papanicolas, C N; Majewski, S; Weisenberger, D; Pani, R; Scopinaro, F; Uzunoglu, N K; Maintas, D; Stefanis, K

    2003-01-01

    The results of studies conducted with a small field of view tomographic gamma camera based on a Position Sensitive Photomultiplier Tube are reported. The system has been used for the evaluation of radiopharmaceuticals in small animals. Phantom studies have shown a spatial resolution of 2 mm in planar and 2-3 mm in tomographic imaging. Imaging studies in mice have been carried out both in 2D and 3D. Conventional radiopharmaceuticals have been used and the results have been compared with images from a clinically used system.

  20. Small animal models to understand pathogenesis of osteoarthritis and use of stem cell in cartilage regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piombo, Virginia

    2017-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is one of the most common diseases, which affect the correct functionality of synovial joints and is characterized by articular cartilage degradation. Limitation in the treatment of OA is mostly due to the very limited regenerative characteristic of articular cartilage once is damaged. Small animal models are of particular importance for mechanistic analysis to understand the processes that affect cartilage degradation. Combination of joint injury techniques with the use of stem cells has been shown to be an important tool for understanding the processes of cartilage degradation and regeneration. Implementation of stem cells and small animal models are important tools to help researchers to find a solution that could ameliorate and prevent the symptoms of OA. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Carriage of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius in small animal veterinarians

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paul, Narayan Chandra; Moodley, Arshnee; Ghibaudo, G.

    2011-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius (MRSP) is increasingly reported in small animals and cases of human infections have already been described despite its recent emergence in veterinary practice. We investigated the prevalence of MRSP and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus...... aureus (MRSA) among small animal dermatologists attending a national veterinary conference in Italy. Nasal swabs were obtained from 128 veterinarians, seven of which harboured MRSP (n = 5; 3.9%) or MRSA (n = 2; 1.6%). A follow-up study of two carriers revealed that MRSP persisted for at least 1 month...... by spa typing. Methicillin-resistant isolates were further typed by antimicrobial susceptibility testing, SCCmec and multi-locus sequence typing. Two lineages previously associated with pets were identified among the five MRSP isolates; the European epidemic clone ST71-SCCmec II-III and ST106-SCCmec IV...

  2. Verification of photon attenuation characteristics for 3D printer based small animal lung model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Se Ho; Lee, Seung Wook [Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Han, Su Chul; Park, Seung Woo [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    Since it is difficult to measure absorbed dose to mice in vivo, replica mice are mostly used as alternative. In this study, realistic mouse phantom was fabricated by using 3D printer (object500 connex3, Stratasys, USA). Elemental inks as material of 3D printer were selected corresponding to mouse tissue. To represent lung, selected material was partially used with air layer. In order to verify material equivalent, super-flex bolus was simply compared to verify photon attenuation characteristics. In the case of lung, Hounsfield unit (HU) of the phantom were compared with a live mouse. In this study, we fabricated mouse phantom by using 3D printer, and practically verified photon attenuation characteristics. The fabricated phantom shows tissue equivalence as well as similar geometry with live mouse. As more and more growing of 3D printer technique, 3D printer based small preclinical animal phantom would increase reliability of verification of absorbed dose in small animal for preclinical study.

  3. Tumor glucose metabolism imaged in vivo in small animals with whole-body photoacoustic computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatni, Muhammad Rameez; Xia, Jun; Sohn, Rebecca; Maslov, Konstantin; Guo, Zijian; Zhang, Yu; Wang, Kun; Xia, Younan; Anastasio, Mark; Arbeit, Jeffrey; Wang, Lihong V.

    2012-07-01

    With the increasing use of small animals for human disease studies, small-animal whole-body molecular imaging plays an important role in biomedical research. Currently, none of the existing imaging modalities can provide both anatomical and glucose molecular information, leading to higher costs of building dual-modality systems. Even with image co-registration, the spatial resolution of the molecular imaging modality is not improved. Utilizing a ring-shaped confocal photoacoustic computed tomography system, we demonstrate, for the first time, that both anatomy and glucose uptake can be imaged in a single modality. Anatomy was imaged with the endogenous hemoglobin contrast, and glucose metabolism was imaged with a near-infrared dye-labeled 2-deoxyglucose.

  4. Performance Evaluation of a Dedicated Camera Suitable for Dynamic Radiopharmaceuticals Evaluation in Small Animals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loudos, George; Majewski, Stanislaw; Wojcik, Randolph; Weisenberger, Andrew; Sakelios, Nikolas; Nikita, Konstantina; Uzunoglu, Nikolaos; Bouziotis, Penelope; Xanthopoulos, Stavros; Varvarigou, Alexandra

    2007-06-01

    As the result of a collaboration between the Detector and Imaging Group of Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (US), the Institute of Radioisotopes and Radiodiagnostic Products (IRRP) of N.C.S.R. ldquoDemokritosrdquo and the Biomedical Simulations and Imaging Applications Laboratory (BIOSIM) of National Technical University of Athens (Greece), a mouse sized camera optimized for Tc^99m imaging was developed. The detector was built in Jefferson Lab and transferred to Greece, where it was evaluated with phantoms and small animals. The system will be used initially for planar dynamic studies in small animals, in order to assess the performance of new radiolabeled biomolecules for oncological studies. The active area of the detector is approximately 48 mm times 96 mm. It is based on two flat-panel Hamamatsu H8500 position sensitive photomultiplier tubes (PSPMT), a pixelated NaI(Tl) scintillator and a high resolution lead parallel-hole collimator. The system was developed to optim

  5. Assessment of the sources of error affecting the quantitative accuracy of SPECT imaging in small animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Andrew B.; Franc, Benjamin L.; Gullberg, Grant T.; Hasegawa, Bruce H.

    2008-05-01

    Small animal SPECT imaging systems have multiple potential applications in biomedical research. Whereas SPECT data are commonly interpreted qualitatively in a clinical setting, the ability to accurately quantify measurements will increase the utility of the SPECT data for laboratory measurements involving small animals. In this work, we assess the effect of photon attenuation, scatter and partial volume errors on the quantitative accuracy of small animal SPECT measurements, first with Monte Carlo simulation and then confirmed with experimental measurements. The simulations modeled the imaging geometry of a commercially available small animal SPECT system. We simulated the imaging of a radioactive source within a cylinder of water, and reconstructed the projection data using iterative reconstruction algorithms. The size of the source and the size of the surrounding cylinder were varied to evaluate the effects of photon attenuation and scatter on quantitative accuracy. We found that photon attenuation can reduce the measured concentration of radioactivity in a volume of interest in the center of a rat-sized cylinder of water by up to 50% when imaging with iodine-125, and up to 25% when imaging with technetium-99m. When imaging with iodine-125, the scatter-to-primary ratio can reach up to approximately 30%, and can cause overestimation of the radioactivity concentration when reconstructing data with attenuation correction. We varied the size of the source to evaluate partial volume errors, which we found to be a strong function of the size of the volume of interest and the spatial resolution. These errors can result in large (>50%) changes in the measured amount of radioactivity. The simulation results were compared with and found to agree with experimental measurements. The inclusion of attenuation correction in the reconstruction algorithm improved quantitative accuracy. We also found that an improvement of the spatial resolution through the use of resolution

  6. Increased concentration of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus sp. in small animals exposed to aerospace environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guthrie, R. K.

    1976-01-01

    The effects of increased concentrations of PSEUDOMONAS AERUGINOSA AND STAPHYLOCOCCUS in the total bacterial flora of small animals exposed to simulated spacecraft environments were evaluated. Tests to detect changes in infectivity, effects of antibiotic treatments, immune responses to bacterial antigens, and effectiveness of immune responses in the experimental environment were conducted. The most significant results appear to be the differences in immune responses at simulated altitudes and the production of infection in the presence of a specific antibody.

  7. Progress of Focusing X-ray and Gamma-ray Optics for Small Animal Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pivovaroff, M J; Funk, T; Barber, W C; Ramsey, B D; Hasegawa, B H

    2005-08-05

    Significant effort is currently being devoted to the development of noninvasive imaging systems that allow in vivo assessment of biological and biomolecular interactions in mice and other small animals. Ideally, one would like to discern these functional and metabolic relationships with in vivo radionuclide imaging at spatial resolutions approaching those that can be obtained using the anatomical imaging techniques (i.e., <100 {micro}m), which would help to answer outstanding questions in many areas of biomedicine. In this paper, we report progress on our effort to develop high-resolution focusing X-ray and gamma-ray optics for small-animal radionuclide imaging. The use of reflective optics, in contrast to methods that rely on absorptive collimation like single- or multiple-pinhole cameras, decouples spatial resolution from sensitivity (efficiency). Our feasibility studies have refined and applied ray-tracing routines to design focusing optics for small animal studies. We also have adopted a replication technique to manufacture the X-ray mirrors, and which in experimental studies have demonstrated a spatial resolution of {approx}190 {micro}m. We conclude that focusing optics can be designed and fabricated for gamma-ray energies, and with spatial resolutions, and field of view suitable for in vivo biological studies. While the efficiency of a single optic is limited, fabrication methods now are being developed that may make it possible to develop imaging systems with multiple optics that could collect image data over study times that would be practical for performing radionuclide studies of small animals.

  8. Factors affecting use of veterinarians by small-scale food animal operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beam, Andrea L; Thilmany, Dawn D; Garber, Lindsey P; Van Metre, David C; Pritchard, Randy W; Kopral, Christine A; Olea-Popelka, Francisco J

    2013-11-01

    To identify factors associated with use of a veterinarian by small-scale food animal operations. Cross-sectional descriptive survey. 16,000 small-scale farm or ranch operations in all 50 states. Surveys were conducted via mail or telephone during 2011 for small-scale operations (gross annual agricultural sales between $10,000 and $499,999) in which an animal or animal product comprised the highest percentage of annual sales. 8,186 (51.2%) operations responded to the survey; 7,849 surveys met the inclusion criteria. For 6,511 (83.0%) operations, beef cattle were the primary animal species. An estimated 82.1% of operations (95% confidence interval [CI], 81.1% to 83.0%) had a veterinarian available ≤ 29 miles away; 1.4% (95% CI, 1.2% to 1.7%) did not have a veterinarian available within 100 miles of the operation. Operations for which the nearest veterinarian was ≥ 100 miles away or for which a veterinarian was not available were located in 40 US states. Overall, 61.7% of operations (95% CI, 60.6% to 62.9%) had used a veterinarian during the 12 months prior to the survey. Producers with college degrees were significantly more likely to use a veterinarian (675%) versus those who did not complete high school (52.9%). Results of this study indicated most small-scale operations had adequate access to veterinarians during 2011, but there seemed to be localized shortages of veterinarians in many states.

  9. Non-Contact Optical Fluorescence Tomography for Small Animal Imaging: System Development and Multispectral Applications

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Optical Fluorescence Tomography (OFT) of live small animals can yield optimum 3-dimensional imaging performance when large amounts of tomographic boundary information are used for reconstruction. Commonly, multiple source-detector projection measurements distributed over the tissue surface of the imaging object are used to generate raw data for tomography. Recent advances in multispectral optical tomography, however, provide an attractive alternative method to harness tomographic boundary dat...

  10. Assessment of the sources of error affecting the quantitative accuracy of SPECT imaging in small animals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joint Graduate Group in Bioengineering, University of California, San Francisco and University of California, Berkeley; Department of Radiology, University of California; Gullberg, Grant T; Hwang, Andrew B.; Franc, Benjamin L.; Gullberg, Grant T.; Hasegawa, Bruce H.

    2008-02-15

    Small animal SPECT imaging systems have multiple potential applications in biomedical research. Whereas SPECT data are commonly interpreted qualitatively in a clinical setting, the ability to accurately quantify measurements will increase the utility of the SPECT data for laboratory measurements involving small animals. In this work, we assess the effect of photon attenuation, scatter and partial volume errors on the quantitative accuracy of small animal SPECT measurements, first with Monte Carlo simulation and then confirmed with experimental measurements. The simulations modeled the imaging geometry of a commercially available small animal SPECT system. We simulated the imaging of a radioactive source within a cylinder of water, and reconstructed the projection data using iterative reconstruction algorithms. The size of the source and the size of the surrounding cylinder were varied to evaluate the effects of photon attenuation and scatter on quantitative accuracy. We found that photon attenuation can reduce the measured concentration of radioactivity in a volume of interest in the center of a rat-sized cylinder of water by up to 50percent when imaging with iodine-125, and up to 25percent when imaging with technetium-99m. When imaging with iodine-125, the scatter-to-primary ratio can reach up to approximately 30percent, and can cause overestimation of the radioactivity concentration when reconstructing data with attenuation correction. We varied the size of the source to evaluate partial volume errors, which we found to be a strong function of the size of the volume of interest and the spatial resolution. These errors can result in large (>50percent) changes in the measured amount of radioactivity. The simulation results were compared with and found to agree with experimental measurements. The inclusion of attenuation correction in the reconstruction algorithm improved quantitative accuracy. We also found that an improvement of the spatial resolution through the

  11. Near Field UHF RFID Antenna System Enabling the Tracking of Small Laboratory Animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Catarinucci

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Radio frequency identification (RFID technology is more and more adopted in a wide range of applicative scenarios. In many cases, such as the tracking of small-size living animals for behaviour analysis purposes, the straightforward use of commercial solutions does not ensure adequate performance. Consequently, both RFID hardware and the control software should be tailored for the particular application. In this work, a novel RFID-based approach enabling an effective localization and tracking of small-sized laboratory animals is proposed. It is mainly based on a UHF Near Field RFID multiantenna system, to be placed under the animals’ cage, and able to rigorously identify the NF RFID tags implanted in laboratory animals (e.g., mice. Once the requirements of the reader antenna have been individuated, the antenna system has been designed and realized. Moreover, an algorithm based on the measured Received Signal Strength Indication (RSSI aiming at removing potential ambiguities in data captured by the multiantenna system has been developed and integrated. The animal tracking system has been largely tested on phantom mice in order to verify its ability to precisely localize each subject and to reconstruct its path. The achieved and discussed results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed tracking system.

  12. Towards a high sensitivity small animal PET system based on CZT detectors (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbaszadeh, Shiva; Levin, Craig

    2017-03-01

    Small animal positron emission tomography (PET) is a biological imaging technology that allows non-invasive interrogation of internal molecular and cellular processes and mechanisms of disease. New PET molecular probes with high specificity are under development to target, detect, visualize, and quantify subtle molecular and cellular processes associated with cancer, heart disease, and neurological disorders. However, the limited uptake of these targeted probes leads to significant reduction in signal. There is a need to advance the performance of small animal PET system technology to reach its full potential for molecular imaging. Our goal is to assemble a small animal PET system based on CZT detectors and to explore methods to enhance its photon sensitivity. In this work, we reconstruct an image from a phantom using a two-panel subsystem consisting of six CZT crystals in each panel. For image reconstruction, coincidence events with energy between 450 and 570 keV were included. We are developing an algorithm to improve sensitivity of the system by including multiple interaction events.

  13. GATE simulation of a new design of pinhole SPECT system for small animal brain imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzun Ozsahin, D.; Bläckberg, L.; El Fakhri, G.; Sabet, H.

    2017-01-01

    Small animal SPECT imaging has gained an increased interest over the past decade since it is an excellent tool for developing new drugs and tracers. Therefore, there is a huge effort on the development of cost-effective SPECT detectors with high capabilities. The aim of this study is to simulate the performance characteristics of new designs for a cost effective, stationary SPECT system dedicated to small animal imaging with a focus on mice brain. The conceptual design of this SPECT system platform, Stationary Small Animal SSA-SPECT, is to use many pixelated CsI:TI detector modules with 0.4 mm × 0.4 mm pixels in order to achieve excellent intrinsic detector resolution where each module is backed by a single pinhole collimator with 0.3 mm hole diameter. In this work, we present the simulation results of four variations of the SSA-SPECT platform where the number of detector modules and FOV size is varied while keeping the detector size and collimator hole size constant. Using the NEMA NU-4 protocol, we performed spatial resolution, sensitivity, image quality simulations followed by a Derenzo-like phantom evaluation. The results suggest that all four SSA-SPECT systems can provide better than 0.063% system sensitivity and < 1.5 mm FWHM spatial resolution without resolution recovery or other correction techniques. Specifically, SSA-SPECT-1 showed a system sensitivity of 0.09% in combination with 1.1 mm FWHM spatial resolution.

  14. Development of a Stereotactic Device for Gamma Knife Irradiation of Small Animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Hyun-Tai; Kim, Dong Gyu; Paek, Sun Ha; Cho, Keun-Tae

    2008-01-01

    Objective The authors developed a stereotactic device for irradiation of small animals with Leksell Gamma Knife® Model C. Development and verification procedures were described in this article. Methods The device was designed to satisfy three requirements. The mechanical accuracy in positioning was to be managed within 0.5 mm. The strength of the device and structure were to be compromised to provide enough strength to hold a small animal during irradiation and to interfere the gamma ray beam as little as possible. The device was to be used in combination with the Leksell G-frame® and KOPF® rat adaptor. The irradiation point was determined by separate imaging sequences such as plain X-ray images. Results The absolute dose rate with the device in a Leksell Gamma Knife was 3.7% less than the value calculated from Leksell Gamma Plan®. The dose distributions measured with GAFCHROMIC® MD-55 film corresponded to those of Leksell Gamma Plan® within acceptable range. The device was used in a series of rat experiments with a 4 mm helmet of Leksell Gamma Knife. Conclusion A stereotactic device for irradiation of small animals with Leksell Gamma Knife Model C has been developed so that it fulfilled above requirements. Absorbed dose and dose distribution at the center of a Gamma Knife helmet are in acceptable ranges. The device provides enough accuracy for stereotactic irradiation with acceptable practicality. PMID:19096541

  15. In vivo small-animal imaging using micro-CT and digital subtraction angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badea, C T; Johnson, G A [Center for In Vivo Microscopy, Department of Radiology, Duke University, Durham, NC 27710 (United States); Drangova, M; Holdsworth, D W [Imaging Research Laboratories, Robarts Research Institute, University of Western Ontario, London, ON N6A 5K8 (United States)], E-mail: Cristian.Badea@duke.edu

    2008-10-07

    Small-animal imaging has a critical role in phenotyping, drug discovery and in providing a basic understanding of mechanisms of disease. Translating imaging methods from humans to small animals is not an easy task. The purpose of this work is to review in vivo x-ray based small-animal imaging, with a focus on in vivo micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) and digital subtraction angiography (DSA). We present the principles, technologies, image quality parameters and types of applications. We show that both methods can be used not only to provide morphological, but also functional information, such as cardiac function estimation or perfusion. Compared to other modalities, x-ray based imaging is usually regarded as being able to provide higher throughput at lower cost and adequate resolution. The limitations are usually associated with the relatively poor contrast mechanisms and potential radiation damage due to ionizing radiation, although the use of contrast agents and careful design of studies can address these limitations. We hope that the information will effectively address how x-ray based imaging can be exploited for successful in vivo preclinical imaging. (topical reviews)

  16. Attitudes of small animal practitioners toward participation in veterinary clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruen, Margaret E; Griffith, Emily H; Caney, Sarah M A; Rishniw, Mark; Lascelles, B Duncan X

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine attitudes of small animal practitioners toward veterinary clinical trials and variables influencing their likelihood of participating in such trials. DESIGN Cross-sectional survey. SAMPLE Small animal practitioners with membership in 1 of 2 online veterinary communities (n = 163 and 652). PROCEDURES An online survey was developed for each of 2 veterinary communities, and invitations to participate were sent via email. Each survey included questions designed to collect information on the respondents' willingness to enroll their patients in clinical trials and to recommend participation to clients for their pets. RESULTS More than 80% of respondents to each survey indicated that they spend no time in clinical research. A high proportion of respondents were likely or extremely likely to recommend clinical trial participation to clients for their pets when those trials involved treatments licensed in other countries, novel treatments, respected investigators, or sponsoring by academic institutions, among other reasons. Reasons for not recommending participation included distance, time restrictions, and lack of awareness of ongoing clinical trials; 28% of respondents indicated that they did not usually learn about such clinical trials. Most respondents (79% to 92%) rated their recommendation of a trial as important to their client's willingness to participate. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Participation in veterinary clinical trials by small animal practitioners and their clients and patients appeared low. Efforts should be increased to raise practitioner awareness of clinical trials for which patients might qualify. Specific elements of trial design were identified that could be modified to increase participation.

  17. Geo-PET: A novel generic organ-pet for small animal organs and tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sensoy, Levent

    Reconstructed tomographic image resolution of small animal PET imaging systems is improving with advances in radiation detector development. However the trend towards higher resolution systems has come with an increase in price and system complexity. Recent developments in the area of solid-state photomultiplication devices like silicon photomultiplier arrays (SPMA) are creating opportunities for new high performance tools for PET scanner design. Imaging of excised small animal organs and tissues has been used as part of post-mortem studies in order to gain detailed, high-resolution anatomical information on sacrificed animals. However, this kind of ex-vivo specimen imaging has largely been limited to ultra-high resolution muCT. The inherent limitations to PET resolution have, to date, excluded PET imaging from these ex-vivo imaging studies. In this work, we leverage the diminishing physical size of current generation SPMA designs to create a very small, simple, and high-resolution prototype detector system targeting ex-vivo tomographic imaging of small animal organs and tissues. We investigate sensitivity, spatial resolution, and the reconstructed image quality of a prototype small animal PET scanner designed specifically for imaging of excised murine tissue and organs. We aim to demonstrate that a cost-effective silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) array based design with thin crystals (2 mm) to minimize depth of interaction errors might be able to achieve sub-millimeter resolution. We hypothesize that the substantial decrease in sensitivity associated with the thin crystals can be compensated for with increased solid angle detection, longer acquisitions, higher activity and wider acceptance energy windows (due to minimal scatter from excised organs). The constructed system has a functional field of view (FoV) of 40 mm diameter, which is adequate for most small animal specimen studies. We perform both analytical (3D-FBP) and iterative (ML-EM) methods in order to

  18. A Novel Restraining Device for Small Animal Imaging Exams: Validation in Rabbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Henrique Barbosa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To develop, validate, and patent a Restraining Device for Small Animal Imaging Exams (RDSAIE that allows exams to be comfortably conducted without risks to animals and professionals. Methods. A RDSAIE with a mobile cover and shelf was built with transparent acrylic material. A total of six anesthetized rabbits were used to perform the following imaging exams of the skull: Cone Beam Computed Tomography, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, and Scintigraphy. Results. The device showed great functionality and full visibility of the animal behavior, which remained fully stabilized and immobilized in either the horizontal or vertical position without the need for a person to remain in the test room to assist them. The procedures were performed without difficulty, and images of good resolution and without artifacts were obtained. Conclusion. The RDSAIE is comfortable, safe, efficient, and ergonomic. It allows the easy placement of animals in different body positions, including the vertical, the maintenance of postural stability, and full visibility. It may be constructed for animals heavier than 4 kg and it is adaptable for translational studies in anima nobile.

  19. Monte-Carlo simulation of pinhole collimator of a small field of view gamma camera for small animal imaging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Jie; MA Wenyan; ZHU Yufeng; MA Hongguang; WU Yuelei; HU Huasi; ZHANG Boping; HUO Yonggang; LIU Silu; JIAN Bin; WANG Zhaomin

    2009-01-01

    Needs in scintimammography applications,especially for small animal cardiac imaging,lead to develop a small field of view,high spatial resolution gamma camera with a pinhole collimator.However the ideal pinhole collimator must keep a compromise between spatial resolution and sensitivity.In order to design a pinhole collimator with an optimized sensitivity and spatial resolution,the spatial resolution and the geometric sensitivity response as a function of the source to collimator distance has been obtained by means of Monte-Carlo simulation for a small field of view gamma camera with a pinhole collimator of various-hole diameters.The results show that the camera with pinhole of 1 mm,1.5 mm and 2 mm diameter has respectively spatial resolution of 1.5 mm,2.25 mm and 3 mm and geometric sensitivity of 0.016%,0.022% and 0.036%,while the source to collimator distance is 3 cm.We chose the pinhole collimator with hole diameter size of 1.2 mm for our the gamma camera designed based on the wade-off between sensitivity and resolution.

  20. Optimal energy window selection of a CZT-based small-animal SPECT for quantitative accuracy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Su-Jin [Department of Radiological Science and Research Institute of Health Science, Yonsei University, Wonju 220-710 (Korea, Republic of); Yu, A. Ram [Laboratory animal center, OSONG Medical Innovation Foundation, Chunguk 363-951 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Nuclear Medicine, College of Medicine, Hanyang University Hospital, Seoul 133-792 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Yun Young [Department of Nuclear Medicine, College of Medicine, Hanyang University Hospital, Seoul 133-792 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kyeong Min [Molecular Imaging Research Center, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul 139-706 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hee-Joung, E-mail: hjk1@yonsei.ac.kr [Department of Radiological Science and Research Institute of Health Science, Yonsei University, Wonju 220-710 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-11

    Cadmium zinc telluride (CZT)-based small-animal single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) has desirable characteristics such as superior energy resolution, but data acquisition for SPECT imaging has been widely performed with a conventional energy window. The aim of this study was to determine the optimal energy window settings for technetium-99 m ({sup 99m}Tc) and thallium-201 ({sup 201}Tl), the most commonly used isotopes in SPECT imaging, using CZT-based small-animal SPECT for quantitative accuracy. We experimentally investigated quantitative measurements with respect to primary count rate, contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), and scatter fraction (SF) within various energy window settings using Triumph X-SPECT. The two ways of energy window settings were considered: an on-peak window and an off-peak window. In the on-peak window setting, energy centers were set on the photopeaks. In the off-peak window setting, the ratios of energy differences between the photopeak from the lower- and higher-threshold varied from 4:6 to 3:7. In addition, the energy-window width for {sup 99m}Tc varied from 5% to 20%, and that for {sup 201}Tl varied from 10% to 30%. The results of this study enabled us to determine the optimal energy windows for each isotope in terms of primary count rate, CNR, and SF. We selected the optimal energy window that increases the primary count rate and CNR while decreasing SF. For {sup 99m}Tc SPECT imaging, the energy window of 138–145 keV with a 5% width and off-peak ratio of 3:7 was determined to be the optimal energy window. For {sup 201}Tl SPECT imaging, the energy window of 64–85 keV with a 30% width and off-peak ratio of 3:7 was selected as the optimal energy window. Our results demonstrated that the proper energy window should be carefully chosen based on quantitative measurements in order to take advantage of desirable characteristics of CZT-based small-animal SPECT. These results provided valuable reference information for the

  1. Animator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tech Directions, 2008

    2008-01-01

    Art and animation work is the most significant part of electronic game development, but is also found in television commercials, computer programs, the Internet, comic books, and in just about every visual media imaginable. It is the part of the project that makes an abstract design idea concrete and visible. Animators create the motion of life in…

  2. 75 FR 53973 - Guidance for Industry; Small Entities Compliance Guide-Designation of New Animal Drugs for Minor...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-02

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Guidance for Industry; Small Entities Compliance Guide... Animal Drugs for Minor Uses or Minor Species.'' This small entities compliance guide (SECG) aids industry... Animal Drugs for Minor Uses or Minor Species.'' This SECG aids industry in complying with...

  3. 3D image-guided robotic needle positioning system for small animal interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bax, Jeffrey S; Waring, Christopher S R; Sherebrin, Shi; Stapleton, Shawn; Hudson, Thomas J; Jaffray, David A; Lacefield, James C; Fenster, Aaron

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the design of a micro-CT guided small animal robotic needle positioning system. In order to simplify the robotic design and maintain a small targeting error, a novel implementation of the remote center of motion is used in the system. The system has been developed with the objective of achieving a mean targeting error of <200 μm while maintaining a high degree of user friendliness. The robot is compact enough to operate within a 25 cm diameter micro-CT bore. Small animals can be imaged and an intervention performed without the need to transport the animal from one workspace to another. Not requiring transport of the animal reduces opportunities for targets to shift from their localized position in the image and simplifies the workflow of interventions. An improved method of needle calibration is presented that better characterizes the calibration using the position of the needle tip in photographs rather than the needle axis. A calibration fixture was also introduced, which dramatically reduces the time requirements of calibration while maintaining calibration accuracy. Two registration modes have been developed to correspond the robot coordinate system with the coordinate system of the micro-CT scanner. The two registration modes offer a balance between the time required to complete a registration and the overall registration accuracy. The development of slow high accuracy and fast low accuracy registration modes provides users with a degree of flexibility in selecting a registration mode best suited for their application. The target registration error (TRE) of the higher accuracy primary registration was TRE(primary) = 31 ± 12 μm. The error in the lower accuracy combined registration was TRE(combined) = 139 ± 63 μm. Both registration modes are therefore suitable for small-animal needle interventions. The targeting accuracy of the robotic system was characterized using targeting experiments in tissue-mimicking gelatin phantoms. The results

  4. Anaphylaxis Imaging: Non-Invasive Measurement of Surface Body Temperature and Physical Activity in Small Animals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krisztina Manzano-Szalai

    Full Text Available In highly sensitized patients, the encounter with a specific allergen from food, insect stings or medications may rapidly induce systemic anaphylaxis with potentially lethal symptoms. Countless animal models of anaphylaxis, most often in BALB/c mice, were established to understand the pathophysiology and to prove the safety of different treatments. The most common symptoms during anaphylactic shock are drop of body temperature and reduced physical activity. To refine, improve and objectify the currently applied manual monitoring methods, we developed an imaging method for the automated, non-invasive measurement of the whole-body surface temperature and, at the same time, of the horizontal and vertical movement activity of small animals. We tested the anaphylaxis imaging in three in vivo allergy mouse models for i milk allergy, ii peanut allergy and iii egg allergy. These proof-of-principle experiments suggest that the imaging technology represents a reliable non-invasive method for the objective monitoring of small animals during anaphylaxis over time. We propose that the method will be useful for monitoring diseases associated with both, changes in body temperature and in physical behaviour.

  5. A small animal holding fixture system with positional reproducibility for longitudinal multimodal imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kokuryo, Daisuke; Kimura, Yuichi; Obata, Takayuki; Yamaya, Taiga; Kawamura, Kazunori; Zhang, Ming-Rong; Kanno, Iwao; Aoki, Ichio, E-mail: ukimura@ieee.or [Molecular Imaging Center, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan)

    2010-07-21

    This study presents a combined small animal holding fixture system, termed a 'bridge capsule', which provides for small animal re-fixation with positional reproducibility. This system comprises separate holding fixtures for the head and lower body and a connecting part to a gas anesthesia system. A mouse is fixed in place by the combination of a head fixture with a movable part made from polyacetal resin, a lower body fixture made from vinyl-silicone and a holder for the legs and tail. For re-fixation, a similar posture could be maintained by the same holding fixtures and a constant distance between the head and lower body fixtures is maintained. Artifacts caused by the bridge capsule system were not observed on magnetic resonance (MRI) and positron emission tomography (PET) images. The average position differences of the spinal column and the iliac body before and after re-fixation for the same modality were approximately 1.1 mm. The difference between the MRI and PET images was approximately 1.8 mm for the lower body fixture after image registration using fiducial markers. This system would be useful for longitudinal, repeated and multimodal imaging experiments requiring similar animal postures.

  6. Improved Excitation Light Rejection Enhances Small-Animal Fluorescent Optical Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kildong Hwang

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Small-animal fluorescence-enhanced imaging involves the detection of weak fluorescent signals emanating from nanomolar to picomolar concentrations of exogenous or endogenously produced fluorophore concurrent with the rejection of an overwhelmingly large component of backscattered excitation light. The elimination of the back-reflected excitation light of the collected signal remains a major and often unrecognized challenge for further reducing the noise floor and increasing sensitivity of small-animal fluorescence imaging. Herein, we show that the combination of three-cavity interference and holographic super notch filters with appropriate imaging lenses to collimate light improves rejection of excitation light, enabling more accurate imaging. To assess excitation leakage, the “out-of-band (S(Λx” to “in-band (S(Λm–S(Λx” signal ratio from phantom studies and the target-to-background ratio (TBR from in vivo animal imaging was acquired with and without collimating optics. The addition of collimating optics resulted in a 51% to 75% reduction in the ratio of (S(Λx/(S(Λm–S(Λx for the phantom studies and an improvement of TBR from 11% to 31% and of signal-to-noise ratio from 11% to 142% for an integrin-targeting conjugate in human glioma xenografts.

  7. Experiments with small animals in BIOLAB and EMCS on the international space station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinckmann, E.; Schiller, P.

    Two ESA facilities will be available for animal research and other biological experiments on the International Space Station: the European Modular Cultivation System (EMCS) in the US Lab "Destiny" and BIOLAB in the European "Columbus" Laboratory. Both facilities use standard Experiment Containers, mounted on two centrifuge rotors allowing either research in microgravity or acceleration studies with variable g-levels from 0.001 to 2.0x g. Standard interface plates provide each container with power and data lines, gas supply (controlled CO 2, O 2 concentration and relative humidity), and -for EMCS only- connectors to fresh and waste water reservoirs. The experiment hardware inside the containers will be developed by the user, but ESA conducted a feasibility study for several kinds of Experiment Support Equipment with potential use for research on small animals: design concepts for experiments with insects, with aquatic organisms like rotifers and nematodes, and with small aquatic animals (sea urchin larvae, tadpoles, fish youngsters) are described in detail in this presentation. Also ESA's initial steps to support experiments with rodents on the Space Station are presented.

  8. Pain control in small animalsControle da dor em pequenos animais

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Duarte Penter

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Pain is an unpleasant sensory or emotional experience that follows the application of a noxious stimulus. Can be experienced with or without the concomitant occurrence of physical stress signs, which occurs frequently in animals caused by trauma, systemic disease or surgical procedures. The control depends on length, where there are painful impulses and mental status of the animal. It is an important clinical condition, resulting in suffer that will affect quality life. This paper is a review of pathophysiology and pain control in small animals.A dor é uma experiência sensorial ou emocional desagradável que se segue à aplicação de um estímulo nocivo. Pode ser vivenciada com ou sem o acontecimento concomitante de sinais físicos de estresse, trauma, doença sistêmica ou procedimento cirúrgico. Seu controle depende de sua duração, de onde surgem os impulsos dolorosos e do estado de consciência do animal. É uma condição clinicamente importante, que resulta em sofrimento e afeta a qualidade de vida dos animais. O objetivo deste trabalho é a revisão da fisiopatologia e controle da dor em pequenos animais.

  9. A new low-turbulence wind tunnel for animal and small vehicle flight experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Daniel B.; Watts, Anthony; Nagle, Tony; Lentink, David

    2017-03-01

    Our understanding of animal flight benefits greatly from specialized wind tunnels designed for flying animals. Existing facilities can simulate laminar flow during straight, ascending and descending flight, as well as at different altitudes. However, the atmosphere in which animals fly is even more complex. Flow can be laminar and quiet at high altitudes but highly turbulent near the ground, and gusts can rapidly change wind speed. To study flight in both laminar and turbulent environments, a multi-purpose wind tunnel for studying animal and small vehicle flight was built at Stanford University. The tunnel is closed-circuit and can produce airspeeds up to 50 m s-1 in a rectangular test section that is 1.0 m wide, 0.82 m tall and 1.73 m long. Seamless honeycomb and screens in the airline together with a carefully designed contraction reduce centreline turbulence intensities to less than or equal to 0.030% at all operating speeds. A large diameter fan and specialized acoustic treatment allow the tunnel to operate at low noise levels of 76.4 dB at 20 m s-1. To simulate high turbulence, an active turbulence grid can increase turbulence intensities up to 45%. Finally, an open jet configuration enables stereo high-speed fluoroscopy for studying musculoskeletal control in turbulent flow.

  10. Application study of the optical biopsy system for small experimental animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Hidetoshi; Suzuki, Toshiaki; Morita, Shin-ichi; Maruyama, Atsushi; Shimosegawa, Toru; Matsuura, Yuji; Kanai, Gen'ichi; Ura, Nobuo; Masutani, Koji; Ozaki, Yukihiro

    2008-02-01

    An optical biopsy system for small experimental animals has been developed. The system includes endoscope probe, portable probe and two kinds of miniaturized Raman probes. The micro Raman probe (MRP) is made of optical fibers and the ball lens hollow optical fiber Raman probe (BHRP) is made of hollow fiber. The former has large focal depth and suitable to measure average spectra of subsurface tissue. The latter has rather small focal depth and it is possible to control focal length by selecting ball lens attached at the probe head. It is suitable to survey materials at the fixed depth in the tissue. The system is applied to study various small animal cancer models, such as esophagus and stomach rat models and subcutaneous mouse models of pancreatic cancers. In the studies of subcutaneous tumor model mouse, it is suggested that protein conformational changes occur in the tumor tissue within few minutes after euthanasia of the mouse. No more change is observed for the following ten minutes. Any alterations in the molecular level are not observed in normal skin, muscle tissues. Since the change completes in such a short time, it is suggested that this phenomenon caused by termination of blood circulation.

  11. Validation of fast Monte Carlo dose calculation in small animal radiotherapy with EBT3 radiochromic films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noblet, C.; Chiavassa, S.; Smekens, F.; Sarrut, D.; Passal, V.; Suhard, J.; Lisbona, A.; Paris, F.; Delpon, G.

    2016-05-01

    In preclinical studies, the absorbed dose calculation accuracy in small animals is fundamental to reliably investigate and understand observed biological effects. This work investigated the use of the split exponential track length estimator (seTLE), a new kerma based Monte Carlo dose calculation method for preclinical radiotherapy using a small animal precision micro irradiator, the X-RAD 225Cx. Monte Carlo modelling of the irradiator with GATE/GEANT4 was extensively evaluated by comparing measurements and simulations for half-value layer, percent depth dose, off-axis profiles and output factors in water and water-equivalent material for seven circular fields, from 20 mm down to 1 mm in diameter. Simulated and measured dose distributions in cylinders of water obtained for a 360° arc were also compared using dose, distance-to-agreement and gamma-index maps. Simulations and measurements agreed within 3% for all static beam configurations, with uncertainties estimated to 1% for the simulation and 3% for the measurements. Distance-to-agreement accuracy was better to 0.14 mm. For the arc irradiations, gamma-index maps of 2D dose distributions showed that the success rate was higher than 98%, except for the 0.1 cm collimator (92%). Using the seTLE method, MC simulations compute 3D dose distributions within minutes for realistic beam configurations with a clinically acceptable accuracy for beam diameter as small as 1 mm.

  12. [The small pox vaccine: its first century in Brazil (from the Jennerian to the animal vaccine)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, T

    1999-01-01

    Covering a period of roughly hundred years, the article looks at some of the more meaningful events during the period in which the small pox vaccine was institutionalized in Brazil. Discoveries and discussions then taking place in other countries are also examined, particularly as they influenced Brazil. The process is followed from introduction of the human vaccine to the arrival of the animal vaccine and creation of the Municipal Vaccine Institute--a private initative by physician Pedro Affonso Franco, also known as the barao de Pedro Affonso. Adoption of the animal vaccine not only represented progress in controlling the disease but also spurred discussions that saw medical and political groups in Brazil taking sides with either Oswaldo Cruz or the barao de Pedro Affonso. The debate continued within the academic and political arenas until the Vaccine Institute was made part of the Manguinhos laboratories.

  13. Effect of ultra-high pressure on small animals, tardigrades and Artemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fumihisa Ono

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This research shows that small animals, tardigrades (Milnesium tardigradum in tun (dehydrated state and Artemia salina cists (dried eggs can tolerate the very high hydrostatic pressure of 7.5 GPa. It was really surprising that living organisms can survive after exposure to such a high pressure. We extended these studies to the extremely high pressure of 20 GPa by using a Kawai-type octahedral anvil press. After exposure to this pressure for 30 min, the tardigrades were soaked in pure water and investigated under a microscope. Their bodies regained metabolic state and no serious injury could be seen. But they were not alive. A few of Artemia eggs went part of the way to hatching after soaked in sea water, but they never grew any further. Comparing with the case of blue-green alga, these animals are weaker under ultra-high pressure.

  14. RFID Technology for Continuous Monitoring of Physiological Signals in Small Animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volk, Tobias; Gorbey, Stefan; Bhattacharyya, Mayukh; Gruenwald, Waldemar; Lemmer, Björn; Reindl, Leonhard M; Stieglitz, Thomas; Jansen, Dirk

    2015-02-01

    Telemetry systems enable researchers to continuously monitor physiological signals in unrestrained, freely moving small rodents. Drawbacks of common systems are limited operation time, the need to house the animals separately, and the necessity of a stable communication link. Furthermore, the costs of the typically proprietary telemetry systems reduce the acceptance. The aim of this paper is to introduce a low-cost telemetry system based on common radio frequency identification technology optimized for battery-independent operational time, good reusability, and flexibility. The presented implant is equipped with sensors to measure electrocardiogram, arterial blood pressure, and body temperature. The biological signals are transmitted as digital data streams. The device is able of monitoring several freely moving animals housed in groups with a single reader station. The modular concept of the system significantly reduces the costs to monitor multiple physiological functions and refining procedures in preclinical research.

  15. Optically detunable, inductively coupled coil for self-gating in small animal magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korn, Matthias; Umathum, Reiner; Schulz, Jessica; Semmler, Wolfhard; Bock, Michael

    2011-03-01

    An inductively coupled coil concept is presented, which improves the compensation of physiological motion by the self-gating (SG) technique. The animal is positioned in a conventional volume coil encompassing the whole animal. A small, resonant surface coil (SG-coil) is placed on the thorax so that its sensitive region includes the heart. Via inductive coupling the SG-coil amplifies selectively the MR signal of the beating heart. With an optical detuning mechanism, this coupling can be switched off during acquisition of the MR image information, whereas it is active during SG data sampling to provide the physiological information. In vivo experiments on a mouse show an amplification of the SG signal by at least 40%. Copyright © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  16. Fully automated intrinsic respiratory and cardiac gating for small animal CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuntz, J; Baeuerle, T; Semmler, W; Bartling, S H [Department of Medical Physics in Radiology, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Dinkel, J [Department of Radiology, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Zwick, S [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Medical Physics, Freiburg University (Germany); Grasruck, M [Siemens Healthcare, Forchheim (Germany); Kiessling, F [Chair of Experimental Molecular Imaging, RWTH-Aachen University, Medical Faculty, Aachen (Germany); Gupta, R [Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)], E-mail: j.kuntz@dkfz.de

    2010-04-07

    A fully automated, intrinsic gating algorithm for small animal cone-beam CT is described and evaluated. A parameter representing the organ motion, derived from the raw projection images, is used for both cardiac and respiratory gating. The proposed algorithm makes it possible to reconstruct motion-corrected still images as well as to generate four-dimensional (4D) datasets representing the cardiac and pulmonary anatomy of free-breathing animals without the use of electrocardiogram (ECG) or respiratory sensors. Variation analysis of projections from several rotations is used to place a region of interest (ROI) on the diaphragm. The ROI is cranially extended to include the heart. The centre of mass (COM) variation within this ROI, the filtered frequency response and the local maxima are used to derive a binary motion-gating parameter for phase-sensitive gated reconstruction. This algorithm was implemented on a flat-panel-based cone-beam CT scanner and evaluated using a moving phantom and animal scans (seven rats and eight mice). Volumes were determined using a semiautomatic segmentation. In all cases robust gating signals could be obtained. The maximum volume error in phantom studies was less than 6%. By utilizing extrinsic gating via externally placed cardiac and respiratory sensors, the functional parameters (e.g. cardiac ejection fraction) and image quality were equivalent to this current gold standard. This algorithm obviates the necessity of both gating hardware and user interaction. The simplicity of the proposed algorithm enables adoption in a wide range of small animal cone-beam CT scanners.

  17. Annular phased array transducer for preclinical testing of anti-cancer drug efficacy on small animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kujawska, Tamara; Secomski, Wojciech; Byra, Michał; Postema, Michiel; Nowicki, Andrzej

    2017-04-01

    A technique using pulsed High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) to destroy deep-seated solid tumors is a promising noninvasive therapeutic approach. A main purpose of this study was to design and test a HIFU transducer suitable for preclinical studies of efficacy of tested, anti-cancer drugs, activated by HIFU beams, in the treatment of a variety of solid tumors implanted to various organs of small animals at the depth of the order of 1-2cm under the skin. To allow focusing of the beam, generated by such transducer, within treated tissue at different depths, a spherical, 2-MHz, 29-mm diameter annular phased array transducer was designed and built. To prove its potential for preclinical studies on small animals, multiple thermal lesions were induced in a pork loin ex vivo by heating beams of the same: 6W, or 12W, or 18W acoustic power and 25mm, 30mm, and 35mm focal lengths. Time delay for each annulus was controlled electronically to provide beam focusing within tissue at the depths of 10mm, 15mm, and 20mm. The exposure time required to induce local necrosis was determined at different depths using thermocouples. Location and extent of thermal lesions determined from numerical simulations were compared with those measured using ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging techniques and verified by a digital caliper after cutting the tested tissue samples. Quantitative analysis of the results showed that the location and extent of necrotic lesions on the magnetic resonance images are consistent with those predicted numerically and measured by caliper. The edges of lesions were clearly outlined although on ultrasound images they were fuzzy. This allows to conclude that the use of the transducer designed offers an effective noninvasive tool not only to induce local necrotic lesions within treated tissue without damaging the surrounding tissue structures but also to test various chemotherapeutics activated by the HIFU beams in preclinical studies on small animals.

  18. Performance evaluation of a very high resolution small animal PET imager using silicon scatter detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sang-June; Rogers, W. Leslie; Huh, Sam; Kagan, Harris; Honscheid, Klaus; Burdette, Don; Chesi, Enrico; Lacasta, Carlos; Llosa, Gabriela; Mikuz, Marko; Studen, Andrej; Weilhammer, Peter; Clinthorne, Neal H.

    2007-05-01

    A very high resolution positron emission tomography (PET) scanner for small animal imaging based on the idea of inserting a ring of high-granularity solid-state detectors into a conventional PET scanner is under investigation. A particularly interesting configuration of this concept, which takes the form of a degenerate Compton camera, is shown capable of providing sub-millimeter resolution with good sensitivity. We present a Compton PET system and estimate its performance using a proof-of-concept prototype. A prototype single-slice imaging instrument was constructed with two silicon detectors 1 mm thick, each having 512 1.4 mm × 1.4 mm pads arranged in a 32 × 16 array. The silicon detectors were located edgewise on opposite sides and flanked by two non-position sensitive BGO detectors. The scanner performance was measured for its sensitivity, energy, timing, spatial resolution and resolution uniformity. Using the experimental scanner, energy resolution for the silicon detectors is 1%. However, system energy resolution is dominated by the 23% FWHM BGO resolution. Timing resolution for silicon is 82.1 ns FWHM due to time-walk in trigger devices. Using the scattered photons, time resolution between the BGO detectors is 19.4 ns FWHM. Image resolution of 980 µm FWHM at the center of the field-of-view (FOV) is obtained from a 1D profile of a 0.254 mm diameter 18F line source image reconstructed using the conventional 2D filtered back-projection (FBP). The 0.4 mm gap between two line sources is resolved in the image reconstructed with both FBP and the maximum likelihood expectation maximization (ML-EM) algorithm. The experimental instrument demonstrates sub-millimeter resolution. A prototype having sensitivity high enough for initial small animal images can be used for in vivo studies of small animal models of metabolism, molecular mechanism and the development of new radiotracers.

  19. Position-Sensitive Detector with Depth-of-Interaction Determination for Small Animal PET

    CERN Document Server

    Fedorov, A; Kholmetsky, A L; Korzhik, M V; Lecoq, P; Lobko, A S; Missevitch, O V; Tkatchev, A

    2002-01-01

    Crystal arrays made of LSO and LuAP crystals 2x2x10 mm pixels were manufactured for evaluation of detector with depth-of-interaction (DOI) determination capability intended for small animal positron emission tomograph. Position-sensitive LSO/LuAP phoswich DOI detector based on crystal 8x8 arrays and HAMAMATSU R5900-00-M64 position-sensitive multi-anode photomultiplier tube was developed and evaluated. Time resolution was found to be not worse than 1.0 ns FWHM for both layers, and spatial resolution mean value was 1.5 mm FWHM for the center of field-of-view.

  20. VrPET/CT: development of a rotating multimodality scanner for small-animal imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Lage, Eduardo; Vaquero, Juan José; Sisniega, Alejandro; España, Manuel; Tapias, Gustavo; Udías, Ángel; García,Verónica; Rodríguez-Ruano, Alexia; Desco, Manuel

    2008-01-01

    Proceeding of: 2008 IEEE Nuclear Science Symposium Conference Record (NSS '08), Dresden, Germany, 19-25 Oct. 2008 This work reports on the development and evaluation of the PET component of a PETtCT system for small-animal in-vivo imaging. The PET and CT subsystems are assembled in a rotary gantry in such a way that the center of rotation for both imaging modalities is mechanically aligned. The PET scanner configuration is based on 2 detector modules, each of which consis...

  1. Performance analysis of a low-cost small animal PET/SPECT scanner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guerra, Pedro [B104 ETS de Telecomuniacion, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, 28040 Madrid (Spain)]. E-mail: pguerra@die.upm.es; Rubio, Jose L. [B104 ETS de Telecomuniacion, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Ortuno, Juan E. [B104 ETS de Telecomuniacion, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Kontaxakis, Georgios [B104 ETS de Telecomuniacion, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Ledesma, Maria J. [B104 ETS de Telecomuniacion, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Santos, Andres [B104 ETS de Telecomuniacion, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2007-02-01

    In this work the performance of novel small animal positron/single-photon emission (PET/SPECT) scanner is estimated via Monte Carlo simulation, considering a YAP/LSO phoswich detector. To overcome the differences between PET and SPECT and in order to simplify the design, the system implements most signal processing digitally with programmable devices. The estimated performance of the described setup, expressed in terms of spatial image resolution and sensitivity, is 1.4 mm/0.6% for PET and 2.5 mm/0.025% for SPECT, figures that are comparable with state of the art dedicated scanners.

  2. Animals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨光

    2000-01-01

    The largest animal ever to live on the earth is the blue whale(蓝鲸)It weighs about 80 tons--more than 24 elephants. It is more than 30 metres long. A newborn baby whale weighs as much as a big elephant.

  3. Animal models for small for gestational age and fetal programming of adult disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuguin, Patricia M

    2007-01-01

    Fetal growth retardation is a fetal adaptation in response to inadequate supply of oxygen and/or nutrients. Animal models of intrauterine growth retardation are an invaluable tool to question the genetic, molecular and cellular events that determine fetal growth and development. Rodent and non-litter bearing animals are mammalian system with similar embryology,anatomy and physiology to humans. Utilization of these systems has led to a greater understanding of the pathophysiology and consequences of intrauterine growth retardation. These observations are comparable to that observed in humans born small for gestational age, and are of interest because of the known association between poor fetal growth and development of adult disease. All the experimental manipulations described here have altered a number of metabolic and physiological variables, but the pattern of alterations seems to vary with the procedure and species employed. This review describes animal models for intrauterine growth retardation and assesses their potentials and limitations at aiming to improve strategies for the prevention of adult disease.

  4. An experimental cone-beam micro-CT system for small animal imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Shouping; Tian, Jie; Yan, Guorui; Qin, Chenghu; Liu, Junting

    2009-02-01

    An experimental cone-beam Micro-CT system for small animal imaging is presented in the paper. The system is designed to obtain high-resolution anatomic information and will be integrated with our bioluminescence tomography system. A flat panel X-ray detector (CMOS technology with a column CsI scintillator plate, 50 micron pixel size, 120 mm × 120 mm photodiode area) and a micro-focus X-ray source (13 to 40 μm of focal spot size) are used in the system. The object (mouse or rat) is placed on a three-degree (two translations and one rotation) programming stage and could be located to an accurate position in front of the detector. The large field of view (FOV) of the system allows us to acquire the whole body imaging of a normal mouse in one scanning which usually takes about 6 to 15 minutes. Raw data from X-ray detector show spatial variation caused by dark image offset, pixel gain and defective pixels, therefore data pre-processing is needed before reconstruction. Geometry calibrations are also used to reduce the artifacts caused by geometric misalignment. In order to accelerate FDK filtered backprojection method, we develop a reconstruction software using GPU hardware in our system. System spacial resolution and image uniformity and voxel noise have been assessed and mouse reconstruction images are illuminated in the paper. Experiment results show that this system is suitable for small animal imaging.

  5. Small-animal tomography with a liquid-metal-jet x-ray source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsson, D. H.; Lundström, U.; Westermark, U.; Takman, P. A. C.; Burvall, A.; Arsenian Henriksson, M.; Hertz, H. M.

    2012-03-01

    X-ray tomography of small animals is an important tool for medical research. For high-resolution x-ray imaging of few-cm-thick samples such as, e.g., mice, high-brightness x-ray sources with energies in the few-10-keV range are required. In this paper we perform the first small-animal imaging and tomography experiments using liquid-metal-jet-anode x-ray sources. This type of source shows promise to increase the brightness of microfocus x-ray systems, but present sources are typically optimized for an energy of 9 keV. Here we describe the details of a high-brightness 24-keV electron-impact laboratory microfocus x-ray source based on continuous operation of a heated liquid-In/Ga-jet anode. The source normally operates with 40 W of electron-beam power focused onto the metal jet, producing a 7×7 μm2 FWHM x-ray spot. The peak spectral brightness is 4 × 109 photons / ( s × mm2 × mrad2 × 0.1%BW) at the 24.2 keV In Kα line. We use the new In/Ga source and an existing Ga/In/Sn source for high-resolution imaging and tomography of mice.

  6. Mid-Range Coil Array for Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Small Animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solis, S. E.; Tomasi, D.; Rodríguez, A. O.

    2008-08-01

    The vast majority of articles on MRI RF coils over the past two decades have focused on large coils, where sample losses dominate, or on micro-coils, where sample and capacitor losses are negligible. Few have addressed the mid-range coils, seen in the majority of small-animal applications, where all the sources of loss are important, for example, mouse brain and body coils from 125 to 750 MHz. We developed a four-saddle coil array for magnetic resonance imaging of small animals. The saddle coil elements in the array were evenly distributed to cover the rat's head. The coil array was tuned to the resonant frequency of 170 MHz. Due to the close proximity of the coil elements, it was necessary to decouple the coil array using nonmagnetic trimmers and, it was operated in the transceiver mode and quadrature-driven. To test the coil array performance at high field, phantom images were acquired with our saddle coil array and standard pulse sequences on a research-dedicated 4 Tesla scanner. Ex vivo brain images of a rat were also acquired, and proved the feasibility of the scaled version of a saddle coil array and, its compatibility with standard pulse sequences when used in a high field magnetic resonance imager.

  7. Online virtual isocenter based radiation field targeting for high performance small animal microirradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, James M. P.; Ansell, Steve; Lindsay, Patricia E.; Jaffray, David A.

    2015-12-01

    Advances in precision microirradiators for small animal radiation oncology studies have provided the framework for novel translational radiobiological studies. Such systems target radiation fields at the scale required for small animal investigations, typically through a combination of on-board computed tomography image guidance and fixed, interchangeable collimators. Robust targeting accuracy of these radiation fields remains challenging, particularly at the millimetre scale field sizes achievable by the majority of microirradiators. Consistent and reproducible targeting accuracy is further hindered as collimators are removed and inserted during a typical experimental workflow. This investigation quantified this targeting uncertainty and developed an online method based on a virtual treatment isocenter to actively ensure high performance targeting accuracy for all radiation field sizes. The results indicated that the two-dimensional field placement uncertainty was as high as 1.16 mm at isocenter, with simulations suggesting this error could be reduced to 0.20 mm using the online correction method. End-to-end targeting analysis of a ball bearing target on radiochromic film sections showed an improved targeting accuracy with the three-dimensional vector targeting error across six different collimators reduced from 0.56+/- 0.05 mm (mean  ±  SD) to 0.05+/- 0.05 mm for an isotropic imaging voxel size of 0.1 mm.

  8. Potential Applications of Flat-Panel Volumetric CT in Morphologic, Functional Small Animal Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanne Greschus

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Noninvasive radiologic imaging has recently gained considerable interest in basic, preclinical research for monitoring disease progression, therapeutic efficacy. In this report, we introduce flat-panel volumetric computed tomography (fpVCT as a powerful new tool for noninvasive imaging of different organ systems in preclinical research. The three-dimensional visualization that is achieved by isotropic high-resolution datasets is illustrated for the skeleton, chest, abdominal organs, brain of mice. The high image quality of chest scans enables the visualization of small lung nodules in an orthotopic lung cancer model, the reliable imaging of therapy side effects such as lung fibrosis. Using contrast-enhanced scans, fpVCT displayed the vascular trees of the brain, liver, kidney down to the subsegmental level. Functional application of fpVCT in dynamic contrast-enhanced scans of the rat brain delivered physiologically reliable data of perfusion, tissue blood volume. Beyond scanning of small animal models as demonstrated here, fpVCT provides the ability to image animals up to the size of primates.

  9. Exprerimental Evaluation of a Dedicated Pinhole SPECT System for Small Animal Imaging and Scintimammography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Loudos

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Nuclear medicine (SPECT and PET provides functional information, which is complementary to the structural. In cancer imaging radiopharmaceuticals allow visualization of cancer cells functionality, thus small cell population can be imaged. This allows early diagnosis, as well as fast assessment of response to therapy. Our system is a single head gamma camera based on an R3292 position sensitive photomultiplier tube (PSPMT, coupled to a 10cm in diameter CsI:Tl crystal. We have assessed two CsI:Tl crystals with pixel size of 2x2mm2 and 3x3mm2 respectively. Three collimators were tested: a a hexagonal, 1.1mm in diameter, general purpose parallel hole collimator b a 1mm pinhole and c a 2mm pinhole. Systems were tested using capillary phantoms. All measurements were carried out in photon counting mode with gamma radiation produced by 99mTc. Using the 2x2mm2 crystal and the 1mm pinhole collimator - a resolution better than 1mm was achieved. This allows very detailed imaging of small animals. Using the 3x3mm2 and the 2mm pinhole collimator a resolution of 1.3mm was possible with suitable sensitivity for breast imaging. Those results indicate that this system is suitable for animal and breast studies. The next step will be clinical evaluation of the camera.

  10. Small animal imaging by single photon emission using pinhole and coded aperture collimation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garibaldi, F.; Accorsi, R.; Cinti, M.N.; Colilli, S.; Cusanno, F.; De Vincentis, G.; Fortuna, A.; Girolami, B.; Giuliani, F.; Gricia, M.; Lanza, R.; Loizzo, A.; Loizzo, S.; Lucentini, M.; Majewski, S.; Santavenere, F.; Pani, R.; Pellegrini, R.; Signore, A.; Scopinaro, F.

    2005-06-01

    The aim of this paper is to investigate the basic properties and limits of the small animal imaging systems based on single photon detectors. The detectors for radio imaging of small animals are challenging because of the very high spatial resolution needed, possibly coupled with high efficiency to allow dynamic studies. These performances are hardly attainable with single photon technique because of the collimator that limits both spatial resolution and sensitivity. In this paper we describe a simple desktop detector based on pixellated NaI(Tl) scintillator array coupled with a pinhole collimator and a PSPMT, the Hamamatsu R2486. The limits of such systems as well as the way to overcome them will be shown. In fact better light sampling at the anode level would allow better pixel identification for higher number of pixel that is one of the parameters defining the image quality. Also the spatial resolution would improve. The performances of such layout are compared with others using PSPMTs differing from R2486 for the light sampling at the anode level and different areas. We show how a further step, namely the substitution of the pinhole collimator with a coded aperture, will allow a great improvement in system sensitivity while maintaining very good spatial resolution, possibly submillimetric. Calculations and simulations show that sensitivity would improve by a factor of 50.

  11. Development of an Extracorporeal Perfusion Device for Small Animal Free Flaps.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas M Fichter

    Full Text Available Extracorporeal perfusion (ECP might prolong the vital storage capabilities of composite free flaps, potentially opening a wide range of clinical applications. Aim of the study was the development a validated low-cost extracorporeal perfusion model for further research in small animal free flaps.After establishing optimal perfusion settings, a specially designed extracorporeal perfusion system was evaluated during 8-hour perfusion of rat epigastric flaps followed by microvascular free flap transfer. Controls comprised sham-operation, ischemia and in vivo perfusion. Flaps and perfusate (diluted blood were closely monitored by blood gas analysis, combined laser Doppler flowmetry and remission spectroscopy and Indocyanine-Green angiography. Evaluations were complemented by assessment of necrotic area and light microscopy at day 7.ECP was established and maintained for 8 hours with constant potassium and pH levels. Subsequent flap transfer was successful. Notably, the rate of necrosis of extracorporeally perfused flaps (27% was even lower than after in vivo perfusion (49%, although not statistically significant (P = 0,083. After sham-operation, only 6% of the total flap area became necrotic, while 8-hour ischemia led to total flap loss (98%. Angiographic and histological findings confirmed these observations.Vital storage capabilities of microvascular flaps can be prolonged by temporary ECP. Our study provides important insights on the pathophysiological processes during extracorporeal tissue perfusion and provides a validated small animal perfusion model for further studies.

  12. Small Animal Models for Human Metapneumovirus: Cotton Rat is More Permissive than Hamster and Mouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Zhang

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Human metapneumovirus (hMPV is the second most prevalent causative agent of pediatric respiratory infections worldwide. Currently, there are no vaccines or antiviral drugs against this virus. One of the major hurdles in hMPV research is the difficulty to identify a robust small animal model to accurately evaluate the efficacy and safety of vaccines and therapeutics. In this study, we compared the replication and pathogenesis of hMPV in BALB/c mice, Syrian golden hamsters, and cotton rats. It was found that BALB/c mice are not permissive for hMPV infection despite the use of a high dose (6.5 log10 PFU of virus for intranasal inoculation. In hamsters, hMPV replicated efficiently in nasal turbinates but demonstrated only limited replication in lungs. In cotton rats, hMPV replicated efficiently in both nasal turbinate and lung when intranasally administered with three different doses (4, 5, and 6 log10 PFU of hMPV. Lungs of cotton rats infected by hMPV developed interstitial pneumonia with mononuclear cells infiltrates and increased lumen exudation. By immunohistochemistry, viral antigens were detected at the luminal surfaces of the bronchial epithelial cells in lungs. Vaccination of cotton rats with hMPV completely protected upper and lower respiratory tract from wildtype challenge. The immunization also elicited elevated serum neutralizing antibody. Collectively, these results demonstrated that cotton rat is a robust small animal model for hMPV infection.

  13. Leptospirosis in a small animal veterinarian: reminder to follow standardized infection control procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baer, R; Turnberg, W; Yu, D; Wohrle, R

    2010-06-01

    A small animal veterinarian in Washington State developed leptospirosis after an occupational exposure. Approximately 10 days prior to the onset of illness, he examined a healthy appearing pet rat for fleas, which urinated on his un-gloved hands. Although the veterinarian washed his hands after the examination, his hands had abrasions from gardening. The veterinarian was hospitalized for 12 days and was able to return to work part-time 1 month following discharge. This illness may have been prevented if the veterinarian had been wearing gloves during the examination as recommended by the National Association of State Public Health Veterinarians (NASPHV), Veterinary Infection Control Committee, in its Compendium of Veterinary Standard Precautions for Zoonotic Disease Prevention in Veterinary Personnel (2008). This case alerts us to the need for small animal veterinarians to minimize their infection risk by practising recommended infection control procedures. Veterinarians should establish and follow a written infection control plan based on the standardized infection control approach adopted by the NASPHV to minimize their risk of occupational zoonotic infections.

  14. Development of an Extracorporeal Perfusion Device for Small Animal Free Flaps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fichter, Andreas M.; Ritschl, Lucas M.; Borgmann, Anna; Humbs, Martin; Luppa, Peter B.; Wolff, Klaus-Dietrich; Mücke, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Background Extracorporeal perfusion (ECP) might prolong the vital storage capabilities of composite free flaps, potentially opening a wide range of clinical applications. Aim of the study was the development a validated low-cost extracorporeal perfusion model for further research in small animal free flaps. Methods After establishing optimal perfusion settings, a specially designed extracorporeal perfusion system was evaluated during 8-hour perfusion of rat epigastric flaps followed by microvascular free flap transfer. Controls comprised sham-operation, ischemia and in vivo perfusion. Flaps and perfusate (diluted blood) were closely monitored by blood gas analysis, combined laser Doppler flowmetry and remission spectroscopy and Indocyanine-Green angiography. Evaluations were complemented by assessment of necrotic area and light microscopy at day 7. Results ECP was established and maintained for 8 hours with constant potassium and pH levels. Subsequent flap transfer was successful. Notably, the rate of necrosis of extracorporeally perfused flaps (27%) was even lower than after in vivo perfusion (49%), although not statistically significant (P = 0,083). After sham-operation, only 6% of the total flap area became necrotic, while 8-hour ischemia led to total flap loss (98%). Angiographic and histological findings confirmed these observations. Conclusions Vital storage capabilities of microvascular flaps can be prolonged by temporary ECP. Our study provides important insights on the pathophysiological processes during extracorporeal tissue perfusion and provides a validated small animal perfusion model for further studies. PMID:26808996

  15. Open-source, small-animal magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poorman, Megan E; Chaplin, Vandiver L; Wilkens, Ken; Dockery, Mary D; Giorgio, Todd D; Grissom, William A; Caskey, Charles F

    2016-01-01

    MR-guided focused ultrasound or high-intensity focused ultrasound (MRgFUS/MRgHIFU) is a non-invasive therapeutic modality with many potential applications in areas such as cancer therapy, drug delivery, and blood-brain barrier opening. However, the large financial costs involved in developing preclinical MRgFUS systems represent a barrier to research groups interested in developing new techniques and applications. We aim to mitigate these challenges by detailing a validated, open-source preclinical MRgFUS system capable of delivering thermal and mechanical FUS in a quantifiable and repeatable manner under real-time MRI guidance. A hardware and software package was developed that includes closed-loop feedback controlled thermometry code and CAD drawings for a therapy table designed for a preclinical MRI scanner. For thermal treatments, the modular software uses a proportional integral derivative controller to maintain a precise focal temperature rise in the target given input from MR phase images obtained concurrently. The software computes the required voltage output and transmits it to a FUS transducer that is embedded in the delivery table within the magnet bore. The delivery table holds the FUS transducer, a small animal and its monitoring equipment, and a transmit/receive RF coil. The transducer is coupled to the animal via a water bath and is translatable in two dimensions from outside the magnet. The transducer is driven by a waveform generator and amplifier controlled by real-time software in Matlab. MR acoustic radiation force imaging is also implemented to confirm the position of the focus for mechanical and thermal treatments. The system was validated in tissue-mimicking phantoms and in vivo during murine tumor hyperthermia treatments. Sonications were successfully controlled over a range of temperatures and thermal doses for up to 20 min with minimal temperature overshoot. MR thermometry was validated with an optical temperature probe, and focus

  16. Evaluation of attenuation and scatter correction requirements in small animal PET and SPECT imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konik, Arda Bekir

    Positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission tomography (SPECT) are two nuclear emission-imaging modalities that rely on the detection of high-energy photons emitted from radiotracers administered to the subject. The majority of these photons are attenuated (absorbed or scattered) in the body, resulting in count losses or deviations from true detection, which in turn degrades the accuracy of images. In clinical emission tomography, sophisticated correction methods are often required employing additional x-ray CT or radionuclide transmission scans. Having proven their potential in both clinical and research areas, both PET and SPECT are being adapted for small animal imaging. However, despite the growing interest in small animal emission tomography, little scientific information exists about the accuracy of these correction methods on smaller size objects, and what level of correction is required. The purpose of this work is to determine the role of attenuation and scatter corrections as a function of object size through simulations. The simulations were performed using Interactive Data Language (IDL) and a Monte Carlo based package, Geant4 application for emission tomography (GATE). In IDL simulations, PET and SPECT data acquisition were modeled in the presence of attenuation. A mathematical emission and attenuation phantom approximating a thorax slice and slices from real PET/CT data were scaled to 5 different sizes (i.e., human, dog, rabbit, rat and mouse). The simulated emission data collected from these objects were reconstructed. The reconstructed images, with and without attenuation correction, were compared to the ideal (i.e., non-attenuated) reconstruction. Next, using GATE, scatter fraction values (the ratio of the scatter counts to the total counts) of PET and SPECT scanners were measured for various sizes of NEMA (cylindrical phantoms representing small animals and human), MOBY (realistic mouse/rat model) and XCAT (realistic human model

  17. A Modified Carbon Monoxide Breath Test for Measuring Erythrocyte Lifespan in Small Animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong-Jian Ma

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was to develop a CO breath test for RBC lifespan estimation of small animals. The ribavirin induced hemolysis rabbit models were placed individually in a closed rebreath cage and air samples were collected for measurement of CO concentration. RBC lifespan was calculated from accumulated CO, blood volume, and hemoglobin concentration data. RBC lifespan was determined in the same animals with the standard biotin-labeling method. RBC lifespan data obtained by the CO breath test method for control (CON, 49.0±5.9 d rabbits, rabbits given 10 mg/kg·d−1 of ribavirin (RIB10, 31.0±4.0 d, and rabbits given 20 mg/kg·d−1 of ribavirin (RIB20, 25.0±2.9 d were statistically similar (all p>0.05 to and linearly correlated (r=0.96, p<0.01 with the RBC lifespan data obtained for the same rabbits by the standard biotin-labeling method (CON, 51.0±2.7 d; RIB10, 33.0±1.3 d; and RIB20, 27.0±0.8 d. The CO breath test method takes less than 3 h to complete, whereas the standard method requires at least several weeks. In conclusion, the CO breath test method provides a simple and rapid means of estimating RBC lifespan and is feasible for use with small animal models.

  18. Vermicomposting as manure management strategy for urban small-holder animal farms – Kampala case study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lalander, Cecilia Helena, E-mail: cecilia.lalander@slu.se [Department of Energy and Technology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala (Sweden); Komakech, Allan John [Department of Energy and Technology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala (Sweden); Department of Agricultural & Bio-systems Engineering, Makerere University, Kampala (Uganda); Vinnerås, Björn [Department of Energy and Technology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala (Sweden)

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • Poor manure management can increase burden of disease and environmental impact. • A low-maintenance vermicompost reactor was set-up in Kampala, Uganda. • High material reduction (45.9%) and waste-to-biomass conversion (3.6% on a TS basis). • Five year return on investment of 275% of system in Uganda. • Technically and economically viable system for improved urban manure management. - Abstract: Inadequate organic waste management can contribute to the spread of diseases and have negative impacts on the environment. Vermicomposting organic waste could have dual beneficial effects by generating an economically viable animal feed protein in the form of worm biomass, while alleviating the negative effects of poor organic waste management. In this study, a low-maintenance vermicomposting system was evaluated as manure and food waste management system for small-holder farmers. A vermicomposting system using the earthworm species Eudrilus eugeniae and treating cow manure and food waste was set up in Kampala, Uganda, and monitored for 172 days. The material degradation and protein production rates were evaluated after 63 days and at the end of the experiment. The material reduction was 45.9% and the waste-to-biomass conversion rate was 3.5% in the vermicomposting process on a total solids basis. A possible increase in the conversion rate could be achieved by increasing the frequency of worm harvesting. Vermicomposting was found to be a viable manure management method in small-scale urban animal agriculture; the return of investment was calculated to be 280% for treating the manure of a 450 kg cow. The vermicompost was not sanitised, although hygiene quality could be improved by introducing a post-stabilisation step in which no fresh material is added. The value of the animal feed protein generated in the process can act as an incentive to improve current manure management strategies.

  19. Collimator optimization for small animal radiation therapy at a micro-CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Felix, Manuela C. [Heidelberg Univ., Mannheim (Germany). Medical Radiation Physics/Radiation Protection; Heidelberg Univ., Mannheim (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Glatting, Gerhard [Heidelberg Univ., Mannheim (Germany). Medical Radiation Physics/Radiation Protection; Giordano, Frank A.; Wenz, Frederik; Fleckenstein, Jens [Heidelberg Univ., Mannheim (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Brockmann, Marc A. [Heidelberg Univ., Mannheim (Germany). Dept. of Neuroradiology; University Medical Center Mainz (Germany). Dept. of Neuroradiology

    2017-05-01

    In radiation therapy of small animals treatment depths range from a few millimetres to several centimetres. In order to spare surrounding organs at risk steep dose gradients are necessary. To minimize the treatment time, and therefore the strain to the animals, a high dose rate is required. A description how these parameters can be optimized through an appropriate choice of collimators with different source surface distances (SSD) as well as different materials and geometries is presented. An industrial micro-CT unit (Y.Fox, YXLON GmbH, Hamburg, Germany) was converted into a precision irradiator for small animals. Different collimators of either stainless steel (Fe) with cylindrical bores (SSD = 42 mm) or tungsten (W) with conical bores (SSD = 14 mm) were evaluated. The dosimetry of very small radiation fields presents a challenge and was performed with GafChromic EBT3 films (Ashland, Vayne, KY, USA) in a water phantom. The films were calibrated with an ionization chamber in the uncollimated field. Treatments were performed via a rotation of the objects with a fixed radiation source. As expected, the shorter SSD of the W-collimators resulted in a (4.5 ± 1.6)-fold increase of the dose rates compared to the corresponding Fe-collimators. The ratios of the dose rates at 1 mm and 10 mm depth in the water phantom was (2.6 ± 0.2) for the Fe- and (4.5 ± 0.1) for the W-collimators. For rotational treatments in a cylindrical plastic phantom maximum dose rates of up to 1.2 Gy/min for Fe- and 5.1 Gy/min for W-collimators were measured. Choosing the smallest possible SSD leads to a high dose rate and a high surface dose, which is of advantage for the treatment of superficial target volumes. For larger SSD the dose rate is lower and the depth dose curve is shallower. This leads to a reduction of the surface dose and is best suited for treatments of deeper seated target volumes. Divergent collimator bores have, due to the reduced scatter within the collimators, a steeper

  20. The Aachen miniaturized heart-lung machine--first results in a small animal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnoering, Heike; Arens, Jutta; Sachweh, Joerg S; Veerman, Melanie; Tolba, Rene; Schmitz-Rode, Thomas; Steinseifer, Ulrich; Vazquez-Jimenez, Jaime F

    2009-11-01

    Congenital heart surgery most often incorporates extracorporeal circulation. Due to foreign surface contact and the administration of foreign blood in many children, inflammatory response and hemolysis are important matters of debate. This is particularly an issue in premature and low birth-weight newborns. Taking these considerations into account, the Aachen miniaturized heart-lung machine (MiniHLM) with a total static priming volume of 102 mL (including tubing) was developed and tested in a small animal model. Fourteen female Chinchilla Bastard rabbits were operated on using two different kinds of circuits. In eight animals, a conventional HLM with Dideco Kids oxygenator and Stöckert roller pump (Sorin group, Milan, Italy) was used, and the Aachen MiniHLM was employed in six animals. Outcome parameters were hemolysis and blood gas analysis including lactate. The rabbits were anesthetized, and a standard median sternotomy was performed. The ascending aorta and the right atrium were cannulated. After initiating cardiopulmonary bypass, the aorta was cross-clamped, and cardiac arrest was induced by blood cardioplegia. Blood samples for hemolysis and blood gas analysis were drawn before, during, and after cardiopulmonary bypass. After 1 h aortic clamp time, all animals were weaned from cardiopulmonary bypass. Blood gas analysis revealed adequate oxygenation and perfusion during cardiopulmonary bypass, irrespective of the employed perfusion system. The use of the Aachen MiniHLM resulted in a statistically significant reduced decrease in fibrinogen during cardiopulmonary bypass. A trend revealing a reduced increase in free hemoglobin during bypass in the MiniHLM group could also be observed. This newly developed Aachen MiniHLM with low priming volume, reduced hemolysis, and excellent gas transfer (O(2) and CO(2)) may reduce circuit-induced complications during heart surgery in neonates.

  1. ANIMALS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Mammals(哺乳动物)Mammals are the world's most dominant(最占优势的)animal.They are extremely(非常)diverse(多种多样的)creatures(生物,动物)that include(包括)the biggest ever animal (the blue whale鲸,which eats up to 6 tons every day),the smallest(leaf-nosed bat小蹄蝠) and the laziest(sloth树獭,who spends 80% of their time sleeping).There are over 4,600 kinds of mammals and they live in very different environments(环境)—oceans(海洋),rivers,the jungle(丛林),deserts,and plains(平原).

  2. The enigma of soil animal species diversity revisited: the role of small-scale heterogeneity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uffe N Nielsen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: "The enigma of soil animal species diversity" was the title of a popular article by J. M. Anderson published in 1975. In that paper, Anderson provided insights on the great richness of species found in soils, but emphasized that the mechanisms contributing to the high species richness belowground were largely unknown. Yet, exploration of the mechanisms driving species richness has focused, almost exclusively, on above-ground plant and animal communities, and nearly 35 years later we have several new hypotheses but are not much closer to revealing why soils are so rich in species. One persistent but untested hypothesis is that species richness is promoted by small-scale environmental heterogeneity. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To test this hypothesis we manipulated small-scale heterogeneity in soil properties in a one-year field experiment and investigated the impacts on the richness of soil fauna and evenness of the microbial communities. We found that heterogeneity substantially increased the species richness of oribatid mites, collembolans and nematodes, whereas heterogeneity had no direct influence on the evenness of either the fungal, bacterial or archaeal communities or on species richness of the large and mobile mesostigmatid mites. These results suggest that the heterogeneity-species richness relationship is scale dependent. CONCLUSIONS: Our results provide direct evidence for the hypothesis that small-scale heterogeneity in soils increase species richness of intermediate-sized soil fauna. The concordance of mechanisms between above and belowground communities suggests that the relationship between environmental heterogeneity and species richness may be a general property of ecological communities.

  3. A comprehensive system for dosimetric commissioning and Monte Carlo validation for the small animal radiation research platform

    OpenAIRE

    Tryggestad, E.; Armour, M.; Iordachita, I.; Verhaegen, F.; Wong, J W

    2009-01-01

    Our group has constructed the small animal radiation research platform (SARRP) for delivering focal, kilo-voltage radiation to targets in small animals under robotic control using cone-beam CT guidance. The present work was undertaken to support the SARRP’s treatment planning capabilities. We have devised a comprehensive system for characterizing the radiation dosimetry in water for the SARRP and have developed a Monte Carlo dose engine with the intent of reproducing these measured results. W...

  4. Biological effects of high-strength electric fields on small laboratory animals. Interim report, March 1, 1978-September 30, 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, R.D.; Anderson, L.E.; Kaune, W.T.

    1979-12-01

    Progress is described on a project assessing the biological effects of 60-Hz electric fields on small laboratory animals (rats and mice). The report includes sections on hematology and seram chemistry, immunology, pathology, metabolism, bone growth, endocrinology, cardiovascular function, neurophysiology, growth and development, and animal behavior. (ACR)

  5. Evaluation of Matrix9 silicon photomultiplier array for small-animal PET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Junwei; Schmall, Jeffrey P.; Yang, Yongfeng; Di, Kun; Roncali, Emilie; Mitchell, Gregory S.; Buckley, Steve; Jackson, Carl; Cherry, Simon R.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The MatrixSL-9-30035-OEM (Matrix9) from SensL is a large-area silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) photodetector module consisting of a 3 × 3 array of 4 × 4 element SiPM arrays (total of 144 SiPM pixels) and incorporates SensL’s front-end electronics board and coincidence board. Each SiPM pixel measures 3.16 × 3.16 mm2 and the total size of the detector head is 47.8 × 46.3 mm2. Using 8 × 8 polished LSO/LYSO arrays (pitch 1.5 mm) the performance of this detector system (SiPM array and readout electronics) was evaluated with a view for its eventual use in small-animal positron emission tomography (PET). Methods: Measurements of noise, signal, signal-to-noise ratio, energy resolution, flood histogram quality, timing resolution, and array trigger error were obtained at different bias voltages (28.0–32.5 V in 0.5 V intervals) and at different temperatures (5 °C–25 °C in 5 °C degree steps) to find the optimal operating conditions. Results: The best measured signal-to-noise ratio and flood histogram quality for 511 keV gamma photons were obtained at a bias voltage of 30.0 V and a temperature of 5 °C. The energy resolution and timing resolution under these conditions were 14.2% ± 0.1% and 4.2 ± 0.1 ns, respectively. The flood histograms show that all the crystals in the 1.5 mm pitch LSO array can be clearly identified and that smaller crystal pitches can also be resolved. Flood histogram quality was also calculated using different center of gravity based positioning algorithms. Improved and more robust results were achieved using the local 9 pixels for positioning along with an energy offset calibration. To evaluate the front-end detector readout, and multiplexing efficiency, an array trigger error metric is introduced and measured at different lower energy thresholds. Using a lower energy threshold greater than 150 keV effectively eliminates any mispositioning between SiPM arrays. Conclusions: In summary, the Matrix9 detector system can resolve

  6. Performing Repeated Quantitative Small-Animal PET with an Arterial Input Function Is Routinely Feasible in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chi-Cheng; Wu, Chun-Hu; Huang, Ya-Yao; Tzen, Kai-Yuan; Chen, Szu-Fu; Tsai, Miao-Ling; Wu, Hsiao-Ming

    2017-04-01

    Performing quantitative small-animal PET with an arterial input function has been considered technically challenging. Here, we introduce a catheterization procedure that keeps a rat physiologically stable for 1.5 mo. We demonstrated the feasibility of quantitative small-animal (18)F-FDG PET in rats by performing it repeatedly to monitor the time course of variations in the cerebral metabolic rate of glucose (CMRglc). Methods: Aseptic surgery was performed on 2 rats. Each rat underwent catheterization of the right femoral artery and left femoral vein. The catheters were sealed with microinjection ports and then implanted subcutaneously. Over the next 3 wk, each rat underwent (18)F-FDG quantitative small-animal PET 6 times. The CMRglc of each brain region was calculated using a 3-compartment model and an operational equation that included a k*4Results: On 6 mornings, we completed 12 (18)F-FDG quantitative small-animal PET studies on 2 rats. The rats grew steadily before and after the 6 quantitative small-animal PET studies. The CMRglc of the conscious brain (e.g., right parietal region, 99.6 ± 10.2 μmol/100 g/min; n = 6) was comparable to that for (14)C-deoxyglucose autoradiographic methods. Conclusion: Maintaining good blood patency in catheterized rats is not difficult. Longitudinal quantitative small-animal PET imaging with an arterial input function can be performed routinely. © 2017 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging.

  7. Feasibility of small animal cranial irradiation with the microRT system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiehl, Erich L.; Stojadinovic, Strahinja; Malinowski, Kathleen T.; Limbrick, David; Jost, Sarah C.; Garbow, Joel R.; Rubin, Joshua B.; Deasy, Joseph O.; Khullar, Divya; Izaguirre, Enrique W.; Parikh, Parag J.; Low, Daniel A.; Hope, Andrew J. [Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri 63110 (United States); Virginia Commonwealth University School of Medicine, Richmond, Virginia 23298 (United States); Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri 63110 (United States); Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9 (Canada)

    2008-10-15

    Purpose: To develop and validate methods for small-animal CNS radiotherapy using the microRT system. Materials and Methods: A custom head immobilizer was designed and built to integrate with a pre-existing microRT animal couch. The Delrin couch-immobilizer assembly, compatible with multiple imaging modalities (CT, microCT, microMR, microPET, microSPECT, optical), was first imaged via CT in order to verify the safety and reproducibility of the immobilization method. Once verified, the subject animals were CT-scanned while positioned within the couch-immobilizer assembly for treatment planning purposes. The resultant images were then imported into CERR, an in-house-developed research treatment planning system, and registered to the microRTP treatment planning space using rigid registration. The targeted brain was then contoured and conformal radiotherapy plans were constructed for two separate studies: (1) a whole-brain irradiation comprised of two lateral beams at the 90 degree sign and 270 degree sign microRT treatment positions and (2) a hemispheric (left-brain) irradiation comprised of a single A-P vertex beam at the 0 degree sign microRT treatment position. During treatment, subject animals (n=48) were positioned to the CERR-generated treatment coordinates using the three-axis microRT motor positioning system and were irradiated using a clinical Ir-192 high-dose-rate remote after-loading system. The radiation treatment course consisted of 5 Gy fractions, 3 days per week. 90% of the subjects received a total dose of 30 Gy and 10% received a dose of 60 Gy. Results: Image analysis verified the safety and reproducibility of the immobilizer. CT scans generated from repeated reloading and repositioning of the same subject animal in the couch-immobilizer assembly were fused to a baseline CT. The resultant analysis revealed a 0.09 mm average, center-of-mass translocation and negligible volumetric error in the contoured, murine brain. The experimental use of the head

  8. Spatial resolution on a small animal RPC-PET prototype operating under magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanco, A. [LIP, Laboratorio de Instrumentacao e Fisica Experimental de Particulas, 3004-516 Coimbra (Portugal)]. E-mail: alberto@coimbra.lip.pt; Carolino, N. [LIP, Laboratorio de Instrumentacao e Fisica Experimental de Particulas, 3004-516 Coimbra (Portugal); Correia, C.M.B.A. [CEI, Centro de Electronica e Instrumentacao, Universidade de Coimbra, 3004-516 Coimbra (Portugal); Fazendeiro, L. [LIP, Laboratorio de Instrumentacao e Fisica Experimental de Particulas, 3004-516 Coimbra (Portugal); Ferreira, Nuno C. [IBILI, Instituto Biomedico de Investigacao de Luz e Imagem, Faculty of Medicine, 3000-548, Coimbra (Portugal); Ferreira Marques, M.F. [ICEMS, Departamento de Fisica, Universidade de Coimbra, 3004-516 Coimbra (Portugal); Ferreira Marques, R. [LIP, Laboratorio de Instrumentacao e Fisica Experimental de Particulas, 3004-516 Coimbra (Portugal); Departamento de Fisica, Faculdade de Ciencias e Tecnologia da Universidade de Coimbra, 3004-516, Coimbra (Portugal); Fonte, P. [LIP, Laboratorio de Instrumentacao e Fisica Experimental de Particulas, 3004-516 Coimbra (Portugal); ISEC, Instituto Superior de Engenharia de Coimbra, Quinta da Nora, 3030-199 Coimbra (Portugal); Gil, C. [ICEMS, Departamento de Fisica, Universidade de Coimbra, 3004-516 Coimbra (Portugal); Macedo, M.P. [CEI, Centro de Electronica e Instrumentacao, Universidade de Coimbra, 3004-516 Coimbra (Portugal); ISEC, Instituto Superior de Engenharia de Coimbra, Quinta da Nora, 3030-199 Coimbra (Portugal)

    2006-08-15

    It has been demonstrated in previous work that the RPC-PET technology is able to deliver radioisotope image resolutions approaching the physical limits of the PET principle. Here we study, by simulation, the effect of the magnetic field on the positron range to evaluate whether the spatial resolution of the RPC-PET could be improved by using an intense magnetic field. Six positron emitters of interest to small animal PET imaging ({sup 18}F, {sup 11}C, {sup 15}O, {sup 68}G, {sup 62}Cu and {sup 86}Y) are considered. Results suggest that a three-fold improvement on the spatial resolution may be obtained under a magnetic field of 10 T for the higher energy radioisotopes like {sup 86}Y or {sup 62}Cu, and by about 20% for the lower energy ones, like {sup 18}F or {sup 11}C.

  9. Whole-body three-dimensional optoacoustic tomography system for small animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brecht, Hans-Peter; Su, Richard; Fronheiser, Matthew; Ermilov, Sergey A.; Conjusteau, Andre; Oraevsky, Alexander A.

    2009-11-01

    We develop a system for three-dimensional whole-body optoacoustic tomography of small animals for applications in preclinical research. The tomographic images are obtained while the objects of study (phantoms or mice) are rotated within a sphere outlined by a concave arc-shaped array of 64 piezocomposite transducers. Two pulsed lasers operating in the near-IR spectral range (755 and 1064 nm) with an average pulsed energy of about 100 mJ, a repetition rate of 10 Hz, and a pulse duration of 15 to 75 ns are used as optical illumination sources. During the scan, the mouse is illuminated orthogonally to the array with two wide beams of light from a bifurcated fiber bundle. The system is capable of generating images of individual organs and blood vessels through the entire body of a mouse with spatial resolution of ~0.5 mm.

  10. The ANIMAGE project: a multimodal imaging platform for small animal research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sappey-Marinier, D.; Beuf, O.; Billotey, C.; Chereul, E.; Dupuy, J.; Jeandey, M.; Grenier, D.; Hasserodt, J.; Langlois, J. B.; Lartizien, C.; Mai, W.; Odet, C.; Samarut, J.; Vray, D.; Zimmer, L.; Janier, M.

    2004-07-01

    The advent of the molecular era has just generated a revolution in the development of new in vivo imaging techniques to examine the integrative functions of molecules, cells, organ systems and whole organisms. Molecular imaging constitutes a new tool allowing the biologist to characterize, repeatedly and non-invasively, a large number of experimental models developed in rodents. In order to monitor biological processes such as gene expression, normal development, metabolic alterations or medical treatment effects, several methodological and technological challenges have to be raised up. Developments are needed in chemistry to create new radiotracers or contrast agents, and in physic, to adapt the medical imaging techniques to the constraints of small animal investigations. ANIMAGE is a multimodal imaging platform to image the structure and function of systems using and developing different technologies such as autoradiography, ultrasounds, positron emission tomography (PET), X-ray computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy (MRI/MRS). The first biological applications and results are presented.

  11. Small animal optoacoustic tomography system for molecular imaging of contrast agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Richard; Liopo, Anton; Ermilov, Sergey A.; Oraevsky, Alexander A.

    2016-03-01

    We developed a new and improved Laser Optoacoustic Imaging System, LOIS-3D for preclinical research applications in small animal models. The advancements include (i) a new stabilized imaging module with a more homogeneous illumination of the mouse yielding a better spatial resolution (research applications, such as imaging vascularization and measuring hemoglobin / oxyhemoglobin distribution in the organs as well as imaging exogenous or endogenous optoacoustic contrast agents. As examples, we present in vivo experiments using phantoms and mice with and without tumor injected with contrast agents with indocyanine green (ICG). LOIS-3D was capable of detecting ~1-2 pmole of the ICG, in tissues with relatively low blood content. With its high sensitivity and excellent spatial resolution LOIS-3D is an advanced alternative to fluorescence and bioluminescence based modalities for molecular imaging in live mice.

  12. Development of visible and NIR imaging equipment for small animals with smart pad.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eum, Nyeon Sik; Han, Jung Hyun; Seong, Ki Woong; Lee, Jong Ha; Park, Hee Joon

    2014-01-01

    The portable visible and near-infrared (NIR) imaging equipment for a pre-clinical test with small animals was designed and developed in this paper. The developed equipment is composed of a CCD camera, a focusing lens, an objective lens, a NIR band pass filter and a NIR filter driving motor. An NIR ray is mainly used for imaging equipment because it has high light penetration depth in biological tissue. Therefore, NIR fluorescent agents are available for chemical conjugation to targeting molecules in vivo. This equipment can provide a visible image, NIR image and merged image simultaneously. A communication system was specifically established to check obtained images through a smart pad in real time. It is less dependent on space and time than the conventional system.

  13. Full-angle optical imaging of near-infrared fluorescent probes implanted in small animals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gang Hu; Junjie Yao; Jing Bai

    2008-01-01

    To provide a valuable experimental platform for in vivo biomedical research of small animal model with fluorescence mediated approach, we developed a whole-body near-infrared fluorescence molecular imaging system as described in this paper. This system is based on a sensitive CCD camera and has the ability to achieve 360° full-angle source illuminations and projections capture of the targets to obtain the dense sampling by performing rotational scan. The measurement accuracy is validated from cylinder phantom experiments by the comparison between the experimental data and theoretical predictions. Finally, we also present typical in vivo images of fluorescent tube implanted into the mouse body. The results are promising and have proved the system imaging performance for macroscopic optical biomedical research.

  14. Balloon Type Elasticity Sensing of Left Ventricular Tissue for Small Experimental Animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higashimori, Mitsuru; Ishii, Ryohei; Tadakuma, Kenjiro; Kaneko, Makoto; Tamaki, Syunsuke; Sakata, Yasushi; Yamamoto, Kazuhiro

    This paper describes an elasticity sensing system for a left ventricular tissue of small experimental animal. We first show the basic concept of the proposed method, where a ring shaped specimen is dilated by a balloon type probe with pressure based control and the elasticity is estimated by using the stress and strain information. We introduce the dual cylinder model for approximating the strengths of material of the specimen and the balloon. Based on this model, we can derive the Young's modulus of the specimen. After showing the developed experimental system, we show basic experiments using silicone specimens. We finally show a couple of experimental results using rat and mouse, where specimens with HFPEF (Heart Failure with Preserved Ejection Fraction) can be separated from normal specimens.

  15. Development of locomotion after spinal cord injury in small animals – Literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andréia Coutinho Facin

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Spinal cord injuries are common in cats and dogs and result in severe neurological deficit, which can lead to permanent loss of sensory and motor capacity. In patients with fair to poor prognoses, complementary treatments have been used to develop an involuntary and uncoordinated ambulation that resembles normal gait, commonly known as spinal locomotion or reflexive stepping. Under experimental conditions, the recovery of a rhythmic gait has been reported following complete spinal cord transection. In veterinary medicine, the development of reflex stepping is of extreme importance to the quality of life and independence of the patients, as well as the satisfaction and tranquility of the owners. The present study is a literature review about the development of locomotion after spinal cord injury in small animals.

  16. Programmable electronics for low-cost small animal PET/SPECT imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guerra, Pedro [Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, ETSI de Telecomunicacion, Madrid 28040 (Spain)]. E-mail: pguerra@die.upm.es; Rubio, Jose L. [Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, ETSI de Telecomunicacion, Madrid 28040 (Spain); Kontaxakis, Georgios [Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, ETSI de Telecomunicacion, Madrid 28040 (Spain); Ortuno, Juan E. [Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, ETSI de Telecomunicacion, Madrid 28040 (Spain); Ledesma, Maria J. [Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, ETSI de Telecomunicacion, Madrid 28040 (Spain); Santos, Andres [Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, ETSI de Telecomunicacion, Madrid 28040 (Spain)

    2006-12-20

    This work describes and characterizes the detector module of a novel positron/single photon emission (PET/SPECT) scanner for small animals. This detector consists of a YAP/LSO phoswich, a photomultiplier and acquisition front-end, and will be used as building block of a low-cost hybrid tomograph. The front-end processes data sampled at a fixed frequency, where a state-of-the-art programmable device estimates scintillation pulse parameters by means of digital algorithms. Finally, the estimated properties of the proposed detector module are used to model a rotating four-head scanner. The performance of the proposed PET/SPECT scanner is estimated and first results are promising in both modalities, deserving further research and optimization.

  17. Efficient system modeling for a small animal PET scanner with tapered DOI detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Mengxi; Zhou, Jian; Yang, Yongfeng; Rodríguez-Villafuerte, Mercedes; Qi, Jinyi

    2016-01-21

    A prototype small animal positron emission tomography (PET) scanner for mouse brain imaging has been developed at UC Davis. The new scanner uses tapered detector arrays with depth of interaction (DOI) measurement. In this paper, we present an efficient system model for the tapered PET scanner using matrix factorization and a virtual scanner geometry. The factored system matrix mainly consists of two components: a sinogram blurring matrix and a geometrical matrix. The geometric matrix is based on a virtual scanner geometry. The sinogram blurring matrix is estimated by matrix factorization. We investigate the performance of different virtual scanner geometries. Both simulation study and real data experiments are performed in the fully 3D mode to study the image quality under different system models. The results indicate that the proposed matrix factorization can maintain image quality while substantially reduce the image reconstruction time and system matrix storage cost. The proposed method can be also applied to other PET scanners with DOI measurement.

  18. A clinical gamma camera-based pinhole collimated system for high resolution small animal SPECT imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Mejia

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of the present study was to upgrade a clinical gamma camera to obtain high resolution tomographic images of small animal organs. The system is based on a clinical gamma camera to which we have adapted a special-purpose pinhole collimator and a device for positioning and rotating the target based on a computer-controlled step motor. We developed a software tool to reconstruct the target’s three-dimensional distribution of emission from a set of planar projections, based on the maximum likelihood algorithm. We present details on the hardware and software implementation. We imaged phantoms and heart and kidneys of rats. When using pinhole collimators, the spatial resolution and sensitivity of the imaging system depend on parameters such as the detector-to-collimator and detector-to-target distances and pinhole diameter. In this study, we reached an object voxel size of 0.6 mm and spatial resolution better than 2.4 and 1.7 mm full width at half maximum when 1.5- and 1.0-mm diameter pinholes were used, respectively. Appropriate sensitivity to study the target of interest was attained in both cases. Additionally, we show that as few as 12 projections are sufficient to attain good quality reconstructions, a result that implies a significant reduction of acquisition time and opens the possibility for radiotracer dynamic studies. In conclusion, a high resolution single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT system was developed using a commercial clinical gamma camera, allowing the acquisition of detailed volumetric images of small animal organs. This type of system has important implications for research areas such as Cardiology, Neurology or Oncology.

  19. A clinical gamma camera-based pinhole collimated system for high resolution small animal SPECT imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mejia, J.; Galvis-Alonso, O.Y., E-mail: mejia_famerp@yahoo.com.b [Faculdade de Medicina de Sao Jose do Rio Preto (FAMERP), SP (Brazil). Dept. de Biologia Molecular; Castro, A.A. de; Simoes, M.V. [Faculdade de Medicina de Sao Jose do Rio Preto (FAMERP), SP (Brazil). Dept. de Clinica Medica; Leite, J.P. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (FMRP/USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Fac. de Medicina. Dept. de Neurociencias e Ciencias do Comportamento; Braga, J. [Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais (INPE), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil). Div. de Astrofisica

    2010-11-15

    The main objective of the present study was to upgrade a clinical gamma camera to obtain high resolution tomographic images of small animal organs. The system is based on a clinical gamma camera to which we have adapted a special-purpose pinhole collimator and a device for positioning and rotating the target based on a computer-controlled step motor. We developed a software tool to reconstruct the target's three-dimensional distribution of emission from a set of planar projections, based on the maximum likelihood algorithm. We present details on the hardware and software implementation. We imaged phantoms and heart and kidneys of rats. When using pinhole collimators, the spatial resolution and sensitivity of the imaging system depend on parameters such as the detector-to-collimator and detector-to-target distances and pinhole diameter. In this study, we reached an object voxel size of 0.6 mm and spatial resolution better than 2.4 and 1.7 mm full width at half maximum when 1.5- and 1.0-mm diameter pinholes were used, respectively. Appropriate sensitivity to study the target of interest was attained in both cases. Additionally, we show that as few as 12 projections are sufficient to attain good quality reconstructions, a result that implies a significant reduction of acquisition time and opens the possibility for radiotracer dynamic studies. In conclusion, a high resolution single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) system was developed using a commercial clinical gamma camera, allowing the acquisition of detailed volumetric images of small animal organs. This type of system has important implications for research areas such as Cardiology, Neurology or Oncology. (author)

  20. A detector head design for small-animal PET with silicon photomultipliers (SiPM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moehrs, Sascha; Del Guerra, Alberto; Herbert, Deborah J; Mandelkern, Mark A

    2006-03-07

    Small-animal PET systems are now striving for sub-millimetre resolution. Current systems based upon PSPMTs and finely pixellated scintillators can be pushed to higher resolution, but at the expense of other performance parameters and a rapidly escalating cost. Moreover, depth of interaction (DOI) information is usually difficult to assess in such systems, even though this information is highly desirable to reduce the parallax error, which is often the dominant error for such high-resolution systems. In this study we propose a high-resolution detector head for a small-animal PET imaging system with intrinsic DOI information. Instead of a pixellated scintillator, our design is based upon the classic Anger camera principle, i.e. the head is constructed of modular layers each consisting of a continuous slab of scintillator, viewed by a new type of compact silicon photodetector. The photodetector is the recently developed silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) that as well as being very compact has many other attractive properties: high gain at low bias voltage, excellent single-photoelectron resolution and fast timing. A detector head of about 4 x 4 cm2 in area is proposed, constructed from three modular layers of the type described above. We perform a simulation study, using the Monte Carlo simulation package Geant4. The simulation results are used to optimize the geometry of the detector head and characterize its performance. Additionally, hit estimation algorithms are studied to determine the interaction position of annihilation photons correctly over the whole detector surface. The resulting detector has a nearly uniform efficiency for 511 keV photons of approximately 70% and an intrinsic spatial resolution of less than approximately 0.4 mm full width at half maximum (fwhm).

  1. Evaluation of an educational campaign to increase hand hygiene at a small animal veterinary teaching hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shea, Annie; Shaw, Scott

    2012-01-01

    To establish baseline data on rates of hand hygiene behavior, evaluate the effectiveness of an educational intervention aimed at improving hand hygiene, and determine whether methods similar to those applied in human hospitals to improve hand hygiene can be successfully applied in a small animal veterinary hospital. Prospective observational study. 568 and 187 observations of interactions between small animal patients and veterinary health-care providers before and after, respectively, educational intervention. Proper hand hygiene practices were defined as use of antibacterial foam or hand washing before or after physical interactions between health-care providers (veterinary medical faculty members, residents, interns, students, and technicians) and patients or proper use of gloves. Data were collected by anonymous direct observation. After an initial observation period, a multimodal educational campaign promoted proper hand hygiene with specific attention to increasing use of antibacterial foam. Two months later, data on proper hand hygiene practices after intervention were collected. At baseline, 117 of 568 (20.6%) interactions met criteria for proper hand hygiene practices; after intervention, a significantly greater proportion (78/187 [41.7%]) of interactions met criteria for proper hand hygiene practices. Use of antibacterial foam significantly increased from 34 of 568 (6.0%) to 67 of 187 (35.8%) interactions. Health-care providers were 4.1 times as likely to wash their hands with soap and water or to use antibacterial foam on their hands after the intervention than before the intervention. Initial low rates of proper hand hygiene practices at baseline were improved substantially 2 months after implementing a low-cost multimodal educational campaign.

  2. Relationship between Small Animal Intern Rank and Performance at a University Teaching Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmeister, Erik H; Saba, Corey; Kent, Marc; Creevy, Kate E

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if there is a relationship between selection committee rankings of internship applicants and the performance of small animal interns. The hypothesis was that there would be a relationship between selection committee rank order and intern performance; the more highly an application was ranked, the better the intern's performance scores would be. In 2007, the Department of Small Animal Medicine and Surgery instituted a standardized approach to its intern selection process both to streamline the process and to track its effectiveness. At the end of intern years 2010-2014, every faculty member in the department was provided an intern assessment form for that year's class. There was no relationship between an individual intern's final rank by the selection committee and his/her performance either as a percentile score or a Likert-type score (p=.25, R2=0.04; p=0.31, R2=0.03, respectively). Likewise, when interns were divided into the top and bottom quartile based on their final rank by the selection committee, there was no relationship between their rank and their performance as a percentile score (median rank 15 vs. 20; p=.14) or Likert-type score (median rank 14 vs. 19; p=.27). Institutions that use a similar intern selection method may need to reconsider the time and effort being expended for an outcome that does not predict performance. Alternatively, specific criteria more predictive of performance outcomes should be identified and employed in the internship selection process.

  3. Split exponential track length estimator for Monte-Carlo simulations of small-animal radiation therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smekens, F.; Létang, J. M.; Noblet, C.; Chiavassa, S.; Delpon, G.; Freud, N.; Rit, S.; Sarrut, D.

    2014-12-01

    We propose the split exponential track length estimator (seTLE), a new kerma-based method combining the exponential variant of the TLE and a splitting strategy to speed up Monte Carlo (MC) dose computation for low energy photon beams. The splitting strategy is applied to both the primary and the secondary emitted photons, triggered by either the MC events generator for primaries or the photon interactions generator for secondaries. Split photons are replaced by virtual particles for fast dose calculation using the exponential TLE. Virtual particles are propagated by ray-tracing in voxelized volumes and by conventional MC navigation elsewhere. Hence, the contribution of volumes such as collimators, treatment couch and holding devices can be taken into account in the dose calculation. We evaluated and analysed the seTLE method for two realistic small animal radiotherapy treatment plans. The effect of the kerma approximation, i.e. the complete deactivation of electron transport, was investigated. The efficiency of seTLE against splitting multiplicities was also studied. A benchmark with analog MC and TLE was carried out in terms of dose convergence and efficiency. The results showed that the deactivation of electrons impacts the dose at the water/bone interface in high dose regions. The maximum and mean dose differences normalized to the dose at the isocenter were, respectively of 14% and 2% . Optimal splitting multiplicities were found to be around 300. In all situations, discrepancies in integral dose were below 0.5% and 99.8% of the voxels fulfilled a 1%/0.3 mm gamma index criterion. Efficiency gains of seTLE varied from 3.2 × 105 to 7.7 × 105 compared to analog MC and from 13 to 15 compared to conventional TLE. In conclusion, seTLE provides results similar to the TLE while increasing the efficiency by a factor between 13 and 15, which makes it particularly well-suited to typical small animal radiation therapy applications.

  4. SU-E-T-89: Comprehensive Quality Assurance Phantom for the Small Animal Radiation Research Platform

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jermoumi, M; Ngwa, W [University of Massachusetts Lowell, MA (United States); Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Korideck, H; Zygmanski, P; Berbeco, R; Makrigiorgos, G; Cormack, R [Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Use of Small Animal Radiation Research Platform (SARRP) systems for conducting state-of-the-art image guided radiotherapy (IGRT) research on small animals has become more common over the past years. The purpose of this work is to develop and test the suitability and performance of a comprehensive quality assurance (QA) phantom for the SARRP. Methods: A QA phantom was developed for carrying out daily, monthly and annual QA tasks including imaging, dosimetry and treatment planning system (TPS) performance evaluation of the SARRP. The QA phantom consists of nine (60×60×5 mm3) KV-energy tissue equivalent solid water slabs that can be employed for annual dosimetry QA with film. Three of the top slabs are replaceable with ones incorporating Mosfets or OSLDs arranged in a quincunx pattern, or a slab drilled to accommodate an ion chamber insert. These top slabs are designed to facilitate routine daily and monthly QA tasks such as output constancy, isocenter congruency test, treatment planning system (TPS) QA, etc. One slab is designed with inserts for image QA. A prototype of the phantom was applied to test the performance of the imaging, planning and treatment delivery systems. Results: Output constancy test results showed daily variations within 3%. For isocenter congruency test, the phantom could be used to detect 0.3 mm deviations of the CBCT isocenter from the radiation isocenter. Using the Mosfet in phantom as target, the difference between TPS calculations and measurements was within 5%. Image-quality parameters could also be assessed in terms of geometric accuracy, CT number accuracy, linearity, noise and image uniformity, etc. Conclusion: The developed phantom can be employed as a simple tool for comprehensive performance evaluation of the SARRP. The study provides a reference for development of a comprehensive quality assurance program for the SARRP, with proposed tolerances and frequency of required tests.

  5. Implementation and assessment of an animal management system for small-animal micro-CT / micro-SPECT imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holdsworth, David W.; Detombe, Sarah A.; Chiodo, Chris; Fricke, Stanley T.; Drangova, Maria

    2011-03-01

    Advances in laboratory imaging systems for CT, SPECT, MRI, and PET facilitate routine micro-imaging during pre-clinical investigations. Challenges still arise when dealing with immune-compromised animals, biohazardous agents, and multi-modality imaging. These challenges can be overcome with an appropriate animal management system (AMS), with the capability for supporting and monitoring a rat or mouse during micro-imaging. We report the implementation and assessment of a new AMS system for mice (PRA-3000 / AHS-2750, ASI Instruments, Warren MI), designed to be compatible with a commercial micro-CT / micro-SPECT imaging system (eXplore speCZT, GE Healthcare, London ON). The AMS was assessed under the following criteria: 1) compatibility with the imaging system (i.e. artifact generation, geometric dimensions); 2) compatibility with live animals (i.e. positioning, temperature regulation, anesthetic supply); 3) monitoring capabilities (i.e. rectal temperature, respiratory and cardiac monitoring); 4) stability of co-registration; and 5) containment. Micro-CT scans performed using a standardized live-animal protocol (90 kVp, 40 mA, 900 views, 16 ms per view) exhibited low noise (+/-19 HU) and acceptable artifact from high-density components within the AMS (e.g. ECG pad contacts). Live mice were imaged repeatedly (with removal and replacement of the AMS) and spatial registration was found to be stable to within +/-0.07 mm. All animals tolerated enclosure within the AMS for extended periods (i.e. > one hour) without distress, based on continuous recordings of rectal temperature, ECG waveform and respiratory rate. A sealed AMS system extends the capability of a conventional micro-imaging system to include immune-compromised and biosafety level 2 mouse-imaging protocols.

  6. A comparison between a time domain and continuous wave small animal optical imaging system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keren, S; Gheysens, O; Levin, C S; Gambhir, S S

    2008-01-01

    We present a phantom study to evaluate the performance of the eXplore Optix (Advanced Research Technologies-GE Healthcare), the first commercially available time-domain tomography system for small animal fluorescence imaging, and compare its capabilities with the widely used IVIS 200 (Xenogen Corporation-Caliper) continuous wave planar imaging system. The eXplore Optix, based on point-wise illumination and collection scheme, is found to be a log order more sensitive with significantly higher detection depth and spatial resolution as compared with the wide-area illumination IVIS 200 under the conditions tested. A time-resolved detection system allows the eXplore Optix to measure the arrival time distribution of fluorescence photons. This enables fluorescence lifetime measurement, absorption mapping, and estimation of fluorescent inclusion depth, which in turn is used by a reconstruction algorithm to calculate the volumetric distribution of the fluorophore concentration. An increased acquisition time and lack of ability to image multiple animals simultaneously are the main drawbacks of the eXplore Optix as compared with the IVIS 200.

  7. Imaging circulating tumor cells in freely moving awake small animals using a miniaturized intravital microscope.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Sarah Sasportas

    Full Text Available Metastasis, the cause for 90% of cancer mortality, is a complex and poorly understood process involving the invasion of circulating tumor cells (CTCs into blood vessels. These cells have potential prognostic value as biomarkers for early metastatic risk. But their rarity and the lack of specificity and sensitivity in measuring them render their interrogation by current techniques very challenging. How and when these cells are circulating in the blood, on their way to potentially give rise to metastasis, is a question that remains largely unanswered. In order to provide an insight into this "black box" using non-invasive imaging, we developed a novel miniature intravital microscopy (mIVM strategy capable of real-time long-term monitoring of CTCs in awake small animals. We established an experimental 4T1-GL mouse model of metastatic breast cancer, in which tumor cells express both fluorescent and bioluminescent reporter genes to enable both single cell and whole body tumor imaging. Using mIVM, we monitored blood vessels of different diameters in awake mice in an experimental model of metastasis. Using an in-house software algorithm we developed, we demonstrated in vivo CTC enumeration and computation of CTC trajectory and speed. These data represent the first reported use we know of for a miniature mountable intravital microscopy setup for in vivo imaging of CTCs in awake animals.

  8. "Clean, green and ethical" animal production. Case study: reproductive efficiency in small ruminants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Graeme B; Kadokawa, Hiroya

    2006-02-01

    In response to changes in society and thus the marketplace, we need a vision for the future of our animal industries, including both on-farm and off-farm activities, that is "clean, green and ethical". Using small ruminants as a case study, we describe three "clean, green and ethical" strategies that farmers could use to improve reproductive performance. The first allows control of the timing of reproductive events by using socio-sexual signals (the "male effect") to induce synchronised ovulation in females. The second strategy, "focus feeding", is based on using short periods of nutritional supplements that are precisely timed and specifically designed for each event in the reproductive process (eg, gamete production, embryo survival, fetal programming, colostrum production). The third strategy aims to maximize offspring survival by a combination of management, nutrition and genetic selection for behaviour (temperament). All of these approaches involve non-pharmacological manipulation of the endogenous control systems of the animals and complement the detailed information from ultrasound that is now becoming available. Importantly, these approaches all have a solid foundation in reproductive biology. In several cases, they are currently used in commercial practice, but there is still room for improvement through both basic and applied research. Ultimately, these "clean, green and ethical" tools can be cost-effective, increase productivity and, at the same time, greatly improve the image of meat and milk industries in society and the marketplace.

  9. Design and performance from an integrated PET/MRI system for small animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Seiichi; Imaizumi, Masao; Kanai, Yasukazu; Tatsumi, Mitsuaki; Aoki, Masaaki; Sugiyama, Eiji; Kawakami, Makoto; Shimosegawa, Eku; Hatazawa, Jun

    2010-02-01

    Although simultaneous measurements of PET and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can provide interesting results in molecular imaging research, most of the combined systems are huge and animal handling in the system is not easy. To minimize these problems, we developed a compact integrated PET/MRI (iPET/MRI) system for small animals. For the iPET/MRI system, a new MR-compatible PET and a permanent magnet open MRI were designed. In the MRI, a tunnel is opened at the yoke of the magnet. The position-sensitive photo-multiplier tubes (PSPMTs) of the MR-compatible PET are positioned at the back of the yoke where the magnetic field is sufficiently low. The scintillators for the PET system are positioned at the center of the MRI magnets, and the direction of the scintillation photons is changed by slanted light guides, and they are fed to the PSPMTs by 75 cm long optical fiber bundles. The PET detectors employed two types of LGSO crystals (1.9 mm x 2.2 mm x 6 mm and 7 mm) with different decay times (33 and 43 ns) for depth of interaction detection. Sixteen optical fiber-based block detectors are arranged in a 112 mm diameter ring. The transaxial field-of-view (FOV) of the PET system is ~80 mm, and the axial FOV is 21 mm which can be enlarged by the axial motion of the PET detector ring during MRI acquisition. The transaxial and axial resolutions at the center of the PET system was 2.9 and 2.4 mm FWHM, respectively. The absolute sensitivity was 1.5% at the center of the axial FOV. Phantom images revealed no artifact in either the PET or MRI images. We successfully obtained simultaneously measured small animal images using the iPET/MRI system. The open geometry of the developed iPET/ MRI facilitates easy accessibility to the subject. The iPET/ MRI system appears to be a promising tool for molecular imaging research.

  10. A finite difference solution to 2-dimensional radiative transfer equation for small-animal imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Meng; Jiao, Yuting; Gao, Feng; Zhao, Huijuan

    2010-02-01

    Diffuse optical tomography (DOT) has been increasingly studied in the past decades. In DOT, the radiative transfer equation (RTE) and its P1 approximation, i.e. the diffuse equation (DE), have been used as the forward models. Since the DE-based DOT fails where biological tissue has a void-like region and when the source-detector separation is less than 5 mean free pathlengths, as in the situations of small animal imaging, the RTE-based DOT methodology has become a focus of investigation. Therefore, the complete formalism of the RTE is attracting more and more interest. It is clear that the quality of the reconstructed image depends strongly on the accuracy of the forward model. In this paper, A FDM was developed for solving two-dimensional RTE in a 2cm×2cm square homogeneous tissue with two groups of the optical properties and different schemes of the spatial and solid angle discretization. The results of the FDM are compared with the MC simulations. It is shown that when the step size of the spatial mesh becomes small, more discretized angle number is needed.

  11. Development of a PET Scanner for Simultaneously Imaging Small Animals with MRI and PET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher J Thompson

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Recently, positron emission tomography (PET is playing an increasingly important role in the diagnosis and staging of cancer. Combined PET and X-ray computed tomography (PET-CT scanners are now the modality of choice in cancer treatment planning. More recently, the combination of PET and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI is being explored in many sites. Combining PET and MRI has presented many challenges since the photo-multiplier tubes (PMT in PET do not function in high magnetic fields, and conventional PET detectors distort MRI images. Solid state light sensors like avalanche photo-diodes (APDs and more recently silicon photo-multipliers (SiPMs are much less sensitive to magnetic fields thus easing the compatibility issues. This paper presents the results of a group of Canadian scientists who are developing a PET detector ring which fits inside a high field small animal MRI scanner with the goal of providing simultaneous PET and MRI images of small rodents used in pre-clinical medical research. We discuss the evolution of both the crystal blocks (which detect annihilation photons from positron decay and the SiPM array performance in the last four years which together combine to deliver significant system performance in terms of speed, energy and timing resolution.

  12. A small long-life acoustic transmitter for studying the behavior of aquatic animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, J.; Deng, Z. D.; Li, H.; Myjak, M. J.; Martinez, J. J.; Xiao, J.; Brown, R. S.; Cartmell, S. S.

    2016-11-01

    Acoustic telemetry is an important tool for studying the behavior of aquatic animals and assessing the environmental impact of structures such as hydropower facilities. However, the physical size, signal intensity, and service life of off-the-shelf transmitters are presently insufficient for monitoring certain species. In this study, we developed a small, long-life acoustic transmitter with an approximate length of 24.2 mm, diameter of 5.0 mm, and dry weight of 0.72 g. The transmitter generates a coded acoustic signal at 416.7 kHz with a selectable source level between 159 and 163 dB relative to 1 μPa at 1 m, allowing a theoretical detection range of up to 500 m. The expected operational lifetime is 1 yr at a pulse rate interval of 15 s. The new technology makes long-term acoustic telemetry studies of small fish possible, and is being deployed for a long-term tracking of juvenile sturgeon.

  13. Multi-modality image reconstruction for dual-head small-animal PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Chang-Han; Chou, Cheng-Ying [National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China)

    2015-05-18

    The hybrid positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) or positron emission tomography/magnetic resonance imaging (PET/MRI) has become routine practice in clinics. The applications of multi-modality imaging can also benefit research advances. Consequently, dedicated small-imaging system like dual-head small-animal PET (DHAPET) that possesses the advantages of high detection sensitivity and high resolution can exploit the structural information from CT or MRI. It should be noted that the special detector arrangement in DHAPET leads to severe data truncation, thereby degrading the image quality. We proposed to take advantage of anatomical priors and total variation (TV) minimization methods to reconstruct PET activity distribution form incomplete measurement data. The objective is to solve the penalized least-squares function consisted of data fidelity term, TV norm and medium root priors. In this work, we employed the splitting-based fast iterative shrinkage/thresholding algorithm to split smooth and non-smooth functions in the convex optimization problems. Our simulations studies validated that the images reconstructed by use of the proposed method can outperform those obtained by use of conventional expectation maximization algorithms or that without considering the anatomical prior information. Additionally, the convergence rate is also accelerated.

  14. Microbiological Standardization in Small Laboratory Animals and Recommendations for the Monitoring

    OpenAIRE

    Meral Karaman

    2014-01-01

    Microbiological standardization in laboratory animal breeding is based on the classification according to the microorganisms that the animals host and consequently their upbringing environment, as well as the certification of their microbiological status and the protection of their properties. Although there are many different classifications for microbiological standardization of laboratory animals, they can be basically classified as; gnotobiotic animals, animals bred with a complete barrie...

  15. Evaluation of Matrix9 silicon photomultiplier array for small-animal PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Du, Junwei, E-mail: jwdu@ucdavis.edu; Schmall, Jeffrey P.; Yang, Yongfeng; Di, Kun; Roncali, Emilie; Mitchell, Gregory S. [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of California-Davis, One Shields Avenue, Davis, California 95616 (United States); Buckley, Steve; Jackson, Carl [SensL Technologies Ltd., 6800 Airport Business Park, Cork (Ireland); Cherry, Simon R. [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of California-Davis, One Shields Avenue, Davis, California, 95616 (United States)

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: The MatrixSL-9-30035-OEM (Matrix9) from SensL is a large-area silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) photodetector module consisting of a 3 × 3 array of 4 × 4 element SiPM arrays (total of 144 SiPM pixels) and incorporates SensL’s front-end electronics board and coincidence board. Each SiPM pixel measures 3.16 × 3.16 mm{sup 2} and the total size of the detector head is 47.8 × 46.3 mm{sup 2}. Using 8 × 8 polished LSO/LYSO arrays (pitch 1.5 mm) the performance of this detector system (SiPM array and readout electronics) was evaluated with a view for its eventual use in small-animal positron emission tomography (PET). Methods: Measurements of noise, signal, signal-to-noise ratio, energy resolution, flood histogram quality, timing resolution, and array trigger error were obtained at different bias voltages (28.0–32.5 V in 0.5 V intervals) and at different temperatures (5 °C–25 °C in 5 °C degree steps) to find the optimal operating conditions. Results: The best measured signal-to-noise ratio and flood histogram quality for 511 keV gamma photons were obtained at a bias voltage of 30.0 V and a temperature of 5 °C. The energy resolution and timing resolution under these conditions were 14.2% ± 0.1% and 4.2 ± 0.1 ns, respectively. The flood histograms show that all the crystals in the 1.5 mm pitch LSO array can be clearly identified and that smaller crystal pitches can also be resolved. Flood histogram quality was also calculated using different center of gravity based positioning algorithms. Improved and more robust results were achieved using the local 9 pixels for positioning along with an energy offset calibration. To evaluate the front-end detector readout, and multiplexing efficiency, an array trigger error metric is introduced and measured at different lower energy thresholds. Using a lower energy threshold greater than 150 keV effectively eliminates any mispositioning between SiPM arrays. Conclusions: In summary, the Matrix9 detector system

  16. High throughput static and dynamic small animal imaging using clinical PET/CT: potential preclinical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aide, Nicolas [Francois Baclesse Cancer Centre and Caen University, Bioticla Team, EA1792, IFR 146 ICORE, GRECAN, Caen (France); Caen University Hospital and Francois Baclesse Cancer Centre, PET Unit, Caen (France); Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Centre for Molecular Imaging, East Melbourne (Australia); Centre Francois Baclesse, Nuclear Medicine Department, Caen cedex 5 (France); Desmonts, Cedric; Agostini, Denis; Bardet, Stephane; Bouvard, Gerard [Caen University Hospital and Francois Baclesse Cancer Centre, PET Unit, Caen (France); Beauregard, Jean-Mathieu; Roselt, Peter; Neels, Oliver [Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Centre for Molecular Imaging, East Melbourne (Australia); Beyer, Thomas [cmi-experts GmbH, Zurich (Switzerland); University Hospital Essen, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Essen (Germany); University Hospital Bern, Institute of Nuclear Medicine, Bern (Switzerland); Kinross, Kathryn [Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Centre for Molecular Imaging, East Melbourne (Australia); Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Sir Donald and Lady Trescowthick Laboratories, East Melbourne (Australia); Hicks, Rodney J. [Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Centre for Molecular Imaging, East Melbourne (Australia); University of Melbourne, The Department of Medicine, Parkville (Australia)

    2010-05-15

    The objective of the study was to evaluate state-of-the-art clinical PET/CT technology in performing static and dynamic imaging of several mice simultaneously. A mouse-sized phantom was imaged mimicking simultaneous imaging of three mice with computation of recovery coefficients (RCs) and spillover ratios (SORs). Fifteen mice harbouring abdominal or subcutaneous tumours were imaged on clinical PET/CT with point spread function (PSF) reconstruction after injection of [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose or [18F]fluorothymidine. Three of these mice were imaged alone and simultaneously at radial positions -5, 0 and 5 cm. The remaining 12 tumour-bearing mice were imaged in groups of 3 to establish the quantitative accuracy of PET data using ex vivo gamma counting as the reference. Finally, a dynamic scan was performed in three mice simultaneously after the injection of {sup 68}Ga-ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA). For typical lesion sizes of 7-8 mm phantom experiments indicated RCs of 0.42 and 0.76 for ordered subsets expectation maximization (OSEM) and PSF reconstruction, respectively. For PSF reconstruction, SOR{sub air} and SOR{sub water} were 5.3 and 7.5%, respectively. A strong correlation (r {sup 2} = 0.97, p < 0.0001) between quantitative data obtained in mice imaged alone and simultaneously in a group of three was found following PSF reconstruction. The correlation between ex vivo counting and PET/CT data was better with PSF reconstruction (r {sup 2} = 0.98; slope = 0.89, p < 0.0001) than without (r {sup 2} = 0.96; slope = 0.62, p < 0.001). Valid time-activity curves of the blood pool, kidneys and bladder could be derived from {sup 68}Ga-EDTA dynamic acquisition. New generation clinical PET/CT can be used for simultaneous imaging of multiple small animals in experiments requiring high throughput and where a dedicated small animal PET system is not available. (orig.)

  17. High efficiency microfluidic beta detector for pharmacokinetic studies in small animals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Convert, Laurence, E-mail: Laurence.Convert@USherbrooke.ca [Nanofabrication and Nanocharacterization Research Center (CRN2), Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Universite de Sherbrooke, 2500 Blvd Universite, Sherbrooke, Quebec, J1K 2R1 (Canada); Girard-Baril, Frederique, E-mail: Frederique.Girard.Baril@USherbrooke.ca [Nanofabrication and Nanocharacterization Research Center (CRN2), Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Universite de Sherbrooke, 2500 Blvd Universite, Sherbrooke, Quebec, J1K 2R1 (Canada); Renaudin, Alan, E-mail: Alan.Renaudin@USherbrooke.ca [Nanofabrication and Nanocharacterization Research Center (CRN2), Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Universite de Sherbrooke, 2500 Blvd Universite, Sherbrooke, Quebec, J1K 2R1 (Canada); Grondin, Etienne, E-mail: E.Grondin@USherbrooke.ca [Nanofabrication and Nanocharacterization Research Center (CRN2), Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Universite de Sherbrooke, 2500 Blvd Universite, Sherbrooke, Quebec, J1K 2R1 (Canada); Jaouad, Abdelatif, E-mail: Abdelatif.Jaouad@USherbrooke.ca [Nanofabrication and Nanocharacterization Research Center (CRN2), Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Universite de Sherbrooke, 2500 Blvd Universite, Sherbrooke, Quebec, J1K 2R1 (Canada); Aimez, Vincent, E-mail: Vincent.Aimez@USherbrooke.ca [Nanofabrication and Nanocharacterization Research Center (CRN2), Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Universite de Sherbrooke, 2500 Blvd Universite, Sherbrooke, Quebec, J1K 2R1 (Canada); and others

    2011-10-01

    New radiotracers are continuously being developed to improve diagnostic efficiency using Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) or Positron Emission Tomography (PET). The characterization of their pharmacokinetics requires blood radioactivity monitoring over time during the scan and is very challenging in small animals because of the low volume of blood available. In this work, a prototype microfluidic blood counter made of a microchannel atop a silicon substrate containing PIN photodiodes is proposed to improve beta detection efficiency in a small volume by eliminating unnecessary interfaces between fluid and detector. A flat rectangular-shaped epoxy channel, 36 {mu}mx1.26 mm cross section and 31.5 mm in length, was microfabricated over a die containing an array of 2x2 mm{sup 2} PIN photodiodes, leaving only a few micrometers of epoxy floor layer between the fluid and the photodiode sensitive surface. This geometry leads to a quasi 2D source, optimizing geometrical detection efficiency that was estimated at 41% using solid angle calculation. CV-IV measurements were made at each fabrication step to confirm that the microchannel components had no significant effects on the diodes' electrical characteristics. The chip was wire-bonded to a PCB and connected to charge sensitive preamplifier and amplifier modules for pulse shaping. Energy spectra recorded for different isotopes showed continuous beta distribution for PET isotopes and monoenergetic conversion electron peaks for {sup 99m}Tc. Absolute sensitivity was determined for the most popular PET and SPECT radioisotopes and ranged from 26% to 33% for PET tracers ({sup 18}F, {sup 13}N, {sup 11}C, {sup 68}Ga) and more than 2% for {sup 99m}Tc. Input functions were successfully simulated with {sup 18}F, confirming the setup's suitability for pharmacokinetic modeling of PET and SPECT radiotracers in animal experiments. By using standard materials and procedures, the fabrication process is well suited

  18. Microbiological Standardization in Small Laboratory Animals and Recommendations for the Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meral Karaman

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Microbiological standardization in laboratory animal breeding is based on the classification according to the microorganisms that the animals host and consequently their upbringing environment, as well as the certification of their microbiological status and the protection of their properties. Although there are many different classifications for microbiological standardization of laboratory animals, they can be basically classified as; gnotobiotic animals, animals bred with a complete barrier system (Germ free, GF, with Colonization-Resistant Flora; CRF, animals bred with a partial barrier system (Specified Pathogen Free, SPF, and animals bred by conventional methods in units without barriers (Conventional; CV. Monitoring of microbiological standardization is carried out in two ways. One is controlling barrier systems (process control and the other is controlling laboratory animals (product control. In controlling barrier systems samples are taken routinely from ambient air, surfaces, base plate materials of animals, foods and waters, and microbiological tests are carried out. FELASA guidelines are frequently used in monitoring laboratory animals. These guidelines where the monitoring frequency, sample size, micro-organisms to be tested, vary according to the microbiological quality of the animals, and test methods and are frequently updated by FELASA and shared in their web pages. In our country, in general, laboratory animals used for experimental studies present no microbiological standardization, and follow-up protocols are not implemented. Therefore, construction of facilities for the production of microbiologically standard animals and establishment of backup laboratories testing microbiological quality should be established.

  19. A small animal image guided irradiation system study using 3D dosimeters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Xin; Admovics, John; Wuu, Cheng-Shie

    2015-01-01

    In a high resolution image-guided small animal irradiation platform, a cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) is integrated with an irradiation unit for precise targeting. Precise quality assurance is essential for both imaging and irradiation components. The conventional commissioning techniques with films face major challenges due to alignment uncertainty and labour intensive film preparation and scanning. In addition, due to the novel design of this platform the mouse stage rotation for CBCT imaging is perpendicular to the gantry rotation for irradiation. Because these two rotations are associated with different mechanical systems, discrepancy between rotation isocenters exists. In order to deliver x-ray precisely, it is essential to verify coincidence of the imaging and the irradiation isocenters. A 3D PRESAGE dosimeter can provide an excellent tool for checking dosimetry and verifying coincidence of irradiation and imaging coordinates in one system. Dosimetric measurements were performed to obtain beam profiles and percent depth dose (PDD). Isocentricity and coincidence of the mouse stage and gantry rotations were evaluated with starshots acquired using PRESAGE dosimeters. A single PRESAGE dosimeter can provide 3 -D information in both geometric and dosimetric uncertainty, which is crucial for translational studies.

  20. MEMS-based side-view endomicroscope for in vivo small animal imaging(Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Xiyu; Li, Haijun; Li, Gaoming; Li, Xue; Oldham, Kenn R.; Wang, Thomas D.

    2017-02-01

    Tremendous advances have been made in technological development of whole body molecular imaging, including PET, SPECT, MRI, bioluminescence, and ultrasound. However, a great unmet need still exists for high resolution imaging of biological processes that occur in the epithelium, the thin layer of tissue where many important cancers originate. Confocal endomicroscopes designed with a fiber bundle are used in the clinic, but they can only create images in the horizontal plane. Imaging in the plane perpendicular to the tissue surface is also important because epithelial cells differentiate in the vertical direction. Subtle changes in normal tissue differentiation patterns can reveal the early expression of cancer biomarkers. In this work, we present a side-viewing confocal endomicroscope that can collect images in either horizontal or oblique plane using an integrated monolithic electrostatic 3D MEMS scanner. The endomicroscope can perform sub-cellular resolution imaging in both the horizontal plane and the oblique plane with FOVs of 500 x 700 µm2 and 500 x 200 µm2. A side-viewing probe will allow optimal contact between the imaging window and the luminal wall, which makes it easy to navigate in the hollow organ. The endomicroscope is packaged into a stainless steel tube with outer diameter of 4.2 mm, which can be used for both small animal and human GI tract imaging. We demonstrate in vivo imaging of colonic dysplasia in mice, showing the endomicroscope can potentially be used for early detection and staging of colon cancer.

  1. First small-animal in-vivo phase-contrast micro-CT scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauwels, B.; Bruyndonckx, P.; Liu, X.; Tapfer, A.; Velroyen, A.; Yaroshenko, A.; Bech, M.; Pfeiffer, F.; Sasov, A.

    2012-10-01

    We have developed a compact grating-based in-vivo phase-contrast micro-CT system with a rotating gantry. The 50 W microfocus x-ray source operates with 20 to 50 kV peak energy. The length of the rotating interferometer is around 47 cm. Pixel size in the object is 30 micron; the field of view is approx. 35 mm in diameter, suited to image a mouse. The interferometer consists of three gratings: an absorption grating close to the x-ray source, a phase grating to introduce a π/2 phase shift and an absorption analyzer grating positioned at the first fractional Talbot distance. Numerous drives and actuators are used to provide angular and linear grating alignment, phase stepping and object/gantry precision positioning. Phantom studies were conducted to investigate performance, accuracy and stability of the scanner. In particular, the influences of gantry rotation and of temperature fluctuations on the interferometric image acquisition were characterized. Also dose measurements were performed. The first imaging results obtained with the system show the complementary nature of phase-contrast micro-CT images with respect to absorption-based micro-CT. Future improvements, necessary to optimize the scanner for in-vivo small-animal CT scanning on a regular and easy-to-use basis, are also discussed.

  2. Extraction of the respiratory signal from small-animal CT projections for a retrospective gating method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ChavarrIas, C; Vaquero, J J; Sisniega, A; RodrIguez-Ruano, A; Soto-Montenegro, M L; GarcIa-Barreno, P; Desco, M [Unidad de Medicina y CirugIa Experimental, Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Maranon, Anexo PsiquiatrIa, 1 Planta. C/Ibiza, 43. Madrid 28007 (Spain)

    2008-09-07

    We propose a retrospective respiratory gating algorithm to generate dynamic CT studies. To this end, we compared three different methods of extracting the respiratory signal from the projections of small-animal cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scanners. Given a set of frames acquired from a certain axial angle, subtraction of their average image from each individual frame produces a set of difference images. Pixels in these images have positive or negative values (according to the respiratory phase) in those areas where there is lung movement. The respiratory signals were extracted by analysing the shape of the histogram of these difference images: we calculated the first four central and non-central moments. However, only odd-order moments produced the desired breathing signal, as the even-order moments lacked information about the phase. Each of these curves was compared to a reference signal recorded by means of a pneumatic pillow. Given the similar correlation coefficients yielded by all of them, we selected the mean to implement our retrospective protocol. Respiratory phase bins were separated, reconstructed independently and included in a dynamic sequence, suitable for cine playback. We validated our method in five adult rat studies by comparing profiles drawn across the diaphragm dome, with and without retrospective respiratory gating. Results showed a sharper transition in the gated reconstruction, with an average slope improvement of 60.7%.

  3. Development of a noncontact 3-D fluorescence tomography system for small animal in vivo imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaofeng; Badea, Cristian; Jacob, Mathews; Johnson, G. Allan

    2009-02-01

    Fluorescence imaging is an important tool for tracking molecular-targeting probes in preclinical studies. It offers high sensitivity, but nonetheless low spatial resolution compared to other leading imaging methods such CT and MRI. We demonstrate our methodological development in small animal in vivo whole-body imaging using fluorescence tomography. We have implemented a noncontact fluid-free fluorescence diffuse optical tomography system that uses a raster-scanned continuous-wave diode laser as the light source and an intensified CCD camera as the photodetector. The specimen is positioned on a motorized rotation stage. Laser scanning, data acquisition, and stage rotation are controlled via LabVIEW applications. The forward problem in the heterogeneous medium is based on a normalized Born method, and the sensitivity function is determined using a Monte Carlo method. The inverse problem (image reconstruction) is performed using a regularized iterative algorithm, in which the cost function is defined as a weighted sum of the L-2 norms of the solution image, the residual error, and the image gradient. The relative weights are adjusted by two independent regularization parameters. Our initial tests of this imaging system were performed with an imaging phantom that consists of a translucent plastic cylinder filled with tissue-simulating liquid and two thin-wall glass tubes containing indocyanine green. The reconstruction is compared to the output of a finite element method-based software package NIRFAST and has produced promising results.

  4. Small animal fluorescence and bioluminescence tomography: a review of approaches, algorithms and technology update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darne, Chinmay; Lu, Yujie; Sevick-Muraca, Eva M.

    2014-01-01

    Emerging fluorescence and bioluminescence tomography approaches have several common, yet several distinct features from established emission tomographies of PET and SPECT. Although both nuclear and optical imaging modalities involve counting of photons, nuclear imaging techniques collect the emitted high energy (100-511 keV) photons after radioactive decay of radionuclides while optical techniques count low-energy (1.5-4.1 eV) photons that are scattered and absorbed by tissues requiring models of light transport for quantitative image reconstruction. Fluorescence imaging has been recently translated into clinic demonstrating high sensitivity, modest tissue penetration depth, and fast, millisecond image acquisition times. As a consequence, the promise of quantitative optical tomography as a complement of small animal PET and SPECT remains high. In this review, we summarize the different instrumentation, methodological approaches and schema for inverse image reconstructions for optical tomography, including luminescence and fluorescence modalities, and comment on limitations and key technological advances needed for further discovery research and translation.

  5. Study of body composition in small animals by a multifrequency impedancemeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribbe, E.; Khider, N.; Moreno, M. V.

    2010-04-01

    Bioimpedance is essentially used today to study the body composition in the human body but not really in small animals. The aim of this paper is to develop a model for body composition in rats to help pharmaceutical labs assessing effects of medicine on rats. We propose a non invasive, rapid and scientific method. With a multifrequency impedancemeter, Z-Métrix® (BioparHom© Company France), resistances and reactances are measured at 55 frequencies for a population of 40 rats (males and females). With our model, derived from Cole-Cole model, resistances of extracellular (Re) and total body (Rinf) compartment are extrapolated. Three methods were applied: posterior to posterior leg, anterior to posterior leg on the left and on the right side. Measurements by CT imaging were performed on the anesthetized population to determine Fat Mass (FM), Lean Body Mass (LBM) and Bone Mineral Content (BMC), as our reference measurements. With electrical data, age, sex and weight, equations are created to calculate FM, LBM and BMC with the three methods. Graphs of correlation, between tissue masses calculated by bioimpedance and obtained with scanner, indicate that measurements with posterior to posterior leg are better. Moreover, there is no significantly difference between tissue masses measured by bioimpedance and with the scanner.

  6. A prototype of very high-resolution small animal PET scanner using silicon pad detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Park, S J; Huh, S; Kagan, H; Honscheid, K; Burdette, D; Chesi, Enrico Guido; Lacasta, C; Llosa, G; Mikuz, M; Studen, A; Weilhammer, P; Clinthorne, N H

    2007-01-01

    Abstract A very high-resolution small animal positron emission tomograph (PET), which can achieve sub-millimeter spatial resolution, is being developed using silicon pad detectors. The prototype PET for a single slice instrument consists of two 1 mm thick silicon pad detectors, each containing a 32×16 array of 1.4×1.4 mm pads readout with four VATAGP3 chips which have 128 channels low-noise self-triggering ASIC in each chip, coincidence units, a source turntable and tungsten slice collimator. The silicon detectors were located edgewise on opposite sides of a 4 cm field-of-view to maximize efficiency. Energy resolution is dominated by electronic noise, which is 0.98% (1.38 keV) FWHM at 140.5 keV. Coincidence timing resolution is 82.1 ns FWHM and coincidence efficiency was measured to be 1.04×10−3% from two silicon detectors with annihilation photons of 18F source. Image data were acquired and reconstructed using conventional 2-D filtered-back projection (FBP) and a maximum likelihood expectation maximizat...

  7. Development of a Si-PM-based high-resolution PET system for small animals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, Seiichi [Kobe City College of Technology, Kobe (Japan); Imaizumi, Masao; Watabe, Tadashi; Shimosegawa, Eku; Hatazawa, Jun [Department of Nuclear Medicine and Tracer Kinetics, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka (Japan); Watabe, Hiroshi; Kanai, Yasukazu, E-mail: s-yama@kobe-kosen.ac.j [Department of Molecular Imaging in Medicine, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka (Japan)

    2010-10-07

    A Geiger-mode avalanche photodiode (Si-PM) is a promising photodetector for PET, especially for use in a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system, because it has high gain and is less sensitive to a static magnetic field. We developed a Si-PM-based depth-of-interaction (DOI) PET system for small animals. Hamamatsu 4 x 4 Si-PM arrays (S11065-025P) were used for its detector blocks. Two types of LGSO scintillator of 0.75 mol% Ce (decay time: {approx}45 ns; 1.1 mm x 1.2 mm x 5 mm) and 0.025 mol% Ce (decay time: {approx}31 ns; 1.1 mm x 1.2 mm x 6 mm) were optically coupled in the DOI direction to form a DOI detector, arranged in a 11 x 9 matrix, and optically coupled to the Si-PM array. Pulse shape analysis was used for the DOI detection of these two types of LGSOs. Sixteen detector blocks were arranged in a 68 mm diameter ring to form the PET system. Spatial resolution was 1.6 mm FWHM and sensitivity was 0.6% at the center of the field of view. High-resolution mouse and rat images were successfully obtained using the PET system. We confirmed that the developed Si-PM-based PET system is promising for molecular imaging research.

  8. Evaluation of New Inorganic Scintillators for Application in a Prototype Small Animal PET Scanner

    CERN Document Server

    Kuntner, C

    2003-01-01

    In the study of new pharmaceuticals as well as brain and genetic research, Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is a useful method. It has also recently entered the clinical domain in cardiology and particularly in oncology. Small animals such as mice, are often used to validate sophisticated models of human disease. High spatial resolution PET instrumentation is therefore necessary due to the reduced dimensions of the organs. Inorganic scintillators are employed in most of the diagnostic imaging devices. The ultimate performance of the PET scanner is tightly bound to the scintillation properties of the crystals. In the last years there has been an effort to develop new scintillating materials characterized by high light output, high detection efficiency and fast decay time. The most studied systems are mainly Ce3+-doped crystals such as LSO:Ce, YAP:Ce, LuAP:Ce, and recently also mixed Lux(RE3+)1-xAlO3:Ce crystals. These crystals are very attractive for medical application because of their high density (with th...

  9. Modern Spirometry Supports Anesthetic Management in Small Animal Clinical Practice: A Case Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calice, Ivana; Moens, Yves

    2016-01-01

    Modern spirometry, like no other monitoring technique, allows insight into breath-to-breath respiratory mechanics. Spirometers continuously measure volume, airway pressure, and flow while calculating and continuously displaying respiratory system compliance and resistance in the form of loops. The aim of this case series is to show how observation of spirometric loops, similar to electrocardiogram or CO2 curve monitoring, can improve safety of anesthetic management in small animals. Spirometric monitoring cases described in this case series are based on use of the anaesthesia monitor Capnomac Ultima with a side stream spirometry sensor. The cases illustrate how recognition and understanding of spirometric loops allows for easy diagnosis of iatrogenic pneumothorax, incorrect ventilator settings, leaks in the system, kinked or partially obstructed endotracheal tube, and spontaneous breathing interfering with intermittent positive-pressure ventilation. The case series demonstrates the potential of spirometry to improve the quality and safety of anesthetic management, and, hence, its use can be recommended during intermittent positive-pressure ventilation and procedures in which interference with ventilation can be expected.

  10. Development of a Si-PM-based high-resolution PET system for small animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Seiichi; Imaizumi, Masao; Watabe, Tadashi; Watabe, Hiroshi; Kanai, Yasukazu; Shimosegawa, Eku; Hatazawa, Jun

    2010-10-07

    A Geiger-mode avalanche photodiode (Si-PM) is a promising photodetector for PET, especially for use in a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system, because it has high gain and is less sensitive to a static magnetic field. We developed a Si-PM-based depth-of-interaction (DOI) PET system for small animals. Hamamatsu 4 × 4 Si-PM arrays (S11065-025P) were used for its detector blocks. Two types of LGSO scintillator of 0.75 mol% Ce (decay time: ∼45 ns; 1.1 mm × 1.2 mm × 5 mm) and 0.025 mol% Ce (decay time: ∼31 ns; 1.1 mm × 1.2 mm × 6 mm) were optically coupled in the DOI direction to form a DOI detector, arranged in a 11 × 9 matrix, and optically coupled to the Si-PM array. Pulse shape analysis was used for the DOI detection of these two types of LGSOs. Sixteen detector blocks were arranged in a 68 mm diameter ring to form the PET system. Spatial resolution was 1.6 mm FWHM and sensitivity was 0.6% at the center of the field of view. High-resolution mouse and rat images were successfully obtained using the PET system. We confirmed that the developed Si-PM-based PET system is promising for molecular imaging research.

  11. Investigation of different sparsity transforms for the PICCS algorithm in small-animal respiratory gated CT.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan F P J Abascal

    Full Text Available Respiratory gating helps to overcome the problem of breathing motion in cardiothoracic small-animal imaging by acquiring multiple images for each projection angle and then assigning projections to different phases. When this approach is used with a dose similar to that of a static acquisition, a low number of noisy projections are available for the reconstruction of each respiratory phase, thus leading to streak artifacts in the reconstructed images. This problem can be alleviated using a prior image constrained compressed sensing (PICCS algorithm, which enables accurate reconstruction of highly undersampled data when a prior image is available. We compared variants of the PICCS algorithm with different transforms in the prior penalty function: gradient, unitary, and wavelet transform. In all cases the problem was solved using the Split Bregman approach, which is efficient for convex constrained optimization. The algorithms were evaluated using simulations generated from data previously acquired on a micro-CT scanner following a high-dose protocol (four times the dose of a standard static protocol. The resulting data were used to simulate scenarios with different dose levels and numbers of projections. All compressed sensing methods performed very similarly in terms of noise, spatiotemporal resolution, and streak reduction, and filtered back-projection was greatly improved. Nevertheless, the wavelet domain was found to be less prone to patchy cartoon-like artifacts than the commonly used gradient domain.

  12. Performance of a DOI-encoding small animal PET system with monolithic scintillators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carles, M., E-mail: montcar@ific.uv.es [Instituto de Instrumentacion para Imagen Molecular(I3M), Centro mixto CSIC-Universitat Politecnica de Valencia- IEMAT, Camino de Vera s/n, 46020 Valencia (Spain); Lerche, Ch.W. [Department X-Ray Imaging Systems, Philips Research Europe, Weisshausstrasse 2, D-52066 Aachen (Germany); Sanchez, F.; Orero, A.; Moliner, L.; Soriano, A.; Benlloch, J.M. [Instituto de Instrumentacion para Imagen Molecular(I3M), Centro mixto CSIC-Universitat Politecnica de Valencia- IEMAT, Camino de Vera s/n, 46020 Valencia (Spain)

    2012-12-11

    PET systems designed for specific applications require high resolution and sensitivity instrumentation. In dedicated system design smaller ring diameters and deeper crystals are widely used in order to increase the system sensitivity. However, this design increases the parallax error, which degrades the spatial image resolution gradually from the center to the edge of the field-of-view (FOV). Our group has designed a depth of interaction(DOI)-encoding small animal PET system based on monolithic crystals. In this work we investigate the restoration of radial resolution for transaxially off-center sources using the DOI information provided by our system. For this purpose we have designed a support for point like sources adapted to our system geometry that allows a spatial compression and resolution response study. For different point source radial positions along vertical and horizontal axes of a FOV transaxial plane we compare the results obtained by three methods: without DOI information, with the DOI provided by our system and with the assumption that all the {gamma}-rays interact at half depth of the crystal thickness. Results show an improvement of the mean resolution of 10% with the half thickness assumption and a 16% achieved using the DOI provided by the system. Furthermore, a 10% restoration of the resolution uniformity is obtained using the half depth assumption and an 18% restoration using measured DOI.

  13. Investigating common clinical presentations in first opinion small animal consultations using direct observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, N. J.; Dean, R. S.; Cobb, M.; Brennan, M. L.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding more about the clinical presentations encountered in veterinary practice is vital in directing research towards areas relevant to practitioners. The aim of this study was to describe all problems discussed during a convenience sample of consultations using a direct observation method. A data collection tool was used to gather data by direct observation during small animal consultations at eight sentinel practices. Data were recorded for all presenting and non-presenting specific health problems discussed. A total of 1901 patients were presented with 3206 specific health problems discussed. Clinical presentation varied widely between species and between presenting and non-presenting problems. Skin lump, vomiting and inappetence were the most common clinical signs reported by the owner while overweight/obese, dental tartar and skin lump were the most common clinical examination findings. Skin was the most frequently affected body system overall followed by non-specific problems then the gastrointestinal system. Consultations are complex, with a diverse range of different clinical presentations seen. Considering the presenting problem only may give an inaccurate view of the veterinary caseload, as some common problems are rarely the reason for presentation. Understanding the common diagnoses made is the next step and will help to further focus questions for future research. PMID:25564472

  14. Small-animal CT: Its difference from, and impact on, clinical CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritman, Erik L.

    2007-10-01

    For whole-body computed tomography (CT) images of small rodents, a voxel resolution of at least 10 -3 mm 3 is needed for scale-equivalence to that currently achieved in clinical CT scanners (˜1 mm 3) in adult humans. These "mini-CT" images generally require minutes rather than seconds to complete a scan. The radiation exposure resulting from these mini-CT scans, while higher than clinical CT scans, is below the level resulting in acute tissue damage. Hence, these scans are useful for performing clinical-type diagnostic and monitoring scans for animal models of disease and their response to treatment. "Micro-CT", with voxel size pathological accumulations of metals such as Fe and Ca, which occur in the arterial wall following hemorrhage or tissue damage. Micro-CT can also be used as a test bed for exploring the utility of several modes of X-ray image formation, such as the use of dual-energy X-ray subtraction, X-ray scatter, phase delay and refraction-based imaging for increasing the contrast amongst soft tissue components. With the recent commercial availability of high speed, multi-slice CT scanners which can be operated in dual-energy mode, some of these micro-CT scanner capabilities and insights are becoming implementable in those CT scanners. As a result, the potential diagnostic spectrum that can be addressed with those scanners is broadened considerably.

  15. Climbing Mount Efficiency--small steps, not giant leaps towards higher cloning success in farm animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oback, Björn

    2008-07-01

    Despite more than a decade of research efforts, farm animal cloning by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) is still frustratingly inefficient. Inefficiency manifests itself at different levels, which are currently not well integrated. At the molecular level, it leads to widespread genetic, epigenetic and transcriptional aberrations in cloned embryos. At the organismal level, these genome-wide abnormalities compromise development of cloned foetuses and offspring. Specific molecular defects need to be causally linked to specific cloned phenotypes, in order to design specific treatments to correct them. Cloning efficiency depends on the ability of the nuclear donor cell to be fully reprogrammed into an embryonic state and the ability of the enucleated recipient cell to carry out the reprogramming reactions. It has been postulated that reprogrammability of the somatic donor cell epigenome is influenced by its differentiation status. However, direct comparisons between cells of divergent differentiation status within several somatic lineages have found no conclusive evidence for this. Choosing somatic stem cells as donors has not improved cloning efficiency, indicating that donor cell type may be less critical for cloning success. Different recipient cells, on the other hand, vary in their reprogramming ability. In bovine, using zygotes instead of oocytes has increased cloning success. Other improvements in livestock cloning efficiency include better coordinating donor cell type with cell cycle stage and aggregating cloned embryos. In the future, it will be important to demonstrate if these small increases at every step are cumulative, adding up to an integrated cloning protocol with greatly improved efficiency.

  16. Denoising of high resolution small animal 3D PET data using the non-subsampled Haar wavelet transform

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ochoa Domínguez, Humberto de Jesús, E-mail: hochoa@uacj.mx [Departamento de Ingeniería Eléctrica y computación, Universidad Autónoma de Ciudad Juárez, Ciudad Juárez, Chih. (Mexico); Máynez, Leticia O. [Departamento de Ingeniería Eléctrica y computación, Universidad Autónoma de Ciudad Juárez, Ciudad Juárez, Chih. (Mexico); Vergara Villegas, Osslan O. [Departamento de Ingeniería Industrial, Universidad Autónoma de Ciudad Juárez, Ciudad Juárez, Chih. (Mexico); Mederos, Boris; Mejía, José M.; Cruz Sánchez, Vianey G. [Departamento de Ingeniería Eléctrica y computación, Universidad Autónoma de Ciudad Juárez, Ciudad Juárez, Chih. (Mexico)

    2015-06-01

    PET allows functional imaging of the living tissue. However, one of the most serious technical problems affecting the reconstructed data is the noise, particularly in images of small animals. In this paper, a method for high-resolution small animal 3D PET data is proposed with the aim to reduce the noise and preserve details. The method is based on the estimation of the non-subsampled Haar wavelet coefficients by using a linear estimator. The procedure is applied to the volumetric images, reconstructed without correction factors (plane reconstruction). Results show that the method preserves the structures and drastically reduces the noise that contaminates the image.

  17. SU-E-T-457: Design and Characterization of An Economical 192Ir Hemi-Brain Small Animal Irradiator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grams, M; Wilson, Z; Sio, T; Beltran, C; Tryggestad, E; Gupta, S; Blackwell, C; McCollough, K; Sarkaria, J; Furutani, K [Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To describe the design and dosimetric characterization of a simple and economical small animal irradiator. Methods: A high dose rate 192Ir brachytherapy source from a commercially available afterloader was used with a 1.3 centimeter thick tungsten collimator to provide sharp beam penumbra suitable for hemi-brain irradiation of mice. The unit is equipped with continuous gas anesthesia to allow robust animal immobilization. Dosimetric characterization of the device was performed with Gafchromic film. The penumbra from the small animal irradiator was compared under similar collimating conditions to the penumbra from 6 MV photons, 6 MeV electrons, and 20 MeV electrons from a linear accelerator as well as 300 kVp photons from an orthovoltage unit and Monte Carlo simulated 90 MeV protons. Results: The tungsten collimator provides a sharp penumbra suitable for hemi-brain irradiation, and dose rates on the order of 200 cGy/minute were achieved. The sharpness of the penumbra attainable with this device compares favorably to those measured experimentally for 6 MV photons, and 6 and 20 MeV electron beams from a linear accelerator. Additionally, the penumbra was comparable to those measured for a 300 kVp orthovoltage beam and a Monte Carlo simulated 90 MeV proton beam. Conclusions: The small animal irradiator described here can be built for under $1,000 and used in conjunction with any commercial brachytherapy afterloader to provide a convenient and cost-effective option for small animal irradiation experiments. The unit offers high dose rate delivery and sharp penumbra, which is ideal for hemi-brain irradiation of mice. With slight modifications to the design, irradiation of sites other than the brain could be accomplished easily. Due to its simplicity and low cost, the apparatus described is an attractive alternative for small animal irradiation experiments requiring a sharp penumbra.

  18. Small-Animal PET Imaging of Tau Pathology with 18F-THK5117 in 2 Transgenic Mouse Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brendel, Matthias; Jaworska, Anna; Probst, Federico; Overhoff, Felix; Korzhova, Viktoria; Lindner, Simon; Carlsen, Janette; Bartenstein, Peter; Harada, Ryuichi; Kudo, Yukitsuka; Haass, Christian; Van Leuven, Fred; Okamura, Nobuyuki; Herms, Jochen; Rominger, Axel

    2016-05-01

    Abnormal accumulation of tau aggregates in the brain is one of the hallmarks of Alzheimer disease neuropathology. We visualized tau deposition in vivo with the previously developed 2-arylquinoline derivative (18)F-THK5117 using small-animal PET in conjunction with autoradiography and immunohistochemistry gold standard assessment in 2 transgenic mouse models expressing hyperphosphorylated tau. Small-animal PET recordings were obtained in groups of P301S (n = 11) and biGT mice (n = 16) of different ages, with age-matched wild-type (WT) serving as controls. After intravenous administration of 16 ± 2 MBq of (18)F-THK5117, a dynamic 90-min emission recording was initiated for P301S mice and during 20-50 min after injection for biGT mice, followed by a 15-min transmission scan. After coregistration to the MRI atlas and scaling to the cerebellum, we performed volume-of-interest-based analysis (SUV ratio [SUVR]) and statistical parametric mapping. Small-animal PET results were compared with autoradiography ex vivo and in vitro and further validated with AT8 staining for neurofibrillary tangles. SUVRs calculated from static recordings during the interval of 20-50 min after tracer injection correlated highly with estimates of binding potential based on the entire dynamic emission recordings (R = 0.85). SUVR increases were detected in the brain stem of aged P301S mice (+11%; P parametric mapping analysis. Saturable binding of the tracer was verified by autoradiographic blocking studies. In the first dedicated small-animal PET study in 2 different transgenic tauopathy mouse models using the tau tracer (18)F-THK5117, the temporal and spatial progression could be visualized in good correlation with gold standard assessments of tau accumulation. The serial small-animal PET method could afford the means for preclinical testing of novel therapeutic approaches by accommodating interanimal variability at baseline, while detection thresholds in young animals have to be considered.

  19. Multi-institutional dosimetric and geometric commissioning of image-guided small animal irradiators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindsay, P. E., E-mail: Patricia.Lindsay@rmp.uhn.on.ca [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, 610 University Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9, Canada and Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5S 1A1 (Canada); Granton, P. V.; Hoof, S. van; Hermans, J. [Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO), GROW - School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht 6201 BN (Netherlands); Gasparini, A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Jelveh, S. [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, 610 University Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9, Canada and Department of Radiation Oncology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Plesmanlaan 121, 1066 CX Amsterdam (Netherlands); Clarkson, R. [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, 610 University Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9 (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5S 1A1 (Canada); Mid-South Radiation Physics, Inc., 1801 South 54th Street, Paragould, Arkansas 72450 (United States); Kaas, J.; Wittkamper, F.; Sonke, J.-J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Plesmanlaan 121, 1066 CX Amsterdam (Netherlands); Verhaegen, F. [Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO), GROW - School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht 6201 BN (Netherlands); Medical Physics Unit, Department of Oncology, McGill University, Montreal, Québec H3G 1A4 (Canada); Jaffray, D. A. [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, 610 University Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9 (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5S 1A1 (Canada); The TECHNA Institute for the Advancement of Technology for Health, Toronto, Ontario M5G 1P5 (Canada)

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: To compare the dosimetric and geometric properties of a commercial x-ray based image-guided small animal irradiation system, installed at three institutions and to establish a complete and broadly accessible commissioning procedure. Methods: The system consists of a 225 kVp x-ray tube with fixed field size collimators ranging from 1 to 44 mm equivalent diameter. The x-ray tube is mounted opposite a flat-panel imaging detector, on a C-arm gantry with 360° coplanar rotation. Each institution performed a full commissioning of their system, including half-value layer, absolute dosimetry, relative dosimetry (profiles, percent depth dose, and relative output factors), and characterization of the system geometry and mechanical flex of the x-ray tube and detector. Dosimetric measurements were made using Farmer-type ionization chambers, small volume air and liquid ionization chambers, and radiochromic film. The results between the three institutions were compared. Results: At 225 kVp, with 0.3 mm Cu added filtration, the first half value layer ranged from 0.9 to 1.0 mm Cu. The dose-rate in-air for a 40 × 40 mm{sup 2} field size, at a source-to-axis distance of 30 cm, ranged from 3.5 to 3.9 Gy/min between the three institutions. For field sizes between 2.5 mm diameter and 40 × 40 mm{sup 2}, the differences between percent depth dose curves up to depths of 3.5 cm were between 1% and 4% on average, with the maximum difference being 7%. The profiles agreed very well for fields >5 mm diameter. The relative output factors differed by up to 6% for fields larger than 10 mm diameter, but differed by up to 49% for fields ≤5 mm diameter. The mechanical characteristics of the system (source-to-axis and source-to-detector distances) were consistent between all three institutions. There were substantial differences in the flex of each system. Conclusions: With the exception of the half-value layer, and mechanical properties, there were significant differences between the

  20. System calibration and image reconstruction for a new small-animal SPECT system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yi-Chun

    A novel small-animal SPECT imager, FastSPECT II, was recently developed at the Center for Gamma-Ray Imaging. FastSPECT II consists of two rings of eight modular scintillation cameras and list-mode data-acquisition electronics that enable stationary and dynamic imaging studies. The instrument is equipped with exchangeable aperture assemblies and adjustable camera positions for selections of magnifications, pinhole sizes, and fields of view (FOVs). The purpose of SPECT imaging is to recover the radiotracer distribution in the object from the measured image data. Accurate knowledge of the imaging system matrix (referred to as H) is essential for image reconstruction. To assure that all of the system physics is contained in the matrix, experimental calibration methods for the individual cameras and the whole imaging system were developed and carefully performed. The average spatial resolution over the FOV of FastSPECT II in its low-magnification (2.4X) configuration is around 2.4 mm, computed from the Fourier crosstalk matrix. The system sensitivity measured with a 99mTc point source at the center of the FOV is about 267 cps/MBq. The system detectability was evaluated by computing the ideal-observer performance on SKE/BKE (signal-known-exactly/background-known-exactly) detection tasks. To reduce the system-calibration time and achieve finer reconstruction grids, two schemes for interpolating H were implemented and compared: these are centroid interpolation with Gaussian fitting and Fourier interpolation. Reconstructed phantom and mouse-cardiac images demonstrated the effectiveness of the H-matrix interpolation. Tomographic reconstruction can be formulated as a linear inverse problem and solved using statistical-estimation techniques. Several iterative reconstruction algorithms were introduced, including maximum-likelihood expectation-maximization (ML-EM) and its ordered-subsets (OS) version, and some least-squares (LS) and weighted-least-squares (WLS) algorithms such

  1. Commentary on key aspects of fecal microbiota transplantation in small animal practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaitman J

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Jennifer Chaitman,1 Albert E Jergens,2 Frederic Gaschen,3 Jose F Garcia-Mazcorro,4 Stanley L Marks,5 Alicia G Marroquin-Cardona,4 Keith Richter,6 Giacomo Rossi,7 Jan S Suchodolski,8 J Scott Weese9 1Veterinary Internal Medicine and Allergy Specialists, New York, NY, 2College of Veterinary Medicine, Iowa State University, Ames, IA, 3School of Veterinary Medicine, Lousiana State University, LA, USA; 4Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León, General Escobedo, Nuevo León, Mexico; 5Department of Medicine & Epidemiology, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, Davis, 6Veterinary Specialty Hospital of San Diego, San Diego, CA, USA; 7Department of Veterinary Science, School of Veterinary Medical Sciences, University of Camerino, Camerino, Italy; 8Gastrointestinal Laboratory, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX, USA; 9Ontario Veterinary College, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON, Canada Abstract: The gastrointestinal tract of dogs, cats, and other mammals including humans harbors millions of beneficial microorganisms that regulate and maintain health. Fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT is a procedure involving the administration of a fecal infusion from a healthy individual (donor to a patient with disease to help improve health. Despite the effectiveness of FMT to treat intestinal disorders in humans, in particular recurrent Clostridium difficile infection, there is a paucity of scientific data regarding the application of FMT in veterinary patients. Here, we outline key aspects of FMT in small animal practice. Keywords: microbiota, health, fecal microbiota transplantation, dysbiosis, enteropathogens, immune system

  2. An Asymmetric Birdcage Coil for Small-animal MR Imaging at 7T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyoung-Nam; Han, Sang-Doc; Seo, Jeung-Hoon; Heo, Phil; Yoo, Dongkyeom; Im, Geun Ho; Lee, Jung Hee

    2016-09-30

    The birdcage (BC) coil is currently being utilized for uniform radiofrequency (RF) transmit/receive (Tx/Rx) or Tx-only configuration in many magnetic resonance (MR) imaging applications, but insufficient magnetic flux (|B1|) density and their non-uniform distribution still exists in high-field (HF) environments. We demonstrate that the asymmetric birdcage (ABC) transmit/receive (Tx/Rx) volume coil, which is a modified standard birdcage (SBC) coil with the end ring split into two halves, is suitable for improving the |B1| sensitivity in 7T small-animal MR imaging. Cylindrical SBC and ABC coils with 35 mm diameter were constructed and bench tested for mouse body MR imaging at 300 MHz using a 7T scanner. To assess the ABC coil performance, computational electromagnetic (EM) simulation and 7T MR experiment were performed by using a cylindrical phantom and in vivo mouse body and quantitatively compared with the SBC coil in terms of |B1| distribution, RF transmit (|B1(+)|) field, and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). The bench measurements of the two BC coils are similar, yielding a quality value (Q-value) of 74.42 for the SBC coil and 77.06 for the ABC coil. The computational calculation results clearly show that the proposed ABC coil offers superior |B1| field and |B1(+)| field sensitivity in the central axial slice compared with the SBC coil. There was also high SNR and uniformly distributed flip angle (FA) under the loaded condition of mouse body in the 7T experiment. Although ABC geometry allows a further increase in the |B1| field and |B1(+)| field sensitivity in only the central axial slice, the geometrical modification of the SBC coil can make a high performance RF coil feasible in the central axial slice and also make target imaging possible in the diagonal direction.

  3. Quantitative analysis of L-SPECT system for small animal brain imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Tasneem; Tahtali, Murat; Pickering, Mark R.

    2016-03-01

    This paper aims to investigate the performance of a newly proposed L-SPECT system for small animal brain imaging. The L-SPECT system consists of an array of 100 × 100 micro range diameter pinholes. The proposed detector module has a 48 mm by 48 mm active area and the system is based on a pixelated array of NaI crystals (10×10×10 mm elements) coupled with an array of position sensitive photomultiplier tubes (PSPMTs). The performance of this system was evaluated with pinhole radii of 50 μm, 60 μm and 100 μm. Monte Carlo simulation studies using the Geant4 Application for Tomographic Emission (GATE) software package validate the performance of this novel dual head L-SPECT system where a geometric mouse phantom is used to investigate its performance. All SPECT data were obtained using 120 projection views from 0° to 360° with a 3° step. Slices were reconstructed using conventional filtered back projection (FBP) algorithm. We have evaluated the quality of the images in terms of spatial resolution (FWHM) based on line spread function, the system sensitivity, the point source response function and the image quality. The sensitivity of our newly proposed L- SPECT system was about 4500 cps/μCi at 6 cm along with excellent full width at half-maximum (FWHM) using 50 μm pinhole aperture at several radii of rotation. The analysis results show the combination of excellent spatial resolution and high detection efficiency over an energy range between 20-160 keV. The results demonstrate that SPECT imaging using a pixelated L-SPECT detector module is applicable in a quantitative study of mouse brain imaging.

  4. Automated analysis of small animal PET studies through deformable registration to an atlas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gutierrez, Daniel F. [Geneva University Hospital, Division of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Geneva 4 (Switzerland); Zaidi, Habib [Geneva University Hospital, Division of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Geneva 4 (Switzerland); Geneva University, Geneva Neuroscience Center, Geneva (Switzerland); University of Groningen, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands)

    2012-11-15

    This work aims to develop a methodology for automated atlas-guided analysis of small animal positron emission tomography (PET) data through deformable registration to an anatomical mouse model. A non-rigid registration technique is used to put into correspondence relevant anatomical regions of rodent CT images from combined PET/CT studies to corresponding CT images of the Digimouse anatomical mouse model. The latter provides a pre-segmented atlas consisting of 21 anatomical regions suitable for automated quantitative analysis. Image registration is performed using a package based on the Insight Toolkit allowing the implementation of various image registration algorithms. The optimal parameters obtained for deformable registration were applied to simulated and experimental mouse PET/CT studies. The accuracy of the image registration procedure was assessed by segmenting mouse CT images into seven regions: brain, lungs, heart, kidneys, bladder, skeleton and the rest of the body. This was accomplished prior to image registration using a semi-automated algorithm. Each mouse segmentation was transformed using the parameters obtained during CT to CT image registration. The resulting segmentation was compared with the original Digimouse atlas to quantify image registration accuracy using established metrics such as the Dice coefficient and Hausdorff distance. PET images were then transformed using the same technique and automated quantitative analysis of tracer uptake performed. The Dice coefficient and Hausdorff distance show fair to excellent agreement and a mean registration mismatch distance of about 6 mm. The results demonstrate good quantification accuracy in most of the regions, especially the brain, but not in the bladder, as expected. Normalized mean activity estimates were preserved between the reference and automated quantification techniques with relative errors below 10 % in most of the organs considered. The proposed automated quantification technique is

  5. Magnetic-resonance-imaging-coupled broadband near-infrared tomography system for small animal brain studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Heng; Springett, Roger; Dehghani, Hamid; Pogue, Brian W.; Paulsen, Keith D.; Dunn, Jeff F.

    2005-04-01

    A novel magnetic-resonance-coupled broadband near-infrared (NIR) tomography system for small animal brain studies is described. Several features of the image formation approach are new in NIR tomography and represent major advances in the path to recovering high-resolution hemoglobin and oxygen saturation images of tissue. The NIR data were broadband and continuous wave and were used along with a second-derivative-based estimation of the path length from water absorption. The path length estimation from water was then used along with the attenuation spectrum to recover absorption and reduced scattering coefficient images at multiple wavelengths and then to recover images of total hemoglobin and oxygen saturation. Going beyond these basics of NIR tomography, software has been developed to allow inclusion of structures derived from MR imaging (MRI) for the external and internal tissue boundaries, thereby improving the accuracy and spatial resolution of the properties in each tissue type. The system has been validated in both tissue-simulating phantoms, with 10% accuracy observed, and in a rat cranium imaging experiment. The latter experiment used variation in inspired oxygen (FiO2) to vary the observed hemoglobin and oxygen saturation images. Quantitative agreement was observed between the changes in deoxyhemoglobin values derived from NIR and the changes predicted with blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) MRI. This system represents the initial stage in what will likely be a larger role for NIR tomography, coupled to MRI, and illustrates that the technological challenges of using continuous-wave broadband data and inclusion of a priori structural information can be met with careful phantom studies.

  6. Bioaerosol sampling for airborne bacteria in a small animal veterinary teaching hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tisha A. M. Harper

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Airborne microorganisms within the hospital environment can potentially cause infection in susceptible patients. The objectives of this study were to identify, quantify, and determine the nosocomial potential of common airborne microorganisms present within a small animal teaching hospital. Methods: Bioaerosol sampling was done initially in all 11 rooms and, subsequently, weekly samples were taken from selected rooms over a 9-week period. Samples were collected twice (morning and afternoon at each site on each sampling day. The rooms were divided into two groups: Group 1, in which morning sampling was post-cleaning and afternoon sampling was during activity, and Group 2, in which morning sampling was pre-cleaning and afternoon sampling was post-cleaning. The total aerobic bacterial plate counts per m3 and bacterial identification were done using standard microbiological methods. Results: A total of 14 bacterial genera were isolated with the most frequent being Micrococcus spp. followed by species of Corynebacterium, Bacillus, and Staphylococcus. There was a significant interaction between location and time for rooms in Group 1 (p=0.0028 but not in Group 2 (p>0.05. Microbial counts for rooms in Group 2 were significantly greater in the mornings than in the afternoon (p=0.0049. The microbial counts were also significantly different between some rooms (p=0.0333. Conclusion: The detection of significantly higher airborne microbial loads in different rooms at different times of the day suggests that the probability of acquiring nosocomial infections is higher at these times and locations.

  7. NEMA NU 2-2007 performance measurements of the Siemens Inveon™ preclinical small animal PET system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemp, Brad J.; Hruska, Carrie B.; McFarland, Aaron R.; Lenox, Mark W.; Lowe, Val J.

    2009-04-01

    National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA) NU 2-2007 performance measurements were conducted on the Inveon™ preclinical small animal PET system developed by Siemens Medical Solutions. The scanner uses 1.51 × 1.51 × 10 mm LSO crystals grouped in 20 × 20 blocks; a tapered light guide couples the LSO crystals of a block to a position-sensitive photomultiplier tube. There are 80 rings with 320 crystals per ring and the ring diameter is 161 mm. The transaxial and axial fields of view (FOVs) are 100 and 127 mm, respectively. The scanner can be docked to a CT scanner; the performance characteristics of the CT component are not included herein. Performance measurements of spatial resolution, sensitivity, scatter fraction and count rate performance were obtained for different energy windows and coincidence timing window widths. For brevity, the results described here are for an energy window of 350-650 keV and a coincidence timing window of 3.43 ns. The spatial resolution at the center of the transaxial and axial FOVs was 1.56, 1.62 and 2.12 mm in the tangential, radial and axial directions, respectively, and the system sensitivity was 36.2 cps kBq-1 for a line source (7.2% for a point source). For mouse- and rat-sized phantoms, the scatter fraction was 5.7% and 14.6%, respectively. The peak noise equivalent count rate with a noisy randoms estimate was 1475 kcps at 130 MBq for the mouse-sized phantom and 583 kcps at 74 MBq for the rat-sized phantom. The performance measurements indicate that the Inveon™ PET scanner is a high-resolution tomograph with excellent sensitivity that is capable of imaging at a high count rate.

  8. NEMA NU 2-2007 performance measurements of the Siemens Inveon preclinical small animal PET system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemp, Brad J; Hruska, Carrie B; McFarland, Aaron R; Lenox, Mark W; Lowe, Val J

    2009-04-21

    National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA) NU 2-2007 performance measurements were conducted on the Inveon preclinical small animal PET system developed by Siemens Medical Solutions. The scanner uses 1.51 x 1.51 x 10 mm LSO crystals grouped in 20 x 20 blocks; a tapered light guide couples the LSO crystals of a block to a position-sensitive photomultiplier tube. There are 80 rings with 320 crystals per ring and the ring diameter is 161 mm. The transaxial and axial fields of view (FOVs) are 100 and 127 mm, respectively. The scanner can be docked to a CT scanner; the performance characteristics of the CT component are not included herein. Performance measurements of spatial resolution, sensitivity, scatter fraction and count rate performance were obtained for different energy windows and coincidence timing window widths. For brevity, the results described here are for an energy window of 350-650 keV and a coincidence timing window of 3.43 ns. The spatial resolution at the center of the transaxial and axial FOVs was 1.56, 1.62 and 2.12 mm in the tangential, radial and axial directions, respectively, and the system sensitivity was 36.2 cps kBq(-1) for a line source (7.2% for a point source). For mouse- and rat-sized phantoms, the scatter fraction was 5.7% and 14.6%, respectively. The peak noise equivalent count rate with a noisy randoms estimate was 1475 kcps at 130 MBq for the mouse-sized phantom and 583 kcps at 74 MBq for the rat-sized phantom. The performance measurements indicate that the Inveon PET scanner is a high-resolution tomograph with excellent sensitivity that is capable of imaging at a high count rate.

  9. Development of a PET Insert for simultaneously small animal PET/MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yingjie; Zhang, Zhiming; Li, Daowu; Liu, Shuangquan; Wang, Peilin; Feng, Baotong; Chai, Pei; Wei, Long [Division of Nuclear Technology and Applications, Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 100049 (China); Beijing Engineering Research Center of Radiographic Techniques and Equipment, Beijing, 100049 (China)

    2015-05-18

    PET/MR is a new multi-modality imaging system which provide both structural and functional information with good soft tissue imaging ability and no ionizing radiation. In recent years, PET/MR is under major progress because of the development of silicon photomultipliers (SiPM). The goal of this study is to develop a MRI compatible PET insert based on SiPM and LYSO scintillator. The PET system was constituted by the detector ring, electronics and software. The detector ring consists of 16 detector module. The inner diameter of the ring was 151 mm, the external diameter was 216 mm, which was big enough for small animal research, e.g. rat, rabbit and tupaia. The sensor of each module was 2*2 SensL SPMArraySL, coupled with an array of 14 x 14 LYSO crystals, each crystal measuring 2 mm x 2 mm 10 mm. The detector was encapsulated in a copper box for light and magnetic shielding. Resister charge multiplexing circuit was used in the front end electronics. Each detector output 8X and 8Y position signals. One summed timing signal was extracted from the common cathode of all 64 channels. All these signals were transmitted to digital electronic board by a 3 m long coaxial cable from inside of the MR to the outside. Each digital electronic board handled 8 detector modules based on FPGA to obtain the timing, position and energy information of a single event. And then these single events were sent to the coincidence processing board to produce coincidence packets which are prepared for further processing. A 0.2mCi 68Ge line source was used to do the preliminary imaging test. The image was reconstructed by 3D-OSEM algorithm. The initial result proved the system to be feasible as a PET. FDG phantom imaging and simultaneous PET/MR imaging are in progress.

  10. Attitudes of Austrian veterinarians towards euthanasia in small animal practice: impacts of age and gender on views on euthanasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartnack, Sonja; Springer, Svenja; Pittavino, Marta; Grimm, Herwig

    2016-02-04

    Euthanasia of pets has been described by veterinarians as "the best and the worst" of the profession. The most commonly mentioned ethical dilemmas veterinarians face in small animal practice are: limited treatment options due to financial constraints, euthanizing of healthy animals and owners wishing to continue treatment of terminally ill animals. The aim of the study was to gain insight into the attitudes of Austrian veterinarians towards euthanasia of small animals. This included assessing their agreement with euthanasia in exemplified case scenarios, potentially predicted by demographic variables (e.g. gender, age, working in small animal practice, employment, working in a team, numbers of performed euthanasia). Further describing the veterinarians' agreement with a number of different normative and descriptive statements, including coping strategies. A questionnaire with nine euthanasia scenarios, 26 normative and descriptive statements, and demographic data were sent to all members of the Austrian Chamber of Veterinary Surgeons (n = 2478). In total, 486 veterinarians answered sufficiently completely to enable analyses. Responses were first explored descriptively before being formally analysed using linear regression and additive Bayesian networks - a multivariate regression methodology - in order to identify joint relationships between the demographic variables, the statements and each of the nine euthanasia scenarios. Mutual dependencies between the demographic variables were found, i.e. female compared to male veterinarians worked mostly in small animal practice, and working mostly in small animal practice was linked to performing more euthanasia per month. Gender and age were found to be associated with views on euthanasia: female veterinarians and veterinarians having worked for less years were more likely to disagree with euthanasia in at least some of the convenience euthanasia scenarios. The number of veterinarians working together was found to be

  11. Effect of bowelrehabilitative therapy on structural adaptation of remnant small intestine: animal experiment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xin Zhou; Yuan Xin Li; Ning Li; Jie Shou Li

    2001-01-01

    AIM To investigate the individual and thecombined effects of glutamine, dietary fiber,and growth hormone on the structural adaptationof the remnant small bowel.METHODS Forty-two adult male Sprague-Dawley rats underwent 85% mid-small bowel( TPN ) support during the first threepostoperational days. From the 4thpostoperational day, animals were randomlyassigned to receive 7 different treatments for 8days: TPNcon group, receiving TPN and enteral20 g.L- 1 glycine perfusion; TPN + Gin group,receiving TPN and enteral 20 g.L-1 glutamineperfusion; ENcon group, receiving enteralnutrition (EN) fortified with 20 g@L-1 glycine; EN+ Gin group, enteral nutrition fortified with20g. L-1 glutamine; EN + Fib group, enteralnutrition and 2 g. d- 1 oral soybean fiber; EN + GHgroup, enteral nutrition and subcutaneousgrowth hormone (GH) (0.31U) injection twicedaily; and ENint group, glutamine-enriched EN.oral soybean fiber, and subcutaneous GHinjection.RESULTS Enteral glutamine perfusion duringTPN increased the small intestinal villus height(jejunal villus height 250 μm ±29 μm in TPNconvs 330 μm ± 54 μm in TPN + Gin, ileal villus height260μm±28μm in TPNcon vs 330 μm±22μm inTPN + Gin, P<0.05) and mucosa thickness( jejunal mucosa thickness 360 μm ± 32 μm inTPNcon vs 460 μm ± 65 μm in TPN + Gin, ilealmucosa thickness 400 μm ± 25 μm in TPNcon vs490μm ± 11 μm in TPN + Gin, P<0.05) incomparison with the TPNcon group. Either fibersupplementation or GH administration improvedbody mass gain (end body weight 270 g ± 3.6 g inEN+Fib, 265.7 g ± 3.3 g in EN+GH, vs 257g±3.3g in ENcon, P<0.05), elevated plasmainsulin-like growth factor ( IGF-Ⅰ ) level(880 μg. L-1 ± 52 μg. L-1 in EN + Fib, 1200 μg. L-1± 96 μg. L- 1 in EN ± GH, vs 620 μg. L-1 ±43 μg. L-1 in ENcon, P<0.05), and increased thevillus height (jejunum 560 μm ± 44 μm in EN ± Fib,530 μm± 30 μm in EN ± GH, vs 450 μm ± 44 μm inENcon, ileum 400 μm ± 30 μm in EN + Fib, 380 μm±49 μm in EN

  12. High-resolution short-exposure small-animal laboratory x-ray phase-contrast tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsson, Daniel H.; Vågberg, William; Yaroshenko, Andre; Yildirim, Ali Önder; Hertz, Hans M.

    2016-12-01

    X-ray computed tomography of small animals and their organs is an essential tool in basic and preclinical biomedical research. In both phase-contrast and absorption tomography high spatial resolution and short exposure times are of key importance. However, the observable spatial resolutions and achievable exposure times are presently limited by system parameters rather than more fundamental constraints like, e.g., dose. Here we demonstrate laboratory tomography with few-ten μm spatial resolution and few-minute exposure time at an acceptable dose for small-animal imaging, both with absorption contrast and phase contrast. The method relies on a magnifying imaging scheme in combination with a high-power small-spot liquid-metal-jet electron-impact source. The tomographic imaging is demonstrated on intact mouse, phantoms and excised lungs, both healthy and with pulmonary emphysema.

  13. Imaging of lung metastasis tumor mouse model using [{sup 18}F]FDG small animal PET and CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, June Youp; Woo, Sang Keun; Lee, Tae Sup [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences (KIRAMS), Seoul (Korea, Republic of)] (and others)

    2007-02-15

    The purpose of this study is to image metastaic lung melanoma model with optimal pre-conditions for animal handling by using [{sup 18}F]FDG small animal PET and clinical CT. The pre-conditions for lung region tumor imaging were 16-22 h fasting and warming temperature at 30 .deg. C. Small animal PET image was obtained at 60 min postinjection of 7.4 MBq [{sup 18}F]FDG and compared pattern of [{sup 18}F]FDG uptake and glucose standard uptake value (SUVG) of lung region between Ketamine/Xylazine (Ke/Xy) and Isoflurane (Iso) anesthetized group in normal mice. Metastasis tumor mouse model to lung was established by intravenous injection of B16-F10 cells in C57BL/6 mice. In lung metastasis tumor model, [{sup 18}F]FDG image was obtained and fused with anatomical clinical CT image. Average blood glucose concentration in normal mice were 128.0 {+-} 22.87 and 86.0 {+-} 21.65 mg/dL in Ke/Xy group and Iso group, respectively. Ke/Xy group showed 1.5 fold higher blood glucose concentration than Iso group. Lung to Background ratio (L/B) in SUVG image was 8.6 {+-} 0.48 and 12.1 {+-}0.63 in Ke/Xy group and Iso group, respectively. In tumor detection in lung region, [{sup 18}F]FDG image of Iso group was better than that of Ke/Xy group, because of high L/B ratio. Metastatic tumor location in [{sup 18}F]FDG small animal PET image was confirmed by fusion image using clinical CT. Tumor imaging in small animal lung region with [{sup 18}F]FDG small animal PET should be considered pre-conditions which fasting, warming and an anesthesia during [{sup 18}F]FDG uptake. Fused imaging with small animal PET and CT image could be useful for the detection of metastatic tumor in lung region.

  14. Small and large animal models in cardiac contraction research: advantages and disadvantages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milani-Nejad, Nima; Janssen, Paul M L

    2014-03-01

    The mammalian heart is responsible for not only pumping blood throughout the body but also adjusting this pumping activity quickly depending upon sudden changes in the metabolic demands of the body. For the most part, the human heart is capable of performing its duties without complications; however, throughout many decades of use, at some point this system encounters problems. Research into the heart's activities during healthy states and during adverse impacts that occur in disease states is necessary in order to strategize novel treatment options to ultimately prolong and improve patients' lives. Animal models are an important aspect of cardiac research where a variety of cardiac processes and therapeutic targets can be studied. However, there are differences between the heart of a human being and an animal and depending on the specific animal, these differences can become more pronounced and in certain cases limiting. There is no ideal animal model available for cardiac research, the use of each animal model is accompanied with its own set of advantages and disadvantages. In this review, we will discuss these advantages and disadvantages of commonly used laboratory animals including mouse, rat, rabbit, canine, swine, and sheep. Since the goal of cardiac research is to enhance our understanding of human health and disease and help improve clinical outcomes, we will also discuss the role of human cardiac tissue in cardiac research. This review will focus on the cardiac ventricular contractile and relaxation kinetics of humans and animal models in order to illustrate these differences.

  15. Optimization of LSO/LuYAP phoswich detector for small animal PET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Jin Ho; Choi, Yong; Chung, Yong Hyun; Devroede, Olivier; Krieguer, Magalie; Bruyndonckx, Peter; Tavernier, Stefaan

    2007-02-01

    LSO/LuYAP phoswich detectors for small animal PET were developed to measure the depth of interaction (DOI), and to improve the spatial resolution at the edge of the field of view (FOV). The aim of this study was to optimize the optical coupling conditions between the crystal and photomultiplier tube (PMT) to maximize the light-collection efficiency, and to develop a method for rejecting scatter events by applying an equal energy window in each crystal layer. The light yields of the phoswich detector were estimated by changing the refractive index of the optical coupling material using a DETECT simulation. The accuracy of the DOI measurement on the phoswich detector, using an optical coupling material with the optimal light yield, were evaluated experimentally and compared with the air condition. The energy window for the photopeak events cannot be applied properly because the light outputs of LSO and LuYAP are different. The LSO/LuYAP photopeaks need to be superposed in order to effectively discriminate the scattered events by applying an equal energy window. The photopeaks of the LSO and LuYAP can be superposed by inserting a reflecting material between the crystals. The optimal coverage ratio of the inserting material was derived from a DETECT simulation, and its performance was investigated. In the simulation result, optimal refractive index of the optical coupling material was 1.7. The average DOI measurement errors of the LSO/LuYAP were 0.6%/3.4% and 4.9%/41.4% in the phoswich detector with and without an optical coupling material, respectively. The photopeaks of the LSO and LuYAP were superposed by covering 75% of the contact surface between the crystals with white Teflon. The DOI measurement errors of the LSO/LuYAP were 0.2%/2.4%. In this study, the optimal condition of the optical coupling material inserted between the crystal and PMT was derived to improve the accuracy of DOI measurement, and a photopeak superposition method of the LSO and LuYAP was

  16. Small animal PET based on 16x16 TSV-MPPCs and monolithic crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez, Antonio; Aguilar, Albert Talens; Conde, Pablo; Hernadez, Liczandro Hernadez; Vidal San Sebastian, Luis Fernando [Institute for Instrumentation in Molecular Imaging, i3M-CSIC, Valencia (Spain); Salbador, Carlos Correcher; Solsona, Cesar Molinos [Oncovision, Valencia (Spain); Junge, Sven; Lankes, Konrad [Bruker BioSpin (Germany); Benlloch, Jose Maria [Institute for Instrumentation in Molecular Imaging, i3M-CSIC, Valencia (Spain)

    2015-05-18

    In this work we present the design of a small animal PET based on 8 high-density arrays of MPPCs and monolithic scintillators. The MPPCs arrays are composed of 16x16 TSV-type (3x3 mm{sup 2}) elements covering a rough active area of 5x5 cm{sup 2}. A single LYSO block with a thickness of 10mm has been mounted on each detector. Black paint has been applied to the entrance and lateral faces of the crystal to preserve the scintillation light distribution. The axial and transaxial FOVs of one ring are 48 mm and 80 mm, respectively. Each MPPC array has been directly attached to a resistive readout circuit that provides outputs for each row and column of the array. These 32 signals are read with flexible boards 30 cm apart from the PET detector without any additional connectors in between. The PET-system is intended for in-line acquisition in front of MR scanners and as PET-insert inside the sensitive MRI volume. For this purpose, it is necessary to avoid magnetic sensible materials, such as nickel, and to prevent eddy currents in metallic structures induced by the MRI gradients. All detectors are air cooled and kept at temperatures of approximately 20{sup o}C with a variation below 0.05{sup o}C. The intrinsic resolution is 2.2 mm at the crystal center (averaged over all 2.6 mm) when Center of Gravity methods are used to resolve the impact position. This value is about a factor 1.5 better than results obtained with the H8500 PSPMT (64 PADs) and similar scintillators. With an improved collimator with holes with only 0.8mm diameter and a length of 70 mm, an intrinsic detector resolution of 1.1mm was reached. The energy resolutions of ROIs of 1x1 cm{sup 2} showed FWHM values in the range of 14%.

  17. Animal Models for Small for Gestational Age and Fetal Programing of Adult Disease

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    Fetal growth retardation is a fetal adaptation in response to inadequate supply of oxygen and/or nutrients. Animal models of intrauterine growth retardation are an invaluable tool to question the genetic, molecular and cellular events that determine fetal growth and development. Rodent and non-litter bearing animals are mammalian system with similar embryology, anatomy and physiology to humans. Utilization of these systems has led to a greater understanding of the pathophysiology and conseque...

  18. The characteristics of human antibody targeting the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor in vivo for radioimmunotherapy in a small animal model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Eun Jung; Choi, Tae Hyun; Kim, Byoung Soo; Cheon, Gi Jeong [Korea Institue of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Kwang Won; Chang, Ki Hwan; Shin, Yong Won; Ryoo, Kyung Hwan; Shin, Yong Nam; Kim, Se Ho [Green Cross Corp., Yongin (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-05-15

    The identification of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) as an oncogene has led to the development of anticancer therapeutics directed against EGFR, including Erbitux for colon cancer. Many therapeutic approaches are aimed at the EGFR. Erbitux is example of monoclonal antibody inhibitors. The monoclonal antibodies block the extracellular ligand binding domain. EGFR4-2, IgG human monoclonal antibody, has been developed on the basis of human antibody gene library in Green Cross Corp. Small animal imaging is useful for preclinical evaluation of radiolabeled antibody to see biodistribution and targeting ability at serial time points in same animals

  19. Biological effects of high strength electric fields on small laboratory animals. Interim progress report, March 9, 1976--September 8, 1976

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, R.D.; Kaune, W.T.; Decker, J.R.; Hjeresen, D.L.

    1976-09-01

    Progress is reported on a broad and comprehensive series of biological experiments made under strictly controlled laboratory conditions to screen for possible effects of exposure to 60-Hz electric fields on small laboratory animals. Electric field strengths comparable to and exceeding those under existing and anticipated transmission line designs will be used. Dosimetry studies will complement the animal studies to establish the relationship between tissue dose and any observed biological effects. Information derived from this project will provide a better basis for evaluating potential hazards of exposure to 60-Hz electric fields and help define parameters to be studied in clinical evaluations on humans.

  20. Anesthesia condition for {sup 18}F-FDG imaging of lung metastasis tumors using small animal PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woo, Sang-Keun; Lee, Tae Sup; Kim, Kyeong Min; Kim, June-Youp; Jung, Jae Ho; Kang, Joo Hyun [Division of Nuclear Medicine and RI Application, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences (KIRAMS), Nowon-Gu, Seoul 139-706 (Korea, Republic of); Cheon, Gi Jeong [Division of Nuclear Medicine and RI Application, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences (KIRAMS), Nowon-Gu, Seoul 139-706 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Nuclear Medicine, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences (KIRAMS), Nowon-Gu, Seoul 139-706 (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: larry@kcch.re.kr; Choi, Chang Woon; Lim, Sang Moo [Division of Nuclear Medicine and RI Application, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences (KIRAMS), Nowon-Gu, Seoul 139-706 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Nuclear Medicine, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences (KIRAMS), Nowon-Gu, Seoul 139-706 (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-01-15

    Small animal positron emission tomography (PET) with {sup 18}F-FDG has been increasingly used for tumor imaging in the murine model. The aim of this study was to establish the anesthesia condition for imaging of lung metastasis tumor using small animal {sup 18}F-FDG PET. Methods: To determine the impact of anesthesia on {sup 18}F-FDG distribution in normal mice, five groups were studied under the following conditions: no anesthesia, ketamine and xylazine (Ke/Xy), 0.5% isoflurane (Iso 0.5), 1% isoflurane (Iso 1) and 2% isoflurane (Iso 2). The ex vivo counting, standard uptake value (SUV) image and glucose SUV of {sup 18}F-FDG in various tissues were evaluated. The {sup 18}F-FDG images in the lung metastasis tumor model were obtained under no anesthesia, Ke/Xy and Iso 0.5, and registered with CT image to clarify the tumor region. Results: Blood glucose concentration and muscle uptake of {sup 18}F-FDG in the Ke/Xy group markedly increased more than in the other groups. The Iso 2 group increased {sup 18}F-FDG uptake in heart compared with the other groups. The Iso 0.5 anesthesized group showed the lowest {sup 18}F-FDG uptake in heart and chest wall. The small size of lung metastasis tumor (2 mm) was clearly visualized by {sup 18}F-FDG image with the Iso 0.5 anesthesia. Conclusion: Small animal {sup 18}F-FDG PET imaging with Iso 0.5 anesthesia was appropriate for the detection of lung metastasis tumor. To acquire {sup 18}F-FDG PET images with small animal PET, the type and level of anesthetic should be carefully considered to be suitable for the visualization of target tissue in the experimental model.

  1. Preclinical molecular imaging: development of instrumentation for translational research with small laboratory animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mejia, Jorge; Miranda, Ana Claudia Camargo; Durante, Ana Claudia Ranucci; Oliveira, Larissa Rolim de; Barboza, Marycel Rosa Felisa Figols de; Rosell, Katerin Taboada; Jardim, Daniele Pereira; Campos, Alexandre Holthausen; Reis, Marilia Alves Dos; Catanoso, Marcela Forli; Galvis-Alonso, Orfa Yineth; Cabral, Francisco Romero

    2016-01-01

    To present the result of upgrading a clinical gamma-camera to be used to obtain in vivo tomographic images of small animal organs, and its application to register cardiac, renal and neurological images. An updated version of the miniSPECT upgrading device was built, which is composed of mechanical, electronic and software subsystems. The device was attached to a Discovery VH (General Electric Healthcare) gamma-camera, which was retired from the clinical service and installed at the Centro de Imagem Pré-Clínica of the Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein. The combined system was characterized, determining operational parameters, such as spatial resolution, magnification, maximum acceptable target size, number of projections, and acquisition and reconstruction times. Images were obtained with 0.5mm spatial resolution, with acquisition and reconstruction times between 30 and 45 minutes, using iterative reconstruction with 10 to 20 iterations and 4 projection subsets. The system was validated acquiring in vivo tomographic images of the heart, kidneys and brain of normal animals (mice and adult rats), using the radiopharmaceuticals technetium-labeled hexakis-2-methoxy-isobutyl isonitrile (99mTc-Sestamibi), technetium-labeled dimercaptosuccinic acid (99mTc-DMSA) and technetium-labeled hexamethyl propyleneamine oxime (99mTc-HMPAO). This kind of application, which consists in the adaptation for an alternative objective of already existing instrumentation, resulted in a low-cost infrastructure option, allowing to carry out large scale in vivo studies with enhanced quality in several areas, such as neurology, nephrology, cardiology, among others. Apresentar o resultado da adaptação de uma gama câmara clínica para uso dedicado na obtenção de imagens tomográficas in vivo de órgãos de pequenos animais de experimentação, e de sua aplicação na obtenção de imagens cardíacas, renais e neurológicas. Foi construída uma versão atualizada do dispositivo de adapta

  2. Animal welfare and meat quality: the perspective of Uruguay, a "small" exporter country.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Campo, M; Brito, G; Montossi, F; Soares de Lima, J M; San Julián, R

    2014-11-01

    Public sensitivity towards animal welfare has risen in recent years. Uruguay is a primary meat exporter. Therefore, it is compulsory not only to provide good quality and safe meat, but also to project a welfare friendly image. Uruguayan meat production systems are mainly based on rangeland pastures but, due to international meat prices and the opening of new markets, intensive fattening systems increased. These systems include a wide range of feeding alternatives between pasture and concentrate utilization, involving differences in terms of animal welfare, carcass and meat quality, that require to be studied. Accordingly, some husbandry practices associated mainly with extensive systems must be evaluated, as well as their applicability to international recommendations related to pre-slaughter handling which may not be suitable for local conditions. In the present paper we share scientific results related to the impact of different production systems, husbandry practices and pre-slaughter procedures associated to animal welfare and meat quality in Uruguayan conditions.

  3. Factors associated with development of Canine Infectious Respiratory Disease Complex (CIRDC) in dogs in 5 Canadian small animal clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joffe, Daniel J; Lelewski, Roxana; Weese, J Scott; Mcgill-Worsley, Jamie; Shankel, Catharine; Mendonca, Sonia; Sager, Tara; Smith, Michael; Poljak, Zvonimir

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the association between presence of respiratory pathogens and development of Canine Infectious Respiratory Disease Complex (CIRDC) in dogs in 5 Canadian small animal clinics. In total, 86 dogs were tested using a commercial PCR respiratory panel; 64 dogs were considered as cases and 22 were control dogs matched by veterinary clinic. No control animals (0/22) were positive for canine parainfluenza virus (CPIV), whereas 27/64 (42%) CIRDC cases were positive. Furthermore, 81% of case dogs tested positive for Mycoplasma cynos, compared with 73% of control dogs. Canine respiratory corona virus (CRCoV) was detected in no control dogs compared with 9.4% of clinical dogs. No animals were positive for any influenza virus type A present in the diagnostic panel. Presence of CPIV was associated (P < 0.01) with the occurrence of CIRDC after adjustment for demographic factors and presence of CRCoV (P = 0.09).

  4. Low cost venom extractor based on Arduino(®) board for electrical venom extraction from arthropods and other small animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besson, Thomas; Debayle, Delphine; Diochot, Sylvie; Salinas, Miguel; Lingueglia, Eric

    2016-08-01

    Extracting venom from small species is usually challenging. We describe here an affordable and versatile electrical venom extractor based on the Arduino(®) Mega 2560 Board, which is designed to extract venom from arthropods and other small animals. The device includes fine tuning of stimulation time and voltage. It was used to collect venom without apparent deleterious effects, and characterized for the first time the venom of Zoropsis spinimana, a common spider in French Mediterranean regions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. High resolution gamma detector for small-animal positron emission tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Tao

    In this study, the performance of continuous miniature crystal element (cMiCE) detectors with LYSO crystals of different thickness were investigated. Potential designs of a cMiCE small animal positron emission tomography scanner were also evaluated by an analytical simulation approach. The cMiCE detector was proposed as a high sensitivity, low cost alternative to the prevailing discrete crystal detectors. A statistics based positioning (SBP) algorithm was developed to solve the scintillation position estimation problem and proved to be successful on a cMiCE detector with a 4 mm thick crystal. By assuming a Gaussian distribution, the distributions of the photomultiplier signals could be characterized by mean and variance, which are functions of scintillation position. After calibrating the detector on a grid of locations, a 2D table of the mean and variance can be built. The SBP algorithm searches the tables to find the location that maximizes the likelihood between the mean and variance of known positions and the incoming scintillation event. In this work, the performance of the SBP algorithm on cMiCE detectors with thicker crystals (6 and 8 mm) was studied. The stopping power of a cMiCE detector is 40% and 49% for 6 and 8 mm thick crystals respectively. The intrinsic spatial resolution is 1.2 mm and 1.4 mm FWHM for the center and corner sections of a 6 mm thick crystal detector, and 1.3 mm and 1.6 mm for center and corner of an 8 mm thick crystal detector. These results demonstrate that the cMiCE detector is a promising candidate for high resolution, high sensitivity PET applications. A maximum-likelihood (ML) clustering method was developed to empirically separate the experimental data set into two to four subgroups according to the depth-of-interaction of the detected photons. This method enabled us to build 2-DOI lookup tables (LUT) (mean and variance lookup tables for front group and back group). Using the 2-DOI SBP LUTs, the scintillation position and DOI

  6. Antibiotic Resistance in Animal and Environmental Samples Associated with Small-Scale Poultry Farming in Northwestern Ecuador

    OpenAIRE

    Braykov, Nikolay P.; Eisenberg, Joseph N. S.; Grossman, Marissa; Lixin, Zhang; Vasco, Karla; CEVALLOS, WILLIAM; Muñoz, Diana; Acevedo,Andrés; Moser, Kara A.; Marrs, Carl F.; Foxman, Betsy; Trostle, James; Trueba, GAbriel; Levy, Karen

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The effects of animal agriculture on the spread of antibiotic resistance (AR) are cross-cutting and thus require a multidisciplinary perspective. Here we use ecological, epidemiological, and ethnographic methods to examine populations of Escherichia coli circulating in the production poultry farming environment versus the domestic environment in rural Ecuador, where small-scale poultry production employing nontherapeutic antibiotics is increasingly common. We sampled 262 “production ...

  7. U-SPECT-II: An Ultra-High-Resolution Device for Molecular Small-Animal Imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Have, F.; Vastenhouw, B.; Ramakers, R.M.; Branderhorst, W.; Krah, J.O.; Ji, C.; Staelens, S.G.; Beekman, F.J.

    2009-01-01

    We present a new rodent SPECT system (U-SPECT-II) that enables molecular imaging of murine organs down to resolutions of less than half a millimeter and high-resolution total-body imaging. Methods: The U-SPECT-II is based on a triangular stationary detector set-up, an XYZ stage that moves the animal

  8. Denoising EMG and EEG for Monitoring Small Animal Models During NMR Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    electrodes. EEG and EMG signals were analogue band-pass filtered at 1-500 Hz, and sampled at 2 kHz. NMR signals were provided using a surface coil...et traitement des signaux physiologiques en vue de l’identification automatique des états de vigilance chez le petit animal », Systèmes et

  9. Creatures in the Classroom: Including Insects and Small Animals in Your Preschool Gardening Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hachey, Alyse C.; Butler, Deanna

    2012-01-01

    When doing spring planting activities, what does a teacher do while waiting for the plants to grow? This waiting time is a golden opportunity to explore another side of gardening--the creatures that make it all possible. Insects are an integral part of everyday world, having existed for over 300 million years; they are the most common animal on…

  10. Development of small-animal PET prototype using silicon photomultiplier (SiPM): initial results of phantom and animal imaging studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Sun Il; Lee, Jae Sung; Yoon, Hyun Suk; Ito, Mikiko; Ko, Guen Bae; Choi, Jae Yeon; Lee, Sung-Hyuk; Chan Song, In; Jeong, Jae Min; Lee, Dong Soo; Hong, Seong Jong

    2011-04-01

    Silicon photomultiplier (SiPM; also called a Geiger-mode avalanche photodiode) is a promising semiconductor photosensor in PET and PET/MRI because it is intrinsically MRI-compatible and has internal gain and timing properties comparable to those of a photomultiplier tube. In this study, we have developed a small-animal PET system using SiPMs and lutetium gadolinium oxyorthosilicate (LGSO) crystals and performed physical evaluation and animal imaging studies to show the feasibility of this system. The SiPM PET system consists of 8 detectors, each of which comprises 2 × 6 SiPMs and 4 × 13 LGSO crystals. Each crystal has dimensions of 1.5 × 1.5 × 7 mm. The crystal face-to-face diameter and axial field of view are 6.0 cm and 6.5 mm, respectively. Bias voltage is applied to each SiPM using a finely controlled voltage supply because the gain of the SiPM strongly depends on the supply voltage. The physical characteristics were studied by measuring energy resolution, sensitivity, and spatial resolution. Various mouse and rat images were obtained to study the feasibility of the SiPM PET system in in vivo animal studies. Reconstructed PET images using a maximum-likelihood expectation maximization algorithm were coregistered with animal CT images. All individual LGSO crystals within the detectors were clearly distinguishable in flood images obtained by irradiating the detector using a (22)Na point source. The energy resolution for individual crystals was 25.8% ± 2.6% on average for 511-keV photopeaks. The spatial resolution measured with the (22)Na point source in a warm background was 1.0 mm (2 mm off-center) and 1.4 mm (16 mm off-center) when the maximum-likelihood expectation maximization algorithm was applied. A myocardial (18)F-FDG study in mice and a skeletal (18)F study in rats demonstrated the fine spatial resolution of the scanner. The feasibility of the SiPM PET system was also confirmed in the tumor images of mice using (18)F-FDG and (68)Ga-RGD and in the

  11. The evolution of juvenile animal testing for small and large molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldrick, Paul

    2013-11-01

    Recent formalised regulatory requirements for ensuring safe use of new drugs in children has increased the requirement, when considered relevant, to perform juvenile animal testing before commencing paediatric clinical trials. A key goal of this work is to identify or examine for a developmental or toxicity finding not seen in other toxicology testing. With our current knowledge, this paper examines what types of testing are occurring, what novel findings are being seen and their relevance in the safety evaluation process. Furthermore, trends for now and the future in the type of juvenile animal testing will be described including a need for more focused study designs and more published data on modern cross-species postnatal development. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Introduction to the physics of molecular imaging with radioactive tracers in small animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Michael A; Pretorius, P Hendrik; Farncombe, Troy; Beekman, Freek J

    2002-01-01

    Recent advances have greatly enhanced the three-dimensional (3D) imaging of radioactive tracers in living animals. this article introduces the physics of imaging behind the imaging methods. The article first discusses the selection of the radiation emitted from the tracer and then the process of tomographic reconstruction or how 3D images are made from imaging around the outside of the animal. The technique of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) in which the detection of one X-ray or gamma ray at a time is employed for image formation is then described. Finally, positron emission tomography (PET) which relies on the simultaneous detection of the pair of gamma-rays formed when the positron annihilates is presented.

  13. Diagnosis and therapy of oral cavity diseases in small domestic animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krstić Nikola

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available In parallel with the stepped up urbanisation of modern man, there is an increasing number of house pets of different breeds and species who suffer certain biological and physiological changes because of the specific manner of breeding and upkeep. The altered conditions of their natural environment can lead to disorders in the animal genetic fund, which is why numerous diseases include cases of constitutional flaws (caries, periodontosis and related complications, cysts, abscesses, malformations of hereditary origin - hypodontia, andontia, impacted teeth, and others. The paper presents cases of the most frequent diseases of teeth and supporting tissues, as well as the optimal manner of therapy. It also points out certain limitations in practicing veterinary orthodontia aimed at avoiding situations when certain congenital or acquired anomalies are corrected but result in the animal no longer meeting the required standards for its species.

  14. Laser-enhanced high-intensity focused ultrasound heating in an in vivo small animal model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Janggun; Yang, Xinmai

    2016-11-01

    The enhanced heating effect during the combination of high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) and low-optical-fluence laser illumination was investigated by using an in vivo murine animal model. The thighs of murine animals were synergistically irradiated by HIFU and pulsed nano-second laser light. The temperature increases in the target region were measured by a thermocouple under different HIFU pressures, which were 6.2, 7.9, and 9.8 MPa, in combination with 20 mJ/cm2 laser exposures at 532 nm wavelength. In comparison with conventional laser therapies, the laser fluence used here is at least one order of magnitude lower. The results showed that laser illumination could enhance temperature during HIFU applications. Additionally, cavitation activity was enhanced when laser and HIFU irradiation were concurrently used. Further, a theoretical simulation showed that the inertial cavitation threshold was indeed decreased when laser and HIFU irradiation were utilized concurrently.

  15. Uses of plants, animal and mineral substances in Mediterranean ethno-veterinary practices for the care of small ruminants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piluzza, G; Virdis, S; Serralutzu, F; Bullitta, S

    2015-06-20

    The cultural heritage of Sardinian shepherds is rapidly vanishing and survives in the memory of elderly people. The objective of our study was not only to report the usage of plants and their preparation for administration but also the use of other remedies of different origin arising from traditional ethno-veterinary knowledge, as Sardinian shepherds were used to employ plants, animals, minerals and combinations of several substances to prepare remedies for prophylaxis or therapy on their animals. The work was carried out in rural areas of the island of Sardinia (Italy) by interviewing shepherds and filling questionnaires in order to record ethno-veterinary practices traditionally used for animal health care. Ethno-veterinary remedies traditionally utilised for treatments of small ruminants against ecto-and endo-parasites, gastrointestinal diseases, viral and bacterial diseases, wounds, sprains and bruises were identified. Non herbal remedies outnumbered the herbal ones, as usually plant species were mainly used for the care of cattle and equines. A total of 150 ethno-veterinary uses were documented for the treatment of 33 animal conditions, a detailed account of the formulations and their administration to sheep and goats was provided. Herbal remedies involved the use of twenty two spontaneous species and seven cultivated species. This study identifies remedies used in ethno-veterinary practices for small ruminants care in Sardinia, the second major Mediterranean island which has agro-pastoral activities dating back to Neolithic. Moreover, the danger of losing oral traditions, and the increasing attention towards traditional remedies as potential sources of natural products for improving animal health and welfare, support the interest of our survey. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. SU-E-U-02: The Development of a Practical Ultrasonic System for Cross-Sectional Imaging of Small Animals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamp, J [Wayne State University, Detroit, MI (United States); Karmanos Cancer Institute - International Imaging Center, Detroit, MI (United States); Malyarenko, E [Karmanos Cancer Institute - International Imaging Center, Detroit, MI (United States); Tessonics Corp, Birmingham, MI (United Kingdom); Chen, D [Karmanos Cancer Institute - International Imaging Center, Detroit, MI (United States); Wydra, A [True Phantoms Solutions, Windsor, ON (Canada); University of Windsor - Institute for Diagnostic Imaging Research, Windsor, ON (Canada); Maev, R [Wayne State University, Detroit, MI (United States); Karmanos Cancer Institute - International Imaging Center, Detroit, MI (United States); Tessonics Corp, Birmingham, MI (United Kingdom); True Phantoms Solutions, Windsor, ON (Canada); University of Windsor - Institute for Diagnostic Imaging Research, Windsor, ON (Canada)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To test the feasibility of developing a practical medium frequency ultrasound tomography method for small animal imaging. The ability to produce cross-sectional or full body images of a live small animal using a low-cost tabletop ultrasound scanner without any special license would be very beneficial to long term biological studies, where repeated scanning is often required over an extended period of time. Methods: The cross sectional images were produced by compounding multiple B-scans of a laboratory phantom or an animal acquired at different projection angles. Two imaging systems were used to test the concept. The first system included a programmable 64-channel phased array controller driving a 128-channel, 5–10 MHz linear probe to produce 143 B-Mode projections of the spinning object. The second system designed and manufactured in house, produced 64 or 128 B-Mode projections with a single unfocused 8 MHz transducer scanning with a 0.116 mm step size. Results: The phased array system provided good penetration through the phantoms/mice (with the exception of the lungs) and allowed to acquire data in a very short time. The cross-sectional images have enough resolution and dynamic range to detect both high- and low-contrast organs. The single transducer system takes longer to scan, and the data require more sophisticated processing. To date, our images allow seeing details as small as 1–2 mm in the phantoms and in small animals, with the contrast mostly due to highly reflecting bones and air inclusions. Conclusion: The work indicates that very detailed and anatomically correct images can be created by relatively simple and inexpensive means. With more advanced algorithms and improved system design, scan time can be reduced considerably, enabling high-resolution full 3D imaging. This will allow for quick and easy scans that can help monitor tumor growth and/or regression without contributing any dose to the animal. The authors would like to acknowledge

  17. High-resolution myocardial perfusion mapping in small animals in vivo by spin-labeling gradient-echo imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kober, Frank; Iltis, Isabelle; Izquierdo, Marguerite; Desrois, Martine; Ibarrola, Danielle; Cozzone, Patrick J; Bernard, Monique

    2004-01-01

    An ECG and respiration-gated spin-labeling gradient-echo imaging technique is proposed for the quantitative and completely noninvasive measurement and mapping of myocardial perfusion in small animals in vivo. In contrast to snapshot FLASH imaging, the spatial resolution of the perfusion maps is not limited by the heart rate. A significant improvement in image quality is achieved by synchronizing the inversion pulse to the respiration movements of the animals, thereby allowing for spontaneous respiration. High-resolution myocardial perfusion maps (in-plane resolution=234 x 468 microm2) demonstrating the quality of the perfusion measurement were obtained at 4.7 T in a group of seven freely breathing Wistar-Kyoto rats under isoflurane anesthesia. The mean perfusion value (group average +/- SD) was 5.5 +/- 0.7 ml g(-1)min(-1). In four animals, myocardial perfusion was mapped and measured under cardiac dobutamine stress. Perfusion increased to 11.1 +/- 1.9 ml g(-1)min(-1). The proposed method is particularly useful for the study of small rodents at high fields.

  18. Near-infrared peptide-coated quantum dots for small animal imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer, Gopal; Li, Jack J.; Pinaud, Fabien; Tsay, James M.; Bentolila, Laurent A.; Michalet, Xavier; Weiss, Shimon

    2006-02-01

    We have synthesized high quality type-II CdTe/CdSe near infrared quantum dots using successive ion layer adsorption and reaction chemistry. Transmission electron microscopy reveals that CdTe/CdSe can be synthesized layer by layer yielding quantum dots of narrow size distribution. Excitation and photoluminescence spectra reveal discrete type-II transitions, which correspond to energy lower that type-I bandgap. We have used a peptide coating technique on type-II and commercial near infrared quantum dots for delivery in live animals and cultured cells.

  19. Measurement of Contractile Activity in Small Animal's Digestive Organ by Carbon Nanotube-Based Force Transducer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirata, Takamichi; Takeda, Naoki; Tsutsui, Chihiro; Koike, Kanako; Shimatani, Yuichi; Sakai, Takafumi; Akiya, Masahiro; Taguchi, Akira

    2011-03-01

    A carbon nanotube (CNT)-based force transducer designed to be embedded in the body of a live animal was fabricated and implanted into the stomach of a rat omit to measure contractile movement. The transducer comprised dispersed poly(ethylene glycol)-grafted multiwalled CNTs applied to a comb-like Au-electrode formed on a poly(dimethylsiloxane) sheet. The implanted rat was injected with acetylcholine to induce muscular contractions and changes in the resistance of the transducer were measured. Such changes arise owing to strain in the CNT network upon distortion. The measured resistance change was found to be proportional to the concentration of injected acetylcholine.

  20. Technical Note: System for evaluating local hypothermia as a radioprotector of the rectum in a small animal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrycushko, Brian A; Bing, Chenchen; Futch, Cecil; Wodzak, Michelle; Stojadinovic, Strahinja; Medin, Paul M; Chopra, Rajiv

    2017-08-01

    The protective effects of induced or even accidental hypothermia on the human body are widespread with several medical uses currently under active research. In vitro experiments using human cell lines have shown hypothermia provides a radioprotective effect that becomes more pronounced at large, single-fraction doses common to stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) and stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) treatments. This work describes the development of a system to evaluate local hypothermia for a radioprotective effect of the rat rectum during a large dose of radiation relevant to prostate SBRT. This includes the evaluation of a 3D-printed small animal rectal cooling device and the integration with a small animal irradiator. A 3-cm long, dual-lumen rectal temperature control apparatus (RTCA) was designed in SOLIDWORKS CAD for 3D printing. The RTCA was capable of recirculating flow in a device small enough for insertion into the rat rectum, with a metal support rod for strength as well as visibility during radiation treatment planning. The outer walls of the RTCA comprised of thin heat shrink plastic, achieving efficient heat transfer into adjacent tissues. Following leak-proof testing, fiber optic temperature probes were used to evaluate the temperature over time when placed adjacent to the cooling device within the rat rectum. MRI thermometry characterized the relative temperature distribution in concentric ROIs surrounding the probe. Integration with an image-guided small animal irradiator and associated treatment planning system included evaluation for imaging artifacts and effect of brass tubing on dose calculation. The rectal temperature adjacent to the cooling device decreased from body temperature to 15°C within 10-20 min from device insertion and was maintained at 15 ± 3°C during active cooling for the evaluated time of one hour. MR thermometry revealed a steep temperature gradient with increasing distance from the cooling device with the desired

  1. Bone scintigraphy for the investigation of lameness in small animals; Einsatz der Skelettszintigrafie in der Lahmheitsdiagnostik beim Kleintier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolln, G.; Franke, C. [Tieraerztliche Klinik fuer Kleintiere, Norderstedt (Germany)

    2010-03-15

    Bone scintigraphy has been used as a helpful method in diagnosing lameness in small animals. It is a sensitive, non-invasive method to evaluate bone lesions and orthopaedic disorders. It provides a functional image of the skeleton and thereby aiding in the localisation and diagnosing of obscure lameness. Compared to human medicine one important difference is the inability of an animal to characterize its pain to the examiner. Another difference is the lacking cooperation of an animal during bone scintigraphy. Before this background are shown on the basis of 5 examples the advantages, the method and the different indication of bone scintigraphy. The technique of this method arrives from a human medicine protocol of a 2-phase-bone-scintigraphy and has to be done under light anaesthesia, to avoid artefacts of movement during acquisitions. The authors are convinced that bone scintigraphy is a very useful and diagnostic method for evaluation of obscure lameness because it can give a quick diagnosis and aimed therapy. Therefore secondary changes and additional costs can be avoided for the animal and its owner. (orig.)

  2. Biological effects of 60-Hz electric fields on small and large laboratory animals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, R.D.

    1981-01-01

    Rats and mice were exposed to 60-Hz electric fields up to 330 kV/m for durations as long as four months. No significant effects were found in the following major areas: metabolic status and growth; organ and tissue morphology; brain morphology; cardiovascular function; serum chemistry; reproduction; prenatal growth and development; teratology; bone growth; peripheral nerve function; humoral and cell-mediated immunity; susceptibility to viral infection; cell and membrane function; illness/malaise; and cytogenetics. Statistically significant effects of electric field exposures were observed in the following areas: bone fracture repair; neonatal development; neuromuscular function; endocrinology; hematology; neurochemistry; urine volume and chemistry; sympathetic nervous system; behavior. It is likely that many of the effects observed are secondary to chronic stimulation of the animal by the field. Our research efforts have shifted to an in-depth investigation of nervous system functions, with emphasis in behavior, neurochemistry, neurophysiology, and dosimetry. Current and future research in these areas will focus on: relationship of effects to field strength and duration of exposure; recovery from observed effects; fundamental understanding of observed effects; fundamental understanding of interaction of field with animal (dosimetry); and biological significance of observed effects. (ERB)

  3. Aspergillus otitis in small animals--a retrospective study of 17 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodale, Elizabeth C; Outerbridge, Catherine A; White, Stephen D

    2016-02-01

    Aspergillus spp. are saprophytic opportunistic fungal organisms and are a common cause of otomycosis in humans. Although there have been case reports of Aspergillus otitis externa in dogs, to the best of the authors' knowledge, this is the first retrospective case series describing Aspergillus otitis in dogs and cats. To characterize signalment, putative risk factors, treatments and outcomes of a case series of dogs and cats with Aspergillus otitis. Eight dogs and nine cats diagnosed with Aspergillus otitis. A retrospective review of medical records from 1989 to 2014 identified animals diagnosed with Aspergillus otitis based on culture. All dogs weighed greater than 23 kg. The most common putative risk factors identified in this study were concurrent diseases, therapy causing immunosuppression or a history of an otic foreign body. Aspergillus otitis was unilateral in all study dogs and most cats. Concurrent otitis media was confirmed in three dogs and one cat, and suspected in two additional cats. Aspergillus fumigatus was the most common isolate overall and was the dominant isolate in cats. Aspergillus niger and A. terreus were more commonly isolated from dogs. Animals received various topical and systemic antifungal medications; however, otic lavage under anaesthesia and/or surgical intervention increased the likelihood of resolution of the fungal infection. Aspergillus otitis is uncommon, typically seen as unilateral otitis externa in cats and larger breed dogs with possible risk factors that include immunosuppression and otic foreign bodies; previous antibiotic usage was common. © 2015 ESVD and ACVD.

  4. A restraint-free small animal SPECT imaging system with motion tracking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weisenberger, A.G.; Gleason, S.S.; Goddard, J.; Kross, B.; Majewski, S.; Meikle, S.R.; Paulus, M.J.; Pomper, M.; Popov, V.; Smith, M.F.; Welch, B.L.; Wojcik, R.

    2005-06-01

    We report on an approach toward the development of a high-resolution single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) system to image the biodistribution of radiolabeled tracers such as Tc-99m and I-125 in unrestrained/unanesthetized mice. An infrared (IR)-based position tracking apparatus has been developed and integrated into a SPECT gantry. The tracking system is designed to measure the spatial position of a mouse's head at a rate of 10-15 frames per second with submillimeter accuracy. The high-resolution, gamma imaging detectors are based on pixellated NaI(Tl) crystal scintillator arrays, position-sensitive photomultiplier tubes, and novel readout circuitry requiring fewer analog-digital converter (ADC) channels while retaining high spatial resolution. Two SPECT gamma camera detector heads based upon position-sensitive photomultiplier tubes have been built and installed onto the gantry. The IR landmark-based pose measurement and tracking system is under development to provide animal position data during a SPECT scan. The animal position and orientation data acquired by the tracking system will be used for motion correction during the tomographic image reconstruction.

  5. Studying the Immunomodulatory Effects of Small Molecule Ras-Inhibitors in Animal Models of Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    GTPases appear to be a promising molecular target for inhibiting T cell activation in RA. Based on an innovative concept Kloog (the partnering PI) and...GTPases are molecular switches that regulate key cellular processes, such as proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, and motility. In T cells...in non-small-cell lung cancer patients (NCT00531401; Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, NY). Thus, Salirasib® is the only available successful

  6. An Analog Front End for Recording Neuronal Activity in Freely Behaving Small Animals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Min; ZHANG Xiao; ZHANG Chun-feng; CAO Mao-yong; LI Cai-fang; KONG Hui-min; QIN Feng-ju; YAN Yu-qin

    2007-01-01

    Abstract.Extracting characteristic brain signals and simultaneous recording animals behaving could help us to understand the complex behavior of neuronal ensembles. Here,a system was established to record local field potentials (LFP) and extracellular signal or multiple-unit discharge and behavior synchronously by utilizing electrophysiology and integrated circuit technique. It comprised microelectrodes and micro-driver assembly, analog front end ( AFE), while a computer ( Pentium Ⅲ ) was used as the platform for the graphic user interface, which was developed using the LabVIEW programming language. It was designed as a part of ongoing research to develop a portable wireless neural signal recording system. We believe that this information will be useful for the research of brain-computer interface.

  7. Refraction-compensated motion tracking of unrestrained small animals in positron emission tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyme, Andre; Meikle, Steven; Baldock, Clive; Fulton, Roger

    2012-08-01

    Motion-compensated radiotracer imaging of fully conscious rodents represents an important paradigm shift for preclinical investigations. In such studies, if motion tracking is performed through a transparent enclosure containing the awake animal, light refraction at the interface will introduce errors in stereo pose estimation. We have performed a thorough investigation of how this impacts the accuracy of pose estimates and the resulting motion correction, and developed an efficient method to predict and correct for refraction-based error. The refraction model underlying this study was validated using a state-of-the-art motion tracking system. Refraction-based error was shown to be dependent on tracking marker size, working distance, and interface thickness and tilt. Correcting for refraction error improved the spatial resolution and quantitative accuracy of motion-corrected positron emission tomography images. Since the methods are general, they may also be useful in other contexts where data are corrupted by refraction effects.

  8. Use of thermographic imaging in clinical diagnosis of small animal: preliminary notes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronica Redaelli

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION. The authors, after a description of the physics of infrared thermographic technique (IRT, analyze the reading of images and the main applications in the veterinary field, compared to the existing literature on the subject and to their experimental researches. IRT lends itself to countless applications in biology, thanks to its characteristics of versatility, lack of invasiveness and high sensitivity. Probably the major limitation to its application in the animal lies in the ease of use and in its extreme sensitivity. MATERIALS AND METHODS. From September 2009 to October 2010, the experimental investigation with the thermo camera took into consideration 110 animals (92 dogs and 18 cats, without any selection criteria. All patients were brought to the Faculty of Veterinary Medicine in Milan University by the owner, to be examined by a specialist, or to undergo one of the following diagnostic procedures: X-rays, computed tomography, or ultrasound examinations; finally some patients were brought in for surgical procedures. With the consent of the owner, 1 to 10 thermographic images were recorded from each clinical case. Results. In this first experimental investigation, thermography has shown a high sensitivity (100%, but a low specificity (44%. This figure excludes the use of thermal imaging technology to replace other imaging techniques such as radiography, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. Furthermore, it does not show any ability to recognize the etiology of the disease, but only the thermal alteration, and this is restricting its use. However, this experimental study has demonstrated that thermography can be used in veterinary medicine, and specifically in dogs and cats. It is hoped that in the field of targeted diseases this technique will become an important tool for diagnostic purposes by using working protocols validated and repeatable.

  9. Active shimming method for a 21.3 MHz small-animal MRI magnet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shanshan; Xia, Tian; Miao, Zhiying; Xu, Luoyuan; Wang, Hongzhi; Dai, Shuguang

    2017-04-01

    In a 21.3 MHz animal nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analyzer and imaging system, high uniformity of the static field B 0 is a crucial prerequisite for obtaining high-quality images and detecting weak signals with short relaxation time. Using only passive shimming and gradient shimming, it is impossible to achieve perfect B 0 uniformity. This paper presents an approach involving high-order active shimming for an NMR analyzer and an imaging magnet. The diameter spherical volume (DSV) of the magnet is only 60 mm. The spherical harmonic function is introduced to analyze the magnetic field and provide a foundation for active shimming. Eleven pairs of bi-planar active shim coils (X, Y, Z, XZ, YZ, Z 2, X 2  +  Y 2, X 2  -  Y 2, Z 3, Z 4, Z 5) were designed using the target field-and stream-function methods, and coils were manufactured with printed circuit board technology in this research. The magnetic field created by these electrified shim coils compensates effectively and accurately for the static magnetic field B 0. The full width at half maximum of the resonance spectrum was used to measure the shimming effect. The results of practical shimming experiments in a 21.3 MHz animal NMR analyzer and imaging device showed that this new approach helps to reduce inhomogeneity from 24 ppm (24  ×  10-6) to 0.39 ppm (0.39  ×  10-6) over a 60 mm DSV, which meets the requirements of imaging and analytical practice.

  10. Motion compensation using origin ensembles in awake small animal positron emission tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillam, John E.; Angelis, Georgios I.; Kyme, Andre Z.; Meikle, Steven R.

    2017-02-01

    In emission tomographic imaging, the stochastic origin ensembles algorithm provides unique information regarding the detected counts given the measured data. Precision in both voxel and region-wise parameters may be determined for a single data set based on the posterior distribution of the count density allowing uncertainty estimates to be allocated to quantitative measures. Uncertainty estimates are of particular importance in awake animal neurological and behavioral studies for which head motion, unique for each acquired data set, perturbs the measured data. Motion compensation can be conducted when rigid head pose is measured during the scan. However, errors in pose measurements used for compensation can degrade the data and hence quantitative outcomes. In this investigation motion compensation and detector resolution models were incorporated into the basic origin ensembles algorithm and an efficient approach to computation was developed. The approach was validated against maximum liklihood—expectation maximisation and tested using simulated data. The resultant algorithm was then used to analyse quantitative uncertainty in regional activity estimates arising from changes in pose measurement precision. Finally, the posterior covariance acquired from a single data set was used to describe correlations between regions of interest providing information about pose measurement precision that may be useful in system analysis and design. The investigation demonstrates the use of origin ensembles as a powerful framework for evaluating statistical uncertainty of voxel and regional estimates. While in this investigation rigid motion was considered in the context of awake animal PET, the extension to arbitrary motion may provide clinical utility where respiratory or cardiac motion perturb the measured data.

  11. Preparedness of small animal veterinary practices to communicate with Spanish-speaking pet owners with limited proficiency in English.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landau, Ruth E; Beck, Alan; Glickman, Larry T; Litster, Annette; Widmar, Nicole J Olynk; Moore, George E

    2016-03-15

    To investigate the preparedness of small animal veterinary personnel to communicate with Spanish-speaking pet owners with limited English-language proficiency (LEP). Cross-sectional telephone survey. Data from 383 small animal veterinary practices. Telephone surveys were conducted with veterinarians and office or practice managers from a random sample of US small animal veterinary practices in 10 states to estimate the number of Spanish-speaking pet owners with LEP visiting these practices, proportion of practices that used services to facilitate communication with Spanish-speaking clients with LEP, and degree of veterinarian satisfaction with their communication with those clients. Responses were obtained from 383 of 1,245 (31%) eligible practices, of which 340 (89%) had Spanish-speaking clients with LEP and 200 (52%) had such clients on a weekly basis. Eight percent of practices had veterinary personnel who were conversant or fluent in spoken Spanish. Veterinarians who depended on clients' friends or family to translate were significantly less satisfied with client communication than were those who could converse in Spanish with clients directly. Availability of Spanish-speaking staff and offering of Spanish-language resources were associated with an increase in the number of Spanish-speaking clients with LEP seen on a weekly basis. Industry- and practice-generated Spanish-language materials were offered at 32% (124/383) and 21% (81/383) of practices, respectively; 329 (86%) practices had no Spanish-language marketing. Opportunities were identified for improving communication with pet owners with LEP in the veterinary clinical setting, which could ultimately positively impact patient well-being and client compliance.

  12. Feasibility of using the micro CT imaging system as the conformal radiation therapy facility for small animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Shu-Ju; Hsieh, Hui-Ling; Chao, Tsi-Chian; Lee, Chung-Chi

    2009-02-01

    In recent years, there has been an increasing number of integration for using the micro CT scanners, either home-built bench-top or commercially made, as the small animal radiation therapy irradiator in several research groups. In this paper, we study the x-ray beam physics such as the percentage depth dose distribution and their dose conformity characteristics using Monte Carlo simulation method for a series of photon energy levels often found in the current commercial micro CT imaging systems. Micro CT scanners have been one of the key imaging modalities in the current state-of-the-art molecular imaging techniques and their applications in various biomedical research areas have been increasing tremendously in recent years due to the ultra-high image quality. Tumor growth development and the corresponding therapeutic response in the small animal model study can be evaluated by a micro CT imaging system. In the most current advanced commercially available micro CT units, the nominal spatial resolution is typically at the scale of 10.0 μm or less. In current research trend, there have been an increasing number of investigations for the applications of x-ray units to organ-specific and whole-body radiation in dedicated small animal model study. In particular, scientists have identified that the integrated micro CT imagers can be commissioned as the dual-purpose unit for the high spatial resolution image acquisition and radiation delivery. As we all realized that small animal models are important and critical in several studies of experimental (or pre-clinical) radiation therapy research. In this paper, a Monte Carlo code (Penelope) was used to calculate the percentage depth dose distributions at different photon energy levels. Also the corresponding iso-dose contour curves were computed and plotted from the circular CT scanning geometry to study the desired dose conformity property. We note that the selected photon energy range that is included in this work is often

  13. Application of photostable quantum dots for indirect immunofluorescent detection of specific bacterial serotypes on small marine animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decho, Alan W.; Beckman, Erin M.; Chandler, G. Thomas; Kawaguchi, Tomohiro

    2008-06-01

    An indirect immunofluorescence approach was developed using semiconductor quantum dot nanocrystals to label and detect a specific bacterial serotype of the bacterial human pathogen Vibrio parahaemolyticus, attached to small marine animals (i.e. benthic harpacticoid copepods), which are suspected pathogen carriers. This photostable labeling method using nanotechnology will potentially allow specific serotypes of other bacterial pathogens to be detected with high sensitivity in a range of systems, and can be easily applied for sensitive detection to other Vibrio species such as Vibrio cholerae.

  14. High-density speckle contrast optical tomography (SCOT) for three dimensional tomographic imaging of the small animal brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dragojević, Tanja; Varma, Hari M; Hollmann, Joseph L; Valdes, Claudia P; Culver, Joseph P; Justicia, Carles; Durduran, Turgut

    2017-06-01

    High-density speckle contrast optical tomography (SCOT) utilizing tens of thousands of source-detector pairs, was developed for in vivo imaging of blood flow in small animals. The reduction in cerebral blood flow (CBF) due to local ischemic stroke in a mouse brain was transcanially imaged and reconstructed in three dimensions. The reconstructed volume was then compared with corresponding magnetic resonance images demonstrating that the volume of reduced CBF agrees with the infarct zone at twenty-four hours. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Application of the hot-wire anemometer to respiratory measurements in small animal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godal, A; Belenky, D A; Standaert, T A; Woodrum, D E; Grimsrud, L; Hodson, W A

    1976-02-01

    A hot-wire anemometer was evaluated to determine its suitability for measurement of small tidal volumes. Used with a constant background flow of gas, the output of the hot-wire anemometer was linear and independent of respiratory frequency, temperature, and humidity. The change in output with CO2 concentration was negligible within the physiologic range. The use of a background flow eliminates the need for one-way valves, minimizes dead space, and maintains the flow velocity past the hot wire within its range of linear response.

  16. Pharmacological constraints associated with positron emission tomographic scanning of small laboratory animals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hume, S.P.; Gunn, R.N.; Jones, T. [PET Methodology Group, MRC Cyclotron Unit, Hammersmith Hospital, London, W12 0NN (United Kingdom)

    1998-02-01

    With the stated aim of scanning small regions of interest in mice, several high-resolution positron emission tomographic (PET) systems are presently under development. Some, however, have low sensitivity and require high doses of radioactivity to achieve count statistics adequate to reconstruct small volumes. Using in vivo dissociation constants for three carbon-11 labelled ligands previously measured in rat brain, the present paper utilises simple saturation kinetics to estimate the limits on radioactivity and specific activity, to minimise the degree of receptor occupancy and achieve maximal specific binding of the radioligand. The extent of the problem is exemplified by considering a high-affinity ligand (dissociation constant in vitro {proportional_to}0.1 nM; in vivo {proportional_to}5 nmol/kg i.v. injected dose), where routinely produced levels of specific activity ({proportional_to}100 MBq/nmol) would limit the activity injected into mice to {proportional_to}0.1 MBq for a 1% receptor occupancy. If, as is feasible, the new generation of high resolution PET systems requires an injected activity >10 MBq, then a >100-fold increase in specific activity would be needed for tracer kinetics to hold. The paper highlights the need to consider realistically achievable goals if high-resolution PET is to be accepted as a viable methodology to acquire pharmacologically and physiologically accurate ligand-receptor binding data in mice. (orig.) With 2 figs., 14 refs.

  17. A small long-life acoustic transmitter for studying the behavior of aquatic animals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, J. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, P.O. Box 999, Richland, Washington 99332, USA; Deng, Z. D. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, P.O. Box 999, Richland, Washington 99332, USA; Li, H. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, P.O. Box 999, Richland, Washington 99332, USA; Myjak, M. J. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, P.O. Box 999, Richland, Washington 99332, USA; Martinez, J. J. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, P.O. Box 999, Richland, Washington 99332, USA; Xiao, J. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, P.O. Box 999, Richland, Washington 99332, USA; Brown, R. S. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, P.O. Box 999, Richland, Washington 99332, USA; Cartmell, S. S. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, P.O. Box 999, Richland, Washington 99332, USA

    2016-11-01

    The lack of stronger acoustic signal, longer service life and smaller size from off-the-shelf transmitters has precluded intensive research for environmental monitoring of certain species using acoustic telemetry techniques. In this study we developed a small long-life acoustic transmitter with the length of approximately 24.2 mm, the diameter of approximately 5.0 mm, and the dry weight of approximately 0.72 g. The new transmitter can generate an acoustic signal at selectable source level between 159 and 163 dB re 1 µPa at 1 m. The new acoustic transmitter has an operation lifetime up to a year or longer at a pulse rate interval of 15 seconds, and also has a signal detection range up to at least 500 meters that enhances detection probability in a quiet environment. The new technology makes long-term acoustic telemetry studies of small fish possible and is being deployed for long-term tracking of juvenile sturgeon.

  18. MediSPECT: Single photon emission computed tomography system for small field of view small animal imaging based on a CdTe hybrid pixel detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Accorsi, R.; Autiero, M.; Celentano, L.; Chmeissani, M.; Cozzolino, R.; Curion, A. S.; Frallicciardi, P.; Laccetti, P.; Lanza, R. C.; Lauria, A.; Maiorino, M.; Marotta, M.; Mettivier, G.; Montesi, M. C.; Riccio, P.; Roberti, G.; Russo, P.

    2007-02-01

    We describe MediSPECT, a new scanner developed at University and INFN Napoli, for SPECT studies on small animals with a small field of view (FOV) and high spatial resolution. The CdTe pixel detector (a 256×256 matrix of 55 μm square pixels) operating in single photon counting for detection of gamma-rays with low and medium energy (e.g. 125I, 27-35 keV, 99mTc, 140 keV), is bump bonded to the Medipix2 readout chip. The FOV of the MediSPECT scanner with a coded aperture mask collimator ranges from 6.3 mm (system spatial resolution 110 μm at 27-35 keV) to 24.3 mm. With a 0.30 mm pinhole the FOV ranges from 2.4 to 29 mm (where the system spatial resolution is 1.0 mm at 27-35 keV and 2.0 mm at 140 keV). MediSPECT will be used for in vivo imaging of small organs or tissue structures in mouse, e.g., brain, thyroid, heart or tumor.

  19. A survey of surgical draping practices in small-animal practice in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delisser, P J; Sinnett, D E; Parsons, K J; Friend, E J

    2012-09-29

    Veterinary practices in the United Kingdom were surveyed to compare their surgical draping practices with Royal College of Veterinary Surgeons (RCVS) accreditation tier and other surgery-related factors. Using descriptive statistics and logistic or ordinal regression analysis (where appropriate), the relationships between draping material and accreditation tier and other surgery-related factors were assessed. Procedures were categorised as short or long. Two hundred and sixty-nine surveys were completed. Reusable drapes were used in 66 per cent of practices. Antibiotics were administered routinely in 38 per cent of short and 93 per cent of long procedures. Practices accredited as a Veterinary Hospital (VH) were 6.3-7.2 (short and long surgeries, respectively) times more likely to use disposable drapes, when compared with non-accredited practices. Use of dedicated surgical attire, draping the whole animal/table, and routine antibiotic usage were also positively correlated with disposable drape usage. Fifty-one per cent of practices rated infection rate as most important when choosing drape material. 'Best practice' techniques are associated with lower importance given to infection rate, and higher importance given to financial cost, when choosing drape material. Disposable drape use correlates with RCVS accreditation and with other aspects of surgical technique. Importance ratings awarded correlate with best practice procedures. Clinical relevance 'Best practice' draping procedures, that are not governed by RCVS accreditation scheme, are also more frequently performed in accredited VHs.

  20. A system for simultaneous exposure of small animals to 60-Hz electric and magnetic fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baum, J.W.; Kuehner, A.V.; Benz, R.D.; Carsten, A.L. (Department of Nuclear Energy, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (USA))

    1991-01-01

    Equipment designed for simultaneous exposure of rodents to 60-Hz electric and magnetic fields is described. Three identical systems were constructed, each capable of continuous exposure of 256 rats or 640 mice to a nominal electric field at less than 50 kV/m, and to horizontal and vertical magnetic fields at less than 1 mT. Design features, construction details, and results of various tests of the systems are described. Tests were made: of phase relations between electric and magnetic fields; of uniformity of electric and magnetic fields; of changes across time in electric-field intensity as a result of animals' soiling of cages and various washing routines; of resistance of bedding material during humid and dry conditions; and of acoustic noise due to background, to field-generation equipment, and to air conditioning equipment. The results demonstrated that fields were effectively generated but that significant and troublesome changes in electric-field intensity occurred because of cage-soiling. However, when cages were frequently cleaned, field intensities were consistent from one exposure to another.

  1. Advances in small animal mesentery models for in vivo flow cytometry, dynamic microscopy, and drug screening

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ekaterina I Galanzha; Vladimir P Zharov; Philips Classic

    2007-01-01

    Using animal mesentery with intravital optical microscopy is a well-established experimental model for studying blood and lymph microcirculation in vivo.Recent advances in cell biology and optical techniques provide the basis for extending this model for new applications, which should generate significantly improved experimental data. This review summarizes the achievements in this specific area, including in vivo label-free blood and lymph photothermal flow cytometry,super-sensitive fluorescence image cytometry, light scattering and speckle flow cytometry, microvessel dynamic microscopy, infrared (IR) angiography, and high-speed imaging of individual cells in fast flow. The capabilities of these techniques, using the rat mesentery model, were demonstrated in various studies; e.g., realtime quantitative detection of circulating and migrating individual blood and cancer cells, studies on vascular dynamics with a focus on lymphatics under normal conditions and under different interventions (e.g. lasers,drugs, nicotine), assessment of lymphatic disturbances from experimental lymphedema, monitoring cell traffic between blood and lymph systems, and highspeed imaging of cell transient deformability in flow.In particular, the obtained results demonstrated that individual cell transportation in living organisms depends on cell type (e.g., normal blood or leukemic cells), the cell's functional state (e.g., live, apoptotic, or necrotic),and the functional status of the organism. Possible future applications, including in vivo early diagnosis and prevention of disease, monitoring immune response and apoptosis, chemo- and radio-sensitivity tests, and drug screening, are also discussed.

  2. Red diode laser for photodynamic therapy: a small animal efficacy study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lytle, A. Charles; Doiron, Daniel R.; Selman, Steven H.

    1994-07-01

    Lasers have traditionally been the preferred light source for activation of the photosensitizing agents used in photodynamic therapy (PDT). Their monochromaticity, high power, and the ability to efficiently couple that power into optical fibers have dictated their use. Dye lasers, metal vapor lasers, or ion gas lasers have been used in the past as the excitation source for PDT, largely because they provided the only available alternatives. These laser systems are very large and complex, and are very expensive to operate. The introduction of high power visible red laser diodes have provided a cost effective alternative to existing lasers for use in PDT. This paper will describe the features of a prototype preclinical red laser diode source for photodynamic therapy, and will present the results of an animal study conducted with this device. The study, using the photosensitizer SnET2, compared the efficacy of PDT performed with the diode laser system with the results obtained from a traditional dye laser system. Future plans for a clinical version of the system will also be discussed.

  3. Imaging of Small Animal Peripheral Artery Disease Models: Recent Advancements and Translational Potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenny B. Lin

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Peripheral artery disease (PAD is a broad disorder encompassing multiple forms of arterial disease outside of the heart. As such, PAD development is a multifactorial process with a variety of manifestations. For example, aneurysms are pathological expansions of an artery that can lead to rupture, while ischemic atherosclerosis reduces blood flow, increasing the risk of claudication, poor wound healing, limb amputation, and stroke. Current PAD treatment is often ineffective or associated with serious risks, largely because these disorders are commonly undiagnosed or misdiagnosed. Active areas of research are focused on detecting and characterizing deleterious arterial changes at early stages using non-invasive imaging strategies, such as ultrasound, as well as emerging technologies like photoacoustic imaging. Earlier disease detection and characterization could improve interventional strategies, leading to better prognosis in PAD patients. While rodents are being used to investigate PAD pathophysiology, imaging of these animal models has been underutilized. This review focuses on structural and molecular information and disease progression revealed by recent imaging efforts of aortic, cerebral, and peripheral vascular disease models in mice, rats, and rabbits. Effective translation to humans involves better understanding of underlying PAD pathophysiology to develop novel therapeutics and apply non-invasive imaging techniques in the clinic.

  4. Evaluating hypotheses of basal animal phylogeny using complete sequences of large and small subunit rRNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medina, Monica; Collins, Allen G.; Silberman, Jeffrey; Sogin, Mitchell L.

    2001-06-21

    We studied the evolutionary relationships among basal metazoan lineages by using complete large subunit (LSU) and small subunit (SSU) ribosomal RNA sequences for 23 taxa. After identifying competing hypotheses, we performed maximum likelihood searches for trees conforming to each hypothesis. Kishino-Hasegawa tests were used to determine whether the data (LSU, SSU, and combined) reject any of the competing hypotheses. We also conducted unconstrained tree searches, compared the resulting topologies, and calculated bootstrap indices. Shimodaira-Hasegawa tests were applied to determine whether the data reject any of the topologies resulting from the constrained and unconstrained tree searches. LSU, SSU, and the combined data strongly contradict two assertions pertaining to sponge phylogeny. Hexactinellid sponges are not likely to be the basal lineage of amonophyletic Porifera or the sister group to all other animals. Instead, Hexactinellida and Demospongia form a well-supported clade of siliceous sponges, Silicea. It remains unclear, on the basis of these data alone, whether the calcarean sponges are more closely related to Silicea or to nonsponge animals. The SSU and combined data reject the hypothesis that Bilateria is more closely related to Ctenophora than it is to Cnidaria, whereas LSU data alone do not refute either hypothesis. LSU and SSU data agree in supporting the monophyly of Bilateria, Cnidaria, Ctenophora, and Metazoa. LSU sequence data reveal phylogenetic structure in a data set with limited taxon sampling. Continued accumulation of LSU sequences should increase our understanding of animal phylogeny.

  5. FID navigator-based MR thermometry method to monitor small temperature changes in the brain of ventilated animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulant, Nicolas; Bottlaender, Michel; Uhrig, Lynn; Giacomini, Eric; Luong, Michel; Amadon, Alexis; Massire, Aurélien; Larrat, Benoît; Vignaud, Alexandre

    2015-01-01

    An MR thermometry method is proposed for measuring in vivo small temperature changes engendered by external RF heat sources. The method relies on reproducible and stable respiration and therefore currently applies to ventilated animals whose breathing is carefully controlled. It first consists in characterizing the stability of the main magnetic field as well as the variations induced by breathing during a first monitoring stage. Second, RF heating is applied while the phase and thus temperature evolutions are continuously measured, the corrections due to breathing and field drift being made thanks to the data accumulated during the first period. The RF heat source is finally stopped and the temperature rise likewise is continuously monitored during a third and last stage to observe the animal cooling down and to validate the assumptions made for correcting for the main field variation and the physiological noise. Experiments were performed with a clinical 7 T scanner on an anesthetized baboon and with a dedicated RF heating setup. Analysis of the data reveals a precision around 0.1°C, which allows us to reliably measure sub-degree temperature rises in the muscle and in the brain of the animal.

  6. Effects of fractionated abdominal irradiation on small intestinal motility. Studies in a novel in vitro animal model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fraser, R.; Frisby, C.; Horowitz, M. [Royal Adelaide Hospital (Australia). Dept. of Medicine; Schirmer, M.; Yeoh, E. [Royal Adelaide Hospital (Australia). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Blackshaw, A. [Royal Adelaide Hospital (Australia). Dept. of Gastrointestinal Medicine; Langman, J.; Rowland, R. [Division of Tissue Pathology, Inst. of Medical and Veterinary Science, Adelaide (Australia)

    1997-12-31

    Disordered small intestinal motility occurs frequently during acute radiation enteritis. However, the characteristics and time course of the motor dysfunction are poorly defined. These parameters were assessed in a novel animal model of radiation enteritis. Ileal pressures were recorded in vitro with perfused microanometric catheter using an arterially perfused ileal loop in 22 ferrets following fractionated abdominal irradiation (9 doses 2.50 Gz thrice weekly for 3 weeks). Tissue damage was graded histologically. Studies were performed 3 to 29 days after irradiation. Tissue from 7 control animals was also studied. All treated animals developed diarrhoea. Histology showed changes consistent with mild to moderate radiation enteritis. Following irradiation, there was an initial increase in frequency followed by a non-significant reduction in the frequency, but not the amplitude of ileal pressure waves. The frequency of pressure waves showed an inverse relationship with time after radiation (r=-0.634, p<0.002). There was no relationship between motility and histology. We conclude that abdominal irradiation is associated with a time-dependent reduction in ileal motility which does not correlate with light microscopic changes. (orig.).

  7. Using remote biomonitoring to understand heterogeneity in immune-responses and disease-dynamics in small, free-living animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adelman, James S; Moyers, Sahnzi C; Hawley, Dana M

    2014-09-01

    Despite the ubiquity of parasites and pathogens, behavioral and physiological responses to infection vary widely across individuals. Although such variation can have pronounced effects on population-level processes, including the transmission of infectious disease, the study of individual responses to infection in free-living animals remains a challenge. To fully understand the causes and consequences of heterogeneous responses to infection, research in ecoimmunology and disease-ecology must incorporate minimally invasive techniques to track individual animals in natural settings. Here, we review how several technologies, collectively termed remote biomonitoring, enable the collection of data on behavioral and physiological responses to infection in small, free-living animals. Specifically, we focus on the use of radiotelemetry and radio-frequency identification to study fever, sickness-behaviors (including lethargy and anorexia), and rates of inter-individual contact in the wild, all of which vary widely across individuals and impact the spread of pathogens within populations. In addition, we highlight future avenues for field studies of these topics using emerging technologies such as global positioning system tracking and tri-axial accelerometry. Through the use of such remote biomonitoring techniques, researchers can gain valuable insights into why responses to infection vary so widely and how this variation impacts the spread and evolution of infectious diseases. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Integrative and Comparative Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Performance evaluation of a compact PET/SPECT/CT tri-modality system for small animal imaging applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei, Qingyang [Department of Electrical Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Key Laboratory of Particle & Radiation Imaging (Tsinghua University), Ministry of Education, Beijing 100084 (China); Wang, Shi [Department of Engineering Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Key Laboratory of Particle & Radiation Imaging (Tsinghua University), Ministry of Education, Beijing 100084 (China); Ma, Tianyu, E-mail: maty@tsinghua.edu.cn [Department of Engineering Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Key Laboratory of Particle & Radiation Imaging (Tsinghua University), Ministry of Education, Beijing 100084 (China); Wu, Jing; Liu, Hui; Xu, Tianpeng; Xia, Yan; Fan, Peng; Lyu, Zhenlei; Liu, Yaqiang [Department of Engineering Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Key Laboratory of Particle & Radiation Imaging (Tsinghua University), Ministry of Education, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2015-06-21

    PET, SPECT and CT imaging techniques are widely used in preclinical small animal imaging applications. In this paper, we present a compact small animal PET/SPECT/CT tri-modality system. A dual-functional, shared detector design is implemented which enables PET and SPECT imaging with a same LYSO ring detector. A multi-pinhole collimator is mounted on the system and inserted into the detector ring in SPECT imaging mode. A cone-beam CT consisting of a micro focus X-ray tube and a CMOS detector is implemented. The detailed design and the performance evaluations are reported in this paper. In PET imaging mode, the measured NEMA based spatial resolution is 2.12 mm (FWHM), and the sensitivity at the central field of view (CFOV) is 3.2%. The FOV size is 50 mm (∅)×100 mm (L). The SPECT has a spatial resolution of 1.32 mm (FWHM) and an average sensitivity of 0.031% at the center axial, and a 30 mm (∅)×90 mm (L) FOV. The CT spatial resolution is 8.32 lp/mm @10%MTF, and the contrast discrimination function value is 2.06% with 1.5 mm size cubic box object. In conclusion, a compact, tri-modality PET/SPECT/CT system was successfully built with low cost and high performance.

  9. Unrestrained video-assisted plethysmography: a noninvasive method for assessment of lung mechanical function in small animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, Jason H T; Thompson-Figueroa, John; Lundblad, Lennart K A; Irvin, Charles G

    2008-01-01

    The assessment of lung mechanical function in small animals, particularly mice, is essential for investigations into the pathophysiology of pulmonary disease. The most accurate and specific methods for making this assessment are highly invasive and so provide data of questionable relevance to normality. By contrast, present noninvasive methods based on unrestrained plethysmography have no direct link to the mechanical properties of the lung. There is thus a need for a completely noninvasive method for determining lung mechanical function in small animals. In the present study, we demonstrate an extension of unrestrained plethysmography in which changes in lung volume are estimated via orthogonal video imaging of the thorax. These estimates are combined with the pressure swings recorded as mice breathe inside a heated and humidified chamber to yield an estimate of specific airway resistance (sRaw). We used this new technique, which we term "unrestrained video-assisted plethysmography" (UVAP), to measure sRaw in 11 BALB/c mice exposed to aerosols of saline, methacholine, and albuterol and obtained mean values of 0.71, 1.23 and 1.10 cmH(2)O x s, respectively. Mean breathing frequency was 4.3, 3.4, and 3.6 breaths/s, respectively, while the corresponding mean tidal volumes were 0.36, 0.44 and 0.37 ml, respectively. We conclude that UVAP, a noninvasive method, is able to provide usefully accurate estimates of sRaw and breathing pattern parameters in mice.

  10. A comprehensive system for dosimetric commissioning and Monte Carlo validation for the small animal radiation research platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tryggestad, E; Armour, M; Iordachita, I; Verhaegen, F; Wong, J W

    2009-09-07

    Our group has constructed the small animal radiation research platform (SARRP) for delivering focal, kilo-voltage radiation to targets in small animals under robotic control using cone-beam CT guidance. The present work was undertaken to support the SARRP's treatment planning capabilities. We have devised a comprehensive system for characterizing the radiation dosimetry in water for the SARRP and have developed a Monte Carlo dose engine with the intent of reproducing these measured results. We find that the SARRP provides sufficient therapeutic dose rates ranging from 102 to 228 cGy min(-1) at 1 cm depth for the available set of high-precision beams ranging from 0.5 to 5 mm in size. In terms of depth-dose, the mean of the absolute percentage differences between the Monte Carlo calculations and measurement is 3.4% over the full range of sampled depths spanning 0.5-7.2 cm for the 3 and 5 mm beams. The measured and computed profiles for these beams agree well overall; of note, good agreement is observed in the profile tails. Especially for the smallest 0.5 and 1 mm beams, including a more realistic description of the effective x-ray source into the Monte Carlo model may be important.

  11. A comprehensive system for dosimetric commissioning and Monte Carlo validation for the small animal radiation research platform

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tryggestad, E; Armour, M; Wong, J W [Deptartment of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD (United States); Iordachita, I [Laboratory for Computational Sensing and Robotics, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD (United States); Verhaegen, F [Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO Physics), GROW School, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht (Netherlands)

    2009-09-07

    Our group has constructed the small animal radiation research platform (SARRP) for delivering focal, kilo-voltage radiation to targets in small animals under robotic control using cone-beam CT guidance. The present work was undertaken to support the SARRP's treatment planning capabilities. We have devised a comprehensive system for characterizing the radiation dosimetry in water for the SARRP and have developed a Monte Carlo dose engine with the intent of reproducing these measured results. We find that the SARRP provides sufficient therapeutic dose rates ranging from 102 to 228 cGy min{sup -1} at 1 cm depth for the available set of high-precision beams ranging from 0.5 to 5 mm in size. In terms of depth-dose, the mean of the absolute percentage differences between the Monte Carlo calculations and measurement is 3.4% over the full range of sampled depths spanning 0.5-7.2 cm for the 3 and 5 mm beams. The measured and computed profiles for these beams agree well overall; of note, good agreement is observed in the profile tails. Especially for the smallest 0.5 and 1 mm beams, including a more realistic description of the effective x-ray source into the Monte Carlo model may be important.

  12. PET performance evaluation of MADPET4: a small animal PET insert for a 7-Tesla MRI scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omidvari, Negar; Cabello, Jorge; Topping, Geoffrey; Schneider, Florian Roland; Paul, Stephan; Schwaiger, Markus; Ziegler, Sibylle I

    2017-10-04

    MADPET4 is the first small animal PET insert with two layers of individually read out crystals in combination with silicon photomultiplier technology. It has a novel detector arrangement, in which all crystals face the center of field of view transaxially. In this work, the PET performance of MADPET4 was evaluated and compared to other preclinical PET scanners using the NEMA NU 4 measurements, followed by imaging a mouse-size hot-rod resolution phantom and two in vivo simultaneous PET/MRI scans in a 7-T MRI scanner. The insert had a peak sensitivity of 0.49%, using an energy threshold of 350 keV. A uniform transaxial resolution was obtained up to 15 mm radial offset from the axial center, using filtered back-projection with single-slice rebinning. The measured average radial and tangential resolutions (FWHM) were 1.38 mm and 1.39 mm, respectively. The 1.2 mm rods were separable in the hot-rod phantom using an iterative image reconstruction algorithm. The scatter fraction was 7.3% and peak noise equivalent count rate was 15.5 kcps at 65.1 MBq of activity. The FDG uptake in a mouse heart and brain were visible in the two in vivo simultaneous PET/MRI scans without applying image corrections. In conclusion, the insert demonstrated a good overall performance and can be used for small animal multi-modal research applications. © 2017 Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine.

  13. In vivo small animal imaging for early assessment of therapeutic efficacy of photodynamic therapy for prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fei, Baowei; Wang, Hesheng; Chen, Xiang; Meyers, Joseph; Mulvilhill, John; Feyes, Denise; Edgehouse, Nancy; Duerk, Jeffrey L.; Pretlow, Thomas G.; Oleinick, Nancy L.

    2007-03-01

    We are developing in vivo small animal imaging techniques that can measure early effects of photodynamic therapy (PDT) for prostate cancer. PDT is an emerging therapeutic modality that continues to show promise in the treatment of cancer. At our institution, a new second-generation photosensitizing drug, the silicon phthalocyanine Pc 4, has been developed and evaluated at the Case Comprehensive Cancer Center. In this study, we are developing magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques that provide therapy monitoring and early assessment of tumor response to PDT. We generated human prostate cancer xenografts in athymic nude mice. For the imaging experiments, we used a highfield 9.4-T small animal MR scanner (Bruker Biospec). High-resolution MR images were acquired from the treated and control tumors pre- and post-PDT and 24 hr after PDT. We utilized multi-slice multi-echo (MSME) MR sequences. During imaging acquisitions, the animals were anesthetized with a continuous supply of 2% isoflurane in oxygen and were continuously monitored for respiration and temperature. After imaging experiments, we manually segmented the tumors on each image slice for quantitative image analyses. We computed three-dimensional T2 maps for the tumor regions from the MSME images. We plotted the histograms of the T2 maps for each tumor pre- and post-PDT and 24 hr after PDT. After the imaging and PDT experiments, we dissected the tumor tissues and used the histologic slides to validate the MR images. In this study, six mice with human prostate cancer tumors were imaged and treated at the Case Center for Imaging Research. The T2 values of treated tumors increased by 24 +/- 14% 24 hr after the therapy. The control tumors did not demonstrate significant changes of the T2 values. Inflammation and necrosis were observed within the treated tumors 24 hour after the treatment. Preliminary results show that Pc 4-PDT is effective for the treatment of human prostate cancer in mice. The small animal MR

  14. Electrospun vascular scaffold for cellularized small diameter blood vessels: A preclinical large animal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Young Min; Ahn, Hyunhee; Arenas-Herrera, Juan; Kim, Cheil; Abolbashari, Mehran; Atala, Anthony; Yoo, James J; Lee, Sang Jin

    2017-09-01

    The strategy of vascular tissue engineering is to create a vascular substitute by combining autologous vascular cells with a tubular-shaped biodegradable scaffold. We have previously developed a novel electrospun bilayered vascular scaffold that provides proper biological and biomechanical properties as well as structural configuration. In this study, we investigated the clinical feasibility of a cellularized vascular scaffold in a preclinical large animal model. We fabricated the cellularized vascular construct with autologous endothelial progenitor cell (EPC)-derived endothelial cells (ECs) and smooth muscle cells (SMCs) followed by a pulsatile bioreactor preconditioning. This fully cellularized vascular construct was tested in a sheep carotid arterial interposition model. After preconditioning, confluent and mature EC and SMC layers in the scaffold were achieved. The cellularized constructs sustained the structural integrity with a high degree of graft patency without eliciting an inflammatory response over the course of the 6-month period in sheep. Moreover, the matured EC coverage on the lumen and a thick smooth muscle layer were formed at 6months after transplantation. We demonstrated that electrospun bilayered vascular scaffolds in conjunction with autologous vascular cells may be a clinically applicable alternative to traditional prosthetic vascular graft substitutes. This study demonstrates the utility of tissue engineering to provide platform technologies for rehabilitation of patients recovering from severe, devastating cardiovascular diseases. The long-term goal is to provide alternatives to vascular grafting using bioengineered blood vessels derived from an autologous cell source with a functionalized vascular scaffold. This novel bilayered vascular construct for engineering blood vessels is designed to offer "off-the-shelf" availability for clinical translation. Copyright © 2017 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. A small animal PET based on GAPDs and charge signal transmission approach for hybrid PET-MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Jihoon; Choi, Yong; Hong, Key Jo; Hu, Wei; Jung, Jin Ho; Huh, Yoonsuk [Department of Electronic Engineering, Sogang University, 1 Shinsu-Dong, Mapo-Gu, Seoul 121-742 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Byung-Tae, E-mail: ychoi.image@gmail.com [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, 50 Ilwon-Dong, Gangnam-Gu, Seoul 135-710 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-08-15

    Positron emission tomography (PET) employing Geiger-mode avalanche photodiodes (GAPDs) and charge signal transmission approach was developed for small animal imaging. Animal PET contained 16 LYSO and GAPD detector modules that were arranged in a 70 mm diameter ring with an axial field of view of 13 mm. The GAPDs charge output signals were transmitted to a preamplifier located remotely using 300 cm flexible flat cables. The position decoder circuits (PDCs) were used to multiplex the PET signals from 256 to 4 channels. The outputs of the PDCs were digitized and further-processed in the data acquisition unit. The cross-compatibilities of the PET detectors and MRI were assessed outside and inside the MRI. Experimental studies of the developed full ring PET were performed to examine the spatial resolution and sensitivity. Phantom and mouse images were acquired to examine the imaging performance. The mean energy and time resolution of the PET detector were 17.6% and 1.5 ns, respectively. No obvious degradation on PET and MRI was observed during simultaneous PET-MRI data acquisition. The measured spatial resolution and sensitivity at the CFOV were 2.8 mm and 0.7%, respectively. In addition, a 3 mm diameter line source was clearly resolved in the hot-sphere phantom images. The reconstructed transaxial PET images of the mouse brain and tumor displaying the glucose metabolism patterns were imaged well. These results demonstrate GAPD and the charge signal transmission approach can allow the development of high performance small animal PET with improved MR compatibility.

  16. Monitoring the Spatiotemporal Activities of miRNAs in Small Animal Models Using Molecular Imaging Modalities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Baril

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs are a class of small non-coding RNAs that regulate gene expression by binding mRNA targets via sequence complementary inducing translational repression and/or mRNA degradation. A current challenge in the field of miRNA biology is to understand the functionality of miRNAs under physiopathological conditions. Recent evidence indicates that miRNA expression is more complex than simple regulation at the transcriptional level. MiRNAs undergo complex post-transcriptional regulations such miRNA processing, editing, accumulation and re-cycling within P-bodies. They are dynamically regulated and have a well-orchestrated spatiotemporal localization pattern. Real-time and spatio-temporal analyses of miRNA expression are difficult to evaluate and often underestimated. Therefore, important information connecting miRNA expression and function can be lost. Conventional miRNA profiling methods such as Northern blot, real-time PCR, microarray, in situ hybridization and deep sequencing continue to contribute to our knowledge of miRNA biology. However, these methods can seldom shed light on the spatiotemporal organization and function of miRNAs in real-time. Non-invasive molecular imaging methods have the potential to address these issues and are thus attracting increasing attention. This paper reviews the state-of-the-art of methods used to detect miRNAs and discusses their contribution in the emerging field of miRNA biology and therapy.

  17. 4D micro-CT-based perfusion imaging in small animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badea, C. T.; Johnston, S. M.; Lin, M.; Hedlund, L. W.; Johnson, G. A.

    2009-02-01

    Quantitative in-vivo imaging of lung perfusion in rodents can provide critical information for preclinical studies. However, the combined challenges of high temporal and spatial resolution have made routine quantitative perfusion imaging difficult in rodents. We have recently developed a dual tube/detector micro-CT scanner that is well suited to capture first-pass kinetics of a bolus of contrast agent used to compute perfusion information. Our approach is based on the paradigm that the same time density curves can be reproduced in a number of consecutive, small (i.e. 50μL) injections of iodinated contrast agent at a series of different angles. This reproducibility is ensured by the high-level integration of the imaging components of our system, with a micro-injector, a mechanical ventilator, and monitoring applications. Sampling is controlled through a biological pulse sequence implemented in LabVIEW. Image reconstruction is based on a simultaneous algebraic reconstruction technique implemented on a GPU. The capabilities of 4D micro-CT imaging are demonstrated in studies on lung perfusion in rats. We report 4D micro-CT imaging in the rat lung with a heartbeat temporal resolution of 140 ms and reconstructed voxels of 88 μm. The approach can be readily extended to a wide range of important preclinical models, such as tumor perfusion and angiogenesis, and renal function.

  18. Review of commonly used clinical pathology parameters for general gastrointestinal disease with emphasis on small animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, Jörg M

    2014-01-01

    A wide variety of markers are available to assess the function and pathology of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. This review describes some of these markers with special emphasis given to markers used in dogs and cats. Small intestinal disease can be confirmed and localized by the measurement of serum concentrations of folate and cobalamin. Fecal α1-proteinase inhibitor concentration can increase in individuals with excessive GI protein loss. A wide variety of inflammatory markers are available for a variety of species that can be used to assess the inflammatory activity of various types of inflammatory cells in the GI tract, although most of these markers assess neutrophilic inflammation, such as neutrophil elastase, calprotectin, or S100A12. N-methylhistamine can serve as a marker of mast cell infiltration. Markers for lymphocytic or eosinophilic inflammation are currently under investigation. Exocrine pancreatic function can be assessed by measurement of serum concentrations of pancreatic lipase immunoreactivity (PLI) and trypsin-like immunoreactivity (TLI). Serum PLI concentration is increased in individuals with pancreatitis and has been shown to be highly specific for exocrine pancreatic function and sensitive for pancreatitis. Serum TLI concentration is severely decreased in individuals with exocrine pancreatic insufficiency.

  19. Preliminary study of metabolic radiotherapy with {sup 188}Re via small animal imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antoccia, A. [Dept. of Biology, Univ. Roma3, V.le G. Marconi, I-00146 Rome (Italy); INFN, Sezione Roma3, Via della Vasca Navale 84, I-00146 Rome (Italy); Baldazzi, G. [Dept. of Physics, Univ. Bologna, V.le C. Berti-Pichat 6/2, I-40127 Bologna (Italy); INFN, Sezione Bologna, V.le C. Berti-Pichat 6/2, I-40127 Bologna (Italy); Bello, M. [Dept. of Physics, Univ. Padova, Via F. Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy); INFN - LNL, V.le dell' Universita 2, I-35020 Legnaro(Italy)

    2006-01-15

    {sup 188}Re is a {beta}{sup -} (Emax=2.12 MeV) and {gamma} (155 keV) emitter. Since its chemistry is similar to that of the largely employed tracer, {sup 99m}Tc, molecules of hyaluronic acid (HA) have been labelled with {sup 188}Re to produce a target specific radiopharmaceutical. The radiolabeled compound, i.v. injected in healthy mice, is able to accumulate into the liver after a few minutes. To study the effect of metabolic radiotherapy in mice, we have built a small gamma camera based on a matrix of YAP:Ce crystals, with 0.6x0.6x10 mm{sup 3} pixels, read out by a R2486 Hamamatsu PSPMT. A high-sensitivity 20 mm thick lead parallel-hole collimator, with hole diameter 1.5 mm and septa of 0.18 mm, is placed in front of the YAP matrix. Preliminary results obtained with various phantoms containing a solution of {sup 188}Re and with C57 black mice injected with the {sup 188}Re-HA solution are presented. To increase the space resolution and to obtain two orthogonal projections simultaneously we are building in parallel two new cameras to be positioned at 90 degrees. They use a CsI(Tl) matrix with 1x1x5 mm{sup 3} pixels read out by H8500 Hamamatsu Flat panel PMT.

  20. Automatic cardiac gating of small-animal PET from list-mode data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herraiz, J.L.; Udias, J.M. [Universidad Complutense de Madrid Univ. (Spain). Grupo de Fisica Nuclear; Vaquero, J.J.; Desco, M. [Universidad Carlos III de Madrid (Spain). Dept. de Bioingenieria e Ingenieria Aeroespacial; Cusso, L. [Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Maranon, Madrid (Spain). Unidad de Medicina y Cirugia Experimental

    2011-07-01

    This work presents a method to obtain automatically the cardiac gating signal in a PET study of rats, by employing the variation with time of the counts in the cardiac region, that can be extracted from list-mode data. In an initial step, the cardiac region is identified in the image space by backward-projecting a small fraction of the acquired data and studying the variation with time of the counts in each voxel inside said region, with frequencies within 2 and 8 Hz. The region obtained corresponds accurately to the left-ventricle of the heart of the rat. In a second step, the lines-of-response (LORs) connected with this region are found by forward-projecting this region. The time variation of the number of counts in these LORs contains the cardiac motion information that we want to extract. This variation of counts with time is band-pass filtered to reduce noise, and the time signal so obtained is used to create the gating signal. The result was compared with a cardiac gating signal obtained from an ECG acquired simultaneously to the PET study. Reconstructed gated images obtained from both gating information are similar. The method proposed demonstrates that valid cardiac gating signals can be obtained for rats from PET list-mode data. (orig.)

  1. Preliminary study of metabolic radiotherapy with 188Re via small animal imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Baldazzi, G; Muciaccio, A; Navarria, Francesco Luigi; Pancaldi, G; Perrotta, A; Zuffa, M; Boccaccio, P; Uzunov, N; Bello, M; Bernardini, D; Mazzi, U; Moschini, G; Riondato, M; Rosato, A; Garibaldi, F; Pani, R; Antoccia, A; De Notaristefani, F; Hull, G; Cencelli, V O; Sgura, A; Tanzarella, C

    2006-01-01

    188Re is a beta- (Emax = 2.12 MeV) and gamma (155 keV) emitter. Since its chemistry is similar to that of the largely employed tracer, 99mTc, molecules of hyaluronic acid (HA) have been labelled with 188Re to produce a target specific radiopharmaceutical. The radiolabeled compound, i.v. injected in healthy mice, is able to accumulate into the liver after a few minutes. To study the effect of metabolic radiotherapy in mice, we have built a small gamma camera based on a matrix of YAP:Ce crystals, with 0.6x0.6x10 mm**3 pixels, read out by a R2486 Hamamatsu PSPMT. A high-sensitivity 20 mm thick lead parallel-hole collimator, with hole diameter 1.5 mm and septa of 0.18 mm, is placed in front of the YAP matrix. Preliminary results obtained with various phantoms containing a solution of 188Re and with C57 black mice injected with the 188Re-HA solution are presented. To increase the space resolution and to obtain two orthogonal projections simultaneously we are building in parallel two new cameras to be positioned at...

  2. Monitoring the Spatiotemporal Activities of miRNAs in Small Animal Models Using Molecular Imaging Modalities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baril, Patrick; Ezzine, Safia; Pichon, Chantal

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of small non-coding RNAs that regulate gene expression by binding mRNA targets via sequence complementary inducing translational repression and/or mRNA degradation. A current challenge in the field of miRNA biology is to understand the functionality of miRNAs under physiopathological conditions. Recent evidence indicates that miRNA expression is more complex than simple regulation at the transcriptional level. MiRNAs undergo complex post-transcriptional regulations such miRNA processing, editing, accumulation and re-cycling within P-bodies. They are dynamically regulated and have a well-orchestrated spatiotemporal localization pattern. Real-time and spatio-temporal analyses of miRNA expression are difficult to evaluate and often underestimated. Therefore, important information connecting miRNA expression and function can be lost. Conventional miRNA profiling methods such as Northern blot, real-time PCR, microarray, in situ hybridization and deep sequencing continue to contribute to our knowledge of miRNA biology. However, these methods can seldom shed light on the spatiotemporal organization and function of miRNAs in real-time. Non-invasive molecular imaging methods have the potential to address these issues and are thus attracting increasing attention. This paper reviews the state-of-the-art of methods used to detect miRNAs and discusses their contribution in the emerging field of miRNA biology and therapy. PMID:25749473

  3. Gamma knife radiosurgery targeting protocols for the experiments with small animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokumaru, Osamu; Hayashi, Motohiro; Katayama, Yoko; Tomida, Mihoko; Kawakami, Yoriko; Kouyama, Nobuo

    2007-01-01

    Manipulation of brain functions via Gamma Knife (GK) irradiation would have numerous applications in clinical and experimental neurology. Alteration of brain functions in the unilaterally irradiated striatum was indexed through monitoring freely moving rat behaviors. Spontaneous activity and rotations on the apomorphine test, which can detect dopaminergic function imbalance, were indexed employing our behavior tracking system. The spatial distribution of necrotic lesions was explored using serial sections, and was assumed to represent the real foci of the GK target. Distinct behavioral alterations corresponded to the precise locations of the lesions in various areas of the basal ganglia. Displacement of the irradiation sites in the anteromedial direction increased spontaneous activity, and posterolateral shift provoked circling behavior on the apomorphine test. Accurate positioning of the target is crucial for experimental GK irradiation locally focused on domains of a small brain such as that of the rat. Here, we propose a protocol for converting the 'intended' focus, based on brain map coordinates, to a 'planned' focus on the MR imaging coordinate system with the Régis-Valliccioni stereotactic frame.

  4. Evaluation of absorbed doses in voxel-based and simplified models for small animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, Akram; Kinase, Sakae; Saito, Kimiaki

    2012-07-01

    Internal dosimetry in non-human biota is desirable from the viewpoint of radiation protection of the environment. The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) proposed Reference Animals and Plants using simplified models, such as ellipsoids and spheres and calculated absorbed fractions (AFs) for whole bodies. In this study, photon and electron AFs in whole bodies of voxel-based rat and frog models have been calculated and compared with AFs in the reference models. It was found that the voxel-based and the reference frog (or rat) models can be consistent for the whole-body AFs within a discrepancy of 25%, as the source was uniformly distributed in the whole body. The specific absorbed fractions (SAFs) and S values were also evaluated in whole bodies and all organs of the voxel-based frog and rat models as the source was distributed in the whole body or skeleton. The results demonstrated that the whole-body SAFs reflect SAFs of all individual organs as the source was uniformly distributed per mass within the whole body by about 30% uncertainties with exceptions for body contour (up to -40%) for both electrons and photons due to enhanced radiation leakages, and for the skeleton for photons only (up to +185%) due to differences in the mass attenuation coefficients. For nuclides such as (90)Y and (90)Sr, which were concentrated in the skeleton, there were large differences between S values in the whole body and those in individual organs, however the whole-body S values for the reference models with the whole body as the source were remarkably similar to those for the voxel-based models with the skeleton as the source, within about 4 and 0.3%, respectively. It can be stated that whole-body SAFs or S values in simplified models without internal organs are not sufficient for accurate internal dosimetry because they do not reflect SAFs or S values of all individual organs as the source was not distributed uniformly in whole body. Thus, voxel-based models

  5. An optimized small animal tumour model for experimentation with low energy protons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyreuther, Elke; Brüchner, Kerstin; Krause, Mechthild; Schmidt, Margret; Szabo, Rita; Pawelke, Jörg

    2017-01-01

    The long-term aim of developing laser based particle acceleration towards clinical application requires not only substantial technological progress, but also the radiobiological characterization of the resulting ultra-short and ultra-intensive particle beam pulses. After comprehensive cell studies a mouse ear tumour model was established allowing for the penetration of low energy protons (~20 MeV) currently available at laser driven accelerators. The model was successfully applied for a first tumour growth delay study with laser driven electrons, whereby the need of improvements crop out. To optimise the mouse ear tumour model with respect to a stable, high take rate and a lower number of secondary tumours, Matrigel was introduced for tumour cell injection. Different concentrations of two human tumour cell lines (FaDu, LN229) and Matrigel were evaluated for stable tumour growth and fulfilling the allocation criteria for irradiation experiments. The originally applied cell injection with PBS was performed for comparison and to assess the long-term stability of the model. Finally, the optimum suspension of cells and Matrigel was applied to determine applicable dose ranges for tumour growth delay studies by 200 kV X-ray irradiation. Both human tumour models showed a high take rate and exponential tumour growth starting at a volume of ~10 mm3. As disclosed by immunofluorescence analysis these small tumours already interact with the surrounding tissue and activate endothelial cells to form vessels. The formation of delimited, solid tumours at irradiation size was shown by standard H&E staining and a realistic dose range for inducing tumour growth delay without permanent tumour control was obtained for both tumour entities. The already established mouse ear tumour model was successfully upgraded now providing stable tumour growth with high take rate for two tumour entities (HNSCC, glioblastoma) that are of interest for future irradiation experiments at experimental

  6. Initial reconstruction results from a simulated adaptive small animal C shaped PET/MR insert

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Efthimiou, Nikos [Technological Educational Institute of Athens (Greece); Kostou, Theodora; Papadimitroulas, Panagiotis [Technological Educational Institute of Athens (Greece); Department of Medical Physics, School of Medicine, University of Patras (Greece); Charalampos, Tsoumpas [Division of Biomedical Imaging, University of Leeds, Leeds (United Kingdom); Loudos, George [Technological Educational Institute of Athens (Greece)

    2015-05-18

    Traditionally, most clinical and preclinical PET scanners, rely on full cylindrical geometry for whole body as well as dedicated organ scans, which is not optimized with regards to sensitivity and resolution. Several groups proposed the construction of dedicated PET inserts for MR scanners, rather than the construction of new integrated PET/MR scanners. The space inside an MR scanner is a limiting factor which can be reduced further with the use of extra coils, and render the use of non-flexible cylindrical PET scanners difficult if not impossible. The incorporation of small SiPM arrays, can provide the means to design adaptive PET scanners to fit in tight locations, which, makes imaging possible and improve the sensitivity, due to the closer approximation to the organ of interest. In order to assess the performance of such a device we simulated the geometry of a C shaped PET, using GATE. The design of the C-PET was based on a realistic SiPM-BGO scenario. In order reconstruct the simulated data, with STIR, we had to calculate system probability matrix which corresponds to this non standard geometry. For this purpose we developed an efficient multi threaded ray tracing technique to calculate the line integral paths in voxel arrays. One of the major features is the ability to automatically adjust the size of FOV according to the geometry of the detectors. The initial results showed that the sensitivity improved as the angle between the detector arrays increases, thus better angular sampling the scanner's field of view (FOV). The more complete angular coverage helped in improving the shape of the source in the reconstructed images, as well. Furthermore, by adapting the FOV to the closer to the size of the source, the sensitivity per voxel is improved.

  7. The Combination of In vivo (124)I-PET and CT Small Animal Imaging for Evaluation of Thyroid Physiology and Dosimetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    El-Ali, Henrik H; Eckerwall, Martin; Skovgaard, Dorthe;

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: A thyroid rat model combining functional and anatomical information would be of great benefit for better modeling of thyroid physiology and for absorbed dose calculations. Our aim was to show that (124)I-PET and CT small animal imaging are useful as a combined model for studying thyroid...... physiology and dose calculation. METHODS: Seven rats were subjects for multiple thyroid (124)I-imaging and CT-scans. S-values [mGy/MBqs] for different thyroid sizes were simulated. A phantom with spheres was designed for validation of performances of the small animal PET and CT imaging systems. RESULTS...... indicates the importance of using an accurate volume-measuring technique such as the small animal CT. The small animal PET system was on the other hand able to accurately estimate the activity concentration in the thyroid volumes. We conclude that the combination of the PET and CT image information...

  8. In vivo imaging of dopamine transporter function in rat striatum using pinhole SPECT and 123I-beta-CIT coregistered with small animal MRI

    CERN Document Server

    Dierkes, K

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this study was to establish in vivo imaging of dopamine transporter function in a small animal model of Parkinson's disease using pinhole SPECT and 123I labeled beta-CIT. Since functional imaging of small animals can hardly be interpreted without localization to related anatomical structures, MRI-SPECT coregistration secondly was established as an inexpensive tool for in vivo monitoring of physiological and pathological alterations in striatal dopamine transporters using beta-CIT as an specific radionuclear ligand.

  9. Comparison between X-rays spectra and their effective energies in small animal CT tomographic imaging and dosimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamdi, Mahdjoub; Mimi, Malika; Bentourkia, M'hamed

    2016-12-22

    Small animal CT imaging and dosimetry usually rely on X-ray radiation produced by X-ray tubes. These X-rays typically cover a large energy range. In this study, we compared poly-energetic X-ray spectra against estimated equivalent (effective) mono-energetic beams with the same number of simulated photons for small animal CT imaging and dosimetry applications. Two poly-energetic X-ray spectra were generated from a tungsten anode at 50 and 120 kVp. The corresponding effective mono-energetic beams were established as 36 keV for the 50 kVp spectrum and 49.5 keV for the 120 kVp spectrum. To assess imaging applications, we investigated the spatial resolution by a tungsten wire, and the contrast-to-noise ratio in a reference phantom and in a realistic mouse phantom. For dosimetry investigation, we calculated the absorbed dose in a segmented digital mouse atlas in the skin, fat, heart and bone tissues. Differences of 2.1 and 2.6% in spatial resolution were respectively obtained between the 50 and 120 kVp poly-energetic spectra and their respective 36 and 49.5 keV mono-energetic beams. The differences in contrast-to-noise ratio between the poly-energetic 50 kVp spectrum and its corresponding mono-energetic 36 keV beam for air, fat, brain and bone were respectively -2.9, -0.2, 11.2 and -4.8%, and similarly between the 120 kVp and its effective energy 49.5 keV: -11.3, -20.2, -4.2 and -13.5%. Concerning the absorbed dose, for the lower X-ray beam energies, 50 kVp against 36 keV, the poly-energetic radiation doses were higher than the mono-energetic doses. Instead, for the higher X-ray beam energies, 120 kVp and 49.5 keV, the absorbed dose to the bones and lungs were higher for the mono-energetic 49.5 keV. The intensity and energy of the X-ray beam spectrum have an impact on both imaging and dosimetry in small animal studies. Simulations with mono-energetic beams should take into account these differences in order to study biological effects or to be compared to

  10. Small animal PET imaging of HSV1-tk gene expression with {sup 124}IVDU in liver by the hydrodynamic injection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, I. H.; Lee, T. S.; Woo, S. G.; Jeong, J. H.; Kang, J. H.; Kim, K. M.; Chun, K. J.; Choi, C. W.; Lim, S. M. [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-07-01

    The liver is an important target organ for gene transfer due to its capacity for synthesizing serum protein and its involvement in numerous genetic diseases. High level of foreign gene expression in liver can be achieved by a large-volume and high-speed intravenous injection of naked plasmid DNA (pDNA), so called hydrodynamic injection. This study is aimed to evaluate liver specific-gene expression of herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase(HSV1-tk) by hydrodynamic injection and image HSV1-tk expression using {sup 124}IVDU-PET. We constructed herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase (HSV1-tk)-expressing pDNA (pHSV1-tk) modified from pEGFP-N1. Hydrodynamic injection was performed using 40 {mu}g of plasmid (pEGFP/N1 or pHSV1-tk) in 2 ml of 0.85% saline solution for 20{approx}22g mice in 5 seconds intravenously. At 1 d post-hydrodynamic injection, biodistribution study was performed at 2 h post-injection of radiolabeled IVDU, fluorescence image was obtained using optical imager and small animal PET image was acquired with {sup 124}IVDU at 2 h post-injection. After PET imaging, digital whole body autoradiography (DWBA) was performed. Expression of HSV1-tk and EGFP was confirmed by RT-PCR in each liver tissue. In liver of pHSV1-tk and pEGFP/N1 injection groups, {sup 123}IVDU uptake was 5.65%ID/g and 0.98%ID/g, respectively. {sup 123}IVDU uptake in liver of pHSV1-tk injection group showed 5.7-fold higher than that of pEGFP/N1 injection group (p<0.01). On the other hand, the liver of pEGFP/N1 injection group showed fluorescence activity. In small animal PET images, {sup 124}IVDU uptake was selectively localized in liver of pHSV1-tk injection group and also checked in DWBA, but showed minimal uptake in liver of pEGFP/N1 injection mice. Hydrodynamic injection was effective to liver-specific delivery of plasmid DNA. Small animal PET image of {sup 124}IVDU could be used in the evaluation of noninvasive reporter gene imaging in liver.

  11. Pharmacology of topical prostaglandin F2 α analogs and their place in the treatment of glaucoma in small animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maślanka, T

    2015-04-01

    A distinguishing feature of the most common types of glaucoma is an increased intra-ocular pressure (IOP), which has a damaging effect on optic nerve axons, leading to the progressive loss of retinal ganglion cells. Therefore, IOP-lowering medications are the mainstay of glaucoma therapy. Topical prostaglandin F2 α analogs (PGAs) are a relatively new class of ocular hypotensive drugs, which have made a huge impact on the treatment of glaucoma in dogs. This study summarizes the current state of knowledge on the mechanism of action of these agents and their effect on IOP in dogs and cats. It also discusses potential harmful side effects of PGAs and presents contemporary opinions about their role and place in the medical management of glaucoma in small animals.

  12. Evaluation of anesthesia effects on [{sup 18}F]FDG uptake in mouse brain and heart using small animal PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toyama, Hiroshi E-mail: htoyama@fujita-hu.ac.jp; Ichise, Masanori; Liow, Jeih-San; Vines, Douglass C.; Seneca, Nicholas M.; Modell, Kendra J.; Seidel, Jurgen; Green, Michael V.; Innis, Robert B

    2004-02-01

    This study evaluates effects of anesthesia on {sup 18}F-FDG (FDG) uptake in mouse brain and heart to establish the basic conditions of small animal PET imaging. Prior to FDG injection, 12 mice were anesthetized with isoflurane gas; 11 mice were anesthetized with an intraperitoneal injection of a ketamine/xylazine mixture; and 11 mice were awake. In isoflurane and ketamine/xylazine conditions, FDG brain uptake (%ID/g) was significantly lower than in controls. Conversely, in the isoflurane condition, %ID/g in heart was significantly higher than in controls, whereas heart uptake in ketamine/xylazine mice was significantly lower. Results suggest that anesthesia impedes FDG uptake in mouse brain and affects FDG uptake in heart; however, the effects in the brain and heart differ depending on the type of anesthesia used.

  13. Design and characterization of a carbon-nanotube-based micro-focus x-ray tube for small animal imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sultana, Shabana; Calderón-Colón, Xiomara; Cao, Guohua; Zhou, Otto; Lu, Jianping

    2010-04-01

    We report the progress in development of carbon nanotube (CNT) field emission micro-focus x-ray tubes for dynamic small animal imaging with high spatial and temporal resolution. Extensive electron optics simulations were performed to study the focusing structure and optimize the tube design. 3D finite element analysis was used for modeling and simulating electron beam optics. A simple and intuitive model is developed to model the field emission properties of CNT cathodes. The dependence of focus spot size and the anode current on the gate extracting voltage, the focusing voltages, the gate mesh geometry, and other geometric parameters were studied. Several tubes were built according to the optimal design. The experimentally measured focus spot size and its dependence on the focus voltages were found to be in quantitative agreement with simulations.

  14. In vivo imaging of brain dopaminergic neurotransmission system in small animals with high-resolution single photon emission computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saji, Hideo; Kawashima, Hidekazu; Ogawa, Mikako; Kitamura, Youji; Mukai, Takahiro [Kyoto University, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kyoto (Japan); Iida, Yasuhiko; Shimazu, Seiichiro; Yoneda, Fumiro [Fujimoto Pharmaceutical Corporation, Matsubara, Osaka (Japan)

    2003-01-01

    High-resolution single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) provides a unique capability to image the biodistribution of radiolabeled molecules in small laboratory animals. Thus, we applied the high-resolution SPECT to in vivo imaging of the brain dopaminergic neurotransmission system in common marmosets using two radiolabeled ligands, [{sup 123}I]2{beta}-carbomethoxy-3{beta}-(4-iodophenyl)tropane ({beta}-CIT) as a dopamine transporter(DAT) ligand and [{sup 123}I]iodobenzamide (IBZM) as a dopamine D{sub 2} receptor (D{sub 2}R) ligand. Specific images of the striatum, a region with a high density of dopaminergic synapses, were obtained at 240 min and 60 min after injection of [{sup 123}I]{beta}-CIT and [{sup 123}I]IBZM, respectively. Furthermore, a significantly low accumulation of [{sup 123}I]{beta}-CIT in the striatum was observed in MPTP-treated animals compared with results for a control group, and a similar accumulation in the control group was observed with the pretreatment of deprenyl in the MPTP-treated animals. However, the striatal accumulation of [{sup 123}I]IBZM showed no changes among the control, MPTP-treated, and deprenyl-MPTP-treated groups. These SPECT imaging results agreed well with those of DA concentration and motor behavior. Since MPTP destroys nigrostriatal dopamine nerves and produces irreversible neurodegeneration associated with Parkinsonian syndrome, SPECDT imaging data in this study demonstrated that deprenyl shows its neuroprotective effect on Parkinsonism by protecting against the destruction of presynaptic dopamine neutrons. (author)

  15. Hardware, software, and scanning issues encountered during small animal imaging of photodynamic therapy in the athymic nude rat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, Nathan; Sharma, Rahul; Varghai, Davood; Spring-Robinson, Chandra; Oleinick, Nancy L.; Muzic, Raymond F., Jr.; Dean, David

    2007-02-01

    Small animal imaging devices are now commonly used to study gene activation and model the effects of potential therapies. We are attempting to develop a protocol that non-invasively tracks the affect of Pc 4-mediated photodynamic therapy (PDT) in a human glioma model using structural image data from micro-CT and/or micro-MR scanning and functional data from 18F-fluorodeoxy-glucose (18F-FDG) micro-PET imaging. Methods: Athymic nude rat U87-derived glioma was imaged by micro-PET and either micro-CT or micro-MR prior to Pc 4-PDT. Difficulty insuring animal anesthesia and anatomic position during the micro-PET, micro-CT, and micro-MR scans required adaptation of the scanning bed hardware. Following Pc 4-PDT the animals were again 18F-FDG micro-PET scanned, euthanized one day later, and their brains were explanted and prepared for H&E histology. Histology provided the gold standard for tumor location and necrosis. The tumor and surrounding brain functional and structural image data were then isolated and coregistered. Results: Surprisingly, both the non-PDT and PDT groups showed an increase in tumor functional activity when we expected this signal to disappear in the group receiving PDT. Co-registration of the functional and structural image data was done manually. Discussion: As expected, micro-MR imaging provided better structural discrimination of the brain tumor than micro-CT. Contrary to expectations, in our preliminary analysis 18F-FDG micro-PET imaging does not readily discriminate the U87 tumors that received Pc 4-PDT. We continue to investigate the utility of micro-PET and other methods of functional imaging to remotely detect the specificity and sensitivity of Pc 4-PDT in deeply placed tumors.

  16. A High-Frequency High Frame Rate Duplex Ultrasound Linear Array Imaging System for Small Animal Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lequan; Xu, Xiaochen; Hu, Changhong; Sun, Lei; Yen, Jesse T.; Cannata, Jonathan M.; Shung, K. Kirk

    2010-01-01

    High-frequency (HF) ultrasound imaging has been shown to be useful for non-invasively imaging anatomical structures of the eye and small animals in biological and pharmaceutical research, achieving superior spatial resolution. Cardiovascular research utilizing mice requires not only real-time B-scan imaging, but also ultrasound Doppler to evaluate both anatomy and blood flow of the mouse heart. This paper reports the development of a high frequency ultrasound duplex imaging system capable of both B-mode imaging and Doppler flow measurements, using a 64-element linear array. The system included a HF pulsed-wave Doppler module, a 32-channel HF B-mode imaging module, a PC with a 200 MS/s 14-bit A/D card, and real-time LabView software. A 50dB signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and a depth of penetration of larger than 12 mm were achieved using a 35 MHz linear array with 50 μm pitch. The two-way beam widths were determined to be 165 μm to 260 μm and the clutter energy to total energy ratio (CTR) were 9.1 dB to 12 dB, when the array was electronically focused at different focal points at depths from 4.8 mm to 9.6 mm. The system is capable of acquiring real-time B-mode images at a rate greater than 400 frames per second (fps) for a 4.8 × 13 mm field of view, using a 30 MHz 64-element linear array with 100 μm pitch. Sample in vivo cardiac high frame rate images and duplex images of mouse hearts are shown to assess its current imaging capability and performance for small animals. PMID:20639149

  17. A flat-panel detector based micro-CT system: performance evaluation for small-animal imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang Chul; Kim, Ho Kyung; Chun, In Kon; Cho, Myung Hye; Lee, Soo Yeol; Cho, Min Hyoung

    2003-12-21

    A dedicated small-animal x-ray micro computed tomography (micro-CT) system has been developed to screen laboratory small animals such as mice and rats. The micro-CT system consists of an indirect-detection flat-panel x-ray detector with a field-of-view of 120 x 120 mm2, a microfocus x-ray source, a rotational subject holder and a parallel data processing system. The flat-panel detector is based on a matrix-addressed photodiode array fabricated by a CMOS (complementary metal-oxide semiconductor) process coupled to a CsI:T1 (thallium-doped caesium iodide) scintillator as an x-ray-to-light converter. Principal imaging performances of the micro-CT system have been evaluated in terms of image uniformity, voxel noise and spatial resolution. It has been found that the image non-uniformity mainly comes from the structural non-uniform sensitivity pattern of the flat-panel detector and the voxel noise is about 48 CT numbers at the voxel size of 100 x 100 x 200 microm3 and the air kerma of 286 mGy. When the magnification ratio is 2, the spatial resolution of the micro-CT system is about 14 1p/mm (line pairs per millimetre) that is almost determined by the flat-panel detector showing about 7 1p/mm resolving power. Through low-contrast phantom imaging studies, the minimum resolvable contrast has been found to be less than 36 CT numbers at the air kerma of 95 mGy. Some laboratory rat imaging results are presented.

  18. Integration and evaluation of a needle-positioning robot with volumetric microcomputed tomography image guidance for small animal stereotactic interventions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waspe, Adam C.; McErlain, David D.; Pitelka, Vasek; Holdsworth, David W.; Lacefield, James C.; Fenster, Aaron [Biomedical Engineering Graduate Program and Imaging Research Laboratories, Robarts Research Institute, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 5K8 (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics and Imaging Research Laboratories, Robarts Research Institute, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 5K8 (Canada); Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 5C1 (Canada); Biomedical Engineering Graduate Program, Department of Medical Biophysics, Department of Medical Imaging, Department of Surgery, and Imaging Research Laboratories, Robarts Research Institute, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 5K8 (Canada); Biomedical Engineering Graduate Program, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Department of Medical Biophysics, and Imaging Research Laboratories, Robarts Research Institute, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 5K8 (Canada); Biomedical Engineering Graduate Program, Department of Medical Biophysics, Department of Medical Imaging, and Imaging Research Laboratories, Robarts Research Institute, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 5K8 (Canada)

    2010-04-15

    Purpose: Preclinical research protocols often require insertion of needles to specific targets within small animal brains. To target biologically relevant locations in rodent brains more effectively, a robotic device has been developed that is capable of positioning a needle along oblique trajectories through a single burr hole in the skull under volumetric microcomputed tomography (micro-CT) guidance. Methods: An x-ray compatible stereotactic frame secures the head throughout the procedure using a bite bar, nose clamp, and ear bars. CT-to-robot registration enables structures identified in the image to be mapped to physical coordinates in the brain. Registration is accomplished by injecting a barium sulfate contrast agent as the robot withdraws the needle from predefined points in a phantom. Registration accuracy is affected by the robot-positioning error and is assessed by measuring the surface registration error for the fiducial and target needle tracks (FRE and TRE). This system was demonstrated in situ by injecting 200 {mu}m tungsten beads into rat brains along oblique trajectories through a single burr hole on the top of the skull under micro-CT image guidance. Postintervention micro-CT images of each skull were registered with preintervention high-field magnetic resonance images of the brain to infer the anatomical locations of the beads. Results: Registration using four fiducial needle tracks and one target track produced a FRE and a TRE of 96 and 210 {mu}m, respectively. Evaluation with tissue-mimicking gelatin phantoms showed that locations could be targeted with a mean error of 154{+-}113 {mu}m. Conclusions: The integration of a robotic needle-positioning device with volumetric micro-CT image guidance should increase the accuracy and reduce the invasiveness of stereotactic needle interventions in small animals.

  19. A flat-panel detector based micro-CT system: performance evaluation for small-animal imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sang Chul; Kim, Ho Kyung; Chun, In Kon; Cho, Myung Hye; Lee, Soo Yeol; Cho, Min Hyoung [Graduate School of East-West Medical Science, Kyung Hee University, 1 Seochun, Kiheung, Yongin, Kyungki 449-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-12-21

    A dedicated small-animal x-ray micro computed tomography (micro-CT) system has been developed to screen laboratory small animals such as mice and rats. The micro-CT system consists of an indirect-detection flat-panel x-ray detector with a field-of-view of 120 x 120 mm{sup 2}, a microfocus x-ray source, a rotational subject holder and a parallel data processing system. The flat-panel detector is based on a matrix-addressed photodiode array fabricated by a CMOS (complementary metal-oxide semiconductor) process coupled to a CsI:Tl (thallium-doped caesium iodide) scintillator as an x-ray-to-light converter. Principal imaging performances of the micro-CT system have been evaluated in terms of image uniformity, voxel noise and spatial resolution. It has been found that the image non-uniformity mainly comes from the structural non-uniform sensitivity pattern of the flat-panel detector and the voxel noise is about 48 CT numbers at the voxel size of 100 x 100 x 200 {mu}m{sup 3} and the air kerma of 286 mGy. When the magnification ratio is 2, the spatial resolution of the micro-CT system is about 14 lp/mm (line pairs per millimetre) that is almost determined by the flat-panel detector showing about 7 lp/mm resolving power. Through low-contrast phantom imaging studies, the minimum resolvable contrast has been found to be less than 36 CT numbers at the air kerma of 95 mGy. Some laboratory rat imaging results are presented.

  20. A Novel Prior- and Motion-Based Compressed Sensing Method for Small-Animal Respiratory Gated CT.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan F P J Abascal

    Full Text Available Low-dose protocols for respiratory gating in cardiothoracic small-animal imaging lead to streak artifacts in the images reconstructed with a Feldkamp-Davis-Kress (FDK method. We propose a novel prior- and motion-based reconstruction (PRIMOR method, which improves prior-based reconstruction (PBR by adding a penalty function that includes a model of motion. The prior image is generated as the average of all the respiratory gates, reconstructed with FDK. Motion between respiratory gates is estimated using a nonrigid registration method based on hierarchical B-splines. We compare PRIMOR with an equivalent PBR method without motion estimation using as reference the reconstruction of high dose data. From these data acquired with a micro-CT scanner, different scenarios were simulated by changing photon flux and number of projections. Methods were evaluated in terms of contrast-to-noise-ratio (CNR, mean square error (MSE, streak artefact indicator (SAI, solution error norm (SEN, and correction of respiratory motion. Also, to evaluate the effect of each method on lung studies quantification, we have computed the Jaccard similarity index of the mask obtained from segmenting each image as compared to those obtained from the high dose reconstruction. Both iterative methods greatly improved FDK reconstruction in all cases. PBR was prone to streak artifacts and presented blurring effects in bone and lung tissues when using both a low number of projections and low dose. Adopting PBR as a reference, PRIMOR increased CNR up to 33% and decreased MSE, SAI and SEN up to 20%, 4% and 13%, respectively. PRIMOR also presented better compensation for respiratory motion and higher Jaccard similarity index. In conclusion, the new method proposed for low-dose respiratory gating in small-animal scanners shows an improvement in image quality and allows a reduction of dose or a reduction of the number of projections between two and three times with respect to previous PBR

  1. Integration and evaluation of a needle-positioning robot with volumetric microcomputed tomography image guidance for small animal stereotactic interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waspe, Adam C; McErlain, David D; Pitelka, Vasek; Holdsworth, David W; Lacefield, James C; Fenster, Aaron

    2010-04-01

    Preclinical research protocols often require insertion of needles to specific targets within small animal brains. To target biologically relevant locations in rodent brains more effectively, a robotic device has been developed that is capable of positioning a needle along oblique trajectories through a single burr hole in the skull under volumetric microcomputed tomography (micro-CT) guidance. An x-ray compatible stereotactic frame secures the head throughout the procedure using a bite bar, nose clamp, and ear bars. CT-to-robot registration enables structures identified in the image to be mapped to physical coordinates in the brain. Registration is accomplished by injecting a barium sulfate contrast agent as the robot withdraws the needle from predefined points in a phantom. Registration accuracy is affected by the robot-positioning error and is assessed by measuring the surface registration error for the fiducial and target needle tracks (FRE and TRE). This system was demonstrated in situ by injecting 200 microm tungsten beads into rat brains along oblique trajectories through a single burr hole on the top of the skull under micro-CT image guidance. Postintervention micro-CT images of each skull were registered with preintervention high-field magnetic resonance images of the brain to infer the anatomical locations of the beads. Registration using four fiducial needle tracks and one target track produced a FRE and a TRE of 96 and 210 microm, respectively. Evaluation with tissue-mimicking gelatin phantoms showed that locations could be targeted with a mean error of 154 +/- 113 microm. The integration of a robotic needle-positioning device with volumetric micro-CT image guidance should increase the accuracy and reduce the invasiveness of stereotactic needle interventions in small animals.

  2. Effect of Carbidopa on 18F-FDOPA Uptake in Insulinoma: From Cell Culture to Small-Animal PET Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Detour, Julien; Pierre, Alice; Boisson, Fréderic; Kreutter, Guillaume; Lavaux, Thomas; Namer, Izzie Jacques; Kessler, Laurence; Brasse, David; Marchand, Patrice; Imperiale, Alessio

    2017-01-01

    Patient premedication with carbidopa seems to improve the accuracy of 6-(18)F-fluoro-3,4-dihydroxy-l-phenylalanine ((18)F-FDOPA) PET for insulinoma diagnosis. However, the risk of PET false-negative results in the presence of carbidopa is a concern. Consequently, we aimed to evaluate the effect of carbidopa on (18)F-FDOPA uptake in insulinoma β-cells and an insulinoma xenograft model in mice. (18)F-FDOPA in vitro accumulation was assessed in the murine β-cell line RIN-m5F. In vivo small-animal PET experiments were performed on tumor-bearing nude mice after subcutaneous injection of RIN-m5F cells. Experiments were conducted with and without carbidopa pretreatment. Incubation of RIN-m5F cells with 80 μM carbidopa did not significantly affect the cellular accumulation of (18)F-FDOPA. Tumor xenografts were clearly detectable by small-animal PET in all cases. Insulinoma xenografts in carbidopa-treated mice showed significantly higher (18)F-FDOPA uptake than those in nontreated mice. Regardless of carbidopa premedication, the xenografts were characterized by an early increase in (18)F-FDOPA uptake and then a progressive reduction over time. Carbidopa did not influence in vitro (18)F-FDOPA accumulation in RIN-m5F cells but improved insulinoma imaging in vivo. Our findings increase current knowledge about the (18)F-FDOPA uptake profile of RIN-m5F cells and a related xenograft model. To our knowledge, the present work represents the first preclinical research specifically focused on insulinomas, with potential translational implications. © 2017 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging.

  3. Anatomical and metabolic small-animal whole-body imaging using ring-shaped confocal photoacoustic computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Jun; Chatni, Muhammad; Maslov, Konstantin; Wang, Lihong V.

    2013-03-01

    Due to the wide use of animals for human disease studies, small animal whole-body imaging plays an increasingly important role in biomedical research. Currently, none of the existing imaging modalities can provide both anatomical and glucose metabolic information, leading to higher costs of building dual-modality systems. Even with image coregistration, the spatial resolution of the metabolic imaging modality is not improved. We present a ring-shaped confocal photoacoustic computed tomography (RC-PACT) system that can provide both assessments in a single modality. Utilizing the novel design of confocal full-ring light delivery and ultrasound transducer array detection, RC-PACT provides full-view cross-sectional imaging with high spatial resolution. Scanning along the orthogonal direction provides three-dimensional imaging. While the mouse anatomy was imaged with endogenous hemoglobin contrast, the glucose metabolism was imaged with a near-infrared dye-labeled 2-deoxyglucose. Through mouse tumor models, we demonstrate that RC-PACT may be a paradigm shifting imaging method for preclinical research.

  4. Longitudinal Raman Spectroscopic Observation of Skin Biochemical Changes due to Chemotherapeutic Treatment for Breast Cancer in Small Animal Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myeongsu Seong

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The cancer field effect (CFE has been highlighted as one of indirect indications for tissue variations that are insensitive to conventional diagnostic techniques. In this research, we had a hypothesis that chemotherapy for breast cancer would affect skin biochemical compositions that would be reflected by Raman spectral changes. We used a fiber-optic probe-based Raman spectroscopy to perform preliminary animal experiments to validate the hypothesis. Firstly, we verified the probing depth of the fiber-optic probe (~800 μm using a simple intravenous fat emulsion-filled phantom having a silicon wafer at the bottom inside a cuvette. Then, we obtained Raman spectra during breast cancer treatment by chemotherapy from a small animal model in longitudinal manner. Our results showed that the treatment causes variations of biochemical compositions in the skin. For further validation, the Raman spectra will have to be collected from more populations and spectra will need to be compared with immunohistochemistry of the breast tissue.

  5. Diffusion tensor and volumetric magnetic resonance measures as biomarkers of brain damage in a small animal model of HIV.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaret R Lentz

    Full Text Available There are currently no widely accepted neuro-HIV small animal models. We wanted to validate the HIV-1 Transgenic rat (Tg as an appropriate neuro-HIV model and then establish in vivo imaging biomarkers of neuropathology, within this model, using MR structural and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI.Young and middle-aged Tg and control rats were imaged using MRI. A subset of middle-aged animals underwent longitudinal repeat imaging six months later. Total brain volume (TBV, ventricular volume (VV and parenchymal volume (PV = TBV-VV were measured. Fractional anisotropy (FA and mean diffusivity (MD values of the corpus callosum (CC were calculated from DTI data.TBV and PV were smaller in Tg compared to control rats in young and middle-aged cohorts (p0.05.We detected brain volume loss in the Tg rat, probably due to astrocytic dysfunction/loss, loss of structural/axonal matrix and striatal neuronal loss as suggested by immunofluorescence. Increased MD and decreased FA in the CC probably reflect microstructural differences between the Tg and Control rats which could include increased extracellular space between white matter tracts, demyelination and axonal degeneration, among other pathologies. We believe that the Tg rat is an adequate model of neuropathology in HIV and that volumetric MR and DTI measures can be potentially used as biomarkers of disease progression.

  6. Novel Approach to Repeated Arterial Blood Sampling in Small Animal PET : Application in a Test-Retest Study with the Adenosine A1 Receptor Ligand [C-11]MPDX

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sijbesma, Jürgen W A; Zhou, Xiaoyun; Vállez García, David; Houwertjes, Martin C; Doorduin, Janine; Kwizera, Chantal; Maas, Bram; Meerlo, Peter; Dierckx, Rudi A; Slart, Riemer H J A; Elsinga, Philip H; van Waarde, Aren

    2016-01-01

    Small animal positron emission tomography (PET) can be used to detect small changes in neuroreceptor availability. This often requires rapid arterial blood sampling. However, current catheterization procedures do not allow repeated blood sampling. We have developed a procedure which allows arterial

  7. Quantitative Comparison of Minimum Inductance and Minimum Power Algorithms for the Design of Shim Coils for Small Animal Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, Parisa; Hudson, Stephen D; Handler, William B; Scholl, Timothy J; Chronik, Blaine A

    2010-04-01

    High-performance shim coils are required for high-field magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy. Complete sets of high-power and high-performance shim coils were designed using two different methods: the minimum inductance and the minimum power target field methods. A quantitative comparison of shim performance in terms of merit of inductance (ML) and merit of resistance (MR) was made for shim coils designed using the minimum inductance and the minimum power design algorithms. In each design case, the difference in ML and the difference in MR given by the two design methods was inductance designs tend to feature oscillations within the current density; while minimum power designs tend to feature less rapidly varying current densities and lower power dissipation. Overall, the differences in coil performance obtained by the two methods are relatively small. For the specific case of shim systems customized for small animal imaging, the reduced power dissipation obtained when using the minimum power method is judged to be more significant than the improvements in switching speed obtained from the minimum inductance method.

  8. Detecting metastasis of gastric carcinoma using high-resolution micro-CT system: in vivo small animal study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Junting; Tian, Jie; Liang, Jimin; Li, Xiangsi; Yang, Xiang; Chen, Xiaofeng; Chen, Yi; Zhou, Yuanfang; Wang, Xiaorui

    2011-03-01

    Immunocytochemical and immunofluorescence staining are used for identifying the characteristics of metastasis in traditional ways. Micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) is a useful tool for monitoring and longitudinal imaging of tumor in small animal in vivo. In present study, we evaluated the feasibility of the detection for metastasis of gastric carcinoma by high-resolution micro-CT system with omnipaque accumulative enhancement method in the organs. Firstly, a high-resolution micro-CT ZKKS-MCT-sharp micro-CT was developed by our research group and Guangzhou Zhongke Kaisheng Medical Technology Co., Ltd. Secondly, several gastric carcinoma models were established through inoculating 2x106 BGC-823 gastric carcinoma cells subcutaneously. Thirdly, micro-CT scanning was performed after accumulative enhancement method of intraperitoneal injection of omnipaque contrast agent containing 360 mg iodine with a concentration of 350 mg I/ml. Finally, we obtained high-resolution anatomical information of the metastasis in vivo in a BALB/c NuNu nude mouse, the 3D tumor architecture is revealed in exquisite detail at about 35 μm spatial resolution. In addition, the accurate shape and volume of the micrometastasis as small as 0.78 mm3 can be calculated with our software. Overall, our data suggest that this imaging approach and system could be used to enhance the understanding of tumor proliferation, metastasis and could be the basis for evaluating anti-tumor therapies.

  9. Establishing a process of irradiating small animal brain using a CyberKnife and a microCT scanner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Haksoo; Welford, Scott [Department of Radiation Oncology, School of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, Ohio 44106 (United States); Fabien, Jeffrey; Zheng, Yiran; Yuan, Jake; Brindle, James; Yao, Min; Lo, Simon; Wessels, Barry; Machtay, Mitchell; Sohn, Jason W., E-mail: jason.sohn@case.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, School of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, Ohio 44106 and University Hospitals of Cleveland, 11100 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, Ohio 44106 (United States); Sloan, Andrew [Department of Neurosurgery, School of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, Ohio 44106 (United States)

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: Establish and validate a process of accurately irradiating small animals using the CyberKnife G4 System (version 8.5) with treatment plans designed to irradiate a hemisphere of a mouse brain based on microCT scanner images. Methods: These experiments consisted of four parts: (1) building a mouse phantom for intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) quality assurance (QA), (2) proving usability of a microCT for treatment planning, (3) fabricating a small animal positioning system for use with the CyberKnife's image guided radiotherapy (IGRT) system, and (4)in vivo verification of targeting accuracy. A set of solid water mouse phantoms was designed and fabricated, with radiochromic films (RCF) positioned in selected planes to measure delivered doses. After down-sampling for treatment planning compatibility, a CT image set of a phantom was imported into the CyberKnife treatment planning system—MultiPlan (ver. 3.5.2). A 0.5 cm diameter sphere was contoured within the phantom to represent a hemispherical section of a mouse brain. A nude mouse was scanned in an alpha cradle using a microCT scanner (cone-beam, 157 × 149 pixels slices, 0.2 mm longitudinal slice thickness). Based on the results of our positional accuracy study, a planning treatment volume (PTV) was created. A stereotactic body mold of the mouse was “printed” using a 3D printer laying UV curable acrylic plastic. Printer instructions were based on exported contours of the mouse's skin. Positional reproducibility in the mold was checked by measuring ten CT scans. To verify accurate dose delivery in vivo, six mice were irradiated in the mold with a 4 mm target contour and a 2 mm PTV margin to 3 Gy and sacrificed within 20 min to avoid DNA repair. The brain was sliced and stained for analysis. Results: For the IMRT QA using a set of phantoms, the planned dose (6 Gy to the calculation point) was compared to the delivered dose measured via film and analyzed using Gamma analysis (3% and 3 mm

  10. Establishing a process of irradiating small animal brain using a CyberKnife and a microCT scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Haksoo; Fabien, Jeffrey; Zheng, Yiran; Yuan, Jake; Brindle, James; Sloan, Andrew; Yao, Min; Lo, Simon; Wessels, Barry; Machtay, Mitchell; Welford, Scott; Sohn, Jason W

    2014-02-01

    Establish and validate a process of accurately irradiating small animals using the CyberKnife G4 System (version 8.5) with treatment plans designed to irradiate a hemisphere of a mouse brain based on microCT scanner images. These experiments consisted of four parts: (1) building a mouse phantom for intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) quality assurance (QA), (2) proving usability of a microCT for treatment planning, (3) fabricating a small animal positioning system for use with the CyberKnife's image guided radiotherapy (IGRT) system, and (4)in vivo verification of targeting accuracy. A set of solid water mouse phantoms was designed and fabricated, with radiochromic films (RCF) positioned in selected planes to measure delivered doses. After down-sampling for treatment planning compatibility, a CT image set of a phantom was imported into the CyberKnife treatment planning system--MultiPlan (ver. 3.5.2). A 0.5 cm diameter sphere was contoured within the phantom to represent a hemispherical section of a mouse brain. A nude mouse was scanned in an alpha cradle using a microCT scanner (cone-beam, 157 × 149 pixels slices, 0.2 mm longitudinal slice thickness). Based on the results of our positional accuracy study, a planning treatment volume (PTV) was created. A stereotactic body mold of the mouse was "printed" using a 3D printer laying UV curable acrylic plastic. Printer instructions were based on exported contours of the mouse's skin. Positional reproducibility in the mold was checked by measuring ten CT scans. To verify accurate dose delivery in vivo, six mice were irradiated in the mold with a 4 mm target contour and a 2 mm PTV margin to 3 Gy and sacrificed within 20 min to avoid DNA repair. The brain was sliced and stained for analysis. For the IMRT QA using a set of phantoms, the planned dose (6 Gy to the calculation point) was compared to the delivered dose measured via film and analyzed using Gamma analysis (3% and 3 mm). A passing rate of 99% was measured in

  11. Establishing a process of irradiating small animal brain using a CyberKnife and a microCT scanner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Haksoo; Welford, Scott [Department of Radiation Oncology, School of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, Ohio 44106 (United States); Fabien, Jeffrey; Zheng, Yiran; Yuan, Jake; Brindle, James; Yao, Min; Lo, Simon; Wessels, Barry; Machtay, Mitchell; Sohn, Jason W., E-mail: jason.sohn@case.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, School of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, Ohio 44106 and University Hospitals of Cleveland, 11100 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, Ohio 44106 (United States); Sloan, Andrew [Department of Neurosurgery, School of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, Ohio 44106 (United States)

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: Establish and validate a process of accurately irradiating small animals using the CyberKnife G4 System (version 8.5) with treatment plans designed to irradiate a hemisphere of a mouse brain based on microCT scanner images. Methods: These experiments consisted of four parts: (1) building a mouse phantom for intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) quality assurance (QA), (2) proving usability of a microCT for treatment planning, (3) fabricating a small animal positioning system for use with the CyberKnife's image guided radiotherapy (IGRT) system, and (4)in vivo verification of targeting accuracy. A set of solid water mouse phantoms was designed and fabricated, with radiochromic films (RCF) positioned in selected planes to measure delivered doses. After down-sampling for treatment planning compatibility, a CT image set of a phantom was imported into the CyberKnife treatment planning system—MultiPlan (ver. 3.5.2). A 0.5 cm diameter sphere was contoured within the phantom to represent a hemispherical section of a mouse brain. A nude mouse was scanned in an alpha cradle using a microCT scanner (cone-beam, 157 × 149 pixels slices, 0.2 mm longitudinal slice thickness). Based on the results of our positional accuracy study, a planning treatment volume (PTV) was created. A stereotactic body mold of the mouse was “printed” using a 3D printer laying UV curable acrylic plastic. Printer instructions were based on exported contours of the mouse's skin. Positional reproducibility in the mold was checked by measuring ten CT scans. To verify accurate dose delivery in vivo, six mice were irradiated in the mold with a 4 mm target contour and a 2 mm PTV margin to 3 Gy and sacrificed within 20 min to avoid DNA repair. The brain was sliced and stained for analysis. Results: For the IMRT QA using a set of phantoms, the planned dose (6 Gy to the calculation point) was compared to the delivered dose measured via film and analyzed using Gamma analysis (3% and 3 mm

  12. Computer aided vertebral visualization and analysis: a methodology using the sand rat, a small animal model of disc degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanley Edward N

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose of this study is to present an automated system that analyzes digitized x-ray images of small animal spines identifying the effects of disc degeneration. The age-related disc and spine degeneration that occurs in the sand rat (Psammomys obesus has previously been documented radiologically; selected representative radiographs with age-related changes were used here to develop computer-assisted vertebral visualization/analysis techniques. Techniques presented here have the potential to produce quantitative algorithms that create more accurate and informative measurements in a time efficient manner. Methods Signal and image processing techniques were applied to digitized spine x-ray images the spine was segmented, and orientation and curvature determined. The image was segmented based on orientation changes of the spine; edge detection was performed to define vertebral boundaries. Once vertebrae were identified, a number of measures were introduced and calculated to retrieve information on the vertebral separation/orientation and sclerosis. Results A method is described which produces computer-generated quantitative measurements of vertebrae and disc spaces. Six sand rat spine radiographs illustrate applications of this technique. Results showed that this method can successfully automate calculation and analysis of vertebral length, vertebral spacing, vertebral angle, and can score sclerosis. Techniques also provide quantitative means to explore the relation between age and vertebral shape. Conclusions This method provides a computationally efficient system to analyze spinal changes during aging. Techniques can be used to automate the quantitative processing of vertebral radiographic images and may be applicable to human and other animal radiologic models of the aging/degenerating spine.

  13. Markerless rat head motion tracking using structured light for brain PET imaging of unrestrained awake small animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, Alan; Staelens, Steven; Stroobants, Sigrid; Verhaeghe, Jeroen

    2017-03-01

    Preclinical positron emission tomography (PET) imaging in small animals is generally performed under anesthesia to immobilize the animal during scanning. More recently, for rat brain PET studies, methods to perform scans of unrestrained awake rats are being developed in order to avoid the unwanted effects of anesthesia on the brain response. Here, we investigate the use of a projected structure stereo camera to track the motion of the rat head during the PET scan. The motion information is then used to correct the PET data. The stereo camera calculates a 3D point cloud representation of the scene and the tracking is performed by point cloud matching using the iterative closest point algorithm. The main advantage of the proposed motion tracking is that no intervention, e.g. for marker attachment, is needed. A manually moved microDerenzo phantom experiment and 3 awake rat [18F]FDG experiments were performed to evaluate the proposed tracking method. The tracking accuracy was 0.33 mm rms. After motion correction image reconstruction, the microDerenzo phantom was recovered albeit with some loss of resolution. The reconstructed FWHM of the 2.5 and 3 mm rods increased with 0.94 and 0.51 mm respectively in comparison with the motion-free case. In the rat experiments, the average tracking success rate was 64.7%. The correlation of relative brain regional [18F]FDG uptake between the anesthesia and awake scan reconstructions was increased from on average 0.291 (not significant) before correction to 0.909 (p  <  0.0001) after motion correction. Markerless motion tracking using structured light can be successfully used for tracking of the rat head for motion correction in awake rat PET scans.

  14. The Combination of In vivo 124I-PET and CT Small Animal Imaging for Evaluation of Thyroid Physiology and Dosimetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrik H. El-Ali

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: A thyroid rat model combining functional and anatomical information would be of great benefit for better modeling of thyroid physiology and for absorbed dose calculations. Our aim was to show that 124I-PET and CT small animal imaging are useful as a combined model for studying thyroid physiology and dose calculation. Methods: Seven rats were subjects for multiple thyroid 124I-imaging and CT-scans. S-values [mGy/MBqs] for different thyroid sizes were simulated. A phantom with spheres was designed for validation of performances of the small animal PET and CT imaging systems. Results: Small animal image-based measurements of the activity amount and the volumes of the spheres with a priori known volumes showed a good agreement with their corresponding actual volumes. The CT scans of the rats showed thyroid volumes from 34–70 mL. Conclusions: The wide span in volumes of thyroid glands indicates the importance of using an accurate volume-measuring technique such as the small animal CT. The small animal PET system was on the other hand able to accurately estimate the activity concentration in the thyroid volumes. We conclude that the combination of the PET and CT image information is essential for quantitative thyroid imaging and accurate thyroid absorbed dose calculation.

  15. Non-invasive imaging of acute renal allograft rejection in rats using small animal F-FDG-PET.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Reuter

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: At present, renal grafts are the most common solid organ transplants world-wide. Given the importance of renal transplantation and the limitation of available donor kidneys, detailed analysis of factors that affect transplant survival are important. Despite the introduction of new and effective immunosuppressive drugs, acute cellular graft rejection (AR is still a major risk for graft survival. Nowadays, AR can only be definitively by renal biopsy. However, biopsies carry a risk of renal transplant injury and loss. Most important, they can not be performed in patients taking anticoagulant drugs. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We present a non-invasive, entirely image-based method to assess AR in an allogeneic rat renal transplantation model using small animal positron emission tomography (PET and (18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG. 3 h after i.v. injection of 30 MBq FDG into adult uni-nephrectomized, allogeneically transplanted rats, tissue radioactivity of renal parenchyma was assessed in vivo by a small animal PET-scanner (post operative day (POD 1,2,4, and 7 and post mortem dissection. The mean radioactivity (cps/mm(3 tissue as well as the percent injected dose (%ID was compared between graft and native reference kidney. Results were confirmed by histological and autoradiographic analysis. Healthy rats, rats with acute CSA nephrotoxicity, with acute tubular necrosis, and syngeneically transplanted rats served as controls. FDG-uptake was significantly elevated only in allogeneic grafts from POD 1 on when compared to the native kidney (%ID graft POD 1: 0.54+/-0.06; POD 2: 0.58+/-0.12; POD 4: 0.81+/-0.06; POD 7: 0.77+/-0.1; CTR: 0.22+/-0.01, n = 3-28. Renal FDG-uptake in vivo correlated with the results obtained by micro-autoradiography and the degree of inflammatory infiltrates observed in histology. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We propose that graft FDG-PET imaging is a new option to non-invasively, specifically, early detect, and follow

  16. Animal models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gøtze, Jens Peter; Krentz, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    In this issue of Cardiovascular Endocrinology, we are proud to present a broad and dedicated spectrum of reviews on animal models in cardiovascular disease. The reviews cover most aspects of animal models in science from basic differences and similarities between small animals and the human...

  17. Antibiotic Resistance in Animal and Environmental Samples Associated with Small-Scale Poultry Farming in Northwestern Ecuador.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braykov, Nikolay P; Eisenberg, Joseph N S; Grossman, Marissa; Zhang, Lixin; Vasco, Karla; Cevallos, William; Muñoz, Diana; Acevedo, Andrés; Moser, Kara A; Marrs, Carl F; Foxman, Betsy; Trostle, James; Trueba, Gabriel; Levy, Karen

    2016-01-01

    The effects of animal agriculture on the spread of antibiotic resistance (AR) are cross-cutting and thus require a multidisciplinary perspective. Here we use ecological, epidemiological, and ethnographic methods to examine populations of Escherichia coli circulating in the production poultry farming environment versus the domestic environment in rural Ecuador, where small-scale poultry production employing nontherapeutic antibiotics is increasingly common. We sampled 262 "production birds" (commercially raised broiler chickens and laying hens) and 455 "household birds" (raised for domestic use) and household and coop environmental samples from 17 villages between 2010 and 2013. We analyzed data on zones of inhibition from Kirby-Bauer tests, rather than established clinical breakpoints for AR, to distinguish between populations of organisms. We saw significantly higher levels of AR in bacteria from production versus household birds; resistance to either amoxicillin-clavulanate, cephalothin, cefotaxime, and gentamicin was found in 52.8% of production bird isolates and 16% of household ones. A strain jointly resistant to the 4 drugs was exclusive to a subset of isolates from production birds (7.6%) and coop surfaces (6.5%) and was associated with a particular purchase site. The prevalence of AR in production birds declined with bird age (P Ecuador, where such backyard poultry operations have become established over the past decade. Our previous research in the region suggests that introduction of AR bacteria through travel and commerce may be an important source of AR in villages of this region. This report extends the prior analysis by examining small-scale production chicken farming as a potential source of resistant strains. Our results suggest that AR strains associated with poultry production likely originate from sources outside the study area and that these outside sources might be a better place to target control efforts than local management practices.

  18. Development of a New Positron Emission Tomography Tracer for Targeting Tumor Angiogenesis: Synthesis, Small Animal Imaging, and Radiation Dosimetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David S. Lalush

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Angiogenesis plays a key role in cancer progression and correlates with disease aggressiveness and poor clinical outcomes. Affinity ligands discovered by screening phage display random peptide libraries can be engineered to molecularly target tumor blood vessels for noninvasive imaging and early detection of tumor aggressiveness. In this study, we tested the ability of a phage-display-selected peptide sequence recognizing specifically bone marrow- derived pro-angiogenic tumor-homing cells, the QFP-peptide, radiolabeled with 64Cu radioisotope to selectively image tumor vasculature in vivo by positron emission tomography (PET. To prepare the targeted PET tracer we modified QFP-phage with the DOTA chelator and radiolabeled the purified QFP-phage-DOTA intermediate with 64Cu to obtain QFP-targeted radioconjugate with high radiopharmaceutical yield and specific activity. We evaluated the new PET tracer in vivo in a subcutaneous (s.c. Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC mouse model and conducted tissue distribution, small animal PET/CT imaging study, autoradiography, histology, fluorescence imaging, and dosimetry assessments. The results from this study show that, in the context of the s.c. LLC immunocompetent mouse model, the QFP-tracer can target tumor blood vessels selectively. However, further optimization of the biodistribution and dosimetry profile of the tracer is necessary to ensure efficient radiopharmaceutical applications enabled by the biological specificity of the QFP-peptide.

  19. Successful endothelialization and remodeling of a cell-free small-diameter arterial graft in a large animal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koobatian, Maxwell T; Row, Sindhu; Smith, Randall J; Koenigsknecht, Carmon; Andreadis, Stelios T; Swartz, Daniel D

    2016-01-01

    The large number of coronary artery bypass procedures necessitates development of off-the-shelf vascular grafts that do not require cell or tissue harvest from patients. However, immediate thrombus formation after implantation due to the absence of a healthy endothelium is very likely. Here we present the successful development of an acellular tissue engineered vessel (A-TEV) based on small intestinal submucosa that was functionalized sequentially with heparin and VEGF. A-TEVs were implanted into the carotid artery of an ovine model demonstrating high patency rates and significant host cell infiltration as early as one week post-implantation. At one month, a confluent and functional endothelium was present and the vascular wall showed significant infiltration of host smooth muscle cells exhibiting vascular contractility in response to vaso-agonists. After three months, the endothelium aligned in the direction of flow and the medial layer comprised of circumferentially aligned smooth muscle cells. A-TEVs demonstrated high elastin and collagen content as well as impressive mechanical properties and vascular contractility comparable to native arteries. This is the first demonstration of successful endothelialization, remodeling, and development of vascular function of a cell-free vascular graft that was implanted in the arterial circulation of a pre-clinical animal model. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Behavioural effects of near-term acute fetal hypoxia in a small precocial animal, the spiny mouse (Acomys cahirinus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ireland, Zoe; Dickinson, Hayley; Fleiss, Bobbi; Hutton, Lisa C; Walker, David W

    2010-01-01

    We have previously developed a model of near-term intra-uterine hypoxia producing significant neonatal mortality (37%) in a small laboratory animal - the spiny mouse - which has precocial offspring at birth. The aim of the present study was to determine if this insult resulted in the appearance of behavioural abnormalities in those offspring which survived the hypoxic delivery. Behavioural tests assessed gait (using footprint patterns), motor coordination and balance on an accelerating rotarod, and spontaneous locomotion and exploration in an open field. We found that the near-term acute hypoxic episode produced a mild neurological deficit in the early postnatal period. In comparison to vaginally delivered controls, hypoxia pups were able to remain on the accelerating rotarod for significantly shorter durations on postnatal days 1-2, and in the open field they travelled significantly shorter distances, jumped less, and spent a greater percentage of time stationary on postnatal days 5 and 15. No changes were observed in gait. Unlike some rodent models of cerebral hypoxia-ischaemia, macroscopic examination of the brain on postnatal day 5 showed no gross cystic lesions, oedema or infarct. Future studies should be directed at identifying hypoxia-induced alterations in the function of specific brain regions, and assessing if maternal administration of neuroprotective agents can prevent against hypoxia-induced neurological deficits and brain damage that occur at birth.

  1. Design Optimization of a Small-animal SPECT System Using LGSO Continuous Crystal and a Micro Parallel-hole Collimator

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Joong Hyun; Kim, Soo Mee; Hong, Seong Jong; Lee, Jae Sung

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to optimize the design of a monolithic LGSO scintillation crystal and micro parallel-hole collimator for the development of a small-animal single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) system with compact size, low-cost and reasonable performance through Monte Carlo simulation. L0.9GSO crystals with surface area of 50 mm X 50 mm were investigated for the design optimization. The intrinsic detection efficiency, intrinsic spatial resolution, and intrinsic energy resolution of crystals were estimated for different crystal thicknesses and photon energies (using I-125 and Tc-99m sources). Two kinds of surface treatments (providing polished and rough surfaces) were compared by optical photon simulation. The standard deviation of the angle between a micro-facet and the mean surface was set to 0.1 and 6.0 for polished and rough surfaces, respectively. For comparison, the intrinsic performance of NaI(Tl) was also investigated. A multi-photomultiplier tube was designed with 16 X 16 anode ...

  2. Coincidence measurements on detectors for microPET II: A 1 mm3 resolution PET scanner for small animal imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Chatziioannou, A; Shao, Y; Doshi, N K; Silverman, B; Meadors, K; Cherry, SR

    2000-01-01

    We are currently developing a small animal PET scanner with a design goal of 1 mm3 image resolution. We have built three pairs of detectors and tested performance in terms of crystal identification, spatial, energy and timing resolution. The detectors consisted of 12 multiplied by 12 arrays of 1 multiplied by 1 multiplied by 10mm LSO crystals (1.15 mm pitch) coupled to Hamamatsu H7546 64 channel PMTs via 5cm long coherent glass fiber bundles. Optical fiber connection is necessary to allow high packing fraction in a ring geometry scanner. Fiber bundles with and without extramural absorber (EMA) were tested. The results demonstrated an intrinsic spatial resolution of 1.12 mm (direct coupled LSO array), 1.23 mm (bundle without EMA) and 1.27 mm (bundle with EMA) using a similar to 500 micron diameter Na-22 source. Using a 330 micron line source filled with F-18, intrinsic resolution for the EMA bundle improved to 1.05 mm. The respective timing and energy resolution values were 1.96 ns, 21% (direct coupled), 2.20 ...

  3. Anatomical standardization of small animal brain FDG-PET images using synthetic functional template: experimental comparison with anatomical template.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coello, Christopher; Hjornevik, Trine; Courivaud, Frédéric; Willoch, Frode

    2011-07-15

    Anatomical standardization (also called spatial normalization) of positron emission tomography (PET) small animal brain images is required to make statistical comparisons across individuals. Frequently, PET images are co-registered to an individual MR or CT image of the same subject in order to transform the functional images to an anatomical space. In the present work, we evaluate the normalization of synthetic PET (synPET) images to a synthetic PET template. To provide absolute error in terms of pixel misregistration, we created a synthetic PET image from the individual MR image through segmentation of the brain into gray and white matter which produced functional and anatomical images in the same space. When comparing spatial normalization of synPET images to a synPET template with the gold standard (MR images to an MR template), a mean translation error of 0.24mm (±0.20) and a maximal mean rotational error of 0.85° (±0.91) were found. Significant decrease in misregistration error was measured when achieving spatial normalization of functional images to a functional template instead of an anatomical template. This accuracy strengthens the use of standardization methods where individual PET images are registered to a customized PET template in order to statistically assess physiological changes in rat brains.

  4. Small animal PET imaging of TAG-72 expressing tumor using {sup 68}Ga-NOTA-3E8 Fab radioimmunoconjugate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, J. H.; Lee, T. S.; Woo, S. K.; Woo, K. S.; Chung, W. S.; Kang, J. H.; Cheon, G. J.; Choi, C. W.; Lim, S. M. [KIRAMS, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Hong, H. J. [KRIBB, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-05-15

    The tumor-associated glycoprotein TAG-72 is express ed in the majority of human adenocarcinomas but is rarely expressed in most normal tissues, which makes it a potential target for the diagnosis and therapy of a variety of human cancer. 3E8 is anti-TAG-72 humanized antibody. Antibody fragments have some advantages such as improved pharmacokinetics and reduced immunogenicity compared to whole IgG. {sup 68}Ga is a short-lived positron emitter (t{sub 1/2} {sup 68} min; {beta}+, 88%) that is produced, independent from a cyclotron, by a {sup 68}Ge/{sup 68}Ga generator. The parent nuclide {sup 68}Ge has a long half-life (270.8 day), allowing its use as a generator for more than 1 year. A {sup 68}Ga is labeled with antibodies through bifunctional chelators, which allows possible kit formulation and which wide availability of the nuclear imaging agents. In this study, Fab fragment of anti-TAG-72 humanized Ab (3E8) was conjugated with 2-(p-isothiocyanatobenzyl)-1,4,7-triazacyclononane-1,4, 7-triacetic acid (p-SCN-Bn-NOTA) and radiolabeled with {sup 68}Ga and acquire small animal PET image.

  5. Characteristics of a multichannel low-noise front-end ASIC for CZT-based small animal PET imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, W.; Liu, H.; Gan, B.; Hu, Y.

    2014-05-01

    In this paper, we present the design and characteristics of a novel low-noise front-end readout application-specific integrated circuit dedicated to CdZnTe (CZT) detectors for a small animal PET imaging system. A low-noise readout method based on the charge integration and the delayed peak detection is proposed. An eight-channel front-end readout prototype chip is designed and implemented in a 0.35 μm CMOS process. The die size is 2.3 mm ×2.3 mm. The prototype chip is tested in different methods including electronic test, energy spectrum test and irradiation test. The input range of the ASIC is from 2000e- to 180,000e-, reflecting the energy of the gamma ray from 11.2 keV to 1 MeV. The gain of the readout channel is 65 mV/fC at the shaping time of 1 μs. The best test result of the equivalent noise charge (ENC) is 58.9 e- at zero farad plus 5.4 e- per picofarad. The nonlinearity and the crosstalk are less than 3% and less than 2%, respectively, at the room temperature. The static power dissipation is about 3 mW/channel.

  6. Characteristics of a multichannel low-noise front-end ASIC for CZT-based small animal PET imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, W., E-mail: gaowu@nwpu.edu.cn [Institute of Microelectronics, School of Computer S and T, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi’an (China); Liu, H., E-mail: newhui.cn@gmail.com [Institute of Microelectronics, School of Computer S and T, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi’an (China); Gan, B., E-mail: shadow524@163.com [Institute of Microelectronics, School of Computer S and T, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi’an (China); Hu, Y., E-mail: Yann.Hu@ires.in2p3.fr [Institut Pluridisciplinaire Hubert Curien, IN2P3/CNRS/UDS, Strasbourg (France)

    2014-05-01

    In this paper, we present the design and characteristics of a novel low-noise front-end readout application-specific integrated circuit dedicated to CdZnTe (CZT) detectors for a small animal PET imaging system. A low-noise readout method based on the charge integration and the delayed peak detection is proposed. An eight-channel front-end readout prototype chip is designed and implemented in a 0.35 μm CMOS process. The die size is 2.3 mm ×2.3 mm. The prototype chip is tested in different methods including electronic test, energy spectrum test and irradiation test. The input range of the ASIC is from 2000e{sup −} to 180,000e{sup −}, reflecting the energy of the gamma ray from 11.2 keV to 1 MeV. The gain of the readout channel is 65 mV/fC at the shaping time of 1 μs. The best test result of the equivalent noise charge (ENC) is 58.9 e{sup −} at zero farad plus 5.4 e{sup −} per picofarad. The nonlinearity and the crosstalk are less than 3% and less than 2%, respectively, at the room temperature. The static power dissipation is about 3 mW/channel.

  7. Longitudinal in vivo transcutaneous observation of Raman signals from breast cancer during chemotherapy in small animal model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seong, Myeongsu; Myoung, NoSoung; Yim, Sang-Youp; Kim, Jae G.

    2015-02-01

    Because mammography, the gold standard of breast cancer screening and monitoring treatment efficacy, has limitations, there is a necessity to have a new method for breast cancer patients. Raman spectroscopy is considered as one of the best alternative approaches due to its ability of visualizing (bio)chemical information of a matter. In this study, we hypothesized that the change of biochemical composition occurs earlier than morphological change in breast cancer during chemotherapy, and attempted to prove it by employing fiber-optic Raman spectroscopy for longitudinal Raman measurement in small animal breast cancer model. To confirm the hypothesis, we measured Raman spectra of a tumor breast and the contralateral breast during chemotherapy for 4 fisher 344 female rats longitudinally. Principal component analysis and Raman spectral differences between breast tumor and contralateral normal breast did not show a clear difference between them which may have been caused by interference from skin. Thus, spatially-offset Raman spectroscopy will be employed in order to acquire the Raman signal directly from tumor while suppressing Raman signal from skin for the future study.

  8. WRN conditioned media is sufficient for in vitro propagation of intestinal organoids from large farm and small companion animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robin H. Powell

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Recent years have seen significant developments in the ability to continuously propagate organoids derived from intestinal crypts. These advancements have been applied to mouse and human samples providing models for gastrointestinal tissue development and disease. We adapt these methods for the propagation of intestinal organoids (enteroids from various large farm and small companion (LF/SC animals, including cat, dog, cow, horse, pig, sheep and chicken. We show that LF/SC enteroids propagate and expand in L-WRN conditioned media containing signaling factors Wnt3a, R-spondin-3, and Noggin (WRN. Multiple successful isolations were achieved for each species, and the growth of LF/SC enteroids was maintained to high passage number. LF/SC enteroids expressed crypt stem cell marker LGR5 and low levels of mesenchymal marker VIM. Labeling with EdU also showed distinct regions of cell proliferation within the enteroids marking crypt-like regions. The ability to grow and maintain LF/SC enteroid cell lines provides additional models for the study of gastrointestinal developmental biology as well as platforms for the study of host-pathogen interactions between intestinal cells and zoonotic enteric pathogens of medical importance.

  9. Comparative efficacy and the window of radioprotection for adrenergic and serotoninergic agents and aminothiols in experiments with small and large animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasin, Mikhail V; Ushakov, Igor B

    2015-01-01

    This review gives a comparative evaluation of the radioprotective properties and the therapeutic index (TI) of radioprotectors from various pharmacological group in experiments on both small and large animals. It presents a hypothesis explaining the decrease in the TI of cystamine and 5-methoxytryptamine (mexamine), and the retention of that of α1-adrenomimetic indralin, and also compares the effects on large and small animals. The considerable differences in the therapeutic indices of catecholamines, serotonin and cystamine are a consequence of specific features of their mechanisms of radioprotective action. Radioprotectors acting via receptor mediation tend to provide a more expanded window of protection. The reduction in the TI of cystamine in larger animals, such as dogs, may be caused by the greater increase in toxicity of aminothiols in relation to the decrease in their optimal doses for radioprotective effect in going from mice to dogs, which is a consequence of the slower metabolic processes in larger animals. The somatogenic phase of intoxication by cystamine is significantly longer than the duration of its radioprotective effect, and increases with irradiation. The decrease in the radioprotective effect and the TI of mexamine in experiments with dogs may be caused by their lower sensitivity to the acute hypoxia induced by the mexamine. This is because of lower gradient in oxygen tension between tissue cells and blood capillaries under acute hypoxia that is determined by lower initial oxygen consumption in a large animal as compared with a small animal. Indralin likely provides optimal radioprotective effects and a higher TI for large animals via the increased specificity of its adrenergic effect on tissue respiration, which supports the development of acute hypoxia in the radiosensitive tissues of large animals. The stimulatory effect of indralin on early post-irradiation haematopoietic recovery cannot provide a high level of radioprotective action for

  10. Euthanasia in small animals in Teresina – PI/ Eutanásia em pequenos animais em Teresina – PI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ezequiel Cardoso Saraiva de Almeida

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Euthanasia is a procedure frequently utilized in small animals with the objective to minimize suffering. In this way, it was realized the survey about reasons that leave the practitioner to realize the procedure and who are these animals. It was analyzed 17406 medical records. It was observed 166 euthanasia corresponding to 0.95%. The percentage of the euthanazied dogs were 97.59% and 2.41% felines. In relation to breed 26.10% were mongrel dogs, 20.48% German sheepherd, 9.04% Brazilian fila, 7.23% Pekinese and 36.75% other breeds. In relation to age, it was observed that 60.84% have 0 – 3 year, 15.06% 3 – 6 year, 4.82% 6 – 9 year, 4.22% 9 – 12 year, 1.2% above 12 year and 13.86% unknown age. About the reason of the euthanasia, 64.60% was sacrificed due to visceral leishmaniosis (calazar, 12.65% due to distemper and 22.89% due to other diseases. It was concluded that the most animals submitted to euthanasia were young, differently of the other countries. Among principal death reasons, it was included also infectious diseases that can be prevented by adequate vaccination.A eutanásia é um procedimento utilizado com freqüência em pequenos animais, com o objetivo principal de aliviar o sofrimento. Desta forma, realizou-se um levantamento sobre os motivos que levam um veterinário a indicá-la e quais são estes animais. Foram analisadas 17406 fichas, onde se observaram 166 eutanásias o que corresponde a 0,95%. A percentagem de cães eutanasiados foi de 97,59% e a de felinos 2,41%. Em relação à raça, 26,10% dos animais era sem raça definida, 20,48% pastor alemão, 9,04% fila brasileiro, 7,23% pequinês e 36, 75% outras raças. Com respeito à idade, registrou-se que 60,84% tinham entre 0 e 3 anos, 15,06% 3 e 6 anos, 4,82% 6 e 9 anos, 4,22% 9 e 12 anos, 1,20% acima de 12 anos e 13,86% idade desconhecida. Sobre o motivo da eutanásia, 64,60% dos animais foram eutanasiados devido à Leishmaniose Visceral Canina (calazar, 12,65% devido a

  11. Ovarian remnant syndrome in small animalsSíndrome do ovário remanescente em pequenos animais

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilson Hélio Toniollo

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The ovarian remnant syndrome (ORS is an iatrogenic disorder in bitches and queens, which is characterized by recurrence of estrus following surgical spay, due to the presence of a piece of ovarian tissue within the abdominal cavity. In most cases, the remnant ovary is found in the right ovarian pedicle, due to its topographic position, deeper and more cranial than the left ovary. The main clinical signs of ORS in small animals are the heat behavior and the presence of vaginal swelling/secretion, especially in canines. The diagnosis should be performed by means of vaginal cytology when attraction of males is detected, serum estrogen and progesterone levels and/or by challenging test with GnRH or hCG administration. However, vaginal citology is the most suitable and less expensive diagnostic tool. Nowadays the treatment of choice is a new laparotomy or laparoscopy, followed by removal of the remnant ovarian tissue. The surgical treatment has more chances of success if it is performed in the diestrus (i.e., between 15 and 60 days after the detection of attraction of males. Furthermore, a careful and accurate surgical procedure aided by advanced visualization techniques during ovariohysterectomy or ovariectomy is the best way to prevent ORS in companion animals. A síndrome do ovário remanescente (SOR é um distúrbio iatrogênico em cadelas e gatas caracterizado pelo retorno do estro após contracepção cirúrgica devido à presença de fragmento de tecido ovariano na cavidade abdominal. Frequentemente, o ovário remanescente está situado no pedículo ovariano direito, sobretudo devido a sua posição topográfica mais profunda e cranial em comparação ao ovário esquerdo. Os principais sinais clínicos de SOR em pequenos animais são cio e presença de edemaciamento/secreção vulvar/vaginal, especialmente em caninos. O diagnóstico deve ser realizado por meio de citologia vaginal quando detecta-se o interesse dos machos pela cópula com a f

  12. Performance assessment of the single photon emission microscope: high spatial resolution SPECT imaging of small animal organs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Mejia

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The single photon emission microscope (SPEM is an instrument developed to obtain high spatial resolution single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT images of small structures inside the mouse brain. SPEM consists of two independent imaging devices, which combine a multipinhole collimator, a high-resolution, thallium-doped cesium iodide [CsI(Tl] columnar scintillator, a demagnifying/intensifier tube, and an electron-multiplying charge-coupling device (CCD. Collimators have 300- and 450-µm diameter pinholes on tungsten slabs, in hexagonal arrays of 19 and 7 holes. Projection data are acquired in a photon-counting strategy, where CCD frames are stored at 50 frames per second, with a radius of rotation of 35 mm and magnification factor of one. The image reconstruction software tool is based on the maximum likelihood algorithm. Our aim was to evaluate the spatial resolution and sensitivity attainable with the seven-pinhole imaging device, together with the linearity for quantification on the tomographic images, and to test the instrument in obtaining tomographic images of different mouse organs. A spatial resolution better than 500 µm and a sensitivity of 21.6 counts·s-1·MBq-1 were reached, as well as a correlation coefficient between activity and intensity better than 0.99, when imaging 99mTc sources. Images of the thyroid, heart, lungs, and bones of mice were registered using 99mTc-labeled radiopharmaceuticals in times appropriate for routine preclinical experimentation of <1 h per projection data set. Detailed experimental protocols and images of the aforementioned organs are shown. We plan to extend the instrument's field of view to fix larger animals and to combine data from both detectors to reduce the acquisition time or applied activity.

  13. IMOTEPAD: A mixed-signal 64-channel front-end ASIC for small-animal PET imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Xiaochao; Ollivier-Henry, Nicolas; Gao, Wu; Hu-Guo, Christine; Colledani, Claude; Humbert, Bernard; Brasse, David; Hu, Yann

    2011-04-01

    This paper presents the design and characteristics of a mixed-signal 64-channel front-end readout ASIC called IMOTEPAD dedicated to multi-channel plate (MCP) photodetector coupled to LYSO scintillating crystals for small-animal PET imaging. In our configuration, the crystals are oriented in the axial direction readout on both sides by individual photodetector channels allowing the spatial resolution and the detection efficiency to be independent of each other. As a result, both energy signals and timing triggers from the photodetectors are required to be read out by the front-end ASIC. This dedicated ASIC IMOTEPAD comprises two parts: the analog part IMOTEPA and the digital part IMOTEPD. The IMOTEPA is dedicated to energy measurement. And the timing information is digitized by the IMOTEPD in which the key principal element is a time-to-digital converter (TDC) based on a delay-locked loop (DLL) with 32 delay cells. The chip is designed and fabricated in 0.35 μm CMOS process. The measurements show that for the analog part IMOTEPA, the energy gain is 13.1 mV/pC while the peak time of a CR-RC pulse shaper is 280 ns. The SNR is 39 dB and the RMS noise is 300 μV. The nonlinearity is less than 3%. The crosstalk is less than 0.2%. For the IMOTEPD, the bin size of the TDC is 625 ps with a reference clock of 50 MHz. The RMS jitter of the DLL is less than 42 ps. The DNL of the TDC is equal to about 0.17 LSB and the INL is equal to 0.31 LSB. The power dissipation of each channel is less than 16.8 mW. The design of the ASIC, especially for TDC and the measurement results of the IMOTEPAD will be presented and discussed in this paper.

  14. SU-E-T-575: Novel Quality Assurance Procedure for the Small Animal Radiation Research Platform Using Commercial OSLDs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keller, J; Lockamy, V; Harrison, A [Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Glenn, S [Xstrahl Inc., Suwanee, GA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To support radiobiological research with the Xstrahl small animal radiation research platform (SARRP) by developing a simple and effective method using commercially available optically stimulated luminescent dosimeters (OSLDs) that ensures dose output consistency. Methods: The SARRP output is calibrated according to the vendor standards and TG-61 protocol utilizing an ADCL calibrated ion chamber and electrometer at 2 cm depth of solid water. A cross calibration is performed by replacing the ion chamber with five OSLDs at the 2 cm depth. The OSLDs are irradiated to 500 cGy with 220 keV at 13 mA (78s delivery time) with a copper filter for an uncollimated 17×17 cm{sup 2} aperture. Instead of the absolute dose, the total amount of raw counts are collected from the OSLD reader and used for analysis. This constancy procedure was performed two more times over the course of three weeks with two OLSDs for validity. Results: The average reading for all OSLDs is 494939 with a 1-sigma standard deviation of the 5.8%. With an acceptable dose output range of ±10%, the OSLD readings have a counts range of [445445, 544433]. Conclusion: This method of using nanoDot™ OSLDs to perform output constancy checks for the SARRP ensures the output of the device is within 10% from the time of calibration and is convenient as well as time efficient. Because this, the frequency of output checks can be increased, which can improve the output stability for research with this device. The output trend of the SARRP will continue to be monitored in the future to establish a timeline for constancy checks and recalibration.

  15. Performance assessment of the single photon emission microscope: high spatial resolution SPECT imaging of small animal organs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mejia, J. [Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, Instituto do Cérebro, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Reis, M.A. [Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, Instituto do Cérebro, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Laboratório Interdisciplinar de Neurociências Clínicas, Departamento de Psiquiatria, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Miranda, A.C.C. [Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, Instituto do Cérebro, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Batista, I.R. [Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, Instituto do Cérebro, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Laboratório Interdisciplinar de Neurociências Clínicas, Departamento de Psiquiatria, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Barboza, M.R.F.; Shih, M.C. [Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, Instituto do Cérebro, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Fu, G. [GE Global Research, Schenectady, NY (United States); Chen, C.T. [Department of Radiology, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL (United States); Meng, L.J. [Department of Nuclear, Plasma and Radiological Engineering, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States); Bressan, R.A. [Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, Instituto do Cérebro, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Laboratório Interdisciplinar de Neurociências Clínicas, Departamento de Psiquiatria, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Amaro, E. Jr [Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, Instituto do Cérebro, São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2013-11-06

    The single photon emission microscope (SPEM) is an instrument developed to obtain high spatial resolution single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) images of small structures inside the mouse brain. SPEM consists of two independent imaging devices, which combine a multipinhole collimator, a high-resolution, thallium-doped cesium iodide [CsI(Tl)] columnar scintillator, a demagnifying/intensifier tube, and an electron-multiplying charge-coupling device (CCD). Collimators have 300- and 450-µm diameter pinholes on tungsten slabs, in hexagonal arrays of 19 and 7 holes. Projection data are acquired in a photon-counting strategy, where CCD frames are stored at 50 frames per second, with a radius of rotation of 35 mm and magnification factor of one. The image reconstruction software tool is based on the maximum likelihood algorithm. Our aim was to evaluate the spatial resolution and sensitivity attainable with the seven-pinhole imaging device, together with the linearity for quantification on the tomographic images, and to test the instrument in obtaining tomographic images of different mouse organs. A spatial resolution better than 500 µm and a sensitivity of 21.6 counts·s{sup -1}·MBq{sup -1} were reached, as well as a correlation coefficient between activity and intensity better than 0.99, when imaging {sup 99m}Tc sources. Images of the thyroid, heart, lungs, and bones of mice were registered using {sup 99m}Tc-labeled radiopharmaceuticals in times appropriate for routine preclinical experimentation of <1 h per projection data set. Detailed experimental protocols and images of the aforementioned organs are shown. We plan to extend the instrument's field of view to fix larger animals and to combine data from both detectors to reduce the acquisition time or applied activity.

  16. Design of a high-resolution small-animal SPECT-CT system sharing a CdTe semiconductor detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryu, Hyun-Ju; Lee, Young-Jin; Lee, Seung-Wan; Cho, Hyo-Min; Choi, Yu-Na; Kim, Hee-Joung [Yonsei University, Wonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-07-15

    A single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) system with a co-registered X-y computed tomography (CT) system allows the convergence of functional information and morphologic information. The localization of radio pharmaceuticals on a SPECT can be enhanced by combining the SPECT with an anatomical modality, such as X-ray CT. Gamma-ray imaging for nuclear medicine devices and X-ray imaging systems for diagnostics has recently been developed based on semiconductor detectors, and semiconductor detector materials such as cadmium telluride (CdTe) or cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) are available for both X-ray and gamma-ray systems for small animal imaging. CdTe or CZT detectors provide strong absorption and high detection efficiency of high energy X-ray and gamma-ray photons because of their large atomic numbers. In this study, a pinhole collimator SPECT system sharing a cadmium telluride (CdTe) detector with a CT was designed. The GEANT4 application for tomographic emission (GATE) v.6.1 was used for the simulation. The pinhole collimator was designed to obtain a high spatial resolution of the SPECT system. The acquisition time for each projection was 40 seconds, and 60 projections were obtained for tomographic image acquisition. The reconstruction was performed using ordered subset expectation maximization (OS-EM) algorithms. The sensitivity and the spatial resolution were measured on the GATE simulation to evaluate the system characteristics. The spatial resolution of the system calculated from the FWHM of Gaussian fitted PSF curve was 0.69 mm, and the sensitivity of the system was measured to be 0.354 cps/kBq by using a Tc-99m point source of 1 MBq for 800 seconds. A phantom study was performed to verify the design of the dual imaging modality system. The system will be built as designed, and it can be applied as a pre-clinical imaging system.

  17. A Small-Animal PET System Based on LYSO Crystal Arrays, PS-PMTs and a PCI DAQ Board

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alva-Sanchez, H.; Murrieta, T.; Moreno-Barbosa, E.; Brandan, M. E.; Ruiz-Trejo, C.; Martinez-Davalos, A.; Rodriguez-Villafuerte, M.

    2010-02-01

    A positron emission tomography system for small animals has been designed for research purposes, and developed at Instituto de Fi¿sica, UNAM, Mexico. Its detection modules are based on pixelated scintillator LYSO crystal arrays coupled to Hamamatsu H8500 position-sensitive photomultiplier tubes. The front-end electronics are based on nuclear instrumentation modules (NIM) and in-house built readout circuits. Peak signal digitization is performed with a commercial analogue-to-digital acquisition (DAQ) board. The system has been characterized for spatial, timing and energy resolution, system dead time, absolute sensitivity, scatter fraction and noise equivalent count rate (NEC). The results indicate that the detection modules are able to identify individual crystals (out of 400) with up to 8-to-1 peak-to-valley ratios with individual crystal energy resolution ranging from 7 to 15% at 511 keV. The timing resolution is 1.9 ns and the system dead time was found to be 16.8 ¿s and 42.1 ¿s for 0.5 ml and 10 ml volume sources, respectively. The measured absolute system sensitivity is 0.11% and the scatter fraction from a glass capillary inside a 2.5 cm diameter mouse phantom is 21.5%. A true NEC maximum value was not achieved with the system due to saturation of the PS-PMT output signals for activities above 0.27 mCi. Results from a Na18 F PET bone scan of a 30 g mouse are shown.

  18. A framework for inverse planning of beam-on times for 3D small animal radiotherapy using interactive multi-objective optimization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Balvert, Marleen; van Hoof, S.J.; Granton, Patrick V.; Trani, Daniela; den Hertog, Dick; Hoffmann, A.L.; Verhaegen, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Advances in precision small animal radiotherapy hardware enable the delivery of increasingly complicated dose distributions on the millimeter scale. Manual creation and evaluation of treatment plans becomes difficult or even infeasible with an increasing number of degrees of freedom for dose deliver

  19. Radiography atlas of domestic animals. Small mammals, birds, reptilia, and amphibia. Atlas der Roentgendiagnostik bei Heimtieren. Kleinsaeuger, Voegel, Reptilien und Amphibien

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruebel, G.A.; Isenbuegel, E.; Wolvekamp, P. (eds.); Gabrisch, K.; Grimm, F.; Koblik, P.; Paul-Murphy, J.; Oschwald, C.P.; Schildger, B.J.

    1991-01-01

    The 370 radiographs presented in the atlas together with notes and explanations give information on normal roentgenographic findings, physiological variations, and important pathological findings observed in small mammals, birds, reptilia and amphibia. Introductory notes to each chapter explain the principles of exposure techniques and the handling of the animals. (VHE).

  20. A simple device to convert a small-animal PET scanner into a multi-sample tissue and injection syringe counter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Michael V; Seidel, Jurgen; Choyke, Peter L; Jagoda, Elaine M

    2017-10-01

    We describe a simple fixture that can be added to the imaging bed of a small-animal PET scanner that allows for automated counting of multiple organ or tissue samples from mouse-sized animals and counting of injection syringes prior to administration of the radiotracer. The combination of imaging and counting capabilities in the same machine offers advantages in certain experimental settings. A polyethylene block of plastic, sculpted to mate with the animal imaging bed of a small-animal PET scanner, is machined to receive twelve 5-ml containers, each capable of holding an entire organ from a mouse-sized animal. In addition, a triangular cross-section slot is machined down the centerline of the block to secure injection syringes from 1-ml to 3-ml in size. The sample holder is scanned in PET whole-body mode to image all samples or in one bed position to image a filled injection syringe. Total radioactivity in each sample or syringe is determined from the reconstructed images of these objects using volume re-projection of the coronal images and a single region-of-interest for each. We tested the accuracy of this method by comparing PET estimates of sample and syringe activity with well counter and dose calibrator estimates of these same activities. PET and well counting of the same samples gave near identical results (in MBq, R(2)=0.99, slope=0.99, intercept=0.00-MBq). PET syringe and dose calibrator measurements of syringe activity in MBq were also similar (R(2)=0.99, slope=0.99, intercept=- 0.22-MBq). A small-animal PET scanner can be easily converted into a multi-sample and syringe counting device by the addition of a sample block constructed for that purpose. This capability, combined with live animal imaging, can improve efficiency and flexibility in certain experimental settings. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. MRI-Only Based Radiotherapy Treatment Planning for the Rat Brain on a Small Animal Radiation Research Platform (SARRP.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shandra Gutierrez

    Full Text Available Computed tomography (CT is the standard imaging modality in radiation therapy treatment planning (RTP. However, magnetic resonance (MR imaging provides superior soft tissue contrast, increasing the precision of target volume selection. We present MR-only based RTP for a rat brain on a small animal radiation research platform (SARRP using probabilistic voxel classification with multiple MR sequences. Six rat heads were imaged, each with one CT and five MR sequences. The MR sequences were: T1-weighted, T2-weighted, zero-echo time (ZTE, and two ultra-short echo time sequences with 20 μs (UTE1 and 2 ms (UTE2 echo times. CT data were manually segmented into air, soft tissue, and bone to obtain the RTP reference. Bias field corrected MR images were automatically segmented into the same tissue classes using a fuzzy c-means segmentation algorithm with multiple images as input. Similarities between segmented CT and automatic segmented MR (ASMR images were evaluated using Dice coefficient. Three ASMR images with high similarity index were used for further RTP. Three beam arrangements were investigated. Dose distributions were compared by analysing dose volume histograms. The highest Dice coefficients were obtained for the ZTE-UTE2 combination and for the T1-UTE1-T2 combination when ZTE was unavailable. Both combinations, along with UTE1-UTE2, often used to generate ASMR images, were used for further RTP. Using 1 beam, MR based RTP underestimated the dose to be delivered to the target (range: 1.4%-7.6%. When more complex beam configurations were used, the calculated dose using the ZTE-UTE2 combination was the most accurate, with 0.7% deviation from CT, compared to 0.8% for T1-UTE1-T2 and 1.7% for UTE1-UTE2. The presented MR-only based workflow for RTP on a SARRP enables both accurate organ delineation and dose calculations using multiple MR sequences. This method can be useful in longitudinal studies where CT's cumulative radiation dose might contribute

  2. I-124 labeled recombinant human annexin V produced by E. coli for apoptosis image using small animal PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, J. H.; Lee, I. S.; Woo, S. K.; Woo, G. S.; Chung, W. S.; Kang, J. H.; Cheon, G. J.; Choi, C. W.; Urn, S. M. [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-07-01

    Annexin V labeled with radioisotope and optical probe has been used to detect apoptosis. To evaluate annexin V as a multimodal apoptosis imaging agent, large-scale preparation of Annexin V (AV) is preliminary. The aim of this study is to produce and purify recombinant human Annexin V (rh-AV) in E. coli system and radiolabeled rh-AV evaluate in vitro and in vivo apoptosis model system. Annexin V cDNA was obtained from human placenta and rh-AV cloning vector used fusion E. coli vector. Expression vector was based on the E. coli pET system. Induction of rh-AV was used Isopropyl--D-thiogalactoside (IPTG) and purification was used TALON metal affinity resin and T7 - Taq. Purification yield confirmed through SDS-PAGE. In camptothecin (0, 50, 100 uM) induced Jurkat T cell apoptosis model, AV-PI flow cytometry analysis and in vitro binding assay of I-124 labeled rh - AV were performed and compared. Small animal PET images of I-124 labeled rh-AV were obtained in Fas-mediated hepatic apoptosis model. Optimum expression condition was at 37, 250 rpm, 8 hr in 2X YT media including 1mM IPTG, Through two step purification process, rh-AV confirmed about 35 Kd single band by SDS-PAGE. As camptothecin concentration increasing, annexin V-FITC positive % increased in flow cytometry analysis and uptake of I-124 labeled rh-AV also increased. Annexin V-FITC positive % was correlated with and uptake of I-124 labeled rh-AV (R{sup 2}=0.99). In Fas-mediated hepatic apoptosis model, I-124 labeled rh-AV was selectively localized in liver region in PET image. Recombinant Human annexin V was produced by E. coli system and purified using two step affinity chromatography. Radiolabeled rh-AV was useful for the evaluation of apoptosis in vitro and in vivo model. Recombinant human annexin V could be used as apoptosis imaging agent with various radiolabel and optical probe.

  3. MRI-Only Based Radiotherapy Treatment Planning for the Rat Brain on a Small Animal Radiation Research Platform (SARRP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez, Shandra; Descamps, Benedicte; Vanhove, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is the standard imaging modality in radiation therapy treatment planning (RTP). However, magnetic resonance (MR) imaging provides superior soft tissue contrast, increasing the precision of target volume selection. We present MR-only based RTP for a rat brain on a small animal radiation research platform (SARRP) using probabilistic voxel classification with multiple MR sequences. Six rat heads were imaged, each with one CT and five MR sequences. The MR sequences were: T1-weighted, T2-weighted, zero-echo time (ZTE), and two ultra-short echo time sequences with 20 μs (UTE1) and 2 ms (UTE2) echo times. CT data were manually segmented into air, soft tissue, and bone to obtain the RTP reference. Bias field corrected MR images were automatically segmented into the same tissue classes using a fuzzy c-means segmentation algorithm with multiple images as input. Similarities between segmented CT and automatic segmented MR (ASMR) images were evaluated using Dice coefficient. Three ASMR images with high similarity index were used for further RTP. Three beam arrangements were investigated. Dose distributions were compared by analysing dose volume histograms. The highest Dice coefficients were obtained for the ZTE-UTE2 combination and for the T1-UTE1-T2 combination when ZTE was unavailable. Both combinations, along with UTE1-UTE2, often used to generate ASMR images, were used for further RTP. Using 1 beam, MR based RTP underestimated the dose to be delivered to the target (range: 1.4%-7.6%). When more complex beam configurations were used, the calculated dose using the ZTE-UTE2 combination was the most accurate, with 0.7% deviation from CT, compared to 0.8% for T1-UTE1-T2 and 1.7% for UTE1-UTE2. The presented MR-only based workflow for RTP on a SARRP enables both accurate organ delineation and dose calculations using multiple MR sequences. This method can be useful in longitudinal studies where CT's cumulative radiation dose might contribute to the total

  4. Performance of a PET Insert for High Resolution Small Animal PET/MR Imaging at 7T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stortz, Greg; Thiessen, Jonathan D; Bishop, Daryl; Khan, Muhammad S; Kozlowski, Piotr; Retière, Fabrice; Schellenberg, Graham; Shams, Ehsan; Zhang, Xuezhu; Thompson, Christopher J; Goertzen, Andrew; Sossi, Vesna

    2017-09-14

    We present the characterization of a compact magnetic resonance (MR) compatible positron emission tomography (PET) insert for simultaneous pre-clinical PET/MR imaging. While specifically designed with the strict size constraint to fit inside the 114 mm inner diameter of the BGA-12S gradient coil used in the Bruker 70/20 and 94/20 series of small animal MR imaging (MRI) systems, the insert can be easily installed in any appropriate MRI scanner or used as a stand-alone PET system. Methods: The insert is made from a ring of 16 detector-blocks each made from depth-of-interaction capable dual-layer-offset arrays of cerium-doped lutetium-yttrium oxyorthosilicate crystals read out by silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) arrays. Scintillator crystal arrays are made from 22×10 / 21×9 crystals in the bottom/top layers with 6/4 mm layer thicknesses, arranged with a 1.27 mm pitch, resulting in a useable field of view (FOV) 28 mm long and ~55 mm wide. Results: Spatial resolution ranges from 1.17 to 1.86 mm full-width-at-half-maximum (FWHM) in the radial direction from a radial offset of 0 to 15 mm. With a 300-800 keV energy window, peak sensitivity is 2.2% and noise-equivalent count rate (NECR) from a mouse-sized phantom at 3.7 MBq is 11.1 kcps and peaks at 20.8 kcps at 14.5 MBq. Phantom imaging shows that feature sizes as low as 0.7 mm can be resolved. (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose ((18)F-FDG) PET/MR images of mouse and rat brains show no signs of inter-modality interference, and can excellently resolve substructures within the brains. Conclusion: Due to excellent spatial resolvability and lack of intermodality interference, this PET insert will serve as a useful tool for pre-clinical PET/MR. Copyright © 2017 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Inc.

  5. First application of liquid-metal-jet sources for small-animal imaging: High-resolution CT and phase-contrast tumor demarcation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsson, Daniel H.; Lundstroem, Ulf; Burvall, Anna; Hertz, Hans M. [Department of Applied Physics, KTH Royal Institute of Technology/Albanova, 10691 Stockholm (Sweden); Westermark, Ulrica K.; Arsenian Henriksson, Marie [Department of Microbiology, Tumor and Cell Biology (MTC), Karolinska Institutet, 17177 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2013-02-15

    Purpose: Small-animal studies require images with high spatial resolution and high contrast due to the small scale of the structures. X-ray imaging systems for small animals are often limited by the microfocus source. Here, the authors investigate the applicability of liquid-metal-jet x-ray sources for such high-resolution small-animal imaging, both in tomography based on absorption and in soft-tissue tumor imaging based on in-line phase contrast. Methods: The experimental arrangement consists of a liquid-metal-jet x-ray source, the small-animal object on a rotating stage, and an imaging detector. The source-to-object and object-to-detector distances are adjusted for the preferred contrast mechanism. Two different liquid-metal-jet sources are used, one circulating a Ga/In/Sn alloy and the other an In/Ga alloy for higher penetration through thick tissue. Both sources are operated at 40-50 W electron-beam power with {approx}7 {mu}m x-ray spots, providing high spatial resolution in absorption imaging and high spatial coherence for the phase-contrast imaging. Results: High-resolution absorption imaging is demonstrated on mice with CT, showing 50 {mu}m bone details in the reconstructed slices. High-resolution phase-contrast soft-tissue imaging shows clear demarcation of mm-sized tumors at much lower dose than is required in absorption. Conclusions: This is the first application of liquid-metal-jet x-ray sources for whole-body small-animal x-ray imaging. In absorption, the method allows high-resolution tomographic skeletal imaging with potential for significantly shorter exposure times due to the power scalability of liquid-metal-jet sources. In phase contrast, the authors use a simple in-line arrangement to show distinct tumor demarcation of few-mm-sized tumors. This is, to their knowledge, the first small-animal tumor visualization with a laboratory phase-contrast system.

  6. Pre-clinical in vivo models for the screening of bone biomaterials for oral/craniofacial indications: focus on small-animal models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stavropoulos, Andreas; Sculean, Anton; Bosshardt, Dieter D; Buser, Daniel; Klinge, Björn

    2015-06-01

    Preclinical in vivo experimental studies are performed for evaluating proof-of-principle concepts, safety and possible unwanted reactions of candidate bone biomaterials before proceeding to clinical testing. Specifically, models involving small animals have been developed for screening bone biomaterials for their potential to enhance bone formation. No single model can completely recreate the anatomic, physiologic, biomechanic and functional environment of the human mouth and jaws. Relevant aspects regarding physiology, anatomy, dimensions and handling are discussed in this paper to elucidate the advantages and disadvantages of small-animal models. Model selection should be based not on the 'expertise' or capacities of the team, but rather on a scientifically solid rationale, and the animal model selected should reflect the question for which an answer is sought. The rationale for using heterotopic or orthotopic testing sites, and intraosseous, periosseous or extraskeletal defect models, is discussed. The paper also discusses the relevance of critical size defect modeling, with focus on calvarial defects in rodents. In addition, the rabbit sinus model and the capsule model in the rat mandible are presented and discussed in detail. All animal experiments should be designed with care and include sample-size and study-power calculations, thus allowing generation of meaningful data. Moreover, animal experiments are subject to ethical approval by the relevant authority. All procedures and the postoperative handling and care, including postoperative analgesics, should follow best practice.

  7. Analysis of Small Ischemic Lesions in the Examinees of a Brain Dock and Neurological Examination of Animals Subjected to Cortical or Basal Ganglia Photothrombotic Infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroiwa, Toshihiko; Tabata, Hitoshi; Xi, Guohua; Hua, Ya; Schallert, Timothy; Keep, Richard F

    2016-01-01

    We analyzed cases of small brain ischemic lesions found in examinees of a brain dock (neurological health screening center). Small cerebral infarction was found in 17 % of the examinees (733 cases). White matter lesions were found in 24 %. Infarctions were located in the cortex or subcortical white matter in 31 % and in the basal ganglia in 44 % of cases. Infratentorial infarction was found in 1.6 %. We have developed an animal model of small infarction in the cortex or basal ganglia induced by photothrombosis in rodents. Sprague-Dawley rats or Mongolian gerbils were anesthetized and photothrombotic infarction was induced in the left caudate nucleus or parietal cortex by light exposure via an optic fiber and intravenous Rose Bengal dye injection. Histological examination revealed development of a small spherical infarction surrounding the tip of the optic fiber. The lesion turned to a cyst by 6 weeks after lesioning. Neurological deficits were found in animals both with cortical and caudate infarction. Behavioral changes in an open field test differed with the lesion site. Neurological deficits were sustained longer in animals with larger infarctions. Thus, photothrombotic infarction is useful for analyzing location-dependent and size-dependent neurological and neuropathological changes after cerebral infarction.

  8. Kindergarten Animation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinshaw, Craig

    2012-01-01

    Animation is one of the last lessons that come to mind when thinking of kindergarten art. The necessary understanding of sequencing, attention to small, often detailed drawings, and the use of technology all seem more suitable to upper elementary. With today's emphasis on condensing and integrating curriculum, consider developing animation lessons…

  9. Kindergarten Animation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinshaw, Craig

    2012-01-01

    Animation is one of the last lessons that come to mind when thinking of kindergarten art. The necessary understanding of sequencing, attention to small, often detailed drawings, and the use of technology all seem more suitable to upper elementary. With today's emphasis on condensing and integrating curriculum, consider developing animation lessons…

  10. Comprehensive small animal imaging strategies on a clinical 3 T dedicated head MR-scanner; adapted methods and sequence protocols in CNS pathologies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepu R Pillai

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Small animal models of human diseases are an indispensable aspect of pre-clinical research. Being dynamic, most pathologies demand extensive longitudinal monitoring to understand disease mechanisms, drug efficacy and side effects. These considerations often demand the concomitant development of monitoring systems with sufficient temporal and spatial resolution. METHODOLOGY AND RESULTS: This study attempts to configure and optimize a clinical 3 Tesla magnetic resonance scanner to facilitate imaging of small animal central nervous system pathologies. The hardware of the scanner was complemented by a custom-built, 4-channel phased array coil system. Extensive modification of standard sequence protocols was carried out based on tissue relaxometric calculations. Proton density differences between the gray and white matter of the rodent spinal cord along with transverse relaxation due to magnetic susceptibility differences at the cortex and striatum of both rats and mice demonstrated statistically significant differences. The employed parallel imaging reconstruction algorithms had distinct properties dependent on the sequence type and in the presence of the contrast agent. The attempt to morphologically phenotype a normal healthy rat brain in multiple planes delineated a number of anatomical regions, and all the clinically relevant sequels following acute cerebral ischemia could be adequately characterized. Changes in blood-brain-barrier permeability following ischemia-reperfusion were also apparent at a later time. Typical characteristics of intra-cerebral haemorrhage at acute and chronic stages were also visualized up to one month. Two models of rodent spinal cord injury were adequately characterized and closely mimicked the results of histological studies. In the employed rodent animal handling system a mouse model of glioblastoma was also studied with unequivocal results. CONCLUSIONS: The implemented customizations including extensive

  11. Comparative study of two flat-panel x-ray detectors applied to small-animal imaging cone-beam micro-CT

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    Proceeding of: 2008 IEEE Nuclear Science Symposium Conference Record (NSS '08), Dresden, Germany, 19-25 Oct. 2008 This work compares two different X-ray flat-panel detectors for its use in high-speed, cone-beam CT applied to small-animal imaging. The main differences between these two devices are the scintillators and the achievable frame rate. Both devices have been tested in terms of system linearity, sensitivity, resolution, stability and noise properties, taking into account the dif...

  12. A high throughput live transparent animal bioassay to identify non-toxic small molecules or genes that regulate vertebrate fat metabolism for obesity drug development

    OpenAIRE

    Woollett Laura A; Jandacek Ronald J; Rilo Horacio L; Alimov Alexander P; Jones Kevin S; Penberthy W Todd

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background The alarming rise in the obesity epidemic and growing concern for the pathologic consequences of the metabolic syndrome warrant great need for development of obesity-related pharmacotherapeutics. The search for such therapeutics is severely limited by the slow throughput of animal models of obesity. Amenable to placement into a 96 well plate, zebrafish larvae have emerged as one of the highest throughput vertebrate model organisms for performing small molecule screens. A m...

  13. Coil concepts for rapid and motion-compensated MR-Imaging of small animals; Spulenkonzepte zur schnellen und bewegungskompensierten MR-Bildgebung von Kleintieren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korn, Matthias

    2009-05-06

    In this work radiofrequency-coils for the imaging of small animals in clinical whole-body MRI-systems were developed. Therefore in a first step single-channel solenoids were designed and characterized. The solenoids had two and three windings respectively, which were implemented as double wires to increase the homogeneity of the receive profile. These coils allow the acquisition of whole-body images of mice with high signal-to-noise ratio and homogeneity over a distance of at least 6.3 cm. Since many imaging experiments require rapid image acquisition, in the next step a novel coil concept was developed, which, due to its geometry, enables parallel imaging in arbitrary directions. A prototype was assembled and tested on phantom and small-animal experiments. With an accelerating factor of R=2, the difference of the SNR in all directions from the theoretical maximum, was less than 1%. In order to compensate physiological motion by the self-gating technique, in this work a coil is presented for the first time, which selectively amplifies the self-gating signal, while - due to a optical detuning technique - preserving the homogeneous illumination of the image. In vivo experiments on a small animal show an amplification of the self-gating signal by at least 40%. (orig.)

  14. Simulation of HyperSPECT: a high-resolution small-animal system with in-line x-ray optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tibbelin, Sandra; Nillius, Peter; Danielsson, Mats

    2012-03-01

    SPECT has become an important tool in pre-clinical applications. Small-animal imaging systems based on the use of one or more pinhole collimators now reach sub-half-mm resolution but unfortunately suffer from a compromise between sensitivity and resolution due to the pinhole collimators. We propose a small-animal SPECT system based not on pinholes but on in-line x-ray optics, which is rare in medical imaging systems for nuclear medicine. The x-ray lenses are optimized for 27 keV for low-energy imaging with iodine-125. We believe that this new system, HyperSPECT, can simultaneously improve on sensitivity and resolution compared to today's state-of-the-art systems. A full three-dimensional simulation of the system has been performed including the prism-array lenses, pre- and post-collimators and scintillator-based detector. Images of capillary phantoms have been reconstructed using an iterative image reconstruction method. Sensitivity was uniformly 0.37% throughout the 1 cm diameter spherical field of view and rod sizes of around 100 μm diameter were distinguishable in the images of simulated capillary phantoms. These results indicate an increase in resolution by a factor of 5 during a simultaneous increase in sensitivity by a factor of 2 compared to the current state-of-the-art small-animal SPECT systems.

  15. Choline molecular imaging with small-animal PET for monitoring tumor cellular response to photodynamic therapy of cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fei, Baowei; Wang, Hesheng; Wu, Chunying; Meyers, Joseph; Xue, Liang-Yan; MacLennan, Gregory; Schluchter, Mark

    2009-02-01

    We are developing and evaluating choline molecular imaging with positron emission tomography (PET) for monitoring tumor response to photodynamic therapy (PDT) in animal models. Human prostate cancer (PC-3) was studied in athymic nude mice. A second-generation photosensitizer Pc 4 was used for PDT in tumor-bearing mice. MicroPET images with 11C-choline were acquired before PDT and 48 h after PDT. Time-activity curves of 11C-choline uptake were analyzed before and after PDT. For treated tumors, normalized choline uptake decreased significantly 48 h after PDT, compared to the same tumors pre-PDT (p detect early tumor response to PDT in the animal model of human prostate cancer.

  16. Imaging of cardiac perfusion of free-breathing small animals using dynamic phase-correlated micro-CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sawall, Stefan; Kuntz, Jan; Socher, Michaela; Knaup, Michael; Hess, Andreas; Bartling, Soenke; Kachelriess, Marc [Institute of Medical Physics, Friedrich-Alexander-University (FAU) Erlangen-Nuernberg, 91052 Erlangen, Germany and Medical Physics in Radiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Medical Physics in Radiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Animal Laboratory Services Core Facility, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Institute of Medical Physics, Friedrich-Alexander-University (FAU) Erlangen-Nuernberg, 91052 Erlangen (Germany); Institute of Experimental and Clinical Pharmacology and Toxicology, Friedrich-Alexander-University (FAU) Erlangen-Nuernberg, 91052 Erlangen (Germany); Medical Physics in Radiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Institute of Medical Physics, Friedrich-Alexander-University (FAU) Erlangen-Nuernberg, 91052 Erlangen, Germany and Medical Physics in Radiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2012-12-15

    Purpose:Mouse models of cardiac diseases have proven to be a valuable tool in preclinical research. The high cardiac and respiratory rates of free breathing mice prohibit conventional in vivo cardiac perfusion studies using computed tomography even if gating methods are applied. This makes a sacrification of the animals unavoidable and only allows for the application of ex vivo methods. Methods: To overcome this issue the authors propose a low dose scan protocol and an associated reconstruction algorithm that allows for in vivo imaging of cardiac perfusion and associated processes that are retrospectively synchronized to the respiratory and cardiac motion of the animal. The scan protocol consists of repetitive injections of contrast media within several consecutive scans while the ECG, respiratory motion, and timestamp of contrast injection are recorded and synchronized to the acquired projections. The iterative reconstruction algorithm employs a six-dimensional edge-preserving filter to provide low-noise, motion artifact-free images of the animal examined using the authors' low dose scan protocol. Results: The reconstructions obtained show that the complete temporal bolus evolution can be visualized and quantified in any desired combination of cardiac and respiratory phase including reperfusion phases. The proposed reconstruction method thereby keeps the administered radiation dose at a minimum and thus reduces metabolic inference to the animal allowing for longitudinal studies. Conclusions: The authors' low dose scan protocol and phase-correlated dynamic reconstruction algorithm allow for an easy and effective way to visualize phase-correlated perfusion processes in routine laboratory studies using free-breathing mice.

  17. Anatomical features for an adequate choice of experimental animal model in biomedicine: II. Small laboratory rodents, rabbit, and pig.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lossi, Laura; D'Angelo, Livia; De Girolamo, Paolo; Merighi, Adalberto

    2016-03-01

    The anatomical features distinctive to each of the very large array of species used in today's biomedical research must be born in mind when considering the correct choice of animal model(s), particularly when translational research is concerned. In this paper we take into consideration and discuss the most important anatomical and histological features of the commonest species of laboratory rodents (rat, mouse, guinea pig, hamster, and gerbil), rabbit, and pig related to their importance for applied research.

  18. All creatures great and small: regulatory T cells in mice, humans, dogs and other domestic animal species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garden, O A; Pinheiro, D; Cunningham, F

    2011-05-01

    Abnormalities of peripheral tolerance are thought to contribute to the pathogenesis of a number of inflammatory, autoimmune and neoplastic diseases of both humans and animals. Furthermore, the induction of allograft tolerance is the 'holy grail' of clinical transplantation. Of the various mechanisms underlying peripheral tolerance, regulatory T cells (Tregs) have risen to particular prominence. Various Treg subsets have been characterised, including naturally occurring cells that develop along a regulatory lineage in the thymus and induced cells that arise in the periphery from conventional T cell precursors. The transcription factor Forkhead box (Foxp3) serves a crucial role in stabilising the Treg transcriptome and is a faithful marker of peripheral Tregs in the mouse, though its expression is somewhat more promiscuous in man. Regulatory T cells display a wide spectrum of suppressive and cytotoxic mechanisms and may convert to specific T helper cell subsets in response to appropriate inflammatory cues. Although knowledge of Tregs in domestic animal species is still in its infancy, a growing body of literature is accumulating in the dog, cat, pig, cow, sheep and horse. We highlight our own and other studies of Tregs in the dog, an important veterinary species and a model for a number of human diseases. The ethos of 'One Health, One Medicine' is anticipated to accelerate efforts to close the knowledge gap between domestic animal and mainstream species in this field. We predict that the prodigious pace of research into Tregs will continue unabated for years to come, fuelled by the exciting therapeutic potential of these cells.

  19. Development and Validation of a Small Animal Immobilizer and Positioning System for the Study of Delivery of Intracranial and Extracranial Radiotherapy Using the Gamma Knife System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awan, Musaddiq J; Dorth, Jennifer; Mani, Arvind; Kim, Haksoo; Zheng, Yiran; Mislmani, Mazen; Welford, Scott; Yuan, Jiankui; Wessels, Barry W; Lo, Simon S; Letterio, John; Machtay, Mitchell; Sloan, Andrew; Sohn, Jason W

    2017-04-01

    The purpose of this research is to establish a process of irradiating mice using the Gamma Knife as a versatile system for small animal irradiation and to validate accurate intracranial and extracranial dose delivery using this system. A stereotactic immobilization device was developed for small animals for the Gamma Knife head frame allowing for isocentric dose delivery. Intercranial positional reproducibility of a reference point from a primary reference animal was verified on an additional mouse. Extracranial positional reproducibility of the mouse aorta was verified using 3 mice. Accurate dose delivery was validated using film and thermoluminescent dosimeter measurements with a solid water phantom. Gamma Knife plans were developed to irradiate intracranial and extracranial targets. Mice were irradiated validating successful targeted radiation dose delivery. Intramouse positional variability of the right mandible reference point across 10 micro-computed tomography scans was 0.65 ± 0.48 mm. Intermouse positional reproducibility across 2 mice at the same reference point was 0.76 ± 0.46 mm. The accuracy of dose delivery was 0.67 ± 0.29 mm and 1.01 ± 0.43 mm in the coronal and sagittal planes, respectively. The planned dose delivered to a mouse phantom was 2 Gy at the 50% isodose with a measured thermoluminescent dosimeter dose of 2.9 ± 0.3 Gy. The phosphorylated form of member X of histone family H2A (γH2AX) staining of irradiated mouse brain and mouse aorta demonstrated adjacent tissue sparing. In conclusion, our system for preclinical studies of small animal irradiation using the Gamma Knife is able to accurately deliver intracranial and extracranial targeted focal radiation allowing for preclinical experiments studying focal radiation.

  20. Wavelet-based regularization and edge preservation for submillimetre 3D list-mode reconstruction data from a high resolution small animal PET system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jesus Ochoa Dominguez, Humberto de, E-mail: hochoa@uacj.mx [Departamento de Ingenieria Eectrica y Computacion, Universidad Autonoma de Ciudad Juarez, Avenida del Charro 450 Norte, C.P. 32310 Ciudad Juarez, Chihuahua (Mexico); Ortega Maynez, Leticia; Osiris Vergara Villegas, Osslan; Gordillo Castillo, Nelly; Guadalupe Cruz Sanchez, Vianey; Gutierrez Casas, Efren David [Departamento de Ingenieria Eectrica y Computacion, Universidad Autonoma de Ciudad Juarez, Avenida del Charro 450 Norte, C.P. 32310 Ciudad Juarez, Chihuahua (Mexico)

    2011-10-01

    The data obtained from a PET system tend to be noisy because of the limitations of the current instrumentation and the detector efficiency. This problem is particularly severe in images of small animals as the noise contaminates areas of interest within small organs. Therefore, denoising becomes a challenging task. In this paper, a novel wavelet-based regularization and edge preservation method is proposed to reduce such noise. To demonstrate this method, image reconstruction using a small mouse {sup 18}F NEMA phantom and a {sup 18}F mouse was performed. Investigation on the effects of the image quality was addressed for each reconstruction case. Results show that the proposed method drastically reduces the noise and preserves the image details.

  1. Irreversible Electroporation versus Radiofrequency Ablation: A Comparison of Local and Systemic Effects in a Small-Animal Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulvik, Baruch E; Rozenblum, Nir; Gourevich, Svetlana; Ahmed, Muneeb; Andriyanov, Alexander V; Galun, Eithan; Goldberg, S Nahum

    2016-08-01

    Purpose To compare both periablational and systemic effects of two mechanistically different types of ablation: thermal radiofrequency (RF) ablation and electroporative ablation with irreversible electroporation (IRE) in appropriately selected animal models. Materials and Methods Animal experiments were performed according to a protocol approved by the Animal Care Committee of Hebrew University. Female C57BL/6 mice (n = 165) were randomized to undergo either RF or IRE ablation of noncancerous normal liver. The inflammatory response, cell proliferation, interleukin 6 (IL-6) levels, and intactness of vessels in the liver were assessed at 6, 12, and 24 hours and at 3, 7, and 14 days after ablation (n = 122 for mechanistic experiments). Systemic effects were then assessed by comparing tumor formation in an Mdr2-knockout (KO) mouse model (n = 15) and tumor growth in a remote BNL 1ME hepatoma xenograft tumor (n = 28). Results were averaged and evaluated by using two-tailed t tests. Results Although RF ablation was associated with a well-defined periablational inflammatory rim, for IRE, the infiltrate penetrated the ablation zone, largely along persistently patent vessels. Peak IL-6 levels (6 hours after ablation) were 10 and three times higher than at baseline for IRE and RF, respectively (P RF ablation or sham operation (mean, 3.6 ± 1.3 [standard deviation] vs 2.4 ± 1.1 and 2.2 ± 0.8, respectively; P RF ablation and sham operation). For BNL 1ME tumors, both RF and IRE liver ablation reduced tumor growth, with a greater effect noted for IRE (1329 mm(3) ± 586 and 819 mm(3) ± 327 vs 2241 mm(3) ± 548 for sham operation; P RF ablation. These local changes of IRE induce more robust systemic effects, including both tumorigenic and immunogenic effects. (©) RSNA, 2016 Online supplemental material is available for this article.

  2. Registration of a needle-positioning robot to high-resolution 3D ultrasound and computed tomography for image-guided interventions in small animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waspe, Adam C.; Lacefield, James C.; Holdsworth, David W.; Fenster, Aaron

    2008-03-01

    Preclinical research often requires the delivery of biological substances to specific locations in small animals. Guiding a needle to targets in small animals with an error animal imaging systems. Both techniques involve moving the needle to predetermined robot coordinates and determining corresponding needle locations in image coordinates. Registration accuracy will therefore be affected by the robot positioning error and is assessed by measuring the target registration error (TRE). A point-based registration between robot and micro-ultrasound coordinates was accomplished by attaching a fiducial phantom onto the needle. A TRE of 145 μm was achieved when moving the needle to a set of robot coordinates and registering the coordinates to needle tip locations determined from ultrasound fiducial measurements. Registration between robot and micro-CT coordinates was accomplished by injecting barium sulfate into tracks created when the robot withdraws the needle from a phantom. Points along cross-sectional slices of the segmented needle tracks were determined using an intensity-weighted centroiding algorithm. A minimum distance TRE of 194 +/- 18 μm was achieved by registering centroid points to robot trajectories using the iterative closest point (ICP) algorithm. Simulations, incorporating both robot and ultrasound fiducial localization errors, verify that robot error is a significant component of the experimental registration. Simulations of micro-CT to robot ICP registration similarly agree with the experimental results. Both registration techniques produce a TRE < 200 μm, meeting design specification.

  3. Identification and characterization of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Staphylococcus haemolyticus and Staphylococcus pettenkoferi from a small animal clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Sonja; Kadlec, Kristina; Fessler, Andrea T; Schwarz, Stefan

    2013-12-27

    The aim of this study was to isolate and characterize methicillin-resistant staphylococci (MRS) in a small animal clinic and to investigate their distribution and possible transmission. Swabs (n=72) were taken from hospitalized pets, the environment and employees of a small animal clinic and screened for the presence of MRS. The staphylococcal species was confirmed biochemically or by 16S rDNA sequencing. Susceptibility to antimicrobial agents was tested by broth dilution. The presence of mecA and other resistance genes was confirmed by PCR. Molecular typing of the isolates followed standard procedures. In total, 34 MRS belonging to the four species Staphylococcus aureus (n=5), Staphylococcus epidermidis (n=21), Staphylococcus haemolyticus (n=6) or Staphylococcus pettenkoferi (n=2) were isolated. All isolates were multidrug-resistant with resistance to at least three classes of antimicrobial agents. Among the five methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) isolates, four belonged to the clonal complex CC398; two of them were isolated from cats, the remaining two from pet cages. Overall, the MRS isolates differed in their characteristics, except for one S. epidermidis clone (n=9) isolated from hospitalized cats without clinical staphylococcal infections, pet cages, the clinic environment as well as from a healthy employee. This MRSE clone was resistant to 10 classes of antimicrobial agents, including aminocyclitols, β-lactams, fluoroquinolones, lincosamides, macrolides, phenicols, pleuromutilins, sulfonamides, tetracyclines and trimethoprim. These findings suggest a possible transmission of specific MRS isolates between animal patients, employees and the clinic environment.

  4. Real-time bladder volume monitoring by the application of a new implantable bladder volume sensor for a small animal model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Sup Lee

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Although real-time monitoring of bladder volume together with intravesical pressure can provide more information for understanding the functional changes of the urinary bladder, it still entails difficulties in the accurate prediction of real-time bladder volume in urodynamic studies with small animal models. We studied a new implantable bladder volume monitoring device with eight rats. During cystometry, microelectrodes prepared by the microelectromechanical systems process were placed symmetrically on both lateral walls of the bladder, and the expanded bladder volume was calculated. Immunohistological study was done after 1 week and after 4 weeks to evaluate the biocompatibility of the microelectrode. From the point that infused saline volume into the bladder was higher than 0.6 mL, estimated bladder volume was statistically correlated with the volume of saline injected (p<0.01. Additionally, the microelectromechanical system microelectrodes used in this study showed reliable biocompatibility. Therefore, the device can be used to evaluate changes in bladder volume in studies with small animals, and it may help to provide more information about functional changes in the bladder in laboratory studies. Furthermore, owing to its biocompatibility, the device could be chronically implanted in conscious ambulating animals, thus allowing a novel longitudinal study to be performed for a specific purpose.

  5. METHOD FOR SIMULTANEOUS 90SR AND 137CS IN-VIVO MEASUREMENTS OF SMALL ANIMALS AND OTHER ENVIRONMENTAL MEDIA DEVELOPED FOR THE CONDITIONS OF THE CHERNOBYL EXCLUSION ZONE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farfan, E.; Jannik, T.

    2011-10-01

    To perform in vivo simultaneous measurements of the {sup 90}Sr and {sup 137}Cs content in the bodies of animals living in the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone (ChEZ), an appropriate method and equipment were developed and installed in a mobile gamma beta spectrometry laboratory. This technique was designed for animals of relatively small sizes (up to 50 g). The {sup 90}Sr content is measured by a beta spectrometer with a 0.1 mm thick scintillation plastic detector. The spectrum processing takes into account the fact that the measured object is 'thick-layered' and contains a comparable quantity of {sup 137}Cs, which is a characteristic condition of the ChEZ. The {sup 137}Cs content is measured by a NaI scintillation detector that is part of the combined gamma beta spectrometry system. For environmental research performed in the ChEZ, the advantages of this method and equipment (rapid measurements, capability to measure live animals directly in their habitat, and the capability of simultaneous {sup 90}Sr and {sup 137}Cs measurements) far outweigh the existing limitations (considerations must be made for background radiation and the animal size, skeletal shape and body mass). The accuracy of these in vivo measurements is shown to be consistent with standard spectrometric and radiochemical methods. Apart from the in vivo measurements, the proposed methodology, after a very simple upgrade that is also described in the article, works even more accurately with samples of other media, such as soil and plants.

  6. Method for simultaneous 90Sr and 137Cs in-vivo measurements of small animals and other environmental media developed for the conditions of the Chernobyl exclusion zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondarkov, Mikhail D; Maksimenko, Andrey M; Gaschak, Sergey P; Zheltonozhsky, Viktor A; Jannik, G Timothy; Farfán, Eduardo B

    2011-10-01

    To perform in vivo simultaneous measurements of the 90Sr and 137Cs content in the bodies of animals living in the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone (ChEZ), an appropriate method and equipment were developed and installed in a mobile gamma beta spectrometry laboratory. This technique was designed for animals of relatively small sizes (up to 50 g). The 90Sr content is measured by a beta spectrometer with a 0.1-mm-thick scintillation plastic detector. The spectrum processing takes into account the fact that the measured object is "thick-layered" and contains a comparable quantity of 137Cs, which is a characteristic condition of the ChEZ. The 137Cs content is measured by a NaI scintillation detector that is part of the combined gamma beta spectrometry system. For environmental research performed in the ChEZ, the advantages of this method and equipment (rapid measurements, capability to measure live animals directly in their habitat, and the capability of simultaneous 90Sr and 137Cs measurements) far outweigh the existing limitations (considerations must be made for background radiation and the animal size, skeletal shape, and body mass). The accuracy of these in vivo measurements is shown to be consistent with standard spectrometric and radiochemical methods. Apart from the in vivo measurements, the proposed methodology, after a very simple upgrade that is also described in this paper, works even more accurately with samples of other media, such as soil and plants.

  7. P.I.X.S.C.A.N.: a micro-CT scanner for small animal based on hybrid pixel detectors; PIXSCAN: micro-tomodensitrometre a pixels hybrides pour le petit animal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khoury, R

    2008-03-15

    Since more than a dozen years, efforts were led in the field of X-ray tomography for small animals, principally for the improvement of spatial resolution and the diminution of the absorbed dose. The C.P.P.M. developed the micro-CT P.I.X.S.C.A.N. based on the hybrid pixel detector X.P.A.D.2. In this context, my thesis work consists in studying the demonstrator P.I.X.S.C.A.N./X.P.A.D.2 and the contribution of the hybrid pixels in the imaging of small animals. A fast analytical simulation, FastSimu, was developed. An extrapolation of the performance of the demonstrator P.I.X.S.C.A.N, as well as the validation of the results obtained with the measured data, were led by means of the analytical simulator FastSimu. The demonstrator P.I.X.S.C.A.N./X.P.A.D.2 allowed to obtain reconstructed images with a rather good quality for a relatively weak absorbed dose. Its spatial resolution is degraded by the high number of defective pixels of the detector X.P.A.D.2. Beyond this study, a new version of the demonstrator P.I.X.S.C.A.N./X.P.A.D.2 is under construction. This latter, characterized by two and a half times smaller pixels and about no defective pixels will bring a considerable improvement on spatial resolution. (author)

  8. An orally available, small-molecule polymerase inhibitor shows efficacy against a lethal morbillivirus infection in a large animal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krumm, Stefanie A; Yan, Dan; Hovingh, Elise S; Evers, Taylor J; Enkirch, Theresa; Reddy, G Prabhakar; Sun, Aiming; Saindane, Manohar T; Arrendale, Richard F; Painter, George; Liotta, Dennis C; Natchus, Michael G; von Messling, Veronika; Plemper, Richard K

    2014-04-16

    Measles virus is a highly infectious morbillivirus responsible for major morbidity and mortality in unvaccinated humans. The related, zoonotic canine distemper virus (CDV) induces morbillivirus disease in ferrets with 100% lethality. We report an orally available, shelf-stable pan-morbillivirus inhibitor that targets the viral RNA polymerase. Prophylactic oral treatment of ferrets infected intranasally with a lethal CDV dose reduced viremia and prolonged survival. Ferrets infected with the same dose of virus that received post-infection treatment at the onset of viremia showed low-grade viral loads, remained asymptomatic, and recovered from infection, whereas control animals succumbed to the disease. Animals that recovered also mounted a robust immune response and were protected against rechallenge with a lethal CDV dose. Drug-resistant viral recombinants were generated and found to be attenuated and transmission-impaired compared to the genetic parent virus. These findings may pioneer a path toward an effective morbillivirus therapy that could aid measles eradication by synergizing with vaccination to close gaps in herd immunity due to vaccine refusal.

  9. Comparative wound healing--are the small animal veterinarian's clinical patients an improved translational model for human wound healing research?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volk, Susan W; Bohling, Mark W

    2013-01-01

    Despite intensive research efforts into understanding the pathophysiology of both chronic wounds and scar formation, and the development of wound care strategies to target both healing extremes, problematic wounds in human health care remain a formidable challenge. Although valuable fundamental information regarding the pathophysiology of problematic wounds can be gained from in vitro investigations and in vivo studies performed in laboratory animal models, the lack of concordance with human pathophysiology has been cited as a major impediment to translational research in human wound care. Therefore, the identification of superior clinical models for both chronic wounds and scarring disorders should be a high priority for scientists who work in the field of human wound healing research. To be successful, translational wound healing research should function as an intellectual ecosystem in which information flows from basic science researchers using in vitro and in vivo models to clinicians and back again from the clinical investigators to the basic scientists. Integral to the efficiency of this process is the incorporation of models which can accurately predict clinical success. The aim of this review is to describe the potential advantages and limitations of using clinical companion animals (primarily dogs and cats) as translational models for cutaneous wound healing research by describing comparative aspects of wound healing in these species, common acute and chronic cutaneous wounds in clinical canine and feline patients, and the infrastructure that currently exists in veterinary medicine which may facilitate translational studies and simultaneously benefit both veterinary and human wound care patients.

  10. Function and research tendency of small peptide in animal nutrition%小肽在动物营养中的作用及研究趋势

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐基利; 许丽

    2011-01-01

    The small peptide, as one important nutrient, is the intermediate product in the process of protein degradation to amino acids.The peptide nutrition theory that it can be absorbed by animal directly is one of the most important findings in animal nutrition, which makes traditional theory of protein nutrition more richful and consummate.The small peptide nutrition theory plays an important role in the degradation, absorption and metabolism of protein.The mechanism of absorption, nutritional functions and research tendency of small peptides were reviewed in this paper.%小肽是动物降解蛋白质为氨基酸过程中的中间产物,是一种重要的营养素,它能被动物体直接吸收的肽营养理论是动物营养学上的一个重要发现,是对传统蛋白质营养理论的丰富和完善,它在蛋白质的消化、吸收和代谢中起重要作用.文中重点从小肽的吸收机制、营养功能和研究趋势等方面进行综述.

  11. Preparation and properties of 117m Sn(IV)-TTHMP in in-vitro and in small animals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Jiaheng; LUO Shunzhong; JIANG Shubin; YANG Yuqing; WANG Guanquan

    2007-01-01

    In this work,TTHMP was synthesized and labelled with 117m Sn.The preparation conditions,stability and lipophilicity of 117m Sn(IV)-TTHMP were investigated.Biodistribution of the complex in rabbits and mice was studied.It was found that the quantity of TTHMP and pH value of the prepararion solution had vital effects on the labeling yield of 117m Sn(IV)-TTHMP.It was also found that 117m Sn(IV)-TTHMP was hydrophilic and stable at room temperature and 37℃ in open air 117m Sn(IV)-TTHMP showed unexpectedly high bone uptake and bone-to-blood ratio in the animals.This made it potentially useful as an reagent for skeletal scintigraphy and radiotherapy of bone tumors.

  12. Human Placenta-Derived Multipotent Cells (hPDMCs) Modulate Cardiac Injury: From Bench to Small and Large Animal Myocardial Ischemia Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuan-Hung; Peng, Kai-Yen; Chiu, Yu-Wei; Ho, Yi-Lwun; Wang, Yao-Horng; Shun, Chia-Tung; Huang, Shih-Yun; Lin, Yi-Shuan; de Vries, Antoine A F; Pijnappels, Daniël A; Lee, Nan-Ting; Yen, B Linju; Yen, Men-Luh

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death globally, and stem cell therapy remains one of the most promising strategies for regeneration or repair of the damaged heart. We report that human placenta-derived multipotent cells (hPDMCs) can modulate cardiac injury in small and large animal models of myocardial ischemia (MI) and elucidate the mechanisms involved. We found that hPDMCs can undergo in vitro cardiomyogenic differentiation when cocultured with mouse neonatal cardiomyocytes. Moreover, hPDMCs exert strong proangiogenic responses in vitro toward human endothelial cells mediated by secretion of hepatocyte growth factor, growth-regulated oncogene-α, and interleukin-8. To test the in vivo relevance of these results, small and large animal models of acute MI were induced in mice and minipigs, respectively, by permanent left anterior descending (LAD) artery ligation, followed by hPDMC or culture medium-only implantation with follow-up for up to 8 weeks. Transplantation of hPDMCs into mouse heart post-acute MI induction improved left ventricular function, with significantly enhanced vascularity in the cell-treated group. Furthermore, in minipigs post-acute MI induction, hPDMC transplantation significantly improved myocardial contractility compared to the control group (p = 0.016) at 8 weeks postinjury. In addition, tissue analysis confirmed that hPDMC transplantation induced increased vascularity, cardiomyogenic differentiation, and antiapoptotic effects. Our findings offer evidence that hPDMCs can modulate cardiac injury in both small and large animal models, possibly through proangiogenesis, cardiomyogenesis, and suppression of cardiomyocyte apoptosis. Our study offers mechanistic insights and preclinical evidence on using hPDMCs as a therapeutic strategy to treat severe cardiovascular diseases.

  13. Dosimetry Formalism and Implementation of a Homogenous Irradiation Protocol to Improve the Accuracy of Small Animal Whole-Body Irradiation Using a 137Cs Irradiator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodin, N Patrik; Chen, Yong; Yaparpalvi, Ravindra; Guha, Chandan; Tomé, Wolfgang A

    2016-02-01

    Shielded Cs irradiators are routinely used in pre-clinical radiation research to perform in vitro or in vivo investigations. Without appropriate dosimetry and irradiation protocols in place, there can be large uncertainty in the delivered dose of radiation between irradiated subjects that could lead to inaccurate and possibly misleading results. Here, a dosimetric evaluation of the JL Shepard Mark I-68A Cs irradiator and an irradiation technique for whole-body irradiation of small animals that allows one to limit the between subject variation in delivered dose to ±3% are provided. Mathematical simulation techniques and Gafchromic EBT film were used to describe the region within the irradiation cavity with homogeneous dose distribution (100% ± 5%), the dosimetric impact of varying source-to-subject distance, and the variation in attenuation thickness due to turntable rotation. Furthermore, an irradiation protocol and dosimetry formalism that allows calculation of irradiation time for whole-body irradiation of small animals is proposed that is designed to ensure a more consistent dose delivery between irradiated subjects. To compare this protocol with the conventional irradiation protocol suggested by the vendor, high-resolution film dosimetry measurements evaluating the dose difference between irradiation subjects and the dose distribution throughout subjects was performed using phantoms resembling small animals. Based on these results, there can be considerable variation in the delivered dose of > ± 5% using the conventional irradiation protocol for whole-body irradiation doses below 5 Gy. Using the proposed irradiation protocol this variability can be reduced to within ±3% and the dosimetry formalism allows for more accurate calculation of the irradiation time in relation to the intended prescription dose.

  14. Tapping the Vast Potential of the Data Deluge in Small-scale Food-Animal Production Businesses: Challenges to Near Real-time Data Analysis and Interpretation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vial, Flavie; Tedder, Andrew

    2017-01-01

    Food-animal production businesses are part of a data-driven ecosystem shaped by stringent requirements for traceability along the value chain and the expanding capabilities of connected products. Within this sector, the generation of animal health intelligence, in particular, in terms of antimicrobial usage, is hindered by the lack of a centralized framework for data storage and usage. In this Perspective, we delimit the 11 processes required for evidence-based decisions and explore processes 3 (digital data acquisition) to 10 (communication to decision-makers) in more depth. We argue that small agribusinesses disproportionally face challenges related to economies of scale given the high price of equipment and services. There are two main areas of concern regarding the collection and usage of digital farm data. First, recording platforms must be developed with the needs and constraints of small businesses in mind and move away from local data storage, which hinders data accessibility and interoperability. Second, such data are unstructured and exhibit properties that can prove challenging to its near real-time preprocessing and analysis in a sector that is largely lagging behind others in terms of computing infrastructure and buying into digital technologies. To complete the digital transformation of this sector, investment in rural digital infrastructure is required alongside the development of new business models to empower small businesses to commit to near real-time data capture. This approach will deliver critical information to fill gaps in our understanding of emerging diseases and antimicrobial resistance in production animals, eventually leading to effective evidence-based policies.

  15. Quantitation of dopamine transporter blockade by methylphenidate: first in vivo investigation using [{sup 123}I]FP-CIT and a dedicated small animal SPECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikolaus, Susanne; Wirrwar, Andreas; Antke, Christina; Arkian, Shahram; Mueller, Hans-Wilhelm; Larisch, Rolf [Heinrich-Heine University, Clinic of Nuclear Medicine, Duesseldorf (Germany); Schramm, Nils [Research Center Juelich, Central Laboratory for Electronics, Juelich (Germany)

    2005-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the feasibility of assessing dopamine transporter binding after treatment with methylphenidate in the rat using a recently developed high-resolution small animal single-photon emission computed tomograph (TierSPECT) and [{sup 123}I]FP-CIT. [{sup 123}I]FP-CIT was administered intravenously 1 h after intraperitoneal injection of methylphenidate (10 mg/kg) or vehicle. Animals underwent scanning 2 h after radioligand administration. The striatum was identified by superimposition of [{sup 123}I]FP-CIT scans with bone metabolism and perfusion scans obtained with {sup 99m}Tc-DPD and {sup 99m}Tc-tetrofosmin, respectively. As these tracers do not pass the blood-brain barrier, their distribution permits the identification of extracerebral anatomical landmarks such as the orbitae and the harderian glands. The cerebellum was identified by superimposing [{sup 123}I]FP-CIT scans with images of brain perfusion obtained with {sup 99m}Tc-HMPAO. Methylphenidate-treated animals and vehicle-treated animals yielded striatal equilibrium ratios (V''{sub 3}) of 0.24{+-}0.26 (mean {+-} SD) and 1.09{+-}0.42, respectively (ttest, two-tailed, p<0.0001). Cortical V''{sub 3} values amounted to 0.05{+-}0.28 (methylphenidate) and 0.3{+-}0.39 (saline, p=0.176). This first in vivo study of rat dopamine transporter binding after pre-treatment with methylphenidate showed a mean reduction of 78% in striatal [{sup 123}I]FP-CIT accumulation. The results can be interpreted in terms of a pharmacological blockade in the rat striatum and show that in vivo quantitation of dopamine transporter binding is feasible with [{sup 123}I]FP-CIT and the TierSPECT. This may be of future relevance for in vivo investigations on rat models of attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder. Furthermore, our findings suggest that investigations in other animal models, e.g. of Parkinson's and Huntington's disease, may be feasible using SPECT radioligands and

  16. SU-E-T-296: Dosimetric Analysis of Small Animal Image-Guided Irradiator Using High Resolution Optical CT Imaging of 3D Dosimeters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Na, Y; Qian, X; Wuu, C [Columbia University, New York, NY (United States); Adamovics, J [John Adamovics, Skillman, NJ (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To verify the dosimetric characteristics of a small animal image-guided irradiator using a high-resolution of optical CT imaging of 3D dosimeters. Methods: PRESAEGE 3D dosimeters were used to determine dosimetric characteristics of a small animal image-guided irradiator and compared with EBT2 films. Cylindrical PRESAGE dosimeters with 7cm height and 6cm diameter were placed along the central axis of the beam. The films were positioned between 6×6cm{sup 2} cubed plastic water phantoms perpendicular to the beam direction with multiple depths. PRESAGE dosimeters and EBT2 films were then irradiated with the irradiator beams at 220kVp and 13mA. Each of irradiated PRESAGE dosimeters named PA1, PA2, PB1, and PB2, was independently scanned using a high-resolution single laser beam optical CT scanner. The transverse images were reconstructed with a 0.1mm high-resolution pixel. A commercial Epson Expression 10000XL flatbed scanner was used for readout of irradiated EBT2 films at a 0.4mm pixel resolution. PDD curves and beam profiles were measured for the irradiated PRESAGE dosimeters and EBT2 films. Results: The PDD agreements between the irradiated PRESAGE dosimeter PA1, PA2, PB1, PB2 and the EB2 films were 1.7, 2.3, 1.9, and 1.9% for the multiple depths at 1, 5, 10, 15, 20, 30, 40 and 50mm, respectively. The FWHM measurements for each PRESAEGE dosimeter and film agreed with 0.5, 1.1, 0.4, and 1.7%, respectively, at 30mm depth. Both PDD and FWHM measurements for the PRESAGE dosimeters and the films agreed overall within 2%. The 20%–80% penumbral widths of each PRESAGE dosimeter and the film at a given depth were respectively found to be 0.97, 0.91, 0.79, 0.88, and 0.37mm. Conclusion: Dosimetric characteristics of a small animal image-guided irradiator have been demonstrated with the measurements of PRESAGE dosimeter and EB2 film. With the high resolution and accuracy obtained from this 3D dosimetry system, precise targeting small animal irradiation can be

  17. Methods for study of cardiovascular adaptation of small laboratory animals during exposure to altered gravity. [hypothermia for cardiovascular control and cancer therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popovic, V.

    1973-01-01

    Several new techniques are reported for studying cardiovascular circulation in small laboratory animals kept in metabolic chambers. Chronical cannulation, miniaturized membrane type heart-lung machines, a prototype walking chamber, and a fluorocarbon immersion method to simulate weightlessness are outlined. Differential hypothermia work on rat cancers provides localized embedding of radionuclides and other chemotherapeutical agents in tumors and increases at the same time blood circulation through the warmed tumor as compared to the rest of the cold body. Some successful clinical applications of combined chemotherapy and differential hypothermia in skin cancer, mammary tumors, and brain gliomas are described.

  18. Wild Animals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宁静

    2005-01-01

    Many of us think that all wild animals are dangerous. In fact, very few of them will eat a man if he leaves them alone. If you meet a tiger, I'm sure you will run away, but even a tiger doesn't like meeting a man if it isn't hungry. Tigers only kill and eat man when they are too old to catch their food, such as sheep and other small animals. Some animals get frightened when they only smell a man. Some of themst and and look at a man for a short time before they run away.

  19. In Vivo Monitoring of the Antiangiogenic Effect of Neurotensin Receptor-Mediated Radiotherapy by Small-Animal Positron Emission Tomography: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Maschauer

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The neurotensin receptor (NTS1 has emerged as an interesting target for molecular imaging and radiotherapy of NTS-positive tumors due to the overexpression in a range of tumors. The aim of this study was to develop a 177Lu-labeled NTS1 radioligand, its application for radiotherapy in a preclinical model and the imaging of therapy success by small-animal positron emission tomography (µPET using [68Ga]DOTA-RGD as a specific tracer for imaging angiogenesis. The 177Lu-labeled peptide was subjected to studies on HT29-tumor-bearing nude mice in vivo, defining four groups of animals (single dose, two fractionated doses, four fractionated doses and sham-treated animals. Body weight and tumor diameters were determined three times per week. Up to day 28 after treatment, µPET studies were performed with [68Ga]DOTA-RGD. At days 7–10 after treatment with four fractionated doses of 11–14 MBq (each at days 0, 3, 6 and 10, the tumor growth was slightly decreased in comparison with untreated animals. Using a single high dose of 51 MBq, a significantly decreased tumor diameter of about 50% was observed with the beginning of treatment. Our preliminary PET imaging data suggested decreased tumor uptake values of [68Ga]DOTA-RGD in treated animals compared to controls at day 7 after treatment. This pilot study suggests that early PET imaging with [68Ga]DOTA-RGD in radiotherapy studies to monitor integrin expression could be a promising tool to predict therapy success in vivo. Further successive PET experiments are needed to confirm the significance and predictive value of RGD-PET for NTS-mediated radiotherapy.

  20. Ultrasound criteria and guided fine-needle aspiration diagnostic yields in small animal peritoneal, mesenteric and omental disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feeney, Daniel A; Ober, Christopher P; Snyder, Laura A; Hill, Sara A; Jessen, Carl R

    2013-01-01

    Peritoneal, mesenteric, and omental diseases are important causes of morbidity and mortality in humans and animals, although information in the veterinary literature is limited. The purposes of this retrospective study were to determine whether objectively applied ultrasound interpretive criteria are statistically useful in differentiating among cytologically defined normal, inflammatory, and neoplastic peritoneal conditions in dogs and cats. A second goal was to determine the cytologically interpretable yield on ultrasound-guided, fine-needle sampling of peritoneal, mesenteric, or omental structures. Sonographic criteria agreed upon by the authors were retrospectively and independently applied by two radiologists to the available ultrasound images without knowledge of the cytologic diagnosis and statistically compared to the ultrasound-guided, fine-needle aspiration cytologic interpretations. A total of 72 dogs and 49 cats with abdominal peritoneal, mesenteric, or omental (peritoneal) surface or effusive disease and 17 dogs and 3 cats with no cytologic evidence of inflammation or neoplasia were included. The optimized, ultrasound criteria-based statistical model created independently for each radiologist yielded an equation-based diagnostic category placement accuracy of 63.2-69.9% across the two involved radiologists. Regional organ-associated masses or nodules as well as aggregated bowel and peritoneal thickening were more associated with peritoneal neoplasia whereas localized, severely complex fluid collections were more associated with inflammatory peritoneal disease. The cytologically interpretable yield for ultrasound-guided fine-needle sampling was 72.3% with no difference between species, making this a worthwhile clinical procedure.

  1. Tumor implantation model for rapid testing of lymphatic dye uptake from paw to node in small animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    DSouza, Alisha V.; Elliott, Jonathan T.; Gunn, Jason R.; Barth, Richard J.; Samkoe, Kimberley S.; Tichauer, Kenneth M.; Pogue, Brian W.

    2015-03-01

    Morbidity and complexity involved in lymph node staging via surgical resection and biopsy calls for staging techniques that are less invasive. While visible blue dyes are commonly used in locating sentinel lymph nodes, since they follow tumor-draining lymphatic vessels, they do not provide a metric to evaluate presence of cancer. An area of active research is to use fluorescent dyes to assess tumor burden of sentinel and secondary lymph nodes. The goal of this work was to successfully deploy and test an intra-nodal cancer-cell injection model to enable planar fluorescence imaging of a clinically relevant blue dye, specifically methylene blue - used in the sentinel lymph node procedure - in normal and tumor-bearing animals, and subsequently segregate tumor-bearing from normal lymph nodes. This direct-injection based tumor model was employed in athymic rats (6 normal, 4 controls, 6 cancer-bearing), where luciferase-expressing breast cancer cells were injected into axillary lymph nodes. Tumor presence in nodes was confirmed by bioluminescence imaging before and after fluorescence imaging. Lymphatic uptake from the injection site (intradermal on forepaw) to lymph node was imaged at approximately 2 frames/minute. Large variability was observed within each cohort.

  2. Effects of casoxin 4 on morphine inhibition of small animal intestinal contractility and gut transit in the mouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glen S Patten

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Glen S Patten1,2, Richard J Head1, Mahinda Y Abeywardena1,21CSIRO Preventative Health National Research Flagship, Adelaide, Australia; 2CSIRO Food and Nutritional Sciences, Adelaide, AustraliaBackground and aims: Chronic opioid analgesia has the debilitating side-effect of constipation in human patients. The major aims of this study were to: 1 characterize the opioid-specific antagonism of morphine-induced inhibition of electrically driven contraction of the small intestine of mice, rats, and guinea pigs; and 2 test if the oral delivery of small milk-derived opioid antagonist peptides could block morphine-induced inhibition of intestinal transit in mice.Methods: Mouse, rat, and guinea pig intact ileal sections were electrically stimulated to contract and inhibited with morphine in vitro. Morphine inhibition was then blocked by opioid subtype antagonists in the mouse and guinea pig. Using a polymeric dye, Poly R-478, the opioid antagonists casoxin 4 and lactoferroxin A were tested orally for blocking activity of morphine inhibition of gut transit in vivo by single or double gavage techniques.Results: The guinea pig tissue was more sensitive to morphine inhibition compared with the mouse or the rat (IC50 [half maximal inhibitory concentration] values as nmol/L ± SEM were 34 ± 3, 230 ± 13, and 310 ± 14 respectively (P < 0.01. The inhibitory influence of opioid agonists (IC50 in electrically driven ileal mouse preparations were DADLE ([D-Ala2, D-Leu5]-enkephalin ≥ met-enkephalin ≥ dynorphin A ≥ DAMGO ([D-Ala2, N-Me-Phe4, Gly-ol5]-enkephalin > morphine > morphiceptin as nmol/L 13.9, 17.3, 19.5, 23.3, 230, and 403 respectively. The mouse demonstrated predominantly Κ- and δ-opioid receptor activity with a smaller µ-opioid receptor component. Both mouse and guinea pig tissue were sensitive to casoxin 4 antagonism of morphine inhibition of contraction. In contrast to naloxone, relatively high oral doses of the µ-opioid receptor antagonists

  3. Development and Operation of a High Resolution Positron Emission Tomography System to Perform Metabolic Studies on Small Animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogan, Matthew John

    A positron emission tomography system designed to perform high resolution imaging of small volumes has been characterized. Two large area planar detectors, used to detect the annihilation gamma rays, formed a large aperture stationary positron camera. The detectors were multiwire proportional chambers coupled to high density lead stack converters. Detector efficiency was 8%. The coincidence resolving time was 500 nsec. The maximum system sensitivity was 60 cps/(mu)Ci for a solid angle of acceptance of 0.74(pi) St. The maximum useful coincidence count rate was 1500 cps and was limited by electronic dead time. Image reconstruction was done by performing a 3-dimensional deconvolution using Fourier transform methods. Noise propagation during reconstruction was minimized by choosing a 'minimum norm' reconstructed image. In the stationary detector system (with a limited angle of acceptance for coincident events) statistical uncertainty in the data limited reconstruction in the direction normal to the detector surfaces. Data from a rotated phantom showed that detector rotation will correct this problem. Resolution was 4 mm in planes parallel to the detectors and (TURN)15 mm in the normal direction. Compton scattering of gamma rays within a source distribution was investigated using both simulated and measured data. Attenuation due to scatter was as high as 60%. For small volume imaging the Compton background was identified and an approximate correction was performed. A semiquantitative blood flow measurement to bone in the leg of a cat using the ('18)F('-) ion was performed. The results were comparable to investigations using more conventional techniques. Qualitative scans using ('18)F labelled deoxy -D-glucose to assess brain glucose metabolism in a rhesus monkey were also performed.

  4. MR-compatibility of a high-resolution small animal PET insert operating inside a 7 T MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiessen, J. D.; Shams, E.; Stortz, G.; Schellenberg, G.; Bishop, D.; Khan, M. S.; Kozlowski, P.; Retière, F.; Sossi, V.; Thompson, C. J.; Goertzen, A. L.

    2016-11-01

    A full-ring PET insert consisting of 16 PET detector modules was designed and constructed to fit within the 114 mm diameter gradient bore of a Bruker 7 T MRI. The individual detector modules contain two silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) arrays, dual-layer offset LYSO crystal arrays, and high-definition multimedia interface (HDMI) cables for both signal and power transmission. Several different RF shielding configurations were assessed prior to construction of a fully assembled PET insert using a combination of carbon fibre and copper foil for RF shielding. MR-compatibility measurements included field mapping of the static magnetic field (B 0) and the time-varying excitation field (B 1) as well as acquisitions with multiple pulse sequences: spin echo (SE), rapid imaging with refocused echoes (RARE), fast low angle shot (FLASH) gradient echo, and echo planar imaging (EPI). B 0 field maps revealed a small degradation in the mean homogeneity (+0.1 ppm) when the PET insert was installed and operating. No significant change was observed in the B 1 field maps or the image homogeneity of various MR images, with a 9% decrease in the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) observed only in EPI images acquired with the PET insert installed and operating. PET detector flood histograms, photopeak amplitudes, and energy resolutions were unchanged in individual PET detector modules when acquired during MRI operation. There was a small baseline shift on the PET detector signals due to the switching amplifiers used to power MRI gradient pulses. This baseline shift was observable when measured with an oscilloscope and varied as a function of the gradient duty cycle, but had no noticeable effect on the performance of the PET detector modules. Compact front-end electronics and effective RF shielding led to minimal cross-interference between the PET and MRI systems. Both PET detector and MRI performance was excellent, whether operating as a standalone system or a hybrid PET/MRI.

  5. Preclinical Testing of Antihuman CD28 Fab' Antibody in a Novel Nonhuman Primate Small Animal Rodent Model of Xenogenic Graft-Versus-Host Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hippen, Keli L; Watkins, Benjamin; Tkachev, Victor; Lemire, Amanda M; Lehnen, Charles; Riddle, Megan J; Singh, Karnail; Panoskaltsis-Mortari, Angela; Vanhove, Bernard; Tolar, Jakub; Kean, Leslie S; Blazar, Bruce R

    2016-12-01

    Graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is a severe complication of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Current therapies to prevent alloreactive T cell activation largely cause generalized immunosuppression and may result in adverse drug, antileukemia and antipathogen responses. Recently, several immunomodulatory therapeutics have been developed that show efficacy in maintaining antileukemia responses while inhibiting GVHD in murine models. To analyze efficacy and better understand immunological tolerance, escape mechanisms, and side effects of clinical reagents, testing of species cross-reactive human agents in large animal GVHD models is critical. We have previously developed and refined a nonhuman primate (NHP) large animal GVHD model. However, this model is not readily amenable to semi-high throughput screening of candidate clinical reagents. Here, we report a novel, optimized NHP xenogeneic GVHD (xeno-GVHD) small animal model that recapitulates many aspects of NHP and human GVHD. This model was validated using a clinically available blocking, monovalent anti-CD28 antibody (FR104) whose effects in a human xeno-GVHD rodent model are known. Because human-reactive reagents may not be fully cross-reactive or effective in vivo on NHP immune cells, this NHP xeno-GVHD model provides immunological insights and direct testing on NHP-induced GVHD before committing to the intensive NHP studies that are being increasingly used for detailed evaluation of new immune therapeutic strategies before human trials.

  6. A Model for Precise and Uniform Pelvic- and Limb-Sparing Abdominal Irradiation to Study the Radiation-Induced Gastrointestinal Syndrome in Mice Using Small Animal Irradiation Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodin, N. Patrik; Velcich, Anna; Guha, Chandan

    2017-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Currently, no readily available mitigators exist for acute abdominal radiation injury. Here, we present an animal model for precise and homogenous limb-sparing abdominal irradiation (LSAIR) to study the radiation-induced gastrointestinal syndrome (RIGS). Materials and Methods: The LSAIR technique was developed using the small animal radiation research platform (SARRP) with image guidance capabilities. We delivered LSAIR at doses between 14 and 18 Gy on 8- to 10-week-old male C57BL/6 mice. Histological analysis was performed to confirm that the observed mortality was due to acute abdominal radiation injury. Results: A steep dose–response relationship was found for survival, with no deaths seen at doses below 16 Gy and 100% mortality at above 17 Gy. All deaths occurred between 6 and 10 days after irradiation, consistent with the onset of RIGS. This was further confirmed by histological analysis showing clear differences in the number of regenerative intestinal crypts between animals receiving sublethal (14 Gy) and 100% lethal (18 Gy) radiation. Conclusion: The developed LSAIR technique provides uniform dose delivery with a clear dose response, consistent with acute abdominal radiation injury on histological examination. This model can provide a useful tool for researchers investigating the development of mitigators for accidental or clinical high-dose abdominal irradiation. PMID:28203121

  7. Small-animal PET imaging of the type 1 and type 2 cannabinoid receptors in a photothrombotic stroke model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vandeputte, Caroline; Casteels, Cindy; Koole, Michel; Gerits, Anneleen [KU Leuven, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Leuven (Belgium); KU Leuven, Molecular Small Animal Imaging Center, MoSAIC, Leuven (Belgium); Struys, Tom [Hasselt University, Laboratory of Histology, Biomedical Research Institute, Hasselt (Belgium); KU Leuven, Biomedical NMR Unit, Leuven (Belgium); Veghel, Daisy van; Evens, Nele; Bormans, Guy [KU Leuven, Molecular Small Animal Imaging Center, MoSAIC, Leuven (Belgium); KU Leuven, Laboratory of Radiopharmacy, Leuven (Belgium); Dresselaers, Tom; Himmelreich, Uwe [KU Leuven, Molecular Small Animal Imaging Center, MoSAIC, Leuven (Belgium); KU Leuven, Biomedical NMR Unit, Leuven (Belgium); Lambrichts, Ivo [Hasselt University, Laboratory of Histology, Biomedical Research Institute, Hasselt (Belgium); Laere, Koen van [KU Leuven, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Leuven (Belgium); KU Leuven, Molecular Small Animal Imaging Center, MoSAIC, Leuven (Belgium); UZ Leuven, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Leuven (Belgium)

    2012-11-15

    Recent ex vivo and pharmacological evidence suggests involvement of the endocannabinoid system in the pathophysiology of stroke, but conflicting roles for type 1 and 2 cannabinoid receptors (CB{sub 1} and CB{sub 2}) have been suggested. The purpose of this study was to evaluate CB{sub 1} and CB{sub 2} receptor binding over time in vivo in a rat photothrombotic stroke model using PET. CB{sub 1} and CB{sub 2} microPET imaging was performed at regular time-points up to 2 weeks after stroke using [{sup 18}F]MK-9470 and [{sup 11}C]NE40. Stroke size was measured using MRI at 9.4 T. Ex vivo validation was performed via immunostaining for CB{sub 1} and CB{sub 2}. Immunofluorescent double stainings were also performed with markers for astrocytes (GFAP) and macrophages/microglia (CD68). [{sup 18}F]MK-9470 PET showed a strong increase in CB{sub 1} binding 24 h and 72 h after stroke in the cortex surrounding the lesion, extending to the insular cortex 24 h after surgery. These alterations were consistently confirmed by CB{sub 1} immunohistochemical staining. [{sup 11}C]NE40 did not show any significant differences between stroke and sham-operated animals, although staining for CB{sub 2} revealed minor immunoreactivity at 1 and 2 weeks after stroke in this model. Both CB{sub 1} {sup +} and CB{sub 2} {sup +} cells showed minor immunoreactivity for CD68. Time-dependent and regionally strongly increased CB{sub 1}, but not CB{sub 2}, binding are early consequences of photothrombotic stroke. Pharmacological interventions should primarily aim at CB{sub 1} signalling as the role of CB{sub 2} seems minor in the acute and subacute phases of stroke. (orig.)

  8. The emerging role of veterinary orthotics and prosthetics (V-OP) in small animal rehabilitation and pain management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mich, Patrice M

    2014-03-01

    In veterinary school, we learn much about how to repair bone fractures, ligament injuries, and neuropathies. The idea, of course, is to return some level of function to a damaged appendage and decrease pain. When a limb cannot be salvaged for medical or financial reasons, we are taught that dogs and cats do "great" on 3 legs. Three legs may mean a less functional limb or outright total amputation. We espouse this doctrine to our clients. Indeed, most of us have countless stories of triped patients acclimating to their disability with aplomb. Although it is true that many patients adapt, learning to ambulate and negotiate their environment, this is functional adaptation-not necessarily the highest quality of life. As a profession, we have come to expect-even accept-that limited mobility, limb breakdown, and chronic neck or back pain are unavoidable consequences. The short- and long-term consequences of limb loss or altered limb function are not benign as once thought. Furthermore, the quality of care demanded by clients is rising and the breadth of knowledge afforded by technology and global communication spawns innovative therapies readily accessible to the computer-savvy pet owner. Recent examples of therapeutic innovations include the following: dentistry, acupuncture, chiropractic, and rehabilitation. Often there is no precedent for these new therapies in animals, and the onus rests with the veterinary community to educate itself to provide best care for patients and clients and to establish evidence-informed best practice. The newest emerging therapeutic modality is veterinary orthotics and prosthetics. Like the previously mentioned modalities, the origin lies in human health care and subsequently leaps to veterinary health care.

  9. Development and applications of TOHR, an original emission tomography system, adapted to small animals; Developpement et applications de TOHR, un systeme original de tomographie d`emission, adapte au petit animal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ploux, Lydie [Inst. de Physique Nucleaire, Paris-11 Univ., 91 - Orsay (France)

    1997-12-11

    For many neuro-biological studies, it is necessary to link microscopic aspects of the brain`s organization with integrated brain functions. Details of the former are obtained by in vitro and in situ molecular biology techniques, whereas the latter are acquired through behavioural studies. In vivo radio-imaging methods, like emission tomography are the ideal tools to investigate the links between these two levels of brain organization. The work which is presented here focuses on a new approach of emission tomography adapted to small animal studies: TOHR (French, acronym for TOmographe Haute Resolution). The principle is based on the use of a large solid angle, high resolution and high efficiency focusing collimator. High resolution and high signal to noise ratio are improved by using nuclides having a two-photon decay with small angular correlation ({sup 125}I, {sup 123}I, {sup 111}In,...). The image is built step-by-step, by moving the animal relative to the collimator focal point. First, numerical simulation showed the possibility of reaching sub-millimetric resolutions; these results led to the collimator geometry (at present 10 over the 20 faces of an icosahedron, 15 faces in the future). Then, a prototype of TOHR has been built and characterized. Its performance is very close to the numerical prediction: spatial resolution of 1.4 mm and detection efficiency 0.64%. Finally, experiments on a rat thyroid allowed the preparation and realization of the first experiments on a rat striatum. The good quality of these images shows that it is now possible to evaluate TOHR capabilities on a dopaminergic neuron degeneration model in rats in the field of neuro-degenerative disease studies. (author) 51 refs., 76 figs., 28 tabs.

  10. Viremia and antibody response of small African and laboratory animals to Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepherd, A J; Leman, P A; Swanepoel, R

    1989-05-01

    Eleven species of small African wild mammals, laboratory rabbits, guinea pigs, and Syrian hamsters were infected with Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF) virus. Low-titered viremia followed by development of antibody was observed in scrub hares (Lepus saxatilis), Cape ground squirrels (Xerus inauris), red veld rats (Aethomys chrysophilus), white tailed rats (Mystromys albicaudatus), bushveld gerbils (Tatera leucogaster), striped mice (Rhabdomys pumilio), and guinea pigs. The maximum viremic titer in 4 scrub hares was 10(1.7-4.2) 50% mouse lethal doses/ml. Viremia was detected in 1/17 infected laboratory rabbits. Antibody response was only detected in South African hedgehogs (Atelerix frontalis), highveld gerbils (T. brantsii), Namaqua gerbils (Desmodillus auricularis), 2 species of multimammate mouse (Mastomys natalensis and M. coucha), and Syrian hamsters. The results of the study indicate that a proportion of infected scrub hares develop CCHF viremia of an intensity shown in the Soviet Union to be sufficient for infection of feeding immature ixodid ticks, but that South African hedgehogs and wild rodents are unlikely to be of importance as maintenance hosts of the virus in southern Africa.

  11. WE-EF-BRA-01: A Dual-Use Optical Tomography System for Small Animal Radiation Research Platform (SARRP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, K; Bin, Z; Wong, J [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, MD (United States); He, X; Iordachita, I [Laboratory for Computational Sensing and Robotics, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: We develop a novel dual-use configuration for a tri-modality, CBCT/bioluminescence tomography(BLT)/fluorescence tomography(FT), imaging system with the SARRP that can function as a standalone system for longitudinal imaging research and on-board the SARRP to guide irradiation. BLT provides radiation guidance for soft tissue target, while FT offers functional information allowing mechanistic investigations. Methods: The optical assembly includes CCD camera, lens, filter wheel, 3-way mirrors, scanning fiber system and light-tight enclosure. The rotating mirror system directs the optical signal from the animal surface to the camera at multiple projection over 180 degree. The fiber-laser system serves as the external light source for the FT application. Multiple filters are used for multispectral imaging to enhance localization accuracy using BLT. SARRP CBCT provides anatomical information and geometric mesh for BLT/FT reconstruction. To facilitate dual use, the 3-way mirror system is cantilevered in front of the camera. The entire optical assembly is driven by a 1D linear stage to dock onto an independent mouse support bed for standalone application. After completion of on-board optical imaging, the system is retracted from the SARRP to allow irradiation of the mouse. Results: A tissue-simulating phantom and a mouse model with a luminescence light source are used to demonstrate the function of the dual-use optical system. Feasibility data have been obtained based on a manual-docking prototype. The center of mass of light source determined in living mouse with on-board BLT is within 1±0.2mm of that with CBCT. The performance of the motorized system is expected to be the same and will be presented. Conclusion: We anticipate the motorized dual use system provide significant efficiency gain over our manual docking and off-line system. By also supporting off-line longitudinal studies independent of the SARRP, the dual-use system is a highly efficient and cost

  12. Marine animal sighting and census data from various small vessels as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 26 July 1982 to 24 August 1982 (NODC Accession 8300139)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine animal sighting and census data were collected from various small vessels from 26 July 1982 to 24 August 1982. Data were collected by the University of Alaska...

  13. Vacina antivariólica: seu primeiro século no Brasil (da vacina jenneriana à animal The small pox vaccine: its first century in Brazil (from the Jennerian to the animal vaccine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tania Fernandes

    1999-06-01

    Full Text Available Neste artigo abordamos aspectos da institucionalização da vacina antivariólica no Brasil, em cerca de um século. Apresentamos descobertas e discussões ocorridas em outros países, mostrando seus reflexos em nosso país desde a introdução da vacina humanizada até a chegada da vacina animal e a criação do Instituto Vacínico Municipal, por iniciativa particular do dr. Pedro Affonso Franco, o barão de Pedro Affonso. A introdução da vacina animal significou um avanço no controle da doença e impulsionou as discussões que redundaram no alinhamento de grupos médicos e políticos em torno de Oswaldo Cruz ou do barão de Pedro Affonso. Com a incorporação do Instituto Vacínico aos laboratórios de Manguinhos, terminou a polêmica que agitou os meios acadêmicos e políticos.Covering a period of roughly hundred years, the article looks at some of the more meaningful events during the period in which the small pox vaccine was institutionalized in Brazil. Discoveries and discussions then taking place in other countries are also examined, particularly as they influenced Brazil. The process is followed from introduction of the human vaccine to the arrival of the animal vaccine and creation of the Municipal Vaccine Institute - a private initiative by physician Pedro Affonso Franco, also known as the barão de Pedro Affonso. Adoption of the animal vaccine not only represented progress in controlling the disease but also spurred discussions that saw medical and political groups in Brazil taking sides with either Oswaldo Cruz or the barão de Pedro Affonso. The debate continued within the academic and political arenas until the Vaccine Institute was made part of the Manguinhos laboratories.

  14. Take Only Photographs, Leave Only Footprints: Novel Applications of Non-Invasive Survey Methods for Rapid Detection of Small, Arboreal Animals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheryl A Mills

    Full Text Available The development of appropriate wildlife survey techniques is essential to promote effective and efficient monitoring of species of conservation concern. Here, we demonstrate the utility of two rapid-assessment, non-invasive methods to detect the presence of elusive, small, arboreal animals. We use the hazel dormouse, Muscardinus avellanarius, a rodent of conservation concern, as our focal species. Prevailing hazel dormouse survey methods are prolonged (often taking months to years to detect dormice, dependent on season and habitat, and/or have low detection rates. Alternatives would be of great use to ecologists who undertake dormouse surveys, especially those assessing the need for mitigation measures, as legally required for building development projects. Camera traps and footprint tracking are well-established tools for monitoring elusive large terrestrial mammals, but are rarely used for small species such as rodents, or in arboreal habitats. In trials of these adapted methods, hazel dormice visited bait stations and were successfully detected by both camera traps and tracking equipment at each of two woodland study sites, within days to weeks of installation. Camera trap images and footprints were of adequate quality to allow discrimination between two sympatric small mammal species (hazel dormouse and wood mouse, Apodemus sylvaticus. We discuss the relative merits of these methods with respect to research aims, funds, time available and habitat.

  15. 小动物PET及PET-CT及其在分子影像学中的应用%Small animal PET and PET-CT its application in molecular imaging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李天然; 田嘉禾

    2008-01-01

    The review article introduce molecular imaging equipment small animal PET and PET-CT's philosophy and technique feature.small animal PET and PET-CT apply many new techniques and images resolution has obviously raising.as same time,small animal PET and small animal CT may come true image fusion.small animal PET and PET-CT permit us to engage molecular level imaging in vivo without invading.so small animal PET and PET-CT are good tool in medical molecular imaging.%阐述小动物PET及PET-CT技术特点及在分子影像学中的应用.小动物PET及PET-CT采用多项新技术,分辨率明显提高,结合小动物CT实现了图像融合.小动物PET及PET-CT实现了在活体上非侵人性分子水平显像,是研究分子影像的尖端设备.

  16. Optimization and evaluation of Flexicult(®) Vet for detection, identification and antimicrobial susceptibility testing of bacterial uropathogens in small animal veterinary practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guardabassi, Luca; Hedberg, Sandra; Jessen, Lisbeth Rem

    2015-01-01

    B (commercial name Flexicult(®) Vet) is a time- and cost-effective point-of-care test to guide antimicrobial choice and facilitate implementation of antimicrobial use guidelines for treatment of UTIs in small animals, provided that clinical staff is adequately trained to interpret the results......BACKGROUND: Urinary tract infection (UTI) is a common reason for antimicrobial prescription in dogs and cats. The objective of this study was to optimize and evaluate a culture-based point-of-care test for detection, identification and antimicrobial susceptibility testing of bacterial uro......-pathogens in veterinary practice. METHODS: Seventy-two urine samples from dogs and cats with suspected UTI presenting to seven veterinary facilities were used by clinical staff and an investigator to estimate sensitivity and specificity of Flexicult Vet A compared to laboratory reference standards for culture...

  17. Proposal for a Simple and Efficient Monthly Quality Management Program Assessing the Consistency of Robotic Image-Guided Small Animal Radiation Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodin, N Patrik; Guha, Chandan; Tomé, Wolfgang A

    2015-11-01

    Modern pre-clinical radiation therapy (RT) research requires high precision and accurate dosimetry to facilitate the translation of research findings into clinical practice. Several systems are available that provide precise delivery and on-board imaging capabilities, highlighting the need for a quality management program (QMP) to ensure consistent and accurate radiation dose delivery. An ongoing, simple, and efficient QMP for image-guided robotic small animal irradiators used in pre-clinical RT research is described. Protocols were developed and implemented to assess the dose output constancy (based on the AAPM TG-61 protocol), cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) image quality and object representation accuracy (using a custom-designed imaging phantom), CBCT-guided target localization accuracy and consistency of the CBCT-based dose calculation. To facilitate an efficient read-out and limit the user dependence of the QMP data analysis, a semi-automatic image analysis and data representation program was developed using the technical computing software MATLAB. The results of the first 6-mo experience using the suggested QMP for a Small Animal Radiation Research Platform (SARRP) are presented, with data collected on a bi-monthly basis. The dosimetric output constancy was established to be within ±1 %, the consistency of the image resolution was within ±0.2 mm, the accuracy of CBCT-guided target localization was within ±0.5 mm, and dose calculation consistency was within ±2 s (±3%) per treatment beam. Based on these results, this simple quality assurance program allows for the detection of inconsistencies in dosimetric or imaging parameters that are beyond the acceptable variability for a reliable and accurate pre-clinical RT system, on a monthly or bi-monthly basis.

  18. Development of a Compton suppression whole body counting for small animals; Desenvolvimento de um detetor de corpo inteiro com supressao Compton para pequenos animais

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martini, Elaine

    1995-12-31

    The basic operation, design and construction of the plastic scintillator detector is described. In order to increase the sensitivity of this detector, two blocks of plastic scintillator have been assembled to act as a anticompton system. The detectors were produced by polymerisation of styrene monomer with PPO (2,5 diphenyl-oxazole) and POPOP (1,4 bis (-5 phenyl-2- oxazoly)benzene) in proportions of 0.5 and 0.05 respectively. The transparency of this detector was evaluated by excitation of the {sup 241} Am source located directly in the back surface plastic coupled to a photomultiplier. The light attenuation according to the detector thickness has fitted to a two-exponential function: relative height pulse = 0,519 e{sup -0.0016} + 0.481 e{sup -0.02112.x}. Four radioactive sources{sup {sup 2}2} Na, {sup 54} Mn, {sup 137} Cs and {sup 131} I were used to evaluate the performance of this system. The Compton reduction factor, determined by the ratio of the energy peak values of suppressed and unsuppressed spectra was 1.16. The Compton suppression factor determined by the ratio of the net photopeak area to the area of an equal spectra width in the Compton continuum, was approximately 1.208 {+-} 0.109. The sensitivity of the system, defined as the least amount of a radioactivity that can be quantified in the photopeak region, was 9.44 cps. First, the detector was assembled to be applied in biological studies of whole body counter measurements of small animals. Using a phantom, (small animal simulator) and a punctual {sup 137} Cs source, located in the central region of the well counter the geometrical efficiency detector was about 5%. (author) 40 refs., 28 fifs., 2 tabs.

  19. Dynamic {sup 11}C-methionine PET analysis has an additional value for differentiating malignant tumors from granulomas: an experimental study using small animal PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Songji; Zhao, Yan [Hokkaido University, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, Sapporo (Japan); Hokkaido University, Department of Tracer Kinetics and Bioanalysis, Graduate School of Medicine, Sapporo (Japan); Kuge, Yuji; Hatano, Toshiyuki [Hokkaido University, Central Institute of Isotope Science, Sapporo (Japan); Yi, Min; Kohanawa, Masashi [Hokkaido University, Department of Advanced Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, Sapporo (Japan); Magota, Keiichi; Tamaki, Nagara [Hokkaido University, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, Sapporo (Japan); Nishijima, Ken-ichi [Hokkaido University, Department of Molecular Imaging, Graduate School of Medicine, Sapporo (Japan)

    2011-10-15

    We evaluated whether the dynamic profile of L-{sup 11}C-methionine ({sup 11}C-MET) may have an additional value in differentiating malignant tumors from granulomas in experimental rat models by small animal positron emission tomography (PET). Rhodococcus aurantiacus and allogenic rat C6 glioma cells were inoculated, respectively, into the right and left calf muscles to generate a rat model bearing both granulomas and tumors (n = 6). Ten days after the inoculations, dynamic {sup 11}C-MET PET was performed by small animal PET up to 120 min after injection of {sup 11}C-MET. The next day, after overnight fasting, the rats were injected with {sup 18}F-2-deoxy-2-fluoro-D-glucose ({sup 18}F-FDG), and dynamic {sup 18}F-FDG PET was performed up to 180 min. The time-activity curves, static images, and mean standardized uptake value (SUV) in the lesions were calculated. {sup 11}C-MET uptake in the granuloma showed a slow exponential clearance after an initial distribution, while the uptake in the tumor gradually increased with time. The dynamic pattern of {sup 11}C-MET uptake in the granuloma was significantly different from that in the tumor (p < 0.001). In the static analysis of {sup 11}C-MET, visual assessment and SUV analysis could not differentiate the tumor from the granuloma in all cases, although the mean SUV in the granuloma (1.48 {+-} 0.09) was significantly lower than that in the tumor (1.72 {+-} 0.18, p < 0.01). The dynamic patterns, static images, and mean SUVs of {sup 18}F-FDG in the granuloma were similar to those in the tumor (p = NS). Dynamic {sup 11}C-MET PET has an additional value for differentiating malignant tumors from granulomatous lesions, which deserves further elucidation in clinical settings. (orig.)

  20. High Dose MicroCT Does Not Contribute Toward Improved MicroPET/CT Image Quantitative Accuracy and Can Limit Longitudinal Scanning of Small Animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wendy A. McDougald

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Obtaining accurate quantitative measurements in preclinical Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography (PET/CT imaging is of paramount importance in biomedical research and helps supporting efficient translation of preclinical results to the clinic. The purpose of this study was two-fold: (1 to investigate the effects of different CT acquisition protocols on PET/CT image quality and data quantification; and (2 to evaluate the absorbed dose associated with varying CT parameters.Methods: An air/water quality control CT phantom, tissue equivalent material phantom, an in-house 3D printed phantom and an image quality PET/CT phantom were imaged using a Mediso nanoPET/CT scanner. Collected data was analyzed using PMOD software, VivoQuant software and National Electric Manufactures Association (NEMA software implemented by Mediso. Measured Hounsfield Unit (HU in collected CT images were compared to the known HU values and image noise was quantified. PET recovery coefficients (RC, uniformity and quantitative bias were also measured.Results: Only less than 2 and 1% of CT acquisition protocols yielded water HU values < −80 and air HU values < −840, respectively. Four out of 11 CT protocols resulted in more than 100 mGy absorbed dose. Different CT protocols did not impact PET uniformity and RC, and resulted in <4% overall bias relative to expected radioactive concentration.Conclusion: Preclinical CT protocols with increased exposure times can result in high absorbed doses to the small animals. These should be avoided, as they do not contributed toward improved microPET/CT image quantitative accuracy and could limit longitudinal scanning of small animals.

  1. Presence, distribution, and molecular epidemiology of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in a small animal teaching hospital: a year-long active surveillance targeting dogs and their environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Balen, Joany; Kelley, Christina; Nava-Hoet, Rocio C; Bateman, Shane; Hillier, Andrew; Dyce, Jonathan; Wittum, Thomas E; Hoet, Armando E

    2013-05-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is known to be present in small animal veterinary clinical environments. However, a better understanding of the ecology and dynamics of MRSA in these environments is necessary for the development of effective infectious disease prevention and control programs. To achieve this goal, a yearlong active MRSA surveillance program was established at The Ohio State University (OSU) Veterinary Medical Center to describe the spatial and molecular epidemiology of this bacterium in the small animal hospital. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing, staphylococcal chromosomal cassette mec (SCCmec) typing, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) typing, and dendrogram analysis were used to characterize and analyze the 81 environmental and 37 canine-origin MRSA isolates obtained during monthly sampling events. Overall, 13.5% of surfaces were contaminated with MRSA at 1 or more sampling times throughout the year. The majority of the environmental and canine isolates were SCCmec type II (93.8% and 86.5%, respectively) and USA100 (90.1% and 86.5%, respectively). By PFGE analysis, these isolates were found to be closely related, which reflects a low diversity of MRSA strains circulating in the hospital. For 5 consecutive months, 1 unique pulsotype was the most prevalent across the medical services and was recovered from a variety of surfaces and hospital locations. Carts/gurneys, doors, and examination tables/floors were the most frequently contaminated surfaces. Some surfaces maintained the same pulsotypes for 3 consecutive months. Molecular analysis found that incoming MRSA-positive dogs were capable of introducing a new pulsotype into the hospital environment during the surveillance period. Our results suggest that once a MRSA strain is introduced into the hospital environment, it can be maintained and spread for extended periods of time. These findings can aid in the development of biosecurity and biocontainment protocols aimed at

  2. Ultrahigh resolution and brilliance laser wakefield accelerator betatron x-ray source for rapid in vivo tomographic microvasculature imaging in small animal models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fourmaux, Sylvain; Kieffer, Jean-Claude; Krol, Andrzej

    2017-03-01

    We are developing ultrahigh spatial resolution (FWHM animal models using optimized contrast agent. It exploits Laser Wakefield Accelerator (LWFA) betatron x-ray emission phenomenon. Ultrashort high-intensity laser pulse interacting with a supersonic gas jet produces an ion cavity ("bubble") in the plasma in the wake of the laser pulse. Electrons that are injected into this bubble gain energy, perform wiggler-like oscillations and generate burst of incoherent x-rays with characteristic duration time comparable to the laser pulse duration, continuous synchrotron-like spectral distribution that might extend to hundreds keV, very high brilliance, very small focal spot and highly directional emission in the cone-beam geometry. Such LWFA betatron x-ray source created in our lab produced 1021 -1023 photonsṡ shot-1ṡmrad-2ṡmm-2/0.1%bw with mean critical energy in the12-30 keV range. X-ray source size for a single laser shot was FWHM=1.7 μm x-ray beam divergence 20-30 mrad, and effective focal spot size for multiple shots FWHM= 2 μm. Projection images of simple phantoms and complex biological objects including insects and mice were obtained in single laser shots. We conclude that ultrahigh spatial resolution μCTA (FWHM 2 μm) requiring thousands of projection images could be accomplished using LWFA betatron x-ray radiation in approximately 40 s with our existing 220 TW laser and sub seconds with next generation of ultrafast lasers and x-ray detectors, as opposed to several hours required using conventional microfocal x-ray tubes. Thus, sub second ultrahigh resolution in vivo microtomographic microvasculature imaging (in both absorption and phase contrast mode) in small animal models of cancer and vascular diseases will be feasible with LWFA betatron x-ray source.

  3. A multi-view time-domain non-contact diffuse optical tomography scanner with dual wavelength detection for intrinsic and fluorescence small animal imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapointe, Eric; Pichette, Julien; Bérubé-Lauzière, Yves

    2012-06-01

    We present a non-contact diffuse optical tomography (DOT) scanner with multi-view detection (over 360°) for localizing fluorescent markers in scattering and absorbing media, in particular small animals. It relies on time-domain detection after short pulse laser excitation. Ultrafast time-correlated single photon counting and photomultiplier tubes are used for time-domain measurements. For light collection, seven free-space optics non-contact dual wavelength detection channels comprising 14 detectors overall are placed around the subject, allowing the measurement of time point-spread functions at both excitation and fluorescence wavelengths. The scanner is endowed with a stereo camera pair for measuring the outer shape of the subject in 3D. Surface and DOT measurements are acquired simultaneously with the same laser beam. The hardware and software architecture of the scanner are discussed. Phantoms are used to validate the instrument. Results on the localization of fluorescent point-like inclusions immersed in a scattering and absorbing object are presented. The localization algorithm relies on distance ranging based on the measurement of early photons arrival times at different positions around the subject. This requires exquisite timing accuracy from the scanner. Further exploiting this capability, we show results on the effect of a scattering hetereogenity on the arrival time of early photons. These results demonstrate that our scanner provides all that is necessary for reconstructing images of small animals using full tomographic reconstruction algorithms, which will be the next step. Through its free-space optics design and the short pulse laser used, our scanner shows unprecedented timing resolution compared to other multi-view time-domain scanners.

  4. Vector-borne diseases of small companion animals in Namibia: Literature review, knowledge gaps and opportunity for a One Health approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruce H. Noden

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Namibia has a rich history in veterinary health but little is known about the vector-borne diseases that affect companion dogs and cats. The aim of this review is to summarise the existing published and available unpublished literature, put it into a wider geographical context, and explore some significant knowledge gaps. To date, only two filarial pathogens (Dirofilaria repens and Acanthocheilonema dracunculoides and three tick-borne pathogens (Babesia canis vogeli, Hepatozoon canis and Ehrlichia canis have been reported. Most studies have focused solely on dogs and cats in the urban Windhoek and surrounding areas, with almost nothing reported in rural farming areas, in either the populous northern regions or the low-income urban areas where animal owners have limited access to veterinary services. With the development of several biomedical training programmes in the country, there is now an excellent opportunity to address zoonotic vector-borne diseases through a One Health approach so as to assess the risks to small companion animals as well as diseases of public health importance.

  5. Oral inflammation in small animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lommer, Milinda J

    2013-05-01

    The oral cavity can be affected by a wide variety of disorders characterized by inflammation of the gingiva and/or oral mucosa. In dogs and cats, differential diagnoses for generalized oral inflammatory disorders include plaque-reactive mucositis, chronic gingivostomatitis, eosinophilic granuloma complex, pemphigus and pemphigoid disorders, erythema multiforme, and systemic lupus erythematosus. In addition, endodontic or periodontal abscesses, infectious conditions, reactive lesions, and neoplastic conditions may initially present with localized or generalized inflammation of the oral mucosa. Determination of the underlying cause of an oral inflammatory condition relies on a thorough history, complete physical and oral examination, and incisional biopsy and histopathologic examination of lesions.

  6. Comparison of a pixelated semiconductor detector and a non-pixelated scintillation detector in pinhole SPECT system for small animal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iida, Hirokazu; Ogawa, Koichi

    2011-02-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate a pixelated semiconductor detector and non-pixelated scintillation detector in a pinhole SPECT system for small animal imaging. We assumed two pixelated CdTe semiconductor detectors (a monolithic type and a modular type) and two non-pixelated NaI(Tl) scintillation detectors (a conventional type and a large detector field type). For the monolithic semiconductor detector we assumed that the size of a pixel was 1.0 × 1.0 mm², the thickness 1 mm, and an effective detector field 128 × 128 mm². For the modular-type semiconductor detector we assumed that the size of a pixel was 2.5 × 2.5 mm², the thickness 5 mm, and an effective detector field 320 × 320 mm². For the two scintillation detectors we assumed that the size of a pixel was 1.4 × 1.4 mm² and the intrinsic spatial resolution 4.0 mm FWHM, and the thickness 9 mm. For the conventional scintillation detector we assumed that the effective detector field was 179.2 × 179.2 mm², and for the large field scintillation detector 358.2 × 358.2 mm² and the magnification factor two. In the simulation we used a pinhole collimator with a pinhole size of 0.3 mm. We reconstructed SPECT images of hot-rod and cold-channel phantoms with projection data calculated with a Monte Carlo method assuming a fixed data acquisition time, and evaluated the image quality with respect to contrast and spatial resolution. In addition, we calculated the scatter fraction to compare the amount of scattered photons between the pixelated and non-pixelated detectors. The image quality of the modular-type pixelated detector was similar to that of the non-pixelated detector operated with a twofold magnified data acquisition. The scattered photons and the parallax effect in the pixelated detector were small and similar to those in the non-pixelated detector. The performance of a modular-type pixelated semiconductor detector was almost the same as that of a non-pixelated scintillation detector with a magnified

  7. Synthesis and small-animal PET image of 18F-Fallypride%18F-Fallypride的自动化合成与小动物PET显像

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨敏; 徐宇平; 潘栋辉; 王颂佩; 唐婕; 黄洪波; 罗世能

    2008-01-01

    目的 研究高效、简单的自动化合成多巴胺D2受体显像剂(S)-(-)-N-(1-烯丙基吡咯烷-2-氨基甲基)-5-(3-18F)-2,3-二甲氧基苯甲酰胺(18F-Fallypride)的方法,并用小动物PET观察其在小鼠活体内的生物分布.方法 采用国产氟标记多功能模块控制整个过程,18F-在乙腈溶液中与前体(s)-(-)-N-(1-烯丙基吡咯烷-2-氨基甲基)-5-(3-磺酰基)-2,3-二甲氧基苯甲酰胺(OTSF)直接反应生成18F-Fallypride,混合物装柱,产品被C18柱吸附,用水冲洗柱,用少量乙醇淋出,加生理盐水稀释.ICR小鼠给药后经小动物PET活体显像.结果 18F-Fallypride放化产率为40.7%(已校正),合成时间为40 min,无需高效液相色谱(HPLC)法分离,放化纯>95%.注射18F-Fallypride后ICR小鼠经小动物PET显像,脑内纹状体区域摄取最高,且双侧放射性浓聚对称,清除较慢.结论 18F-Fallypride自动化合成速度快,效率高.18F-Fallypride适于多巴胺D2受体显像.%Objective Benzamide,5-(3-fluoropropyl)-2,3-dimethoxy-N-[(2S)-1-(2-propenyl)-2-pyrrolidinyl]methyl(Fallypride)is a well-known dopamine D2 and D3 antagonist.18F-Fallypride PET has been used to study D2 and D3 receptor occupancy and density in neuropsychiatric disorders and aging in humans.This study aimed to develop an automated synthesis of the potent dopamine D2 and D3 receptor PET imaging agent and to study the distribution of the mice by small-animal PET.Methods 18F ion Was reacted with precursor(s)-(-)-N-(1-allyl-2-pyrrolidinyl)methyl-5-(3-tolunesulfonyloxypropyl)-2,3-dimethoxy-benzamide in a chemical process control unit(CPCU).The crude product was transported to a C18 column.18F-Fallypride was absorbed on the column.the column Was washed by water.18F-Fallypride was then eluted from the column with small volume of ethanol.The mice were imaged by small-animal PET after in travenous 18F-Fallypride(1.85 MBq).Results It took 40 min for synthesizing 18F-Fallypride at CPCU,the radiochemical yield was 40

  8. The Application of Laparoscopic Technique in Small Animals%腹腔镜技术在小动物中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张士霞; 张建涛; 范宏刚; 肖建华; 王洪斌

    2012-01-01

    Laparoscopic surgery had many advantages, such as sufficient exposure of abdominal organ structure during the operation, the minimal invasion on the operative animals, the minimal incision, the less bleeding, postoperative mild pain, rapid recovery and the less tissue adhesions. Laparoscopic technique has been used routinely in human medicine since the 1980s. In veterinary medicine, there are many reports of the application of laparoscopic technique abroad, but relatively little in domestic. The main application of laparoscopic technique in small animals includes the application in biopsied, digestive system, urinary system and reproductive system.%腹腔镜手术具有术中腹腔脏器显露充分、对施术动物损伤小、手术切口小、出血量少、术后痛苦轻、恢复快和组织粘连少等优点.腹腔镜技术从20世纪80年代就普遍应用于人医临床,在兽医领域国外早就有腹腔镜技术在动物中应用的报道,而国内腹腔镜技术在动物上的应用则相对较少.腹腔镜技术在小动物中的应用主要包括在活组织检查中的应用、在消化系统中的应用,在泌尿系统中的应用及在生殖系统中的应用.

  9. Estimating Effective Dose from Phantom Dose Measurements in Atrial Fibrillation Ablation Procedures and Comparison of MOSFET and TLD Detectors in a Small Animal Dosimetry Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson-Evans, Colin David

    Two different studies will be presented in this work. The first involves the calculation of effective dose from a phantom study which simulates an atrial fibrillation (AF) ablation procedure. The second involves the validation of metal-oxide semiconducting field effect transistors (MOSFET) for small animal dosimetry applications as well as improved characterization of the animal irradiators on Duke University's campus. Atrial Fibrillation is an ever increasing health risk in the United States. The most common type of cardiac arrhythmia, AF is associated with increased mortality and ischemic cerebrovascular events. Managing AF can include, among other treatments, an interventional procedure called catheter ablation. The procedure involves the use of biplane fluoroscopy during which a patient can be exposed to radiation for as much as two hours or more. The deleterious effects of radiation become a concern when dealing with long fluoroscopy times, and because the AF ablation procedure is elective, it makes relating the risks of radiation ever more essential. This study hopes to quantify the risk through the derivation of dose conversion coefficients (DCCs) from the dose-area product (DAP) with the intent that DCCs can be used to provide estimates of effective dose (ED) for typical AF ablation procedures. A bi-plane fluoroscopic and angiographic system was used for the simulated AF ablation procedures. For acquisition of organ dose measurements, 20 diagnostic MOSFET detectors were placed at selected organs in a male anthropomorphic phantom, and these detectors were attached to 4 bias supplies to obtain organ dose readings. The DAP was recorded from the system console and independently validated with an ionization chamber and radiochromic film. Bi-plane fluoroscopy was performed on the phantom for 10 minutes to acquire the dose rate for each organ, and the average clinical procedure time was multiplied by each organ dose rate to obtain individual organ doses. The

  10. Exploitation of a noninvasive small animal's heart rate measuring apparatus%小动物无创式心率监测仪的研制及应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴艳茹; 司伟; 易小林; 孟燕军; 范振中

    2012-01-01

    目的:研制一种无创测量小动物心率及存活时间的监测仪.方法:采用MB-6型鼠尾脉搏波传感器,无创伤状态下拾取鼠尾脉搏波信号,应用单片机对脉搏波信号进行识别,寻找出正确的心动周期,计算小动物的实时心率,并与对应的记忆示波器测量的数据进行统计分析.结果:监测仪和示波器所测大鼠心率分别为(370.0±45.3) min-1和(371.0±46.0) min-1,小鼠心率(598.4±78.0) min-1和(597.5±74.9) min-1,差异均无统计学意义(t大鼠=0.026,P=0.979;t小鼠=0.049,P=0.961).大、小鼠的两种测量数据的直线相关系数值皆为0.996.结论:该仪器可用于无创测量小动物心率及存活期.%Aim:To develop a noninvasive measuring apparatus in order to measure the heart rate and survival time of small animals. Methods:By using the MB-6-type tail pulse wave sensor,the pulse wave signals of small animals were obtained without hurting. Then by analyzing these signals with a microcontroller,and to acquire the right cardiac cycle,which can be used to calculate the real time heart rate. Furthermore, we contrasted the results with those obtained by the oscilloscope. Results: The heart rates of rats/mice measured by the apparatus and the oscilloscope were ( 370. 0 ± 45. 3 ) min -1/ (598.4±78.0) min-1 and ( 371. 0 ±46. 0 ) min-1/(597.5 ±74.9) min-1,respectively. There was no significant difference between the values measured by the two methods( t-rat = 0.026 ,P = 0. 979 ;t-mouse = 0. 049 ,P = 0. 961 ). Linear correlation analyses of the two data sets showed that the coefficients of correlation were both 0.996. Conclusion: The developed apparatus could hold promise for the application in measuring the heart rate noninvasively.

  11. A compact and high sensitivity positron detector using dual-layer thin GSO scintillators for a small animal PET blood sampling system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Seiichi; Imaizumi, Masao; Shimosegawa, Eku; Kanai, Yasukazu; Sakamoto, Yusuke; Minato, Kotaro; Shimizu, Keiji; Senda, Michio; Hatazawa, Jun

    2010-07-07

    For quantitative measurements of small animals such as mice or rats, a compact and high sensitivity continuous blood sampling detector is required because their blood sampling volume is limited. For this purpose we have developed and tested a new positron detector. The positron detector uses a pair of dual-layer thin gadolinium orthosilicate (GSO) scintillators with different decay times. The front layer detects the positron and the background gamma photons, and the back layer detects the background gamma photons. By subtracting the count rate of the latter from that of the former, the count rate of the positrons can be estimated. The GSO for the front layer has a Ce concentration of 1.5 mol% (decay time of 35 ns), and that for the back layer has a Ce concentration of 0.5 mol% (decay time of 60 ns). By using the pulse shape analysis, the count rate of these two GSOs can be discriminated. The thickness is 0.5 mm, which is thick enough to detect positrons while minimizing the detection of the background gamma photons. These two types of thin GSOs were optically coupled to each other and connected to a metal photomultiplier tube (PMT) through triangular light guides. The signal from the PMT was digitized by 100 MHz free-running A-D converters in the data acquisition system and digitally integrated at two different integration times for the pulse shape analysis. We obtained good separation of the pulse shape distributions of these two GSOs. The energy threshold level was decreased to 80 keV, increasing the sensitivity of the detector. The sensitivity of a small diameter plastic tube was 8.6% and 24% for the F-18 and C-11 positrons, respectively. The count rate performance was linear up to approximately 50 kcps. The background counts from the gamma photons could be precisely corrected. The time-activity curve (TAC) of the rat artery blood was successfully obtained and showed a good correlation with that measured using a well counter. With these results, we confirmed

  12. Micro insert: a prototype full-ring PET device for improving the image resolution of a small-animal PET scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Heyu; Pal, Debashish; Song, Tae Yong; O'Sullivan, Joseph A; Tai, Yuan-Chuan

    2008-10-01

    A full-ring PET insert device should be able to enhance the image resolution of existing small-animal PET scanners. The device consists of 18 high-resolution PET detectors in a cylindric enclosure. Each detector contains a cerium-doped lutetium oxyorthosilicate array (12 x 12 crystals, 0.72 x 1.51 x 3.75 mm each) coupled to a position-sensitive photomultiplier tube via an optical fiber bundle made of 8 x 16 square multiclad fibers. Signals from the insert detectors are connected to the scanner through the electronics of the disabled first ring of detectors, which permits coincidence detection between the 2 systems. Energy resolution of a detector was measured using a (68)Ge point source, and a calibrated (68)Ge point source stepped across the axial field of view (FOV) provided the sensitivity profile of the system. A (22)Na point source imaged at different offsets from the center characterized the in-plane resolution of the insert system. Imaging was then performed with a Derenzo phantom filled with 19.5 MBq of (18)F-fluoride and imaged for 2 h; a 24.3-g mouse injected with 129.5 MBq of (18)F-fluoride and imaged in 5 bed positions at 3.5 h after injection; and a 22.8-g mouse injected with 14.3 MBq of (18)F-FDG and imaged for 2 h with electrocardiogram gating. The energy resolution of a typical detector module at 511 keV is 19.0% +/- 3.1%. The peak sensitivity of the system is approximately 2.67%. The image resolution of the system ranges from 1.0- to 1.8-mm full width at half maximum near the center of the FOV, depending on the type of coincidence events used for image reconstruction. Derenzo phantom and mouse bone images showed significant improvement in transaxial image resolution using the insert device. Mouse heart images demonstrated the gated imaging capability of the device. We have built a prototype full-ring insert device for a small-animal PET scanner to provide higher-resolution PET images within a reduced imaging FOV. Development of additional

  13. Inter-crystal scatter identification for a depth-sensitive detector using support vector machine for small animal positron emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshida, Eiji [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Anagawa 4-9-1 Inage-ku, Chiba-shi, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan)]. E-mail: rush@nirs.go.jp; Kitamura, Keishi [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Anagawa 4-9-1 Inage-ku, Chiba-shi, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Shimadzu Corporation, Nishinokyo Kuwabaracho 1 Nakagyo-ku, Kyoto-shi, Kyoto 604-8511 (Japan); Kimura, Yuichi [Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Gerontology, Nakamachi 1-1 Itabashi-ku, Tokyo 173-0022 (Japan); Nishikido, Fumihiko [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Anagawa 4-9-1 Inage-ku, Chiba-shi, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Shibuya, Kengo [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Anagawa 4-9-1 Inage-ku, Chiba-shi, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Yamaya, Taiga [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Anagawa 4-9-1 Inage-ku, Chiba-shi, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Murayama, Hideo [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Anagawa 4-9-1 Inage-ku, Chiba-shi, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan)

    2007-02-01

    In a conventional positron emission tomography (PET) detector, detected events are projected onto a 2D position histogram by an Anger calculation for crystal identification. However, the measured histogram is affected by inter-crystal scatterings (ICS) which occur in the entire detector. Peaks which are projected for each crystal in the histogram are blurred, and this causes ICS mispositioning. A depth-of-interaction (DOI) detector has been developed for the small animal PET scanner jPET-RD. This DOI detector uses 32x32 crystals with four layers and a 256-channel multi-anode flat panel photomultiplier tube (FP-PMT) which was developed by Hamamatsu Photonics K.K. Each crystal element is 1.45x1.45x4.5 mm{sup 3}. The FP-PMT has a large detective area (49x49 mm{sup 2}) and a small anode pitch (3.04 mm). Therefore, the FP-PMT can extensively trace the behavior of incident {gamma} rays in the crystals including ICS event. We, therefore, propose a novel method for ICS estimation using a statistical pattern recognition algorithm based on a support vector machine (SVM). In this study, we applied the SVM for discriminating photoelectric events from ICS events generated from multiple-anode outputs. The SVM was trained by uniform irradiation events generated from a detector simulator using a Monte Carlo calculation. The success rate for ICS event identification is about 78% for non-training data. The SVM can achieve a true subtraction of ICS events from measured events, and it is also useful for random correction in PET.

  14. Modeling of inertial deposition in scaled models of rat and human nasal airways: Towards in vitro regional dosimetry in small animals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xi, Jinxiang; Kim, JongWon; Si, Xiuhua A.; Corley, Richard A.; Zhou, Yue

    2016-09-01

    Rodents are routinely used in inhalation toxicology tests as human surrogates. However, in vitro dosimetry tests in rodent casts are still scarce due to small rodent airways and in vitro tests to quantify sub-regional dosimetry are still impractical. We hypothesized that for inertial particles whose deposition is dominated by airflow convection (Reynolds number) and particle inertia (Stokes number), the deposition should be similar among airway replicas of different scales if their Reynolds and Stokes numbers are kept the same. In this study, we aimed to (1) numerically test the hypothesis in three airway geometries: a USP induction port, a human nose model, and a Sprague-Dawley rat nose model, and (2) find the range of applicability of this hypothesis. Five variants of the USP and human nose models and three variants of the rat nose model were tested. Inhalation rates and particle sizes were scaled to match the Reynolds number and Stokes numbers. A low-Reynolds-number k–ω model was used to resolve the airflow and a Lagrangian tracking algorithm was used to simulate the particle transport and deposition. Statistical analysis of predicted doses was conducted using ANOVA. For normal inhalation rates and particle dia- meters ranging from 0.5 to 24 mm, the deposition differences between the life-size and scaled models are insignificant for all airway geometries considered (i.e., human nose, USP, and rat nose). Furthermore, the deposition patterns and exit particle profiles also look similar among scaled models. However, deposition rates and patterns start to deviate if inhalation rates are too low, or particle sizes are too large. For the rat nose, the threshold velocity was found to be 0.71 m/s and the threshold Froude number to be 50. Results of this study provide a theoretical foundation for sub-regional in vitro dosimetry tests in small animals and for interpretation of data from inter-species or intra-species with varying body sizes.

  15. Development of double-layer coupled coil for improving S/N in 7 T small-animal MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyoung-Nam; Seo, Jeung-Hoon; Han, Sang-Doc; Heo, Phil; Im, Geun Ho; Lee, Jung Hee

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a new double-layer coupled (DLC) surface radiofrequency (RF) coil using a combination of single-layer planar (SLP) and single-layer circular (SLC) coils, for enhancement of magnetic flux (B1 ) sensitivity and RF penetration in 7 T rat-body magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The proposed DLC surface coil was fabricated according to an electromagnetic (EM) simulation and validated based on the B1 distribution and bench measurements. The DLC coil performance was quantitatively evaluated based on the signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) and coil-response signal intensity curves in phantom and in vivo rat-body images. In the computational EM calculation and 7 T in vivo experimental results, the DLC surface coil clearly showed an increased S/N and higher RF transmit (B1 (+) ) profiles, compared to those of the SLP and SLC coils. While all surface coils displayed a rapid decrease in the MR signal from the near-coil region to the subject, the results reveal that the DLC coil concept may be used to provide sufficient RF penetration and high S/N and degrees of freedom for use in partial body imaging for 7 T ultra-high-field small-animal MRI.

  16. Assessment of myocardial metabolic rate of glucose by means of Bayesian ICA and Markov Chain Monte Carlo methods in small animal PET imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berradja, Khadidja; Boughanmi, Nabil

    2016-09-01

    In dynamic cardiac PET FDG studies the assessment of myocardial metabolic rate of glucose (MMRG) requires the knowledge of the blood input function (IF). IF can be obtained by manual or automatic blood sampling and cross calibrated with PET. These procedures are cumbersome, invasive and generate uncertainties. The IF is contaminated by spillover of radioactivity from the adjacent myocardium and this could cause important error in the estimated MMRG. In this study, we show that the IF can be extracted from the images in a rat heart study with 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) by means of Independent Component Analysis (ICA) based on Bayesian theory and Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) sampling method (BICA). Images of the heart from rats were acquired with the Sherbrooke small animal PET scanner. A region of interest (ROI) was drawn around the rat image and decomposed into blood and tissue using BICA. The Statistical study showed that there is a significant difference (p < 0.05) between MMRG obtained with IF extracted by BICA with respect to IF extracted from measured images corrupted with spillover.

  17. Microphysiological Human Brain and Neural Systems-on-a-Chip: Potential Alternatives to Small Animal Models and Emerging Platforms for Drug Discovery and Personalized Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haring, Alexander P; Sontheimer, Harald; Johnson, Blake N

    2017-06-01

    Translational challenges associated with reductionist modeling approaches, as well as ethical concerns and economic implications of small