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Sample records for rf-linac-driven xuv free-electron

  1. XUV free-electron laser-based projection lithography systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newnam, B.E.

    1990-01-01

    Free-electron laser sources, driven by rf-linear accelerators, have the potential to operate in the extreme ultraviolet (XUV) spectral range with more than sufficient average power for high-volume projection lithography. For XUV wavelengths from 100 nm to 4 nm, such sources will enable the resolution limit of optical projection lithography to be extended from 0.25 {mu}m to 0.05{mu}m and with an adequate total depth of focus (1 to 2 {mu}m). Recent developments of a photoinjector of very bright electron beams, high-precision magnetic undulators, and ring-resonator cavities raise our confidence that FEL operation below 100 nm is ready for prototype demonstration. We address the motivation for an XUV FEL source for commercial microcircuit production and its integration into a lithographic system, include reflecting reduction masks, reflecting XUV projection optics and alignment systems, and surface-imaging photoresists. 52 refs., 7 figs.

  2. Dichroism in the photoionisation of atoms at XUV free-electron lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazza, T., E-mail: tommaso.mazza@xfel.eu [European XFEL GmbH, Albert-Einstein-Ring 19, D-22761 Hamburg (Germany); Gryzlova, E.V.; Grum-Grzhimailo, A.N. [Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics, Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Kazansky, A.K. [Departamento de Fisica de Materiales, UPV/EHU, E-20018 San Sebastian/Donostia (Spain); IKERBASQUE, Basque Foundation for Science, E-48011 Bilbao (Spain); Donostia International Physics Center (DIPC), E-20018 San Sebastian/Donostia (Spain); Kabachnik, N.M. [European XFEL GmbH, Albert-Einstein-Ring 19, D-22761 Hamburg (Germany); Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics, Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Donostia International Physics Center (DIPC), E-20018 San Sebastian/Donostia (Spain); Meyer, M., E-mail: michael.meyer@xfel.eu [European XFEL GmbH, Albert-Einstein-Ring 19, D-22761 Hamburg (Germany)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • We studied 2-color photoionization of He by angle-resolved electron spectroscopy. • Beta-parameters contain information about the symmetry of outgoing electron waves. • Experiments are compared to strong field approximation and perturbation theory. • 2-Photon measurements can be used to characterize FEL radiation properties. • Non-dipole contributions are predicted to produce new features in the dichroism. - Abstract: Two-color photoionization of atomic He has been investigated by angle-integrated and angle-resolved electron spectroscopy. The combined action of intense radiation pulses from the XUV free-electron laser (FEL), FERMI or FLASH, and a synchronized optical laser on the target atom gives rise to a rich sideband structure in the photoemission spectrum. Measurements of the angular distribution parameters and the determination of the circular and linear dichroism for the two-color photoionization enable a detailed analysis of the symmetry of the outgoing electron waves and of the dynamics underlying the multi-photon processes. The experimental results are in excellent agreement with theoretical results obtained using perturbation theory (low intensity regime) and the strong field approximation. For the particular case of two-photon ionization the measurements represent an ideal tool for characterizing certain FEL parameters, here for example the degree and the sign of circular polarization. Finally, new features of the dichroism are theoretically predicted originating from the non-dipole contribution into the photoionization amplitudes.

  3. Interference effects and Stark broadening in XUV intrashell transitions in aluminum under conditions of intense XUV free-electron-laser irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galtier, E.; Rosmej, F. B.; Calisti, A.; Talin, B.; Mossé, C.; Ferri, S.; Lisitsa, V. S.

    2013-03-01

    Quantum mechanical interference effects in the line broadening of intrashell transitions are investigated for dense plasma conditions. Simulations that involved LSJ-split level structure and intermediate coupling discovered unexpected strong line narrowing for intrashell transitions L-L while M-L transitions remained practically unaffected by interference effects. This behavior allows a robust study of line narrowing in dense plasmas. Simulations are carried out for XUV transitions of aluminum that have recently been observed in experiments with the FLASH free-electron laser in Hamburg irradiating solid aluminum samples with intensities greater than 1016 W/cm2. We explore the advantageous case of Al that allows, first, simultaneous observation of M-L transitions and L-L intrashell transitions with high-resolution grating spectrometers and, second, has a convenient threshold to study interference effects at densities much below solid. Finally, we present simulations at near solid density where the line emission transforms into a quasicontinuum.

  4. Desorption of H atoms from graphite (0001) using XUV free electron laser pulses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siemer, B.; Olsen, Thomas; Hoger, T.;

    2010-01-01

    , and identifies the highest vibrational state in the adsorbate potential as a major source for the slow atoms. It is evident that multiple electron scattering processes are required for this desorption. A direct electronic excitation of a repulsive hydrogen-carbon bond seems not to be important.......The desorption of neutral H atoms from graphite with femtosecond XUV pulses is reported. The velocity distribution of the atoms peaks at extremely low kinetic energies. A DFT-based electron scattering calculation traces this distribution to desorption out of specific adsorption sites on graphite...

  5. Single-shot spectro-temporal characterization of XUV pulses from a seeded free-electron laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Ninno, Giovanni; Gauthier, David; Mahieu, Benoît; Ribič, Primož Rebernik; Allaria, Enrico; Cinquegrana, Paolo; Danailov, Miltcho Bojanov; Demidovich, Alexander; Ferrari, Eugenio; Giannessi, Luca; Penco, Giuseppe; Sigalotti, Paolo; Stupar, Matija

    2015-08-20

    Intense ultrashort X-ray pulses produced by modern free-electron lasers (FELs) allow one to probe biological systems, inorganic materials and molecular reaction dynamics with nanoscale spatial and femtoscale temporal resolution. These experiments require the knowledge, and possibly the control, of the spectro-temporal content of individual pulses. FELs relying on seeding have the potential to produce spatially and temporally fully coherent pulses. Here we propose and implement an interferometric method, which allows us to carry out the first complete single-shot spectro-temporal characterization of the pulses, generated by an FEL in the extreme ultraviolet spectral range. Moreover, we provide the first direct evidence of the temporal coherence of a seeded FEL working in the extreme ultraviolet spectral range and show the way to control the light generation process to produce Fourier-limited pulses. Experiments are carried out at the FERMI FEL in Trieste.

  6. Light field driven streak-camera for single-shot measurements of the temporal profile of XUV-pulses from a free-electron laser; Lichtfeld getriebene Streak-Kamera zur Einzelschuss Zeitstrukturmessung der XUV-Pulse eines Freie-Elektronen Lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fruehling, Ulrike

    2009-10-15

    The Free Electron Laser in Hamburg (FLASH) is a source for highly intense ultra short extreme ultraviolet (XUV) light pulses with pulse durations of a few femtoseconds. Due to the stochastic nature of the light generation scheme based on self amplified spontaneous emission (SASE), the duration and temporal profile of the XUV pulses fluctuate from shot to shot. In this thesis, a THz-field driven streak-camera capable of single pulse measurements of the XUV pulse-profile has been realized. In a first XUV-THz pump-probe experiment at FLASH, the XUV-pulses are overlapped in a gas target with synchronized THz-pulses generated by a new THz-undulator. The electromagnetic field of the THz light accelerates photoelectrons produced by the XUV-pulses with the resulting change of the photoelectron momenta depending on the phase of the THz field at the time of ionisation. This technique is intensively used in attosecond metrology where near infrared streaking fields are employed for the temporal characterisation of attosecond XUV-Pulses. Here, it is adapted for the analysis of pulse durations in the few femtosecond range by choosing a hundred times longer far infrared streaking wavelengths. Thus, the gap between conventional streak cameras with typical resolutions of hundreds of femtoseconds and techniques with attosecond resolution is filled. Using the THz-streak camera, the time dependent electric field of the THz-pulses was sampled in great detail while on the other hand the duration and even details of the time structure of the XUV-pulses were characterized. (orig.)

  7. XUV ionization of aligned molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelkensberg, F.; Siu, W.; Gademann, G. [FOM Institute AMOLF, Science Park 104, NL-1098 XG Amsterdam (Netherlands); Rouzee, A.; Vrakking, M. J. J. [FOM Institute AMOLF, Science Park 104, NL-1098 XG Amsterdam (Netherlands); Max-Born-Institut, Max-Born Strasse 2A, D-12489 Berlin (Germany); Johnsson, P. [FOM Institute AMOLF, Science Park 104, NL-1098 XG Amsterdam (Netherlands); Department of Physics, Lund University, Post Office Box 118, SE-221 00 Lund (Sweden); Lucchini, M. [Department of Physics, Politecnico di Milano, Istituto di Fotonica e Nanotecnologie CNR-IFN, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); Lucchese, R. R. [Department of Chemistry, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843-3255 (United States)

    2011-11-15

    New extreme-ultraviolet (XUV) light sources such as high-order-harmonic generation (HHG) and free-electron lasers (FELs), combined with laser-induced alignment techniques, enable novel methods for making molecular movies based on measuring molecular frame photoelectron angular distributions. Experiments are presented where CO{sub 2} molecules were impulsively aligned using a near-infrared laser and ionized using femtosecond XUV pulses obtained by HHG. Measured electron angular distributions reveal contributions from four orbitals and the onset of the influence of the molecular structure.

  8. Comments on advanced, time-resolved imaging techniques for free-electron laser (FEL) experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lumpkin, A.H.

    1992-01-01

    An extensive set of time-resolved imaging experiments has been performed on rf-linac driven free-electron lasers (FELs) over the past few years. These experiments have addressed both micropulse and macropulse timescales on both the charged-particle beam and the wiggler/undulator outputs (spontaneous emission and lasing). A brief review of first measurements on photoinjecter micropulse elongation, submacropulse phase slew in drive lasers, submacropulse wavelength shifts in lasers, etc. is presented. This is followed by discussions of new measurements of 35-MeV electron beam micropulse bunch length (<10 ps) using optical transition radiation, some of the first single bend synchrotron radiation beam profile measurements at gamma <80, and comments on the low-jitter synchroscan streak camera tuner. These techniques will be further developed on the 200-650 MeV linac test stand at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) in the next few years. Such techniques should be adaptable to many of the present FEL designs and to some aspects of the next generation of light sources.

  9. Comments on advanced, time-resolved imaging techniques for free-electron laser (FEL) experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lumpkin, A.H.

    1992-11-01

    An extensive set of time-resolved imaging experiments has been performed on rf-linac driven free-electron lasers (FELs) over the past few years. These experiments have addressed both micropulse and macropulse timescales on both the charged-particle beam and the wiggler/undulator outputs (spontaneous emission and lasing). A brief review of first measurements on photoinjecter micropulse elongation, submacropulse phase slew in drive lasers, submacropulse wavelength shifts in lasers, etc. is presented. This is followed by discussions of new measurements of 35-MeV electron beam micropulse bunch length (<10 ps) using optical transition radiation, some of the first single bend synchrotron radiation beam profile measurements at gamma <80, and comments on the low-jitter synchroscan streak camera tuner. These techniques will be further developed on the 200-650 MeV linac test stand at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) in the next few years. Such techniques should be adaptable to many of the present FEL designs and to some aspects of the next generation of light sources.

  10. Ablation of various materials with intense XUV radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juha, Libor E-mail: juha@fzu.cz; Krasa, Josef; Cejnarova, Andrea; Chvostova, Dagmar; Vorlicek, V.; Krzywinski, Jacek; Sobierajski, Ryszard; Andrejczuk, Andrzej; Jurek, Marek; Klinger, Dorota; Fiedorowicz, Henryk; Bartnik, Andrzej; Pfeifer, Miroslav; Kubat, Pavel; Pina, Ladislav; Kravarik, Jozef; Kubes, Pavel; Bakshaev, Y.L.; Korolev, V.D.; Chernenko, A.S.; Ivanov, M.I.; Scholz, Marek; Ryc, Leszek; Feldhaus, Josef; Ullschmied, Jiri; Boody, F.P

    2003-07-11

    Ablation behavior of organic polymer (polymethylmethacrylate) and elemental solid (silicon) irradiated by single pulses of XUV radiation emitted from Z-pinch, plasma-focus, and laser-produced plasmas was investigated. The ablation characteristics measured for these plasma-based sources will be compared with those obtained for irradiation of samples with XUV radiation generated by a free-electron laser.

  11. Free electron lasers for the XUV spectral region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, J.B.; Pellegrini, C.

    1984-01-01

    Using the system described, an electron storage ring with an undulator in a special bypass section, we can obtain high intensity coherent radiation by sending the beam through the undulator and using the FEL collective instability to produce radiation. Compared to other systems, such as an FEL oscillator or a transverse optical klystron, this system has the advantage that it does not

  12. Spectrotemporal shaping of seeded free-electron laser pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauthier, David; Ribič, Primož Rebernik; De Ninno, Giovanni; Allaria, Enrico; Cinquegrana, Paolo; Danailov, Miltcho Bojanov; Demidovich, Alexander; Ferrari, Eugenio; Giannessi, Luca; Mahieu, Benoît; Penco, Giuseppe

    2015-09-11

    We demonstrate the ability to control and shape the spectrotemporal content of extreme-ultraviolet (XUV) pulses produced by a seeded free-electron laser (FEL). The control over the spectrotemporal properties of XUV light was achieved by precisely manipulating the linear frequency chirp of the seed laser. Our results agree with existing theory, which allows us to retrieve the temporal properties (amplitude and phase) of the FEL pulse from measurements of the spectra as a function of the FEL operating parameters. Furthermore, we show the first direct evidence of the full temporal coherence of FEL light and generate Fourier limited pulses by fine-tuning the FEL temporal phase. The possibility of tailoring the spectrotemporal content of intense short-wavelength pulses represents the first step towards efficient nonlinear optics in the XUV to x-ray spectral region and will enable precise manipulation of core-electron excitations using the methods of coherent quantum control.

  13. Four-wave-mixing experiments with seeded free electron lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bencivenga, F; Calvi, A; Capotondi, F; Cucini, R; Mincigrucci, R; Simoncig, A; Manfredda, M; Pedersoli, E; Principi, E; Dallari, F; Duncan, R A; Izzo, M G; Knopp, G; Maznev, A A; Monaco, G; Di Mitri, S; Gessini, A; Giannessi, L; Mahne, N; Nikolov, I P; Passuello, R; Raimondi, L; Zangrando, M; Masciovecchio, C

    2016-12-16

    The development of free electron laser (FEL) sources has provided an unprecedented bridge between the scientific communities working with ultrafast lasers and extreme ultraviolet (XUV) and X-ray radiation. Indeed, in recent years an increasing number of FEL-based applications have exploited methods and concepts typical of advanced optical approaches. In this context, we recently used a seeded FEL to demonstrate a four-wave-mixing (FWM) process stimulated by coherent XUV radiation, namely the XUV transient grating (X-TG). We hereby report on X-TG measurements carried out on a sample of silicon nitride (Si3N4). The recorded data bears evidence for two distinct signal decay mechanisms: one occurring on a sub-ps timescale and one following slower dynamics extending throughout and beyond the probed timescale range (100 ps). The latter is compatible with a slower relaxation (time decay > ns), that may be interpreted as the signature of thermal diffusion modes. From the peak intensity of the X-TG signal we could estimate a value of the effective third-order susceptibility which is substantially larger than that found in SiO2, so far the only sample with available X-TG data. Furthermore, the intensity of the time-coincidence peak shows a linear dependence on the intensity of the three input beams, indicating that the measurements were performed in the weak field regime. However, the timescale of the ultrafast relaxation exhibits a dependence on the intensity of the XUV radiation. We interpreted the observed behaviour as the generation of a population grating of free-electrons and holes that, on the sub-ps timescale, relaxes to generate lattice excitations. The background free detection inherent to the X-TG approach allowed the determination of FEL-induced electron dynamics with a sensitivity largely exceeding that of transient reflectivity and transmissivity measurements, usually employed for this purpose.

  14. Spectro-temporal shaping of seeded free-electron laser pulses

    CERN Document Server

    Gauthier, David; De Ninno, Giovanni; Allaria, Enrico; Cinquegrana, Paolo; Danailov, Miltcho Boyanov; Demidovich, Alexander; Ferrari, Eugenio; Giannessi, Luca; Mahieu, Benoît; Penco, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate the ability to control and shape the spectro-temporal content of extreme-ultraviolet (XUV) pulses produced by a seeded free-electron laser (FEL). The control over the spectro-temporal properties of XUV light was achieved by precisely manipulating the linear frequency chirp of the seed laser. Our results agree with existing theory, which allows retrieving the temporal properties (amplitude and phase) of the FEL pulse from measurements of the spectra as a function of the FEL operating parameters. Furthermore, we show the first direct evidence of the full temporal coherence of FEL light and generate Fourier limited pulses by fine-tuning the FEL temporal phase. The possibility to tailor the spectro-temporal content of intense short-wavelength pulses represents the first step towards efficient nonlinear optics in the XUV to X-ray spectral region and will enable precise manipulation of core-electron excitations using the methods of coherent quantum control.

  15. Spatio-temporal coherence of free-electron laser radiation in the extreme ultraviolet determined by a Michelson interferometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilbert, V.; Rödel, C.; Brenner, G.; Döppner, T.; Düsterer, S.; Dziarzhytski, S.; Fletcher, L.; Förster, E.; Glenzer, S. H.; Harmand, M.; Hartley, N. J.; Kazak, L.; Komar, D.; Laarmann, T.; Lee, H. J.; Ma, T.; Nakatsutsumi, M.; Przystawik, A.; Redlin, H.; Skruszewicz, S.; Sperling, P.; Tiggesbäumker, J.; Toleikis, S.; Zastrau, U.

    2014-09-01

    A key feature of extreme ultraviolet (XUV) radiation from free-electron lasers (FELs) is its spatial and temporal coherence. We measured the spatio-temporal coherence properties of monochromatized FEL pulses at 13.5 nm using a Michelson interferometer. A temporal coherence time of (59±8) fs has been determined, which is in good agreement with the spectral bandwidth given by the monochromator. Moreover, the spatial coherence in vertical direction amounts to about 15% of the beam diameter and about 12% in horizontal direction. The feasibility of measuring spatio-temporal coherence properties of XUV FEL radiation using interferometric techniques advances machine operation and experimental studies significantly.

  16. Spatio-temporal coherence of free-electron laser radiation in the extreme ultraviolet determined by a Michelson interferometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hilbert, V.; Rödel, C.; Zastrau, U., E-mail: ulf.zastrau@uni-jena.de [Institut für Optik und Quantenelektronik, Friedrich-Schiller-Universität, Max-Wien-Platz 1, 07743 Jena (Germany); Brenner, G.; Düsterer, S.; Dziarzhytski, S.; Harmand, M.; Przystawik, A.; Redlin, H.; Toleikis, S. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Döppner, T.; Ma, T. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Fletcher, L. [Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Förster, E. [Institut für Optik und Quantenelektronik, Friedrich-Schiller-Universität, Max-Wien-Platz 1, 07743 Jena (Germany); Helmholtz-Institut Jena, Fröbelstieg 3, 07743 Jena (Germany); Glenzer, S. H.; Lee, H. J. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Hartley, N. J. [Department of Physics, Clarendon Laboratory, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PU (United Kingdom); Kazak, L.; Komar, D.; Skruszewicz, S. [Institut für Physik, Universität Rostock, 18051 Rostock (Germany); and others

    2014-09-08

    A key feature of extreme ultraviolet (XUV) radiation from free-electron lasers (FELs) is its spatial and temporal coherence. We measured the spatio-temporal coherence properties of monochromatized FEL pulses at 13.5 nm using a Michelson interferometer. A temporal coherence time of (59±8) fs has been determined, which is in good agreement with the spectral bandwidth given by the monochromator. Moreover, the spatial coherence in vertical direction amounts to about 15% of the beam diameter and about 12% in horizontal direction. The feasibility of measuring spatio-temporal coherence properties of XUV FEL radiation using interferometric techniques advances machine operation and experimental studies significantly.

  17. Cluster sources for the low density matter beamline at the FERMI free electron laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katzy, Raphael; Lyamayev, Viktor; Mudrich, Marcel; Stienkemeier, Frank [Universitaet Freiburg, Physikalisches Institut, D-79104 Freiburg im Breisgau (Germany)

    2012-07-01

    Applying high gain harmonic generation process (HGHG) the new FERMI free electron laser in Trieste provides intense XUV pulses of high brilliance with tunable wavelength and excellent confinement in time. The LDM endstation has been designed to combine the FERMI XUV radiation with molecular beam experiments. In several exchangeable beam sources, atomic, molecular and cluster beams are generated and can be doped by the pick-up technique in oven cells or in a laser ablation unit. Detailed information about the interaction with the FEL light is gathered by combined VMI, TOF and X-ray imaging detectors. Design and characterization of two sources are presented: A versatile high temperature high pressure pulsed source is utilized for generation of atomic, molecular and cluster beams of various materials in a gas expansion or applying the seeded beams technique. A pulsed cryogenic source gives the opportunity to use helium droplets with their unique cold, superfluid properties.

  18. Free Electron Laser in Poland

    CERN Document Server

    Romaniuk, Ryszard

    2009-01-01

    The idea of building a new IVth generation of light sources of high luminosity, which use accelerators, arose in the 80ties of XXth century. Now, in a numerable synchrotron and laser laboratories in Europe, there is carried out, since a couple of years, intense applied research on free electron lasers (FEL) [17,18]. Similarly, in this country, free electron laser in Poland – POLFEL [9] is, in a design, a coherent light source of the IVth generation, characterized by very short pulses in the range of 10-100fs, of big power 0,2GW and UV wavelength of 27nm, of average power 1W, with effective high power third harmonic of 9nm. The laser consists of a linear superconducting accelerator 100m in length, undulator and experimental lines. It generates a monochromatic and coherent radiation and can be tuned from THz range via IR, visible to UV, and potentially to X-rays. The linac works in quasi-CW or real-CW mode. It is planned by IPJ [9,10] and XFEL-Poland Consortium [16] as a part of the ESFRI [1] priority EuroFEL...

  19. Matter under extreme conditions probed by a seeded free-electron-laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bencivenga, F.; Principi, E.; Cucini, R.; Danailov, M. B.; Demidovich, A.; D’Amico, F.; Di Fonzo, S.; Gessini, A.; Kurdi, N.; Mahne, N.; Raimondi, L.; Zangrando, M.; Masciovecchio, C. [Elettra-Sincrotrone Trieste S.C.p.A., S.S. 14 km 163,5 in AREA Science Park, 34149 Basovizza (Italy); Giangrisostomi, E.; Battistoni, A.; Svetina, C. [Elettra-Sincrotrone Trieste S.C.p.A., S.S. 14 km 163,5 in AREA Science Park, 34149 Basovizza (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Trieste, Piazzale Europa, 34127 Trieste (Italy); Di Cicco, A.; Gunnella, R.; Hatada, K. [CNISM, Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita' di Camerino, Via Madonna delle Carceri, 62032 Camerino (Italy); Filipponi, A. [Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche e Chimiche, Universita' dell’Aquila, Via Vetoio, 67100 L’Aquila (Italy); and others

    2015-08-17

    FERMI is the first user dedicated seeded free-electron-laser (FEL) working in the extreme ultraviolet (XUV) and soft x-ray range. The EIS-TIMEX experimental end-station was availabe to external users since from the beginning of the user operation of the facility, in Dicember 2012. EIS-TIMEX has been conceived to exploit the unique properties of the FERMI source to study matter under extreme and metastable thermodynamic conditions. We hereby report on its basic parameters and applications, which includes very low jitter (i.e., high time resolution) pump-probe measurements.

  20. Free electron laser and superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Iwata, A

    2003-01-01

    The lasing of the first free-electron laser (FEL) in the world was successfully carried out in 1977, so the history of FELs as a light source is not so long. But FELs are now utilized for research in many scientific and engineering fields owing to such characteristics as tunability of the wavelength, and short pulse and high peak power, which is difficult utilizing a common light source. Research for industrial applications has also been carried out in some fields, such as life sciences, semiconductors, nano-scale measurement, and others. The task for the industrial use of FEL is the realization of high energy efficiency and high optical power. As a means of promoting realization, the combining of an FEL and superconducting linac is now under development in order to overcome the thermal limitations of normal-conducting linacs. Further, since tuning the wavelength is carried out by changing the magnetic density of the undulator, which is now induced by moving part of the stack of permanent magnets, there is un...

  1. Development and Application of XUV Lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    The focus of this program is the development of extreme ultraviolet (XUV) lasers and their application to scientific problems. Laser development concentrates...techniques. Such techniques should have a number of applications and be particularly useful in the life sciences. This report presents recent progress on XUV laser development

  2. Unusual electron dynamics in He clusters induced by intense XUV pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ovcharenko, Yevheniy; Moeller, Thomas [IOAP, TU-Berlin (Germany); LaForge, Aaron; Katzy, Raphael; Stienkemeier, Frank [Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Freiburg (Germany); Lyamayev, Viktor [European XFEL, Hamburg (Germany); O' Keeffe, Patrick [CNR IMIP, Monterotondo Scalo (Italy); Plekan, Oksana; Finetti, Paola; Richter, Robert; Prince, Kevin; Callegari, Carlo [Elettra-Sincrotrone Trieste, Basovizza (Italy); Drabbels, Marcel [EPFL, Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2014-07-01

    The investigation of complex atomic and molecular systems in intense IR and XUV pulses has attracted considerable attention during the last decade, since it leads to a better understanding of light matter interaction. Recently, the first seeded Free Electron Laser FERMI became available for users and now offers unique possibility to perform detailed investigations in such systems due to the narrow bandwidth, fine energy tunability and high intensity in XUV energy range. By using this new source the ionization dynamics in He clusters has been explored with electron spectroscopy in a wide energy range. In addition to the conventional sequential multi-step ionization with a photon energy well above the first ionization potential (IP) a novel ionization process following resonant excitation below IP was observed. It is due to autoionization of two or more electronically excited cluster atoms as predicted recently. The process is very efficient and can exceed the rate of direct photoionization above IP.

  3. Feasibility of an XUV FEL Oscillator Driven by a SCRF Linear Accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lumpkin, A. H.; Freund, H. P.; Reinsch, M.

    2014-01-01

    The Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator (ASTA) facility is currently under construction at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. Using a1-ms-long macropulse composed of up to 3000 micropulses, and with beam energies projected from 45 to 800 MeV, the possibility for an extreme ultraviolet (XUV) free-electron laser oscillator (FELO) with the higher energy is evaluated. We have used both GINGER with an oscillator module and the MEDUSA/OPC code to assess FELO saturation prospects at 120 nm, 40 nm, and 13.4 nm. The results support saturation at all of these wavelengths which are also shorter than the demonstrated shortest wavelength record of 176 nm from a storage-ring-based FELO. This indicates linac-driven FELOs can be extended into this XUV wavelength regime previously only reached with single-pass FEL configurations.

  4. Short wavelength regenerative amplifier free electron lasers

    OpenAIRE

    Dunning, D J; McNeil, B. W. J.; Thompson, N. R.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we discuss extending the operating wavelength range of tunable Regenerative Amplifier FELs to shorter wavelengths than current design proposals, notably into the XUV regions of the spectrum and beyond where the reflectivity of broadband optics is very low. Simulation studies are presented which demonstrate the development of good temporal coherence in generic systems with a broadband radiation feedback of less than one part in ten thousand.

  5. A high repetition rate XUV seeding source for FLASH2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Willner, Arik

    2012-05-15

    Improved performance of free-electron laser (FEL) light sources in terms of timing stability, pulse shape and spectral properties of the amplified FEL pulses is of interest in material science, the fields of ultrafast dynamics, biology, chemistry and even special branches in industry. A promising scheme for such an improvement is direct seeding with high harmonic generation (HHG) in a noble gas target. A free-electron laser seeded by an external extreme ultraviolet (XUV) source is planned for FLASH2 at DESY in Hamburg. The requirements for the XUV/soft X-ray source can be summarized as follows: A repetition rate of at least 100 kHz in a 10 Hz burst is needed at variable wavelengths from 10 to 40 nm and pulse energies of several nJ within a single laser harmonic. This application requires a laser amplifier system with exceptional parameters, mJ-level pulse energy, 10-15 fs pulse duration at 100 kHz (1 MHz) burst repetition rate. A new optical parametric chirped-pulse amplification (OPCPA) system is under development in order to meet these requirements, and very promising results have been achieved in the last three years. In parallel to this development, a new HHG concept is necessary to sustain high average power of the driving laser system and to generate harmonics with high conversion efficiencies. Currently, the highest conversion efficiency with HHG has been demonstrated using gas-filled capillary targets. For our application, only a free-jet target can be used for HHG, in order to overcome damage threshold limitations of HHG target optics at a high repetition rate. A novel dual-gas multijet gas target has been developed and first experiments show remarkable control of the degree of phase matching forming the basis for improved control of the harmonic photon flux and the XUV pulse characteristics. The basic idea behind the dual-gas concept is the insertion of matching zones in between multiple HHG sources. These matching sections are filled with hydrogen which

  6. Frequency Comb Spectroscopy - From IR to XUV

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-09

    sensitivity of highly charged ions. Unlike visible light, radiation in the extreme ultraviolet (XUV) has traditionally lacked long-term phase coherence...Direct frequency comb spectroscopy in the extreme ultraviolet ”, Nature, vol. 482, no. 7383, pp. 68 - 71, 2012. [2] C. Benko, Ruehl, A. , Martin, M...precision metrology and ultrafast science from the visible spectral region to the next exciting frontier of extreme ultraviolet (XUV) by developing

  7. Capillary Discharge XUV Radiation Source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Nevrkla

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A device producing Z-pinching plasma as a source of XUV radiation is described. Here a ceramic capacitor bank pulse-charged up to 100 kV is discharged through a pre-ionized gas-filled ceramic tube 3.2 mm in diameter and 21 cm in length. The discharge current has amplitude of 20 kA and a rise-time of 65 ns. The apparatus will serve as experimental device for studying of capillary discharge plasma, for testing X-ray optics elements and for investigating the interaction of water-window radiation with biological samples. After optimization it will be able to produce 46.9 nm laser radiation with collision pumped Ne-like argon ions active medium. 

  8. Applications for Energy Recovering Free Electron Lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    George Neil

    2007-08-01

    The availability of high-power, high-brilliance sources of tunable photons from energy-recovered Free Electron Lasers is opening up whole new fields of application of accelerators in industry. This talk will review some of the ideas that are already being put into production, and some of the newer ideas that are still under development.

  9. Undulators and free-electron lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Luchini, P

    1990-01-01

    This book is a reference text for all those working in free-electron laser research as well as being a learning aid for physicists and graduate students who wish an introduction to this field. Only a basic understanding of relativistic mechanics and electromagnetism is presupposed. After an overview of early developments and general principles of operation, the different models that can be used to describe free-electron lasers are presented, organized according to their range of applicability. The relevent conceptual and mathematical constructs are built up from first principles with attention to obtaining the practically important results in a simple but rigorous way. Interaction of the undulator with the driving electron accelerator and the laser cavity and design of undulator magnets are treated and an overview is given of some typical experiments.

  10. Chaos in free electron laser oscillators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruni, C. [Univ Paris 11, LAL, UMR 8607, F-91898 Orsay, (France); Bachelard, R.; Couprie, M.E. [Synchrotron SOLEIL, F-91192 Gif Sur Yvette, (France); Garzella, D. [CEA DSM DRECAM SPAM, F-91191 Gif Sur Yvette, (France); Orlandi, G.L. [CR Frascati FIM FISACC, ENEA, I-00044 Frascati, (Italy)

    2009-07-01

    The chaotic nature of a storage-ring free electron laser (FEL) is investigated. The derivation of a low embedding dimension for the dynamics allows the low-dimensionality of this complex system to be observed, whereas its unpredictability is demonstrated, in some ranges of parameters, by a positive Lyapounov exponent. The route to chaos is then explored by tuning a single control parameter, and a period-doubling cascade is evidenced, as well as intermittence. (authors)

  11. Excitation of XUV radiation in solar flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emslie, A. Gordon

    1992-01-01

    The goal of the proposed research was to understand the means by which XUV radiation in solar flares is excited, and to use this radiation as diagnostics of the energy release and transport processes occurring in the flare. Significant progress in both of these areas, as described, was made.

  12. Quantum aspects of the free electron laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaiba, R.

    2007-03-15

    We study the role of Quantum Mechanics in the physics of Free Electron Lasers. While the Free Electron Laser (FEL) is usually treated as a classical device, we review the advantages of a quantum formulation of the FEL. We then show the existence of a regime of operation of the FEL that can only be described using Quantum Mechanics: if the dimensionless quantum parameter anti {rho} is smaller than 1, then in the 1-dimensional approximation the Hamiltonian that describes the FEL becomes equivalent to the Hamiltonian of a two-level system coupled to a radiation field. We give analytical and numerical solutions for the photon statistics of a Free Electron Laser operating in the quantum regime under various approximations. Since in the quantum regime the momentum of the electrons is discrete, we give a description of the electrons in phase space by introducing the Discrete Wigner Function. We then drop the assumption of a mono-energetic electron beam and describe the general case of a initial electron energy spread G({gamma}). Numerical analysis shows that the FEL quantum regime is observed only when the width of the initial momentum distribution is smaller than the momentum of the emitted photons. Both the analytical results in the linear approximation and the numerical simulations show that only the electrons close to a certain resonant energy start to emit photons. This generates the so-called Hole-burning effect in the electrons energy distribution, as it can be seen in the simulations we provide. Finally, we present a brief discussion about a fundamental uncertainty relation that ties the electron energy spread and the electron bunching. (orig.)

  13. The FERMI free-electron lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allaria, E; Badano, L; Bassanese, S; Capotondi, F; Castronovo, D; Cinquegrana, P; Danailov, M B; D'Auria, G; Demidovich, A; De Monte, R; De Ninno, G; Di Mitri, S; Diviacco, B; Fawley, W M; Ferianis, M; Ferrari, E; Gaio, G; Gauthier, D; Giannessi, L; Iazzourene, F; Kurdi, G; Mahne, N; Nikolov, I; Parmigiani, F; Penco, G; Raimondi, L; Rebernik, P; Rossi, F; Roussel, E; Scafuri, C; Serpico, C; Sigalotti, P; Spezzani, C; Svandrlik, M; Svetina, C; Trovó, M; Veronese, M; Zangrando, D; Zangrando, M

    2015-05-01

    FERMI is a seeded free-electron laser (FEL) facility located at the Elettra laboratory in Trieste, Italy, and is now in user operation with its first FEL line, FEL-1, covering the wavelength range between 100 and 20 nm. The second FEL line, FEL-2, a high-gain harmonic generation double-stage cascade covering the wavelength range 20-4 nm, has also completed commissioning and the first user call has been recently opened. An overview of the typical operating modes of the facility is presented.

  14. Progress toward the Wisconsin Free Electron Laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bisognano, Joseph; Eisert, D; Fisher, M V; Green, M A; Jacobs, K; Kleman, K J; Kulpin, J; Rogers, G C; Lawler, J E; Yavuz, D

    2011-03-01

    The University of Wisconsin-Madison/Synchrotron Radiation Center is advancing its design for a seeded VUV/soft X-ray Free Electron Laser facility called WiFEL. To support this vision of an ultimate light source, we are pursuing a program of strategic R&D addressing several crucial elements. This includes development of a high repetition rate, VHF superconducting RF electron gun, R&D on photocathode materials by ARPES studies, and evaluation of FEL facility architectures (e.g., recirculation, compressor scenarios, CSR dechirping, undulator technologies) with the specific goal of cost containment. Studies of high harmonic generation for laser seeding are also planned.

  15. Free Electron Lasers using `Beam by Design'

    CERN Document Server

    Henderson, J R; McNeil, B W J

    2015-01-01

    Several methods have been proposed in the literature to improve Free Electron Laser output by transforming the electron phase-space before entering the FEL interaction region. By utilising `beam by design' with novel undulators and other beam changing elements, the operating capability of FELs may be further usefully extended. This paper introduces two new such methods to improve output from electron pulses with large energy spreads and the results of simulations of these methods in the 1D limit are presented. Both methods predict orders of magnitude improvements to output radiation powers.

  16. Kinetic theory of free electron lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hafizi, B. [Naval Research Lab., Washington, DC (United States); Roberson, C.W. [Office of Naval Research, Arlington, VA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    We have developed a relativistic kinetic theory of free electron lasers (FELs). The growth rate, efficiency, filling factor and radius of curvature of the radiation wave fronts are determined. We have used the theory to examine the effects of beam compression on growth rate. The theory has been extended to include self field effects on FEL operation. These effects are particularly important in compact, low voltage FELs. The surprising result is that the self field contribution to the beam quality is opposite to the emittance contribution. Hence self fields can improve beam quality, particularly in compact, low voltage FELs.

  17. Airborne Tactical Free-Electron Laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitney, Roy; Neil, George

    2007-02-01

    The goal of 100 kilowatts (kW) of directed energy from an airborne tactical platform has proved challenging due to the size and weight of most of the options that have been considered. However, recent advances in Free-Electron Lasers appear to offer a solution along with significant tactical advantages: a nearly unlimited magazine, time structures for periods from milliseconds to hours, radar like functionality, and the choice of the wavelength of light that best meets mission requirements. For an Airborne Tactical Free-Electron Laser (ATFEL) on a platforms such as a Lockheed C-130J-30 and airships, the two most challenging requirements, weight and size, can be met by generating the light at a higher harmonic, aggressively managing magnet weights, managing cryogenic heat loads using recent SRF R&D results, and using FEL super compact design concepts that greatly reduce the number of components. The initial R&D roadmap for achieving an ATFEL is provided in this paper. Performing this R&D is expected to further reduce the weight, size and power requirements for the FELs the Navy is currently developing for shipboard applications, as well as providing performance enhancements for the strategic airborne MW class FELs. The 100 kW ATFEL with its tactical advantages may prove sufficiently attractive for early advancement in the queue of deployed FELs.

  18. Holographic free-electron light source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guanhai; Clarke, Brendan P.; So, Jin-Kyu; MacDonald, Kevin F.; Zheludev, Nikolay I.

    2016-12-01

    Recent advances in the physics and technology of light generation via free-electron proximity and impact interactions with nanostructures (gratings, photonic crystals, nano-undulators, metamaterials and antenna arrays) have enabled the development of nanoscale-resolution techniques for such applications as mapping plasmons, studying nanoparticle structural transformations and characterizing luminescent materials (including time-resolved measurements). Here, we introduce a universal approach allowing generation of light with prescribed wavelength, direction, divergence and topological charge via point-excitation of holographic plasmonic metasurfaces. It is illustrated using medium-energy free-electron injection to generate highly-directional visible to near-infrared light beams, at selected wavelengths in prescribed azimuthal and polar directions, with brightness two orders of magnitude higher than that from an unstructured surface, and vortex beams with topological charge up to ten. Such emitters, with micron-scale dimensions and the freedom to fully control radiation parameters, offer novel applications in nano-spectroscopy, nano-chemistry and sensing.

  19. Modelling elliptically polarised Free Electron Lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Henderson, J R; Freund, H P; McNeil, B W J

    2016-01-01

    A model of a Free Electron Laser operating with an elliptically polarised undulator is presented. The equations describing the FEL interaction, including resonant harmonic radiation fields, are averaged over an undulator period and generate a generalised Bessel function scaling factor, similar to that of planar undulator FEL theory. Comparison between simulations of the averaged model with those of an unaveraged model show very good agreement in the linear regime. Two unexpected results were found. Firstly, an increased coupling to harmonics for elliptical rather than planar polarisarised undulators. Secondly, and thought to be unrelated to the undulator polarisation, a signficantly different evolution between the averaged and unaveraged simulations of the harmonic radiation evolution approaching FEL saturation.

  20. Electron emission following collective autoionization of He nanodroplets irradiated by intense XUV pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ovcharenko, Yevheniy; Moeller, Thomas [Technische Universitaet Berlin (Germany); Lyamayev, Viktor; Katzy, Raphael; LaForge, Aaron; Stienkemeier, Frank [Universitaet Freiburg (Germany); Devetta, Michele; Piseri, Paolo [University of Milan (Italy); Plekan, Oksana; Richter, Robert; Finetti, Paola; Prince, Kevin; Callegari, Carlo [Sincrotrone Trieste (Italy); O' Keeffe, Patrick; Coreno, Marcello [CNR-IMIP Rome (Italy); Mazza, Tommaso [European XFEL GmbH (Germany); Di Fraia, Michele [University of Trieste (Italy); Brauer, Nils-Benedict; Drabbels, Marcel [EPFL Lausanne (Switzerland); Stranges, Stefano [University of Rome ' ' Sapienza' ' (Italy)

    2013-07-01

    The narrow bandwidth and tunability of FERMI rate at Elettra seeded FEL (Free Electron Laser) open new areas in the study of ultrafast radiation-matter interaction. Using this unique source with high-brilliance femtosecond XUV-pulses, photoelectron spectroscopy of He-nanodroplets has been performed by velocity map imaging technique in the photon energy range 20-27 eV. The electron spectra show that ionization occurs not only by a direct process at photon energies above the ionization potential (IP) but also below the threshold. It was found that electron spectra below IP strongly depend on the total energy absorbed by nanodroplets and give evidence for a collective autoionization process with energy transfer between neighboring atoms.

  1. Plasma wake field XUV radiation source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prono, Daniel S. (Los Alamos, NM); Jones, Michael E. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1997-01-01

    A XUV radiation source uses an interaction of electron beam pulses with a gas to create a plasma radiator. A flowing gas system (10) defines a circulation loop (12) with a device (14), such as a high pressure pump or the like, for circulating the gas. A nozzle or jet (16) produces a sonic atmospheric pressure flow and increases the density of the gas for interacting with an electron beam. An electron beam is formed by a conventional radio frequency (rf) accelerator (26) and electron pulses are conventionally formed by a beam buncher (28). The rf energy is thus converted to electron beam energy, the beam energy is used to create and then thermalize an atmospheric density flowing gas to a fully ionized plasma by interaction of beam pulses with the plasma wake field, and the energetic plasma then loses energy by line radiation at XUV wavelengths Collection and focusing optics (18) are used to collect XUV radiation emitted as line radiation when the high energy density plasma loses energy that was transferred from the electron beam pulses to the plasma.

  2. Initial Results from the XUV Doppler Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kano, R.; Hara, H.; Kobayashi, K.; Kumagai, K.; Nagata, S.; Sakao, T.; Shimizu, T.; Tsuneta, S.; Yoshida, T.

    We developed a unique telescope to obtain simultaneous XUV images and the velocity maps by measuring the line-of-sight Doppler shifts of the Fe XIV 211A&ring line (T = 1.8 MK): the Solar XUV Doppler Telescope (hereafter XDT). The telescope was launched by the Institute of Space and Astronautical Science with the 22nd S520 rocket on January 31, 1998, and took 14 XUV whole sun images during 5 minutes. Simultaneous observations of XDT with Yohkoh (SXT), SOHO (EIT, CDS, LASCO and MDI) were successfully carried out. The images taken with EIT, XDT and SXT are able to cover the wide temperature ranging from 1 to 10 MK, and clearly show the multi-temperature nature of the solar corona. Indeed, we notice that both the cool (1-2 MK) loops observed with EIT and XDT, and the hot (>3 MK) loops observed with SXT exist in the same active regions but in a spatially exclusive way. The XDT red-blue ratio between longer- and shorter-wavelength bands of Fe XIV 211A&ring line indicates a possible down-flow of 1.8 MK plasma near the footpoints of multiple cool loops

  3. First observation of SASE radiation using the compact wide-spectral-range XUV spectrometer at FLASH2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanikawa, T., E-mail: takanori.tanikawa@desy.de [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Hage, A. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen' s University Belfast, University Road, Belfast BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Kuhlmann, M. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Gonschior, J. [Max Planck Research Group for Structural Dynamics, Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Grunewald, S.; Plönjes, E.; Düsterer, S.; Brenner, G.; Dziarzhytski, S.; Braune, M.; Brachmanski, M. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Yin, Z. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Max Planck Institute for Biophysical Chemistry, Am Fassberg 11, 37077 Göttingen (Germany); Siewert, F. [Helmholtz Zentrum Berlin, Albert-Einstein-Str. 15, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Dzelzainis, T.; Dromey, B. [School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen' s University Belfast, University Road, Belfast BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Prandolini, M.J. [Helmholtz-Institut Jena, Fröbelstieg 3, 07743 Jena (Germany); Tavella, F. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, CA 94025 (United States); Zepf, M. [School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen' s University Belfast, University Road, Belfast BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Helmholtz-Institut Jena, Fröbelstieg 3, 07743 Jena (Germany); Faatz, B. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany)

    2016-09-11

    The Free-electron LASer in Hamburg (FLASH) has been extended with a new undulator line FLASH2 in 2014. A compact grazing-incident wide-spectral-range spectrometer based on spherical-variable-line-spacing (SVLS) gratings in the extreme ultraviolet (XUV) region was constructed to optimize and characterize the free-electron laser (FEL) performance at FLASH2. The spectrometer is equipped with three different concave SVLS gratings covering a spectral range from 1 to 62 nm to analyze the spectral characteristics of the XUV radiation. Wavelength calibration and evaluation of the spectral resolution were performed at the plane grating monochromator beamline PG2 at FLASH1 before the installation at FLASH2, and compared with analytical simulations. The first light using self-amplified spontaneous emission from FLASH2 was observed by the spectrometer during a simultaneous operation of both undulator lines—FLASH1 and FLASH2. In addition, the spectral resolution of the spectrometer was evaluated by comparing the measured spectrum from FLASH2 with FEL simulations.

  4. Workshop on scientific and industrial applications of free electron lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Difilippo, F.C. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA)); Perez, R.B. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA) Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (USA))

    1990-05-01

    A Workshop on Scientific and Industrial Applications of Free Electron Lasers was organized to address potential uses of a Free Electron Laser in the infrared wavelength region. A total of 13 speakers from national laboratories, universities, and the industry gave seminars to an average audience of 30 persons during June 12 and 13, 1989. The areas covered were: Free Electron Laser Technology, Chemistry and Surface Science, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Condensed Matter, and Biomedical Applications, Optical Damage, and Optoelectronics.

  5. Short Rayleigh length free electron lasers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. B. Colson

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Conventional free electron laser (FEL oscillators minimize the optical mode volume around the electron beam in the undulator by making the resonator Rayleigh length about one third to one half of the undulator length. This maximizes gain and beam-mode coupling. In compact configurations of high-power infrared FELs or moderate power UV FELs, the resulting optical intensity can damage the resonator mirrors. To increase the spot size and thereby reduce the optical intensity at the mirrors below the damage threshold, a shorter Rayleigh length can be used, but the FEL interaction is significantly altered. We model this interaction using a coordinate system that expands with the rapidly diffracting optical mode from the ends of the undulator to the mirrors. Simulations show that the interaction of the strongly focused optical mode with a narrow electron beam inside the undulator distorts the optical wave front so it is no longer in the fundamental Gaussian mode. The simulations are used to study how mode distortion affects the single-pass gain in weak fields, and the steady-state extraction in strong fields.

  6. Nearly free electron states in MXenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khazaei, Mohammad; Ranjbar, Ahmad; Ghorbani-Asl, Mahdi; Arai, Masao; Sasaki, Taizo; Liang, Yunye; Yunoki, Seiji

    2016-05-01

    Using a set of first-principles calculations, we studied the electronic structures of two-dimensional transition metal carbides and nitrides, so called MXenes, functionalized with F, O, and OH. Our projected band structures and electron localization function analyses reveal the existence of nearly free electron (NFE) states in a variety of MXenes. The NFE states are spatially located just outside the atomic structure of MXenes and are extended parallel to the surfaces. Moreover, we found that the OH-terminated MXenes offer the NFE states energetically close to the Fermi level. In particular, the NFE states in some of the OH-terminated MXenes, such as T i2C (OH) 2,Z r2C (OH) 2,Z r2N (OH) 2,H f2C (OH) 2,H f2N (OH) 2,N b2C (OH) 2 , and T a2C (OH) 2 , are partially occupied. This is in remarkable contrast to graphene, graphane, and Mo S2 , in which their NFE states are located far above the Fermi level and thus they are unoccupied. As a prototype of such systems, we investigated the electron transport properties of H f2C (OH) 2 and found that the NFE states in H f2C (OH) 2 provide almost perfect transmission channels without nuclear scattering for electron transport. Our results indicate that these systems might find applications in nanoelectronic devices. Our findings provide new insights into the unique electronic band structures of MXenes.

  7. The free-electron laser FLASH

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Siegfried Schreiber; Bart Faatz

    2015-01-01

    FLASH at DESY, Hamburg, Germany is the first free-electron laser(FEL) operating in the extreme ultraviolet(EUV)and soft x-ray wavelength range. FLASH is a user facility providing femtosecond short pulses with an unprecedented peak and average brilliance, opening new scientific opportunities in many disciplines. The first call for user experiments has been launched in 2005. The FLASH linear accelerator is based on TESLA superconducting technology, providing several thousands of photon pulses per second to user experiments. Probing femtosecond-scale dynamics in atomic and molecular reactions using, for instance, a combination of x-ray and optical pulses in a pump and probe arrangement,as well as single-shot diffraction imaging of biological objects and molecules, are typical experiments performed at the facility. We give an overview of the FLASH facility, and describe the basic principles of the accelerator. Recently,FLASH has been extended by a second undulator beamline(FLASH2) operated in parallel to the first beamline, extending the capacity of the facility by a factor of two.

  8. Circular dichroism measurements at an x-ray free-electron laser with polarization control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, G.; Lindahl, A. O.; Knie, A.; Hartmann, N.; Lutman, A. A.; MacArthur, J. P.; Shevchuk, I.; Buck, J.; Galler, A.; Glownia, J. M.; Helml, W.; Huang, Z.; Kabachnik, N. M.; Kazansky, A. K.; Liu, J.; Marinelli, A.; Mazza, T.; Nuhn, H.-D.; Walter, P.; Viefhaus, J.; Meyer, M.; Moeller, S.; Coffee, R. N.; Ilchen, M.

    2016-08-01

    A non-destructive diagnostic method for the characterization of circularly polarized, ultraintense, short wavelength free-electron laser (FEL) light is presented. The recently installed Delta undulator at the LCLS (Linac Coherent Light Source) at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory (USA) was used as showcase for this diagnostic scheme. By applying a combined two-color, multi-photon experiment with polarization control, the degree of circular polarization of the Delta undulator has been determined. Towards this goal, an oriented electronic state in the continuum was created by non-resonant ionization of the O2 1s core shell with circularly polarized FEL pulses at hν ≃ 700 eV. An also circularly polarized, highly intense UV laser pulse with hν ≃ 3.1 eV was temporally and spatially overlapped, causing the photoelectrons to redistribute into so-called sidebands that are energetically separated by the photon energy of the UV laser. By determining the circular dichroism of these redistributed electrons using angle resolving electron spectroscopy and modeling the results with the strong-field approximation, this scheme allows to unambiguously determine the absolute degree of circular polarization of any pulsed, ultraintense XUV or X-ray laser source.

  9. Efficiency enhancement of a two-beam free-electron laser using a nonlinearly tapered wiggler

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Maryam Zahedian; B.Maraghechi; M.H.Rouhani

    2012-01-01

    A nonlinear and non-averaged model of a two-beam free-electron laser (FEL) wiggler that is tapered nonlinearly in the absence of slippage is presented.The two beams are assumed to have different energies,and the fundamental resonance of the higher energy beam is at the third harmonic of the lower energy beam.By using Maxwell's equations and the full Lorentz force equation of motion for the electron beams,coupled differential equations are derived and solved numerically by the fourth-order Runge-Kutta method.The amplitude of the wiggler field is assumed to decrease nonlinearly when the saturation of the third harmonic occurs.By simulation,the optimum starting point of the tapering and the slopes for reducing the wiggler amplitude are found.This technique can be applied to substantially improve the efficiency of the two-beam FEL in the XUV and X-ray regions.The effect of tapering on the dynamical stability of the fast electron beam is also studied.

  10. STUDIES OF A FREE ELECTRON LASER DRIVEN BY A LASER-PLASMA ACCELERATOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montgomery, A.; Schroeder, C.; Fawley, W.

    2008-01-01

    A free electron laser (FEL) uses an undulator, a set of alternating magnets producing a periodic magnetic fi eld, to stimulate emission of coherent radiation from a relativistic electron beam. The Lasers, Optical Accelerator Systems Integrated Studies (LOASIS) group at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) will use an innovative laserplasma wakefi eld accelerator to produce an electron beam to drive a proposed FEL. In order to optimize the FEL performance, the dependence on electron beam and undulator parameters must be understood. Numerical modeling of the FEL using the simulation code GINGER predicts the experimental results for given input parameters. Among the parameters studied were electron beam energy spread, emittance, and mismatch with the undulator focusing. Vacuum-chamber wakefi elds were also simulated to study their effect on FEL performance. Energy spread was found to be the most infl uential factor, with output FEL radiation power sharply decreasing for relative energy spreads greater than 0.33%. Vacuum chamber wakefi elds and beam mismatch had little effect on the simulated LOASIS FEL at the currents considered. This study concludes that continued improvement of the laser-plasma wakefi eld accelerator electron beam will allow the LOASIS FEL to operate in an optimal regime, producing high-quality XUV and x-ray pulses.

  11. STUDIES OF A FREE ELECTRON LASER DRIVEN BY A LASER-PLASMA ACCELERATOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montgomery, A.; Schroeder, C.; Fawley, W.

    2008-01-01

    A free electron laser (FEL) uses an undulator, a set of alternating magnets producing a periodic magnetic fi eld, to stimulate emission of coherent radiation from a relativistic electron beam. The Lasers, Optical Accelerator Systems Integrated Studies (LOASIS) group at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) will use an innovative laserplasma wakefi eld accelerator to produce an electron beam to drive a proposed FEL. In order to optimize the FEL performance, the dependence on electron beam and undulator parameters must be understood. Numerical modeling of the FEL using the simulation code GINGER predicts the experimental results for given input parameters. Among the parameters studied were electron beam energy spread, emittance, and mismatch with the undulator focusing. Vacuum-chamber wakefi elds were also simulated to study their effect on FEL performance. Energy spread was found to be the most infl uential factor, with output FEL radiation power sharply decreasing for relative energy spreads greater than 0.33%. Vacuum chamber wakefi elds and beam mismatch had little effect on the simulated LOASIS FEL at the currents considered. This study concludes that continued improvement of the laser-plasma wakefi eld accelerator electron beam will allow the LOASIS FEL to operate in an optimal regime, producing high-quality XUV and x-ray pulses.

  12. Circular dichroism measurements at an x-ray free-electron laser with polarization control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartmann, G.; Shevchuk, I.; Walter, P.; Viefhaus, J. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron, Notkestraße 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Lindahl, A. O. [PULSE at Stanford, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Knie, A. [Institut für Physik, University of Kassel, Heinrich-Plett-Str. 40, 34132 Kassel (Germany); Hartmann, N.; Lutman, A. A.; MacArthur, J. P.; Glownia, J. M.; Helml, W.; Huang, Z.; Marinelli, A.; Nuhn, H.-D.; Moeller, S.; Coffee, R. N.; Ilchen, M., E-mail: markus.ilchen@xfel.eu [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Buck, J.; Galler, A.; Liu, J. [European XFEL GmbH, Albert-Einstein-Ring 19, 22761 Hamburg (Germany); and others

    2016-08-15

    A non-destructive diagnostic method for the characterization of circularly polarized, ultraintense, short wavelength free-electron laser (FEL) light is presented. The recently installed Delta undulator at the LCLS (Linac Coherent Light Source) at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory (USA) was used as showcase for this diagnostic scheme. By applying a combined two-color, multi-photon experiment with polarization control, the degree of circular polarization of the Delta undulator has been determined. Towards this goal, an oriented electronic state in the continuum was created by non-resonant ionization of the O{sub 2} 1s core shell with circularly polarized FEL pulses at hν ≃ 700 eV. An also circularly polarized, highly intense UV laser pulse with hν ≃ 3.1 eV was temporally and spatially overlapped, causing the photoelectrons to redistribute into so-called sidebands that are energetically separated by the photon energy of the UV laser. By determining the circular dichroism of these redistributed electrons using angle resolving electron spectroscopy and modeling the results with the strong-field approximation, this scheme allows to unambiguously determine the absolute degree of circular polarization of any pulsed, ultraintense XUV or X-ray laser source.

  13. Nonlinear optics with coherent free electron lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bencivenga, F.; Capotondi, F.; Mincigrucci, R.; Cucini, R.; Manfredda, M.; Pedersoli, E.; Principi, E.; Simoncig, A.; Masciovecchio, C.

    2016-12-01

    We interpreted the recent construction of free electron laser (FELs) facilities worldwide as an unprecedented opportunity to bring concepts and methods from the scientific community working with optical lasers into the domain of x-ray science. This motivated our efforts towards the realization of FEL-based wave-mixing applications. In this article we present new extreme ultraviolet transient grating (X-TG) data from vitreous SiO2, collected using two crossed FEL pulses (photon frequency 38 eV) to generate the X-TG and a phase matched optical probing pulse (photon frequency 3.1 eV). This experiment extends our previous investigation, which was carried out on a nominally identical sample using a different FEL photon frequency (45 eV) to excite the X-TG. The present data are featured by a peak intensity of the X-TG signal substantially larger than that previously reported and by slower modulations of the X-TG signal at positive delays. These differences could be ascribed to the different FEL photon energy used in the two experiments or to differences in the sample properties. A systematic X-TG study on the same sample as a function of the FEL wavelength is needed to draw a consistent conclusion. We also discuss how the advances in the performance of the FELs, in terms of generation of fully coherent photon pulses and multi-color FEL emission, may push the development of original experimental strategies to study matter at the femtosecond-nanometer time-length scales, with the unique option of element and chemical state specificity. This would allow the development of advanced experimental tools based on wave-mixing processes, which may have a tremendous impact in the study of a large array of phenomena, ranging from nano-dynamics in complex materials to charge and energy transfer processes.

  14. Dynamics of a multi-beam photonic free electron laser

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lee, J.H.H.; van Dijk, M.W.; Denis, T.; van der Slot, Petrus J.M.; Boller, Klaus J.

    2012-01-01

    A photonic free-electron laser (pFEL) uses free electrons streaming through a photonic crystal (PhC) to generate tunable coherent radiation. Here, we consider a pFEL driven by a set of three low energy (~ 10 keV), low perveance (< 0.1 μP) electron beams. Using a particle-in- cell code, we numericall

  15. Effects of XUV radiation on circumbinary planets

    CERN Document Server

    Sanz-Forcada, J; Micela, G

    2014-01-01

    Several circumbinary planets have recently been discovered. The orbit of a planet around a binary stellar system poses several dynamic constraints. The effects that radiation from the host stars may have on the planet atmospheres must be considered. Because of the configuration of a close binary system, these stars have a high rotation rate, which causes a permanent state of high stellar activity and copious XUV radiation. The accumulated effects are stronger than for exoplanets around single stars, and cause a faster evaporation of their atmospheres. We evaluate the effects that stellar radiation has on the evaporation of exoplanets around binary systems and on the survival of these planets. We considered the XUV spectral range to account for the photons that are easily absorbed by a planet atmosphere that is mainly composed of hydrogen. A more complex atmospheric composition is expected to absorb this radiation more efficiently. We used direct X-ray observations to evaluate the energy in the X-rays range an...

  16. Manifestation of attosecond XUV fields temporal structures in attosecond streaking spectrogram

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guanglong Chen; Yunjiu Cao; Dong Eon Kim

    2011-01-01

    @@ The features of an attosecond extreme ultraviolet (XUV) field are encoded in the attosecond XUV spectrogram.We investigate the effect of the temporal structures of attosecond XUV fields on the attosecond streaking spectrogram.Factors such as the number of attosecond XUV pulses and the temporal chirp of attosecond XUV pulses are considered.Results indicate that unlike the attosecond streaking spectrogram for an attosecond XUV field with two pulses of a half-cycle separation of streaking field, the spectrogram for the attosecond XUV field with three pulses demonstrates fine spectral fringes in separated traces.%The features of an attosecond extreme ultraviolet (XUV) field are encoded in the attosecond XUV spectrogram. We investigate the effect of the temporal structures of attosecond XUV fields on the attosecond streaking spectrogram. Factors such as the number of attosecond XUV pulses and the temporal chirp of attosecond XUV pulses are considered. Results indicate that unlike the attosecond streaking spectrogram for an attosecond XUV field with two pulses of a half-cycle separation of streaking field, the spectrogram for the attosecond XUV field with three pulses demonstrates fine spectral fringes in separated traces.

  17. Biological applications of ultraviolet free-electron lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sutherland, J.C.

    1997-10-01

    This review examines the possibilities for biological research using the three ultraviolet free-electron lasers that are nearing operational status in the US. The projected operating characteristics of major interest in biological research of the free-electron lasers at Brookhaven National Laboratory, the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, and Duke University are presented. Experimental applications in the areas of far- and vacuum ultraviolet photophysics and photochemistry, structural biology, environmental photobiology, and medical research are discussed and the prospects for advances in these areas, based upon the characteristics of the new ultraviolet free-electron lasers, are evaluated.

  18. Absolute calibration of a multilayer-based XUV diagnostic

    CERN Document Server

    Stuik, R; Tümmler, J; Bijkerk, F

    2002-01-01

    A portable, universal narrowband XUV diagnostic suitable for calibration of various XUV light sources, was built, tested and fully calibrated. The diagnostic allows measurement of the absolute XUV energy and average power in two selected wavelength bands, at 11.4 and 13.4 nm. In addition, the pulse-to-pulse and long-term XUV stability of the source can be assessed, as well as the contamination of multilayer XUV optics exposed to the source. This paper describes the full calibration procedure: all optical elements were calibrated at the wavelength of operation by Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt at the storage ring Bessy II, a full analysis of geometrical factors was done, and the influence of the spectral emissivity of the source on the calibration was analyzed in detail. The calibration was performed both for the centroid wavelength as for the full bandwidth of the diagnostic. The total uncertainty in the absolute calibration allowed measurement of source characteristics with an uncertainty of less than...

  19. Studies of high repetition rate laser-produced plasma soft-X-ray amplifiers; Etudes d'amplificateurs plasma laser a haute cadence dans le domaine X-UV et applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cassou, K

    2006-12-15

    The progress made as well on the Ti:Sa laser system, as in the control and the knowledge of laser produced X-UV sources allowed the construction of a X-UV laser station dedicated to the applications. My thesis work falls under the development of this station and more particularly on the characterization of a X-UV laser plasma amplifier. The experimental study relates to the coupling improvement of the pump infra-red laser with plasma within the framework of the transient collisional X-UV laser generation. These X-UV lasers are generated in a plasma formed by the interaction of a solid target and a laser pulse of approximately 500 ps duration, followed by a second infra-red laser pulse known as of pump (about 5 ps) impinging on the target in grazing incidence. For the first time, a complete parametric study was undertaken on the influence of the grazing angle on the pumping of the amplifying medium. One of the results was to reach very high peak brightness about 10{sup 28} ph/s/mm{sup 2}/mrad{sup 2}/(0.1%bandwidth), which compares well with the free-electron laser brightness. Moreover, we modified then used a new two-dimensional hydrodynamic code with adaptive mesh refinement in order to understand the influence of the space-time properties of the infra-red laser on the formation and the evolution of the amplifying plasma. Our modeling highlighted the interest to use a super Gaussian transverse profile for the line focus leading to an increase in a factor two of the gain region size and a reduction of the electron density gradient by three orders of magnitude. These improvements should strongly increase the energy contained in X-UV laser beam. We thus used X-UV laser to study the appearance of transient defects produced by a laser IR on a beam-splitter rear side. We also began research on the mechanisms of DNA damage induced by a very intense X-UV radiation. (author)

  20. A spectral unaveraged algorithm for free electron laser simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andriyash, I.A., E-mail: igor.andriyash@gmail.com [Laboratoire d' Optique Appliquée, ENSTA-ParisTech, CNRS, Ecole Polytechnique, UMR 7639, 91761 Palaiseau (France); P.N. Lebedev Physics Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Lehe, R.; Malka, V. [Laboratoire d' Optique Appliquée, ENSTA-ParisTech, CNRS, Ecole Polytechnique, UMR 7639, 91761 Palaiseau (France)

    2015-02-01

    We propose and discuss a numerical method to model electromagnetic emission from the oscillating relativistic charged particles and its coherent amplification. The developed technique is well suited for free electron laser simulations, but it may also be useful for a wider range of physical problems involving resonant field–particles interactions. The algorithm integrates the unaveraged coupled equations for the particles and the electromagnetic fields in a discrete spectral domain. Using this algorithm, it is possible to perform full three-dimensional or axisymmetric simulations of short-wavelength amplification. In this paper we describe the method, its implementation, and we present examples of free electron laser simulations comparing the results with the ones provided by commonly known free electron laser codes.

  1. A spectral unaveraged algorithm for free electron laser simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Andriyash, Igor A; Malka, Victor

    2014-01-01

    We propose and discuss a numerical method to model electromagnetic emission from the oscillating relativistic charged particles and its coherent amplification. The developed technique is well suited for free electron laser simulations, but it may also be useful for a wider range of physical problems involving resonant field-particles interactions. The algorithm integrates the unaveraged coupled equations for the particles and the electromagnetic fields in a discrete spectral domain. Using this algorithm, it is possible to perform full three-dimensional simulations of short-wavelength amplification. In this paper we describe the algorithm, its implementation, and we present examples of free electron laser simulations comparing the results with the ones provided by commonly known free electron laser codes.

  2. The FERMI@Elettra free-electron-laser source for coherent X-ray physics: photon properties, beam transport system, and applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allaria, Enrico; Callegari, Carlo; Cocco, Daniele; Fawley, William M.; Kiskinova, Maya; Masciovecchio, Claudio; Parmigiani, Fulvio

    2010-04-05

    FERMI@Elettra is comprised of two free electron lasers (FELs) that will generate short pulses (tau ~;; 25 to 200 fs) of highly coherent radiation in the XUV and soft X-ray region. The use of external laser seeding together with a harmonic upshift scheme to obtain short wavelengths will give FERMI@Elettra the capability to produce high quality, longitudinal coherent photon pulses. This capability together with the possibilities of temporal synchronization to external lasers and control of the output photon polarization will open new experimental opportunities not possible with currently available FELs. Here we report on the predicted radiation coherence properties and important configuration details of the photon beam transport system. We discuss the several experimental stations that will be available during initial operations in 2011, and we give a scientific perspective on possible experiments that can exploit the critical parameters of this new light source.

  3. Gain of double-slab Cherenkov free-electron laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, D. [Institute for laser Technology, suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)], E-mail: dazhi_li@hotmail.com; Huo, G. [Petroleum development center, Shengli Oilfield, SINOPEC, Dongying 257001 (China); Imasak, K. [Institute for laser Technology, suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Asakawa, M. [Department of pure and applied physics, Faculty of Engineering Science, Kansai University, Osaka 564-8680 (Japan)

    2009-07-21

    A formula is derived for the small-signal gain of a double-slab Cherenkov free-electron laser. The simplified model is composed of a rectangular wave-guide partially filled with two lined parallel dielectric slabs and a sheet electron beam. The theory describes the electron beam as a plasma dielectric moving between the two dielectric slabs. With the help of hydrodynamic approximation, we derived the dispersion equation and the formula of small-signal gain. Through numerical computing, we studied an ongoing experiment of double-slab Cherenkov free-electron laser, and worked out the synchronous frequency and single-pass gain.

  4. Chaotic dynamics in a storage-ring Free Electron Laser

    CERN Document Server

    De Ninno, G; Bruni, C; Couprie, Marie Emmanuelle

    2002-01-01

    The temporal dynamics of a storage-ring Free Electron Laser is here investigated with particular attention to the case in which an external modulation is applied to the laser-electron beam detuning. The system is shown to produce bifurcations, multi-furcations as well as chaotic regimes. The peculiarities of this phenomenon with respect to the analogous behavior displayed by conventional laser sources are pointed out. Theoretical results, obtained by means of a phenomenological model reproducing the evolution of the main statistical parameters of the system, are shown to be in a good agreement with experiments carried out on the Super-ACO Free Electron Laser.

  5. Rovibrational analysis of the XUV photodissociation of HeH{sup +} ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loreau, J. [Institute for Theoretical Atomic, Molecular and Optical Physics, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States); Lecointre, J.; Urbain, X. [Institute of Condensed Matter and Nanosciences, Universite Catholique de Louvain, B-1348 Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Vaeck, N. [Laboratoire de Chimie Quantique et Photophysique, Universite Libre de Bruxelles, CP160/09, B-1050 Bruxelles (Belgium)

    2011-11-15

    We investigate the dynamics of the photodissociation of the helium hydride ion HeH{sup +} by XUV radiation with the aim to establish a detailed comparison with a recent experimental work carried out at the FLASH free electron laser using both vibrationally hot and cold ions. We determine the corresponding rovibrational distributions using a dissociative charge transfer setup and the same source conditions as in the FLASH experiment. Using a nonadiabatic time-dependent wave-packet method, we calculate the partial photodissociation cross sections for the n=1-3 coupled electronic states of HeH{sup +}. We find good agreement with the experiment for the cross section into the He + H{sup +} dissociative channel. On the other hand, we show that the experimental observation of the importance of the electronic states with n>3 cannot be well explained theoretically, especially for cold (v=0) ions. We find a good agreement with the experiment on the relative contribution of the {Sigma} and {Pi} states to the cross section for the He{sup +} + H channel, but only a qualitative one for the He + H{sup +} channel. We discuss the factors that could explain the remaining discrepancies between theory and experiment.

  6. Compact XUV excimer radiation sources and their application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedenev, Andrei V.; Morozov, Andrei; Wieser, Jochen; Ulrich, Andreas

    2004-05-01

    Low energy electron beam excitation of dense helium and neon was used for light production in the extreme ultraviolet (XUV) wavelength range. The entire system was completely filled with the working gas avoiding the use of vacuum equipment for light production, propagation and detection. Emission spectra from He and Ne are dominated by the second continua with peak intensities at 80 and 83 nm, respectively. The hydrogen Lyman-α line was observed as the dominant impurity line. This XUV light source was used for transmission measurements of LiF near its absorption edge.

  7. First microwave generation in the FOM free-electron maser

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhoeven, A. G. A.; Bongers, W. A.; Bratman, V. L.; Caplan, M.; Denisov, G. G.; van der Geer, C. A. J.; Manintveld, P.; Poelman, A. J.; Pluygers, J.; Shmelyov, M. Y.; Smeets, P. H. M.; Sterk, A. B.; Urbanus, W. H.

    1998-01-01

    A free-electron maser (FEM) has been built as a pilot experiment for a millimetre-wave source for applications on future fusion research devices such as ITER, the International Tokamak Experimental Reactor. A unique feature of the Dutch fusion FEM is the possibility to tune the frequency over the en

  8. First high power experiments with the Dutch free electron maser

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhoeven, A. G. A.; Bongers, W. A.; Bratman, V. L.; Caplan, M.; Denisov, G. G.; van Dijk, G.; van der Geer, C. A. J.; Manintveld, P.; Poelman, A. J.; Pluygers, J.; Shmelyov, M. Y.; Smeets, P. H. M.; Sterk, A. B.; Urbanus, W. H.

    1998-01-01

    A free electron maser (FEM) has been built as a mm-wave source for applications on future fusion research devices such as ITER, the international tokamak experimental reactor [M. A. Makowski, F. Elio, and D. Loeser, April 97, Proc. 10th Workshop on ECE and ECRH, EC10, 549-559. World Scientific (1998

  9. A free-electron laser in the pulsar magnetosphere

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fung, P.K.; Kuijpers, J.M.E.

    2004-01-01

    We have studied systematically the free-electron laser in the context of high brightness pulsar radio emission. In this paper, we have numerically examined the case where a transverse electromagnetic wave is distorting the motion of a relativistic electron beam while travelling over one stellar radi

  10. Study of Short Bunches at the Free Electron Laser CLIO

    CERN Document Server

    Delerue, Nicolas; Khodnevych, Vitalii; Berthet, Jean-Paul; Glotin, Francois; Ortega, Jean-Michel; Prazeres, Rui

    2016-01-01

    CLIO is a Free Electron Laser based on a thermionic electron gun. In its normal operating mode it delivers electron 8 pulses but studies are ongoing to shorten the pulses to about 1 ps. We report on simulations showing how the pulse can be shortened and the expected signal yield from several bunch length diagnostics (Coherent Transition Radiation, Coherent Smith Purcell Radiation).

  11. A high brightness electron beam for Free Electron Lasers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oerle, van Bartholomeus Mathias

    1997-01-01

    In a free electron laser, coherent radiation is generated by letting an electron beam propagate through an alternating magnetic field. The magnetic field is created by a linear array of magnets, which is called an undulator or a wiggler. The wavelength of the laser radiation depends on the amplitude

  12. Free electron lifetime achievements in liquid Argon imaging TPC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baibussinov, B; Ceolin, M Baldo; Centro, S; Cieslik, K; Farnese, C; Fava, A; Gibin, D; Guglielmi, A; Meng, G; Pietropaolo, F; Varanini, F; Ventura, S [INFN, Sezione di Padova via Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Calligarich, E [INFN, Sezione di Pavia via Bassi 6, I-27100 Pavia (Italy); Rubbia, C, E-mail: Carlo.Rubbia@cern.c [Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso dell' INFN I-67010 Assergi (Italy)

    2010-03-15

    A key feature for the success of the liquid Argon imaging TPC (LAr-TPC) technology is the industrial purification against electro-negative impurities, especially Oxygen and Nitrogen remnants, which have to be continuously kept at an exceptionally low level by filtering and recirculating liquid Argon. Improved purification techniques have been applied to a 120 liters LAr-TPC test facility in the INFN-LNL laboratory. Through-going muon tracks have been used to determine the free electron lifetime in liquid Argon against electro-negative impurities. The short path length here observed (30 cm) is compensated by the high accuracy in the observation of the specific ionization of cosmic ray muons at sea level as a function of the drift distance. A free electron lifetime of tau {approx} (21.4{sup +7.3}{sub -4.3}) ms, namely > 15.8 ms at 90% C.L. has been observed over several weeks under stable conditions, corresponding to a residual Oxygen equivalent of {approx} 15 ppt (part per trillion). At 500 V/cm, the free electron speed is 1.5 mm/mus. In a LAr-TPC a free electron lifetime in excess of 15 ms corresponds for instance to an attenuation of less than 20% after a drift path of 5 m, opening the way to the operation of the LAr-TPC with exceptionally long drift distances.

  13. A microtron accelerator for a free electron laser

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Botman, J.I.M.; Delhez, J.L.; Webers, G.A.; Hagedoorn, H.L.; Kleeven, W.J.G.M.; Timmermans, J.C.M.; Ernst, G.J.; Verschuur, J.W.J.; Witteman, W.J.; Haselhoff, E.H.

    1991-01-01

    A racetrack microtron as a source for a free electron laser is being constructed. It will accelerate electrons up to 25 MeV to provide 10 ¿m radiation in a hybrid undulator with a periodicity distance of 25 mm. The aim is to accelerate 100 A bunches of 30 ps pulse length at 81.25 MHz. This frequency

  14. Applications of free electron lasers in the UV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Couprie, M.E.

    1994-12-31

    The first applications of the UV Free Electron Lasers (FEL) show the advance to a stage of maturity for such sources. Two-color experiments coupling storage ring FEL and synchrotron radiation offer the wide range of use. (TEC). 26 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Cavity ring down spectroscopy with a free-electron laser

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engeln, R.; van den Berg, E.; Meijer, G.; Lin, L.; Knippels, G.M.H.; van der Meer, A. F. G.

    1997-01-01

    A cavity ring down (CRD) absorption experiment is performed with a free-electron laser (FEL) operating in the 10-11 mu m region. A short infrared pulse of approximately 20 ns, sliced from the much longer FEL pulse, is used to measure CRD spectra of ethylene in two different ways. First, ''

  16. Modeling paraxial wave propagation in free-electron laser oscillators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karssenberg, J.G.; van der Slot, Petrus J.M.; Volokhine, I.; Verschuur, Jeroen W.J.; Boller, Klaus J.

    2006-01-01

    Modeling free-electron laser (FEL) oscillators requires calculation of both the light-beam interaction within the undulator and the light propagation outside the undulator. We have developed a paraxial optical propagation code that can be combined with various existing models of gain media, for

  17. Modeling paraxial wave propagation in free-electron laser oscillators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karssenberg, J.G.; Slot, van der P.J.M.; Volokhine, I.V.; Verschuur, J.W.J.; Boller, K.J.

    2006-01-01

    Modeling free-electron laser (FEL) oscillators requires calculation of both the light-beam interaction within the undulator and the light propagation outside the undulator. We have developed a paraxial optical propagation code that can be combined with various existing models of gain media, for exam

  18. Resonator design for a visible wavelength free-electron laser (*)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhowmik, A.; Lordi, N. (Rockwell International Corp., Canoga Park, CA (United States). Rocketdyne Div.); Ben-Zvi, I.; Gallardo, J. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States))

    1990-01-01

    Design requirements for a visible wavelength free-electron laser being developed at the Accelerator Test Facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory are presented along with predictions of laser performance from 3-D numerical simulations. The design and construction of the optical resonator, its alignment and control systems are also described. 15 refs., 8 figs., 4 tabs.

  19. Design and Analysis of Megawatt Class Free Electron Laser Weapons

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    25 H. THERMAL BLOOMING .......................................................................25 V. FREE ELECTRON LASER AND... thermal blooming. .................................................26 Figure 11. FEL 4-D model simulating an FEL oscillator configuration...nanoseconds apart . By contrast, normal conducting linear accelerators can only operate with microseconds-long macro-pulses separated by milliseconds due to

  20. An electro-optical timing diagnostic for pump-probe experiments at the free-electron laser in Hamburg FLASH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azima, Armin

    2009-07-15

    Femtosecond pump-probe experiments have extensively been used to follow atomic and molecular motion in time. The very intense extreme ultraviolet XUV light of the Free electron LASer in Hamburg FLASH facility allows to investigate fundamental processes such as direct one or few photon inner shell ionizations. A supplementary Ti:Sapphire near infrared femtosecond laser system allows to perform two-color pump-probe experiments with FLASH involving intense laser fields of hugely different photon energies. Within this work a bunch arrival measurement system has been built, which assists these two-color pump-probe experiments to reduce the temporal jitter of FLASH and to increase the temporal resolution. The diagnostic is based upon an electro-optical detection scheme and measures the relative arrival time between the Ti:Sapphire femtosecond pulse and the electron bunch, which generates the self-amplified by stimulated emission SASE XUV pulse in the undulator section of FLASH. Key feature of the diagnostic is a 150 m long glass fiber pulse transport line, which inflicts non-linear dispersion. A dispersion control system to compensate for this higher order dispersion has been developed including the control and programming of a spatial light phase modulator. It was possible to transport a 90 fs FWHM short near infrared femtosecond laser pulse Fourier limited by the dispersion compensated glass fiber. The electro-optical signal induced by the FLASH electron bunch was generated, characterized and optimized. The signal features beside the designated bunch arrival timing capability the additional possibility to measure the longitudinal electron bunch density distribution of an arbitrary bunch of FLASH in a single shot with a temporal resolution of below 100 fs RMS. Timing and bunch analysis capabilities of the developed diagnostic have been cross-checked with other comparable diagnostics at FLASH like the transversal deflecting cavity structure named LOLA. Finally, the

  1. XUV-initiated high harmonic generation: driving inner valence electrons using below-threshold-energy XUV light

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, A C

    2016-01-01

    We propose a novel scheme for resolving the contribution of inner- and outer-valence electrons in XUV-initiated high-harmonic generation in neon. By probing the atom with a low energy (below the 2s ionisation threshold) ultrashort XUV pulse, the 2p electron is steered away from the core, while the 2s electron is enabled to describe recollision trajectories. By selectively suppressing the 2p recollision trajectories we can resolve the contribution of the 2s electron to the high-harmonic spectrum. We apply the classical trajectory model to account for the contribution of the 2s electron, which allows for an intuitive understanding of the process.

  2. RoHS/Pb-free Electronics for DoD?: Managing the Pb-free Electronics Transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-14

    GEIA = Government Electronics & Information Technology Association AMC = Avionics Maintenance Conference Pb-free Electronics Risk Management PERM... AlA EMC PERM Consortium Management PERM International Beneficiaries ............... ?.~~~-~·i...elected) - AlA Liaison/Executive Secretary -DoD LSA4 for Soldering Technologies -Executive Committee Ex-Chair Task Team Leads International Advisory

  3. Crystallographic data processing for free-electron laser sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, Thomas A., E-mail: taw@physics.org; Barty, Anton; Stellato, Francesco [DESY, Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Holton, James M. [University of California, San Francisco, CA 94158 (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Kirian, Richard A. [DESY, Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287 (United States); Zatsepin, Nadia A. [Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287 (United States); Chapman, Henry N. [DESY, Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); University of Hamburg, Luruper Chaussee 149, 22761 Hamburg (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    A processing pipeline for diffraction data acquired using the ‘serial crystallography’ methodology with a free-electron laser source is described with reference to the crystallographic analysis suite CrystFEL and the pre-processing program Cheetah. A processing pipeline for diffraction data acquired using the ‘serial crystallography’ methodology with a free-electron laser source is described with reference to the crystallographic analysis suite CrystFEL and the pre-processing program Cheetah. A detailed analysis of the nature and impact of indexing ambiguities is presented. Simulations of the Monte Carlo integration scheme, which accounts for the partially recorded nature of the diffraction intensities, are presented and show that the integration of partial reflections could be made to converge more quickly if the bandwidth of the X-rays were to be increased by a small amount or if a slight convergence angle were introduced into the incident beam.

  4. Ramsey-type phase control of free electron beams

    CERN Document Server

    Echternkamp, Katharina E; Schäfer, Sascha; Ropers, Claus

    2016-01-01

    Interference between multiple distinct paths is a defining property of quantum physics, where "paths" may involve actual physical trajectories, as in interferometry, or transitions between different internal (e.g. spin) states, or both. A hallmark of quantum coherent evolution is the possibility to interact with a system multiple times in a phase-preserving manner. This principle underpins powerful multi-dimensional optical and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopies and related techniques, including Ramsey's method of separated oscillatory fields used in atomic clocks. Previously established for atomic, molecular and quantum dot systems, recent developments in the optical quantum state preparation of free electron beams suggest a transfer of such concepts to the realm of ultrafast electron imaging and spectroscopy. Here, we demonstrate the sequential coherent interaction of free electron states with two spatially separated, phase-controlled optical near-fields. Ultrashort electron pulses are acted upon in ...

  5. Vanderbilt free electron laser project in biomedical and materials research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haglund, Richard F.; Tolk, N. H.

    1988-06-01

    The Medical Free Electron Laser Program was awarded to develop, construct and operate a free-electron laser facility dedicated to biomedical and materials studies, with particular emphases on: fundamental studies of absorption and localization of electromagnetic energy on and near material surfaces, especially through electronic and other selective, non-statistical processes; non-thermal photon-materials interactions (e.g., electronic bond-breaking or vibrational energy transfer) in physical and biological materials as well as in long-wavelength biopolymer dynamics; development of FEL-based methods to study drug action and to characterize biomolecular properties and metabolic processes in biomembranes; clinical applications in otolaryngology, neurosurgery, ophthalmology and radiology stressing the use of the laser for selective laser-tissue, laser-cellular and laser-molecule interactions in both therapeutic and diagnostic modalities.

  6. Inverse free electron laser accelerator for advanced light sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. P. Duris

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available We discuss the inverse free electron laser (IFEL scheme as a compact high gradient accelerator solution for driving advanced light sources such as a soft x-ray free electron laser amplifier or an inverse Compton scattering based gamma-ray source. In particular, we present a series of new developments aimed at improving the design of future IFEL accelerators. These include a new procedure to optimize the choice of the undulator tapering, a new concept for prebunching which greatly improves the fraction of trapped particles and the final energy spread, and a self-consistent study of beam loading effects which leads to an energy-efficient high laser-to-beam power conversion.

  7. Physics of Superpulses in Storage Ring Free-Electron Lasers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir N. Litvinenko

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Contradictory to the widespread perception, storage ring free-electron lasers with substantial net gain can generate peak lasing power reaching GW levels in the so-called superpulse mode. This power level is sufficient for studies of nonlinear processes and efficient intracavity harmonic generation. This letter describes the physics of the superpulses and a phase-space refreshment in the electron beam responsible for this phenomenon.

  8. Component technologies for a recirculating linac free-electron laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litvinenko, Vladimir N.; Madey, John M. J.; Vinokurov, Nikolai A.

    1994-05-01

    The key component technologies required for a high average power free-electron laser (FEL) are described. Some basic aspects of approaches for high average power (scalable to megawatt level) accelerators and FELs are presented. A short description of the Novosibirsk 100 kW average power near infrared (IR) FEL driven by a race-track microtron-recuperator is given. The current status and plans for this facility are provided by Institute of Nuclear Physics (Novosibirsk).

  9. Free electron laser based on the Smith-Purcell radiation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Ming-hong; XIAO Xiao-guang; YU Hui-shan; MENG Xian-zhu

    2006-01-01

    A Smith-Purcell (SP) free electron laser (FEL) ,composed of a metallic diffraction flat grating,an open cylindrical mirror cavity and a relativistic sheet electron beam with moderate energy, is presented. The characteristics of this device are studied by theoretical analysis, experimental measurements and particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation method. Results indicate that the coherent radiation with an output peak power up to 50 MW at millimeter wavelengths can be generated by using relativistic electron beam of moderate energy.

  10. Pair creation and an x-ray free electron laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkofer, R; Hecht, M B; Roberts, C D; Schmidt, S M; Vinnik, D V

    2001-11-05

    Using a quantum kinetic equation we study the possibility that focused beams at proposed x-ray free electron laser facilities can initiate spontaneous electron-positron pair production from the QED vacuum. Under conditions reckoned achievable at planned facilities, repeated cycles of particle creation and annihilation will take place in tune with the laser frequency. The peak particle number density is insensitive to this frequency, and one can anticipate the production of a few hundred particle pairs per laser period.

  11. Naval electric weapons the electromagnetic railgun and free electron laser

    OpenAIRE

    Williams, Robert E.

    2004-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited Theory and simulations of the railgun and free electron laser are presented, as well as a suggestion for extending the railgun lifecycle. The theory, design, and analysis of an electromagnetic railgun using a numerical model are discussed. The effects of varying electrical pulse formations, rail materials and geometries are explored. The application of a metallurgical process to mitigate hypervelocity gouging in railgun rails is propos...

  12. High Harmonic Inverse Free Electron Laser Interaction at 800 nm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sears, C

    2005-03-08

    We demonstrate for the first time an inverse free electron laser (IFEL) operating at 800 nm and observe multiple resonances of the IFEL interaction. The IFEL is tested at half its fundamental resonance electron energy and scanned through multiple harmonics by adjusting the undulator field strength. We obtain a peak modulation of {approx}50 keV FWHM and observe the 4th through 6th harmonics of the IFEL resonance.

  13. An Efficient Microwave Power Source: Free-electron Laser Afterburner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, C.; Sessler, Andrew M.

    1993-03-04

    A kind of microwave power source, called a free-electron laser afterburner (FEL afterburner) which consists of a free-electron laser buncher and a slow-wave output structure sharing a magnetic wiggler field with the buncher, is proposed. The buncher and the slow-wave structure can operate in either a travelling-wave state or a standing-wave state. In the buncher, the wiggler field together with the radiation field makes an electron beam bunched, and in the slow-wave structure the wiggler field keeps the beam bunched while the bunched beam interacts strongly with the slow-wave structure and so produces rf power. The bunching process comes from the free-electron laser mechanism and the generating process of rf power is in a slow-wave structure. A three-dimensional, time-dependent code is used to simulate a particular standing-wave FEL afterburner and it is shown that rf power of up to 1.57 GW can be obtained, at 17.12 GHz, from a l-kA, 5-MeV electron beam.

  14. Noncollinear wave mixing of attosecond XUV and few-cycle optical laser pulses in gas-phase atoms: Toward multidimensional spectroscopy involving XUV excitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Wei; Warrick, Erika R.; Fidler, Ashley; Neumark, Daniel M.; Leone, Stephen R.

    2016-11-01

    Ultrafast nonlinear spectroscopy, which records transient wave-mixing signals in a medium, is a powerful tool to access microscopic information using light sources in the radio-frequency and optical regimes. The extension of this technique towards the extreme ultraviolet (XUV) or even x-ray regimes holds the promise to uncover rich structural or dynamical information with even higher spatial or temporal resolution. Here, we demonstrate noncollinear wave mixing between weak XUV attosecond pulses and a strong near-infrared (NIR) few-cycle laser pulse in gas phase atoms (one photon of XUV and two photons of NIR). In the noncollinear geometry the attosecond and either one or two NIR pulses interact with argon atoms. Nonlinear XUV signals are generated in a spatially resolved fashion as required by phase matching. Different transition pathways can be identified from these background-free nonlinear signals according to the specific phase-matching conditions. Time-resolved measurements of the spatially gated XUV signals reveal electronic coherences of Rydberg wave packets prepared by a single XUV photon or XUV-NIR two-photon excitation, depending on the applied pulse sequences. These measurements open possible applications of tabletop multidimensional spectroscopy to the study of dynamics associated with valence or core excitation with XUV photons.

  15. Online Monitoring of Laser-Generated XUV Radiation Spectra by Surface Reflectivity Measurements with Particle Detectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Hoffmann

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this contribution, we present a wavelength-sensitive method for the detection of extreme ultraviolet (XUV photon energies between 30 eV and 120 eV. The method is based on 45° reflectivity from either a cesium iodide-coated or an uncoated metal surface, which directs the XUV beam onto an electron or ion detector and its signal is used to monitor the XUV beam. The benefits of our approach are a spectrally sensitive diagnosis of the XUV radiation at the interaction place of time-resolved XUV experiments and the detection of infrared leak light though metal filters in high-harmonic generation (HHG experiments. Both features were tested using spectrally shaped XUV pulses from HHG in a capillary, and we have achieved excellent agreement with XUV spectrometer measurements and reflectivity calculations. Our obtained results are of interest for time-resolved XUV experiments presenting an additional diagnostic directly in the interaction region and for small footprint XUV beamline diagnostics.

  16. Free electron laser for gamma-gamma collider at TESLA

    CERN Document Server

    Saldin, E L; Yurkov, M V

    2000-01-01

    The present paper contains the results of optimization of the free electron laser for the gamma-gamma collider at TESLA. A superconducting linear accelerator, similar to the TESLA test facility (TTF) accelerator, produces a driving electron beam for the FEL. The MOPA FEL scheme is studied when the radiation from a master oscillator is amplified in the FEL amplifier with tapered undulator. The FEL produces the radiation of TW level with a wavelength of 1 mu m. Optimization of the FEL amplifier is performed with three-dimensional, time-dependent simulation code FAST.

  17. Deep Saturated Free Electron Laser Oscillators and Frozen Spikes

    CERN Document Server

    Ottaviani, P L; Dattoli, G; Sabia, E; Petrillo, V; Van Der Slot, P; Biedron, S; Milton, S

    2016-01-01

    We analyze the behavior of Free Electron Laser (FEL) oscillators operating in the deep saturated regime and point out the formation of sub-peaks of the optical pulse. They are very stable configurations, having a width corresponding to a coherence length. We speculate on the physical mechanisms underlying their growth and attempt an identification with FEL mode locked structures associated with Super Modes. Their impact on the intra-cavity nonlinear harmonic generation is also discussed along with the possibility of exploiting them as cavity out-coupler.

  18. Quantum regime of a free-electron laser: relativistic approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kling, Peter; Sauerbrey, Roland; Preiss, Paul; Giese, Enno; Endrich, Rainer; Schleich, Wolfgang P.

    2017-01-01

    In the quantum regime of the free-electron laser, the dynamics of the electrons is not governed by continuous trajectories but by discrete jumps in momentum. In this article, we rederive the two crucial conditions to enter this quantum regime: (1) a large quantum mechanical recoil of the electron caused by the scattering with the laser and the wiggler field and (2) a small energy spread of the electron beam. In contrast to our recent approach based on nonrelativistic quantum mechanics in a co-moving frame of reference, we now pursue a model in the laboratory frame employing relativistic quantum electrodynamics.

  19. Coherent XUV generation driven by sharp metal tips photoemission

    CERN Document Server

    Ciappina, M F; Shaaran, T; Lewenstein, M

    2014-01-01

    It was already experimentally demonstrated that high-energy electrons can be generated using metal nanotips as active media. In addition, it has been theoretically proven that the high-energy tail of the photoemitted electrons is intrinsically linked to the recollision phenomenon. Through this recollision process it is also possible to convert the energy gained by the laser-emitted electron in the continuum in a coherent XUV photon. It means the emission of harmonic radiation appears to be feasible, although it has not been experimentally demonstrated hitherto till now. In this paper, we employ a quantum mechanical approach to model the electron dipole moment including both the laser experimental conditions and the bulk matter properties and predict is possible to generate coherent UV and XUV radiation using metal nanotips as sources. Our quantum mechanical results are fully supported by their classical counterparts.

  20. Free electron lifetime achievements in Liquid Argon Imaging TPC

    CERN Document Server

    Baibussinov, B; Calligarich, E; Centro, S; Cieslik, K; Farnese, C; Fava, A; Gibin, D; Guglielmi, A; Meng, G; Pietropaolo, F; Rubbia, C; Varanini, F; Ventura, S

    2010-01-01

    A key feature for the success of the Liquid Argon TPC technology is the industrial purification against electro-negative impurities, especially Oxygen and Nitrogen remnants, which have to be initially and continuously kept at an exceptional purity. New purification techniques have been applied to a 120 litres LAr-TPC test facility in the INFN-LNL laboratory. Through-going muon tracks have been used to monitor the LAr purity. The short path length used (30 cm) is compensated by the high accuracy in the observation of the specific ionization of cosmic rays muons at sea level. A free electron lifetime of (21.4+7.3-4.3) ms, namely > 15.8 ms at 90 % C.L. has been observed under stable conditions over several weeks, corresponding to about 15 ppt (part per trillion) of Oxygen equivalent. At 500 V/cm, where the electron speed is approximately of 1.5 mm/us, the free electron lifetime >15 ms corresponds to an attenuation <15 % for a drift path of 5 m, opening the way to reliable operation of LAr TPC for exceptionall...

  1. Materials Research with the Vanderbilt Free-Electron Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolk, Norman

    1997-11-01

    The Vanderbilt Free-Electron Laser's (FEL) tunability (2-10=B5m), high intensity (15 MW) and short pulse structure (1 ps) make it ideal for studying (a) the electronic and vibrational structure of small and wide band gap semiconductors, and (b) non-thermal wavelength-selective materials alteration (``Free-Electron Laser Wavelength-Selective Materials Alteration and Photoexcitation Spectroscopy,'' N.H. Tolk, R.G. Albridge, A.V. Barnes, B.M. Barnes, J.L. Davidson, V.D. Gordon, G. Margaritondo, J.T. McKinley, G.A. Mensing, and J. Sturmann, Appl. Surf. Sci. 106, 205-210 (1996).). Two-photon absorption measurements in Ge were the first verification of a two-decades old predictionby Bassani and Hassan that the indirect two-photon absorption in Ge would be an LO-phonon assisted process. The FEL has greatly facilitated internal photoemission (IPE) heterojunction band discontinuity measurements. This technique is a photocurrent excitation spectroscopy that provides a direct measurement of the discontinuity without resorting to complex modeling. Another important area of materials research at the FEL concerns identification of wavelength-selective mechanisms for materials alteration. We have used the FEL to demonstrate strongly wavelength-selective ablation near the C-H stretch vibrational mode in chemical vapor deposited (CVD) diamond.

  2. Electron injector for Iranian Infrared Free Electron Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajabi, A.; Jazini, J.; Fathi, M.; Khosravi, N.; Shokri, B.

    2016-12-01

    The quality of the electron beam for applications like free electron lasers (FELs) has a direct impact on the quality of the laser radiation. The electron injector considered for Iranian Infrared Free Electron Laser (IRIFEL) includes a thermionic RF electron gun plus a bunch compressor as the electron preinjector and a 50 MeV constant gradient traveling wave linac as the main accelerator of the electron injector. In the present work, a thermionic RF gun is designed and matched with an optimized linac to produce a high quality mono-energetic electron beam. The results show that the preinjector is capable of delivering an electron bunch with 1 ps bunch length and 3 mm-mrad emittance to the linac entrance which is desirable for IRIFEL operation. The results also show that by geometrical manipulation and optimization of the linac structure, the pattern of the RF fields in the linac will be more symmetric, which is important in order to produce high stable mono-energetic bunches.

  3. Development of superconducting acceleration cavity technology for free electron lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jong Min; Lee, Byung Cheol; Kim, Sun Kook; Jeong, Young Uk; Cho, Sung Oh

    2000-10-01

    As a result of the cooperative research between the KAERI and Peking University, the key technologies of superconducting acceleration cavity and photoelectron gun have been developed for the application to high power free electron lasers. A 1.5-GHz, 1-cell superconducting RF cavity has been designed and fabricated by using pure Nb sheets. The unloaded Q values of the fabricated superconducting cavity has been measured to be 2x10{sup 9} at 2.5K, and 8x10{sup 9} at 1.8K. The maximum acceleration gradient achieved was 12 MeV/m at 2.5K, and 20MV/m at 1.8 K. A cryostat for the 1-cell superconducting cavity has been designed. As a source of electron beam, a DC photocathode electron gun has been designed and fabricated, which is composed of a photocathode evaporation chamber and a 100-keV acceleration chamber. The efficiency of the Cs2Te photocathode is 3% nominally at room temperature, 10% at 290 deg C. The superconducting photoelectron gun system developed has been estimated to be a good source of high-brightness electron beam for high-power free electron lasers.

  4. Charge transfer to ground-state ions produces free electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, D.; Fukuzawa, H.; Sakakibara, Y.; Takanashi, T.; Ito, Y.; Maliyar, G. G.; Motomura, K.; Nagaya, K.; Nishiyama, T.; Asa, K.; Sato, Y.; Saito, N.; Oura, M.; Schöffler, M.; Kastirke, G.; Hergenhahn, U.; Stumpf, V.; Gokhberg, K.; Kuleff, A. I.; Cederbaum, L. S.; Ueda, K.

    2017-01-01

    Inner-shell ionization of an isolated atom typically leads to Auger decay. In an environment, for example, a liquid or a van der Waals bonded system, this process will be modified, and becomes part of a complex cascade of relaxation steps. Understanding these steps is important, as they determine the production of slow electrons and singly charged radicals, the most abundant products in radiation chemistry. In this communication, we present experimental evidence for a so-far unobserved, but potentially very important step in such relaxation cascades: Multiply charged ionic states after Auger decay may partially be neutralized by electron transfer, simultaneously evoking the creation of a low-energy free electron (electron transfer-mediated decay). This process is effective even after Auger decay into the dicationic ground state. In our experiment, we observe the decay of Ne2+ produced after Ne 1s photoionization in Ne-Kr mixed clusters.

  5. Spin-polarizing interferometric beam splitter for free electrons

    CERN Document Server

    Dellweg, Matthias M

    2016-01-01

    A spin-polarizing electron beam splitter is described which relies on an arrangement of linearly polarized laser waves of nonrelativistic intensity. An incident electron beam is first coherently scattered off a bichromatic laser field, splitting the beam into two portions, with electron spin and momentum being entangled. Afterwards, the partial beams are coherently superposed in an interferometric setup formed by standing laser waves. As a result, the outgoing electron beam is separated into its spin components along the laser magnetic field, which is shown by both analytical and numerical solutions of Pauli's equation. The proposed laser field configuration thus exerts the same effect on free electrons like an ordinary Stern-Gerlach magnet does on atoms.

  6. Raman free-electron laser with a coaxial wiggler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farokhi, B.; Maraghechi, B.; Willett, J. E.

    2000-10-01

    A one-dimensional theory of the stimulated Raman scattering mechanism for a coaxial free-electron laser (FEL) is developed. The beam-frame FEL dispersion relation and a formula for the lab-frame spatial growth rate are derived. A numerical study of the growth rate for the coaxial wiggler is made and compared with that for the helical wiggler. Except for a part of the group II orbits, the growth rate is found to be less than the helical wiggler. Relativistic effects due to the transverse oscillation of electrons in the wiggler field prevent the FEL operation from approaching magnetoresonance. In the absence of these relativistic mass effects, the calculations show a magnetoresonance associated with the first spatial harmonic and a much narrower resonance at the third spatial harmonic.

  7. Medical free-electron laser: fact or fiction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, James P.; Ponikvar, Donald R.

    1994-07-01

    The free electron laser (FEL) has long been proposed as a flexible tool for a variety of medical applications, and yet the FEL has not seen widespread acceptance in the medical community. The issues have been the laser's size, cost, and complexity. Unfortunately, research on applications of FELs has outpaced the device development efforts. This paper describes the characteristics of the FEL, as they have been demonstrated in the U.S. Army's FEL technology development program, and identifies specific medical applications where demonstrated performance levels would suffice. This includes new photodynamic therapies for cancer and HIV treatment, orthopedic applications, tissue welding applications, and multiwavelength surgical techniques. A new tunable kilowatt class FEL device is described, which utilizes existing hardware from the U.S. Army program. An assessment of the future potential, based on realistic technology scaling is provided.

  8. Resurrection of beam conditioning for free electron lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Ming

    2003-02-17

    Recently Emma and Stupakov identified a fatal flaw in a Free Electron Laser (FEL) beam conditioning scheme. They showed that the conditioning is always accompanied by a projected transverse emittance growth that is so large as to make the beam conditioning completely impractical for short wavelength FELs. Furthermore, they provided a general proof along with evidence of computer simulation and reached a conclusion that any beam conditioner, regardless of the method, would suffer from the same constraints and limitations. In this paper, the author proposes an easy surgical removal of the fatal flaw by making a critical yet simple modification to the very scheme analyzed, thus resurrect the beam conditioning for short wavelength FELs. More generally, the also explain why a general search for removing have failed, why the concept and definition of beam conditioning.

  9. Charge transfer to ground-state ions produces free electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, D.; Fukuzawa, H.; Sakakibara, Y.; Takanashi, T.; Ito, Y.; Maliyar, G. G.; Motomura, K.; Nagaya, K.; Nishiyama, T.; Asa, K.; Sato, Y.; Saito, N.; Oura, M.; Schöffler, M.; Kastirke, G.; Hergenhahn, U.; Stumpf, V.; Gokhberg, K.; Kuleff, A. I.; Cederbaum, L. S.; Ueda, K

    2017-01-01

    Inner-shell ionization of an isolated atom typically leads to Auger decay. In an environment, for example, a liquid or a van der Waals bonded system, this process will be modified, and becomes part of a complex cascade of relaxation steps. Understanding these steps is important, as they determine the production of slow electrons and singly charged radicals, the most abundant products in radiation chemistry. In this communication, we present experimental evidence for a so-far unobserved, but potentially very important step in such relaxation cascades: Multiply charged ionic states after Auger decay may partially be neutralized by electron transfer, simultaneously evoking the creation of a low-energy free electron (electron transfer-mediated decay). This process is effective even after Auger decay into the dicationic ground state. In our experiment, we observe the decay of Ne2+ produced after Ne 1s photoionization in Ne–Kr mixed clusters. PMID:28134238

  10. Čerenkov free-electron laser with side walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalkal, Yashvir; Kumar, Vinit

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we have proposed a Čerenkov free-electron laser (CFEL) with metallic side walls, which are used to confine an electromagnetic surface mode supported by a thin dielectric slab placed on top of a conducting surface. This leads to an enhancement in coupling between the optical mode and the co-propagating electron beam, and consequently, performance of the CFEL is improved. We set up coupled Maxwell-Lorentz equations for the system, in analogy with an undulator based conventional FEL, and obtain formulas for the small-signal gain and growth rate. It is shown that small signal gain and growth rate in this configuration are larger compared to the configuration without the side walls. In the nonlinear regime, we solve the coupled Maxwell-Lorentz equations numerically and study the saturation behaviour of the system. It is found that the Čerenkov FEL with side walls saturates quickly, and produces powerful coherent terahertz radiation.

  11. Chirped pulse inverse free-electron laser vacuum accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartemann, Frederic V.; Baldis, Hector A.; Landahl, Eric C.

    2002-01-01

    A chirped pulse inverse free-electron laser (IFEL) vacuum accelerator for high gradient laser acceleration in vacuum. By the use of an ultrashort (femtosecond), ultrahigh intensity chirped laser pulse both the IFEL interaction bandwidth and accelerating gradient are increased, thus yielding large gains in a compact system. In addition, the IFEL resonance condition can be maintained throughout the interaction region by using a chirped drive laser wave. In addition, diffraction can be alleviated by taking advantage of the laser optical bandwidth with negative dispersion focusing optics to produce a chromatic line focus. The combination of these features results in a compact, efficient vacuum laser accelerator which finds many applications including high energy physics, compact table-top laser accelerator for medical imaging and therapy, material science, and basic physics.

  12. Čerenkov free-electron laser with side walls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalkal, Yashvir, E-mail: yashvirkalkal@gmail.com [Homi Bhabha National Institute, Mumbai 400094 (India); Accelerator and Beam Physics Laboratory, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore 452013 (India); Kumar, Vinit [Homi Bhabha National Institute, Mumbai 400094 (India); Accelerator and Beam Physics Laboratory, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore 452013 (India)

    2016-08-11

    In this paper, we have proposed a Čerenkov free-electron laser (CFEL) with metallic side walls, which are used to confine an electromagnetic surface mode supported by a thin dielectric slab placed on top of a conducting surface. This leads to an enhancement in coupling between the optical mode and the co-propagating electron beam, and consequently, performance of the CFEL is improved. We set up coupled Maxwell–Lorentz equations for the system, in analogy with an undulator based conventional FEL, and obtain formulas for the small-signal gain and growth rate. It is shown that small signal gain and growth rate in this configuration are larger compared to the configuration without the side walls. In the nonlinear regime, we solve the coupled Maxwell–Lorentz equations numerically and study the saturation behaviour of the system. It is found that the Čerenkov FEL with side walls saturates quickly, and produces powerful coherent terahertz radiation.

  13. High current racetrack microtron as a free electron laser driver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurakin, V. G.

    1994-03-01

    A racetrack microtron combines the best features of a linac and a classical microtron. It might serve as a basis for free electron lasers to make these promising devices more compact and relatively cheap and thus available for many laboratories. At the same time it is known that stable acceleration in a racetrack is broken up at high intensity by automodulation of the beam current. It is shown in this paper that such modulation originates from positive feedback arising at some frequencies between the system rf cavity and the electron beam. The beam-cavity interaction equations followed by a stability analysis are presented. A linear approximation is used to derive stability conditions, the latter being represented in an analytical form followed by numerical calculations and a stability diagram. Comparing the results obtained with experimentally measured values shows the validity of the approach used. The physical meaning of observed intensity modulation as well as some measures of their suppression are discussed.

  14. Observation of Hanbury Brown-Twiss anticorrelations for free electrons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiesel, Harald; Renz, Andreas; Hasselbach, Franz

    2002-07-25

    Fluctuations in the counting rate of photons originating from uncorrelated point sources become, within the coherently illuminated area, slightly enhanced compared to a random sequence of classical particles. This phenomenon, known in astronomy as the Hanbury Brown-Twiss effect, is a consequence of quantum interference between two indistinguishable photons and Bose Einstein statistics. The latter require that the composite bosonic wavefunction is a symmetric superposition of the two possible paths. For fermions, the corresponding two-particle wavefunction is antisymmetric: this excludes overlapping wave trains, which are forbidden by the Pauli exclusion principle. Here we use an electron field emitter to coherently illuminate two detectors, and find anticorrelations in the arrival times of the free electrons. The particle beam has low degeneracy (about 10(-4) electrons per cell in phase space); as such, our experiment represents the fermionic twin of the Hanbury Brown-Twiss effect for photons.

  15. Imaging the dynamics of free-electron Landau states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schattschneider, P; Schachinger, Th; Stöger-Pollach, M; Löffler, S; Steiger-Thirsfeld, A; Bliokh, K Y; Nori, Franco

    2014-08-08

    Landau levels and states of electrons in a magnetic field are fundamental quantum entities underlying the quantum Hall and related effects in condensed matter physics. However, the real-space properties and observation of Landau wave functions remain elusive. Here we report the real-space observation of Landau states and the internal rotational dynamics of free electrons. States with different quantum numbers are produced using nanometre-sized electron vortex beams, with a radius chosen to match the waist of the Landau states, in a quasi-uniform magnetic field. Scanning the beams along the propagation direction, we reconstruct the rotational dynamics of the Landau wave functions with angular frequency ~100 GHz. We observe that Landau modes with different azimuthal quantum numbers belong to three classes, which are characterized by rotations with zero, Larmor and cyclotron frequencies, respectively. This is in sharp contrast to the uniform cyclotron rotation of classical electrons, and in perfect agreement with recent theoretical predictions.

  16. On harmonic operation of Shanghai deep UV free electron laser

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    By choosing parameters in the modulator,the dispersive section and the seed laser,the spatial bunching of the electron beam can be correlated to then-th harmonic of ther adiator radiation,instead of the fundamental radiation in conventional high-gain harmonic generation(HGHG).Thus,the radiator undulator is operated at high harmonic mode.In this paper,the possibility of harmonic operation of Shanghai deep ultraviolet(SDUV)free electron laser (FEL)is studied.Discussions on the principle of harmonic operation,the simulation code development,the simulation results.and the proposed experimental procedure for verification of harmonic operation at the SDUV FEL are also presented.

  17. Limitations of electron beam conditioning for free-electron lasers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Emma

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available Several ideas have been proposed to “condition” an electron beam prior to the undulator of a free-electron laser (FEL by increasing each particle’s energy in proportion to the square of its transverse betatron amplitude. This conditioning enhances FEL gain by reducing the axial velocity spread within the electron bunch. We demonstrate that for symplectic beam lines, and independent of the method, this conditioning is always accompanied by a large head-tail focusing variation which, for short-wavelength FELs, is so severe as to make conditioning completely impractical. We furthermore find that any system added to correct the head-tail focusing variation will also remove the conditioning. As an example, a new method for conditioning is presented and shown to generate exactly the same head-tail focusing problems as in previously published work.

  18. Free electron lasers with slowly varying beam and undulator parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Huang

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available A self-consistent theory of a free electron laser (FEL with slowly varying beam and undulator parameters is developed using the WKB approximation. The theory is applied to study the performance of a self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE FEL when the electron beam energy varies along the undulator as would be caused by vacuum pipe wakefields and/or when the undulator strength parameter is tapered in the small signal regime before FEL saturation. We find that a small energy gain or an equivalent undulator taper slightly reduces the power gain length in the exponential growth regime and can increase the saturated SASE power by about a factor of 2. Power degradation away from the optimal performance can be estimated based upon knowledge of the SASE bandwidth. The analytical results, which agree with numerical simulations, are used to optimize the undulator taper and to evaluate wakefield effects.

  19. Optical klystron and harmonic generation free electron laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qika Jia

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available The optical field evolution of an optical klystron free electron laser is analytically described for both low gain and high gain cases. The harmonic optical klystron (HOK in which the second undulator is resonant on the higher harmonic of the first undulator is analyzed as a harmonic amplifier. The optical field evolution equation of the HOK is derived analytically for both the CHG mode (coherent harmonic generation, the quadratic gain regime and the HGHG mode (high gain harmonic generation, the exponential gain regime, the effects of energy spread, energy modulation, and dispersion in the whole process are taken into account. The linear theory is given and discussed for the HGHG mode. The analytical formula is given for the CHG mode.

  20. Gain of harmonic generation in high gain free electron laser

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DENG Hai-Xiao; DAI Zhi-Min

    2008-01-01

    In a planar undulator employed free electron laser(FEL),each harmonic radiation starts from linear amplification and ends with nonlinear harmonic interactions of the lower nonlinear harmonics and the fundamental radiation.In this paper,we investigate the harmonic generation based on the dispersion relation driven from the coupled Maxwell-Vlasov equations,taking into account the effects due to energy spread,emittance,betatron oscillation of electron beam as well as diffraction guiding of the radiation field.A 3D universal scaling function for gain of the linear harmonic generation and a 1D universal scaling function for gain of the nonlinear harmonic generation are presented,which promise rapid computation in FEL design and optimization.The analytical approaches have been validated by 3D simulation results in large range.

  1. Conceptual design of industrial free electron laser using superconducting accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saldin, E.L.; Schneidmiller, E.A.; Ulyanov, Yu.N. [Automatic Systems Corporation, Samara (Russian Federation)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    Paper presents conceptual design of free electron laser (FEL) complex for industrial applications. The FEL complex consists of three. FEL oscillators with the optical output spanning the infrared (IR) and ultraviolet (UV) wave-lengths ({lambda} = 0.3...20 {mu}m) and with the average output power 10 - 20 kW. The driving beam for the FELs is produced by a superconducting accelerator. The electron beam is transported to the FELs via three beam lines (125 MeV and 2 x 250 MeV). Peculiar feature of the proposed complex is a high efficiency of the. FEL oscillators, up to 20 %. This becomes possible due to the use of quasi-continuous electron beam and the use of the time-dependent undulator tapering.

  2. Free-electron laser emission architecture impact on EUV lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosler, Erik R.; Wood, Obert R.; Barletta, William A.

    2017-03-01

    Laser-produced plasma (LPP) EUV sources have demonstrated approximately 125 W at customer sites, establishing confidence in EUV lithography as a viable manufacturing technology. However, beyond the 7 nm technology node existing scanner/source technology must enable higher-NA imaging systems (requiring increased resist dose and providing half-field exposures) and/or EUV multi-patterning (requiring increased wafer throughput proportional to the number of exposure passes. Both development paths will require a substantial increase in EUV source power to maintain the economic viability of the technology, creating an opportunity for free-electron laser (FEL) EUV sources. FEL-based EUV sources offer an economic, high-power/single-source alternative to LPP EUV sources. Should free-electron lasers become the preferred next generation EUV source, the choice of FEL emission architecture will greatly affect its operational stability and overall capability. A near-term industrialized FEL is expected to utilize one of the following three existing emission architectures: (1) selfamplified spontaneous emission (SASE), (2) regenerative amplification (RAFEL), or (3) self-seeding (SS-FEL). Model accelerator parameters are put forward to evaluate the impact of emission architecture on FEL output. Then, variations in the parameter space are applied to assess the potential impact to lithography operations, thereby establishing component sensitivity. The operating range of various accelerator components is discussed based on current accelerator performance demonstrated at various scientific user facilities. Finally, comparison of the performance between the model accelerator parameters and the variation in parameter space provides a means to evaluate the potential emission architectures. A scorecard is presented to facilitate this evaluation and provide a framework for future FEL design and enablement for EUV lithography applications.

  3. Alignment and characterization of the two-stage time delay compensating XUV monochromator

    CERN Document Server

    Eckstein, Martin; Kubin, Markus; Yang, Chung-Hsin; Frassetto, Fabio; Poletto, Luca; Vrakking, Marc J J; Kornilov, Oleg

    2016-01-01

    We present the design, implementation and alignment procedure for a two-stage time delay compensating monochromator. The setup spectrally filters the radiation of a high-order harmonic generation source providing wavelength-selected XUV pulses with a bandwidth of 300 to 600~meV in the photon energy range of 3 to 50~eV. XUV pulses as short as $12\\pm3$~fs are demonstrated. Transmission of the 400~nm (3.1~eV) light facilitates precise alignment of the monochromator. This alignment strategy together with the stable mechanical design of the motorized beamline components enables us to automatically scan the XUV photon energ in pump-probe experiments that require XUV beam pointing stability. The performance of the beamline is demonstrated by the generation of IR-assisted sidebands in XUV photoionization of argon atoms.

  4. Simulation studies of a XUV/soft X-ray harmonic-cascade FEL for the proposed LBNL recirculating linac*

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fawley, W.M.; Barletta, W.A.; Corlett, J.N.; Zholents, A.

    2003-06-02

    Presently there is significant interest at LBNL in designing and building a facility for ultrafast (i.e. femtosecond time scale) x-ray science based upon a superconducting, recirculating RF linac (see Corlett et al. for more details). In addition to producing synchrotron radiation pulses in the 1-15 keV energy range, we are also considering adding one or more free-electron laser (FEL) beamlines using a harmonic cascade approach to produce coherent XUV soft X-ray emission beginning with a strong input seed at {approx}200 nm wavelength obtained from a ''conventional'' laser. Each cascade is composed of a radiator together with a modulator section, separated by a magnetic chicane. The chicane temporally delays the electron beam pulse in order that a ''virgin'' pulse region (with undegraded energy spread) be brought into synchronism with the radiation pulse, which together then undergo FEL action in the modulator. We present various results obtained with the GINGER simulation code examining final output sensitivity to initial electron beam parameters. We also discuss the effects of spontaneous emission and shot noise upon this particular cascade approach which can limit the final output coherence.

  5. The History of X-ray Free-Electron Lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pellegrini, C.; /UCLA /SLAC

    2012-06-28

    The successful lasing at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory of the Linear Coherent Light Source (LCLS), the first X-ray free-electron laser (X-ray FEL), in the wavelength range 1.5 to 15 {angstrom}, pulse duration of 60 to few femtoseconds, number of coherent photons per pulse from 10{sup 13} to 10{sup 11}, is a landmark event in the development of coherent electromagnetic radiation sources. Until now electrons traversing an undulator magnet in a synchrotron radiation storage ring provided the best X-ray sources. The LCLS has set a new standard, with a peak X-ray brightness higher by ten orders of magnitudes and pulse duration shorter by three orders of magnitudes. LCLS opens a new window in the exploration of matter at the atomic and molecular scales of length and time. Taking a motion picture of chemical processes in a few femtoseconds or less, unraveling the structure and dynamics of complex molecular systems, like proteins, are some of the exciting experiments made possible by LCLS and the other X-ray FELs now being built in Europe and Asia. In this paper, we describe the history of the many theoretical, experimental and technological discoveries and innovations, starting from the 1960s and 1970s, leading to the development of LCLS.

  6. Field Emitter Arrays for a Free Electron Laser Application

    CERN Document Server

    Shing-Bruce-Li, Kevin; Ganter, Romain; Gobrecht, Jens; Raguin, Jean Yves; Rivkin, Leonid; Wrulich, Albin F

    2004-01-01

    The development of a new electron gun with the lowest possible emittance would help reducing the total length and cost of a free electron laser. Field emitter arrays (FEAs) are an attractive technology for electron sources of ultra high brightness. Indeed, several thousands of microscopic tips can be deposited on a 1 mm diameter area. Electrons are then extracted by applying voltage to a first grid layer close to the tip apexes, the so called gate layer, and focused by a second grid layer one micrometer above the tips. The typical aperture diameter of the gate and the focusing layer is in the range of one micrometer. One challenge for such cathodes is to produce peak currents in the ampere range since the usual applications of FEAs require less than milliampere. Encouraging peak current performances have been obtained by applying voltage pulses at low frequency between gate and tips. In this paper we report on different tip materials available on the market: diamond FEAs from Extreme Devices Inc., ZrC single ...

  7. The Free-Electron-Laser user facility FELIX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oepts, D.; van der Meer, A. F. G.; van Amersfoort, P. W.

    1995-01-01

    The Free Electron Laser for Infrared eXperiments FELIX presents to its users a versatile source of radiation in the infrared and far-infrared spectral regions. Presently, the wavelength range of operation extends from 5 to 110 μm (2000-90 cm -1). The wavelength is continuously tunable over an octave in a few minutes. The output normally consists of macropulses of 5-10 μs duration, formed by a train of micropulses of a few ps length. Average power in the macropulses is of order 10 kW, peak power in the micropulses is in the MW range. The temporal and spectral characteristics of the micropulses can be controlled by varying the synchronism between the electron pulses and the optical pulses circulating in the laser cavity. Transform-limited pulse lengths in the range 2-20 ps can be generated. Long-range coherence has been induced by phase-locking successive micropulses, and narrow-band, essentially single-mode, radiation has been selected from the output.

  8. Optical guiding and beam bending in free-electron lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scharlemann, E.T.

    1987-01-01

    The electron beam in a free-electron laser (FEL) can act as an optical fiber, guiding or bending the optical beam. The refractive and gain effects of the bunched electron beam can compensate for diffraction, making possible wigglers that are many Rayleigh ranges (i.e., characteristic diffraction lengths) long. The origin of optical guiding can be understood by examining gain and refractive guiding in a fiber with a complex index of refraction, providing a mathematical description applicable also to the FEL, with some extensions. In the exponential gain regime of the FEL, the electron equations of motion must be included, but a self-consistent description of exponential gain with diffraction fully included becomes possible. The origin of the effective index of refraction of an FEL is illustrated with a simple example of bunched, radiating dipoles. Some of the properties of the index of refraction are described. The limited experimental evidence for optical beam bending is summarized. The evidence does not yet provide conclusive proof of the existence of optical guiding, but supports the idea. Finally, the importance of refractive guiding for the performance of a high-gain tapered-wiggler FEL amplifier is illustrated with numerical simulations.

  9. Ultraviolet Free Electron Laser Facility preliminary design report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben-Zvi, I. [ed.

    1993-02-01

    This document, the Preliminary Design Report (PDR) for the Brookhaven Ultraviolet Free Electron Laser (UV FEL) facility, describes all the elements of a facility proposed to meet the needs of a research community which requires ultraviolet sources not currently available as laboratory based lasers. Further, for these experiments, the requisite properties are not extant in either the existing second or upcoming third generation synchrotron light sources. This document is the result of our effort at BNL to identify potential users, determine the requirements of their experiments, and to design a facility which can not only satisfy the existing need, but have adequate flexibility for possible future extensions as need dictates and as evolving technology allows. The PDR is comprised of three volumes. In this, the first volume, background for the development of the proposal is given, including descriptions of the UV FEL facility, and representative examples of the science it was designed to perform. Discussion of the limitations and potential directions for growth are also included. A detailed description of the facility design is then provided, which addresses the accelerator, optical, and experimental systems. Information regarding the conventional construction for the facility is contained in an addendum to volume one (IA).

  10. European X-Ray Free Electron Laser (EXFEL): local implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romaniuk, Ryszard S.

    2013-10-01

    European X-Ray FEL - free electron laser is under construction in DESY Hamburg. It is scheduled to be operational at 2015/16 at a cost more than 1 billion Euro. The laser uses SASE method to generate x-ray light. It is propelled by an electron linac of 17,5GeV energy and more than 2km in length. The linac uses superconducting SRF TESLA technology working at 1,3 GHz in frequency. The prototype of EXFEL is FLASH Laser (200 m in length), where the "proof of principle" was checked, and from the technologies were transferred to the bigger machine. The project was stared in the nineties by building a TTF Laboratory -Tesla Test Facility. The EXFEL laser is a child of a much bigger teraelectronovolt collider project TESLA (now abandoned in Germany but undertaken by international community in a form the ILC). A number of experts and young researchers from Poland participate in the design, construction and research of the FLASH and EXFEL lasers.

  11. Structural enzymology using X-ray free electron lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupitz, Christopher; Olmos, Jose L; Holl, Mark; Tremblay, Lee; Pande, Kanupriya; Pandey, Suraj; Oberthür, Dominik; Hunter, Mark; Liang, Mengning; Aquila, Andrew; Tenboer, Jason; Calvey, George; Katz, Andrea; Chen, Yujie; Wiedorn, Max O; Knoska, Juraj; Meents, Alke; Majriani, Valerio; Norwood, Tyler; Poudyal, Ishwor; Grant, Thomas; Miller, Mitchell D; Xu, Weijun; Tolstikova, Aleksandra; Morgan, Andrew; Metz, Markus; Martin-Garcia, Jose M; Zook, James D; Roy-Chowdhury, Shatabdi; Coe, Jesse; Nagaratnam, Nirupa; Meza, Domingo; Fromme, Raimund; Basu, Shibom; Frank, Matthias; White, Thomas; Barty, Anton; Bajt, Sasa; Yefanov, Oleksandr; Chapman, Henry N; Zatsepin, Nadia; Nelson, Garrett; Weierstall, Uwe; Spence, John; Schwander, Peter; Pollack, Lois; Fromme, Petra; Ourmazd, Abbas; Phillips, George N; Schmidt, Marius

    2017-07-01

    Mix-and-inject serial crystallography (MISC) is a technique designed to image enzyme catalyzed reactions in which small protein crystals are mixed with a substrate just prior to being probed by an X-ray pulse. This approach offers several advantages over flow cell studies. It provides (i) room temperature structures at near atomic resolution, (ii) time resolution ranging from microseconds to seconds, and (iii) convenient reaction initiation. It outruns radiation damage by using femtosecond X-ray pulses allowing damage and chemistry to be separated. Here, we demonstrate that MISC is feasible at an X-ray free electron laser by studying the reaction of M. tuberculosis ß-lactamase microcrystals with ceftriaxone antibiotic solution. Electron density maps of the apo-ß-lactamase and of the ceftriaxone bound form were obtained at 2.8 Å and 2.4 Å resolution, respectively. These results pave the way to study cyclic and non-cyclic reactions and represent a new field of time-resolved structural dynamics for numerous substrate-triggered biological reactions.

  12. Optical Shaping of X-Ray Free-Electron Lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinelli, A.; Coffee, R.; Vetter, S.; Hering, P.; West, G. N.; Gilevich, S.; Lutman, A. A.; Li, S.; Maxwell, T.; Galayda, J.; Fry, A.; Huang, Z.

    2016-06-01

    In this Letter we report the experimental demonstration of a new temporal shaping technique for x-ray free-electron lasers (FELs). This technique is based on the use of a spectrally shaped infrared (IR) laser and allows optical control of the x-ray generation process. By accurately manipulating the spectral amplitude and phase of the IR laser, we can selectively modify the electron bunch longitudinal emittance thus controlling the duration of the resulting x-ray pulse down to the femtosecond time scale. Unlike other methods currently in use, optical shaping is directly applicable to the next generation of high-average power x-ray FELs such as the Linac Coherent Light Source-II or the European X-FEL, and it enables pulse shaping of FELs at the highest repetition rates. Furthermore, this laser-shaping technique paves the way for flexible tailoring of complex multicolor FEL pulse patterns required for nonlinear multidimensional x-ray spectroscopy as well as novel multicolor diffraction imaging schemes.

  13. LIPSS Free-Electron Laser Searches for Dark Matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Afanaciev, Andrei; Beard, Kevin; Biallas, George; Boyce, James R; Minarni, M; Ramdon, R; Robinson, Taylor; Shinn, Michelle D

    2011-09-01

    A variety of Dark Matter particle candidates have been hypothesized by physics Beyond the Standard Model (BSM) in the very light (10{sup -6} - 10{sup -3} eV) range. In the past decade several international groups have conducted laboratory experiments designed to either produce such particles or extend the boundaries in parameter space. The LIght Pseudo-scalar and Scalar Search (LIPSS) Collaboration, using the 'Light Shining through a Wall' (LSW) technique, passes the high average power photon beam from Jefferson Lab's Free-Electron Laser through a magnetic field upstream from a mirror and optical beam dump. Light Neutral Bosons (LNBs), generated by coupling of photons with the magnetic field, pass through the mirror ('the Wall') into an identical magnetic field where they revert to detectable photons by the same coupling process. While no evidence of LNBs was evident, new scalar coupling boundaries were established. New constraints were also determined for hypothetical para-photons and for millicharged fermions. We will describe our experimental setup and results for LNBs, para-photons, and milli-charged fermions. Plans for chameleon particle searches are underway.

  14. Free electron lasers for transmission of energy in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segall, S. B.; Hiddleston, H. R.; Catella, G. C.

    1981-01-01

    A one-dimensional resonant-particle model of a free electron laser (FEL) is used to calculate laser gain and conversion efficiency of electron energy to photon energy. The optical beam profile for a resonant optical cavity is included in the model as an axial variation of laser intensity. The electron beam profile is matched to the optical beam profile and modeled as an axial variation of current density. Effective energy spread due to beam emittance is included. Accelerators appropriate for a space-based FEL oscillator are reviewed. Constraints on the concentric optical resonator and on systems required for space operation are described. An example is given of a space-based FEL that would produce 1.7 MW of average output power at 0.5 micrometer wavelength with over 50% conversion efficiency of electrical energy to laser energy. It would utilize a 10 m-long amplifier centered in a 200 m-long optical cavity. A 3-amp, 65 meV electrostatic accelerator would provide the electron beam and recover the beam after it passes through the amplifier. Three to five shuttle flights would be needed to place the laser in orbit.

  15. Model-based optimization of tapered free-electron lasers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan Mak

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The energy extraction efficiency is a figure of merit for a free-electron laser (FEL. It can be enhanced by the technique of undulator tapering, which enables the sustained growth of radiation power beyond the initial saturation point. In the development of a single-pass x-ray FEL, it is important to exploit the full potential of this technique and optimize the taper profile a_{w}(z. Our approach to the optimization is based on the theoretical model by Kroll, Morton, and Rosenbluth, whereby the taper profile a_{w}(z is not a predetermined function (such as linear or exponential but is determined by the physics of a resonant particle. For further enhancement of the energy extraction efficiency, we propose a modification to the model, which involves manipulations of the resonant particle’s phase. Using the numerical simulation code GENESIS, we apply our model-based optimization methods to a case of the future FEL at the MAX IV Laboratory (Lund, Sweden, as well as a case of the LCLS-II facility (Stanford, USA.

  16. Extreme-Ultraviolet Vortices from a Free-Electron Laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Primož Rebernik Ribič

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Extreme-ultraviolet vortices may be exploited to steer the magnetic properties of nanoparticles, increase the resolution in microscopy, and gain insight into local symmetry and chirality of a material; they might even be used to increase the bandwidth in long-distance space communications. However, in contrast to the generation of vortex beams in the infrared and visible spectral regions, production of intense, extreme-ultraviolet and x-ray optical vortices still remains a challenge. Here, we present an in-situ and an ex-situ technique for generating intense, femtosecond, coherent optical vortices at a free-electron laser in the extreme ultraviolet. The first method takes advantage of nonlinear harmonic generation in a helical undulator, producing vortex beams at the second harmonic without the need for additional optical elements, while the latter one relies on the use of a spiral zone plate to generate a focused, micron-size optical vortex with a peak intensity approaching 10^{14}  W/cm^{2}, paving the way to nonlinear optical experiments with vortex beams at short wavelengths.

  17. Ultraviolet Free Electron Laser Facility preliminary design report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben-Zvi, I. (ed.)

    1993-02-01

    This document, the Preliminary Design Report (PDR) for the Brookhaven Ultraviolet Free Electron Laser (UV FEL) facility, describes all the elements of a facility proposed to meet the needs of a research community which requires ultraviolet sources not currently available as laboratory based lasers. Further, for these experiments, the requisite properties are not extant in either the existing second or upcoming third generation synchrotron light sources. This document is the result of our effort at BNL to identify potential users, determine the requirements of their experiments, and to design a facility which can not only satisfy the existing need, but have adequate flexibility for possible future extensions as need dictates and as evolving technology allows. The PDR is comprised of three volumes. In this, the first volume, background for the development of the proposal is given, including descriptions of the UV FEL facility, and representative examples of the science it was designed to perform. Discussion of the limitations and potential directions for growth are also included. A detailed description of the facility design is then provided, which addresses the accelerator, optical, and experimental systems. Information regarding the conventional construction for the facility is contained in an addendum to volume one (IA).

  18. Free electron lasers: Present status and future challenges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barletta, W A; Corlett, J N; Emma, P; Huang, Z; Kim, K -J; Lindberg, R; Murphy, J B; Neil, G P; Nguyen, D C; Pellegrini, C; Rimmer, R A; Sannibale, F; Stupakov, G; Walker, R P

    2010-06-01

    With the scientific successes of the soft X-ray FLASH facility in Germany and the recent spectacular commissioning of the Linac Coherent Light Source at SLAC, free electron lasers are poised to take center stage as the premier source of tunable, intense, coherent photons of either ultra-short time resolution or ultra-fine spectral resolution, from the far infrared to the hard X-ray regime. This paper examines the state of the art in FEL performance and the underlying enabling technologies. It evaluates the state of readiness of the three basic machine architectures—SASE FELs, seeded FELs, and FEL oscillators—for the major X-ray science user facilities on the 5–10 years time scale and examines the challenges that lie ahead for FELs to achieve their full potential throughout the entire spectral range. In soft and hard X-rays, high longitudinal coherence, in addition to full transverse coherence, will be the key performance upgrade; ideas using laser-based or self-seeding or oscillators can be expected to be qualitatively superior to today's SASE sources. Short pulses, from femtoseconds to attoseconds, can be realistically envisioned. With high repetition rate electron sources coupled to superconducting radiofrequency linear accelerators, unprecedented average beam brightness will be possible and many users would be served simultaneously by a single accelerator complex.

  19. Free electron lasers: Present status and future challenges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barletta, W.A. [Department of Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Bldg. 26-563, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139-4307 (United States); Bisognano, J. [Synchrotron Radiation Center, 3731 Schneider Dr., Stoughton, WI 53589-3097 (United States); Corlett, J.N. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Emma, P.; Huang, Z. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Kim, K.-J.; Lindberg, R. [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Murphy, J.B., E-mail: jbm@bnl.go [National Synchrotron Light Source, Building 725C, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Neil, G.R. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Laboratory, 12000 Jefferson Avenue, Newport News, VA 23606 (United States); Nguyen, D.C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Pellegrini, C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California-Los Angeles, 405 Hilgard Avenue, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Rimmer, R.A. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Laboratory, 12000 Jefferson Avenue, Newport News, VA 23606 (United States); Sannibale, F. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Stupakov, G. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Walker, R.P. [Diamond Light Source Ltd, Diamond House, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Zholents, A.A. [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

    2010-06-21

    With the scientific successes of the soft X-ray FLASH facility in Germany and the recent spectacular commissioning of the Linac Coherent Light Source at SLAC, free electron lasers are poised to take center stage as the premier source of tunable, intense, coherent photons of either ultra-short time resolution or ultra-fine spectral resolution, from the far infrared to the hard X-ray regime. This paper examines the state of the art in FEL performance and the underlying enabling technologies. It evaluates the state of readiness of the three basic machine architectures-SASE FELs, seeded FELs, and FEL oscillators-for the major X-ray science user facilities on the 5-10 years time scale and examines the challenges that lie ahead for FELs to achieve their full potential throughout the entire spectral range. In soft and hard X-rays, high longitudinal coherence, in addition to full transverse coherence, will be the key performance upgrade; ideas using laser-based or self-seeding or oscillators can be expected to be qualitatively superior to today's SASE sources. Short pulses, from femtoseconds to attoseconds, can be realistically envisioned. With high repetition rate electron sources coupled to superconducting radiofrequency linear accelerators, unprecedented average beam brightness will be possible and many users would be served simultaneously by a single accelerator complex.

  20. Attosecond Hard X-ray Free Electron Laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep Kumar

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, several schemes of soft X-ray and hard X-ray free electron lasers (XFEL and their progress are reviewed. Self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE schemes, the high gain harmonic generation (HGHG scheme and various enhancement schemes through seeding and beam manipulations are discussed, especially in view of the generation of attosecond X-ray pulses. Our recent work on the generation of attosecond hard X-ray pulses is also discussed. In our study, the enhanced SASE scheme is utilized, using electron beam parameters of an XFEL under construction at Pohang Accelerator Laboratory (PAL. Laser, chicane and electron beam parameters are optimized to generate an isolated attosecond hard X-ray pulse at 0.1 nm (12.4 keV. The simulations show that the manipulation of electron energy beam profile may lead to the generation of an isolated attosecond hard X-ray of 150 attosecond pulse at 0.1 nm.

  1. Modeling and multidimensional optimization of a tapered free electron laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Jiao

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Energy extraction efficiency of a free electron laser (FEL can be greatly increased using a tapered undulator and self-seeding. However, the extraction rate is limited by various effects that eventually lead to saturation of the peak intensity and power. To better understand these effects, we develop a model extending the Kroll-Morton-Rosenbluth, one-dimensional theory to include the physics of diffraction, optical guiding, and radially resolved particle trapping. The predictions of the model agree well with that of the GENESIS single-frequency numerical simulations. In particular, we discuss the evolution of the electron-radiation interaction along the tapered undulator and show that the decreasing of refractive guiding is the major cause of the efficiency reduction, particle detrapping, and then saturation of the radiation power. With this understanding, we develop a multidimensional optimization scheme based on GENESIS simulations to increase the energy extraction efficiency via an improved taper profile and variation in electron beam radius. We present optimization results for hard x-ray tapered FELs, and the dependence of the maximum extractable radiation power on various parameters of the initial electron beam, radiation field, and the undulator system. We also study the effect of the sideband growth in a tapered FEL. Such growth induces increased particle detrapping and thus decreased refractive guiding that together strongly limit the overall energy extraction efficiency.

  2. Numerical Simulations of X-Ray Free Electron Lasers (XFEL)

    KAUST Repository

    Antonelli, Paolo

    2014-11-04

    We study a nonlinear Schrödinger equation which arises as an effective single particle model in X-ray free electron lasers (XFEL). This equation appears as a first principles model for the beam-matter interactions that would take place in an XFEL molecular imaging experiment in [A. Fratalocchi and G. Ruocco, Phys. Rev. Lett., 106 (2011), 105504]. Since XFEL are more powerful by several orders of magnitude than more conventional lasers, the systematic investigation of many of the standard assumptions and approximations has attracted increased attention. In this model the electrons move under a rapidly oscillating electromagnetic field, and the convergence of the problem to an effective time-averaged one is examined. We use an operator splitting pseudospectral method to investigate numerically the behavior of the model versus that of its time-averaged version in complex situations, namely the energy subcritical/mass supercritical case and in the presence of a periodic lattice. We find the time-averaged model to be an effective approximation, even close to blowup, for fast enough oscillations of the external field. This work extends previous analytical results for simpler cases [P. Antonelli, A. Athanassoulis, H. Hajaiej, and P. Markowich, Arch. Ration. Mech. Anal., 211 (2014), pp. 711--732].

  3. A wide bandwidth free-electron laser with mode locking using current modulation.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kur, E.; Dunning, D. J.; McNeil, B. W. J.; Wurtele, J.; Zholents, A. A. (Accelerator Systems Division (APS)); (Univ. of California at Berkeley); (Univ. of Strathclyde); (STFC Daresbury Lab.); (LBNL)

    2011-01-20

    A new scheme for mode locking a free-electron laser amplifier is proposed based on electron beam current modulation. It is found that certain properties of the original concept, based on the energy modulation of electrons, are improved including the spectral brightness of the source and the purity of the series of short pulses. Numerical comparisons are made between the new and old schemes and between a mode-locked free-electron laser and self-amplified spontaneous emission free-electron laser. Illustrative examples using a hypothetical mode-locked free-electron laser amplifier are provided. The ability to generate intense coherent radiation with a large bandwidth is demonstrated.

  4. Tailoring of XUV supercontinua through coherent control of high-order harmonic generation

    CERN Document Server

    Holgado, W; Alonso, B; Miranda, M; Silva, F; Plaja, L; Crespo, H; Sola, I J

    2016-01-01

    We present observations of the emission of XUV supercontinua in the 20-37 eV region by high harmonic generation (HHG) with 4-7 fs pulses focused onto a Kr gas jet. The underlying mechanism relies on coherent control of the relative delays and phases between individually generated attosecond pulses, achievable by adjusting the chirp of the driving pulses and the interaction geometry. Under adequate chirp and phase matching conditions the resulting interference will yield a supercontinuum XUV spectrum. This technique opens the route for modifying the phase of individual attosecond pulses and for the coherent synthesis of XUV supercontinua without the need of an isolated attosecond burst.

  5. An ultrastable Michelson interferometer for high-resolution spectroscopy in the XUV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corsi, C; Liontos, I; Cavalieri, S; Bellini, M; Venturi, G; Eramo, R

    2015-02-23

    We developed an ultra-stable and accurately-controllable Michelson interferometer to be used in a deeply unbalanced arm configuration for split-pulse XUV Ramsey-type spectroscopy with high-order laser harmonics. The implemented active and passive stabilization systems allow one to reach instabilities in the nanometer range over meters of relative optical path differences. Producing precisely delayed pairs of pump pulses will generate XUV harmonic pulses that may significantly improve the achievable spectral resolution and the precision of absolute frequency measurements in the XUV.

  6. Studies of harmonic generation in free electron lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldammer, K.

    2007-11-12

    Nonlinear harmonic generation is one of the most interesting aspects of Free Electron Lasers under study today. It provides for coherent, high intensity radiation at higher harmonics of the FEL resonant frequency. The sources, numerical simulation and applications of harmonic radiation in cascaded High Gain Harmonic Generation FELs were the subject of this thesis. Harmonic emission in FELs originates from harmonic microbunching of the particles and the particular electron trajectory during FEL interaction. Numerical FEL simulation codes model these analytical equations and predict the performance of Free Electron Lasers with good accuracy. This thesis has relied heavily upon the FEL simulation code Genesis 1.3 which has been upgraded in the framework of this thesis to compute harmonic generation in a self-consistent manner. Tests against analytical predictions suggest that the harmonic power levels as well as harmonic gain lengths are simulated correctly. A benchmark with the FEL simulation code GINGER yields excellent agreement of the harmonic saturation length and saturation power. The new version of the simulation code Genesis was also tested against measurements from the VUV-FEL FLASH at DESY. The spectral power distributions of fundamental and third harmonic radiation were recorded at 25.9 nm and 8.6 nm, respectively. The relative bandwidths (FWHM) were in the range of 2 % for both the fundamental as well as the third harmonic, which was accurately reproduced by time-dependent simulations with Genesis. The new code was also used to propose and evaluate a new design for the BESSY Soft X-Ray FEL, a cascaded High Gain Harmonic Generation FEL proposed by BESSY in Berlin. The original design for the BESSY High Energy FEL line requires four HGHG stages to convert the initial seed laser wavelength of 297.5 nm down to 1.24 nm. A new scheme is proposed that makes use of fifth harmonic radiation from the first stage and reduces the number of HGHG stages to three. It

  7. Design and experimental tests of free electron laser wire scanners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlandi, G. L.; Heimgartner, P.; Ischebeck, R.; Loch, C. Ozkan; Trovati, S.; Valitutti, P.; Schlott, V.; Ferianis, M.; Penco, G.

    2016-09-01

    SwissFEL is a x-rays free electron laser (FEL) driven by a 5.8 GeV linac under construction at Paul Scherrer Institut. In SwissFEL, wire scanners (WSCs) will be complementary to view-screens for emittance measurements and routinely used to monitor the transverse profile of the electron beam during FEL operations. The SwissFEL WSC is composed of an in-vacuum beam-probe—motorized by a stepper motor—and an out-vacuum pick-up of the wire signal. The mechanical stability of the WSC in-vacuum hardware has been characterized on a test bench. In particular, the motor induced vibrations of the wire have been measured and mapped for different motor speeds. Electron-beam tests of the entire WSC setup together with different wire materials have been carried out at the 250 MeV SwissFEL Injector Test Facility (SITF, Paul Scherrer Institut, CH) and at FERMI (Elettra-Sincrotrone Trieste, Italy). In particular, a comparative study of the relative measurement accuracy and the radiation-dose release of Al (99 )∶Si (1 ) and tungsten (W) wires has been carried out. On the basis of the outcome of the bench and electron-beam tests, the SwissFEL WSC can be qualified as a high resolution and machine-saving diagnostic tool in consideration of the mechanical stability of the scanning wire at the micrometer level and the choice of the wire material ensuring a drastic reduction of the radiation-dose release with respect to conventional metallic wires. The main aspects of the design, laboratory characterization and electron beam tests of the SwissFEL WSCs are presented.

  8. Novosibirsk Free Electron Laser: Recent Achievements and Future Prospects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shevchenko, O. A.; Arbuzov, V. S.; Vinokurov, N. A.; Vobly, P. D.; Volkov, V. N.; Getmanov, Ya. V.; Davidyuk, I. V.; Deychuly, O. I.; Dementyev, E. N.; Dovzhenko, B. A.; Knyazev, B. A.; Kolobanov, E. I.; Kondakov, A. A.; Kozak, V. R.; Kozyrev, E. V.; Kubarev, V. V.; Kulipanov, G. N.; Kuper, E. A.; Kuptsov, I. V.; Kurkin, G. Ya.; Krutikhin, S. A.; Medvedev, L. E.; Motygin, S. V.; Ovchar, V. K.; Osipov, V. N.; Petrov, V. M.; Pilan, A. M.; Popik, V. M.; Repkov, V. V.; Salikova, T. V.; Sedlyarov, I. K.; Serednyakov, S. S.; Skrinsky, A. N.; Tararyshkin, S. V.; Tribendis, A. G.; Cheskidov, V. G.; Chernov, K. N.; Shcheglov, M. A.

    2017-02-01

    Free electron lasers (FELs) are unique sources of electromagnetic radiation with tunable wavelength. A high-power FEL has been created at the G. I.Budker Institute for Nuclear Physics. Its radiation frequency can be tuned over a wide range in the terahertz and infrared spectral ranges. As the source of electron bunches, this FEL uses a multi-turn energy-recovery linac, which has five straight sections. Three sections are used for three FELs which operate in different wavelength ranges (90-240 μm for the first, 37-80 μm for the second, and 5-20 μm for the third ones). The first and the second FELs were commissioned in 2003 and 2009, respectively. They are used for various applied and research problems now. The third FEL is installed on the last, forth accelerator loop, in which the electron energy is the maximum. It comprises three undulator sections and a 40 m optical cavity. The first lasing of this FEL was obtained in the summer of 2015. The radiation wavelength was 9 μm and the average power was about 100 W. The design power is 1 kW at a pulse repetition rate of 3.75 MHz. Radiation of the third FEL will be delivered to user stations from the protected hall in the near future. The third FEL commissioning results are presented and the current status of the first and second FELs as well as their future development prospects are described.

  9. High efficiency, multiterawatt x-ray free electron lasers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Emma

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we present undulator magnet tapering methods for obtaining high efficiency and multiterawatt peak powers in x-ray free electron lasers (XFELs, a key requirement for enabling 3D atomic resolution single molecule imaging and nonlinear x-ray science. The peak power and efficiency of tapered XFELs is sensitive to time dependent effects, like synchrotron sideband growth. To analyze this dependence in detail we perform a comparative numerical optimization for the undulator magnetic field tapering profile including and intentionally disabling these effects. We show that the solution for the magnetic field taper profile obtained from time independent optimization does not yield the highest extraction efficiency when time dependent effects are included. Our comparative optimization is performed for a novel undulator designed specifically to obtain TW power x-ray pulses in the shortest distance: superconducting, helical, with short period and built-in strong focusing. This design reduces the length of the breaks between modules, decreasing diffraction effects, and allows using a stronger transverse electron focusing. Both effects reduce the gain length and the overall undulator length. We determine that after a fully time dependent optimization of a 100 m long Linac coherent light source-like XFEL we can obtain a maximum efficiency of 7%, corresponding to 3.7 TW peak radiation power. Possible methods to suppress the synchrotron sidebands, and further enhance the FEL peak power, up to about 6 TW by increasing the seed power and reducing the electron beam energy spread, are also discussed.

  10. Hybrid planar free-electron maser in the magnetoresonance regime

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vitaliy A. Goryashko

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available We study the operation regime of a hybrid planar free-electron maser (FEM amplifier near the magnetoresonant value of the uniform longitudinal (guide magnetic field. Using analytical expressions for individual test electron trajectories and normal frequencies of their three-dimensional oscillations in the magnetostatic field of the hybrid planar FEM, an analytical condition of chaotization of motion is established and shown to be given by the Chirikov resonance-overlap criterion applied to the normal undulator and cyclotron frequencies with respect to the coupling induced by the undulator magnetic field. It is also shown analytically that, in spite of the well-known drop for the exact magnetoresonance, the gain attains its maximal value in the zone of regular dynamics slightly above the magnetoresonant value of the guide magnetic field. Under the condition of undulator resonance, it is practically independent of the amplitude of the undulator magnetic field and the wavelength of amplified signal. To account for space-charge effects, we propose a theoretical model of a weakly relativistic FEM, which accommodates not only potential but also rotational parts of the nonradiated electromagnetic field of a moving charged particle. It turns out that the rotational part of nonradiated field diminishes the defocusing influence of the potential part on the beam bunching. Numeric simulation of the nonlinear stage of amplification is fulfilled, taking into consideration adiabatic entrance of the electron beam to the interaction region and initial electron velocity spread. We find that nonradiated field and initial electron velocity spread do not influence essentially the efficiency of hybrid planar FEM amplification if parameters of the beam-microwave interaction correspond to the operational regime in the zone of regular dynamics near the magnetoresonance.

  11. Extension of the Free-Electron Laser-Amplifier Code Tda to Resonator Configurations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Faatz, B.; Best, R. W. B.; Oepts, D.; van Amersfoort, P. W.; Tran, T. M.

    1993-01-01

    The investigation of many interesting, complex phenomena in a free-electron laser (FEL) requires the use of numerical computer codes. In this paper we describe the extension of one such code (TDA), which in its original form could only be used to study free-electron laser amplifiers, to include reso

  12. A Low-Energy-Spread Rf Accelerator for a Far-Infrared Free-Electron Laser

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Geer, C. A. J.; Bakker, R. J.; van der Meer, A. F. G.; van Amersfoort, P. W.; Gillespie, W. A.; Saxon, G.; Poole, M. W.

    1993-01-01

    A high electron current and a small energy spread are essential for the operation of a free electron laser (FEL). In this paper we discuss the design and performance of the accelerator for FELIX, the free electron laser for infrared experiments. The system consists of a thermionic gun, a prebuncher,

  13. Extension of the Free-Electron Laser-Amplifier Code Tda to Resonator Configurations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Faatz, B.; Best, R. W. B.; Oepts, D.; van Amersfoort, P. W.; Tran, T. M.

    1993-01-01

    The investigation of many interesting, complex phenomena in a free-electron laser (FEL) requires the use of numerical computer codes. In this paper we describe the extension of one such code (TDA), which in its original form could only be used to study free-electron laser amplifiers, to include

  14. Coherent Sources of XUV Radiation Soft X-Ray Lasers and High-Order Harmonic Generation

    CERN Document Server

    Jaeglé, Pierre

    2006-01-01

    Extreme ultraviolet radiation, also referred to as soft X-rays or XUV, offers very special optical properties. The X-UV refractive index of matter is such that normal reflection cannot take place on polished surfaces whereas beam transmission through one micrometer of almost all materials reduces to zero. Therefore, it has long been a difficult task to imagine and to implement devices designed for complex optics experiments in this wavelength range. Thanks to new sources of coherent radiation - XUV-lasers and High Order Harmonics - the use of XUV radiation, for interferometry, holography, diffractive optics, non-linear radiation-matter interaction, time-resolved study of fast and ultrafast phenomena and many other applications, including medical sciences, is ubiquitous.

  15. Material Processing Opportunites Utilizing a Free Electron Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, Alan

    1996-11-01

    Many properties of photocathode-driven Free Electron Lasers (FEL) are extremely attractive for material processing applications. These include: 1) broad-band tunability across the IR and UV spectra which permits wavelength optimization, depth deposition control and utilization of resonance phenomena; 2) picosecond pulse structure with continuous nanosecond spacing for optimum deposition efficiency and minimal collateral damage; 3) high peak and average radiated power for economic processing in quantity; and 4) high brightness for spatially defined energy deposition and intense energy density in small spots. We discuss five areas: polymer, metal and electronic material processing, micromachining and defense applications; where IR or UV material processing will find application if the economics is favorable. Specific examples in the IR and UV, such as surface texturing of polymers for improved look and feel, and anti-microbial food packaging films, which have been demonstrated using UV excimer lamps and lasers, will be given. Unfortunately, although the process utility is readily proven, the power levels and costs of lamps and lasers do not scale to production margins. However, from these examples, application specific cost targets ranging from 0.1=A2/kJ to 10=A2/kJ of delivered radiation at power levels from 10 kW to 500 kW, have been developed and are used to define strawman FEL processing systems. Since =46EL radiation energy extraction from the generating electron beam is typically a few percent, at these high average power levels, economic considerations dictate the use of a superconducting RF accelerator with energy recovery to minimize cavity and beam dump power loss. Such a 1 kW IR FEL, funded by the US Navy, is presently under construction at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility. This dual-use device, scheduled to generate first light in late 1997, will test both the viability of high-power FELs for shipboard self-defense against cruise

  16. Hemostatic properties of the free-electron laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cram, Gary P., Jr.; Copeland, Michael L.

    1998-09-01

    We have investigated the hemostatic properties of the free-electron laser (FEL) and compared these properties to the most commonly used commercial lasers in neurosurgery, CO 2 and Nd:YAG, using an acute canine model. Arterial and venous vessels, of varying diameters from 0.1 to 1.0 mm, were divided with all three lasers. Analysis of five wavelengths of the FEL (3.0, 4.5, 6.1, 6.45, and 7.7 microns) resulted in bleeding without evidence of significant coagulation, regardless of whether the vessel was an artery or vein. Hemorrhage from vessels less than 0.4 mm diameter was subsequently easily controlled with Gelfoam® (topical hemostatic agent) alone, whereas larger vessels required bipolar electrocautery. No significant charring, or contraction of the surrounding parenchyma was noted with any of the wavelengths chosen from FEL source. The CO 2 laser, in continuous mode, easily coagulated vessels with diameters of 4 mm and less, while larger vessels displayed significant bleeding requiring bipolar electrocautery for control. Tissue charring was noted with application of the CO 2 laser. In super pulse mode, the CO 2 laser exhibited similar properties, including significant charring of the surrounding parenchyma. The Nd:YAG coagulated all vessels tested up to 1.4 mm, which was the largest diameter cortical artery found, however this laser displayed significant and extensive contraction and retraction of the surrounding parenchyma. In conclusion, the FEL appears to be a poor hemostatic agent. Our results did not show any benefit of the FEL over current conventional means of achieving hemostasis. However, control of hemorrhage was easily achieved with currently used methods of hemostasis, namely Gelfoam® or bipolar electrocuatery. Although only cortical vessels in dogs were tested, we feel this data can be applied to all animals, including humans, and the peripheral, as well as central, vasculature, as our data on the CO 2 and Nd:YAG appear to closely support previous

  17. Electron Interference in Molecular Circular Polarization Attosecond XUV Photoionization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai-Jun Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Two-center electron interference in molecular attosecond photoionization processes is investigated from numerical solutions of time-dependent Schrödinger equations. Both symmetric H\\(_2^+\\ and nonsymmetric HHe\\(^{2+}\\ one electron diatomic systems are ionized by intense attosecond circularly polarized XUV laser pulses. Photoionization of these molecular ions shows signature of interference with double peaks (minima in molecular attosecond photoelectron energy spectra (MAPES at critical angles \\(\\vartheta_c\\ between the molecular \\(\\textbf{R}\\ axis and the photoelectron momentum \\(\\textbf{p}\\. The interferences are shown to be a function of the symmetry of electronic states and the interference patterns are sensitive to the molecular orientation and pulse polarization. Such sensitivity offers possibility for imaging of molecular structure and orbitals.

  18. Japanese sounding rocket experiment with the solar XUV Doppler telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakao, Taro; Tsuneta, Saku; Hara, Hirohisa; Kano, Ryouhei; Yoshida, Tsuyoshi; Nagata, Shin'ichi; Shimizu, Toshifumi; Kosugi, Takeo; Murakami, Katsuhiko; Wasa, Wakuna; Inoue, Masao; Miura, Katsuhiro; Taguchi, Koji; Tanimoto, Kazuo

    1996-11-01

    We present an overview of an ongoing Japanese sounding rocket project with the Solar XUV Doppler telescope. The telescope employs a pair of normal incidence multilayer mirrors and a back-thinned CCD, and is designed to observe coronal velocity field of the whole sun by measuring line- of-sight Doppler shifts of the Fe XIV 211 angstroms line. The velocity detection limit is estimated to be better than 100 km/s. The telescope will be launched by the Institute of Space and Astronautical Science in 1998, when the solar activity is going to be increasing towards the cycle 23 activity maximum. Together with the overview of the telescope, the current status of the development of each telescope components including multilayer mirrors, telescope structure, image stabilization mechanism, and focal plane assembly, are reviewed. The observation sequence during the flight is also briefly described.

  19. Magnetic Activity and High Energy XUV Irradiances of Dwarf K-Stars - Impacts of XUV Emissions on Hosted Extrasolar Planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakatos, S. L.; Voyer, E. N.; Guinan, E. F.; DeWarf, L. E.; Ribas, I.; Harper, G. M.

    2005-05-01

    We report on the study of magnetic activity and spectral X-ray-UV (XUV) irradiances of main-sequence K-type (dK) stars covering a wide range of ages from <0.1 to 10 Gyr and rotation periods of <0.5 - 45d. This study is an extension of the Villanova ``Sun in Time'' Program (see Guinan et al. 2003; Ribas et al. 2005) to cooler, less luminous, but much more numerous, dK stars. These dK stars have deeper convective zones and more efficient magnetic dynamos. Of particular interest is the study of the evolution of coronal and chromospheric XUV emissions of these stars because of the critical roles that these emissions play in the photochemical and photoionization (and possible erosion) of the atmospheres of potentially hosted planets. The extension to dK stars is motivated by the upcoming extrasolar planet search missions (such as Kepler, SIM, and Darwin-TPF) that will search for earth-size planets in the (liquid water) habitable zones of nearby dG, dK and dM stars. Because of the very high space densities of low mass stars, they will likely be discovered to host numerous planets. In this study we have combined our FUSE FUV observations with archival X-ray, EUV, and UV, along with ground-based photometry, to study dependencies of XUV emissions with respect to age and rotation. Here we report on our initial study of a small sample of bright, nearby dK0-5 stars with a wide range of ages and rotation periods. The initial results are presented and we discuss the suitability of low mass dK stars as hosts for planets habitable for life. Also, the long lifetimes and high spacial densities of older dK stars make them attractive targets for searches for advanced intelligent life. This research is supported by NASA/FUSE Grants NAG5-12125, NNG04G038G, and NNGG04GC76G, which we gratefully acknowledge.

  20. Three-dimensional model of small signal free-electron lasers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Webb

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Coherent electron cooling is an ultrahigh-bandwidth form of stochastic cooling which utilizes the charge perturbation from Debye screening as a seed for a free-electron laser. The amplified and frequency-modulated signal that results from the free-electron laser process is then used to give an energy-dependent kick on the hadrons in a bunch. In this paper, we present a theoretical description of a high-gain free-electron laser with applications to a complete theoretical description of coherent electron cooling.

  1. Imaging Molecular Structure and Dynamics utilizing X-ray Free-Electron-Laser Sources

    OpenAIRE

    Küpper, Jochen

    2015-01-01

    Imaging controlled molecules with ultrashort x- ray pulses from free-electron lasers enables the recording of “molecular movies”, i.e., snapshots of molecules at work, with spatial (picometer) and temporal (femtosecond) atomic resolution.

  2. Proceedings of the workshop prospects for a 1 angstrom free-electron laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallardo, J.C. (ed.)

    1990-01-01

    This report contains papers on the following topics free-electron laser theory, scaling relations and simulations; micro-wigglers; photocathode and switched power gun; applications; and summary of working groups.

  3. Design and Analysis of an Electron Gun/Booster and Free Electron Laser Optical Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL MONTEREY, CALIFORNIA DISSERTATION DESIGN AND ANALYSIS OF AN ELECTRON GUN/BOOSTER AND FREE ELECTRON LASER OPTICAL THEORY by...298-102 September 2010 Dissertation Design and Analysis of an Electron Gun/Booster and Free Electron Laser Optical Theory Niles, Sean P. Naval...motor attached to a spool for adjusting the bead’s position in the cavity. The bead is a small piece of stainless steel hypodermic needle threaded

  4. Development of diffractive XUV-VUV light extractors for fusion plasma diagnostic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stutman, D.; Caravelli, G.; Delgado-Aparicio, L.; Finkenthal, M.; Tritz, K.; Kaita, R.; Roquemore, L.

    2009-11-01

    The diagnostic and control of next generation MFE and ICF fusion experiments will require optical light extractors capable of withstanding intense plasma and radiation exposure. A solution applicable from the XUV to the infrared is to use free-standing diffractive optics such as transmission gratings or zone plates. Here we present results on XUV-VUV diffractive extractors for the diagnostic of boundary MFE plasmas. For the VUV range we developed Si transmission gratings having 1 μm period, 5 μm thickness, 40% open fraction, 1x2 mm active area, and coated with Ni, while for the XUV range we use SiN gratings having 0.2 μm period, 0.3 μm thickness, 1x1 mm area, and coated with Ta. The grating extractors are spectrally and spatially calibrated in the laboratory using a newly developed extended XUV-VUV source and will be employed for imaging spectrometry on the NSTX experiment. The operational characteristics of the extended source and first space resolved XUV-VUV spectra will be presented. Work supported by DoE Grant DE-FG02-99ER54523 at JHU and Contract DE-AC02-09CH11466 at PU.

  5. High Harmonic Generation XUV Spectroscopy for Studying Ultrafast Photophysics of Coordination Complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryland, Elizabeth S.; Lin, Ming-Fu; Verkamp, Max A.; Vura-Weis, Josh

    2016-06-01

    Extreme ultraviolet (XUV) spectroscopy is an inner shell technique that probes the M2,3-edge excitation of atoms. Absorption of the XUV photon causes a 3p→3d transition, the energy and shape of which is directly related to the element and ligand environment. This technique is thus element-, oxidation state-, spin state-, and ligand field specific. A process called high-harmonic generation (HHG) enables the production of ultrashort (≈20fs) pulses of collimated XUV photons in a tabletop instrument. This allows transient XUV spectroscopy to be conducted as an in-lab experiment, where it was previously only possible at accelerator-based light sources. Additionally, ultrashort pulses provide the capability for unprecedented time resolution (≈70fs IRF). This technique has the capacity to serve a pivotal role in the study of electron and energy transfer processes in materials and chemical biology. I will present the XUV transient absorption instrument we have built over the past two years, along with preliminary data and simulations of the M2,3-edge absorption data of a battery of small inorganic molecules to demonstrate the high specificity of this ultrafast tabletop technique.

  6. A Search for Extended Ultraviolet Disk (XUV-disk) Galaxies in the Local Universe

    CERN Document Server

    Thilker, David A; Meurer, Gerhardt; de Paz, Armando Gil; Boissier, Samuel; Madore, Barry F; Boselli, Alessandro; Ferguson, Annette M N; Muńoz-Mateos, Juan Carlos; Madsen, Greg J; Hameed, Salman; Overzier, Roderik A; Forster, Karl; Friedman, Peter G; Martin, D Christopher; Morrissey, Patrick; Neff, Susan G; Schiminovich, David; Seibert, Mark; Small, Todd; Wyder, Ted K; Donas, Jose; Heckman, Timothy M; Lee, Young-Wook; Milliard, Bruno; Rich, R Michael; Szalay, A S; Welsh, Barry Y; Yi, Sukyoung K

    2007-01-01

    We have initiated a search for extended ultraviolet disk (XUV-disk) galaxies in the local universe. Herein, we compare GALEX UV and visible--NIR images of 189 nearby (D$<$40 Mpc) S0--Sm galaxies included in the GALEX Atlas of Nearby Galaxies and present the first catalogue of XUV-disk galaxies. We find that XUV-disk galaxies are surprisingly common but have varied relative (UV/optical) extent and morphology. Type~1 objects ($\\ga$20% incidence) have structured, UV-bright/optically-faint emission features in the outer disk, beyond the traditional star formation threshold. Type~2 XUV-disk galaxies ($\\sim$10% incidence) exhibit an exceptionally large, UV-bright/optically-low-surface-brightness (LSB) zone having blue $UV-K_s$ outside the effective extent of the inner, older stellar population, but not reaching extreme galactocentric distance. If the activity occuring in XUV-disks is episodic, a higher fraction of present-day spirals could be influenced by such outer disk star formation. Type~1 disks are associa...

  7. SXR-XUV Diagnostics for Edge and Core of Magnetically Confined Plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stutman, Dan [Johns Hopkins University

    2014-09-10

    The present report summarizes the results obtained during a one-year extension of DoE grant “SXR-XUV Diagnostics for Edge and Core of Magnetically Confined Plasmas”, at Johns Hopkins University, aimed at completing the development of a new type of magnetic fusion plasma diagnostic, the XUV Transmission Grating Imaging Radiometer (TGIR). The TGIR enables simultaneous spatially and spectrally resolved measurements of the XUV/VUV radiated power from impurities in fusion plasmas, with high speed. The instrument was successfully developed and qualified in the laboratory and in experiments on a tokamak. Its future applications will be diagnostic of the impurity content and transport in the divertor and edge of advanced magnetic fusion experiments, such as NSTX Upgrade.

  8. XUV lasing during strong-field assisted transient absorption in molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Bredtmann, Timm; Bandrauk, Andre D; Ivanov, Misha

    2015-01-01

    Using ab-initio non-Born-Oppenheimer simulations, we demonstrate amplification of XUV radiation in a high-harmonic generation type process using the example of the hydrogen molecular ion. A small fraction of the molecules is pumped to a dissociative Rydberg state from which IR-assisted XUV amplification is observed. We show that starting at sufficiently high IR driving field intensities the ground state molecules become quasi-transparent for XUV radiation, while due to stabilization gain from Rydberg states is maintained, thus leading to lasing from strongly driven Rydberg states. Further increase of the IR intensity even leads to gain by initially unexcited molecules, which are quickly excited by the driving IR pulse.

  9. Monochromatization of femtosecond XUV light pulses with the use of reflection zone plates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metje, Jan; Borgwardt, Mario; Moguilevski, Alexandre; Kothe, Alexander; Engel, Nicholas; Wilke, Martin; Al-Obaidi, Ruba; Tolksdorf, Daniel; Firsov, Alexander; Brzhezinskaya, Maria; Erko, Alexei; Kiyan, Igor Yu; Aziz, Emad F

    2014-05-05

    We report on a newly built laser-based tabletop setup which enables generation of femtosecond light pulses in the XUV range employing the process of high-order harmonic generation (HHG) in a gas medium. The spatial, spectral, and temporal characteristics of the XUV beam are presented. Monochromatization of XUV light with minimum temporal pulse distortion is the central issue of this work. Off-center reflection zone plates are shown to be advantageous when selection of a desired harmonic is carried out with the use of a single optical element. A cross correlation technique was applied to characterize the performance of the zone plates in the time domain. By using laser pulses of 25 fs length to pump the HHG process, a pulse duration of 45 fs for monochromatized harmonics was achieved in the present setup.

  10. In-situ determination of dispersion and resolving power in simultaneous multiple-angle XUV spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zastrau, U; Hilbert, V; Foerster, E [Institut fuer Optik und Quantenelektronik (IOQ), Friedrich-Schiller-Universitaet Jena, Max-Wien Platz 1, 07743 Jena (Germany); Brown, C; Gregori, G [Clarendon Laboratory, University of Oxford, Oxford, OX1 3PU (United Kingdom); Doeppner, T; Glenzer, S H [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Post Office Box 808, Livermore, CA 94551 (United States); Dziarzhytski, S; Harmand, M; Laarmann, T; Przystawik, A; Radcliffe, P; Schulz, M; Tavella, F [HASYLAB, Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Notkestrasse 85, 22603 Hamburg (Germany); Goede, S; Meiwes-Broer, K-H; Skruszewicz, S [Institut fuer Physik, Universitaet Rostock, D-18051 Rostock (Germany); Hochhaus, D; Neumayer, P [Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies (FIAS), Johann Wolfgang Goethe-Universitaet, Max-von-Laue-Str. 1, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Lee, H J, E-mail: ulf.zastrau@uni-jena.de [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC), Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States)

    2011-10-15

    We report on the simultaneous determination of non-linear dispersion functions and resolving power of three flat-field XUV grating spectrometers. A moderate-intense short-pulse infrared laser is focused onto technical aluminum which is commonly present as part of the experimental setup. In the XUV wavelength range of 10-19 nm, the spectrometers are calibrated using Al-Mg plasma emission lines. This cross-calibration is performed in-situ in the very same setup as the actual main experiment. The results are in excellent agreement with ray-tracing simulations. We show that our method allows for precise relative and absolute calibration of three different XUV spectrometers.

  11. Extending Tabletop XUV Spectroscopy to the Liquid Phase to Examine Transition Metal Catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benke, Kristin; Ryland, Elizabeth S.; Vura-Weis, Josh

    2017-06-01

    M-edge spectroscopy of first row transition metals (3p to 3d excitation) is the low energy analogue of more well-known K- and L-edge spectroscopy, but can be implemented without the use of a synchrotron. Instead, M-edge spectroscopy can be performed as a tabletop method, relying on high harmonic generation (HHG) to produce ultrashort (˜ 20 fs) pulses of extreme ultraviolet (XUV) light in the range of 10-100s of eV. We have shown tabletop M-edge spectroscopy to be a valuable tool in determining the electronic structure of metal-centered coordination complexes and have demonstrated its capacity to yield element-specific information about a compound's oxidation state, spin state, and ligand field. The power of this technique to distinguish these features makes it a promising addition to the arsenal of methods used to study metal-centered catalysts. A catalytic reaction can be initiated photochemically and the XUV probe can be used to track oxidative and structural changes to identify the key intermediates. Until recently tabletop XUV spectroscopy has been performed on thin film samples, but in order to examine homogeneous catalysis, the technique must be adapted to look at samples in the liquid phase. The challenges of adapting tabletop XUV spectroscopy to the liquid phase lie in the lower attenuation length of XUV light compared to soft and hard x-rays and the lower flux compared to synchrotron methods. As a result, the sample must be limited to a sub-micron thickness as well as isolated from the vacuum environment required for x-ray spectroscopy. I am developing a liquid flow cell that relies on confining the sample between two x-ray transmissive SiN membranes, as has been demonstrated for use at synchrotrons, but adapted to the unique difficulties encountered in tabletop XUV spectroscopy.

  12. An XUV source using a femtosecond enhancement cavity for photoemission spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Arthur K.; Zhdanovich, Sergey; Sheyerman, Alex; Levy, Giorgo; Damascelli, Andrea; Jones, David J.

    2015-05-01

    Recent development of extreme ultraviolet (XUV) sources based on high harmonic generation (HHG) in femtosecond enhancement cavities (fsEC) has enabled generation of high photon ux ( ̴ 1013-1014 photons/sec) in the XUV, at high repetition rates (> 50 MHz) and spanning the spectral region from 40 nm - 120 nm. Here we demonstrate the potential offered by this approach for angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy by measuring the photoemission spectrum of Au using 8.3 and 25 eV photons with excellent resolution at rapid data rates.

  13. Single-order laser high harmonics in XUV for ultrafast photoelectron spectroscopy of molecular wavepacket dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mizuho Fushitani

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available We present applications of extreme ultraviolet (XUV single-order laser harmonics to gas-phase ultrafast photoelectron spectroscopy. Ultrashort XUV pulses at 80 nm are obtained as the 5th order harmonics of the fundamental laser at 400 nm by using Xe or Kr as the nonlinear medium and separated from other harmonic orders by using an indium foil. The single-order laser harmonics is applied for real-time probing of vibrational wavepacket dynamics of I2 molecules in the bound and dissociating low-lying electronic states and electronic-vibrational wavepacket dynamics of highly excited Rydberg N2 molecules.

  14. Time resolved 3D momentum imaging of ultrafast dynamics by coherent VUV-XUV radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sturm, F. P., E-mail: fpsturm@lbl.gov [Ultrafast X-Ray Science Lab, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Institut für Kernphysik, Universität Frankfurt, Max-von-Laue Str. 1, D-60438 Frankfurt (Germany); Wright, T. W.; Ray, D.; Zalyubovskaya, I.; Shivaram, N.; Slaughter, D. S.; Belkacem, A.; Weber, Th. [Ultrafast X-Ray Science Lab, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Ranitovic, P. [Ultrafast X-Ray Science Lab, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); ELI-ALPS, ELI-Hu Nkft, Dugonics ter 13, Szeged H6720 (Hungary)

    2016-06-15

    We present a new experimental setup for measuring ultrafast nuclear and electron dynamics of molecules after photo-excitation and ionization. We combine a high flux femtosecond vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) and extreme ultraviolet (XUV) source with an internally cold molecular beam and a 3D momentum imaging particle spectrometer to measure electrons and ions in coincidence. We describe a variety of tools developed to perform pump-probe studies in the VUV-XUV spectrum and to modify and characterize the photon beam. First benchmark experiments are presented to demonstrate the capabilities of the system.

  15. Generation of Phase-Locked Pulses from a Seeded Free-Electron Laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauthier, David; Ribič, Primož Rebernik; De Ninno, Giovanni; Allaria, Enrico; Cinquegrana, Paolo; Danailov, Miltcho Bojanov; Demidovich, Alexander; Ferrari, Eugenio; Giannessi, Luca

    2016-01-15

    In a coherent control experiment, light pulses are used to guide the real-time evolution of a quantum system. This requires the coherence and the control of the pulses' electric-field carrier waves. In this work, we use frequency-domain interferometry to demonstrate the mutual coherence of time-delayed pulses generated by an extreme ultraviolet seeded free-electron laser. Furthermore, we use the driving seed laser to lock and precisely control the relative phase between the two free-electron laser pulses. This new capability opens the way to a multitude of coherent control experiments, which will take advantage of the high intensity, short wavelength, and short duration of the pulses generated by seeded free-electron lasers.

  16. Propagation of gamma rays and production of free electrons in air

    CERN Document Server

    Dimant, Y S; Sprangle, P; Penano, J; Romero-Talamas, C A; Granatstein, V L

    2012-01-01

    A new concept of remote detection of concealed radioactive materials has been recently proposed \\cite{Gr.Nusin.2010}-\\cite{NusinSprangle}. It is based on the breakdown in air at the focal point of a high-power beam of electromagnetic waves produced by a THz gyrotron. To initiate the avalanche breakdown, seed free electrons should be present in this focal region during the electromagnetic pulse. This paper is devoted to the analysis of production of free electrons by gamma rays leaking from radioactive materials. Within a hundred meters from the radiation source, the fluctuating free electrons appear with the rate that may exceed significantly the natural background ionization rate. During the gyrotron pulse of about 10 microsecond length, such electrons may seed the electric breakdown and create sufficiently dense plasma at the focal region to be detected as an unambiguous effect of the concealed radioactive material.

  17. X-ray Free-Electron Lasers - Present and Future Capabilities [Invited

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galayda, John; Ratner, John Arthur:a Daniel F.; White, William E.; /SLAC

    2011-11-16

    The Linac Coherent Light Source is now in operation as an X-ray free-electron laser (FEL) user facility. It produces coherent pulses of 550-10,000 eV X-rays of duration adjustable from <10 fsto500 fs. Typical peak power is in excess of 20 GW. The facility will soon be joined by several X-ray FELs under construction around the world. This article will provide an abridged history of free-electron lasers, a description of some basic physics regarding free-electron laser light amplification, and an overview of the rapidly growing list of examples in which lasers will be used in the control and operation of X-ray FELs.

  18. X-ray free-electron lasers--present and future capabilities [Invited

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galayda, John N.; Arthur, John; Ratner, Daniel F.; White, William E. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States)

    2010-11-15

    The Linac Coherent Light Source is now in operation as an X-ray free-electron laser (FEL) user facility. It produces coherent pulses of 550-10,000 eV X-rays of duration adjustable from <10 fs to 500 fs. Typical peak power is in excess of 20 GW. The facility will soon be joined by several X-ray FELs under construction around the world. This article will provide an abridged history of free-electron lasers, a description of some basic physics regarding free-electron laser light amplification, and an overview of the rapidly growing list of examples in which lasers will be used in the control and operation of X-ray FELs.

  19. Free electron degeneracy effects on collisional excitation, ionization, de-excitation and three-body recombination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tallents, G. J.

    2016-09-01

    Collisional-radiative models enable average ionization and ionization populations, plus the rates of absorption and emission of radiation to be calculated for plasmas not in thermal equilbrium. At high densities and low temperatures, electrons may have a high occupancy of the free electron quantum states and evaluations of rate coefficients need to take into account the free electron degeneracy. We demonstrate that electron degeneracy can reduce collisional rate coefficients by orders-of-magnitude from values calculated neglecting degeneracy. We show that assumptions regarding the collisional differential cross-section can alter collisional ionization and recombination rate coefficients by a further factor two under conditions relevant to inertial fusion.

  20. Hierarchic electrodynamics and free electron lasers concepts, calculations, and practical applications

    CERN Document Server

    Kulish, Victor V

    2011-01-01

    Hierarchic Electrodynamics and Free Electron Lasers: Concepts, Calculations, and Practical Applications presents intriguing new fundamental concepts in the phenomenon of hierarchical electrodynamics as a new direction in physics. Concentrating on the key theory of hierarchic oscillations and waves, this book focuses on the numerous applications of nonlinear theory in different types of high-current Free Electron Lasers (FEL), including their primary function in the calculation methods used to analyze various multi-resonant, multi-frequency nonlinear FEL models. This is considered the first boo

  1. Two-colour generation in a chirped seeded Free-Electron Laser

    CERN Document Server

    Mahieu, B; Castronovo, D; Danailov, M B; Demidovich, A; De Ninno, G; Di Mitri, S; Fawley, W M; Ferrari, E; Fröhlich, L; Gauthier, D; Giannessi, L; Mahne, N; Penco, G; Raimondi, L; Spampinati, S; Spezzani, C; Svetina, C; Trovò, M; Zangrando, M

    2013-01-01

    We present the experimental demonstration of a method for generating two spectrally and temporally separated pulses by an externally seeded, single-pass free-electron laser operating in the extreme-ultraviolet spectral range. Our results, collected on the FERMI@Elettra facility and confirmed by numerical simulations, demonstrate the possibility of controlling both the spectral and temporal features of the generated pulses. A free-electron laser operated in this mode becomes a suitable light source for jitter-free, two-colour pump-probe experiments.

  2. Two-colour generation in a chirped seeded free-electron laser: a close look.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahieu, Benoît; Allaria, Enrico; Castronovo, Davide; Danailov, Miltcho B; Demidovich, Alexander; De Ninno, Giovanni; Di Mitri, Simone; Fawley, William M; Ferrari, Eugenio; Fröhlich, Lars; Gauthier, David; Giannessi, Luca; Mahne, Nicola; Penco, Giuseppe; Raimondi, Lorenzo; Spampinati, Simone; Spezzani, Carlo; Svetina, Cristian; Trovò, Mauro; Zangrando, Marco

    2013-09-23

    We present the experimental demonstration of a method for generating two spectrally and temporally separated pulses by an externally seeded, single-pass free-electron laser operating in the extreme-ultraviolet spectral range. Our results, collected on the FERMI@Elettra facility and confirmed by numerical simulations, demonstrate the possibility of controlling both the spectral and temporal features of the generated pulses. A free-electron laser operated in this mode becomes a suitable light source for jitter-free, two-colour pump-probe experiments.

  3. Accelerator Layout and Physics of X-Ray Free-Electron Lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Decking, W

    2005-01-01

    X-ray Free-Electron Lasers facilities are planned or already under construction around the world. This talk covers the X-Ray Free-Electron Lasers LCLS (SLAC), European XFEL (DESY) and SCSS (Spring8). All aim for self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) FEL radiation of approximately 0.1 nm wavelengths. The required excellent electron beam qualities pose challenges to the accelerator physicists. Space charge forces, coherent synchrotron radiation and wakefields can deteriorate the beam quality. The accelerator physics and technological challenges behind each of the projects will be reviewed, covering the critical components low-emittance electron gun, bunch-compressors, accelerating structures and undulator systems.

  4. Model for nonlinear behavior in the self-amplified spontaneous-emission free-electron laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krinsky, S.

    2004-06-01

    We introduce a simplified model for the saturation of a self-amplified spontaneous-emission free-electron laser. Within this model, we determine the effect of nonlinearity upon the statistical properties of the output radiation. Comparing our results with the computer simulations of Saldin, Schneidmiller, and Yurkov [The Physics of Free Electron Lasers (Springer-Verlag, Berlin, 2000)], we find that the model provides a good description of the average intensity, field correlation function, and coherence time, but underestimates the intensity fluctuation. Asymmetric spectral broadening phenomena are not included in the model.

  5. Broadband tunability of a far-infrared free-electron laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakker, R. J.; van der Geer, C. A. J.; Jaroszynski, D. A.; van der Meer, A. F. G.; Oepts, D.; van Amerstoort, P. W.

    1993-08-01

    Results obtained in operation of the long-wavelength free electron laser (FEL) of the FELIX facility are presented. These involve measurements of the spectral range covered (16-110 microns), the output power, and the influence of the cavity desynchronism. The free electron laser for infrared experiments (FELIX) uses an undulator with tunable field strength that enables a factor of 2 tunability of the radiation wavelength. Results show that the dependence of the small signal gain and output power on cavity length tuning and undulator strength can be estimated. The results are compared with numerical simulations.

  6. Fast Polarization Switching Demonstration Using Crossed-Planar Undulator in a Seeded Free Electron Laser

    CERN Document Server

    Deng, Haixiao; Feng, Lie; Feng, Chao; Chen, Jianhui; Liu, Bo; Wang, Xingtao; Lan, Taihe; Wang, Guanglei; Zhang, Wenyan; Liu, Xiaoqing; Zhang, Meng; Lin, Guoqiang; Zhang, Miao; Wang, Dong; Zhao, Zhentang

    2013-01-01

    Fast polarization switching of light sources is required over a wide spectral range to investigate the symmetry of matter. In this Letter, we report the first experimental demonstration of the crossed-planar undulator technique at a seeded free-electron laser, which holds great promise for the full control and fast switching of the polarization of short-wavelength radiation. In the experiment, the polarization state of the coherent radiation at the 2nd harmonic of the seed laser is switched successfully. The experiment results confirm the theory, and pave the way for applying the crossed-planar undulator technique for the seeded X-ray free electron lasers.

  7. Transverse beam diagnostics for the XUV seeding experiment at FLASH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boedewadt, Joern

    2011-12-15

    High-gain free-electron lasers (FEL) offer intense, transversely coherent, and ultra short radiation pulses in the extreme ultraviolet, the soft- and the hard-X-ray spectral range. Undulator radiation from spontaneous emission is amplified. Due to the stochastic emission process, the radiation exhibits a low temporal coherence, and the structure of the amplified radiation in the temporal and in the spectral domain shows large shot-to-shot fluctuations. In order to improve the temporal coherence, an external radiation pulse is used to induce (or seed) the FEL process. With this, only a defined wavelength range within the FEL bandwidth is amplified provided that the irradiance of the external radiation exceeds the noise level of the FEL amplifier. In addition to the improved longitudinal coherence, a seeded FEL provides the possibility to perform pump-probe experiments with an expected temporal resolution of the order of the pulse durations. In order to experimentally proof this statement, a test experiment for direct HHG-seeding at wavelength below 40 nm was installed at the free-electron laser facility FLASH at DESY. Crucial for the seeded operation of an FEL is the six-dimensional laser-electron overlap of the seed laser pulses with the electron bunches. Hence, dedicated diagnostics to measure and mechanisms to control the overlap are essential. Within this thesis, a transport beamline for the seed laser beam and the transverse diagnostics for seed laser- and the electron-beam were developed and commissioned. Results of the performance of the seed injection beamline are presented, and first measurements of the seeded operation of the FEL are analyzed and evaluated. (orig.)

  8. The Space Density of Extended Ultraviolet (XUV) Disks in the Local Universe and Implications for Gas Accretion on to Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Lemonias, Jenna J; Thilker, David; Wyder, Ted K; Martin, D Christopher; Seibert, Mark; Treyer, Marie A; Bianchi, Luciana; Heckman, Timothy M; Madore, Barry F; Rich, R Michael

    2011-01-01

    We present results of the first unbiased search for extended UV (XUV)-disk galaxies undertaken to determine the space density of such galaxies. Our sample contains 561 local (0.001 1.5 x 10^4 s) and SDSS DR7 footprints. We explore modifications to the standard classification scheme for our sample that includes both disk- and bulge-dominated galaxies. Visual classification of each galaxy in the sample reveals an XUV-disk frequency of up to 20% for the most nearby portion of our sample. On average over the entire sample (out to z=0.05) the frequency ranges from a hard limit of 4% to 14%. The GALEX imaging allows us to detect XUV-disks beyond 100 Mpc. The XUV regions around XUV-disk galaxies are consistently bluer than the main bodies. We find a surprisingly high frequency of XUV emission around luminous red (NUV-r > 5) and green valley (3 1.5-4.2 x 10^-3 Mpc^-3. Using the XUV emission as an indicator of recent gas accretion, we estimate that the cold gas accretion rate onto these galaxies is > 1.7-4.6 x 10^-3...

  9. Transient absorption and reshaping of ultrafast XUV light by laser-dressed helium

    CERN Document Server

    Gaarde, Mette B; Tate, Jennifer L; Schafer, Kenneth J

    2010-01-01

    We present a theoretical study of transient absorption and reshaping of extreme ultraviolet (XUV) pulses by helium atoms dressed with a moderately strong infrared (IR) laser field. We formulate the atomic response using both the frequency-dependent absorption cross section and a time-frequency approach based on the time-dependent dipole induced by the light fields. The latter approach can be used in cases when an ultrafast dressing pulse induces transient effects, and/or when the atom exchanges energy with multiple frequency components of the XUV field. We first characterize the dressed atom response by calculating the frequency-dependent absorption cross section for XUV energies between 20 and 24 eV for several dressing wavelengths between 400 and 2000 nm and intensities up to 10^12 W/cm^2. We find that for dressing wavelengths near 1600 nm, there is an Autler-Townes splitting of the 1s ---> 2p transition that can potentially lead to transparency for absorption of XUV light tuned to this transition. We study...

  10. Influence of XUV radiation on Pv ionization fraction in hot star winds

    CERN Document Server

    Krticka, Jiri

    2012-01-01

    Different diagnostics of hot star wind mass-loss rates provide results that are difficult to reconcile with each other. The widely accepted presence of clumping in hot star winds implies a significant reduction of observational mass-loss rate estimates from diagnostics that depend on the square of the density. Moreover, the ultraviolet Pv resonance lines indicate a possible need for even stronger reduction of hot star mass-loss rates, provided that Pv is a dominant ionization stage of phosphorus at least in some hot stars. The latter assumption is challenged by a possible presence of the XUV radiation. Here we study the influence of the XUV radiation on the Pv ionization fraction in the hot star winds. By a detailed solution of the hydrodynamical, radiative transfer, and statistical equilibrium equations we confirm that sufficiently strong XUV radiation source may decrease the Pv ionization fraction, possibly depreciating the Pv lines as a reliable mass-loss rate indicator. On the other hand, the XUV radiatio...

  11. Laser-phase determination methods and transfer equations for direct temporal structure measurements of atto- and femtosecond XUV pulses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ge Yu-Cheng

    2006-01-01

    In this paper the laser-phase determination methods and transfer equations are presented to directly reconstruct the detailed temporal structures of ultra-short extreme ultraviolet (xuv) pulses from the measured photoelectron energy spectra (PES). Each transfer equation includes one of PID (proportional-integral-differential) terms of PES. The intensity and instantaneous frequency of attosecond xuv can be retrieved from the integral term of PES. The intensity profiles of narrow bandwidth atto- and femtosecond xuvs can be rebuilt from the proportional and differential terms of PES respectively. The methods and equations 05 bc used to improve time resolutions in measuring ultrashort pulses.

  12. Nonlinear effects in propagation of radiation of X-ray free-electron lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nosik, V. L.

    2016-05-01

    Nonlinear effects accompanying the propagation of high-intensity beams of X-ray free-electron lasers are considered. It is shown that the X-ray wave field in the crystal significantly changes due to the formation of "hollow" atomic shells as a result of the photoelectric effect.

  13. Fireworks in noble gas clusters a first experiment with the new "free-electron laser"

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    An international group of scientists has published first experiments carried out using the new soft X-ray free-electron laser (FEL) at the research center DESY in Hamburg, Germany. Using small clusters of noble gas atoms, for the first time, researchers studied the interaction of matter with intense X-ray radiation from an FEL on extremely short time scales (1 page).

  14. First mm-wave generation in the FOM free electron maser

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhoeven, A. G. A.; Bongers, W. A.; Bratman, V. L.; Caplan, M.; Denisov, G. G.; van der Geer, C. A. J.; Manintveld, P.; Poelman, A. J.; Plomp, J.; Savilov, A. V.; Smeets, P. H. M.; Sterk, A. B.; Urbanus, W. H.

    1999-01-01

    A free electron maser (FEM) has been built as a pilot mm-wave source for applications on future fusion research devices such as international tokamak experimental reactor (ITER), A unique feature of the Dutch FEM is the possibility to tune the frequency over the entire range from 130 to 260 GHz at a

  15. Femtosecond X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy at a Hard X-ray Free Electron Laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lemke, Henrik T.; Bressler, Christian; Chen, Lin X.

    2013-01-01

    X-ray free electron lasers (XFELs) deliver short (<100 fs) and intense (similar to 10(12) photons) pulses of hard X-rays, making them excellent sources for time-resolved studies. Here we show that, despite the inherent instabilities of current (SASE based) XFELs, they can be used for measuring hi...

  16. Time-resolved electron spectrum diagnostics for a free-electron laser

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gillespie, W. A.; MacLeod, A. M.; Martin, P. F.; van der Meer, A. F. G.; van Amersfoort, P. W.

    1996-01-01

    Time-resolved electron-beam diagnostics have been developed for use with free-electron lasers (FELs) and associated electron sources, based on the techniques of secondary electron emission and optical transition radiation (OTR). The 32-channel OTR detector forms part of a high-resolution (0.18%) ele

  17. Status and research objectives of the Dutch free electron laser for infrared experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Amersfoort, P. W.; Best, R. W. B.; Van Buuren, R.; Delmee, P. F. M.; Faatz, B.; Van Der Geer, C. A. J.; Jaroszynski, D. A.; Manintveld, P.; Mastop, W. J.; Meddens, B. J. H.; Van Der Meer, A. F. G.; Oepts, D.; Pluygers, J.; Van Der Wiel, M. J.

    1990-10-01

    We review the status and research objectives of the free electron laser for infrared experiments (FELIX), which will be operated as a users facility for the far-infrared and submillimeter spectral regions. The spectral region between 8 and 80 μm will be covered in the first stage of the project.

  18. Broad-Band Tunability of a Far-Infrared Free-Electron Laser

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, R. J.; van der Geer, C. A. J.; Jaroszynski, D. A.; van der Meer, A. F. G.; Oepts, D.; van Amersfoort, P. W.

    1993-01-01

    A unique property of the free-electron laser (FEL) is its capability to be tuned continuously over a wide spectral range. This is a major difference with all other high-power lasers. However, the tunability of first-generation FELs used to be quite poor (typically 10% or less), due to constraints im

  19. Short-Wavelength Free-Electron Lasers with Periodic Plasma Structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bazylev, V. A.; Schep, T. J.; Tulupov, A. V.

    1994-01-01

    Concepts of compact free-electron lasers that are based on beam-plasma interactions and that operate in the vacuum ultraviolet and x-ray wavelength ranges are discussed. Coherent radiation can not only be produced by periodic transverse motions of an electron beam, but also by its longitudinal motio

  20. Status of the high power free electron laser using the race-track microtron-recuperator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinokurov, N. A.; Gavrilov, N. G.; Gorniker, E. I.; Kulipanov, G. N.; Kuptsov, I. V.; Kurkin, G. Ya.; Erg, G. I.; Levashov, Yu. I.; Oreshkov, A. D.; Petrov, S. P.; Petrov, V. M.; Pinayev, I. V.; Popik, V. M.; Sedlyarov, I. K.; Shaftan, T. V.; Skrinsky, A. N.; Sokolov, A. S.; Veshcherevich, V. G.; Vobly, P. D.

    1996-02-01

    The high power infrared free electron laser is under construction at the Novosibirsk Scientific Centre. The goal of this project is to provide a user facility for Siberian Centre of Photochemical Researches. The features of the installation and its status are described.

  1. Low-loss electron beam transport in a high-power, electrostatic free-electron maser

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valentini, M.; van der Geer, C. A. J.; Verhoeven, A. G. A.; van der Wiel, M. J.; Urbanus, W. H.

    1997-01-01

    At the FOM Institute for Plasma Physics ''Rijnhuizen'', The Netherlands, the commissioning of a high-power, electrostatic free-electron maser is in progress. The design target is the generation of 1 MW microwave power in the frequency range 130-260 GHz. The foreseen application o

  2. Coherent spontaneous emission and spontaneous phase locking in a free-electron laser

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weits, H. H.; Oepts, D.

    1999-01-01

    We present measurements that demonstrate the existence of spontaneous coherence between independently generated laser pulses in the FELIX free-electron laser, The experiments show that the interpulse coherence is caused by a high level of coherently enhanced spontaneous emission. We have been able t

  3. Microwave Undulators and Electron Generators for New-Generation Free-Electron Lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abubakirov, E. B.; Bandurkin, I. V.; Vikharev, A. A.; Kuzikov, S. V.; Rozental, R. M.; Savilov, A. V.; Fedotov, A. E.

    2016-03-01

    We discuss possible applications of relativistic pulsed microwave electronic devices in physics and engineering of modern free-electron lasers. In particular, the possibilities of using high-power millimeter-wave radiation pulses for electron pitching in the operating space of the laser (in a microwave undulator), as well as for cooling and focusing of electron bunches, are considered.

  4. Multi-dimensional free-electron laser simulation codes: a comparison study

    CERN Document Server

    Biedron, S G; Dejus, Roger J; Faatz, B; Freund, H P; Milton, S V; Nuhn, H D; Reiche, S

    2000-01-01

    A self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) free-electron laser (FEL) is under construction at the Advanced Photon Source (APS). Five FEL simulation codes were used in the design phase: GENESIS, GINGER, MEDUSA, RON, and TDA3D. Initial comparisons between each of these independent formulations show good agreement for the parameters of the APS SASE FEL.

  5. Spectral Dynamics of a Free-Electron Maser with a Step-Tapered Undulator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eecen, P. J.; Schep, T. J.; Tulupov, A. V.

    1995-01-01

    The spectral behavior of a high-power, high-gain free-electron maser (FEM) is investigated. The maser has a step-tapered undulator consisting of two sections with different strengths and lengths and equal periodicities. The sections are separated by a field-free gap. The configuration is enclosed

  6. Broad-Band Tunability of a Far-Infrared Free-Electron Laser

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, R. J.; van der Geer, C. A. J.; Jaroszynski, D. A.; van der Meer, A. F. G.; Oepts, D.; van Amersfoort, P. W.

    1993-01-01

    A unique property of the free-electron laser (FEL) is its capability to be tuned continuously over a wide spectral range. This is a major difference with all other high-power lasers. However, the tunability of first-generation FELs used to be quite poor (typically 10% or less), due to constraints

  7. Three-dimensional, time-dependent simulation of a regenerative amplifier free-electron laser

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Freund, H.P.; Nguyen, D.C.; Sprangle, P.; Slot, van der P.J.M.

    2013-01-01

    Free-electron lasers have been designed to operate over virtually the entire electromagnetic spectrum from microwaves through x rays and in a variety of configurations including amplifiers and oscillators. Oscillators typically operate in the low-gain regime where the full spectral width is ð !=!Þ

  8. First mm-wave generation in the FOM free electron maser

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhoeven, A. G. A.; Bongers, W. A.; Bratman, V. L.; Caplan, M.; Denisov, G. G.; van der Geer, C. A. J.; Manintveld, P.; Poelman, A. J.; Plomp, J.; Savilov, A. V.; Smeets, P. H. M.; Sterk, A. B.; Urbanus, W. H.

    1999-01-01

    A free electron maser (FEM) has been built as a pilot mm-wave source for applications on future fusion research devices such as international tokamak experimental reactor (ITER), A unique feature of the Dutch FEM is the possibility to tune the frequency over the entire range from 130 to 260 GHz at

  9. Recent Advances on LASERIX Facility: Development of XUV Sources System and Applications. Perspectives from 2008 to 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ros, D.; Kazamias, S.; Guilbaud, O.; Habib, J.; Zielbauer, B.; Pittman, M.; Jamelot, G.; Klisnick, A.; Lagron, J.-C.; Joyeux, D.; de Rossi, S.; Delmotte, F.; Lacombe, S.; Porcel, E.; Lesech, C.; Penhoat, A. M.; Touati, A.

    LASERIX is a high-power laser facility leading to High-repetition-rate XUV laser pumped by Titanium:Sapphire laser. The aim of this laser facility is to offer Soft XRLs in the 30-7 nm range and auxiliary IR beam that could also be used to produce synchronized XUV sources. This experimental configuration highly enhances the scientific opportunities of the facility, giving thus the opportunity to realize both X-ray laser experiments and more generally pump/probe experiments, mixing IR and XUV sources. In this contribution, the main results concerning both the development of XUV sources (in the seeded or ASE mode) and their use for applications (irradiation of DNA samples) are presented.

  10. New Free Electron Wire for Loss Free Utilization of Electrical Energy and Highly Energy Efficient Electrical Appliances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabyasachi Haldar

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available New Free Electrons Wire will enable the use of electrical energy and also energy in various other forms, in a loss free way, at room temperature. Free Electrons confined in vacuum at the order of 10-4 torr or more, at the core of the wire, can move a distance as long as about, to a few kilometers without any collision. The vacuum is maintained in a tube made up of alternate layers of Teflon and Silicon Oxynitride. The columbic repulsion between these free electrons will actually conduct energy without any loss. The free electrons trapped in vacuum tube, should be at a particular density of around 2.02 x 108 electrons per unit area. A metal encapsulation(s over the wire is there to keep the electromagnetic field remain confined within the free electron wire, to make it harmless to the health of living creatures. Apart from loss free energy transportation, the free electron wire is also capable of generating very high electromagnetic field due to the free electrons, simply by removing the metal encapsulation(s, which can be used for various purposes. The materials and techniques adopted will make New Free Electron Wire producible commercially, at the cost of general copper wires.

  11. Few-femtosecond time-resolved measurements of X-ray free-electron lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrens, C; Decker, F-J; Ding, Y; Dolgashev, V A; Frisch, J; Huang, Z; Krejcik, P; Loos, H; Lutman, A; Maxwell, T J; Turner, J; Wang, J; Wang, M-H; Welch, J; Wu, J

    2014-04-30

    X-ray free-electron lasers, with pulse durations ranging from a few to several hundred femtoseconds, are uniquely suited for studying atomic, molecular, chemical and biological systems. Characterizing the temporal profiles of these femtosecond X-ray pulses that vary from shot to shot is not only challenging but also important for data interpretation. Here we report the time-resolved measurements of X-ray free-electron lasers by using an X-band radiofrequency transverse deflector at the Linac Coherent Light Source. We demonstrate this method to be a simple, non-invasive technique with a large dynamic range for single-shot electron and X-ray temporal characterization. A resolution of less than 1 fs root mean square has been achieved for soft X-ray pulses. The lasing evolution along the undulator has been studied with the electron trapping being observed as the X-ray peak power approaches 100 GW.

  12. Mode-selective phonon excitation in gallium nitride using mid-infrared free-electron laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagaya, Muneyuki; Yoshida, Kyohei; Zen, Heishun; Hachiya, Kan; Sagawa, Takashi; Ohgaki, Hideaki

    2017-02-01

    The single-phonon mode was selectively excited in a solid-state sample. A mid-infrared free-electron laser, which was tuned to the target phonon mode, was irradiated onto a crystal cooled to a cryogenic temperature, where modes other than the intended excitation were suppressed. An A 1(LO) vibrational mode excitation on GaN(0001) face was demonstrated. Anti-Stokes Raman scattering was used to observe the excited vibrational mode, and the appearance and disappearance of the scattering band at the target wavenumber were confirmed to correspond to on and off switching of the pump free-electron laser and were fixed to the sample vibrational mode. The sum-frequency generation signals of the pump and probe lasers overlapped the Raman signals and followed the wavenumber shift of the pump laser.

  13. Aerosol Imaging with a Soft X-ray Free Electron Laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bogan, Michael J.; /SLAC /LLNL, Livermore; Boutet, Sebastien; /SLAC; Chapman, Henry N.; /DESY /Hamburg U.; Marchesini, Stefano; /LBL, Berkeley; Barty, Anton; Benner, W.Henry /LLNL, Livermore; Rohner, Urs; /LLNL, Livermore /TOFWERK AG; Frank, Matthias; Hau-Riege, Stefan P.; /LLNL, Livermore; Bajt, Sasa; /DESY; Woods, Bruce; /LLNL, Livermore; Seibert, M.M.; Iwan, Bianca; Timneanu, Nicusor; Hajdu, Janos; /Uppsala U.; Schulz, Joachim; /DESY

    2011-08-22

    Lasers have long played a critical role in the advancement of aerosol science. A new regime of ultrafast laser technology has recently be realized, the world's first soft xray free electron laser. The Free electron LASer in Hamburg, FLASH, user facility produces a steady source of 10 femtosecond pulses of 7-32 nm x-rays with 10{sub 12} photons per pulse. The high brightness, short wavelength, and high repetition rate (>500 pulses per second) of this laser offers unique capabilities for aerosol characterization. Here we use FLASH to perform the highest resolution imaging of single PM2.5 aerosol particles in flight to date. We resolve to 35 nm the morphology of fibrous and aggregated spherical carbonaceous nanoparticles that existed for less than two milliseconds in vacuum. Our result opens the possibility for high spatialand time-resolved single particle aerosol dynamics studies, filling a critical technological need in aerosol science.

  14. Pickup design for high bandwidth bunch arrival-time monitors in free-electron lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Angelovski, Aleksandar; Penirschke, Andreas; Jakoby, Rolf [TU Darmstadt (Germany). Institut fuer Mikrowellentechnik und Photonik; Kuhl, Alexander; Schnepp, Sascha [TU Darmstadt (Germany). Graduate School of Computational Engineering; Bock, Marie Kristin; Bousonville, Michael; Schlarb, Holger [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Weiland, Thomas [TU Darmstadt (Germany). Institut fuer Theorie Elektromagnetischer Felder

    2012-07-01

    The increased demands for low bunch charge operation mode in the free-electron lasers (FELs) require an upgrade of the existing synchronization equipment. As a part of the laser-based synchronization system, the bunch arrival-time monitors (BAMs) should have a sub-10 femtosecond precision for high and low bunch charge operation. In order to fulfill the resolution demands for both modes of operation, the bandwidth of such a BAM should be increased up to a cutoff frequency of 40 GHz. In this talk, we present the design and the realization of high bandwidth cone-shaped pickup electrodes as a part of the BAM for the FEL in Hamburg (FLASH) and the European X-ray free-electron laser (European XFEL). The proposed pickup was simulated with CST STUDIO SUITE, and a non-hermetic model was built up for radio frequency (rf) measurements.

  15. Optimization of a seeding option for the VUV free electron laser at DESY

    CERN Document Server

    Saldin, E L; Yurkov, M V

    2000-01-01

    In order to get fully coherent radiation from the Free Electron Laser (FEL) amplifier starting from the shot noise, it is foreseen to implement a seeding option into the VUV FEL being under construction at DESY (DESY print TESLA-FEL 95-03, Hamburg, DESY, 1995, Seeding option for the VUV free electron laser at DESY: joint DESY and GKSS proposal; Available at DESY upon request only). It consists of an additional undulator, a bypass for electrons and an X-ray monochromator. This paper presents the results of optimization of the seeding option for the VUV FEL providing maximal spectral brightness at minimal shot-to-shot intensity fluctuations. Calculations are performed with three-dimensional, time-dependent simulation code FAST (Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A 429 (1999) 233).

  16. Free-electron laser operation with a superconducting radio-frequency photoinjector at ELBE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teichert, J., E-mail: j.teichert@hzdr.de [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Bautzner Landstr. 400, 01328 Dresden (Germany); Arnold, A.; Büttig, H.; Justus, M. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Bautzner Landstr. 400, 01328 Dresden (Germany); Kamps, T. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin, Albert-Einstein-Str. 15, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Lehnert, U. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Bautzner Landstr. 400, 01328 Dresden (Germany); Lu, P. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Bautzner Landstr. 400, 01328 Dresden (Germany); Technische Universität Dresden, 01062 Dresden (Germany); Michel, P.; Murcek, P. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Bautzner Landstr. 400, 01328 Dresden (Germany); Rudolph, J. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin, Albert-Einstein-Str. 15, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Schurig, R.; Seidel, W. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Bautzner Landstr. 400, 01328 Dresden (Germany); Vennekate, H. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Bautzner Landstr. 400, 01328 Dresden (Germany); Technische Universität Dresden, 01062 Dresden (Germany); Will, I. [Max-Born-Institut, Berlin, Max-Born-Str. 2a, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Xiang, R. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Bautzner Landstr. 400, 01328 Dresden (Germany)

    2014-04-11

    At the radiation source ELBE a superconducting radio-frequency photoinjector (SRF gun) was developed and put into operation. Since 2010 the gun has delivered beam into the ELBE linac. A new driver laser with 13 MHz pulse repetition rate allows now to operate the free-electron lasers (FELs) with the SRF gun. This paper reports on the first lasing experiment with the far-infrared FEL at ELBE, describes the hardware, the electron beam parameters and the measurement of the FEL infrared radiation output. - Highlights: • The superconducting RF gun produces beam with Cs{sub 2}Te photocathodes. • The SRF gun operates as an injector for the ELBE linear accelerator. • First lasing of an infrared free-electron laser with an SRF gun.

  17. An extreme ultraviolet Michelson interferometer for experiments at free-electron lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilbert, Vinzenz; Blinne, Alexander; Fuchs, Silvio; Feigl, Torsten; Kämpfer, Tino; Rödel, Christian; Uschmann, Ingo; Wünsche, Martin; Paulus, Gerhard G; Förster, Eckhart; Zastrau, Ulf

    2013-09-01

    We present a Michelson interferometer for 13.5 nm soft x-ray radiation. It is characterized in a proof-of-principle experiment using synchrotron radiation, where the temporal coherence is measured to be 13 fs. The curvature of the thin-film beam splitter membrane is derived from the observed fringe pattern. The applicability of this Michelson interferometer at intense free-electron lasers is investigated, particularly with respect to radiation damage. This study highlights the potential role of such Michelson interferometers in solid density plasma investigations using, for instance, extreme soft x-ray free-electron lasers. A setup using the Michelson interferometer for pseudo-Nomarski-interferometry is proposed.

  18. An extreme ultraviolet Michelson interferometer for experiments at free-electron lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hilbert, Vinzenz; Fuchs, Silvio; Paulus, Gerhard G.; Zastrau, Ulf [Institute of Optics and Quantum Electronics, Friedrich-Schiller University Jena, Max-Wien-Platz 1, 07743 Jena (Germany); Blinne, Alexander [Institute for Theoretical Physics, Friedrich-Schiller University Jena, Max-Wien-Platz 1, 07743 Jena (Germany); Feigl, Torsten [Fraunhofer Institute for Applied Optics and Precision Engineering, Albert-Einstein-Straße 7, 07745 Jena (Germany); Kämpfer, Tino; Rödel, Christian; Uschmann, Ingo; Wünsche, Martin; Förster, Eckhart [Institute of Optics and Quantum Electronics, Friedrich-Schiller University Jena, Max-Wien-Platz 1, 07743 Jena (Germany); Helmholtz Institute, Fröbelstieg 3, 07743 Jena (Germany)

    2013-09-15

    We present a Michelson interferometer for 13.5 nm soft x-ray radiation. It is characterized in a proof-of-principle experiment using synchrotron radiation, where the temporal coherence is measured to be 13 fs. The curvature of the thin-film beam splitter membrane is derived from the observed fringe pattern. The applicability of this Michelson interferometer at intense free-electron lasers is investigated, particularly with respect to radiation damage. This study highlights the potential role of such Michelson interferometers in solid density plasma investigations using, for instance, extreme soft x-ray free-electron lasers. A setup using the Michelson interferometer for pseudo-Nomarski-interferometry is proposed.

  19. A ferroelectric electron gun in a free-electron maser experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Einat, M; Rosenman, G

    2002-01-01

    An electron-gun based on a ferroelectric cathode is studied in a free-electron maser (FEM) experiment. In this gun, the electrons are separated from the cathode surface plasma, and are accelerated in two stages. The electron energy-spread is reduced sufficiently for an FEM operation in the microwave regime. A 14 keV, 1-2 A e-beam is obtained in a 0.1-2.1 mu s pulse width. The pulse repetition frequency attains 3.1 MHz in approx 50% duty-cycle. This gun is implemented in an FEM oscillator experiment operating around 3 GHz. The paper presents experimental results and discusses the applicability of ferroelectric guns in free-electron laser devices.

  20. Bremsstrahlung and Line Spectroscopy of Warm Dense Aluminum Plasma Generated by EUV Free Electron Laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zastrau, U; Fortmann, C; Faustlin, R; Bornath, T; Cao, L F; Doppner, T; Dusterer, S; Forster, E; Glenzer, S H; Gregori, G; Holl, A; Laarmann, T; Lee, H; Meiwes-Broer, K; Przystawik, A; Radcliffe, P; Redmer, R; Reinholz, H; Ropke, G; Tiggesbaumker, J; Thiele, R; Truong, N X; Uschmann, I; Toleikis, S; Tschentscher, T; Wierling, A

    2008-03-07

    We report on the novel creation of a solid density aluminum plasma using free electron laser radiation at 13.5 nm wavelength. Ultrashort pulses of 30 fs duration and 47 {micro}J pulse energy were focused on a spot of 25 {micro}m diameter, yielding an intensity of 3 x 10{sup 14} W/cm{sup 2} on the bulk Al-target. The radiation emitted from the plasma was measured using a high resolution, high throughput EUV spectrometer. The analysis of both bremsstrahlung and line spectra results in an estimated electron temperature of (30 {+-} 10) eV, which is in very good agreement with radiation hydrodynamics simulations of the laser-target-interaction. This demonstrates the feasibility of exciting plasmas at warm dense matter conditions using EUV free electron lasers and their accurate characterization by EUV spectroscopy.

  1. Compositional change in hu-man enamel irradiated with MIR free electron laser

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate compositional changes in human enamel irradiated with the free electron laser (FEL). The exposure on dental enamel at the wavelength of 9.64 ?m was observed with the Beijing free electron laser. The distribution of elements in the irradiated or non-irradiated enamel was measured by scanning electron microscope (SEM) with energy-dispersive spectroscopy and synchrotron radiation X-ray fluorescence (SRXRF) in Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility (BSRF). The results showed that the P/Ca ratio in the ablation region of enamel at the maximum wavelength of infrared absorption was obviously smaller than that at the non-maximum wavelength. In the ablation region the ratios of P/Ca and Ca/Sr were smaller than those in the non-ablation region. The distributions of P, Ca and Sr in the ablation region were heterogeneous due to the element change caused by FEL irradiation.

  2. Effects of free-electron-laser field fluctuations on the frequency response of driven atomic resonances

    CERN Document Server

    Nikolopoulos, G M

    2012-01-01

    We study the effects of field fluctuations on the total yields of Auger electrons, obtained in the excitation of neutral atoms to a core-excited state by means of short-wavelength free-electron-laser pulses. Beginning with a self-contained analysis of the statistical properties of fluctuating free-electron-laser pulses, we analyse separately and in detail the cases of single and double Auger resonances, focusing on fundamental phenomena such as power broadening and ac Stark (Autler-Townes) splitting. In certain cases, field fluctuations are shown to influence dramatically the frequency response of the resonances, whereas in other cases the signal obtained may convey information about the bandwidth of the radiation as well as the dipole moment between Auger states.

  3. Undulator commissioning by characterization of radiation in x-ray free electron lasers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Tanaka

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available In x-ray free electron lasers (XFELs where a long undulator composed of many segments is installed, there exist a number of error sources to reduce the FEL gain such as the trajectory error, K value discrepancy, and phase mismatch, which are related to the segmented-undulator structure. Undulator commissioning, which refers to the tuning and alignment processes to eliminate the possible error sources, is thus an important step toward realization of lasing. In the SPring-8 angstrom compact free electron laser (SACLA facility, the undulator commissioning has been carried out by means of characterization of x-ray radiation, i.e., measurements of the spatial and spectral profiles of monochromatized spontaneous undulator radiation as well as by probing the FEL intensity. The achieved tuning and alignment accuracies estimated from the statistics of actual measurements in SACLA show the effectiveness of this commissioning scheme.

  4. Synchrotron radiation and free-electron lasers principles of coherent X-ray generation

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Kwang-Je; Lindberg, Ryan

    2017-01-01

    Learn about the latest advances in high-brightness X-ray physics and technology with this authoritative text. Drawing upon the most recent theoretical developments, pre-eminent leaders in the field guide readers through the fundamental principles and techniques of high-brightness X-ray generation from both synchrotron and free-electron laser sources. A wide range of topics is covered, including high-brightness synchrotron radiation from undulators, self-amplified spontaneous emission, seeded high-gain amplifiers with harmonic generation, ultra-short pulses, tapering for higher power, free-electron laser oscillators, and X-ray oscillator and amplifier configuration. Novel mathematical approaches and numerous figures accompanied by intuitive explanations enable easy understanding of key concepts, whilst practical considerations of performance-improving techniques and discussion of recent experimental results provide the tools and knowledge needed to address current research problems in the field. This is a comp...

  5. Equation of state of the relativistic free electron gas at arbitrary degeneracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faussurier, Gérald

    2016-12-01

    We study the problem of the relativistic free electron gas at arbitrary degeneracy. The specific heat at constant volume and particle number CV and the specific heat at constant pressure and particle number CP are calculated. The question of equation of state is also studied. Non degenerate and degenerate limits are considered. We generalize the formulas obtained in the non-relativistic and ultra-relativistic regimes.

  6. Soft x-ray free electron laser microfocus for exploring matter under extreme conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nelson, A. J.; Toleikis, S.; Chapman, H.; Bajt, S.; Krzywinski, J.; Chalupsky, J.; Juha, L.; Cihelka, J.; Hajkova, V.; Vysin, L.; Burian, T.; Kozlova, M.; Faustlin, R. R.; Nagler, B.; Vinko, S. M.; Whitcher, T.; Dzelzainis, T.; Renner, O.; Saksl, K.; Khorsand, A. R.; Heimann, P. A.; Sobierajski, R.; Klinger, D.; Jurek, M.; Pelka, J.; Iwan, B.; Andreasson, J.; Timneanu, N.; Fajardo, M.; Wark, J. S.; Riley, D.; Tschentscher, T.; Hajdu, J.; Lee, R. W.

    2009-01-01

    We have focused a beam (BL3) of FLASH (Free-electron LASer in Hamburg: lambda = 13.5 nm, pulse length 15 fs, pulse energy 10-40 mu J, 5Hz) using a fine polished off-axis parabola having a focal length of 270 mm and coated with a Mo/Si multilayer with an initial reflectivity of 67% at 13.5 nm. The OA

  7. Soft x-ray free electron laser microfocus for exploring matter under extreme conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nelson, A. J.; Toleikis, S.; Chapman, H.; Bajt, S.; Krzywinski, J.; Chalupsky, J.; Juha, L.; Cihelka, J.; Hajkova, V.; Vysin, L.; Burian, T.; Kozlova, M.; Faustlin, R. R.; Nagler, B.; Vinko, S. M.; Whitcher, T.; Dzelzainis, T.; Renner, O.; Saksl, K.; Khorsand, A. R.; Heimann, P. A.; Sobierajski, R.; Klinger, D.; Jurek, M.; Pelka, J.; Iwan, B.; Andreasson, J.; Timneanu, N.; Fajardo, M.; Wark, J. S.; Riley, D.; Tschentscher, T.; Hajdu, J.; Lee, R. W.

    2009-01-01

    We have focused a beam (BL3) of FLASH (Free-electron LASer in Hamburg: lambda = 13.5 nm, pulse length 15 fs, pulse energy 10-40 mu J, 5Hz) using a fine polished off-axis parabola having a focal length of 270 mm and coated with a Mo/Si multilayer with an initial reflectivity of 67% at 13.5 nm. The OA

  8. Soft x-ray free electron laser microfocus for exploring matter under extreme conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nelson, A. J.; Toleikis, S.; Chapman, H.; Bajt, S.; Krzywinski, J.; Chalupsky, J.; Juha, L.; Cihelka, J.; Hajkova, V.; Vysin, L.; Burian, T.; Kozlova, M.; Faustlin, R. R.; Nagler, B.; Vinko, S. M.; Whitcher, T.; Dzelzainis, T.; Renner, O.; Saksl, K.; Khorsand, A. R.; Heimann, P. A.; Sobierajski, R.; Klinger, D.; Jurek, M.; Pelka, J.; Iwan, B.; Andreasson, J.; Timneanu, N.; Fajardo, M.; Wark, J. S.; Riley, D.; Tschentscher, T.; Hajdu, J.; Lee, R. W.

    2009-01-01

    We have focused a beam (BL3) of FLASH (Free-electron LASer in Hamburg: lambda = 13.5 nm, pulse length 15 fs, pulse energy 10-40 mu J, 5Hz) using a fine polished off-axis parabola having a focal length of 270 mm and coated with a Mo/Si multilayer with an initial reflectivity of 67% at 13.5 nm. The

  9. Optical Transition Radiation Measurement of Electron Beam for Beijing Free Electron Laser

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Qiang; XIE Jia-Lin; LI Yong-Gui; ZHUANG Jie-Jia

    2001-01-01

    We used transition radiation techniques instead of the original phosphor targets to improve the electronic beam diagnostic system at Beijing Free Electron Laser. The beam profile, size (3.3 × 2.4 mm), position and divergence angle (σrms = 2.5 mrad) in transverse have been obtained from optical transition radiation. We also present the experimental set-up and some preliminary results.

  10. CAS to set up a free-electron laser facility in Shanghai

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    @@ CAS has decided to establish a soft X-ray free-electron laser (SXFEL) experiment facility and an RF superconducting accelerator unit in Shanghai,according to a presentation made by Prof. ZHAO Zhentang, vice director-general of the CAS Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics (SINAP), at the 122nd session of the Eastern Forum of Science and Technology held on 11 and 12 December, 2008, in Shanghai.

  11. Free Electron Laser For The Siberian Centre For Photochemical Research The Control System

    CERN Document Server

    Avlasov, Y K; Miginskaya, E G; Oreshkov, A D; Ovchar, A V; Salikova, T V; Selivanov, P A; Serednyakov, S I; Tararyshkin, S V; Tribendis, A G; Vinokurov, N A

    2004-01-01

    This article describes the software for the control system of the Free Electron Laser for the Siberian Center for photochemical research. The main components of subsystems composing the control system as well as their hardware and software components are considered. Also main features of each of the subsystems and of the whole control system are mentioned. The prospects of control system development to meet the future requirements are discussed.

  12. First lasing at the high-power free electron laser at Siberian center for photochemistry research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antokhin, E. A.; Akberdin, R. R.; Arbuzov, V. S.; Bokov, M. A.; Bolotin, V. P.; Burenkov, D. B.; Bushuev, A. A.; Veremeenko, V. F.; Vinokurov, N. A.; Vobly, P. D.; Gavrilov, N. G.; Gorniker, E. I.; Gorchakov, K. M.; Grigoryev, V. N.; Gudkov, B. A.; Davydov, A. V.; Deichuli, O. I.; Dementyev, E. N.; Dovzhenko, B. A.; Dubrovin, A. N.; Evtushenko, Yu. A.; Zagorodnikov, E. I.; Zaigraeva, N. S.; Zakutov, E. M.; Erokhin, A. I.; Kayran, D. A.; Kiselev, O. B.; Knyazev, B. A.; Kozak, V. R.; Kolmogorov, V. V.; Kolobanov, E. I.; Kondakov, A. A.; Kondakova, N. L.; Krutikhin, S. A.; Kryuchkov, A. M.; Kubarev, V. V.; Kulipanov, G. N.; Kuper, E. A.; Kuptsov, I. V.; Kurkin, G. Ya.; Labutskaya, E. A.; Leontyevskaya, L. G.; Loskutov, V. Yu.; Matveenko, A. N.; Medvedev, L. E.; Medvedko, A. S.; Miginsky, S. V.; Mironenko, L. A.; Motygin, S. V.; Oreshkov, A. D.; Ovchar, V. K.; Osipov, V. N.; Persov, B. Z.; Petrov, S. P.; Petrov, V. M.; Pilan, A. M.; Poletaev, I. V.; Polyanskiy, A. V.; Popik, V. M.; Popov, A. M.; Rotov, E. A.; Salikova, T. V.; Sedliarov, I. K.; Selivanov, P. A.; Serednyakov, S. S.; Skrinsky, A. N.; Tararyshkin, S. V.; Timoshina, L. A.; Tribendis, A. G.; Kholopov, M. A.; Cherepanov, V. P.; Shevchenko, O. A.; Shteinke, A. R.; Shubin, E. I.; Scheglov, M. A.

    2004-08-01

    The first lasing near wavelength 140 μm was achieved in April 2003 on a high-power free electron laser (FEL) constructed at the Siberian Center for Photochemical Research. In this paper, we briefly describe the design of FEL driven by an accelerator-recuperator. Characteristics of the electron beam and terahertz laser radiation, obtained at the first experiments, are also presented in the paper.

  13. Characteristics of radiation safety for synchrotron radiation and X-ray free electron laser facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asano, Yoshihiro

    2011-07-01

    Radiation safety problems are discussed for typical electron accelerators, synchrotron radiation (SR) facilities and X-ray free electron laser (XFEL) facilities. The radiation sources at the beamline of the facilities are SR, including XFEL, gas bremsstrahlung and high-energy gamma ray and photo-neutrons due to electron beam loss. The radiation safety problems for each source are compared by using 8 GeV class SR and XFEL facilities as an example.

  14. Status of polarization control experiment at Shanghai deep ultraviolet free electron laser

    CERN Document Server

    Deng, Haixiao; Feng, Lie; Liu, Bo; Chen, Jianhui; Dai, Zhimin; Fan, Yong; Feng, Chao; He, Yongzhou; Lan, Taihe; Song, Lin; Wang, Dong; Wang, Xingtao; Wang, Zhishan; Zhang, Jidong; Zhang, Meng; Zhang, Miao; Zhao, Zhentang

    2012-01-01

    A polarization control experiment by utilizing a pair of crossed undulators has been proposed for the Shanghai deep ultraviolet free electron laser test facility. Numerical simulations indicate that, with the electromagnetic phase-shifter located between the two crossed planar undulators, fully coherent radiation with 100 nJ order pulse energy, 5 picoseconds pulse length and circular polarization degree above 90% could be generated. The physical design study and the preparation status of the experiment are presented in the paper.

  15. Electron trajectories in free electron laser with realizable helical wiggler and ion channel guiding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Ebrahimi

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available   A detailed analysis of electron trajectories in a realizable helical wiggler free electron laser with ion channel guiding using electron (single particle dynamics is presented. Conditions for stability of electron orbit have been investigated, calculations are made to illustrate. Conclusion shows that there are differences stable (unstable condition(s electron trajectories between ideal helical wiggler(2D and realizable helical wiggler (3D.

  16. 3-D numerical analysis of a high-gain free-electron laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallardo, J.C.

    1988-10-19

    We present a novel approach to the 3-dimensional high-gain free- electron laser amplifier problem. The method allows us to write the laser field as an integral equation which can be efficiently and accurately evaluated on a small computer. The model is general enough to allow the inclusion of various initial electron beam distributions to study the gain reduction mechanism and its dependence on the physical parameters. 16 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Condensed matter research using the UCSB FEL. [Univ. of California, Santa Barbara Free Electron Laser project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-01-01

    The University of California, Santa Barbara (UCSB) Free Electron Laser (FEL) project was initiated in 1981 to test the idea of using an electrostatic accelerator in a recirculating beam mode to produce high-power, continuously tunable, coherent far infrared radiation. The development and application of this device to condensed matter research are briefly recounted. Emphasis was on semiconductor research and two-photon experiments. (RWR)

  18. Identification of the Amplification Mechanism in the First Free-Electron Laser as Net Stimulated Free-Electron Two-Quantum Stark Emission

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    S.H.Kim

    2009-01-01

    We find that the electron phase with respect to the incident laser radiation must be random in the first freeelectron laser (FEL) and, hence, the incident laser radiation works as a relaxation force to keep a Maxwellian distribution. We formulate the threshold laser intensity for amplification which agrees with the measured value in the order of magnitude in the first FEL. The magnetic wiggler must produce an electric wiggler whose period is the same as that of the magnetic wiggler. We find that net stimulated free-electron two-quantum Stark (FETQS)emission driven by this electric wiggler is the mechanism responsible t'or the measured ga/n and the measured laser intensity at the plateau in the first FEL.

  19. Direct and secondary nuclear excitation with x-ray free-electron lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gunst, Jonas; Wu, Yuanbin, E-mail: yuanbin.wu@mpi-hd.mpg.de; Kumar, Naveen; Keitel, Christoph H.; Pálffy, Adriana, E-mail: Palffy@mpi-hd.mpg.de [Max-Planck-Institut für Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2015-11-15

    The direct and secondary nuclear excitation produced by an x-ray free electron laser when interacting with a solid-state nuclear target is investigated theoretically. When driven at the resonance energy, the x-ray free electron laser can produce direct photoexcitation. However, the dominant process in that interaction is the photoelectric effect producing a cold and very dense plasma in which also secondary processes such as nuclear excitation by electron capture may occur. We develop a realistic theoretical model to quantify the temporal dynamics of the plasma and the magnitude of the secondary excitation therein. Numerical results show that depending on the nuclear transition energy and the temperature and charge states reached in the plasma, secondary nuclear excitation by electron capture may dominate the direct photoexcitation by several orders of magnitude, as it is the case for the 4.8 keV transition from the isomeric state of {sup 93}Mo, or it can be negligible, as it is the case for the 14.4 keV Mössbauer transition in {sup 57}Fe. These findings are most relevant for future nuclear quantum optics experiments at x-ray free electron laser facilities.

  20. Chirped pulse amplification in an extreme-ultraviolet free-electron laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauthier, David; Allaria, Enrico; Coreno, Marcello; Cudin, Ivan; Dacasa, Hugo; Danailov, Miltcho Boyanov; Demidovich, Alexander; di Mitri, Simone; Diviacco, Bruno; Ferrari, Eugenio; Finetti, Paola; Frassetto, Fabio; Garzella, David; Künzel, Swen; Leroux, Vincent; Mahieu, Benoît; Mahne, Nicola; Meyer, Michael; Mazza, Tommaso; Miotti, Paolo; Penco, Giuseppe; Raimondi, Lorenzo; Ribič, Primož Rebernik; Richter, Robert; Roussel, Eléonore; Schulz, Sebastian; Sturari, Luca; Svetina, Cristian; Trovò, Mauro; Walker, Paul Andreas; Zangrando, Marco; Callegari, Carlo; Fajardo, Marta; Poletto, Luca; Zeitoun, Philippe; Giannessi, Luca; de Ninno, Giovanni

    2016-12-01

    Chirped pulse amplification in optical lasers is a revolutionary technique, which allows the generation of extremely powerful femtosecond pulses in the infrared and visible spectral ranges. Such pulses are nowadays an indispensable tool for a myriad of applications, both in fundamental and applied research. In recent years, a strong need emerged for light sources producing ultra-short and intense laser-like X-ray pulses, to be used for experiments in a variety of disciplines, ranging from physics and chemistry to biology and material sciences. This demand was satisfied by the advent of short-wavelength free-electron lasers. However, for any given free-electron laser setup, a limit presently exists in the generation of ultra-short pulses carrying substantial energy. Here we present the experimental implementation of chirped pulse amplification on a seeded free-electron laser in the extreme-ultraviolet, paving the way to the generation of fully coherent sub-femtosecond gigawatt pulses in the water window (2.3-4.4 nm).

  1. Chirped pulse amplification in an extreme-ultraviolet free-electron laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauthier, David; Allaria, Enrico; Coreno, Marcello; Cudin, Ivan; Dacasa, Hugo; Danailov, Miltcho Boyanov; Demidovich, Alexander; Di Mitri, Simone; Diviacco, Bruno; Ferrari, Eugenio; Finetti, Paola; Frassetto, Fabio; Garzella, David; Künzel, Swen; Leroux, Vincent; Mahieu, Benoît; Mahne, Nicola; Meyer, Michael; Mazza, Tommaso; Miotti, Paolo; Penco, Giuseppe; Raimondi, Lorenzo; Ribič, Primož Rebernik; Richter, Robert; Roussel, Eléonore; Schulz, Sebastian; Sturari, Luca; Svetina, Cristian; Trovò, Mauro; Walker, Paul Andreas; Zangrando, Marco; Callegari, Carlo; Fajardo, Marta; Poletto, Luca; Zeitoun, Philippe; Giannessi, Luca; De Ninno, Giovanni

    2016-12-01

    Chirped pulse amplification in optical lasers is a revolutionary technique, which allows the generation of extremely powerful femtosecond pulses in the infrared and visible spectral ranges. Such pulses are nowadays an indispensable tool for a myriad of applications, both in fundamental and applied research. In recent years, a strong need emerged for light sources producing ultra-short and intense laser-like X-ray pulses, to be used for experiments in a variety of disciplines, ranging from physics and chemistry to biology and material sciences. This demand was satisfied by the advent of short-wavelength free-electron lasers. However, for any given free-electron laser setup, a limit presently exists in the generation of ultra-short pulses carrying substantial energy. Here we present the experimental implementation of chirped pulse amplification on a seeded free-electron laser in the extreme-ultraviolet, paving the way to the generation of fully coherent sub-femtosecond gigawatt pulses in the water window (2.3-4.4 nm).

  2. Intra- and intercycle interference of electron emission in laser assisted XUV atomic ionization

    CERN Document Server

    Gramajo, Ana Alicia; Garibotti, Carlos Roberto; Arbó, Diego

    2016-01-01

    We study the ionization of atomic hydrogen in the direction of polarization due to a linearly polarized XUV pulse in the presence a strong field IR. We describe the photoelectron spectra as an interference problem in the time domain. Electron trajectories steming from different optical laser cycles give rise to intercycle interference energy peaks known as sidebands. These sidebands are modulated by a grosser structure coming from the intracycle interference of the two electron trajectories born during the same optical cycle. We make use of a simple semiclassical model which offers the possibility to establish a connection between emission times and the photoelectron kinetic energy. We compare the semiclassical predictions with the continuum-distorted wave strong field approximation and the ab initio solution of the time dependent Schr\\"odinger equation. We analyze such interference pattern as a function of the time delay between the IR and XUV pulse and also as a function of the laser intensity.

  3. Experimental studies of X-UV rays by a laser plasma: X-UV strioscopy by means of multilayer mirrors; Etude experimentale de la refraction X-UV par un plasma laser: strioscopie X-UV a l`aide de miroirs multicouches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lutrin, F

    1996-05-20

    This thesis studies a new instrument -from its conception to the measures interpretation- that analyses electronic density gradient in the super critical transportation area of a laser plasma (0,35 {mu}m). This device, so-called of X-UV Schlieren, is based on the refraction property of a probe beam by an index gradient. Its specificity is the use of the X-UV emission at 13 nm (92 eV) of another laser plasma as X-UV probe. The conception and characterization of this instrument are defined thanks to both the emissivity and reflectivity properties of laser plasmas and the reflectivity properties of multilayers. Within this report are presented strioscopy images, spatially and spectrally resolved of an aluminium plasma from a 3.10{sup 12} W/cm{sup 2} laser flux, probed by a 13 nm wavelength. The device has to be closely aligned so as to obtain good contrast and good spatial resolution. For the first time, the refraction of a X-UV probe beam by a laser plasma is displayed. The experiments show that this refraction is all the more obvious for a gold probe plasma of energy 105 J and an aluminium probed plasma of energy 1 J. According to our plasma hydrodynamic simulation, the detected refraction corresponds to an electronic density gradient of 6,5.10{sup 25} electrons/cm{sup 4} in the two first microns of the sur-critical area. To study the parameters dependence of this gradient in the sur-critical area, several solutions for improving the instrument are produced. (author) 168 refs.

  4. The Variable Polarization XUV Beamline P04 at PETRA III: Optics, mechanics and their performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viefhaus, Jens, E-mail: jens.viefhaus@desy.de [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, Notkestraße 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Scholz, Frank; Deinert, Sascha; Glaser, Leif; Ilchen, Markus; Seltmann, Jörn; Walter, Peter [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, Notkestraße 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Siewert, Frank, E-mail: frank.siewert@helmholtz-berlin.de [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin (HZB) für Materialien und Energie, Albert-Einstein-Straße 15, 12489 Berlin (Germany)

    2013-05-11

    The layout of the Variable Polarization XUV Beamline P04 at PETRA III is described with emphasis on selected examples of optics, mirrors and gratings. A precise characterization of the optics, their performance inside the holder and of the surrounding mechanics is presented. This also includes a detailed characterization of the different beamline mechanics as a whole (grating unit, exit slit unit, re-focusing unit) including the environment.

  5. Angular anisotropy of time delay in XUV/IR photoionization of H$_2^+$

    CERN Document Server

    Serov, Vladislav V

    2016-01-01

    We develop a novel technique for modeling of atomic and molecular ionization in superposition of XUV and IR fields with characteristics typical for attosecond streaking and RABBITT experiments. The method is based on solving the time-dependent Schr\\"odinger equation in the coordinate frame expanding along with the photoelectron wave packet. The efficiency of the method is demonstrated by calculating angular anisotropy of photoemission time delay of the H$_2^+$ ion in a field configuration of recent RABBITT experiments.

  6. Powerful 170-attosecond XUV pulses generated with few-cycle laser pulses and broadband multilayer optics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schultze, M [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Quantenoptik, Hans-Kopfermannstrasse 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Goulielmakis, E [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Quantenoptik, Hans-Kopfermannstrasse 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Uiberacker, M [Department fuer Physik, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet, Am Coulombwall 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Hofstetter, M [Department fuer Physik, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet, Am Coulombwall 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Kim, J [Laser Science Laboratory, Department of Physics, POSTECH, Pohang, Kyungbuk 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, D [Laser Science Laboratory, Department of Physics, POSTECH, Pohang, Kyungbuk 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Krausz, F [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Quantenoptik, Hans-Kopfermannstrasse 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Kleineberg, U [Department fuer Physik, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet, Am Coulombwall 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2007-07-15

    Single 170-as extreme ultraviolet (XUV) pulses delivering more than 10{sup 6} photons/pulse at {approx}100 eV at a repetition rate of 3 kHz are produced by ionizing neon with waveform-controlled sub-5 fs near-infrared (NIR) laser pulses and spectrally filtering the emerging near-cutoff high-harmonic continuum with a broadband, chirped multilayer molybdenum-silicon (Mo/Si) mirror.

  7. CITIUS: an IR-XUV light source for fundamental and applied ultrafast science

    CERN Document Server

    Grazioli, C; Ciavardini, A; Coreno, M; Frassetto, F; Gauthier, D; Golob, D; Ivanov, R; Kivimäki, A; Mahieu, B; Bucar, Bojan; Merhar, M; Miotti, P; Poletto, L; Polo, E; Ressel, B; Spezzani, C; De Ninno, G

    2013-01-01

    We present the main features of CITIUS, a new light source for ultrafast science, generating tunable, intense, femtosecond pulses in the spectral range from IR to XUV. The XUV pulses (about 10^5-10^8 photons/pulse in the range 14-80 eV) are produced by laser-induced high-order harmonic generation in gas. This radiation is monochromatized by a time-preserving monochromator, allowing also to work with high-resolution bandwidth selection. The tunable IR-UV pulses (10^{12}-10^{15} photons/pulse in the range 0.4-5.6 eV) are generated by an optical parametric amplifier, which is driven by a fraction of the same laser pulse that generates high order harmonics. The IR-UV and XUV pulses follow different optical paths and are eventually recombined on the sample for pump-probe experiments. The new light source will become the fulcrum of a new center located at the University of Nova Gorica, active in a wide range of scientific fields, including materials science, catalysis, biochemistry and magnetism. We also present th...

  8. Solar XUV and ENA-driven water loss from early Venus' steam atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichtenegger, H. I. M.; Kislyakova, K. G.; Odert, P.; Erkaev, N. V.; Lammer, H.; Gröller, H.; Johnstone, C. P.; Elkins-Tanton, L.; Tu, L.; Güdel, M.; Holmström, M.

    2016-05-01

    We present a study on the influence of the upper atmosphere hydrodynamic escape of hydrogen, driven by the solar soft X-ray and extreme ultraviolet radiation (XUV), on an expected outgassed steam atmosphere of early Venus. By assuming that the young Sun was either a weak or moderately active young G star, we estimated the water loss from a hydrogen dominated thermosphere due to the absorption of the solar XUV flux and the precipitation of solar wind produced energetic hydrogen atoms (ENAs). The production of ENAs and their interaction with the hydrodynamic extended upper atmosphere, including collision-related feedback processes, have been calculated by means of Monte Carlo models. ENAs that collide in the upper atmosphere deposit their energy and heat the surrounding atmosphere mainly above the main XUV energy deposition layer. It is shown that precipitating ENAs modify the thermal structure of the upper atmosphere, but the enhancement of the thermal escape rates caused by these energetic hydrogen atoms is negligible. Our results also indicate that the majority of oxygen arising from dissociated H2O molecules is left behind during the first 100 Myr. It is thus suggested that the main part of the remaining oxygen has been absorbed by crustal oxidation.

  9. Towards circularly polarized (sub-) femtosecond XUV pulses for ultrafast pump-probe experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, Juergen; Chew, Soo Hoon; Kranjec, Mihael; Kleineberg, Ulf [LMU Muenchen, Physik-Department, Garching (Germany); Guggenmos, Alexander; Hofstetter, Michael [MPQ fuer Quantenoptik, Garching (Germany)

    2012-07-01

    Circularly polarized (CP) XUV radiation has been demonstrated to be a useful probe for the experimental investigation of electronic effects in magnetic materials such as magnetic circular dichroism, spin-polarized photoemission, magneto-optical Kerr-effect and others. On the laboratory scale, High Harmonic (HH) gas jet sources which inherently provide coherent and ultrashort linearly polarized XUV pulses in the sub-fs domain, suitable to study ultrafast dynamics, have emerged. In our setup we aim at incorporating in-house fabricated broadband transmission multilayer phase shifters into a laser driven 10kHz repetition rate HH Source in the 50-70eV photon energy range. To our knowledge only little investigation on such polarizers intended for use in HH radiation has been made so far. We examine our phase shifters regarding tunability of energy range, phase retardation, transmission efficiency and spectral bandwidth. For this purpose we use a home-made XUV flat-field spectrometer and a multilayer mirror based polarization analyzer. Combining the expected CP pulses with our TOF-PEEM and ARPES spectrometer will pave the way towards time resolved measurements of exchange-coupled electron dynamics.

  10. Three-dimensional manipulation of electron beam phase space for seeding soft x-ray free-electron lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Feng, Chao; Deng, Haixiao; Zhao, Zhentang

    2014-01-01

    In this letter, a simple technique is proposed to induce strong density modulation into the electron beam with small energy modulation. By using the combination of a transversely dispersed electron beam and a wave-front tilted seed laser, three-dimensional manipulation of the electron beam phase space can be utilized to significantly enhance the micro-bunching of seeded free-electron laser schemes, which will improve the performance and extend the short-wavelength range of a single-stage seeded free-electron laser. Theoretical analysis and numerical simulations demonstrate the capability of the proposed technique in a soft x-ray free-electron laser.

  11. Three-dimensional manipulation of electron beam phase space for seeding soft x-ray free-electron lasers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Feng

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a simple technique is proposed to induce strong density modulation into the electron beam with small energy modulation. By using the combination of a transversely dispersed electron beam and a wave-front tilted seed laser, three-dimensional manipulation of the electron beam phase space can be utilized to significantly enhance the microbunching of seeded free-electron laser schemes, which will improve the performance and extend the short-wavelength range of a single-stage seeded free-electron laser. Theoretical analysis and numerical simulations demonstrate the capability of the proposed technique in a soft x-ray free-electron laser.

  12. High Intensity Femtosecond XUV Pulse Interactions with Atomic Clusters: Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ditmire, Todd [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States). Center for High Energy Density Science

    2016-10-12

    We propose to expand our recent studies on the interactions of intense extreme ultraviolet (XUV) femtosecond pulses with atomic and molecular clusters. The work described follows directly from work performed under BES support for the past grant period. During this period we upgraded the THOR laser at UT Austin by replacing the regenerative amplifier with optical parametric amplification (OPA) using BBO crystals. This increased the contrast of the laser, the total laser energy to ~1.2 J , and decreased the pulse width to below 30 fs. We built a new all reflective XUV harmonic beam line into expanded lab space. This enabled an increase influence by a factor of 25 and an increase in the intensity by a factor of 50. The goal of the program proposed in this renewal is to extend this class of experiments to available higher XUV intensity and a greater range of wavelengths. In particular we plan to perform experiments to confirm our hypothesis about the origin of the high charge states in these exploding clusters, an effect which we ascribe to plasma continuum lowering (ionization potential depression) in a cluster nano-­plasma. To do this we will perform experiments in which XUV pulses of carefully chosen wavelength irradiate clusters composed of only low-Z atoms and clusters with a mixture of this low-­Z atom with higher Z atoms. The latter clusters will exhibit higher electron densities and will serve to lower the ionization potential further than in the clusters composed only of low Z atoms. This should have a significant effect on the charge states produced in the exploding cluster. We will also explore the transition of explosions in these XUV irradiated clusters from hydrodynamic expansion to Coulomb explosion. The work proposed here will explore clusters of a wider range of constituents, including clusters from solids. Experiments on clusters from solids will be enabled by development we performed during the past grant period in which we constructed and

  13. Synchronization of Chaotic Storage-Ring Free-Electron Laser by Bi-Directional Coupling Scheme with the Coupling Strength Varied Periodically

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Liang-Yu; LUO Xiao-Shu

    2006-01-01

    @@ We analyse the chaotic dynamics of storage-ring free-electron lasers and report a bi-directional coupled scheme with the coupling strength varied periodically to synchronize two chaotic storage-ring free-electron lasers.

  14. Quantum confinement in perovskite oxide heterostructures: Tight binding instead of a nearly free electron picture

    OpenAIRE

    Zhong, Zhicheng; Zhang, Qinfang; Held, Karsten

    2013-01-01

    Most recently, orbital-selective quantum well states of $d$ electrons have been experimentally observed in SrVO$_3$ ultrathin films [K. Yoshimatsu et. al., Science 333, 319 (2011)] and SrTiO$_3$ surfaces [A. F. Santander-Syro et. al., Nature 469, 189 (2011)]. Hitherto, one tries to explain these experiments by a nearly free electron (NFE) model, an approach widely used for delocalized electrons in semiconductor heterostructures and simple metal films. We show that a tight binding (TB) model i...

  15. Radiation control aspects of the civil construction for a high power free electron laser (FEL) facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunn, T.; Neil, G.; Stapleton, G.

    1996-12-31

    The paper discusses some of the assumptions and methods employed for the control of ionizing radiation in the specifications for the civil construction of a planned free electron laser facility based on a 200 MeV, 5 mA superconducting recirculation electron accelerator. Consideration is given firstly to the way in which the underlying building configuration and siting aspects were optimized on the basis of the early assumptions of beam loss and radiation goals. The various design requirements for radiation protection are then considered, and how they were folded into an aesthetically pleasing and functional building.

  16. Proposals for gain cascading in single-pass of a free-electron laser oscillator

    CERN Document Server

    Deng, Haixiao

    2016-01-01

    The low-gain free electron laser (FEL) oscillators are cutting-edge tools to produce fully coherent radiation in the spectral region from terahertz to vacuum ultraviolet, and potentially in hard X-ray. In this paper, it is proposed to utilize an oscillator with multi-stage undulators to enable gain cascading in a single pass of FEL oscillator, making it possible to achieve shorter pulses and higher power than classical FEL oscillators. Theoretical analysis and numerical simulations in the infrared and hard X-ray regions show that our proposal is effective and practically simple to implement.

  17. Ultrashort electromagnetic clusters formation by two-stream superheterodyne free electron lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kulish, Viktor V.; Lysenko, Alexander V.; Volk, Iurii I.

    2016-01-01

    A cubic nonlinear self-consistent theory of multiharmonic two-stream superheterodyne free electron lasers (TSFEL) of a klystron type, intended to form powerful ultrashort clusters of an electromagnetic field is constructed. Plural three-wave parametric resonant interactions of wave harmonics have...... been taken into account. An amplitude, phase and spectral analyses of the processes occurring in such devices have been carried out. The conditions necessary for the forming of the ultrashort clusters of an electromagnetic field have been found out. The possibility of the ultrashort electromagnetic...

  18. A free-electron laser for cyclotron resonant heating in magnetic fusion reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freund, H. P.; Read, M. E.; Jackson, R. H.; Pershing, D. E.; Taccetti, J. M.

    1995-05-01

    A G-band free-electron laser designed for plasma heating is described using a coaxial hybrid iron (CHI) wiggler formed by insertion into a solenoid of a central rod and an outer ring of alternating ferrite and nonferrite spacers positioned so that the central ferrite (nonferrite) spacers are opposite the outer nonferrite (ferrite) spacers. The CHI wiggler provides for enhanced beam focusing and the ability to handle intense beams and high-power continuous wave radiation. Simulations indicate that a power/efficiency of 3.5 MW/13% are possible using a 690 kV/40 A beam. No beam loss was found in simulation.

  19. Coherent-pulse 2D crystallography using a free-electron laser x-ray source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancuso, A P; Schropp, A; Reime, B; Stadler, L-M; Singer, A; Gulden, J; Streit-Nierobisch, S; Gutt, C; Grübel, G; Feldhaus, J; Staier, F; Barth, R; Rosenhahn, A; Grunze, M; Nisius, T; Wilhein, T; Stickler, D; Stillrich, H; Frömter, R; Oepen, H-P; Martins, M; Pfau, B; Günther, C M; Könnecke, R; Eisebitt, S; Faatz, B; Guerassimova, N; Honkavaara, K; Kocharyan, V; Treusch, R; Saldin, E; Schreiber, S; Schneidmiller, E A; Yurkov, M V; Weckert, E; Vartanyants, I A

    2009-01-23

    Coherent diffractive imaging for the reconstruction of a two-dimensional (2D) finite crystal structure with a single pulse train of free-electron laser radiation at 7.97 nm wavelength is demonstrated. This measurement shows an advance on traditional coherent imaging techniques by applying it to a periodic structure. It is also significant that this approach paves the way for the imaging of the class of specimens which readily form 2D, but not three-dimensional crystals. We show that the structure is reconstructed to the detected resolution, given an adequate signal-to-noise ratio.

  20. Free electron laser-driven ultrafast rearrangement of the electronic structure in Ti

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Principi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available High-energy density extreme ultraviolet radiation delivered by the FERMI seeded free-electron laser has been used to create an exotic nonequilibrium state of matter in a titanium sample characterized by a highly excited electron subsystem at temperatures in excess of 10 eV and a cold solid-density ion lattice. The obtained transient state has been investigated through ultrafast absorption spectroscopy across the Ti M2,3-edge revealing a drastic rearrangement of the sample electronic structure around the Fermi level occurring on a time scale of about 100 fs.

  1. Electron Beam Spectrum Diagnostics with Optical Transition Radiation on the Beijing Free-Electron Laser

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李泉凤; 吴频; 高建江; 吴刚

    2004-01-01

    A measurement system was developed to measure the electron beam spectrum of the Beijing free-electron laser based on the optical transition radiation (OTR). This paper describes the system, which consists of a 32-channel high resolution of 0.02% OTR detector, especially the spectrometer. The OTR angular-distribution pattern at the focal plane has two apexes, but the two apexes are smoothed out due to the electron beam energy distribution. The energy spectrum can be measured if the magnet energy resolution is higher than 0.7% to distinguish the electron beam energy distribution.

  2. Large-Scale Production of Carbon Nanotubes Using the Jefferson Lab Free Electron Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holloway, Brian C.

    2003-01-01

    We report on our interdisciplinary program to use the Free Electron Laser (FEL) at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (J-Lab) for high-volume pulsed laser vaporization synthesis of carbon nanotubes. Based in part on the funding of from this project, a novel nanotube production system was designed, tested, and patented. Using this new system nanotube production rates over 100 times faster than conventional laser systems were achieved. Analysis of the material produced shows that it is of as high a quality as the standard laser-based materials.

  3. Beam shaping to improve the free-electron laser performance at the Linac Coherent Light Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Y.; Bane, K. L. F.; Colocho, W.; Decker, F.-J.; Emma, P.; Frisch, J.; Guetg, M. W.; Huang, Z.; Iverson, R.; Krzywinski, J.; Loos, H.; Lutman, A.; Maxwell, T. J.; Nuhn, H.-D.; Ratner, D.; Turner, J.; Welch, J.; Zhou, F.

    2016-10-01

    A new operating mode has been developed for the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) in which we shape the longitudinal phase space of the electron beam. This mode of operation is realized using a horizontal collimator located in the middle of the first bunch compressor to truncate the head and tail of the beam. With this method, the electron beam longitudinal phase space and current profile are reshaped, and improvement in lasing performance can be realized. We present experimental studies at the LCLS of the beam shaping effects on the free-electron laser performance.

  4. Pair Production from Vacuum at the Focus of an X-Ray Free Electron Laser

    OpenAIRE

    Ringwald, A.

    2001-01-01

    There are definite plans for the construction of X-ray free electron lasers (FEL), both at DESY, where the so-called XFEL is part of the design of the electron-positron linear collider TESLA, as well as at SLAC, where the so-called Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) has been proposed. Such an X-ray laser would allow for high-field science applications: One could make use of not only the high energy and transverse coherence of the X-ray beam, but also of the possibility of focusing it to a spo...

  5. Growth rate enhancement of free-electron laser by two consecutive wigglers with axial magnetic field

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A Hasanbeigi; A Farhadian; E Khademi Bidhendi

    2014-06-01

    The operative mechanism for a free-electron laser (FEL) with two consecutive helical wigglers having opposite circular polarization in the presence of an axial magnetic field is proposed and analysed. With the help of fluid theory, a tenth-degree polynomial dispersion equation for electromagnetic and space-charge waves is derived. The results are used to illustrate and discuss the dependence of growth rate on different system parameters. Finally, it is shown that for the same system parameters the growth rate of the proposed structure is more than the growth rate of instability in a conventional FEL.

  6. Toward atomic resolution diffractive imaging of isolated molecules with x-ray free-electron lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Stern, Stephan; Filsinger, Frank; Rouzée, Arnaud; Rudenko, Artem; Johnsson, Per; Martin, Andrew V; Barty, Anton; Bostedt, Christoph; Bozek, John D; Coffee, Ryan N; Epp, Sascha; Erk, Benjamin; Foucar, Lutz; Hartmann, Robert; Kimmel, Nils; Kühnel, Kai-Uwe; Maurer, Jochen; Messerschmidt, Marc; Rudek, Benedikt; Starodub, Dmitri G; Thøgersen, Jan; Weidenspointner, Georg; White, Thomas A; Stapelfeldt, Henrik; Rolles, Daniel; Chapman, Henry N; Küpper, Jochen

    2014-01-01

    We give a detailed account of the theoretical analysis and the experimental results of an x-ray-diffraction experiment on quantum-state selected and strongly laser-aligned gas-phase ensembles of the prototypical large asymmetric rotor molecule 2,5-diiodobenzonitrile, performed at the Linac Coherent Light Source [Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 083002 (2014)]. This experiment is the first step toward coherent diffractive imaging of structures and structural dynamics of isolated molecules at atomic resolution, i. e., picometers and femtoseconds, using x-ray free-electron lasers.

  7. Power delivery of free electron laser light by hollow glass waveguides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuura, Y; Matsuura, K; Harrington, J A

    1996-09-20

    Hollow glass waveguides are used to deliver free electron laser (FEL) energy for applications in medicine and laser surgery. The hollow guides, optimized for the delivery of 6.45-μm FEL radiation, exhibited losses for the 1000-μm bore as low as 0.39 dB/m when the guide was straight and 1.75 dB/m when bent to a radius of 25 cm. Hollow glass guides are flexible, and their broadband capability provides an ideal fiber optic for the tunable FEL.

  8. Ultrafast Coherent Diffraction Imaging with X-ray Free-Electron Lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chapman, H N; Bajt, S; Barty, A; Benner, W; Bogan, M; Frank, M; Hau-Riege, S; London, R; Marchesini, S; Spiller, E; Szoke, A; Woods, B; Boutet, S; Hodgson, K; Hajdu, J; Bergh, M; Burmeister, F; Caleman, C; Huldt, G; Maia, F; Seibert, M M; der Spoel, D v

    2006-08-22

    The ultrafast pulses from X-ray free-electron lasers will enable imaging of non-periodic objects at near-atomic resolution [1, Neutze]. These objects could include single molecules, protein complexes, or virus particles. The specimen would be completely destroyed by the pulse in a Coulomb explosion, but that destruction will only happen after the pulse. The scattering from the sample will give structural information about the undamaged object. There are many technical challenges that must be addressed before carrying out such experiments at an XFEL, which we are doing so with experiments at FLASH, the soft-X-ray FEL at DESY.

  9. W-Band Free Electron Laser for High Gradient Structure Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lidia, S. M.; Whittum, D. H.; Donohue, J. T.

    1997-05-01

    We discuss the use of a free electron laser in support of material stress studies of W-band high-gradient accelerating structures. We propose the use of the linear induction accelerator LELIA (CEA/CESTA, France) to generate a 1-kiloamp, 80-ns FWHM electron pulse. We present a design for a helical FEL TE_11 amplifier that will generate high peak power (100's MW) at 93 GHz. We support our design with analytical estimates of gain, and with numerical simulations of power and phase development.

  10. Free-Electron Laser as a Driver for a Resonant Cavity at 35 GHz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefevre, T.; Gardelle, J.; Rullier, J. L.; Vermare, C.; Donohue, J. T.; Meurdesoif, Y.; Lidia, S. M.

    2000-02-01

    An intense beam of relativistic electrons (800 A, 6.7 MeV) has been bunched at 35 GHz by a free-electron laser, in which output power levels exceeding 100 MW were obtained. The beam was then extracted and transported through a resonant cavity, which was excited by its passage. Microwave power levels of 10 MW were extracted from the cavity, in reasonable agreement with the simple formula which relates power to known properties of both the beam and the cavity.

  11. Single-shot measurement of free-electron laser polarization at SDUV-FEL

    CERN Document Server

    Feng, Lie; Zhang, Tong; Feng, Chao; Chen, Jianhui; Wang, Xingtao; Lan, Taihe; Shen, Lei; Zhang, Wenyan; Yao, Haifeng; Liu, Xiaoqing; Liu, Bo; Wang, Dong

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, a division-of-amplitude photopolarimeter (DOAP) for measuring the polarization state of free-electron laser (FEL) pulse is described. The incident FEL beam is divided into four separate beams, and four Stokes parameters can be measured in a single-shot. In the crossed-planar undulators experiment at Shanghai deep ultraviolet FEL test facility, this DOAP instrument constructed in house responses accurately and timely while the polarization-state of fully coherent FEL pulses are switched, which is helpful for confirming the crossed-planar undulators technique for short-wavelength FELs.

  12. Dissociative multiple ionization of diatomic molecules by extreme-ultraviolet free-electron-laser pulses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Lars Bojer; Leth, Henriette Astrup

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear dynamics in dissociative multiple ionization processes of diatomic molecules exposed to extreme-ultraviolet free-electron-laser pulses is studied theoretically using the Monte Carlo wave packet approach. By simulated detection of the emitted electrons, the model reduces a full propagation...... of the system to propagations of the nuclear wave packet in one specific electronic charge state at a time. Suggested ionization channels can be examined, and kinetic energy release spectra for the nuclei can be calculated and compared with experiments. Double ionization of O2 is studied as an example, and good...

  13. Gain enhancement in a two-frequency high-gain waveguide free-electron laser

    CERN Document Server

    Lefèvre, T; Rullier, J L; Gouard, P; Donohue, J T

    2002-01-01

    In a waveguide monomode free-electron laser (FEL), two resonant frequencies can be amplified by the electron beam. At the CEA/CESTA facility, single-pass high-gain FEL experiments have been performed over the last five years using relativistic electron beams provided by induction linacs. Most of the work was done in the amplifier regime (at the higher frequency) with the aim of producing a 35 GHz bunched beam. However, super-radiant measurements were also made and have shown that the FEL gain at the upper frequency is higher than in the amplifier regime and may be driven by the lower frequency FEL interaction.

  14. Femtosecond x-ray free electron laser pulse duration measurement from spectral correlation function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Lutman

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available We present a novel method for measuring the duration of femtosecond x-ray pulses from self-amplified spontaneous emission free electron lasers by performing statistical analysis in the spectral domain. Analytical expressions of the spectral correlation function were derived in the linear regime to extract both the pulse duration and the spectrometer resolution. Numerical simulations confirmed that the method can be also used in the nonlinear regime. The method was demonstrated experimentally at the Linac Coherent Light Source by measuring pulse durations down to 13 fs FWHM.

  15. Intense ultrashort pulse generation using the JAERI far-infrared free electron laser

    CERN Document Server

    Nagai, R; Nishimori, N; Kikuzawa, N; Sawamura, M; Minehara, E J

    2002-01-01

    An intense ultrashort optical pulse has been quasi-continuously generated using a superconducting RF linac-based free-electron laser at a wavelength of 22.5 mu m. The pulse shape and width are measured by second-order optical autocorrelation with a birefringent Te crystal. At synchronism of the optical resonator, the pulse shape is a smooth single pulse with an FWHM width of 255 fs and energy of 74 mu J. A train of subpulses is developed by increasing the desynchronism of the optical resonator. The measured results are in good agreement with numerical simulation.

  16. Improved performance of the JAERI injection and free electron laser system

    CERN Document Server

    Nishimori, N; Hajima, R; Shizuma, T; Sawamura, M; Kikuzawa, N; Minehara, E J

    2000-01-01

    Several modifications have been made for the JAERI Free Electron Laser (FEL) system in order to extract greater average lasing power. The electron gun was improved to produce an electron beam with 1 ns pulse width, 600 mA peak current, amplitude fluctuation less than 1% and timing jitter less than 0.1 ns. In addition, the 180 deg. bending arc was modified to match the beam envelope inside the undulator. After these modifications, we obtained an FEL power of 180 W in macro-pulse average at wavelength of 23 mu m.

  17. Imaging the He$_2$ quantum halo state using a free electron laser

    CERN Document Server

    Zeller, S; Voigtsberger, J; Kalinin, A; Schottelius, A; Schober, C; Waitz, M; Sann, H; Hartung, A; Bauer, T; Pitzer, M; Trinter, F; Goihl, C; Janke, C; Richter, M; Kastirke, G; Weller, M; Czasch, A; Kitzler, M; Braune, M; Grisenti, R E; Schöllkopf, W; Schmidt, L Ph H; Schöffer, M; Williams, J B; Jahnke, T; Dörner, R

    2016-01-01

    We report on coulomb explosion imaging of the wavefunction of the quantum halo system He$_2$. Each atom of this system is ionized by tunnelionization in a femto second laser pulse and in a second experiment by single photon ionization employing a free electron laser. We visualize the exponential decay of the probability density of the tunneling particle over distance for over two orders of magnitude up to an internuclear distance of 250 \\r{A}. By fitting the slope of the density in the tunneling regime we obtain a binding energy of 151.9 $\\pm$ 13.3 neV, which is in agreement with most recent calculations.

  18. Free electron laser induced two-photon photoconductivity in Hg1-xCdxTe

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The Beijing free electron laser (BFEL) has been employed for the first time to study the nonlinear photoconductivity characteristics of the typical infrared photoelectronic material Hg1-xCdxTe. Taking advantage of the high photon flux density of BFEL, we have investigated the photoconductivity characteristics in Hg1-xCdxTe induced by two-photon absorption by means of the photoconductivity technique, observed the photoconductivity signals saturation, and studied the two-photon photoconductivity characteristics on different bias voltages across the sample.

  19. The project of the high power free electron laser based on the race-track microtron-recuperator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinokurov, N. A.; Gavrilov, N. G.; Gorniker, E. I.; Kulipanov, G. N.; Kuptsov, I. V.; Kurkin, G. Ya.; Erg, G. I.; Levashov, Yu. I.; Oreshkov, A. D.; Petrov, S. P.; Petrov, V. M.; Pinayev, I. V.; Popik, V. M.; Sedlyarov, I. K.; Shaftan, T. V.; Skrinsky, A. N.; Sokolov, A. S.; Veshcherevich, V. G.; Vobly, P. D.

    1995-02-01

    To provide a user facility for the Siberian Centre of Photochemical Researches in Novosibirsk a high power free electron laser is under construction. The project status and installation are described.

  20. Chirped seeded free-electron lasers: self-standing light sources for two-colour pump-probe experiments

    CERN Document Server

    De Ninno, Giovanni; Mahieu, Benoit

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate the possibility to run a single-pass free-electron laser in a new dynamical regime, which can be exploited to perform two-colour pump-probe experiments in the VUV/X-ray domain, using the free-electron laser emission both as a pump and as a probe. The studied regime is induced by triggering the free-electron laser process with a powerful laser pulse, carrying a significant and adjustable frequency chirp. As a result, the emitted light is eventually split in two sub-pulses, whose spectral and temporal separations can be independently controlled. We provide a theoretical description of this phenomenon, which is found in good agreement with experiments performed on the FERMI@Elettra free-electron laser.

  1. Near-field optical microscopy with an infra-red free electron laser applied to cancer diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, A. D.; Siggel-King, M. R. F.; Holder, G. M.; Cricenti, A.; Luce, M.; Harrison, P.; Martin, D. S.; Surman, M.; Craig, T.; Barrett, S. D.; Wolski, A.; Dunning, D. J.; Thompson, N. R.; Saveliev, Y.; Pritchard, D. M.; Varro, A.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Weightman, P.

    2013-02-01

    We show that the combination of a scanning near field optical microscope and an infra-red free electron laser yields chemical images with sub-cellular spatial resolution that have the potential to provide a diagnostic for oesophageal adenocarcinoma.

  2. First observation of self-amplified spontaneous emission in a free-electron laser at 109 nm wavelength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saldin; Sandner; Sanok; Schlarb; Schmidt; Schmuser; Schneider; Schneidmiller; Schreiber; Schreiber; Schutt; Sekutowicz; Serafini; Sertore; Setzer; Simrock; Sonntag; Sparr; Stephan; Sytchev; Tazzari; Tazzioli; Tigner; Timm; Tonutti; Trakhtenberg

    2000-10-30

    We present the first observation of self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) in a free-electron laser (FEL) in the vacuum ultraviolet regime at 109 nm wavelength (11 eV). The observed free-electron laser gain (approximately 3000) and the radiation characteristics, such as dependency on bunch charge, angular distribution, spectral width, and intensity fluctuations, are all consistent with the present models for SASE FELs.

  3. Shack-Hartmann Electron Densitometer (SHED): An Optical System for Diagnosing Free Electron Density in Laser-Produced Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-01

    the free electron density in USPL-created plasmas are limited in the number of space-time dimensions that can be measured simultaneously. One...profile, and c) parabolic density profile 2.1 Cylindrical Geometry This geometry is a first -order approximation of that created in the...Free Electron Density in Laser-Produced Plasmas by Anthony R Valenzuela Approved for public release; distribution is

  4. Direct and secondary nuclear excitation with x-ray free-electron lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Gunst, Jonas; Kumar, Naveen; Keitel, Christoph H; Pálffy, Adriana

    2015-01-01

    The direct and secondary nuclear excitation produced by an x-ray free electron laser when interacting with a solid-state nuclear target is investigated theoretically. When driven at the resonance energy, the x-ray free electron laser can produce direct photoexcitation. However, the dominant process in that interaction is the photoelectric effect producing a cold and very dense plasma in which also secondary processes such as nuclear excitation by electron capture may occur. We develop a realistic model to quantify the temporal dynamics of the plasma and the magnitude of the secondary excitation therein. Numerical results show that depending on the nuclear transition energy and the temperature and charge states reached in the plasma, secondary nuclear excitation by electron capture may dominate the direct photoexcitation by several orders of magnitude, as it is the case for the 4.8 keV transition from the isomeric state of $^{93}$Mo, or it can be negligible, as it is the case for the 14.4 keV M\\"ossbauer trans...

  5. Analysis and comparison between electric and magnetic power couplers for accelerators in Free Electron Lasers (FEL)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serpico, C.; Grudiev, A.; Vescovo, R.

    2016-10-01

    Free-electron lasers represent a new and exciting class of coherent optical sources possessing broad wavelength tunability and excellent optical-beam quality. The FERMI seeded free-electron laser (FEL), located at the Elettra laboratory in Trieste, is driven by a 200 m long, S-band linac: the high energy part of the linac is equipped with 6 m long backward traveling wave (BTW) structures. The structures have small iris radius and a nose cone geometry which allows for high gradient operation. Development of new high-gradient, S-band accelerating structures for the replacement of the existing BTWs is under consideration. This paper investigates two possible solutions for the RF power couplers suitable for a linac driven FEL which require reduced wakefields effects, high operating gradient and very high reliability. The first part of the manuscript focuses on the reduction of residual field asymmetries, while in the second analyzes RF performances, the peak surface fields and the expected breakdown rate. In the conclusion, two solutions are compared and pros and cons are highlighted.

  6. A low-energy-spread rf accelerator for a far-infrared free electron laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Geer, C. A. J.; Bakker, R. J.; van der Meer, A. F. G.; van Amersfoort, P. W.; Gillespie, W. A.; Saxon, G.; Poole, M. W.

    1993-10-01

    A high electron current and a small energy spread are essential for the operation of a free electron laser (FEL). In this paper we discuss the design and performance of the accelerator for FELIX, the free electron laser for infrared experiments. The system consists of a thermionic gun, a prebuncher, a buncher and two standard commercial linac sections. The gun is operated with a pulse duration of 280 ps and a bunch charge of 200 pC. After compression to 35 ps by the prebuncher, the bunches are accelerated to 4 MeV in the buncher and simultaneously compressed to 6 ps. The principle of the method is that the order of the electrons is conserved in the buncher, so that the resulting more or less linear energy-phase relationship along each bunch can be compensated effectively against space charge forces and the accelerating field gradient in the linacs, via an appropriate choice of the phase of the rf wave. Behind the linacs an rms energy spread of 0.30% has been measured.

  7. The effects of slippage and diffraction in long wavelength operation of a free electron laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhulin, V. I.; Haselhoff, E. H.; van Amersfoort, P. W.

    1995-01-01

    The Free-Electron Laser user facility FELIX produces picosecond optical pulses in the wavelength range of 5 110 μm. The proposed installation of a new undulator with a larger magnetic period would allow extension towards considerably longer wavelengths. This would result in the production of extremely short, far-infrared pulses, with a duration of a single optical period or even less. In order to investigate the pulse propagation for free-electron lasers operating in the long wavelength limit, a three-dimensional simulation code was developed. Using the FELIX parameters, with the addition of a long-period undulator, the effects of slippage, diffraction losses, changes in the filling factor, as well as the effects of the optical cavity geometry were studied for wavelengths up to 300 μm, with electron pulses in the ps regime. It is shown that slippage effects are less restrictive for long wavelength operation than the increasing losses due to optical beam diffraction.

  8. Visible-infrared self-amplified spontaneous emission amplifier free electron laser undulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Roger; Cornacchia, Max; Emma, Paul; Nuhn, Heinz-Dieter; Poling, Ben; Ruland, Robert; Johnson, Erik; Rakowsky, George; Skaritka, John; Lidia, Steve; Duffy, Pat; Libkind, Marcus; Frigola, Pedro; Murokh, Alex; Pellegrini, Claudio; Rosenzweig, James; Tremaine, Aaron

    2001-12-01

    The visible-infrared self-amplified spontaneous emission amplifier (VISA) free electron laser (FEL) is an experimental device designed to show self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) to saturation in the near infrared to visible light energy range. It generates a resonant wavelength output from 800-600 nm, so that silicon detectors may be used to characterize the optical properties of the FEL radiation. VISA is designed to show how SASE FEL theory corresponds with experiment in this wavelength range, using an electron beam with emittance close to that planned for the future Linear Coherent Light Source at SLAC. VISA comprises a 4 m pure permanent magnet undulator with four 99 cm segments, each of 55 periods, 18 mm long. The undulator has distributed focusing built into it, to reduce the average beta function of the 70-85 MeV electron beam to about 30 cm. There are four FODO cells per segment. The permanent magnet focusing lattice consists of blocks mounted on either side of the electron beam, in the undulator gap. The most important undulator error parameter for a free electron laser is the trajectory walk-off, or lack of overlap of the photon and electron beams. Using pulsed wire magnet measurements and magnet shimming, we were able to control trajectory walk-off to less than +/-50 μm per field gain length.

  9. Optical synchronization of a free-electron laser with femtosecond precision

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loehl, F.

    2009-09-15

    High-gain free-electron lasers (FELs) are capable of generating sub-10 fs long light pulses. In order to take full advantage of these extremely short light pulses in time-resolved experiments, synchronization with a so far unprecedented timing accuracy is required. Within this thesis, an optical synchronization system providing sub-10 fs stability has been developed and was implemented at the ultra-violet and soft X-ray free-electron laser FLASH at DESY, Hamburg. The system uses a mode-locked laser as a timing reference. The laser pulses are distributed via length stabilized optical fiber-links to the remote locations. A key feature of the system is a bunch arrival-time monitor detecting the electron bunch arrival-time with an unrivaled resolution of 6 fs. A feedback system based on the arrival-time monitor was established, improving the arrival-time fluctuations from 200 fs in the unstabilized case to 25 fs with active feedback. In order to achieve the high peak current of several thousand amperes required for the FEL process, the electron bunches are longitudinally compressed in two magnetic chicanes. A second feedback system was developed stabilizing the bunch compression process based on measurements of diffraction radiation. The combination of both feedback systems improves the stability of the FEL radiation significantly. (orig.)

  10. Compositional change in human enamel irradiated with MIR free electron laser

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANGXueping; LiGuangcheng; HuangYuying; DONGYanmei; GAOXuejun; LUIN

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate compositional changes in human enamel irradiated with the free electron laser (FEL).The exposure on dental enamel at the wavelength of 9.64μm was observed with the Beijing free electron laser.The distribution of elements in the irradiated or non-irradiated enamel was measured by scanning electron microscope (SEM) with energy-dispersive spectroscopy and synchrotron radiation X-ray fluorescence(SRXRF) in Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility (BSRF).The results showed that the P/Ca ratio in the ablation region of enamel at the maximum wavelength of infrared absorption of enalmel at the maximum wavelength of infrared absorption was obviously smaller than that at the non-maximum wavelength.In the ablation region the ratios of P/Ca and Ca/Sr were smaller than those in the non-ablation region.The distribution of P,Ca and Sr in the ablation region were heterogeneous due to the element change caused by FEL irradiation.

  11. Microbunching-instability-induced sidebands in a seeded free-electron laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen Zhang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Measurements of the multishot-averaged, soft x-ray, self-seeding spectrum at the LCLS free-electron laser often have a pedestal-like distribution around the seeded wavelength, which limits the spectral purity and can negatively affect some user applications not employing a post-undulator monochromator. In this paper, we study the origins of such pedestals, focusing on longitudinal phase space modulations produced by the microbunching instability upstream of the free-electron laser (FEL undulator. We show from theory and numerical simulation that both energy and density modulations can induce sidebands in a high-gain, seeded FEL whose fractional strength typically grows as the square of the undulator length. The results place a tight constraint on the longitudinal phase space uniformity of the electron beam for a seeded FEL, possibly requiring the amplitude of long-wavelength modulations to be much smaller than the typical incoherent energy spread if the output sideband power is to remain only a couple percent or less of the amplified seed power.

  12. Visible-infrared self-amplified spontaneous emission amplifier free electron laser undulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger Carr

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available The visible-infrared self-amplified spontaneous emission amplifier (VISA free electron laser (FEL is an experimental device designed to show self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE to saturation in the near infrared to visible light energy range. It generates a resonant wavelength output from 800–600 nm, so that silicon detectors may be used to characterize the optical properties of the FEL radiation. VISA is designed to show how SASE FEL theory corresponds with experiment in this wavelength range, using an electron beam with emittance close to that planned for the future Linear Coherent Light Source at SLAC. VISA comprises a 4 m pure permanent magnet undulator with four 99 cm segments, each of 55 periods, 18 mm long. The undulator has distributed focusing built into it, to reduce the average beta function of the 70–85 MeV electron beam to about 30 cm. There are four FODO cells per segment. The permanent magnet focusing lattice consists of blocks mounted on either side of the electron beam, in the undulator gap. The most important undulator error parameter for a free electron laser is the trajectory walk-off, or lack of overlap of the photon and electron beams. Using pulsed wire magnet measurements and magnet shimming, we were able to control trajectory walk-off to less than ±50 μm per field gain length.

  13. Terawatt x-ray free-electron-laser optimization by transverse electron distribution shaping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Emma

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available We study the dependence of the peak power of a 1.5 Å Terawatt (TW, tapered x-ray free-electron laser (FEL on the transverse electron density distribution. Multidimensional optimization schemes for TW hard x-ray free-electron lasers are applied to the cases of transversely uniform and parabolic electron beam distributions and compared to a Gaussian distribution. The optimizations are performed for a 200 m undulator and a resonant wavelength of λ_{r}=1.5  Å using the fully three-dimensional FEL particle code genesis. The study shows that the flatter transverse electron distributions enhance optical guiding in the tapered section of the undulator and increase the maximum radiation power from a maximum of 1.56 TW for a transversely Gaussian beam to 2.26 TW for the parabolic case and 2.63 TW for the uniform case. Spectral data also shows a 30%–70% reduction in energy deposited in the sidebands for the uniform and parabolic beams compared with a Gaussian. An analysis of the transverse coherence of the radiation shows the coherence area to be much larger than the beam spotsize for all three distributions, making coherent diffraction imaging experiments possible.

  14. Start-to-end simulations for a seeded harmonic generation free electron laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Thorin

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper shows how the MAX linac injector and transport system can be efficiently retuned to suit free electron laser (FEL performance. In a collaboration between MAX-lab and BESSY, a seeded harmonic generation free electron laser is being constructed at MAX-lab. The setup uses the existing MAX-lab facility upgraded with a new low emittance photocathode gun, a Ti∶Sa 266 nm laser system used for both the gun and seeding and an FEL undulator system. To produce the high quality electron beam needed, it is shown how the magnet optics in an achromatic dogleg can be tuned to create an optimum bunch compression and how a good quality beam can be maintained through the beam transport and delivered to the FEL undulators. In extensive start-to-end simulations from the cathode of the gun to the generation of photons in the undulators, FEL performance and stability has been calculated using simulation tools like ASTRA, ELEGANT, and GENESIS. This has been done for both the third and fifth harmonic of the seed laser. The results from the calculation are 30 fs light pulses with a power of 11 MW at 88 nm and 1.4 MW at 53 nm.

  15. Batch crystallization of rhodopsin for structural dynamics using an X-ray free-electron laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Wenting; Nogly, Przemyslaw; Rheinberger, Jan; Kick, Leonhard M.; Gati, Cornelius; Nelson, Garrett; Deupi, Xavier; Standfuss, Jörg; Schertler, Gebhard; Panneels, Valérie, E-mail: valerie.panneels@psi.ch [Paul Scherrer Institute, OFLC/103, 5232 Villigen-PSI (Switzerland)

    2015-06-27

    A new batch preparation method is presented for high-density micrometre-sized crystals of the G protein-coupled receptor rhodopsin for use in time-resolved serial femtosecond crystallography at an X-ray free-electron laser using a liquid jet. Rhodopsin is a membrane protein from the G protein-coupled receptor family. Together with its ligand retinal, it forms the visual pigment responsible for night vision. In order to perform ultrafast dynamics studies, a time-resolved serial femtosecond crystallography method is required owing to the nonreversible activation of rhodopsin. In such an approach, microcrystals in suspension are delivered into the X-ray pulses of an X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) after a precise photoactivation delay. Here, a millilitre batch production of high-density microcrystals was developed by four methodical conversion steps starting from known vapour-diffusion crystallization protocols: (i) screening the low-salt crystallization conditions preferred for serial crystallography by vapour diffusion, (ii) optimization of batch crystallization, (iii) testing the crystal size and quality using second-harmonic generation (SHG) imaging and X-ray powder diffraction and (iv) production of millilitres of rhodopsin crystal suspension in batches for serial crystallography tests; these crystals diffracted at an XFEL at the Linac Coherent Light Source using a liquid-jet setup.

  16. Direct Comparison of Brookhaven Reflectivity Measurements with Free-Electron Theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bane, Karl L.F.

    2010-12-13

    The reflectivity at normal incidence of copper and aluminum samples was recently measured over a large frequency range at Brookhaven by one of us (JT). Then using the Kramers-Kroning integrals, and assuming the free-electron model of conductivity, the dependence of conductivity on frequency was obtained. The results seemed to suggest, for example, that the dc conductivities of the copper and evaporated aluminum samples are a factor of 3 lower than expected. We propose in this report, instead, directly fitting the free-electron model to the low frequency end of the reflectivity data. This fitting does not depend on the higher frequency results and on Kramers-Kronig integrations, but it does assume that the data at the low frequency end is sufficiently accurate. Note that for our LCLS wakefield studies, it is only over these (relatively) low frequencies that we need to know the electrical properties of the metals. The equations that relate reflectivity R with the free electron parameters dc conductivity {sigma} and relaxation time {tau} are: (1) {tilde {sigma}} = {sigma}/1-ikc{tau}; (2) {tilde n} = {radical} {tilde {epsilon}} = {radical}(1+4{pi}i{tilde k}c/{omega}); and (3) R = |{tilde n}-1/{tilde n} + 1|{sup 2}. The parameters are ac conductivity {tilde {sigma}}, index of refraction {tilde n}, dielectric constant {tilde {epsilon}}, and wave number k = {omega}/c, with {omega} frequency and c the speed of light. In Fig. 1 we show the ideal behavior of R for a reasonably good conducting metal, where {sigma} = 0.12 x 10{sup 17}/s and {tau} = 0.55 x 10{sup -14} s (solid line); these parameters are, respectively, 2% ({sigma}) and 20% ({tau}) of the nominal values for copper. The parameters were chosen so that the important features of R(k) could be seen easily in one plot. We see 3 distinct regions: (1) for low frequencies, k {approx}< 1/c{tau}, R continually decreases, with positive curvature, and with a low frequency asymptote of (1 - {radical}2kc/{pi}{sigma}); (2) for

  17. Seeded free-electron and inverse free-electron laser techniques for radiation amplification and electron microbunching in the terahertz range

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Sung

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available A comprehensive analysis is presented that describes amplification of a seed THz pulse in a single-pass free-electron laser (FEL driven by a photoinjector. The dynamics of the radiation pulse and the modulated electron beam are modeled using the time-dependent FEL code, GENESIS 1.3. A 10-ps (FWHM electron beam with a peak current of 50–100 A allows amplification of a ∼1  kW seed pulse in the frequency range 0.5–3 THz up to 10–100 MW power in a relatively compact 2-m long planar undulator. The electron beam driving the FEL is strongly modulated, with some inhomogeneity due to the slippage effect. It is shown that THz microbunching of the electron beam is homogeneous over the entire electron pulse when saturated FEL amplification is utilized at the very entrance of an undulator. This requires seeding of a 30-cm long undulator buncher with a 1–3 MW of pump power with radiation at the resonant frequency. A narrow-band seed pulse in the THz range needed for these experiments can be generated by frequency mixing of CO_{2} laser lines in a GaAs nonlinear crystal. Two schemes for producing MW power pulses in seeded FELs are considered in some detail for the beam parameters achievable at the Neptune Laboratory at UCLA: the first uses a waveguide to transport radiation in the 0.5–3 THz range through a 2-m long FEL amplifier and the second employs high-gain third harmonic generation using the FEL process at 3–9 THz.

  18. A Study on the fusion reactor - Development of a flat-field XUV spectrograph for tokamak diagnostics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nam, Chang Hee; Choi, Il Woo; Shin, Hyun Joon; Cha, Yong Ho; Yang, Ho Soon; Ra, Sun Ae [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Chan Hong [Kyungwon University, Sungnam (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-09-01

    The research on the development of a flat-field XUV spectrograph for tokamak fusion diagnostics investigated the following items: Theoretical investigation of a flat-field XUV spectrograph to determine the position of toroidal mirror, incident slit, varied-line spacing concave grating, detector, etc, Design and fabrication of spectrograph components using Auto CAD, Design and fabrication of film cassette holder and translator, Design and fabrication of vacuum chamber for spectrograph, Computer simulation of aberration, Installation of spectrograph to tokamak, Design of components for soft x-ray CCD. 24 refs., 3 tabs., 23 figs. (author)

  19. Modélisation de la Physique Atomique et du Transfert Radiatif pour le laser X-UV

    OpenAIRE

    Robillart, Bruno

    2010-01-01

    The X-UV laser sources have been experiencing important development for about ten years. In this spectral range, we are now able to produce highly coherent and intense collimated sources which could have applications in medical imaging, photolithography, or for the diagnostic of dense plasmas... This thesis was dedicated to the modeling of the "OFI" X-UV laser, studied in the LOA (ENSTA, Palaiseau). This type of X-ray laser is generated following the ionization of a gas (Kr, Xe) by a high pow...

  20. A Citizen-Science-enabled Comprehensive Search for XUV-disk Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thilker, David A.

    2017-03-01

    Initial efforts to identify extended UV disk (XUV-disk) galaxies were confined to nearby targets using image products from early in the GALEX mission. We developed a beta Zooniverse-based citizen science project to address this issue, specifically (1) allowing a dramatically larger galaxy sample by crowd-sourcing blink comparison UV-optical image inspection to volunteers, and (2) incorporating all archived GALEX data for each target considered. We aim to widely deploy this project to the public within the upcoming year.

  1. Coherent control for the spherical symmetric box potential in short and intensive XUV laser fields

    CERN Document Server

    Barna, I F

    2007-01-01

    Coherent control calculations are presented for a spherically symmetric box potential for non-resonant two photon transition probabilities. With the help of a genetic algorithm (GA) the population of the excited states are maximized and minimized. The external driving field is a superposition of three intensive extreme ultraviolet (XUV) linearly polarized laser pulses with different frequencies in the femtosecond duration range. We solved the quantum mechanical problem within the dipole approximation. Our investigation clearly shows that the dynamics of the electron current has a strong correlation with the optimized and neutralizing pulse shape.

  2. Wavefront propagation through the beamline designed for seeding the DESY XUV FEL

    CERN Document Server

    Reininger, R; Gürtler, P; Bahrdt, J

    2001-01-01

    A beamline designed to reduce the spectral bandwidth of the DESY XUV FEL is described. The beamline is intended to cover the wavelength range from 6.4 to 50 nm with three variable line spacing gratings. A plane mirror in front of the grating is used to maintain constant magnification in the dispersion direction. The electric field generated by the first undulator at three wavelengths, 6.4, 13, and 25 nm, is propagated through the beamline. The results show that the beamline has the resolution and imaging properties required for seeding the second undulator at these wavelengths.

  3. XUV-laser induced ablation of PMMA with nano-, pico-, and femtosecond pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juha, L. [Institute of Physics, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Na Slovance 2, 182 21 Prague 8 (Czech Republic)]. E-mail: juha@fzu.cz; Bittner, M. [Institute of Physics, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Na Slovance 2, 182 21 Prague 8 (Czech Republic); Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Charles University in Prague, Ke Karlovu 3, 121 16 Prague 2 (Czech Republic); Chvostova, D. [Institute of Physics, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Na Slovance 2, 182 21 Prague 8 (Czech Republic)] (and others)

    2005-06-15

    For conventional wavelength (UV-vis-IR) lasers delivering radiation energy to the surface of materials, ablation thresholds, etch (ablation) rates, and the quality of ablated structures often differ dramatically between short (typically nanosecond) and ultrashort (typically femtosecond) pulses. Various very short-wavelength ({lambda} < 100 nm) lasers, emitting pulses with durations ranging from {approx}10 fs to {approx}1 ns, have recently been placed into routine operation. This has facilitated the investigation of how ablation characteristics depend on the pulse duration in the XUV spectral region. Ablation of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) induced by three particular short-wavelength lasers emitting pulses of various durations, is reported in this contribution.

  4. Calibration of the Multi-Spectral Solar Telescope Array multilayer mirrors and XUV filters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Maxwell J.; Willis, Thomas D.; Kankelborg, Charles C.; O'Neal, Ray H.; Martinez-Galarce, Dennis S.; Deforest, Craig E.; Jackson, Lisa; Lindblom, Joakim; Walker, Arthur B. C., Jr.; Barbee, Troy W., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    The Multi-Spectral Solar Telescope Array (MSSTA), a rocket-borne solar observatory, was successfully flown in May, 1991, obtaining solar images in eight XUV and FUV bands with 12 compact multilayer telescopes. Extensive measurements have recently been carried out on the multilayer telescopes and thin film filters at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory. These measurements are the first high spectral resolution calibrations of the MSSTA instruments. Previous measurements and/or calculations of telescope throughputs have been confirmed with greater accuracy. Results are presented on Mo/Si multilayer bandpass changes with time and experimental potassium bromide and tellurium filters.

  5. Reflection of femtosecond pulses from soft X-ray free-electron laser by periodical multilayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ksenzov, D.; Grigorian, S.; Pietsch, U. [Faculty of Physics, University of Siegen (Germany); Hendel, S.; Bienert, F.; Sacher, M.D.; Heinzmann, U. [Faculty of Physics, University of Bielefeld (Germany)

    2009-08-15

    Recent experiments on a soft X-ray free-electron laser (FEL) source (FLASH in Hamburg) have shown that multilayers (MLs) can be used as optical elements for highly intense X-ray irradiation. An effort to find most appropriate MLs has to consider the femtosecond time structure and the particular photon energy of the FEL. In this paper we have analysed the time response of 'low absorbing' MLs (e.g. such as La/B{sub 4}C) as a function of the number of periods. Interaction of a pulse train of Gaussian shaped sub-pulses using a realistic ML grown by electron-beam evaporation technique has been analysed in the soft-X-ray range. The structural parameters of the MLs were obtained by reflectivity measurements at BESSY II and subsequent profile fittings. (Abstract Copyright [2009], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  6. Application of FPGA technology for control of superconducting TESLA cavities in free electron laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozniak, Krzysztof T.

    2006-10-01

    Contemporary fundamental research in physics, biology, chemistry, pharmacology, material technology and other uses frequently methods basing on collision of high energy particles or penetration of matter with ultra-short electromagnetic waves. Kinetic energy of involved particles, considerably greater than GeV, is generated in accelerators of unique construction. The paper presents a digest of working principles of accelerators. There are characterized research methods which use accelerators. A method to stabilize the accelerating EM field in superconducting (SC) resonant cavity was presented. An example was given of usage of TESLA cavities in linear accelerator propelling the FLASH free electron laser (FEL) in DESY, Hamburg. Electronic and photonic control system was debated. The system bases on advanced FPGA circuits and cooperating fast DSP microprocessor chips. Examples of practical solutions were described. Test results of the debated systems in the real-time conditions were given.

  7. Longitudinal phase space manipulation in energy recovering linac-driven free-electron lasers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Piot

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available Energy recovering an electron beam after it has participated in a free-electron laser (FEL interaction can be quite challenging because of the substantial FEL-induced energy spread and the energy antidamping that occurs during deceleration. In the Jefferson Lab infrared FEL driver accelerator, such an energy recovery scheme was implemented by properly matching the longitudinal phase space throughout the recirculation transport by employing the so-called energy compression scheme. In the present paper, after presenting a single-particle dynamics approach of the method used to energy recover the electron beam, we report on experimental validation of the method obtained by measurements of the so-called “compression efficiency” and “momentum compaction” lattice transfer maps at different locations in the recirculation transport line. We also compare these measurements with numerical tracking simulations.

  8. High gain harmonic generation free electron lasers enhanced by pseudoenergy bands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Tanaka

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available We propose a new scheme for high gain harmonic generation free electron lasers (HGHG FELs, which is seeded by a pair of intersecting laser beams to interact with an electron beam in a modulator undulator located in a dispersive section. The interference of the laser beams gives rise to a two-dimensional modulation in the energy-time phase space because of a strong correlation between the electron energy and the position in the direction of dispersion. This eventually forms pseudoenergy bands in the electron beam, which result in efficient harmonic generation in HGHG FELs in a similar manner to the well-known scheme using the echo effects. The advantage of the proposed scheme is that the beam quality is less deteriorated than in other existing schemes.

  9. Emerging opportunities in structural biology with X-ray free-electron lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlichting, Ilme; Miao, Jianwei

    2012-01-01

    X-ray free-electron lasers (X-FELs) produce X-ray pulses with extremely brilliant peak intensity and ultrashort pulse duration. It has been proposed that radiation damage can be “outrun” by using an ultra intense and short X-FEL pulse that passes a biological sample before the onset of significant radiation damage. The concept of “diffraction-before-destruction” has been demonstrated recently at the Linac Coherent Light Source, the first operational hard X-ray FEL, for protein nanocrystals and giant virus particles. The continuous diffraction patterns from single particles allow solving the classical “phase problem” by the oversampling method with iterative algorithms. If enough data are collected from many identical copies of a (biological) particle, its three-dimensional structure can be reconstructed. We review the current status and future prospects of serial femtosecond crystallography (SFX) and single-particle coherent diffraction imaging (CDI) with X-FELs. PMID:22922042

  10. Spectrometer for Hard X-Ray Free Electron Laser Based on Diffraction Focusing

    CERN Document Server

    Kohn, V G; Vartanyants, I A

    2012-01-01

    X-ray free electron lasers (XFELs) generate sequences of ultra-short, spatially coherent pulses of x-ray radiation. We propose the diffraction focusing spectrometer (DFS), which is able to measure the whole energy spectrum of the radiation of a single XFEL pulse with an energy resolution of $\\Delta E/E\\approx 2\\times 10^{-6}$. This is much better than for most modern x-ray spectrometers. Such resolution allows one to resolve the fine spectral structure of the XFEL pulse. The effect of diffraction focusing occurs in a single crystal plate due to dynamical scattering, and is similar to focusing in a Pendry lens made from the metamaterial with a negative refraction index. Such a spectrometer is easier to operate than those based on bent crystals. We show that the DFS can be used in a wide energy range from 5 keV to 20 keV.

  11. Smith-Purcell free electron laser based on the semi-elliptical resonator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Meng xian-Zhu; Wang Ming-Hong; Ren Zhong-Min

    2011-01-01

    A novel Smith-Purcell (S-P) free electron laser composed of an electron gun, a semi-elliptical resonator, a metallic reflecting grating and a collector, is presented for the first time. This paper studies the characteristics of this device by theoretical analysis and particle-in-cell simulation method. Results indicate that tunable coherent S-P radiation with a high output peak power at millimeter wavelengths can be generated by adjusting the length of the grating period,or adjusting the voltage of the electron beam. The present scheme has the following advantages: the semi-elliptical resonator can reflect all radiation with the emission angle θ and random azimuthal angles, back onto the electron beam with same-phase and causes the electrons to be modulated, so the output power and efficiency are improved.

  12. Theory of nonlinear harmonic generation in free-electron lasers with helical wigglers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geloni, G.; Saldin, E.; Schneidmiller, E.; Yurkov, M.

    2007-05-15

    CoherentHarmonicGeneration (CHG), and in particularNonlinearHarmonicGeneration (NHG), is of importance for both short wavelength Free-Electron Lasers (FELs), in relation with the achievement of shorter wavelengths with a fixed electron-beam energy, and high-average power FEL resonators, in relation with destructive effects of higher harmonics radiation on mirrors. In this paper we present a treatment of NHG from helical wigglers with particular emphasis on the second harmonic. Our study is based on an exact analytical solution of Maxwell's equations, derived with the help of a Green's function method. In particular, we demonstrate that nonlinear harmonic generation (NHG) fromhelicalwigglers vanishes on axis. Our conclusion is in open contrast with results in literature, that include a kinematical mistake in the description of the electron motion. (orig.)

  13. Development of High Performance Electron Beam Switching System for Swiss Free Electron Laser at PSI

    CERN Document Server

    Paraliev, M

    2012-01-01

    A compact X-ray Free Electron Laser (SwissFEL) is under development at the Paul Scherrer Institute. To increase facility efficiency the main linac will operate in two electron bunch mode. The two bunches are separated in time by 28 ns and sent to two undulator lines. The combination of two beam lines should produce short X-ray pulses covering wavelength range from 1 to 70 {\\AA} with submicron position stability. To separate the two bunches, a novel electron beam switching system is being developed. The total deflection is achieved with a combination of high Q-factor resonant deflector magnet, followed by a DC septum magnet. The shot-to-shot deflection stability of the entire switching system should be <+/-10 ppm in amplitude and +/-100 ps in time, values which present severe measurement difficulties. Deflection magnets requirements, development and results of the kicker prototype are presented.

  14. Sorting algorithms for single-particle imaging experiments at X-ray free-electron lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobkov, S A; Teslyuk, A B; Kurta, R P; Gorobtsov, O Yu; Yefanov, O M; Ilyin, V A; Senin, R A; Vartanyants, I A

    2015-11-01

    Modern X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) operating at high repetition rates produce a tremendous amount of data. It is a great challenge to classify this information and reduce the initial data set to a manageable size for further analysis. Here an approach for classification of diffraction patterns measured in prototypical diffract-and-destroy single-particle imaging experiments at XFELs is presented. It is proposed that the data are classified on the basis of a set of parameters that take into account the underlying diffraction physics and specific relations between the real-space structure of a particle and its reciprocal-space intensity distribution. The approach is demonstrated by applying principal component analysis and support vector machine algorithms to the simulated and measured X-ray data sets.

  15. Towards jitter-free pump-probe measurements at seeded free electron laser facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danailov, Miltcho B; Bencivenga, Filippo; Capotondi, Flavio; Casolari, Francesco; Cinquegrana, Paolo; Demidovich, Alexander; Giangrisostomi, Erika; Kiskinova, Maya P; Kurdi, Gabor; Manfredda, Michele; Masciovecchio, Claudio; Mincigrucci, Riccardo; Nikolov, Ivaylo P; Pedersoli, Emanuele; Principi, Emiliano; Sigalotti, Paolo

    2014-06-02

    X-ray free electron lasers (FEL) coupled with optical lasers have opened unprecedented opportunities for studying ultrafast dynamics in matter. The major challenge in pump-probe experiments using FEL and optical lasers is synchronizing the arrival time of the two pulses. Here we report a technique that benefits from the seeded-FEL scheme and uses the optical seed laser for nearly jitter-free pump-probe experiments. Timing jitter as small as 6 fs has been achieved and confirmed by measurements of FEL-induced transient reflectivity changes of Si3N4 using both collinear and non-collinear geometries. Planned improvements of the experimental set-up are expected to further reduce the timing jitter between the two pulses down to fs level.

  16. Absorber for wakefield interference management at the entrance of the wiggler of a free electron laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchlik, Matthew; Biallas, George Herman

    2017-03-07

    A method for managing the broad band microwave and TeraHertz (THz) radiation in a free electron laser (FEL) having a wiggler producing power in the electromagnetic spectrum. The method includes placement of broadband microwave and TeraHertz (THz) radiation absorbers on the upstream end of the wiggler. The absorbers dampen the bounced back, broad band microwave and THz radiation returning from the surfaces outside the nose of the cookie-cutter and thus preventing broadening of the electron beam pulse's narrow longitudinal energy distribution. Broadening diminishes the ultimate laser power from the wiggler. The broadband microwave and THz radiation absorbers are placed on either side of the slot in the cookie-cutter that shapes the wake field wave of the electron pulse to the slot shape of the wiggler chamber aperture. The broad band microwave and THz radiation absorber is preferably a non-porous pyrolytic grade of graphite with small grain size.

  17. Comparison of short pulse generation schemes for a soft x-ray free electron laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, I. P. S.; Bartolini, R.

    2011-03-01

    In this paper we study the performance of two complementary short pulse generation schemes as applied to a soft x-ray free electron laser. The first scheme, recently proposed by Saldin et al., makes use of a laser pulse consisting of only a few optical cycles to give an energy chirp to a short section of an electron bunch and tapers the main radiator undulator in order to compensate the chirped region. The second scheme investigated takes a low-charge, high brightness electron bunch and compresses it to ˜1fs in order to operate in the so-called “single-spike” regime. We perform start-to-end simulations of both these schemes, assess the sensitivity of each scheme to realistic jitter sources, and provide a direct comparison of the respective strengths and drawbacks.

  18. Comparison of short pulse generation schemes for a soft x-ray free electron laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. P. S. Martin

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we study the performance of two complementary short pulse generation schemes as applied to a soft x-ray free electron laser. The first scheme, recently proposed by Saldin et al., makes use of a laser pulse consisting of only a few optical cycles to give an energy chirp to a short section of an electron bunch and tapers the main radiator undulator in order to compensate the chirped region. The second scheme investigated takes a low-charge, high brightness electron bunch and compresses it to ∼1  fs in order to operate in the so-called “single-spike” regime. We perform start-to-end simulations of both these schemes, assess the sensitivity of each scheme to realistic jitter sources, and provide a direct comparison of the respective strengths and drawbacks.

  19. Statistical and coherence properties of radiation from X-ray free electron lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Saldin, E L; Yurkov, M V

    2009-01-01

    We describe statistical and coherence properties of the radiation from x-ray free electron lasers (XFEL). It is shown that the X-ray FEL radiation before saturation is described with gaussian statistics. Particularly important is the case of the optimized X-ray FEL, studied in detail. Applying similarity techniques to the results of numerical simulations allowed us to find universal scaling relations for the main characteristics of an X-ray FEL operating in the saturation regime: efficiency, coherence time and degree of transverse coherence. We find that with an appropriate normalization of these quantities, they are functions of only the ratio of the geometrical emittance of the electron beam to the radiation wavelength. Statistical and coherence properties of the higher harmonics of the radiation are highlighted as well.

  20. High Power Electron Beam Injectors for 100 kW Free Electron Lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Todd, Alan; Bluem, Hans; Christina, Vincent; Cole, Michael; Rathke, John; Schultheiss, Tom; Colestock, Patrick; Kelley, J.P.; Kurennoy, Sergey; Nguyen, Dung; Russell, S.; Schrage, Dale; Wood, R.L.; Young, L.M.; Campisi, Isidoro; Daly, Edward; Douglas, David; Neil, George; Preble, Joseph; Rimmer, Robert; Rode, Claus; Sekutowicz, Jacek; Whitlatch, Timothy; Wiseman, Mark

    2003-05-01

    A key technology issue on the path to high-power FEL operation is the demonstration of reliable, highbrightness, high-power injector operation. We describe two ongoing programs to produce 100 mA injectors as drivers for 100 kW free-electron lasers. In one approach, in collaboration with the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, we are fabricating a 750 MHz superconducting RF cryomodule that will be integrated with a room-temperature DC photocathode gun [1] and tested at the Laboratory. In the other approach, in collaboration with Los Alamos National Laboratory, a high-current 700 MHz, normal-conducting, RF photoinjector [2,3] is being designed and will undergo thermal management testing at the Laboratory. We describe the design, the projected performance and the status of both injectors.

  1. High-power beam injectors for 100 KW free-electron lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Todd, A. M. (Alan M.); Wood R. L. (Richard L.); Bluem, H.; Young, L. M. (Lloyd M.); Wiseman, M. (Mark); Schultheiss, T. (Thomas); Schrage, D. L. (Dale L.); Russell, S. J. (Steven J.); Rode, C. H.; Rimmer, R. (Robert); Nguyen, D. C. (Dinh C.); Kelley, J. P. (John Patrick); Kurennoy, S. (Sergey); wood, r

    2003-01-01

    A key technology issue on the path to high-power FEL operation is the demonstration of reliable, high-brightness, high-power injector operation. We describe two ongoing programs to produce 100 mA injectors as drivers for 100 kW free-electron lasers. In one approach, in collaboration with the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, we are fabricating a 750 MHz superconducting RF cryomodule that will be integrated with a room-temperature DC photocathode gun and tested at the Laboratory. In the other approach, in collaboration with Los Alamos National Laboratory, a high-current 700 MHz, normal-conducting, RF photoinjector is being designed and will undergo thermal management testing at the Laboratory. We describe the design, the projected performance and the status of both injectors.

  2. Optical transition radiation measurements for the Los Alamos and Boeing Free-Electron Laser experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lumpkin, A.H.; Feldman, R.B.; Feldman, D.W.; Apgar, S.A.; Calsten, B.E.; Fiorito, R.B.; Rule, D.W.

    1988-01-01

    Optical transition radiation (OTR) measurements of the electron-beam emittance have been performed at a location just before the wiggler in the Los Alamos Free-Electron Laser (FEL) experiment. Beam profiles and beam divergence patterns from a single macropulse were recorded simultaneously using two intensified charge-injection device (CID) television cameras and an optical beamsplitter. Both single-foil OTR and two-foil OTR interference experiments were performed. Preliminary results are compared to a reference variable quadrupole, single screen technique. New aspects of using OTR properties for pointing the e-beam on the FEL oscillator axis, as well as measuring e-beam emittance are addressed. 7 refs., 9 figs.

  3. Spatial and temporal coherence properties of single free-electron laser pulses

    CERN Document Server

    Singer, A; Mancuso, A P; Gerasimova, N; Yefanov, O M; Gulden, J; Gorniak, T; Senkbeil, T; Sakdinawat, A; Liu, Y; Attwood, D; Dziarzhytski, S; Mai, D D; Treusch, R; Weckert, E; Salditt, T; Rosenhahn, A; Wurth, W; Vartanyants, I A

    2015-01-01

    The experimental characterization of the spatial and temporal coherence properties of the free-electron laser in Hamburg (FLASH) at a wavelength of 8.0 nm is presented. Double pinhole diffraction patterns of single femtosecond pulses focused to a size of about 10 microns by 10 microns were measured. A transverse coherence length of 6.2 microns in the horizontal and 8.7 microns in the vertical direction was determined from the most coherent pulses. Using a split and delay unit the coherence time of the pulses produced in the same operation conditions of FLASH was measured to be 1.75 fs. From our experiment we estimated the degeneracy parameter of the FLASH beam to be on the order of $10^{10}$ to $10^{11}$, which exceeds the values of this parameter at any other source in the same energy range by many orders of magnitude.

  4. Analysis of Coherence Properties of 3-rd Generation Synchrotron Sources and Free-Electron Lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Vartanyants, I A

    2009-01-01

    A general theoretical approach based on the results of statistical optics is used for the analysis of the transverse coherence properties of 3-rd generation synchrotron sources and x-ray free-electron lasers (XFEL). Correlation properties of the wavefields are calculated at different distances from an equivalent Gaussian Schell-model source. This model is used to describe coherence properties of the five meter undulator source at the synchrotron storage ring PETRA III. In the case of XFEL sources the decomposition of the statistical fields into a sum of independently propagating transverse modes is used for the analysis of the coherence properties of these new sources. A detailed calculation is performed for the parameters of the SASE1 undulator at the European XFEL. It is demonstrated that only a few modes contribute significantly to the total radiation field of that source.

  5. Diffraction data of core-shell nanoparticles from an X-ray free electron laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xuanxuan; Chiu, Chun-Ya; Wang, Hsiang-Ju; Kassemeyer, Stephan; Botha, Sabine; Shoeman, Robert L; Lawrence, Robert M; Kupitz, Christopher; Kirian, Richard; James, Daniel; Wang, Dingjie; Nelson, Garrett; Messerschmidt, Marc; Boutet, Sébastien; Williams, Garth J; Hartmann, Elisabeth; Jafarpour, Aliakbar; Foucar, Lutz M; Barty, Anton; Chapman, Henry; Liang, Mengning; Menzel, Andreas; Wang, Fenglin; Basu, Shibom; Fromme, Raimund; Doak, R Bruce; Fromme, Petra; Weierstall, Uwe; Huang, Michael H; Spence, John C H; Schlichting, Ilme; Hogue, Brenda G; Liu, Haiguang

    2017-04-11

    X-ray free-electron lasers provide novel opportunities to conduct single particle analysis on nanoscale particles. Coherent diffractive imaging experiments were performed at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), SLAC National Laboratory, exposing single inorganic core-shell nanoparticles to femtosecond hard-X-ray pulses. Each facetted nanoparticle consisted of a crystalline gold core and a differently shaped palladium shell. Scattered intensities were observed up to about 7 nm resolution. Analysis of the scattering patterns revealed the size distribution of the samples, which is consistent with that obtained from direct real-space imaging by electron microscopy. Scattering patterns resulting from single particles were selected and compiled into a dataset which can be valuable for algorithm developments in single particle scattering research.

  6. High Power Amplifiers Chain nonlinearity influence on the accelerating beam stability in free electron laser (FLASH)

    CERN Document Server

    Cichalewski, w

    2010-01-01

    The high power amplifiers transfer characteristics nonlinearities can have a negative influence on the overall system performance. This is also true for the TESLA superconducting cavities accelerating field parameters control systems. This Low Level Radio Frequency control systems uses microwave high power amplifiers (like 10 MW klystrons) as actuators in the mentioned feedback loops. The amplitude compression and phase deviations phenomena introduced to the control signals can reduce the feedback performance and cause electron beam energy instabilities. The transfer characteristics deviations in the Free Electron Laser in Hamburg experiment have been investigated. The outcome of this study together with the description of the developed linearization method based on the digital predistortion approach have been described in this paper. Additionally, the results from the linearization tool performance tests in the FLASH's RF systems have been placed.

  7. Probing vacuum birefringence using x-ray free electron and optical high-intensity lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Karbstein, Felix

    2016-01-01

    Vacuum birefringence is one of the most striking predictions of strong field quantum electrodynamics: Probe photons traversing a strong field region can indirectly sense the applied "pump" electromagnetic field via quantum fluctuations of virtual charged particles which couple to both pump and probe fields. This coupling is sensitive to the field alignment and can effectively result in two different indices of refraction for the probe photon polarization modes giving rise to a birefringence phenomenon. In this article we perform a dedicated theoretical analysis of the proposed discovery experiment of vacuum birefringence at a x-ray free electron laser/optical high-intensity laser facility. Describing both pump and probe laser pulses realistically in terms of their macroscopic electromagnetic fields, we go beyond previous analyses by accounting for various effects not considered before in this context. Our study facilitates stringent quantitative predictions and optimizations of the signal in an actual experim...

  8. Probing vacuum birefringence using x-ray free electron and optical high-intensity lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karbstein, Felix; Sundqvist, Chantal

    2016-07-01

    Vacuum birefringence is one of the most striking predictions of strong field quantum electrodynamics: Probe photons traversing a strong field region can indirectly sense the applied "pump" electromagnetic field via quantum fluctuations of virtual charged particles which couple to both pump and probe fields. This coupling is sensitive to the field alignment and can effectively result in two different indices of refraction for the probe photon polarization modes giving rise to a birefringence phenomenon. In this article, we perform a dedicated theoretical analysis of the proposed discovery experiment of vacuum birefringence at an x-ray free electron laser/optical high-intensity laser facility. Describing both pump and probe laser pulses realistically in terms of their macroscopic electromagnetic fields, we go beyond previous analyses by accounting for various effects not considered before in this context. Our study facilitates stringent quantitative predictions and optimizations of the signal in an actual experiment.

  9. Generation of high harmonic free electron laser with phase-merging effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Heting; Jia, Qika; Zhao, Zhouyu

    2017-03-01

    An easy-to-implement scheme is proposed to produce the longitudinal electron bunch density modulation with phase-merging phenomenon. In this scheme an electron bunch is firstly transversely dispersed in a modified dogleg to generate the exact dependence of electron energy on the transverse position, then it is modulated in a normal modulator. After travelling through a modified chicane with specially designed transfer matrix elements, the density modulation with phase-merging effect is generated which contains high harmonic components of the seed laser. We present theoretical analysis and numerical simulations for seeded soft x-ray free-electron laser. The results demonstrate that this technique can significantly enhance the frequency up-conversion efficiency and allow a seeded FEL operating at very high harmonics.

  10. An analysis on optimization of undulator in self-seeding free electron laser

    CERN Document Server

    Qika, Jia

    2013-01-01

    A simple analysis is given for optimum length of undulator in self-seeding free electron laser (FEL). The obtained relations show the correlation between the undulator length and the system parameters. The power required for the seeding in the second part undulator and overall efficiency to monochromatizating the seeding settle on the length of the first part undulator; the magnitude of seeding power dominates the length of the second part undulator; the whole length of the undulators in self-seeding FEL is determined by the overall efficiency to get coherent seed, it is about half as long again as that of SASE, not including the dispersion section. The requirement of the dispersion section strength is also analyzed.

  11. The ion channel free-electron laser with varying betatron amplitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ersfeld, B.; Bonifacio, R.; Chen, S.; Islam, M. R.; Smorenburg, P. W.; Jaroszynski, D. A.

    2014-09-01

    The ion-channel laser (ICL) is an ultra-compact version of the free-electron laser (FEL), with the undulator replaced by an ion channel. Previous studies of the ICL assumed transverse momentum amplitudes which were unrealistically small for experiments. Here we show that this restriction can be removed by correctly taking into account the dependence of the resonance between oscillations and emitted field on the betatron amplitude, which must be treated as variable. The ICL model with this essential addition is described using the well-known formalism for the FEL. Analysis of the resulting scaled equations shows a realistic prospect of building a compact ICL source for fundamental wavelengths down to UV, and harmonics potentially extending to x-rays. The gain parameter ρ can attain values as high as 0.03, which permits driving an ICL with electron bunches with realistic emittance.

  12. The Segmented Beamformer for Electromagnetic Waves of the Terahertz Free Electron Laser

    CERN Document Server

    Bogomolov, G D; Letunov, A A; Zavyalov, V V

    2015-01-01

    The quasi-optical segmented mirror for a formation of the target irradiation field was manufactured and investigated. It was designed for the high power THz beam of the free electron laser (FEL) using as a target a dust particle cloud, simulating cosmic dust. Numerical calculation of the beam shape and its low power laboratory measurements was made in the spectral region 1 - 3 THz of the first phase of the Novosibirsk FEL construction. The theoretical calculations of the diffraction effects reveal a speckle structure of a target spot, which was confirmed by the laboratory experiment. The beamformer technology was adapted for manufacturing and such device could be widely used for a concentration of powerful terahertz radiation.

  13. Design, construction and characterization of the compact ultrafast terahertz free-electron laser undulator

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    B Biswas; V Kumar; S Chouksey; S Krishnagopal

    2008-12-01

    A compact ultrafast terahertz (CUTE) free-electron laser (FEL) is being developed at the Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology (RRCAT), Indore. The undulator required for the CUTE-FEL has recently been developed. We have designed, built and characterized a variable gap, 5 cm period, 2.5 m long pure permanent magnet undulator in two identical segments. The tolerable error in the magnetic field was 1% in rms, and we have measured it to be 0.7%. The obtained rms phase shake is around 2°. To ensure that the trajectories do not have an exit error in position or angle, corrector coils have been designed. Shimming coils have been applied for both the undulator segments to reduce the amplitude of the betatron oscillations in the vertical trajectory. Details of novel corrector coils and soft iron shims are given and their performance is discussed.

  14. Time-resolved electron spectrum diagnostics for a free-electron laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillespie, W. A.; MacLeod, A. M.; Martin, P. F.; van der Meer, A. F. G.; van Amersfoort, P. W.

    1996-03-01

    Time-resolved electron-beam diagnostics have been developed for use with free-electron lasers (FELs) and associated electron sources, based on the techniques of secondary electron emission and optical transition radiation (OTR). The 32-channel OTR detector forms part of a high-resolution (0.18%) electron spectrometer with a time resolution of 50 ns. Variable-magnification optics allow the spectrometer to view single-macropulse spectra with widths in the range of 0.2%-7%; wider spectra are taken with several momentum settings. Design criteria for the spectrometer are presented, and experience of operating with the diagnostics over a range of FEL physics experiments is summarized. The spectrometer is used, in conjunction with optical diagnostics, in studies at FELIX of efficiency enhancement, pulse chirping, and stepped-undulator operation.

  15. Strong coupling operation of a free-electron-laser amplifier with an axial magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rullier, J.L.; Devin, A.; Gardelle, J.; Labrouche, J.; Le Taillandier, P. [Commissariat a lEnergie Atomique, Boite Postale 2, 33114 Le Barp (France); Donohue, J.T. [Centre dEtudes Nucleaires de Bordeaux-Gradignan, Boite Postale 120, 33175 Gradignan (France)

    1996-03-01

    We present the results of a free-electron-laser (FEL) experiment at 35 GHz, using a strongly relativistic electron beam ({ital T}=1.75 MeV). The electron pulse length is 30 ns full width at half maximum with a peak current of 400 A. The FEL is designed to operate in the high-gain Compton regime, with a negative coupling parameter ({Phi}{lt}0) leading to a strong growth rate. More than 50 MW of rf power in the TE{sub 1}{sub 1} mode (43 dB gain) has been obtained with good reproducibility. The experimental results are in good agreement with predictions made using the three-dimensional stationary simulation code solitude. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  16. Thomson scattering from near-solid density plasmas using soft x-ray free electron lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Höll, A

    2006-01-01

    We propose a collective Thomson scattering experiment at the VUV free electron laser facility at DESY (FLASH) which aims to diagnose warm dense matter at near-solid density. The plasma region of interest marks the transition from an ideal plasma to a correlated and degenerate many-particle system and is of current interest, e.g. in ICF experiments or laboratory astrophysics. Plasma diagnostic of such plasmas is a longstanding issue. The collective electron plasma mode (plasmon) is revealed in a pump-probe scattering experiment using the high-brilliant radiation to probe the plasma. The distinctive scattering features allow to infer basic plasma properties. For plasmas in thermal equilibrium the electron density and temperature is determined from scattering off the plasmon mode.

  17. A Far-infrared Undulator for Coherent Synchrotron Radiation and Free Electron Laser at Tohoku University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hama, Hiroyuki; Hinode, Fujio; Kawai, Masayuki; Nanbu, Kenichi; Miyahara, Fusashi; Yasuda, Mafuyu

    2010-06-01

    In order to develop an intense far-infrared radiation source, a high quality electron beam has been studied at Tohoku University, Sendai. The bunch length of the beam expected is very much shorter than terahertz (THz) wavelength, so that coherent spontaneous emission of synchrotron radiation will be a promising high brilliant far-infrared source. An undulator consisting of permanent magnets has been designed in which optional free electron laser (FEL) will be operated in free space mode. Consequently the minimum gap of the undulator is decided to be 54 mm for 0.36 mm radiation to avoid diffraction loss, and then the period length of 10 cm is employed. The undulator may cover a wavelength range from 0.18 to 0.36 mm with the beam energy of 17 MeV. Property of coherent THz radiation from the undulator and possibility of novel pre-bunched THz FEL is discussed.

  18. Spectrometer for X-ray emission experiments at FERMI free-electron-laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poletto, L., E-mail: poletto@dei.unipd.it; Frassetto, F.; Miotti, P. [CNR - Institute of Photonics and Nanotechnologies (CNR-IFN), via Trasea 7, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Di Cicco, A.; Iesari, F. [Physics Division, School of Science and Technology, Università di Camerino, I-62032 Camerino (Italy); Finetti, P. [ELETTRA - Sincrotrone Trieste, Basovizza Area Science Park, S. S. 14 - km 163,5, I-34149, Basovizza (TS) (Italy); Grazioli, C. [Department of Chemical and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Trieste, Via L. Giorgieri 1, I-34127 Trieste (Italy); CNR-Istituto Officina dei Materiali (CNR-IOM), Laboratorio TASC, I-34149 Trieste (Italy); Kivimäki, A. [CNR-Istituto Officina dei Materiali (CNR-IOM), Laboratorio TASC, I-34149 Trieste (Italy); Stagira, S. [Politecnico di Milano – Department of Physics, I-20133 Milano (Italy); Coreno, M. [ELETTRA - Sincrotrone Trieste, Basovizza Area Science Park, S. S. 14 - km 163,5, I-34149, Basovizza (TS) (Italy); CNR – Istituto di Struttura della Materia (CNR-ISM), UOS Basovizza, I-34149 Trieste (Italy)

    2014-10-15

    A portable and compact photon spectrometer to be used for photon in-photon out experiments, in particular x-ray emission spectroscopy, is presented. The instrument operates in the 25–800 eV energy range to cover the full emissions of the FEL1 and FEL2 stages of FERMI. The optical design consists of two interchangeable spherical varied-lined-spaced gratings and a CCD detector. Different input sections can be accommodated, with/without an entrance slit and with/without an additional relay mirror, that allow to mount the spectrometer in different end-stations and at variable distances from the target area both at synchrotron and at free-electron-laser beamlines. The characterization on the Gas Phase beamline at ELETTRA Synchrotron (Italy) is presented.

  19. A CW normal-conductive RF gun for free electron laser and energy recovery linac applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baptiste, K.; Corlett, J.; Kwiatkowski, S.; Lidia, S.; Qiang, J.; Sannibale, F.; Sonnad, K.; Staples, J.; Virostek, S.; Wells, R.

    2009-02-01

    Currently proposed energy recovery linac and high average power free electron laser projects require electron beam sources that can generate up to ˜1 nC bunch charges with less than 1 mm mrad normalized emittance at high repetition rates (greater than ˜1 MHz). Proposed sources are based around either high voltage DC or microwave RF guns, each with its particular set of technological limits and system complications. We propose an approach for a gun fully based on mature RF and mechanical technology that greatly diminishes many of such complications. The concepts for such a source as well as the present RF and mechanical design are described. Simulations that demonstrate the beam quality preservation and transport capability of an injector scheme based on such a gun are also presented.

  20. Reversible electron beam heating for suppression of microbunching instabilities at free-electron lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Behrens, Christopher; Xiang, Dao

    2011-01-01

    The presence of microbunching instabilities due to the compression of high-brightness electron beams at existing and future X-ray free-electron lasers (FELs) results in restrictions on the attainable lasing performance and renders beam imaging with optical transition radiation impossible. The instability can be suppressed by introducing additional energy spread, i.e., "heating" the electron beam, as demonstrated by the successful operation of the laser heater system at the Linac Coherent Light Source. The increased energy spread is typically tolerable for self-amplified spontaneous emission FELs but limits the effectiveness of advanced FEL schemes such as seeding. In this paper, we present a reversible electron beam heating system based on two transverse deflecting radio-frequency structures (TDSs) in front and behind a magnetic bunch compressor chicane. The additional energy spread will be introduced in the first TDS, which suppresses the microbunching instability, and then will be eliminated in the second T...

  1. High Harmonic Inverse Free-Electron-Laser Interaction at 800 NM

    CERN Document Server

    Sears, Chris M S; Colby, Eric R; Cowan, Benjamin; Plettner, Tomas; Siemann, Robert; Spencer, James

    2005-01-01

    The inverse Free Electron Laser (IFEL) interaction has recently been proposed and used as a short wavelength modulator forμbunching of beams for laser acceleration experiments*,**. These experiments utilized the fundamental of the interaction between the laser field and electron bunch. In the current experiment, we explore the higher order resonances of the IFEL interaction from a 3 period, 1.8 centimeter wavelength undulator with a picosecond, 0.25 mJ/pulse laser at 800 nm. The resonances are observed by adjusting the gap of the undulator while keeping the beam energy constant. We will also discuss diagnostics for obtaining beam overlap and statistical techniques used to account for machine drifts and analyze the data.

  2. Ultrafast time dynamics studies of periodic lattices with free electron laser radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quevedo, W.; Busse, G.; Hallmann, J.; More, R.; Petri, M.; Rajkovic, I. [Max Planck Institute for Biophysical Chemistry, Am Fassberg 11, 37077 Goettingen (Germany); Krasniqi, F.; Rudenko, A. [Max Planck Advanced Study Group at CFEL, Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Tschentscher, T. [European XFEL GmbH, Albert-Einstein-Ring 19, 22671 Hamburg (Germany); Stojanovic, N.; Duesterer, S.; Treusch, R.; Tolkiehn, M. [HASYLAB at DESY, Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Techert, S. [Max Planck Institute for Biophysical Chemistry, Am Fassberg 11, 37077 Goettingen (Germany); Max Planck Advanced Study Group at CFEL, Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany)

    2012-11-01

    It has been proposed that radiation from free electron laser (FEL) at Hamburg (FLASH) can be used for ultrafast time-resolved x-ray diffraction experiments based on the near-infrared (NIR) pump/FEL probe scheme. Here, investigation probing the ultrafast structural dynamics of periodic nano-crystalline organic matter (silver behenate) with such a scheme is reported. Excitation with a femtosecond NIR laser leads to an ultrafast lattice modification which time evolution has been studied through the scattering of vacuum ultraviolet FEL pulses. The found effect last for 6 ps and underpins the possibility for studying nanoperiodic dynamics down to the FEL source time resolution. Furthermore, the possibility of extending the use of silver behenate (AgBh) as a wavelength and temporal calibration tool for experiments with soft x-ray/FEL sources is suggested.

  3. Thomson scattering from near-solid density plasmas using soft x-ray free electron lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holl, A; Bornath, T; Cao, L; Doppner, T; Dusterer, S; Forster, E; Fortmann, C; Glenzer, S H; Gregori, G; Laarmann, T; Meiwes-Broer, K H; Przystawik, A; Radcliffe, P; Redmer, R; Reinholz, H; Ropke, G; Thiele, R; Tiggesbaumker, J; Toleikis, S; Truong, N X; Tschentscher, T; Uschmann, I; Zastrau, U

    2006-11-21

    We propose a collective Thomson scattering experiment at the VUV free electron laser facility at DESY (FLASH) which aims to diagnose warm dense matter at near-solid density. The plasma region of interest marks the transition from an ideal plasma to a correlated and degenerate many-particle system and is of current interest, e.g. in ICF experiments or laboratory astrophysics. Plasma diagnostic of such plasmas is a longstanding issue. The collective electron plasma mode (plasmon) is revealed in a pump-probe scattering experiment using the high-brilliant radiation to probe the plasma. The distinctive scattering features allow to infer basic plasma properties. For plasmas in thermal equilibrium the electron density and temperature is determined from scattering off the plasmon mode.

  4. High gain harmonic generation free electron lasers enhanced by pseudoenergy bands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Takashi; Kinjo, Ryota

    2017-08-01

    We propose a new scheme for high gain harmonic generation free electron lasers (HGHG FELs), which is seeded by a pair of intersecting laser beams to interact with an electron beam in a modulator undulator located in a dispersive section. The interference of the laser beams gives rise to a two-dimensional modulation in the energy-time phase space because of a strong correlation between the electron energy and the position in the direction of dispersion. This eventually forms pseudoenergy bands in the electron beam, which result in efficient harmonic generation in HGHG FELs in a similar manner to the well-known scheme using the echo effects. The advantage of the proposed scheme is that the beam quality is less deteriorated than in other existing schemes.

  5. Compact beam transport system for free-electron lasers driven by a laser plasma accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tao; Zhang, Tong; Wang, Dong; Huang, Zhirong

    2017-02-01

    Utilizing laser-driven plasma accelerators (LPAs) as a high-quality electron beam source is a promising approach to significantly downsize the x-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) facility. A multi-GeV LPA beam can be generated in several-centimeter acceleration distance, with a high peak current and a low transverse emittance, which will considerably benefit a compact FEL design. However, the large initial angular divergence and energy spread make it challenging to transport the beam and realize FEL radiation. In this paper, a novel design of beam transport system is proposed to maintain the superior features of the LPA beam and a transverse gradient undulator (TGU) is also adopted as an effective energy spread compensator to generate high-brilliance FEL radiation. Theoretical analysis and numerical simulations are presented based on a demonstration experiment with an electron energy of 380 MeV and a radiation wavelength of 30 nm.

  6. Preparatory procedure and equipment for the European x-ray free electron laser cavity implementation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reschke, D.; Bandelmann, R.; Buettner, T.; Escherich, K.; Goessel, A.; v.d.Horst, B.; Iversen, J.; Klinke, D.; Kreps, G.; Krupka, N.; Lilje, L.; /DESY /Fermilab

    2010-07-01

    The European x-ray free electron laser is under construction at Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY). The electron beam energy of up to 17.5 GeV will be achieved by using superconducting accelerator technology. Final prototyping, industrialization, and new infrastructure are the actual challenges with respect to the accelerating cavities. This paper describes the preparation strategy optimized for the cavity preparation procedure in industry. For the industrial fabrication and preparation, several new hardware components have been already developed at DESY. The design and construction of a semiautomated rf-measurement machine for dumbbells and end groups are described. In a collaboration among FNAL, KEK, and DESY, an automatic cavity tuning machine has been designed and four machines are under construction. The functionality of these machines with special attention to safety aspects is described in this paper. A new high pressure rinsing system has been developed and is operational.

  7. Quantum effects with an x-ray free-electron laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, C D; Schmidt, S M; Vinnik, D V

    2002-10-07

    A quantum kinetic equation coupled with Maxwell's equation is used to estimate the laser power required at an x-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) facility to expose intrinsically quantum effects in the process of QED vacuum decay via spontaneous pair production. A 9 -TW-peak XFEL laser with photon energy of 8.3 keV could be sufficient to initiate particle accumulation and the consequent formation of a plasma of spontaneously produced pairs. The evolution of the particle number in the plasma will exhibit non-Markovian aspects of the strong-field pair production process, and the plasma's internal currents will generate an electric field whose interference with that of the laser leads to plasma oscillations.

  8. Bound-Free Electron-Positron Pair Production in Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Sengul, M Y; Fritzsche, S

    2009-01-01

    The bound-free electron-positron pair production is considered for relativistic heavy ion collisions. In particular, cross sections are calculated for the pair production with the simultaneous capture of the electron into the 1s ground state of one of the ions and for energies that are relevant for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) and the Large Hadron Colliders (LHC). In the framework of perturbation theory, we applied Monte-Carlo integration techniques to compute the lowest-order Feynman diagrams amplitudes by using Darwin wave functions for the bound states of the elec- trons and Sommerfeld-Maue wave functions for the continuum states of the positrons. Calculations were performed especially for the collision of Au + Au at 100 GeV/nucleon and Pb + Pb at 3400 GeV/nucleon.

  9. First lasing of a high-gain harmonic generation free- electron laser experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, L H; Ben-Zvi, I; Di Mauro, Louis F; Doyuran, A; Graves, W; Johnson, E; Krinsky, S; Malone, R; Pogorelsky, I V; Skaritka, J; Rakowsky, G; Solomon, L; Wang, X J; Woodle, M; Yakimenko, V; Biedron, S G; Galayda, J N; Gluskin, E; Jagger, J; Sajaev, Vadim; Vasserman, I

    2000-01-01

    We report on the first lasing of a high-gain harmonic generation (HGHG) free-electron laser (FEL). The experiment was conducted at the Accelerator Test Facility (ATF) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). This is a BNL experiment in collaboration with the Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National Laboratory. A preliminary measurement gives a high-gain harmonic generation (HGHG) pulse energy that is 2x10 sup 7 times larger than the spontaneous radiation. In a purely self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) mode of operation, the signal was measured as 10 times larger than the spontaneous radiation in the same distance (approx 2 m) through the same wiggler. This means the HGHG signal is 2x10 sup 6 times larger than the SASE signal. To obtain the same saturated output power by the SASE process, the radiator would have to be 3 times longer (6 m).

  10. A compact terahertz free-electron laser with two gratings driven by two electron-beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Weihao; Lu, Yalin; Wang, Lin; Jia, Qika

    2017-02-01

    We proposed and investigated a novel terahertz free-electron laser, which is based on two gratings driven by two electron-beams. Two gratings are symmetrically arranged to form an open-cavity. Two electron-beams generate special Smith-Purcell radiations, respectively, from two gratings. When radiation interferes constructively, operation modes of the open-cavity are excited and then amplified by beam-wave interactions. By means of particle-in-cell simulations, we have shown that, with compact equipments and available electron-beams, this scheme can generate radiation with power and efficiency being higher than those of majority radiation sources in the vicinity region of 1 THz. It can promisingly be developed as a high-power, high-efficiency, and compact terahertz source for practice.

  11. High Harmonic Inverse Free-Electron-Laser Interaction at 800nm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sears, Christopher M.S.; Colby, Eric; Cowan, Ben; Siemann, Robert H.; Spencer, James; /SLAC; Byer, Robert L.; Plettner, Tomas; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2005-05-13

    The inverse Free Electron Laser (IFEL) interaction has recently been proposed and used as a short wavelength modulator for micro bunching of beams for laser acceleration experiments [1,2]. These experiments utilized the fundamental of the interaction between the laser field and electron bunch. In the current experiment, we explore the higher order resonances of the IFEL interaction from a 3 period, 1.8 centimeter wavelength undulator with a picosecond, 0.5 mJ/pulse laser at 800nm. The resonances are observed by adjusting the gap of the undulator while keeping the beam energy constant. We also compare the experimental results to a simple analytic model that describes coupling to high order harmonics of the interaction.

  12. High-Harmonic Inverse Free-Electron-Laser Interaction at 800nm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sears, C

    2006-02-17

    The inverse Free Electron Laser (IFEL) interaction has recently been proposed and used as a short wavelength modulator for micro bunching of beams for laser acceleration experiments [1,2]. These experiments utilized the fundamental of the interaction between the laser field and electron bunch. In the current experiment, we explore the higher order resonances of the IFEL interaction from a 3 period, 1.8 centimeter wavelength undulator with a picosecond, 0.5 mJ/pulse laser at 800nm. The resonances are observed by adjusting the gap of the undulator while keeping the beam energy constant. We also compare the experimental results to a simple analytic model that describes coupling to high order harmonics of the interaction.

  13. Time-interleaved multienergy acceleration for an x-ray free-electron laser facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toru Hara

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available To meet the demand from the growing number of user experiments, multi-beam-line operation with a wide spectral range is seriously considered in x-ray free-electron laser facilities. In a conventional design, the beam line of low photon energies branches off from the middle of the accelerator to take out low energy electron beams. Here in this paper, a novel method is proposed to deliver bunch-to-bunch energy changed electron beams at the end of the accelerator. Since all accelerator components are operated in steady state, this method enables quasisimultaneous operation of multi-beam-line in the same undulator hall without degrading the stability and performance of the electron beam.

  14. Phase jump method for efficiency enhancement in free-electron lasers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan Mak

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The efficiency of a free-electron laser can be enhanced by the phase jump method. The method utilizes the phase-shifting chicanes in the drift sections between the undulator segments. By applying appropriate phase jumps, the microbunched electron beam can decelerate and radiate coherently beyond the initial saturation, enabling further energy transfer to the optical beam. This article presents a new physics model for the phase jump method, and supports it with numerical simulations. Based on the electron dynamics in the longitudinal phase space, the model describes the energy extraction mechanism, and addresses the selection criteria for the phase jump magnitude. While the ponderomotive bucket is stationary, energy can be extracted from electrons outside the bucket. With the aid of the new model, a comparison is made between the phase jump method and undulator tapering. The model also explores the potential of the phase jump method to suppress the growth of synchrotron sidebands in the optical spectrum.

  15. Obtaining attosecond x-ray pulses using a self-amplified spontaneous emission free electron laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Zholents

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available We describe a technique for the generation of a solitary attosecond x-ray pulse in a free-electron laser (FEL, via a process of self-amplified spontaneous emission. In this method, electrons experience an energy modulation upon interacting with laser pulses having a duration of a few cycles within single-period wiggler magnets. Two consecutive modulation sections, followed by compression in a dispersive section, are used to obtain a single, subfemtosecond spike in the electron peak current. This region of the electron beam experiences an enhanced growth rate for FEL amplification. After propagation through a long undulator, this current spike emits a ∼250   attosecond x-ray pulse whose intensity dominates the x-ray emission from the rest of the electron bunch.

  16. Performance of the x-ray free-electron laser oscillator with crystal cavity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. R. Lindberg

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Simulations of the x-ray free-electron laser (FEL oscillator are presented that include the frequency-dependent Bragg crystal reflectivity and the transverse diffraction and focusing using the two-dimensional FEL code GINGER. A review of the physics of Bragg crystal reflectors and the x-ray FEL oscillator is made, followed by a discussion of its numerical implementation in GINGER. The simulation results for a two-crystal cavity and realistic FEL parameters indicate ∼10^{9} photons in a nearly Fourier-limited, ps pulse. Compressing the electron beam to 100 A and 100 fs results in comparable x-ray characteristics for relaxed beam emittance, energy spread, and/or undulator parameters, albeit in a larger radiation bandwidth. Finally, preliminary simulation results indicate that the four-crystal FEL cavity can be tuned in energy over a range of a few percent.

  17. Phase matching strategy for the undulator system in the European X-ray Free Electron Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuhui; Pflueger, Joachim

    2017-02-01

    The undulator system in the European X-ray Free Electron Laser is mainly comprised of 5-m long undulator segments and 1.1 m long intersections in between. The longitudinal component of the electrons' velocity is reduced when traveling inside an undulator due to the wiggle motion. Therefore the optical phase is detuned. The detune effect is also from the undulator fringe field where electron longitudinal speed also deviates from the oscillation condition. The total detune effect is compensated by a magnetic device called phase shifter, which is correspondingly set for a specific undulator gap. In this paper we investigate the homogeneity of the fringe field from different undulators. Different phase matching criteria are studied. The field fitting technique for the phase matching in high accuracy is demonstrated in detail. The impact by air coil is also studied. Eventually the matching test by spontaneous radiation simulation is made. A test method for high sensitivity to matching error is proposed.

  18. Evidence for competition modes in a partially guided far-infrared free-electron laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.-M. Ortega

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The infrared free-electron laser (FEL offers a large tunability since the FEL gain remains high throughout the infrared spectral range, and the reflectivity of metal mirrors remains also close to unity. The main limitation comes from the diffraction of the optical beam due to the finite size of the vacuum chamber of the undulator. A solution is to use this chamber as a waveguide by adapting the radius of curvature of the cavity mirrors to this regime. Then, as has been shown before, a minimum appears in the spectrum that can be produced by the FEL. We discuss the physical mechanism of this particular regime and compare it to experiments using vacuum chambers of different transverse sizes. A good agreement is found with results of simulations and with a simple analytical formula.

  19. Influence of an imperfect energy profile on a seeded free electron laser performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Botao Jia

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available A single-pass high-gain x-ray free electron laser (FEL calls for a high quality electron bunch. In particular, for a seeded FEL amplifier and for a harmonic generation FEL, the electron bunch initial energy profile uniformity is crucial for generating an FEL with a narrow bandwidth. After the acceleration, compression, and transportation, the electron bunch energy profile entering the undulator can acquire temporal nonuniformity. We study the influence of the electron bunch initial energy profile nonuniformity on the FEL performance. Intrinsically, for a harmonic generation FEL, the harmonic generation FEL in the final radiator starts with an electron bunch having energy modulation acquired in the previous stages, due to the FEL interaction at those FEL wavelengths and their harmonics. The influence of this electron bunch energy nonuniformity on the harmonic generation FEL in the final radiator is then studied.

  20. Phase jump method for efficiency enhancement in free-electron lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mak, Alan; Curbis, Francesca; Werin, Sverker

    2017-06-01

    The efficiency of a free-electron laser can be enhanced by the phase jump method. The method utilizes the phase-shifting chicanes in the drift sections between the undulator segments. By applying appropriate phase jumps, the microbunched electron beam can decelerate and radiate coherently beyond the initial saturation, enabling further energy transfer to the optical beam. This article presents a new physics model for the phase jump method, and supports it with numerical simulations. Based on the electron dynamics in the longitudinal phase space, the model describes the energy extraction mechanism, and addresses the selection criteria for the phase jump magnitude. While the ponderomotive bucket is stationary, energy can be extracted from electrons outside the bucket. With the aid of the new model, a comparison is made between the phase jump method and undulator tapering. The model also explores the potential of the phase jump method to suppress the growth of synchrotron sidebands in the optical spectrum.

  1. Undulator beamline optimization with integrated chicanes for X-ray free-electron-laser facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prat, Eduard; Calvi, Marco; Ganter, Romain; Reiche, Sven; Schietinger, Thomas; Schmidt, Thomas

    2016-07-01

    An optimization of the undulator layout of X-ray free-electron-laser (FEL) facilities based on placing small chicanes between the undulator modules is presented. The installation of magnetic chicanes offers the following benefits with respect to state-of-the-art FEL facilities: reduction of the required undulator length to achieve FEL saturation, improvement of the longitudinal coherence of the FEL pulses, and the ability to produce shorter FEL pulses with higher power levels. Numerical simulations performed for the soft X-ray beamline of the SwissFEL facility show that optimizing the advantages of the layout requires shorter undulator modules than the standard ones. This proposal allows a very compact undulator beamline that produces fully coherent FEL pulses and it makes possible new kinds of experiments that require very short and high-power FEL pulses.

  2. Generation of large-bandwidth x-ray free-electron-laser pulses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Saa Hernandez

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs are modern research tools in disciplines such as biology, material science, chemistry, and physics. Besides the standard operation that aims at minimizing the bandwidth of the produced XFEL radiation, there is a strong scientific demand to produce large-bandwidth XFEL pulses for several applications such as nanocrystallography, stimulated Raman spectroscopy, and multiwavelength anomalous diffraction. We present a self-consistent method that maximizes the XFEL pulse bandwidth by systematically maximizing the energy chirp of the electron beam at the undulator entrance. This is achieved by optimizing the compression scheme and the electron distribution at the source in an iterative back-and-forward tracking. Start-to-end numerical simulations show that a relative bandwidth of 3.25% full-width can be achieved for the hard x-ray pulses in the SwissFEL case.

  3. The prototype of new variable period undulator for Novosibirsk free electron laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidyuk, I. V.; Shevchenko, O. A.; Getmanov, Ya. V.; Tcheskidov, V. G.; Vinokurov, N. A.; Vobly, P. D.

    2016-12-01

    To improve the parameters of the second stage Novosibirsk free electron laser we plan to replace the existing electromagnetic undulator by permanent-magnet variable-period undulator (VPU). The VPUs have several advantages compared to conventional undulators, which include wider radiation wavelength tuning range and an option to increase the number of poles. Both these advantages will be realized in the new undulator under development in Budker INP. There are some technical problems, which have to be solved before this idea can be implemented in practice. To check the solution of these problems we designed and manufactured a small undulator prototype, which has just several periods. In this paper, the results of mechanical and magnetic measurements of this undulator prototype are presented and compared with simulations.

  4. Simplified model for fast optimization of a free-electron laser oscillator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Li

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available A simplified one-dimensional theoretical model for free-electron laser oscillator (FELO calculation which reserves the main physics is proposed. Instead of using traditional macroparticles sampling method, the theoretical model takes advantage of low gain theory to calculate the optical power single-pass gain in the undulator analytically, and some reasonable approximations are made to simplify the calculation of power growth in the cavity. The theoretical analysis of single-pass gain, power growth, time-dependent laser profile evolution and cavity desynchronism are accomplished more efficiently. We present the results of infrared wavelength FELO and X-ray FELO with the new model. The results are validated by simulation with GENESIS and OPC.

  5. Suppression of microbunching instability using bending magnets in free-electron-laser linacs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiang, Ji; Mitchell, Chad E; Venturini, Marco

    2013-08-02

    The microbunching instability driven by collective effects of the beam inside an accelerator can significantly degrade the final electron beam quality for free electron laser (FEL) radiation. In this Letter, we propose an inexpensive scheme to suppress such an instability in accelerators for next generation FEL light sources. Instead of using an expensive device such as a laser heater or RF deflecting cavities, this scheme uses longitudinal mixing associated with the transverse spread of the beam through bending magnets inside the accelerator transport system to suppress the instability. The final uncorrelated energy spread increases roughly by the current compression factor, which is important in seeded FEL schemes in order to achieve high harmonic short-wavelength x-ray radiation.

  6. Optical transition radiation measurements for the Los Alamos and Boeing Free-Electron Laser experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lumpkin, A.H.; Feldman, R.B.; Feldman, D.W.; Apgar, S.A.; Calsten, B.E.; Fiorito, R.B.; Rule, D.W.

    1988-01-01

    Optical transition radiation (OTR) measurements of the electron-beam emittance have been performed at a location just before the wiggler in the Los Alamos Free-Electron Laser (FEL) experiment. Beam profiles and beam divergence patterns from a single macropulse were recorded simultaneously using two intensified charge-injection device (CID) television cameras and an optical beamsplitter. Both single-foil OTR and two-foil OTR interference experiments were performed. Preliminary results are compared to a reference variable quadrupole, single screen technique. New aspects of using OTR properties for pointing the e-beam on the FEL oscillator axis, as well as measuring e-beam emittance are addressed. 7 refs., 9 figs.

  7. A CW normal-conductive RF gun for free electron laser and energy recovery linac applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baptiste, K.; Corlett, J.; Kwiatkowski, S.; Lidia, S.; Qiang, J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, One Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Sannibale, F. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, One Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)], E-mail: fsannibale@lbl.gov; Sonnad, K.; Staples, J.; Virostek, S.; Wells, R. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, One Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2009-02-01

    Currently proposed energy recovery linac and high average power free electron laser projects require electron beam sources that can generate up to {approx}1nC bunch charges with less than 1 mm mrad normalized emittance at high repetition rates (greater than {approx}1MHz). Proposed sources are based around either high voltage DC or microwave RF guns, each with its particular set of technological limits and system complications. We propose an approach for a gun fully based on mature RF and mechanical technology that greatly diminishes many of such complications. The concepts for such a source as well as the present RF and mechanical design are described. Simulations that demonstrate the beam quality preservation and transport capability of an injector scheme based on such a gun are also presented.

  8. A CW normal-conductive RF gun for free electron laser and energy recovery linac applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baptiste, Kenneth; Corlett, John; Kwiatkowski, Slawomir; Lidia, Steven; Qiang, Ji; Sannibale, Fernando; Sonnad, Kiran; Staples, John; Virostek, Steven; Wells, Russell

    2008-10-08

    Currently proposed energy recovery linac and high average power free electron laser projects require electron beam sources that can generate up to {approx} 1 nC bunch charges with less than 1 mmmrad normalized emittance at high repetition rates (greater than {approx} 1 MHz). Proposed sources are based around either high voltage DC or microwave RF guns, each with its particular set of technological limits and system complications. We propose an approach for a gun fully based on mature RF and mechanical technology that greatly diminishes many of such complications. The concepts for such a source as well as the present RF and mechanical design are described. Simulations that demonstrate the beam quality preservation and transport capability of an injector scheme based on such a gun are also presented.

  9. A Simplified Model for Fast Optimization of Free-Electron Laser Oscillator

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Kai; Deng, Haixiao

    2016-01-01

    A simplified theoretical model for free-electron laser oscillator (FELO) simulation which reserves the main physics is proposed. In stead of using traditional macro particles sampling method, the theoretical model takes advantages of low gain theory to calculate the optical power single-pass gain in the undulator analytically, and some reasonable approximations are made to simplify the calculation of power growth in the cavity. The theoretical analysis of single-pass gain, power growth, time-dependent laser profile evolution and cavity desynchronism are accomplished more efficiently. We present the results of infrared wavelength FELO and X-ray FELO with the new model. The results is checked by simulation with GENESIS and OPC which demonstrates the validity of the theoretical model.

  10. Absorber for wakefield interference management at the entrance of the wiggler of a free electron laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marchlik, Matthew; Biallas, George Herman

    2017-03-07

    A method for managing the broad band microwave and TeraHertz (THz) radiation in a free electron laser (FEL) having a wiggler producing power in the electromagnetic spectrum. The method includes placement of broadband microwave and TeraHertz (THz) radiation absorbers on the upstream end of the wiggler. The absorbers dampen the bounced back, broad band microwave and THz radiation returning from the surfaces outside the nose of the cookie-cutter and thus preventing broadening of the electron beam pulse's narrow longitudinal energy distribution. Broadening diminishes the ultimate laser power from the wiggler. The broadband microwave and THz radiation absorbers are placed on either side of the slot in the cookie-cutter that shapes the wake field wave of the electron pulse to the slot shape of the wiggler chamber aperture. The broad band microwave and THz radiation absorber is preferably a non-porous pyrolytic grade of graphite with small grain size.

  11. Spin-polarized free electron beam interaction with radiation and superradiant spin-flip radiative emission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Gover

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available The problems of spin-polarized free-electron beam interaction with electromagnetic wave at electron-spin resonance conditions in a magnetic field and of superradiant spin-flip radiative emission are analyzed in the framework of a comprehensive classical model. The spontaneous emission of spin-flip radiation from electron beams is very weak. We show that the detectivity of electron spin resonant spin-flip and combined spin-flip/cyclotron-resonance-emission radiation can be substantially enhanced by operating with ultrashort spin-polarized electron beam bunches under conditions of superradiant (coherent emission. The proposed radiative spin-state modulation and the spin-flip radiative emission schemes can be used for control and noninvasive diagnostics of polarized electron/positron beams. Such schemes are of relevance in important scattering experiments off nucleons in nuclear physics and off magnetic targets in condensed matter physics.

  12. High-gain X-ray free electron laser by beat-wave terahertz undulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Chao; Hei, DongWei [Science and Technology on High Power Microwave Laboratory, Northwest Institute of Nuclear Technology, Xi' an City 710024 (China); Institute of Energy, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Pellegrin, Claudio; Tantawi, Sami [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94309 (United States)

    2013-12-15

    The THz undulator has a higher gain to realize a much brighter X-ray at saturation, compared with the optical undulator under the same undulator strength and beam quality. In order to fill the high-power THz gap and realize the THz undulator, two superimposed laser pulses at normal incidence to the electron-beam moving direction form an equivalent high-field THz undulator by the frequency difference to realize the high-gain X-ray Free electron laser. The pulse front tilt of lateral fed lasers is used to realize the electron-laser synchronic interaction. By PIC simulation, a higher gain and a larger X-ray radiation power by the beat wave THz undulator could be realized, compared with the optical undulator for the same electron beam parameters.

  13. Phase Jump Method for Efficiency Enhancement in Free-Electron Lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Mak, Alan; Werin, Sverker

    2016-01-01

    The efficiency of a free-electron laser can be enhanced by sustaining the growth of the radiation power beyond the initial saturation. One notable method is undulator tapering, which involves the variation of the gap height and/or the period along the undulator. Another method is the introduction of phase jumps, using phase-shifting chicanes in the drift sections separating the undulator segments. In this article, we develop a physics model of this phase jump method, and verify it with numerical simulations. The model elucidates the energy extraction process in the longitudinal phase space. The main ingredient is the microbunch deceleration cycle, which enables the microbunched electron beam to decelerate and radiate coherently beyond the initial saturation. The ponderomotive bucket is stationary, and energy can even be extracted from electrons outside the bucket. The model addresses the selection criteria for the phase jump values, and the requirement on the undulator segment length. It also describes the me...

  14. High Efficiency, Multi-Terawatt X-ray free electron lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Emma, Claudio; Wu, Juhao; Pellegrini, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    We study high efficiency, multi-terawatt peak power, few angstrom wavelength, X-ray Free Electron Lasers (X-ray FELs). To obtain these characteristics we consider an optimized undulator design: superconducting, helical, with short period and built-in strong focusing. This design reduces the length of the breaks between modules, decreasing diffraction effects, and allows using a stronger transverse electron focusing. Both effects reduce the gain length and the overall undulator length. The peak power and efficiency depend on the transverse electron beam distribution and on time dependent effects, like synchrotron sideband growth. The last effect is identified as the main cause for reduction of electron beam microbunching and FEL peak power. We show that the optimal functional form for the undulator magnetic field tapering profile, yielding the maximum output power, depends significantly on these effects. The output power achieved when neglecting time dependent effects for an LCLS-like X-ray FEL with a 100 m lo...

  15. CAS on Free-Electron Lasers and Energy Recovery Linacs in Hamburg

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Accelerator School

    2016-01-01

    The CERN Accelerator School (CAS) and DESY held a jointly-organised specialised course on Free-Electron Lasers and Energy Recovery Linacs (FELs and ERLs) in Hamburg, Germany, from 31 May to 10 June 2016.      The course was held in the Hotel Scandic Emporio in Hamburg and was attended by 68 participants of 13 nationalities, coming from countries as far away as China, Iran and Japan. The intensive programme comprised 44 lectures and one seminar. Following introductory lectures on electromagnetism, relativity and synchrotron radiation issues, the basic requirements of linacs and ERLs were discussed. Detailed lectures on the theory of FEL science followed. Undulators and the process of lasing and seeding were covered in some detail along with lectures on various beam dynamics and beam control issues. Case studies, for which seven hours were allocated, completed the academic programme. For these, the students were divided into small groups and tasked with completing the basic desig...

  16. Experimental Investigation of Multibunch, Multipass Beam Breakup in the Jefferson Laboratory Free Electron Laser Upgrade Driver

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christopher Tennant; David Douglas; Kevin Jordan; Nikolitsa Merminga; Eduard Pozdeyev; Haipeng Wang; Todd I. Smith; Stefan Simrock; Ivan Bazarov; Georg Hoffstaetter

    2006-03-24

    In recirculating accelerators, and in particular energy recovery linacs (ERLs), the maximum current can be limited by multipass, multibunch beam breakup (BBU), which occurs when the electron beam interacts with the higher-order modes (HOMs) of an accelerating cavity on the accelerating pass and again on the energy recovering pass. This effect is of particular concern in the design of modern high average current energy recovery accelerators utilizing superconducting RF technology. Experimental characterization and observations of the instability at the Jefferson Laboratory 10 kW Free Electron Laser (FEL) are presented. Measurements of the threshold current for the instability are made under a variety of beam conditions and compared to the predictions of several BBU simulation codes. This represents the first time in which the codes have been experimentally benchmarked. With BBU posing a threat to high current beam operation in the FEL Driver, several suppression schemes were developed.

  17. MAGNETIC MODELING VS MEASUREMENTS OF THE DIPOLES FOR THE JLAB 10 KW FREE ELECTRON LASER UPGRADE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David Douglas; Robin Wines; Tom Hiatt; George Biallas; Kenneth Baggett; T.J. Schultheiss; V.A. Christina; J.W. Rathke; A. Smirnov; D. Newsham; Y. Luo; D. Yu

    2003-05-01

    Magnetic measurements of the six families of dipoles for the infrared Free Electron Laser Upgrade at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jlab) are compared to the magnetic models on which their design is based. The magnets were designed in parallel by three organizations. They used ANSYS, Radia or Opera 3D as a 3D magnetic modeling program. Comparison of the discrepancies between model and magnet measurement is presented along with analysis of their potential causes. These dipoles operate in two field ranges. The Injector/ Extractor Dipoles operate around 0.05 T and the Arc Dipoles and Optical Chicane Dipoles operate between 0.22 to 0.71 T. All magnets are required to meet core field and field integral flatness to parts in 104 over their good field region.

  18. Status of the Northrop Grumman Compact Infrared Free-Electron Laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehrman, I.S.; Krishnaswamy, J.; Hartley, R.A. [Northrop Grumman Advanced Technology & Development Center, Princeton, NJ (United States)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    The Compact Infrared Free Electron Laser (CIRFEL) was built as part of a joint collaboration between the Northrop Grumman Corporation and Princeton University to develop FEL`s for use by researchers in the materials, medical and physical sciences. The CIRFEL was designed to lase in the Mid-IR and Far-IR regimes with picosecond pulses, megawatt level peak powers and an average power of a few watts. The micropulse separation is 7 nsec which allows a number of relaxation phenomenon to be observed. The CIRFEL utilizes an RF photocathode gun to produce high-brightness time synchronized electron bunches. The operational status and experimental results of the CERFEL will be presented.

  19. Efficiency Enhancement in a Tapered Free Electron Laser by Varying the Electron Beam Radius

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiao, Yi; Wu, J.; Cai, Y.; Chao, A.W.; Fawley, W.M.; Frisch, J.; Huang, Z.; Nuhn, H.-D.; /SLAC; Pellegrini, C.; /SLAC /UCLA; Reiche, S.; /PSI, Villigen

    2012-02-15

    Energy extraction efficiency of a free electron laser (FEL) can be increased when the undulator is tapered after the FEL saturation. By use of ray equation approximation to combine the one-dimensional FEL theory and optical guiding approach, an explicit physical model is built to provide insight to the mechanism of the electron-radiation coherent interaction with variable undulator parameters as well as electron beam radius. The contribution of variation in electron beam radius and related transverse effects are studied based on the presented model and numerical simulation. Taking a recent studied terawatt, 120 m long tapered FEL as an example, we demonstrate that a reasonably varied, instead of a constant, electron beam radius along the undulator helps to improve the optical guiding and thus the radiation output.

  20. Single-Molecule Imaging with X-Ray Free-Electron Lasers: Dream or Reality?

    KAUST Repository

    Fratalocchi, Andrea

    2011-03-09

    X-ray free-electron lasers (XFEL) are revolutionary photon sources, whose ultrashort, brilliant pulses are expected to allow single-molecule diffraction experiments providing structural information on the atomic length scale of nonperiodic objects. This ultimate goal, however, is currently hampered by several challenging questions basically concerning sample damage, Coulomb explosion, and the role of nonlinearity. By employing an original ab initio approach, we address these issues showing that XFEL-based single-molecule imaging will be only possible with a few-hundred long attosecond pulses, due to significant radiation damage and the formation of preferred multisoliton clusters which reshape the overall electronic density of the molecular system at the femtosecond scale.

  1. Electronic structure of graphene: (Nearly) free electron bands versus tight-binding bands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogan, E.; Silkin, V. M.

    2017-09-01

    In our previous paper (Phys. Rev. B {\\bf 89}, 165430 (2014)) we have found that in graphene, in distinction to the four occupied bands, which can be described by the simple tight-binding model (TBM) with four atomic orbitals per atom, the two lowest lying at the $\\Gamma$-point unoccupied bands (one of them of a $\\sigma$ type and the other of a $\\pi$ type) can not be described by such model. In the present work we suggest a minimalistic model for these two bands, based on (nearly) free electrons model (FEM), which correctly describes the symmetry of these bands, their dispersion law and their localization with respect to the graphene plane.

  2. SASE自由电子激光%SASE free-electron lasers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张令翊; 庄杰佳; 赵夔; 陈佳洱

    2001-01-01

    SASE自由电子激光可以产生短至0.1nm的高亮度(峰值亮度比当前的第三代同步辐射高10个量级;平均亮度高3~5个量级)、短脉冲(脉冲长度小于2个量级,达到亚皮秒水平)硬X射线相干光。因而被称为是继第三代同步辐射之后的第四代光源。SASE依据的是高增益自由电子激光原理,利用了光阴极微波电子枪技术和电子直线加速器技术。综述了SASE的历史发展、基本原理、基本结构、主要物理特征和对电子束的要求。%As the fourth generation light source hard X-ray SASE free-electron laser has many unique properties superior to the 3rd synchrotron radiation: higher brightness (ten orders of magnitude of peak spectral bribhteness and three~five orders of magnitude of average brightness greater than the 3rd synchrotron radiation currently acjhieved), shorter pulse (two orders of magnitude of pulse duration shorter than the 3rd synchrotron radiation, down to sub-picosecond), shorter wavelength down to 0.1nm etc.. SASE is based on the principle of high gain free electron lasers, and technologies of photoinjector and linear accelerator. The development history of SASE, the basic theory, the typical configuration, the main physical characteristics and the requirements for electron beam is described.

  3. Free electron laser induced two-photon photoconductivity in Hg1-xCdxTe

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YUAN; Xianzhang

    2001-01-01

    [1]Nathan, V., Guenther, A. H., Mitra, S. S., Review of multiphoton absortion in crystalline solids, J. Opt. Soc. Am. B, 1985, 2: 294—316.[2]Gibson, A. F., Hatch, C. B., Maggs, P. N. D. et al., Two-photon absorption in indium antimonide and germanium, J. Phys., C, 1976, 9: 3259—3275.[3]Miller, A., Johnston, A., Dempsey, J. et al., Two-photon absorption in InSb and Hg1-xCdxTe, J. Phys. C, 1929, 12: 4839—4849.[4]Burghoorn, J., Anderegg, V. F., Klaassen, T. O. et al., Free electron laser induced two-photon absorption in Hg1-xCdxTe, Appl. Phys. Lett., 1992, 61(19): 2320—2322.[5]Hui, Z. X., Yang, Z. H., Free Electron Laser (in Chinese), Beijing: National Defense Industry Press, 1995, 7—8.[6]Matter, J. C., Smirt, A. L., Scully, M. O., Saturable transmission in mercury cadmium telluride, Appl. Phys. Lett., 1976, 28(9): 507—509.[7]Nurmikko, A. V., Nonlinear absorption at 10.6 μm in Hg1-xCdxTe, Optics Communications, 1976, 18(4): 522—524.[8]Catalano, I. M., Cingolani, A., Minafra, A., Multiphoton transitions in ionic crystals, Phys. Rev. B, 1972, 5(4): 1629—1632.[9]Blakemore, J. S., Semiconductor Statistics, Oxford: Pergamon, 1962, 221—222.[10]Shen, S. C., Optical Property of Semiconductor (in Chinese), Beijing: Science Press, 1992, 392—394.

  4. The superatom states of fullerenes and their hybridization into the nearly free electron bands of fullerites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jin; Feng, Min; Yang, Jinlong; Petek, Hrvoje

    2009-04-28

    Motivated by the discovery of the superatom states of C60 molecules, we investigate the factors that influence their energy and wave function hybridization into nearly free electron bands in molecular solids. As the n = 3 solutions of the radial Schrodinger equation of the central attractive potential consisting of the short-range C atom core and the long-range collective screening potentials, respectively, located on the icosahedral C60 molecule shell and within its hollow core, superatom states are distinguished by their atom-like orbitals corresponding to different orbital angular momentum states (l = 0, 1, 2,...). Because they are less tightly bound than the pi orbitals, that is, the n = 2 states, which are often exploited in the intermolecular electron transport in aromatic organic molecule semiconductors, superatom orbitals hybridize more extensively among aggregated molecules to form bands with nearly free electron dispersion. The prospect of exploiting the strong intermolecular coupling to achieve metal-like conduction in applications such as molecular electronics may be attained by lowering the energy of superatom states from 3.5 eV for single chemisorbed C60 molecules to below the Fermi level; therefore, we study how the superatom state energies depend on factors such as their aggregation into 1D-3D solids, cage size, and exo- and endohedral doping by metal atoms. We find, indeed, that if the ionization potential of endohedral atom, such as copper, is sufficiently large, superatom states can form the conduction band in the middle of the gap between the HOMO and LUMO of the parent C60 molecule. Through a plane-wave density functional theory study, we provide insights for a new paradigm for intermolecular electronic interaction beyond the conventional one among the sp(n) hybridized orbitals of the organic molecular solids that could lead to design of novel molecular materials and quantum structures with extraordinary optical and electronic properties.

  5. Imaging charge and energy transfer in molecules using free-electron lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudenko, Artem

    2014-05-01

    Charge and energy transfer reactions drive numerous important processes in physics, chemistry and biology, with applications ranging from X-ray astrophysics to artificial photosynthesis and molecular electronics. Experimentally, the central goal in studies of transfer phenomena is to trace the spatial localization of charge at a given time. Because of their element and site sensitivity, ultrafast X-rays provide a promising tool to address this goal. In this talk I will discuss several experiments where free-electron lasers were employed to study charge and energy transfer dynamics in fragmenting molecules. In a first example, we used intense, 70 femtosecond 1.5 keV pulses from the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) to study distance dependence of electron transfer in laser-dissociated methyl iodide molecules. Inducing well-localized positive charge on the heavy iodine atom, we observe signature of electron transition from the separated methyl group up to the distances of 35 atomic units. In a complementary experiment, we studied charge exchange between two partners in a dissociating molecular iodine employing a pump-probe arrangement with two identical 90 eV pulses from the Free-Electron LASer in Hamburg (FLASH). In both cases, the effective spatial range of the electron transfer can be reasonably described by a classical over-the-barrier model developed for ion-atom collisions. Finally, I will discuss a time-resolved measurement on non-local relaxation mechanism based on a long-range energy transfer, the so-called interatomic Coulombic decay. This work was supported by Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences Division, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Office of Science, US Department of Energy and by the Kansas NSF ``First Award'' program.

  6. Single Shot Polarization Characterization of XUV FEL Pulses from Crossed Polarized Undulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, E.; Allaria, E.; Buck, J.; De Ninno, G.; Diviacco, B.; Gauthier, D.; Giannessi, L.; Glaser, L.; Huang, Z.; Ilchen, M.; Lambert, G.; Lutman, A. A.; Mahieu, B.; Penco, G.; Spezzani, C.; Viefhaus, J.

    2015-01-01

    Polarization control is a key feature of light generated by short-wavelength free-electron lasers. In this work, we report the first experimental characterization of the polarization properties of an extreme ultraviolet high gain free-electron laser operated with crossed polarized undulators. We investigate the average degree of polarization and the shot-to-shot stability and we analyze aspects such as existing possibilities for controlling and switching the polarization state of the emitted light. The results are in agreement with predictions based on Gaussian beams propagation. PMID:26314764

  7. Photo-induced dynamics in heterocyclic aromatic molecules probed by femtosecond XUV transient absorption spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lackner, Florian; Chatterley, Adam S.; Pemmaraju, Chaitanya D.; Neumark, Daniel M.; Leone, Stephen R.; Gessner, Oliver

    2016-05-01

    We report on the ring-opening and dissociation dynamics of strong-field ionized selenophene (C4 H4 Se), studied by transient XUV absorption spectroscopy at the Se 3d edge. The table-top experiments are facilitated by high-order harmonic generation coupled with a gas phase transient XUV absorption setup that is optimized for the study of organic compounds. Employing element-specific core-to-valence transitions, the ultrafast molecular dynamics are monitored from the perspective of the well-localized Se atoms. Spectral features are assigned based on first principles TDDFT calculations for a large manifold of electronic states. We observe signatures of rapidly (~ 35 fs) decaying highly excited molecular cations, the formation of ring-opened products on a 100 fs time scale and, most notably, the elimination of bare Se+ ions in a very rapid multi-step process. A delayed onset of the Se+ ions provides direct evidence that both selenium-carbon bonds are broken within only ~ 130 fs and that a sequential mechanism, presumably an initial ring-opening followed by a subsequent breaking of the second bond, is required to eliminate the atomic fragments.

  8. Strong XUV irradiation of the Earth-sized exoplanets orbiting the ultracool dwarf TRAPPIST-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheatley, Peter J.; Louden, Tom; Bourrier, Vincent; Ehrenreich, David; Gillon, Michaël

    2017-02-01

    We present an XMM-Newton X-ray observation of TRAPPIST-1, which is an ultracool dwarf star recently discovered to host three transiting and temperate Earth-sized planets. We find the star is a relatively strong and variable coronal X-ray source with an X-ray luminosity similar to that of the quiet Sun, despite its much lower bolometric luminosity. We find LX/Lbol = 2-4 × 10-4, with the total XUV emission in the range LXUV/Lbol = 6-9 × 10-4, and XUV irradiation of the planets that is many times stronger than experienced by the present-day Earth. Using a simple energy-limited model, we show that the relatively close-in Earth-sized planets, which span the classical habitable zone of the star, are subjected to sufficient X-ray and EUV irradiation to significantly alter their primary and any secondary atmospheres. Understanding whether this high-energy irradiation makes the planets more or less habitable is a complex question, but our measured fluxes will be an important input to the necessary models of atmospheric evolution.

  9. Strong XUV irradiation of the Earth-sized exoplanets orbiting the ultracool dwarf TRAPPIST-1

    CERN Document Server

    Wheatley, Peter J; Bourrier, Vincent; Ehrenreich, David; Gillon, Michaël

    2016-01-01

    We present an XMM-Newton X-ray observation of TRAPPIST-1, which is an ultracool dwarf star recently discovered to host three transiting and temperate Earth-sized planets. We find the star is a relatively strong and variable coronal X-ray source with an X-ray luminosity similar to that of the quiet Sun, despite its much lower bolometric luminosity. We find L_x/L_bol=2-4x10^-4, with the total XUV emission in the range L_xuv/L_bol=6-9x10^-4. Using a simple energy-limited model we show that the relatively close-in Earth-sized planets, which span the classical habitable zone of the star, are subject to sufficient X-ray and EUV irradiation to significantly alter their primary and perhaps secondary atmospheres. Understanding whether this high-energy irradiation makes the planets more or less habitable is a complex question, but our measured fluxes will be an important input to the necessary models of atmospheric evolution.

  10. Longitudinal space charge assisted echo seeding of a free-electron laser with laser-spoiler noise suppression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirsten Hacker

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Seed lasers are employed to improve the temporal coherence of free-electron laser (FEL light. However, when these seed pulses are short relative to the particle bunch, the noisy, temporally incoherent radiation from the unseeded electrons can overwhelm the coherent, seeded radiation. In this paper, a technique to seed a particle bunch with an external laser is presented in which a new mechanism to improve the contrast between coherent and incoherent free electron laser radiation is employed together with a novel, simplified echo-seeding method. The concept relies on a combination of longitudinal space charge wakes and an echo-seeding technique to make a short, coherent pulse of FEL light together with noise background suppression. Several different simulation codes are used to illustrate the concept with conditions at the soft x-ray free-electron laser in Hamburg, FLASH.

  11. A conceptual design of the set-up for solid state spectroscopy with free electron laser and insertion device radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Makhov, V N

    2001-01-01

    The set-up for complex solid state spectroscopy with the use of enhanced properties of radiation from insertion devices and free electron lasers is proposed. Very high flux and pulsed properties of radiation from insertion devices and free electron lasers offer the possibility for the use of such powerful techniques as electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and optically detected magnetic resonance (ODMR) for the studies of excited states of electronic excitations or defects in solids. The power density of radiation can become high enough for one more method of exited-state spectroscopy: transient optical absorption spectroscopy. The set-up is supposed to combine the EPR/ODMR spectrometer, i.e. cryostat supplied with superconducting magnet and microwave system, and the optical channels for excitation (by radiation from insertion devices or free electron laser) and detection of luminescence (i.e. primary and secondary monochromators). The set-up can be used both for 'conventional' spectroscopy of solids (reflec...

  12. Experimental demonstration of longitudinal beam phase space linearizer in a free-electron laser facility by corrugated structures

    CERN Document Server

    Deng, Haixiao; Feng, Chao; Zhang, Tong; Wang, Xingtao; Lan, Taihe; Feng, Lie; Zhang, Wenyan; Liu, Xiaoqing; Yao, Haifeng; Shen, Lei; Li, Bin; Zhang, Junqiang; Li, Xuan; Fang, Wencheng; Wang, Dan; Couprie, Marie-emmanuelle; Lin, Guoqiang; Liu, Bo; Gu, Qiang; Wang, Dong; Zhao, Zhentang

    2014-01-01

    Removal of residual linear energy chirp and intrinsic nonlinear energy curvature in the relativistic electron beam from radiofrequency linear accelerator is of paramount importance for efficient lasing of a high-gain free-electron laser. Recently, it was theoretically and experimentally demonstrated that the longitudinal wakefield excited by the electrons itself in the corrugated structure allows for precise control of the electron beam phase space. In this Letter, we report the first utilization of a corrugated structure as beam linearizer in the operation of a seeded free-electron laser driven by a 140 MeV linear accelerator, where a gain of ~10,000 over spontaneous emission was achieved at the second harmonic of the 1047 nm seed laser, and a free-electron laser bandwidth narrowing by about 50% was observed, in good agreement with the theoretical expectations.

  13. LASERIX: An open facility for developments of EUV and soft X-ray lasers and applications-Developments of XUV sources using high power laser facilities: ILE, ELI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ros, D., E-mail: david.ros@u-psud.fr [CLUPS-LUMAT, Universite Paris Sud 11-CNRS (France); LPGP, CNRS-Universite Paris Sud 11 (France); Cassou, K.; Cros, B.; Daboussi, S. [CLUPS-LUMAT, Universite Paris Sud 11-CNRS (France); LPGP, CNRS-Universite Paris Sud 11 (France); Demailly, J. [CLUPS-LUMAT, Universite Paris Sud 11-CNRS (France); Guilbaud, O.; Kazamias, S.; Lagron, J.-C. [CLUPS-LUMAT, Universite Paris Sud 11-CNRS (France); LPGP, CNRS-Universite Paris Sud 11 (France); Maynard, G. [LPGP, CNRS-Universite Paris Sud 11 (France); Neveu, O.; Pittman, M. [CLUPS-LUMAT, Universite Paris Sud 11-CNRS (France); LPGP, CNRS-Universite Paris Sud 11 (France); Zielbauer, B. [CLUPS-LUMAT, Universite Paris Sud 11-CNRS (France); LPGP, CNRS-Universite Paris Sud 11 (France); GSI Darmstadt (Germany); Zimmer, D. [CLUPS-LUMAT, Universite Paris Sud 11-CNRS (France); GSI Darmstadt (Germany); Kuhl, T. [GSI Darmstadt (Germany); Lacombe, S.; Porcel, E. [ISMO, CNRS-Universite Paris Sud 11 (France); Penhoat, M.-A. du [IMCP, Paris VI (France); Zeitoun, P. [LOA, ENSTA-Ecole Polytechnique-CNRS (France); Mourou, G. [ILE (France)

    2011-10-11

    LASERIX is a high-power laser facility leading to High-repetition-rate XUV laser pumped by Titanium:Sapphire laser. The aim of this laser facility is to offer Soft XRLs in the 30-7 nm range and auxiliary IR beam, which could also be used to produce synchronized XUV sources. In this contribution, the main results concerning both the development of XUV sources and their use for applications (irradiation of DNA samples) are presented, as well the present status and some perspectives for LASERIX.

  14. Demonstration of Single-Crystal Self-Seeded Two-Color X-Ray Free-Electron Lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lutman, A. A.; Decker, F. -J; Arthur, J.; Chollet, M.; Feng, Y.; Hastings, J.; Huang, Z.; Lemke, H.; Nuhn, H. -D.; Marinelli, A.; Turner, J. L.; Wakatsuki, S.; Welch, J.; Zhu, D.

    2014-12-18

    A scheme for generating two simultaneous hard-x-ray free-electron laser pulses with a controllable difference in photon energy is described and then demonstrated using the self-seeding setup at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). The scheme takes advantage of the existing LCLS equipment, which allows two independent rotations of the self-seeding diamond crystal. The two degrees of freedom are used to select two nearby crystal reflections, causing two wavelengths to be present in the forward transmitted seeding x-ray pulse. The free-electron laser system must support amplification at both desired wavelengths.

  15. High Repetition Rate Electron Beam RF-Acceleration and Sub-Millimeter Wave Generation Via a Free Electron Laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-02-14

    Period, Including Journal References: (a) D.B. McDermott, W.J. Nunan and N.C. Luhmann, Jr., "A High Duty Cycle, Compact 94 GHz Free Electron Laser...34 submitted to Journal IR and am-Waves. (b) W.J. Nunan , D.B. McDermott and N.C. Luhmann, Jr., "A High Repetition *Rate, Compact 94 GHz Free Electron Laser...34 Bulletin of the American Phy- * ) sical Society 30, 1543 (1985). L J (c) D.B. McDermott, W.J. Nunan and N.C. Luhmann, Jr., "A High RepetitionLL

  16. Femtosecond X-ray magnetic circular dichroism absorption spectroscopy at an X-ray free electron laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higley, Daniel J., E-mail: dhigley@stanford.edu; Yuan, Edwin [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Department of Applied Physics, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Hirsch, Konstantin; Dakovski, Georgi L.; Jal, Emmanuelle; Lutman, Alberto A.; Coslovich, Giacomo; Hart, Philip; Hoffmann, Matthias C.; Mitra, Ankush; Moeller, Stefan; Ohldag, Hendrik; Seaberg, Matthew; Stöhr, Joachim; Nuhn, Heinz-Dieter; Reid, Alex H.; Dürr, Hermann A.; Schlotter, William F. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Liu, Tianmin; MacArthur, James P. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Department of Physics, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); and others

    2016-03-15

    X-ray magnetic circular dichroism spectroscopy using an X-ray free electron laser is demonstrated with spectra over the Fe L{sub 3,2}-edges. The high brightness of the X-ray free electron laser combined with high accuracy detection of incident and transmitted X-rays enables ultrafast X-ray magnetic circular dichroism studies of unprecedented sensitivity. This new capability is applied to a study of all-optical magnetic switching dynamics of Fe and Gd magnetic sublattices in a GdFeCo thin film above its magnetization compensation temperature.

  17. Electron beam properties and impedance characterization for storage rings used for free electron lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dattoli, G.; Mezi, L.; Renieri, A. [ENEA, Divisione Fisica Applicata, Centro Ricerche Frascati, Frascati, RM (Italy); Migliorati, M. [Rome Univ. La Sapienza, Rome (Italy). Dipt. di Energetica; Couprie, M.E.; Garzella, D.; Nutarelli, D.; Thomas, C.; De Ninno, G. [Service de Photons, Atomes et Molecules DSM/DRECAM, Gif Sur Yvette (France); Walker, R. [Sincrotrone, Basorizza, TS (Italy)

    2000-07-01

    Good electron beam qualities and stability are the crucial features of Storage Rings dedicated to synchrotron radiation sources or to Free Electron Laser. Most of these characteristics depends on the coupling of the e-beam with the machine environment, which can be in turn modelled in terms of a characteristic impedance, whose absolute value and structure can be used to specify both the stability (longitudinal and transverse) of the beam and its qualities (energy spread, bunch length, peak current ...). In this paper are considered two specific examples of Storage Rings used for FEL operation and analyze their performances by means of semi analytical and numerical methods. The analysis is aimed at clarifying the dependence of beam energy spread and bunch length on beam current and at providing a set of parameters useful for the optimization of Free Electron Laser or synchrotron radiation sources. [Italian] La qualita' di fascio di un anello di accumulazione e la sua stabilita' sono le caratteristiche cruciali di un anello di accumulazione dedicato a sorgenti di Luce di Sincrotrone o al Laser ad Elettroni Liberi. La gran parte di tali caratteristiche dipende dall'accoppiamento del fascio di elettroni con la macchina stessa, tale accoppiamento puo' essere descritto in termini di una impedenza caratteristica, il cui valore assoluto e struttura possono essere utilizzati per specificarne sia la stabilita' del fascio (longitudinale e trasversale) e le sue qualita' (dispersione di energia, lunghezza del pacchetto, corrente di picco ...). In questo articolo si considerano due esempi specifici di anelli di accumulazione utilizzati per l'operazione Laser ed Elettroni Liberi e si analizzano le loro caratteristiche per mezzo di metodi semianalitici e numerici. L'analisi e' essenzialmente dedicata a chiarire la dipendenza della dispersione di energia e della lunghezza del pacchetto dalla corrente media e a fornire un insieme di

  18. Ultrafast XUV spectroscopy: Unveiling the nature of electronic couplings in molecular dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmers, Henry Robert

    Molecules are traditionally treated quantum mechanically using the Born-Oppenheimer formalism. In this formalism, different electronic states of the molecule are treated independently. However, most photo-initiated phenomena occurring in nature are driven by the couplings between different electronic states in both isolated molecules and molecular aggregates, and therefore occur beyond the Born-Oppenheimer formalism. These couplings are relevant in reactions relating to the perception of vision in the human eye, the oxidative damage and repair of DNA, the harvesting of light in photosynthesis, and the transfer of charge across large chains of molecules. While these reaction dynamics have traditionally been studied with visible and ultraviolet spectroscopy, attosecond XUV pulses formed through the process of high harmonic generation form a perfect tool for probing coupled electronic dynamics in molecules. In this thesis, I will present our work in using ultrafast, XUV spectroscopy to study these dynamics in molecules of increasing complexity. We begin by probing the relaxation dynamics of superexcited states in diatomic O 2. These states can relax via two types of electronic couplings, either through autoionization or neutral dissociation. We find that our pump-probe scheme can disentangle the two relaxation mechanisms and independently measure their contributing lifetimes. Next, we present our work in observing a coherent electron hole wavepacket initiated by the ionization of polyatomic CO 2 near a conical intersection. The electron-nuclear couplings near the conical intersection drive the electron hole between different orbital configurations. We find that we can not only measure the lifetime of quantum coherence in the electron hole wavepacket, but also control its evolution with a strong, infrared probing field. Finally, we propose an experiment to observe the migration of an electron hole across iodobenzene on the few-femtosecond timescale. We present

  19. Electron-beam confinement by rotational stabilization in a linear wiggler free electron laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedland, L.; Shefer, R.E. (Science Research Laboratory, Inc., Somerville, MA (USA))

    1990-11-15

    Finite radius electron-beam transport in a linear wiggler free-electron laser with a guide magnetic field is investigated. The addition of a guide magnetic field improves the beam confinement, but also leads to a detrimental drift in the direction transverse to the wiggler magnetic field. The introduction of a rotational transformation of the wiggler magnetic field is proposed to further improve the beam confinement. It is shown that the transformation results in a stable, uniform, solid body rotation of the beam provided (a) the guide field is larger than the amplitude of the wiggler field, (b) the electron drift velocity is much smaller than the rotation speed of the wiggler field as seen by the beam, and (c) the wiggler field rotates in the direction opposite to the direction of the electron gyromotion in the guide field. Theoretical predictions of the improvement of the radial beam transport with the introduction of the rotation of the wiggler field are confirmed in numerical simulations.

  20. Bunch decompression for laser-plasma driven free-electron laser demonstration schemes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Seggebrock

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available X-ray free-electron lasers (FELs require a very high electron beam quality in terms of emittance and energy spread. Since 2004 high quality electrons produced by laser-wakefield accelerators have been demonstrated, but the electron quality up to now did not allow the operation of a compact x-ray FEL using these electrons. Maier et al. [Phys. Rev. X 2, 031019 (2012PRXHAE2160-330810.1103/PhysRevX.2.031019] suggested a concept for a proof-of-principle experiment allowing FEL operation in the vacuum ultraviolet range based on an optimized undulator and bunch decompression using electron bunches from a laser-plasma accelerator as currently available. In this paper we discuss in more detail how a chicane can be used as a bunch stretcher instead of a bunch compressor to allow the operation of a laser-wakefield accelerator driven FEL using currently available electrons. A scaling characterizing the impact of bunch decompression on the gain length is derived and the feasibility of the concept is tested numerically in a demanding scenario.

  1. Superradiance driven by coherent spontaneous emission in a Cherenkov free-electron maser amplifier

    CERN Document Server

    Jaroszynski, D A; McNeil, B W J; Robb, G R M; Aitken, P; Phelps, A D R; Cross, A W; Ronald, K; Shpak, V G; Yalandin, M I; Ginzburg, N S

    2000-01-01

    Superradiance (SR) initiated by coherent spontaneous emission (CSE) has been studied in a 35 GHz high gain free-electron Cherenkov maser. We present experimental results that show the development of ultra-short pulses of radiation in the non-linear superradiant regime which are characterised by a quadratic dependence of the intensity on the current. The self-similar pulses that develop have a duration that scales inversely with the fourth root of the intensity leading to three cycle long pulses at the highest intensity (few MW). The non-linear SR regime is preceded by a stage of linear exponential growth of the microwave pulses with a gain length of 1 cm. The superradiant pulse is shown to evolve from a CSE seed by extrapolating the growth curve. Further confirmation of CSE has been obtained by varying the current pulse shape. By varying the slope of the leading edge, and thus the Fourier components of the longitudinal spectral density, we are able to vary the strength of the CSE source. We compare the experi...

  2. Extreme ultraviolet resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) at a seeded free-electron laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dell’Angela, M.; Hieke, F.; Malvestuto, M.; Sturari, L.; Bajt, S.; Kozhevnikov, I. V.; Ratanapreechachai, J.; Caretta, A.; Casarin, B.; Glerean, F.; Kalashnikova, A. M.; Pisarev, R. V.; Chuang, Y.-D.; Manzoni, G.; Cilento, F.; Mincigrucci, R.; Simoncig, A.; Principi, E.; Masciovecchio, C.; Raimondi, L.; Mahne, N.; Svetina, C.; Zangrando, M.; Passuello, R.; Gaio, G.; Prica, M.; Scarcia, M.; Kourousias, G.; Borghes, R.; Giannessi, L.; Wurth, W.; Parmigiani, F.

    2016-12-01

    In the past few years, we have been witnessing an increased interest for studying materials properties under non-equilibrium conditions. Several well established spectroscopies for experiments in the energy domain have been successfully adapted to the time domain with sub-picosecond time resolution. Here we show the realization of high resolution resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) with a stable ultrashort X-ray source such as an externally seeded free electron laser (FEL). We have designed and constructed a RIXS experimental endstation that allowed us to successfully measure the d-d excitations in KCoF3 single crystals at the cobalt M2,3-edge at FERMI FEL (Elettra-Sincrotrone Trieste, Italy). The FEL-RIXS spectra show an excellent agreement with the ones obtained from the same samples at the MERIXS endstation of the MERLIN beamline at the Advanced Light Source storage ring (Berkeley, USA). We established experimental protocols for performing time resolved RIXS experiments at a FEL source to avoid X ray-induced sample damage, while retaining comparable acquisition time to the synchrotron based measurements. Finally, we measured and modelled the influence of the FEL mixed electromagnetic modes, also present in externally seeded FELs, and the beam transport with ~120 meV experimental resolution achieved in the presented RIXS setup.

  3. X-ray free-electron lasers principles, properties and applications f*9493

    CERN Document Server

    Stöhr, J

    2002-01-01

    Creating matter from the vacuum, taking an atomic scale motion picture of a chemical process in a time of a few femtoseconds (1 fs = 10 sup - sup 1 sup 5 sec) or unraveling the complex molecular structure of a single protein or virus. These are some of the new exciting experiments envisioned with a novel radiation source, the X-ray free-electron laser (FEL). John Madey and collaborators built the first FEL in the 1970s. It is a powerful and challenging combination of particle accelerator and laser physics and technology. Until recently FELs have been operating at infrared or near ultraviolet wavelengths. A combination of theoretical, experimental, and technological advances has made possible their extension to the X-ray region. X rays have allowed us to see the invisible for almost a century. With their help we have been making great progress in understanding the properties of materials and of living systems. Today the best sources of X rays utilize synchrotron radiation from relativistic electron beams in st...

  4. Fresh-slice multicolour X-ray free-electron lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutman, Alberto A.; Maxwell, Timothy J.; MacArthur, James P.; Guetg, Marc W.; Berrah, Nora; Coffee, Ryan N.; Ding, Yuantao; Huang, Zhirong; Marinelli, Agostino; Moeller, Stefan; Zemella, Johann C. U.

    2016-11-01

    X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) provide femtosecond X-ray pulses with a narrow energy bandwidth and unprecedented brightness. Ultrafast physical and chemical dynamics, initiated with a site-specific X-ray pulse, can be explored using XFELs with a second ultrashort X-ray probe pulse. However, existing double-pulse schemes are complicated, difficult to customize or provide only low-intensity pulses. Here we present the novel fresh-slice technique for multicolour pulse production, wherein different temporal slices of an electron bunch lase to saturation in separate undulator sections. This method combines electron bunch tailoring from a passive wakefield device with trajectory control to provide multicolour pulses. The fresh-slice scheme outperforms existing techniques at soft X-ray wavelengths. It produces femtosecond pulses with a power of tens of gigawatts and flexible colour separation. The pulse delay can be varied from temporal overlap to almost one picosecond. We also demonstrate the first three-colour XFEL and variably polarized two-colour pulses.

  5. Attosecond interferometry with self-amplified spontaneous emission of a free-electron laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usenko, Sergey; Przystawik, Andreas; Jakob, Markus Alexander; Lazzarino, Leslie Lamberto; Brenner, Günter; Toleikis, Sven; Haunhorst, Christian; Kip, Detlef; Laarmann, Tim

    2017-05-01

    Light-phase-sensitive techniques, such as coherent multidimensional spectroscopy, are well-established in a broad spectral range, already spanning from radio-frequencies in nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy to visible and ultraviolet wavelengths in nonlinear optics with table-top lasers. In these cases, the ability to tailor the phases of electromagnetic waves with high precision is essential. Here we achieve phase control of extreme-ultraviolet pulses from a free-electron laser (FEL) on the attosecond timescale in a Michelson-type all-reflective interferometric autocorrelator. By varying the relative phase of the generated pulse replicas with sub-cycle precision we observe the field interference, that is, the light-wave oscillation with a period of 129 as. The successful transfer of a powerful optical method towards short-wavelength FEL science and technology paves the way towards utilization of advanced nonlinear methodologies even at partially coherent soft X-ray FEL sources that rely on self-amplified spontaneous emission.

  6. Airborne megawatt class free-electron laser for defense and security

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roy Whitney; David Douglas; George Neil

    2005-03-01

    An airborne megawatt (MW) average power Free-Electron Laser (FEL) is now a possibility. In the process of shrinking the FEL parameters to fit on ship, a surprisingly lightweight and compact design has been achieved. There are multiple motivations for using a FEL for a high-power airborne system for Defense and Security: Diverse mission requirements can be met by a single system. The MW of light can be made available with any time structure for time periods from microseconds to hours, i.e. there is a nearly unlimited magazine. The wavelength of the light can be chosen to be from the far infrared (IR) to the near ultraviolet (UV) thereby best meeting mission requirements. The FEL light can be modulated for detecting the same pattern in the small fraction of light reflected from the target resulting in greatly enhanced targeting control. The entire MW class FEL including all of its subsystems can be carried by large commercial size airplanes or on an airship. Adequate electrical power can be generated on the plane or airship to run the FEL as long as the plane or airship has fuel to fly. The light from the FEL will work well with relay mirror systems. The required R&D to achieve the MW level is well understood. The coupling of the capabilities of an airborne FEL to diverse mission requirements provides unique opportunities.

  7. A tapered undulator experiment at the ELBE far infrared hybrid-resonator oscillator free electron laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asgekar, V; Lehnert, U; Michel, P

    2012-01-01

    A tapered undulator experiment was carried out at the ELBE far-infrared free electron laser (FEL). The oscillator FEL makes use of a hybrid optical resonator. The main motivation was to see whether the presence of a dispersive medium in the form of a waveguide in the resonator has any effect on the outcome. The FEL saturated power and the wavelength shifts have been measured as a function of both positive as well as negative undulator field amplitude tapering. In contrast to the typical high-gain FELs where positive tapering proves beneficial for the output power we observed an improvement of performance at negative taper. During the same experiments we studied the characteristics of the detuning curves. The width of the curves indicates a maximum small signal gain for zero taper while the output peak power increases with negative taper. The saturated power output, the detuning curve characteristics, and the wavelength shifts agrees with the theoretical predictions. Details of the experiment are presented.

  8. Angular correlations of photons from solution diffraction at a free-electron laser encode molecular structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derek Mendez

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available During X-ray exposure of a molecular solution, photons scattered from the same molecule are correlated. If molecular motion is insignificant during exposure, then differences in momentum transfer between correlated photons are direct measurements of the molecular structure. In conventional small- and wide-angle solution scattering, photon correlations are ignored. This report presents advances in a new biomolecular structural analysis technique, correlated X-ray scattering (CXS, which uses angular intensity correlations to recover hidden structural details from molecules in solution. Due to its intense rapid pulses, an X-ray free electron laser (XFEL is an excellent tool for CXS experiments. A protocol is outlined for analysis of a CXS data set comprising a total of half a million X-ray exposures of solutions of small gold nanoparticles recorded at the Spring-8 Ångström Compact XFEL facility (SACLA. From the scattered intensities and their correlations, two populations of nanoparticle domains within the solution are distinguished: small twinned, and large probably non-twinned domains. It is shown analytically how, in a solution measurement, twinning information is only accessible via intensity correlations, demonstrating how CXS reveals atomic-level information from a disordered solution of like molecules.

  9. 5 (Upgradable to 25 keV) Free Electron Laser (FEL) Facility

    CERN Document Server

    York, R C

    2013-01-01

    A Free Electron Laser (FEL) facility utilizing a recirculated Superconducting Radio Frequency (SRF) linear accelerator (linac) provides the opportunity to achieve about five times greater photon energy than an unrecirculated linac of similar cost. > A 4 GeV SRF, cw, electron linac can be used to drive an FEL producing 5 keV photons. The SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, a Department of Energy (DOE) Basic Energy Sciences (BES) laboratory, proposes to utilize a 4 GeV unrecirculated, SRF, linac in a segment of existing linac tunnel. > For an initial investment similar to that of the proposed SLAC strategy, a recirculated SRF linac system could deliver the 4 GeV electrons for photon energies of 5 keV and provide an upgrade path to photon energies of 25 keV. > Further support amounting to about a third of the initial investment would provide upgrade funds for additional SRF linac and cryogenic capacity sufficient to provide electron energies appropriate for 25 keV photons matching the European XFEL.

  10. Femtosecond Diffractive Imaging with a Soft-X-Ray Free-Electron Laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chapman, Henry N.; /LLNL, Livermore /UC, Davis; Barty, Anton: AUTHOR = Bogan, Michael J.; /LLNL, Livermore; Boutet, Sebastian; /LLNL, Livermore /SLAC /Uppsala U., Biomed. Ctr.; Frank, Matthias; Hau-Riege, Stefan P.; /LLNL, Livermore; Marchesini, Stefano; /LLNL, Livermore /UC, Davis; Woods, Bruce W.; Bajt, Sasa; Benner, W.Henry; /LLNL, Livermore; London, Richard A.; /LLNL, Livermore /UC, Davis; Plonjes, Elke; Kuhlmann, Marion; Treusch, Rolf; Dusterer, Stefan; Tschentscher, Thomas; Schneider, Jochen R.; /CERN; Spiller, Eberhard; /Spiller X-ray Optics, Livermore; Moller, Thomas; Bostedt, Christoph; Hoener, Matthias; /Berlin, Tech. U.; Shapiro, David A.; /UC, Davis /SLAC /Uppsala U. /LLNL, Livermore /Uppsala U. /Uppsala U. /SLAC /Uppsala U.

    2010-10-07

    Theory predicts that with an ultrashort and extremely bright coherent X-ray pulse, a single diffraction pattern may be recorded from a large macromolecule, a virus, or a cell before the sample explodes and turns into a plasma. Here we report the first experimental demonstration of this principle using the FLASH soft X-ray free-electron laser. An intense 25 fs, 4 x 10{sup 13} W/cm{sup 2} pulse, containing 10{sup 12} photons at 32 nm wavelength, produced a coherent diffraction pattern from a nano-structured non-periodic object, before destroying it at 60,000 K. A novel X-ray camera assured single photon detection sensitivity by filtering out parasitic scattering and plasma radiation. The reconstructed image, obtained directly from the coherent pattern by phase retrieval through oversampling, shows no measurable damage, and extends to diffraction-limited resolution. A three-dimensional data set may be assembled from such images when copies of a reproducible sample are exposed to the beam one by one.

  11. X-ray free-electron lasers: from dreams to reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellegrini, C.

    2016-12-01

    The brightness of x-ray sources has been increased one to ten billion times by x-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) that generate high intensity coherent photon pulses at wavelengths from nanometers to less than one angstrom and a duration of a few to 100 femtoseconds. For the first time XFELs allow for experimental exploration of the structure and dynamics of atomic and molecular systems at the angstrom-femtosecond space and time scale, creating new opportunities for scientific research in physics, chemistry, biology, material science and high energy density physics. This paper reviews the history of this development, concentrating on the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), the world’s first hard x-ray XFEL. It also presents the physical principles on which XFELs are based, their present status and future developments, together with some recent experimental results in physics, chemistry and biology. LCLS success has spurred the worldwide construction of more XFELs; SACLA in Japan, XFEL and FLASH in Germany, Swiss FEL, Korean XFEL, Fermi in Italy. The characteristics of these other sources are also discussed.

  12. Coherence Properties of Individual Femtosecond Pulses of an X-ray Free-Electron Laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vartanyants, I.A.; /DESY /Moscow Phys. Eng. Inst.; Singer, A.; Mancuso, A.P.; Yefanov, O.M.; /DESY; Sakdinawat, A.; Liu, Y.; Bang, E.; /UC, Berkeley; Williams, G.J.; /SLAC; Cadenazzi, G.; Abbey, B.; /Melbourne U.; Sinn, H.; /European XFEL, Hamburg; Attwood, D.; /UC, Berkeley; Nugent, K.A.; /Melbourne U.; Weckert, E.; /DESY; Wang, T.; Zhu, D.; Wu, B.; Graves, C.; Scherz, A.; Turner, J.J.; Schlotter, W.F.; /SLAC /LERMA, Ivry /Zurich, ETH /LBL, Berkeley /ANL, APS /Argonne /SLAC /LLNL, Livermore /Latrobe U. /SLAC /SLAC /European XFEL, Hamburg /SLAC /Hamburg U.

    2012-06-06

    Measurements of the spatial and temporal coherence of single, femtosecond x-ray pulses generated by the first hard x-ray free-electron laser, the Linac Coherent Light Source, are presented. Single-shot measurements were performed at 780 eV x-ray photon energy using apertures containing double pinholes in 'diffract-and-destroy' mode. We determined a coherence length of 17 {micro}m in the vertical direction, which is approximately the size of the focused Linac Coherent Light Source beam in the same direction. The analysis of the diffraction patterns produced by the pinholes with the largest separation yields an estimate of the temporal coherence time of 0.55 fs. We find that the total degree of transverse coherence is 56% and that the x-ray pulses are adequately described by two transverse coherent modes in each direction. This leads us to the conclusion that 78% of the total power is contained in the dominant mode.

  13. Resonator stability and higher-order modes in free-electron laser oscillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, Abhishek; Krishnagopal, Srinivas

    2014-08-01

    Three-dimensional simulation codes genesis and opc are used to investigate the dependence of the resonator stability of free-electron laser (FEL) oscillators on the stability parameter, laser wavelength, outcoupling hole size and mirror tilt. We find that to have stable lasing over a wide range of wavelengths, the FEL cavity configuration should be carefully chosen. Broadly, the concentric configuration gives near-Gaussian modes and the best performance. At intermediate configurations the dominant mode often switches to a higher-order mode, which kills lasing. For the same reason, the outcoupled power can also be less. We have constructed a simple analytic model to study resonator stability which gives results that are in excellent agreement with the simulations. This suggests that modes in FEL oscillators are determined more by the cavity configuration and radiation propagation than by the details of the FEL interaction. We find (as in experiments at the CLIO FEL) that tilting the mirror can, for some configurations, lead to more outcoupled power than a perfectly aligned mirror because the mode is now a more compact higher-order mode, which may have implications for the mode quality for user experiments. Finally, we show that the higher-order mode obtained is usually a single Gauss-Laguerre mode, and therefore it should be possible to filter out the mode using suitable intracavity elements, leading to better FEL performance.

  14. Slippage effect on laser phase error amplification in seeded harmonic generation free-electron lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Feng, Chao; Wang, Guanglei; Wang, Dong; Xiang, Dao; Zhao, Zhentang

    2013-01-01

    Free-electron lasers (FELs) seeded with external lasers hold great promise for generating high power radiation with nearly transform-limited bandwidth in soft x-ray region. However, it has been pointed out that the initial seed laser noise will be amplified by the frequency up-conversion process, which may degrade the quality of the output radiation produced by a harmonic generation scheme. In this paper, theoretical and simulation studies for laser phase error amplification in seeded FEL schemes with slippage effect taken into account are presented. It is found that, the seed laser imperfection experienced by the electron beam can be significantly smoothed by the slippage effect in the modulator when the slippage length is comparable to the laser pulse length. This smoothing effect allows one to preserve the excellent temporal coherence of seeded FELs in presence of large laser phase errors. For ultra-short UV seed lasers with FWHM around 16 fs, the slippage length in a modulator with ~30 undulator periods i...

  15. A Proof-of-Principle Echo-enabled Harmonic Generation Free Electron Laser Experiment at SLAC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pernet, Pierre-Louis [Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2010-06-24

    With the advent of X-ray Free Electron Lasers (FELs), new methods have been developed to extend capabilities at short wavelengths beyond Self-Amplified Spontaneous Emission (SASE). In particular, seeding of a FEL allows for temporal control of the radiation pulse and increases the peak brightness by orders of magnitude. Most recently, Gennady Stupakov and colleagues at SLAC proposed a new technique: Echo-Enabled Harmonic Generation (EEHG). Here a laser microbunches the beam in an undulator and the beam is sheared in a chicane. This process is repeated with a second laser, undulator and chicane. The interplay between these allows a seeding of the X-ray laser up to the 100th harmonic of the first laser. After introducing the physics of FELs and the EEHG seeding technique, we describe contributions to the experimental effort. We will present detailed studies of the experiment including the choice of parameters and their optimization, the emittance effect, spontaneous emission in the undulators, the second laser phase effect, and measurements of the jitter between RF stations. Finally, the status and preliminary results of the Echo-7 experiment will be outlined.

  16. Imaging the He2 quantum halo state using a free electron laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeller, Stefan; Kunitski, Maksim; Voigtsberger, Jörg; Kalinin, Anton; Schottelius, Alexander; Schober, Carl; Waitz, Markus; Sann, Hendrik; Hartung, Alexander; Bauer, Tobias; Pitzer, Martin; Trinter, Florian; Goihl, Christoph; Janke, Christian; Richter, Martin; Kastirke, Gregor; Weller, Miriam; Czasch, Achim; Kitzler, Markus; Braune, Markus; Grisenti, Robert E.; Schöllkopf, Wieland; Schmidt, Lothar Ph. H.; Schöffler, Markus S.; Williams, Joshua B.; Jahnke, Till; Dörner, Reinhard

    2016-12-01

    Quantum tunneling is a ubiquitous phenomenon in nature and crucial for many technological applications. It allows quantum particles to reach regions in space which are energetically not accessible according to classical mechanics. In this “tunneling region,” the particle density is known to decay exponentially. This behavior is universal across all energy scales from nuclear physics to chemistry and solid state systems. Although typically only a small fraction of a particle wavefunction extends into the tunneling region, we present here an extreme quantum system: a gigantic molecule consisting of two helium atoms, with an 80% probability that its two nuclei will be found in this classical forbidden region. This circumstance allows us to directly image the exponentially decaying density of a tunneling particle, which we achieved for over two orders of magnitude. Imaging a tunneling particle shows one of the few features of our world that is truly universal: the probability to find one of the constituents of bound matter far away is never zero but decreases exponentially. The results were obtained by Coulomb explosion imaging using a free electron laser and furthermore yielded He2’s binding energy of 151.9±13.3151.9±13.3 neV, which is in agreement with most recent calculations.

  17. First demonstration of a free-electron laser driven by electrons from a laser irradiated photocathode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtin, Mark; Bennett, Glenn; Burke, Robert; Benson, Stephen; Madey, J. M. J.

    Results are reported from the first observation of a free-electron laser (FEL) driven by an electron beam from a laser-irradiated photocathode. The Rocketdyne/Stanford FEL achieved sustained oscillations lasting over three hours and driven by photoelectrons accelerated by the Stanford Mark III radio-frequency linac. A LaB6 cathode, irradiated by a tripled Nd:YAG mode-locked drive laser, is the source of the photoelectrons. The drive laser, operating at 95.2 MHz, is phase-locked to the 30th subharmonic of the S-band linac. Peak currents in excess of 125 amps are observed and delivered to the Rocketdyne two-meter undulator, which is operated as a stand-alone oscillator. The electron beam has an energy spread of 0.8 percent (FWHM) at 38.5 MeV and an emittance, at the undulator, comparable to that observed for thermionic operation of the electron source. Small signal gain in excess of 150 percent is observed. Preliminary estimates of the electron beam brightness deliverable to the undulator range from 3.5 to 5.0 x 10 to the 11 amps/sq m.

  18. Compact compressive arc and beam switchyard for energy recovery linac-driven ultraviolet free electron lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akkermans, J. A. G.; Di Mitri, S.; Douglas, D.; Setija, I. D.

    2017-08-01

    High gain free electron lasers (FELs) driven by high repetition rate recirculating accelerators have received considerable attention in the scientific and industrial communities in recent years. Cost-performance optimization of such facilities encourages limiting machine size and complexity, and a compact machine can be realized by combining bending and bunch length compression during the last stage of recirculation, just before lasing. The impact of coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) on electron beam quality during compression can, however, limit FEL output power. When methods to counteract CSR are implemented, appropriate beam diagnostics become critical to ensure that the target beam parameters are met before lasing, as well as to guarantee reliable, predictable performance and rapid machine setup and recovery. This article describes a beam line for bunch compression and recirculation, and beam switchyard accessing a diagnostic line for EUV lasing at 1 GeV beam energy. The footprint is modest, with 12 m compressive arc diameter and ˜20 m diagnostic line length. The design limits beam quality degradation due to CSR both in the compressor and in the switchyard. Advantages and drawbacks of two switchyard lines providing, respectively, off-line and on-line measurements are discussed. The entire design is scalable to different beam energies and charges.

  19. Batch crystallization of rhodopsin for structural dynamics using an X-ray free-electron laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wenting; Nogly, Przemyslaw; Rheinberger, Jan; Kick, Leonhard M; Gati, Cornelius; Nelson, Garrett; Deupi, Xavier; Standfuss, Jörg; Schertler, Gebhard; Panneels, Valérie

    2015-07-01

    Rhodopsin is a membrane protein from the G protein-coupled receptor family. Together with its ligand retinal, it forms the visual pigment responsible for night vision. In order to perform ultrafast dynamics studies, a time-resolved serial femtosecond crystallography method is required owing to the nonreversible activation of rhodopsin. In such an approach, microcrystals in suspension are delivered into the X-ray pulses of an X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) after a precise photoactivation delay. Here, a millilitre batch production of high-density microcrystals was developed by four methodical conversion steps starting from known vapour-diffusion crystallization protocols: (i) screening the low-salt crystallization conditions preferred for serial crystallography by vapour diffusion, (ii) optimization of batch crystallization, (iii) testing the crystal size and quality using second-harmonic generation (SHG) imaging and X-ray powder diffraction and (iv) production of millilitres of rhodopsin crystal suspension in batches for serial crystallography tests; these crystals diffracted at an XFEL at the Linac Coherent Light Source using a liquid-jet setup.

  20. The Most Accredited English Language Free Electronic Journals in Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    farshid Danesh

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Finding free e-journals is very difficult in web environment, because these types of journals are all scattered and they are rarely found in traditional bibliographic sources. Therefore, locating and their retrieval are hard. Then it is not easy to disseminate the accredited ones. The aim of this study was to determine the most accredited free English e-journals in medical sciences. The research methods were content and link analysis. In order to collect the data, a checklist has been used which its validity has been confirmed. The research population consisted of 700 free electronic journals of medical sciences which were collected from two reputable websites. Using qualitative study on the websites of these journals, the number of eligible journals in this research decreased to 269 journals. In the next step, Journals' websites has been analyzed with webometrics methods. Then, utilizing core journal formula, the accredited ones were determined. Results showed that "New South Wales Public Health Bulletin" in Health, "Online Journal of Rural Nursing and Health Care" in Nursery, "BMC Oral Health" in Dentistry and "Brazilian Journal of Medical and Biological Research" in Medicine were the most accredited journals in term of in links. Also, "International Journal of Integrated Care" in Health, "BMC Nursing" in Nursery, "Journal of Oral Science" in Dentistry, "The New York State Dental Journal" and "Journal of Oral Science" were the top free e-journals in term of web impact factor.

  1. Electron trajectories and growth rates of the plasma wave pumped free-electron laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafari, S.; Jafarinia, F.; Nilkar, M.; Amiri, M.

    2014-12-01

    A theory for a plasma wave wiggler has been described which employs the plasma whistler wave for producing laser radiation in a free-electron laser (FEL). While electromagnetically pumped FELs have been proven to be an effective means generating short wavelengths, practical difficulties occur in the design of these wigglers. For this reason, it is found that a plasma wave wiggler can be employed in concept with an electromagnetic wave wiggler due to both higher tunability and holding the focus of pump wave and e-beam over a significant distance to achieve a suitable amplification. Plasma in the presence of static magnetic field supports a plasma whistler wave. The plasma wiggler period can be tuned by varying the plasma density and/or ambient magnetic field. Electron trajectories have been analyzed using single particle dynamics and regimes of orbital stability have been demonstrated. A polynomial dispersion relation for electromagnetic and space-charge waves has then been derived, analytically. Numerical studies of the dispersion relation reveal that the growth rates are sensitive functions of the cyclotron frequency. It has been shown that by increasing the axial magnetic field strength (or cyclotron frequency), the growth rate for groups I and III orbits increases, while a growth decrement has been obtained for groups II and IV orbits.

  2. Femtosecond Diffractive Imaging with a Soft-X-ray Free-Electron Laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chapman, H N; Barty, A; Bogan, M; Boutet, S; Frank, M; Hau-Riege, S P; Marchesini, S; Woods, B; Bajt, S; Benner, W H; London, R; Ploenjes-Palm, E; Kuhlmann, M; Treusch, R; Dusterer, S; Tschentscher, T; Schneider, J; Spiller, E; Moller, T; Bostedt, C; Hoener, M; Shapiro, D; Hodgson, K O; der Spoel, D v; Burmeister, F; Bergh, M; Caleman, C; Huldt, G; Seibert, M; Maia, F; Lee, R; Szoke, A; Timneanu, N; Hajdu, J

    2006-03-13

    Theory predicts that with an ultrashort and extremely bright coherent X-ray pulse, a single diffraction pattern may be recorded from a large macromolecule, a virus, or a cell before the sample explodes and turns into a plasma. Here we report the first experimental demonstration of this principle using the FLASH soft X-ray free-electron laser. An intense 25 fs, 4 x 10{sup 13} W/cm{sup 2} pulse, containing 10{sup 12} photons at 32 nm wavelength, produced a coherent diffraction pattern from a nano-structured non-periodic object, before destroying it at 60,000 K. A novel X-ray camera assured single photon detection sensitivity by filtering out parasitic scattering and plasma radiation. The reconstructed image, obtained directly from the coherent pattern by phase retrieval through oversampling, shows no measurable damage, and extends to diffraction-limited resolution. A three-dimensional data set may be assembled from such images when copies of a reproducible sample are exposed to the beam one by one.

  3. Statistical properties of a free-electron laser revealed by the Hanbury Brown and Twiss interferometry

    CERN Document Server

    Gorobtsov, O Yu; Brenner, G; Lorenz, U; Gerasimova, N; Kurta, R P; Hieke, F; Skopintsev, P; Zaluzhnyy, I; Lazarev, S; Dzhigaev, D; Rose, M; Singer, A; Wurth, W; Vartanyants, I A

    2016-01-01

    We present a comprehensive experimental analysis of statistical properties of the self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) free-electron laser (FEL) FLASH at DESY in Hamburg by means of Hanbury Brown and Twiss (HBT) interferometry. The experiments were performed at the FEL wavelengths of 5.5 nm, 13.4 nm, and 20.8 nm. We determined the 2-nd order intensity correlation function for all wavelengths and different operation conditions of FLASH. In all experiments a high degree of spatial coherence (above 50%) was obtained. Our analysis performed in spatial and spectral domains provided us with the independent measurements of an average pulse duration of the FEL that were below 60 fs. To explain complicated behaviour of the 2-nd order intensity correlation function we developed advanced theoretical model that includes the presence of multiple beams and external positional jitter of the FEL pulses. By this analysis we determined that in most experiments several beams were present in radiating field and in one of t...

  4. Compact compressive arc and beam switchyard for energy recovery linac-driven ultraviolet free electron lasers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. A. G. Akkermans

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available High gain free electron lasers (FELs driven by high repetition rate recirculating accelerators have received considerable attention in the scientific and industrial communities in recent years. Cost-performance optimization of such facilities encourages limiting machine size and complexity, and a compact machine can be realized by combining bending and bunch length compression during the last stage of recirculation, just before lasing. The impact of coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR on electron beam quality during compression can, however, limit FEL output power. When methods to counteract CSR are implemented, appropriate beam diagnostics become critical to ensure that the target beam parameters are met before lasing, as well as to guarantee reliable, predictable performance and rapid machine setup and recovery. This article describes a beam line for bunch compression and recirculation, and beam switchyard accessing a diagnostic line for EUV lasing at 1 GeV beam energy. The footprint is modest, with 12 m compressive arc diameter and ∼20  m diagnostic line length. The design limits beam quality degradation due to CSR both in the compressor and in the switchyard. Advantages and drawbacks of two switchyard lines providing, respectively, off-line and on-line measurements are discussed. The entire design is scalable to different beam energies and charges.

  5. Beyond the Standard Model – Searches with a Free-Electron Laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. Afanasev, O.K. Baker, K.B. Beard, G. Biallas, J. Boyce, M. Minarni, R. Ramdon, Michelle D. Shinn, P. Slocumb

    2010-02-01

    Much of the focus of Beyond the Standard Model physics searches is on the TeV scale, making use of hadron and lepton colliders. Additionally, however, there is the means to make these searches in different regions of parameter space using sub-electron volt photons from a Free Electron Laser, for example. We report on the experimental results of searches for opticalwavelength photons mixing with hypothetical hidden-sector paraphotons in the mass range between 10^-5 and 10^-2 electron volts for a mixing parameter greater than 10-7. We also report on the results of a sensitive search for scalar coupling of photons to light neutral bosons in the mass range of approximately 1.0 milli-electron volts and coupling strength greater than 10-6 GeV-1. These were generation-regeneration experiments using the “light shining through a wall” technique in which regenerated photons are searched for downstream of an optical barrier that separates it from an upstream generation region. The present results indicate no evidence for photon-paraphoton mixing or for scalar couplings of bosons to photons for the range of parameters investigated.

  6. Medical Application of Free Electron Laser Trasmittance using Hollow Optical Fiber

    CERN Document Server

    Suzuki, Sachiko; Ishii, Katsonuri

    2004-01-01

    Mid-infrared Free Electron Laser (FEL) is expected as new application for biomedical surgery. However, delivery of MIR-FEL into the body is difficult because the common glass optical fibers have strong absorption at MIR region. A good operational and flexible line for FEL is required at medical field. A Hollow optical fiber is developed for IR laser and high-power laser delivery. We evaluated the fiber for FEL transmission line. This fiber is coated with cyclic olefin polymer (COP) and silver thin film on the inside of glass capillary tube. It is 700 μm-bore and 1m in lengths. The fiber transmission loss of the measured wavelength region of 5.5 μm to 12 μm is less than 1dB/m when the fiber is straight and 1.2 dB/m when bent to radius of 20 cm. Additionally, the output beam profile and the pulse structure is not so different form incidence beam. In conclusion, the fiber is suitable for delivery of the FEL energy for applications in medical and laser surgery.

  7. Pair production from vacuum at the focus of an X-ray free electron laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ringwald, A.

    2000-03-01

    There are definite plans for the construction of X-ray free electron lasers (FEL), both at DESY, where the so-called XFEL is part of the design of the electron-positron linear collider TESLA, as well as at SLAC, where the so-called Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) has been proposed. Such an X-ray laser would allow for high-field science applications: One could make use of not only the high energy and transverse coherence of the X-ray beam, but also of the possibility of focusing it to a spot with a small radius, hopefully in the range of the laser wavelength. Along this route one obtains very large electric fields, much larger than those obtainable with any optical laser of the same power. In this letter we discuss the possibility of obtaining an electric field so high that electron-positron pairs are spontaneously produced in vacuum (Schwinger pair production). We find that if X-ray optics can be improved to approach the diffraction limit of focusing, and if the power of the planned X-ray FELs can be increased to the terawatt region, then there is ample room for an investigation of the Schwinger pair production mechanism. (orig.)

  8. Pair production from vacuum at the focus of an X-ray free electron laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringwald, A.

    2001-06-01

    There are definite plans for the construction of X-ray free electron lasers (FEL), both at DESY, where the so-called XFEL is part of the design of the electron-positron linear collider TESLA, as well as at SLAC, where the so-called Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) has been proposed. Such an X-ray laser would allow for high-field science applications: one could make use of not only the high energy and transverse coherence of the X-ray beam, but also of the possibility of focusing it to a spot with a small radius, hopefully in the range of the laser wavelength. Along this route one obtains very large electric fields, much larger than those obtainable with any optical laser of the same power. In this Letter we discuss the possibility of obtaining an electric field so high that electron-positron pairs are spontaneously produced in vacuum (Schwinger pair production). We find that if X-ray optics can be improved to approach the diffraction limit of focusing, and if the power of the planned X-ray FELs can be increased to the terawatt region, then there is ample room for an investigation of the Schwinger pair production mechanism.

  9. Free-electron laser based resonant inelastic X-ray scattering on molecules and liquids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kunnus, Kristjan, E-mail: kkunnus@stanford.edu [Institute for Methods and Instrumentation for Synchrotron Radiation Research, Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin GmbH, Albert-Einstein-Str. 15, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Institut für Physik und Astronomie, Universität Potsdam, Karl-Liebknecht-Str. 24/25, 14476 Potsdam (Germany); Schreck, Simon; Föhlisch, Alexander [Institute for Methods and Instrumentation for Synchrotron Radiation Research, Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin GmbH, Albert-Einstein-Str. 15, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Institut für Physik und Astronomie, Universität Potsdam, Karl-Liebknecht-Str. 24/25, 14476 Potsdam (Germany)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • Femtosecond time-resolved RIXS can be used to follow charge, spin and structural dynamics of dilute solute molecules in solution. • Ultrashort X-ray pulses allow probing of highly radiation sensitive states of matter. • Nonlinear X-ray probes provide an enhanced selectivity and sensitivity as well as a path to control radiation damage and increase the photon yields in RIXS experiments. - Abstract: The unprecedented beam properties of free-electron laser based X-ray sources enable novel resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) experiments. Femtosecond time-resolved RIXS can be used to follow charge, spin and structural dynamics of dilute solute molecules in solution. Ultrashort X-ray pulses allow probing of highly radiation sensitive states of matter such as the metastable phase of supercooled liquid water. Nonlinear X-ray probes like amplified spontaneous emission and stimulated resonant X-ray scattering provide an enhanced selectivity and sensitivity as well as a path to control radiation damage and increase the photon yields in RIXS experiments.

  10. Structural biology at the European X-ray free-electron laser facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altarelli, Massimo; Mancuso, Adrian P

    2014-07-17

    The European X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) facility, under construction in the Hamburg region, will provide high-peak brilliance (greater than 10(33) photons s(-1) mm(-2) mrad(-2) per 0.1% BW), ultrashort pulses (approx. 10 fs) of X-rays, with a high repetition rate (up to 27 000 pulses s(-1)) from 2016 onwards. The main features of this exceptional X-ray source, and the instrumentation developments necessary to exploit them fully, for application to a variety of scientific disciplines, are briefly summarized. In the case of structural biology, that has a central role in the scientific case of this new facility, the instruments and ancillary laboratories that are being planned and built within the baseline programme of the European XFEL and by consortia of users are also discussed. It is expected that the unique features of the source and the advanced features of the instrumentation will allow operation modes with more efficient use of sample materials, faster acquisition times, and conditions better approaching feasibility of single molecule imaging.

  11. Theoretical study of a waveguide THz free electron laser and comparisons with simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shobuda, Yoshihiro; Chin, Yong Ho

    2016-09-01

    In a so-called waveguide free electron laser (FEL) for THz radiations, an extremely small aperture (˜mm ) waveguide is used to confine angularly wide spread radiation fields from a low energy electron beam into a small area. This confinement increases the interaction between the electron beam and the radiation fields to achieve a much higher FEL gain. The radiation fields propagate inside the waveguide as waveguide modes, not like a light flux in a free space FEL. This characteristic behavior of the radiation fields makes intuitive understanding of the waveguide FEL difficult. We developed a three-dimensional waveguide FEL theory to calculate a gain of THz waveguide FEL including the effects of the energy spread, the beam size and the betatron oscillations of an electron beam, and effects of a rectangular waveguide. The FEL gain can be calculated as a function of frequency by solving the dispersion relation. Theoretical gains are compared with simulation results for a waveguide FEL with a planar undulator similar to the KAERI one. Good agreements are obtained.

  12. Coherence Properties of Individual Femtosecond Pulses of an X-ray Free-Electron Laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vartanyants, I.A.; /DESY /Moscow Phys. Eng. Inst.; Singer, A.; Mancuso, A.P.; Yefanov, O.M.; /DESY; Sakdinawat, A.; Liu, Y.; Bang, E.; /UC, Berkeley; Williams, G.J.; /SLAC; Cadenazzi, G.; Abbey, B.; /Melbourne U.; Sinn, H.; /European XFEL, Hamburg; Attwood, D.; /UC, Berkeley; Nugent, K.A.; /Melbourne U.; Weckert, E.; /DESY; Wang, T.; Zhu, D.; Wu, B.; Graves, C.; Scherz, A.; Turner, J.J.; Schlotter, W.F.; /SLAC /LERMA, Ivry /Zurich, ETH /LBL, Berkeley /ANL, APS /Argonne /SLAC /LLNL, Livermore /Latrobe U. /SLAC /SLAC /European XFEL, Hamburg /SLAC /Hamburg U.

    2012-06-06

    Measurements of the spatial and temporal coherence of single, femtosecond x-ray pulses generated by the first hard x-ray free-electron laser, the Linac Coherent Light Source, are presented. Single-shot measurements were performed at 780 eV x-ray photon energy using apertures containing double pinholes in 'diffract-and-destroy' mode. We determined a coherence length of 17 {micro}m in the vertical direction, which is approximately the size of the focused Linac Coherent Light Source beam in the same direction. The analysis of the diffraction patterns produced by the pinholes with the largest separation yields an estimate of the temporal coherence time of 0.55 fs. We find that the total degree of transverse coherence is 56% and that the x-ray pulses are adequately described by two transverse coherent modes in each direction. This leads us to the conclusion that 78% of the total power is contained in the dominant mode.

  13. Reversible electron beam heating for suppression of microbunching instabilities at free-electron lasers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Behrens

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The presence of microbunching instabilities due to the compression of high-brightness electron beams at existing and future x-ray free-electron lasers (FELs results in restrictions on the attainable lasing performance and renders beam imaging with optical transition radiation impossible. The instability can be suppressed by introducing additional energy spread, i.e., heating the electron beam, as demonstrated by the successful operation of the laser heater system at the Linac Coherent Light Source. The increased energy spread is typically tolerable for self-amplified spontaneous emission FELs but limits the effectiveness of advanced FEL schemes such as seeding. In this paper, we present a reversible electron beam heating system based on two transverse deflecting radio-frequency structures (TDSs upstream and downstream of a magnetic bunch compressor chicane. The additional energy spread is introduced in the first TDS, which suppresses the microbunching instability, and then is eliminated in the second TDS. We show the feasibility of the microbunching gain suppression based on calculations and simulations including the effects of coherent synchrotron radiation. Acceptable electron beam and radio-frequency jitter are identified, and inherent options for diagnostics and on-line monitoring of the electron beam’s longitudinal phase space are discussed.

  14. Thermocathode radio-frequency gun for the Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics free-electron laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkov, V.; Getmanov, Ya.; Kenjebulatov, E.; Kolobanov, E.; Krutikhin, S.; Kurkin, G.; Ovchar, V.; Petrov, V. M.; Sedlyarov, I.

    2016-12-01

    A radio-frequency (RF) gun for a race-track microtron-recuperator injector driving the free-electron laser (FEL) (Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics) is being tested at a special stand. Electron bunches of the RF gun have an energy of up to 300 keV and a repetition rate of up to 90 MHz. The average electro-beam current can reach 100 mA in the continuous operation regime. The advantages of the new injector are as follows: long lifetime of the cathode for high average beam current; simple scheme of longitudinal beam bunching, which does not require an additional bunching resonator in the injector; absence of dark-current contamination of the injector beam; and comfortable RF gun operation due to the absence of a high potential of 300 kV at the cathode control circuits. In this study we describe the RF gun design, present the main characteristics of the injector with the RF gun, and give the results of testing.

  15. Low-frequency wiggler modes in the free-electron laser with a dusty magnetoplasma medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafari, S.

    2015-07-01

    An advanced incremental scheme for generating tunable coherent radiation in a free-electron laser has been presented: the basic concept is the use of a relativistic electron beam propagating through a magnetized dusty plasma channel where dust helicon, dust Alfven and coupled dust cyclotron-Alfven waves can play a role as a low-frequency wiggler, triggering coherent emissions. The wiggler wavelength at the sub-mm level allows one to reach the wavelength range from a few nm down to a few Å with moderately relativistic electrons of kinetic energies of a few tens/hundreds of MeV. The laser gain and the effects of beam self-electric and self-magnetic fields on the gain have been estimated and compared with findings of the helical magnetic and electromagnetic wigglers in vacuum. To study the chaotic regions of the electron motion in the dusty plasma wave wiggler, a time independent Hamiltonian has been obtained. The Poincare surface of a section map has been used numerically to analyze the nonintegrable system where chaotic regions in phase-space emerge. This concept opens a path toward a new generation of synchrotron sources based on compact plasma structures.

  16. Integrating a Machine Protection System for High-Current Free Electron Lasers and Energy Recovery Linacs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trent Allison; James Coleman; Richard Evans; Al Grippo; Kevin Jordan

    2002-09-01

    A fully integrated Machine Protection System (MPS) is critical to efficient commissioning and safe operation of all high-current accelerators. The MPS needs to monitor the status of all devices that could enter the beam path, the beam loss monitors (BLMs), magnet settings, beam dump status, etc. This information is then presented to the electron source controller, which must limit the beam power or shut down the beam completely. The MPS for the energy recovery linac (ERL) at the Jefferson Lab Free Electron Laser [1] generates eight different power limits, or beam modes, which are passed to the drive laser pulse controller (DLPC) (photocathode source controller). These range from no beam to nearly 2 megawatts of electron beam power. Automatic masking is used for the BLMs during low-power modes when one might be using beam viewers. The system also reviews the setup for the two different beamlines, the IR path or the UV path, and will allow or disallow operations based on magnet settings and valve positions. This paper will describe the approach taken for the JLab 10-kW FEL. Additional details can be found on our website http://laser.jlab.org [2].

  17. Isotope separation of silicon and molybdenum using a free electron laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noda, Tetsuji E-mail: noda.tetsuji@nims.go.jp; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Araki, Hiroshi; Lyman, John L.; Newnam, Brian E

    2002-12-01

    The isotope separation of silicon and molybdenum was studied with a free electron laser (FEL). The FEL was used to irradiate flowing Si{sub 2}F{sub 6} between 1000 and 800 cm{sup -1} wavenumbers and to irradiate MoF{sub 6} at 740 cm{sup -1}. Enrichments of {sup 29}Si and {sup 30}Si were detected by 1000 cm{sup -1} irradiation. A similar tendency with the {sup 29}Si and {sup 30}Si concentration as a function of the wavenumber resulted with a CO{sub 2} laser irradiation. The maximum concentration occurred at around 950-955 cm{sup -1} for {sup 30}Si and 960 cm{sup -1} for {sup 29}Si. The concentration of {sup 29}Si was also detected at 800 cm{sup -1} band. {sup 98}MoF{sub 6} and {sup 100}MoF{sub 6} were selectively decomposed and {sup 92}Mo and {sup 94}Mo were concentrated in the residual gas after the FEL irradiation at 728 cm{sup -1} but the enrichment was small.

  18. Destruction-and-diffraction by X-ray free-electron laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jimin

    2016-09-01

    It is common knowledge that macromolecular crystals are damaged by the X-rays they are exposed to during conventional data collection. One of the claims made about the crystallographic data collection now being collected using X-ray free-electron lasers (XFEL) is that they are unaffected by radiation damage. XFEL data sets are assembled by merging data obtained from a very large number of crystals, each of which is exposed to a single femtosecond pulse of radiation, the duration of which is so short that diffraction occurs before the damage done to the crystal has time to become manifest, i.e. "diffraction-before-destruction." However, recent theoretical studies have shown that many of the elemental electronic processes that ultimately result in the destruction of such crystals occur during a single pulse. It is predicted that the amplitudes of atomic scattering factor could be reduced by as much as 75% within the first 5 femtoseconds of such pulses, and that different atoms will respond in different ways. Experimental evidence is provided here that these predictions are correct. © 2016 The Protein Society.

  19. Beam energy distribution influences on density modulation efficiency in seeded free-electron lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Guanglei; Deng, Haixiao; Zhang, Weiqing; Wu, Guorong; Dai, Dongxu; Wang, Dong; Zhao, Zhentang; Yang, Xueming

    2015-01-01

    The beam energy spread at the entrance of undulator system is of paramount importance for efficient density modulation in high-gain seeded free-electron lasers (FELs). In this paper, the dependences of high harmonic micro-bunching in the high-gain harmonic generation (HGHG), echo-enabled harmonic generation (EEHG) and phase-merging enhanced harmonic generation (PEHG) schemes on the electron energy spread distribution are studied. Theoretical investigations and multi-dimensional numerical simulations are applied to the cases of uniform and saddle beam energy distributions and compared to a traditional Gaussian distribution. It shows that the uniform and saddle electron energy distributions significantly enhance the performance of HGHG-FELs, while they almost have no influence on EEHG and PEHG schemes. A numerical example demonstrates that, with about 84keV RMS uniform and/or saddle slice energy spread, the 30th harmonic radiation can be directly generated by a single-stage seeding scheme for a soft x-ray FEL f...

  20. Analytic model of bunched beams for harmonic generation in thelow-gain free electron laser regime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Penn, G.; Reinsch, M.; Wurtele, J.S.

    2006-02-20

    One scheme for harmonic generation employs free electron lasers (FELs) with two undulators: the first uses a seed laser to modulate the energy of the electron beam; following a dispersive element which acts to bunch the beam, the second undulator radiates at a higher harmonic. These processes are currently evaluated using extensive calculations or simulation codes which can be slow to evaluate and difficult to set up. We describe a simple algorithm to predict the output of a harmonic generation beamline in the low-gain FEL regime, based on trial functions for the output radiation. Full three-dimensional effects are included. This method has been implemented as a Mathematica package, named CAMPANILE, which runs rapidly and can be generalized to include effects such as asymmetric beams and misalignments. This method is compared with simulation results using the FEL code GENESIS, both for single stages of harmonic generation and for the LUX project, a design concept for an ultrafast X-ray facility, where multiple stages upshift the input laser frequency by factors of up to 200.

  1. X-band rf driven free electron laser driver with optics linearization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yipeng Sun (孙一鹏

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a compact hard X-ray free electron lasers (FEL design is proposed with all X-band rf acceleration and two stage bunch compression. It eliminates the need of a harmonic rf linearization section by employing optics linearization in its first stage bunch compression. Quadrupoles and sextupoles are employed in a bunch compressor one (BC1 design, in such a way that second order longitudinal dispersion of BC1 cancels the second order energy correlation in the electron beam. Start-to-end 6-D simulations are performed with all the collective effects included. Emittance growth in the horizontal plane due to coherent synchrotron radiation is investigated and minimized, to be on a similar level with the successfully operating Linac coherent light source (LCLS. At a FEL radiation wavelength of 0.15 nm, a saturation length of 40 meters can be achieved by employing an undulator with a period of 1.5 cm. Without tapering, a FEL radiation power above 10 GW is achieved with a photon pulse length of 50 fs, which is LCLS-like performance. The overall length of the accelerator plus undulator is around 250 meters which is much shorter than the LCLS length of 1230 meters. That makes it possible to build hard X-ray FEL in a laboratory with limited size.

  2. Phase matching strategy for the undulator system in the European X-ray Free Electron Laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuhui Li

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The undulator system in the European X-ray Free Electron Laser is mainly comprised of 5-m long undulator segments and 1.1 m long intersections in between. The longitudinal component of the electrons’ velocity is reduced when traveling inside an undulator due to the wiggle motion. Therefore the optical phase is detuned. The detune effect is also from the undulator fringe field where electron longitudinal speed also deviates from the oscillation condition. The total detune effect is compensated by a magnetic device called phase shifter, which is correspondingly set for a specific undulator gap. In this paper we investigate the homogeneity of the fringe field from different undulators. Different phase matching criteria are studied. The field fitting technique for the phase matching in high accuracy is demonstrated in detail. The impact by air coil is also studied. Eventually the matching test by spontaneous radiation simulation is made. A test method for high sensitivity to matching error is proposed.

  3. Compact 13.5-nm free-electron laser for extreme ultraviolet lithography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Socol

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Optical lithography has been actively used over the past decades to produce more and more dense integrated circuits. To keep with the pace of the miniaturization, light of shorter and shorter wavelength was used with time. The capabilities of the present 193-nm UV photolithography were expanded time after time, but it is now believed that further progress will require deployment of extreme ultraviolet (EUV lithography based on the use of 13.5-nm radiation. However, presently no light source exists with sufficient average power to enable high-volume manufacturing. We report here the results of a study that shows the feasibility of a free-electron laser EUV source driven by a multiturn superconducting energy-recovery linac (ERL. The proposed 40×20  m^{2} facility, using MW-scale consumption from the power grid, is estimated to provide about 5 kW of average EUV power. We elaborate the self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE option, which is presently technically feasible. A regenerative-amplifier option is also discussed. The proposed design is based on a short-period (2–3 cm undulator. The corresponding electron beam energy is about 0.5–1.0 GeV. The proposed accelerator consists of a photoinjector, a booster, and a multiturn ERL.

  4. First operation of a harmonic lasing self-seeded free electron laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneidmiller, E.A.; Faatz, B.; Kuhlmann, M.; Roensch-Schulenburg, J.; Schreiber, S.; Tischer, M.; Yurkov, M.V.

    2016-12-15

    Harmonic lasing is a perspective mode of operation of X-ray FEL user facilities that allows to provide brilliant beams of higher energy photons for user experiments. Another useful application of harmonic lasing is so called Harmonic Lasing Self-Seeded Free Electron Laser (HLSS FEL) that allows to improve spectral brightness of these facilities. In the past, harmonic lasing has been demonstrated in the FEL oscillators in infrared and visible wavelength ranges, but not in high-gain FELs and not at short wavelengths. In this paper we report on the first evidence of the harmonic lasing and the first operation of the HLSS FEL at the soft X-ray FEL user facility FLASH in the wavelength range between 4.5 nm and 15 nm. Spectral brightness was improved in comparison with Self-Amplified Spontaneous emission (SASE) FEL by a factor of six in the exponential gain regime. A better performance of HLSS FEL with respect to SASE FEL in the post-saturation regime with a tapered undulator was observed as well. The first demonstration of harmonic lasing in a high-gain FEL and at short wavelengths paves the way for a variety of applications of this new operation mode in X-ray FELs.

  5. Theoretical study of a waveguide THz free electron laser and comparisons with simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshihiro Shobuda

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In a so-called waveguide free electron laser (FEL for THz radiations, an extremely small aperture (∼mm waveguide is used to confine angularly wide spread radiation fields from a low energy electron beam into a small area. This confinement increases the interaction between the electron beam and the radiation fields to achieve a much higher FEL gain. The radiation fields propagate inside the waveguide as waveguide modes, not like a light flux in a free space FEL. This characteristic behavior of the radiation fields makes intuitive understanding of the waveguide FEL difficult. We developed a three-dimensional waveguide FEL theory to calculate a gain of THz waveguide FEL including the effects of the energy spread, the beam size and the betatron oscillations of an electron beam, and effects of a rectangular waveguide. The FEL gain can be calculated as a function of frequency by solving the dispersion relation. Theoretical gains are compared with simulation results for a waveguide FEL with a planar undulator similar to the KAERI one. Good agreements are obtained.

  6. Beam energy distribution influences on density modulation efficiency in seeded free-electron lasers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guanglei Wang

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The beam energy spread at the entrance of an undulator system is of paramount importance for efficient density modulation in high-gain seeded free-electron lasers (FELs. In this paper, the dependences of high harmonic bunching efficiency in high-gain harmonic generation (HGHG, echo-enabled harmonic generation (EEHG and phase-merging enhanced harmonic generation (PEHG schemes on the electron beam energy spread distribution are studied. Theoretical investigations and multidimensional numerical simulations are applied to the cases of uniform and saddle beam energy distributions and compared to a traditional Gaussian distribution. It shows that the uniform and saddle electron energy distributions significantly enhance the bunching performance of HGHG FELs, while they almost have no influence on EEHG and PEHG schemes. A further start-to-end simulation example demonstrated that, with the saddle distribution of sliced beam energy spread controlled by a laser heater, the 30th harmonic can be directly generated by a single-stage HGHG scheme for a soft x-ray FEL facility.

  7. First operation of a harmonic lasing self-seeded free electron laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. A. Schneidmiller

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Harmonic lasing is a possible mode of operation of X-ray FEL user facilities that allows us to provide brilliant beams of higher energy photons for user experiments. Another useful application of harmonic lasing is the so-called harmonic lasing self-seeded free electron laser (HLSS FEL that allows the improvement of spectral brightness of these facilities. In the past, harmonic lasing has been demonstrated in the FEL oscillators in infrared and visible wavelength ranges, but not in high-gain FELs and not at short wavelengths. In this paper we report on the first evidence of the harmonic lasing and the first operation of the HLSS FEL at the soft X-ray FEL user facility FLASH in the wavelength range between 4.5 nm and 15 nm. Spectral brightness was improved in comparison with self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE FEL by a factor of six in the exponential gain regime. A better performance of HLSS FEL with respect to SASE FEL in the post-saturation regime with a tapered undulator was observed as well. The first demonstration of harmonic lasing in a high-gain FEL and at short wavelengths paves the way for a variety of applications of this new operation mode in X-ray FELs.

  8. Velocity dispersion of correlated energy spread electron beams in the free electron laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, L. T.; Maier, A. R.

    2017-03-01

    The effects of a correlated linear energy/velocity chirp in the electron beam in the free electron laser (FEL), and how to compensate for its effects by using an appropriate taper (or reverse-taper) of the undulator magnetic field, is well known. The theory, as described thus far, ignores velocity dispersion from the chirp in the undulator, taking the limit of a ‘small’ chirp. In the following, the physics of compensating for chirp in the beam is revisited, including the effects of velocity dispersion, or beam compression or decompression, in the undulator. It is found that the limit of negligible velocity dispersion in the undulator is different from that previously identified as the small chirp limit, and is more significant than previously considered. The velocity dispersion requires a taper which is nonlinear to properly compensate for the effects of the detuning, and also results in a varying peak current (end thus a varying gain length) over the length of the undulator. The results may be especially significant for plasma driven FELs and low energy linac driven FEL test facilities.

  9. $\\boldmath{\\check{\\text{C}}}$erenkov free-electron laser in side-wall configuration

    CERN Document Server

    Kalkal, Yashvir

    2015-01-01

    We have proposed a $\\check{\\text{C}}$erenkov free-electron laser (CFEL) with metallic side walls. In this system, metallic side walls are used to confine the surface mode supported by a thin dielectric slab placed at the top of a conducting surface. This leads to an enhancement in the coupling between the optical mode and the co-propagating electron beam, and consequently, the performance of CFEL is improved. We set up coupled Maxwell-Lorentz equations for the system, in analogy with the undulator based conventional FELs; and obtain formulas for small signal gain and growth rate. It has been shown that the small signal gain and the growth rate in the sidewall configuration of CFEL are larger compared to the configuration without side walls. In the nonlinear regime, we solve the coupled Maxwell-Lorentz equations numerically and study the saturation behaviour of the system. It is found that the $\\check{\\text{C}}$erenkov FEL with side walls attains saturation quickly, and produces powerful coherent terahertz (TH...

  10. Operational Radiation Protection in Synchrotron Light and Free Electron Laser Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, James C.; Rokni, Sayed H.; /SLAC; Vylet, Vaclav; /Jefferson Lab

    2009-12-11

    The 3rd generation synchrotron radiation (SR) facilities are storage ring based facilities with many insertion devices and photon beamlines, and have low injection beam power (< few tens of watts), but extremely high stored beam power ({approx} 1 GW). The 4th generation x-ray free electron laser (FEL) facilities are based on an electron Linac with a long undulator and have high injection beam power (a few kW). Due to its electron and photon beam characteristics and modes of operation, storage ring and photon beamlines have unique safety aspects, which are the main subjects of this paper. The shielding design limits, operational modes, and beam losses are first reviewed. Shielding analysis (source terms and methodologies) and interlocked safety systems for storage ring and photon beamlines (including SR and gas bremsstrahlung) are described. Specific safety issues for storage ring top-off injection operation and FEL facilities are discussed. The operational safety program, e.g., operation authorization, commissioning, training, and radiation measurements, for SR facilities is also presented.

  11. Three-dimensional, time-dependent simulation of a regenerative amplifier free-electron laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freund, H. P.; Nguyen, D. C.; Sprangle, P. A.; van der Slot, P. J. M.

    2013-01-01

    Free-electron lasers have been designed to operate over virtually the entire electromagnetic spectrum from microwaves through x rays and in a variety of configurations including amplifiers and oscillators. Oscillators typically operate in the low-gain regime where the full spectral width is (Δω/ω)≈1/Nw and the efficiency η≈1/(2.4Nw). Further, since a low-gain oscillator saturates when the gain compensates for losses in the resonator G=L/(1-L), this implies that the losses must be relatively small and the cavity Q must be relatively large. This imposes problems for high power oscillators because the high Q can result in mirror loading above the damage threshold, and in short-wavelength oscillators because sufficiently low loss resonators may not be possible at x-ray wavelengths. In contrast, regenerative amplifier FELs (RAFELs) employ high-gain wigglers that reach exponential gain and can operate with high loss (i.e., low Q) resonators. As such, RAFELs may be able to function at either high power levels or short wavelengths. In this paper, we describe a three-dimensional, time-dependent simulation of a RAFEL operating at a 2.2-μm wavelength, and show that its behavior differs substantially from that of low-gain oscillators, and is closer to that of self-amplified spontaneous radiation FELs in regard to spectral linewidth and extraction efficiency.

  12. Exchange Energy Density Functionals that reproduce the Linear Response Function of the Free Electron Gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Aldea, David; Alvarellos, J. E.

    2009-03-01

    We present several nonlocal exchange energy density functionals that reproduce the linear response function of the free electron gas. These nonlocal functionals are constructed following a similar procedure used previously for nonlocal kinetic energy density functionals by Chac'on-Alvarellos-Tarazona, Garc'ia-Gonz'alez et al., Wang-Govind-Carter and Garc'ia-Aldea-Alvarellos. The exchange response function is not known but we have used the approximate response function developed by Utsumi and Ichimaru, even we must remark that the same ansatz can be used to reproduce any other response function with the same scaling properties. We have developed two families of new nonlocal functionals: one is constructed with a mathematical structure based on the LDA approximation -- the Dirac functional for the exchange - and for the second one the structure of the second order gradient expansion approximation is took as a model. The functionals are constructed is such a way that they can be used in localized systems (using real space calculations) and in extended systems (using the momentum space, and achieving a quasilinear scaling with the system size if a constant reference electron density is defined).

  13. Reversible Electron Beam Heating for Suppression of Microbunching Instabilities at Free-Electron Lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behrens, Christopher; /DESY; Huang, Zhirong; Xiang, Dao; /SLAC

    2012-05-30

    The presence of microbunching instabilities due to the compression of high-brightness electron beams at existing and future x-ray free-electron lasers (FELs) results in restrictions on the attainable lasing performance and renders beam imaging with optical transition radiation impossible. The instability can be suppressed by introducing additional energy spread, i.e., heating the electron beam, as demonstrated by the successful operation of the laser heater system at the Linac Coherent Light Source. The increased energy spread is typically tolerable for self-amplified spontaneous emission FELs but limits the effectiveness of advanced FEL schemes such as seeding. In this paper, we present a reversible electron beam heating system based on two transverse deflecting radio-frequency structures (TDSs) upstream and downstream of a magnetic bunch compressor chicane. The additional energy spread is introduced in the first TDS, which suppresses the microbunching instability, and then is eliminated in the second TDS. We show the feasibility of the microbunching gain suppression based on calculations and simulations including the effects of coherent synchrotron radiation. Acceptable electron beam and radio-frequency jitter are identified, and inherent options for diagnostics and on-line monitoring of the electron beam's longitudinal phase space are discussed.

  14. Membrane protein structural biology using X-ray free electron lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neutze, Richard; Brändén, Gisela; Schertler, Gebhard F X

    2015-08-01

    Membrane protein structural biology has benefitted tremendously from access to micro-focus crystallography at synchrotron radiation sources. X-ray free electron lasers (XFELs) are linear accelerator driven X-ray sources that deliver a jump in peak X-ray brilliance of nine orders of magnitude and represent a disruptive technology with potential to dramatically change the field. Membrane proteins were amongst the first macromolecules to be studied with XFEL radiation and include proof-of-principle demonstrations of serial femtosecond crystallography (SFX), the observation that XFEL data can deliver damage free crystallographic structures, initial experiments towards recording structural information from 2D arrays of membrane proteins, and time-resolved SFX, time-resolved wide angle X-ray scattering and time-resolved X-ray emission spectroscopy studies. Conversely, serial crystallography methods are now being applied using synchrotron radiation. We believe that a context dependent choice of synchrotron or XFEL radiation will accelerate progress towards novel insights in understanding membrane protein structure and dynamics.

  15. Characterization and control of femtosecond electron and X-ray beams at free-electron lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behrens, Christopher

    2012-11-15

    X-ray free-electron lasers (FELs) open up new frontiers in photon science, and in order to take full advantage of these unique accelerator-based light sources, the characterization and control of the femtosecond electron and X-ray beams is essential. Within this cumulative thesis, recent results achieved within the active research field of femtosecond electron and X-ray beams at FELs are reported.The basic principles of X-ray FELs are described, and concepts of longitudinal electron beam diagnostics with femtosecond accuracy are covered. Experimental results obtained with a transverse deflecting structure (TDS) and spectroscopy of coherent terahertz radiation are presented, and the suppression of coherent optical radiation effects, required for diagnostics utilizing a TDS, is demonstrated. Control of the longitudinal phase space by using multiple radio frequencies for longitudinal electron beam tailoring is presented, and a new technique of reversible electron beam heating with two TDSs is described. For the characterization of femtosecond X-ray pulses, a novel method based on dedicated longitudinal phase space diagnostics for electron beams is introduced, and recent measurements with a streaking technique using external terahertz fields are presented.

  16. Monitoring the electron beam position at the TESLA test facility free electron laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamps, T.

    2000-06-14

    The operation of a free electron laser working in the Self Amplified Spontaneous Emission mode (SASE FEL) requires the electron trajectory to be aligned with very high precision in overlap with the photon beam. In order to ensure this overlap, one module of the SASE FEL undulator at the TESLA Test Facility (TTF) is equipped with a new type of waveguide beam position monitor (BPM). Four waveguides are arranged symmetrically around the beam pipe, each channel couples through a small slot to the electromagnetic beam field. The induced signal depends on the beam intensity and on the transverse beam position in terms of beam-to-slot distance. With four slot--waveguide combinations a linear position sensitive signal can be achieved, which is independent of the beam intensity. The signals transduced by the slots are transferred by ridged waveguides through an impedance matching stage into a narrowband receiver tuned to 12 GHz. The present thesis describes design, tests, and implementation of this new type of BPM. (orig.)

  17. Frequency mixing in accelerator based sources and application to tunable seeded free-electron lasers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Evain

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In this article we address the problem of tunability of seeded free-electron lasers (FELs, working typically in the domain of the vacuum ultraviolet. The seeding of FELs with an external laser permits us to obtain FEL pulses with both good longitudinal coherence and good stability properties (contrary to an amplification starting from noise. However, with a fixed external laser wavelength, only amplification at harmonics of this wavelength is possible. If full tunability is wanted, it is necessary to have a tunable external source; but this type of source has much less power, hence it is much harder to reach high harmonics numbers. Here we propose the so-called frequency mixing scheme (from its analogy with the similar process in nonlinear optics, based on two laser/electron interactions. Numerical and analytic studies show that it permits to increase significantly the tunability at short wavelengths using a low-energy tunable source. Numerical simulations are made with the parameters of FERMI-FEL 1, the first seeded FEL for user operation.

  18. Present status of the NIJI-IV storage-ring free-electron lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamazaki, T.; Yamada, K.; Sei, N. [Electrotechnical Lab., Ibaraki (Japan)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    The tunable region of the free-electron-laser (FEL) wavelength with the NIJI-IV system is now 348{approximately}595 nm. After the lasing at 352 nm in 1994, the quality of the electron beam stored in the ring has been improved further, and the highest peak intensity of the laser obtained so far is more than 300 times as high as that of the resonated spontaneous emission. The macro-temporal structure of the lasing has been greatly improved. Recently, a single-bunch injection system was completed, and the system has been installed in the injector linac, which is expected to increase the peak stored-beam current. The commissioning and the test of the new system is under way. The beam transporting system from the linac to the ring is also being modified by increasing the number of quadrupole magnets. The experiments related to the FEL in the ultraviolet wavelength region will be begun in this coming May. The results and the status of the FEL experiments will be presented at the Conference.

  19. Studies on a VUV free electron laser at the TESLA Test Facility at DESY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rossbach, J. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron, Hamburg (Germany)

    1995-12-31

    The TESLA Test Facility (TTF) currently under construction at DESY is a test-bed for acceleration sections of a high-gradient, high efficiency superconducting linear collider. Due to ist unrivaled ability to sustain high beam quality during acceleration, a superconducting rf linac is considered the optimum choice to drive a Free Electron Laser (FEL). We aim at a photon wavelength of {lambda} = 6 manometer utilizing the TTF after is has been extended to 1 GeV beam energy. Due to lack of mirrors and seed-lasers in this wavelength regime, a single pass FEL and Self-Amplified-Spontaneous-Emission (SASE) is considered. A first test is foreseen at a larger photon wavelength. The overall design as well as both electron and photon beam properties will be discussed. To reach the desired photon wavelength, the main components that have to be added to the TTF are: (a) a low emittance rf gun including space charge compensation (b) a two stage bunch compressor increasing the peak bunch current from 100 A up to 2500 A (c) four more accelerating modules to achieve 1 GeV beam energy (d) a 25 m long undulator (period length 27 mm, peak field 0.5 T) The average brillance will be larger than 1-10{sup 22}photons/s/mm{sup 2}/mrad{sup 2}/0.1%. Each 800 {mu}s long pulse will contain up to 7200 equidistant bunches. The repetition frequency of the linac is 10 Hz.

  20. Strongly aligned gas-phase molecules at Free-Electron Lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Kierspel, Thomas; Mullins, Terry; Robinson, Joseph; Aquila, Andy; Barty, Anton; Bean, Richard; Boll, Rebecca; Boutet, Sébastien; Bucksbaum, Philip; Chapman, Henry N; Christensen, Lauge; Fry, Alan; Hunter, Mark; Koglin, Jason E; Liang, Mengning; Mariani, Valerio; Morgan, Andrew; Natan, Adi; Petrovic, Vladimir; Rolles, Daniel; Rudenko, Artem; Schnorr, Kirsten; Stapelfeldt, Henrik; Stern, Stephan; Thøgersen, Jan; Yoon, Chun Hong; Wang, Fenglin; Trippel, Sebastian; Küpper, Jochen

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate a novel experimental implementation to strongly align molecules at full repetition rates of free-electron lasers. We utilized the available in-house laser system at the coherent x-ray imaging beamline at the Linac Coherent Light Source. Chirped laser pulses, i. e., the direct output from the regenerative amplifier of the Ti:Sa chirped pulse amplification laser system, were used to strongly align 2,5-diiodothiophene molecules in a molecular beam. The alignment laser pulses had pulse energies of a few mJ and a pulse duration of 94 ps. A degree of alignment of $\\left$ = 0.85 was measured, limited by the intrinsic temperature of the molecular beam rather than by the available laser system. With the general availability of synchronized chirped-pulse-amplified near-infrared laser systems at short-wavelength laser facilities, our approach allows for the universal preparation of molecules tightly fixed in space for experiments with x-ray pulses.

  1. Emittance studies at the Los Alamos National Laboratory Free-Electron Laser (FEL)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlsten, B. E.; Feldman, D. W.; Lumpkin, A. H.; Stein, W. E.; Warren, R. W.

    Recent emittance studies at the Los Alamos Free-Electron Laser (FEL) have indicated several areas of concern in the linac and beamline feeding the wiggler. Four emittance growth mechanisms of special importance have been studied. First, a rapid growth of the electron beam's emittance immediately after the spherical gridded Pierce gun resulted, in part, from the long time required for our pulsing electronics to ramp the grid voltage up at the start and down at the end of the pulse, which created a pulse with a cosine-like current distribution as a function of time. The growth was compounded by the extremely small radial beam size (almost a waist) leaving the gun. In addition, we saw evidence of electrostatic charging of the insulators in the gun, reducing the quality of the electron beam further. Second, the action of the solenoidal focusing fields in the low-voltage bunching region was studied, and criteria for a minimum emittance growth were established. Third, maximum misalignment angles and displacements for various elements of the beamline were calculated for the desired low emittance growth. Finally, emittance growth in the horizontal dimension through the nonisochronous bend caused by varying energy depression on the particles due to longitudinal wake fields was both calculated and observed. In addition, we measured energy depressions caused by the wake fields generated by various other elements in the beamline. Strategies were developed to relieve the magnitude of these wake-field effects.

  2. A table-top monochromator for tunable femtosecond XUV pulses generated in a semi-infinite gas cell: Experiment and simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Conta, A; Huppert, M; Wörner, H J

    2016-07-01

    We present a new design of a time-preserving extreme-ultraviolet (XUV) monochromator using a semi-infinite gas cell as a source. The performance of this beamline in the photon-energy range of 20 eV-42 eV has been characterized. We have measured the order-dependent XUV pulse durations as well as the flux and the spectral contrast. XUV pulse durations of ≤40 fs using 32 fs, 800 nm driving pulses were measured on the target. The spectral contrast was better than 100 over the entire energy range. A simple model based on the strong-field approximation is presented to estimate different contributions to the measured XUV pulse duration. On-axis phase-matching calculations are used to rationalize the variation of the photon flux with pressure and intensity.

  3. Formation of multiple subpulses in a free-electron laser operating in the limit-cycle mode

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knippels, G.M.H.; van der Meer, A. F. G.; Mols, Rfxam; Oepts, D.; van Amersfoort, P. W.

    1996-01-01

    The evolution of the longitudinal pulse shape and the spectrum of the short-pulse, far-infrared free-electron laser FELIX are investigated. Depending on the amount of cavity desynchronization applied, the laser is found to operate in the stable-focus mode or in the limit-cycle mode. In the latter ca

  4. A Transition Radiation Experiment to Measure the Electron Beam Modulation Induced by the Free Electron Laser: A Design Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-12-01

    a detector of the phototube, TV camera, or reticon type. The characteristics of TR that will apply to the proposed experiment are: (1) The angular...January- February 1987. 4. Colson, W.B., and A.M. Sessler, "Free Electron Lasers," Annual Review of Nuclear Particle Science, v. 35, pp. 25-54, 1985

  5. Free-electron laser for infrared SEW characterization surfaces of conducting and dielectric solids and nm films on them

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhizhin, G. N.; Alieva, E. V.; Kuzik, L.; Yakovlev, V. A.; Shkrabo, D. M.; van der Meer, A. F. G.; van der Wiel, M. J.

    1998-01-01

    The set of problems that can be solved by new very sensitive method for investigation of surfaces and very thin layers on solids - surface electromagnetic waves (SEW) spectroscopy - is presented. The field of applications for this method was considerably extended with the use of the free electron la

  6. VUV and X-ray coherent light with tunable polarization from single-pass free-electron lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Spezzani, C; Diviacco, B; Ferrari, E; Geloni, G; Karantzoulis, E; Mahieu, B; Vento, M; De Ninno, G

    2011-01-01

    Tunable polarization over a wide spectral range is a required feature of light sources employed to investigate the properties of local symmetry in both condensed and low-density matter. Among new-generation sources, free-electron lasers possess a unique combination of very attractive features, as they allow to generate powerful and coherent ultra-short optical pulses in the VUV and X-ray spectral range. However, the question remains open about the possibility to freely vary the light polarization of a free-electron laser, when the latter is operated in the so-called nonlinear harmonic-generation regime. In such configuration, one collects the harmonics of the free-electron laser fundamental emission, gaining access to the shortest possible wavelengths the device can generate. In this letter we provide the first experimental characterization of the polarization of the harmonic light produced by a free-electron laser and we demonstrate a method to obtain tunable polarization in the VUV and X-ray spectral range....

  7. Eigenmodes and mode competition in a high-gain free-electron laser including alternating-gradient focusing

    CERN Document Server

    Wu Ju Ha

    2001-01-01

    We solve the eigenvalue problem for a high gain free-electron laser in the 'water-bag' model including alternating-gradient focusing by a variational-solution-based (VSB) expansion method. Such VSB expansion method is very efficient for finding the eigenvalue. The results agree with those obtained by numerical simulation quite well. We further discuss the mode degeneracy and mode competition.

  8. Charge and current density profiles of a degenerate magnetized free-electron gas near a hard wall

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.M. Kettenis; L.G. Suttorp

    1998-01-01

    The charge and current densities of a completely degenerate free-electron gas in a uniform magnetic field are found to have a damped oscillatory spatial dependence near a wall that is parallel to the magnetic field. For large distances from the wall the behaviour of the associated profile functions

  9. Three-dimensional, time-dependent simulation of free-electron lasers with planar, helical, and elliptical undulators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Freund, H.P.; van der Slot, Petrus J.M.; Grimminck, D.L.A.G.; Setija, I.D.; Falgari, P.

    2017-01-01

    Free-electron lasers (FELs) have been built ranging in wavelength from long-wavelength oscillators using partial wave guiding through ultraviolet through hard x-ray that are either seeded or start from noise. In addition, FELs that produce different polarizations of the output radiation ranging from

  10. Free-Electron Laser Operation and Self-Amplified Spontaneous Emission Using a Step-Tapered Undulator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jaroszynski, D. A.; Prazeres, R.; Glotin, F.; Ortega, J. M.; Oepts, D.; van der Meer, A. F. G.; Knippels, G.; van Amersfoort, P. W.

    1995-01-01

    We present an experimental and theoretical evaluation of a new method of enhancing the efficiency and gain of the free-electron laser (FEL) and observations of self-amplified spontaneous emission at start-up of the step-tapered FEL. The stepped undulator is divided into two uniform sections of

  11. Analogy for Drude's Free Electron Model to Promote Students' Understanding of Electric Circuits in Lower Secondary School

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Almeida, Maria José B. M.; Salvador, Andreia; Costa, Maria Margarida R. R.

    2014-01-01

    Aiming at a deep understanding of some basic concepts of electric circuits in lower secondary schools, this work introduces an analogy between the behavior of children playing in a school yard with a central lake, subject to different conditions, rules, and stimuli, and Drude's free electron model of metals. Using this analogy from the first…

  12. The Effects of Slippage and Diffraction in Long-Wavelength Operation of a Free-Electron Laser

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhulin, V. I.; Haselhoff, E. H.; van Amersfoort, P. W.

    1995-01-01

    The Free-Electron Laser user facility FELIX produces picosecond optical pulses in the wavelength range of 5-110 mu m. The proposed installation of a new undulator with a larger magnetic period would allow extension towards considerably longer wavelengths. This would result in the production of extre

  13. German and U.S. laboratories to collaborate on the development of X-ray free electron lasers

    CERN Multimedia

    Calder, N

    2002-01-01

    Germany's leading particle physics and synchrotron radiation laboratory (DESY), and the U.S. Department of Energy's Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC), have signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) to establish a unique international collaboration for the development of X-ray free-electron lasers (1 page).

  14. A mirror-less, multi-beam photonic free-electron laser oscillator pumped far beyond threshold

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Slot, Petrus J.M.; Boller, Klaus J.; Strooisma, A.; Kang, Heung-Sik; Kim, Dong Eon; Schaa, Volker R.W.

    2015-01-01

    In a photonic free-electron laser electrons are transmitted through a photonic crystal in the form of one or multiple electron beams to generate coherent Cerenkov radiation. Here we consider a photonic-crystal slab consisting of a two-dimensional, periodic array of bars inside a rectangular waveguid

  15. Measurement of XUV-absorption spectra of ZnS radiatively heated foils

    CERN Document Server

    Kontogiannopoulmos, Nikolaos; Thais, Frédéric; Chenais-Popovics, Claude; Sauvan, Pascal; Schott, R; Fölsner, Wolfgang; Arnault, Philippe; Poirier, Michel; Blenski, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Time-resolved absorption of zinc sulfide (ZnS) and aluminum in the XUV-range has been measured. Thin foils in conditions close to local thermodynamic equilibrium were heated by radiation from laser-irradiated gold spherical cavities. Analysis of the aluminum foil radiative hydrodynamic expansion, based on the detailed atomic calculations of its absorption spectra, showed that the cavity emitted flux that heated the absorption foils corresponds to a radiation temperature in the range 55 60 eV. Comparison of the ZnS absorption spectra with calculations based on a superconfiguration approach identified the presence of species Zn6+ - Zn8+ and S5+ - S6+. Based on the validation of the radiative source simulations, experimental spectra were then compared to calculations performed by post-processing the radiative hydrodynamic simulations of ZnS. Satisfying agreement is found when temperature gradients are accounted for.

  16. Production of ultrashort FEL XUV pulses via a reverse undulator taper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fawley, W. M.

    2008-08-01

    We adapt the "reverse taper" scheme presented by Saldin et al. (Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 9 (2006) 050702) for attosecond pulse production to the XUV/soft-X-ray regime. We find that GW-level pulses of a few femtosecond duration or shorter can be produced using electron beams of quite moderate parameters and undulators of 20-m length or shorter. The output pulse is significantly shifted in wavelength relative to the main background which permits a further increase in contrast ratio via simple monochromatization. Moreover, the output pulse has a natural wavelength chirp that allows further temporal compression, if wanted. Both positive and negative chirps can be produced depending upon the sign of the undulator taper.

  17. Photoelectron angular distribution in two-pathway ionization of neon with femtosecond XUV pulses

    CERN Document Server

    Douguet, Nicolas; Staroselskaya, Ekaterina I; Bartschat, Klaus; Grum-Grzhimailo, Alexei N

    2016-01-01

    We analyze the photoelectron angular distribution in two-pathway interference between non\\-resonant one-photon and resonant two-photon ionization of neon. We consider a bichromatic femtosecond XUV pulse whose fundamental frequency is tuned near the $2p^5 3s$ atomic states of neon. The time-dependent Schr\\"odinger equation is solved and the results are employed to compute the angular distribution and the associated anisotropy parameters at the main photoelectron line. We also employ a time-dependent perturbative approach, which allows obtaining information on the process for a large range of pulse parameters, including the steady-state case of continuous radiation, i.e., an infinitely long pulse. The results from the two methods are in relatively good agreement over the domain of applicability of perturbation theory.

  18. Clusters in Intense XUV pulses: effects of cluster size on expansion dynamics and ionization

    CERN Document Server

    Ackad, Edward; Briggs, Kyle; Ramunno, Lora

    2010-01-01

    We examine the effect of cluster size on the interaction of Ar$_{55}$-Ar$_{2057}$ with intense extreme ultraviolet (XUV) pulses, using a model we developed earlier that includes ionization via collisional excitation as an intermediate step. We find that the dynamics of these irradiated clusters is dominated by collisions. Larger clusters are more highly collisional, produce higher charge states, and do so more rapidly than smaller clusters. Higher charge states produced via collisions are found to reduce the overall photon absorption, since charge states of Ar$^{2+}$ and higher are no longer photo-accessible. We call this mechanism \\textit{collisionally reduced photoabsorption}, and it decreases the effective cluster photoabsorption cross-section by more than 30% for Ar$_{55}$ and 45% Ar$_{2057}$. compared to gas targets with the same number of atoms. An investigation of the shell structure soon after the laser interaction shows an almost uniformly charged core with a modestly charged outer shell which evolve...

  19. XUV coherent diffraction imaging in reflection geometry with low numerical aperture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zürch, Michael; Kern, Christian; Spielmann, Christian

    2013-09-09

    We present an experimental realization of coherent diffraction imaging in reflection geometry illuminating the sample with a laser driven high harmonic generation (HHG) based XUV source. After recording the diffraction pattern in reflection geometry, the data must be corrected before the image can be reconstructed with a hybrid-input-output (HIO) algorithm. In this paper we present a detailed investigation of sources of spoiling the reconstructed image due to the nonlinear momentum transfer, errors in estimating the angle of incidence on the sample, and distortions by placing the image off center in the computation grid. Finally we provide guidelines for the necessary parameters to realize a satisfactory reconstruction within a spatial resolution in the range of one micron for an imaging scheme with a numerical aperture NA < 0.03.

  20. Submicron focusing of XUV radiation from a laser plasma source using a multilayer Laue lens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reese, M.; Schäfer, B.; Großmann, P.; Bayer, A.; Mann, K.; Liese, T.; Krebs, H. U.

    2011-01-01

    The focusing properties of a one-dimensional multilayer Laue lens (MLL) were investigated using monochromatic soft X-ray radiation from a table-top, laser-produced plasma source. The MLL was fabricated by a focused ion beam (FIB) structuring of pulsed laser deposited ZrO2/Ti multilayers. This novel method offers the potential to overcome limitations encountered in electron lithographic processes. Utilizing this multilayer Laue lens, a line focus of XUV radiation from a laser-induced plasma in a nitrogen gas puff target could be generated. The evaluated focal length is close to the designed value of 220 μm for the measurement wavelength of 2.88 nm. Divergence angle and beam waist diameter are measured by a moving knife edge and a far-field experiment, determining all relevant second-order moments based beam parameters. The waist diameter has been found to be approximately 370 nm (FWHM).

  1. Controlled molecules for X-ray diffraction experiments at free-electron lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stern, Stephan

    2013-12-15

    X-ray diffractive imaging is at the very heart of materials science and has been utilized for decades to solve unknown molecular structures. Nowadays, it serves as the key method of structural biology to solve molecular structures of large biological molecules comprising several thousand or even millions of atoms. However, X-ray diffraction from isolated molecules is very weak. Therefore, the regular and periodic arrangement of a huge number of identical copies of a certain molecule of interest within a crystal lattice has been a necessary condition in order to exploit Bragg diffraction of X-rays. This results in a huge increase in scattered signal and a strongly improved signal-to-noise ratio compared to diffraction from non-crystalline samples. The major bottleneck of structural biology is that many of biologically interesting molecules refuse to form crystals of sufficient size to be used at synchrotron X-ray lightsources. However, novel X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs), which became operational very recently, promise to address this issue. X-ray pulses provided by XFELs are many orders of magnitude more intense than X-ray pulses from a synchrotron source and at the same time as short as only several tens of femtoseconds. Combined with wavelengths in the nm-pm range, XFELs are well-suited to study ultrafast atomic and molecular dynamics. Additionally, the ultrashort pulses can be utilized to circumvent the damage threshold which set a limit to the incident intensity in X-ray diffraction experiments before. At XFELs, though eventually destroying the investigated sample, no significant sample deterioration happens on the ultrashort timescale of the XFEL pulse and the measured diffraction pattern is due to an (almost) unharmed sample. In the framework of this thesis, the approach of utilizing the highly intense XFEL pulses for X-ray diffraction of weakly-scattering non-crystalline samples was taken to the limit of small isolated molecules. X-ray diffraction was

  2. NASA-DoD Lead-Free Electronics Project: Vibration Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodrow, Thomas A.

    2010-01-01

    Vibration testing was conducted by Boeing Research and Technology (Seattle) for the NASA-DoD Lead-Free Electronics Solder Project. This project is a follow-on to the Joint Council on Aging Aircraft/Joint Group on Pollution Prevention (JCAA/JG-PP) Lead-Free Solder Project which was the first group to test the reliability of lead-free solder joints against the requirements of the aerospace/miLItary community. Twenty seven test vehicles were subjected to the vibration test conditions (in two batches). The random vibration Power Spectral Density (PSD) input was increased during the test every 60 minutes in an effort to fail as many components as possible within the time allotted for the test. The solder joints on the components were electrically monitored using event detectors and any solder joint failures were recorded on a Labview-based data collection system. The number of test minutes required to fail a given component attached with SnPb solder was then compared to the number of test minutes required to fail the same component attached with lead-free solder. A complete modal analysis was conducted on one test vehicle using a laser vibrometer system which measured velocities, accelerations, and displacements at one . hundred points. The laser vibrometer data was used to determine the frequencies of the major modes of the test vehicle and the shapes of the modes. In addition, laser vibrometer data collected during the vibration test was used to calculate the strains generated by the first mode (using custom software). After completion of the testing, all of the test vehicles were visually inspected and cross sections were made. Broken component leads and other unwanted failure modes were documented.

  3. Maximizing spectral flux from self-seeding hard x-ray free electron lasers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xi Yang

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Fully coherent x rays can be generated by self-seeding x-ray free electron lasers (XFELs. Self-seeding by a forward Bragg diffraction (FBD monochromator has been recently proposed [G. Geloni, V. Kocharyan, and E. Saldin, J. Mod. Opt. 58, 1391 (2011JMOPEW0950-034010.1080/09500340.2011.586473] and demonstrated [J. Amann et al., Nat. Photonics 6, 693 (2012NPAHBY1749-488510.1038/nphoton.2012.180]. Characteristic time T_{0} of FBD determines the power, spectral, and time characteristics of the FBD seed [Yu. Shvyd’ko and R. Lindberg, Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 15, 100702 (2012PRABFM1098-440210.1103/PhysRevSTAB.15.100702]. Here we show that for a given electron bunch with duration σ_{e} the spectral flux of the self-seeding XFEL can be maximized, and the spectral bandwidth can be respectively minimized by choosing T_{0}∼σ_{e}/π and by optimizing the electron bunch delay τ_{e}. The choices of T_{0} and τ_{e} are not unique. In all cases, the maximum value of the spectral flux and the minimum bandwidth are primarily determined by σ_{e}. Two-color seeding takes place if T_{0}≪σ_{e}/π. The studies are performed, for a Gaussian electron bunch distribution with the parameters, close to those used in the short-bunch (σ_{e}≃5  fs and long-bunch (σ_{e}≃20  fs operation modes of the Linac Coherent Light Source XFEL.

  4. Maximizing spectral flux from self-seeding hard x-ray free electron lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xi; Shvyd'ko, Yuri

    2013-12-01

    Fully coherent x rays can be generated by self-seeding x-ray free electron lasers (XFELs). Self-seeding by a forward Bragg diffraction (FBD) monochromator has been recently proposed [G. Geloni, V. Kocharyan, and E. Saldin, J. Mod. Opt. 58, 1391 (2011)JMOPEW0950-034010.1080/09500340.2011.586473] and demonstrated [J. Amann , Nat. Photonics 6, 693 (2012)NPAHBY1749-488510.1038/nphoton.2012.180]. Characteristic time T0 of FBD determines the power, spectral, and time characteristics of the FBD seed [Yu. Shvyd’ko and R. Lindberg, Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 15, 100702 (2012)PRABFM1098-440210.1103/PhysRevSTAB.15.100702]. Here we show that for a given electron bunch with duration σe the spectral flux of the self-seeding XFEL can be maximized, and the spectral bandwidth can be respectively minimized by choosing T0˜σe/π and by optimizing the electron bunch delay τe. The choices of T0 and τe are not unique. In all cases, the maximum value of the spectral flux and the minimum bandwidth are primarily determined by σe. Two-color seeding takes place if T0≪σe/π. The studies are performed, for a Gaussian electron bunch distribution with the parameters, close to those used in the short-bunch (σe≃5fs) and long-bunch (σe≃20fs) operation modes of the Linac Coherent Light Source XFEL.

  5. Microfluidic sorting of protein nanocrystals by size for X-ray free-electron laser diffraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahige G. Abdallah

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The advent and application of the X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL has uncovered the structures of proteins that could not previously be solved using traditional crystallography. While this new technology is powerful, optimization of the process is still needed to improve data quality and analysis efficiency. One area is sample heterogeneity, where variations in crystal size (among other factors lead to the requirement of large data sets (and thus 10–100 mg of protein for determining accurate structure factors. To decrease sample dispersity, we developed a high-throughput microfluidic sorter operating on the principle of dielectrophoresis, whereby polydisperse particles can be transported into various fluid streams for size fractionation. Using this microsorter, we isolated several milliliters of photosystem I nanocrystal fractions ranging from 200 to 600 nm in size as characterized by dynamic light scattering, nanoparticle tracking, and electron microscopy. Sorted nanocrystals were delivered in a liquid jet via the gas dynamic virtual nozzle into the path of the XFEL at the Linac Coherent Light Source. We obtained diffraction to ∼4 Å resolution, indicating that the small crystals were not damaged by the sorting process. We also observed the shape transforms of photosystem I nanocrystals, demonstrating that our device can optimize data collection for the shape transform-based phasing method. Using simulations, we show that narrow crystal size distributions can significantly improve merged data quality in serial crystallography. From this proof-of-concept work, we expect that the automated size-sorting of protein crystals will become an important step for sample production by reducing the amount of protein needed for a high quality final structure and the development of novel phasing methods that exploit inter-Bragg reflection intensities or use variations in beam intensity for radiation damage-induced phasing. This method will also

  6. Half-period optical pulse generation using a free-electron laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaroszynski, D.A.; Chaix, P.; Piovella, N. [Commissariat a l`Energie Atomique, Bruycres-le-Chatel (France)

    1995-12-31

    Recently there has been growth, in interest in non-equilibrium interaction of half-period long optical pulses with matter. To date the optical pulses have been produced by chopping out a half-period long segment from a longer pulse using a semiconductor switch driven by a femtosecond laser. In this paper we present new methods for producing tunable ultra-short optical pulses as short as half an optical period using a free-electron laser driven by electron bunches with a duration a fraction of an optical period. Two different methods relying on the production of coherent spontaneous emission will be described. In the first method we show that when a train of ultra-short optical pulses as short as one half period. We present calculations which show that the small signal gain is unimportant in the early stages of radiation build up in the cavity when the startup process is dominated by coherent spontaneous emission. To support our proposed method we present encouraging experimental results from the FELIX experiment in the Netherlands which show that interference effects between the coherent spontaneous optical pulses at start-up are very important. The second proposed method relies on the fact that coherent spontaneous emission mimics the undulations of electrons as they pass through the undulator. We show that ultra-short optical pulses are produced by coherent spontaneous emission when ultra-short electron bunches pass through an ultra-short undulator. We discuss the interesting case of such undulator radiation in the presence of an optical cavity and show that the optical pulse can be {open_quotes}taylored{close_quotes} by simply adjusting the optical cavity desynchronism. The proposed methods may be realisable using existing rf driven FELs in the far-infrared.

  7. The vacuum system of the European X-ray free electron laser XFEL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zapfe, K; Boehnert, M; Hensler, O; Hoppe, D; Mildner, N; Nagorny, B; Rehlich, K; Remde, H; Wagner, A; Wohlenberg, T; Wojtkiewicz, J [Deutsches Elektronen Synchrotron DESY, Notkestrasse 85, D-22607 Hamburg (Germany)], E-mail: kirsten.zapfe@desy.de

    2008-03-01

    The European X-ray Free Electron Laser XFEL, a new international research facility, will be built at DESY/Hamburg. The XFEL will generate extremely brilliant and ultra short pulses of spatially coherent X-rays with tuneable wavelengths down to 0.1 nm, and exploit them for revolutionary scientific experiments at various disciplines. The basic process adopted to produce the X-ray pulses is SASE (Self-Amplified Spontaneous Emission). Therefore electron bunches are produced in a high-brightness gun, brought to high energy of about 20 GeV through a superconducting linear accelerator, and transported to up to 250 m long undulators, where the X-rays are generated. The beam vacuum system of the accelerator contains sections operated at room temperature as well as at 2 K in the areas of the superconducting accelerating structures, thus requiring an insulating vacuum system. In addition to standard UHV requirements, the vacuum system for this facility needs to preserve the cleanliness of the superconducting cavity surfaces. Therefore the preparation of all vacuum components for the 1.6 km long main linac includes cleaning of the components in a clean room to remove particles, installation into the accelerator in local clean rooms, and special procedures for pump down and venting. Further challenges are the undulator vacuum chambers filling more than 700 m, where a high surface quality with respect to surface roughness and thickness of oxide layers is mandatory to reduce wake field effects, and the vacuum systems for the various beam dumps, where exit windows acting as vacuum barriers of sufficient reliability need to be developed. In addition, a large amount of about 1.7 km of transport beam lines is required. The layout of the various vacuum sections as well as experience with prototype components will be described.

  8. The EIS beamline at the seeded free-electron laser FERMI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simoncig, A.; Mincigrucci, R.; Principi, E.; Bencivenga, F.; Calvi, A.; Foglia, L.; Kurdi, G.; Raimondi, L.; Manfredda, M.; Mahne, N.; Gobessi, R.; Gerusina, S.; Fava, C.; Zangrando, M.; Matruglio, A.; Dal Zilio, S.; Masciotti, V.; Masciovecchio, C.

    2017-05-01

    Among the fourth-generation light sources, the Italian free-electron laser (FEL) FERMI is the only one operating in the high-gain harmonic generation (HGHG) seeding mode. FERMI delivers pulses characterized by a quasi transform limited temporal structure, photon energies lying in the extreme ultra-violet (EUV) region, supreme transversal and longitudinal coherences, high peak brilliance, and full control of the polarization. Such state of the art performances recently opened the doors to a new class of time-resolved spectroscopies, difficult or even impossible to be performed using self-amplified spontaneous sources (SASE) light sources. FERMI is currently equipped with three operating beamlines opened to external users (DiProI, LDM and EIS), while two more are under commissioning (MagneDYN and TeraFERMI). Here, we present the recent highlights of the EIS (Elastic and Inelastic Scattering) beamline, which has been purposely designed to take full advantage from the coherence, the intensity, the harmonics content, and the temporal duration of the pulses. EIS is a flexible experimental facility for time-resolved EUV scattering experiments on condensed matter systems, consisting of two independent end-stations. The first one (EIS-TIMEX) aims to study materials in metastable and warm dense matter (WDM) conditions, while the second end-station (EIS-TIMER) is fully oriented to the extension of four-wave mixing (FWM) spectroscopies towards the EUV spectral regions, trying to reveal the behavior of matter in portions of the mesoscopic regime of exchanged momentum impossible to be probed using conventional light sources.

  9. Nonlinear resonances in a multi-stage free-electron laser amplifier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hashimoto, S. [Graduate Univ. for Advanced Studies, Ibaraki-ken (Japan); Takayama, K. [National Lab. for High Energy Physics, Ibaraki-ken (Japan)

    1995-12-31

    A two-beam accelerator (TBA) is a possible candidate of future linear colliders, in which the demanded rf power is provided by a multi-stage free-electron laser (MFEL). After if amplification in each stage, a driving beam is re-accelerated by an induction unit and propagates into the next stage. Recently it has been recognized that the multi-stage character of the MFEL causes resonances between its periodicity and the synchrotron motion in an rf bucket. Since the synchrotron oscillation is strongly modulated by the resonance and at the worst a large fraction of particles is trapped in the resonance islands, the nonlinear resonances in the FEL longitudinal beam dynamics can lead to notable degradation of the MFEL performance, such as output fluctuation and phase modulation which have been big concerns in the accelerator society. The overall efficiency of the MFEL and the quality of the amplified microwave power are key issues for realizing the TBA/FEL Particularly the rf phase and amplitude errors must be maintained within tolerance. One of significant obstacles is an amplification of undesired modes. If a small-size waveguide is employed, the FEL resonance energies for undesired higher order modes shift very far from that for a fundamental mode; so it is possible to prevent higher order modes from evolving. Such a small-size waveguide, however, gives a high power density in the FEL. Simulation results have demonstrated that the nonlinear resonances occur in die FEL longitudinal motion when the power density exceeds some threshold. An analytical method for studying the nonlinear resonance in the TBA/FEL is developed based on the macroparticle model which can describe analytically the drastic behaviors in the evolutions of the phase and amplitude. In the theory the basic 1D-FEL equations are reduced to a nonlinear pendulum equation with respect to the ponderomotive phase.

  10. An infrared free-electron laser for the Chemical Dynamics Research Laboratory. Design report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaughan, D. [comp.

    1992-04-01

    This document describes a free-electron laser (FEL) proposed as part of the Chemical Dynamics Research Laboratory (CDRL), a user facility that also incorporates several advanced lasers of conventional design and two beamlines for the ALS. The FEL itself addresses the needs of the chemical sciences community for a high-brightness, tunable source covering a broad region of the infrared spectrum -- from 3 to 50 {mu}m. All of these sources, together with a variety of sophisticated experimental stations, will be housed in a new building to be located adjacent to the ALS. The radiation sources can be synchronized to permit powerful two-color, pump-probe experiments that will further our fundamental understanding of chemical dynamics at the molecular level, especially those aspects relevant to practical issues in combustion chemistry. The technical approach adopted in this design makes use of superconducting radiofrequency (SCRF) accelerating structures. The primary motivation for adopting this approach was to meet the user requirement for wavelength stability equal to one part in 10{sup 4}. Previous studies concluded that a wavelength stability of only one part in 10{sup 3} could be achieved with currently available room-temperature technology. In addition, the superconducting design operates in a continuous-wave (cw) mode and hence offers considerably higher average optical output power. It also allows for various pulse-gating configurations that will permit simultaneous multiuser operations. A summary of the comparative performance attainable with room-temperature and superconducting designs is given. The FEL described in this report provides a continuous train of 30-ps micropulses, with 100{mu}J of optical energy per micropulse, at a repetition rate of 6.1 MHz. The device can also deliver pulses at a cw repetition rate of 12.2 MHz, with a peak power of 50 {mu}J per micropulse. 70 ref.

  11. An infrared free-electron laser for the Chemical Dynamics Research Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaughan, D. (comp.)

    1992-04-01

    This document describes a free-electron laser (FEL) proposed as part of the Chemical Dynamics Research Laboratory (CDRL), a user facility that also incorporates several advanced lasers of conventional design and two beamlines for the ALS. The FEL itself addresses the needs of the chemical sciences community for a high-brightness, tunable source covering a broad region of the infrared spectrum -- from 3 to 50 {mu}m. All of these sources, together with a variety of sophisticated experimental stations, will be housed in a new building to be located adjacent to the ALS. The radiation sources can be synchronized to permit powerful two-color, pump-probe experiments that will further our fundamental understanding of chemical dynamics at the molecular level, especially those aspects relevant to practical issues in combustion chemistry. The technical approach adopted in this design makes use of superconducting radiofrequency (SCRF) accelerating structures. The primary motivation for adopting this approach was to meet the user requirement for wavelength stability equal to one part in 10{sup 4}. Previous studies concluded that a wavelength stability of only one part in 10{sup 3} could be achieved with currently available room-temperature technology. In addition, the superconducting design operates in a continuous-wave (cw) mode and hence offers considerably higher average optical output power. It also allows for various pulse-gating configurations that will permit simultaneous multiuser operations. A summary of the comparative performance attainable with room-temperature and superconducting designs is given. The FEL described in this report provides a continuous train of 30-ps micropulses, with 100{mu}J of optical energy per micropulse, at a repetition rate of 6.1 MHz. The device can also deliver pulses at a cw repetition rate of 12.2 MHz, with a peak power of 50 {mu}J per micropulse. 70 ref.

  12. Design Studies for a VUV--Soft X-ray Free-Electron Laser Array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corlett, J.; Baptiste, K.; Byrd, J.M.; Denes, P.; Falcone, R.; Kirz, J.; McCurdy, W.; Padmore, H.; Penn, G.; Qiang, J.; Robin, D.; Sannibale, F.; Schoenlein, R.; Staples, J.; Steier, C.; Venturnini, M.; Wan, W.; Wells, R.; Wilcox, R.; Zholents, A.

    2009-08-04

    Several recent reports have identified the scientific requirements for a future soft X-ray light source [1, 2, 3, 4, 5], and a high-repetition-rate free-electron laser (FEL) facility responsive to them is being studied at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) [6]. The facility is based on a continuous-wave (CW) superconducting linear accelerator with beam supplied by a high-brightness, high-repetition-rate photocathode electron gun operating in CW mode, and on an array of FELs to which the accelerated beam is distributed, each operating at high repetition rate and with even pulse spacing. Dependent on the experimental requirements, the individualFELs may be configured for either self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE), seeded highgain harmonic generation (HGHG), echo-enabled harmonic generation (EEHG), or oscillator mode of operation, and will produce high peak and average brightness x-rays with a flexible pulse format ranging from sub-femtoseconds to hundreds of femtoseconds. This new light source would serve a broad community of scientists in many areas of research, similar to existing utilization of storage ring based light sources. To reduce technical risks and constructioncosts, accelerator research, development, and design studies at LBNL target the most critical components and systems of the facility. We are developing a high-repetition-rate low-emittance electron gun, high quantum efficiency photocathodes, and have embarked on design and optimization of the electron beam accelerator, FEL switchyard, and array of FELs. We continue our work on precision timing and synchronization systems critical for time-resolved experiments using pump-probe techniques.

  13. Microglial responses to free-electron laser incisions in rat brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, M.Z.; Edwards, G.S.; Reinsch, L. [Vanderbilt Univ., Nashville, TN (United States)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    In the CNS, two distinct populations of ramified glia, microglia and astrocytes, are identified by two Ca{sup ++}-binding proteins, lipocortin 1 (LC1) and S100{beta}, respectively. In some forms of CNS trauma, the responses of these two populations are quite-different. The present study sought to characterize and compare the responses of microglia and astrocytes to cortical incisions made with the free-electron laser (FEL, 6.45 and 4.0 {mu}m wavelength) and with a scalpel. After 3 and 6 days recovery, rats were perfused with acidified glutaraldehyde; the activated glia were identified using immunohistochemistry and quantified using BIOQUANT. In a 200 {mu}m thick zone of gliosis located beneath the damaged necrotic tissue, similar response patterns were observed for both incision types. At either time point, S100-{beta}-positive glia showed only minor shape changes and slight increases relative to astrocytes in control regions. Conversely, the population density of microglia in the reaction zone increased approximately 2- and 3-fold at days 3 and 6, respectively. Mitotic figures are detected among the LC1-positive glia at day 3, indicating that the activated phagocytes arise from proliferating resident microglia rather than from hematogenous invaders. Thus, in this system, the glial response to CNS damage comprises primarily microglia rather than astrocytes. The data also suggest that the anti-inflammatory and immuno-suppressive properties of LC1 may play important roles in recovery from CNS trauma and disease. Preliminary experiment show subdued glial responses to incisions made with FEL at 6.45 versus. 4.0 {mu}m wavelengths, suggesting that tissue damage is wavelength dependent.

  14. Microscopic study on lasing characteristics of the UVSOR storage ring free electron laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hama, H. [Institute for Molecular Science, Okazaki (Japan)]|[Graduate Univ. for Advanced Stuides, Okazaki (Japan); Yamazaki, J.; Kinoshita, T. [Institute for Molecular Science, Okazaki (Japan)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    Characteristics of storage ring free electron laser (SRFEL) at a short wavelength region (UV and visible) has been studied at the UVSOR facility, Institute for Molecular Science. We have measured the laser power evolution by using a biplanar photodiode, and the micro-macro temporal structure of both the laser and the electron bunch with a dualsweep streak camera. The saturated energy of the laser micropulse in the gain-switching (Q-switching) mode has been measured as a function of the ring current. We have not observed a limitation of the output power yet within the beam current can be stored. We have analyzed the saturated micropulse energy based on a model of gain reduction due to the bunch-heating. The bunch-heating process seems to be very complicate. We derived time dependent gain variations from the shape of macropulse and the bunch length. Those two gain variations are almost consistent with each other but slightly different in detail. The gain may be not only simply reduced by the energy spread but also affected by the phase space rotation due to synchrotron oscillation of the electron bunch. As reported in previous issue, the lasing macropulse consists of a couple of micropulses that are simultaneously evolved. From high resolution two-dimensional spectra taken by the dual-sweep streak camera, we noticed considerable internal substructures of the laser micropulse in both the time distribution and the spectral shape. There are a couple of peaks separated with almost same distance in a optical bunch. Such substructure does not seem to result from statistical fluctuations of laser seeds. Although the origin of the substructure of macropulse is not dear at the present, we are going to discuss about SRFEL properties.

  15. Anomalously Strong Scattering of Spontaneously Produced Laser Radiation in the First Free-Electron Laser and Study of Free-Electron Two-Quantum Stark Lasing in an Electric Wiggler with Quantum-Wiggler Electrodynamics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    S. H. Kim

    2006-01-01

    We calculate the scattering cross section of an electron with respect to the spontaneously produced laser radiation in the first free-electron laser (FEL) with quantum-wiggler electrodynamics (QWD). The cross section is 1016 times the Thomson cross section, confirming the result obtained by a previous analysis of the experimental data. A QWD calculation show that spontaneous emission in an FEL using only an electric wiggler can be very strong while amplification through net stimulated emission is practically negligible.

  16. Evidence of High Harmonics from Echo-Enabled Harmonic Generation for Seeding X-ray Free Electron Lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiang, D.; Colby, E.; Dunning, M.; Gilevich, S.; Hast, C.; Jobe, K.; McCormick, D.; Nelson, J.; Raubenheimer, T.O.; Soong, K.; Stupakov, G.; Szalata, Z.; Walz, D.; Weathersby, S.; Woodle, M.; /SLAC

    2012-02-15

    Echo-enabled harmonic generation free electron lasers hold great promise for the generation of fully coherent radiation in x-ray wavelengths. Here we report the first evidence of high harmonics from the echo-enabled harmonic generation technique in the realistic scenario where the laser energy modulation is comparable to the beam slice energy spread. In this experiment, coherent radiation at the seventh harmonic of the second seed laser is generated when the energy modulation amplitude is about 2-3 times the slice energy spread. The experiment confirms the underlying physics of echo-enabled harmonic generation and may have a strong impact on emerging seeded x-ray free electron lasers that are capable of generating laserlike x rays which will advance many areas of science.

  17. Digital in-line holography with femtosecond VUV radiation provided by the free-electron laser FLASH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenhahn, Axel; Staier, Florian; Nisius, Thomas; Schäfer, David; Barth, Ruth; Christophis, Christof; Stadler, Lorenz-M; Streit-Nierobisch, Simone; Gutt, Christian; Mancuso, Adrian; Schropp, Andreas; Gulden, Johannes; Reime, Bernd; Feldhaus, Josef; Weckert, Edgar; Pfau, Bastian; Günther, Christian M; Könnecke, René; Eisebitt, Stefan; Martins, Michael; Faatz, Bart; Guerassimova, Natalia; Honkavaara, Katja; Treusch, Rolf; Saldin, Evgueni; Schreiber, Siegfried; Schneidmiller, Evgeny A; Yurkov, Mikhail V; Vartanyants, Ivan; Grübel, Gerhard; Grunze, Michael; Wilhein, Thomas

    2009-05-11

    Femtosecond vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) radiation provided by the free-electron laser FLASH was used for digital in-line holographic microscopy and applied to image particles, diatoms and critical point dried fibroblast cells. To realize the classical in-line Gabor geometry, a 1 microm pinhole was used as spatial filter to generate a divergent light cone with excellent pointing stability. At a fundamental wavelength of 8 nm test objects such as particles and diatoms were imaged at a spatial resolution of 620 nm. In order to demonstrate the applicability to biologically relevant systems, critical point dried rat embryonic fibroblast cells were for the first time imaged with free-electron laser radiation.

  18. Near Edge X-Ray Absorption Fine Structure Spectroscopy with X-Ray Free-Electron Lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernstein, D.P.; Acremann, Y.; Scherz, A.; Burkhardt, M.; Stohr, J.; /SLAC; Beye, M.; Schlotter, W.F.; Beeck, T.; Sorgenfrei, F.; Pietzsch, A.; Wurth, W.; Fohlisch, A.; /Hamburg U.

    2009-12-11

    We demonstrate the feasibility of Near Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy on solids by means of femtosecond soft x-ray pulses from a free-electron laser (FEL). Our experiments, carried out at the Free-Electron Laser at Hamburg (FLASH), used a special sample geometry, spectrographic energy dispersion, single shot position-sensitive detection and a data normalization procedure that eliminates the severe fluctuations of the incident intensity in space and photon energy. As an example we recorded the {sup 3}D{sub 1} N{sub 4,5}-edge absorption resonance of La{sup 3+}-ions in LaMnO{sub 3}. Our study opens the door for x-ray absorption measurements on future x-ray FEL facilities.

  19. Damage threshold of platinum/carbon multilayers under hard X-ray free-electron laser irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jangwoo; Nagahira, Ayaka; Koyama, Takahisa; Matsuyama, Satoshi; Sano, Yasuhisa; Yabashi, Makina; Ohashi, Haruhiko; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Yamauchi, Kazuto

    2015-11-01

    We evaluated the irradiation damage induced by hard X-ray free-electron lasers to platinum/carbon multilayers intended for use in a focusing reflective mirror. In order to determine the damage threshold, we compared X-ray reflectivities before and after irradiation at the first-order Bragg angle using a focused X-ray free-electron laser with a beam size of approximately 1 μm and a pulse energy ranging from 0.01 to 10 μJ at a photon energy of 10 keV. We confirmed that the damage threshold of the platinum/carbon multilayer with a bilayer period of 3 nm was 0.051 μJ/μm(2), which is sufficiently higher than that in practical applications.

  20. Damage investigation on tungsten and diamond diffractive optics at a hard x-ray free-electron laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhlén, Fredrik; Nilsson, Daniel; Holmberg, Anders; Hertz, Hans M; Schroer, Christian G; Seiboth, Frank; Patommel, Jens; Meier, Vivienne; Hoppe, Robert; Schropp, Andreas; Lee, Hae Ja; Nagler, Bob; Galtier, Eric; Krzywinski, Jacek; Sinn, Harald; Vogt, Ulrich

    2013-04-08

    Focusing hard x-ray free-electron laser radiation with extremely high fluence sets stringent demands on the x-ray optics. Any material placed in an intense x-ray beam is at risk of being damaged. Therefore, it is crucial to find the damage thresholds for focusing optics. In this paper we report experimental results of exposing tungsten and diamond diffractive optics to a prefocused 8.2 keV free-electron laser beam in order to find damage threshold fluence levels. Tungsten nanostructures were damaged at fluence levels above 500 mJ/cm(2). The damage was of mechanical character, caused by thermal stress variations. Diamond nanostructures were affected at a fluence of 59 000 mJ/cm(2). For fluence levels above this, a significant graphitization process was initiated. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and µ-Raman analysis were used to analyze exposed nanostructures.